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Newton

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Friday, September 27, 2013

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Newton, Iowa

A Legacy of Love

OBITUARIES Martha (Sheeler) Brayton

INSIDE TODAY

Chamber, NDC host Skilled Iowa testing day at DMACC By Bob Eschliman Daily News Editor

Lions Club

Leader Dogs for Blind benefit Page 7A

Submitted Photo John and Jo Jenkins look up at the H.A. Lynn Field stands during a night last fall that honored former coach Jenkins for his outstanding achievements. “It was a very special night,” Jo said.

Sports

PCM cross country in Monroe Page 1B

Former coach’s family unites in face of dementia Part 2 of a two-part series By Kate Malott Daily News Staff Writer Red Pride Throughout Newton Senior High School football coach John Jenkins’ career, the Cardinals played against fellow legendary head coach Jerry Pezzetti and the Ankeny Hawks nearly every year. The experienced coach, now calling the shots at Ankeny Centennial, holds an impressive 313-130 record with the team. Pezzetti started coaching at Ankeny in 1970 and was a close friend with Frank Gilson. He even served as a pallbearer at his funeral. “We’ve always had the absolute greatest respect for New-

Community

Free show to benefit Capitol II Page 1C

WEATHER

Saturday

ton,” Pezzetti said. “There probably isn’t another town in the state with such a great football community, and that’s largely because of John. “Every time we played, whether we won or lost, you knew it was going to be real, hard-nosed football. You knew you were going to have to tackle as hard as them, run as hard as them, play as hard as them. “The kids believed in their coaches and had pride in their sport,” Pezzetti continued. “He couldn’t have done a better job.” One thing John took pride in doing was hosting instrumental football camps for young players in the area and inviting speakers to join from surrounding collegiate programs, like Iowa and Iowa State.

Dan McCarney, former University of Iowa assistant coach and Iowa State University head coach, said he has known John for decades. They worked together in many of those valuable football camps and in numerous recruiting efforts. “The best coaches I have been around are the ones that take a collection of young men who are just a ‘group’ and turn them into a ‘team’ that represents a school, town and state the way everyone respects and admires. Who better than John Jenkins?” McCarney said. “How special was Newton Cardinal football on a Friday night in the fall? Always JENKINS See Page 8A

Active Aging Week draws to close

High 69 Low 45

By Ty Rushing Daily News Staff Writer

Sunday

High 75 Low 47 WEATHER ALMANAC

Thurs., Sept. 26 High 84 Low 62 No Precipitation ALSO: Astrograph Page 5B Classifieds Page 4B Comics & Puzzles Page 6A Dear Abby Page 6A

By Ty Rushing Daily News Staff Writer

Ty Rushing/Daily News John Postma reads to Thomas Jefferson Elementary School first-graders Alex Riney, Cade Bauer and Karter Prellwitz on Thursday. John is a Park Centre resident and was reading to the children as a part of Active Aging Week activities Park Centre lined up through Saturday.

By Matthew Nosco Daily News Staff Writer

Obituaries Page 3A Police Page 3A Our 112th Year No. 92

98213 00008

Newton Athletic Boosters changing tailgating for NHS football games

A few changes are taking place with regard to tailgating hosted by the Newton Athletic Booster Club at Newton Senior High School’s Friday-night home football games. First, the cost to tailgate is being lowered to BOOSTERS See Page 5A

Golden Apple award goes to PCM principal

Opinion Page 4A

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SKILLED IOWA See Page 5A

Park Centre Lifestyle Director Lori Griffin took some of her residents to Thomas Jefferson Elementary School on Thursday as a part of their Active Aging Week activities. “It’s going very well,” she said. “Great participation and we were lucky to have great weather.” Park Centre will wrap up it’s Active Aging Week activities today with a walk and lunch around Lake Red Rock. Staff writer Ty Rushing may be contacted at (641) 7923121, ext. 426, or at trushing@newtondailynews.com.

Reactions to the National Career Readiness Certificate test ranged from “that was really hard” to “it was easier than I expected.” But whether the roughly one dozen community leaders and Newton residents who took part in the Skilled Iowa testing day received NCRC certification or not, they all learned something about themselves Thursday morning. And, for many of them, future employers will be able to tall something about them, as well. “[I] had a great time with the test,” Greater Newton Area Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Darrell Sarmento said. “The NCRC test was not easy, which means this is a very valuable tool for employers to use in hiring. I’m happy with my ‘silver’ certificate for my first time out.” The Chamber and Newton Development Corporation partnered to host the event at the DMACC Newton Campus. Testing is available at the community college on a regular basis by appointment, but Thursday’s testing event was meant to serve as a promotion of Newton’s efforts to become a Skilled Iowa Community.

