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Record The Putnam County

Volume 145 No. 47

Single Copy Cost 50¢

Putnam County’s Only Newspaper

“PRSRT STD.” US Postage Paid No. 486 SHAW MEDIA POSTAL PATRON LOCAL R.R. BOXHOLDER CARRIER ROUTE PRESORT

Wednesday, July 31, 2013

Speed limit increase? Does an extra 5 mph really make a difference? By Ken Schroeder news@tonicanews.com

HENNEPIN — Get ready to push the accelerator a little further. The Illinois General Assembly has passed Senate Bill 2356 to Gov. Pat Quinn’s desk, which would increase speed limits on Illinois’ rural freeways and certain highways from 65 miles per hour to 70 miles per hour.

According to the Illinois General Assembly website, the bill would provide the maximum speed limit outside an urban district for any vehicle to be 70 miles per hour on any interstate highway, as well as on all or part of other highways designated by the Illinois Department of Transportation. The affected highways would need to have at least four

lanes of traffic and have a separation between the roadways moving in opposite directions. The proposed law does have an opt-out ordinance option for urban counties. Not everyone thinks this is a good idea. “Seventy is just too fast for semis,” said Kent Zellmer of Zellmer Trucking in Cedar Point. “For cars it might be fine, but it’s just too fast for semis. If anything goes wrong at that speed, it’s a real safety issue.”

The Illinois State Police and the Illinois Department of Transportation are opposed to the idea, and Quinn is also concerned about safety factors. However, the bill passed with more than enough votes to override a veto if Quinn does not sign the legislation. The Illinois House approved the speed limit increase bill with an 85 to 30 vote. The Senate approved the bill on a 41 to 6 vote. Voting in favor of the bill was Rep. Frank Mautino (D-76th) of Spring Valley.

Mautino said he voted in favor of the bill because it would help bring Illinois into line with surrounding states that have 70 mph speed limits on their interstates. The increased speed limit in Illinois would help conform speed limits when crossing state lines. The change to increased speed limits would affect only the rural interstate areas and exclude the urban areas, he said. One possible side effect is loss of revenue

at a time when Illinois needs all the money it can get. Last year, Indiana raised its speed limit on a stretch of the Indiana Toll Road from 55 to 70 mph, and the result was a more than 50 percent drop in tickets issued, according to the Indiana State Police. Illinois joins 18 other states with a 70 mph speed limit. The highest limit still belongs to Texas, who recently raised its limits on nonurban interstates to 85 mph.

Getting to know Magnolia Library district presents next program in 75th anniversary series By Dixie Schroeder dschroeder@putnamcountyrecord.com

MAGNOLIA — The Putnam County Library 75th Anniversary series of presentations moves to Magnolia on Aug. 5 at 6:30 p.m. for an in-depth look at the history of Magnolia. Presenters for this program are Sandra Woest and Lonna Nauman. Nauman’s family settled in the Magnolia area in the 1870s outside of town. Her part of the presentation will be on the history of Magnolia through family stories and pictures she has heard and seen growing up throughout the years. Nauman’s maiden name was Johnson. “I like that this is an old town,” she said. “I think that we were the first settlement between Chicago and Peoria way back when.” According to Nauman, Captain Haws was the person who really started Magnolia. “In 1824, he was on his way to Galena as he was thinking of becoming a lead miner,” she said. “He stopped when he saw this area as he thought it was the most beautiful area he had ever seen.” Haws supposedly then carved his initials on a tree so he would know where to come back. In 1826, he

built his cabin. In 1827 he sent for more men who came, built their cabins and sent for their families. Several different businesses before that were stage coach stops. During that same era there were rumors there were nine doctors in the town back then. Nauman’s great-grandmother also worked for a family in Magnolia who had a unique visitor: Abraham Lincoln. As it was traditional, when lawyers rode the circuit, they often stayed in stranger’s homes. Lincoln apparently paid this family a visit, and Nauman’s greatgrandmother heard of the story. Sandy Woest will be speaking in her part of the presentation on the history of the schools in Magnolia and Putnam County. Woest has a very unique connection to the first school in Magnolia. “Talk about a strange connection; it began where I lived,” she said. When Woest was recently remodeling, she was stripping down the walls and found hand hewn walnut wood with the square headed nails. She then realized her home was more than likely the first school.

See Magnolia Page 2

Putnam County Record photo/Dixie Schroeder

Gettin’ spiffy for Granville Days Charlie Jones of Granville polishes his 1948 Ford convertible that will be in the Granville Days Car Cruise on Aug. 2. Jones purchased the wrecked car in 1958 from a junk yard. He estimates there are less than 1,200 of this model ever made. Granville Days is Aug. 1-2.

Fun and entertainment at Granville Days By Ken Schroeder kschroeder@putnamcountyrecord.com

GRANVILLE – Granville Days are just around the corner, and there’s something for everyone at this year’s celebration. The weekend kicks off with a movie in the park on Aug. 1. The movie will be family fare, and there will be a conces-

sion stand. Admission is free. The seventh annual Granville Cruise Night kicks off at 5 p.m. Aug. 2. Several of the local taverns will be serving food outside, as well as Casey’s and the Taco Wagon. The Putnam County cheerleaders will be selling lemon shake-ups. The night will

include a 50/50 drawing and a street dance with music by Road Angel after the cruise until midnight. For the children, there will be a petting zoo and pony rides. The Balloon Man will also be there making balloon sculptures for the youngsters. The Cruise-in has a registration fee of $5

Inside

Vol. 145 No. 47 One Section - 16 Pages The Putnam County

Record Putnam County’s Only Newspaper

© The Putnam County Record

Fore! See Page 2

Restaurant renovations See Page 6

with the first 100 entries receiving dash plaques. There will be raffles for prizes for the registrants as well. Throughout Aug. 3 and 4, there will be the annual city-wide garage sale. Anyone who wants to register for the garage sale can stop by the Putnam County Record office to get on the list.


2 Local 2 • The Putnam County Record • Wednesday, July 31, 2013

‘Fore’ the love of the game

The Putnam County

Record

Serving Putnam County Since 1868 815-339-2321 Published at Granville, Illinois each Wednesday $20 Per Year in Advance in Putnam County $40 Per Year in Advance Outside of Putnam County

Contact Publisher Sam Fisher sfisher@putnamcountyrecord.com

Editor Terri Simon tsimon@putnamcountyrecord.com

Submit

The Putnam County Record encourages readers to submit news for publication in our paper. Special events, weddings, births, awards and honors, anniversaries, promotions, etc. are welcome items for the paper. Some fees may apply. Schools, businesses, organizations and groups are encouraged to send information on activities and events.

Email to:

news@putnamcountyrecord.com. Photos should be sent as an attachment. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the Putnam County Record, P.O. Box 48, Granville, IL 61326

August is National Golf Month Dixie Schroeder dschroeder@putnamcountyrecord.com

MCNABB — August is National Golf Month. For those who play the sport and for those who do not, this is a time to learn — in theory or practice — something about the world of golf. According to About.com, the history of golf, the game as it is known today, can be traced to 15th century Scotland. The Scots had learned parts of the game from the Dutch during the 14th century. The Dutch played a game where balls were hit by sticks that were slightly curved at the bottom, trying to get the ball from Point “A” to Point “B.” As both countries were trading partners, this lends itself to the theory that golf as the game we know today came from Scotland. The Scots were more about the warmer weather idea and took the Dutch game and moved it from being played on ice to being played on grass. The ironic thing was that Scotland had to play with imported sticks or clubs from the Dutch and used balls that they received in a trade from Holland. Many area players use Edgewood Park Golf Club outside of McNabb. According to one of the original owners, Corky Mabis, the club was developed in 1967 when Andy Clausen bought land and a tavern on the site. Clausen then formed a corporation of 25 owners, who worked to develop the first nine holes. Bob Pletsch, Ken Petterson and Mabis put in the water lines for the course. The park opened in the fall of 1968 with a round of golf costing

Magnolia From Page 1 ‘My house was a little log structure on land that was owned by a Thomas Patterson,” Woest said.

Putnam County Record photo/Dixie Schroeder

Ian Roach of Hennepin has been playing golf since he was 4 years old. $6. The second nine holes was created when the corporation of 25 owners purchased 35 more acres. The front nine was adapted to flow better with the new nine and the 18 hole course that

“He donated the land for the first school ... It was 1836-1837.” The original school was erected upon a brick yard. Woest said for years when she would plant a

people use today was opened in the fall of 1995. Former Putnam County resident Marge VanNess of Lacon said she has been golfing since 1979.

garden or flowers in her yard, she kept running into bricks when she dug. The community outgrew this location, and the school moved to a new location.

“Its frustrating and enjoyable at the same time, if you can believe that,” she said. VanNess said the courses and equipment have evolved and gotten better. “There’s been changes in the equipment — in the golf clubs, in the golf balls — not necessarily in the golf courses and the way they have been taken care of,” she said. “I think they have improved the golf courses a lot in the last 10 to 15 years.” Roberta Henson, a former Putnam County teacher, took up golf only six years ago. “I was getting ready to retire, and I knew I needed to have something to occupy my time,” Henson said. “Also, I love sports, and it is a sport you can play well into your later years.” Henson notes golf can be a very good social activity for some. “You only compete with yourself really. I decided that as I traveled around the country it would be a great thing to do. I thought about investigating different golf courses around the United States and ended up joining Edgewood Ladies Golf League and met a great group of ladies. I enjoy being around them,” Henson said. The mental game of golf is what Henson learned was challenging. “It is a mind game,” she said. “The hardest thing to overcome when you golf is what goes on in your head. You can over think too much. The challenges for me is my short game is harder for me than the long game is. Anticipating what you do with each shot is key. You need to think about only what you do with the next shot, don’t worry about the one after that.”

Woest will give the history of the schools in Magnolia from 1836 to the consolidation of the area into the Putnam County School District in 1965.

“An In-Depth Look at Magnolia” will be presented free of charge at the Magnolia branch of the Putnam County Library District on Aug. 5. The program begins at 6:30 p.m.

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3 Local Wednesday, July 31, 2013 • The Putnam County Record • 3

A shot in the arm August is National Immunization Awareness Month By Ken Schroeder kschroeder@putnamcountyrecord.com

HENNEPIN — Back to School means making sure your children are up to date with their shots. So it’s only natural that August is National Immunization Awareness Month (NIAM). The idea behind the designation is to highlight the need to improve national immunization coverage and encourage all people to protect their health by being immunized against infectious diseases. During the month, public health departments across the country will be promoting back-to-school immunizations, encouraging college students to catch up on immunizations before they move into dormitories, and reminding everyone that immunizations are needed through adulthood.  “The ones that are really hot right now —

“The VFC program is Vaccines For Children. The state provides us that vaccine, and we screen the clients to make sure they qualify by insurance and income.” Chris Kelly they just changed the school rules — kids who are entering into sixth grade have to have the Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis), and they never had to have that until high school before,” said Chris Kelley of the Putnam County Health Department. Students in sixth through twelfth grade have to have it if they’ve never had it before.” “For the younger kids —we’re talking Kindergarten — they need the IPB, which is polio, the MMR, which is measles, mumps and rubella, and varicella, which is chickenpox,” said Kelley. “Those are the ones the schools are requiring. We also say the meningitis and humanpapillomavirus — they’re recommended, but not

required.” For those who either cannot afford vaccinations for their children or are underinsured, there are still ways to insure their health. “The VFC program is Vaccines For Children. The state provides us that vaccine, and we screen the clients to make sure they qualify by insurance and income,” Kelley said. “Otherwise, they do have to go to a private provider.” While the main reason for National Immunization Awareness Month is to prepare students for school, they’re not the only people who should think about preventative medicine. With the various types of influenza spreading through the cold months, you might

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think you need several shots, but it’s just one. “It’s the flu shot, and they culture it out from what it was in the years before. Those are the components that go into the shot,” Kelley said. “I can’t tell you what’s in this year’s shot, since it hasn’t been released yet. It’ll be September or October when we get that. “We also recommend a Tdap for adults. It’s for anyone who’s pregnant or around children under a year old. That pertussis is a bad guy, and it can put a baby in the hospital.” Other recommended inoculations for adults include Hepatitis A and B, pneumonia and zoster (shingles). Unfortunately, said Kelley, there’s been a move by some parents away from vaccinations. Since many of the diseases prevented by immunizations have all but disappeared, many people feel the inoculations do more harm than good. “They never had to live through that kind of time, when these diseases were a continual threat,” Kelley said. “They’re still a very real problem.”

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Giving 17 year olds the vote By Ken Schroeder kschroeder@putnamcountyrecord.com

CHICAGO – Gov. Pat Quinn signed legislation earlier this month that will increase access to democracy across Illinois by giving 17 year olds the ability to vote in primary elections if they are 18 years old by the general election date. “Our democracy is strongest when more voters raise their voices at the ballot box,” Quinn said. “This new law will encourage young adults to take on their civic duties as soon as possible and make their voices heard in all Illinois elections.” House Bill 226 amends the Election Code by revising the qualifications of voters. The bill allows a 17 year old the ability to vote during a primary election if he or she will be 18 years old on the date of the immediately following general election. According to FairVote, 20 other states permit 17 year olds to vote in the primary election. Putnam County Clerk Dan Kuhn said he is very

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supportive of the move. “If we can get a person involved early, it may influence them to stay connected to the process,” Kuhn said. “Voting in a primary election, before the general election, is a good introduction to the system. Kuhn regularly visits Putnam County High School to help inform students about the election process and has often registered voters who were 17 at the time, but would be 18 before the next general election. “Election Day in 2014 is Nov. 4. It’s important for young people to know that if you turn 18 on Nov. 3, you’re eligible to vote,” Kuhn said. “I think lowering the age for a primary election will encourage them to get involved.” Quinn signed the bill at Adlai E. Stevenson High School in Lincolnshire. Locally, Rep. Frank Mautino (D-Spring Valley) voted in favor of the bill, while Sen. Sue Rezin (R-Morris) voted against it. The new law takes effect Jan. 1.

