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Montevallo Frostbite November 2012 • $4.95

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3

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November 3-4, 2012

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From the Editor

I

t’s a crisp, cool day in mid-September as I write this letter. For the last four weeks, I’ve focused on fall activities and Thanksgiving! I’ve even worked ahead on our December issue. I’ve always struggled with that aspect of magazine publishing. How do you get in the holiday spirit when it’s still warm enough to go for a swim? Luckily, I don’t have to look far to find reasons to be thankful this year. In fact, working so far ahead serves as a terrific reminder that I don’t have to wait for a certain day or time of year to give thanks. This year, I’m thankful for my loving husband, our rambunctious cat, a fulfilling job and my relationships with my family and friends. Here’s hoping this magazine helps you find reasons to be thankful to live in Shelby County. Here’s a little sampler of our November issue. uSusan Green of Birmingham Bake and Cook shared recipes for three side dishes that are guaranteed to spice your Thanksgiving feast. I was lucky enough to try all three recipes during our photo shoot, and they are fantastic. uShelby County is home to three fantastic wineries and there are rumors a fourth will open in the future. uChelsea residents Josh and Wendy Torres have created a wonderful way to let even young children in on football fun. The couple wrote several books, based on the children’s rhyme “This Little Piggy,” with a fun SEC-inspired twist. Make sure to buy a copy for your budding quarterback at your local bookstore. As always, contact me if you have any questions, comments or story ideas. Happy Thanksgiving!

Katie McDowell, Editor

Katie.McDowell@ShelbyLiving.com

ON THE COVER Charles Brammer Jr. owns Morgan Creek Vineyards in Harpersville with his parents, Charles and Mary Brammer.

Cover design: Daniel Holmes Photography: Jon Goering

editor’s note: The “Best Farmers Market” category was left out of the 2012 Best of the Best article in October. Congratulations to Helena Market Days. All winners of the 2012 Best of the Best contest will receive a certificate from Shelby Living this fall. Shelby Living employees will distribute the certificates to the winners.

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SHELBY Living editorial Katie McDowell Amy Jones Neal Wagner Christine Boatwright Mickel Ponthieux contributors Lisa Phillips David Butler Laura Brookhart production Daniel Holmes Jamie Sparacino Amy Baldis Jon Goering marketing Alan Brown Sloane Hudson Thomas LaBoone Nicole Loggins Rhett McCreight Meagan Mims Diane Fant LaShan Johnson Tracy Jones administration Tim Prince Jan Griffey Mary Jo Eskridge Hailey Dolbare Annie McGilvray

Shelby Living is published monthly by Shelby County Newspapers Inc., P.O. Box 947, Columbiana, AL 35051. Shelby Living is a registered trademark. All contents herein are the sole property of Shelby County Newspapers Inc. [the Publisher]. No part of this periodical may be reproduced without written permission from the Publisher. Please address all correspondence (including but not limited to letters, story ideas and requests to reprint materials) to: Editor, Shelby Living, P.O. Box 947, Columbiana, AL 35051. Shelby Living is mailed to select households throughout Shelby County, and a limited number of free copies are available at local businesses. Please visit Shelbyliving.com for a list of those locations. Subscriptions are available at a rate of $12 for one year by emailing subscribe@shelbyliving.com, or calling (205) 669-3131, ext. 21. Advertising inquiries may be made by emailing advertise@shelbyliving.com, or by calling (205) 669-3131, ext. 11.


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in every issue 7

the simple life Making use of your “ah-ha moments”

8

short stories Local teens talk politics on Nickelodeon

58

shelby spotted Paws for a Cause, Grape Stomp and more

80

out & about November events in Shelby County

82

why i loVe shelby county American Village’s Tom Walker shares his memories

34 30

arts & culture 12

reading room Carol Smith shares her book recommendations

14

this little company Chelsea couple adapts nursery rhyme in new books

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November 2012

5


features 16

simple holiday workouts No time for the gym? No problem.

18

Do you want a whiter smile? Tips for treating and preventing stains

20

on the trail of wine Shelby County is home to three wineries

28

The thrill of the hunt Hunting season begins

30

putting through the air Disc golf players celebrate rapid growth of the sport

34

the wild side of shelby county Bugs, beetles and butterflies

39

20 82

home & food 39

classic colonial Couple brings New England charm to Mt Laurel home

46

5 outdoor objects Keep your yard looking colorful throughout the year

48

quintessential comfort Main Street Tavern: A meeting place for Montevallo

54

a twist on tradition Try these savory sides to spice up your Thanksgiving spread

28

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The Simple Life

Ah-ha Moments

Y

ou know what that means – those thoughts that cross your mind that have you thinking, “Duh, why didn’t I think of that?” It’s usually those seconds that have you wondering why something so simple is just now making it into your brain. “Ah-ha moments” are comprised Lisa Phillips, of a basic idea that is so super easy owner of SimpleWorks, it frequently causes embarrassment lisa_phillips@bellsouth.net, because of its simplicity. 981.7733 uStore bed linens inside one of the pillowcases. Keep sets of sheets together for storage and they become easy to identify. uMuffin tins. Perfect for condiments at a cookout. Use them to hold stuffed peppers while baking. uKoozies. Keep them in your car cup holders to keep your drinks from sweating. uPaint. Put a dab of the wall paint on the back of the light switch cover and use a Sharpie to write the name. So easy to remember the paint color this way. uZiplock bags. Perfect for leftovers. Stores easier in a refrigerator versus a plastic container. Use them when packing small items or complete outfits for children. Cut a hole in the corner to make an icing bag for cake decorating. Use to store a wet paint brush while taking a break. Great for individual craft projects. uDryer lint. Makes a great fire starter for your camping trips. uDryer sheets. Place in stinky shoes, closets or even under the car seat as an easy way to freshen a stale environment. uCinnamon. Pour a small amount on your counter tops to keep ants from invading your kitchen. uWhistle. Put a referee’s whistle around the neck of a bedridden patient. You can hear their need for help all over the house. uCork. Use slices of cork to level uneven legs on a table or chair. Even works for a spur of the moment pin cushion. Use a piece for a protective tip on an ice pick. uVelcro. For drying golf gloves, attach a strip of Velcro on the roof or windshield post on a golf cart. uContainerize. Use silverware divider trays in the bathroom, workshop or office desk. uNail polish. Color code tool accessories so you know what part goes with what tool. None of these ideas are original, yet they are ones that causes even someone who is in the “simple business” to have an “ah-ha moment.” It’s that simple!l

“Ah-ha moments” are comprised of a basic idea that is so super easy it frequently causes embarrassment because of its simplicity.

November 2012

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Short Stories &

UM ranks high The University of Montevallo continues to receive accolades through the rankings of “America’s Best Colleges,” published by U.S. News & World Report. According to the 2013 edition, UM ranked as the numberone public master’slevel university in Alabama, a distinction it has held each year since 2008. For 2013, Montevallo was listed as the 14th best public university in the south in its division and 37th overall in the south, up 22 spots from its 2007 ranking. Montevallo was also recognized as one of the top four southern universities that graduates students with the lowest average debt loads. Montevallo earned high marks for academic reputation, freshman retention rate, graduation rate, entering freshmen test scores and class rank, small class sizes and low student-faculty ratio. — From staff reports

Fogle wins SCAC show Saginaw resident Joanne Fogle won Best of Show at the Shelby County Arts Council’s fourth-annual Juried Art Show on Sept. 6. Fogle’s winning piece was an oil painting titled “Woods in Winter.” Fogle received a $500 cash award and a solo exhibit tentatively scheduled for May 2013 at the SCAC gallery. More than 50 pieces for the 2012 Juried Art Show, and they were judged by Gar Chapman, honorary juror from the University of Alabama at Birmingham’s art department. Other winners include: uLaura Brookhart, Best of Photography, “Daylily Frenzy.” uJanet Sanders, Best of 2-D Mixed Media, “Black Bamboo.” uChristopher J. Bissett, Best of Printmaking, “Chawan.” uSylvie Popov, Best of Ceramics, “Ms. Green.” uStephanie Dunkin, Best of 3-D Mixed Media, “Farmhouse Totem.” uMartha Fulgham, Best of Watercolor, “Trillium.” uElaine Mayes, Best of Acrylic, “Like Minded.”

uDeAnne Thorn, Best of Oil, “Industrial Focus.” uJerry Slayton, Best of Drawing, “Moonie Text.” — From staff reports

Local teens talk politics on Nickelodeon show Two local teenagers recently appeared on the Nickelodeon show “Kids Pick the President.” Jaylan Jacobs, 14, and MyKailah Thompson, 13, who served as counselors in training at Montevallo’s Boys and Girls Club this summer, both appeared on the show, which features kids’ thoughts on the presidential candidates on specific issues, including same-sex marriage, health care, employment and education. Jacobs, a Calera resident who attends Indian Springs School, commented during the health care and employment portions of the show. “I believe it is not the role of the federal

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government to create jobs. I believe it is more to create more opportunities for private businesses to create jobs,” Jacobs said during the program. During the program, Thompson, a student at Montevallo Middle School, commented during the tax portion. “I don’t think rich people are richer just because they work harder than poor people. Poor people work just as hard,” she said. To view “Kids Pick the President,” visit News.nick.com. — Christine Boatwright

Jacobs and Thompson


VIS Librarian Mary W. Foy and students

Reading their way to a record The world record book is one of the most checked-out books at Valley Intermediate School’s library. Next year, VIS students may see their own names in the book. Students at the school made the top 20 in the Scholastic Summer Challenge, which secured them a spot in the 2013 Scholastic Book of World Records. Through the voluntary challenge, which was

sponsored by the Scholastic book company, kids got a chance to choose their own books to read throughout the summer. The kids logged their reading hours from MayAugust and turned them in upon returning to school. When VIS faculty members tallied up the school’s summer reading minutes, they totaled more than 1 million, which put them in 11th place. — neal wagner

A Gingerbread Christmas... for Pre-K through Kindergarten! Step into the pages of a Colonial Christmas storybook! Call today to make your reservation.

Meet George n’s gto Washin ughter a d d n gra Nelly!

Program dates: Dec. 3-7; 10-14, 17-18 9:30-11:00 or 11:30-1:00

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Students change lives in Honduras A group of students from Calera High School visited Honduras on a humanitarian trip this summer. The students, who are part of an engineering program at their school, traveled

to the impoverished country in order to deliver basic utility vehicles (BUVs) and prosthetic legs they developed as part of their class. — from staff reports

for stu de chape nts & rones Free k o o b coloring h for eac child

Sing Carols, hear Christmas stories, and make cookies!

