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NORTHWEST HERALD THU RSD A Y , DE C E M B E R 1, 20 16 • $1.5 0

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PLAY

Dole Christmas Weekend’s worth of activities in Crystal Lake / Inside LOCAL NEWS

Investigation

Ex-CLC choir director accused of sex with former students / A6 SPORTS

Hot-handed

Jacobs rolls Huntley as Schwartz hits 6 3-pointers / B2

EXTRA ELECTION

3 McHenry County townships to hold GOP primaries in February / A3 Holiday Furnace & A/C

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Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Thursday, December 1, 2016

2

NORTHWEST

HERALD A NWHerald.com OFFICE 7717 S. Route 31, Crystal Lake, IL 60014 815-459-4040 Fax: 815-477-4960 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday NEWSROOM 815-459-4122 Fax: 815-459-5640 tips@nwherald.com CUSTOMER SERVICE 800-589-9363 subscriptions@shawmedia.com 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday 7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday Missed your paper? If you have not received your paper by 6 a.m. Monday-Friday, or by 7 a.m. Saturday/Sunday, call 800589-9363 by 10 a.m. for same-day redelivery. SUBSCRIPTIONS Monday-Saturday: $1.50 / issue Sunday: $2.00 / issue Basic weekly rate: $11.00 Basic annual rate: $572 To subscribe, make a payment or discuss your delivery, contact Customer Service. CLASSIFIED SALES 877-264-CLAS (2527) Fax: 815-477-8898 classified@shawsuburban.com

Don’t retire these Christmas classics Crabby Editor Eric Olson used this space on Monday to bemoan all of the Christmas songs he wishes would just go away – holiday tunes he claims should be retired for good. A former resident of Cary, Olson was Northwest Herald’s sports editor, business editor and community editor in the earlier 2000s and 2010s. He now is editor of our sister publication, The Daily Chronicle in DeKalb. In his column, Olson compiled a list of seven Christmas songs of shame (it actually was more than seven – No. 5 was Mannheim Steamroller’s entire catalogue). Since I’m feeling a little more festive than Olson, I decided to put together my own short list, this one of seasonal songs that I and my family especially enjoy (although we wouldn’t necessarily agree on all of them). Here they are, in no particular order: • “Peace on Earth/Little Drummer Boy” – Bing Crosby’s and David Bowie’s beautiful duet was recorded in 1977 for a Christmas special, “Bing Crosby’s Merrie Olde Christmas.” The “Peace on Earth” lyrics and melody were written specifically for this version because Bowie reportedly did not want to sing “Little Drummer Boy.” Crosby died just five weeks later, but this masterpiece lives on. • “Santa Claus is Coming to Town” – Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band performed their rocking version of this Christmas classic

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FROM THE EDITOR’S DESK Dan McCaleb in 1975, and it has become a staple ever since. The late Clarence Clemons, aka The Big Man, belts out the memorable “You better be good for goodness sake” lyric in his deep, bass voice. • “Carol of the Bells” – There are dozens of worthy versions of this classic, but I’ll pitch George Winston’s take from his solo piano album “December.” You just can’t go wrong with this song. • “Sleigh Ride” – Another classic with many great versions, but my wife prefers the instrumental one where coconuts are used to duplicate the sound of horses prancing. • “Wonderful Christmastime” – Paul McCartney wrote this song in 1979, and although it’s not the former Beatles member’s best composition, it is my son’s Christmas favorite and worthy of inclusion here. So that’s my list. How about you? Email me your favorites and why, and I’ll consider your responses for a future column.

• Dan McCaleb is executive editor of the Northwest Herald. Email him at dmccaleb@shawmedia. com. Follow him on Twitter @Dan_McCaleb.

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT

TODAY’S TALKER

EX-CHOIR DIRECTOR ARRESTED

VEGANS WANT ‘FAT-FREE’ UK 5-POUND BANK NOTE

A former Crystal Lake Central High School choir director is under investigation for allegedly having sex with former students, police said. In October, the school district received allegations claiming Justin Hubly provided alcohol and was engaging in sexual activities with former students at his Crystal Lake residence. On Tuesday, arrest warrants were issued for Hubly. See story, page A6

TRYON’S LAST LEGISLATION

On Wednesday, the Illinois House approved outgoing state Rep. Mike Tryon’s final piece of legislation. Senate Bill 1367 aims to encourage healthier eating by allowing low-income residents to use their federal SNAP benefits or Illinois LINK cards at farmers markets. See story, page A9

WHERE IT’S AT

Advice..............................................................A30-31 Business...............................................................A26 Buzz.......................................................................A27 Classified..................................................Play! 19-27 Comics.............................................A28-29, Play! 19 Lottery.............................................................A21 Nation&World.................................................A21-23 Neighbors............................................................A18

LONDON – The Bank of England’s new plastic 5-pound note is stronger, cleaner and safer – but apparently not suitable for vegetarians. Vegans and vegetarians are calling for the new bank notes, which have only been in circulation for two months, to be replaced because they are made with a substance derived from animal fat. The Bank of England confirmed on Twitter that the notes contain “a trace of a substance known as tallow” – a rendered form of animal fat, processed from suet, which is sometimes used in soaps and candles. An online petition against the notes was getting attention Wednesday. – Wire report

Play!.............................................................Inside Puzzles............................................................A30-31 Obituaries.......................................................A14-15 Opinions.........................................................A24-25 Sports..................................................................B1-8 State...............................................................A20 Television................................................................A19 Weather.................................................................A5

The daily

TWEET @NWHerald

“House is back in session.” @ilhousegop

Illinois House Republicans “Chicago Bears defensive plan to stop Colin Kaepernick: Play the Star Spangled Banner every time he takes a snap.” @KevinLyonsNWH

Northwest Herald news editor Kevin Lyons

The daily

DIGIT

$100

The price of a Regal Entertainment Group “ultimate ticket” to see “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story” for unlimited viewings. See story in Play

ON THE COVER Algonquin Township Republican Party Chairman Andrew Gasser announces results Nov. 8 at the Republican watch party at Marzano’s in McHenry. Gasser is challenging longtime Algonquin Township Highway Commissioner Robert Miller in the Republican primary this spring. See story, page A3. Photo by H. Rick Bamman – hbamman@shawmedia.com

CORRECTIONS & CLARIFICATIONS

Accuracy is important to the Northwest Herald, and we want to correct mistakes promptly. Please call errors to our attention by phone, 815-4594122; email, tips@nwherald.com; or fax, 815-459-5640.


A CLOSER LOOK

3 Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Thursday, December 1, 2016 Shaw Media file photo

McHenry County Board member Michael Walkup explains that McHenry County government takes a small portion of the property tax pie during the Illinois Tax Revolution sponsored rally Aug. 31 at the McHenry County Treasurer’s Office in Woodstock. Walkup is running for Nunda Township supervisor against incumbent Lee Jennings and Cate Williams.

HEATED RACES

3 McHenry County townships having Republican primary races Feb. 28 By KEVIN P. CRAVER

cuses so that respective parties can choose their candidates, unless they specifically choose to hold a primary. Three township Republican organi- Caucuses will be held Tuesday under zations with contested township races state law. in the April 4 election have decided to Townships have three responsibilhave voters choose the candidates in ities that are defined under state law: a primary. assess properties, maintain township Republican voters in Algonquin, roads and give out public assistance. Nunda and Grafton townships will go to the polls Feb. 28 to whittle down Nunda Township their candidates to one each for superThe race for the Republican nomvisor, highway commissioner, asses- ination for township supervisor is a sor and clerk, and four for township three-way contest, pitting incumbent board trustees. All three township Lee Jennings against challengers Cate primaries have longtime officials de- Williams and McHenry County Board parting or facing credible challengers, member Michael Walkup. Jennings is making races more interesting. seeking a second term in office. Most Illinois townships hold cauWalkup, who lost his bid in Nokcraver@shawmedia.com

vember to become County Board chairman, is running on a platform of cutting the township’s budget in half, starting with slashing the supervisor’s annual salary from about $75,000 to $21,000. Walkup ran for supervisor in 2001 but lost to candidate John Heisler, who mounted a write-in campaign after Walkup succeeded in challenging his petition. Williams is treasurer of the Nunda Township Republican Party and president of the Crystal Lake Food Pantry. Incumbent Highway Commissioner Mike Lesperance is seeking a second term but faces a challenge from Eric Dowd, who currently is a member of the McHenry County Regional Board

of School Trustees. The board, which is elected but meets infrequently, is an obscure body whose primary purpose is to decide changes to school district boundaries. Assessor Mark Dzemske, who is seeking his first full term, is facing a primary challenge from candidate Justin Franzke. Dzemske, who has worked in the assessor’s office for 29 years, was appointed to fill the remaining term of former Assessor Dennis Jagla, who retired in May. The four incumbent trustees – Ed Dvorak, Karen Tynis, Bill Boltz and Mike Shorten – face primary challenges from candidates Robert Parrish,

See TOWNSHIP PRIMARIES, page A9


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Thursday, December 1, 2016

4

LOCAL NEWS

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LOCAL BRIEF

“Tony and his family are just phenomenal. … When we met Tony, it really broadened our horizons. There are so many traumatic brain injuries out there with soldiers.”

Volunteers sought for woodland restoration

McHENRY – Volunteers are needed for the Habitat Restoration & Stewardship Team at Moraine Hills State Park, 1510 S. River Road. Volunteers will help ecologist Wayne Schennum clear invasive brush from a woodland from 9:30 a.m. to noon Saturday, Tuesday, Dec. 17 and 20 and Jan. 3, 14, 17, 24 and 28. For information, contact Stacy Iwanicki at 815-344-1294 or dnr.volobog@illinois.gov. – Northwest Herald

Mike Fitzpatrick A Soldier’s Journey Home president

LOCAL DEATHS OBITUARIES ON PAGES A14-15

Regina Galaher 85, Lake in the Hills

The nonprofit A Soldier’s Journey Home will build a home in Spring Grove for Anthony “Tony” Chobanov and his family, of Naperville.

Caleb Jason Harnish 17, Crystal Lake Joan Catherine Pellegrini-Frey 87 David Rainey 68, Fox River Grove Sharon Lynn Sales 67, Woodstock Bertha M. Smith 91, McHenry Virginia Lee Zeckser 80, formerly of Woodstock

NEWS ALERTS Get news from your community sent to your phone. Text the following keyword to 74574 for your community text alerts: NWHALGONQUIN NWHCARY NWHCRYSTALLAKE NWHHUNTLEY NWHLITH NWHMCHENRY NWHWOODSTOCK To sign up for more alerts or to manage your text alerts – visit http://shawurl.com/textalert. Message and data rates apply.

Photo provided

Nonprofit to build Spring Grove home for injured Army specialist A Soldier’s Journey Home helping Naperville man with traumatic brain injury By HANNAH PROKOP

hprokop@shawmedia.com SPRING GROVE – A nonprofit organization dedicated to building homes for severely injured members of the military is starting its next project in Spring Grove. Arlington Heights-based A Soldier’s Journey Home chose Army Spc. Anthony “Tony” Chobanov and his family, of Naperville, as its 2017 home recipients. Chobanov, who has a wife, Abbey, and three children with a fourth on the way, suffered a traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder during his service time. He has served in Afghanistan and was part of Operation Iraqi Freedom, and each explosion he endured during deployment caused different degrees of blast-induced concussions and layers of brain injuries,

according to a news release from A Soldier’s Journey Home. Chobanov has trouble working outside the home, and two-thirds of the family’s monthly income goes toward rent. “Tony and his family are just phenomenal,” A Soldier’s Journey Home President Mike Fitzpatrick said. “… When we met Tony, it really broadened our horizons. There are so many traumatic brain injuries out there with soldiers.” Fitzpatrick said A Soldier’s Journey Home formed after the 9/11 attacks, and its leaders mostly are comprised of current and retired firefighters and veterans from more than 14 states. First Midwest Bank donated the land for the home on Prairie Drive in Spring Grove, and it will be the first home the organization has built in Illinois. “One of the things [Tony] wanted so

badly was to be able to live somewhere where he could have a little seclusion,” Fitzpatrick said. “You could not find a better lot for what he needs.” Construction will take place from May 11 through May 20. About 85 firefighters and military personnel from around the country will donate labor hours to build the home, Fitzpatrick said. To donate labor or materials, call project manager Chuck Frankiewicz at 847-951-7384, Fitzpatrick at 502-803-5499 or email asoldiersjourneyhome@gmail. com. Donations also can be made by visiting www.asoldiersjourneyhome.org/donate, by texting veteran to 91999, or by sending them to A Soldier’s Journey Home, PO Box 1865, Arlington Heights, IL 60006. For information, visit the group’s Facebook page.


WEATHER

5

Cloudy skies along with a few morning flurries as moisture wraps around a nearly-stationary storm system across the Great Lakes. Temperatures will remain slightly below normal for this time of year. Cloud cover will remain through Saturday. A quickmoving storm system will spread some light rain and snow Sunday with some light accumulations possible.

TODAY

FRIDAY

40 32

Cloudy with a few morning flurries

39 26

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

MONDAY

Mix of sun and clouds; chilly

Cloudy with light rain and snow

Mix of sun and clouds; mild

38 28

Mostly cloudy and chilly

38 29

41/29

Freeport

41/30

40/31

Belvidere

42/31

Rockford

UV INDEX

8 am 10 am Noon 2 pm 4 pm 6 pm The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. 0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme.

AIR QUALITY TODAY Main offender ................. particulates

0-50 Good, 51-100 Moderate, 101-150, Unhealthy for sensitive groups, 151-200 Unhealthy 201-300 Very Unhealthy, 301-500 Hazardous Source: Illinois EPA

42/29

41/33

Full

Last

New

Dec 7

Dec 13

Dec 20

Dec 29

Chicago

43/32

Aurora

42/33

Orland Park 42/33 Hammond

43/35

Joliet

42/34

42/33

Michigan City

43/35

Gary

45/33 Valparaiso

Ottawa

41/32

42/34

44/33

Kankakee

41/32

FOX RIVER STAGES

NATIONAL WEATHER

Fld: flood stage. Prs: stage in feet at 7 a.m Wednesday. Chg: change in previous 24 hours. Station Fld Prs Chg

Algonquin Burlington, WI Fox Lake McHenry Montgomery New Munster, WI Nippersink Lake Waukesha

3 11 -4 13 11 -6

1.63 7.52 2.94 1.75 11.90 7.49 2.86 3.70

-0.09 +0.46 +0.04 +0.15 none +0.61 +0.07 -0.02

WEATHER HISTORY The temperature soared to 65 degrees on Dec. 1, 1927, in State College, Pa. This was the highest December reading ever recorded there in the first half of the 20th century.

One of the most stormy, ranking in the top three.

First

43/34

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

A:

MOON PHASES

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Evanston

Oak Park

42/34

La Salle Kewanee

42/32

St. Charles

42/33

41/30

Arlington Heights Elgin

40/32

Sandwich

Davenport

least stormy months in the U.S.?

Sunrise today .......................... 7:03 a.m. Sunset today ........................... 4:22 p.m. Moonrise today ........................ 8:35 a.m. Moonset today ......................... 6:28 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow .................... 7:04 a.m. Sunset tomorrow ..................... 4:22 p.m. Moonrise tomorrow ................. 9:22 a.m. Moonset tomorrow .................. 7:20 p.m.

45/30

43/32

40/32

Rock Falls

48 39

Cloudy with periods Cloudy and mild with of rain showers

Waukegan

Crystal Lake

DeKalb

41/33

Clinton

WEATHER TRIVIA™ Q: Is December is one of the most or

SUN AND MOON

42/31

41/31

42 38

43/29

McHenry

Hampshire Dixon

Statistics through 4 p.m. yesterday

41/30

WEDNESDAY

Kenosha

40/32

Savanna

ALMANAC

Harvard

43/31

42/30

TEMPERATURES High ................................................... 45° Low ................................................... 34° Normal high ....................................... 40° Normal low ........................................ 26° Record high .......................... 66° in 1962 Record low ........................... -1° in 1947 Peak wind ...................... WSW at 17 mph PRECIPITATION 24 hours through 4 p.m. yest............Trace Month to date ................................. 1.69” Normal month to date ..................... 3.15” Year to date .................................. 34.20” Normal year to date ...................... 34.72”

43 32

Lake Geneva

Galena

TUESDAY

NATIONAL CITIES City

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Buffalo Charlotte Chicago Dallas Denver Detroit Honolulu

Today Hi Lo W

24 57 56 58 45 64 43 66 42 45 81

18 38 35 39 36 33 32 45 17 34 68

sf s s pc c s c s pc c sh

Forecasts and graphics, except WFLD forecasts, provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2016

WORLD CITIES Friday Hi Lo W

22 59 52 51 45 58 40 65 36 45 82

11 39 34 37 33 32 26 48 18 31 69

sn s s s sn s pc pc c c sh

City

Houston Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles Louisville Miami Minneapolis New Orleans New York City Seattle Wash., DC

Today Hi Lo W

67 45 57 66 50 83 39 63 55 49 59

46 26 42 48 32 71 28 48 39 44 39

s s pc s pc sh sf s pc c s

Friday Hi Lo W

69 47 55 66 49 83 35 66 51 50 54

53 29 38 46 31 71 24 52 39 44 37

sh pc s s pc pc c pc s r s

City

Athens Baghdad Bangkok Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Cairo Hong Kong Istanbul Kabul London

Today Hi Lo W

52 72 90 48 46 84 64 73 43 59 43

43 57 75 24 34 64 55 63 36 29 36

pc c s s r s pc pc pc s pc

Friday Hi Lo W

60 69 90 48 41 89 67 73 51 62 45

50 46 76 27 25 65 54 65 41 34 37

pc c c s s t s pc c s pc

City

Madrid Manila Mexico City Moscow New Delhi Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome Seoul Tokyo Toronto

Today Hi Lo W

53 88 74 26 82 41 80 57 44 63 45

44 75 46 22 53 31 69 40 26 47 37

pc pc pc sn c pc c pc s r pc

Friday Hi Lo W

55 88 75 25 82 41 83 60 47 58 45

42 76 44 21 53 34 72 44 31 47 33

pc t pc sn c c sh pc s s sn

Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Thursday, December 1, 2016

SEVEN-DAY FORECAST FOR MCHENRY COUNTY SEVEN-DAY FORECAST FOR McHENRY COUNTY


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Thursday, December 1, 2016

|LOCAL NEWS

6 CRYSTAL LAKE

Police investigate ex-choir director for allegedly having sex with ex-students By NATE LINHART

nlinhart@shawmedia.com CRYSTAL LAKE – A former Crystal Lake high school choir director is under investigation for allegedly having sex with former students, police said. In October, Crystal Lake police received information from a member of the Community High School District 155 staff reporting an incident of possible misconduct between a district staff member and several former students of Crystal Lake Central High School. The allegations claimed that Justin Hubly provided alcoholic beverages and was engaging in sexual activities with these former students at his Crystal Lake residence, police said. Crystal Lake Deputy Police Chief Tom Kotlowski said the two al-

leged victims both were female and already were graduates of Crystal Lake Central at the time of the incidents. On Tuesday, arrest warrants were issued for Hubly, 35, for two counts of misdemeanor battery and one count of unlawful delivery of alcoholic liquor, police said. He was taken into custody and released on a $10,000 bond. His next court date is scheduled for Dec. 27. Hubly had been the Justin Hubly school’s choir director since 2004. He also served as student activities director, and has served five terms as president of the District 155 Education Association, which represents teachers at all four of the district’s high schools. He

earns $85,290 a year, not counting benefits, according to school records. The case was assigned to the Investigations Unit, where detectives conducted several interviews and obtained evidence of criminal activity. This case remains an active investigation, and additional charges might be forthcoming. District 155 officials suspended Hubly in October and eventually accepted his resignation Nov. 8. A statement released Wednesday by District 155 said, “We cannot share specific information regarding personnel matters. We have taken appropriate actions to ensure there is no interruption in our student’s learning. We are also cooperating with local authorities. We cannot discuss this matter any further.”

Area lawmakers claim victory in fight against a lame-duck increase of taxes By KEVIN P. CRAVER

kcraver@shawmedia.com The odds of a lame-duck income tax increase, already pretty remote, became even more of a long shot with a significant majority of Illinois House lawmakers now on the record opposed to it. House Resolution 1494, which opposes any effort to raise taxes in the final days of session in January, passed on an 87-12 vote Wednesday. The House on Thursday is scheduled to vote on a proposed amendment to the Illinois Constitution that would make it much harder to raise taxes in the final days of session after elections. With almost three-fourths of the House backing the House bill, local Reps. David McSweeney, R-Barrington Hills, and Jack Franks, D-Marengo, consider a lame-duck tax increase dead in the water. McSweeney filed the resolution, and Franks the constitutional amendment, and both lawmakers have co-sponsored each other’s bills. With a six-month stopgap budget set to expire at the end of the year, and ongoing talk of a “grand compromise” budget deal between Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner and Democratic leaders of the House and Senate, McSweeney and Franks were concerned that

“I hope this kills a massive tax increase. Eighty-seven members stood up and said no tax increase during a lame-duck session.” David McSweeney

State representative, R-Barrington Hills an effort would be made to ram a deal through in the final days of session. “I hope this kills a massive tax increase. Eighty-seven members stood up and said no tax increase during a lameduck session,” McSweeney said. Under the state constitution, the number of votes needed to pass legislation that takes effect immediately increases from a simple majority to a three-fifths supermajority with the May 31 end of the spring session. However, the threshold reverts back to a simple majority on Jan. 1, which gives lawmakers a window after each November election until the new General Assembly is sworn in several weeks later to pass controversial legislation without incurring voter wrath.

Returning lawmakers who are “safe” after the election, and lawmakers who are leaving office and have nothing political left to lose, may be more easily convinced Jack Franks to vote on issues in lameduck session that they would never have dared to otherwise. The unpopular 67 percent income tax increase in 2011 was approved in the final hours of lame-duck session – and six of the lawmakers leaving office who voted yes ended up with high-paying state jobs. Franks’ proposed constitutional amendment would close the loophole and require a three-fifths vote for any tax or revenue increase up until the new General Assembly is sworn in on the second Wednesday in January. “For months, we’ve heard talk of a post-election ‘grand bargain’ in which retiring or defeated lawmakers could slam through another tax hike in the final hours of the General Assembly, but such a backroom deal is not the change voters demanded in November,” Franks said. Any proposed amendment to the Illinois Constitution has to be placed on the ballot with a three-fifths vote of the House and Senate.

Northwest Herald Web Poll Question Log on to www.NWHerald.com and vote on today’s poll question:

How would you grade President-elect Donald Trump’s Cabinet picks so far? Wednesday’s results as of 9 p.m.:

Will you or have you cut down your own Christmas tree?

77% No

23% Yes

Your Home and Your Future

Barb Kelly

...Is My First Priority

Barb Kelly

Assistant Vice President bkelly@homestateonline.com 40 Grant Street Crystal Lake, IL 60014 (815) 788-3330

Apply online at hsbmortgage.com Member FDIC

SM-CL0408848

NMLS No. 631482


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• Thursday, December 1, 2016

WOOD FLOORING

LOCAL NEWS | Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

Photos by H. Rick Bamman – hbamman@shawmedia.com

LEFT: Lakeside Legacy Foundations employees Kristin Miller (left) and Patty Bell work to decorate a Christmas tree Wednesday in the Dole Gallery at the Dole Mansion in Crystal Lake. ABOVE: Lakeside Legacy Foundations employee Robin Allen adjusts an ornament on a Christmas tree Wednesday in the Dole Gallery. A Holiday Extravaganza is scheduled from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday at 401 Country Club Road, Crystal Lake. Find out more about Christmas at the Dole, inside in Play.


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Thursday, December 1, 2016

|NORTHWEST HERALD

8

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By KEVIN P. CRAVER

kcraver@shawmedia.com

Photo provided

Josh and Jessica Arnow, co-owners of Bike Haven in McHenry, will open a second shop at 132 Cass St. on the Woodstock Square in 2017.

McHenry-based Bike Haven opening 2nd location in Woodstock By NATE LINHART

nlinhart@shawmedia.com WOODSTOCK – Josh and Jessica Arnow, co-owners of Bike Haven in McHenry, have lived in Woodstock for 16 years. Seeing a need for a bike shop in their city, the Arnows plan to open a new location on the Woodstock Square early next year. The new shop will be at 132 Cass St. on the Square, next door to furniture and decors shop, A New Interiors Anew. Josh Arnow said that although a soft opening likely will be in early 2017, a grand opening is planned for the beginning of March. “We’re part of the community already since we live here,” Arnow said. “We help sponsor several events around Woodstock and community programs, so this second location just makes sense.” This will be Woodstock’s first specialty bike shop since Outdoor Recreation Inc., formerly located at 1480 S. Eastwood Drive, which closed in the

fall after more than four decades in business. “The area of Woodstock could use a bike shop,” Arnow said. “So we thought it’d be a great idea to expand our business here.” The new location is expected to open with three full-time employees. “We plan to still offer Woodstock residents the same great service that we’ve been providing people at our McHenry store for all these years,” Arnow said. “Josh has been a huge contributor to Woodstock,” said Garrett Anderson, the city’s economic development director. “We’re just excited he’s opening up a retail location here as well.” Bike Haven has been in business for more than 50 years selling a large selection of bicycles and bike accessories. In 2011, the Arnows took over ownership of Bike Haven from longtime owner Wally Nuss. Under the new ownership, the McHenry store relocated in January 2012 from 2298 W. Route 120 to 3318 W. Pearl St.

• TOWNSHIP PRIMARIES

Russell Cardelli are running, but so are five additional challengers for the Continued from page A3 four seats: Terence Ferenc, Rachael Lawrence, Melissa Victor, Scott TailTim Parrish and Debra Heath. Robert let and David Chapman. Trustee Larry Parrish ran four years ago for highway Emery is not seeking re-election. Ferenc mounted an unsuccessful County commissioner. Joni Smith, a former township Board run earlier this year. Chapman trustee and unsuccessful candidate for is a Cary Village Board trustee. Richard Alexander is running uncounty recorder, is running unopposed opposed for township assessor to sucfor township clerk. ceed Robert Kunz, who is retiring after 39 years in office. Algonquin Township The decision by longtime Supervisor Dianne Klemm to not seek re-elec- Grafton Township Two candidates are running to suction has created a shake-up as elected officials try to move up the pecking ceed Supervisor James Kearns, who order – every office is contested in the did not seek another term after winprimary. But the township race also ning election last month to the Counis made interesting by a challenge ty Board. Trustees Joe Holtorf and mounted against longtime Highway Eric Ruth – who is president of Woodstock-based Alliance Contractors – are Commissioner Robert Miller. Township Clerk Charles Lutzow Jr. running for the top spot. The race for the GOP nomination and Crystal Lake City Council member Ellen Brady Mueller are running for Grafton Township highway comto replace Klemm as supervisor. Trust- missioner is a three-way one, with inee Melissa Sanchez-Fisher has filed to cumbent Tom Poznanski facing chalsucceed Lutzow as clerk, as has former lenges from candidates Frank Kearns and Steven Stoltzman. Candidates Cary trustee Karen Lukasik. Miller, first elected in 1993, faces a Kathleen Wilson and Dina Frigo are challenge as highway commissioner running to replace Clerk Kathryn Hurfrom County Board member and Al- ley, who is not seeking re-election. Even with two newcomers, there are gonquin Township Republican Party Chairman Andrew Gasser. Besides not enough candidates in the primary running on a platform of cutting the for the four open trustee positions. Incumbent Dan Ziller Jr. is joined department’s costs, Gasser has been pushing for the GOP at the local level on the primary ballot by newcomers to fight nepotism in government – he Thomas Welch and Sean Cratty. Trusthas criticized the fact that Miller’s wife ees Betty Zirk and Bob Wagner are not and several relatives are on the high- seeking re-election. Assessor Al Zielinski is running unway department payroll. Incumbent trustees Dan Shea and opposed.

• Thursday, December 1, 2016

The Illinois House approved outgoing state Rep. Mike Tryon’s final piece of legislation Wednesday. Senate Bill 1367 seeks to encourage healthier eating by enabling low-income residents to use their federal SNAP benefits or Illinois LINK cards at farmers markets to buy fresh fruits and vegetables. It is expected to head to Gov. Bruce Rauner’s desk after a concurrence vote. Tryon, R-Crystal Lake, said in a statement than only 68 of the state’s 500 farmers markets accept LINK cards. “The provisions of my bill will allow public assistance benefits to be used all over the state at farmers markets, and incentivize lower-income citizens to purchase healthy foods,” Tryon said.

The language of Senate Bill 1367 is almost identical to the House Bill 6027 that lawmakers passed earlier this year. Rauner used his amendatory veto to deMike Tryon crease the state appropriation from $1 million to $500,000, preventing any of it from being spent on administrative costs and making it a pilot program. The bill was shelved in a House committee to advance the Senate version that incorporated the changes Rauner suggested. Tryon is stepping down after 12 years in office representing what is now the 66th Illinois House District. He will be succeeded by Republican Allen Skillicorn, who won election to succeed him and will be seated with the swearing in of the next General Assembly on Jan. 11.

9

LOCAL NEWS | Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

House passes Tryon’s final piece of legislation


Gingerbread for The Salvation Army Participating businesses in Downtown Crystal Lake will create their own Gingerbread Creation to display at their business with a countertop Salvation Army Red Kettle. The public is invited to view the various Business Gingerbread Creations. Every dollar deposited in the corresponding Red Kettle is worth one vote. The business who collects the most $$ by December 24th will be the winner of the Business Gingerbread Creation contest. In reality, the real “winner” isThe Salvation Army and all the people they serve in our community. So here’s your opportunity to (legally) STUFF the ballot box with votes (dollars)!! www.DowntownCL.org 815-479-0835

Gingerbread Contest Open to the Public

Stop by these businesses and “vote” with your donation: Benedicts La Strata, 40 N. Williams St. Crystal Lake Bank &Trust, 70 N. Williams St. Crystal Lake Natural Health Care, 30 N. Williams St. Georgio’s Pizzeria & Pub, 75 E. Woodstock St. Kitchen Outfitters, 64B N. Williams St. Le Petit Marche, 19 N. Williams St.

Material Girl, 21 N. Williams St. Out of the Box, 71 N. Williams St. Starbucks Coffee, 40 N. Williams St. That’s Amore Pizza, 105 N. Main St. Yours & Meyn, 33 N. Williams St.

Members of the public are invited to create and submit a Gingerbread Creation. This can be a gingerbread house, train, street scene, whatever! Entries must be dropped off and registered at KaleidoScoops Ice Cream, 53 N. Williams. The gingerbread creations will remain on display at KaleidoScoops.

At Kitchen Outfitters, we have gifts for every kitchen and stocking.

The public is invited to vote for their favorite Gingerbread Cretation based on Adult/Child and Home-Baked/Kit. Complete details, recipes, and more can be found at: www.DowntownCL.org. For phone information call KaleidoScoops Ice Cream 815/788-0027

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Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Thursday, December 1, 2016

| LOCAL NEWS

12 MARENGO

NORTHWEST HERALD

Wreck was 2nd fatal crash in past week at intersection with Harmony Road NORTHWEST HERALD Authorities have identified the 29-year-old Elgin man who was killed Monday evening after a two-vehicle crash near Marengo. McHenry County Coroner Anne Majewski said Malone D. Deloncker died from blunt force trauma injuries to his chest and abdomen, according to the results of an autopsy performed Wednesday. Police and rescue workers responded at 7:05 p.m. to the crash at Route 20 and Harmony Road that involved a 2009 International ProStar semitrailer and a 2002 Dodge Durango, according to the McHenry County Sheriff’s Office. Deloncker was traveling east on Harmony Road in the Dodge and failed to yield at a stop sign, according to a

preliminary investigation. The semitrailer was traveling north on Route 20 and struck the Dodge in the intersection, causing both vehicles to leave the roadway, police said. Deloncker was pronounced dead at the scene. Police said he was not wearing a seat belt, and air bags were deployed at the time of the crash. Earlier this week, police said the driver of the semitrailer, a 59-year-old Hanover Park man, was cooperating with the investigation and in good condition. The McHenry County Sheriff’s Police Accident Investigation Unit and the coroner’s office still are investigating the crash. Monday’s was the second fatal crash at the same intersection in the past week. A Woodstock man was killed after a two-vehicle crash Nov. 23, when a box truck did not stop at the Harmony Road stop sign, police said. Traffic traveling north and south on Route 20 at Harmony Road does not have a stop sign, police said.

CRYSTAL LAKE – Centegra Health System is offering a breast cancer survivor support group for women. The High On Positive Energy Breast Cancer Survivor Group helps participants connect with other breast cancer survivors to share, learn and support one another during and after treatment. HOPE meets the first Tuesday of every month. The next HOPE group session will be from 7 to 8 p.m. Tuesday at Centegra Gavers Breast Center, 360 N. Terra Cotta Road in Crystal Lake. Walk-ins are welcome. For information about the group, call 815-788-2288. Centegra officials said peer support is one of the most effective approaches

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By HANNAH PROKOP

hprokop@shawmedia.com

Melissa Kasischke

Heineman Middle School social studies teacher for the Poor, Dobbs matches money from fundraising campaigns to bring clean water to people in Haiti, which is one of the poorest countries in the world. After the wells were made last year through donations from Heineman students, Dobbs brought school T-shirts to Haiti and provided the school with a picture and coordinates of the wells they helped build, Kasischke said. He also spoke to sixth-grade classes. One of Kasischke’s students, Gabby Whitfield of Algonquin, said she’s planning on donating her Christmas money to Food for the Poor, and her parents are matching

Santa’s favorite stop for

her donation. “I thought it was kind of cool how we can make a difference all the way over in Haiti with just donating money,” Whitfield said. The school plans on keeping the book and fundraising project in its curriculum in coming years, Kasischke said. “I like that I’m teaching them compassion for others, and to be a good person,” Kasischke said. “And I feel like they’ll remember this, and remember the book and helping others.” To donate, visit Dobb’s fundraising page or contact Kasischke at mkasischke@district158.org.

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CRYSTAL LAKE – Prairie Ridge High School will host its third annual Ugly Sweater 5K on Dec. 10, with all proceeds benefiting the Crystal Lake Food Pantry. Check-in will be from 8 to 8:45 a.m. in the school’s cafeteria, and the race, organized by Prairie Ridge students, will start at 9 a.m. at the high school, 6000 Dvorak Drive, Crystal Lake. “The idea originated with a great group of freshmen two years ago who are now juniors,” English teacher Bob Boldwyn said. “They were looking for a way to give back, and they realized a lot of our neighbors depended on the Crystal Lake Food Pantry.” This year’s entry fee is $5 or five donated items for the Crystal Lake Food Pantry. Participants younger than age 5 will receive free entry. Boldwyn said the first year resulted in about 600 pounds of food donations, and about 700 pounds were collected last year. People can register by texting WOLVES to 555-888. All registered participants will get an official race bib, have their times recorded and receive post-event beverages. Prizes also will be awarded that day.

• Thursday, December 1, 2016

ALGONQUIN – Heineman Middle School sixth-grade students are working to raise $6,700 to build wells in Haiti. This is the second year students are participating in the fundraiser, which was inspired by a book they read in class called “A Long Walk to Water,” social studies teacher Melissa Kasischke said. The book blends the real-life story of a Sudanese man who builds wells in Africa with a fictional story about a girl who has to carry water to her village each day. “After reading the book, the kids become really enthusiastic about it, and they want to make a difference,” Kasischke said. Students raised $5,300 last year, and they were able to build two wells after local businessman Jim Dobbs matched the donation. Through the nonprofit Food

By NATE LINHART

nlinhart@shawmedia.com

13

LOCAL NEWS | Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

Prairie Ridge’s Heineman Middle School students Ugly Sweater 5K raise money to build wells in Haiti set for Dec. 10 ALGONQUIN


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Thursday, December 1, 2016

14

OBITUARIES REGINA GALAHER

Born: March 18, 1931; in Wilmette, IL Died: November 27, 2016; in Lake in the Hills, IL Regina Galaher (Schafer), 85, of Lake in the Hills, IL passed away on Sunday November 27, 2016 in her home, surrounded by family. She was born on March 18, 1931 in Wilmette, IL the daughter of Frank and Regina Wirth. Regina was a loving mother and grandmother. She will be deeply missed. Longtime member of St. Margaret Mary Catholic Church. Survivors include her children, Mary (John) Maier, Yvonne Xagas, William (Sylvia) Schafer, John (Tonia) Schafer, Joseph (Debi) Schafer and Thomas (Betsy) Schafer; 18 grandchildren; 14 great grandchildren; three brothers: Charlie, Frank (Anita) and William (Barb) Wirth along with many family and friends. She was preceded in death by her parents; her husband: Marshall Galaher; three children, Brian Melody, Margaret and James Schafer. Mass will be celebrated on Friday, December 2, 2016 at 12:00 Noon, at St. Margaret Mary Catholic Church, Algonquin, IL. Burial will be private. Family will receive friends, at the church, from 11:15 AM until the mass. Wait Ross Allanson Funeral & Cremation Chapel, Algonquin, IL, is in charge of arrangements, for information, 847-658-4232 or www.lairdfamilyfuneralservices.com.

CALEB JASON HARNISH Caleb Jason Harnish, 17, of Crystal Lake. Caleb will be dearly missed by his parents, Jason and Sarah Harnish; his siblings, Faith, Kayley, and Austin Harnish; paternal grandparents, Nancy and Paul Harnish; maternal grandparents, Judy Altman and John Hohmeier; aunts and uncles, Lyndsey and Aaron Harnish, and Jon and Anne Harnish; and his cousins, Elizabeth and Andrew Harnish and Robbie, John, and Camden Harnish. The visitation for Caleb will be held Friday, December 2nd, from 4:00 to 9:00 p.m. at Davenport Family Funeral Home and Crematory, 419 E Terra Cotta Ave (Rt. 176) Crystal Lake. The funeral service will be held the following day, Saturday, December 3rd at 11:00 a.m. with visiting beginning at 10:00 a.m. at the funeral home. Burial will follow at Windridge Memorial Park, Cary. The family kindly requests any donations to be made to Caleb’s family. For online condolences please visit www. davenportfamily.com or call the funeral home for information at 815-459-3411.

How to submit Send obituary information to obits@ nwherald.com or call 815-526-4438. Notices are accepted until 3 p.m. for the next day’s edition. Obituaries also appear online at NWHerald.com/obits, where you may sign the guest book, send flowers or make a memorial donation.

JOAN CATHERINE PELLEGRINI-FREY

Born: September 12, 1929 Died: November 22, 2016 Joan Catherine Pellegrini-Frey, of Lafayette, CO, joined our Heavenly Father on Tuesday, November 22, 2016. She was 87 years old. Joan was born in Chicago, Illinois on September 12, 1929 to Thomas E. and Mildred H. (Hunt) Knox. Joan is survived by her children, Donna Pellegrini-Shuford, Scott C. Pellegrini and his wife, Jackie Hillis, Shawn M. Frey and his wife, Norma, and Todd E. Frey. She is also survived by her brother, Thomas E. Knox and three grandchildren, Daniel Shuford, Jonathan Shuford, and Aida Frey. A memorial service will be held at All Saints Cemetery in Des Plaines, on Friday, December 2 at 1:00 PM. Friends may share condolences with the family at www.darrellhowemortuary.com.

DAVID RAINEY

Born: April 27, 1948; in Belfast, Ireland Died: November 28, 2016; in Fox River Grove, IL David Rainey passed quietly at home, after a long illness, the morning of November 28, 2016. An Irish Immigrant born on April 27, 1948 in Belfast, Ireland, he Immigrated to the United States in 1954 with his family. He was honorably discharged from the United States Army Oct 1969 after serving as a Combat Engineer with the 87th Engineer Co 199th Infantry Brigade during the Vietnam War. Returned home and began his lifetime career as a Union 597 Pipefitter. He was Preceded in death by his father, David Rainey, mother, Nora Catherine (Kerr) Rainey and sister Sharlene Fuog. David is survived by his wife, Kathleen Carr-Rainey; Stepchildren, Kelly (Pete) Pearson, and Katherine (Paul) Lazzaretti; grandchildren, Nicholas Czerniak, Mary and Giovanni Lazzaretti. His son and daughter (previous marriage), Bryan and Julie; Brother, Ken (Mary Ann) and their children, Kerri Rainey, Ryan (Kathy) Rainey, Katie (Justin) Blue, their children Jack, Breden, Wyatt, Josie, Will

& Cullen; Sister, Sandra (Jerry) Ernst Colleen (Fuog) and Yanni Zavakos, Constantine & Nikolaos; Several cousins and extended family still residing in Ireland. Visitation will take place on Saturday, December 3, 2016 beginning at 2:00 PM and concluding with a Service with military honors at 6:00 PM at the Kahle-Moore Funeral Home, 403 Silver Lake Rd., Cary. For info: 847-639-3817 or kahlemoore.com.

Her family and close friends will be hosting a Celebration of Life party to remember and honor her life. The family asks that all monetary donations are provided to her children to help offset the cost of her final expenses.

