Page 1

W eekend SV

Saukvalley.com

Your source for news and sports 7 days a week

Serving Lee, Whiteside, Carroll, Ogle and Bureau counties Saturday&Sunday, January 18-19, 2014 $2.00

Newman to clash GOP CANDIDATE DROPS with Rockridge OUT OF STATE HOUSE RACE LOCAL, A10 BOYS BASKETBALL, B1

LOCAL ECONOMY | STERLING

What’s next for Kmart plaza? Mayor: No one has expressed an interest yet BY PAM EGGEMEIER peggemeier@saukvalley.com 800-798-4085, ext. 570

STERLING – The liquidation sale is over and the doors are locked. The strip mall loosely

known as Sterling Center is without its anchor store, and the huge Kmart building at 2901 E. Lincolnway is available for sale or lease. The complex offers 104,960 square feet for prospective tenants. Built in 1972, it was gutted and renovated in the 1990s. It once was home to seven businesses, but now houses only two. One of those is Kidder Music, which has been at the mall

since April inside 1990. An obviWith a ous concern is site secured, the reduction owner hopes in foot traffic Jimmy John’s that is likely to will open in come with the Rock Falls by loss of a bigearly summer, box retailer A5 like Kmart. The store has no plan to move at this time, Kidder President Beth Houlihan said. While the Kmart clo-

sure has brought uncertainty regarding the mall’s future, things could ultimately work out for the better, Houlihan said. “We would love to have a situation where this is locally owned,” Houlihan said. “I think it could bring more stability. People in Chicago don’t know what happens here.” The building is owned by Kmart parent Sears Holding Co., based in Hoffman Estates.

The companies merged in 2005. Houlihan said she also believes the older buildings might be better cared for under local ownership. “I think the upkeep would improve,” she said. “I think it would be better for the community and the plaza.” The other tenant at the plaza is My Nail Salon. KMART CONTINUED ON A5

WEEKEND ENTERPRISE | 6 MONTHS AFTER THE PROPHETSTOWN FIRE

CONCEALED CARRY

Spring to action in downtown

Local law agencies can object to requests Police departments review applications BY DAVID GIULIANI dgiuliani@saukvalley.com 800-798-4085, ext. 525

Alex T. Paschal/apaschal@saukvalley.com

Prophetstown Mayor Steve Swanson looks out over the area of the historic downtown that was destroyed by fire July 15. Swanson has been busy dealing with the fire’s aftermath, but is looking forward to ground being broken in late April or early May to begin the rebuilding process on some or all of the eight now-vacant lots.

Ground could be broken in April; rebuild to start soon after BY MATT MENCARINI mmencarini@saukvalley.com 800-798-4085, ext. 529

PROPHETSTOWN – There is snow and a few pine trees where eight buildings once stood in downtown Prophetstown. By May, a construction crew might be working there. It’s been 6 months since a fire started behind Cindy Jean’s Restaurant on July 15 and spread to destroy a significant portion of the historic downtown. The rubble has been cleared, and the town and its displaced residents are moving on with their lives.

Snow likely

VOLUME 6 ISSUE 21 40 Pages

Today: 23/9 For the forecast, see Page A8

Monday Prophetstown residents look back, and ahead, after the fire. The rebuilding effort is expected to pick up steam in late April or early May, when it’s possible that a developer will “break dirt” on a new building, said Larry DeNeve, chairman of the town’s Economic Development Committee. That developer is about “99 percent” committed, DeNeve said, adding that two others have expressed a strong interest.

Rebuilding could begin less than a year after the fire because the town quickly formed a redevelopment plan, organized the cleanup, and took ownership of five of the eight lots. Mayor Steve Swanson said the town hopes to acquire two more lots soon. “The following day [after the fire], a bunch of us got together and had a meeting – people from Main Street and some of the property owners that were affected,” Swanson said. “I kind of gave them my plan, what I thought should be done.

Pub revamped

Last Alarm Firehouse Pub in Amboy has seen many improvements. See Page C1

ACTION CONTINUED ON A9

You can help Prophetstown has set up a fund, “Rebuild Prophetstown Strong,” to help clean up and rebuild the downtown. Donations can be made at Farmers National Bank branches, in Prophetstown, Geneseo and Morrison, as well as at IH Mississippi Valley Credit Union locations.

Actor, husband, dad Greg Kinnear, star of “Rake,” cherishes family Also inside USA Weekend: Reignite that spark Romantic getaways The French 75 cocktail

STERLING – Local police agencies are playing a role in the review of concealed carry applications Inside locally. How many Under a law that took effect concealed Jan. 1, state carry licenses police a r e have been in charge of requested in approving per- local counmits for con- ties? A4 cealed carry of guns, but city and county law enforcement agencies may have a 30-day window to object to applicants. Compelled by a federal court to pass such legislation, Illinois is the last state to allow concealed carry. Rock Falls Police Chief Mike Kuelper has asked to review concealed carry applications from Sterling, Rock Falls and Whiteside County. Earlier this week, his department had received 85 applications to review, he said. The department has yet to object to any. REQUESTS CONTINUED ON A4

COMMUNITY

Eyes on eagles The Sauk Valley has become a hotbed of activity for our national bird. PAGE C12

Index Births................ C5 Markets .......... A10 Business........... C1 Nation .............. A8 Classified .......... D1 Obituaries ......... A4 Comics ............. B6 Opinion............. A6 Community ..... C12 Scoreboard .... B10 Scrapbook ....... C3 Crossword Saturday ........... D5 Sports .............. B1 Support groups .. C9 Crossword Sunday ............. C8 Travel .............. C10 Dear Abby ........ C6 Weather............ A8 Lottery .............. A2 Wheels ............. D8


!s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

2014 ELECTIONS | NEW LAWS

COMMUNITY WATCH

ERROR? Getting it right 7ECAREABOUTACCU RACY ANDWEWANTTO CORRECTERRORSPROMPTLY 0LEASECALLMISTAKESTO OURATTENTIONAT  OR   EXTOR. Note to readers "ECAUSEOFTHEARTISTS VACATION THE"ABY"LUES COMICSTRIPWILLBERERUNS FOR*AN  *AN  &EB AND&EB AND

Abraham Doak  OF ,EAF2IVERAM4HURS DAYON7ALNUT!VENUEIN &ORRESTONDRIVINGWHILE LICENSEREVOKED OBSTRUCTING JUSTICEHELDAT/GLE#OUNTY *AILINLIEUOFBOND James W. Feary  OF &REEPORT4HURSDAYWARRANT FORFAILURETOAPPEARPOSTED BONDANDGIVENNOTICETO APPEARINCOURT Perry Shaw  OF&REE PORT4HURSDAYWARRANTSFOR FAILURETOAPPEARANDCON TEMPTOFCOURTPOSTEDBOND ANDGIVENNOTICETOAPPEAR INCOURT

Police POLICE & FIRE State Adan T. Garcia  OF

Sterling Police

Daniel J. Eddy  OF $IXONAM4HURSDAY AT,OCUSTAND7EST3ECOND STREETSDRIVINGUNDERTHE INFLUENCE DRIVINGTHEWRONG WAYONAONE WAYGIVEN NOTICETOAPPEARINCOURT Desiree S. Blazek  OF 3TERLINGPM4HURSDAY AT7EST3EVENTH3TREETAND !VENUE&FAILURETOYIELD ATANINTERSECTIONISSUED ) BOND 17-year-old girlFROM3TER LINGPM4HURSDAYAT %AST&OURTH3TREETANDTH !VENUESPEEDINGGIVEN NOTICETOAPPEARINCOURT

%DGERTON 7ISPM 4HURSDAYON)NTERSTATEIN /GLE#OUNTYSPEEDING NO VALIDDRIVERSLICENSEISSUED ) BONDANDGIVENNOTICETO APPEARINCOURT Karla Sanchez  OF2OCKFORDAM 7EDNESDAYATSTATE2OUTE AND&RANKLIN3TREETIN /REGONDRIVINGWHILELICENSE SUSPENDED OPERATIONOF VEHICLEWITHSUSPENDED REGISTRATIONISSUED) BOND ANDGIVENNOTICETOAPPEAR INCOURT

BIRTHDAYS

(APPYBIRTHDAYTO*IM -C#ORMICK !DAH-ILLS Dixon Police !NDY3COTT  !MBER !VELAR ,INDA$AY 'LENNA Brandon A. Hunt  !LLMON -ARG"ITY $OREEN OF$IXONPM&RIDAY "ONTZ -IKE&ELDTHOUSE INTHEBLOCKOF3OUTH AND3USAN%PPERSON ALLON (ENNEPIN!VENUE,A3ALLE #OUNTYWARRANTFORFAILURETO 3ATURDAY APPEARnPOSSESSIONOFDRUG (APPYBIRTHDAYTO.IC PARAPHERNALIAPOSTEDBOND (OLLDORF .ILA(ARRIS 2ON ANDRELEASEDWITHNOTICETO "USHAW AND*AMES7ATER HOUSE ALLON3UNDAY APPEARINCOURT

LOTTERY NUMBERS Pick Three-Midday:   &IREBALL.ONE Pick Three-Evening:   &IREBALL Pick Four-Midday:    &IREBALL.ONE Pick Four-Evening:    &IREBALL.ONE My 3-Midday:    My 3-Evening:    Lucky Day Lotto – Midday:      Lucky Day Lotto –

Evening:      Estimated Lotto jackpot: MILLION Estimated Mega Millions jackpot: $ MILLION

Estimated Powerball jackpot: MILLION

MEGA MILLIONS      Mega Ball:  Megaplier: 

www.saukvalley.com

17 years old and voting Some can cast ballots in this year’s primaries BY DAVID GIULIANI DGIULIANI SAUKVALLEYCOM    EXT

DIXON – Helen Pate of Dixon, who plans to vote in the March 18 primary election, will be among a new group of voters – 17-year-olds. Under a new state law, Illinois 17-year-olds can vote in the Republican and Democratic primaries in March, as long as they will be 18 by the time of the Nov. 4 general election. Sharon U. Thompson, Pate’s grandmother, recently read in the newspaper about the new law and realized her granddaughter fell into the group of new voters. “I knew she was qualified,� said Thompson, a former Lee County treasurer and County Board member. On Wednesday, Thompson went with Pate to the county clerk’s office, where Pate registered to vote. “I’ve never missed an election,� Thompson said. “Voting’s very important to me. “[The younger generation] needs to be made aware of how important it is. It’s a great freedom we have here in the United States.� Pate said her grandmother is big into politics. “I hang out at her house,� the Dixon High School senior said. “We

Alex T. Paschal/apaschal@saukvalley.com

Helen Pate, 17, of Dixon registers to vote Wednesday morning at the Lee County clerk’s office. Under a new provision of state law, Pate is allowed to vote in the March 18 primary, because she will be 18 in time for the general election on Nov. 4.

Registering to vote 4HEDEADLINETOREGIS TERTOVOTEINTHE-ARCH $EMOCRATICAND 2EPUBLICANPRIMARIES IS&EB0EOPLECAN REGISTERAFTERTHATUNTIL -ARCH BUTTHEYMUST VOTEATTHESAMETIMEAT THECOUNTYCLERKSOFFICE #ALLTHE7HITESIDE #OUNTYCLERKSOFFICEAT   ANDTHE ,EE#OUNTYCLERKSOFFICE AT  FOR MOREINFORMATION

ROCKFORD (AP) – !UTHORITIESSAIDTHEYARE INVESTIGATINGHOWAFEMALE PRISONERMANAGEDTOSTEAL A7INNEBAGO#OUNTYSHER

IFFSCARTHISWEEK PROMPT INGA HOURMANHUNT 4HE YEAR OLD2OCK FORDWOMANMANAGEDTO STEALTHESQUADCARAROUND PM4HURSDAY ACCORD INGTOAREPORTINTHE2OCK FORD2EGISTER3TAR

Rebates up to

$1,000 + 3.99%

Financing as low as

Mom

Find your ride today!

County clerk’s office, a few 17-year-olds have registered to vote so far. In Whiteside County, none had come to the counter to register as of earlier this week, County Clerk Dana Nelson said.

Love Your Car?

always talk about it.� Pate said she hadn’t thought much about the coming primaries, because she is focused on school. After graduation, she

IN BRIEF Police probe prisoner escape

plans to go to Sauk Valley Community College for 2 years, then transfer to Northern Illinois University or some other school. She hopes to become a history teacher. According to the Lee

thing for you!

t the s u ej

We h av

Ogle County Sheriff

Were we in

3ATURDAY *ANUARY 

2EMOTE 3TARTERS 3EAT 7ARMERS 5PHOLSTERY

#ONVERTIBLE 4OPS "OAT #OVERS #AR4RUCK !CCESSORIES

4ONNEAU #OVERS

7EATHER4ECH &LOOR ,INERS

!UDIO  6IDEO 'IFT #ERTIlCATES

CALL TODAY 815-625-3169  %LM !VE 3TERLING s BRUPH COMCASTNET

T R I V I A

Q U E S TI ON ? 1) What important scientific chart was created in the 1860? 2) What do the A&M abbreviate in the name Texas A&M University? Answer located in today’s classified section

Before you make a move call‌

SHIPPERTS Moving & Storage

404 N. Lincoln Ave., Dixon, IL 288-3133 www.alliedvan.com

ILL CC 10540

US DOT 76235

SVWeekend

Subscription

Ernest Appleyard

Production Director

Jennifer Baratta

Advertising Director

Kris Boggs

Subscribers should receive their paper by 7:00 a.m. weekdays, and by 8:00 a.m. Saturdays. Subscribers receiving the paper by carrier should call their your carrier, Daily Gazette subscribers should call 815-625-3600, and Telegraph subscribers should call 815-284-2222. Redelivery will be made in Sterling, Dixon, and Rock Falls. All other areas will receive

Human Resources Offers good on new and unregistered units purchased between 1/1/14-2/28/14. *On select models. See your dealer for details. Rates as low as 3.99% for 36 months. Approval, and any rates and terms provided, are based on credit worthiness. Fixed APR of 3.99%, 6.99%, or 9.99% will be assigned based on credit approval criteria. For other Amounts Financed, the payment would be approximately $29.56 per $1,000 financed. ANNUAL PERCENTAGE RATE 3.99%. Rates advertised are based on Tier A&B Customers with credit scores of 700 or higher and debt to income ratio on all tiers of 45% or less. Subject to credit approval. Approval, and any rates and terms provided, are based on credit worthiness. Tiers will be based on the customer’s credit score. Other financing offers are available. See your local dealer for details. Minimum Amount Financed $1,500; Maximum Amount Financed $50,000. Other qualifications and restrictions may apply. Financing promotions void where prohibited. Offer effective on all new and unused 2008-2014 Polaris ATV, RANGERŽ, and RZRŽ models purchased from a participating Polaris dealer between 1/1/2014 and 2/28/2014. Offer subject to change without notice. Warning: The Polaris RANGERŽ and RZRŽ are not intended for on-road use. Driver must be at least 16 years old with a valid driver’s license to operate. Passengers must be at least 12 years old and tall enough to grasp the hand holds and plant feet firmly on the floor. All SxS drivers should take a safety training course. Contact ROHVA atwww.rohva.org or (949) 255-2560 for additional information. Drivers and passengers should always wear helmets, eye protection, protective clothing, and seat belts. Always use cab nets or doors (as equipped). Be particularly careful on difficult terrain. Never drive on public roads or paved surfaces. Never engage in stunt driving, and avoid excessive speeds and sharp turns. Riding and alcohol/drugs don’t mix. Check local laws before riding on trails. ATVs can be hazardous to operate. Polaris adult models are for riders 16 and older. For your safety, always wear a helmet, eye protection and protective clothing, and be sure to take a safety training course. For safety and training information in the U.S., call the SVIA at (800) 887-2887. You may also contact your Polaris dealer or call Polaris at (800) 342-3764. Š2013 Polaris Industries Inc.

Practice Makes Perfect NORTHERN ILLINOIS RETINA Serving the Northern Illinois Area for 22 years

Susan Fowell, MD

Randy Jacobs

are 6:00 a.m. to noon on Saturday.

Press Foreman

General

Ed Bushman Telegraph General Manager

Joanne Doherty Finance Director

Sheryl Gulbranson

Circulation Director

Your Full-Time, Full-Service Fellowship Trained Retina Specialist.

Larry Lough

Practice limited to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the Vitreous and Retina, including Macular Degeneration, Diabetic Retinopathy, Retinal Detachment and Ocular Trauma.

Jeff Rogers

Executive Editor

Trevis Mayfield Publisher

Managing Editor

SV Weekend uses recycled paper and is recyclable.

Board certified in Ophthalmology, Fellowship Trained in Vitreoretinal Surgery

4855 East State Street, Rockford, IL 61108

815-226-4990

815-625-3600

815-284-2224

www.saukvalley.com


Saturday, January 18, 2014

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs!

THE PEOPLE’S VOICE

ROCK FALLS

An even bigger loser than me I

Snow emergency put into effect until Tuesday a.m.

f you haven’t faltered on a New Year’s resolution, I’m guessing it’s because you’ve never made one. I showed up at the Dixon Family YMCA on Wednesday, expecting to speak at length with CEO Andrew McFarlane about how his particular Y handles the January Joiner phenomenon. You know, the folks who lay out grandiose wellness plans, sign up for the Y membership, crush it for about 2 weeks, and then go MIA. But as I sat across the desk from Andy, I immediately noticed he was about three-quarters of the man he used to be. He confirmed that, since last February, he had lost nearly 50 pounds, down from 208 to 161. Your immediate reaction might be, “No fair! He’s got everything he needs right at work!� Sure, that doesn’t hurt. But I saw Andy working out occasionally while my wife and I lived in Dixon and used the Y, during the time he was building up to his highwater weight. He solved the problem by fixing his diet. You can hear all about his method by listening to the podcast at saukvalley.com. The long and short of it is that he didn’t set out to lose weight. He set out to change his lifestyle. That’s how you avoid becoming one of the January Joiners. Don’t set a deadline. Set a standard. For life. His first reason for changing his lifestyle warmed my heart: He wanted to be more active with his children, Anne, 6, and Drew, 5, and to set a good example for them. I was moved by that motivation because that was my own big takeaway from working on my sports nutrition series, The Naturals, last summer. I wanted to be fit for my twin girls, in the hopes that they might follow my lead. I managed to lose roughly 20 pounds in about 6 weeks. Nothing compared to Andy’s feat. I’ll abstain from offering excuses for why I have put 13 of those pounds back on since the girls’ arrival Aug. 10, but I’m In Memory of Kevin “Doc� Hummel

ROCK FALLS – The city of Rock Falls declared a winter snow emergency from 3 p.m. Friday through 6 a.m. Tuesday. That means vehicles must be parked on evennumbered side streets on even-numbered days of the month, and on oddnumbered sides on oddnumbered calendar days. All vehicles parked on posted designated snow routes are required to be removed until the route is cleared from curb to curb or until the snow emergency parking ban is lifted.

Listen in

christopher HEIMERMAN Heimerman is the Night News Editor at Sauk Valley Media. He can be reached at cheimerman@ saukvalley. com or 800-798-4085, EXT

back on the horse and in a heated weight-loss competition with fellow page designer Lucas Pauley. And that brings us to another impossible-tooverlook topic that Andy spoke about at length: accountability. His girls, the Y members, his co-workers – they all will hold him accountable. I think that’s half the battle. Without my bride, Kayla, who also is shedding pounds like crazy, I’d likely be an amorphous blob. Thanks to her, I can have my cake and eat it, too. OK, no cake. The same way I’ve given up

Go to saukvalley.com to listen to a podcast of Christopher Heimerman’s interview with $IXON&AMILY9-#! #%/!NDREW-C&ARlane. alcohol, she’s cut out her biggest vice: sweets. But I can eat mouth-watering meals, as long as they fit into MyFitnessPal’s calorie counter. When you listen to the podcast, you’ll also hear Andy talk about the glaring statistics that should give any sensible parent the howling fantods. For instance, he mentions that there’s a 1-in-2 chance that a newborn will, at some point, be diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. As I wrote about ad nauseam in The Naturals, there’s a glut of gutwrenching statistics that show how easy it is to eat unhealthy and to be unhealthy, and how the gross percentage of the populace has followed

that easy-to-tread path. Ours is a fast-food, TVtray society. I dig what my man, Lucas, said a few minutes ago. He’s been eating his meals at the table, in order to make it an experience. Such simple little changes can change the game. It’s a case-by-case basis, and we all just need to find what works for us. Ultimately, here’s where the hope lies for us: I keep running into folks who have taken aggressive measures to combat how extremely easy it is to not live well. To eat poorly. To not work out. I feel like I’ve been talking about myself too much in this column, but Andy’s story spoke to me. At times, I felt like he was reading my concluding column from The Naturals, word for word. It felt incredible to have such a sense of camaraderie. Perhaps more important, there’s the sense of competition. He’s got 14 pounds on me. It’s on, Andy.

2013 Chevy

LT

#C3158

MSRP ......................... $19,035 PETE DISCOUNT .............. $603 FACTORY REBATE ......... $1,500 CHEVROLET LOYALTY....... $500

Pete’s Price $16,423*

239

$

per monthA

* Plus tax, title, license and doc fees. A) 3.9% for 78 months with approved credit. Plus tax, title, license and doc fees. Photos for illustration only. Dealer not liable for errors.

Catholics Returning Home St. Mary’s Catholic Church  . &RANKLIN !VE 0OLO ), s 815 -946-2535

WE WELCOME YOU HOME!!

An Open Door For Returning Catholics Were you raised Catholic but do not or seldom come to church anymore? Are you a Catholic who now feels separated from your Church? Would you like to know more about the Church as it is today? Would you like to feel at home in the Catholic Church again? No matter how long you have been away, or whatever reason, we invite you to consider renewing your relationship with the church.

To some you are forgotten. To others a part of the past, but to us who loved and lost you, your memory will always last. Sadly missed by, Husband Mike, Children Tammy, James, Melissa and Heidi, and Grandchildren

JOIN US MARCH 1ST For Our

5th Annual “Top Dog�

“BAGS�

Tournament Fundraiser At The

ELKS LODGE

1279 Franklin Grove Rd., Dixon

Registration Starts At 10:00 a.m. Tournament Begins At 11:00 a.m.

TEXAS HOLD’EM POKER TOURNAMENT

Registration Starts at 3:00 p.m. Play Begins at 4:00 p.m.

7/17/56 - 1/14/13

IN MEMORIAM God knows you had to leave us, but you didn’t go alone, for parts of us went with you the day God took you home.

EVER!!!!

$50 Buy In 2/$25 Re-Buys

WWW.PETEHARKNESS.COM

4/8/46 - 1/19/2008

BIGGEST BADDEST BAGS TOURNAMENT

lus P SONIC

815-772-2171 Rt. 30 E, Morrison

BARBARA JEAN NERSTHEIMER

Additional parking restrictions are in effect downtown. No parking will be allowed from 2 to 5 a.m. during the snow emergency period on: s 7EST 3ECOND 3TREET from First Avenue to Fifth Avenue s %AST 3ECOND 3TREET from First Avenue to Avenue B s %AST 4HIRD 3TREET from First Avenue to Avenue B s  BLOCKS OF 3ECond, Third and Fourth avenues s&IRST!VENUEFROMTHE bridge to Dixon Avenue. Vehicles left in these areas will be ticketed and towed at owners’ expense.

Alex T. Paschal/apaschal@saukvalley.com

Dixon Family YMCA Executive Director Andrew McFarlane has made great strides in the past year toward getting fit. He has lost about 50 pounds since February.

Chevrolet

Sadly Missed by, His girlfriend, Beth “our kids & grandkids,� Friends & Family

STAFF REPORT news@saukvalley.com 800-798-4085, ext. 501

Tuesday: January 21 - February 25, 2014 - 7:00 - 8:30 PM St. Mary’s - Polo Parish House This process is being successfully used in our diocese and many people like you are experiencing the peace of being a Catholic Christian again.

We have been praying for your and hope that you will be pleased and surprised with what you see. Please come. St. Mary’s - Polo Parish House, 211 N. Franklin Ave., Polo, IL &OR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT &ATHER ,OUIS 4OSTO s 815 -946 -2535

BLACKHAWKS HOCKEY

TICKET RAFFLE!! WHAT YOU GET:

s"EST SEATS IN THE HOUSE (2 seats - Section 101 Row 11) s$INNER AT $ITKAS s4RANSPORTATION TO  FROM EVENT

ONLY 300 TICKETS AVAILABLE

1/$10 - 3/$25 - 7/$50 4ICKETS /N 3ALE .OW AT: s Granny Rose Animal Shelter

s/LIVERS #ORNER -ARKET s 6EGAS 3UN s &LOWERS %TC s 3UPREME #LEANERS s +NIE !PPLIANCE  46 3TERLING s 4UFF $OG "AKERY

ALSO INCLUDING:

4JMFOU "VDUJPO t  3BGýF 'PPE%SJOLT t %BSUT t 1SJ[F 8IFFM

++Everyone Welcome ++ For more information Call Rudy 815-440-4096

Granny Rose Animal Shelter

613 River Lane, Dixon, IL 815-288-PETS(7387)

Just west of the Dixon city limits on IL Rt. 2


!s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

3ATURDAY *ANUARY 

OBITUARIES James H. Wink STERLING – James H. Wink, 89, of Sterling, died Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014, at CGH Medical Center in Sterling. He was a farmer in the Milledgeville area for 40 years, retiring in 1988. Upon retiring, he and his wife moved to Rock Falls, and later to Parkway Center in Sterling. Jim was born Feb. 4, 1924, in Sterling, the son of Julius August and Alma Amalie Laura (Hess) Wink. He served in the Army during World War II. He married Ida Ann Harms on June 8, 1948, in Rock Falls. He was a lifetime member of Messiah Evangelical Lutheran Church. He served on the Carroll County Fair Board, Milledgeville Park District, and the Lions Club. Jim enjoyed singing and spending time with family and friends. Survivors include his wife, Ida Ann; four daughters, Christine Reed of Rockford, Mary K. (Mark) Bain of Washington, Suzanne (Doug) Patton of Novi, Mich., and Marsha (the Rev. Dan) Fulmer of Charlevoix, Mich.; one son,

the Rev. Thomas (Linda) Wink of Hartland, Wis.; one brother, Donald Wink of Glenview; 12 grandchildren, Shauna (Jason) Bartel, Jeffrey (Stephanie) Wink, Kathryn (Scott) Skonieczny, Abigail Reed, Travis Reed, Joseph Reed; Matthew (Jenny) Bain, Laura (Tom) Hagan, Amanda Patton, Ryan Patton, Kristen Fulmer, and James Fulmer; six great-grandchildren; and many other relatives and friends. He was preceded in death by his parents; and one brother, Robert Wink. Visitation will be from 5 to 8 p.m. Sunday at Schilling Funeral Home in Sterling. Visitation also will be from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. Monday at Messiah Evangelical Lutheran Church in Sterling, and the funeral at 10:30 a.m. at the church, with the Rev. Patrick Pinion, pastor, officiating. Burial will be at Oak Knoll Memorial Park in Sterling. A memorial has been established. Visit www.schillingfuneralhome.com to send condolences.

Concha ‘Connie’ Delgado STERLING – Concha “Connie� Delgado, 86, of Sterling, died Wednesday, Jan. 15, 2014, at Sterling Pavilion Nursing Home. Connie was born March 25, 1927, in San Benito, Texas, to Felix and Clara (Perez) Trevino. She married Francisco Delgado in San Benito, Texas. He preceded her in death on May 20, 2002. Connie worked for Frantz Manufacturing Co. for 11 years before retiring in 1975. She enjoyed cooking, dancing, and listening to Mexican music. Connie cherished the time she spent with her family and friends. Survivors include two daughters, Lila (Dave) Sulouff of Byron and Ana (Rory) Fullmer of Rock Falls; three sons, Robert Delgado of Morrison, Oscar (Linda) Delgado of Bellingham, Wash., and Rudy (Renee) Delgado

of Sterling; one brother, Santiago (Modesta) Trevino of California; 24 grandchildren; 38 great-grandchildren; and seven great-great grandchildren. She was pre ceded in death by her husband; one son; two brothers; seven sisters; three grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; and one great-greatgrandchild. Visitation will be from 1 to 3 p.m. Sunday at McDonald Funeral Home in Rock Falls. The funeral will be at 10 a.m. Monday at the funeral home, with the Rev. Roger Carlson officiating. Burial will be at Calvary Cemetery in Sterling. A memorial has been established to Passages Hospice. Visit www.mcdonaldfuneralhomes.com to send condolences.

William W. ‘Walt’ Spangler OREGON – William Walter “Walt� Spangler, 92, of Oregon, died Wednesday, Jan. 15, 2014, at Oregon Living and Rehabilitation Center. He was born April 20, 1921, to Mervin Stanley and Grace (Hill) Spangler in Daysville, where he attended school and remained a resident his entire life. He met his future wife, Julia Marie Isenhart, when her family moved next door to his. The two were married on Nov. 29, 1941, in Kahoka, Mo. Shortly afterward, Walt enlisted in the Navy as a Seabee and served in California and Okinawa in Japan, returning home on Jan. 1, 1946, to Daysville. He began working as a plumbing apprentice for Leo Piper of Byron, and earned his master plumber’s license. He and his brother, Clyde, eventually started Spangler Brothers Plumbing and Heating, working out of Walt’s Daysville garage. The business eventually moved to the 300 block of Franklin Street in Oregon, where they served the community for many years. Walt retired in 1988. Walt and Julia spent their retirement years tending an orchard they had planted some years prior to his retirement. Many children’s groups were treated to teaching field trips to the Spangler Orchard, and Julia always saw that they got applesauce bars as a treat. One of the ways Walt and Julia served the Lord was by donating the proceeds from the sale of the apples to local churches. A longtime and active member of the Oregon Church of God, Walt served on the board of Lifeline Food

Pantry for many years. Walt loved serving his community. He was one of the founders of local Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 8739, and a member of American Legion Post 97. He also was a member of the Oregon Development Corporation that oversaw the development of the west end of Oregon, as well as the recruitment of Dr. Prakob Scrichai, MD, to serve the medical needs of the Oregon community. He was a member of the Rotary Club and the Oregon Golf Club, and was honored as Oregon Citizen of the Year in 1992. Walt is survived by his children, Melody (Ken) Welty and Steven (Diane) Spangler, both of Oregon, and Phyllis (Jim) Blake of Murfreesboro, Tenn. Walt took great pride in seeing five generations of his family and spending time with his grandchildren, great-grandchildren, and great-great grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his wife of 57 years, Julia; his parents; and his siblings, Charles, Clyde, Stanley, Eugene, and Zeta. Visitation will be from 4 to 7 p.m. Sunday at Oregon Church of God. The funeral will be at 10:30 a.m. Monday at the church, with the Rev. Michael Hoffman, pastor, officiating. Burial will be at Lighthouse Cemetery in Oregon. FarrellHolland-Gale Funeral Home in Oregon is handling arrangements. Memorial contributions are welcome and may be directed to Oregon Church of God, Lifeline, and Rock River Center in Oregon. Visit www.farrellhollandgale.com to send condolences.

Madelyn Greene FREEPORT – Madelyn Greene, 4, the daughter of Brian and Nicole Greene of Freeport, died Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014, at home. Law-Jones Funeral Homes is handling arrangements.

Robert L. Plumley THOMSON – Robert L. Plumley, 87, of Thomson, died Sunday, Jan. 12, 2014, at The Alverno Health Care Facility in Clinton, Iowa. Law-Jones Funeral Home in Thomson is handling arrangements.

Obituary information

All obituaries, including death notices, are due by 2 p.m. Sunday through James E. Workman Friday if sent via email, MORRISON – James E. Workman, 69, of 711 Milnes obituaries@saukvalley. Drive, Morrison, died Friday, Jan. 17, 2014, at CGH com or fax, 815-625-9390. Obituary corrections Medical Center in Sterling. Bosma-Renkes Funeral Home in Morrison is han- and clarifications will appear in the Corrections dling arrangements.

box on Page A2 the next publication day after we are notified of an error. Receipt of all obituaries must be confirmed by phone. For more information, call 800-798-4085, ext. 530 or 502.

Stanley B. Goode DIXON – Stanley B. Goode, 98, of Dixon, died Monday, Jan. 13, 2014, at Heritage Square Health Center in Dixon. He was born June 1, 1915, in Amboy, the son of Samuel and Edna (Bates) Goode. He had been employed as a draftsman by General Electric before retiring. He was a veteran of the Army during World War II, and was a recipient of the Purple Heart Medal. He was a member of First United Methodist Church and the American Legion. He married Helen A. McCrystal Wells on Aug. 4, 1951, in Dixon. She preceded him in death on Feb. 10, 2013. He is survived by a stepdaughter, Judith

Wells of Amboy; a sister, Natalin Keho of Rockford; and several nieces and nephews. He also was preceded in death by his parents; and a brother, Jordan Good. A private family memorial service will be Jan. 23, with the Rev. Mike Jones, pastor of First United Methodist Church in Dixon, officiating. Burial of cremains, with military honors accorded by the combined veterans group, will be at Oakwood Cemetery in Dixon. Jones Funeral Home in Dixon is handling arrangements. A memorial has been established to Kreider Services in Dixon. Visiti www.thejonesfh. com to send condolences.

Robert A. Hammes OREGON – Robert A. Hammes, 73, of Oregon, died Wednesday, Jan. 15, 2014, at Serenity Hospice & Home in Oregon. He was born Feb. 4, 1940, near Middle Ridge in LaCrosse County, Wis., the son of Leo and Irene (Gronemus) Hammes. He was a graduate of Bangor High School. He married Marjorie Black Cox on Aug. 27, 2005, in Oregon. Bob retired from Northwestern Steel & Wire Co. in Sterling after 23 years of service, and then worked part time at UPS in Rockford. He was a member of St. Mary Catholic Church in Oregon, the Knights of Columbus, and Mount Morris Moose Lodge. He was a sports fan and enjoyed NASCAR, but was a season ticket holder and avid Green Bay Packers fan. During the ’70s and ’80s, Bob coached flag football in Sterling for the St. Mary Packers (of course), and Little League baseball, and grade school basketball for St. Mary and St. Andrew. He also umpired baseball games. He loved to travel with Marge, and especially enjoyed class reunions and family reunions. Survivors include his wife, Marjorie; son, Tim (Bernadette) Hammes of Sterling; daughter, Jennifer (Allen) Stultz of Rochelle; mother, Irene Hammes of LaCrosse; brothers, Kenny (friend, Luanne) of Wausau,

Wis., Ron (Jeanette) of LaCrosse, and Leo Jr. (Jan) of Sterling; sister, Renee (friend, Steve) Hammes of West Salem, Wis.; stepchildren, Carol (Todd) Cline, Pat Cox, and Sandra (Jim) Young, all of Mount Morris, and David (Kim) Cox of Leaf River; grandchildren, Espen Hammes, Reagan Hammes, Aidynn Stultz, and Gracynn Stultz; six stepgrandchildren; three stepgreat-grandchildren; and numerous nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his father, Leo; brother, David; sister, Mary Ellen Pitz; brother, Jerome, and his former wife and mother of his children, Gloria Schrabeck Hammes-McKenna. Visitation will be from 5 to 7 p.m., with the rosary recited at 6:45 p.m., Monday at FarrellHolland-Gale Funeral Home, 110 S. Seventh St., Oregon. Visitation also will be from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. Tuesday and a Christian funeral Mass at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday at St. Mary Catholic Church, 301 N. Fourth St., Oregon, with the Rev. Joseph Naill, celebrant, officiating. Burial will be at St. Mary Cemetery in Oregon. Memorials may be directed to Serenity Hospice & Home, Oregon Ambulance Service, and St. Mary Church. Visit www.farrellhollandgale.com to send condolences.

Sterling chief says more clarification of law needed REQUESTS

CONTINUED FROM A1

Kuelper said he would object to someone who is under investigation for domestic violence but not yet charged – a case the state police wouldn’t necessarily know about. If local police object to an applicant, he said, state police can ask local officials for documentation. “So far, everyone is good,�

the chief said. Nearly all of the 85 applicants are men, and the average age appears to be about 55, Kuelper said. Sterling Police Chief Ron Potthoff said his agency decided to review applicants from Sterling, Rock Falls, Dixon and Whiteside, Lee and Carroll counties. The department chose a larger area, he said, because many people who work in Sterling live elsewhere. “I have 206 [applications]. We

haven’t rejected any of them,� Potthoff said in an interview this week. “We have three people able to look at them: me and two lieutenants.� He said more clarification is needed for some parts of the concealed carry law. “Illinois doesn’t want concealed carry,� the chief said. “They want to make it as hard as possible to do it.� Lee County Sheriff John Varga said his department has had trouble on its end with its password for the sys-

2014

tem. It is working with state police on the issue, he said. He said his department would keep an eye out for any applicant who has had brushes with the law or has mental health issues. “We’re looking for those who might have fallen through the cracks, which shouldn’t happen,� he said. State police have 90 days to act on applications. Within those 90 days, local law enforcement is allowed 30 days for review.

AWARDS YOU MAKE THE CALL!

VOTE ONLINE NOW AT

Online Voting Through Midnight, Monday, January 20th.

Concealed carry applications by county

4HENUMBEROFAPPLICATIONSFORCONCEALEDCARRYLICENSESBYCOUNTY Bureau: 88APPLICATIONSPER  PEOPLE Carroll: 39 APPLICATIONSPER  PEOPLE Lee: 79APPLICATIONSPER  PEOPLE Ogle: 145APPLICATIONSPER  PEOPLE Whiteside: 80APPLICATIONS PER PEOPLE 3OURCE)LLINOIS3TATE0OLICE

THERN ILLINOIS R O N TV DAN MASSEY - OWNER POLO, IL

815-973-4389 www.northerniltv.com tvguydan@yahoo.com

With Over 20 Years of Experience Serving All of Northen Illinois CUSTOM TV INSTALLATION HOME AUDIO SURVEILLANCE SYSTEMS


Saturday, January 18, 2014

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs!

ROCK FALLS

New Jimmy John’s could open in spring Owner closes on Rock Falls property BY PAM EGGEMEIER peggemeier@saukvalley.com    EXT

ROCK FALLS – Li Arellano closed on the property for a new Jimmy John’s Gourmet Sandwiches restaurant Friday, setting into motion plans for its opening. The store will be at 511

First Ave. in Rock Falls, which had been home to Zuppa’s Deli until it closed in October 2012. The property then was bought by Maria Rodriguez, owner of Willy’s restaurant in Sterling. Jerry Rodriguez, Willy’s manager and Maria’s son, said the family had a change of heart about the property. “We were going to keep it, and we had a used equipment sale,� Rodriguez said. “But when we

found someone who was really interested in it, we decided to sell it.� Arellano and his wife, Jamie, are owners of the new store. Arellano and his father-in-law, Eric Forman, own the Dixon Jimmy John’s. Although he says it’s too soon to confidently set a firm target date, Arellano hopes construction can begin in the next month or two and is shooting for a late spring or early summer opening.

“We’re just beginning the bidding process for general contractors,� Arellano said. “Jimmy John’s estimates construction to be a 6- to 8-week process, but that’s for a new building.� The exterior of the building went up in 1993, and several interior renovations have been done since. “We’ll have to do some modifications, so I’m planning for at least 2 months,� Arellano said. Arellano had tried to

open a store in Sterling before focusing his efforts on Rock Falls. After trying to reach an agreement with Sterling for more than 6 months, the plans he had for the former Auto Store, at 2402 E. Lincolnway, fell through, largely over design standards in Sterling’s city code. Arellano said he is working through the final details to adhere to the Rock Falls city code, but said it’s nothing that has

held up the process. “The biggest delay came on the corporate side,� Arellano said. “We were waiting on the blueprints.� Arellano said he won’t hire until construction begins. The Dixon Jimmy John’s employs 30 to 35 people, and Arellano expects the staffing needs to be similar. Interested people can pick up a job application at the Dixon store, 845 N. Galena Ave.

Harkness puts rumors to rest about interest in property KMART

CONTINUED FROM A1

Given that Kmart has just wrapped up the long closing process that started in earnest in late October, not much is going on regarding a sale or new lease agreement, said Sterling Mayor Skip Lee. “No one has expressed an interest in it yet,� Lee

said, “but I wouldn’t expect inquiries until the store officially closed.� The mayor is guardedly optimistic about prospects for bringing in a new owner. “It’s a fantastic property at a great location,� Lee said. “But my experience with these types of buildings is you can expect it to sit empty for at least a year or two.�

Welcome

to Your New Kitchen

s #ABINETRY &OR !LL "UDGETS s 3TOCK 4O &ULL #USTOM #ABINETRY

The size of the complex and scale of the project have put it on the radar of economic development people outside of Sterling, Lee said. “There are several people from economic development and the chambers from Sterling and Rock Falls keeping a close eye on this,� Lee said. “We’re not standing idly by, hoping someone

comes in off the interstate to inquire.� Speculation about the future of the plaza brought several theories from local residents, some of which appeared on the Sauk Valley Media Facebook page. Businessman Pete Harkness is part of the conversation, with some people insisting he has already bought the property.

While Harkness didn’t go so far as to say he wasn’t interested, he did put some of the rumors to rest when asked Friday. “I do not have the Kmart facility under contract, nor have I purchased the property,� Harkness said. About a year ago, Harkness bought the Ryan’s Family Steakhouse property at 3900 E. Lincolnway, a few blocks east of

the former Kmart store. The restaurant closed in 2007, and at the time of the purchase, Harkness said he planned to find a new tenant. Lee said Harkness gave no indication he was looking at the Kmart property. “I talked to Pete about it,� Lee said, “and I really didn’t think he was interested.�

COUPON

6WU\NHU +LS 5HSODFHPHQW 5HFDOO

s 0ERSONALIZED $ESIGN s #OMPUTER 2ENDERINGS s !LL 3TYLES /F #OUNTERTOPS s /VER  9EARS /F #OMBINED %XPERIENCE

Contact our law firm for information regarding your legal rights and remedies.

2510 N. Locust, Sterling 815-626-5499 www.creativekitchensandbath.com

PLUMBING & REPLACEMENT WORK REPAIR

(815) 962-6144

“ We ’ l l g e t y o u r k i t c h e n c o o k i n ’ ! �

Steve & Pam Workman, Owners

20% OFF

Contact Attorney Kevin Frost

CREATIVE KITCHENS & BATH, INC. Mon-Thur 9:30-5:00; Fri 9:30-4:00 Other Hours By Appt.

Present This Coupon To Our Technicans & Receive

100% Satisfaction Guaranteed...or you don’t pay

&ODUN -XVWHQ =XFFKL )URVW /WG 5RFNIRUG ,OOLQRLV z ZZZFM]ODZQHW

WE ANSWER OUR PHONES LIVE 24/7

625-3252  288-7915 OFFER EXPIRES JANUARY 31ST, 2014 NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER OFFER

Today’s         

P



      

              ŕ Ž ,TLYNLUJ` :OLS[LY ŕ Ž -VVK 7HU[YPLZ ŕ Ž +H` *HYL ŕ Ž 9LU[  <[PSP[` (ZZPZ[HUJL ŕ Ž ,SKLYS` *HYL ŕ Ž 4LU[HS /LHS[O :LY]PJLZ ŕ Ž ,TWSV`TLU[ ŕ Ž /LHS[O 9LZV\YJLZ ŕ Ž ,K\JH[PVUHS  =VJH[PVUHS  ŕ Ž +PZHIPSP[` 9LZV\YJLZ ŕ Ž +Y\N  (SJVOVS 9LOHIPSP[H[PVU ŕ Ž +VTLZ[PJ (I\ZL ŕ Ž *V\UZLSPUN ŕ Ž +PZHZ[LY 9LJV]LY`

 

^^^Ă&#x201E;UKOLSWVYN

Collect all 6!


