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SHELBY Living Blue Spring Manor

Art s for all

Shelby County Arts Council looking for local support

January 2012 Free in Shelby County • $4.95

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ways to

warm up your winter workout January 2012

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January 2012

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From the Editor

I

’m not a big fan of New Year’s resolutions, probably because I rarely keep them. This year, however, I have found myself wanting to set goals and make lists more often than usual. I blame it on being married. By the time this issue hits the stands, I will have been married almost five months. Although my husband and I dated for more than seven years, we are still enjoying the newlywed stage, which, in my case, involves some heavy nesting instincts. He travels during the week for work, so I find other ways to occupy my time, like rearranging our silverware, vacuuming multiple times a week and throwing away all of his wire hangers. Now, I’m not obsessed with cleanliness or tidiness. Anyone who has ridden in my car can attest to that. But there’s something about organizing a shared space that just feels good. I love making our home nice and neat during the week, so we have time to visit friends and family or just watch football and play with our cat on the weekends. In this issue, we take a look at resolutions - ways to get healthy, happy or organized. We also talk to Kim McBrayer, who makes a living helping others organize their homes and businesses. What I learned in this issue is that it’s important to make goals instead of grand resolutions. Instead of pledging to drop 50 pounds, start by working out a couple of times a week, even if it’s just walking. Likewise, you shouldn’t strive for perfection in your home. Instead, find manageable ways to organize your home that gives you time to do things that really matter, like visit with friends and family. My resolution this year? To keep doing what I’m doing. That, and to exercise regularly, but we all know how that’s going to turn out. I hope you and yours have a happy and safe start to the new year. l

Katie McDowell, Editor

Katie.McDowell@ShelbyLiving.com

ON THE COVER Susan Dennis Gordon and Terri Sullivan stand outside a studentpainted door at the Shelby County Arts Council in Columbiana. Gordon and Sullivan work with a small staff to offer arts classes and programs to Shelby County residents of all ages. The SCAC is currently in the midst of a capital campaign to raise money for a new, state-of-the-art building.

Cover design: Jamie Sparacino Photography: Jon Goering

SHELBY Living eDItORIal Katie McDowell Amy Jones Wesley Hallman Neal Wagner Christine Boatwright Brad Gaskins cONtRIBUtORS Lisa Phillips Kim McBrayer PRODUctION Daniel Holmes Jamie Sparacino Jon Goering MaRKetING Matthew Allen Melissa Clark Jeff Fletcher Jessica Hardin Steven Kilpatrick Meagan Mims Cassie Screws Diane Fant LaShan Johnson Tracy Jones aDMINIStRatION Tim Prince Jan Griffey Mary Jo Eskridge Annie McGilvray Catherine Cousins

Shelby Living is published monthly by Shelby County Newspapers, Inc., P.O. Box 947, Columbiana, AL 35051. Shelby Living is a registered trademark. All contents herein are the sole property of Shelby County Newspapers, Inc. [the Publisher]. No part of this periodical may be reproduced without written permission from the Publisher. Please address all correspondence (including but not limited to letters, story ideas and requests to reprint materials) to: Editor, Shelby Living, P.O. Box 947, Columbiana, AL 35051. Shelby Living is mailed to select households throughout Shelby County, and a limited number of free copies are available at local businesses. Please visit Shelbyliving.com for a list of those locations. Subscriptions are available at a rate of $22 for one year by emailing subscribe@shelbyliving.com, or calling (205) 669-3131, ext. 21. Advertising inquiries may be made by emailing advertise@shelbyliving.com, or by calling (205) 669-3131, ext. 26. January 2012

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in every issue 8

tHe SIMPle lIFe Paper, paper go away

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SHelBY SPOtteD Pet-A-Palooza, Spa Greystone and more

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OUt & aBOUt Local events in January

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WHY I lOVe SHelBY cOUNtY MLB player Wes Helms finds a home

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arts & culture 10

FaSt eNOUGH Country singer films music video in Helena

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DeSIGNING GaMeS UM introduces a new minor

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194 aND cOUNtING Shelby County celebrates its birthday

recreation

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NeW YeaR’S ReSOlUtIONS How to change your life for the better

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WINteR WORKOUt Eight ways to stay warm while you sweat

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POSt-HOlIDaY PaMPeRING Spa treatments for under $100

features 24

aRtS FOR all SCAC hopes to open a new center

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BlUe SPRING MaNOR Bed and breakfast offers an upscale retreat

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48 20

home & food 40

ORGaNIZeD BY DeSIGN Local resident will bring order to your life

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tHe JOe BeHIND tHe DOUGH Step inside Pelham’s favorite doughnut shop

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MIDWeSt MeetS Mt laURel Illinois natives fall in love with the South

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ItalIaN aND SO MUcH MORe Petrucelli’s celebrates 20 years of service January 2012

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The Simple Life

Paper, paper go away

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ith the upcoming calendar change, many people are thinking out with the old and in with the new. Sounds simple, but with paper, the yearly “file purge” entails knowing what to keep, what to toss, what to separate and how to blend old tax returns and new owner’s manuals. Tax day is engrained in our minds (often more than a mother’s birthday) and there are mounds of papers to sort through. These are general guidelines to give you an idea on how to start clearing out legal, financial and personal papers. Some things should never be thrown away: For birth certificates, social security cards, trust documents, marriage/divorce/ adoption certificates, and retirement records, etc., consider storing these permanent papers in a safe deposit or fire safe box. Business records need permanent storage: Permanent files are needed for financial statements, licenses, corporate documents, receipts, etc. These files should be stored in a separate filing cabinet. Keep tax records for six years: Your particular situation will determine the length of time to keep old tax records, anywhere from three years to forever. Tax laws change every year, so the best rule is to consult your Lisa Phillips, accountant or attorney owner of SimpleWorks, before throwing anything lisa_phillips@bellsouth.net, away. Plastic storage bins 981.7733 with tight fitting lids are a better option since plastic protects papers from bugs and humidity. Keep general household bills for one year: For non-tax related papers, like bank statements, utility bills, credit card receipts, and miscellaneous purchases, etc., set up a simple filing system with file folders and labels. These will be accessed monthly and purged yearly. “What do I do with this” category: Common sense plays a big part in hanging on to warranties (keep as long as you own the item), bank deposit slips (until reconciled on your bank statement), insurance policies (keep for the life of the policy), etc. Sentimental: Memories are the hardest thing to let go. Space will often be the determining factor for what you can physically keep and what needs to be kept in your heart. Organization is key: Active, reference and permanent are the three main categories for paper retention for both office and home. Keep active files close at hand; have reference papers easily accessible; and Space will often be permanent files should be the determining clearly labeled and stored in a safe place. Clutter happens factor for what you when you mix the three. With can physically keep these few simple tips, you can continue bringing a fresh and what needs to be start to the New Year with files that work for you. It’s kept in your heart that simple. l

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ic Complex! Ice Skate with your friends at the Pelham Civ Check our public session schedule online at:

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January 2012

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Arts & Culture

Fast Enough

Country singer films video in Helena

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Written by KatIe McDOWell Photographs cONtRIBUteD

ountry-rock singer John Maison is a familiar name in his home state of Michigan. The singer-songwriter has received play on several large radio stations in the state, as well as GAC

Television. He’s also performed with several big names in the music business, including Uncle Cracker and Easton Corbin. But he’s hoping a music video he shot in Helena in the fall of 2011 will help him earn national recognition. Shelby County residents will recognize many scenes in “Fast Enough,” Maison’s first national single. The filming took place at the old Incahoots building, in addition to several other homes, roads and businesses in Helena.

Maison and director Kristopher Kimlin said the location was the perfect choice for the video. “It’s a song about a guy who’s trying to get home to his girl,” Maison said. “It’s fun because there’s kind of a twist to the video.” Kimlin, who lived in Birmingham for about a decade, said Helena offered the small-town look they were aiming for in the video. They considered Nashville, where Maison lives for part of the year, and Charlotte, N.C., where Kimlin

“I loved the idea of John just playing John. This guy’s on the road. He’s an artist; he travels around. We wanted to make it feel story driven, like a movie.” — Kristopher Kimlin 10

ShelbyLiving.com


Michigan native John Maison recently filmed a music video in Helena.

recently moved, but settled on Helena. Kimlin said he was eager to return to Birmingham because he enjoyed working with a freelance crew he met while working with Erwin Brothers Motion Pictures in Alabaster. “The only way we could have done (this video) is with one, the crew, and two, the location,” Kimlin said. “Fast Enough” marks the second time Maison and Kimlin have worked together in Helena. They previously collaborated on another single, “Hit Your Heartbreaks.” Maison contacted Kimlin for their recent collaboration after he signed with

a new label, Big High Five, and recorded “Fast Enough.” Kimlin said the idea for the video occurred to him as soon as he heard the new single. The song is about a man who goes on a road trip to get back to his girlfriend. Kimlin said he based the character in the video on Maison himself. “I loved the idea of John just playing John,” Kimlin said. “This guy’s on the road. He’s an artist; he travels around. We wanted to make it feel story driven, like a movie.” For Maison, who holds a bachelor’s and master’s degree in finance, the trips

to Birmingham and Shelby County were a great introduction to the South. The singer-songwriter splits his time between Michigan and Nashville, but said the latter isn’t much of a culture shock because of the large number of people who move into that city. “It’s really not that different,” he said. “Almost no one is from Nashville.” He adjusted similarly to Alabama, although he said he was “overwhelmed” by the hospitality he encountered here. For more information about John Maison or to watch “Fast Enough,” visit Johnmaison.com. l

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January 2012

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Dr. Cathlena Martin leads her class in a game of Frag. The students are enrolled in the game design workshop, one of several classes offered in the University of Montevallo’s new game design minor.

