Page 1

Ashley Mac’s opens in Inverness

Ready, set,

show Alabaster family and their canines travel country for dog shows

Fashion

springs forward

Iron Forge

April 2013 • $4.95

Local blacksmiths gather at Shelby Iron Works

April 2013 | 1


2 | ShelbyLiving.com


Hippity Hop Over to Helena Mercantile For Your Easter Basket Gifts & Dresses!

April 2013 | 3


FROM THE EDITOR

H

ave you heard of Owens House? I’m sad to say I had not until several months after I began working in Shelby County. That was about a year and a half ago, and since that time, I’ve been astounded by the work I’ve seen take place at Owens House, Shelby County’s child advocacy center. As a member of Owens House’s board of directors, I now have a better understanding of how much work goes into keeping the organization up and running. Owens House handles the county’s child abuse cases with four full-time staff members. They have served thousands of children and families through therapy, forensic interviews, abuse prevention programs, support groups and more. In 2011 alone, the center conducted 200 forensic interviews, 1,108 counseling sessions, 30 parenting class sessions and taught body safety training to 5,136 schoolchildren. This year, the center marks its 20th anniversary. This month is also Child Abuse Prevention Month. In honor of

both of those events, I hope you will consider supporting Owens House, either through donations or volunteer work. Read more about the organization on page 30. This month’s issue also has several lighthearted articles. We had a great time shooting a spring fashion article with the help of many indispensible people. Miss Shelby County Jamie Brooks and Heather Buckner, editor of The Alabamian at the University of Montevallo, served as our models. The lovely ladies of Morgan Ashley Salon did the hair and makeup, in addition to letting us use their salon as our backdrop at the last minute! Our second backdrop was Sweet Frog Yogurt on U.S. 280 in Birmingham. It was snowing — OK, there were just a few flurries — on the day of our photo shoot, but people were still lining up for their yogurt. Check out our fashion spread on page 18 for more spring looks. As always, feel free to call or email me if you have any questions, comments or suggestions. I have heard from so many of our readers in the last month, and I appreciate the feedback! l

SHELBY Living ediTorial Katie McDowell Amy Jones Neal Wagner Christine Boatwright Mickel Ponthieux CoNTribuTors Lisa Phillips Laura Brookhart Rebecca Peeples produCTioN Daniel Holmes Jamie Sparacino Amy Baldis Jon Goering markeTiNg Alan Brown Thomas LaBoone Nicole Loggins Rhett McCreight Meagan Mims LaShan Johnson admiNisTraTioN Tim Prince Jan Griffey Mary Jo Eskridge Annie McGilvray Hailey Dolbare Christine Roberts

Katie McDowell, Editor

Katie.McDowell@ShelbyLiving.com ON THE COVER Heather Buckner models a dress and shoes from Chic Boutique during a spring fashion shoot at Morgan Ashley Salon in Birmingham. Check out page 18 for more spring looks from local boutiques. Cover design: Jamie Sparacino Photography: Jon Goering Hair and Makeup: Emily Hurst of Morgan Ashley Salon Location: Morgan Ashley Salon

4 | ShelbyLiving.com

Shelby Living is published monthly by Shelby County Newspapers Inc., P.O. Box 947, Columbiana, AL 35051. Shelby Living is a registered trademark. All contents herein are the sole property of Shelby County Newspapers Inc. [the Publisher]. No part of this periodical may be reproduced without written permission from the Publisher. Please address all correspondence (including but not limited to letters, story ideas and requests to reprint materials) to: Editor, Shelby Living, P.O. Box 947, Columbiana, AL 35051. Shelby Living is mailed to select households throughout Shelby County, and a limited number of free copies are available at local businesses. Please visit Shelbyliving.com for a list of those locations. Subscriptions are available at a rate of $12 for one year by emailing subscribe@shelbyliving.com, or calling (205) 669-3131, ext. 21. Advertising inquiries may be made by emailing advertise@shelbyliving.com, or by calling (205) 669-3131, ext. 11.


fashion

WHAT’S INSIDE

18 fashioN spriNgs forWard Punch up your wardrobe with spring’s bright colors and vibrant prints 24 hoT haNdbags Spring bags are roomy and come in eye-popping colors 26 Color me Charmed Put your best foot forward with these bold and bright shoes

18 April 2013 | 5


WHAT’S INSIDE

41

50

32 in every issue 7

The simple life

8

SHORT STORIES

56

Shelby spotted

80

out & About

82

WHY I LOVE SHELBY COUNTY

art & culture 10

Life as art Welcome to Edna Sealy’s busy art studio

28

Be one with courage Owens House honors Child Abuse Awareness Month

12

Building the future SCAC launches capital campaign for new building

32

Putting the Metal to the Anvil Group preserves skill America was built on

14

Reading Room An English professor shares her favorite books

16

Folk Art Exhibit Southern music and art share the spotlight

24 6 | ShelbyLiving.com

features

Check out new spring bags!

home & food 41

A world of color The Leibs’ bright, bold house is perfect for this family of five

50

Homestyle with a twist Ashley Mac’s opens a location in Inverness

54

Preserving a dying art Vickie Lewis shares a favorite Southern recipe


THE SIMPLE LIFE

Storage for a good deal

B

eing a thrifty shopper is not only smart, but a necessity in today’s economy.  Saving a few pennies here and there can really make a difference when it comes to protecting your budget. We have heard “cheaper is not always better,” but doesn’t it Lisa Phillips, owner of SimpleWorks, make sense to buy 30 rolls of toilet Simpleworksmtsp.com paper to save $3.14?  lisa@simpleworksmtsp.com “A penny saved is a penny 205.981.7733 earned” — but maybe not when it comes to finding a place to store those 30 rolls of toilet paper. Clutter happens when there is too much. But is it clutter when it’s a good deal? When storage space is an issue, you need to reevaluate your thought process when buying in bulk. Consider expiration dates. Will you use up the product before it goes out of date? If you throw it away, was the price difference worth it? storage space. Is there ample room to store the excess of paper towels, cereal and cleaning supplies?  store duplicates in another area. Have a home for the two cans of green beans in the pantry and then have another space (like shelves in the basement) to store the other 10 cans. share with a friend. One option is to split the purchase with someone — you each get eight rolls of paper towels and divide the cost. make sure you can handle it. One client kept her 50-pound bag of dog food in her truck — and scooped it out from there — because she could not move it once she got it home. Is this practical for your lifestyle? Think of the investment. While the cost per slice, roll or bottle may be good, does your budget allow you to afford items that will take you a year to use? brands differ. Before buying two large mouthwashes, do you like it? When organizing and finding a home for all of your “stuff,” it is important to weigh the pros and cons of bulk items in regards to space available.  When space is an issue, the solution may be to purchase the eight-pack of toilet paper versus the industrial size. It’s that simple. l

When storage space is an issue, you need to reevaluate your thought process when buying in bulk.

April 2013 | 7


SHORT STORIES

Irvin displays designs at Birmingham Museum of Art

Gold wins UM College Night The Gold team took home top honors during the University of Montevallo’s annual College Night competition in February. College Night is the longest running collegiate tradition in the United States, according to Student Government President Ashley Lowe. This year was the 94th competition, which sees the campus split into two teams: Gold and Purple. The teams are judged on a point system in a variety of events,

including athletics and spirit levels. The week culminates with the College Night performances — full-length plays written, acted, directed and costumed entirely by the students. The Purple side has won 48 College Nights, and Gold has won 45, which includes a three-year streak. “It’s a great tradition, and it’s great to see new students catching on,” UM President John W. Stewart III said. — Christine Boatwright

Strawberry festival returns The third annual Calera Strawberry Festival will be held Saturday, April 27 from 10 a.m.- 2 p.m. Last year’s event attracted about 3,000 people, and organizers are expecting a big crowd this year as well. In addition to freshly picked, locally grown strawberries, the event will include a kids’ zone, barbecue, vendors, arts and crafts and musical entertainment. Free booth spaces will be available for non-profit organizations. For more information, contact Rebecca Krueger at 205-281-1975 or info@calerafarmersmarket.com. — Staff Reports 8 | ShelbyLiving.com

Maylene resident Rachel Irvin was selected as one of the Rising Design Stars for Birmingham Fashion Week 2013. Irvin is a junior at SMIC Academy in Hoover. Her concept is a geometric dress with softened elements. She used a screen as the main element to give structure to the dress. Trash bags serve as a liner and grommets provide adjustability. Her materials include a metal wire screen, white trash bags, plastic bath poufs, net produce bags, staples and metal grommets. More than 80 middle and high school students from across the state submitted their garment designs using nontraditional items assembled with glue, tape and staples in the place of stitches. The top 40 designs from those applicants were displayed at the Rising Design Star Exhibit in the Birmingham Museum of Art from Jan. 13-Feb. 10. Irvin was one of the top 30 finalists to showcase her design on the runway at Birmingham Fashion Week 2013. The students’ materials ranged from aluminum, bubble wrap, Cheerios boxes, and coffee filters to melted recycled plastic bags. “The designs we have received this year have blown us away with their fashion sense and creativity,” said Jeanna Lee Fleming, co-founder of Birmingham Fashion Week. “These students, ranging from 11-18 years old, are already well on the way to becoming the next hot designers in New York City and this competition can be the catalyst that propels their dreams forward.” — Staff Reports


