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Record The Putnam County

Volume 145 No. 28

Single Copy Cost 50¢

Putnam County’s Only Newspaper

“PRSRT STD.” US Postage Paid No. 486 SHAW MEDIA POSTAL PATRON LOCAL R.R. BOXHOLDER CARRIER ROUTE PRESORT

Wednesday, March 20, 2013

Putnam County to join LaSalle County ROE McCracken: ‘Sensible move’ By Ken Schroeder kschroeder@putnamcountyrecord.com

HENNEPIN – The Putnam County Board members voted unanimously at their regular meeting March 11 to incorporate Putnam County into the LaSalle County Regional Office of Education (ROE). “This resolution reflects what the state legislature is asking for, but there’s no guarantee that they

won’t require further consolidation,” said Putnam County State’s Attorney James Mack regarding the resolution. Putnam County was formerly part of the Marshall-Putnam-Woodford ROE, which was ordered to dissolve after state officials required offices across the state to consolidate. In May 2012, the Illinois legislature approved a recommendation to

restructure the 44 ROES in the state, cutting the number down to 35. ROEs are in charge of the compliance, health, life, safety, reporting, consolidation and organization of school districts, and provide services such as certification, bus driver training, general educational development (GED) testing, cooperative educational programs, regional safe school programs, truancy intervention, homeless services, early childhood programs,

virtual schools, new principal mentoring, grant proposal assistance and a wide range of professional development. “This is actually a very sensible move by the board,” said Putnam County Schools Superintendent Jay McCracken. “Many of our programs already line up with the programs in LaSalle County. We’re already affiliated with the L.E.A.S.E. (LaSalle/Putnam County Educational Alliance for Special Education) program.”

McCracken said the district received great service with the Marshall-PutnamWoodford office, but with the consolidation efforts, it was time to move on. Any new regional boundary maps need to be completed by September 2013, prior to the date by which candidates must file for the office of regional superintendent. In addition, all current regional superintendents would fulfill their terms of office through June 30, 2015.

In other business, the board also decided to look into requiring solicitors and door-todoor salesmen to register with the county sheriff’s office before allowing them to operate in the county. This action followed reports of salesmen committing theft during their visits in peoples’ homes. A proclamation was issued by the board, setting up the month of May as Motorcycle Safety and Awareness Month.

‘None of us find this acceptable’ McNabb Board unhappy with street work By Ken Schroeder kschroeder@putnamcountyrecord.com

MCNABB – The McNabb Village Board is not happy with some street work done in October of last year. The village spent $100,000 on street repairs, with $60,000 of that work done in the subdivision. According to some people, the work done in the subdivision is already falling apart. “None of us find this acceptable,” said Rick Presthus, village board president, at the village board meeting March 13. “The aesthetics were less than pleasing.” The street was done in a “recycle and reclaim” method which uses some of the old street surface to resurface the street. Roadways are usually 1 to 3 inches thick, but Presthus said that many sections are one-half inch or less in thickness. “Shoulder work was not included in the job, which we didn’t know,” Presthus said. “The same job was done in another community, and it turned out perfect.” The village has not yet approached Advanced Asphalt, the company that did the road work, but it will be doing so shortly. In other business: • The board received a letter from Adam Kinzinger, representative for

the 16th District, supporting the village’s proposal to rework the water and sewer system. Recent problems due to rain and snow melting have underlined the shortcomings of the current system. The North Central Illinois Council of Governments has also voiced its support, clearing the way for a Community Development Assistance Program loan. • The board will look into ways to secure the area around the pump house from damage from four-wheel trucks driving through the area. Posts with chain and posted signs will be put up in an effort to protect the manholes and grounds. • Brandy Sandberg of the Parks and Recreation Committee told the board many pieces of the playground in the park are showing wear, especially in the ground surrounding the rides. She was advised to bring a list of items that need to be replaced or repaired before the board for further action. • The board made several contributions to local charities: $500 to the McNabb Fire Department; $500 to the McNabb/Magnolia Ambulance Service; $500 to the Putnam County Emergency Management Agency; $100 to the Putnam County Historical Society; and $50 to the Illinois Special Olympics.

Putnam County Record photo/Barb Kromphardt

The legs of the McNabb grain elevator tower over the heads of board member Gregg Carr (from left), manager Bart Ericson and board President Ben Day. The McNabb Grain Co. will celebrate its 100th anniversary March 22.

McNabb Grain Co. celebrates 100 years By Barb Kromphardt bkromphardt@putnamcountyrecord.org

Mark your calendars

MCNABB — It was 100 years ago, on March 22, 1913, when nine local men were elected to serve as directors of the board of the new McNabb Grain Co. The men were part of a group of farmers who worked together to have an elevator in McNabb where farmers could store their grain and borrow money against that grain for their farming and living expenses.

The McNabb Grain Co. will celebrate its 100th anniversary in August with an appreciation dinner for patrons and employees, past and present. On Friday, the elevator will celebrate 100 years of serving the McNabb farming community. There have been a lot of changes in those hundred years.

Inside

Vol. 145 No. 28 One Section - 16 Pages The Putnam County

Record Putnam County’s Only Newspaper

© The Putnam County Record

First Person See Page 5

Spiritually speaking See Page 10

“In 1913, they moved 273,000 bushels of grain and had no patronage refunds,” said Gregg Carr, one of seven men who now make up the board of directors. “Last year, we moved 4.7 million bushels, and we gave patronage back to the customers of $543,000.” Carr said the business has had to grow to meet customers’ needs due to increasing corn yields and more planted acres.

See 100 years Page 2


2 Local 2 • The Putnam County Record • Wednesday, March 20, 2013 The Putnam County

Record

Serving Putnam County Since 1868 815-339-2321 Published at Granville, Illinois each Wednesday $20 Per Year in Advance in Putnam County $40 Per Year in Advance Outside of Putnam County

Contact Publisher Sam Fisher sfisher@putnamcountyrecord.com

Editor Terri Simon Photo contributed

tsimon@putnamcountyrecord.com

Managing Editor Barb Kromphardt bkromphardt@putnamcountyrecord.com

This aerial photograph of the McNabb Grain Co. was taken in 1988.

100 years

Carr gave much of the credit to the good managers the elevator has had The Putnam County throughout the years, Record encourages readincluding current manager ers to submit news for Bart Ericson. publication in our paper. Ericson said the elevator Special events, weddings, births, awards and honors, has had to learn to be more anniversaries, promotions, efficient. “Back in the day, there etc. are welcome items for were always long lines, the paper. Some fees may and now people don’t have apply. time to sit and wait,” he Schools, businesses, organizations and groups said. “Therefore we’ve had to adapt as the farmers are encouraged to send information on activities adapted, becoming more efficient and faster at what and events. If you have they do.” attended a function or Carr said farmers used to event and have a photo come to the elevator with and/or news, please sub200 bushels of corn in a mit them. wagon. “Today they’re bringing in 950-bushel semis news@putnamcountyrecord.com. or more, or wagons that are holding 1,100 bushels,” Photos should be sent as an he said. “Everything is bigattachment. ger.” Like other grain elevaPOSTMASTER: tors, the McNabb Grain Co. Send address changes to takes grain in and stores it the Putnam County Record, on behalf of the farmer. P.O. Box 48, Granville, IL The farmer pulls onto 61326 the scales with a loaded semi or wagon. The grain is tested for moisture or damage, and then is dumped into a pit. The truck is then weighed again empty, and the farmer heads back to the fields.

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Out of the past

From Page 1

A brochure produced for the company’s 75th anniversary recounts the beginning days of the McNabb Grain Co. “In a horse trading deal, Mr. Matern was offered $6,000 for his elevator, cribs, scales and office fixtures with three days to accept. Mr. Matern held out for $7,000. The board voted no, so Mr. Matern accepted the $6,000. “Mr. W.A. King met with the board and was hired as the first manager at $150 per month, and he was to furnish his own extra help. The new manager was authorized to make arrangements with the bank to borrow up to $5,000 for 60 days as working capital. “After considerable discussion it was agreed to purchase a second elevator belonging to John McNabb for $3,000 on June 1, provided Mr. McNabb leave all equipment including the office safe. “In addition to buying corn, oats, wheat and rye, the company sold tile, coal, coke and some feed. “The first year of businesses showed a profit of about $2,000.” “We condition that grain — basically we dry it at harvest, so it stays in good quality,” Ericson said. “We monitor that quality until the farmer decides to sell it, so we can move that grain out to the destination.” The farmer can sell the grain to the elevator immediately, or he can store it. “We buy it from him eventually, but the fact that we offer storage gives him that flexibility that he can sell it at anytime he wants,” Ericson said. Another important aspect for farmers is time. “As the farms get bigger, time is of the essence for a lot of farmers,” Carr said. “They want to come in, weigh, dump, and get out

of here in five,10 minutes.” While most farmers are loyal to one elevator, that loyalty can be tested if the wait is too long. “If we have a line, they might drive by, and if we’re shut down, they might drive by and go to another elevator,” Carr said. “We don’t want that. We want them to stay local and keep the business here.” In addition to handling more grain, the elevator has changed in other ways. One hundred years ago, the elevator also handled coal, lumber, feed and other items, but now it’s strictly a grain elevator. Those changes haven’t always been easy. Board President Ben Day has been on the board

since 1971. He grew up in the area, and the McNabb Grain Co. has been a part of his life for a long time. Day said the board has made a few decisions over the years that were pretty unpopular at the time, but they needed to be made. One of those was the closing of the feed mill after John Gorman started auditing the business. “One of the first things he told us, he says, ‘You guys are losing $20,000 per year on that feed-mill,’” Day said. “It was definitely unpopular, but it was one of those things that needed to be done.” Carr said doing what needs to be done is important to the board. “When we look at a deci-

sion that has to be made for this company, we’re looking at the company’s bottom-line,” he said. “It may affect us — negatively or positively — but we’re looking at what’s best for the company.” Another change the elevator has had to deal with are the high commodity prices of the last few years. “What it does is increase everybody’s financial needs, both the customers’ and the elevator itself,” Ericson said. “Prices have gone up, but so have inputs. So have cash rents. So has the cost of equipment. It kind of runs together, and it just puts a bigger need for a strong working capital and balance sheet.” Day said when he got on the board, they would talk in terms of hundreds of thousands of dollars. “Now we talk about millions,” he said. At this 100-year celebration, the McNabb Grain Co. is not done growing. “We’re looking to expand,” Carr said. “We’re looking at the possibility of another leg, another pit, another holding facility, so we can accommodate more farmers at once. When the grain’s ready to haul, there’s a time window, and we want to keep farmers here and keep them happy.”


3 Local Wednesday, March 20, 2013 • The Putnam County Record • 3

Drugs still a problem for Putnam County Mack: Increase in heroin usage By Ken Schroeder kschroeder@putnamcountyrecord.com

HENNEPIN – According to the 2010 National Survey on Drug Use and Health performed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, more than 22 million people age 12 and older in the U.S. use illegal drugs. That number equates to more than 9 percent of the American population. Drug usage among young adults is high-

er with estimates of 20 percent of persons 18-25, while 10 percent of teens between 12 and 17 have used drugs. Juvenile arrests in 2009 amounted to more than 130,000 people under 18, about 8 percent of the total arrests on drug charges. With more than $51 billion spent each year on the war against drugs, narcotic usage is a big national problem. It’s also a local problem. “On a rough estimate, we prosecute about 100 misdemeanor drug charges a year,” said

Hennepin water recognized for quality HENNEPIN – The Hennepin water system has been officially recognized by the Illinois Department of Public Health for maintaining 12 consecutive months of perfect compliance with the state of Illinois fluoridation law Public Water Supply Regulation Act. Kevin Coleman, chairman of the Water District, credited the efforts of Michael Holmes and Alex Rolan-

do for maintaining the quality of the water system. “I’m proud and happy for them,” Coleman said. Award ceremonies will take place this week during the Illinois American Water Works Association — Illinois Section Annual Meeting in Springfield as well as in September at the Illinois Potable Water Supply Operators Association Conference.

Putnam County State’s Attorney James Mack. “Felony charges amount to about 20 per year.” Mack estimated the number of drug arrests has stayed the same for the last several years since local drug prosecution became a focal point for local police with the formation of the Tri-County Drug Enforcement Narcotics Team (Tri-DENT.) “One thing I have seen is an increase in heroin usage and the resulting cases of property damages and theft to pay for the perpetrator’s habit,” Mack said.

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of people are against legalizing it. Marijuana just leads to something heavier in a lot of cases.” Drug arrests surge around the Memorial Day weekend, which Mack attributes to commuter traffic traveling through the county on the way to Chillicothe’s Summer Camp Music Festival, as well as the Bigfoot Concert held at the Putnam County Conservation Grounds west of McNabb. Officers have targeted the Bigfoot Festival in an effort to maintain the safety of concert-goers.

Kinzinger to hold office hours The office of Rep. Adam Kinzinger will hold traveling office hours in March to assist residents across the 16th Congressional District. Constituents are encouraged to stop by and ask questions or seek assistance about any issues they may have with federal agencies ranging from Medicare and Social Security to veterans benefits and immigration issues. Caseworkers and field representatives will be available at the traveling office hours to facilitate questions and personally address any problems residents may have. No appointments are necessary. Those who cannot attend the traveling office hours, but have questions can contact the Ottawa District Office at 815-431-9271.