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Arts & Culture

Designing Written by KatIe McDOWell Photographs by JON GOeRING

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n a Wednesday evening in November 2011, a group of University of Montevallo students sat around a table in Hill Hall playing a board game. The game served not just as a distraction on that dreary, rainy evening. It was also a classroom lesson for students enrolled in UM’s recently introduced game studies and design minor. The game was Frag, which is a board game version of a first-person shooter video game. Dr. Cathlena Martin led the class in the discussion and encouraged the students to consider how the creators adapted the game for board play. The key to the lesson - and the game studies minor - is that all games follow similar principles, whether it’s a board game, video game, card game or roleplaying game. “All the fundamental design principles, no matter what the game is, are still relevant,” Martin said in a separate interview. Introduced in fall 2011, the game studies minor was an initiative of UM President Dr. John Stewart. The minor is intended to provide students with an interdisciplinary education. “With this minor, we are really trying to capitalize on Montevallo’s liberal arts perspective,” Martin said. The game studies program was developed by two UM mathematics professors, Dr. Benton Tyler and Dr. Adrian Cartier. The professors visited game companies in California in the summer of 2010 as they considered how to bring a game studies program to campus. They spoke to game company employees with a range of degrees: business, math, history, English and geography. “We asked them what classes they would want to have taken if they had the option,” Tyler said.

The professors also visited with UM students to gauge their interest in the proposed program. “One of the things that surprised us is that students that didn’t want to complete the minor said they would at least be interested in taking one of the classes,” Tyler said. The minor has four core classes: History of Games, Survey of Modern Games, Game Design Workshop I and Game Design Workshop II. For the remaining 24 credits, students pursuing the minor can choose from classes in several fields of studies. Some are tailored to games: English 301, Technical Writing for Games; Mathematics 202, Mathematics of Games; Philosophy 300 and Aesthetics of Games. Other classes offer broad skills that would be valued at a game company, such as Principles of Marketing and Creative Writing. UM senior Tyler Smith decided to stay an extra year to complete the minor. As a math major, he enjoyed the technical components of game design, although the students do not learn how to code video games. However, he also found himself enjoying his History of Games class, which starts with the Royal Game of Ur, a game that dates back to 2600 B.C. Mesopotamia. “That’s a class that caught me by surprise,” he said. “It’s very different. You can feel the culture of every game you play.” In Martin’s workshop, Smith and his classmates are designing their own games. In the fall class, they were still working on the prototypes, but their games should be finished by the end of the spring 2012 semester. “By the end of next semester, it will actually look like a game, like something they can go out and market,” Martin said. “Hopefully, that’s what they’ll do.”

Smith and a classmate are working on a card deck-building game with a twist for their project. Instead of building a deck of cards, the players begin with a deck and take it apart. He hopes he will be able to find a job in the field after graduation. “What got me interested in game design is the only things that will never die is Hollywood and games,” he said. “Why not be in a field that will never go away?” l

January 2012

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Arts & Culture

194 and count ing

Left: A band plays at the 193rd Shelby County anniversary celebration. Middle: Shelby County native Gov. Robert Bentley, pictured with Shelby County Historical Society President Bobby Joe Seales, attended the 2011 celebration. Right: The Shelby County Museum and Archives, pictured here at night, will be the setting of the 2012 celebration.

Shelby County birthday celebration to be held in Columbiana Written by Katie McDowell Photographs by JON GOERING

S

helby County will celebrate its 194th birthday Feb.5. The Shelby County Historical Society has planned an afternoon of speakers and events to celebrate the occasion.

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President Bobby Joe Seales said the theme for the celebrations and the historical society’s 2012-2013 events is “Becoming Alabama.” The theme will focus on the events leading up to Alabama becoming a state. This year’s celebrations will focus on the Creek Indians. While plans have

not been finalized, the pre-program will likely include Native American exhibits and entertainment. The special guests include Dr. Edwin C. Bridges of the Alabama Department of Archives and History, who will present “The Birthing of a State,” Lee Sentell of the Alabama Tourism Department and Roger G. Thrower,


Jr., a Poarch Creek and the Education Director of the Poarch Band of Creek Indians. Seales said the celebrations have been planned leading up to both Shelby County and the State of Alabama’s 200th anniversaries. The next two years will focus on the Creek Indians, followed by two years of

the Civil War and two years of the Civil Rights Movement. “It’s all going to tie in together,” he said. In 2018, the celebration will focus on the Shelby County founding, followed by Alabama’s anniversary the following year. “We are older than the State of

Alabama,” Seales said. “When Shelby County was founded, it was part of the Alabama Territory.” The pre-program will begin at 1 p.m. on Main Street in front of the Shelby County Historical Museum. The program begins at 2 p.m. and will likely be held inside the museum. For more information, call 205-669-3912. l

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Health & Recreation

The problem with

New Year’s resolutions 16

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LEFT: A woman stretches during a pilates class at St. Vincent’s One Nineteen. ABOVE: Women participate in a water aerobics class at St. Vincent’s One Nineteen.

Local experts give tips on how to change your life for the better this year Written by Katie McDowell Photographs by JON GOERING

D

r. Melissa Clinger doesn’t believe in New Year’s resolutions. The psychologist at Grayson

and Associates in Birmingham has good reason not to. She has seen many people, including herself, fail when faced with a task that just seems too daunting. Instead, she likes to break down her resolutions into smaller, measurable goals. “There’s nothing wrong with having an end goal,” she said. “It’s good to have something to work toward, but just realize you can break it down.” Looking at resolutions as a journey, rather than a one-shot deal, makes the process seem more manageable. The most common New

Year’s resolutions are usually quite involved, according to the official website of the United States’ government. Twelve of the most common New Year’s resolutions that Americans make are: drink less alcohol, get a better education, get a better job, get fit, lose weight, manage debt, manage stress, quit smoking, save money, take a trip, volunteer more and live a green lifestyle. When faced with such a large task - such as paying off debt or losing a large amount of weight - it is no wonder so many people

“There’s nothing wrong with having an end goal. It’s good to have something to work toward, but just realize you can break it down.” — Dr. Melissa Clinger January 2012

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give up on their resolutions before the temperatures heat up. To battle resolution fatigue, Clinger suggests focusing on the process, rather than the outcome. “Define the goal as specifically as possible and set measurable outcomes,” she said. Mandy Cox, the fitness supervisor at St. Vincent One Nineteen in Birmingham, agrees. Cox said One Nineteen sees a large increase in new clients around the start of the year when people are ready to lose weight gained during the holiday season.

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She encourages them to set goals and to find an exercise they enjoy. While some people thrive in solitary exercise or with a personal trainer, most people join to participate in one of the wellness center’s 80-plus group exercise classes. “A lot of our people go because they have friends in there,” Cox said. “They’re really held accountable by their friends. It’s more engaging than if you’re just on a treadmill.” Clinger agreed that companions can be helpful in fulfilling weight loss goals, or any

other goal for that matter. Other common resolutions, such as managing stress or increasing happiness, can also be easier with the help of friends. Clinger said she read in a book about a group of women who met regularly to discuss things they were proud of. Friendships and relationships can be helpful not just for accountability, but also for encouragement, she said. Other small ways to keep you in good mental and physical health in 2012 is to make sure you have at least 30 minutes a day to


The Total Body Conditioning class at St. Vincent’s One Nineteen is a popular group class.

yourself. That time should be spent doing something you enjoy or want to accomplish, whether it is exercising, volunteering or relaxing. What to do if you fall off the resolution wagon by the time March rolls around? Clinger said don’t sweat it. Goals should be set throughout the year, and not confined to an annual event. “I’m not stuck on January,” she said. l January 2012

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Health & Recreation

8

ways to

warm up your winter workout

This Under Armour offers a second layer of knit fabric to increase comfort, breathability and warmth. Women’s Coldgear fitted long-sleeved mock turtleneck, $49.99, from Academy Sports & Outdoors

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Wick moisture from your forehead and keep your ears warm with headbands. Green Saucony headband with ponytail insert, $15, from The Trak Shak, 4700 U.S. 280 East, North Shelby Reversible purple/black Therma-fit Nike headband, $16, from The Trak Shak Reversible blue/black Therma-fit Nike headband, $12.99, from Academy Sports & Outdoors, 310 Doug Baker Boulevard, North Shelby. Under Armour Coldgear headband, $17.99 from Academy Sports & Outdoors

These gloves feature reflective logos for added safety and plush cloth on the exterior to wipe away sweat. Try arm warmers to ease your transition into winter months. Saucony’s arm warmers feature temperature-regulating fabric to keep you warm and dry. Saucony 3 Season Glove, $30, from The Trak Shak Saucony Elite Arm Warmers, $25, from The Trak Shak


This beanie is lined for warmth and wicks away moisture. Adidas Climawarm slicker beanie, $14.99, from Academy Sports & Outdoors

The pink sweatshirt has a lightweight exterior and fleece interior to keep you going through the cold months. The green hoodie feels like an ordinary sweatshirt, but features water-resistant cotton. Women’s Big Logo pullover, $54.99, from Academy Sports & Outdoors; Men’s Under Armour Charged Cotton Storm hoody, $59.99

These running tights keep you warm and dry with an extra interior layer, while the slick outer layer won’t hinder your movement. Women’s Under Armour Coldgear Frosty Compression Tights, $49,99, from Academy Sports & Outdoors Men’s Nike Pro Combat Compression Hyperwarm tights, $50, from Academy Sports & Outdoors

Slip into these waterproof, reflective kicks in the winter to keep you safe and dry. Women’s Nike Lunareclipes+ Shield running shoes, $140, from The Trak Shak January 2012

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Health & Recreation

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Post-holiday

pampering Spa treatments for under $100

Peel off those warm layers and pamper yourself during the cold months. Or treat a loved one to a day at a local spa to relieve holiday stress and rejuvenate the body from the wintry chill.