BERTHA M. SMITH

Born: August 22, 1925; in McHenry, IL Died: November 29, 2016; in Crystal Lake, IL

Bertha M. Smith, age 91 of McHenry, passed away on Tuesday, November 29, 2016 in Crystal Lake, surrounded by her loving family. She was born on August 22, 1925, the daughter of Anthony P. and Margaret (Blake) Freund. On May 29, 1948, she married (the late) Elmer Smith. Bertha was a member of St. Mary’s Church and Christian Mothers & Foresters. She was a SHARON LYNN SALES homemaker who loved being a wife, mother, Born: July 30, 1949 grandmother, great-grandmother and sister. Died: November 16, 2016 Family was everything to her. She enjoyed Sharon Lynn Sales “Sherry”, traveling, playing cards, sewing and the Chicago Cubs. age 67, passed away peaceShe is survived by her children, Deborah fully on November 16, 2016 (Larry) Webb of Rockford and Cheryl (Tim) at her daughters’ home in Reinhard of McHenry; her grandchildren, Lombard, IL surrounded by Matthew Webb, John Webb, Karen Webb the love of her family. She Wooders, Peter Webb, Christopher Reinhard; lived in Woodstock. great-grandchildren, Jennifer, Vanessa, Elijah, From her birth in Chicago, IL on July 30, 1949 until her passing on November 16, 2016 Lucas; sisters, Dorothy Frett, Marian Herrman she nourished and inspired those around her and Margaret Rooney. She was preceded in death by her husband, with her loving, caring and compassionate Elmer Smith; Leone Tonyan, Delphine Freund, spirit. Her kind spirit had a way of touching Evelyn Petticlair, Irvin Freund, Angela Brown, everyone who had the pleasure of knowing her. Some of her many interests and hobbies Ralph Freund and Donald Freund. Visitation will be on Friday, December 2, that she enjoyed were: painting, beading, 2016 from 4:00 to 8:00pm and will continue crocheting, sewing and cooking. on Saturday, December 3, 2016 from 9:15amSherry had a huge heart and generous 10am at Colonial Funeral Home & Cremanature which showed through her volunteer work for meals on wheels and The Angelman tory 591 Ridgeview Dr. McHenry IL. Funeral Mass will be Saturday, December 3, 2016 Syndrome Foundation which had a special at 10:30am at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in place in her heart. Sherry was a devoted McHenry. Interment will follow at St. Mary’s mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, Cemetery. sister, aunt, cousin and friend who could If desired memorials in Bertha’s name may always be counted on to offer a helping hand be made to JourneyCare Hospice, 405 N. Lake to those she loved. Zurich Rd., Barrington, IL 60010 or McHenry Left here on this earth to honor her, remember her and keep her vibrant spirit alive County CASA, 70 N. Williams St., Suite B, are: Thomas (Jennifer) Schaade, Lori (Mario) Crystal Lake, IL 60014. For more information contact the funeral Moretti, Jennifer Clark and Michelle Ciccarelli; home at 815-385-0063 or log onto www. 9 grandchildren, 3 Great-Grandchildren, 4 colonialmcherny.com. sisters and many nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her parents LaVerne and Raymond Shreve. • Continued on page A15

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By JOE MANDAK

The Associated Press

AP file photo

Big Mac creator Michael “Jim” Delligatti sits behind a Big Mac birthday cake at his 90th birthday party Aug. 21, 2008, in Canonsburg, Pa. Delligatti, the Pittsburgh-area McDonald’s franchisee who created the Big Mac in 1967, has died. He was 98. Ann Dugan, a former assistant dean of the University of Pittsburgh’s Katz School of Business and an expert on business franchises, said Jim Delligatti’s genius was simple: He listened to customers who wanted a bigger burger. “In franchising, there’s always this set playbook and you have to follow it. Jim saw an opportunity to go outside the playbook because he knew the customer,” Dugan said. “He persevered and (McDonald’s) listened, and the rest is history.”

Born: June 16, 1936; in Shelby County, IL Died: November 27, 2016; in Effingham, IL Virginia Lee Zeckser, 80, of Stewardson, IL, formerly of Woodstock, IL, died at 8:10 p.m. Sunday, November 27, 2016 in Lakeland Rehabilitation and Health Care Center, Effingham, IL. Funeral services will be held at 10:00 a.m. Saturday, December 3, 2016 in Trinity Lutheran Church, Stewardson, IL with Rev. David Weaver officiating. Visitation will be from 9:00-10:00 a.m. Saturday in the church. Burial will be in Union Cemetery, near Mode, IL. Arrangements are by Howe and Yockey Funeral Home, Strasburg, IL. Memorials may be given to Trinity Lutheran Church or Trinity Lutheran School. Virginia was born on June 16, 1936 in Shelby County, IL, the daughter of James B. and Stella L. Grove Rogers. She attended Stewardson-Strasburg High School before graduating in Chicago. She was a computer programmer for National Cash Register, working in the Chicago area. She married Eldor Walter Zeckser on October 25, 1969. Virginia was a member of Trinity Lutheran Church in Stewardson, IL, where she was active in Ladies Aid. She was an accomplished artist and also enjoyed gardening, crocheting, cooking, caring for her dogs, and spending time with her family. She is survived by her son, Eldor Eugene “Gene” Zeckser (Becky) of Post Falls, ID; daughters, Gail Thompson (Mike) of Woodstock, IL, Janell Liscio (Bob) of Mocksville, NC and Connie Janikowski (Philip) of McHenry, IL; brother, William Rogers (Linda) of Stewardson, IL; 10 grandchildren; 13 great grandchildren; and 2 great great grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her parents; husband, Eldor on December 5, 2010; son, Charles Zeckser; sister, Linda Kay Oles; and grandson, Tige Schmeer. Send condolences at www.howeandyockey.com.

FUNERAL ARRANGEMENTS Lorraine Mae Bognar: The visitation will until the 11 a.m. funeral Mass celebration be from 9 a.m. until the 10 a.m. funeral Thursday, Dec. 1, at the Church of St. PatMass celebration Saturday, Dec. 3, at St. rick, 15000 Wadsworth Road, Wadsworth. Mary Catholic Church, 10307 Dundee Road, James W. Hill: The funeral services will be at Huntley. 1 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 3, at First Presbyterian Church, 2018 Route 47, Woodstock. For Judith S. Clark: The memorial gathering information, call Schneider-Leucht-Merwin will be from 2 to 5 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 4, at & Cooney Funeral Home at 815-338-1710. Lakeside Arts Park at the Dole, 401 Country Donna L. Johnson: The visitation will be from Club Road, Crystal Lake. 1 p.m. until the 3 p.m. celebration of life Rocco Peter Dawson: The visitation will be ceremony Sunday, Dec. 11, at First United from noon until the 2 p.m. Mass of Christian Methodist Church, 236 W. Crystal Lake Ave., Burial celebration Friday, Dec. 2, at St. JoCrystal Lake. seph Catholic Church, 206 E. Front St., Harvard. Interment will be in St. Joseph Catholic Glenn Rodney Jorian: The memorial service will be at 1 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 10, at Willow Cemetery. For information, call Saunders & Creek Community Church, Lakeside AuditoMcFarlin Funeral Home at 815-943-5400. Pat Doyle: The visitation will be from 10 a.m. rium, 67 Algonquin Road, South Barrington.

Donald P. Kaiser: The visitation will be from Community Church, 220 Exchange Drive, 10 a.m. until the 11 a.m. funeral service Crystal Lake. Friday, Dec. 2, at Schneider-Leucht-Merwin Steven Michael Reichenbach: The celebra& Cooney Funeral Home, 1211 N. Seminary tion of life will be at 11 a.m. Friday, Dec. 2, Ave., Woodstock. Burial will be private in at Willow Creek Community Church, 220 Maryhill Cemetery in Niles. For information, Exchange Drive, Crystal Lake. A luncheon call the funeral home at 815-338-1710. will follow at the church. Burial will follow at Christine “Teena” Kochan: The visitation 3 p.m. in Windridge Memorial Park, 7014 S. will be from 3 to 7 p.m., with a 5:30 p.m. celRawson Bridge Road, Cary. ebration of life service, Thursday, Dec. 1, at Gary D. Weisse: The visitation will be from Thompson Spring Grove Funeral Home, 8103 10 a.m. until the 11 a.m. funeral service Wilmot Road, Spring Grove. Interment will Thursday, Dec. 1, at Davenport Family be private. For information, call the funeral Funeral Home and Crematory, 419 E. Terra home at 815-675-0550. Cotta Ave. (Route 176), Crystal Lake. Burial Joseph Weldon Laytham: The visitation will will follow in Windridge Memorial Park in be from 3 p.m. until the 4 p.m. memorial Cary. For information, call the funeral home service Monday, Dec. 5, at Willow Creek at 815-459-3411.

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• Thursday, December 1, 2016

PITTSBURGH – You probably don’t know his name, but you’ve almost certainly devoured his creation: two all-beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions, on a sesame seed bun. Michael James “Jim” Delligatti, the McDonald’s franchisee who created the Big Mac nearly 50 years ago and saw it become perhaps the best-known fast-food sandwich in the world, died Monday at home in Pittsburgh. Delligatti, who his son said ate at least one 540-calorie Big Mac a week for decades, was 98. Delligatti’s franchise was based in Uniontown, not far from Pittsburgh, when he invented the chain’s signature burger in 1967 after deciding customers wanted a bigger sandwich. Demand exploded as Delligatti’s sandwich spread to the rest of his 47 stores in Pennsylvania and was added to the chain’s national menu in 1968. “He was often asked why he named it the Big Mac, and he said because Big Mc sounded too funny,” his son Michael Delligatti said. However, McDonald’s in 1985 honored Esther Glickstein Rose with coming up for a name for the burger and presented her with a plaque etched with a likeness of the best-selling sandwich and french fries between the Golden Arches. She was a 21-year-old secretary for the company’s advertising department in 1967 when, the story goes, a harried executive dashing to a board meeting asked her for a name nomination. Jim Delligatti’s family disputes that Rose came up with the idea. The company didn’t immediately clear up the dispute Wednesday. Delligatti told The Associated Press in 2006 that McDonald’s resisted the idea at first because its simple lineup of hamburgers, cheeseburgers, fries and shakes was selling well. “They figured, why go to something else if (the original menu) was working so well?” Delligatti said then. McDonald’s has sold billions of Big Macs since then, in more than 100 countries. When the burger turned 40, McDonald’s estimated it was selling 550 million Big Macs a year, or roughly 17 every second. Delligatti received no payment or royalties for coming up with the burger, the company said. “Delligatti was a legendary franchisee within McDonald’s system who made a lasting impression on our brand,” the Oak Brook, Illinois-based company said Wednesday in a statement. The Big Mac “has become an iconic sandwich enjoyed by many around the world.”

VIRGINIA LEE ZECKSER

OBITUARIES | Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

McDonald’s Big Mac creator dies

• Continued from page A14


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Thursday, December 1, 2016

| NORTHWEST HERALD

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18

NEIGHBORS Crystal Lake

THINGS TO DO IN & AROUND McHENRY COUNTY

1

LADIES NIGHT AT THE CLAYWORKERS GUILD OF ILLINOIS HOLIDAY POTTERY SALE

WHEN: 5 to 10 p.m. Dec. 1 WHERE: Old Courthouse Arts Center, 101 N. Johnson St., Woodstock COST & INFO: Featuring the work of 15 members of the guild. Sale continues through Jan. 7 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sundays. Free admission. Information: www.clayworkersguild.com.

2

“SOUL OF STEEL”

WHEN: 7:30 p.m. Dec. 1 WHERE: Elgin Community College Arts Center’s Blizzard Theatre, 1700 Spartan Drive, Elgin COST & INFO: The ECC Steel Bands, under the direction of Steve Butters, will perform an eclectic mix of calypso, reggae, rock and more. The concert will feature several pieces, including tunes from Prince, Taylor Swift, Phish, Radiohead, Beethoven and many others. Cost: $9 for adults, $7 for students and seniors. Tickets and information: tickets.elgin.edu or 847-6220300.

CHECK PRESENTATION – The Crystal Lake Public Library, as part of its Pay It Forward Forgiving Fines to Feed Families program, presented the Crystal Lake Food Pantry with a check for $7,362 Nov. 15 at a Crystal Lake Chamber of Commerce mixer at BMO Harris Bank Crystal Lake. The program, which was established in 2008, allows library patrons with overdue fines to pay cash or write a check to the Crystal Lake Food Pantry for at least half the amount of their fines. Eight hundred and seventy-nine patrons paid 3,248 fines during the two weeks of the promotion. Pictured (from left) are Jamie Maravich of BMO Harris Bank Crystal Lake; Judy Pelinski, Community Harvest chairman; William Eich, Crystal Lake Food Pantry president; Terri Reece, library board president; and Kathryn Martens, library director.

COMMUNITY

CALENDAR Dec. 1

• 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. – STD testing, McHenry County College, 8900 Route 14, Crystal Lake. The McHenry County Health Department will conduct sexually transmitted disease testing in observation of World AIDS Day. Cost: $20. Information: 815-455-8728. • 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. – Defenders’ used book sale, Woodstock Square Mall building lobby, 110 S. Johnson St., Woodstock. Continues through Dec. 10 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily (3 p.m. Saturdays, closed Sunday). Annual holiday sale sponsored by the Environmental Defenders of McHenry County. Books priced at $1 for hardcovers, 50 cents for paperbacks and 25 cents for children’s books. Bag sale Dec. 8-10 with all books $5 a paper grocery bag. Information: 815-338-0393 or www.mcdef.org.

Have an event to share? Submit your information online at PlanitNorthwest.com. Photos may be emailed to neighbors@nwherald.com.

Crystal Lake

Registration open for holiday decorating contest The Crystal Lake Park District is seeking entries for its “Light Up Crystal Lake” contest recognizing the best outdoor holiday lights display. Judging will take place from 5 to 7 p.m. Dec. 21. The contest winner will receive a Main Beach party package valued at $100 and a trophy donated by TOBG Engraving. The contest is open to Crystal Lake Park District residents only. The cost is $5. The registration deadline is Dec. 19. Register for program code 141401-02 at www.crystallakeparks.org or at the Crystal Lake Park District Administrative Office, 1 E. Crystal Lake Ave. For information, contact Jessica Ortega at 815-459-0680, ext. 1213, or jortega@crystallakeparks.org.

Woodstock

Sheriff’s office to host snowmobile safety courses Beginning snowmobilers will have an opportunity to learn the principles of safe snowmobile operation at an Illinois Department of Natural Resources education course from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dec. 10, Jan. 7 and Feb. 19 at the McHenry County Sheriff’s Office, 2200 N. Seminary Ave. Under Illinois law, the course is required for those ages 12 through 16 who plan to operate a snowmobile. The course also is required for those older than 16 who do not have a valid driver’s license. A Snowmobile Safety Education Certificate will be issued by the Department of Natural Resources upon successful completion of the course. The free eight-hour course includes instruction in safe operation, rules of the road, snowmobile law, first aid, proper riding techniques and more. Registration is required by contacting Cathy Hardt at 815-334-4739 or cdhardt@co.mchenry.il.us.


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By EUGENIA LAST

Newspaper Enterprise Association TODAY – Consider the differences you have with the people you deal with daily, and try to close the gaps this year. It’s up to you to make alterations to your life that will broaden your vision and to mold the outcome to suit your needs. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) – Stick to the facts and don’t make promises you can’t keep. It’s important to move forward at a steady pace and without conflict to avoid interference. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) – An emotional plea will inspire you to voice your concerns regarding certain situations. Speak up and share your point of view as well as your suggestions, solutions and alternative plans.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) – Open talks with someone whom you feel can help you reach your goal. His or her suggestions will help you make significant changes to the way you move forward. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) – A creative idea will bring you recognition. Don’t let someone’s jealousy stop you from following through with your plans. Believe and trust in yourself and your ideas. ARIES (March 21-April 19) – Your emotions may prevent you from making a good decision. Don’t jump to conclusions or get all worked up over something that will set you back instead of helping you get ahead. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) – Use your ingenuity and do what you can to initiate a conversation

with someone who may have something to contribute to your plans. Travel may be necessary, but it will not be easy. Expect delays. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) – You must use caution when dealing with contracts, legalities, health or financial issues. Promises will be made, but you nonetheless should get things in writing or ask for a second opinion. CANCER (June 21-July 22) – An emotional connection with someone quite different from you will develop into something very special. A partnership will encourage you to follow your dreams. Romance is in the stars. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) – Networking, doing things with people you love or making positive alterations at home that will encourage you to take on a new project are featured. Keep busy

and stay focused. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) – A unique partnership will develop. Use your intuitive insight to select the best route. Expect interference from someone close to you regarding your decisions or choice of friendships. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) – Taking part in activities that allow you to show off your skills, experience and knowledge will interest someone who has something to offer. Communication will lead to a promising partnership. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) – Let past personal experience dictate how you move forward. Choosing a unique way to live that satisfies you mentally, physically and emotionally will encourage success and happiness. Romance is highlighted.

• Thursday, December 1, 2016

HOROSCOPE

19

TELEVISION | Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

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Rosewood (N) ’ (CC) (DVS) (7:59) Pitch “Scratched” (N) ’ G WQRF Anger ManageAnger Manage- Harry (N) ’ (CC) The Big Bang DC’s Legends of Tomorrow The Supernatural Vince Vincente plans The X-Files Occult display of murThe X-Files “Humbug” Escape artThe Simpsons Modern Family Family Feud ’ Family Feud ’ R WPWR (CC) ment (CC) ment (CC) Theory (CC) Legends work to kill the invaders. to kill his fans. (N) ’ (CC) ist’s mysterious death. (CC) (CC) dered teen. ’ (CC) ’ (CC) ’ (CC) CABLE 5:00 5:30 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30 (A&E) The First 48 “Bad Love” (CC) The First 48 ’ (CC) The First 48 (N) ’ (CC) Nightwatch “New Beginnings” ’ (:02) Gangland Undercover (N) ’ (:03) The First 48 “Knock Knock” (:03) The First 48 ’ (CC) (12:03) Nightwatch ’ (CC) (3:30) Movie ›› “Monster-in-Law” Movie ››› “Back to the Future” (1985, Comedy) Michael J. Fox, Christopher Lloyd, Movie ››› “Back to the Future Part II” (1989, Comedy) Michael J. 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(CC) (CC) (4:10) Movie: ›› “Monte Walsh” (:10) Movie: ›› “The Quick and the Dead” (1995) Sharon Stone. A Movie: ›››› “Dances With Wolves” (1990, Historical Drama) Kevin Costner, Mary McDonnell, Graham (:05) Movie: ››› “Arlington Road” (1999, Suspense) Jeff Bridges. A (STZENC) (2003) Tom Selleck. (CC) female gunslinger enters a deadly quick-draw competition. ’ (CC) Greene. A Union officer befriends the Lakota. ’ (CC) professor learns his new neighbors have a sinister agenda. ’ (CC) Movie: ›› “Jurassic Park III” (2001) Sam Neill, William H. Macy. A Movie: ››› “Galaxy Quest” (1999, Comedy) Tim Allen, Sigourney Weaver, Alan Rickman. Movie: ›› “Final Destination 3” (2006) Mary Elizabeth Winstead. Death Movie: ›› “Insidious: Chapter 2” (2013, Horror) (SYFY) search party encounters new breeds of prehistoric terror. (CC) Aliens kidnap actors from an old sci-fi TV series. (CC) stalks young survivors of a horrible roller-coaster accident. Patrick Wilson, Rose Byrne, Barbara Hershey. 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A chauffeur becomes Harlem’s most-powerful crime boss. ’ ‘R’ (CC) patrons battle ravenous monsters. ’ ‘R’ (CC) Shameless “Ouroboros” Lip tries to Jimmy Vestvood: Amerikan Hero Man becomes The Affair A request from Noah Gigolos Vin has Gigolos “Double Shameless “Ouroboros” Lip tries to The Affair A request from Noah (4:15) Movie ›› “What Women Want” (2000, (SHOW) a special date. Date” ’ (CC) hide his relapse. ’ (CC) hide his relapse. ’ (CC) embroiled in conspiracy. (N) ’ (CC) devastates Helen. ’ (CC) devastates Helen. ’ (CC) Romance-Comedy) Mel Gibson. ’ ‘PG-13’ (CC) Movie ›› “Alpha Dog” (2006, Crime Drama) Bruce Willis. A teenage Movie ››› “Erin Brockovich” (2000) Julia Roberts. A woman probes a (:15) Movie ››› “Away From Her” (2006) Julie Christie. A long-married (:05) Movie ››› “Clouds of Sils Maria” (2014) Juliette Binoche. 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Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Thursday, December 1, 2016

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STATE

Court weighs decision on LGBT workplace bias By MICHAEL TARM The Associated Press

CHICAGO – A rare full-court session of a U.S. appeals court in Chicago heard arguments Wednesday on whether protections under a 1964 Civil Rights Act should be expanded to cover workplace discrimination against LGBT employees, as hopes dim among some gay rights activists that the question will be resolved in their favor after Republican election victories. Several of the 11 judges at the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals signaled they are ready to enter what would be a historic ruling broadening the scope the 52-year-old landmark law, with the court directing the toughest questions during the hourlong hearing at a lawyer who argued only Congress could extend the protections. Judge Richard Posner repeatedly interrupted the lawyer representing an Indiana community college that was sued by a lesbian for alleged discrimination and at one point asked: “Who will be hurt if gays and lesbians have a little more job protection?” When attorney John Maley said he couldn’t think of anyone who would be harmed, Posner shot back, “So, what’s the big deal?”

ILLINOIS

ROUNDUP

News from across the state

1

Caretakers of disabled Illinois residents could get OT pay

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois General Assembly approved a measure allowing home health care workers to get overtime pay for working more than 40 hours a week. The 68-42 vote in the House on Wednesday would allow disabled people aided by visiting workers to keep familiar faces helping them even if work exceeds 40 hours in a week. The bill now goes to Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner. But Rauner cited cost in severely limiting overtime pay this year after a federal rule qualified the workers for time-and-a-half overtime pay. Advocates said it’s meant that disabled people had to find newcomers to finish up a few hours each week – people who are unfamiliar to the clients and hard to find for minimal hours.

‘‘

Even if the 7th Circuit becomes the first U.S. appellate court to rule that the law covers sex-orientation bias, legal experts said the issue is likely to land before the Supreme Court. Chances of a majority of justices agreeing that workplace protections should include LGBT workers will be slimmer if President-elect Donald Trump fills a high court vacancy with a social conservative. A GOP-majority House and Senate also makes it unlikely the next Congress will amend the statute, said Chicago-based labor lawyer Barry Hartstein. “You can’t count on Congress or the

courts,” said Hartstein, who wants the act to cover LGBT workers. President Barack Obama’s administration has taken the position that the law already prohibits discrimination of LGBT workers. It has criticized courts for a reluctance to reach the same conclusion. The 7th Circuit decided in October to rehear the case of teacher Kimberly Hively, who claimed Ivy Tech Community College didn’t hire her full time because she is a lesbian. The full court vacated the July finding by three of its own judges that the civil rights law doesn’t cover sexual-orientation bias. A new ruling is expected within several weeks. Wednesday’s hearing focused on the meaning of the word “sex” in Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, the provision that bans workplace bias based on race, religion, national origin or sex. Multiple court rulings back Maley’s contention that Congress meant for the word to refer only to whether a worker was male or female. Given that, he said it would be wrong to stretch the meaning of “sex” in the statute to also include sexual orientation. The school’s lawyer conceded the law is imprecise, but added: “That

2

3

You seem to think the meaning of the statute was frozen on the day it passed. That, of course, is false. Are we bound by what people thought in 1964?”

Richard Posner, U.S. Circuit Court of

Appeals judge

Lawmakers ask Rauner to resume contract talks

SPRINGFIELD – Nearly three dozen Illinois legislators of both political stripes are asking Gov. Bruce Rauner to resume contract negotiations with the state’s largest public-employee union. The lawmakers said Wednesday the issue is crucial to the struggling state. Decatur Democratic Rep. Sue Scherer said, “Nothing happens if you’re not at the table.” Republican Rauner ended talks last winter with the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees state council. A state labor board sided with Rauner this month that talks were at “impasse.” That means the governor can impose his terms. He did that a second time Wednesday in announcing an employee drug and alcohol testing plan. AFSCME said in a statement it will talk. Rauner spokeswoman Catherine Kelly said the two sides should cooperate on implementing the governor’s provisions.

Regulators: Illinois doctor’s pill mill supplied 11 states

CHICAGO – Illinois regulators have yanked a suburban Chicago doctor’s license for running a cash-only pill mill and prescribing vast amounts of fentanyl and other addictive painkillers to patients in 11 states. Illinois is sharing information about Dr. Paul C. Madison with Indiana, where he has an office. Michigan barred Madison from practicing last year. Madison prescribed 1.6 million doses of controlled substances in 2015 and 2016, according to paperwork signed Tuesday by Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation Acting Director Jessica Baer. His patients lived in Illinois, California, Florida, Iowa, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee and Wisconsin. Madison ran a clinic in Riverside, Illinois, that has drawn suspicion for years, the document stated. Pharmacists were refusing to fill Madison’s prescriptions because of the large quantities and patients’ behavior.

makes it an issue for Congress.” Several judges challenged him for arguing it’s not a federal court’s place to mandate that a law do something lawmakers didn’t originally intend for it to do. “You seem to think the meaning of the statute was frozen on the day it passed,” Posner said to Maley. “That, of course, is false.” And the judge added: “Are we bound by what people thought in 1964?” He and other judges pointed to bans on interracial marriage as examples of laws that changed or were expanded by courts as societal norms changed. In his presentation, the teacher’s lawyer pointed to what he described as the absurdity of one 1980s Supreme Court finding that if workers are discriminated against because they don’t behave around the office by norms of how men or women should behave, then that violates the Civil Rights Law. But if a man or woman is discriminated against at work for being gay that was found not to violate the Civil Rights Act. “You can’t discriminate against a woman because she rides a Harley, had Bears tickets or has tattoos,” attorney Gregory Nevins said. “But you can if she’s lesbian.”

4

Ill. agency revokes group home provider’s license

CHICAGO – The Illinois Department of Human Services has revoked a group home provider’s license and cited the state-funded business for safety issues and rights violations of individuals with developmental and intellectual disabilities. On Monday, the department’s chief licensing official, Felicia Stanton Gray, told Reuben Goodwin Sr. she was revoking the license for his eight group homes and daytime training program, all under the name Disability Services of Illinois, the Chicago Tribune reported. “I think we do a good job to make sure people are safe and that the staff is trained,” Goodwin said last month. Goodwin can appeal the decision by requesting a hearing before Dec. 23, but the department still will move 45 adults to other community-living options in the next two weeks. Human Services spokeswoman Meredith Krantz said the agency will work toward changing the way group homes “are held accountable in order to ensure individuals with disabilities receive high levels of care.”

– Wire reports


NATION&WORLD

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AP photo

Stein asks for presidential convict him of murder or convict him of voluntary manslaughter. recount in Michigan LANSING, Mich. – Green Party presidential nominee Jill Stein on Wednesday requested a full hand recount of Michigan’s presidential vote, making it the third state narrowly won by Republican Donald Trump where she wants another look at the results. Stein previously asked for recounts of the votes in Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. Trump defeated Democrat Hillary Clinton by about 10,700 votes out of nearly 4.8 million ballots cast in Michigan, or two-tenths of a percentage point. But Stein alleged that irregularities and the possibility that vote scanning devices could have been hacked call the results into question. Elections officials in all three states have expressed confidence in the results. Michigan’s recount could start as early as Friday, although a challenge to the recount by Trump may delay it.

The case then went to the jury Wednesday evening after a monthlong trial in which 55 witnesses testified. They deliberated for about an hour before going home for the night. Slager was charged with murder, but the judge said Wednesday that the jury also could consider manslaughter in the death of 50-year-old Walter Scott, who died after five of the eight bullets Slager fired hit him in the back as he tried to run away.

OPEC agrees to cut output in bid to push up oil price

VIENNA – Breaking with years of inaction, OPEC agreed Wednesday to cut its oil output for the first time since 2008. The move effectively scraps its strategy of squeezing U.S. competition through high supply that had backfired by lowering prices and draining the cartel’s own economies. The reduction of 1.2 million barrels a day is significant, leaving Charleston jurors begin deliberating murder trial OPEC’s daily output at 32.5 million CHARLESTON, S.C. – A jury of 11 barrels. And OPEC President whites and one black man began Mohammed Bin Saleh Al-Sada said non-OPEC nations are expected to deliberations Wednesday in the pare an additional 600,000 barrels murder trial of Michael Slager, a fired white police officer who was a day off their production. The videotaped killing a black motorist combined cut will result, at least in after a traffic stop. the short term, in somewhat more Circuit Judge Clifton Newman in- pricey oil – and, by extension, car structed the jurors on the law and fuel, heating and electricity. told them they could acquit Slager, – Wire reports

Steven Mnuchin, President-elect Donald Trump’s nominee for Treasury secretary, talks with reporters Wednesday in the lobby of Trump Tower in New York.

Trump diving right in by tapping Cabinet members By JULIE PACE and JOSH BOAK The Associated Press

WASHINGTON – Donald Trump promised to “drain the swamp” in the nation’s capital. Instead, he’s diving right in. So far, the president-elect is tapping people with deep ties to Washington and Wall Street as he fills out his Cabinet, turning to two power centers he vilified as greedy, corrupt and out of touch with Americans during his White House campaign. His choices have won praise from Republicans relieved by his more conventional choices, but could risk angering voters who rallied behind his calls for upending the political system. Two of Trump’s early picks are wealthy financial industry insiders with ties to the kinds of institutions he railed against as a candidate. Elaine Chao, his choice for transportation secretary and an accomplished political figure in her own right, is married to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell – blending family and political power in a way Trump fiercely criticized campaign rival Hillary Clinton for. Jeff Sessions, Trump’s selection for attorney general, has spent two decades in the Senate, and Tom Price, his health and human services nominee, is a six-term congressman. The gap between Trump’s campaign rhetoric and his governing decisions is most striking regarding his emerging economic team. On Wednesday, he announced that he planned to nominate former Goldman Sachs executive Steven Mnuchin as his Treasury secretary and billionaire investor Wilbur Ross to lead the

Commerce Department. As a candidate, Trump said Wall Street had created “tremendous problems” for the country. He included the CEO of Goldman Sachs in a TV advertisement that accused global financial powers of having “robbed our working class.” Mnuchin and Ross also have financial links to Trump’s White House bid, with Mnuchin having led the campaign’s fundraising efforts. Trump repeatedly bragged that his personal wealth – he mostly self-funded his campaign during the primaries – meant he would not be beholden to donors who might expect their financial contributions to be repaid with powerful jobs or insider access. “I can’t be bought,” Trump said during the campaign. “I won’t owe anybody anything.” Trump’s transition team brushed aside questions about whether there are inconsistencies between the president-elect’s campaign rhetoric and his Cabinet picks. “These are experts who know how to win,” spokesman Jason Miller said Wednesday. By picking billionaires, as well as a smattering of millionaires, for his Cabinet, Trump is asking voters to trust that privileged insiders can help a stressed and dispirited middle class – although he, like past presidential candidates, promised he would change that dynamic. Few of his choices have outwardly displayed much of a common touch. Many live surrounded by a level of wealth that most Americans struggle to fathom – and prospered in recent decades as many Americans coped with stagnant incomes.

Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Thursday, December 1, 2016

LOTTERY


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Thursday, December 1, 2016

| NATION

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Trump claims to have saved Carrier jobs The ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON – In persuading Carrier to keep hundreds of jobs in Indiana, President-elect Donald Trump is claiming victory on behalf of factory workers whose positions were bound for Mexico. But the scant details that have emerged so far raise doubts about the extent of the victory. By enabling Carrier’s Indianapolis plant to stay open, the deal spares about 800 union workers whose jobs were going to be outsourced to Mexico, according to federal officials who were briefed by the heating and air conditioning company. This suggests that hundreds still will lose their jobs at the factory, where about 1,400 workers were slated to be laid off. Also, neither Trump nor Carrier has yet to say what the workers might have

to give up or precisely what threats or incentives were used to get the manufacturer to change its mind. “There’s excitement with most people, but there’s a lot of skepticism and worry because we don’t know the details,” said TJ Bray, 32, who has worked for Carrier for 14 years and installs insulation in furnaces. “There’s a few that are worried. And there’s still a few that don’t even believe this is real. They think it’s a play, a setup or a scam.” Sen. Joe Donnelly, an Indiana Democrat, said he, too, has lingering questions about what the announcement could mean for the workers. “Who is going to be retained? What is the structure there will be for the retention? What is going to be put in place?” Donnelly said. “Are these the same jobs at the same wage? I would sure like to

know as soon as I can.” Fuller answers could emerge Thursday, when Trump and Vice President-elect Mike Pence, who is ending his tenure as Indiana governor, are to appear with Carrier officials in Indiana. On the campaign trail, Trump threatened to impose sharp tariffs on any company that shifted its factories to Mexico. And his advisers have since promoted lower corporate tax rates as a means of keeping jobs in the U.S. Trump may have had some leverage because United Technologies, Carrier’s parent company, also owns Pratt & Whitney, a big supplier of fighter jet engines that relies in part on U.S. military contracts. Carrier said in a statement that more than 1,000 jobs were saved, although that figure includes headquarters and engineering staff that were likely to

stay in Indiana. The company attributed its decision to the incoming Trump administration and financial incentives provided by Indiana, which is something of a reversal, since earlier offers from the state had failed to sway Carrier from decamping to Mexico. “Today’s announcement is possible because the incoming Trump-Pence administration has emphasized to us its commitment to support the business community and create an improved, more competitive U.S. business climate,” the company said. In February, United Technologies said it would close its Carrier air conditioning and heating plant in Indianapolis and move its manufacturing to Mexico. The plant’s workers would have been laid off over three years starting in 2017.

Drought, flood, fire and now killer storms plague South By JAY REEVES

The Associated Press BIRMINGHAM, Ala. – Tornadoes that dropped out of the night sky killed five people in two states and injured at least a dozen more Wednesday, adding to a seemingly biblical onslaught of drought, flood and fire plaguing the South. The storms tore through just as firefighters began to get control of wildfires that killed seven and damaged or wiped out more than 700 homes and businesses around the resort town of Gatlinburg, Tennessee. In Alabama, the weather system dumped more than 2 inches of rain in areas that had been parched by months of choking drought. At least 13 confirmed twisters damaged homes, splintered barns and toppled trees in parts of Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi and Tennessee, the National Weather Service said. Tombstones were knocked over in the cemetery behind the badly damaged Rosalie Baptist Church, near where three people died in northeastern Alabama. “It looks like the rapture happened up there,” said church member Steve Hall, referring to the end-times belief of many Christians. “Are we thinking the Lord is trying to get our attention?” said the pastor, Roger Little. The National Weather Service was assessing damage from multiple possible tornadoes across the region. At least five hit Alabama, and three more struck southern Tennessee, and one confirmed in Louisiana and at least four in Mississippi, forecasters said.

AP photo

People work to salvage items from Sullivan Cycles on Wednesday after it was destroyed by overnight storms and high winds in Neel, Ala. A possible tornado was spotted on the ground Wednesday a few miles from Atlanta, and flights were briefly delayed at the city’s main airport, but no major damage occurred. Three people were killed and one person critically injured in a mobile home after an apparent twister hit tiny Rosalie, about 115 miles northeast of Birmingham, said Jackson County Chief Deputy Rocky Harnen. A suspected tornado was responsible for the death of a husband and wife in southern Tennessee’s Polk County,

while an unknown number of others were injured, said Tennessee Emergency Management Agency spokesman Dean Flener. No details were immediately available. The Daily Post-Athenian in Athens, Tennessee, reported the Meigs County Sheriff’s Office said lightning is suspected as the cause of two deaths in a mobile home fire overnight. Shirley Knight, whose family owns a small propane business in Rosalie, said the storm crashed in on them in the middle of the night. Daybreak revealed

mangled sheets of metal, insulation and a ladder hanging in trees. “We had a plaza, a service station and several buildings connected together, and it’s all gone,” said Knight, adding that the storm also destroyed a church and damaged buildings at a nearby Christmas tree farm. The same storm apparently hit a closed day care center in the community of Ider, injuring seven people, including three children who had left their mobile home to seek shelter, said Anthony Clifton, DeKalb County emergency management director. Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley issued a state of emergency because of the storms. Meanwhile, thousands of people were without power, including up to 45,000 homes at one point in Alabama. Many schools dismissed early in Alabama and Georgia to avoid having students on the road in buses as storms continued to roll across the region Wednesday. Teams from the National Weather Service confirmed that at least two weak tornadoes struck western Alabama, and meteorologist Kurt Weber from Huntsville said they were assessing damage tracks from at least four other possible tornadoes. Tornadoes and hail also were reported Tuesday in Louisiana and Mississippi. The National Weather Service in Jackson, Mississippi, counted six confirmed tornadoes in areas of the state it monitors. Despite dozens of tornado warnings, authorities said no one was injured in Mississippi, but six homes were reported destroyed in one southeastern county.


By ERICA WERNER

The Associated Press

AP photo

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of Calif. speaks to reporters Wednesday after the House Democratic Caucus elections for House leadership positions on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. fections she suffered. “They weren’t defections, I had two-thirds of the vote,” Pelosi said, repeating “two-thirds, twothirds” to a group of assembled reporters. And she insisted Democrats would rebound. “We know how to win elections. We’ve done it in the past, we will do it again.” Supporters said the 76-year-old Pe-

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WASHINGTON – House Democrats re-elected Nancy Pelosi as their leader Wednesday, ratifying the status quo in a changing Washington despite widespread frustration over the party’s direction. That disenchantment manifested itself in 63 lawmakers supporting Pelosi’s opponent, Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan, in the secret-ballot vote. That was by far the largest defection Pelosi has suffered since she began leading House Democrats in 2002. Still, the California lawmaker had declared ahead of time that more than two-thirds of the caucus was supporting her, and she won almost exactly twothirds with 134 votes. It was a testament to her vote-counting skills and to her ability to hang onto power even in dark days for Democrats, as they confront a capital that will be fully controlled by the GOP next year. “I have a special spring in my step today because this opportunity is a special one, to lead the House Democrats, bring everyone together as we go forward,” Pelosi said after the vote, appearing elated in her victory. She disputed the suggestion that she might be concerned about the de-

told fellow Democrats in nominating Pelosi. “We need our leader to be seasoned, tough.” For their part, Ryan and his backers insisted that they had won a victory in sending a message to Pelosi about the significant desire for change among House Democrats. “Somebody had to do something,” said Ryan, a seven-term lawmaker who before now had been largely a backbencher. “Our prospects have improved just because of this conversation.” Yet Democrats’ marginalized status was evident as Ryan struggled to answer a question about who would lead the party forward, before concluding: “We’re all going to participate in leading the party.” Leadership elections were originally scheduled to be held before Thanksgiving but were delayed to give Democrats more time to consider a path forward. Lawmakers expressed frustration over a range of issues, including stagnant leadership in their caucus, and Democrats’ failures to connect with white working class voters. “I’m very concerned we just signed the Democratic party’s death certificate ... unless we change what we are talking about, which is really the working man and woman’s agenda,” Rep. Kurt Schrader of Oregon said.

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NATION | Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

House Dems re-elect Pelosi as leader despite discontent


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Thursday, December 1, 2016

24

OPINIONS

NORTHWEST HERALD EDITORIAL BOARD:

Dan McCaleb

Kevin Lyons

Valerie Katzenstein

John Sahly

OUR VIEW

New approach to choosing speaker

A courageous, bipartisan coalition could bring new leadership to Illinois House The goal of the Illinois Legislature, reduced to its simplest terms, is to make life better for all the people of Illinois. Legislative leaders, unfortunately, aren’t delivering on that goal. The result? Massive deficits, billions in debt, hugely unfunded pensions, billions in unpaid bills, and gridlock on such basics as a state budget. House Speaker Michael Madigan, 74, a Chicago Democrat who has led the House for 32 of the past 34 years, has presided over a failing state that is falling further behind. A House member since 1971, and speaker since 1983 (with a 2-year gap in the 1990s), Madigan seems less interested in the public’s welfare than in his own. For reasons known only to Madigan, holding power is his obsession. But the Nov. 8 election saw losses for Madigan. Democrats will control 67 seats when the new House convenes in January, with Republicans having 51 seats. That compares to this year’s House, where Madigan has a 71-seat supermajority, while Republicans, led by Minority Leader Jim Durkin, R-Western Springs, have 47 seats. Many Illinois voters have said they want the parties to work together for the public good. Under Madigan’s leadership, as he stubbornly locks horns with Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner, that’s unlikely to happen. For the first time in years, however, several House Democrats publicly expressed concerns over Madigan’s lack of a positive agenda going forward. They’re not ready to commit their support to his re-election as speaker. To those Democrats, their fellow party members, and House Republicans, may we suggest a new approach? When the election for House speaker takes place, minority Republicans should not do the same thing they’ve done for years – fruitlessly vote for their party caucus leader for speaker. Instead, after some behind-thescenes negotiations, they should announce the following: “We are prepared to vote en masse

THE FIRST

AMENDMENT

for a compromise Democratic candidate for House speaker.” That’s right, 51 Republicans voting for a Democratic candidate who is not named Madigan. Republicans could continue: “We, in fact, will nominate such a person. We will then supply 51 votes, out of the minimum 60 that are required for election. That’s 85 percent of the total.” Democrats disaffected by Madigan’s leadership would thus have an opportunity and a choice to bravely chart a new course. It would take a coalition of only nine Democrats to join 51 Republican colleagues to unseat Madigan as House speaker. Nine Democrats who want Illinois to have fresh leadership.

Is this outside the box? Definitely. Unorthodox? Of course. But it could happen. House members, after all, are not a monolithic group of stodgy old-timers, unalterably set in their ways. A lot of fresh faces have joined the House so far this decade. Democrats have added 37 new House members in the 2010s, and Republicans 33 (not counting the Nov. 8 election results). From that group of 70, surely there are aspiring leaders with fresh, innovative ideas who would like their turn to lead. Insanity is defined as doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results. That’s like electing Madigan speaker over and over and expecting real

change. Think about it. Hasn’t Madigan had long enough to make life better for Illinoisans? Yes. Wouldn’t it be crazy to keep electing him House speaker? Yes. Shouldn’t a courageous coalition of Democrats and Republicans band together to end the Madigan era? Definitely. High drama would result when Madigan’s minions nominate him, the Republicans nominate their coalition Democratic alternative, and a roll-call vote is taken. Riding this coalition bronco might be a little rough at first, but it would be worth the effort to topple Madigan from his high horse.

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.


