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NORTHWEST HERALD W ED NES DA Y , N O V E MB E R 3 0 , 20 16 • $1.5 0

THE ONLY DAILY NEWSPAPER PUBLISHED IN McHENRY COUNTY

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SPORTS

Senior shines Rice leads McHenry girls over Prairie Ridge in FVC victory / B2 LOCAL NEWS

Lame-duck bills McSweeney, Franks will consider no tax hike a success / A4 NATION

‘Hell opened’

Residents rough landscape to escape Tenn. wildfires / A26

BUSINESS WIZARD

Marian Central senior plans to run gaming company after graduation / A3 TODAY’S WEATHER Fresh Ingredients Incredible Taste From omelettes to apple pancakes to our lunch menu, our chefs prepare only the finest food for your enjoyment. 5680 Northwest Highway, Crystal Lake View our online menu! 815.479.9000 richardwalkers.com Open Everyday 6:30 am - 2:30 pm

santa fe omelette

HIGH

LOW

42 35

A cold front will sag south of the area by the late afternoon, and temperatures will fall from the 40s into the mid-30s by Wednesday evening. Complete forecast on page A5


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016

2

NORTHWEST

HERALD A

Good morning, McHenry County ... The 2015 Kiwanis Santa Run begins last year in downtown Crystal Lake. This year’s 5K event will be from 9 to 10 a.m. Sunday at the Raue Center for the Arts, 26 N. Williams St., Crystal Lake.

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Photo courtesy of Robin Pendergast

Ever consider putting on a Santa costume and running for a good cause? Believe it or not, you could join about 1,000 Santas and do exactly that this weekend in downtown Crystal Lake. The fifth annual Kiwanis Santa Run will be held Sunday morning at the Raue Center for the Arts. Just imagine being a part of the photo above and contributing to charity at the same time. Last year’s event raised $35,000 for Turning Point of McHenry County, CASA of McHenry County, Girls on the Run of Northwest Illinois, Big Brothers Big Sisters of McHenry County and Main Stay Therapeutic Farm. The same nonprofits, along with the Kiwanis Club of Crystal Lake, will benefit from this year’s event. And if you’re not a runner, joggers and walkers are welcome. A 5K and a 1-mile trek are scheduled. “This sea of Santas on the first Sunday of December is truly phenomenal. It emulates Americana in a marvelous way,” race director

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Dress as Santa; run for charity

News Editor Kevin Lyons 815-526-4505 kelyons@shawmedia.com

All rights reserved. Copyright 2016

The daily

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FROM THE EDITOR’S DESK Dan McCaleb and In Sync Systems owner Mike Splitt said in a news release about the event. For a donation of $38, every 5K participant receives a five-piece Santa suit, beard included. The registration fee for the 1-mile walk is $15. To register, visit www.kiwanissantarunforkids.org by Thursday. You also can register from 3 to 6 p.m. Friday and from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday at the Running Depot, 30 N. Williams St., Crystal Lake. Last-minute registration is available from 7:30 to 8:45 a.m. on race day.

• Dan McCaleb is executive editor of the Northwest Herald. Email him at dmccaleb@ shawmedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @ Dan_McCaleb.

Scan this QR code with your smartphone to access the Northwest Herald’s new commuter page featuring updated Metra and traffic information, weather and more. Or visit the page directly at NWHerald.com/commuter.

WHERE IT’S AT

Advice.............................................................A38-39 Business...............................................................A30 Buzz.......................................................................A31 Classified.................................................. Taste 7-19 Comics..............................................A36-37, Taste 7 Health....................................................A32-33 Lottery.............................................................A25 Nation&World................................................A25-27

GET OUR NEWSLETTER Sign up for our Morning Update newsletter to get a mix of our best stories straight to your email Monday through Friday. Visit NWHerald.com/ newsletter.

Neighbors............................................................A23 Puzzles............................................................A38-39 Obituaries.......................................................A21-22 Opinions.........................................................A28-29 Sports.................................................................B1-11 State...............................................................A24 Television................................................................A35 Weather.................................................................A5

The daily

POST Facebook.com/NWHerald

“That’s a terrible intersection! There should be a light......lots of accidents!!!!” Robin Bishop

on a story about a Monday night crash near Route 20 and Harmony Road

The daily

DIGIT

24

The number of seat belt tickets the Woodstock Police Department wrote during a special enforcement campaign around Thanksgiving

ON THE COVER Marian Central Catholic High School senior Tyler Rambuski-Salzman has seen his business, Gamercrates, grow since it opened in 2014. He plans to run the business full time after graduation in the spring. See story, page A3.

Photo by H. Rick Bamman – hbamman@shawmedia.com

CORRECTIONS & CLARIFICATIONS

Accuracy is important to the Northwest Herald, and we want to correct mistakes promptly. Please call errors to our attention by phone, 815-4594122; email, tips@nwherald.com; or fax, 815-459-5640.


A CLOSER LOOK

3

Marian Central senior develops online service for serious gamers By NATE LINHART

nlinhart@shawmedia.com

W

OODSTOCK – Some high school seniors might be struggling to figure out what they want to do as a career, but Marian Central Catholic High School’s Tyler Rambuski-Salzman seems to have his future planned out. Rambuski-Salzman, 17, has been playing video games since he was a kid, and he really took a liking to competitive gaming, which led the Marian Central senior to follow his passion to another level. “I got the idea to start my own gaming business,” Rambuski-Salzman said. With the help of an invest-

ment from his mother, Rambuski-Salzman officially launched his business, GamerCrates, on Oct. 1, 2014. GamerCrates is a monthly eSports and gaming subscription box with a new theme every month. The company started at his home and moved into a commercial space in Woodstock last January. “We’ve actually grown by about 800 percent since our first year,” Rambuski-Salzman said. “We’ve also partnered with major people in the gaming industry by going to events.” A GamerCrate typically will include a T-shirt, an energy drink and other miscellaneous gear,

See GAMERCRATES, page A16

Photos by H. Rick Bamman – hbamman@shawmedia.com

Marian Central Catholic High School senior Tyler Rambuski-Salzman checks the contents of one of his GamerCrates products. Rambuski-Salzman started the eSports and gaming subscription service in 2014, offering a box with a monthly theme packed with gaming gear and other related items for hardcore gamers.

Rambuski-Salzman sits in his GamerCrates office in Woodstock. GamerCrates is not Rambuski-Salzman’s first foray into the business of gaming. He started his own forum called Game ’Til Insane at age 13, then interned as a designer with Anthony Scalzi of Connecticut-based Aporia Customs, which customizes gaming controllers.

Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016

LET THE GAMES BEGIN


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016

4

LOCAL NEWS LOCAL BRIEF Volunteers needed to help seniors with tax preparation

AARP Tax-Aid is seeking volunteers to help seniors in McHenry County with federal and state tax preparation. No previous tax experience is necessary, but good computer skills are required. Volunteers must satisfactorily complete a required test to become IRS-certified tax preparers. Those interested should register at www.aarp.org/taxvolunteer. – Northwest Herald

LOCAL DEATHS OBITUARIES ON PAGES A21-22

Rocco Peter Dawson 81, Harvard Pat Doyle 62 Regina Galaher 85, Lake in the Hills William L. Jacobs 92, Woodstock Donald P. Kaiser 80, Woodstock Christine “Teena” Kochan 72, McHenry David Rainey 68, Fox River Grove

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McSweeney, Franks: Bills a success if no rise in taxes By KEVIN P. CRAVER

kcraver@shawmedia.com Two McHenry County lawmakers said they will consider it a success if the separate bills they have filed in Springfield during the last days of session torpedo any effort to raise taxes in the lame-duck legislative session. In hopes of getting their bills to a vote in the full House by the end of the fall veto season Rep. Jack Thursday, state Reps. Franks David McSweeney and Jack Franks will have both of their bills heard Wednesday morning in the State Government Administration Committee that Franks chairs. With a six-month stopgap state budget set to expire at the end of the year, both lawmakers said at a Tuesday news conference that they want to eliminate any chance that a “grand compromise” package, which likely would include an income tax increase, would be ramrodded through in the final days of the 99th General Assembly. House Resolution 1494, filed by McSweeney, R-Barrington Hills, seeks to put House members on record as opposing a lame-duck tax increase. “I strongly oppose raising the Illinois income tax rate. Raising taxes during a lame-duck session will hurt families and kill jobs,” McSweeney said. Franks, D-Marengo, filed a proposal to put a constitutional amendment before voters that would require threefifths House and Senate supermajorities to raise taxes between the November election and the seating of the new General Assembly on the second Wednesday of January. Under current law, the three-fifths legislative threshold that kicks in with the end of the spring session May 31 resets back to simple majority on Jan. 1, which gives lawmakers a window after every election to pass controversial legislation without incurring the wrath of voters. “The actions of unaccountable legislators have been allowed to go unchecked for far too long,” Franks said. “The idea that a ‘grand bargain’ may be negotiated to pass another tax increase in the final days of session is unacceptable, as it undermines the ability of voters to hold their elected officials accountable.”

The odds of his proposed House Joint Resolution Constitutional Amendment 62 clearing both houses with the needed three-fifths majorities is slim, but Franks said he will declare it a success if the new General Assembly is sworn in Jan. 11 without the previous one raising taxes. Lawmakers used the lame-duck session after the 2010 election to pass a 67 percent income tax increase on individual filers and 46 percent on businesses. Rep. David McSweeney It passed without a single Republican vote and with the bare minimum needed in both houses. Twelve lawmakers who were leaving office voted for it, six of whom later ended up with high-paying government jobs – two of them had campaigned against a tax increase before losing their re-election bids.

Illinois has been without a permanent budget since July 2015 because of the stalemate between Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner and the Democratic leaders of the General Assembly. Rauner has signaled that he would be willing to approve a budget that increases taxes, but only if portions of his Turnaround Agenda aimed at reversing Illinois’ economic misfortunes are adopted. A number of bipartisan working groups have been meeting behind closed doors to discuss compromises, hence the talk of a bargain being struck. Both Franks and McSweeney have harshly criticized the meetings being closed to the public. Franks is leaving state office to become chairman of the McHenry County Board. McSweeney said he and others will take up the charge in the next session to get the constitutional amendment on the ballot in 2018.

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TODAY’S WEATHER BROUGHT TO YOU BY

SEVEN-DAYFORECAST FORECAST MCHENRY COUNTY SEVEN-DAY FORFOR McHENRY COUNTY A cold front will sag south of the area by the late afternoon. Temperatures will start falling from the 40s into the mid-30s by the evening. Don’t be surprised to see a snowflake by the early evening. Cloudy and cool Thursday and Friday along with a flurry or two. Sunshine will return this weekend along with unseasonably mild air for this time of year.

TODAY

42 35

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

Cloudy & cool; few flurries around

Cloudy and still cool

39 30

M. cloudy, breezy & cooler

38 24

Galena

Freeport

41/34

AIR QUALITY TODAY

0-50 Good, 51-100 Moderate, 101-150, Unhealthy for sensitive groups, 151-200 Unhealthy 201-300 Very Unhealthy, 301-500 Hazardous Source: Illinois EPA

41/35

43/35

Rockford

New

Dec 7

Dec 13

Dec 20

Dec 29

43/35

45/34

McHenry

44/36

Waukegan

47/35

Crystal Lake

42/35

Chicago

45/35

45/36

Orland Park 46/35 Hammond

La Salle

48/37

Joliet

43/35

Kewanee

46/37

Aurora

45/35

41/33

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Evanston

Oak Park

46/36

42/35

Sandwich

Davenport

45/37

St. Charles

42/35

Rock Falls

Arlington Heights Elgin

45/36

DeKalb

43 31

Kenosha

42/35

42/35

41/33

46/35

Michigan City

49/37

Gary

49/36 Valparaiso

Ottawa

42/34

44/35

48/35

Kankakee

46/33

FOX RIVER STAGES

NATIONAL WEATHER

Fld: flood stage. Prs: stage in feet at 7 a.m Tuesday. Chg: change in previous 24 hours. Station Fld Prs Chg

Algonquin Burlington, WI Fox Lake McHenry Montgomery New Munster, WI Nippersink Lake Waukesha

3 11 -4 13 11 -6

1.72 7.06 2.90 1.60 11.90 6.88 2.79 3.72

+0.11 +0.48 +0.13 +0.17 +0.42 +0.70 +0.04 +0.54

WEATHER HISTORY On Nov. 30, 1985, Rancho Mirage, Calif., had 1.56 inches of rain. This was 150 percent of the total rainfall for the first 10 months of 1985.

Thunderstorms, tornadoes and hurricanes.

Last

Harvard

46 35

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

A:

Full

Cloudy & mild; few showers late

43/35

Clinton

SUN AND MOON

First

Increasing clouds and mild

43 29

Hampshire

the U.S. during late November?

MOON PHASES

Mostly sunny and pleasant

43/34

WEATHER TRIVIA™ Q: What three storms rarely occur in

Sunrise today .......................... 7:02 a.m. Sunset today ........................... 4:22 p.m. Moonrise today ........................ 7:43 a.m. Moonset today ......................... 5:41 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow .................... 7:03 a.m. Sunset tomorrow ..................... 4:22 p.m. Moonrise tomorrow ................. 8:35 a.m. Moonset tomorrow .................. 6:28 p.m.

Partly sunny and seasonable

Belvidere

Savanna

Statistics through 4 p.m. yesterday

Main offender ................. particulates

TUESDAY

43/35

Dixon

8 am 10 am Noon 2 pm 4 pm 6 pm The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. 0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme.

MONDAY

Lake Geneva

ALMANAC

UV INDEX

SUNDAY

40 24

42/34

TEMPERATURES High ................................................... 57° Low ................................................... 44° Normal high ....................................... 41° Normal low ........................................ 26° Record high .......................... 68° in 1998 Record low ........................... -2° in 1872 Peak wind ....................... SSW at 23 mph PRECIPITATION 24 hours through 4 p.m. yest............0.41” Month to date ................................. 1.69” Normal month to date ..................... 3.05” Year to date .................................. 34.20” Normal year to date ...................... 34.62”

SATURDAY

NATIONAL CITIES City

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Buffalo Charlotte Chicago Dallas Denver Detroit Honolulu

Today Hi Lo W

13 70 70 52 57 75 45 62 43 56 82

12 43 47 46 39 43 35 39 18 37 71

sn t r r r t pc s pc c sh

Forecasts and graphics, except WFLD forecasts, provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2016

WORLD CITIES Thursday Hi Lo W

25 59 58 57 46 63 44 66 41 46 82

15 38 33 39 37 33 31 46 19 35 70

sf s s pc c s c s pc c sh

City

Houston Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles Louisville Miami Minneapolis New Orleans New York City Seattle Wash., DC

Today Hi Lo W

70 45 55 69 59 83 41 68 60 51 71

40 28 37 49 36 73 34 46 54 41 50

s c s s pc pc c t r sh r

Thursday Hi Lo W

67 45 58 67 50 84 38 64 58 49 60

46 26 41 48 31 72 27 47 41 42 39

s s pc s pc sh sn s pc c s

City

Athens Baghdad Bangkok Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Cairo Hong Kong Istanbul Kabul London

Today Hi Lo W

51 70 92 51 38 81 73 74 46 60 41

40 55 74 28 37 65 59 61 35 31 30

sh pc pc s sh pc sh s r s pc

Thursday Hi Lo W

52 70 90 48 46 83 63 74 43 58 44

42 53 74 23 35 63 55 62 37 29 37

pc t pc s r s pc s pc s pc

City

Madrid Manila Mexico City Moscow New Delhi Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome Seoul Tokyo Toronto

Today Hi Lo W

56 88 76 17 81 40 77 54 48 52 52

44 77 44 14 55 26 70 35 38 46 37

pc s pc c pc s c s r pc r

Thursday Hi Lo W

53 89 74 27 81 42 79 56 44 62 46

44 76 45 25 55 32 70 42 26 48 38

pc pc pc sn pc c sh pc s r pc

Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016

WEATHER

5


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016

|LOCAL NEWS

6

LOCAL BRIEF Animal shelter conducting shoe collection drive

WOODSTOCK – Helping Paws Animal Shelter is collecting donations of gently worn or new shoes through Dec. 15. The shelter will earn money based on the number of pairs collected, as Funds2Orgs will buy all of the donated shoes. Donations may be dropped off at the shelter, 2500 Harding Lane, Woodstock; Woodstock Veterinary Clinic, 691 Lake Ave., Woodstock; Uptown Salon, 116 N. Benton St., Woodstock; Nature’s Feed, 2440 Westward Drive, Unit C, Spring Grove; or Bentley’s Pet Stuff, 5300 Route 14, Crystal Lake. All donated shoes will be redistributed throughout the Funds2Orgs network of microenterprise partners in developing nations. Funds2Orgs helps impoverished people start, maintain and grow businesses in countries such as Haiti, Honduras and other nations in Central America and Africa. For information, call 815-3384400 or visit www.helpingpaws. net. – Northwest Herald

MARENGO

29-year-old Elgin man dies in crash NORTHWEST HERALD

A 29-year-old Elgin man died Monday after a two-vehicle crash near Marengo. About 7:05 p.m., police and fire officials responded to Route 20 and Harmony Road for a crash between a 2009 International ProStar semi-truck pulling an empty 53-foot trailer and a 2002 Dodge Durango, according to a news release from the McHenry County Sheriff’s Office. The Dodge was traveling east on Harmony Road and failed to yield at a stop sign, according to a preliminary investigation. The semi-truck was northbound on Route 20 and struck the Dodge in the intersection, causing both vehicles to leave the roadway, police said. The driver of the Dodge was pronounced dead at the scene, McHenry County Sheriff’s Deputy Tim Creighton said. He was not wearing a seat belt, and air bags were deployed at the time of the crash, police said. This is the second fatality to happen

at the intersection in the past week. A Woodstock man was killed after a two-vehicle crash Nov. 23, when a box truck did not stop at the Harmony Road stop sign, police said. Traffic traveling north and south on Route 20 at Harmony Road does not have a stop sign, Creighton said. The driver of the semi-truck, a 59-year-old Hanover Park man, is cooperating with the investigation and in good condition, police said. He initially was taken to Centegra Hospital – Huntley for treatment, police said. The names of the drivers are not being released pending notification of families. The crash remains under investigation by the McHenry County Sheriff’s Office Major Traffic Crash Investigations Unit, the Illinois State Police and the McHenry County Coroner’s Office. McHenry County Conservation District police, Marengo police and the Huntley Fire Protection District also responded.

MARENGO

City Council names new police chief Solarz has been part of department for 24 years By BRITTANY KEEPERMAN

bkeeperman@shawmedia.com MARENGO – Richard Solarz has been named Marengo’s newest chief of police after 24 years with the department. The Marengo City Council appointed Solarz as interim chief in June after Joe Hallman resigned. Solarz began his career as a McHenry County Sheriff’s Office deputy in 1990 and started with the Marengo Police Department in 1993. He has worked in numerous roles in Marengo, including patrol officer and supervisor of dispatch and patrol. Council members promoted Solarz to permanent chief this week. “I am honored,” he said. “Police are going through a lot of scrutiny right

Northwest Herald Northwest Herald Web Poll Question Web Poll Question

Log on to www.NWHerald.com and vote on topoll www.NWHerald.com and vote onLog today’s question: on today’s poll question:

Will you or have you cut ghghghghg? down your own Christmas tree?

???day’s results as of XX p.m.: Tuesday’s results as of 10 p.m.:

xxxx Have you put up a Christmas tree yet? xxx

57% No

43% Yes

Your Home and Your Future

“I am honored. Police are going through a lot of scrutiny right now throughout the United States, and I am honored that I get to work for a department that has the community support.”

community support. During his interim role, he launched an initiative that involved Marengo patrol officers visiting local businesses and introducing themselves to owners and employees. Officers also asked for feedback on any concerns in the area. “I think we went through about 100 businesses during a 30-day time frame,” he said. “We got a lot of good feedback, and I think it was a positive as far as community engagement.” He said he also wants to implement a “coffee with the police” type of informational event and continue commuRichard Solarz nity outreach at events such as the anMarengo police chief nual Settlers’ Days festival. Solarz will earn a salary of $102,263 under his new contract, up from his now throughout the United States, and current $99,769. I am honored that I get to work for a The salary is set to be bumped to department that has the community $109,421 in November 2017. support.” In November 2018, Solarz will earn Solarz said his No. 1 priority is $114,345 annually, according to city maintaining and strengthening that documents.

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The Kane County Coroner’s Office has identified the 54-year-old Woodstock man killed in a crash last week as John Burke, also known as John Dimauro. An autopsy conducted Monday revealed the preliminary cause of death as multiple injuries. Toxicology samples still are being analyzed, according to a news release, and the investigation is ongoing. The crash occurred about 6:40 p.m. Nov. 23 at Route 20 and Harmony Road, police said. A preliminary investigation indicates that a 1999 Ford Expedition

SUV was traveling north on Route 20 at the same time a 2007 Hino 268 box truck was traveling east on Harmony Road. The McHenry County Sheriff’s Office said the box truck did not stop at the intersection’s stop sign and collided with the Ford. The driver of the Ford, Burke, was taken by the Huntley Fire Protection District to Advocate Sherman Hospital in Elgin, where he was pronounced dead. The driver of the Hino, a 24-yearold man, also was taken by fire officials for precautionary reasons to Advocate Sherman Hospital, where he was treated and eventually released.

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• Wednesday, November 30, 2016

CARY – A commuter train struck and killed a pedestrian Tuesday evening in Cary, according to a news release from Cary police. About 5:10 p.m., someone reported a pedestrian jumping in front of a train near the railroad crossing at Three Oaks Road and Route 14, police said. The Cary Police Department and Cary Fire Protection District responded to the scene and found the victim northwest of the intersection, police said. The incident still is under investigation by Cary police, the Metra Police Department and the McHenry County Coroner’s Office. The identity of the victim was not

released. The crash caused extensive delays on Metra’s Union Pacific Northwest line. About the same time as the fatal train crash, Cary police also responded to a two-vehicle crash on Route 14 near Westbury Drive, which caused traffic backups in the area. One vehicle rolled over, and a 32-year-old Cary woman was issued a traffic citation for making an illegal left turn, police said. A large amount of fuel spilled because of the crash, and both vehicles were towed, police said. No one was injured in the vehicle crash. Crystal Lake police, Fox River Grove police and the McHenry County Sheriff’s Office assisted with traffic control during the incidents.

Coroner’s office IDs man who died in crash last week

7

LOCAL NEWS | Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

Police: Pedestrian dies in train crash

WOODSTOCK


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016

|LOCAL NEWS

8

LOCAL BRIEF $100K winning lottery ticket bought in LITH unclaimed

LAKE IN THE HILLS – Time is out for an Illinois Lottery player who never redeemed a winning $100,000 ticket that was bought in Lake in the Hills. All five numbers were picked for the Lucky Day Lotto midday drawing on Nov. 18, 2015, Illinois Lottery spokesman Jason Schaumburg said. The ticket was bought at a Shell gas station, 4231 Algonquin Road, and needed to be turned in within a year of the purchase, Schaumburg said. The winning numbers for the drawing were 3-6-19-21-32. Schaumburg said the chances of hitting the jackpot for that game are about 1 in 1.2 million. One percent of the prize amount, or $1,000, was given to the retailer for selling the ticket, Schaumburg said. The unclaimed prize money will go toward the common school fund.

– Northwest Herald

Could Castro’s death bring change? The death of Cuban dictator Fidel Castro last week at the age of 90 seems almost hard to believe. After all, Castro had been out of sight for almost a decade, and rumors of his demise often were greatly exaggerated. Yet even dictators and defining figures of the 20th century eventually fall victim to the one enemy they cannot outfox or control: death. The revolution that Castro ushered in with the ouster of military dictator Fulgencio Batista in 1959 no doubt was cause for hope for many in Cuba. The country had been wracked by civil war, and the revolutionaries claimed to be bringing change. Little did they realize at the time that those promises would be empty ones – the country trading one dictator for yet another. As a Cold War kid, I can’t remember a time when Castro wasn’t ruling Cuba with an iron grip. Although the Bay of Pigs invasion attempt and the Cuban Missile Crisis took place before I was born, the echoes of those momentous events reverberated through my teen years. In fact, I had the dubious honor of representing Cuba in the annual Model United Nations held at McHenry Community High

VIEWS Joan Oliver School. My debate partner wanted to represent the Soviet Union and needed a strong ally. Mind you, this had nothing to do with actual sympathies for socialists and everything to do with the opportunity to be agitators during any U.N. floor debates. However, it did ignite a desire to know more about international relations, and specifically about those Cold War foes of the U.S. Trying to understand Castro and his principal ally, the Soviet Union, would play a major role in the courses I took in college. At one time, I was taking Russian and Spanish language classes, as well as courses in Soviet politics. Despite how it might have appeared, I was just a naïve Midwestern girl trying to make sense of the world. Oh, and I had a crazy idea that I wanted to be a foreign correspondent. At that time, studying the Soviet Union often meant studying about Castro’s Cuba. Neither were places that any normal-thinking person would want to be, much less emulate.

Abject poverty. Repression. Persecution of political enemies. Lack of a free press. It is no wonder that over the years thousands have fled Cuba, often risking their lives to make it to Florida’s shores. Yet, even when the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, taking with it billions of dollars in annual subsidies for Cuba, Castro managed to keep his grasp on his island nation. Even riots in Havana in 1994 did not topple his regime. Ill health finally led Castro to turn the reins of power over to younger brother Raul in 2008. Even so, his influence still could be felt, particularly when he would sound off to denounce any softening in policy toward the U.S. Still, a thaw is underway between Cuba and the U.S. Perhaps now that Castro has died, it will be met with less controversy among the hard-liners in Little Havana. Hope – esperanza in Spanish – has returned to Cuba. Finalmente (Finally).

• Joan Oliver is the former Northwest Herald assistant news editor. She has been associated with the Northwest Herald since 1990. She can be reached at jolivercolumn@gmail.com.

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• Wednesday, November 30, 2016

WOODSTOCK – The Woodstock Police Department announced the results of an enforcement campaign conducted Nov. 14 to 27 designed to crack down on drivers driving under the influence and violating seat belt laws. During the Click It or Ticket campaign, Woodstock police joined other state and local law enforcement agencies across Illinois to reduce highway fatalities. The department issued the following tickets during the campaign: • 24 citations for not using seat-belt restraints • three DUI arrests • 27 citations for using an electronic communication device • one driver’s license expired more

than a year arrest • three uninsured motorist citations Police said that although the annual Click It or Ticket campaign in Woodstock is over, they want to remind drivers that there is no excuse not to use seat belts. “Woodstock’s police officers are wholly dedicated to the safety and well-being of each of our citizens. If you or your passengers are not wearing a seat belt in a moving vehicle, day or night, you will be cited for the violation,” Woodstock Police Chief John Lieb said. The law enforcement mobilization was funded by federal traffic safety funds through the Illinois Department of Transportation and is part of the nationwide Click It or Ticket and Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over campaigns. For information, visit www.idot.illinois.gov.

LOCAL NEWS | Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

Police issue dozens of citations during holiday crackdown


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016

| LOCAL NEWS

10 ALGONQUIN

LAKE IN THE HILLS

District 300 parents Village to host annual asked to take school Festival of Trees event improvement survey NORTHWEST HERALD

Know more

By NATE LINHART

nlinhart@shawmedia.com ALGONQUIN – Community Unit School District 300 parents, students and teachers can take a statewide survey to help improve the district’s learning conditions and environment. From now until Jan. 16, the Illinois 5Essentials survey is available. The research-based survey will take about 25 minutes, allowing people to help identify the strengths and weaknesses of each school in the district. The survey also will allow school officials to see whether there was any progress in areas mentioned as concerns in last year’s survey. The survey measures a school’s success by determining the effectiveness of its leaders, the strength of environmental support, the ambition of its curriculum, the involvement from parents and

For information about the survey, visit https://illinois.5-essentials.org. the frequency of collaboration among teachers. According to District 300 officials, University of Chicago research has shown that schools that scored highly on at least three of the 5Essentials were 10 times more likely to improve student reading and math than schools that didn’t. District 300’s superintendent and principals will get their 5Essentials Reports in March. Survey results will be reported publicly in the fall of 2017 on the Illinois Report Card website. For information about the survey, visit https://illinois.5-essentials.org.

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LAKE IN THE HILLS – Lake in the Hills will hold the 15th annual Santa’s Festival of Trees on Friday. Starting at 6 p.m., Santa and Mrs. Claus will lead the lighting ceremony at the Lake in the Hills Village Hall, 600 Harvest Gate. After the trees are lit, people can vote for their favorite by placing nonperishable food and household items in bins inside Village Hall. All items will be collected and donated to local food pantries, according to a news release from the village. This year, 18 trees will be featured, said Kristi Brewer, Lake in the Hills recreation supervisor. Participating groups will include the Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts and Lincoln Prairie Elementary School. “It’s a small event, but it also has a lot going on,” Brewer said, adding that more area businesses have been involved in the past few years.

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This is the first year the holiday market will be held with the Festival of Trees in Village Hall, Brewer said. Twelve local vendors will have booths with homemade items such as makeup, jewelry and more. The trees will be up through Christmas, Brewer said. There also is a Toys for Tots dropoff box and Salvation Army angel tree located inside Village Hall. Angel tree gifts can be dropped off through Dec. 16, Brewer said.

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LOCAL BRIEFS CRYSTAL LAKE – To recognize Dec. 1 as World AIDS Day, the McHenry County Health Department is offering testing for sexually transmitted diseases Thursday at McHenry County College. The comprehensive testing will be from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in MCC’s Room B172. The cost for the testing is $20 a person. Informational booths on sexual health also will be available in the Commons area, and MCC’s human sexuality class will have student projects on display.

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McHenry VFW’s Operation Christmas Cheer seeks donations

McHENRY – The McHenry VFW’s Operation Christmas Cheer, which provides Christmas packages to veterans at the James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center in North Chicago, is seeking donations. Cash and donations of items such as hats, scarves, gloves, snacks, games, blankets and socks may be dropped off at VFW Post 4600, 3002 W. Route 120, by Dec. 8. Volunteers are sought to help sort items and pack boxes at 8 a.m. Dec. 9 and 10. Boxes will be delivered to veterans Dec. 11. For information, call Ken Hauser at 847-207-3028. – Northwest Herald

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• Wednesday, November 30, 2016

LAKE IN THE HILLS – Children will have the chance to eat with Santa and the Grinch at the Lake in the Hills Parks and Recreation Department’s Naughty and Nice Holiday Spaghetti Dinner. The meal will be served from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Dec. 9 at Village Hall, 600 Harvest Gate. Spaghetti and meatballs, bread, salad, cookies and drinks will be available, along with activities including DJ music, GrinchMas trivia and photo opportunities. Guests 3 years old and younger are free with a paying adult. The cost for children ages 3 to 12 years old is $9 for residents and $11 for nonresidents, and the cost for people ages 13 and older is $12 for residents and $15 for nonresidents. A family of five will cost $40 for residents and $46 for nonresidents, and can include all ages. If a party is less than eight guests, others will be seated at the same table. Registration runs through Dec. 7 or until all spots are filled. Visit www.lith.org/parksrec for information or call 847-960-7460. – Hannah Prokop

Sexually transmitted disease testing available Thursday at MCC

LOCAL NEWS | Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

Lake in the Hills to hold holiday dinner featuring Santa, the Grinch

5301 E. Terra Cotta Avenue (Rt. 176) CRYSTAL LAKE • 815.459.8130 www.countrysideflowershop.com Open Daily 9-8, Sat 9-6, Sun 9-5


POLICE REPORTS Information in police reports is obtained from the McHenry County Sheriff’s Office and municipal police departments. Individuals listed in police reports who have been charged with a crime have not been proved guilty in court. Huntley • David R. Sepsey, 18, 10582 Scott Drive, Huntley, was charged Saturday, Oct. 29, with theft. • A 17-year-old Huntley girl was charged Tuesday, Nov. 1, with possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia. • Joseph E. Grippo, 38, 9603 Baumgartner St., Huntley, was charged Thursday, Nov. 3, with driving while license revoked and possession of a controlled substance. • A 17-year-old Huntley girl was charged Thursday, Nov. 3, with possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia.

• A 16-year-old Huntley girl was charged Thursday, Nov. 3, with possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of tobacco. • A 16-year-old Huntley boy was charged Monday, Nov. 7, with criminal damage to state supported property, aggravated assault, disorderly conduct and possession of tobacco by a minor. • Frank Domino, 19, 5120 Princeton Lane, Lake in the Hills, was charged Tuesday, Nov. 8, with battery and criminal damage to property. • Anastosous J. Droulias, 46, 1606 Surrey Lane, Arlington Heights, was charged Saturday, Nov. 12, with driving under the influence, driving with no valid driver’s license and possession of drug paraphernalia. • Brett A. Miller, 36, 11701 Davey Drive, Huntley, was charged Saturday, Nov. 12, with driving under the influence, driving with a blood-alcohol content greater than 0.08 percent and improper lane use.

Wednesday, November 30 – Monday, December 5

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LOCAL BRIEF Crystal Lake Park District offers Holiday Drop and Shop

CRYSTAL LAKE – The Crystal Lake Park District will offer Holiday Drop and Shop, open to children ages 5 to 11, from 2 to 5 p.m. Dec. 10 at The Racket Club, 9101 S. Route 31, Crystal Lake. Parents can use the opportunity to

get organized and shop for the holidays while their children enjoy games, a movie, crafts and sports. The cost is $15 a child. The registration deadline is Dec. 3. For information, call 847-658-5688 or email rlaue@crystallakeparks.org. – Northwest Herald

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Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016

| LOCAL NEWS

12


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BLOOD DRIVES Following is a list of places to give blood. Donors should be 17 or older or 16 with a parent’s consent, weigh at least 110 pounds and be in good health.

312 Lincoln Ave., Woodstock. Appointments and information: Carrie Futchko, 815-2712910 or www.heartlandbc.org. • 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Dec. 11 – Sts. Peter & Paul Parish, 410 First St., Cary. Appointments and information: Carrie Futchko, • 7:30 to 11:30 a.m. Dec. 4 – Woodstock Moose Family Center, 406 Clay St., Wood- 815-271-2910 or www.heartlandbc.org. • 3 to 7 p.m. Dec. 12 – Spring Grove Vilstock. Appointments and information: Carrie Futchko, 815-271-2910 or www.heartlandbc. lage Hall, 7401 Meyer Road, Spring Grove. Appointments and information: Carrie Futcorg. hko, 815-271-2910 or www.heartlandbc.org. • 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Dec. 5 – Del Webb Sun • 3 to 7 p.m. Dec. 12 – Zion Lutheran City, 12980 Meadow View Court, Huntley. Church, 4206 W. Elm St., McHenry. ApAppointments and information: Camille Piazza, 847-305-9998 or www.heartlandbc. pointments and information: Carrie Futchko, 815-271-2910 or www.heartlandbc.org. org. • 3:30 to 7:30 p.m. Dec. 13 – Shepherd of • 7:30 a.m. to noon Dec. 6 – Johnsburg the Hills Lutheran Church, 404 N. Green High School, 2002 W. Ringwood Road, St., McHenry. Appointments and informaJohnsburg. Appointments and information: tion: Carrie Futchko, 815-271-2910 or www. Carrie Futchko, 815-271-2910 or www. heartlandbc.org. heartlandbc.org. • 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Dec. 17 – The Pointe • 7:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Dec. 10 – St. John’s Parish, 2302 W. Church St., Johnsburg. Outreach Center, 5650 Route 14, Crystal Appointments and information: Carrie Futchko, Lake. Appointments and information: Carrie Futchko, 815-271-2910 or www.heartlandbc. 815-271-2910 or www.heartlandbc.org. org. • 8 a.m. to noon Dec. 11 – Saint Mary’s,

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• Wednesday, November 30, 2016

You-cut, pre-cut or rooted for later planting. Weekend horse-drawn wagon rides, bakery, lunch, cocoa and Mrs. Claus in her North Pole house. Wreaths, garland, decorations and gifts available. Open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Dec. 11. Information: www. oneystreefarm.com. Pine-Apple Tree Farm, 309 Three Oaks Road, Cary. Ten acres of you-cut Black Hill and Colorado blue spruce, Scotch pine, and Douglas and Canaan fir, starting at $65. Precut Wisconsin Frazier fir. Open from 9 a.m. to dusk Saturdays and from 11 a.m. to dusk Sundays through Dec. 18. Accepts checks and cash only. Information: www.pine-applefarm.com. Pioneer Tree Farm, 4614 Pioneer Road, McHenry. Organically grown pine, juniper, spruce and fir for more than 40 years. All trees $50. Featuring tractor-drawn wagon rides, free cocoa and coffee in the warming house, as well as handmade decorations. Open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekends through Dec. 18. Accepts checks and cash only. Information: www.pioneertreefarm.com. Richardson’s Tree Farm, 9407 Richardson Road, Spring Grove. More than 90,000 trees on 75 acres, including Scotch and white pine; spruce; and Fraser, concolor and Canaan fir. Most trees $68; select trees $29; pre-cut trees up to 12 feet priced per foot. Fresh fudge and free coffee and cocoa daily in the heated barn with wreaths, garlands, decorations and indoor restrooms. Tractor-drawn wagon rides on weekends, plus fresh doughnuts and kettle corn. Free shaking and baling. Open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. through Dec. 23. Accepts checks, cash and credit cards. Information: www.richardsonadventurefarm.com. Source: Visit McHenry County

LOCAL NEWS | Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

Ben’s Christmas Tree Farm, 7719 Ryan Road and 16324 Capron Road, Harvard. Nine varieties of organically grown, pesticide-free trees from 6 to 15 feet tall, including fir, spruce and pine, from $5 to $9 a foot. Wreaths and garland, available at the farm, also may be ordered online for delivery anywhere in the continental U.S. Horse-drawn wagon rides, gift shop, Santa Claus, farm animals, free cocoa and coffee. Open from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekends through Dec. 18, and from 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Dec. 2, 9 and 16. Accepts checks and cash. Information: www.benstreefarm.com. Bill’s Friendly Evergreen Tree Farm, 3102 W. Miller Road, Spring Grove. Six varieties of pine, spruce and fir from $50. Family-owned and -operated for more than 20 years, this farm offers a backwoods atmosphere. Open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekends through Dec. 18. Information: www.billsfriendlyevergreentreefarm.weebly.com. Cal & Shan’s Christmas Tree Farm, 14216 Thayer Road and 3509 Lily Pond Road, Woodstock. Ten varieties of spruce, fir and pine, starting at $50. Also rooted live trees for planting after Christmas. Gift shop available. Open Dec. 3 and 4. Information: www. calandshans.com. Holly Jolly Tree Farm, 4919 Bull Valley Road, McHenry. You-cut Scotch pine, plus pre-cut Fraser fir. Petting zoo, wagon rides, gift shop and free cocoa. Open from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dec. 10, 11 and 17. Information: 815-385-9627. Oney’s Tree Farm, 16608 Route 14, Woodstock. The oldest and largest tree farm in northern Illinois, with more than 60,000 trees on 60 acres. Offers Fraser, concolor and Douglas fir; Austrian, white and Scotch pine; Colorado, Norway and Serbian spruce.


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016

| LOCAL NEWS

14

Holiday activities abundant in McHenry County Following are holiday related events and activities in McHenry County and beyond. To have your event listed, visit PlanitNorthwest.com. ONGOING CLAYWORKERS GUILD OF ILLINOIS HOLIDAY POTTERY SALE, through Jan. 7, 2017, Old Courthouse Arts Center, 101 N. Johnson St., Woodstock. Featuring the work of 15 members of the guild. Extended hours: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sundays. Ladies’ Night 5 to 10 p.m. Dec. 1. Free. Information: www.clayworkersguild.com. HOLIDAY TRAIN DISPLAY, through Dec. 28, Prairie Lodge, 12880 Del Webb Blvd., Huntley. Annual model train display presented by the Kishwaukee Valley & Eakin Creek Sun City Model Railroad Club. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Free. Information: 847-669-2392 or www.sccah.com. ANNUAL CHRISTMAS TREE & WREATH SALE, Algonquin State Bank, 2400 N. Huntington Drive, Algonquin. The Algonquin Lions Club will sell Fraser fir trees and wreaths from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Information: 847877-1221 or www.lionsclubofalgonquin.org. SANTA HOUSE VISITS, through Dec. 23, Brink Street Market, 30-40 Brink St., Crystal Lake. Children and their families invited to visit with Santa. Bring a camera. Schedule: 6 to 8

Shaw Media file photo

you find the holidays more than a little stressful? This intimate revue takes a wry and knowing look at a stressful season. Schedule: 8 p.m. Dec. 2-3; 3 p.m. Dec. 3-4. Tickets: $32.50, 38.50. Tickets and information: 815-356-9212, www.rauecenter.org or www.wsrep.org. HAPPY HOLIDAY RAILWAY, through Dec. 18, Illinois Railway Museum, 7000 Olson Road, Union. The railway hosts 40-minute train rides with Santa through the winter countryside. Includes treats and gifts for children, holiday lights display, hot chocolate and more. Schedule: Dec. 3-4, Dec. 10-11 & Dec. 17-18. Saturday trips are hourly from 2 to 7 p.m.; Sunday trips are hourly from 1 to 6 p.m. Rides at other times may be opened up at a later date based on demand. Plan to arrive 30 minutes before scheduled trip. Tickets: $18 a person. Tickets and information: www. irm.org or 815-923-4000.

John Leask (right) of Oakwood Hills and Cooper Doson of West Dundee try to get a look NOVEMBER inside Santa’s hut during last year’s Lighting of the Square in Woodstock. Nov. 30 DECO MESH WREATH CRAFT, 1 to 3 p.m. p.m. Thursdays and Fridays, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. past, present and future with his three ghost- and 6 to 8 p.m. Nov. 30, Harvard Diggins Library, Saturdays, noon to 3 p.m. Sundays. Hosted by ly guides. Schedule: 8 p.m. Dec. 2, 2 & 8 p.m. 900 E. McKinley St., Harvard. Harvard resident Downtown Crystal Lake. Free. Information: 815- Dec. 3 and 2 p.m. Dec. 4. Cost: $24 adults, $21 Kelly Wood will teach how to create deco mesh 479-0835 or www.downtowncl.org. seniors and students. Tickets and information: wreaths for the holiday season. All supplies “A CHRISTMAS CAROL,” through Dec. 4, 815-338-5300 or www.woodstockoperahouse. included. Cost: $3 deposit required upon regWoodstock Opera House, 121 Van Buren St., com. istration. Registration and information: www. Woodstock. Annual production by the Wood“A CHRISTMAS SURVIVAL GUIDE,” through harvard-diggins.org. stock Musical Theatre Company. Join Scrooge Dec. 4, Raue Center for the Arts, 26 N. Williams See ACTIVITIES, page A15 as he journeys through the Christmases of St. Presented by Williams Street Repertory. Do

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• ACTIVITIES

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LOCAL NEWS | Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

DECEMBER Dec. 2 RICHMOND’S CHRISTMAS OF YESTERYEAR, Dec. 2-4, throughout Richmond. The festivities begin with a Christmas tree lighting and arrival of Santa on an antique fire engine at 6:30 p.m. Dec. 2 at Stevens Park, followed by photos with Santa, coffee and cocoa, popcorn, raffles and more inside Memorial Hall, 5600 Hunter Drive. From 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dec. 3 at Memorial Hall, events include the St. Joseph’s Church Cookie Walk, crafters, refreshments, raffles, a holiday shop, a bake sale photos with Santa, telling of the “Origin of Santa” by Joseph Steele (10 to 10:50 a.m.), a ballet performance by Broadway Academy of Art & Dance (11:15 a.m. and 2 p.m.), photos with Father Christmas as he strolls through downtown Richmond (11 a.m. to 3 p.m.), face painting (noon to 1:30 p.m.), free hayrides with a donation for the Community Food Pantry (11 a.m. and 2 p.m.) and more. From 9 a.m. to noon Dec. 4 at Memorial Hall will be a pancake breakfast hosted by the Richmond Fire Department and visits with Santa. Information: www.richmond–il.com. A VERY MERRY HUNTLEY, Dec. 2-3, Huntley. Featuring a kids room, horse-drawn trolley rides and visits with Mrs. Claus (until 7 p.m.) from 4 to 8 p.m. Dec. 2 at the Municipal Complex, 10987 Main St. A Kris Kringle Market will be open from 3 to 8 p.m at the Municipal Complex. On Dec. 3, events will take place at First Con-

gregational Church, 11628 E. Main St. and the Town Square. Church events include an indoor farmers market and craft fair (9 a.m. to 2 p.m.), a Cookie Walk (9 a.m. to noon), free crafts for children (10 a.m. to 2 p.m.), visits with live reindeer (10 a.m. to noon), a handbell choir performance (noon) and a live Nativity and outside games (noon to 2 p.m.). Town Square events include carolers, horse-drawn trolley rides and free hot chocolate from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m., the announcement of Christmas tree decorating contest winners at 4:45 p.m. and the arrival of Santa on a fire truck and the lighting of the square at 5 p.m. Information: www.huntley.il.us or 847-515-5262. HOLIDAY BOOK REVIEW, 11 a.m. Dec. 2, D’Andrea Banquets & Conference Center, 4419 Route 14, Crystal Lake. The 11th annual benefit for Pioneer Center for Human Services. Event includes a social hour and raffles, lunch at 12:30 p.m. and book review of “Christmas at the White House” presented by book dramatist Jenny Riddle. Review tickets: $50. Grand raffle tickets: $10 each or 6 for $50. Tickets and information: 815-759-7144 or www.holidaybookreview.org. SANTA’S FESTIVAL OF TREES, 6 to 8 p.m. Dec. 2, Village Hall, 600 Harvest Gate, Lake in the Hills. Travel down the Tinsel Trail and view trees decorated by local civic groups businesses and individuals. Lighting ceremony will be led by Santa and Mrs. Claus at 6 p.m. Santa will be inside Village Hall for a visit and photo opportunity. Trees will be on display throughout December. Free. Information: 847-960-7460 or www.lith.org.