Ashiatsu Oriental Bar Therapy

• $70 for 60 minutes or $100 for 90 minutes • Experience deep tissue massage with this specialized therapy. As you relax on a massage table, the masseuse uses parallel bars overhead to balance as he or she uses barefoot massage for light or deep pressure. • Beyond Wellness Medspa, 4898 Valleydale Road, Suite A-3, Birmingham, 408-2889

Formostar Infrared Body Wrap

• $80 for 50-minute session • Keep your New Year’s resolution with a body wrap that burns 1,200 calories in 50 minutes. The deep heat therapy stimulates natural enzymes and metabolism in the tissues. • Spa Moksha, 500 Cahaba Park Circle, Birmingham, 980-9393

Pumpkin Enzyme Facial

• $85 for treatment • This facial offers the highlights of a traditional facial with the added benefit of a pumpkin enzyme peel. The peel is perfect for dry skin, as it cleans, exfoliates and protects to give your skin a healthy glow. • Spa Greystone, 140 Village Street, Greystone, 980-1744

Back Paraffin Massage

• $87 for 55-minute session • A masseuse will brush your back with warm paraffin wax to warm your muscles while your hands and feet are massaged. After the paraffin cools, the masseuse will peel off the treatment and treat you to a back massage. • Santa Fe Day Spa, 661 Doug Baker Boulevard, Birmingham, 408-7221

Hot Stone Massage

• $95 for 60 minutes • Have your aches soothed away with a hot stone massage. The stones, combined with massage oil, warm and relax the muscles, which improves circulation and calms the nervous system. • Natural Balance Massage Therapy, 4601 Alabama 31, Suite G, Calera, 837-8252

Mini Facial and Massage

• $100 for both treatments • Spend an hour in heaven with a 30-minute mini facial and a 30-minute massage. The facial will moisturize dry skin, and the massage will erase stress build-up from the holiday season. • Spa One Nineteen, 7191 Cahaba Valley Road, Hoover, 408-6510 January 2012

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Art s for all

The Shelby County Arts Council dreams of opening a first-class arts center January 2012

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PAGE 24: Lynn Dodson assists Charley Hutto in her painting studio at the SCAC. PAGE 25: Original Art by Max Newton. Featured in the SCAC Director’s Invitational 2012. LEFT: As the director of arts and education, Susan Dennis Gordon plans the SCAC’s classes and outreach programs. ABOVE: This rendering of the proposed Shelby County Arts Council center, viewed from West College Street, was produced by Keith Design Architecture. The proposed two-story building includes a black box theater, standing art gallery, youth orchestra rehearsal hall, a conference room and art and dance studios.

Written by Katie McDowell Photographs by JON GOERING

O

n a Monday afternoon the week before Thanksgiving, a handful of painters gathered in the Shelby County Arts Council in Columbiana. The painters were some of the original students of the SCAC. Several of them followed instructor Lynn Dodson to the organization when she joined soon after it was founded in 2005. Each week, they come to Columbiana from across the county and even neighboring Jefferson County for an afternoon of studio work. Seven years have passed since the first students arrived at the SCAC. In that time, the organization’s programs have expanded to include lessons in painting,

drawing, watercolors, pottery jewelry, clay and photography, in addition to theater and music. The number of students has increased even quicker than the offerings, with students of all ages — from pint-sized kids to grandparents — signing up for classes. The one thing that hasn’t grown since the SCAC’s founding is its cramped headquarters in downtown Columbiana. Located next to a dance studio, the building has been the setting for classes and exhibits for years. It wasn’t supposed to be this way. Plans for a much larger community arts center, which also would be located in Columbiana, were hatched years ago. Terri Sullivan, the founder and volunteer executive director, said the fundraising for the project has gone slower than expected, but she’s confident the

SCAC will meet its goal. “We’ve got the blueprints, we’ve got the property, we’ve got some financial commitments. We need more,” she said. Shelby County’s Community Arts Center Sullivan envisions the center as an arts mecca in Shelby County — something she said is missing from the area. I think the county needs it,” she said. “If you leave out Montevallo, you have no place to go for the performing arts ... It’s very obvious we have a severe shortage of space to support performing arts.” The proposed center is a 26,000-square-foot, two-story brick building with a vintage façade. The plans, created by Keith Design

“We’ve got the blueprints, we’ve got the property, we’ve got some financial commitments. We need more.” — Terri Sullivan January 2012

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Architecture, include separate rooms for all of the SCAC’s existing classes — art, pottery, photography, music and dance, as well as a standing art gallery, a youth orchestra rehearsal hall, office space and a conference room. The main attraction is a 450-seat black box theater that would host both local groups and touring performers. Sullivan said the size is ideal for Shelby County. It’s large enough to attract top groups from around the state, but small enough to keep the ticket price affordable.

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The seats and stage can also be removed for functions. “That allows us to rent the space, which is a big revenue generator for a non-profit,” Sullivan said. The center would cost about $6.5 million, but Sullivan would like to raise an additional $2 million to cover operating costs for the first two years, including an expanded staff of six full-time employees. By mid-November 2011, the SCAC had raised about $2.7 million through grants, donations and a land gift from

the city of Columbiana, which donated 1.2 acres on the corner of Summer Classics Way and West College Street. Sullivan said the SCAC wants another $2.5 million before it breaks ground. “I would like to say we are in the very early stages of the capital campaign,” Sullivan said. “We would be very interested in finding people in Shelby County who would be interested in naming opportunities.” She would like to see groups from Birmingham or even the Alabama Shakespeare Festival in Montgomery


PAGE 28: Industrial Strength, mixed media, by DeAnne Thorn. Featured in the SCAC 2011 Juried Art Exhibit. LEFT: SCAC instructor Stephanie Dikis assists Phyllis French in a pottery class. RIGHT: Terri Sullivan, the founder and executive director of the SCAC, has spearheaded the capital campaign to raise money to build the organization’s new building.

bring their shows to Columbiana for performances. “We feel that we would be an asset to the performing arts groups in Birmingham because we would develop a new audience for them,” Sullivan said. Sullivan said the center also would be a huge draw for Columbiana and Shelby County. Serving the community The SCAC has undergone several transformations — the Columbiana Fine Arts Center and the Academy of

Fine Arts of Shelby County — before it settled into its current version. The SCAC is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization governed by a 27-member board of directors. Susan Dennis Gordon is the full-time director of arts and education and the organization also employs two part-time employees for bookkeeping and marketing. Gordon, an artist who has a master’s degree in art education from the University of Montevallo, was the first employee hired by the SCAC in 2007. “Our original goal was to enrich

and expand our programs,” she said. “There’s something for everybody here, which is what I wanted.” The classes are geared toward people of all ages and abilities. A major goal of the SCAC is to develop young artists who want to pursue art professionally. But the SCAC also serves children and youth interested in art as a hobby and adults interested in it for leisure or continuing education. “A goal for me is to help everyone who comes here find their own voice,” Gordon said. January 2012

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The SCAC has also offered outreach programs over the years, reaching demographics that may not be exposed to the organization otherwise. • In-school programs: Over the years, the SCAC has brought numerous programs into schools across Shelby County. Previous programs include visits from authors, musicians and visual and performing artists. The SCAC also organizes a field trip to the Alabama Symphony Orchestra each year. • Special needs classes: The SCAC taught weekly art classes for special education classes in several local schools in 2008-2009. • Senior citizen classes: Programs for senior citizen groups have been ongoing for several years. The classes are offered in Pelham, Alabaster and Heardmont Park and have included painting, watercolors and hand bells. • At-risk youth: Programs for at-risk youth have been held at the Shelby County Juvenile Detention Center and the Alternative High School in Alabaster. Take Back Our Kids has offered art, music and photography classes to the youth. Challenges and support One of the fundraising challenges the SCAC has faced is an image problem. Sullivan said many people associate Shelby County with affluent areas, such as Greystone and Inverness, but a lot of the county is still rural. Twenty-two of the 39 schools in the Shelby County School System have free and reduced lunch participation of 30 percent or more, Sullivan said. That’s one of the reasons Sullivan chose Columbiana as the home of the SCAC. It’s located an equal distance between Calera and Chelsea — two of the fastest growing cities in the county — but it is also easily accessible to some of the rural communities in the area. “I have no doubt that we could have had this facility built two years ago if we’d gone to another area in Shelby County,” Sullivan said. Based on feedback from students at the SCAC, the interest for a community arts center in Shelby County is apparent. LEFT ABOVE: Oil still life, 18 by 24 inches, by Annabelle DeCamillis, 11th grade. Featured in the Alabama School of Fine Arts Exhibit at the SCAC. LEFT: Dandelions in Blue by Susan Gordon, Acrylic on Canvas. Featured in the SCAC Sidewalk Exhibit.

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In Dodson’s painting studio in November, several of the artists expressed their desire to see the plans come to fruition. Calera resident Judy Pinson began painting after she retired and found she enjoyed it. She visits the SCAC each week for the studio, but said she would not be willing to travel outside the county for classes. While she is happy with the SCAC, she said the new building would give the painters a nicer environment and storage space to house their supplies after they finish class. “We really do a lot with the amount of space that they have,” she said. “We just can’t wait until they get the new one built.” Riley Foster, an 11-year-old Chelsea resident, is another of Dodson’s private students. Foster took private lessons when the family lived in Auburn, and she has won several awards, including third place in the Alabama Wildlife Federation’s duck stamp contest. Foster’s mother, Michelle, said she enrolled her daughter in classes because of the convenience and quality of the SCAC.