Call (205) 665-3535 or 1-877-811-1776 (ext. 1062) or email javerett@americanvillage.org WWW.AMERICANVILLAGE.ORG

November 2012

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Arts & Culture

The

educator Story and photographs by LAURA BROOKHART

as artist

Lazenby works on a piece at his studio. His work has been featured at area showhouses, Birmingham Home & Garden magazine and Faux Effects World Magazine.

“A

good teacher does not teach his students to imitate, but rather helps and guides the student through the process of finding their own style. You should teach them as if they are going to be better than you are so they can carry it to another level,” Rik Lazenby

maintains. “The teacher should pass the knowledge on; sharing the talent is what it is all about.” After 32 years in education as art teacher, principal and administrator, Rik Lazenby had a desire to change directions. “For an artist, it can be a tough old world, so I was looking to find work I could financially survive on.” In 2000, he started Lazenby’s Decorative Arts Studio in Mt Laurel. The company offers a range of faux finishes, Italian and Venetian plasters and other finishes. “I have long advised students to train with the best,” Lazenby said. Lazenby followed his own advice. He studied with Martin Alan Hirsch in Louisville; the School of Italian Plasters in Georgia; and

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the Doyle Self School of Italian Plasters in Dallas. In 2004, Lazenby received Advanced Certification at Safra Decoration Academy, which he said was one of the premier manufacturers of authentic Italian plasters in Verona, Italy. In 2006, Lazenby was joined by his daughter, Jennifer LazenbyBlanton. While seeking studio space, he was approached by Linda Williams, a former community educator, who suggested the 83-year-old former Shades Crest Elementary School building – a structure in poor repair that the community wished to see saved. Lazenby’s Decorative Arts Studio was one of the first to occupy Artists on the Bluff, now an artist community and Alabama Nonprofit Arts Education Corporation sponsored by the city of Hoover and Hoover City School System. Lazenby also took on the role of director at Artists on the Bluff, thus his time and energy have been devoted to multiple tasks over the past year leading up to the official grand opening in October. But, he notes with a smile, “I’d rather be doing this at my present age than piddling in the garden.” In addition to decorative finish classes, this fall Lazenby returns to teaching his first love, painting.


Blue Phrog Gallery

Lynn McCary made the ceramic vase in this niche.

“Many years ago, I was lying in bed late one night listening to a bird sing outside my window and my mind wondered ‘What is that bird doing up?’” Lazenby tells that he wrote about the experience and what came to him was “that bird is different; that’s a night bird; that bird flies in its own way.” “It has its own gifts and talents and it is moving through life in a different dimension than other birds. And there are other night birds out there and occasionally their paths cross and at some point one passes his or her gift off to another.” In all of Lazenby’s paintings you will see a night bird. At Artists on the Bluff, Lazenby is also enthused to have in the studio and now be certified with paints by Maison Blanche. Their product, La Craie (French for ‘the chalk’), produces a soft, smooth finish that distresses well and can be covered with Cire d’Antiques, a wax sealer and finish. Lazenby emphasizes that even in a one-day faux finish class, one can learn a lot. His painting/mixed media classes begun in September are ongoing – students can enroll at any point. Contact: 281-273 or learn more at Lazenbystudio.com. l

November 2012

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Arts & Culture

Reading Room: Carol Smith Reading Recommendations the invention of hugo cabret I realize that I am the adult fiction librarian, but I cannot let this book, written by Brian Selznick, go by unmentioned. After all the hoopla died down – it won the Caldecott back in 2008 – I finally read this. It turned out to be my hands-down favorite book I’ve read this year. Very original. Half the story is told in pictures and the other half in words. I even recommend this one to older people who would appreciate the fact that it involves one of the earliest film makers, Georges Melies.

C

Photograph by jon goering

arol Smith is a librarian in the adult services department of the Albert L. Scott Library in Alabaster. Smith received a bachelor’s degree in psychology from UAB and a master’s degree in library services from the University of Alabama. The Vestavia native lived in Alabaster for 12 years but now lives in Chilton County. Smith is married and has a daughter who attends Kingwood Christian School.

q. why do you love to read? a. I love to read because it helps me relax at night before I go to sleep. Also, it distracts me from the everyday drama of real life. q. what’s the first book you remember loving? a. I remember loving “The Sneetches and Other Stories” by Dr. Seuss. I liked one of the other stories in the collection called “What Was I Scared Of?” – It’s about a pair of pale green pants with nobody inside them. q: what are your favorite genres? a. I love many different kinds of books. I read some of the classics for comfort – like Jane Austen. I like humorous books and stories – ones that really make me laugh out loud – P.G. Wodehouse is one of

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my favorites in that category. I like the Harry Potter books and the Percy Jackson and the Olympians books. I still love children’s picture books. I love to look at their artwork. Since I am responsible for the adult fiction books, I must say I like British cozy mysteries and I recently checked out a couple of Steampunk fantasy books. q: why did you decide to pursue a literary career? a. I worked at the Little Professor bookstore in Homewood for a while when I was in college at UAB and I just loved it. I loved the smell of new books and seeing people smile when they got the books they were looking for. It’s a service that I enjoy providing – connecting people with the books they want.

time and again This is sort of a cult classic written by Jack Finney, who wrote “Invasion of the Body Snatchers.” Basically, it’s a time-travel romance that was published in 1970. The text is enhanced with some vintage pictures of New York City, specifically The Dakota luxury apartment building. John Lennon fans will remember that that is where he lived and where he was killed. It’s just a good fantasy story that is very well told while somehow still sort of being realistic.


November 2012

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ok from y! o b a Win pan m o C tle tle his Lit This Lit

Arts & Culture T

“ opy of away. has a c ant” to give g in iv L h tie Shelby is Little Elep ail Editor Ka de Th m clu “ e in o d t e n s s a r a Tiger” st two reade e books. Ple le of the The fir ill receive th ss and the tit ader. ell w er re ddre McDow e, mailing a ly one book p n m a O n your ld like. ou wou book y

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This Little Company Written by katie mcdowell | Photographs by jon goering

N

ew parents can forgive Josh Torres for forgetting the words to “This Little Piggy.” It’s hard to remember the words to an English nursery rhyme when you’ve been tasked with entertaining your infant child. Besides, “This Little Piggy” has been around for centuries – at least since 1728 – and it was probably time for a little updating anyway. So, he improvised. “Josh couldn’t remember the words, and he likes creating his own things. He started making up words,” his wife, Wendy, recalled. That was in March 2010 when the Chelsea couple’s firstborn, Madison, who is now 3, was still a baby. The piggy became a tiger or an elephant. The animals also found much more interesting places to visit, rather than the market or staying home. Instead, they visited other animals that anyone who watches College GameDay would recognize. This little elephant rode a razorback, while this little tiger caught a bulldog. Other mascots that make appearances include the University of Florida’s gator, South Carolina’s gamecock and LSU’s Bengal tiger. “The (rhymes) all revolve around college mascots doing something to other college mascots and ending up in their home stadium,” Josh explained. The rhymes caught on in their house, and other friends loved the idea when the Torreses shared it. One night in July 2010, Wendy told Josh, a Birmingham attorney who was in the Marines for 10 years, they should try to get their nursery rhymes published. He initially balked at the idea, but a month later, he submitted their manuscripts to Mascot Books, Inc., a Virginia-based publishing company. A company representative contacted the couple right away, and the Torreses founded This Little Company. While Mascot Books liked the book concept, there was still work to do. “We were only doing one foot, so (the book) was five pages,” Wendy said. “They came back and said they wanted it to be longer and wanted all 10 toes.” They played around with the wording until they were pleased with the final product. They also worked with illustrator Charr Floyd on the book’s images. They wanted the characters to be recognizable as the actual mascots for each team. “Learning the process of getting a book published took a lot longer than we expected,” Josh said. In the fall of 2010, “This Little Tiger,” featuring Auburn University’s Aubie as the main character, was published. “This Little Elephant,” featuring Big Al from the University of Alabama, followed soon after, as well as “This Little Bulldog,” featuring Uga from the University of Georgia. The first three characters were easy to pick. Josh received his bachelor’s degree from Auburn University and attended law school at the University of Alabama. Wendy attended the University of Georgia. Sales for the book reached several hundred dollars by the end of that year and have since broken several thousand. The books, which cost $14.95 each, are available online at Amazon, Books-A-Million and Barnes and Noble. They’re also available in local boutiques, including Fireflies and Fairytales and Favorite Laundry, and other stores, including several in Auburn. The Torreses, who welcomed a second daughter, Olivia, this spring, hope to expand This Little Company’s products to include puzzles and other games. l November 2012

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Simple holiday

workouts No time for the gym? That’s no problem.

Written by KATIE MCDOWELL | Contributed photographs

T

he holidays are here, along with family gatherings, shopping trips and mouth-watering feasts. The busy holiday season often leaves people without the time to visit the gym. Brandon Harris, lead fitness specialist at St. Vincent’s One Nineteen Health and Wellness, shared a few exercise circuits that require little exercise equipment. You can do these on the road or in your own home or yard for those days you’re just too busy to make it to the gym.

Routine 1

Routine 2

Routine 3

3-5 circuits of: 10 push-ups 20 squats 30 sit-ups 40 jumping jacks

3-5 circuits of: Run - 400m as fast as you can 10 leg raises 10 flutter kicks 10 scissor kicks 10 reverse sit-ups

3-5 circuits of: 10 burpees 10 bird dogs (10 each side) 10 dead bugs (10 each side) 10 lunges (10 each leg) 30 seconds - 1 minute jumping jacks or jumping rope

uEnsure proper form while performing each exercise movement and try not to stop until the entire circuit is completed. uRest 30 seconds - 2 minutes max between each circuit.

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u*You will need room to run 400m. uEnsure proper form while performing each exercise movement and try not to stop until the entire circuit is completed. uRest 30 seconds - 2 minutes max between each circuit.

uEnsure proper form while performing each exercise movement and try not to stop until the entire circuit is completed. uRest 30 seconds - 2 minutes max between each circuit.


Page 16: You don’t have to visit a gym to get in a good workout. ABOVE:Fitness specialists from St. Vincent’s One Nineteen suggest breaking a sweat in your own home or yard.

Glossary Leg raises – Lay flat on your back. Raise both legs to a 45-degree angle for one count, then return to starting position. Flutter kicks - Lay flat on your back. Raise your left leg to a 45-degree angle, while keeping the right leg stationary. Next, raise the right leg to a 45-degree angle, while moving your left leg to the starting position. Scissor kicks – Lay flat on your back. Raise legs to about a 45-degree angle or to the point that your back starts to rise off the floor. Spread your legs wider than hip-width distance. Swing your legs back in, allowing your right leg to cross over your left leg. Swing both legs back to their starting position and repeat with your left leg crossing above your right. Reverse sit-ups – Lay flat on your back. Flex your knees and raise them into the air (toward your head) by crunching your abs. Burpees – Begin in a standing position, bend your knees and take a squatting position with your hands on the ground. Extend your feet back in one motion to assume a plank position. Return to a squatting position, then jump straight into the air. Bird dogs – Kneel on the floor with hands placed about shoulder width apart. Raise one arm and the opposite leg so they’re pointing straight out from your body while balancing on the other hand and knee. Hold for 10 seconds, then return to ground position. Dead bugs - Start by lying flat on your back, arms by your sides, hips and knees bent and feet flat on the floor. To start, tighten your abdominal muscles and press your lower back against the floor. At the same time, extend and straighten your right leg forward and lift and extend your left arm behind your head. Hold them parallel to the floor, but not touching with the floor. Return your leg and arm to the starting position and repeat with your left and right arm.