IT’S YOUR WRITE

The fight against Alzheimer’s

To the Editor: With so much attention being paid to baseball and the election results and as we approach the busy holiday season, I wanted to make sure we didn’t forget that November was National Family Caregivers Month. My dad has Alzheimer’s disease and I am one of his caregivers. He was diagnosed 15 years ago and has declined from the strong, independent person who raised me on his own to someone who now needs 24/7 care. As a caregiver, I know responsibilities range over time from mild assistance to life-changing, full-time care. Often these responsibilities take a toll on the physical and mental health of caregivers. The Alzheimer’s Association estimates that this year, 15-plus million individuals served as unpaid caregivers, working 17.9 billion hours at an economic value of more than $217 billion. As a result, more than half of all dementia caregivers experience

VIEWS Albert Hunt an independent maverick these past eight years. But winning his bid for what probably will be his final term may be liberating for the 80 year-old senator. He and Trump have little regard for each other. During the primary campaign, Trump, who never served in the military, belittled McCain’s 5 1/2 years of captivity as a prisoner-of-war in North Vietnam, declaring, “I like people who were not captured.” He also accused the senator of neglecting veterans. Trump bitterly resents McCain for withdrawing his endorsement this fall after the disclosure of a recording on which the candidate could be heard bragging about assaulting women. McCain deeply resents Trump’s attack on the mother of a Muslim U.S. Army officer who was killed in Iraq. A recent conversation between the president-elect and the senator did not go well. If McCain clashes with the new

some form of job disruption, necessarily negatively impacting our entire economic system. The federal government is spending more than $160 billion every year caring for people with Alzheimer’s, making the case for increased federal investment in Alzheimer’s research a no-brainer. Congress is currently considering a $400 million increase in funding for dementia research. After personally meeting with Congressman Randy Hultgren and hearing he is committed to our cause, I am optimistic we are one step closer to a world without Alzheimer’s. Patients and caregivers alike need our support. I urge you to contact your congressman today. It would mean so much to all of us fighting this terrible disease. Lori A. Ray

Richmond

Submit to government

To the Editor: Congratulations to Donald J. Trump for being elected by the people and

president on some national security and ethics issues it likely would embolden a handful of other Republicans and wobbly Democrats to not be intimidated by Trump. Yet don’t expect McCain to oppose Trump and other Republicans on tax and spending or most domestic issues. Economic questions never have been McCain’s forte, and he holds pretty traditional conservative Republican views, including as an advocate of free-trade pacts. Although he has long been anathema to the right wing, he is far more conservative than some liberal admirers used to hope he was. One exception may be immigration: He has been an advocate of reform and is turned off by Trump’s immigrant-bashing. Both Republicans carried Arizona this month, though McCain’s margin was four times larger and he did considerably better with Hispanics. On national security, Russia will be a major flashpoint. Trump has spoken favorably of Putin and wants to cut a deal with the former KGB agent. McCain considers Putin a thug and has called Russia “a gas station run by a Mafia that is masquerading as a country.”

If Trump tries to cut a deal with Putin that allows the Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad to remain in power, McCain likely would go ballistic. In Asia, he’s worried that Trump seems more determined to label China a currency manipulator and erect trade barriers than to prevent the country from dominating the South China Sea. The senator believes those priorities should be reversed. In some cases, relations between the two may depend on Trump’s appointments to national security posts. McCain would support retired Marine General James Mattis as secretary of defense, despite reservations about putting a military man in charge of the Pentagon. He was worried Trump might appoint Senator Jeff Sessions of Alabama, who instead will be nominated for attorney general. This is very likely McCain’s final term. In 2002, riding up to the Senate, he spotted Strom Thurmond of South Carolina, then 99, being wheeled into the office building, seemingly oblivious to his surroundings. “If you ever see me like that,” McCain said, “shoot me.”

• Albert Hunt is a Bloomberg View columnist.

HOW TO SOUND OFF We welcome original letters on public issues. Letters must include the author’s full name, home address and day and evening telephone numbers. We limit letters to 250 words and one published letter every 30 days. All letters are subject to editing for length and clarity at the sole discretion of the

appointed by God to be the 45th president of the United States of America. From Romans 13:1-7, New King James Version: “Submit to Government “1. Let every soul be subject to the governing authorities. For there is no authority except from God, and the authorities that exist are appointed by God. 2. Therefore whoever resists the authority resists the ordinance of God, and those who resist will bring judgment on themselves. 3. For rulers are not a terror to good works, but to evil. Do you want to be unafraid of the authority? Do what is good, and you will have praise from the same. 4. For he

editor. Submit letters by: • Email: letters@nwherald.com • Mail: Northwest Herald “It’s Your Write” Box 250 Crystal Lake, IL 60039-0250

is God’s minister to you for good. But if you do evil, be afraid; for he does not bear the sword in vain; for he is God’s minister, an avenger to execute wrath on him who practices evil. 5. Therefore you must be subject, not only because of wrath but also for conscience’ sake. 6. For because of this you also pay taxes, for they are God’s ministers attending continually to this very thing. 7. Render therefore to all their due: taxes to whom taxes are due, customs to whom customs, fear to whom fear, honor to whom honor.” Scott Barrettsmith Spring Grove

• Thursday, December 1, 2016

There may be one senator, not Chuck Schumer or any other Democrat, who could be a check on some of President Donald Trump’s likely excesses: John McCain. The president-elect and the fiveterm Republican from Arizona are almost polar opposites on issues ranging from service and public responsibilities to national security. McCain, the chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, has made clear he will oppose Trump policies that would amount to appeasement of Russia’s Vladimir Putin on Syria or elsewhere, or any effort to circumvent the law and revive “enhanced interrogation” methods against terrorists that he has described as torture. McCain could be big thorn in Trump’s side on ethics. He has been a fierce fighter against corruption since he was ensnared in a savings and loan scandal more than a quarter-century ago. And he will set a much higher ethical bar than Trump, who seems oblivious to the potential conflicts of interests presented by his far-flung business empire. McCain never fully got over his loss to Barack Obama in the 2008 presidential race and has been less of

OPINIONS | Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

McCain could provide check on Trump excesses

25


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Thursday, December 1, 2016

26

BUSINESS

California ponders legal pot, paying up By MICHAEL R. BLOOD The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES – California’s legal marijuana industry is expected to involve everything from backyard growers to sprawling fields in the farm belt, storefront sellers along rural roads to chain-store like outlets in Los Angeles. State tax collectors are taking initial steps to get a hand into that vast, emerging economy, with billions of dollars at stake in the future for the state treasury. State analysts have estimated that state and local governments could eventually collect more than $1 billion annually from the production and sale of legal pot. Just how big a job that will be, no one knows. The state has no reliable way to predict how many new retailers will enter the marketplace when marijuana becomes legal in 2018. It’s estimated there could be 25,000 cultivators who will have to register and begin paying taxes. But it’s only a guess how many operations making money off the fragrant, sticky buds will try to remain hidden in the black market. “It’s just going to be the wild, wild West out there,” predicted Jerome Horton, who sits on the state’s tax-collecting Board of Equalization. The panel on Tuesday started framing its job, approving on a divided vote a proposal to request funds to begin gradually adding staff in anticipation of collecting taxes from the legal sale and cultivation of marijuana.

AP file photo

Customers buy products April 20 at the Harvest Medical Marijuana Dispensary in San Francisco, Calif. State tax collectors are taking initial steps to get ready for the emerging economy. The board’s action came three weeks after voters approved Proposition 64, which legalized the recreational use of marijuana in the nation’s most populous state. A draft report made an estimate of new jobs that would be needed to police the market and make sure everyone is paying up: by 2021, 114 positions and nearly $20 million in funding. But with so many unknowns, several board members acknowledged those figures would likely need to be updated within months. Horton, at the meeting in Culver City, California, called the projections

“grossly understated.” Board member Diane Harkey alluded to the challenges of taking what has been largely an illegal marketplace and moving it under state government. “Nobody knows how this is really going to work,” she said. California was the first state to embrace legal, medicinal marijuana two decades ago, and the board estimates there are 1,700 dispensaries operating in the state. The California vote on Nov. 8 represented the national legalization movement’s biggest victory to date and sets

the stage for a sweeping transformation. The new law attempts, at least in theory, to tame a market that now ranges from legal, medicinal production and sales to vast illegal grows operated by drug cartels. In general, the state will treat cannabis like it does alcohol. Taking effect in 2018, the law allows people 21 and older to legally possess up to an ounce of pot and grow six marijuana plants at home. It also allows cities and counties to impose their own regulations and taxes on recreational marijuana. Proposition 64’s approval comes with two new state taxes on legal weed: Consumers will pay a 15 percent excise tax on the retail selling price, which applies to recreational and medical marijuana. Separately, a cultivation tax will be imposed on all harvested marijuana that enters the commercial market. Local governments also can take a bite, and dozens of communities are ready to impose new levies and regulations. With pot-growing long a growth industry for criminal gangs and cartels, there are fears about possible violence against tax inspectors or investigators who go looking for hidden grows. Meanwhile, with pot remaining illegal on the federal level, it’s unclear what stance the incoming Donald Trump administration will take with the new marketplace. California and other weed-friendly states might be in for trouble: Trump’s pick for attorney general, Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions, has called marijuana a danger that should not be legalized.

THE MARKETS

THE STOCKS Stock

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Abbott Labs AbbVie AGL Resources Allstate Alphabet American Airlines Apple AptarGroup Arch Dan AT&T Bank of America Bank of Montreal Baxter Berry Plastics Boeing Caterpillar CME Group Coca-Cola Comcast

38.07 -0.66 60.80 -0.79 65.97 0.00 69.92 0.29 758.04 -12.80 46.44 -0.45 110.52 -0.94 73.18 -2.50 43.23 0.46 38.63 -0.85 21.12 0.91 65.86 -0.49 44.37 -0.26 49.77 -0.17 150.56 -1.08 95.56 1.52 112.91 0.24 40.35 -0.80 69.51 -0.63

Stock

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Stock

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Dean Foods Dow Chemical Exelon Exxon Facebook Ford General Electric General Motors Home Depot IBM ITW JPMorganChase Kellogg Kohl’s Kraft Heinz Company Live Nation McDonald’s Medtronic Microsoft

19.86 55.72 32.51 87.30 118.42 11.96 30.76 34.53 129.40 162.22 125.18 80.17 72.00 53.83 81.65 27.68 119.27 73.01 60.26

-0.65 1.73 -1.15 1.40 -2.45 0.04 -0.29 -0.04 -0.22 -1.31 -0.43 1.25 -1.62 -0.31 -1.75 -0.44 -1.41 -0.41 -0.83

Modine Moto Solutions Netflix Office Depot Pepsi Pulte Homes Sears Holdings Snap-On Southwest Air. Supervalu Target Tesla Motors Twitter United Contint. Visa Wal-Mart Walgreen Waste Mgmt. Wintrust Fincl.

11.75 80.25 117.00 4.87 100.10 18.86 12.88 167.20 46.61 4.64 77.24 189.40 18.49 68.95 77.32 70.43 84.73 69.52 65.84

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-0.55 -0.86 -0.51 0.01 -1.69 -0.43 -0.12 -0.61 -0.63 -0.10 -1.17 -0.17 0.30 -0.77 -1.83 -0.94 -0.80 -0.46 0.72

COMMODITIES

+1.98

19,123.58

-56.24

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1175.70 +1.7999 16.57 +0.088 2.6255 +0.004

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111.95 UNCH 55.225 UNCH 128.425 UNCH

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THINGS

WORTH TALKIN’ ABOUT THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

NEW YORK – Katy Perry was the night’s big honoree, but Hillary Clinton got the biggest ovation as the former presidential candidate presented the pop star with an award from UNICEF at Tuesday’s Snowflake Ball. Clinton, who lost the recent election to Donald Trump, gave Perry the Audrey Hepburn Humanitarian Award for her charitable efforts with the organization. Her appearance at the event was a surprise, and Clinton got a sustained standing ovation from the cheering crowd. She described Perry as having “the spirit and the energy and the compassion that Audrey Hepburn brought to her work.”

BUZZWORTHY

Binge watching on Netflix no longer requires internet

AP file photo

This image released by Disney shows tenacious teenager Moana (left), voiced by Auli’i Cravalho, recruits a demigod named Maui, voiced by Dwayne Johnson, to help her become a master wayfinder and sail out on a daring mission to save her people.

‘Moana’ a Disney hit but portrayal irks some in the South Pacific WELLINGTON, New Zealand – Disney’s animated movie “Moana” debuted to critical acclaim and box office success over the Thanksgiving weekend, but some people in the South Pacific dislike how it depicts their culture. Of particular concern is the movie’s portrayal of the demigod Maui, who is shown as enormous and egotistical, albeit with a good heart. That has been jarring for some in Polynesia, where obesity rates are among the highest in the world and where Maui is a revered hero in oral traditions. Criticism from the Pacific has likely stung Disney, which went to extraordinary lengths to ensure the movie was culturally appropriate after being accused of racism in previous movies such as “Aladdin” (1992). For “Moana,” the filmmakers traveled to the Pacific and met with anthropologists, historians, fisherman and linguists, part of what they came to call the Oceanic Story Trust. The fictional movie takes place 3,000 years ago in the islands of Polynesia, an area that includes Hawaii, Tonga and Tahiti. The star is 16-year-old Moana, voiced by Hawaiian actress Auli’i Cravalho, who goes on an ocean voyage with Maui, voiced by Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson. The movie made $82 million over the five-day weekend, placing it behind only “Frozen” (2013) for a Thanksgiving debut. Disney suffered an early embarrassment when it decided to sell costumes of Maui, which featured brown shirts and long pants with full-body tattoos. Disney put the costumes in stores in time for Halloween, but quickly pulled them after critics compared them to blackface. Producer Osnat Shurer, speaking by phone from Berlin where she was promoting the movie, said the moviemakers spent five years working closely with people in the Pacific to create what they believe is a beautiful representation. “The costume fell short of that,” she said. “As different things grow around the movie, sometimes they don’t hit the same mark.”

SAN FRANCISCO – Netflix subscribers now can binge on many of their favorite shows and movies even when they don’t have an internet connection. The long-awaited offline option announced Wednesday gives Netflix’s 87 million subscribers offline access to videos for the first time in the streaming service’s decade-long history. Netflix is matching a downloading feature that one of its biggest rivals, Amazon.com, has been offering to its video subscribers for the past year. It’s something that also has been available on YouTube’s popular video site, although a subscription is required in the U.S. and other countries where the site sells its “Red” premium service. The new feature puts Netflix a step ahead of two other major rivals. Offline options aren’t available on HBO’s internet-only package, HBO Now, or Hulu, although that service has publicly said it hopes to introduce a downloading feature. Not all of the selections in Netflix’s video library can be downloaded, although several of the service’s most popular shows, including “Orange Is The New Black,” ‘’House of Cards,” and “Stranger Things,” are now available to watch offline. Downloadable movies include “Spotlight,” this year’s Oscar winner for best film. Notably missing from the downloadable menu are movies and TV shows made by Walt Disney Co. Those still require an internet connection to watch on Netflix.

Canadian police threaten Nickelback on drunk drivers

KENSINGTON, Prince Edward Island – A police department in Canada’s province of Prince Edward Island is threatening to impose “the Nickelback treatment” on anyone who drinks and drives. The Kensington Police Service shared a social media post over the weekend promising to force any drunk drivers it arrests to listen to the Canadian band while in the back seat of a cruiser. The band has been a huge commercial success, with multiple awards in Canada, but is also gleefully maligned by some detractors. Constable Robb Hartlen said on Facebook that if you are foolish enough to get behind a wheel while drinking, then a little Chad Kroeger and the boys is a perfect gift. The officer posed alongside a photo of the band’s breakthrough album, Silver Side Up.

Murakami’s new novel set for February release in Japan

TOKYO – Haruki Murakami’s new novel is set for release February in Japan, and that’s about as much as his fans are being told. Publisher Shinchosha Publishing Co. made the announcement Wednesday. The book’s title, theme and exact date of release remain a mystery. The publisher showed two blank white books on its website with the message, “Haruki Murakami’s new novel coming soon in February 2017.” Murakami’s longer novels have been released in multiple short volumes in Japanese.

TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Actor-director Woody Allen is 81. Singer Dianne Lennon of the Lennon Sisters is 77. Singer-guitarist Eric Bloom of Blue Oyster Cult is 72. Drummer John Densmore of The Doors is 72. Actress-singer Bette Midler is 71. Singer Gilbert O’Sullivan is 70. Actor Treat Williams is 65. Country singer Kim Richey is 60. Actress Charlene Tilton is 58.

Comedian Sarah Silverman is 46. Singer Bart Millard of MercyMe is 44. Actor David Hornsby (“It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia”) is 41. Singer Mat Kearney is 38. Singer Janelle Monae is 31. Actress Ashley Monique Clark (“The Hughleys”) is 28. Singer Tyler Joseph of Twenty One Pilots is 28. Singer Nico Sereba of Nico and Vinz is 26.

27 Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Thursday, December 1, 2016

HILLARY CLINTON SURPRISES KATY PERRY AT UNICEF GALA


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Thursday, December 1, 2016

28

FUN&GAMES Arlo & Janis

Beetle Bailey

Big Nate

Blondie

The Born Loser

Dilbert

Frazz

Monty

Non Sequitur

Pearls Before Swine


Pickles

The Family Circus

FUN & GAMES | Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

Rose is Rose

The Argyle Sweater

Frank & Ernest

• Thursday, December 1, 2016

Soup to Nutz

Crankshaft

29


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Thursday, December 1, 2016

| FUN & GAMES

30 Parents worried about baby’s sleep position Dear Readers: Welcome to the launch of a new column – “Ask the Doctors.” Together with a colleague, we take over for “Ask Doctor K,” in which Dr. Anthony Komaroff dispensed advice and guidance to readers. We plan to continue in this same tradition by offering answers to your questions about health and wellness. “We” are Dr. Eve Glazier and Dr. Elizabeth Ko, internists and primary care physicians at UCLA Health. Our specialty is internal medicine, with a focus on the management and prevention of chronic disease. We share this column on alternating days with our colleague, Dr. Robert Ashley, whose introduction will be published tomorrow. Amid a flood of information – and misinformation – available these days, our goal is to provide not just facts and statistics but also context and nuance. We want to give you the tools you need for a healthy and happy life. We are firm believers that knowledge can help you to take control of your health and well-being. Dear Doctors: We always have been careful to put our son to sleep on his back to prevent SIDS, but he recently has started turning over by himself, and we find him on his stomach. Should we prevent this? Should we put him on his back again? Dear Reader: You’re right that placing infants on their backs to sleep greatly reduces the rate of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), the leading cause of death in infants between 1 month and 1 year old. About 1,500 infants die of SIDS each year in the United States, with most of the cases occurring in babies younger than 6 months old. The good news is once your baby is able to turn over by himself, which happens at about 6 months, his brain is developed enough to alert him to breathing problems. Rolling over

SUDOKU

ASK THE DOCTORS Elizabeth Ko and Eve Glazier is an important part of his development, and he should be allowed to do so. You should continue to place him on his back when you put him down to sleep, but according to guidelines published by the National Institutes of Health, you don’t need to return him to his back when he turns over. At that point, it’s OK to let your baby choose his sleep position. You also should: • Be sure to use a firm mattress with a fitted sheet. • Keep his crib clear of soft objects such as pillows, stuffed toys, crib bumpers or loose bedding. • Overheating may play a role in SIDS, so keep his room at a comfortable temperature and don’t overdress him for bed. He might be too warm if his chest feels hot or if he is sweating. • Don’t cover him with loose bedding such as a blanket, quilt or sheet, as he may get tangled up. • Do keep your baby close by in your room, but don’t sleep with him in your bed. The risk of accidentally rolling over on the baby or of him falling out of the bed is too great. Follow these simple precautions to give your baby the safest sleep environment. And congratulations on your son’s milestone of turning over by himself. • Eve Glazier, M.D., MBA, is an internist and assistant professor of medicine at UCLA Health. Elizabeth Ko, M.D., is an internist and primary care physician at UCLA Health.

HOW TO PLAY Each row, column and set of 3-by-3 boxes must contain the numbers 1 through 9 without repetition.

PREVIOUS SOLUTION

CROSSWORD


ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

Y V E S

E N D

M I C I S H NW A T T E N B E A T A R R S R

JUMBLE

B O N A

I T S B A S E M O A N T I S O M M P E G

Y A W U T E K L E N S A T G O C A L F H I E F U M R A F N T H I O N S U M A E L E G A N E L R A C E

I N D O O R Z A G A T

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G R O U T

R E A M S

R A E C G T I T I O W N N I A N O L H D O A I S E R S T E O N R D T S

O N T A P

C A U S E S

• Write Dear Abby at www.dearabby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

29 #1 hit for Bill Withers (1972) and Club Nouveau (1987) 32 ___ es Salaam 34 Address not found on a GPS 35 Full of ghosts … like four answers in this puzzle? 37 “Now I ain’t sayin’ ___ a gold digger” (Kanye West lyric) 40 ___ Pérignon (brand of bubbly) 41 Milton Berle hosted the world’s first one 43 Berry said to have anti-aging qualities 46 Crew leader, for short 47 Advice between “buy” and “sell” 48 Zapper 51 Campfire entertainment 53 Monster film hit of 1984 54 How the fashionable dress

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56 Grp. that brought Colbert to Baghdad 57 “That was over the line” 59 Like on Twitter, informally 60 Bleu expanse 61 School assignment specification 62 Word before “Happy New Year!” 63 It went boom, for short 64 Repeat offenses, metaphorically 65 GPS lines: Abbr. DOWN 1 Sink or swim, e.g. 2 Package delivery person 3 Fit for a queen 4 It follows a curtain-raising 5 Inauguration V.I.P.: Abbr. 6 Comedian Daniel 7 Brief records, in brief 8 Knight’s ride 9 Shredded 10 4,200 feet, for the Golden Gate Bridge 11 One involved with underground rock bands? 12 “This ___!” (fighting words) 13 Tête-à-têtes 21 Element #50 23 Ingot, e.g. 25 Home of the Thunder, the Double-A affiliate of the Yankees 26 Certain bug 27 ___ Darya

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PUZZLE BY MILO BECKMAN

30 “Now you’re talking!” 31 “Smokey, this is not ___. This is bowling. There are rules” (“The Big Lebowski” quote) 32 Joe Biden’s home: Abbr. 33 Suffix with hater 36 Ted Cruz’s home: Abbr. 37 Aimed at 38 Suriname colonizer

39 Last song recorded by all four Beatles, with “the” 40 German article 42 By way of: Abbr. 43 Reunion attendees 44 Welfare worker’s workload 45 Of ___ (so to speak) 46 More adorable 49 Boxing segments: Abbr.

50 Joint ailment 51 Bit of dust 52 Tap options 54 Take a long bath 55 Fashion’s ___ Saint Laurent 58 Early fifthcentury year

Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/studentcrosswords.

• Thursday, December 1, 2016

DEAR ABBY wife and I have been married for Jeanne almost 11 years Phillips and have three children. About four years ago, my wife cheated on me and left. After a six-week split, we decided we wanted to work things out. Everything was great – until recently, when she got a job working at a gym. Several of the guys from the gym have added her on Facebook and send her messages. They like all her posts and pictures. I work out there, and when I go in, I see her laughing and joking with them. This all has started to bring me flashbacks to when she cheated. I tried talking to her about how I feel, but she just says they are my insecurity issues and I need to deal with them. At this point, I’m contemplating divorce so I won’t go through the same pain I went through last time. I check her Facebook page constantly to see if she has added any new guys and see what comments they are leaving. I know it’s not healthy, and it makes me constantly depressed. My wife has no interest in marriage counseling, but tells me I should seek professional help for my issues. Is there any saving this marriage, or is it time to move on? – Threatened In Texas Dear Threatened: Part of your wife’s job is to be friendly to the members of that gym. It doesn’t mean she’s involved with any of them outside of work. The problem with jealousy and insecurity is unless they are managed, they tend to feed on each other and grow. While I can’t banish the suspicions from your mind, some sessions with a licensed mental health professional might help you to put them into perspective. However, if it doesn’t ease your mind, you always can talk to a lawyer. Dear Abby: I take a maintenance pain pill for arthritis. I count them every other day to make sure I’m not taking too many. My daughter has been coming to my house a lot lately, and – not every time, but off and on – I’ll count my pills after she leaves, and my count doesn’t match the one from the day before. Sometimes I’m missing almost all of them, but when I ask my daughter if she took them, she always says she didn’t. If I ask nicely, “Are you sure?” she accuses me of calling her a liar. I know she’s taking them, but I don’t know what to do about her lying to me about it. I really need the pills for myself. The doctor prescribes them only once a month, and I know I’m going to run out. What should I do? I don’t want to hurt my daughter’s feelings, but she needs to stop taking my pills. – In Pain In Kansas Dear In Pain: Your daughter may have become addicted to your pain medication or be selling them to people who are. It’s time to start keeping your pills under lock and key. Once you do, your daughter may be forced to come clean about the lying – or you may find you’re seeing a lot less of her than you currently do.

ACROSS 1 Blu-ray ancestor 4 European History and Physics C: Mechanics, for two 11 One may be open at the bar 14 Fair-hiring inits. 15 Midriff-showing garment 16 “Kinda sorta” 17 Area ___ 18 Tile in a mosaic 19 The “World’s Most Dangerous Group” 20 Like fish and chips 22 Like many celebrity memoirs 24 Some gold rush remnants 25 Sister publication of 16 Magazine 26 What’s done in Haiti? 27 Suffix with drunk 28 Column on an airport screen: Abbr.

A L B U M S

Dear Abby: My

31

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

FUN & GAMES | Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

Wife’s gym job has husband in a sweat


| NORTHWEST HERALD

32

Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Thursday, December 1, 2016

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SPORTS

Jacobs’ Cameron Krutwig (from left), Kameron Mack, Ryan Phillips and Jack Nickoley cheer on the team during the fourth quarter of Wednesday’s game at Huntley. Jacobs won, 70-32. Sarah Nader – snader@shawmedia.com

DAILY PULLOUT SECTION Thursday, December 1, 2016 • NWHerald.com

NO CONTEST

Jacobs rolls past Huntley in FVC opener / 2


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Thursday, December 1, 2016

|SPORTS

2

THE DAILY

FEED

Tweets from last night

BOYS BASKETBALL: JACOBS 70, HUNTLEY 32

Long-distance delivery Schwartz hits 6 treys; Jacobs cruises on road By JOE STEVENSON

joestevenson@shawmedia.com

Happy to receive an offer from Loras. – @ZeisAj (Huntley offensive lineman A.J. Zeis)

Still shaking. thanks @DwyaneWade! Go Bulls! – @EthanWiles34 (Dundee-Crown graduate) Follow our writers on Twitter: Joe Stevenson – @NWH_JoePrepZone Sean Hammond – @sean_hammond Alex Kantecki – @akantecki John Wilkinson – @jwilks26

What to watch PGA Tour: Hero World Challenge, noon, TGC Tiger Woods returns to competitive golf for the first time in 15 months in the first round of the 18-player tournament in Albany, Bahamas.

HUNTLEY – Jacobs guard Cooper Schwartz soon might find opponents game planning to slow him down. Schwartz, who made Palatine’s Ed Molitor Thanksgiving Classic all-tournament team last week, continued his hot shooting, hitting 6 of 10 3-pointers Wednesday night as the Golden Eagles defeated Huntley, 70-32, in their Fox Valley Conference boys basketball opener. “I guess I just had the hot hand,” Schwartz said. “We talked before the game to have confidence and knock it down. The way they were guarding us, they weren’t closing out hard, they didn’t have their hands up, so take advantage and knock one in their face.” With 6-foot-9 center Cameron Krutwig drawing attention inside, Jacobs’ shooters know they will get opportunities from the outside. “Coop’s been the guy who shook loose a little bit,” Eagles coach Jimmy Roberts said. “I don’t know if that’s going to happen anymore. But Mason (Materna), Ryan (Phillips) and some of our guys are perfectly capable.” Schwartz led all players with 18 points, hitting two 3s in the second quarter and four more in the third. He had one hit the rim, bounce 3 feet in the air and swish through. “I shot pretty well in the Thanksgiving tournament, so I tried to carry that over into the first conference game,” Schwartz said. Krutwig finished with 14 points and nine rebounds. Materna added 10 points, and Phillips grabbed nine rebounds as the Eagles moved to 5-0 overall, 1-0 in the FVC. “We came out with a lot of good energy,” Materna said. “We knew they were going to have a game plan for Cam and we would have to adjust. We came out well, Cooper was phenomenal, he was hitting everything. Everyone’s going to have to contribute in some way.” The Eagles’ defense, which was mostly man-to-man, gave Huntley fits as well. The Red Raiders (1-4, 0-1) managed only 26.7 percent (12 of 45) from

Sarah Nader – snader@shawmedia.com

Jacobs’ Cooper Schwartz shoots a 3-pointer during the third quarter Wednesday at Huntley. Schwartz scored 18 points, and Jacobs won, 70-32. the field and trailed, 29-10, at halftime. “We could never get in a rhythm with consistent looks,” Raiders coach Will Benson said. “I don’t know if we scored twice in a row the entire game. We actually played pretty good defense in the first half, we just couldn’t make a shot. We just are in an offensive funk, we have been for a few games.” Stephen Browne hit a pair of 3s and led Huntley with nine points. “Defensively is always a thing for us,” Roberts said. “We’ve been really solid defensively the last few years. We don’t have great individual defenders like Chris Orange or Kenton Mack (in the past), but as a team we defend very well. When we’re able to knock down some shots like Cooper was, it makes us really hard to catch because we do a really good job defending.”

OUTSIDE THE BOX SCORE q UNSUNG HERO Mason Materna Jacobs, sr., F

Materna scored the Golden Eagles’ first two baskets inside as they jumped to a ninepoint lead by the end of the first quarter and maintained control the entire game. Materna finished with 10 points and five rebounds.

q THE NUMBER

44.4

The 3-point percentage for Jacobs guard Cooper Schwartz after five games. He is 16 of 36.

q AND ANOTHER THING ...

Jacobs’ 6-foot-9 center Cameron Krutwig has 1,116 points for this career, a school-record 893 rebounds and is shooting 65 percent from the field, which also is a school record.


PRAIRIE RIDGE FOOTBALL

NORTHWEST HERALD

Where they rank Here’s a look at where Prairie Ridge’s Class 6A state championship football team finished in various rankings for the area, state and nation: MaxPreps Illinois Rankings 1. Prairie Ridge (14-0) 2. Loyola (13-1) 3. East St. Louis (14-0) 4. Maine South (11-3) 5. Palatine (12-1) MaxPreps National Ranking 35. Mill Creek (Hoschton, Ga.) (13-0) 36. Ben Davis (Indianapolis) (9-4) 37. Central Catholic (Pittsburgh) (13-1) 38. Elk River (Minnesota) (13-0) 39. Plant (Tampa, Fla.) (12-0) 40. Prairie Ridge (14-0) Chicago Sun-Times Beth Long’s Super 25 1. Maine South (11-3) 2. Prairie Ridge (14-0) 3. Loyola (13-1) 4. Palatine (12-1)

5. St. Charles East (11-1) Chicago Tribune Mike Helfgot’s Final Top 20 1. Prairie Ridge (14-0) 2. Maine South (11-3) 3. Loyola (13-1) 4. IC Catholic (14-0) 5. Palatine (12-1) USA Today Super 25 Computer Rankings 1. Mater Dei (Santa Ana, Calif.) 2. Bishop Gorman (Las Vegas) 3. St. John Bosco (Bellflower, Calif.) 4. IMG Academy (Brandenton, Fla.) 5. DeMatha (Hyattsville, Md.) 6. Prairie Ridge 7. Grayson (Loganville, Ga.) 8. Centennial (Corona, Calif.) 9. Cass Tech (Mich). 10. East St. Louis

• Thursday, December 1, 2016

The most important ranking was the No. 1 spot Prairie Ridge earned on the turf Saturday at the University of Illinois’ Memorial Stadium in Champaign. The Wolves convincingly beat Springfield Sacred Heart-Griffin, 48-17, to take their second Class 6A football state championship in six years. Prairie Ridge began the season at No. 3 in The Associated Press’ Class 6A poll, then spent most of the season at No. 2, behind SH-G. In the few days after winning the title, the Wolves have piled up more accolades in various polls in the Chicago area and across the nation. Prairie Ridge was the largest class state champion to finish 14-0, so the Wolves vaulted to the No. 1 spot in the Chicago Tribune final rankings and No. 2 in the Chicago Sun-Times. They also went to No. 1 in the MaxPreps Illinois rankings. In two national rankings, Prairie Ridge jumped to No. 6 in the USA Today Super 15 Computer Rankings. The Wolves were No. 12 last week before making that leap.

Sarah Nader file photo – snader@shawmedia.com

Prairie Ridge fullback Manny Ebirim scores a touchdown against Crystal Lake Central on Sept. 9. Prairie Ridge won, 48-14.

Inside Wrestling ATHLETE OF THE WEEK ANTHONY RANDAZZO Marian Central, jr., 132 pounds Randazzo, a two-time returning state qualifier, got off to a strong start to his junior year. Randazzo won all seven of his matches over the weekend, including five by pin, to help the Hurricanes take first at the Carmel duals. NORTHWEST HERALD POWER RANKINGS 1. Crystal Lake Central: The Tigers started the season with a fourth-place finish at the 18-team Chris Hruska Conant Cougar Classic. Lenny Petersen led the way with a second-place finish at 138. Central also got third-place finishes from Brock Montford (113), Braden Bisram (170) and Seamus O’Donnell (195). They now begin a stretch of five duals (four of them FVC bouts) in nine days. 2. Marian Central (7-0): The Hurricanes began the season with an impressive showing at the Carmel Team Duals, winning all seven matches and taking first place. Randazzo, Luke Silva, Adam Konopka and Conor Smith all went 7-0 over the course of the tournament to lead the Hurricanes, while Anthony Silva

Proud Sponsor of Athlete of the Week and Daniel Valeria each went 6-1 with three pins. 3. Huntley (5-1): The Red Raiders began the season with two strong quad results, picking up dual wins over Grayslake Central, Fremd, Lake Zurich, Bolingbrook and Plainfield North with one loss coming to Glenbard East by seven points. The Red Raiders open their conference slate with an Fox Valley Conference dual against Dundee-Crown on Thursday at home. 4. Jacobs: The Golden Eagles started the season with a seventh-place finish at the 18-team Chris Hruska Conant Cougar Classic. Jacobs was led by Jacobs Sabella (160) and Loren Strickland (182), who took second place in their brackets, while Beau Harrier (120) and David Dudych (152) placed third. The Golden Eagles begin their conference dual schedule with back-to-back matches Thursday and Friday against Crystal Lake Central and

SPORTS | Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

Wolves rise in state, national rankings

3

Hampshire. 5. Crystal Lake South (5-3, 1-0 FVC): The Gators, coming off a rebuilding season, had a strong opening week. They narrowly beat McHenry in an FVC dual and over the weekend took sixth place at Antioch’s 16-team Ted DeRousse Invitational. South senior Anthony Castro led the way, taking second at 132 and going 8-2 over the two-day tournament. NOTEWORTHY Fantastic freshmen: While most of the focus on returning FVC champions Huntley is on its two returning state qualifiers, there are two program newcomers who coach BJ Bertelsman is excited about, and they have shown flashes of that promise to start the season. Freshmen Sammy Spencer and David Ferrante were elementary school-level state champions and qualified for the Fargo National Championships over the summer. Spencer is the younger brother of Huntley junior returning state qualifier Zach Spencer. Before the season, Bertelsman called Ferrante a “manbeast” and said “he will be fun to watch.” Through the Red Raiders’ first two quads, the freshmen have lived up to expectations. Ferrante has picked up two wins by pin and one tech fall. Spencer has won five bouts,

two by pin, two by decision and one by forfeit. EVENTS TO WATCH Crystal Lake Central at Jacobs, 6:30 p.m. Thursday The two FVC division winners from last season meet in their conference opener. These two also finished second and third at the FVC tournament last season, but without a conference tournament this year, the FVC duals will take on even more importance. Richmond-Burton Tom DuBois Classic, 9 a.m. Saturday Local teams from Alden-Hebron, Hampshire, Huntley (JV team), Marengo, Woodstock and the hosting Rockets will be competing in the sixth edition of this tournament. Lake Forest, Rockford Auburn, Rockford Jefferson and Winnebago also will be there. This tournament was a good predictor of success last season: Marengo, which took the team title, went on to win the Big Northern Conference East Division; both of last year’s Most Outstanding Wrestlers (R-B’s Gavin Sutton at lower weights and Alden-Hebron’s Colten Cashmore at the upper weights) reached IHSA state championship matches, with Cashmore taking home a state title.

– John Wilkinson jwilkinson@shawmedia.com


GIRLS BASKETBALL: GENOA-KINGSTON 44, WOODSTOCK NORTH 36

|SPORTS

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Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Thursday, December 1, 2016

Thunder battle back, fall short By JOHN GALLIONE

sports@nwherald.com

Mary Beth Nolan for Shaw Media

Woodstock North’s Laura Nicks brings the ball up the court against Genoa-Kingston in the second quarter Wednesday in Genoa. Woodstock North lost, 44-36.

GENOA – Woodstock North’s girls basketball team overcame an early deficit against Genoa-Kingston on Wednesday, but the Thunder struggled down the stretch in a 44-36 nonconference loss. The Thunder (2-3) came back from a 6-0 deficit to tie it at 10 in the second quarter. “We made a great adjustment and caught up with them,” Thunder coach Mike Lewis said. “We have to come out and make shots. I don’t know if it was the hour-and-fifteen-minute bus ride that had us starting tight or what, but we ended up down only two possessions late in the fourth. They made a shot and we didn’t. That’s what it came down to.” The Thunder got a scoring boost from senior center Madison Butler, who scored 16 points and added two blocks. “I think I started off a little rough shooting,” Butler said. “I think I ended up getting better coming off of cuts as the game went on. I didn’t try to force it. I let the game come to me.” Despite the outcome, Cogs coach

Kyle Henkel wasn’t too pleased with what he called “a lack of energy.” Henkel said his team will have to come out of the gate with more gusto in the future. “They were beating us to all of the loose balls,” Henkel said. “We were flat defensively, and when that happens, it leads to being flat offensively. They played a little bit harder than we did. But we did stick with it and play better late. I have some talented girls on this team. Maybe a less talented team would have made more mistakes. “I wasn’t ready for a sub-par performance in terms of energy and effort, but I have a group of good kids. I’m still going to be as happy to coach them tomorrow as I would be any other day.” Senior guard Julie Galauner put up six points and forced three turnovers on a steal and a pair of blocks for the Cogs (4-2). “We have to make sure that we put a body on someone,” Galauner said. “We have to box out and go get the ball. There were too many possessions where we left a girl open, she got an offensive rebound and scored. We can’t do that.”

LAKERS 96, BULLS 90

Butler struggles from floor in rematch with Lakers By JOE COWLEY

jcowley@suntimes.com CHICAGO – The student hasn’t become the master yet. An All-Star? Yes. An MVP candidate this season? Definitely. But Luol Deng at least has bragging rights over Jimmy Butler for the time being, as Deng’s Los Angeles Lakers beat the Bulls, 96-90, Wednesday night at the United Center, avenging a loss between the two teams a week earlier. Not a loss that sat well with coach Fred Hoiberg. “Disappointing,” Hoiberg said. “Lost momentum, lost our pace, lost our flow. I thought they were the more physical

LAKERS 96, BULLS 90 L.A. LAKERS (96) Deng 3-9 3-6 10, Ingram 1-9 6-8 8, Randle 4-13 5-8 13, Mozgov 1-4 0-0 2, Calderon 3-4 1-1 7, Nance 5-8 2-3 12, Robinson 1-2 0-0 2, Black 2-2 2-4 6, Williams 4-12 9-11 18, Clarkson 9-18 0-0 18. Totals 33-81 28-41 96. CHICAGO (90) Gibson 4-9 3-6 11, Lopez 4-12 2-2 10, Rondo 6-12 0-0 14, Wade 7-15 3-4 17, Butler 4-18 13-15 22, Mirotic 3-9 0-0 6, Portis 1-2 1-2 3, Canaan 2-9 0-0 5, Grant 1-3 0-0 2, Valentine 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 32-91 22-29 90. L.A. Lakers Chicago

17 30 28 19

23 26—96 26 17—90

3-Point Goals–L.A. Lakers 2-8 (Deng 1-2, Williams 1-3, Clarkson 0-1, Ingram 0-2), Chicago 4-21 (Rondo 2-3, Canaan 1-5, Butler 1-6, Grant 0-1, Wade 0-1, Valentine 0-1, Mirotic 0-4). Fouled Out–Gibson. Rebounds–L.A. Lakers 60 (Randle 20), Chicago 46 (Gibson 10). Assists–L.A. Lakers 17 (Williams 5), Chicago 22 (Rondo, Wade 6). Total Fouls–L.A. Lakers 24, Chicago 26. A–21,773 (20,917).

team all across the board.” But there was an important subplot

in the loss. If Dwyane Wade has helped Butler deal with stardom and leadership this season, Deng has to be the one credited for originally even pointing Butler in that direction. Selected with the last pick of the first round in the 2011 NBA Draft, Butler was on a team full of championship promise and veteran players. There was little playing time, and not a lot of teammates interested in grabbing the Marquette product by the hand and showing him the ropes. Deng, who played for the Bulls from 2004 to 2014, was. According to Butler, Deng would call him up and take him to the Berto Center for some late-night shooting, making

sure Butler was not only understanding the system of then-coach Tom Thibodeau, but also what it meant to work like an NBA player. “Lu showed me the ropes when I got here as a first year,” Butler said. “The way I look at it, I owe him a little bit.” Butler entered the game against Deng with back-to-back All-Star seasons under his belt, as well as a 40-point game last week in Los Angeles when the two teams met. Although Butler had his struggles in the Wednesday rematch, he still tried to play hero late, hitting a game-tying 3-pointer with 1:30 left. But Deng and his Lakers would have the final say, as Julius Randle hit the go-ahead lay-up, and Butler went ice cold.


CUBS

By GORDON WITTENMYER gwittenmyer@suntimes.com

AP file photo

White Sox starter Chris Sale, who turns 27 in March, was an All-Star in each of the past five seasons and has a contract that pays him $12 million next year and includes club options at $12.5 million for 2018 and $15 million for 2019. at the epicenter of potential activity as the seller with the most to offer in game-changing talent, from starting pitchers Chris Sale and Jose Quintana to hitters Jose Abreu and Adam Eaton. “As I have said many times over the years, we are always open to discussing trades with all 29 other clubs,” Hahn continued in the statement. “We even have completed trades within our division, despite facing these teams 19 times a year, and while trades between the Cubs and White Sox will always draw heightened scrutiny and attention, it makes no sense for us to ever

eliminate any potential trading partners.” The Cubs have an “imbalance” of position players over pitching in their farm system. But the Cubs figure to focus their efforts on strengthening their pitching depth, both in the rotation and bullpen, outside the city limits. “I don’t think it’s either one side’s stance or the other,” Hoyer said. “I just don’t think you’re ever going to see a lot of deals done between the two sides.” Signing Jay to the one-year, $8 million deal might have cleared the decks

MLB

MLB players, owners reach tentative labor deal By STEPHEN HAWKINS and RONALD BLUM The Associated Press

IRVING, Texas – Baseball players and owners reached a tentative agreement on a five-year labor contract Wednesday night, a deal that will extend the sport’s industrial peace to 26 years since the ruinous fights in the first two decades of free agency. After days of near round-the-clock talks, negotiators reached a verbal agreement about 31/2 hours before the expiration of the current pact. Then they worked to draft a memorandum of understanding, which must be ratified by both sides. “It’s great! Another five years of uninterrupted baseball,” Oakland catcher Stephen Vogt said. In announcing the agreement, Major League Baseball said it will make

specific terms available when drafting is complete. As part of the deal, the luxury tax threshold rises from $189 million to $195 million next year, $197 million in 2018, $206 million in 2019, $209 million in 2020 and $210 million in 2021, a person familiar with the agreement told The Tony Clark Associated Press. The person spoke on the condition of anonymity because the deal had not yet been signed. Tax rates increase to 20 percent for first offenders, 30 percent for second offenders and 50 percent for third offenders. There also is a new surtax of 12 percent for teams $20 million to $40 million above the threshold and addi-

tional amounts for teams more than $40 million above the threshold. There will be a new penalty for signing certain free agents that could affect a team’s draft order. There is no change to limits on active rosters, which remain at 25 for most of the season and 40 from Sept. 1 on. Management failed to obtain an international draft of amateurs residing outside the U.S., Puerto Rico and Canada but did get a hard cap on each team’s annual bonus pool for those players. Negotiators met through most of Tuesday night in an effort to increase momentum in the talks, which began during spring training. This is the third straight time the sides reached a new agreement before expiration, but a deal was struck eight weeks in advance of expiration in 2006 and three weeks ahead of expiration in 2011.