AÊ casuallyÊ sophisticatedÊ wineÊ shop

Finding the funds While the economy has slowed the fundraising process for the SCAC, Sullivan is confident they’ll make the goal, although she’s not sure when. “I would like to have my 50th birthday in the new facility. I turn 50 in April,” she said with a laugh. “I don’t think we’re going to make my deadline.” However, the funds continue to come in, mostly grants and donations from organizations that support the arts. Sullivan would like to see larger donations from Shelby County families. She would also like to be able to hire a full-time executive director, who would take Sullivan’s place. “We would certainly be much closer to our goals if we did have a full-time, paid executive director in place,” she said. Until that goal is met, the SCAC will continue expanding its programs and growing the next generation of artists in Shelby County. For more information about the SCAC and its classes, visit its website at Shelbycountyartscouncil.com. For information about donating to the organization, contact Sullivan at 205-215-1136. l January 2012

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Blue Spring Manor

Bed and breakfast offers an upscale retreat Written by Katie McDowell Photographs by JON GOERING

January 2012

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F

  ew buildings in Shelby County can claim to have as varied a history as Blue Spring Manor in Vincent. The bed and breakfast has had several incarnations in its 80-year history. Originally a barn located on what is now the Greystone development, there are rumors that it once served as a gambling hall and house of ill repute. Eventually, it was converted into a residential home and moved to its current location in west Shelby County. Today, Blue Spring Manor is a threestory bed and breakfast located on about 10 acres of land. While it’s tucked away in west Shelby County, the bed and breakfast is popular with travelers and vacationers from across the Southeast. It’s also the opposite of what current owners Ray and Doris Harris thought they wanted when they began searching for property to convert into a bed and breakfast. “We thought we were going to be an urban bed and breakfast,” Doris said. Instead, they stumbled across Blue Spring Manor in 2000. They bought the property at the end of April, started renovations the next month and opened on Oct. 1 of the same year. It was a whirlwind experience, but they have loved the property and the people it brings into their lives. The Harrises live at the house and have become friends with many of their repeat clients. “It doesn’t get old because every day there’s someone new that’s experiencing it,” Doris said. One of those clients is Ann Marie James of Destin, Fla. James first discovered Blue Spring Manor about five years ago when she was searching for a place to stay during a trip through the area. She has returned six times since, either when she is traveling or just in need of a short vacation. “It’s the perfect retreat,” she said. “You feel like you’re coming home. It’s your home away from home.” That was the feeling the Harrises wanted when they bought Blue Spring Manor 11 years ago. The house is decorated in French Country décor downstairs, while the eight guest rooms on the second and third floors

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Collectibles and antiques can be found throughout the bed and breakfast, including this oldfashioned radio. Colorful birdhouses are scattered across the 10-acre property. Fall foliage offered a beautiful landscape on a November afternoon. A hidden door doesn’t lead anywhere, but is a fun find for visitors exploring the grounds. The great room is a gathering place for guests during their visit. The Lancashire Suite was inspired by the owners’ love of British history.


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have themes. “There is a theme for each room,” Doris said. “Most of that has to do with something in our life, some inspiration that happened in our life.” The Sunset Suite is named after the sunset that can be viewed from windows overlooking the courtyard, front lawn and freshwater spring. Adjacent to the Sunset Suite on the third floor is the Kilamanjaro Suite. The suite features African decorations collected by Doris during a trip to Malawi in the late ‘80s. Other rooms are the Lancashire Suite, inspired by the Harris’ love of British history; the Willow Oak room, which overlooks a 200-year-old Willow Oak; and the GressKlipper Room, a Norwegian word that means “the lawns,” fitting for a room that overlooks the front lawns, where games are often played. Paintings by local artists Dale Chambliss and Sheila Cook line the hallways of the second and third floors and can also be found in some rooms. Prices range from $110 to $220 without tax, depending on the room. One of the few structural changes the Harrises made to the house when they bought it was making sure each guest room had its own bathroom with tub. Other than that, they found the house to be in great shape - surprising given the journey it took to make it to Vincent. Doris said the house was taken apart piece by piece in its original location and transported on three trailers to Vincent, where it was reassembled in 1998. Doris doubted the story for a long time until a chance meeting changed her mind. She was in line at a Chelsea bookstore, which had Blue Spring Manor bookmarks for sale on the counter. The man behind her pointed to the bookmarks and said he was part of the team that disassembled the house in the late ‘90s. “I don’t say that story so hesitantly any more,” Doris said. The common rooms are on the ground floor, including the parlor and the Red Rooster Dining Hall. A full breakfast is included in the overnight rates, but the dining hall is also open to people who are not guests of Blue Spring Manor. “We are licensed as a restaurant,” Doris said. “Everything we do is by reservation, but we are open seven days a week.” Blue Spring Manor also has a conference room and a spa. Treatments at the spa LEFT: A dining table is set in the Red Rooster Dining Hall. The restaurant is available to visitors, not just Blue Spring Manor guests, seven days a week with reservations. RIGHT: Sun peaks through a tree on the lawn of Blue Spring Manor.

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include massages, scrubs, facials, manicures and pedicures. “It allows for a quiet spa experience on the property so you don’t have to get in your car and drive away,” Doris said. “All you have to do is climb the stairs.” Perhaps the most popular part of Blue Spring Manor is the extensive grounds. The 10 acres of property includes a pool, hot tub and several gardens and trails. A koi pond is located in one of the gardens, while a stone garden can be found behind the property. Blue Spring Manor was recently granted Certified Wildlife Habitat by the National Wildlife Federation. The lawn adjacent to Blue Spring Manor is home to a majestic, 200-year-old Willow Oak. The lawn is a popular place for weddings with the exchange of vows taking place beneath the tree. In addition to weddings, Doris said Blue Spring Manor is popular for small, overnight meetings and conferences or larger, outdoor parties and gatherings. Add those gatherings to the regular flow of guests and Blue Spring Manor stays busy year round. It’s one of the challenges of being a bed and breakfast owner, but it’s one the Harrises love. “If you are in any way offended by people being in your home, you’ll struggle with it,” Doris said. “I think the sharing of space is motivational.” For more information about Blue Spring Manor, located at 2870 Highway 83 in Vincent, visit Bluespringmanor.com or call 672-9955. l CLOCKWiSe FROM TOP LeFT: A statue stands guard in the stone garden on the grounds. This 200-year-old Willow Oak has been the setting for the exchanging of vows at many weddings held at Blue Spring Manor. The bed and breakfast includes a fully operational spa on the property. The Sunset Suite overlooks the courtyard, front lawns and a freshwater spring. Fall leaves turn a vibrant red in the late fall. The Kilimanjaro Suite includes a table overlooking the lawns. Each of the rooms includes a sign on the door and a description of the room’s history inside.

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Organized

Home & Food

by design

Written by KatIe McDOWell Photographs cONtRIBUteD

K

im McBrayer knows the panicky feeling an unorganized office can induce. She understands how an overflowing garage can overwhelm homeowners. And a cluttered closet? That one really gets under the skin of the certified professional organizer and owner of All Spaced Out, an organizing services business she operates out of her North Shelby home. McBrayer founded All Spaced Out almost a decade ago. She and her staff help clients organize the problem areas of their home or business. “When you don’t live in that space, you’re able to see it a lot more clearly,” she said. “I do believe that everyone can be organized.” McBrayer speaks from experience. She calls herself a “reformed messy”

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and said laundry rooms and closets are her weaknesses. In fact, it was a feeling of disorganization that first spurred her interest in organizing. At the time, McBrayer felt intimidated by fellow moms and friends, who seemed calm and collected. “I felt like I was all alone, like I was the only person who didn’t have it all together,” she said. After sharing her thoughts with some friends, she discovered the feeling was widespread. So she decided to try to do something about it. She began reading self-help and organizing books. She also turned a sharp eye to her own life. She broke down her daily routine — how she spent her time and the structure of her home. She looked for problem rooms that were eating up more time than they should, such as an inefficient laundry system or a messy pantry. Then she set to work finding ways to

improve her situation. She saw a major improvement, but she admits her home is far from perfection, which shocks friends and acquaintances familiar with her work. “Everybody thinks it would be perfect, and it’s not,” she said. “We’re not looking for perfection. We’re looking for manageable.” Over the last 10 years, McBrayer has worked with men and women in residential and business settings. She even worked with a hoarder during her first year of operation. I’m very thankful I’ve had that situation,” she said. “Pretty much everything since then has been easier to deal with.” At one point, her business expanded so much she opened a showroom and expanded her staff. However, she scaled back the business after her son, Carson Sumpter, was diagnosed with bone cancer. He died in July 2011, and McBrayer took a break from the

after


before business for a while. She now runs All Spaced Out from her home again. The clients are still there, though, and they all have different versions of the same problem — a room or space that takes up too much time. The process of fixing the problem is the same no matter the size or purpose of the space. The two key concepts of organization are the function and capacity of the space. McBrayer starts by examining the function of the space. She asks the homeowner what purpose it is supposed to serve and helps them decide if it’s performing too many roles, such as a catch-all closet that is packed with items. When analyzing the capacity of the space, McBrayer said there are two options: “reduce the stuff” or “increase the space.” She has used many organization and design products to increase the amount of storage space in an area. “Then it comes down to discipline,” she said. That’s often the hard part, but McBrayer said people generally do a better job when they understand the function of a space. For McBrayer, the point of organization is not to achieve perfection. It is to is to create time to focus on important things, such as family and loved ones, rather than the mundane day-to-day tasks of housekeeping. “My whole thought process is we can enjoy our homes, we can enjoy our family and we can live a simpler, easier life,” she said. l

after

before

“We’re not looking for perfection. We’re looking for manageable.” — Kim McBrayer

after

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Home & Food

Start the New Year off right Written by KIM McBRaYeR

Organization = preparation! Plan now to make the next season the best ever.