Here we GROW again! Henderson & Walton Women’s Center is excited to announce our new satellite office in Chelsea! The physicians you know and trust at our main office in Birmingham will now be coming to YOU in Chelsea. They bring with them the excellence you have come to expect—healthcare that is delivered in a personal, considerate, sensitive and knowledgeable manner. Give us a call at (205) 678-8093 to set up an appointment in our Chelsea office and meet our physicians.

398 Chesser Drive, Suite 3 | Chelsea, AL 35043

ma aba Al

Baby & Child Maga zin e’s

2012

ma aba Al

Baby & Child Maga zin e’s

2012

Exercise definitions provided by Livestrong.com and About.com. November 2012

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Show your team spirit!

DO YOU WANT A WHITER SMILE?

Tips for treating and preventing stains

W

More than 30 colors of mesh in stock

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Written by katie mcdowell Contributed photographs

hat do red wine, cigarettes and root canals have in common? They can all stain your teeth. But don’t fear – the market is now full of products, both over-the-counter and in-patient, to give people a whiter teeth. That’s lucky for those who, whether through vice or circumstance, find themselves with a dingy smile. However, deciding how to whiten your teeth and how to prevent future stains can be overwhelming given the large number of options available. There are two types of dental stains: intrinsic and extrinsic. Extrinsic stains are surface stains that are usually caused by drinks or behaviors. “The most common (cause) is food. It can be coffee, wine, anything with vibrant colors,” Calera dentist Dr. John Allen Baggett said. Smoking or chewing tobacco can also cause external stains to your teeth. Intrinsic stains go below the surface. One cause of intrinsic stains is tetracycline, an antibiotic. If a woman uses tetracycline while pregnant, her child will often have stained teeth. “If they had a root canal or trauma to the tooth, that can cause stains as well,” said Dr. Kelli Albritton of Albritton and Ardovino Family Dentistry in Alabaster. In the case of a root canal, the tooth is cut off from its blood supply, which causes it to dehydrate and become stained. Dr. Trent Buchanan, a dentist with Greystone Smile Design, said all teeth will stain, and the severity depends on time – older teeth typically have more severe stains – and amount – how much vibrantly colored food or drink a person consumes. Buchanan said older people are more likely to have stubborn stains. Younger teeth are more porous, which makes them easier to bleach. “That’s why a lot of older people say, ‘I can’t bleach my teeth,’” Buchanan said. Whitening treatments range widely in both intensity and price, from about $30 for over-the-counter options to several hundred dollars or more for in-office procedures. Baggett’s office offers a take-home whitening kit and Zoom, a light-activated bleach procedure that is done in the office. The client comes in for three or four sessions for a total of about one to one-and-a-half hours of bleaching. Greystone Smile Design offers Deep Bleaching by Kor, in addition to chemical, light-activated and take-home tray bleaching. The Deep Bleaching system focuses on opening the pores of the teeth to treat the stains. For a client with regular stains, the system includes about two weeks of at-home, overnight bleaching using bleach and trays made by Kor, followed by an in-office bleaching. Buchanan said the company creates


ABOVE: Teeth whitening options have advanced in recent years.

trays that are more accurate and seal onto the individual teeth, which prevents saliva from breaching the trays and deactivating the bleach. Albritton and Ardovino also offer both take-home trays and in-office bleaching. Albritton said she stresses that clients should come in for a check-up before they begin any whitening regimen. “They really need to have a comprehensive exam first,” she said. “You don’t want to whiten if you have active decay or other issues that need to be treated.” In-office bleaching uses a higher percentage of bleach, which can cause sensitivity for some people. Albritton said using a prescription fluoride toothpaste for two weeks prior to a bleaching will decrease sensitivity. Buchanan said over-the-counter whitening kits available at grocery stores also work well. In fact, he’s written about the topic and other dentistry questions online at BirminghamAlabamaTeethWhitening.com. Buchanan said the delivery technique is the biggest disadvantage of over-the-counter kits, which are typically strips or paint-on and allow saliva to deactivate the whitening agent. However, since the over-the-counter whitening strips and trays are intended to be used daily for short periods of time, often for 30 minutes or less, this isn’t always an issue. “The store-bought stuff that’s hydrogen peroxide is going to work way better because it’s so fast,” he said. In another blog post, Buchanan said he addressed whether or not teeth can be too white. Based on studies he reviewed, he found that most people didn’t think teeth could be too white, unless that person has veneers. Based on his own experience, he has found that the desire for white teeth isn’t restricted to one age group or demographic. “We have a space on our form that (clients) fill out that asks, ‘Are you interested in getting your teeth white?’” he said. “Nearly everybody says yes.” l November 2012

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On

the

trail of wine Shelby County is home to three of the 14 vineyards on Alabama’s Wine Trail. Visit Vizzini Farms Winery, Morgan Creek Vineyards or Ozan Vineyards and Celllar for a relaxing afternoon of good drinks and good company. 20

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Written by Katie Mcdowell | Photographs by jon goering

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n a Saturday afternoon in September, Morgan Creek Vineyards in Harpersville was packed with visitors. Hundreds of people came from across the state and even the country for the winery’s annual Grape Stomp. They spent the day picking their own grapes, tasting wine, stomping grapes and listening to the live band. About 30 miles away in Calera, a smaller but no less enthusiastic group of people sipped wine while enjoying the view overlooking the vineyards at Ozan Winery. Meanwhile, patrons enjoyed lunch and wine at Vizzini Farms Winery, also located in Calera. Shelby County is home to three of the 14 wineries on the Alabama Wine Trail. Morgan Creek, Vizzini and Ozan offer visitors from Shelby County and beyond a chance to taste locally made wine. While their wines are sold at retail outlets across the country, visitors to their Shelby County locations can

experience a full-day of activities, which include wine tastings, train excursions, meals and more. As one of a small number of wineries across the state, Shelby County’s wineries are playing a big role in defining what it means to be a winery in the Deep South. Rumors of a fourth Shelby County began circulating this year, but Charles Brammer, owner of Morgan Creek Vineyards, welcomes the competition. “I’m really excited to have these other wineries in Shelby County,” he said. “Nobody would go to Napa if there was only one winery in Napa.” Ozan owner Burt Patrick said he would like to see the wineries in Alabama grow. Patrick visits wineries across the state for recreation and business and said they are beneficial to other state’s economies, such as North Carolina, which has more than 100 wineries. “The wineries are successful and provide jobs for the people,” he said. So, next time you have a free weekend, head out to one of Shelby County’s own wineries for a relaxing afternoon of good

Clockwise from top left: The setting sun washes a grapevine at Vizzini Farms in light. A young girl gives her friend a boost to reach grapes at Morgan Creek Vineyard. Morgan Creek displayed bottles of its wine on a barrel in its vineyard. Diners enjoy drinks and food at Vizzini’s. Bottles of wine line the gift shop at Ozan Vineyard and Cellars.

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Morgan Creek Vineyards 181 Morgan Creek Lane Harpersville, AL 35078

Clockwise from top left: A cheerful display welcomes guests to Morgan Creek. Several of Ozan’s wines have won awards, including Peach, 2010 Shelby Blanc and the 2008 Norton. The exterior of Vizzini Farms has an Italian feel.

wine in good company. Opened in 2000, Morgan Creek Vineyards is the oldest winery in Shelby County. Charles Brammer, who worked as an All-State agent for 37 years, owns and operates the winery with his wife, Mary, and son, Charles Jr. “All my life, I’ve been fascinated with wineries,” he said. “I’ve been wanting to open a winery for about 30-40 years.” Known for its muscadine wines, Morgan Creek also produces several fruit wines, including blueberry, apple and peach. The winery is located on 115 sprawling acres in Harpersville, although only eight acres are dedicated to the vineyards. While the company imports some of its fruit, all of the wine is produced and bottled onsite in Harpersville. During their first year of production, the Brammers sold 600 cases of wine. Now, they sell approximately 15,000 cases annually. Throughout the year, Morgan Creek Vineyards will produce about 18 or 19 different kinds of wine. “There’s one for everybody,” Brammer said. His favorite? “Whatever’s in my hand,” he said. Morgan Creek also hosts events throughout the year. In addition to the annual Grape Stomp, the winery hosts Music and Fireworks in the Vineyard, a concert series held throughout the spring and summer. The vineyard also hosts weddings, club events and group lunches. Morgan Creek, 181 Morgan Creek Lane, Harpersville, is open daily for free wine tastings and guided tours. For more information, visit Morgancreekwinery. com or call 205-672-2053.

Ozan Vineyard and Cellars 173 Highway 301 Calera, AL 35040

Located on a hillside in Calera, Ozan Vineyard and Cellars resembles a November 2012

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vineyard from Napa Valley or the Italian countryside. Owner Burt Patrick was raised in Shelby County, and he and his father live on the Calera property. They decided to open the vineyard in 2003. While Patrick did not have winery experience prior to opening Ozan, he has spent the last nine years educating himself on the latest practices and trends by visiting other wineries across the country. “If you have an interest, you pursue it and teach yourself about it,” he said. Patrick uses Norton grapes, which he said grow particularly well in North America. The winery is home to four acres of grapes – approximately three miles of vineyard rows. Ozan’s wines include traditional varieties, such as merlot, rose and chardonnay, as well as several fruit wines. The winery has won several awards in state and national contests over the years, including 2012 Gold Medals for its 2008 vintage of Norton and the 2010 vintage of Shelby Blanc. Ozan’s name comes from the Heart of Dixie Railroad, which features a stop on the winery’s property. “This was a miniature petticoat stop for the train,” he said. The railroad still makes regular stops at Ozan, which offers train excursions along with wine tastings and a gourmet box lunch on Saturdays. Ozan, which recently expanded its facility, also hosts weddings, events and wine tastings. “We try to provide a nice, unique setting for the people and meet their expectation of what an Alabama winery should be,” he said. Ozan Vineyard and Cellars, 173 Highway 301, Calera, is open on Fridays and Saturdays. For more information, call 205-668-6926 or visit Ozanwine. com.