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4 Local 4 • The Putnam County Record • Wednesday, July 31, 2013

IVCC adapts for the times By Dixie Schroeder dschroeder@putnamcountyrecord.com

OGLESBY – Illinois Valley Community College has found being adaptable, learning and changing with the times is important in today’s world. IVCC President Jerry Corcoran has been at the helm for the past five years. Corcoran believes a good community college must adapt and change with the times. IVCC has also been working with the 22 high schools in the college district, holding seminars, talks and telling future students about not only the quality education IVCC can offer students, but also the monetary savings that can come with it. “We are getting a far greater percentage of valedictorians and salutatorians and the Top 2 percent of the class (at each high school). We are getting a greater relationship with employers that want to partner with us on pro-

grams that are in the new building for those individuals that don’t want to go on and get a bachelor’s or master’s or doctorate, but want to get an associate’s degree or certificate and go to work,” Corcoran said. Another step that IVCC has taken in working with the same high schools is to offer dual credit coursework that gives high school students college credit from the same class. At Marquette Academy in Ottawa, students can participate in a program where they can take enough classes that give them not only high school credit, but also enough college credits to graduate with an associate’s degree along with their high school degree. This means they would have only two years of college to go. This program is estimated to save a student $30,000 to $40,000 in college costs. “The price tag for the college credit is 50 percent of what the normal tuition rate would be, so it is a huge savings there,” said Corcoran. As the economy has gone up and down, so has life at the college. The adminis-

tration is trying to be sensitive to the potential needs of the students and have adjusted programs over time. With the opening of the new Peter Miller Technology Center on Nov. 1, IVCC will be taking a huge step in offering new programs that are sensitive to the needs of their current and future students. Hand in hand with this is the new Community Technology Center Capital Campaign at IVCC. Corcoran has noted the school wanted to have the best state of the art equipment and services for their students as the new Peter Miller Technology Center opened. The capital campaign is currently reaching out to IVCC alumni, especially ones who they had temporarily lost track of, to ask for donations to help make these plans come to fruition. The technology center will have programs that had not previously been at the college. The IVCC Center for Innovation and Opportunity will take education, businesses from the community and career planning to offer students hands-on learning experi-

ence in specific fields to help them get a leg up on the competition for jobs in the future. “One of the challenges and opportunities we have with the new building is encouraging young people to look at technical careers in manufacturing,” said Fran Brolley, head of community relations and development at IVCC. “I just don’t think that young people see themselves in those positions. There are three million jobs open in manufacturing and many more in the future to come.” “We are very passionate about education,” said Corcoran. “We are committed to lifelong learning for a variety of reasons, but one of the reasons being the education level requisite for keeping jobs has the bar going up higher all the time. So a greater percentage of people have to go to college ... They have to get a credential or certificate of value to be able to present to their employers as evidence that they can do the job.” Corcoran noted the world is changing, and the Illinois Valley will fall behind if this does not become a priority.

FFA Alumni Consignment Sale is Aug. 3 GRANVILLE – The time is ticking away on preparations for the annual PCHS FFA alumni consignment sale on Aug. 3. Starting at 9 a.m., auctioneers from Bradley’s and Immke Auction Service will start the bidding on a great selection of items. These items include a

1986 Honda Goldwing, a 1980 Suzuki motorcycle, a 2004 KIA Sedona Van, five different styles and sizes of golf carts, a 500-gallon poly tank, 48 planter chemical spreaders, two-sided mount tool boxes for a pick-up truck, a three-ton Yale Trolley, a 25-hp Mercury outboard motor, 100 bales of straw,

MagnoliAffaire AUGUST 16, 17 & 18TH FRIDAY – AUGUST 16

Family Movie in Village Park (Dusk) Refreshments available

a 1,500 gallon water tank, a Carrier Weathermaker natural gas forced-air furnace, several different brands and types of lawn mowers, an Allis Chalmers 3016 3 pt. plow, a 10-frame mount no-till Coulter’s, miscellaneous items and more to come. The group will be accepting consignments

on July 31 from 3 to 8 p.m. and on Aug. 1 and Aug. 2 from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Contact Gary Bruch at 815-257-2565 or John Twardowski at 815-4882873. Over the eight years of the sale, the group has raised almost $40,000 for the FFA Alumni group to donate to the PCHS FFA.

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GRANVILLE – The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), commonly called Obamacare or the Affordable Care Act (ACA), was signed into law on March 23, 2010. Before the ink was dry, several of the provisions of the bill were already law while the remainder is being spread out until the last piece of the puzzle clicks into place on Jan. 1, 2020; unless the bill is later overturned or amended. However, three years later, there’s still a bit of confusion as to what is expected from businesses and insurance agencies. What of the biggest questions for some is “Where is the money going to come from for people who don’t qualify for insurance at work?” “Where is that money going to come from?” said Valerie Keeney, human resources manager at Mennie Machine Co. “I don’t see where these exchanges are going to have enough money for the amount of people who are going to go with them.” Rather than pay the new insurance premiums, many employers are cutting staff hours or laying off staff to bring the number of full-time workers under control. While that sounded tempting, Keeney said that’s not going to happen at Mennie’s. “We’d like to see these

Try Outs for the

SATURDAY – AUGUST 17

Main Street Car & Motorcycle Show with DJ (9-2) Bags Tournament (10) @ Car Show Bocce Ball @ Fire Station (2) (Sign-up between Noon & 2) DJ & Karaoke by Mama Susz (3-7) Street Dance Featuring “Rival Karma (8-12) Fire Station Craft & Vendor Show (9-5) Ball DiaMonD Craft & Vendor Show (9-5) Kids’ Activities, Petting Zoo & Pony Rides (11-3) Bags Tournament (12:30) Horse Drawn Shuttle

By Ken Schroeder kschroeder@putnamcountyrecord.com

For more information contact... Mark Stevens at 815-224-2642 or Email: srarockers@aol.com

461063

New programs, opportunities for IVCC students

Working through Obamacare people covered so they don’t miss medications or skip healthcare. How do you justify taking that away from your employees? We’ll continue to make insurance affordable for our people,” Keeney said. Businesses are not the only agencies affected by the ACA. Illinois Valley Community College President Jerry Corcoran said they’re also feeling the crunch. “That’s affected how many hours part-time people can work before they go past the threshold and you have to offer them insurance,” Corcoran said. “Roughly half of our teachers are fulltime, and though we’d love to offer insurance to everyone who works here, health insurance costs over $20,000 per year, so there’s a limit to what we can do.” While employers are heavily impacted by the ACA, insurance agencies are being kept up on policies by their providers. Questions still remain, though. “The health insurance companies are preparing for it; the large employers are preparing for it; and it’s changing the landscape,” said Mike Gonet of Opper Gonet Insurance Agency. “We get articles from publications which carry bits and pieces of it. I haven’t read it; I don’t know if anybody’s read the whole thing or understands it. I think we’ll just find out as we go along.”


5 Local Wednesday, July 31, 2013 • The Putnam County Record • 5

Angelo’s owners renovate restaurant By Lyle Ganther Shaw Media Service

SPRING VALLEY — Angelo and Tracy Fousekas, owners of Angelo’s Restaurant and Pizza in Spring Valley, are planning a grand opening July 31-Aug. 4 to show off their recent renovation of the restaurant they have owned for the past 13 years. “We made a huge investment in making the interior nicer and more open for our customers,” said Tracy Fousekas. “We wanted to update and expand our party room.” The major renovation consists of installing two fireplaces, adding a big screen television and putting in new floors and walls. The restaurant’s interior is more open for patrons to come in and enjoy their meals. “We also made the party room larger by

knocking out a wall, so it can hold up to 50 people,” Fousekas said. “We can now host banquets, birthday parties or funeral meals.” With the recent renovation, Angelo’s Restaurant and Pizza can seat 120 people. The restaurant will also have a new menu of salads, wraps, burgers and paninis. Fousekas urges people to come in during the grand opening to sign up for a chance to win gift certificates, giveaways and pizza for a year. There will be daily specials during the grand opening. Hours for Angelo’s Restaurant and Pizza are 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Wednesdays and Thursdays, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Fridays, 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Saturdays and 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Sundays. They also offer a delivery service for all items on the menu.

Photo contributed

American Nickeloid Co. makes donation

Putnam County Record photo/Dixie Schroeder

Angelo’s Restaurant is hosting a grand opening July 31 through Aug. 4. There will be giveaways, gift certificates and a chance to win pizza for a year during the restaurant’s grand opening. Tracy Fousekas (from left), Nic Fousekas and Angelo Fousekas invite area residents to come in and try their new menu entrees. Angelo’s is located at 400 E. Dakota St. in Spring Valley.

American Nickeloid Co. of Peru recently made a $1,000 donation to the Illinois Valley Community College Peter Miller Community Technology Center capital campaign. IVCC President Jerry Corcoran (left) accepts the donation from Nickeloid Vice President/General Manager Mike Stariha and production scheduling manager Gregg Maze. “This is further proof of American Nickeloid’s commitment to the community and of the Maze family’s renowned philanthropic spirit,” said Corcoran. The campaign has now reached $1.8 million of its $2.1 million goal.

Median price of homes purchased rose 2.3 percent to $110,000 Homeowners in the United States paid a median price of $110,000 for their homes, according to a 2011 American Housing Survey profile released this month. This is an increase of 2.3 percent from the $107,500 reported in the 2009 survey. The median purchase price of homes constructed in the past four years was higher at $235,000, down 2.1 percent from the $240,000 reported for new construction in 2009. The profile provides information on the nation’s housing costs, mortgages and a variety of other physical and financial characteristics about housing in the United States. The statistics come from the American Housing Survey, which is sponsored by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau, and is the most compre-

hensive housing survey in the United States. National data are collected every odd-numbered year and metropolitan area data are collected on a rotating basis. The Census Bureau also released profiles for 29 selected metro areas. “The last five years remind us how central housing is to each of us personally, to the fiscal health of our cities and counties, and the national economy. For 40 years, the American Housing Survey has provided a unique set of data that connects the detailed characteristics of who is living in homes to the detailed characteristics of the homes themselves,” said Kurt Usowski, HUD’s Deputy Assistant Secretary for Economic Affairs. “From the American Housing Survey, we can see why people chose to move, how often homes need repairs, and the extent to which housing costs are

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outpacing income growth. All this information can help inform policymaking around continued recovery in the U.S. and in metropolitan areas around the country.” “We are pleased to have the opportunity to collaborate with HUD on these profiles,” said the Census Bureau’s Arthur Cresce Jr., assistant division chief for Housing Characteristics. “Analysts in government and business study the nation’s housing very closely and the AHS yields a wealth of information that can be used by professionals in nearly every field for planning, decision-making, and market research.” Some highlights for the U.S. include: • The median year occupied homes were built in the United States was 1974. • Nationally, piped gas was the most prevalent

home heating source, used by 50.4 percent of occupied homes. Electricity was used by 35.3 percent. • Among owner-occupied homes in the United States, 46.3 percent had working carbon monoxide detectors. • Among all U.S. homes, 72.5 percent of owneroccupied units had central air. • Median monthly expenditures for homeowners in the United States totaled $151 for real estate taxes, $121 for electricity and $58 for property insurance. • Among U.S. owneroccupied homes, 65.4 percent had a regular and/ or home equity mortgage and 23.4 percent had a refinanced primary mortgage. • The median monthly mortgage payment for homeowners was $1,015 in 2011.

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Casstevens-Jasiek honored Kathy Casstevens-Jasiek (center), marketing director at Starved Rock Lodge and Conference Center, accepts the Illinois Office of Tourism’s Land of Lincoln Award on July 11 from Bob Navarro (left), president of the Heritage Corridor Convention and Visitors Bureau, and Jen Hoezle, deputy director of the Illinois Office of Tourism. Starved Rock Lodge won the Illinois Office of Tourism’s Fan Favorite Attraction Contest in 2012, in which 64 state tourist attractions competed.

