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DECKING THE HALLS

November 30, 2014 • $1.50

Jazz up your holidays with the latest in lights / Planit Style 6-7 NWHerald.com

THE ONLY DAILY NEWSPAPER PUBLISHED IN McHENRY COUNTY

HIGH

41 15 Complete forecast on page A12

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CLASS 7A CHAMPIONSHIP GAME: PROVIDENCE 31, CARY-GROVE 28

‘GREAT SEASON, BOYS’

LOW

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Ill. video gambling is raising eyebrows By DAVID MERCER and JIM SUHR The Associated Press

Photos by Lathan Goumas – lgoumas@shawmedia.com

Cary-Grove’s Matt Sutherland (left) and George Hartke react after losing the Class 7A state championship game Saturday against Providence Catholic at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign in Champaign. BELOW: Cary-Grove’s Tyler Pennington is taken down during the first half of the game.

Cary-Grove’s legacy will be as winners despite loss VIEWS Joey Kaufman CHAMPAIGN – This time, there was no long line of high fives waiting for a giddy Cary-Grove football team. There was just one long solemn march to the south end of Memorial Stadium. Tears streaked down the Trojans’ cheeks. Heads sank. Seniors Jason Gregoire and Willie Hartke wrapped their arms around one another as if to will themselves toward the stage to receive the second place trophy. Fans tried to console them. “Great season, boys,” yelled one. It was, and yet it ended like a season does for nearly every high school playoff team across Illinois, with a loss and with teenage boys crying. In the Class 7A champi-

onship game on a cool Saturday night, Cary-Grove fell to Providence, 31-28. The loss marked the lone blemish for the Trojans (13-1) this season. It prevented them from securing what would have been the school’s second state title. It should

n More coverage of Cary-Grove vs. Providence. PAGES C1-2

hardly, though, spoil an otherwise banner run. Asked afterward how history will view the 2014 Trojans, coach Brad Seaburg didn’t hesitate to offer a response. “A very dominant group that played a great team in the state

championship game and just came up a little short,” he said. “But was a source of pride for a lot of people in our community. Were great role models for our younger guys. It was a great, great season.” He’s right. Try this. Before Saturday, Providence had given up 38 points in four playoff games (14 of them coming in garbage time in the semifinals against Mt. Carmel). And coming out of the Blue Division of the Chicago Catholic League, the Celtics were, of course, battle tested, led by a smart quarterback in Justin Hunniford and an offense littered with Division I talent. Still, Cary-Grove, using that little ole triple option offense, went out and put up 28 points, running the ball 62 times and amassing 343 yards of total offense, nearly equaling Providence’s total of 346. On the big stage, under the lights, the Trojans went toe-to-toe

See LEGACY, page A10

n View more photos from the game online at NWHerald.com.

CHAMPAIGN – Since video gambling began in Illinois two years ago, the slot-like terminals have been showing up in places lawmakers never imagined – floral shops, laundromats, liquor stores and gas stations. They’re also now the main attraction at dozens of storefront bistros and cafes geared toward women. Video gambling has become a big business for the state, but it’s also raised some second thoughts in the process. Since the first terminal was turned on in 2012, it has generated $210.8 million in tax revenue for the cashRead more strapped state govMarengo ernment officials hear and $42.2 backlash on million for local gov- proposed video e r n m e n t s gaming expansion o n m o r e at gas stations. than $3 bil- PAGE A3 lion in wagered cash, according to the Illinois Gaming Board. The terminals also have meant significant money for businesses, such as the Arabian Knights Farms and Training Center, an equestrian center in Willowbrook, southwest of Chicago. The horse barn makes most of its money on weddings and parties for income, some of which can be seasonal, owner Michael Vena said. “There’s no money in horses. ... In the middle of winter, this will help,” Vena said, talking about the three gambling terminals tucked into a red-carpeted, plywood-walled room in his barn. They bring him $1,750 a month in profit. One of the sponsors of the video-gambling bill when it was approved in Springfield in 2009 says the spread of the machines into some of these places isn’t what he had in mind. “It was never our intention to turn florists’ shops into places for gambling,” said Rep. Lou Lang, a Skokie Democrat. “And so, it’s something that needs to be looked at, for sure.” The intent was to legalize and regulate a business already operating illegally in many bars and social clubs. Under the law, the key requirement is a liquor license, with each license-holder eligible for three to five machines.

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Gaming expansion paused

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Marengo alderman hearing criticism on idea to add terminals at gas stations / A3 BUSINESS

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See GAMBLING, page A10


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Mr. Gorbachev, tear down these bleachers I’m not a big fan of “character education” or any other fad that schools jump at if it means having to spend less time teaching kids to read, write and add. But I’m much less of a fan of lousy neighbors, so I’ll make an exception in the case of the District 155 School Board and its decision to build the Colosseum at the Crystal Lake South High School stadium. The school board needs some character, and they need it badly. First, some background. The school board decided in May 2013 to more than triple the size of its bleachers at a $1.18 million cost, without one tinker’s cuss given about the neighbors. The bleachers now are a gigantic eyesore that are too tall and too close to their lot lines. And that much larger footprint now gives football fans who happen to be peeping toms an opportunity for a show whether they’re watching the game or watching the neighbors through their windows. A number of the neighbors filed suit, and city government demanded the school board go through its planning and zoning process, citing the numerous violations of city ordinance. The school district’s argument that its rights supersede municipal law has been rejected by both the circuit

VIEWS Kevin Craver and appellate courts. An order to tear down the bleachers has been stayed as the school board appeals to the Illinois Supreme Court. In the end, I’m forced to wonder whether the legal fees blown by the school district will exceed the costs to build the bleachers in the first place. All of this over football. Let’s dispense with any bull flop about hosting bigger graduation ceremonies, community events or other hokum. This is about football and Friday Night Lights. Period. This is about a school board playing the role of the jerk neighbor – which we see all too much of in this nation of “me, me, me” – who thinks that his rights trump everybody else’s. This is not about people who bought homes next to a high school and then one day decided they didn’t like the noise. So let’s get back to character education. I’m most familiar with the national Character Counts! program. It’s geared toward K-through-8 classrooms, but seeing as how the high school board is acting like a bunch of petulant children, a program aimed

at the kiddies is sweet and appropriate. Character Counts! has six pillars: trustworthiness, respect, responsibility, fairness, caring and citizenship. One glance at the bullet points that come with each pillar – build a good reputation, follow the Golden Rule, think before you act and consider the consequences, play by the rules, etc. – shows Samson couldn’t have done a better job knocking them down than the school board. But all hope is not lost for the board. There’s a bullet point under the pillar of trustworthiness that tells kids to “have the courage to do the right thing.” The board should have done the right thing years ago, but it’s not too late. Drop the Supreme Court appeal, tear the bleachers down and work with the city of Crystal Lake to put up new ones. And give those neighbors a say. Another of the bullet points under trustworthiness is to “build a good reputation,” and that would be a start. The school board more likely than not still could get larger bleachers by working with the city. Or here’s an idea – maybe just keep them simple and instead, I don’t know, spend more on, say, education? That thing we pay taxes for the school to do when

the Crystal Lake South Gators aren’t on the field? The millions we will inevitably pour down the sewer of government waste over this debacle could have bought a lot of textbooks and tablets. Listen, folks, I love football. I spent six wonderful years attending games and killing brain cells as part of the Northern Illinois University Huskie Marching Band under the command of one Frank V. Bibb of Topeka, Kansas, You-nited States of ‘Murica. Next to the guys I served with in the military, my bandmates were the most dedicated bunch of degenerates I ever had the privilege to know. But at the end of the day, football’s only a game. It’s not why you fork over thousands of dollars a year in property taxes. The School District 155 Board has to re-examine its priorities. Because there’s a place that provides a raw and stark reminder of what happens when your priorities get out of whack over sports. It’s called Penn State.

• Senior reporter Kevin P. Craver has won more than 70 state and national journalism awards during his 14 years with the Northwest Herald. He can be reached at 815-526-4618 or at kcraver@shawmedia. com.

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H. Rick Bamman – hbamman@shawmedia.com

Bears mascot Staley greets Crosby Elementary School students after the Bear Down on Bullies program recently in Harvard. Staley and MC Lauren Hart presented the program that teaches the importance of respect and how to deal with and prevent bullying.

LIKE WHAT YOU SEE? Check out our photo galleries of images made by award-winning Northwest Herald photographers on the Northwest Herald website at: http://www.nwherald.com/lists/. Photos can also be purchased at http://photos.nwherald.com/photostore.

LOCAL BRIEF Reduced fine program to benefit food pantry

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Northwest Herald Web Poll Question The Northwest Herald invites you to voice your opinion. Log on to www.NWHerald.com and vote on today’s poll question:

“Fines for FISH” will run through Dec. 13 at the McHenry Public Library, 809 Front St.

Count on Me...

Andrew Killinger

Do you decorate your house and/or trees and bushes with holiday lights? Saturday’s results as of 10:30 p.m.:

How much time did you spend shopping on Black Friday?

73%

Library patrons can return overdue books, movies and CDs and pay half of the fines due. Fines collected will be donat-

ed to the FISH Food Pantry to help local families in need. Only overdue items are eligible for the program; lost or damaged items are not eligible,

SHARE IN GAINS WITHOUT ANY DOWNSIDE RISK!

– Northwest Herald

CRISIS LINE Don’t know where to turn for help? Call the McHenry County Crisis Line at 800892-8900. The phone line is open 24 hours a day. It’s confidential and free. You also can visit the crisis line on the Web at www.mchenry-crisis. org.

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nor are accounts in collection. For information, visit www. mchenrylibrary.org or call 815385-0036.

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LOCAL NEWS SUNDAY NWHerald.com

CONTACT: Kevin Lyons • kelyons@shawmedia.com

LOCAL BRIEFS Smoke detector saves woman’s life An Oakwood Hills woman escaped her home around 2 a.m. Saturday when a smoke detector alerted her to a fire. Alice Costello reported a fire in her kitchen at 2:06 a.m. Saturday at her home on 8 Lake Shore Drive in Oakwood Hills, according to a news release from the Cary Fire Protection District. Costello was awoken by a smoke detector, found her house filled with smoke and saw flames in her kitchen, according to the release. Costello called 911 and left her home. She was the only person in the house at the time and was treated for smoke inhalation, according to the release. No firefighters were injured. A damage estimate was not available Saturday morning, but the fire was determined to have started because of a warm mist humidifier that was running in the kitchen. The rest of the house had smoke damage, making it uninhabitable. Fire crews from Algonquin-Lake in the Hills, Barrington, Barrington-Countryside, Fox River Grove and Nunda Rural also responded to the scene.

November 30, 2014 Northwest Herald Section A • Page 3

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Gaming expansion on pause Marengo officials hear backlash on idea to add gambling at gas stations By STEPHEN Di BENEDETTO sdibenedetto@shawmedia.com MARENGO – Aldermen will have more time to digest a proposal that would allow Marengo gas stations to operate video gaming machines, as some City Council members already have heard negative feedback on the idea. A crowded December meeting agenda means the council likely will vote on the potential gambling expansion in January. The delay allows alder-

men time to think about the proposal, after they were divided during an initial discussion on the issue earlier this month. Mayor Don Lockhart and Alderman Matt Keenum, who said he opposes the idea, have heard negative opinions about it from constituents. “I’m hearing a lot of people against it,” Lockhart said. “I’ll be frank.” Aldermen started debating the idea of allowing gas stations to have video gaming machines after the owners

of the Shell station at 302 E. Grant Highway approached the city about it. The proposal would allow the Shell and other businesses that sell packaged liquors to be able to pour alcohol and serve customers on location. The change consequently would make the businesses eligible for video gaming licenses with the Illinois Gaming Board. City staff members so far haven’t drafted an ordinance for the council because the Marengo police department

needed more time to research how other communities have handled the unconventional video gaming idea. Across the state, many convenience stores and gas stations that traditionally sell packaged liquors have been awarded gaming licenses as part of the truck stop criteria set by the state. The state has granted licenses to the Quick Mart in Union, a Shell station in East Dundee and the Grove Mart gas station in Lake in the Hills, according to Illinois

Gaming Board data. During a meeting this week, Keenum wanted aldermen to take another informal poll on the idea to see whether staff should even pursue a draft ordinance. But members couldn’t do it because the item wasn’t listed on their posted agenda. Keenum, though, reiterated his opposition. “Our job, among other things, is to cast a vision,” he said. “It’s my opinion that’s not the way we want to see Marengo grow.”

Habitat for Humanity gives to local family

Office accepting food donations CRYSTAL LAKE – The Rick O’Connor Group Realty Executives Cornerstone, 7115 Virginia Road, Suite 101, Crystal Lake, will accept donations of canned food to help those in need through Dec. 18. Donations can be dropped off from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. For information, call 815477-3000.

– Northwest Herald

LOCAL DEATHS OBITUARIES ON PAGE A11

Lorraine R. Berra 91 Ronald J. Freund 61, Wonder Lake Agnes J. Jamison 93, Cary Daniel C. Marander 62, McHenry Mary E. Schlipf 87, Carol Stream Joyce E. Stampler 81, Crystal Lake Dr. Jack Winn White 78, Rockford

Kyle Grillot – kgrillot@shawmedia.com

Hugo and Laticia Cardoso of Crystal Lake stand in front of their soon-to-be home in McHenry. The Habitat for Humanity house has been under construction since August, and will be dedicated to the couple and their two children Sunday.

Algonquin planning water system updates By JOSEPH BUSTOS jbustos@shawmedia.com ALGONQUIN – The village is beginning to plan for upgrades to its water distribution system. A water model update completed in 2013 indicated Algonquin needs to complete an estimated $8 million worth of “higher priority capital investments,” Assistant Village Manager Mike Kumbera said. The improvements in-

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clude building redundancies where none exist for certain parts of the water system, in case certain pressure-regulating valves fail, if there’s an emergency or if maintenance needs to performed. To carry out these distribution system improvements, the village is planning to apply for a low-interest loan through the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency, according to a memo written by Andrew Warmus, the vil-

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lage’s utilities superintendent. Interest rates on the loan are projected to be between 2 percent and 2.5 percent. Obtaining a loan requires Algonquin to complete a project plan and other loan documents, in addition to designing the projects. “The project plan summarizes the improvement plans, provides cost estimates for the proposed improvements, evaluates the environmental

impacts of the improvements, and provides a general financial impact analysis for the improvements,” Warmus wrote. The village has contracted to pay Engineering Enterprises Inc. about $234,000 to design the proposed improvements, complete the project plan and other loan paperwork, and perform construction observation. Doing this work would help answer questions as to

the level of money needed and financing needed for the projects. “Considerations for financial support and subsequent increases will be accomplished in a planned water and sewer rate study to take place in fiscal year 2016 as the next logical step in planning,” Warmus wrote. The village also plans to complete the design work for

See WATER SYSTEM, page A10

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4 LOCAL NEWS • Sunday, November 30, 2014 • Section A • Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

McHenry Public Library adds solar panels to roof By JEFF ENGELHARDT jengelhardt@shawmedia.com McHENRY – James Scholtz has helped re-energize the McHenry Public Library. One of the longtime dreams of the library’s executive director recently became a reality as a 10-kilowatt solar panel structure went live and could produce as much as 10 percent of the facility’s energy. The $54,000 project had

been budgeted by Scholtz and library leadership for years. “When we did the remodeling project back in 2009, we talked about solar panels but the technology just wasn’t there,” Scholtz said. “We always knew we wanted to make it as green of an environment as we could and do our due diligence to reduce our energy use.” While the panels will be inaccessible for public tours because of their location on

the roof, Scholtz said there will be a station in the library where visitors can monitor the energy the panels are producing and view them on a screen thanks to a mounted camera on the roof. The monitoring information will show how much energy the panels are producing and how much carbon dioxide is avoided because of the source. Scholtz said he hopes to have that feature running next month while the camera

BLOOD DRIVES

could be installed in March. Solar panels are the beginning of the green efforts, Scholtz said. He hopes to expand that feature to a 20-kilowatt system eventually and add wind power to the facility so there can be green energy year-round. Scholtz said he plans on presenting a wind power option that could mirror the alternative turbines installed on the roof of a Rockford Christian High School building.

“We want to produce at least half our own energy,” Scholtz said. Scholtz said he has also had discussions with people at the Shah Center about hosting green energy seminars to let people know what the library is doing, how it works and why it is important. The Shah Center installed a 90-kilowatt solar panel structure at its McHenry facility. Because the Shah Center

received a grant for its solar panel structure, Scholtz said it was able to install and implement much more public outreach and interactive tools. And though he is passionate about showing the people the benefits of green energy, he said there is a balance. “I do not want to spend the money we save from green energy showing the public that we saved money,” Scholtz said.

tion of more than 0.08, expired registration, disregarding a stop sign and improper lane use.

driving without headlamps when required and unlawful transportation of open alcohol. • Tierni L. Micek, 54, 343 Ridge Road, Barrington, was charged Saturday, Nov. 8, with two counts of domestic battery. • Jay P. Rebscher, 44, 271 Country Commons Road, Unit 1, Trout Valley, was charged Monday, Nov. 10, with driving under in the influence, failure to dim headlamps and possession of drug paraphernalia.

POLICE REPORTS

Following is a list of places to give blood. Donors should be 17 or older or 16 with a parent’s consent, weigh at least 110 pounds, and be in good health. • 3 to 7 p.m. Dec. 1 – Joyful Harvest Lutheran Church, 5050 N. Johnsburg Road, Johnsburg. All donors will receive a Culver’s coupon. Walk-ins welcome. Appointments and information: 847-497-4569 or www.heartlandbc.org. • 3 to 6 p.m. Dec. 3 – Riverwood Elementary School, 300 S. Driftwood Trail, McHenry. All donors will receive a Culver’s coupon. Walk-ins welcome. Appointments and information: Sarah McCollum at smccollum@d15.org or www. heartlandbc.org. • 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Dec. 6 – The Church of Holy Apostles, 5211 Bull Valley Road, McHenry. All donors will receive a Culver’s coupon. Walk-ins welcome. Appointments and information: Frank Sweeney, 815-385-8322 or www.heartlandbc. org. • 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Dec. 7 – Sts. Peter & Paul Church, 410 First St., Cary. All donors will receive a Jersey Mike’s Subs coupon. Walkins welcome. Appointments and information: Dan Pertile, 847-6394313 or www.heartlandbc.org. • 8 to 11 a.m. Dec. 7 – Woodstock Family Moose Center, 406 Clay St., Woodstock. Free breakfast for all donors served 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. All donors will receive a Culver’s coupon. Walk-ins welcome.

Appointments and information: 815-338-0126 or www.heartlandbc. org. • 2:30 to 6:30 p.m. Dec. 8 – Spring Grove Fire Station, 8214 Richardson Road, Spring Grove. All donors will receive a Guns and Hoses T-shirt. Walk-ins welcome. Appointments and information: 815-675-2450 or www.heartlandbc.org. • 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Dec. 9 – Johnsburg High School, 2002 W. Ringwood Road, Johnsburg. Walkins welcome. Appointments and information: www.heartlandbc.org. • 3 to 7 p.m. Dec. 9 – Diamond Physical Therapy, 1140 E. Algonquin Road, Algonquin. All donors will receive a Culver’s coupon. Walk-ins welcome. Appointments and information: Nicole, 847-8540196 or www.heartlandbc.org. • 3 to 7 p.m. Dec. 10 – Hebron-Alden-Greenwood Fire/ Rescue Association, 12302 Route 173, Hebron. All donors will be entered into a drawing for a chance to win three $25 Crandalls gift certificates. Appointments and information: Tom, 815-648-2218. • 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Dec. 11 – Richmond-Burton High School, 8311 N. Route 31, Richmond. Walk-ins welcome. Appointments and information: www.heartlandbc.org. • 7:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Dec. 13 – St. John’s Parish, 2302 W. Church St., Johnsburg. All donors will receive a Culver’s coupon and pancake breakfast. Walk-ins welcome. Appointments and informa-

tion: Arnie, 815-790-6837 or www. heartlandbc.org. • 8 a.m. to noon Dec. 14 – St. Mary’s Church, 312 Lincoln Ave., Woodstock. All donors will receive a Culver’s coupon. Walk-ins welcome. Appointments and information: Dave Grote, 815-861-2014 or www.heartlandbc.org. Blood service organizations • American Red Cross of Greater Chicago – 800-448-3543 for general blood services; 312-7296100 general questions. • Heartland Blood Centers – 800-786-4483; 630-264-7834 or www.heartlandbc.org. Locations: 6296 Northwest Highway, Crystal Lake, 815-356-0608; 1140 N. McLean Blvd., Elgin, 847-741-8282; 649 W. State St., Geneva, 630208-8105; 1200 N. Highland Ave., Aurora, 630-892-7055. • LifeSource Blood Center – Crystal Lake Community Donor Center, 5577 Northwest Highway, Crystal Lake, 815-356-5173. Hours: noon to 7 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday; 7:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Wednesday and Friday; 7:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Saturday. Information: 877-543-3768 or www.lifesource. org. • Rock River Valley Blood Center – 419 N. Sixth St., Rockford, 877-778-2299; 815-965-8751 or www.rrvbc.org. Hours: 6:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays, 6:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Fridays; 7 to 11 a.m. second Saturdays.

Woodstock • Amy C. Paris, 47, 121 Carins Court, Woodstock, was charged Monday, Nov. 10, with two counts of domestic battery. • A 17-year-old Woodstock girl was charged Monday, Nov. 10, with domestic battery. • Russell W. Crone, 35, 1848 Powers Road, Woodstock, was charged Friday, Nov. 14, with driving under the influence, driving with a blood-alcohol concentra-

Cary • Harold Braxton, 43, 264 Crystal St., Cary, was charged Monday, Nov. 3, with two counts of domestic battery. • Diego Vazquez-Silva, 26, 575 Norman Drive, Cary, was charged Saturday, Nov. 8, with driving under the influence of alcohol,

LOCAL BRIEFS Bethlehem Market will bring history to life ALGONQUIN – Bethlehem Marketplace will be from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Dec. 6 at Christ United Methodist Church, 9009 W. Algonquin Road. The event will feature biblical characters, such as tax collectors, Roman soldiers, beggars, wise men and a Nativity scene. Children’s activities will include jewelry-making, leather projects, rope-braiding, weaving, bread-baking and more. Admission is free. For information, call 847-6699009.

Senior care seeking volunteers for program CRYSTAL LAKE – Senior Care Volunteer Network, a nonprofit

organization that provides services to seniors so they can maintain their independence, is seeking volunteer drivers for its Gift of a Lift senior transportation program. Volunteers use their personal vehicles to transport seniors age 60 and older to medical appointments, dialysis, shopping and other destinations. Volunteers are reimbursed for mileage. Drivers must be at least 25 years of age, attend a volunteer orientation session, provide proof of a valid driver’s license and auto insurance and consent to a background check. For information, call Aileen Zei at 815-455-3120, ext. 223, or visit www.scvnmchenrycounty.org.

MCC offers financial planning class CRYSTAL LAKE – The McHenry County Continuing Education Department will offer “Estate Planning” from 7 to 9 p.m. Dec. 9 in Room E222 at the college, 8900 Route 14. Students will learn how to do basic estate planning. A review of several estate planning tools is included, such as revocable and irrevocable trusts, wills, transfer on death agreements and more. Steps that can be taken without the help of an attorney also will be covered. The cost is $25. To register, call 815-4558588. For information, call Tracy Berry at 815-455-8758.

– Northwest Herald

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LOCAL NEWS 5

Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Section A • Sunday, November 30, 2014 •

Picking out the perfect tree

CRYSTAL LAKE

Sewing, craft classes feature holiday theme NORTHWEST HERALD CRYSTAL LAKE – Sewing and craft classes are gearing up at the Crystal Lake Park District. A sewing class called “Sew Cool” will teach those ages 10 and older how to read a pattern and use a sewing machine as they make a holiday project. One machine will be available for group use, so attendees are recommended to bring their own if they have one. The class will be from 9 a.m. to noon Dec. 13 in the art room of the Crystal Lake Park District Administrative Office, 1 E. Crystal Lake Ave. The cost is $37 for residents of the park district and $52 for nonresidents. Another class, geared for a younger crowd, will guide kids ages 5 to 10 through making holiday-themed duct tape creations, rubber band bracelets, window clings, Fimo Clay and Fuse Beads. Called Craft Fads, this class will be from 9 to 11 a.m. Dec. 20, also in the art room of the Crystal Lake Park District Administrative Office. The cost is $29 for residents of the park district and $30 for nonresidents. Registration can be completed online at www. crystallakeparks.org or in person at the Crystal Lake Park District Administrative Office. The deadline to register is one week before the start of each program. The program code for Sew Cool is #2167-9, and the code for Craft Fads is Code #2457-5.

Photos by Kyle Grillot – kgrillot@shawmedia.com

Jay Jones of Cary (left) and his son Tristan carry their Christmas tree after cutting it down Saturday at Oney’s Tree Farm in Woodstock. The farm offers a free wagon ride to choose from a variety of pine, fir and spruce trees on their 50-acre farm. Read a list of local Christmas tree farms in Planit Style, pages 6-7. LEFT: Greg Beck of Harvard ties his Christmas tree to his car Saturday at Oney’s Tree Farm in Woodstock. RIGHT: Nicolette Capuano of Palos Heights and her daughter Delilah, 2, look for their Christmas tree Saturday at Oney’s Tree Farm in Woodstock.

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LOCAL NEWS 7

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8 LOCAL NEWS • Sunday, November 30, 2014 • Section A • Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

McHENRY COUNTY

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Crafting ornaments and discovering the basics of snowshoeing are some of the programs lined up at the McHenry County Conservation District in December. The programs, which are designed for a variety of ages, require advance registration.

• Natural Ornament Making: 1:30 to 3 p.m. Dec. 6 at Prairieview Education Center, 2112 Behan Road, Crystal Lake. Children ages 6 to 12 years old will create handmade ornaments using natural materials. The program is free for county residents and $5 for nonresidents. Children should be accompanied by an adult. The deadline to register is Tuesday.

• The Changing Views of Prairieview: 7 to 8:30 p.m. Dec. 11 at Prairieview Education Center, 2112 Behan Road, Crystal Lake. The Prairieview Education Center was once a private home and farm, but the owners were far more than simple farmers. Prairieview is full of interesting stories about the previous owners, and evidence of their activity is apparent

• Introduction to Snowshoeing: 7 to 8 p.m. Dec. 10 at Lost Valley Visitor Center in Gla-

throughout the site. The history will be told at this program for adults and children ages 14 and up. The program is free for county residents and $6 for nonresidents. Children should be accompanied by an adult. The deadline to register is Dec. 7. For information about these and other programs, visit the McHenry County Conservation District’s website at www.MCCDistrict. org. A sign-up for the district’s seasonal magazine “Landscapes” also is available there. Program registration can be completed online; by mailin and drop-off at Prairieview Education Center, 2112 Behan Road in Crystal Lake; drop-off only at Lost Valley Visitor Center, Route 31 and Harts Road in Ringwood; or, for free programs only, by phone at 815-479-5779.

LOCAL BRIEFS resident Mohammed Faheem, director of Employer Solutions and Corporate Relations at the Illinois workNet Center, will present “Get Ready, Get Set, Get Employed” from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Dec. 6 at the Algonquin Area Public Library Eastgate Branch, 115 Eastgate Drive. The free employment skills workshop will cover writing résumés, networking, job search techniques and goal setting. A box lunch will be provided. Registration is required. For information, visit www. aapld.org/events or call 847458-6060.

Kindergartners host hot chocolate, cookie stand WOODSTOCK – Kindergarten students at Verda Dierzen Early Learning Center in Woodstock start hosting their annual hot chocolate and cookie stand on Monday. Proceeds from the stand benefit Woodstock’s Christmas Clearinghouse. The students will be selling hot chocolate for $1 and two cookies for 50 cents from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday and Tuesday inside the school’s lobby, 2045 N. Seminary Ave. The District 200 Education Foundation partly funded the hot chocolate and cookie stand.

– Stephen Di Benedetto

Library users’ Hoopla access starts Monday

Library to host job skills workshop

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adding access to Hoopla to allow cardholders to access digital video, music and audiobook titles for free, according to a news release. Library cardholders, starting Monday, can visit www. hoopladigital.com and create an account. Apps also are available for Apple and Android devices. People can download titles to their computers, tablets or smartphones. Cardholders can borrow up to five titles each month, which are then automatically “returned” on the due date, the news release said. Hoopla offers streaming of movies, TV shows, audiobooks, music, educational material, children’s titles and foreign films, among other content, the news release said.

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– Northwest Herald

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Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Section A • Sunday, November 30, 2014 •

MCCD offers winter hikes in Ringwood, Marengo, Crystal Lake NORTHWEST HERALD A variety of hikes – some at night, in search of owls or full of games – will be offered at McHenry County Conservation District sites in December. The hikes require advance registration and are geared for a variety of ages. Hikers should dress for the weather. • Owl Walk: 5 to 7 p.m. Dec. 7 at Lost Valley Visitor Center in Glacial Park, Route 31 and Harts Road, Ringwood. Adults and children ages 14 and older will go in search for sights and sounds of the owls that reside at Glacial Park during the winter months. In addition to the hike, attendees will view an informative presentation and visit with a live owl. The walk is over hilly terrain. The program is free for county residents and $6 for nonresidents. The deadline to register is Wednesday.

LOCAL NEWS 9

CARY

Affordable senior housing development talks a while away By JOSEPH BUSTOS jbustos@shawmedia.com CARY – Discussion and consideration of a potential affordable senior housing independent living development behind the Jewel-Osco in Cary is still a while away, a village official said. There has not been a closure on the purchase price between the seller and potential buyer of the 3.9-acre lot along Three Oaks Road,

Village Administrator Chris Clark said. A memo to Village Board members earlier in November indicated Ohio-based Pirhl development was interested in the vacant lot. Village officials in their memo had said Pirhl has submitted a letter of intent to purchase the property and they believe they will have the property under contract within the next few weeks. “It may be down the

road further than initially briefed,” Clark said. Clark added there’s no agreement in place and no one has come in to petition for zoning changes on the property. “We’re sitting here waiting as well,” Clark said. Pirhl is looking into building a 66-unit senior housing development that would be two to three stories tall. According to the village

memo, a project funding source would be Low-Income Housing Tax Credits, and the independent living development would be restricted to people age 55 and older. Pirhl representatives described a recent meeting with Cary officials – including Clark, Village President Mark Kownick and outgoing Community Development Director Chris Stilling – as a first visit.

The property is listed for $899,000 and in recent months the asking price had been dropped from $1.4 million. The area is zoned for commercial use. The real estate listing says the property has sewer and water connections available and is ideal for a hotel or senior housing. The village’s comprehensive plan calls for commercial development on the site.

• Winter Wonders for Homeschool Families: 1 to 3 p.m. Dec. 17 at Marengo Ridge Conservation Area, 2411 N. Route 23, Marengo. Children ages 7 years and older will hike, play games and find out how animals survive winter in McHenry County. The entire program will be outdoors. The program is free for county residents and $5 for nonresidents. Children should be accompanied by an adult. The deadline to register is Dec. 13. • Solstice Night Hike: 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Dec. 19 at Prairieview Education Center, 2112 Behan Road, Crystal Lake. A candlelight night hike, ending at a warm campfire, will be used to mark the winter solstice, the longest, darkest night in the northern hemisphere. Attendees are asked not to bring flashlights; candles and the stars will guide the way. The hike may be accompanied by a simultaneous Candlelight Ski program if weather allows. The program is free for county residents and $2 for nonresidents. The deadline to register is Dec. 15.

• An Afternoon with the Short-Eared Owls: 3:30 to 5 p.m. Dec. 20 at Lost Valley Visitor Center in Glacial Park, Route 31 and Harts Road, Ringwood. The shorteared owl is an Illinois endangered species that makes Glacial Park its home every winter. Adults and families with ages children 8 and up will go out on a winter hike at dusk to search for the owls. Attendees should bring binoculars if they have them. The program will start indoors for a short presentation. The program is free for county residents and $2 for nonresidents. The deadline to register is Dec. 16. For information about these and other programs, visit the McHenry County Conservation District’s website at www.MCCDistrict. org. A sign-up for the district’s seasonal magazine “Landscapes” also is available there. Program registration can be completed online; by mail-in and drop-off at Prairieview Education Center, 2112 Behan Road in Crystal Lake; drop-off only at Lost Valley Visitor Center, Route 31 and Harts Road in Ringwood; or, for free programs only, by phone at 815-4795779.

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10 LOCAL NEWS • Sunday, November 30, 2014 • Section A • Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com Groups sought to decorate holiday trees CARY – The Cary Park District is seeking clubs, troops, neighborhoods, businesses and families to help decorate the trees for the Jaycee Park Holiday Walk. One tree will be available to each registered group. Each group is responsible for providing its own decorations, putting them up and taking them down. Tree decorating will be from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday at Jaycee Park. Decorated trees will stay up for about four weeks. Pre-registration is required and is accepted at the Community Center, 255 Briargate Road. The cost is $25 a tree.

The registration deadline is Wednesday. For information, call 847639-6100 or visit www. carypark.com.

• GAMBLING Choirs to perform Christmas cantata

Continued from page A1

CRYSTAL LAKE – The First Congregational Church’s 2014 Christmas cantata, “Silent Night,” will be performed at 9 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. services Dec. 7 at 461 Pierson St. The production will feature a 20-member cast and the second- through eighth-grade Cherub, Carol and Chancel Choirs. Child care will be available for infants and toddlers. For information, call 815-4596010 or visit www.fcc-cl.org.

“The liquor distinction was something we put in there to keep some control over the amount [of terminals],” Lang said. As of October, there were 18,669 terminals scattered across 4,570 businesses, according to the Gaming Board, with several hundred being added every month. Among them are a scuba shop and laundromat in Winnebago County’s Loves Park, a florist in Oak Lawn outside Chicago and a Champaign apartment complex, among others. Blackhawk Restaurant Group is one of several companies that have opened chains of storefront gambling businesses that also sell food and drinks. They operate under names like Betty’s Bistro, Penny’s, Emma’s and Jena’s, and promote their “higher-end demographic segment” and “aspirational experience.” A company official declined to talk, but according to its website, Blackhawk has 43 locations in the Chicago suburbs and nine others open or planned in the Champaign area, Peoria and elsewhere. Four of the Blackhawk outlets are in Elk Grove Village, where Mayor Craig Johnson said they are the leading revenue generators among the town’s 16 businesses with video gambling terminals. “They gear their businesses toward women between the ages of 35 and 65, and they tell you that,” Johnson said. The suburb has set up

– Northwest Herald

Cary-Grove bound to produce more talent • LEGACY Continued from page A1 with the suburban Catholic powerhouse, which won its fourth state title since the turn of the century. They lined up as they had all season, pounded the ball and dared Providence to stop them. It nearly worked. They proved that. “I feel like a lot of people think they know the answers of how to stop this,” senior left tackle Trevor Ruhland said of the offense. “Like, if you take away certain things, it’s not going to work. We always have counters off everything. And we probably ran the same play 60 times. I mean, it was just a matter of stopping it. Cary-Grove’s always going to be option. I don’t know if we’ll ever be a spread team like everyone is leaning to now. “We’re downhill. We’re physical football. That’s just how we grew up playing.” Maybe that physical, run-heavy style isn’t suited for winning state championships. Not enough balance, one could argue. After all, C-G has made four trips downstate since 2004, and has come away with just one state title. But maybe that’s an argument for another day.

Here’s what’s become plainly evident. As much as Saturday’s loss stings for the Trojans and their fans, the program has cemented itself as a modern day high school football powerhouse. It’s become too consistent to be denied of that claim. Over the past three years, with Ruhland and senior left guard Michael Gomez on the offensive line, Cary-Grove went 33-6, won two Fox Valley Conference Valley Division titles and made two trips to the state title game. This was a group of seniors that was about as good as the school has ever seen. “They’d be the first ones I’d put in a foxhole with,” Seaburg said. “Because they’re solid kids. They battle. They’re tough. And what else can you ask for as a coach?” The thing about CaryGrove, is that it’s bound to produce another talented class, another class that battles, that works every bit as hard. The program is rolling, still. Just maybe next time it’ll be rewarded. Consistency usually does.

Christmas Open House

hurdles to other operations that officials feared would become “mini-casinos,” – requiring food service and setting a minimum business size. “It couldn’t be like a 500 square-foot storefront and a guy would hand you a can of beer,” the mayor said. Elected officials in other towns are becoming uneasy about video gambling’s growth. Peoria enacted a temporary moratorium on new gambling locations over concerns that some may offer little but gambling. The City Council recently rejected several measures that would have permanently restricted further expansion, but Councilwoman Beth Akeson hopes for some kind of limit. “We have what we have, but I would not like to see any more,” she said. The state’s casino industry also is concerned that the growth of video gambling isn’t generating new gamblers but turning the casinos’ customers into their own. A report by the state Commission on Government Forecasting and Accountability found that in the fiscal year that ended in June, eight of the state’s 10 casinos had revenue drops of at least 9 percent. It concluded that new gambling businesses were siphoning off casino customers. “If our revenues and admissions are dropping because of video gaming parlors, the taxes we’re paying are going to start decreasing,” said Tom Swoik, the Illinois Casino Gaming Association’s executive director.

Thursday, December 4th • 10 am - 7 pm Saturday, December 6th • 10am - 2pm 440 Riverside Drive, Crystal Lake Original Mary Ann Johnson Greeting Cards, hand painted glassware, crockery, mugs, cookies for Santa plates, snowman signs, ornaments, girlfriend items, wedding, plates and ornaments... Everything can be personalized. Please bring a friend and come for some Holiday fun and girlfriend chit chat! Call Mary Ann for directions at 815-459-3243

Submitting paperwork could take about a year • WATER SYSTEM Continued from page A3 the improvements concurrently with the low-interest loan application process to start construction in fall 2015, village documents said. Preparing and submitting the loan application and other documents, along with the IEPA review, is expected to take about a year.

• Northwest Herald sports reporter Joey Kaufman can be reached at jkaufman@shawmedia. com or on Twitter @JoeyRKaufman.

The scope of the projects will be identified and considered as part of the application for the low-interest loan, Kumbera wrote in an email to the Northwest Herald. “Funding sources will be finalized as part of the budgeting approval process, which may include system tap-on fees from new development, existing capital replacement reserves, and/or user fees,” Kumbera wrote.

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Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Section A • Sunday, November 30, 2014 •

LOCAL NEWS 11

PUBLIC ACCESS McHenry County Board When: 9 a.m. Monday Where: Administration Building, 667 Ware Road, Woodstock

MONDAY District 156 school board When: 7:30 p.m. Monday Where: District office board room, 4716 W. Crystal Lake Road, McHenry

McHenry County Board Liquor and License Committee When: 10 a.m. Monday Where: Administration Building, 667 Ware Road, Woodstock

Holiday Hills Committee of the Whole When: 7 p.m. Monday Where: Holiday Hills Village Hall, 1304 Sunset Drive

TUESDAY Algonquin Village Board When: 7:30 p.m. Tuesday Where: Ganek Municipal Center, 2200 Harnish Drive

The Monday, Dec. 1 meeting of the McHenry County Board Law and Justice Committee has been canceled.

Cary Village Board

When: 6 p.m. Tuesday Where: Cary Village Hall, 655 Village Hall Drive

Spring Grove Village Board When: 6 p.m. Tuesday Where: Spring Grove Village Hall, 7401 Meyer Road

Cary Committee of the Whole When: 6:30 p.m. Tuesday Where: Cary Village Hall, 655 Village Hall Drive Richmond Community Development Committee When: 5 p.m. Tuesday Where: Richmond Village Hall, 5600 Hunter Drive

WEDNESDAY Island Lake Fire and Police Commission When: 7:30 p.m. Wednesday Where: Island Lake Village Hall, 3720 Greenleaf Ave.

Gate Lakemoor Village Board When: 7 p.m. Thursday Where: Lakemoor Police Department, 27901 W. Concrete Drive Richmond Village Board When: 7 p.m. Thursday Where: Richmond Village Hall, 5600 Hunter Drive.

District 46 school board When: 7 p.m. Dec. 9 Where: Prairie Grove Junior High School library, 3225 Route 176, Crystal Lake Volo Village Board When: 7:30 p.m. Dec. 9 Where: Volo Village Board, 500 S. Fish Lake Road.

DEC. 10

DEC. 9 THURSDAY

Richmond Finance Committee When: 7 p.m. Tuesday Where: Richmond Village Hall, 5600 Hunter Drive

Lake in the Hills Parks and Recreation Board When: 6:30 p.m. Thursday Where: Village Hall, 600 Harvest

Abbie Butler, Mason, Hannah and Christian Wohlfeil, Allie, Maddie, Colton and Owen Lewis, and Sam and Charlie Johnson. She was preceded in death by her husband Jimmy and a daughter Jane Kay. Visitation will be held on Sunday from 3 p.m. until the time of the service at 5 p.m. at the Skaja Bachmann Funeral Home, 7715 W. Route 14 in Crystal Lake. Interment will be in Parklawn Memorial Park in Hampton, Virginia. In lieu of flowers memorial donations to JourneyCare hospice or to the charity of your choice appreciated. For funeral information call 815-455-2233 or visit www. skajafuneralhomes.com

directed to McHenry County Senior Services Associates, 3519 Richmond Road, Johnsburg, IL 60051, for their much appreciated help in providing meals-on-wheels services for Daniel. For information, please call the funeral home, or visit www.justenfh.com, where friends may leave an on-line condolence message for his family.

District 15 school board When: 7:30 p.m. Dec. 9 Where: Central office, 1011 N. Green St., McHenry

McHenry Planning and Zoning Commission When: 7:30 p.m. Dec. 10 Where: McHenry City Hall, 333 Green St

Facebook.

2250 Pearl St. Belvidere, IL. 61008. Online condolences visit www. querhammerandflagg.com.

OBITUARIES Hwy., Arlington Heights, IL 60004. Friends and family will gather Tuesday, 9:00 a.m. until time of the funeral mass, 10:00 a.m., at St. Cecilia Church, 700 S. Meier Rd., Mt. Prospect, IL 60056. Interment All Saints Cemetery. In lieu of flowers contributions to Alzheimer’s Research Foundation at www.alzinfo.org appreciated.

How to submit Send obituary information to obits@nwherald.com or call 815-526-4438. Notices are accepted until 3 p.m. for the next day’s edition. Obituaries also appear online at NWHerald.com/obits, where you may sign the guest book, send flowers or make a memorial donation.

RONALD J. FREUND Ronald J. Freund, age 61, of Wonder Lake, passed away suddenly Saturday, November 22, 2014, in his home. Arrangements are pending at Justen Funeral Home & Crematory, 3700 W. Charles J. Miller Road, McHenry, IL 60050. For Information, please call the funeral home at 815-385-2400, or visit www. justenfh.com.