Opinion !s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

3ATURDAY *ANUARY 

EDITORIAL

Give Dirksen his due on civil rights reform P

eople across the country will pay tribute Monday to the memory of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his legacy of advancing civil rights for blacks through non-violent means. A federal holiday was established to honor the memory of King, who was killed by an assassin in 1968. Because King was born on Jan. 15, 1929, the third Monday of January was selected as the date for Martin Luther King Jr. Day. President Ronald Reagan signed the King holiday bill into law in 1983, and it was first observed in 1986. In his push to advance the cause of civil rights, King had help. One of those key supporters was a U.S. senator from Illinois who was also born in January â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Jan. 4, 1896, to be precise. Everett McKinley Dirksen, a Republican, played a crucial role in the passage of the Civil

What we think As we observe the birthday of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., let us also recall a gallant supporter of civil rights from Illinois â&#x20AC;&#x201C; U.S. Sen. Everett Dirksen. Rights Act of 1964. Dirksen was Senate minority leader at a time when Republicans were outnumbered by Democrats, 67 to 33. But history tells us that, because a southern bloc of 21 Democratic senators had always succeeded in blocking civil rights legislation through the filibuster, the chances for passage depended on Dirksen and his fellow Republicans. Dirksen burnished his statesman credentials by delivering 27 Republican votes to help kill a 2-month filibuster, 71-29, on June 10, 1964. Days later, the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was approved. The executive secretary of the NAACP, Roy

Wilkins, praised Dirksenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leadership on the bill, writing that it â&#x20AC;&#x153;will become a significant part of the history of this century.â&#x20AC;? Four years later, Dirksen played a key role in the approval of the Open Housing Act of 1968 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the year that King was tragically slain. Dirksen survived King by only a year. He died in 1969 after surgery for lung cancer. The Dirksen Congressional Center is based in Pekin, Dirksenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hometown. It keeps alive the senatorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; legacy of working in a bipartisan manner to accomplish important goals. But Dirksen has been gone for nearly 45 years now. Many younger Illi-

Walter P. Reuther Library, Wayne State University

The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. (left) met with U.S. Sen. Everett Dirksen (second from right) the same day King delivered his famous â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Have a Dreamâ&#x20AC;? speech in Washington, D.C., in 1963. Pictured (from left) are Whitney Young, National Urban League; King, of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference; Roy Wilkins, NAACP; Walter Reuther, UAW; Dirksen, an Illinois Republican; and John Lewis, Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee. The occasion was the Aug. 28, 1963, March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. After Dirksen provided crucial votes to end a filibuster of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the NAACPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wilkins wrote to Dirksen, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Your leadership of the Republican party in the Senate at this turning point will become a significant part of the history of this century.â&#x20AC;? noisans have no personal recollection of his leadership.

As the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Civil Rights Act approaches, let us

remember the gallant role played by Sen. Dirksen to get it approved.

AFTER THE COLD WAR

LBJâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Great Societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; legacy after half a century His domestic agenda gets positive marks ARTHUR I. CYR Northbrook

January marks the 50th anniversary of President Lyndon B. Johnsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dramatic declaration that his still-new administration was giving high priority to economic poverty, and not just the reduction but literal eradication of the problem in the United States. He declared a â&#x20AC;&#x153;war on poverty.â&#x20AC;? Media commentary on the benchmark anniversary has been emphasizing this anti-poverty effort. In fact, however, that was just one component of an extraordinarily ambitious agenda, titled â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Great Societyâ&#x20AC;? and

pressed urgently in Congress. LBJâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s program was described in detail in his 1964 State of the Union address, less than 2 months after the shocking assassination of predecessor John F. Kennedy had catapulted Johnson into the Oval Office. At that point, the new president was a reassuring, respected figure. In 1945, there had been widespread public anxiety when relatively unknown Vice President Harry S. Truman became chief executive. He succeeded Franklin D. Roosevelt, who dominated the landscape of American politics, and increasingly the wider world, during an unprecedented 12 years in the White House. BY CONTRAST, Johnson had been a consistently strong, visible leader in the U.S. Senate

through the 1950s. He had delivered home state Texas into the Democratic Arthur I. electoral Cyr column in the exceptionally close 1960 election. That was crucial to victory for the KennedyJohnson ticket. LBJ linked eliminating poverty to ending unemployment as well. He also emphatically pressed Congress to pass comprehensive legislation on civil rights, tax reduction, medical care for senior citizens, transportation and related national infrastructure redevelopment, and foreign aid. That last program in the 1960s involved more money in real terms, and far more controversy, than is the case today.

Characteristically seized by his own vision of the future, this president declared that the Congress should â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;Ś build more homes, more schools, more libraries, and more hospitals than any â&#x20AC;Ś in the history of our Republic.â&#x20AC;? Remarkably, he largely delivered on the agenda. McGeorge Bundy, national security adviser, later described the experience as seemingly seeing â&#x20AC;&#x153;one freight train per minuteâ&#x20AC;? relentlessly moving through Congress. The wheeling and dealing involved was extraordinary. LBJ hedged on Medicare cost estimates, insightfully arguing time was of the essence, and that the people would become strongly supportive of the program. This history bears directly on the current health care debate.

After 1964, growing social and political turmoil, and violence, came to characterize the decade. In early 1968, Hanoiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tet Offensive destroyed U.S. public support for the Vietnam War. DURING LBJâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LAST months in the White House, his public appearances were limited almost exclusively to military bases, such was the hostility toward him. The war devastated him emotionally as well as politically. Yet, President Johnsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s populist legacy endures. Hurricane Betsy in 1965 provides one telling example. This was the first Gulf Coast storm to create more than $1 billion in damage. LBJ immediately flew to New Orleans and ceaselessly visited storm victims, slogging through

deep water to shacks. He shined a flashlight on his own face after dark, so residents could recognize their visitor. Federal relief was comprehensive â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and immediate. Poverty has been reduced since the mid1960s from approximately 25 percent of the U.S. population to an estimated 15 percent, even though the income threshold has been raised. Great Society programs have been successful. The civil rights and voting rights acts of 1964 and 1965 fundamentally altered race relations. Profound long-term results include the election of Barack Obama to the White House in 2008. Note to readers: Arthur I. Cyr is Clausen distinguished professor at Carthage College.

GUEST COLUMN

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Stick to the factsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; when reporting about Ogle County Ogle officials â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;responsible, conscientiousâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; KIM P. GOUKER Byron

Recently, Sauk Valley Mediaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s readers have been served with a weekly barrage of articles about Ogle County. The press has a duty to report on the actions of elected representatives, and I encourage it. But, obligation brings responsibility, to stick to the facts, and let the readers draw their conclusions. Nearly half the articles written have been opinion, without being labeled as such, and with

countless incorrect conclusions. Unfortunately, these are often read as fact, rather than opinion. The reader gets the impression that taxpayer money is spent recklessly, while the Ogle County Board is â&#x20AC;&#x153;asleep at the switch,â&#x20AC;? and until two new board members came along, nobody asked about anything. ALL our department heads are good, fiscally responsible, conscientious public servants. We have very good board members, with diverse backgrounds, who arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t afraid to ask tough questions. In the past, our oversight was more lax, but the tough questions

didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t start last year with just two new board members, but 3 years ago, when Kim P. Jim Barnes Gouker became our chairman. Under his leadership, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve turned around many areas, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll continue as long as Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m chairman. TO BE SURE, there WERE problems last year. But, they were promptly addressed, and corrected, long before this newspaper reported it. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll see more changes this coming year. Just because â&#x20AC;&#x153;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always been

EDITORIAL BOARD

4(%&)234!-%.$-%.4

Jennifer Baratta Jim Dunn Sheryl Gulbranson Larry Lough Trevis Mayfield Jeff Rogers

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

done that way,â&#x20AC;? is exactly the reason Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always felt a procedure needs to be re-evaluated. I also feel these articles unfairly included the coroner in their â&#x20AC;&#x153;exposĂŠ.â&#x20AC;? His online computer purchase was done by another county employee, using a county credit card, which the coroner had no notion whatsoever was being processed in that manner. The coroner wrote a personal check to pay for it immediately, not a month later, as the newspaper reported. The coroner never even had a county credit card, and yet, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s included in the newspaper â&#x20AC;&#x153;controversy.â&#x20AC;? Regarding the sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s matters, using one situ-

ation can illustrate how the newspaperâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s opinion writings can distort the publicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s perception of what really occurred. I was present during the reporterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s interview, when he asked the sheriff [Michael Harn] about the purchase of jeans. The sheriff answered, â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is my ONE uniform, and I wear jeans and polo shirts, with the name of the Ogle sheriff on the sleeve, because these can be bought at a fraction of the cost of one uniform.â&#x20AC;? WHEN THE newspaper opined about â&#x20AC;&#x153;designer jeans,â&#x20AC;? without the context of the rest of the rationale, it leaves the reader with the interpre-

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The struggle of the governmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s need for secrecy versus the publicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s right to know and the pressâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s duty to find out and tell is unending.â&#x20AC;? Douglass Cater, journalist, author, 1959

1UOTESBROUGHTTOYOUCOURTESYOF

tation of the editorialist, rather than the reality. In summary, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important that taxpayers understand these issues in full context, and that they are an exception, and not the rule. That taxpayers are well served by their county officers, and the board is engaged in oversight of their funds. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;big pictureâ&#x20AC;? needs to be kept in mind, when seeing this kind of reporting, and realize during an election cycle, like now, creating news, instead of just reporting news, helps to sell newspapers. But, it leaves an improper picture for the taxpayer. Note to readers: Kim P. Gouker is chairman of the Ogle County Board.

3HAREYOUROPINIONS Mail: The Readerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Voice Sauk Valley Media 3200 E. Lincolnway, P.O. Box 498 Sterling, IL 61081 Email: letters@saukvalley.com Fax: 815-625-9390 Website: Visit www.saukvalley.com Policy: Letters are to be no more than 300 words and must include the writerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name, town and daytime telephone number, which we call to verify authorship. Individuals may write up to 12 letters a year.

OPINIONS EXPRESSED IN LETTERS AND COLUMNS ARE THOSE OF THE WRITERS AND DO NOT REPRESENT THE VIEWS OF SAUK VALLEY MEDIA.


Saturday, January 18, 2014

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs!

SECOND OPINION

News comes in new ways (the old way, too) M

ake no mistake about it: print is still a huge part of the newspaper business. Despite what some people think. A list circulating on the Internet suggests “24 things babies born in 2014 may never know. No. 9 on the list is this: Newspapers – In days before everyone had computers at home and in their pockets, printing presses made paper versions of websites. People would then drive around and throw them on your lawn. Funny, but false. Babies born this year will count on local newspapers for information about their schools and their communities. Not all of them will pick up the print edition each day, but they will all turn to newspapers – in some form – for the news that hits closest to home. People get hung up on the word “paper.” We’re Sauk Valley Media – whether you are reading in print, online,

or some other form. That should cover it. NEWSPAPER WORK used to be pretty simple. Work all day. Put a newspaper on the streets. Come back tomorrow and do it again. Not anymore. While we still publish a print edition once a day, the word “publish” has been expanded in this digital age. Staff members send out text alerts whenever news develops, post news updates on our website, and share the news on Facebook. They occasionally will tweet developments (in 140 characters or less) from courtrooms, meeting rooms and sporting events. Our job still involves working all day. But we don’t wait until tomorrow to publish again. We do it now – whenever now happens to be. AS YOU MIGHT imagine, digital devices have greatly expanded our audience.

larryLOUGH Larry Lough is executive editor of Sauk Valley Media. Contact him via email at llough@ saukvalley. com.

Each month, we get more than 1.6 million total page views through our website, mobile and tablet audiences. That involves nearly half a million total visits and more than 200,000 unique visitors. Our Facebook pages have more than 13,000 friends. Staff tweets are followed by more than 5,000 people. People want information in different forms. We aim to deliver. DIFFERENT KINDS of readers also means different kinds of issues for editors and reporters. Our new website includes a feature for readers to report story

comments that they find objectionable. When that happens, editors get an email notice and are able to review the comments in question. During our recent coverage of the fatal shooting at a Rock Falls bar, one reader posted a comment that started like this. This will be happening more often ’cause of the new concealed carry law, mark my words on it. ... Another reader objected to the comment and notified us. For the record, let us say that editors will not remove a comment just because you disagree with the opinion stated. We will take down comments for the usual reasons, which mostly involve personal attacks, vulgar or profane language, or libelous statements. Criticizing public officials and public figures is fine as long as it involves the performance of their official duties. That isn’t considered personal, even if the motive for the

comment might be. So, keep it clean and reasonably civil. But feel free to express a disagreeable opinion. FACEBOOK READER Maria objected to some comments that, she said, “you guys took .... down.” We hadn’t done that, actually, but only because Facebook beat us to it. As online editor Angel Sierra explained to her, “Our Facebook page has a profanity filter that may sometimes automatically pull comments down.” If you wonder what kinds of words prompt comments to be taken down, think of comedian George Carlin’s “Seven dirty words you can’t say on TV.” In case you don’t know what they are, take a guess. You’ll probably be pretty close. FOR THOSE TENS of thousands of readers who still count on the printed edition of this newspaper, your paper is coming for years to come. Of course, that means

somebody has to deliver it. You might have read the recent letter to the editor about a newspaper carrier whose car got stuck in the snow during an especially cold January morning. “I felt sorry for the man; he was just trying to do his job, but really?” the letter said. “The Gazette prints the story on the front page for people not to travel, but they don’t tell their rural drivers to stay home. “... I don’t think getting Monday’s paper was an emergency.” Some readers might disagree. We note that the mail was delivered that same cold and snowy winter day. That fact likely would have been mentioned to us by a disappointed reader who didn’t get his paper that morning if we had failed to deliver. Besides, our home delivery crew is every bit as hardy and dedicated as the courageous carriers of the U.S. Postal Service. Neither rain, nor sleet ...

THE READER’S VOICE

Sunday event honors King’s life and legacy LINDA BARBER Sterling

On Sunday from 5 until 7:30 p.m., the annual Community Celebration of Peace and Justice, honoring the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., will be held. This celebration will take place at the First Congregational Church – The Big Red Church, 311 Second Ave., Sterling. King once said, “Life’s

most persistent and urgent question is: What are you doing for others?” He was a man who looked at the world and saw that change was needed. He bravely and relentlessly took action. He made change happen. He served the world through his leadership and inspiration. He risked and ultimately gave his life to make his dream our reality. His dream still lives on, and we are all called to unite and serve. To honor this element of King’s dream, this

Dave Granlund, GateHouse News Service

year’s event will include a volunteer fair. Those looking for ways to serve their community will

Getting Married? Get the Guide! COMING SOON

SAUK VALLEY WEDDINGS

2014

Sauk Valley

Weddings Weddings 2014

TO RECIEVE YOUR FREE COPY EMAIL

kweinstock@SaukValleyMedia.com

WITH YOUR NAME, ADDRESS &WEDDING DATE OR CALL

815-625-3600 Ext. 601

be able to connect with groups and organizations needing the services of volunteers.

Awards will be given to individuals or groups from Lee or Whiteside counties who are felt to exemplify the spirit and honor the legacy of King. We also invite the community to participate in a Peace Art Show honoring King and his legacy of peace and nonviolence. Entries for the exhibit may be a medium of the artist’s choosing and may be single or group art. The show will be open to all people. The evening will include entertainment and refreshments. Come, be a part of this uplift-

What do you think? Let us know. Write your own letter to the editor and send it to: letters@saukvalley. com ing celebration. The art show and volunteer fair begin at 5 p.m. The celebration begins at 6 p.m. For more information, contact the YWCA of the Sauk Valley at 815-6250333. Note to readers: Linda Barber is an advocate for the YWCA of the Sauk Valley.


!s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

3ATURDAY *ANUARY 

NATIONAL SECURITY AGENCY

Reins tightened on surveillance Obama orders spying limits

IN BRIEF Pope defrocked 400 priests

CANFIRSTPROVIDEDDETAILS ONTHENUMBEROFPRIESTS WHOHAVEBEENDEFROCKED 6!4)#!.#)49n!DOCU 0RIORTOTHAT ITHADONLY PUBLICLYREVEALEDTHE MENTOBTAINEDBY4HE NUMBEROFALLEGEDCASES !SSOCIATED0RESSON&RI DAYSHOWS0OPE"ENEDICT OFSEXUALABUSEITHAD RECEIVEDANDTHENUMBER 86)DEFROCKEDNEARLY OFTRIALSITHADAUTHORIZED PRIESTSOVERJUSTYEARS 7HILEITSNOTCLEARWHY FORSEXUALLYMOLESTINGCHIL THENUMBERSSPIKEDIN DREN  ITCOULDBEBECAUSE 4HESTATISTICSFOR ANDSHOWADRAMATIC SAWANEWEXPLOSION INTHENUMBEROFCASES INCREASEOVERTHE REPORTEDINTHEMEDIAIN PRIESTSREMOVEDIN %UROPEANDBEYOND AND WHENTHE6ATI

State EPA files petcoke rules 02).'&)%,$n.EW 3 EMERGENCYRULESINVOLVING THESTORAGEOFPETROLEUM COKECOULDGOINTOEFFECT ASSOONASNEXTWEEK THE )LLINOIS%NVIRONMENTAL0RO TECTION!GENCYSAID 4HE)LLINOIS%0!FILEDTHE RULES4HURSDAYWITHTHE )LLINOIS0OLLUTION#ONTROL "OARDTODEALWITHPETRO LEUMCOKEPILES ALTHOUGH ENVIRONMENTALGROUPS

HAVESAIDITDOESNTGOFAR ENOUGH â&#x20AC;&#x201D;The Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Tightening the reins on the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sweeping surveillance operations, President Barack Obama on Friday ordered new limits on the way intelligence officials access phone records from hundreds of millions of Americans â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and moved toward eventually stripping the massive data collection from the governmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hands. But Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s highly anticipated intelligence recommendations left many key details unresolved, most notably who might take over as keeper of the vast trove of U.S. phone records. Final decisions on that and other major questions were left to the Justice Department and to intelligence agencies that oppose changing surveillance operations, and to a Congress that is divided about the future of the programs. If fully implemented, Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proposals would mark the most significant changes to the surveillance laws that were passed in reaction to the Sept. 11, 2011, terror attacks. While Obama has said he has welcomed the recent spying debate, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unlikely to have happened without the national and international backlash following a wave of leaks

AP

Seeking to calm a furor over U.S. surveillance, President Barack Obama on Friday called for an end to the governmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s control of phone data from hundreds of millions of Americans. from former National Security Agency analyst Edward Snowden. For now, the phone records will continue to reside with the government. But the NSA will need to get approval from the secretive Foreign Surveillance Intelligence Court each time it wants to access the data, a more cumbersome process than currently required. Exceptions will be made in the event of a national security emergency, officials said. Responding to outrage overseas, Obama pledged on Friday to curb spying on friendly allied leaders and to extend some privacy protections to foreign citizens. The proposals appeared to ease some anger in Germany, which had been particularly incensed by revelations that the NSA had monitored the communications of Chancellor Angela Merkel.

â&#x20AC;&#x153; Still the Best Buy in Illinois.â&#x20AC;?

Starting at $14,981 We Continually search the country to find vehicles that offer our customers the best value for their hard earned dollar. And for the past year weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve offered what still to this day is one of the best buys out there - The 2013 Impala packs a punch in power, comfort, safety... and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just the start. Underneath direct injected the hood lies a 3.6-liter V6 that delivers power and economy - 302 horsepower with up to 30 mpg. Once you slip behind the wheel youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll realize this is not an ordinary car, but how comforting and easy it is to drive. I highly recommend you stop by Sterling Chevrolet and take one for a drive. Just remember... We look forward to your visit. These 2013 Impalas still carry the balance of a 5 year, 100,000 mile powertrain warranty, along with the remainder of a 3 year, 36,000 mile bumper-to-bumper.

1824 N. Locust, Sterling

815-625-2700

www.sterlingchevy.com

Rock Falls residents now qualify for the complete system rebate of up to $1000!


Saturday, January 18, 2014

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs!

Seven volunteers have joined townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fire department ACTION

CONTINUED FROM A1

â&#x20AC;&#x153;And it took awhile. There was some opposition to it. But we finally got everybody on board, that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d try to clean it up collectively.â&#x20AC;? Swanson hopes to have construction on four of the lots by the fall. DeNeve credits Swanson, who is retired but previously worked in construction, for getting the town to where it is today, far ahead of other small communities that

have experienced similar fires. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We had the right mayor for this crisis,â&#x20AC;? DeNeve said.

A bigger, tested fire department Prophetstown Fire Chief Keith Crady recalled the day of the fire as â&#x20AC;&#x153;hectic.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was one of those days that I wish wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have happened,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We still talk about it at the station from time to time.â&#x20AC;? Those talks, Crady said, often involve what

Moving forward

firefighters could have done differently, quicker or better. He said his department now is better prepared for a large fire, having dealt with one just two blocks from the department. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Before, you think, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not going to happen. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not going to happen,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Crady said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But it can happen.â&#x20AC;? About 2 months after the fire, seven new firefighters had joined the townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s volunteer department. All seven volunteers have stayed on, and

Crady said that while some of them probably are ready to fight fires, he wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make them if they arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t comfortable. There are plenty of jobs to do at a fire scene, he said. Since the July 15 blaze, the Prophetstown Fire Department has responded to â&#x20AC;&#x153;three of fourâ&#x20AC;? other fires, Crady said, adding that the department usually responds to about 11 a year, including calls in other towns for mutual aid. About 30 other departments helped fight the downtown fire.

Because the town canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t offer large financial incentives such as tax breaks, it will donate the lots, which have been appraised at about $7,000, Swanson said, Local construction companies and suppliers have offered their services and products at a discount, DeNeve said, to ensure a quick rebuild. The businesses that were there at the time of the fire likely wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t

attorneys agreed he was mentally ill. U.S. District Judge #LAIRE%AGANFOUND'REGORY!RTHUR7EILER))OF%LK 'ROVE6ILLAGE )LL NOTGUILTY on a charge of possessing an unregistered, destructive device. Prosecutors accused Weiler of plotting to bomb 48 churches in /TTAWA#OUNTY THOUGH no explosives were set off, and no one was injured.

nomic recovery is generating more tax revenue than many states had anticipated. $EMOCRATIC.EW9ORK

'OV!NDREW#UOMO FOR example, wants to tap a surplus to cut taxes, despite other Democratsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ideas for new spending.

return. Cindy Jeanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still might rebuild, owner Cindy Eriks said, but a decision wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be made for a while. While the businesses that were lost werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t bringing the town significant sales tax revenue, DeNeve said, they were reflective of the downtown and Prophetstown community. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I know for one thing, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard to imagine, but it takes a loss before we all appreciate what we have,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know why it does, but it does.â&#x20AC;?

IN BRIEF Tax incentives under scrutiny

Raise wages, Durbin says

#()#!'/n,AWMAKERS on Friday questioned the effectiveness of the tax breaks Illinois gives companies to keep or create jobs, with one legislator saying thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s little verifiable evidence the incentives work and another calling the current system â&#x20AC;&#x153;insanity.â&#x20AC;? Illinois businesses benefited from about $1.15 billion in tax incentives in fiscal year 2012, according to an analysis by the bipartisan Commission on 'OVERNMENT&ORECASTING AND!CCOUNTABILITY9ET lawmakers noted the state continues to have one of the highest unemployment rates in the country. /NLYTHREESTATESn Nevada, Rhode Island and -ICHIGANnHADJOBLESS rates higher than Illinoisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 8.7 percent as of November.

#()#!'/n)LLINOIS Democrats continued their election-year strategy of pushing for a minimum wage hike Friday when U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin USEDA-ARTIN,UTHER+ING breakfast to call for an increase to the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rate and blast a Republican gubernatorial candidate, Bruce Rauner, for his evolving stance on the issue.

Acquittal in bomb plot case 45,3! /KLAn!N)LLINOIS man accused in a failed plot to firebomb dozens of /KLAHOMACHURCHESWAS found not guilty by reason of insanity Friday after prosecutors and defense

3610 E. LINCOLNWAY STERLING, IL

815-626-2996

â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The Associated Press

Let us be the solution to your New Years Resolution!

State surpluses spark debate *%&&%23/.#)49 -O n!SLEGISLATURESRETURN to action and governors outline their budget plans, politicians in many states are facing a pleasant election-year challenge: What to do with all the extra money? !SLOWBUTSTEADYECO-

463 s !PPLIANCES s -ATTRESSES

Up To 12 Months Interest Free Financing Available

)N,OUISIANA 2EPUBLICAN 'OV"OBBY*INDALWANTS to steer the surplus to education and health care.

BE READY WITH A WWWTOROCOM Frankâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Small Engine Repair

4UNE 5PS s 0ARTS s "LADES s !CCESSORIES s - &   3AT  .OON

 !SH !VENUE 3TERLING s   

Angie & Al Delhotal Owners

Dreaming We guarantee you will love your new floor! 2528 E. Lincolnway Sterling,IL    s WWWANAmOORINGCOM

are you

of a new

Kitchen or Bath?

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll help re-design your kitchen to your unique style & needs and keep your costs down.

FREE DESIGNS BY Ask about our

FREE Upgrade Specials

Jocelyn Lilly, Kitchen Design:

815-266-1354

MILLEDGEVILLE DO-IT-BEST HOME CENTER 'SFF &TUJNBUFT t 'SFF .FBTVSJOH t 'SFF %FMJWFSZ

Bring the Beauty of StarMark into Your Home. 3BJMSPBE BOE $PDISBO 4USFFUT .JMMFEHFWJMMF *   UPMM GSFF


!s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

3ATURDAY *ANUARY 

2014 ELECTIONS | 71ST STATE HOUSE DISTRICT

GOP candidate withdraws, backs rival McKinley cites family concerns in leaving campaign BY DAVID GIULIANI DGIULIANI SAUKVALLEYCOM    EXT

ROCK ISLAND â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The race for the Republican nomination for 71st District state representative is no longer a race. Jeff McKinley has withdrawn as a candidate in the March 18 Republican primary, which leaves only Jim Wozniak. Both men are prosecutors for the Rock Island County stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

attorney. They were vying to face state Rep. Mike Smiddy, D-Hillsdale, in the November general election. Jeff The 71st District includes White- McKinley side County. Upon leaving the race, McKinley endorsed Wozniak. McKinley revealed his decision in a speech Thursday to the Rock Island County Republican Party. He cited unspecified family concerns as the reason for withdrawing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I assembled a great team, and we had the pieces in place

to achieve victory, not only in the primary, but also in the general election in November,â&#x20AC;? McKinley told the RepubJim licans, according Wozniak to a copy of the speech distributed by his campaign. He said he was confident that his former rival would successfully put â&#x20AC;&#x153;our shared ideas of liberty and limited governmentâ&#x20AC;? into action. He promised to join Wozniak on the campaign trail. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mike Smiddy should consider himself on notice: His time

SAUK VALLEY COMMUNITY COLLEGE

as a cog in the Pat Quinn-Mike Madigan machine is up,â&#x20AC;? Wozniak said. In a news release, Wozniak called McKinley a State Rep. friend and a good Mike Smiddy attorney, father and Republican. He thanked his colleague for running a â&#x20AC;&#x153;spirited and positiveâ&#x20AC;? campaign. Wozniak had gained momentum in recent weeks, including the endorsements of all five Republican members of the Rock Island County Board. According to a report filed

with the state, Wozniak raised more money than McKinley in the last quarter â&#x20AC;&#x201C; $7,316 to $1,996. The 71st District contest is among a handful of competitive races in Illinois. Wozniak likely faces an uphill battle. In 2012, Smiddy beat Rep. Rich Morthland, R-Cordova, in a district whose lines had just been redrawn to benefit Democrats. In that race, Smiddy raised $461,609 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; nearly all from unions â&#x20AC;&#x201C; far ahead of Morthlandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s $192,372. The unions seem ready to step up again. Smiddy recently got a $20,000 contribution from the Illinois Federation of Teachers.

STERLING

A night of Wild West fun Fundraiser to help Sterling Games, auction at Casino Fest fundraiser today STAFF REPORT NEWS SAUKVALLEYCOM    EXT

DIXON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Round up the gang for Sauk Valley College Foundationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wild West Casino Fest from 5 to 11 p.m. today at the college. This year, guests are in for a treat as the collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s East Mall, second floor and cafeteria will transform into a night of Wild West fun, including

a chuck wagon, minislot corral, saloons, gold mine and jail. Dress your cowboy best and dust off your boots for this fundraiser. The night of entertainment will include casino-style games (blackjack, craps, roulette, poker, etc.) where guests will earn â&#x20AC;&#x153;gaming chipsâ&#x20AC;? (of no monetary value) for an opportunity to win big prizes later in the event. Guests do not have to be skilled gamers. There will be professional dealers at all tables to keep everyone challenged.

A silent auction will feature items and gift baskets donated by local businesses and organizations. Guests also can enjoy a caricature artist, photo booth and more. All proceeds go toward SVCC scholarships and student needs. Tickets are $35 and include $50 in â&#x20AC;&#x153;gaming chips,â&#x20AC;? a light cowboy buffet and dessert, and two drink tickets. This event is for ages 21 and older. Purchases can be made online at svcc. edu, by calling 815835-6345, or at the door tonight.

MONEY & MARKETS The following stock quotations, as of 5 p.m., are provided as a community service by Chad Weigle of Edward Jones, Dixon and Raymond James and Associates, Sterling. Abbott ...........................39.38 Alcoa .............................11.36 AltriaCorp .....................37.02 Autonation ...................47.82 American Express ........90.96 Arris-Group ..................26.49 Apple...........................540.60 ADM..............................41.03 AT&T .............................33.69 Bank of America...........17.00 Boeing.........................140.45 BorgWarner ..................55.77 BP ..................................48.20 Caseyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ..........................68.46 Caterpillar ....................91.30 CenturyLink .................30.00 Chevron ......................119.32 Cisco .............................22.74 Citigroup ......................52.23 CNW .............................40.66

CocaCola ......................39.29 ConAgra........................33.43 Dean .............................17.01 Deere & Co ...................89.34 Disney ...........................73.94 Donaldson....................42.38 DuPont .........................64.00 Exxon ............................99.16 Ford ..............................16.51 Exelon ...........................27.20 GE .................................26.55 FifthThird .....................21.55 HawaiianElectric .........26.37 Hewlett Packard ..........29.79 HomeDepot .................80.96 Intel Corp. ....................25.85 IBM .............................189.86 IntlPaper.......................48.34 JCPenney ........................6.51 JohnsonControls..........51.05 Johnson&Johnson .......95.03 JPMorgan Chase ..........58.14 Kraft ..............................54.76 Kroger ...........................36.79 Leggett&Platt ...............29.74 Manpower ....................85.57 McDonaldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ..................94.92

Merck&Co ....................51.94 Microsoft ......................36.38 3M ...............................137.29 Monsanto ...................113.02 Newell ...........................31.76 AGL ...............................46.86 Nike...............................73.38 Parker-Han.................127.42 Pfizer .............................31.09 Pepsico .........................82.21 Procter&Gamble ..........79.87 RaymondJames............54.05 Republic .......................32.25 Sears Hldg ....................37.58 SensientTech ...............50.95 Sprint ..............................8.96 Staples ..........................13.61 TheTravelers ................86.45 UnitedContinental ......47.10 UnitedTech ................114.17 USBancorp ...................41.45 USSteel .........................27.41 Verizon .........................48.36 Walgreen ......................59.16 WalMartStores .............76.16 WasteMgt .....................43.11 Wendyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ..........................8.98

firefighter battle cancer STAFF REPORT NEWS SAUKVALLEYCOM    EXT

STERLING â&#x20AC;&#x201C; A benefit will take place Feb. 1 to help a Sterling firefighter with his battle against Hodgkinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lymphoma. Tim Wright, 45, was diagnosed with the cancer in September. He is undergoing chemotherapy at CGH Medical Center in Sterling, which will be followed up by radiation treatments. Tim and his wife, Heather Kuehl Wright, have three children,

Kolton, 18, Jaxen, 15, and Phinley, 5. Tim still is able to work. Debbie Kuehl, Timâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mother-in-law, said: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s doing very well. The chemotherapy is doing what itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s supposed to do.â&#x20AC;? The benefit will be from 2 to 7 p.m. at Latin American Social Club, 2708 W. Lincolnway. Admission is free. A taco dinner and a bake sale are planned. Kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; activities and a bouncy house will be provided from 2 to 4 p.m. A silent auc-

tion, with items such as car washes and an origami owl basket, will take place until 6:30 p.m. A bags tournament will take place from 4 to 7 p.m. The fee is $20 a person, with two-person teams and a maximum of 20 teams. The registration cutoff will be at 3:45 p.m. Feb. 1. A $100 first prize will be awarded, while $50 will be given for second place. Call 309-219-5799 to register or for more information. A DJ also will perform from 4 to 7 p.m.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Likeâ&#x20AC;? us on Facebook www.facebook.com/saukvalley

CHOOSE GAFFEY FOR HOME CARE

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Where Better To Be Than At Home?â&#x20AC;?

For those who choose Gaffey Health Service Inc. or Gaffey Home Nursing & Hospice for their home health care needs: Beginning immediately, ALL GAFFEY PATIENTS automatically qualify for a FREE Emergency Home Response System, called Carelink. This offer includes FREE professional installation & 60 days of Carelink service for FREE ($110 value). Call 815-625-5575 for more information! 3408 E. 23rd 3T 3TERLING s    s    s -ON &RI  AM  PM

Commodities The following quotations are provided as a community service by Sterling Futures: Corn: March 4.24; July 4.38½; Dec. 4.49 Soybeans: Jan. 13.16½; May 12.97Ÿ; July 12.82 Soybean oil: March 37.74; July 38.43 Soybean meal: March

434.50; July 411.90 Wheat: March 5.63ž; July 5.77 Oats: March 3.99ž; July 3.26½ Live cattle: Feb. 140.35; April 139.30; June 131.45 Feeder cattle: Jan. 170.00; May 169.50 Lean hogs: Feb. 86.175;

April 91.90; June 101.57 Sugar: March 15.22 Cotton: March 86.80 T-Bonds: March 13114â &#x201E;32 Silver: March 20.28 Gold: Feb. 1253.00 Copper: March 3.3435 Crude: Feb. 94.11 Dollar Index: March 81.34

CONGRATULATIONS! r e b m e c e D

GM SALESPERSON

OF THE MONTH!

Denny Bellows

815-285-5322

&*+ 'L[RQ 9LVLRQ &HQWHU

&RPSOHWH (\H &DUH )RU $OO <RXU 9LVLRQ 1HHGV z

&RPSUHKHQVLYH (\H ([DPV z

&RQWDFW /HQVHV z

z

z

*ODVVHV

z

:LGH 6HOHFWLRQ RI )UDPHV z

z

z

0DFXODU 'HJHQHUDWLRQ 7UHDWPHQW

)UHH (VWLPDWHV

z

(\HOLG 6XUJHU\

 1 *DOHQD $YH 'L[RQ ,/ 

      

       

&DUULH 0HQHW 2'

-RKQ +DKQ 0'

-DVRQ )ULHGULFKV 0'

2SWRPHWULVW

2SKWKDOPRORJLVW

2SKWKDOPRORJLVW

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I wish to thank all my customers, family & friends for the opportunity to serve you!â&#x20AC;?

815-288-4455 SHOP

24/7

@ www.KenNelsonAuto.com

*ODXFRPD

5HWLQD 6HUYLFHV

Denny.bellows@kennelsonauto.com

928-1100 N. Galena Ave., Dixon

&DWDUDFWV

ZZZFJKPFFRP


Sports

IMPRESSIVE

v weekend

Prophets swarm Comets, B3.

e-mail: sports@saukvalley.com

Section B

Not showing Aaron Hernandez, former Patriots TE who is being held after being charged with murder, will not be allowed to watch Sunday’s game.

30

Saturday, January 18, 2014

Numbers game

‘Like’ us! Sauk Valley Sports

That’s how many wins the Newman football and boys basketball teams have combined for during this school year. In this span, the Comets have lost one game ... to Rockridge in football in Week 1. Newman plays No. 1 Rockridge in basketball on Saturday.

Sports for the Sauk Valley fan!

NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE | CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS

BOYS HOOPS

Fast start propels Dukes Dixon buries LP in first 13 minutes BY LARRY BRENNAN lbrennan@saukvalley.com 800-798-4085, ext. 5590

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

LASALLE – If the first 13 minutes weren’t perfect for Dixon, they were awfully close. The Dukes dominated early, building a 22-point first-half lead. They saw their lead shrink to six before putting LaSallePeru away in a 73-59 Northern Illinois Big 12 West win Friday night at LaSallePeru High Laron Carr School. Dixon It took Dixon junior (13-3, 3-1) less than 6 minutes to build a double-digit lead. Two 3-pointers from Laron Carr, and another from Cal Jarrett propelled the Dukes to a 16-4 advantage with 2:16 left in the opening quarter. Dixon led 22-9 after one quarter, with Carr scoring 10 of his team-high 22 points in the period.

Illustration by Dan Woessner

The NFL could not have asked for a better ending to its season with the four top teams left standing, led by young stars like Colin Kaepernick and Russell Wilson, and true legends like Petyon Manning and Tom Brady.

STARS ALIGNED

Championship weekend filled with biggest and brightest AFC s0ATRIOTSAT Broncos, 2 p.m. Sunday (CBS)

NFC sERSAT Seahawks, 5:30 p.m. Sunday (Fox)

BY DAVE CAMPBELL AP Pro Football Writer

The Super Bowl needs a ratings boost like a racecar could use more horsepower. No program in television history has lured more viewers. No single sporting event is capable of commercially generating more hype. This time, the NFL’s annual national holiday has some

competition for the attention, drama and intrigue. The challenge has come from within: the league’s semifinals. The conference championship games set for Sunday have all but guaranteed a popular pairing for the title game in New Jersey on Feb. 2, but the peak of this postseason could actually be reached this weekend.

“It’s hard to find a better set of four. Really, any combination you come up with for the Super Bowl is going to be a great matchup,” said CBS Sports announcer Jim Nantz. In the AFC, the Tom BradyPeyton Manning rematch in the New England-Denver game is an epic qualifier for the Super Bowl. STARS CONTINUED ON B8

START CONTINUED ON B4

Star of the game: Laron Carr, Dixon, team-high 22 points, 10 in 1st quarter Key performers: Noah Lamboley, LP, gamehigh 26 points; Cal Jarrett, Dixon, 18 points; Isaiah Roby, Dixon, 17 points Up next: Dixon at Mendota, 7:15 p.m. Saturday

BOYS BASKETBALL PREVIEW | MANNY’S SHOOTOUT | NO. 4 NEWMAN VS. NO. 1 ROCKRIDGE

Measuring stick provided

Comets ready to take on top-ranked Rockridge Manny’s schedule (G) Girls; (B) Boys 10 a.m. – West Carroll vs. Forreston (G) 11:30 a.m. – Oregon vs. Milledgeville (G) 1 p.m. – West Carroll vs. Aquin (B) 2:30 p.m. – North Scott vs. Sycamore (G) 4 p.m. – Forreston vs. Easton Valley (B) 5:30 p.m. – Peoria vs. Gary West Side (B) 7 p.m. – Rockridge vs. Newman (B)

Sports inside

check in at No. 4. “This will be a great measuring stick for us,” NewNewman’s boys basketball man coach Ray team is facing a tall task, both Sharp said. “Someliterally and figuratively, on times, we tend to Saturday night. get a little stagnant The Comets (17-0) will venture Noah McCarty in practice, and out of conference play to tangle Newman having a game like with Rockridge (16-0) in the sophomore this coming up is marquee game of the Manny’s great motivation to Pizza Shootout. Tipoff is slated for 7 p.m., and is the last of seven keep improving. We have some lofty goals we want to accomgames to be played that day at plish, and if we are to do that, Mount Carroll Middle School. we’ll see a team like Rockridge in The Rockets are the unanithe supersectional.” mous No. 1 team in the AP MEASURING CONTINUED ON B7 Class 2A poll, while the Comets BY BRIAN WEIDMAN bweidman@saukvalley.com 800-798-4085, ext. 551

Michael Krabbenhoeft/mkrabbenhoeft@saukvalley.com

HIGH SCHOOL EXTRA

OUTDOORS

Meet Morrison’s Chelsea Eads, B2.

Where have deer gone? B4.

Newman’s A.J. Sharp shoots a basket during the Comets’ game against Mercer County at the Rock Falls Shootout. The Comets will face a big challenge when they play Class 2A’s No. 1-ranked team, Rockridge, at the Manny’s Shootout on Saturday in Mount Carroll.

Suggestion box Comment or story tip? Contact Sports Editor Dan Woessner at dwoessner@saukvalley.com or 800-798-4085, ext. 555


TOP OF 2

Another accolade Alshon Jeffery !FTEREARNINGREPLACEMENT SPOTIN0RO"OWL "EARS 72CHOSENAS.&,S-OST )MPROVED0LAYERBY0RO &OOTBALL7RITERS!SSOCIATION

In under the wire Nate Schierholtz #UBS/&AVOIDSARBITRATION BYSIGNING YEAR MILLION DEAL&RIDAYJeff Samardzija Travis Wood & Darwin BarneyMISSNOONDEADLINE

Your guide to whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going on in sports

"s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

3ATURDAY *ANUARY 

MY 2 CENTS

Super Tuesday upcoming On the tube TV listings Saturday College football 3 p.m.

s%AST 7EST3HRINE'AME AT3T0ETERSBURG &LA .&,

Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball 10 a.m.

s4OLEDOAT!KRON %30.5 11 a.m.

s4ENNESSEEAT+ENTUCKY #"3 s"OSTON#OLLEGEAT. #AROLINA %30. s4EMPLEAT,A3ALLE %30. s3ETON(ALLAT 'EORGETOWN &3. 11:30 a.m.

s'EORGE-ASONAT2HODE )SLAND ."#30 Noon

s-ISSOURI3TAT.)OWA %30.5 1 p.m.

s.#3TATEAT$UKE #"3 s/KLAHOMAAT"AYLOR %30. s!LABAMAAT-ISSOURI %30. s53#AT#OLORADO &OX3PORTS s-URRAY3TAT 3)5 %DWARDSVILLE &3. s7IS -ILWAUKEEAT 6ALPARAISO #3. 1:30 p.m.

E

very Monday, I open a template page in our system that contains the complete schedule of local events for the current season. After a couple waves of my technological wand, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll end up with several sheets of paper in my hand with the schedule of events for the next week. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s that list which I use to to make our department schedule. The first step in the process is scanning through requests for days off and so forth. Then I work out what days each person will have off, and make sure that I leave enough people to get the section out each day. Then I take the events schedule, and start putting stars next to every event that it seems like we should cover. Some might be average games from one of our four main schools â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Dixon, Newman, Rock Falls and Sterling. Some might hold special significance â&#x20AC;&#x201C; conference game or meet, rivalry game, or non-conference matchup between two powerhouses. Anyway, I started the

smaller schools at tourin Orion, West DANWOESSNER naments Carroll and Plano. The 3PORTS Dukes will look to make %DITOR a statement against 2EACH HIMAT the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most storied DWOESSNER basketball program in SAUKVALLEY the Rockets. This one COMCOM should be a lot of fun. OR   EXT Moving down the list of  games, the Bureau Valley Storm will play at the No. 4-ranked Newman Comets. schedule for this comThe Storm have a ing week, and I almost used up the ink in a pen dangerous collection of talent, and the Comets making stars for events will be coming off a on Tuesday. big game against No. 1 This coming Tuesday Rockridge on Saturday might be one of, if not at the Mannyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Shootthe most-packed days out in Mount Carroll. of the winter. I say this, Could the Storm have and fully expect the an upset brewing? sports gods to deliver a On the girls side, the terrible snowstorm to Sterling Golden Warwipe it all out. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just been my luck lately. riors host the Dixon Duchesses. The WarOperating on the riors will be looking to assumption that I avenge a loss at Lanhavenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t disturbed the heavens, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll take a min- caster Gym in Decemute to preview an excit- ber. Depending on how things went Friday, both ing day in local sports. The first eye-catcher is teams might need the boys basketball between win to stay in the NIBRock Falls and Dixon at 12 West race. Another girls game Lancaster Gym at 7:15. of note is the Eastland The Rockets suffered a tough loss to Sterling on Cougars playing at the Tuesday, but rebounded Oregon Hawks. The to win at Stillman Valley Cougars are probably on Thursday. the top 1A team in the Dixon has feasted on area, while the Hawks

are one of the best 2A teams. This is the kind of non-conference game that should make both teams better. If those donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t satiate your hoops hunger, perhaps a drive to Freeport to watch a doubleheader between Sauk Valley Community College and Highland would fill your belly. These two schools are big rivals, and usually produce very entertaining games. Perhaps basketball doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t interest you? How about wrestling? A big Class 1A meet will be occurring at Erie. The Erie-Prophetstown Panthers will host Newman and Dakota. All three programs are consistently strong. The Comets feature a few kids that should finish at or near the top of the podium in Champaign in few weeks. Dakota has Josh Alber, who is undefeated in high school, and heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a senior. Seeing him grapple alone will be worth the price of admission. In all, there are 25 events scheduled for Tuesday. So, letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hope for good weather, because it should be a night to remember.

s.ORTHWESTERNAT)NDIANA "4. s&ORDHAMAT3T,OUIS ."#30

SAUK VALLEY EXTRA

s$AYTONAT2ICHMOND %30.5

Chelsea Eads

2 p.m.