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6 Obit Records 6 • The Putnam County Record • Wednesday, July 31, 2013

PC Court report Driving 11-14 mph above limit Margee Cadwell, 28, Granville, fined $120. Linda McCabe, 53, Princeton, fined $230 plus three months supervision. Driving 15-20 mph above limit Kip Galloway, 43, Mackinaw, fined $120. Taylor Joiner, 18, Tiskilwa, fined $230 plus six months supervision. Scott Miller, 41, Granville, fined $230 plus three months supervision. William Urnikis, 53, Granville, fined $120. Thomas Wilhite, 57, Naperville, fined $120. Driving 26-30 mph above limit Kim Resetich, 52, DePue, fined $280 plus six months supervision. Possession drug paraphernalia Caitlyn Kelley, 25, Yardley, Pa., fined $2,825 plus 12 months conditional discharge. Possession cannabis/2.5-10 grams Matthew Girton, 34, Allentown, Pa., fined $2,498 plus six months supervision. Ryan Warfuel, 26, Eau Claire, Wis., fined $2,598 plus 12 months supervision. Michael Zavattaro, 25, Chicago, fined $1,633 plus six months supervision. Obstruction of justice/ destroy evidence Kaitlyn Lenick, 23, Cary, fined $4,806 plus 24 months probation/special conditions Possession cannabis less than 2.5 grams Justin Chamberlin, 27, Madison, Wis., fined $2,299 plus 12 months supervision. Michael Ciulini, 20, Hoffman Estates, fined $2,299 plus 12 months supervision. Kenneth Degner, 26,

Cary, fined $2,199 plus six months supervision. Marina Feffer, 19, Northbrook, fined $2,199 plus 12 months supervision. Bethany Lorene Fraga, 22, Ithaca, N.Y., fined $1,303 plus three months supervision. Jaclyn Galbreath, 18, Naperville, fined $2,299 plus 12 months supervision. Anthony Hanson, 20, Glen Ellyn, fined $1,303 plus three months supervision. Trevor Johnson, 17, Darien, fined $2,299 plus 12 months supervision. Caitlyn Kelly, 18, Yardley, Pa., fined $2,825 plus 12 months conditional discharge. Alicia Lehmann, 20, Glen Ellyn, fined $1,633 plus two days supervision. Timothy McCarthy, 26, Chicago, fined $1,303 plus three months supervision. Tracey Paglicci, 23, Buffalo, N.Y., fined $2,299 plus 12 months supervision. Paul Michael Pionke, 25, Atlantic Mine, Mi., fined $2,299 plus 12 months supervision. Jeffrey Rinchiuso, 23, Elk Grove Village, fined $2,299 plus 12 months supervision. Marissa Rodriquez, 19, Lake Zurich, fined $2,299 plus 12 months supervision. Gregory Roth, 20, Lake Barrington, fined $2,299 plus 12 months supervision. Harrison Ruesch, 20, Hoffman Estates, fined $2,299 plus six months supervision. Marissa Smith, 21, Ithaca, N.Y., fined $2,199 plus six months supervision. Marcus Winnings, 23, Tower Lakes, fined $2,299 plus 12 months supervision. Kaitlin Lenick, 23, Cary, $4,806 plus 12 months supervision.

Meeting Calendar Aug. 6 • Granville Village Board, Village Hall, 6:30 p.m. • Mark Village Board, Mark Community building, 7 p.m.

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FEMA extends registration deadline AURORA – The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has extended the registration deadline by 15 days to Aug. 8 for those families affected by the severe rain and floods from April 16 to May 5 of this year. Affected residents of 35 counties covered in the Illinois disaster declaration for severe storms and flooding are encouraged to register with FEMA. Individuals affected by the storms and flooding that occurred in the designated counties during the period of April 16 to May 5 can register online at www.disasterassistance. gov or via web-enabled phone at m.fema.gov. Applicants may also call 800-621-3362 or (TTY) 800-462-7585. People who use 711-Relay or Video Relay Services (VRS) can call 800-621-3362. For more information, visit the Illinois Disaster website www.fema.gov/ disaster/4116. Multilingual phone operators are

available on the FEMA helpline. Choose Option 2 for Spanish and Option 3 for other languages. “I am happy to see that they have extended the deadline,” said Jim Goldasich, coordinator of Putnam County Emergency Management Agency. “It will get those who haven’t had a chance to file an application to do so. Just call 800-621-3362. They will take apps over telephone and ask for information between applicant and agency. All information is privileged.” Goldasich encouraged all Putnam Country residents to make an application if their homes were damaged during the time period mentioned. He was happy to see FEMA was doing well and getting a lot of results from local residents. “All it takes is a telephone call,” he said. Federal assistance is only available for individuals who incurred damage in a designated county as a

CHAMPAIGN – Soil moisture levels at depths of 2 inches declined an average of 15 percent from June, according to Jennie Atkins, Water and Atmospheric Resources Monitoring (WARM) Program manager at the Prairie Research Institute, Illinois State Water Survey, University of Illinois. On July 15, soil moisture levels at 2 inches averaged 0.24 water

fraction by volume (wfv) across Illinois, a decline of 15 percent from June 15. Moisture levels were higher at deeper depths with statewide averages of 0.36 wfv at 20 inches and 0.44 wfv at 39 inches, exhibiting no significant change from June. Levels were greater in southern Illinois with an average of 0.33 wfv at 2 inches. However, the more localized nature of summer

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Individual Assistance for homeowners and renters can include grants to help pay for temporary rental assistance and other serious disaster-related expenses not met by insurance or other assistance programs. Assistance for homeowners also can include grants for home repair. Low-interest disaster loans from the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) are available to cover residential and business losses not fully compensated by insurance. SBA low-interest disaster loans may be available for homeowners, renters, businesses and private non-profit organizations of all sizes to repair or replace real estate, contents and/or personal property damaged in the severe storms and flooding. Information and assistance from SBA is available at 800-659-2955, (TTY) 800-877-8339 or online at www.sba.gov/services/disasterassistance.

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result of storms and flooding that occurred during the period of April 16 to May 5. If you incurred damage as a result of a storm that occurred before April 16 or after May 5, you are not eligible for assistance. Registering for assistance for damages sustained as a result of a storm that occurred before April 16 or after May 5 could be considered fraudulent, and you could face recoupment of grant money you receive and/or fraud charges. Counties designated for individual assistance for this disaster declaration are: Brown, Bureau, Calhoun, Clark, Cook, Crawford, DeKalb, Douglas, DuPage, Fulton, Grundy, Henderson, Henry, Kane, Kendall, Knox, Lake, LaSalle, Livingston, Marshall, Mason, McDonough, McHenry, Peoria, Pike, Putnam, Rock Island, Schuyler, Stark, Tazewell, Warren, Whiteside, Will, Winnebago, and Woodford.

precipitation resulted in soil moisture varying greatly in the area, ranging from 0.17 wfv in Carbondale to 0.36 wfv at Rend Lake at 2 inches. Soil temperatures averaged 82.9 degrees at 4 inches under bare soil, an increase of 7.5 degrees from June. The Illinois State Water Survey’s WARM Program collects hourly and daily weather and soil information

at 19 stations across the state. Daily and monthly summaries can be found at the WARM website (http:// www.isws.illinois.edu/ warm/) and in the Illinois Water and Climate Summary (http://www. isws.illinois.edu/warm/ climate.asp).  Maps of soil temperatures and moisture levels can also be found at the WARM website (http:// www.isws.illinois.edu/ warm/soiltemp.asp).

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FROM THE VILLAGE BOARD OF MCNABB

The Board of Trustees of the Village of McNabb would like to take this opportunity to thank village resident Douglas Kuhn for his many years of helping maintain the hedges in Coleman Park. This act of volunteerism has not gone unnoticed and is truly appreciated by us all.

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7 Perspective Wednesday, July 31, 2013 • The Putnam County Record • 7

The Editorial Page

Record The Putnam County

Putnam County’s Only Newspaper Sam R Fisher

Terri Simon

Publisher

Editor

A delicious fantasy of the future I have a simple fantasy. I basically imagine myself preparing a new dinner for my family when I’m all grown up. It’s just another end of the day in the American dream: Dinner cooking in the oven with a dessert cooling by the window or settling in the fridge. Then, when it’s all ready, I can see my family and me sitting down at the table, ready to discuss what happened in our 8-5 day. There is a simple truth to cooking that brings me much joy (but not as much as my music). Mixing eggs and sugar together is called creaming. If you add flour, baking powder, salt, milk, vanilla and butter to the creamed mixture and then bake it, there is a lovely yellow cake in your oven — a sinfully simple cake impossible to get off your mind. Spread some pretty colored frosting (a trusty gang of vanilla, oodles of shortening and more powdered sugar than should be allowed) over the beauty, and you have masterCOMMENTARY piece that makes taste buds cry with joy. There’s no funny business going on there. Under the correct conditions that any baked good deserves ... that cake will never, ever let you down. I swear upon the “Joy of Cooking.” A few weeks ago, I whipped up a batch of brownies for a small party. Granted it was boxed, something I strongly advise against, but brownies are always the exception. These specific brownies were just as good as if from scratch, so no party-goers could tell. As the brownies’ smell danced throughout the house, I was jolted back to last summer when my best friend and I would make them every other week. I remember my feat of the hand mixer and chocolate batter splattered on the cabinets, our faces, clothes and fingers. Food can bring up memories faster than pizza can burn the roof of your mouth. Mac ‘n’ cheese reminds me of my brother, sister and I inhaling it while watching “World’s Greatest Videos” on Spike. Pizza brings me to Friday night movies with my father. Clam chowder is reserved for my favorite seafood restaurant with my late grandparents. Chocolate mint bars make me think of Christmas Eve at my other grandparents’ home, and cinnamon rolls are for after presents on Christmas morning. Baking anything reminds me of being in my grandmother’s kitchen. She has influenced my mother’s and my baking and cooking choices. She has drilled in my mind that food is more than just a few ingredients melded together, if not in so many words. It’s a conversation starter and entertainment. It defines a culture, a community, a family and a person. It’s a dip into the past, a fold in the present, and a sift into the future. Taking a foods class has expanded my love for culinary arts, and sometimes I like to dabble into the idea of making it a career. At the end of our meal, I would ask my family if the recipe was worth keeping. I imagine them as excited about trying something new as I am. I also can see one of those nights filing away in my mind as another memory associated to food. Maddi Loiselle, 16, of Hennepin is a junior at Putnam County High School. She can be reached in care of this newspaper at P.O. Box 48, Granville, IL 61326.

Letters to the Editor should not be more than 500 words in length. Only one person can sign a Letter to the Editor. The author of the letter must include his/her name, hometown and telephone number. The author’s name and hometown will be published, however, the telephone number is only used to verify the authenticity of the author’s signature and will not be published. Unsigned letters are never read or published. No letter will be published until the Putnam County Record contacts the author of the letter to verify the signature. The Putnam County Record reserves the right to edit or refuse any Letter to the Editor.

On the street

What do you think about the governor suspending pay to legislators until they figure out pension reform?

“It’s about time. The rest of us don’t get paid if we don’t work.” Cheryl Shagena, McNabb

“I guess it’s good. Should take it away. They all need to get to work.” Don Junker, Magnolia

“It’s about time. We don’t work; we don’t get paid.” Edna Olson, Hennepin

“It is about time. Something needs to change here.” Kim Kettman, Granville

Maddi Loiselle

First Amendment “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof, or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press, or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.” Constitution of the United States, 1789

“I really don’t know much about it.” Hattie Carrie, Granville

Field of Dreams Lauren Passini from Standard and Elizabeth Larsen from Hennepin made their towns and Putnam County proud at the M-P Fair Queen Pageant recently. Lauren by winning the fair queen and Elizabeth by winning the Junior Miss Pageant. Congratulations to both of these special ladies. ••• When I planted corn when I was young, my dad who planted really perfectly straight rows told me “Keep your eyes on the line far ahead to make a straight row. Don’t look at the line close.” Sometimes I would look down or turn and look back where I had been and end up with crooked rows. Later in life I have found his advice equally helpful on living life. One day, Darryl Bouxsein was attempting to build a patio by his beautiful brick home. He bought 100 cement blocks, laying them out in a pattern, he discovered the area was too small, so he stacked the blocks against the house and cleared more space. The next day Darryl put the blocks back down only to find that the ground was too hard to keep the patio level. He ordered a truckload of sand to be delivered the next morning. Again he stacked the 100 blocks against the house. Observing all this, Darryl’s neighbor to the south who never misses much that goes on, Bill Trudell, asked, “Hey Darryl, are you going to put that patio away every night?” ••• A politician is a fellow who will lay down your life for his country. ••• My wife, Jeanne, suggests a

Darrell Alleman COMMENTARY book for me to read to enhance our long relationship. The title is “Women are from Venus, men are wrong!” ••• Children seldom misquote you. In fact they usually repeat word for word what should not have been said. Children are natural mimics, who act like their parents despite every effort by the parents to teach them good manners. Anyone who says it’s easy as taking candy from a baby has never tried it. With children you spend the first two years of their life teaching them to walk and talk. Then you spend the next 10 years, telling them to sit down and shut up. When mamas not happy, nobody is happy. ••• Trivia: “Which two Cubs set a modern day record by playing 98.8 percent of their team’s games for a whole decade?” Answer at the end of this article. ••• “Sending millionaires unemployment checks is a case study in out of control spending” - U.S. Sen. Tom Coburn, Republican from Oklahoma said in response to a congressional research service report that revealed nearly 2,400 people who received unemployment insurance in 2009 resided in households with annual incomes of $1 million or more. •••

“If God wanted us to vote, he would have given us candidates” Jay Leno “The problem with political jokes is that they get elected.” Henry Cate VII. “When I was a boy I was told that anybody could become president. I’m beginning to believe it.” - Clarence Darrow. ••• Never argue with someone you have to educate first. When Thomas Edison was a young boy his teachers said he was so stupid he could never learn anything. ••• In our country now you can be arrested for expired tags on your car, but not for being in the country illegally. You have to have your parents signature to go on a school trip, but not for an abortion. Your government believes the best way to eradicate trillions of dollars of debt is to spend more of our money. The government’s plan for getting people back to work is to provide 99 weeks of unemployment checks to not work. ••• Answer to the trivia question: Billy Williams and Ron Santo were the men. Williams missed 14 games and Santa 23 from 1961 to 1970. The Cubs played 1,618 games in that span of time. ••• Count your blessings, by smiles not tears, count your age by friends, not years. Darrell Alleman of Granville can be reached in care of this newspaper at Putnam County Record, P.O. Box 48, Granville, IL 61326.