If for any reason it is not in stock, Big R will cheerfully issue a rain check for the merchandise at the sale price when available. All sale items subject to stock on hand. Sale pricing does not apply to previously purchased merchandise. We reserve the right to limit quantities and correct printing errors.


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016

| A CLOSER LOOK

16

• GAMERCRATES

Continued from page A3 such as gaming mouse pads, charging cables and controller grips. Each box features a different theme every month, such as Call of Duty or Mass Effect. Along with a monthly box full of gaming goodies, GamerCrates also added a Snack Pack service in January, which aims to keep video game enthusiasts energized by providing them with a variety of snacks. Rambuski-Salzman said what separates his company from similar services is GamerCrates has more gear intended for hardcore gamers. “We target casual gamers as well, but we’re really focusing our efforts on providing competitive gamers with stuff they need,” Rambuski-Salzman said. Although it may be difficult going to school during the day before going to the office, Rambuski-Salzman said he’s been able to handle both. “I do think it’s getting more and more tough to do as we are growing,” Rambuski-Salzman said. “But so far I think I’ve been able to manage it pretty well, especially with the help from my mom.” When GamerCrates was first created, Rambuski-Salzman had to learn important business practices such as hiring an accountant and expanding his network. He said his toughest initial challenge was creating relationships

“I want to put 100 percent of my focus on my business and see where it goes from there.” Tyler Rambuski-Salzman Marian Central senior and GamerCrates creater

with vendors and manufacturers. “All that seems easy now,” Rambuski-Salzman said. “Now that we have these relationships, the quality of our product has gone way up.” With graduation coming in the spring, Rambuski-Salzman said he plans to focus on his business full time after he graduates. “I want to put 100 percent of my focus on my business and see where it goes from there,” Rambuski-Salzman said. After two years of seeing his company grow, the Marian Central senior has some ideas of what’s next. “They’re all kind of in the early stages right now, so I can’t really discuss them,” Rambuski-Salzman said. “But I’ve got big plans.” With Christmas coming up in a few weeks, Rambuski-Salzman said he expects to see an increase in subscriptions bought, which cost about $18.49 to $19.99, plus shipping, per month. December’s theme will be Battlefield 1.

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brain activity after researchers read to them one or two hours a day for eight weeks. Reading to children has the added benefit of leading to conversation, which also increases language skills.

By Diane Krieger Spivak Cuddling up with little ones for a bedtime story has always been a comforting, relaxing way to get children to fall asleep. But, did you know that reading to your child offers more benefits than just a peaceful night’s rest? In addition to improving skills in logic, reading also rewires the brain to make learning language easier, researchers at Yale University and the University of Austin have discovered. There are 44 different sounds in the English language, and when you emphasize those sounds while reading to your child, he/she learns the differences, making reading later on much easier because he/she can recognize those differences. Researchers are actually able to take electronic images of the brain, which show the differences between a child that has been read to and one that hasn’t, according to Parents magazine. But those who had not been read to showed an increase in

But don’t stop reading to your children after they’ve learned to read themselves. Continuing to read higher level books to a reader — even a fourth or fifth grader — can strengthen their reading skills. You can do this by reading to them with expression, pausing for punctuation, raising or lowering your voice with the story, speeding up or slowing down in correlation with the tension, according to Scholastic magazine. Reading aloud to your older elementary-age child can also lead to questions about certain elements in a story that can lead to a quick online search that further increases your child’s learning and vocabulary. It’s a great way to learn about the world and everything in it. And, no matter what age, don’t forget the best part of reading to your children at bedtime — bonding with your child as he or she unwinds and prepares for a good night of sleep..

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NOTICE OF PROPOSED PROPERTY TAX INCREASE FOR BURTON TOWNSHIP I. A public hearing approve a proposed property tax levy increase for Burton Township Road District for 2017 will be held on Tuesday, December 13, 2016, at 7:00 p.m. at the Spring Grove Village Hall, 7401 Meyer Rd., Spring Grove, IL. Any person desiring to appear at the public hearing and present testimony to the taxing district may contact Dan Sutton, Road Commissioner at (815) 790-5426. II. The corporate and special purpose property taxes extended or abated for 2016 were $217,576.00 The proposed corporate and special purpose property taxes to be levied for 2017 are $221,926.00. This represents a 2.0% increase over the previous year. III. The property taxes extended for debt service and public building commission leases for 2016 were $0.00. The estimated property taxes to be levied for debt service and public building commission leases for 2017 are $0.00. This represents a 0% increase over the previous year. IV. The total property taxes extended or abated for 2016 were $217,576.00 The estimated total property taxes to be levied for 2017 are $221,926.00. This represents a 2.0% increase over the previous year. April Shetsky, Township Clerk


17

THE POWER OF YOUR STORY

For Personal and Professional Gain Registration:

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11:30 a.m.-1:15 p.m.

Ticket Price:

Lunch $35 Lunch and Learn Workshop $50 Table of 8 $280 or $400* Table of 10 $350 or $500*

Learn Workshop: 1:30-2:30 p.m.

Every person has a story. Every story is important to the world.

Women, more often than not, do not embrace their story nor do they have the courage to share it. Now more than ever, we need to hear as many stories as there are women and people to tell them.

Following the lunch, a special workshop will allow attendees to take action in embracing and articulating their own personal stories for both professional and personal development. KEYNOTE SPEAKER

Denise Barreto

Managing Partner Relationships Happen Now LLC

Please join us for the fifth annual Women’s Power Luncheon Series featuring guest keynote speaker Denise Baretto. Denise Baretto is an entrepreneur, author and Tedx speaker. The Women’s Power Luncheon Series has been designed to inform, inspire and engage aspiring women, decision makers and leaders on contemporary business and life topics.

PANELIST

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PANELIST

PANELIST

PANELIST

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MODERATOR

Hadley Streng

Lynn Caccavallo

Cheryl Kranz

Carmen Boyer

Suzanne Hoban

Robin Doeden

Anna Weselak

VP Strategy & Development Centrega

Executive Director Cary Grove Chamber of Commerce

Financial Advisor Edward Jones

Owner White Oak Interiors

Executive Director Family Health Partnership Clinic

Executive Director McHenry County Community Foundation

President Weselak & Associates

Order tickets online at: http://shawmediaevents.com/a/MCPowerLunch If you are interested in sponsoring a table, please contact: Kelly Buchanan at 319-471-1202 or kbuchanan@threesixtybluesky.com if you have questions. Priority reservations due Friday, December 2, 2016. *Includes workshop session following the luncheon.

• Wednesday, November 30, 2016

The 2016 Power Women’s Luncheon tour will shine a light on the Power of Your Story. In the keynote address, Denise Barreto will masterfully craft a relevant tale why every person’s story matters in today’s marketplace and challenge everyone in ear shot to find, articulate and lift the stories of every day people, often.

NORTHWEST HERALD | Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

Tuesday, December 6, 2016


2 sentenced to probation in drug case Men pleaded guilty in connection with NIU student’s LSD death By BRETT ROWLAND

browland@shawmedia.com SYCAMORE – A judge on Tuesday sentenced two men who pleaded guilty to drug charges in connection with a Northern Illinois University student’s 2015 death to probation. Michael R. Kielhack, 21, of the 600 block of Woodbridge Drive in Elgin, and Michael Z. Montgomery, 20, of the 1800 block of Abriter Court in Naperville, were initially charged with giving the hallucinogenic drug LSD to a Northern Illinois University student who later fell to his death from a dormitory window. In October, both pleaded guilty to amended charges of possession of a controlled substance as part of a deal with prosecutors. The crime typically is punishable by one to three years in prison. DeKalb County Chief Judge Robbin Stuckert sentenced the two former NIU students to a two-year form of probation that could spare them felony con-

Shaw Media file photos

Michael Z. Montgomery (left), 20, of Naperville, and Michael R. Kielhack, 21, of Elgin, leave the courtroom Oct. 12 after entering a guilty plea at the DeKalb County Courthouse in Sycamore. victions. “Those decisions that you made that night had horrible, horrible consequences,” the judge said. “I have been the presiding judge over [drug] treatment court since 2006, and I cannot tell you the number of lives that have been destroyed by the use of drugs, by the use of alcohol. ... If there was one thing

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of selling the drugs to Northern Illinois University students before the death of 19-year-old NIU geology major Oluwarotimi “Timi” Okedina. Quirke, who pleaded not guilty in May, is next due in court Dec. 12. Okedina fell Sept. 26, 2015, from an 11th-floor window in a room at Stevenson Towers C building. Toxicology reports showed he had LSD and marijuana in his system when he died. After Okedina’s death, police learned that he and other students had taken LSD that night. Assistant State’s Attorney Alicia Caplan, who prosecuted the case, said Okedina had a bad reaction to the drug and locked himself in a dorm room. Police said he removed a window screen before accidentally falling to his death. At a hearing Tuesday, Caplan asked the judge to consider all sentencing options available under the law. She didn’t request a specific punishment. “I understand the charge is possession of a controlled substance. The circumstances that surround these cases are much larger than that,” the prosecutor said. “It’s an incident that caused someone’s death.”

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I wish I could do with this sentence, it’s bring back this individual whose life was lost for making a poor decision himself that night, but we all know that I cannot do that. So what I have to look at is a sentence that is just.” A third man charged in the case – Thomas P. Quirke, 20, of the 200 block of Oakhurst Drive in Aurora – is accused

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• DRUG CASE

Continued from page A18

19

NEWS | Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

Michael R. Kielhack Elgin resident

“It will be with me for the rest of my life. This led to me never experimenting with drugs ever again,” he said. “Every day I wish it had never happened.” Montgomery called that night the “biggest mistake” he’d ever made, and said he had learned from it. “I thought I was a friend to someone. ... I think about it every day,” he said. “It could happen to me, it could happen to anybody.” If both men successfully complete probation, they could ask a judge to remove the conviction from their record. In addition to probation, Stuckert ordered both men to get drug and alcohol assessments, submit to three random drug tests and perform 30 hours of community service. They also will be required to pay fines and other costs. Both also will have to prove that they are working or enrolled in college courses. Kielhack’s attorney, David Camic, and Montgomery’s attorney, Bob Nolan, both praised Stuckert’s fairness in sentencing after the hearing.

• Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Caplan said the case was unusual and acknowledged there were other mitigating factors that needed to be considered. “It’s unfortunate that a lot of college students view drugs as something they can do that is recreational – that it’s something that no one gets hurt, that it’s something that’s fun to do on weekends,” she said. “Making those decisions can have very serious consequences. In this case, someone died.” Caplan said that while Kielhack and Montgomery didn’t think that what they were doing at the time could result in the death of one of their classmates, that’s what happened. Kielhack had asked several friends if they wanted to take LSD that weekend and asked Montgomery if he knew anyone who could get the drugs. In turn, Montgomery contacted Quirke, who drove to DeKalb and gave LSD to Kielhack and others, including Montgomery, Caplan said. Prosecutors had initially charged all three men with unlawful delivery of a controlled substance, which typically carries a sentence of four to 15 years in prison. Both Kielhack and Montgomery made brief statements before they were sentenced. Kielhack said that losing a friend “was the most devastating thing.”

“It will be with me for the rest of my life. This led to me never experimenting with drugs ever again.”

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Leather, Black, 4WD, V8, FFV, 5.3 Liter, Automatic, 144,590

Leather, Black, 4WD, V6, 3.7 Liter, Automatic, 69,121

$14,977 or 2.7% Financing

$16,977 or 2.7% Financing

2012 GMC Yukon XL SLT 1500

Leather, Black, AWD, V8, 6.2 Liter, Automatic, 132,049

SM-CL0409398

2007 Jeep Liberty Limited

2001 GMC Yukon XL 1500 4WD

2010 Ford F-150 Lariat Super Crew

Leather, Black, 4WD, V8, Flex Fuel, 5.3 Liter, Auto, 6-Spd HD w/OD, 173,024

Leather, Black, 4WD, V8, Flex Fuel, 5.4 Liter, Automatic, 75,280

$19,977 or 2.7% Financing

2013 GMC Yukon SLE 4WD

$21,477 or 2.7% Financing

2015 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sport 4WD

Leather, Black, 4WD, V8, Flex Fuel, 5.3 Liter, Automatic, 94,201

$23,977 or 2.7% Financing

NO PAYMENTS TIL FEBRUARY 2017

Cloth, Black, 4WD, V6, 3.6 Liter, Automatic, 29,584

$27,977 or 2.7% Financing


ROCCO PETER DAWSON

Born: October 30, 1935 Died: November 26, 2016

Rocco Peter Dawson, 81, of Harvard passed away at his home on Saturday, November 26, 2016 with his wife by his side. He was born on October 30, 1935 in Highland Park, IL the son of the late Joseph Edward and Marie G. (Petite) Dawson. Rocco worked as an Operating Engineer for the Local 150 until retirement. He served in the United States Army. On November 26, 1964, Rocco married Margaret E. Hirons in Arlington Heights, IL. Rocco was a member of St. Joseph Catholic Church and the Knights of Columbus. He enjoyed spending time with his family and friends. Survivors include his wife of 52 years Margaret; Children, Peter (Karen) Dawson of Frisco, TX, Paul (Paula) Dawson of Doylestown, PA, and Theresa Dawson of Grapevine, TX; Daughter-inlaw, Tina Dawson Scott (Brian Scott) of Harvard; 6 grandchildren, Luke Dawson, Devon Dawson, Grace Dawson, Tate Dawson, Kailey Haron, and Phoebe Haron; one brother, Frank Dawson. He was preceded in death by one son, Mark Dawson; and two brothers, Joseph and Kenneth Dawson. Visitation will be 12:00 to 2:00 pm Friday, December 2, 2016 at St. Joseph Catholic Church, 206 E. Front St. Harvard, IL 60033. A Mass of Christian Burial will follow at 2:00 pm. Interment will be in St. Joseph Catholic Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donation may be given to JourneyCare Hospice, 405 Lake Zurich Road,

21 Barrington, IL 60010. Family and friends may sign the online guest book at www.saundersmcfarlin.net. For more information, call Saunders & McFarlin at 815-943-5400.

PAT DOYLE

Born: May 24, 1954 Died: November 25, 2016

How to submit Send obituary information to obits@ nwherald.com or call 815-526-4438. Notices are accepted until 3 p.m. for the next day’s edition. Obituaries also appear online at NWHerald.com/obits, where you may sign the guest book, send flowers or make a memorial donation.

10:00 to 11:00am at the Church of Saint Patrick, 15000 Wadsworth Rd., Wadsworth IL; with a funeral mass to follow at 11:00am.

REGINA GALAHER

Born: March 18, 1931; in Wilmette, IL Died: November 27, 2016; in Lake in the Hills, IL

Pat Doyle was born May 24, 1954 and called to heaven November 25, 2016. There was nothing better to see then our Dad’s excitement and happiness when Pat Hughes announced on AM Radio that his beloved Cubs won the World Series. He had each of us – his three kids Kierre, Gracie, and Quinn right there with him. He had nothing but unconditional love for us kids, and could not have been a prouder father. He loved his precious grand-daughter Lucy and made her breakfast on Sunday mornings and always remembered to bring “Papa Juice.” It is near impossible to describe this man that was larger than life in only a few words. He grew up in Gurnee and was a proud graduate of Warren Class of ‘72. He worked hard all his life starting in his parents’ and grandparents’ restaurant The Rustic Manor, into a carpenter, and finally township supervisor of Richmond. Simple things made him so happy; mowing the lawn, watching his Blackhawks while Uncle Savage would call him in between periods. He loved Notre Dame football with his oldest friends Joe and Brandon, loved his Brat Brew. Heavy Metal and tattoos, countless con-

Regina Galaher (Schafer), 85, of Lake in the Hills, IL passed away on Sunday November 27, 2016 in her home, surrounded by family. certs with his Shorty, “if it’s too loud, you’re She was born on March 18, 1931 in Wiltoo old!” mette, IL the daughter of Frank and Regina He loved going to see his son Quinn’s Wirth. Regina was a loving mother and football games and stood on the fence just grandmother. She will be deeply missed. like his dad did, shooting guns and Poncho’s Longtime member of St. Margaret Mary every Wednesday with his boucha boy, mak- Catholic Church. ing Murph sing with the harmonica, and sushi Survivors include her children, Mary (John) with his Cookies. Maier, Yvonne Xagas, William (Sylvia) Schafer, We know Jeanne, the mother of his chilJohn (Tonia) Schafer, Joseph (Debi) Schafer dren, Hula Hoop, Uncle Savage, Joe, Blue Boy, and Thomas (Betsy) Schafer; 18 grandchildren; Toots, Pig Striker, Rusty, Cupcake, Brother 14 great grandchildren; three brothers: Charlie, Tim (Jan) John, Vicky, countless cousins, Frank (Anita) and William (Barb) Wirth along nephews, nieces, great nieces will miss him with many family and friends. so. She was preceded in death by her parents; He is now watching over us all with his her husband: Marshall Galaher; three children, parents, Daniel and Marjorie; finally re-united Brian Melody, Margaret and James Schafer. with his big brother, Mike and big sister, Mass will be celebrated on Friday, DecemNancy; and having a pint with Fatman, Ernie ber 2, 2016 at 12:00 Noon, at St. Margaret Kranich, Mark Fuller, and Josh Rymarz. Mary Catholic Church, Algonquin, IL. Burial He was our friend, leader, coach, teammate, will be private. Family will receive friends, at #53, brother, cousin, uncle, father-in-law, the church, from 11:15 AM until the mass. Papa D, Papa, and our Dada. Wait Ross Allanson Funeral & Cremation Visitation will be held on Wednesday, Chapel, Algonquin, IL, is in charge of arrangeNovember 30 from 4:00 to 8:00pm at the ments, for information, 847-658-4232 or Gurnee-Salata Funeral Home, 4190 Old Grand www.lairdfamilyfuneralservices.com Avenue, Gurnee IL. Another visitation will be • Continued on page A22 held on Thursday, December 1, 2016 from

bration Friday, Dec. 2, at St. Margaret Mary Catholic Church, Algonquin. Burial will be private. For information, call Wait-Ross-Allanson Funeral & Cremation chapel at 847-658-4232. Frank W. Geib: The visitation will be from 9 a.m. until the 10 a.m. funeral Mass celebration Wednesday, Nov. 30, at St. Mary Catholic Church, 10307 Dundee Road, Huntley. For information, call James A. O’Connor Funeral Home at 847-669-5111. James W. Hill: The funeral services will be at 1 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 3, at First Presbyterian Church, 2018 Route 47, Woodstock. For information, call Schneider-Leucht-Merwin & Cooney Funeral Home at 815-338-1710. Donna L. Johnson: The visitation will be from 1 p.m. until the 3 p.m. celebration of life ceremony Sunday, Dec. 11, at First United Methodist Church, 236 W. Crystal Lake Ave., Crystal Lake. Glenn Rodney Jorian: The memorial service will be at 1 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 10, at Willow Creek Community Church, Lakeside Auditorium, 67 Algonquin Road, South Barrington.

Donald P. Kaiser: The visitation will be from 10 a.m. until the 11 a.m. funeral service Friday, Dec. 2, at Schneider-Leucht-Merwin & Cooney Funeral Home, 1211 N. Seminary Ave., Woodstock. Burial will be private in Maryhill Cemetery in Niles. For information, call the funeral home at 815-338-1710. Christine “Teena” Kochan: The visitation will be from 3 to 7 p.m., with a 5:30 p.m. celebration of life service, Thursday, Dec. 1, at Thompson Spring Grove Funeral Home, 8103 Wilmot Road, Spring Grove. Interment will be private. For information, call the funeral home at 815-675-0550. John R. Lawrence: The funeral Mass will be celebrated at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 30, at St. Mary’s Catholic Church, 1401 Richmond Road, McHenry. Interment will be private. For information, call Colonial Funeral Home at 815-385-0063. Joseph Weldon Laytham: The visitation will be from 3 p.m. until the 4 p.m. memorial service Monday, Dec. 5, at Willow Creek Community Church, 220 Exchange Drive, Crystal Lake.

FUNERAL ARRANGEMENTS Lorraine Mae Bognar: The visitation will be from 9 a.m. until the 10 a.m. funeral Mass celebration Saturday, Dec. 3, at St. Mary Catholic Church, 10307 Dundee Road, Huntley. Judith S. Clark: The memorial gathering will be from 2 to 5 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 4, at Lakeside Arts Park at the Dole, 401 Country Club Road, Crystal Lake. Rocco Peter Dawson: The visitation will be from noon until the 2 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial celebration Friday, Dec. 2, at St. Joseph Catholic Church, 206 E. Front St., Harvard. Interment will be in St. Joseph Catholic Cemetery. For information, call Saunders & McFarlin Funeral Home at 815-943-5400. Pat Doyle: The visitation will be from 4 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 30, at Gurnee-Salata Funeral Home, 4190 Old Grand Ave., Gurnee. The visitation will continue from 10 a.m. until the 11 a.m. funeral Mass celebration Thursday, Dec. 1, at the Church of St. Patrick, 15000 Wadsworth Road, Wadsworth. Regina Galaher: The visitation will be from 11:15 a.m. until the noon funeral Mass cele-

Rose M. Panek: The visitation will be from 9 a.m. until the 10 a.m. funeral Mass celebration Wednesday, Nov. 30, at St. Mary of the Annunciation Catholic Church, 22333 W. Erhart Road, Mundelein. Interment will follow in St. Mary Cemetery. For information, call Kisselburg-Wauconda Funeral Home at 847-526-2115. Steven Michael Reichenbach: The celebration of life will be at 11 a.m. Friday, Dec. 2, at Willow Creek Community Church, 220 Exchange Drive, Crystal Lake. A luncheon will follow at the church. Burial will follow at 3 p.m. in Windridge Memorial Park, 7014 S. Rawson Bridge Road, Cary. Gary D. Weisse: The visitation will be from 4 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 30, at Davenport Family Funeral Home and Crematory, 419 E. Terra Cotta Ave. (Route 176), Crystal Lake. The visitation will continue from 10 a.m. until the 11 a.m. funeral service Thursday, Dec. 1, at the funeral home. Burial will follow in Windridge Memorial Park in Cary. For information, call the funeral home at 815459-3411.

Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016

OBITUARIES


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016

| OBITUARIES

22

• Continued from page A21

WILLIAM L. JACOBS

Born: October 28, 1924; in Evanston, IL Died: November 27, 2016; in Woodstock, IL William L. Jacobs, 92, of Woodstock and formerly of Crystal Lake, passed away November 27, 2016. He was born October 28, 1924 in Evanston. Bill is survived by his wife of 65 years, Joan Jacobs; his children, Susan Jacobs, Karen Moore, William Jacobs Jr., Laura Jacobs Anderson; six grandchildren and four great-grandchildren; and his sister, Nancy Flannery. Services for Bill will be private. Memorials may be made to the First Congregational Church, 461 Pierson St., Crystal Lake, IL 60014. Arrangements entrusted to Querhammer & Flagg Funeral Home. For information call the funeral home at 815-459-1760. Online condolences may be made at www. querhammerandflagg.com.

DONALD P. KAISER

Born: August 19, 1936 Died: November 28, 2016

Donald P. Kaiser 80 of Woodstock died Monday, November 28, 2016, at Hearthstone Manor Nursing Home in Woodstock. He was born in Chicago on August 19, 1936

to Paul and Catherine (O’Neill) Kaiser. He married Carole Ann McLean on October 15, 1966 at St. Juliana Church in Chicago. Donald was a member of the Illinois National Guard for 6 years. For 29 years he faithfully served as Greenwood Township Supervisor. He served on the Board at Helping Paws. He was a lifelong Cubs and Bears fan. He enjoyed keeping up with local politics and served as an election judge. His hobbies included history, transportation museums, watching grandchildren participate in sporting events and nature photography. He was loved and will be missed. He is survived by his wife of 50 loving years, Carole Ann Kaiser; a son, Donald (Dori) Kaiser Jr.; daughter, Cheryl (Frank) McCormick; 2 grandchildren, Allison and Jeffrey Kaiser; two sisters, Norene (Lee) Zulawinski and Joyce Schoene; also many nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents. The visitation will be at the Schneider, Leucht, Merwin & Cooney Funeral Home 1211 N. Seminary Ave. Woodstock on Friday December 2, 2016 starting at 10:00 am until the time of the funeral service at 11:00 am. Private Burial will be at Maryhill Cemetery in Niles. In lieu of flowers memorials to any No Kill Animal Shelter would be appreciated. For information call the Schneider, Leucht, Merwin & Cooney Funeral Home at 815 338 1710 or visit our website at www.slmcfh. com.

CHRISTINE KOCHAN

Born: March 27, 1944; in Chicago, IL Died: November 25, 2016; in McHenry, IL Christine “Teena” Kochan, age 72, of McHenry, passed away peacefully on Friday, November 25, 2016 at Centegra Hospital in McHenry, surrounded by her loving family. She was born on March 27, 1944 in Chicago, to Gleason and Kathleen (Kline) Kauffman. Teena was a graduate of Lakeview High School and married her high school sweetheart, Arnie Helsing at the tender age of sixteen. During their marriage, they had five children together. On February 28th, 1980 she married her best friend, John Kochan. Together they were blessed with two sons. Teena was a loving wife and mother and a doting grandma. Throughout her life, Teena served as a bartender and was most well known for her many years of service at Pratser’s Silver Saddle Restaurant in Grayslake. As a hobby, she collected all sorts of pottery. She was a very meticulous housekeeper and kept her yard perfectly manicured as well. In her later years, Teena enjoyed all types of sweets, especially chocolate and ice cream and she could always be found with water and lots of ice always on hand. Teena is survived by her husband, John; children, Sharlene May, Arnie, Nancy, Erick (Jennifer) Helsing, Marilyn (Scott) Gutherie, Michael (Katie) Kochan, Walter (Kelly) Kochan,

Sharla (Omar) Ahmed, Sheila (Mark) Hill, Sherry Lennon; fifteen grandchildren; eight great-grandchildren; and sisters, Karen (James) Vincent; Annette Karlin, and Estelle Nimsgren. Preceded in death by her parents. Visitation will be held on Thursday, December 1, 2016 at Thompson Spring Grove Funeral Home, 8103 Wilmot Road, Spring Grove, IL 60081 from 3:00 p.m. until the Celebration of Life Service at 5:30 p.m. with Pastor Nathan Anderson officiating. Visitation will resume after the Celebration of Life Service until the hour of 7:00 p.m. Interment will be private. To send flowers or an online condolence to the family of Christine M. Kochan, please visit www.ThompsonSpringGrove.com For additional information call the funeral home at 815-675-0550.

DAVID RAINEY David Rainey, age 68, of Fox River Grove passed away November 28, 2016. Arrangements are pending at the Kahle-Moore Funeral Home. 847-639-3817 or kahlemoore.com.

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NEIGHBORS

23 Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016

McHenry County

THINGS TO DO IN & AROUND McHENRY COUNTY

1

FALL JAZZ CONCERT

WHEN: 7 to 8:30 p.m. Nov. 30 WHERE: McHenry County College, Luecht Conference Center, 8900 Route 14, Crystal Lake COST & INFO: The MCC Jazz Ensemble, directed by adjunct music instructor Michael Bazan, will perform a variety of music from jazz greats. The Chamber Group, directed by music instructor Paige Lush, PhD, will perform Dixieland jazz tunes. Free. Information: www.facebook.com/ events/337325049978296 or Michael Hillstrom at 815479-7814.

2

CRAFT & VENDOR FAIR

WHEN: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Nov. 30 WHERE: Senior Services Associates Inc., 3519 N. Richmond Road, McHenry COST & INFO: Offering home decor, jewelry, candles, ceramics, knitted items, cosmetics, Christmas decor, ornaments, kitchen tools, a bake sale and more. Free admission. Information: 815344-3555 or www.seniorservicesassoc.org.

CITIZENS’ CLIMATE LOBBY – Members of the McHenry County Chapter of Citizens’ Climate Lobby attended the organization’s regional conference in Indiana. Attendees heard from director Mark Reynolds and Dr. David Karowe of Western Michigan University, and participated in workshops on the use of a carbon fee and dividend to reduce carbon emissions. Pictured (from left) are Lois Johnson of Wonder Lake; Karen Dombrowski of Crystal Lake; Ann Legg of Woodstock; Rick Johnson of Wonder Lake; Pat Dieckhoff of Crystal Lake; and Jim Thrall of Spring Grove.

COMMUNITY

CALENDAR Nov. 30

• 10 to 11:30 a.m. – Résumé writing workshop, McHenry County College, 8900 Route 14, Crystal Lake. Receive tips and techniques on how to write or revise and reformat a résumé. Free. Information: 815-455-8576 or www.mchenry.edu/ careerservices. • 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. – Defenders’ used book sale, Woodstock Square Mall building lobby, 110 S. Johnson St., Woodstock. Annual holiday sale sponsored by the Environmental Defenders of McHenry County. Books priced at $1 for hardcovers, 50 cents for paperbacks and 25 cents for children’s books. Bag sale Dec. 8-10 with all books $5 a paper grocery bag. Continues through Dec. 10 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily (3 p.m. Saturdays, closed Sunday). Information: 815-338-0393 or www.mcdef.org. • 5 p.m. – Magic class, Algonquin Historic Village Hall, 2 S. Main St., Algonquin. Crystal Lake Park District program. Children ages 5 to 12 will learn tricks from the Magic Team of Gary Kantor, including card, rope and coin tricks, mind-reading and more. All materials are provided, and each child receives a magic kit to take home. Registration required. Cost: $20 residents, $25 nonresidents. Information: www. crystallakeparks.org or 815-459-0680.

McHenry County

Two MCCD sites open after dark through March 12

The McHenry County Conservation District has two sites open late for hiking or cross-country skiing through March 12. Hiking or skiing is permitted until 9 p.m. daily on the solar-lit trails at Pleasant Valley, 13315 Pleasant Valley Road, Woodstock, and Hickory Grove Highlands, 500 Hickory Nut Grove Lane, Cary. The Pleasant Valley trail is a half-mile trail on the east side of the entrance drive and traverses relatively flat terrain, perfect for beginners or shorter outings. Park in the first parking area and sign in. The trail at Hickory Grove Highlands is a 1.25 mile looped trail that travels through a restored savanna, offering a longer scenic route with some hills and turns, suitable for intermediate skiers. Visitors should sign in at the trail head. Both sites also offer candlelight ski events once a month during the winter season. For information,visit www.mccdistrict.org.

Union

Historical society’s open house to include quilt show The McHenry County Historical Society will host a month-long quilt show, “Rock Around the Quilted Tree,” kicking off with its annual Holiday Open House from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dec. 3 at the county historical museum, 6422 Main St. The open house will feature free admission to the museum that day, as well as live music, a bake sale and other surprises. Veteran Christmas memorabilia collectors Dave Harms and Lynne Eltrevoog are collaborating to deck the halls of the museum and stage in holiday memorabilia. Regular admission, $5 for adults and $3 for seniors and students, applies for the remainder of the month. The museum will be open from 1 to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, with the exception of Dec. 23, 26 and 30. For information, visit www.gothistory.org.


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016

24

STATE

Win for couple in civil union complaint By SOPHIA TAREEN

“Business owners cannot pick and choose to follow laws simply because they personally disagree with same-sex couples’ decision to marry.”

The Associated Press

CHICAGO – A same-sex couple denied access to a Paxton bed-and-breakfast while planning their civil union ceremony has won another legal victory in a five-year discrimination case that’s highlighted the conflict between religious freedoms and gay civil rights. Owners of the Timber Creek Bed & Breakfast contend they don’t believe in same-sex unions and refused to consider hosting Todd and Mark Wathen’s ceremony in 2011, the year Illinois legalized same-sex civil unions. However, an administrative judge ruled last year that the owners violated the state’s Human Rights Act because the couple was denied a venue based on sexual orientation. A three-member panel of the Illinois Human Rights Commission sided with the judge earlier this month by declining to take on the case. On Tuesday, attorneys with the American Civil Liberties Union of Illinois, among several representing the Wathens, said the move is a clear interpretation of Illinois law, whether applied to civil unions or marriage. Illinois legalized same-sex marriage in 2013 and the Wathens have since wed.

ILLINOIS ROUNDUP

1

News from across the state Illinois House committee approves revised Exelon legislation

SPRINGFIELD – An Illinois House committee has endorsed a revised plan to subsidize state nuclear plants. The Energy Committee voted, 10-1, to send the legislation to benefit Exelon and two of its Illinois nuclear plants to the House floor. The plan now would provide $235 million a year for Exelon for 13 years to reward the company because nuclear energy is produced without emitting damaging greenhouse gases. Exelon would use the money to shore up unprofitable nuclear plants in the Quad Cities and Clinton.

John Knight

Director, ACLU of Illinois

AP photo

Todd (left) and Mark Wathen pose after their civil union ceremony in the backyard of their Mattoon home on Sept. 6, 2011. “The commission’s decision once again sends a clear message that denying couples the use of a public wedding venue in Illinois because they are gay or lesbian is simply not permitted,” ACLU director John Knight said. “Business owners cannot pick and choose to follow laws simply because they personally disagree with same-

sex couples’ decision to marry.” However, Jason Craddock, an attorney for the bed-and-breakfast owners, said he plans to fight the decision. The owners have been ordered to pay around $80,000 in damages and legal fees and allow same-sex couples access to their facilities. Timber Creek’s website still notes that they do “not

The new version, however, removes incentives for southern Illinois coal-fired plants that were added to draw more support for the bill.

campaign that he would seek ways to cut federal funding for sanctuary cities.

2

Evanston aldermen pass strengthened ‘welcoming city’ law

CHICAGO – City council members in Evanston have passed legislation strengthening its status as being welcoming to immigrants. WBEZ reports that the Evanston City Council unanimously passed the measure Monday. It forbids police and city employees from asking about a person’s immigration status and from reporting undocumented immigrants to the federal government. Several aldermen said they felt the measure was necessary to reassure immigrant communities. Evanston passed its previous Welcoming City Ordinance in 2008. The measure comes after President-elect Donald Trump said during the

3

Reward offered in search for missing Pekin boy

PEKIN – Police are offering a $1,000 reward for information in the disappearance of a 13-year-old boy who has been missing for two weeks. The Pekin Daily Times reports that Pekin police offered the reward Monday for help in their search for Robert Bee Jr. The boy’s mother reported him missing on Nov. 18. Police designated him a runaway. Spokesman Mike Eeten says the department dedicated an investigation unit after the boy couldn’t be found for ensuing days. The boy is 4-foot-6, weighs 110 pounds and was last seen wearing and red and gray shirt, jeans and red shoes. Police say they haven’t issued an Amber Alert because they don’t have evidence the boy was abducted. Authorities have issued a Missing and

host civil union or gay marriage ceremonies and/or receptions.” Craddock said he wasn’t surprised by the panel’s move and was prepared to ask the whole commission to consider the case and, if necessary, take it beyond the agency to an Illinois appellate court. “We’re going through all the steps,” Craddock said, adding that the owners have been “punished for living out their faith.” The case was among several that cropped up in response to Illinois legalizing same-sex civil unions. But there hasn’t been a similar response since Illinois began issuing same-sex marriage licenses in 2014, according to the ACLU. The following year, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that gay marriage is legal nationwide.

Endangered Persons Advisory.

4

Slain man’s fiancee accuses alleged gang member

CHICAGO – The fiancee of a federal informant allegedly killed by a purported street-gang leader told jurors that she recognized the masked gunman as he ambushed her family in Dolton. Shanice Peatry testified Monday that the man shot her fiance, Keith Daniels, while the couple and their two children were outside her apartment in April 2013. Peatry said she recognized the gunman’s eyes and his dreadlocks sticking out from his mask. “It was so many (shots), I couldn’t count,” Peatry said. “It kind of felt like it was in slow motion to me, like he wasn’t in no rush.” When asked to identify the gunman in court, Peatry pointed at Paris Poe, an alleged Hobos gang leader. “Him, right there,” she said in a barely audible voice.

– Wire reports


LOTTERY

ILLINOIS LOTTERY

Midday Pick 3: 2-7-9 Midday Pick 4: 7-9-8-6 Evening Pick 3: 4-6-0 Evening Pick 4: 2-4-1-8 Lucky Day Lotto Midday: 1-3-19-25-30 Lucky Day Lotto Evening: 20-23-33-42-45 Lotto jackpot: $3.25 million MEGA MILLIONS Numbers: 22-33-49-51-59

Megaball: 8 Megaplier: 4 Est. jackpot: $25 million

POWERBALL Est. jackpot: $40 million INDIANA LOTTERY Daily 3 Midday: 1-1-2 Daily 3 Evening: 4-6-8 Daily 4 Midday: 6-1-6-4 Daily 4 Evening: 0-4-3-0

Cash 5: 9-15-22-23-24 Est. Lotto jackpot: $2 million

WISCONSIN LOTTERY Pick 3: 2-9-6 Pick 4: 6-0-3-6 SuperCash: 1-15-18-20-37-38 Badger 5: 2-4-13-16-26

NATION & WORLD BRIEFS Arrests during protests for herd, which roams an area of north-central Alaska about the higher minimum wages

CHICAGO – Dozens of people were arrested Tuesday as they participated in protests nationwide for a $15-per-hour minimum wage. Fast-food restaurant workers and home and child-care workers rallied in cities including Chicago, Detroit, Houston, Los Angeles, Minneapolis and New York. In many cities the protesters blocked busy intersections. In Chicago, hundreds of protesters at O’Hare International Airport chanted outside terminals: “What do we want? $15! When do we want it? Now!” Police gated an area to allow travelers room to walk. As many as 500 workers at the airport participated in an unfair labor practices strike, said officials from Service Employees International Union Local 1 who have been organizing the workers.

size of Ohio, hit a peak of about 70,000 caribou in 2010. It fell to 50,000 in 2013. That year, spring arrived late, meaning caribou had to trudge through snow later than usual at a time when their bodies are already stressed and not getting the grasses they need for nutrition.

Dems concerned about Sessions’ viewpoints

WASHINGTON – Senate Republicans are hoping to move quickly to confirm President-elect Donald Trump’s nominee for attorney general, but Democrats say they have concerns about Sen. Jeff Sessions’ views on civil liberties, voting rights and immigration and are asking for time to review his decades of work as a senator and federal prosecutor. Sessions met Tuesday with Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Charles Grassley, Biologists research R-Iowa, the first time a Trump caribou herd mystery Cabinet nominee has made JUNEAU, Alaska – The size of the customary courtesy call on a large caribou herd in Alaska’s Capitol Hill. Arctic region has dropped by At the meeting, Grassley said more 50 percent over the last three years, and researchers who he hopes to hold a confirmation hearing before Trump’s inauguhave tentatively ruled out huntration Jan. 20, setting Sessions ing and predation as significant factors for the decline are trying up for a quick vote once Trump is president. to determine why. The state’s Central Arctic – Wire reports

25

Price, Obamacare foe, to oversee health care By STEVE PEOPLES and RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR The Associated Press

WASHINGTON – Reaching deep into conservative territory, President-elect Donald Trump chose Georgia Rep. Tom Price to oversee the nation’s health care system on Tuesday, picking a fierce Obamacare critic who also has championed efforts to privatize Medicare. Trump selected another veteran Republican, Elaine Chao, to lead the Department of Transportation. Both have long ties to Washington. Price, picked to lead the Department of Health and Human Services after more than a decade in Congress, helped craft House Speaker Paul Ryan’s plan to privatize Medicare – a position Trump opposed in the campaign. Chao, who was the first Asian-American woman to serve in a president’s Cabinet, is married to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. The selections came as Trump spent Tuesday with advisers in his Manhattan skyscraper, racing through meetings with prospective administration hires as high-profile vacancies loom – none bigger than secretary of State. Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, on the shortlist for the nation’s chief diplomat, was to have a private dinner with the incoming president. At the same time, Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein delivered $3.5 million to the state of Wisconsin to guarantee a recount in one of the states that fueled Trump’s unexpected victory. Stein, who is also pursuing recounts in Pennsylvania and Michigan, has raised concerns that the results may have been hacked. Trump has assailed the Green Party effort as a scam

AP photo

Rep. Tom Price, R-Ga., chairman of the House Budget Committee, appears before the Rules Committee on Jan. 5, joined at right by Rep. John Yarmuth, D-Ky., on Capitol Hill in Washington. Republicans hope Price will preside over the dismantlement of President Barack Obama’s signature health care law. and separately has made unsupported claims of voter fraud in other states. Meanwhile, Price’s selection raised questions about the incoming president’s commitment to Medicare, among other popular entitlement programs he repeatedly vowed to preserve before the election. The Georgia congressman led GOP efforts on Capitol Hill to transform Medicare into a voucher-like system, a change that if enacted, would likely dramatically reduce government spending on the health care program that serves an estimated 57 million people. Trump did not address Price’s position on Medicare in a statement released by his transition team. The team did not respond to subsequent questions about it. “Chairman Price, a renowned physician, has earned a reputation for being a tireless problem solver and the goto expert on health care policy, making him the ideal choice to serve in this capacity,” Trump said. “He is exceptionally qualified to shepherd our commitment to repeal and replace Obamacare and bring affordable and accessible health care to every American.”

Trump, in a 2015 interview promoted on his campaign website, pledged not to cut expensive entitlement programs that Republicans have fought for years to cut to help reduce the federal deficit. “I’m not going to cut Social Security like every other Republican. And I’m not going to cut Medicare or Medicaid. Every other Republican’s going to cut,” Trump told the Daily Signal. He later changed his mind on Medicaid, embracing the GOP concept of turning the program over to the states with a fixed amount of federal “block grant” funding. Like any Cabinet official, Price would carry out the wishes of the president. And a sweeping Medicare initiative would have to go through Congress wwith some Democratic support, which would be unlikely. Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders charged that Price “has a long history of wanting to do exactly the opposite of what Trump campaigned on.” “Rep. Price has a long history of wanting to cut Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid. What hypocrisy!” Sanders said in a statement.

Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016

NATION&WORLD


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Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016

| NATION

Ohio State attacker stewed over treatment of fellow Muslims By ERIC TUCKER, TAMI ABDOLLAH and ANDREW WELSH–HUGGINS The Associated Press

AP photos

Wildfires burn Tuesday near Gatlinburg, Tenn. Thousands of people have fled wildfires that killed at least three people and destroyed hundreds of homes and a resort in the Great Smoky Mountains.

Escaping wildfires meant fleeing through hell-like landscape By STEVE MEGARGEE and JONATHAN MATTISE The Associated Press

GATLINBURG, Tenn. – With flames dripping from tree branches and the air filled with embers, thousands of people raced through a hellish landscape as they fled wildfires that killed three people and destroyed hundreds of homes and a resort in the Great Smoky Mountains. Fanned by hurricane-force winds, the flames reached the doorstep of Dollywood, the theme park named after country music legend and local hero Dolly Parton. But the attraction was spared significant damage. The fires spread quickly on Monday night, when winds topping 87 mph whipped up the flames, catching residents and tourists in the Gatlinburg area by surprise. Police banged on front doors and told people to get out immediately. Some trekked 20 minutes to catch lifesaving rides on trolleys usually reserved for tours and wedding parties. “There was fire everywhere. It was like we were in hell,” said Linda Monholland, who was working at Park View Inn in Gatlinburg when she and five other people fled on foot. “Walking through hell, that’s what it was. I can’t believe it. I never want to see something like that again in my life, ever.” “Hell opened up,” her co-worker Sissy Stinnett said. In all, more than 14,000 residents and tourists were forced to evacuate the tourist city in the mountains, where some hotspots persisted and a curfew in place Tuesday night. No details on the deaths were imme-

diately available. More than a dozen people were injured. The extent of the damage began to emerge even as smoke from the wildfires lingered late Tuesday afternoon. The Castle, perhaps the largest and most iconic home in Gatlinburg, was destroyed. So was Cupid’s Chapel of Love, a wedding venue. Entire churches were gone. Scorched cars parked outside set on their rims after their tires had melted away. The only sound came from the eerie screech of hotel fire alarms echoing through the empty streets. Some Christmas decorations on lampposts and utility poles were on fire. Marci Claude, a spokeswoman for both the city and the Gatlinburg Convention and Visitors Bureau, choked up as she surveyed the damage for the first time on a media tour. “I’m just astonished this is my town,” she said. On an aerial and driving tour of the damage in and around Gatlinburg, Gov. Bill Haslam said he was struck by the seemingly random nature of the fire that destroyed some structures and left others untouched. Noting that much of the downtown entertainment district was undamaged, Haslam said “it just could have been so much worse.” As darkness fell on the area near the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, open flames could still be seen burning near razed homes. A line of strong to marginally severe storms was expected in east Tennessee on Tuesday night and into early Wednesday morning, with damaging straight-line winds of up to 60 mph and lightning possible.