Auburn snaps up Spain Park’s coach Chip Lindsey, Spain Park’s head football coach for two seasons, recently accepted an off-field support position with Auburn University’s football program. “The Spain Park family is very excited and very happy for Coach Lindsey as this opportunity gives him the chance to work and coach at a major Division I college football program,” Spain Park athletic director Patrick Kellogg said in an email statement. Lindsey said newly hired Auburn head coach Gus Malzahn approached him about the opportunity with the Tigers. He informed his team and coaches the morning of Feb. 16 that he accepted the position at Auburn. “It was a hard meeting with the team just because these are special bunch of kids at Spain Park,” said Lindsey. “As tough as it was, it was a good time too.” Lindsey said that many of the Jaguars met with him after his announcement and were “all very supportive” of his decision to leave Spain Park. “Coach Lindsey is a great person, family man, mentor to student-athletes, and, most importantly, a great educator. He will be greatly missed,” Kellogg said. Lindsey led Spain Park to its first region championship in school history in 2012 with an appearance in the Class 6A quarterfinals with a record of 10-3. Lindsey came to Spain Park after a season at Troy University as the quarterbacks coach. Prior to joining Troy’s coaching staff, he was the head football coach at Lassiter High School in Marietta, Ga. from 2008-2009. Spain Park recently hired a new head coach, former Hoover High defensive coordinator Shawn Raney, to build on what Lindsey has built in his time as the Jaguars head coach. “Our goal now is to find a head football coach that embodies the same caring and relational persona that Coach Lindsey grew at this football program,” the release from the school stated. Lindsey said that the program would continue to excel under the new head coach. “I think the program will continue to do really well in years to come,” said Lindsey. “I was just glad I was able to be a part of it.” — mickel ponthieux

PE

T GROOMING

&B

OUTIQUE April 2013 | 9


ARTS & CULTURE

CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE LEFT: Local artist Edna Sealy teaches classes at the Shelby County Arts Council and the Pelham Senior Center. Sealy paints while her two Shih Tzus, Buster and Shelby, look on. Sealy’s studio is crammed with her own art, as well as work by other artists.

W

Life as art

elcome to the lakeside home and studio/gallery and veritable museum of mixed-media artist Edna

Sealy. Crammed with her own artwork and others, as well as family memorabilia, the 10 | ShelbyLiving.com

Story and photographs by Laura Brookhart

space offers insight on one of the county’s most productive artists. “I consider myself a teaching artist.” Sealy said. “In my earlier years I taught history, speech, psychology, sociology, English and art and completed all my course work for a doctorate in education. I

always taught each subject with a creative slant.” Sealy said she loves bold, bright colors, and, initially, it was painting portraits of her daughter that first inspired her to pick up a brush. “A lot of my art is just for myself, and


you can see that I continue to enjoy it in my surroundings,” she said. “On my back porch is a little bird nest that is home to new babies each spring. In my painting, all you can see are their little heads and open mouths — now I wouldn’t expect anyone but me to want that.” Often, a bird can be found in her creations. “Little birds go from one place to another — the bird is a symbol of life. There is no beginning and no end, you just honor your past and evolve into your future.” Sealy collects the work of others, especially those reflecting her favorite motifs, such as a goldfinch by Xander Booker or a pink chicken rooster by folk artist She She. She appreciates folk art pieces she has collected made by Lonnie Holly, Chris Clark and Lennie Jones, as well as gourd art by Teresa Wamble. Saying that she is not one to “let go of anything,” Sealy points out a childhood treasure she has preserved in a shadowbox montage. “I was very close to my daddy,” she said. “When I was little, I wanted and received a soap shaped like a poodle. Well, when I got in the tub, part of his ear came off, and I got hysterical and started crying. “Daddy took that dog soap and said he would keep him safe,” she added. “After he died, I found that — Edna Sealy little dog, still wrapped in his handkerchief, and I felt he deserved an honor.” That shadowbox resides in Sealy’s family history room along with generational old photos, books and artifacts and the 1827 land-grant seal from her great-great-grandfather’s pre-Civil War country home. There is a gently faded pieced quilt of a tulip pattern made by her grandmother, her father’s collection of hats and Nixon memorabilia and her own silver baby cup alongside those of her parents. In attendance, also, are many childhood dolls. Sealy teaches mixed media classes at the Shelby County Arts Council and the Pelham Senior Center. She is the current president of the Hoover-Shelby Art Association and displays in shows throughout the area. She is a member of the DAR through her lineage from Peter Seeley, a patriot of the Revolutionary War. Sealy may incorporate inkjet images, encaustic application and broken pottery shards into her collages. A upper-level back porch room has become her painting studio, offering year-round natural light. Here she can rest her gaze on the lake beyond, and is kept company by her turtles and Shih Tzus, Buster and Shelby. l

“A lot of my art is just for myself and you can see that I continue to enjoy it in my surroundings.”

Home of Alabama’s

Favorites

April 2013 | 11


ARTS & CULTURE

Building the Future SCAC launches capital campaign for new building

Story by katie mcdowell Photograph contributed

I

f you build it, they will come. That’s Terri Sullivan’s thinking behind a proposed 26,000-squarefoot community arts building to be built in Columbiana. The building would serve as the new headquarters of the Shelby County Arts Council, which is currently housed in retail space on Mildred Street in Columbiana. Sullivan announced the launch of the SCAC’s official capital campaign, Building the Future, to raise funds to build the community arts center at the Feb. 2 Celebration of the Arts fundraiser, which was emceed by First Lady Diane Bentley. 12 | ShelbyLiving.com

“My dream is that the arts council will be the heart and soul of arts culture in Shelby County, creating a vibrant arts community that benefits all in the areas of visual arts, dance, theater, music and creative writing,” Sullivan said. The proposed center would serve as a space for both performances and education with a black box theater, orchestra hall, art gallery, courtyard, art and music classrooms and a dance studio. “A flourishing arts community is an economic engine,” Sullivan said. “People who attend arts events and classes spend money locally creating revenue for business owners and generating sales tax revenue for the city

and county.” Sullivan said the center would bring about 150 people daily to Columbiana and 300 on the weekends. Bentley, whose husband, Gov. Robert Bentley, is from Columbiana, said the center would be an asset to the community. “The performing arts and education center in Columbiana will not only serve as an economic engine bringing new life to Main Street, but it will also enrich lives,” she said. The SCAC was founded in 2005 and has served more than 23,000 children, youth and adults since that time. The organization offers dozens of art, photography, writing and music classes both at the SCAC headquarters and


The Legacy Circle Legacy Circle Gifting Levels

• Art of Community: $5,000-$7,500 • Art of Outreach: $2,500-$4,999 • Art of Visual Arts: $1,000-$2,499 • Art of Music: $500-$999 • Art of Theatre: $250-$499

Exclusive Naming Opportunities

• The Performing Arts and Education Center: $1.2 million • Black Box Performance Theatre: $500,000 • Art Gallery: $300,000 • Orchestra Rehearsal Hall: $225,000 • Grand Lobby: $200,000 • Dance Studio: $125,000 • Courtyard: $100,000 • Visual Arts Classroom: $75,000 • Photography Studio: $75,000 • Pottery Studio: $75,000 • Plaza Lawn: $50,000 • Creative Writing Conference Room: $25,000 • Theatre Dressing Room (2): $15,000 • Music Practice Room (2): $10,000 • Box Office: $10,000 All Legacy Circle gifts will be permanently recognized on the Donor Wall of the new center. Contact Terri Sullivan at 205-2151136 for more information.

throughout the county. It also hosts art exhibits, contests and other events each year. Sullivan said the expanded center would offer far more opportunities for residents throughout Shelby County. “The Shelby County Arts Council is about community,” Sullivan said. “Our community is not defined by city limits, income, education or race. The arts council brings our community together to share the beauty of the arts.” l

Welcome to the good life. Welcome to Shelby Living!

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April 2013 | 13


ARTS & CULTURE

Reading Room: Bryn Chancellor were “To Kill a Mockingbird” and “The Catcher in the Rye.” At the same time, I also loved the “Modesty Blaise” spy thrillers.

Story by KATIE MCDOWELL Photograph by STEPHANIE BATKIE

B

ryn Chancellor is an assistant professor of English and creative writing at the University of Montevallo. She and her husband, Timothy Winkler, an artist, live in Montevallo. Chancellor hails from the West — California and Arizona — and received a bachelor’s degree in English from Northern Arizona University and postgraduate degrees in English and creative writing from Arizona State University and Vanderbilt. She is a fiction writer working on a short story collection and a novel.