Talks took place at a hotel outside Dallas where the players’ association held its annual executive board meeting. Tony Clark, the first former player to serve as executive director of the union, and others set up in a meeting room within earshot of a children’s choir practicing Christmas carols. A man dressed as Santa Claus waited nearby. Although there were no games to be lost at this point, baseball had faced the prospect of a hold on transactions and other offseason business only hours after the Mets finalized their four-year, $110 million contract for Yoenis Cespedes. Baseball had eight work stoppages from 1972 to ’95, the last a 71/2-month strike in 1994-95 that led to the first cancellation of the World Series in 90 years.

• Thursday, December 1, 2016

Dexter Fowler? The Cubs don’t expect the center fielder back but would welcome another late-winter shocker. A trade with the White Sox? That ship appears to have Saled. The day after the Cubs addressed their center field issue by signing free agent Jon Jay, general manager Jed Hoyer acknowledged – vaguely – a report this week that the Sox won’t do business with the Cubs despite obvious personnel fits. “I think they’d always listen to the merits of a deal. They’re in the business of getting better and in the business of doing the best deal,” Hoyer said during a media conference call Wednesday. “But I don’t think anything that’s been written is the least bit surprising. I don’t expect a lot of deals done between the White Sox and the Cubs. I don’t think I’m saying anything surprising when I say that.” After Hoyer’s comments were published Wednesday, Sox GM Rick Hahn issued a statement that read, in part: “To clarify any confusion regarding our stance on possible trading partners, we want to once again make it clear that our primary goal is to make our club better. We will consider any trade, with any team, that improves the Chicago White Sox.” With the annual winter meetings looming next week, the Sox are

for the Cubs to focus solely on pitching the rest of the winter. The deal for the left-handed hitting Jay gives the Cubs a strong defensive center fielder who can help right-handed hitting Albert Almora transition into the everyday starting role as the Cubs look to repeat in 2017. Hoyer suggested Almora Jr. could see the bulk of the playing time, depending on performance. “He’s a guy that we see as our center fielder of the future,” Hoyer said. “And it’s important for him to develop in the big leagues and get a chance to face all kinds of pitchers. But ultimately the game does come down to performance, and we’ve given (manager) Joe (Maddon) two really good options in center field.” The implication, of course, is that the Cubs view the already unlikely possibility of Fowler returning as an all but foregone conclusion. Fowler is expected to take advantage of an otherwise weak free agent market. “We would never close the door on a reunion with Dexter,” Hoyer said of the leadoff man who eschewed a threeyear offer from Baltimore in February to return to the Cubs on a one-year deal. “He’s always welcome here. He’s a guy that’s going to live in Cubs lore for a long time. “We would love to have him back, but we know how the business works, and that’s not something we’d necessarily count on.”

SPORTS | Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

Hoyer: Don’t expect many deals with Sox

5


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Thursday, December 1, 2016

|SPORTS

6

FIVE-DAY PLANNER TEAM

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

MONDAY

SAN FRANCISCO Noon FOX AM-780, 105.9-FM NEW JERSEY 7:30 p.m. CSN AM-720

at Philadelphia noon WGN, NHLN AM-720 CLEVELAND 7 p.m. CSN, ESPN AM-890

at Dallas 7:30 p.m. WGN AM-890

WINNIPEG 6 p.m. CSN AM-720 PORTLAND 7 p.m. CSN AM-890

WHAT TO WATCH Pro hockey 7:30 p.m.: New Jersey at Blackhawks, CSN Pro football 7:20 p.m.: Dallas at Minnesota, NBC, NFLN Pro basketball 7 p.m.: L.A. Clippers at Cleveland, TNT 9:30 p.m.: Houston at Golden State, TNT Men’s basketball 6 p.m.: Columbia at Seton Hall, FS1 8 p.m.: Cinncinati at Iowa St., ESPN 8 p.m.: Oregon St. at Mississippi St., ESPNU 8 p.m.: Stephen F. Austin at Arkansas, SEC Women’s basketball 6 p.m.: Miami at Ohio St., BTN 6 p.m.: DePaul at Connecticut, CSN+

SPORTS BRIEFS

Johnsburg’s Murtaugh almost perfect in loss to Woodstock

Johnsburg’s Tony Murtaugh rolled a 299 game and a 697 series to lead all bowlers, but Woodstock defeated the Skyhawks, 2,662-2,586, Wednesday at Wayne’s Lanes in Johnsburg. Woodstock was led by Eddie Zurawski’s 625 series, which included a 237 high game, and Joey Brown’s 562 series. Ryan Baier had a 528 series, and Josh Black had a 458. For Johnsburg, Evan Hitchcock added a 544 series, Cody Onopa had a 494, and Jacob Smith had a 453.

Woods returns amid varied expectations, high interest

NASSAU, Bahamas – Everyone is watching, everyone is curious, and Jordan Spieth had the perfect view of Tiger Woods for his return to golf. Spieth was on the 17th green and looked across a narrow pond to the ninth tee at Albany Golf Club where Woods stood over his tee shot during the Wednesday proam. He saw the swing, but he lost sight of the ball in the glare of the tropical sun. “Where did it go?” Spieth said as he tried to gauge where the ball might land. “Not in the fairway.” He looked again. “Whoa! There it is – WAY down there,” he said. The shots and the score don’t count until Thursday at the Hero World Challenge with an 18-man field, small but strong.

6 p.m.: South Carolina at Texas, ESPN2 6 p.m.: Oklahoma at Kentucky, SEC 8 p.m.: Virginia at Northwestern, BTN Golf 6:30 a.m.: European Tour-Sunshine Tour, Alfred Dunhill Championship, first round, TGC Noon: PGA Tour, Hero World Challenge, first round, TGC 7:30 p.m.: Australian PGA Championship, second round, TGC 2:30 p.m. (Friday): European Tour-Sunshine Tour, Alfred Dunhill Championship, second round, TGC Prep basketball 8 p.m.: High School Showcaase, Hamilton Heights (Tenn.) vs. Memphis East (Tenn.), ESPN2

Woods is playing for the first time in 465 days. The expectations have rarely been this varied. The interest is as high as ever. “He’s the only person ... in the last 30 years in golf that any expectation you set, he’ll somehow prove to you that he can do better,” Spieth said.

QB Zaire leaving Notre Dame, eligible to play immediately

SOUTH BEND, Ind. – Malik Zaire, the quarterback who won the starting job at Notre Dame last year before a broken ankle ended his season, plans to graduate in December and use his final year of eligibility elsewhere next season. University spokesman Michael Bertsch said Wednesday that Zaire has been given his release. Zaire told the South Bend Tribune among the schools he is considering are Florida, Wisconsin, Pittsburgh and Michigan State, an Irish opponent next season.

Packers’ Matthews: ‘Cheap shot’ got him hurt vs Eagles

GREEN BAY, Wis. – Clay Matthews didn’t mince words about the play that got him injured against the Eagles. “It was a cheap shot,” Matthews said. Matthews suffered an injured left shoulder on a crunching first-quarter block from Philadelphia lineman Allen Barbre on Monday night He returned for the Eagles’ third series and played most of the rest of the game. – From staff, wire reports

NFL NATIONAL CONFERENCE

North W L T Detroit 7 4 0 Minnesota 6 5 0 Green Bay 5 6 0 Bears 2 9 0 East W L T Dallas 10 1 0 N.Y. Giants 8 3 0 Washington 6 4 1 Philadelphia 5 6 0 South W L T Atlanta 7 4 0 Tampa Bay 6 5 0 New Orleans 5 6 0 Carolina 4 7 0 West W L T Seattle 7 3 1 Arizona 4 6 1 Los Angeles 4 7 0 San Francisco 1 10 0

PREPS AMERICAN CONFERENCE

Pct .636 .545 .455 .182

PF 247 218 274 178

PA 238 192 289 264

Pct .909 .727 .591 .455

PF 316 231 280 254

PA 213 213 264 213

Pct .636 .545 .455 .364

PF 358 249 334 276

PA 302 264 307 281

Pct .682 .409 .364 .091

PF 224 245 170 228

PA 187 228 236 344

WEEK 13 Thursday’s Game Dallas at Minnesota, 7:25 p.m. Sunday’s Games San Francisco at Bears, noon Kansas City at Atlanta, noon Los Angeles at New England, noon Philadelphia at Cincinnati, noon Miami at Baltimore, noon Denver at Jacksonville, noon Detroit at New Orleans, noon Houston at Green Bay, noon Buffalo at Oakland, 3:05 p.m. Washington at Arizona, 3:25 p.m. Tampa Bay at San Diego, 3:25 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Pittsburgh, 3:25 p.m. Carolina at Seattle, 7:30 p.m. Monday’s Game Indianapolis at N.Y. Jets, 7:30 p.m. Off: Tennessee, Cleveland

East W L T New England 9 2 0 Miami 7 4 0 Buffalo 6 5 0 N.Y. Jets 3 8 0 North W L T Baltimore 6 5 0 Pittsburgh 6 5 0 Cincinnati 3 7 1 Cleveland 0 12 0 South W L T Houston 6 5 0 Tennessee 6 6 0 Indianapolis 5 6 0 Jacksonville 2 9 0 West W L T Oakland 9 2 0 Kansas City 8 3 0 Denver 7 4 0 San Diego 5 6 0

PF 293 249 281 196

PA 197 240 236 266

Pct .545 .545 .318 .000

PF 218 266 213 197

PA 201 222 245 352

Pct .545 .500 .455 .182

PF 194 308 270 214

PA 236 296 301 293

Pct .818 .727 .636 .455

PF 307 252 266 313

PA 275 214 219 291

WEEK 14 Thursday, Dec. 8 Oakland at Kansas City, 7:25 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 11 Bears at Detroit, noon Denver at Tennessee, noon Cincinnati at Cleveland, noon Minnesota at Jacksonville, noon Arizona at Miami, noon Houston at Indianapolis, noon Washington at Philadelphia, noon Pittsburgh at Buffalo, noon San Diego at Carolina, noon N.Y. Jets at San Francisco, 3:05 p.m. New Orleans at Tampa Bay, 3:25 p.m. Seattle at Green Bay, 3:25 p.m. Atlanta at Los Angeles, 3:25 p.m. Dallas at N.Y. Giants, 7:30 p.m. Monday, Dec. 12 Baltimore at New England, 7:30 p.m.

NHL

NBA

WESTERN CONFERENCE

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Central Division GP W L OT Pts Blackhawks 24 15 6 3 33 St. Louis 23 13 7 3 29 Nashville 22 11 8 3 25 Minnesota 22 11 8 3 25 Dallas 24 9 9 6 24 Winnipeg 25 11 12 2 24 Colorado 21 9 11 1 19 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts San Jose 24 14 9 1 29 Anaheim 23 11 8 4 26 Edmonton 24 12 10 2 26 Los Angeles 23 12 10 1 25 Calgary 26 11 13 2 24 Vancouver 23 10 11 2 22 Arizona 21 8 10 3 19

GF GA 68 60 62 63 65 57 62 47 61 79 66 72 47 63 GF GA 58 50 59 55 70 63 58 58 60 77 54 70 51 65

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Montreal 23 16 5 2 34 68 50 Ottawa 23 14 8 1 29 55 56 Tampa Bay 24 13 10 1 27 71 65 Boston 23 12 10 1 25 55 53 Detroit 23 11 10 2 24 57 59 Florida 23 11 10 2 24 58 60 Toronto 23 10 9 4 24 70 74 Buffalo 22 8 9 5 21 44 57 Metropolitan Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA N.Y. Rangers 24 16 7 1 33 88 59 Pittsburgh 23 13 7 3 29 69 70 Washington 21 13 6 2 28 57 48 Columbus 21 12 5 4 28 67 48 New Jersey 22 10 7 5 25 55 58 Philadelphia 24 11 10 3 25 77 80 Carolina 22 9 9 4 22 54 59 N.Y. Islanders 22 8 10 4 20 56 67 Note: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Wedneday’s Results N.Y. Islanders 5, Pittsburgh 3 Calgary 3, Toronto 0 San Jose 4, Los Angeles 1 Thursday’s Games New Jersey at Blackhawks, 7:30 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Buffalo, 6 p.m. Dallas at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Washington, 6 p.m. Carolina at Boston, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at Ottawa, 6:30 p.m. Florida at Detroit, 6:30 p.m. Edmonton at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. Tampa Bay at St. Louis, 7 p.m. Columbus at Colorado, 8 p.m. Los Angeles at Arizona, 8 p.m. Anaheim at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Friday’s Games Minnesota at Calgary, 8 p.m. Montreal at San Jose, 9:30 p.m.

FOOTBALL

Pct .818 .636 .545 .273

Central Division W L Pct Cleveland 13 3 .813 Bulls 10 7 .588 Milwaukee 8 8 .500 Detroit 10 10 .500 Indiana 9 10 .474 Atlantic Division W L Pct Toronto 12 6 .667 Boston 10 8 .556 New York 9 9 .500 Brooklyn 5 12 .294 Philadelphia 4 14 .222 Southeast Division W L Pct Charlotte 10 8 .556 Atlanta 10 9 .526 Orlando 7 11 .389 Washington 6 11 .353 Miami 6 12 .333

GB — 3½ 5 5 5½ GB — 2 3 6½ 8 GB — ½ 3 3½ 4

WESTERN CONFERENCE

Southwest Division W L Pct San Antonio 15 4 .789 Houston 11 7 .611 Memphis 11 8 .579 New Orleans 7 12 .368 Dallas 3 14 .176 Northwest Division W L Pct Oklahoma City 12 8 .600 Utah 11 8 .579 Portland 10 10 .500 Denver 7 11 .389 Minnesota 5 13 .278 Pacific Division W L Pct Golden State 16 2 .889 L.A. Clippers 14 5 .737 L.A. Lakers 10 10 .500 Sacramento 7 11 .389 Phoenix 6 13 .316

GB — 3½ 4 8 11 GB — ½ 2 4 6 GB — 2½ 7 9 10½

Wednesday’s Results L.A. Lakers 96, Bulls 90 Sacramento at Philadelphia, ppd. Detroit 121, Boston 114 Toronto 120, Memphis 105 New York 106, Minnesota 104 Oklahoma City 126, Washington 115 (OT) San Antonio 94, Dallas 87 Miami 106, Denver 98 Phoenix 109, Atlanta 107 Portland 131, Indiana 109 Thursday’s Games Dallas at Charlotte, 6 p.m. Milwaukee at Brooklyn, 6:30 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Orlando at Memphis, 7 p.m. Miami at Utah, 8 p.m. Houston at Golden State, 9:30 p.m. Friday’s Games Cleveland at Bulls, 7 p.m. Orlando at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Toronto, 6:30 p.m. Minnesota at New York, 6:30 p.m. Sacramento at Boston, 6:30 p.m. Detroit at Atlanta, 7 p.m. L.A. Clippers at New Orleans, 7 p.m. Washington at San Antonio, 7:30 p.m. Houston at Denver, 9:30 p.m.

All-Fox Valley Conference Team Cary-Grove: Tyler Pennington, FB-LB, sr.; Max Skol, FB-S, jr.; Kevin Pedersen, LB, sr.; Bobby Collins, QB, sr.; Nate Hartke, OL, sr.; Colton Ruhland, OL, jr.; Ryan Magel, RB, sr.; Kyle Pressley, RB, sr.; Collin Walsh, LB-K, sr.; Jordan Latkas, DL, sr. Crystal Lake Central: Wyatt Blake, OL, jr.; Daniel Berg, OL, sr. Crystal Lake South: Kyle Leva, RB, jr.; Trevor Keegan, OL, so.; Mike Swiatly, RB-LB, sr. Dundee-Crown: Sean Jay, WR-DB, sr.; Greg Williams, RB, sr. Huntley: Caleb Jones,. DE, sr.; Eric Mooney, QB, jr.; Joe Boland, DB, sr.; Andrew Pertzborn, Ol, sr.; Tyler Szekely, LB, sr.; Nick Dennis, LB, sr.; Tyler Koss, DB, jr.; Justin Domingo, OL, sr. Jacobs: Chris Katrenick, QB, sr.; Jim Wormsley, OL, jr.; Eric Schutt, DE, jr.; Loren Strickland, RB, jr.; John Farrissey, WR, jr. McHenry: Gio Purpura, RB, sr.; A.J. Sweeney, OT-DE, sr.; Colton Folliard, LB, sr.; Andrew Rupcich, OL, sr.; Braden Crowley, WR-DB, so.; Colton Klein, QB, sr. Prairie Ridge: Jeff Jenkins, OL-DL, jr.; Samson Evans, QB, jr.; Manny Ebirim, FB, sr.; Austen Ferbet, TE-LB, sr.; Joe Perhats, LB, jr.; Jacob Ommen, LB, jr.; Cole Brown, RB, sr.; Daniel Renteria, DB, sr.; Nik Koelblinger, LB, sr.; Justin Grapenthin, OL, jr.; Peter Dunican, DL, sr. All-Kishwaukee River Conference Team Burlington Central: Erik Hanson, LB, sr.; James Fay, RB, sr.; Dionte Pierre, RB, sr.; Joseph Garbacz, OL, sr.; Ryan Doubek, LB, jr. Harvard: John Lynch, DL, sr.; Brett Lehman, LB, jr. Johnsburg: Austin Butler, LB, jr.; Dyllan Hess, OL, sr.; Brandon Ackman, OL, sr.; Jarrid Wagner, DL, sr.; Bryce Jordan, TE, sr.; Brady Frazier, DB, jr.; Riley Buchanan, QB, sr.; Joe Moore, DL, sr.; Jack Kegel, LB, jr.; Nico LoDolce, WR, jr.; Adam Jayko, K, jr. Marengo: Jarren Jackson, RB-DB, sr.; Jake LaSota, DB, jr.; Justin D’Ambrosia, OL-DL, sr.; Casey Gara, OL, sr. Richmond-Burton: Dalton Wagner, OT, sr.; Blaine Bayer, DB, sr.; Brady Gibson, DB, sr.; Shane Byrne, RB, jr.; Bobby Berwick, DT, sr.; Kevin Pedley, LB, sr.; Mark Marzahl, RB, sr. Woodstock: Jacob Sumner, RB-DB, sr.; Jake Rowan, LB-OL, sr.; Jesus Hernandez, OL-DL, sr.; Sean Doyle, FB-DE, jr. Woodstock North: Matt Zinnen, QB, sr.; Casey Dycus, RB-LB, sr.; Lee Thomas, OL-DL, sr.; Collin Mergl, RB-LB, jr.; Dylan Martinez, OL-DL, sr.

SCHEDULE

THURSDAY Boys basketball: Alden-Hebron at Harvard, Cary-Grove at Carmel, Faith Lutheran at Mooseheart, 7 p.m. Girls basketball: Faith Lutheran at Mooseheart, 5:30 p.m. Boys bowling: Huntley at Marengo, 4 p.m. Girls bowling: Huntley at Marengo, 4 p.m., McHenry at Woodstock, DundeeCrown a Johnsburg, 4:30 p.m. Wrestling: Woodstock North at Johnsburg Triangular, 5:30 p.m., Woodstock at Burlington Central, Prairie Ridge at Hampshire, Dundee-Crown at Huntley, Crystal Lake Central at Jacobs, McHenry at Cary-Grove, 6:30 p.m.

NCAA FOOTBALL TOP 25 SCHEDULE

Friday’s Games No. 4 Washington vs. No. 9 Colorado, Pac-12 championship at Santa Clara, Calif., 8 p.m. No. 13 Western Michigan vs. Ohio, MAC Championship at Detroit, 6 p.m. Saturday’s Games No. 1 Alabama vs. No. 15 Florida, SEC championship at Atlanta, 3 p.m. No. 3 Clemson vs. No. 19 Virginia Tech, ACC championship at Orlando, Fla., 7 p.m. No. 6 Wisconsin vs. No. 8 Penn State, Big Ten championship at Indianapolis, 7:17 p.m. No. 7 Oklahoma vs. No. 11 Oklahoma State, 11:20 a.m. No. 14 West Virginia vs. Baylor, 2:30 p.m. No. 20 Navy vs. Temple, AAC championship, 11 a.m.

NCAA BASKETBALL MEN’S AP TOP 25 SCHEDULE

Wednesday’s Results No. 13 Indiana 76, No. 3 North Carolina 67 No. 6 Virginia 63, Ohio St. 61 No. 9 Baylor 79, Sam Houston St. 45 No. 11 UCLA vs. UC Riverside (n) No. 12 Saint Mary’s at Stanford (n) No. 14 Louisville 71, No. 15 Purdue 64 No. 16 Arizona 85, Texas Southern 63 No. 23 Oregon 93, Western Oregon 54 Thursday’s Games No. 8 Gonzaga vs. MVSU, 8 p.m. No. 19 Iowa St. vs. Cincinnati, 8 p.m. No. 20 S. Carolina vs. Vermont, 5:30 p.m. No. 24 Florida at North Florida, 6 p.m.


OUTDOORS Steve Sarley really important, but traction is even more important. Big rubber treads on your boots are great for walking on snow, but you still can fall on your rump, even with the knobbiest of treads on your soles. You need to have a set of cleats or creepers attached to your soles. No cleats, no ice fishing. That ought to be a law. Above all, never go ice fishing alone. I cannot emphasize that enough, my friends. Now, what about frostbite and hypothermia that I mentioned earlier? Hypothermia occurs because your body is unable to maintain its normal body temperature because of exposure to severe cold. It doesn’t have to be 30 below, it can be cool, but if your skin gets wet, hypothermia can set in. It comes on slowly. Of course, after a fall through the ice, it can set in in mere minutes. The most important way to stave off the threat of hypothermia is by wearing layers of warm clothing to trap in the body heat and keeping your skin dry. The beginning signs of hypothermia are a deterioration of coordination or other motor or physical abilities. Often, a decrease in mental functions occurs. Other symptoms include slow breathing, extreme tiredness, shivering, cold and pale skin and slurred speech. Hypothermia can lead to death. Obviously, at the first sign of hypothermia, get out of the cold. If wet, get dry – fast. Medical attention is warranted – this is no time to try to be a hero. Someone with severe hypothermia can be minutes away from falling into a coma. Frostbite is damage to the skin and underlying tissues caused by extreme cold. Frostbite happens when the ex-

posed skin becomes hard, pale and cold. The skin lacks sensitivity when it is touched, although you might feel a dull throbbing. When the skin gets warmed again, it gets red and painful, and you might feel tingling and burning. The face, hands, feet, nose and ears are where frostbite most commonly occurs. Frostbite may cause permanent damage and, if severe enough, can be cause for amputation of the effected area. Frostbite’s first symptom is tingling, and that is followed by numbness. If frostbite is suspected, get the victim to a warm place. Apply warm, damp washcloths to the afflicted area or submerse it in warm, not hot, water. If the frostbitten person has to go back out into the freezing temps, it might be better not to warm the area until the victim can be kept in the warmth permanently. Do not administer alcohol as a remedy for frostbite. Your best bet is to seek proper, professional medical attention. I’m not trying to scare you. OK, I’ll confess. I am trying to scare you. If scaring you can save one person from falling through the ice or getting hypothermia or frostbite, it’s worth it to me.

OUTDOORS REPORT Northern Illinois: Dave Kranz from

Dave’s Bait, Tackle and Taxidermy in Crystal Lake reports: “Although the calendar says it is Dec. 1, some people are still fishing open water on the Fox River and area lakes. Walleyes are hitting on a jig head tipped with an extra-large fathead minnow. Smallmouth bass below the Algonquin dam seem to be taking 4- to 6-inch suckers. The ice will be here soon enough. Call 815455-2040 for an update on any of these reported areas.” Chris Taurisano of T-Bone Guide Service (tboneguideservice.com – 630330-0090) sends word, “Fishing has been very good for the past week. The

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colder temperatures have put the fish in a feeding mode. A good mixed bag of walleyes, crappies and white bass are available. Muskie action has been slow but steady. “On Dec. 10, Munson Marine will host an open house in Fox Lake at Route 59 and Grand Avenue. Catered food will be available, and I will be giving a seminar covering the Fox Chain. 11 a.m. is the starting time.” Archery deer hunting: Through Sunday, Illinois archery deer hunters harvested a preliminary total of 46,920 deer, compared to 47,970 for the same period in 2015. The harvest to date has consisted of 57 percent males. The top five counties were Pike (1,786), Fulton (1,304), Jefferson (1,093), Adams (1,087) and JoDaviess (893). The totals for some selected northern Illinois counties are McHenry (415), Lake (185), Winnebago (400), Kane (180), DuPage (20), DeKalb (144), Boone (104) and Cook (72).

NOTE New outdoors app: Babe Winkelman,

the host of “Good Fishing” and “Outdoor Secrets,” has launched the Babe Winkelman Mobile App for Apple and Android. The Babe App will feature contests and prizes and showcase sponsors of outdoor products. The Babe App is available through Apple AppStore and GooglePlay for Android. A free version is available, and users can subscribe for custom and unique content by becoming a “Babe Insider” for $4.99 a month through in-app purchase. There is a lot of great content in the free version, and subscribers who become “Babe Insiders” will have daily video emails, behind-the-scenes content and unique programming only available through the Babe App. • Steve Sarley writes about the outdoors for Shaw Media. Write to him at sarfishing@yahoo.com.

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Every year I write about the perils that can befall ice anglers, and I think it’s such an important subject that I’m revisiting the topic. Even if you don’t drown after falling through the ice, your life is going to be miserable. You’re going to be severely cold, your trip will be ruined, and you will be lucky if you don’t suffer the effects of frostbite or hypothermia. My first rule is don’t fall through the ice. Don’t walk on ice that is too thin. Don’t walk on ice that has formed over moving water. Don’t walk on ice that is dark colored. Don’t take silly risks just to try to catch a few fish. Wait for better conditions. I’m sure they’ll come around. Ice safety equipment is a must. You’ll need a spud bar, to be sure. A spud bar is a long rod with a weighted end. You pound on the ice in front of you before you walk on it to make sure it is solid. Carrying a long length of rope is a wise thing, as well. Having spikes tied to the ends is a good idea. If you fall through, you jam the spikes into the ice and then pull yourself up and out of the hole. The spikes also can weight the ends in case you have to toss the rope to someone else who has fallen through the ice. A lot of people think wearing a flotation device when going ice fishing is silly. I’ll admit it is hard to fit a personal flotation device over all of your layers of winter clothing. How about checking out the vests that inflate when needed? They are like wearing just an extra shirt. You can buy PFDs that automatically inflate when they are submersed under water or a cheaper version that you need to pull a rip cord to inflate the vest. You don’t have to go through the ice to hurt yourself badly. A fall on a layer of rock-hard ice can do a lot of damage to your body. Foot warmth is

7

SPORTS | Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

Safety measures crucial when ice fishing


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Thursday, December 1, 2016

|SPORTS

8 BEARS NOTES

Defense prepares for 49ers’ Kaepernick By KEVIN FISHBAIN

kfishbain@profootballweekly.com LAKE FOREST – Vic Fangio saw four years of Colin Kaepernick in San Francisco when he ran the 49ers’ defense and Kaepernick eventually ascended to a franchise quarterback role. On Sunday, Fangio will be on the opposite sideline against Kaepernick, who is now quarterbacking a 1-10 49ers team. His performance, and the offense’s, has improved over the past few weeks. Kaepernick went off for 113 rushing yards against the Dolphins on Sunday, a reminder of the athleticism Fangio saw plenty of from 2011 to ‘14. “It’s challenging. He’s very athletic, very elusive and he’s extremely fast,” Fangio said. “Once he gets in the open field he gobbles up ground quickly. So we’re going to have to do a good job in the rush, try to keep him hemmed in when we can and make the tackles when we can.” Titans quarterback Marcus Mariota’s 46 rushing yards against the Bears last week were the most they have allowed from a QB this season, and 29 of those yards came on one play. Kaepernick is the biggest rushing threat the Bears have seen at the position this year.

AP photo

Miami Dolphins free safety Bacarri Rambo pushes San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick out of bounds Sunday in Miami Gardens, Fla. Facing a player with the speed of Kaepernick highlights the need to have outside linebacker Leonard Floyd back. He participated in Wednesday’s practice, but the firstround pick remains in the concussion protocol after his scary injury against the Giants. Floyd’s athleticism and playmak-

ing also would help a unit that still isn’t taking the ball away, and Fangio acknowledged what a disappointment that has been. “It is a problem, and we’re not getting enough takeaway,” he said. “It’s one of the reasons we have the record we have. We just have to do a better job of getting playmakers to make

plays at the ball and get the ball out. We had one last week. We got it out, but we didn’t cover it. We gotta get more than that.” Kaepernick has lost only two fumbles in 110 carries, and he has thrown three interceptions. The Bears’ eight takeaways are tied for 31st in the NFL, one ahead of the Jaguars. Fuller’s return: The Bears had cornerback Kyle Fuller practicing Wednesday in a limited fashion, opening the three-week window when they can activate him from injured reserve. Fuller hasn’t played in a game this season because of a knee injury. The 2014 first-round pick had two interceptions last season and four as a rookie, including two against the 49ers. “I was encouraged by what I saw today,” coach John Fox said. “We’re not going to put him out there if he’s not healthy enough to at least practice. He’s been around, so it’s not like he’s been away and not with us, not in meetings, not paying attention to what we’re doing. So we’ll have to see one day at a time and we’ll see how the week progresses.” Injury report: QB Jay Cutler (shoulder), S Adrian Amos (foot) and WR Eddie Royal (toe) did not practice. G Josh Sitton, DE Mitch Unrein, Floyd, and CBs Deiondre’ Hall, Tracy Porter and Fuller were limited.

COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

Indiana tops N. Carolina, but ACC wins Challenge The ASSOCIATED PRESS

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. – OG Anunoby scored 16 points, James Blackmon Jr. had 14, and Robert Johnson added 11 Wednesday night, leading No. 13 Indiana past No. 3 North Carolina, 76-67, in the ACC/Big Ten Challenge. The ACC won this season’s series, 9-5. The Hoosiers (5-1) have won two straight since last week’s stunning loss to little-known IPFW. North Carolina (7-1), which trailed for a total of 16 seconds during its four-game trip to Hawaii, never led and spent most of the game trailing by double digits. The Tar Heels were led by Justin Jackson with 21 points and Kennedy Meeks with 10. North Carolina was 13 of 22 on free throws. No. 7 Virginia 63, Ohio St. 61: At Charlottesville, Virginia, London Perrantes scored 15 of his 19 points in the

ACC/Big Ten Challenge

Monday Florida State 75, Minnesota 67 Northwestern 65, Wake Forest 58 Tuesday Illinois 88, North Carolina State 74 No. 17 Wisconsin 77, No. 22 Syracuse 60 No. 5 Duke 78, Michigan State 69 Notre Dame 92, Iowa 78 Penn State 67, Georgia Tech 60 Pittsburgh 73, Maryland 59 Wednesday No. 14 Louisville 71, No. 15 Purdue 64 Virginia Tech 73, Michigan 70 Miami 73, Rutgers 61 No. 13 Indiana 76, No. 3 North Carolina 67 No. 7 Virginia 63, Ohio State 61 Clemson 60, Nebraska 58

ACC wins, 9-5

second half for Virginia in a victory over Ohio State (6-1) in the Challenge.

Devon Hall added 12 points for the Cavaliers (7-0), who trailed by as many as 16 points in the first half. Jae’Sean Tate led Ohio State with 14 points.

No. 14 Louisville 71, No. 15 Purdue 64:

At Louisville, Kentucky, Ray Spalding and Mangok Mathiang each scored 11 points, and Donovan Mitchell contributed seven critical points down the stretch to help Louisville (6-1) hold off Purdue. Caleb Swanigan had 14 points and 11 rebounds and P.J. Thompson had 13 points, but the Boilermakers (5-2) had their four-game winning streak stopped along with a conference-record seven-game winning streak in the Challenge. Virginia Tech 73, Michigan 70: At Ann Arbor, Michigan, Zach LeDay scored 15 of his 18 points in the second half, and Virginia Tech (6-1) rallied from a 15-point first-half deficit to beat Michigan (5-2) in the Challenge. Zak Irvin led Michigan with 23

points.

Clemson 60, Nebraska 58: At Clemson, South Carolina, Jaron Blossomgame scored 15 points, Donte Grantham had a tiebreaking free throw, and Clemson (42) held on despite a wild final stretch for a win over Nebraska (4-3) in the Challenge. Glynn Watson had a game-high 20 points for Nebraska. Miami 73, Rutgers 61: At Coral Gables, Florida, freshman Dewan Huell had 14 points and seven rebounds in 25 minutes, and Miami (5-2) scored 17 consecutive points in the second half to beat previously undefeated Rutgers (6-1) in the Challenge. Indiana St. 63, N. Illinois 52: At Terre Haute, Indiana, T.J. Bell scored 17 points, and Indiana State (3-4) pulled away in the second half to beat Northern Illinois (4-4). Justin Thomas was the lone player in double figures for NIU, finishing with 14 points.


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Pet of the Week SUNSHINE 7 YEARS 8 MONTHS OLD FEMALE TORTIE DSH In 2010 we took Sunshine from a rescue organization that got her out of southern Illinois. She was very stressed at the shelter which caused her to have dermatitis. She was treated and put on special food. She got better and was adopted in 2015. Unfortunately she was returned because she was too shy. She came back with her dermatitis so she was treated again and put back on her food. Once she was healthy she was adopted in 2016 but the other cat in the house was stalking her. For her own good she came back to us. She is a very sweet girl that loves to be petted and scratched all over. She is beautiful, has great markings, big green eyes and petite size at 8 pounds. She needs a quiet adult home where she can be the only pet. She is shy at first so she needs time to adjust to any new environment. A patient guardian that will not rush her and give Sunshine her own space would be ideal. Come meet her at Helping Paws located at 2500 Harding Lane, Woodstock, Illinois. 815-338-4400 www.helpingpaws.net She is waiting for another chance for a home.

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| Pl@y | Thursday, December 1, 2016 • NWHerald.com

CONTENTS

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12•1•2016

FEATURES

4

MOVIES & TV

6

PLANIT 10

Looking for holiday television specials? A look at what’s to come this month. Plus, find this weekend’s movie showtiems.

There are a lot of events taking place in the county this weekend. We choose the top 10.

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ON THE COVER

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ON STAGE

13

CONCERTS & BANDS

With festivities inside and out, Christmas at the Dole begins this weekend. Plus, a complete roundup of area holiday activities.

Read our reviews of the Raue’s “A Christmas Survival Guide,” “A Christmas Carol” at the Opera House and Steppenwolf’s “The Fundamentals.”

A listing of concerts and bands coming to McHenry County in the coming weeks.

DEPARTMENTS Concerts & bands..........................................13 Go Guide..........................................................13 Movies..............................................................4 On the Cover..................................................10 Planit 10............................................................6

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ON THE COVER Ellie Copley, then 10, of McHenry, builds a structure out of ice blocks at last year’s winter festivities at Lakeside Legacy Arts Park. This year’s event will take place Dec. 2-3. Shaw Media file photo

Airing Dec. 10 on CBS, “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer” is among a slew of holiday-themed TV shows airing this month. Photo provided


NWHerald.com • Thursday, December 1, 2016

| Pl@y |

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TV channels the holiday spirit By LYNN ELBER

movie and stage show, Buddy (Jim Parsons) travels to meet the dad he never knew. Ed Asner narrates.

The Associated Press The spirit of the holidays is an elastic concept when it comes to both commerce and TV programming. Endlessly varied gift possibilities are equaled by what’s on the small screen, with Taraji P. Henson’s “White Hot” special and a Mormon Tabernacle Choir concert both making the cut. There’s also the old – “It’s a Wonderful Life,” again! – and the new, including Amazon’s now-streaming animated specials “If You Give a Mouse a Christmas Cookie” and “The Snowy Day,” based on the children’s books. For an ongoing blast from the past, catch holiday-themed episodes of shows ranging from “Lassie” to “Quantum Leap” to “Frasier” on the Cozi TV channel from Dec. 12 to 25. Here’s some other fare.

Animation

• “A Charlie Brown Christmas,” 7 p.m. Dec. 1, ABC. Upset by the season’s materialism, Charlie ends up learning the true meaning of Christmas in this 1965 special. • “Albert,” 6 p.m. Dec. 9, Nickelodeon. Tiny Douglas fir tree Albert aspires to be the Christmas king of New York City. The voice cast includes Bobby Moynihan and Sasheer Zamata of “Saturday Night Live.” • “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer,” 7 p.m. Dec. 10, CBS. Rudolph really glows in this color-corrected version of the 1964 special featuring Burl Ives’ memorable voice. • “Elf: Buddy’s Musical Christmas,” 7 p.m. Dec. 21, NBC. In this stop-motion animated special based on the

Movies

• “Holiday Joy,” 2 p.m. Dec. 8, repeats Dec. 9 and 15, Freeform. A new TV movie in which teen Joy Hockstatter (Bailee Madison) finds life transformed. • “It’s a Wonderful Life,” 7 p.m. Dec. 3, NBC. In Frank Capra’s enduring 1946 fable, George Bailey (James Stewart) learns what’s important in this world with help from angel Clarence (Henry Travers). • “A Christmas Story,” 24-hour marathon starting at 7 p.m. Dec. 24, TBS and TNT. All 9-year-old Ralphie (Peter Billingsley) wants for Christmas is a Red Ryder air rifle. Watch, smile, repeat. • “A Nutcracker Christmas,” 7 p.m. Dec. 10, Hallmark Channel. Ballerina Lily (Amy Acker) missed the chance to perform in “The Nutcracker” and must confront her past in this new TV movie.

Tunes

• “VH1 Divas Holiday: Unsilent Night,” 8 p.m. Dec. 5, VH1. It’s a family affair with Patti LaBelle joined by her goddaughter, Mariah Carey. Also aboard: Chaka Khan, Vanessa Williams and Teyana Taylor. • “Taraji’s White Hot Holidays,” 7 p.m. Dec. 8, Fox. The “Empire” star welcomes Pharrell Williams, Taye Diggs, Missy Elliott, Alicia Keys and other guests. • “A Pentatonix Christmas Special,” 7 p.m. Dec. 14, NBC. The Grammy-winning a cappella group performs with guests Reba McEntire and Kelly Clarkson. • “Christmas with the Mormon Tabernacle Choir Featuring

“It’s a Wonderful Life” AP photo

Laura Osnes and Martin Jarvis,” 8 p.m. Dec. 19, PBS (check local listings for times). Broadway star Osnes and British actor Jarvis team with the choir.

Stocking stuffers

• “I Love Lucy Christmas Special,” 7 p.m. Dec. 2, CBS. Two colorized half-hours, the December 1956 “Christmas Episode” and 1955’s “Lucy Gets in Pictures.” • “Rock the Troops ,” 8 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 13, Spike. Dwayne Johnson salutes the U.S. military with a celebrity-filled special featuring Nick Jonas, Flo Rida, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Kevin Hart, Jack Black and others. • “Lidia Celebrates America: Holiday for Heroes,” 9 p.m. Dec. 16, PBS (check local listings). Chef Lidia Bastianich meets veterans and cooks a holiday dinner for the crew of the USS George Washington. • “A Home for the Holidays,” 7 p.m. Dec. 23, CBS. Adoption and foster care are the focus of this special that includes inspirational stories and celebrity guests.

WEEKEND SHOWTIMES

The following are showtimes for Dec. 2-4 unless otherwise noted.

5:40, 7:45, 9:50 p.m. Regal Cinemas – 3:40, 6:00, 8:20, 10:55 p.m.

“THE ACCOUNTANT”

“BELIEVE”

“ALLIED”

“BLEED FOR THIS”

Regal Cinemas – 1:30, 4:30, 7:35, 10:50 p.m. AMC Lake in the Hills 12 – 11:50 a.m., 1:30, 4:20, 7:10, 10:05 p.m. Classic Cinemas Carpentersville – 11:00 a.m., 1:40, 4:20, 7:00, 9:40 p.m. Classic Cinemas Woodstock – Dec. 2: 1:40, 4:20, 7:00, 9:40 p.m.; Dec. 3-4: 11:00 a.m., 1:40, 4:20, 7:00, 9:40 p.m. Regal Cinemas – 12:30, 3:30, 6:40, 9:35 p.m.

“ALMOST CHRISTMAS”

Classic Cinemas Carpentersville – 11:00 a.m., 1:30, 4:00, 6:30, 9:00 p.m.

“ARRIVAL”

AMC Lake in the Hills 12 – 11:30 a.m., 2:15, 5:00, 7:45, 9:40 p.m. Classic Cinemas Carpentersville – 11:35 a.m., 2:05, 4:35, 7:05, 9:35 p.m. Regal Cinemas – 2:10, 5:20, 8:10, 11:00 p.m. Classic Cinemas Woodstock – Dec. 2: 1:50, 4:20, 6:50, 9:20 p.m.; Dec. 3-4: 11:20 a.m., 1:50, 4:20, 6:50, 9:20 p.m.

“BAD SANTA 2”

AMC Lake in the Hills 12 – 2:40, 5:15, 7:40, 10:15 p.m. Classic Cinemas Carpentersville – 1:20, 3:35,

Regal Cinemas – Dec. 2: 12:40, 7:10 p.m.; Dec. 3-4: 7:10 p.m.