LORRAINE R. BERRA Lorraine R. Berra, 91, passed on to eternity on Wednesday, November 26, 2014, in Crystal Lake. She is survived by her three daughters, Louise (Michael) Kraft, Cathy (Thomas) Mueller, Julie (Scott) Pappas; seven grandchildren, Lauren (Chris) Conklin, Brian (Beth) Kraft, Luke (Jacqueline) Mueller, Scott (Kelli Duffy) Mueller, Tommy Mueller, Jason (Caitlin) Pappas and Brandon Pappas; and four great grandchildren, Marion Mueller, Isabella Kraft, Brooklyn Duffy Mueller, and Makenzie Jo Mueller. Lorraine was a cherished wife, mother, grandmother and great grandmother. She is preceded in death by her devoted husband of 62 years, Joseph J. Berra, 90, in July; and her sister, Florence Carlson. Lorraine was an accomplished painter, played the guitar, and was an avid traveler. Born in Chicago, she and Joseph met at the Cappa Club, Holy Name Cathedral, and courted in the ballrooms of the post-war era. They raised their girls in Jefferson Park before moving with them in 1969 to Mt. Prospect. Lorraine worked as a secretary for the YMCA and Lydell Engineering. While raising her daughters, she was a loving stayat-home mom. Later, she worked as a Welcome Wagon Lady among other part time jobs. She spent her retirement years with her family, traveling, playing bridge, poker, and Scrabble, and solving crossword puzzles she could get her hands on. She was a devoted wife, mother, and grandmother. Visitation Monday, 4:00 to 8:00 p.m. at Lauterburg & Oehler Funeral Home, 2000 E. Northwest

AGNES J. JAMISON Born: Dec. 23, 1920; in Suffolk, VA Died: Nov. 25, 2014; in Cary, IL Agnes Jane Jamison, age 93, known to all as “Grammie”, passed away Tuesday in her home at Three Oaks Assisted Living, she was surrounded by her family. She was born on December 23, 1920, in Suffolk, VA, the daughter of Mercer and Ella Jane Christian. She married Jimmy Jamison on March 9, 1942, in Hampton, VA. Grammie was a sweet and gracious friend to all, she never knew a stranger. She enjoyed walking her dog “Lucky”, attending bible study, visiting with family and baking angel food cakes. She will be deeply missed by those who knew and loved her. She is survived by her daughters; Carolyn (Don) Lewis and Connie (Rex) Johnson, her grandchildren; Tammara (Joe) Schmidt, Mark (Daschelle) Lewis, Donald Lewis, Janelle (Jim) Butler, Lorrie (Mike) Wohlfeil, David (Miel) Johnson and Brian Johnson, her great grandchildren; Austin, Logan and

DR. JACK WINN WHITE JOYCE E. STAMPLER

Born: Feb. 9, 1936 Died: Nov. 27, 2014

Born: March 22, 1933; in Edson, KS Died: Nov. 27, 2014; Belvidere, IL

Dr. Jack Winn White, 78, of Rockford, IL passed away peacefully on Thursday, November 27, 2014. Jack was born on February 9, 1936, in Falmouth, KY. He was the son of the late Robert White and the late Mary Lee

Daniel C. Marander, passed away Monday, November 24, 2014, at his residence in McHenry. He was born June 8, 1952, in Evanston to Donald and Elaine Marander. Dan assisted his brother in his construction business until health issues no longer allowed him to do so. Among friends, he earned the nickname “Smiley” for his constant smile. Dan is survived by three sons, Dan Jr., Jim and Donny; two brothers and two sisters, Ron (Cheri) Marander and Jeff (Jackie) Marander, all of Spring Grove, Mia (David) Schwandt of Libertyville, and Sherry (Steve) Kroll of Grayslake; his aunts, Elsie and Barbara; and his uncle, Homer, along with many cousins, nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents; an infant brother; his uncles, Kelly, Wendell, Art, and Keith; and his aunt, Grace. Cremation rights have been accorded privately by Justen Funeral Home & Crematory, 3700 Charles J. Miller Road, McHenry, IL 60050. A celebration of Dan’s life will be held by his family in the spring, when his ashes will be scattered over his parents grave site. For those wishing to send an expression of condolence, his family suggests memorials be

Mary E. Schlipf, age 87, of Carol Stream, formerly St. Charles, died Thursday, November 27, 2014, at Central DuPage Hospital, Winfield from complications from Crohn’s Disease. Mary had been employed by Cook County Hospital, Oak Forest Hospital, and Delnor Hospital. She also was employed by St. Charles Manufacturing and later her and her husband operated Schlipf Custom Furniture in St. Charles. She was a member of the Eastern Star. One of her enjoyments was her animals on the farm; horses, dogs, and especially the loved cows. She loved to travel here and abroad. She is survived by her daughter, Karen Schlipf. Two grandchildren, William and Sarah (Doug) Galbreth; and great grand daughter, Hayden. She was preceded in death by her husband, Robert N. Her son, Robert S. Her sisters, Constance Stamler and Loredo Crow. Her three brothers, Ralph, Paul, and Charles Rensink. Visitation will be held 4:00 to 7:00 p.m. on Tuesday, December 2, 2014, at Yurs Funeral Home St. Charles, 405 East Main Street (Corner of Rt. 64 & Rt. 25), St. Charles, IL 60174. Graveside service will be held at 1:00 p.m. on Wednesday at Memorial Park Cemetery in Muscatine, Iowa. To leave an online condolence or remembrance to the family, visit the funeral homes obituary page at www.yursfuneralhomes.com. For more information, please call Yurs Funeral Home of St. Charles, 630-584-0060 or like us on

Joyce Elaine Stampler, 81, of Crystal Lake, passed away at Northwood Care Center in Belvidere, Illinois, on Thursday, November 27, 2014, after a lengthy illness. She was born March 22, 1933, in Edson, Kansas the daughter of Melvin and Georgianna (Hevner) Peters. Joyce married Francis W. Stampler on January 26, 1954, and they resided in Crystal Lake, IL. She worked as a medical technician and office manager for Hillstrom, Bryant, and Wall medical office. She attended Immanuel Lutheran Church where she enjoyed Bible study groups and organizing church functions. Joyce enjoyed cooking, gardening, reading and traveling with her husband. She will be lovingly remembered for her warm smile, friendly personality, caring heart and deep devotion to God and family. She is survived by her brother, Clyde (Eleanor) Peters of Lincoln, Nebraska; daughters, Jan (Craig) Klaas of Rockford, Renee Stampler and Judy Stampler of Seattle, Washington; son, Ron Stampler of Fairbanks, Alaska; 3 grandchildren and 8 great-grandchildren. She is preceded in death by her parents and her husband. The family wishes to thank the staff of Northwoods Care Center for their kindness and loving care, as well as the staff of Transitions Hospice Care. Visitation will be held from 12:00 to 2:00 p.m. on Friday, December 5, followed by a private family service at Querhammer & Flagg Funeral Home, 500 W. Terra Cotta Ave. Crystal Lake. Burial will be in Crystal Lake Memorial Park. In lieu of flowers memorials can be directed to Northwoods Care Centre,

Hampton White. Jack graduated from the University of Kentucky in 1958 and served in the United States Army Reserve. He went on to earn a Master of Business Administration from The George Washington University in 1964 and a Doctorate of Business Administration specializing in Health Care Administration also from The George Washington University in 1969. Jack worked at The Joint Commission on Hospital Accreditation and later worked as Deputy Director of The American Psychiatric Association in Washington, DC for 23 years. Before retiring to Rockford, IL in 2001, Jack enjoyed volunteering at Our Lady of Mercy Church in Potomac, MD where he guided the church in the areas of finance and budget. Jack loved to read, fish and spend time with his family. Jack is survived by his wife of over 40 years, Deanna Michalek White; his daughter, Rebecca White Macon; and his son-in-law, William Harrison Macon. He has two granddaughters, Elle Grace Macon and Avery Madeleine Macon. Visitation Tuesday, December 2, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. Holy Family Catholic Church, 4401 Highcrest Rd. with a funeral mass to follow at 11:30 a.m. a private burial will be held at a later date in Leesburg, VA. Fitzgerald Funeral Home and Crematory, Mulford Chapel is assisting the family. Express online condolences at: www.fitzgeraldfh.com

be visitation from 9 a.m. Monday, Dec. 1, until the prayer service at 9:30 a.m. at the funeral home, then proceeding to St. Thomas the Apostle Church, 451 W. Terra Cotta Ave., Crystal Lake, to celebrate a 10 a.m. Mass of Christian Burial. Burial will follow in St. Michael the Archangel Cemetery, Palatine. For information, call the funeral home at 815-459-3411. Norma Lee Lindsey: A celebration of Norma’s life will be Saturday, Dec. 27, in Huntley. In accordance with Norma’s wishes, no funeral services will be held. For information, call 217-525-1500. Una Patton: A celebration of life

service will be at 5 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 17, at Panther Creek Golf Club, Springfield. David N. Roche: The memorial visitation will be from 2 to 6 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 7, at Kahle-Moore Funeral Home, 403 Silver Lake Road, Cary. For information, call 847-639-3817. Jacqueline R. Schaefer: The memorial visitation will be from 2 to 5 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 30, at Shepherd of the Hills Lutheran Church, 404 N. Green St., McHenry, with the memorial service at 3:30 p.m. For information, call Colonial Funeral Home and Crematory at 815-385-0063.

Mary. E. Schlipf: The visitation will be from 4 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 2, at Yurs Funeral Home St. Charles, 405 E. Main St. (corner of Route 64 & Route 25), St. Charles. Graveside service will be at 1 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 3, at Memorial Park Cemetery in Muscatine, Iowa. For information, call Yurs Funeral Home at 630584-0060. Joyce E. Stampler: The visitation will be from noon to 2 p.m. Friday, Dec. 5, followed by a private family service at Querhammer & Flagg Funeral Home, 500 W. Terra Cotta Ave., Crystal Lake. Burial will be in Crystal Lake

Memorial Park. Meagan C. Sunde: The celebration of life service will be at 11:30 a.m. Thursday, Dec. 4, at Willow Creek Community Church Chapel (Building B), 67 Algonquin Road, South Barrington. There will be a reception following the celebration. For information, call the funeral home at 815-459-1760. Dr. Jack Winn White: The visitation will be at 11 a.m. Tuesday, Dec. 2, at Holy Family Catholic Church, 4401 Highcrest Road, with a funeral Mass celebration to follow at 11:30 a.m. a private burial will be at a later date in Leesburg, Virginia.

DANIEL C. MARANDER Born: June 8, 1952; in Evanston, IL Died: Nov. 24, 2014; in McHenry, IL

MARY E. SCHLIPF

Lorraine R. Berra: The visitation will be from 4 to 8 p.m. Monday, Dec. 1, at Lauterburg & Oehler Funeral Home, 2000 E. Northwest Highway, Arlington Heights. Friends and family will gather at 9 a.m. Tuesday until the funeral Mass celebration at 10 a.m. at St. Cecilia Church, 700 S. Meier Road, Mt. Prospect. Interment will be in All Saints Cemetery. Agnes J. Jamison: The visitation will be from 3 p.m. until the 5 p.m. service Sunday, Nov. 30, at Skaja Bachmann Funeral Home, 7715 W. Route 14, Crystal Lake. Interment will be in Parklawn Memorial Park in Hampton, Virginia.

For information, call the funeral home at 815-455-2233. Ernest W. Kautz: The visitation will be from 4 to 8 p.m. Monday, Dec. 1, at Ehorn-Adams Funeral Home. The funeral service will be at 11 a.m. Tuesday, Dec. 2, at Ehorn-Adams Funeral Home, Richmond. Interment will be in Hillside Cemetery in Genoa City, Wisconsin. For information, call the funeral home at 815-678-7311. Joseph P. Kowasz: The visitation will be from 3 to 9 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 30, at Davenport Family Funeral Home and Crematory, 419 E. Terra Cotta Ave. (Route 176), Crystal Lake. There will also $-,% 7*-6 *.3 +10"0 $*-

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WEATHER SUNDAY

Text the keyword NWHWEATHER to 74574 to sign up for daily weather forecast text alerts from the Northwest Herald. Message and data rates apply.

NWHerald.com

MON

Mostly cloudy and breezy

TUE

Partly sunny, breezy and cold

WED

Partly sunny, breezy and not as cold

THU

Partly sunny and warmer

FRI

N/NW 10-20 mph

S 10-20 mph

Mostly cloudy and chilly

W/NW 5-15 mph

Partly sunny and chilly

NE 5-15 mph

Partly sunny and a little warmer

E/SE 5-15 mph

McHenry 40/12

Crystal Lake 41/15

Rockford 38/13

Hampshire 40/12

90

Waukegan 41/12 Algonquin 41/12

St. Charles 41/15

DeKalb 41/15

88

Dixon 37/14

39

National Forecast

City

Arlington Hts Aurora Bloomington Carbondale Champaign Chicago Clinton Evanston Galesburg Joliet Kankakee Mt. Vernon Naperville Peoria Princeton Rockford Rock Island Springfield Waukegan Wheaton

Today

Monday

Tuesday

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

44/14/c 44/15/c 55/19/c 67/30/c 59/21/c 45/15/c 55/20/c 45/17/c 40/15/c 49/15/c 54/19/c 64/27/c 44/14/c 52/20/c 42/16/c 38/13/c 36/15/c 59/21/c 41/12/c 44/14/c

22/16/pc 23/14/pc 27/16/pc 36/26/i 30/18/c 22/17/pc 28/19/pc 23/19/pc 24/13/pc 24/15/pc 27/16/c 36/24/i 23/14/pc 27/17/pc 24/14/pc 20/10/pc 23/10/pc 31/18/pc 20/13/pc 23/14/pc

34/28/pc 35/25/pc 36/28/pc 44/34/pc 37/28/pc 34/28/pc 37/29/pc 36/30/pc 35/25/pc 35/27/pc 36/28/pc 42/33/pc 35/26/pc 37/28/pc 35/25/pc 32/24/pc 35/27/pc 39/29/pc 34/28/pc 35/27/pc

World Cities

Today

-10s

-0s

0s

10s

29°

Normal high

41°

Normal low

26°

Record high

68° in 1998

Record low

-2° in 1872

24 hours through 4 p.m. yest.

0.00”

Month to date

1.41”

Normal month to date

3.05”

Year to date

38.69”

Normal year to date

34.54”

RealFeel Temperature

The patented AccuWeather.com RealFeel Temperature®is an exclusive index of effective temperature based on eight weather factors

Sun.

Q.

43

Orland Park 47/19

Regional Cities

51°

Low

Mon.

Tue.

Wed.

Thu.

Sat.

What three storms rarely occur in the U.S. during late November?

?

Sun and Moon Sunrise

7:01 a.m.

Sunset 20s

Fri.

Weather Trivia™

Lake Forecast

WATER TEMP: Chicago Winds: W 10-20 kts. 45/15 Waves: 1-3 ft.

Aurora 44/15

Sandwich 43/14

Bill Bellis

Chief Meteorologist

W 5-15 mph

Oak Park 46/17

High

Thunderstorms, tornadoes and hurricanes.

Belvidere 38/14

@NWHerald

Precipitation

Today will start out mild with some early morning sunshine. A strong cold front will move through during the afternoon and drop temperatures into the lower 30s by the evening along with gusty winds. Monday will be cold and dry, but high pressure will quickly slide to the east allowing for warmer air to return. Not much precipitation is expected next week.

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Harvard 37/12

Facebook.com/NWHerald

Temperature

SAT

4115 2210 3224 3619 3422 3625 3924 Wind: NW 10-20 mph

Northwest Herald Section A • Page 12

Almanac at Chicago through 4 p.m. yesterday

Seven-Day Forecast for McHenry County TODAY

November 30, 2014

30s

40s

50s

60s

70s

A.

Get a daily forecast

80s

90s

100s 110s

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

4:22 p.m.

Moonrise

12:58 p.m.

Moonset

12:24 a.m.

Moon Phases Full

Last

New

First

Dec 6

Dec 14

Dec 21

Dec 28

Air Quality Index

Saturday’s reading

0-50 Good; 51-100 Moderate; 101-150 Unhealthy for sensitive groups; 151-200 Unhealthy; 201-300 Very Unhealthy; 301-500 Hazardous Source: http://www.epa.state.il.us/air/aqi/index.html

UV Index Today

The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.

Front

Front

Front

Cold

Warm

Stationary

Today

City

Hi/Lo/W

City

Hi/Lo/W

Showers T-storms

Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Beijing Berlin Brussels Buenos Aires Cairo Cancun Dublin Geneva Hong Kong Islamabad Istanbul Kabul Kingston Lima London Madrid

87/74/s 41/31/s 68/56/c 64/41/pc 46/22/pc 33/27/s 43/32/s 68/52/sh 72/54/pc 82/71/s 50/38/pc 54/44/c 82/66/c 76/45/s 54/46/r 51/30/pc 88/78/pc 74/65/c 52/43/pc 60/45/r

Manila Melbourne Mexico City Montreal Moscow New Delhi Paris Rome Santiago Sao Paulo Seoul Singapore Stockholm Sydney Tel Aviv Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

86/77/t 91/69/sh 74/44/s 44/37/sh 19/10/pc 83/56/pc 49/37/s 72/59/c 69/45/pc 82/67/pc 50/34/r 88/76/t 35/30/c 83/70/t 69/58/s 64/56/pc 51/30/sh 35/22/s 38/37/r 26/18/s

National Cities

Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice

Rain

Flurries

Today

City

Albany Albuquerque Amarillo Anchorage Atlanta Atlantic City Austin Baltimore Billings Birmingham Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo Charlotte Chattanooga Cincinnati Cleveland Dallas Dayton Denver Des Moines

Hi/Lo/W

44/40/c 61/33/pc 71/16/s 24/13/s 66/49/pc 55/47/pc 78/60/pc 58/44/pc 13/4/s 69/55/pc 7/-16/pc 34/23/pc 53/43/c 52/34/sh 63/43/s 65/51/c 62/39/sh 56/36/sh 77/44/pc 60/36/sh 47/17/pc 26/12/pc

Snow

Ice

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Weather History Nov. 30, 2001, marked the mildest, most snow-free November in the history of Buffalo, N.Y. Not a flake of snow fell during the entire month, which was the first time this has happened since records were kept.

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COMMUNITY SUNDAY

Nation & world inside Ferguson officer who shot Michael Brown resigns B4

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Contact: Valerie Katzenstein, vkatzenstein@shawmedia.com

November 30, 2014 Northwest Herald

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The daily

THINGS TO DO IN & AROUND McHENRY COUNTY

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WOODSTOCK CHRISTMAS PARADE

“@McHenryCoSports I know they won’t feel this way for awhile but @CaryGroveHS played a heck of a game. Don’t hang your heads.”

WHEN: 2 p.m. Nov. 30 WHERE: Downtown Woodstock COST & INFO: Madrigal singers will perform at noon, followed at 2 p.m. by the parade, and at 4 p.m., Santa will have cookies and milk with children at the old fire station behind City Hall, 121 W. Calhoun St. The Christmas Tree Walk will be featured at the Opera House throughout the day. Information: 815-3384301 or www.woodstockil.gov.

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“Tough tough game...... Great job and great season Trojans!!!!” Colleen Thiel In response to Cary-Grove football’s 31-28 loss to Providence in Class 7A championship final

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“A CHRISTMAS CAROL”

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The village of Algonquin is planning upgrades to its water distribution system that are estimated to cost $8 million.

COMMUNITY

CALENDAR Nov. 30 • 9 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. – Church to focus on mental illness, First Congregational Church of Crystal Lake, 461 Pierson St., Crystal Lake. The theme of the sermon will be “Welcoming and Valuing People with Mental Illness and Their Families,” presented by Deacon Tom Lambert, co-chairman of the National Catholic Partnership on Disability’s Council on Mental Illness. Information: 815-4596010 or www.fcc-cl.org. • 9:45 a.m. – Lifetree Café, Immanuel Lutheran School Library, 300 S. Pathway Court, Crystal Lake. How the millennial generation – people born between 1980 and 2000 – will change the world will be discussed. Free. Information: 815-459-5907 or rdorn@immanuelcl.org. • 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. – Work day at Ryder’s Woods, nearest address is 750 E. Kimball Ave., Woodstock. The Land Conservancy of McHenry County needs volunteers for ongoing work to transform dense buckthorn into an open oak woodland. This work day will require walking moderate distances over rolling terrain. Information: 815-337-9502 or www. conservemc.org. • Noon – Habitat for Humanity McHenry County house dedication, 1906 Orchard Lane, McHenry. The public is invited to a house dedication for the Cardoso family. Information: 815-759-9002 or www. habitatmchenry.org. • 2 p.m. – Christmas parade on the Square, downtown Woodstock. After the parade, children can enjoy cookies and milk with Santa at 4 p.m. at the old fire station behind City Hall, 121 W. Calhoun St. Carolers and musicians will stroll the streets. Information: 815-338-4301 or www. woodstockil.gov.

Dec. 1 • 1 p.m. – Poetry appreciation class, Senior Services Associates Inc., 110 W. Woodstock St., Crystal Lake. Led by Richard Perkins, a poet whose work has appeared in hundreds of publications. Registration and information: 815-356-7457. • 7 p.m. – Affordable Care Act presentation, Algonquin Public Library, 115 Eastgate Drive, Algonquin. Offered by the McHenry County Department of Health and presented by trained counselors to educate residents about their new insurance options. Registration and information: 847-658-4343 or www. mcdh.info. • 7 to 8 p.m. – “The Financial Aid Process,” McHenry Public Library, 809 N. Front St., McHenry. Representatives of ISACorps will

Sarah Nader – snader@shawmedia.com

Snow falls on a path at Moraine Hills State Park in McHenry.

discuss grants, scholarships and student loans. Parents are encouraged to attend with their teens in grades nine through 12. Registration and information: 815-385-0036 or www. mchenrylibrary.org. • 7:30 to 9 p.m. – Fox Valley Rocketeers meeting, Challenger Learning Center, 222 E. Church St., Woodstock. Local club of model rocketry enthusiasts. Information: 815-337-9068 or www.foxvalleyrocketeers.org. • 8 p.m. – Crystal Lake branch of American Association of University Women monthly program, Senior Center, 110 W. Woodstock St., Crystal Lake. The program will feature The Dickens Carollers a cappella group dressed in Victorian costumes. Information: 847-669-3362.

• 7 p.m. – Holiday Floral Show, McHenry High School West Campus, 4724 W. Crystal Lake Road, McHenry. Presented by the McHenry Garden Club. Floral arrangers from local florists will prepare arrangements, which will be awarded to audience members through drawings. Tickets: $10 in advance, $12 at the door. Proceeds benefit scholarships, educational programs, beautification and community service. Information: 815-385-3369 or www.mchenrygardenclub.com. • 7 p.m. – Lifetree Café, Conscious Cup Coffee, 5005 Route 14, Crystal Lake. Discussion topic will be how the millennial generation – people born between 1980 and 2000 – will change the world. Free. Information: 815-715-5476 or shalasz@yahoo.com.

Dec. 2

Dec. 3

• 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. – Pottery & Poinsettia Sale, McHenry County College commons area, Building B, 8900 Route 14, Crystal Lake. MCC ceramics students will sell handcrafted vases, trays, bowls, plates and mugs, as well as other artistic pieces. The Horticulture Department will offer several colors of poinsettias. Free admission. Information: 815-455-8786. • 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. – Elgin Genealogical Society meeting, Elgin Historical Society & Museum, 300 Park St., Elgin. Genealogist Marsha Peterson-Maass will present “The Most Helpful Genealogy Tools You’ve Never Used.” Information: www.elginroots.com. • 10 a.m. – Caregiver discussion group, Crystal Lake Senior Services Associates, 110 W. Woodstock St., Crystal Lake. For those taking care of a family member with dementia or caregivers in general. Group meets the first Tuesday of the month. Information: 815-356-7457. • 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. – Marengo Senior Club meeting, MORE Center, 829 Greenlee St., Marengo. Gathering for seniors in Marengo and Union. Information: 815-5686534. • 6 to 8 p.m. – Tree of Lights Celebration, Park Place, 406 W. Woodstock St., Crystal Lake. Hosted by JourneyCare to honor the memories of loved ones. There will be live music, readings, a candle-lighting ceremony and tree lighting. Light refreshments. Free. For a $25 gift to the JourneyCare Foundation, donors will receive a remembrance ornament. Registration and information: 224-770-2273 or www.journeycare. org/treeoflights. • 6:30 to 8 p.m. – College information session, Room A100, McHenry County College, 8900 Route 14, Crystal Lake. For adults age 24 or older thinking of returning to college. Free. Information: 815479-7732 or www.mchenry.edu/life.

• 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. – Craft & Vendor Fair, Senior Services Associates, 3519 N. Richmond Road, McHenry. A variety of crafts will be available including seasonal decor, jewelry, greeting cards, gift baskets

and more. Pampered Chef, Tastefully Simple, Scentsy, Mary Kay Cosmetics and other vendors will be represented. Information: 815-344-3555. • 11:30 a.m. – Bingo, VFW Post 5915, 301 Lake Marian Road, Carpentersville. Hosted by the VFW Ladies Auxiliary. Classic bingo played with chips. Progressive jackpot. Doors open at 9:30 a.m. Food available. Proceeds benefit military veterans and community programs. Information: 847-658-3391 or 847-428-4836 on Wednesday mornings. • Noon – Bingo, VFW Post 4600, 3002 W. Route 120, McHenry. Play bingo to help support GiGi’s Playhouse, a Down syndrome achievement center. Information: 815-3857529 or www.gigisplayhouse.org/ mchenry. • Noon to 6 p.m. – Free virtual dementia tours, The Fountains at Crystal Lake, 965 N. Brighton Circle West, Crystal Lake. Attendees can learn what it is like to live with forms of dementia during a 15-minute appointment where they will be guided to perform a series of simple tasks in an environment that simulates

COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT: Crystal Lake

Ceremony names Eagle Scout

confusion, vision and hearing impairment and arthritis. Appointments and information: 815-455-8400. • 5 to 7 p.m. – McHenry County Green Drinks, Duke’s Alehouse & Kitchen, 110 N. Main St., Crystal Lake. Brent Hollenberg, from Reclaimed in Crystal Lake, will discuss reclaiming, reusing and repurposing materials. Information: 815-3380393 or www.mcdef.org. • 6 to 6:30 p.m. – Bilingual story time, Cary Area Public Library, 1606 Three Oaks Road, Cary. Interactive stories and songs with Ester Figueroa for parents and children to enjoy together. Program will continue Wednesday nights at least through February. Free. Information: 847-639-4210 or www.caryarealibrary.info. • 6 to 9 p.m. – “Adult Sip and Paint, Art Attack!”, Park Place, 406 W. Woodstock St., Crystal Lake. The painting party is offered by the Crystal Lake Park District. No art talent necessary. Cost: $39 includes all materials. Cash bar. Registration and information: 815-459-0680, ext. 1220, or www.crystallakeparks.org. • 7 p.m. – Bingo, Woodstock Moose Lodge 1329, 406 Clay St., Woodstock. First game Bonanza, Progressive Coverall. Sales start at 5:30 p.m. Food available 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Information: 815-338-0126. • 7:30 p.m. – Young adult support group, National Alliance on Mental Illness, 620 Dakota St., Crystal Lake. For ages 18 to 25. No registration required. Information: 815-308-0851 or www.namimchenrycounty.org.

Dec. 4

Photo provided

Crystal Lake resident Matthew Kebr was awarded the rank of Eagle Scout during a ceremony at St. Thomas the Apostle Catholic Church. For his Eagle Scout project, Kebr led the fundraising, design and construction of picnic tables for Richard Bernotas Middle School. He is a member of Boy Scout Troop 127, which is sponsored by the Knights of Columbus Council 3880.

• 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. – “Holly Jolly Healthy Holiday Tips,” Enlightened Balance, 30 N. Williams St., Crystal Lake. Holiday nutrition and wellness class presented by Joyce Lande, wellness coach and speaker. Cost: $15 includes handouts. Registration and information: 847-7541593 or landemom2@comcast.net. • 7 p.m. – Affordable Care Act presentation, Crystal Lake Public Library, 126 Paddock St., Crystal Lake. Offered by the McHenry County Department of Health and presented by trained counselors to educate residents about their new insurance options. Registration and information: 815-459-1687 or www. mcdh.info. • 7 p.m. – Lifetree Café, The Pointe Outreach Center, 5650 Route 14, Crystal Lake. Discussion topic will be how the millennial generation – people born between 1980 and 2000 – will change the world. Free. Information: 815-459-5907 or rdorn@immanuelcl.org.

Have news or photos to share? Send your information to neighbors@nwherald.com or submit online at NWHerald.com/forms.

WHEN: Nov. 30 through Dec. 7 WHERE: Woodstock Opera House, 121 W. Van Buren St., Woodstock COST & INFO: Charles Dickens’ classic tale presented by the Woodstock Musical Theatre Company. Join Scrooge as he journeys through the Christmases of past, present and future with his three ghostly guides. Schedule: 4 p.m. Nov. 30; 8 p.m. Dec. 5; 2 & 8 p.m. Dec. 6; 3 p.m. Dec. 7. Tickets: $23 adults, $20 seniors and students. Tickets and information: 815-3385300 or www.woodstockoperahouse.com.

Photo provided

Belle Fezziwig (Riley Coduto) is the woman a young Scrooge (Andrew Conrad) loved deeply. Belle broke off their engagement after Scrooge became consumed with greed.

KRIS KRINGLE DAYS WHEN: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Nov. 30 WHERE: The Shops of Ridgefield, 8509 Ridgefield Road COST & INFO: A quaint village of shops filled with antiques, vintage, architectural, primitives, florals, custom framing and fine arts. Information: 815-459-4220, 815-4774601 or www.theshopsofridgefield.com.

FREE PONY RIDES WITH SANTA

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WHEN: 2 to 4 p.m. Nov. 30 WHERE: Timmermann’s Ranch & Saddle Shop, 29550 W. Roberts Road, Island Lake COST & INFO: Come see Santa and take a pony ride. Enjoy hot chocolate and cookies. Event is free, but donations for the food pantry will be accepted. Information: 847-526-8066. Find more local events at PlanitNorthwest.com.


Northwest Herald Editorial Board John Rung, Kate Weber, Dan McCaleb, Jason Schaumburg, Kevin Lyons, Jon Styf, John Sahly, Val Katzenstein

OPINIONS SUNDAY

NWHerald.com

OUR VIEW

November 30, 2014 Northwest Herald Section B • Page 2

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SKETCH VIEW

Election will make chair accountable When it was up to voters to decide whether the chairman on the McHenry County Board should be popularly elected, we supported the effort. Soon-to-be-County-Board-member Andrew Gasser helped illustrate why. “This is political prostitution,” Gasser, of Fox River Grove, said. “It’s a swap meet. It’s horrible.” Gasser was referring to all the For the record politicking that had begun from When County Board memCounty Board bers choose their own leader, members interest- nobody is held accountable. ed in the chairmanship. Gasser said he was sick of all the phone calls and promises of position in exchange for support. While he publicly opposed making the office popularly elected, he said he is starting to come around as a result of his exposure to the process. Gasser will be sworn in Monday. It also is the day that members of the County Board will choose its own leader for the last time. In 2016, voters will decide who will be the County Board chairman. That’s a good thing. When County Board members choose their own leader, nobody is held accountable. The chairman answers to the board and, maybe, voters in his or her district, when selected from within. When voters choose the chairman, that person is accountable to all. It also takes away the wheeling and dealing Gasser described happening behind the scenes in exchange for votes because the chairman assigns the chairmanships and the vice chairmanships of the board’s 11 standing committees. Those chairpeople run the meetings and have the power to decide the meeting agendas, meaning they have latitude in deciding what gets discussed and acted on and what does not. It’s a process we have to stomach only one more time, voters. In two years, accountability comes to the McHenry County Board chairman’s role.

ANOTHER VIEW

Voucher troubles Wisconsin state leaders are going to spend more public money on private schools next year. That much is clear. The real question is whether Republicans who run the statehouse will ensure those dollars are spent wisely. Wisconsin’s voucher school program needs more accountability, based on objective measures of success. As sensible state Sen. Luther Olsen, R-Ripon, has advocated: “If you get a check, you get a checkup.” Taxpayers deserve nothing less. So when Republicans lift or even eliminate a cap on voucher school enrollment in the next state budget, they should require voucher students to take the same state test that public school students already do. Gov. Scott Walker and the Legislature also should set clear consequences for low performance. Public money for private school vouchers should be pulled if evidence shows bad results and no improvement. Some voucher advocates want a big expansion in the next state budget, which would require tens of millions of additional dollars. Not so fast. Equal and transparent assessments of vouchers schools and students are needed first, for comparison with the public school system. Private schools that want more taxpayer money need to earn more public confidence and support. A private school voucher costs less than Wisconsin’s average per-pupil expense in public schools. In that sense, they potentially save money. But other factors suggest vouchers pull money from public schools. When a traditional school district, for example, loses a handful of students to the voucher program, those dollars that follow those children aren’t easy to make up in savings. A small district still may need the same number of teachers and facilities, even though its state aid falls by tens of thousands of dollars, based on lower enrollment spread across several grades. The bigger problem, though, is that most of the new vouchers are going to students who were already attending private schools. That’s because state leaders have raised income limits on participating families, many of whom could already afford private school. The statewide expansion should have been restricted to new students. Ultimately, what matters most is how well Wisconsin is educating its young people. Allowing different models of education is wise. Not every child learns the same way. And competition can encourage innovation. Yet gauging success requires clear and comparable information. That’s what the Legislature’s voucher accountability bill must provide. Wisconsin State Journal

THE FIRST

AMENDMENT

IT’S YOUR WRITE Thank God for America To the Editor: Election night results were good news. President Obama’s degradation of American values and principles were repudiated – good news to all optimists like me. The Republicans have been able to take control of the Senate away from the Democrats. While only one-third of the eligible voters voted, Republicans got seven seats. They needed six. There still are two seats waiting for runoffs. Even though the Republicans control both houses, there is a tremendous problem to get America back where it was when it was considered the greatest nation the world had ever known. The Republicans are a long way from being the statesmen who built America. And we have the farthest left president we have ever had who is in his second term. The president said he would transform America, and so far he seems to be doing it. We are experiencing the slowest and longest recovery from a recession since the Great Depression. We have the greatest debt, the most indebtedness and the worst foreign relations we have ever had. There are more people in the poor category; one of every six families has someone receiving government help. I understand that a fifth of Americans are receiving

food stamps. There are more than a half million American children who have never been born because of the legalization of abortion. These and many other departures from the original American traditions cry out for a return to the Christian policies that made America great. See next month for a solution.

HOW TO SOUND OFF We welcome original letters on public issues. Letters must include the author’s full name, home address and day and evening telephone numbers. We limit letters to 250 words and one published letter every 30 days. All letters are subject to editing

for length and clarity at the sole discretion of the editor. Submit letters by: • Email: letters@nwherald.com • Mail: Northwest Herald “It’s Your Write” Box 250 Crystal Lake, IL 60039-0250

Clifford Evenson Johnsburg

Start a new family tradition To the Editor: Want a recipe for a happy holiday? I will share a tradition our family has embraced to make it an enjoyable experience for all. We decided to go to a family grab bag and get gifts for one person only. It is acceptable to ask the person drawn to indicate what they would like as a gift. When asked, my answer is always the same. Because I have four grandsons and one princess, I tell the parents that they must take my grandchildren to a grocery store and let them select the food for the cart. The money spent will be equivalent to what they would have spent on me. Payment is made by handing the cash, no credit cards, to the child, hopefully with some of their allowance included. They hand it to the cashier. The entire family will then take the goods to a food pantry for

distribution to those in need. As a parent and primary teacher, you have just taught your child the concept of helping others, working together as a family and how money can be used to help people. Then it’s off for a family snack to discuss the day’s activities. Like the idea? Start your own family day tradition. Share it with a friend. Take this idea to work and post it and have an enjoyable holiday this year. Thank you. Dan Malecki Crystal Lake

Congrats, young hunter To the Editor: I am writing about the Northwest Herald article and picture of the 10-point buck shot by Hailey Schwarz of Wonder Lake that ran Nov. 20. I say to her, “Hailey, congratulations on an excellent shot. If you did it by bow and arrow, you’re extremely skilled. The American In-

dians started training (mostly boys, but some girls – Seneca, I believe) by 7 or 8 years old. If you did it by shotgun – you’re skilled like Annie Oakley.” The ancient ways of the Yukon of Siberia, American Indians, the Magyars and Huns was so skilled and precise, including the ancient ways of skinning, tanning, preparing doeskin, buckskin, etc., and the butchering of the deer skins for the meat and teepees (Chanty Magyars had teepees, too.) The sinew of the buffalo, deer, etc., were used for preparing the long process of bow string making. The ancient ways make us very wise in hunting, tracking and knowing the wilderness. My ancestors were the ancient Magyars, first and original natives of Hungary and Hungarians, and I am a fan of Davy Crockett. Christine Spielman Wonder Lake

Better to have an attitude of gratitude If Thomas Jefferson could be faulted for one thing in composing the Declaration of Independence, it might be his inclusion of the words “the pursuit of happiness” in the text. Happiness is a vapor that cannot be grasped; a temporary feeling based on transitory circumstances akin to the euphoria of a full-on sugar rush. Happiness is good for a time, but it cannot last. Life invariably intervenes. So many seem so unthankful about so much these days. Turn on the TV or read a newspaper and you will find complainers. Democrats complain about Republicans and the reverse. The poor complain about the rich, and the rich complain they are being taxed too much. Citizens complain about illegal immigrants. Whites complain about people of color and people of color complain right back. This week in Ferguson, Missouri, we saw lots of people complaining about the police and alleged injustice while storeowners whose businesses were destroyed legitimately

VIEWS Cal Thomas complained about the rioters. There’s an old Southern gospel song whose title other writers have used with different lyrics, but the one I like best is the one that encourages people to “have an attitude of gratitude.” At Thanksgiving, those of us who believe in God thank Him for His many blessings. These include food to eat, clothes to wear, a roof over our heads, good health for those fortunate enough to have it and good doctors for those who don’t, a job for those who have one and the chance to find employment for those who don’t (and unemployment insurance to bridge the gap between jobs). We aren’t grateful enough for what we have. Instead of complaining about what we don’t have, try thanking someone for what you do have. Thank a soldier for your freedom, even the freedom to complain about your political

leaders without fear of being arrested, as is the case in many countries. Find something good to say about another person, and thank them for it. Thank your parents, if they are living, no matter how bad your upbringing may have been. They gave you the gift of life; what you make of it is up to you. Oprah Winfrey sometimes comes up with something worth quoting. I found this gem through a Google search: “Be thankful for what you have; you’ll end up having more. If you concentrate on what you don’t have, you will never, ever have enough.” Have you noticed in the past several years how public storage units have sprung up all over the country? Think about this: In our very large houses, we don’t have enough room to store all of the stuff we’ve accumulated, so we rent other places to put it. Advertisers say acquiring stuff will make us happy. Obviously not, or we would be happy most of the time because most of us have more stuff than our parents and certainly our grandparents ever had, or ever needed.

Previous generations may not have had a lot of material things, but they had something we appear to lack – contentment. To be content is better than being happy. Contentment is akin to satisfaction. Maybe the reason Mick Jagger couldn’t get any satisfaction was because he was looking for it in the wrong place. Author A.J. Jacobs says, “I’ve started to look at life differently. When you’re thanking God for every little joy – every meal, every time you wake up, every time you take a sip of water – you can’t help but be more thankful for life itself, for the unlikely and miraculous fact that you exist at all.” Mr. Jacobs has an attitude of gratitude. Try it and see what difference it makes in you and in others. If you do, you might have a happy – strike that – a contented Thanksgiving.

• Cal Thomas’ latest book is “What Works: Common Sense Solutions for a Stronger America” is available in bookstores now. Readers may email Cal Thomas at tcaeditors@tribune. com.

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Section B • Sunday, November 30, 2014 •

STATE BRIEFS Rantoul police will start using body cameras RANTOUL – Police in central Illinois’ Rantoul are joining the growing number of law enforcers using body cameras – a technology that’s been gaining traction since the recent shooting death of a black 18-year-old by a suburban St. Louis officer who was not wearing one. Rantoul’s police department got a large, anonymous donation in 2011 for the research and purchase of the cameras, the Champaign News-Gazette reported Saturday. Rantoul police Lt. Jeff Wooten said the cameras, consisting of a digital video recorder and a battery pack that allows for 10 hours of recording time, would be used to phase out dashboard cameras in the village’s police cars.

STATE 3

Former high school QB files head injury lawsuit By MICHAEL TARM The Associated Press CHICAGO – A former high school quarterback followed in the steps of one-time pro and college players Saturday by suing a sports governing body – in this case the Illinois High School Association – saying it didn’t do enough to protect him from concussions when he played and still

doesn’t do enough to protect current players. The lawsuit, filed in Cook County Circuit Cook on the same day Illinois wrapped up its last high school football championship games, is among the first instances in which legal action has been taken for former high school football players as a whole against a group responsible for overseeing prep sports in

a state. The lead plaintiff in the lawsuit is Daniel Bukal, a star quarterback at Notre Dame College Prep in Niles from 1999 to 2003. He received multiple concussions playing at the suburban Chicago school and, a decade on, still suffers frequent migraines and has experienced notable memory loss, according to the 51-page suit. Bukal didn’t play beyond

high school. The IHSA did not have concussion protocols in place, putting Bukal and other high school players at risk, and those protocols remain deficient, the lawsuit alleges. It calls on the Bloomington-based IHSA to tighten its rules and regulations regarding head injuries at the 800 high schools it oversees. It does not seek specific monetary damages.

“In Illinois high school football, responsibility – and, ultimately, fault – for the historically poor management of concussions begins with the IHSA,” the lawsuit states. It calls high school concussions “an epidemic” and says the “most important battle being waged on high school football fields ... is the battle for the health and lives of” young players.

Rockford teachers get CPR training ROCKFORD – Teachers in northern Illinois are receiving potentially lifesaving training they’ll pass on to students. The Rockford Register Star reports middle- and high-school teachers are learning what to do when someone goes into cardiac arrest. That includes CPR. How to use defibrillator equipment is also taught. Teachers will then teach their students. Illinois law requires such training for secondary school students. That law was adopted after 17-year-old Lauren Laman of St. Charles died in 2008 from cardiac arrest at school. Rockford School District sixth-graders will get introductory training. Older students will get more advanced training. The SwedishAmerican Foundation has granted tens of thousands of dollars to help pay for training. A SwedishAmerican manager, Tom Pratt, said the more people who are trained, “the more lifesavers” in the community.

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– Wire reports


NATION&WORLD SUNDAY Ferguson officer who shot Michael Brown resigns By ALAN SCHER ZAGIER The Associated Press FERGUSON, Mo. – The Ferguson police officer who fatally shot Michael Brown has resigned, his attorney said Saturday, nearly four months after the confrontation between the white officer and unarmed black 18-year-old that ignited protests in the St. Louis suburb and across the nation. Darren Wilson, who has been on administrative leave since the Aug. 9 shooting, resigned effective immediately, said his attorney, Neil Bruntrager. He declined further immediate comment. The Brown family attorney, Benjamin Crump, didn’t immediately return phone and email messages from The Associated Press. Wilson told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch he was stepping down out of his “own free will” after the police department told him it had received threats of violence if he remained an employee. “I’m not willing to let someone else get hurt because of me,” he told the newspaper. A grand jury spent more than three months reviewing evidence before announcing Monday that it wouldn’t indict Wilson, who had testified that he feared for his life when Brown hit him and reached for his gun. Some witnesses have said that Brown had his hands up when Wilson shot him fol-

lowing a confrontation in a street in Ferguson. The U.S. Justice Department is conducting a civil rights investigation into the shooting and a separate investigation of police department practices. Wilson’s resignation didn’t seem to affect protesters outside Ferguson police headquarters Saturday night. Rick Campbell said he didn’t care about the resignation, saying: “I’ve been protesting out here since August.” Several other protesters merely shrugged their shoulders when asked about the resignation. “We were not after Wilson’s job,” civil rights activist the Rev. Al Sharpton said in a written statement. “We were after Michael Brown’s justice.” Ferguson Police Chief Tom Jackson didn’t immediately return a message left on his cellphone seeking comment. Wilson spent months in hiding and made no public statements following the shooting. Wilson, who recently got married, broke his silence after the grand jury decision, telling ABC News that he couldn’t have done anything differently in the encounter with Brown. Wilson said he had a clean conscience because “I know I did my job right.” Brown’s shooting was the first time he fired his gun on the job, he said.