What drew you to Shelby County? My job at the University of Montevallo brought us to the area, but we chose to live in Montevallo because we liked the small-town charm and natural beauty. I love taking walks in Orr Park, along the walking trail or around my neighborhood — as well as being able to walk to campus! The city and campus are supportive places for artists, with events such as the Montevallo Literary Festival, Montevallo Artwalk and Montevallo Arts Festival, among others. Why do you love to read? My mom always likes to tell the story of how I surprised her by reading a note aloud when I was around 3 years

old. Startled, she said, “I didn’t know you could read,” and I shrugged my tot shoulders and said, “Yeah.” In some ways, that’s how reading still feels to me: like something I have always known how to do. Yet it also stands out as one of the saving graces of my life, the act to which I have turned again and again to find solace, to escape, to expand and enrich my mind. What a wonder a book is: through the art of language, we are transported to worlds that we would otherwise never know. Reading is simultaneously the most ordinary and the most wildly magical habit of my life. What’s the first book you loved? In memory I clump together favorites: Beverly Cleary’s “Ramona” and “Ralph Mouse” books, and then everything Judy Blume wrote. Scott Dell’s “The Island of the Blue Dolphins,” too. In high school, the literary books that knocked me flat

Why did you pursue a literary career? From a writer’s perspective, I often ask myself this same question! Heaven knows it’s not to be rich or famous, though the myth of “The Author” still looms large in our culture. Flannery O’Connor said, “Fiction is about everything human and we are made out of dust, and if you scorn getting yourself dusty, then you shouldn’t try to write fiction. It’s not a grand enough job for you.” Writing indeed is a humbling pursuit, but getting down in the dust is also deeply gratifying. Writing teaches me to look for the extraordinary in the mundane, to see possibilities in wrong turns, to revel in my own imagination. From a teacher’s perspective, I am grateful every day to be able to make a living by reading and talking about literature and helping others to become better writers. Do you have anything to promote? Please join us for the Montevallo Literary Festival on April 12, on the University of Montevallo campus. Visit Montevallo.edu/english/mlf. I also blog at Unboundleaves.wordpress.com. l

Bryn’s Reading Recommendations: “Middlesex” by Jeffrey Eugenides Eugenides’ epic novel is stunning for its sweeping historic scope, mythic allusions and narrative range. At its heart, though, is the story of Cal, whose sexual identity is swept up in three generations of Greek-American family secrets and genetics, who grabs the reader with the opening sentence and never lets us go. 14 | ShelbyLiving.com

“The Blind Assassin” by Margaret Atwood Atwood melds mystery and family drama in this structurally magnificent book, which includes, among other texts, a futuristic novelwithin-a-novel. Though at times it can get tricky, it’s a complete original, which is what Atwood does best. There’s no one quite like her.

“Plainsong” by Kent Haruf One of the quietest, most humane and achingly beautiful books I have ever read. Though it interweaves multiple perspectives, the unadorned prose keeps us intimate with the characters and absolutely grounded in the world of Holt, a rural town in Colorado.


April 2013 | 15


ARTS & CULTURE

Folk art

exhibit Southern music and art share the spotlight

Story by rebeCCa peeples Photographs CoNTribuTed

T

he worlds of art and music will collide April 6 with the opening reception of the Shelby County Arts Council’s Folk Art Exhibit: The Roots of American Music. The exhibit will feature the works of Bruce Andrews and Lennie Jones, two Southern artists and musicians whose work will be on display throughout the month of April at the SCAC’s gallery in Columbiana. Andrews and Jones will discuss their work during the exhibit, and Andrews’ band, 2 Blu and the Lucky Stiffs, will perform in the performance space adjacent to the gallery. Andrews is an accomplished musician and artist who has been featured in Birmingham Magazine, Southern Living and the Southern Living Seasonal Coffee Table Book. The Shelby County resident

Lennie Jones and Bruce Andrews will display their artwork at the Shelby County Arts Council’s Folk Art Exhibit on April 6. ABOVE: Artwork by Bruce Andrews. RIGHT: Jones paints portraits of blues musicians on electric guitars.

has been creating art ever since he was a young child and studied at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. He is a professional musician with a passion for playing the blues and American music derived from blues and gospel. He plays harmonica and lead vocals for 2 Blu and The Lucky Stiffs, a band he cofounded that plays a blend of blues, rock, funk and gospel. Lennie Jones, a primitive, self-taught painter with a deep love for the blues, will exhibit his paintings and several pieces from the “Lennie Jones Collection,” which features portraits of great blues musicians laminated on electric guitars. Working as a traveling musician during the late 1960s in New York, he met and opened for some of the greatest Blues musicians in the country. Jones battled alcoholism and had several brushes with the law before he began a 20-year job as a

21 Weatherly Club Drive Alabaster, AL 35007 205-663-4111 • Fax: 205-663-4134 www.joesitalianonline.com

16 | ShelbyLiving.com

ranger for the federal government chasing lawbreakers. He was the event artist for the prestigious Telluride Blues and Brews Festival in fall 2012. The opening reception is free to the public. The reception will be held Saturday, April 6 from 2 to 5 p.m. at the Shelby County Arts Council Gallery, 104 Mildred St., Columbiana. 2 Blu and the Lucky Stiffs will perform from 4:30-6 p.m. Tickets to the concert may be purchased online at Shelbycountyartscouncil.com. Exhibit dates are April 4-30. The event is funded in part by the Alabama State Council on the Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts. l


April 2013 | 17


FASHION

Heather Buckner wears a Thyce dress, $34.95, necklace, $33.95, and bracelet, $13.95, all from J. Allen’s Gifts. Photograph taken at Sweet Frog Yogurt, 5403 Highway 280, Birmingham.

Fashion

springs forward

Produced by katie mcdowell Photographs by JON GOERING Hair and makeup by HALEY TAYLOR AND EMILY HURST OF MORGAN ASHLEY SALON Locations SWEET FROG YOUGURT AND MORGAN ASHLEY SALON

18 | ShelbyLiving.com


Miss Shelby County Jamie Brooks wears colored jeans, $154, and a Nic and Zoe printed top, $129, both from Chic Boutique. The earrings are her own. Photograph taken at Morgan Ashley Salon, 7350 Cahaba Valley Road, Birmingham.

April 2013 | 19


Jamie wears an Uncle Frank dress, $124, and necklace, $52, all from Chic Boutique, 270 Doug Baker Boulevard, #300, Birmingham.

20 | ShelbyLiving.com


Heather wears a pink and white top, $29.95, white pants, $48, and necklace and earrings set, $18.95, all from J. Allen’s Gifts.

April 2013 | 21


Jamie wears a colorblock dress, $104, and Sasha London heels, $124, from Chic Boutique. She accessorized the look with white chevron bangles, $16.95, from J. Allen’s Gifts, 37 Buck Creek Plaza, Alabaster.

22 | ShelbyLiving.com


April 2013 | 23


FASHION

Let the sunshine in with this lovely yellow bag. Fossil handbag, $168, Belk.

Stop traffic with a hot pink purse in a bold graphic pattern. Nine West handbag, $69, Belk.

Hot handbags Spring bags are roomy and come in eye-popping colors

A structured shape and chain strap give this bag a sophisticated flair. Anne Klein purse, $85, Belk.

With bright colors and bold patterns, this bag is guaranteed to help you stand out from the crowd. Nine West handbag, $69, Belk, 300 Colonial Promenage Parkway, #2100, Alabaster.

24 | ShelbyLiving.com


Green signals “go” — as in “Go buy yourself this gorgeous Dooney & Burke right now.” Dooney & Burke Russell bag, $298, Belk.

This shoulder bag is big enough to be practical, but the bright colors and contrast stitching keep it fun and funky. Desigual handbag, $119, Chic Boutique, 270 Doug Baker Boulevard, #300, Birmingham. April 2013 | 25


FASHION

Color me

charmed Produced by KATIE MCDOWELL Photograph by JON GOERING

Put your best foot forward with this spring’s collection of bright and bold shoes 26 | ShelbyLiving.com

From back, Re-Mix Deluxe Vintage Classics red platform wedge, $212; Sasha London heel, $116; Re-Mix Deluxe Vintage Classics multicolor wedge, $168; Restricted yellow flat, $52, all from Chic Boutique.