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Perseverance and the silver lining were very much the themes to Stephanie Langstraat’s nomination letters for the Golden Apple award, a recognition given out once a month to an Iowa educator who performs above and beyond the call of duty. The middle school principal from the Prairie City-Monroe district was held up high by nine different students who, when assigned to think of a strong leader in the community, selected Langstraat for her work in the school.

Each student compared Langstraat to a different historical leader, one drawing a parallel to Harriet Tubman as she discussed her fearless demeanor in the face of the school’s bomb threat last school year. “When we had the bomb threat, she was calm and kept us on our toes,” the letter read. “She took charge and made sure we were all safe. Following the plan set in place with her in charge made us very safe, and I feel comfortable saying I trust her with my life, as we very well did that day.” GOLDEN APPLE See Page 5A

Matthew Nosco/Daily News Stephanie Langstraat, principal of the Prairie City Monroe middle school, accepts the Golden Apple Award from the WHO staff at a ceremony on Wednesday.


Local News

Page 2A

Friday, September 27, 2013

Submitted Photo Pictured (from left) are Rick Vernon, Robin Stoner, Mary Brown, Mercy Meador, Bill Vernon, Kay Lepley, Wanda Shipley, Eloise Froah, Janie Hills and Chris Vernon.

Vernon recognizes employees for years of service Special to the Daily News

merchandise program. Each person’s name also has been added to a dedication plaque that is prominently displayed to honor employees for their career milestones. New members of Vernon’s 25 Year Club include: Charlene Ackerman and Robin Stoner New members of Vernon’s 35 Year Club include: Mercy Meador, Mary Brown, Rick

Nine employees were recently inducted in The Vernon Company’s 25, 35, 40 and 45 Year Clubs. The nine new club members have 315 years of combined dedicated service to the company. At the club induction, new members were honored with a gift of their choice from the company’s gift and awards

Vernon and Janie Hills New members of Vernon’s 40 Year Club include: Kay Lepley and Eloise Froah New member of Vernon’s 45 Year Club: Wanda Shipley Currently, there are 40 Vernon employees that have achieved the 25-year milestone with The Vernon Company. When combined with individuals who have retired from the company that number jumps

to 118 employees with careers spanning 25 years or more. The years-of-service clubs were started in 1971 by William F. Vernon, Sr. to honor Vernon employees for outstanding careers and dedication to the company. The Vernon Company, a fourth-generation family business founded in 1902, manufactures and markets promotional products designed to

Iowa State Fair Winners • The Warrick Brothers of Prairie City won fourth place in gilts in the Hampshire Swine Show. • Nolin Red Angus of Monroe earned the Grand Champion Bull title; second place in summer yearling heifer — May 1 - June 30, 2012; first place in senior yearling heifer — Sept. 1 - Dec. 31, 2011; second place in winter bull calf — Nov. 1- Dec. 31, 2012; first place in 2-yearA Fantastic shopping event.

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old bull — Jan. 1 - April 30, 2011; Reserve Champion Intermediate Heifer; Champion Senior Yearling Heifer; Champion Senior Bull; Grand Champion Senior Bull; and Champion Bull in the Red Angus Show. • Brice Conover of Baxter exhibited the Champion Gilt; first place in gilts; and first place in boars in the Yorkshire Show.

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A Chicago Holiday December 9-12, 2013

The Spirit of the holiday in the Windy City! Lunch at Macy’s, Irish Neighborhood tour, Christmas Around the World, Lincoln Park Conservatory, Navy Pier, Eli’s Cheesecake Factory tour & lots more! Accommodations at Palmer House Hilton!

100 N. 2nd Ave. W., Newton (N.E. corner of 1st Newton National Bank)

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Presents

The Dixie Swim Club October 4,5,10,11 & 12 at 7:30pm October 6th at 2:00pm Tickets: $12 for adults $10 for youth

A Jones Hope Wooten Comedy

Letterhead

(641)792-1980

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We have the services you want at a time that is right for you.

Same day appointments always available!