Vizzini Farms Winery 800 Highway 87 Calera, AL 35040

Founded in 2005, Calera’s Vizzini Farms Winery is a place to have a glass of wine or a meal. Tom Vizzina, who opened Vizzini Farms Winery in November 2005 with partners Michael Cash and Teal Dick, has family roots in the winemaking

Left: Bottles of wine sit on display in Vizzini Farms Winery, where visitors can also enjoy a meal at the café. This page: A mother and son experience the old-fashioned method of making wine during Morgan Creek’s annual Grape Stomp.

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business. “Both of my grandfathers were winemakers in Sicily,” he said. According to Vizzina, his winery is the only one in the state with a restaurant. Vizzina said his son, who is a chef, helped him put together a menu. Tabatha Lawley, the winery’s event planner, said they make all of the wines at the winery. The winery offers a variety of options, including cabernet, chardonnay, riesling and more. Vizzini’s also carries a collegiate collection series, which features wine labels celebrating both the University of Alabama and Auburn University. The winery created award-winning wines in an international wine competition, where a handful of his entries won gold. Paulina, a black raspberry merlot, won silver in the competition. “I named it after my mother,” Vizzina said. “My grandfather made it on the farm.” Vizzini Farms Winery regularly holds special events, including live music and taste tastings. Vizzini Farms Winery is located at 800 Shelby County 87 in Calera, which is near the Shelby County Airport exit off Interstate 65. The winery itself is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. from Monday through Saturday. For more information, call 6850655 or visit Vizzinifarmswinery.com. l

n n n n

www

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hildrens

org/ on ussion


From left: Charles Brammer Jr. and his father, Charles Brammer Sr., own and operate Morgan Creek Vineyards. An Ozan employee pours a glass of wine for a visitor during a Saturday taste testing.

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The

thrill of the

HUNT Written by graham carr Photographs by jon goering

john champion

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or many Alabamians, the fall season signals more than the return of shorter days, chilly nights and tailgates. The changing of the leaves also marks the start of deer season. On Oct. 15 of every year, thousands of deer hunters enter the woods in Alabama for the first day of bow season. Hunting has long been popular in the South. According to the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, Alabama has more than 250,000 licensed hunters. Bill Justice, a Columbiana attorney, believes the reason so many Southerners hunt is that it offers an escape from their daily routine. It is more than sitting in the woods waiting to kill a deer, turkey or dove. “I haven’t killed a deer in three years,” he said. “I just enjoy getting out in the woods, seeing nature, seeing the sun come up and the birds wake up. The experience is what I like the most, whether I get something is just a bonus.” John Champion, who owns a private hunting club in Shelby County, echoed Justice’s sentiment. “It is very relaxing for me to get away from my day-today stuff,” he said. “It is all about the hunt. I don’t have to kill a deer every time I go out. If I did that, it would become boring.” For Justice, hunting is a family affair. His father taught him to hunt when he was 10 years old, and he has since passed it down to his own sons. Justice suspects this timehonored ritual is why hunting is so popular in the South. Today, most hunters do not have to be successful to feed their families, but hunting is so engrained in the culture that it is still passed down from generation to generation. Champion, however, did not follow this trend. He picked up the sport from friends and instantly fell in love with it.

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He has hunted in Shelby County for about 30 years. Champion now owns Wolf Creek Hunting Club, a private hunting club located just north of Columbiana. Champion believes hunting clubs make hunters feel like part of a community. “There is a lot of camaraderie and it is great to get to see guys that I haven’t seen all year,” Champion said. Justice prefers to hunt on his own land. He said he has nothing against joining clubs; it was just not the way he grew up. “Hunting was always a family activity and I am just in the habit, I guess,” he said. Other hunters, who do not own hunting land or do not want to pay to join a hunting club, can hunt at state-owned hunting lands. The public hunting land in Shelby County and Bibb County is the 27,894-acre Cahaba River Management Area Tract. While hunting was once primarily a man’s sport, the growth of women hunters has been noticeable in recent years. In the past 10 years, Champion said his club has had many women members. Whether male of female, every hunter is different in what and how he or she likes to hunt. Alabama hunting seasons include turkey, dove, quail, squirrel, raccoon, opossum, alligator, geese, turkey, ducks and more. Depending on the time of year, hunters can hunt with guns, bows or even dogs. “You never have a dull moment dog hunting,” Champion said. “It is just something about hearing the hounds running, while they are barking and hollering that gets your heart running about a hundred miles an hour.” Deer season is probably the most popular in the state, but turkey hunting also has a strong following. It opens every


bill justice and son year on March 15. Justice said he enjoys turkey hunting. He explained the stalking a turkey, compared to waiting for a deer to pass, is what makes it exciting. “If I hear the turkey gobbling, the blood pressure gets going,” Justice said. In recent years, technology has made hunting easier and more comfortable. While some hunters like these changes, Justice does not. He believes half of the fun of hunting is being out in nature with nothing but a gun and some cover. “I have never been comfortable with all this high-tech stuff such as food plots and air-conditioned hunting stands. It is like shooting cows,” he said. He believes using too much technology sometimes leads to hunters forgetting the reason why they are hunting. “It is like golf,” Justice said. “You have to remember you are hitting that little white ball because you are having fun, no matter how many times it doesn’t go the way you want it to. It is the same way with hunting.” Both men believe it is never too late to take up hunting. Champion said he has a club member in his early 50s who started hunting about eight years ago and loves it. He warned that for people to enjoy hunting, they have to go into it with realistic expectations. “If you expect to see deer every time out, you will be disappointed,” Champion said. “If you are trophy hunting and expect to see a trophy deer every time you go out, you will be disappointed.” Champion encourages hunters to take that advice and they will be rewarded because there is no such thing as a bad hunt, no matter if you kill something or not. “Everybody has a good hunting story,” he said. “I know it is great every time I go out.” l November 2012

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Putt ing

through the air Disc golf enthusiasts celebrate rapid growth of the sport

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Page 30: Disc golf holes are typically elevated and feature chains to catch the disc. ABOVE: A disc golfer takes a shot during the grand opening of the new Inverness disc golf course.

Written by NEAL WAGNER Photographs by JON GOERING

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any outdoor Frisbee enthusiasts spend their weekends searching out wide-open, grassy fields to let their discs soar through the air unobstructed. But for a group of local Frisbee enthusiasts, using discs to strike a metal basket lined with dangling chains in sometimes heavily wooded areas is the norm. Over the past several years, disc golf has grown “by leaps and bounds” not only in the Birmingham metropolitan area, but also across the nation. When Justin Littrell, a member of the Disc Golf Birmingham group, moved to Birmingham about 10 years ago, local options for the sport were limited. “Back then, there was only one course, and it was at George Ward Park in downtown Birmingham,” Littrell

said. “I grew up in Muscle Shoals, and I got interested in disc golf by playing at Veterans Park in Florence.” Today, the number of disc golf courses has grown significantly in the Birmingham area, with courses built in Trussville, Montevallo and Inverness over the past several years. The newest of these courses, which is located in the Inverness Nature Park off U.S. 280 in Hoover, was built as the result of a collaboration between Disc Golf Birmingham and the city of Hoover. When Disc Golf Birmingham members started looking for land for a new course on the northern end of Shelby County, the nature park immediately stuck out. “It just looked like a really good property,” Littrell said, noting the project kicked off when club members brought the idea to then-Hoover Mayor Tony Petelos. “It has a lot of elevation changes. We see this as a way to use land that has been under-utilized.” Disc Golf Birmingham board members

helped design the Inverness disc golf course, and the club raised the money necessary to construct it. The Hoover Parks and Recreation Department helped make the design a reality. A few days after construction on the course was completed in September, the club hosted its first InDiGo Open disc golf tournament, drawing players from all over the nation. “The Professional Disc Golf Association sanctions courses, and they have classified the Inverness course as a B-tier course. That’s a respectable size,” said North Shelby resident Richard Brown. “The tiers mean there’s a certain guaranteed level of payoff for professional disc golfers.” For Brown, the new Inverness course will give him a venue to practice his favorite sport just a few miles from home. But like many other local disc golfers, their passion for the sport is not confined to the Birmingham metro area. Because the equipment requirement for disc golf November 2012

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is minimal, it is easy to take everything necessary to play while traveling, Brown said. “I’ve probably played 100 courses in 25 states. It’s cheap, fun, quick entertainment,” Brown said. “I really enjoy meeting the locals when I play while I’m traveling. You can find a disc golf course just about everywhere now.” Brown said he is split between Zboaz Park in Ft. Worth and George Ward Park in Birmingham as his favorite courses in the country. “Zboaz just offers stark beauty with scrub oak and cacti on the course,” Brown said. “It’s just a real beautiful course. “But George Ward was my home course for a long, long time,” he added. “The course designers made very good use of the terrain there.” Much like a traditional golf course, disc golfers tee off from tee boxes designed for either amateur or professional players,

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IsÊ YourÊ ChildÊ ReachingÊ TheirÊ Ê Ê Ê Ê Ê Ê Ê Ê FullÊ Potential?Ê Could a hidden vision or sensory problem be holding your child back?

CLOCKWISE FROM FAR LEFT: Shelby County resident Richard Brown tees off during a tournament; Disc golf enthusiast Tony Hartman tees off; A detail shot of the assorted discs that disc golf enthusiasts take with them to tournaments like the one at InDiGo Park.

and attempt to throw their discs into a basketlike structure using as few throws as possible. While playing, disc golfers must use the right disc for the situation. Much like a bag of golf clubs, disc golfers often carry several discs designed for nearly every shot imaginable. “The drivers are always sharp discs that fly faster and longer. Mid-range discs are slower and more accurate and putters are blunt so you can use them over a short range,” Brown said. “Some of the discs have different aerodynamic designs so they will turn left or right when you throw them.” Even though experienced disc golfers often carry several discs when they play, a collection of discs is not necessary to play, Littrell said. “Disc golf is a great sport for any age level and any skill level,” Littrell said. “You can go out there with an $8 disc you just bought at Academy. The main thing is to just have fun.” l

Many children and adults struggle with undetected visual, listening, and sensory processing disruptions. These disruptions interfere with the brain’s ability to function efficiently, which will have a negative impact on reading and writing, attention and focus, behavior, social skills, and athletic performance. Snider Therapy utilizes individualized, drug-free therapy programs to address these interferences in brain function. The doctor and staff will tailor a program to address individual needs toward improving learning, listening, and fine motor skills. The following signs and symptoms are indicators of an undetected vision, listening, and sensory disruptions:            

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Wild of ShelbySide County The

Bugs, beetles and butterflies Story and photographs by DAVID BUTLER

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sk anyone who hikes, bikes or paddles around the Cahaba River about flying insects, and you’ll likely hear more than once about biting flies and pesky mosquitoes that often have visitors swatting and scratching. What are often overlooked in the tangle of branches and vines are both common and elusive flying insects that also call the Cahaba River and the woods that surround it home. One of these insects that people enjoy seeing is the Pipevine Swallowtail butterfly (Battus philenor), just one of many species of butterfly that can be found along the river as it searches for moisture. “You can often find clumps of

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butterflies on the banks of the river or small muddy pools in the woods,” said Anna Lyons, an Alabama butterfly enthusiast. “More often than not, I find several hanging around the same little puddles.” The Pipevine Swallowtail butterfly is a metallic bluish-black, and has a distinctive pattern of seven orange spots on the underside of its wings. And while the butterflies are beautiful, the caterpillars they come from are not near as appealing. “The first time I saw a Pipevine caterpillar, I knew it was trouble,” said Lyons, who has spent hours in Shelby County chasing butterflies. “I had never seen anything like them before, so I went home to read about them and learned that they were poisonous to most predators.”