3 p.m.

s/KLAHOMA3TAT+ANSAS #"3 s0ITTAT3YRACUSE %30. s)NDIANA3TAT7ICHITA3T %30. s5#,!AT5TAH &OX3PORTS s$E0AULAT6ILLANOVA &3. 4 p.m.

s#INCINNATIAT3&LORIDA %30.5 5 p.m.

s-ICHIGANAT7ISCONSIN %30. s$ARTMOUTHAT3T*OHNS &OX3PORTS 6 p.m.

s0ENN3TAT0URDUE %30.5 7 p.m.

s-ICHIGAN3TAT)LLINOIS "4. s)LLINOIS3TAT$RAKE #3. s#REIGHTONAT0ROVIDENCE &OX3PORTS 8 p.m.

s,OUISVILLEAT5#ONN %30. s6ANDERBILTAT,35 %30.5 10 p.m.

s7ASHINGTONAT3TANFORD %30.5

Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball 11 a.m.

s)LLINOISAT-ICHIGAN "4. 6 p.m.

s76IRGINIAAT/KLAHOMA 3T &OX3PORTS

Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hockey 5:30 p.m.

s0ENN3TAT-ICHIGAN3T ."#30

College wrestling 4:30 p.m.

s)OWAAT.EBRASKA "4.

Golf 2 p.m.

s0'! (UMANA#HALLENGE THIRDROUND AT,A1UINTA #ALIF 4'#

NBA 7 p.m.

sERSAT"ULLS 7'.

NHL 7 p.m.

s$UCKSAT"LUES &3.

Tennis 8 p.m.

s!USTRALIAN/PEN ROUNDOF  %30. 2 a.m. (Sunday)

s!USTRALIAN/PEN ROUNDOF  %30.

Q &A

On the tube TV listings Sunday Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball Noon

s-INNESOTAAT)OWA "4. s,OUISIANA4ECHAT3OUTH ERN-ISS &OX3PORTS 1 p.m.

s"OWLING'REENAT 7-ICHIGAN #3. 2:30 p.m.

s4OWSONAT#OLLEGEOF #HARLESTON ."#30 5 p.m.

s6IRGINIA4ECHAT.OTRE $AME %30.5 7 p.m.

s/REGONAT/REGON3T %30.5

Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball 11 a.m.

s$UKEAT6IRGINIA4ECH &3. 12:30 p.m.

s,OUISVILLEAT3-5 %30.5 1 p.m.

s,35AT6ANDERBILT &3. 2:30 p.m.

s&ORDHAMAT$AYTON %30.5 2 p.m.

s)OWAAT/HIO3T "4. s5#ONNAT2UTGERS %30. s6ILLANOVAAT$E0AUL &OX3PORTS 4 p.m.

s0URDUEAT.EBRASKA "4. s0ENN3TAT-ICHIGAN3T %30.

Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hockey 7 p.m.

s/HIO3TAT-INNESOTA "4.

Morrison senior not big on math

Filliesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; three-sport standout from an athletic family, loves living in a small town.

Golf 2 p.m.

s0'! (UMANA#HALLENGE FINALROUND AT,A1UINTA #ALIF 4'#

NFL playoffs 2 p.m.

Do you have time for any hobbies besides sports? I really donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have anything except sports. Last night I had two batting practices and basketball practice on top of that, and staying after basketball practice to shoot. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just school, sports, homework, and then sleep, and wake up and go over the cycle again.

s!&##HAMPIONSHIP 0ATRIOTSAT"RONCOS #"3

Any brothers and sisters? I have two brothers and one sister. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all younger, and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all athletes, too.

s#APITALSAT2ANGERS ."#30

Were your parents athletes? Yes. My mom [Tori] was a pretty good basketball player [at Morrison]. My dad [Justin] was a wrestler and football player [also at Morrison].

s!USTRALIAN/PEN ROUNDOF  AT-ELBOURNE %30.

Have you always lived in Morrison? Yes. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a small town. I love it. I love playing on the home court. I only have a couple games left, so Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to make it what I can.

On this date January 18

Plans beyond high school? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m definitely going to go to college and play softball. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m looking at Wartburg [College in Waverly, Iowa] and a couple other colleges that I still have to visit. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m planning on studying fitness management, but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not sure yet. Career aspirations? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always wanted to be a coach. I definitely want to stay in fitness.

5:30 p.m.

s.&##HAMPIONSHIP ERSAT3EAHAWKS &OX

NHL 11:30 a.m.

s"RUINSAT"LACKHAWKS ."# 6:30 p.m.

Tennis 8 p.m.

2 a.m. (Monday)

s!USTRALIAN/PEN ROUNDOF  AT-ELBOURNE %30.

Favorite TV shows? The Fosters. I love that show. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on ABC Family. I watch ABC Family a lot. Favorite music? I have a pump-up playlist before every game. I have old-school music on it. I have Michael Jackson on there. And, I love getting pumped up to the pep band, so I even have a playlist on my iPod of pep bands playing. Favorite foods? Chicken nuggets and mashed potatoes. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the best.

Favorite school subject? I want to say P.E., but thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kind of lame. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even have to take P.E., but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve taken it all 4 years, all year-round. I enjoy the activity. Least favorite subject? I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like math. I struggle with math. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m in [pre-calculus]. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard. But you can still figure out your batting average, right? Yeah. I know how to do that stuff.

!STOLDTO,ARRY"RENNANs36-PHOTOBY0HILIP-ARRUFFO

24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE

GATOR

TAKE A BITE OUT OF HIGH PRICES IN HEATING & COOLING THE SAUK VALLEY!

815-631-6232

Kelly Wallingford - Owner r .KEGPUGF r $QPFGF r +PUWTGF

1973 s Orlando Cepeda BECOMESTHEFIRSTPLAYER SIGNEDTOBEADESIGNATED HITTER(ESIGNSWITHTHE 2ED3OXWEEKAFTERTHE $(RULEISAPPROVED

Let us hear it s'AMERESULTS STORYTIPS ATHLETEOFTHEWEEK NOMINATIONS TEAMAND INDIVIDUALSTATSCANBE FAXEDTO   CALLEDINTO   EXTORE MAILEDTO SPORTS SAUKVALLEYCOM

Contact us at 800-798-4085 Sports Editor Dan Woessner EXT DWOESSNER SAUKVALLEYCOM Sports Reporters Larry Brennan EXT LBRENNAN SAUKVALLEYCOM Ty Reynolds EXT TREYNOLDS SAUKVALLEYCOM Brian Weidman EXT BWEIDMAN SAUKVALLEYCOM


Saturday, January 18, 2014

sportShorts

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs"

GIRLS BASKETBALL | PROPHETSTOWN 50, NEWMAN 36

SVM staff, wire services NFL

On the calendar Local events

Fox, CBS submit bids for games &OXAND#"3HAVESUBMITTEDBIDSFORTHERIGHTS TOBROADCASTASMANY ASEIGHT4HURSDAYNIGHT .ATIONAL&OOTBALL,EAGUE GAMES "ASEDONTHEREPORTED MILLIONTHAT."#PAYS FORITSPACKAGEOF.&, 3UNDAYNIGHTGAMES AN EIGHT GAMELINEUPCOULDBE WORTHMILLIONORMORE 2EPRESENTATIVESFORBOTH NETWORKSDIDNOTIMMEDIATELYRESPONDTOREQUESTS FORCOMMENT

Saturday Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball 3 p.m.

s-ALCOLM8AT3AUK6ALLEY Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball 1 p.m.

s-ALCOLM8AT3AUK6ALLEY Boys basketball 9 a.m.

s3OUTH"ELOIT-,+TOURNAment, AFC vs. Harvard 11:30 a.m.

s-ANNYS3HOOTOUT -ILLEDGEVILLEVS7EST #ARROLL AT-OUNT#ARROLL

TENNIS

Djokovic extends winning streak to 27 -%,"/52.% !USTRALIAn Novak DjokovicEXTENDED HISWINNINGSTREAKTO MATCHES ANDSTAYEDON TRACKFORAFOURTHCONSECUTIVE!USTRALIAN/PENTITLE WITHA     WIN &RIDAYOVERDenis Istomin. "EFORERAINCOOLEDTHINGS OFFAT-ELBOURNE0ARK Serena WilliamsPERSEVEREDTHROUGHAFOURTHDAY OFSEARINGTEMPERATURESTO also advance. &IVE TIMECHAMPION7ILLIAMSEQUALEDMargaret CourtS!USTRALIAN/PEN MARKOFMATCHWINS WITHHERSECOND ROUNDVICTORY ANDBEATTHATINTHE THIRDROUNDWHENSHEALSO MATCHEDLindsay DavenportSRECORDOFMAIN DRAWMATCHESHEREINTHE /PENERA /N3UNDAY SHELLPLAY FORMER.O RANKEDAna Ivanovic WHOBEAT 53/PENCHAMPIONSam Stosur      MLB

Sox reach deals with Beckham, De Aza 4HE#HICAGO7HITE3OX AVOIDEDARBITRATIONWITH SECONDBASEMANGordon BeckhamANDOUTFIELDER Alejandro De Aza on &RIDAY AGREEINGTO YEAR CONTRACTSWITHBOTH PLAYERS "ECKHAMWILLRECEIVE MILLIONINBASESALARYIN WHILE$E!ZA WILLRECEIVEMILLION OLYMPICS

Putin: Russia is not â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;going afterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; gays 2USSIAISNOThGOINGAFTERv GAYS 0RESIDENTVladimir PutinSAIDON&RIDAY DEFENDINGABANONhPROPAGANDAOFHOMOSEXUALITYv THATHASBROUGHTCRITICISM FROMTHE7ESTAHEADOFTHE 7INTER/LYMPICS 4HE+REMLINHOPESTHE GAMES STARTINGON&EB INTHECITYOF3OCHIONTHE "LACK3EA WILLSHOWCASE 2USSIASMODERNFACE MORETHANDECADESAFTER THE3OVIET5NIONCOLLAPSED

Stockholm pulls plug on bid 3TOCKHOLMHASSURPRISINGLYPULLEDTHEFINANCIAL PLUGONITSBIDTOHOSTTHE WINTER/LYMPICS WITH THE3WEDISHCITYSRULING -ODERATEPARTYSAYINGON &RIDAYTHATINVESTINGINTHE 'AMESWASNOTATTRACTIVE ENOUGH

1 p.m.

s-ANNYS3HOOTOUT /REGONVS!QUIN AT -OUNT#ARROLL 2:20 p.m.

Philip Marruffo/pmarruffo@saukvalley.com

Prophetstownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Corrie Reiley goes up for a layup in front of Newmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Aubree Schmitt during Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Three Rivers North game in Sterling. The Prophets won 50-36.

Put a lid on it

Comets go 12 minutes without point in loss BY TY REYNOLDS treynolds@saukvalley.com    EXT

STERLING â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The collective sigh of relief from the Newman bench was almost audible in the nearly silent gym. For more than 12 minutes at the start of the Cometsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Three Rivers North contest against the Prophetstown Prophets on Friday night, there seemed to be a lid on the basket for the home team. Finally, after Newman missed its first dozen or so shots, Julie Hurd broke the invisible barrier with the second of two free throws with 3:57 left before halftime. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We played a lot better after that,â&#x20AC;? Hurd said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Once we got one shot to go in, then we hit the next one, and we started shooting with confidence again.â&#x20AC;? But the deficit, which had grown to 24 before the Cometsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; first point, was too much for Newman to overcome in the Prophetsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 50-36 victory. In this case, the 24-0 run over the gameâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first quarter and a half wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t due to the normally unyielding full-court press with which Prophetstown usually suffocates its opponents. Instead, the Prophets instituted an aggressive half-court man-to-man defense, forcing the Comets into tough shots, and then limiting any offensive rebound opportunities. Newman finished the first quarter 0-for-9 from the field, with eight turnovers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be able to do that to them, even playing that good of defense,â&#x20AC;? Prophetstown guard Corrie Reiley said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It really surprised me that they didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t score for so long, but we just made sure

Star of the game:#ORRIE2EILEY 0ROPHETSTOWN POINTS STEALS REBOUNDS ASSISTS Key performers: #LARE+RAMER 0ROPHETSTOWN POINTS REBOUNDS*ULIE(URD .EWMAN POINTS STEALS Up next:0ROPHETSTOWNAT2IVERDALE PM -ONDAY&ULTONAT.EWMAN PM4HURSDAY they had to take tough shots, then got the rebounds and got back down the court.â&#x20AC;? Though very few of Newmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 15 turnovers led to fast-break layups, the Prophets (20-2, 8-0) still took advantage on the offensive end. Ball movement was the key, as Prophetstown notched assists on 15 of its 18 field goals; the other three, all in the first quarter, consisted of two walk-up 3-pointers by Reiley, and Kassi Henrekinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pull-up jumper in the lane. All 10 Prophets scored at least two points and pulled down at least one rebound, and eight of them dished an assist. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We talk all the time about getting in the flow of the offense, and taking â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; shots,â&#x20AC;? Prophetstown coach Don Robinson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re open, we want them to shoot, and I think the girls get a lot of confidence on offense thanks to their strong defense and rebounding.â&#x20AC;? Leading 32-10 at halftime, the Prophets put things away in the third quarter. They held the Comets (5-13, 4-5) to 2-for-14 shooting in the period, and scored 12 of the final 14 points in the frame after Newmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Aubree Schmittâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s opening bucket a minute in to take a 44-14 lead. But it was a whole different ballgame over the final 8 minutes. With Robinson playing his five reserves for almost the

2011 Chevy

IMPALA

LT

NADA RETAIL AIL $14,950

Peteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Price $13,987* Chevrolet

FREE KITCHEN DESIGNS BY Jocelyn Lilly, Kitchen Design: 815-266-1354

Ask about our FREE Upgrade Special MILLEDGEVILLE DO-IT-BEST HOME CENTER

'SFF &TUJNBUFT t 'SFF .FBTVSJOH t 'SFF %FMJWFSZ

Bring the Beauty of StarMark into Your Home. 3BJMSPBE BOE $PDISBO 4USFFUT .JMMFEHFWJMMF *   UPMM GSFF

B & D HOME SERVICES

5HVLGHQWLDO Â&#x2021; &RPPHUFLDO

3OXPELQJ Â&#x2021; +HDWLQJ &RROLQJ Â&#x2021; (OHFWULFDO

201 W. 14th, Rock Falls

815-626-0897 Lic # 058-157413

7:15 p.m.

s$IXONAT-ENDOTA 7 p.m.

s-ANNYS3HOOTOUT .EWMANVS2OCKRIDGE AT -OUNT#ARROLL Girls basketball 10 a.m.

s-ANNYS3HOOTOUT West Carroll vs. Forreston 11:30 a.m.

s-ANNYS3HOOTOUT /REGONVS-ILLEDGEVILLE 2 p.m.

s2OCK&ALLSAT%ASTLAND 6 p.m.

s-ORRISAT$IXON 7:30 p.m.

s!QUINAT0OLO s&ORRESTONAT-ILLEDGEVILLE Boys bowling 9 a.n.

s$IXON2EGIONALAT0LUM Hollow Girls bowling 9 a.m.

s3TERLINGAT'ALESBURG )NVITE Boys swimming 11 a.m.

s3TERLINGAT2OCKFORD *EFFERSON)NVITE Wrestling 9 a.m.

s$IXONAT'ENESEO)NVITE s3TERLINGAT"ATAVIA)NVITE s2OCK&ALLSAT1UINCY )NVITE s0OLO &ULTONAT+EWANEE Tournament s!MBOYTOURNAMENT 10 a.m.

s2OCKFORD,UTHERAN 0RINCETON 2IVERDALEAT /REGON s-ORRISON 2OCKRIDGEAT -ERCER#OUNTY

saukvalleysports.com saukvalleysports.com saukvalleysports.com

JANUARY CLEARANCE

SAVE UP TO

$400

ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S OUR NAME AND OUR NUMBER

626-GUNS

1114 1st Ave., Rock Falls, IL.

(Between Grummertâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and Auto Zone)

Go Ahead.

Send Us Packing! We offer expert packaging solutions, plus shipping via FedEx & UPS.

Pack & Protect Your Items!

If You Are Shipping, Moving, or Storing, Our Supply Center Has Everything You Need: s /VER  "OX 3IZES s 3PECIALTY "OXES

#P3037

219

$

815-772-2171 Rt. 30 E, Morrison WWW.PETEHARKNESS.COM

entire fourth quarter, the Comets made some hay and built some confidence for the future. The shots that refused to fall earlier in the game started going down, and Newman ratcheted up the pressure in its half-court defense. The Comets forced 12 of the Prophetsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 22 turnovers in the final period, and outscored them 22-6. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We all stayed positive, figured out how to play better defense, and started getting shots to fall,â&#x20AC;? Hurd said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think if we had played like that the whole game, we couldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve really stuck with them â&#x20AC;Ś and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to help our confidence for next game.â&#x20AC;? Hurd scored 10 of her team-high 11 points in the fourth quarter, and she also nabbed four steals. Schmitt finished with six points, four assists and four steals, while Kayci Howell knocked down a pair of fourth-period

3s and finished with eight points and six rebounds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was impressed and proud of the girls in that second half,â&#x20AC;? Newman coach Jay Howell said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They played for each other, they didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t give up, and they stuck with it despite shots not falling and Prophetstown playing very well earlier in the game.â&#x20AC;? Reiley finished with 11 points, four steals, three assists and three rebounds for Prophetstown, while Henrekin and Clare Kramer each scored nine points; Kramer grabbed five rebounds and dished two assists. Heather Strike had four assists and four steals, and Karlie Stafford chipped in nine rebounds and two assists as the Prophets became the first area team this season â&#x20AC;&#x201C; boys or girls â&#x20AC;&#x201C; to reach the 20-win plateau. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Coach Robinson told us before the game that we were one win away from 20,â&#x20AC;? Reiley said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and that really got us pumped up. It was really nice to come out and get that early lead, because it took a lot of pressure off us and helped us relax and run our offense and defense.â&#x20AC;?

s3OUTH"ELOIT-,+TOURNAMENT !&#VS3OUTH"ELOIT

per monthA

* Plus tax, title, license and doc fees. A) 3.9% for 72 months with approved credit. Plus tax, title, license and doc fees. Photos for illustration only. Dealer not liable for errors.

s 7ARDROBE "OXES s 'OLF #LUB "OXES s 0ICTURE -IRROR "OXES

s 0EANUTS s "UBBLEWRAP s 3TRETCH 7RAP s 4APE  $ISPENSERS s -ATTRESS "AGS s -OVING "LANKETS s 0ACKAGING 0APER  -UCH -ORE

All-Safe Storage Center www.allsafecenter.com

  ;PTILY *YLLR 9K VMM VM 3V^LSS 7HYR 9K +P_VU Â&#x2039;  )\ZPULZZ 6MĂ&#x201E;JL 6WLU 4- ! [V  HUK :H[ ! [V UVVU


"s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

OUTDOOR ADVENTURES

Trouble ahead for deer population N ow that we have just about wound down with the deer archery season, and all of what seems like 20 different gun seasons, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to ask the question that is on a lot of hunterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s minds. That question is, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Where have all the deer gone?â&#x20AC;? This statement has been bouncing around the hunting community for several years, but never more than after this season. After years of having Chronic Wasting Disease shoved down our throat and seeing just about no effects from it, the powers that be just kept plugging along like our deer herd was stronger than ever â&#x20AC;&#x201C; even though the numbers of tags they issued kept rising, and the number of deer killed kept dropping. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s typical Illinois bunk, and now we have a problem. Numbers are down â&#x20AC;&#x201C; significantly. Look into this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s deer harvest totals for yourself on the DNR website and form your own opinion on the matter. Our herd is in trouble, folks, and that ainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t good. Now the hot disease around the country is the Blue Tongue disease, or EHD. Rumors of massive deer kills have spread like wildfire. Now, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not sure what to believe, but I do know this: If this disease turns out to be real and you combine a mass kill with our own over-harvest, well, that could spell disaster for our deer. Have you deer hunters thought about life without deer hunting? I have, and I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like it very much at all. In all fairness, there are other things that affect our deer herd negatively. I think many hunters out there need to look in the mirror and ask themselves if they are part of the problem or part of the solution. I mean, a lot of the complaints I have listened to have gone something

MATTJONES -ATT*ONES ISAFISHING GUIDEFROM 0ROPHETSTOWN(E CANBE REACHEDAT CATMATT CATFISHACADEMYCOM

like this: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Well, me and the guys, we usually kill 15 or 20 deer out at our land every shotgun season, but this year we only killed eight.â&#x20AC;? Or a guy will tell me he can remember when he used to shoot 10 deer with his bow every season, and now he struggles to kill two or three. Well, no kidding â&#x20AC;&#x201C; think about it. We canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t kill five or six does apiece and expect to help the herd. Things only get better when you decide to take a stand and do something as individuals to make it better. Now, if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re under the line of thinking that the state will come around, cut back on the amount of tags issued, maybe cancel some of the outrageous seasons we have, then great, sleep well. I know better than to think any of that will happen. I understand we arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t going to change things instantly, but you better commit to killing fewer deer, does especially. While youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing that, you may want to start raising a little hell with your state representative. Or hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an idea â&#x20AC;&#x201C; boycott shotgun season altogether. Nobody buy a tag. The state will stand up and take notice when all that money stops rolling in from hunters. In other words, stand united or fall apart. We have to let them know we are not happy, and steps need to start being taken now â&#x20AC;&#x201C; right now. What are we going to do? I am not sure, but I know it has to be something, and I know it has to be now! Go Catfish!

3ATURDAY *ANUARY 

Roby dunks highlight Dukesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; run START

CONTINUED FROM B1

Two dunks by Isaiah Roby, who scored 17 points, and 3-pointers from Carr and Jarrett helped the Dukes up the margin to 39-17 with 2:58 left in the first half. Jarrett scored 18 points. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We came out with a lot of energy,â&#x20AC;? Carr said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is a game we really needed to win. We owed them big time, so we came out and played our hardest. I came out with a lot of confidence.â&#x20AC;? The Cavaliers (6-8, 1-3) shaved the difference to

Isaiah Roby $IXON SOPHOMORE

Cal Jarrett $IXON JUNIOR

44-29 by halftime. Leading 55-35 with less than 2 minutes left in the third quarter, Dixon saw LPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Noah Lamboley, who scored a game-high 26 points, shoot his team back into the game. Lamboley hit three straight 3-pointers to end

Kyle LeBlanc $IXON SOPHOMORE

Matt Coffey $XON JUNIOR

the third quarter, making it 55-44. He knocked down two more early in the fourth quarter, and suddenly it was 58-52 with 5:46 to play. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really worried. We just did what we had to do,â&#x20AC;? said Roby, who had a season-high

three dunks. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was scary, but we werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t worried too much. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Last year, we would have lost that game by at least 25. Once he started making shots, we would have had our heads down. But this year, the whole team is stepping up.â&#x20AC;? The Dukes answered the threat, outscoring the Cavs 15-7 the rest of the way. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We executed our gameplan really well,â&#x20AC;? Dixon coach Jason Mead said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We were aggressive on offense, and defensively, we took them out of what they wanted in the first half.â&#x20AC;?

Shoe & Zipper Repair

 

Work Done by Gary Lenox 815-388-8047 s 815-499-4772

    

Grummertâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hardware Drop off

&' ()' ' &        !"#  $%

Sterling/Rock Falls

     

         %

 !   !    !# # $" !  $ !   ! ! $ Trade-in must be in good working condition. Savings provided through Verizon Wireless gift card for telesales and online orders.

THROUGH THE LENS

 







After Verizon Wireless Trade-In gift card.

After Verizon Wireless Trade-In gift card.

%$ -()"$ ))',





After Verizon Wireless Trade-In gift card.

*%' &'%((%' $'%".

!"$$()  

(#')&!%$

DROID MAXX by MOTOROLA

 

Samsung Galaxy SÂŽ 4

DROID ULTRA by MOTOROLA

Also available in white. $249.99 2-yr. price â&#x20AC;&#x201C; $50 mail-in rebate debit card.

Also available in white and black.

All smartphones require new 2-yr. activation. Offers valid thru 2/28.

Philip Marruffo/pmarruffo@saukvalley.com

Prophetstownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Karlie Stafford reaches up for a rebound Friday against Newman in Sterling. The Prophets beat the Comets 50-36. Read more about the game on B3.

Dixon Metal Specialties For your next autobody repairs See Rich or Eric Kanzler

$IXON 3TERLING &REEWAY $IXON ), s 

  

-)!#%$")%'"$ +'"()$

+) $ +)' '("()$) (%*$

WAS $59.99

WAS $129.99

From minor dents to major body repairs, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll get your car back in shape.

D.M.S. AUTOBODY



 

  

YurbudsÂŽ Signature Series Earbuds

UP by JAWBONEÂŽ

CALL: 1.800.256.4646

|

CLICK: vzw.com/tradeup

|

VISIT: vzw.com/storelocator

Activation/upgrade fee/line: Up to $35. IMPORTANT CONSUMER INFORMATION: Subject to Cust. Agmt, Calling Plan, rebate form & credit approval. Up to $350 early termination fee/line. Restocking fee may apply. Rebate debit card takes up to 6 weeks & expires in 12 months. Offers & coverage, varying by svc, not available everywhere; see vzw.com. Limited-time offers. While supplies last. 4G LTE is available in 500 markets in the U.S. DROID is a trademark of Lucasfilm Ltd. and its related companies. Used under license. Š 2014 Samsung Telecommunications America, LLC (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Samsungâ&#x20AC;?). Samsung and Galaxy S are both registered trademarks of Samsung Electronics America, Inc. and/or its related entities.GooglePlay andAndroidare trademarksof GoogleInc.Š2014 ElectronicArtsInc.EA,EASPORTS,theEA SPORTSlogoandPlantsvs.Zombiesare trademarksof ElectronicArtsInc.Allothertrademarksare theproperty of their respective owners. Š 2014 Verizon Wireless. H1114


Saturday, January 18, 2014

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs"

An Advertising Feature Look for answers LQ WRGD\¡V paper.

ATTENTION... Dollar Divas, Bargain Babes, Fashion Frugales.

 

We Got You

COVERED!

        

        

   

              !  

   

"#$ %   %  &             

Kids Name Brand Clothing and Toys Jewelry (Bling)

'   ( ) "* +   + ,-..  /0+

Purses & Accessories (Dress it up!) New Born & Maternity (For The Expecting)

           

  

   

   !

,-..  +  ; ; 

 0 +

"#   $%

 &!     ) 1 *#2#"/ ./" 3 45   6 7  

Plus Sizes (Celebrate Your Curves)

  < 5 8+

Teens Adult (Designer Digs)

 !     +

Home Accents

<7  ! + 8  ; 

Daily drop-offs allowed. Up to 25 items. Call for larger drops. 815.625.6827

 8 ) 1 "9"*./ ONLY THE BEST )  :    Areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s #1 Consignment 6KRS Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s All Here, Stop And Shop!

 (DVW UG 6W 6WHUOLQJ Â&#x2021; 0RQ6DW  DP   SP

1RZ $FFHSWLQJ

)ROORZ XV IRU VSHFLDOV


"s367EEKEND Dilbert by Scott Adams

www.saukvalley.com

Saturday, January 18, 2014

Zits® by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

Arlo & Janis by Jimmy Johnson Garfield by Jim Davis

Freshly Squeezed by Ed Stein Get Fuzzy by Darby Conley

Blondie by Dean Young & John Marshall

Wizard of Id by Brant Parker and Johnny Hart

Pearls Before Swine by Stephan Pastis Rose is Rose by Pat Brady and Don Wimmer

Pickles by Brian Crane Big Nate by Lincoln Peirce

Born Loser by Art and Chip Sansom

Baby Blues by Jerry Scott & Rick Kirkman

Soup To Nutz by Rick Stromoski

Family Circus by Bil Keane

The Argyle Sweater by Scott Hilburn

Alley Oop by Dave Graue and Jack Bender

Bridge Frank & Ernest by Bob Thaves

The houses meet across the Baize

Grizzwells by Bill Schorr

The Houses of Parliament in London are encouraging the development of bridge. In July, 12 pupils from Spaxton Primary School in Somerset, U.K., played a game of MiniBridge in the River Room, made available by the Lord Speaker of the House of Lords, The Rt. Hon. the Baroness D’Souza, CMG. The Lords and the Commons also hold an annual bridge match. Last year’s was won by the lower house, the Commons, and that leaves the series score at 21-18 in favor of the upper house. Today’s deal was chosen as the best-played of the day. It was declared by the Earl of Caithness, who was in four spades. West led the diamond king. When East started a highlow with his 10, West cashed

his diamond ace and persevered with the diamond queen. How did Caithness continue? North, Lady Blackstone, made a game-invitational limit raise of three spades. These

days, in the tournament world, jump raises in competitive auctions are pre-emptive. North would have cue-bid three diamonds to show spade support and at least game-invitational values. If South ruffed the third diamond low in the dummy, East would overruff, and later declarer would lose a club to go down one. Alternatively, if he ruffed with dummy’s spade queen, that would promote a trump trick for the opponents if spades were breaking 3-1, also resulting in down one. Caithness saw the solution. At trick three, he discarded a club from the board – a textbook loser-on-loser play. Then, after drawing trumps, South ruffed his club loser in the dummy to take five spades, two hearts, two clubs and that ruff. © 2014 UFS


Saturday, January 18, 2014

LOCAL SPORTS

FRIDAYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SCOREBOARD Boys basketball Northern Illinois Big 12 West Conf. 4-0 3-1 2-2 1-3 1-3 1-3

Ottawa Dixon Sterling LaSalle-Peru Geneseo Streator

All 14-1 13-3 6-8 6-8 6-9 6-10

Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s results s$IXON ,A3ALLE 0ERU s/TTAWA 3TERLING s3TREATOR 'ENESEO Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s games s,A3ALLE 0ERUAT0RINCETON  s$IXONAT-ENDOTA PM

Big Northern West 2OCKFORD,UTHERAN Winnebago "YRON -ENDOTA 2OCK&ALLS 3TILLMAN6ALLEY Oregon

Conf.   2-0         0-4

Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s result South Beloit MLK tournament s"YRON /RANGEVILLE Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s games s$IXONAT-ENDOTA PM s7INNEBAGOAT3TILLMAN6ALLEY  Jefferson MLK tournament s,UTHERANVS4"$ South Beloit MLK tournament s"YRONVS3TOCKTON AM s"YRONVS.ORTH"OONE  Mannyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Shootout s/REGONVS!QUIN 

.EWMAN "UREAU6ALLEY -ORRISON &ULTON 0ROPHETSTOWN 2IVERDALE !MBOY %RIE

All                

Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s game Mannyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Shootout s.EWMANVS2OCKRIDGE 

ERIE (0-17, 0-5 Three Rivers North) +OBY+UHNEN  .ICH7ILDT  +ALLEN*EPSON  3EAN-ALONEY   +EN #OLE     /WEN -C#ONNELL     6INNIE "RAMM     "RANSEN 2OSENOW Totals: 12 10-19 36. MORRISON (8-11, 4-1) +OLLIN"URN  4RISTON(OUZENGA   -ASON3ITZMORE  +ALEB#HURCH     *OEY "RACKEMYER     "ILL Greul 8 0-1 16, Kyle Vanderleest 1 1-1 3, (UNTER(AMSTRA  3COTT&ERRY  Totals: 18 14-19 50. %RIE     Â&#x2C6;  -ORRISON     Â&#x2C6;  3s â&#x20AC;&#x201C;%RIE*EPSON 2OSENOW -ORRISON

FULTON (13-5, 3-2 TRAC North) -ATT$AIL  #ODY#ROSTHWAITE   3ETH3ANDERSON  *ASON/SBORN   "REVIN-ASON  $EVIN+UEHL   :ACH"ARBER  +YLE(UEBNER   0AUL6ELASCO  *AKE7ILLGING Totals: 13 21-24 51. PROPHETSTOWN (4-10, 1-3) 'RANT!MES  %THAN(OWARD   3ETH#ADY  $ANIEL3HIRLEY   #HRIS"AUER  *OSH0AUL   !USTIN'ERLACH  *OSH3IGEL  Totals: 15 26-36 61. &ULTON      Â&#x2C6; 0ROPHETSTOWN      Â&#x2C6; 3s n &ULTON  (UEBNER  "ARBER $AIL 0ROPHETSTOWN(OWARD !MES 3HIRLEY  at Manlius

BUREAU VALLEY 69, RIVERDALE 45

NUIC East All       6-4   8-8        

Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s games Mannyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Shootout s-ILLEDGEVILLEVS7EST#ARROLL AM s!QUINVS/REGON  s&ORRESTONVS0RESTON  South Beloit MLK tournament s!&#VS(ARVARD AM s/RANGEVILLEVS$AKOTA AM s/RANGEVILLEVS.ORTH"OONE  s!&#VS3OUTH"ELOIT  s$AKOTAVS3TOCKTON  s/RANGEVILLEVS3TOCKTON  s3OUTH"ELOITVS-OOSEHEART 

NUIC West Conf. %AST$UBUQUE   %ASTLAND   Lena-Winslow 3-1 Warren 4-3 2IVER2IDGE   3CALES-OUND   3TOCKTON   0EARL#ITY   Galena 1-4 7EST#ARROLL   Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s results s$URAND ,ENA 7INSLOW s0EARL#ITY 7EST#ARROLL s7ARREN 2IVER2IDGE South Beloit MLK tournament s%AST$UBUQUE !&#

MORRISON 50, ERIE 36

at Prophetstown

Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s results s"UREAU6ALLEY 2IVERDALE s-ORRISON %RIE s.EWMAN !MBOY s0ROPHETSTOWN &ULTON /4

Conf. !QUIN   0OLO   -ILLEDGEVILLE   Dakota 2-1 0ECATONICA   Durand 2-3 !SHTON &RANKLIN#ENTER   &ORRESTON   3OUTH"ELOIT   /RANGEVILLE   Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s results s$URAND ,ENA 7INSLOW s0OLO &ORRESTON South Beloit MLK tournament s"YRON /RANGEVILLE s$AKOTA .ORTH"OONE s%AST$UBUQUE !&# s(ARVARD 3OUTH"ELOIT

OTTAWA (14-1, 4-0) #OLEMAN  *OHNSON  $ONOVAN  2OMBACH  'ASSMAN   "OAZ  3TOKES  #URTIS  "RENT  #ARROLL   (ILL  0ARKS  $RAPER  Totals: 26 10-13 63. 3TERLING     Â&#x2C6;  /TTAWA     Â&#x2C6;  3sn3TERLING2EHMERT 'OMEZ (URLEY #OOK 4HORNTON /TTAWA  #ARROLL  Rebounds n 3TERLING  "ROUILETTE  /TTAWA#ARROLL Assists â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sterling 'OMEZ /TTAWA(ILL Steals â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3TERLING /TTAWA'ASSMAN Blocks n3TERLING2EHMERT /TTAWA3TOKES  Turnoversn3TERLING /TTAWAFouls n3TERLING /TTAWA

PROPHETSTOWN 61, FULTON 51, 2 OT

Three Rivers North Conf.                

BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

at Morrison All   11-3         4-12

All     6-8 9-10         3-9  

Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s games South Beloit Shootout s3TOCKTONVS"YRON AM s3TOCKTONVS$AKOTA  s%AST$UBUQUEVS-OOSEHEART  s3TOCKTONVS/RANGEVILLE  s%AST$UBUQUEVS(ARVARD  Mannyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Shootout s7EST#ARROLLVS-ILLEDGEVILLE AM Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s box scores at LaSalle

DIXON 73, LASALLE-PERU 59 DIXON (13-3, 3-1 NIB 12 West) .ATE 'ASCOIGNE      )SAIAH 2OBY    ,ARON#ARR   #AL *ARRETT   +YLE,E"LANC    2ILEY-EHRENS   -ATT#OFFEY    *$'IESON   !*-URDOCK      2YAN 7EBB      &JONN "UESCHE   !NGEL6ALDES   Totals: 25-48 15-25 73. LASALLE-PERU (6-8, 1-3) (UEBBE   +A*AKSE   7EISTART   :EMAN   ,AMBOLEY    -ILAICKI   +E*AKSE 0-3 0-0 0, Stoker 2-4 0-0 4, Pagan 3-9 0-0 9, $RESBACH  Totals: 23-54 2-4 59. $IXON     Â&#x2C6;  ,A3ALLE 0ERU     Â&#x2C6;  3s â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Dixon 8-16 (Carr 4-6, Jarrett 2-4, 2OBY  #OFFEY  ,0 ,AMBOLEY   0AGAN  :EMAN  -ILAICKI  7EISTART  (UEBBE  Fouls â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Dixon  ,0-ILAICKIOUT  at Kingman Gym, Ottawa

OTTAWA 63, STERLING 50 STERLING (6-8, 2-2 NIB-12 West) $IMITRIC 9OUNG     )SAIAH #ELESTINO     3TEPHEN 'EIGER     *UAN 'OMEZ  2YAN(URLEY  !USTIN#OOK  3TERLING4HORNTON  :ACH2EHMERT  2AFA3OSA  $RAQUE0ENAFLOR (EIER  *OE"ROUILETTE Totals: 20 4-9 50.

RIVERDALE (5-11, 1-4 TRAC North) 'ELLERSTEDT  +OSMINSKY  "USSERT  'EBHARDT  "RINKMAN  (ANRAHAN  !LGUIRE   "EALE  4URKAL  'OODWIN  "ENSENBERG Totals: 17 6-10 45. BUREAU VALLEY (14-7, 5-0) 4OMMY*OHNSTON  0ARKER.EUHALFEN     2YAN 9OUNG     !LEX*OHNSON  *OSH-EAD  $AVID-ILLER  0AYTON3HIPP  #HRIS3HYNK  %VAN&RANK  ,ENNARD7INRICH  3EAN3HEPARD   3ETH#AMBRON  $YLAN-ARTIN  Totals: 22 22-35 69. 2IVERDALE     Â&#x2C6;  "UREAU6ALLEY     Â&#x2C6;  3sn2IVERDALE'ELLERSTEDT +OSMINSKY "UREAU6ALLEY*OHNSTON .EUHALFEN 9OUNG  at Polo

POLO 63, FORRESTON 35 FORRESTON (5-9, 2-3 NUIC East) +ERCHNER  'ROOM  2EINING   3HELTON  "EASLEY  %DLER  3TAKE  3CHNEIDERMAN  #UNNINGHAM Totals: 11 7-16 35. POLO (18-2, 5-1) "AILEY3HIPMAN  "RAD#AVANAUGH   +ARL0REROST  3AWYER&RANO   "RIAN#AVANAUIGH  4RAVIS Van Drew 0 0-2 0, Austin Webb 0 1-2 1, -ATTHEW(ANDEL  *USTIN7RIGHT   )VAN'ROGAN  -AX3IMMONS 3 0-0 6, Wyatt Patterson 2 0-0 4, AJ DollMEYER Totals: 21 16-23 62. &ORRESTON     Â&#x2C6;  0OLO     Â&#x2C6;  3s â&#x20AC;&#x201C;&ORRESTON%DLER "EASLEY 0OLO &RANO (ANDEL  at East Dubuque

EAST DUBUQUE 59, AFC 53 AFC (5-8) "RET'ITTLESON  *ACOB(ILLIKER   4ROY-AIRS  $AVID:INKE   -ATT'ENDUSA  +EVIN+URZ  Totals: 22 4-6 53. EAST DUBUQUE (12-0) 0ULS  $,ANGE  3CHULTING   0LACE  !,ANGE  (ILBY  4RANEL  3CHNEIDER  Totals: 21 8-12 59. !&#     Â&#x2C6;  %$UBUQUE     Â&#x2C6;  3sn!&#:INKE 'ITTLESON 'ENDUSA % $UBUQUE  !,ANGE  $,ANGE  0LACE 3CHULTING (ILBY  at Savanna

PEARL CITY (5-15, 1-4 NUIC West) /LLIE  +LUCK  7INGERT   "ULL  *ACOBS  ,IEB  Totals: 30 9-12 76. WEST CARROLL (2-10, 0-5) #ALEB "RASHAW     *ORDAN "RACERO   4RAVIS(ARTMAN  4REVOR -ILLER     "RANDON 3TURTEVANT     4REVOR*ONES  $EVON(ARTLEY   %VAN'ENGENBACH Totals: 25 5-6 64. 0EARL#ITY     Â&#x2C6;  7EST#ARROLL     Â&#x2C6;  3s n 0EARL #ITY  +LUCK  7INGERT  7EST #ARROLL  3TURTEVANT  "RACERO  #RASHAW (ARTLEY 

Girls basketball Northern Illinois Big 12 West Conf. 4-0 3-2 3-2   1-3  

Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s result s/TTAWA 3TERLING Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s game s-ORRISAT$IXON 

Big Northern West Conf. -ENDOTA   "YRON   2OCKFORD,UTHERAN   /REGON   3TILLMAN6ALLEY   2OCK&ALLS   7INNEBAGO   Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s result s,UTHERAN /REGON s-ENDOTA 3TILLMAN6ALLEY

All              

Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s games s2OCK&ALLSAT%ASTLAND  Byron MLK tournament s"YRONVS4"$

Three Rivers North Conf. 0ROPHETSTOWN   !MBOY   2IVERDALE   %RIE   .EWMAN   -ORRISON   "UREAU6ALLEY   &ULTON   Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s result s0ROPHETSTOWN .EWMAN

All          X      

NUIC East !QUIN $AKOTA $URAND &ORRESTON !SHTON &RANKLIN#ENTER -ILLEDGEVILLE /RANGEVILLE 3OUTH"ELOIT Polo 0ECATONICA

Conf.                 1-4  

All                 1-14  

Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s games s3OUTH"ELOITAT$URAND  s!QUINAT0OLO  s&ORRESTONAT-ILLEDGEVILLE  s/RANGEVILLEAT0ECATONICA  Byron MLK tournament s$AKOTAVS"ELVIDERE.ORTH 4"!

Chris Johnson/Shaw Media

Poloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brad Cavanaugh secures a rebound during Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s game against Forreston in Polo. The Marcos won the NUIC East game 62-35.