While your home is decorated and the storage bins are empty, donate or discard all the decorations you have not used. If there are sentimental items, put them in a special place for keepsakes. With the bins full of only the items you use, picking out what you need won’t be necessary. Once the items are reduced to the final amount, purchase plastic bins, considering quantity and sizes. Suppliers offer numerous types, ranging from specific storage for ornaments, wreaths and trees to just basic storage bins, small to large. Measure and plan before purchasing. Create specialized storage solutions for your specific items. Install storage shelving, bin storage units and attic units to accommodate items for easy access and safe keeping. Designate shelves for certain containers and replace in same spot every year. Consider hooks for wreaths to hang. Pack like with like: Keep area groupings together, such as living room, kids room, outdoor, certain trees or scenes. Label bins with a numbering system like Bin 1 of 10. Then, number the interior boxes to make it easy to replace in the correct bin. Create a list of contents and tape to the inside of the lid, as well as a master list to keep in your home files for quick reference, like finding white lights for a party in June! Make a list of things you need for next year, like wrapping paper or plates and napkins. Shop the day after Christmas to stock up and take advantage of the great sales. Create a Christmas notebook (small binders work best) that will store all your information in one place. Divide into categories and use a plastic zipper pouch for shopping receipts because it can be removed from the binder and carried in your purse. analyze the traditions: Start new ones and toss out the ones nobody enjoyed. Record gifts so you’ll never forget that special memory. Jot down a new recipe you discovered at someone’s party. Make a list for next year’s gift ideas. Divide the names into the number of months and shop for that person all month long for just the perfect gift. This will also help in budgeting yearround instead of all in one month at the end of the year! While it’s fresh, evaluate your spending this year and then establish a budget for next Christmas. Are you going to regret getting the bills in January? Start setting aside cash each week and eliminate having to use credit cards at all. Start a Christmas savings account at your bank. Have a family meeting to discuss how this month made each person feel. What could be better? If it felt too stressful, could something be scratched from the calendar? Perhaps, advance planning might help. What were the kids’ favorite memories of the holiday season? Be sure to do more of that next time.

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You are cordially invited to attend The

SHELBY Living

Bridal Show Presented by

Sunday, February 5, 2012 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.

at the Cahaba Grand Conference Center 3660 Grandview Parkway, Birmingham For more information and to pre-register, visit Shelbyliving.com.


Home & Food

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ShelbyLiving.com


Joe

The

behind the dough

E

Written by NEAL WAGNER Photographs by JON GOERING

very morning before the sun rises, employees at Pelham’s Donut Joe’s are busy handcrafting and preparing what they see as edible works of art. Using homemade doughnuts as a canvas, the chefs in the small building wedged between two sets of railroad tracks on Shelby County 52 use toppings ranging from Fruit Loops to bacon and maple syrup to paint a delicious scene behind the glass display cases lining the front of the store. “We try to constantly innovate what we make,” said Donut Joe’s owner Richard Byrd. “We always try to make things to go with the season.” About two-and-a-half years ago, Byrd opened the small business admittedly with some uncertainty. Today, he has been having trouble figuring out where to park all the cars surrounding the business on Saturday mornings. “I’m sure everybody was thinking ‘What is this crazy guy doing?’ when we opened,” Byrd said with a laugh. “All business is a risk. We just kind of rolled the dice on this one, and it has turned out great.” After several businesses opened and closed in the small building in just a few years, Byrd “pretty much had to gut” the building and start from scratch. “It was a pretty substantial investment,” he said. “But it is in a good, high-traffic area.” Because Shelby County 52 serves as a major commuter route for those liv-

Rows of donuts at Donut Joe’s in Pelham sit ready for the morning shoppers.

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Donut Joe’s employees Eric Byrd and J.C. Lentine help customers during an early morning rush.

ing in Pelham and Helena, most of the business’s first customers were people stopping in on their way to and from work. Today, the donut shop has gained a loyal following, and is drawing visitors from all over the country. “People come from Pelham, Alabaster, Helena, Hoover, Trussville, Mountain Brook, everywhere,” Byrd said. “We are supported by everyone locally, and that means a lot to us. We couldn’t do it without that local support. “We actually get a lot of snowbirds who read about us on the Internet and stop by on their way to the beach,” Byrd added with a laugh. By the time Donut Joe’s opens its doors at 6 a.m., its employees have been

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working for nearly four hours already. “To do real donuts, you have to deal with dough. It’s got to rise before you can do anything with it, and there’s no way to rush that process,” Byrd said. “We make everything from scratch in the building.” When the store opens, it sells everything from coffee to apple fritters to donuts topped with everything from Oreos to Fruit Loops. One of the restaurant’s newest offerings are called “Joe Pops.” “It’s basically a doughnut hole on a popsicle stick with different toppings,” Byrd said. “The kids love them.” As the seasons change, so do Donut Joe’s offerings. For example, the business features coffee blends especially for the Christmas season, and a pumpkin

spice blend for autumn. When warmer temperatures bring more outdoor events, the business is able to create enormous doughnuts for birthday parties and other social gatherings. Byrd also said he is looking into the possibility of offering a delivery service for some orders to help spread the Donut Joes experience around the community. “I knew it was a risk to open Donut Joe’s in this economy, but it has really paid off,” Byrd said. “It’s so nice to have the local support we do. We really appreciate it. “I have a great staff and crew who do a fantastic job,” Byrd added. “From day one, everything has been great.” l


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Midwest meets Mt Laurel Illinois natives fall in love with the South

Written by Katie McDowell Photographs by JON GOERING


D

on and Gail Rule knew they wanted to retire near Birmingham. The couple had spent years in their home in Waterloo, Ill., a small town about 25 miles south of St. Louis, but they were looking for a change. The Midwesterners’ daughter and her family moved to Birmingham about four years ago, and the Rules fell in love with the area during their visits. They soon began making trips to the South to search for their own place. They considered gated communities, but they were struck by the sense of openness and hospitality in the town of Mt Laurel. “We just kept coming back to Mt Laurel,” Don said. “We kept saying to ourselves, ‘This is too good to be true.’” Once they made their decision, they moved fast. They bought land in September 2010 and moved in eight months later. Their two-story, Craftsman-style house is larger than they expected. The couple planned to downsize to a smaller home when they moved, but that plan was dropped during the fun of creating their dream home. “As it turns out, this is probably the largest house we’ve lived in,” Don said. The Rules do most of their living on the first floor, while the second floor is usually reserved for guests, including their two grandchildren, who live nearby. The home opens to the formal living room, which features a 24-foot, arched ceiling with wooden beams and a fireplace Gail designed. Adjacent to the living room is a library where Gail spends her mornings. “That’s where I read my Bible and pray in the morning. It’s my quiet time,” she said. The living room flows into an open kitchen with a large island and dining table. The kitchen has quickly become another favorite of Gail’s, who loves to cook. PREVIOUS PAGE CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: A custom fireplace and 24-foot arched ceiling are the focal points of the formal living room. Peacock feathers peak out from a custom-made wreath in the formal living room. The Rules bought paintings and decorative accents in stores in the Birmingham area. A second-floor balcony overlooks the formal living room. Peacock figurines and feathers – Gail’s a fan of the bird’s vibrant plumage – can be found throughout the living room. RIGHT: The library is Gail’s favorite room in the house and the place where she does her morning devotionals.

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Both of the guest bedrooms are decorated in bright, cheerful colors. RIGHT: A brilliant chandelier hangs over the dining room table.

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The master bedroom and the family room round out the first floor of the home. The master bedroom is decorated in airy blue and white tones, while the master bathroom includes a heated tile floor. The family room is where the Rules spend most of their time. The room is large and open, and is decorated in an “eclectic meets Southwest” style. “The room is large, but they did a great job in still creating and keeping the warmth in an area that is maybe a little bigger than a normal-sized family room,” Don said. Don’s office is located upstairs, as well as two guest bedrooms. Oak floors can be found throughout the house, with the exception of the bedrooms. Many of the decorations reveal the Rules’ interests – family pictures are scattered throughout the house, as well as the peacock figurines and feathers that Gail loves and decorative cardinals, a tribute to Don’s beloved St. Louis Cardinals. Most of the furniture and decorations came from the Birmingham area. The Rules, who were living with their daughter’s family while their house was being built, bought most of the furniture during construction.

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CLOCKWISE FROM THE TOP LEFT: The Craftsman-style home features a shingle and brick facade. A balcony on the second floor overlooks the formal living. A large island offers space for prep work and additional seating in the kitchen. The Rules used an interior designer to help pick the paint colors throughout the house, including the blue in the master bedroom. A small sitting area is located on the second floor of the house.