Newton  Clinic PC Be treated ... like family  

300 N. 4th Ave. E. www.newtonclinic.com www.facebook.com/newtonclinic

Newton Zoning Board of Adjustment to meet The Newton Zoning Board of Adjustment will meet at 4:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Newton City Hall Council Chambers. Agenda items include a public hearing on V13-1: Front Yard Setback at 1319 W 4th Street S (Vanderpol, Applicant) and on AP13-1: Appeal of the Issuance of Building Permit at 920 S 8 Ave W (Campbell, Appellant).

NHS ‘Red Out’ game tonight Tonight is the annual Newton Cardinal “Red Out” football game against Grinnell. The Newton Athletic Booster Club will be selling Red Pride shirts for $10 dollars.

Jasper County Pheasants Forever 28th Annual Banquet

Saturday, October 5, 2013 Newton Location Moose Lodge 2233 S. 24th Ave. W.

Newton

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Newton Clinic PC Daily

Hours: Mon. - Fri. 7:30 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sat. 9 a.m. - noon

for reservations.

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Newton

Newton Clinic doctors have been caring for our community for more than 80 years.

Call (641) 792-1230

Call Today! 641-792-3121

Final balance due October 1, 2013 Janie Haunsperger

Newton Community Theatre

VARIED INDUSTRIES BLDG. IOWA STATE FAIRGROUNDS DES MOINES, IOWA Fri. 5-9; Sat. 9-5; Sun. 10-4 ADM. Just $6.00 FREE PARKING Free Shuttle Bus (10 & under free) 3-day re-entry stamp Service from North Parking Lot Next Show Nov. 15-17 on both Fri. & Sat.

News

Call Today! 641-792-3121

We would like to thank the following businesses in Newton who helped to make Fall Fest at The Way a success!

Arby’s Cardinal Corner Casey’s Culvers Pizza Hut Pizza Ranch Ryan’s Quick Trip Subway on 1st Ave Taco John’s You are greatlY appreciated! thank You!

Blessings, Newton Church of The Way

help other businesses increase sales and improve profits. The company has more than 30,000 customers, served by 265 account executives and sales managers throughout the United States and Puerto Rico and 190 administrative and production employees in its Newton headquarters and two sign graphics manufacturing subsidiaries based in Missouri and New Jersey.

Doors Open at 5:30PM Please reserve tickets in advance

by calling 641-792-9780

How important could this be to your business? Very. For more information contact The Newton Daily News Jeff Holschuh 641-792-3121 ext. 300

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Local Record

Friday, September 27, 2013

Martha (Sheeler) Brayton

Obituaries

Sept. 26, 2013 Martha (Sheeler) Brayton died on Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013, in the comfort of her daughter’s home surrounded by her loving family. Per her request, she will be cremated, and no services will be held.  Memorials to Skiff Hospice may be left at the Wallace Family Funeral Home and Crematory. Born in December 1931 to Howard and Lilly (VanBaale) Sheeler, she graduated from Monroe High School.  Martha was an employee of Maytag, retiring after 39 years of service, and was a well-known realtor in Newton for 31

years. She was a member of the Jasper County Public Health Advisory Board, Junior Achievement, Kiwanis, Newton Board of Realtors and ABWA. Martha was married to Harold Brayton on Aug. 5, 1950, and during their 53 years of marriage had two daughters who survive her, Rebecca (Sid) Gimre and Jana (Hank) Turney. She is also sur-

Births

vived by two grandchildren, Amy Faust and Adam (Harmony) Turney and four greatgrandchildren, David and Hannah Faust and Alex and Miles Turney. Martha is also survived by two brothers, Bob (Nona) Sheeler and Ivan (MaryLou) Sheeler; two sisters, Mary Kingdon and JoAnn Sheeler; one brother-inlaw, Don (Myrna) Brayton; and many nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her husband, Harold; parents, Howard and Lilly Sheeler; sisters, Gladys DeJoode and Kathleen Jackson; in-laws, Patricia Skiles, Robert Brayton and Wilbur and Marie Brayton; and a niece, Nancy Albright.