NUIC West Conf. %ASTLAND   2IVER2IDGE 3CALES-OUND 4-1 %AST$UBUQUE   Pearl City 2-1 ,ENA 7INSLOW   'ALENA   3TOCKTON   West Carroll 0-3 Warren 0-6

All   10-4   9-8       3-13 1-13

Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s games s'ALENAAT0OTOSI  s2OCK&ALLSAT%ASTLAND  s,ENA 7INSLOWAT7ARREN  s0EARL#ITYAT$AKOTA  West Carroll Shootout s7EST#ARROLLVS&ORRESTON AM Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s box scores at Newman H.S., Sterling

PROPHETSTOWN 50, NEWMAN 36 PROPHETSTOWN (20-2, 8-0) #ORRIE 2EILEY      (EATHER 3TRIKE    +ARLIE3TAFFORD   3HELBY !DAMS   #LARE+RAMER   +ASSI(ENREKIN   +AELI+OVARIK     -IKAYLA "OLTON      #YDNEY 7ESTEN   #ALYA#RANE   Totals: 18-45 9-12 50. NEWMAN (5-13, 4-5 TRAC North) 3ARAH4RUJILLO   *ULIE(URD    +AYCI(OWELL   !UBREE3CHMITT      -ARY !LICE /SWALT      %LEXIA3ANDERS   "REANNA#ONBOY    +ELSEY3IMPSON   !LANI #OOK  Totals: 12-50 7-13 36. 0ROPHETSTOWN     Â&#x2C6;  .EWMAN     Â&#x2C6;  3sn0ROPHETSTOWN 2EILEY  3TRIKE   (ENREKIN   #RANE   +OVARIK   .EWMAN   (OWELL   /SWALT   (URD   3CHMITT   4RUJILLO    Reboundsn0ROPHETSTOWN3TAFFORD +RAMER .EWMAN(OWELL /SWALT  3ANDERS   Assists n 0ROPHETSTOWN 3TRIKE 2EILEY .EWMAN3CHMITT   Steals n 0ROPHETSTOWN  2EILEY  3TRIKE  .EWMAN  (URD  3CHMITT  Blocksn.EWMAN3ANDERS Turnovers n 0ROPHETSTOWN  .EWMAN  Foulsn0ROPHETSTOWN .EWMAN at Kingman Gym, Ottawa

OTTAWA 51, STERLING 47 STERLING (13-9, 3-2 NIB-12 West) #AROLYNN (AMMELMAN     'ABBY 3ANDOVAL  +AYLEEN4ERROCK   +AITLYN"AUER  +IARRA(ARRIS   -YA0EARSON  (ALIE2OBINSON  $ENAJHA0HILLIPS  *AILYN "ORUM Totals: 20 4-8 47. OTTAWA (11-2, 4-0) #ARLSON     2ICE     7AGNES   "AILEY  (AYNE  7AGNES  -C'RATH Totals: 20 4-11 51. 3TERLING     Â&#x2C6;  /TTAWA     Â&#x2C6;  3s â&#x20AC;&#x201C;3TERLING4ERROCK 3ANDOVAL /TTAWA2ICE "AILEY  at Oregon

ROCKFORD LUTHERAN 64, OREGON 60

PEARL CITY 76, WEST CARROLL 64

Ottawa Sterling Geneseo $IXON LaSalle-Peru 3TREATOR

367EEKENDs"

All 11-2 13-9 11-8   11-10  

LUTHERAN (12-6, 5-2 Big Northern West) +OEHLER  +ERESTES  -C'IRK   3TRADTMANN  3TRAWBRIDGE   -ILANI  7OOLLACOTT   'USE Totals: 23 14-14 64. OREGON (14-7, 5-2) 3AM ,AMBRIGTSEN     -C+AYLEE "EETER  %MY7RIGHT  -C#AHL 3ANDERS  -AL3ANDERS  +IMMIE *ANKE  -EGAN"OEHLE  +ELSEY 0UDLAS Totals: 18 17-20 60. ,UTHERAN     Â&#x2C6;  /REGON     Â&#x2C6;  3s â&#x20AC;&#x201C;,UTHERAN+ERESTES +OEHLER 3TRAWBRIDGE /REGON7RIGHT "EETER "OEHLE  at Silvis

FAITH CHRISTIAN 33, QUAD CITY CHRISTIAN 11 FAITH CHRISTIAN (7-4) 3ARAH 3MITH     :OE :IGLER     (ANNAH(UDSON  +ATIE#OVER  3TACIA(AMILL  3AM-ERRIMAN  (ANNAH+NAPP  !LYRICA-YERS  !MANDA,A0AGE Totals: 16 1-5 33. QUAD CITY CHRISTIAN 7IBORG  6ILA  ,ONSDALE 0-0 0, Stribling 0 0-0 0, Raya 0 2-2 2, CalaHAN Totals: 4 3-4 11. &AITH     Â&#x2C6;  Quad City 3 4 2 2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 11 3s â&#x20AC;&#x201C;NONE

Comets clip Amboy Sterling swept in Ottawa; Polo pounds Forreston "Y36-3PORTS3TAFF

The Newman Comets scored 22 points in each of the final three quarters Friday night in Amboy, downing the Clippers 81-52 in a Three Rivers North game. The Comets (17-0, 5-0) led 15-12 after one quarter, then proceeded to outscore Amboy (2-13, 0-4) 66-40 the rest of the way. Newman shot almost 50 percent from the floor (28-for-57) and 40 percent from 3-point range (9-for-22), and forced 23 Clipper turnovers. A.J. Sharp had 26 points, three assists and three steals, and Noah McCarty added 22 points and 12 rebounds for the Comets. Nate Terveer finished with 12 points and four steals, and Micah Trancoso dished five assists. Ottawa 63, Sterling 50:

The Golden Warriors led 37-34 at halftime, but were outscored 29-13 in the second half of a NIB12 West loss at Kingman Gym. Zach Rehmert had 15 points for Sterling (6-8, 2-2), and Joe Brouilette added eight points and four rebounds. John Carroll scored 17 points and grabbed 15 rebounds for the Pirates (14-1, 4-0), including their only 3-pointer.

Alex Lange hit three 3s and finished with 15 points for the Warriors (12-0).

Pearl City 76, West Carroll 64: Trevor Jones

led the Thunder with 18 points in a home loss to the Wolves. Also for West Carroll (2-10, 0-5), Jordan Bracero had 15 points, and Brandon Sturtevant added 12. For Pearl City (5-15, 1-4), Cody Kluck had 22 points, and T.J. Wingert added 20.

(14-7, 5-0 Three Rivers North) routed the Rams Girls basketball in Manlius. Ottawa 51, Sterling 47: Jake Gellerstedt had Kaitlyn Bauer didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss 21 points for Riverdale a shot for the Golden (5-11, 1-4). Warriors, but it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Prophetstown 61, Ful- enough to prevent a road ton 51, 2OT: Ethan How- loss to the Pirates. ard scored 24 points, Bauer was 6-for-6 from and Grant Ames added the field and 3-for-3 from 20 as the Prophets (4-10, the line in scoring 15 1-3 Three Rivers North) points to lead Sterling upset the Steamers in (13-9, 3-2 NIB-12 West). Prophetstown. Kiarra Harris added 13 Matt Dail led Fulton points, 14 rebounds and (13-5, 3-2) with 15 points, six assists. and Kyle Huebner added Cassidy Rice led Ottawa 14. (11-2, 4-0) with 19 points. Polo 62, Forreston 35:

Lutheran 64, Oregon 60: Emy Wright hit five

3-pointers and scored 24 points for the Hawks in a home loss to the Crusaders. Also for Oregon (14-7, 5-2 Big Northern West), Sam Lambrigtsen scored 18 points. Kaitlyn Strawbridge led Lutheran (12-6, 5-2) with 15 points, while Ashley Kerestes and Baillie McGirk added 14 apiece.

Faith Christian 33, Quad City Christian 11: Sarah

Smith had 16 points and five steals as the Falcons rolled in Silvis. Also for Faith Christian (7-4), Katie Cover had seven rebounds and four points.

Tall Rockets tough matchup MEASURING

Chris Johnson/Shaw Media

A.J. Sharp .EWMAN POINTS ASSISTS steals Ethan Howard 0ROPHETSTOWN POINTS Emy Wright, Oregon, POINTS S Tommy Johnston "6 POINTS Noah McCarty .EWMAN POINTS  rebounds Grant Ames 0ROPHETSTOWN POINTS

AJ Dollmeyer collected 15 points, 12 rebounds and three blocked shots as the Marcos routed the Cardinals in Polo. Also for Polo (18-2, 5-1 NUIC East), Brian Cavanaugh had 13 points. For Forreston (5-9, 2-3), Markus Edler had 11 Morrison 50, Erie 36: points. East Dubuque 59, AFC Bill Greul scored 16 points, and Kaleb Church had 10 53: After entering the points, as the Mustangs fourth quarter tied at 43, (8-11, 4-1 Three Rivers the Raiders were outNorth) handled the Cardi- scored 16-10 over the final 8 minutes in an nals in Morrison. Ken Cole led Erie (0-17, NUIC crossover loss at the South Beloit MLK 0-5) with 11 points. Bureau Valley 69, River- tournament. Troy Mairs scored 12 dale 45: Tommy Johnston tossed in 22 points, points, and David Zinke and Parker Neuhalfen hit three 3-pointers for added 17 as the Storm nine points for AFC (5-8).

to double down, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to put a lot of pressure on our other players. We need to play Sharp has scouted great team defense.â&#x20AC;? Rockridge three times Rockridgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s second this season, including option is Brian Heath, Jan. 4 at the Galesburg a 6-4 junior wing who Shootout. The Rockets averages 23 points and knocked off Rockford eight boards a game. East 63-60 that night. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just so athletic,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Their five starters are Sharp said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He can all really, really good,â&#x20AC;? dunk the ball any way Sharp said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They can you want it, but thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all hurt you in a lot of more to his game than ways.â&#x20AC;? that.â&#x20AC;? Leading the way for the Rounding out the lineRockets is 6-foot-8 senior up are 6-2 junior point center Ethan Happ, a guard Luke Johnson, 6-3 Wisconsin recruit. He junior power forward Nolan Stevens and 6-4 averages 31 points and wing T.J. Martens. 13 rebounds per game. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re definitely â&#x20AC;&#x153;He has the ball skills of a guard, but he can score the biggest team weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll face this season,â&#x20AC;? Sharp down low,â&#x20AC;? Sharp said. said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re really â&#x20AC;&#x153;When they feed the going to have to box out ball into him, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have CONTINUED FROM B1

AJ Dollmeyer is fouled by Forrestonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kaleb Reining during Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s game in Polo. The Marcos won 62-35.

Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stars

and rebound to have a chance to compete with them.â&#x20AC;? Newman has faced some stiff challenges this season, primarily beating Winnebago in the finals of the Forreston tournament, two wins against perennially tough Freeport Aquin and a road win over a strong league foe, Fulton. This, however, will be as tough a game as the Comets face before the postseason. Both teams were in action Friday night, with Rockridge going to Orion and Newman going to Amboy. Neither were upset, and both remain undefeated â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is definitely one weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been looking forward to,â&#x20AC;? Sharp said.


"s367EEKEND

NFL

49ers (14-4) at Seahawks (14-3)

Patriots (13-4) at Broncos (14-3)

When:PM3UNDAY TV: Fox Line:3EAHAWKSBY Series:4IED  Last meeting:$EC  ERS 3EAHAWKS  Last week: ERS 0ANTHERS3EAHAWKS 3AINTS 49ers offense:/VERALL  2USH 0ASS 49ers defense:/VERALL 2USH 0ASS Seahawks offense:/VER ALL 2USH 0ASS Seahawks defense:/VER ALL 2USH4  0ASS FYI:4EAMSSPLITREGULAR SEASONMEETINGS ERSSEEKINGSEVENTH 3UPER"OWLAPPEARANCE 3EAHAWKSGOINGFORSEC OND.&#TITLEGAME DECIDEDBYSEVENPOINTS ORFEWERINEACHOFLASTSIX CONTESTS LONGESTSTREAK INCONFERENCECHAMPION SHIPGAMEHISTORY4HREE OFTHOSEIN/4 INCLUDING ERS LOSSTO'IANTS AFTERSEASON 3EATTLEPLAYEDEIGHTGAMES DECIDEDBYSEVENPOINTSOR FEWER AND3AN&RANCISCO FIVE3EAHAWKSHAVE OUTSCOREDERS  ANDFORCEDSEVENTURNOVERS INLASTTWOWINSATHOME

When:PM3UNDAY TV:#"3 Line:"RONCOSBYÂ&#x17E; Series: "RONCOS  Last meeting: .OV  0ATRIOTS "RONCOS  /4 Last week:0ATRIOTS #OLTS"RONCOS #HARGERS Patriots offense:/VERALL  2USH 0ASS Patriots defense: /VERALL  2USH 0ASS Broncos offense:/VERALL  2USH 0ASS Broncos defense:/VERALL  2USH4  0ASS FYI: .EW%NGLANDOVER CAME HALFTIMEDEFICIT ON.OV0ATRIOTS COACHBill Belichick  VS"RONCOS'AME MARKSTHMEETING BETWEEN0ATRIOTS1"Tom BradyAND"RONCOS1" Peyton Manning"RADY LEADS  INCLUDING  INPLAYOFFS.EW%NGLAND  IN!&#CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES"ELICHICK"RADY OWNMOSTWINS BY COACH1"COMBO'AME MARKSFIRST!&#ROADPLAYOFF GAMEFOR0ATRIOTSSINCETITLE GAMEFOLLOWINGSEA SON WHEN0ATRIOTSLOSTTO -ANNINGS#OLTS  0ATRIOTS ONROADUNDER "ELICHICKINPOSTSEASON

3ATURDAY *ANUARY 

Championship games will be tough act to follow STARS

recalling a better set of matchups than this? Good luck. These four teams combined for a 50-14 record in the regular season. The NFC, though, features â&#x20AC;&#x153;If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a football fan, it canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fierce division rivals, two of the get any better than this week,â&#x20AC;? best under-27 quarterbacks Seahawks quarterback Russell around, and a prickly relationship Wilson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You think about the between head coaches with the NFC championship game, us verSan Francisco-Seattle game. The sus the 49ers, and you think about Seahawks are so good at home, the AFC side and the Patriots verand CenturyLink Field is so loud, sus the Broncos, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s as good as that the stadium is a story in itself. it gets.â&#x20AC;? Then thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the fact both Brady already beat Manning this contests Sunday will be played season when the Patriots overoutside, raising the possibility of came a 24-0 halftime deficit to unpredictable weather to help defeat the Broncos 34-31 in overprepare the winners for, well, time. This will be the 15th time unpredictable weather. theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll play against each other, The decision to subject the and Brady has already won 10. Super Bowl to potential cold, â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is tantamount to Ali-Frazier wind and snow for the first time in one more time. This is Palmerhistory put the league in position Nicklaus. This is Bird-Magic,â&#x20AC;? for criticism if the title tilt were to Nantz said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not trying to create be influenced by, say, a fumbled some sort of synthetic drama here, wet ball or a gust-guided missed but this is what it is. This is as big field goal. as it gets. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to savor it, With two of these remaining because you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know how many teams on stage, however, the more times weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll get it again.â&#x20AC;? weather will be hard-pressed to If the Patriots win, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll tie make the headlines. The NFL, this Dallas and Pittsburgh for the most carefully cultivated cultural mag- Super Bowl appearances with eight. net and money-making machine, Brady, who has already won three â&#x20AC;&#x201C; has managed to top itself yet but none since the 2004 season â&#x20AC;&#x201C; again with these conference would also set a record with his championship matchups. sixth trip as a starting quarterback. Sure, Brady and Manning have Manning has made two, winning squared off for a spot in the Super one. Despite leading the Broncos Bowl twice before. Three straight to the most points in NFL regularDallas-San Francisco games in season history in his second season back from the neck injury that the 1990s were memorable. But CONTINUED FROM B1

Free Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Orthopedic Clinic

ended his tenure in Indianapolis, the chatter that he hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t won enough in the playoffs has persisted. Brady is immune, with a record 18 postseason victories in 25 starts. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget about the coaches in this drama, either. Bill Belichick would match Tom Landryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all-time mark with 20 postseason wins, and Don Shulaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s record of six Super Bowl appearances if the Patriots triumph. Then thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Belichickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels, no stranger to Denver. He had two tumultuous years as head coach of the Broncos, and is not remembered fondly by the orange-andblue clad fans. The coaches are more central to the narrative on the other side. Pete Carroll famously and angrily asked Jim Harbaugh, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your deal?â&#x20AC;? in 2009 after Stanford ran up the score in a win over Southern California, which Carroll left for the Seahawks the following season. Harbaugh departed the college ranks the year after to take over the 49ers, and their teams have been fighting over the NFC West since. Leading run-first, defense-fueled teams, millennials Wilson and Colin Kaepernick are from a different mold than Brady and Manning of Generation X. But theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re more than capable of taking the baton.

Make Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Propane Company YOUR Propane Company

DOES YOUR CHILD: Â&#x2021; +DYH IHHW WXUQLQJ LQ RU RXW" Â&#x2021; &RPSODLQ RI OHJ NQHH KLS VKRXOGHU HOERZ RU ZULVW SDLQ"

Â&#x2021; 6HHP FOXPV\ RU IDOOV" Â&#x2021; %HHQ 'LDJQRVHG ZLWK VFROLRVLV"

For ALL OF YOUR PROPANE Needs!

Thursday, January, 23rd, 8:30 AM to 10:30 AM KSB Foot &Ankle Center 215 East 1st Street, Dixon

Dr.Tyler Gunderson & Dr. DavidYeager For Information or Appointment

Call 1-800-272-0074

Between 1:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;4:00 PM Monday through Friday for appointment Sponsored by Dixon Elks Lodge #779 and the Illinois Elks Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Care Program

4'5+&'06+#. r %1//'4%+#. r 4'6#+.

Find us on Facebook & Twitter www.amerigas.com/blog For Grill Cylinder Exchange visit www.amerigas.com

(815) 625-2395

 ' 4QEM (CNNU 4QCF r Rock Falls, IL 61071 !UTOMATIC $ELIVERY s  ,)6% #USTOMER #ARE s &LEXIBLE 0AYMENT /PTIONS

RESERVE YOUR COPY TODAY!

Limited Edition Book featuring photos of the Newman Cometsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; State Championship football season.

Hurry...Limited Quantity!

$44.95 tax includ

Available at the Telegraph  3 0EORIA !VENUE $IXON ),  s    and Sauk Valley Media  % ,INCOLNWAY 3TERLING ),  s   

ed


Saturday, January 18, 2014

www.saukvalley.com

NHL | BLACKHAWKS 4, DUCKS 2

367EEKENDs"

NBA | WIZARDS 96, BULLS 93

Missed chances lead to loss Bullsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; road streak comes to end BY K.C. JOHNSON Chicago Tribune

AP

The Ducksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Mathieu Perreault (22) controls the puck against the Blackhawksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Michal Handzus (26) during the first period of Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s game in Chicago.

Blackhawks cool off Ducks BY CHRIS KUC Chicago Tribune

CHICAGO â&#x20AC;&#x201C; It started at the United Center, and the Chicago Blackhawks ended it at the arena. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;itâ&#x20AC;? was the Anaheim Ducksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; run of 18 wins in their last 19 games that began the last time the teams met on Dec. 6. The struggling Hawks set their sights on ending their recent run of mediocre play when they faced

off against the Ducks on Friday night at the United Center. The Hawks pulled out a 4-2 victory. The defending Stanley Cup champions got two goals from Marian Hossa, scores from Kris Versteeg and Bryan Bickell, and quality goaltending from Corey Crawford to win for the third time in their last seven games. Niklas Hjalmarsson added two assists for the Hawks.

WASHINGTON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The Bulls are struggling enough defensively that giving opponents points is recipe for disaster. Then again, the threepoint play John Wall converted after a thirdquarter turnover is only a present for those who like spectacular highlights. What Wall did â&#x20AC;&#x201C; flipping the ball blindly over his head as Mike Dunleavy pulled him down â&#x20AC;&#x201C; will be repeated for ages. The Wizards prevailed 96-93 Friday night at Verizon Center, scoring 25 points off 15 Bullsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; turnovers. Still, the Bulls had

Up next sERSAT"ULLS PM3ATURDAY (WGN/1000 AM a chance for their fifth straight road victory. But they managed just six points in the final 7 minutes, 33 seconds, and Nene blocked Jimmy Butlerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 3-point attempt at the buzzer. Coming out of a timeout with 10.4 seconds left, Dunleavy caught the inbounds pass, but felt too crowded to shoot. AP Butler caught Dunleavyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pass, dribbled to try to Bulls forward Mike Dunleavy (34) takes a shot over create space, but Nene Wizards center Marcin Gortat (4) during the first didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t bite. quarter of Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s game in Washington.

Trade up to iPhoneÂŽ 5c for a penny.

Family Spaghetti includes garlic bread & salad

$

1899

+tax Dine-in only. Saturdays or Sundays. Expires 1/31/14.

Mama Ciminoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dine-In ~ Carry-Out ~ Delivery

104 S. Peoria Dixon 288-4448 or 288-4449

See website for gift certificate specials www.MamaCiminosDixon.com

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ $ $ $ $ Top $ $ Dollar $ $ Paid! $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 1707 East 4th St., Sterling $ $ (815) 625-9600 $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

WE BUY CARS!

PUZZLE SOLUTIONS

Switch to U.S. CellularÂŽ or add a line, and get iPhone 5c for just a penny. Upgrade your device to the network that works where and when you need it. 551.(&'1* "-&7*) &9& 1&3 7*6:.7*) *< >7 &,29 &3)   &(9 +** &551>

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


"s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

WE SELL FOR LESS

FRIDAY’S SCOREBOARD NFL

Pro Bowl Sunday, Jan. 26 At Honolulu 4"$ PM."# Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 2 At East Rutherford, N.J. !&# CHAMPION VS .&# CHAMPION  PM&/8

College football Bowl glance Saturday’s game East-West Shrine Classic At St. Petersburg, Fla. %ASTVS7EST PM.&,.

Big Ten Conference Overall W-L Pct. W-L Pct. -ICHIGAN3T       -ICHIGAN       7ISCONSIN       )OWA       -INNESOTA       )NDIANA       0URDUE       /HIO3T       )LLINOIS       .ORTHWESTERN       .EBRASKA       0ENN3T       Saturday’s games .ORTHWESTERNAT)NDIANA PM -ICHIGANAT7ISCONSIN PM 0ENN3TAT0URDUE PM -ICHIGAN3TAT)LLINOIS PM Sunday’s game -INNESOTAAT)OWA NOON

State schedule Friday’s result "RADLEY 3)LLINOIS Saturday’s games -URRAY3TAT3)5% PM ,OYOLAAT%VANSVILLE PM !USTIN0EAYAT%)LLINOIS PM 7)LLINOISAT.$AKOTA3T PM 4EXAS 0AN!MAT#HICAGO3T PM $E0AULAT6ILLANOVA PM /HIOAT.)LLINOIS PM )LLINOIS3TAT$RAKE PM Sunday’s game 7IS 'REEN"AYAT)LL #HICAGO PM

Top 25 schedule Saturday’s games .O3YRACUSEVS.O0ITT PM .O7ISCONSINVS-ICHIGAN PM .O-ICHIGAN3TATEAT)LLINOIS PM .O7ICHITA3TVS)NDIANA3TATE PM .O6ILLANOVAVS$E0AUL PM .O&LORIDAAT!UBURN PM .O)OWA3TATEAT4EXAS PM .O/KLAHOMA3TAT.O+ANSAS PM .O3AN$IEGO3TVS5.,6 PM .O"AYLORVS.O/KLAHOMA PM .O+ENTUCKYVS4ENNESSEE AM .O5-ASSAT%LON PM .O-EMPHISVS,E-OYNE /WEN PM .O,OUISVILLEAT5#ONN PM .O#INCINNATIAT3OUTH&LORIDA PM .O#REIGHTONAT0ROVIDENCE PM .O#OLORADOVS3OUTHERN#AL PM .O$UKEVS.#3TATE PM .O3AINT,OUISVS&ORDHAM PM .O5#,!AT5TAH PM Sunday’s game .O)OWAVS-INNESOTA NOON Friday’s box score

BRADLEY 66, SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 60 S. ILLINOIS (6-13) " 6ERHINES      /"RIEN      $RINKARD   *ACKSON    "EANE   "ALOGUN   0ENDLETON   3MITHPETERS    /LANIYAN   $6ERHINES   0. Totals 23-41 10-19 60. BRADLEY (7-12) "ARNES   0ICKETT   4AY LOR   'RIER   ,EMON *R    "ELL   &IELDS    !LWAN   3WOPSHIRE   "LAKE   0ROSSER  Totals 24-49 12-18 66. Halftime–3 )LLINOIS   3-Point Goals–3 )LLINOIS   "EANE   *ACK SON  3MITHPETERS  0ENDLETON  /"RIEN   "RADLEY   !LWAN   "ARNES   'RIER   "ELL   ,EMON *R    Fouled Out–"ELL *ACKSON Rebounds–3)LLINOIS*ACKSON /"RIEN  "RADLEY0ICKETT Assists–3)LLI NOIS*ACKSON "RADLEY,EMON *R   Total Fouls–3)LLINOIS "RADLEY

NBA EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct 4ORONTO    "ROOKLYN    .EW9ORK    "OSTON    0HILADELPHIA   

GB ˆ   ž ž

Southeast Division W L Pct -IAMI    !TLANTA    7ASHINGTON    #HARLOTTE    /RLANDO   

GB ˆ  ž  ž

Central Division W L Pct               

GB ˆ  ž  

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct 3AN!NTONIO    (OUSTON    $ALLAS    -EMPHIS    .EW/RLEANS   

GB ˆ ž ž ž 

Northwest Division W L Pct               

GB ˆ    

Pacific Division W L Pct ,!#LIPPERS    'OLDEN3TATE    0HOENIX    ,!,AKERS    3ACRAMENTO   

GB ˆ ž  ž ž

Friday’s results #HARLOTTE /RLANDO -IAMI 0HILADELPHIA 7ASHINGTON #HICAGO ,!#LIPPERS .EW9ORK 4ORONTO -INNESOTA ,!,AKERS "OSTON 5TAH $ETROIT -EMPHIS 3ACRAMENTO 0ORTLAND 3AN!NTONIO $ALLAS 0HOENIX #LEVELAND $ENVER 'OLDEN3TATEAT/KLAHOMA#ITY LATE Saturday’s games ,!#LIPPERSAT)NDIANA PM $ETROITAT7ASHINGTON PM -IAMIAT#HARLOTTE PM 0HILADELPHIAAT#HICAGO PM 5TAHAT-INNESOTA PM -ILWAUKEEAT(OUSTON PM 'OLDEN3TATEAT.EW/RLEANS PM 0ORTLANDAT$ALLAS PM Sunday’s games ,!,AKERSAT4ORONTO NOON "OSTONAT/RLANDO PM 3ACRAMENTOAT/KLAHOMA#ITY PM -ILWAUKEEAT3AN!NTONIO PM $ENVERAT0HOENIX PM

815-625-9600 5-9600 Call 815-62 1701 East 4th St., Sterling

Hours: Mon.-Thur. 9-7, Friday 9-6, Sat. 8:30-4

2011 BUICK REGAL

Atlantic Division W L OT Pts "OSTON     4AMPA"AY     -ONTREAL     4ORONTO     /TTAWA     $ETROIT     &LORIDA     "UFFALO    

GF        

GA        

Metropolitan Division W L OT Pts GF 0ITTSBURGH      0HILADELPHIA      .92ANGERS      7ASHINGTON      .EW*ERSEY      #OLUMBUS      #AROLINA      .9)SLANDERS     

GA        

OR

#HICAGO 3T,OUIS #OLORADO -INNESOTA $ALLAS .ASHVILLE 7INNIPEG

GF       

GA       

Pacific Division W L OT Pts GF GA !NAHEIM       3AN*OSE       ,OS!NGELES       6ANCOUVER       0HOENIX       #ALGARY       %DMONTON       Note: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

LOADED!

SUNROOF, LOADED, 30+ MPG!

2012 FORD ESCAPE 4X4 LIMITED

2012 NISSAN ALTIMA SL

OR

ZERO DOWN

2012 MERCEDES C300 4MATIC

ONLY 16,000 MILES! EVERY AVAILABLE OPTION! SPORT PACKAGE! ONE OWNER!

SAVE $$$ OFF NEW! 2007 INFINITI G35X

LT

2 TO CHOOSE!

LOADED

15,999*

$

SUNROOF

5 TO CHOOSE!

LOW MILES, SUNROOF, SPOILER,

19,999*

NOW $

OR

2013 CHEVY IMPALA’S

BEST PRICE IN TOWN!

LIKE NEW, WAS $22,999

2012 NISSAN MAXIMA

LOADED!!!

LTZ

LOW MILES!

19,999* OR $269/MO** $

ONLY 17,000 MILES! ONLY 19,000 MILES!

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division W L OT Pts                            

2013 CHEVY CRUZE LTZ

ONLY 15,000 MILES!

2009 MERCEDES C300 4MATIC

NEARLY 5,000 CARS SOLD!

YOUR CHOICE!

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Men’s basketball

0ORTLAND /KLAHOMA#ITY $ENVER -INNESOTA 5TAH

CHICAGO (93) $UNLEAVY      "OOZER      .OAH   (INRICH   "UTLER    3NELL   'IBSON    !UGUSTIN   -OHAMMED   Totals 35-76 14-16 93. WASHINGTON (96) !RIZA   .ENE   'ORTAT    7ALL   "EAL     7EBSTER      "OOKER     4EMPLE   0ORTER*R    3ERAPHIN  Totals 40-79 10-13 96. #HICAGO     ˆ  7ASHINGTON     ˆ  3s–#HICAGO   !UGUSTIN   (INRICH   $UNLEAVY  3NELL  "UTLER  7ASHINGTON   7EBSTER   "EAL   4EMPLE   7ALL   !RIZA    Rebounds–#HICAGO.OAH 7ASH INGTON  !RIZA   Assists–#HICAGO  .OAH 7ASHINGTON7ALL Fouls– #HICAGO 7ASHINGTON

NHL

Saturday, Jan. 25 Senior Bowl At Mobile, Ala. 3OUTHVS.ORTH PM.&,.

)NDIANA #HICAGO $ETROIT #LEVELAND -ILWAUKEE

EVERYDAY!!!

Friday’s box score

Playoff glance

ALL VEHICLES ARE CARFAX GUARANTEED!

You Can’t Go Wrong With...

WIZARDS 96, BULLS 93

Conference Championships Sunday, Jan. 19 !&# .EW%NGLANDAT$ENVER PM#"3 .&# 3AN&RANCISCOAT3EATTLE PM &/8

3ATURDAY *ANUARY 

2011 CHEVY MALIBU LTZ

$0 DOWN $256 /MO LOW MILES, SUNROOF

22,000 MILES!

2012 LINCOLN MKX

2011 CADILLAC CTS 4

2010 CADILLAC SRX

2010 CADILLAC CTS

LOW MILES!

24,000 MILES!

LOW MILES!

26,000 MILES!

Friday’s results #OLUMBUS 7ASHINGTON #HICAGO !NAHEIM Saturday’s games .92ANGERSAT/TTAWA PM 3AN*OSEAT4AMPA"AY PM %DMONTONAT7INNIPEG PM #OLUMBUSAT"UFFALO PM -ONTREALAT4ORONTO PM ,OS!NGELESAT$ETROIT PM .9)SLANDERSAT0HILADELPHIA PM &LORIDAAT#AROLINA PM !NAHEIMAT3T,OUIS PM #OLORADOAT.ASHVILLE PM .EW*ERSEYAT0HOENIX PM $ALLASAT-INNESOTA PM #ALGARYAT6ANCOUVER PM Sunday’s games "OSTONAT#HICAGO AM 4AMPA"AYAT#AROLINA PM 7ASHINGTONAT.92ANGERS PM Friday’s box score

BLACKHAWKS 4, DUCKS 2 !NAHEIM    ˆ #HICAGO    ˆ First Period– #HICAGO (OSSA  4OEWS (JALMARSSON  SH   #HI CAGO 6ERSTEEG  Second Period–.ONE Third Period– #HICAGO "ICKELL  3EABROOK   !NAHEIM 'ETZLAF  0ERRY   !NAHEIM 0ALMIERI  &OWLER  #HICAGO (OSSA+RU GER (JALMARSSON EN  Shots on Goal–!NAHEIM  n#HI CAGO  n Goalies–!NAHEIM (ILLER#HICAGO #RAWFORD

Tennis Friday’s results

DIAMOND WHITE OR TUXEDO BLACK, LUXURY

SAVE $15,000 PLUS OFF NEW! 2013 LINCOLN MKX

LOADED, NAVIGATION, SUNROOF

SAVE $15,000 PLUS OFF NEW!

2012 LINCOLN MKS

Women Third Round s 3ERENA 7ILLIAMS  5NITED 3TATES DEF $ANIELA(ANTUCHOVA 3LOVAKIA     s,I.A #HINA DEF,UCIE3AFAROVA #ZECH2EPUBLIC       s!NGELIQUE+ERBER 'ERMANY DEF!LI SON2ISKE 5NITED3TATES     s!NA)VANOVIC 3ERBIA DEF3AM3TO SUR !USTRALIA       s 3AM 3TOSUR  !USTRALIA LOST TO !NA )VANOVIC 3ERBIA       s %KATERINA -AKAROVA  2USSIA DEF -ONICA.ICULESCU 2OMANIA     s,UCIE3AFAROVA #ZECH2EPUBLIC LOST TO,I.A #HINA       s&LAVIA0ENNETTA )TALY DEF-ONA"AR THEL 'ERMANY     s %UGENIE "OUCHARD  #ANADA DEF ,AUREN$AVIS 5NITED3TATES     s$ANIELA(ANTUCHOVA 3LOVAKIA LOSTTO 3ERENA7ILLIAMS 5NITED3TATES    

Golf PGA Tour Friday’s result Humana Challenge p-PGA West, Palmer Course; 6,950 yards, par 72 n-PGA West, Nicklaus Course; 6,924 yards, par 72 q-La Quinta Country Club; 7,060 yards, par 72 La Quinta, Calif. Purse: $5.7 million Second Round 0ATRICK2EED P Qˆ  "RENDON4ODD N Pˆ  2YAN0ALMER P Qˆ  #HARLEY(OFFMAN Q Nˆ  "ILL(AAS Q Nˆ  *AMES$RISCOLL P Qˆ  #HARLIE"ELJAN Q Nˆ  -ATT%VERY N Pˆ  7ILL-AC+ENZIE N Pˆ  *USTIN,EONARD N Pˆ  -ATT*ONES N Pˆ  $ANIEL3UMMERHAYS N Pˆ  (ARRIS%NGLISH Q Nˆ  "RIAN3TUARD Q Nˆ  :ACH*OHNSON Q Nˆ  "EN#RANE Q Nˆ  *ERRY+ELLY Q Nˆ  #AMERON4RINGALE Q Nˆ  -ARTIN&LORES P Qˆ  #HARLIE7I P Qˆ  3EUNG 9UL.OH P Qˆ 

LEATHER, 3RD SEAT, NEW TIRES PANORAMIC, SUNROOF, GRANITE METALIC

ONLY $9,999 ONLY $27,995

20,000 MILES! 2012 LINCOLN MKZ

LOW MILES!

HEATED & COOLED SEATS, SUNROOF, SNYC

2012 LINCOLN MKS

ONLY 18,000 MILES!

D L O S ONLY 15,000 1 OWNER MILES

LUXURYAT A FRACTION OF THE COST

30+ MPG

2013 CHEVY TRAVERSE LT

2011 CHEVY TRAVERSE T

LOW MILES!

ONLY 8,000 MILES!

LOADED, 1 OWNER

BLACK OVER CASHMERE LEATHER

WOW

2011 BUICK ENCLAVE CXL 2011 BUICK REGAL TURBOL

LOW MILES!

AWD, DVD, LIKE NEW,

DUAL DVDS, ONE OWNER

HURRY

SAVE THOUSANDS OFF NEW

2011 CHEVY TRAVERSE LT

SUNROOF, 1 OWNER

2012 CHEVY EQUINOX LT

2004 BUICK RENDEZVOUS CXL 2012 BUICK LACROSSE CXL

LOW MILES!

13,000 MILES!

Australian Open Seeds Fared

At Melbourne Park Melbourne, Australia Men Third Round s .OVAK $JOKOVIC  3ERBIA DEF $ENIS )STOMIN 5ZBEKISTAN       s$AVID&ERRER 3PAIN DEF*EREMY#HAR DY &RANCE       s4OMAS"ERDYCH #ZECH2EPUBLIC DEF $AMIR$ZUMHUR "OSNIA (ERZEGOVINA       s3TANISLAS7AWRINKA 3WITZERLAND DEF 6ASEK0OSPISIL #ANADA WALKOVER s2ICHARD'ASQUET &RANCE LOSTTO4OMMY 2OBREDO 3PAIN          s&ABIO&OGNINI )TALY DEF3AM1UER REY 5NITED3TATES       s4OMMY2OBREDO 3PAIN DEF2ICHARD 'ASQUET &RANCE          s+EVIN!NDERSON 3OUTH!FRICA DEF %DOUARD2OGER 6ASSELIN &RANCE           s*ERZY*ANOWICZ 0OLAND LOSTTO&LO RIAN-AYER 'ERMANY       s6ASEK0OSPISIL #ANADA LOSTTO3TAN ISLAS7AWRINKA 3WITZERLAND WALKOVER s*EREMY#HARDY &RANCE LOSTTO$AVID &ERRER 3PAIN      

PANORAMIC SUNROOF, 1 OWNER PANORAMIC SUNROOF, 1 OWNER

2010 CHEVY TRAVERSE LT LT

$299 /MO $0 DOWN!

2004 DODGE RAM 1500

ONLY 70,000 MILES! CREW CAB, HEMI

12,999*

$

2013 FORD EDGE LIMITED

ONLY 16,000 MILES! 25+ MPG, SAVE THOUSANDS OFF NEW!

$27,999*

2012 NISSAN ROGUE AWD

3 TO CHOOSE FROM! FULL SIZE, LUXURY, ONEOWNER LOW MILES!

SAVE THOUSANDS OFF NEW

31,000 MILES!

AWD

LEATHER, DVD

$21,999

2009 CHEVY HHR LT

2012 FORD FOCUS SEL

LOW MILES! GREAT MPG! LOW MILES!

2 TO CHOOSE FROM! HEATED LEATHER, SUNROOF

$11,999 OR 209/MO** $16,999 OR 228/MO**

HURRY

LOW MILES!

17,999*

$

2012 FORD FUSION SEL

2009 ACURA TSX

LOW MILES!

ONLY 40,000 MILES!

LEATHER, SUNROOF, BACK UP CAMERA, 6 FUSIONS IN STOCK!

$16,999 OR 228/MO**

LOADED! ZERO DOWN!

16,999*

$

UNDER $9,999*!

WE STAND BEHIND WHAT WE SELL!!! 2007 CHEVY AVEO

CLEAN + 40+MPG, 5-SPEED

ONLY $6,999*

2004 BUICK LESABRE LTD

2004 CHEVY K1500

NEW TIRES!

33,000 MILES!

3800 V-6, VERY CLEAN

ONLY $6,999*

5.3L HARD TO FIND, LONG BOX, REG CAB

$8,999*

2000 LINCOLN LS

$5,999*

Plus tax, title, license, & doc fee. ** $0 Down, 78 months @ 3.99% With approved credit, plus tax, title, license + doc fee. Photos for illustration use only.

*

SHOP 24/7 ONLINE www.majeskimotors.com


Business

www.saukvalley.com

Section C

SV Weekend

Saturday, January 18, 2014

BUSINESS NOTEBOOK

Shoe repairman back in business BY PAM EGGEMEIER peggemeier@saukvalley.com 800-798-4085, ext. 570

STERLING – Gary Lenox of Rock Falls learned the shoe repair trade at age 16. After taking a break from the business, he is back at it. Now 66, Lenox fixed just about anything with leather and zippers in the Sauk Valley for many years.

Lenox ran his business on Avenue G island for many years before the building was destroyed by fire. He also had done work from the Sterling and Rock Falls Grummert’s, and that is where he will be based again. Customers can drop off their shoes or other leather items including handbags, orthope-

dic footwear or even baseball gloves. He says he can do just about any kind of custom repair work. He will do his work from home, and says he is even willing to pick up items at a customer’s home. Lenox said his motivation for starting up the business again is twofold. He fears for the future of his trade, and its

disappearance has created a market need. “I want to keep the trade going,” Lenox said. “There aren’t many of us left anymore. They’ve gotten old and aren’t training others.” Lenox said he would love to teach his trade to his son or grandson, but he would be willing to pass his skills

along to anyone who shares his passion for the business. He learned as a teen from a German tradesman who was working in Dixon. “I’d be willing to teach a vet or someone else who is interested in learning the trade,” he said. NOTEBOOK CONTINUED ON C8

AMBOY | THE LAST ALARM FIREHOUSE PUB

Pub experiences year of change Upgrades fueled by benefits and video gambling BY KIMBERLY WATLEY For Sauk Valley Media

F

or the past 10 years, Barb Harrison, owner of The Last Alarm Firehouse Pub, has dreamed of big changes. Little by little, she has seen them come to fruition. The past year, however, has been her biggest year of change. The firefighter theme is about the only thing she didn’t want to alter. “Our department is an instrumental part of the community,” Harrison said, “and this is a good way to honor them for all they do.” Outside, on the red building at the end of the block on East Avenue, the pub’s sign is shaped with a traditional firefighter rank insignia. Along the interior, antique firehouse relics line the walls. Inside a mounted display case, Harrison has memorabilia from departments and their members locally and as far away as New York, including a memorial to firefighter Robert J. Foti of FDNY, who died in the line of duty on Sept. 11, 2001. The revamp began 5 years ago with new bathrooms and a roof, things that, Harrison said, had to be addressed first. Renovations this year included a new wood floor, ceiling, bar stools and a complete redesign of the bartender station with new coolers.

Photos by Kimberly Watley/Special to SVM

ABOVE: The Last Alarm Firehouse Pub, at the end of the block on East Avenue in Amboy, has undergone a big makeover in the past year, but has kept its firehouse theme. The pub’s sign is shaped with a traditional firefighter rank insignia. BOTTOM RIGHT: Bartender Gerri Arntzen pours a beer while discussing how the number of people coming to The Last Alarm has increased, in spite of the struggling economy. She credits the success to owner Barb Harrison and all the work she has put toward remodeling the neighborhood bar.

PUB CONTINUED ON C8

The Last Alarm Located at 43 S. East Ave. in Amboy, The Last Alarm Firehouse Pub is open from 11 to 1 a.m. Monday through Thursday, 11 to 2 a.m. Friday and Saturday, and 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Sunday.

The Last Alarm Firehouse Pub in Amboy has seen many new customers since five video gambling machines were installed last spring.

Heritage Square Bonnie O’Connell BSN, Administrator

620 N. Ottawa, Dixon

(815)288-2251 www.heritagesquaredixon.com

“Dutch is one of Heritage Square’s special 4-legged volunteers. He has been visiting regularly for over 5 years and provides us with attention, compassion and unconditional love.” - Bonnie O’Connell BSN, Administrator Dutch is a family member of Jim and Betty Higby


#s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

3ATURDAY *ANUARY 

IN BRIEF Help needed with pilot program $)8/.n4HE"UDDY"AG 0ROGRAMISINNEEDOFVOLUNTEERSTOHELPPACKITEMS FORFOODBAGSTOBEGIVEN TOCHILDREN !TTHISTIME THEREARE BAGSTOBEPREPARED EACHWEEK CONSISTINGOF TOITEMSPERBAG4HE PACKINGWILLBEFROMTO PMEVERY7EDNESDAYAT 3T0AUL,UTHERAN#HURCH 30EORIA!VE 4HISPILOTPROGRAM WILLPROVIDEWEEKEND MEALSFORSTUDENTSAT 7ASHINGTON%LEMENTARY 3CHOOL4OVOLUNTEEROR FORMOREINFORMATION CALL 'WEN7EIDMANAT  

Safe commute meeting planned

Kali Blackburn/Special to SVM

The Amboy High School Student of the Month is Damon Quest. He plans to attend college to study physical therapy.