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For Obama and Pentagon, an uneasy relationship The ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON – On a trip to Afghanistan during President Barack Obama’s first term, Defense Secretary Robert Gates was stunned to find a telephone line at the military’s special operations headquarters that linked directly back to a top White House national security official. “I had them tear it out while I was standing there,” Gates said earlier this month as he recounted his discovery. “I told the commanders, ‘If you get a call from the White House, you tell them to go to hell and call me.’” To Gates, the phone in Kabul came to symbolize Obama’s efforts to microman-

age the Pentagon and centralize decision-making in the White House. That criticism later would be echoed publicly and pointedly by Gates’ successor, Leon Panetta. The president’s third Pentagon chief, Chuck Hagel, was picked partly because he was thought to be more deferential to Obama’s close circle of White House advisers. But over time, Hagel also grew frustrated with what he saw as the West Wing’s insularity. There have been similar gripes from other Cabinet officials, but the friction between the White House and the Pentagon has been particularly pronounced during Obama’s six years in office. That dynamic already appears to be affecting the president’s abil-

ity to find a replacement for Hagel, who resigned Monday under pressure from Obama. Within hours, former Pentagon official Michele Flournoy called Obama to take herself out of consideration, even though she was widely seen as his top choice and would have been the first woman to hold the post. Flournoy officially cited family concerns, but people close to her say she also had reservations about being restrained like Hagel and would perhaps wait to see if she could get the job if another Democrat – namely Hillary Rodham Clinton – won the presidency in 2016. Obama’s eventual nominee will join a national security team that is under intense

criticism for its response to the rise of the Islamic State group in Syria and Iraq. The president has authorized airstrikes in both countries and sent about 3,000 U.S. troops to train and assist Iraqi security forces. He has resisted sending American troops into ground combat and has insisted the military campaign is not designed to oust Syrian President Bashar Assad, whose 3½-year assault on civilians helped create the chaos that allowed the Islamic State to thrive. The foreign policy landscape looks far different from what Obama envisioned when he ran for the White House and pledged to end the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Suspect in Etan Patz’s killing asked: Did I do it? By JENNIFER PELTZ The Associated Press NEW YORK – As he watched TV reports on a 33-year-old missing-child case, a man who’d never been a suspect started pondering whether he was the killer, he later told a psychologist. “ ‘Did I [do] it?’ It was just a thought that came into my head,” Pedro Hernandez recalls in the psychologist’s report, part of a recent court filing that adds new details about his defense in a case that galvanized the missing-children’s movement. “I was, like, nervous and questioning myself ... trying to make sense.” Hernandez would soon tell police he did choke 6-year-old Etan Patz in 1979, confessing after investigators were tipped that he’d spoken of having harmed a child. But defense

AP file photo

A newspaper with a photograph of Etan Patz was part of a makeshift memorial May 28, 2012, in the SoHo neighborhood of New York. While Pedro Hernandez told police he choked 6-year-old Patz in 1979, his defense said it was fiction from a man with an IQ in the bottom 2 percent of the population and mental illness that makes it difficult for him to distinguish real life from fantasy. psychological experts later found him unsure of whether the brutal scenario he’d described was real or imaginary. “I believed it in my mind

Senate – would help isn’t certain. Proposed rule for farms aims to improve Lake Erie Black Friday sales fall TOLEDO, Ohio – Ohio’s lawmakers are taking their first step as sales start earlier toward slowing the spread of algae in Lake Erie since a toxin contaminated the drinking water for more than 400,000 people. Legislation approved in the state House would ban farmers in much of northwestern Ohio from spreading manure on top of frozen or saturated fields. Another provision would set new rules on dumping dredged sediment in the lake. Both are thought to contribute to the algae blooms that produce dangerous toxins. But how much those proposed changes – they still need approval in the Ohio

November 30, 2014

that I did it, but I don’t think I did it,” Hernandez, 53, told one psychologist. The interplay between belief and reality is shaping up

to be a central issue in his murder trial, set for early next year. Since a judge ruled this week that jurors could hear Hernandez’s confession, it will be up to them to decide whether it was true. His defense says it was fiction from a man with an IQ in the bottom 2 percent of the population and mental illness that makes it difficult for him to distinguish real life from fantasy. Prosecutors say his confession was legitimate, and they’re seeking to limit proposed expert testimony on the psychological phenomenon of false confessions. “We believe the evidence that Mr. Hernandez killed Etan Patz to be credible and persuasive and that his statements are not the product of any mental illness,” the Manhattan district attorney’s office has said.

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NATION&WORLD 5

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6 NATION&WORLD • Sunday, November 30, 2014 • Section B • Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

Supreme Court to hear EX-UPS driver’s pregnancy bias claim By MARK SHERMAN The Associated Press WASHINGTON – Peggy Young only has to look at her younger daughter to be reminded how long she has fought United Parcel Service over its treatment of pregnant employees, and why. Young was pregnant with Triniti, who’s now 7 years old, when UPS told Young that she could not have a temporary assignment to avoid lifting heavy packages, as her doctor had ordered. “They told me basically to go home and come back when I was no longer pregnant,” Young said in an interview with The Associated Press. “I couldn’t believe it.” She sued the Atlanta-based package-delivery company

for discriminating against pregnant women. She lost two rounds in lower courts, but the Supreme Court will hear her case Wednesday. The 42-year-old Young, who lives in Lorton, Virginia, said her persistence is not only for herself. “I am fighting for my two daughters and I’m fighting for women who want to start a family and provide for the family at the same time,” she said. UPS spokeswoman Kara Gerhardt Ross said the law is on the company’s side. “UPS did not intentionally discriminate,” Ross said. The outcome could have wide-ranging effects. Three-quarters of women entering the workforce today will become pregnant at least once while employed, and many will work throughout

their pregnancies, employment discrimination expert Katherine Kimpel wrote in a court brief. Some will experience complications or physical effects that cause them to ask their employers for a change of duties or other modifications, Kimpel said. Young’s case hinges on the Pregnancy Discrimination Act, a law that Congress passed in 1978 specifically to include discrimination against pregnant women as a violation of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Congress acted after the Supreme Court, then composed entirely of men, said workplace rules that excluded pregnant workers from disability benefits and insurance coverage did not amount to sex discrimination under the landmark civil rights law.

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Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Section B • Sunday, November 30, 2014 •

NATION&WORLD 7

Murder charges against Egypt’s Mubarak dismissed The Associated Press CAIRO – A judge dismissed murder charges Saturday against former President Hosni Mubarak and acquitted his security chief over the killing of protesters during Egypt’s 2011 uprising, crushing any hope of a judicial reckoning on behalf of the hundreds of victims of the revolt that toppled him. Yet instead of outrage, a largely muted initial reaction greeted the decision in an Egypt where unlicensed protests draw stiff prison terms and many remain fearful over their security four years after the nation’s Arab Spring revolt. Some 2,000 young people protested the verdict near Cairo’s Tahrir Square, the

birthplace of the 2011 uprising closed off Saturday by soldiers and police, though open a day earlier despite widespread fears of violent Islamist protests. They chanted against the military, whose former chief, Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, is now the president. “The people want to bring down the regime!” they shouted, using one of the chief slogans in the 18-day, anti-Mubarak uprising. In the evening, police broke up the gathering, firing water cannon and tear gas and AP photo driving protesters into side Supporters of former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak celebrate Satstreets after supporters of the banned Muslim Brotherhood urday after hearing the verdict of his trial outside a police academy on joined the protest. An Interior the outskirts of Cairo. The court Saturday dismissed murder charges Ministry statement said that against Mubarak in connection with the killing of protesters in the Brotherhood supporters pelted 2011 uprising that ended his nearly three-decade reign. security forces with rocks and fought with the protesters. on the condition of anonymity rized to brief reporters, said Security officials, speaking because they weren’t autho- police arrested 29 people.

Pope prays in Istanbul mosque in new outreach The ASSOCIATED PRESS ISTANBUL – Pope Francis stood Saturday for two minutes of silent prayer facing east in one of Turkey’s most important mosques, a powerful vision of Christian-Muslim understanding at a time when neighboring countries are experiencing violent Islamic assault on Christians and religious minorities. His head bowed, eyes closed and hands clasped in front of him, Francis prayed alongside the Grand Mufti of Istanbul, Rahmi Yaran, in the 17th-century Sultan Ahmet mosque, shifting gears to religious concerns on the second day of his three-day visit to Turkey. “May God accept it,” Yaran told the pope of their prayer. The Vatican spokesman, Rev. Federico Lombardi, called it a moment of “silent adoration.” Lombardi said Francis told the mufti twice that Christians and Muslims must “adore” God and not just

praise and glorify him. It was a remarkably different atmosphere from Francis’ first day in Turkey, when the simple and frugal pope was visibly uncomfortable with the pomp and protocol required of him for the state visit part of his trip. With President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s mega-palace, honor guard and horseback escort now behind him, Francis got down to the business of being pope, showing respect to Muslim leaders, celebrating Mass for Istanbul’s tiny Catholic community and meeting with the spiritual leader of the world’s 300 million Orthodox Christians. Francis bowed before Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I and asked him “to bless me and the church of Rome” at the end of an ecumenical service Saturday evening. The Orthodox leader obliged, kissing Francis’ bowed head. The two major branches of Christianity rep-

resented by Bartholomew and Francis split in 1054 over differences on the primacy of the papacy, giving particular resonance to Francis’ display of deference. Francis’ visit comes at an exceedingly tense time for Turkey, with Islamic State militants grabbing territory next door in Syria and Iraq and sending some 1.6 million refugees fleeing across the border. Some refugees were expected to attend Francis’ final event on Sunday before he returns to Rome. Francis nodded, smiled and looked up in awe as Yaran gave him a tour of the Blue Mosque, famed for its elaborate blue tiles and cascading domes. Presenting the pope with a blue, tulip-designed tile, Yaran said he prayed to God that his visit would “contribute to the world getting along well and living in peace.” “We are in need of prayers. The world really needs prayers,” Yaran said.

WORLD BRIEFS Ebola death toll up, Sierra 15 dead in attack in west Leone needs more beds China’s Xinjiang region

Nigeria: Mosque blasts death toll above 102

DAKAR, Senegal – Sierra Leone will soon see a dramatic increase in desperately needed Ebola treatment beds, but it’s still not clear who will staff them, according to the top United Nations official in the fight against the disease. Ebola has sickened more than 16,000 people of whom nearly 7,000 have died, according to figures released Friday by the World Health Organization. Sierra Leone is now bearing the brunt of the 8-month-old outbreak. In the other hard-hit countries, Liberia and Guinea, WHO says infection rates are stabilizing or declining, but in Sierra Leone, they’re soaring. The country has been reporting around 400 to 500 new cases each week for several weeks. Those cases are concentrated in the capital, Freetown, its surrounding areas and the northern Port Loko district.

KANO, Nigeria – Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan vowed to track down the perpetrators of the bomb blasts that killed more than 100 people at the central mosque in the city of Kano. Jonathan said his government will “continue to take every step to put an end to the reprehensible acts of all groups and persons involved in acts of terrorism.” At least 102 people were killed in the bomb explosions at the central mosque in Kano, said a hospital worker. The multiple explosions that hit the mosque on Friday injured more than 150. “Most of those receiving treatment ... are in dire need of blood and we are appealing to people to come and donate their blood to rescue the victims,” Dr. Usman Bashir told Associated Press on Saturday.

BEIJING – An attack in China’s troubled western Xinjiang region left 15 people dead and 14 injured, state media reported Saturday, the latest in a wave of ethnic violence there that has claimed dozens of lives over the past year. The official Xinhua News Agency reported that the attack took place at a “food street” Friday in Shache county, the same region where state media said a series of attacks in July left 96 people dead, including 59 assailants. The Tianshan news portal said the assailants in Friday’s attack wielded explosives, knives and at least one vehicle. Xinhua reported that 11 of the 15 people killed were assailants. Xinjiang has seen repeated violence over the past year as members of the Muslim Uighur minority group have bristled under what they say is repressive Chinese government rule.

– Wire reports

of the Gulf Arab island nation. Mubarak, who assumed Egypt’s highest office in 1981 following the assassination of Anwar Sadat, has spent virtually all the time since he was detained in April 2011 in hospitals due to poor health. On Saturday, he came to the courtroom on a gurney, wearing dark glasses, a navy blue tie and a matching cardigan. In his ruling, judge Mahmoud al-Rashidi cited the “inadmissibility” of the case against Mubarak due to a technicality. He said Mubarak’s May 2011 referral to trial by prosecutors ignored the “implicit” decision that no criminal charges be filed against him when his security chief and six of his top aides were referred to trial by the same prosecutors two months earlier.

The dispersal contrasted with the jubilant well-wishers who greeted Mubarak after the decision when he returned to his temporary home at a Nileside military hospital. He later triumphantly waved back to supporters from his hospital window. A television interviewer reached him by telephone, asking whether he had ordered the killing. “I did not do anything at all,” replied Mubarak, who was convicted and sentenced to life in prison in 2012 on charges related to the killing of protesters. The verdict was overturned on appeal the following year. The monarch of close U.S. ally Bahrain, King Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa, also called to congratulate Mubarak, according to the official news agency

Islamic State group launches attack on Kobani from Turkey By BASSEM MROUE The Associated Press BEIRUT – The Islamic State group launched an attack Saturday on the Syrian border town of Kobani from Turkey, a Kurdish official and activists said, although Turkey denied that the fighters had used its territory for the raid. The assault began when a suicide bomber driving an armored vehicle detonated his explosives on the border crossing between Kobani and Turkey, said the Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights and Nawaf Khalil, a spokesman for Syria’s powerful Kurdish Democratic Union Party. The Islamic State group “used to attack the town from three sides,” Khalil said. “Today, they are attacking from four sides.” Turkey, while previously backing the Syrian rebels fighting to topple President Bashar Assad in that country’s civil war, has been hesitant to aid them in Kobani because it fears that could stoke Kurdish ambitions for an independent

state. A Turkish government statement on Saturday confirmed that one of the suicide attacks involved a bomb-loaded vehicle that detonated on the Syrian side of the border. But it denied that the vehicle had crossed into Kobani through Turkey, which would be a first for the extremist fighters. “Claims that the vehicle reached the border gate by crossing through Turkish soil are a lie,” read the statement released from the government press office at the border town of Suruc. “Contrary to certain claims, no Turkish official has made any statement claiming that the bomb-loaded vehicle had crossed in from Turkey.” “The security forces who are on alert in the border region have ... taken all necessary measures,” the statement continued. Associated Press journalists saw thick black smoke rise over Kobani during the attack. The sound of heavy gunfire echoed through the surrounding hills as armored vehicles took up positions on

the border. The Observatory said heavy fighting also took place southwest of the town where the Islamic State group brought in tanks to reinforce their fighters. Mustafa Bali, a Kobani-based activist, said by telephone that Islamic State group fighters have taken positions in the grain silos on the Turkish side of the border and from there are launching attacks toward the border crossing point. He added that the U.S.led coalition launched an airstrike Saturday morning on the eastern side of the town. “It is now clear that Turkey is openly cooperating with Daesh,” Bali said, using the Arabic acronym for the Islamic State. Later in the day, he said the situation was relatively calm on the border after a day of heavy clashes. The Islamic State group claimed three suicide attacks in Kobani’s border crossing point, the SITE Intelligence Group reported. The group, quoting Twitter accounts linked to the militants, said the suicide attacks were carried out by a Saudi and a Turkmen.

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SPORTS SUNDAY

Hawks win Brad Richards scores two goals in the Hawks’ 4-1 victory over the Kings / C8

CONTACT: Jon Styf • jstyf@shawmedia.com

NWHerald.com

* November 30, 2014 Northwest Herald

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@McHenryCoSports

CLASS 7A FOOTBALL STATE CHAMPIONSHIP PROVIDENCE 31, CARY-GROVE 28

DEVASTATED TROJANS COME UP SHORT IN CHAMPIONSHIP GAME FOR 2ND TIME IN 3 YEARS / PAGE C2

Lathan Goumas – lgoumas@shawmedia.com

Cary-Grove senior quarterback Jason Gregoire (front) and senior running back/defensive back Willie Hartke (36) are overcome with emotion after losing the Class 7A state championship game against Providence, 31-28, Saturday at the University of Illinois’ Memorial Stadium in Champaign.

INSIDE BITTERSWEET: Cary-Grove players aware of accomplishment, but sting of loss still painful in aftermath. PAGE C2 WORTH A SHOT: C-G coach Brad Seaburg says he’d make decision to kick short again after gamble late in second half eventually proves costly. PAGE C2

ONLINE

Tyler Pennington Lathan Goumas – lgoumas@shawmedia.com

Visit McHenryCountySports. com to watch video highlights of Saturday’s Class 7A state championship game between Cary-Grove and Providence.

SATURDAY’S STATE SCOREBOARD 8A: Stevenson 31, Homewood-Flossmoor 26 7A: Providence 31, Cary-Grove 28 6A: Nazareth Academy 26, Lemont 7 5A: Sacred-Heart Griffin 29, Montini 14


2 SPORTS • Sunday, November 30, 2014 • Section C • Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

CLASS 7A FOOTBALL STATE CHAMPIONSHIP PROVIDENCE 31, CARY-GROVE 28

Take2 Joey Kaufman and

Joe Stevenson

FACE OFF

Cary-Grove took risks in final, most of them worked The high school football season ended Saturday night as Cary-Grove fell to Providence, 31-28, in the Class 7A state championship game. The loss kept the Trojans from winning their second state title since 2009. Reporters Joey Kaufman and Joe Stevenson discuss:

Kaufman: Well, that was a football game. Back and forth. Just chippy enough. Two really good, talented teams going at it. This’ll sting for Cary-Grove, probably for a good while. A second state title in six years would’ve been some accomplishment. But on the flip side, the Trojans were 13-1, ran into a mean Providence team and lost by a slim margin of three points. That still was among the better high school football teams I ever have seen. But, Joe, you’ve seen a lot of good teams from here. I know the dust has hardly settled from the season, but where do you put the 2014 Trojans? Stevenson: We have two state champions recently – C-G in 2009 and Prairie Ridge in 2011 – that are among the area’s best ever. Although neither of them saw teams as tough as C-G saw in 2012 (Crete-Monee) and 2014 (Providence). So, even though they didn’t finish the job, I’d put both those C-G teams right up there on the list. Kaufman: They had Providence on the ropes for a bit there in the second quarter. It looked like the same Trojans we saw all year. It might be neck and neck early, but they’d pull away. And they started to, going up 14-7 a few minutes right before halftime. Then they tried to recover a pooch kick and get the ball back, but couldn’t. What’d you think of that call? Stevenson: I loved Trojans coach Brad Seaburg’s calls in the second quarter. He went for it on fourth down twice in their second scoring drive, then called for that pop-up kick, which caught Providence off-guard. Kevin Hughes almost had the recovery, but touched it before a Providence player could get it. If they get that, it’s a 21-7 game at halftime and possibly a different outcome. I have to hand it to Providence, however, the only time it didn’t get a touchdown in the second half was when it was running out the clock. Kaufman: Seaburg really did coach a heck of a game. But, as well-discplined as the Trojans were, I kept thinking they had their hands tied behind their back in the second half. Look, the triple option is great and it makes Cary-Grove what it is. I’m not saying it should be scrapped. By no means. But much like the 2012 state title game, C-G got in a hole and it couldn’t climb its way out of it. For that team, it’s especially hard to come back down 10. It might be helpful to add some wrinkles, something to speed up the pace of play, at least. Stevenson: It does make it crucial not to fall behind, but the offense has served C-G well and gives teams fits in the postseason because true triple-option teams are rarer. There’s a little give and take with everything like that. And usually more take for C-G than give. Kaufman: That’s fair. It also is probably wise not to overhaul an offense based on two games. If something’s worked to get a team this far, you don’t really want to deviate from that. But then again, isn’t the definition of insanity doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results?

Lathan Goumas – lgoumas@shawmedia.com

Cary-Grove’s Tyler Pennington (39) rushes for a touchdown during the second half of the Class 7A state championship game against Providence on Saturday at Memorial Stadium at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.

LEFT WITH A FEELING OF UNFULFILLMENT Players: Feeling of accomplishment will override sting

STANDOUT STATS q THE GAME BALL

Michael Gomez Cary-Grove, G/DE, Sr

Gomez played almost the whole game on both lines for the Trojans and had two tackles for losses. The offense gained 343 total yards and FB Tyler Pennington rushed for 180 yards and two touchdowns.

By JOE STEVENSON joestevenson@shawmedia.com CHAMPAIGN – Cary-Grove’s Michael Gomez was slightly conflicted after his high school football career ended. Gomez wanted to be happy with playing in a Class 7A football state championship game that lived up to the hype, a matchup of two of the state’s best teams, regardless of class, that was not decided until the final minutes. But the Trojans had lost to Providence, 31-28, Saturday at the University of Illinois’ Memorial Stadium, which meant a second runner-up trophy in three years, and not the big one they coveted most. “This is really bad,” said Gomez, a guard/defensive end who started two years ago. “Coming in my sophomore year I had a very different perspective, knowing I had more time. Senior year, losing it just hurts worse. But I’ve had the most fun I’ve ever had on this team. So much heart, so much effort we put in. A couple plays here and there, we finish on top.” Instead, it was Providence (131) that won its 10th state championship in school history, its first since 2004. “I’m proud of how we fought to the end, but just making it here wasn’t the goal,” offensive tackle/

q THE NUMBER

4

Rushing touchdowns by Providence RB Richie Warfield, who carried 23 times for 123 yards.

q THE TURNING POINT

Lathan Goumas – lgoumas@shawmedia.com

Cary-Grove players react after receiving the second-place trophy Saturday in Champaign. defensive tackle Trevor Ruhland said. “We’re disappointed, but in a couple days we’ll be happy with how we played this season. It was a really fun ride.” C-G (13-1) could not get the defensive stop it desperately needed in the second half. The Trojans led, 14-10, at halftime, but Providence finished its first three second-half possessions with touchdown runs by 6-foot, 200-pound sophomore running back Richie Warfield. The Trojans held Providence’s NCAA Division I receivers Nate Veyvoda (Iowa) and Miles Boykin (Notre Dame) to a combined eight receptions for 103 yards. But Warfield carried 23 times for 123 yards and four touchdowns, while quarterback Justin Hunniford kept plays alive with his scrambling and completed 18 of 26 passes for 184 yards.

“The way they aligned, they had two backs over Miles, we kind of knew Richie was going to have to carry the load,” Celtics coach Mark Coglianese said. The critical play came after C-G had cut Providence’s lead to 24-21 with fullback Tyler Pennington’s 7-yard touchdown run. The Celtics drove back, and Warfield wriggled free for a 41-yard touchdown with 6:05 remaining in the fourth quarter. “We stopped ourselves in the first half,” Hunniford said. “We came out in the third quarter, kept doing what we were doing, limited the mental mistakes and didn’t turn the ball over or commit penalties. It carried us the whole way.” C-G came back to make it 31-28 on Pennington’s 2-yard run with 1:30 remaining, but the Celtics recovered the onside kick and ran

Providence came out in the third quarter with a pair of touchdowns and a defensive stop of C-G to grab a 24-14 lead.

out the remaining time. “There weren’t a whole lot of possessions in the second half,” Trojans coach Brad Seaburg said. “They took advantage of every opportunity. It was one of those games where they scored and we missed our chance (in the third quarter) and we’re playing catchup the rest of the game.” C-G has been to a state championship game four times in 11 years and won the Class 6A state title in 2009, defeating Providence, 34-17. “It was our goal to get here, but it was also our goal to win it,” linebacker Travis Myerson said. “It’s disappointing, but we left no regrets out there. Everyone played their hardest, I couldn’t ask for a better group of guys to play with.”

Short kickoff late in 1st half proves costly for Trojans By ALEX KANTECKI akantecki@shawmedia.com CHAMPAIGN – After CaryGrove battled back from its first deficit of the season with two unanswered touchdowns to take a 14-7 lead late in the first half, coach Brad Seaburg and the Trojans hoped to catch Providence Catholic off-guard. On the ensuing kickoff, Trojans sophomore kicker Collin Walsh popped up a kick 24 yards down the right sideline that C-G’s Kevin Hughes appeared to tip and recover at the Celtics’ 36-yard line. But, instead of C-G getting the ball back in Providence territory, referees threw a flag for catch interference – giving Providence the ball at midfield. Providence then went 46 yards in the final 1:24 of the

first half, where C-G stiffened and held the Celtics out of the endzone on three plays from inside the 5. The Celtics’ P.J. Kowalkowski kicked a 21-yard field goal as time expired to trim the Trojans’ lead to 14-10 at the break. The gamble by C-G was a turning point for Providence, as many players on the field thought the Trojans had recovered the ball. But, according to IHSA rules, the ball has to hit the ground before any member of the kicking team can touch it or before any member of the receiving team has a chance to catch it. Hughes, for his part, knew the rule. “I knew he didn’t signal for the fair catch,” Hughes said. “I know the rule. I know I can’t touch it when the ball is in the air, but my instincts took over

Providence’s Richie Warfield is tackled by CaryGrove’s George Hartke (left) and Matt Sutherland (bottom right) during the first half Saturday in Champaign. Lathan Goumas – lgoumas@shawmedia.com

and I wanted to get the ball back for my team. My adrenaline just took over at that time. It happens.” The field goal by Providence proved to be the difference, as the Celtics prevailed, 31-28, in the Class 7A state championship at University of Illinois’ Memorial Stadium. Seaburg stood by his decision to short kick. He also

didn’t want to put the ball in the hands of 6-foot, 200-pound running back/kick returner Richie Warfield (123 yards, four TDs). “Their special teams are probably the best special teams we’ve seen this year,” Seaburg said. “They don’t put a lot of backups in. They have all of their studs out there, and we’re very aware of who they have deep. Collin had a great kick

Although Warfield didn’t hurt the Trojans on that play, he certainly had his way with C-G Cary-Grove 0 14 0 14 – 28 Providence 7 3 14 7 – 31 after the break – scoring three of his four TDs and rushing for FIRST QUARTER P–Warfield 1 run (Kowalkowski kick), 3:22. 95 yards in the second half. SECOND QUARTER CG–Gregoire 25 run (Walsh kick), 11:09. Providence scored on every CG–Gregoire 10 run (Walsh kick), 1:24. possessions in the second half, P–FG Kowalkowski 21, 0:00. THIRD QUARTER excluding its final drive to run P–Warfield 5 run (Kowalkowski kick), 8:57. P–Warfield 1 run (Kowalkowski kick), 0:56. out the clock. FOURTH QUARTER Would Seaburg call for the CG–Pennington 7 run (Walsh kick), 7:17. P–Warfield 41 run (Kowalkowski kick), 6:05. short kick again if he had the CG–Pennington 2 run (Walsh kick), 1:30. chance to do it over? INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS “Absolutely,” he said. “I RUSHING–Cary-Grove: Pennington 39-180, Gregoire 10-78, Sutherland 8-20, Hughes 5-18. Tohave total confidence in our tals: 62-296. Providence: Warfield 23-123, Hunniford 7-38, Markasovic 1-2. Totals: 31-168. players to execute. We’ve done PASSING–Cary-Grove: Gregoire 3-4-0-49. Proviit many times over the years. dence: Hunniford 18-26-0-184. RECEIVING–Cary-Grove: Hanselmann 3-49. ProvDefinitely, there’s no quesiton idence: Warfield 7-51, Vejvoda 5-55, Boykin 3-48, I would do it all again.” Markasovic 3-30,. TOTAL TEAM YARDS: Cary-Grove 343, Providence Added Hughes: “It was an 346. excellent kick, it’s something we practiced all week. Collin’s and it landed where we wanted been a great kicker for us. it. Fortunately we held them to a I think we did [catch Provifield goal and not a touchdown.” dence off guard].” PROVIDENCE 31, CARY-GROVE 28


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4 SPORTS • Sunday, November 30, 2014 • Section C • Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com SPORTS BRIEFS

BOYS BASKETBALL: RICHMOND-BURTON/JOHNSBURG THANKSGIVING BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT

Reiser qualifies for cross country National Finals

CLS cruises past R-B in 5th-place game

McHenry senior Jesse Reiser finished third at the Foot Locker Cross Country Championship Midwest Regional on Saturday in Kenosha, Wisconsin, and earned an automatic invitation to compete in the National Finals. The top 10 boys and top 10 girls in Saturday’s seeded races qualified to compete against runners from the South, Northeast and West regional meets in the 36th annual Foot Locker Cross Country Championships National Finals Dec. 13 at Morley Field, Balboa Park in San Diego, California.

Poster of missing OSU player shown before game COLUMBUS, Ohio – Ohio State’s football stadium went silent Saturday as an announcer called out the name of a missing football player while a police poster seeking information on his disappearance appeared on the scoreboard. Kosta Karageorge was the last of 24 Ohio State players who were expected to play their final game at Ohio Stadium against rival Michigan. His family said he was last seen Wednesday. The seventh-ranked Buckeyes went on to defeat archrival Michigan, 42-28. After the game, an emotional coach Urban Meyer addressed the missing player. “Our prayers and thoughts are with him and his family and to have him return home safe,” Meyer said.

Referee injured, taken off court on a stretcher NEW YORK – Referee Rick Crawford was taken off the court on a stretcher shortly after he inadvertently was struck in the face by LaSalle’s Steve Dack after the opening tipoff of the consolation game of the Barclays Center Classic on Saturday night. A Barclays Center spokesperson said Crawford was being taken to Brooklyn Hospital, and could move his fingers. He had bruising over his right eye, and his neck was in a brace. Both eyes were open.

STANDOUT STATS q THE GAME BALL

Alex Reich CL South, sr., guard

The senior had 18 points to lead the Gators in the victory over Johnsburg.

q THE NUMBER

8

Three-point field goals by the Gators, which helped take control of the game in the second quarter.

q THE TURNING POINT

After a hard-fought first quarter, Crystal Lake South built its lead thanks in part to 3-point field goals by Reich and Zach Geske.

By TIM SIECK sports@nwherald.com JOHNSBURG – What started as a grind-it-out, in-yourface defensive battle between Johnsburg and Crystal Lake South turned into a game dominated by the Gators as Crystal Lake South cruised to a 63-34 victory over Johnsburg on Saturday in the fifth-place game of the Richmond-Burton/ Johnsburg Thanksgiving Basketball Tournament at Johnsburg High School. The first quarter was dominated by defense, with each team forcing several turnovers and having few shot attempts that weren’t contested. Both teams made only one basket

each the first 5:30 of the game. Crystal Lake South (3-1) held a 10-6 lead after one quarter, and when the second quarter began, the Gators started hitting their shots. South took control in the second quarter thanks to sharp shooting from 3-point range by Alex Reich, and Johnsburg (13) had no answer. The Gators increased their lead to 33-17 at halftime, and continued their defensive dominance in the second half en route to the victory. Reich led all scorers with 18 points, and Zach Geske added 14 points for South. The Skyhawks were led by Tanner Kreassig with 10 points. Geske and Kreassig were named to the all-tournament team.

Ocean race crew abandons grounded sloop Volvo Ocean Race organizers said nine crewmen from Team Vestas Wind have abandoned their 65-foot racing sloop hours after it went aground on the Cargados Carajos Shoals, Mauritius, in the Indian Ocean. Organizers said the sailors have moved to two life rafts anchored to a dry section of the reef. No injuries are reported. At daylight, they will either board a boat from the local coast guard and be taken to a nearby island or join Team Alvimedica, a competitor that is standing by. – Staff, wire reports

Richmond-Burton 56, Grayslake North 42: Richmond-Burton made some adjustments on defense and started hitting shots as the Rockets overcame an early deficit and defeated Grayslake North in the thirdplace game. Grayslake North (2-2) couldn’t miss in the first quarter and raced out to a 10-point first-quarter lead before Richmond-Burton (3-1) made some

adjustments. The Rockets began forcing turnovers and broke down the Knights’ zone as they cut the deficit to three at halftime. The Rockets started the second half on a 16-0 run, which was too much for Grayslake North to overcome. Richmond-Burton was led by all-tournament recipient Sam Kaufman with 16 points. “We played very well this week, but it is kind of disappointing that we were just two points away from the championship game,” Rockets coach Brandon Creason said. “We came out a little flat today, but turned it around after a slow first quarter. I’m pretty happy to start 3-1.”

BOYS BASKETBALL: CRYSTAL LAKE CENTRAL THANKSGIVING TOURNAMENT

Tigers fall to Vikings in title game

STANDOUT STATS q THE GAME BALL

Jack Berg Paririe Ridge, Sr., F

By CHRIS CASEY ccasey@shawmedia.com CRYSTAL LAKE – Crystal Lake Central knew that, heading into Saturday’s tournament championship game against Geneva, it would need to play a perfect game. After the game was over, coach Rich Csezlawski wasn’t even sure if that would have been enough. Starting four players over 6-foot-7, Geneva outscored the Vikings, 17-2, in the second quarter on its way to cruising to the Crystal Lake Central Thanksgiving Tournament title over the host Tigers, 64-31. “There are college teams that are envious of their size,” Czeslawski said. “I told them after the game that, as a coach, these are the years you

wait for. That is a very special team over there.” The Tigers (3-1) were bothered by the height of the Vikings for most of the night. It also didn’t help that Buffalo-bound Nate Navigato started making shots in the second quarter, knocking down two 3s and finishing the game with 21 points. Crystal Lake Central was playing without senior and starting guard Cavanagh Murphy because of a broken wrist that he sustained in Friday’s game against Carmel. The team will know more on the timetable for return on Sunday when Murphy gets re-examined. “It was our first game playing without Cav, so we knew it would be a little bit of a struggle,” senior Jack Ortner said. “That was a real good

team we played, but when we look at the whole tournament, we can take away some positives for sure.” Ian Koch led Crystal Lake Central with 12 points.

Prairie Ridge 50, McHenry 42: In the fifth place game, Prairie Ridge held off a late McHenry rally to win. The Wolves (2-2) forced 28 turnovers, including back-toback turnovers in the final two minutes that led to layups by Chris Bradshaw. “I thought we pressured them fairly well,” Prairie Ridge coach Corky Card said. “We made some little plays to give us a chance to win, and that’s all want at the end of the game is to have a chance.” Prairie Ridge had four players in double figures to McHenry’s one. Joey Kinowski had 13,

Jack Berg finished with 11 and both Bradshaw and Logan Card scored ten each for the Wolves. Corey Lersch led McHenry (1-3) with a game-high 14 points,

Belvidere North 49, Huntley 47: Huntley took on Belvidere North in the first game of the day looking for its first win under new head coach Will Benson. The Red Raiders fought but came up short to start to season 0-4. “We are still going through the process of what it takes to be successful,” Benson said. “This was our best game, and we had a lot of different players contribute. I would have been more disappointed if we didn’t play better today, but we did, and that’s a step in the right direction.”

Berg scored 11 points for the Wolves and made several hustle plays that would not show up in the box score to help Prairie RIdge beat McHenry to finish in fifth place at the Crystal Lake Central Tournament.

q THE NUMBER

4

players for Prairie Ridge that scored in double figures

q THE TURNING POINT With the game tied at 42 with under two minutes to play, Prairie Ridge’s press forced two of its total 28 turnovers, which were both finished with layups by Chris Bradshaw to clinch the victory for the Wolves. Bradshaw finished with 10 points.

PREP ROUNDUP

A-H boys basketball snaps 23-game losing streak at Westminster tournament NORTHWEST HERALD The Alden-Hebron boys basketball team snapped a 23-game losing streak dating back to last season with its 6362 win Saturday over Islamic Foundation at the Westminster Christian Tournament in Elgin. The Giants (1-3) were led by Jacob Heaver with 21 points. Trevor Redlin added 19 for A-H.

Cricket umpire dies in Israel after struck JERUSALEM – Israeli police said a 60-year-old man has died after being struck in the face by a ball while working as an umpire at a cricket match in the coastal city of Ashdod. Police spokeswoman Luba Samri said the man was hit by a ball during a league game Saturday and that no foul play was suspected. He was taken to hospital where he was pronounced dead. Saturday’s accident comes two days after professional Australian cricket player Phillip Hughes died from injuries he sustained after being struck by a ball. Witnesses told Israeli media a batsman struck a ball and it rebounded off the stumps to hit the umpire, who was not wearing protective gear.

“The way we played on defense contributed to a lot of the looks we had on offense,” Gators coach Matt LePage said. “Pretty pleased with how we played this tournament, posting a 3-1 record. We have some things to work on, but we had a lot of positives also.”

Metamora 62, Marengo 51: Erica Benson – ebenson@shawmedia.com

Nazareth’s Edward Claudio kisses the championship trophy Saturday after Nazareth defeated Lemont, 26-7, in the IHSA Class 6A state football title game at Memorial Stadium at the University of Illinois in Champaign.

FOOTBALL STATE CHAMPIONSHIP ROUNDUP

Stevenson holds on to win IHSA Class 8A championship CLASS 6A CLASS 5A Nazareth 26, Lemont 7: NoSacred Heart-Griffin 29, MonCHAMPAIGN – Stevenson tini 14: Sacred Heart-Griffin lan Dean ran for 199 yards and The ASSOCIATED PRESS

held off a furious rally to beat Homewood-Flossmoor for a second time this season to win the IHSA Class 8A football state championships, 31-25. Down 24-10, the Vikings cut the Stevenson lead to 24-16 with a Devonte Harley-Hampton touchdown run at 2:35 of the third quarter. Stevenson appeared in control after Willie Bourbon scored with 6:26 left in the fourth to push the lead to 31-16. Stevenson (14-0) later couldn’t get the ball out of the end zone and the Vikings scored on a safety. They got the ball back with 2:18 to go and scored three plays later. A squib kick was recovered by Homewood-Flossmoor (11-3) and the Vikings drove inside the 10 but fumbled at the three and Stevenson was able to run out the clock.

captured its second straight Class 5A championship, beating Montini for the second year in a row. The Cyclones (14-0) trailed the Broncos (10-4), 7-0, in the second quarter. It was only the second time in 2014 that Sacred Heart trailed. But it rattled off 29 straight points to gain a commanding lead it never relinquished. Southern Miss quarterback recruit Gabe Green threw for 207 yards and a score. And running back Sam Sergent rushed for 98 yards and two scores for the Cyclones. Montini kept Sacred Heart-Griffin from obtaining a running clock (a 40-point lead) for the first time this year. It was led by Charles Norgle III’s 234 yards passing and two scores.

two scores, Julian Love added a touchdown and Jonah Beauduy threw for another as Nazareth won its first state title. Dean scored on a 1-yard run in the first quarter to give the Roadrunners the lead, and his 27-yard run with just more than 10 minutes to go in the game sealed it. The Roadrunners (140) were in command from the start, jumping to a 13-7 first-quarter lead before tacking on scores in both the third and fourth quarters. They held Lemont (13-1) to just 202 yards overall and forced three turnovers. The Indians were led by Thomas Bleka’s 54 yards rushing, and Flynn Nagel added 70 receiving. Nagel entered the game with 31 touchdowns but did not score.

At the Ottawa Tournament in Ottawa, the Indians (3-1) finished in second place at the tournament after the loss in the championship game. Zach Knobloch led Marengo with 21 points, including four 3-pointers, and Ben Volkening added 10 points. York 48, Jacobs 37: At the Palatine Tournament, Cory Boeckh scored 10 points to lead the Golden Eagles (22) in the third-place game at Palatine’s Ed Molitor Tournament. Cameron Krutwig was the second-leading scorer for Jacobs with seven points.

ry over 13th-ranked DeKalb, on Saturday morning in McHenry. The Warriors (4-0) also had a 55-19 victory over Mundelein and a 60-22 victory over York. Patrick Roewer went 3-0 at 170 pounds, with all victories coming by pinfall. Ryan Grannemann (220) also went 3-0 at the meet and Carter Herber (138) won an 8-1 decision against DeKalb to claim the victory for the Warriors. Carmel Triangular: At Mundelein, Richmond-Burton went 0-2 at the meet. The Rockets lost, 50-18, to Carmel and, 44-9, to Round Lake. Grant Sutton (138) went 2-0 for R-B with a pinfall victory against Carmel and a 7-3 decision against Round Lake.

BOYS BOWLING Woodstock 15th at Harlem Invite: The Woodstock co-op boys

bowling team finished in 15th place at the 20-team Harlem Invite at Forest Hills Lanes in Loves Park on Saturday. Woodstock finished with a six-game score of 5,718. Zach Myers finished 12th overall for WRESTLING McHenry goes 3-0: T h e Woodstock with a six-game seMcHenry wrestling team ries score of 1,300. Joey Brown went 3-0 at the McHenry was second on the team with Quad, including a 37-30 victo- 1,230.

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SPORTS 5

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6 SPORTS • Sunday, November 30, 2014 • Section C • Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

BIG TEN ROUNDUP

TOP 25 ROUNDUP

USC 49, NOTRE DAME 14

Illini gain bowl eligibility, Florida State survives Kessler’s 6 TDs lead beat Northwestern, 47-33 battle against Florida USC past Notre Dame The ASSOCIATED PRESS

EVANSTON – Tim Beckman walked into the small office that serves as the visiting interview room at Ryan Field on Saturday and took a quick look around. “Two years ago I walked in here and was disappointed as a football coach could be,” the Illinois coach said. “Not with our players but with the way the program had turned out. I just felt that we needed to give more.” His players delivered this time. Reilly O’Toole passed for 147 yards and three touchdowns and also ran for 147 yards, Josh Ferguson had a pair of rushing scores and Illinois took advantage of five Northwestern turnovers for a 47-33 victory over its in-state and Big Ten rival. Illinois (6-6, 3-5 Big Ten) is bowl eligible for the first time since 2011, and the win may end speculation that coach Beckman could lose his job in his third season.

No. 7 Ohio State 42, Michigan 28: In Columbus, Ohio, Ezekiel Elliott scored untouched on a 44-yard run on fourth-and-1 with 4:58 left to help Ohio State, without injured star quarterback J.T. Barrett, beat Michigan. With no postseason, the only thing left to be decided for Michigan (5-7, 3-5) is the future of coach Brady Hoke. Interim athletic director Jim Hackett will make the call on whether the coach stays or goes. Barrett threw for a score and ran for two before his right leg crumpled underneath him when he was tackled on a run on the first play of the fourth quarter. He broke his right ankle and will have surgery Sunday. Cardale Jones came in for the Buckeyes (11-1, 8-0) to lead the drive that culminated in Elliott’s long run. Darron Lee returned a fumble 33 yards late to add to the lead.

No. 10 Michigan State 34, Penn State 10: In State College, Pa. R.J. Shelton returned the opening kickoff 90 yards for a touchdown and Jeremy Langford ran for 118 yards and two scores in Michigan State’s victory over Penn State. The Spartans (10-2, 7-1) won their third straight game and hit the double-digit win mark for the fourth time in the last five seasons under coach Mark Dantonio. The Spartans have four of their six 10-plus win seasons in school history under Dantonio. Shelton doused the enthusiasm of the emotional senior day festivities at Beaver Stadium when he used all of 14 seconds to dart through defenders for the score. From there, the Spartans never really dazzled against the Nittany Lions (6-6, 2-6). Connor Cook threw a 10yard TD pass and Langford chipped in with a 3-yard score in the third quarter to methodically put it away.

No. 14 Wisconsin 34, No. 22 Minnesota 24: In Madison, Wisc. Melvin Gordon ran for 151 yards and accounted for two scores, and Wisconsin overcame a two-touchdown deficit to beat Minnesota and earn a spot in the Big Ten championship game. Joel Stave threw for 215 yards, including 160 to receiver Alex Erickson. Stave’s 17-yard touchdown pass to Robert Wheelwright with 4:41 left gave the Badgers (10-2, 7-1) a 10-point lead. It was not easy. Physical Minnesota (8-4, 5-3) let a 17-3 lead early in the second quarter slip away. David Cobb ran for 118 yards on 25 carries, including a 40-yard score. Indiana 23, Purdue 16: In Bloomington, Ind. Zander Diamont will definitely put Saturday’s touchdown run on his Bucket list. Indiana’s fans won’t forget this one, either. The much maligned freshman quarterback capped a second-half rally by scoring on a 1-yard run with 27 seconds left to give Indiana a 2316 victory over rival Purdue (3-9, 1-7).

“It’s hard to describe a moment like that, it’s something you dream about,” Diamont said after Indiana reclaimed the Old Oaken Bucket. “Getting to score and just kind of having this moment with my teammates to celebrate, it means the world. Especially after the season, it hasn’t been easy for us.” He finished 15 of 24 for 119 yards, ran 11 times for 34 yards and led the Hoosiers (4-8, 1-7 Big Ten) to scores on five of their final six possessions including his decisive score.