8 Biz Ag 8 • The Putnam County Record • Wednesday, July 31, 2013

USDA report shows corn and soybeans hold steady WASHINGTON, D.C. – The July World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates report released July 11 by the Agriculture Department shows no change in the projected corn and soybean yields this month. July’s WASDE report projected the 2013 corn yield to be 156.5 bushels per acre and the soybean yield to be 44.5 bushels per acre, paralleling the June report. AFBF economist Todd Davis said corn production is down slightly from June due to slightly lower harvested acreage expectations. “The corn crop is projected at 13.95 billion bushels, down from slightly above 14 billion bushels in last month’s report. Despite a decreased estimate, corn production is still on target for a record setting-year, if realized,” said Davis. Davis added the soybean crop, projected at 3.42 billion bushels, would also be record-setting if obtained.

“The late planted corn and soybeans need cooperative weather throughout the rest of the growing season as well as a late frost.” Todd Davis Both corn and soybean acreage were reflective of the acreage survey released June 28, upping corn planted acres by 100,000 to 97.4 million acres and soybean planted acres by 600,000 to 77.7 million acres. The report predicts a dip in 2013-14 corn exports by 50 million bushels due to a later harvest and tight old crop corn stocks. The 201314 exports are projected at 1.25 billion, which would be an increase of 550 million bushels from the 2012-13 marketing year. Davis said the estimate may be opti-

mistic because of South American competition. Corn ending stocks are estimated to build significantly, from 729 million in 2012-13 to a projected 1.959 billion for 2013-14. Davis said the WASDE projections for corn ending stocks are higher than the trade pre-report predictions of 1.88 billion. “Elevated corn ending stocks predictions will reflect negatively on marketing-year prices, reducing the estimated 2013 farm price to $4.80 per bushel from $6.95 per bushel in 2012,” said Davis.

U.S. soybean ending stocks are expected to more than double from the 2012-13 marketing year, projected at 295 million bushels for 201314, up from 265 million bushels in June’s WASDE report. The increase will lower the 2013-14 projected soybean price to $10.75 per bushel, down from $14.40 per bushel in the 2012-13 marketing year. “Due to a late planting season, the corn crop is on the verge of entering the crucial reproductive phase of tasseling. Moderate temperatures and moisture should ensure a good crop,” said Davis. “The late planted corn and soybeans need cooperative weather throughout the rest of the growing season as well as a late frost.” August’s WASDE, released Aug. 12, will include the first field and producer surveys and provide the first projection of 2014 corn and soybean yields.

Soil health field day set SUBLETTE – A field day highlighting soil health through the use of conservation tillage practices and cover crops is planned at the Althaus Brothers farm in Sublette Aug. 8 from 10 a.m. to noon. The public is invited to explore properties of healthy soil with a Natural Resources Conservation Services soil scientist, view plots and soil pits comparing conventional tillage and strip tillage, and to learn about cover cropping basics.  “Though they have been grown for generations, cover crops are among today’s exciting frontiers in conservation,” said Aaron Seim, a district conservationist with the Natural Resources Conservation

Service (NRCS). “Cover crops are employed for a wide variety of uses, such as covering, protecting, or building the soil. Investing money, time and management in both cover crops and conservation tillage is a bold, but often highly productive, strategy for a farming system that is healthy over the long term – both economically and ecologically.” Attendance is free, but attendees are asked to register by calling or emailing the Lee County Farm Bureau Office at 815-857-3531 or leecfb@ comcast.net to ensure enough food is available for everyone. Attendees are to meet in the field north of the house at the Althaus Brothers’ farm

located at 154 LaMoille Road, Sublette. Lunch will be provided at noon.  “We are excited to be part of this farmland conservation field day in the upper reach of the Big Bureau Creek Watershed,” said Stacy James of Prairie Rivers Network.  “Cover crops and reduced tillage are among the best practices to improve soil health while increasing

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farm productivity if done right. This field day will put interested farmers in touch with experts who have valuable insight.”  This field day is sponsored by the Lee and Bureau County offices of the NRCS, Lee County Farm Bureau, Prairie Rivers Network, Illinois Stewardship Alliance, and Friends of Big Bureau Creek Watershed.

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Illinois crop yield surveys underway SPRINGFIELD – Enumerators representing the Illinois Field Office of USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service will soon begin collecting data that will be used to estimate the corn and soybean yields that Illinois farmers will harvest this year. The Objective Yield survey consists of 280 sample plots of corn and 230 sample plots of soybeans that are randomly selected from fields across Illinois. Each month until plants reach maturity, enumerators measure and count the number of plants and ears of corn or bean pods in each plot. At maturity, samples of the crop are collected for weighing at the agency laboratory, which permits a more accurate yield determination to be made. “Information collected during the Objective Yield survey is used to set monthly yield forecasts that have a farranging effect on agriculture and agriculture related industries,” said Mark Schleusener, State Statistician of the Illinois Field Office. “Farmers, buyers, processors and grain-handling industries rely on unbiased and accurate predictions of supply to make informed decisions concerning marketing, product access and transpor-

“Information collected during the Objective Yield survey is used to set monthly yield forecasts that have a farranging effect on agriculture and agriculture related industries.” Mark Schleusener tation.” The first forecast of corn and soybean production will be available Aug. 12. Monthly forecasts will then be updated Sept. 12, Oct. 11 and Nov. 8. After harvest, final production statistics are published in mid-January, based on laboratory weights of crop samples and a mail and telephone survey of producers. The Illinois Field Office is the local administrator of programs for the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service and is a cooperator with the Illinois Department of Agriculture.

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9 Sports Wednesday, July 31, 2013 • The Putnam County Record • 9

Edgewood Ladies League

Sports

MCNABB – The Edgewood Ladies League played on July 23. Hostesses were Jackie Stupic and Marge VanNess. Play of the day was: Most one putts — A, 2 putts — B, 3 putts — C. Winners included: A Flight — Jackie Stupic and Roberta Henson; B Flight — Dee Khoury; C Flight — Kathy Kline and Marge VanNess. Low gross and Low Net — Jackie Stupic; Low Putts — Dolly Piccoli and Birdies — Roberta Henson on hole No. 4.

PCHS volleyball ‘setting up’ for 2013 campaign By Dixie Schroeder dschroeder@putnamcountyrecord.com

GRANVILLE – The 2013 Putnam County High School volleyball season isn’t underway yet, but second year head coach Amy Kreiser already has her team busy this summer. Kreiser is young and full of enthusiasm and brings several years of coaching experience to PCHS. “I went to Augustana College, and I played my freshman year,” she said. “I decided that I wanted to coach club volleyball, so I coached the U-15 Club team while I finished up at Augie.” Her previous club coaching experience led her to the club volleyball circuit in the Illinois Valley where

Amy Kreiser

she coached the IVP (Illinois Valley Power), a local club team that included a lot of area girls. She then decided to apply for the varsity job at PCHS. Kreiser learned by example in coaching as her dad, Ron Kreiser, coached at Fieldcrest. Kreiser not only coaches for PCHS but had coached for the past three years at Lostant Junior High School, as well as continuing coaching on the club circuit. She brings a high level of enthusiasm to all her efforts, and her teams have responded positively. Goals of the summer for Kreiser are for participants to get in condition for the upcoming season, so that when it actually starts, the girls will be ready to focus on volleyball skills. According to Kreiser, the girls have goals and work toward them. They work out unofficially a couple times a week, playing summer league when games are scheduled and working on skills when at PCHS. “The girls know at the beginning of the season that they have expectations they have to meet,” she said. “So that if they were not at a summer workout session because of vacation or whatever, there

Putnam County Record photo/Dixie Schroeder

Putnam County’s Taylor Erjavsek hits the ball from the frontline against two Ottawa High School defenders in the practice on July 25. are things that they could have been doing on their own to help them prepare. When it comes into season time, we are not only necessarily trying to get into shape but can really focus on the volleyball part of it.” Kreiser enjoys her team and loves to work on the skills she demonstrates with them. “There’s a joy that

comes out of these workouts, just like teaching,” she said. “When a kid finally gets a skill and it clicks with one of the girls, you see them be successful and see their excitement and their passion for the game when they get what they want.” In 2012, Putnam County pulled out of the merry-go-round of coaches with Krei-

ser’s arrival and upped their performance levels. PCHS finished with the best record in the program in the last eight years. The team finished fourth in the conference in the regular season along with fourth in the conference tournament. The team also won the AshtonFranklin Tournament. Kreiser is welcoming back the majority of

her team for the 2013 season and looks forward to taking on conference foes like Fieldcrest, Woodland and Marquette. “With so many returning to the team, I have a lot of options and depth at each of our positions,” she said. “So that’s good. We even have some returning people in the positions which is also great.”

Athletes keep a tight schedule at PCHS By Dixie Schroeder dschroeder@putnamcountyrecord.com

Editor’s note: this is part two of a five part series GRANVILLE – What makes students today make the choices they do in high school? Some choose clubs, some choose sports and some choose not to do anything in the extra-curricular activity area. Those that choose sports seem to be, for the most part, able to keep a lot more “balls” juggling in the air as they go through high school. Student-athletes at Putnam County High School break down into two categories: those that like team sports and those who like to challenge themselves. These students all agree that whether in a team sport or an individual one, at least 50 percent of their game or contest is mental. A team sport that appeals to many girls at Putnam County High School is volleyball. Junior Megan Rehn and senior Taylor Pettit have played volleyball first for the Putnam County Lady Pumas as well as the Lady Panthers at PCHS. The Putnam County High School volleyball program has gone through several head coaches in the past few years. Current head coach Amy Kreiser will be entering her second year at the helm with the 2013 fall season. “Last year was a better year,” said Rehn. “She (Kreiser) did a lot for us.” There are multiple reasons both students play the game. Camaraderie, physical fitness and possible scholarships for college are just a few reasons they play.   “I just love the game,” said Pettit. “You only get so long to play a sport before you have to grow up and can’t do fun things like this anymore I guess.”

“I love the game. I also love the competition,” said Rehn. “I love being in that kind of a situation. We, (the current junior and senior class) have played together in every sport for as long as I can remember. Bottom line, we play really well together.” “Our group works very well together,” Pettit said. “We don’t just do the school sports. We go out and we do traveling softball and volleyball. We are always working to get better.” With the future holding graduation and college, both look forward to playing if at all possible at the college level. The idea of doing so while on a scholarship in their chosen sport wouldn’t hurt. “I would love to play sports in college,” said Pettit. “Because I don’t want to stop playing, I just love it so much.” “I would like to as well. I think it would be a really great experience,” said Rehn. “It would be great to play that much and continue my career.” Recruitment for volleyball programs is a little different at the small town level. “There are a lot of things you can do to promote yourself,” said Rehn. “You can put your profile at a site called recruitme.com I think a couple of people from our school have already done that. Especially if you don’t play club team, this is good. There are colleges that go to the club tournaments and they watch.” Volleyball itself has gotten a lot more sophisticated from its introduction as a high school extracurricular sport. Both Pettit and Rehn focus on specific positions that they play on the team and work to better themselves. “I had always been a setter since grade school,” said Rehn. “But this year I’m going to be a back row, defensive specialist.”

“Oh, I’m a hitter and I hit outside,” Pettit said. “I also play back row. So sometimes I play all the way around on the floor.”   “You just really have to work really hard at the position you play,” said Rehn. “If you are at a single position you have to keep practicing that one, you can’t be doing others.” Rehn and Pettit have learned to lean on their teammates for the years. When playing a team sport this means that you count on the others that play with you. If one person misses a ball or does not serve correctly, others on the team try to cheer them up. Focus and the mental part of the game are important. Both girls have played club volleyball too. Club volleyball is during the winter, starting up about the time high school volleyball ends. There are tryouts for each team. The season runs roughly from December to April each year. The teams play their season mostly in the Chicagoland area. Club volleyball is funded by the individual athlete’s family. “I thought it was fun,” said Pettit. “It was fun,” said Rehn “It was good because we got different coaches. Different coaches can bring different things to the table. Some are good, some not so much, but you pick up little things.” Most student-athletes recognize that sports exercise not only the body, but the mind. Sports also offer the opportunity to have athletes earn scholarships to help pay for college. It takes a dedicated and organized individual to become successful. Putnam County High School offers cross country golf teams for both boys and girls; volleyball and baseball in the fall. In the winter, it offers basketball for both boys and girls as well as a co-op wrestling team. The school then offers track for boys and girls along with softball and baseball in the spring.


10 Life 10 • The Putnam County Record • Wednesday, July 31, 2013

Community Jessica Baker named scholarship winner GRANVILLE — The Granville National Bank trustee for the Erna A. Moews Educational Trust has been notified of the winner for the trust’s 2013-14 scholarship. This year’s scholarship winner is Jessica Baker, the daughter of Lee and Juli Baker of Granville. The recipient is chosen on the consideration of scholarship and community service activities. One must be a resident of Granville Township and meet other criteria set up under Erna Moews’ will.

The applicant is chosen by a committee which consists of the local school district superintendent and one other school administrator. The scholarship is awarded to those students who are enrolled in the College of Architecture, College of Fine Arts, or any college in which the applicant will be working toward a degree with a major in any science, mathematics or computer degree. Baker will receive $1,340 for the 2013-14 academic year.

Bible School time!

Library Corner Hennepin: Story hour continues at 10:30 a.m. on Friday mornings for young children. Themes will coordinate with the library’s Summer Reading Program, stories and crafts will be appropriate for the very young. Summer reading programs for July at the Hennepin Library: July 31, 1-2 p.m. Destination: Putnam County. Summer readers return home from their worldwide travels for the finale of the summer reading program. Come share adventures, stories and crafts from around the world. McNabb: Summer reading programs for August at the McNabb Library: July 27 - Discover your continent ... North America. The Marshall-Putnam Farm Bureau will take us on an adventure from Canada to Mexico. Get ready to explore! Aug. 3, 10-11 a.m. - Returning to Putnam County! Summer readers return home from their global adventures for the final summer reading program. Come share stories and crafts from around the world. Standard: Summer reading programs for August at the Standard Library: Returning to Putnam County, Aug. 1, 1-2 p.m.