Amboy Student of the Month Damon Quest, 17, a senior at Amboy High School, is the December Student of the Month. He is the son of Lisa and Troy Quest. His sister is Mariah, 12. Favorite class: Physical education, because it is your chance to get your mind off of the more challenging classes Top teacher: Cyndi Carlson, because we make the best out of math by joking around while being very productive at the same time Favorite â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tommy Boyâ&#x20AC;?

movie:

If you could go anywhere in the world for

because I like to relax outfree, where would it be? almost all music. side of school and sports. I would go to Hawaii, because it seems very Favorite actor: Will FerSurvival guide: Keep a rell relaxing. smile and stay away from Extracurricular: Foot- Favorite activities: Ath- the drama. ball, basketball, and letics and hunting Useless knowlNational Honor Society edge: Fifty percent of our Favorite food: Steak math classes most likely After graduation: I want to go to college to Least favorite class: will not be used, but we have to suck it up and Government study physical therapy. learn it anyway. What makes your Paycheck: I worked summer jobs as a bus blood boil? The sound Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m in the dictionary mechanic at the Amboy of two pieces of paper next to: Humorous bus garage, and I also rubbing together Personal trivia: I race was a farmhand. I enjoyed working at the What kind of music motocross. makes your skin crawl? bus garage. Dream job: Comedian Jazz music BFF: I have many best Where are some of the Trading places: Jonafriends. places you like to hang than Goldsmith, because F a v o r i t e s i n g e r o r out? I like hanging out at he is the most interesting musical group: I like home or at friendsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; houses, man in the world

COLLEGE NEWS St. Norbert College BOTHOF&ULTON#AMERON $%0%2% 7ISn-OLLY 5PHOFFOF&RANKLIN'ROVE AND4AYLOR-ILLEROF,A-OILLE HAVEBEENNAMEDTOTHE FALLSEMESTERDEANSLISTAT 3T.ORBERT#OLLEGE

0RIEWEOF,ANARK COMPUTER SCIENCEANDMATHEMATICS #OLIN!NDERSON NATURALSCIENCE AND$AVID!,ONG SOCIALSCIENCE BOTHOF-ORRISONAND+ATHERINE,EFFELMAN OF7EST"ROOKLYN %NGLISH ANDCOMMUNICATION

Beloit College "%,/)4 7ISn-ARIA (EATHOF-OUNT#ARROLL *USTIN0ITZEROF&RANKLIN 'ROVE AND$ILLON-C#ANNONOF!SHTONWERENAMED TOTHEFALLDEANSLISTAT "ELOIT#OLLEGE

(AUCK BOTHOF3TERLING AND!NNA0HILLIPSOF4AMPICOHAVEBEENNAMEDTO THEFALLDEANSLISTAT4RINITY #HRISTIAN#OLLEGE

Monmouth College

-/.-/54(n3TUDENTS NAMEDTOTHEFALLDEANS Western Illinois Morrison Institute LISTAT-ONMOUTH#OLUniversity William Penn LEGEINCLUDE0AIGE2USOF of Technology 3TUDENTSNAMEDTOTHE !LBANY -C#AHL-URRAYOF University -/22)3/.n*USTIN FALLDEANSLISTAT7ESTERN "YRON #OURTNEY*ONSSON /3+!,//3! )OWAn $ROLEMAOF0OLOHASBEEN OF#OMPTON !NDREA3AN)LLINOIS5NIVERSITYCAMPUSES "RIAN7"AHRSOF2OCK NAMEDTOTHEDEANSLISTAT DROCKOF$EER'ROVE *ASE IN-ACOMBANDTHE1UAD &ALLSHASBEENNAMEDTO -ORRISON)NSTITUTEOF4ECH- &ANEOF$IXON -ORGAN #ITIESINCLUDE.ORMA' THEFALLDEANSLISTAT7ILLIAM NOLOGY 3PERRYOF%RIE+YLIE2 "URNOF-ORRISON 2ACHEL 0ENN5NIVERSITY +ENNEDY ,ISA-ITCHELL ,AMPSONOF0AW0AW 4HOMAS/TTENS AND%VAN *ESSICA"OUWENSOF2OCK John Wood Clarke University -2EGENWETHER ALLOF Community College &ALLS $USTIN7ATTSOF3TER&ULTON"RIANNA.%IZENGA $5"515% )OWAn3TULING AND!SHLEY!TWELLOF 15).#9n#HRISTOPHER 3ARAH-APES -OLLY+ DENTSNAMEDTOTHEFALL 7ALNUT (EIEROF3TERLINGWAS 3EDIG AND%MILY#7EETS DEANSLISTAT#LARKE5NIVERALLOF-ORRISON3HAWN2 SITYINCLUDE"RENDAN7ALTERS NAMEDTOTHEFALLDEANSLIST Central College /SZFOLKOF0ROPHETSTOWN OF"YRON+ELSEY3ZYMANSKI AT*OHN7OOD#OMMUNITY 0%,,! )OWAn-ATTHEW #OLLEGE AND!NTHONY$!DAMSON OF$AVIS*UNCTION+ELSEY +EPPENOF#HADWICKAND !NDREW,"LACKBURN 6INNEDGEOF&ORRESTON $ANI+ATELYN4EMPLEOF%RIE .ICHOLAS-"REED $ENISE ELLE3TRALOWOF-ORRISON"RITBob Jones HAVEBEENNAMEDTOTHE !#ESSNA +ACIE%+LINGE TANY(USTONOF/REGONAND University FALLDEANSLISTAT#ENTRAL *AMES!-ANUS #HARIS.ICOLE*OHNSONOF0ROPHET#OLLEGE '2%%.6),,% 3#n MA)--ARTINEZ 2EBECCA STOWN %MILY6AN$EBURGHAND ,-EGLI AND3ARAH% 2EBECCA6AN$EBURGHOF 3AENZ ALLOF3TERLING Educators Columbia College ,ANARKHAVEBEENNAMED of Beauty #/,5-")! -O n3TARLET TOTHEFALLDEANSLISTAT"OB Ashford University !3TOFFELOF&ORRESTON *USTIN *ONES5NIVERSITY 34%2,).'n#HELSEY #,).4/. )OWAn3TUDENTS (-OOREOF,ANARK AND *OHNSONOF2OCK&ALLSHAS EARNINGBACHELORSDEGREES +AYLA,%NGLEOF,EAF2IVER GRADUATEDFROM%DUCATORS Trinity Christian $ECFROM!SHFORD5NIVER- WERENAMEDTOTHE#OLUMBIA OF"EAUTY College SITYINCLUDE+AYLA!+AMPE #OLLEGE &REEPORTCAMPUS *ENNY0ARKEROF3TERLING ELEMENTARYEDUCATION AND WASNAMEDTHE*ANUARY DEANSLISTFORTHE!UGUST 0!,/3(%)'(43n%RIN *OSEPH3NYDER SPORTSAND /CTOBERAND/CTOBER &UTURE'RADUATEOFTHE 7ESSELSOF&ULTON 4YLER -ONTH $ECEMBERSESSIONS $E+OEKKOEKAND*OSHUA RECREATIONMANAGEMENT

Rock Falls native starring in film, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Streamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; PEORIA â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Jacob M. Williams, the star of the movie â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Stream,â&#x20AC;? and the son of Bridgette Martin Williams of Rock Falls, will attend a showing of the movie Jan. 29 at Peoria Riverfront Museum, 222 S.W. Washington St.

The screening is a fundraiser for the Washington Tornado Relief Fund. The Rock Falls native and his family lost their home during the Nov. 17 tornado in Washington. Admission is $25. A celebrity meet and greet will be from 6 to 6:45 p.m.,

with the movie at 7 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Streamâ&#x20AC;? premiered in October, and centers on a group of gradeschool friends in 1981 at the height of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Star Warsâ&#x20AC;? popularity. The family comedy follows the five friends as they go along a stream to a mall after a

bat breaks, having adventures along the way. Contact Cathie Neumiller, museum senior marketing and communications director, at cneumiller@peoriariverfrontmuseum.org or 309863-3006 for more information.

4!-0)#/n!PUBLIC INFORMATIONMEETINGON 4AMPICOS3AFE2OUTES TO3CHOOLWILLBEATPM 4UESDAYATTHEVILLAGEHALL 7-ARKET3T 4HEGOALISTOLAUNCH THEPROGRAMINTHEFALL)T ISDESIGNEDTOENCOURAGE STUDENTSTOWALKANDRIDE BICYCLESTOSCHOOL $URINGTHEMEETING A 0OWER0OINTPRESENTATION WILLBESHOWN ANDCOLLECTED INFORMATIONWILLBEREVIEWED )NPUTFROMSTUDENTSAND PARENTSISWELCOME !CCORDINGTOTHE .ATIONAL(OUSEHOLD4RAVEL 3URVEY IN PERCENT OFSTUDENTSFROMKINDERGARTENTOEIGHTHGRADE WHOLIVEDWITHINMILEOF SCHOOLUSUALLYWALKEDOR BICYCLEDTHERE"Y THEPERCENTAGEDROPPED TOPERCENTEVENONCE AWEEK6ISITWWWDOT ILGOV3AFE2OUTESORWWW SAFEROUTESINFOORGFORMORE INFORMATION

2OOM%AT3AUK6ALLEY#OMMUNITY#OLLEGE STATE2OUTE4UTORS MUSTCOMPLETEHOURS OFTRAINING$INNERWILLBE PROVIDEDATALLSESSIONS /NLINETRAININGISAVAILABLEONTHESTARTDATEOF THECLASSES ASWELLTO COMPLETEWORKDURINGTHE TRAININGPERIOD3ESSIONS WILLEDUCATETUTORSON UNDERSTANDINGTHENEEDS OF%NGLISHASA3ECOND ,ANGUAGEAND!DULT"ASIC %DUCATIONSTUDENTS TUTORINGBEGINNINGREADERS TEACHINGSTRATEGIESINWRITINGANDVOCABULARY AND LESSONPLANNING 0ROJECT6)4!,ISAFREE ANDCONFIDENTIALPROGRAM DESIGNEDFORLOCALADULTS WHOWANTTOIMPROVE READING WRITING ANDOTHER BASICACADEMICSKILLS 4UTORSMEETWITHSTUDENTS TOHOURSAWEEK -ATERIALSANDSUPPORTARE SUPPLIED #ALL  TO REGISTERORFORMOREINFORMATION

Utilities to offer scholarships

2/#+&!,,3n4HE CITYOF2OCK&ALLSWITH THE)LLINOIS-UNICIPAL 5TILITIES!SSOCIATIONARE OFFERINGASCHOLARSHIP COMPETITIONPROGRAMFOR HIGHSCHOOLSENIORS %LIGIBLEAPPLICANTSMUST BESENIORSWHOSEPARENTSORLEGALGUARDIANS ARERESIDENTIALCUSTOMERSOFTHECITYOF2OCK &ALLS-UNICIPAL5TILITY 4HOSEAPPLYINGNEEDTO SUBMITANAPPLICATION ANDANESSAYOF WORDSORLESSADDRESSINGTHEIRCHOICEOFONE OFFOURUTILITY RELATED QUESTIONS4HEDEADLINE IS-ARCH 6ISITWWWROCKFALLSCOMFOR Volunteers sought SCHOLARSHIPPACKETS !COMMITTEEOF for literacy class MUNICIPALUTILITYOFFICIALS WILLSELECTFOURFINAL$)8/.n6OLUNTEERSIN ISTS EACHOFWHOMWILL 4EACHING!DULT,ITERACY RECEIVEACERTIFICATE WILLHOSTBIANNUALTUTOR ANDSCHOLARSHIP TRAININGSESSIONSBEGINAWARD7INNERSWILLBE NINGTHISMONTH 4UTORSWILLATTENDCLASSES ANNOUNCEDIN!PRIL 4HISISTHETHYEARFOR FROMTOPM*AN THESCHOLARSHIP AND&EB  AND #ALL)-5!AT  WITHACOMPLETIONCELEBRATION&EB!LLSESSIONS FORMOREINFORMAAREFREEANDWILLBEIN TION

MILITARY NEWS Airmen complete training program

4HEAIRMENCOMPLETED ANINTENSIVE  WEEK PROGRAMTHATINCLUDED TRAININGINMILITARYDIS!IR&ORCE!IRMEN7ILLIAM*2OBINSON))) %RIC CIPLINEANDSTUDIES 73YMONS AND6ICTORIA !IR&ORCECOREVALUES ,#OX AND!IR.ATIONAL PHYSICALFITNESS AND 'UARD!IRMAN3TEVEN- BASICWARFAREPRINCIPLES +ETCHAMGRADUATEDFROM ANDSKILLS !IRMENWHOCOMPLETE BASICMILITARYTRAININGAT BASICTRAININGEARNFOUR *OINT"ASE3AN!NTONIO ,ACKLANDIN3AN!NTONIO CREDITSTOWARDAN!SSO2OBINSONISTHESONOF CIATEIN!PPLIED3CIENCE %DNA2OBINSONOF#HULA DEGREETHROUGHTHE 6ISTA #ALIF #OMMUNITY#OLLEGEOF AND7ILLIAM THE!IR&ORCE 2OBINSONOF "YRON(E Soldier completes ISA chaplain course GRADUATE OF#ASTLE !RMY3PEC$EVON7 0ARK(IGH "USEHASCOMPLETED William Robinson III 3CHOOLIN THE#HAPLAIN!SSISTANT #HULA6ISTA !DVANCED)NDIVIDUAL 3YMONS 4RAININGCOURSEATTHE ISTHESON #HAPLAIN3CHOOLAT&ORT OF"RIAN *ACKSONIN#OLUMBIA 3YMONSOF 3# /REGON(E 4HECOURSEEMPHAISA SIZEDRELIGIOUSSUPGRADUATE Eric PORT DEVELOPMENTOF Symons OF/REGON INTERPERSONALSKILLS AND (IGH UNITMINISTRYSUPPORT 3CHOOL TOSOLDIERSANDFAMILY #OXISTHEDAUGHTEROF MEMBERS4HESUP%LIZABETH PORTTRAININGPROVIDED /GRADYOF SERVICESINABATTLEFIELD #ASSELBER- ENVIRONMENTANDBATTLE RY &LA AND FATIGUECASUALTYCARE THEGRAND2ELIGIOUSSUPPORT DAUGHTER CLASSESINSTRUCTEDSTUOF,OU DENTSTOPREPAREALTARS !NN#OX FOR0ROTESTANT #ATHOLIC Victoria OF3TERCox *EWISH AND/RTHODOX LING3HE SERVICES ANDSTRESSED ISA THEIMPORTANCEOFBEING GRADUATE KNOWLEDGEABLEOFALL OF,AKE FAITHGROUPSREPRESENT(OWELL(IGH EDINTHE!RMY 3CHOOL "USEISTHESONOF IN7INTER 0AMELA'ASKILLAND 3TEVEN 0ARK &LA $ONALD"USE BOTHOF +ETCHAM +ETCHAM -OUNT-ORRIS(EIS ISTHESON AGRADUATEOF OF"RIAN+ETCHAMOF /REGON(IGH3CHOOL 3UBLETTE(EISA ANDAGRADUATEOF GRADUATEOF!MBOY(IGH 3OUTHERN)LLINOIS5NIVER3CHOOL SITYIN#ARBONDALE


Saturday, January 18, 2014

Scrapbook www.saukvalley.com

REACHING TO THE SKY

367EEKENDs#

IN BRIEF

Laurin Williamson of Dixon photographed Robert Schulze (from left), Mike Burgess, Linda Burgess, and Katie Schulze Dec. 29 at the Bears-Packers party at the Dixon Elks Lodge.

NATURE’S PALETTE

Dave Fox of Tampico photographed the world’s tallest Christmas tree at the Soldiers and Sailors Monument in downtown Indianapolis from 2 blocks away. The “tree” is lit on the Friday after Thanksgiving, with the electricity paid for by donations throughout the Christmas season.

Bright colors light up a late December sky over Riverdale Road in Rock Falls. Photo submitted by Tim Boyd of Rock Falls.

SNOWY DAY IN OREGON

LEFT: Eileen Considine of Oregon recently photographed eagles on the Rock River near the dam in Oregon. ABOVE: Lorado Taft’s “The Eternal Indian,” known as the Black Hawk Statue, stands watch over a snowy Ogle County landscape at Lowden State Park in Oregon.

HALT, WHO GOES THERE?

FROZEN

An American mink pauses Nov. 13 along the Rock River. Photo submitted by Dave Tackett of Sterling.

When Linda Little of Oregon recently looked out her door, she was greeted by a display of crystals. Photo submitted by Little.

Wanted: Photos from you A scrapbook is a book with blank pages, and that’s what our Scrapbook page is without your pictures. We want to fill the page with images that capture lives in the Sauk Valley. They can be submitted by email to photos@saukvalley.com or can be taken to the Sterling and Dixon offices.


#s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

3ATURDAY *ANUARY 

ABOVE: Music, art, a blood drive, and information from vendors were part of the New Year Resolution Support Fair Jan. 4 at Traditional Wellness Center in Dixon. Photos by Stevie Clark. RIGHT: Among the musicians performing at the fair were (front row, from left) Kathy Cecchetti and Matthew Kinnaman; and (back row) Nathan Green and Matthew Francis Smith.

Resolution fair starts people off in the right direction DIXON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The first New Year Resolution Support Fair was Jan. 4 at Traditional Wellness Center. Artists, service providers, and vendors provided works, information, and door and raffle prizes. Participants shared their New Year resolutions by writing them on the wall

for public display. American Red Cross staff members were looking to fill a quota of 13 pints of blood that day. They collected 12. The TWC Day of Music and TWC Visual Art Exhibition, January 2014 added to the event. Artwork from the exhibition

will hang until the end of January at the center, 216 W. First St. Participating vendors and agencies were Traditional Wellness Center & Gingko Tree CafĂŠ, Keith McBride Genesis Pure IBO, R & R Massage Solutions, Ameriprise Financial, Piller Chiropractic &

MUSIC BENEFITS PROGRAM, FUND

Weight Loss Center, Carlson Acupuncture and Chiropractic Clinic, Still Life, KSB Community Wellness, motivational speaker and life coach Genesis Hey, Liberty Court Assisted Living Facility, Health & Nutrition Plus, Woodlawn Arts Academy, American Red Cross Disaster Relief, Mary

Kay, Sinnissippi Centers, Alcoholics Anonymous, and It Works. Musicians who performed included AnnaMary Petry, Olivia Petry, Micah â&#x20AC;&#x153;redstar,â&#x20AC;? Matthew Kinnaman, Matthew Francis Smith, Nathan Green, Kathy Cecchetti, Steve Catron, and Mackenzie

CHADWICK JUNIOR HIGH, ELEMENTARY SCHOOL HONOR ROLL

Spirit of Joy, a vocal trio, and Joyce Person, their accompanist and a solo performer, gave proceeds from donations received at their Christmas concert at Dixon Church of the Brethren to the Dixon Buddy Bag program and the Good Samaritan Fund. The musicians presented money to Bev Pickering of the Buddy Bag program (third from left). With her are (from left) Kathy Mackey, Pat Ball, Janet Hoover, and Person. Photo courtesy of Chuck Pomazal.

Programs feature reading, play ROCK FALLS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Rocket Readers will get together from 4 to 4:45 p.m. Feb. 3 at Rock Falls Public Library, 1007 Seventh St. This afterschool reading program for students in kindergarten to fourth grade also will meet Feb. 10 and 24. Stories, activities, and snack time are part of the event. Registration is required. Other activities at the library are: A Readerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Theater performance of â&#x20AC;&#x153;How I Became a Pirateâ&#x20AC;? will be from 6 to 7 p.m. Feb. 5. Participants will perform for their families and friends. The Craft Club meets from 5 to 7:30 p.m. Feb. 5 and 19. The Mystery Book Club will meet at 10 a.m. Feb. 6. Club members are reading â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kidnapped,â&#x20AC;? by Jan Burke. Newcomers are welcome. Copies of the book are available at the library desk. Parts for a â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Taste for

Wine and Murder,â&#x20AC;? a murder mystery and dessert set for March 6, will open Feb. 6. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;murderâ&#x20AC;? starts with dessert at 6 p.m., followed by the performance at 6:30 p.m. Tickets will be available Feb. 20. The next library board meeting will be at 6:30 p.m. Feb. 10. Scrapbooking is scheduled from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Feb. 14 and 28. The library will be closed Feb. 17 for Presidentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Day. A free Candy Land family fun night is planned for 6 to 7:30 p.m. Feb. 27 with door prizes. A lifesize game of Candy Land will be played. Candy crafts and stories also will be featured. Tickets are required, and can be picked up at the library desk. The library offers individual computer lessons, which can be scheduled for 30 minutes to 1 hour,

depending upon available times. One-on-one help will be provided for basic computer skills, email, Facebook, Word, and E-books and audiobooks. The Secretary of State and Illinois State Library recently awarded a grant to Reaching Across the Illinois Library System and the Illinois Heartland Library System for the E-books for Illinois Program, eRead Illinois. It includes an ebook collection and Axis 360 software platform from Baker and Tailor for RAILS members. Readers can visit the library website at www. rockfallslibrary.com and click on the eRead Illinois graphic in the resources section to visit the Baker and Taylor eBook site. Cardholders can use their card and PIN to login and borrow ebooks. For more information about library programs, call 815-622-1106.

Two-week deadline for submitting copy The deadline to submit event information, including photos, for the SV Weekend Community pages is 2 weeks before the event. Information may be submitted in writing by hand,

mail, fax or email at the Dixon or Sterling offices. Information on events that already have taken place will be published as soon as possible, in the order in which it is received.

Given the volume of such information, that could be 2 weeks or more after the event. Photos will be published as space permits. For information, call 800798-4085, ext. 575.

Comer. Visual artwork was by McBride, T.L. Doty, Micah â&#x20AC;&#x153;redstar,â&#x20AC;? Judy Dixon, E. Jayne DeMarco, Mercedez L. Lowery, Camilo Quintana, Rick Munson, M.C. Garner, and Erin Clark. The fair was sponsored by People United Reaching Everyone Agenda.

Highest Honors Sixth grade:3AMANTHA(ARTMAN Seventh grade: -ADALYN(ICKS +ORTNEY 1UECKBOERNER .ATHAN 2AHN AND.ATALIE 7ILKINSON Eighth grade:-ADYSON&REDERICK 4YRA (AAG 3ABREENA(ARTMAN AND(OLLY3MITH High Honors Sixth grade: "RIDGET !DAMEC 4ESSA"RUBAKER !NGELINA$E6ITO %MILY(INRICHS !LEXIS *ANSSEN !NTHONY,APP 0ARKER,ITWILLER +EZIAH 0ASCH 3YDNEY0AULEY -ASON0HILLIPS -EGAN 3CHAVE !VA3HAW #LAYTON3IMPSON AND !LYVIA7OODARD Seventh grade: !NDREA&EARY 4ITUS *ILDERDA (OPE+RSKA -ASON-C+ENNA -EGAN-ILLER *ACK -UNZ *ASMINE3TURRUP #HRISTIAN4OMS 3MITH AND#ONNOR7OODIN Eighth grade:+YLE !UDE !DAM"RALL .ATALIE"ROWN %MILIA %LLER %MILY(ENSON 3HELBY*UDD -EGAN ,ITWILLER "RYCE-C#LURE 'RACE-ERKEL -AD-

ELINE-OLENDA 4ESSA -ORHARDT !LEXANDRA 3CHMIDT 2ACHEL3CIDMORE +ALEIGH4ARBILL AND2EBECCA7AITE Honors Sixth grade:3TEVEN !DEE *ACQUELYN&OLKERS $ESTANI'ARZA *USTIN(ACKBARTH "REE (ARTMAN #ARLY*ANSSEN +YLE,APP #ARSON-URPHY -EGAN0ORT AND $AKOTA0YSE Seventh grade:#OREY !NDERSON #ARSON "OYER !LEXIS$UBLO ,OGAN$UDLEY (OPE (ERIN *AKE(UBBARD !UGEST*ONES "LAYNE +APPES +ADEN0OLILLO #OURTNEY1UECKBORNER 'RANT3CHURMAN ,AUREN 3TRAUSS AND#ODY6AN$YKE Eighth grade-ATTHEW"ILLER *OCELYN &OLKERS +YLE+ENDALL #IARA-ILLER +ASSIE-URRAY +YLE/TTENS AND 3YDNEE0OTTRATZ

Perfect Attendance Fourth grade:%THAN "RADLEY )SABELLA#OVEY #ARTER$UDLEY (UNTER 'ALLENTINE $IMETRI'ARZA ,INSEY,APP 2YLEE-ATTHEWS "LAKE3CHURMAN 3OPHIE3HAW #OLTON

3TAHL )ZAAC4OMS 3MITH 0EYTON5RISH #ADEN6AN$YKE AND"RIANA7ILKINSON Fifth grade:-ATTHEW "ALSIGER "RETT'UMS !SHLYN(ENDRICK 2YAN +ENDALL $ANIEL,OHNES $AWSON-ARONDE $AMON -ILLER .OAH.EWSTRAND %MMA0ORT -ALLORY2USSELL #HASE3ARBER 2EGAN 3CIDMORE 4REYTON3ELMAN AND-ADISON4ARBILL Sixth grade:4ESSA "RUBAKER +RYSTAL$RUIEN *ACQUELYN&OLKERS 3AMANTHA(ARTMAN (UNTER(ATTEN !LEXIS *ANSSEN #ARLY*ANSSEN -ASON*OHNSON 0ARKER ,ITWILLER #ARSON-URPHY -EGAN0ORT $AKOTA0YSE -EGAN3CHAVE AND#LAYTON3IMPSON Seventh grade:+EATON #ASARES ,OGAN$UDLEY #HARLEESE&AULKNER (OPE +RSKA !BBYGAIL-EREMA *ACK-UNZ +ORTNEY 1UECKBOERNER ,OGAN 2AYHORN 'RANT3CHURMAN #OLTON3IMPSON #HRISTIAN4OMS 3MITH #ODY6AN$YKE AND.ATALIE7ILKINSON Eighth Grade:-ATTHEW "ILLER 3ABREENA(ARTMAN $YLAN*ANSSEN 3COTTI -C.EAL 2ACHEL3CIDMORE AND(OLLY3MITH

Eli Blaney of Dixon (center) won the St. Mary Elementary and Junior High School National Geographic Bee Jan. 9. With him are Sarah Campbell, junior high school social studies teacher, and fifth-grade student Jake Ackman of Dixon who came in second. Photo submitted by Sarah Campbell.

Dixon youth advances in geography DIXON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Eli Blaney of Dixon, an eighth-grade student at St. Mary Elementary and Junior High School, won the schoollevel National Geographic Bee Jan. 9, and a chance to win a $50,000 college scholarship. The competition, the first round in the 26th annual bee, started

Nov. 11, with students answering oral questions. Blaney and other school winners will take a written test. Up to 100 of the top scorers will be eligible to compete April 4 in their stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bee. State champions receive a free trip from May 19 to 21 to Washington,

D.C., to compete in the national championship rounds. Besides the scholarship, the national winner will receive a lifetime membership in the society and a trip to the Galapagos Islands. Visit www.nationalgeographic.com for more information.


Saturday, January 18, 2014

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs#

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENTS Irya Jain

Paternal grandparents mother is Isabel Valdivia are Matthew Bennett and of Sterling. Poonam Sachdev and Charlene Bennett, both of Sameer Jain of Dixon are Emmalee JoAnne Riverdale, Iowa. the parents of a daughter Maternal great-grandborn at 6:48 a.m. Dec. 14, Freas mother is Charlotte Houz2013, at KSB Hospital in Wendy Shank and Jason enga of Morrison. Dixon. Freas of Sterling are the Paternal great-grandIrya Jain weighed 5 parents of a daughter born mother is Marie Bennett pounds, 9 ounces at birth. at 12:54 p.m. Dec. 29, 2013, of Hudson, Mo. Maternal grandparents at CGH Medical Center in are C.B. Sachdev and Quentin John Wade Shakuntla Sachdev, both Sterling. Emmalee JoAnne Freas of India. Kara and C.J. Wade of Paternal grandparents weighed 6 pounds at Sterling are the parents birth and was 20 inches in are Somchand Jain and of a son born at 7:46 p.m. Shivani Jain, both of India. length. Jan. 3, 2014, at CGH MediShe is welcomed by Allie Paternal great-grandcal Center in Sterling. Ray Freas, 6. mother is Kailash ChoudQuentin John Wade Maternal grandparhary of India. ents are Paul and Connie weighed 8 pounds,14 ounces at birth, and was Cheshire of Sterling. Carter John Paternal grandmother is 21.5 inches in length. Maternal grandparents Linda Freas of Sterling. Mahaffey are Donna and Randy Maternal great-grandJanna and Kyle Mahaffey of Ashton are the parents parents are Paul Cheshire Landis of Milledgeville. of a son born at 7:15 a.m. Sr. of Como and Joyce Cur- Paternal grandparents are Debbie and Ed Wade Dec. 24, 2013, at KSB Hos- tis of Boles, Ark. II of Sterling. Paternal great-grandpital in Dixon. Maternal great-grandmother is Betty Freas of Carter John Mahaffey mother is Shirley Nye of Rock Falls. weighed 7 pounds, 4 Milledgeville. ounces at birth and was Paternal great-grand20.5 inches in length. Charlee Realynn parents are Lois and Ed He is welcomed by Isaac, Scoles Wade I of Sterling. 2. Maternal grandparents Kolesha and James are Steve and Pam Thom- Scoles of Sterling are the Wyatt Bhodi Kelm parents of a daughter born Cassie Jo and James as of Schererville, Ind. P a t e r n a l g r a n d p a r - at 9:11 p.m. Dec. 31, 2013, Kelm of Rock Falls are the ents are Ron and Laura at CGH Medical Center in parents of a son born at Sterling. Mahaffey of Ashton. 3:45 p.m. Jan. 3, 2014, at Maternal great-grand- Charlee Realynn Scoles CGH Medical Center in mother is Jan Meenach of weighed 7 pounds, 8.5 Sterling. ounces at birth and was 21 W y a t t B h o d i K e l m Darlington, Ind. Paternal great-grandfa- inches in length. weighed 8 pounds, 2 ther is Ray Forney of Ash- She is welcomed by ounces at birth and was Landyn Scoles, 6. ton. 21.5 inches in length. Maternal grandparents He is welcomed by Tessa are Jodi and Joe Henson of Kelm, 11, Avery Kelm, 8, Austin Thomas Rock Falls and Scott Moen Eliah Kelm, 5, and Tehly Shomaker of Dixon. Kelm, 3. Paternal grandparents Autumn and Eric Shomaker of Maternal grandparents Dixonaretheparentsofasonbornat are Mary House of Sterling are Mary Steagall and 6:51a.m.Dec.20,2013,atKSBHospi- and the late Jim Scoles. Gerald Steagall, both of Maternal great-grand- Rock Falls. talinDixon. Austin Thomas Shomaker mother is Pamela Larkey of Paternal grandparents weighed7pounds,4ouncesatbirth Rock Falls. are Julie Kelm and Mike Paternal great-grand- Kelm, both of Rock Falls. andwas21inchesinlength. He is welcomed by Mason Sho- father is Paul House of Paternal great-grandComo. maker,1. mother is Joyce Leonard MaternalgrandparentsareWendy of Bullhead City, Ariz. LoseyLehmanofMendotaandTom Jace Allen Velasco and Tammi Lehman of Franklin Kristina Cortes and Jarren Richard Grove. Miguel Velasco of MorReyes PaternalgrandparentsareBoband rison are the parents of a JudyShomakerofDixon. Ashley Flores of Rock Maternal great-grandparents are son born at 5:35 a.m. Jan. Falls is the mother of a 3, 2014, at CGH Medical GlenandSharonLehmanandKenson born at 4:03 a.m. Jan. dallandNancyWhitson,allofDixon. Center in Sterling. J a c e A l l e n V e l a s c o 4, 2014, at CGH Medical weighed 7 pounds, 13 Center in Sterling. Jarren Richard Reyes Karsten James ounces at birth and was weighed 6 pounds, 12 21.5 inches in length. Haya-Ji Oberg ounces at birth and was Maternal grandparents Nicole and Erik Oberg 20 inches in length. of Sterling are the parents are Junee Cortes and DanHe is welcomed by Kylan of a son born at 9:49 a.m. iel Cortes, both of Morri- Reyes-Krepfle, 7, and son. Dec. 19, 2013, at KSB HosPaternal grandmother Kiera Krepfle, 6. pital in Dixon. Maternal grandparents Karsten James Haya-Ji is Martha Velasco of Vera are Paula Chavez and Oberg weighed 8 pounds, Cruz, Mexico. Santos Chavez Jr., both of 4 ounces at birth and was Rock Falls. 20 inches in length. Gregory Adam Maternal great-grandfaHe is welcomed by ther is Richard Condiff of Dorwaldt Henry, 7. Kristin Schwarz and Rock Falls. Maternal grandparents are Lynda Pfeiffer of Anthony Dorwaldt of Anthony Edward Skokie and John Pfeiffer of Rochelle are the parents of a son born at 10 a.m. Stith Columbus, Ohio. Paternal grandparents Dec. 27, 2013, at KSB HosAnthony and Ann Stith are Charles M. and Judy pital in Dixon. of Brookfield, Wis., are the Gregory Adam Dorwalt Oberg of Rockford. parents of a son born at Maternal great-grand- weighed 8 pounds at birth 1:10 a.m. Dec. 11, 2013, at mother is Jean Mishima of and was 19.5 inches in Elmbrook Memorial Hoslength. Glenview. He is welcomed by Tyler pital in Brookfield. Paxton, 8, and Alainah Anthony Edward Stith weighed 7 pounds, 9 Lilliana Rosalie Jordal, 2. Segura Maternal grandparents ounces at birth and was 19 inches in length. Alexandra Segura of are Pam Schwarz of AshHe is welcomed by Elizton and Jeff Schwarz of Clinton, Iowa, is the abeth, 7, Mary, 5, and mother of a daughter born Rock Falls. Thomas, 3. Paternal grandparents at 6:24 p.m. Dec. 24, 2013, Maternal grandparents at CGH Medical Center in are Christine Greguras are Arnie and Phyllis Getz and William Greguras, Sterling. of Chadwick. Lilliana Rosalie Segura both of South Elgin, and Paternal grandparents weighed 6 pounds, 10 the late Gregory Dorwaldt are Ed and Paulette Stith ounces at birth and was and Phyllis Dorwaldt. of Mundelein. Maternal great-grand20 inches in length. Maternal great-grandMaternal grandparents parents are Irene Thomas mother is Amanda Kneifl are Mary Ordean and of Ashton, Delbert Thom- of Chadwick. Dale Ordean, both of Rock as of Rochelle, and Annice Paternal great-grandand Ken Joseph of Las Falls. parents are Frank and Vegas. Antoinette Fabianski of Paternal great-grandChicago. Christian Samuel parents are David and Mendoza Lois Coombs of South Julie and Jason Mendoza Elgin and Janet Dorwaldt Alexander Valdivia of Prophetstown are the of Rochelle. Lopez parents of a son born at Laura Lopez and Favian 5:42 a.m. Dec. 31, 2013, Jericho Matthew Valdivia of Sterling are the at CGH Medical Center in parents of a son born at Donald Bennett Sterling. 3:23 a.m. Jan. 5, 2014, at Christian Samuel Men- Sarah Sorochan and CGH Medical Center in doza weighed 9 pounds, Joshua Bennett of Ster- Sterling. 4 ounces at birth and was ling are the parents of a Alexander Valdivia son born at 8:25 a.m. Jan. Lopez weighed 6 pounds, 23 inches in length. He is welcomed by Pey- 2, 2014, at CGH Medical 15 ounces at birth and Center in Sterling. ton Henry, 7. was 20 inches in length. Maternal grandparents Jericho Matthew Donare Jeff and Pam Albrecht ald Bennett weighed 7 of Prophetstown and Jay pounds, 10 ounces at Elyse Bell Thomas Terra and Eric Thomas and Robyn Moresi of Deer birth and was 23 inches in length. of Sterling are the parents Grove. P a t e r n a l g r a n d p a r - He is welcomed by Alex- of a daughter born at 2:10 ents are John and Benni ys, 8, Rylee, 6, and Misha, a.m. Jan. 6, 2014, at CGH 4. Medical Center in SterMendoza of Sterling. Maternal great-grand- Maternal grandparents ling. Elyse Bell Thomas parents are Bob and Judy are Diane Boden of Sterling and Peter Bomleny of weighed 6 pounds, 12 Guthrie of Stockton, Mo. ounces at birth and was Paternal great-grand- Princeton.

18 inches in length. She is welcomed by Rowyn Thomas, 2. Maternal grandparents are Andrea Hadwin and David Hadwin, both of Longview, Texas. Paternal grandparents are Patricia Thomas and Earl Thomas, both of Franklin Grove. Maternal great-grandmother is Julie Monroe of Piedmont, S.C. Paternal great-grandparents are Earl Thomas and Judy Thomas, both of Fort Myers, Fla.

Tinley Rae Swertfeger Kara and Adam Swertfeger of Deer Grove are the parents of a daughter born at 11:44 a.m. Jan. 7, 2014, at CGH Medical Center in Sterling. Tinley Rae Swertfeger weighed 7 pounds, 1 ounce at birth and was 19 inches in length. She is welcomed by Braylon, 7, and Channing, 4. Maternal grandparents are Dan Ribordy and Lynetta Ribordy, both of Deer Grove. Paternal grandparents are Tina Colley of Darlington, S.C., and John Swertfeger of La Crosse, Wis. Maternal great-grandparents are Jack Dietz and Gloria Dietz, both of Harmon. Paternal great-grandparents are Robert Witzke and Beverly Swertfeger, both of La Crosse, Wis.

Trenton William Newendyke Nikki and Timothy Newendyke of Fowler are the parents of a son born at 3:48 p.m. Dec. 28, 2013, at Blessing Hospital in Quincy. Trenton William Newendyke weighed 7 pounds, 14 ounces at birth and was 20 inches in length. He is welcomed by Natalie, 10, and Bryce, 7. Maternal grandparents are Mike and Becky Helfrich of Dixon. Paternal grandparents are Richard and Lois Newendyke of Sterling. Maternal great-grandmother is Evelyn Plock of Barron, Wis. Paternal great-grandparents are Vernon and Mary Newendyke of Lanark. Maternal great-greatgrandmother is Sally Culver of Dixon.

Ariana Rose Magana Hali Shipman and Andrew Magana of Sterling are the parents of a daughter born at 2:47 p.m. Jan. 11, 2014, at CGH Medical Center in Sterling. Ariana Rose Magana weighed 6 pounds, 8 ounces at birth and was 18.5 inches in length. She is welcomed by Bentley Michael Magana, 10 months. Maternal grandparents are Tina Baldwin of Paragould, Ark., and Kevin Williams of Rockford. Paternal grandparents are Cari Magana and Chuck Magana, both of Sterling. Maternal great-grandparents are Marie Carroll of Crete, Neb., and Gloria Hucakbee and Sam Williams, both of Rockford. Paternal great-grandparents are Rick Cutler of Dixon, Vickie Martin of Rockford, and Louis Magana of Sterling.

Penelope Carol Marrandino Maureen and Martin Marrandino of Sterling are the parents of a daughter born at 1:42 p.m. Jan. 11, 2014, at CGH Medical Center in Sterling. Penelope Carol Marrandino weighed 7 pounds, 9 ounces at birth and was 20 inches in length. She is welcomed by Cyrus Gabriel Marrandino, 3. Maternal grandparents are Jeanine and Tom Heck and Dean Parker, all of Rockford.

Paternal grandparents are Rob and Christy Haenitsch of Ashton. Maternal great-grandparents are Jim and Mildred Doyle of Shabbona. Paternal great-grandparents are Dee Powers Julian Ismael and Melvin and Wilma Castro Haenitsch, all of Ashton, Claudia and Jose Luis and Shirley Williams of Castro are the parents of a Rochelle. son born at 7:25 a.m. Jan. 10, 2014, at CGH Medical Maxine Kay Center in Sterling. Julian Ismael Castro Grossman weighed 7 pounds, 14 Katie and Dalton Grossounces at birth and was man of Dixon are the par21 inches in length. ents of a daughter born at He is welcomed by Jose 8:36 p.m. Jan. 1, 2014, at Lucio Castro, 7, and Joan- KSB Hospital in Dixon. na Castro, 5. Maxine Kay Grossman Maternal grandparents weighed 7 pounds, 13 are Consuelo Flores and ounces at birth and was Octaviano Navarro, both 21 inches in length. of Sterling. Paternal grandparents She is welcomed by are Guadalupe Castro of Lucas, 2, and Charlotte, 1. Maternal grandparMexico and the late Lucio ents are Tom and Paula Castro. DuBois of Sterling. Paternal grandparents Mercy Grace are Heidi Palmer of Dixon Elisabeth and Dean and Joan Grossman of Plymouth, Minn. Rodriguez Maternal great-grandFawne and Noah Rodriparents are Mary Kay guez of Mount Morris are McCue of Rock Falls and the parents of a daughPaul Vock of Morrison. ter born at 7:28 a.m. Jan. 10, 2014, at CGH Medical Paternal great-grandparents are Earl and Center in Sterling. Mercy Grace Elisabeth Nancy Grossman of LakeRodriguez weighed 6 land, Fla. pounds, 7 ounces at birth Addyson Marie and was 19.5 inches in length. Gustafson She is welcomed by Mia and Michael GusMadalin Russell, 12, Olivia tafson of Rock Falls are Russell, 8, Noelle Rodrithe parents of a daughguez, 3, and Elijah Rodriter born at 8:45 a.m. Jan. guez, 1. Paternal grandparents 9, 2014, at CGH Medical are Terry Rodriguez and Center in Sterling. Santos â&#x20AC;&#x153;Reneâ&#x20AC;? Rodriguez, Addyson Marie Gustafson weighed 7 pounds both of Sterling. Maternal great-grand- at birth and was 20.5 inchmother is Betty Rucker of es in length. She is welcomed by Mount Morris. Karah Ann Gustafson, 3. Maternal grandparents Brayton Ryan Gatz are Victor Medrano and Brenda and Jestun Gatz Norma Medrano, both of of Sterling are the parents Sterling. of a son born at 3;20 p.m. Paternal grandparents Nov. 21, 2013, at Trinity are Marty Gustafson and Birthplace in Moline. Lucia Gustafson, both of Brayton Ryan Gatz Sterling. weighed 6 pounds, 15 Maternal great-grandfaounces at birth and was ther is Bill Garza of Rock 19 inches in length. He is welcomed by Falls. Paternal great-grandMakaylee Gatz, 3. mother is Dee Morey of Maternal grandparents are Roger and Cindy Cambridge. Fields of Eldena. Macy Lynne Paternal grandparents are David and Marla Gatz Saathoff of Sterling. Maternal great-grand- Erica and Justin Saathoff parents are Wayne and of Sterling are the parents of a daughter born at Francis Fields of Eldena. Paternal great-grand- 10:22 p.m. Dec. 29, 2013, parents are Wayne Gatz at KSB Hospital in Dixon. Macy Lynne Saathoff and Merle and JoAnn Linton, all of Sterling, and weighed 9 pounds, 12 Merle and Barb Meiners ounces at birth and was 21.5 inches in length. of Hot Springs, Ark. She is welcomed by Jared, 13, Jack, 4, and Cayden Lane Nolan, 2. Dyson Maternal grandparents Amber Frieberg of Clin- are Denny and Brooke ton, Iowa, and Cody Weidman of Amboy. Dyson of Mount Carroll Paternal grandparents are the parents of a son are Jay and Marj Saathoff born at 11:01 p.m. Jan. 4, of Jupiter, Fla. 2014, at KSB Hospital in Maternal great-grandDixon. parents are Patricia Weller Cayden Lane Dyson and Marion Weidman, weighed 6 pounds, 13 both of Amboy. ounces at birth and was 19 inches in length. Briselle Micaela He is welcomed by TrisDiaz ton Frieberg, 8, Allie Frieberg, 4, and Madison Annette Rae and Miguel Dyson, 7. Angel Diaz of Rock Falls Maternal grandparents are the parents of a daughare Vera Bode of Clinton, ter born at 4:44 p.m. Jan. Iowa, and Raymond Bode 10, 2014, at CGH Medical of St. Cloud, Minn. Center in Sterling. P a t e r n a l g r a n d p a r - Briselle Micaela Diaz ents are Denise Dyson of weighed 8 pounds, 11 Mount Carroll and Dennis ounces at birth and was Dyson of Savanna. 21 inches in length. Maternal great-grand- She is welcomed by mothers are Arlene KalGabriela Diaz, 12, Jocelyn lenbach of Prophetstown Diaz, 4, and Nayeli Diaz, and Claudine Laxton of 4. Clarkson, Ky. Paternal great-grand- Maternal grandparents mother is Jean Dyson of are Ramon Menchaca and Linda Menchaca, both of Mount Carroll. Rock Falls. Paternal grandparents Kendall Rae are Baudelio Diaz and Martha Diaz, both of St. Haenitsch Kayla and Jesse Hae- Charles. nitsch of Amboy are the Maternal great-grandparents of a daughter parents are Martin Castro born at 7:37 a.m. Jan. 3, Menchaca Sr. and Mary 2014, at KSB Hospital in Menchaca, both of Sterling, and Rich Vido Panice Dixon. Kendall Rae Haenitsch and Gloria Panice, both of weighed 7 pounds, 8 Rock Falls. Paternal great-grandparounces at birth and was ents are Roberto and Ester 20 inches in length. Maternal grandparents Diaz, Genaro Mendoza, are Patty Rood and Vern and Guadalupe Huerta, Kuper, both of Amboy. all of Jalisco, Mexico. Paternal grandparents are Betty and Vincent Marrandino of Dixon. Maternal great-grandmother is Hilda Peterson of Roanoke.