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“This has a big impact on the people and businesses of Putnam County.” Putnam County Sheriff Kevin Doyle said heroin has definitely made a comeback of late, but it is not the only drug seeing increased usage. “Prescription drugs are one of the bigger problems,” Doyle said. “People will get a prescription and then sell the pills for, say $7.” Doyle said marijuana is also still an issue. “It’s a gateway drug — people try it and then one-up it,” Doyle said. “That’s the reason a lot

Locally, office hours will be held at: Peru 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. March 21 Peru City Hall, Community Room 1901 Fourth St., Peru Hennepin 3:30 to 4:30 p.m., March 20 Hennepin Village Hall 627 E. High St., Hennepin NOTE: Due to the House schedule, Kinzinger will not be present at the traveling office hours.

Early voting for the April 9 consolidated election HENNEPIN — Putnam County Clerk and Election Authority Dan Kuhn has announced early voting is available for all Putnam County registered voters/ precincts for the April 9 consolidated election. Early voting will be conducted at the office of the Putnam County Clerk, Putnam County Courthouse, 120 N. Fourth St., Hennepin, and will begin March 25 through April 5 on weekdays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., and also on April 6 from 9 a.m. to noon. Any voter that is a valid registrant in Putnam County may vote during the early voting period, after showing proper identification. Any vote cast is final and may not be revoked. Early voters are ineligible to cast a vote on Election Day. Those with questions or who need more information on early voting can contact the Putnam County Clerk’s Office at 815-925-7129.

Meeting Calendar March 21 – Village of Magnolia Board, Magnolia Village Hall, 7 p.m. March 26 – Granville Township Board, Granville Library, 7 p.m.

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4 Obit Records 4 • The Putnam County Record • Wednesday, March 20, 2013

Traveling to make a living

James Wright Whitaker James Wright Whitaker died Friday, March 1, 2013, at Agrace Hospice Care Inc. following complications from a 28-year history of Parkinson’s disease. He was born to Marion Saunders and Joel Whitaker of Granville on July 15, 1936. He was educated in Granville public schools. Upon high school graduation in 1954, he volunteered for service in the U.S. Army during which he served in Germany and traveled throughout western Europe. Following his service he attended Oberlin College in Oberlin, Ohio, and earned a Bachelor of Arts in History in 1960. At age 10 he determined that he would become a historian and fulfilled his ambition at the University of Wisconsin where he earned his Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. He joined the Department of History at Iowa State University in 1965 and during his professorship there he worked on the development of the Native American Studies program, the Ph.D. program in Agricultural History, and taught and wrote on the history of agriculture in the United States. Parkinson’s disease forced his retirement in 1998. In 1970 he married Faye Pauli of rural Belleville who joined him on the Iowa State faculty. 1975 marked the birth of their twin daughters, Martha Hopkins Pauli Whitaker and Katherine Clara Saunders Whitaker. He was a member of several professional organizations, the board of the Iowa State University Press, Ames United Church of Christ, where he served as treasurer for 18 years, and many other university and community committees and boards. For retirement he and Faye, along with brother Sidney Whitaker, renovated the family farmhouse and gardens at Cedar Point. At the same time, a move from Ames to part-time residence in Verona in 2003 brought him back to Madison and renewed association with First Congregational Church. He is survived by his wife, Faye; daughters Martha and Katherine; sons-in-law Darin McCauley and Colin Richmond; and grandsons Nathaniel McCauley and Miles Richmond, as well as his brother, Sidney of Cedar Point. He was preceded in death by his parents; his brother Joel Philip; and his brother-in-law, Robert Pauli. Memorial services were held March 5 at the First Congregational Church in Madison, Wis. A gathering in the church parlors followed the service. The Zentner-Beal Funeral Home of New Glarus is serving the family. His memory may be commemorated by contributions to the Whitaker-Hopkins-Bent Scholarship Fund at Oberlin College or the First Congregational Church/ United Church of Christ in Madison. An online memorial with guestbook is available at www.bealfuneralhomes.com.

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By Barb Kromphardt bkromphardt@putnamcountyrecord.com

American workers are facing a longer work day, not in terms of hours spent on the clock, but hours spent getting to and from work. According to a new report released by the Census Bureau, 600,000 American workers travel at least 90 minutes and 50 miles or more to get to work, and 10.8 million travel at least an hour each way. The average one-way daily commute for workers across the country is 25.5 minutes, and one in four commuters leave their county to work.
 The percentage of workers who have to leave their home county is growing. About 27.4 percent of all U.S. workers traveled outside the county where they live for work during a typical week, compared with 26.7 percent in 2000.
  Two types of counties are found to dominate the list of counties with the highest percentage of workers commuting outside the county

At the courthouse The following cases were heard in Putnam County Circuit Court. Driving 15-20 mph above the limit Colette Bailey, 57, Peoria, fined $230 plus three months supervision. Dustin Lee Bohnke, 26, North Liberty IN, fined $120. James J. Hasselman, 66, Crystal Lake, fined $120. Leonard E. Rast II, 39, Peoria, fined $120. Sean R. Whiting, 49, Chillicothe, fined $120.

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Driving 21-25 mph above the limit Michael D. Lindsey, 65, Chicago, fined $140. Kishor A. Salunkhe, 39, Aurora, fined $140. Driving with a revoked/ suspended license Lee M. Jones, 55, Granville, fined $802, plus 30 months conditional discharge, plus 30 days jail. Driving license more than a year Mindy K. Robinson, 38, Granville, fined $600, plus six months supervision.

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where they live. Small counties with few businesses can be found, as can counties near to metropolitan areas such as Washington, D.C. In Manassas Park, Va., 91.2 percent of the residents travel out of their county to work. When you’re talking raw numbers instead of percentages, three counties in the New York City metropolitan area had the highest number of commuters leaving the county for work. They include workers living in Kings County (Brooklyn), Queens County (Queens) and Bronx County (The Bronx) traveling to New York County (Manhattan) for work.
 According to the report, which looked at commuting patterns from 2006-10, Putnam County had 2,968 workers. Of those workers, more than 60 percent, 29 percent — more than twice the national average — left the county for work. Neighboring counties drew most of the driving workers. LaSalle County took the largest share with

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989 making the commute. Following that, 302 drove to Bureau County, 144 to Marshall County and 127 to Peoria County.
 The Census Bureau report also examined workers who commute across state lines. In five states and the District of Columbia, one in 10 workers lived in a different state, including Delaware (14.8 percent), Rhode Island (12.8 percent), New Hampshire (10.8 percent) and West Virginia (10.0 percent). That percentage was much lower for Putnam County, perhaps due to its location in the center of the state. Only 39 workers reported leaving the state to work, or slightly more than 1 percent. Lake County Indiana drew the greatest numbers, with 21, followed by Plaquemines Parish in Louisiana with 10 and Hennepin County in Minnesota with eight. Nationally, 8.1 percent of U.S. workers have “megacommutes” of at least 90 minutes and 50 miles. Of those, 23.0 percent of work-

ers used public transit, compared with 5.3 percent for all workers. Only 61.1 percent of workers with long commutes drove to work alone, compared with 79.9 percent for all workers who worked outside the home. Workers who live in New York state show the highest rate of long commutes at 16.2 percent, followed by Maryland and New Jersey at 14.8 percent and 14.6 percent, respectively. Megacommuters were more likely to be male, older, married, make a higher salary, and have a spouse who does not work. Of the total mega commutes, 75.4 percent were male and 24.6 percent women. Mega commuters were also more likely to depart for work before 6 a.m. Metro areas with large populations tend to attract large flows of mega commuters.
 These figures come from the U.S. Census Bureau’s annual American Community Survey, which provides local statistics on a variety of topics for even the smallest communities.

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PublIc NotIcE Proposed Issuance of a Federally Enforceable State operating Permit Mid American Growers in Granville Mid American Growers has requested that the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency issue a federally enforceable state operating permit (FESOP) regulating the air emissions from its greenhouse located at 14240 Greenhouse Avenue in Granville. The Illinois EPA has made a preliminary determination that the application would comply with the environmental regulations and has prepared a draft permit for public review. The Illinois EPA is accepting comments on the draft permit. Comments must be postmarked by midnight April 19, 2013. If sufficient interest is expressed in the permit, a hearing or other informational meeting may be held. Requests for information, comments and questions should be directed to Brad Frost, Division of Air Pollution Control, Illinois Environmental Protection Agency, PO. Box 19506, Springfield, Illinois, 62794-9506, phone 217/7822113, TDD phone number 217/782-9143 Persons wanting more information may obtain copies of the draft permit and project summary at http://www.epa.gov/reg5oair/ permits/ilonline.html. The repositories for these documents and the application are at the Illinois EPA’s offices at 5407 North University, Peoria, 309/693-5462 and 1340 North Ninth St., Springfield, 217/782-7027 (please call ahead to assure that someone will be available to assist you). Copies of the documents will be made available upon request. The 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act require potentially major sources of air emissions to obtain federally enforceable operating permits. A FESOP allows a source that is potentially major to take operational limits in the permit so that it is a non-major source. The permit will contain federally enforceable limitations that restrict the facility’s emissions to non-major levels. The permit will be enforceable by the USEPA, as well as the Illinois EPA. Published in the Putnam County Record Mar. 20, 2013.


5 Perspective Wednesday, March 20, 2013 • The Putnam County Record • 5

The Editorial Page

Record The Putnam County

Putnam County’s Only Newspaper Sam R Fisher

Terri Simon

Publisher

Editor

My Main Street I drive up and down Princeton’s Main Street several times a week. I know that street like the back of my hand. I’ve been cruising Main Street for many years. I grew up here, and the street — like every Main Street in every small town, is somewhat sacred. I have to believe it’s the same in Spring Valley, Sheffield, Tonica, Granville ... and everywhere in between. The main drag through a town or village is a landmark to those who have hung their hats there. Driving up and down Main Street — well, in a way, it’s a history lesson from years gone by. If I look in the rear view mirror, I see a street from yesteryear that speaks of fond memories, simple times, family and friends from the past. It is a street that evokes many feelings, and one that often causes my heart to Terri skip a beat or two. Simon I could chug up and down a 1960s Main Street with you, where we spent Friday night parked in front of the bank to watch people walk by. It was the place to be, and everybody came to Main Street on a Friday night. It was where you learned about what was happening with your friends, neighbors. It was a place filled with people standing on the sidewalks and talking about everything from their crops, to the church supper, to anything out of the ordinary. My 1970s Main Street consisted of what we called “cruising the gut,” where we’d spend entire Friday and Saturday evenings driving somebody’s parents’ car up and down Main Street, after we’d each chipped in a $1 bill for some gas. Later, it was my old, yellow Pinto that cruised the gut. It was where you fell in love, sang along to the eight-track tape in your car, and plotted and planned with your friends. It was the place where you learned every word to Don McLean’s “American Pie.” Main Street was the catalyst for future dreams of growing up and youthful memories of where you’d been. You knew every store, every storekeeper, every inch of that business district. It was your home away from home. For me, my Main Street of the 1980s and early ‘90s was filled with bittersweet moments. Living out of state, I’d come back to visit, and the first thing I’d do was take a few trips on my well-worn Main Street path. I’d see the changes, and I’d remember what was. While I was always quick to applaud the progress, I couldn’t help but mourn the losses. My Main Street was evolving, and even though I wasn’t there to see the daily changes, my heart yearned to keep close the picture I had painted of the Main Street that lived in my heart. In the late ‘90s, I returned to the area, and while I felt like a stranger in my own land, Main Street served as a close friend, a confidant, if you will. While many of the people and the names had changed, Main Street still existed — different, yet somehow intrinsically the same. While I don’t mind admitting I longed for what was, the familiarity of Main Street welcomed me home with open arms. Today, I try to see my Main Street with fresh eyes, yet I am steeped in several decades of memories — all which tend to run together despite my attempts to keep them separate. As an editor of the hometown newspaper, I try to look at Main Street from an economic development standpoint, however, I know that loving a place means watching it change. I see some storefronts empty of the history from my past yet filled with the promise of optimistic new endeavors. I see the storefronts that have survived the test of time, and my heart smiles. This is my Main Street, my town — and regardless of where you live, it is yours too. May the reflection you see in your rear view mirror remain in your heart, and may you embrace the future of that precious street with promise. Putnam County Record Editor Terri Simon can be reached at tsimon@putnamcountyrecord.com or follow her on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ bcrnews.tsimon.

Letters to the Editor should not be more than 500 words in length. Only one person can sign a Letter to the Editor. The author of the letter must include his/her name, hometown and telephone number. The author’s name and hometown will be published, however, the telephone number is only used to verify the authenticity of the author’s signature and will not be published. Unsigned letters are never read or published. No letter will be published until the Putnam County Record contacts the author of the letter to verify the signature. The Putnam County Record reserves the right to edit or refuse any Letter to the Editor.

First Person Holly Tallent City: LaSalle. Where did you grow up: Mendota. Pets: None. Occupation: Server. What is the last song you listened to: “Heart beat.” What is the last book you read: “Safe Haven” by Nicholas Sparks. What is the last TV show you watched: Sports Center.