3:45, 7:00, 10:00 p.m.; 3D: 12:15, 3:15, 6:30, 9:30 p.m. Classic Cinemas Carpentersville – 11:00 a.m., 12:45, 1:45, 3:30, 4:30, 6:15, 7:15, 9:00, 10:00 p.m. Classic Cinemas Woodstock – Dec. 2: 12:45, 1:45, 3:30, 4:30, 6:15, 7:15, 9:00 p.m.; Dec. 3-4: 11:00 a.m., 12:45, 1:45, 3:30, 4:30, 6:15, 7:15, 9:00 Regal Cinemas – 2D: 12:00, 3:10, 6:20, 9:30 p.m.; 3D: 10:50 a.m., 1:55, 5:00, 8:05 p.m.

“DOCTOR STRANGE”

“HACKSAW RIDGE”

Regal Cinemas–11:10a.m.,2:00,4:50,7:40,10:30p.m.

AMC Lake in the Hills 12 – 11:10 a.m., 2:10, 4:50, 7:30, 10:10 p.m. Classic Cinemas Carpentersville – 11:15 a.m., 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:15 p.m. Classic Cinemas Woodstock – Dec. 2: 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30 p.m.; Dec. 3-4: 11:30 a.m., 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30 p.m. Regal Cinemas – Dec. 2 & 5: 2D: 11:30 a.m., 2:30, 5:15, 8:00, 9:50 p.m.; 3D: 10:45 p.m.; Dec. 3: 2D: 2:30, 5:15, 8:00, 9:50 p.m.; 3D: 10:45 p.m.

“THE EDGE OF SEVENTEEN”

AMC Lake in the Hills 12 – Dec. 2-3: 1:00, 3:50, 9:15 p.m.; Dec. 4: 1:00, 3:50, 6:40, 9:15 p.m. Classic Cinemas Carpentersville – 2:45, 5:05, 7:25, 9:45 p.m. Classic Cinemas Woodstock – 10:00 p.m. Regal Cinemas – 2:15, 4:55, 7:50, 10:35 p.m.

“FANTASTIC BEASTS AND WHERE TO FIND THEM” AMC Lake in the Hills 12 – 2D: 11:15 a.m., 12:45,

AMC Lake in the Hills 12 – 1:50, 8:00 p.m. Regal Cinemas – Dec. 2 & 4: 12:10, 3:20, 6:30, 10:00 p.m.; Dec. 3: 10:00 a.m., 12:10, 3:20, 6:30, 10:00 p.m.

“INCARNATE”

AMC Lake in the Hills 12 – 11:40 a.m., 2:20, 4:40, 7:20, 10:30 p.m. Classic Cinemas Carpentersville – 11:30 a.m., 1:30, 3:30, 5:30, 7:30, 9:30 p.m. Regal Cinemas – 11:20 a.m., 1:45, 4:10, 7:00, 9:40 p.m.

“THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: THE MAGICAL FLUTE – SPECIAL ENCORE” Regal Cinemas – Dec. 3 only: 12:55 p.m.

“MOANA”

AMC Lake in the Hills 12 – Dec. 2-3: 2D: 11:00 a.m., 1:15, 4:00, 6:15, 6:45, 9:30 p.m.; 3D: 1:45, 4:30, 7:15, 10:00 p.m.; Dec. 4: 2D: 11:00 a.m., 1:15, 4:00,

6:45, 9:30 p.m.; 3D: 1:45, 4:30, 7:15, 10:00 p.m. Classic Cinemas Carpentersville – 11:00, 11:20 a.m., 12:20, 1:40, 2:40, 4:00, 5:00, 6:20, 7:20, 8:35, 9:40 p.m. Classic Cinemas Woodstock – Dec. 2: 12:20, 1:40, 2:40, 4:00, 5:00, 6:20, 7:20, 8:40, 9:40 p.m.; Dec. 3-4: 11:20 a.m., 12:20, 1:40, 2:40, 4:00, 5:00, 6:20, 7:20, 8:40, 9:40 p.m. Regal Cinemas – Dec. 2: 2D: 11:00, 11:50 a.m., 1:50, 2:20, 2:50, 4:35, 5:10, 5:40, 7:20, 8:30 p.m.; 3D: 11:25 a.m., 7:55, 10:10, 10:40 p.m.; Dec. 3: 2D: 10:00, 11:00 a.m., 1:50, 2:20, 2:50, 4:35, 5:10, 5:40, 7:20, 8:30 p.m.; 3D: 11:25 a.m., 7:55, 10:10, 10:40 p.m.; Dec. 4: 11:00, 11:50 a.m., 1:50, 2:20, 3:05, 4:35, 5:10, 5:55, 7:20, 8:45 p.m.; 3D: 11:25 a.m., 7:55, 10:10, 10:40 p.m.

“RULES DON’T APPLY”

AMC Lake in the Hills 12 – 5:10 p.m. Classic Cinemas Carpentersville – 12:00 p.m. Regal Cinemas – 3:50, 10:20 p.m.

“TROLLS”

AMC Lake in the Hills 12 – 11:15 a.m., 2:00, 4:45, 7:30, 9:45 p.m. Classic Cinemas Carpentersville – 12:10, 2:20, 4:30, 6:40, 8:50 p.m. Classic Cinemas Woodstock – 12:10, 2:20, 4:30, 6:40, 8:50 p.m. Regal Cinemas – Dec. 2 & 4: 11:05, 11:40, 11:41 a.m., 12:20, 1:00, 2:40, 5:05, 7:30 p.m.; Dec. 3: 11:05, 11:40, 11:41 a.m., 12:25, 12:50, 1:00, 3:25, 5:50, 8:15 p.m.


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Wo o d s t o c k

Opera House

THE NUTCRACKER BALLET

Ed Hall’s Woodstock Christmas Guitar Night

Presented by Woodstock Musical Theatre Company

December 30 at 8:00 PM

December 2nd at 8 PM December 3rd at 2 PM & 8 PM December 4th at 2 PM

Join Ebenezer Scrooge as he journeys through the Christmases of Past, Present and Future with his three Ghostly Guides.

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Coming Attractions

December 10, 11, 16, 17 & 18

Come enjoy the magic of the holiday season as the Judith Svalander Dance Theatre transforms the Opera House stage into a realm of fantasy.

December 23 at 8:00 PM

Five internationally acclaimed musicians will present an evening of entertaining arrangements for the guitar as well as popular holiday favorites.

PIANO MAN brings the music of Elton John and Billy Joel to life in a show that pays them the ultimate tribute. With some of the most versatile musicians and the uncanny ability to mimic the voices of these two mega-superstars, PIANO MAN is one of the most authentic tribute bands in the country.

FOUR EASY In person at: The Box Office Ticket Counter • By Phone at: 815-338-5300 WAYS TO BUY TICKETS: Online at: WoodstockOperaHouse.com • By Mail to: 121 Van Buren St Woodstock IL 60098

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| Pl@y | Thursday, December 1, 2016 • NWHerald.com

A FAMILY TRADITION FOR OVER 30 YEARS

Yo uk n Wa ow w ter ha pr t’s oo f C awe arp som et. e?


EVENTS

NWHerald.com • Thursday, December 1, 2016

| Pl@y |

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Siblings Emma, Joey and Gracie Teson roast marshmallows during last year’s festivities at Lakeside Legacy Arts Park. Shaw Media file photo

GS 10 THIN TO DO OUND R A & N I UNTY O C Y R McHEN CHRISTMAS OF YESTERYEAR

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WHEN: Dec. 2-4 WHERE: Throughout Richmond COST & INFO: The festivities begin with a Christmas tree lighting and arrival of Santa at 6:30 p.m. Dec. 2 at Stevens Park, followed by raffles and more inside Memorial Hall, 5600 Hunter Drive. From 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dec. 3 at Memorial Hall, events include the St. Joseph’s Church Cookie Walk, crafters, a holiday shop, “Origin of Santa” by Joseph Steele (10 to 10:50 a.m.), a performance by Broadway Academy of Art & Dance (11:15 a.m. and 2 p.m.), photos with Father Christmas downtown Richmond (11 a.m. to 3 p.m.), face painting (noon to 1:30 p.m.), free hayrides with a donation for the Community Food Pantry (11 a.m. and 2 p.m.) and more. From 9 a.m. to noon Dec. 4 at Memorial Hall will be a pancake breakfast and visits with Santa. Information: www.richmond–il.com.

SANTA’S FESTIVAL OF TREES

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WHEN: 6 to 8 p.m. Dec. 2 WHERE: Village Hall, 600 Harvest Gate, Lake in the Hills COST & INFO: Travel down the Tinsel Trail and view trees decorated by local civic groups businesses and individuals. Lighting ceremony will be led by Santa and Mrs. Claus at 6 p.m. Santa will be inside Village Hall for a visit and photo opportunity. Trees will be on display throughout December. Free. Information: 847-960-7460 or www.lith.org.

CHRISTMAS AT THE DOLE

WHEN: 5 to 8 p.m. Dec. 2 and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dec. 3 WHERE: Lakeside Arts Park at the Dole, 401 Country Club Road, Crystal Lake COST & INFO: Annual holiday festivities with a 1st Friday art show ($5 donation requested), the lighting of the Sage Gallery tree at 7:45 p.m. and 8 p.m. Dec. 2 “Cool Yule” performance with jazz singer Spider Saloff and pianist Tommy Muellner (tickets $18 in advance, $23 at the door). The event also will include caroling, ballerinas, a cash bar and light appetizers. Saturday’s Holiday Extravaganza includes indoor and outdoor activities for all ages from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. More than 15 vendors will sell holiday gifts. Information: 815455-8000 or www.lakesideartspark.org. For more on the festivities, see page 10.

A VERY MERRY HUNTLEY

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WHEN: Dec. 2-3 WHERE: Throughout Huntley COST & INFO: Featuring a Kids Room and horse-drawn trolley rides (4 to 8 p.m.), visits with Mrs. Claus (until 7 p.m.) and a Kris Kringle Market (3 to 8 p.m.) Dec. 2 at the Municipal Complex, 10987 Main St. On Dec. 3, events will take place at First Congregational Church, 11628 E. Main St. and the Town Square. Church events include an indoor farmers market and craft fair (9 a.m. to 2 p.m.), a Cookie Walk (9 a.m. to noon), free crafts for children (10 a.m. to 2 p.m.), visits with live reindeer (10 a.m. to noon), a handbell choir performance (noon) and a live nativity and outside games (noon to 2 p.m.). Town Square events include carolers, horse-drawn trolley rides and free hot chocolate from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m., and the arrival of Santa and the lighting of the square at 5 p.m. Information: www.huntley.il.us or 847-515-5262.

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“ROCK AROUND THE QUILTED TREE”

WHEN: Dec. 3-29 WHERE: McHenry County Historical Society Museum, 6422 Main St., Union COST & INFO: A holiday open house, contest and show. Quilters invited to show their holiday-themed bed, wall and heirloom quilts at this inaugural event. Show opening is 1 to 4 p.m. Dec. 3 with free admission. The quilts will be on display from 1 to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday (closed Dec. 23 & 26). Museum admission is $5, $3 for seniors. Information: www. gothistory. org.


NORTHWEST HERALD

Shaw Media file photo

KIWANIS SANTA RUN FOR KIDS

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HOLIDAY ROCK ON THE FOX

WHEN: 9 a.m. Dec. 4 WHERE: Starting at the Raue Center for the Arts, 26 N. Williams St., Crystal Lake COST & INFO: A 5K and a 1-mile run/walk with a full Santa suit and beard as part of the 5K registration. The money raised goes to charitable organizations in McHenry County. The 5K cost is $38 (an extra $8 for those preferring a collector long-sleeve T-shirt) to register with packet pickup at The Running Depot in Crystal Lake. The 10mile run/walk is $15 a person. Registration and information: 815-459-1773 or www.kiwaniscrystallake.com.

WHEN: Noon to 3:30 p.m. Dec. 4 WHERE: Downtown Cary COST & INFO: Featuring a petting zoo, pony rides, horsedrawn sleigh rides, parade at 1 p.m. down West Main Street, Carolers of Cary, storytime with Mrs. Claus, visits with Santa and music by the Cary Junior High Bands and McHenry County Youth Orchestra. Sponsored by the village of Cary, Cary-Grove Area Chamber of Commerce and Algonquin Township. Free. Information: 847-639-2800 or www. carygrovechamber.com.

MARENGO & UNION HOLIDAY HOUSEWALK

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WHEN: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Dec. 3 & 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dec. 4 WHERE: Throughout Marengo and Union Townships COST & INFO: Featuring displays at 14 homes and community facilities. For a map and information, visit www.holidayhousewalk.com.

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CHRISTMAS IN HARVARD

WHEN: Dec. 3 WHERE: Downtown Harvard COST & INFO: Featuring breakfast with Mrs. Claus from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. at Joe & Tammy’s Family Restaurant, 69 N. Ayer St. Cost: $5 for children ages 10 and young, $8.50 for adults. Craft show from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Starline Factory, 300 W. Front St. Christmas parade at 12:30 p.m. Also featuring carriage rides, Santa and more. Information: www.cityofharvard.org.

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WHEN: 5:30 to 7 p.m. Dec. 3 WHERE: Riverfront Park, 201 N. Harrison St., Algonquin COST & INFO: Community tree lighting, candy cane hunt, visit with Santa, activities and the creation of a holiday ice sculpture. Hosted by the village of Algonquin. Free. Information: 847-658-2716 or www.algonquin. org/recreation.

B A K C O R Music ShowILLY

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$8 DEC PENNY ROAD PUB

GET LISTED! Listings are free. Include the name of the event, time, date, location, length of run, cost, phone number, email address and/or website. Must be submitted at least one week prior to publication. Fill out the form at PlanitNorthwest.com and click on add event.

TICKETS

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MERRY CARY HOLIDAY PARADE & FESTIVAL

With Regal Entertainment Group, including its Crystal Lake theater, offering an “ultimate ticket” to see “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story,” area fans of the blockbuster can see the movie daily when it opens Dec. 16. At a cost of $100, the “ultimate ticket” is described as a laser-etched black metal card featuring gold etching with a distinct black gloss “Rebellion” insignia. Each card will be personalized with the name of the person who buys it and will provide admission to any showing in any format, including 3D, RPX and IMAX, once a day at Regal throughout the movie’s run. The “ultimate ticket” for the Regal theater at 500 Route 14 in Crystal Lake can be bought at www.regmovies.com. The tickets went on sale Monday, with only 1,000 available. They were expected to sell out. As of Wednesday, tickets still were available. A 30-second TV spot for “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story” debuted overnight Sunday to herald Monday’s ticket-sales kickoff. “Rogue One” – the first stand-alone Star Wars film in what Disney is calling

its Anthology series – is part heist flick and part war movie. And so, like any good heist picture, the band of upstarts is gathered around its goal – in this case, the Death Star, or rather, the blueprints for the Empire’s first Death Star. “Rogue One” is set before the events in the original film, “A New Hope.” Cut to a close-up of new heroine, Jyn Erso (Felicity Jones). “Rogue One” pivots into a war picture as the Rebels engage – with the highly anticipated Darth Vader appearing, again voiced by James Earl Jones. The new teaser is titled “Breathe,” and the Sith, as guided by Director Orson Krennic (Ben Mendelsohn), will no doubt challenge Jyn’s ability to use the Force.

545 Penny Rd, Barrington, IL 60010-9207

| Pl@y | Thursday, December 1, 2016 • NWHerald.com

‘Rogue One’ fans can see movie daily 7 at CL theater with ‘ultimate ticket’

Diana Kenney, dressed as a gingerbread person, talks with Andrew Christensen, dressed as Santa Claus, inside the Raue Center for the Arts before last year’s Santa Run in Crystal Lake.


NWHerald.com • Thursday, December 1, 2016

| Pl@y |

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HOLIDAY HAPPENINGS Our guide to events taking place for the holidays

To have your event listed, visit PlanitNorthwest.com.

Rylan Shaw, then 5, of Crystal Lake, waits to see Santa Clause last year at Brink Street Market in Crystal Lake.

McHENRY COUNTY

Shaw Media file photo

ONGOING

CLAYWORKERS GUILD OF ILLINOIS HOLIDAY POTTERY SALE, through Jan. 7, 2017, Old Courthouse Arts Center, 101 N. Johnson St., Woodstock. Featuring the work of 15 members of the guild. Hours: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sundays. Ladies’ Night 5 to 10 p.m. Dec. 1. Free. Information: www.clayworkersguild.com. HOLIDAY TRAIN DISPLAY, through Dec. 28, Prairie Lodge, 12880 Del Webb Blvd., Huntley. Annual model train display presented by the Kishwaukee Valley & Eakin Creek Sun City Model Railroad Club. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Free. Information: 847-669-2392 or www.sccah.com. ANNUAL CHRISTMAS TREE & WREATH SALE, Algonquin State Bank, 2400 N. Huntington Drive, Algonquin. The Algonquin Lions Club will sell Fraser fir trees and wreaths from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Information: 847-877-1221 or www.lionsclubofalgonquin.org. “A CHRISTMAS CAROL,” through Dec. 4, Woodstock Opera House, 121 Van Buren St., Woodstock. Annual production by the Woodstock Musical Theatre Company. Join Scrooge as he journeys through the Christmases of past, present and future with his three ghostly guides. Schedule: 8 p.m. Dec. 2, 2 & 8 p.m. Dec. 3 and 2 p.m. Dec. 4. Cost: $24 adults, $21 seniors and students. Tickets and information: 815-338-5300 or www.woodstockoperahouse.com. “A CHRISTMAS SURVIVAL GUIDE,” through Dec. 4, Raue Center for the Arts, 26 N. Williams St. Presented by Williams Street Repertory. Do you find the holidays more than a little stressful? This intimate revue takes a wry and knowing look at a stressful season. Schedule: 8 p.m. Dec. 2-3; 3 p.m. Dec. 3-4. Tickets: $32.50, 38.50. Tickets and information: 815-356-9212, www.rauecenter.org or www.wsrep.org. HAPPY HOLIDAY RAILWAY, through Dec. 18, Illinois Railway Museum, 7000 Olson Road, Union. Featuring 40-minute train rides with Santa through the winter countryside. Includes treats and gifts for children, holiday lights display, hot chocolate and more. Schedule: Dec. 3-4, Dec. 10-11 & Dec. 17-18. Saturday trips are hourly from 2 to 7 p.m.; Sunday trips are hourly from 1 to 6 p.m. Rides at other times may be opened up at a later date based on demand. Plan to arrive 30 minutes before scheduled trip. Tickets: $18 a person. Tickets and information: www.irm.org or 815-923-4000.

DEC. 2 RICHMOND’S CHRISTMAS OF YESTERYEAR, Dec. 2-4, throughout Richmond. The festivities begin with a Christmas Tree Lighting and arrival of Santa on an antique fire engine at 6:30 p.m. Dec. 2 at Stevens Park, followed by photos with Santa,

SANTA HOUSE VISITS WHEN: Through Dec. 23 WHERE: Brink Street Market, 30-40 Brink St., Crystal Lake COST & INFO: Children and their families invited to visit with Santa. Bring a camera. Schedule: 6 to 8 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturdays, noon to 3 p.m. Sundays. Hosted by Downtown Crystal Lake. Free. Information: 815-479-0835 or www.downtowncl.org. coffee and cocoa, popcorn, raffles and more inside Memorial Hall, 5600 Hunter Drive. From 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dec. 3 at Memorial Hall, events include the St. Joseph’s Church Cookie Walk, crafters, refreshments, raffles, a holiday shop, a bake sale, photos with Santa, telling of the “Origin of Santa” by Joseph Steele (10 to 10:50 a.m.), a ballet performance by Broadway Academy of Art & Dance (11:15 a.m. and 2 p.m.), photos with Father Christmas as he strolls through downtown Richmond (11 a.m. to 3 p.m.), face painting (noon to 1:30 p.m.), free hayrides with a donation for the Community Food Pantry (11 a.m. and 2 p.m.) and more. From 9 a.m. to noon Dec. 4 at Memorial Hall will be a pancake breakfast hosted by the Richmond Fire Department and visits with Santa. Information: www.richmond–il.com. A VERY MERRY HUNTLEY, Dec. 2-3, Huntley. Featuring a Kids Room, horse-drawn trolley rides and visits with Mrs. Claus (until 7 p.m.) from 4 to 8 p.m. Dec. 2 at the Municipal Complex, 10987 Main St. A Kris Kringle Market will be open from 3 to 8 p.m at the Municipal Complex. On Dec. 3, events will take place at First Congregational Church, 11628 E. Main St., and the Town Square. Church events include an indoor farmers market and craft fair (9 a.m. to 2 p.m.), a cookie walk (9 a.m. to noon), free crafts for children (10 a.m. to 2 p.m.), visits with live reindeer (10 a.m. to noon), a handbell choir performance (noon) and a live nativity and outside games (noon to 2 p.m.). Town Square events include carolers, horse-drawn trolley rides and free hot chocolate from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m., the announcement of Christmas tree decorating contest winners at 4:45 p.m. and the arrival of Santa on a fire truck and the lighting of the square at 5 p.m. Information: www. huntley.il.us or 847-515-5262. HOLIDAY BOOK REVIEW, 11 a.m. Dec. 2, D’Andrea Banquets & Conference Center, 4419 Route 14, Crystal Lake. An 11th annual benefit for Pioneer

Center for Human Services. Event includes a social hour and raffles, lunch at 12:30 p.m. and book review of “Christmas at the White House” presented by book dramatist Jenny Riddle. Review tickets: $50. Grand raffle tickets: $10 each or six for $50. Tickets and information: 815-759-7144 or www.holidaybookreview.org. SANTA’S FESTIVAL OF TREES, 6 to 8 p.m. Dec. 2, Village Hall, 600 Harvest Gate, Lake in the Hills. Trees decorated by local civic groups, businesses and individuals. Lighting ceremony will be led by Santa and Mrs. Claus at 6 p.m. Santa will be inside village hall for a visit and photo opportunity. Trees on display throughout December. Free. Information: 847-960-7460 or www.lith.org. CHRISTMAS AT THE DOLE, 5 to 8 p.m. Dec. 2 and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dec. 3, Lakeside Arts Park at the Dole, 401 Country Club Road, Crystal Lake. Annual holiday festivities with a 1st Friday art show ($5 donation requested), the lighting of the Sage Gallery tree at 7:45 p.m. by Mayor Aaron Shepley and 8 p.m. Dec. 2 “Cool Yule” performance with jazz singer Spider Saloff and pianist Tommy Muellner (tickets $18 in advance, $23 at the door). The event also will include caroling, ballerinas, a cash bar and light appetizers. Saturday’s Holiday Extravaganza includes indoor and outdoor activities for all ages from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. More than 15 vendors will sell holiday gifts. Information: 815-455-8000 or www. lakesideartspark.org.

DEC. 3 ALGONQUIN ROTARY CLUB BREAKFAST WITH SANTA, 8 to 10:30 a.m. Dec. 3, Westfield Community School, 2100 Sleepy Hollow Road, Algonquin. Pancakes, sausage, milk, orange juice, coffee and hot chocolate will be served. Event includes holiday music, face painting, games, time with Santa and

a raffle. Suggested donation: $5 a family. Jacobs High School Interact Club also will host a toy drive for Adopt A Family. Bring a new toy to donate to a local family in need. Information: Jennifer Chanda, 815-353-6726 or jenchanda@gmail.com. CHILDREN’S CAKE DECORATING CLASS, 9 to 11 a.m. Dec. 3, Woodscreek Park, 1420 Willow Tree, Crystal Lake. Decorate a gingerbread house for ages 8 through 18 offered by the Crystal Lake Park District. Cost: $40 residents, $55 nonresidents. Registration and information: 815-459-0680, ext. 1220, or www.crystallakeparks.org. BREAKFAST WITH SANTA, 9 to 11 a.m. Dec. 3, Old Towne Hall, 54 Brink St., Crystal Lake. Featuring pancakes, sausage, scrambled eggs, juice and more with music and Santa and Mrs. Claus. Each child can sit on Santa’s lap and recite their Christmas list and receive a keepsake photo. Each child also receives a special cuddly gift. Tickets: $14, free for children younger than 2. Tickets and information: 815-4790835 or www.downtowncl.org. SANTA’S CANDY CANE HUNT, 9 to 11 a.m. Dec. 3, McHenry Recreation Center, 3636 Municipal Drive, McHenry. Children ages 1 through 10 can hunt for candy canes hidden by elves outside the center. Includes hot chocolate, a holiday craft, cookie decorating, a holiday story, carols and visit with Santa. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Cost: $10 a child, free for children younger than age 1. Information: 815-363-2160 or www.ci.mchenry.il.us. 16TH ANNUAL CHRISTMAS COOKIE WALK, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dec. 3, Memorial Hall, 10308 Main St., Richmond. Hosted by the St. Joseph Church Altar & Rosary Society CCW in conjunction with Richmond’s Christmas of Yesteryear. Information: 815-678-7421 or www.stjosephrichmondil.weconnect.com. HELP THE HUNGRY, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Dec. 3, Valley View Center, 3103 Route 176, Crystal Lake. Adela Crandell Durkee, author of “A Ship of Pearl” and “The Fable of Little Tzurie,” will sign books with proceeds from book sales and a raffle to benefit the Crystal Lake Food Pantry. Raffle prizes. Information: 847-414-0708 or adelacrandell@me.com. WINTER EXPO, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Dec. 3, McHenry Township Hall, 3703 N. Richmond Road, Johnsburg. Hosted by the McHenry Township Board of Trustees. Learn about winter activities from fishing to snowmobiling and more. Free. Information: 815-653-3516 or www.mchenrytownship.com. “SNOWMAN” PAINT-A-LONG “BLOW-OUT,” 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. or 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. p.m. Dec. 3, Amber’s Art Place, 9243 S. Route 31, Lake in the Hills. Family event at 2:30 p.m. and adult bring-your-own-beverage event at 4:30 p.m. No experience necessary. Step-by-step instruction. Cost: $12 a canvas. Information: 815-404-6520 or www.ambersartplace.com. CHRISTMAS IN HARVARD, Dec. 3, downtown Harvard. Featuring breakfast with Mrs. Claus and elves from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. at Joe & Tammy’s Family Restaurant, 69 N. Ayer St. Cost: $5 for children ages 10 and younger, $8.50 for adults. Craft show from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Starline Factory, 300 W. Front St. Christmas parade at 12:30 p.m. Also featuring carriage rides, visits with Santa and more. Information: www.cityofharvard.org.

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DEC. 4 KIWANIS SANTA RUN FOR KIDS, 9 a.m. Dec. 4, starting at the Raue Center for the Arts, 26 N. Williams St., Crystal Lake. A 5K and a 1-mile run/ walk with a full Santa suit and beard as part of the 5K registration. The money raised goes to charitable organizations in McHenry County. The 5K cost is $38 (an extra $8 for those preferring a long-sleeve T-shirt) with packet pickup at The Running Depot in Crystal Lake. The 10-mile run/walk is $15 a person. Registration and information: 815-459-1773 or www. kiwaniscrystallake.com. BREAKFAST WITH JOLLY OLD ST. NICK, 8:30 to 11

DEC. 8

HOLIDAY PARTY WITH MRS. CLAUS WHEN: Dec. 4-6 WHERE: Crystal Lake Public Library, 126 W. Paddock St., Crystal Lake COST & INFO: After a storytime with songs, children can take a photo with Mrs. Claus. Schedule: 2 p.m. Dec. 4; 4:30 & 7 p.m. Dec. 5 & 6. CLPL cardholders only. Free. Register at www.clpl.org or 815-459-1687. a.m. Dec. 4, Sts. Peter & Paul Catholic School, 416 N. First St., Cary. Pancake breakfast, crafts, Christmas choir performance and photo opportunity with St. Nick. Free. Information: 847-639-3041, ext. 280, or www.peterpaulschoolcary.org. MERRY CARY HOLIDAY PARADE & FESTIVAL, noon to 3:30 p.m. Dec. 4, at various locations in downtown Cary. Family event featuring a petting zoo, pony rides, horse-drawn sleigh rides, parade at 1 p.m. down West Main Street, Carolers of Cary, storytime with Mrs. Claus, visits with Santa and music by the Cary Junior High bands and McHenry County Youth Orchestra. Sponsored by the village of Cary, Cary-Grove Area Chamber of Commerce and Algonquin Township. Free. Information: 847-639-2800 or www.carygrovechamber.com. “THE ESSENTIAL CHRISTMAS CAROL,” 1 to 2:30 p.m. Dec. 4, McHenry Public Library, 809 Front St., McHenry. William Pack will perform a reading of “A Christmas Carol” enhanced with a modern recreation of a magic lantern slide show popular during Dickens’ lifetime. Free. Information: 815-385-0036 or www. mchenrylibrary.org. SANTA’S WORKSHOP, 2 to 4 p.m. Dec. 4, Grand Oaks Recreational Center, 1401 W. Route 176, Crystal Lake. For ages 3 through 7 with a parent. Crafts, an Elves Sweet Shoppe and reindeer games. Every child will have a private moment to share their holiday wishes with Santa. Hosted by the Crystal Lake Park District. Cost: $8 a child. Registration and information: 815-459-0680 or www.crystallakeparks.org. FOX VALLEY MEN OF HARMONY CHRISTMAS CONCERT, 2:30 p.m. Dec. 4, Prince of Peace Lutheran Church, 932 S. McHenry Ave., Crystal Lake. Barbershop chorus performance also will feature Girls Nite Out, Implied Harmony, Golden Tones and The Clefhangers quartets. A free afterglow party follows the concert. Tickets: $10 available at the door. A portion of the proceeds benefits the Crystal Lake Food Pantry. Tickets and information: Jack, 815-459-6910. CRYSTAL LAKE COMMUNITY BAND WINTER POPS CONCERT, 4 p.m. Dec. 4, Cary-Grove High

School Performing Arts Centre, 21 Jandus Road, Cary. Tickets: $12 adults, $10 seniors, students and military; $7 groups of 10 or more. Reserved seating. Tickets and information: 815-679-2263 or www. clcb.org. FAMILY CHRISTMAS CONCERT, 4 p.m. Dec. 4, First Congregational Church of Crystal Lake, 461 Pierson St., Crystal Lake. “Angels and Trumpets” concert featuring the Vestry Adult Choir, Jubilate Adult Handbell Choir and Alleluia Sound High School Choir. A benefit chili supper follows the concert. Free. Information: 815-459-6010 or www.fcc-cl.org. FIRST CHURCH CHRISTMAS CONCERT, 4 to 5 p.m. Dec. 4, First United Methodist Church, 236 W. Crystal Lake Ave., Crystal Lake. Musical groups from the worship ministry will put on a concert with diverse styles of music. Child care provided. Free. Information: 815-459-0785 or www.firstchurchcl.org.

DEC. 5 REINDEER ART AT CARY LIBRARY (GRADES 1-5), 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Dec. 5, Cary Area Public Library, 1606 Three Oaks Road, Cary. Using recycled materials and paint, children will create reindeer. Registration required. Free. Registration and information: 847-639-4210 or www.caryarealibrary.org.info.

DEC. 6 CLASSIC CHRISTMAS BEDTIME STORIES, 6 to 7 p.m. and 7:15 to 8:15 p.m. Dec. 6, 9, 13 & 16, Rotary Building at Veteran Acres Park, 431 N. Walkup Road, Crystal Lake. The Crystal Lake Park District invites children ages 2 through 7, dressed in pajamas, to hear Christmas stories read by Mrs. Claus. Cost: $15 residents, $20 nonresidents. Siblings must be registered too. Registration and information: 815459-0680, ext. 1213, or www.crystallakeparks.org.

DEC. 7 MCC POTTERY & POINSETTIA SALE, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dec. 7, McHenry County College Commons Area in Building B, 8900 Route 14, Crystal Lake. Ceramics students will sell handcrafted pottery items and other

HOLIDAY HOUSE WALK FOR CHARITY, 2 to 6 p.m. Dec. 8, Sun City, Huntley. Tour five beautifully decorated holiday homes in Sun City. Hosted by the Sunflower Garden Club. All proceeds to be donated to homeowners’ choice of charity. Tickets: $10 a person available day of walk at Fountain View Center in Prairie Lodge, 12940 Del Webb Blvd. Tickets and information: Marsha, 224-858-4843 or www.sccah.com/events. MUSIC CONCERT, 7 to 8:30 p.m. Dec. 8 and 1 to 2:30 p.m. Dec. 10, Drendel Ballroom at Prairie Lodge, 12880 Del Webb Blvd., Huntley. Concert of Broadway music and holiday songs presented by the Sun City Concert Band. Tickets: $10 adults, $3 students available at the door. Information: Chery Rotermund, 847-961-5905, 224-650-9247 or wmcroter@ comcast.net.

DEC. 9 SENIORS CHRISTMAS PARTY, 9 a.m. Dec. 9, St. John’s Lutheran Church, 9812 Saint Albans St., Hebron. Refreshments and bingo followed by a live performance by local Christian singer/songwriter Dan Holmes. A free Golden Diners hot lunch available at 11:15 a.m. with reservations required by calling 630-232-6676 by Dec. 7. Information: 262-812-3486. 13TH ANNUAL CHRISTMAS ART & CRAFT FAIRE, noon to 5 p.m. Dec. 9 and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Dec. 10-11, RavenStone Castle, 4504 Route 23, Harvard. Featuring European wall tapestries, holiday decor, vintage jewelry, essential oils, fresh fudge and more. A Renaissance musical performance by Court & Country is scheduled for 2 p.m. Dec. 10. Castle tours available at $6 an adult. Information: 815-943-5764 or www.ravenstonecastle.com. WOODSTOCK SANTA HUT, Dec. 9-23, Woodstock Square. Visits with Santa in his hut. Schedule: 5 to 7 p.m. Dec. 9, 12-16 & 19-23; 2 to 5 p.m. Dec. 10-11 & Dec. 17-18. Information: www.woodstockil.gov. NORTHWEST INDIANA SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA “HOLIDAY POPS CONCERT,” 8 p.m. Dec. 9, Raue Center for the Arts, 26 N. Williams St., Crystal Lake. The orchestra returns to the Raue Center for a holiday tradition. Featuring festive combinations of contemporary and classic hits. Tickets start at $52. Tickets and information: 815-356-9212 or www. rauecenter.ticketforce.com. HUNTLEY FAMILY CHRISTMAS MOVIE NIGHT, 7 p.m. Dec. 9, Huntley High School Cafeteria, 13719 Harmony Road, Huntley. Screening of “Elf!” with popcorn and candy courtesy of Willow Creek Community Church. Free. Information: 847-765-5000 or www.willowcreek.org.

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| Pl@y | Thursday, December 1, 2016 • NWHerald.com

WINTER WONDER WALK, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Dec. 3, Wonder Lake Chamber of Commerce, 7602 Hancock Drive, Wonder Lake. Horse-drawn carriage rides, ice sculptures, pictures with Santa, holiday gift items to buy, goody bags for children, raffle prizes and more. Information: 815-728-0682 or www. wonderlake.org. BETHLEHEM MARKETPLACE, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Dec. 3, Christ United Methodist Church, 9009 W. Algonquin Road, Algonquin. Experience how people lived in Jesus’ time. Participate in rope braiding, weaving, bread baking, spice mulling, leather work and more. Free. Information: 847-669-9009 or www.gocumc.org. HOLIDAY DANCE MIX PARTY, 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. Dec. 3, Grand Oaks Recreational Center, 1401 W. Route 176, Crystal Lake. Ages 4 through 8 will learn styles of dance, play games and make a craft. Hosted by the Crystal Lake Park District. Cost: $25 residents, $30 nonresidents. Registration and information: 815-459-0680 or www.crystallakeparks.org. HOLIDAY ROCK ON THE FOX, 5:30 to 7 p.m. Dec. 3, Riverfront Park, 201 N. Harrison St., Algonquin. Community tree lighting, candy cane hunt, visit with Santa, activities and the creation of a holiday ice sculpture. Hosted by the village of Algonquin. Free. Information: 847-658-2716 or www.algonquin.org/ recreation. CHRISTMAS LIGHTS SCAVENGER HUNT, 6 to 8 p.m. Dec. 3, Memorial Park, 3400 Pearl St., McHenry. Hosted by the McHenry Area Jaycees. Teams will be given a list with different types of Christmas lights, then go find them. Prizes. All ages welcome. No advance registration required. Free. Information: Char, 224-678-1635 or www.mchenryareajaycees.org. JAYCEE PARK HOLIDAY WALK & TREE LIGHTING, 6 to 8 p.m. Dec. 3, Jaycee Park, 650 Cary-Algonquin Road, Cary. Featuring decorated trees, visits with Santa and his live reindeer and ice skating on the pond (weather permitting). Hosted by the Cary Park District. Free. Information: 847-639-6100 or www. carypark.com. “ROCK AROUND THE QUILTED TREE,” Dec. 3-29, McHenry County Historical Society Museum, 6422 Main St., Union. A holiday open house, contest and show. Quilters invited to show their holiday-themed bed, wall and heirloom quilts at this inaugural event. Awards given in six categories. Show opening is 1 to 4 p.m. Dec. 3 with free admission. The quilts will be on display from 1 to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday (closed Dec. 23 & 26). Museum admission is $5, $3 for seniors. Members are free. For information or an entry form, visit www.gothistory.org. MARENGO & UNION HOLIDAY HOUSEWALK CRAFT FAIR, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Dec. 3 & 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dec. 4, throughout Marengo and Union townships. Featuring displays at 14 homes and community facilities. For a map and information, visit www.holidayhousewalk.com.

artistic pieces. The Horticulture Department will feature several colors of poinsettia plants for sale until 2 p.m. Information: Betty Carmon, 815-455-8674 or bcarmon@mchenry.edu. HOLIDAY CONCERT, 10 a.m. Dec. 7, Community Church of Richmond, 5714 Broadway St., Richmond. Hosted by the Women’s Fellowship and presented by the Richmond-Burton Community High School Choir. Coffee and cookies will be served after the concert. Handicap accessible. Free. No reservations necessary. Information: 815-678-6521. HOLIDAY MADRIGALS CONCERT, 6 to 7 p.m. Dec. 7, Harvard Diggins Library, 900 E. McKinley St., Harvard. Harvard High School’s madrigals ensemble will be caroling throughout downtown Harvard, concluding with an indoor concert at the library. Free. Information: 815-943-4671 or www.harvarddiggins.org.


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‘Christmas at the Dole’ brings weekend festivities to CL By JAMI KUNZER

jkunzer@shawmedia.com “Christmas at the Dole” combines the elegance of the Dole Mansion with everything festive about the holiday season to offer a weekend’s worth of activities in Crystal Lake. Originating as a night of visual art displays and music, the festival has grown in the last several years into two day’s worth of events and activities. This year’s “Christmas at the Dole” will take place Dec. 2-3 at Lakeside Legacy Arts Park, 101 Country Club Road, Crystal Lake. “We openly invite the community to come and see the beautiful holiday decorations, experience the festivities here and, on Saturday, we have a winter wonderland,” said Siobhan Cottone, executive director of Lakeside Legacy Arts Park. The festivities begin with a 1st Friday Art Show from 5 to 8 p.m. featuring caroling, a ballet performance by the Summers Academy of Dance, the McHenry County Yough Orchestra

and Academy, the Crystal Lake Central Madrigal Singers, a cash bar and light appetizers and winter-themed artwork. A $5 donation is requested. The Dole Gallery will include “Disturbances in the Field,” a display of photography-based digital images by Sara Risley, while “Watercolors of Winter” by various members of the Lake Region Watercolor Guild will take over the Sage Gallery. At 7:45 p.m., Crystal Lake Mayor Aaron Shepley officially will light the Sage Gallery Tree followed by a lighting of the outdoor tree by Lakewood Village President Erin Smith. “We have lots of activity and music and all forms of art going on that night,” Cottone said. “It’s a very elegant, but festive evening.” Following the art show at 8 p.m. will be a “Cool Yule” holiday concert in The Listening Room featuring jazz singer Spider Saloff accompanied by jazz pianist and compeer Tommy Muellner. The composer, playwright and actress who wrote the one-woman musical, “Roar of the Butterfly,”

Continued from page 9 NAUGHTY & NICE HOLIDAY SPAGHETTI DINNER, 6 to 8 p.m. Dec. 9, Village Hall, 600 Harvest Gate, Lake in the Hills. Hosted by the village of Lake in the Hills. Featuring visits from Santa and The Grinch, disc jockey music, Grinchmas Trivia and photo opportunities. Registration required. Cost: $12 residents ages 13 and older, $15 nonresidents; $9 residents ages 3 to 12, $11 nonresidents; $40 resident family of 5 all ages, $46 nonresidents. Registration and information: 847-960-7460 or www.lith.org.