#s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

3ATURDAY *ANUARY 

Long friendship suffers after man makes pass Dear Abby: Our neighbors of 14 years watch our dog while we are away, which is quite often. They have free access to our home with the key we have given them. Two months ago, the husband hit on me, really pushing the issue for me to have sex with him. Then he apologized like it was nothing. I was upset, scared, shocked, and told my husband because I was concerned. My husband was not happy about it. We have not been able to look at him or his wife (my friend) since then. We are all middle-aged. Should I tell her why we have been absent, or can you help me figure out what to do? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Badly In Need Of Advice

DEARABBY $EAR!BBY ISWRITTEN BY!BIGAIL 6AN"UREN ALSOKNOWN AS*EANNE 0HILLIPS4HE COLUMNISPROVIDEDTHROUGH 5NIVERSAL 5CLICK

Dear Badly In Need: Make other plans for your dog when you travel, change the locks on your doors, and if your friend asks why you have been â&#x20AC;&#x153;absent,â&#x20AC;? tell her why. She may not like to hear it, but she should know that if your friendship with her is going to continue, it will have to be without her husband being included. (She should have herself

checked for STDs in case her husband has managed to get lucky with a neighbor who was willing.) Dear Abby: Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m 31 and have been married to my husband for 2.5 years. He wants a baby in the worst way. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t, and I have been clear about it. Abby, my husband helps with nothing. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m constantly cleaning, doing the laundry, and cooking meals. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s OK, but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like some help. I have asked him many times to do things before football comes on or to take a break from Netflix and get something done. It never happens. I have been nice about it, and I have been angry. We agreed to buy a big-

STERLING OPTIMIST DONATIONS

Home of Hope Cancer Wellness Center in Dixon recently received a $200 donation from the Sterling Optimist Club. The money was presented by Joan Padilla, executive director of the center, by Jim Hammer, Optimist treasurer. Padilla also gave a presentation to the club about the benefits the center provides. Photos submitted by Sharon Hammer.

ger house and then have a baby, but at this rate, I already have one â&#x20AC;&#x201C; my husband. Is there any hope? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Mama Already Dear Mama Already: No, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think so. You married a man who is lazy, or passive aggressive and angry at your refusal to have a baby, or has been so spoiled by his mother that he thinks this is a normal way to live. Counseling might help you get through to him, but I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t bet on it. Dear Abby: I am 10 years old and I have a major boy problem. My ex (Bob) broke up with me, and I felt funny around him and a little mad. So I kind of moved

on. I went to my crush who had previously asked me out, and I said yes. Now Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m stuck and I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what to do. I asked my mom and didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like the answer, so now Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m asking you. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Confused Girl in Arkansas

taco bowl, eat everything out of it, and then eat the taco bowl? I asked my husband, and he said to ask you. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Traci in Amsterdam, N.Y.

Dear Abby: Can you please tell me the proper way to eat a taco salad? Do you crunch up the

Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Dear Traci: There are no rules of etiquette governing how to eat a taco Dear Confused Girl: I salad. donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what your However, when I order mother told you, but one, I usually eat the conhereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my advice: At 10, tents of the bowl, then youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re too young to be in chip off pieces of the toran exclusive relationship tilla if I still have enough with anyone. Because room to nibble. I also you regret saying yes to have seen diners order your crush, tell him your the salad and ask that it mother disapproves and be served on a salad plate you cannot go against (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hold the tacoâ&#x20AC;?) in order her wishes. to save a few calories.

Basketball competition set The Coloma Township Park District is sponsoring a free throw competition at 1:30 p.m. Feb. 1 at the gymnasium of Rock Falls Middle School. 1701 12th Ave. The contest is open to females and males, age 8 and older, based upon the playerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s age as of Feb. 1. There is a limit of 100 participants. The players will compete based on age and gender. The contest tests the ability of each participant to make free throws. The person making the most free throws out of 30 shots will be the winner in each category. First-place trophies and placement and merit ribbons will be awarded. The awards will be presented by the park district at the end of the contest.

JOANFRITZ *OAN&RITZIS THERECREATION SUPERVISOROF THE#OLOMA 4OWNSHIP 0ARK$ISTRICT IN2OCK&ALLS

Registration is $1. Forms are available at the park district administrative office. Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Arts and Crafts: Children take so much pride in the tasks they accomplish themselves. If you enjoy neat, but messy crafts of all types, give this class a try, and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t worry about having to clean the mess. All materials are provided. Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Arts and Crafts is being offered for students in first through eighth

grade from 3:30 to 5 p.m. Mondays at the Little Red Schoolhouse, Centennial Park, Avenue D and East 11th Street. Crafts for Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day will be Feb. 3, St. Patrickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day March 3, Easter April 7, and Motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day May 5. Each class is $5. Zumba Fitness: This is cardio-based workout uses dance-style movements and is for those 14 and older. Classes run from 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays through May 29 at Merrill School, 400 Fourth Ave. The cost is $5 daily, $30 a month (unlimited use), or $40 for a 10-visit punch card. Registration for events and programs can be done at the park districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s administrative office, 508 E. 11th St. For information, call 815625-0272.

IN BRIEF Dickens relative part of program

Hammer also presented $200 to Johanna Hager, executive director of April House in Morrison. Trish Joyce, Whiteside County stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attorney and an April House director, gave an informational program on how the facility benefits those in abusive situations.

S HESERVEDLOCALLY IN.ORTH0RAIRIEIN/HIO 4OWNSHIP ,A-OILLE AND 02).#%4/.Â&#x2C6;0ATRICK 7ALNUT 4HEPUBLICISWELCOME (ODGE "UREAU#OUNTY THEREISNOCHARGE 'ENEALOGICAL3OCIETYS #ALLTHESOCIETYAT TREASURER WILLSPEAK  FORMOREINFOR4HURSDAYATTHESOCIETYS MEETING ABOUTTHE2EV MATION "ERTRAM!$ICKENS ANEPHEWOFAUTHOR Holiday tips on #HARLES$ICKENS tap at meeting 4HEGROUPGATHERAT PMATTHESOCIETY $)8/.n.ATIONAL!LLILIBRARY 3-AIN3T ANCEON-ENTAL)LLNESS !FTERTHEBUSINESS 3AUK6ALLEYWILLMEETAT MEETING (ODGEWILLGIVE PM*ANAT3INNTHEPROGRAM"ETRAM ISSIPPI#ENTERS STATE $ICKENSSERVEDFORMORE 2OUTE THANYEARSINNORTHERN 4HEMEETINGWILLPROVIDE )LLINOISASA-ETHODIST EDUCATION ASWELLAS %PISCOPALMINISTER WITH SUPPORTTOFAMILIESSTRUGOFTHOSEYEARSBEING GLINGWITHMENTALILLNESS IN"UREAU#OUNTY$URING DIAGNOSISINARELATIVEOR THELATESINTOTHE FRIEND3ECRETSOFRELAXING

DURINGTHEHOLIDAYSEASON WILLBESHARED .!-)3AUK6ALLEYALSOIS ANAFFILIATEOF.!-))LLINOIS SERVINGTHERESIDENTSOF #ARROLL ,EE /GLE AND 7HITESIDECOUNTIES &ORMOREINFORMATION E MAILNAMISAUKVALLEY GMAILCOMORCALL-ARY !NN(UTCHISONAT  OR,ORNA%NGWALLAT  

Clothing sale to benefit auxiliary 34%2,).'n,IFE5NIFORMSWILLHAVEASCRUB SALEFROMAMTOPM &RIDAYINTHECLASSROOMS AT#'(-EDICAL#ENTER %,E&EVRE2OAD 0ROCEEDSWILLGOTOTHE #'(!UXILIARY

Events scheduled at senior center Winter programs include movie STERLING â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The action continues this month at Whiteside County Senior Center, 1207 W. Ninth St. Two special occasions will be celebrated Thursday. A National Handwriting Day competition will be at 11 a.m. A paragraph will be provided for competitors to write. First- and second-place winners will be chosen. National Pie Day will be observed with lunch and a piece of homemade pie for $5. Tacos, refried beans, rice, and a beverage also will be served. A presentation on the basics of Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

disease will be at 12:30 p.m. Jan. 27. Subjects covered will be symptoms, causes and risk factors for Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and dementia, the benefits of early detection, treatment options, stages of the disease, and ways the association can help. The cost is $5 to cover materials. Call 800272-3900 to register. A competition is planned for National Puzzle Day from 10:30 to 11 a.m. Jan. 29. The competitors will assemble a puzzle for prizes in first- and second-place. A foot clinic for those 60 and older will be from 9

a.m. to 3 p.m. Jan. 29. Call Whiteside County Health Department at 815-7724213 for appointments. VCP Home Health Care will sponsor a wellness event with blood pressure and oxygen level checks at 11 a.m. Jan. 29. Snacks will be provided. A free movie, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eight Below,â&#x20AC;? will be shown at 12:30 p.m. Jan. 31. Free popcorn will be served. Paul Walker, Jason Biggs, and Bruce Greenwood star in this Antarctic survival story. Whiteside Homecare is the film sponsor. Call 815-622-9230 for more information.

FRANKLIN GROVE â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The Franklin Grove Public Library Book Club will meet at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday at the library, 112 S. Elm St., This monthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s selection is â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Astronaut Wives Club,â&#x20AC;? by Lily Koppel. Copies are available at the library. Movie night will be from 6 to 8 p.m. Jan. 31. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Despicable Me 2â&#x20AC;? will be shown. Wintertime crafts and game playing will be from 10:30 a.m. to noon. Feb. 1. Children younger than 8 will need parental supervision for both activities.

New books at the library are â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wyoming Bold, by Diana Palmer; â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Gods of Guilt,â&#x20AC;? by Michael Connelly; â&#x20AC;&#x153;1920: Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Great War,â&#x20AC;? by Robert Conroy; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Innocence,â&#x20AC;? by Dean Koontz; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hunted,â&#x20AC;? by Karen Robards; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Forget Me Not,â&#x20AC;? by Fern Michaels; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Not So Fast: Parenting Your Teen Through the Dangers of Driving,â&#x20AC;? by Tim Hollister; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mars Inc.: The Billionaireâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Club,â&#x20AC;? by Ben Bova; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Newtown: An American Tragedy,â&#x20AC;? by Matthew Lysiak; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Backstage at the Lincoln Assas-

sination,â&#x20AC;? by Thomas A. Bogar; â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Kid: The Immortal Life of Ted Williams,â&#x20AC;? by Ben Bradlee Jr.; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Board Stiff,â&#x20AC;? by Piers Anthony; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pacific Blitzkrieg: World War II in the Central Pacific,â&#x20AC;? by Sharon Tosi Lacey; and â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Christmas Hope,â&#x20AC;? by Anne Perry New DVDs are â&#x20AC;&#x153;The To Do List,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;2 Guns,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Red 2,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Planes,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re The Millers,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jobs,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Paranoia,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Smurfs 2,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;City of Bones,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Wolverine,â&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Heat.â&#x20AC;? Call 815-456-2823 for more information.

Friday dance for teens includes games; volunteers sought for chili-soup supper AMBOY â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Teen Turf will have a fun night and dance from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday at the Boehle Youth Center, 235 W. Main St. The $4 event is for students in fifth grade and older. Foosball, pool,

and other games will be offered; refreshments will be sold. Those attending cannot leave the dance without a parent signing them out. Teen Turf volunteers are

needed to help at dances and with a chili-soup supper Feb. 1. Call Teen Turf for more information. The Homework Club is held after school until 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday. This is a free

program for students in third grade and older. Central School students, with a note written to their teacher, can ride the bus to Teen Turf. Senior Moments chair aerobics will start Feb. 4.

The classes are from 10 to 10:45 a.m. Tuesday and Thursday. A high intensity aerobics class is available from 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. Monday and Wednesday. Donations are accepted for both.

Teen Turf also collects recycled cans. Donors can place their bags behind the fence on the red trailer. For information or to volunteer, call 815-8574800.


Saturday, January 18, 2014

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs#

SEMINARS, CONFERENCES, ELECTIONS Grants available for homeowners

Oregon Carefree 4-H Club members (front row, from left) Jared Glendenning, Jackson Glendenning, and Levi Eden; and (back row) Abby Mongan, Chelsea Eden, Adam Glendenning, Michaela Eden, Grace Mongan, and Rebecca Eden delivered Christmas dinner baskets to needy families. Photo submitted by Vickie R. Broos.

Carefree 4-Hâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ers stay busy Members of the Oregon Carefree 4-H club have been busy with several activities. Club members took a trip Dec. 1 to Barnacopia in Polo. Barnacopia is a museum housing several of owner, Gary Bockerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, tractors and cars. After a tour of the

barn, members had ice cream at the soda fountain area. The clubâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual award banquet was Dec. 9. After the banquet, gifts to be donated to families at Hope House were donated. The group also helped fill Christmas dinner bas-

kets Dec. 21 for local families in need. In January, members held a bowling tournament Jan. 5 at Town & County Lanes in Mount Morris. Members also discussed fair project selections. Information submitted by Austin Ebert.

Camp sites, licences available The Illinois Department of Natural Resources offers a variety of programs including: Fishing, hunting and sportsmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s combination licenses and usage stamps: DNR Direct license and permit vendors will be available starting Monday online through the IDNR website at www.dnr.illinois. gov, or by calling 888673-7648. The licenses and usage stamps will be valid through Mar. 31, 2015, unless otherwise noted. Deer management program: The Division of Wildlife Resources has released survey results from stakeholders regarding the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s deer management program. Information was gathered during a series of open house meetings in June, and from individuals unable to attend, through an online survey. In addition, the Illinois Natural History Survey conducted several scientific surveys of hunters and non-hunters. The report also is available. Go to www.dnr.illinois. gov/conservation/wildlife/Pages/DeerOpenHouse.aspx to view the survey results, and other information regarding deer management. Upland deer hunting permits: Hunters who received a free 2013-14 upland permit to hunt at an IDNR state site are asked to return those cards to the IDNR by Feb.

15. The cards and data allow IDNR biologists to better understand upland wildlife populations and assess hunter success at state sites. Hunters who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t not return the cards will forfeit hunting privileges at all free upland hunting sites for the following year. Photography Contest: The IDNR is soliciting pictures of live wildlife that are hunted or trapped in Illinois to be used for the 2014-15 Illinois Digest of Hunting and Trapping Regulations. The contest is open to Illinois residents of all ages. The selected picture will run on the cover of the digest, and the photographerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name will be identified on the inside page. The top three pictures will be presented to the public at the end of March through an online survey to pick the winner, and the winning photographer will be sent 10 copies of the digest. Entries must be submitted by March 1. Go to www.dnr.illinois. gov/hunting/Pages/HuntingTrappingDigests.aspx for more information. Camping reservations available: Campsite and shelters at state parks and other IDNR sites are available to reserve. Reservations can be made online through the ReserveAmerica website at www.reserveamerica.com using a Visa or MasterCard.

Go to http://dnr.state. il.us/lands/Landmgt/ Programs/Camping/ for more information. The Illinois Biodiversity Field Trip Grant program: Prekindergarten through 12th-grade teachers may apply for up to $500 to cover the costs of transportation and substitute teachers for a field trip to one of Illinoisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; natural resources sites. The field trip must take place in the calendar year that the money is received. The deadline to apply is Jan. 31. Go to dnr.state.il.us/ education/CLASSRM/ grants.htm for detailed instructions and the application form. Funding for this program is provided by the Independence Tube Corp. in Chicago and the Daniel F. and Ada L. Rice Foundation in Skokie. Earth Day in the Parks: Applications are being accepted through Feb. 28 for Earth Day in the Parks events this spring. Go to http://dnr.state. il.us/education/CLASSRM/EDITPinstruct.htm to download the application form and to view the list of participating state parks. Teachers are welcome to apply to involve students in natural resources stewardship activities this spring. A grant from the Illinois Wildlife Preservation Fund helps support the Earth Day in the Parks program.

$EPARTMENTOF!GRICULTURE )LLINOISISRANKEDTHIRDINTHE NATIONFORTHENUMBEROF OREGON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Homeowners FARMERSMARKETS&ARMERS IN"UREAU #ARROLL ,EE 7HI- markets offer consumers FARM FRESH AFFORDABLE CONTESIDE ANDOTHERNORTHERN VENIENT ANDHEALTHYPRODIllinois counties can apply FORHOMEREPAIRGRANTSAND UCTS WHILEGIVINGFARMERSA LOWINTERESTHOMEIMPROVE- PLACETOSELLTHEIRGOODSAND REACHVARIOUSCONSUMERS MENTLOANSFROMTHE53 $EPARTMENTOF!GRICULTURE Money from a rural devel- Crop issues topic opment repair loan must be of statewide series used to improve or modERNIZEHOMES MAKETHEM -!,4!n4HE5NIVERSITYOF safer and more sanitary, or )LLINOIS%XTENSIONISHOSTING REMOVEHEALTHANDSAFETY THETHANNUAL)LLINOIS#ROP HAZARDS%LIGIBLEREPAIRS -ANAGEMENTCONFERENCES INCLUDEROOFING SIDING WIN- THROUGHOUTTHESTATE dows, foundation repairs, %ACHONEISA DAY IN KITCHENCABINETS SEPTIC DEPTHPROGRAMPROVIDING system, and furnace/air UNIVERSITYRESEARCH BASED CONDITIONING information on current crop 4HEMAXIMUMLOAN production issues. AMOUNTIS ,OANS ,OCALLY THEPRESENTATION can be made for a term will be from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. of 20 years at 1 percent &EBANDAT+ISHWAUinterest. Applicants need to KEE#OLLEGE#ONVENTION OWNANDOCCUPYTHEHOME #ENTER -ALTA2OAD HAVEACCEPTABLECREDITBE 2EGISTRATIONISREQUIRED ABLETOREPAYTHELOANAND ANDINCLUDESLUNCHONBOTH MEETINCOMEGUIDELINES! DAYS!DVANCEDREGISTRATION FAMILYOFFOURIN,EE#OUNTY ISORATTHEDOOR can earn up to $32,450 to CHECKSONLY 'OTOHTTP QUALIFY WHILEAFAMILYOFFOUR WEBEXTENSIONILLINOISEDU IN7HITESIDECANEARNUPTO csrec for online and mail-in   REGISTRATIONFORMSANDINFORGrants are available to mation. APPLICANTSWHOMEETLOW 4HECONFERENCEISGEARED INCOMEGUIDELINESARE toward farmers, certified YEARSOROLDERANDDEMON- CROPADVISERS ANDOTHER strate an inability to make AGRICULTUREPROFESSIONALS loan payments. Repair 4HIRTEENHOURSOFCONTINUGRANTFUNDSHAVEA  INGEDUCATIONUNITSCANBE lifetime limit, and must be EARNED&ORMOREINFORMAUSEDTOADDRESSHEALTH TION CALL2USS(IGGINSAT safety, or accessibility    ISSUESATTHEHOME'RANTS DONOTHAVETOBEREPAID Voters sought for #ALL   EXT 4, or visit www.rurdev.usda. officer elections GOVILFORMOREINFORMATION !-"/9n4HE,EE #OUNTY3OILAND7ATER #ONSERVATION$ISTRICTS annual election of direcTORSWILLBEFROMAMTO !-"/9n4HE,EE PM&EBATTHE #OUNTY&ARM"UREAU"OARD ,#37#$OFFICE 3 OF$IRECTORSHELDELECTIONS Mason Ave. Jan. 9. 4HREEDIRECTORSWILLBE Officers are Don Meyer of elected to serve a 2-year !MBOY PRESIDENT$AVID TERMONTHE,#37#$ Gorman of Steward, vice Board. PRESIDENT0ETER0RATTOF All people, firms, or cor$IXON VICEPRESIDENTAND PORATIONSWHOHOLDLEGAL !LLYN"UHROWOF!SHTON TITLE ORWHOAREINLEGAL treasurer. possession of any land 4HEMISSIONOFTHE,#&" LYINGWITHINTHEBOUNDARis to be a positive voice for IESOFTHEDISTRICT ARE AGRICULTURETHROUGHLEADELIGIBLETOVOTEASALESERSHIPANDEDUCATIONTO see, renter, tenant, or IMPROVETHEQUALITYOFLIFE OTHERWISE ANDECONOMICWELL BEINGOF Absentee ballots can members and community. BEREQUESTEDBEGINNING 7EDNESDAY4HEMUSTBE Farmers markets COMPLETEDBY&EB &ORMOREINFORMATION OR get 1st Farm help to request an absentee 2/#+&!,,3nST&ARM BALLOT CALLTHE,#37#$ AT   EXT #REDIT3ERVICESHASDONATEDTOTHE4WIN#ITY -ARKETANDTHE-ORRISON Schools sought &ARMERS-ARKETTOSUPPORT for rural program THELOCALFOODSMOVEMENT 4HEDONATIONISPARTOFA &ORTHETHIRDCONSECUTIVE  DONATIONTOGROUPS YEAR !MERICAS&ARMERS INVOLVEDWITHSUPPORTING Grow Rural Education, FARMERSMARKETSINTHE SPONSOREDBYTHE-ONcompanyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s territory. SANTO&UND WILLGIVEELIGIBLE !CCORDINGTOTHE)LLINOIS FARMERSACROSSTHECOUNTRY

Farm bureau names officers

THEOPPORTUNITYTOENHANCE MATHANDSCIENCEPROGRAMSINTHEIRCOMMUNITIES .OWUNTIL!PRIL FARMERS IN"UREAU #ARROLL ,EE /GLE AND7HITESIDECOUNTIES can nominate a local public SCHOOLDISTRICTTOCOMPETE FORAMERIT BASEDGRANTOF up to $25,000. AdministraTORSOFNOMINATEDSCHOOL DISTRICTSTHENMAYSUBMIT GRANTAPPLICATIONSTHROUGH !PRIL4HENUMBER OFELIGIBLECOUNTIESHAS EXPANDEDTO ACROSS 39 states. Go to www.GrowRuralEducation.com to view a LISTOFALLTHEWINNINGSCHOOL districts from previous years and for more information.

Beef management, sire theme of class /44!7!n0RODUCERS WILLHAVETHEOPPORTUNITYTO learn more about improvINGPASTURECONDITIONSAND lower commodity prices at THEANNUALBEEFSIRESELECTIONANDMANAGEMENT seminar Jan. 29. 4HEPROGRAMWILLRUNFROM TOPMATTHE0ITSTICK0AVILION .STATE Route 23. Travis Meeter will talk on MANAGEMENTANDNUTRITION OFHERDBULLSANDGIVEAN UPDATEONTHE)LLINOIS0ERformance Tested Bull Sale. /THERSPEAKERSINCLUDE $OUG0ARRETT *OE$EDRICKSON AND+EVIN'LAUBIUS 2EGISTRATIONISDUE 7EDNESDAYBYEMAILING WMETEER GMAILCOMOR CALLING  'O TOHTTPWEBEXTENSION illinois.edu/oardc for more information.

Seminar offers education units OREGON â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Soil, water, and air interactions will BETHEFOCUSOFASOILAND WATERMANAGEMENTSEMINAR&EBATTHE5NIVERSITYOF)LLINOIS%XTENSION /GLE#OUNTYOFFICE 7 0INES2OAD 0RESENTATIONSWILLBE DELIVEREDVIA0OWER0OINT AND7EBCONFERENCING FROMAMTOPM Topics include cover CROPS VERTICALTILLAGEEQUIPMENT THEEFFECTOFTHE "IRDS0OINT,EVYBREACHON CROPLAND USINGWETLANDS to reduce nutrient loadING ANDMANAGINGSOILTO ADAPTTOCLIMATECHANGE $UANE&RIEND EXTENSION EDUCATOR WILLPRESENTTHE PROGRAM#ERTIFIEDCROP advisers will receive five CONTINUINGEDUCATIONUNITS INSOILANDWATERMANAGEment. 4HECOSTISAND INCLUDESLUNCH#ONTACT THE/GLE#OUNTYOFFICEAT WEBEXTENSIONILLINOISEDU BDOOR  TO REGISTERBY&EB

MEETINGS, PROGRAMS, HIKES Large predators theme of program

two private pesticide APPLICATORTESTSIN&EBRUary. 4HETESTSWILLSTARTAT /2%'/.n0EGGY $OTY 5NIVERSITYOF)LLINOIS AM&EBATTHE,OVELAND#OMMUNITY(OUSE %XTENSIONEDUCATOR WILL PRESENTh,ARGE0REDATORS 513 W. Second St., 2ETURNx/R!RE4HEYv $IXONANDAM&EB ATTHE.AAMAN$IEHL 4HEPROGRAMWILLFOCUS !UDITORIUM 3#LAY ONTHEBEHAVIORSOFCOU3T -OUNT#ARROLL GARS WOLVES ANDBLACK 'OTOHTTPWEBEXTENBEARS ANDWHYTHEYMAY sion.illinois.edu/clw or BEINTHEAREAAGAIN CALL  TO 4HEPROGRAMWILLBE REGISTERFORTHETEST ONLY FROMTOPM&EB sites. Self-study trainATTHE/GLE#OUNTY INGVIATHE)NTERNETIS %XTENSIONOFFICE 7 ANOPTIONFORTRAININGBY 0INES2OAD4HECOSTIS VISITINGHTTPWEBEXTEN$5. sion.illinois.edu/psep/ or $UETOTHESPORADIC PURCHASINGTHETRAINING SIGHTINGSOFCOUGARS manual at any county wolves, and black bears office. IN)LLINOIS $OTYISOFFERING THISPROGRAMTODISCUSS Walkers welcome THEANIMALSTHEMSELVES ANDTHEBEHAVIORSTHAT to join Sunday hike MAYBEPLAYINGAPARTIN 4HE&RIENDSOFTHE#ANAL THEIRATTEMPTSTORETURN WILLHAVEITSMONTHLY(IKE THE#ANALOUTING3UNDAY Mount Carroll, 4HEGROUPWILLMEETAT PMAT,OCK Dixon to host tests WHERETHEYWILLBESHUT4HE5NIVERSITYOF)LLINOIS TLEDTO,OCKTOBEGIN #ARROLL ,EE 7HITESIDE THEHIKE,OCKIS miles west of Wyanet on %XTENSION5NITWILLOFFER

532OUTESAND 4HIS(IKETHE(ENNEPIN ISMILESANDHASBEEN NAMEDTHE+INGFISHER 4HEHIKESAREFREEAND OPENTOTHEPUBLIC4HE NEXTHIKEWILLBE&EB &ORMOREINFORMATION contact Ed Herrmann at HIKES FRIENDS HENNEPIN CANALORGOR  2403.

Cattle feeders meeting March 5 #ATTLEMENANDFARMERS WILLHAVETHEOPPORTUNITY TOHEARFROMUNIVERSITY ANDINDUSTRYEXPERTSON STRATEGIESTOMAXIMIZE PROFITSINCATTLEFEEDING !FREEMEETINGWILLBE from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. -ARCHAT3AUK6ALLEY #OMMUNITY#OLLEGE  STATE2OUTE $IXON ,UNCHISINCLUDED 'OTOWEBEXTENSIONILLInois.edu/clw or call Mary .ELSONATTHE7HITESIDE #OUNTY%XTENSIONOFFICE AT  BY&EB TOREGISTER3EATINGIS limited.

Junior Stewards (from left) Ethan Brown of Savanna; Allison Zimmerman of Clinton. Iowa; Emma Swiderski of Savanna; and Joscie Boyer of Hampton check a bluebird box. Photo submitted by Pam Steinhaus.

Junior Stewards members sought The US Fish and Wildlife Service and the Stewards of the Upper Mississippi River Refuge are looking for youth to join Junior Stewards. The mission of the program is for members and their families to connect and be engaged with the natural world. The group is looking for 16 children, ages 9

to 14. Membership is on a first come, first serve basis. There is no cost to join. Meetings will be from 9 a.m. to noon beginning March 1, and on the first Saturday of the month thereafter. Registration is due Feb. 15. Sessions include discover life down under;

mosquito hawks, a trip to Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge, and migration sensation. For more information and a registration form, go to www.stewardsumrr.org or call the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge office in Savanna at 815-2732732, ext. 116.


#s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

3ATURDAY *ANUARY 

Stashing â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;squirrel fundâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; often effective Dear Dave, My husband works construction, so we barely scrape by during the winter months. Should we build an emergency fund for the slow times? â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Cathy Dear Cathy, I think thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a great idea. Although, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d probably call it something other than an emergency fund. How about a squirrel fund? Squirrels need to have nuts saved up for winter, and in your case youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be setting money aside during

DAVERAMSEY &INANCIAL STRAIGHTTALK &ORMORE ADVICE PLUSSPECIAL READERS OFFERS VISIT DAVESAYSORG ORCALL  0%!#%

the summer to get you through the slow winter months. You may think Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m playing games with the name, but really Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not. This sort of saving isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t

for emergencies. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a budget issue, because youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re planning and setting aside cash leading up to the down time you know is coming. Keep your emergency fund of 3 to 6 months of expenses separate from this, and take a careful look at what he made this winter and how much that left you short each month. Remember, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not talking about some random amount of money here. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an exact amount that you can budget for accordingly.

Darts, pool offered at bar PUB

NOTEBOOK

Items can be dropped off during Grummertâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; regular business hours. The Sterling store at 424 Locust Ave. is open from 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday. Hours at the Rock Falls store, 1112 First Ave., are 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. Lenox can be reached at 815-499-4772 or 815-3888047.

Local J.C. Penney survives cut STERLING â&#x20AC;&#x201C; When struggling departmentstore operator J.C. Penney announced Wednes-

Dear Dave, What do you think about the idea of putting your emergency fund into bonds? â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Ryan

Dear Ryan, I think thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a really bad idea, and hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why. Bond values and prices go down as long-term interest rates rise. Right now, long-term interest rates â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a good example would be mortgage rates â&#x20AC;&#x201C; are ticking up. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve moved up a quarter of a percent recently. So, as this happens, the value of bonds goes down. If these interest rates spiked, you could lose half your emergency fund. Never, ever put your

emergency fund into things where risk and volatility are factors. An emergency fund isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t an investment. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s there to help protect things that are investments and your life. Keep it in something safe and simple, like a money market account where thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no penalty for early withdrawal. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not looking to make money with an emergency fund, Ryan. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s insurance. Just let it sit there, safe and sound, until itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s needed. â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Dave

Astrograph

&$35,&251 'HF -DQ 

 /LYH DQG OHDUQ /HWWLQJ VRPHRQH IURP \RXU SDVW JHW DZD\ ZLWK VRPH WKLQJ \RX VKRXOG KDYH DQWLFLSDWHG ZLOO EH KDUG WR VZDOORZ 3URWHFW \RXU KHDUW DQG \RXU SRVVHVVLRQV $48$5,86 -DQ )HE   3XW \RXU Ă&#x20AC;QDQFHV LQ RUGHU $ FKDQFH WR PDNH H[WUD FDVK RU UHFHLYH D JLIW RU UHZDUG ZLOO KHOS \RX PDNH D SRVLWLYH FKDQJH WR \RXU FXUUHQW GL UHFWLRQ 3,6&(6 )HE 0DUFK   7DNH KROG RI ZKDWHYHU VLWXDWLRQ \RX HQ FRXQWHU 7KHUH LV PRQH\ WR EH PDGH GHDOV WR EH VLJQHG DQG LPSURYH PHQWV WR HQDFW WKDW ZLOO EROVWHU \RXU SHUVRQDO OLIH $5,(6 0DUFK $SULO   :KDW \RX GR ZLOO PDNH D GLIIHUHQFH WR \RXU FRPPXQLW\ EH LW VSLULWXDO PRUDO RU SK\VLFDO $Q LPSXOVLYH

Weigh the pros and cons. Sunday, January 19, 2014 PRYH PD\ FRVW \RX EXW WKH SULFH ZLOO EH ZRUWK \RXU ZKLOH 7$8586 $SULO 0D\   ([ SDQG \RXU IULHQGVKLSV WRGD\ 0L[ WKH ROG ZLWK WKH QHZ WR DFKLHYH IUHHGRP DQG SHDFH RI PLQG $ WULS or reunion will lead to an interesting WXUQ RI HYHQWV *(0,1, 0D\ -XQH   .HHS HYHU\RQH JXHVVLQJ <RXU FKDQJLQJ attitude and innovative mind will FDSWXUH LQWHUHVW DQG UHVXOW LQ WKH FKDQFH WR WU\ \RXU KDQG DW VRPH WKLQJ QHZ DQG H[FLWLQJ 6SHDN XS DQG HQMR\ WKH DWWHQWLRQ &$1&(5 -XQH -XO\   7UDY HO WR GHVWLQDWLRQV WKDW RIIHU VRPH WKLQJ GLIIHUHQW 5RPDQFH LV RQ WKH ULVH DQG LW FRXOG WXUQ D GXOO GD\ LQWR DQ H[FLWLQJ HQFRXQWHU <RX¡OO DOVR KDYH WKH FKDQFH WR HVWDEOLVK D EHWWHU UHODWLRQVKLS /(2 -XO\ $XJ   'RQ¡W WDNH DQ\WKLQJ RU DQ\RQH IRU JUDQWHG /LYH XS WR ZKDW¡V H[SHFWHG RI \RX VR WKDW \RX FDQ PRYH DKHDG ZLWKRXW IHHOLQJ JXLOW\ $JJUHVVLYH DFWLRQ ZLOO EH UH TXLUHG WR H[FHO

9,5*2 $XJ 6HSW   <RX need to socialize, offer favors and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

 $ FKDQFH WR IXOĂ&#x20AC;OO D GUHDP PD\ FRPH DW D FRVW 1RW HYHU\RQH ZLOO ZDQW \RX WR JR LQ WKH GLUHFWLRQ \RX FKRRVH :HLJK WKH SURV DQG FRQV EXW GR ZKDW \RXU KHDUW FUDYHV 7KH RWKHUV ZLOO XQGHUVWDQG HYHQWXDOO\

6HH 7RGD\¡V &ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HG 6HFWLRQ IRU &URVVZRUG $QVZHUV

Kimberly Watley/Special to SVM

A breathing apparatus and tank hang on the wall at The Last Alarm Firehouse Pub in Amboy. It is one of many firehouse memorabilia pieces decorating the walls. pantry, United Way, the hosted was an eye-openLions Club, and usually er. itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a couple hundred â&#x20AC;&#x153;I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know threedollars. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great being quarters of the people,â&#x20AC;? able to do that.â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some said Harrison also attributes they never have been in the growing popularity of here before and lived in Last Alarm to the benefits town all their life. They she hosts. may not come back Inviting people and every week, but they community organizado come back, and I tions to use her bar as remember them when a facility to raise funds they do.â&#x20AC;? allows Harrison and her Last Alarm offers neighbors to give back, darts and pool, a digital she said. jukebox, and recently â&#x20AC;&#x153;The human spirit is had a lottery machine just wonderful,â&#x20AC;? she said. installed. St. Patrick Catholic â&#x20AC;&#x153;I wanted to fix up the Churchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Food Pantry bar so bad, just couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t and United Way each afford it,â&#x20AC;? Harrison said. sponsor an annual guest â&#x20AC;&#x153;I would never have bartending event. The been able to do half of guest bartenders donate the stuff I wanted to do all tips back to the orgawithout the changes the nization. Those events, last year has brought. I Harrison said, have wanted my customers brought in many new to have a nice place to customers. come, and now â&#x20AC;Ś I feel The first benefit she like they do.â&#x20AC;?

Local J.C. Penney staying open CONTINUED FROM C1

Emergency fund in bonds?

Develop contracts, sign agreements DQG WDNH FDUH RI XQĂ&#x20AC;QLVKHG EXVLQHVV WKLV \HDU 7KH PRUH WLPH \RX SXW LQWR HQKDQFLQJ \RXU SHUVRQDO DQG SURIHVVLRQDO VHFXULW\ WKH PRUH \RX ZLOO HQFRXQWHU SHRSOH ZKR ZDQW WR VKDUH LGHDV DQG IXWXUH SURVSHFWV *RRG IRUWXQH LV KHDGLQJ \RXU ZD\

CONTINUED FROM C1

She replaced the concrete behind the business, where flooding often was a problem, and upgraded the air conditioning. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I worked here when it was Dempseyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tap, and you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t believe the difference,â&#x20AC;? bartender Gerri Arntzen said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s done so much, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s incredible.â&#x20AC;? A customer, Mike Mead, agrees. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The work Barb has done with renovating her establishment, along with her friendly staff, has really made Last Alarm an even friendlier and more enjoyable place to relax and get a refreshing beverage,â&#x20AC;? Mead said. The improvements, Harrison said, were made possible in part by the installation of five video gambling machines the bar received at the beginning of last year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I love having them here,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They are being well used. They have brought in new faces. Some people come in just for that.â&#x20AC;? The most someone can win on a spin, Harrison said, is $500. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But there have been people who won $1,100 who continue to play on their winnings,â&#x20AC;? she said. The payout slip that players receive when they win can include amounts as low as a penny. Players often give those smaller winnings to Harrison or one of her staff of six to add to their tips. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We started collecting them [payout slips], and in a couple months, we have a couple hundred dollars that we can donate,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be surprised how fast they add up. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve given what we collect to CASA, Muscular Dystrophy, the food

Teachers can do the same thing, if theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not paid 12 months a year. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a simple matter of planning ahead for the down time, and setting aside enough during the other 9 months to see you through! â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Dave

day that it will close 33 stores, the store in Northland Mall was not on that list. In fact, J.C. Penney will close only two Illinois stores â&#x20AC;&#x201C; in Bloomingdale and Forsyth. The closures will result in the cut of 2,000 jobs and should save more than $65 million annually, the Associated Press reported. Penney has 116,000 staffers and operates more than 1,100 stores.

Deadline extended for local awards ROCK FALLS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not too late to nominate someone for the Shoulder to the Wheel awards. As in years past, the awards will be presented at the Rock Falls Chamber of Commerceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual meeting and dinner. This

yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s event is planned for Feb. 27, at the Rock Falls Days Inn, 2501 First Ave. Nominees will be accepted in the categories of individual, organization, and youth organization. Nominees can be recognized for accomplishments in the workplace or as a volunteer in the community. While emphasis is given to work done in recent years, the work can be cumulative, or focused on one specific project. The winners will be chosen by the Awards Committee, which is made up of past winners and area volunteers. The deadline has been extended through Monday, in part because a broken water pipe has kept chamber staff out of the office for several days, president and CEO Bethany Bland said.


Saturday, January 18, 2014

www.saukvalley.com

DONATIONS

THANK GOODNESS Royal Neighbors of America Chapter 1570 of Thomas recently donated to Gianna House in Rock Falls. Three large boxes of assorted-size diapers, small assorted colored shirts, romper sets, and fleece pajamas were collected. Members also toured the facility. Those present for the donation were (from left) Margaret Tyne, Gianna House director; and RNA members, Shirley Lester, event planner; Arlene Johnson, oracle; and Mary Anne Batten, secretary, treasurer. Thrivent Financial of Whiteside County recently matched $500 to the School Supply Closet at 910 Second Ave., Sterling. At the presentation were (from left) Larry Cooper, Thrivent representative; Bonnie Donnell of School Supply Closet; and Dawn Kirchhoff of Thrivent. The School Supply Closet provides free school supplies to students in need.

RNA photo submitted by Lester. Thrivent photo submitted by Donnell

SUPPORT GROUPS, CLUBS, AND SERVICES Today Alcoholics Anonymous,AM closed, Big Book, United Methodist #HURCH %#HICAGO!VE $AVIS Junction. Alcoholics Anonymous,AM open, tradition; 12:30 p.m., closed; PM CLOSED "AZAAR!MERICANA 74HIRD3T 3TERLING Alcoholic Anonymous,AM open, womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s; noon, open; 6 PM OPEN  3(ENNEPIN !VE $IXON Alcoholics Anonymous, AM FORMER3T!NNE'RADE3CHOOL .*ONES!VE !MBOY   2315. Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Alcoholics Anonymous, 10:30 a.m., 7 p.m., closed, 808 Freeport Road, Sterling. Mercy Nursing Services free blood pressure clinic, 11 a.m.NOON 7ALMART &IRST!VE Rock Falls. Reality Check Narcotics Anonymous NOON PM &IRST#HRISTIAN #HURCH &IFTH!VE 2OCK&ALLS   $OWNSTAIRS WEST door. Sauk Valley Group Alcoholics Anonymous, noon, open, Old School; 8 p.m., open, Fun Night n"RING!&RIEND BACKDOOR  First Ave., Rock Falls. Mercy Nursing Services free blood pressure clinic, 1-2:30 p.m., 3AVE ! ,OT &IRST!VE 2OCK Falls. Bi-Ways Brain Injury Support Group, 2 p.m., Winning Wheels, %4HIRD3T 0ROPHETSTOWN 2EGISTER   EXT Alcoholics Anonymous, 7 p.m., OPEN &IRST0RESBYTERIAN#HURCH #ALVIN2OAD 2OCHELLE Alcoholics Anonymous, 8 p.m., CLOSED 6ILLAGEOF0ROGRESS 3 13th St., Oregon. Sunday Alcoholics Anonymous, 7 a.m., closed; 7 p.m., open, 2OCHELLE#OMMUNITY(OSPITAL .3ECOND3T Alcoholics Anonymous, 8

a.m., closed; 11 a.m., open; 1 p.m., closed, Spanish; 7 p.m., CLOSED "AZAAR!MERICANA  W. Third St., Sterling. Alcoholics Anonymous,  a.m., closed; noon, open; 6 PM CLOSED STEP  3 (ENNEPIN!VE $IXON Alcoholics Anonymous, 10 AM OPEN (ORIZON6IEW&ARM BARN .2IVER2OAD Oregon. Sauk Valley Group Alcoholics Anonymous, 10 a.m., open, "IG"OOK BACKDOOR &IRST Ave., Rock Falls. Parents, Families & Friends of Lesbians and Gays Sauk Valley, 2:30 p.m., St. Luke %PISCOPAL#HURCH 74HIRD 3T $IXON Dixon Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 540, 5:30 p.m., 1560 Franklin Grove Road, 815288-5165. Compassionate Friends, Death of a Child Support Group,PM #HURCHOF'OD 860 W. Oregon Trail Road, Oregon, 815-441-3710. Alcoholics Anonymous, 6 PM CLOSED #HURCHOF3T !NNE .#HERRY3T -ORrison. Reality Check Narcotics Anonymous, 6 p.m., First #HRISTIAN#HURCH &IFTH!VE 2OCK&ALLS    $OWNSTAIRS WESTDOOR Alcoholics Anonymous, 7 PM CLOSED 3PANISH 3T0ATRICK#ATHOLIC#HURCH +ELLY $RIVE 2OCHELLE Alcoholics Anonymous, 7 p.m., closed, clearance REQUIRED "!!BBLEONFOR,IFE 0RISON'ROUP    Alcoholics Anonymous, 7 p.m., closed, 808 Freeport Road, Sterling. Alcoholics Anonymous, 7:30 p.m., closed, 304 Seventh Ave. W., Lyndon. Alcoholics Anonymous, 8 p.m., closed (4), Mount Morris

to junior level majors. Recipients then are eligible for an additional $4,000 in this renewable program, for their junior and senior year of college. There also are 25 $1,200 scholarships available to students from specific southern Illinois counties as part of the Dorothy and Wilhelmine Ratermann Memorial scholarships. Twelve $2,000 Prairie Farms Dairy scholarships are available to patrons and employees of the company. New this year are two additional $1,000 scholarships for producers affiliated with the St. Louis District Dairy Council. An additional 10 scholarships, ranging from $1,000 to $1,500, also will be presented to students who meet certain criteria. Guidelines include area of study, place of residence, previous 4-H experience, and college or university attended. Applicants must be

Thank you for special New Yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s event JOSIE ALMASSY $IXON

While absolutely nothing compares to New Yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Eve in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, because of the warm, balmy weather, the nonstop 30-minute fireworks, and that you can see all around the Pacific Bay surrounded by the Sierra Mountains, I would say the New Yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Eve we had at Timber Creek comes in a good second. Starting with great appetizers (I especially liked the shrimp), followed by the steak and lobster dinner, some games and prizes, allnight dancing with the DJ, and ending with the champagne toast, it was wonderful. It was a great way to end 2013 and welcome 2014 with renewed hope, energy, and well wishes to everyone. I want to especially thank Ron and Sue Keith and the wonderful staff, especially Deb, for making this a very special and memorable celebration. I heard that there is a Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day party. See you there.