I want a do-over My alarm clock malfunctioned this morning. It went downhill after that. You will soon see why. I have become accustomed to waking up at precisely 5:30 a.m. to the song “Mr. Blue Sky” performed by the Electric Light Orchestra. At 5:30 a.m. and four seconds, Chubby, our family cat, jumps up on the bed and meows at me, informing me that she would like me to wake up and tend to her needs. I spend approximately the next 36 minutes and 56 seconds ignoring her. During that time period, I hear such songs as “Play That Funky Music” by Wild Cherry, “Rockin’ at Midnight” by the Honeydrippers, “I’m Gonna Miss Her” by Brad Paisley, “Dueling Banjos” from the “Deliverance” movie soundtrack and “Freakin’ at the Freaker’s Ball” by Dr. Hook along with a few others. At 6:07 a.m., “Blue Moon” by the Marcels kicks in. This is my signal that it’s time to get serious about getting out of bed. By the time that the first chorus starts, I finally prop myself up, poised to jump out of bed and get my day off to a running start. Two minutes and 20 seconds later, when “Always with Me, Always with You” by Joe Satriani starts playing, I actually get out of bed. Chubby follows me to the bathroom and jumps up on the sink and stares at me quizzically with her head cocked to the side while I look in the mirror to make sure that I woke up with the same breathtakingly good looks that I went to sleep with just hours before. Luckily my eyesight is getting worse as I age. By about 20-30 seconds after 6:15, I jump in the shower, so I can be done by the time my wife wants to wake up at 6:30. I’m not sure what Chubby does on the other side of the shower curtain at this time. My guess is that she grooms herself with our tooth-

If you were stranded on a desert island and could have just one meal for the rest of your life, what would it be: Buffalo wrap. If you were stranded on a desert island and could only take one thing with you, what would it be: A friend. What is your favorite local restaurant: Applebees. If someone handed you a mil-

Greg Wallace FROM THE SKETCHBOOK brushes, but that’s pure speculation on my part. At about 6:26, I get out of the shower and debate on what I should do with my hair for the day. At 6:26 and seven seconds, I end up doing the same thing I’ve done for the past 47 years. It’s gotten me this far, so why change now? As I comb my hair and put on the deodorant, I turn the water on in the sink so Chubby can get a drink. The cat likes to drink cold, running water and gets mad at me when I don’t give her that option. After a minute and a half of this, it’s time to leave the bathroom and let others in the house start preparing for their day. This is what usually happens. As you can see, I’m on a very tight, strict morning time schedule (except maybe for that 37 minutes I spend laying in bed listening to “Dueling Banjos”). When that music didn’t start blaring at exactly 5:30 this morning, my schedule for the entire day was ruined beyond repair. Luckily I have a contingency plan in place, and my cellphone alarm goes off at six, but by that time, it didn’t matter. The rest of the day was tainted because I didn’t have that half hour of staring at the ceiling. My wife claims I might possibly be a creature of habit. On good days that’s what she calls it. On other days she just thinks I’m nuts. When it comes to time, I like structure. I like to do certain things, certain ways at certain times. Any disturbance in any of these rituals brings utter chaos raining down on me and those in my immediate vicinity. If you don’t believe me, take this morning as an example. As I was making my daughter and myself peanut butter and jelly sandwiches

lion dollars, how would you spent it: I would buy a smart phone. People would be surprised to know that you: Love to sing. What is your favorite thing about the city you live in: The gym, X-ercise Science. If you could change one thing about your town, what would it be: I would like more excitement.

for our lunches, I accidentally used the “whipped” creamy peanut butter instead of the usual “regular” creamy peanut butter. My life had been thrown into complete disorder and confusion. When I went to feed the goldfish, I missed the tank. (Don’t tell my wife. We’ll pretend it’s our little secret.) I went to put a check in my wallet, and it was one of those stupid business checks that are too long to fit in your wallet without folding them in half. (I’m always worried that the bank will void the check if it’s creased in any way.) Nothing was going the way it was supposed to, and it was obviously all due to the simple fact that my alarm didn’t go off at the right time. And it wasn’t just me. Chubby was running around like a beast possessed. She tripped me three or four times, and when I would let her out the front door, 30 seconds later she was at the back door wanting back in. It was pure bedlam. After a while, I had to sit down in my chair and take a minute to compose myself. I came to the realization that this was going to be a bad day, and there was absolutely nothing I could do about it. As I contemplated throwing in the towel and going back to bed in hopes for a better start the next day, my wife calmed me down and reassured me that the rest of the day would get better. “Everything will be just fine,” she said. “You’re just used to everything being done a certain way at a certain time everyday. It will be good for you to break out of your comfort zone,” she said with a sinister smile. That was easy for her to say. She wasn’t going to be eating “whipped” creamy peanut butter in the next five hours and 42 minutes. You can contact Wallace at gwallace@bcrnews.com. You can follow him on his blog at http:// gregwallaceink.blogspot.com.


6 Biz Ag 6 • The Putnam County Record • Wednesday, March 20, 2013

Business&Ag Do you need optional insurance when you’re renting a car? MCNABB — You’re standing at the car rental counter waiting to start your vacation when you’re asked when a tricky question. Do you want to buy damage waivers — better known as car rental insurance. How will you answer? “Knowing if you need to buy rental insurance can save you money and give you peace of mind,” said Alexis Chambers with Campbell Insurance of McNabb. “Optional insurance could nearly double the cost of the rental. Do your homework, and know before you go.” Chambers offered the following pointers: • Review your policy with your insurance agent. Your agent can evaluate your personal car insurance policy to find out if you are covered in a vacation rental car. • Check with your

credit card company. Some credit cards provide coverage at no charge if you use their card to pay for the rental. Some restrictions may apply. Be sure to ask for an exact description of what’s covered. • Take your insurance policy declarations page with you to the rental counter. You may be asked a question these papers can answer. If you’re not sure of an answer, you’ll have your agent’s name and phone number readily available. “Generally, if you have comprehensive, collision and liability coverages on your personal car insurance policy, there’s a good chance you’ll be covered in a rental car,” said Chambers. Source: Campbell Insurance has been in business since 1994, and is located at 416 W. Main in McNabb.

Donny Camatti The family of Donny Camatti extend a heartfelt thank you for the outpouring of love and kindness when Donny passed. Bobby and Darlene Cofoid did a beautiful job, we were so happy to be able to have Donny’s beloved scooter at his visitation. A special thanks to Pastor Carol for lovingly walking us through the hard days following Donny’s passing. Our thanks to Donny’s beloved community, church, courthouse, senior center, family, and friends. Donny loved you all, from wing Wednesday, breakfast Saturday, mail getting, bell ringing, visits after work, dish doing, Senior Center days, storywriting, to homework finishing ... Donny LOVED you all. Everyone was a piece of a huge puzzle called Donny Camatti. Thank you for being such an important part of Donny’s life. He will always be loved, missed, and remembered.

Rosie Boggio and Donny’s family

IBA offers memorial scholarship SPRINGFIELD — The Johnson family and the Illinois Beef Association (IBA) will award one $3,000 scholarship in memory of Maralee Johnson and her commitment to the beef and agriculture industry. IBA youth can now begin the application

process for this scholarship to be presented at the IBA Summer Conference in June. The application can be downloaded at www.illinoisbeef.com. Johnson worked at the IBA for 23 years, where she served as executive vice president for 13

years. Eligible IBA youth must be an Illinois resident from a family that is actively involved in beef production and currently an IBA member, attending or planning to attend a two or four-year college majoring in agriculture,

and must complete the application and write an original essay on “How I can impact the agriculture industry in the future.” With the addition of the Maralee Johnson Memorial Scholarship, the deadline for all IBA scholarships is April 1.

Food manager course set for April 9 PRINCETON — A food service sanitation manger’s five-hour refresher course will be held from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. April 9 at the Bureau and Putnam County Health Department, 526 Bureau Valley Parkway in Princeton. This one-day educa-

tion course will meet the requirements for renewing a current food service sanitation manager’s certificate. A minimum of five hours is required by the Illinois Department of Public Health for renewal of a certificate prior to the expiration of a current

certificate. Anyone with an expired certificate will not be allowed to take this course. There is a non-refundable $55 fee, with payment necessary at the time of registration to guarantee a seat in class. Register at the Health

Department from 8 a.m. to noon or from 1 to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. Registration forms can be downloaded from bpchd. org. Bring a photo I.D. and a current food service sanitation manager’s certificate. Lunch is on your own.

Illinois Forage Institute to be held

GALVA — The Illinois Forage Institute has been rescheduled for April 2 at Black Hawk College, East Campus, Conference Center, 26230 Black Hawk Road, Galva. The first scheduled date was cancelled due to inclement weather. The educational program, beginning at 9 a.m. and concluding at 4 p.m., will focus on managing hayland and pastures. The program will also include commercial exhibits focusing on the forage indus-

try. Companies interested in setting up forage-related commercial exhibits should contact Dave Gentry at (309) 557-6397, dgentry@growmark.com/. Topics to be presented in the morning include forages for horses, forage species selection, pasture weed control, soil sampling and costs to produce hay. The afternoon topics include pasture fertility, grazing cover crops, economics of pasture forage production, pasture renovation after the drought

and feeding livestock on drought damaged hay and forage. Cost for the educational program is $15 per person for IFGC members and $20 per person for nonmembers. Pre-registration is requested by March 22. Cost will be $20 and $25 respectively per person after March 22 and at the door on April 2. Registration covers a noon meal and forage presentation handout material. Program registration can be made by contacting Uni-

versity of Illinois Extension, Rock Island County, 321 W. Second Ave., Milan, IL, 61264, 309-7569978. Online registration and the program agenda can be accessed at http:// web.extension.illinois.edu/ hmrs/. The Forage Institute is sponsored by the Illinois Forage and Grassland Council, Black Hawk College and supported by USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service and University of Illinois Extension.

Elizabeth E. Immel The family of Betty Immel wishes to express our grateful appreciation to our family, dear friends, and relatives who helped in so many ways upon Betty’s death. We appreciate the kind words, visits, prayers, flowers, food, and monetary contributions that helped us during this most difficult time. We would like to extend a special thank you to Pastor Ron McNeill for his help in making the service a celebration of her life. Everyone helped us remember the precious times we spent together. Thank you, John & Lora Immel Carol & Jerry Patterson William & Kathy Immel Grandchildren: Jaclyn, Jonathan, & Justin Immel & Jodi Patterson Step Grandchildren: Brett, Brian, & Amy Burkiewicz

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7 Sports Wednesday, March 20, 2013 • The Putnam County Record • 7

Sports

Lady Panthers gearing up for season By Dixie Schroeder dschroeder@putnamcountyrecord.com

Putnam County Record photo/Dixie Schroeder

The Putnam County High School Lady Panther track team has four juniors that include Brooke Veronda. Veronda is back and participating after an injury during her sophomore year track season. Coach of the Lady Panthers is Missy Carlson.

GRANVILLE – It’s a new year at Putnam County High School for the girls track team. Missy Carlson, a special education aide at PCHS, has moved her coaching skills up to the high school from Putnam County Junior High and will be coaching the PCHS girls track program for its second year. Carlson is delighted to be in the coaching job. “I had all these girls from seniors to freshmen in junior high,” she said. “It’s nice to work with them. It’s fun to watch them grow and develop. I like that part of coaching a lot. The kids become like part of your family — when they do great, you feel great for them.” Carlson has 12 girls out for the team, two more than last year’s numbers. “I have three freshmen, four sophomores, four juniors and one senior,” she said. “My senior (Claire Griffin), this year is coming back after an injury before sectionals in her eighth-grade year ... She’s going to be able to run for us this year, so we are very excited about that. She’s a sprinter, so we are looking to put her into a relay and a couple of sprint events for us this year.” The four juniors on the team are Brooke Veronda, Emily Whitney, Tara Doyle and Becky Arnold. Veronda is a sprinter, and Carlson has plans to use her in a couple of the sprinting events. Carlson said Veronda had an injury last year that kept her out, but this year she is back and running which makes Carlson very happy. The middle distance runner is Whitney, who runs the 4 by 800 for PCHS. “She is a very hard-worker and always does a great job for us,” Carlson said. Doyle was out last year with a back injury but worked in the off season to rehab and is ready to join the team again. Doyle is a sprinter, and is slated to be part of the 4 x 100 relay team. Becky Arnold, who was out for track her freshman year, sat out her sophomore year and is now

back again and will participate in a variety of field events for the team as well as running several relays. “We are looking for good things from her this year,” Carlson said. Megan Rehn is another sprinter for PCHS. Rehn will be participating in the 4 x 200 and 4 x 400 relays. “Megan can run just about anything you ask her to run,” Carlson said. “From the 100 to the 800; Megan is kind of our utility person — she does a lot of things for us.” Sophomore Lydia Warren is another sprinter on the team, participating in the 4 x 100, and the 4 x 200, and is also part of the 4 x 400 yard relays. Carlson said Kirsten Davis was a standout athlete in her freshman year, and she’s is going to be part of the 4 x 400 and the 4 x 800 relay. The three freshman are very versatile as well. Chloe Judd will be part of the 4 x 800 relay as well as run the mile. Judd ran the mile in junior high. “We are looking for good things from her too,” she said. LeAnn Smith is going to play a lot of roles for the Lady Panthers this track season. Carlson said she is slated to run some hurdles, be part of the 4 x 100 relay and participate in some sprint-oriented races. Ashlyn Haage will be the distance runner for the team. Haage has competed in some off-season 5K runs and has done well. Haage will be assigned to the two-mile run, be part of the 4 x 800 relay and possibly the mile-run as well. The Lady Panthers run their first meet on March 23 at Illinois State University. The first home meet for the team will be April 6 in a quadrangular with Streator, Henry and Stark County at 10 a.m. “Our goal is to get more people down there (to state) this year,” Carlson said. “We want to be competitive in the Tri-County meet, as we did pretty well last year with a young group of kids, so we are looking to go back and compete and have a good showing in that as well. We want to increase our times and improve every week and work hard and watch them go from there.”