COLUMBUS, Ohio – A Somali-born student who carried out a car-and-knife attack at Ohio State University stewed over the treatment of Muslims while apparently staying under the radar of federal law enforcement, underscoring the difficulty authorities face in identifying and stopping lone wolves bent on violence. Abdul Razak Ali Artan was not known to FBI counterterrorism authorities before Monday’s rampage, which ended with him shot to death by police and 11 people injured, a law enforcement official told The Associated Press. That’s in contrast to several other recent attacks, including those in New York City; Orlando, Florida; and Garland, Texas, in which those blamed for the violence had previously come to the attention of federal agents. Law enforcement officials have not identified a motive for the Ohio State violence but have suggested terrorism as a possibility. FBI agents continued to search Artan’s apartment for clues, but California U.S. Rep. Adam Schiff, the top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, said he had seen no evidence Artan was directed by or was in communication with any overseas terror organization. The mode of attack – plowing a car into civilians, then slashing victims with a butcher knife – was in keeping with the recommended tactics of jihadist propaganda. And Facebook

posts that were apparently written shortly before the attack and came to light afterward show that Artan nursed grievances against the U.S. He railed against U.S. intervention in Muslim lands and warned, “If you want us Muslims to stop carrying lone wolf attacks, then make peace” with the Islamic State group. “America! Stop interfering with other countries, especially the Muslim Ummah. We are not weak. We are not weak, remember that,” he wrote, using the Arabic term for the world’s Muslim community. He also warned that other Muslims are in sleeper cells, “waiting for a signal. I am warning you Oh America!” The posts were recounted by a law enforcement official who was briefed on the investigation but wasn’t authorized to discuss it publicly and spoke on the condition of anonymity. On Tuesday, a self-described Islamic State news agency called Artan “a soldier of the Islamic State” who “carried out the operation in response to calls to target citizens of international coalition countries.” The Islamic State group has described other attackers around the world as its “soldiers” without specifically claiming to have organized the acts of violence. Artan’s social media rants seemed at odds with the portrait of the young man painted by neighbors and acquaintances. Jack Ouham, owner of a market near the home on the outskirts of Columbus where Artan lived with his parents and siblings, saw him almost every day when he stopped in for snacks but never alcohol or cigarettes.

Students Tanner Hale (center) and Kayla Croyle attend a vigil following an attack Tuesday at The Ohio State University campus the previous day in Columbus, Ohio.


By FERNANDO VERGARA and JOSHUA GOODMAN The Associated Press

AP file photos

Players of Brazil’s Chapecoense celebrate at the end of a Copa Sudamericana semifinal soccer match against Argentina’s San Lorenzo on Nov. 23 in Chapeco, Brazil. time of the crash. Authorities also said they were not ruling out the possibility, relayed to rescuers by a surviving flight attendant, that the plane ran out of fuel minutes before its scheduled landing at Jose Maria Cordova airport outside Medellin. Whatever the cause, the emotional pain of Colombia’s deadliest air trag-

edy in two decades was felt across the soccer world. Expressions of grief poured in as South America’s federation canceled all scheduled matches in a show of solidarity, Real Madrid’s squad interrupted its training for a minute of silence and Argentine legend Diego Maradona sent his condolences to the victims’

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• Wednesday, November 30, 2016

LA UNION, Colombia – Colombian authorities searched for answers Tuesday into the crash of a chartered airliner that slammed into the Andes mountains while transporting a Brazilian soccer team whose Cinderella story had won it a spot in the finals of one of South America’s most prestigious regional tournaments. All but six of the 77 people on board were killed. The British Aerospace 146 shorthaul plane declared an emergency and lost radar contact just before 10 p.m. Monday, according to Colombia’s aviation agency. It said the plane’s black boxes had been recovered and were being analyzed. The aircraft, which departed from Santa Cruz, Bolivia, was carrying the Chapecoense soccer team from southern Brazil for Wednesday’s first leg of the two-game Copa Sudamericana final against Atletico Nacional of Medellin. Twenty-one Brazilian journalists were also on board the flight. Colombian officials initially said the plane suffered an electrical failure but there was also heavy rainfall at the

families over Facebook. Brazil’s top teams offered to lend the small club players next season so they can rebuild following the sudden end to a fairy tale season that saw Chapecoense reach the tournament final just two years after making it into the first division for the first time since the 1970s. “It is the minimum gesture of solidarity that is within our reach,” the teams said in a statement. Sportsmanship also prevailed, with Atletico Nacional asking that the championship title be given to its rival, whose upstart run had electrified soccer-crazed Brazil. Rescuers working through the night were initially heartened after pulling three people alive from the wreckage. But as the hours passed, heavy fog and stormy weather grounded helicopters and slowed efforts to reach the crash site. At daybreak, dozens of bodies scattered across a muddy mountainside were collected into white bags. They were then loaded onto several Black Hawk helicopters that had to perform a tricky maneuver to land on the crest of the Andes mountains. The plane’s fuselage appeared to have broken into two, with the nose facing downward into a steep valley.

27

WORLD | Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

Brazilian soccer team’s plane crashes in Colombia; 71 dead


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016

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OPINIONS

NORTHWEST HERALD EDITORIAL BOARD:

Dan McCaleb

Kevin Lyons

Valerie Katzenstein

John Sahly

ANOTHER VIEW

It’s time for AFSCME to show its hand In a month filled with horrible fiscal news, a ruling by the Illinois Labor Board could serve as the catalyst to starting the long process of improving the disaster otherwise known as the state’s finances. The Labor Board unanimously ruled Nov. 15 contract talks between the state and Council 31 of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees are at an impasse. That allowed Gov. Bruce Rauner’s administration to impose its contract terms on the union that represents about 38,000 state employees – and the governor started taking some of those steps the next day. The state notified workers of its intent to implement an employee merit pay plan and extend the work week to 40 hours before overtime is paid. AFSCME has said it plans to appeal the ruling. The union says it wants Rauner to return to the bargaining table and work on a contract that should have started July 1, 2015. Rauner is under no obligation to negotiate. We recommend he does, but only – and this is mandatory in our eyes – if a hard-and-fast expiration date is set so both sides come ready to negotiate. AFSCME must come to the table with a proposal that indicates the union understands just how precarious Illinois’ finances are. Waking up from the state’s fiscal nightmare is going to cause pain. It’s unfair for pretty much everyone, and sadly, we’ve a long way to go before the agony ceases. Keeping the bigger picture in mind when considering any state expense commitment is mandatory. AFSCME has a harder task than other unions in negotiations because of the breadth of employees it represents. While the governor’s office points to the 18 unions that have settled contract talks with it, those unions combined represent about 5,000 people and are more likely to represent one type of employee. AFSCME has employees who range from caregivers for people with disabilities to corrections officers, and there is a correspondingly huge range in pay. AFSCME told this editorial board it hasn’t presented its last/best offer. Here’s their chance: Publicly release it. Let the public know what you’re asking for, so taxpayers can judge the merits. Make it compelling, so the governor’s administration would look unreasonable to not give it consideration. A return to the bargaining table, with a firm date for an agreement set, could give taxpayers the decision they deserved months ago.

The (Springfield) State Journal-Register

THE FIRST

AMENDMENT

ANOTHER VIEW

Fraud accusations endanger democracy The recent presidential campaign eroded custom after custom, but in the end the legitimacy of the results and the sanctity of the peaceful transition of power were reaffirmed. Or so it seemed. Once the electoral college vote was clear, Hillary Clinton graciously conceded to President-elect Donald Trump, and President Barack Obama promised to work for a smooth transition. Neither emphasized the fact Clinton won the popular vote. Then Jill Stein, the Green Party presidential nominee, pressed for recounts in a handful of swing states, based on thin suspicions of election tampering. The Clinton campaign indicated it saw little reason to initiate a recount or any other kind of inquiry, but announced it would join in anyway so its representatives would be present for any official review. The likely results of Stein’s recount effort are twofold: enhancing her fundraising and sowing

unfounded doubts in Americans’ minds about the integrity of the election. Yet it was Trump’s reaction that was the most corrosive. The president-elect lashed out on Twitter on Sunday. “In addition to winning the Electoral College in a landslide, I won the popular vote if you deduct the millions of people who voted illegally,” Trump wrote, offering zero evidence for the incendiary charge. The president-elect appeared to be repeating a debunked story circulating on conspiracy-peddling right-wing websites that claims millions of noncitizens voted. Trump is the president-elect. He above all others bears responsibility to safeguard and defend the integrity of the nation’s democratic government. Instead, he illogically attacked the very system that resulted in his victory. For those who hoped

as president-elect he would be slower to take offense than he had been as candidate, and less willing to trade in lies, the tweet came as one more disappointment. Trump’s overreaction suggests he is not prepared for the responsibilities of the presidency or the scrutiny that comes with it. The nation, in fact, does have a voting problem, but it is not the imaginary fraud Trump conjures. Rather, it is a system that makes it too difficult for citizens to cast their votes. Registration procedures are unnecessarily restrictive. Early voting opportunities are needlessly limited. Lines are way too long. Names are too easily purged from voter rolls. Election equipment lacks paper trails in some states. Yet, if Trump’s preoccupation with phantom voting fraud is any indication, his administration may spend a lot of time making ballot access worse, not better.

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

The Washington Post


VIEWS Scott Reeder that scores a lot of three-point shots wins even when they made fewer baskets than their opponents. That’s just the way it works. I suppose a loser could holler their team made the most baskets. And most folks would file it away as “interesting but not relevant.” As I noted in last week’s column, I did not vote for Donald Trump. In fact, I dislike his brand of politics. But what I do value is the rule of law. Presidents are elected in this country by the Electoral College, not the popular vote. Counting Trump, five of the 44 men elected president have lost the popular vote. That’s one out of 10 presidents. So, it’s hardly an unknown phenomenon in our history. Hillary Clinton supporters can shout she won the popular vote by 2 million ballots. I can just shrug and file that away as “interesting but irrelevant.” Like basketball, you play by the

rules you have, not the ones you want. And the Electoral College has been around since the election of George Washington. It’s a provision in the Constitution that always has had its critics. In fact, over the history of our country, there have been at least 700 proposed amendments to modify or abolish the Electoral College – more than any other subject of Constitutional reform. But each one of the provisions has failed. Each state has as many electors as it does U.S. Senators and members of the U.S. House of Representatives. Since all states have the same number of senators, it gives a slight, but at times significant, added weight to votes from less populated jurisdictions such as Wyoming or South Dakota. The framers of the U.S. Constitution did this because they wanted to ensure big states didn’t dominate smaller states. In fact, the provision granting each state equal representation in the Senate is the only part of the Constitution that can never be amended. Back in the 1960s, American Basketball Association Commis-

sioner George Mikan, the pioneer of the three-point field goal, said the three-pointer would give the smaller player a chance to score more often. Framers of the constitution were thinking something similar. They wanted to ensure smaller states in the union would continue to have influence so they created the Electoral College. Those who don’t like this arrangement can work to amend the Constitution. Complaining about the system being “rigged” diminishes your cause – and your candidate. Elections have consequences, and your candidate lost. And it’s impossible to say who would have won the popular vote if there wasn’t an Electoral College because the strategies of both campaigns were predicated not on winning the popular vote but collecting more than 270 electors. They were playing by the rules that were in place, not the ones they may have wanted.

• Scott Reeder is a veteran statehouse journalist. He works as a freelance reporter in the Springfield area and can be reached at scottreeder1965@gmail.com.

IT’S YOUR WRITE Village fighting billboards to protect values, aesthetics

To the Editor: Several weeks ago, a new billboard sign was put in place on Algonquin Road between the bike path bridge and Pyott Road. The subject matter is for a “gentleman’s” club many miles from Algonquin. The sign location is unincorporated and outside of our jurisdiction. The village board and I fought to prevent billboard signs from being erected in proximity of our village for just this reason. I have contacted those who have jurisdiction over this matter to ask again for their assistance in removing billboard signs from any location near our community. Simply stated, our families should not have to worry about exposing their children to explicit content and suggestive images when traveling area roads. The village board and I will continue to work on your behalf to eliminate these signs and protect the values and

aesthetics of our community. John C. Schmitt

Algonquin village president

Republican caucus for McHenry Township trustees set for Dec. 6

To the Editor: McHenry Township trustees definitely are in sync with County Board winners of the Nov. 8 elections. They all are on the same platform of applying common sense for budget matters and providing more transparency to the electorate. They listen to all residents about reducing the operating costs of township responsibilities, understanding consumer spending aside from taxes bolsters the economy. Unique to township processes prior to the upcoming elections April 4 are the provisions for caucusing by the respective parties to provide candidates, should there be more than one aspirant per party for each position. Caucusing for the incumbent Repub-

HOW TO SOUND OFF We welcome original letters on public issues. Letters must include the author’s full name, home address and day and evening telephone numbers. We limit letters to 250 words and one published letter every 30 days. All letters are subject to editing for length and clarity at the sole discretion of the

lican party candidates and vacancies will occur Dec. 6 at the McHenry VFW hall on Route 120, with backup plans to accommodate a larger gathering of Republican supporters nearby. Among those attending the caucus will be well-qualified, tax-sensitive incumbent trustees Gary Barla, Neal Schepler and Craig Wallace, along with Sue Draffkorn adding her knowledge from a past County Board experience. This process alone is a tax-saving process, eliminating the cost of unnecessary primaries for the township level.

editor. Submit letters by: • Email: letters@nwherald.com • Mail: Northwest Herald “It’s Your Write” Box 250 Crystal Lake, IL 60039-0250

Expecting to continue adding to the future of McHenry Township are highly qualified incumbents Craig Adams, supervisor; Jim Condon, road commissioner; and Marsha Nelson, clerk. Other aspirants are expected to make their case, requiring an interested and necessary large electorate to attend. One must have voted Republican in the primaries to vote here. My wife and I will see you there. George Braun Johnsburg

• Wednesday, November 30, 2016

AMES, Iowa – I remember watching my older brother, Danny, dribbling down the court and me wiggling uncomfortably in the bleachers, staring at my blue Keds and asking, “How do we know who wins?” Someone patiently explained the team with the most baskets wins. I guess that was a good enough explanation for a 4-year-old, and that’s usually the way things worked out. But not always. You see in basketball, a basket can count as one, two or three points. So occasionally the team with the fewest baskets wins. The same could be said for democracy. Sometimes the candidate who receives the most votes loses. I was thinking about that Nov. 20 as I sat high in the seats of Hilton Coliseum with two of my college buddies, Doug and Fred. I watched my beloved Iowa State Cyclones set a new all-time school scoring record as they played the Citadel. Player after player sank 3-point shots quite a distance from the basket. While it wasn’t the case in this particular game, sometimes a team

OPINIONS | Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

Electoral College like the 3-point rule

29


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016

30

BUSINESS

For-profit colleges expect fortunes under Trump By COLLIN BINKLEY The Associated Press

BOSTON – After nearing collapse under the Obama administration, the for-profit college industry is celebrating Donald Trump’s election as a chance for a rebound. As stock prices for some of the nation’s largest college chains have surged, industry lobbyists say they have received a warm welcome from Trump’s transition team and already have launched a campaign to rebrand the embattled industry as a key to the new president’s plan for economic growth. While Trump has yet to detail his education plan, some in the for-profit sector see the president-elect as an ally who has championed the private sector and promised to roll back many of President Barack Obama’s regulations. Industry lobbyists hope those include federal “gainful employment” rules, which can cut funding to academic programs whose graduates struggle to pay off student debt, and new borrower defense rules that can force financially unstable schools to put up large sums of money to cover student loans if the school fails. “Unfortunately, the focus in the last eight years has been fighting for survival from an ideological administration that was opposed to our very existence, and hopefully that is a fight we will no longer have to wage,” said Steve Gunderson, president of the industry lobbying group Career Education Colleges and Universities and a former Republi-

AP file photo

The entrance to DeVry University is seen Nov. 24, 2009, in Miramar, Fla. Since Donald Trump’s election, shares in the parent company of DeVry University have increased to their highest value in more than a year. can congressman. Gunderson said that early conversations with Trump’s transition team showed promise for a smoother relationship with the White House. “They absolutely see a place for postsecondary career education which is not exclusively constructed around just four-year liberal-arts programs,” Gunderson said. Trump’s transition team did not respond to requests for comment. The for-profit college industry has suffered steep enrollment losses since 2010. Many schools blame Obama, whose administration has cracked

down on schools accused of fraud and added new regulations that officials say were meant to protect students from abuse. In September, the ITT Technical Institute chain shut down after the federal government mostly barred it from enrolling new students as a sanction for academic troubles. A month later, the Apollo Education Group, owner of the University of Phoenix, told investors that it might not survive the policies of another Democratic president. Trump, who graduated from the University of Pennsylvania, spoke little about for-profit colleges during his cam-

paign. His pick for education secretary, Betsy DeVos, is known for promoting charter schools and school vouchers but has less of a track record when it comes to higher education. DeVos did not respond to a request for comment. Still, critics expect that Trump will loosen the reins on for-profit colleges, and some see parallels between those schools and the Republican’s now-defunct Trump University. This month, Trump agreed to pay $25 million to settle three fraud lawsuits filed against his Trump University real-estate seminars, although he didn’t admit fault. Ben Miller, senior director for postsecondary education at the liberal think tank Center for American Progress, said it’s revealing that the industry is celebrating someone accused of misconduct “that resembles the worst practices of that industry.” But Miller and other critics doubt the sector will see a major rebound because its image has already been tarnished. To repair its reputation, Gunderson’s group is rebranding the industry as a key to Trump’s plan for economic growth. This month, the schools Gunderson represents promised to train 5 million skilled workers over the next decade, echoing Trump’s promise to create 25 million jobs in that span. “Our sector needs to reintroduce ourselves to the policymakers,” Gunderson said. Four-year for-profit colleges enrolled an estimated 1.1 million undergraduates in spring 2016, according to the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center, a nonprofit research group.

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WORTH TALKIN’ ABOUT

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2016

NEW YORK – Lionsgate has partnered best-selling author Pat Rothfuss with composer and writer Lin-Manuel Miranda for an ambitious TV and film adaptation of the fantasy trilogy “The Kingkiller Chronicles.” The film studio said Tuesday that it will develop and produce the feature film franchise, as well as a TV drama series that expands on the world outside of Rothfuss’ books. There also is an option for a stage adaptation. Miranda, creator of the Broadway hit “Hamilton,” will serve as producer of the franchise and will compose original music, as well as write the songs. Rothfuss will be executive producer for both film and television.

BUZZWORTHY

Young wants Obama to end ‘violence’ at pipeline protest

AP photo

Filmmaker Oliver Stone accepts the IFP “Tribute” award Monday at the 26th annual Gotham Independent Film Awards at Cipriani Wall Street in New York.

‘Moonlight’ shines brightest at Trump-focused Gotham Awards NEW YORK – At a Gotham Independent Film Awards overshadowed by the election of Donald Trump, Barry Jenkins’ coming-of-age drama “Moonlight” shined brightest. A celebrated film about a boy growing up gay, black and poor in Miami, “Moonlight” virtually swept the night, taking best feature, best screenplay, a special jury award for best ensemble and the audience award. The Gothams, which honor independent film, are essentially the kickoff to Hollywood’s long awards season. Monday night’s ceremony, hosted in Manhattan by Keegan-Michael Key, also served as the first opportunity for the film industry – or at least a sizable chunk of its more East Coast, indie contingent – to formally gather since the election. It gave much of Hollywood (which overwhelmingly backed Hilary Clinton) a chance to commiserate over drinks, try out punchlines and make a rallying cry for art’s political power. Key, half of the former Comedy Central duo “Key and Peele,” opened, with deadpan sarcasm, with what he said was a four-week-old monologue. “Ladies and gentlemen, we are so grateful that we live in a country that celebrates diversity,” Key said. Later, he gave up the guise and spoke earnestly. “Our voices need to be heard now,” he said. It was fitting then that “Moonlight” dominated the evening. The string of awards had the cast – which features newcomers Trevante Rhodes, Ashton Sanders and Alex R. Hibbert playing the young protagonist in three chapters – frequently dancing arm-in-arm while the Gotham crowd stood to applaud. Although “Moonlight,” based on Tarell Alvin McCraney’s play, has some big-name backers (Brad Pitt’s Plan B produced it), Jenkins played the role of the underdog.

BISMARCK, N.D. – Neil Young is calling on President Barack Obama “to step in and end” what he called the “violence” against protesters demonstrating against an oil pipeline being built in North Dakota near an Indian reservation. In an open letter on Facebook posted Monday, the 71-year-old rock star called the protest at the Standing Rock Indian Reservation “an awakening.” He said demonstrators are “standing strong in the face of outrageous, unnecessary and violent aggression.” He said law enforcement agencies and the National Guard are “seemingly acting to protect the interests of the Dakota Access Pipeline profiteers” with taxpayer money. Young also chided President-elect Donald Trump, labeling him the “surprise president.” The letter is signed by Young and his girlfriend, actress Daryl Hannah. Young included a video of him singing against the backdrop of the protest camp.

Parton heartbroken by wildfires torching hometown

ATLANTA – Country music icon Dolly Parton said she’s heartbroken about wildfires that tore through the Tennessee county where she grew up but spared the Dollywood theme park that bears her name. In a statement released Tuesday by her publicists, Parton said she’s been watching the “terrible fires” in the Great Smoky Mountains. At least 14,000 people have been forced to evacuate the tourist area of

Gatlinburg, Tennessee, and a dozen people have been injured in the wildfires. “I am praying for all the families affected by the fire and the firefighters who are working so hard to keep everyone safe,” she said. In a video released just hours before the wildfires engulfed Gatlinburg and areas around Pigeon Forge, Parton urged people to prevent forest fires. Parton appears with Smokey Bear in the 30-second video released Sunday by Great Smoky Mountains National Park. She told people to avoid burning leaves and parking vehicles on dry grass, and warns that even a campfire can spark a wildfire.

Driver who struck Tracy Morgan’s van pleads guilty

NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. – The truck driver who slammed into the back of a van carrying actor-comedian Tracy Morgan and several other people, killing one of them, pleaded guilty Tuesday and could avoid jail time. Kevin Roper entered the plea in state Superior Court to vehicular homicide and four counts of aggravated assault. Roper was driving a Wal-Mart truck in June 2014 when he crashed into Morgan’s van on the New Jersey Turnpike. The group was returning from Morgan’s show in Delaware. The 37-year-old Jonesboro, Georgia, resident also had faced an aggravated manslaughter count, which is punishable by a 10- to 30-year prison term on conviction. Vehicular homicide carries a 10-year maximum prison sentence.

TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Actor Robert Guillaume is 89. Director Ridley Scott is 79. Bassist Roger Glover of Deep Purple is 71. Singer-actor Mandy Patinkin is 64. Guitarist Shuggie Otis is 63. Country singer Jeannie Kendall of The Kendalls is 62. Singer Billy Idol is 61. Gui-

tarist John Ashton of Psychedelic Furs is 59. Rapper Jalil of Whodini is 53. Actor-director Ben Stiller is 51. Actress Sandra Oh is 46. Singer Clay Aiken is 38. Actress Elisha Cuthbert (“24”) is 34. Actress Kaley Cuoco is 31. Model Chrissy Teigen is 31.

31 Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016

MIRANDA TO TACKLE ‘THE KINGKILLER CHRONICLES’


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016

32

HEALTH

Device allows DIY breast reconstruction

Still under review by FDA, AeroForm lets women regain control, do part at home By MARILYNN MARCHIONE The Associated Press

This might be the ultimate do-ityourself project: Doctors are testing a device that would let women do part of their own breast reconstruction at home. It’s aimed at not only making treatment more comfortable and convenient, but also giving women a sense of control – something cancer often takes away. More than 100,000 women each year in the United States have surgery to remove a cancerous breast, and many of them choose reconstruction with an implant. To make room for a permanent one, many of them get a tissue expander, a temporary pouch that is gradually enlarged with saline to stretch the remaining skin and muscle. This means trips to the doctor every week or two for several months for injections of saline into the pouch, which can be a painful ordeal. “We would put as much saline as we could until basically the patient would say, ‘I can’t stand it anymore,’ ” said Dr. Daniel Jacobs, a Kaiser Permanente plastic surgeon in San Jose, California. While biking home one day, Jacobs had an idea: Why couldn’t a tiny can of compressed gas, like the one he carries to fix a flat tire, be used to let women inflate their own tissue expanders, a little each day so there is less stretching at a time and less pain? He helped found a company – AirXpanders Inc. of Palo Alto, California – to develop the device, called AeroForm. It’s sold in Australia, approved in Europe and under review by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Its use requires no special training, wires or tubes – just a palmsized remote control that activates a tiny cartridge inside the pouch to pump gas, up to three times a day according to how the woman feels. In a company-sponsored study of 150 women, AeroForm patients finished tissue expansion in half the time and were able to get implants a month sooner than others who had the usual saline treatments, said the study leader, Dr. Jeffrey Ascherman, a plastic surgeon at New York-Presbyterian/Columbia Medical Center in New York.

AP photo

Luincys Fernandez demonstrates how she had used the AeroForm handheld dosage controller during an interview at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center. Doctors are testing the device that would let women contribute to the breast reconstruction process at home. It is aimed at not only making treatment more comfortable and convenient, but also giving women a sense of control – something cancer often takes away.

AP photo

The AeroForm tissue expander (left) and handheld dosage controller. “My patients love it,” he said. When some women who agreed to be in the study learned they had been assigned to get the saline device for comparison, “I had one who started crying, and other women said, ‘please Dr. Ascherman, can’t you change it?’ ” he said. There was no difference in rates of side-effects such as infections, but seven of the air expanders malfunctioned versus only one saline one,

Ascherman said. The device was tweaked to fix the problem, he said. “It’s a really interesting concept,” said one outside expert, Dr. Deanna Attai, a University of California, Los Angeles, surgeon who is a past president of the American Society of Breast Surgeons. “Giving the patient a sense of control is very psychologically important,” because many women feel robbed of that, Attai said. “To a patient that’s going through cancer treatment that could be a big deal.” Dr. Susan E. Downey, a Los Angeles plastic surgeon who used the AeroForm on two patients in the study, said: “I think it will make life easier for a lot of people.” It did for 35-year-old Luincys Fernandez, a high school chemistry teacher who lives in Bogota, New Jersey, and teaches in New York. She was diagnosed with breast cancer a year ago, when pregnant with her second son, and used the AeroForm as part of the study.

“I really, really liked it,” she said. She carried the remote control in her purse and completed the tissue expansion in just 18 days. “It did not interrupt any of my daily activities. I could go back to normal. I could see the results right away and I could see where I wanted it to go” in terms of size and appearance, she said. The device comes in three sizes. Women can choose the amount of inflation up to a point, limited by how much tissue is left and how far the device can expand. Once fully expanded, the device is removed and replaced with a breast implant. In Australia, AeroForm costs more than saline expanders but requires fewer office visits, so costs are not directly comparable. In the U.S., tissue expansion generally is reimbursed at a flat rate that is part of breast reconstruction, and AeroForm’s impact on this cost – if the device wins FDA approval – is not clear.


By LINDSEY TANNER The Associated Press

The study

Researchers analyzed nationally representative government surveys

9 percent – Rate of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias in adults ages 65 and older in 2012 12 percent – Rate of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias in adults ages 65 and older in 2000 45 percent – Older adults with at least 13 years of education in 2012 33 percent – Older adults with at least 13 years of education in 2000 of about 10,500 older adults in both years, including some living in nursing homes. They were interviewed and given mental tests by phone or in person; spouses or relatives responded for those impaired by dementia or other illness. The dementia rate declined amid a rise in diabetes and heart disease. Both increase risks for Alzheimer’s and other dementias, but the researchers say better treatment for both diseases may explain the results. Obesity rates also increased, while dementia was most common among underweight adults. Previous

research has shown weight loss may precede dementia by several years and late-life obesity may be healthier than being underweight. But a journal editorial says more research is needed to determine whether excess pounds in older age somehow protect the brain.

Aging numbers

Dementia was most common in the oldest adults; in 2012 almost 30 percent of adults ages 85 and older were afflicted versus just 3 percent of those 65-74. The number of adults ages 85 and older rapidly is rising and expected to triple by mid-century. John Haaga, director of the National Institute on Aging’s behavior and social research division, said dementia rates would have to decline much more sharply than they have to counteract that trend. The Alzheimer’s Association estimates about 5 million people ages 65 and older have Alzheimer’s, and that is expected to rise to almost 14 million by 2050.

Education’s role

The average education level

CLINIC

I want a that doesn’t CHARGE a facility fee.

climbed during the study. About 45 percent of older adults had at least 13 years of education in 2012, versus about 33 percent in 2000. Previous studies have found less dementia in highly educated people, but it isn’t known whether education somehow protects the brain from dementia or whether it helps people compensate for brain changes linked with Alzheimer’s or other dementias. Studies on brain-training exercises have had conflicting results.

Bottom line

Haaga said more research is needed to explain the education-dementia link and to explore potential treatments that mimic the effects of education to stave off dementia. Meantime, experts say there are ways to help keep your brain healthy. That includes avoiding smoking, eating healthy foods and getting plenty of exercise. Experts also advise staying mentally active – take a class, learn a new skill or hobby. “There is reason to hope that you’re not doomed if you didn’t get massive education early in life,” Haaga said.

When it comes to health care, you want a provider that treats you fairly. Unfortunately, health systems in this region are changing their billing practices and are now charging a facility fee every time you visit your clinic doctor. This means higher out-ofpocket expenses—sometimes hundreds of dollars more—even for routine clinic visits. At Mercyhealth’s 15 McHenry County clinics, there are no hidden costs and you will NOT be charged a facility fee. It’s our honor to care for you and we’ll treat you fairly, always. To schedule an appointment with a doctor and save additional out-of-pocket expenses at one of our clinics that charges ZERO facility fees, call (888) 39-MERCY.

Mercyhealth does not charge a facility fee at any of our 15 McHenry County clinics. Most insurance plans accepted.

MercyHealthSystem.org

• Wednesday, November 30, 2016

CHICAGO – New research documents another decline in dementia rates, but experts say the rising numbers of older Americans may halt that trend unless better ways are found to keep brains healthy. The study shows the rate of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias in adults ages 65 and older dropped to about 9 percent in 2012 from nearly 12 percent in 2000, continuing a decline noted in earlier research. Older adults with the most schooling had the lowest dementia rates, and the average education level increased during the study years. Alzheimer’s is the most common form of dementia, which also can be caused by strokes, Parkinson’s disease and other conditions. Led by University of Michigan researchers, the study was published in JAMA Internal Medicine. The National Institute on Aging paid for the research.

By the numbers

33

HEALTH | Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

Dementia rate declines, but aging America may halt trend


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016

| NORTHWEST HERALD

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Newspaper Enterprise Association TODAY – Set the standard instead of letting someone else lead the way. Make decisions and changes based on what will make you happy and ease your stress. Times are changing, and so are you. Get with the program and make the necessary updates. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) – Don’t hold back when you should be moving forward. Back away from waste and indulgence and move toward cost efficiency and success. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) – Doing something just because someone else does it will not be in your best interest. You are best off doing your own thing and avoiding getting stuck with other

people’s mistakes. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) – Pump up the volume and let your voice be heard. If there is something you want, you should ask for it. Change will only come about if you initiate what you want to see happen. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) – Refuse to let others’ commotion daunt you. Head in a direction that makes you feel comfortable. It’s important to be true to your beliefs and to stick to personal objectives. ARIES (March 21-April 19) – Strive to put your plans in motion. Change is good, and it will encourage you to step out of your comfort zone and go in search of bigger and better opportunities. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) – Do your research

when dealing with money, health or legal matters. Trust in your own vision instead of what someone else is trying to convince you to believe in. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) – Get involved, make a power play and bring about change. Your ability to tap into a trend or drum up support will encourage you to set higher goals and strive for excellence. CANCER (June 21-July 22) – Read between the lines and be aware of body language when dealing with others. It’s the little subtleties that will give you insight into what’s actually happening. Trust your instincts. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) – Travel plans or business trips will lead to enthusiastic endeavors. Pump up your energy and tackle whatever needs to be

done to take advantage of an offer, proposal or opportunity. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) – Size up your situation and proceed to do whatever works best for you. Don’t believe everything you hear or allow someone to manipulate you. Find a way to use your creative skills. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) – New beginnings look promising. Choose to make a move, start a project or engage in talks that will help you pursue your dreams. Live your life with gusto and avoid procrastination. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) – Personal improvements resulting from an unexpected change will help you establish what you want to pursue. Don’t give in to pressure. If you live your dream, you’ll have no regrets.

• Wednesday, November 30, 2016

HOROSCOPE

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TELEVISION | Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

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(N) and the Aftermath ’ (CC) The 11th Hour Hardball Chris The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word Hardball With Chris Matthews (N) All In With Chris Hayes (N) The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Last Word (MSNBC) With All Due Respect (N) Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness (12:15) Ridiculousness ’ (CC) Teen Mom 2 “Backstage Pass” Teen Mom OG (CC) (MTV) Teen Mom 2 “Gone Fishing” ’ Teen Mom OG “I Do!” ’ (CC) Real World Seattle: Bad Blood ’ Real World Thundermans Full House ’ Full House Full House Friends (CC) (:33) Friends ’ Fresh Prince Fresh Prince (NICK) Henry Danger Henry Danger Paradise Run The Thundermans ’ (CC) Full House ’ Friends “The Last One” ’ (CC) (1:30) “Saving Movie: ›››› “The Shawshank Redemption” (1994, Drama) Tim Robbins, Morgan Freeman, Bob Gunton. An innocent man Movie: ›››› “The Shawshank Redemption” (1994, Drama) Tim Robbins, Morgan Freeman, Bob Gunton. 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(CC) (DVS) (:15) Movie: ››› “Ocean’s Twelve” (2004, Comedy-Drama) George Clooney, Brad Pitt. (CC) (DVS) Arrow “Salvation” ’ (CC) Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond (:33) Impastor King of Queens King of Queens King of Queens King of Queens Younger (CC) (:33) Impastor Younger (N) (TVL) Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Incorporated “Vertical Mobility” Ben (:04) Modern (:34) Modern (:04) Modern (:34) Modern (12:04) Law & Order: Special Vic(USA) Larson keeps secrets. Family ’ Family ’ Family ’ Family ’ tims Unit “Funny Valentine” ’ “Depravity Standard” ’ “Catfishing Teacher” ’ “Townhouse Incident” ’ “Nationwide Manhunt” ’ Dinner Party Black Ink Crew: Chicago (CC) (VH1) Love & Hip Hop ’ (CC) (4:00) Movie: “Beauty Shop” ’ Movie: ›› “Big Momma’s House” (2000) Martin Lawrence, Nia Long. ’ (CC) Movie: ›› “Beauty Shop” (2005, Comedy) Queen Latifah. ’ (CC) Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Conan Actor Nick Offerman. (N) 2 Broke Girls Conan Actor Nick Offerman. Seinfeld (CC) (WTBS) Seinfeld (CC) Seinfeld (CC) Seinfeld (CC) Seinfeld (CC) Big Bang PREMIUM 5:00 5:30 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30 (:05) Westworld Maeve proposi- (:05) REAL Sports With Bryant (:05) Movie ››› “Deadpool” (2016, Action) Ryan Reynolds. Deadpool (4:40) Movie ››› “Eddie the Eagle” (2016, Biogra- VICE News To- Movie ››› “Black Mass” (2015, Crime Drama) Johnny Depp. Irish (HBO) night (N) (CC) gangster Whitey Bulger helps the FBI in 1970s Boston. ’ ‘R’ (CC) Gumbel ’ (CC) tions Hector. ’ (CC) hunts down the man who nearly destroyed his life. ’ ‘R’ (CC) phy) Taron Egerton, Jo Hartley. ’ ‘PG-13’ (CC) (:10) Movie ›› “Vacation” (2015, Comedy) Ed Helms. Rusty Griswold (6:50) Movie ››› “Knocked Up” (2007) Seth Rogen, Katherine Heigl. A Movie ››› “Juno” (2007) Ellen Page. A teen decides (:40) Movie ››› “Emelie” (2015, Suspense) Sarah (12:05) Movie “Paranormal Sex(MAX) periments” (2016) Erika Jordan. to give up her unborn child for adoption. (CC) and family take a road trip to Walley World. ’ ‘R’ (CC) one-night stand has an unforeseen consequence. ’ ‘R’ (CC) Bolger, Joshua Rush. ’ ‘NR’ (CC) With Florida The Affair A request from Noah Movie ››› “Zoolander” (2001, Comedy) Ben Stiller, Inside the NFL Movie ››› “Carol” (2015, Romance) Cate Blanchett. Two women kindle Movie ››› “Casino Royale” (2006, Action) Daniel Craig, Eva Green, Mads Mikkelsen. (SHOW) State Football Owen Wilson, Will Ferrell. ’ ‘PG-13’ (CC) ’ (CC) devastates Helen. ’ (CC) a bond deeper than mere friendship. ’ ‘R’ (CC) James Bond plays poker with a man who finances terrorists. ’ ‘PG-13’ (CC) (4:55) Movie ››› “The Stanford Prison Experiment” (2015) Billy Movie ››› “Traffic” (2000, Crime Drama) Michael Douglas, Don Cheadle, Benicio Del Movie ›› “Stander” (2003, Drama) Thomas Jane, Dexter Fletcher. A Movie ›››› “Pulp Fiction” (1994, Crime Drama) (TMC) Crudup. A professor’s psychology experiment gets way out of hand. Toro. The war on drugs brings many casualties and few victories. ’ ‘R’ (CC) South African police captain becomes a bank robber. ’ ‘R’ (CC) John Travolta, Uma Thurman. ’ ‘R’ (CC) ^ WBBM


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016

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FUN&GAMES Arlo & Janis

Beetle Bailey

Big Nate

Blondie

The Born Loser

Dilbert

Frazz

Monty

Non Sequitur

Pearls Before Swine


Pickles

The Family Circus

FUN & GAMES | Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

Rose is Rose

The Argyle Sweater

Frank & Ernest

• Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Soup to Nutz

Crankshaft

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Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016

| FUN & GAMES

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Dr. K: Goodbye and thank you Dear Readers: Elton John sang “Sorry Seems to Be the Hardest Word,” but for me the hardest word is “Goodbye.” Every goodbye is an ending. Long before life ends, individual pieces of that life end. Many of those little endings are the close of something you cherish – something that brought meaning or pleasure to your life. Today’s column will be my last. I’ve been writing this column for more than five years. At age 75, I’ve decided to slow down. The time required to write a column six days a week, 52 weeks a year, makes that hard. Even though this is the right decision for me, I regret having to make it. Your questions have been interesting and remarkably wide-ranging: “Is it safe to swaddle a baby?” “How does Alzheimer’s wreak so much havoc in the brain?” “When we lose memories, do we lose them forever?” I doubt you assumed I was an oracle who could just write the answer to every question off the top of my head. Indeed, I leaned heavily on the knowledge of many colleagues at Harvard Medical School, and I did my homework. I learned a lot, and I hope I was helpful to you. Above all, I love the process of trying to clearly explain things that can be pretty complicated. I tried to do that for the more than 1,500 columns I wrote. Each one gave me pleasure. And your letters and emails thanking me for my efforts added greatly to that pleasure. Were there any themes that ran through my columns? There were at least two. The first is, through the lifestyle we choose, we can do more to improve our health than anything our doctor can do for us. For example, through lifestyle we

SUDOKU

ASK DOCTOR K Anthony L. Komaroff can reduce our risk of getting Type 2 diabetes (the most common kind) by nearly 70 percent. No medicine yet invented can do that. The second theme is we need to do more to support biomedical research. Most of that support comes from our federal tax dollars. Biomedical science has progressed so rapidly in the past 50 years we have the power to make major advances. Yet there is not enough money in the budget to fund many worthy projects, slowing progress. Who decides how much money is spent on medical research in our democracy? We, the people. Although today’s column is my last, I’m pleased three members of the faculty at the UCLA School of Medicine will be starting a new column, “Ask the Doctors,” which will appear in the many papers where my column appeared. This closes a circle for me, since I grew up practically next door to that prestigious institution. I want, in particular, to thank Urmila Parlikar, who has helped me to gather and organize information for this column with remarkable skill and dedication. In addition, Alan McDermott and Shena Wolf, the column’s editors, have added elegance and clarity to every column. I will miss you, and miss writing for you. Thank you again for all of your kind words over the years. And goodbye. • Dr. Komaroff is a physician and professor at Harvard Medical School.

HOW TO PLAY Each row, column and set of 3-by-3 boxes must contain the numbers 1 through 9 without repetition.

PREVIOUS SOLUTION

CROSSWORD


47

Running by itself

53

Low-altitude clouds Certain Indonesian

I O N A

U M A T H U R M A N

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ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

T T Y L

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I N S E T

D U N E E L A R A C P R T O

N S A S D N A R L E G H I H A R D S O T H V S J U T A B H U O N U T

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• Write Dear Abby at www.dearabby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Indian bread

I B Y A MO U T A N K L E C A S A O G P I C A L T H I E S UM A S R A MO N T H N O I S UM OM E L E P A N E G R A C

didn’t feel you were capable of taking on the new assignment, they could have offered the job to the numerous other people at the company. Your former director might not have congratulated you because he/she was jealous. As to your fear you won’t succeed, all you can do is give it your best and keep moving forward. If you do that, you won’t let anybody down – including yourself.

46

B E A T S M E

The Midwest Dear Unsure: If your boss and new manager

“Fast Times” school

S T R E R E U T R C A R L E D G N A W E D

more clearly defined what “prone to seduction” means. Was he saying because years ago he had little success with women he is enjoying the attention? While you might be willing to “do anything” to have him all to yourself, if this man craves variety and is trying to make up for lost time, there’s nothing you can do to dissuade him. The two of you appear to be at very different places in your lives. If you want a man who is willing to have an exclusive relationship, you’re going to have to look elsewhere. Dear Abby: I was just offered a huge promotion at my company. It will mean more than a 40 percent increase in pay, which is unheard of in my company, which has more than 10,000 employees. People in my department are not taking it well. Even my director did not congratulate me. Taking on this new endeavor kind of scares me. I have had a tough year in my current position, and this new job is tailored to me. My current manager – who is new to the department – feels this job was meant for me. I know the team I will be working with, and I have a feeling I will love it. I’m just scared of setting myself up for failure. My boss and new manager are giving me a great opportunity, and I don’t want to let anyone down. – Unsure In

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Anything Dear Willing To Do Anything: I wish you had

Verbal zinger

to pour 2 Enlarges, as a hole 3 Good rep 4 Sexual appetites 5 Sgt. Friday catchphrase 6 ___ fide 7 Big laughs 8 NATO part: Abbr. 9 Exploded 10 Like winter soccer, most likely 11 Rider’s handful 12 Fish-eating raptor 13 Feet, slangily 19 Sea ___ (12-Down) 21 Like Mayberry 26 “For real!” 27 Butter maker 28 Shoot for

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PUZZLE BY SCOTT YUT

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“Kill Bill” co-star

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“Please?”

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Restaurant guide name since 1979

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“No clue”

Prenatal test, for short 42 Acquire by deceit 44 Chewed like a chipmunk 45 Onetime forgirls-only course, for short 48 Sets of foot bones 49 Tatum who won an Oscar at 10 41

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J.F.K. landers until 2003

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High fig. for a hybrid car

Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/studentcrosswords.