April 2013 | 27


Be one with courage Owens House honors Child Abuse Awareness Month Story by CINDY GREER Photographs by JON GOERING

C

hild sexual abuse — the taboo nature of this act can create shame among everyone involved — perpetrators, victims and family members alike. As a society, we are quick to point a finger when it happens. We’re glued to the TV when the news covers it. Unfortunately, we’re often unwilling to face its impact and prevent it from reoccurring. Nothing can truly prepare you for seeing the bad things that others do to children. Nothing can scare you as much as the thought of a trusted person abusing your child. But, until we begin to openly discuss the issue, we all help hide abuse. It is time for courage — for you to 28 | ShelbyLiving.com

be one with courage — the one who combats the secrecy that enables child abuse: • Start the dialogue Cindy Greer, and inspire executive director of others to Owens House CAC, The talk about it Shelby County Children’s openly. Advocacy Center • Learn the signs and symptoms of abuse (Stopitnow.org) • Start a discussion with responsible family members, other parents, coaches, teachers and educators about what you learn. • Educate and empower your children

(Dl2.org). • Register for community notification (Shelbyso.com). • Act on suspicions, help a parent, make a report if needed on behalf of a child. • Get involved with your local Children’s Advocacy Center (Owenshousecac.org). In Shelby County, Owens House CAC is a nationally accredited children’s advocacy center that involves the entire community in its efforts to keep children safe. Specially trained interviewers take statements from children when allegations of abuse are made and family advocacy is provided to non-offending caregivers. The center also offers mental health / counseling services, as well as parenting classes, support groups and


PAGE 28: Child abuse victims and sometimes their family members leave a handprint on a mural of a tree downstairs when they complete their time at Owens House — a sign to future visitors that others have walked in their shoes. ABOVE: The top painting reads, “It’s a big leap — sometimes a scary one — but arriving on the other side clearly positions the jumper in a new realm of possibility, opportunity, clarity and competitive advantage.” The second sign reads, “A hundred years from now ... it will not matter what my bank account was, the sort of house I lived in or the kind of car I drove ... but the world may be different because I was important in the life of a child.”

prevention programs. Owens House CAC is a non-profit and every single service is provided free of charge thanks to the generosity of the community, grantors, businesses and individuals. Owens House CAC was formed 20 years ago through the vision of District Attorney Robert “Robby” Owens, Jr. This young DA had seen crime victim after crime victim with similar stories — they were abused as children, never told, never received help with the trauma endured and that trauma impacted their entire life, often in negative ways. Children who did tell were having to repeat their story over and over, questioned by person after person after person, sometimes in police departments, in hospital beds or dark crowded rooms. Assistant District Attorney Jill Hall Lee recalls a young victim throwing up in the parking lot before his trial. Both knew the system could respond to children and to abuse better. And both knew that involving the community was key and formed a multidisciplinary team involving law enforcement, child protective services, education, mental health, medical experts and prosecution. Counselors, educators, businesses, churches and citizens

Tournament proceeds to benefit the TJ Atchison Spinal Cord Injury Research Program at UAB. Register online at www.tjatchisonfoundation.com. For more information, contact Tory Minus at 205-996-5014 or email at tminus@uab.edu

April 2013 | 29


came together to open The Shelby County CAC in Columbiana in June 1993. The CAC, now known as Owens House, is a testament of how something good, something productive, can grow out of a tragedy. Owens House CAC is now one of 29 CACs in Alabama and one of the more than 750 CACs in the United States. These CACs plant seeds — seeds so children can continue to grow. It would be unrealistic to say that victims of child sexual abuse will forget what happened to them. They won’t, it is a part of them, a part of their life. But, if we are successful as a community, they will know that their abuse is a part of them and not the whole. While we can’t promise healing for each child, we have the honor and the responsibility — for an hour or a day or a period of years — to make sure that child is safe and accepted and valued for who they are. You can help them be one with courage. And you can be one with courage. Cindy Greeg is the executive director of Owens House CAC, The Shelby County Children’s Advocacy Center. l

30 | ShelbyLiving.com

The Blue Ribbon Campaign During the month of April, Owens House CAC will join with advocates across the country to raise awareness about child abuse prevention. The symbol of National Child Abuse Prevention Month is the blue ribbon. The Blue Ribbon campaign began in 1989 when a Virginia tied a blue ribbon to her car antenna to commemorate her grandson, who died of child abuse, according to Childwelfare. gov.

What can you do to participate? • • • •

individuals / schools Blue ribbons on doors and trees Hat Day / Koins for Kids Drive Big Blue Box for Wish List items Spread the word on social media

Community / businesses • Blue ribbons on doors and trees • Display child abuse prevention materials

• Host a Give Back night • Sponsor Blue Ribbon Kid Fest or Ride

Events

• Blue Ribbon City Proclamations by Shelby County mayors — April 2013 • Blue Ribbon Kids Fest — April 6, 2-4 p.m. at Owens House • Blue Sunday Faith Initiative — Prayer for Kids on April 21 • Blue Ribbon Ride — May 18

Be the ONE to effect change. Know the signs. Know the truth. Stop the Secrecy. Be ONE with Courage


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Putting the

metal to the anvil

Story by Neal WagNer Photographs by JoN goeriNg

32 | ShelbyLiving.com


benefitingÊ localÊ charities

Group preserves skill America was built on

O

n the first Saturday of every month, the sound of clanging metal emanates from a small covered work area in the Shelby Iron Works Park as smoke billows from a metal

chimney. A group of about eight modern-day blacksmiths gather around a small coal- or coke-fueled fire as they mold pieces of metal into items ranging from nails and knives to fireplace tools and metal racks. “The kids love to see you blacksmith. Their eyes always get big when they see that metal start getting red hot,” said Shelby Iron Forge member and Calera resident Jerry Green. “Blacksmithing helped to build this nation.” The Shelby Iron Forge blacksmithing group has been carrying on a metalworking art replaced many years ago by automated machines. But for Green and his group, nothing beats the experience of using their hands to create something from a scrap or unused piece of metal. The forging journey begins by using a fuel — usually coal or coke — to start a fire hot enough to make irons such as steel and iron malleable. “It’s gotten really hard to find blacksmithing coal. We use coke, but it can be hard to get going sometimes,” Green said, noting he also has gas-powered and coal-powered forges at his Calera home, which sits on a 5-acre lot. At the Shelby Iron Works forge, an electric blower is used to feed oxygen into the fire to increase its temperature. Traditional blacksmiths used manual billows to achieve the same effect. “We usually get the fire up to about 2,000 degrees, but you can get it up to about 3,000 degrees,” Green

Hoover Metro Kiwanis Club

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Jerry Green does work at the Shelby Iron Work Park.

April 2013 | 33


34 | ShelbyLiving.com


Ê

Calera

205-668-4822Ê Ê www.theupsstorelocal.com/6068Ê

Shelby Iron Forge members use fire to mold metal into nails, knives and other objects.

Ê Ê

April 2013 | 35


36 | ShelbyLiving.com


CLOCKWISE FROM FAR LEFT: Scenes from a morning at Shelby Iron Works Park. Members of the Shelby Iron Forge group meet the first Saturday of every month.

said. “You want to get it up to a critical heat. That is the point where steel becomes non-magnetic and the molecules get all confused. “You try to get the metal up to a red heat, because at that point the metal basically becomes plastic,” Green added. Once the metal becomes malleable, the blacksmiths use tools ranging from handheld mallets to large electric “power hammers” to mold the metal into shape against an anvil. The blacksmiths’ technique depends on the material they are working with and the type of item they are creating, Green said. “The trick to blacksmithing is knowing how to use your tools. You don’t have to be a big old burly guy to blacksmith,” Green said with a laugh, noting he gets most of the metal he forges from KGS Steel Distributors in Bessemer and Saginaw Pipe in Alabaster. Because of the heat and sparks produced while blacksmithing, a fence at the Shelby Iron Works forge keeps visitors several feet away from the action. “Fire and sparks go everywhere,” Green


said. “Sometimes people want to get a closer look and I have to tell them to back up a little bit. “One time a lady got too close and a spark hit her pantyhose and burned those suckers up,” Green added with a laugh. Green said he became interested in blacksmithing after taking a jewelry making class in college, and later took classes at the John C. Campbell Folk School in Brasstown, N.C. “Growing up in my family, if something broke you had to fix it. It’s something that’s always interested me,” Green said, noting he has been blacksmithing since 1979. Although Green has made items such as fire pokers and pot racks, he said a knife made from a strand of steel cable is the most difficult item he has ever made. “That one was particularly hard because those fibers will just melt all over the place,” Green said as he pointed to the knife he made in 1989. After nearly “dying out” in the 1970s, blacksmithing has made a comeback over the past few decades, and now involves “more men and women than you would

An Iron Forge member uses a hammer to flatten a piece of hot metal.

think,” Green said. “There are a lot of people involved in blacksmithing - probably more than you would think,” Green said. “I just love getting out there and learning stuff from

them and teaching them stuff.” The Shelby Iron Forge group meets the first Saturday of each month at 9 a.m. at the Shelby Iron Works Park, which is off Shelby County 42 in Shelby. l

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38 | ShelbyLiving.com


215 juried artists Live Music • Corks & Chefs 35 kids workshops 40 Cultural Tents 2013 SPONSORS TITANIUM City of Birmingham • Regions Bank GOLD Joe Piper, Inc. • Kinetic Communications SILVER Motion Mobs • Royal Cup Coffee • al.com • Magic 96.5 BRONZE Alabama Power • BlueCross and BlueShield of Alabama Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP • Giattina Aycock Architecture Studio, Inc. • HealthSouth Corporation Miller Communications • Publix Super Markets Charities University of Montevallo • Birmingham Business Journal Birmingham Magazine • The Scout Guide Birmingham

Linn Park, downtown Birmingham, Alabama April 26-28, 2013 10-6 Fri. & Sat. 10-5 Sun.