“About 90 percent of the furniture that was in the house was bought before the house was built,” Don said. They planned each room carefully and organized delivery of the furniture from the back of the house to the front to assist with the moving process. While the Rules, particularly Gail, did much of the interior design on their own, they did receive help throughout the process. Glenda Underwood of Issis and Sons assisted the couple with some of the interior design, helping them decorate and choose wall colors that flowed throughout the house. The Rules said Underwood was one of many people who helped with the process of building and decorating their home. They said they owe their gratitude to numerous people, including Vice President of EBSCO Development John Freeman, Mt Laurel Sales Manager Della Pender, project manager Brian Phillips

and home designer Clem Burch. “I can’t say enough about everybody that had a hand in this house,” Gail said. A sense of camaraderie developed between the Rules and the people who built and designed their home. The feeling was so great that the Rules often found themselves visiting their future home multiple times a week, not because they were concerned about the construction, but because they enjoyed the company. That friendliness was something that

the Rules loved about Mt Laurel and Shelby County. They have quickly become involved in the community. They attend Valleydale Church and Gail volunteers in local organizations. “Coming from St. Louis to Birmingham is an improvement that’s almost immeasurable,” Don said. “Maybe it’s part of the definition of Southern hospitality. Although I still love my St. Louis Cardinals and follow them closely, college football has taken a front seat to professional football.” l

“Coming from St. Louis to Birmingham is an improvement that’s almost immeasurable. Maybe it’s part of the definition of Southern hospitality.” — Don Rule January 2012

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It alian Home & Food

and so much more

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Written by AMY JONES Photographs by JON GOERING

W

hen Charlie Vatella and his family moved back to the Birmingham area from Long Island, N.Y., in the early 1990s to open their restaurant, Vatella saw a prime opportunity sitting on U.S. 280. “In 1992, most of what you see on 280 was not here,” he said. “I had been here in the mid-1980s and moved here right after the Galleria opened. You could just see that the area was going to keep developing.” In April of 1992, Petruccelli’s opened in its first location, an 1,800-squarefoot building very close to the Jefferson County line. Five years later, the business had grown enough to move to its current location, where it’s still going strong almost 20 years after its inception. Vatella said his own Italian heritage and previous culinary experience in Italian and pizza restaurants led to his decision to open an Italian restaurant. However, the name Petruccelli isn’t from Vatella’s heritage. Rather, the Petruccellis were a family Vatella befriended when he opened a Chuck E. Cheese franchise in Jasper. Three of the Pettruccelli kids worked at that franchise, and it became a running joke that when Vatella opened his own restaurant, he would name it “Petruccelli’s.” When he finally did open the restaurant, the family “asked for residuals,” said Vatella, laughing. “I said, ‘You can eat for free.’” When Petruccelli’s first opened, the restaurant needed a way to set itself apart. Vatella found a way to do that by offering classic Italian cuisine plus something more. “When we first opened, the idea was to do Italian entrees, reasonably priced, plus something nobody else had — something I still don’t think anyone else has. We’re (also) a full pizzeria,” Vatella said. Petruccelli’s specialty pizzas include the Philly cheese steak pizza, with tomato sauce, Black Angus sirloin steak, mushrooms, peppers, onions and mozzarella cheese, as well as the classic margherita pizza, with virgin olive oil, juicy Roma tomatoes, fresh basil and mozzarella cheese. The restaurant also provides a fresh grilled vegetable pizza, which boasts

bell peppers, mushrooms, onions, green olives, Roma tomatoes and mozzarella cheese, as a vegetarian option. However, many county residents know Petruccelli’s first and foremost as a classic Italian restaurant. “We’ve had people who have eaten with us 10 years and have never opened up the menu enough to know we sell pizza,” Vatella said. Instead of pizza, those customers go straight for the Italian classics, such as saucy chicken parmigiana smothered in mozzarella cheese and fettuccini with olive oil-sautéed chicken, mushrooms and the diner’s choice of Alfredo or marinara sauce. Vatella said oven-baked lasagna is perhaps the restaurant’s most popular entrée, and Petruccelli’s allows diners to customize their lasagna orders to fit their personal palates. Lasagna can be made with beef, chicken and mushrooms, spinach and mushrooms or vegetables, and diners can add ingredients such as meatballs, Italian sausage or sautéed peppers and onions to their lasagna entrees. Petruccelli’s also offers pork, chicken and beef entrees, sandwiches, salads and seafood. Vatella said he’s particularly fond of the pork chops and grilled mahi mahi fish. Desserts are also available, with tiramisu, bread pudding, cannoli and New York-style cheesecake among the offerings. Vatella said the restaurant’s recipes and offerings continually evolve. “A lot of them, we just have over a lifetime. We have employees contribute some stuff — we’ve even had customers come up with some,” he said. “It’s just an ongoing, evolving process.” Petruccelli’s also offers a full bar, with an impressive wine list boasting more than 30 wines. However, the bar’s claim to fame goes beyond drink selection, Vatella said. “We have the longest happy hour in town — from 11 a.m.-7 p.m.,” he said. “If you want to pay full price for a drink, you almost have to work at it.” Petrucelli’s is located at 10 Meadow View Drive. For more information, visit the website at Cafelazio.net/petruccellis or call the restaurant at 991-7455. l The restaurant’s menu includes Italian classics such as oven-baked lasagna and chicken parmigiana. Diners can also order chicken alfredo tortellini with vegetables, along with Petruccelli’s well-loved rolls. Petruccelli’s is also home to a full pizzeria.

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the Shelby Living

dining guide

ALCOHOL SERVED

CATERING AVAILABLE

RESERVATIONS RECOMMENDED

LIVE MUSIC

FACEBOOK

TWITTER

BREAKFAST

LUNCH

January 2012

DINNER

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dining guide Tejano Bar & Grill 2991 Hwy 95 / Helena / 205.621.0404 We opened our doors Aug. 13 and have decorated the inside to give a warm welcome to our guest. If you are in the mood for good Tex-Mex food and a unique dining experience, then this is the place to dine-in. We serve freshmade tamales, chicken enchiladas, and taco salads.  Our dinner includes our Fajitas Tejana’s, which is served on our one of a kind stone dish. We have daily lunch specials and a great dinner selection among other combinations of dishes made from the grill.  Our bar includes margaritas made with freshly squeezed lime juice and piña coladas. We also have one of Tejano’s favorite drinks, the Michelada, which is a drink that is made with your favorite beer mixed with a few spices.  Come join us for great food and drinks from south of the border!

Mellow Mushroom Pizza Bakers 920 Inverness Corners / Hoover / 205.981.9914 Mellowmushroom.com/hoover Often called “the Cadillac of pizzas,” the secret is in the dough. Made with spring water, the whole wheat dough is sweetened with molasses for your health’s sake. The red sauce is made with vine-ripened, steam-peeled tomatoes with no citric acid added. Boasting a 16-inch large pizza, 14-inch medium pies are the same size as most large pizzas. Although famous for pizza, including a gluten-free option, the delicious array of hoagies, salads and award-winning, oven-roasted wings should not be overlooked. Reserve the party room featuring a wall-to-wall chalkboard for a Mellow good time!

TownHouse Tea Shoppe 23 Olmsted St. / Mt Laurel / 205.529.0081 Thetownhouseatmtlaurel.com TownHouse Tea Shoppe is open Wednesday-Saturday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. for lunch and Thursdays, 5-7 p.m. for dinner. We offer lunch salads, soup, sandwiches, hot entrees and a lovely selection of desserts. Our three-course tea service is absolutely second to none. Our hot and cold tea menu offers a broad selection of the best teas and infusions. We are the perfect location for small special occasions such as birthday parties, bridal teas or showers, baby showers or teas and wedding receptions.

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The South Shelby Chamber of Commerce held its sixth annual Diamond Awards Ceremony at the United Methodist Church in Columbiana on Dec. 1 1. Libby Jones and Debbie Battles 2. Julie, Angela, Art, Dean and Tom Speers 3. Suzie Smart and Mary Strehle 4. Donald Shirley and Mike Cooley 5. Helen Brooks and Carol Harrison 6. Wayne Barber and Columbiana Mayor Allan Lowe 7. Pat McDanal and Martha Coffey 8. Marvin Copes and John Q. Adams 9. Jennifer Thomas and Heather Bell-Lawing 10. George Anderson and Blake Anderson

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Hedden Plastic Surgery held Spa Greystone to benefit Smile train on Saturday, Nov. 12. 1. Kristen Peveler and Lauren Armstrong 2. Abigail Hedden, Lauren McDonald and Lacy Wallace 3. Holly Stevens and Christine House 4. Mary Katherine Shealy, Courtney Maddox and Savanna Barlow 5. Doug and Niki Hovanec 6. Mike and Sandra Booker 7. Jama Dixon and Angela Sanders 8. Martha Lee and Jessica Fuchs 9. Heather and Jon Strauss 10. Grace and Patti Hedden 62

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Animal lovers headed to Veteran’s Park on Oct. 29 for Pet-A-Palooza, sponsored by the Hoover Parks and Recreation Department.

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1. Nicklas Taylor, Mike Lester, Kristi Taylor and Winnie 2. Bailey and Ellen Yates 3. Kathy Southerland and Jamie Snead 4. Janice Greer and Karis Akin with Lady Kristal 5. David and Kristen Peat with Enya and Kodi 6. Eric and Thuy Linh Penedo with Nellie 7. Timothy Detrick and Heather Berryhill 8. Caroline Kaiser with Wendy and Katherine Sexton with Pepper 9. Dave and Sally Kinder with Ducky 10. Kimberly and Robert Kelly with Libby 11. Katie, Joshua and Steve Childree with Holly

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Chelsea Kiwanis Club

Alabama Attorney General Luther Strange spoke to the Chelsea Kiwanis Club at its annual Thanksgiving luncheon on Nov. 7. 1. Bob Wanninger and Michael Griffin 2. Talon Kollars, Chris Prosch and Mark Mayhan 3. Miranda Carter and Je Anne Smith 4. Marty and Ed Tyndal 5. Burkley Johnstone, Jaime Echols and Randy Mathews 6. Luther Strange with Merritt Wanninger 7. Joe and Anne Murphy 8. Mike Denton, Juanita Champion, Luther Strange, June Niven and Earl Niven 9. Slade Blackwell and Ben Smith 10. Will Lantrip and Chris Wilson 64

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Community of Hope dinner The Community of Hope held a dinner Nov. 7.

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1. Edwina Taylor, Howard Mullis, Susan Mullis and Steve Hendricks 2. Glenda Pace, Maria Gooch and Angelica Alvarado 3. Carol and Mitch Shelton 4. Ben and Abi Davis 5. Tiffani Hambrick and Millie Opper 6. Tami Chance and Trista Reasonover 7. Holli Casey and Liz Stewart 8. Lynn Benton, Christy Isbell and Monica Williams 9. Charles Tucker 10. Jennifer Darnell, Lynn and Cheryl Hill

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Hometown Halloween

Montevallo’s Hometown Halloween was held Oct. 31.