PCHS baseball ready to make a hit By Dixie Schroeder dschroeder@putnamcountyrecord.com

GRANVILLE – The Putnam County High School Panthers baseball program has a tradition of excellence. The program, peppered with names like Joe Massino and Ken Jenkins, is now led by veteran player and coach Dave Garcia. Garcia is very excited about this year’s group of players. “We are returning nine players this year,” he said. “I will be carrying 14 full time and four part time. The sophomore players go back and forth depending on the needs we have on the varsity.” The Panthers have 10 senior athletes on the squad including Cody Ballerini, Xavier Warren, Tyler Williams, Justin Pettit, Austin Pletsch, Jack Egan, Antonio Diaz DeLeon, Ryan Salz, Jake Kasperski and Christian Carboni. Juniors include Harold Fay, Justin Galetti and Evan Kreiser. Sophomores on the Panther squad are R.J. Copeland, Nick Diaz DeLeon, Danny Pavlovich and Austin Biagini. The Panthers are not lacking in leadership either. Co-captains Warren, Ballerini, Pettit and Egan are four seniors whom Garcia looks toward when setting the tone for the squad. “Egan is a strong left-handed pitcher and outfielder. Warren was all-conference and all-area last year, and he is very valuable as he can move to any position and play well,” Garcia said. “Pettit will be a strong third baseman for us when the season breaks. The big guy coming back this year is Ballerini, who has been with me since his freshman year.” Ballerini has been one of the area’s leading hitters in the last three years, having more than 100 RBIs in his career at Putnam County. During his three years on the varsity squad, he has had a career batting average of .420 and leads the team in varsity innings and at-bats. “This group of guys is a fun group. They really like baseball, and they get along well. They have a lot of chemistry together,” Garcia said. Garcia evaluates the new players to see how they can contribute on the varsity level. In the Panther program, junior varsity baseball is looked at for helping athletes hone their skills in defense as well as offense, so they can contribute at the varsity level. “If they are a JV player that can hit at the varsity level, they are probably going to be up (at varsity level) more often,” Garcia said. “But it’s more important if we bring them up to fill in spots defensively. The main thing I look for is their overall ability, their accessibility to play different positions and their mental toughness.” Athletes who participate in baseball have to be tough to play on the Panthers’ squad. Garcia works his team hard, scheduling 35 games during the season — which

is the most that teams can play according to IHSA rules — before the drive toward state play. If the early season games get canceled due to weather, Garcia works hard to get them rescheduled. Almost all the teams the Panthers’ varsity squad play are 2A, which means they face schools that include Dwight, Streator, Ottawa and other strong programs. Bill Booker, a 25-year coaching veteran, is the assistant coach in the Panther program. John Cruz, a 35-year coaching veteran, heads the junior varsity team, assisted by Sergio Cirilo. “I’m extremely fortunate to have the staff I do,” said Garcia. When breaking down practices and working with the athletes, Garcia takes the catchers and outfielders, while Booker works primarily with the infielders. Both coaches split the pitchers and hitters when working with them. “This group is a very competitive group,” Garcia said. “I think they are going to be ready come regional time. I don’t know how that is going to transpire as far as the season goes ... I expect this group to be ready on May 17. it’s a good group, and they’ve been looking forward to this.” Cruz assisted Garcia during the 2011-12 season and is in his first season as the junior varsity coach. Cruz said he’s getting to know all the players and their strengths and weaknesses. Players out for the team include Colton Washkowiak, R.J. Copeland, Austin Biagini, Michael Laxner, Nick Diaz Deleon, Danny Pavlovich, Brandon Elliot, Riley Elliot, Jeff Baker, Matt Magana, Garrett Ossola, Matt Galetti, Neal Stasell, Michael Glenn, Matt Donelson, Matt Miller, Alex Veverka and Cody Phoenix, The junior varsity squad has been blessed with an abundance of pitchers this year. Cruz said there are 11 athletes on the 19-athlete roster who can pitch. It is a delightful situation to have. Traditionally teams often are short pitchers, so Cruz said he will be having multiple athletes pitching in the early season to establish who will be the top pitchers on the team. “I’ll have them pitch two innings each in the first games to see how they do,” he said. “Some of my main pitchers will be Pavlovich, Biagini, Diaz Deleon and Washkowiak, Elliot, Glenn and some of the sophomores, I have six of them on the team, and five of those I can count on to pitch, too.” With the six freshman games, along with the second game of the doubleheaders on the schedule, the pitchers will be getting quite the workout. Cruz said not only the pitchers, but freshmen who don’t get a lot of playing time in the regular season will be able to get a lot more playing time. The tentative starting lineup will include the infield of Veverka or Magana at first base, Pavlovitch at third base, Diaz Deleon at shortstop, Stasell at second base,

Washkowiak in left field, Copeland in center and Biagini in right field. Catcher will be Baker or Wink. “Every year I go home and tell my wife that I can’t believe the group of kids that I have,” he said. “They keep getting better and better every year. Like this group I have. They have opened their arms to me, coming over from the varsity. I have just enjoyed it.” The junior varsity schedule is just as challenging as the varsity schedule. Big games that the team is looking forward to include Ottawa, Rock Island Alleman, St. Bede and IVC. “We have 35 games too, and we don’t play too many small schools — we play a lot of big schools for our size. We either play 2A schools or 3A schools. We don’t go out and expect them to win every game. We expect them to have good sportsmanship, respect their coaches, other schools, other players — we want them to be good young men,” said Cruz. Cruz’s wife has gone to all his games as he has coached over the years. Every once in a while he tells her he is going to get out of it, and his wife calls his bluff. “She says to me you know you’re not (going to stop coaching),” he said. The next home game for the varsity squad will be at 4:30 p.m. March 22 versus Paw Paw on Jenkins Field. The junior varsity team will be at home at 11 a.m. March 23 versus Seneca at Jenkins Field.

Putnam County Record photos/Ken Schroeder

Putnam County High School senior Austin Pletsch settles in at catcher during practice of the PCHS varsity squad on March 14. Pletsch is one of 10 returning seniors to the PCHS team. The next home game for the squad will be at 4:30 p.m. March 22.


8 Sports 8 • The Putnam County Record • Wednesday, March 20, 2013

WIC information

WIC stands for the Women, Infants and Children nutrition program. The WIC program provides free foods to pregnant and postpartum women, infants, and children up to 5 years old who meet the eligibility requirements. WIC provides free healthy foods, and a healthy pregnancy is an important step toward having a healthy baby. WIC is not the same as food stamps/LINK. If you are pregnant, you may be eligible for the WIC program, depending on your income. WIC is a federal program and does not interfere with any other government programs or benefits you may be receiving. Please call the Putnam County Health Department at 815-925-7326 to find out more about the WIC program.

Magnolia to host blood drive MAGNOLIA – The American Red Cross is sponsoring a blood drive at the Magnolia Fire Department from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on April 7. The blood drive is being held in honor of all past and present veterans, and the Illinois Patriot Guard Traveling Memory Wall will be on display. For an appointment, contact Peggy at 815-257-0707.

Card shower for Margaret Bonucchi A card shower to celebrate the 95th birthday of Margaret Bonucchi of Granville is being planned. Margaret, who will celebrate her birthday on March 25, is currently living at the Hawthorne Inn in Peru. Cards and notes of well-wishes may be sent to her at the Hawthorne Inn, Room 122, 1101 31st St. Peru, IL 61354.

Couples in Christ Bible study group TONICA – Immanuel Lutheran Church is hosting a Bible study for couples at 5:30 p.m. every third Sunday of each month in the basement of the church. The first meeting of the group was March 17. There will be food, fellowship, and of course, Bible study. Reservations are asked if possible, so that food can be ordered appropriately. Contact Bob Ashley at 815-252-2042 or the Rev. Roger Helgren at 815-488-3231.

Talent, anyone? By Dixie Schroeder dschroeder@putnamcountyrecord.com

GRANVILLE – The fourth annual Putnam County High School Music Talent Show on March 23 has opened its doors to not only current performing students, but PCHS alumni as well. “We are looking to create a bigger experience for the whole thing,” said Natalie Hulmstrom, PCHS music director. “We have a bunch of the high school kids signed up to perform in the talent show, as well as some past alumni who have participated.” The annual show, which will be held at 7 p.m. in the auditorium at PCHS, will be led by student masters of ceremonies to help make the show flow well. There will also be a bake sale in the Putnam County High School commons during intermission and a 50/50 raffle during the event. Hulmstrom said there are a couple of alumni who are at Illinois State University. “They are bringing their vocal jazz group, ‘On the Brink of Normal’ to perform,” she

said. “Brandon Mennie, Shawn Connerton and Tom Augustyniak are planning on coming back and performing as well.” Hulmstrom said they want to turn the events into an entire show, and the evening will include judges for the kids’ performances to decide the winners. PCHS students are pre-selling tickets to this event, and all seating is reserved. This is something new from past talent show events. “We are pre-selling tickets,” said Hulmstrom. “Anyone that calls the high school can ask for my extension (219) and get tickets, which are $3 each. This will be assigned seating. First come, first served.” Hulmstrom said the proceeds from this event will be divided among the students who are attending the music department’s June trip to Cleveland. “The goal is to help them pay off the balance of the trip costs that they may have,” she said. The “Cleveland Tour,” as Hulmstrom and the music department stu-

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two years. “We have three days chock-full of stuff for the kids to be doing,” she said. “It should be a great experience for the students.”

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dents call it, will take 31 PCHS students plus chaperones on a charter bus for three jampacked days of tours, performances and fun. Hulmstrom said the goal is to take a trip every

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Putnam County Record photo/Dixie Schroeder

Antonio Diaz DeLeon, Stephen Morine and Nathanial Ward practice for the fourth annual Putnam County High School Music Department Talent Show, which will be held March 23. Reserved ticket seating is available at 815-882-2800, ext. 219.

Magnolia CeMetery Clean Up Starting March 15, clean Sweep! Everything will be removed. If you wish to save what is on a grave, please remove before March 15. No new materials will be accepted until April 1. There will be only 2 in-ground items to a site, 1 floral arrangement, 1 shepherds hook, or 1 night light. If there is more, they will be removed. NO planting in ground, arrangements should be saddled or on monument pieces. Any questions please call Marge at 815-869-7811. No answer, please leave message, she will return all question calls.

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9 Life Wednesday, March 20, 2013 • The Putnam County Record • 9

Putnam County Schools

Recipe corner

Breakfast menus March March milk. March March milk. March

25 – Breakfast sandwich or cereal and toast, fruit, juice, milk. 26 – Whole grain French toast sticks or cereal and toast, fruit, juice, 27 – Sausage and toast or cereal and toast, fruit, juice, milk. 28 – Scrambled eggs with croissant or cereal and toast, fruit, juice, 29 – Spring break begins.

Lunch menus March 25 – Chicken quesadilla, refried beans, corn, whole grain tortilla chips with salsa, pears, milk. March 26 – Sub sandwich on whole grain bun, broccoli with cheese sauce, peaches, cookie, milk. March 27 – Chili, crackers, baby carrots, pineapple, ice cream cup, milk. March 28 – High school/junior high – Salad bar; Elementary/primary – Hot dog on whole grain bun, green beans, grapes, milk. March 29 – Spring break begins

Putnam County Achievement Services March 25 – Seasoned chicken quarter, American fries, peas, sliced peaches, wheat bread. March 26 – Meat loaf with ketchup, au gratin potatoes, stewed tomatoes, orange, bread. March 27 – Cheeseburger casserole, Brussels sprouts, romaine salad with dressing, fruit cocktail, peanut butter with wheat crackers. March 28 – Easter Party – ham with raisin sauce, sweet potatoes, green beans almondine, cinnamon applesauce, Jell-O cake, wheat roll. March 29 – Closed for Good Friday.

Brief Masons to hold dinner

Births ​Battles Neil Battles and Kayli Rae Magnafici of Peru are the parents of a daughter born March 6 at St. Margaret’s Hospital in Spring Valley.

MAGNOLIA – The Magnolia Masonic Lodge will hold its annual chicken dinner from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on April 7 at the Lodge Hall in Magnolia. The cost is $8 for adults, with children under 12 costing $4.

ELECT William “Bill”

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It’s almost Easter, and to me, Easter always means ham. Here are a couple of ham recipes I think you’ll enjoy! It’s time to start planning your Easter dinner and all the festivities, Easter egg hunts, church services and celebrations for family and friends.