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815-339-6278 • Open 7 Days a Week MOn. 1/4 Fried Chicken & Ribeye Steak Dinner $9.99 Fries $5.00 saT. 1/2 Rack Baby Back Tues. All You Can Eat Tacos Ribs $8.99 $5.00 sun. Carolina BBQ Pork WeD. Bleu Cheese Steak Sandwich w/ Slaw $5.00 Wrap w/ one side $7.99 Thur. Hamburger Waterstreet Horseshoe $6.99 Pub & eatery FrI. Ribeye Steak now open! Sandwich $7.99;

www.paganolearys.net 304 S. McCoy St. • Granville, IL

Putnam County Record photo/Dixie Schroeder

Children from the Putnam County Methodist churches attended Bible school on July 23-25. The theme, “Make Hay,” was assisted by a giant farm scene made by Fred Nimke and Herschal Kays. “It was a multiteam effort to decorate the basement,” said Pastor Carol Stufflebeam.

‘MagnoliAffaire’ set for Aug. 16-18 MAGNOLIA — MagnoliAffaire, the summer celebration of Magnolia, is set for Aug. 16-18. The festivities begin on Friday with a family movie in the park at dusk sponsored by the Magnolia Fire Department Auxiliary. Bring your lawn chairs; refreshments will be available for purchase. A weekend softball tournament is planned with beer and concessions available at the ball diamond. No coolers will be allowed. Interested parties should contact Peggy Smith at 815-257-0707. Saturday will feature a craft and vendor show in the fire station and at the ball diamond park from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Any questions regarding the craft and vendor show should be directed

to Sara Rubin at 309-369-3991. The car and motorcycle show with a DJ will be from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. For details, contact Chris Foster at 815-780-0728. Bags tournaments are scheduled for 10 a.m. at the car show and 12:30 p.m. at the ball diamond. A bocce ball tournament begins at the fire station at 2 p.m. with sign-up from noon to 2 p.m. Kids’ activities at the ball diamond from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. will include games and a petting zoo, as well as pony rides sponsored by Gallop 4ward Equine Products. A horse-drawn shuttle sponsored by Wayne Withers will provide transportation between the

ball diamond and Main Street with donations welcome. The fire department pork chop fry will begin at 11 a.m., serving at the fire station and ball diamond. Mama Susz will provide DJ and karaoke entertainment from 3 to 7 p.m. Rival Karma (sponsored by Magnolia Fire Department and Auxiliary) will perform for the street dance from 8 p.m. to midnight. Beer and concessions will be available at the ball diamond and fire station. Sunday’s activities include the fire department pork chop fry beginning at 11 a.m., kids’ water fights at 11 a.m. with fire department water fights immediately following. Beer and concessions will again be available.

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11 Life Wednesday, July 31, 2013 • The Putnam County Record • 11

Counting the days

Paniers will note 70th wedding anniversary Mr. and Mrs. Joe Panier of Granville will celebrate their 70th wedding anniversary this December. Due to travel restraints and a family reunion in August, the couple will celebrate their anniversary with an open house from 1 to 4 p.m. Aug. 11 at the United Church of Christ in Granville. They will also celebrate Joe’s 90th birthday. Joe Panier and the former Jean Harker were high school sweethearts at Hopkins Township High Class (Class of ‘41 and ‘42). They were married Dec. 20, 1943, while Joe was on leave from the Army. The couple joined the Lutheran Church after they got married and are still active members. Joe worked as a carpenter with the Pletsch Brothers in McNabb until 1974, when he was elected as Putnam County Clerk and Jean was his Deputy County Clerk. They continued that job for 13 years prior to their retirement. They are the parents of three children, Janice, married to Ted Querciagrossa, lives in La Quinta, Calif.; Joyce, married to Ron Zellmer, lives in Peoria, Ariz.; and Jim, married to Jennifer (Kenyon), Pan-

School is just around the corner By Ken Schroeder kschroeder@putnamcountyrecord.com

GRANVILLE – Despite the temperatures of the past several days, August is here, and with it comes the new school year. While school usually begins in late August or even early September, many schools – including the Putnam County School District – have started earlier in an attempt to compensate

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Panier ier of Plainfield. They also have four grandchildren, Krista (Zellmer) Platte, married to Mark Platte, of Waverly, Iowa; Dana Querciagrossa of Huntington Beach, Calif.; Brandon Querciagrossa, married to Bridget (Mansfield), of Phoenix, Ariz.; and Eric Zellmer, married to Leigh (Blackwell), of Trabuco Canyon, Calif. They also have six great-grandchildren, Nathan and Kelsey Platte of Waverly, Iowa, Jacob Caporicci of Huntington Beach, Calif., and Cullen, Alana and Trevor Querciagrossa of Phoenix, Ariz. Everyone is invited to join them for coffee/punch and dessert. They request that gifts be omitted. Cards may be sent to the couple at: P.O. Box 192, Granville, IL 61326.

for heavier winters and potential snow days. “We’re ready,” said Jay McCracken, superintendent of schools. “Our teachers have been working at getting their classrooms ready, and we’ve cleaned up the buildings. Our new technology supervisor has our computers set. We’re looking forward to a great school year.” Problems with the bus service last year have been addressed with a change to a new bus service this year. Although there were a few hic-

cups during the early start program, things are better, according to McCracken. “Johannes (bus service) has been very proactive in meeting our needs. I am very happy with their performance so far,” he said. Registration is Aug. 1, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Aug. 2, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Forms and documents for registration can be found on the school website at http:// www.pcschools535. org/vnews/display.v/ ART/4e2eed3a73875. The student handbook

Recipe Corner Now’s the time to do some delicious and tasty peach recipes since they are becoming so abundant now.

Perfect Peach Cobbler 4 cups sliced peaches 1 tablespoon lemon juice 1 cup all-purpose flour 1 cup sugar 1/8 teaspoon salt 1 beaten egg 6 tablespoons butter Place peaches on bottom of 10-by-6-by-1 1/2inch baking dish. Sprin-

kle with lemon juice. Add 1/2 cup sugar to peaches and mix. Sift together dry ingredients. Add egg and toss with fork until crumbly. Sprinkle over peaches. Drizzle with butter. Bake at 375° for 35 to 40 minutes or until slightly browned. Top with cinnamon and ice cream if desired (1 pint vanilla ice cream, softened and 3/4 teaspoon cinnamon.)

Peach Muffins 4 cups flour 2/3 cup brown sugar 2 tablespoons baking

for each school is also viewable on the district website. Parents and students should note all students with the exception of high school students are prohibited from bringing cell phones or pagers to school. High school students must leave their phones turned off except during lunch periods. Institute days for instructors are Aug. 15 and 16. The first day of school is Aug. 19, with school dismissing at 2:05 each day from Aug. 19-23.

Judy Dyke GRANDMA JUDY’S CAFE

powder 1 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 1/4 teaspoon allspice 2 eggs 2 cups sour cream 1/2 cup vegetable oil 1 cup peaches, chopped Mix dry ingredients. Set aside. Combine eggs, sour cream and oil. Add peaches. Add to dry ingredients. Stir just until moistened. Coat 24 muffin cups with Pam cooking spray. Fill

muffin cups 2/3 full with batter. Bake at 400° for 20 to 25 minutes. Do you have a peach recipe you’d like to share with other readers? Email it to me at judyd2313@frontier. com. Please remember to include your name, address and telephone number (telephone number won’t be published). Happy Peach-ing!

2013 Granville Town-Wide Garage Sales Map & Addresses N

Hill St.

Elizabeth St.

Edwards St.

S

Village of Granville Putnam County, Illinois

Elm St.

E

School St. Opper Ave.

W. Silverspoon Ave.

E. Silverspoon Ave.

Hopkins Ave.

Main St.

Main St.

Filmore Ct.

Harrison Ct.

Hopkins Ave. Sheridan St.

Rail Rd.

Elm St.

Church St.

N. McCoy St.

Willow St.

Laughlin Ave.

Division St.

E. Tomlinson St.

Route 71

#

Cleveland Cir.

Archie Ave.

Harrison Ct.

Front St.

Colby St.

Archie Ave. South St.

High St.

Hopkins Ave.

Whitaker St.

Shafer St.

Harrison Ct.

Hawthorne Ave.

W. South St.

W. South St.

Cleveland Cir.

Church St.

W. Main St.

Front St. N. McCoy St.

High St.

Shafer St.

Turner St.

Hawkins St.

Westscott St.

Adams St.

Hennepin St.

Tomlinson St.

Grant St.

Route 71

This map is provided to help you in locating the addresses listed below. Clip and take with you on Friday, August 2nd & Saturday, August 3rd. Good Hunting! • 411 E. Harrison St. • 409 S. Willow St. • 103 E. South St. • 12763 IL Hwy 71

• 511 Westcott St. • 307 E. Hopkins Ave. (in rear) • 1117 E. Main St. • 12197 N. Division St.

• 212 S. McCoy St. (Granville Library) • 306 W. Hopkins St. • 15123 N. 1100 Ave. • 205 Elliot St., Mark, IL

Unless otherwise marked, all addresses are Granville.

G R A N V ILLE

!

Division St.

W


12 Life 12 • The Putnam County Record • Wednesday, July 31, 2013

Cooling center in Standard STANDARD — The Putnam County Community Center is announcing Country Catering from Lostant will provide meals on Tuesdays and Thursdays. The meal will be avail-

able to everyone at a cost of $5 per meal and will be available to senior citizens for a suggested donation of $5. If you would like to eat, call 815-339-2711 at least 24 hours in advance. The public is also

reminded the PCCC is a cooling center for the community. If you or someone you know is without air conditioning this summer, call the office between 8 a.m. and 3 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Library

favorite and not-so-favorite reads. The next meeting is Aug. 1 at 10 a.m.  Summer reading programs for July at the Granville Library include: Return to Granville on July 30 from 10 to 11 a.m. Condit (Putnam): Summer reading programs for August at the Putnam (Condit) Library: Returning to Putnam County, Aug. 1, 3-4 p.m. Magnolia: 75th anniversary program: “An In-depth Look at Mag-

nolia.” At 6:30 p.m. Aug. 5, the Magnolia Library will explore the history of Magnolia, the oldest town in Putnam County. Sandra Woest and Lonna Nauman will present a program filled with the important events and lives of the community’s founders and their accomplishments. Summer reading programs for July at the Magnolia Library: Returning to Putnam County, July 31, 3-4 p.m.

From Page 10 Granville: Special Event: On Aug. 3, the Granville Library will have a book sale in conjunction with “Garage Sale” days in Granville. Hardcover books are 50 cents, and paperback books are 25 cents. Proceeds will go toward our preschool story hour in the fall. The Favorites Club meets the first Thursday of each month to discuss

Performances announced for ‘Seussical, Jr.’ LASALLE — Summer comes to a close at Stage 212 with the children’s theater workshop production of “Seussical, Jr.,” a musical extravaganza by Lynn Ahrens

and Stephen Flaherty. “Seussical, Jr.” will be presented Aug. 16 (two shows) and Aug. 18 (two shows) at Stage 212, 700 First St., LaSalle. Friday and Saturday evening

Tri-CounTy AuTo SAleS

Rt. #71 • Standard, IL 61363

339-6165

2008 Hyundai Sonata 4 Cyl. $5,995

2005 Dodge Stratus R/T, Loaded $3,595

2007 Chevy Cobalt Coupe $4,595

2004 Chrysler Sebring Conv. $2,995

2006 Ford Five Hundred Loaded $3,995

2003 Chrysler Town & Country Van $2,995

Attention Golfers! Join us for the

putnam County Classic Golf tournament AuGust 3, 2013 stArtinG At 1 pm

Located at Edgewood Park Golf Course

tHere will be A men’s Division women’s Division mixed Division $10 Entry Fee per person plus Golf Fees Best Ball - 4 per team

there will be food & drinks available along with CAsH priZes!!! Proceeds Benefit P.C.H.S. Boys and Girls Golf Teams and P.C. Athletic Boosters

performances begin at 7 p.m. Saturday matinee begins at 1 p.m. Sunday performances begin at 1 and 3:30 p.m. Tickets are $10 each and on sale to the public beginning Aug. 1.

Registration set for PC Schools GRANVILLE – Registration for Putnam County Schools will be Aug. 1 and 2 at Putnam County High School. Hours will be 9 a.m. to noon and 1:30 to 7 p.m. on Aug. 1, and 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Aug. 2. Parents are urged to register and pay fees on these dates at Putnam County High School. Late registration will be held during the week of Aug. 5-9 at each school. Parents who miss the Aug. 1-2 registrations will need to register at the school at which their child will attend. Registration packets include emergency forms. Federal law now requires all children from age 5 to have a Social Security number. Please bring this information when registering. Registration packets will be available to download from the school district’s website, www. pcschools535.org. The first day of school is Aug. 19 beginning at 8:05 a.m. Regular bus runs will begin on that date. School will be dismissed at 2:05 p.m. School will dismiss at

2:05 p.m. each day the first week of school. School and sports physical exams will be available for $25 at PCHS from 3 to 6 p.m. on Aug. 1. Parents please note all children must be in compliance with both health examination and immunization requirements to attend school. Students in non-compliance may register for school but may not attend classes until such time as they are in compliance. Children entering kindergarten must reach their fifth birthday on or before Sept. 1. They are required to have a physical, dental and eye examination, as well as a lead screening. All immunizations must be up-to-date and verified by a health care provider. Students entering kindergarten, sixth and ninth grades are required to have a physical examination prior to the opening of school. Detailed information about registration will also be posted on the school district’s website at www. pcschools535.org.