Rutgers 41, Maryland 38: In College Park, Md. Ralph Friedgen had just helped orchestrate the biggest comeback victory in Rutgers (7-5, 3-5) history, and the last thing he wanted to do was talk about himself or his strange return to Maryland (7-5, 4-4). Yet there were questions to be asked, so Friedgen reluctantly pulled himself away from family and friends to address reporters after the Scarlet Knights rallied from a 25-point deficit to beat Maryland 41-38 Saturday. His offense amassed 491 yards, Gary Nova threw for 347 yards and four touchdowns and three receivers finished with more than 100 yards. Janarion Grant had eight catches for 105 yards; Andre Patton had eight receptions for 101 yards and two touchdowns; and Leonte Carroo caught six passes for 104 yards and two scores. The Scarlet Knights (7-5, 3-5) trailed 35-10 late in the first half before closing to 3517 at the break. It would be the first of four straight possessions that ended in touchdowns.

The ASSOCIATED PRESS TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – Dalvin Cook ran for a career-high 144 yards and No. 1 Florida State survived Jameis Winston’s struggles to beat Florida, 24-19, on Saturday night in Will Muschamp’s final game as the Gators’ coach. The Seminoles (12-0, 8-0) will face Georgia Tech Dec. 6 in the Atlantic Coast Conference championship game.

No. 2 Alabama 55, No. 15 Auburn 44: In Tuscaloosa, Amari Cooper tied his own school record with 224 yards receiving and caught three touchdown passes in Alabama’s 55-44 comeback victory over Auburn (8-4, 4-4) on Saturday night in the highest-scoring Iron Bowl. Quarterback Blake Sims and the Crimson Tide (11-1, 7-1) turned to the Heisman Trophy candidate for touchdowns of 39 and 75 yards in the third quarter.

touchdowns, two of them to record-setting wide receiver Tyler Lockett, and Kansas State routed Kansas to move into a tie atop the Big 12 standings.

No. 16 Georgia Tech 30, No. 8 Georgia 24, OT: In Athens, Harrison Butker kicked a career-long 53-yard field goal on the final play of regulation, and D.J. White picked off a pass in overtime to preserve Georgia Tech’s victory over Georgia. Georgia Tech (10-2, 6-2) trailed 24-21 after Hutson Mason threw a 3-yard touchdown pass to Malcolm Mitchell on fourth down with 18 seconds left.

No. 23 Clemson 35, South Carolina 17: In Clemson, Artavis

Scott had two long touchdown catches, Wayne Gallman ran for 191 yards and Clemson ended a five-game losing streak to rival South Carolina. The Tigers (9-3, 6-2) hadn’t No. 18 Ole Miss 31, No. 4 beaten the Gamecocks (6-6, 3-5) Mississippi St. 17: In Oxford, Jaylen Walton had a 91-yard since 2008, an unprecedented touchdown run and running run of failure that overshadback Jordan Wilkins threw a owed their 32-8 record the past 31-yard scoring pass to lead three seasons. No. 24 Louisville 44, KenMississippi (9-3, 5-3) past Mistucky 40: In Louisville, Bransissippi State in the Egg Bowl. The loss by Mississippi don Radcliff ran 4 yards for a State (10-2, 6-2) gave Alabama touchdown with 2:47 remainthe SEC Western Division ti- ing and safety Gerod Hollitle. Dak Prescott threw for 282 man had an NCAA record-tying 14th interception with 35 yards and a touchdown. No. 5 Baylor 48, Texas Tech seconds left, helping Louis46: In Arlington, Bryce Pet- ville (9-3, 5-3) beat Kentucky ty threw for 210 yards and (5-6, 2-7). No lead was safe in a backtwo touchdowns before getting knocked out of the game and-forth game between riwith a concussion and playoff vals that got physical before hopeful Baylor (10-1, 7-1) held kickoff. Louisville coach Bobby Petrino grabbed the jacket off Texas Tech (4-8, 2-7). No. 11 Kansas State 51, Kansas of Wildcats assistant Daniel 13: In Manhattan, Jake Waters Berezowitz during one prethrew for 294 yards and four game scuffle.

By GREG BEACHAM The Associated Press LOS ANGELES – Cody Kessler passed for 372 yards and threw two of his six touchdown passes to George Farmer, leading Southern California to a 49-14 victory over Notre Dame in the 85th edition of the intersectional rivalry Saturday. Adoree Jackson, Darreus Rogers and Nelson Agholor also caught TD passes in a dynamic first half for the Trojans (8-4), who jumped to a 35-0 lead in the second quarter. USC easily reclaimed the Jeweled Shillelagh after two straight losses to the Irish, piling up 577 yards against Notre Dame’s injury-plagued defense. With Kessler’s second-half scoring throw to Randall Telfer, Notre Dame yielded six touchdown passes for the first time in the program’s 127-year history. That defensive low caps a miserable second-half slide for the Irish (7-5), who have lost five of their last six games. Everett Golson struggled mightily before Malik Zaire replaced him late in the first half with Notre Dame already trailing by 35. Zaire led a scoring drive and finished with 170 yards passing, providing hope for Notre Dame’s future. But the present in this rivalry belongs to the Trojans, who rebounded from their lifeless effort last week in a blowout loss to UCLA in their other big rivalry game. “These guys have been

such a resilient group all year,” said USC coach Steve Sarkisian, who won his first shot at Notre Dame. “They have been through so much, and they keep working.” Kessler, who went 32 for 40, also became the first quarterback to throw five touchdown passes in a half against Notre Dame while completing 16 straight passes in a stretch spanning halftime. After setting his career high in completions, the junior finished the regular season with 3,505 yards passing and 36 TDs against just four interceptions. Agholor caught 12 passes for 120 yards in perhaps his final game at USC, while Justin Davis rushed for 81 yards and a 16-yard score in the third quarter. Javorius Allen added 93 yards rushing. Before the final regular-season game of its NCAA sanctions era, USC said farewell to a small senior class. Several upperclassmen left with memorable games: J.R. Tavai matched his previous season total with 3½ sacks, including a fourth-down sack with 4 minutes to play, while Gerald Bowman had an interception and Hayes Pullard recovered a fumble as USC built its lead. Greg Bryant rushed for 79 yards and a late TD for Notre Dame. The low stakes didn’t matter to fans as USC and Notre Dame closed out two disappointing regular seasons on a brilliant sunny day at the Coliseum, which hosted the schools’ first meeting on Dec. 4, 1926.


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Section C • Sunday, November 30, 2014 •

SPORTS 7

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8 SPORTS • Sunday, November 30, 2014 • Section C • Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

BLACKHAWKS 4, KINGS 1

Trip to LA brings bad memories for Hawks By MARK LAZERUS

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Blackhawks’ Jonathan Toews (center) tries to score against Los Angeles Kings goalie Jonathan Quick (right) during the first period of Saturday’s game in Los Angeles. The Blackhawks beat the Kings, 4-1. riod rally in Game 6 at Staples Center. But in Game 7, the Hawks couldn’t hold on to an early 2-0 lead, or a 4-3 lead in the third period. Marian Gaborik tied it in the third, and Martinez won it at 5:47 of overtime. Martinez went on to score the Cup-winning goal in Game 5 against the New York Rangers, too. It could have been the Hawks. They were that close. “Sour [memories], obviously,” Shaw said. “We were playing great last year in the playoffs, and we were playing against a good team. In Game 7s, you never know which way they can go. Obviously, it left a sour taste in our mouth.” Vengeance wasn’t going to come Saturday night, no matter the result. Not in November. But neither team would be shocked to see the other again in late May. Sure, the Hawks entered Saturday night’s game in third place in the Central Division. The Kings were fourth in the Pacific. But these teams, as well as anyone in the league, know how little that matters right now. They’re the two best teams

in the NHL, the standards, the franchises everyone else is chasing. They’ve combined to win four of the past five Stanley Cups, and have met in two straight Western Conference finals, including last spring’s unforgettable seven-game clash, arguably the best playoff series in the past decade. They’re talented and deep, with battle-tested goalies and iconic coaches and championship experience that sets them apart from nearly every team in the league. It’s a rivalry built not on blood and hate, but on a shared history and a mutual respect. On memories, good and bad. “I’m sure it’s a lot of respect on both sides,” Quenneville said. “Two great series. Last year was as good as they come; terrible ending. There’s some disappointing at the end of it all, but we’re certainly excited about playing these guys. Our regular-season games are as intense as our playoff games. It makes for a great contest, a great showdown.” And maybe another great preview of bigger things to come.

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LOS ANGELES – It was cold and drafty in the cavernous Staples Center on Saturday morning as nine Blackhawks and the assistant coaches took part in a casual and optional morning skate. The breeze circulating throughout the empty arena kept catching the newest banner hanging from the rafters, the one reading “Stanley Cup Champions 2013-14” – waving it, flaunting it, seemingly taunting the players below. Outside the Los Angeles Kings’ dressing room, just down the hall from the visitors’ room, was a light fixture with two Stanley Cups etched on it, one labeled 2012, one labeled 2014. And there were pictures and posters throughout the arena, serving as cruel reminders of how last season ended for the Hawks, and how close they came to a return trip to the Stanley Cup Final, to a possible second straight championship. “You kind of see how close we were,” Bryan Bickell said. “One shot. One goal. We could have had [the banners] in our rink.” The Hawks have moved on from their Western Conference final Game 7 loss at the United Center in June, but they haven’t forgotten. Probably never will. Every now and then, the image of Alec Martinez’s shot fluttering off of Nick Leddy’s sweater and past Corey Crawford in overtime flickers in their minds. They can’t help it. “It’s there,” Hawks coach Joel Quenneville said. “It’s always there,” Andrew Shaw said. The Hawks had erased a 3-1 series deficit with an exhilarating double-overtime win at the United Center in Game 5, and pulled off a thrilling third-pe-

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Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Section C • Sunday, November 30, 2014 •

Bears fail to exert effort vs. Lions There are a number of things that jump off the tape of the Bears’ 34-17 loss to the Lions on Thanksgiving Day. But no matter how many times you watch it, you are drawn back to the failure of Marc Trestman and his coaching staff to put the Bears in a position to win. On offense, the Bears threw the ball 48 times and ran it only eight, including 29 passes and just one rushing attempt in the second half. It is clear from early in the third quarter on that the Lions’ defense abandons any concern about the run on almost every Bears snap. Detroit’s front four pin their ears back and race to the passer while six, and often seven, defenders drop into coverage and clog the passing lanes. Although the Lions have one of the best run defenses in the league, on the couple runs the Bears tried early, there were lanes available and, had they stayed with it, Matt Forte would eventually have had some success. Even if he didn’t, it would have opened up the field for his passing game, and given his club a fighting chance. Trestman and his staff get an F for their effort vs. the Lions. As a result, I don’t know what to give Forte and Ka’Deem Carey for the game but an incomplete. I do have to give Alshon Jeffery an A-, Martellus Bennett a B and the rest of the Bears receivers a C+. In addition to Jeffery’s two touchdowns, he did a nice job of blocking against the Lions. Bennett

BEARS INSIDER Hub Arkush was the Bears’ best offensive player with eight catches for 109 yards, but he had one bad drop and a second pass he didn’t exactly drop but mishandled when Jay Cutler surprised him with a shovel pass. The Bears’ pass catchers all do a nice job of blocking, so I hung the plus on an average performance for the rest of them. Sadly, Brandon Marshall is becoming just one of the rest of the Bears receivers. Cutler gets a C. Yes, he was put in a tough spot by Trestman but he had an unusually poor day mechanically, even for him, and he seemed less than interested for big chunks of the game. The offensive line also gets an incomplete because of the bizarre gameplan, but after studying this tape I don’t understand how the Bears can leave Jordan Mills on the field, and Michael Ola’s star is sinking fast, as well. Ola struggled terribly all day inside, and the fourth quarter sack Mills allowed Jason Jones was one of the most pathetic attempts at a block I’ve ever seen. He was incompetent all day. It’s time to find out if Charles Leno can play. Particularly because Jermon Bushrod hasn’t played well recently either. The defense allowed a struggling Lions offense 474 yards, 34

points and Matt Stafford’s best game of the year with a 116.0 passer rating. Grades seem a bit silly, don’t they? Jared Allen benefited from getting to play against undrafted rookie free-agent Cornelius Lucas but, regardless, he played his best game of the year. The rest of the defense was below average to awful. Another player who needs to join Mills on the bench is Shea McClellin. McClellin is usually in the wrong place, looks clueless on the blitz and shows no instincts for the position. Whatever Phil Emery thought he was getting, it’s time to waive the white flag. Unfortunately, Christian Jones didn’t look a whole lot better and Jon Bostic just didn’t make anywhere near enough plays in 74 snaps. The rookies in the secondary have to concern you a bit at this point, too. Calvin Johnson makes everybody look bad, but Kyle Fuller really didn’t compete against him Thursday, and Brock Vereen played flat-out timid and doesn’t appear all that excited about contact. I realize there are four games left to play, but the Lions’ tape more than anything feels like a sad exclamation point on a terribly disappointing season.

• Chicago Football editor Hub Arkush can be reached at harkush@shawmedia.com or on Twitter @Hub_Arkush.

FIVE-DAY PLANNER SUNDAY

TEAM

PLAYOFFS Class 1A championship Game 31 — Forreston 20, Carrollton 15 Class 2A championship Game 31 — Eastland-Pearl City co-op 41, Maroa-Forsyth 12 Class 3A championship Game 31 — Wilmington 20, Williamsville 17 Class 4A championship Game 31 — Chicago Phillips 49, Rochester 28 Class 5A championship Game 31 — Sacred Heart-Griffin 29, Montini 14 Class 6A championship Game 31 — Nazareth Academy 26, Lemont 7 Class 7A championship Game 31 — Providence Catholic 31, Cary-Grove 28 Class 8A championship Game 31 — Stevenson 31, Homewood-Flossmoor 25

BOYS BASKETBALL

JOHNSBURG (34) Kreassig 4 2-4 10, Jordan 1 0-0 2, Lobermeier 2 0-0 5, Shelton 3 2-2 9, Anderson 1 2-3 4, Rackow 1 0-2 2, Kowalski 0 2-2 2. Totals 12 8-13 34. 3-point goals: Crystal Lake South- 8 (Geske 4, Reich 3, Carlson 1). Johnsburg-2 (Lobermeier 1, Shelton 1).

RICHMOND-BURTON 56 GRAYSLAKE NORTH 42 RICHMOND-BURTON (56) Bayer 3 2-2 9, S.Kaufman 7 0-0 16, St.Pierre 4 0-0 8, J.Kaufman 3 0-0 8, Banks 5 0-0 10, Hill-Male 2 0-0 5, Vogt 0 0-1 0, Bush 0 0-1 0. Totals 24 2-4 56. GRAYSLAKE NORTH (42) Krebs 2 0-0 5, Geary 1 0-0 2, DiProva 3 5-6 11, Sinclair 1 1-2 3, Einloth 1 1-2 3, Atwater 4 2-5 10, Aikin 0 1-2 1, Bowen 3 1-3 7. Totals 15 11-20 42. Richmond-Burton Grayslake North

at Brooklyn 2 p.m. WGN AM-1000

ALDEN-HEBRON (63) Nelson 1 8-14 10, LeJune 1 2-8 4, Judson 1 1-1 3, Johnson 1 0-2 2, Heaver 5 11-14 21, Redlin 8 3-5 19, VonBergen 1 0-0 2, Glenn 1 0-0 2. Totals: 19 25-44 63.

Geneva CL Central

METAMORA 62, MARENGO 51 11 12 17 22 – 62 14 12 9 16 – 51

MARENGO (51) Nice 2 0-0 4, Shepard 0 3-4 3, M. Volkening 2 0-4 4, Kissack 1 0-0 3, Simonini 3 0-0 6, Knobloch 6 5-8 21, B. Volkening 3 4-4 10. Totals: 17 12-20 51. 3-point goals: Marengo 5 (Knobloch 4, Kissack).

JOHNSBURG/RICHMOND-BURTON TOURNAMENT CRYSTAL LAKE SOUTH 63, JOHNSBURG 34 Crystal Lake South 10 23 13 17 – 63 Johnsburg 6 11 6 11 – 34 CRYSTAL LAKE SOUTH (63) Baker 3 2-2 8, Geske 5 0-0 14, Bartusch 4 2-3 10, Schingel 0 2-4 2, Friesen 3 0-0 6, Reich 7 1-2 18, Murtaugh 0 2-5 2, Carlson 1 0-0 3. Totals 23 9-16 63.

15 19 17 13 – 64 11 2 9 9 – 31

GENEVA (64) Santa Caterina 1 0-1 2, B. Fuzak 3 0-0 8, N. Navigato 9 0-0 21, Vollbrecht 3 0-1 6, Chambers 1 1-3 3, Moyer 1 0-0 2, C. Navigato 1 0-0 2, Stahl 1 0-0 2, Callaly 0 0-0 0, Vedder 1 0-0 3, Scleichler 1 0-0 3, De Lavallade 1 0-0 2, Dreyer 1 0-0 2, Rocks 0 0-0 0, Ralston 1 0-0 2, Samples 3 0-2 6, Klaus 0 0-0 0. Totals: 28 1-7 64. CRYSTAL LAKE CENTRAL (31) McKenzie 1 0-0 2, Franzen 0 0-0 0, Olson 0 2-2 2, Cruz 0 0-0 0, Sigmund 1 0-0 3, MacAlpine 1 0-0 2, Price 2 1-2 6, Ortner 1 0-0 2, Panicko 1 0-0 2, Koch 5 2-4 12. Totals: 12 5-8 31. 3-point goals: Geneva 7 (N. Navigato 3, B. Fuzak 2, Vedder, Schleicher), Crystal Lake Central 2 (Price, Sigmund). Total fouls: Geneva 13, Crystal Lake Central 13.

WRESTLING MCHENRY QUAD

YORK 48 JACOBS 37

MCHENRY 60, YORK 22

York Jacobs

10 9 14 15 – 48 12 10 5 10 – 37

JACOBS (37) Canady 1 0-2 3, Ross 2 0-0 6, Krutwig 3 1-2 7, Boeckh 3 1-2 10, Bindi 3 0-2 6, Orange 5 1 3-4 5. Totals: 13 5-12 37. 3-point goals: Jacobs: 6 (Boeckh 3, Ross 2, Canady).

CRYSTAL LAKE CENTRAL THANKSGIVING TOURNAMENT PRAIRIE RIDGE 50, MCHENRY 42 Prairie Ridge McHenry

12 15 12 10

6 17 – 50 9 11 – 42

PRAIRIE RIDGE (50) Todd 0 0-0 0, K. Stenzel 0 0-0 0, Otto 2 0-1 4, Lamb 0 0-0 0, Kinowski 5 3-4 13, Loeding 0 0-0 0, Dorn 0 2-2 2, Card 3 2-4 10, Bradshaw 4 0-0 10, Berg 3 5-7 11. Totals: 17 12-18 50. MCHENRY (42) O’Toole 2 3-4 8, Wilson 3 1-1 8, Mulhall 0 0-0 0, Balog 0 0-0 0, Bellich 2 0-0 6, Mohr 2 2-2 6, Lersch 7 0-0 14, Trocki 0 0-0 0. Totals: 16 6-7 42. 3-point goals: Prairie Ridge 4 (Card 2, Bradshaw 2), McHenry 4 (Bellich 2, O’Toole, Wilson). Total fouls: Prairie

106: Mullen (McH) pin. Crowley, 2:54 113: Sikula (McH) by fft. 120: Busse (McH) by fft. 126: Duh (McH) pin. Ordonaez, 2:53 132: Conlon (McH) pin. Karabelas, 3:28 138: Ordonez (Y) maj. dec. Herber, 14-2 145: Hoffman (Y) pin. Collins, 1:53 152: Leske (McH) pin. Varghese, 1:46 160: Roewer (McH) pin. Strueli, :49 170: Kalinich (Y) pin. Flores, 3:32 182: Andrade (McH) by fft. 195: Grannemann (McH) by fft. 220: Little (McH) pin. Shipman, 2:24 285: Helton (Y) by fft.

MCHENRY 37, DEKALB 30 106: Mullen (McH) by fft. 113: Sikula (McH) maj. dec. Komitas, 12-4 120: Busse (McH) pin. Soto, 2:34 126: McGee (D) dec. Duh, 4-1 132: Stratton (D) pin. Neises, 3:54 138: Herber (McH) dec. Montgomery, 8-1 145: Green (D) pin. Collins, 3:29 152: Olson (D) pin. Leske, 5:04 160: Somer (D) pin. Flores, 2:44 170: Roewer (McH) pin. Farrell, 1:04 182: Engleson (D) dec/ Andrade, 8-7 195: Grannemann (McH) dec. Williams, 7-3 220: Little (McH) dec. Johnson, 3-2 285: Paszternak (McH) pin. Dombeck, 1:30

CARMEL TRIANGULAR ROUND LAKE 44 RICHMOND-BURTON 9 106: Artega (RL) by fft. 113: Horst (RL) by fft. 120: fft. 126: Kant (R-B) pin, Enriquez, 1:08 132: Wawrzyniak (RL) pin. Hastings, 1:47 138: Sutton (R-B) dec. Arteagle, 7-3 145: Vonan (RL) tech. Kellum 152: Vityk (RL) pin. Braden, 2:56 160: Moore (RL) tech. Mckimmy 170: Avila (RL) pin. Krumenacher, 4:17 182: fft 195: Greenhill (RL) dec. Fernero, 4-0 220: fft. 285: fft.

CARMEL 50, RICHMOND-BURTON 18 106: Schoer (C) fft. 113: Tortorice (C) fft. 120: Tortorice (C) pin. Kant, 4:28 126: Palm (C) fft. 132: Chukewill (C) pin. Hastings, 2:25 138: Sutton (R-B) pin. Pryhaclc, 3:37 145: Lucanell (C) pin. Kellum, 5:13 152: Braden (R-B) fft. 160: Morris (C) tech. McKimmy 170: Chapman (C) dec. Krumenacher, 5-2 182: fft. 195: Fernero (R-B) fft. 220: Alleu (C) fft. 285: fft.

BOYS BOWLING HARLEM INVITE Team Scores: 1. Hononegah 6,660, 2. Lincoln-Way North 6,424, 3. Harlem 6,415, 4. Rochelle 6,201, 5. Freeport 6,173, 15. Woodstock co-op 5,718. Woodstock co-op: Edward Zurawski 1,125, Austin Luna 1,058, Joey Brown 1,230, Josh Black 490, Zach Myers 1,300, Ethan Geggie 227, Adrian Geske 288. Total: 5,718.

HOCKEY NHL WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF Nashville 23 16 5 2 34 64 St. Louis 24 16 6 2 34 66 Blackhawks 24 15 8 1 31 74 Winnipeg 25 12 9 4 28 52 Minnesota 23 13 9 1 27 65 Dallas 24 9 10 5 23 70 Colorado 24 9 10 5 23 64 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF Vancouver 23 16 6 1 33 72 Anaheim 24 14 5 5 33 64 Calgary 25 15 8 2 32 78 Los Angeles 24 12 7 5 29 65 San Jose 24 10 10 4 24 62 Arizona 24 9 12 3 21 57 Edmonton 24 6 14 4 16 54 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF Tampa Bay 24 16 6 2 34 85 Montreal 25 16 7 2 34 65 Detroit 23 13 5 5 31 69 Boston 24 14 9 1 29 61 Toronto 23 12 8 3 27 76 Florida 21 9 6 6 24 45 Ottawa 23 10 9 4 24 61 Buffalo 24 8 14 2 18 43 GP W L OT Pts GF Pittsburgh 23 16 5 2 34 81 N.Y. Islanders 24 17 7 0 34 77 N.Y. Rangers 23 11 8 4 26 68 Washington 23 10 9 4 24 65 New Jersey 24 9 11 4 22 58 Philadelphia 23 8 12 3 19 61 Carolina 23 7 13 3 17 54 Columbus 23 6 15 2 14 52

GA 46 51 48 56 55 84 75 GA 61 60 64 57 66 74 82 GA 64 63 58 58 69 53 63 76 GA 55 65 64 65 71 74 68 83

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Saturday’s Games Blackhawks 4, Los Angeles 1 Buffalo 4, Montreal 3, SO St. Louis 3, Minnesota 2, SO N.Y. Rangers 5, Philadelphia 2 Toronto 6, Washington 2 Tampa Bay 4, Ottawa 1 Pittsburgh 3, Carolina 2 N.Y. Islanders 3, New Jersey 1 Nashville 2, Columbus 1 Colorado 5, Dallas 2 Calgary 3, Arizona 0 Anaheim at San Jose (n) Sunday’s Game Vancouver at Detroit, 1 p.m. Monday’s Games Tampa Bay at N.Y. Rangers, 6 p.m.

Adirondack Hamilton Rochester Toronto

BLACKHAWKS 4, KINGS 1 2 0

1 1

1 — 4 0 — 1

First Period–1, Chicago, Carcillo 3 (Bickell), 1:52. 2, Chicago, B.Richards 5 (Versteeg), 17:59. Penalties–Toews, Chi (high-sticking), 12:44; Crawford, Chi, served by Versteeg (tripping), 15:31. Second Period–3, Los Angeles, Nolan 1 (Muzzin), 5:53. 4, Chicago, B.Richards 6 (Rozsival, Versteeg), 8:14. Penalties–Versteeg, Chi (tripping), 16:11. Third Period–5, Chicago, Saad 4 (Hossa), 18:11 (en). Penalties–Regehr, LA (hooking), 9:23; Carcillo, Chi, major (fighting), 18:35; Nolan, LA, game misconduct, 18:35; McNabb, LA, minor-major (elbowing, fighting), 18:35. Shots on Goal–Chicago 9-8-8–25. Los Angeles 8-8-4–20. Power-play opportunities–Chicago 0 of 2; Los Angeles 0 of 3. Goalies–Chicago, Crawford 12-5-1 (20 shots-19 saves). Los Angeles, Quick 10-5-4 (24-21). A–18,471 (18,118). T–2:24. Referees–Tom Chmielewski, Mike Leggo. Linesmen–Shane Heyer, Tony Sericolo.

AHL WESTERN CONFERENCE Midwest Division W L OL SL Pts GF Rockford 15 5 1 1 32 70 Wolves 13 6 3 0 29 68 Milwaukee 12 5 0 1 25 55 Grand Rapids 9 7 2 0 20 52 Lake Erie 6 8 2 2 16 51 North Division W L OL SL Pts GF Utica 14 5 2 0 30 58

GA 48 53 39 50 66 GA 44

12 8 1 0 25 62 9 9 2 0 20 57 9 11 1 0 19 68 5 11 2 0 12 29 West Division W L OL SL Pts GF Oklahoma City 11 4 2 2 26 67 San Antonio 12 6 1 0 25 63 Texas 7 6 6 0 20 51 Charlotte 6 11 1 0 13 42 Iowa 5 14 1 0 11 49 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L OL SL Pts GF Manchester 13 5 1 0 27 61 St. John’s 9 9 4 1 23 54 Portland 11 9 0 0 22 48 Worcester 9 8 2 0 20 52 Providence 9 9 2 0 20 56 East Division W L OL SL Pts GF W-B/Scranton 12 8 1 1 26 55 Hershey 10 8 1 1 22 50 Binghamton 9 8 2 1 21 68 Lehigh Valley 9 8 2 0 20 49 Norfolk 8 12 0 0 16 47 Northeast Division W L OL SL Pts GF Springfield 15 7 1 0 31 76 Syracuse 11 7 3 0 25 64 Albany 10 6 2 3 25 61 Hartford 11 8 2 0 24 55 Bridgeport 10 7 2 1 23 68

65 53 68 52 GA 60 56 60 58 73 GA 44 72 46 55 53 GA 50 46 63 52 69 GA 63 65 61 64 58

NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win, one point for an overtime or shootout loss. Saturday’s Games Wolves 2, Rockford 1 Albany 2, Utica 1 Worcester 5, Providence 2 Hartford 3, Bridgeport 1 Springfield 4, Manchester 1 Syracuse 4, Hershey 1 Grand Rapids 6, Adirondack 1 Charlotte 5, Milwaukee 4 Hamilton 4, Lake Erie 3, OT Binghamton 4, Rochester 3 Lehigh Valley 4, Norfolk 3 Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 1, St. John’s 0 Texas 4, Iowa 3 Oklahoma City 4, San Antonio 3, OT Sunday’s Games Milwaukee at Charlotte, noon Providence at Bridgeport, 2 p.m. St. John’s at Hershey, 4 p.m. Iowa at San Antonio, 4 p.m. Lake Erie at Toronto, 4 p.m.

SOCCER MLS PLAYOFFS CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIP Eastern Conference New England 4, New York 3 Leg 1 — Sunday, Nov. 23: New England 2, New York 1

Leg 2 — Saturday, Nov. 29: New York 2, New England 2 Western Conference LA Galaxy 1, Seattle 0 Leg 1 — Sunday, Nov. 23: LA Galaxy 1, Seattle 0

Leg 2 — Sunday, Nov. 30: LA Galaxy at Seattle, 8 p.m.

MLS CUP Sunday, Dec. 7: New England at LA Galaxy-Seattle winner, 2 p.m.

NBA EASTERN CONFERENCE Central Division W L Pct Bulls 10 6 .625 Milwaukee 10 8 .556 Cleveland 8 7 .533 Indiana 7 10 .412 Detroit 3 13 .188 Atlantic Division W L Pct Toronto 13 3 .813 Brooklyn 6 8 .429 Boston 4 9 .308 New York 4 13 .235 Philadelphia 0 16 .000 Southeast Division W L Pct Washington 10 5 .667 Atlanta 9 6 .600 Miami 8 7 .533 Orlando 6 12 .333 Charlotte 4 14 .222 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct Memphis 14 2 .875 Houston 13 4 .765 San Antonio 11 4 .733 Dallas 13 5 .722 New Orleans 7 8 .467 Northwest Division W L Pct Portland 12 4 .750 Denver 8 8 .500 Utah 5 12 .294 Oklahoma City 5 12 .294 Minnesota 4 10 .286 Pacific Division W L Pct Golden State 13 2 .867 L.A. Clippers 11 5 .688 Phoenix 10 7 .588 Sacramento 9 7 .563 L.A. Lakers 3 13 .188

GB — 1 1½ 3½ 7 GB — 6 7½ 9½ 13 GB — 1 2 5½ 7½ GB — 1½ 2½ 2 6½ GB — 4 7½ 7½ 7 GB — 2½ 4 4½ 10½

Saturday’s Games Dallas 110, Philadelphia 103 Washington 83, New Orleans 80 Atlanta 105, Charlotte 75 Cleveland 109, Indiana 97 L.A. Clippers 112, Utah 96 Houston 117, Milwaukee 103 Sunday’s Games Bulls at Brooklyn, 2 p.m. San Antonio at Boston, noon

FOOTBALL National Football League BEARS — Signed S Anthony Walters. Signed DE Jamil Merrell to the practice squad. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Signed LB Darius Fleming from the practice squad. OAKLAND RAIDERS — Signed RB

at Charlotte 6 p.m. CSN AM-1000

ON TAP SUNDAY NFL

TV/Radio MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 11 a.m.: Texas at UConn, ESPN2 11 a.m.: Army at Duke, ESPNU Noon: Orlando Classic, Tennessee vs. Marquette, at Orlando, Fla., ESPN 1 p.m.: Providence at Kentucky, ESPN2 1 p.m.: Wooden Legacy, San Diego vs. Western Michigan, Calif., ESPNU 1 p.m.: Air Force at Texas Tech, FSN 1:30 p.m.: Stanford at DePaul, FS1 2 p.m.: Richmond at Northern Iowa, CSN 2 p.m.: Charlotte at North Carolina Asheville, CSN+ 3 p.m.: Orlando Classic, Kansas vs. Michigan State, at Orlando, Fla., ESPN2 3 p.m.: Wooden Legacy, Xavier vs. Long Beach State, at Anaheim, Calif., ESPNU 3:30 p.m.: Delaware at Villanova, FS1 5:30 p.m.: Orlando Classic, Georgia Tech vs. Rhode Island, at Orlando, Fla., ESPNU 9 p.m.: Wooden Legacy, Washington vs. UTEP, at Anaheim, Calif., ESPN2

Noon: San Diego at Baltimore, CBS Noon: New Orleans at Pittsburgh, Fox 3:25 p.m.: New England at Green Bay, CBS 7:20 p.m.: Denver at Kansas City, NBC

SOCCER 7:25 a.m.: Premier League, Manchester City at Southampton, NBCSN 9:55 a.m.: Premier League, Everton at Tottenham, NBCSN 8:20 p.m.: MLS, playoffs, conference finals, second leg, Los Angeles at Seattle, ESPN

WINTER SPORTS 2 p.m.: USSA, Aspen Winternational, at Aspen, Colo. (same-day tape), NBC

WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 5:30 p.m.: Tennessee at Texas, FS1

CANADIAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE 5:30 p.m.: Grey Cup, Hamilton vs. Calgary, at Vancouver, British Columbia, ESPN2

NFL NATIONAL CONFERENCE North W L T Pct PF PA Green Bay 8 3 0 .727 354 246 Detroit 8 4 0 .667 231 207 Bears 5 7 0 .417 253 337 Minnesota 4 7 0 .364 202 244 East W L T Pct PF PA Philadelphia 9 3 0 .750 375 285 Dallas 8 4 0 .667 302 273 N.Y. Giants 3 8 0 .273 233 294 Washington 3 8 0 .273 217 273 South W L T Pct PF PA Atlanta 4 7 0 .364 262 281 New Orleans 4 7 0 .364 288 286 Carolina 3 7 1 .318 215 300 Tampa Bay 2 9 0 .182 207 300 West W L T Pct PF PA Arizona 9 2 0 .818 240 195 Seattle 8 4 0 .667 298 221 San Francisco 7 5 0 .583 231 244 St. Louis 4 7 0 .364 209 285 AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA New England 9 2 0 .818 357 227 Miami 6 5 0 .545 285 219 Buffalo 6 5 0 .545 238 207 N.Y. Jets 2 9 0 .182 177 303 South W L T Pct PF PA Indianapolis 7 4 0 .636 333 256 Houston 5 6 0 .455 242 226 Tennessee 2 9 0 .182 192 293 Jacksonville 1 10 0 .091 161 305 North W L T Pct PF PA Cincinnati 7 3 1 .682 246 234 Baltimore 7 4 0 .636 295 208 Pittsburgh 7 4 0 .636 288 263 Cleveland 7 4 0 .636 242 219 West W L T Pct PF PA Denver 8 3 0 .727 332 260 Kansas City 7 4 0 .636 261 195 San Diego 7 4 0 .636 245 216 Oakland 1 10 0 .091 176 285 Sunday’s Games Tennessee at Houston, noon Oakland at St. Louis, noon Carolina at Minnesota, noon Washington at Indianapolis, noon Cleveland at Buffalo, noon San Diego at Baltimore, noon N.Y. Giants at Jacksonville, noon Cincinnati at Tampa Bay, noon New Orleans at Pittsburgh, noon Arizona at Atlanta, 2:05 p.m. New England at Green Bay, 3:25 p.m. Denver at Kansas City, 7:30 p.m. Monday’s Game Miami at N.Y. Jets, 7:30 p.m. Thursday’s Games Detroit 34, Bears 17 Philadelphia 33, Dallas 10 Seattle 19, San Francisco 3

BETTING ODDS COLLEGE TOP 25 FARED

No. 1 Florida State (12-0) beat Florida 24-19. Next: vs. No. 16 Georgia Tech, ACC championship, Saturday. No. 2 Alabama (11-1) beat No. 15 Auburn 55-44. Next: vs. No. 17 Missouri, SEC championship, Saturday. No. 3 Oregon (11-1) beat Oregon State 47-19. Next: vs. No. 12 Arizona, Pac-12 championship, Friday. No. 4 Mississippi State (10-2) lost to No. 18 Mississippi 31-17. Next: TBA. No. 5 Baylor (10-1) beat Texas Tech 48-46 at Arlington, Texas. Next: vs. No. 11 Kansas State, Saturday. No. 6 TCU (10-1) beat Texas 48-10, Thursday. Next: vs. Iowa State, Saturday, Dec. 6. No. 7 Ohio State (11-1) beat Michigan 42-28. Next: vs. No. 14 Wisconsin, Big Ten championship, Saturday. No. 8 Georgia (9-3) lost to No. 16 Georgia Tech 30-24 OT. Next: TBA. No. 9 UCLA (9-3) lost to Stanford 31-10. Next: TBA. No. 10 Michigan State (10-2) beat Penn State 34-10. Next: TBA. No. 11 Kansas State (9-2) beat Kansas 51-13. Next: at No. 5 Baylor, Saturday. No. 12 Arizona (10-2) beat No. 13 Arizona State 42-35. Next: vs. No. 3 Oregon, Pac-12 championship, Friday. No. 13 Arizona State (9-3) lost to No. 12 Arizona 42-35. Next: TBA. No. 14 Wisconsin (10-2) beat No. 22 Minnesota 34-24. Next: vs. No. 7 Ohio State, Big Ten championship, Saturday. No. 15 Auburn (8-4) lost to No. 2 Alabama 55-44. Next: TBA. No. 16 Georgia Tech (10-2) beat No. 8 Georgia 30-24 OT. Next: vs. No. 1 Florida State, ACC championship, Saturday. No. 17 Missouri (10-2) beat Arkansas 21-14. Next: vs. No. 2 Alabama, SEC championship, Saturday. No. 18 Mississippi (9-3) beat No. 4 Mississippi State 31-17. Next: TBA. No. 19 Marshall (11-1) lost to Western Kentucky 67-66, OT. Next: vs. Louisiana Tech, Conference USA championship, Saturday, Dec. 6. No. 20 Oklahoma (8-3) did not play. Next: vs. Oklahoma State, Saturday, Dec. 6. No. 21 Colorado State (10-2) lost to Air Force 27-24. Next: TBA. No. 22 Minnesota (8-4) lost to No. 14 Wisconsin 34-24. Next: TBA. No. 23 Clemson (9-3) beat South Carolina 35-17. Next: TBA. No. 24 Louisville (9-3) beat Kentucky 44-40. Next: TBA. No. 25 Boise State (9-2) vs. Utah State. Next: TBA. Midwest Illinois 47, Northwestern 33 Indiana 23, Purdue 16 Kansas St. 51, Kansas 13 Ohio St. 42, Michigan 28 West Virginia 37, Iowa St. 24 Wisconsin 34, Minnesota 24

Golden State at Detroit, 2:30 p.m. Memphis at Sacramento, 5 p.m. Miami at New York, 6:30 p.m. Orlando at Phoenix, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Portland, 8 p.m. Toronto at L.A. Lakers, 8:30 p.m. Monday’s Games San Antonio at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Miami at Washington, 6 p.m. Denver at Utah, 8 p.m. Minnesota at L.A. Clippers, 9:30 p.m. Friday’s Games Bulls 109, Boston 102 Golden State 106, Charlotte 101 Atlanta 100, New Orleans 91 Dallas 106, Toronto 102 Milwaukee 104, Detroit 88 Oklahoma City 105, New York 78 L.A. Clippers 102, Houston 85 Indiana 98, Orlando 83 San Antonio 112, Sacramento 104 Denver 122, Phoenix 97 Memphis 112, Portland 99 Minnesota 120, L.A. Lakers 119

MEN’S COLLEGE TOP 25 FARED Saturday 1. Kentucky (6-0) did not play. Next: vs. Providence, Sunday. 2. Wisconsin (7-0) did not play. Next: vs. No. 4 Duke, Wednesday. 3. Arizona (6-0) did not play. Next: vs. Gardner-Webb, Tuesday. 4. Duke (6-0) did not play. Next: vs. Army, Sunday. 5. North Carolina (5-1) did not play. Next: vs. Iowa, Wednesday. 6. Louisville (5-0) did not play. Next: vs. No. 16 Ohio State, Tuesday. 7. Texas (5-0) did not play. Next: at No. 24 UConn, Sunday. 8. Virginia (7-0) beat Rutgers 45-26. Next: at Maryland, Wednesday. 9. Wichita State (4-0) beat Tulsa 7555. Next: at Utah, Wednesday. 10. Gonzaga (6-0) did not play. Next: vs. Southeastern Louisiana, Tuesday. 11. Kansas (4-1) did not play. Next: vs. No. 20 Michigan State, Sunday. 12. Villanova (5-0) did not play. Next: vs. Delaware, Sunday. 13. Iowa State (3-1) did not play. Next: vs. Lamar, Tuesday.

14. VCU (4-2) lost to Old Dominion 7367. Next: at Illinois State, Tuesday. 15. San Diego State (5-1) did not play. Next: vs. San Diego, Thursday. 16. Ohio State (5-0) did not play. Next: at No. 6 Louisville, Tuesday. 17. Miami (7-0) did not play. Next: vs. Illinois, Tuesday. 18. Florida (3-3) did not play. Next: at No. 11 Kansas, Friday. 19. Michigan (5-1) beat Nicholls State 91-62. Next: vs. Syracuse, Tuesday. 20. Michigan State (5-1) did not play. Next: vs. No. 11 Kansas, Sunday. 21. West Virginia (7-0) beat College of Charleston 86-57. Next: vs. LSU, Thursday. 22. UCLA (5-2) did not play. Next: vs. Cal State Fullerton, Thursday. 23. Creighton (6-1) beat Middle Tennessee 57-47. Next: at Tulsa, Wednesday. 24. UConn (3-1) did not play. Next: vs. No. 7 Texas, Sunday. 25. Arkansas (5-0) did not play. Next: vs. Iona, Sunday. Midwest Belmont 83, Ohio 81 Dayton 75, Ill.-Chicago 41 Lewis 76, Wayne (Mich.) 59 Georgia St. 66, IUPUI 63 Cent. Michigan 79, Grand Canyon 77< Illinois St. 85, Youngstown St. 73, OT Iowa 77, Longwood 44 UMKC 84, William Jewell 44< Loyola of Chicago 69, Kent St. 61 Michigan 91, Nicholls St. 62 Milwaukee 64, Mid Continent 59 Nebraska-Omaha 78, Nevada 54 Notre Dame 90, Chicago St. 42 Oakland 81, Toledo 79 S. Illinois 76, Olivet Nazarene 60 SE Missouri 85, Alabama A&M 51 W. Illinois 91, Greenville 56 Wichita St. 75, Tulsa 55

TRANSACTIONS BASKETBALL National Basketball Association MINNESOTA TIMBERWOLVES — Signed F Jeff Adrien.

THURSDAY

at Lake Erie 6 p.m.

BASKETBALL

Florida at Columbus, 6 p.m. Montreal at Colorado, 8 p.m. Arizona at Edmonton, 8:30 p.m. Boston at Anaheim, 9 p.m. Friday’s Games Blackhawks 4, Anaheim 1 Detroit 5, New Jersey 4, SO N.Y. Rangers 3, Philadelphia 0 Washington 5, N.Y. Islanders 2 Boston 2, Winnipeg 1, OT Buffalo 2, Montreal 1 Carolina 4, Pittsburgh 2 Vancouver 5, Columbus 0 Florida 3, Ottawa 2 St. Louis 4, Edmonton 3, OT Minnesota 5, Dallas 4, OT

Chicago Los Angeles

DALLAS 7 p.m. CSN AM-1000

2 p.m.: Bulls at Brooklyn, WGN, AM-1000

106: Mullen (McH) pin. Durlacker, 1:43 113: Sikula (McH) pin. Morton, :20 120: Ripertella (M) pin. Busse, 3:45 126: Duh (McH) pin. Hernandez, 1:45 132: Neises (McH) pin. Mcraw, 1:30 138: Herber (McH) maj. dec. Antunez, 10-2 145: Collins (McH) pin. Olechno, 3:51 152: Cruz (M) maj. dec. Leske, 9-0 160: Roewer (McH) pin. Adams, 1:37 170: Kranstanidas (M) pin. Flores, 1:40 182: Andrade (McH) dec. Hernandez, 4-1 195: Sielck (McH) by fft. 220: Grannemann (McH) pin. Steele, :23 285: Obispo (M) dec. Pasternak, 4-2

WEDNESDAY

ST. LOUIS 7 p.m. NBCSN AM-720

NBA

MCHENRY 55, MUNDELEIN 19

GENEVA 64, CRYSTAL LAKE CENTRAL 31

PALATINE TOURNAMENT

Alden-Hebron 19 8 16 20 – 63 Islamic Foundation 13 14 16 19 – 62

TUESDAY

FOOTBALL

Ridge 12, McHenry 22. Fouled out: Bellich.