The poison comes from the leaves of the plants that the caterpillars eat. Pipevine caterpillars only feed on leaves from the Pipevine or Aristolochia family of plants, which contain a poison that keeps most predators away. An example of such a plant is the Dutchman’s Pipe (Aristolochia macrophylla), which can be found in Shelby County. “They won’t eat anything else as caterpillars, but once they become butterflies, they feed on the nectar and help pollinate a variety of flowers,” says Lyons. And while most anyone can appreciate a butterfly peacefully floating through the woods, beetles don’t generally evoke the same emotion. “I have always really been interested in beetles, from the time I was a little


PAGE 34: The Pipevine Swallowtail butterfly often seeks moisture along the Cahaba River. TOP LEFT: The Pipevine caterpillar (Battus philenor) is poisonous to predators. TOP RIGHT: The Eyed Click beetle (Alaus oculatus) makes a clicking noise when threatened. ABOVE: Male Giant Stag Beetles have large jaws that are used to fight off other males in territorial battles.

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The Pipevine Swallowtail butterfly is a metallic bluish-black, and has a distinctive pattern of orange spots on the underside of its wings.

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kid,” said Ty Ennis, an Alabaster resident who has collected unusual insects for more than 20 years. “Most people think I’m a little nuts when I start talking about beetles, but they haven’t really thought much about them either.” One flying beetle that many people haven’t seen is the Eyed Click beetle (Alaus oculatus), which lives in wooded areas and is also called an Eyed Elater. “I think the click beetle was one of the first beetles that I got really interested in,” said Ennis. “I looked at it, and it seemed like it was looking right back at me,” As the name suggests, these beetles belong to a family of beetles (Elateridae) that make a clicking sound when alarmed. This mechanism is mainly used to scare away predators, but often works on curious people too. “I went to pick it up and it tucked all its legs into its body. Next thing I know, it had made this clicking noise and popped completely out of my hand,” laughed Ennis. “Nearly scared me to death.” Another beetle Ennis was surprised to find in Shelby County is the much larger Giant Stag Beetle (Lucanus elaphus), which can also be found along the river bank, usually beneath decaying wood during daylight hours. “I didn’t expect to see anything this weird in Alabama, or this large,” said Ennis. “But that was before I really knew much about the bugs that live here.” Although the large antlers look imposing, these mandibles, or jaws, are more likely to be used to fight off other males in territorial battles than to attack humans. As is usually the case with Stag beetles, the males are much larger than females, which don’t have the large jaws that make them look so fearsome. And because of the large size and high fat content of the Stag beetle, they make perfect food for bigger animals. “Beetles are an important link in the food chain,” said Ennis. “I have seen birds grab them right out of the sky.” So while mosquitoes and flies grab much of the attention, the next time you hike through the woods in Shelby County, take a look around and you are likely to see something strange, unusual or even beautiful flying through the trees. David Butler is a Hoover resident and the owner of Canoe the Cahaba in Helena. He is a naturalist, photographer, and lover of all things green. He can be reached at madrecycler@gmail.com. l

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Home & Food

Classic

Colonial Written by KATIE MCDOWELL | Photographs by JON GOERING

November 2012

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Couple brings New England charm to Mt Laurel home

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all it kismet, fate or destiny. Something more was at work to bring New Englanders Mike and Nancy Bonner to Mt Laurel. Their move to the South began several years ago with a phone call from Nancy’s sister, who lives in Florida. She wanted the Bonners to make a move South too and suggested Helen, Ga. “But she made a mistake and said Helena, Alabama,” Nancy recalled. The Bonners visited Helena and while they liked it, they didn’t think it was right for them. They visited Mt Laurel at the suggestion of a new acquaintance and fell in love. “When we came here, we liked the architecture, the stonework, the sidewalks. It reminded us a lot of New England,” Nancy said. That was three years ago. It took two years to sell their Massachusetts home and about half a year to build their Craftsman-style home. The Bonners made the move official in January 2012 and have settled into their new life. “You can’t find a nicer bunch of friends than we’ve met,” Mike said. “Talk about Southern hospitality. We’ve experienced it for ourselves, and it’s incredible.” These “Northerners with Southern hearts” brought plenty of reminders of their former life with them. Their two-story home is decorated in a distinctly Colonial style with antique wood tables, brightly colored candlesticks and pewter china. The Bonners worked with home designer Clem Burch to adapt one of the Mt Laurel floor plans for their family, which also includes Rudy, a 12-year-old Shih Tzu. The Bonners wanted all of the main living areas to be on the main floor for easy access. “We wanted the flow of the house to make perfect sense as far as form follows function,” Nancy said. The home features a modified open floor plan. It opens into the foyer, which leads to the family room, kitchen and breakfast nook. The dining room is located to the left of the foyer and a two-way bookshelf in the kitchen allows a glimpse into the room. “We wanted it open,” Nancy said. “I liked the idea of being able to see from one room to the other but having that division. You can see glimpses of the other rooms.” The home pays tribute to its natural surroundings with teak floors, a large stone fireplace and neutral paint

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Page 39: Brightly colored candles serve as a decoration when hung by their wicks in the dining room. This page: The pull-out tray located at the head of the antique dining room table holds a candle, just as it did for its original owners.

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colors. The Bonners collect antique tables, and several are scattered throughout the home, including the buffet and dining room table. The dining room table is a favorite because of a pull-out tray. Located at the head of the table, the tray was originally used to support a candle to provide light for the diners during meals. Other tables have found new life from their original purpose. An old lacemaker’s table is used as a console table in the family room. An old tool chest serves as a coffee table in the family room. Most of the Bonners’ paintings reflect

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their New England heritage, but they did purchase a wooded landscape to mark their new surroundings. Pottery and candlesticks also provide pops of color. Bright blue and orange glass bottles line a shelf above the windows in the family room – salvaged decades ago by a teenage Nancy. “The main thing I try to do is turn a house into a home, so it feels welcoming with interesting details,” Nancy said. The master bedroom, laundry room and an office are also located on the main floor, while the second floor is home to a guest bedroom and bathroom and a craft room.

The basement includes an exercise room and Mike’s workshop. One of the Bonners’ favorite rooms is the screen porch that overlooks the back yard. They have plans to landscape the yard in the spring and are looking forward to lowmaintenance lawn care. “Another thing that attracted us to here is the ease of the yards,” Nancy said. “I like plants that are well behaved.” Until then, the Bonners have found plenty of other ways to spend their time. In addition to making friends with the neighbors, the “die-hard New England


Clockwise from top left: The Bonners love the porch that overlooks the backyard. The warm colors and beautiful antique wooden pieces in the kitchen are repeated throughout the house. Pewter plates on display in the dining room are another nod to Colonial style.


Patriots fans” have already adopted a local college football team. After much deliberation between the University of Alabama and Auburn University, the Bonners decided to pull for the Crimson Tide. Now they’re working on bringing their own family closer to them, starting with Nancy’s sister, who accidentally recommended Mt Laurel to the Bonners in the first place. They have plenty of selling points: The weather, the ease of access to Birmingham shopping and the beautiful neighborhood. Their biggest selling point, however, is the people. “It just has a safe, friendly atmosphere,” Nancy said. “Everyone waves to you. It’s kind of like living in Pleasantville.” l

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FROM LEFT: A pelican figurine – one of the Bonners’ many bird decorations – stands guard over a rustic table. The library includes several nautical decorations – a nod to the couple’s Northeastern roots. The kitchen island offers a functional place to cook dinner.

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Home & Food

5

Outdoor

Objects

Keep your yard looking colorful throughout the year

This gourd birdhouse comes in a variety of shapes and colors. Birdhouse, $26, Wild Bird Center.

This birdhouse is cute enough to hang outside or inside as decoration. Birdhouse, $79.99, Wild Bird Center.

They’re pests in real life, but these overgrown metal ants would add personality to any lawn. Ants, $24 each, Myers Plants and Pottery, 2935 Pelham Parkway, Pelham.

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Wind chimes provide outdoor musical entertainment year round. Wind chime, $39.99, Wild Bird Center.

These hanging wasp traps keep flying insects at bay and provide a pop of color. Wasp traps, $16.99 and $12.99, Wild Bird Center, 400 Cahaba Park Circle, Birmingham. November 2012

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Quintessential

comfort food

Written by CHRISTINE BOATWRIGHT Photographs by JON GOERING

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CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: Main Street Tavern’s bar, which was built in the early 20th century, serves a full range of beverages. The Tavern’s Blue Cheese Burger is loaded with blue cheese and fresh, hand-cut beef. Misty and Jeff Webster opened Main Street Tavern three years ago in downtown Montevallo. The Websters place plaques in honor of frequent customers.

Main Street Tavern: A meeting place for Montevallo

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eff and Misty Webster took a leap of faith three years ago. While in the midst of an economic downturn, the Websters decided to follow their dream of opening their own restaurant, Main Street Tavern. After hearing about an empty business front on Montevallo’s Main Street, the couple walked in, saw the exquisite ceiling tiles and Jeff verbally committed to his dream

on the spot. As a chef, Jeff has always been in the restaurant business, as has Misty, who’s led a career in restaurant management. Jeff’s resume holds entries from Hot and Hot Fish Club and V. Richards in Birmingham to more commercial positions such as Ruby Tuesday. “Jeff’s always wanted to own a restaurant since I’ve known him. It started to become a reality when we had our first November 2012

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CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE: The Barbecue Chicken Salad, one of three salads on the menu, boasts barbecue sauce, blue cheese crumbles, pecans, tomatoes and onions. Vintage photos of downtown Montevallo’s past grace the restaurant’s walls. Tomato n’ cucumber salad and collard greens accompany blackened tilapia. The best-selling Fried Chicken Buffalo Burger can come with sweet potato fries or French fries.