• Out-of-state transfer students (regardless of age) must have physical, eye and dental exams and up-to-date immunizations. • Preschoolers must have up-to-date immunizations, a physical exam and lead screening. • Kindergarten students need up-to-date immunizations, a physical exam, lead screening, an eye exam (which must be performed by an optometrist) and a dental exam. • Second-graders require a dental exam. Sixth-grade students require up-to-date immunizations (Tdap is required), a physical exam and a dental exam. • Ninth-grade students must have up-to-date immunizations (Tdap is required) and a physical exam. • Grades 7, 8, 10, 11 and 12 – Tdap vaccination is required if your child has not already received this vaccine. Physical exams must include diabetes screening, the doctor’s signature with phone number, and a health history with parent’s signature.


13 Granville Cruise Wednesday, July 31, 2013 • The Putnam County Record • 13

Granville’s Annual Cruise Night • Local Bars & Restaurants Serving Refreshments & Food Street Side • Food Vendors • Street Dance featuring Road Angel starts at 8pm • Free for Kids: Petting Zoo, Pony Rides, Balloon Guy • Putnam County Band & Putnam County Panteras

AuGust 2, 2013

starts at 5pm, Downtown DeVine Floral Make Any Room Look Great! • Carpet • Vinyl • Ceramic • Hardwood

“Family Owned & Operated” 815-339-2345 • 327 S. McCoy St., Granville Come check us out at: www.granvilleflooring.com

We’re proud to be a part of our community!

Al Cioni

F ord inC. No baloney with Al Cioni! 504 S. McCoy • Granville

815-339-2511 Visit us at: www.alcioniford.com

Designs, Gifts & Tanning

• Personal Service • Elegant Style • Memorable Designs

Full service florist for any occasion State-of-the-art tanning beds at our Granville location

Call now to schedule an appointment to have your air conditioner cleaned & checked or get a new high efficiency American Standard air conditioner!

Kettman Heating & Plumbing, inC.

815-339-6124

107 E. Harrison Ct. • Granville www.kettmanheating.com

Look For the Man in the Orange & White Van!

24 Hour Service Lic. #058-179011

Drive Up 402 South McCoy St. Granville, IL 61326

Main Bank 328 South McCoy St. Granville, IL 61326 815-339-2222 800-259-1383 (toll free) 815-339-2123 (fax)

“We’re here to serve you”

Ann uAl C ookout !!

110 N. Columbia Avenue, Oglesby • 815-883-3373 616 Grant Street, Granville • 815-339-2400 505 Edward Street, Henry • 309-364-2400

Saturday, Aug. 3

Come Out & Enjoy Granville Days!

ribeye Steak Sandwiches pork chop Sandwiches Burgers • Hotdogs

Hopkins & Associates, CPAs 306 S. McCoy St., Granville, IL 61326 815-339-6630 726 S. Main St., Princeton, IL 61356 815-875-1186

Thurs., AugusT 1

It’s All About Comfort

G ranville N ational B ank

FREE MOVIE IN THEat Hopkins Park PARK in Granville ConCessions oPen at 7:30Pm movie to start at Dark

Fri., AugusT 2

11 am - 1 pm

Beer SpecialS Miller Lite $14.99 24 pack cans

Bud & Bud Light $14.99 24 pack cans

The Corner STore 815-339-2592 • Downtown Granville

2 DAY EVENT! during Granville Days

Friday during car show

We will be serving Beer, BurGerS, hot doGS, Corn BoIL outside

Dining room is also open inside See the band “Road Angel” directly across the street! Beer sales open outside until midnight Bar open inside until 3 am

CRuIsE NIGHT

Saturday

Food VendoRs And LoCAL BARs & ResTAURAnTs seRVinG ReFReshmenTs & Food sTReeT side Performances by Putnam County Band 6:00pm Putnam County Panteras 6:30pm FREE for KIDS: Petting Zoo • Pony Rides Unique Twist: The Balloon Guy Street Dance featuring Road Angel – 8pm-12

Break out the Beach party clothes!

Cruise in to start at 5Pm in Granville

Luau Party on the Patio!

Kitchen serving 5-9 Tom, Todd & Daryl • 9 to Midnight

218 S. McCoy St. Granville, IL Tue. - Sat. Kitchen Open 11AM- 9PM Bar Open 9:30 AM & All Day Sunday


14 Life/Class 14 • The Putnam County Record • Wednesday, July 31, 2013

––––––––––– Classifieds –––––––––– General Terms and Policies The Putnam County Record reserves the right to classify correctly, edit, reject or cancel any advertisement at any time in accordance with its policy. All ads must be checked for errors by the advertiser, on the first day of publication. We will be responsible for the first incorrect insertion, and its liabilities shall be limited to the price on one insertion. CLASSIFIED LINE AD & LEGAL DEADLINES: • Wednesday Paper deadline Thursday before by 3pm We Accept Call 815-875-4461 classified@bcrnews.com

-100Announcements 108 • Lost & Found Found: Female Yellow Lab mix, found near 211 South Hawthorne Street in Granville. Owner or interested party please call McNabb Veterinary at 815-882-2000 Found: Male intact brindle and white Pit Bull with a black collar. Found near 600 West Harrison Street in Granville. Owner or interested party please call McNabb Veterinary at 815-882-2000 LOST: Cell Phone In Tonica Park on July 7th. Contains very important pictures. Reward! If you found it, please call 815-442-3284

110 • Special Notices FREE SCRAP METAL PICKUP Household appliances. Vehicles. Farm machinery. Any & all metals accepted. 815-830-3524

CONGRATULATIONS To My Wife who has completed a life long goal of acquiring her Doctoral Degree. We are very proud of you Dr. Nora Hamilton

- 200 Employment 228 • Help Wanted At this time, the Board of Director's for the Putnam County Conservation District is looking to fill the position of TRUSTEE, from any township located in Putnam County. This is a five year term commencing on July 22, 2013, during the Annual meeting. The Board meets monthly, the fourth Monday of each month at 6:00 pm. Anyone interested, please send your resume to the Putnam County Board: %County Clerk, 120 North 4th Street, Hennepin, IL 61327, by August 7, 2013

228 • Help Wanted Wanted: Experienced COOK & WAIT STAFF. Please call 815-866-4500 or 815-664-4433

HARD TO FIND THAT RIGHT PERSON FOR THAT JOB OPENING? The Putnam County Record Classified can reach just the right person you are looking for to fill that job opening. Call 815-8754461

232 • Business Opportunities ********** THE CLASSIFIED Advertising Department of the Putnam County Record Does not have the opportunity to fully investigate the credibility of each advertiser appearing within these columns. If an offer sounds “too good to be true” it probably is. Proceed with caution if you are asked to send money or to give a credit card number. Proceed with caution in calling 900 phone numbers. All phone numbers prefixed by”900” are charged to the CALLER. Charges may be assessed on a “per minute” basis rather than a “per call” basis. The Putnam County Record Classifieds makes every effort to qualify these charges for the reader. If you have a concern about an advertiser, please contact: Better Business Bureau 330 North Wabash Chicago, IL 60611 312 832-0500

- 300 Services 320 • Misc Services

Medicare Supplement Insurance & Major Medical Health Insurance. From Blue Cross Blue Shield. Gonet Insurance, Inc. Granville, IL. 815-339-2411

ADVERTISE YOUR SERVICES RIGHT HERE! The Putnam County Record can promote your services and let people know you are out there wanting there business. Just call (815) 875-4461 and let us help.

- 400 Merchandise 450 • Under $1000 Craftsman 20hp, 48" riding lawn mower, electric start, automatic transmission. $275. Granville, 815343-1928

450 • Under $1000 ************ HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL? Put your ad in for FREE Items $1,000 or less can run FREE for 1 time. Limit of 5 lines. Up to 3 items with price and price totaling under $1,000. 1 ad per household per week. No commercial ads, firearms or animal sales. E-mail information to: classified@ bcrnews.com (include your name, address & phone number) or mail to: BCR, PO Box 340, Princeton, IL 61356 No Phone Calls! YOU’LL FIND IT right here in the Putnam County Record Classified!

460 • Garage Sales GRANVILLE 109 East South Street. Friday, August 2, 7am-1pm; Saturday, August 3, 7am-noon GRANVILLE On Rt. 71, between Casey's and BP. Thursday, August 1, 1pm5pm; Friday, August 2, 8am-6pm; Saturday, August 3, 8am3pm; Sunday, August 4, 9am-1pm. LARGE ESTATE SALE. Antiques, collectibles, furniture, household items, old tools, old toys & holiday decorations. Beautiful Victorian breakfront, piano, old records, old sheet music. 815-3392565 PRINCETON 1011 North Maple. Saturday, August 3, 8am–noon; Saturday, August 4, 11am–2pm. Antiques: secretary, “Pie Safe”, bedroom set, arm chair, 6 year old dark wood table and chairs, other furniture, fabric, XL adult clothing, dishware and more PRINCETON 704 Eastmor Drive. Thursday, Friday, August 1 & 2, 8am-5pm; Saturday, August 3, 8amNoon. MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE SALE Rain Date: August 8-9 PRINCETON North Main Street inside Sherwood Flea Market Building (North of Sherwood Antique Mall). Saturday, Sunday, August 3, 4; 9am-3pm. Annual Fundraiser for the elderly cats of Aunt “B”s Bed & Breakfast. Over 300 cat and dog related items, (mostly new), for you, your best friend and gifts for animal lovers

ADVERTISE GARAGE SALES OR YARD SALES! The Putnam County Record can promote your garage sale or yard sale to let everyone know about the treasures you have for sale. Just call 815-8754461 and we’ll help you “Clean Up!”

- 700 - 800 Real Estate For Sale Real Estate For Rent 767 • Mobile Home Sales

856 • Apartment Rentals

**************** PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call, HUD tollfree at 800 669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 800 927-9275

1 Bedroom Apartment for rent, downtown Granville. Available immediately! $350/month plus utilities. Please inquire in person at Big Shots, 301 South McCoy Street, Granville or via Facebook. https://www. facebook.com/Bigshots granville?ref=tn_tnmn

PROMOTE YOUR RENTAL Call 815-875-4461

864 • Misc Rentals (2) 3500 Bushel Grain Storage Bins for rent. Between Rt. 71 & McNabb on Rt. 89. Contact 815-482-7880

999 • Legal Notices TAKE NOTICE CERTIFICATE NO. 2009-00033 TO: Sylvester Cieslak, Lake Thunderbird Association, Peoples, National Bank of Kewanee, Robert Kotalik, Current Occupants and unknown owners or parties interested. A Petition for Tax Deed on premises described below has been filed in the Circuit Court of PUTNAM County, Illinois, as case

Come to the Fish & Fun Annual Pancake Breakfast starting at 7AM then stop by our...

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3752 E. Fish & Fun McNabb

“MillioN DollaR” ViEw from your front deck. 3 bdrm /2 bath home on 2 lots w/37 x 24 heat garage in Beautiful Fish N Fun Resort w/Membership. Live there all year or use as vacation home. Spring fed Lake stocked for over 60 year, 3 pools, tennis/basketball court, shelter w/kitchen & bar. Playground & Acres of well maintained common ground all for members use. MlS#08374884 $92,500

While there request a private showing of these homes: 11017 N 700th Rd. Granville

3 bdrm/ 2 bath on beautiful 1+ acres. Many updates. Full, nice basement with fireplace & wood burning stove in living room. attach. garage, & nice landscaping. MlS#08340030 $153,900

12867 N 600 ave., McNabb

Immaculate county home with much to offer. Nestled on 1.5 Acres of land with a 3 car detached garage. 3 large bedrooms & 2 baths, living room, dining room & parlor. Many updates throughout. MlS#08388844 $149,900

Call Dee Barrera 815-252-9696

Starved Rock Realty

P.O. Box 279, Utica IL • 815-667-9990

999 • Legal Notices

999 • Legal Notices

999 • Legal Notices

13-TX-9. The real estate is described as: Parcel #: 03-00-042-320 Said property was sold on NOVEMBER 16, 2010 for the General Taxes for the year 2009. The period of redemption will expire on AUGUST 29, 2013. On DECEMBER 5, 2013, the petitioner will make application to such court in said County for an order for Tax Deed should the real estate not be redeemed. Vista Securities, Inc. Petitioner Published in the Putnam County Record July 31, Aug. 7 and 14, 2013.

A Petition for Tax Deed on premises described below has been filed in the Circuit Court of PUTNAM County, Illinois, as case 13-TX12. The real estate is described as: Parcel #: 04-19-010-000 Said property was sold on NOVEMBER 16, 2010 for the General Taxes for the year 2009. The period of redemption will expire on AUGUST 29, 2013. On DECEMBER 5, 2013, the petitioner will make application to such court in said County for an order for Tax Deed should the real estate not be redeemed. Vista Securities, Inc. Petitioner Published in the Putnam County Record July 31, Aug. 7 and 14, 2013.

Susan Spayer, Financial Plus Credit Union, Current Occupant, and unknown owners or parties interested. A Petition for Tax Deed on premises described below has been filed in the Circuit Court of PUTNAM County, Illinois, as case 13-TX-11. The real estate is described as: Parcel #: 04-13-133-000 Said property was sold on NOVEMBER 16, 2010 for the General Taxes for the year 2009. The period of redemption will expire on AUGUST 29, 2013. On DECEMBER 5, 2013, the petitioner will make application to such court in said County for an order for Tax Deed should the real estate not be redeemed. Vista Securities, Inc. Petitioner Published in the Putnam County Record July 31, Aug. 7 and 14, 2013.