• Wednesday, November 30, 2016

recently started seeing a selfmade entrepreneur. He’s intelligent, and basically the most amazing man I have ever been with. Because of his position and stature, many beautiful and sophisticated women throw themselves at him. A friend of his told me in the months I’ve known him, he has had sex with at least five other women, several on the first date. I’m not angry about it since we never formally agreed to be exclusive, but I’m in love with him and want him all to myself. When I confronted him, he said because he never had success with women previously, he is prone to seduction. He said they didn’t mean anything to him and he wants to be with me. I have dropped the matter for now, but I’m still concerned. I have tried to step up my game in the bedroom, and I’m willing to do anything to stop him from looking elsewhere. How do I make him give up his harem? – Willing To Do

Not dress overmodestly 36 Countess’s man … or what 18-, 25- and 37 Basic 43-Across each spreadsheet do? function 57 G.I. fare 38 Like much 58 Figure head? Gene Wilder 59 “Meet the humor Press” feature 39 Roll call vote 60 ___ rule 61 Glove material 40 Port of Iraq 62 It’s a blessing 42 Like cobra/ 63 Zippo mongoose encounters, to cobras DOWN 35

for hosp. scrubs 4 Arab Spring country 9 Overcaffeinated 14 Bring home 15 “Too rich for me” 16 Month after diciembre 17 Blacktop material 18 Source of start-up cash, perhaps 20 ___ Cup 22 Makes up (for) 23 Prefix with science or intellectual 24 Hot 17-Across, e.g. 25 Guava or papaya 32 Certain pool sites, for short 34 Robin Hood, notably

T H O U

DEAR ABBY Jeanne Phillips

ACROSS

1 Places

S S T S

Dear Abby: I

39

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

FUN & GAMES | Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

Entrepreneur enjoys new popularity in bed


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016

| NORTHWEST HERALD

40

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SPORTS

DAILY PULLOUT SECTION Wednesday, November 30, 2016 • NWHerald.

McHenry’s Elizabeth Alsot and Madi Kaempf celebrate during the first quarter against Prairie Ridge on Tuesday in Crystal Lake. McHenry won, 49-38. John Konstantaras for Shaw Media

McHENRY PULLS AWAY Warriors top Prairie Ridge in FVC action / 2


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016

|SPORTS

2

THE DAILY

FEED

Tweets from last night

GIRLS BASKETBALL: McHENRY 49, PRAIRIE RIDGE 38

Warriors finish strong By ALEX KANTECKI

akantecki@shawmedia.com

#DogPound – @CoachZacBarton (Winona State defensive line coach, on CaryGrove graduate Michael Gomez earning honorable mention All-Northern Sun Intercollegiate Conference recognition)

Carly Nolan picks up First Team All-American Athletic Conference honors for the second time! – @GoBearcatsVB (Cincinnati volleyball, on Crystal Lake South graduate Nolan) Follow our writers on Twitter: Joe Stevenson – @NWH_JoePrepZone Sean Hammond – @sean_hammond Alex Kantecki – @akantecki John Wilkinson – @jwilks26

Boers to retire in January Longtime WSCR the Score sports talk radio host Terry Boers announced Tuesday he will retire Jan. 5 after 25 years with the station. He wrote in a column on the Score’s website, “This has been the worst year of my life health-wise. I’ve been forced to miss way more time than I ever dreamed I would. There’s no part of me that thought I would ever be gone for more than four months following a major surgery that continues to plague me. And as you read this, know that I have already had a second surgery done on Nov. 1. It wasn’t as complicated as the first, but a surgery nonetheless.”

– Northwest Herald

What to watch NBA: L.A. Lakers at Bulls, 7 p.m., CSN The Bulls return home after going 4-2 on their annual “circus trip,” which included a 118-110 victory over the Lakers.

CRYSTAL LAKE – After McHenry jumped on a loose ball near midcourt late in the fourth quarter, senior guard Julia Rice raised her hands, looking for the ball and an opportunity. Rice got the ball, rushed upcourt and hit a running shot in the lane while getting fouled by Prairie Ridge, giving the Warriors a much-needed basket with the Wolves looking to climb back into Tuesday’s Fox Valley Conference girls basketball game. “I kind of just saw it as a chance to capitalize on a mistake by them and just take it down all the way,” said Rice, who scored six of her 10 points in the fourth quarter. “Not think about it, I just wanted to score and put the ball in the hoop because I knew it was crucial for us.” Rice also hit the ensuing foul shot, turning a five-point lead into eight in a matter of seconds and leading the Warriors to a 49-38 FVC win. “At that point, we needed it to keep the game going,” Rice said. “I think it brought the energy back up. After that, we just stopped thinking and played like we know how to play.” Rice, who hit 4 of 5 free throws in the fourth, was one of three players to score in double figures for McHenry. Liz Alsot added a game-high 12 points to go with 15 rebounds, and Izzy Gscheidle added 10 points and two 3-pointers for the Warriors (3-3, 2-0 FVC). McHenry led, 37-30, entering the fourth, but Prairie Ridge cut the lead to four points two times. Rice’s running basket was the first in the fourth quarter for McHenry. Madi Kaempf added eight points and two assists for McHenry, and Avalon Henderson had six points and 10 rebounds. “The thing I liked about the finish is we kept it simple,” Warriors coach Rob Niemic said. “It was just a matter of sureness and believing in each other. The biggest thing is you should want the ball in your hands. And Julia ... it’s awesome to see a senior step up and get her first double-digits right there.” McHenry outscored Prairie Ridge, 12-8, in the fourth, but both teams struggled to finish at the free-throw line. McHenry was 10 of 20 for the game, and Prairie Ridge was 10 of 17. “We were just having fun, playing together and playing our game,” Alsot said. “We’re starting to get things going, and our confidence is up.”

John Konstantaras for Shaw Media

McHenry’s Jordyn Bessler (right) guards Prairie Ridge’s Emily Perhats during the second quarter Tuesday in Crystal Lake. McHenry won, 49-38. Prairie Ridge was led by Emily Perhats, who hit three 3s and finished with a team-high 11 points. Karly Statter added nine points, and Bailey Gorman had six. Sammi Lockwood had four points but got in foul trouble early and fouled out with six minutes left. “For us, it’s pretty much been the same story every game,” Wolves coach Rick Lima said. “We get in foul trouble in the first half, and we have kids that we can’t risk playing with two fouls. We sit them, and teams take advantage of that in the first half. “We get everybody back, start chipping away and get to the point where we’re right on the edge, and then all the energy you spent getting back in the game gets you back. McHenry is tough inside. They’re a physical team and very tough to defend.”

OUTSIDE THE BOX SCORE q UNSUNG HERO Julia Rice McHenry, sr., G

Rice came up big in the fourth quarter, scoring six of her 10 points to help the Warriors pull away from the Wolves.

q THE NUMBER

15

Rebounds for McHenry junior forward Liz Alsot

q AND ANOTHER THING ...

Prairie Ridge is back to full strength with 6-foot-3 sophomore center Sammi Lockwood (shoulder) and sophomore guard Karly Statter (ankle) starting on Tuesday.


GIRLS BASKETBALL: JACOBS 46, HAMPSHIRE 41

Junior’s guard’s 14 points lead Jacobs in FVC opener for both teams By TIM SIECK

OUTSIDE THE BOX SCORE

sports@nwherald.com

q UNSUNG HERO

Kyra Cabusao Jacobs, fr., G

Cabusao converted a three-point play in the fourth quarter that helped spark a 10-0 run and lead Jacobs to victory.

q THE NUMBER

78

Hampshire’s shooting percentage in the first three quarters

q AND ANOTHER THING ...

Tuesday was a day of firsts for Jacobs. Not only was it the Golden Eagles’ first home game and first Fox Valley Conference game of the season, but it also marked the first game on their new floor. Hampshire couldn’t have shot much better in the first half. The

PREP FOOTBALL NOTES

PR loaded with junior talent By JOE STEVENSON

joestevenson@shawmedia.com Prairie Ridge fullback Manny Ebirim looked up and down the table at his five teammates, four of whom are juniors, and smiled. The Wolves had just won the Class 6A football state championship and were asked about next year. “This group of juniors has a great work ethic,” said Ebirim, who ran for 134 yards in the Wolves’ 4817 victory over Springfield Sacred Heart-Griffin. “So whatever they want to do, they can do. Because they get after it in the offseason, and that’s what’s most important. I’m very excited to come back next year, and I will be coming back next year to see you guys, and I know you’re going to do something great.” Prairie Ridge’s triumph was its second 6A state championship in six seasons. Unlike the 2011 team that won it, however, this group is heavy with talented juniors, led by two Illinois High School Football Coaches Association All-Staters: quarterback Samson Evans and

tackle Jeff Jenkins. The Wolves’ best defensive players are linebackers Joe Perhats and Jacob Ommen, also juniors. And running back Zach Gulbransen, who ran for 100 yards in Saturday’s win, also is a junior. That core of five juniors was on the varsity team as freshmen. The Wolves won all their games this season by at least Alex Peete 11 points, and Jenkins thinks next year can be special again. “I think we can definitely get better,” he said. “I’m expecting another good year next year. Jacob [Ommen] was talking about we’re getting in the weight room Monday morning before school.” No. 7 is No. 8: Johnsburg running back Alex Peete finished his career with a bang, running for 233 yards in the Skyhawks’ 38-14 loss to Rochester in the Class 4A title game Friday. Those yards put Peete at No. 8 on the state career rushing list.

Peete came into the season at 3,542 yards and ran for 2,529 yards this season, leaving him with 6,071 for his career. He has a visit scheduled with NCAA Division I Indiana State and likely will check out more schools now that he has some free time.

Tyler Pennington

C-G rankings:

Cary-Grove fullback Tyler Pennington finished his career with 5,161 rushing yards, which puts him 15th on the IHSA career list. He also scored 84 touchdowns, which places him Collin Walsh tied for seventh for his career. Pennington was a fouryear varsity player. C-G kicker Collin Walsh, who kicked for the Trojans since his freshman season, had 185 extra points for his career, which puts him at No. 6 on the career list.

big shots in the fourth quarter,” Jacobs coach Joe Benoit said. “I’m really proud of these kids. Hampshire is a good team that hit their shots. This conference is going to be tough every night, and no game will be easy. We need to get better starting tomorrow.” Jacobs was led by Healy with 14 points and Carly Sidor with 10. For Hampshire (3-3, 0-1), too many turnovers and not making a basket in the fourth quarter until the 2:42 mark are what hurt the most. Hampshire was led by Heine with 16 points and Dumoulin with 14. “When you have 27 turnovers and give up 13 offensive rebounds, it makes it really hard to win,” Hampshire coach Mike Featherly said. “We shot the ball well, but we didn’t get many shots off. We need more of our players to look to score besides Rachel and Meagan and need others to step up.”

GIRLS CROSS COUNTRY

R-B’s Carlson is North Division 1A Coach of the Year By JOE STEVENSON

joestevenson@shawmedia.com Richmond-Burton’s Ryan Carlson has been honored by the Illinois Track and Cross Country Coaches Association as North Division Class 1A Girls Coach of the Year. The Rockets’ girls finished fourth in the Class 1A girls race at the IHSA Cross Country State Meet at Peoria’s Detweiller Park this month. R-B was third in the Kishwaukee River Conference Meet, then was team champion at both the Winnebago Regional Ryan Carlson and Oregon Sectional. At state, the Rockets finished with 191 points, 17 behind third-place Liberty’s 174. St. Joseph-Ogden was the 1A team champion with 100, Tolono Unity was second at 161. “The girls have been coming on strong the last three weeks,” Carlson said after state. “We were superexcited for today. Our senior leadership up front with Emma (Langlois), Breanna (Retherford) and Gabby (Ross) was great. We were happy with where we landed. It was a fun day.”

• Wednesday, November 30, 2016

ALGONQUIN – Jacobs guard Kerri Healy is no stranger to varsity basketball. Entering her junior season, Healy will be looked upon as more of a leader on offense, which is something new for the third-year varsity player. With her play in Tuesday’s game against Hampshire, Healy seems up to the challenge. “I really just wanted to help anyway I could, and anyone on the team could have made those shots I hit,” Healy said. “My teammates did a great job of getting me the ball especially in the fourth quarter.” In what was a fairly even matchup all night, it was Jacobs that pulled ahead in the fourth quarter, thanks to some big shots from Healy, and held on for a 46-41 victory over Hampshire in the Fox Valley Conference opener for both teams.

Whip-Purs missed only one shot in the first quarter, and that was a three-quarters-court shot at the buzzer. In the second quarter, Hampshire missed only two shots. The issue for the Whip-Purs was they didn’t take many shots, 11 in the first half, because of turnovers. The Whip-Purs turned the ball over 12 times in the first half and trailed, 21-17. The second half was much of the same, but Hampshire took the lead back in the third quarter after an 11-0 run sparked by Rachel Dumoulin and Meagan Heine and led, 33-28, after the third quarter. The fourth quarter was all Jacobs. The Golden Eagles (2-3, 1-0 FVC) started the final quarter on a 10-0 run behind some big shots by Healy and a three-point play by Kyra Cabusao. Jacobs never trailed the rest of the night. “Our pressure was consistent most of the game, and we hit some

SPORTS | Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

Healy helps lift Eagles over Whips

3


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016

|SPORTS

4 PREP RECRUITING NOTES

CL South runner Prus picks Northeastern Cross country, track athlete seeks career in music industry By JOE STEVENSON

joestevenson@shawmedia.com Jon Prus someday hopes to work, in some capacity, in the music business. The Crystal Lake South senior will take a path not traveled by many, if any at all, to get there. Prus aspires to work for a record label, or perhaps manage talent, or maybe even become a music patent lawyer. In the meantime, he will run at Northeastern University in Boston to help pay for his education. Prus, who scored 34 on his ACT, signed his National Letter of Intent this month with Northeastern for cross country. He also will receive money for a track scholarship and for

academics. “I wanted a school that had an (NCAA) Division I running program and my major, music business. That brought down a lot of schools,” Prus said. “Northeastern has a co-op program, so by the time I graduate, I’ll already have worked two jobs in my field, so that attracted me there.” Jon Prus Prus contacted coach Catherine Erickson, visited the school and decided on Northeastern. He also had visited Butler in Indianapolis. Prus earned a state track and field medal in the Class 3A 4x800-meter relay as a freshman. He finished 28th in the Class 3A cross country state meet as a junior, missing All-State status by three spots. He took eighth in the Fox Valley Conference Cross Country Meet this fall and did not qualify for the Class 3A state meet.

“It definitely was not what I wanted,” Prus said. “I’m not sure why. My knee was bothering me for about a month, and it was too late to take time off. Now, I’ve taken time off, and it feels a lot better. I’m going to make this track season a really good one. Track’s always been the thing I liked a lot more anyway.” Prus always liked listening to music and liked to write, so in the summer before his freshman year, he experimented writing rap lyrics. “It wasn’t very good, but I tried again and again and again,” Prus said. “I got a lot better at it, so I tried rapping for a variety show my freshman year, and some people told me it was really good. I’ve kept working at it to get where I am now.” That led to Prus wanting to do something in the music business. “I know with the co-op program I’ll be able to figure some stuff out, so I’ll be able to figure out what I want to do by the time I graduate,” Prus said. McGowan to St. Cloud: Hampshire se-

nior Max McGowan, a 160-pound wrestler, has signed his National Letter of Intent with D-II St. Cloud (Minnesota) State. McGowan qualified for the Illinois National Team in Greco Roman and freestyle wrestling and went 11-4 in both styles at the national championships in Fargo, North Dakota. McGowan, who is looking to study biomedical sciences, will be joining a Huskies team that won back-to-back NCAA D-II national championships and has won five consecutive Northern Sun Intercollegiate Conference championships. St. Cloud State was ranked No. 1 in this year’s NCAA D-II preseason poll. Dunham to Dubuque: Crystal Lake South’s Luke Dunham, a right-handed senior pitcher, has chosen to attend the University of Dubuque (Iowa) and pitch for the Spartans. Dunham was 5-0 with a 3.54 ERA last season for the Gators, who shared the FVC Valley Division title with Cary-Grove. Dunham struck out 21 batters in 272/3 innings.

PREP ROUNDUP

Balanced Gators defeat Carmel in boys basketball NORTHWEST HERALD Four Crystal Lake South players scored in double digits as the Gators beat Carmel, 61-54, Tuesday in a nonconference game in Crystal Lake. Matt Meyers iced the game by making 11 of 17 free throws in the fourth quarter, finishing with a team-high 17 points. Kyle Leva scored 13 points, as did Jonathan Holloway, who made three 3-pointers. Luke Nolan hit a pair of 3s and finished with 10 points. Johnsburg 71, Wilmot 70: At Johnsburg, Jackson LaMarche, Zach Toussaint and Mason Sobiesk scored in double digits to lead the Skyhawks (3-2) to a nonconference win over Wilmot (Wisconsin). LaMarche led the way with 18 points, including three 3s. Sobiesk hit a team-high four 3-pointers and finished with 16 points, and Toussaint added 17. Warren Nusser hit a pair of 3s and finished with eight points.

Prairie Ridge 78, Rockford Lutheran 74 (OT): At Rockford, Kyle Loeding

scored 19 points, and Brian Dorn had 16 to lead the Wolves to a nonconference overtime victory. James Queen, who finished with 14 points, hit three 3-pointers, while Dorn and Loeding each made a pair.

Trevor Potter chipped in 11 points.

Richmond-Burton 71, Rockford Christian 62: At Rockford, Blaine Bayer

scored a game-high 24 points to lead the Rockets in a nonconference victory. Joey St. Pierre added 15 points, Jake Kaufman had 14, and Mark Marzahl chipped in 10 points. Bayer and Marzahl each hit three 3-pointers.

Alden-Hebron 53, Berean Baptist 41:

At Hebron, Logan Grove scored 18 points, and Taylor Glenn added 14 to lead the Giants (2-3) in a nonconference victory. Austin Stauss had nine points, and Mason Mindham made a pair of 3-pointers to finish with six points.

Woodstock North 62, Hinckley BigRock 41: At Hinckley, Collin Mergl

scored 20 points, and Vic Ortiz added 14 to lead the Thunder to a nonconference victory. Mergl, Ortiz and Ryan Schaffter, who finished with eight points, each hit a pair of 3-pointers.

GIRLS BASKETBALL Crystal Lake South 46, Dundee-Crown 42: At Carpentersville, Annika Sevcik

scored 11 points, while Maddie Bush and Taylor Keegan each chipped in nine to lead the Gators to a win against Dundee-Crown in a Fox Val-

ley Conference game. Kelly Gaede added six points. Sevcik, Bush and Taylor Jozefowicz each hit a 3-pointer, as the Gators (15, 1-1 FVC) picked up their first win of the season. Paige Gieseke led D-C with 14 points, including a 3-pointer. Madilyn Tripp added 10 points, Allison Michalski had nine, and Kennedy White hit two 3-pointers for six points. Johnsburg 51, Marengo 24: At Marengo, Morgan Madsen scored 11 points, Kayla Stefka scored 10, and Cortland Sommerfeldt added nine to lead the Skyhawks (4-3, 1-0) in a Kishwaukee River Conference win. Marissa Knobloch led the Indians with 12 points, including three 3-pointers. Woodstock 76, Harvard 12: At Harvard, Woodstock’s Camryn Tafoya hit seven 3-pointers, tying a school record and leading the Blue Streaks with 21 points in a KRC win over the Hornets. Diana Spokas added 15 points for Woodstock, Gabriella Scolio had nine, and Autumn Overly had eight.

Burlington Central 32, Richmond-Burton 22: At Richmond, Burlington Cen-

tral scored 17 points in the fourth quarter to beat R-B in KRC play. K.C.

Davids led R-B (2-2, 0-1 KRC) with 10 points, Mackenzie Hahn had six points, and Brooke Legnaioli added five and a 3-pointer.

Cary-Grove 52, Crystal Lake Central 37: At Crystal Lake, Katie Sowa

scored a game-high 21 points to lead the Trojans to an FVC victory. Maddie Gorz added 15 points with three 3s for C-G (3-4, 2-0 FVC), and Becca Kendeigh had five points. The Trojans outscored Central, 24-11, in the third quarter. Cori Hamill led the Tigers (3-2, 0-1) with 14 points, Maddie Haslow had nine points, and Jane Johnsey added eight points and two 3s.

Marian Central 55, Alden-Hebron 41: At Woodstock, Marian Central’s

Vanessa Garrelts set a single-game school scoring record with 33 points, leading the Hurricanes (4-2) to a nonconference win over the Giants.

GIRLS BOWLING Grayslake Central 2,426, McHenry 2,350: At Hawthorn Lanes in Vernon

Hills, Rebecca Beaman rolled a 549 series to lead McHenry, but the Warriors lost to Grayslake Central. The Warriors’ best game was the second, which they won, 826-786, but they lost the other two.


BLACKHAWKS 2, PANTHERS 1 (SO)

Goalie makes 38 saves, bails out sluggish Hawks

BLACKHAWKS 2, PANTHERS 1 (SO) Florida Chicago

By MARK LAZERUS

AP photo

The Florida Panthers’ Reilly Smith trips over Blackhawks goalie Corey Crawford during the second period Tuesday at the United Center. Crawford made 38 saves in the Hawks’ 2-1 shootout win. who had the other shootout goal, said through an interpreter. “We’re lucky to have him.” However, already down their top center, Jonathan Toews, the Hawks now have to be concerned about their No. 2 pivot. Artem Anisimov took a Duncan Keith shot off the inside of his ankle in the third period and limped off to the dressing room in obvious pain. Coach Joel Quenne-

ville said he’d know more Wednesday, but that “he seemed to be OK.” Panarin called it a “sleepy game,” and it looked exactly like a team coming off a draining 13-night road trip playing against a team that just lost a popular coach it didn’t really want to lose. It was a disjointed sloppy affair, with Crawford (38 saves) and Roberto Luongo (32 saves) doing the heavy lifting.

Beyond the Crawford heroics, the Hawks followed their usual script in the first period, getting badly outshot yet still coming out with a lead thanks to Panik’s breakaway goal. It was the first goal since Oct. 22 for Panik, who led the league in goals after six games, and his first point in 13 games. “It feels good,” Panik said “It feels even better when we win.” After a sluggish second and third, and a key penalty kill in overtime, the Hawks did what they’ve been doing all year – pulling out wins despite themselves. “I thought our team was ordinary across the board,” Quenneville said. “One of those games you find a way to keep yourself in it.” Having Crawford in goal certainly helps.

HAWKS NOTES

Toews sits again, questionable for Thursday By MARK LAZERUS

mlazerus@suntimes.com CHICAGO – The Blackhawks returned to the United Center on Tuesday against the Florida Panthers, but they again took the ice without Jonathan Toews, who missed his third straight game with an upper-body injury. Toews was injured after an awkward fall along the boards Wednesday in San Jose and hasn’t skated since. Hawks coach Joel Quenneville, who has been deeming Toews “day to day” for almost a week, said his captain hasn’t had a setback but that he’s “the same.” A team source said it was not a

concussion. Quenneville said Toews was questionable for Thursday’s game against the New Jersey Devils. “You’d like to get him back on the ice,” Quenneville said. “As soon as you see him on the ice, you’ve got Jonathan an idea he’s close to Toews playing. Jonny wants to be out there in the worst way, so we’ll do everything we can to get him back.” Firing fallout: The Panthers have been taking heat for firing coach Ge-

rard Gallant on Sunday night, and for the images of Gallant waiting for a cab outside PNC Arena in Raleigh, North Carolina, after being dumped during a road trip. Interim coach Tom Rowe, Florida’s general manager, said the images were misleading, and that he was with Gallant for “30 to 35 minutes” outside, and had inquired about a car service to pick him up. “Yeah, I know how it looked,” Rowe said. “It didn’t look great. But that was not how it went down.” Former Panthers defenseman Brian Campbell of the Hawks said he was “shocked” by the firing of Gallant, who was the runner-up for the Jack Adams Trophy last year as coach of

the year after leading the Panthers to the Atlantic Division title. “I didn’t know that it was that bad of a situation,” Campbell said. “I really like Gerard, I think he’s a good coach, I thought he was fair. He did some really good things for that organization.” Roster report: Michal Kempny was a healthy scratch for the third time in four games, with Michal Rozsival playing for the fourth time in six games (he played only four times in the first 18). Jordin Tootoo returned to the lineup after suffering an apparent foot injury blocking a shot in Anaheim. Andrew Desjardins was scratched for the fourth time in six games.

• Wednesday, November 30, 2016

First Period–1, Chicago, Panik 7 (Kruger, Rasmussen), 17:50. Penalties–None. Second Period–None. Penalties–Demers, FLA, (interference), 11:30; Panik, CHI, (holding), 14:45; Hjalmarsson, CHI, (hooking), 19:08. Third Period–2, Florida, Jagr 4 (Marchessault, Ekblad), 0:35 (pp). Penalties–Kindl, FLA, (hooking), 11:57; Kane, CHI, (high sticking), 19:40. Overtime–None. Penalties–None. Shootout–Florida 0 (Barkov NG), Chicago 2 (Kane NG, Panarin G, Panik G). Shots on Goal–Florida 13-12-10-4–39. Chicago 8-1111-3–33. Power-play opportunities–Florida 1 of 3; Chicago 0 of 2. Goalies–Florida, Luongo 8-6-1 (33 shots-32 saves). Chicago, Crawford 11-6-2 (39-38). A–21,475 (19,717). T–2:46. Referees–Frederick L’Ecuyer, Francois St Laurent. Linesmen–Darren Gibbs, Bryan Pancich.

mlazerus@suntimes.com CHICAGO – Corey Crawford was flat on his back and without his stick in a tie game in the third period Tuesday night, accidentally tripped by teammate Vinnie Hinostroza in a moment of confusion. Crawford, either in disbelief or in pain, was slow to get up, but quickly realized the puck was still in play, and that Derek MacKenzie was winding up to shoot. Crawford lunged to his right and somehow swatted the puck with his hand, banking it off the post and back into his glove. “I was pretty mad,” Crawford said. He was grinning when he said that. Winning helps. Crawford was spectacular yet again for the Blackhawks in Tuesday night’s 2-1 shootout victory over the Florida Panthers. Richard Panik had the lone goal in regulation and the shootout winner, but this win was all Crawford – as so many of the Hawks’ wins this season have been. “If it weren’t for him, the last couple games would turn out differently, that’s for sure,” Artemi Panarin,

0 0 1 0—1 1 0 0 0—2 Blackhawks won shootout, 2-0.

SPORTS | Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

Crawford simply spectacular in win

5


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016

|SPORTS

6 COLLEGE BASKETBALL: ACC/BIG TEN CHALLENGE ROUNDUP

Illini shoot past N.C. State in 2nd half Scoreboard

The ASSOCIATED PRESS CHAMPAIGN – Malcolm Hill scored 22 points to lead Illinois to an 88-74 victory over North Carolina State on Tuesday night in the ACC/Big Ten Challenge. Illinois (5-3) shot 30 of 60 from the field for 50 percent to outlast N.C. State in what was a tightly contested game in which neither team had a double-digit lead until the Illini led, 67-57, with about eight minutes left. The Wolfpack held a 33-32 edge at the half, but Illinois came out firing, shooting 68 percent in the second half and creating large leads that the Wolfpack could not overcome. The Illini bench outscored the Wolfpack’s 39-22 and was led by Leron Black, who scored 15 points and brought in eight rebounds. Torin Dorn scored 17 points to lead N.C. State (5-2), which shot 53 percent from the field. Despite the hot shooting, the Wolfpack committed 19 turnovers, which prevented the offense to consistently produce and resulted in 17 Illinois points.

No. 17 Wisconsin 77, No. 22 Syracuse 60: At Madison, Wisconsin, Ethan

Happ had 24 points and 13 rebounds, zone-busting guard Bronson Koenig scored 20 points, and Wisconsin beat Syracuse. Koenig, the seasoned senior guard, was 6 of 9 from 3-point range, and the Badgers (6-2) shot 48 percent overall (11 of 23) from behind the arc against the

ACC/Big Ten Challenge results and schedule: Monday Florida State 75, Minnesota 67 Northwestern 65, Wake Forest 58 Tuesday Illinois 88, North Carolina State 74 No. 17 Wisconsin 77, No. 22 Syracuse 60 No. 5 Duke 78, Michigan State 69 Notre Dame 92, Iowa 78 Penn State 67, Georgia Tech 60 Pittsburgh 73 Maryland 59

Challenge is tied, 3-3

Illinois fans cheer after guard Malcolm Hill scored against North Carolina State during the second half Tuesday in Champaign. Illinois won, 88-74.

Wednesday No. 15 Purdue at No. 14 Louisville, 6 p.m., ESPN Virginia Tech at Michigan, 6 p.m., ESPNU No. 3 North Carolina at No. 13 Indiana, 6:30 p.m., ESPN Ohio State at No. 6 Virginia, 8 p.m., ESPN2 Nebraska at Clemson, 8 p.m., ESPNU

Orange’s 2-3 zone. Andrew White III led Syracuse (4-2) with 14 points but went scoreless in the second half. DaJuan Coleman added 12 points. No. 5 Duke 78, Michigan St. 69: At Durham, North Carolina, Grayson Allen scored 24 points, Luke Kennard added 20 and Duke beat Michigan State in the ACC/Big Ten Challenge. Amile Jefferson had 17 points and 13 rebounds while freshman Frank Jackson finished with 11 points and keyed a timely 11-0 run for the Blue Devils (7-1). They won their fourth straight de-

spite shooting just 27 percent from 3-point range. Eron Harris scored 14 points for Michigan State (4-4). Playing their first game as an unranked team since March 2015, the Spartans had 18 turnovers and star freshman Miles Bridges was held to 11 points – six fewer than his team-leading average – on 4-of-13 shooting. Notre Dame 92, Iowa 78: At South Bend, Indiana, Bonzie Colson had season-high 24 points and a career-high 17 rebounds, Steve Vasturia tied a ca-

AP photo

reer-high with 22 points, and Notre Dame overcame squandering a 15-point lead in the first half to beat Iowa. Colson made all 12 of his free throws and Vasturia made all seven of his as Notre Dame (7-0) made 30 of 33 free throws, while Iowa was 12 of 16. The Irish also had a 45-32 advantage in rebounds. Freshman Jordan Bohanon, whose previous season-high was six points, finished with a team-high 23 points for Iowa (3-4). Penn St. 67, Georgia Tech 60: At State College, Pennsylvania, Shep Garner scored 17 points, and Mike Watkins added 12 and grabbed 12 rebounds to lead Penn State to a win over Georgia Tech. The Nittany Lions (5-3) won their third straight after leading the Yellow Jackets for 20:57 including most of the second half. Quinton Stephens led Georgia Tech (4-2) with 13 points and 11 rebounds while Josh Okogie also scored 13. Pittsburgh 73, Maryland 59: At College Park, Maryland, Jamel Artis scored 15 of his 22 points in the decisive first half, and Pittsburgh held off previously unbeaten Maryland. The Panthers (6-1) shot 67 percent from the floor before halftime, including 5 for 10 beyond the arc, and used a 25-4 run to turn a 16-15 deficit into a 40-20 lead. It was 51-26 with 15:45 remaining before Maryland (7-1) closed to 63-55 with three minutes left. But the Terrapins could not complete the comeback.

COLLEGE FOOTBALL PLAYOFF RANKINGS

Ohio St. still No. 2, positioned to make playoffs By RALPH D. RUSSO The Associated Press

Ohio State held firm at second in the College Football Playoff rankings, putting the Buckeyes in position to become the first team to be selected to the final four without winning its conference. The second-to-last rankings were released Tuesday night and Alabama was No. 1, followed by Ohio State, Clemson and Washington. The Crimson Tide, Tigers and Huskies all play conference championship games this weekend and presumably would be in good shape to make the playoff if they win. The final rankings and playoff pairings will be released Sunday. Unbeaten Alabama probably is in

good shape to make the playoff even if it loses to Florida in the Southeastern Conference title game Saturday Michigan dropped to No. 5 after losing to Ohio State. Wisconsin was sixth and Penn State was seventh. The Badgers and Nittany Lions will play for the Big Ten title Saturday in Indianapolis.

HUSKIES vs. WOLVERINES

Assuming the Buckeyes are a lock, and it looks good for them, and Clemson doesn’t get upset by Virginia Tech in the ACC title game, the debate for the committee when it gathers Saturday night in Texas to watch games and discuss the only rankings that matter will be Pac-12 or Big Ten. Can Michigan, or maybe the Big Ten champion with two losses, edge a

Washington team that would finish 12-1 by beating Colorado on Friday night in the Pac-12 title game? “There is a small separation between these two teams,” selection committee chairman Kirby Hocutt said of Michigan and Washington. At one point Hocutt added that the difference between the Wolverines and Huskies was “razor thin.” It looks as if not only does the committee not mind putting one Big Ten team without a conference championship in the playoff, but it also is comfortable with two. Michigan at 10-2 has victories against Penn State and Wisconsin.

PENN STATE’S PLIGHT

A Wisconsin victory in the Big Ten

title game would eliminate the controversy. The Badgers lost to Ohio State during the regular season. Penn State fans, however, already are cranking up the complaints. The Nittany Lions beat Ohio State in October. Add a Big Ten title, and Penn State is bound to feel slighted. Conference titles and head-to-head results are essentially used by the committee like tiebreakers when teams are very close. The Buckeyes and Nittany Lions are not in the committee’s eyes. At least not yet. “The selection committee recognizes the head-to-head win, but in this particular case, it hasn’t been the distinguishing point in our evaluation of those two teams,” he said.


7

BETTING ODDS NBA

Wednesday LINE O/U UNDERDOG 10 (212) LA Lakers 5½ (205) at PHILADELPHIA 10½ (196½) Memphis 8 (197½) Detroit 5½ (212) Washington 3½ (211½) New York 9 (192) at DALLAS 5½ (204) Miami 5½ (209½) at PHOENIX 8 (215) Indiana

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

BULLS

One big, happy family By JOE COWLEY

jcowley@suntimes.com CHICAGO – There’s no pushback for Jimmy Butler this season. His work ethic is now everyone’s work ethic. Not the case in previous years, and definitely not the case with all the dysfunction going on last season, both on and off the court. But there was Butler after Tuesday’s practice, proudly pointing out all the teammates still in the gym, getting up shots or having a 3-point contest. “Yeah, I think of it like this: I don’t see what else you have to do all day. I don’t,” Butler said. “Like the job that we have it’s incredibly lenient. Like, you practice for an hour and a half, what do you do the rest of your day? Why don’t you come in here, work on your game? Shoot? Watch some film? All you’re going to do is sit at home and play some video games on your phone anyways. “But these guys are buying into that, which is great. And when you fall in love with the process, you find out that your confidence only comes from the work anyways.” That’s all Butler wanted from last season’s team. He wanted the veteran players to buy in, and if that meant fol-

lowing his lead – like it or not – so be it. The not won. Then came frustration and finger pointing. That is all gone. Like Butler, Rajon Rondo and Dwyane Wade are workers. So while last year’s team started to fade after Jan. 7, Butler’s feeling is this year’s version of the Bulls will be immune to that type of nose dive. Rajon Rondo “I know what I think we’re going to continue to do,” Butler said. “I think we’re going to continue to win games. We’re practicing extremely well right now, and the saying goes that if you’re practicing the way you play and all that good stuff, if we do that then I think we we’re going to win.” December will test that, especially this first week. Yes, the “circus trip” is behind the Bulls, but they welcome the Lakers on Wednesday night before tipping off four games in five nights, including hosting LeBron James and the Cleveland Cavaliers on Friday. What Butler, Wade and Rondo are banking on is the team chemistry that has been built so far carries weight. “As much as you see guys around

each other, you’d think we live in a dorm together,” Butler said, when asked about a college atmosphere surrounding this team. “We all leave the building at the same time, we all eat together or are at somebody else’s house. You would think, good or bad, that we are a college team. We’re always talking in a group chat or competing, something about this group of guys, we always wanna be around each other. “We realize we’re all we have when we step out into the United Center floor or an away game. It’s us. These coaches, this organization.” Which are words that look nice on T-shirts, but Butler also knows that wins need to be produced. So far, so good in that department, as the Bulls will enter the final game of November 10-6. The Bulls were 11-5 through their first 16 games last season, as well as 22-12 through Jan. 7. As the chemistry wilted, however, so did the winning. “I told y’all that all last year,” Butler said. “It’s all fine and dandy when you’re winning. You lose a couple games, it seems everything goes to [expletive].” Note: Coach Fred Hoiberg said Doug McDermott (concussion) still is not taking contact, and his timetable for that next stage remains day-to-day.

Wednesday LINE 7 4 4½ 14½ 11 16 5 6½ OFF 7 6 7 2 6½ 5½ 13 5 13½ 6½ 11 10 4½ 8 12½ OFF OFF OFF 14½ OFF 3½ 25

UNDERDOG at DETROIT at CORNELL James Madison Dartmouth FIU Rutgers Virginia Tech Purdue Ohio Wright St at W. MICHIGAN Washington Temple N. Illinois at SOUTHERN MISS George Mason Middle Tennessee Green Bay Cleveland St Drake Nebraska at BOISE ST Utah St Colorado St North Carolina Ohio State Louisiana Tech at SAN DIEGO UC Irvine at STANFORD UC Riverside

NHL

FAVORITE Pittsburgh at CALGARY at LOS ANGELES

Wednesday LINE UNDERDOG -145 at NY ISLANDERS OFF Toronto OFF San Jose

LINE +135 OFF OFF

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Friday OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG 17½ 19 (58½) Ohio 6½ 7 (58) Colorado Saturday at WEST VIRGINIA 14½ 17 (66½) Baylor at TCU 4½ 4½ (52½) Kansas St at SOUTH ALABAMA 12 12 (58) New Mexico St Troy 9 7 (54½) at GA. SOUTHERN Louisiana-Lafayette 9½ 6½ (59) at LA.-MONROE at OKLAHOMA 14 11 (77½) Oklahoma St Arkansas St 21½ 23 (54) at TEXAS STATE at IDAHO 7 6½ (53) Georgia St at W KENTUCKY 7½ 10 (80) Louisiana Tech at NAVY 2 3 (62) Temple Alabama 21½ 24 (40½) Florida San Diego St 7 7 (63) at WYOMING Clemson 9 10½ (58) Virginia Tech Wisconsin 1½ 2½ (48) Penn St FAVORITE W Michigan Washington

NFL

Thursday FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG Dallas 2½ 3 (43½) at MINNESOTA Sunday at BEARS 4 2 (43½) San Francisco Denver 4½ 4½ (42) at JACKSONVILLE at ATLANTA 4 3½ (49) Kansas City at GREEN BAY 3½ 6½ (45½) Houston Philadelphia PK 1½ (42½) at CINCINNATI at NEW ORLEANS 4 5½ (53½) Detroit at NEW ENGLAND 14½ 13½ (44½) Los Angeles at BALTIMORE 3½ 3 (40½) Miami at OAKLAND 4 3 (50) Buffalo at SAN DIEGO 5½ 3½ (47) Tampa Bay at ARIZONA 3 3 (49) Washington at PITTSBURGH 6 6 (49½) NY Giants at SEATTLE 6½ 6½ (44) Carolina Monday Indianapolis PK 1½ (49½) at NY JETS

Updated odds available at Pregame.com

• Wednesday, November 30, 2016

AP file photo

Bulls guard Dwyane Wade (left) talks to forward Jimmy Butler in the closing moments of the team’s game against the Nuggets on Nov. 22 in Denver. Butler said he sees a more tight-knit team this season compared with last season.

FAVORITE E. Michigan Northeastern at CHARLOTTE at OLD DOMINION at ELON at MIAMI at MICHIGAN at LOUISVILLE at MARSHALL at GEORGIA ST UNC-Wilmington at TCU at ST. JOSEPH’S at INDIANA ST South Alabama at N. IOWA at MISSISSIPPI at KANSAS ST at ARKANSAS ST at DEPAUL at CLEMSON SMU BYU at COLORADO at INDIANA at VIRGINIA at CALIFORNIA SOUTHERN CAL at SANTA CLARA Saint Mary’s Ca at UCLA

SPORTS | Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

FAVORITE at BULLS Sacramento at TORONTO at BOSTON at OKLAHOMA CITY at MINNESOTA San Antonio at DENVER Atlanta at PORTLAND


FIVE-DAY PLANNER TEAM

WEDNESDAY

Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY SAN FRANCISCO Noon, Sunday FOX AM-780, 105.9 FM

|SPORTS

8

NEW JERSEY 7:30 p.m. CSN AM-720 L.A. LAKERS 7 p.m. CSN AM-890

at Philadelphia Noon WGN AM-720 CLEVELAND 7 p.m. CSN AM-890

WINNIPEG 6 p.m. SN, CSN-CH AM-720

at Dallas 7:30 p.m. WGN AM-890

WHAT TO WATCH Pro basketball 6:30 p.m.: Detroit at Boston, NBA 7 p.m.: L.A. Lakers at Bulls, CSN 9 p.m.: Indiana at Portland, NBA Pro hockey 7 p.m.: Pittsburgh at N.Y. Islanders, NBCSN 9:30 p.m.: San Jose at Los Angeles, NBCSN College basketball 5:30 p.m.: New Hampshire at Providence, FS2 5:30 p.m.: Coppin St. at Georgetown, FSN 6 p.m.: Temple at St. Joseph’s, CBSSN 6:15 p.m.: Purdue at Louisville, ESPN 6:15 p.m.: Virginia Tech at Michigan, ESPN2 6:15 p.m.: Rutgers at Miami, ESPNU 7:30 p.m.: W. Carolina at Marquette, FS2 7:30 p.m.: Drake at DePaul, FSN

8:15 p.m.: North Carolina at Indiana, ESPN 8:15 p.m.: Ohio St. at Virginia, ESPN2 8:15 p.m.: Nebraska at Clemson, ESPNU Golf 7 p.m.: Australian PGA Championship, first round, at Gold Coast, Australia, TGC 2:30 a.m. (Thursday): European PGA Tour-Sunshine Tour, Alfred Dunhill Championship, first round, at Malelane, South Africa, TGC Soccer 6 p.m.: MLS playoffs, Eastern Conference finals, Leg 2, Montreal at Toronto, FS1 Women’s college basketball Noon: Butler at TCU, FSN 6 p.m.: Florida St. at Minnesota, BTN 8 p.m.: Notre Dame at Iowa, BTN

CUBS

OF Jay agrees to 1-year deal By STEVE GREENBERG

sgreenberg@suntimes.com The Cubs and Jon Jay, a veteran outfielder who will be 32 on Opening Day, agreed Tuesday to a one-year contract worth a reported $8 million. Jay has played seven major league seasons – his first six with the Cubs’ rivals in St. Louis – primarily as a center fielder. He can play all three outfield spots, but he’s known for his glove work in the middle of the outfield. Jay’s career fielding percentage in center is .996, the highest mark for any active player (minimum 500 games) at the position. The move solidifies months-long speculation that the Cubs will lose the services of popular center fielder Dexter Fowler, one of the heroes of the team’s

drive to the World Series title. While Cubs fans come to terms with saying goodbye to “Dex,” the 30-year-old Fowler – a first-time All-Star in 2016 who tied for the team’s postseason lead with three home runs and 11 runs scored – will be seeking a lucrative, multiyear deal elsewhere. How much Jay plays during the season to come will have a lot to do with the ongoing development of Albert Almora Jr., the team’s first-round draft pick in 2012 and a solid contributor off the bench during the 2016 regular season and playoffs. The right-handed-hitting Almora is considered a potential Gold Glove-level talent in center field and could have more upside offensively than the left-handed Jay.

SPORTS BRIEFS Kaleigh Johnson helps MCC top DuPage in women’s basketball

Kaleigh Johnson recorded a double-double, scoring 20 points and grabbing 11 rebounds, to lead McHenry County College’s women’s basketball team to a 78-47 win over College of DuPage on Tuesday in Crystal Lake. Johnson, a McHenry West graduate, also dished out four assists. Kaylee Bischke, a Harvard grad, scored 15 points, had a team-high six assists and grabbed five rebounds for the Scots (4-3).

Grace Schewgel scored 12 points and had four rebounds. McHenry East grad Ashley Kaempf had eight points and 10 rebounds, while Ayanna Hunter had eight points and seven rebounds. Kristy Darling, a Woodstock North grad, had a team-high 13 rebounds and six points. Quixmia Washington did a little of everything with nine points, five assists, five steals and three rebounds.