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STEEL A l a b a m a St a t e C o u n c i l o n t h e Ar t s a n d t h e National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency Birmingham Coca Cola Bottling Company • New Latitude About Town • Alabama Baby & Child Magazine • B-Metro Birmingham Parent • CityVision - The Visitor’s Channel H-Life • Over the Mountain Journal • Shelby Living Tannehill Trader • WBHM • Weld for Birmingham

April 2013 | 39


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HOME & FOOD

A world of

color

The Leibs’ bright, bold house is perfect for this energetic family of five Story by KATIE MCDOWELL Photographs by JON GOERING April 2013 | 41


PAGE 41: The Leibs customized their kitchen with modern barstools and patterned tin around the island. ABOVE: A brown chair in the living room gets an abundance of color from multi-colored stripes. PAGE 43, ABOVE: Ryan and Abby Leib live in the Beaumont neighborhood of Hoover. PAGE 43, BELOW: A red couch and green patterned curtains brighten up the living room.

A

bby Leib is a woman on the go. The 35-year-old is married, works full time and has three children under the age of 7. She and her husband, Ryan, who runs Briarwood Soccer Club, lead a Sunday School group for young marrieds at their church. They regularly host groups of 20, including couples with young children, for dinners. Recently, a young family friend moved into their guest bedroom while he decided his next step after school. Their life is busy — “We’re ships passing in the night,” she said of seeing Ryan — and, sometimes, chaotic, 42 | ShelbyLiving.com

as life with young kids can be. When Abby, who is an interior designer and co-owner of Rose Gate Design in Hoover, began decorating their home, she kept their hectic lifestyle in mind. “I know everybody loves neutral and I love neutral, but color, to me, when you have kids, hides a multitude of sins,” she said. “Everything’s textured and colored. You can’t tell if somebody spilled something. It doesn’t matter.” Their two-story home, which is located in the Beaumont neighborhood off Valleydale Road in Hoover, reflects Abby’s eclectic design style. It’s a blend of modern and traditional with large

doses of vibrant color and patterns. “I think it’s good to look like you’ve blended your house, so the pieces that you’ve had forever don’t look out of place,” she said. “I like things to have a little sense of formality to it, but maybe the color makes them playful. I like textures and colors, kind of a richness of things.” The mindset is evident as soon as you step into the house. The entry portrays a cultivated look of casual creativity with plant prints on the wall and a rustic bench against the staircase. Located off the entry, the dining room displays more of Abby’s eclectic style. Floor-length, polka dot drapes


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April 2013 | 43


CLOCKWISE FROM THIS PHOTO: The Leibs’ bedroom features a “romantic and serene” black and champagne color scheme. Abby Lieb gave her husband an abstract painting of herself for Valentine’s Day one year. Vases and paintings add texture and color throughout the house.

44 | ShelbyLiving.com


April 2013 | 45


46 | ShelbyLiving.com


frame the windows, while a jute rug covers the floor. The dining chairs feature three fabrics, including a brocade and a stripe. “This room is very much me,” she said. “A little bit of elegant, a little bit of fun with a little bit of natural, kind of all wrapped up into one.” The heart of the house, where the family spends most of their time indoors, is an open living space that includes the kitchen, breakfast nook and living room. The living room blends functional living — plush rug and plenty of seating — with funky fabrics. Abby points out the colors in the room don’t match perfectly, but they complement each other. A bright red, deepseated sofa and two chairs upholstered in a colorful, striped fabric provide seating. Leopard print pillows provide a punch of personality, and a plush rug, which is actually almost turquoise, fits perfectly in the room. Abby uses window treatments to blend the different elements of a room. In the living room, the drapes feature two fabrics — a floral and plaid — that feature many of the colors in the other furniture. “I love window treatments. Those bring my — Abby Leib world together,” she said. “There are so many ways you can do simple window treatments that give big character to (rooms).” Although Beaumont is a planned neighborhood, the Leibs found ways to customize their home’s interior. They decided against some of the upgrades offered by their builder and did their own projects, including adding a mud room and porch and customizing the kitchen. “It looks way more custom than what you would have upgraded to,” she said.

“I know everybody loves neutral and I love neutral, but color, to me, when you have kids, hides a multitude of sins.”

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: In the breakfast nook, a zebra rug, polka dot chair and madras curtains fit in with Abby’s eclectic style. Reds and oranges take the spotlight in the house. Abby made use of bright drapes in multiple rooms, including the second floor sitting area. The pendant lighting above the breakfast table adds to the eclectic feel. Knickknacks adorn the mantle in the living room.

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In the kitchen, Abby worked with a carpenter to add patterned tin — salvaged debris from tornadoes in the Birmingham area — around the body of the island. The island is currently gray, but she’s considering adding a white wash in the future. They also created custom gray cabinets with chicken wire and glass shelves. Modern silver barstools, a polka dot chair and madras drapes maintain the house’s eclectic vibe. However, Abby broke the home’s colorful pattern in the master bedroom, also located on the main floor. Decorated in a black, white and champagne color scheme, the bedroom is “romantic and serene.” A custom painting hangs above the chest. The triptych features Abby’s outline and was a present to her husband for Valentine’s Day one year. “In chaos, you have to have a room that’s serene,” she said. The second floor is home to three bedrooms. The Leibs’ daughters,

5-year-old Taylor and 16-month-old Mitchell — share a bedroom decorated in pinks and greens. Matthias, 7, has his own room decorated in red, white and blue with Ryan’s college soccer poster hanging above his bed. The athletic family — Abby ran in college and Ryan played for a pro soccer team as a young adult – spend as much time as possible outdoors. The house is located in a cul-de-sac, which is perfect for afternoons spent on bicycles. It also overlooks Heather Lake, and Abby and her carpenter recently added a porch to take advantage of the view. Abby still has plans for additional projects, but she follows the same advice she gives her clients: Take your time. “Don’t aim for the stars and be broke, but give yourself a little project for the month or the year,” she said. After two years in the house, the Leibs still love it. It’s the place where the family pauses from their daily rou-

A rustic bench welcomes visitors to the home.

tine to appreciate each other. “It’s like our haven,” she said. l

Signature Communities -“where your family calls home.” e-signaturehomes.com 48 | ShelbyLiving.com


Play & Stay www.facebook.com/pages/City-of-Pelham

in Pelham

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April 2013 | 49


HOME & FOOD

ABOVE LEFT: Ashley Mac’s club sandwich features sliced ham, turkey, roast beef, bacon, cheddar cheese and fresh toppings. ABOVE RIGHT: Ashley Mac’s offers fresh food, catering and to-go casseroles and other dishes. PAGE 51: Ashley McMakin recently opened her third Ashley Mac’s location in Inverness.

Homestyle with a twist W

Story by CHRISTINE BOATWRIGHT Photographs by JON GOERING

hen walking into Ashley Mac’s, patrons are immediately greeted by smiling faces, mouthwatering food and a warm welcome into what is sure to become a favorite luncheon location. Owner Ashley McMakin greets guests by name and with open arms as women of all ages — and a few men — look for 50 | ShelbyLiving.com

a chic, lovely place to lunch. Ashley Mac’s newest location, which opened in January, is located at 5299 Valleydale Road in Inverness. With a degree in marketing from the University of Alabama, Ashley McMakin launched her career in an advertising agency, but soon grew tired of her desk job. McMakin and a coworker decided to turn their love of cooking into a small

catering business, each contributing $250 to a joint checking account. What started out as a hobby quickly grew, and three months later, McMakin’s husband, Andy, encouraged her to quit her marketing job to pursue her culinary dream. “When I quit, my partner thought I was crazy, but two weeks later, she quit too,” McMakin said.


A year later, McMakin’s partner decided to leave the business to start a family. Soon after, Andy McMakin quit his job as a certified public accountant and helped his wife search for a place to grow her business. McMakin grew up in Birmingham and graduated from Briarwood High School, so she was familiar with the area. The couple found a Bluff Park location in 2007, and the catering business flourished. “It kept growing by word of mouth,” McMakin said. “I was doing all of the cooking, and my husband did the business side.” McMakin learned to cook from her mother, Sandy Deaton, but learned a lot with “trial and error, especially in the first three years of business,” she said. “I would try a recipe, and I would find random recipes in magazines and change them,” she said. When the McMakins started a family of their own, McMakin trained a chef on her tweaked recipes to make sure the business would continue to grow without her having to be in the kitchen constantly. “We didn’t want to make it personcentric so it would fall apart if I wasn’t there. You can’t base it just on one person’s talent,” she said. Ashley Mac’s first venture into faceto-face customer service was in opening a “tiny shop” in her grandmother’s Cahaba Heights antique shop. The location served as a pick-up spot for customers who didn’t want to drive to Bluff Park. Less than a year later, McMakin opened her first café in Cahaba Heights. McMakin launched Ashley Mac’s theme of “café, catering, gourmet to go,” and focused on fresh, light ingredients that would serve customers in a café setting or ready-to-serve meals from the restaurant’s freezer. When the McMakins opened their second eat-in café in Inverness, the community responded with appreciation. “We serve homestyle food, but a little better than you can get at home,” she said. “It’s homestyle food kicked up a little bit.” April 2013 | 51


CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: Employees ring up a customer at the Inverness location, which opened in January. Ashley Mac’s signature strawberry cake comes in mini cupcakes, cupcakes, cake slices and whole cakes. The Baby Bleu Salad is dressed with homemade poppyseed vinaigrette to complement the tangy bleu cheese and sweet fruit. McMakin is a Shelby County native and a Briarwood Christian School graduate.