Iowa Gov. seeks federal approval for health plan DES MOINES (AP) — Federal authorities have not signed off on Iowa’s low-income health care expansion because they do not like the use of premiums in the plan, Gov. Terry Branstad said Thursday. Branstad met with federal officials in Washington this week to urge them to provide a waiver enabling the state to receive more federal Medicaid money for the proposed Iowa Health and Wellness Plan, a new health insurance program that would cover as many as 150,000 residents. Branstad said the program calls for eventually charging some small premiums that are intended to serve as health incentives. He said participants can avoid the charges if they complete

certain health goals. “We’ve got pretty much everything else resolved except this one last point, and that’s what we told them. We’d like to see this done,” Branstad said. But the clock is ticking, and millions of dollars in new Medicaid funding hangs in the balance. The governor said he would like to have the waiver in place by Oct. 1. That’s when enrollment opens for the new health care exchanges, the online marketplaces created under President Barack Obama’s health care law that allow users to buy and compare health insurance. If approved, the new program would start coverage January 1. Some of the eligible people are currently on a limited-

Page 3A

benefit state health plan that is set to expire by the end of the year. Without a new program in place, they could lose coverage. Branstad said he had no indication of a timeline from federal officials. A public comment period for people to weigh on the proposal with the federal government concluded Thursday. A spokesman for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services did not immediately return a call for comment. Iowa lawmakers in May approved legislation that accepts federal dollars offered to states that expand Medicaid under President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul. The plan would cover up to 150,000 low-income Iowans, but not on the current Medicaid plan.

DMACC Nursing Information Session

DMACC Nursing Information Sessions offer those interested in the nursing program a chance to learn what they need to do to get into the program. This includes requirements for entry, who to contact for various questions about entry requirements, where to go for assessment and for help in meeting the entry requirements, how to get on the waiting list and what to take while waiting. Attendance at an Information Session is one of the entry requirements for the Nursing program. A session will be held at the Newton DMACC Campus on Friday, Oct. 4th. from 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. Room 114. Space is limited to 50. Please call 641-791-3622 to make your reservation to attend this session.

EXTENDED HOURS WALK-IN CLINIC

Monday - Friday 8am - 8pm

Violet Elisabeth Wylie Sept. 15, 2013 Dustin and Jocelyn Wylie of Nashville, Tenn., announce the birth of Violet Elisabeth Wylie on Sept. 15, 2013. Violet weighed 7 pounds, 3 ounces, and was 193⁄4 inches in length. She is welcomed home by a sister, Audra Wylie. Grandparents are Sam and Carol Gengo of Hartland, Wis., and Larry and Vernelle Wylie of Newton. Great-grandparents are Jerry and Ruby Wylie of Newton and Phillip and Linda Newell of Indianola.

Mitchell Scott Werden Aug. 7, 2013 Kylie and Nate Werden of Newton announce the birth of their son, Mitchell Scott Werden, on Aug. 7, 2013, at Skiff Medical Center in Newton. Grandparents are Marcia McAnally and Toni Werden, all of Newton, and Gary Werden of Van Cleve. Great-grandparents are Darrel and Joy Lee Steinberger, Brenda Damman and Byron Damman, all of Newton.

Kimber Anne Estrada Sept. 13, 2013 Spencer Estrada and Paige Verwers of Newton announce the birth of their daughter, Kimber Anne Estrada, on Sept. 13, 2013, at Skiff Medical Center in Newton. Grandparents are Sandy Verwers and Amy Schilling, both of Newton; Darcy Verwers of Tiffin; and Francisco Estrada of Denver, Colo. Great-grandparents are Trudy and Jim Verwers and Pat and Morris Van Baale, all of Newton, and Penny Larson of Albuquerque, N.M.

Elderly Nutrition For reservations or information about congregate and home-delivered meals, call (641) 792-7102 or (866) 942-7102 toll-free. Monday Italian beef sandwich, duchess potatoes, asparagus, fruit cocktail, fresh orange and skim milk Tuesday Meat loaf, baked potato, brussels sprouts, bananas, bread and strawberries and skim milk NewtoN

Daily News

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Official Newspaper of the City of Newton and Jasper County © 2013 News Printing Company All Rights Reserved Established 1902 (USPS 390-120) ISSN 1040-1539 Printed Daily Monday - Friday Excluding Saturday & Sunday, New Years, Memorial Day, July 4th, Labor Day, Thanksgiving & Christmas NEWS PRINTING COMPANY 200 1st Avenue East, Newton, Iowa 50208 Phone 641-792-3121 www.newtondailynews.com E Mail: newsroom@newtondailynews.com or advertising@newtondailynews.com

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Alcoholics Anonymous 10 a.m. at St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church Peer Support (For those living with mental illness) 1 to 4 p.m. at Optimae Life Services, 1422 First Ave. E.