1. Tevon Gentry, Kane Gentry, Lauryn Conwell and Trevon Gentry 2. Kaylee and Jaycie Mandrell with Bryanna Blackman 3. Rachael and Sydney Baker 4. Thad, Eli, Kaia and Jodie Hosey 5. Karen Bell, Stephanie Farragher and Emily Loggins 6. Kelly Ray and Paige Gentry 7. Kayla and Kayleigh Howard 8. Anna and Kelli Burt 9. Bryan and Missy Wilson 10. Bentley Howell, Julie Underwood, Candice Underwood, Haley Davis and Riley Martin

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GSCC Clay Shoot

The Greater Shelby County Chamber of Commerce held a clay shoot fundraiser on Nov. 2. 1. Jennifer Whisenant, David Williams and Terri Gualano 2. Ashlyn Delianides, Misty Gibson, Chris Bottcher and Elizabeth Eades 3. Charmaine Dye and Adam Weiger 4. Kellie Upchurch and Allison Farmer 5. Jeff Jowers, Mitch Jones, Jimmy Broadhead, Susan Taylor and Terry Lawley 6. Philip Webb 7. Reanna Swinford and Heather Stripling 8. Chris Bottcher, Tim Bowen and Jon Lauderdale 9. Larry Kirkpatrick, Jason Kirby, Bobby Foster and Joe Hill 10. Mike Gay, Mike Desantis, Josh Lucas and Chase Harris 68

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The Shelby County Arts Council kicked off its Daniel Moore exhibit Oct. 30 at St. Vincent One Nineteen.

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1. April and Daniel Moore 2. Jonathan Brain, Brittany Moore and Josh and Julie Payne 3. Bob Whetstone and University of Montevallo President John Stewart 4. SCAC President Terri Sullivan and Brant Sanders 5. Carla Henley and Patsy Parker 6. Stephanie Justinger and Keith Sorrells 7. Micheal and Stacey Box 8. Alice Cusimano, Kay Tyler and Allison Tyler 9. Cary Moore 10. Jennifer Stewart, Christine Willis, Chad Willis and Judy Quick

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Alabama Youth Symphony

The Alabama Youth Symphony held its first recital of the 2011-2012 season Nov. 14 at the Indian Springs School Concert Hall. 1. Dawn and Carleigh Allen 2. Erika and Ilse Hill 3. Susanna Sims, Sasha Taunton and Olivia Sims 4. Debbie Stanford and Madelyn Gray 5. Tania and Izzy Tse 6. Raynette and Mike Ellison 7. Anne Hentz and Charles Esther Henry 8. Paul Merryman and AYS Conductor Dr. Jim Smisek 9. Sydney and Carol Ann Cross 70

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10. Albany Hornbuckle and Courtney Wrenn 11. Ellen Stanton and Monica Steelreath 12. Josh Davis, Rachel Nix and William Ake 13. Mauryo Jones and her niece Peyton Jones 14. Debra Smith and Sharon Robinson-Holmes 15. Jennifer Warren and Marilyn Pipkin 16. Brittany Seagle and Carson Smisek 17. Nikki Newman and Susmita Murthy

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ask the professionals

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Relay for Life Kickoff

The West Shelby Relay for Life held its kickoff party Nov. 10 at the Dairy Queen in Alabaster.

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1. Caron Vanwardenburg, Elizabeth Ware and Katherine Ware 2. April Miller and Alison Miller 3. Kenneth Miller and Tim Miller 4. Ann Harris and Hunter Bowen 5. Tesla and Elayna Noble 6. Zachary Cuppett and Jane Ferguson 7. Mark and Tammy Smith 8. Blake Lovett and Emily Rogers 9. Tanya Casale and Anna Buntin

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The Out of Darkness Community Walk benefiting the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention was held Nov. 6 at Heardmont Park in North Shelby. 1. Carol and Mike Hill, Lisa and Jim Davis, Dolores Jones, Ronald and Rachel Richey 2. Robby, Natalie, Marli and Jennifer Odgers, Dolores Jones, Jaclyn and Shane Collins 3. AFSP Volunteer Janet Jackson and Danny Van Deventer 4. Emily Lyle, Camille Browning and Frances Peterson 5. Haley Temple, Jennifer Edens, Fred Howard, Karina Pasenjants and Megan Edens 6. Dolores Jones, Beth and Steve Scruggs 7. Mollie Beth Gay, Morgan Jeffries, Marli Odgers and Faith Richardson 8. Carol Hill, Maria Tidmore and Rachel Richey 9. Sean Bunn and Mike Lathan 10. Katie Starrett, Kathy Fish, Kirsten Fish, Rob Fish, Isaac Hudson-Fish, Garth Haley, Chip Hudson, Skylar Hudson, Jim Haley, Lesley Hudson (Captain), Noah Hudson, Lee Hall and Natalie Marler

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Hoover Chamber luncheon The Hoover Chamber of Commerce held a luncheon Nov. 17 at the Hoover Country Club.

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1. Charlotte Biscotto and Cynthia Butler 2. Leah Studdard and Allen Corrigan 3. Cathy Vinzant and Ken Graff 4. Sammy Harris and Lori Salter 5. Shegun Otulana and Joe Thomas 6. Eugene and Darlene Sommers 7. Ross Silas and Gina Roberson 8. Jerome Morgan and Hoover Mayor Gary Ivey 9. Bill Powell and Jason Gaston 10. Scott Pinkerton and Verona Petite 11. Pattie King and Melinda Bonner

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University of Montevallo Choral Christmas concert

The University of Montevallo’s Choral Christmas Concert was held Nov. 29 at the American Village’s Colonial Chapel. 1. Saundra McRoberts, Pat Bakane and Sharon Harris 2. Morgan Stoker and Cory O’Quinn-Price 3. Barbara Orr and Ginger Orr 4. Emili Blanton and Johnna Bryant 5. Laura Bellina and Toni Bellina 6. Joe and Lori Ardovino 7. Daniel Birdsong and Lorilyn Thompson 8. Barrington McQueen and Stephanie Bagley 9. Melissa Talley and Zachary Banks

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10. David Orr and Chelsea Orr 11. Julie Scott and Linda Giles 12. Ed and Ruth Robertson 13. Drew and Ted Hoffman 14. Kirk and Robin Pichelmayer 15. Michael Tallon and Patrick Jones 16. Casey Eubanks and Katie Cearcy 17. Kathy Hoefker and Mary Horton 18. Florrie and Craig Maluff 19. Hal and Ginger Ferrell and Ruth Miller

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GSCC prayer breakfast

The Greater Shelby County Chamber of Commerce’s annual prayer breakfast was held Nov. 22 at the Pelham Civic Complex. 1. Sylvia Wright, Kelli Keith and Ann Marie Boyd 2. Mike Vest and Terri Gualano 3. Lisa Phillips and Charmaine Rohrbaugh Dye 4. Joyce Preston 5. Sam Raymond and Amanda Smith 6. April Stone and Melanie Goodwin 7. Jeff Brown and Rhett McReight 8. Wendy Stewart-Sandlin and Ann Marie Boyd 9. Justin Fisher and Ryan Sherman

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Welcome to the good life. Welcome to Shelby Living! Ja nu ar y 20 11

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SHELBY Living

e yea Arts & Culture n o r fo es u s s i Local Fashions 12 Unique Home Features Monthly calendar of events and happenings

To subscribe visit ShelbyLiving.com or call 669-3131 January 2012

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Hilltop on the Green

Hilltop on the Green benefiting Hilltop Montessori School in Mt Laurel was held Nov. 19 at Old Overton Club in Vestavia Hills. 1. Natalie and Scott Reddington and Lisa and Anthony Bandura 2. Allison Vickes and Shellie Scott 3. Sally and Chris Dollar 4. Montessori Executive Director Michele Scott and Michael Wilensky 5. Nichole Lariscy and John Moore 6. Shiela and Don Jones 7. Sherry Cook and Vicky Boyd 8. Charles and Susan Desmond 9. Robyn Knight and Adam Robinett

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10. Kevin and Selena Harrison and Mary Simms 11. Chuck and Gwinne Sams and Ted Kluz 12. Lisa and Kirk Wilthrow 13. Beverly and Thomas Goldsmith 14. Daniel Adams and Ona Gribben 15. Ben and Keri Rankin 16. Matthew and Melissa Ipsen 17. Greg and Brenda Calhoun 18. Rachael and Thomas Stover and Martha Kay Griffith

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Montevallo Christmas Parade

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Montevallo got into the Christmas spirit early with a parade held Nov. 17. 1. Robert, April, Emily and Skyler Polk 2. Tracy Creger and Michelle Mayfield 3. Jael Acosta and Nidia Escamilla 4. Jared Elrod and Stone Pritchett 5. Anna Little and Keeley Thompson 6. Amy Hanim and Ann Curl 7. Amory Sellers and Jenny Lucas 8. Christie Headley, Betty Massey and Brian Headley 9. Elizabeth Tubbs, Hannah Coppock and Sydney Sims 82

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10. Erin and Kenneth Dukes 11. Josh Miller and Meredith Milstead 12. Jennie and Zoe Gandy 13. Roger Hamilton with Pearl and Lola Marheine 14. Melissa Talley and Colbye Krebs 15. Luke and Melissa Thompson with Alayna Scott 16. John Boothe, Caleb Leak, Makayla Leak, Amanda Boothe and Hannah Doyle 17. Jerry and Teresa Tingle 18. Joy and Dale Parker

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Out & About

Month-long

Director’s Invitational Exhibit: The Shelby County Arts Council will hold a Director’s Invitational Exhibit featuring the visual art of public school teachers in Shelby County. The exhibit will be on display in January and February and is free and open to the public. The SCAC is located at 104 Mildred Street in Columbiana. For more information, call 6690044. Teen Boot Camp: This class, held at St. Vincent’s One Nineteen, is designed for teenagers 13- to 16-yearsold and motivates teens to be actively involved. Personal training, with fitness specialists Tiffany Harris and Haley Jasper, is included in the program. Each session lasts one hour and includes a healthy snack. The class is held Monday and Wednesdays from 4:30-5:30 p.m. It includes a family session allowing you to join your teen during a workout session every other week is included. A four-week session $150/person. Frozen Tide: The Frozen Tide, the University of

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Alabama’s club hockey team, plays at the ice arena at the Pelham Civic Complex every Friday and Saturday in January. Visit Pelhamciviccomplex.com for more information.