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child,” Misty said. While Jeff was working in one of his many corporate restaurant positions, the Webster family had a dance recital one weekend and a birthday to celebrate the next. “They said, ‘Pick one,’” Misty said. “He came home and said, ‘This is it. I’m done.’” Now, 7-year-old Jaylyn and 5-year-old Jordan can be found talking with Main Street Tavern customers and playing in the restaurant as their parents work. “Jeff works twice as many hours, but I see him more,” Misty said. “Corporate was good to us, but I love that I can throw the kids in the car and come here. We’re just at home here.” The Webster family connection continues throughout the restaurant. Jeff’s brother, Jimmy, tends the bar, while his mother daily prepares desserts from scratch. Jeff’s grandmother, who provided a portion of the financial backing for the restaurant’s start, can be found eating dinner at the Tavern every Thursday at 5 p.m. “My first memory of cooking was with my grandmother,” Jeff said. “I pulled up a chair to the stove to cook my eggs.” Jeff turned his culinary passion into a career as he graduated from Culinard with honors. Instead of following trends and fads, however, Jeff said he cooks “simple, good food” for his customers. “Our style is a naked style of cooking,” Jeff said. “We don’t believe in over-seasoning food. We’re very salt-and pepper kind of people. You don’t need to put Cajun seasoning or lemon pepper on food to make it good. “Any restaurant you go to is going to have a burger, so how do you separate yourself?” Jeff asked. “I’m a burger nut. I love cheeseburgers. There’s a difference between an average burger and a great burger.” The Main Street Tavern secret is freshness. “We don’t freeze the meat; we get the meat fresh,” Jeff said. “Most restaurants have a stockpile in the freezer,” Misty said. The Tavern’s kitchen cooks in small batches to keep the food fresh and tasty, Jeff said. “You could eat here three to four times a week, and it’d be like eating at home,” Misty said. “We have enough of a variety, and it’s what you’re used to making at home.” Main Street Tavern’s best sellers include hamburger steak, bacon-cheddar burgers and the buffalo chicken sandwich. The Tavern features seven burgers slathered with everything from sautéed mushrooms to blue cheese, a full list of entrée pastas and salads and hand-cut steaks. “Everyone asks me where I got our menu from. Our menu is things I love,” Jeff said. “They’re things I’ve had in the past that I fell in love with. I put a twist on it. It’s cool to have that freedom.” Jeff’s culinary creativity spills over onto the restaurant’s catering menu, which is ever-changing depending on clients’ preferences. The Websters offer catering for events both onand off-site. The Tavern’s backroom sees recurring Christmas parties and other events each year, Misty said. Over the past three years, the Websters, although residents of Chelsea, have become ingrained in the Montevallo culture. “I almost feel like Montevallo picked us,” Misty said. “I love this small town. I gauge success on relationships and how many people we can affect in our lives,” Jeff said. I can tell you people’s children’s names, and that’s awesome. It’s a meeting place in this small community.” For more information about Main Street Tavern, visit Mainsttavern.com. l November 2012

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Home & Food

$6 Main Street Tavern 629 Main Street Montevallo 205-665-0336 Mainsttavern.com

Montevallo

Frostbite Written by CHRISTINE BOATWRIGHT Photograph by JON GOERING

M

ain Street Tavern bartender Jimmy Webster created this seasonal drink with his brother, owner and chef Jeff Webster. The duo added the purple color in honor of Montevallo, and the beverage “tastes like a Thin Mint,” Jeff Webster said. Mix ½ oz. Rumple Minze, ½ oz. Razzmatazz, ½ oz. Crème de Cacao and 3 oz. cream. Shake ingredients over ice and strain onto new ice in a glass.

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You are cordially invited to attend The

SHELBY Living

Bridal Show Sunday, January 6, 2013 1 p.m.-4 p.m. at the Cahaba Grand Conference Center 3660 Grandview Parkway, Birmingham, AL For more information, visit facebook.com/shelbylivingbridalshow.

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Home & Food

Roasted Beet Salad with Cranberry Vinaigrette

Seared Green Beans with Bacon and Shallots 54

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A twist on tradition

Try these savory sides to spice up your Thanksgiving spread

Skillet Sweet Potato and Apple Crisp

Produced by katie mcdowell Photographs by jon goering Recipes and photo styling by susan green birmingham bake and cook November 2012

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Skillet Sweet Potato and Apple Crisp

Seared Green Beans with Bacon and Shallots

10 servings

4 servings

Ingredients ½ cup + 1 ¼ cup light brown sugar, firmly packed ½ cup + 2 Tbsp All-purpose flour Pinch of salt 8 Tbsp. Butter, ½-inch dice, chilled ½ cup pecans, chopped ¾ cup oats, old fashioned 3 Granny Smith apples, large, peeled, cored, ¾-inch dice 4 cups sweet potatoes, peeled, 2/3-inch dice ½ tsp. + ½ tsp. cinnamon, ground ½ tsp. allspice 1 lemon, zested, juiced 1 orange, zested, juiced Method 1. Preheat conventional oven to 400 degrees. 2. Place ½ cup of brown sugar, ½ cup of flour and salt into the bowl of a food processor. Add the butter and pulse until buttery “crumbs” form. Stir in the pecans and oats. Refrigerate until ready to use. 3. In a large bowl, toss together the apples, sweet potatoes and 2 Tbsp. of flour to coat. 4. Add the brown sugar, cinnamon and allspice; tossing gently to combine. 5. Add lemon zest and juice, and orange zest and juice, stirring well. 6. Heat a 12-inch cast iron skillet and add the apple/ sweet potato mixture. Cook, stirring occasionally until the juices are released and the apples are softened. 7. Remove from the heat and top with the crumbs, leaving about 1-inch uncovered around the edge. 8. Bake until the topping is golden brown, the sweet potatoes are tender and the filling is bubbling about 40 minutes.

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Ingredients 4 pieces bacon, thick slice, 1-inch dice 1 shallot, minced 1 green beans, ends trimmed 1/4 cup fresh Italian flat-leaf parsley, minced Salt and freshly cracked black pepper Method 1. Heat a large cast iron skillet and cook the bacon until just crisp, rendering the fat. Remove the bacon from the pan and drain on paper towels. 2. Remove all but 3 Tbsp. of bacon fat from the pan. With the heat turned up, add the shallot and green beans. 3. Use tongs to move the green beans in the pan so that they cook quickly and evenly, taking care that the shallots don’t burn, about three minutes. The green beans should still be kind of crunchy. 4. Add back the bacon and toss quickly with the fresh herb to combine and heat through. Season to taste with salt and pepper.


¼cup Champagne vinegar (raspberry vinegar or white balsamic vinegar may be substituted) 1 tsp. Dijon mustard Sea salt, fine Black pepper, freshly ground ½ cup extra virgin olive oil Method 1. Combine the shallots, cranberry relish, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper in a bowl. 2. Whisking constantly, add the oil in a thin, slow, steady stream until the ingredients are emulsified. 3. Adjust flavors to reflect your own love of sweet/tart with additional Fresh Cranberry Relish or vinegar.

Roasted Beet Salad with Cranberry Vinaigrette 4 servings Ingredients 2 beets 2 cups arugula, washed, dried 2 cups curly Endive, washed, dried 2 cups baby spinach, washed, dried ½ cup dried cranberries (optional) 4 oz. goat cheese, crumbled 2 oranges, skinned, segments ½ cup candied pecans Cranberry Vinaigrette Method 1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Trim the beet greens so that about 1 ½-inches only are still attached. Scrub the beets well with cold, running water. Wrap the beets individually in aluminum foil and roast for an hour or so, or until they are soft and tender, and easily pierced with a fork. Then unwrap

The relish can either be used in the Cranberry Vinaigrette or as a standalone accompaniment to the meal.

Fresh Cranberry Relish

them and allow them to cool. When cool enough to handle, slip off the skins and cut them into ½-inch dice. Cover and refrigerate until cold, at least two hours (can be done a day ahead). 2. Toss the arugula, curly endive, spinach, dried cranberries (if using) and beets with the vinaigrette and plate. Garnish with goat cheese, orange segments and candied pecans.

Cranberry Vinaigrette Approximately 1 cup Ingredients 1 shallot, small, minced ¼ cup Fresh Cranberry Relish (recipe follows)

Approximately 2 cup Ingredients 12 oz. cranberries, fresh, picked over 1 cup granulated sugar 1 tsp. orange zest, grated 1/3 cup orange juice, fresh Method 1. Place all ingredients in an uncovered skillet and cook until most of the cranberries are popped open and the mixture is somewhat thickened, 5-10 minutes. Skim and discard any foam that rises to the surface. 2. Let the relish cool and then serve, or refrigerate for up to one day.

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Greystone Ladies Club

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ABC 33/40 Meteorologist James Spann spoke at a Greystone Ladies Club luncheon Sept. 12 at the Greystone Golf and Country Club. 1. Julie Kim, Ranea Brown, Shirl Ward and Susan Shirley 2. Wilma Thompson, Rose Stephenson, Blanche Henry and Nita Yarbrough 3. Shirley Welch and Karen Spann 4. Jeannie Johnson and Mary Rankin 5. Sandy Marriner and Graziella Marriner 6. Wanda Stone and LaRue Carter 7. Hiltrud Hollibaugh, Barbara Brickner and Denise Tassone 8. Kathy Morris and Roula Hakin 9. Hendree Moore and Sandra Ware

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10. Carolyn Haynes and Hollis Traylor 11. Susan Gaston and Wendy Howell 12. Glynis Burrow, Claudia Mosco and Sharon Lager 13. Renee Newfield and Janice Renn 14. James Spann and Alicia Cuevas

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SCAC Juried Art Show

The Shelby County Arts Council held an opening reception for the Fourth Annual Juried Art Show on Sept. 6. 1. Joanne Fogle with her winning painting, Randy Swafford and Kathie Wiley 2. John Thomas, Scott Owen, Tayler Owen and Betty Owen 3. Courtney Davis and Dave Davis 4. Bob Whetstone and Travis Reed 5. Peggy Wood and Phyllis French 6. Stancil and Anne Handley 7. Kathy Copeland, Jim Fuhrmeister and Cindy Fuhrmeister 8. Eva Smyth and Douglas Smyth 9. Bonnie Atchison and Scott Owen 60

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Camp Fire at Shoal Creek

Camp Fire Alabama’s Kathleen P. Bruhn Memorial Leadership Open was held June 25 at Shoal Creek Golf and Country Club.