– Northwest Herald

NFL NATIONAL CONFERENCE

North W L T Detroit 7 4 0 Minnesota 6 5 0 Green Bay 5 6 0 Bears 2 9 0 East W L T Dallas 10 1 0 N.Y. Giants 8 3 0 Washington 6 4 1 Philadelphia 5 6 0 South W L T Atlanta 7 4 0 Tampa Bay 6 5 0 New Orleans 5 6 0 Carolina 4 7 0 West W L T Seattle 7 3 1 Arizona 4 6 1 Los Angeles 4 7 0 San Francisco 1 10 0

PREPS AMERICAN CONFERENCE

Pct .636 .545 .455 .182

PF 247 218 274 178

PA 238 192 289 264

Pct .909 .700 .591 .455

PF 316 231 280 254

PA 213 213 264 213

Pct .636 .545 .455 .364

PF 358 249 334 276

PA 302 264 307 281

Pct .682 .409 .364 .091

PF 224 245 170 228

PA 187 228 236 344

WEEK 12 Thursday’s Results Detroit 16, Minnesota 13 Dallas 31, Washington 26 Pittsburgh 28, Indianapolis 7 Sunday’s Results Tennessee 27, Bears 21 Atlanta 38, Arizona 19 San Diego 21, Houston 13 Baltimore 19, Cincinnati 14 Buffalo 28, Jacksonville 21 Tennessee 27, Chicago 21 New Orleans 49, Los Angeles 21 N.Y. Giants 27, Cleveland 13 Miami 31, San Francisco 24 Tampa Bay 14, Seattle 5 New England 22, N.Y. Jets 17 Oakland 35, Carolina 32 Kansas City 30, Denver 27, OT Monday’s Result Green Bay 27, Philadelphia 13

East W L T New England 9 2 0 Miami 7 4 0 Buffalo 6 5 0 N.Y. Jets 3 8 0 North W L T Baltimore 6 5 0 Pittsburgh 6 5 0 Cincinnati 3 7 1 Cleveland 0 12 0 South W L T Houston 6 5 0 Tennessee 6 6 0 Indianapolis 5 6 0 Jacksonville 2 9 0 West W L T Oakland 9 2 0 Kansas City 8 3 0 Denver 7 4 0 San Diego 5 6 0

PF 293 249 281 196

PA 197 240 236 266

Pct .545 .545 .318 .000

PF 218 266 213 197

PA 201 222 245 352

Pct .545 .500 .455 .182

PF 194 308 270 214

PA 236 296 301 293

Pct .818 .727 .636 .455

PF 307 252 266 313

PA 275 214 219 291

WEEK 13 Thursday’s Game Dallas at Minnesota, 7:25 p.m. Sunday’s Games San Francisco at Bears, noon Kansas City at Atlanta, noon Los Angeles at New England, noon Philadelphia at Cincinnati, noon Miami at Baltimore, noon Denver at Jacksonville, noon Detroit at New Orleans, noon Houston at Green Bay, noon Buffalo at Oakland, 3:05 p.m. Washington at Arizona, 3:25 p.m. Tampa Bay at San Diego, 3:25 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Pittsburgh, 3:25 p.m. Carolina at Seattle, 7:30 p.m. Monday’s Games Indianapolis at N.Y. Jets, 7:30 p.m. Off: Tennessee, Cleveland

NHL

NBA

WESTERN CONFERENCE

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Central Division GP W L OT Pts Blackhawks 24 15 6 3 33 St. Louis 23 13 7 3 29 Minnesota 22 11 8 3 25 Nashville 22 11 8 3 25 Dallas 24 9 9 6 24 Winnipeg 25 11 12 2 24 Colorado 21 9 11 1 19 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts San Jose 23 13 9 1 27 Anaheim 23 11 8 4 26 Edmonton 24 12 10 2 26 Los Angeles 22 12 9 1 25 Vancouver 23 10 11 2 22 Calgary 25 10 13 2 22 Arizona 21 8 10 3 19

GF GA 68 60 62 63 62 47 65 57 61 79 66 72 47 63 GF GA 54 49 59 55 70 63 57 54 54 70 57 77 51 65

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Montreal 23 16 5 2 34 68 50 Ottawa 23 14 8 1 29 55 56 Tampa Bay 24 13 10 1 27 71 65 Boston 23 12 10 1 25 55 53 Toronto 22 10 8 4 24 70 71 Detroit 23 11 10 2 24 57 59 Florida 23 11 10 2 24 58 60 Buffalo 22 8 9 5 21 44 57 Metropolitan Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA N.Y. Rangers 24 16 7 1 33 88 59 Pittsburgh 22 13 6 3 29 66 65 Washington 21 13 6 2 28 57 48 Columbus 21 12 5 4 28 67 48 New Jersey 22 10 7 5 25 55 58 Philadelphia 24 11 10 3 25 77 80 Carolina 22 9 9 4 22 54 59 N.Y. Islanders 21 7 10 4 18 51 64 Note: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Tuesday’s Results Blackhawks 2, Florida 1, SO N.Y. Rangers 3, Carolina 2 Columbus 5, Tampa Bay 1 Detroit 3, Dallas 1 Philadelphia 3, Boston 2, SO Buffalo 5, Ottawa 4 Winnipeg 3, New Jersey 2 Toronto 4, Edmonton 2 Nashville 5, Colorado 3 San Jose 2, Arizona 1, OT Anaheim 2, Montreal 1 Vancouver 5, Minnesota 4 Wednesday’s Games Pittsburgh at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m. Toronto at Calgary, 7:30 p.m. San Jose at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m. Thursday’s games New Jersey at Blackhawks, 7:30 p.m. Carolina at Boston, 6 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Buffalo, 6 p.m. Dallas at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Washington, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at Ottawa, 6:30 p.m. Florida at Detroit, 6:30 p.m. Edmonton at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. Tampa Bay at St. Louis, 7 p.m. Columbus at Colorado, 8 p.m. Los Angeles at Arizona, 8 p.m. Anaheim at Vancouver, 9 p.m.

SCHEDULE

Pct .818 .636 .545 .273

Central Division W L Pct Cleveland 13 3 .813 Bulls 10 6 .625 Milwaukee 8 8 .500 Indiana 9 9 .500 Detroit 9 10 .474 Atlantic Division W L Pct Toronto 11 6 .647 Boston 10 7 .588 New York 8 9 .471 Brooklyn 5 12 .294 Philadelphia 4 14 .222 Southeast Division W L Pct Charlotte 10 8 .556 Atlanta 10 8 .556 Orlando 7 11 .389 Washington 6 10 .375 Miami 5 12 .294

GB — 3 5 5 5½ GB — 1 3 6 7½ GB — — 3 3 4½

WESTERN CONFERENCE

Southwest Division W L Pct San Antonio 14 4 .778 Memphis 11 7 .611 Houston 11 7 .611 New Orleans 7 12 .368 Dallas 3 13 .188 Northwest Division W L Pct Oklahoma City 11 8 .579 Utah 11 8 .579 Portland 9 10 .474 Denver 7 10 .412 Minnesota 5 12 .294 Pacific Division W L Pct Golden State 16 2 .889 L.A. Clippers 14 5 .737 L.A. Lakers 9 10 .474 Sacramento 7 11 .389 Phoenix 5 13 .278

GB — 3 3 7½ 10 GB — — 2 3 5 GB — 2½ 7½ 9 11

Tuesday’s Results Detroit 112, Charlotte 89 Brooklyn 127, L.A. Clippers 122, 2OT Milwaukee 118, Cleveland 101 New Orleans 105, L.A. Lakers 88 Orlando 95, San Antonio 83 Utah 120, Houston 101 Wednesday’s Games L.A. Lakers at Bulls, 7 p.m. Sacramento at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Detroit at Boston, 6:30 p.m. Memphis at Toronto, 6:30 p.m. New York at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Washington at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m. San Antonio at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Atlanta at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Miami at Denver, 8 p.m. Indiana at Portland, 9 p.m. Thursday’s Games Dallas at Charlotte, 6 p.m. Milwaukee at Brooklyn, 6:30 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Orlando at Memphis, 7 p.m. Miami at Utah, 8 p.m. Houston at Golden State, 9:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY Boys basketball: Jacobs at Huntley, Wauconda at Woodstock, 7 p.m. Girls basketball: Woodstock North at Genoa-Kingston, 7 p.m. Boys bowling: Johnsburg at Woodstock, 4:30 p.m. Wrestling: Marian Central at Wauconda, Richmond-Burton at Winnebago Triangular, 6 p.m. THURSDAY Boys basketball: Alden-Hebron at Harvard, Cary-Grove at Carmel, Faith Lutheran at Mooseheart, 7 p.m. Girls basketball: Faith Lutheran at Mooseheart, 5:30 p.m. Boys bowling: Huntley at Marengo, 4 p.m. Girls bowling: Huntley at Marengo, 4 p.m., McHenry at Woodstock, Dundee-Crown at Johnsburg, 4:30 p.m. Wrestling: Woodstock North at Johnsburg Triangular, 5:30 p.m., Woodstock at Burlington Central, Prairie Ridge at Hampshire, Dundee-Crown at Huntley, Crystal Lake Central at Jacobs, McHenry at Cary-Grove, 6:30 p.m. FRIDAY Boys basketball: Hampshire at Dundee-Crown, Sandwich at Marian Central, 7 p.m., Alden-Hebron at Christian Liberty, 7:30 p.m. Girls basketball: Alden-Hebron at Christian Liberty, 6 p.m., Richmond-Burton at Woodstock, Harvard at Johnsburg, Woodstock North at Marengo, Jacobs at Huntley, Prairie Ridge at Crystal Lake South, Crystal Lake Central at Hampshire, Dundee-Crown at Cary-Grove, 7 p.m. Boys swimming: Huntley vs. West Aurora at IMSA, 5 p.m. Girls bowling: McHenry at Larkin, 4:30 p.m. Wrestling: McHenry at Prairie Ridge, Hampshire at Jacobs, Crystal Lake South at Dundee-Crown, Cary-Grove at Crystal Lake Central, 6:30 p.m.

NCAA BASKETBALL Tuesday 1. Kentucky (7-0) did not play. Next: vs. No. 11 UCLA, Saturday. 2. Villanova (7-0) beat Pennsylvania 82-57. Next: vs. Saint Joseph’s, Saturday. 3. North Carolina (7-0) did not play. Next: at No. 13 Indiana, Wednesday. 4. Kansas (6-1) beat Long Beach State 91-61. Next: vs. Stanford, Saturday. 5. Duke (7-1) beat Michigan State 78-69. Next: vs. Maine, Saturday. 6. Virginia (6-0) did not play. Next: vs. Ohio State, Wednesday. 7. Xavier (7-0) beat North Dakota State 85-55. Next: vs. No. 9 Baylor, Saturday. 8. Gonzaga (6-0) did not play. Next: vs. MVSU, Thursday. 9. Baylor (6-0) did not play. Next: vs. Sam Houston State, Wednesday. 10. Creighton (7-0) beat Buffalo 93-72. Next: vs. Akron, Saturday. 11. UCLA (7-0) did not play. Next: vs. UC Riverside, Wednesday. 12. Saint Mary’s (Cal) (5-0) did not play. Next: at Stanford, Wednesday. 13. Indiana (4-1) did not play. Next: vs. No. 3 North Carolina, Wednesday. 14. Louisville (5-1) did not play. Next: vs. No. 15 Purdue, Wednesday. 15. Purdue (5-1) did not play. Next: at No. 14 Louisville, Wednesday. 16. Arizona (5-1) did not play. Next: vs. Texas Southern, Wednesday. 17. Wisconsin (6-2) beat No. 22 Syracuse 77-60. Next: vs. Oklahoma, Saturday. 18. Butler (7-0) did not play. Next: vs. Central Arkansas, Saturday. 19. Iowa State (5-1) did not play. Next: vs. Cincinnati, Thursday. 20. South Carolina (6-0) did not play. Next: vs. Vermont, Thursday. 21. Rhode Island (5-2) lost to Valparaiso 65-62. Next: at Providence, Saturday. 22. Syracuse (4-2) lost to No. 17 Wisconsin 77-60. Next: vs. North Florida, Saturday. 23. Oregon (5-2) did not play. Next: vs. Western Oregon, Wednesday. 24. Florida (6-1) did not play. Next: at North Florida, Thursday. 25. West Virginia (5-1) did not play. Next: at No. 6 Virginia, Saturday.


U.S. MEN’S SOCCER: WORLD CUP QUALIFYING

By RONALD BLUM

The Associated Press

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• Wednesday, November 30, 2016

NEW YORK – Bruce Arena opened a binder to a page with 48 names, his depth chart for the U.S. soccer team. Back in charge for the first time in a decade, he views the Americans’ state as urgent after losses in the first two games of the final round of World Cup qualifying and already has plans. “We’re fighting for our lives starting Bruce Arena March 24. We’re behind the eight ball,” he said. “We’ve got to close the gap, and we get six points in the next two games, the gap is closed.” During an hourlong session with reporters Tuesday, Arena said comments he made in 2013 about foreign-born players on the national team were aimed at the U.S. player development system, not a criticism of German-Americans who made up almost a quarter of the 2014 World Cup roster under Jurgen Klinsmann. “I was told today, somebody, they referenced me in Spain as the Donald

Trump of soccer,” Arena said. “I think that I’m at fault, obviously, for those statements, but I would like to clear that up. It’s absolutely ridiculous. It’s no way in the way I think.” “I think the phrase foreign nationals is a very poor term, whoever uses it, and I will not use it. I will not use dual citizens. They’re national team players,” he explained. “The comment regarding foreign-born players, at the time I believe was referencing player development. And I was simply saying that if our senior national team program consists of a large minority of players, large majority of players that were born elsewhere, where are we going with our development? It has nothing to do with who should be playing on the national team, who should not.” Now 65 and a member of the U.S. National Soccer Hall of Fame, Arena coached the U.S. from 1998 to 2006 and is the winningest coach in team history. He led the Americans to the 2002 World Cup quarterfinals, their best finish since the first tournament in 1930, then was fired after a first-round elimination in 2006. He took over from Klinsmann last week after a 2-1 home loss to Mexico and a 4-0 rout at Costa Rica.

SPORTS | Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

Arena to the rescue?

9


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016

| SPORTS

10 GOLF: HERO WORLD CHALLENGE

Just playing again a success for Tiger By DOUG FERGUSON The Associated Press

NASSAU, Bahamas – This might be one time that Tiger Woods doesn’t measure success on the golf course by the score on his card. He measured it with three words Tuesday: “I’m playing again.” There were times during his 15 months away from golf that Woods wasn’t entirely sure that would be the case. He said that when he was at the Hero World Challenge last year, he needed help just to climb out of bed. At an outdoor party at Albany Golf Club, he would mingle for a few minutes and then sit on a stone bench. He spent more time looking back than looking forward, saying at one point that anything else he achieved in golf would be “gravy.” And now he can’t wait to get started Thursday. The 15-month break to heal after

back surgeries is the longest he has been away from golf. Woods was a mixture of optimism and reality about his return. He talked about having all the shots he needs to compete against a field that includes 17 players from the top 40 and Woods, the tournament host who is at a career-low No. 898 in the world rankings. He is playing, so he said he wants to win. The outlook is no different. He also noted that Bubba Watson won last year at 25-under par, and it probably will take something around that to win. “I know that’s a tall order since I’ve been away from the game for so long, and I’ve made a lot of different changes in my game,” he said. “Physically and also equipment, practice schedules, training, all that has evolved. The mindset of competing hasn’t. That is to go out there and try to beat these guys.”

See TIGER, page 11

NOTICE OF PROPOSED PROPERTY TAX INCREASE FOR BURTON TOWNSHIP I. A public hearing to approve a proposed property tax levy increase for Burton Township Town Fund for 2017 will be held on Tuesday, December 13, 2016 at 7:00 p.m. at the Spring Grove Village Hall, 7401 Meyer Rd., Spring Grove, IL. Any person desiring to appear at the public hearing and present testimony to the taxing district may contact Sam Jones, Supervisor at (815) 482.5112. II. The corporate and special purpose property taxes extended or abated for 2016 were $155,643.00. The proposed corporate and special purpose property taxes to be levied for 2017 are $155,643.00. This represents a 0% increase over the previous year. III. The property taxes extended for the debt services and public building commission leases for 2016 were $0.00. The estimated property taxes to be levied for debt service and public building commission leases for 2017 are $0.00. This represents a 0% increase over the previous year.

• Adam Jayko, Johnsburg, Football • McKayla Wuensch, Marian Central, Volleyball • Samson Evans, Prairie Ridge, Football

VOTE NOW! mchenrycountysports.com

IV. The total property taxes extended or abated for 2016 were $155,643.00. The estimated total property taxes to be levied for 2017 are $155,643.00. This represents a 0% increase over the previous year. April Shetsky, Township Clerk

SM-CL0409141


• TIGER

11

Continued from page 10

AP photo

Tiger Woods speaks during a new conference Tuesday for the Hero World Challenge in Nassau, Bahamas.

FAMILY RUN/WALK!

Sunday, December 4, 9am

The Raue Center for the Arts, 26 N. Williams St., Crystal Lake

Men, Women and Children are welcome to participate! The 5k Santa Run/Walk and 1 Mile Reindeer Dash/Saunter starts and ends at The Raue.

5K - $38 per person • 1-Mile - $15 per person

Each 5K registrant will receive a Santa Suit (no cost) or a long sleeve Dry Fit Red Shirt (additional $8.00).

This event raises financial support for children in McHenry County. Proceeds benefit the following organizations: Turning Point, Big Brothers Big Sisters of McHenry County, CASA of McHenry County, Main Stay, Girls on the Run Northwest Illinois and Kiwanis Club of Crystal Lake For more info or to register, visit: kiwanissantarunforkids.org or Email: rdkiwanissantarun@gmail.com

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Thanks to our sponsors!

• Wednesday, November 30, 2016

with any adrenaline since the final round of the Wyndham Championship on Aug. 23, 2015. He doesn’t know how his game will stack up against players he watched at Hazeltine when he was an assistant captain at the Ryder Cup. His previous long break from golf was eight months when he had reconstructive surgery on his left knee after winning the 2008 U.S. Open at Torrey Pines, the last of his 14 major titles. He won his opening match in the Match Play Championship and won two tournaments later at Bay Hill. That was a knee. This is a back. He was 33, not a month away from turning 41. And that was long before any chaos in his personal life. Asked what he would expect to feel Thursday at Albany Golf Club, Woods said, “I’ll let you know then, because I don’t know right now.”

SPORTS | Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

He still is working with swing coach Chris Como, whom he brought on two years ago. Now that Nike is out of the equipment business, Woods is using a TaylorMade driver and fairway metals, a Bridgestone golf ball and his old Scotty Cameron putter that he used to win all but one of his 14 majors. But it starts with playing. “Put it this way: It’s a lot better situation this year than last,” Woods said. “I just couldn’t get out of bed. I needed help. It was a tough, tough time. You asked me then, ‘Could I play?’ No. I can’t even get out of bed. How am I supposed to swing a club at 120 miles an hour?” The Hero World Challenge, which he started in 1999 to benefit the Tiger Woods Foundation, is effectively a holiday tournament for golf’s elite that has no cut and pays $1 million to the winner. It feels so much bigger this year because of Woods. Over the past year, he played five holes to open his new golf course, Bluejack National, outside Houston. And he took three swings with a wedge on the par-3 10th hole at Congressional during a day to promote the Quicken Loans National. All three went in the water. Everyone is curious to see how he plays. That includes Woods. His biggest concern is how far his shots will go because he hasn’t played


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016

| SPORTS

12


ENTREES • DESSERTS • SOUPS • WINES • BREADS • APPETIZERS NWHerald.com

11•30•16

TODAY’S CLASSIFIED SECTION APPEARS INSIDE

GREEN GENIE SPREAD IS SANDWICH MAGIC

PAGE 7

BET ON BISCOTTI

Dry Italian cookies perfect complement to hot coffee

SPICY SNACK

Cheesy DIY crackers have bite

Caramel

creations

Caramel sauce tops Hot Cider Cocktail for cold winter days PLUS

Homemade Salted Caramel Sauce makes great holiday gift


Cheesy, spicy crackers are perfect snack for cold days, good enough to be gifts

NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016

| Taste |

2

Taste is published each Wednesday by Shaw Media, P.O. Box 250, Crystal Lake, IL 600390250. Periodicals and postage paid at Crystal Lake, IL 60014.

Features editor

Valerie Katzenstein 815-526-4529 vkatzenstein@shawmedia.com

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Fill out the form at PlanitNorthwest.com/calendar.

ON THE COVER Hot Cider Cocktail AP photo

ENTER TO WIN

a $25 gift card to Joseph’s Marketplace in Crystal Lake HOW TO ENTER

Submit your favorite recipe to share with our readers at shawurl.com/recipe or email it (ingredients and directions) with your name and hometown to lifestyle@nwherald.com. Recipes do not have to be original but must be complete. Winners are drawn every two weeks.

By SARA MOULTON The Associated Press

When I was a kid, my parents sometimes brought home tins of deliriously delicious cheese crackers. I can’t remember the brand – I think it was a British import – but I do remember my sister, brother and I would inhale them as soon the tin was opened. All these years later, the flavor of those crackers, richly cheesy and spicy, remains burned into my memory. This recipe is my attempt to resurrect them. The ingredients and technique for making these crackers are similar to those used to make pie dough. Butter and flour (with added flavorings) are its bones. And as with pie dough, as soon as you combine gluten (the protein in flour) with a liquid, you have to mix quickly and briefly or the end product will be tough. So be careful not to overmix the dough. The stars of this recipe are its two cheeses: extra-sharp cheddar and Parmesan. The spice, which is added to the dough at the start, then dusted onto the outside of each cracker, is provided by Colman’s Mustard powder (a venerable English brand) and cayenne pepper. Happily, this recipe is simple to make. The dough is mixed quickly in a food processor, then shaped into a cylinder and chilled for an hour, time enough for the gluten to relax and the dough to solidify, making it easy to slice and bake. The typical cracker recipe requires you to roll out the dough and cut it with a cutter, a method that takes a lot more time – and generates a bigger mess – than my cylinder method. Another advantage of this method is you can freeze the cylinder (just take care to wrap the dough well, first in plastic, then in foil) and then, when guests show up unexpectedly, let the dough soften on the counter for a bit, then slice off and bake as many crackers as you need. Or you can package the baked crackers in batches of 10 or 12, tie them up with a bow, and give them as gifts. No matter how you use them – as presents or served at home – I believe your family and friends will make them disappear as quickly as my sister, brother and I made that tin go poof.

Spicy Cheese Crackers

Start to finish: 2 hours 10 minutes (40 minutes active) Makes about 50 crackers

Spicy Cheese Crackers AP photo

1/2 pound extra-sharp cheddar, coarsely grated 5 ounces finely grated Parmesan cheese, divided 1½ cups (6 1/3 ounces) all-purpose flour 1/2 cup (1 stick) cold unsalted butter, cut into chunks 1½ teaspoons Colman’s Mustard powder, divided 1/2 teaspoon table salt 1¼ teaspoons cayenne, divided 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 2 tablespoons ice water In a food processor, combine the cheddar and 4 ounces of the Parmesan. Pulse until the cheddar is finely chopped. Add the flour,

butter, 1/2 teaspoon of the mustard, the salt and 1/4 teaspoon of the cayenne. Pulse until the mixture looks like small pellets. Add the Worcestershire sauce and ice water, then pulse until just combined. Pour the dough onto the counter, divide it into two mounds, then use the palm of your hands to smear each mound across the counter several times, or until it comes together quickly when you press it with your fingers. Transfer each half of the dough onto a 16-inch-long sheet of plastic wrap. Shape into a 12-inch log (about 1½ inches around), using the plastic as needed, then wrap tightly in the plastic. Chill for at least 1 hour. When ready to bake, heat the oven to 325 degrees F. Line two sheet pans with kitchen parchment and position one of the oven racks in the center of the oven. On a large plate, combine the remaining 1 teaspoon of mustard and 1 teaspoon of cayenne. Remove one of the cylinders from the refrigerator. Unwrap the dough, then roll it in the spice mix, rubbing off the excess spice. Slice the dough crosswise about 1/3 inch thick. Arrange the dough rounds on the prepared sheet pans, about 1/2 inch apart. Sprinkle each round with a pinch of the additional Parmesan cheese and bake on the oven’s middle and bottom shelves, switching places halfway through, until dark golden brown, 25 to 30 minutes. Transfer to a rack to cool.

Nutrition information per cracker: 60 calories; 40 calories from fat (67 percent of total calories); 4 g fat (2.5 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 10 mg cholesterol; 100 mg sodium; 3 g carbohydrate; 0 g fiber; 0 g sugar; 2 g protein.


Sweet cider

This hot cocktail is soothing and comforting on a cold day By THE CULINARY INSTITUTE OF AMERICA

A

fter a snowy walk or long day on the slopes, there’s nothing like curling up under a warm blanket. Maybe you have a fire going and the dog asleep at your feet, with a good book just within reach. But before you can relax, you need to warm up those cold hands and chilled bones. Before you settle in for your long winter’s nap, stir up this hot cider cocktail, featured at The Tavern at American Bounty at our campus in Hyde Park, New York. Hot cocktails are inspired by the classic hot toddy, a curative mixture dating back centuries that includes

whiskey, rum, or brandy with hot water, a sweetener, and sometimes some spicing. However you like your hot toddy, it should be soothing and comforting on a cold day. In fact, hot toddies made with spirits, honey and lemon juice often are used to ease the symptoms from our seasonal colds and coughs. Our cider cocktail recipe begins with almond-flavored amaretto and hot apple cider. Bitters are added to help balance the sweetness from the cider (and the caramel sauce and whipped cream we’ll add later). Bitters are a blend of naturally sour or bitter botanical flavors – such as

Hot Cider Cocktail

Start to finish: 20 minutes Makes one drink 2 ounces amaretto 6 ounces warm apple cider 1 dash bitters Whipped Cream, as needed (recipe follows) Caramel Sauce, as needed (recipe follows) Combine amaretto, warm cider and bitters in an Irish coffee mug or regular coffee mug. Top with fresh whipped cream and caramel sauce.

Caramel Sauce Makes about 2 cups

1½ cups heavy cream 3/4 cup sugar 1/2 cup light corn syrup 2 tablespoons unsalted butter Prepare an ice bath. Bring the cream to a boil in a saucepan over medium heat. Remove from the heat. Combine the sugar and corn syrup in a heavy saucepan over low heat and stir until the sugar dissolves. Slowly cook to a golden brown without stirring, 8 to 9 minutes. Remove from the heat and put the saucepan in the ice bath for 20 seconds to stop the cooking. Remove from the ice bath and stir in the butter. Carefully stir in the hot cream, mixing until fully blended. To store the caramel sauce, transfer it to a clean bowl or jar, cover tightly, and refrigerate for up to 2 weeks. Reheat the sauce over low heat or in the microwave before serving.

orange peel or herbs. In cocktails, they add a concentrated dose of bitterness without diluting the primary flavors in the drink. There are no rules when it comes to a hot cocktail, and this recipe can be reformulated to suit your mood or the contents of your liquor cabinet. In place of amaretto, you can use any of your favorite spirits, such as whiskey or apple brandy. If you like infused spirits or syrups (a great make-at-home holiday gift), a hot cocktail is the perfect way to show them off. Cinnamon-infused bourbon or cardamom-infused simple syrup are great starts to making this

recipe your own. Hot cocktails are the perfect treat for a little bit of quiet time, but they also are an excellent make-ahead recipe when you are hosting winter parties. They can be mixed and kept warm in a crock pot or on the stovetop over a very low flame. Be sure to put some of the hot apple cider aside before adding the amaretto, for children and guests who choose not to partake. Garnish your party drinks with freshly made whipped cream, our caramel sauce and a cinnamon stick for a particularly Instagram-worthy presentation.

Whipped Cream Makes about 2 cups

1 cup heavy cream, chilled 1/4 cup confectioners’ sugar 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract Chill a stainless-steel bowl and the beaters of a handheld mixer, the whisk attachment of a stand mixer, or a balloon whisk. Pour the cream into the chilled bowl and whip on medium speed until thickened, about 3 minutes. Increase the speed to high and gradually add the confectioners’ sugar while whipping. Add the vanilla extract and continue to whip until the cream has the desired peak according to its intended use. Soft peaks are good for dolloping cream, while firmer peaks are better if the cream is to be piped, used for topping, or folded into another mixture. Note: If your cream starts to turn slightly yellow while you are whipping, it is close to being overwhipped and turning into butter. Fold in a small amount of unwhipped cream, if you have it, to rescue the texture.

Nutrition information per serving of the cocktail without cream or caramel sauce: 310 calories; 0 calories from fat; 0 g fat (0 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 0 mg cholesterol; 19 mg sodium; 56 g carbohydrate; 0 g fiber; 19 g sugar; 0 g protein.

Hot Cider Cocktail AP photo

| Taste | Wednesday, November 30, 2016 • NWHerald.com

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NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016

| Taste |

4

Dark Chocolate Rosemary Biscotti AP photo

Chocolate rosemary biscotti ideal for a gift By MELISSA D’ARABIAN The Associated Press

I remember the first party I ever hosted. I was 5 and my mom invited all of my kindergarten girlfriends and their moms for a holiday singing gathering. We knoshed on homemade cookies dunked in hot cocoa made from packets of powder dissolved in boiling water. Standing there around our piano, surrounded by tiny off-key singers with crumby, smiling mouths and steamy chocolate breath, I fell in love with hospitality. I felt in my heart the joy of feeding people, especially around the holidays. Joy to the world, indeed. As the days grow colder and shorter, and cookie-baking season is ushered in, the calorie-counter in me steps aside just enough to strike that balance of reasonable, but small, indulgence. A perfect example of smart cookie indulgence is the biscotti. Biscotti are firm, dry Italian cookies that typically are served alongside an espresso or coffee for dunking. Biscotti are dryer and harder than your average cookie, due to a double-baking process

(which is easy, so don’t be intimidated) and relatively lower amounts of fat and sugar. But the harder texture has a huge tactical advantage: biscotti take longer to nibble your way through, so the chances of me accidentally downing seven or eight are pretty small. One or two of these little guys, especially with a little espresso, and I feel like I’ve participated in the joy of holiday dessert. Plus, biscotti feel a little fancy. Fancy enough, in fact, to double as a holiday gift – wrap some up in cellophane and take as a hostess or neighbor gift, or even send home with your guests as a little party favor. Today’s recipe is flavored with dark chocolate and rosemary because they are classic winter flavors that I love together, but feel free to play with zests, spices, herbs and chocolate types to make a combo you love. Bonus points if you eat them with friends singing around the piano.

Dark Chocolate Rosemary Biscotti Start to finish: 1 hour, 15 minutes

Servings: 16 biscotti 1 cup white whole wheat flour 1/2 cup all-purpose flour 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt 1 teaspoon baking powder 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened 1/2 cup sugar 2 eggs 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 teaspoon finely-grated orange zest 2 teaspoons fresh rosemary, finely minced 1/2 cup dark chocolate chips, finely chopped 1/4 cup sliced almonds, toasted Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Combine the flours, salt and baking powder in a small bowl and set aside. In a medium bowl, cream the butter and sugar together with a hand or stand-mixer until light in color, fluffy and creamy, about 3 minutes. Add the eggs in, one at a time, mixing well after each one. Add the vanilla, zest and rosemary and mix until incorporated. Add the flour, half at a time, mixing until incorporated after each half. Use a rubber

spatula to fold in the dark chocolate and the almonds. Place the dough on a lightly-floured surface and divide into two. Shape into two logs, about 14 inches each, and place on a large baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Lightly press each log flatter, to make a rounded strip, about 15 inches long by 2½ inches wide. Remove excess flour with a clean pastry brush. Bake the logs until golden, about 20 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool 10 minutes. Meanwhile, reduce the oven temperature to 300 degrees F. Carefully transfer each flattened log to a cutting board and cut each log on the bias into 8 slices (16 slices total). Place the slices cut side down on the parchment-lined baking sheet and continue baking until the cookies are golden and crisp, about 30 more minutes. Once baked, let cool completely. Can be stored in airtight container for several days.

Nutrition information per serving: 133 calories; 59 calories from fat; 7 g fat (4 g saturated; 1 g trans fats); 35 mg cholesterol; 41 mg sodium; 18 g carbohydrate; 2 g fiber; 9 g sugar; 3 g protein.


By KATIE WORKMAN The Associated Press

“Salted” and “caramel” are two words that make many people get misty in the eyes and weak in the knees. You can buy lovely salted caramel in the stores to drizzle over ice cream, cake, pie or just your tongue, but you also can make it easily at home, and for a lot less money. Do share the wealth – what a great holiday gift this makes. There is no need for a thermometer, no special equipment, no difficult techniques. The thing to pay attention to is how fast the sugar mixture is browning. Resist the urge to wander away and clean out the vegetable bin, because the caramel will turn from pale to golden to dark to “oh no, what’s that smell?” very quickly. A lighter color will produce a more delicate caramel sauce, while a richer golden brown will produce a more pronounced caramel flavor. And have that cream warmed and ready to go – seconds make a difference. When you add the cream to the pot it will sputter and bubble quite a bit, so use a bigger pot than you think you need; it will shortly settle back down, but the last thing you want is hot car-

Salted Caramel Sauce AP photo

amel bubbling over onto your stove. Some caramel recipes call for a pastry brush to brush down the sides of the pot where the sugar is caramelizing. I think nah, not necessary. Also, it’s hard not to keep stirring the sugar melted with the water, but you have to trust in the caramelization process. Stirring makes the mixture grainy, whereas leaving it alone will let the sugar gently brown and prevent crystals from forming. Counter-

intuitive, but true.

Salted Caramel Sauce

Start to finish: 20 minutes Makes about 1½ cups, roughly 12 servings 1 cup heavy cream, warmed 1 cup sugar 1/4 cup water 1/4 cup (1/2 stick) unsalted butter, cut into small pieces

1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract 1 teaspoon kosher salt In a large, heavy saucepan, combine the sugar and water and turn the heat to medium high. Stir just until the sugar is dissolved and then stop stirring completely. Allow the mixture to come to a gentle boil. Do not stir the mixture; even if it looks a little grainy, that’s just the sugar doing its thing. Boil for 6 to 7 minutes until the mixture has turned golden brown and starts to smell like caramel; make sure it doesn’t get too dark or start to burn. When the mixture is a deep golden brown, turn the heat down to medium and stir as you slowly add the warmed cream. The mixture will bubble up vigorously (this is why you are using a large pot). Remove the pot from the heat and stir in the butter until it is melted and the mixture is smooth. Stir in the vanilla and salt. Cool the mixture to room temperature and then use right away, or transfer to a glass jar or two with a tight seal. Store in the refrigerator for up to one month.

Nutrition information per serving: 178 calories; 134 calories from fat; 15 g fat (9 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 51 mg cholesterol; 172 mg sodium; 13 g carbohydrate; 0 g fiber; 13 g sugar; 1 g protein.

EVERY SUCCESS STORY HAS A BEGINNING START YOURS AT MCC MCC was recently selected as a 2016 Bellwether Award finalist and was named among Aspen Institute’s top 150 community colleges in the nation. Meet our instructors; learn more about MCC’s degree programs; and explore industry-specific earning potential, job outlook, and more at www.mchenry.edu/futurestudents. In addition to Associate in Arts, Fine Arts, Science, and Engineering Science degrees, MCC offers more than 25 Associate in Applied Science (AAS) degrees and close to 60 professional certificates. MCC still has spring scholarships available! Visit www.mchenry.edu/scholarships.

www.mchenry.edu

Full-time student, part-time pet sitter, future Veterinarian

| Taste | Wednesday, November 30, 2016 • NWHerald.com

Salted Caramel Sauce the winter topping everyone needs 5


By ELIZABETH KARMEL The Associated Press

My sister sent me a text about a green spread that said, “you have to make this ... love it on sandwiches, crackers, eggs, etc.” And she was right – this green spread is a sandwich genie. It also is a great way to get a few more vegetables in your diet. Better yet, it’s made with ingredients you almost always have in the pantry. The “Green Genie” spread, as my sister and I refer to it, is a garlicky puréed artichoke spread colored with curly green parsley that gives it a fresh, clean flavor rich with garlic, lemon zest, pistachios and good olive oil. It is neutral enough to go with most of your sandwich fillings and enhance their flavor. It also is a great topping for crackers, and if you keep it on hand, it’s an easy appetizer before dinner. Making it took a bit of maneuvering in my blender, as the vegetables had to be pushed around to blend evenly, but soon I had a bright green, aromatic spread that was thick like a dip. I tried a little on a cracker, and it made me want to have another. But it was lunchtime, so I made a sandwich

instead. I replaced my mustard and my lettuce with this spread and made a ham and Swiss cheese on rye. And I was richly rewarded with the best sandwich that I had eaten in a long time.

dried Zest and juice of a large lemon 1/3 cup best-quality extra-virgin olive oil ½ teaspoon fine-grain sea salt or more to taste White pepper to taste

Ham and Swiss on Rye with Green Genie Sandwich Spread

Put all ingredients in a blender or a food processor fitted with the “S’’ blade. Process until smooth and puréed. Depending on your blender, you may need to use a spoon to move the ingredients as you process them. Place in a non-reactive container until

Servings: 2 Start to finish: 15 minutes

2 slices rye bread 2 slices of Swiss cheese 2 slices ham Green Genie Sandwich Spread (below)

ready to use. Will keep in refrigerator for up to one week.

Ham & Swiss on rye nutrition information per serving: 278 calories; 89 calories from fat; 10 g fat (5 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 30 mg cholesterol; 784 mg sodium; 32 g carbohydrate; 4 g fiber; 4 g sugar; 15 g protein. Green Genie Spread nutrition information per serving: 112 calories; 85 calories from fat; 9 g fat (1 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 0 mg cholesterol; 174 mg sodium; 6 g carbohydrate; 2 g fiber; 1 g sugar; 2 g protein.

Mary Ann Johnson

Christmas Open House

Spread each slice of bread with the Green Genie Spread. Layer the ham and the cheese and cut sandwich in half. Enjoy at room temperature.

Thursday, December 1st • 10 am - 7 pm Saturday, December 3rd • 10am - 1pm 440 Riverside Drive, Crystal Lake

Green Genie Sandwich Spread

Original Mary Ann Johnson Greeting Cards, hand painted glassware, crockery, mugs, cookies for Santa plates, snowman signs, ornaments, girlfriend items, wedding, plates and ornaments... Everything can be personalized. Please bring a friend and come for some Holiday fun and girlfriend chit chat! Call Mary Ann for directions at 815-459-3243

Makes about 1 ¼ cups (10 servings)

1 can water-packed artichoke hearts, rinsed and drained 1/3 cup roasted pistachios or other favorite nut 3 cloves of garlic 1 cup packed curly parsley, washed and

adno=0335873

NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016

| Taste |

6 Green Genie sandwich spread transforms ham and cheese

Lakeside Arts Park at the Dole |Presents

Presenting Sponsor:

Christmas at the Dole

December 2nd j 1st Friday Art Show

‘the Listening Room’ AT THE DOLE

AT THE DOLE

5:00 - 8:00 PM j $5 Suggested Donation

Dole Gallery

Sara Risley Disturbances in the Field

j

Sage Gallery

Lake Region Watercolor Guild Watercolors of Winter View Art

j

Art Sales j Holiday Festivities

Holiday Celebration! December 2nd @ 8:00PM

‘Cool Yule’ Jazz singer Spider Saloff & pianist Tommy Muellner.

Sponsored by:

BUY TICKETS NOW @ LAKESIDEARTSPARK.ORG

December 3rd 10:00am – 4:00pm

An indoor and outdoor holiday extravaganza.

Attractions for all ages!

Ice Scu lptur es | Ic e G a m es P h o t os w i t h S a n t a | Pe ttin g Z o o H olid a y S h o p p in g Baz aar

( 2 0 + Vendors)

H olid a y P hot o Bo o th | S ’mores by McHenry Country Living

by Exemplar Financial Network

...a weekend full of winter fun!

L A K E S I D E A R T S PA R K AT THE DOLE

LakesideArtsPark.org

Lakeside Legacy Foundation, a 501(c)3 charitable organization.

401 Country Club Road, Crystal Lake, IL 60014 | 815.455.8000


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016 •

CLASSIFIED 7

For Better or For Worse

CAREGIVERS Now Hiring... Always Caring Seeking experienced caregivers to provide companionship and assistance with personal care.

LINCOLN'S CHALLENGE ACADEMY Having trouble in high school? Education *Discipline* Job Skills LCA offers a structured education program for Illinois Youth 16 to 18 www.lincolnschallenge.org

OFFICE CLERK / BOOKKEEPER Part Time 20 - 25 hours a week

Small Packaging/Crating Company has a part time position available. Quickbooks & Excel Experience. Duties would include: A/P, A/R, Payroll, Bank Reconciliations and Administrative Duties. Please email resume to: hr0421@hotmail.com

The Illinois Classified Advertising Network (ICAN) provides advertising of a national appeal. To advertise in this section, please call ICAN directly at 217-241-1700. We recommend discretion when responding. Please refer questions & comments directly to ICAN.

OVERNIGHT (STAY AWAKE) SHIFTS AVAILABLE Apply online: https://va175.ersp.biz/employment Visiting Angels is an EEO employer

Food Service

MEAT CUTTER

Full or part time. Experienced only. Apply in person at:

Butcher on the Block

4660 W. Algonquin Rd, Lake in the Hills - or - call 847-669-6679

Tool & Die Opportunities

Don't worry about rain! With our

Great Garage Sale Guarantee

you'll have great weather for your sale, or we'll run your ad again for FREE*.

Call to advertise 877-264-2527 *within 4 weeks of original sale date. Ask your representative for details.

Kenmode Tool & Engineering in Algonquin has almost 60 years of high precision metal stamping experience servicing a variety of industries. We are seeking several new members for our new Technology Center:

Die Designer (3D Solidworks Required) Tool & Die Maker CNC/Tool & Die Maker (2nd shift) Tool & Die Apprentice (5 yr program) If you are interested in any of these opportunities, please forward your resume to: rbd@kenmode.com

CNA

Up to $15.88/Hr!

We are looking for experienced and dedicated professionals to assume key full time positions on our nursing team. We offer: up to $15.88/hr; shift differentials; quarterly wage increases; vacation & holiday pay; paid time off; medical, dental, and vision; and much more! For an immediate and confidential interview, apply in person or call 815-459-7791. You may also submit your resume in confidence to CrystalPines@tutera.com

Crystal Pines

Rehab and Health Care 335 N. Illinois St. Crystal Lake, IL

RN / LPN

Immediate Openings!

FT Days/Nights/PMs

Excellent pay.

Pediatric experience.

$750 Sign On Bonus!

$1,000 additional bonus per month McHenry & Lake Co. 815-356-8400

A TV Antenna Will Save you $1000's .

PART TIME PRODUCTION/ SANITATION POSITIONS

Kikkoman Foods, Inc. is currently in search of candidates to fill 1st shift (hours vary) and 2nd shift (12:00pm-6:00pm) part-time production/sanitation positions in our Walworth,WI plant. Applicants must have a high school diploma or equivalent, a strong work ethic, an excellent attendance record and a safety-conscious attitude. Applicants must be able to lift over 50 lbs. Kikkoman Foods, Inc. is a growing company and we are offering an excellent starting wage of $13.33 per hour, along with paid holidays. Interested candidates can apply in person at:

Walworth County Job Center

400 County Rd. H • Elkhorn, WI 53121 Apply on-line at: www.kfijobs.com Or email/fax your resume to: bhertel@kikkoman.com Fax: 262-275-1475 Kikkoman Foods, Inc. is an equal opportunity employer

HANDYMAN

Anything to do with Wood

READER NOTICE:

As a service to you, our valued readers, we offer the following information. This newspaper will never knowingly accept any advertisement that is illegal or considered fraudulent. If you have questions or doubts about any ads on these pages, we advise that before responding or sending money ahead of time, you check with the local Attorney General's Consumer Fraud Line and/or the Better Business Bureau. They may have records or documented complaints that will serve to caution you about doing business with these advertisers. Also be advised that some phone numbers published in these ads may require an extra charge. In all cases of questionable value, such as promises or guaranteed income from work-at-home programs, money to loan, etc., if it sounds too good to be true, it may in fact be exactly that. Again, contact the local and/or national agency that may be able to provide you with some background on these companies. This newspaper cannot be held responsible for any negative consequences that occur as a result of you doing business with these advertisers.

JOHNSBURG ESTATE SALE 3118 River Park Drive Thursday, Friday, Saturday 9A-4P Furniture, Glassware, Household, Washer, Dryer, Antiques, Tools, & MORE!

We can Fix or Replace Doors and Windows

KANE COUNTY ANTIQUE FLEA MARKET

Kathy's Office & Home Cleaning Service

Shows March – December ~ Hundreds of Dealers

FREE ESTIMATES, Great References. 224-858-4515

525 S. Randall Rd. (Between Routes 38 & 64) St. Charles, Illinois

Licensed, Bonded, Insured. 815-355-5297 POLISH LADY Will Clean Your Home/Office

Chihuahua “Poncho”

Male, short hair, brown with black tips. Lost Thursday evening, November 17 near Pleasant St in Woodstock. 815-575-0646 or 815-575-0647 Missing cat Grey tabby, neutered male named Remley, has claws. Last seen in woods near Peet Frate, Woodstock. Chief of mouse control for The Land Conservancy on Dean Street south of Square. Call Lisa at 815-236-5765 with info.

KANE COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS

Saturday, December 3 Sunday, December 4

12pm - 5pm 7am - 4pm

★★★★★★★★★★★★★★

Admission $5 each day ~ Children Under 12 FREE Parking Free Share your flea finds: #iFounditAtKane @KCFMarket Info: 630-377-2252 www.kanecountryfleamarket.com

Northwest Herald Classified 877-264-2527 www.NWHerald.com/classified


8 CLASSIFIED • Wednesday, November 30, 2016 BRIDGE by Phillip Alder

• Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com WOODSTOCK

Snow Angels Craft Fair, Cookies & Quilts Redeemer Lutheran Church 1320 Dean St.

Sat, Dec. 3rd 8:00 am – 3:00 pm Free admission 815-338-9370

McHenry Garage Sale 3723 Pebble Creek December 2nd & 3rd 10AM-3PM Power Tools, Household & MORE!