3-point goals: Richmond-Burton- 6 (Bayer 1, S.Kaufman 2, J.Kaufman 2, HillMale 1). Grayslake North- 1 (Krebs).

ALDEN-HEBRON 63 ISLAMIC FOUNDATION 62

Metamora Marengo

9 11 26 10 – 56 18 5 10 9 – 42

MONDAY

DALLAS 7:25 p.m. CBS/NFLN AM-780, FM-105.9

PREPS FOOTBALL

SPORTS 9

George Atkinson III from the practice squad. Placed CB Carlos Rogers on the reserve/injured list. HOCKEY National Hockey League NHL — Fined Montreal D Alexei Emelin $11,021.51 for an illegal check to the head of Buffalo F Brian Gionta during a Nov. 28 game. COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS — Recalled C Michael Chaput and LW Kerby Rychel from Springfield (AHL). Assigned C Alexander Wennberg to Springfield.

DALLAS STARS — Reassigned LW Curtis McKenzie to Texas (AHL). MINNESOTA WILD — Signed D Marco Scandella to a five-year contract extension. MONTREAL CANADIENS — Signed F Brendan Gallagher to a six-year contract extension. SAN JOSE SHARKS — Activated F Mike Brown from the injured list. Placed F Tyler Kennedy on the injured list. WASHINGTON CAPITALS — Recalled D Steven Oleksy from Hershey (AHL).

GLANTZ-CULVER LINE NFL Sunday PTS O/U UNDERDOG Sunday at Indianapolis 9½ (51) Washington at Houston 7 (42½) Tennessee at Buffalo 3 (42) Cleveland at Baltimore 6 (46) San Diego N.Y. Giants 3 (44½) at Jacksonville Cincinnati 3½ (44) at Tampa Bay at St. Louis 6½(42½) Oakland at Pittsburgh 4½ (54) New Orleans at Minnesota 2½(42½) Carolina Arizona 2 (44½) at Atlanta at Green Bay 3 (58½) New England Denver 1½(49½) at Kansas City Monday Miami 7 (42) at N.Y. Jets FAVORITE

NCAA Basketball FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG at UConn 1½ Texas at Texas Tech 9½ Air Force at Kentucky 20 Providence Stanford 8½ at DePaul at Detroit 4 Bowling Green at N. Iowa 6 Richmond at New Mexico 11½ Southern Cal at Villanova-x 27 Delaware at Drexel Pk Southern Miss. California 7 at Fresno St. at Miami (Ohio) 5½ Elon Portland-y 1 Valparaiso Murray St.-y 11 Drake at UTSA 8½ S. Utah at Tulane 6 Tennessee Tech at Arkansas 11 Iona at Maryland 21 VMI at San Francisco 9½ Montana at SMU 14 Monmouth (NJ) N. Dakota St. 3½ at Montana St. at Oregon 14½ Portland St. x-at Wells Fargo Center y-at Nashville, Tenn. Orlando Classic At Lake Buena Vista, Fla. Seventh Place Rider Pk Santa Clara Fifth Place Rhode Island 1 Georgia Tech Third Place Tennessee 1 Marquette Championship Michigan St. 1 Kansas Wooden Legacy At Nashville, Tenn. Seventh Place Princeton 5 San Jose St. Fifth Place San Diego 2 W. Michigan Third Place Xavier 7 Long Beach St. Championship UTEP 1 Washington FAVORITE at Brooklyn San Antonio Golden State Memphis Miami at Phoenix at Portland Toronto

NBA LINE O/U UNDERDOG Pk (196) Bulls 6 (205) at Boston 9 (201) at Detroit 2½ (193½) atSacramento 3 (193) at New York 9½ (209) Orlando 14 (212) Minnesota 5½ (214) at L.A. Lakers

FAVORITE at Detroit

NHL LINE UNDERDOG -130 Vancouver

LINE +110

GOLF PGA TOUR EMIRATES AUSTRALIAN OPEN Saturday At The Australian Golf Club Sydney Purse: $1.07 million Yardage: 7,208; Par: 71 Third Round a-amateur Jordan Spieth, United States 67-72-69—208 Brett Rumford, Australia 70-69-69—208 Greg Chalmers, Australia 71-66-71—208 Adam Scott, Australia 74-66-69—209 Rod Pampling, Australia 73-67-69—209 a-Todd Sinnott, Australia 71-67-73—211 Aron Price, Australia 68-75-69—212 Jake Higginbottom, Australia 71-69-72—212 Daniel Nisbet, Australia 74-72-67—213 Ryan Fox, New Zealand 72-72-69—213 Josh Younger, Australia 71-72-70—213 David Bransdon, Australia 72-70-71—213 Robert Allenby, Australia 71-69-73—213 Alistair Presnell, Australia 74-72-68—214 James Nitties, Australia 71-73-70—214 Rohan Blizard, Australia 70-73-71—214 Aaron Townsend, Australia 73-70-71—214 Boo Weekley, United States 72-71-71—214 Jason Norris, Australia 73-69-72—214 Matthew Griffin, Australia 72-69-73—214 Richard Green, Australia 69-71-74—214 Adam Crawford, Australia 69-69-76—214 Rory McIlroy, NorthernIreland 69-69-76—214 a-Ryan Ruffels, Australia 71-74-70—215 Callan O’Reilly, Australia 74-71-70—215 Steven Bowditch, Australia 70-74-71—215 Kang Sung-Hoon, SouthKorea 73-70-72—215 Oliver Goss, Australia 71-72-72—215 Rhein Gibson, Australia 70-70-75—215 Stephen Allan, Australia 75-71-70—216 Leigh McKechnie, Australia 73-71-72—216 Nathan Green, Australia 72-72-72—216 a-Antonio Murdaca,Australia 70-73-73—216 Choi Joon-woo, South Korea 72-71-73—216 GarrettSapp, United States 73-72-72—217 Geoff Ogilvy, Australia 74-71-72—217 BrendonDeJonge,Zimbabwe 69-75-73—217 Josh Geary, New Zealand 76-68-73—217 Bryden Macpherson, Australia 70-73-74—217 Stephen Dartnall, Australia 72-71-74—217 John Senden, Australia 73-69-75—217 Choi Jin-ho, South Korea 74-68-75—217 Jason Scrivener, Australia 72-74-72—218 Matthew Millar, Australia 73-73-72—218 a-Lucas Herbert, Australia 75-71-72—218 Stephen Leaney, Australia 73-73-72—218 David McKendrick, Australia 75-71-72—218 Brad Shilton, New Zealand 74-72-72—218 Adam Bland, Australia 73-72-73—218 Nathan Holman, Australia 73-72-73—218 Lincoln Tighe, Australia 70-72-76—218 Nick Cullen, Australia 73-69-76—218 Matthew Giles, Australia 73-73-73—219 MichaelHendry, New Zealand 70-74-75—219


10 SPORTS • Sunday, November 30, 2014 • Section C • Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

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Inside

D BUSINESS SUNDAY Tax lien put on campus November 30, 2014

Dave Ramsey: Make your budget the boss / D2

Northwest Herald

NWHerald.com

CONTACT: Brett Rowland • browland@shawmedia.com

ACCOUNTING Ryan VanderKoy

Still ways to reduce taxes before year end As another year draws to a close, there may still be opportunities to reduce your 2014 taxes. Tax planning can be beneficial regardless of your income level or the complexity of your taxes. A few simple steps can do much to reduce your tax bill, or increase your refund, on April 15.

Maximize retirement contributions: One of the most effective methods to reduce taxable income is to maximize retirement contributions. If you participate in a 401(k) plan through your employer, you may defer a maximum of $17,500 ($23,000 if you are older than 50) to your 401(k) plan for 2014. You may have signed a document indicating that a certain percentage of each paycheck will be withdrawn for 401(k) contributions each paycheck. However, employers will often allow employees to modify this percentage. This can be a particularly effective option if you will receive a year-end bonus. You also may be eligible to contribute to a traditional or Roth IRA account. The maximum contribution for 2014 for IRA accounts is $5,500 ($6,500 if you are older than 50). Keep in mind that you may not be eligible to make an IRA contribution if you participate in a workplace retirement plan and your income is too high. IRA contributions may be made for 2014 retroactively through April 15, so consult with your tax accountant to see if an IRA contribution would be advantageous for you. Individuals with adjusted gross income of less than $30,000 may be eligible for a credit of up to $1,000, and married couples with adjusted gross income of less than $60,000 may be eligible for a credit of up to $2,000 on their tax returns for making retirement plan contributions in addition to the normal tax savings. Here are some additional planning opportunities: • If you have an eligible high deductible health plan, make additional contributions to a Health Savings Account before year end. For 2014, individuals with an eligible high deductible health plan may contribute up to $3,300 ($6,550 for family coverage) into a Health Savings Account. • Make charitable contributions to eligible charitable organizations before year end if you itemize your deductions. • Consider using a credit card to pay deductible expenses (such as charitable contributions) before the end of the year. Doing so will increase your 2014 deductions even if you don’t pay your credit card bill until after the end of the year. • If you have been unemployed, or your income is down for any reason in 2014, consider converting assets in a traditional IRA to a Roth IRA. This does increase your taxable income for the year, but if your income is minimal, you may be able to pay little tax to transfer your retirement funds to a tax free Roth account. • Consider making contributions to an Illinois Bright Start or Illinois Bright education savings account. If you live in Illinois, contributions to a Bright Start account for anyone are tax deductible up to a total of $10,000 a year ($20,000 for married filing joint), and you pay no tax on earnings and withdrawals that cover qualified education expenses. • If you have had a large gain from security sales in 2014, consider selling other security holdings at a loss to offset gains. You can sell the original holding and then buy back the same security 31 days later to take advantage of the tax loss. • You can exclude certain gifts up to $14,000 per recipient each year ($28,000 per recipient if your spouse elects to split the gift with you) without depleting any of your gift tax exemption. Consider making gifts to reduce your taxable estate. • If you think you will still owe taxes, consider having your employer increase your federal and state withholdings on your remaining paychecks. The withheld tax will be applied pro rata over the full 2014 tax year to reduce penalties on underpayments of estimated tax. Tax planning is never a one-sizefits-all approach. A strategy that works well for one person may not work for another.

• Ryan VanderKoy is a CPA with Caufield & Flood in Crystal Lake. He can be reached at 815-455-9538, via email at ryanv@cfcpas.com, or through the website, www.cfcpas.com.

Facebook.com/NWHerald

By BRETT ROWLAND browland@shawmedia.com HARVARD – Winter could be rough on the former Motorola campus in Harvard. After years of heating, maintaining and paying the property taxes on the vacant corporate campus at 2001 N. Division St., the Miami company that owns it has stopped doing so. A Chicago company recently secured a lien on the 1.5-million-square-foot building after Miami-based Optima Ventures failed to pay more than $300,000 in property taxes this fall. Electricity at the former Motorola building has been turned off since the spring. In May, ComEd filed a lawsuit against Optima seeking more than $50,000. Without heat, the cold winter temperatures could damage the building infrastructure, said Charles Eldredge, executive director of the Harvard Economic Development Corp. “I was told they do not intend to turn the heat on,” Eldredge said Wednesday after accompanying real estate brokers who were showing the property to potential buyers on a chilly tour of the campus.

Northwest Herald file photo

An aerial view of the former Motorola campus in Harvard. Owner Optima Ventures failed to pay more than $300,000 in property taxes to the county this fall. “That’s not good for the building, but it will really depend on how well they’ve drained the water. If it was done well, then the effect will be minor. If not, then there could be very substantial plumbing damage come spring.” It’s not clear what Optima Ventures plans to do with the property. A message left for officials at the

Miami company wasn’t returned. However, the property is being marketed. Four groups have looked at the building one or more times in recent months, Eldredge said. And the price has been dropped to $15 million, although Eldredge said it fluctuates and is ultimately up to the owner. “I presume [the groups] have

@NWHeraldbiz

some level of interest if they are looking at the property,” he said. “All the gawkers and tire-kickers have gone.” Optima International bought the building in 2008 for $16.75 million. The Midwest Corporate Campus has 1.5 million square feet through four connected buildings. Amenities include a fitness center with a dance room, two child-care centers, nine elevators, a keyless security system, a 500-seat auditorium, a 1,100-person capacity cafeteria, miles of biking and running trails and two heliports (one rooftop, one ground level). The campus has 6,000 parking spaces and 28 underground executive parking spaces. It has been vacant since 2003. A marketing brochure for the property notes the replacement cost of the facility is more than $250 million, “and the facility is available immediately at well below this cost.” Marketing materials don’t list an asking price for the campus. So far, efforts to fill the property – with everything from a major company to a water park and a prison – haven’t been successful.

See TAX LIEN, page D2

MCEDC 2014 BUSINESS CHAMPION AWARD WINNER

H. Rick Bamman – hbamman@shawmedia.com

Radicom technician Rick Wolf works with a communication analyzer at the Johnsburg company’s facility. The 15-employee business designs, installs and services communication systems for public safety organizations throughout northern Illinois and southern Wisconsin.

‘We fought hard to survive’ Back from brink, Johnsburg’s Radicom catches new wave to growth By SARAH STRZALKA editorial@nwherald.com JOHNSBURG – Radicom is a small company in a small town, but with clients such as Metra and PACE, it does big business. A 5,000 square-foot building on Chapel Hill Road has been home to Radicom since 1969 – decades before Johnsburg had even become a village. That same year, Phil Bartmann came on board as a part-time technician; three years later he was full time. He eventually bought the company in a partnership with the founder’s son. The 15-employee business designs, installs and services communication systems for public safety organizations throughout northern Illinois and southern Wisconsin. The business was built on twoway radios and working for RCA, which was taken over by General Electric. As ownership continued to change hands, Radicom continued to stay on board, now working with Harris Corp. to provide radio communication for first responders. It’s a relationship that helped Radicom stay afloat. “They have come up with some

Phil Bartmann President and CEO

Bob Lueders Executive vice president and COO

Radicom Inc. n WHAT: Radicom designs, installs, and

H. Rick Bamman – hbamman@shawmedia.com

Radicom technician Rick Wolf works with a communication analyzer at the company’s Johnsburg facility. Even in the smartphone era, the immediacy of two-way radio communication makes it an essential tool for many public safety agencies, hospitals and other businesses, said Phil Bartmann, president and CEO of Radicom Inc. incredible, groundbreaking products, so they helped us in the last two, three years really get out of the doldrums that the entire country was in,” Bartmann said. “All I can say is in our industry, we fought hard to survive.” One week, Bartmann would cut

the grass while his business partner cleaned the washrooms. The next week they would switch. “At one time, we had four Nextel stores,” Bartmann said. “We had to divest ourselves of our stores and get back into our core business, which was public safety.”

services advanced communication technologies for public safety organizations and businesses throughout northern Illinois and southern Wisconsin. n WHERE: 2604 N. Chapel Hill Road, Johnsburg n INFORMATION: 815-385-4224 or www.radicom.com When the Nextel industry collapsed, Bartmann said the leadership was forced to make hard decisions, and over the course of about six to eight months, they dropped from 29 employees to nine.

See RADICOM, page D2


2 BUSINESS • Sunday, November 30, 2014 • Section D • Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

To fix finances, make your budget the boss Dear Dave, My husband and I are following your plan, and we’re trying to reconcile our on-paper budget with what’s going on in our bank account. Most of our bills are due the first half of the month, but we receive most of our income during the second half of the month. Can you help us figure out what to do?

– Kathy

Dear Kathy, If you’re actually making a budget and sticking to it, what you’re describing is a cash flow bind. You are in charge of your budget until it’s on paper. Once it’s on paper, it has to accurately represent reality. In your reality, that means a cash

DAVE SAYS Dave Ramsey flow strain on the first checks and extra money on the second checks. You won’t be able to fix this in just one month, but there is a long-term solution. Move some of the money from your second checks into the first half of the next month. By doing this, you’ll start running from the 15th to the 15th instead of from the first to the first. It will help you stay ahead and avoid getting pinched. The second part of this equation is that you are in charge of your

budget. The budget does not become the boss of you until you get it done. When everything is written and agreed on by you and your husband, that’s when the budget becomes the boss. You can’t come home with a new shirt or a new purse and hope it fits into the plan. The budget has to be the plumb line by which you build your finances straight and true.

– Dave

Dear Dave, My husband and I both work two jobs. Together we make about $53,000 a year, and we’re trying to get out of debt. We have $35,000 in debt, and most of that is on our truck. I’d like to go back to school and become an ultrasound techni-

cian, so we’ll have more money. Do you think this is a good idea?

– Sarah

Dear Sarah, Getting more education is always a good idea. For starters, I’d begin doing some research to find out what ultrasound technicians in your area are earning. Then, look into the cost of training at a nearby school. But I would only recommend starting school after you guys have done some work and cleaned up your finances. You’ve got a bunch of debt hanging over your heads, and the truck you mentioned is a big part of the problem. Sell the truck and move down to something very inexpensive to drive

for a little while. Then tear into the remainder of the debt and get it paid off as fast as you can. After that, save up a bunch of money so you can go to school debt-free. I know that may seem like a long time before you can start school, but chances are you can get this done in less than two years. And trust me, going to school debt-free will feel a whole lot better than having another bunch of payments buzzing around your heads for years to come.

– Dave • Dave Ramsey is the author of five New York Times best-selling books. Follow him on Twitter at @DaveRamsey and on the web at daveramsey.com.

With business improving, Radicom CEO plans to retire

FACES & PLACES

“Whether it’s public safety, a farmer that’s got a $150,000 machine down, or a warehouse that has 20 forklifts running around, they need to know exactly what’s going on now, this second,” Bartmann said. “They don’t have time to dial a number and hope the person will answer.” Bartmann plans to retire next month and hand the operation over to the current executive vice president and chief operating officer, Bob Leuders, although Bartmann still will have an office. He believes he’s going out on a high note with business trending upward again, and a local award that shows it. Last month, Radicom tied with Huntley-based Tegel Design and was named a 2014 Business Champion by the McHenry County Economic Development Corp. in Division 1 for companies with fewer than 25 employees. “We survived long enough to be in the right place in the right time with the right product,” Bartmann said. “We had the product that some of the other movers and shakers in our business needed and that helped tremendously.”

• RADICOM Children’s clothing boutique Green Sprouts, 37 N. Williams, Crystal Lake, recently opened its doors and celebrated with a Crystal Lake Chamber of Commerce ribbon-cutting ceremony. Pictured (back row, from left) are Carol Pringle, Melanie Hiser, Titus Mielke (Savannah Mielke) and Deidre Martinez; (middle row) Mary Margaret Maule and Chad Furs; (front row) owners Tracy Green and Brooks Green with children Beckham, Penelope, Isidora; and (holding the ribbon) John Pletz and Jerry Shaffer. Photo provided

Continued from page D1 With the help of Harris’ product, Radicom is back up to 15 employees, with plans to add more. Two-way radios are frequency specific, meaning if someone had a VHF, or very high frequency radio, they must communicate with another VHF radio, Bartmann said. For example, local fire departments were on VHF, while hospitals were on UHF, or ultra-high frequency. So an ambulance would have to be equipped with two radios: one to talk to dispatch and another to communicate with the hospital. “Harris came out with a product that was all bands; one radio could provide communication on all those bands,” Bartmann said. How does the company stay relevant now that so many people have smartphones? Cellphones don’t give instant communication, Bartmann said, which is why many people are coming back to the immediate capability that two-way radios provide.

WALL STREET WEEK IN REVIEW Stock Photo provided

The McHenry Area Chamber of Commerce recently celebrated a ribbon-cutting ceremony with Lighthouse Health & Wellness at Strength Fitness-Personal Training, 616 S. Route 31, Suite I, McHenry. Pictured (from left) are Kurt Rice, A Better Water Treatment Co.; Kristina Hosticka, LegalShield; Keven Haggerty, Lighthouse Health & Wellness; Frank Hosticka, LegalShield; Jan Haggerty, owner; Lisa and Brian Gatewood, Strength Fitness-Personal Training; and Tim Stewart, Executive Leadership Coach.

Photo provided

Huntley Area Chamber of Commerce members and guests recently gathered at Brunch Café, 12270 Princeton Drive, Huntley, for a ribboncutting ceremony. Pictured (front, from left) are Sunday Graham, Huntley Chamber executive director; Nancy Engelhardt, Castle Bank; Chuck Veach, CT Veach; Dave Johnson, Huntley village manager; Andy Zatos, Monica Pfeil and Nick Zentefis, Brunch Café; Margo Griffin, village of Huntley; and Kim Egger, Heartland Bank and Trust Co. For information about Brunch Café, call 847-669-8437.

Chicago company ‘almost certain’ lien will be redeemed • TAX LIEN Continued from page D1 Chicago-based First National Assets, a specialty financing private equity group that acquires and services tax lien certificate portfolios, bought the property’s unpaid taxes at auction Oct. 24, said Glenda Miller, chief deputy McHenry County treasurer. Another company bought the taxes on vacant land adjacent to the building. To remove the lien from the building, Optima would have to get an estimate of redemption from the county and then pay $333,307.05 plus 3 percent interest to the tax buyer, Miller said. The interest rate doubles every six months. Optima could lose the property if the lien isn’t redeemed after more than two years. But that is rare, Miller said.

Northwest Herald file photo

The vacant former Motorola campus in October. “The owner has two years to pay off the tax lien,” said Jim Finnerty, tax lien portfolio manager for Chicagobased First National Assets. “It’s almost certain they will redeem it.” Eldredge said tax buyers “are interested in getting paid interest, not acquiring

real estate.” He also said the tax lien wouldn’t hamper the sale of the property, though the lien would have to be removed before the title could change hands. However, he said liens are “very routine in commercial real estate.” City officials don’t think

the property will rapidly deteriorate and become blighted, Harvard City Administrator David Nelson said. “We have a very good relationship with the broker,” he said. “We’d like to see it put to good use and see people working there, but we don’t own the property. We’re just along for the ride.” Eldredge said he couldn’t speculate on Optima’s level of interest in the property. “Everyone can make their own judgment,” he said. “Obviously, [Optima’s] enthusiasm for the building would be perceived as greater if they turned the utilities on. On the other hand, operating the building as they have is very costly.” He estimated the property taxes on the building “were relatively small compared to other costs” such as heating and maintaining the building.

Friday close

Abbott 44.51 AbbVie 69.20 AGL Resources 52.31 Allstate 68.15 American Airlines 48.53 Apple 118.93 AptarGroup 65.25 Arch Dan 52.68 AT&T 35.38 Bank of America 17.04 Bank of Montreal 73.69 Baxter 73.00 Berry Plastics 28.94 Boeing 134.36 Caterpillar 100.60 CME Group 84.64 Coca-Cola 44.83 Comcast 57.04 Covidien 101.00 Dean Foods 17.05 Dow Chem. 48.67 Exelon 36.17 Exxon 90.54 Facebook 77.70 Ford 15.73 General Electric 26.49 General Motors 33.43 Google 541.83 Home Depot 99.40 IBM 162.17 JPMorganChase 60.16 Kellogg 66.25 Kohl’s 59.62 Kraft Foods 60.17 Live Nation 26.80 McDonald’s 96.81 Microsoft 47.81 Modine 12.17 Motorola 65.72 Netflix 346.59 OfficeDepot 6.63 Pepsi 100.10 Pulte Homes 21.63 Safeway 34.84 Sears Holdings 36.10 Snap-On 135.33 Southwest Air. 41.82 Supervalu 9.36 74.00 Target 244.52 Tesla Motors 41.74 Twitter United Contint. 61.23 258.19 Visa 87.54 Wal-Mart 68.61 Walgreen Waste Mgmt. 48.73 Wintrust Fincl. 44.69

P/E ratio

50-day avg.

200-day avg.

35.10 30.09 15.19 11.02 94.79 18.44 23.74 18.11 10.82 42.60 12.68 21.35 56.75 19.32 16.27 28.11 24.92 17.94 27.67 15.98 14.82 11.39 72.14 10.29 20.24 21.48 28.51 22.68 13.14 11.14 13.76 14.86 15.31 515.38 19.05 18.74 4.47 11.67 92.15 22.14 17.37 2.46 19.96 25.22 18.61 31.09 19.03 29.96 17.97 34.31 219.50 15.27

42.86 61.04 52.93 64.39 39.88 107.85 62.20 48.36 34.72 16.89 72.34 70.55 25.56 125.81 99.33 82.68 42.65 53.74 92.48 14.98 48.81 35.69 94.21 75.58 14.42 25.79 31.15 541.71 95.40 166.92 59.45 63.08 56.98 57.10 24.76 93.75 46.721 12.26 63.24 387.99 5.74 95.79 19.56 34.45 33.76 129.72 35.47 8.66 64.16 241.09 44.47 51.55 232.12 78.98 64.56 48.14 45.21

41.84 56.65 52.88 60.82 39.75 98.59 63.78 47.74 35.14 16.04 73.27 73.38 24.93 127.57 104.02 76.29 41.69 53.80 87.02 15.82 51.32 34.40 98.52 71.51 16.16 26.10 33.97 562.65 86.91 183.01 58.16 64.62 56.01 57.82 23.69 96.51 44.26 13.81 63.94 426.30 5.42 91.58 19.17 34.43 33.72 122.97 30.83 8.66 60.80 237.07 42.77 47.00 218.11 76.75 66.76 46.05 45.61

52-week range

35.65 45.50 44.74 49.18 21.45 70.51 55.59 37.92 31.74 14.37 60.34 65.53 21.22 116.32 83.11 66.44 36.89 47.74 65.49 12.62 38.42 26.45 86.91 46.26 13.26 23.69 28.82 502.80 73.96 159.80 52.97 55.69 48.68 50.54 17.80 89.34 34.63 10.79 57.79 299.50 3.84 77.01 16.56 26.70 22.45 96.24 17.73 5.38 54.66 123.93 29.51 36.39 194.84 72.27 54.86 40.35 41.99

44.77 69.48 55.59 68.47 49.45 119.75 68.78 53.54 37.48 18.03 78.56 77.31 29.49 144.57 111.46 86.40 45.00 57.49 101.66 18.70 54.97 37.90 104.76 81.16 18.12 28.09 41.85 604.83 99.80 199.21 61.93 69.50 63.54 61.10 27.00 103.78 50.05 17.51 68.33 489.29 7.00 100.70 21.92 36.03 60.53 137.83 42.42 9.78 74.76 291.42 74.73 61.93 259.50 88.09 76.39 49.71 49.99


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Section D • Sunday, November 30, 2014 •

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Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Section F • Sunday, November 30, 2014 • CLASSIFIED Sunday, November 30, 2014 date,

Classified

JOBS SUNDAY

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5 Career Risks You Should Never Take By Catherine Conlan Monster Contributing Writer Have you ever been tempted to make up a job offer with better pay in an attempt to persuade your boss to give you a raise? If you have, career coach Alex Simon has a story that may put that thought out of your mind for good. “One of my newer clients came to me after being fired,” Simon says. “He had tried to negotiate a raise by telling his direct boss that he had received an offer from a competitor and was going to jump ship unless his current employer matched or beat the offer he received.” The problem was it was an offer he had made up. “His direct boss contacted the competitor, the truth came out and he ended up with no job.” To learn, grow and advance in your career, you’re going to have to take some risks. You just need to be sure they’re the right ones, says Tom Cooper, principal of the BrightHill Group. Sometimes people can be so worried about not taking risks that they take the wrong ones,

ally at risk. Not all chances are created equal. You can afford to take bigger risks with some relationships or a job title that will soon be forgotten, says executive coach Dennis J. O’Neill. But risking your integrity or reputation in your Lying in an attempt to get a industry could cause permaraise “is definitely not a risk nent damage to your career. worth taking,” Simon says. As you plan your next career For example, O’Neill says he move, consider these other worked with a 47-year-old married HR director who risks you should never take. was having an affair with his married administrative Rushing for the door assistant, who wanted to end Even if your boss is a pain or the relationship. “She eventuyour job is horrible, take a ally ended the affair and his moment before you walk out, career in HR when she filed says career coach Jon Le Bret- suit and the company inveson — yes, even when you real- tigated and fired him for sexly hate it. While it might feel ual harassment,” O’Neill says. good to start applying for jobs, “Approaching 50, divorced, doing so without a plan will and unable to replicate his inmake it hard to find one that’s come restarting his career in a good fit and a good next step another field, he lamented his in your career. Look at what stupidity.” you once liked about your job and other aspects of your ca- Taking chances close to reer you’ve enjoyed, and use retirement that to fuel your job search. Similar to a financial portfoPutting your reputation on the lio, O’Neill says, taking career risks is safer when you’re line just starting out than when If you’re facing a choice in you’re older. Big risks such as your career, assess what’s re- working abroad, launching a Cooper says. “Most people take zero risks intentionally, and many risks accidentally. Learning to take carefully measured risks on purpose and being OK with failure allows you to learn and grow.”

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It’s important to see your career as a series of opportunities — opportunities to celebrate and opportunities to learn, Masler says. “Most of the time, celebration and learning show up in the same experiences; both keep you curious and challenged, which You may not copy, reproduce or other career-related articles, visis key for continued growth.” distribute this article without the itcareer-advice.monster.com. For

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Life coach Adrienne Masler says one of the biggest risks people take in their careers is worrying about success and failure, because it keeps them from seeing their career paths. “Believing you’ve failed can make you feel ashamed and defeated, so you’re less likely to learn from your experience. Believing in success means you constantly need to prove your intelligence and competence to yourself and everyone around you.”

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CREDIT ANALYST Fast paced, independent community bank is seeking a credit analyst to work in our Woodstock bank. The ideal candidate will have a Bachelor's degree in accounting, finance, or business, and recent college graduates are encouraged to apply! Strong Word and Excel skills are required, and responsibilities include overall evaluation and financial analysis of lending opportunities including financial statement spreading, appraisal reviews, and preparation of formal loan presentations. Competitive wages commensurate with experience; credit and background checks are required. To apply, please visit

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Electrical / Mechanical Maintenance Technician

ISLAND LAKE 2 BEDROOM Quiet bldg, incl heat, no pets. $850 + sec. 847-526-4435

Island Lake Luxury Apt. Spacious 2 bedroom, 2 bath. D/W, W/D, C/A, approx 1000 sq ft. $900/mo. 847-875-7985

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Marengo ~ 2 Bedroom Appl, W/D hook-up, new flooring, carpet, paint, garage, $725/mo + sec deposit. 815-568-6706 McHenry -Studio & 1 bdrm, Most utilities included, balcony $670 & up. Broker Owned 815-347-1712

Ex-Tech Plastics, Inc. is currently seeking career minded Electrical / Mechanical Maintenance Technicians.

We offer competitive wages/benefits, including Medical/Dental/Vision/Life insurance, matching 401(k) & more! Pre-employment physical and drug screen are required. Send, fax, email resume with salary history or apply in person to: Ex-Tech Plastics, Inc., 11413 Burlington Road, PO Box 576, Richmond, IL 60071-0576. Fax: 847-829-8193 Email: mbultman@extechplastics.com

LOTS 335, 336, 337, 338, 339, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348, 349, 350, 351, 352, 353, 354, 355, 356, 357, 358, 359, 360, 361, 362, 364, 365, 366, 367, 368, 369, 370, 371, 372, 373, 374, 375, 376, 377, 378, 379, 380, 381, 383, 384, 385, 386, 387, 388, 389, 390, 391, 392, AND 393 IN HUNTINGTON RIDGE SUBDIVISION, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 46 NORTH, RANGE 5 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, AND THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 30, TOWNSHIP 46 NORTH, RANGE 6, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED NOVEMBER 8, 2006 AS DOCUMENT 2006R082246, IN MCHENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS. PIN NOS: 02-30-101-001, LOT 335 01-25-229-002, LOT 337 01-25-228-015, LOT 339 01-25-228-013, LOT 341 01-25-228-011, LOT 343 01-25-228-009, LOT 345 01-25-228-007, LOT 347 01-25-228-004, LOT 350 01-25-226-002, LOT 352 01-25-226-005, LOT 354 01-25-226-007, LOT 356 01-25-227-002, LOT 358 01-25-227-004, LOT 360 01-25-227-006, LOT 362 01-25-227-009, LOT 365 01-25-227-011, LOT 367 01-25-227-013, LOT 369 01-25-227-015, LOT 371 01-25-227-017, LOT 373 01-25-226-008, LOT 375 01-25-226-010, LOT 377 01-25-226-012, LOT 379 01-25-226-014, LOT 381 01-25-226-019, LOT 384 01-25-226-021, LOT 386 01-25-226-023, LOT 388 01-25-226-025, LOT 390 01-25-226-027, LOT 392

02-30-101-002, LOT 336 01-25-229-001, LOT 338 01-25-228-014, LOT 340 01-25-228-012, LOT 342 01-25-228-010, LOT 344 01-25-228-008, LOT 346 01-25-228-006, LOT 348 01-25-228-002, LOT 351 01-25-226-004, LOT 353 01-25-226-006, LOT 355 01-25-227-001, LOT 357 01-25-227-003, LOT 359 01-25-227-005, LOT 361 01-25-227-008, LOT 364 01-25-227-010, LOT 366 01-25-227-012, LOT 368 01-25-227-014, LOT 370 01-25-227-016, LOT 372 01-25-227-018, LOT 374 01-25-226-009, LOT 376 01-25-226-011, LOT 378 01-25-226-013, LOT 380 01-25-226-018, LOT 383 01-25-226-020, LOT 385 01-25-226-022, LOT 387 01-25-226-024, LOT 389 01-25-226-026, LOT 391 01-25-226-028, LOT 393

Common Address: Huntington Ridge, Harvard, McHenry County, Illinois

Primary duties include providing safe and timely mechanical and electrical support, preventative maintenance, installation, service, repair, troubleshooting and resolution of multiple operating machines within a manufacturing industrial environment. The ideal candidate will have 3-5 years mechanical and electrical experience in manufacturing facility, a familiarity with hydraulics and pneumatics and have basic troubleshooting experience with proven ability of machine repair. Starting wages - $18 to $22 per hour. Job Knowledge to include: An operational knowledge of industrial machinery which includes; motors, pumps, drives, relays, 3 phase power, communication devices, industrial / electronic controls & power transmission systems. Strong PLC trouble shooting & problem solving ability with practical, mechanical & electrical aptitude. Must be able to read and interpret both electrical and mechanical drawings. Must be able to work in a fast paced environment. Ability to work independently in a mature and professional manner. Ability to work various shifts / overtime / days per week. Plastics background is a plus, but not required. Must be able to complete a Maintenance Skills Assessment Test with a passing percentage grade after your interview. This test is a test of knowledge relating to skilled maintenance.

NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on November 3, 2014, the Sheriff of McHenry County, Illinois, or such deputy as he may appoint, will on December 18, 2014 at 10:00 a.m. in the Civil Process Division of the McHenry County Sheriff's Office located in room 262 at 2200 N. Seminary Avenue in Woodstock, Illinois, offer for sale at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate, together with all buildings and improvements thereon:

815-653-7095 ~ 815-341-7822

Anything to do with Wood We can Fix or Replace Doors and Windows Sr. Disc. 815-943-4765

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWENTY SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MCHENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS

MAILBOX & POST

HANDYMAN

877-264-CLAS (2527)

Close to metra, 2nd flr, large rooms, walk-in closet, W/D, laundry. $850, no pets. 847-639-3224

15 years + Housecleaning – Walworth & McHenry Counties Great Ref's, I bring most supplies, Call Lori, 262-279-0772 6a-10p

www.mailboxpostman.com

Northwest Herald Classified

MCHENRY - ROUTE 31

IRISH PRAIRIE APTS

1 & 2 Bedrooms W/D and Fitness Center 815/363-0322

Sale terms: at the time of the sale, ten percent (10%) of the purchase price is due in the form of a cashier's check or certified bank check (no personal checks), with the balance due by certified funds by noon the following Tuesday after the sale. The subject property is subject to real estate taxes, special assessments and special taxes levied against said real estate, if any, and is offered for sale in an “As Is Condition” without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the Court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. For information: Examine the court file or contact UNGARETTI & HARRIS LLP, 70 West Madison, Suite 3500, Chicago, Illinois 60602 (312) 977-4400. Please ask for Richard Ungaretti or Keith Edeus, Attorneys for the Plaintiff. (Published in the Northwest Herald November 23, 30, December 7, 2014. #5497)


2 CLASSIFIED • Sunday, November 30, 2014 • Section F • Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com WILLOW BROOKE Woodstock's Newest Apartment Community FREE – Pool & Fitness Membership Clubhouse with WIFI Apartment Features Include water, sewer & garbage services Pet friendly Very clean & maintained

McHenry 3 Bedroom Ranch

Woodstock Big in the Country

Round Lake – Long Lake,

1 bath, basement, garage, W/D. $1100/mo + security & utilities. Avaialbe 12/1. 815-575-6919

4BR, 2BA, large DR, FR, LR, Frplc Double-Wide Mobile Home.

McHenry Fox River Front, 5 bedroom, 3 bath, DR, In-Law Arrangment, Pier, 1 acre, Country Club Sub-Div $1400+ 847-521-3064

Woodstock, Farmhouse 3 bedroom, $820 Broker Owned 815-347-1712

3 BR., Free Buildable Lot, 3 Car Garage, New Windows, Corian Countertops, Dead End Street, Very Private, Fairfield/Rollins. $120,000 Move in ready condition. Call: 847-875-6739

RENT TO BUY

Woodstock Furnished Bedroom For female, house priviliges, no pets, $550/mo. Call Kate aft 7pm. 815-276-3221

Choose from 400 listed homes

815-482-0171

Studio-One-Two Bedrooms

Flexible Credit Rules

Prairie Grove ~ 3000 Sq Ft

815-338-2383

815-814-6004

Lakemoor ~ 1500 Sq Ft

Wonder Lake Cozy 1 Bedroom Living and dining area open to kitchen. Huge deck, ample parking, no dogs. $715/mo, utilities incl. Agent Owned. 815-814-3348

WOODSTOCK Hurry On In......

Supplies Limited 1 and 2 Bedroom Apts Autumnwood ! Elevator Bldgs.

Silver Creek ! Garage Incl. Rents starting as low as $700 per month

815-334-9380 www.cunat.com Woodstock 1BR $645, 2BR $745 2BR $820 All appliances, A/C, balcony, on site laundry, no pets. 847-382-2313 ~ 708-204-3823

Gary Swift Berkshire Hathaway Starck Realty Richmond Lovely Home on Lake w/acreage, 4+ bedroom, 4+ bath, $1950/mo. Contact Joe @ 847-370-6666

Wonder Lake 3 Bedroom 1.5 bath, C/A, W/D hook-up $1100/mo + 1st, last, security. Avail. Now. 708-417-8129

Wonder Lake Remodeled, Lovely Very Spacious 2 Bedroom 1 car garage, eat-in-kit, $890/mo + sec dep. No dogs, Agent Owned. Winter Special Security Deposit 815-814-3348

With exposure on frontage Route 176, $1500/mo.

Light industrial with built-out and bath, $900/mo. 847-456-8329 Woodstock: 1750sf. Shop and Office w/restroom, Shop has 10 x 10 door, Great for small contractor $950/mo. 630-514-4956 McHenryCountySports.com is McHenry County Sports

Send your Classified Advertising 24/7 to: Email: classified@ shawsuburban.com Fax: 815-477-8898 or online at: www.nwherald.com

Northwest Herald Classified

Publisher's Notice: All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation of discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD tollfree at 1-800-669-9777. The tollfree telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

BREAKING NEWS available 24/7 at NWHerald.com

877-264-CLAS (2527)

The Illinois Classified Advertising Network (ICAN) provides advertising of a national appeal. To advertise in this section, please call ICAN directly at 217-241-1700. We recommend discretion when responding. Please refer questions & comments directly to ICAN.

ey Consumer Fraud Line and/or the Better Business Bureau. They may have records or documented complaints that will serve to caution you about doing business with these advertisers. Also be advised that some phone numbers published in these ads may require an extra charge. In all cases of questionable value, such as promises or guaranteed income from work-at-home programs, money to loan, etc., if it sounds too good to be true -- it may in fact be exactly that. Again, contact the local and/or national agency that may be able to provide you with some background on these companies. This newspaper cannot be held responsible for any negative consequences that occur as a result of you doing business with these advertisers.

2004, Toyota Camry LE,

$6,000 847-639-3693 9a-6p 2010 Honda EXL V6, Excellent Condition, 48K. Miles, Silver, Garage Kept $17,000 815-206-0236

1997 Ford Explorer Good Runner ! $1500/obo 815-861-6667

1992 F250 4x4 XLT, excellent condition, second owner $1500 815-861-3699 2000 GMC Jimmy SLT 4x4 1 owner, leather-fully loaded-black needs nothing-good tires/brakes $3900/obo 815-344-9440

CAR TIRES 4 - BF Goodrich Touring A/T P205-70R-15, Plenty of Tread $140/OBO. 815-479-0492

FlOOR MATS

For a Lincoln Navigator for 3rd row seating, brand new, $75. Spring Grove 815-307-9034

READER NOTICE: As a service to you -- our valued readers -- we offer the following information. This newspaper will never knowingly accept any advertisement that is illegal or considered fraudulent. If you have questions or doubts about any ads on these pages, we advise that before responding or sending money ahead of time, you check with the local Attorney General's Co Fr d Li d/ th

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Micky Thompson Sportsman 28x10x15"(2) 2 BFG 275 $300.00 ALL. 847-875-6739

2002 Lincoln Town Car Cartier L Gold Series 45000 miles new tires garage kept. excellent condition a must see. $10000 firm. Call 815-568-3620

Pick-up truck Rack SHORT bed (Chevy) $400.O.B.O. 847-875-6739

TIRE & RIM

WOODSTOCK 2BR. Historic Rogers Hall. Quiet, Secure Bldg. Mgr on site. $800/mo. NO PETS! 815-482-4909

Goodyear tire, size P225 75 R16, new, mounted on rim from a Jeep Grand Cherokee. New $264, sell for $135. 815-756-0333

Woodstock Intentionally Quiet 2BR available, includes heat. W/D on premises, non smoking. $775/mo + sec. 815-206-4573

TIRES You have 15” rims, I have new set of 4 tires, Toyo 215/70R15. Cost $475, selling for $350/obo. 815-404-6769

Woodstock, Nice 1 bedroom, balcony, laundry, garage new paint & flooring, $795 Broker Owned 815-347-1712

Send your Help Wanted Advertising 24/7 to: Email: helpwanted@ shawsuburban.com Fax: 815-477-8898

Marengo 2 Bedroom Appl, basement with famly room. W/D hook-up, $795/mo. Available now. 815-568-6706

1990 & Newer Will beat anyone's price by $300. Will pay extra for Honda, Toyota & Nissan

815-814-1964 or

815-814-1224 !! !! !!! !! !!

A-1 AUTO

Will BUY UR USED CAR, TRUCK, SUV,

Tires – Used

(2) 235-75R-15 Goodyear - $50 (1) 245-75-16 RTS Goodyear Wrangler, Like new - $65. 815-334-8847 9am-6pm

Crystal Lake 2nd Floor, 2BR,1.5BA Appl, W/D, garage, no pets/smkg. $990/mo. 815-459-0260 or 815- 690-7172

I BUY CARS, TRUCKS, VANS & SUVs

Rims - Chrome Pontiac Grand AM,16” with tires, great shape! $350/obo. Mercedes rims, fits all, 17”, $100/obo. 847-409-5446

woodstocknorthwestapartments.com

!! !! !!! !! !!

109,000 miles, great condition.

MOST CASH WILL BEAT ANY QUOTE GIVEN!! $400 - $2000 “don't wait.... call 2day”!!

815-575-5153 Junk Car, Truck & Equipment THE OLDER THE BETTER! McHenry 866-870-4321 We pay cash and towing is free.

Woodstock 1 & 2BR Duplex Heat & water incl, laundry facility, new carpet, $795/mo + security. 815-529-3782

Place your Classified ad online 24/7 at: www.NWHerald.com/ PlaceAnAd

WOODSTOCK 3 BEDROOM 1.5 Bath, A/C, Stove, Refrigerator, Garage, No Pets. Broker Owned. 847-683-7944 HURRY!!