For Sunday Penny Bingo 1 to 3:30 p.m. at Jasper County Senior Citizens Center Al-Anon 6 p.m. at St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church Narcotics Anonymous 7 p.m. St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church Alcoholics Anonymous 6:30 p.m. Christian Church in Colfax

For Monday Alcoholics Anonymous Noon at St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church Celebrate Recovery 5 to 6 p.m. at Hephzibah House (641) 792-1232 Alcoholics Anonymous 7 p.m. at St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church

Lottery Thursday Midday Pick 3: 6 5 3 Pick 4: 0 3 2 7 Thursday Evening $100,000 Cash Game: 7 11 21 23 29 Pick 3: 5 6 7 Pick 4: 2 9 6 5

Benefit Tip Night Monday, Sept. 30 5:00 - 8:00pm

Proceeds from all tips will be donated to Robert Terris to help with funeral expenses of his Mother Patty Terris, who recently passed away.

Periodicals postage paid at Newton, Iowa Postmaster: Please send change of address form 3579 to Newton Daily News P.O. Box 967, Newton, Iowa 50208

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Corrections: The Newton Daily News strives for fairness and accuracy. Errors in our news columns will be corrected on this page. Readers who believe the newspaper has erred may request a correction by telephoning the News Department at 641-792-3121, extension 424, or by e-mail at mlamb@shawmedia.com. SUBSCRIPTION RATES By carrier 13 weeks ...................................... $33.75 26 weeks ...................................... $66.90 52 weeks .................................... $127.80 By motor route 13 weeks ...................................... $39.90 26 weeks ...................................... $79.50 52 weeks .................................... $154.20 By mail in Jasper, adjoining counties where carrier service not provided (one year) ........................................ $171.00 By mail outside Jasper and adjoining counties (one year) ........................... $192.00

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Saturday, Sunday 9am - 3pm 641.791.0790

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Local Opinion

Page 4A

Katiedid Vs.

Dancing exotically “We’re very excited by the prospect of having you as a client. Do you have any questions about us and what we do here?” Staring down at me from behind a huge wooden desk sat a veteran literary agent and my potential new representation. I glanced from her to her teenagelooking assistant, who was bouncing on a yoga ball and jotting down By Katiedid notes. I subconsciously Langrock tugged at my pink headCreators Syndicate band and lace dress, recent purchases made in hopes of creating a youthful appearance for my meeting. By 30, you’re practically the Cryptkeeper in my industry. My ultra-adolescent outfit was a pathetic attempt to cover up my granny mothball stench. “Well, I guess I’m curious whether you are going to give me any extracurricular assignments,” I said to the veteran agent. “Of course. We will do our best to get you paid writing assignments.” “No,” I said. The veteran agent noticed as I awkwardly pulled on my dress. “I mean more, like, uh, are you going to send me to classes for things outside of my writing ability?” “I’m not following you,” said the veteran. “I mean, are you going to send me to stripping classes?” “Excuse me?” A couple of years ago, my then agent was promoting a script I had written. The story had garnered some interest, and meetings were set up. But one thing was bothering my agent. “Your story is sexy,” she said. “But you — oh, how do I say this — aren’t.” “They’re meeting me because they like my script,” I said, “not because they want to sleep with me.” “Oh, I know. But wanting to sleep with you couldn’t hurt, right?” “Uh. I guess not,” I said. “How do you feel about pole dancing?” Strip-based exercise classes are a big trend in my town. I have no issue with women who take take control of their sexuality and their core muscles with some Sunday morning pole dancing. However, I made perfectly clear to my then agent it was utterly appalling to insist on a client’s taking such classes to enhance her sexual appeal in a pitch meeting. There was no way I would partake in that type of misogynistic, anti-feminist behavior! A few weeks later, I was looking down at my baggy T-shirt and yoga pants as the 10 a.m. class let out. So much for standing my ground. Women in their early 60s, wearing sequined corsets, came out of the classroom. They stopped to comment on the newest clothing being sold in the lobby before continuing on to the changing room. The classroom was dark, with no windows and no mirrors. Our instructor sat in the center of our circle, yelling out self-affirming statements as we stretched. “Love your womanhood!” “Embrace your Virginia!” I thought about yelling back, “I will once you embrace wearing pants.” But I chickened out. Our warm-up exercise consisted of performing the iconic slinky cat crawl. This required our using our arm and core muscles to lower our upper bodies, barely avoiding sweeping our breasts across the floor, and then pushing our bodies back up as we inched forward on all fours. I was excited to give it a try. I figured, “Hey, I’m here already. May as well make the most of it.” That day, I gained immense respect for my exotic-dancing sisters. Stripping is hard work! I tried to crawl. I tried to slink. I lowered my torso in a suggestive way. But then, just as I was supposed to teasingly lift myself back up, I remembered something: I don’t have upper body strength. Bam! My face hit the mat. The instructor yelled at me to relish my femininity. I tried again. Bam! Face and floor met. After a few more face plants, I was relegated to the side to watch the other class members slink sexily across the mats. I went home with a bruised ego and an even more bruised nose. So, I wasn’t ready to go through that again. The veteran agent looked at me, mouth agape. “We would never send you to stripping class.” “Never?” “With us, you don’t even have to dress like a teenager.” Aw, she noticed. I smiled. “Where do I sign?”