DEC. 10 ST. JOHN’S COOKIE WALK, 8 a.m. to noon Dec. 10, St. John’s Church, 401 St. John’s Road, Woodstock. Free admission. Information: 815-482-4686 or www. stjohnswoodstock.com. 25TH ANNUAL COOKIE WALK, 9 a.m. to noon Dec. 10, Ridgefield Crystal Lake Presbyterian Church, 8505 Church St., Ridgefield. Butter cookies, candies and breads offered at $8 a pound. Information: 815459-1132 or www.rclpc.org. “JINGLE ALL THE WAY” MOVIE SHOWING, 10 a.m. Dec. 10, Woodstock Theatre, 209 Main St., Woodstock. Admission: $1. Information: 815-338-8555 or www.classiccinemas.com. HISTORICAL HOLIDAYS OPEN HOUSE, noon to 4 p.m. Dec. 10, PowersWalker House “The in Glacial Park, Nutcracker” Route 31 and Harts Road, Dec. 10-18 Ringwood. Woodstock Opera Visit the 1854 House restored home-

Ada Merrill, then 6, of Lake in the Hills, builds a structure out of ice blocks while attending last year’s festivities at the Dole. Shaw Media file photo

Saloff will perform a collection of holiday classics in a modern style and share her own holiday stories. Tickets to the concert cost $18 in advance at www.lakesideartspark.org or $23 at the door. From 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dec. 3, Lakeside Arts Park will transform into a “Holiday Extravaganza” with indoor and outdoor activities, including ice sculptures and ice games for children, including ice blocks they can build

stead and witness volunteers in historical attire preparing for winter in the mid-19th century. Hosted by the McHenry County Conservation District. Free. Information: 815-338-6223 or www.mccdistrict.org. HOLIDAY DROP & SHOP, 2 to 5 p.m. Dec. 10, The Racket Club, 9101 S. Route 31, Algonquin. Parents can shop while children enjoy games, crafts, sports, a movie and candy cane hunt. Hosted by the Crystal Lake Park District. Cost: $15 a child ages 5 through 11. Registration deadline: Dec. 3. Registration and information: 847-658-5688; 815-459-0680, ext. 1212, or www.crystallakeparks.org. “THE NUTCRACKER,” Dec. 10-18, Woodstock Opera House, 121 Van Buren St., Woodstock. Presented by Judith Svalander Dance Theatre. Schedule: 2 & 7 p.m. Dec. 10; 2 & 6 p.m. Dec. 11; 8 p.m. Dec. 16; 2 & 7 p.m. Dec. 17; 2 & 6 p.m. Dec. 18. Tickets: $25 adults, $18 students. Tickets and information: 815-338-5300 or www.woodstockoperahouse.com. 3RD ANNUAL GINGERBREAD HOUSE DECORATING EVENT, 3 to 4:30 p.m. Dec. 10 & 2 to 3:30 p.m. De.c 11, The Flour Shoppe Bakery & Confections, 372 Route 14, Cary. Cost: $31.99 includes gingerbread house, decorating candies and free hot chocolate. Registration and information: 224-888-8182 or www.facebook.com/sherylsflourshoppe. LIVE NATIVITY, 4 to 8 p.m. Dec. 10, Zion Lutheran Church, 4206 W. Elm St., McHenry. Includes a donkey, a pony, sheep and goats. Food and drinks available. Free. Information: 815-385-4488 or www.zionmchenry.org. “’TIS THE SEASON CHARITY BALL,” 7:30 p.m. Dec. 10, St. John Lutheran Church Activity Center, 300 Jefferson St., Algonquin. Home of the Sparrow benefit featuring the waltz. Free dance lesson taught by Frank and Jackie Penze followed by open dancing. Cake, coffee and prizes. Admission: $8 members, $10 seniors, $12 nonmembers. Doors open 7 p.m. Information: 847-639-8699, www.dancefoxvalley.org or www.dancewithfrankandjackie.com. NORTH STREET’S “COOL YULE” CONCERT, 7:30 p.m. Dec. 10, Kingston Lanes, Route 47 and Lake Avenue, Woodstock. Holiday music featuring Bill Denk on guitar and Dave Childress on keyboard and synthesizer. Information: 815-342-2425 or www.facebook.com/northstband.

DEC. 11 ANNUAL CHRISTMAS CANTATA, 9 and 11 a.m. Dec. 11, First Congregational Church of Crystal Lake, 461 Pierson St., Crystal Lake. “And They Named Me Jesus” will be performed by the Youth and Children Choirs

into castles. Visitors can drink hot chocolate, make s’mores around a campfire, take pictures with Santa (11 a.m. to 3 p.m.) and visit a petting zoo (11 a.m. to 3 p.m.). A Holiday Shopping Bazaar will feature at least 15 vendors with holiday gifts. “It’s a very spirited holiday here,” Cottone said. For information on the festivities, visit www.lakesideartspark.org.

at both church services. Child care available for infants and toddlers. Visitors welcome. Information: 815-459-6010 or www.fcc-cl.org. ADVENT/CHRISTMAS CANTATA, 9:30 to 11 a.m. Dec. 11, Grace Lutheran Church, 1300 Kishwaukee Valley Drive, Woodstock. Featuring “The Promise of a King.” Free. Information: 815-338-0554 or www.gractwoodstock.org. VICTORIAN HOLIDAY TEA, 12:30 to 2 p.m. and 3 to 4:30 p.m. Dec. 11, Colonel Palmer House, 660 E. Terra Cotta Ave., Crystal Lake. A 19th century Victorian holiday tea served by costumed staff. Jennifer McAllister will present the history of tea. Registration deadline: Dec. 4. Cost: $15 resident adults, $10 resident children age 12 and younger; $23 nonresident adults, $15 nonresident children. Registration and information: 815-477-5873 or www.crystallakeparks.org. RADIO PLAYERS CHRISTMAS PROGRAM, 2 to 3 p.m. Dec. 11, Crystal Lake Public Library, 126 W. Paddock St., Crystal Lake. The Radio Players of Lake County will entertain with a Christmas-themed radio program. Free. Information: 815-459-1687 or www.clpl.org. “SING-ALONG MESSIAH,” 4 p.m. Dec. 11, Raue Center for the Arts, 26 N. Williams St., Crystal Lake. Presented by Voices in Harmony. Handel’s masterwork is presented with a 25-piece orchestra, soloists and projections of calligraphy by Timothy Botts. The McHenry County Choir Chorus will supplement the on-stage choir. Tickets start at $15. Tickets and information: 815-356-9212 or www.rauecenter.ticketforce.com.

DEC. 14 KIDS’ CHRISTMAS PROGRAM: HERZOG’S MARIONETTES, 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Dec. 14, McHenry Public Library, 809 Front St., McHenry. Frosty’s Winter Wonderland holiday program for ages 3 and older featuring Dave Herzog’s Marionettes. Santa will drop by. Bring a camera. Free. Information: 815-385-0036 or www.mchenrylibrary.org.

DEC. 15 JINGLE BELL ROCK ‘N’ READ, PRESCHOOLERS WITH ADULT, 10 to 11 a.m. Dec. 15 & 16, Crystal Lake Public Library, 126 W. Paddock St., Crystal Lake. Sing songs, listen to stories and enjoy treats. CLPL cardholders only. Free. Register at www.clpl.org or call 815-459-1687.

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NIGHTLIFE READ MORE STAGE NEWS AT NWHERALD. COM

Williams Street Repertory offers a funny, poignant revue for the holidays REVIEWS Anthony Walker

The sound of snow under your boots. The smell of heavenly scents emerging from the kitchen. The feel of pine needles as ornaments hung on the tree. The taste of peppermint in any and all hot beverages. The sight of family gathered together to celebrate time-honored traditions. Or ... The sound of too many relatives in one place. The smell of too many strangers packed together in the mall. The feeling of stress while trying to find that perfect gift for the person who already has everything. The bitter taste of loneliness in the time of gatherings. The sight of bills piling up waiting to be paid. Happy holidays! Williams Street Repertory offers a bough of holly in the form of “A Christmas Survival Guide,” conceived and written by James Hindman and Ray Roderick, at the Raue Center for the Arts in Crystal Lake. This revue looks at the stresses and joys of the Christmas season by using short, disconnected scenes, holiday standards and new music. Most of the vignettes are funny, but some are poignant and filled with deeper meaning. The five cast members use the “Christmas Survival Guide” to help navigate their way through the darkness of the season of light by trying to maintain a positive mental attitude. Lovers of the holidays will catch all kinds of allusions to popular songs, holiday movies, dated technology, television specials and traditional music. Musical arranger John Glaudin did some very clever things using familiar songs with newly sung melodies and modern lyrics. The revue takes you into the mind of a part-time Santa, the feelings of the annually spurned Mrs. Claus, eight steps up a Christmas 12-step program onto a busy city street to hear silver bells and into the audience of a Noel-spangled, jumpsuited Elvis performance. Director Miriam Naponelli keeps the focus on the actors by clearing the stage of set and allowing the singing, acting and dancing to happen in the open or using only minimal props. The very competent five-piece band serves as much as scenery as the small forest of illuminated Christmas trees behind the action. It all begins slowly, but the last several numbers before the intermission build the energy to the point where the audience took a break feeling a buzz children (and some adults

– different buzz, though) feel at 9 p.m. on Dec. 24. The second half brings the more familiar Christmas tunes and culminates with a very poppy, but very satisfying, version of “O Holy Night.” The numbers where the company harmonizes are strong, whether it is pop, standard or jazz. Their unified sound is one of the strengths of the show, with their jazz numbers being especially impressive thanks to musical director Mike Potts. The ensemble is spearheaded by WSR company member Amanda Flahive. She maximizes the opportunities given her by consistently bringing energy and solid vocal power to each of her numbers. Billy Seger draws the viewer’s attention with his heartfelt performance, crisp dancing and clarion tenor. Jillian Mayer is as adorable with her infectious energy as Jake Stempel is delightfully smarmy with his Elvis wig and gyrating pelvis. Sarah Weinstein shows her comic chops as she draws some of the biggest laughs in the show with her self-deprecation. WSR rates this holiday revue as PG due to some references to alcohol and adult activities, which is an appropriate rating. The show is not raunchy, but it is not fit for the whole family. There is nothing worse than you would see on current primetime TV, but children younger than 12 or 13 wouldn’t understand or appreciate most of the material. “A Christmas Survival Guide” would fit nicely as part of an evening out of dining, Christmas shopping and some seasonal revelry in downtown Crystal Lake. You shouldn’t shy away from a glass of wine or a cocktail before the show and maybe one at intermission as well; anyone who has ever told a joke at a holiday party likes listeners to be in the “holiday mood.” The show moves quickly within its two hours from scene to scene and song to song,

“A CHRISTMAS SURVIVAL GUIDE” WHEN: Through Dec. 4 WHERE: Raue Center for the Arts, 26 N. Williams St., Crystal Lake COST & INFO: Presented by Williams Street Repertory. Do you find the holidays more than a little stressful? This intimate revue takes a wry and knowing look at a stressful season. Schedule: 8 p.m. Nov. 26 and Dec. 2-3; 3 p.m. Nov. 27 and Dec. 3-4. Tickets: $32.50, 38.50. Tickets and information: 815-356-9212, www.rauecenter.org or www.wsrep.org. never gets too sentimental and never takes itself too seriously. There still is one more weekend to trim your season with this show.

• Anthony Walker earned his Master of Fine Arts in theatre at Western Illinois University in 2004. He has taught English, theater and speech for more than 15 years. He has been the theater director at Woodstock High School for 11 years.

The cast of the Raue Center for the Arts’ “A Christmas Survival Guide,” presented by Williams Street Repertory, includes Billy Seger (from top), Jake Stempel, Amanda Flahive, Sarah Weinstein and Jillian Mayer. Photo provided courtesy of Michele V. Knight

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| Pl@y | Thursday, December 1, 2016 • NWHerald.com

ON STAGE

SURVIVING CHRISTMAS


NWHerald.com • Thursday, December 1, 2016

| Pl@y |

12

‘A Christmas Carol’ exudes spirit REVIEWS

“A CHRISTMAS CAROL”

Carolyne Hurlburt

WHEN: Through Dec. 4 WHERE: Woodstock Opera House, 121 Van Buren St., Woodstock COST & INFO: Annual production by the Woodstock Musical Theatre Company. Schedule: 8 p.m. Nov. 25-26, 4 p.m. Nov. 27, 8 p.m. Dec. 2, 2 & 8 p.m. Dec. 3 and 2 p.m. Dec. 4. Cost: $24 adults, $21 seniors and students. Tickets and information: 815-338-5300 or www.woodstockoperahouse.com.

“A Christmas Carol” has become a holiday classic for a reason. Written by Charles Dickens in 1843, the story emphasizes the capacity of the Christmas spirit to bring out the best in humanity. It seems even the “Bah, Humbug!” muttering Ebenezer Scrooge, a miser with no compassion for others, can be transformed by the yuletide season. Scrooge needs a little spiritual help, however, which he receives from the Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present and Yet to Come, who each help him to see his life, and the lives of those around him, from a new perspective. Woodstock Musical Theater Company’s production of “A Christmas Carol” at the Woodstock Opera House provides an appealing rendition of Dickens’s vision. Directed by Kathie Comella from an adaptation by Ned O’Reilly, the play’s Victorian aesthetic is complemented by the charm of the venue, and the affinity between the two helps to draw the audience into the story. Steve Connell portrays Scrooge quite ably, scaring young children with scant effort, while also registering the humorous fright of the ghostly encounters that force him to confront his own humanity. Many of his scenes are with the ghosts played by Mary Beth Euker, Rikki Lee Travolta and Joey Brown, who each offer a different characterization of the afterlife. The ghostly gravitas of Peter Heimsoth as Marley, Scrooge’s dead partner who warns him to change his ways before it is too late, stands out as particularly compelling. The rest of the large cast round out an eclectic

mix of characters, with many actors portraying more than one role. The youngest character, Tiny Tim, played by adorable 6-year-old Charlie Martin, will melt your heart, just as he does Scrooge. He is joined by many other young castmates who effortlessly exude the exuberance of the season. Altogether, they help bring the story to life. From a technical perspective, the ghost scenes that produce Scrooge’s transformation offer the most visually engaging moments of the show. Special lighting designed by Jen Prise, fog, and rotation platforms enable the ghosts to appear and disappear with dramatic effect. The costumes, designed by Kathy Bruhnke and coordinated by Trudie Dreyer, are excellent as well, and enhance the visual cohesion of the production. “A Christmas Carol” is part of the narrative tradition associated with the holiday season – one that reminds us compassion and generosity of spirit is important all year, not only for the benefit of others, but for ourselves. Maybe the play has endured so well over time because it conveys a message we continu-

Steve Connell, as Scrooge, and Charlie Martin, as Tiny Tim, star in “A Christmas Carol.” Photo provided courtesy of @Christy Sturm Photography

ally want, and need, to hear. Now’s your chance. As Marley warns, “No space of regret can make amends for one life’s opportunity misused.” The opportunity to see “A Christmas Carol” is now before you – don’t let it get away.

• Carolyne Hurlburt has been involved in local theater for many years, both on stage and off. Formerly a board member of TownSquare Players in Woodstock and Light-Hearted Productions, she now studies contemporary literature at Marquette University. Find her on Twitter: @churlbu.

Premiere of ‘Fundamentals’ proves Steppenwolf keeps getting better “THE FUNDAMENTALS”

REVIEWS

WHEN: Through Dec. 23 WHERE: Steppenwolf’s Upstairs Theatre, 1650 N. Halsted., Chicago COST & INFO: Tickets: $20 to $89. Tickets and information: 312-335-1650 or www.steppenwolf.org.

Regina M. Belt-Daniels I have a great appreciation for world premieres – the hopes, dreams, promises and potential of a show never seen before, never experienced – it’s exciting! And if it’s a Chicago premiere, it’s all that and more. The venerable Steppenwolf Theater excels at world premieres; it’s numbered 11 within the past five years. Its latest world premiere is the witty and insightful “The Fundamentals” by New York playwright Erika Sheffer. Directed by Steppenwolf ensemble member Yasen Peyankov (who also directed Sheffer’s Russian Transport in 2014), the ensemble cast of five vibrantly captivates the audience from the moment the monotone boutique hotel walls slide open to reveal the basement office/ supply room of the Wellington Hotel. Stephan Mazurek and Collette Pollard’s production and scenic design almost become a character in itself thanks to the very realistic set and slick, faux, so-identifiable hotel videos and power

Photo provided

Ensemble member Alana Arenas (Millie) and Armando Riesco (Lorenzo) star in Steppenwolf’s production of “The Fundamentals.” points that open and close both acts. (You will love the touchy-feely 7 Characteristics of a valued Wellington Hotel employee.) What makes the show so successful is three-fold: Sheffer’s talent for writing well-developed and tightly drawn characters; Sheffer’s highly observant capture of real life; and how topical and cohesive this story of corporate American is. Language and ideas flow. Millie is an overlooked and overworked housekeeper in New York’s prestigious luxury boutique hotel.

When a management opportunity arises, Millie tries to secure her dreams and family’s security with a series of decisions and sacrifices that affect many others. Millie has ambitions, goals and integrity – or does she? Kudos to JC Clements and Tam Dickson for their magnificent casting. Alana Arenas as Millie is a remarkable actress. She is attractive, expressive and engaging in her very human delivery of a complex character whose actions resulted in a variety of audible audience reactions throughout. And be forewarned: that sickening thud in your stomach a the end is both a comedic and sad realization of events. Audrey Francis is another unique talent; she possesses the exquisite timing, facials and credibility so needed to make us believe she is every bit the

sleek, shallow hotel manager Eliza who cajoles and manipulates Millie. Alan Wilder as Abe, the loyal 30-year-hotel housekeeping manager, is a strong natural, vulnerable actor who provides the reason and kindness you hope always to find in a boss. Armando Riesco as Lorenzo, Millie’s husband and a maintenance worker, is the right mix of virility, confusion and hope as he tries to defeat the system in unorthodox ways. Caroline Neff as the newly hired desk clerk, Stellan, is a bright, nuanced actress who may be the not-so-innocent catalyst that is the source of all change. Just when I think Steppenwolf productions couldn’t get any better, they do. As with any world premiere, there’s bound to be tweaks to be done. But “The Fundamentals” is such a sparkling production of game playing and survival, I cannot possibly tell you where. But I can tell you to go see “The Fundamentals.”

• Regina Belt-Daniels is a working actress and director who began her career onstage in 1985 at the Woodstock Opera House. Currently serving on the Raue Center for the Arts Board, she also is a lifetime member of TownSquare Players and a retired District 47 teacher.


GO GUIDE

AREA CONCERTS & BANDS

‘FURIOUS 7’ CAR ON DISPLAY WHERE: Volo Auto Museum, 27582 Volo Villag Road, Volo COST & INFO: Nov. 30 marked the third anniversary of the death of Paul Walker, star of “The Fast and the Furious” franchise, and the official opening of the museum’s new Walker tribute exhibit. Filming on “Furious 7” was ongoing at the time of the 40-year-old actor’s death. The exhibit features the only one of the film-used Subaru Impreza WRX STIs still in existence, along with a portion of a tribute to Walker shown in the final minutes of the film. The movie tribute loops in a memorial video clip put together by museum director Brian Grams (above), who sought out the blue Impreza, now suspended as if in freefall in the museum’s Showroom 2. Museum hours: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Admission: $15 adults, $9 children ages 5 to 12, free for children ages 4 and young. Information: 815-385-3644 or find Volo Auto Museum on Facebook.

DEC. 2 McHENRY B&B SQUARE DANCE CLUB DANCE, 8 p.m. Dec. 2, McHenry Township Complex, 3703 N. Richmond Road, Johnsburg. Toys for Tots dance. Cost: $6 members, $7 visitors. Information: 815-344-2975, 847-395-1108 or www.mchenrybnbsquaredance.com.

DEC. 5 AUDITIONS FOR “THE NORMAL HEART,” 7 to 9 p.m. Dec. 5 and Dec. 7, Black Box Theatre, McHenry

• HOLIDAY HAPPENINGS continued from page 10

DEC. 16 CHRISTMAS CONCERT, 7 p.m. Dec. 16, St. Thomas the Apostle Catholic Church, 451 W. Terra Cotta Ave., Crystal Lake. Free. Information: 815-455-5400 or www.saintthomascatholicchurch.org. PETER MAYER, 7 p.m. Dec. 16, Living Waters Lutheran Church, 1808 Miller Road, Crystal Lake. Mayer, a guitarist and singer with the Peter Mayer Group and Jimmy Buffett’s Coral Reefer Band, will perform as part of his “Stars & Promises” tour. Featuring arrangements of traditional and original carols, composed and led by Mayer and his ensemble of world-class musicians. The performance is accompanied by a stage production. Tickets: $35 at www.itickets.com/events/369150.html or at the door. Information: www.petermayer.com. “BLUE CHRISTMAS” FEATURING GUITARIST ROGER ADLER & BLUES DELUXE BAND, 8 p.m. Dec. 16, The Listening Room at Lakeside Arts Park, 401 Country Club Road, Crystal Lake. There also will be an open jam opportunity during the show. Tickets: $18 in advance, $23 at the door. Tickets and information: 815-455-8000 or www.lakesideartspark.org.

DEC. 17 CHILDREN’S CHRISTMAS COOKIE DECORATING CLASS, 9 to 11 a.m. Dec. 17, Woodscreek Park,

County College, 8900 Route 14, Crystal Lake. No appointments necessary. Rehearsals begin Jan. 17. Performance dates: March 9-25. Information: Jay Geller, 815-455-8746 or jgeller@mchenry.edu.

DEC. 7 “LITTLE MERMAID, JR.,” 7 to 8:30 p.m. Dec. 7 and Dec. 9, Huntley Park District Cosman Theater, 12015 Mill St., Huntley. Presented by members of Northern Illinois Special Recreation Association. Tickets: $2 a person. Information: 815-459-0737 or www.nisra.org. 1420 Willow Tree, Crystal Lake. For ages 8 through 18 offered by the Crystal Lake Park District. Cost: $40 residents, $55 nonresidents. Registration and information: 815-459-0680, ext. 1220, or www. crystallakeparks.org. “THE NUTCRACKER BALLET,” 3 & 7 p.m. Dec. 17; and 3 p.m. Dec. 18, Raue Center for the Arts, 26 N. Williams St., Crystal Lake. A holiday tradition featuring the Berkshire Ballet Theatre of Crystal Lake. Hear Tchaikovsky’s music, witness emotional dancing and see lavish costumes in this production in which a child’s imagination makes dolls come alive. Tickets start at $28. Tickets and information: 815-356-9212 or www.rauecenter.ticketforce.com. SANTA’S SCAVENGER HUNT, 3:30 to 5 p.m. Dec. 17, Lost Valley Visitor Center in Glacial Park, Route 31 and Harts Road, Ringwood. Outdoor program to learn about area animals. Follow the tracks and solve the clues to find Santa and a prize. Hot chocolate and cookies. Registration deadline: Dec. 13. Cost: $5 county residents, $7 nonresidents. Registration and information: 815-479-5779 or www.mccdistrict.org. CHRISTMAS JOY WITH CASSANDRA & FRIENDS, 8 p.m. Dec. 17, Stage Left Café, 125 W. Van Buren St., Woodstock. Friends of the Opera House benefit concert. Tickets: $25 all seats. Tickets and information: 815-338-5300 or www.woodstockoperahouse.com. “HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS,” 7:30 p.m. Dec. 17, Marengo High School, 110 Franks Road, Marengo. A benefit concert for the Marengo High School Theatre Department. A 70-minute review for all ages featuring five professional entertainers from the Chicago area,

LONESOME HIGHWAY, 10 to 11 p.m. Dec. 3, Duke’s Alehouse and Kitchen, 110 N. Main St., Crystal Lake. Formed in 1996 as a four-piece cover band, Lonesome Highway has become a major force on the bluegrass scene. The songwriting of band members Buddy Dunlap and John Arnold have propelled the group to the top of the regional music scene. Free. Information: www.thedukeabides.com. THE LAST REVEL, 9 p.m. Dec. 3, Mackey’s Hideout, 2601 S. River Road, McHenry. This trio of multi-instrumentalists from Minneapolis blends the genres of folk, rockabilly, old-time string band and rock through the use of acoustic guitar, upright bass, fiddle, 5-string banjo, harmonica, kick drum and three-part vocal harmonies. For ages 21 and older. Free. Information: www.mackeyshideout.com. FOX VALLEY MEN OF HARMONY, 2:30 p.m. Dec. 4, Prince of Peace Lutheran Church, 932 S. McHenry Ave., Crystal Lake. The group presents an a capella barber shop style performance. Cost: $10 at the door, children younger than 5 are free. Donations of canned goods and non-perishable food items to the Crystal Lake Food Pantry will be collected at the door. MCC STUDENT RECITAL, 6 p.m. Dec. 4, McHenry County College Luecht Conference Center, 8900 Route 14, Crystal Lake. Student soloists showcase their semester’s work. Free. Information: 815-4797814 or www.mchenry.edu/events. TOM JONES TRIBUTE BY LOU NELSON, 7 p.m. Dec. 6, Prairie Lodge, 12880 Del Webb Blvd., Huntley. Former lead singer with rock band Wrabit and also has toured with Black Sabbath, Rush, The Guess Who and many others. Tickets: $20 residents, $25 public, $5 additional day of event. Tickets and information: inspired by the classic films “White Christmas” and “Holiday Inn.” The concert will feature 30 songs from the 1940s and ’50s, transporting the audience to the USO, a 1950s Florida nightclub and a New England town. Cost: $8 for students, $18 for adults. Tickets and information: www.mchs.booktix.com.

DEC. 19 3D ORNAMENTS, 10:30 a.m. and 1 p.m. Dec. 19, Cary Area Public Library, 1606 Three Oaks Road, Cary. For children in grades 4 through 8. All supplies provided. Schedule: 10:30 a.m. to noon for grades 4 and 5; 1 to 2:30 p.m. for grades 6 through 8. Free. Registration required. Registration and information: 847-6394210 or www.caryarealibrary.info.

DEC. 21 “LET’S MAKE HOLIDAY CARDS,” 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Dec. 21, Crystal Lake Public Library, 126 W. Paddock St., Crystal Lake. All supplies provided. No registration required. Free. Information: 815-459-1687 or www.clpl.org. COOKIE & ORNAMENT FESTIVAL, 10 a.m. to noon Dec. 21, McHenry Recreation Center, 3636 Municipal Drive, McHenry. Children ages 5 through 10 will travel through several stations decorating cookies and making holiday ornaments, watch a holiday movie and hang out with Santa Claus. Parents can drop off their children and get some shopping done. Cost: $10 a child. Registration and information: 815-

847-515-7650 or www.sccah.com/events. JIMMY NICK SOLO SHOW, 9 p.m. Dec. 8, Duke’s Alehouse and Kitchen, 110 N. Main St., Crystal Lake. An old-fashioned, guitar-slinging blues prodigy who was developing his chops in famous Chicago clubs when he was 16. Free. Information: www.thedukeabides.com/events/. THINNER TEED WITH JUSTIN WELLS, 8 p.m. Dec. 10, Mackey’s Hideout, 2601 S. River Road, McHenry. An area rock band, Thinner Teed blends original music from a multi-faceted interest in all styles of music including rock, funk, Latin and bluegrass. Free. Information: www.mackeyshideout.com. FREE GUITARS FOR FUTURE STARS STUDENT RECITAL, 2 to 3 p.m. Dec. 11, Woodstock Public Library, 414 W. Judd St., Woodstock. Area students enrolled in the non-profit Free Guitars for Future Stars program, which provides lower-income children with free guitars and weekly lessons, will entertain the crowd with their newly found musical skills. Information: www.woodstockpubliclibrary.org. DENNY DIAMOND, 7 p.m. Dec. 12, Prairie Lodge, 12880 Del Webb Blvd., Huntley. Diamond will be performing with his sons, “The Jewels.” Tickets: $20 residents, $25 public. Tickets and information: 847-515-7650 or www.sccah.com/events. “MIRROR OF JOHNNY MATHIS” BY DAVID ROBBINS, 7 p.m. Dec. 15, Prairie Lodge, 12880 Del Webb Blvd., Huntley. A professional entertainer, impersonator and recording artist for more than 10 years with a tribute show of Johnny Mathis. Tickets: $18 residents, $23 public. Tickets and information: 847-515-7650 or www.sccah.com/events. LEVER, 10 p.m. Dec. 17, Duke’s Alehouse and Kitchen, 110 N. Main St., Crystal Lake. A grunge rock band band from the Chicago area influenced by Nirvana, The Vines, Silverchair, Wavves, Jimi Hendrix and The Beatles. Free. Information: www.thedukeabides. com/events/. 363-2160 or www.ci.mchenry.il.us. CRYSTAL LAKE WINTER FAM FEST, 6 to 8 p.m. Dec. 21, Willow Creek Community Church, 220 Exchange Drive, Suite A, Crystal Lake. Featuring a petting zoo, inflatables, Christmas karaoke, ugly sweater contest, hot chocolate bar and more. Sing along with music from “How the Grinch Stole Christmas” and take a family picture at one of the photo stations. Free. Information: 847-765-5000 or www.willowcreek.org. “LIGHT UP” HOLIDAY DECORATING CONTEST, 5 to 7 p.m. Dec. 21, judging by the Crystal Lake Park District. The winner will receive a Main Beach party package valued at $100. Registration deadline: Dec. 19. Cost: $5. Registration and information: 815-4590680 or www.crystallakeparks.org.

DEC. 23 ED HALL’S CHRISTMAS GUITAR NIGHT, 8 p.m. Dec. 23, Woodstock Opera House, 121 Van Buren St., Woodstock. Five internationally acclaimed musicians will present arrangements for the guitar as well as popular holiday favorites. Performing will be Tim and Myles Thompson, a father/son duo from Hendersonville, Tennessee; Helen Avakian, a singer/ songwriter and “guitar goddess” from Madison, Wisconsin; Brother Yusef, the originator of the “Fattback Blues” guitar style from Altadena, California; and host, award-winning guitarist and songwriter Jeff Friedlander from Pittsburgh. Tickets: $30 all seats. Tickets and information: 815-338-5300 or www.woodstockoperahouse.com.

| Pl@y | Thursday, December 1, 2016 • NWHerald.com

Following is a list of area concerts and band performances in the coming weeks. To have your event listed, visit PlanitNorthwest.com.

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HOMES

Thursday, December 1, 2016 • Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

5 tips to prepare the bath for winter

(BPT) - As chilly weather approaches, it’s time for homeowners to consider ways to winterize their living spaces. New seasons serve as a great opportunity to refresh bath décor and incorporate simple upgrades - ultimately transforming the bath from a cold, simple space into a warm and comforting winter oasis. Warm it up! There is nothing more relaxing after a stressful day than a steamy, luxurious shower. However, showers can’t last forever - even in the wintertime. Decrease the temperature shock by investing in a towel warmer like the WarmlyYours Barcelona free-standing towel warmer available at The Home Depot. A cozy, heated towel within arm’s reach will help eliminate those post-shower chills.

Keep the pipeline smooth. When ice and snow cover the ground outside, there’s always a risk of frozen pipes. If residual water sitting in the pipes freezes, the flow is stopped, allowing water to expand and potentially lead to a burst pipe. Prevent a water shut-off by ensuring your pipes are insulated well in advanced of winter’s approach. Leave cabinet doors under the sink open to let warm air in, or if your pipe has already frozen over, use a hair dryer or portable heat source to thaw the pipe before bursting occurs. Amp up the shower. Swapping out an old showerhead can completely transform the bath experience in as little as five minutes. Consider the Delta In2ition two-in-

one showerhead and hand shower with H20Kinetic Technology which offers the feeling of using more water, while using less. This showerhead also brings maximum flexibility to the bath - stream water from the showerhead, hand held sprayer or both at once. Enjoy the benefits of a luxurious shower without depleting the hot water supply (and saving some for the guests). Set the mood. Speaking of simple swaps, trading out bathroom accessories to fit the season is a great way to change the look of the bath. Display cozy, plush robes to keep bathers warm when stepping out of the shower and make guests feel right at home. Consider installing robe hooks close to the shower door for easy access. For add-

ed flair, incorporate accessories such as towels in a festive pattern, splashes of gold in soap dishes, or hints of bronze in candle holders and picture frames. Create candlelit luxury. A flame effect creates a soothing aesthetic to any room. If your bath is particularly chilly, consider a freestanding, electronic fireplace heater to boost the temperature and add an element of sophistication to the room. Don’t have the space? Simply arrange a few candles to create a subtle, yet comforting environment. Lush, wintery scents like sweet peppermint, crisp pine and woodsy cedar enhance the mood.


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Thursday, December 1, 2016 •

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LAKE-FRONT RESIDENCE & PANORAMIC VIEWS

www.3416highlanddrive.com/ Waterfront Home with outstanding views of Island Lake and surrounding subdivision—perfectly beautiful and inspiring. 2 or 3 bedrooms. Walkout Lower-Level used as bedroom, plus 1st-floor bedroom, plus a finished bedroom in second-floor walkup attic space. Additional adjacent Vacant Lot is included in the price. Spacious Living/Dining Room with overall Lake Views. Located at the top of a hill providing highand-dry panoramic views. Lovely patio facing the water. Newer roof about 8-years. Ideal for a “Legacy Resort Home” for your family for generations, but also large enough for a yearround residence. Also located near shopping, transportation, recreation. Only $119,900.

STUNNING TOWNHOUSE FOR SALE OR RENT 736 Kresswood Drive, McHenry. Stunning, firstclass Townhouse FOR RENT only $1,550 per month. For Sale $185K. 1,800 square feet above grade, plus an additional 500+/- square-foot finished Recreation Room/3rd BR and bathroom in the basement. 2 large bedrooms, each with its own bathroom. 3 ½ bathrooms in all. Large Loft Space for Office/Den. Spacious Living Room w/ gas Fireplace. Sliding Glass Door to Deck. Fully Applianced Kitchen. Kitchen Dinette/Dining Room. Washer and Dryer included. Volume Foyer and Vaulted Ceiling with Skylights. 2-car attached garage. This immaculate home contains numerous upgrades and improvements. Located in the well-maintained Kresswood Trails Subdivision in McHenry, IL. The Landlord/Original-Owner, has meticulously cared for the property. An Outstanding Value.

Tom Zarnek, Managing Broker Tom Zarnek, Managing Broker SM-CL0416696

815 347-2469

SM-CL0416695

815 347-2469


16 CLASSIFIED • Thursday, December 1, 2016

• Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS ALGONQUIN $390,000, 640 Brookside Ave, Algonquin 60102-6826, 19-31-103-019-0000, Raul Cuevas To Maria R Gonnella & Jon P Mitchell, October 26 $269,500, 2251 Buckthorn Dr, Algonquin 60102-5000, 19-35-279-006-0000, Saleem Mohammed To Samantha Wosik Mcgill & Donald Cornelius Mcgill Jr, October 24 $270,000, 4760 Whitehall Ct, Algonquin 60102-6734, 18-26-426-027-0000, Maria I Ruiz To Beata Sadowski, November 10 $315,000, 4130 Georgetown Cir, Algonquin 601026208, 18-36-103-003-0000, Phillip Reiter To Suchinth Gopalakrishnan & Sayana Suchinth, October 27 $140,000, 200 Hillcrest Dr, Algonquin 60102-2224, 1927-331-016-0000, Richard Andreasen To Nancy Contreras & Viviana Silva, October 25 $232,000, 15 Brixton Ct, Algonquin 60102-6277, 18-25351-066-0000, Sally J Benoit To Amy Bozic, November 10 BULL VALLEY $460,000, 818 Locust Ln, Bull Valley 60098-7941, 1303-477-001-0000, Schwaab Trust To Bradley D Lohmeyer & Emanuela V Lohmeyer, October 26 CARY $151,500, 524 New Haven Dr, Cary 60013-1806, 1911-304-013-0000, Justin M Finefiled To Stephanie Kalte, November 10 $205,000, 256 Firenze Dr, Cary 60013-3241, 19-14-407034-0000, Marsha J Wieder To Glenn A Pierxe & Gia A Pierxe, October 26 $371,000, 353 Geneva Ln, Cary 60013-1862, 19-11351-006-0000, John J Mchugh Jr To Thomas D Kern Jr, November 9 $252,500, 727 Big Sky Trl, Cary 60013-1953, 19-11-481021-0000, Mckenna Trust To Brain Skiba & Deboaah Skiba, October 25 $305,000, 397 Oakmont Dr, Cary 60013-1179, 20-06403-002-0000, Robert T Mathews To Jeffrey M Keske & Carrie C Niemet, October 25 $107,000, 15 W Margaret Ter, Cary 60013-2153, 19-12429-013-0000, Deutsche Bank Natl Trt Co Ttee To Xuefen H Brinkman & Chad D Brinkman, October 25 $225,000, 811 E Main Street Rd, Cary 60013-2961, 20-17176-073-0000, Brian M Stein To Richard Blden & Michaela Bolden, October 24 $187,000, 321 Candlewood Trl, Cary 60013-1665, 20-07-402-003-0000, Lester Wisnios To Christopher R Loustaunnau, November 9 $117,000, 95 Pine Cir, Cary 60013-1546, 19-12-105-0030000, Kenneth W Ludvigsen To Milos Saric & Sanela Saric, October 26 $167,000, 8393 Abbott Ln, Cary 60013-3001, 20-17252-030-0000, Susan M Masbaum To Anne Grace Nimke, November 9 CRYSTAL LAKE $275,000, 1658 Brigham Ln, Crystal Lake 60014-1900, 19-19-104-018-0000, Christian Trust To Grzegorz Stanko & Marta Maria Stanko, October 25 $235,000, 1608 Brompton Ct, Crystal Lake 60014-2030, 19-19-201-001-0000, Approved Porperties Llc To Patricia Pace & Michael J Pace, October 27 $80,000, 140 W Crystal Lake Ave, Crystal Lake 600145927, 14-32-380-017-0000, Zachary Romme To Scott Currier & Katehrine Currier, October 25 $190,000, 400 S Oriole Trl, Crystal Lake 60014-5934, 19-05-152-006-0000, Stephenitch Trust To Gerald W Hage & Alison T Hage, October 26 $87,000, 410 Westwood Ct, Crystal Lake 60014-2821, 19-07-281-007-0000, Fanne Mae To Barbara J Schnieder & Rancel L Bachman, October 27 $295,000, 6717 Rhode Island Trl, Crystal Lake 600123119, 14-29-127-007-0000, Jeffrey O Ozburn To Scott J Bowden & Shaina Bowden, October 27 $140,000, 532b Penny Ln, Crystal Lake 60014-2708, 19-19-209-012-0000, Michael K Croy To Barbara A Skoty, November 14 $285,000, 4102 Harvard Cir, Crystal Lake 60012-3106, 14-29-126-009-0000, Marilyn Little To Connor J O Malley, November 14

$399,000, 9408 Elm Ln, Crystal Lake 60014-4823, 18-02-202-010-0000, Mark L Bellish To Ricky Sacks, November 10 $118,500, 670 Pointe Dr, Crystal Lake 60014-8021, 1910-106-013-0000, Gia Pierce To Dorothy Kline, November 9 $235,000, 9414 Georgetown Ln, Crystal Lake 600143332, 18-14-251-034-0000, Toepfer Trust To Venita Weigand Bruss, November 9 FOX RIVER GROVE $242,500, 318 Old Hunt Rd, Fox River Grove 600211877, 20-19-430-013-0000, Bruce D Skof To Sonya J Miller, November 14 $250,000, 200 Foxmoor Rd, Fox River Grove 60021-1867, 20-19-433-003-0000, Michael Richardson To Kathleen Mccarragher, November 14 $121,500, 109 Beachway Dr, Fox River Grove 600211420, 20-18-457-004-0000, Bruhn Trust To Barbara Puzey, November 9 $92,000, 213 Gladys Ave, Fox River Grove 60021-1424, 20-19-253-006-0000, Shemints Trust To Rosemarie A Shemaitis, November 10 HARVARD $300,000, 5907 Schultz Rd, Harvard 60033-8414, 0706-100-016-0000, Ronalde Campbell To Robert T Smith & Dorene Smith, October 25 $175,000, 508 Country Brook Ln, Harvard 60033-8362, 06-02-327-001-0000, Matthew J Stech To Steven J Foy & Taryn H Morris, October 26 HUNTLEY $315,000, 10981 Wing Pointe Dr, Huntley 60142-6618, 18-34-355-008-0000, Carter Trust To Becky D Andrea & Marcus D Andrea, October 25 $208,000, 9968 Williams Dr, Huntley 60142-6034, 1821-354-040-0000, Ryan A Berman To Gregory M Goldstein & Jeanine I Goldstein, October 26 $270,000, 12275 Ferris Ln, Huntley 60142-0130, 18-17477-008-0000, Calatlantic Group Inc To Christopher S Howard & Katie D Howard, October 24 $353,500, 9793 Schaffner Dr, Huntley 60142-0080, 18-20-403-061-0000, Cal Atlantic Group Inc To Pramodh Narayana & Aparna Anantha Narayana, October 24 $375,000, 12509 Elliot Ln, Huntley 60142-7044, 18-32405-019-0000, Drh Cambridge Homes Inc To Robert A Pudell & Lisa A Pudell, October 24 $314,500, 11672 Clark Ln, Huntley 60142-7053, 18-32404-010-0000, Drill Cambridge Home Inc To Donla J Goritz & Pamela A Goritz, October 24 $315,000, 12085 Oakcrest Dr, Huntley 60142-7006, 18-28-301-011-0000, Vincent J Hager To Paul W Loiacono & Jacqueline L Loiacono, October 25 $216,000, 11516 Bethel Ave, Huntley 60142-8134, 18-34254-004-0000, Michelle L Mclaiughlin To Joshua Raper & Tiffany Raper, October 24 $250,000, 8401 N Il Route 47, Huntley 60142-9500, 18-16-100-004-0000, Greg Wilkerson To Chris E Lincoln & Barbara J Lincoln, October 25 $250,000, 10429 Dutch Barn St, Huntley 60142-8115, 1834-203-004-0000, Peter N Weil To Todd Farbiak & Shawn Farbiak, October 25 $350,000, 11912 Stonewater Xing, Huntley 60142-7583, 18-32-377-010-0000, Busch Trust To Michael R Hasselbring & Karyn J Hasselbring, October 25 $184,500, 12012 Main St, Huntley 60142-9608, 1828-354-005-0000, Scott J Phillips To Nicolas Lopez & Macecilia Lopez, October 24 ISLAND LAKE $164,000, 311 Ralph Ct, Island Lake 60042-9614, 15-20276-010-0110, Sara J Irasek To Michael J Semler, November 10 JOHNSBURG $139,000, 3820 Buchanan Rd, Johnsburg 60051-5130, 09-14-126-001-0000, John Pawlik To Lauren Pierpont, November 10 $141,500, 1818 Pine St, Johnsburg 60051-4450, 0926-231-005-0000, Terry L Pungiture To Ryan V Stade, November 14

$174,000, 4811 Brorson Ln, Johnsburg 60051-7714, 1007-177-008-0000, Federal Home Loan Mtg Corp To Frank Kraszewski, November 10 LAKE IN THE HILLS $178,500, 13 Quail Run, Lake In The Hills 60156-1242, 1929-178-011-0000, Ford Trust To Scott H Beesley & Deanna L Beesley, October 26 $115,500, 108 Woody Way, Lake In The Hills 60156-1253, 19-29-133-007-0000, Matthew Scott Pearson To Timothy Lauterbach & Paige Wilson, October 25 $223,000, 6 Banbury Ct, Lake In The Hills 60156-6387, 18-14-351-014-0000, John Conte To Gregorio A Blanco Ramirez, November 10 $229,000, 772 Brandt Dr, Lake In The Hills 60156-5241, 19-21-378-021-0000, Robert M Wellnitz To Michael S Kuhlin, November 14