Pineapple Ham Loaf 2 eggs 1/2 cup milk 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 3/4 cup dry bread crumbs 1 1/2 teaspoons ground mustard, divided 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon pepper 1 pound fully cooked ham, ground (4 cups) 1 pound ground pork 1 20-ounce can sliced pineapple 1/2 cup packed brown sugar In a bowl, combine eggs, milk, Worcestershire sauce, bread crumbs, 1 teaspoon mustard, salt and pepper. Add ham and pork, stir well. Shape into eight oval patties; set aside. Drain pineapple, reserving 1/2 cup juice. Place a pineapple slice between each ham patty.

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(Refrigerate remaining pineapple and juice for another use.) Carefully place in an ungreased 9-by-5-inch loaf pan. Pat patties around pineapple to form a loaf. Combine brown sugar, remaining mustard and reserved juice. Pour a small amount over loaf. Bake, uncovered, at 350° for 1 1/4 hours or until lightly browned and a meat thermometer reaches 160°, basting occasionally with remaining juice mixture.

Apricot Baked Ham 1/2 fully cooked bonein ham (5 to 7 pounds) 20 whole cloves 1/2 cup apricot preserves 3 tablespoons ground mustard

Do you have a ham recipe you’d like to share with other readers? Email it to me at judyd2313@frontier. com. Please remember to include your name, address and telephone number (telephone number won’t be published). Happy Easter, my friends!

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1/2 cup packed light brown sugar Place ham on a rack in a shallow roasting pan. Score the surface of the ham, making diamond shapes 1/2-inch deep, insert a clove in each diamond. Combine preserves and mustard, spread over ham. Pat brown sugar into apricot mixture. Bake at 325° for 20 minutes per pound or until a meat thermometer reads 140°.

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10 Llife 10 • The Putnam County Record • Wednesday, March 20, 2013

Spiritually speaking ... New church pastored by McNabb resident B y Donna Barker Shaw Media Service

SPRING VALLEY — A new church has opened its doors in Spring Valley. Pastored by Dan Richardson, the Spring Valley Apostolic Tabernacle is located at 121 E. St. Paul St. in a storefront in Spring Valley’s downtown business district. The first service for the new church was an evening service on Feb. 24 with about 75 people in attendance. For now, the church will continue to meet Sunday evenings at 6 p.m. In describing the evening service, Richardson said the service is upbeat, Bible-based and Spirit-filled. The style of music is primarily Southern gospel with some contemporary music as well. Regardless of the style of music, people are free to worship the Lord and

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to worship Him from the heart, he said. As far as needing to dress up for church, Richardson said people are welcomed just as they are. In other opportunities for the community, the church also plans to begin a children’s program at 10 a.m. Sundays and a 7 p.m. Wednesday service, which will be geared for the whole family with a Bible study and worship time. Richardson said he chose Spring Valley for the new church because God had placed in his heart a desire to plant a church in that community. The goal of the new church is not to take people away from other churches already in the community, but rather to reach out to those who have no church, he said. When asked what sets the Spring Valley Apos-

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tolic Tabernacle apart from other churches in the community, Richardson said that difference can be explained by the Acts 2:38 verse in the Bible and the church’s strong belief in the name of Jesus. The church also believes in the repentance of sin, separation from the world, a high standard of holiness, baptism in Jesus’ name, and the evidence of a Spiritfilled life by speaking in other tongues. Richardson said he does not take a salary for pastoring the church, which is not part of any denomination but rather an independent outreach. Every penny received will go back into the Spring Valley ministry. Within three years, he hopes to build a new church building. The church has a threeyear lease at its current building. Richardson, who lives

Dan and Annette Richardson in McNabb with his wife, Annette, said he’s received his training for being a pastor through a 10-year mentoring process with an area pastor. In looking at the goals of the church, Richardson said being a Christian is about a lot more than going to a church

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Church, he wants to share that friend — Jesus — and that relationship lifestyle with people, Richardson said. He knows from firsthand experience that God is the God of second chances, a forgiving God who welcomes people, he said.

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building once a week. Being a Christian is about knowing Jesus as a friend and constant companion, 365 days a year. People may go to church and still not know Jesus as that personal friend, he said. Through the Spring Valley Apostolic

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11 Life Wednesday, March 20, 2013 • The Putnam County Record • 11

PC students capture second at edible car event OGLESBY — It wasn’t a record-breaking race for the Edible Car Contest recently at Illinois Valley Community College, but students from Hall High School dominated the speed competition for the second year in a row. Teams of Hall calculus students won first and third in the speed competition in the eighth annual contest, which IVCC hosts in celebration of National Engineering Week.   This year’s fastest vehicle was designed and built by Olivia Brandner, Jacquelyn Petzel, Alex Olivares and Sam Rizzo, under the team name The Uncle Worms. The thirdplace car was built by the Going Cakeless team of Joe Parochetti, Rebekah Dagraedt and Abney Bernardini. Math teacher Jill Bruner advised the students. Last year, Hall students swept the speed category, but this year, a pair of IVCC students, Kevin Smith and Logan Koepke, took second place, racing under the name Fire Breathing Rubber Duckies.  An IVCC student team named Smokin’ Hot Babes, which finished in the middle of the pack for speed, was the overall winner, taking a first in three categories — design, detail and prospective engineers. The team is comprised of Marsha Weidert, Katherine Duda and Amber Wade. A Putnam County High School team was second overall, winning a first in creativity and first in the high school category. That team, “Cannoli Buggy,” included Loralee Wilson, Maddi Loiselle and Katie Alleman and was advised by biology teacher Andrea Skinner. “Our purpose is to demonstrate that STEM, or science, technology, engineering and math, can be

creative and fun,” said contest organizer Dorene Peres, program coordinator of Computer-Aided Design at IVCC. According to participants, the contest succeeded. “Eating the leftovers” emerged as a real plus for some participants. And the challenges, similar to past years, were “figuring out the axles” and “keeping it from breaking.” Many of the participants said they really enjoyed the teamwork involved and seeing the vehicle work. And a plus, according to one participant, was: “Even though our car got into an accident, the passengers are OK.” While the speed contest continues to be the highlight of the event, the 58 participants on 18 teams competed for prizes in eight other categories. One vehicle, produced by the Veggie Wheels, wasn’t able to slide down the track, even with a little help. But it won a first in nutrition and second in design and in detail.

That vehicle, one of the top overall winners, was designed by IVCC’s Billie Scamen, Cassie Platt and Jeni Shute. The cars may have been low tech, but the timing for the speed competition was definitely high tech. Under the guidance of Jim Gibson, electronics program coordinator, electronics students designed, programmed and built a programmable logic controller to time the speed on the track. The control was connected to a computer running Rockwell automated software and it utilized a reflective photo eye at the start and finish.  In addition to recording the time, the software also translated the time into “mouthfuls per hour.”  To highlight Engineering Week, as spectators and participants were gathering for the speed competition, they competed for prizes by completing a quiz on engineering career information. Correct answers were announced during the awards ceremony.  The quiz question that

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generated the most incorrect answers was about the percentage of people in engineering careers who are women, Perez said. “Women make up less than 20 percent of the engineering workforce,” she said, explaining that most people believe there is a much higher percentage. “That’s one reason why there is a big push nationally to increase the exposure of young women to STEM.” The contest was sponsored by the Division of Career and Technical

Programs and the Making Industry Meaningful In College project. The contest originated in 2006 with support from a National Science Foundation grant. Judges were IVCC educational technologists Mary Smith and Dawn Lockwood and engineering technology student Kevin Staton. The Student Government Association provided pizza. Organizers were Perez, Gibson and communications instructor Rose Marie Lynch. In 2012, IVCC’s Edible

Car Contest was one of 10 finalists for a Bellwether Award, a national award which recognizes outstanding and innovative community college projects. It was IVCC’s second nomination for the contest. Organizers have written a “how to” handbook and given workshops at a number of national conferences to encourage and assist teachers to organize contests as a fun way to provide hands-on experience for classroom content with students of all ages.

CONSOLIDATED ELECTION NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT ON TUESDAY, APRIL 9, 2013 at the following precincts and established polling places: PRECINCT POLLING PLACE GRANVILLE #1 Standard Fire Station GRANVILLE #2 American Legion Hall GRANVILLE #3 Mark Community Bldg. GRANVILLE #4 American Legion Hall MAGNOLIA #1 Magnolia Fire Station MAGNOLIA #2 McNabb Fire Station HENNEPIN #1 Park District Complex SENACHWINE #1 Putnam Town Hall (Locations subject to change as necessity requires)

LOCATION Standard, IL Granville, IL Mark, IL Granville, IL Magnolia, IL McNabb, IL Hennepin, IL Putnam, IL

in the County of Putnam, State of Illinois, a Consolidated Election will be held for the purpose of electing candidates for the following offices: MUNICIPAL: • For Mayor or Village President • Village Clerk • Trustees of the following Municipalities: Standard Granville Mark Magnolia McNabb Hennepin TOWNSHIP: • Supervisor • Township Clerk • Highway Commissioner • Assessor Granville Magnolia • Multi-Township Assessor Hennepin-Senachwine • Trustees Granville Hennepin Magnolia Senachwine HENNEPIN PARK DISTRICT: • Commissioners PUTNAM COUNTY LIBRARY DISTRICT: • Trustees REGIONAL BOARD OF SCHOOLS (MARSHALL, PUTNAM, WOODFORD): • Trustees COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT #513: • Trustees PUTNAM COUNTY SCHOOL UNIT DISTRICT #535 • Board Members HENRY-SENACHWINE SCHOOL UNIT DISTRICT #5 • Board Members PRINCETON ELEMENTARY SCHOOL UNIT DISTRICT #115 • Board Members PRINCETON HIGH SCHOOL UNIT DISTRICT #500 • Board Members TISKILWA RURAL FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT • Trustee The polls of said General Election shall be opened continuously from 6:00 A.M. until 7:00 P.M. on Tuesday, April 9, 2013. Dated at Hennepin, Illinois on March 12, 2013. DANIEL S. KUHN Putnam County Clerk & Election Authority


12 Classifieds 12 • The Putnam County Record • Wednesday, March 20, 2013

– Classifieds – General Terms and Policies The Putnam County Record reserves the right to classify correctly, edit, reject or cancel any advertisement at any time in accordance with its policy. All ads must be checked for errors by the advertiser, on the first day of publication. We will be responsible for the first incorrect insertion, and its liabilities shall be limited to the price on one insertion. CLASSIFIED LINE AD & LEGAL DEADLINES: • Wednesday Paper deadline Thursday before by 3pm We Accept Call 815-875-4461 classified@bcrnews.com

- 200 Employment 227 • Drivers DRIVERS: Want a Professional Career? Haul Flatbed/OD Loads for Trinity Logistics Group! Earn $.41-.51cpm! CDL-A with 2 years experience EEO/ AA. Call 800-533-7862 www.trinitytrucking.com

228 • Help Wanted Local Ag Business looking for SEASONAL HELP. Must have CDL with hazmat and tanker endorsement. Send or drop off resume to: Sun Ag Inc. McNabb, 4476 IL Hwy 89, McNabb, IL 61335

231 • Childcare HENNEPIN Licensed daycare has 1 full-time preschool opening. Call Kelly's Daycare, 815-925-4004 LICENSED DAYCARE in Standard, has full-time openings for Pre-School and under children. Please call Lynn at 815-339-6855

232 • Business Opportunities ********** THE CLASSIFIED Advertising Department of the Putnam County Record Does not have the opportunity to fully investigate the credibility of each advertiser appearing within these columns. If an offer sounds “too good to be true” it probably is. Proceed with caution if you are asked to send money or to give a credit card number. Proceed with caution in calling 900 phone numbers. All phone numbers prefixed by”900” are charged to the CALLER. Charges may be assessed on a “per minute” basis rather than a “per call” basis. The Putnam County Record Classifieds makes every effort to qualify these charges for the reader. If you have a concern about an advertiser, please contact: Better Business Bureau 330 North Wabash Chicago, IL 60611 312 832-0500

- 300 Services 320 • Misc Services

Medicare Supplement Insurance & Major Medical Health Insurance. From Blue Cross Blue Shield. Gonet Insurance, Inc. Granville, IL. 815-339-2411

- 400 Merchandise 450 • Under $1000 Oak Pub Table/4 chairs, very good condition, new. $1,514, selling $700. NICE!!! MUST SEE! Call 815-488-2483 ************ HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL? Put your ad in for FREE Items $1,000 or less can run FREE for 1 week. Limit of 5 lines. Up to 3 items with price and price totaling under $1,000. 1 ad per household per week. No commercial ads, firearms or animal sales. E-mail information to: classified@ bcrnews.com (include your name, address & phone number) No Phone Calls!