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWENTY SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MCHENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS

Cary, 2br, 1ba, 965 sq ft, Charming riverfront cottage, pier & dock incl., huge yard, gorgeous view. All appl., w/d, no pets/smoking. $1300/mo 847-417-3166.

BMO HARRIS BANK N.A., as assignee, Plaintiff, v. MONTALBANO BUILDERS, INC., MONTALBANO HOMES OF ARIZONA, INC., MONTALBANO BUILDERS OF ARIZONA, INC., APM HOLDINGS, INC., ANTHONY MONTALBANO, STOCK BUILDING SUPPLY, LLC, COMPLETE FENCE, INC., PROFESSIONAL DRYWALL & DECORATING, LLC, S & H ELECTRIC COMPANY, INC., DAVE'S EXCAVATING, INC., CLASSIC LANDSCAPE, LTD., OUTDOOR ACCENTS, INC., MIDWEST TECHNICAL CONSULTANTS, INC., TRENCH-IT, INC., MANHARD CONSULTING GROUP, LTD., MICHAEL NICHOLAS CARPENTRY, COLEMAN FLOOR, LLC, HUNTINGTON RIDGE SUBDIVISION HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, LENNY SZAREK, INC., MIXED MEDIA GROUP, INC., UNKNOWN OWNERS and NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, Defendants. Case No. 09 CH 1584

Crystal Lake/Burton Bridge 2 bedroom, 1 bath, C/A, W/D, no garage, pets neg w/deposit. $1150 + sec+credit chk. 815-459-4807 Marengo 3BR, 1 BA, basement 1 car gar. $890/mo. Broker Owned 815-347-1712 Marengo, 2 bedroom, super clean, 1 bath, Apl. C/A, bsmt, W/D, pets OK, $950/mo+sec. 847-313-1328

www.HuskieWire.com All NIU Sports... All The Time

PlanitSave.com is part of the Northwest Herald family of publications.

NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE

PRE-OWNED BULL VALLEY FORD/ MERCURY

MOTOR WERKS INFINITI

ANDERSON BMW

LIBERTYVILLE CHEVROLET

360 N. Rte. 31 • Crystal Lake, IL

888/682-4485

1001 S Milwaukee Ave Libertyville, IL

1460 S. Eastwood Dr. • Woodstock, IL

www.andersoncars.com

847/362-1400

www.bullvalleyford.com

www.motorwerks.com

BUSS FORD

INFINITI OF HOFFMAN ESTATES

BILL JACOBS BMW 1564 W. Ogden Ave. • Naperville, IL

800/731-5824 www.billjacobs.com

KNAUZ BMW

www.libertyvillechevrolet.com

MARTIN CHEVROLET 5220 W. Northwest Highway Crystal Lake, IL

815/459-4000 www.martin-chevy.com

407 Skokie Valley Hwy. • Lake Bluff, IL

847/604-5000 www.KnauzBMW.com

MOTOR WERKS BMW Barrington & Dundee Rds. Barrington, IL

800/935-5913 www.motorwerks.com

MOTOR WERKS CERTIFIED OUTLET Late Model Luxury PreOwned Vehicles 1001 W. Higgins Rd. (Rt. 71) or 1000 W. Golf Rd. (Rt. 58) • Hoffman Estates, IL

RAY CHEVROLET 39 N. Rte. 12 • Fox Lake, IL

847/587-3300 www.raychevrolet.com

RAYMOND CHEVROLET 118 Route 173 • Antioch, IL

847/395-3600 www.raymondchevrolet.com

800/407-0223

111 S. Rte 31 • McHenry, IL

815/385-2000 www.bussford.com

SPRING HILL FORD

Barrington & Dundee Rds. Barrington, IL

800/935-5913

1075 W. Golf Rd. Hoffman Estates, IL

MERCEDES-BENZ OF ST. CHARLES 225 N. Randall Road • St. Charles, IL

877/226-5099 www.st-charles.mercedesdealer.com

KNAUZ CONTINENTAL AUTOS 409 Skokie Valley Hwy • Lake Bluff, IL

888/280-6844

847/234-1700

www.infinitihoffman.com

www.Knauzcontinentalauto.com

800 Dundee Ave. • East Dundee, IL

TOM PECK FORD

CRYSTAL LAKE CHRYSLER JEEP DODGE

13900 Auto Mall Dr. • Huntley, IL

5404 S. Rt. 31 • Crystal Lake, IL

888/800-6100

www.TomPeckFord.com

www.clcjd.com

ZIMMERMAN FORD

GURNEE CHRYSLER JEEP DODGE RAM

REICHERT CHEVROLET

630/584-1800

2145 S. Eastwood Dr. • Woodstock, IL

www.zimmermanford.com

815/338-2780

7255 Grand Avenue • Gurnee, IL

888/471-1219 www.gurneedodge.com

www.reichertautos.com

CRYSTAL LAKE CHRYSLER JEEP DODGE

BULL VALLEY FORD/ MERCURY 1460 S. Eastwood Dr. • Woodstock, IL

800/407-0223 www.bullvalleyford.com

BUSS FORD LINCOLN MERCURY

Route 31, between Crystal Lake & McHenry

815/385-2100

111 S. Rte 31 • McHenry, IL

815/385-2000

800/935-5923

815/385-2100

770 Dundee Ave. (Rt. 25) • Dundee, IL

847/426-2000 www.piemontechevy.com

815/385-2100

www.garylangauto.com

www.billjacobs.com

FENZEL MOTOR SALES

ARLINGTON KIA IN PALATINE

KNAUZ MINI

888/231-7818

409A Skokie Valley Hwy • Lake Bluff, IL

www.EvanstonSubaru.com

1400 E. Dundee Rd., Palatine, IL

847/604-5050

GURNEE CHRYSLER JEEP DODGE RAM 7255 Grand Avenue • Gurnee, IL

888/471-1219

SUNNYSIDE COMPANY CHRYSLER DODGE

MOTOR WERKS HONDA Barrington & Dundee Rds. Barrington, IL

800/935-5913 www.motorwerks.com

O’HARE HONDA River Rd & Oakton, • Des Plaines, IL

888/538-4492

847/202-3900

224/603-8611 www.raymondkia.com

CRYSTAL LAKE CHRYSLER JEEP DODGE 5404 S. Rt. 31 • Crystal Lake, IL

GURNEE CHRYSLER JEEP DODGE RAM 7255 Grand Avenue • Gurnee, IL

881 E. Chicago St. • Elgin, IL

www.billjacobs.com

KNAUZ HYUNDAI 775 Rockland Road Routes 41 & 176 in the Knauz Autopark • Lake Bluff, IL Experience the best…Since 1934

847/234-2800 www.knauzhyundai.com

888/471-1219

O’HARE HYUNDAI

www.gurneedodge.com

River Rd & Oakton, • Des Plaines, IL

SUNNYSIDE COMPANY CHRYSLER DODGE Route 120 • McHenry, IL

300 East Ogden Ave. • Hinsdale, IL

888/204-0042

www.elginhyundai.com

888/553-9036

LAND ROVER LAKE BLUFF

www.sunnysidecompany.com

771 S. Randall Rd. • Algonquin, IL

866/469-0114 www.rosenrosenrosen.com

www.raysuzuki.com

www.garylangauto.com

LIBERTYVILLE MITSUBISHI 1119 S. Milwaukee Ave.• Libertyville, IL

847/816-6660 www.libertyvillemitsubishi.com

ELGIN TOYOTA 1200 E. Chicago St. Elgin, IL

847/741-2100

847/604-8100

PAULY TOYOTA MOTOR WERKS PORCHE

1035 S. Rt. 31, One Mile South of Rt. 14 Crystal Lake, IL

Barrington & Dundee Rds., Barrington, IL

www.paulytoyota.com

LAND ROVER HOFFMAN ESTATES 1051 W. Higgins • Hoffman Estates, IL

866/346-0211 landroverhoffman.com

BUSS FORD LINCOLN MERCURY 111 S. Rte 31 • McHenry, IL

815/385-2000

ANDERSON MAZDA 360 N. Rt. 31 • Crystal Lake, IL

888/682-4485 www.andersoncars.com

LINE AD DEADLINE: Tues-Fri: 2pm day prior, Sat: 2pm Fri, Sun-Mon: 4pm Fri OFFICE HOURS: Mon-Fri, 8am-5pm PHONE: 815-455-4800

LOTS 335, 336, 337, 338, 339, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348, 349, 350, 351, 352, 353, 354, 355, 356, 357, 358, 359, 360, 361, 362, 364, 365, 366, 367, 368, 369, 370, 371, 372, 373, 374, 375, 376, 377, 378, 379, 380, 381, 383, 384, 385, 386, 387, 388, 389, 390, 391, 392, AND 393 IN HUNTINGTON RIDGE SUBDIVISION, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 46 NORTH, RANGE 5 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, AND THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 30, TOWNSHIP 46 NORTH, RANGE 6, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED NOVEMBER 8, 2006 AS DOCUMENT 2006R082246, IN MCHENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS. PIN NOS: 02-30-101-001, LOT 335 01-25-229-002, LOT 337 01-25-228-015, LOT 339 01-25-228-013, LOT 341 01-25-228-011, LOT 343 01-25-228-009, LOT 345 01-25-228-007, LOT 347 01-25-228-004, LOT 350 01-25-226-002, LOT 352 01-25-226-005, LOT 354 01-25-226-007, LOT 356 01-25-227-002, LOT 358 01-25-227-004, LOT 360 01-25-227-006, LOT 362 01-25-227-009, LOT 365 01-25-227-011, LOT 367 01-25-227-013, LOT 369 01-25-227-015, LOT 371 01-25-227-017, LOT 373 01-25-226-008, LOT 375 01-25-226-010, LOT 377 01-25-226-012, LOT 379 01-25-226-014, LOT 381 01-25-226-019, LOT 384 01-25-226-021, LOT 386 01-25-226-023, LOT 388 01-25-226-025, LOT 390 01-25-226-027, LOT 392

02-30-101-002, LOT 336 01-25-229-001, LOT 338 01-25-228-014, LOT 340 01-25-228-012, LOT 342 01-25-228-010, LOT 344 01-25-228-008, LOT 346 01-25-228-006, LOT 348 01-25-228-002, LOT 351 01-25-226-004, LOT 353 01-25-226-006, LOT 355 01-25-227-001, LOT 357 01-25-227-003, LOT 359 01-25-227-005, LOT 361 01-25-227-008, LOT 364 01-25-227-010, LOT 366 01-25-227-012, LOT 368 01-25-227-014, LOT 370 01-25-227-016, LOT 372 01-25-227-018, LOT 374 01-25-226-009, LOT 376 01-25-226-011, LOT 378 01-25-226-013, LOT 380 01-25-226-018, LOT 383 01-25-226-020, LOT 385 01-25-226-022, LOT 387 01-25-226-024, LOT 389 01-25-226-026, LOT 391 01-25-226-028, LOT 393

Common Address: Huntington Ridge, Harvard, McHenry County, Illinois

www.elgintoyota.com

www.knauzlandrover.com

CALL FOR THE LOWEST PRICES IN CHICAGOLAND

ROSEN HYUNDAI

Route 31, between Crystal Lake & McHenry

888/446-8743 847/587-3300

375 Skokie Valley Hwy • Lake Bluff, IL

www.oharehyundai.com

815/385-7220

RAY SUZUKI 23 N. Route 12 • Fox Lake

GARY LANG MITSUBISHI 815/385-2100

ELGIN HYUNDAI 847/888-8222

EVANSTON SUBARU IN SKOKIE

www.Knauz-mini.com

119 Route 173 • Antioch, IL

BILL JACOBS LAND ROVER HINSDALE

www.sunnysidecompany.com

www.garylangauto.com

3340 Oakton St., Skokie, IL

RAYMOND KIA

www.oharehonda.com

815/385-7220

1564 W. Ogden Ave. • Naperville, IL

www.arlingtonkia.com

Route 120 • McHenry, IL

www.garylangauto.com

AL PIEMONTE CHEVROLET

Route 31, between Crystal Lake & McHenry

www.clcjd.com

www.clcjd.com

Route 31, between Crystal Lake & McHenry

GARY LANG KIA

800/295-0166

888/800-6100

GARY LANG CHEVROLET

Route 31, between Crystal Lake & McHenry

815/385-2100

MOTOR WERKS CADILLAC 200 N. Cook St. • Barrington, IL

GARY LANG GMC

www.garylangauto.com

www.garylangauto.com

www.motorwerks.com

815/459-7100 or 847/658-9050

888/800-6100

www.gurneedodge.com

GARY LANG CADILLAC

1035 S. Rt. 31, One Mile South of Rt. 14 Crystal Lake, IL

BILL JACOBS MINI

847/683-2424

www.reichertautos.com

PAULY SCION

1107 S Rt. 31 between Crystal Lake and McHenry

www.garylangauto.com

2145 S. Eastwood Dr. • Woodstock, IL

MOTOR WERKS SAAB

815/385-2100

206 S. State Street • Hampshire, IL

815/338-2780

www.motorwerks.com

5404 S. Rt. 31 • Crystal Lake, IL

815/385-2100

REICHERT BUICK

800/935-5909

GARY LANG SUBARU

www.motorwerks.com

Route 31, between Crystal Lake & McHenry

“Home of the $1,995 Specials”

www.motorwerks.com

800/935-5909

GARY LANG BUICK

847/838-4444 www.steves-auto-sales.com

800/935-5393

www.springhillford.com

2525 E. Main Street • St. Charles, IL

10709 N. Main St. (Route 12) Richmond, IL

200 N. Cook Street • Barrington, IL

888/600-8053

847/669-6060

STEVE’S AUTO SALES

PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on November 3, 2014, the Sheriff of McHenry County, Illinois, or such deputy as he may appoint, will on December 18, 2014 at 10:00 a.m. in the Civil Process Division of the McHenry County Sheriff's Office located in room 262 at 2200 N. Seminary Avenue in Woodstock, Illinois, offer for sale at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate, together with all buildings and improvements thereon:

815/459-7100 or 847/658-9050

800/935-5913 www.motorwerks.com

MOTOR WERKS CERTIFIED OUTLET Late Model Luxury Pre-Owned Vehicles

1001 W. Higgins Rd. (Rt. 71) or 1000 W. 1000 W. Golf Rd. (Rt. 58) Hoffman Estates, IL

800/935-5909 www.motorwerks.com

PRE-OWNED

ANDERSON VOLKSWAGEN 360 N. Rt. 31 • Crystal Lake, IL

888/682-4485 www.andersoncars.com

BILL JACOBS VOLKSWAGEN 2211 Aurora Avenue • Naperville, IL

800/720-7036 www.billjacobs.com

KNAUZ NORTH 2950 N. Skokie Hwy • North Chicago, IL

847/235-8300 www.knauznorth.com Golf Rd. (Rt. 58) • Hoffman Estates, IL

BARRINGTON VOLVO 300 N. Hough (Rt. 59) • Barrington, IL

847/381-9400

Sale terms: at the time of the sale, ten percent (10%) of the purchase price is due in the form of a cashier's check or certified bank check (no personal checks), with the balance due by certified funds by noon the following Tuesday after the sale. The subject property is subject to real estate taxes, special assessments and special taxes levied against said real estate, if any, and is offered for sale in an “As Is Condition” without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the Court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. For information: Examine the court file or contact UNGARETTI & HARRIS LLP, 70 West Madison, Suite 3500, Chicago, Illinois 60602 (312) 977-4400. Please ask for Richard Ungaretti or Keith Edeus, Attorneys for the Plaintiff. (Published in the Northwest Herald November 23, 30, December 7, 2014. #5497)

EMAIL: classified@shawsuburban.com, helpwanted@shawsuburban.com ONLINE: www.nwherald.com/classified FAX: 815-477-8898


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Section F • Sunday, November 30, 2014 •

CLASSIFIED 3

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CROSSWORD No. 1123 SURROUND SOUND

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BY PATRICK BERRY / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ 18

57 “Outside the Lines” broadcaster 1 Canned food you don’t eat 61 Stickers? 5 “Black Swan” 62 Like audiences for director Aronofsky R-rated films 11 Compete in the 64 D.C. transport Winter Games, 65 It may be open at say a bar 14 Lose strength 66 Photographers 18 Whistle prompters who stalk future lieutenants? 20 Become invalid 71 Sunset shade 21 Org. that prepares tables 72 One getting a licking, 22 Norway’s patron informally? saint 23 Office missive sent 74 The Pequod, e.g. out arbitrarily? 75 Poverty relief organization 26 “Rent” character ___ Marquez 77 Support for a proposal? 27 It borders five U.S. states 78 Animal that may carry its baby on 28 Yarn its back 29 What Gustave 79 Wireless? Doré’s “The Confusion of 82 Subsist Tongues” depicts 84 Desktop machine 30 Stone fruit? made of malleable metal? 36 Fellow sailors 88 Eddie ___, 39 Gourmand’s want “Leave It to 40 Tailor’s sideline? Beaver” boy 41 Dark horse 92 Like some 42 Applicability restrictions 43 Back 93 Blast furnace input 46 Expander during 94 Thurman of “The inhalation Producers” 48 Aeronaut who’s 95 Turkey’s place, in headed for the large part moon? 97 Snowbelt city 53 Headmaster 98 Groused honorific 101 Provides some 54 Earnest request idea of an object’s 55 Suffix with land or size? sea 106 Communicate with the server, Online subscriptions: perhaps Today’s puzzle and more 107 Oscar nominee for than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords “Silkwood” ($39.95 a year). 108 Feed supplier ACROSS

112 Wind up 113 Lassie’s affliction after failing to rescue Timmy? 118 C.P.A.’s study 119 1965 Johnny Mathis album of Latin American music 120 Turn while seated 121 “Into the Wild” star Hirsch 122 ___ mining 123 Gender-neutral pronoun 124 Excomm-unication provocation 125 “It’s a pity”

24 Some Veterans Day honorees, for short 25 Pentagon Papers subject, for short 29 Babe in the woods 31 Lead one to believe 32 Plane, e.g. 33 “Cubist” Rubik 34 Dinero unit 35 Not just see 36 Hybrid animal 37 South American capital 38 Arm of the sea 43 Was in session 44 Amenity in a G.M. vehicle 45 What some dreams and themes do DOWN 47 First Nations tribe 1 Age of Aquarius 49 What doesn’t come hairstyle full circle? 2 Student’s burden 50 Hear again 3 Bad choice on first 51 “Bugsy Malone” down star Scott 4 Retirement period 52 ___ avis 5 Possessor? 56 Candy from Austria 6 Medieval battle 58 Briggs & ___ weapon (engine maker) 7 Dashboard abbr. 59 Tinseltown event 8 Kia model 60 Drift off 62 Nyasaland, today 9 Go astray 63 Parody 10 “That’s amazing!” 64 Problem of 11 Moves obliquely mistaken identity 12 Last name in horror 65 Reformer from the 13 Doctrine time of D.D.E. to 14 George Eliot, L.B.J. but not Marilyn 67 Tommy Lasorda’s Manson jersey number 15 Chinese company 68 Require balm, say whose 2014 I.P.O. 69 Reacted to a shock, was the world’s maybe largest in history 70 Streak 16 Retail clerk’s 73 Boon for an accessory investigative 17 Glare journalist 19 “You’ll be ___!”

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HOROSCOPE

TODAY - If you face sensitive issues head-on, you won’t be bogged down with tedious arguments and tension this year. The longer you postpone the inevitable, the harder it will be to change what’s troubling you. Recognize what needs to be done and make your move. Take control. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Financial losses will plague you if your records aren’t up-to-date. Revisit financial contracts and agreements in order to ensure that you haven’t overlooked an important detail. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -Someone will reach out to you for help. Your

other responsibilities will suffer if you don’t make arrangements to ensure that nothing is neglected. Your diligence will be impressive. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Consistency is key. Indecision will confuse and annoy those around you. Decide what is best for you and act accordingly. Timing is crucial. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Mistakes are likely if you don’t keep your emotions in check. Take time to rationally think matters through before you make a rash move that could be costly. Don’t make a financial commitment. ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Be

truthful. You can avoid a misunderstanding if you stick to the facts. The more you try to embellish the truth, the worse off you will be. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Don’t be too free with your cash. You can make a greater impression with your personality than your wallet. If you have to buy someone’s love, it’s not worth it. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Don’t offer more than you are prepared to give. Be candid regarding your personal and professional dealings. Boastfulness or exaggeration will come back to haunt you. CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- If you are

open and accepting, you will reap the benefits of an unexpected opportunity. Good fortune is headed your way. Enjoy the moment and the popularity that will come with it. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Don’t take risks with your hard-earned cash. Impulse purchases and overindulgence will deplete your bank account and increase your stress level. Think before you spend or act out. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Don’t wait for someone else to make the first move. The choice you make will influence your emotional and personal well-being, so step up and be the one who makes a decision.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Once issues are out in the open, you will be able to resolve any problems that have been bedeviling you. Refusing to discuss what’s going on will not lead to happiness. Stop waffling. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- You will impress someone special if you do something out of the ordinary. Show your fun side and use your imagination; you won’t be disappointed at the results you get.

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(:31) Madam Secretary A search The Mentalist An undercover agent CSI: Crime Scene Investigation A CBS 2 News at 10PM (N) ’ (CC) Blue Bloods “Mercy” Jamie goes Blue Bloods ’ (3:25) NFL Football: New England Patriots at Green 60 Minutes (N) ’ (CC) ^ WBBM Bay Packers. (N) (Live) (CC) man is murdered in an alley. (N) (CC) under cover at a bar. ’ (CC) for a secret bank account. (N) ’ is murdered. ’ (CC) (12:05) 1st (:35) Open Football Night in America Bob Costas and others (:20) NFL Football: Denver Broncos at Kansas City Chiefs. The Chiefs are in the thick of the AFC West race, NBC5 News 10P Sports Sunday (:35) Open NBC5 News 5P NBC Nightly % WMAQ (N) (CC) News (N) (CC) recap the day’s NFL highlights. (N) (CC) (N) (CC) (N) (CC) House ’ (CC) Look ’ House (N) ’ and now host Peyton Manning and the Broncos. (N) ’ (Live) (CC) Weekend ABC7 ABC World Scandal “Top of the Hour” Olivia America’s Funniest Home Videos Once Upon a Time “Fall” (N) ’ Resurrection “Forsaken” Pastor (:01) Revenge “Intel” Nolan tries to Weekend ABC7 Eyewitness News Inside Edition Windy City _ WLS News News Tonight A woman loses her wig. (N) (CC) (CC) and Jake continue to flirt. (CC) Tom’s church becomes a refuge. salvage his reputation. (N) ’ Weekend (N) ’ Weekend (N) ’ (CC) WGN News at (:40) Instant Chicago’s Best Best of WGN Friends ’ (CC) Everybody WGN Sunday Evening News (N) Chicago’s Best Two and a Half Movie: ››› “Tangled” (2010) Voices of Mandy Moore. Animated. A The Middle ’ The Middle ’ ) WGN (Live) (CC) Loves Raymond (CC) Morning News Nine (N) (CC) Replay (N) (CC) ’ (CC) (CC) (CC) bandit provides Rapunzel’s ticket out of her prison tower. (CC) Men ’ (CC) Victor Borge’s Great Performances Itzhak Perlman; Yitzchak Meir Downton Abbey Rediscovered Moments from “Down- Downton Abbey Rediscovered Moments from “Downton Abbey.” ’ (CC) Remembering Chicago: The Boomer Years Locals recount growing up in Chicago. + WTTW Timeless Helfgot. ’ (CC) ton Abbey.” (N) ’ (CC) Father Brown Father Brown investi- Moyers & Com- In the Loop How to Go to War Generals pre- POV “Granito: How to Nail a Dictator” Indictment of Get the Math ’ Beyond the Beltway Start Up ’ (CC) Great Romances Battle Castle “Conwy Castle” 4 WYCC gates an ex-serviceman’s death. Conwy Castle in northern Wales. pare armies for battle. ’ (CC) (CC) pany ’ (CC) Efraín Ríos Montt. ’ (CC) Paid Program Paid Program Raising Hope Two and a Half Paid Program Paid Program SAF3 “Father’s Day” Haunted by Burn Notice “Fearless Leader” Ring of Honor Wrestling (CC) Bones A body is found in a social- Burn Notice “Acceptable Loss” The 8 WCGV memory of a father’s death. (CC) Former flame. (CC) team helps Jesse’s friend. Men ’ (CC) ite’s home. ’ (CC) ’ (CC) The King of Rules of EnRules of EnTyler Perry’s Tyler Perry’s Mike & Molly Mike & Molly ’ Mr. Box Office Mr. Box Office The First Family The First Family Family Guy ’ Raising Hope Seinfeld “The Seinfeld “The The King of : WCIU House of Payne House of Payne “Spring Break” (CC) (CC) ’ (CC) Note” ’ (CC) Truth” ’ (CC) Queens (CC) Queens (CC) gagement ’ gagement ’ ’ (CC) ’ (CC) ’ (CC) ’ (CC) Final Word Game Night Inside Bears Bensinger Whacked Out Intelligence The Office ’ Ice Age: Xmas Mulaney (N) ’ The Simpsons Brooklyn Nine Family Guy ’ Bob’s Burgers Fox 32 News at Nine (N) @ WFLD The Office ’ Healing ADD Renée Fleming -- Christmas in Christmas With the Mormon Tabernacle Choir Great Performances “Encores! Great Performances at the Met” Nineteen Independent Lens “Muscle Shoals; Waiting for a Train: The Toshio Front and Center John Hiatt perD WMVT With-Amen New York (N) ’ (CC) Featuring Alfie Boe and Tom Brokaw ’ (CC) arias and duets. ’ (CC) Hirano Story” Alabama recording studio. ’ (CC) (DVS) forms hits of his career. ’ (CC) Movie: “A Christmas Mystery” (2014) Esmé Bianco. Premiere. ’ Movie: “A Christmas Wedding Date” (2012) Marla Sokoloff. ’ Movie: “Christmas Twister” ’ F WCPX (4:00) “A Golden Christmas 3” ’ Movie: “All I Want for Christmas” (2013) Melissa Sagemiller. ’ Big Bang Modern Family Modern Family Family Guy ’ Family Guy ’ Futurama (CC) Futurama (CC) G WQRF Paid Program Paid Program Ice Age: Xmas Mulaney (N) ’ The Simpsons Brooklyn Nine Family Guy ’ Bob’s Burgers News How I Met Your How I Met Your Modern Family Modern Family The Big Bang The Big Bang The Big Bang The Big Bang Anger Manage- Anger Manage- Anger Manage- Anger Manage- Comedy.TV ’ (CC) Raw Travel ’ Paid Program R WPWR Mother “Stuff” Mother (CC) Theory (CC) Theory (CC) Theory (CC) Theory (CC) ment (CC) ment (CC) ment (CC) ment (CC) “Hit and Run” ’ (CC) (CC) CABLE 5:00 5:30 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30 Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars (A&E) Shipping Wars Shipping Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars (:02) Dogs of War “Thomas” (N) The Walking Dead Rick wants to Talking Dead The Walking Dead “Self-Help” A The Walking Dead “Consumed” A The Walking Dead “Crossed” The The Walking Dead Rick wants to (:01) Talking Dead Guests discuss The Walking Dead Rick wants to Comic Book (AMC) new set of issues. (CC) rescue mission. (CC) group is spread thin. (CC) find a peaceful agreement. (N) the episode, “Coda.” (N) (CC) find a peaceful agreement. (CC) Men (N) (CC) find a peaceful agreement. (CC) (CC) Call of Wildman Finding Bigfoot Big Red Eye; Bobcat Goldthwait. ’ Finding Bigfoot ’ The Whale: Revenge/Deep (ANPL) To Be Announced The Whale: Revenge From the Deep ’ Finding Bigfoot ’ Somebody’s Gotta Do It/ Rowe Somebody’s Gotta Do It/ Rowe Somebody’s Gotta Do It/ Rowe Somebody’s Gotta Do It/ Rowe Somebody’s Gotta Do It/ Rowe Somebody’s Gotta Do It/ Rowe Somebody’s Gotta Do It/ Rowe CNN Newsroom (N) (CNN) Kevin Hart: Laugh at My Pain Kevin Hart: Grown Little Man All-Star (:03) South Park (:33) South Park (:02) South Park (:32) South Park All-Star (COM) (3:16) Movie: “Couples Retreat” Aziz Ansari: Dangerously What’s Cookin The Haney Project SportsNite Bensinger Poker Night World Poker Tour: Season 12 SportsNet Cent SportsNet Cent UFA SportsNet Cent Spartan Race Heartland Poker Tour (CC) (CSN) Alaska: The Last Frontier (CC) Alaska: The Last Frontier Ex Alaska: The Last Frontier (CC) Edge of Alaska: Legends Alaska: The Last Frontier (CC) (DISC) Alaska: The Last Frontier (CC) Alaska: The Last Frontier (N) ’ Edge of Alaska: Legends Good Luck The Suite Life Wizards of (:05) Austin & Dog With a Blog Girl Meets World Liv & Maddie ’ Good Luck Dog With a Blog Austin & Ally ’ Jessie Jessie and the Ross kids in Movie ›› “Santa Buddies” (2009) George Wendt. (:40) Jessie (DISN) Charlie (CC) Charlie (CC) on Deck (CC) Waverly Place “Where’s Zuri?” Ally ’ (CC) (CC) Talking puppies band together to save Christmas. (CC) ’ (CC) ’ (CC) Hawaii. ’ (CC) ’ (CC) (:10) Movie: ››› “O Brother, Where Art Thou?” (2000) George ClooMovie: ›› “Flightplan” (2005, Suspense) Jodie (:40) Movie: ››› “Speed” (1994, Action) Keanu Reeves. iTV. A transit (:40) Movie: ››› “Dave” (1993) Kevin Kline, Sigourney Weaver. iTV. A (:35) Movie: › (ENC) ney. Three escaped convicts embark on an unusual odyssey. “Idle Hands” Foster, Peter Sarsgaard. iTV. ’ (CC) bus is wired to explode if it drops below 50 mph. ’ (CC) presidential look-alike takes over for the ailing leader. ’ (CC) Championship Drive: Who’s In? MLS Soccer: Western Conference Finals, Leg 2 -- Galaxy at Sounders SportsCenter (N) (Live) (CC) SportsCenter (N) (Live) (CC) SportsCenter (N) (Live) (CC) (ESPN) 2014 World Series of Poker College Basketball 30 for 30 ESPN FC (N) (Live) (ESPN2) Grey Cup Pre. 2014 Grey Cup: Teams TBA. From BC Place Stadium in Vancouver, B.C. (N) (Live) Joel Osteen David Jeremiah James Robison Paid Program (FAM) Movie: ››› “Brave” (2012, Adventure) Voices of Kevin McKidd. Movie: ››› “Despicable Me” (2010) Voices of Steve Carell. Movie: ››› “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation” (1989) Fox News Sunday Huckabee FOX News Special Stossel Huckabee FOX News Special Stossel FOX Report (N) (FNC) Guy’s Grocery Games Cutthroat Kitchen Holiday Baking Championship Cutthroat Kitchen Guy’s Grocery Games (N) Holiday Baking Championship (N) Cutthroat Kitchen (N) (FOOD) Holiday Baking Championship (FX) Movie: ›› “Horrible Bosses” (2011) Jason Bateman, Charlie Day. Movie: ››› “21 Jump Street” (2012, Comedy) Jonah Hill, Channing Tatum. Movie: › “The Watch” (2012, Comedy) Ben Stiller, Vince Vaughn. Movie: › “The Watch” (2012, Comedy) Ben Stiller. Movie: “Northpole” (2014, Fantasy) Tiffani Thiessen, Josh Hopkins. Movie: “One Christmas Eve” (2014) Anne Heche, Juan-Carlos Velis. Movie: “Snow Bride” (2013, Drama) Katrina Law, Jordan Belfi, Susie Movie: “The Christmas Spirit” (2013, Comedy) Nicollette Sheridan, (HALL) Santa Claus prepares to bring joy to the world on Christmas. Premiere. Mishaps disturb the Christmas of a divorcee and her kids. Abromeit. A tabloid reporter falls for a politician’s son. Olympia Dukakis. Charlotte’s spirit tries to change a developer’s mind. Living Alaska Living Alaska House Hunters Hunters Int’l Living Alaska Living Alaska Property Brothers (CC) Hawaii Life (N) Hawaii Life (N) Vacation House for Free (N) Vacation House for Free (CC) (HGTV) Property Brothers (CC) (HIST) Pawn Stars ’ Pawn Stars ’ Pawn Stars ’ Pawn Stars ’ Pawn Stars ’ Pawn Stars ’ Ax Men “Logged and Loaded” (N) (:03) Alaska Off-Road Warriors ’ (:03) Pawn Stars (:32) Pawn Stars (:01) Pawn Stars (:31) Pawn Stars (12:01) Ax Men ’ (CC) (12:02) Movie: “Grumpy Cat’s (4:00) Movie: ››› “Crazy for Movie: ›› “Christmas With the Kranks” (2004) Tim Allen, Jamie Lee Movie: “Grumpy Cat’s Worst Christmas Ever” (2014, Comedy) Voice (:02) Movie: ›› “Christmas With the Kranks” (2004, Comedy) Tim (LIFE) Worst Christmas Ever” (2014) of Aubrey Plaza, Megan Charpentier, Daniel Roebuck. (CC) Allen. A couple scramble to assemble a holiday celebration. (CC) Christmas” (2005) Andrea Roth. Curtis. A couple scramble to assemble a holiday celebration. (CC) Caught on Camera Caught on Camera Caught on Camera Lockup Lockup Lockup Lockup (MSNBC) Caught on Camera Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness (MTV) “Bring It On: Fight to the Finish” Movie: ››› “Bring It On: In It to Win It” (2007) Ashley Benson. ’ Movie: ›› “Bring It On: All or Nothing” (2006) Hayden Panettiere. Fresh Prince (NICK) Henry Danger Henry Danger Nickelodeon HALO Awards Movie: “Santa Hunters” (2014, Fantasy) ’ (CC) Full House ’ Fresh Prince Fresh Prince Friends (CC) (:36) Friends ’ (:12) How I Met Your Mother ’ How I Met (:12) Movie: ››› “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade” (1989, Adventure) Harrison Ford, Sean Connery, (:15) Movie: ›› “Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull” (2008, Adventure) Harrison Ford, Cate Blanchett, Shia (:16) Movie: ›› “John Carter” (2012, Science Fic(SPIKE) Denholm Elliott. Indy’s hunt for his missing father leads to the Holy Grail. ’ La Beouf. Indy and a deadly Soviet agent vie for a powerful artifact. ’ tion) Taylor Kitsch, Lynn Collins, Willem Dafoe. ’ (3:00) ›› “30 Movie: ›› “Blade: Trinity” (2004, Horror) Wesley Snipes, Kris Kristofferson, Jessica Biel. Movie: › “The Happening” (2008) Mark Wahlberg, Zooey Deschanel. A Spartacus: War of the Damned (:05) Movie: ›› “Poseidon” (2006, Adventure) Josh Lucas, Kurt Rus(SYFY) One last attempt to win freedom. sell, Jacinda Barrett. A luxury liner capsizes in the North Atlantic. Days of Night” Blade and a pair of vampire slayers battle Dracula. couple flee an invisible killer that threatens all of humanity. (:15) Movie: ››› “Lassie Come Home” (1943) Roddy McDowall. A Movie: ››› “The Black Stallion” (1979) Kelly Reno, Mickey Rooney. A (:15) Movie: ›››› “National Velvet” (1944, Drama) Mickey Rooney, Elizabeth Taylor. An Movie: ››› “Mare Nostrum” (1926, War) Antonio (TCM) British boy’s collie finds her way back home from Scotland. shipwrecked boy forms a spiritual bond with a horse. (CC) ex-jockey coaches an English girl to the Grand National. (CC) (DVS) Moreno, Alice Terry, Hughie Mack. The Little Couple “The Big 4-0” The Little Couple “I Do... Again!” 90 Day Fiance ’ (CC) (TLC) 90 Day Fiance (N) ’ (CC) My Five Wives (N) ’ (CC) 90 Day Fiance ’ (CC) My Five Wives ’ (CC) 90 Day Fiance ’ (CC) (TNT) Movie: ›› “Clash of the Titans” (2010, Fantasy) Sam Worthington. Movie: ››› “Transformers” (2007) Shia LaBeouf. Two races of robots wage war on Earth. (CC) (DVS) (:01) Movie: ›› “Clash of the Titans” (2010) Sam Worthington. (12:01) Movie: ›› “I, Robot” Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls (:43) The Golden Girls ’ (CC) Golden Girls Love-Raymond Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens King of Queens King of Queens King of Queens King of Queens Friends (CC) Friends (CC) (TVL) Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Movie: ››› “Brideshead Revis(USA) “Lunacy” ’ (CC) “Unstable” ’ (CC) “Smoked” ’ (CC) “Home Invasions” ’ (CC) “Undercover Blue” ’ (CC) “Egg Drop” ’ “Me? Jealous?” ’ (CC) “Fulgencio” ’ ited” (2008) Matthew Goode. Mob Wives “Cabin Fever” (CC) Mob Wives “Of Dogs and Men” (VH1) Mob Wives “Fire Away” ’ (CC) Mob Wives “Torn Apart” (CC) Mob Wives ’ (CC) Mob Wives Renee’s paranoia. ’ Mob Wives “If Books Could Kill” Mob Wives “Taking the Rap” ’ (WTBS) (4:30) Movie: ›› “Fred Claus” (2007) Vince Vaughn. (DVS) Movie: ›› “Four Christmases” (2008) Vince Vaughn. (DVS) Movie: ›› “Four Christmases” (2008) Vince Vaughn. (DVS) Movie: ›› “Nothing Like the Holidays” (2008) John Leguizamo. PREMIUM 5:00 5:30 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30 (4:00) Movie ›› “The Internship” Movie ›› “Escape Plan” (2013, Action) Sylvester Stallone. A security The Newsroom “Contempt” Will The Comeback Getting On (N) The Newsroom “Contempt” Will The Comeback Getting On ’ The Newsroom “Contempt” Will (HBO) refuses to reveal a source. (CC) refuses to reveal a source. (CC) (CC) (2013) Vince Vaughn. (CC) refuses to reveal a source. (N) ’ (N) ’ (CC) ’ (CC) ’ (CC) expert must break out of a formidable prison. ’ ‘R’ (CC) (3:30) Movie Movie “The Super Sex Program” (2013, Adult) Mary (:25) Movie ›› (:25) Movie › “Runner Runner” (2013, Drama) Ben Movie ››› “Pacific Rim” (2013) Charlie Hunnam, Idris Elba. Humans (:15) Movie ›› “X-Men: The Last Stand” (2006, Action) Hugh Jackman. (MAX) “Broken City” “Warm Bodies” Carey, Jazy Berlin. ’ ‘NR’ (CC) Affleck, Justin Timberlake. ’ ‘R’ (CC) pilot giant robots to fight monstrous creatures. ’ ‘PG-13’ (CC) A cure for mutations divides the X-Men. ’ ‘PG-13’ (CC) The Affair Noah asks Alison to help The Affair Noah and Alison grow The Affair New difficulties at home. The Affair There is more to Alison. The Affair The Solloways return to Movie ››› “August: Osage County” (2013) Meryl Streep. A funeral Homeland Carrie uses improvisa(SHOW) tion. ’ (CC) him. ’ (CC) closer. ’ (CC) ’ (CC) ’ (CC) Brooklyn. ’ (CC) reunites three sisters with their venomous mother. ’ ‘R’ (CC) (3:50) “The Cold (:25) Movie “A Promise” (2013, Drama) Rebecca Movie ››› “Silver Linings Playbook” (2012) Bradley Cooper. A man (:05) Movie ››› “The Master” (2012, Drama) Joaquin Phoenix, Philip Seymour Hoffman. Movie ››› “Killing Them Softly” (2012, Crime (TMC) Light of Day” intends to rebuild his life and reunite with his estranged wife. ‘R’ Hall, Alan Rickman, Richard Madden. ’ ‘R’ (CC) A drifter becomes a charismatic religious leader’s disciple. ’ ‘R’ (CC) Drama) Brad Pitt, Scoot McNairy. ’ ‘R’ (CC)


4 CLASSIFIED • Sunday, November 30, 2014 • Section F • Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com No. 1116 DON’T QUIT YOUR DAY JOB

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50 Pitcher of milk? 1 Charged things 52 “That feels goo-oo-ood” 5 Actress Normand of the silents 54 Cosmetician ___ Laszlo 10 Like some textbook publishers 55 La Scala segment 14 Wee bit 56 Inclined 18 Instruments with 57 Action star who flared bells would make a lousy free-range 20 Perfume with an farmer? accent in its name 60 Singers do it 21 Locker-room user 61 Historian’s interest 22 Motorola smartphone 63 Smooths 23 Oscar winner 64 Scholarship name who would 65 “The Hunger make a lousy Games” and others anesthesiologist? 67 Theme park 25 Spotlight with a spherical 27 Who’s there? landmark 28 Glove-box item 68 Defeat decisively 30 N.F.L. rarity 69 Fiery 31 It’s faster than the 71 Jones of the original blink of an eye: Stones Abbr. 72 Contest winner’s 32 Scrubs wearers, for feeling short 73 Consumed 33 Punk rocker who 76 Bygone comic who would make a would make lousy grocer? a lousy baker? 35 Milk dispenser 78 Work at 37 Bieber Fever, e.g. 79 Byzantine emperor 38 Piano-playing known as “The cat, once Philosopher” 39 Horror author who 81 Like dollhouse would make a furniture lousy firefighter? 82 French nobleman 43 Fr. title 83 Early eight-bit 45 Cold computer maker 49 Red Baron, e.g. 85 Tom ___, big role in “The Purple Rose of Cairo” Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more 86 Blades that sound than 4,000 past puzzles, like an allergic nytimes.com/crosswords reaction ($39.95 a year). ACROSS

88 Elapse 90 Cabaret pianist who would make a lousy electrician? 92 The gamut 94 Dog-___ 96 Where to learn to draw? 97 Lawyer who would make a lousy anti-Communist leader? 101 Electronic music’s Daft Punk, e.g. 102 Junior’s challenge, for short 106 Org. replaced by the N.R.C. 107 Elaborate 108 Set side by side 110 More than plump 112 Singer who would make a lousy mohel? 114 German title 115 Michael of “Arrested Development” 116 Bother 117 Feints 118 ___ of the earth 119 Helmeted god 120 Window’s counterpart 121 Word before or after lime DOWN

1 John Wayne or Johnny Carson, by birth 2 Newspaper dept. 3 “Cape Fear” co-star 4 New England town official

5 Class ring, e.g. 6 Parliaments produce them 7 Air-conditioner fig. 8 Always, in verse 9 Reveals 10 God, with “the” 11 Genève’s lake 12 Toy holder 13 “Present” 14 Residents, eventually: Abbr. 15 Bonnie who sang “Nick of Time” 16 15-time All-Star shortstop Smith 17 Primp 19 Trig function 24 Cost for some plugs 26 Drifter outside a coffee shop? 29 Add one’s two cents about 33 Shocks 34 Sprint, e.g. 36 Con’s plan 37 Short-order sandwich 39 Deepest part 40 See 44-Down 41 “Can I leave now?” 42 Possessed 44 Big producer of 40-Down 46 Yearbook feature 47 “Picnic” playwright 48 “That ___ it!” 51 Immobilized, as one’s arm 53 Twain contemporary 56 Jerk

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99 Confederate general 102 Combo 104 Belg. locale 105 Welker or Craven 106 Unripe 107 Talon 108 Urge (2 wds.) 110 Flat-topped hill 112 AWOL schoolboy 114 The ones here 115 Flatt or Maddox 117 Sod 119 “-- She Sweet” 120 More costly 121 Give off 123 Refuse to stop 125 Barber’s cry 126 Uncle -129 Candid 131 River in France 132 Suit part 133 Rds. 136 Bedouin 138 Sound loudly 140 Abbr. in business 141 Destiny 142 Ocean liner 143 British gasoline 145 Town 147 Old Greek weight 149 Tell 151 Hackneyed 152 Theater area (Abbr.) 153 Aboriginal Japanese 154 Eisenhower’s predecessor 155 Watched 156 Throb 157 Carry with effort 158 T-man DOWN 1 Tooth part 2 Seasons goddesses 3 “-- -- of Two Cities” 4 Done for 5 School subj. 6 “Hello, --!” 7 Chills and fever 8 Place 9 Unmindful 10 Predicament 11 “Much -- About Nothing” 12 Paper unit 13 Domesticates 14 Kind of gas 15 Adams or Poehler

16 Oodles 17 Killed 19 Put to use 23 Raines or Fitzgerald 28 Bauble 31 Hard wood 33 “-- Town” 35 Snooze 38 -- d’Azur 39 Leaf 40 Analyze grammatically 42 Musical composition 44 Yield by treaty 45 Wee 46 Kindled 48 Animal habitation 49 The “I” 50 -- vera 51 Household goods 52 Burn 54 Lower in value 56 Crushing force 57 XI 58 Passover meal 60 Quahog 61 Perfect place 63 Furrow 66 Cat breed 68 Extra performance 70 Meeting 73 Search 74 Wrapping paper 75 Minion of Sauron 76 Rechargeable battery 79 Animal cry 80 Brooch 81 Tip 83 Calendar abbr. 84 Animal hair 85 Inn in Turkey 86 Red-brown horse 89 Tower of -91 Helper (Abbr.) 92 -- laureate 95 Total 97 Small goose 98 Landlord’s due 100 Facilitate 101 Pitcher 103 Be too fond 105 Merchandise 106 False appearance 107 Confabulation 109 “20,000 Leagues” captain 111 Have a meal 113 Slicker 114 Printed matter

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116 Moved in waves 118 Cargo 120 Arid place 122 Suit to a -124 Do wrong 125 After deductions 126 Plant fluid 127 God of war 128 Dull surface 130 Man of wealth and power 132 Worth 133 Something regrettable 134 Giant god 135 Exhausted 137 Laugh loudly 139 Enticement 141 Baptismal bowl 142 Hit 144 Cry at a bullfight 146 Electronics giant 148 Life story 150 Time

70 Horse halter 71 Osso ___ 72 Supersmooth 74 Asseverate 75 Gossip 77 Barbecue fryer? 78 Elbow, maybe 80 Many boomers, now 84 Still snoozing, say 85 One way to learn

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THE PUZZLER

ACROSS 1 Go after 6 Recipe amount 10 Flit 14 Pesters 18 Round and fat 20 Pointed arch 21 Notion 22 Soap plant 24 -- pekoe 25 Old instrument 26 Rich soil 27 Killer of Mercutio 29 Promenade 30 Warsaw native 32 Deer 34 Bill of fare 36 Storage structure 37 Wedding announcement word 38 Modeling material 39 Downturn 41 Red gem 43 Certain vote 44 Chef 45 Relating to heat 47 Peter -- Rubens 49 Kind of pin 52 So-so grades 53 Dry 55 Rental contracts 59 Escape 60 Quiche ingredient 62 Ending for pun or fun 64 Name 65 Traditional learning 66 Bias 67 A letter 69 Coach 71 Tall grass 72 Marshland 73 Book with a lock 74 Half a score 75 Of a grain 77 -- Maria 78 Girder (Hyph.) 80 Nippers 82 Cook slowly 84 Sacred song 85 Long-legged bird 87 Formerly 88 Reject 89 Act properly 90 Roof type 92 Baby grand 93 -- Baba 94 Composition 96 Application 97 Group of young

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87 Farm homes 89 Caviar sources 91 Main source of aluminum 93 Neighbor of Chiapas 95 Modern name of Mare Mecca 97 Campaign setback 98 Grasp 99 The planets, now

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100 Subject of many a Turner landscape 101 Golfer David 103 Terrif 104 Posed 105 “The Gondoliers” girl 108 Things aircraft carriers carry 109 With 111 Alpine land: Abbr. 113 ___ chi


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Section F • Sunday, November 30, 2014 •

Female, like new, size large, $30. Men's brown, xtra large, like new, $50. Spring Grove 815-307-9034

WANTED: OLD CARS & TRUCKS FOR

$CASH$ We pay and can Tow it away!