SPRING GROVE $222,500, 807 Wilmot Farms Dr, Spring Grove 600818253, 05-17-356-014-0000, Walter Blanton To James Krakowski, October 31 $110,000, 217 James Rd, Spring Grove 60081-9612, 0517-400-007-0000, Kerry Graham To John Sefick, November 1 $208,500, 2418 Fox Bluff Ln, Spring Grove 60081-8054, 04-12-401-003-0000, Mtglq Investors Lp To Ryan Kellogg, November 2 $269,500, 8904 Bentley Ln, Spring Grove 60081-8267, 05-20-126-007-0000, James W Hay To Walter Blanton, October 31 $312,500, 7002 Tall Grass Ct, Spring Grove 60081-8328, 04-35-126-003-0000, James C Howatt To Emad John Fakhoury, October 31

LAKEMOOR $121,000, 622 Arbor Cir, Lakemoor 60051-2212, 10-32284-002-0000, Lisa Cooper To Roman Dousko & Iryna Barbashyonva, October 25

VILLAGE OF LAKEWOOD $295,000, 7702 Dairy Ln, Village Of Lakewood 600146636, 18-11-302-016-0000, James A Herrmann To Tracy Argahavani, October 31

MCHENRY $145,000, 2614 Kendall Xing, Mchenry 60051-8520, 09-23-277-072-0000, Michael Levato Iii To Jing An Zheng, November 14 $289,000, 5809 Amherst Ct, Mchenry 60050-9016, 09-21-326-006-0000, Knights Fork Properties Llc To Austin Schramm & Sarah Schramm, October 25 $125,000, 1112 Clover Ln, Mchenry 60051-4604, 09-25478-004-0000, Koseph N Lomeka Jr To Matthew J Ferick, November 14 $121,000, 212 Nippersink Dr, Mchenry 60050-7784, 1005-254-016-0000, John R Hurst To Mark Fugate, November 14 $400,000, 1425 N River Rd, Mchenry 60051-4547, 0925-301-013-0000, David B Smith To Ichael P Fox, November 14 $245,000, 2023 Olde Mill Ln, Mchenry 60050-3979, 09-26-101-002-0000, Karyn L Mcelroy To Anna Wuchter, November 14 $130,000, 1740 Court St, Mchenry 60051-4400, 0926-280-006-0000, First Midwest Bank Trustee To Patricia Morga, November 4 $171,000, 703 Nancy Ln, Mchenry 60051-3215, 15-05181-008-0000, Mark W Gozdecki To Christopher Wolf, November 4 $112,500, 4115 N Riverdale Dr, Mchenry 60051-8997, 10-07-481-003-0000, Fannie Mae To Pavlo Derbedyenyev & Nataliya Derbedyenyev, October 27 $248,000, 6528 Midleton Ln, Mchenry 60050-8058, 09-32-401-004-0000, Andrew Van Treeck To Brian John Krieger, November 9 $173,000, 515 Silbury Ct, Mchenry 60050-5020, 0934-154-019-0000, Skrzypinski Trust To Melissa A Brown & Matthew Tracey Brown, October 26 $160,000, 616 Center St, Mchenry 60050-5512, 0935-179-001-0000, First Midwest Bank Trustee To John R Powers & Gail L Powers, October 26 $91,500, 1210 Eastwood Ln, Mchenry 60051-4608, 09-25-476-021-0000, Bayview Loan Servicing Llc To Nancy Engstrom, November 4 $240,000, 108 N Cross Trl, Mchenry 60050-5423, 09-34-380-004-0000, William V Baird To Rudolph Gloria & Regivic Gloria, October 26

WONDER LAKE $95,000, 4125 W Lake Shore Dr, Wonder Lake 600978883, 08-12-454-002-0000, Citimortgage Inc To Bonnie Okey, November 3 $160,000, 3920 Marengo Ln, Wonder Lake 60097-9407, 08-13-130-016-0000, Express Restoration To June M Poe, November 10 $52,000, 8505 Burton Rd, Wonder Lake 60097-8855, 08-13-251-006-0000, Fannie Mae To Vaughn D Jakieda, November 4 $131,000, 8923 Oriole Trl, Wonder Lake 60097-9484, 08-13-357-010-0000, Bradley P Zundel To Benjamin A Cardwell, August 1 $155,000, 7104 Huron Dr, Wonder Lake 60097-8393, 0907-431-036-0000, Mlp Llc To Aimee L Guiterrez, November 3 $225,000, 4020 Adam Dr, Wonder Lake 60097-8156, 08-14-202-001-0000, Beverly A Jakic To Deborah A Simon, November 4 $110,000, 8412 Elm St, Wonder Lake 60097-8409, 0813-452-012-0000, House Account Llc To Joshua Dijoseph, August 2 $80,000, 8901 Pine Ave, Wonder Lake 60097-8422, 0813-354-008-0000, Roger M Victory To Regina M Seeling, November 3 $150,000, 3214 Edgewood Dr, Wonder Lake 600979314, 09-18-378-007-0000, Mccallag Trust To Deborah A Copeland, October 28 $102,500, 8506 W Sunset Dr, Wonder Lake 600978894, 08-13-404-010-0000, James M Stevens To Erich G Gebhardt Jr, August 2 $171,000, 4017 Seneca Rd, Wonder Lake 60097-8806, 08-13-201-005-0000, Ronald E Mortan To Dominick Lucchetti, September 8 $198,000, 7710 Lucy Dr, Wonder Lake 60097-8691, 09-19-179-017-0000, Jason M Mohlman To Mattew Gertenberger, July 14 $123,000, 5618 Sylvan Dr, Wonder Lake 60097-8732, 0906-283-036-0000, Dickson Trust To Scott Walter, August 3 $170,000, 9503 Creekside Dr, Wonder Lake 60097-7527, 08-14-381-007-0000, Primestar Fund I Trs Llc To Bridget Slezak, November 10

RICHMOND $267,000, 2508 Overlook Dr, Richmond 60071, 04-02451-002-0000, Dschida Trust To Ronald E Campbell & Joyce M Campbell, October 25 $375,000, 10911 Hickory Nut Way, Richmond 600718713, 05-07-103-011-0000, Lichtc Trust To Jamic Jankowski, November 10 $160,000, 3707 Hill Rd, Richmond 60071, 04-02-376010-0000, May Trust To Daniel P May, November 10 RINGWOOD $260,000, 5018 Patty Ln, Ringwood 60072-9673, 09-09-201-012-0000, Federal Home Loan Mtg Corp To Christopher Diedrich & Melissa Diedrich, October 27

WOODSTOCK $135,000, 1820 Powers Rd, Woodstock 60098-2775, 08-32-284-013-0000, John J Hartley To Arturo D Cuenca & Jaqueline A Cuenca, October 26 $329,500, 10619 Deerpath Rd, Woodstock 600988061, 13-10-177-082-0000, George W Young To Willa R Wertheimer & Edward Groenendal, October 25 $212,000, 15906 W South Street Rd, Woodstock 600988965, 12-11-300-008-0000, Randolph S Carroll To Michael Cussen & Diane Wlezien, October 25 $92,000, 653 Silver Creek Rd, Woodstock 60098-4320, 08-32-406-033-0000, Fannie Mae To Alexander R Martinez & Yaylor C Schramm, October 25


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Thursday, December 1, 2016 •

FEATURED LISTINGS Algonquin

CLASSIFIED 17

Wonder Lake

Algonquin

$255,000 OLD WORLD CHARM ON THE FOX! If you’re tired of cookie cutter houses, this is the home for you! Built in 1896, this home has many great features: 4 bedrooms, 2 full baths, partial basement, fireplace, enclosed porch, dining room, 1 car garage. Hurry! MLS#09356903 CENTURY 21 Roberts & Andrews

$269,900 QUALITY BUILT BRICK RANCH! Comfortable home with 3/5 bedrooms, 2 baths, full basement, 1 car garage, hardwood floors, built-in shelving, extra storage, cement patio, spacious lot. Close to the race track & major highways. Call for more details! MLS#09355580 CENTURY 21 Roberts & Andrews

$134,900 UPDATED AND MOVE IN READY Enjoy maintenance free townhome in Bright Oaks. Spacious rooms, updated baths, 1st flr master, eat-in kitchen w/island. Walk to park/playground & pool. Highly regarded Cary schools! New back deck & freshly painted throughout. MLS#09331135 CENTURY 21 Sketchbook

Cary

Cary

$219,900 CUSTOM CRAFTSMANSHIP One owner custom built w/high quality materials/craftsmanship featuring red cedar siding,architectural grade shingled roof,cedar decks,Andersen windows,storm & sliding glass doors,Peachtree steel front door,skylites, & more. MLS#09384824 CENTURY 21 Sketchbook

Crystal Lake

Lake In The Hills

Jean Botts/Debbie Lovatt-Berggren

815-236-9733

$199,900 SPECIAL SPACEOUS SIENNA POINT Great living space in Sienna Point, vaulted ceilings, full finished walkout basement w/fireplace, eat-in kitchen w/atrium door to deck, master en suite w/2 closets, extra storage, paver patio, attached garage, close to metra. MLS#09366616 CENTURY 21 Sketchbook

Shirley M Rochford

847-639-8700

Arlington Heights

Maureen Forgette/Pam Wagner

Gary J Koopman

815-354-4236

847-639-8700

Cary

Blake Bauer

847-639-8700

$169,900 QUALITY-BUILT SPLIT LEVEL! Make this great home yours! About 1,750 square feet of living space, 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, English basement, eat-in kitchen plus second dining space, 1 car garage. Close to shopping, restaurants, schools and Ladd Park! MLS#09294255 CENTURY 21 Roberts & Andrews

Jean Botts/Lena Maratea

847-815-1706

3, 09Huntley

$278,000 FABULOUS FOX MODEL IN SUN CITY Loaded w/upgrades & improvements, home has private landscaped back yard w/entertainment patio;updated kitchen w/granite counters; custom master en suite w/dual vanity; heated garage; Alside double pain windows; home warranty. MLS#09292413 CENTURY 21 Sketchbook

$270,500 IT CHECKS ALL THE BOXES! Gorgeous 2 story home with 5 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, walk-out basement, 2 fireplaces, gourmet kitchen, hardwood floors, new furnace & water heater, 3 car garage. Convenient location for commuting. Don’t wait, call now! MLS#09368225 CENTURY 21 Roberts & Andrews

Lakemoor

Lakewood

Mchenry

$131,000 PERFECT! Move in before the holidays! Three bedroom ranch that has been recently redecorated with an updated bath. Spacious kitchen. Fenced yard. Great condition, great location, Johnsburg schools! MLS#09343402 CENTURY 21 Roberts & Andrews

Mchenry

Mchenry

$329,900 CUSTOM-BUILT BEAUTY! Beautiful 2 story in Woodcreek with curb appeal to spare! Four bedrooms, 2 full/2 half baths, full basement, 2 fireplaces, kitchen with island, master suite, office with custom cabinetry, 3 car garage. Original owners! MLS#09244215 CENTURY 21 Roberts & Andrews

Palatine

Wonder Lake

Wonder Lake

Gary J Koopman

847-639-8700

$336,000 BRICK RANCH IN TURNBERRY! With over 4,000 square feet of space, this home offers plenty of room to spread out! Highlights: 3 bedrooms, 2 full & 2 half baths, walk-out basement, fireplace, open floor plan, master suite, 3 car garage, 3/4 acre lot! MLS#09318240 CENTURY 21 Roberts & Andrews

Maureen Forgette/Pam Wagner

815-354-4236

Maureen Forgette/Pam Wagner

Sharon Lane

815-354-4236

815-382-5386

$218,500 LAKEMOOR FARMS! Spectacular & spacious 2 story with 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, full basement, open floor plan, master bedroom with private bath, first floor laundry, 2 car garage. Low traffic location, but close to highways. Call now! MLS#09389830 CENTURY 21 Roberts & Andrews

Sandy Etten

815-405-2194

$144,900 IN-TOWN CHARMER! Home sweet home! Two story with many great features: 4 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, full basement, den, first floor bedroom, screened porch, 2 car garage. Updates include: roof, gutters, siding, windows, furnace & water heater! MLS#09361440 CENTURY 21 Roberts & Andrews

Anna Schweder

815-558-1204

2, 09Mchenry

$184,900 IN-TOWN RANCH! Spacious home with 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, fireplace in great room, eat-in kitchen, screened porch, oversized 2 car garage. New roof in 2015. Close to city pool, schools, shopping & restaurants. Going, going, gone! MLS#09373304 CENTURY 21 Roberts & Andrews

Sandy Etten

815-405-2194

Sandy Etten

815-405-2194

$339,900 BEAUTIFUL UPDATED SUTTON PARK .Open concept,volume ceilings,family room in finished English bsmt,2-story foyer & dining room, gourmet kitchen w/stainless appliances,living room fireplace,master en suite, spacious 2nd bedroom,loft area & much more to see. MLS#09353937 CENTURY 21 Sketchbook

Blake Bauer

847-639-8700

8Spring Grove

$379,000 BETTER THAN NEW! Gorgeous ranch in “Forest Ridge.” Highlights: 3/4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, English basement, fireplace, eat-in kitchen, separate dining room, movie room, screened porch, 3 car garage, custom shed. Picturesque lot! Don’t wait! MLS#09357234 CENTURY 21 Roberts & Andrews

Linda Bykowski/Maureen Forgette

815-482-2069

$169,900 WELCOME HOME! Charming cottage with four bedrooms, two baths, full basement, one car garage, eat-in kitchen, formal dining & living rooms. Hardwood floors & decorative nooks add to the comfort of home. Make it yours! MLS#09066755 CENTURY 21 Roberts & Andrews

Jean Botts/Pat Maggio

847-212-7140

$189,900 7416 Boston Rd This 4BR 3Bath home offers fresh paint and a great layout for your family. 2 car attached garage has gas line run for heater, modern kitchen with sliders to deck and back yard. Master BR has private bath. Priced to sell! Coldwell Banker Honig-Bell

Kitty Zriny

815-790-7857


18 CLASSIFIED • Thursday, December 1, 2016

FEATURED LISTINGS

• Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

Wonder Lake

Vacant Land - McHenry

Wonder Lake

$239,000 LAKEFRONT RANCH! Enjoy beautiful sunsets & that vacation feeling year round! Features include: 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, fireplace, kitchen with island & pantry, 2 car garage with second story, 2 sheds. Dock & shore station included! Hurry! MLS#09241049 CENTURY 21 Roberts & Andrews Sandy Etten

815-405-2194

Woodstock

$349,000 BEST BUY IN THE AREA! If you want a deal, here it is! This home offers plenty of living space, 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, partial basement, 3 fireplaces, heated sunroom, master bedroom with bath, 2 car garage. Sits on 4.3 acres, enjoy peace & quiet! MLS#09371558 CENTURY 21 Roberts & Andrews Hope Ball

847-477-3503

Woodstock

$199900 1641 Raffel Rd Under $200k for all this! 3 BR, 2.5 Bath with new carpeting thru out, tons of storage and ready to close! You could be in by Christmas! Seller has done a Home Inspection for you, so no surprises and one less expense for you. Coldwell Banker Honig-Bell

Kitty Zriny VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT

LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND

815-790-7857

VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT

LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND

VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT

LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND

VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT

T N A C VA AND L

LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND

VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT

LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND LAND

Woodstock

$248,900 EASIER LIFESTYLE INCLUDED! Buy this lovely ranch in the Maples At The Sonatas and snow removal, lawn care and even window cleaning will be done for you! You can relax and enjoy the clubhouse & pool! Home has 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 car garage & more.. MLS#09389404 CENTURY 21 Roberts & Andrews Pam Wagner/Maureen Forgette

847-745-9101

Mchenry

$39,400 BUILD THAT DREAM HOME NOW! This is the perfect spot! One acre lot with beach rights. Electric and gas to site. Call for more information! MLS#09145407 Anna Schweder

CENTURY 21 Roberts & Andrews

815-558-1204

Federal Fair Housing law prohibits discrimination based on race, color, sex, handicap, familial status, national origin or religion in connection with the rental or sale of real estate. The Northwest Herald does not knowlingly accept advertising in violation of these laws.

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Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Thursday, December 1, 2016 •

CLASSIFIED 19

QUICK MOVE-INS AVAILABLE NOW!

Maintenance-Free Ranch Homes in a Clubhouse Community Ranch Homes from the mid $200s • • • • •

2 to 3 Bedrooms • Snow Removal (when over 2”) Spacious Living Areas • Community Clubhouse with Seasonal Verandas Pool & Fitness Room Private Patio or Courtyard • Minutes from Entertainment, Lawn Mowing & Weed Control Shopping, Dining, and More!

Maples at the Sonatas | Woodstock, IL (815) 334-0340 | WilcoxCommunities.com

PlanitSave.com is part of the Northwest Herald family of publications.

For Better or For Worse

Food Service

ADMINISTRATIVE

Protective Apparel Mfr. has a full time entry-level position in our Accounting / H.R. Department. Duties include AR/AP, order entry and misc. administrative duties. The successful candidate will be detail oriented, work well independently, have strong communication and computer skills. Hours Monday thru Friday 8:00 am to 3:30 pm. Apply in person at:

Standard Safety Equipment Company 1407 Ridgeview Drive, McHenry, IL 60050 No phone calls please.

CAREGIVERS Now Hiring... Always Caring Seeking experienced caregivers to provide companionship and assistance with personal care.

To subscribe to the Northwest Herald Call 815-459-8118 or visit: www.NWHerald.com

OVERNIGHT (STAY AWAKE) SHIFTS AVAILABLE Apply online: https://va175.ersp.biz/employment Visiting Angels is an EEO employer

MEAT CUTTER

Full or part time. Experienced only. Apply in person at:

Butcher on the Block

4660 W. Algonquin Rd, Lake in the Hills - or - call 847-669-6679

Tool & Die Opportunities

Kenmode Tool & Engineering in Algonquin has almost 60 years of high precision metal stamping experience servicing a variety of industries. We are seeking several new members for our new Technology Center:

Die Designer (3D Solidworks Required) Tool & Die Maker CNC/Tool & Die Maker (2nd shift) Tool & Die Apprentice (5 yr program) If you are interested in any of these opportunities, please forward your resume to: rbd@kenmode.com

OFFICE CLERK / BOOKKEEPER Part Time 20 - 25 hours a week

Small Packaging/Crating Company has a part time position available. Quickbooks & Excel Experience. Duties would include: A/P, A/R, Payroll, Bank Reconciliations and Administrative Duties. Please email resume to: hr0421@hotmail.com

CNA

Up to $15.88/Hr!

We are looking for experienced and dedicated professionals to assume key full time positions on our nursing team. We offer: up to $15.88/hr; shift differentials; quarterly wage increases; vacation & holiday pay; paid time off; medical, dental, and vision; and much more! For an immediate and confidential interview, apply in person or call 815-459-7791. You may also submit your resume in confidence to CrystalPines@tutera.com

Crystal Pines

Being the FIRST to grab reader's attention makes your item sell faster!

Rehab and Health Care 335 N. Illinois St. Crystal Lake, IL

Highlight and border your ad!

Northwest Herald Classified

877-264-2527

www.NWHerald.com

877-264-2527 www.NWHerald.com/classified


20 CLASSIFIED • Thursday, December 1, 2016

• Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

BRIDGE by Phillip Alder

The Illinois Classified Advertising Network (ICAN) provides advertising of a national appeal. To advertise in this section, please call ICAN directly at 217-241-1700. We recommend discretion when responding. Please refer questions & comments directly to ICAN.

READER NOTICE:

A TV Antenna Will Save you $1000's .

MAILBOX & POST SALES & INSTALLATION 815-653-7095 ~ 815-341-7822 www.mailboxpostman.com

HANDYMAN

Anything to do with Wood

We can Fix or Replace Doors and Windows

Kathy's Office & Home Cleaning Service

Licensed, Bonded, Insured. 815-355-5297 POLISH LADY Will Clean Your Home/Office

Randy K. Milholland, a web comic author, wrote, “Friendship is being FREE ESTIMATES, Great References. 224-858-4515 there when someone’s feeling low and not being afraid to kick them.” I hope that Milholland picks the right friend to kick; for some, that Male, short hair, brown with black tips. would be a bad idea. The psychology Lost Thursday evening, November 17 of the individual is an interesting subnear Pleasant St in Woodstock. ject. 815-575-0646 or 815-575-0647 North knew not to say anything Missing cat Grey tabby, neutered male named at the end of this deal. What should Remley, has claws. Last seen in woods near Peet South have done in four spades after Frate, Woodstock. Chief of mouse control for The West led the club ace? Land Conservancy on Dean Street south of Square. North’s three-club rebid was a Call Lisa at 815-236-5765 with info. double negative, showing some 0-4 REWARD points. Three hearts, a new suit, was LOST NECKLACE EARLY NOVEMBER! forcing for one round. South could Crystal Lake/Cary Area have passed out three spades but Gold Omega Necklace, Large Mystic Topaz 847-875-3029 could see 10 potential winners in his own hand: seven spades and three hearts. LINCOLN'S CHALLENGE ACADEMY Having trouble in high school? This deal would trip up almost Education *Discipline* Job Skills everyone -- and to be honest, 90.4 LCA offers a structured education program for Illinois Youth 16 to 18 percent of the time the spades will www.lincolnschallenge.org not be 4-0. The original declarer ruffed the club ace, cashed his spade ace, then took his two top hearts and led another heart. However, West ruffed in and shifted to a diamond. East won with his ace and returned a heart. West ruffed that as well, then cashed the diamond king for down one. Later, North pointed out that it was right to discard a diamond at trick one. (Yes, at double dummy, South could have survived by leading a diamond at trick three, but if hearts were 4-3 and West had only two diamonds, that would not have worked.) Assuming West continues with the club king, South pitches his other diamond. Then East can never get on lead for a trump promotion.

Chihuahua “Poncho”

As a service to you, our valued readers, we offer the following information. This newspaper will never knowingly accept any advertisement that is illegal or considered fraudulent. If you have questions or doubts about any ads on these pages, we advise that before responding or sending money ahead of time, you check with the local Attorney General's Consumer Fraud Line and/or the Better Business Bureau. They may have records or documented complaints that will serve to caution you about doing business with these advertisers. Also be advised that some phone numbers published in these ads may require an extra charge. In all cases of questionable value, such as promises or guaranteed income from work-at-home programs, money to loan, etc., if it sounds too good to be true, it may in fact be exactly that. Again, contact the local and/or national agency that may be able to provide you with some background on these companies. This newspaper cannot be held responsible for any negative consequences that occur as a result of you doing business with these advertisers. Northwest Herald Classified It works.

Find the help you need

At Your Service In print daily Online 24/7

JOBS ANNOUNCEMENTS STUFF VEHICLES REAL ESTATE SERVICES LEGALS Northwest Herald Classified and online at: NWHerald.com

LAND & EQUIP. AUCTION SAT. DEC. 3, 10 AM

191 ACRES IN 4 PARCELS -6.6 T0 80 ACRES & COMBINATIONS

Land Auction to be held at 10 AM at Marengo Fire Station #1, located at 120 Prairie St. 1 Block E of Rte.23, Marengo, IL. Park in Lg Lot Behind Fire Station. on this Site. *Equip. to be sold starting at Noon on Nursery Site, at 520 North Rte.23, up long lane on E. side.* Land: Parcel #1 60 Acres, under cultivation in either Nursery Stock or Cropland. 1320' Frontage on Rte. 23. Stl Bldg on this Parcel is 105'x40' w/20' x 105' overhang. Also 3 120'x20' Hoop Houses. Nat. Gas & 3 Phase Elec. Incl's office & heated shop. A Potable Water Well & 2 Irrigation Wells on Property. An excellent Site to continue the Nursery or clear for Grain Farming. This Nursery was built & operated by the Late Denny Church, & later by his Family & Employees. Parcel #2 80.84 Acres. Adjacent to Parcel #1. Approx 25 Acres on back (E.) side in Mature Trees surrounding a Fen. Excellent Hunting Area. A Creek & Approx 10 Acres land in SE corner, both growing Nursery Stock & Cropland. Parcel #3 44.32 Acres. just No. of Parcel #1 & #2 on W side of Rte. 23. All Tillable Land, approx 1/2 in Nursery Stock & balance rented to an area Farmer. Lease open for 2017. Parcel #4 6.5 Acres on W side of Rte. 23, incl's 3 BR House. Nat. Gas. Central Air. A Handyman's Special. 74' x 40' shed. "Open House on Sunday Nov. 27, 2 to 4pm". Terms on RE: Buyers need $20,000.00 each on Parcel #1, 2 & 3 & $5,000.00 on Parcel #4 as Earnest Money. Closing on Dec. 30, 2016. *EQUIP.: Sells at Nursery on Parcel #1 Approx Noon. Tractors & Skid Steers:* JD 990, MFWD, 2846 Hrs. JD 790 MFWD, 3276 Hrs. Kubota L4200 MFWD, w/Cab,3907 Hrs. CIH 265 Hi-Clear offset w/Cultv, 2223 Hrs. JD 270 Skidsteer. Vermeer Hydramac Skidsteer w/Forks, 6413 Hrs. Nursery & Landscraping Equip.: 2 Boss Hyd. Ball Handlers for Lg & Sm Trees. 2 Big John Tree Spades, 42" #4295, 32" #3470. Klegg 24" Tree Spade #2415. 2 Sets Grosser SS Tracks. 6' Rot Mower. Walsh 250G PTO Sprayer. 3Pt. Box Scraper. 3Pt 7' Rr Blade. 2 SS Pallet Forks. 6' SS Bucket. 6' 3Pt Disc. 6' Field Cultv. 3 Fl Rack Wagons. 4 1/2 x 8' Trlr. Other Nursery Equipt & Supplies. Shop Equip.: Incl's Welder, Compressor, Grinder, Pressure Washer & more. Terms for Equip.: Cash or Check on Day of Auction, No Credit Cards or Buyers Premium. For Pictures or updated info log on www.gordonstadeauctions.com or auctionzip.com

ROYAL OAKS NURSERY – CHURCH FAMILY Auctioneers Gordon Stade, Huntley, IL 847-514-2853 & Tim Hall, Kirkland, IL

Vehicles & Equipment Auction

Saturday, December 3 – 9:00 am Inspection and Registration Friday 9:00 am to 5:00 pm & Auction Day from 8:00 am

Lake County Fairgrounds 1060 E. Peterson Rd, Grayslake, IL 60030

Cars, Vans, Pickup & Dump Trucks, 2005 Chevrolet Impala, 2004 Volvo XC90 Inline 5 turbo, 2003 Cadillac Escalade ESV AWD, 2000 GMC Sonoma Ext. Cab, 1999 Redi Haul 32' Gooseneck trailer, 1994 Pontiac Firebird Formula 1, 1991 Ford L9000 Roll Off Truck, 1991 Case Uni-Loader, 1988 Ford L8000 Dump Truck, Go-Cart, Power tools, Shop equipment, Many misc. items. 10% Buyers Fee - 7% Sales Tax

www.ObenaufAuctions.com

OBENAUF AUCTION SERVICE, Inc. Round Lake, IL #444.000105

847-546-2095 Don't worry about rain!

With our Great Garage Sale Guarantee you'll have great weather for your sale, or we'll run your ad again for FREE. Call to advertise 877-264-2527


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Thursday, December 1, 2016 •

ALGONQUIN 1390 Braewood Dr

WOODSTOCK

Moving Sale by Lifestyle Transitions Fri-Sat 9-3, Sun 10-3

Fri-Sat-Sun.

See https://www.estatesales.net/IL/Algonquin/60102/1388958

Downers Grove Estate Sale

Sat & Sun 10-4 High End Mid Century Furniture

Pics @ estatesales.net Kathy's Estate Sales Liquidations & Consignment 847-363-4814 JOHNSBURG ESTATE SALE 3118 River Park Drive Thursday, Friday, Saturday 9A-4P Furniture, Glassware, Household, Washer, Dryer, Antiques, Tools, & MORE!

KANE COUNTY ANTIQUE FLEA MARKET Shows March – December ~ Hundreds of Dealers

KANE COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS 525 S. Randall Rd. (Between Routes 38 & 64) St. Charles, Illinois

Saturday, December 3 Sunday, December 4

12pm - 5pm 7am - 4pm

★★★★★★★★★★★★★★

Admission $5 each day ~ Children Under 12 FREE Parking Free Share your flea finds: #iFounditAtKane @KCFMarket Info: 630-377-2252 www.kanecountryfleamarket.com

MARENGO/UNION 25th ANNUAL HOLIDAY HOUSE WALK Arts and Crafts Show ★★★ 14 STOPS! ★★★ SAT. DEC. 3RD 9AM-5PM SUN. DEC. 4TH 10AM-3PM

Snow Angels Craft Fair, Cookies & Quilts Redeemer Lutheran Church 1320 Dean St.

Sat, Dec. 3rd 8:00 am – 3:00 pm Free admission 815-338-9370

McHenry Garage Sale 3723 Pebble Creek December 2nd & 3rd 10AM-3PM Power Tools, Household & MORE!

Woodstock SAT & SUN, DEC 3 & 4 9-4

Desk with Hutch Top

Excellent condition, you pick up. 224-703-2079 Five Solid Oak Bar Chairs – 30in High. 815-341-8998

Piano ~ Spinet

Story & Clark, works well, you pick up. 847-497-9773 Leave Message Freezer, Kenmore 15cf, upright, 20 years old, runs perfect, $75 815-477-4828

WAHL APPLIANCE

Reconditioned Appliances Sales and Service Lakemoor 815-385-1872 Bell systems telephone booth

3 sides wood, bifold glass panel door, great conversation piece $325/obo 815-701-2076 Diecast Model “T” Fords 1/43rd Scale, $5each, 1/18th scale $12each/OBO 815-477-4667

Sports Cards - 20,0000

Baseball, Football, Basketball, $225/obo. Great Holiday Gift! 815-338-4829

Northwest Herald Classified

Wind Ridge Memorial Park, Cary – 1 Plot, W/ Package. $2,000. 231-227-1130

Call today to place your ad

877-264-2527

With several stations for arm, triceps, biceps, legs and calves. 170 lb total weight, $150. 847-639-8928

Electric Fireplace - 42in x 48in x 23in Excellent Condition, Golden/Honey Oak. Use W/Or W/O Heat, $175.

Corrected Phone # 847-313-9862

Firewood - Mix Cord/Maple, Ash & Oak

Regular Cord/Oak, Cherry & Birch. 815-943-6960

BEDSPREADS - NEW

Sage green King bedspread, NEVER used, nice stitching, medium weight, $110. Ivory Queen bedspread, NEVER used, nice stitching, medium weight, $100. Call Laura 224-858-4635 or 505-860-4187

www.helpingpaws.net 815-338-4400 FREE TO A GOOD HOME 10 m/o German Shep. Mix. Male, Neutered, Vaccinated. Call David @ 773-405-9408

Geece - Pair, White

Were hatched in April, $40/pair. Also some Black East Indie Ducks, hatched in March, $8/ea. 815-719-1503

KITTENS ~ FREE

6 weeks old, black and gray Tabby, Litter trained. 815-355-0901

Scroll Saw Patterns $2.50 each. 200 Avail. 815-385-1432

Transport Wheelchair - MedLine

New In Box, 19in Wide, Weighs 15lbs. Holds up to 300lbs max, cost over $200, sell for $100. 815-701-7369

55 Gal Fish Tank, Complete W/ Fish. You Break Down. $60. 815-385-1432

Bathtub - Whirlpool, 42 x 66

Dark navy blue, new, never used, (paid $1,950 new), sell for $400/firm.

815-653-4612

Blankets - Medical

www.helpingpaws.net 815-338-4400

MIXER

Pictures increase attention to your ad!

74”x100”, very warm, brand new. Cost $35, sell $10/ea. 815-701-7369

Follow the Northwest Herald on Twitter.

Stand Mix List, 5 quart, black, brand new, still in box, $200. 815-382-8712

@NWHerald

Place your Classified ad online 24/7 at: www.NWHerald.com/PlaceAnAd

McHenry County area breaking news, entertainment news, feature stories and more!

Phillips 3 CD – AM/FM Radio, CD, Turner, Tape, AUX. Remote Control. 2 Ext. Separate Speakers. Exc Cond! $100 815-575-2495 Sears Kenmore Deep Freeze – 13.2cft, 2.5 Years Old, $200. 224-225-6048

NEW BALANCE ELLIPTICAL 8.0e elliptical trainer, gently used and always covered. Great Christmas Gift. $125. 815-943-7664

3 Piece BR Set – Dresser & Nightstands, Dark wood,Good Cond! Will Deliver! $245 Sofa sleeper & recliner loveseat, white BR set, Call 847-274-7556 7 pc. dinette, stools, TV stands, entertainment center, 42” TV, 3 pc. desk, poker table, bar signs Couch – Loveseat – Chair. Cream W/ Pastels. & man cave stuff, electronics, lots of musical $180 847-533-4812 items, digital piano, miter saw, ladder, workbench Couch/Hide-A-Bed – 75in Long, Light Blue, Good & cabinet, Christmas trees & many decos, Cond! Can Send Pics! Will Deliver! Call For Details. life size Halloween figures, games, porcelain dolls, $125 847-274-7556 household items and a whole lot more! Great Bargains for Christmas - No Junk! New Oak Quilt Rack – 4ft, New Oak Mantle – 76in, 2 Wood Book Cases – 41inH x 25inW. Advertise here for a successful garage sale! Call 877-264-2527 815-759-9948

For info and Map www.holidayhousewalk.com Call: 815-568-0443

It works.

Home Gym - Weider

CLASSIFIED 21

Be sure to include a photo of your pet, home, auto or merchandise.

Call to advertise 877-264-2527 Or place your ad online nwherald.com/placeanad


22 CLASSIFIED • Thursday, December 1, 2016

• Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com ★★ ★★ ★★★ ★★ ★★

2002 OLDS Aurora, 94K Miles, Orig Owner EXC COND! $3,250. 815-455-3767-815-245-4323

1996 Ford Ranger XLT, Asking $1200/obo 815-814-5743

I BUY CARS, TRUCKS, VANS & SUVs 1990 & Newer

Will beat anyone's price by $300. Will pay extra for Honda, Toyota & Nissan.

815-814-1964

212K miles, 4WD, 8 cylinder, towing package, some rust under doors. Air, heated leather seats, On Star, etc, very well taken care of. www.helpingpaws.net 815-338-4400

or

CRYSTAL TERRACE APARTMENTS

Crystal Terrace Apts. Located in Crystal Lake, Illinois, has reopened its waiting list for (1) & (2) bedroom Section 8 apartments. Accepting names of interested persons commencing 12/01/2016 from 9AM to 5PM. First 150 applicants for the 1 BR & 150 applicants for the 2BR units. Interested persons MUST CALL (815) 338-5151. No Walk Ins Accepted.

847-997-6106

★★ ★★ ★★★ ★★ ★★

MOTORCYCLES WANTED

$3000/obo

FOX LAKE 1 BR, Laundry on-site, no pets, Sect 8 OK, $730/mo + sec. 847-812-9830

Call or text 847-878-4621

Fox River Grove 2 Bedroom, Close to Metra $725/mo, call for Move in Specials! 815-236-4051 or 815-923-2521

Dinner for 24 People

Spode, pattern, “Christmas Tree”. Like new, $400/firm. 847-515-8693 or 847-271-2503 ★★ GUN SHOW ★★ December 2, 3 & 4

Jefferson County Fairgrounds - Jefferson, WI FRIDAY, 3PM - 8:30PM SATURDAY, 9AM - 5PM SUNDAY, 9AM - 3PM

OVER 200 TABLES!

ALL COLLECTIONS, AUTOGRAPHS, MUSIC OLD INVENTORY CASH 815-354-6169

Antique and Modern Guns

Old Lever Actions, Winchesters, Marlins, Savages, etc. Old Pistols and Revolvers. Cash for Collection. FFL License. 815-338-4731

Buying Old & Unusual Toys, Antiques Comics Records, RR Items, Meadowdale Raceway Memorabilia. 815-351-4387

★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

CLASSICS WANTED

Restored or Unrestored Cars & Vintage Motorcycles Domestic / Import Cars: Mercedes, Porsche, Corvette, Ferrari's, Jaguars, Muscle Cars, Mustang & Mopars, $$ Top $$ all makes, Etc.

Harvard Lrg Studio $640, 1BR $750, Frplc

W/D, C/A, Fish/Swim, Pets OK. 815-648-2716 Efficiency $575/mo + sec, 1BR $700/mo + sec. All Harvard - Beautiful Lower 1BR, Incl Partial Heat

3 furnished with all util incl, no pets. 815-509-5876

and garbage, SEC DEP, no pets, as Low as $625/mo. 847-899-5463

With storage, laundry and parking, $875/mo. 847-401-3242

Northwest Herald Classified 877-264-2527 www.NWHerald.com

★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

A-1 AUTO

Northwest Herald

Check rates daily at http://nwherald.interest.com Institution

WANTED TO BUY: Vintage or New, working or not.

Antiques, Video Games, Outboard motors, Fishing Gear, Motorcycles or Mopeds, Chainsaws, Tools etc. Cash on the spot. Cell: 815-322-6383

CAR, TRUCK, SUV

MOST CASH

Town & Country Mortgage

$400 - $2000

815-575-5153 Need customers? We've got them! 2000 Plymouth Grand Voyager 3L, V6, 162K

Runs Great, 2 Roof Vent Fans, $850. 847-658-8883 You Want It?

We've Got It!

Classified has GREAT VARIETY!

877-264-2527

30yr Fixed APR

WILL BEAT ANY QUOTE GIVEN!!

Advertise in print and online for one low price.

Call Classified today! 877-264-2527

30 yr Fixed

Product

Rate: 3.875

20 yr fixed

3.750 0.000 $907

20% 3.813

Points: 0.000 15 yr fixed

3.250 0.000 $907

20% 3.330

10 yr fixed

3.125 0.000 $907

20% 3.241 www.tcmortgageservices.com

Fees: $907

% Down: 20%

Rate: 3.875

“don't wait....call 2day”!!

Powered by:

30 yr APR

3.920%

Lionel & American Flyer Trains 815-353-7668

WE'VE GOT IT!

3.900% Gateway Capital Mortgage Inc.

30yr Fixed APR

Rate

Points

Fees

% Down

APR

Phone Number / Website

NMLS # / License #

NMLS# 221739

847-757-5075

MB.6759601

Float Down Available on All Products!

15 yr fixed

Points: 0.000 5/1 ARM

3.125 0.000 $695

5%

3.186

3.375 0.000 $495

5%

3.739

NMLS# 246585

888-595-7339

Fees: $495

30 yr jumbo

4.250 0.000 $25

20%

4.251 www.gwcmortgage.com

% Down: 5%

30 yr FHA

3.750 0.000 $15

3.5%

3.751

LIC# 6760411

LENDERS, TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS AD CALL BANKRATE.COM @ 800-509-4636 Legend: The rate and annual percentage rate (APR) are effective as of 11/28/16. © 2016 Bankrate, LLC. http://www.interest.com. The APR may increase after consummation and may vary. Payments do not include amounts for taxes and insurance. The fees set forth for each advertisement above may be charged to open the plan (A) Mortgage Banker, (B) Mortgage Broker, (C) Bank, (D) S & L, (E) Credit Union, (BA) indicates Licensed Mortgage Banker, NYS Banking Dept., (BR) indicates Registered Mortgage Broker, NYS Banking Dept., (loans arranged through third parties). “Call for Rates” means actual rates were not available at press time. All rates are quoted on a minimum FICO score of 740. Illinois Mortgage Licensee. Conventional loans are based on loan amounts of $165,000. Jumbo loans are based on loan amounts of $435,000. Points quoted include discount and/or origination. Lock Days: 30-60. Annual percentage rates (APRs) are based on fully indexed rates for adjustable rate mortgages (ARMs). The APR on your specific loan may differ from the sample used. Fees reflect charges relative to the APR. If your down payment is less than 20% of the home’s value, you will be subject to private mortgage insurance, or PMI. FHA Mortgages include both UFMIP and MIP fees based on a loan amount of $165,000 with 5% down payment. VA Mortgages include funding fees based on a loan amount of $165,000 with 5% down payment. Bankrate, LLC. does not guarantee the accuracy of the information appearing above or the availability of rates and fees in this table. All rates, fees and other information are subject to change without notice. Bankrate, LLC. does not own any financial institutions. Some or all of the companies appearing in this table pay a fee to appear in this table. If you are seeking a mortgage in excess of $417,000, recent legislation may enable lenders in certain locations to provide rates that are different from those shown in the table above. Sample Repayment Terms – ex. 360 monthly payments of $5.29 per $1,000 borrowed ex. 180 monthly payments of $7.56 per $1,000 borrowed. We recommend that you contact your lender directly to determine what rates may be available to you. To appear in this table, call 800-509-4636. To report any inaccuracies, call 888-509-4636. • http://nwherald.interest.com


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Thursday, December 1, 2016 •

CLASSIFIED 23

JM SEAMLESS GUTTERS

• Seamless Gutters 5” & 6” • Leaf Protection w/Different Styles Avail. • Soffit & Fascia • Aluminum Wrap Free Estimates

815-404-9749

Fully Insured

An Affordable Electrician 847-566-2663 Free Estimates

Veterans Disc Senior Disc Single Parent Disc 40 Years Experience Licensed Bonded Insured

WILL BEAT ANY ESTIMATE

ROB'S FIREWOOD

Mixed Seasoned Hardwoods - for 32 years $110/facecord $300/cord Free Delivery

BEST HARDWOOD

224-234-3637

Verhaeghe Seasoned Firewood Mixed $100.00 / Oak $150.00

FREE DELIVERY BOB EVANS FIREWOOD & MULCH

We sell only the finest seasoned firewood! Mixed Premium Hardwood $150 F/C Oak $160 F/C Hickory / Cherry $180 F/C

Small Bundles Availiable Tree Services

Free Local Delivery. Stacking Available.

847-334-5740 or 847-732-4014

S&W Furniture Refinishing ✦

We are a Family Owned and Operated Heating and Air-Conditioning Company. We offer the following services: ~ Servicing all Makes and Models ~ ·New Construction ·Remodels & Additions ·New Units Installed ·Old Units Replaced ·Duct Work Installation ·Custom Sheet Metal Fabrication ~ Free Estimates ~ Get the job you want at NWHerald.com/jobs

Need Help Rebuilding, Repairing or Replanting? Check out the

At Your Service Directory

www.bobevansfirewoodandmulch.com

Call Gary 847-888-3599

Share your photos with McHenry County!