Woodstock SAT & SUN, DEC 3 & 4 9-4 Doug Larson, a newspaper columnist and editor, wrote, “What some people mistake for the high cost of living is really the cost of high living.” Today’s deal was played in a money game with the fairly high stake of 25 cents per point. What happened in three no-trump after West led his fourth-highest spade? The auction was straightforward. Yes, North would have preferred a fourth heart for his takeout double, but his hand was too strong to pass. Then South’s advance of three notrump promised 13-15 points with spades well held. When the dummy came down, declarer saw 26 points between his hand and the dummy’s. Maybe East had a jack or two, but West had to have the three missing aces. South made the normal-looking play of running the opening lead around to his holding, taking East’s eight with his 10. He then led a low diamond, but West won with his ace, cashed the spade ace and continued with the spade jack. Declarer took eight tricks (two spades, three diamonds and three clubs), but as soon as he tried to establish a heart winner, West won that trick and cashed his spades. Down one cost $25. North was not amused. He had noticed that if South had played second hand high, winning the first trick with dummy’s spade king, the contract would have made. Declarer would then play a diamond to his queen. West wins with his ace, but cannot continue spades without conceding two more tricks in the suit. Whatever he does, South has time to drive out the heart ace to claim plus 600 and $150.

Sofa sleeper & recliner loveseat, white BR set, 7 pc. dinette, stools, TV stands, entertainment center, 42” TV, 3 pc. desk, poker table, bar signs & man cave stuff, electronics, lots of musical items, digital piano, miter saw, ladder, workbench & cabinet, Christmas trees & many decos, life size Halloween figures, games, porcelain dolls, household items and a whole lot more!

Couch/Hide-A-Bed – 75in Long, Light Blue, Good Cond! Can Send Pics! Will Deliver! Call For Details. $125 847-274-7556 Reconditioned Appliances Sales and Service Lakemoor 815-385-1872 New Oak Quilt Rack – 4ft, New Oak Mantle – 76in, 2 Wood Book Cases – 41inH x 25inW. 815-759-9948 Bell systems telephone booth

WAHL APPLIANCE

3 sides wood, bifold glass panel door, great conversation piece $325/obo 815-701-2076

Sports Cards - 20,0000

Baseball, Football, Basketball, $225/obo. Great Holiday Gift! 815-338-4829 Wind Ridge Memorial Park, Cary – 1 Plot, W/ Package. $2,000. 231-227-1130

Home Gym - Weider

With several stations for arm, triceps, biceps, legs and calves. 170 lb total weight, $150. 847-639-8928 NEW BALANCE ELLIPTICAL 8.0e elliptical trainer, gently used and always covered. Great Christmas Gift. $125. 815-943-7664

Great Bargains for Christmas - No Junk! Electric Fireplace - 42in x 48in x 23in Advertise here for a successful garage sale!

Call 877-264-2527

Desk with Hutch Top

Excellent condition, you pick up. 224-703-2079 Five Solid Oak Bar Chairs – 30in High. 815-341-8998

Piano ~ Spinet

Story & Clark, works well, you pick up. 847-497-9773 Leave Message Freezer, Kenmore 15cf, upright, 20 years old, runs perfect, $75 815-477-4828 Get the job you want at NWHerald.com/jobs

Excellent Condition, Golden/Honey Oak. Use W/Or W/O Heat, $175.

Corrected Phone # 847-313-9862

Firewood - Mix Cord/Maple, Ash & Oak

BEDSPREADS - NEW

Sage green King bedspread, NEVER used, nice stitching, medium weight, $110. Ivory Queen bedspread, NEVER used, nice stitching, medium weight, $100. Call Laura 224-858-4635 or 505-860-4187 Industrial Tools, Aaladin Model FS Steam Pressure Unit, Uline Pallet Truck 5500lbs – 48x21, Uline Fork Extensions 32in, Uline Industrial Strapping Parts – Tools & Steel Strapping. 815-355-3700

Scroll Saw Patterns $2.50 each. 200 Avail. 815-385-1432

Transport Wheelchair - MedLine

New In Box, 19in Wide, Weighs 15lbs. Holds up to 300lbs max, cost over $200, sell for $100. 815-701-7369

55 Gal Fish Tank, Complete W/ Fish. You Break Down. $60. 815-385-1432

Blankets - Medical

74”x100”, very warm, brand new. Cost $35, sell $10/ea. 815-701-7369

MIXER

Regular Cord/Oak, Cherry & Birch. 815-943-6960

Stand Mix List, 5 quart, black, brand new, still in box, $200. 815-382-8712

3 Piece BR Set – Dresser & Nightstands, Dark wood,Good Cond! Will Deliver! $245 Call 847-274-7556 Couch – Loveseat – Chair. Cream W/ Pastels. $180 847-533-4812

Phillips 3 CD – AM/FM Radio, CD, Turner, Tape, AUX. Remote Control. 2 Ext. Separate Speakers. Exc Cond! $100 815-575-2495 Sears Kenmore Deep Freeze – 13.2cft, 2.5 Years Old, $200. 224-225-6048

Follow the Northwest Herald on Twitter. McHenry County area breaking news, entertainment news, feature stories and more! @NWHerald

www.helpingpaws.net 815-338-4400


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016 • FREE TO A GOOD HOME 10 m/o German Shep. Mix. Male, Neutered, Vaccinated. Call David @ 773-405-9408

★★ GUN SHOW ★★ December 2, 3 & 4

Jefferson County Fairgrounds - Jefferson, WI FRIDAY, 3PM - 8:30PM SATURDAY, 9AM - 5PM SUNDAY, 9AM - 3PM

Geece - Pair, White

Were hatched in April, $40/pair. Also some Black East Indie Ducks, hatched in March, $8/ea. 815-719-1503

KITTENS ~ FREE

CLASSIFIED 9

OVER 200 TABLES!

ALL COLLECTIONS, AUTOGRAPHS, MUSIC

6 weeks old, black and gray Tabby, Litter OLD INVENTORY CASH 815-354-6169 trained. Antique and Modern Guns 815-355-0901 Old Lever Actions, Winchesters, Marlins, Savages, etc. Old Pistols and Revolvers. Cash for Collection. FFL License. 815-338-4731

Buying Old & Unusual Toys, Antiques Comics Records, RR Items, Meadowdale Raceway Memorabilia. 815-351-4387

Lionel & American Flyer Trains 815-353-7668

WANTED TO BUY: Vintage or New, working or not.

★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

CLASSICS WANTED

Restored or Unrestored Cars & Vintage Motorcycles Domestic / Import Cars: Mercedes, Porsche, Corvette, Ferrari's, Jaguars, Muscle Cars, Mustang & Mopars, $$ Top $$ all makes, Etc.

With storage, laundry and parking, $875/mo. 847-401-3242

CRYSTAL TERRACE APARTMENTS

Crystal Terrace Apts. Located in Crystal Lake, Illinois, has reopened its waiting list for (1) & (2) bedroom Section 8 apartments. Accepting names of interested persons commencing 12/01/2016 from 9AM to 5PM. First 150 applicants for the 1 BR & 150 applicants for the 2BR units. Interested persons MUST CALL (815) 338-5151. No Walk Ins Accepted.

★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

A-1 AUTO

Fox River Grove 2 Bedroom, Close to Metra $725/mo, call for Move in Specials!

815-236-4051 or 815-923-2521 Fox River Grove 2 Bedroom, Newly Remodeled No pets/smkg, $850/mo + sec. 224-358-6114

Antiques, Video Games, Outboard motors, Fishing Gear, Motorcycles or Mopeds, Chainsaws, Tools etc. Cash on the spot. Cell: 815-322-6383

CAR, TRUCK, SUV

MOST CASH

WILL BEAT ANY QUOTE GIVEN!!

www.helpingpaws.net 815-338-4400

$400 - $2000

“don't wait....call 2day”!!

Powered by:

2000 Plymouth Grand Voyager 3L, V6, 162K

Runs Great, 2 Roof Vent Fans, $850. 847-658-8883

1996 Ford Ranger XLT, Asking $1200/obo 815-814-5743

815-575-5153

Harvard Lrg Studio $640, 1BR $750, Frplc

W/D, C/A, Fish/Swim, Pets OK. 815-648-2716 Harvard - Beautiful Lower 1BR, Incl Partial Heat and garbage, SEC DEP, no pets, as Low as $625/mo. 847-899-5463

★★ ★★ ★★★ ★★ ★★

I BUY CARS, TRUCKS, VANS & SUVs 1990 & Newer

Will beat anyone's price by $300. Will pay extra for Honda, Toyota & Nissan.

815-814-1964

www.helpingpaws.net 815-338-4400

Dinner for 24 People

Spode, pattern, “Christmas Tree”. Like new, $400/firm. 847-515-8693 or 847-271-2503 Pictures increase attention to your ad! Be sure to include a photo of your pet, home, auto or merchandise.

212K miles, 4WD, 8 cylinder, towing package, some rust under doors. Air, heated leather seats, On Star, etc, very well taken care of.

$3000/obo

or

847-997-6106

★★ ★★ ★★★ ★★ ★★

Studios & 1 BR's. W/D, Dishwasher, Indoor/Outdoor Pool/Gym, Pets Welcome (Restrictions Apply.)

www.HuskieWire.com

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10 CLASSIFIED • Wednesday, November 30, 2016

• Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

Village of Lakewood

LAKE IN THE HILLS - 2 BR TH $1200. New carpet, paint, appliances. 1 car gar w/ bsmt. Credit check req. 847-894-8920

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PUBLIC NOTICE

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE TWENTY- SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MC HENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS U.S. BANK TRUST, N.A. AS Publisher's Notice: All real estate advertising in this TRUSTEE FOR LSF9 MASTER newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which PARTICIPATION TRUST makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation Plaintiff, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, -v.handicap, familial status or national origin, or an HEIDI BRODIE A/K/A HEIDI R. intention, to make any such preference, limitation of BRODIE, et al discrimination." Familial status includes children under Defendant the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, 15 CH 478 pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in opportunity basis. the above cause on October 6, To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275 2016, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 1:00 PM on December 27, 2016, at the NLT Title L.L.C, 390 Congress Parkway, Suite D, Crystal Lake, IL, 60014, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the It works. following described real estate: Commonly known as Call today to place your ad 1010 PERRY DR, ALGONQUIN, IL 60102 877-264-2527

incl all util and high speed DSL, $350/mo.

Northwest Herald Classified

815-790-0240

, Property Index No. 19-35-155-010. The real estate is improved with a gray, vinyl siding, two unit home, one car attached garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any represen-

any pr tation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in \"AS IS\" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701 (C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver's license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. McCalla Raymer Pierce, LLC, Plaintiff's Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number 253084. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. McCalla Raymer Pierce, LLC One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 E-Mail: pleadings@pierceservices.com Attorney File No. 253084 Case Number: 15 CH 478 TJSC#: 36-13046 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I708206 (Published in the Northwest Herald, November 23, 30, 2016 December 7, 2016)

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 22ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MC HENRY COUNTY, WOODSTOCK, ILLINOIS WELLS FARGO BANK NA; Plaintiff, vs. RICHARD J. FLYNN JR. AKA RICHARD JOSEPH FLYNN JR. AKA RICHARD FLYNN JR.; JESSICA K. FLYNN AKA JESSICA ROBYN KYRK AKA JESSICA R. KYRK AKA JESSICA FLYNN; SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN

DEVELOPMENT; WORLD BUSINESS LLC; UNKNOWN LENDERS, OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS; Defendants, 16 CH 434 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Thursday, January 5, 2017, at the hour of 10:30 a.m. in the conference room, 970 McHenry Avenue, Crystal Lake, Illinois 60014, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described mortgaged real estate: Commonly known as 824 Oceola Drive, Algonquin, Illinois 60102. P.I.N. 19-34-357-025. The improvement on the property consists of a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. For information call The Sales Department at Plaintiff's Attorney, Anselmo Lindberg Oliver LLC, 1771 West Diehl Road, Naperville, Illinois 60563-1890. (630) 453-6960. For Bidding instructions visit www.fal-illinois.com 24 hours prior to sale. F16050056 I708844 (Published in the Northwest Herald, November 30, 2016 December 7, 14, 2016)

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 22ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MC HENRY COUNTY, WOODSTOCK, ILLINOIS DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE FOR ARGENT SECURITIES INC., ASSET BACKED PASS THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-W4; Plaintiff, vs. THERESA GROSCH; DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR ARGENT SECURITIES INC ASSET BACKED PASS THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-W4, UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED NOVEMBER 1, 2005; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF THERESA GROSCH, IF ANY; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS; Defendants, 16 CH 435 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Thursday, January 5, 2017, at the hour of 10:30 a.m. in the conference room, 970 McHenry Avenue, Crystal Lake, Illinois 60014, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described mortgaged real estate: Commonly known as 1113 Bonita Lane, McHenry, IL 60050. P.I.N. 14-11-203-017-0000. The improvement on the property consists of a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section

by (g ) 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. For information call sales department at Plaintiff's Attorney, The Wirbicki Law Group, 33 West Monroe Street, Chicago, Illinois (312) 360-9455. 60603. WA16-0349 I708845

PLATS, PAGES 56 AND 57, INB MCHENRY COUNTY, ILLINIOS. 6818 HIAWATHA DRIVE, WONDER ALKE, ILLINOIS 60097 09-08-151-044 NOW, THEREFORE, you are further notified to file your appearance in the Office of the Clerk of the Court above stated on or before 12/20/2016, and if you fail to do so or do not otherwise make your appearance on or before said date, this cause may be heard and judgment entered as prayed for in said Complaint without further notice. (Published in the Northwest IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I have Herald, November 30, 2016 hereunto set my hand and affixed December 7, 14, 2016) the seal of said Court at my office in Woodstock, Illinois, this day of 11/08/2016, 2016.

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 22ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MCHENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS HOME STATE BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. 3rd STREET LLC; INDIAN RIDGE IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION, INC; PAUL FALLAW; any other HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN OWNERS and NONRECORD LIEN CLAIMANTS, Defendants. No. 16CH000907 PUBLICATION NOTICE The requisite Affidavit having been duly filed herein, NOTICE IS HEREIN GIVEN YOU, 3rd STREET LLC; INDIAN RIDGE IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION, INC; PAUL FALLAW; any other HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN OWNERS and NON-RECORD LIEN CLAIMANTS, Defendants in the above-entitled action, that an action is now pending in this Court as shown above, wherein the Plaintiff seeks to foreclose a mortgage made to HOME STATE BANK, N.A., with respect to the following described real estate: Count I: LOT 35 AND THE EAST 8.75 FEET OF LOT 34 IN BLOCK 33 IN INDIAN RIDGE UNIT NO. 2 A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF SECTIONS 7 AND 8, TOWNSHIP 45 NORTH, RANGE 8, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED APRIL 13, 1940 AS DOCUMENT NO. 145768 IN BOOK 9 OF PLATS, PAGES 56 AND 57, IN MCHENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 6814 HIAWATHA DRIVE, WONDER LAKE, ILLINOIS 60097 09-08-151-046 Count II: THE EAST HALF OF LOT 33 AND LOT 34 (EXECPT THE EAST 8.75 FEET) IN BLOCK 33 IN INIDAN RIDGE UNIT NO. 2, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF SECTIONS 7 AND 8, TOWNSHIP 45 NORTH, RANGE 8 EAST OF the THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED APRIL 13, 1940 AS DOCUMENT NO. 145768 IN BOOK 9 OF PLATS, PAGE 56 IN MCHENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 6816 HIAWATHA DRIVE, WONDER LAKE, ILLINOIS 60097 09-08-151-045 Count III: LOT 32 (EXCEPT THE WEST 8.75 FEET THEREOF) AND THE WEST HALF OF LOT 33 IN BLOCK 33 IN INDIAN RIDGE UNIT NO. 2, A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF SECTION 7 AND 8, TOWNSHIP 45 NORTH, RANGE 8, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED APRIL 13, 1940 AS DOCUMENT NO. 145768, IN BOOK 9 OF

/s/Katherine M Keefe Clerk of the Circuit Court McHenry County, Illinois FRANKS, GERKIN & McKENNA, P.C. Our File No. 15168.130 Attorney for Plaintiffs 19333 E. Grant Hwy. PO Box 5 Marengo, IL 60152 (815) 923-2107 (Published in the Northwest Herald on November 16, 23, 30, 2016) 1243713

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NWHerald.com /myphotos Upload photos of your family and friends with our online photo album. Share your sports team, birthday party, big catch, pets, or vacation!

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877-264-2527

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Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016 •

CLASSIFIED 11

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JOBS ANNOUNCEMENTS STUFF VEHICLES REAL ESTATE SERVICES LEGALS Northwest Herald Classified and online at: NWHerald.com

NOTICE PUBLICATION POLICIES This publication reserves the right to edit or reject any ads without comment. This publication is careful to review all advertising but the burden of truthful content belongs to the advertiser. We use standard abbreviations and we reserve the right to properly classify your ad. All ads are subject to credit approval. We reserve the right to require prepayment. We accept cash, check, Visa, Mastercard, Discover & American Express. CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad the first day it is published. If you see an error, call us immediately and it will be corrected for the next available publication date. Our liability is for only one publication date and shall not exceed the total cost of the first day of publication.


12 CLASSIFIED • Wednesday, November 30, 2016

• Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

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Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016 •

CLASSIFIED 13

ANNUAL STATEMENT OF AFFAIRS SUMMARY FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 2016 The summary must be published in the local newspaper. Copies of the detailed Annual Statement of Affairs for the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2016 will be available for public inspection in the school district/joint agreement administrative office by December 1, 2016. Individuals wanting to review this Annual Statement of Affairs should contact: Johnsburg CUSD #12 2222 W. Church Street, Johnsburg, IL 60051 (815) 385-6916 7:30am - 4:00pm School District/Joint Agreement Name Address Telephone Office Hours Also by January 15, 2017 the detailed Annual Statement of Affairs for the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2016, will be posted on the Illinois State Board of Education's website@ www.isbe.net. SUMMARY: The following is the Annual Statement of Affairs Summary that is required to be published by the school district/joint agreement for the past fiscal year. Statement of Operations as of June 30, 2016 Educational

Operations & Maintenance

Debt Services

Transportation

Municipal Retirement/ Social Security

3,059,030

1,552,082

863,917

0

0

Local Sources

1000

14,435,457

2,381,346

Flow-Through Receipts/Revenues from One District to Another District

2000

0

0

State Sources

3000

3,365,117

0

0

607,045

Federal Sources

4000

1,211,432

0

0

0

19,012,006

2,381,346

3,059,030

2,159,127

Total Direct Receipts/Revenues Total Direct Disbursements/Expenditures Other Sources/Uses of Funds

Capital Projects

Working Cash

Tort

Fire Prevention & Safety

91,041

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

863,917

94,041

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

19,591,945

1,959,654

3,374,301

1,123,097

798,105

25,549,668

922,807

-321,169

398,362

-1,000,000

0

0

Beginning Fund Balances - July 1, 2015

-4,389,593

-743,943

1,332,833

355,218

318,473

38,836,672

4,133,805

0

0

Other Changes in Fund Balances

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Ending Fund Balances June 30, 2016

-4,046,725

-643,420

1,415,924

391,248

384,285

13,381,045

4,133,805

0

0

GROSS PAYMENT FOR CERTIFICATED PERSONNEL SALARY RANGE: LESS THAN $25,000: ALEXANDER, NANCY J; ALSOT, LAUREN; AMES, LINDA; BAUER, CHRISTINE J; BENNETT, BETTY A; BERWICK, KELLEY; BJORGE, JACKIE G; BLOUNT, KATHLEEN; BORGHARDT, AMY L; BRANTLEY, KATIE A; BULTMAN, MARGARET H; CEBRZYNSKI, STAN G; CHILDRESS, SUE; CHRISTENSEN, CARRIE; CHRISTENSEN, MICHELE S; CZARNY, TRACY E; DAHLBERG, LEON K; DOHRN, HANNAH K; ERNST, ANDREW M; FELD, ANGELA G; FISCHER, COURTNEY J; FLYNN, COLLEEN C; FODOR, NANCY E.; GERMANN, DEVON A; GREEN, SAMANTHA M; GRZECA, BRITTANY; HALLETT, ELISE C; HAMMOND, DANIEL S; HAZE, JEANNIE L; HUEMANN, LAURA E; JOHNSON, ARIS D; KAMMER, ANNE M; KARTHEISER, MAKA; KENT, JUDITH; KNIGHT, DEANNA ADAIR NICOLE; LEMAN, AMY; LETTNER, JESSICA; LEVINSON, SHARON L.; LOPEZ, RYAN M; MALONEY, MICHAEL J; MARTIN, HOLLY L; MARTIN, SUZY J; MCBAIN, DIANE E; MOSS, CHERYL L; MURRIN, VERONIKA; NEISS, CATHY; NIMOCKS, DIANE; OLSON, TERESA; PEGUES, PAMELA; PEPPMEYER, ABIGAIL C; PIKER, MARY A; POKUTA, SUSAN H; RIZZO, SAMANTHA F; SARFF, JOHN; SCOTT, KARLEY; SHEA, TERRI; SHEPHERD, CATHERINE E; SHORE, THERESA C; SINCORA, CRAIG; SMITH, COURTNEY L; SOTELO, LUPITA; STADE, STEPHANIE; STARK, KIRSTEN M; STEWART, DAWN M; STEWART, TIMOTHY; SZALOWSKI, ADAM E; VANNOY, RICHARD A; WEBER, JENNIFER L; WEISS, LAUREN C; WENDER, CAITLIN O; WILLEMS, KARISSA E; WULF, ASHLEY SALARY RANGE: $25,000 - $39,999: BARGER-ANCOG, TRACIE L; BRAUN, ABBEY; BUSHALA, CHRISTINA C; CHAMPION, JOHN W; CLAVER, MICHAEL S; DAVIES, DANIELLE C; DEBOEUF, DANIEL J; ELIA, DANA M; HUNT, AMANDA; MARSCHMAN, PATRICIA E; MCCANN, SHELBY; SEYMOUR, CARRIE; SMIRZ, AMANDA M; SMITH, BRETT A; THOMPSON, ALLISON M; VON OBSTFELDER, KELLY E; WHEELER, JENNIFER L SALARY RANGE: $40,000 - $59,999: AKERS, ELIZABETH; ARVANITIS, KATHERINE; ASCHBACHER, CHRISTINE J; BARDELL, JENNIFER M; BESHEL, JENNIFER MARIE; BODAM, GINA E; BREZAK, JOHN Z; CHRISMAN, EMILY K; DAVIS, RAVEN G; DUFFY, KEVIN; EASTLAND, ROBERT L; FEELY, SUSAN C; FLANNIGAN, DEANNE R; FLAXMAN, JEFFREY L; GRISAMORE, JOE F; HADDEN, JAKE R; HARBECKE, KOLIN K; JOHNSON, JESSICA T; KEGEL, SHERRY S; KINZLE, JESSICA J; KOLBA, MELISSA M; KRUEGER, GRETA L; KRUEGER, JUDY A; LAUDADIO, CHRISTINE M; LAWNICZAK, MICHELLE S;

LESNIAK, SAM H; MORRIS, MICHAEL D; MRAZEK, LYNN N; MURPHY, JON; MYATT, JAMI N; MYERS, JANET N; NELSON, MICHELLE D; PETERSON, AARON N; PONITZ, CARRIE D; PREJNA, NICOLE; REINHARD, KIMBERLIN B; REIS, MOLLY A; RIMMER, DIANE E; SCHAEFER, DEBRA A; SKVARCE, CARLY L; SLAVICEK, DANIEL; SOMMERFIELD, MICHAEL C; SOTKA, STEFANIE J; STRZALKA, LISA A; TAUBERY, LAURA S; TERSELIC, CARMEN E; THOMAS, NATHANIEL A; TOOMEY, JAMES M; VENT, DAWN M; WALUSIAK, SUSAN R; WICINSKI, KELLY C; WIDOMSKA, ILONA; WORK, SARA E SALARY RANGE: 60,000 - $89,999: AULT, KIMBERLY A; BELCASTRO, BRIDGET E; BENNETT, WAYNE E; BESHEL, BARRY THOMAS; BIVIN, TERESA C; BRONARS, ADAM M; CANEVELLO, KATHLEEN M; DAVIS-WEAVER, KERI; DIEDRICH, DEBRA; DOHRMANN, ERIC D; DOHRN, LAURIE; DORMAN, JEAN; ELBERT, ANDREW J; ENGELBRECHT, TERIE R; FABER, JERI; FREY, BRADLEY C; GERLACH, NICOLE L; GUETZLOFF, CYNTHIA; HAURUM, THOMAS G; HEINZ, DAWN D; HESEMANN, SARA J; HILLER, ERIN K; HUEMANN, BRENDA; HUFF, PAMELA S; JOHNSON, KATHLEEN Y; KAUPE-ALTOBELLI, ILONA V; KEPPLE, NANCY K; KERRIGAN, ROBERT; KIRK, WENDY M; KITTERMAN, CATHERINE; LEATHERS, DEBRA; LINDE, DENISE; LOPEZ, BRENDA K; LUECK, JENNIFER A; MAJERCIK, LISA C; MASS, NICOLE M; MCCARTHY, HOPE A; MEYERS, LAURA J; MILEWSKI, FRANCES M; MITCHELL, ERIN M; MOORE, TRACY L; MORSE, STEPHANIE S; MULVANEY, ANGELA; MYERS, SUZANNE; NORMAN, JEFFREY M; O’BRIEN, FRANCES; O’NIEL, CHRISTOPHER D; OEFFLING, MEGAN E; ORT, KATHERINE A; REGNER, LISA A; REINHARD, ANDREW; REITH, ANN FARISH; REITZ, SUSAN L; RINGLE, JODI A; RODGERS, JOHN M; ROLLIE, WENDY M; SABATKA, KATHLEEN; SAMPLE, PAUL; SAMPLE, SUE; SANDS, MARTIN C; SCHRADER JR, RONALD D; SETZLER, CHRISTOPHER; SEYDEL, BETH H; SIUDAK, JENNIFER E; SMERECKY, MARY; SZRAMEK, THERESA J; TORRES, MELISSA A; TRIONE, CHERYL; UTHE, JAMES E; WEINGER, KATHRYN L; WILSON, ELIZABETH E; WILTSE, ROBERTA A; WINN, BRADLEY A; WOLF, SANDRA K SALARY RANGE: $90,000 AND OVER: BEERNINK, JOYCE; BETKE, KATHLEEN J; FROEMING, LYNN; GAVIN, JUDY LYNN; HANRAHAN, PAUL; HINLEY, KIMBERLY A; HURCKES, NANCY J; JACOBS, LORA; JOHNSON, DANIEL T; OPON, BRIAN; PITZEN, CYNTHIA; RICHARDSON, CAROL; ROSS, THOMAS P; SCHISLER, RICHARD L; SHELTON, KEVIN P; SIMON, SUZETTE; STONE, MARY ALICE; ZIMMERMAN, LARRY G

GROSS PAYMENT FOR NON-CERTIFICATED PERSONNEL SALARY RANE LESS THAN $25,000: ADAMS, KASEY; DOMANICO, KAREN I; HUEMANN, LISA; MURPHY, CHRISTOPHER M; MYERS, DENNIS; ADLER, JACQUELINE L; DYAL, HOLLY L; HUHN, LISA C; MYERS, GRANT; NEMETH, LEONARD J; ANSELL, BYRON JOHN; ELGIN, CHRISTOPHER M; IANDOLA, ZANDRA; NETHAWAY, KAREN L; NISSEN, KANDIS; ARCHER, GREGG D; ELLICSON, SHARON A; JAHNKE, TERESE A; NOONAN, KIMBERLY A; NUGENT, CHRISTIAN; ARDITO, CASEY L; ERK, DAVID MICHAEL; JAKUS, DONNA; NUSSER GOVEKAR, CYNTHIA; NUSSER, ELIZABETH G; ARMBRUST, COLLEEN E; ERK, JOSEPH S; JANSEN, DONNA J; NYGAARD, JAMES R; OLENICK, LORIANN F; AXELSSON, ERIK; ESP, STEPHEN; JANSEN, KURT T; PABST, SHERRY L; PARRA, SONIA A; AYLWARD, NATALIE; EWERT, WILLIAM R; JAYKO, KATHLEEN M; PETER, TERI M; PETTY, KRISTI R; BAILEY, RICHARD; FABER, KYLE; JUNKUNC, VEL; PLUM, TREVA; POCKLINGTON, CHRISTINE K; BARNETTE, JACQUELINE E; FARLEY, MONICA; JUSKE, THEODORE L; PYLES, JAMIE M; QUINLAN, LANEY M; BECKER, DAWN M; FARRELL, MARY JO; JUSTEN, KATHLEEN A; RADTKE, JEFFREY; RAYCRAFT, JACQUELINE S; BEELART, DEBBIE L; FARRELL, WILBUR W; KADERA, TAMARA F; REINHARD, LARRY; RIDLEY, JOHN; BEGLEY, ANGELA; FISCHER, DEBORAH A; KEBR, SHERI L; RIECHERS, MARGARET M; RODRIGUEZ, EZEQUIEL; BELL, ARLENE R; FISHER, MARGARITE J; KELLER, LISA C; ROMANELLI, HALLIE A; ROOS, KATHLEEN E; BELL, DAVE; FISHER, NICHOLAS A; KIRK, NATHANIEL H; RUNG, RACHEL; SAVICKAS, CHERIE; BELL, JANE L; FITCH, MATTHEW D; KOCZERSUT, MATTHEW; SCHAEFER, KIMBERLY M; SCHINKOWSKY, CAROLYN M; BENTZ, DONALD; FLYNN, SEAN; KONECNY, CORRIE; SCHMIDT, DEBRA L; SCHMITT, JENNIFER; BIELSKI, JACOB; FOX, MARY JO; KRENNRICH, SUZANNE E; SCHROEDER, TREVOR; SCHULTZ, KATELYN JOY; BIGELOW, EAN; FREUND, CHERISE; KUREK, KELLY J; SCHULTZ, RENEE J; SCIANNA, JENNIFER L; BLANEY, CHERYL A; FUNARI, KELLIE K; KURTZ, BRENDA A; SCOTT, DEBBIE G; SEEBERGER, APRIL; BLEA, KAREN; GERASCO, FONZIE R; KUTINAC, BRIAN C; SHELTON, MICHAEL; SHERMAN, KRISTIN A; BOETTIN, JOANNE; GIOIA, KIMBERLY R; LARSON, MICHELE; SIMON, SCOTT B; SKOWRON, JOHN; BOTTLEMY, LAURIE F; GIOVANNI, SHAE M; LAYTON, KELLEY; SMEIGH, JAMIE K; SMID, LAURA L; BRENNAN, CARSON; GRANT, BRIAN; LEARY, MARJORIE; SMITH, DAWNE R; SMITH, JOANNE Z; BRUST, CINDY L; GRAVEL III, RAOUL J; LENCKUS, TIMOTHY; SMITH, JULIE; SMOODY, TAMELA D; BUCK III, ELBURN; GREEN, ANGELICA; LEONARDI, CHERYL A; ST. ANDRE, LAUREN; ST. ANDRE, ROBERT; BUERER, CODY D; GREEN, BOBBIE LYNN; LETCHINGER, JOELLEN; STADE, LAURIE A; STANEK, AMANDA LYNN; BUERER, KAREN K; GRIZELY, ZACHARY J; LIEBICH, LAUREN; STEVENS, JANE E; STOCHL, SEAN; BULLAMORE, JULIE; GROBARCIK, LAURA B; LISTON, ERIN;

STROTE, KENNETH W; SULLIVAN-SCHROYER, PATRICIA; CALLAHAN, PATRICK F; HARBECKE, BRUCE; LORENTZ, DAWN L; SWANSON, SPENCER; SZAREK, LISA; CALMEYER, LINDA M; HARRIS, KATHLEEN M; LOZANO, CADE PARKER; SZEKERES, GAGE A; THATCHER, SHARI A; CAMPBELL, EVERET; HARRISON, TIMOTHY; LUTTRELL, NICHOLAS J; THOREN, REBECCA L; TOALSON, WILLIAM; CAPPS, JESSE; HART, DALLYS N; MAKOWSKI, STANLEY; TOUSSAINT, ERIC H; TOUSSAINT, MICHAEL D; CARTMILL, BRIANNA S; HEELEIN, SARA R; MALOUF, CHRISTIAN A; TROJAN, ERIKA N; TURNER, JENNIFER M; CAVANAUGH, PATRICIA K; HELFAND, SUZANNE; MALUEG, MICHELLE M; VANDERSTAPPEN, AUSTIN J; VELOZ, SUSAN M; CEDERGREN, ANN MARIE; HENNING, RUSSELL C; MARSALA, THOMAS MICHAEL; VENDEGNA, GLORIA E; VOLPENDESTA, NANCY A; CICHON, EDWARD J; HESS, HENRY; MARSHALL, MARTI; VOSS, STEPHANIE Y; WALKER, COLIN; CLEMENTS, JOHNNA; HILLER, ANDREW; MARTINO, SUSAN K; WALLAERT, PHYLLIS; WALTERS, CATHY J; COOK, ALYSSA M; HILLER, CHRISTINE; MCCAFFERTY, GRACE; WARNKE, TYLER; WEBSTER, JORDAN A; CROOK, GIGI; HOPP, MIRANDA; MEINECKE, RANDY; WHITE, JOSEPH R; WHITMORE, PAMELA; CUMMINGS, DAWN C; HOPP, VIRGINIA; MILLER, KYLER K; WILSON, MARK; WINDGASSEN, LAURA J; DEAN, PAMELA; HORCHER, RYAN J; MOORE, DAMION; WITKOWSKI, DANITA H; WIZCEB, CADE; DECARLO, THOMAS M; HOTH, MELLISSA; MORRIS, CHRISTINE L; WOSELOWSKY, WILLIAM MICHAEL; WOZNICKI, PHILIP J; DICKEY, TAMMY J; HOUGHTON, DALE A; MORRIS, JAMEE L; YOUNGLOVE, GERALD A; YOUNG, JULIA; DIEDRICH, MADELYN; HUDSON, HEATHER; MURPHY, ANNA M; ZAKROCKY, KATHLEEN; ZAKRZEWSKI, ANNA ROSE K; DOHERTY, SARA; HUEMANN, ANTHONY; MURPHY, CAROL J; ZAWACKI, ROGER; SALARY RANGE $25,000 - $39,999: AMBROSE, DANIEL H; BESSERT, MICHAEL E; CHAMBERS, TRACY K; DUPLAIN, ELIZABETH M; FRANTZ, DIANE E; FUNARI, KAREN J; GRASZER, TERI; HASS, LAURA; HAZE, DIANE; HITCHCOCK, JULIANNE; KOEHL, HENRY S; KORMANAK, NICK F; LEWIS, SHARI; MATHEWS, BLYTHE; MILLER, ROBIN; O’BRIEN, SUZANN M; PETERS, MARGO R; PIQUETTE, KIMBERLY; RAYNER, ROSE K; SARGENT, JULIE; SAYLOR, SANDRA M; SCHMIDT, JAMES E; SEEBERGER, JACQUELINE J; SMITH, LYNNE F; STROHFELDT, RUTH A; WILLIAMS, DANIEL P; WILLIAMS, MICHAEL D; WIZCEB, CHRISTINA; WOLFF, KIM E; ZIEBEL, CHRISTINE LT SALARY RANGE $40,000 - $59,999: BURKE, TERRY; DUDLEY, SUSAN; FISCHER, DEBRA J; GLOMP, LESLEE L; HAHN, JANE F; KUCHARZ, SCOTT T; PIERCE, ROBBIN; SALLAZ, GREGORY J; SEGER, BETH; SEMRICH, ROBERT J; TEMPLE, PENNY; WEAVER, THOMAS B; WOLK, ANNA M SALARY RANGE $60,000 AND OVER: MCKENNA, DAVE T; RICHTER, GLENN R; SCHWARTZ, THOMAS E; VAN VALZAH, ELLYN

SM-CL0416815


14 CLASSIFIED • Wednesday, November 30, 2016 PAYMENTS OVER $2,500, EXCLUDING WAGES AND SALARIES 12five Capital FBO Safe Haven School $22,516.98 A To Z Rental Center $3,522.30 A.J.Gallagher Risk Management $13,250.00 Advanced Fire Protection & Safety, Inc $6,053.00 Aflac $8,176.08 Alexander Leigh Center For Autism $130,137.19 Alexian Brothers Behavioral Health Hosp. $6,720.00 All American Sports Camps, Inc $6,075.00 All Doors N More $3,434.00 All Midwest Volleyball $4,550.00 Allendale West $24,342.09 Alliance Group Inc. $2,907.75 Alpha Baking Company, Inc. $7,913.59 Amalgamated Bank Of Chicago $2,837,853.75 American Fund Sol Llc $127,220.00 Ameriprise Financial $10,900.00 Annuity Premium Reserve Account $9,600.00 Ap Exams $11,409.00 Apple Computer, Inc. $19,088.58 Aspire Financial Services $6,250.00 Assured Healthcare Staffing $7,338.83 At & T $17,093.74 Auto-Jet Muffler Corp. $3,352.45 Automotive Lift Service & Equipment Co. $10,455.00 Avalon Petroleum Company $84,790.60 Axa Equitable $161,746.72 Behm Enterprises, Inc. $5,500.00 Blinking Tower $20,484.11 Blue Tarp Financial $3,008.19 Bob Rogers Travel $38,926.00 Bradfield’s Computer Supply $47,267.00 Braun, Abbey $2,687.33 Bsn Corportation $6,658.54 Btu Consultants $3,140.00 Bureau Of Education & Research $5,419.00 Cabay & Company, Inc $104,245.58 Cdw Government, Inc. $142,695.42 Centegra Occupational Health $8,414.00 Centegra Worksite Wellness $19,500.00 Center for the Collaborative Classroom $5,027.40 Centerpoint Energy Services, Inc. $110,487.17 Central Illinois Trucks, Inc. $6,175.00 City Of McHenry $5,400.00 Clic $314,990.00 College Of Lake County- JLC $3,977.00 Collins Sports Medicine $2,844.71 Comcast $7,487.10 Comcast Cable $13,167.68 Comed - New Business Dept $19,234.25 Comfort Services, Inc. $10,008.61 Community Unit School Dist. 95 $46,007.00 Complete Floor Covering $36,478.00 Concorde Banquets $13,060.34 Connection’s Academy East $57,478.06 Connection’s Day School $50,051.25 Conserv Fs $2,690.00 Consolidated School District 158 $7,441.00 Corvus Industries, LTD. $4,940.00 Cotg $43,844.00 Crescent Electric Supply Co. $3,212.64 Crystal Lake School Dist 47 $14,720.00

• Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

Dave & Buster’s Depot Tire and Auto Service Ctr Inc. Discount School Supply Dohrmann, Eric Don Johnston, Inc. Duffy, Kevin Eastbay, Inc Ecessa Corporation Eder, Casella & Co Edmentum Ehc Industries, Inc. Electude USA Engelbrecht, Terie Enlight Technical Services European Sports Excent Corportation Exxon Fleet Services Fan Cloth Products Fellers, Inc. Fidelity Tax-Exempt Ret. Ser. Flannigan, Deanne Follett School Solutions, Inc. Forecast 5 Analytics, inc. Fox River Foods Company Freelap USA Frontier Frontline Technologies Group, LLC Gaggle.Net, Inc. Garaventa, Usa Inc Get Fresh Produce Inc. Geweke, Brandon Gillespie Design Group Glenbrook High School District 225 Gopher Sport Grand Piano Haus, LLC Graphic 14 Inc Graphic Edge Great Lakes Credit Union Great Minds Hadden, Jake Handwriting Without Tears Heinemann Hinshaw & Culbertson Home Depot Credit Services Horace Mann Insurance Company HR Imaging Partners Inc Huemann Water Conditioning Huff, Pamela Hunt, Amanda Hyatt Regency-Chicago Il. Dept. Of Revenue Illinois Assn Of School Bds Illinois Education Assn./nea Illinois Municipal Retire. Fd Illinois State Police Illinois Virtual School Imagetec L.P. Integrated Systems Corporation Interstate Battery System Of J. Condon & Associates, Inc. J.M. Irrigation, Llc James Williams Jensen’s Plumbing And Heating John Baylor Test Prep Johnsburg P.T.O Johnsburg Teachers Organization Joseph H. Huemann & Sons, Inc.