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1. Jason Frey, Drayton Green, Cecil Ingram and Richard Schmidt 2. Kevin Witherington, Bruce Ovitt, Danny Lazenby and Eric Witherington 3. Janis and Jeffery Barksdale 4. Allison Bruhn and Katie Patrick 5. Sandra Dozier and Janice Adams 6. John Blackwell, Johnny Garlington, Ben Patrick and Slade Blackwell 7. Cathy Chiarmonte, Mitch Bruhn, Ben Pitts and Allison Wise 8. John Bromberg, David White and Adam Smitherman November 2012

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Alabama Ballet

The Shelby County ARts and Lectures Club hosted “The Alabama Ballet at St. Vincent’s One Nineteen” on Sept. 13. 1. Denis and Julia Stork, Tammy and Marlene Wallace and Donna Francavilla 2. Liz Von Bergen, Linda Self, Susan Sanders and Pat Finklestein 3. Elana Gagliano, Debbie Gray and Katie Gray 4. Donna and Jason Mann 5. Mark and Carla Suto 6. Scott and Krista Sherer with Emma and Caroline 7. Donna Francavilla, LaRue Carter and Anne Marie Brown 8. Brent and Sarah Walker 9. Laurie Acton, Patricia Thompson and Jeannie Acton 62

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10. Danièl Callegan and Tracy Richardson 11. Brooke Beckham, Mindy Boggs and Rebecca Blythe 12. David and Madeline Salathe 13. Karen and Bruce Ely 14. Naile Sarac and Solmac Oget

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Hoover Chamber Golf Tournament

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The 17th annual Hoover Chamber Golf Tournament was held at the Riverchase Country Club Aug. 27. 1. Michael Burch, Jeff Ireland, John Lyda and Will Swift 2. Chad Ellis, Jacob Ervin and Grey Leslie 3. Douglas Pate and Charles Yerby 4. Phillip Davis and Johnny Wierengo 5. Robert Mathews and Ronnie Blakney 6. Stuart Adam and Chad Wilson 7. John Clay, Frank Alberghina and Russ Tibbs 8. Heath Williams and Wes Turner 9. Bill Gray, John Platt and Dave Story 64

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Welcome to the good life. Welcome to Shelby Living!

Sydnii Todd

and the spring’s The Little hottes

tTh fashio ens d beek Sheepe amRe rorck

Hilltop Montessori students Mt Laurel’s new take learning outdoors Irish

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Interviews

Farmers markets kick off across the county

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May 2012

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Paws for the Cause

The Animal League of Birmingham sponsored the fourth annual Paws for the Cause Pet Walk benefiting the Shelby Humane Society at Veterans Park in Hoover on Sept. 15. 1. Hillary Carnel, Gail Batchelor and Donna McFeters 2. Leah Sain and Rodeo 3. Mimi Turner and Boomer 4. Chris and Evette Cleland 5. Mark Burris, Amy Mertler and Poco 6. Lindsay Anderson and Diamond 7. Bart Troxell and Beau 8. Maggie Bowers and Jager 9. Patricia Burch and Gypsy 66

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10. Lisa Williams and Bay Bay 11. Karen Peterlin and Missile 12. Katie Rogers, James York and Callie Richie 13. Courtney Waldrop, Adam Cleveland and Gizmo 14. Scott Leigh and Jarhead 15. Roger and Meredith Davis and Lexington

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Back-to-School Bash The University of Montevallo held a back-to-school bash on Aug. 27. (Photos by Amy Wilson.)

1. Rebecca White, Mechay Rush, Clark Maxwell and Stephen Billy 2. Jennifer Ellis, Kaitlee Daw and Ashley Gray 3. Mia Shirley and Riley McEuen 4. Brittany Smith and Jamie Beam 5. Michael Harrison and Hannah Curry 6. Natalie Marrero, Kearson Roberts, Robin Hargrove and Darion Smyly 7. Laura Batt, Kendal Overton and Savannah Kidd 8. Melanie Porter, Carly Laing and Emily Porter 68

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The Symphony Volunteer Council, which has many members from Hoover, held its fall party Sept. 6 to kick off another season of supporting the Alabama Symphony Orchestra.

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1. Barbara Davis, Mimi Jackson, Kathie Ramsey and Pringle Ramsey 2. Roderick Cox and Alison Bolton 3. Pat Nix and Charlotte Adams 4. Shirley Brown, Donna McCauley, Marlene Gaither and Jo Ann Harkins

RESERVATIONS RECOMMENDED • (205) 981-8001 611 DOUG BAKER BLVD., BIRMINGHAM, AL 35242 MELTINGPOT.COM

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Morgan Creek Grape Stomp

Morgan Creek Vineyards in Harpersville held its annual Grape Stomp, including a “Lucy Look-Alike� contest, on Sept. 15. 1. Lauren Anderson and Phoebe Black 2. Katelyn Clark, Whitney Smith and Amanda Eubanks 3. Sydney and Jordan Johnson 4. Victor and Heather Martinez 5. Lee and Charlotte Jennings 6. Lateefah and Belinda Nation 7. Amber Holloway and Sydni Sims 8. Beth Francis, Cheryl Arnold and Beth Weinheimer 9. Karen Allen and Melissa Wilson 10. Mallory McPhaul, Elise Brown and Ashley Merritt 70

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11. Patsy and Brandi Martin 12. Heather Powell and Vanessa Hernandez 13. Chelsie Pope and Emana Berry 14. Darlene and Ronnie Echols 15. Alisha Clark, Charlita Woodruff, Julius White and Sandra Woodruff

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Montevallo Art Walk

The city of Montevallo held the Montevallo Art Walk on Aug. 25. 1. Sally Hart, Meredith Johnson and Jamie King 2. Wallace Jordan, Dora Clayton and Cominita Leblow 3. Andrew Harbison and Hayley Williams 4. Brittni Palmore and Kelsey Thomason 5. Zoyla Pinacho and John Wilson 6. Kristen and Olivia Gilbert 7. Daniela Phillips, Rachel Arrington and Cristin Foster 8. Jessica Hamlin, Brittany Headley and Jessie Webb 9. David and Celeste Gray 72

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The Shelby County University of Alabama Alumni Chapter held its annual kickoff event on Aug. 16 at the Heart of Dixie Harley Davidson in Pelham.

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1. Mike Quenneville, Ian Hebert and Tyler Johnston 2. Cindy Gilbert and her grandson, Cade Forrester 3. Wayne Harmon and his son, Carter 4. Cliff and Kelly Windham 5. Dick Coffee and Robyn Mitchell 6. Rhea Wimbley and Jennifer Smith

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SSCC monthly luncheon

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The South Shelby Chamber of Commerce held its monthly luncheon Sept. 6 at First United Methodist Church in Columbiana. 1. Calvin Gunn, David Bobo and Reggie Holloway 2. Michelle Johnston and Jamie Bessette 3. Michele Nielson and Peggy Horton 4. Keith Mire and Cindy Hilbrich 5. Cindy Nicholson and Bridgette Jordan-Smith 6. Darryl Wilson, Vicki Everett and Heath Morris 7. Chris Curry and Stephen Craft 8. Alex Dudchok and Jim Fuhrmeister 74

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GSCC Monthly Luncheon

The Greater Shelby Chamber of Commerce held its monthly luncheon on Aug. 29 at the Pelham Civic Complex.

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1. Jerry Price and Dale Bolena 2. Mike and Sue Ellen Gerrells 3. April Dennis and Samantha Hall 4. Teresa Shunnarah and April Elliott 5. Nicholas Kapp and T.J. Sayers

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Plumbing • Heating • Cooling

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ROAR Fundraiser

Carolyn Higginbotham welcomed members and guests of ROAR, the Regional Oncology Action Research committee, to her Greystone home Aug. 23. ROAR is the volunteer fundraising committee of the Southeast Cancer Foundation, and has raised $1 million for cancer research in the last three years. 1. Sherry Tatom, Carolyn Fisher and Terry Crutchfield 2. Heather Lettow, Sarah Moseley, Kathi Thomason and Carol Balden 3. Julie Kim, Fanoula Goulas and Dr. Anne Bishop 4. Kati Higginbotham, Carolyn Higginbotham and Kayla Arnold 5. Somaz Oget, Betty Bussey, Margaret Stewart and Martha Thompson 6. Carolyn Higginbotham, Yvonne Pope and Barbie Arnold 7. Kim Hull, Julie Kim, Jackie McAtee and Peggy DeVane 8. Michelle Scholtz, Kristie Dobelbower and Diane Flowers 9. Melody McGuire, Wanda Stone and Joan Zolak

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Chronic Low Back Pain and Constipation Study Have you been treating your chronic low back pain with prescription pain medication and experiencing constipation? A research study is currently underway in your area to test the safety and effectiveness of an investigational medication to help treat moderate-severe low back pain and the constipation that may occur in people taking prescription pain medications

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In order to qualify, you must: • Be 18 years or older • Be experiencing moderate to severe chronic low back pain for 3 months • Be taking a prescription pain medication for at least 4 weeks Qualified participants may receive: • Study-related medical care • Study medication • Compensation for time and travel Health insurance is not needed to participate.

Clinical Research Consultants, Inc.

Call (205)

267-3415

for more information and to see if you qualify.

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10. Libby Bontly, Hollis Traylor, Carol Campbell and Alicia Pangman 11. Dr. Anne Bishop and Fran Baker 12. Barbara Brickner, Sue Nuby, Glenda Sparacio, Mary Rankin and Hiltrud Hollibaugh 13. Audrey Lindquist and Barbara Klyce 14. Janice Herring, Karen Duncan and Mary Anne Barrett

No one should go hungry especially on Thanksgiving

Happy Thanksgiving from the Jimmie Hale Mission

Your $1.95 will provide a meal for a hungry man, woman or child at

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Jimmie Hale Mission & Jessie’s Place Your gift of $19.50 feeds 10 hungry people, $39 feeds 20, $195 feeds 100, and so on.

jimmiehalemission.com P.O. Box 10472, Birmingham, AL 35202

Costs are average and include preparing meals. If gifts exceed expenses, extra funds will be used throughout the year.


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National Summit at the American Village

The National Summit on Keeping the Republic was held at the American Village on Sept. 17. 1. Willard and Emily McCall 2. Roosevelt Lewis, Mary Bomar, Cathy Randall, Richard Brookhiser, Kay Ivey and Tom Walker 3. Halcyann Badham and Peggy Patton 4. Jim and Linda Maples 5. Laura Turner and Lynne Coper 6. Walter and Carolyn LaGroue 7. Bob and Shanon McWhorter 8. Richard Sharpe and Elizabeth Moore 9. Libby Holmes and Jo McGinnis 78

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10. Mary Bomar, Marianne Peak and Scott Bentley 11. Jessie Brooks, Melanie Smith, Merry Kathryn Herald, Karrin Ballstadt and Julie McGuffey 12. Stephanie Jordan and Becky Evans 13. Cliff and Gail Daniels 14. Angie Cash, Martha Rabb, Genoa McPhatter and Virginia Glaze

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Out & About Opera Scenes

A Southern Christmas Bazaar

Ongoing

Christmas Tree Farm Old Baker Farm’s Choose and Cut Christmas Tree Farm is open daily from 9 a.m.dark through Dec. 24. Fee scale for trees range from $15-$100. Available trees include Virginia Pine, Leyland Cypress, Caroline Sapphire and Red Cedar. Cash or check only. Old Baker Farm is located at 1041 Farmingdale Road in Harpersville. Visit Oldbakerfarm.com. Photography Roundtable The Shelby County Arts Council holds a photography roundtable on the first Wednesday of each month from 6-8 p.m. at 104 Mildred St. in Columbiana. Join facilitator Hank Siegel to share advice, tips, ideas and knowledge. Amateurs and professionals are invited. $5 participation fee. Visit. Shelbycountyartscouncil.com.