Call us today: 815-338-2800 ROUTE 14 AUTO PARTS

John Deere Gator 625i XUV Olive, Black Bench Seat, Power Bed Lift, Bed Liner, 88 hours: $9500. 630-263-3907

LEATHER JACKETS

Good bike jackets, $50/obo. Winter Gloves, $5. All brand new. 847-409-5446 MEN'S WORK SHIRT - Dickies Brand black long sleeve industrial work shirt, size L. New, never worn - $25. 815-477-9023

WINTER JACKET Ladies, very warm, sz medium. Medium blue color, excellent condition, $25. 847-515-3986 Women's Leather Coat Wilson, black, knee length leather coat w/ detachable hood, fur lined, size small, excellent condition $75. 847-732-3632 after 6pm

5 Chickens – 3-5 yrs old, great shape 815-790-1694

DRYER/ELECTRIC

FREE: TOSHIBA THEATRE VIEW HD SRS. 50” TV. Works great! Call: 815-382-2490

GE Profile, works great, $75. 815-385-3269

Refrigerator ~ G.E.\ Older, White, double door $130 Works great ! Dishwasher, Working cond. Black, Roper Brand $50 815-315-3047

Thomas Organ – perfect cond. Just right for Christmas ! 815-385-2168

Betty Boop Leather Jacket

Black & white, XL, excellent condition, Makes a nice gift for a collector - $125. 630-479-0435 after 2pm BULLS JACKET – Mens, Leather/ Wool Size LARGE Brand = Jeff Hamilton $150. 815-382-5271 (pictures available on request)

GREAT GIFT! - Fleece Hooded Zippered Cubs Jacket. $45 New! Call: 815-861-1163

WE'VE GOT IT!

60's Style Arm Chair

Orange vinyl chair with chrome frame, modern design - $55. 815-382-4743 before 9pm Antique Headboard & Curved Footboard, Slats, etc., Solid Wood, 1920's , Its for a double bed $50. 815-861-0566 evenings Barbies – Happy Holiday Collection 1988 – 1998 11 barbies, mint in box + bonus $350/all. 708-603-9395

Community Classified 877-264-CLAS (2527) www.NWHerald.com

BREAKING NEWS available 24/7 at NWHerald.com

Bathtub - Antique, primitive metal bathtub painted blue, the bowl of the tub is lined w/ 2 layers of blue fabric w/ tiny flowers. Bowl diameter: 23-1/4"; top upright rim at back is 6" high & 29" long; the seat ledge just in front of the upright back rim is 5" at deepest & tapers down around the large rim; the height of the tub at the back from floor to top of upright rim is 18-1/2" $185. 815-236-1747 McHenry

BRONZE FLATWARE

Blue Willow (old) dishes. 16 sets cups/saucers no chips, over 120 pieces of plates, bowls, other pieces. $2.00 each. Also 50 pieces childrens b.w. Unbelievable! 815-931-2972

130 pieces in wooden case from Siam, $90. 815-893-0059

! !

JACKETS/LEATHER

CLASSIFIED 5

SUDOKU TRIPLES

CAKE PLATE AND COVER Vintage Retro Polished Chrome Square Cake Carrier with locking lid, fantastic condition. Top locks onto serving tray with two push tabs. $35. 815 477-9023

Brass bed (1880's) full size with mattress set. $100.00 OBO. 815-931-2972 Check out McHenryCountySports.com for local prep sports and video.

McHenryCountySports.com is McHenry County Sports

ANSWERS TO CROSSWORD No. 1123 A F R O

L O A N

P U N T

O L D A G T E E N A T R A C C L L E E A S K A N T D E L E O N T A

M U L E

A S U N C M I L O K N H U M O R E D

A M E R I C A

D E M M I O A N S S B A A T I O T W K O E L L S I O N C C O O L O N

S O R R Y R E T R Y R E A I R

A R R E N X P I R E E M O R A N T A I T E P O M M O R E P O N S O R L L O O N E Y S C M A T U C P A P A R H A L E R A L A P E W T E R D I E T A A E R I S D I M E N H E R L L I E M E E S W I V E H E R E

S I D L E S

K R U E G E R

I S M

W O M B A R A N A M I B C S I R E E M E Z I O X F O U S M P U

R A P R E A Z A C R E S

C O Y

M O I O N T W I L A N C E L E S Y

A L I B A B A

N A M E T A G

E V I L E Y E

S T R A T T O A N S T T H O M I A L

P R E M I E R E

N O D

E L L A

R Y E S

C R E D

ANSWERS TO CROSSWORD No. 1109 ANSWERS TO CROSSWORD No. 1116 W A T T

H A G A R

Y A O M I N G

M I S N O M E R

L A R V A

I L I U M

O H A R A

L I S T I N A G P P E S T T H O R D E E L G H A I B L G E L S O

E S B L N E Y O S I F E S L A W L M I X E E I L I C A C P R O N Y E L A G E B E R R E S I T A R F E S T N T E A O S S A T H A R F O R M M O T E L A R N E I A A T N Y S

U E J A T E A M E L B A T S M I T O E E T A T M I N E L O W S E S E T S E L L S L A B H A P T L A S M O N I L E T T B O N G A P E A C T O R K

Y B O E D L E A L L L I P E E S N T E A B T S R N A I U L B B L A E L C A E R S A S A S L E E M

R I C K T H A N E O N I P A N H E L E A S T O N E E L E D G E W E L V E L I E S G N S E T C K E Y O I B E R R D I E L B E I A B L M B O S O O N

E D E N I R E F U S E Y U L E S

I O W A N

O B I T S

N O L T E

S E L E C T B R A M A I R A S C E N S E W E P A R D E G E O R T I N Y S N E E A G L O R A E C F A T A F R A U E N D S

M S E I A M N D E R N E A T S T O C E A A P A S I C S N T G E B D U S G T O Z I A A E X P S A P C E A R

A S H E S K E P T B U C O L O I R E

B E L T E E U R T S S C J O H M A N I E R M L S I E T N I S A N E P C O R I A N R N S A T A B Y B E A R E L R E D U N D G S T A E A S A I

E T E R N A L

L E M A N

H A P P Y M L E A A C O L D S T S G L P L Y R I O B B D A D U J U X E V I T A T S L E

I M H E R E H A R T E B Y R O T E

D R O P R A Z R A S I Z E R T I E O T T E N M E A L G I D E R N O S C A G E H O D E S O M P E H A D L E O V I A X T E R S H O R T T I P S A T A P O S E N I C K S D E K E S S O D A

In print daily Online 24/7

AT YOUR SERVICE Call to advertise 877-264-2527

OTTO'S FIREWOOD 4x8 FC Mixed Hardwood & Softwood Oak, Maple, Cherry

$120 Free Delivery

815-943-6103

ALL HOME REPAIRS

S&W Furniture Refinishing Refinishing ! Stripping ! Repair

Plumbing, Bath, Kitchen Painting, Tile

Free Pick-Up & Delivery

Serving McHenry County and Surrounding Area

!

Imperial Drywall & Remodeling ! ! ! ! !

Home Repair Hang, Tape & Repair Framing & Insulation Basement Finishing Our Specialty: Electrical & Plumbing Repairs

FREE ESTIMATES Insured, Quality Work Reasonable Rates

815-735-0779

Eddie's Tree Service

815-382-1021

Power Washing Gutter Cleaning

All Jobs Big and Small

847-344-5713 ODDJOB HANDYMAN SERVICES Whether its a tough job0 or just some odd jobs around the house my low rates make it affordable. Just like having your son come and help you out.

SEASONED FIREWOOD Mixed Firewood $125/Face Cherry or Oak $150/Face

Call Steve at 815-353-7720

MOVERS By the Hour, Day or Week Local or Long Distance Straight Truck or Semi Residential or Commercial

POWER Tree & Stump Removal, Inc.

866-870-4321

815-943-6960

FULLY INSURED

McHenry, IL. USDOT 1205997, mc 672989

JUNK REMOVAL SERVICES

Free Local Delivery

4617 S. Route 47 Woodstock, IL

Have a photo you'd like to share? Upload it to our online photo album at NWHerald.com/MyPhotos

Share your photos with McHenry County!

Pictures increase attention to your ad! Be sure to include a photo of your pet, home, auto or merchandise.

Moving In or Out?

815-337-1799 847-875-4077

Free Pick-Up Appliances, Electronics Any Kind of Metal or Batteries

RECRUIT LOCAL! Target your recruitment message to McHenry County or reach our entire area. For more information, call 877-264-CLAS (2527) or email: helpwanted@ shawsuburban.com

Interior/Exterior Carpentry Light Fixtures Drywall Repairs Doors, Hardware

815-482-8406 You Want It? We've Got It! McHenryCountySports.com is McHenry County Sports

Classified has GREAT VARIETY!

877-264-CLAS (2527)

NWHerald.com /myphotos Upload photos of your family and friends with our online photo album. Share your sports team, birthday party, big catch, pets, or vacation!

24 Hour Emergency Cell 815-236-5944

SNOW REMOVAL * Trimming & Removal * Specializing Large & Dangerous Trees * Storm Damage * Lot Clearing * Stump Grinding * Pruning

RECRUIT LOCAL! Need Help Rebuilding, Repairing or Replanting? Check out the

At Your Service Directory

Call to advertise 877-264-CLAS (2527) Or place your ad online nwherald.com/placeanad

Target your recruitment message close to home or reach our entire area. For more information, call 877-264-CLAS (2527) or email: helpwanted@ shawsuburban.com


6 CLASSIFIED • Sunday, November 30, 2014 • Section F • Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

COMMUNITY

“Winter “xxx” Inchworm” Photo by: xx Photo by: Grace

815-455-4800

CLASSIFIED

classified@shawsuburban.com NWHerald.com/classified Upload your photos at

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2014X • SECTION F DAY, DATE, 2014 • SECTION

CHAIRS - blue velvet 1940's wingback - $30; 1890's walnut grandmother's chair, re-upholstered beige fabric - $25. Both great shape. 815-931-2972

Jim Verhaeghe Seasoned Firewood mixed $90/facecord, free local delivery, stacking available 847-334-5740 / 847-732-4014

David Winters Houses (7) 1980-1988 - Good Condition $15 to $45. 815-347-3673

Oak - Maple - Cherry, $90/FC. Free Stacking and Delivery. 815-321-2077 - 815-334-7914

DOLL HOUSE - Completely Assembled Farmhouse, shingled roof, painted exterior, Ready for interior décor & furnishings $100/OBO. 815-648-4192

Natural gas Ventfree Fireplace Insert - like new, 36” $150 815-338-0050

E.T. Movie Original stuffed toy figure with original tag. 11" tall - $25. 815-236-1747 McHenry.

HUMMELS / GOEBEL West Germany, add to your collection. Starting at $75 847-987-8632 King Crown 30 gal. Crock, w/ wood top & handles, perfect cond, no cracks/chips $400 call Demmy 815-790-8512

LLADRO 12 pc. Nativity set + many more pieces, starting at $150. 847-987-8632 MIXING BOWLS - 3 matching: "Hall's Superior Quality Kitchenware - Eureka Homewood Pattern". Lg 8 5/8", Med 7 3/8", Sm 6 1/8" $39. McHenry. 815-236-1747 OAK CHAIRS - (2) Antique Finished 39" tall at back & 18" wide seat, Unique designs on curved upper backs w/ 8 dowels on lower backs, These chairs are very sturdy. $135 each or $250 for the pair. McHenry 815-236-1747 Singer Sewing Machine Walnut w/ 4 drawers & iron treadle base. Has working Necchi sewing machine inside. $30. 815-931-2972 Tea cart- old, wooden with wheels. $35.00 815-931-2972 Two humped-back steamer trunks. One large- $40.00. One small$30.00. 815-931-2972 VANITY Beautiful antique pine w/ attached mirror & center drawer. Brought from England by dealer, 37-1/4"W x 20"D & 29-1/2" to top of vanity. Mirror 22-3/8"W x 35-3/8"H. Center drawer has metal pull. Legs & side mirror supports have charming decorative sculptured detail. $400. 815-236-1747

Victrola - Hiawatha Floor model, made in Geneva, IL Approx 100 years old, great cond, $395. 815-578-0212 Walnut 3/4 bed with mattress set. $125.00 obo. 815-931-2972

Double Strollers

1side by side / 1 front & back good condition, asking $40 each 815-334-0804 after 5pm DRESS SET- Girls 2 piece dress and coat set, size 4T, very nice. NEW with tags. $35. 815-477-9023 PLAYPEN – Fisher Price, extra large, w/ zoo animals & cover, used twice, looks brand new! Adorable! Paid $95, Asking $65. 815-477-1183 late afternoons

Oak $120/FC, $330/C.

BAR/BISTRO CHAIRS (2)

Walnut 3/4 Bed with Mattress Set $125/OBO 815-931-2972

Bassett Headboard & Footboard Twin bed with matching dresser & mirror – Great condition! $400 OBO. 815-382-5271 Big Vase, 33 inch tall, very decorative, mint cond. Paid $279, Selling for $65 815-477-7916

Bookcase/Stereo With shelves & glass doors and on wheels, $35.00. 847-532-5837 Brass Bed - 1880's full size with mattress set. $100/OBO 815-931-2972

BUFFET

Maple 43"W, 36"H, 20"D with 2 drawers and 2 bottom cabinet doors with inside shelf. $200. 847-987-8632 BUNK BED – Metal, Top Single – Bottom Double Sleeps 3, Very Strong - $175. 815-382-4436 9a-8p CHAIRS - office chair, swivels, black mesh $20; blue velvet 1940's wingback $30; Walnut small beige upholstered chair $25; Two slipper chairs expensive ivory fabric $20 each. All good condition. 815-931-2972 Child's Princess Castle Bed, converts from toddler to twin size will text picture, $175 815-690-5776 CHILDRENS TABLE AND CHAIRS Very cute, excellent condition, 24"L x 18"W x 18"H. $75. 815-477-9023

CURIO CABINET Maple 76" H, 32"W, 13"D cabinet with four glass shelves and inside light. $150. 847-987-8632

CURIO CABINET Walnut, smaller with storage and lights, $150. Call or text Harry. Crystal Lake, Local Delivery Available. 779-236-6986 DINING ROOM SET - MAPLE OVAL TABLE WITH TWO LEAVES, FOUR CHAIRS, PADS, AND TWO CORNER HUTCHES. $400. JUST IN TIME FOR THE HOLIDAYS. 847-987-8632

DRESSER ~ DARK WOOD 4drawer, solid wood, good condition, by Carolina Furniture Works $75 847-409-8955

ALBUMS - Vintage 1960's & 70's. Fifty cents each, three boxes full. 815-931-2972.

CUCKOO CLOCKS

Charming wooden Swiss Alps/Black Forest clocks approximately 13" H, 11"W, 7"D with pine cone pendulums. $200. 847-987-8632 RECORDS – Box Of 100 Easy Listening, 45 is from 50's & 60's, Good Condition - $10. Call Mike 847-695-9561 TEAPOT SET Signed Mary Engelbreit Very Cherry Teapot Cup Saucer Black with Cherries Tea Set, hard to find, retired set. Excellent. $75. 815-477-9023

CAR STEREO AMPLIFIER BOSS 400 watts. Brand new in box, never opened. 2 channel bridgeable. $100/obo. 847-409-5446.

Sharp TV – 27”

$100. 815-578-0501

DUMBBELLS & RACK 8lb. to 30lb. weights with rack. Nine lb. medicine ball included. $150. Excellent condition. 815-236-8522

Place your Classified ad online 24/7 at: www.NWHerald.com/ PlaceAnAd

BAR STOOLS Solid wood stools look great in kitchen or bar area. Excellent condition - $75 for the pair. 815-477-9023 Bavarian China Dinnerware pattern: Multi-colored leaves w/ gold rim, 49 pieces - $250/OBO. 847-639-3693 Call 9am-6pm Beveled mirrors, 36x72 inch, $20. 36x36 inch, $10. 847-476-6771 CHAIRS - Vintage chairs from $8 to $15, great selection, 10 to choose from, will separate. 815-477-9023 Dishes Blue Willow, 16 sets cups/saucers. Over 120 pieces plates, bowls, accessory pieces. $2 each. Also, 50 pieces children's blue willow. Very cheap. 815-931-2972 FLOOR LAMP Tall Victorian Hurricane Floor Lamp, antique brass finished, etched chimney inner, with white spray roses on outer glass shade. $85. 815-477-9023

Mikasa Dishes

Service for 12, whole wheat design, JARDINAIRE pattern. $150/obo 815-444-0557 Quaker Oats Cookie Jar Ceramic, 120th Anniversary New in Box - $45. 815-387-4743 before 9pm Sewing machine. Walnut SINGER with four drawers and iron treadle base but with working Necchi machine inside. $30.00 815-931-2972

Table Lamp beautiful, Like new, paid $125 selling for $30. 815-477-7916

ECHO GAS LEAF BLOWER Very good condition, runs great $99/OBO. See picture in online email: ad.bpk31257@yahoo.com

LAWN MOWER

Old reel type push, 18-19” cut, very good cond, American made. $45. 847-639-4991

FUTON ~ VERLO

Wooden frame, premium mattress with cover & pillows. Excellent condition! $250 815-459-6751

Headboard & Footboard

Black Iron with cherry wood for FULL SIZE BED - $75 Picture can be emailed on request 815-382-5271 Headboard & Footboard for Full Size Bed - $50. Photo can be sent email or text 815-382-5271

HUTCH Drexel Heritage, pecan with glass shelves and glass doors include lights, 55x84, $325. 708-309-5397

WICKER CHAIRS - Vintage garden appeal, custom painted, sturdy construction, classic, very cute cottage chic! $195. 815-477-9023

Black & Decker Portable Workmate Station 225 – Folds up, easy to transport, in good condition $30. 815-276-2335 Electric Sewer Rod Brass-Craft-400 Series Drain Cleaner, 75' x ½ Cable, 110 Volt, Portable, Reverse & Forward, Used Little, Like New, New over $300, Asking $225/OBO 815-479-0492

Lift Chair, excellent condition, barely used. $350.00 or best offer. (815)338-1199

Leather Tool/Nail Bag to put on your waist, $5. 815-404-9570

MATTRESS

Trade only for CHAIN SAW 18" / Van Rack Astro/ 8-lug 315"x16" Or Cash. 847-875-6739

King size and Boxspring with topper, $200. 224-600-7404 Princess Castle Toddler Bed, converts to Twin Bed, $75 815-307-9034 Spring Grove Queen Headboard black metal, head & foot board, excellent shape - $100. 815-482-0567 Racecar toddler bed for boy $75 815-307-9034 Spring Grove

ROCKING CHAIR - $50

Picture can be emailed by request 815-382-5271 Rugs - $50/OBO; Desk - dark brown, Never used $200; Security set, never been used $70. 815-403-1102 after 3pm

SLEEPER/SOFA Excellent condition, $175. 815-459-0337

Sofa & LoveSeat, Quality, Very Comfy, Neutral Colors, Really Good Cond. $325/set 815-403-5598 (McHenry)

BREAKING NEWS available 24/7 at NWHerald.com

Acoustic Guitar Alvarez Regent, Like new, includes bag, purchased at Players Bench $175. 815-403-4063

Books – Science & Invention Encyclopedias – 26 Books! Great Condition! $30. 815-455-6201

MUSIC SHELF - Self standing or hang, design supports in the shape of a musical staff, G Clef's on each end. Very cute piece, excellent condition. $55. 815-477-9023

What to Expect When Expecting, Infant and Toddler, new, all for $10. 815-404-9570

Dickens Village Series Heritage Village collection with people & accessories, $200. 708-309-5397 DINNERWARE - 46 PIECES Set of Fairwinds, The Friendship of Salem, brown, exc cond, $350. 847-807-9156

Furniture, Collectibles, Tiff Lamps, Electronics and some high end merchandise & much more. Starting @ $5.00 224-858-3116

GAME TABLE

TORO 421 Snow Blower - 2 stage straight gas with electric start, 3 speeds forward & reverse, well maintained solid older unit. new carburetor, oil change & adjusted $350. 815-675-2155

Malibu Pilates Chair with 3 DVD's LIKE NEW! $200. 815-382-5271 Schwinn Home Gym $150.O.B.O. 847-875-6739 Treadmill Proform 540S Works fine-has built in fan $200 firm. 815-382-5271

Power 2 to 7, w/tapered cross hairs, $175 excellent condition. 847-639-4991

Entertainment Center

END TABLES (3)

DUTCH DOOR

Brass & white porcelain 3” in center $.50/ea, all for $12 (28 piece available) current style . 815-477-7916

Redfield Widefield Rifle Scope

STATUES Woman holding vase over SOLID, very old cement base-$40; 1963 statue of cupids holding bowl for flowers/fruit w/ Corinthian base, $25; Unusually large - over 4 ft., metal bird cage on legs – old, $20; White wicker plant stand on legs w/ hooped top – antique $80/OBO. 815-931-2972

Solid oak, 3 piece very nice, good condition, holds up to 40” TV, lots of storage & shelves, lighted, 88”W x 75”H x 17”D - $175, 815-575-1023 Crystal Lake

Porcelain Sink

Victorian Eastlake Parlor Set Early 1900's - Loveseat, platform rocker & chair. Mahogany, blue cloth flower pattern. Beautiful original condition - $695. Call 847-658-5125 Anytime

Forged Iron Two, one-of-a-kind with tapestry cushions, Both for $175. Please call/text Harry, Crystal Lake. Local Delivery Avail. 779-236-6986

BED SKIRT - Classic and charming with a sweet eyelet detail along the bottom. Queen/King, easy care, ivory. $25. 815-477-9023

BOOKS

Delivered and Stacked. 815-568-7348

Walnut, different styles, $20/ea or 3 for $50. 815-459-6751

Black Italian with Gold Trim (drop in) $200. Faucets, towel bars, solid brass, starting @ $300 take it all. 815-444-0557 Pull Handles for Cabinets

Solid oak dining room set, clawfoot table with two leaves and four matching oak chairs. $250.00 815-931-2972

MIXED FIREWOOD

2 Bi-fold Closet Doors New in Boxes, Half Louvered, Pine. 24” x 80” each $25 for both – total 815-455-6201 4'x 7' PLYCO Steel Dutch Door, w/frame. Autumn Red, Cross trim, tudor brown, new in 2 boxes. Pic avail, $400. 847-476-6771

NWHerald.com/myphotos

Absorbent Mattress pads, for people & pets, 30” x 36” case of 100. $35 815-578-0212 Electric operated hospital bed $100.00. (815)338-1199

Capial MD Sports. 12 in 1 game table, $50. 815-459-6751

GLOVES Nitrile, black, case of 1200. $65. 815-578-0212 Harley Davidson Leather Bags, Fatboy, Sportsters, like brand new $150 Spring Grove 815-307-9034

HUNTING KNIVES (2) $50/both, will get 4 extra knives. 815-893-0059 ITEMS for SALE, All Must Go! Hoover Vacuum, X-Pro, brand new Collectibles, New Wave oven, New Keurig coffee maker new in box, Tiffany Lamp, Chairs, Betty Bop Jacket, Broncos NFL 98-99 Super Bowl Leather Jacket, Collectibles Call for info 224-858-3116

ORGAN 1971 CLASSIC CAPRIE

Works great, deluxe, antique, $100/obo. 847-409-5446

Pianos Quality Pre-Owned Pianos Delivered & Warrantied 815-334-8611 Sheet Music Individual Pieces Copyright 1889-1919, 62 pieces; 1920's, 52 pieces; 1930's, 62 pieces; 1940's, 47 pieces; 1950's, 31 pieces & 1970's, 5 pieces. $200/OBO will separate, 815-236-1747 McHenry Very old piano music from early 1900's to the 40's. Great titles and pictures. $1.00 each. 815-931-2972

AKC ROUGH COLLIE PUPS 2 Sable/White, 6 Month old, Females, Sire/Dam Onsite, Shots, Eye-Exams, AKC Limited With Spay Agreement. $800. Each, Fenced Yard Required. SPRING GROVE 815-679-7015 LEAVE MESSAGE Aquarium 30 gallon with wooden base and filter, all accessories. $30.00. 815-931-2972 Beagle Puppies – Beautiful, READY TO GO! 3 FeMale, 3 Male, call for info 224-436-1322 Dog Pet Stairs For Dogs up to 60lbs $25. 815-385-0456 GIVE AWAY – Dog Crate 28” x 27” x 43” - Used FREE 815-385-2057

$20/all 815-404-9570

Wooden, new in boxes, $2-$5/ea. Longaberger Baskets $10-$20/ea. Triumph Dinnerware, 1960's, Linda pattern, $1 a piece. 815-690-4258 Pachinko game. Works great. $50.00. 815-931-2972 SALON ORGANIZER Commercial Salon rollabout roller cart, professional service cart for the beauty and spa industries. Excellent condition. $95. 815-477-9023 Serger Sewing Machine White, Speedylock Model SL34D, Used about 5 times, with carry case $75/OBO 847-659-1958

Sewing Machine Singer Stylist ZigZag, model 416 with cabinet, $45. 815-337-7544 Shelving, Metal all sizes all shapes. $400/all 815-739-0886 Stained Glass "Freedom Heart" 11" X 11" $30 815-363-8974 Stained Glass Clock 10" round on stand, flower design $30 815-363-8974 Stained Glass Clock Hot Air Balloon w/puppy in basket 14" tall X 8" wide $30 815-363-8974 Swifter Duster - Sheets Hardwood Floor Duster Sheets selling box off 100+ $20 815-477-7916 Tires – set of 4, size 215 70 R16 Cross contact Continental brand, no defects, only 1800 miles on them $160/set 815-690-5776

TRAIN CARS Lionel Railroader Club, Western Union Telegraph Co, 7 different cars, $350/all. New in box. 847-464-5543

6 year old female Siamese What I expect from my friends is unconditional love, the ability to comfort me when I'm sad and laugh when I'm happy. Adopt Seniors. www.helpingpaws.net

815-338-4400

KITTENS 1 male, 3 female, litter box trained, approx 10 weeks old. FREE to loving family only. 847-658-4467 RHODESIAN RIDGEBACK PUPPIES We have 2 males and 1 female. They are almost ready to go! Call me at 815 955-5738 XXL Corner Dog Beds - Like new, sherpa, washable cover & liner, poly cotton bolster - $50 each. 815-3080-5787 4-6pm

Canon A-1 35mm film Camera Kit Includes Canon A-1 camera body, Canon FD 50mm 1:1.4 lens', Sun Pak auto 422D flash, UV filter, strap, photo bag & manuals $125. Please call 815-363-8974 LUNCH PAIL - Vintage industrial metal lunch pail, metal handle, latches and name label slot. Fantastic photo prop, excellent condition - $25. 815-477-9023

Artificial Christmas Tree w/ lights, 6-1/2' Virginia Spruce, Ornaments & trimming included $100. 847-515-1175 Christmas Lights 1000 Lights – Color & Clear Most in working order – FREE 815-459-2578 Christmas Tree Lights – New 100 lights per string (4) strings $3.00 ea. Or all for $10 815-477-7916 Christmas Village - Beautiful, Hand-Painted, Includes 40 buildings set in an “old town” theme with many trees & accessories – Reduced to $125. Call anytime. 815-494-6472

Christmas Wreath 36”, artificial green with white lights, excellent condition with box, $40. 815-459-4675

WATER GOBLETS

DEPT 56 Dickens Village

Silver plated, service for 8, assorted plated serving pieces, $75/all. 815-444-0557 Weathertech Stone & Bug Shield for 2007-2014 GMC Yukon/Denali Smoke color. $25/OBO. 815-236-1747 McHenry

WINE BARREL COFFEE TABLE

CAN'T GET ENOUGH BEARS NEWS?

Original wine barrel coffee table with distressed top that opens up $375. Call/text 815-451-4822

Get Bears news on Twitter by following @bears_insider

Wooden Pallets, 4 way, used, (9) 48x36 inch, (4) 48x42 inch. $3 each. 847-476-6771

TORO 3650 Snow Blower In Super Condition, 6.5 Hp Single Stage, new paddles & scraper, R-TEC Engine GTS. $350. 815-675-2155

WOODEN NUTCRACKERS

Several Wooden Nutcrackers in various sizes from 6" to 73" high. Just in time for the holidays. $10 - $100 847-987-8632

Wreath 42” Flocked

TORO POWERLITE SNOW BLOWER Single stage, 16" Cut, I have 3 units; 1 Pull start & 2 electric start. Prices starting at $200. Look & work well. 815-675-2155

170 Parabolic Ski Set, Poles, Size 8 Mens Boot (Lange) Excellent Condition - $400 Call 815-236-1355 Crystal Lake Cross Country Skis - 3 pair old but usable adult Telemark cross country skis, 1 pr. Youth Fugi, Includes shoes, poles & skis, $40 cash. 847-669-0411 9a-8p CURL BAR FOR WEIGHTLIFTING 47”long, 1”diameter, knurled hand grips, threaded ends w/ star collars, very good condition $20. See picture online. Email:bpk31257@yahoo.com

Lionel 027 gauge Steam Locomotive Freight Train Set w/ track & transformer $100

815-338-1519 Lionel Santa Holiday Trolley set, 027 guage, like new, $75 815-338-1519 PIRATE CAPTAIN DRESS UP - Size 3-4T, wonderfully crafted costume. Lots of cute details, the works, includes all the gear. New with tags, never worn - $35. 815-477-9023

Power Wheels (2)

Girl's Jeep Barbie Princess, new battery, carries 2-3 toddlers, $100. Boys Power Wheels Jeep, brand new battery, carries 2-3 toddlers, $100. Spring Grove 815-307-9034 Radio Flyer ATW Wagon rubber tires, full padding with cooler & umbrella, mint condition $100. 815-276-2335

VINTAGE RESALE STORE Huge Christmas Sale Tons of Christmas deco Vintage mercury glass, Hallmark and more. Beautiful glassware, art, jewelry, collectibles, nicnacs, vintage posters, & lighting. Antique tin and wood boxes, spindles & more. Vintage cake and cookie plates. 50% off Christmas (not vintage) nic-nacs, glassware, framed art, jewelry 20% off cookie jars and antique stained glass windows. CDs 2/$1.00 DVDs $1.00 (singles) 10 % off anything not on sale. $10.00 store gift card with $50.00 purchase. Discounts cannot be combined. Vintage Resale Store 11017 Woodstock Huntley IL. 60142 Mon- Sat. 10-6 Sun 11-4 Sale 11/29-12/14

Razor RIPSTICK Great Condition! Red or Blue, Fun outdoors - $19 (paid $50) 815-455-6201

HOLIDAY CRAFT SHOW WAUCONDA AMERICAN LEGION

Antique and Modern Guns

515 S. Main St.

Old Lever Actions, Winchesters, Marlins, Savages, etc. Old Pistols and Revolvers. Cash for Collection. FFL License 815-338-4731

847-526-9718 SAT DEC 6 9am-4pm SUN DEC 7 10am-3pm

Wanted - Recumbent Exercise Bike 815-236-3287 8am-9pm

WANTED

Butane Refills for BRAUN Ladies Portable Curling Iron 847-659-9537

* Free Admission Great Food (Benefits Scholarship Fund)

WANTED TO BUY: Vintage or New, working or not. Bicycles, Outboard motors, fishing gear, motorcycles or mopeds, chainsaws, tools etc. Cash on the spot. Cell: 815-322-6383

BARN SALE

CRYSTAL LAKE

FRI, SAT, SUN NOV 28, 29, 30 10AM - 4PM

WOODSTOCK

BULL VALLEY

GOLF CART ~ EZ-GO

Jasmine

Wagon Wheels

Three – Decorative $120. 815-321-1540

Snow Village Ceramic Main Street Hardware Store, $50. 815-690-4258

(2) PERKO Chrome fits ¾ - 1” rails, paid $90, sell $65/both. Condition new. 847-639-4991

with all accessories and shampooer, $399. 815-578-0501

NUTCRACKER COLLECTION

Set of (2) 4' artificial trees in pots with clear lights, heavily weighted $40/set 847-409-8955

Fishing Rod Holders

KIRBY VACUUM CLEANER

Nitrile Gloves disposable. 1 case of 1500 x-lrg. Cost $150 Selling for $65. 815-578-0212

Garland, Light Sets, Ribbon Craft Kit & Items, large centerpiece. Starting @ 25¢ - $25. All items TOP QUALITY! 815-337-0382

Artificial, great condition, $40. 815-444-0557

JIM BEAM bottles

LIL TYKES GIANT STURDY TOYBOX white, blue top, like new $30 847-571-6811

FLOWER CART - Vintage chippy green 3 tier flower cart, bits of white paint peeking though, years of rusty goodness. $85. 815-477-9023

30 + houses, trees, people, lights, accessories. All original packaging, $350. Call Sandi 815-790-8513

Fiber Optic Christmas Tree, 3Ft. Tall. Asking $10 Call: 815-861-1163 Fiber Optic Wreath, 24”. Asking $10 Call: 815-861-1163

Gas, older model, runs great! $875, also have parts. 847-287-0283

Ice Fishing Sled, Otter

2'2” x 4'3” by 10”H, $45. Strong, very good condition. 847-639-4991

NFL Authentic Jersey Number 34 Walter Payton size 50 Original Cost $300 ASKING $150 Brand new w/tags 815-385-2316 SKI EQUIPMENT NORDICA SIZE 11 BOOTS HEXCEL 195 CM SKIS ROSSIGNOL 195 SKIS WITH BINDINGS SET TO BOOTS SCOTT POLES $50 DOLLARS TAKES ALL 847-658-3436 TOBAGGAN - Vintage Toboggan Sled by Adirondack Industries, 94 L x 18 W, very little use, in excellent condition, ready to be enjoyed by the whole family or add to your decor! $275. 815-477-9023

9205 Bull Valley Rd.

FRI, SAT, SUN NOV 28, 29, 30 10AM - 3PM

Christmas Gifts For The

692 PROVIDENCE LN. Off of Terra Cotta

MOVING SALE

HORSE LOVER!

WOODSTOCK NOV. 29TH SAT 9AM – 3PM SUN 9AM – NOON

Furniture, art, jewelry, W/D, tools, storage cabinets

& MUCH MORE! 847-772-7030

2301 SERENITY LN

Need customers?

THE PONDS OF BULL VALLEY Off of McConnell Rd.

We've got them.

A little bit of everything, black loveseat, black sofa table, black/grey corner computer desk/table, lawn furn, black file cab, lots of holiday ! & much more !

TRAMPOLINE ~ MINI

Advertise here for a successful garage sale! Call 815-455-4800

With handlebars, $50/obo. 847-669-1104 12" Disney Princess Bike – Pink, 12" Huffy bike, blue & purple, 20" Huffy bike, purple, Little Tykes playhouse (42w x 36d x 46h) Little Tykes art desk, Little Tykes sandbox. All bikes & art desk $20 each, playhouse $40, sandbox $30. Call 815-385-3475

American Girl Desk for Samantha, Beautiful cherry wood & cast iron style desk, inkwell attached Great Condition! $22. 815-455-6201 American Girl Furniture Kit Kittredge's green trundle bed w/ mattress, Table & 2 chairs, Will sell separately $60 each 815-455-6201 Angelina Ballerina Books & dolls, based on ballerina/gymnastic mouse show 6 books – 3 dolls – house, etc. $30. 815-455-6201 Bachmann Thomas HO Train Set with Thomas the Tank Engine and Annie and Clarabel coaches. Like new. $50. 815-385-4329 Barbie Wireless Video Camera New In Box, Would make a great Christmas present! $60 Call 214-917-1723 See picture in Online Ad

Send your Classified Advertising 24/7 to: Advertise in print and online for one low price. Call your classified advertising representative today!

Email: classified@ shawsuburban.com Fax: 815-477-8898 or online at: www.nwherald.com

877-264-CLAS (2527)

Vehicles & Equipment Auction Saturday, December 6 – 9:00 am

Lake County Fairgrounds 1060 E. Peterson Rd, Grayslake, IL 60030 Cars, Vans, Pickups, Dumps, Flatbed & Box Trucks, Buses, Blazer, 1948 Willys Jeep, 1961 Buick Lesabre, 2000 Arctic Cat 500, Massey Ferguson 1020 4x4 Tractor, Tools, Contractors & Shop Equipment, Many Misc. Items.

www.ObenaufAuctions.com 8% Buyers Fee - 7% Sales Tax

Bitty Baby changing table in good condition. $20 Call 815-344-2513 between 8 AM8 PM.

OBENAUF AUCTION SERVICE, Inc.

Hafner, wind up 027 gauge, Freight Train Set w/Track $50 815-338-1519

847-546-2095

Lionel 027 Gauge Diesel Freight Train Set with track and transformer, $125. 815-338-1519

PUBLIC AUCTION th

Thursday December 4 Unique Products, Inc.

50 W 485 Route 64, Sycamore, Illinois Featuring: Giddings & Lewis Fraser 4” CNC Boring Mill Clausing, Monarch & LeBlond Lathes • Vertical & Horizontal Mills Grinders • Band Saws • Radial Drills • Welders • D & K 12• Press Brake • Ironworker • Shear • Strippit Fabricator • Forklifts • Air Compressors • Inspection Equipment • Large Qty of Tooling • Much More!

Inspection: Wednesday, December 3rd, 9 AM - 4 PM bid live onsite or online at bidspotter.com

Heath Industrial www.heathindustrial.com toll free 855-88-HEATH

Round Lake, IL #444.000105

COMPLETE LIQUIDATION AUCTION ONE OWNER COMPLETE LIQUIDATION - CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT, SNOW EQUIPMENT, TRUCKS, TRAILERS, SUPPORT EQUIPMENT & ATTACHMENTS.

Meridian Industrial Service Corporation

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 17 @ 10:00 AM Address: 2000 Eastwood Drive, Woodstock, IL 60098 EARLY HILITES: TRACKED CONCRETE CRUSHER: 2004 Pegson Premier, 8 HYDRAULIC EXCAVATORS, CRAWLER TRACTOR, 12 HYDRAULIC EXCAVATOR ATTACHMENTS, 2 CRAWLER LOADERS, 5 SKID STEERS, TELESCOPIC FORKLIFT, BOOM LIFT, WELDER, AIR COMPRESSOR, 7 SKID STEER ATTACHMENTS, 18 ABATEMENT SCRUBBERS, 3 STORAGE TRAILERS, FLATBED TRAILER, 3 TAGALONG TRAILERS, TAGALONG TRAILER, PLUS LARGE QUANTITY ASSORTED MECHANICAL TOOLS & EQUIPMENT, LARGE QUANTITY OF ASSORTED SMALL TOOLS & EQUIPMENT. SITE PHONE: (262) 903-6269 IL LIC. # 441001125 Jack Lyon In Conjunction with: PPL Auction www.pplgroupllc.com ALEX LYON & SON SALES MANAGERS & AUCTIONEERS, INC., BRIDGEPORT, NY Phone: (315) 633-2944 www.lyonauction.com


11â&#x20AC;˘30, 2014

TURKEY TROT

A daring escape muddles Thanksgiving plans

PlanitNorthwest.com

GUIDING LIGHTS LED, RGB or laser lights? New technology gives holiday decorators plenty of options PLUS: Decorating trends for every home AND: Find where in McHenry County to cut down your own Christmas tree

HOLIDAY CRAFT FAIRS HAVE YOU COVERED FOR HOLIDAY SHOPPING AND DECORATING


Great escape foils Thanksgiving

PlanitNorthwest.com • Sunday, November 30, 2014

| PlanIt Style |

2

By GOSIA WOZNIACKA The Associated Press PlanIt Style is published each Sunday by Shaw Media, P.O. Box 250, Crystal Lake, IL 60039-0250. Periodicals and postage paid at Crystal Lake, IL 60014.

FEATURES EDITOR Valerie Katzenstein 815-526-4529 vkatzenstein@shawmedia.com

NORTHWEST HERALD EDITOR Jason Schaumburg 815-526-4414 jschaumburg@shawmedia.com

ADVERTISE 815-459-4040

NORTHWEST HERALD NEWSROOM

815-459-4122 lifestyle@nwherald.com

CELEBRATIONS Births, engagements, weddings and anniversaries are printed every Sunday in the Planit Style section in the Northwest Herald. Engagement announcements must be received no later than three weeks before the wedding date. Wedding announcements are accepted up to six months after the wedding date. We will accept one color photo for weddings and engagements. We will accept two color photos – wedding and current – for anniversaries. Photos not accompanied with a self-addressed, stamped envelope will not be returned. They may be picked up at the Crystal Lake office after publication. To complete a form online, visit NWHerald.com/forms or email celebrations@nwherald. com. Call 877-264-2527 for information.