- 700 Real Estate For Sale 767 • Mobile Home Sales **************** PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call, HUD tollfree at 800 669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 800 927-9275

- 800 Real Estate For Rent 864 • Misc Rentals (2) 3500 Bushel Grain Storage Bins for rent. Between Rt. 71 & McNabb on Rt. 89. Contact 815-482-7880 Indoor/Outdoor Storage for rent. Boats, Rvs, Campers & related items. Owner lives on site for security purposes. Between Rt. 71 & McNabb on Rt. 89. Call 815-482-7880

866 • Wanted to Rent Putnam County Family of 4 seeks 3+ bedroom house, within Putnam County, to: rent, rent to own, rent with option to buy. Call 815-579-6839

999 • Legal Notices NOTICE Public Notice is hereby given that on February 28, 2013, a certificate was filed in the Office of the County Clerk of Putnam County, Illinois, setting forth the names and post office addresses of all of the persons owning, conducting and transacting

999 • Legal Notices

999 • Legal Notices

the business known as G & G Auto Repair located at 610 N. School Street, Granville, Illinois. Dated this 28th day of February, 2013. /s/Daniel S. Kuhn County Clerk Published in the Putnam County Record Mar. 20, 27 and Apr. 3, 2013.

THE COST OF EACH MOWING AND TRIMMING FOR EACH OF THE THREE (3) CEMETERIES. BIDS MAY BE SUBMITTED TO THE PUTNAM COUNTY CLERK’S OFFICE, P.O. BOX 236, HENNEPIN, IL 61327. BIDS MUST BE RECEIVED NO LATER THAN 4:00 P.M. ON FRIDAY, APRIL 5, 2013. THE COUNTY OF PUTNAM RESERVES THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY OR ALL BIDS SUBMITTED. DUANE CALBOW, CHAIRMAN PUTNAM COUNTY BOARD Published in the Putnam County Record Mar. 20, 2013.

LEGAL PUBLICATION NOTICE TO BID THE COUNTY OF PUTNAM IS NOW ACCEPTING BIDS FOR THE MOWING AND TRIMMING OF THREE (3) CEMETERIES; FLORID, CALEDONIA, AND THE “OLD” GRANVILLE CEMETERY. THE BID SHOULD STATE

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT PUTNAM COUNTY - HENNEPIN, ILLINOIS BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR ) THE CERTIFICATE HOLDERS CWABS, ) INC. ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, ) SERIES 2005-3 ) PLAINTIFF ) VS ) JOHN LADSON A/K/A JOHN R. LADSON; ) CHANIN R. LADSON; UM CAPITAL, LLC; ) UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD ) CLAIMANTS ; ) DEFENDANTS ) 08 CH 19 7456 AUDUBON DRIVE HENNEPIN, IL 61327 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE ACT ***THIS DOCUMENT IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT ON A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE*** PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered by said Court in the above entitled cause on April 20, 2010, PUTNAM COUNTY SHERIFF in PUTNAM County, Illinois, will on April 25, 2013, in Putnam County Courthouse 4th Street., Hennepin, IL 61327, at 1:00 p.m., sell at public auction and sale to the highest bidder for cash, all and singular, the following described real estate mentioned in said Judgment, situated in the County of PUTNAM, State of Illinois, or so much thereof as shall be sufficient to satisfy said Judgment: LOT 106 IN HENNEPIN FARMS, SECTION 1, SITUATED IN PUTNAM COUNTY, ILLINOIS, PURSUANT OF SURVEY THEREOF BY ASSOCIATED ENGINEERS, INC. DATED OCTOBER 18, 1967 AND RECORDED IN THE RECORDER’S OFFICE OF PUTNAM COUNTY, ILLINOIS IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 127. TAX NO. 01-00-054-060 COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 7456 AUDUBON DRIVE HENNEPIN, IL 61327 Description of Improvements: SEE ATTACHED. The Judgment amount was $180,583.50. Sale Terms: This is an “AS IS” sale for “CASH”. The successful bidder must deposit 25% down by certified funds; balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. NO REFUNDS. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate, water bills, etc., and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to plaintiff. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the bid amount, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/ expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DYAS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For Information: Visit our website at http:\\ service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only - Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel. No. (312) 372-2060. Please refer to file #PA0806859 Plaintiff’s attorney is not required to provide additional information other than that set forth in this notice of sale. I514088 Published in the Putnam County Record Mar. 13, 20 and 27, 2013. F11090045 CHOH IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT PUTNAM COUNTY- HENNEPIN, ILLINOIS JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association ) Plaintiff, ) vs. ) Eric T. Mrowicki; Temple J. Mrowicki; ) Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants )

999 • Legal Notices

999 • Legal Notices

) 11 CH 18 Property Address: 110 Division Street, Mark, Illinois 61340 NOTICE OF SHERIFF SALE Public notice is hereby given that in pursuance of a judgment of said Court entered in the aboveentitled cause on December 20, 2012, I, Sheriff, Kevin Doyle of Putnam County, Illinois, will hold a sale on April 18, 2013 , commencing at 9 a.m., at Putnam County Sheriff’s Office, Fourth & High Street, Hennepin, IL 61327. to sell to the highest bidder or bidders the following described real estate, or so much thereof as may be sufficient to satisfy said decree, to-wit: THAT PART OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 32 NORTH, RANGE 1 WEST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 14 IN QUIN-MAR SUBDIVISION TO THE VILLAGE OF MARK; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST 208.89 FEET (207.95 FEET PLAT DISTANCE) ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF LOTS 14, 13 AND 12 OF SAID SUBDIVISION TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID LOT 12; THENCE NORTH 3 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 156.81 FEET ALONG THE EAST LINE OF LOTS 11 AND 10 OF SAID SUBDIVISION; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 217.87 FEET PARALLEL WITH THE NORTH LINE OF SAID LOTS 14, 13 AND 12 TO THE WEST RIGHT-OFWAY LINE OF DIVISION STREET IN THE VILLAGE OF MARK, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST 156.80 FEET ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, ALL BEING SITUATED IN THE VILLAGE OF MARK, PUTNAM COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 110 Division Street, Mark, Illinois 61340 P.I.N.: 02-07-032-000 (new) ; 02-07-030-000 (old) First Lien Position; Single-Family Residence; Judgment Amount $78,666.82 IN ACCORDANCE WITH 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) AND (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), AND 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT THE PURCHASER OF THE PROPERTY, OTHER THAN A MORTGAGEE, SHALL PAY THE ASSESSMENTS AND LEGAL FEES REQUIRED BY SUBSECTIONS (g)(1) AND (g)(4) OF SECTION 9 AND THE ASSESSMENTS REQUIRED BY SUBSECTION (g-1) OF SECTION 18.5 OF THE ILLINOIS CONDOMINIUM PROPERTY ACT. The property will not be open for inspection. Terms of Sale: CASH - 10% down at the time of sale and the balance due within 24 hours of the sale. All payments for the amount bid shall be in certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Putnam County. The person to contact for information regarding this property is: Anthony Porto at FREEDMAN ANSELMO LINDBERG LLC 1807 West Diehl Road, Naperville, IL (866)402-8661. For bidding instructions, visit www.fal-illinois. com 24 hours prior to sale. This communication is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. FREEDMAN ANSELMO LINDBERG LLC 1807 W. Diehl Rd., Ste 333 Naperville, IL 60563 EMAIL: foreclosurenotice@fal-illinois.com 630-453-6960 866-402-8661 630-428-4620 (fax) I512580 Published in the Putnam County Record Mar. 6, 13 and 20, 2013.

Association as successor by merger to LaSalle Bank National Association, as Trustee for Certificateholders of Bear Stearns Asset Backed Securities I LLC, Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2006-HE7 PLAINTIFF Vs. Larry E. Williams; et. al. DEFENDANTS 10 CH 00017 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on 2/28/2013, the Sheriff of Putnam County, Illinois will on 4/11/13 at the hour of 9:30 a.m. at Putnam County Courthouse, 120 North 4th Street, Hennepin, IL 61327, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of Putnam and State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: LOTS 242 AND 243 IN DAVID L. CASTEEL’S ADDITION TO THE ORIGINAL TOWN, NOW VILLAGE OF MAGNOLIA, PUTMAN COUNTY, ILLINOIS. PIN 04-00-041-020 04-00-041-030 Improved with Single Family Home COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 210 N. Maple Street, Magnolia, IL 61336 Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the property is a condominium and the foreclosure takes place after 1/1/2007, purchasers other than the mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: Codilis & Associates, P.C., 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-10-29716. I516649 Published in the Putnam County Record Mar. 20, 27 and Apr. 3, 2013.

Defendants.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT PUTNAM COUNTY, HENNEPIN, ILLINOIS U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee, successor in interest to Bank of America, National HENNEPIN TOWNSHIP Notice is hereby given that meeting dates for the Hennepin Township Board for the fiscal year 2013-2014 will be the second Wednesday of every month commencing at 7:00 o’clock p.m. at the Hennepin Town Hall. 2013 April 10th May 8th June 12th July 10th August 14th September 11th October 9th November 13th December 11th 2014 January 8th February 12th March 12th Hennepin Township Clerk Daniel J. DeMattia Published in the Putnam County Record Mar. 20 and 27, 2013.

Just Reduced!

PUBLIC AUCTION

Auction to be held at the Tumbleson Auction Center, 1635 North Main Street, Princeton, IL, Located 100 miles West of Chicago, Il just off INT 80, Exit 56, South on Rt. 26. (Behind the Sherwood Antique Mall) on:

SAT., MARCH 23, 2013 TIME: 9:30 A.M. (Preview: 7:30 A.M.)

#08101436

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Call Bonnie Lester

815-228-7565

2409 4th St., Peru

815-223-1088

1-800-414-5788

View Listing & Photos on website: www.tumblesonauction.com PLEASE NOTE: WE WILL SELL ONE HAYRACK OF VARIOUS TOOLS AND MISC OUTSIDE AT 9:30 AM AND BEGIN INSIDE DIRECTLY AFTER. ANTIQUE & MODERN FURNITURE/ APPLIANCES, ANTIQUES, COLLECTIBLES, TOYS, HUGE COLLECTION OF HOLIDAY/DÉCORATOR DÉCOR & HOUSEHOLD ITEMS PLEASE NOTE: There will be MANY Box Lots & Many Boxes Yet to be Unpacked!!!

HOgE’S ANTIQUES

Owner Josephine Hoge, Streator, Il & Others TUMBLESON AUCTION COMPANY, PRINCETON, IL Email: ttauction@yahoo.com Or Phone: 815-872-1852 AUCTIONEERS: TOM AND MARY TUMBLESON LIC # 040000396-397 & TIFFANY FOES LIC #041.001601


13 Wednesday, March 20, 2013 • The Putnam County Record • 13 999 • Legal Notices

999 • Legal Notices

999 • Legal Notices

999 • Legal Notices

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT PUTNAM COUNTY - HENNEPIN, ILLINOIS US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS ) TRUSTEE FOR CMLTI 2007-WFHE4 ) PLAINTIFF ) VS ) JIM ZIANO A/K/A JAMES B. ZIANO A/K/A ) JAMES ZIANO; CAPITAL ONE BANK (USA),) N.A. F/K/A CAPITAL ONE BANK; UNITED ) STATES OF AMERICA; STATE OF ) ILLINOIS; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND ) LEGATEES OF JIM ZIANO, IF ANY; ) UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON ) RECORD CLAIMANTS ; ) DEFENDANTS ) 10 CH 18 11351 WOODY WALKER ROAD MCNABB, IL 61335 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE ACT ***THIS DOCUMENT IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT ON A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE*** PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered by said Court in the above entitled cause on December 13, 2012, PUTNAM COUNTY SHERIFF in PUTNAM County, Illinois, will on April 25, 2013, in Putnam County Courthouse 4th Street, Hennepin, IL 61327, at 1:00 p.m., sell at public auction and sale to the highest bidder for cash, all and singular, the following described real estate mentioned in said Judgment, situated in the County of PUTNAM, State of Illinois, or so much thereof as shall be sufficient to satisfy said Judgment: PARCEL 1: THAT PART OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 17, TOWNSHIP 31 NORTH, RANGE 1 WEST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTH HALF OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 17; THENCE SOUTH 3 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 3,309.52 FEET ON THE EAST LINE OF THE WEST HALF OF THE SAID NORTHWEST AND SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 17 TO THE NORTH LINE OF THE SOUTH HALF OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 17; THENCE SOUTH 86 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 33 SECONDS WEST 300.18 FEET ON THE NORTH LINE OF THE SOUTH HALF TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH 3 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 329.42 FEET TO THE SOUTH LINE OF THE NORTH 5/8 OF THE WEST HALF OF THE SAID SOUTHWEST QUARTER, THENCE SOUTH 86 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 19 SECONDS WEST 200.23 FEET ON THE SOUTH LINE OF THE NORTH 5/8 OF THE SAID WEST HALF; THENCE NORTH 3 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 727.51 FEET; THENCE NORTH 87 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 200 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 3 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 397.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, AND ALL BEING SITUATED IN MAGNOLIA TOWNSHIP, PUTNAM COUNTY, ILLINOIS. PARCEL 2: THAT PART OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER AND THE WEST HALF OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER, ALL IN SECTION 17, TOWNSHIP 31 NORTH, RANGE 1 WEST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTH HALF OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 17, THENCE SOUTH 03 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 3,316.30 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE NORTH 03 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 10.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 86 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 33 SECONDS WEST 300.18 FEET; THENCE NORTH 03 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 387.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 46 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 243.74 FEET; THENCE NORTH 86 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 784.72 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 03 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 449.66 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 09 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 105.89 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 86 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 33 SECONDS WEST 681.13 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, AND ALL BEING SITUATED IN MAGNOLIA TOWNSHIP, PUTNAM COUNTY, ILLINOIS PURSUANT TO PLAT OF SURVEY THEREOF BY J WILLIAM SHAFER, ILLINOIS REGISTERED LAND SURVEYOR NO. 2213 DATED OCTOBER 9, 1996. SITUATED IN PUTNAM COUNTY, ILLINOIS. TAX NO. 04-11-105-000 04-11-151-000 COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 11351 WOODY WALKER ROAD MCNABB, IL 61335 Description of Improvements: FRAME SINGLE FAMILY HOUSE DETACHED 2 CAR The Judgment amount was $246,895.37. Sale Terms: This is an “AS IS” sale for “CASH”. The successful bidder must deposit 25% down by certified funds; balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. NO REFUNDS. The subject property is subject to general real

estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate, water bills, etc., and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to plaintiff. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the bid amount, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DYAS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For Information: Visit our website at http:\\ service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only - Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel. No. (312) 372-2060. Please refer to file #PA1029375 Plaintiff’s attorney is not required to provide additional information other than that set forth in this notice of sale. I514104 Published in the Putnam County Record Mar. 13, 20 and 27, 2013.