$7,973.82 $2,691.08 $3,336.17 $5,612.15 $6,096.00 $2,878.84 $4,000.50 $5,005.00 $28,250.00 $14,614.41 $31,740.00 $2,900.00 $4,862.00 $6,000.00 $5,660.30 $9,848.50 $11,128.82 $2,554.00 $3,395.99 $112,550.00 $2,897.90 $9,970.13 $9,000.00 $241,028.25 $2,719.00 $22,886.45 $11,124.50 $5,040.00 $2,787.00 $8,299.95 $3,000.00 $548,440.80 $37,500.00 $2,869.70 $6,000.00 $5,750.14 $3,749.44 $103,266.32 $4,600.00 $2,542.74 $3,874.63 $20,108.73 $4,515.00 $3,134.84 $30,349.92 $9,016.98 $9,138.95 $6,379.08 $3,412.03 $3,907.60 $467,218.30 $8,826.00 $96,601.47 $539,357.67 $14,088.25 $5,965.00 $41,154.00 $9,600.00 $5,212.17 $35,266.15 $3,314.00 $4,539.15 $9,964.00 $9,000.00 $2,832.00 $4,505.98 $4,463.32

Jostens, Inc. $15,299.66 Kellenberger Technologies LLC. 229,730.00 ; Kockler, Karen $10,755.00 Krossover $2,518.20 Lake County High Schools Tech. Campus $10,003.34 Lamp, Inc. $20,342,317.00 Larry Reinhard $5,754.00 Lawniczak, Michelle $4,284.00 Leach Enterprises, Inc.. $6,188.07 Learnerator Education, Inc. $2,500.00 Lesniak, Sam $7,116.54 Lincoln Investment Annuity $95,900.00 M&O Environmental Company $234,465.00 Mad Bomber $3,000.00 Martin Group $9,344.73 Mastercard Corporate Clients $222,639.70 McHenry Analytical Water Lab., $3,683.00 McHenry Co Dept Of Health $3,612.50 McHenry High School $25,420.14 Menards Fox Lake $16,083.92 Meyer, Lydia $7,906.50 Midamerican Energy Co $317,261.17 Midwest Commercial Fitness $3,324.25 Midwest Pro Paving Contractors $14,950.00 Midwest Transit Equipment $16,916.68 Mike’s Brass & Woodwind Rpr, Sales & Serv. $2,684.85 Morse, Stephanie $4,087.90 Muller-Pinehurst Dairy Inc $38,386.45 Murphy, Jon $6,837.84 Music Theatre International $3,050.00 Napa (McHenry) $6,442.21 Nasco $4,382.05 NASP, INC. $3,446.00 Nihip $2,016,634.74 Northwest Herald $4,707.90 Novotny True Value $6,236.43 NWEA - Northwest Evaluation Assoc. $20,200.00 Ombudsman Educational Services $8,900.00 On -Target Sales $7,739.65 One-Stop Shop $17,089.57 Orkin Pest Control $2,622.00 Paetec - Windstream $56,533.50 Patterson Medical Supply, Inc $4,157.64 Pearson $8,037.30 Pearson Assessment $3,046.75 Pepsi-Cola Gen. Bott. Inc. $10,701.98 Pfeiffer’s Sales & Service LLC $9,370.00 Phoenix Consulting Services $47,005.00 Pioneer Athletics $4,029.10 Pitel Septic Service, Inc. $11,836.25 Pitney Bowes Global Financial Services Llc $4,728.00 Pma Leasing, Inc. $72,330.24 Polar (Heart Monitors) $11,039.43 Prentice Hall $4,066.23 Putnam Fiduciary Trust Company $37,200.00 Quality Tire Service, Inc. $5,009.78 Quill Corporation $6,868.44 Quinlan & Fabish Music Co $3,971.11 R & G Consultants $4,810.14 R. A. Adams Enterprises, Inc. $8,325.50 Ray Chevrolet $7,997.74 Raymond’s Bowl & Entertainment Center $4,810.00 Red Oak Tree Removal Service $6,900.00

Reinhard, Kimberlin $6,359.00 Reliance Communications, LLC. $3,000.00 Reserve Account $17,000.00 Revtrak $23,555.06 Riddell $9,144.80 Rock River Environmental Sol. $7,231.73 Rockford Charter Coach $5,550.00 Ruck Pate Architecture $14,782.50 Rush Truck Centers of Illinois, Inc. $51,556.33 Rusty Nail Bar & Grill $4,846.00 Sam Glenn, Inc. $2,597.60 Santander Leasing LLC $84,548.00 Savage Pro Audio Inc $313,633.00 Scariano, Himes, And Petrarca $12,308.77 Scholastic Book Fairs $5,778.45 Scholastic Classroom Magazines $4,013.82 School Specialty Inc $6,250.71 Secure Content Solutions $11,900.00 Six Flags Great America $5,948.00 Skills USA Illinois $4,251.00 Skyward, Inc. $63,572.30 Sommerfield, Michael $5,535.00 Sovereign Pediatric Therapy $19,592.50 Spec Educ Dist Of Mchenry Co $110,096.73 Sportdecals Sport and Spirit Products, inc. $56,315.45 Start Interaction $6,925.00 State Disbursement Unit $9,672.00 Streamwood Behavioral Health System $3,325.00 T & J Printing Supply Inc. $8,933.61 Taubery, Laura $3,526.65 Teachers’ Retiremt Sys.Of Il $1,240,980.66 Technology Campus $84,399.98 Terselic, Carmen $4,959.09 The Grounds Guys $64,315.17 This Fund $329,662.28 Toomey, James $5,331.54 Tredroc Tire Svc $27,665.03 Tyler Technologies, Inc $8,937.98 Unisource a Veritiv Company $20,957.95 Unity School Bus Parts $2,617.89 Us Bank $447,187.50 V. Paul Hanrahan $8,463.96 V.I.P. Sealcoat $11,500.00 Valor Technologies Incorporated $40,665.00 Van Galder Bus Company $2,550.00 Varsity Spirit Fashions $5,729.19 Verizon Wireless $7,115.26 Village Of Johnsburg $51,523.60 Walsh, Donald $24,463.00 Waste Management North $17,700.56 Weatherwise Heating And Air Conditioning $2,765.00 Wenger $6,500.00 Wi Sctf $5,616.00 Wilson Language Training Corp. $3,872.00 Wisconsin Dept. Of Revenue $48,104.10 Wonder Lake State Bank $852,078.46 Wonder Lake State Bank $1,601,378.16 Wonder Lake State Bank $6,390,208.75 Woodmaster Fence $24,593.00 Woodstock Communit Unit School Dist 200 $79,727.24


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016 •

CLASSIFIED 15

ANNUAL STATEMENT OF AFFAIRS SUMMARY FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 2016 The summary must be published in the local newspaper. Copies of the detailed Annual Statement of Affairs for the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2016 will be available for public inspection in the school district/joint agreement administrative office by December 1, 2016. Individuals wanting to review this Annual Statement of Affairs should contact: Prairie Grove CSD #46 3223 IL Route 176, Crystal Lake, IL 60014 815-459-3023 8:30AM-4:30PM School District/Joint Agreement Name Address Telephone Office Hours Also by January 15, 2017 the detailed Annual Statement of Affairs for the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2016, will be posted on the Illinois State Board of Education's website@ www.isbe.net. SUMMARY: The following is the Annual Statement of Affairs Summary that is required to be published by the school district/joint agreement for the past fiscal year. Statement of Operations as of June 30, 2016 Educational

Operations & Maintenance

Debt Services

Transportation

Municipal Retirement/ Social Security

4

670,825

284,507

0

0

Local Sources

1000

8,700,058

1,140,886

Flow-Through Receipts/Revenues from One District to Another District

2000

0

0

State Sources

3000

539,141

0

0

174,544

Federal Sources

4000

370,639

0

0

0

9,609,838

1,140,886

4

845,369

Total Direct Receipts/Revenues Total Direct Disbursements/Expenditures Other Sources/Uses of Funds

Capital Projects

Working Cash

Tort

Fire Prevention & Safety

0

24,148

146,072

92

0

157,380

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

284,507

157,380

24,148

146,072

92

97,470

0

0

0

0

9,280,900

1,059,518

656,846

584,564

351,658

22,415

(436,846)

0

656,846

(220,000)

0

0

Beginning Fund Balances - July 1, 2015

6,874,611

1,416,225

2,109

913,072

182,604

2

177,341

279,652

64,996

Other Changes in Fund Balances

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Ending Fund Balances June 30, 2016

6,766,703

1,497,593

2,113

953,877

115,453

134,967

201,489

328,254

65,088

SALARY SCHEDULE OF GROSS PAYMENTS FOR CERTIFICATED PERSONNEL AND NON-CERTIFICATED PERSONNEL This listing must be published in the local newspaper, sent to ISBE, and retained within your district/joint agreement administrative office for public inspection. GROSS PAYMENT FOR CERTIFICATED PERSONNEL CERTIFIED UNDER $25,000: Abbate, Roxane C; Anderson, Julianne K; Bader, Jenni L; Baudin, Deborah L; Baudin, Jennifer A; Bauman, Amber A; Blahnik, Suzanne R; Clairy, Amber L; Cristo, Julia E; Cunningham, Jennifer M; Farley, Deborah K; Feucht, Angela L; Figgins, Melissa; Fitzpatrick, Seanna M; Gettig, Sherry A; Gordon, Danielle A; Hagedorn, Helen; Hannig, Mary K; Haze, Jeannie L; Heiderman, Meghan C; Hendricksen, Jennifer A; Hoffman, Edward L; Hoffman, Susan; Huette, Sarah M; Jurgensen, Daniel M; Kahoun, Denise Lynne; Karlow, Erin M; Keltner, Rebecca L; Klop, Patricia S; Kronewitter, Karen; Lange, Lisa K; Lowderman, Laura B; Lynch, Eileen T; Marineau, Tara K; Martin, Mary M; Matenaer, Mark A; Nevsimal, Ricky J; Oakes, Carolyn; Paroongsup, Tabitha D; Perruzzi, Colleen M; Petersen, Jamie A; Rett, Kelly L; Ricciardi, Suzanne M; Rico, Mallory H; Rolf, Sharon J; Romagnano, Patty A; Schmidt, Shari P; Seibold, Cassie L; Shabino, Katherine A; Shepherd, Catherine E; Spinner, Sara E; Stoermer, Marilyn E; Szczesny, Gina M; Tufte, Jennifer C.; Walsh, Denise P; Zielinski, Julianne M; CERTIFIED $25,000 - $39,999: Frisby, Megan A; Gradt, Rachelle B; Johnson, Mallory M; Langosch, Jessica E; Maloney, Megan F; Mittelhauser, Rebekkah A; Rieb, Stefanie M; Rohrer, Julia A; Vinton, Elizabeth P; Walter, Kristina M; Wiberg, Nicole B; CERTIFIED; $40,000 - $59,999: Bak, Melissa; Becker, Amy J; Cahir, Wendy; Coffey, Kristen J; Conklin, Ashley D; Cotton, Colleen M; Delmissier, Renee M; Dressel, Kristin; Ershen, Elizabeth K; Fabbri, Lauren M; Fish, Christopher J; Goudy, Elizabeth G; Hamlin-Faure, Carol A; John, Jaclyn E; Loftus, Laureen; Martin, Stephanie M; Meier, Joyce; Moon, Jennifer; Pandocchi, Dayna; Preston, Kelly E; Reedal, Kristin E; Reiman, Laura A; Spella, Corey B; Vaughan, Jenna Lynn; Wilke, Heather A; Williams, Linda S; CERTIFIED $60,000 - $89,999: Asp, Janna C; Bieschke, Mary Kate; Burnidge, Amy; Cahill, Charlene; Dalton, Laura; Dieschbourg, Margaret; Forsman, Oscar; Furlong, Monica N; Gorrell, Linda L; Hart, Kaitlyn; Heinemann, Nicole M; Jaeger, Laurie; Janke, Kathleen S; Lehner, Susan; Liethen, Mary K; Luedke, Julie; Massier, Alyssa; Mate, Cassy; Nelson, Lisa A; O’Leary, Mary; Orr, Tracey E; Page, Peggy; Piech, Jennifer; Pieroni, Jane; Piotrowski, Tracy L; Rempert, Joy; Riley, Cathleen H; Payments over $2,500, excluding wages and salaries. Person, Firm, or Corporation Aggregate Amount PHOENIX LEARNING SYSTEMS $4,780 CURRICULUM ASSOCIATES $2,508 TAYLOR BROTHERS DOOR LOCK, LLC $4,834 CENTEGRA OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH $2,530 QUINLAN & FABISH MUSIC $4,919 AT&T $2,605 CENGAGE LEARNING $4,944 CAMBIUM LEARNING INC $2,681 APPLE, INC $4,984 EXCENT CORP. $2,685 REALLY GOOD STUFF $5,040 PAM HORGAN $2,740 GAMETIME $5,113 EMPLOYEE RESOURCE SYSTEMS, INC $2,754 FRONTLINE TECHNOLOGIES $5,170 ELEMENTAL SOLUTIONS, LLC $2,775 TRUGREEN $5,605 MCGRAW HILL SCHOOL EDUCATION HOLDIN $5,638 VERIZON $2,804 $5,785 STAR AUTISM SUPPORT CPI $2,878 CL GRAPHICS $6,213 SUSAN HOFFMAN $2,892 NORTHERN KEY & LOCK $6,379 OWC PRO IT SERVICES $2,903 SIMPLEX GRINNELL $6,534 HOUGHTON MIFFLIN HARCOURT $2,933 EDMENTUM $6,761 RADI-LINK, INC. $2,940 IASB $6,908 K-12 TEACHERS ALLIANCE $3,000 STATE CHEMICAL $6,970 RENAISSANCE LEARNING $3,074 NICOR GAS $7,124 COIT DRAPERY CLEANERS INC $3,285 DURA WAX $7,216 CRYSTAL BOWL $3,315 HEINEMANN EDUCATIONAL BOOKS, INC.$7,241 KAREN KRONEWITTER $3,521 TOTAL SYSTEMS ROOFING, INC $7,407 CHALLENGER LEARNING CENTER $3,900 ARTHUR GALLAGHER RISK MANAGEMENT SE $3,925 E.D. CLARK PHOTOGRAPHY $7,642 VARITRONICS LLC $3,956 FOLLETT SCHOOL SOLUTIONS, INC. $8,270 CHARLES SMOLAREK $4,000 INFOSNAP, INC. $8,568 DON JOHNSTON INC $4,108 CORVUS INDUSTRIES, LTD $8,663 UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE $4,150 UTILITYHELP.ORG $8,774 GRAINGER $4,405 NORTHWEST EVALUATION ASSOC $9,063 PRAIRIE GROVE TEACHERS ASSOC. $4,410 ETA HAND2MIND $9,064 CHICAGOLAND PAVING CONTRACTORS, INC $9,125 SCHNEIDER ELECTRIC $4,485 APPLE INC $9,226 CRYSTAL LAKE SEPTIC SERVICE $4,494 MCHENRY COUNTY COLLECTOR $9,900 SCHOLASTIC, INC. $4,523

Rohrer, Joanne; Rosner, Sandra; Salazar, Jeanne M; Spizzirri, Regan; Terrill, Mary; Williams, Kimberly J; Wilson, Frances; CERTIFIED $90,000 AND OVER: Bender, Philip V; Krepel, Kathleen A; Levy, Paulina F; Maggiore, Martha M; Painter, Dorothy; Slovacek, Cynthia; NON-CERTIFIED UNDER $25,000: Andrzejewski, Frank A; Barber, Adam J; Barber, Karl J; Batt, Christine M; Benjamin, Amanda L; Bishop, Julie A; Brady, Lindsay J; Butman, Eileen M; Cano, Cathleen L; CianciaruloKukla, Cindy A; Colby, Robert O; Coss, Michelle L; Desmet, Jennifer L; Domanico, Karen I; Dooley, Sean J; Downs, Trina; Elkin, Cheryl; Falat, Gina R; Fenton, Colleen; Fetzner, Michelle T; Flaherty, Janice L; Flores, Tammy; Frantz, Sarah J; Gibbons, Ellen U; Gibbons, Stephanie M; Goebel, Ashley C; Grahl, Hope A; Grant, Jodi; Grant, Kevin M; Heatley, Brienne M; Heinzmann, Kyle A; Hinkemeyer, Diana L; Hoops, Allison L; Johnsen, Justin A; Kaltenbach, Chantel L; Kimble, Kimberly K; Kimble, Roy; Klimkowski, Michelle E; Klinsky, Samuel W; Kociszewski, Christina P; Kramka, Laura M.; Krepel, Erin R; Krepel, Kelly A; Kreutzer, Rita C; Laymon, Krista D; Lowitzki, Kimberly A; Lynn, Michael S; Maldonado, George L; Malek, Joyce M; Manges, Ashley M; Marchik, Jonathon D; Mariano, Dawn M; Marwitz, Andrea L; Mayher, Robin L; Mcneil, Cynthia; Mcpherson, Mark A; Meyer, Susan L; Meyers, Trisha M; Michel, Dale; Michel, Linda; Mohr, Shawna L; Neeley, Tamera D.; Nehls, Thomas F; Orr, Ryan A; Orr, Tyler D; Ottum, John J; Patapack, Vivian; Pergler, Carrie; Popovits, Kelly Jo; Quintana, Karen S; Rasmussen, Tim; Richeal, Cynthia B; Riess, Resa; Sandock, Lori; Saxon, Lynn; Saxon, Ryan E; Sazma, Chere; Scarlette, Mary J; Scott, Jacquelyn T.; Scott, Laura A; Serrano Jr, Cesar; Soto, Kelly A; Spagnolo, Edward; Stilling, Gerald; Thrushman, Ron B; Trexler, Lee A; Wehner, Lynn M; Weisenburger, Edward J; Wendler, Jennifer A; Wold, Margaret M; Wright, Amy F; Yantis, Mischelle L; Zanzola, Elizabeth; NON-CERTIFIED; $25,000 - $39,999: Bailey, Barbara; Boltz, Kimberly; Chlebicki, Diane M; Domin, Marie; Douglas, Leska L; Eng, Dennis W; Kulovsek, Valerie; Long, Donna; Marchik, Julie A; Perez, Jose L; Serrano, Cesar; Trevithick, Cheryl M; Wikierak, Cynthia; Woo, Tony; NONCERTIFIED; $40,000 - $59,999: Abrams, Dawn M; Hasman, Bruce W; Mcavoy, Joan M; Vazquez, Stephen J; NON-CERTIFIED; $60,000 AND OVER: Martin, Scott C; Scheibe, Frank A; Werner, Kevin T ORBIS CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC.$10,000 ADVANCED DISPOSAL $10,365 FORECAST5 ANALYTICS $10,500 KEBARA CORPORATION $11,149 FATHER & SONS LAWN SERVICE $11,400 NCS PEARSON $11,778 METROPOLITAN LIFE INSURANCE CO. $11,886 SCHOOL SPECIALTY INC. $11,997 UNITED INDUSTRIAL CONSTRUCTION, INC $12,415 VERITIV OPERATING COMPANY $12,657 CRYSTAL LAKE SCHOOL DISTRICT 47$12,997 SANTANDER LEASING LLC $13,247 PRAIRIE GROVE FLEX SPENDING $13,395 VISION SERVICE PLAN (IL) $13,578 OFFICE DEPOT $13,812 CALL ONE $14,137 ILLINOIS EDUCATION ASSOCIATION $14,412 ELIZABETH TABACSKO OTR/L MOT $14,428 TIMBER-LEE CHRISTIAN CENTER $16,300 NICOLE ANN GLINSKI $16,565 FOX VALLEY CHEMICAL CO. $16,953 XEROX CORPORATION $18,136 SOVEREIGN PEDIATRIC THERAPY $19,061 COMCAST $19,140 SPECIAL EDUCATION DISTRICT $19,179 ECRA $19,250 CENTER POINT ENERGY SERVICES, INC. $19,444 EDER, CASELLA & CO $20,783 BOB RIDDINGS FLEET SALES $21,175 XEROX CORPORATION $26,751 SKYWARD $29,346

ORIX PUBLIC FINANCE LLC, INC. $32,725 TEACHERS RETIREMENT SYSTEMSURCHARG $34,891 PETRO LIANCE $35,028 GE CAPITAL $35,672 ILLINOIS EDUCATION ASSOC $45,503 BEHM PAVEMENT MAINTENANCE INC$47,950 TESSENDORF MECHANICAL $59,098 DENA DENNY, PT $60,248 MAGGIE MCPHERSON $61,712 HOUGHTON MIFFLIN $69,594 FRANCZEK RADELET $70,388 CDW GOVERNMENT $79,047 TEACHERS’ HEALTH INSURANCE SECURITY$96,927 CLIC $96,958 MID AMERICAN ENERGY COMPANY $117,624 WOODSTOCK COMMUN. SCHOOL DISTRICT 2$122,691 MIDWEST TRANSIT EQUIPMENT,INC.$175,244 CERES $201,855 EMPLOYEE BENEFIT CLIENTS DD $205,921 IL DEPT OF REVENUE $220,499 IL MUNICIPAL RETIREMENT FUND $230,785 PRAIRIE GROVE HSA FUND $294,081 TEACHERS’ RETIREMENT SYS. $502,237 AMALGAMATED BANK $616,838 UNITED STATES TREASURY $1,039,438 BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIELD $1,266,405 PRAIRIE GROVE DIST HEALTH FUND $1,328,024


16 CLASSIFIED • Wednesday, November 30, 2016

• Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

ANNUAL STATEMENT OF AFFAIRS SUMMARY FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 2016 Copies of the detailed Annual Statement of Affairs for the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2016 will be available for public inspection in the school district/joint agreement administrative office by December 1, 2016. Individuals wanting to review this Annual Statement of Affairs should contact: Crystal Lake School District #47 300 Commerce Drive Cyrstal Lake, IL 60014 815-788-5000 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Also by January 15, 2017 the detailed Annual Statement of Affairs for the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2016, will be posted on the Illinois State Board of Education's website@ www.isbe.net. SUMMARY: The following is the Annual Statement of Affairs Summary that is required to be published by the school district/joint agreement for the past fiscal year. Statement of Operations as of June 30, 2016 Educational Local Sources Flow-Through Receipts/Revenues from One District to Another District State Sources Federal Sources Total Direct Receipts/Revenues Total Direct Disbursements/Expenditures Other Sources/Uses of Funds Beginning Fund Balances - July 1, 2015 Other Changes in Fund Balances Ending Fund Balances June 30, 2016

Salary Range: Less Than $25,000 Altendorf, Lauralee G; Anderson, Bonnie M; Anderson, Catherine J; Arkell, Shelley L; Arnold, Kelsey L; Arrell-Rosenquist, Denise B; Audette, Sharon L; Beck, Alyssa L; Bedell, Andrea S; Bentley, Renee A; Blazyk, Nancy S; Borchert, Nancy A; Borg, Kelsey S; Borman, Brianna C; Boro, Sara E; Bounds, Colleen; Brewer, Kandis J; Burgess, Elizabeth Ann; Burmeister, Margaret A; Butler, Kacie A; Campion, Katie J; Campos, Vera M; Cane, Jordan M; Carroll, Michelle L; Caruso Raines, Kathleen M; Cavazos, Darina I; Chang, Jessica M; Ciezadlo, Shannon L; Ciosek, Carol J; Clairy, Amber L; Clough, Susan K; Cohen, Jody A; Colson, Pamela M; Concha, Serena J; Conetzkey, Georgann Betty; Cooper, Kathleen M; Corcoran, Deborah A; Cranston, Amy M; Cubit, Julie L; Curiel, Jaclyn N; D’Annunzio, Kathryn K; Daleo, Beth R; Diederich, Stacy S; Diersen, Kimberly A; DiOrio, Jenay M; Dubey, Rita; Dunican, Sarah E; Ehlenburg, Holly A; Elwart, Sherry Joy; Evens, Christina L; Fadden, Kristen D; Ferretti, Jill Blass; Fitzpatrick, Seanna M; Freeland, Bridget A; Freund, Gregory A; Freund, Julene S; Freund, Lori D; Frey, Norma A; Friesen, Lisa A; Frost, Amy E; Garton, Tina Morrissey; Gavle, Kari A; Genovese, Sara N; Gillis-Svehla, Laurie A; Glawe, Eric E; Gluck, Kathleen; Golko, Michelle L; Goorsky, Mary C; Granger, Erin A; Green, Samantha M; Groe, Vicki K; Haeger, Amanda M; Hagedorn, Helen; Hamilton, Leslie L; Hansen, Dina A; Harter, Carrie J; Hartwig, William M; Hausch, Jennifer J; Hearne, Donna Lynn; Heffernan, Diane L; Heiden, William D; Helms, Patrick D; Hendrickson, Jennifer A; Hodorowicz, Mary; Holden, Barbara J; Holmer, Corey C; Holmes, Michael T; Holtz, Theodore M; Hougas, Julie A; Hovi, Janis A; Hubbard, Maureen T; Hughes, Anna M; Hyser, Janet G; Jablonsky, Colleen M; Johnson, Colleen F; Keltner, Rebecca L; King, Morgan L; Kisly, Sarah E; Kisman, Jacqueline; Kistler, Lauren A; Kivley, Rachel D; Klaric, Mariano G; Kozlowski, Joshua T; Kreuz, Allison M; Krohn, Carole J; Kuhns, Heide M; Laegeler, Nicole A; Legel, Tamra K; Lewis, Janice Lynn; Liszka, Tanya S; Lockhart, Kathy Lynn; Lukasik, Karen E; Luken, Janet L; Lund, Elizabeth B; MacCrindle, Amy N; Mack, Judith C; Mader, Linda; Maguire, Donna J; Majzner, Claudia A; Manno, Michele L; Marcus, Ann K; Marochak, Jean Ann; Marsh, Linda S; Martinez, Laura Mary; Mathes, Roxana L; Maule, Victoria E; McCluskey, Kelsey A; McCune, Carrie A; McDermott, Laurie A; Meyer, Charlene M; Meyer, Laura A; Meyer, Sandra L; Miskowicz, Amy E; Monbrod, Marisol; Monica, Rianne E; Montiel, Amy L; Mroz, Teresa B; Mulcahy, Janice B; Murphy, Carolyn S; Natoli, Jordan C; Nelson, Kimberly S; Nestle, Patty K; Newsome, Megan S; Nowack, Leonice C; Noxon, Kimberly D; O’Brien, Kourtney; O’Hanian, Susan R; Passe, Eulalia; Payne, Rebecca R; Perrin, Mary Illana; Perruzzi, Colleen M; Perry, Marilyn S; Peterson-Cook, Heather Anne; Piola Orihuela, Grasielle; Prince, Gail L; Proksa, Traci S; Purintun, Stephanie R; Quinn, Carolyn A; Rapisarda, Angela

1000 2000 3000 4000

56,626,302 0 9,185,069 4,072,204 69,883,575 67,250,758 -1,561,997 27,323,280 0 28,394,100

Operations & Maintenance 7,929,237 0 475,000 0 8,404,237 8,145,890 128,583 867,300 0 1,254,230

Debt Services Transportation 4,115,868 0 156,419 4,272,287 5,842,528 1,559,899 1,000,398 0 990,056

2,189,775 0 1,699,313 0 3,889,088 4,163,446 0 7,385,412 0 7,111,054

Municipal Retirement/ Social Security 4,201,780 0 0 0 4,201,780 2,700,154 0 1,264,483 0 2,766,109

Capital Projects 0

Fire Prevention & Safety 156,542 1,464,707 62,213

Working Cash

Tort

0 1,874,475 0 0 0 0 0 2,031,017 1,464,707 0 1,335,894 0 -126,485 0 433 13,950,587 564,687 0 0 0 433 15,855,119 693,500

SALARY SCHEDULE OF GROSS PAYMENTS FOR CERTIFICATED PERSONNEL AND NON-CERTIFICATED PERSONNEL GROSS PAYMENT FOR CERTIFICATED PERSONNEL L; Marchetti, Heidi J; Marciano, Lida A; Rett, Kelly L; Reynolds, James L; Jason D; Brogan, Jenna L; Brouder, M; Mariani, Crystle A; Marino, Teri M; Rodriguez, Jennifer S; Rolf, Sharon Rachel K; Brown, Justin R; Bucheger, Marquis, Cassie D; Martin, Sharon R; J; Romano, Diane L; Rotelli, Corey L; Kelly A; Buresch-Zoellick, Darlene A; Massett, Suzanne J; Matousek, Heidi Rubio, Jacalyn J; Salek, Ruth L; Santis, Calendo, Mary E; Campisi, Jennifer B; Matsie, Jennifer A; Matthies, Jennifer Lisa M; Saputa, Laurie Lynne; Sarles, K; Capalbo, Nicholas M; CarbajalM; Maxwell, Lori G; Mayers, Alexandria Susan E; Schaefer, Andrea M; Schilling, Gaspers, Gabriela C; Carbajal, Luis; G; Mayer, Ashley N; McAvoy, Bridget Lisa C; Schmidt, Cassandra B; Schmidt, Carter, Patricia Marie; Cashmore, M; McCafferty, Jennafer R; McCoy, Tracy L; Schulze, Heather Mcdonald; Colleen Catherine; Cavicchioni, Ana Maria; McCoy, Megan L; McEnery, Scott, Diane E; Sebastian, Alexandra Amanda L; Cervantes, Heather M; TeriSue; McKenna, Laura M; Merke, E; Senyshyn, Crystal Dawn; Shay, Chang, Peter; Chapman, Melinda Erik M; Merlin, Diane M; Meucci, Allison Ericka L; Shetsky, Angela M; ShragalJ; Chatham, Kendra J; Christensen, Mosnick, Phyllis Marie; Simmonds, Melissa J; Chudik, Kimberley D; Cimino, M; Meza, Mary Jo; Michelau, Jamie L; Mikulka, Becky R; Miller, Cynthia Christine A; Sindelar, Prudence H; Maria V; Clark-Keene, Katharine C; S; Miller, Kimberly J; Miranda, Ana L; Singleton, Melissa; Sisco, Christine D; Clouser, Denise B; Conrad, Benjamin Mitchell, Trisha K; Moderhack, Matthew Sitko, Regina L; Skube, Stephanie A; R; Cooper, Shay E; Copeland, Scott; R; Montoya, Amanda M; Moody, Melanie Slowinski, Margaret M; Smith, Jessica Copley, Lindsey J; Coss, Katherine J; Moon, Judson R; Moore, Jamie M; S; Soltys, Wendy C; Sopena, Nathan M; Cruz, Gina M; Culasso Medansky, Moore, Laura A; Morales, Corina L; D; Sterchi, Donna L; Stewart, Natalie Vanesa; Czerwonka, Kaitlyn A; Dacy, Moritz, Janet B; Morley, Lindsay B; C; Stringillo, Nancy C; Stumpf, Debra Meggan M; Dalton, Theresa M; Daly, Morrison, Julie M; Morrone, Kelly D; S; Sugrue, Cecilia M; Swank, Eileen J; Deborah M; Dalzell, Scott D; Davis, Taldone, Jessica A; Theberge, Jennifer Kristina L; de Bonis Canadas, Maria Morton, Rebecca M; Mosolino, Kelly H; Threadgill-Smith, Leslie J; Trybula, del Mar; Deredowski, Agnes M; Diaz, A; Moylan, Michael S; Muehling, Ry Colleen E; Tudor, Linda M; Tunnicliffe, Monica E; Digrazia, Melody C; Dindia, W; Muggli, Michael Andrew; Murk, Cynthia J; Unterberger, Bradley A; Nicole S; Dominici, Lauren M; Dool, Jacqueline M; Nelson, George R; Nelson, Unterberg, Lynn E; Updike, Molly A; Rachelle A; Doyle, Ryan J; Dreyer, Heather L; Nelson, Robin M; Nero, Urbina, Pamela J; Van Pee-Adams, Keith M; Drozt, Jennifer L; Dumovich, Cynthia J; Nisenson, Amanda M; Nixon, Ingrid M; Vandenheuvel, Maureen Kay; Laura L; Dunham, Katherine M; Dunne Jennifer C; Norris, Cynthia Jennifer; Vernagallo, Nicole A; Villec, Theresa Grantham, Karen; Edwards, Colleen O’Berry, Courtney A; Oates, Chelsea M; Walsh, Denise P; Ward, Diane L; J; Eiden, Hilary L; Ellerman, Lauren E; R; Oliver, Brenda D; Olsen, Allison R; Wasserman, Denise L; Weber, Beth Elliott, Joseph P; Eschman, Heather L; Olson, Kristin; Olson, Terri Lynette; Orna, Anne; Whittier, Monika; Whitworth, Evans, Carissa N; Evans, Heather A; Doris M; Oziminski, Daniel E; Panke, Elizabeth J; Wickersty, Jennifer L; Evenson, Suzanne C; Evitts, Jennifer Sara E; Paolella, Mary A; Parker, Adam Wieland, Savannah B; Wiggerman, Erin; Fata, Rita K; Felz, Katherine J; D; Parker, Marguerite L; Pearce, Amy M; Dorene Marie; Wiggs, Maria L; Wilhelmi, Fennell, Lynette M; Flanagan, Nitza A; Pearl, Tricia L; Pellikan, Jodi Christine; Erin E; Wilson, Jessica A; Xanos, Maria Fontana, Michelle L; Fortin, Michelle M; Penny, Melinda M; Perri, Candice M; R; Yellets, Carissa E; Zalokar, Gail Ann; Frey, Kari L; Fuessle, Mallory E; Gabel, Peterson, Sara D; Piel, Nancy A; Pietrini, Zelasko, Irene D; Zoellick, Corrine E Jill S; Garcia Navarro, Maria del Mar; Anthony R; Pinshower, Scott J; Pioro, Behrns, Leslie E; Brizzolara, Natasha Gardner, Christine A; Gelsosomo, Tami Justine A; Plump, Lori Ann; Plunkett, L; Dalicandro, Janet L; Ebert, April L; R; Gerke, Laura Ann; Giffels, Sandra J; Catherine R; Powell, Elizabeth C; Haase, Vanessa M; Helsom, Trina L; Glass, Michelle Elaine; Glover, Kristen Prendergast, Jennifer Anne; Preshlock, Janczak, Elizabeth L; Kahovec, Mark A; P; Gorman, Cathleen Jo; Gorman, Emily Julie Ann; Preski, Jeni Lee; Price, Daniel Krotser, Elizabeth M; E; Primus, Kristi A; Prusha, Melissa F; Gray, Jennifer M; Gregorin, Leslie Salary Range: $25,000 - $39,999 A; Pysh, Emily J; Raistrick, Karen L; V; Groh, Ellen L; Grubbs, Kari Lynn; Larsen, Maureen P; Lawson, Laniea R; Rannie, Karen A; Rasmussen, Jessica; Guzman, Lisa Lyn; Hackett, Jacqueline Ludwig, Jessica M; Miller, Brian A; Miller, A; Hall, Tricia A; Hammerstone, Alia T; Raudabaugh, Lauren A; Reese, Penny Cassandra M; Mitchell Gaylord, Paula J; Hanfland, Alison K; Hanks, Diane R; D; Reinke, Melissa L; Resac, Melissa J; Nash, Nicole C; O’Connor, Kathryn M; Reynolds, Rachel E; Rickerson, Kathleen Hanson, Taylor L; Hardy, Amanda M; Pingitore, Virginia A; Reining, Kathleen L; Rietz, Tracy A; Riggsby, Rachel E; Harrold, Hannah M; Heidrich, Michelle M; Sander, Kristin A; Satalino, Kimberly Roberts, Dawn T; Roberts, Michelle L; Ann; Heidtke, Janine L; Heidt, Lenny J; Scott, Yvonne E; Tropp, Julie M; Robson, Jamela B; Roloff, Betsy D; Esther; Heileman, Pamela Jo; Heinrich, Volling, Christine N; Walt, Ayrielle L Romero Blanco, Javier; Rosales, Maria Sarah A; Hensel, Meredith A; Herlihy, Salary Range: $40,000 - $59,999 L; Rosenbloom, Mara F; Routzahn, Lauren O; Hightower, Charles A; Adams, Kelly Sue; Adaska, Marni; Melissa K; Ruhnke, Kurt D; Rutishauser, Himley, Kathleen M; Honcoop, Danae Ahsmann, Ruth A; Alejandro, Denise; Jennifer M; Saavedra, Mariel F; Sagalov, J; Hopper, Amanda L; Horist, Kelly J; Alfieri, Carolyn Marie; Alfieri, Christina Natalya; Salas, Nereida; Salas, Sharon Hotchkiss, Elizabeth I; Houk, Patrick J; M; Allen, Heidi E; Almazan Nelson, Lara G; Schaefer, Emily E; Schenk, Kelly S; Houk, Rebecca A; Huart, Lindsay M; V; Alonso Monfort, Ignacio; Altman, Schramm, Beth M; Schroeder, Jessica Huffman, Rebecca Marie; Hulen, Keith Janice E; Amato, Christina J; Anderson, M; Schultz, Kirsten A; Schwab, Amy E; Hurckes, Kerri L; Hurtado, Victoria Denese L; Anderson, Wendy E; Angulo, Renee; Schwabe, Erin M; Scianna, E; Imhoff, Katie A; Ipjian, Carolina; Meghan M; See, Denise M; Seibert, Norma O; Atkinson, Shelly S; Augustine, Jackson, Jenna L; Jaconetti, Hannah I; Nellica J; Seibert, Shannon C; Serra, Jenkins-Rudolf, Edith S; Jensen, Susan Jill E; Austin, Dawn Marie; Avery, Amy Tina M; Servedio, Laura A; Shapiro, M; Johnston-Haislip, Julie L; Johnson, L; Bakey, Hollylee K; Banaszynski, Carey Lynne; Sharp, Cynthia J; Silva, Kristin Lea; Johnson, Margaret Ellen; Katie R; Barker, Erin L; Barkley, Karen Nicole E; Skorup, Karen L; Slater, Johnson, Nicole T; Jonker, Matthew M; Barklow, Kathrine Ann; Barton, Robyn L; Smalley, Jill A; Smiley, Casey N; Juliano, Carly R; Juliano, Deborah Kendelle R; Bauer, Lauren A; Bavaro, D; Smith, Beth A; Smith, Courtney L; Lynne; Karapanos, Melissa A; Keenan, Selena Christine; Beaudoin, Brooke Smith, Maggie A; Smith, Maureen J; Kristen M; Keller, Heidi K; Keller, R; Beier, Jennifer; Belloto, Linda Jean; Smith, Megan J; Smith, Shanna M; Matthew R; Keller, Pamela D; Kinahan, Benoit, Molly M; Benson, Meghan Soderwall, Joanne M; Soling, Ashley E; Sandra L; King, Carol M; Kleckauskas, C; Bernhardt, Colleen M; Bernhard, Sollenberger, Lydia R; Stefani, Brittany Kristy L; Knopsnyder, Stephanie G; Nicole Marie; Bethers, Ellen M; Bezik, A; Stlaske, Marcia L; Sutter, Megan E; Knoth, Aaron M; Konrath, Constance A; Jennifer M; Biamonte, Jennifer M; Swanson, Kacie M; Swihart, Laurie Ann; Konstant, Katherine J; Kraft, Amanda Biermeier, Maureen J; Bigos, Sandra Talbott, Heather L; Tatman, Melissa R; M; Krutsch, Julie A; Krystal, Kathleen R; L; Blake, Erin E; Bohnsack, Christine Taylor, Janet C; Tech, Agnes M; Thomas, Kulack, Nidia A; Kuligowski, Stephanie M; Boldwyn, Peggy Ann; Bolos, Nicole Carolyn L; Thomas, Cheryl L; Thurston, L; Kulovsek, Jillian K; Lancaster, M; Borman, Kathleen McDermott; Catherine M; Tilton, Kerri K; Timmerman, Kimberly S; Lance, Koriann R; Lara, Borowicz, Lori Ann; Bouchard, April Lauren E; Tonkin, Holly R; Toussaint, Denise; Larburu Apalategui, Joane; Lynn; Boyer, Christine D; Braun, Brianne M; Trivellini, Angela; Trow, Larsen, Joan K; Lentz, Meghan B; Karilee K; Brayton, Barbara A; Brazao, Lezon, Patricia; Lomen, Faye A; Lubing, Susan J; Breutzmann, Michelle R; Jamie K; Turner, Tiffany M; Van Camp, Nicole L; Ludwig, Rita Ann; March, Dana Jill M; Van Dorpe, Catherine R; Van Broederdorf, Patricia S; Brogan,

0 0 62,213 56,969 0 97,224 0 102,468

Syckle, Stacey R; Vehring, Rita P; Verba, Erin K; Villicana, Michelle A; Virnig, Katherine M; Vitacco, Nancy S; VogtHeckman, Shannon L; Wadley, Denise M; Wadman, Ashley B; Weber, Beth Ann; Welty, Breanne N; Wessell, Julia C; Weyers, Brianna C; Whiting, Rebecca S; Widdowson, Karen T; Widing, Jill M; Wiley, Abby A; Willard, Lauren A; Winsor, Krystal D; Wirtz, Sara A; Wise, Daniel R; Wise, Leslie Ann; Wodarski, Courtney A; Wolf, Melissa M; Wondolkowski, Alissa A; Wyman, Erin R; Wyzard, Melissa A; Ziemba, Kristin Ann; Zubieta Dauden, Javier Salary Range: 60,000 - $89,999 Adducci, Susan P; Aiello, Ann H; Albertsen, Jill D; Anderson, Beth A; Anderson, Susan L; Arredondo, Salvador; Atkinson, Jennifer L; Bailey, Emily R; Bardan, Simona; Barnard, Patricia J; Barrett, Michelle M; Bauman, Laura P; Bauman, Sarah Jane; Baxter, Sherri Lynne; Beldin, Colleen F; Belke, Karen M; Bell, Adam C; Bell, Joyce Ann; Besserud, Jean M; Boro, Nancy J; Bowers, Thomas A; Bowman, Jean M; Brackett, Cindy L; Breen, Ellen J; Browne, Wendy L; Bulaga, Kathleen Marie; Cannon, Kristen Joy; Carl, Kimberly M; Carran, Janet M; Casey, Linda G; Castellanos, Alba G; Caulk, Debra Jo; Chakoian, Sharon Lou Mcginn; Combs, Bethany Ann; Conway, Jenny Rebecca; Copeland, Kimberly C; Cordes, Cynthia L; Coughlin, Margaret E; Covganka, Effie A; Crane, Caroline E; Crowley, Jennifer Lynn; Cruz, Kathryn K; Czaja, Nicole J; Dalman, Nancy L; Droho, Jennifer; Fanella, Laura E; Farquhar, Michelle Ann; Ferguson, Erika Ildiko; Ferguson, Susan E; Ferraro, Laura L; Finnerty, Amy M; Fiorito, Christine A; Ford, Diane M; Fox, Julie A; Francis, Laura E; Frank, Amy L; Freund, Kimberly Ann; Gannon, Jennifer Joy; Gemperline, Theresa A; Glawe, Debra Ann; Goodrich, Rita Anne; Goodwin, Margaret A; Grabner, Julie A; Grant, Heather M; Greenman, Diane Ruth; Green, Julianne Ida; Gruper, Anastasia Catherine; Guynes, Terry L; Haage, Donna M; Hall, Debbie E; Hamilton, Linnea; Hanawalt, Barbara Ann; Harvel, Jody L; Hasting, Candy S; Havenga, Beth Ann; Hensley, Amy J; Heyen, Michele C; Hoffman, Lori B; Hopp, Joyce H; Horne, Diane K; Howe, Mary Alice C; Huffman, Robert M; Jackson, Dennis M; Jacobsen, Teresa; Janowicz, Katherine S; Jawnyj, Kimberly R; Jelen, Laura Michelle; Jenkins, Jennifer E; Johannesen, Susan B; Johnson, Katherine D; Johnson, Rachelle Nadine; Kaiser, Frederick Henry; Kearns, Ann M; Keenan, David A; Keesey, Todd A; Kelley, Gail Lee; Kilhoffer, Maureen T; Klinsky, Jordan Hugh; Kolasinski, Lisa Jean; Komperda, Joseph Bernard; Kondrad, Carrie Lynn; Krol, John Michael; Kuhns, Jill Christine; Kwayzer, Chandra K; Ladner, Donna Lynne; Lane, Wendy J; Langdon, Dawn C; Lashelle, Melissa Sue; Leidy-Semprit, Kristin A; Leli, Cynthia A; Leman, Libby Georgann; Lemieux-Mcdonald, Denise S; Lerum, Jennifer A; Lichtenberger, Mary H; Liebenow, Jennifer Lynn; Lilly, Amy L; Lindquist-Materna, Laura Ann; Lopresto, Richard Allen; Ludwig, Ronald P; Mac Nally, Patricia J;


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016 • Madura, Donna J; Maglares, Julie Ann; Main, Christine E; Marks, Kellie R; Martin, Shannon Christine; Massie, Jennifer L; Mattoon, Catherine L; Maule, Eileen T; McMahon, Pamela K; Melville, Kristina Marie; Mendelson, Barbara; Mengler, Amy E; Merritt, Melinda Leigh; Merritt, Steven R; Militello, Kimberlee D; Miller, Janene L; Mitchell, Alison Nicole; Mootz, Tammy L; Moran, Christina A; Moreschi, Beata M; Morrissey, Brad J; Morrissey, Therese M; Myers, Jennifer A; Nanna, Patricia Lynn; Napoleoni, Luann; Neiert, Kimberlee A; Nenn, Christian; Norgard, Marla J; Olson, Stephanie L; Orr, Tina D; Pawlicki, Mary

SALARY SCHEDULE OF GROSS PAYMENTS FOR CERTIFICATED PERSONNEL AND NON-CERTIFICATED PERSONNEL GROSS PAYMENT FOR CERTIFICATED PERSONNEL (Continued) Tina Allane; Witkowski, Lisa M; V; Sevrey, Carol Ann; Sharkey, Nicole E; Pearce, Jillian M; Pesola, Jodi Ann; Wlodzimierski, Elizabeth A; Wojcik, Alice Piller, Deborah G; Pohl, Laurie Shepherd; M; Shute, Dianne E; Sites, Shannon Ann; Wolek, Susan Johns; Wolf, Teresa P; Smart, Allison M; Smithana, Diana; Pomis, Georgia; Post, Julie C; Pottala, A; Wolfe, Anita O; Wynn, Susan Annette; Smith, Lily A; Sromek, Guy Michael; Jodi Ann; Pritchard, Jennifer Leigh; Zehrer, Saundra J; Zilm, Melissa D; Stadlman, Carolyn K; Stanich, Joy Pulvino, Patricia J; Rafferty, Annette H; Zimmerman, Mariann Reith-Fischer, Mary C; Roesslein, Nancy Evelyn; Starnes, Michael D; Staroske, Salary Range: $90,000 and over Cynthia S; Strebel, Belinda Ann; Strebler, J; Rogers, Michele Kathryn; Rogocki, Alberth, Cathy Lynn; Alt, Rachael A; Tony P; Rokos, Kelly M; Rokusek, Debra Laura T; Stroman, Carol A; Sullivan, Bartelt, Deborah A; Beam, Penny L; Patricia L; Swatscheno, Maria Ann; Lynn; Roman-Rojas, Saira; Rothermel, Bereiter, Cathy A; Bevevino, Jean H; Theiss, Beth Ann; Thomas, Gretchen L; Heidi Jane; Rounds, Lisa M; Rubin, Buchanan, Gregory S; Catini, Kelli Sue; Thompson, Nicole E; Thorsen, Kristin Cynthia L; Ryan, Mary L; Sadoski, Cherry, Mark H; Clark-Cox, Brenda K; E; Toussaint, Jessica Jo; Treptow, Destiny F; Sanchez, Jenny L; Sarther, Compere, Angela C; Fletcher, Charmian Jodie K; Valenzuela-Taylor, Lorraine C; Kelly A; Schaefer, Gretchen S; Schmidt, K; Gabel, Glen R; Gatsakos, Mark Kristin Lynn; Scholnick, Meghan Sullivan; Van Vianen, Sarah E; Vasquez, Marisa; Albert; Graff, Stacy K; Grubbs, Matthew Schroeder, Susan C; Sedivec, Molly Walls, Trisha J; Walsh, Tracy M; Warren, S; Hinz, Kathleen J; Hivon, Patricia R; Seegert, Erin Joann; Severns, Lisa Mary E; Weichle, Jennifer A; Wilbrandt,