ON THE COVER LED Christmas lights are one of the many options available to decorators who like a little extra twinkle this year. Photo provided

PORTLAND, Ore. – Two Sundays before Thanksgiving, my farming partner and I brought a live turkey in a burlap sack to our urban farm on the outskirts of Portland. The lanky brown-feathered bird quietly took her place in our chicken coop. The turkey was intended to become Thanksgiving dinner, but she had other plans. It was unusually cold, and in our haste we forgot to clip the turkey’s feathers. So one day last week, Turkey escaped the coop and flew above our suburban street to the top of a tree in the neighbor’s backyard. Our attempts to shoo her from the branches could not convince Turkey to come down. My partner and I have raised chickens, goats and ducks in Portland for the past five years. We keep animals because we love interacting with them, eggs and milk being added benefits. Occasionally we’ve made chicken soup out of a rooster, but we rarely eat our flock. Still, I’d much rather eat a happy turkey that lived its life out on a small farm than a frozen industrial turkey deprived of space and sunlight. So the next day, we dragged a ladder to the tree and my partner Ali clambered up, but as soon as she got near the turkey, the beast clucked in alarm and soared off. We stood awed by the height and distance of its flight – Turkey alighted on top of a very tall pine, which we couldn’t possibly climb. There she remained, despite the wind, cold and our pleas. The escape was collectively funny, sad, and mildly embarrassing. It wasn’t a complete surprise: we’ve had our share of breakouts with goats and chickens. Still, the bird’s yearning for survival gnawed at us. We faced a moral dilemma: If Turkey stayed in the tree, it could die of cold and starvation or be captured by a cat or raccoon. But if we rescued the bird, we would eat her within a week. Which was more humane? Standing under that tree and cajoling Turkey to descend, I felt like the fox in Aesop’s Fable waiting for the cheese to fall. There was a more practical question, too: How do you get a turkey out of a tree? Call the firefighters? Animal control? Put up posters and offer a bounty? Paging Portlandia! Our lives had inadvertently turned into an episode of

AP photo

A turkey brought home by Associated Press reporter Gosia Wozniacka stands in its coop at Wozniacka’s home in Portland, Ore. Wozniacka had brought the live turkey in a burlap sack to her urban farm on the outskirts of Portland. Although intended to be Thanksgiving dinner, the turkey had other plans. the TV show that pokes fun at Portland, including its unbound penchant for urban farming. Friends suggested gobbling loudly, spreading turkey snacks under the tree, spraying the bird with a hose or (gulp) finding a hunter to shoot her down. One recommended buying a turkey caller at a hunting store. Another told us turkeys have a keen sense of smell, so a turkey decoy might be our only chance. Many friends pleaded that Turkey had earned her freedom. Others supported talking her down sweetly, then eating her. Still others told us to “let the spirit of Thanksgiving decide.” Three days after the bird first escaped, I went to do a welfare check on Turkey, only to find her gone. I inspected all area pines, played turkey calls on my cellphone – to no avail. We figured that was the end of it. Turkey had flown away looking for food, or had joined a wild flock escaping Thanksgiving madness. But that afternoon, a neighbor called – Turkey had been spotted in her front lawn, doing what turkeys do, pecking. Ali reached home when it was already dark. Flashlight in hand, she spent half an hour searching our oneacre animal pasture before suddenly

seeing Turkey perched on the fence a few feet away. The bird was asleep, but woke up, startled by the flashlight’s beam. Ali turned off the light and backed away. She crouched close to the ground and sat in silence, immobile, before inching her way toward Turkey and clucking. Ali’s clucks visibly calmed the bird. Then snap, she reached her hand up and grabbed the turkey’s leg. The bird flapped and tried to fly away, but Ali didn’t let go. She clipped her wings, and put her back in the chicken coop. That evening, we decided that given Turkey’s travails, we couldn’t possibly eat her. We decided to pardon her and keep her on our farm. I called the grocery store to order a frozen turkey for Thanksgiving. Despite what we saw as a happy ending, Turkey seemed distressed. She sulked around the coop, refusing to eat or drink. She didn’t mix with the other animals. Maybe she didn’t understand her life had been spared. Then we figured she might just be lonely. So we made the trek to another farm and bought a turkey tom for our girl. This time, we clipped his wings right away.

FOLLOW ON FACEBOOK Visit Facebook.com/PlanitNorthwest for updates on events in the area and the latest deals in McHenry County from Planit Save.


To donate

Early warning signs LITH woman folds nonprofit before tests reveal lupus diagnosis By SARAH STRZALKA editorial@nwherald.com LAKE IN THE HILLS – The tests were negative, but Julianne Taylor’s body was still telling her something was wrong. In 2002, Taylor started the nonprofit Working Class Dogs, training service dogs for children and adults with disabilities in what she called “the best job in the world.” She brought the dogs to Johnsburg High School and worked with at-risk kids. Seven years later, the economy was taking its toll, as was the exhaustion. “I stopped because of the economy, but also I was exhausted,” said Taylor, 43. “I assumed it was because I was working so much. Twelve- to 14-hour days, seven days a week. Now I’m looking back

saying maybe that was some of the early signs and symptoms.” She finished placing the dogs she had trained and then shut down Working Class Dogs. The following year, 2010, is when she became very sick. Still, it wasn’t until this past spring that the tests came back positive for systemic lupus erythematosus. According to the Lupus Foundation of America, lupus is a chronic autoimmune disease that can damage any part of the body including skin, joints and organs. The immune system cannot tell the difference between healthy tissues and “invaders” such as viruses, bacteria and germs, and begins to attack the healthy tissues.

See LUPUS, page 4

Jesse Taylor (left), 14, is picked up from school by his mother, Julianne Taylor, at Westfield School in Lake in the Hills. Julianne has lupus and formerly ran Working Class Dogs, which trained service dogs for adults and children with disabilities. When the economy went downhill and she became more symptomatic, she had to fold the nonprofit. Sarah Nader – snader@ shawmedia.com

3 | PlanIt Style | Sunday, November 30, 2014 • PlanitNorthwest.com

Julianne Taylor suffers from lupus, an autoimmune disease that causes the body to attack healthy tissues. A friend has set up a Go Fund Me page for donations at www.gofundme. com/juliannesmission.


PlanitNorthwest.com • Sunday, November 30, 2014

| PlanIt Style |

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“I think it’s really important that people become aware of what lupus is because we need funding. No, it’s not cancer, but it’s horrible.” Julianne Taylor of Lake in the Hills, who was diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus

Taylor’s goals: limit flare-ups, remission • LUPUS Continued from page 3 There is no cure, only treatment. While lupus can be fatal, 80 to 90 percent of people with it can expect to live a normal life span, according to the Lupus Foundation. “I think it’s really important that people become aware of what lupus is because we need funding,” Taylor said. “No, it’s not cancer, but it’s horrible.” For Taylor, the lupus has affected multiple parts of her body, including her hands, hips and ankles. The nerverich sacroiliac joint in her tailbone sometimes becomes inflamed, making it difficult to sit. Narcotics for the pain often dull her cognitive function. There also was debilitating exhaustion to the point where it was difficult to even shower, making her reliant on friends to do her grocery shopping. Until recently, she had been living in Lake in

the Hills; she’s temporarily staying with a friend in Beach Park. Taylor, a single mom, has two children: a daughter who lives on her own and a 14-year-old son. One of the hardest aspects of dealing with a chronic illness is not being able to do everything she wants to do for him. “I feel horrible because … sometimes some burden falls to him,” she said. “I can’t take him to a lot of things and I can’t be a soccer mom. As a mother, you want to give your kids everything they want and I just can’t do that for him.” With some new medication, Taylor has seen the pain decrease. Her goal is to limit flare-ups and go into remission. “I have a certain limited amount of energy,” she said. “I’m trying to push against what my limits are to get stronger, but not so much that I end up relapsing and am in bed for two days. I’m not done yet.”


5 | PlanIt Style | Sunday, November 30, 2014 • PlanitNorthwest.com

Photo provided

Lighting is used to create atmosphere of warmth and charm evocative of the holiday season by Restoration Hardware.

Holiday decor trends go from vintage to city chic By KIM COOK The Associated Press For those who love to decorate, there’s no time like the holidays for adding fun, festive touches to our living spaces. This year, there’s something for many tastes and styles. A look at the trends you’ll see at stores:

Christmas past The 1920s inspire a lot of holiday decor, with West Elm offering glittery Art Deco letter ornaments and star garlands, as well as Deco-patterned, mercury-glass hurricanes in silver and midnight blue. Elegant, gold, blown-glass animals fit the vibe. Throw pillows and signs printed with a vintage-style chalkboard Christmas greeting hold charm at Pottery Barn, where the design also is available in a door mat. Here too, a decorative collection of old-fashioned village homes, churches and schoolhouses evokes turn-of-the-century German ornaments similarly made of cardboard and silver glitter. Purchases from the collection support shelters nationwide through the Give a Little Hope organization. For a more midcentury look, consider Crate & Barrel’s teardrop ornaments in a

sexy, red matte glass. If you’re into making some of your own midcentury modern Christmas decorations, check out the DIY Network’s website for suggestions including stockings and ornaments.

City sparkle “This year I’m seeing deep, rich hues,” designer Taniya Nayak said. “Think sapphire, deep emerald and sexy violet. The real wow factor rolls in with the metallic touches. There is a cool juxtaposition that happens when you mix the sophisticated richness of jewel tones and the medley of copper patina and copper shine.” Pier 1’s peacock-inspired tree skirt anchors a collection of vibrant ornaments in faceted glass, sequins or feathers. There are accent pillows on the market this year decorated with glitter, bugle beads, sequins or metallic embroidery thread. Look for snowflake or tree motifs, or seasonal words like “Noel” and “Joy.” One or two on an entryway bench greet guests with panache; Target and Homegoods have nicely priced options. Z Gallerie has the glamorous Folly collection of white and gold pearl wreaths, table trees and garlands, as well as crystal flower spheres and ornaments in trendy turquoise.

Find more ideas at PlanitNorthwest.com

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Clark Griswold would be proud. Thanks to advances in lighting technology, suburban dads (and moms) across the country have a lot to choose from when it comes to creative ways to deck their halls for the holidays this year. Forget about white incandescent lights and animatronic reindeer. Think lasers. Think smartphones. And hundreds, if not millions, of color choices.

7

BEYOND THE LIGHTS

RGB lights

Lights fantastic

The latest tech in Christmas twinkle includes lasers, smartphones and millions of color choices

TREE TIME Local Christmas tree farms in McHenry County.

ANTHONY’S TREE FARM – 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekends through Dec. 20, 3200 Raycraft Road, Woodstock, 815-3387354 or www.anthonystreefarm.com.

BEN’S CHRISTMAS TREE FARM – 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Fridays, Saturdays & Sundays through Dec. 21, 7719 Ryan Road, Harvard, 630-279-0216 or www.benstreefarm. com.

BILL’S FRIENDLY EVERGREEN TREE FARM – 8 a.m. to dusk weekends through Dec. 21, 3102 Miller Road, McHenry, 847-5259809 or billsfriendlyevergreentreefarm. weebly.com.

CAL AND SHAN’S CHRISTMAS TREE FARM – 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 30 & Dec. 6-7, 2819 Raycraft Road, Woodstock, 815-5091026; or 14216 Thayer Road, Woodstock, 815-648-2300 or www. calandshans.com.

GRANDPA’S CHRISTMAS TREE FARM – 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. weekends through Dec. 14, 13616 Route 176, Woodstock, 815-337-2682 or www.grandpastreefarm. com.

Single light bulbs that hold three LEDs – red, green and blue – are the secret behind a new category of holiday lights that offer up to 16 million color combinations. Known as RGB lights, they can be dialed up or down in a variety of ways via a smartphone app. And because their color range is so varied, they can be kept up year-round and used for any number of holidays – Halloween, the Fourth of July, Easter, you name it. Lumenplay offers the most colors by far at more than 16 million. The exotic lighting system doesn’t come cheap ($79.99 for a starter pack) and is only available in 10foot strands. But you can string as many as 500 lights together on one controller, which comes with the starter pack. GE also offers RGB lighting technology with its new iTwinkle light sets and pre-lit Christmas trees, while Texas-based decorating firm Christmas Décor is offering the lights as an option for holiday customers this year.

‘Smart’ lights All the talk of RGB technology leads right into the next holiday lighting trend this year – “smart” lights or lighting systems controlled by your smartphone. Both the Lumenplay and iTwinkle systems are operated via apps available for Apple and Android phones. With just a swipe of your screen, you can dim or brighten outdoor lights, set them to music or choose new colors and patterns. With iTwinkle, you can even record a greeting to play, like “Happy Holidays” or “Merry Christmas,” spokeswoman Amanda Hayes says. Most of these apps have a range of up to 150 feet, meaning you can control the action from across the yard or while plopped on your couch watching “It’s A Wonderful Life” (or the Griswolds in “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation”) for the 10th time. “No longer do you have to venture

GRIZZY’S TREE FARM – 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekends through Dec. 14, 15900 Marengo Road, Union, 847-8122961.

M & M CHRISTMAS TREE FARM – 9 a.m. to dusk weekends through Dec. 14, 11715 Brier Hill Road, Huntley, 847-2758720.

Trends in tree ornaments at national retailers vary from the glitzy to the campy.

Photos provided

Battery-powered lights by Lights.com have been around a while, but was mostly limited to smaller, incandescent light strands you’d put in your window box or a small porch display. Now they come in LED strands up to 30 feet long with batteries that are much more powerful and longer-lasting. outside to plug in your lights,” says Dave Geraci with Ohio-based Technical Consumer Products. TCP recently unveiled a smart home lighting system known as Connected by TCP, which links to a home’s Wi-Fi or mobile network and is controlled via smartphone, computer or a special remote.

Atlanta-based Pinnacle Lighting Group. “For people who live in the northern part of the country, it’s extremely helpful when you have to take them down and it’s zero degrees outside,” he says. “Instead of taking a string of lights down in January, just unplug the fixture and put it in a box and you’re done.”

Projected laser lights

Battery-powered lights

Using small spotlights, this technology projects thousands of tiny pinpoints of red, green or red and green lights onto your home or any other hard surface. California-based BlissLights offers them for $179 or $199 each, depending on whether the lights are in motion. To a passerby, “at first glance, they look like traditional holiday rope lights, but actually they float freely across the house’s exterior, plants and more to create a display that neighbors will think took hours to design and hang,” BlissLights spokeswoman Natalia Barclay says. There are no cords or wires involved with the laser lights, says Nick Burks of

This technology has been around a while but was mostly limited to smaller, incandescent light strands that you’d put in a window box or small porch display. Now they come in LED strands up to 30 feet long with batteries that are much more powerful and longer-lasting. Many feature auto-timers and buttons that control blinking and other patterns. At online retailer Lights.com, you can connect up to six strands of batterypowered lights for a total of 600 LED lights on one battery pack, spokeswoman Aimee Majoros says. You know what that means? 180 feet of energy-saving holiday sparkle.

MT. THABOR TREE FARM – 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekends through Dec. 14, 4813 Mt. Thabor Road, Woodstock, 815861-9211.

ONEY’S TREE FARM – 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily through Dec. 14, 16608 Route 14, Woodstock, 815-338-4108 or www. oneystreefarm.com.

PINE-APPLE FARM – 9 a.m. to dusk Saturdays and 11 a.m. to dusk Sundays through Dec. 21, 309 Three Oaks Road, Cary, 847-639-3248 or www.pine-applefarm. com.

PIONEER TREE FARM – 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekends through Dec. 21, 4614 Pioneer Road, McHenry, 815-385-8512 or www.pioneertreefarm.com.

The rustic, cabin-y look that took off last year has held strong. At West Elm, Boston designer Mimi Kirchner’s felt foxes (right), deer, raccoons and bears sport jaunty scarves and plaid coats.

A peacock sequin ornamental ball from Pier 1 Imports brings in the holiday colors with a touch of global exoticism. Blue, green and turquoise continue to find favor with many home decorators for the holidays. Glittery stars and garlands from West Elm bring a touch of magic to both rustic and contemporary decor. The look also is found at Ikea, Pottery Barn and Crate & Barrel. Photos provided

RICHARDSON FARM – 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily through Dec. 23, 9407 Richardson Road, Spring Grove, 815-675-9729 or www.richardsonadventurefarm.com.

TAMARACK FARMS – 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday through Sunday through Dec. 22, 6129 W. Broadway, Richmond, 815-678-3500.

| PlanIt Style | Sunday, November 30, 2014 • PlanitNorthwest.com

PlanitNorthwest.com • Sunday, November 30, 2014

6 | PlanIt Style |

By SARAH WOLFE The Associated Press


PlanitNorthwest.com • Sunday, November 30, 2014

| PlanIt Style |

8

DearAbby

Questions? Visit dearabby.com

Jeanne Phillips

Recovering addict must fight battle without family Dear Abby: I am a former drama queen and addict now enjoying longterm sobriety, or trying to. What’s missing in my life is my family. Since returning from rehab, I have been “going it alone” – and I’m not sure why. My kids are the only grandchildren in the family. I work and go to school. I am pleasant. There have been some rough spots I have had to deal with, and when I have needed to, I have called my mom or sister, but they don’t call me or visit. They have expressed no love for me through all of this. When I call, I feel like I’m intruding. Aren’t I entitled to their love and caring? I feel abandoned. It’s hard doing things on my own. My family lives close by, so distance isn’t the issue. What am I missing? I want my kids and me to have a family, but when I try to reach out,

I end up hurt by their lack of interest. Should I just get on with my life? I have been going through this for years. – Moving On In Florida Dear Moving On: It’s possible that the “drama” and turmoil you put your family through while in the throes of your addiction is the reason your mother and sister avoid you. They may be reluctant to take a chance again. Because they have made it plain that they aren’t interested in a closer relationship with you and your children, you should absolutely get on with your life. Sobriety isn’t easy to attain, and you have every right to enjoy yours to the fullest. It would be healthier for you to stop courting rejection and “create” a caring family for yourself and your children. Many people do this for a variety of reasons. It’s not unusual for people in recovery to socialize with

others like themselves. Start there, because it would be better for all of you to spend your time with people who welcome and appreciate you. Dear Abby: My fiancé, “Bryan,” is a mama’s boy. There’s nothing wrong with loving your parents and being close to them, but his family takes it to the extreme. Bryan must see them multiple times a week, call and text them all the time, and they still don’t get enough. Then they usually call wanting something or needing our help. Bryan and I have worked hard to get where we are, and we can’t always be at their beck and call. His sister says I have “changed him” because he doesn’t come around as often anymore. I’m 21 and Bryan is 24. I don’t think he realizes that growing up means leaving the nest and detaching from the family a bit. I understand

closeness, but if I’m going to be his wife, I’m scared I won’t come first. What happens if we have a child who needs him, but Bryan has to bail his mama out of something? – Getting

Worried In Georgia Dear Getting Worried: Do not wait until you have a child to find out that the two of you will never agree on this. Find out now. Sometimes the most important conversations are the most difficult to engage in. You and Bryan need to have a serious talk about how you feel about his relationship with his parents and sister, because unless you come to a mutual understanding, it will become a source of constant irritation after you two are married, and you will both be unhappy.

• Write Dear Abby at www. dearabby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

StraightTalk Rick Atwater

Questions? Visit northwestcommunitycounseling.com

Happiness found through gratitude and giving I have noticed that people who have the most are not usually the people who are the most grateful, and grateful seems to translate roughly to happiness. Maybe you have to lose some things in life to be able to appreciate more fully what you have. Maybe if you don’t have much to begin with, you don’t have big expectations and don’t start with an entitled attitude. Nevertheless, my observation is that a grateful attitude and a grateful heart seems to make for a happy life. “James” never had much as a kid but always felt the need to prove himself, pushing to go beyond what his parents had accomplished. His parents were simple,

humble people who worked hard and did what they could for the children. James, they said, could never have enough. He always wanted more, and when he got it, he wanted even more. He stepped into a sales position in his early 20s and was a rising star. He soon had everything a young man could want, but oddly, he felt lonely and empty. He couldn’t help secretly feeling like a fraud and like he didn’t really deserve what he had. He didn’t know he was propping up his low self-esteem by feeding his over-inflated ego. This is where the booze and drugs came in. The more he accomplished, the more he wanted – possessions, power, sex

and substances. The more he accumulated, the more fearful he became of losing what he had. James became more isolated, afraid that people only wanted his money or were trying to steal his prestige. The more he felt these things, the more he drank and used drugs, until his decision-making began to become affected and his business career began to collapse. James went from his idea of “the top” and ended up at the bottom. With few friends, living on nearly maxed out credit cards and driving fancy leased vehicles whose payments were overdue, he was having a harder and harder time keeping up the façade. He would tell people about the “next big deal,”

even though there was no such thing in sight. His money, what little of it there was, was going to bottles and bags instead of the expensive nightclubs whose owners used to know him by his first name. At age 33, living in a downtown YMCA, James reached out for help. He called the number for Alcoholics Anonymous, and they sent a couple of men out to visit. They told him about their struggles and losses and invited him to a meeting. He went. The rest, as they say, is history. James had virtually nothing, but he found peace, something he’d never had. He found relief that he didn’t need to prove himself to anybody and that he could just

be a worker among workers. He found happiness in helping himself, getting honest and “right-sized,” and then began helping others. The phrase he heard was, “don’t think less of yourself, just think of yourself less.” Through sobriety, James found peace and a sense of belonging. He learned that happiness, for him, wasn’t through material accumulation but through gratitude and giving.

• Rick Atwater is a licensed clinical professional counselor. He hosts the weekly radio show “Straight Stuff on Addictions” at recoveryinternetradio.com. He can reached by email at rickatwater@northwestcommunitycounseling.com.


HOME & GARDEN EVENTS advance, $12 at the door. Tickets available at Chapel Hill Florists and Lockers Flowers of McHenry, Countryside Flower Shop and The Twisted Stem Floral of Crystal Lake and Renee’s of Ridgefield. Refreshments available. Doors open 6:30 p.m. Proceeds benefit scholarships, educational programs, beautification and

community service. Information: 815-385-3369 or www.mchenrygardenclub.com. HOLIDAY-THEMED CRAFT CLASSES, McHenry County College, 8900 Route 14, Crystal Lake. Schedule: 6 to 9 p.m. Dec. 3, Christmas Themed Artist Trading Cards ($24, course ID: NFAS12012); 6 to 9 p.m. Dec. 10,

main lobby reception area, 4201 Medical Center Drive, McHenry. Sponsored by the Centegra Health System Auxiliary. A large selection of books and gifts for all ages will be available. Proceeds support the patients and families of the Centegra Health System. Information: 815-363-1354. HOLIDAY BOOK SALE, Dec. 5-7, Huntley Area Public Library District, 11000 Ruth Road, Huntley. Hosted by the Huntley Area Public Library Friends Foundation. Schedule: 5 to 8 p.m. Dec. 5; 9:15 a.m. to 1 p.m. Dec. 6; and 12:30 to 4 p.m. Dec. 7 ($5 a bag sale day). Information: 847-669-5386 or www.huntleylibrary.org. HOLIDAY BOOK REVIEW, ninth annual, 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m. Dec. 5, D’Andrea Banquets, 4419 Route 14, Crystal Lake. Fundraiser to benefit Pioneer Center for Human Services featuring a 12:30 p.m. luncheon and 6:45 p.m. dinner and book review. Afternoon event features Barbara

Rinella, book dramatist, presenting “Finding the Dragon Lady: The Mystery of Vietnam’s Madame Nhu;” and evening features Jenny Riddle as she presents “Audition: A Memoir,” a glimpse into Barbara Walters’ life. Both events include gift basket raffles, grand raffle, a used book “adoption” and entertainment. Tickets: $50 each event. Raffle tickets: $10 each or six for $50. Tickets and information: 815-759-7144 or www.holidaybookreview.org. MARK ROTHMAN: AUTHOR PRESENTATION & BOOK SIGNING, 6 to 8 p.m. Dec. 11, Huntley Area Public Library District, 11000 Ruth Road, Huntley. Television sitcom writer Mark Rothman will read from his book, “Mark Rothman’s Essays,” and talk about his experiences as a writer for several iconic shows. Free, but tickets required for entry. Tickets and information: 847-669-5386 or www.huntleylibrary.org.

Mixed Media Christmas Collage Ornament ($24, course ID: NCFS04012). Registration and information: 815-455-8588. “WOODY PLANTS II: TREE & SHRUB IDENTIFICATION IN WINTER,” 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dec. 6, Lost Valley Visitor Center in Glacial Park, Route 31 and Harts Road, Ringwood. Part of McHenry

County Conservation District’s People and Nature Programs. Designed for adults and interested students age 14 and older to learn how to identify trees and shrubs by their twigs and bark. Cost: $40 county residents, $45 nonresidents. Register by Dec. 2 online at www.mccdistrict.org. Information: 815-338-6223.

BOOK EVENTS To have an event listed in this calendar, fill out the form at PlanitNorthwest.com/forms, email calendars@nwherald.com or mail the information along with a contact name and phone number to Calendar Listing, the Northwest Herald, P.O. Box 250, Crystal Lake, IL 60039-0250. DEFENDERS’ USED BOOK SALE, through Dec. 11, Woodstock Square Mall lobby, 110 S. Johnson St., Woodstock. Sponsored by the Environmental Defenders of McHenry County. Hardcover books $1 each, 50 cents for paperbacks, 25 cents for children’s books. Dec. 9-11 all books $5 a paper grocery bag. Schedule: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, closed Sunday. Through Dec. 11. Information: 815-338-0393 or www.mcdef.org. BOOKS ARE FUN BOOK FAIR, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Dec. 3-5, Centegra Hospital – McHenry

Norma Grace Periman Bingham Mathews 80 years old on December 5th Send cards to: 6318 2nd Ave. Lake Geneva, WI 53147 Love you, BELWK adno=0299538

Thank You

Gem Talk

®

By Karly Bulinski

Every year, while our family is sitting around the Thanksgiving dinner table, each person gets a chance to tell what it is that they are thankful for. In addition to fantastic topics of conversation, we get a chance to let it be known how truly grateful we are to those that we love. Over the years, our Thanksgiving dinner table has shrunk, with all the grandchildren growing up and moving away or having to split their time equally between their in-laws and us. That’s why I would like to dedicate this Gem Talk to the two amazing women that I am thankful for this year…my Mom and my Aunt Sue. First my mom, with whom without I would never have become the person that I am today! My mom has supported me through every crazy dream that I have ever gotten, and if you know me even a little bit, you know there have been some pretty crazy ones. I mean just a few weeks ago I had decided I wanted to go to law school and instead of laughing at me she said, “Go for it…I always thought you’d be a good lawyer.” She has been my biggest fan throughout my entire life; from the years of tumbling meets to college to watching me raise my own 2 kids she has been there for me since day one. I am truly blessed to have the love and support of this wonderful woman…Thank you mom for raising me and continuing to support me every day of my life! I love you! I am also thankful for the other amazingly strong and influential woman in my life…my Aunt Sue. Without her guidance in my life, I would never have become a Gemologist. She offered me a job at our family store 3 years ago and sent me to the GIA so I could learn about the wonderful world of gemology. She believed in my ability to learn a new field and with her support I became a jewelry appraiser. I am continually learning new things from her every day and for that I am eternally grateful. Thank you for all the opportunities that you have opened up for me! I love you! I don’t know what my future holds, but I know that it is bright because of these two remarkable women that I am proud to call my role models! I love you both very much. Happy Thanksgiving everyone…now let’s bring on Christmas.

Karly Bulinski Graduate Gemologist Email jewelry questions to: suzanne@steffansjewelers.com or karly@steffansjewelers.com

Karly Bulinski, Gemologist Email jewelry questions to: suzanne@steffansjewelers.com or karly@steffansjewelers.com

WWW.STEFFANSJEWELERS.COM

Located in the Fountain Shoppes - 325 N. Front St., (Rt. 31) McHenry • 815/385-6070 • Hours: M, T, W, F: 10-6 TH: 10-7, SAT: 9-3, SUN: Closed

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Men’s Night Party - December 18th 4-8pm. Enter to WIN a pair of Blackhawks Tickets or a Free Weekend Harley Davidson Rental! Plus the McHenry Brewery will be here sampling their awesome brews. See our website for all the details.

9 | PlanIt Style | Sunday, November 30, 2014 • PlanitNorthwest.com

HOLIDAY FLORAL SHOW, 7 p.m. Dec. 2, McHenry West High School, 4724 W. Crystal Lake Road, McHenry. Presented by the McHenry Garden Club. Live and on-stage floral arrangers from local florists will prepare arrangements which will be given through drawings to audience members to take home. Tickets: $10 in


CRAFT SHOWS The following is a list of craft bazaars, fairs and shows scheduled to take place in the area.

McHenry County KRIS KRINGLE DAYS, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Nov. 30, The Shops of Ridgefield, 8509 Ridgefield Road off Route 14, between Crystal Lake and Woodstock. The mood is festive in the quaint village of shops filled with affordable antiques, vintage, architectural, primitives, florals, custom framing and fine arts. Information: 815-459-4220, 815-477-4601 or www.theshopsofridgefield.com. ANNUAL CRAFT & VENDOR FAIR, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dec. 3, Senior Services Associates, 3519 N. Richmond Road, McHenry. A variety of crafts will be available including seasonal decor, jewelry, greeting cards, gift baskets and more. Pampered Chef, Tastefully Simple, Scentsy, Mary Kay Cosmetics and other vendors will be represented. Information: 815344-3555. CRAFT SHOW & PANCAKE BREAKFAST, 8 to 11 a.m. Dec. 6, Canterbury Elementary School, 875 Canterbury Drive, Crystal Lake. Craft show with more than 20 vendors and a pancake breakfast. Cost: $6 pancake breakfast. Free admission to craft show. Children can bring a canned good for the Crystal Lake food pantry for a take home craft. Information: 815-4598180 or 847-815-7296. GINGERBREAD HOUSE COOKIE WALK & CRAFT FAIR, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dec. 6, First United Methodist Church, 201 W. South St., Woodstock. Offers a variety of crafts as well as cookies by the pound for a one-stop shopping experience. Information: 815-338-3310 or www. fumcwoodstock.org. NATIVITY LUTHERAN CHURCH CHRISTMAS BAZAAR, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dec. 6, Nativity Lutheran Church, 3506 E. Wonder Lake Road, Wonder Lake. There will be vendor craft tables, silent auction, face painting, raffles, cookie walk, refreshments and Mrs. Claus in attendance. A portion of the proceeds will benefit Turning Point, PADS and the Wonder Lake Neighbors Food Pantry. Informa-

tion: 815-653-3832. PANCAKE BREAKFAST & CRAFT SHOW, 7 a.m. to noon Dec. 6, Bethany Lutheran Church, 76 W. Crystal Lake Ave., Crystal Lake. Hosted by Boy Scout Troop 347. Cost: $8 adults, $5 children age 10 and younger. There will also be a camping and sports equipment resale. Information: www.t347.net. ST. JOHN’S CRAFT FAIR, 27th annual, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dec. 6, St. John’s Lutheran School Activity Center, 300 Jefferson St., Algonquin. Hosted by St. John’s Parent Teacher League. Featuring arts and crafts, door prizes and lunch. Homemade soup, chili and salad bar from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Hot cinnamon rolls and coffee. Free admission. Information: 815-8542304. ANNUAL CHRISTMAS CRAFT FAIR & COOKIE WALK, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dec. 13, St. John’s Lutheran Church, 401 St. John’s Road, Woodstock. Crafters will be offering a variety of items. There also will be holiday cookies and candies available to choose from. Information: 815-482-4686. 2014 HOLIDAY FAIRE “HOMEMADE FOR THE HOLIDAYS,” first, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dec. 13 and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dec. 14, McHenry County Fairgrounds, 11900 Country Club Road, Woodstock. Featuring 30 craft booths with homemade items, Home Arts Department demonstrations, children’s Craft Corner, performances by the Madrigals, storytelling hayride, meet and greet with Santa Claus and more. Hosted by the McHenry County Fair Association. Admission: $2 a person or one nonperishable food item for donation to local food pantries. Information: 815-338-5315 or www.mchenrycountyfair.com.

Regional ANNUAL COOKIE & CRAFT SALE, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Dec. 6, St. John’s United Church of Christ, 1520 McAree Road, Waukegan. Offering a variety of homemade cookies and sweets sold by the pound. Breads and other goodies as well as unique crafts will also be available. Information: 847-662-6151 or www.stjohnsuccwaukegan.org.

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FOOD EVENT HOLIDAY COOKING CLASS, 7 to 9 p.m. Dec. 5, McHenry County College, 8900 Route 14, Crystal Lake. Holiday Gingerbread House class offered by the McHenry

County College Continuing Education Department. Cost: $25, course ID: NCUS80005. Registration and information: 815-4558588.

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QUICKCRITIC

11

MINI-REVIEWS & LOCAL SHOWTIMES OF CURRENT MOVIES ON SCREEN NOW

“HORRIBLE BOSSES 2” STARRING: Jason Bateman, Jason Sudeikis, Charlie Day PLOT: Dale, Kurt and Nick decide to start their own business, but things don’t go as planned because of a slick investor, prompting the trio to pull off a harebrained and misguided kidnapping scheme. RATED: R for strong crude sexual content and language throughout TIME: 1 hour, 48 minutes VERDICT: Having haplessly tried to murder their bosses in the first “Horrible Bosses,” Jason Bateman, Charlie Day and Jason Sudeikis return in “Horrible Bosses 2” as hopeful inventors. “Let’s bet on ourselves,” they tell each other, making a clearly questionable wager. They go into business with a bath product dubbed “Shower Buddy,” and with their abysmal guest spot on a morning show promoting it, it’s clear they may have backed the wrong horse. While the first “Horrible Bosses” tried to tap into the widely held fantasy of killing the overlords of the office, its sequel mines the farce in being your own boss. The entrepreneurial efforts of the film’s ever-yammering trio, of course, fail, and the film descends into a thinly sketched kidnapping plot that serves mainly to space its celebrity cameos. “Horrible Bosses 2,” directed and co-written by Sean Anders, is built on its hydra-headed leads who appear almost tethered together, crowding the frame like the Three Stooges. Bateman, Day and Sudeikis are each talented comic actors who have their riffing rhythm down, skillfully weaving and overlapping their idiotic antics. But this gratuitous sequel fails most because their triangle offense, while smooth, isn’t dynamic enough. So “Horrible Bosses 2” goes for whatever cheap, vulgar gags it can collide into. Most unfortunate is the sex-crazed debasement of Aniston, who lights up the movie but suffers some of its lowest jokes. Really, it’s an altogether likable cast, all of whom appear quite game despite the lacking material. That the film skitters aimlessly away from the office is a wasted opportunity, too, since today’s workplaces could use the levity. Someone should have given “Horrible Bosses” a real job.

– The Associated Press

“THE PENGUINS OF MADAGASCAR”

LOCAL SHOWTIMES STARRING: Tom McGrath, Chris

“BEYOND THE LIGHTS”

“HORRIBLE BOSSES 2”

“NIGHTCRAWLER”

Miller, Christopher Knights PLOT: Skipper, Kowalski, Rico and Private join forces with undercover organization The North Wind to stop the villainous Dr. Octavius Brine from destroying the world as we know it. RATED: PG for mild action and some rude humor TIME: 1 hour, 32 minutes VERDICT: For a movie that’s more paint by numbers than Picasso, “Penguins of Madagascar” begins with something completely unexpected: a Werner Herzog voiceover. Parodying his own work and documentary films’ obsession with the flightless birds, the German filmmaker gives an auspiciously clever start to a movie targeted toward the younger than 10 set. It’s a little wink to the adults in the audience right at the front. But don’t be fooled. This movie is almost exclusively and unapologetically for tots. Kids, no doubt, will be amused by the exhausting madcap antics of the cuddly breakout stars of the popular “Madagascar” films. Parents: probably less so. In this golden age of animation, it’s especially difficult to become an instant classic. “Penguins of Madagascar” does not appear to be reaching for those heights, which is just as well. The story is simple, the characters are basic, unfussy and barely evolve, and there’s no overriding lesson, moral or otherwise, to be gleaned from the tale. What we do get is a fairly amusing, surface-level spectacle. Overall, neither animation nor storytelling is particularly elevated in this outing. “Penguins of Madagascar” is a passible, inoffensive addition to DreamWorks Animation’s canon. – The

Classic Cinemas Carpentersville – 9:00 p.m.

AMC Lake in the Hills 12 – 11:00 a.m., 1:50, 4:25, 7:00, 9:35 p.m. Classic Cinemas Carpentersville – 12:25, 2:45, 5:05, 7:25, 9:45 p.m. Classic Cinemas Woodstock – 12:25, 2:45, 5:05, 7:25, 9:45 p.m. Regal Cinemas – 11:30 a.m., 1:20, 2:20, 4:20, 5:20, 7:10, 8:20, 10:10, 11:00 p.m.

AMC Lake in the Hills 12 – 9:30 a.m., 5:15 p.m. Regal Cinemas – 12:45, 9:15 p.m.

Associated Press

“THE HUNGER GAMES: MOCKINGJAY – PART 1” STARRING: Jennifer Lawrence, Josh Hutcherson, Liam Hemsworth PLOT: When Katniss destroys the games, she goes to District 13 after District 12 is destroyed. She meets President Coin, who convinces her to be the symbol of rebellion, while trying to save Peeta from the Capitol. RATED: PG-13 for intense sequences of violence and action, some disturbing images and thematic material TIME: 2 hours, 3 minutes VERDICT: “Mockingjay – Part 1” is, ultimately, a slow-burn portrait of the repeated rise and fall of dystopia’s most reluctant hero, nimbly told through its examination of the mechanics of propaganda. In the Games, the goal

“BIG HERO 6” AMC Lake in the Hills 12 – 2D: 9:45, 10:45 a.m., 3:40, 5:45, 6:45 p.m.; 3D: 1:40, 9:15 p.m. Classic Cinemas Carpentersville – 11:00 a.m., 12:00, 1:20, 2:20, 3:40, 4:40, 6:00, 7:00, 8:20, 9:20 p.m. Classic Cinemas Woodstock – 12:00, 2:20, 4:40, 7:00, 9:20 p.m. Regal Cinemas – 2D: 12:40, 3:40, 6:30, 9:20 p.m.; 3D: 1:30, 4:40 p.m.

“BIRDMAN” Regal Cinemas – 6:20, 9:40 p.m.

“THE BOOK OF LIFE” Classic Cinemas Carpentersville – 12:00, 2:15, 4:30, 6:45 p.m.

“DUMB AND DUMBER TO” AMC Lake in the Hills 12 – 11:50 a.m., 2:35, 5:10, 7:45, 10:30 p.m. Classic Cinemas Carpentersville – 12:00, 2:25, 5:05, 7:25, 9:40 p.m. Classic Cinemas Woodstock – 12:00, 2:25, 4:50, 7:15, 9:40 p.m. Regal Cinemas – 11:10 a.m., 2:00, 4:50, 7:40, 10:30 p.m.

“THE EQUALIZER” Regal Cinemas – 2:40, 10:25 p.m.

“FURY” AMC Lake in the Hills 12 – 12:25, 8:20 p.m. Regal Cinemas – 6:50 p.m.

“GONE GIRL” AMC Lake in the Hills 12 – 9:30 a.m., 12:45, 4:00, 7:15, 10:25 p.m. Regal Cinemas – 8:00 p.m.

was simple: Keep Peeta alive. Now, Katniss is powerless, just a tool of the machine. Charred and fatally wounded bodies aside, “Mockingjay – Part 1” is not for the faint of heart when it comes to the relentless emotional torture of its heroine. Director Francis Lawrence, in his second outing in the franchise, stays fairly true to the original text, carrying over the war-torn bleakness of “Catching Fire” without any of the disturbing thrill of the Games. He sprinkles in a handful of fairly exciting action sequences (one of which was not

“THE HUNGER GAMES: MOCKINGJAY – PART 1” AMC Lake in the Hills 12 – 9:30, 10:30, 11:30 a.m., 12:30, 1:30, 2:30, 3:30, 4:30, 5:30, 6:30, 7:30, 8:30, 9:30, 10:30 p.m. Classic Cinemas Carpentersville – 11:20 a.m., 1:00, 2:00, 3:40, 4:40, 6:20, 7:20, 9:00, 10:00 p.m. Classic Cinemas Woodstock – 11:20 a.m., 1:00, 2:00, 3:40, 4:40, 6:20, 7:20, 9:00, 10:00 p.m. Regal Cinemas – 11:00 a.m., 12:10, 1:00, 2:10, 3:10, 4:00, 5:10, 6:10, 7:20, 8:10, 9:10, 10:15 p.m.

“OUIJA” Classic Cinemas Carpentersville – 1:00, 3:05, 5:10, 7:15, 9:20 p.m.

“THE PENGUINS OF MADAGASCAR AMC Lake in the Hills 12 – 2D: 10:00, 12:20, 1:20, 2:40, 3:25, 5:00, 6:15, 7:20, 9:40 p.m.; 3D: 11:15 a.m., 4:15, 6:40 p.m. Classic Cinemas Carpentersville – 2D: 11:00 a.m., 12:00, 1:05, 2:10, 4:20, 5:20, 6:30, 7:30, 8:40, 9:40 p.m.; 3D: 3:10 p.m. Classic Cinemas Woodstock – 2D: 11:00 a.m., 12:00, 1:05, 2:10, 4:20, 5:20, 6:30, 7:30, 8:40, 9:40 p.m.; 3D: 3:10 p.m. Regal Cinemas – 2D: 11:20 a.m., 1:50, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30 p.m.; 3D: 12:00, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30, 10:00 p.m.

“INTERSTELLAR” AMC Lake in the Hills 12 – 4K DIGITAL: 11:35 a.m., 3:10, 8:35, 9:45 p.m. Classic Cinemas Carpentersville – 4K DIGITAL: 1:00, 4:20, 7:45 p.m. Classic Cinemas Woodstock – 4K DIGITAL: 12:55, 4:20, 7:45 p.m. Regal Cinemas –12:20, 4:10, 8:30 p.m.

“THE JUDGE” Regal Cinemas – 11:40 a.m., 3:00 p.m.

“THE MAZE RUNNER” Regal Cinemas – 7:45, 10:40 p.m.

actually described in the book), but, he mostly allows the film to luxuriate in the quiet moments. Yet too many involve Katniss tearing up while sitting on piles of rubble. In its best moments, the movie has a tense, night before the battle feel. Only the battle is still a year away. Ever since the “Harry Potter” juggernaut split their final story into two separate films, it’s become standard practice in Hollywood for every successful franchise, regardless of whether or not the story is there. “Mockingjay - Part 1” is a serviceable

“ST. VINCENT” AMC Lake in the Hills 12 – 12:15, 2:45, 6:40 p.m. Classic Cinemas Carpentersville – 12:05, 2:25, 4:45, 7:05, 9:25 p.m. Regal Cinemas – 3:30, 6:15 p.m.

“SAVING CHRISTMAS” Regal Cinemas – 10:50 a.m., 1:40, 4:45 p.m.

“THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING” Regal Cinemas – 11:50 a.m., 2:50, 6:00, 9:00 p.m.

entry into the conclusion of Katniss’s saga. It boasts some imaginative visuals, a few truly thrilling moments, and standout performances from Lawrence, Elizabeth Banks, Woody Harrelson, and Philip Seymour Hoffman, to whom the film is dedicated. Still, even with Hoffman’s subtly brilliant reaction shots, it does not seem to be the type of movie that fans will revisit on its own. This half is part of a whole in the most cynical way. You say you want a revolution? They’ll get to that next year. – The Associated Press

| PlanIt Style | Sunday, November 30, 2014 • PlanitNorthwest.com

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