the 6 months immediately preceding institution of an action to enforce the collection of assessments, and which remain unpaid by the owner during whose possession the assessments accrued. If the outstanding assessments are paid at any time during any action to enforce the collection of assessments, the purchaser shall have no obligation to pay any assessments which accrued before he or she acquired title. If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5 (g)(l). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701 (c) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW Note: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act you are advised that the Law Firm of Heavner, Scott, Beyers & Mihlar, LLC, is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. James A. Coale Attorney for Heavner, Scott, Beyers, & Mihlar, LLC I517759 Published in the Putnam County Record Mar. 20, 27 and Apr. 3, 2013.

of electors numbering ten percent (10%) or more of the number of registered voters in the Village, asking that the question of improving the System, as provided in the Ordinance, and the issuance of the Bonds to pay the cost thereof, be submitted to the electors of the Village, the Village Clerk shall certify the question for submission at the election to be held on 18th day of March, 2014, for the purpose of voting upon such question. The Circuit Court may declare that an emergency referendum should be held prior to said election date pursuant to the provisions of Section 2A-1.4 of the Election Code of the State of Illinois, as amended. A petition form shall be provided by the Village Clerk to any individual requesting one. If no valid petition is filed with the Village Clerk as so provided, said Ordinance shall be in effect after the expiration of that 30-day period. BY ORDER OF the President and Board of Trustees of the Village of Standard, Putnam County, Illinois. DATED the 13th day of March, 2013, s/ Debra L. Holmes Village Clerk Village of Standard Putnam County, Illinois ORDINANCE NUMBER HR-2013-01 AN ORDINANCE authorizing the issuance of Water Revenue Bonds of the Village of Standard, Putnam County, Illinois, in an aggregate principal amount not to exceed $762,000. WHEREAS the Village of Standard, Putnam County, Illinois (the “Village”), operates its municContinued on page 14

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COUNTY OF PUTNAM - HENNEPIN, PUTNAM COUNTY, ILLINOIS EVERBANK, ) Plaintiff, ) vs. ) KARL SWANSON aka KARL S. SWANSON ) and ROBERTA SWANSON aka ROBERTA ) M. SWANSON, ) Defendants. ) 12-CH-4 6 Timberland Court, Putnam, IL 61560 PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of the above Court entered on July 19, 2012 in the above-entitled cause, the following described real estate, to wit: Lot 94 in Plat of Lake Thunderbird Hills in Putnam County, Illinois, as per Plat thereof recorded September 5, 1969, in Plat Book 3, Page 156, all situated in Putnam County, Illinois. Permanent Index Number: 03-00-032-300 Commonly known as: 6 Timberland Court, Putnam, IL 61560 will be offered for sale and sold at public vendue on April 18, 2013, at 9:30 a.m., at the Putnam County Courthouse, Hennepin, Illinois. The judgment amount is $98,478.84. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: The bid amount, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, shall be paid in certified funds immediately by the highest and best bidder at the conclusion of the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate, and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to the Plaintiff. The Sale is further subject to confirmation by the Court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. For information contact Plaintiff’s Attorney: Heavner, Scott, Beyers & Mihlar, LLC, 111 E. Main St., Decatur, Illinois 62523 (217) 422-1719. The purchaser of a condominium unit at a judicial foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, who takes possession of a condominium unit pursuant to a court order or a purchaser who acquires title from a mortgagee shall have the duty to pay the proportionate share, if any, of the common expenses for the unit which would have become due in the absence of any assessment acceleration during LEGAL NOTICE Granville Township Residents You’ve changed your time clocks... now it’s time to change your smoke detector batteries! Granville Township Officials will be distributing two smoke detector batteries FREE to Township residents at our office at 212 S. McCoy in Granville. Distribution times are: Wednesday, March 20, 2013 - 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday, March 21, 2013 - 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Friday, March 22, 2013 - 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, March 23, 2013 - 9 a.m. to 12 noon You must provide your current Ameren or REA Power bill for proof of residency. James Moriarty, Supervisor Donald Troglio, Clerk Trustees Phil Edgerley, Frank Vulcani, Mark Mudge, Kelly Goetz. Published in the Putnam County Record Mar. 20, 2013.

NOTICE OF INTENT TO ISSUE BONDS AND RIGHT TO FILE PETITION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to Ordinance Number HR-2013-01 adopted on March 13, 2013 (the “Ordinance”), the Village of Standard, Putnam County, Illinois (the “Village”), intends to issue its Water Revenue Bonds (the “Bonds”), in an aggregate principal amount not to exceed $762,000, and bearing interest per annum at a rate not to exceed the maximum rate authorized by law at the time the Bonds are sold, for the purpose of paying the costs of constructing improvements to the existing System. A complete copy of the Ordinance accompanies this notice. NOTICE IS HEREBY FURTHER GIVEN that if, within 30 days after the publication of this Notice accompanied by publication of the Ordinance, a petition is filed with the Village Clerk signed by 31 or more electors of the Village, being that number F11090045 CHOH IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT PUTNAM COUNTYHENNEPIN, ILLINOIS JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association ) Plaintiff, ) vs. ) Eric T. Mrowicki; Temple J. Mrowicki; ) Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants ) Defendants. ) 11 CH 18 Property Address: 110 Division Street, Mark, Illinois 61340 NOTICE OF SHERIFF SALE Public notice is hereby given that in pursuance of a judgment of said Court entered in the above-entitled cause on December 20, 2012, I, Sheriff, Kevin Doyle of Putnam County, Illinois, will hold a sale on April 18, 2013 , commencing at 9 a.m., at Putnam County Sheriff’s Office, Fourth & High Street, Hennepin, IL 61327. to sell to the highest bidder or bidders the following described real estate, or so much thereof as may be sufficient to satisfy said decree, to-wit: Commonly known as: 110 Division Street, Mark, Illinois 61340 P.I.N.: 02-07-032-000 (new) ; 02-07-030-000 (old) First Lien Position; Single-Family Residence; Judgment Amount $78,666.82 IN ACCORDANCE WITH 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) AND (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), AND 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT THE PURCHASER OF THE PROPERTY, OTHER THAN A MORTGAGEE, SHALL PAY THE ASSESSMENTS AND LEGAL FEES REQUIRED BY SUBSECTIONS (g) (1) AND (g)(4) OF SECTION 9 AND THE ASSESSMENTS REQUIRED BY SUBSECTION (g-1) OF SECTION 18.5 OF THE ILLINOIS CONDOMINIUM PROPERTY ACT. The property will not be open for inspection. Terms of Sale: CASH - 10% down at the time of sale and the balance due within 24 hours of the sale. All payments for the amount bid shall be in certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Putnam County. The person to contact for information regarding this property is: Anthony Porto at FREEDMAN ANSELMO LINDBERG LLC 1807 West Diehl Road, Naperville, IL (866)402-8661. For bidding instructions, visit www.fal-illinois.com 24 hours prior to sale. This communication is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. FREEDMAN ANSELMO LINDBERG LLC 1807 W. Diehl Rd., Ste 333 Naperville, IL 60563 EMAIL: foreclosurenotice@fal-illinois.com 630-453-6960 866-402-8661 630-428-4620 (fax) I512580 Published in the Putnam County Record Mar. 6, 13 and 20, 2013.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT PUTNAM COUNTY HENNEPIN, ILLINOIS BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR ) THE CERTIFICATE HOLDERS CWABS, INC. ) ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES,SERIES ) 2005-3 ) PLAINTIFF ) VS ) JOHN LADSON A/K/A JOHN R. LADSON; ) CHANIN R. LADSON; UM CAPITAL, LLC; ) UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD ) CLAIMANTS ; ) DEFENDANTS ) 08 CH 19 7456 AUDUBON DRIVE HENNEPIN, IL 61327 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE ACT ***THIS DOCUMENT IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT ON A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE*** PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered by said Court in the above entitled cause on April 20, 2010, PUTNAM COUNTY SHERIFF in PUTNAM County, Illinois, will on April 25, 2013, in Putnam County Courthouse 4th Street., Hennepin, IL 61327, at 1:00 p.m., sell at public auction and sale to the highest bidder for cash, all and singular, the following described real estate mentioned in said Judgment, situated in the County of PUTNAM, State of Illinois, or so much thereof as shall be sufficient to satisfy said Judgment: TAX NO. 01-00-054-060 COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 7456 AUDUBON DRIVE HENNEPIN, IL 61327 Description of Improvements: SEE ATTACHED. The Judgment amount was $180,583.50. Sale Terms: This is an “AS IS” sale for “CASH”. The successful bidder must deposit 25% down by certified funds; balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. NO REFUNDS. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate, water bills, etc., and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to plaintiff. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the bid amount, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DYAS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For Information: Visit our website at http:\\ service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only - Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel. No. (312) 372-2060. Please refer to file #PA0806859 Plaintiff’s attorney is not required to provide additional information other than that set forth in this notice of sale. I514088 Published in the Putnam County Record Mar. 13, 20 and 27, 2013.


14 14 • The Putnam County Record • Wednesday, March 20, 2013 999 • Legal Notices

999 • Legal Notices

999 • Legal Notices

999 • Legal Notices

Continued from page 13 ipally-owned waterworks system (the “System”) in accordance with the provisions of Division 129 of Article 11 of the Illinois Municipal Code, as supplemented and amended, and in particular as supplemented by the Local Government Debt Reform Act, as amended (collectively, the “Act”); and WHEREAS the President and Board of Trustees of the Village (the “Corporate Authorities”) have determined that it is advisable, necessary and in the best interests of public health, safety and welfare to construct improvements to the existing System, including, but not limited to construction of a water filtration treatment plant to prevent non-compliance with the arsenic maximum containment level, enable the System to maintain a finished water quality that meets iron standards, and maintain the rated capacity of the existing System to provide an uninterrupted supply of water, together with the acquisition of all land or rights in land and all mechanical, electrical and other services necessary, useful or advisable to the construction program, and, incidental to such construction, to pay bond discount, bond interest, capitalized interest, bond reserve account, original issue discount, underwriting discount, funding, legal, financing, and administrative expense (all of which said construction, services, and incidental expenses may be referred to as the “Project”), all in accordance with the plans and specifications therefor prepared by consulting engineers to the Village; and WHEREAS the estimated cost of constructing and installing the Project is not less than $2,147,000 and there are insufficient funds on hand and lawfully available to pay such costs; WHEREAS such costs are expected to be defrayed by a CDAP grant in the anticipated amount of $450,000, a Rural Development grant in the anticipated amount of $935,000, and $762,000 from the proceeds of bonds payable from the revenues of the System; and WHEREAS pursuant to and in accordance with the provisions of the Act, the Village is authorized to borrow funds and may issue its Water Revenue Bonds in the aggregate principal amount of not to exceed $762,000 in evidence thereof for the purpose of providing funds to pay the costs of the Project: NOW THEREFORE Be It Ordained by the President and Board of Trustees of the Village of Standard, Putnam County, Illinois, as follows: Section 1. Incorporation of Preambles. The Corporate Authorities hereby find that the recitals contained in the preambles to this Ordinance are true and correct and do incorporate them into this Ordinance by this reference. Section 2. Determination To Issue Bonds. It is necessary and in the best interests of the Village to construct the Project for the public health, safety and welfare, in accordance with the plans and specifications, as described, that the System continue to be operated in accordance with the provisions of the Act, and that for the purpose of constructing the Project, there are hereby authorized to be issued and sold Water Revenue Bonds of the Village in an aggregate principal amount not to exceed $762,000. Section 3. Publication. This Ordinance, accompanied by a Notice in the statutory form, shall be published once within ten (10) days after passage hereof by the Corporate Authorities in the Putnam County Record, being a newspaper of general circulation in the Village. If, within 30 days after the publication of this Ordinance, accompanied by a notice in the statutory form, a petition is filed with the Village Clerk signed by 31 or more electors of the Village, being that number of electors numbering ten percent (10%) or more of the number of registered voters in the Village, asking that the question of improving the System, as provided in this Ordinance, and the issuance of revenue bonds to pay the cost thereof, be submitted to the electors of the Village, the Village Clerk shall certify the question for submission at an election. If no valid petition is filed with the Village Clerk as so provided, this Ordinance shall be in effect after the expiration of that 30 day period. A petition form shall be provided by the Village Clerk to any individual requesting one. Section 4. Additional Ordinances. If no petition meeting the requirements of the Act and other applicable law is filed during the petition period hereinabove referred to, then the Corporate Authorities may adopt additional ordinances or proceedings supplementing or amending this Ordinance providing for the issuance and sale of the Water Revenue Bonds, prescribing all the details of said Water Revenue Bonds, and providing for the collection, segregation and distribution of the revenues of the System, so long as the maximum amount of said Water Revenue Bonds as set forth in this Ordinance is not exceeded and there is no material change in the Project or purposes described herein. Such additional ordinances or proceedings shall in all instances become effective in accordance with the Act and other applicable law. This Ordinance, together with such additional ordinances or proceedings, shall constitute complete authority for the issuance of said Water Revenue Bonds under applicable law. Section 5. Severability. If any section, paragraph, clause or provision of this Ordinance shall be held invalid, the invalidity of such section, paragraph, clause or provision shall not affect any of the other provisions of this Ordinance. Section 6. Repealer. All ordinances, resolutions or orders, or parts thereof, in conflict with the provisions of this Ordinance are to the extent of such conflict hereby repealed. PASSED by the President and Board of Trustees on March 13, 2013. Approved March 13, 2013. /s/Frank M. Vulcani, Jr. Village President Village of Standard Putnam County, Illinois AYES: Jody Piccinelli, Al Peterson, Jack Seghi and James Reno NAYS: -

ABSENT: RECORDED in the Village Records on March 13,2013. ATTEST: /s/Debra L. Holmes Village Clerk Village of Standard Putnam County, Illinois Published in the Putnam County Record on Mar. 20, 2013.