TAKE NOTICE CERTIFICATE NO. 2009-00080 TO: Ronald W Doran, Dawson Glenn, Current Occupant, Dawson Glenn Estate, Heirs, Devisees & Legatees, and unknown owners or parties interested.

TAKE NOTICE CERTIFICATE NO. 2009-00079 TO: Randall Popurella,

Public Auction

PutnAm county FFA Alumni consignment Auction

Held at: Putnam Co. High School in Granville, IL. Directions: Exit I-80 at Spring Valley, IL., (Rt. 89, Exit #70) & go south 8 miles to Granville, IL. (North end of town). Watch for signs.

sAturdAy, August 3, 2013 at 9:00 aM

FArm eQuiPment 2003 Wilson “Pacesetter” alum. Hopper Bottom Semi-trailer, 66”W X 40’L,tandem axle; IH 5400 Grain Drill, 15’, on No-till Caddy w/ grass Seed; Kongslide 700 Grain Vac, (rebuilt meter & blower); 1937 “F-20” Farmall tractor (on rubber); Woods HD315 Batwing Mower; Case 500 Plow, 6-18”, 3 Pt., on Land; allis Chalmers Plow, 3-16”, 3 Pt.; IH 183 Cultivator, 8-36”, Flat Fold; Donahue Implement trailer; New Hayrack top on Gear; 2 – 225 Bu. Gravity Wagons; Homemade 20’ Head Carrier, (4-Wheel); Kewanee 600 Elevator, 54 Ft.; Mayrath PtO auger, 56 Ft., Bottom Drive; truck auger w/ Elect. Motor, (8” X 34’); 18- Kinze Brush Bean Meters; 1500 Gal. Water tank; 2 – Poly tanks, (135 Gal. & 500 Gal.); 8 – Rolling Shields; 48 Planter Chemical Spreaders; 10 – No-till Coulters (Frame Mount); 1945 JD B on rubber, manual start VeHicles 2004 KIa Sedona Van; 1986 Honda Goldwing Motorcycle; 2008 250CC Scooter; 1980 Suzuki Motorcycle golF cArts Club Car, Gas w/ Back Seat; Club Car, Elect. w/ Back Seat; Yamaha Elect., (New Batteries); E-Z Go Electric; Gas Golf Cart lAWn eQuiPment Cub Cadet Lt 1550 Lawn tractor; Craftsman Mower w/ Bagger; agri-Fab Lawn Spreader miscellAneous 100 Bales of Straw (sold in 25 Bale Lots); Mercury 25HP Outboard Motor; 4 – 100 Gal. Gas Cylinders; Yale Chain Hoist, (1 ton); Yale 3 ton trolley; 2 – Side Mount P.U. tool Boxes; 4 – 285/75R-24.5 tires & Rims (10 Hole Rims); Carrier 58 SXa Furnace, 110,000 BtU, Nat. Gas; Heil DC90 Furnace, 90,000 BtU, Propane, (Ultra Hi-Effec.); Hyd. tank & Pump w/ Control Valve (for twp. truck Snow Plow); Precision Dog House, 30” X 42” (Wood sides, Shingled Roof); 2 – Hon Steel Desks, (U-Shaped); Many Miscellaneous Small Items LAST YEARS’ SALE DREW 300 BUYERS AND 120 CONSIGNERS this is a partial listing as of 7/18/13. Much more expected by auction Day. Loader tractors available on auction Day. all listed items have been consigned and are assumed to be there on auction Day in the condition described. However, if-not we assume no responsibility. accepting consignments from July 31 from 3:00 pm to 8:00 pm and august 1st & 2nd from 8:00 am to 8:00 pm or contact by phone: Gary (815) 257-2565; John (815) 488-2873; Mike (815) 866-6105 or Mr. Hieser (815) 509-5404. terms: Cash or Check (Photo ID required to Register). all items sold “as-is”. All sales are final. Announcements on day of auction to take precedence over printed material. Lunch will be provided by the Putnam County FFa Chapter. Restrooms are on grounds. Auctioneers

brAdley’s And immke Auction serVice

Brian Bradley Streator, IL Ph. 815-672-7977

Brent Bradley Streator, IL Ph. 815-672-9318

Freddie Immke Saunemin, IL Ph. 815-832-4957

E-mail items for sale to: classified@bcrnews.com


15 Class Wednesday, July 31, 2013 • The Putnam County Record • 15 999 • Legal Notices

999 • Legal Notices

999 • Legal Notices

999 • Legal Notices

999 • Legal Notices

REQUEST FOR BIDS The Lake Wildwood Association is currently taking bids for the clearing and seeding of approximately 3.5 acres of property. To request Bid Documents call the Lake Wildwood office at (309) 463-2047 Ext. 1 and ask for the 2013 Shaw Creek Clearing Project packet. Bids will be due by August 8, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. All work must be completed and approved by the Association no later than September 23, 2013. Lake Wildwood hires and awards contracts in accordance with all Federal and State non-discrimination law. Published in the Putnam County Record July 24 and 31, 2013.

Deed on premises described below has been filed in the Circuit Court of PUTNAM County, Illinois, as case 13-TX-7. The real estate is described as: Parcel #: 02-09-091-000 Said property was sold on NOVEMBER 16, 2010 for the General Taxes for the year 2009. The period of redemption will expire on AUGUST 29, 2013. On DECEMBER 5, 2013, the petitioner will make application to such court in said County for an order for Tax Deed should the real estate not be redeemed. Vista Securities, Inc. Petitioner Published in the Putnam County Record July 31, Aug. 7 and 14, 2013. TAKE NOTICE CERTIFICATE NO. 2009-00028 TO: Henry Ruwe Barton Trustee (Beacon Hill) for Barton Family Declaration of Trust Agreement Dated 06-0507, Lake Thunderbird Association, and unknown owners or parties interested. A Petition for Tax Deed on premises described below has been filed in the Circuit Court of PUTNAM County, Illinois, as case 13-TX-8. The real estate is described as: Parcel #: 03-00-038-260 Said property was sold on NOVEMBER 16, 2010 for the General Taxes for the year 2009. The period of redemption will expire on AUGUST 29, 2013. On DECEMBER 5, 2013, the petitioner will make application to such court in said County for an order for Tax Deed should the real estate not be redeemed. Vista Securities, Inc. Petitioner Published in the Putnam County Record July 31, Aug. 7 and 14, 2013.

RECORD CLAIMANTS ; ) DEFENDANTS ) 12 CH 00006 408 LAUGHLIN AVENUE GRANVILLE, IL 61326 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE ACT ***THIS DOCUMENT IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT ON A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE*** PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered by said Court in the above entitled cause on April 25, 2013, PUTNAM COUNTY SHERIFF in PUTNAM County, Illinois, will on September 5, 2013, in Putnam County Courthouse 4th Street., Hennepin, IL 61327, at 1:30 p.m., sell at public auction and sale to the highest bidder for cash, all and singular, the following described real estate mentioned in said Judgment, situated in the County of PUTNAM, State of Illinois, or so much thereof as shall be sufficient to satisfy said Judgment: LOTS FIFTEEN AND SIXTEEN IN NEWTON H. COLBY’S THIRD ADDITION TO THE VILLAGE OF GRANVILLE, PUTNAM COUNTY, ILLINOIS, EXCEPT THE COAL UNDERLYING THE SAME, TOGETHER WITH THE RIGHT TO MINE AND REMOVE THE SAME THROUGH UNDERGROUND PASSAGES. TAX NO. 02-00-063-100 02-00-063-090. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 408 LAUGHLIN AVENUE GRANVILLE, IL 61326 Description of Improvements: YELLOW ALUMINUM SIDED TWO STORY SINGLE FAMILY WITH DETACHED TWO CAR GARAGE The Judgment amount was $68,437.54. Sale Terms: This is an “AS IS” sale for “CASH”. The successful bidder must deposit 25% down by certified funds; balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. NO REFUNDS. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate, water bills, etc., and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to plaintiff. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the bid amount, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open

for inspection. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/ expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DYAS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For Information: Visit our website at http:\\ service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only - Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel. No. (312) 372-2060. Please refer to file #PA1121660 Plaintiff’s attorney is not required to provide additional information other than that set forth in this notice of sale. I549635 Published in the Putnam County Record July 24, 31 and Aug. 7, 2013.

CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT PUTNAM COUNTY, ILLINOIS ESTATE OF ) CARMEL M. BASSI, ) DECEASED. ) NO. 2013-P-10 CLAIM NOTICE Notice is hereby given of the death of Carmel M. Bassi. Letters of Office were issued on July 11, 2013, to Carol Delgado, 427 W Benton Ave, Naperville, IL 60540, and Richard Bassi, 19334 Boulder Ridge Dr, Mokena, IL 60448, as Co-Executors, whose attorney is Wimbiscus Law Firm, P.C., 102 East St. Paul Street, Spring Valley, Illinois 61362. Claims against the estate may be filed in the office of the Clerk of the Court, Putnam County Court House, Hennepin, Illinois 61327, or with the Co-Executors or both, on or before January 27, 2014, which date is not less than 6 months from date of first publication, or, if mailing or delivery of a notice from the Co-Executors are required by Sec. 18-3 of the Probate Act of 1975, the date stated in that notice. Any claim not filed on or before said date is barred. Copies of a claim filed with the clerk must be mailed or delivered by the claimant to the Co-Executors and to the attorney within 10 days after it has been filed. Dated this 16th day of July, A. D. 2013. Wimbiscus Law Firm, P. C. Attorney for Estate 102 East St. Paul Street Spring Valley, IL 61362 Tele: (815) 664-4151 Published in the Putnam County Record July 24, 31 and Aug. 7, 2013.

Contract B: Plumbing Contract C: Electrical Contract D: Heating and Ventilating Proposals will be received until 10:00 a.m. August 21, 2013 at the office of Illinois Valley Surveying and Consultants, Inc. 401 Court Street Hennepin, Il 61327 and read aloud at that time. Printed contract documents and specifications are available from Illinois Valley Surveying and Consultants, Inc. 815-925-7511 for a non-refundable fee of $25.00, electronic copies are available at no charge. All proposals shall be accompanied by a bid bond, or certified check or cashiers check in and amount of not less than 5% of the bid. All Proposals shall be enclosed in a sealed envelope clearly marked “Proposal for P.C.E.M.A. STORAGE BUILDING” Bidders are advised that all work in these proposals is subject to prevailing wage requirements, The Fair Labor Standards Act and the Putnam County Responsible Bidder’s Resolution number 2003-10. Putnam County reserves the right to reject any and all bids and waive technicalities in bidding. No bid may be withdrawn after the scheduled closing time for receipt of bids for sixty (60) days. The successful bidder(s) shall provide a performance and payment bond in 100% of the amount of the contract(s). By order of James Goldasich P.C.E.M.A. Published in the Putnam County Record July 31 and Aug. 7, 2013.

TAKE NOTICE CERTIFICATE NO. 2009-00013 TO: James Ziano, James B Ziano, Concrete Products Ziano Co, LaSalle State Bank, U.S. Attorney General, U.S. District Attorney, Internal Revenue Service, Illinois Dept of Revenue, Illinois Attorney General, and unknown owners or parties interested. A Petition for Tax

TAKE NOTICE CERTIFICATE NO. 2009-00053 TO: William R Myers, Lake Thunderbird Association, Judith A Myers, Illini State Bank, Current Occupant and unknown owners or parties interested. A Petition for Tax Deed on premises described below has been filed in the Circuit Court of PUTNAM County, Illinois, as case 13-TX-10. The real estate is described as: Parcel #: 03-00-069-190 Said property was sold on NOVEMBER 16, 2010 for the General Taxes for the year 2009. The period of redemption will expire on AUGUST 29, 2013. On DECEMBER 5, 2013, the petitioner will make application to such court in said County for an order for Tax Deed should the real estate not be redeemed. Vista Securities, Inc. Petitioner Published in the Putnam County Record July 31, Aug. 7 and 14, 2013.

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Putnam County will receive sealed bids for a Storage Building at the Putnam County Emergency Management Agency facility located at 1120 Old Highway 26, Hennepin, Il. 61327. The work will be bid and awarded in multiple contracts: Contract A: Building (60’ by 68’, optional 72’, with 16’ eave. Includes site grading, concrete, etc.)