Salary Range: Less Than $25,000 Abruzzo, Deborah L; Adams, Begonia; Adams, Connie L; Allen, Barbara; Allen, Carrie E; Alo, Aysha Z; Alvarez, Dulce M; Alwine, Lynn M; Amici, Robyn L; Anderson, Carolyn J; Anderson, Jeannine L; Anderson, Laura A; Anklam, Cara D; Arellano Lopez, Gerardo; Arredondo, Edelmira; Austen, Gina M; Baier, Margaret J; Balasi, Barbara J; Balzer, Alissa A; Bargo, Diane C; Baron, Jennifer K; Barr, Nicholas R; Barrett, Jennifer R; Barry, Timothy J; Bartelt, Steven Charles; Bartosz, Elzbieta K; Batliner, Debbie; Belt, Regina M; Bennett, Cynthia L; Benoit, Andrew S; Benoit, Dawn M; Benson, Linda J; Berg-Roemeling, Christine T; Bilodeau, Jody E; Bishop, Elizabeth J; Blanco, Norma; Borgo, Anita M; Boxrud, Jennifer P; Brady, Cheryl M; Brent, Terri L; Briden, Joyce Ann; Brigante-Dziedzic, Wendy; Brokhof, Simone E; Brown, Kerry A; Brown, Kimber L; Burkat, Valerie J; Burke, Nikole L; Burney, Joy Ellen; Busse, Rachel M; Butler, Laura Ann; Buzinski, Gina M; Byczynski, Melissa C; Byrne, Debra A; Campioni, Deanna; Cane, Suzanne M; Capalbo, Carol; Carlson, Adrienne L; Carlstedt, Richard A; Carone, Linda R; Chapman, Connie S; Chirumbolo Burns, Elizabeth A; Chrzan, Susan A; Chubb, Kristen A; Clohessy, Holly E; Coel, Gail A; Conro, Domenica M; Conti, Deborah A; Cooper, Sarah K; Costello, Marisa I; Cotter, Dina L; Cozzi, Terese M; Cubelic, Laura A; Cummings, Annamarie; Czarnecki, Katharine A; Czipo, Jacob M; Czipo, Rachel A; Damler, Joann M; Daniels, Edward Farling; Davis-Foster, Danielle K; DeGenova, Leticia; DeJesus, Aileen A; Devoe, Cynthia E; Devona, Lisa M; Diaz, Agustina; Dietz, Amy E; Dirksen, Gayle L; Disselhorst, Michele L; Dittrich, Samantha L; Dowejko, Margaret M; Duchek, Michelle R; Egelston, Patricia M; Eggert, Jacolyn C; Erb, Corinna E; Erickson, Linda J; Feck, Sandra N; Ferreira, Veronica; Fier, Sarah R; Filskov, Marlene L; Fischer, Alexandrea; Fischer, Maryann G; Flanagan, Kim M; Fleter, Terri L; Flores, Cynthia L; Flores, Evette; Fogel, Jamie A; Foote, Joanne; Ford, Anita I; Foster, Jill L; Fox, Margarita; Frasca, Barbara; Frasca, John F; Frederick, Kevin A; Freese, Megan C; Frigo, Dina M; Fuchs, Sylvia S; Furio, Paula M; Gablenz, Cynthia L; Gagnon,

SALARY SCHEDULE OF GROSS PAYMENTS FOR CERTIFICATED PERSONNEL AND NON-CERTIFICATED PERSONNEL GROSS PAYMENT FOR NON-CERTIFICATED PERSONNEL Selden, Janice L; Sengstock, Pamela D; Paula J; Gatza, Mary C; Gedzyk, Patricia L; Martinez, Jessica; Martin Zima, Maria del Carmen; Martinez, Pamela N; Serra, Nick; Sevcik, Karin A; Seyller, Lee; Genovese, Michael J; Gerharz, Diane M; Sibley, Kimberly; Sievers, Mary Stacy M; Getz, Paige A; Giffels, Daniel P; Matras, Barbara J; Mazur, Debra J; Mazzaferro, Jeane A; Mcabee-Cragg, B; Siffrar, Karen E; Sistko, Linda M; Gillespie, Tiana L; Gilson, Tara L; Giron, Karen; McAnally, Donna A; McLean, Siudyla, Katarzyna J; Skiba, Joan R; Alma G; Glueckert, Darla J; Godines, Deborah Keller; Melendez, Lisa M; Skrandzius, Debbie J; Skrypek, Connor Maria V; Goldman, Wendy S; Good, Melton, Christine K; Merideth, Rebecca W; Slavenas, Christi C; Smith, Lisa S; Linda J; Goodman, Kirsten M; Grade, L; Meservey, Michele V; Meyers, Marie Smittle, Taylor A; Snyder, Michele M; Christine L; Graham, Karen A; Greanya, C; Milam, Pam; Millar, Regina T; Milnor, Sosa, Blanca; Spears, Leigh A; Jennifer L; Gru, Susan A; Gulbransen, Emily A; Min, Ann Marie; Mitre, Cherilyn Spychala, Mary M; Stahl, Kimberly C; Carole A; Hagen, Sherry L; Hansen, S; Mitsch, Amparo V; Mize, Lori Lea; Stalo, Colleen P; Stanek, Kathleen M; Carol J; Hanson, Anais R; Harenza, Lisa Moczalla, Dina L; Montressor, Mary K; Stanton, Melinda L; Starr, Janice J; G; Harris, Valerie R; Hartwig, Nancy J; Moore, Michelle C; Muellner, Cassandra Steinsdoerfer, Mary Ann; Sternberg, Harvel, Diane J; Harvel, William M; Shirley M; Stromberg, Karen J; Struck, Haviland, Mary A; Henry, Carol A; Hentz, A; Murray, Susan L; Myers, Sheryl; Nadzam-Honsa, Joan M; Neal, Dorothy; Rebecca M; Stuart, Daniela S; Sullivan, Adrienne J; Hernandez Ortiz, Jose Neckar, Kimberly L; Nelson, Janet L; Ann C; Sullivan, Elizabeth A; Sullivan, Miguel; Hernandez, Miguel; Herron, Nelson, Lisa Marie; Niles, Jody C; Kathryn A; Sundberg, Diane R; Mark D; Higgins, Sherry M; Hinkemeyer, Noelle, Jennifer M; Noonan, Clarissa M; Sundberg, Linda L; Sweet, Karen M; Diana L; Howard, Kathleen L; Howell, Nystrom, LouAnn; O’Brien, Jennifer L; Taldone, Amy J; Talley, Madonna J; Anna J; Hubacher, Nichole M; Hunt, O’Brien, Kevin; O’Brien, Lisa M; Teator, Alyssa J; Tennessen-Porter, Kylie Cathy D; Hunter, Sonja A; Hutchinson, O’Connell, Annette M; O’Connor, Ergina E; Tharp, Alexandra; Theodos, Chelsea Sara A.; Hyma, Marcia J; Innis, Leslie A; M; O’Fallon, Dawn Marie; O’Reilly, E; Thomas, Mary K; Thomas, Patricia C; Janes, Donna D; Jenkins, Laura J; Dorothy L; Oberhart, Mary B; Ochoa, Tobolt, Janet K; Tomasi, Rachel A; Tozzi, Jensen, Susan L; Johnson, Chris A; Johnston, Kathleen E; Johnson, Krista D; Teresa; Olsen, Maggie; Olson, Patricia N; Roseanne D; Trandel, Nancey K; Trannel, Paolelli, Susan E; Pappas, Julie B; Karen D; Turner, Kathleen Wayda; Johnston, Sarah L; Jones, Andrea L; Pecora, Dayna M; Pedersen, Debra; Twenty, Mary S; Ulreich, Tracy A; Valade, Jones, Patricia J; Jones, Ronald L; Pedzimaz, Joline M; Peraino, Charles R; Margaret A; Vattimo, Debra J; Velazco, Judson, Lisa A; Juliano, Christopher D; Peterson, Kody; Petricca, Janet M; Luis A; Velpel, Dena M; VentocillaKaczynski, Elaine M; Kaludis, Honey L; Petrucci, Dominic M; Petty, Allison L; Kalinsky, Gail V; Vermett, Candyce L; Kamholz, Karen A; Kane, Debra D; Kay, Pfeiffer, Katherine M; Phillips, Susan B; Voller, Kimberly M; Wardwell, Barbara A; Catherine M; Kelley, Shanna M; Kelly, Pietsch, Geoffrey M; Piller, Brett A; Weber, Dustin M; Wilkins, Dona R; Wille, Patricia H; Kencharek, Kristin M; Keys, Kathy M; Wille, Lori J; Williams, Priscilla Angeline; Kielbasa, Kathleen A; Kiermas, Pinter, Jennifer A; Pitrello, Amy E; Poremba, Ann N; Potthast, Marcia J; M; Wingo, Trace R; Winterling, Rachael Christine Marie; Kimpel, Laura A; Poulin, Nancy M; Prost, Dawn M; Puca, L; Witte, Gladys M; Wolf, Jessica R; Kiolbassa, Colleen R; Kirkpatrick, Vicki Carol M; Puccini, Jean E; Pulda, Mikki L; Wolfe, Jeanne L; Wolke, Rene L; Worline, A; Kistler, Carole J; Kluver, Michelle A; Purvey, Victoria T; Raithel, Mary K; Rana, Kimberly A; Wruck, Pamela J; Wuerl, Kobeluch, Lisa M; Koby, Pamela G; Jenny; Rand, Patricia L; Rangel, Myriam; Evelyn; Zacher, Susan W; Zawistowski, Kohlbacher, Michelle S; Kolarczyk, Regan, Mary E; Reichman, Therese A; Sandra R; Zgonina, Isabella; Zurawski, Jennifer P; Konzak, Kathleen E; Kosin, Repplinger, Casey Lee; Richardson, Wendy M Victoria; Kotarski, Jill; Kotarski, Kristen Deborah H; Richards, Marilyn J; Salary Range: $25,000 - $39,999 E; Kreitz, Jennifer E; Kronke, Erica T; Richardson, Susan S; Rierson, Cathy L; Alexander, Deborah A; Alfus, Sharon Krusinski, Janet M; Ksiazek, Paulina; A; Barcus, Sandra L; Barreto, Jesus G; Kubiak, Theresa A; Kuta, Miriam; Kyska, Rivas, Maria A; Rivera, Claudia; Rochford, Alyssa M; Rodriguez, Claudia Berens, Barbara A; Bottalla, Judy W; Michelle M; Lacassa, Darlene L; Lahey, A; Rodriguez, Cristina; Rodriguez, Brown, Mary Ann; Buchert, Matthew Linda A; Landeroz, Melissa C; LaPak, Mireya A; Roels, Susan; Rokusek, W; Campos, Armando; Casanas, Brandon J; Laureys, Patricia; Leach, Katie L; Leali, Deonna M; Leider, Carol L; Jennifer C; Ross, Karen J; Rouse, Robyn Doria; Davidson, Shirley J; DeFalco, M; Roycroft, Joan; Rudin, Marcy A; Kimberly Ann; Espinoza, Adalberto Lenzi, Kathryn L; Letak, Jennifer L; Rueff, Alec J; Ruffino, Mary F; Ruiz, Z; Faes, H. Eve; Flores- Ruiz, Carlos Levin, Gretchen C; Ley, Ellen M; Marlene O; Russell, Christine M; Russo, A; Folak, Carolyn; Fox, Kimberly A; Lieurance, Stephanie M; Lilja, Tina J; Joyce M; Russo, Leanne M; RyanGervais, Sandra C; Glauner, Jack A; Loera, Angeline E; Loescher, Marcia J; Lomelino, Collene F; Lorentz, Tamera M; Kujawa, Karen L; Saladin, Mary C; Salas Glauner, Mary L; Hemmerling, Debra JR, Jose B; Santor, Katie D; Saputa, G; Hendrix, Erendira Z; Hermenegildo, Loria, Jill E; Losasso, Cheryl R; Losch, Danielle R; Savage, Melissa J; Leonel; Hernandez Bautista, Jose A; Elizabeth D; Lutz, Kathleen A; Maag, Sawallisch, Diane C; Schlesinger, Hernandez, Remberto; Hillers, Rebecca Sherry L; Macalpine, Laraine M; Magly, S; Jaimes Martinez, Olga O; Keegan, Jill K; Mahnke, Ronda; Mailey, Becky M; Jacqueline A; Schneider, Linda L; Schneider, Michelle S; Schultz, Catherine Amanda J; Kenney, Lyle C; King, Ronald Malato, Katherine; Malek, Joyce M; A; Schuppert, Kristin L; Schuring, S; Kneip, Maria T; Komosa, Renee B; Mallory, Brenda P; Maltby, Trasa D; Kimberly D; Scott, Cameron; Sedlak, Lopez, Juan Carlos; Malpica, Daniel; Marchik, Julie A; Marshall, Karen E; Marshall, Rebecca A; Martinez, Brenda Lisa R; Seisser, Alexis C; Selcke, Julie A; McCormick, Susan Marie; Mueller,

Person, Firm, or Corporation Aggregate Amount CATINI, KELLI S $2,505.50 GRUPER, ANASTASIA C $2,520.00 BRUCKER COMPANY $2,522.30 4IMPRINT $2,549.91 SEVERNS, LISA V $2,621.00 SCHMIDT, WILLIAM D $2,645.41 GREAT LAKES CLAY & SUPPLY CO $2,663.96 QUILL CORPORATION $2,685.82 CRISIS PREVENTION INSTITUTE $2,688.25 SCHOOL OUTFITTERS $2,705.54 1ST AYD CORPORATION $2,706.18 MITCHELL, ALISON N $2,721.00 ELGIN SHEET METAL COMPANY $2,750.00 ULINE $2,781.89 GLOBAL COMPLIANCE NETWORK, INC. $2,800.00 AIR CYCLE CORPORATION $2,824.50 BIGOS, SANDRA L $2,844.20 AJS PUBLICATIONS, INC $2,909.25 CAROLINA BIOLOGICAL SUPPLY CO $2,919.01 ANSERCALL 24 $2,956.00 WM. J. CASSIDY TIRE & AUTO SUPPLY $3,007.78 STAN’S OFFICE MACHINES, INC. $3,033.02 READ BETWEEN THE LYNES $3,034.87 FLAGHOUSE INC $3,048.60 CABLEEXPRESS CORPORATION $3,056.10 JUDSON UNIVERSITY - A BAPTIST

Payments over $2,500, excluding wages and salaries. INSTITUTION $3,060.00 DREISILKER ELECTRIC MOTORS, INC STANDARD STATIONERY SUPPLY CO $3,092.46 BUCK BROS INC FOX VALLEY JR HIGH SCHOOL CONF $3,103.00 COLUMBIA PIPE AND SUPPLY CO CAMBIUM LEARNING INC $3,111.94 NES EQUIPMENT SERVICES CORPORATION TRANE U.S., INC $3,117.00 ILLINOIS PRINCIPAL ASSOCIATION $3,160.50 FLINN SCIENTIFIC, INC COSTCO WHOLESALE $3,174.97 SCHOLASTIC, INC HUGHES & SON, INC $3,175.00 DEMCO, INC BOOKSOURCE, INC $3,188.22 MARENEM, INC ACADEMIA CULTURAL BUREAU OF EDUCATION & RESEARCH, INC $3,199.00 BRIGHT STAR CARE OF BARRINGTON/MCHENRY COUNTY W-T LAND SURVEYING INC $3,200.00 MIDWEST APPLIED SOLUTIONS, INC $3,266.68 ZIEGLER’S ACE HARDWARE MAHONEY LIMITED PARTNERSHIP $3,300.00 ILLINOIS READING COUNCIL THERMOSYSTEMS INC $3,317.24 PARRISH, LORI SCHOLASTIC CLASSROOM MAGAZINE ILLINOIS ASSOC OF SCHOOL BUSINESS OFFICALS $3,325.00 SUCCESS BY DESIGN INC GEORGIO’S PIZZERIA & PUB, LLC $3,333.12 AIRGAS VEX ROBOTICS, INC $3,361.17 NICCHIA, DORIS NELSON, CATHERINE A $3,381.21 COMELEC SERVICES, INC ORIENTAL TRADING CO. $3,385.02 CONSORTIUM FOR EDUCATIONAL CHANGE BYE-MO’R INC $3,409.70 LEADERSHIP GREATER MCHENRY CO $3,450.00 REVCORE RADIATOR INC VANDERS ENTERPRISES, INC $3,460.00 WEST MUSIC COMPANY, INC. POMP’S TIRE SERVICE, INC $3,495.76 UNITED CEREBRAL PALSY SEGUIN GREATER CHICAGO WISCONSIN BUS SALES & SERVICE $3,575.87 TEACHING STRATEGIES, INC. $3,588.75 ENABLEMART

$3,596.73 $3,602.19 $3,666.55 $3,685.00 $3,729.46 $3,753.25 $3,758.67 $3,762.00 $3,785.00 $3,806.50 $3,808.96 $3,825.00 $3,834.80 $3,862.62 $3,867.52 $3,940.64 $4,029.60 $4,055.35 $4,085.96 $4,155.00 $4,230.55 $4,237.20 $4,282.49

CLASSIFIED 17

J; Hochstetler, Laurel H; Jacobsen, John M; Johnston, Gayle W; Juarez, Suzanne E; Kelley, James S; Klinsky, Bethany A; Luto, Ceneca L; Marks, Amy M; Meyer, Scott W; Mosquera, Amy L; Nelson, Catherine A; Parrish, Lori Renee; Petersen, Monica J; Prickett, Jeffry D; Rasmussen, Susan L; Richmond, Susan Carol; Sampson, Scott G; Savage, Kathleen A; Scarfe, Stephen C; Smith, Jessica Ann; Stone, James Michael; Supert, Kathleen A; Treptow, Jeanne M; Van Fleet, Kathleen B; White, Pamela S; Wolk, Mary Jo K; Wyse, Jacqueline J; Youel, Curt

Cathy L; Perez, Brian; Plaza, Karen J; Poulos, Rita E; Ramirez, Marina; Ratzek, Cynthia J; Renteria JR, David; Renteria, Luserito; Reyes, Roberto F; Sandor, John; Schoepel, Jennifer A; Schuldt, Louise A; Seymour, Gary W; Simons, Jennifer A; Simons, Kori J; Slimko, Dana Rae; Smith, Jana; Stahl, Matthew TJ; Stampnick, Monica B; Stotz, Beverly J; Tapia, Oscar; Tharp, Janna L; Walke, Terry Kay; Washington, Richard E; Weber, Lynn Frances; Wirth, Phyllis L; Zaccagni, Valerie D; Zambole, Shannon M; Zielinski, Sara M Salary Range: $40,000 - $59,999 Aldana, Cristino; Alvarado, Jesus M; Avalos, Salvador; Barratt, Marina S; Barradas, Ricardo; Bell, Shauna R; Belmonte, Michael J; Black, Katherine; Boldog, Jeffrey G; Bourne, Clare F; Bright, Lori A; Brock, Amy K; Cervantes, Herman; Chamberlin, Shelly L; Czeslawski-Perez, Nancy J; DeAngelis, Jaclyn M; Ferretti, Jeannine J; Fowler, Thomas G; Hernandez, Antonio; Kenny, Debra A; Kociszewski, Janet M; Kwayzer, Debra A; Larson, Lynnda M; Lazaro, Francisco; Limon, Luis Antonio; Ljunggren, Kristi L; Meier, Larry L; Mejia, Lucino; Milnor, Sandra L; Montgomery, Lisa A; Morales, Narciso L; Myers, Martha E; Nyberg, Dorothy F; O’Reilly, Kevin M; Olivar, Guillermo; Olivar, Juan; Olson, Megan B; Pavlis, Kristina; Pelon, Lisa M; Perez, Luis; Platek, Susan J; Prathan, Bim; Rivera, Mario; Rivera, Ramiro; Ross, Karen Lee; Saucedo, Jennifer M; Shuh, Judith M; Smith, Sean R; Swanson, Kelly A; Tendick, Katherine J; Velazquez, Carlos; Wysock, Anne E Salary Range: $60,000 and over Adams, Michael R; Barr, Denise C; Chanthasene, Thany; Currao, Bettina C; DeFalco, Michael A; Farina, Karen Ann; Friel, Robert P; Gitzinger, James C; Groves, Gregory L; Hanson, Carl W; Lozynski, Douglas J; Maycroft, David E; McLeland, Marcia J; Perez, Raul; Pluciennik, Stephen; PonsolleMays, Michelle R; Puesta, Helen F; Rueff, James E; Rueff, John R; Salas, Guillermo; Salas, Inocensio; Salas, Jose V; Schmidt, William D; Stahl, Matthew M; Whitlock, Laurie L; Woodall, Lorna M; Yates, Larry, Bauer, Donna; Correa, Sandra G; Jenkins, David C; Schuh, David S

E SCHOOL SOLUTIONS PREFERRED INVESTORS CERIDIAN BENEFIT SERVICES THINK INK INC TOBG TROPHIES, INC ACE HARDWARE MULTI-HEALTH SYSTEMS INC. WACKER HARDWARE COMPANY HERITAGE FOOD SERVICE GROUP EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH UNIVERSITY OF OREGON STORAGE ON THE SPOT, INC STONE, JAMES M MCMASTER-CARR SUPPLY CO SEPTRAN, INC SKIRMONT MECHANICAL CONTRACTOR INC MOFTWARE, INC SIMPLEXGRINNELL LP CRYSTAL LAKE SCHOOL DIST #47 PRO COM SYSTEMS MIDWEST TIME RECORDER INC TYLER TECHNOLOGIES INC 3 CHEFS CATERING, INC THE CENTER: RESOURCES FOR TEACHING & LEARNING HOUCHEN BINDERY LTD

$4,380.75 $4,417.80 $4,419.36 $4,434.60 $4,447.76 $4,496.78 $4,507.84 $4,533.00 $4,549.00 $4,625.00 $4,650.00 $4,665.00 $4,720.53 $4,892.81 $4,895.59 $5,185.60 $5,368.00 $5,471.65 $5,500.00 $5,544.50 $5,550.00 $5,593.84 $5,677.85 $5,750.00 $5,787.60


18 CLASSIFIED • Wednesday, November 30, 2016 STATE CHEMICAL $5,829.76 NORTHWEST NEWS GROUP $5,868.27 IXL LEARNING, INC $5,940.00 DOORS DONE RIGHT, INC $6,155.00 J W PEPPER & SON, INC $6,156.53 LEROY’S LAWN EQUIPMENT INC $6,159.24 GUSTAVE A LARSON CO $6,217.98 MIKE’S SERVICE CENTER INC $6,377.43 SCHOOL HEALTH CORP $6,426.39 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORP. $6,430.80 SASED - MIDWEST PBIS $6,450.00 SANTILLANA PUBLISHING CO INC $6,522.91 REALLY GOOD STUFF, INC $6,597.84 D & H DISTRIBUTING CO $6,618.59 THINK SOCIAL PUBLISHING, INC. $6,681.44 HONEYWELL INTERNATIONAL INC $6,743.36 PITNEY BOWES, INC $6,814.16 PIONEER VALLEY EDUC PRESS $7,044.60 LAWSON PRODUCTS INC $7,085.91 CROWN GYM MATS, INC $7,100.00 JGR COMMERCIAL SOLUTIONS, INC $7,111.25 VILLAGE OF LAKEWOOD $7,201.88 WISCONSIN DEPT OF REVENUE $7,234.19 WICKSTROM AUTO GROUP $7,310.65 LAC ENTERPRISES, INC $7,479.63 WOODSTOCK POWER EQUIPMENT, INC$7,587.06 NORTHERN KEY & LOCK INC $7,667.50 NORTH AMERICAN CORPORATION OF ILLINOIS $7,905.12 CHICAGO OFFICE TECHNOLOGY GROUP, INC. $7,920.00 MARK’S SEWER SERVICE, INC $8,225.00 NICOR $8,315.38 LAKELAND COMMUNICATIONS, INC $8,340.66 FOLLETT SOFTWARE CO $8,400.00 DM OF INDIANA, INC $8,415.95 PAULY’S CUSTOM APPAREL COMPANY $8,434.13 BOULDER RIDGE COUNTRY CLUB, INC $8,450.00 ACTION CLEANERS, INC $8,467.01 MONDO PUBLISHING $8,486.26 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION $8,533.39 PROJECT LEAD THE WAY, INC $8,579.00 DALJEAN, INC. $8,641.48 EBSCO PUBLISHING $8,659.37 PYRAMID SCHOOL PRODUCTS $8,900.64 US GAMES $9,066.88 TRUGREEN LIMITED PARTNERSHIP $9,090.00 PRO-ED INC $9,390.27 $9,496.88 PTSR, INC $9,600.00 HAND2MIND, INC $9,727.54 SEIU LOCAL 73 $9,802.00 ANDERSON PEST CONTROL $9,891.40 KROESCHELL ENGINEERING CO., INC $9,973.26 AURORA UNIVERSITY $10,000.00 DON JOHNSTON, INC $10,046.96 CL GRAPHICS, INC $10,151.56 FORECAST 5 ANALYTICS, INC $10,330.00 NASCO $10,406.75 ADAMS ENTERPRISES INC $10,472.48 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY $10,531.47 FISHER AUTO PARTS $10,560.24 VISIPLEX, INC $10,654.02 UNIQUE PRODUCTS & SERVICE CORP $10,767.72 ENCK, TIMOTHY $11,078.62 DURA WAX COMPANY INC $11,248.55 ARROW SEPTIC & SEWER $11,285.00 NORTHWESTERN ILLINOIS ASSOCIATION $11,325.60 LEARNING A-Z $11,341.22

• Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

Payments over $2,500, excluding wages and salaries. (Continued) JOHN W GASPARINI, INC $11,443.02 MIDWEST DECORATING, INC. PARTITION PROS, INC $11,755.80 TOMASELLOS LANDSCAPING LIONHEART ENGINEERING $11,973.82 COMMERCIAL SPECIALTIES, INC. EMERALD DATA SOLUTIONS, INC $12,000.00 INTEGRATED SYSTEMS CORPORATION GREAT LAKES ELEVATOR SERVICE, INC $12,152.84 TEAMSTERS LOCAL UNION NO. 731 M&A PRECISION TRUCK REPAIR $12,445.17 ZONAR SYSTEMS, INC CRYSTAL LAKE PARK DISTRICT $12,555.00 CARNOW CONNIBEAR & ASSOC LTD E.T. PADDOCK ENTERPRISES, INC REGIONAL SUPERINTENDENT/ SCHOOL $12,653.25 VIRCO, INC SCHOLASTIC BOOK FAIRS $12,703.62 OC TANNER RECOGONITION CO $12,726.36 TEAM REIL, INC MEDNIK WIPING MATERIALS CO BEHM PAVEMENT MAINTENACE, INC $13,050.00 AT&T - SBC SAM’S CLUB $13,059.17 KELLEY WILLIAMSON COMPANY LLOYD’S PAINT’N’PAPER INC $13,111.90 WALMART COLOR PORTRAITS, INC $13,143.76 CONSERV FS, INC SCHOOLDUDECOM $13,317.46 LESLIE SHANKMAN SCHOOL ALEXIAN BROTHERS $13,440.00 CORPORATION TOM PECK FORD OF HUNTLEY, INC $13,740.59 STEINER ELECTRIC CO MODERNFOLD CHICAGO, INC $13,775.00 EXXON-MOBIL BUSINESS G&K SERVICES-ROCKFORD-11TH $14,161.88 MENARDS LOGSDON STATIONERS $14,815.07 NCS PEARSON, INC FOX VALLEY FIRE & SAFETY CO., INC $14,888.90 RESERVE ACCOUNT STAPLES ADVANTAGE $14,894.55 THE ALLENDALE ASSOCIATION NAPA AUTO PARTS $14,974.44 SKYWARD, INC. MATRIX GLASS INC $15,441.09 WAREHOUSE DIRECT, INC YOUTH CARE OF UTAH, INC. $15,442.00 NILCO, INC UNISOURCE $15,580.14 MIDWEST COMPUTER R&G CONSULTANTS $15,659.55 PRODUCTS, INC MIDLAND PAPER COMPANY $15,710.39 CRYSTAL LAKE CROSSING GUARDS GULGRENS APPLIANCES, INC $15,750.00 STATE DISBURSEMENT UNIT ALTHOFF INDUSTRIES, INC $15,832.35 SUMMIT SCHOOL, INC SPECIAL ED DIST OF MCHENRY CO ADVANTAGE MOVING & STORAGE, INC $16,019.85 COMED NEUCO INC $16,051.13 HEINEMANN WORKSHOP NATIONAL LOUIS UNIVERSITY COMPUTER MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGIES, INC $16,135.00 UNITY SCHOOL BUS PARTS, INC. PRINTER SUPPLIES INCORPORATED $16,745.99 CHICAGO ALTERNATIVE ED HOLDING COMPANY, INC EDUCATION TECHNOLOGY PARTNERS, INC $17,000.00 MORROW BROTHERS FORD, INC CENGAGE LEARNING, INC $17,307.40 MUSIC & ARTS CENTER INC IL ASSOC OF SCHOOL BOARDS $17,327.00 ILLINOIS DEPT EMPLOY SECURITY MC GUIRE, NANCY $17,439.64 ASSURANT EMPLOYEE BENEFITS MICHAEL’S UNIFORM COMPANY $17,910.72 CRESCENT ELECTRIC SUPPLY CO INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE $18,002.18 MURNANE PAPER COMPANY CAREY ELECTRIC CONTRACTING, INC $18,600.00 GANDER PUBLISHING, INC CITY OF CRYSTAL LAKE $18,694.54 TREDROC TIRE SERVICES OFFICE DEPOT LAKESHORE CURRICULUM MATERIALS $18,757.48 AUXIER FINISH SYSTEMS, INC DISCOVERY EDUCATION $18,840.00 TOTAL SYSTEMS ROOFING, INC INTEGRA BUSINESS SYSTEMS INC $19,322.19 LEACH ENTERPRISES INC GRAINGER WW INC AMBASSADOR ATHLETIC APPAREL, INC $19,514.20 SCHOOL OF EXPRESSIVE ARTS & LEARNING, INC COLFAX CORPORATION $19,600.00 STANS OFFICE TECHNOLOGIES ALLIANCE PUBLISHING & MARKETING, INC $19,621.66 SANTANDER LEASING, LLC VERIZON WIRELESS SERVICE $19,687.23 DELL FINANCIAL SERVICES CLASS $20,206.46 LINDAMOOD-BELL LEARNING PROCESSES MT TRASH CANS CLEANING, INC. $21,300.00 KRANZ INC $22,181.30 CRYSTAL LAKE WATER HAMILTON ACADEMY INC $22,321.44 KS STATEBANK BLACKBOARD, INC $22,330.62 SPEECH AND LANGUAGE PROFESSIONALS, INC HEINEMANN $22,734.68 ARTHUR J GALLAGHER RMS INC $23,750.00 HARBOUR HOLDING CORPORATION NCS PEARSON INC $23,822.30 DE LAGE LANDEN FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC PEARSON EDUCATION, INC $24,718.29 ACTION FENCE CONTRACTORS, INC. $25,115.00 VISION SERVICE PLAN, NFP BARNES & NOBLE $25,170.84 EASTER SEALS METROPOLITAN CHICAGO, INC LANGTON SNOW SOLUTIONS, INC $25,224.78 LANDMARK FORD, INC $25,402.00 HOUGHTON MIFFLIN HARCOURT PUBLISHING CO PERSPECTIVES, LTD $25,484.70

$26,300.00 $26,791.00 $26,887.00 $27,000.00 $27,040.50 $27,644.82 $27,765.00 $27,942.00 $28,965.76 $29,425.87 $29,547.00 $29,817.79 $30,035.65 $30,818.18 $31,449.14 $31,520.38 $31,704.11 $31,948.14 $32,243.45 $32,552.71 $33,000.00 $33,733.92 $34,100.25 $35,349.23 $37,247.06 $37,314.72 $37,857.28 $37,884.08 $38,422.32 $38,804.82 $38,818.08 $38,929.72 $39,645.00 $42,220.54 $42,843.32 $43,168.00 $44,402.73 $45,412.66 $46,530.32 $48,862.49 $49,043.50 $49,159.99 $49,609.04 $49,660.27 $49,700.00 $51,347.50 $53,332.48 $54,323.22 $56,256.75 $56,359.02 $56,472.24 $57,859.20 $61,078.40 $64,202.88 $64,907.00 $67,213.25 $69,804.70 $70,683.72 $71,400.98 $72,920.66 $73,608.37

ARBOR MANAGEMENT, INC $76,819.47 SCHOOL SPECIALTY, INC $83,871.86 AT&T $86,046.59 ALEXANDER LEIGH CENTER FOR AUTISM $87,396.46 STEVE TOBIN CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION INC. $87,533.00 FOLLETT LIBRARY RESOURCES $91,592.90 NORTHWEST EVALUATION ASSOC. $94,175.00 HASTINGS ASPHALT SERVICES, INC. $100,356.80 COMCAST $104,812.68 FAMILY GUIDANCE CENTERS, INC $104,913.47 DELL COMPUTER CORP $114,030.64 MCGRAW-HILL COMPANIES $116,083.08 HOME STATE BANK- FICA MDCR $116,893.00 LOWERY MCDONNELL CO $134,146.00 RUSH TRUCK CENTERS OF ILLINOIS, INC $138,466.89 METROPOLITAN LIFE CO. $144,388.62 AUDIO ENGINEERING INC $147,169.50 HUNTLEY DIST 158 $148,034.00 ADVANCED DISPOSAL SERVICES MIDWEST, LLC $172,112.98 SCHOOL DISTRICT #47 $174,953.32 VORTEX COMMERCIAL FLOORING, INC $184,336.89 GENERAL ELECTRIC CAPITAL CORPORATION $189,751.22 METRO PROFESSIONAL PRODUCTS $190,075.21 CONSTELLATION NEWENERGY GAS DIVISION, LLC $216,026.77 RB CONSTRUCTION, INC. $264,718.99 THE BANCROFT SCHOOL $285,985.22 AMERICAN UNITED LIFE $288,195.00 CLETA $293,731.15 SCHOOL DIST #47-FLEX ACCOUNT $297,516.51 DELTA DENTAL - ASC $325,149.54 ASSURANCE AGENCY LTD $346,273.00 HOME STATE BANK- IRS $354,025.90 CDW GOVERNMENT, LLC $466,313.05 HOME STATE BANK- FICA $499,815.88 PERFORMANCE SERVICES, INC $517,900.50 APPLE, INC $532,416.95 PETROLEUM TRADERS CORPORATION $602,961.75 ILLINOIS MUNICIPAL RETIREMENT FUND $632,729.14 DIRECT ENERGY MARKETING, INC $678,493.26 MIDWEST TRANSIT EQUIPMENT, INC $747,016.60 $915,011.75 TEACHERS HEALTH INSURANCE CLIC $1,148,744.98 COMMUNITY UNIT SCHOOL DIST 200 $1,196,064.05 TSA CONSULTING GROUP, INC $1,257,419.19 HOME STATE BANK - FICA $1,423,753.95 HOME STATE BANK - FICAMED $1,548,439.61 IMRF $1,727,334.83 ILLINOIS DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE $1,848,706.44 HEALTH CARE SERVICES CORP. $2,816,576.74 TRANSPORTATION JOINT AGREEMENT $3,773,351.31 BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIELD OF ILLINOIS $4,234,974.45 TEACHERS RETIREMENT SYSTEM $4,484,730.48 HOME STATE BANK - IRS $5,212,191.98 US BANK $5,527,257.00 SCHOOL DIST 47-INSURANCE FUND $7,325,839.16


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Wednesday, November 30, 2016 •

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE TWENTY- SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MC HENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS U.S. BANK TRUST, N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR LSF9 MASTER PARTICIPATION TRUST Plaintiff, -v.HEIDI BRODIE A/K/A HEIDI R. BRODIE, et al Defendant 15 CH 478 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on October 6, 2016, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 1:00 PM on December 27, 2016, at the NLT Title L.L.C, 390 Congress Parkway, Suite D, Crystal Lake, IL, 60014, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: LOT 72 IN COMPLEX 121-122, BEING A RE-SUBDIVISION OF LOTS 121 AND 122 OF SPRING CREEK FARMS UNIT NO. 1, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE WEST HALF OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 43 NORTH, RANGE 8 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED MAY 27, 1981 AS DOCUMENT NO. 817044, IN MCHENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as 1010 PERRY DR, ALGONQUIN, IL 60102 Property Index No. 19-35-155-010. The real estate is improved with a gray, vinyl siding, two unit home, one car attached garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real

ght estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in \"AS IS\" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701 (C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver's license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Cook County and the same identification for sales held at other county venues where The Judicial Sales Corporation conducts foreclosure sales. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 pm. McCalla Raymer Pierce, LLC, Plaintiff's Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number 253084. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. McCalla Raymer Pierce, LLC One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 E-Mail: pleadings@pierceservices.com Attorney File No. 253084 Case Number: 15 CH 478 TJSC#: 36-13046 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt

Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff's attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I708206 (Published in the Northwest Herald, November 23, 30, 2016 December 7, 2016)

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE TWENTYY-SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MCHENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS IN THE MATTER OFTHE PETITION OF MANDY MEYER and JOSEPH ANGEL VILLARREAL, Petitioners, TO ADOPT MADISON CASTALDO, a minor. vs. GARY CASTALDO, Respondent. VS. ALL WHOM IT MAY CONCERN, Defendant. Case No. 16 AD 17 ADOPTION-PUBLICATION NOTICE ADOPTION NOTICE-STATE OF ILLINOIS, Circuit Court of McHenry County. In the matter of the Petition for the Adoption of MADISON CASTALDO a female child. Adoption No. 16AD17. To GARY CASTALDO Take notice that a petition was filed in the Circuit Court of McHenry County, Illinois, for the adoption of a child named MADISON CASTALDO. Now, therefore, unless you GARY CASTALDO, and all whom it may concern, file your answer to the Petition in the action or otherwise file your appearance therein, in the said Circuit Court of McHenry County, Room 101, in the City of Woodstock, Illinois, on or before the 19th day of December, 2016, a default may be entered against you at any time after that day and a judgment entered in accordance with the prayer of said Petition. Dated this 15th day of Nov, 2016, at my office located in Elgin, Illinois. By: /s/Julie M. Pirtle Dated November 16, 2016 /s/Katherine M Keefe Clerk of the Circuit Court of the 22nd Judicial Circuit McHenry County, Illinois (Published in the Northwest Herald on November 23, 30, December 7, 2016) 1245346

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 22ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MC HENRY COUNTY,

WOODSTOCK, ILLINOIS WELLS FARGO BANK NA; Plaintiff, vs. RICHARD J. FLYNN JR. AKA RICHARD JOSEPH FLYNN JR. AKA RICHARD FLYNN JR.; JESSICA K. FLYNN AKA JESSICA ROBYN KYRK AKA JESSICA R. KYRK AKA JESSICA FLYNN; SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; WORLD BUSINESS LENDERS, LLC; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS; Defendants, 16 CH 434 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Thursday, January 5, 2017, at the hour of 10:30 a.m. in the conference room, 970 McHenry Avenue, Crystal Lake, Illinois 60014, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described mortgaged real estate: LOT 3 IN MOELLER'S RESUBDIVISION, BEING A RESUBDIVISION OF LOTS 19, 20, 21, 22, AND 23 IN BLOCK 4 IN INDIAN GROVE SUBDIVISION, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 34, TOWNSHIP 43 NORTH, RANGE 8, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AUGUST 6, 1979 AS DOCUMENT NO. 775714, IN MCHENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as 824 Oceola Drive, Algonquin, Illinois 60102. P.I.N. 19-34-357-025. The improvement on the property consists of a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property Act. Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. For information call The Sales Department at Plaintiff's Attorney, Anselmo Lindberg Oliver LLC, 1771 West Diehl Road, Naperville, Illinois 60563-1890. (630) 453-6960. For Bidding instructions visit www.fal-illinois.com 24 hours prior to sale. F16050056 I708844

PUBLIC NOTICE

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 22ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MC HENRY COUNTY, WOODSTOCK, ILLINOIS DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE FOR ARGENT SECURITIES INC., ASSET BACKED PASS THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-W4; Plaintiff, vs. THERESA GROSCH; DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR ARGENT SECURITIES INC ASSET BACKED PASS THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-W4, UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED NOVEMBER 1, 2005; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF THERESA GROSCH, IF ANY; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS; Defendants, 16 CH 435 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Thursday, January 5, 2017, at the hour of 10:30 a.m. in the conference room, 970 McHenry Avenue, Crystal Lake, Illinois 60014, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described mortgaged real estate: LOT 14 IN BLOCK 43 IN MCHENRY SHORES UNIT NO. 5, A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 44 NORTH, RANGE 8 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, AND PARTS OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 44 NORTH, RANGE 8 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED SEPTEMBER 20, 1960 AS DOCUMENT NO. 375179, IN BOOK 14 OF PLATS, PAGE 59, IN MCHENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as 1113 Bonita Lane, McHenry, IL 60050. P.I.N. 14-11-203-017-0000. The improvement on the property consists of a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property (Published in the Northwest Act. Herald, November 30, 2016 Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 December 7, 14, 2016) hours, by certified funds. No refunds. WE'VE GOT IT! The property will NOT be open for Northwest Herald inspection. Community Classified For information call sales 877-264-2527 department at Plaintiff's Attorney, www.NWHerald.com Th Wirbicki La Gr 33 We

ey, partm The Wirbicki Law Group, 33 West Monroe Street, Chicago, Illinois (312) 360-9455. 60603. WA16-0349 I708845

CLASSIFIED 19

PUBLIC NOTICE ANNUAL TREASURER'S REPORT VILLAGE OF BULL VALLEY FISCAL YEAR ENDING APRIL 30, 2016

(Published in the Northwest Herald, November 30, 2016 REVENUE SUMMARY Property Taxes - 408,194; Circuit Court Fines - 149,164; Income Tax December 7, 14, 2016) 116,817; Local Ordinance Citations - 101,772; Utility Tax -87,129; Impound Fees - 70,560; MFT Funds - 27,602; Sales Tax - 21,504; Local Use Tax - 20,014; Home State Bank - 20,000; Hay Sales PUBLIC NOTICE 9,199; Squad Car Fund - 7,447; Liquor License - 7,200; DUI Fines 6,017; Park Income - 5,408; Still Farm Income - 3,000; Building Permits - 1,770; Dog Park Donation - 1,500; Misc. Income - 2,000 ASSUMED NAME TOTAL REVENUES: $1,066,232 PUBLICATION NOTICE Public Notice is hereby given that on November 10, 2016, a certificate was filed in the Office of the County Clerk of McHenry County, Illinois, setting forth the names and post-office address of all of the persons owning, conducting and transacting the business known as YUMMY ASIAN BISTRO located at: 918 ROUTE 22 FOX RIVER GROVE IL 60021

EXPENDITURE SUMMARY Advance Roofing- 12,700; Advance Public Safety - 2,583; Baxter & Woodman - 115,629; Brown & Co. 6,135; Buck Bros - 4,387; Capital One Bank - 4,956; CMS - 17,280; ComEd - 3,106; Compass Minerals - 44,308; Copy Express - 3,585; Cowlin, Curran & Coppedge 20,525; Curran Cont. - 6,906; DeCraene's - 3,707; Geske & Sons 14,757; Grays Inc. - 3,177; Home State Bank - 20,067; IMLRMA 42,389; James Page - 7,961; Lintner Automotive - 14,199; McHenry County Sheriff's Police - 16,812; McHenry Savings Bank - 15,034; Menards - 5,699; Morrie & Sons Inc. - 3,230; Nunda Township Road District - 33,816; Olson Auto Body - 2,877; Peter Mader - 6,144; PetroLiance - 7,508; Quill - 4,962; Richard C. Kelly - 2,750; Richard Vance - 9,184; Safebuilt - 2,968; Service Master - 7,000; Wex Bank 16,555; Zukowski, Rogers, Flood & McArdle - 25,679 All Other Disbursements Less Than ($2,500) - 7,784 TOTAL EXPENDITURE: $516,359

COMPENSATION SUMMARY Dated November 10, 2016 Range; Less than $15,000: Antoni, Al; Hoffman, Kenneth; Hysell, Ryan; Koch, Marc; Mader, Peter; Mucciante, Tina; O'Connor, Kevin; /s/ Mary E. McClellan Rodriguez, Ryan; Schneider, Mark; Walker, Randy; Zdanowski, Luke; McHenry County Clerk $15,000 to $24,999: Jesske, Mike; Page, James; $45,00 to $54,999 Keinz, Phyllis; Koch, Michael; Vance, Richard. (Published in the Northwest Herald TOTAL COMPENSATION: $395,610 on November 16, 23, 30, 2016) General Fund Other Fund 1243704 Beginning Fund Balance 150, 937 59,726 Income 1,038,538 27,694 PUBLIC NOTICE 911,969 0 Two Board of Trustee positions of Expense 277,515 87,420 the Algonquin-Lake in the Hills Fire Ending Fund Balance Protection District for a 6-year term County, IlliI, Phyllis Keinz, Clerk of the Village of Bull Valley, McHenry will be voted upon at the Consolidated Election on April 4, 2017. nois do hereby certify that the above is a true copy of the Annual TreaCandidate petition packets will be surer's Report for the fiscal year ending April 30, 2016. available for the position of Trustee during regular office hours begin- Phyllis Keinz ning Wednesday, November 23, Clerk 2016 from the District office, located at 1020 West Algonquin Road, (Published in the Northwest Herald on November 30, 2016) 1245208 Lake in the Hills. Candidates must Find. Buy. Sell. be a registered voter, and must be All in one place... HERE! a resident of the Algonquin-Lake in Everyday in the Hills Fire Protection District. Northwest Herald Candidates, or a candidate's deClassified signee, may begin circulating petitions. Completed candidate packets are filed between Monday, December 12, 2016 and Monday, December 19, 2016 at the Algonquin-Lake in the Hills Fire Protection District office.

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(Published in the Northwest Herald on November 30, 2016) 1247552

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