3. The names of the titleholders of record are known as Gregory S. Skelly and Deborah E. Skelly. 4. A legal description of the real estate sufficient to identify it with reasonable certainty is as follows: Lot 440 in Plat No.2 of Lake Thunderbird Hills, according to the plat thereof recorded in the Recorder’s Office of Putnam County, Illinois in Plat Book 3, Page 161, on October 21, 1969, situated in Putnam County, Illinois. Permanent Index No. 03-00-042-300 5. A common address or description of the location of the real estate is as follows: 77 Barbados Drive, Putnam, Illinois, 61560-9507 6. An identification of the mortgage sought to be foreclosed is as follows: a. Names of Mortgagors: Gregory S. Skelly and Deborah E. Skelly. b. Name of Mortgagee: American Chartered Bank. c. Date of Mortgage: September 2, 2008. d. Date of Recording: September 30,2008. e. County Where Recorded: Putnam County, Illinois

f. Recording Document Identification: Document No. Roll 107, Page 2202. NOW, THEREFORE, unless you ALL NON RECORD CLAIMANTS AND ALL UNKNOWN OWNERS, Defendants, file your answer to the complaint in this cause or otherwise make your appearance therein, in the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit, Putnam County, Illinois, held in the Putnam County Courthouse, in the City of Hennepin, 120 West North Street, or before April 15, 2013, default may be entered against you and each of you at any time after that day and a judgment for foreclosure entered in accordance with the prayer of the complaint for foreclosure. /s/Cathy J. Oliveri Circuit Clerk of Putnam County DOCUMENT PREPARED BY: James A. Andreoni - #3126948 Perona, Peterlin, Andreoni & Brolley, LLC 4110 Progress Blvd. Peru, IL 61354 Phone: (815) 224-4102 Published in the Putnam County Record Mar. 13, 20 and 27, 2013.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COUNTY OF PUTNAM - HENNEPIN, PUTNAM COUNTY, ILLINOIS EVERBANK, ) Plaintiff, ) vs. ) KARL SWANSON aka KARL S. SWANSON ) and ROBERTA SWANSON aka ROBERTA ) M. SWANSON, ) Defendants. ) 12-CH-4 6 Timberland Court, Putnam, IL 61560 PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of the above Court entered on July 19, 2012 in the above-entitled cause, the following described real estate, to wit: Permanent Index Number: 03-00-032-300 Commonly known as: 6 Timberland Court, Putnam, IL 61560 will be offered for sale and sold at public vendue on April 18, 2013, at 9:30 a.m., at the Putnam County Courthouse, Hennepin, Illinois. The judgment amount is $98,478.84. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: The bid amount, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, shall be paid in certified funds immediately by the highest and best bidder at the conclusion of the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate, and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to the Plaintiff. The Sale is further subject to confirmation by the Court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. For information contact Plaintiff’s Attorney: Heavner, Scott, Beyers & Mihlar, LLC, 111 E. Main St., Decatur, Illinois 62523 (217) 422-1719. The purchaser of a condominium unit at a judicial foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, who takes possession of a condominium unit pursuant to a court order or a purchaser who acquires title from a mortgagee shall have the duty to pay the proportionate share, if any, of the common expenses for the unit which would have become due in the absence of any assessment acceleration during the 6 months immediately preceding institution of an action to enforce the collection of assessments, and which remain unpaid by the owner during whose possession the assessments accrued. If the outstanding assessments are paid at any time during any action to enforce the collection of assessments, the purchaser shall have no obligation to pay any assessments which accrued before he or she acquired title. If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5 (g)(l). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701 (c) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW Note: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act you are advised that the Law Firm of Heavner, Scott, Beyers & Mihlar, LLC, is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. James A. Coale Attorney for Heavner, Scott, Beyers, & Mihlar, LLC I517759 Published in the Putnam County Record Mar. 20, 27 and Apr. 3, 2013.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT PUTNAM COUNTY, HENNEPIN, ILLINOIS U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee, successor in interest to Bank of America, National Association as successor by merger to LaSalle Bank National Association, as Trustee for Certificateholders of Bear Stearns Asset Backed Securities I LLC, Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2006-HE7 PLAINTIFF Vs. Larry E. Williams; et. al. DEFENDANTS 10 CH 00017 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on 2/28/2013, the Sheriff of Putnam County, Illinois will on 4/11/13 at the hour of 9:30 a.m. at Putnam County Courthouse , 120 North 4th Street Hennepin, IL 61327, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of Putnam and State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: 04-00-041-030 Improved with Single Family Home COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 210 N. Maple Street, Magnolia, IL 61336 Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twentyfour (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the property is a condominium and the foreclosure takes place after 1/1/2007, purchasers other than the mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: Codilis & Associates, P.C., 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-10-29716. I516649 Published in the Putnam County Record Mar. 20, 27 and Apr. 3, 2013.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF ILLINOIS PUTNAM COUNTY, ILLINOIS AMERICAN CHARTERED BANK, ) Plaintiff, ) vs. ) GREGORY S. SKELLY and ) DEBORAH E. SKELLY, UNKNOWN ) OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, ) Defendants. ) No. 13-CH- 7 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE BY PUBLICATION The requisite Affidavit for Publication having been filed, notice is hereby given to you, ALL NON RECORD CLAIMANTS AND ALL UNKNOWN OWNERS, as Defendants in the above entitled cause, that the above entitled foreclosure action was filed on Feb. 27, 2013 and is now pending. 1. The names of all Plaintiffs and the case number are identified above. 2. The court in which said action was brought is identified above. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT PUTNAM COUNTY HENNEPIN, ILLINOIS US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS ) TRUSTEE FOR CMLTI 2007-WFHE4 ) PLAINTIFF ) VS ) JIM ZIANO A/K/A JAMES B. ZIANO A/K/A ) JAMES ZIANO; CAPITAL ONE BANK (USA), ) N.A. F/K/A CAPITAL ONE BANK; UNITED ) STATES OF AMERICA; STATE OF ILLINOIS; ) UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF JIM ) ZIANO, IF ANY; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND ) NON RECORD CLAIMANTS ; ) DEFENDANTS ) 10 CH 18 11351 WOODY WALKER ROAD MCNABB, IL 61335 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE ACT ***THIS DOCUMENT IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT ON A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE*** PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered by said Court in the above entitled cause on December 13, 2012, PUTNAM COUNTY SHERIFF in PUTNAM County, Illinois, will on April 25, 2013, in Putnam County Courthouse 4th Street., Hennepin, IL 61327, at 1:00 p.m., sell at public auction and sale to the highest bidder for cash, all and singular, the following described real estate mentioned in said Judgment, situated in the County of PUTNAM, State of Illinois, or so much thereof as shall be sufficient to satisfy said Judgment: TAX NO. 04-11-105-000 04-11-151-000 COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 11351 WOODY WALKER ROAD MCNABB, IL 61335 Description of Improvements: FRAME SINGLE FAMILY HOUSE DETACHED 2 CAR The Judgment amount was $246,895.37. Sale Terms: This is an “AS IS” sale for “CASH”. The successful bidder must deposit 25% down by certified funds; balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. NO REFUNDS. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate, water bills, etc., and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to plaintiff. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the bid amount, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DYAS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For Information: Visit our website at http:\\ service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only - Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel. No. (312) 372-2060. Please refer to file #PA1029375 Plaintiff’s attorney is not required to provide additional information other than that set forth in this notice of sale. I514104 Published in the Putnam County Record Mar. 13, 20 and 27, 2013.


15 Spotlight Wednesday, March 20, 2013 • The Putnam County Record • 15

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16 16 • The Putnam County Record • Wednesday, March 20, 2013

McNabb Library works with kids, technology By Dixie Schroeder dschroeder@putnamcountyrecord.com

MCNABB — The McNabb Library branch of the Putnam County Library is located at 322 W. Main St. in the old Farmers State Bank building. The branch is hosted by the village of McNabb which actually owns the building and allows the library to function in the front portion. The McNabb Library is staffed by Marilyn Calbow on Mondays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Paula Taylor on Wednesdays from 3 to 6 p.m.; and Brittany Blomquist on Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The library serves an average of more than 100 patrons each month. The librarians said they like to get to know their patrons and work hard to have what the “regulars” like to read on the shelves for them to check out. “We do have a few murder-mystery people,” Taylor said. “Large print books,” Calbow said. “There is always the DVD crowd, too.” “We do have several audio book people,” Blomquist said. The library’s hours are set and determined by staff availability and budgetary needs. “For example Paula (Taylor) works on Wednes-

days. Those hours got changed and moved back an hour,” Calbow said. “We used to open from 4 to 7 p.m., and there wasn’t a lot of walk in traffic between 6 and 7 p.m.,” Taylor said. “So we upped the hour from 3 to 6 p.m., and we are now getting a lot of the school kids because the bus stop is right out in front of the building for bus drop off and after-school activities at the junior high.” This change in hours has led to the development of an unofficial plan to provide more services to the younger age patrons in the McNabb area. Blomquist has developed specific craft projects for her Saturday hours that tie in with books the library features. “We have had good attendance in past summer reading programs,” Blomquist said, “It’s dropped off a little bit, so we are trying to build it back up.” “Brittany is making a strong effort to get more kids back in. The village has been great about sharing the space and allowing us to use the meeting room in the back of the building for our craft projects,” Calbow said. “We appreciate the town being so generous,” Putnam County Library District Director Bobbie Mor-

gan said. “Because otherwise we would not be able to hold programs, and we would probably have difficulty finding a place for the library.” The library has a computer for public use, and Morgan said Blomquist and Taylor are very technology-oriented. “Brittany is the one working behind the scenes on putting together some computer classes,” Morgan said. “We still have all the logistics to work out yet.” Morgan said those logistics included coming up with a set of computers that could be used for technology-based classes. “The only place we have a lot of computers — and that is really not a lot — is the six computers in Hennepin,” Morgan said. There’s a laptop at both Granville and McNabb, but Morgan said that’s still not quite enough to do a class. “We are looking at the budget for next year to maybe purchase a few laptops, but the new year doesn’t start until July,” she said. “We are trying to get somewhat of a pilot program out there in April, but we are still trying to figure out how to do it. Paula and Brittany will hopefully do the teaching.” Blomquist said it would be a series of basic computer classes broken down into groups for those who

Putnam County Record photo/Dixie Schroeder

The McNabb Library is part of the Putnam County Library District, and located in the old Farmers State Bank building in McNabb. are just starting out with email, Internet searching and browsing the web to using programs such as Microsoft Word and Excel. If there was a wish list for the McNabb library, all three librarians agree that having more technology would be good. In addition, Blomquist said a bigger collection of books that would include specific topics would be good. “A better space for the patrons to come in and sit would be good,” Taylor said. Libraries are evolving into more than they were 20 years ago, and all the

McNabb librarians say it would be nice if there was a place for patrons to “try out” books, sitting and reading before checking them out. “Libraries used to be, more or less, repositories of books,” Morgan said. “Now what they are is welcoming communities, gathering places and a place for people to come and learn about technology when they are stumped at home.” The McNabb librarians are busy with their plans for the future with the potential technology classes and building back up the children’s attendance

at the library. “We are starting to do more interesting programs here for the children,” Morgan said. They all agree the attendance is starting to get better. “We have had everybody here from ages 3 to 10,” Blomquist said. “Especially those older kids because they can drop off at a certain age,” Calbow said. “Even though we have a small library and a small collection, we can still get books from everywhere on anything,” Blomquist said. “It’s not limited to just what we have here.”

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PCR-03-20-2013  

Putnam County Record

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