F11110060 CHOH IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT PUTNAM COUNTY- HENNEPIN, ILLINOIS JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association ) sbm with Chase Home Finance LLC, sbm ) with Chase Manhattan Mortgage Corporation ) Plaintiff, ) vs. ) Michael Siegmann; First Federal Savings Bank; ) Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants ) Defendants. ) 11 CH 24 Property Address: 112 Roberts Street, Mark, Illinois 61340 NOTICE OF SHERIFF SALE Public notice is hereby given that in pursuance of a judgment of said Court entered in the aboveentitled cause on April 18, 2013, I, Sheriff, Kevin Doyle of Putnam County, Illinois, will hold a sale on August 22, 2013, commencing at 9:00a.m., at Fourth & High Street, Hennepin, IL 61327 to sell to the highest bidder or bidders the following described real estate, or so much thereof as may be sufficient to satisfy said decree, to-wit: LOT NUMBERED THIRTY-FIVE IN JOSEPH GARIGLIETTI’S SECOND ADDITION TO THE VILLAGE OF MARK, EXCEPTING AND RESERVING HOWEVER, ALL OF THE UNDERLYING COAL AND FIRE CLAY WITH THE RIGHT TO DIG, MINE AND REMOVE THE SAME, WITHOUT ENTERING OR OCCUPYING THE SURFACE THEREOF, SITUATED IN PUTNAM COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 112 Roberts Street, Mark, Illinois 61340 P.I.N.: 02-00-089-210 First Lien Position; Single-Family Residence; Judgment Amount $45,127.57 IN ACCORDANCE WITH 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) AND (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), AND 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT THE PURCHASER OF THE PROPERTY, OTHER THAN A MORTGAGEE, SHALL PAY THE ASSESSMENTS AND LEGAL FEES REQUIRED BY SUBSECTIONS (g)(1) AND (g)(4) OF SECTION 9 AND THE ASSESSMENTS REQUIRED BY SUBSECTION (g-1) OF SECTION 18.5 OF THE ILLINOIS CONDOMINIUM PROPERTY ACT. The property will not be open for inspection. Terms of Sale: CASH - 10% down at the time of sale and the balance due within 24 hours of the sale. All payments for the amount bid shall be in certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Putnam County. The person to contact for information regarding this property is: Steven J. Lindberg at FREEDMAN ANSELMO LINDBERG LLC 1807 West Diehl Road, Naperville, IL (866)402-8661. For bidding instructions, visit www.fal-illinois.com 24 hours prior to sale. This communication is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. FREEDMAN ANSELMO LINDBERG LLC 1771 W. Diehl Rd., Ste 150 Naperville, IL 60563-4947 630-453-6960 866-402-8661 630-428-4620 (fax) I548072 Published in the Putnam County Record July 17, 24 and 31, 2013. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT PUTNAM COUNTY - HENNEPIN, ILLINOIS BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. ) PLAINTIFF ) VS ) HOWARD BENCE A/K/A HOWARD R. BENCE; ) DIANE BENCE A/K/A DIANE L. BENCE; HSBC) BANK NEVADA, N.A. F/K/A HOUSEHOLD ) BANK; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON )

F11110060 CHOH IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT PUTNAM COUNTYHENNEPIN, ILLINOIS JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association ) sbm with Chase Home Finance LLC, sbm ) with Chase Manhattan Mortgage Corporation ) Plaintiff, ) vs. ) Michael Siegmann; First Federal Savings Bank; ) Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants ) Defendants. ) 11 CH 24 Property Address: 112 Roberts Street, Mark, Illinois 61340 NOTICE OF SHERIFF SALE Public notice is hereby given that in pursuance of a judgment of said Court entered in the aboveentitled cause on April 18, 2013, I, Sheriff, Kevin Doyle of Putnam County, Illinois, will hold a sale on August 22, 2013, commencing at 9:00 a.m., at Fourth & High Street, Hennepin, IL 61327. to sell to the highest bidder or bidders the following described real estate, or so much thereof as may be sufficient to satisfy said decree, to-wit: Commonly known as: 112 Roberts Street, Mark, Illinois 61340 P.I.N.: 02-00-089-210 First Lien Position; Single-Family Residence; Judgment Amount $45,127.57 IN ACCORDANCE WITH 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) AND (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), AND 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT THE PURCHASER OF THE PROPERTY, OTHER THAN A MORTGAGEE, SHALL PAY THE ASSESSMENTS AND LEGAL FEES REQUIRED BY SUBSECTIONS (g) (1) AND (g)(4) OF SECTION 9 AND THE ASSESSMENTS REQUIRED BY SUBSECTION (g-1) OF SECTION 18.5 OF THE ILLINOIS CONDOMINIUM PROPERTY ACT. The property will not be open for inspection. Terms of Sale: CASH - 10% down at the time of sale and the balance due within 24 hours of the sale. All payments fo the amount bid shall be in certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Putnam County. The person to contact for information regarding this property is: Steven J. Lindberg at FREEDMAN ANSELMO LINDBERG LLC 1807 West Diehl Road, Naperville, IL (866)402-8661. For bidding instructions, visit www.fal-illinois.com 24 hours prior to sale. This communication is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. FREEDMAN ANSELMO LINDBERG LLC 1771 W. Diehl Rd., Ste 150 Naperville, IL 60563-4947 630-453-6960 866-402-8661 630-428-4620 (fax) I548072 Published in the Putnam County Record July 17, 24 and 31, 2013.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT PUTNAM COUNTY - HENNEPIN, ILLINOIS BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. ) PLAINTIFF ) VS ) HOWARD BENCE A/K/A HOWARD R. BENCE; ) DIANE BENCE A/K/A DIANE L. BENCE; HSBC ) BANK NEVADA, N.A. F/K/A HOUSEHOLD ) BANK; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON ) RECORD CLAIMANTS ; ) DEFENDANTS ) 12 CH 00006 408 LAUGHLIN AVENUE GRANVILLE, IL 61326 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE ACT ***THIS DOCUMENT IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT ON A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE*** PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered by said Court in the above entitled cause on April 25, 2013, PUTNAM COUNTY SHERIFF in PUTNAM County, Illinois, will on September 5, 2013, in Putnam County Courthouse 4th Street., Hennepin, IL 61327, at 1:30 p.m., sell at public auction and sale to the highest bidder for cash, all and singular, the following described real estate mentioned in said Judgment, situated in the County of PUTNAM, State of Illinois, or so much thereof as shall be sufficient to satisfy said Judgment: TAX NO. 02-00-063-100 02-00-063-090 COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 408 LAUGHLIN AVENUE GRANVILLE, IL 61326 Description of Improvements: YELLOW ALUMINUM SIDED TWO STORY SINGLE FAMILY WITH DETACHED TWO CAR GARAGE The Judgment amount was $68,437.54. Sale Terms: This is an “AS IS” sale for “CASH”. The successful bidder must deposit 25% down by certified funds; balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. NO REFUNDS. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate, water bills, etc., and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to plaintiff. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the bid amount, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DYAS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For Information: Visit our website at http:\\ service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only - Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel. No. (312) 372-2060. Please refer to file #PA1121660 Plaintiff’s attorney is not required to provide additional information other than that set forth in this notice of sale. I549635 Published in the Putnam County Record July 24, 31 and Aug. 7, 2013.


16 From You 16 • The Putnam County Record • Wednesday, July 31, 2013

The origin of the Mark cross Editor’s note: Randy Borri sent in this story about the history of the cross on the Mark coal mine. MARK – In the past five years, we have heard numerous versions of how the cross on the Mark coal mine got there. Since many people have claimed to know the history of the first cross. I (Randy Borri), Jack Moriarty and Ron Moriarty would like to give the historical society the correct version of the original cross. In 1957, after seeing a small cross on the Ladd dump, Jack Moriarty and I decided to place a cross on the Mark dump. Michael T. Novak wanted to help, but he was on the verge of moving to LaSalle and couldn’t spend much time with us. We asked Ron Moriarty to help us and the three of us made and placed the original cross on the dump. Jack was in eighth grade, I was in seventh grade, and Ron was in sixth grade. Jim “Booge” Moriarty was remodeling his house at the time and gave us the needed twoby-fours to construct the cross. We made the original cross 14 feet long and

placed large coffee cans on the end of each arm and one on the top of the main pole. Our plans were to use kerosene burners (smudge pots), used at the time to mark road potholes, construction, etc, and tie them in the coffee cans. We were going to use a ladder to light the burners each evening. After the cross was assembled, Jack, Ron and I carried it up the dump and set it up. About five days after we set the cross up, we approached Mayor Bruno Biagi, Harvey Brown, and my dad Hugo Borri, who were in the process of doing Christmas decorating at the village hall, to ask them for permission to borrow three smudge pots to light the cross. Biagi had never noticed the cross before and, along with Borri and Brown, was amazed at the sight. They suggested rather than use kerosene burners, the town should light the cross with lights. Brown furnished the generator, which I believe came from Illinois Power Company. I remember it was a very big and heavy unit. Borri volunteered to wire the cross and the Mark Boy Scouts dragged the heavy generator to

the top. Jimmie Troglio was the main person to carry the gas to the top and start the generator every evening. You could hear the generator running every night throughout the town. The following year, 1958, a new and bigger cross was made in the basement of the Mark Grade School. Borri was in charge and did the lighting while the Mark Boy Scouts helped make the cross. That cross was carried to the top by the seventh- and eighthgrade boys of Mark Grade School. The Mothers Club of Mark Grade School offered to purchase the electric wire that was placed on small poles to run up the dump. The Mark Boy Scouts offered to take care of the cross and get it ready for lighting every Christmas and Easter. However, the weather – lightning, etc. – took such a toll on the cross and wiring that it was not lit the Christmas and Easter of 1964. In 1965, while I was attending IVCC, I approached the town board members to get permission and financial backing to fix the cross again. The Mark School Club helped, along with

citizens who furnished construction supplies. David Piccioli, Kenny Johnson and I took the cross down, repaired, and painted it behind my parents’ garage. The lights were put on a one-by-four with the intention of bolting it to the main cross at Christmas and Easter, and then taking that portion down and storing it until the next season to help preserve it. Wire was run up the dump from a tele-

phone pole on the southwest corner of the dump. All was going well until the end of the second season when someone stole the wire going from the pole to the top. After 1966, I went away to the University of Illinois and lost track of who took care of the cross after that. We hope this clarifies the originality of the first cross because it is the actual fact. Jack, Ron and I had no specific inten-

tions to honor anyone as stated by some, but to just put a cross on the dump and light it with kerosene burners. We would like to say it was done to honor the miners, as some have suggested, but it wasn’t. It was three boys who got an idea that the townspeople supported. We see no reason why it shouldn’t be a memorial for all the miners everywhere who worked in coal mines like Mark’s St. Paul coal mine.

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lb

Grocery SpecialS

Keebler Deluxe Graham or Asst Fudge Cookies, 9 oz .. 2/$5 Wesson Cooking Oil, 48 oz ................................. $3.99 Asst Gatorade, 8Pack/20oz .................................. $4.99 Asst Cheese It Crackers, All .............................. $2.99 Asst Tostito or Sun Chip Snacks, All .................... 2/$5 Hidden Valley Dressings, 16 oz ............................. 2/$5 Asst Pringles Potato Chips, All ............................. 2/$3 Nabisco Trisket, Wheat Thin, Chix Basket, Better Cheddar Crackers, All .. 2/$5 Smuckers Ice Cream Toppings, All ....................... 2/$4 Act II Popcorn, 3 Pack ........................................... 5/$5 MIO Drink Enhancers, All ..................................... 2/$6 Our Family Fruit Preserves, 18 oz ......................... 2/$5 Charmin Double Roll Bath or Bounty Paper Towels, 12/8 roll .. $6.99

Bakery

Italian Spoletti Bread, each ................................. $1.89 Hawaiian Sweet Dinner Rolls, doz ....................... 2/$5

Dairy

Simply Orange Juice, 59 oz ................................ $2.88 Blue Bonnet Margarine, 1# ................................ $0.89 Our Family Cottage Cheese, 24 oz ..................... $2.39 Kraft Shredded or Chunks Cheese, 8 oz ............. 2/$5 Kraft American Singles, 10 oz .............................. 2/$5

proDUce

Chiquita Bananas, lb ......................................... $0.49 Red or Green Seedless Grapes, lb .................... $1.99 Fresh Blackberries, 6 oz ....................................... 2/$5 Louisiana Sweet Potatoes, lb ............................. $0.79

end oF July SavingS Sale!!!

open 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. daily 8 a.m. - noon Sunday

925-7308

our Family rotini, Bow ties, penne, rainbow rotini, $ rigatoni paSta 16 oz

5/ 5

kellogg Fruit loop,rice krispies, apple Jack $ cereal 10-14 oz

2/ 5

our Family GranUlateD SUGar 10#

4

$ 99

keebler townhouse or club crackerS 16 oz

2/$5

cascade powder, Gel, act pac 75 oz/25 ct

Dawn DiSh Soap 24 oz

c o BlUe BUnny ice U p pailS o 4.5 Qt n Limit 2 with coupon and $15 order

3

$ 99

2/$5

creaM

4

$ 99

Whole

lb

loins

(While supplies last)

Meat SpecialS

Lean Baby Back Ribs, lb .................................... $3.59 Our Family Sliced Bacon, lb .............................. $3.99 Johnsonville Brats or Burgers, lb ........................ $3.99 Land of Frost Deli Shaved Meats, 2 oz ................ 5/$4 Hormel Smoked Porkchops, 15 oz ...................... $4.49 Black Angus Boneless Chuckroast, lb ............... $3.59 Tray Pak Boneless Chicken Breast, lb ............... $2.89

Frozen FooD

Jacks Pizzas, each ............................................. $2.50 New York 5 Cheese Garlic Toast, 13.5 ........................2/$5 Aunt Jemima Breakfast Entrees, All .................... 5/$5 Our Family Rasberries, Whole Strawberries, Blackberries Fruit, All ..2/$5

Deli

Eckrich Honey or Virginia Ham, lb...................... $4.59 Walnut American Cheese, lb.............................. $3.99 Butterball Lemon Peppered Turkey Breast, lb .... $5.99 Fresh Homestyle Potato Salad, lb ...................... $1.99

ye olDe pUB Shoppe

Icehouse Beer, 12 pk cans ................................... $6.99 Rock Hard Red Malt Beer, 6 pk .......................... $7.99

SeaFooD Shoppe

Seafood Sensation Shrimp Ring, 10 oz ................ 2/$9 Our Family Popcorn Shrimp, 12 oz ....................... 2/$7

Go to hennepinfoodmart.com for Great Savings!


PCR-07-31-2013