52 | ShelbyLiving.com


Luscious chicken salad and melt-in-your-mouth strawberry cake are in the menu’s forefront, followed by a vast array of sandwiches, salads and sweets. The Signature Chicken Salad is a blend of celery, fresh red grapes, special seasoning and fresh chicken served on a buttery croissant. “It’s the best chicken salad I’ve put in my mouth,” said Judy Moore, who works the restaurant’s counter. “Also, I’m a chocolate eater, but the strawberry cake is awesome.” To satisfy a sweet tooth, McMakin’s mother’s signature strawberry cake recipe fits the bill perfectly. Ashley Mac’s also offers everything from triple chocolate brownies to cake truffles. Ashley Mac’s also features a large selection of frozen casseroles, desserts, soups and desserts for an easy take-out meal option. The eggplant parmesan, a frozen take-out option, is a light dish made with roasted, fresh eggplant, homemade tomato sauce, cheese and herbs. The McMakins are “big Bama fans,” so in addition to a few more Ashley Mac’s in the Birmingham area, McMakin may open one in Tuscaloosa. McMakin credits her partnership with her husband for the reason the business has been so successful. “I feel really blessed because of the way the Lord put it together with me and my husband. We’re both business majors. I have a marketing background, and he’s the numbers guy,” McMakin said. “So many people in this industry are creative without the business side. You have to have someone you trust on the business side.” For more information, visit Ashleymacs.com. l April 2013 | 53


HOME & FOOD

Irene’s Butterbeans and Cornbread Irene’s Butterbeans: This recipe can also be put into a slow cooker on low for at least four hours. Serve beans with cornbread and a sliced onion. 1 lb. dried butterbeans Salt to taste 2 Tbsp. Crisco 2 slices of bacon or 3 bouillon cubes

Directions: 1. Wash beans thoroughly, and remove any beans that are undesirable. Transfer beans to a large pot and cover with cold water. 2. Bring to a boil on medium heat. 3. Turn off heat and put lid on pot. 4. Let beans sit for at least three hours. 5. Drain water off and add fresh water to cover beans. Salt to taste. 6. Add Crisco and bacon or bouillon cubes. 7. Simmer slowly for several hours, making sure to add water as needed. 8. Beans are done when they are no longer hard.

Cornbread: 1/4 cup vegetable oil 2 cups self-rising cornmeal 1 cup self-rising flour 2 cups buttermilk 1. Preheat oven to 485 degrees. 2. Pour oil to oven-safe pan and heat on medium. 3. While pan is heating, combine cornmeal, flour and buttermilk in a bowl. Mix until batter is smooth. 4. Pour batter into center of pan. You should hear a sizzle. 5. Transfer pan to preheated oven and cook approximately 30 minutes. 6. Remove from oven carefully, and transfer to plate. 54 | ShelbyLiving.com


Preserving a dying art

Story by ChrisTiNe boaTWrighT Photographs by JoN goeriNg

V

ickie Lewis learned the “dying art” of cooking from-scratch, Southern food from her mother, Irene. Using her mother’s original cast-iron skillet and metal pot, Lewis whips up cornbread and butterbeans in the same way her mother did. Lewis and her family also live in the same Calera home in which she was raised. “I was always in the kitchen under her feet,” Lewis said of her mother. “I was always wanting to know.” Lewis’ relationship with cooking kicked off when she entered a 4H cook off at 10 years old. She was disappointed when her cornbread entry won second place, but never gave up her love of culinary creations. Lewis, who works “three minutes” down the road at Calera City Hall as the

city’s assistant city clerk, said since she was the only girl in the family she continues to hold family dinners around her table. The secret to her down-home cornbread is all about the heat. “You’ve got to get that sizzle,” she said. “It has to be the right temperature.” The recipe calls for a preheated oven set at 485 degrees because “you’ve got to have that crunch,” Lewis said. “My mother always made (cornbread) round. She called it a ‘pone’ of cornbread,” Lewis said. “I’m still not sure what a pone was.” Another secret involves the condition of the skillet in which Lewis cooks her cornbread. “I never wash the pan, but it’s not like it sounds,” Lewis said. “I don’t use detergent. I just wipe it out. It’s dedicated solely to cornbread. It’s seasoned well, and I only use it for that.” Lewis is also known for her “sweet”

FOR ALL YO U

meatloaf, as she adds brown sugar, and her red velvet cake. “I make pretty good biscuits, but not as good as Mom’s. I think I surpassed my mom’s cornbread, though,” she said. Lewis adopted her butterbean recipe from her mother. “Northerners tend to think they’re bland, but I love them,” she said. “It’s all about how you season them. Seasoning is the key to everything.” l

OFING NEEDS April 2013 | 55


SHELBY SPOTTED

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College Night

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The University of Montevallo held the 94th annual College Night Feb. 9 in Palmer Auditorium. 1. Ed, Laura and Worth Bice 2. Meaghan Hirtle and Laura Beth Askelson 3. Stephen and Jenny Bell 4. Ali and Karen Lake 5. Riley and Shelby Beddingfield 6. Sandy Gwin Burleson and Grace Burleson 7. Meghan and Dan Suda 8. Ashley Gothard and Sky Johnson 9. Tonya Fleming and Molly Meadows 10. John and Melinda Gragnani

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11. Andrew Cooper and Diana Douglas 12. Mechay Rush and Ashley Lowe 13. Audrey Atkins and Darby Jack Gustafson 14. Abigail Bradley, Shelley McMoy, Sydney Upp and Savannah Champion 15. Che Carlisle, Towanda Hughes and Challis Wells 16. Brook and Melanie Earley 17. Christina Daley and Maygan Hamilton 18. Zane Davitz, Hannah Davitz, Ryan Moody and Chase Stewart 19. Lindsay Hodgens, Ben Bryan and Ashton Palomaria

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April 2013 | 57


SHELBY SPOTTED

Quilt exhibit

The Shelby County Arts Council hosted a quilt exhibit at its gallery in Columbiana during the month of February. 1. Alabama First Lady Dianne Bentley and Carol Hill 2. Duffie Morrison, Agnes Poole, Sarah Atchison and Judy Elliot 3. Allison Stephens, Rachel Fowler, Terri Sullivan and Ceil Jenkins Snow 4. Trey Sullivan and Alabama First Lady Dianne Bentley

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April 2013 | 59


SHELBY SPOTTED

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GSCCC luncheon

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The Greater Shelby County Chamber of Commerce held its annual meeting at the Pelham Civic Complex on Jan. 30. 1. Curt Bloom and Kevin Anderson 2. Brenda and Bob Fitzgerald 3. Lisa Glasgow, Gail Blankenship and Beverly Baker 4. Gib Johnson and Paul Graham 5. John Samaniego and Ethan Vice 6. Alison Weinstein and Lori Glennon 7. Mike and Sue Ellen Gerrels 8. Brian Massey and Stephen Preston 9. Rick Hayes and Mark Hall 10. Warren Caldwell and the Rev. Green Calhoun

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11. Lacey Bacchus, Jason Irvin, TJ Fincher and Gib Johnson 12. Dough Seagle, Alicia Rudolph and David Willingham 13. Wendy Sandlin and Vicki Everett 14. Kim Miller, Cris Nelson, Amanda Traywick and Leslie Bartlett

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1

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Thompson High time capsule Former faculty and students of Thompson High School in Alabaster attended the Jan. 25 opening of a time capsule that was hidden in 1988.

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1. Thomas Johnson, Betty Simmons and Bobby Joe Seales 2. Peggy Kent and Wynn Brakefield 3. Dr. Danny Steele and Michelle Holdbrooks 4. Andy Lackey and Brian Lee

April 2013 | 63


SHELBY SPOTTED

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The Riverchase Women’s Club hosted the Riverchase Loves Artists annual art show at Riverchase Country Club Feb. 2.