Jan. 3

Chapter One Nineteen: St. Vincent’s One Nineteen will discuss “When We Were Strangers” by Pamela Schoenewaldt at its monthly book club meeting on Jan. 3 from 7-8 p.m. The book is available at a 20 percent discount at 939-7766 and will be delivered to One Nineteen for your convenience. The book selected for February is “The Paris Wife” by Paul McLain. The book club is free, but registration is suggested by calling 4086550.

Jan. 10

Snowball Run: Evangel Classical Christian School, 423 Thompson Road, Alabaster, will hold its Snowball Run 5K, 10K and 1-mile Fun Run on Jan. 14 at 8 a.m. Proceeds will benefit ECCS. Early registration by Jan. 10. Cost is $25 for 5K and 10K; $15 for Fun Run.

After Jan. 10, cost is $30 for 5K and 10K; $20 for Fun Run. Visit Evangelclassical.org/ snowball to register.

Jan. 10

Global Wok Cooking: Stir fry is going global with Rose Nguyen of Rose’s Dinner Bowl’s internationally inspired wok menu at Birmingham Bake and Cook at 5921 Valleydale Road, No. 125 in Birmingham. Rose’s menu - Vietnamese lemongrass chicken with vegetables, classic pad Thai and shrimp fried rice with Chinese sausage — will immerse you in the process, techniques and equipment of wok cooking, including how to turn everyday classics into vegetarian dishes. The class will be held Jan. 10 from 6:30-9 p.m. For more information, call 980-3661 or visit Birminghambake andcookco.com.

Jan. 17

Biscuits and Scones: Rebecca Touliatos of Hoffman Media will demystify both biscuits and scones - a classic buttermilk biscuit and a wweet potato biscuit, a cut cranberry

orange scone and a toasted pecan drop scone will round out the menu. The class will be held Tuesday, Jan. 17 from 6:30-9 p.m. at Birmingham Bake and Cook. Registration is $35. For more information, call 980-3661 or visit Birminghambake andcookco.com.

Jan. 19

Pasta and Polenta: Join Chef Gray Byrum for a demonstration and dinner at Saint Vincent’s One Nineteen. Gray will be making homemade pasta and ravioli plus some other Italian fare. If you haven’t tried this class, bring a bottle of wine and a friend to share in the health of good eating. Nursery provided with advance registration. The dinner is scheduled for Jan. 19 from 6:30-8 p.m. Admission is $25 per person. Call 408-6550 for more information and to register. St. Vincent’s One Nineteen is located at 7191 Cahaba Valley Road in Hoover.

Jan. 19

One Pie at a Time: During the course of baking 36 separate yet equal pies and


Out & About pie crusts, over the past year Susan Green has discovered much about herself, pie crust and pie making in general. She will make her three favorite pies from this past year and share with you everything that she has learned, including various crusts, mixing and rolling techniques, time and temperature guidelines, what cookbooks can, will and/or don’t tell you. This class will be held from 6-9 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 19 at Birmingham Bake and Cook. Registration is $40. For more information, call 980-3661 or visit Birminghambake andcookco.com.

Jan. 24

The Art of Indian Curry Making: Mukta Joshi will lead this class, which includes a basic overview of Indian foods, India’s spices and herbs, the health benefits of Indian cuisine and India’s vast and complex regional culinary diversity. Curry making techniques are explored through discussion, demonstration and the tasting of some well-known curries, including Gobhi Gazar Matar (Cauliflower, Carrots and Peas) Masala and Paneer Makhani, served

with Cumin Rice. This class will be held from 6:30-9 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 24 at Birmingham Bake and Cook. Registration is $40. For more information, call 980-3661 or visit Birminghambake andcookco.com.

Jan. 25

GSCC Annual meeting: The Greater Shelby Chamber of Commerce will install new officers at its annual meeting on Jan. 25. The speaker will be announced at a later date. The event will take place from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Pelham Civic Complex at 500 Amphitheater Road in Pelham. Tickets costs $17 for chamber members and $25 for other guests. Visit Shelbychamber.org or call 663-4542 to register.

Jan. 25

CPR for Family and Friends: This course is a classroom-based, practicewhile-you-watch DVD and instructor-facilitated program on how to perform the basic skills of CPR in adults, children and infants and how to help an adult, child or infant who is choking. It is designed for parents, family members, friends, older siblings

and babysitters age 11 and older, who want to learn CPR but do not need a course certification card. Call Dial-A-Nurse at 9397878 to register. The class will be held Jan. 25 from 6-8:30 p.m. at St. Vincent’s One Nineteen. Class size is limited. Registration is $20 per person.

Jan. 26

Pizza dough class: Susan Green and Melanie Thorn will demonstrate a pizza dough recipe that is so versatile that it can be used to make not only ovenbaked pizza, but pizza on the grill, hand-held calzones, authentic Sicilian stromboli and super-versatile focaccia. The class will be held Thursday, Jan. 26 from 6:309 p.m. at Birmingham Bake and Cook Company. Cost is $40. Call 980-3661 to register.

Jan. 28

Grandparenting — Making It Grand: This is a fun and informative interactive class for expectant grandparents. Class discussion will include a review of normal newborn characteristics, safety guidelines for home and car, and some do’s and don’ts for 21st century grandparents.

The class will be held Jan. 28 from 1:30-3:30 p.m. at Saint Vincent’s One Nineteen. Registration is $10 per couple. Call Dial-A-Nurse at 939-7878.

Feb. 4

Supersitters: This class teaches boys and girls ages 11 and older about the basics of childcare. Topics include: Childcare - An Awesome Responsibility; developmental and age appropriate activities and interests; basic techniques, including feeding, bathing and dressing; and safety. The class will be held from 9 a.m. to noon Feb. 4 at St. Vincent’s One Nineteen. Registration is $20 per person. To register, call Dial-A-Nurse at 9397878.

Feb. 4

Safe At Home: This class is for boys and girls ages 11 and older who might be home alone or caring for a brother or sister while parents are away. Topics include basic first aid and practicing safe behavior in the home. The class will be held from 1-3 p.m. on Feb. 4 at St. Vincent’s One Nineteen. Registrations is $10 per person. Call DialA-Nurse at 939-7878.

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Why I LOVE Shelby County

Wes Helms: MLB player finds a home

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Written by brad gaskins Photograph by JON GOERING

  es Helms may be a free agent in Major League Baseball, but there’s no doubt about where he and his family choose to live. The Gastonia, N.C. native lives in Shelby County with his wife and kids. When the grueling professional baseball schedule gives him a break, Helms spends his time enjoying time with his family, and giving back to Shelby County a place he said he’s proud to call home.

Q: Why did you choose to live in Shelby County, and what do you enjoy most about living here? A: I chose Shelby County to live in because my family and I wanted to live on a lot of land. My wife and I have always wanted to have room for our kids to play and grow up outdoors. Shelby County is perfect because we can have land but we can also be close to great schools. I love the community and the convenience of being in the country but having the opportunity to be close to great stores and dining. Q: Who inspired you to get to where you are today, and why? A: My father inspired my to get to where I am at today because he raised me to be a Christian man and to work extremely hard at everything I laid my hand on. Q: Why is it important for you to give back to the Shelby County community by holding baseball camps? A: It is important for

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me to give back by holding a baseball camp because I feel it is God’s plan for me. I have a lot of knowledge about the game of baseball. God blessed me with a gift to be talented in the sport and to excel in the sport. I feel it is my obligation to God to give back to kids and young men the knowledge I have in the game. I also want to raise money for the people in the community and the world that are not as fortunate as we are. Q: What is the most memorable moment you’ve had playing professional baseball? A: The most memorable moment I have had in baseball is when I made it to the Major Leagues. That day was the day it all came together for me. All the hard work, all the sweat, all the pain, all the heart and all the time I had put in to become the best I could be in my profession. Q: What’s the toughest part of being a professional baseball player? A: The toughest part

about being a professional baseball player is having to say no sometimes. I want to please everyone, but I can’t always. I have to say no sometimes when asked to do things because I have a family to raise and love. It really gets to me when I can’t do something for someone or help someone when asked to do. Q: As an aspiring young baseball player, what player did you look up to the most, and why? A: As a young player I always looked up to Greg Maddux. He was always so focused and so driven to be the best he could be. He was always studying the game inside and out. He always tried to help me as a

young player when I played with him. He taught me that mental toughness is way more important than physical strength. Q: What is your favorite book, and why? A: My favorite book is “The Inner Athlete.” I love this book because it teaches how to think mentally in sports and how to be positive minded all the time. Q: What is your favorite food? A: My favorite food is steak or BBQ. I love cooking it as well as eating it. l See more of Wes Helms’ answers online at Shelbyliving.com.


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Shelby Living January 2012  

Shelby Living January 2012

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