Serving W. Rt. 59, N. of I-88 &S. of Rt 176 Find !t here! PlanitNorthwest.com

NOTICE

We are At Your Service! The Northwest Herald reaches 137,000 adult readers in print every week, and 259,000 unique visitors on NWHerald.com every month.

NWHerald.com/myphotos

Call to advertise in the At Your Service directory.

DON'T NEED IT? SELL IT FAST!

Upload photos of your family and friends with our online photo album.

877-264-2527

Northwest Herald Classified Call 877-264-2527 or www.NWHerald.com

Share your sports team, birthday party, big catch, pets, or vacation!

classified@shawsuburban.com

PUBLICATION POLICIES This publication reserves the right to edit or reject any ads without comment. This publication is careful to review all advertising but the burden of truthful content belongs to the advertiser. We use standard abbreviations and we reserve the right to properly classify your ad. All ads are subject to credit approval. We reserve the right to require prepayment. We accept cash, check, Visa, Mastercard, Discover & American Express. CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad the first day it is published. If you see an error, call us immediately and it will be corrected for the next available publication date. Our liability is for only one publication date and shall not exceed the total cost of the first day of publication.


24 CLASSIFIED • Thursday, December 1, 2016

• Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com Woodstock – 2BR, 1B, $760 Heat/Wtr Incl. No Smkg/Pets, Quiet, Call 815-337-0628

MARENGO LRG 1BR $700, LRG 3BR $850

Sewer and water included.

815-575-2446

McHenry – Greens Of Irish Prairie. ★Free Months Rent★ Studios & 1 BR's. W/D, Dishwasher, Indoor/Outdoor Pool/Gym, Pets Welcome (Restrictions Apply.)

Professional Quality Affordable Prices

Residential · Commercial Industrial Interiors And Exteriors

Please Call About Our Current Special. 815-363-0322

•Pressure Washing •Fence & Deck Staining •Industrial Coatings •Epoxy Floor Coating •Staining/Varnishing •Drywall Repair •Wallpaper Removal

Twin Lakes, WI Lakefront 4BR, FREE MO! $850

Pier, Beach,18 min to Rt 120 & 31. 847-256-0986 Northwest Herald. Giving you more!

Fully Insured · FREE Estimates

847-946-3409

Village of Lakewood

LAKE IN THE HILLS - 2 BR TH $1200. New carpet, paint, appliances. 1 car gar w/ bsmt. Credit check req. 847-894-8920

Marengo 2BR TH, 2BA, Rec Rm, No Pets/Smkg $850/mo + dep.

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handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation of discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275 Have a news tip?

Email: tips@nwherald.com


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Thursday, December 1, 2016 •

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE TWENTY- SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MC HENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, -v.MICHEAL R. CRUMP A/K/A MICHAEL CRUMP, et al Defendant 13 CH 01916 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on August 20, 2015, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 1:00 PM on December 13, 2016, at the NLT Title L.L.C, 390 Congress Parkway, Suite D, Crystal Lake, IL, 60014, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 5683 DANBURY CIRCLE, LAKE IN THE HILLS, IL 60156 Property Index No. 18-15-376-022. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in \"AS IS\" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver's license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identificatio fo le held othe

y identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Corporation conducts Sales foreclosure sales. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876 Please refer to file number 14-13-25137. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 E-Mail: pleadings@il.cslegal.com Attorney File No. 14-13-25137 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Case Number: 13 CH 01916 TJSC#: 36-12969 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I707879 (Published in the Northwest Herald, November 17, 24, 2016 December 1, 2016)

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE TWENTY- SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MC HENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR OPTION ONE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2001-B, CERTIFICATES, ASSET-BACKED SERIES 2001-B Plaintiff, -v.JAMES G. WEBER, et al Defendant 16 CH 00441 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on August 18, 2016, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 1:00 PM on December 27, 2016, at the NLT Title L.L.C, 390 Congress Parkway, Suite D, Crystal Lake, IL, 60014, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 5615 MARIETTA DRIVE, CRYSTAL LAKE, IL 60014 Property Index No. 14-34-401-035. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied

sp against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in \"AS IS\" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701 (C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver's license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876 Please refer to file number 14-16-05268. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 E-Mail: pleadings@il.cslegal.com Attorney File No. 14-16-05268 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Case Number: 16 CH 00441 TJSC#: 36-10442 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I707909

PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on August 20, 2015, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 1:00 PM on December 13, 2016, at the NLT Title L.L.C, 390 Congress Parkway, Suite D, Crystal Lake, IL, 60014, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: LOT 833 IN MEADOWBROOK UNIT 19, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 AND THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 15, TOWNSHIP 43 NORTH, RANGE 7, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, IN MCHENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as 5683 DANBURY CIRCLE, LAKE IN THE HILLS, IL 60156 Property Index No. 18-15-376-022. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in \"AS IS\" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The (Published in the Northwest Condominium Property Act, 765 Herald, November 17, 24, 2016 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit December 1, 2016) which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS PUBLIC NOTICE 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE (HOMEOWNER), MORTGAGOR IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN THE TWENTY- SECOND IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFJUDICIAL CIRCUIT TER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSMC HENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS SESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLIPlaintiff, NOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identi-v.MICHEAL R. CRUMP A/K/A fication issued by a government MICHAEL CRUMP, et al agency (driver's license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our Defendant building and the foreclosure sale 13 CH 01916 room in Cook County and the same NOTICE OF SALE

y identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Corporation conducts Sales foreclosure sales. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876 Please refer to file number 14-13-25137. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 E-Mail: pleadings@il.cslegal.com Attorney File No. 14-13-25137 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Case Number: 13 CH 01916 TJSC#: 36-12969 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I707879 (Published in the Northwest Herald, November 17, 24, 2016 December 1, 2016)

PUBLIC NOTICE

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 22nd JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MC HENRY COUNTY WOODSTOCK, ILLINOIS U.S. Bank National Association Plaintiff, vs. Jennifer Haerle; Chalets of Fox River Grove Building A; Chalets of FoxRiver Grove Building “A Condominium Association; Unknown Owners and Nonrecord Claimants; Unknown Heirsand Legatees of Joel Haerle; Lyle Haerle; Missy Matuga a/k/a Melissa L.Haerle a/k/a Melissa L. Matuga a/k/a Missy Haerle; Brandon Haerle; Richard Kuhn, as Special Representative for Joel Haerle (Deceased) Defendants. Case No. 16 CH 00213 Notice to Heirs and Legatees. Notice is hereby given to you, the Unknown Heirs and Unknown Legatees of the decedent, Joel

ga Haerle, that on November 10, 2016, an order was entered by the Court, naming Richard W. Kuhn, 552 S. Washington Street, Suite 100, Naperville, Illinois 60540, Tel. No. 630-420-8228, as the Special Representative of the above-named decedent under 735 ILCS 13-1209 (Death of a Party). The cause of action for the Foreclosure of a certain Mortgage upon the premises commonly known as: 300 Opatrny Drive Unit #110, Fox River Grove, IL 60021 Fox River Grove, IL 60021 (Published in the Northwest Herald on December 1, 8, 15, 2016) 1248003

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE TWENTY- SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MC HENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR OPTION ONE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2001-B, CERTIFICATES, ASSET-BACKED SERIES 2001-B Plaintiff, -v.JAMES G. WEBER, et al Defendant 16 CH 00441 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on August 18, 2016, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 1:00 PM on December 27, 2016, at the NLT Title L.L.C, 390 Congress Parkway, Suite D, Crystal Lake, IL, 60014, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: LOT 45 IN ROLLING HILL ESTATES, A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE WEST 1/2 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 34, TOWNSHIP 44 NORTH, RANGE 8, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE THEREOF RECORDED PLAT FEBRUARY 28, 1962 AS DOCUMENT 398902 IN BOOK 14 OF PLATS, PAGE 87, AS AMENDED BY INSTRUMENT RECORDED APRIL 12, 1962 AS DOCUMENT 400689, IN MCHENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as 5615 MARIETTA DRIVE, CRYSTAL LAKE, IL 60014 Property Index No. 14-34-401-035. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential

PUBLIC NOTICE PRE-FILING NOTICE NOTICE is hereby given that the office of Seneca Township Clerk, Dawn Seemann will be open from 5:30 p.m. To 8:00 p.m. Beginning December 12, 2016 through December 16 and 19th, 2016 for the purpose of accepting candidate petitions or certificates for the Consolidated election to be held on April 4, 2017 for the following offices. Supervisor – 1 Clerk – 1 Trustee – 4 Road Commissioner – 1 Assessor – 1 Location: 5604 Dunham Road Union, IL 60180 815-923-2457 /s/ Dawn M. Seemann Seneca Township Clerk (Published in the Northwest Herald a on December 1, 2016) 1248024

Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in \"AS IS\" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701 (C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver's license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county

CLASSIFIED 25 unty venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876 Please refer to file number 14-16-05268. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 E-Mail: pleadings@il.cslegal.com Attorney File No. 14-16-05268 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Case Number: 16 CH 00441 TJSC#: 36-10442 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I707909 (Published in the Northwest Herald, November 17, 24, 2016 December 1, 2016)

See more public notices on page 27

PUBLIC NOTICE City of McHenry Public Works Department Notice to Bidders Sealed proposals will be received at the Department of Public Works 1415 Industrial Drive, McHenry, IL 60050 until 2:00 PM on Wednesday December 28, 2016 for the following improvements: Water Treatment Plant #4 Residing Water Treatment Plant #4 located at 2007 Pine Street was constructed in 1993 and consists of a masonry interior shell. The exterior aluminum siding and trim work replicates existing residential homes in the area. Due to normal weathering and wear the existing siding and associated exterior trim are in need of replacement. The scope of work is to include removal and replacement of all existing siding, window/door related trim, soffit, fascia, garage door, and gutters/downspouts in their entirety. All proposals shall be submitted on forms furnished by the City of McHenry Public Works Department which may be obtained at the Public Works Department facility at 1415 Industrial Drive McHenry, IL 60050. The City of McHenry reserves the right to reject any, or all proposals and to waive technicalities. The bidder shall at all times observe and comply with all laws, ordinances, regulations and codes of federal, state, county and City governments and/or any other local governing agencies which may in any manner affect the preparation of proposals or the performance of a contract. The Contractor shall abide by the Illinois Prevailing Wage Act, 820 ILCS 130, and must submit certified payroll records with all payment requests. Any request for payment submitted without certified payroll records will not be processed by the City Accounts Payable Department. All proposals shall include a proposal guarantee in the amount of not less than 5 percent of the bid. Dated at McHenry, Illinois, 1st day of December, 2016 /s/ Janice C. Jones, City Clerk (Published in the Northwest Herald on December 1, 2016) 1248037


26 CLASSIFIED • Thursday, December 1, 2016

• Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

ANNUAL STATEMENT OF AFFAIRS SUMMARY FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 2016 Copies of the detailed Annual Statement of Affairs for the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2016 will be available for public inspection in the school district/joint agreement administrative office by December 1, 2016. Individuals wanting to review this Annual Statement of Affairs should contact: McHenry Community H.S. District #156 4716 West Crystal Lake Road, McHenry, IL 60050 (815) 385-7900 7:30 am - 4:00 pm School District/Joint Agreement Name Address Telephone Office Hours Also by January 15, 2017 the detailed Annual Statement of Affairs for the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2016, will be posted on the Illinois State Board of Education's website@ www.isbe.net. SUMMARY: The following is the Annual Statement of Affairs Summary that is required to be published by the school district/joint agreement for the past fiscal year. Statement of Operations as of June 30, 2016

Educational

Operations & Maintenance

Local Sources

1000

20,074,631

2,819,216

Flow-Through Receipts/Revenues from One District to Another District

2000

0

0

Debt Services

Transportation

Municipal Retirement/ Social Security

3,726,363

504,464

850,911

0

0

Capital Projects

Working Cash

40,634

107,515

Tort

Fire Prevention & Safety

121,834

0

State Sources

3000

4,817,806

0

0

728,734

0

0

0

0

0

Federal Sources

4000

1,028,771

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

107,515

Total Direct Receipts/Revenues

25,921,208

2,819,216

3,726,363

1,233,198

850,911

40,634

Total Direct Disbursements/Expenditures

23,707,050

3,122,349

3,595,375

1,335,672

832,260

0

Other Sources/Uses of Funds Beginning Fund Balances - July 1, 2015 Other Changes in Fund Balances Ending Fund Balances June 30, 2016

121,834

0

153,444

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

8,577,793

6,130,638

1,982,132

931,616

278,396

584,634

361,294

200,344

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

10,791,951

5,827,505

2,113,120

829,142

297,047

625,268

468,809

168,734

0

GROSS PAYMENT FOR CERTIFICATED PERSONNEL CERTIFIED UNDER $25,000: AAVANG, STEVEN E.; ANDERSON, JAMES; CHRISTIANSEN, BARBARA J.; CIALABRINI, MADISON S.; COUGHLAN, TIM; CRUTCHFIELD, PEGGY A.; CZARNY, LOUIS J.; DAHLBERG, LEON K.; DAVIS, JOHN; DUSTHIMER, JAMIE G.; ETERNICK, BRUCE D.; FARRELL, WILBUR; FITZPATRICK, SEANNA; GALVICIUS, COLLEEN B.; GERDES, CRAIG S.; GIORDANO, ANGELA M.; GORA, COURTNEY A.; GRUVER-KAMPS, LISA J.; HALM, KATHLEEN A.; HANSON, BRANDY; HOLT, JACK D.; HOWELL, PATRICK V.; HUTCHESON, COREY; LEONARD, JOHN R.; LIM, JESSICA; LINNER, MICHELE R.; MATHIS, JAY; MAZUR, DENNIS W.; MONTRESSOR, BRUCE; NEHLS, THOMAS F.; NYSTROM, LOU ANN; PHELPS, MICHAEL BARRY; ROJAS APARICIO, JAVIER; SARFF, JOHN N.; SCHENNUM, WAYNE; SIMPSON, ERIN; SINCLAIR, ELAINE A.; SITKIEWICZ, BARBARA A.; STANLEY, ALLISON R.; STASTNY, WILLIAM; STEPHAN, PATRICK J.; STULL, ADRIANNA L; SULLIVAN, MICHAEL R.; SULLIVAN, SALLY J.; SWANSON, ANTHONY M.; TOALSON JR, WILLIAM N.; WELCH, ANGELA M.; WOZNICKI, PHILIP; CERTIFIED $25,000 - $39,999: BILINSKI, ABIGAIL E.; GORNIAK, SARAH; JUST, KYLE; McCAFFERTY, DAVID A.; MILLER, KRISTI R.; POKRYWKA, MICHELLE; SHIVLEY, KAYLA; TIMPE, TERESA A.; CERTIFIED; $40,000 - $59,999: BRACHMANN, DAVID J.; CARHART, MARGARET M.; CARR, DANIEL J.; CENTELLA, ANNA E.; CORZO, OTTO; DART, BRANDON S.; DRAFFKORN, KATIE M.; EDWARDS, ROBIN; FARRIS, MELISSA L.; FOLDEN, ANNETTE N.; FRANZ, AMANDA J.; FREDERICK, PATRICE A.; GERACI JR, THOMAS J.; HARDIE, KAITLIN A.; KOBLER, COLLEEN M.; KORN, ALYX K.; LUKAS, STEFANIE A.; LUNKENHEIMER, JOHN R.; MADSON, CHRISTOPHER D.; MARTIN, DAVID A.; MCGRATH, JULIANNE M.; MORRIS, SCOTT; NOOTE, PATRICK A.; O NEIL, MEGHAN L.; OLIVER, MICHELLE C.; PENNY, LAUREN E.; PROBST, BRITTANY W.; ROSENZWEIG, CHRISTIAN; SANDERS, ERIN E.; SANTOIANNI, KELLEEN A.; SANTOSDIAZ, CHRISTINE; SIMEK, NATALIE M.; STEGENGA, ANDREW V.; THOMPSON, ALEXANDRA L.; TROST, KATELYN M.; VANDERMYDE, CARA N.; VERCELLI, LEAH M.; VESELY, DONNA L.; CERTIFIED $60,000 - $89,999: ADAM, MATTHEW J.; ADAMS, GINA M.; ALHEIT, JEFFREY A.; ANCONA, THERESA M.; ANELLI, MAUREEN M.; BALGEMAN, MAGDALENA S.; BEATTIE, JENNIFER L.; BEERBOWER, JOHN D.; BENNETT, MEGAN L.; BOCIAN, JR; BOGIE JR, PATRICK J.; BRUNSTRUM, JEFFREY R.; CONNOR, MATTHEW S.; COOPER, DREW E.; CRISTO, ANGELA L.; CUSTODIO, NICHOLAS M.; CZUBIK, BETH D.; DAVIS, THEODORA H.; DECKER, MATTHEW K.; DIEDRICH, ASHLEY L.; DIFRANCESCA, JOHN S.; DISSELHORST, LEXI A.; DRUFKE, BARBARA W.; DUNN, HEIDIE; DWIRE, SANDRA J.; DYER, PAUL J.; DZIUBINSKI, LAURA D.; EGGERT, VERONICA S.; EISERMAN, JENNIFER L.; ELLISON, RYAN P.; ERBACH, DANE G.; FAITH, KIMBERLY A.; FOREMAN, KELEIGH E.; FRANCIS, AUBREY E.; GALVICIUS, DEREK D.; GEBERT, GAIL A.; GIBOUR, SHAE M.; GUARDALABENE, JACOB A.; HALVORSON, SARAH E.; HILLIER, ANDREW J.; HOKINSON, KRISTIAN D.; HUTCHINSON, DENNIS J.; JOHNSON, ROBERT A.; KADLEC, MELANIE A.; KALISEK, JOSEPH W.; KENNEDY, MICHAEL P.; KERR, MARLO J.; KIM, PETER J.; KOZLOWSKI, EVAN R.; LEVON, STEVEN A.; LUKAS, ANDREW W.; MAHLEBASHIAN, SHANNON K.; MALENIUS, ADAM P.; McCONNELL, MARTHA J.; MENKE, CURTIS E.; METROPULOS, JESSICA M.; MICKLINGHOFF, RUSSELL A.; MILLER, MICHAEL P.; MYHRE, JASON A.; MYNES, TRICIA M.; NELSON, JAMES M.; NIEMIC, ROBERT A.; NOMIKOUDIS, GINA M.; OWENS, KYLE; PERLOW, HOWARD L.; POCZTOWSKI, SHAINA G.; POLLOCK, CAROLYN A.; PONTARELLI, JULIA C.; RANDS, LISA A. U.; REID, MAURA B.; REITZ, LON; RIDLEY, ROBERT B.; ROCKWEILER, BRIAN R.; RYAN, TIFFANY E.; SCHAEFER, RICK W.; SHAVER, KELLY C.; SINDELAR, KIMBERLY D.; SLIFFY, SHEILA J.; STECK, MEGHAN E.; STERNER, SEAN R.; THEEL, EMMA JO; TRUAX, BRIAN D.; WILBOIS, BRIAN J.; WRIGHT, BRYAN L.; CERTIFIED $90,000 AND OVER: BEAGLE, TIMOTHY;BLAKE, ERIC D.; BOWGREN, AMBER D.; BURMEISTER, BARRY L.; BURMEISTER, KARYN L.; CARUSO, ANTHONY J.; CHROMY, SHEREE; COOPER, PAULA K.; COVALT, BECKY L.; CURRIE, MARLA E.; CURRIE, RAYMOND; CURRY, LISA M.; DANGELO, DAVID M.; EISERMAN, GREGORY C.; ELLMAN, NANCY W.; FENTON, DEBORAH J.; FITZGIBBONS, TERRENCE M.; FREIBERGER, KATHERINE; FUNKHOUSER, KYLE M.; GADDY, ROBERT; GARRETT, DAVID M.; GROSS, DALE E.; HOBSON, KYLE N.; HUBER, JACLYN E.; HURCKES, MICHAEL P.; LAWSON, DAVID T.; MAUCK, RYAN E.; McCARREL BURMEISTER, PAMELA; McCOLLOUGH, JANET A.; MEYER, MICHAEL G.; MYERS, CHERYL B.; MYERS, GARY E.; PADDOCK, TIMOTHY

M.; PEARSON, KURT; POPOVICH, JAMES R.; POTTHOFF, MARSHA L.; PRIMUS, DOUGLAS; QUINNETT, MICHAEL; RICHTER, JOAN E.; ROBERTS, MICHAEL; ROCKWEILER, STACY ANN; ROGERS, VICTORIA A.; SEILER, SUE ANN; SODA PIEKARSKI, VICTORIA; STOFFEL, PATRICIA M.; VALLIANATOS, CARL D.; WILM, PAUL; ZIMMERMAN, MICHELE, GROSS PAYMENT FOR NON-CERTIFICATED PERSONNEL NON-CERTIFIED UNDER $25,000: ACKERMAN, CATHERINE P.; ADAIR, ANN T.; AGUIRRE, INGRID X.; ALATORRE-LAGUNES, NATALIE; ALLEN, CARY J.; ALM,VANESSA V.; ANAYA, MONICA; ANDERSON, LAURA; ANDERSON, LEANNA K.; ARVANITIS, GEORGE G.; BADGLEY, ZACHARY J.; BARTA, RYAN; BAUER, LIANE S.; BENEDETTO, JULIANA M.; BLATZHEIM, AMANDA; BOONE, CANDICE M.; BRICE, MARIELLYN M.; BRIXY, VALERIE P.; BROADUS, HANNAH; BRUCE, MARY L.; BURGIN, KATHRYN A.; BURKE, GALE R.; BURLEY, DANIELLE G.; BURMEISTER, TYLER; CALIENDO, MICHAEL; CAVANAUGH, PATRICIA K.; CAYABYAB, JON-LUC; CHEATHAM, SHERYL L.; CLARK, JASON; COLE, JEFFREY; COLOMER, KAREN G.; CYRIER, MARGARET A.; DAME, LAUREN N.; DANGELO, MARK E.; DAS, BRANDON; DAWSON, JESSICA E.; DOHERTY, CATHERINE; DONAHUE, TAMARA; DORFNER, ANN M.; DYRA, MARY F.; ELEM, STANLEY A.; EVERITT, KATHLEEN J.; FLYNN, MARY M.; FORD, MARY E.; FOWLES, CRAIG A.; FREIBERGER, CODY D.; GALWAY, JOSHUA S.; GANN, DIANE M.; GARCIA, FILIBERTO; GAUL, KATELYN; GIAMALVA, JOEL A.; GIAMALVA, JUDI A.; GIGL, DEBRA; GILLIGAN, DARRIN J.; GIURLANI, ANTHONY J.; GONZALEZ, MARIBEL; GRIEVE, ALEXANDER S.; GRIFFIN, LOGAN J.; HALLIN, DILLON F.; HANSEN, CHARLES R.; HARTER, KIERA B.; HARTZBURG, JAKE A.; HAUBOLD, NANCY JO; HAYES, WENDY; HEIDEMANN, CELESTE; HENNING, RUSSELL C.; HERNANDEZ-WARNER, RIKAINE R.; HEUER, APRIL L.; HOLDERMAN, CAROL L.; HOYER, KIMBERLY M. ROY; IDSTEIN, RYAN A.; INGRAFFIA, MICHELLE; JOHNSON, DOMENICA; KARRAS, ANDREW M.; KAZORT, TONYA; KILCHENMAN, DANIEL E.; KNEIP, JUSTIN J.; KOCISZEWSKI, CHRISTINA P.; KOGAN, DINA; KOTIW, RUTH A.; KRATZKE, ELIZABETH; KULBA, DENISE; KUSCH, MICHELLE; LARIMORE, LAURA; LAWSON, JASMINE; LEMUS, EFREN L.; LESNIAK, SUSAN C.; LETIZIA, APRIL F.; LYNCH, JAMES; MAHER, PATRICK; MATTESON, HELEN M.; MATTIOLI, DANA; MCCARTHY, ANDREA; MCELROY, GABRIELLA; MCREYNOLDS, MARY K.; MCREYNOLDS, STEVEN A.; MENDEZ, CHARLIE; MESZAROS, HALEY M.; MOLNAR, MALGORZATA M.; MOORE, ANDREW J.; MURPHY, CATHY A.; MURPHY, ELIZABETH M.; MUZZALL, MIA R.; NELSON, KAREN H.; NOLAN, CYNTHIA L.; OLIFER, GEORGE B.; ORTEGA-TROVILLION, LORENA; OTTO, TAYLOR; PAYTON, SERENA; PETERSON, KATHLEEN; PETROV, BOYKA; POWERS, DONNA; PRESTON, JAMES; PURICH, CHRISTINE A.; QUARTERMAN, SAMANTHA; RAY, JOSEPH D.; REEL, SHANNON C.; REIF, LAUREN D.; REISINGER, ANDREW S.; REUTER, CONNIE L.; RISKA, HILLARY; RIZZO, SAMANTHA; ROBINSON, VIRGINIA M.; RODRIGUEZ, IVELISSE; ROMME, ZACHARY A.; RUDZENA, JOHN R.; SADOWSKI, JANE L.; SANDACZ, DANIEL J.; SAUER, SHANNON; SCHMIDT, DANETTE; SCHOLL, JOANN V.; SCHWEITZER, BRIAN; SHARP, KATHERINE M.; SHEA, NANCY; SHEEHY, KRISTI; SHERMAN, GABRIELLE F.; SHERMAN, NORA F.; SIMMONS, PAMELA; SIMON, MATTHEW W.; SINCLAIR, DEAN R.; SPATOL, JENNIFER; STALEY, BETH L.; STELTZRIEDE, CHRISTINE A.; STERRETT, SAMANTHA; STORLIE, KARAN B.; STRICKFADEN, DANIEL; SWANK, SAMANTHA; SWANSON, SPENCER V.; TEUBER, ZAKARY T.; TURNER, CHARLYNN R.; VAN BEEK, BARBARA L.; WALTER, BEATRICE M.; WALTER, JACLYN; WEISENBERGER, ABIGAIL M.; WHEELER, JAMES; WILSON, DAVID B.; WILSON, DESHAWN M.; WITBECK, JORDAN; WOLFF, MEGAN; ZASADA, RYAN S.; ZIESK, JACK T. NON-CERTIFIED; $25,000 - $39,999: BAUMGARTNER, SUSAN; BENEDETTO, JEAN P.; DEJA, DENNIS L.; GARCIA, MANUEL; HARTER, PATRICIA A.; HEATH, RORY L.; JOHANES, LYNDA D.; JOHNSTON, DAVID; KARNATZ, CATHLEEN; KELLS, ANDREA; KMIEC-GALASSO, DENISE A.; MACDONALD, REBECCA; NELSON, BETH V.; OBRIEN, VANESSA; ORZEHOSKIE, SARAH R.; PETERSON, LAURA J.; RABE, KENNETH W.; ROGAN, ELEANOR L.; SCHURING, ROBIN R.; SIEGRIST, KYLE D.; TABISZ, RICHARD D.; WIRTZ, ELIZABETH; WITHROW, CHERIE; NON-CERTIFIED; $40,000 - $59,999: CYNOWA, LEROY A.; DEVER,LON; HARTZBURG, CYNTHIA M.; KOZICKI, HARRIET; KUECHEL, BONNIE; MOE, DOUGLAS F.; MORROW, NICOLE D.; OTTO, JENNIFER E.; PIGOTT, TIMOTHY P.; RICH, BRIAN R.; ROTH, KENDRA K.; NON-CERTIFIED; $60,000 AND OVER: MAY, JOANN; WEISENBERGER, KEVIN G.; ZELEK, JOE;


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Thursday, December 1, 2016 • Payments over $2,500, excluding wages and salaries. BSN SPORTS INC - remit $2,712.61; ELECTRONIX EXPRESS $2,738.34; MCHENRY SPECIALTIES $2,741.00; SCHOOL HEALTH CORPORATION remit $2,755.70; BOONE CREEK GOLF CLUB $2,784.00; MUSIC & ARTS CENTER INC $2,793.51; MCHENRY HIGH SCHOOL-ATHLETIC $2,800.00; CRISIS PREVENTION INSTITUTE $2,810.00 FLINN SCIENTIFIC INC. remit $2,861.64; MAILFINANCE INC $2,874.60; ECOLAB INC $2,880.46; MCH. ELEMENTARY SCH. DIST.15misc $2,901.47; HOUGHTON MIFFLIN HARCOURT $2,950.00; DAVISSON, LORI $2,960.00; BIDD CONSULTING $3,000.00; UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE $3,000.00; MINUTEMAN PRESS $3,038.70; NORTHWEST COMM HEALTHCARE $3,100.50; GOPHER PERFORMANCE $3,192.91; PHONAK INC $3,201.63; LANTER DISTRIBUTING LLC $3,212.54; INDUSTRIAL CONTROLS DIST. LLC $3,400.82; LAKE GENEVA FRESH AIR ASSOC INC $3,480.00; INDUSTRIAL APPRAISAL COMPANY $3,510.00; CENTURY SPRINGS - remit $3,530.14; FREY SCIENTIFIC - remit $3,557.72; ELEMENTAL SOLUTIONS LLC $3,615.50; GRAPHIC 14 INC. $3,659.70; CASH $3,682.24; PRAIRIE RIDGE HS ATHLETIC $3,873.00; MAKERBOT INDUSTRIES LLC $3,905.48; TAPCO $4,046.15; PALOS SPORTS INC $4,051.87; REGIONAL OFFICE of EDUCATION $4,200.00; USPS-HASLER $4,200.00; MILWAUKEE SCHOOL-ENGINEERING $4,215.00; MPS remit $4,336.20; ON TARGET SALES $4,372.00; FELLERS INC $4,496.93; Educational Management Consulting Inc $4,560.00; UNILOCK CHICAGO INC $4,560.10; POLAR ELECTRO INC $4,594.20; ALL PRO SOUND $4,625.00; STA-KLEEN, INC. $4,650.00; JOHNSON CONTROLS INC $4,710.00; MCHENRY COUNTY COLLEGE $4,720.00; TDS DOOR CO & GLASS $4,751.00; SCHOOLDUDE.COM - remit $4,756.24; MCHENRY HIGH SCHOOL FOOD SERVICE $4,795.57; ANDERSON LOCK $4,827.91; COMMUNICATIONS DIRECT INC $4,854.50; CAREER CRUISING $4,900.00; UNIVERSITY of ILLINOIS-PLTW $4,948.00; ARTHUR J. GALLAGHER RMS INC $4,950.00; RAYMONDS BOWL $5,000.00; BUCK BROTHERS INC $5,109.99; SPECIALIZED DATA SYSTEMS INC. $5,141.40; JENSENS PLUMBING & HEATING INC $5,266.40; GORDON FOOD SERVICES $5,294.29; NWEA $5,400.00; TRI-DIM FILTER CORP $5,762.36; SHOUTPOINT INC $6,020.00; PSfinishing BOOK BINDERS $6,454.00; AQUA PURE ENTERPRISES INC $6,546.48; CAROLINA BIOLOGICAL SUPPLY remit $6,556.26; JOURNEYED.com INC $6,648.00; ESSCOE LLC $6,858.65; MONARCH RENOVATION INC $6,880.00; JOSTENS remit $6,941.75; CAMBRIDGE EDUCATIONAL SRVS $7,090.00; MCGRAW-HILL SCH.EDUC.HOLDINGS $7,112.73; CONSERV FS INC $7,324.53; COMPASSLEARNING INC $7,400.00; SCHNELKER, LYNN $7,500.00; COMM. HIGH SCHOOL D-117 $7,626.00; AMERICAN TIME $7,684.63; BAKER & TAYLOR $7,699.22; FRONTLINE TECHNOLOGIES GROUP LLC $7,789.50; HINSHAW & CULBERTSON LLP $7,863.59; EBSCO INFORMATION-remit $7,923.45; GENERAL DUCT CLEANING, INC. $8,050.00; CORNELL INTERVENTIONS INC $8,235.00; CAREY ELECTRIC CONT.INC $8,250.00; STAR TOTAL PRINT SOLUTIONS $8,263.58; ALPHA BAKING CO INC $8,347.96; SKEETER KELL SPORTING GOODS INC $8,373.38; SOUTH CAMPUS $8,499.15; ROCKFORD BOE-FINANCIAL SRV $8,616.16; G & K SERVICES remit $8,617.48; ANDERSON, JAMES $8,624.92; IL. ASSOC. of SCHOOL BOARDS $8,704.00; ALEXIAN BROTHERS $8,840.00; SHARP AUTO BODY $8,993.07; GUARDIAN $9,058.06; SHERWIN WILLIAMS $9,091.25; VIRCO $9,117.14; PCM - TIGERDIRECT SALES INC $9,337.00; M. Hardt And Associates, Inc. $9,339.00; OFFICE DEPOT CORP - remit $9,461.90; DOTY & SONS CONCRETE PROD.INC $9,702.36; JAMF SOFTWARE LLC $10,000.00; ONARGA ACADEMY $10,093.24; RIDDELL - ALL AMERICAN SPORTS CORP $10,177.13; SPORTDECALS SPORT - remit $10,196.80; SUBURBAN ELEVATOR $10,256.00; DIRECT FITNESS

PUBLIC NOTICE

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 22nd JUDICIAL CIRCUIT McHENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS -IN PROBATE In the Matter of the Estate of MARY LOU ZIERER Deceased, CLAIM NOTICE Case No. 16PR342 Notice is given of the death of: MARY LOU ZIERER of: HARVARD, IL Letters of office were issued on: 11/17/2016 to Representitive: WILLIAM K ZIERER JR 707 S. OLBRICH RD HARVARD, IL 60033 whose attorney is: FlLLER & ASSOCIATES 3901 N ROUTE 23 PO BOX 115 MARENGO, IL 60152 Claims against the estate may be filed within six months from the date of first publication. Any claim not filed within six months from the date of first publication or claims not filed within three months from the date of mailing or delivery of Notice to Creditor, whichever is later, shall be barred. Claims may be filed in the office of the Clerk of Circuit Court at the McHenry County Government Center, 2200 North Seminary Avenue, Woodstock, Illinois, 60098, or with the representative, or both. Copies of claims filed with the Clerk must be mailed or delivered to the representative and to his attorney within ten days after it has been filed.

/s/ Katherine M. Keefe Clerk of the Circuit Court (Published in the Northwest Herald, on December 1, 8, 15, 2016) 1247558

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PROPOSED PROPERTY TAX INCREASE FOR THE ALGONQUIN-LAKE IN THE HILLS FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT A public hearing to approve a proposed property tax levy increase for the Algonquin-Lake in the Hills Fire Protection District for 2016 will be held on December 14, 2016 at 7:00 p.m. at the Algonquin-Lake in the Hills Fire Protection District Headquarters Station located at 1020 W Algonquin Road, Lake in the Hills, IL 60156. Any person desiring to appear at the public hearing and present testimony to the taxing district may contact District Fire Chief Peter Van Dorpe at the District Headquarters Station located at 1020 W Algonquin Road, Lake in the Hills, IL 60156, 847-658-8233. The corporate and special purpose property taxes extended or abated for 2015 were $9,091,537. The proposed corporate and special purpose property taxes to be levied for 2016 are $10,482,500. This represents a 15.3% increase over the previous year. The property taxes extended for debt service and public building commission leases for 2015 were $0.00. The estimated property taxes to be levied for debt service and public building commission leases for 2016 are $0.00. This represents a 0% increase over the previous year. The total property taxes extended or abated for 2015 were $9,091,537. The estimated total property taxes to be levied for 2016

prope y are $10,482,500. This represents a 15.3% increase over the previous year. (Published in the Northwest Herald on December 1, 2016) 1245970

PUBLIC NOTICE ASSUMED NAME PUBLICATION NOTICE Public Notice is hereby given that on November 11, 2016, a certificate was filed in the Office of the County Clerk of McHenry County, Illinois, setting forth the names and post-office address of all of the persons owning, conducting and transacting the business known as BRUSH AND ROLLER PAINTING located at: 1432 Park Ridge Drive Crystal Lake, IL 60014 Dated November 11, 2016 /s/ Mary E. McClellan McHenry County Clerk (Published in the Northwest Herald on November 17, 24, December 1, 2016) 1244171

To subscribe to the Northwest Herald Call 815-459-8118 or visit: www.NWHerald.com

CLASSIFIED 27

SOLUTIONS $10,412.34; GRAINGER $10,777.21; ACE HARDWARE,BJORKMANS $10,813.18; SOUND INCORPORATED $10,848.00; HOLIDAY INN C.L. CONF.CENTER $10,976.34; MENARDS FOX LAKE $11,104.27; REICHES PLUMBING SEWER RODDING $11,270.00; POPE INSTRUMENT REPAIR $11,975.00; VIRCO INC $11,996.88; FORECAST5 ANALYTICS INC. $12,000.00; TWIN SUPPLIES LTD $12,143.24; HOME DEPOT CREDIT SRVS. remit $12,244.78; GREATAMERICA FINANCIAL SRVS $12,602.61; CENGAGE LEARNING INC remit $12,801.80; CDW- remit $13,815.50; partners4results $14,040.00; C & S FABRICATION SRVS. INC $14,200.00; HASLER, TOTAL FUNDS BY $14,364.12; FOLLETT SCHOOL SOLUTIONS INC remit $14,616.35; LARSON EQUIP & FURNITURE CO $15,940.00; MEIERS OUTDOOR WORLD $16,125.00; WASTE MANAGEMENT NORTH $16,261.56; BWP & ASSOCIATES LTD $16,373.97; Tandus Centiva $17,121.68; MCGRAWHILL EDUCATION $17,313.88; PMA FINANCIAL NETWORK INC $17,333.28; ZUKOWSKI- ROGERSFLOOD & MCARDLE $17,543.75; R.A. ADAMS ENTERPRISES INC $18,351.51; McHenry High School Print Shop $18,723.73; NCS PEARSON INC $19,168.00; QUILL CORPORATION - remit $19,395.16; EDER - CASELLA & CO $19,550.00; A-YARD CORPORATION $19,810.00; HERB FITZGERALD CO INC $20,200.00; AT & T MOBILITY $20,281.16; ACT $20,777.00; KaTom Restaurant Supply $20,960.71; TWOTREES $21,600.00; SAMARITAN COUNSELING CTR NORTHWEST $22,100.00; TW PROMOTIONS INC $22,100.00; ADVANCED FIRE PROTECTION & SAFETY INC $22,827.50; APPLE INC $23,396.00; CORNERSTONE CARE INC $23,415.00; CUSTOM MUSIC INTERNATIONAL $23,771.00; SCHURING & SCHURING INC $23,841.43; GREAT LAKES COCA COLA DIST. LLC $24,873.94; RICHMOND-BURTON C.H.S.D. 157 $25,570.32; SPECIALTY FLOORS INC $25,590.00; ARCON ASSOCIATES INC $27,009.27; BURRIS EQUIPMENT CO remit $27,092.00; GARY NAWROCKI $27,197.04; PARTNERING for PREVENTION LLC $27,313.75; VERITIV OPERATING COMPANY $28,620.00; THRESHOLDS $29,197.28; STEINER ELECTRIC $29,918.75; FRANCZEK RADELET P.C. $30,651.21; MIDWEST EDUC. FURNISHINGS INC $30,851.15; BUSS FORD LINCOLN $30,897.54; MOTT, JESSICA $31,444.25; ONE STOP INC - remit $33,014.00; PCM - TIGERDIRECT remit $35,945.82; ONE HOPE UNITED-CARE PROGRAM $36,113.12; COMPUTER INFO. CONCEPTS INC $40,276.50; AT & T $40,296.11; HAMILTON ACADEMY INC. $40,818.21; CONNECTIONS DAY SCHOOL $43,050.37; COMPUTER POWER SYSTEMS INC $43,760.78; KOTOVSKY, DARLENE $44,192.50; IMAGETEC L.P. $44,556.05; BETH M MEGA $45,280.00; KANSAS STATE BANK $47,199.00; AP EXAMS $47,220.00; ATHLETICO MANAGEMENT LLC $47,312.48; AMERICAN BUILDING SERVICES $49,495.00; SCHOOLBELLS TRANSPORTATION LTD $50,784.00; PMA LEASING INC. $51,999.84; PROJECT LEAD THE WAY INC. $53,948.00; PROVANTAGE LLC $60,129.39; QUINLAN & FABISH MUSIC CO $64,409.25; COMCAST $64,455.51; TOTAL STRENGTH AND SPEED $68,000.00; CAMELOT EDUC-HOFFMAN ESTATES $72,706.00; SUMMIT SCHOOL INC $83,280.33; CENTERPOINT ENERGY SRVS INC $84,869.96; SEAL OF ILLINOIS $94,019.27; TONYAN & SONS INC,WM. $106,645.50; COMMUNITY HSD 155 $107,694.78; S.E.D.O.L. $118,279.00; APPLE INC - orders/remit $122,257.42; NEW CONNECTIONS ACADEMY $124,640.18; CITY OF MCHENRY $131,836.14; S.E.D.O.M. $179,665.59; PERFORMANCE FOODSERVICE $185,352.47; BMO HARRIS MASTERCARD $188,468.65; S. K. TRANSPORTATION INC $200,752.00; CLIC $249,155.00; BEHM PAVEMENT MAINT.INC $276,363.00; ALLENDALE ASSOC.CORP $291,173.01; MCH. ELEMENTARY SCH. DIST.15split $331,475.18; WOODSTOCK COMM.U.S.D. 200 $354,643.97; GCA SERVICES GROUP $493,773.12; MidAMERICAN ENERGY SERVICES LLC $515,375.70; MCH. ELEMENTARY SCH. DIST.15 $974,909.65; NIHIP $2,892,299.01


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Thursday, December 1, 2016

| NORTHWEST HERALD

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GET M RE BED FOR YOUR BUCK! SAVE ON OUR ADJUSTABLE BEDS SLEEP. LOUNGE. WHATEVER. BETTER! Relieve pressure by raising your head or feet. Enjoy a relaxing massage at the touch of a button with Verlo’s adjustable beds.

SAVE UP TO

400 OFF

$

ADJUSTABLE BED SETS One coupon per transaction. Not applicable on previous purchases. Expires 9/30/16. See store for details. COUPON CODE #7501SC

$3

SAVE UP TO

00 OFF

ON SELECT FLOOR MODELS One coupon per transaction. Not applicable on previous purchases. Expires 9/30/16. See store for details. COUPON CODE #7501SC

CRYSTAL LAKE 5150 North West Hwy • (815) 455-2570 LAKE GENEVA 2462 Hwy 120 • (262) 249-0420 McHENRY 3710 West Elm St. • (815) 578-8375

SM-CL0416509

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