1. Tyson Stewart and Corinne Phillips 2. Toni Palmer and Cathy Wheeler 3. Meghan Richdson and Brian Bohanan 4. Nikki and Wayne Barré 5. Alexis and Dan Bullard 6. Carol, Hayden and Tracy Bruser 7. Christine Martin and Cyndi Smith 8. Anne Moore and Robin Minor 9. Cecily and Arthur Chaney 10. Liesa Pitts and Cathy Gué

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11. Peggy Roberts, Cherie Season and Laura Cunningham 12. Pam McCormick and Teresa Tice 13. Donna Parks and Frankie Mitchell 14. Gloria and Steve Adams 15. Eric and Tonja Johnson 16. Brenda Cook and Sheryl Heen

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April 2013 | 65


SHELBY SPOTTED

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Shelby County’s 195th birthday celebration

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Shelby County’s 195th birthday celebration was held Feb. 3 at the Shelby County Museum in Columbiana.

1. Harpersville Mayor Theoangelo Perkins, Brittany, Kinsley and Makayla Perkins 2. Cody Bearden, Columbiana Fire Chief Johnny Howard, Columbiana Police Chief Lamar Vick, Capt. Rodney Reed, Assistant Fire Chief Jerry Lamb, Parrish Argo and Brian Stevens 3. Poarch Creek Indian Senior Princess Samantha Miller and Edwina Chapell 4. Miss Shelby County Outstanding Teen Sydney Slaughter, Ms. Senior Alabama Niva Dorough, Miss Alabama Anna Laura Bryan and Miss Shelby County Jamie Brooks 5. Bobby Joe Seales and Sen. Jabo Waggoner 6. Bill and Beverly Justice, Jim Lewis, Dr. Tim Nettles, Dr. Fred Olive III, Scott Martin and Mickey Griffin 7. Edwin and Sarah Atchison, Beverly Hall and Ted Wells 8. Ouida Mayfield and Carol Hill

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9. Sen. J.T. “Jabo” Waggoner, Rep. Mike Hill, Sen. Cam Ward and Columbiana Mayor Stancil Handley 10. Josh Boggan, Matthew Rush, Jeff Bomberg, Tim Billingsley and Terry Gower 11. Leslie and Teresa Whiting 12. Robert Kelley, Lindsey Allison, Diane Ellis and Ricky Ruston

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SHELBY SPOTTED

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Leadership Shelby County Alumni Social

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Leadership Shelby County held a Nacho Average Alumni Social Jan. 29 at Superior Grill. 1. Lynn Cook, Sally Price, Jim Miller, Randy Fuller and Kathy Miller 2. Paul Rogers, Jennifer Whisenant and Bill Holmes 3. Calvin Gunn and Diane Seales 4. Micheal Smith and Bill Sanders 5. Cindy Nicholson, Ken Jackson and Rene Day 6. Randy May and Joey Ritchey 7. Sally Price, Tricia Corbett and Lindsey Allison 8. Michael Sznajderman, Bobby Joe Seales, Cindy Nicholson, Leslie Greenwood, Wayne Shirley and Garland Stansell

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9. Leslie Greenwood, Donna Francavilla and Cindy Nicholson 10. Marty Connors and Doug Sweet 11. Donna Francavilla and Jacqui Sweet 12. Carol Bruser and Randy Fuller 13. Bobby Joe Seales, Clovia Wheeler and Maurice Mercer

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April 2013 | 69


SHELBY SPOTTED

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Wild about Chocolate

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Wild About Chocolate, a fundraiser benefiting the Alabama Wildlife Center in Pelham, was held Feb. 9 at Rosewood Hall in Homewood. 1. Lauren and Bill Edmundson 2. Mark and Crystal Berry 3. AWC Executive Director Carol Argo and Ken Jackson 4. David and Stephanie Kennedy 5. Tine Hoffmeister and Keith Feinman 6. Erin and Daniel Garrett 7. Brent and Lisa Warren 8. Artist Justin Gaffrey 9. Jennifer Roby and Jennifer White 10. Sean and Jen Palmer

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11. Kaitlin McCulley, April Jones and Jayde Moore 12. Steve and Linda Jones 13. Dana Blount and Liz Rozzelle 14. Ross and Katie Kingery 15. Kelli Steward, Pam Cooper and Peggy Buckman

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Alabama Furniture Market Behind the Gates in Calera www.alabamafurnituremarket.com 205.668.9995 • Open 7 days a week April 2013 | 71


SHELBY SPOTTED

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Celebration of Arts

The Alabama Federation of Women’s Clubs of Shelby County hosted a Celebration of the Arts benefiting the Shelby County Arts Council Feb. 2 at the First Baptist Church in Columbiana. 1. Kathy Copeland, Terri Sullivan and Rachel Fowler 2. Miss Shelby County Outstanding Teen Sydney Slaughter, Ms. Senior Alabama Niva Dorough and Miss Shelby County Jamie Brooks 3. Gerie Kelley and Mary Louise Jones 4. Tammy Holcombe, Jade Bertovic and Emolly Holcombe 5. Mary Berryman and Jane Hampton 6. April Stone and Donna Smelcer 7. Rene Day and Sandy Dollar 8. Hunter Rush, Maddie Kirkland and Sarah Elizabeth Head 9. Jan Greer, Roberta Atkinson, Pam Thompson and Darcie Carlson 10. Columbiana Mayor Stancil Handley and Helen Dean 72 | ShelbyLiving.com

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11. Sarah Atchison and Carolyn Mundy 12. Terri and Trey Sullivan 13. Dianne Bentley Ellis, First Lady Dianne Bentley and Martha Bentley Ferguson 14. Lindsey and Lynn Dodson, David and Janice Falkner and Edna Sealy 15. Alana Ray, Helen Ray, Joan Hinson and Tresa House 16. Ouida Mayfield and Carol Hill 17. Gloria Turner and Linda Cundiff 18. Doris Duice, Phyllis French, Shirley Venente, Lisa Burdette and Janet Bonds 19. Krista Smith, Marcia Murrah, Leslie Murrah, Suzan Cochran and Dee Neumann

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April 2013 | 73


SHELBY SPOTTED

SSCC luncheon

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The South Shelby Chamber of Commerce luncheon was held Feb. 7 at United Methodist Church in Columbiana. 1. Cindy Smith and Judy Glass 2. Jennifer Chappell, Vickie Everett and April Stone 3. April Ling, Hartley Nichols and Renee Castleberry 4. Mayor Earl Niven and June Niven

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April 2013 | 75


SHELBY SPOTTED

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Cowboy Day

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Cowboy Day was held Feb. 16 in downtown Columbiana. 1. Glenn Reese and Tom Saunders 2. Ann Handley and Columbiana Mayor Stancil Handley 3. Peggy Wood, Ruth Bliss and Madison and Carter Wood 4. Chris and Harleigh Wood 5. Alan, Dawn, Keaton, Kollin, Katelyn Keef and Bradley Thomas 6. Dwight and Charity Bentley 7. Randi Reaves-Welch, Aubrey Schreiber and Emily Dover 8. John and William Hurt and Rick Honeycut 9. Dalton and Dawson Brooks and Tim, Cole and Pam Pesnell 10. Robert, Katherine, Tripp, Rushton and Jackson Robinson 76 | ShelbyLiving.com

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AMERICAN VILLAGE

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D the po iscover wer an d dram of Ame ric a for ind a’s journey epende nce, liberty self-go and vernm ent.

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April 1775 - The "shot heard 'round the world" marked the beginning of the American Revolutionary War and the battles of Lexington and Concord - a chain of events which led to the signing of the Declaration of Independence. Experience firsthand America’s journey for independence and self-government with a visit to the American Village in Montevallo. Schedule your school or group visit online at www.americanvillage.org or join our public tour Monday-Friday at 10, 12 and 2.

205-665-3535

or 1-877-811-1776 ext. 1062 P. O. Box 6 • Montevallo, AL 35115

“Every child should experience this! Great history lesson.”

Mary – Bayshore Christian; Fairhope, AL

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11. Alex Cuellor and Robin and Taylor McCullough 12. Gregg Rushton, Gary Crumpton, Tripp and Red Robinson 13. Brad, Betsy and Amber Davis 14. Paulette, Daron and Lacey Bell and Randy Rey

1st Week is FREE

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Greystone Ladies Club The Greystone Ladies Club celebrated its 20th anniversary Feb. 13 at the Founders Club.

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1. Former GLC presidents: Jeannie Johnson, Brenda Sheehan, Diane Cuicchi, Mary Sue Ludwig, Susan Shirley, Marie Michel, Debbie Benson, Sherry Best, D.J. DeCastro, Sue Nuby, Carolyn Haynes and Alicia Cuevas 2. Taylor Tassone and Janie Condra 3. Katila Farley and Kathy Frey 4. Jean Gaylord 5. Carolyn Haynes and Hollis Traylor

April 2013 | 79


OUT & ABOUT

Nocturnal Creatures

April 4

Run 4 Mike

Alabama, the Double Oak Duathlon returns to Oak Mountain State Park on April 6 at 8 a.m.

Folk Art Exhibit: The Shelby County Arts Council will host an opening exhibit for “Folk Art Exhibit: The Roots of American Music,” featuring the work of Bruce Andrews and Lennie Jones, at its gallery, 104 Mildred Street, Columbiana, on Saturday, April 2, from 2-5 p.m. Exhibit dates are April 4-30.