3ENIOR#ENTER %&RONT3T

   Lee County Honor Flight, 6 p.m., Monday 6ETERANSOF&OREIGN7ARS0OST &RANKLIN'ROVE2OAD $IXON Martin Luther King Jr. Day. SVM has not received cancelation notices 815-288-5683. Rock Falls Rotary, 6 p.m., on these events. "EELENDORFS$ELI 7TH3T Women, infants and children Rock Falls. clinic, and family planning serCelebrate Recovery, 6-8 p.m., vices,ALLBYAPPOINTMENTONLY ,EE 201 W. Market St., Morrison, 815#OUNTY(EALTH$EPARTMENT 3UITE    3'ALENA!VE $IXON Celebrate Recovery, Christ815-284-3371. Alcoholics Anonymous, 8 a.m., centered Recovery Group, 6-8 open, Methodist church, 402 First PM 2EVIVE#OMMUNITY#HURCH Ave., Forreston. 8 E. Front St., Mount Morris, 815Abuse Changing team, 815-625-   0338. Overeaters Anonymous, 6 p.m., Mercy Nursing Services free Room 2,#'(-EDICAL#ENTER  blood pressure clinic, 8:30-10:30 E. LeFevre Road, Sterling, 815-441AM 9-#! 9-#!7AY 4452. Sterling. Dixon CHIP Support Group Dixon Rotary Club, noon, lower meeting, 6:30 p.m. potluck, Town LEVEL 3T,UKE%PISCOPAL#HURCH 3QUARE#ENTRE #ONFERENCE2OOM 74HIRD3T $IXON 1, Second Street entrance, 102 S. Alcoholics Anonymous, noon, (ENNEPIN!VE $IXON   CLOSED 3T0AUL,UTHERAN#HURCH 6555. 3&IFTH3T /REGON Rock Falls Boy Scout Troop Alcoholics Anonymous, noon, 306,  PM FELLOWSHIPHALL CLOSED STEPPM OPEN  3 (ARVEST4IME"IBLE#HURCH  (ENNEPIN!VE $IXON $IXON!VE 2OCK&ALLS   Alcoholics Anonymous, noon,  closed, Big Book; 6 p.m., closed, Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3PANISHPM OPEN "AZAAR 5418 Ladies Auxiliary meeting, !MERICANA 74HIRD3T 3TER7 p.m., 217 First Ave., Rock Falls, ling. Reality Check Narcotics Anony- 815-626-3513. Al-Anon,PM #HURCHOF'OD mous, NOON PM &IRST#HRISTIAN #LAY3T -OUNT#ARROLL  #HURCH &IFTH!VE 2OCK&ALLS 284-3444.   $OWNSTAIRS WEST Alcoholics Anonymous, 7 p.m., door. closed, 808 Freeport Road, Sterling. American Red Cross blood Alcoholics Anonymous, 7 p.m., drive, noon-6 p.m., American CLOSED STEPSTUDY .EW(OPE&EL,EGION0OST 7&IRST3T LOWSHIP#HURCH STATE2OUTE $IXON!PPOINTMENTS  64, Kings. 3543 or 800-733-2767. Country Crossroads Quilt Guild, TOPS Chapter IL 634 meeting, 4:30 p.m., 205 S. Walnut St., Frank- PM &ORRESTON'ROVE#HURCH 7246 Freeport Road, Forreston, lin Grove. TOPS, 4 p.m. weigh-in, 4:30 p.m. 815-382-4544. Alcoholics Anonymous, 7:30 meeting; 5:30 p.m. weigh-in, 6 p.m. p.m., closed, St. Luke Episcopal MEETING (UB#ITY3ENIOR#ENTER #HURCH 74HIRD3T $IXON #HERRY!VE 2OCHELLE TOPS, 5 p.m. weigh-in, 5:30 p.m. Alcoholics Anonymous, 8 p.m., CLOSED &IRST0RESBYTERIAN#HURCH MEETING 0OLO#HURCHOFTHE"RETHREN 3#ONGRESS!VE 0OLO 502 Third St., Savanna.

Ag-related field scholarships available BLOOMINGTON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Agriculture students and Illinois Farm Bureau members and their children may apply for college scholarships offered by the Illinois Agricultural Association Foundation. Seventy-four scholarships, ranging from $1,000 to $7,500 per year, will be awarded in total of $177,800 for the 2014-15 school year. A variety of scholarships will be offered, including the IAA Foundation Top scholarships of $7,500 each. Another $7,500 award will be presented to the Illinois Farm Bureau Legacy of Leadership Scholarship winner. New this year is a $1,000 scholarship for a student of Western Illinois University. Students studying crop science and pursuing a masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree related to research are eligible for the Illinois Soybean Association Crop Science Scholarships. Ten $4,000 scholarships will be awarded

367EEKENDs#

high school seniors accepted for enrollment or students already enrolled at an accredited college, university or community college. Scholarships are awarded for exceptional academic ability, leadership and financial need. Previous winners of an IAA Foundation scholarship are eligible to apply again. Go to www.iaafoundation.org for a full listing of available scholarships, eligibility guidelines, and application documents. Completed applications must be postmarked on or before Feb. 1. For more information, contact any county farm bureau, email smoore@ ilfb.org. or call IAA Foundation at 309-557-2230. The Lee County Farm Bureau Foundation will offer one or more scholarships to qualified applicant(s). The foundation applicants must be a LCFB member or dependent of a LCFB member in good

standing and be pursuing a major in an agricultural or agriculturalrelated field of study in his or her college curriculum for fall 2014. Scholarship amounts for area high school seniors ranges from $250-$750, depending upon availability of funds and the recipientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s financial need. LCFBF also will offer one $500 scholarship to a current undergraduate student. The $500 Larry J. Green and the $750 Dean Henkel memorial scholarships each will be given to a high school senior. Complete details on eligibility and criteria for awarding the scholarship are detailed in the scholarship application. To obtain an application, visit the Lee County Farm Bureauâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website, www.leecfb.org, email leecfb@comcast.net or call 815-857-3531. Applications are due to the Lee County Farm Bureau, 37 East Ave., Amboy, IL 61310, by Feb. 1.

Health official commends local volunteers PAM VANDERVINNE Morrison

A young teen girl has spearheaded for the past year or so a program through her church at New Life Lutheran

Church in Sterling. Faith Sandrock, with the help of her church, family, and friends, has delivered diapers, wipes, clothing, blankets, and other needed baby items to our health department case management program for babies in need. This past year, she was able to get her school involved and, thanks to the Montmorency Student Council and Mr. Hanson, they also delivered baby items to the health department to help us continue being able to help families out with needed baby items. We are so grateful to see young people of all ages getting involved in this effort and giving to others. Good job and thanks to all. Christmas also is made brighter by so many. This year at the health department, we had many calls from businesses in the area, staff members, and private individuals wanting to adopt a family for Christmas. Your giving to others is to be praised and commended. Those families appreciate the uplifting attention you give to them. The need gets bigger every year in our area due to our economy and families losing jobs, or medical illnesses hitting them. The kindness and compassion shown by all of you is the true spirit of Christmas reflected in you. Note to readers: Pam VanderVinne is a registered nurse and case management coordinator at the Whiteside County Health Department.

IN BRIEF Blood donations sought in Amboy AMBOY â&#x20AC;&#x201C; An AmeriCAN2ED#ROSSBLOOD DRIVEWILLBEFROMNOON to 6 p.m. Jan. 28 at THE!MBOY#OMMUNITY Building, 280 W. Wasson Road. #ALL$ARLENE(INKLEAT 815-857-3864 to schedule an appointment.

Bergnerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual fundraiser nears

WORKFOR)LLINOIS!MERICAN 7ATERAFTERTHECOMPANYSACQUISITIONOF.ORTHERN)LLINOIS7ATER#ORP IN(EISACERTIFIED #LASS"AND#DRINKING water operator in Illinois, ANDISCERTIFIEDBYTHE STATE$EPARTMENTOF0UBLIC(EALTHFORSPECIALIZED TESTINGOFWATERSAMPLES

Crest helps out Serenity Hospice

#REST&OODSOF!SHTON has donated money to MILWAUKEE â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Bon-Ton 3ERENITY(OSPICE(OME Stores Inc., which includes in Oregon. The donation will allow Bergnerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in Sterling, will Serenity to purchase HOST#OMMUNITY$AYS equipment, including a &EBAND-ARCH BALERNEEDEDTOIMPLEThe event raises monment a recycling project EYSFORLOCAL#  THATWILLBELAUNCHEDIN NONPROFITORGANIZATIONS the coming year. schools, and the American #LOTHING LINENS PURSES (EART!SSOCIATION BELTS ANDSTUFFEDANI.ONPROFITGROUPSMAY mals donated to Angel sign up at www.commuTreasures Resale Shop nitydayevent.com to sell THATAREUNABLETOBE SAVINGSBOOKLETSFOR SOLDWILLBESORTED BALED ANDKEEPPERCENTOF ORBAGGED ANDSOLDTO the money raised. COMPANIESTHATDISTRIBUTE 4HEBOOKLETINCLUDES these items to underdeA OFFCOUPON A veloped countries. PERCENT OFFSHOP4HISBUSINESSMODELIS ping pass, and more in place at many larger THANINCOUPONSAV- resale shops, such as the INGS#OUPONSMAYBE 2OCKFORD2ESCUE-ISUSEDATWWWBONTONCOM sion, Goodwill, and The or any Bon-Ton store. Salvation Army. Go to www.communiSerenity has partnered TYDAYEVENTCOMFORMORE WITHTHE6ILLAGEOF0ROGINFORMATIONONTHEPROress in the new recycling gram and how to donate OPERATION4HEBALERWILL TOTHE!MERICAN(EART BEHOUSEDATONEOFTHE Association. 6/0SITES ANDCONSUMERSWILLBEEMPLOYEDTO Company names create, weigh, and stack THEBALESFORPICKUP

superintendent

STERLING â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Steve "ARNETHASBEENNAMED operations superintenDENTOF)LLINOIS!MERICAN 7ATERS3TERLING$ISTRICT EFFECTIVE$EC Barnet previously SERVEDASCHIEFPLANT OPERATORIN3TERLINGFOR YEARS(EALSOHASSERVED as the union steward in THE3TERLING$ISTRICTSINCE  (EBEGANHISCAREER with Northern Illinois 7ATER#ORPIN holding positions in the FIELDANDASPLANTOPERATOR(ECONTINUEDTO

Volunteer training offered in Iowa #,).4/. )OWAn-ERCY (OSPICEISPLANNINGAVOLunteer training class Jan. 28 and 30. Volunteers are needed in the Savanna area. Those giving their time CANBAKEITEMS READ to patients, play music, provide companionship, and help in other ways. #ONTACT!SHLEY3PAINAT spainam@mercyhealth. COMOR  TO REGISTERFORTHECLASSOR FORMOREINFORMATION


Travel

3ATURDAY *ANUARY 

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs#

“The Earth is beautiful. The Earth is beautiful. The Earth is beautiful.” ~ Navajo blessing song

Photos by MCT News Service

The Sun’s Eye natural feature looks like an eye surrounded by eyelashes in Monument Valley, Utah.

The sandstone spires, buttes and mesas of Monument Valley were created when a massive inland sea retreated millions of years ago; weather and wind have done the rest. The spire on the left is called Totem Pole.

Navajo country I

BY ELLEN CREAGER MCT News Service

t was 7 a.m. when the tour van got stuck in the sand, and the temperature was 32 degrees, and it was still a little bit dark. My sister and I, the only passengers, got out of the battered vehicle and stomped around to keep warm amid the sharp, gray-green sagebrush and snakeweed. Otherworldly spires in the distance were silhouetted by the impending sunrise. All was silent in this magnificent Navajo tribal park in Monument Valley, Utah, along the Utah-Arizona border. Then I heard clanking. It was the driver, Don, trying to jack up the rickety Dodge Ram van’s right rear tire in the deep sand of the off-road trail. Then he trudged out of the ditch. He called someone on his cell. He said, “I knew I should have brought my own truck, but they made me take this one.” He didn’t say much else. He tried driving us out of the ditch, half-heartedly, a few more times. Then he called the tribal park version of AAA, a friend with a truck. Outside the van, my sister and the driver stood patiently and silently in the crisp splendor of Navajo country. Inside the van, I grumpily sneaked a sip from the driver’s Thermos of hot coffee and plotted how we could avoid paying $95 each for the hopelessly delayed 3-hour tour. I have to explain that visiting Monument Valley has been a dream of mine for at least 3 years. A photograph of Monument Valley’s awesome topaz- and sapphire-colored landscape is thumbtacked to the bulletin board next to my desk. The park’s 3-year-old VIEW hotel has garnered rave reviews for its service and vistas from every room. Monument Valley is so iconic that anyone who ever saw a movie will recognize it. It’s the place where Forrest Gump tires of running and says, “Think I’ll go home now.” It’s the place

As seen in the movies Monument Valley has been the background for hundreds of Hollywood films, magazine shoots, video games and TV commercials since the 1930s. Among its films are “Stagecoach,” “Forrest Gump,” “2001: A Space Odyssey,” “Once Upon a Time in the West,” “The Lone Ranger,” “She Wore a Yellow Ribbon,” “Back to the Future Part III,” “Easy Rider” and “National Lampoon’s Vacation.” where sandstone buttes and strange-shaped spires stand like beautiful monuments carved by God. It’s the place that has been the backdrop for famous Westerns, from John Wayne’s first film, “Stagecoach,” in 1939 to Johnny Depp’s bomb “The Lone Ranger” early last year. The part I didn’t know is that this park, which gets 360,000 visitors a year, is quirky. Operated by the Navajo Nation, the park has excellent, well-paved entrance roads. However, the 17-mile loop tour inside the park has dirt roads that are really, really terrible, so terrible that they recommend you do not drive your own vehicle unless it is four-wheel drive, and certainly do not go off-trail lest you get stuck in sand or tumble into a ditch. Tours are operated independently by Navajo vendors, so you deal directly with each vendor and get whatever driver and vehicle they offer – rickety van, nice truck, chilly opensided vehicle or sturdy Jeep. And you really do need to do the tour if you want to see the park’s hidden wonders, which we did, which was why I was on this sunrise tour in the middle of nowhere, tapping my foot. Monument Valley might have eternity, but I did not. Naturally, we got out of there. After an hour, a friend of Don’s came with a big Chevy and towed the van out in 2 minutes, and away we went. It was

Monument Valley grandeur enhances lure

The Navajo Nation The autonomous Navajo Nation spreads across four states – Arizona, Utah, Colorado and New Mexico. Its 27,000 square miles contain about 173,000 residents. Federal data show 42 percent live below the poverty line, with 38 percent having no electricity, running water or cellphones. Opening hotels, shops and its grand natural attractions for tourists brings in jobs and dollars. Besides Monument Valley, the Navajo Nation has Canyon de Chelly and other attractions. See http://discovernavajo.com/ done in what is often called the Navajo way – not much talk. Not much mention of what happened. Just continue on. And Don didn’t scrimp on the tour. We started near Totem Pole, a famous spire that is one feature of Monument Valley’s unique geology. Rocks you see today are about 160 million years old, formed when water, wind, volcanic eruptions and an uplifting of the Earth’s crust created what look like statues and monuments across a vast plain. In the valley, we saw Anasazi rock drawings of animals, echoes of an ancient Southwest people who lived here as long ago as 1300 AD. They vanished, long before the Navajo arrived 400 years ago. The van bumped along and made it safely to two iconic outposts that have famous openings in the rock – Sun’s Eye, surrounded with stripes on the rock that look like eyelashes, and Ear-in-the-Wind, in the shape of a human ear. We passed buttes shaped like elephants and camels and the twin buttes Right Mitten and Left Mitten (eerily shaped like Michigan). The van shuddered on sandy roads past a trio of spires called the Three Sisters, and past mesas as big as whole city blocks. Visitors used to the emptiness of national parks might find it jarring, but people live in Monu-

Navajo guides wait for tourists at Ear-of-the-Wind in early morning at Monument Valley.

What is a butte? Monument Valley has been shaped by water, wind, volcanoes, eruptions and temperatures of the past 570 million years. Its formations are: Mesas: Wide, flat-topped rock; “mesa” means “table” in Spanish. Buttes: (pronounced beeoot): A mesa that has eroded so it is a free-standing, chunky formation surrounded by what looks like a pedestal of stone and flat land beyond. Spires: A butte that has eroded so much that it is only a narrow formation of steeples surrounded by stone. Source: Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park

If you go Getting there: Monument Valley is 300 miles north of Phoenix, a 5.5-hour drive. Along the way are Sedona and Flagstaff and the Navajo towns of Tuba City and Kayenta. There are no gas stations, except in the towns. The park is open year-round and gets little snow, but in winter, the challenge is making it through snowy Flagstaff to get there. Admission: $5 per person to enter the tribal park. It is not part of the National Park system. Its Navajo name is Tsé Bii’ Ndzisgaii, and it is 5,564 feet above sea level. (http:// navajonationparks.org/htm/ monumentvalley.htm) Lodging: The VIEW hotel (from $219/night, www.monumentvalleyview.com, 435-7275555), or try Gouldings Lodge (4 miles from Monument Valley) or the Hampton Inn in Kayeta (30 miles). The park is building a new RV campground, but it’s not open yet. Tours: Book tours when you arrive from vendors in the hotel parking lot. Tours are daytime, sunrise or sunset, last between 1.5 and 3 hours. A 3-hour tour is about $100. Driving the 17-mile loop on your own generally requires a four-wheel-drive vehicle. You also can hike the 3.2-mile Wildcat Trail or take a horseback ride. Shop: The VIEW hotel is attached to a visitors center and the large Trading Post gift shop featuring Navajo pottery, rugs, jewelry, flutes and blankets; find authentic Hopi baskets at the TUUVI Travel Center in Tuba City on the way. Note: No alcohol is sold inside the Navajo Nation, including restaurants.

ment Valley. Some Navajo clans still dwell in tiny enclaves, and their trailers are dots in the landscape – but a definite human presence. From the valley, we also could spot the VIEW hotel in the far distance. Low-slung and tan colored, it was nearly invisible. Which is exactly as the hotel designers planned it. Finally, on a high cliff, we stood at John Ford’s Point, where the movie director liked to stand when orchestrating his magnificent Westerns and where today you can take a picture of a horse in front of the scenery for $2. A local vendor was struck by lightning and killed at that spot in 2006. Then Don talked as he drove. He worried that kids today aren’t ambitious. He said his dad would whip him if he didn’t obey, but now you can’t spank kids, too bad. And then he drove us back to the hotel parking lot. When we got there an hour late, nobody said anything about our mishap, the tour vendor didn’t apologize, and I don’t know why but I made only a token attempt to get our tour rate cut. In the end, I paid for ized that it didn’t matter, the the whole thing, plus a $20 tip money or the delay or the ditch. for Don, who was still brushing What mattered was, the Earth the sand out of his boots. As I went in for breakfast, I real- is beautiful.

On a cold November afternoon, tourists walk the Wildcat Trail past the Left Mitten monument in Monument Valley. The 4-mile trail is one of only two in the park. With the park at 5,500 feet above sea level, hikers need to be fit to walk it.


3ATURDAY *ANUARY 

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs#

Area artisans honored during show at Dixon gallery DIXON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Artists from across northern Illinois were recognized recently during the Regional Survey of Art 10 at The Next Picture Show. Paula Kuehl of McHenry took best of show for her pastel drawing, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Clouds Over the Field.â&#x20AC;? First place went to Ken Reif of Berwyn for an oil painting, â&#x20AC;&#x153;LaSalle County.â&#x20AC;? Graydon Cafarella of Dixon won second place with his watercolor, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Autumn Road,â&#x20AC;? while Richard Born of DeKalb was in third place for a scanography, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Summerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Remnants.â&#x20AC;? Honorable mention went to Ellen Mumford of Dixon for her watercolor, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Crossing the Light,â&#x20AC;? and Rick Cortez of LaGrange Park for a mixed media piece, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hasta Que Nos Separa La Muerte.â&#x20AC;? Andrea Fox of New Lenox judged the competition. She is a professional artist and art instructor, who taught art in Orland Park for 12 years.

The watercolor, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Crossing the Light,â&#x20AC;? by Ellen Mumford of Dixon, was one of the honorable mention winners during the recent Regional Survey of Art 10 at The Next Picture Show in Dixon. Photos submitted by Bonnie Kime.

Graydon Catarella of Dixon brought home second place with his watercolor, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Autumn Road.â&#x20AC;?

IN BRIEF Byron preserve selling photo book

NEEDTOFILEARETURNFOR another state. 2EGISTRATIONFORMSMUST BECOMPLETEDBEFORE BYRON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Advance the service is rendered. orders are being taken )NANEFFORTTOKEEPON UNTIL*ANFORANEW BOOKOFWILDLIFEANDLAND- schedule, those taking scape photographs taken part must arrive at least AHALFHOURBEFORETHEIR in the Byron Forest Prescheduled appointment. serve District. Those without completed Gary Gullett, a Byron FORMSWILLBEASKEDTO NATIVEANDWILDLIFEPHOtographer, took the pho- reschedule. Forms can be picked up in advance tos. The book can be at the center. ORDEREDFORBEFORE 0HOTOIDENTIFICATIONIS *ANBYCALLINGTHE REQUIREDFOREACHPERSON FORESTPRESERVEAT FILINGANDTHEIRDEPEN 0RE ORDERED dants. Also needed are books can be picked up ACOPYOFLASTYEARS at the preserve, 7993 N. returns, Social SecuRiver Road, or they can RITYCARDSFORTHEENTIRE be mailed. household, income state!FTER*AN BOOKS ments, and any other WILLCOST ANDCANBE OFFICIALDOCUMENTATION bought at the preserve or FORHOUSEHOLDMEMBERS at Severson Dells Nature APPLYINGTO4O #ENTER -ONTAGUE make an appointment, 2OAD 2OCKFORD CALL  OR 3OMEOFTHEIMAGESIN    the book are on display at the preserveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jarrett Teams sought for 0RAIRIE#ENTERAND0RAIRIE6IEW'OLF#LUB center fundraiser OREGON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Oak Lane, 3NYDER2OAD WILL PRESENTh7HATS#OOKIN  vAFUNDRAISERFOR OREGON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; AARP will 2OCK2IVER#ENTERAT provide trained tax aides PM-ARCH to prepare tax returns at !MAXIMUMOFTEAMS 2OCK2IVER#ENTER  OFFOURWILLPREPAREA 3TH3T FORTHOSEWITH FOODITEMINONEOFFOUR low to modest incomes. categories: appetizer, Sessions start Feb. entrĂŠe, side dish, or des4HESERVICEISFREE sert. Organizers, Joyce and open to all ages by Bruns and Diane Palmer, appointment only. AARP encourage participation membership is not necFROMALL/GLE#OUNTY essary. communities, as the cen4HESERVICEISNOTFOR ter provides services to those who have a busithe entire county. NESS FARM PARTNERSHIP Team sign-up is underor rental property, or who way. There is no charge

Sign-up opens for tax help in Oregon

to take part. !DMISSIONFORTHEPUBLICISPERPERSON includes the opportunity TOTASTE TESTTHEFOOD Visit whatscookin. homestead.com and click ONTHEhCONTACTUSvBUTton to send a message to the organizers, or call   FORMORE INFORMATION

Tampico plans birthday party 4!-0)#/n2ONALD Reaganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s birthday will BECELEBRATED&EBAT the Tampico Area HisTORICAL3OCIETY -AIN St., and Ronald Reagan "IRTHPLACE-USEUM  -AIN3T Open houses will be FROMAMTOPM at both sites, with tours throughout the day. 2EFRESHMENTS INCLUDing birthday cake, will be served at the historical society museum. 2EAGANFOREVERSTAMPS still are available at the MUSEUM#ONTACT*OAN Johnson at reaganbirthplace@thewisp.net or   FORMORE INFORMATION

ed at the door. The meal will include homemade chili, relish, dessert, and a beverage. A ham sandwich or hot dog can be SUBSTITUTEDFORTHECHILI meal, or all three can be PURCHASEDFORANEXTRA donation. An elevator is located at THESOUTHENTRANCE#ALL 4ERRY'ASKILLAT  FORMOREINFORMATION

Dixon physician to speak at meeting OREGON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Dr. Brandon Gumbiner, a podiatrist in private practice with KSB Hospital in Dixon, will speak to the Living Well with Diabetes Support 'ROUP&EB The meeting will be at PMAT2OCK2IVER #ENTER 3TH3T Gumbiner will give a preSENTATIONONDIABETESFOOT care. 4HESUPPORTGROUPISFOR those with diabetes, their FAMILYMEMBERS ANDCAREGIVERS-EETINGSARETHE FIRST7EDNESDAYOFEVERY month. #ALLTHECENTERAT  OR  FORMOREINFORMATION

Methodists to serve chili meal

Woodcarving tips offered in Oregon

4!-0)#/n-EMBERSOF the The Tampico United -ETHODIST-ENWILLHAVE an all-you-can-eat annual CHILISUPPERFROM TOPM*ANINTHE basement at First United -ETHODIST#HURCH . Lincoln St. Donations will be accept-

OREGON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Dave Ostrem OF'REEN,AKE 7IS WILL teach a woodcarving class FORALLSKILLLEVELSFROM AMTOPM&EBAT 2OCK2IVER#ENTER 3 TH3T Students can bring their own project and their own wood or start a new proj-

ect. Ostrem also will have basswood blanks available FORPURCHASE4OOLSWILLBE provided. He will help students solve carving problems and will teach the tips and TRICKSOFWOODCARVING 4HETOPICSOFTHECLASS include tool sharpening and selection, choosing woods, carving techNIQUES PAINTINGORFINISHING wood, and how to achieve APARTICULAREFFECTWITH wood. 4HECLASSISLIMITEDTOFIVE STUDENTS4HECOSTIS FORCENTERMEMBERSAND FORNONMEMBERS0AYment and registration are due by Feb. 7. 4OREGISTER CALL  OR  

Sign-up underway for Circa 21 trip

OREGON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Rock River #ENTERSTAFFAREORGANIZING A&EBTRIPTO#IRCA Dinner Playhouse in Rock Island to see â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Buddy (OLLY3TORYv Trustees to offer The show is a musical annual scholarships CELEBRATIONANDLIFESTORYOF (OLLY WITHMORETHAN STERLING â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Applications are being accepted by the SONGS SUCHASh/H"OY v h0EGGY3UE vh4HATLL"E TRUSTEESOFTHE3TERLING THE$AY vANDh2AVE/Nv 2OCK&ALLS#OMMUNITY 0ICKUPWILLBEAT Trust. AMATTHECENTER 3 Future and past graduTH3T WITHPARTICIPANTS ATESFROM3TERLINGAND RETURNINGAPPROXIMATELY 2OCK&ALLSMAYAPPLYFOR AWIDERANGEOFCOLLEGE p.m. scholarships to be award4HECOSTOFTHETRIPIS ed in mid-April. ApplicaFORCENTERMEMBERS tions must be submitted by ANDFORNONMEMBERS !PRIL It includes transporta#ANDIDATESMUSTBEELItion, tickets, lunch, taxes, GIBLETOGRADUATEIN and gratuities. Dessert is FROM3TERLING 2OCK&ALLS optional, and will be availOR.EWMAN#ENTRAL#ATHOABLEATTHESHOWFORAN lic high school. They must additional cost. live within the SterlingSeating is limited. ResRock Falls public school ervations and prepayment boundaries. Full-time are required. Stop at the COLLEGEFRESHMEN SOPHOcenter to sign up, or call mores, or juniors, who   OR GRADUATEDFROM3TERLING  FORINFORMATION Rock Falls, or Newman, MAYAPPLYORREAPPLYFOR about mail-in reservations.

EAGLE WATCH

A bald eagle flies Jan. 9 at Lawrence Park between Sterling and Rock Falls. Photos by Greg Moran of Sterling.

ANNUALSCHOLARSHIPSFROM TO 3CHOLARships are available based ONVARYINGCRITERIAFOR selection. !PPLICATIONFORMSCAN be picked up at the high SCHOOLGUIDANCEOFFICESOR AT-IDLAND3TATES"ANK &IRST!VE &ORMOREINFORMATION contact any trustee, the GUIDANCEOFFICE ORCALL   

An eagle stands out against the winter sky.


Community 367EEKENDs#

www.saukvalley.com

EAGLES EYED

A bald eagle soars above the Mississippi River on Jan. 4 at Lock and Dam 13 in Fulton.

New photos every day www.saukvalley.com

3ATURDAY *ANUARY 

Michael Krabbenhoeft/mkrabbenhoeft@saukvalley.com

Photos by Michael Krabbenhoeft/mkrabbenhoeft@saukvalley.com

LEFT: Jordan Nailor (left), 7, of Morrison, and Lily Nailor, 8, of DeKalb, watch the eagles soar as they take part in Clintonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bald Eagle Watch. TOP: Bald eagles fill the air above Lock and Dam 13. ABOVE: A young eagle grabs fish for dinner.

Alex T. Paschal/apaschal@saukvalley.com

The Sauk Valley has become a hotbed of eagle activity. Bald eagles can be seen regularly along the Rock River from Dixon to Sterling. Page Park in Dixon is a great place to spot the raptors, and Lawrence Park in Sterling has dozens of the majestic birds nested in trees and fishing below the dam. ABOVE: An eagle snags itself a rabbit in a cornfield near Nelson.

Michael Krabbenhoeft/mkrabbenhoeft@saukvalley.com

LEFT: The birds are opportunistic eaters, meaning pretty much anything that crosses their path that looks tasty, but they prefer to eat fish. This one feasts on its catch Jan. 9 in a tree near the upper dam in Rock Falls. ABOVE: An eagle prepares to land on a patch of ice .


place ads online www.saukvalley.com

CLASSIFIED SAUK VALLEY

Section D

Saturday, January 18, 2014

Dixon

110

IS YOUR PET MISSING? Read our found section in todays paper. Just in case it is not there, call one of your area animal shelters listed below: Lee County Animal Control (815)284-3833 Granny Rose Animal Shelter (815)288-7387 Whiteside County Animal Control (815)625-3507 Happy Tails Humane Society (815)626-2994 A public service of Sauk Valley Media Lost- Dachshund/ Chihuahua mix, male. Answers to Honey Bun or puppy. Lost from 7th Ave., Sterling. $250 Reward. 815-5908002 or 815-7085845. Missing Chocolate Lab, 2yrs old. Male. Wearing blue collar. Last seen on Interstate 88 by Bottom Rd. & Prophetstown Rd. overpass. Call 815716-0445.

VOLUNTEERS

126

As we approach our 30th anniversary year the Ronald Reagan Boyhood Home hopes to move forward with a very special commemorative project. We are in need of skilled volunteers who would like to help plan and build a selection of bird houses. If you are handy with a blueprint and tools, we would love to hear from you. Please call Brandi or Heather at the Reagan Home for details. 815-2885176 CASA 15th Judicial Circuit (Lee/ Carroll/Ogle Counties) is seeking volunteers to advocate for children in the court system involved in abuse and neglect cases. Your involvement can impact a child’s future. Contact Vanessa White, Director of Advocate Services (815) 288-1901 www.casalee carroll.com LOVELAND MUSEUM... Are you interested in Dixon and local history, Civil War, Blackhawk War? Are you a people person? We are looking for people like you to help host our Museum one or more days a month. The Museum is open Thurs. & Fri. 9-2, Sat. 103. Interested? Please stop at the main office at the Loveland Community House between 8-4 Mon. thru Fri. to pick up an application and learn more. 513 W. Second St. 815-284 2741 lovelandcommunity house.org.

ADOPTION NOTICES

128

♥ ADOPTION: ♥ Loving TV Sports Editor & Pharmacist Music, Nurturing Family Values awaits 1st baby. Expenses paid ♥ Lyn & Rob ♥ ♥1-800-354-2608♥

INVESTMENT PROPERTY

220

4 Unit Brick townhouse complex w/ attached garages. Nice area near hospital in Sterling. $237,000 815-6524517

CEMETERY LOTS

226

2 Cemetery Lots, $750 each, Call Fairmount Cemetery in Polo, 815946-2810

MOBILE HOMES 230 Loving Couple Wanting to Adopt We will provide a loving, happy home where your baby will thrive and grow, with a mom and dad who are very eager to become parents. We will provide unconditional love, security and support for your baby. All approved expenses paid. To learn more about us, Call 708-9576849 or email us at: seanandjennifer adopt@gmail.com LCFS#012998

REAL ESTATE 202 SERVICES PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference , limitation or discrimination based on race, color,religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-279275.

FOR SALE BY OWNER

MOBILE HOMES

230

Advertise your mobile homes for sale here!!

DIXON

CHATEAU ESTATES

ROCK FALLS 2BR, mobile home, owner financing, $13,500. Call 309716-5622 richbev77@yahoo.com

SUBLETTE Sterling Home for Sale!! Restoration Project with hardwood floors, large rooms, and river view. www.10516thAve.com. $89,900 #122110. Call John Rosengren at RE/MAX Sauk Valley, 815-284-4663 or visit www.SaukValleyHomes.net

DIXON

2BR $450 Jan. rent free, very clean, all applcs. No Pets. Ref. & dep. Req. 815849-5334.

Quiet 2 BR apt., 2nd floor, new flooring & paint, near downtown, $485 $500/mo. 815-2620756

ASHTON

HARMON

★★ 1&2 BR., Ashton/ F.G. 815-7512712/562-5075.★

1st Month Free! 2BR, appl. incl. Pet friendly. $475/mo. 815-562-7368

DIXON

MT. MORRIS

1BR appl. water, sewer, garbage, incl. Remodeled, offroad parking, no pets. $395 mo + dep. 815-378-2151 1BR upper apt., garage, stove, fridge, & water furn. near KSB, No pets or smoking. Deposit required. 815-732-7662.

Homes for sale and rent call our VMÄJL MVY KL[HPSZ

1BR upper, very spacious. Heat & water paid. $390/ mo. No pets. 815284-1263

3 bed 2 bath $24,900 2 bed 2 bath $17,900

2BR laundry, appl. garage. No pets. 815-499-3753.

815-284-2000 ROCK RIVER ESTATES Homes for sale and rent call our VMÄJL MVY KL[HPSZ

815-284-2000 2 bed 1 bath on the river $27,900 2 bed 1 bath $9,900

FARMS / ACREAGE

235

FARMS FOR SALE 57 acres approximately 53 tillable with river frontage

11.5 acres, river frontage, road to river with cement dock

Matt Hermes, Broker

815-288-4648

WANTED TO BUY 255 Old Set of Lincoln Logs, that don't fall apart when assembled. 815-6256284.

APARTMENTSFURNISHED 305 ROCK FALLS EFFICIENCIES! -InclusiveClean & Quiet

Monthly Discount

815-626-8790*

209

AMBOY

APARTMENTS UNFURNISHED 306 Attractive 1 & 2 BR. apts. with some utilities. Sterling & Rock Falls. No pets, no parties. Refs. req. 815-336-2305. HAVING TROUBLE wording your ad? Call our Classified Department today. We'll be glad to help you. 626-SOLD or 284-SOLD

2BR Upper, northside, clean, quiet. Appl., A/C, new flooring, on-site laundry, lg. storage room, garage. No pets. Security dep. $500/mo. 847-8361906 3 BR. 2 floor apt. 528 Morgan. $550/mo. Pets ok! 708-203-6677 nd

Condo Style, 2BR apt. w/private entrance and deck. Appliances included plus W/D. Water, sewer, garbage provided. Tenant pays elec. Off road parking. No pets. Lease & dep. req. $650/mo. Call 815378-2151 DIXON MANOR APTS- 2BR CLEAN QUIET, WALK TO DOWNTOWN, ONSITE LAUNDRY, APPLIANCES INCLUDED, HEAT, WATER INCLUDED. CALL ERICK 815-739-5806 Efficiency Upper, appl. W & D, water, sewer, garbage, incl. Off-road parking, no pets. $310 mo + dep. 815378-2151 LG 2BR lower level $495/mo. Includes garage, cable, trash p/u. Quiet neighbors. No pets 815-973-6363 Modern clean, 2BR. Stove, refrig., D/W. No smoking or pets. $475. 815652-3365. Nice 2BR garage & fireplace, garbage & water inc. $575 + dep. 815-973-5886

1BR, Mt. Morris. $310/mo. + dep., 815-508-2345

POLO 2 BR., appl., water, sewer & garbage incl. Coin laundry on site. $425 mo. + $400 dep. 815378-7820.

PROPHETSTOWN 2 Bed Apt. for Rent: Unit #3 at 109 E. Second Street, Prophetstown. $525/month Includes 1 garage space, storage in the lower level, and coin laundry located in the lower level as well. Call Ken Kophamer (815) 631-6115

ROCK FALLS 1BR, $375/mo. Hampton Apts. 815-625-7043 2 BR duplex, 2 ba. 1 car gar. W/D hookup, applncs, $650/mo. + dep. w/ ref., 509 W. 11th St., RF. NO PETS. 815-716-0353 2BR stove, refrig. C/A, garage W/D $500 mo. + dep. & lease. Call 563613-1756 or 815438-2690 2BR, stove, refrig. furn. heat, water & sewer included, $525/mo. + dep. 815-499-9957. Clean, 1 BR. Applc. Inc. $400 Call 815-718-5278 Completely remodeled 2 BR, located 1 ½ mi. outside RF, on 3 acre lot w/ use of a 35 acre lake. $700/ mo. plus utilities. No pets. Call 815-626-2145 Edon Apts. 2BR, $480 mo., $400 dep. Refs. req. No dogs. 815-5379190, 815-4413999. Lg. 1BR. + appl. No pets. $425 + dep. 815-625-4701

STERLING 1 or 2BR apts. $420. Call 815562-7368 Rochelle Realty.

STERLING

RIVER RIDGE APARTMENTS

2 Bedroom Great Location Garages Available

$

495 1st Month’s Rent

$

PER MONTH

1.00

*

*with 1 year lease

Next to

ALDI in Sterling

1-815-414-2288

STERLING

DIXON

MORRISON

2BR. Stove & refrig. provided. Pay own utilities. Share garage. Lease & dep. req. 815-6263609. Goes Fast! NE 1BR excel. Cond. Applcs. W/ W/D. Quiet & No pets. $500 815-6252225.

Small 2BR garage, no pets. $535 + Dep. Call 815-4402145.

3 BR, 2 BA country home on 16 acres, hunting rights included. $900 per month. Call Kophamer & Blean Realty (815) 7722728.

★ NEW TODAY ★ House mate Wanted $300/mo. Private Room. Everything included except food. Call 815-626-1122. Nice LG 2br, stove & refrig. $575 + dep. 815-631-6678

Call Me 2-Rent (815)632-7368 (Located Behind Nor Northland thland Mall)

Sterling Rentals Newer 2 Bedroom $599.00 & Up Applcs., Fireplaces 2002 3rd Ave. 1836 First Ave. 606 W. Lefevre 2 BR $535.00 1 BR $465.00 1 Studio $390.00 Partial Heat, Water, Sewer, Refuse Removal, Laundry Facilities, Satellite

(815)626-1431 1BR upper, 1008 4th Ave., $375/mo. + dep. utilities incl., 815-499-0288 2 BR, incl. water & heat, $495/mo. + dep. 815-973-6768 2 BR., clean, QUIET, coin laundry. 641-777-7261 2BR Duplex, 512 W 5th St. $375/mo. 815-499-5575. 2BR with attached garage. Beautiful sun porch. 4407 W. Lincolnway, apt A. Big back yard. Call 815-590-2191. 2BR, stove & refrig. furnished, $450 lease and dep. req. H & H rental Properties LLC. 815625-7995 Apts. No pets. Call 815-716-0367.

HOMES FOR RENT

FOR RENT HOUSES & APTS. svla.org

CHADWICK 3BR, 1.5 bath. 2 car garage. No pets. $525/mo. 815-499-1793

DIXON 1BR, Stove & refrig. incl. No pets. Tenants pay utilities + dep. $400/ mo. Available now! 815-440-2613 2BR/BA. No smoking or pets. $675/ mo. 815-440-0927 3BR, 1ba. NE side. $695/mo. 815-9736768. Beautiful Riverfront Home in historic Dixon Illinois. 2400 sq. ft. open concept ranch, wet bar, outside workshop, boat landing, Pets welcome. $1550/mo. + dep. (815) 440-7793 Clean 2br, 2ba. NE loc. Furnished, basement. No pets, non smoking, lease $625 + dep. 815-761-4507 For Rent Condominium On the River Boat Dock Incl. 2 BR 2BA Upper 1400 sq. ft. 1 Car garage Snow removal Lawn care $925/mo. + util. Lease-opt to buy 815-378-2151

Motor Route Drivers

2BR w/appls, deck $470mo. + lease & dep. 815-716-0123

TR IV I A AN SW ER

Before you make a move call…

SHIPPERTS Moving & Storage

404 N. Lincoln Ave., Dixon, IL 288-3133 www.alliedvan.com ILL CC 10540

US DOT 76235

310

Sauk Valley Media is looking for

Motor Routes Available Inquire in person at:

Sauk Valley Media 3200 E. Lincolnway Sterling, IL 61081

C CCLASSIFIEDS LASSIFIEDS SAUK VALLEY SAUK VALLEY SAUK VALLEY

LASSIFIEDS dailyGAZETTE

dailyGAZETTE dailyGAZETTE

TELEGRAPH

TELEGRAPH TELEGRAPH

815-284-2224 815-625-3600

PUBLIC NOTICES

Studio, 1 & 2 Bedroom Washer & Dryer Units Fitness Center Balconies / Patios Open House Daily

Park Setting, newer 2BR, L/R, garage, NS, 1 floor, near CGH, energy efficient, 1832 2nd Ave., $585/mo. 815-499-0199. Sinnissippi Townhomes First Mo. Free! Spacious 2 BR. 2 story townhomes. Central air, good location. Laundry hookup. (815)6261130.

1 & 2BR Apts. Or Duplex. 815-440-8116

2) Agricultural and Mechanical

Terry of Rock Falls sold his 2002 Pontiac Grand Am for $4200 using

NORTHLAND PARK APARTMENTS SAUK VALLEY

AMBOY

1) the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements

Classifieds Work!

Telegraph 113 S. Peoria Dixon, IL 61021

or call: 625-3600 or 284-2222, ext. 301

ASSUMED NAME PUBLICATION NOTICE Public Notice is hereby given that on January 13, A.D. 2014, a certificate was filed in the office of the County Clerk of Whiteside County, Illinois, setting forth the names and post-office addresses of all of the persons owning, conducting and transacting the business known as ELITE Heating Cooling and Electrical Services, located at 1603 Wike Drive, Rock Falls, IL 61071. Dated this 13th day of January, A.D. 2014. Dana Nelson County Clerk January 18, 25, February 1, 2014

Sauk Valley Classi eds

LOST

Need to place an ad?

