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locations might be multiuser developments – if you’ve got domestic residents or share ser vices with other trades , they might not necessarily want CO2 at 80 -90 bar in th o s e a re as , s o we ’re a ls o trialling hydrocarbons used in conjunction with a glycol system,” he reveals. “ We e nv isag e that C O 2 will be able to deliver 95% of what we need,” he explains. “It ’s just the odd store that is more challenging , where you might need another tool in the toolbox to be able to implement a natural refrigerant solution.”

LEFT A lift and shuttle system takes up to 7,500 delivery boxes − known as totes − from the shelves to the delivery and back per hour.

Older stores installed between 10 and 20 years ago continue to operate on HFCs, so the company cannot yet say that it is HFC-free. “When systems come to the end of their useful life, we’ll replace them w i t h a C O 2 s y s te m , ” A r r o w s m i t h says. “If we’re doing a substantial amount of work and changing nearly all the fixtures, then we’d change it out to CO 2 .”

A changing urban landscape Hypermarkets still represent around 60% of Europe’s food retail landscape. Yet urbanisation means space is at a premium in European cities. Other trends, such as smaller households and the growing popularity of convenience food for busy lifestyles, also favour smaller, more flexible s to r e f o r m a t s . A n y f u t u r e - p r o o f r e f r i g e r a ti o n s t r a te g y m u s t t a ke account of these trends. Convenience stores initially proved a tougher nut to crack for Sainsbury’s. “In supe r mar kets you have large r systems, and it’s easier to get efficient NatRef systems at cost-parity with HFC systems,” Arrowsmith argues.

Summer 2018 // Accelerate Australia & NZ

“The smaller format posed a few more challenges, but we’re there now – it just took a little more of a rethink.” He is confident that the new generation of products for smaller capacities and smaller equipment can satisf y the demand. “It’s becoming easier now, for smaller formats,” he argues. A r r o w s m i t h w o u l d k n o w. P r i o r to j o i n i n g Sainsbury’s in December 2013, he worked in the field of refrigeration contracting for 32 years. “ This experience helps when I’m talking to contractors, because I’m from their background,” h e s a y s w i t h a s m i l e . “ T h e y ’r e a w a r e o f my bac kground , because I was probably a commercial retail competitor of theirs.” As refrigeration design manager for all Sainsbury’s stores the length and breadth of the UK, Arrowsmith is well aware of the challenges facing the commercial refrigeration sector. “It ’s no good having the latest thing on the market if it’s not readily available or reliable – we can’t have customers walking out without the frozen food that they’re looking for,” he quips. One oft-cited barrier to wider market penetration of natural refrigerant-based HVAC&R systems is a reported shortage of components, particularly

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Accelerate Australia & NZ #8 Summer 2018  

DRAKES: PIONEERING CO2 IN AUSTRALIA Facing some of the highest energy costs in the world in its South Australia home, Drakes Supermarkets –...

Accelerate Australia & NZ #8 Summer 2018  

DRAKES: PIONEERING CO2 IN AUSTRALIA Facing some of the highest energy costs in the world in its South Australia home, Drakes Supermarkets –...

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