Walk for Autism: Walk for Autism will be held Saturday, April 6, at Veterans Park, 4800 Jaguar Drive, Hoover. The event includes a 5k and a 2-mile awareness walk. Visitwalkforautismal.com.

April 5

April 7

Shelby County Best BBQ Contest: The Third Annual Shelby County’s Best BBQ Cook-off, hosted by the Shelby County Arts Council and the South Shelby Chamber of Commerce, will be April 5 at West College Street in Columbiana. Prizes awarded for Best Ribs, Best Sauce and Chef’s Specialty. Public welcome from 4-7 p.m. Activities include an art show, car exhibit and entertainment. Call 205-669-0044.

April 6

Dave Matthews Band: Dave Matthews Band will perform April 6 at 7 p.m. at the Oak Mountain Amphitheatre, 1000 Amphitheatre Drive, Pelham. Visit Ticketmaster.com. Double Oak Duathlon: Formerly known as Powerman 80 | ShelbyLiving.com

Unscripted: Admire the works of local fine arts photographers at “Unscripted,” a tri-annual gallery held from 1-4 p.m. at Gretchen B. Photography, 833 Creekside Court, Helena. Visit Gretchenbphotography.com.

April 11-14

Six Degrees of Separation: When a young AfricanAmerican man shows up at the New York apartment of wellto-do-couple, he immediately wins them over with his charm and the claim of being Sidney Poitier’s son. As their involvement with him takes unexpected twists and turns, they question not only his identity but their own. Watch the University of Montevallo Theatre’s performance at Reynolds Theatre April 11-13 at 7 p.m. at April 14 at 2 p.m.

April 12-13

Stadium Fest: Stadium Fest 2013, a free Christian music festival, will be held April 1213 at Spain Park Stadium, 4700 Jaguar Drive, Hoover. Hours are 6-9:30 p.m. on Friday and noon-9:30 p.m. on Saturday. Visit Stadiumfest.com.

April 13

Run 4 Mike: The Run 4 Mike 5k and Fun Run will be held April 13 at Veterans Park in Alabaster. The 5k begins at 7:30 a.m. and the fun run at 8:15 a.m. The race supports a non-profit foundation to promote awareness and raise funds for a cure and prevention of Transverse Myelitis, a spinal cord disease. Visit Active.com or google “Run 4 Mike.” Montevallo Art Show: The seventh annual Montevallo Art Show will be held at Orr Park on Saturday, April 13, from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Visit Montevalloartscouncil.org.

April 18

Big Celebrity Golf Classic: The eighth annual Kevin Derryberry Big Celebrity Golf Classic will be held Thursday, April 18, at Timberline Golf Club in Calera. Morning flight sign-in is 7 a.m., and afternoon flight sign-in is 11:30 a.m. Call

Shelby County Best BBQ Contest

205-663-4968 or 205-515-3769. Visit Kevinderryberry.com. Montevallo Chamber Golf Tournament: The Montevallo Chamber of Commerce Golf Tournament will be held Thursday, April 18, at 11 a.m. at Montevallo Golf Club. Chamber members and guests are invited. Visit. Montevallocc. com or call 205-665.1519.

April 18-27

“Onesies”: The South City Theatre, 3640 Highway 26 in Alabaster, will perform “Onesies: An evening of comedies by David Ives.” The event is sure to feature something that tickles everyone’s funnybone, from monkeys typing “Hamlet” to a “Groundhog Day” date in a restaurant. Performances will be held April 18-20, 2527 at 8 p.m. and April 21 at 2 p.m. Call 205-621-2128 or visit Southcitytheatre.com.

April 18-21

“Smoke on the Mountain”: The Montevallo Main Street Players will perform “Smoke on the Mountain” April 18-21 at Parnell Memorial Library, 277 Park Road, Montevallo. An interactive musical in two acts, “Smoke on the Mountain” is set in the 1930s and tells the


story of the singing Sanders family. Performances are scheduled for April 18-20 at 7:30 p.m. and April 21 at 2 p.m. Visit Montevalloartscouncil. org/mmsp.

April 19

TJ atchison golf Classic: The inaugural TJ Atchison Golf Classic will be held Friday, April 19, at Ballantrae Golf Club in Pelham. Shotgun start at 1 p.m. The foundation raises awareness and funding for spinal cord research. Potential sponsors or participants should call Tory Minus at Info@tjatchisonfoundation. com or 205-996-5014. Visit TJAtchisonfoundation.com.

April 19-20

“albert herring”: “Albert Herring,” a classic opera by Benjamin Britten, tells the story of a shy, young man who is crowned the king of May Day. Performances will be held

at LeBaron Recital Hall at the University of Montevallo April 19-20 at 7:30 p.m.

April 20

Nocturnal Creatures: Come learn about the creatures that are active at night with a hike through Oak Mountain State Park in Pelham. This hike will take place in conjunction with Southeastern Outing and will begin at the park office parking lot on Terrace Drive at 7 p.m. Call 205-620-2520.

April 26-28

musical production: This small cast musical presented by UM’s advanced musical theater lab class once again explores a specific style of contemporary musical theatre. Performances will be held at Chichester Black Box Theatre April 26-27 at 7:30 p.m. and April 28 at 2 p.m.

April 27

Calera strawberry festival:

The third annual Calera Strawberry Festival will be held at Oliver Park, 9758 Highway 25, on Saturday, April 27, from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. The festival will include vendors, non-profit groups, musical performances, fresh produce and more. Visit Calerafarmersmarket.com. special equestrians gala: The Special Equestrians Gala: A Salute to Changing Lives will be held Saturday, April 27, at The Briar Rose Farm, 3552 Highway 331, Columbiana. The event will include hors d’oeuvres, dinner, drinks, music by members of the Birmingham concert orchestra, a musical ride presentation by champion dressage rider Rob Moore and a silent auction. Visit Specialequest.org or call 205-987-WHOA. alan Jackson: Country singer Alan Jackson will perform April 27 at 7:30 p.m. at the Oak

Mountain Amphitheatre, 1000 Amphitheatre Drive, Pelham. Visit Ticketmaster.com. Walk me home: The Walk Me Home 5k will be held Saturday, April 27, at 8 a.m. at Veterans Park in Hoover. The event raises awareness of the need for foster parents. italian food festival: The community’s biggest Italian food and cultural event of the year will take place Saturday, April 27, 4-11 p.m., at Saint Mark the Evangelist Catholic Church, 7340 Cahaba Valley Road (Hwy 119) in Shelby County. The festival will feature authentic Italian cuisine and cookies, a rock-climbing cookies, children’s activities, musical entertainment and a bonfire finale. Lawn chairs are welcome. Tickets are $20 for adults, $10 for children, available at Feastofsaintmark. com. l

April 2013 | 81


WHY I LOVE SHELBY COUNTY

Randy Fuller:

‘The greatest strengths of the school system are the people’

Story by kaTie mCdoWell Photograph CoNTribuTed

contribute to the success of our students.

helby County Schools Superintendent Randy Fuller has been an educator in Alabama for 31 years. Originally from Sprott in Perry County, he received a bachelor’s degree in commerce and business administration from the University of Alabama and postgraduate degrees in education from the University of Montevallo. He lives in the Oak Mountain community and has three children and one grandchild.

When you were a child, what did you want to be when you grew up? When I was a young child, I wanted to be a farmer like my grandfather. As I got older and moved into high school, I wanted to become a teacher and basketball coach.

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Why did you want to go into education? Aside from my family, my teachers had a tremendous influence in my life. They supported me, pushed me to do my best and would not allow me to be unsuccessful. I wanted to have that same influence on young people and to make a difference in their lives also. At what point did you realize you wanted to be an administrator? Why? When I was a teacher and a coach, my principal told me that he felt that I had a great influence on the students and teachers at the school. He asked me to be a part-time administrative assistant. I took him up on the offer and discovered that I could help and influence more people from an administrative position. The rest is history. Each administrative position that I’ve held since then has

82 | ShelbyLiving.com

given me a better opportunity to make a difference in the lives of students. What do you enjoy most about your job? Having the opportunity to work with our students, teachers, staff, parents and stakeholders has been a joy for me. We all have a common goal of making all of our students successful. What do you consider the Shelby County School System’s greatest strengths? The greatest strengths of the Shelby County School System are the people. We have passionate teachers, staff and administrators who value providing a quality education for its students. Parental support and collaboration with community and civic leaders all

What lessons have you learned from parenting? Recognizing that all three of my children are different and have different needs has been the lesson that has helped me most as a parent to love them, support them and guide them in their own special way. The three Ts — “Time, Touch and Talk” — are so important. What are your hobbies? While I enjoy working outside in my yard, golf is the hobby I enjoy most. When I get an opportunity, I love to play golf with my son and my friends. Who is your role model? I guess from a young age, my role model has been my grandfather. Now that I’m a grandfather myself, I really appreciate who he was and how he helped me become who I am today. He instilled the values of integrity, hard work and humility that have guided me throughout my life. l


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Shelby Living April 2013