Call Us! 625-3600 284-2222

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, LEE COUNTY, ILLINOIS IN THE ESTATE OF RAY H. NEISEWANDER, JR. DECEASED CASE NUMBER 2013 P 71 Claims Notice is given of the death of Ray H. Neisewander, Jr. Letters of Office were issued on December 9, 2013, to Ray H. Neisewander, III, 894 Cedar Court, Dixon, IL 61021 and to Kim Neisewander, 468 Timberland Drive, Dixon, IL, 61021, as Independent Co-Executors, whose attorney is James H. Cundiff, c/o McDermott Will & Emery LLP, 227 West Monroe Street, Suite 4700, Chicago, IL 60606-5096. Claims against the estate may be filed in the office of the Clerk of Court, Lee County Courthouse, 309 South Galena, Dixon, IL 61021, or with one of the representatives, or both, on or before July 11, 2014, and any claim not filed on or before that date is barred. Copies of a claim filed with the clerk must be mailed or delivered to the representative and to the attorney within 10 days after it has been filed. Prepared on January 3, 2014 by James H. Cundiff Attorney for the Estate, c/o McDermott Will & Emery LLP, 227 W. Monroe St., Suite 4700, Chicago IL 60606-5096 Telephone 312-272-2000; Fax: 312-2775203 Jan. 11, 18, 25, 2014 CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT LEE COUNTY, ILLINOIS ESTATE OF ROBERT N. MINOR, Deceased. No. 2013 P 72 CLAIM NOTICE Notice is given to creditors of the death of Robert N. Minor. Letters of Office were issued on December 17, 2013 to Melissa J. Thompson, as independent executor, whose attorney of record is John E. Miller, of MILLER, LANCASTER & WALKER, P.C., 15 East Third Street, P.O. Box 535, Sterling, Illinois, 61081. Claims against the estate may be filed in the Circuit Clerk's office, Lee County Courthouse, Dixon, Illinois 61021, or with the representative, or both, on or before the 18th day of July, 2014 or if mailing or delivery of a notice from the representative is required by Sec. 18-3 of the Probate Act of 1975, the date stated in that notice. Any claim not filed on or before that date is barred. Copies of a claim filed with the clerk must be mailed or delivered by the claimant to the representative and to the attorney within ten (10) days after it has been filed. Melissa J. Thompson Independent Representative for the Estate MILLER, LANCASTER & WALKER, P.C. Attorneys for the Estate 15 E. Third Street, P.O. Box 535 Sterling, IL 61081 (815) 625-0600 Jan. 18, 25, Feb. 1, 2014


SAUK VALLEY MEDIA s Saturday, January 18, 2014 s PAGE D2


SAUK VALLEY MEDIA s Saturday, January 18, 2014 s PAGE D3


SAUK VALLEY MEDIA s Saturday, January 18, 2014 s PAGE D4

A1

SERVICE DIRECTORY SAUK VALLEY

Air Cond./Heating

Bicycles

Electricians

Haul/Clean Service JOHN'S CLEANUP & REMOVAL Anything goes!! Estate Cleanups PHONE 815-622-0240

205 E. 1st St. Dixon, IL 61021 (815)622-8180

C.P. ELECTRIC For Your Electrical Needs. New Homes, 100 amp. Service Updates, Rewires 25 Yrs. Experience Â&#x2122;Licensed Â&#x2122;Bonded Â&#x2122;Insured Musky & Bass Fishing Consultant Leave Message 815-626-6219

Eikenberry Sheet Metal 412 E. 3rd, Sterling Service work heating & cooling; gas, electric. Free estimates. Accept Visa & MC on all new installations. CALL 815-625-0955

FARLEY'S APPLIANCE Heating & Cooling Sale & Service Free Estimates New & Replacement Units We service all brands! Call Today (815)284-2052

www.greenrivercyclery.com 7XHV  )UL  Â&#x2021; 6DW QRRQ

Cleaning Service

Automotive â&#x153;ąCarpet/ Upholstery â&#x153;ąMaid/Janitorial Gift Certificates Available for cleaning 815-632-3822 Car Audio/Video/Starters LOW PRICE GUARANTEE Complete Automotive Detailing & Accessories

Window Tinting *LIW &HUWLĂ&#x20AC;FDWHV Hot Rods & Choppers Consignment / Sales 1807 Locust St. Sterling IL

www.advanced cleaners.biz

Cleaning Service Houses/Buildings Extras: laundry, cooking, errands, sm. handiwork, etc Call Angie 779-861-0523

Dumpster Rental

Days Furniture Repair Expert repairs on recliners, sofas, chairs, tables, beds. Stripping/ refinishing/ re-gluing. 815-626-5136

Genl. Contracting Gilbertson Construction Residential & Commercial. Remodeling, house additions, windows, siding & doors. Also mobile home repairs. Licensed, Bonded, Insured. No Job Too Small. 30 yrs exp. (815)6220087.

Handyman

Basement Waterproofing Prater Paint & Waterproofing We Dry Up Basements & Crawl Spaces, Remediate Mold & Install E-Z Breatheâ&#x201E;˘ Ventilation Systems 815-626-5165

www.praterpaintand waterproofing.com

Dumpster Rental for Clean-ups & Construction Small & Large containers avail. Tidy Bug Inc. Dixon, IL tidybuginc.com 815-456-3001

Call Classified ToSAUK sell those extra items! VALLEY SAUK VALLEY LASSIFIEDS dailyGAZETTE TELEGRAPH

HANDYMAN/ GENERAL Contracting, siding, drywall, concrete work, decks, flooring (tile, linoleum, carpet, wood), bathroom and kitchen, complete remodels, additions all types of home repairs. Free Estimates and Insured-Bonded 815-564-7428

CLASSIFIEDS C dailyGAZETTE

815-625-3600

TELEGRAPH

815-284-2222

â&#x153;śSince 1981â&#x153;ś â&#x2014;&#x2020;Home Improvement â&#x2014;&#x2020;New Construction

Winter is the perfect time to build your garage, addition or remodel bath or kitchen!!

Randy L. Moore

815-626-1333

IL State Roofing Licensed 104-002247(1986) Bonded-Insured

Handy Woman Marsha Baker Residential Painting & 15 yearsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; experience New Construction s 0AINTING Inside/Out s &AUX 0AINTING s 0OWER7ASHING s $ECKS s 3MALL (OME )MPROVEMENTS

www.mullerslane farm. com

BALAYTI PAINTING

Interior & Exterior Light Carpentry Pressure Washing 35 Years Experience Insured - References Cell #815-440-2202

Roofing

Illinois License #104.016127 Bonded/Insured &oofing&Siding &indo$!& oors & tion!& Garages& %$& cks and more Free Estimates 815-213-0556

Plumbing

Lewis Plumbing 815-288-0028 Serving All of the Sauk Valley Area Lic.#058-173956

Power Washing

Mobil Pressure Wash Service Commercial, esidential emis Yo me we  ant! Call Ben 815-590-2694

Roofing

Illinois License #104.016127 Bonded/Insured &oofing&Siding &indo$!& oors & tion!& Garages& %$& cks and more Free Estimates 815-213-0556

Roofing/Siding *ALL SEASONS* CONSTRUCTIONBetter Service, Better Quality! *Custom Siding *Windows * All Doors- Aluminum, Steel, Wood* Soffit *Fascia Roofing* Family Owned and Operated. Over 30 Years Experience Licensed, Bonded, and Insured 815-590-2231

SELL

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Area's #1 Roofing Contractor IL Lic# 104-015191 Licensed, Bonded & Insured $oofing$Siding $# $ ecks $ tions $es & More Residential & Commercial Call now to schedule your FREE Estimate! Will beat any leading competitor price 815-590-2677

Roofing/Siding

Storage

Tree Service

â&#x153;°CORNERâ&#x153;° STORAGE

â&#x153;¤â&#x153;¤â&#x153;¤â&#x153;¤â&#x153;¤â&#x153;¤â&#x153;¤â&#x153;¤â&#x153;¤â&#x153;¤â&#x153;¤â&#x153;¤

Dixon near Walmart Sterling near Menards Various Sizes

www.ho reir.or

Painting

(815) 973-0858 SHAZTA MSNCOM PAULâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S HANDYMAN SERVICE â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anything Your Husband Wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Do!â&#x20AC;?  xperience On All Manner of Home Repairs & Maintenance since 1986 (815)625-2607

SPECIALIZING IN " erior Pa " od "l you Ho  air Needs  sured d Boed , S k Falls area. Now Accepting Credit & Debit Card Payments Free Estimates

815-739-2089

Furniture Repair

(815) 625-2500

www.HotRods Choppers.com

Home Improvement

Painting

those unwanted items with the help of a Sauk Valley Classified Ad 625-3600 284-2222

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Area's #1 Roofing Contractor IL Lic# 104-015191 Licensed, Bonded & Insured $oofing$Siding $# $ ecks $ tions $es & More Residential & Commercial Call now to schedule your FREE Estimate! Will beat any leading competitor price 815-590-2677

Sewing/Repairs SHOE REPAIR ZIPPER REPAIR Call for appointment or pick up Call Gary Lenox 815-388-8047 or 815-499-4772

Snowplowing Commercial & Residential Most driveways $15 Serving the entire Sauk Valley area. Sidewalks & Salt. Battery dead? We have a battery jumper. If you're stuck we can pull you out. 815-973-4936 or 815-973-4789

Commercial and Residential Snow & Ice Control serving the Sauk Valley Area. www.porter brothers.net â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;

MATT'S SNOWPLOWING Sterling Rock Falls Residential & Commercial Most Driveways $20 LOWEST PRICE GUARANTEED 815-590-1677

GREAT RATES 815-973-3613

www.allsafe center.com High-Security Storage Solutions and Much More! Climate Controlled Storage Low-Cost Moving Truck Rental Confidential Document Shredding We Ship FedEx & UPS! Expert Packaging Services Value Boxes & Packaging Supplies EBAY and EMOTORS Internet Auction Sales Over 15,000 Sales Office Hours: Mon-Fri. â&#x2DC;&#x203A; 8:306, Sat. â&#x2DC;&#x203A; 8:30noon 690 Timber Creek Rd. Dixon, (815)285-2212

BRAD'S TREE SERVICE Tree & Limb Removal Stump Removal Storm Clean-up Mulch & Firewood       Ins d 815-857-3674 Amboy, IL

TV Repair

TELEVISION IN HOME REPAIR All Types Brands & Models Over 25 yrs. Exp. Call Ron for a free quote at 815-561-0011

Water Softeners The Softener Man Repair on all makes & models Service Call Special $19.95 Over 30 years experience 815-323-1622 The Softener Man Repair on all makes & models Service Call Special $19.95 Over 30 years experience 815-323-1622

at 815-625-3600

to announce Birthdays and graduations in Celebrations!

â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;

Going on Vacation? www.saukvalley.com

Keep in touch with Sauk Valley News While youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re away!


SAUK VALLEY MEDIA s Saturday, January 18, 2014 s PAGE D5

Go BOLD

STERLING

STERLING

STERLING

1BR home, 8th Ave. $475/ mo. $400/ dep. Call 309-2420259

2 BR w/ garage, newly remodeled, $600/mo. + dep., 815-625-8475 or 815-535-6619

Free Housing, utilities, cable & internet and small living allowance in Exchange for part time mature Personal Assistant in Sterling. This is a live-in position. Interested candidates please contact Rick at:

Newly renovated home. $900/mo. Disc. for 2 to 3 yrs lease. 3BR/2.5 baths, Jacuzzi tub, 2 car, SS applcs. Basement suit. Call Josh 815-7160303 Rent to own. 2BR 815-622-9665. Realtor Owned.

2BR, 1 ba. Garage. $625/mo. Call 815973-6768.

Nice clean, 1-2 BR, appliances., no pets. $450 + dep. 815-622-4344

Get SOLD Bold type

draws readers to your ad. Get

GARAGE SPACE

ROCK FALLS

LG 2BR, 2 ba. Home. 108 E. 6th St. $650 mo. + security deposit. 815303-0026. Nice 3 bed Ranch, all renewed, 2003 16th Ave., Why Rent? $698/mo. 815-878-7399

rick25119@gmail.com

or 510-508-3894.

ROUTES AVAILABLE!

Towns

Streets

Dixon Franklin Polo P-Town Rock Falls

Call For Open Routes! In-Town Route Division, Barber, Cherry, Mason, Dixon & Fulton Buttercup Lane, Grove St., Jackson St. Lafayette, Locust, W. Riverside, Sunset Lane, Birch & Elm Call For Open Routes!

Sauk Valley Media 3200 E. Lincolnway Sterling, IL 61081

Route

Customers

3232

56

333

50

311

1200 sq. ft. 10 E. Miller Rd. Sterling. 815-625-9638 Great location! Approx. 1,000sq.ft. Call 815-499-7448. Secured 3 acre w/ high bays and office, 3818 River Rd., Sterling. 815-626-8790

MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT

315

DIXON

Telegraph 113 S. Peoria Dixon, IL 61021

$395 2BR. 1 Mo. Free 630-965-1470 or 815-716-3703

815-625-3600 ext. 301

EARN CASH NOW! OGLE COUNTY, ILLINOIS LAND AUCTION Monday, February 17th, 2014 at 11:00 am SELLING AS 1 PARCEL

Sale to be held: The Auction Shed 900 South Division Ave Polo, IL 61064

155 Acres MOL in Sections 9 & 10 of Pine Creek Township, Ogle Co., IL. OPEN TENANCY 2014!

FARMLAND & TIMBER GROUND

Consists of 86.75 Acres MOL Tillable; 68.41 Acres MOL Timber Land GREAT HUNTING, HARD FRONTAGE ROAD; LOCATED NEXT TO WHITE PINES STATE PARK and just 8 miles west of Oregon, IL- The Ogle County Seat Tax I.D. # 15-09-400-008 & 15-10-300-001 2012 Taxes $ 702.54

For More Information Contact: Lenny Bryson- Auctioneer 900 South Division Ave. Polo, IL 61064 Ph) 815-946-4120

COMMERCIAL RENTAL

Owner, Harriett Sheely & Cecil Sheely Trust Alvina Glenn, Trustee

C Print All E Your L Special Events E Here! B R A T I CALL O N S TODAY

noticed!

CLASSIFIEDS dailyGAZETTE

815-625-3600 815-284-2222

To place your AD TODAY!

Own a Computer? Put it to work. Make an extra $500-$1500 P.T. $5,000-$8,000 F.T.

Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present. Each letter in the cipher stands for another.

TODAY’S CLUE: X equals L “PTOR VGOXXC USOVGU JG JDUR, J D V G R T O K K I L G U D V S O K S G V, M U

D B T I J D V. ” - - E D K O R T O K P M K R G V U Previous Solution: “When I was in junior high school, the teachers voted me the student most likely to end up in the electric chair.” -- Sylvester Stallone (c) 2014 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-18

Don’t let impulse take over. Saturday, January 18, 2014 Your vision, discretion and determination will lead you to the winner’s circle. Remaining calm when everyone around you is anxious will ensure that your reputation remains stellar. Discipline and consistency will keep the competition or opposition you face in the background. Partnerships will need nurturing. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Don’t let impulse take over, or you may make a costly mistake. Make choices based on knowledge and facts, not hearsay and fear of missing out. Love should be a priority. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Speak up and let everyone know what you think and how you feel. Someone will try to take advantage of your kindness and enthusiasm if you’re not careful. Protect your heart and your money. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Join a group that will help you reach your personal goals. Starting a diet or a new exercise routine will get you back on track and boost your confidence. ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- A fast-paced approach to whatever you do will attract interest. Develop your ideas and share

504

Full Time Director of Nursing Must be an RN, exp. preferred, Responsible for upholding superior standards of care for a 97 bed skilled facility. a Must be able to lead, motivate and mentor the nursing team. Must be able to communicate effectively with physicians, NP's, resident's & families while reinforcing and complying with federal and state regulations. at Green Acres Healthcare Call 815-857-2550 or send resume to: admin@ greenacreshc .com

www.cbbhomebiz.com

HEALTH / MEDICAL

504

★ NEW TODAY ★ Hiring Medical Assistants for lg. medical practice in Rockford. Exp. preferred but will train good candidates. Paid training & certification. Full benefits package. E-mail resumes: supervision969 @gmail.com.

Now Hiring for RN/D.O.N. Full Time Send resume to: Box #:1197, c/o Sauk Valley Classifieds, P.O. Box 498, Sterling, IL 61081

RN Part time or full time. Apply within at: Tammerlane 3601 16th Ave. Sterling, IL

Sudoku! Answer on D6

CELEBRITY CIPHER

TELEGRAPH

CALL

402

THE CLASSIFIED Advertising Department of Sauk Valley Media does not have the opportunity to fully investigate the credibility of each advertiser appearing within these columns. If an offer sounds “too good to be true” it probably is. Proceed with caution if you are asked to send money or to give a credit card number. Proceed with caution in calling 900 phone numbers. All phone numbers prefixed by “900” are charged to the CALLER. Charges may be assessed on a “per minute” basis rather than a “per call” basis. Sauk Valley Classified makes every effort to qualify these charges for the reader. If you have a concern about an advertiser, please contact the Better Business Bureau 330 N. Wabash, Chicago, IL 60611. 312-832-0500

284-2222

Astrograph SAUK VALLEY

LOANS

NOTICEPURSUANT to the Business Opportunity Sales Law of 1995, every business opportunity must be registered with the Illinois Securities Department. Protect yourself and get the facts before you hand over your hard earned money by contacting the Illinois Secretary of State's Securities Department at 1800-628-7937. This notice provided as a public service by Sauk Valley Classifieds.

HEALTH / MEDICAL

or

Attorney: Kim Krahenbuhl WilliamsMcCarthy 607 Washington Street Oregon, IL 61061 815-732-2101 For photos, aerials, soil maps, and terms & conditions, visit www.lennybrysonauctioneer.com

O JOK DV PDJOK PMRTDIR O UGKUG

GO BOLD

10x20 $50/mo. + $35 dep. 815-5909478.

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 501

625-3600

by Luis Campos

your ad

331

your thoughts. A partnership with someone who is pursuing a similar dream will help you excel.

be indulgent with friends, family or someone you love. Don’t let an impulsive move quash your good time.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -Staying in the background may be difficult. Someone will try to flesh out your ideas. Focus on what you can offer physically, rather than mentally, and you will avoid an unsettling situation.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Be careful how you handle domestic situations. Invest your time and money wisely. Home improvements, a move or altering the way you live will result in greater happiness.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -Enjoy your home today. Entertain friends and new acquaintances, and share what you have to offer. Your hospitality will result in an interesting proposal that could lead to good fortune.

SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Keep your emotions wellhidden. Consider what you can do to help a greater cause. A unique approach to the way you live will make you feel more at ease.

CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- Partnerships should take top priority. Offer something special, or make a move on someone you want to get to know better. An unusual discovery will result in a moneymaking idea.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Let your competitive side take over. Play a game of chance or make a personal change that will inspire you to follow your dreams.

ACROSS

carrier 46 Cold War 1 — support power 5 Greeted 50 Dough formally raisers 10 Empty 53 Full-length 12 Cope garment 13 Home of the 55 Soften Illini 56 Aquatic 14 Lone Star mammals nine 15 Get wind of 57 Upright 16 Baby beaver 58 Como — usted? 18 Tire pressure meas. DOWN 19 Untouched by time 1 Zoomed 23 Apprehend a 2 Napoleon’s suspect island 26 Cuttlefish 3 Ms. Barton defense 4 Term of 27 Fleece endearment 30 Develop 5 — -relief slowly 6 Can. province 32 Juicy morsel 7 “Star Trek” 34 Contradicted speed 35 Is of benefit 8 Id companions 36 Crib filler 9 Mr. Arnez 37 Homer 10 What was Simpson’s that? dad 11 Came to 38 When Paris 12 Jane, to sizzles Tarzan 39 Paving 17 Variety material 20 Basic as42 Go back and sumptions 21 Turn forth 22 Fizzy 45 Stockholm

Answer to Previous Puzzle

beverage 23 Beak of a bird 24 With, to Maurice 25 String tie 28 Tony kin 29 Cheery tune 31 Milan money, once 32 Hot sauce 33 Mao — -tung 37 Just as I thought! 40 Attention getter 41 Tassels 42 Ceremonial fire 43 Wolf’s expression

44 Harvard rival 47 Proofer’s word 48 Writer — Paretsky 49 ER personnel 51 Jiffy 52 Explosive letters 54 Had a meal

PUZZLE ENTHUSIASTS: Get more puzzles in “Random House Crossword MegaOmnious” Vols. 1 & 2

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Your willingness to make the changes that are necessary to keep your personal relationships running smoothly will not go unnoticed. An unusual offering will lead to certainty and security. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -Participate in community events or activities that will allow you to

©2014 UFS

1-18

© 2014 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


SAUK VALLEY MEDIA s Saturday, January 18, 2014 s PAGE D6

★ NEW TODAY ★ Accounting / Payroll Flexiforce in Dixon, IL, is seeking an Accounting/Payroll individual. Candidate should have 7+ years of experience of Accounting with a minimum associate's degree. Experience is preferred to efficiently processing AP, AR, General Ledger entries, closing the books for month end & year-end reporting along with processing payroll functions. Attention to detail and meeting corporate deadline a must. Email resume to tmadigan@ flexiforceusa.com fax 815-288-5064 or mail to 1101 Warp Road, Dixon, IL 61021 CAB DRIVER Must know & live in Dixon. Week-ends a MUST! 815-2851000 CDL Driver Needed Rock River Cartage is a family owned flatbed carrier. $50,000 + a yr. We offer 401K, Health Ins., & home every night. Must have 2 yrs exp. Please call 1-800-8929587 ext: 101 Coventry Living Center Is accepting applications for full time night Nurse, Full & Part time C.N.A'S all shifts. Applicants must apply on line at:

www.coventrylivingcenter.com

★ NEW TODAY ★ Customer Service Flexiforce in Dixon, IL, is seeking a Customer Service Representative. Candidates should have 5+ years of experience interacting directly with customers. Quick Books experience is preferred for entering/ confirming orders, sendingout acknowledgements to customers, reviewing inventory safety stock and reordering material shortages with suppliers. Prefer individuals with technical knowledge in the Garage Door Hardware Industry. Email resume to tmadigan@ flexiforceusa.com fax to 815-2885064 or mail to 1101 Warp Road, Dixon, IL 61021

505

EXPERIENCED DRIVERS Wanted to haul bulk feed & grain, to our feed lots 600 mi. radius of Clinton IA. Year around steady work drivers must have Class A CDL and tractor trailer experience. Belt trailer experience a plus!! Full benefit package. 563-249-9292. Naeve Inc. Experienced NC-Brake Press Operator needed 2-3 years' experience operating a Brake Press. Fulltime, temp-to-hire position. Reliable, dependable, hard-working. 2nd shift. Salary DOE. Submit cover letter and resume to: hr@ifhgroup.com No phone calls. Serious applicants only. Rock Falls location. Financial Advisor Trainee No exp. necessary, will train right individual. Paid training. Dixon office 288-0550 Free Housing, utilities, cable & internet and small living allowance in Exchange for part time mature Personal Assistant in Sterling. This is a live-in position. Interested candidates please contact Rick at: rick25119@gmail.com

or 510-508-3894.

Legal Assistant Join the best. Our prominent, general practice law firm seeks a selfmotivated Legal Secretary to join our elite team. Duties include project management, client interaction, scheduling and calendaring, document production, filing, and answering phones. Computer skills required; dictation skills preferred. The successful candidate will be diligent, pleasant, able to communicate well, and adept at multi-tasking. We offer competitive wages and benefits, and the opportunity to learn any skills not yet developed. Prior legal experience required; prior experience in the medical field would be a plus. To apply please send your cover letter and resume to either saukvalleylaw @gmail.com or send replies to Box #:1196 ,c/o Sauk Valley Classifieds, P.O.Box 498, Sterling, IL 61081 Small Business seeking an Apprentice plumber/ heating technician. Please send replies to Box #:1198, c/o Sauk Valley Classifieds, P.O. Box 498, Sterling, IL 61081

EMPLOYMENT

505

Northern Grain Marketing is seeking Experienced CDL drivers. Immediate openings for temporary local grain hauling. Hours may vary. To inquire call Tom Wilson @ 815-973-3016. RESEARCH PARTICIPANTS NEEDED For a unique Opinion Focus Group to be held at the Brandywine Easy/Fun! $100 PAID SAME DAY Coffee, danish, lunch provided. 1-800-886-2795 Schwan's Home Service of Freeport is currently accepting applications for Route sales Representative positions. Position offers paid training, base wage, commission, and benefits. Please apply at: www.schwans jobs.com or call 507-537-8990 with questions. Search for a qualified day care Director/ Teacher is re-opened for Rock Falls Day Care Center 729 W Rt. 30 Rock Falls. Fax resume and transcripts to 815625-1581 or call 815-625-0106 for an appointment.

★ NEW TODAY ★ Social Services Master Child Welfare Specialist LSSI is seeking a full time Counselor to work 37.5 hours per week, for our nonprofit social service agency. The Counselor will provide services to at risk youth and their families in the community. Master's degree in counseling/ social work or related field preferred. Fax or email to: Attn: Chris Mills (815) 284-6162 or email chris.mills@lssi.org EOE Someone to support me to sell on Ebay; and possibly light housekeeping. 815-7034120 Call Monte. Franklin Grove WANTED COOK 32-40 hrs. a week Apply at: Heritage Square 620 N. Ottawa Ave. Dixon, IL EOE NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

Need to place an ad? Call us 625-3600 284-2222

EMPLOYMENT

505

TO OUR

READERS:

Sauk Valley Media does not knowingly accept advertising which is in violation of the law. Likewise, we do not knowingly accept advertising which is fraudulent or has malicious intent. While we attempt to screen advertising with potential fraud, it is impossible to screen all potential problems. We strongly encourage our readers to exercise caution and common sense, particularly when dealing with companies with which you are not familiar.

CHILD CARE

512

Licensed group daycare, 27 yrs. exp. Has openings for NB on up. Located between Dixon & Sterling. 815-994-6629 NO INDIVIDUAL, unless licensed or holding a permit as a childcare facility, may cause to be published any advertisement soliciting a child care service.* A childcare facility that is licensed or operating under a permit issued by the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services may publish advertisements of the services for which it is specifically licensed or issued a permit. Sauk Valley Media strongly urges any parent or guardian to verify the validity of the license of any facility before placing a child in it's care. *Family homes that care for no more than three (3) children under the age of twelve or which receive only children from a single household, for less than 24 hours per day, are exempt from licensure as day care homes. The three children to whom this exemption applies includes the family's natural or adopted children and any other persons under the age of 12 whether related or unrelated to the operator of the day care home. (DCFS Rule, Part 377.3 (c))

AREA GARAGE SALES 624 ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES 705 I Buy: Antique furniture, fishing tackle, toys, post cards junk. 815-445-6151

GUNS & ARCHERY

706

Illinois CCW Trinity Firearms Training LLC. John815-535-2413 Ed815-590-3534

CLOVER APPLIANCES HILLS

710

CLOVER HILLS LEASE TO OWN APPLIANCES TV’S MATTRESSES

815.625.8529 Maytag Refrigerator, 3 dr., bottom freezer, 3 yrs. old, exc. cond., $500 815-994-0228

WOOD / FUEL

746

Mixed Hardwood $80/pickup load Delivered 779-423-4249

FURNITURE

755

4 ft solid wood round table w/ 2 additional leafs. Exc. Con. $40 OBO. Call 815-718-2000 Mattress sets: Twin $99, Full $129, Queen $159, King $199. Will deliver! Kern Mattress Outlet 309-4527477. Thomasville Full size bedroom set, pecan wood. W/ lg. mirror, dresser, & 6 drawer sm. dresser $300. Exc. cond. 815-973-9760.

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 765 Wurlitzer Spinnet w/ bench, maple wood, $300 firm, 815-718-2424

PETS & PET SUPPLIES 775 Free farm cats, males/females, younger/older, various colors. If interested, please call 815-499-5158.

PETS & PET SUPPLIES 775

HAY & STRAW

To indoor home only, black & white neutered male cat, (family health probs, must find cat new home) 815-626-9046 Wanted: A Collie or Shelty, housetrained, for us to love, in Franklin Grove. Call 815703-4120. WARNING ADS FOR FREE PETS Your beloved pet deserves a loving, caring home. The ad for your free pet may draw response from individuals who will sell your animal for research or breeding purposes. Please screen respondents carefully when giving an animal away. Your pet will thank you!

SNOWBLOWERS 782 421 Torro Snowblower, 4 cyl, 2 stage, 21” cut, pull start, good cond. runs great! $425 815-973-3223 Ariens 22” single stage snow thrower, 2 cycle. Elec. start. Exc. Cond. Used only 2 or 3x. $400. 815-6262157 after 11am.

No person or business, unless properly licensed by the Illinois Secretary of State, may sell ticket(s) for any sporting event or otherwise, for more than the price printed upon the face of the said ticket(s). Only licensed ticket brokers may legally advertise, negotiate and execute the sale of ticket(s) for any amount over what is printed upon the face of ticket. 792

Shilsaw 7 ¼” worm gear heavy duty saw. $65. 815-631-1534.

1/64 Nascar collection, orig. packaging. 250+ cars, 15 semis + 20 misc. $3,000/obo. 815-625-4943. 13” Sony TV, works perfectly $50 815-284-7684 1964 sterling silver set- 6 pc. setting, 66pcs. In plastic, never used. $3500. 928-592-7302. 45 pc. snowvillage, $299 Call Marce or Kay, 815626-1121 M-F 8-4. Antique Curio cabinets, graniteware 815-973-4972 Espirit faux suede tan coat with hood, from Bergners. Like New! $30, 815-441-4543 Gas Grill, two burner, used only once, no tank. $50 815-285-4816 New 13' Band Saw Blade. $15 815677-0896 New boys wrestling shoes Asic, sz. 9 Dan Gable $40. 815490-0721 Rely adult protective underwear. XL. New/50 count. $15 815-677-0896 See More Online Photos, Commerce, Expanded Text ➛Look for WEB ID ➛Log on to: www.saukvalley. com classifieds ➛Enter the WEB ID in the WEB ID Box ➛View Photos, Expanded Text BUY ONLINE!! saukvalley.com CLASSIFIEDS Twin, full, queen, king beds. Washer, dryer, sofa, sofa sleeper, recliner, dresser, dbl. rec. sofa 815-718-4385 Wii fit plus with board & skin. $50. 815-441-4543 Women's relativity black boots from Bergner's. Hardly worn. $20 815441-4543 825

LIVESTOCK / SUPPLIES

840

8 head black calves, 4 heifers-4 steers, average wt. 550 lbs, had shots, $1.68/lb. 815-440-5726

CLASSIC CARS

904

74 Chevrolet Chevelle/ Malibu Classic/ 2 DR. H.T. Rebuilt suspension/ new exhaust/ New floorpans/ Solid Car, Very restorable/ 400 motor/ New Turbo 400 trans. Big block 454, can go with it. Becoming a rare find. $3,500 OBO. Call 815631-3409

AUTOMOBILES

905

Bob Endress Auto S&S

13571 Lincoln Rd. (Rte 30 West) Morrison, Illinois

815-772-3215

AUTOMOBILES

905

Dixon

Rock Falls 622-6655

*Plus tax, title, license & doc fee.

Was $3,795

Now $2,995

2000 Buick Park Ave Only $2,995

03 Pontiac Grand Am

Credit Problems? Bad Credit? No Credit? We might be able to help! If you're looking to buy a vehicle we have many financing options available through qualified lenders. Call Brett Simpson today at 815-2855313. Ken Nelson Auto Plaza. creditautosales dixon.com Always over 100+ vehicles to choose from. HAVING TROUBLE wording your ad? Call our classified department today. We'll be glad to help you. 626SOLD or 284SOLD.

815-441-0246

(Don't be lied to this number is not affliated with anyother number in paper}

$$$$$$$$$$$$$ 815-499-3543

CASH 4-CARS

2 To Choose From

01 Chevy

Express Van

Hard to Find!

02 Cadillac Deville

Clean $5,995

02 Chrylser Sebring

We are licensed & insured to buy vehicles. Running or non running, scrap, Ect. 7 days a week. All Calls Answered!

(815)499-3543 $$$$$$$$$$$$$

Loaded, Reduced

We Buy Used cars & trucks. Call Dixon ATV 815-288-2146

Was $4,495

Loaded, Clean

2005 Altima Nice and Clean

$6,995

06 Chevy Uplander Was $5,995

Now $4,995

97 F150

1/2 ton, 4x4, EXT-Cab Was $5,995 Now

$4,995

88 Dodge Dakota Auto Topper

Just Reduced

$2,695

‡ Plus Tax Title and License ‡ 0RUH WR FKRRVH IURP DEALER FINANCING AVAILABLE

Check out our website

ZZZ6DXN9DOOH\0RWRUVFRP

Hours: Monday - Friday 10:00- 6:00 Saturday 9:00- 3:00

S.U.V.S

909

1995 Blazer, auto. 4wd. V6. Very good cond. 172K mi. $2800. Call 815-288-6814.

TRUCKS

910

2004 Chevy Avalanche, 2 wheel dr., 120k mi., two tone grey. $6,700 815-238-5502

Offer expires 12/31/14 No Commercial Advertising, Pets, Garage Sales, Wood/ Fuel, Tickets/ Travel or Real Estate

We Pay the BEST! Guaranteed! Fastest Pickup All calls answered 7 days a week. Licensed Dealer

X-Cab, 4x4, 3/4 ton V10

NEW REAL DEAL

ad runs for 30 days in Sauk Valley Classifieds, 4 Ogle County Papers, The Review and saukvalley.com all for only $38! Special must be mentioned at time of ad placement.

VEHICLES $150-$2000

95 Dodge Ram

1998 Chevy S 10, extended cab, 167K mi., asking $2200/obo Call 815-626-1779 after 6 pm.

A 5 Line REAL DEAL

(running or not)

Clean, 4x4

1992 Chevrolet Camaro RS model. Low millage. Very Good condition. $4,500 Call 815626-8078

FOR ALL READERS!

Unwanted

97 Toyota Rav4

32,000 Miles

Business Hours: Monday 8 to 8, Tues.-Fri. 8 to 5, Saturday 8 to 3

THE BEST CASH PAID FOR JUNK or

288-5626

04 Buick Lesabre LTD

1998 Mercury Mountaineer 4x4 1998 Ford F-700 Dump Truck, Gas http://endress autosales. webs.com/

$$$

CHANCE DEALER

4X4S

912

1999 Dodge Ram 1500 Ex. Cab. New tires & brakes 134K mi. good con. $6,300 OBO. Call 815-632-0780

PARTS & ACC.

925

2 Cooper tires, 225/55 R17, Excellent tread. $100 815-677-0896 Chevy 6 bolt 311050 wheels & tires aluminum 15” rims w/ center caps & lugs, $600 815-213-1968

MOTORCYCLES

935

★ NEW TODAY ★ 7th Annual Swap Meet Jan. 26, 2014 Sterling Moose Gen. Admission $5, (under 12 free) Booth $25 Set up 7-9 Doors Open 9:00 to 2:00 815-625-4943

Call Classified ToSAUK sell those extra items! VALLEY SAUK VALLEY LASSIFIEDS dailyGAZETTE TELEGRAPH

CLASSIFIEDS C

Good quality grass hay. 1St & 2nd cutting avail. Small squares. Call 815499-8967.

dailyGAZETTE

815-625-3600

TELEGRAPH

815-284-2222

Go

960

815-441-0246 ABSOLUTELY

1st + 2nd

Now $3,995

2009 Buick Enclave CXL 2008 Buick Lucerne CXL 2008 Buick Enclave 2005 Chevrolet Trailblazer LT Sunroof & Leather 2004 Buick Rainier 2002 Pontiac Montana 2002 Pontiac Bonneville 2002 Pontiac Grand Prix 40th Anniversary, Two door 2001 Dodge 2500 Ext. Cab 4x4, Diesel 2000 Buick Century 2000 Ford Explorer LTD AWD 1999 Chevrolet Blazer 4x4

AUTOS WANTED

Sauk Valley Motors

USED AUTOS

SOLD

MISCELLANEOUS 796 FOR SALE

HAY & STRAW

Hay 35 Lg. Rounds. $110. Sm. Squares $7 ea. 815-238-8999

2009 Chevrolet Silverado Reg. Cab,

TICKETS / TRAVEL 787 & EVENTS

TOOLS & MACHINERY

825

BOLD

Get SOLD Bold type draws readers to your ad.

Get your ad noticed!

GO BOLD CALL

815-625-3600 815-284-2222

To place your AD TODAY!

CLASSIFIEDS SAUK VALLEY dailyGAZETTE

TELEGRAPH

Call 815-625-3600 or 815-284-2222

ABC AmeriCorps of SVCC offering immediate opportunity at Kreider Services/25 hours weekly. Living Allowance/Education Award. HS diploma/GED, legal US resident, background checks, reliable transportation. SVCC is EOE. Applications online at: svcc.edu/ americorps or call 815-8356313 for more information.

EMPLOYMENT

Published Every Other Tuesday!

505

C E L E B R A T I O N S

EMPLOYMENT


SAUK VALLEY MEDIA s Saturday, January 18, 2014 s PAGE D7

Share your passion to be featured in the next ad #PASSIONTOWORK

THEREâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S A CAREER FOR EVERY PASSION. Whether itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cooking, catering, or something completely unique, you may be surprised at how many jobs are connected to the things you love. So bring your passion to saukvalley.com/monster and start searching. :KR NQRZV \RX PLJKW ÂżQG WKH SHUIHFW RSSRUWXQLW\ WR SXW \RXU SDVVLRQ WR ZRUN 0RQVWHU )LQG %HWWHU

saukvalley.com


Wheels

3ATURDAY *ANUARY 

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs$ Paid Advertisement

2014 TOYOTA RAV4 Submitted by Ken Nelson Auto Group

in which even the LE comes with a nice array of standard amenities and no model has a lengthy options list. Every 2014 RAV4 will again come with USB-iPod and Bluetooth hands-free mobile-phone and music-streaming connectivity. Also included will be cruise control, a backup camera that displays on the dashboard screen, and a six-speaker CD audio system with satellite radio. Expect standard equipment on the 2014 XLE and Limited models to again include a sunroof and dualzone automatic climate control, plus front bucket seats with extra side bolstering. Toyota probably

T

he 2014 RAV4’s styling will be a mirror image of the 2013’s. It’ll repeat the body that came with the redesign, one that traded rounded forms for a more creased, aerodynamic shape. Lost in the redesign was RAV4’s trademark side-hinged cargo door, replaced by a conventional lift-gate. a class that’s moved from junior-truck styling to sleeker, high-riding-hatchback looks. Leaders will again include the 2014 Ford Escape, 2014 Honda CR-V, 2014 Mazda CX-5, and the redesigned 2014 Nissan Rogue. This fourth-generation RAV4 kept the same basic exterior dimensions as its 2006-2012 predecessor so it remains among the most spacious compact crossovers, with an especially roomy rear seat. The third-generation’s optional, child-sized third-row seat was discontinued, leaving today’s RAV4 a Its dashboard will continue among the more contemporary in the class and include a 6.1-inch-diameter screen for audio, climate, and available navigation displays. Cabin materials also will remain a high point, with a mix of richly padded and stout plastic surfaces and even French-stitched seams on the seats and instrument panel. Expect the 2014 RAV4 to reprise a three-model lineup consisting of the base LE, volume-selling XLE, and top-line Limited. Visual differentiators standard fog lamps and body-colored turn-signal mirrors on XLE and Limited models. The 2014 LE is likely to return with 17 inch steel wheels with wheel covers while the XLE continues with 17-inch alloys and the Limited with 18-inch alloys. Mechanical: No mechanical changes are anticipated for the 2014 RAV4. It’ll retain one engine, a 2.5-liter four-cylinder carried over from the

Limited’s standard-equipment list a power liftgate, leather-wrapped steering wheel, power driver’s seat, heated front seats, and keyless entry with pushbutton ignition. Similarly, the Limited likely will again be the only RAV4 available with a blind-spot monitor

The 2.5-liter matches the output of most competing entry-level four-cylinder engines. third-generation. Output should remain 179 horsepower and 172 pound-feet of torque (consider torque the real key to acceleration). The 2.5-liter matches the output of most competing entry-level four-cylinder engines. And it’s linked to a modern six-speed automatic transmission with a shift-lever that can be toggled to replicate manual-type gear control. But the 2014 RAV4 probably will remain slightly heavier than most rivals and continue to suffer mediocre acceleration for merging or passing. Toyota dropped RAV4’s available V-6 engine with the 2013 redesign and joined a compact-crossover trend toward all-four-cylinder powertrains. But the 2.5-liter is not a particularly smooth-running engine. And lacks some advanced technology found on many competitors, such as direct fuel injection and turbocharging. Toyota probably will continue to direct buyers

who want more power – or three rows of seats -- to its midsize, seven-passenger Highlander crossover, which offers a V-6. The RAV4’s all-wheel-drive system is fully up-to-date. Available on all three models and called Dynamic Torque Control, it’ll be ordered on about 65 percent of 2014 RAV4s in place of front-wheel drive. Typical of AWD systems in this class, Dynamic Torque Control operates in fuel-saving frontwheel drive until sensors detect tire slip, whereupon power is automatically reapportioned front-to-rear until traction is restored. Dynamic Torque Control, however, is also designed to enhance grip by reapportioning power during cornering and acceleration. The RAV4 is not intended for serious off-road use (virtually no compact crossover is), but its AWD system does include a button to lock in a 50/50 front/rear torque split for

system warns of unseen vehicles in adjacent lanes or approaching from the sides when backing from a parking space. Toyota’s Display Audio with Navigation and Entune setup should again be an option exclusive to the XLE and Limited. This combines a voice-activated navigation system with Toyota’s Entune infotainment interface. Entune works with an onboard Smartphone to access to a variety of mobile apps, including Pandora Internet radio, iHeartRadio, and the Bing search engine. We applaud Toyota for offering navigation on a model other than the top-line version, as do many competitors. But we wish the system itself employed a screen with greater size and better resolution than the standard 6.1-inch dashboard display.

maximum low-speed traction. And Toyota will again include on all 2014 RAV4s a dashboard button that activates Eco and Sport modes. Eco mode is designed to save gas by calming throttle response, remapping shift points, and regulating the air conditioner. Sport mode reduces power-steering assist, sharpens throttle response, and maintain higher engine rpm. On AWD models, Sport mode also recalibrates front/rear torque distribution as another way to improve handling and control. The result should again be a compact crossover with road manners that, overall, fall short of the sportiest class leaders, the Escape and CX-5. Expect steering that overreacts to subtle inputs at highway speeds, and a ride that’s stable but a little too hard over big bumps and ruts. Features: The 2014 RAV4 should again

ITS TIME FOR A

NEW TOYOTA! NEW 2014 CAMRY CAMRY

$

NEW NEW 2013 RAV4 RAV4

SE, LE, XLE

7 TO CHOOSE FROM

0 % APR* OR

1000

MANUFACTURER REBATE!

America’s Best Selling Sedan, come in and see why.

$

STOCK # TE089

NEW 2014 SIENNA

SE, LE, XLE, LTD

8 PASSENGER PASSENGER Comfort

$

500

LE, XLE, LTD

500

NEW 2014 COROLLA

LE, S

1.9% 1.9% APR*

0% APR* OR

COMPLETELY REDESIGNED 38 MPG HIGHWAY, 29 MPG CITY

MANUFACTURER REBATE!

AWD, SAFETY+ SECURITY

STOCK # TE0928

NEW 2014 PRIUS

ALL NEW 2014 HIGHLANDER

5 DOOR

NOW IN STOCK, READY FOR DELIVERY STOCK # TE104

0 % APR* OR

$

MANUFACTURER REBATE!

AFFORDABLE FAMILY MOTORING

500

0%

APR* OR MANUFACTURER REBATE!

THE LEADER IN HYBRIDS

STOCK # TE047

STOCK # TE112

1050 N. Galena, Dixon, IL 815-288-4455 See Us At www.KenNelsonAuto.com

TOYOTA

0 F i n a n c i n g w i t h a p p ro v e d c re d i t t h r u T F S . N o t a l l w i l l q u a l i f y. O ff e r e n d s 1 / 3 1 / 1 4 . $ 1 6 6 D o c f e e a d d i t i o n a l .

* %


TEL_01182014  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you