Nov. 3

NEGU Race The Never Ever Give Up (NEGU) Race will raise money to cover the medical expenses of Chris Goodwin, who was injured in a car accident in the spring of 2012. Chris suffered severe leg injuries and had to

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undergo the amputation of his left leg below the knee. The race will be held Saturday, Nov. 3 at 7 a.m. at Shelby County High School, 101 Washington St. Columbiana. Registration is $35 for the 5k and $20 for the fun run. Visit Negurace.com. Get Wild The Alabama Wildlife Center offers this free, monthly family-oriented program promoting bird conservation and stewardship. Each program is hosted by wild bird educators and may feature one or more of our glovetrained Education Birds. Come get wild and have a learning adventure! Program starts at 1 p.m. and lasts 20-60 minutes. Visit Awrc.org for more information.

Nov. 4

Juried Art Exhibit The Shelby County Arts Council, 104 Mildred St. Columbiana, will host the opening reception for the statewide Student Juried Art Exhibit Sunday, Nov. 4 from 2-4 p.m. Out of the Darkness The Out of the Darkness community walk benefiting the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention will

be held Sunday, Nov. 4 at Heardmont Park, 5452 Cahaba Valley Road, Birmingham. Registration begins at 1 p.m. For more information, contact Lisa Dunn at ldunn@asfp.org.

Nov. 5

P.E.O Auction Chapter B of P.E.O. will hold its annual auction Nov. 5 from 1-3 p.m. at Danberry at Inverness, 235 Inverness Center Drive, Birmingham. A program by Dorothy McDaniel, flower expert, will be presented. The $10 admission includes a live auction, shop and go, program and refreshments. Call 968-4005 for tickets. This fundraiser raises money to provide scholarships to local women seeking help with education expenses.

Nov. 10

Battle for Oak Mountain Bike Ride The XTERRA Oak Mountain State Park Trail half marathon, 10k and 5k will be held Saturday, Nov. 10 at 8:30 a.m. Registration costs $25 for the 5k, $30 for the 10k and $35 for the half marathon. Register online at Active.com Race day registration requires a $10 late fee. Frozen Tide vs. Arkansas The University of Alabama Frozen Tide will face off against Arkansas at the Pelham Civic Complex at 7:30 p.m.

Nov. 11

Nov. 5-8

Student exhibit The University of Montevallo will feature a BFA Student Art Exhibition at Bloch Art Gallery Nov. 5-8.

Dirty Spokes Duathlon The third annual Dirty Spokes Duathlon will be held Sunday, Nov. 11 at Oak Mountain State Park in Pelham. The off-road race includes a 3.1-mile run and an 11-mile bike ride. Team and individual registration available. Visit Dirtyspokes. com.

Nov. 9

Nov. 12-15

Frozen Tide vs. FGC The University of Alabama Frozen Tide will play Florida Gulf Coast at the Pelham Civic Complex at 8 p.m.

Student exhibit The University of Montevallo will feature a BFA Student Art Exhibition at Bloch Art Gallery Nov. 12-15.


Out & About Nov. 15

Montevallo Art Walk and Christmas parade Visit Main Street in downtown Montevallo for the annual Christmas parade and an art walk. The Artwalk Street Party starts at 3 p.m., while the parade begins at 6 p.m. Local businesses extend their hours so visitors can browse while admiring the art vendors set up around downtown. North Shelby Book Club The North Shelby Library Book Club meets the third Thursday of every month from 10:30 a.m.-noon in the library conference room. For more information, call Michelyn Reid at 439-5510 or visit Northshelbylibrary.org.

Nov. 15-18

“Rent” Jonathan Larson’s Pulitzer Prize winning “Rent” weaves together a group of young artists dealing with poverty, disease, ambition, love and ultimately a celebration of life in the East Village of NYC. Don’t miss UM Theatre’s take on this iconic musical. Performances will be held at Reynolds Studio Theatre on Nov. 15-18 at 7:30 p.m. with a matinee Nov. 18 at 2 p.m.

Nov. 16

Guest clarinetist Jeremy Reynolds will perform in LeBaron Recital Hall at the University of Montevallo on Nov. 16 at 7:30 p.m.

Nov. 17

Disc Golf Birmingham Disc Golf Birmingham’s second fall event will be held Nov. 17 at Inverness Disc Golf Park in Hoover. For more information, contact Justin Littrell at 531-8121 or email Justin@discgolfbirmingham. com. A Southern Christmas Bazaar A Southern Christmas Bazaar, sponsored by the AlabasterPelham Rotary Club, will be held Nov. 17 from 10 a.m.6 p.m. at the Pelham Civic Complex. More than 50 merchants from Alabama and surrounding states will participate in this shopping event. Shoppers will enjoy a variety of unique Christmas themed items, including clothing, food, collectibles, decorations and more. Visit RotarySouthernChristmas. com or call 414-3672. St. Jude Walk Join St. Jude supporters in Shelby County and in 90 cities

Guest clarinetist

nationwide to participate in the “St. Jude Give thanks. Walk.” to raise money for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Registration for this familyfriendly event is free and all participants are encouraged to raise money to help save kids battling cancer and other deadly diseases. The walk will be held Saturday, Nov. 17 at 8 a.m. at Veterans Park, 4800 Valleydale Road, Hoover. Walk begins at 9 a.m.

Nov. 23-24 Santa Special Take a train ride with Santa at the Heart of Dixie Railroad Museum Nov. 23-24. Every child receives a gift. Tickets and info at www.HODRRM. org or 205-757-8383

Nov. 26-29

Student exhibit The University of Montevallo will feature a BFA Student Art Exhibition at Bloch Art Gallery Nov. 26-29.

Nov. 26

Pelham Christmas Tree Lighting Head to Pelham to watch the lighting of the city Christmas Tree. This family fun event includes singing, skate and

hockey performances and a visit with Santa. Free skating to follow the program! City Christmas ornaments will be given to the first 1,000 families. The lighting will be held Monday, Nov. 26 from 6:30-9 p.m. at the Pelham Civic Complex, 500 Amphitheater Road.

Nov. 27

Choral Christmas Concert The Montevallo Choral Christmas Concert will be held at the Colonial Chapel at The American Village at 7:30 p .m. Free admission.

Nov. 30

Gallery Opening Dixon-Ballog Gallery Reception, Friday, Nov. 30, 5-8 p.m., 2040 Old Montgomery Highway, Pelham, refreshments served, Call 4022333. Opera Scenes The University of Montevallo Opera will present scenes from various operas Nov. 30 and Dec. 1 in LeBaron Recital Hall at 7:30 p.m. Do you have an event you would like to include in our calendar? Email katie.mcdowell@shelby living.com.

Christmas Tree Farm November 2012

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Why I LOVE Shelby County

Tom Walker:

‘The heart of Alabama’ Written by KATIE MCDOWELL

Patrick Henry’s Virginia Resolves for Independence, enthusiastically drill in Washington’s Army at Yorktown and serve as delegates to the Constitutional Convention at Philadelphia. They leave with a better understanding of liberty, service, sacrifice and good citizenship.

A

merican Village Executive Director and founder Tom Walker has deep roots in Shelby County. Walker graduated from the University of Montevallo, where he majored in political science and history. He met his wife, Betty, at UM, and they now have three grown children. Walker, who also has a master’s degree in political science from Mississippi State University, served as president of the UM National Alumni Association and assistant to UM’s president for several years before the American Village was opened in the mid-1990s.

Q: How did the idea for The Citizenship Trust at The American Village develop? A: In the late 1980’s I began to think about creating a unique place that could teach and inspire young people to know more about our country and to be engaged citizens. Q: Why was the American Village located in Montevallo? A: I felt Montevallo and Shelby County would be the perfect setting, right in the center of Alabama. A local committee chaired by then UM President Dr. Robert McChesney identified some sites. The city of Montevallo and Shelby County stepped forward to help acquire the Burgin farm on Washington’s

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birthday in 1996. Q: What is a typical workday like for you? A: It’s definitely not 8-5 and am busy non-stop. I love it. I spend a lot of time introducing people here and around the country to our mission to prepare young people to be good citizens. I am privileged to work with a great staff, board, volunteers and donors. Q: What is your favorite aspect of serving as the CEO of the American Village? A: I especially enjoy seeing students converge on this 183-acre campus and step into dramatic moments of American history. They take risks for liberty in colonial Boston, prepare to debate

Q: What is your favorite celebration at the American Village? A: My favorite event is Independence Day because it is the birthday of our country and I get to celebrate that with thousands of our fellow citizens. But my favorite celebration is held every school day when I see young people discovering and then celebrating America’s legacy of liberty and self-government. Q: What’s it like being back in your old stomping grounds? A: I fell in love with UM from the first moment in 1971 I stepped on the brick streets as a first-generation college student. And that love affair continues. I felt welcomed by this community as well. After Betty and I graduated in 1975, moved away, got married and had children, we always came back for College Night and special events and felt right at home when we moved here in 1992. Q: What do you love about Shelby County? A: I love that Shelby County still has a real community atmosphere. We are fortunate to have civic, business,

educational and governmental leaders who want to make sure that as our county grows that we keep a high quality of life for citizens here. We are located in the heart of Alabama, and Shelby County people always show their good heart in so many ways. Q: Who is your role model? A: First, there are several role models in my family. As a citizen I was inspired by the life and example of William Winter, a friend and the former governor of Mississippi, to the extent I personally felt that I should “do something” to make a civic contribution. As a student of history, I believe George Washington is a role model of good character and selfless service to our country. Q: If you could have dinner with three people, dead or alive, who would they be and why? A: As a matter of fact, a few nights ago I broke bread with Patrick Henry and Abigail Adams at the American Village! This is a tough question. I would really like to dine with previous generations of my family to hear firsthand their stories. One would be James Walker, who was born in Pennsylvania and who settled in Shelby County in the early 1800’s. Q: What advice would you give your 18-year-old self? A: Remember that photos last for generations – don’t wear plaid bellbottom pants, two-tone shoes and big sideburns!


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Shelby Living November 2012