Dan Goetz Publisher Mandi Lamb Associate Editor

All In

Stop blaming violent video games Yesterday, I saw one of my coworkers mow down a pedestrian with a semi-truck. He was able to do this from the comfort of his couch. Whenever a new “ G r a n d Theft Auto” video game comes out, the media By Dave Hon pull out that old, tattered Daily News Staff Writer card. Violent video games cause violence. I can assure you, I’ve been playing video games since I was able to talk, and I have no urge to inflict violence upon anyone. While watching coverage of the Navy Yard shootings and the attack on the mall on Kenya, news anchors always led right into the release of “GTA V.” One of the CNN anchors pointed out that in GTA you can even rob a bank and kill all the hostages. The other anchor shook his head in disappointment. This entire faux debate started when it was revealed that Columbine shooter Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold played hours and hours of the popular game “Doom.” That is incorrect. They didn’t just play “Doom.” The two were so talented, they actually created levels for the game. They had an appreciation

for the art form and contributed back to it. Yes, video games are an art form. It wasn’t their appreciation and contribution to video games that motivated Harris and Klebold to kill their classmates. It was the fact that one of them was a sociopath and the other was a psychopath. Yes, there are some games that are brutal and brutality doesn’t make a video game a work of art alone. God forbid any news anchor actually play one these games and realize all the characters aren’t just made of pixels, they have depth. I have yet to play a game that was for the sole purpose of glorifying violence. What I doubt has ever crossed the national media’s mind when it comes to violence in video games is the hypocrisy behind juxtaposing the criticism of that violence while televising violence under the guise of news. Do I think the media should censor themselves? Not at all. There’s an age-old question about art. Does art mimic life or does life mimic art? Those who believe the latter is true, must also not believe in the human will. They must believe we are so influenced by outside factors we can’t discern between a controller and a steering wheel. Sure, there are some people who can’t tell the difference. Those people have a form of men-

tal illness and should be treated and maybe those around them, in their circle of trust, should keep them close so they don’t go off the deep-end. I’ve only been around for 22 years. But in that time, there’s been more mass shootings in America than in any other period of time. I’ve come to a conclusion. It’s not video games or guns, and it’s not the media. Anyone still blaming Charles Manson for Columbine is, frankly, an idiot. These mass shootings are our fault. Every mass shooting has one thing in common: isolation. In “Bowling for Columbine” Michael Moore asks Charles Manson what he would say to Harris and Klebold if they were still alive. Manson replies, “I wouldn’t say anything. I’d listen.” Call it the denigration of the family, call it the destruction of social values, but mass shootings have more to do with the lack of proper socialization than anything else. So, next time you see someone who is alone, confused, depressed, angry or isolated, approach them. Don’t approach them because you think they might shoot someone, or because you have pity for them. Approach them because you don’t want to be alone when you feel like they do. Now, I’m going to go kill some zombies.

Got an opinion? Let us know! We welcome your letters to the editor, guest commentaries and op-ed submissions. Send all submissions to the Daily News newsroom, c/o Editor Bob Eschliman, to P.O. Box 967, Newton, IA, or email them to newsroom@newtondailynews.com Common Sense

College football brings out the stupid ... in all of us. Yesterday was a busy day, but not so busy that I couldn’t remember it was Game Day for my beloved Iowa State Cyclones. It’s been a rough start to the 2013 season for the Cardinal By Bob Eschliman Daily News Editor and Gold. So rough, I was beginning to think the lateseason match-up with Kansas might be their only hope for a victory this season. Something needed to change. The last two big game weeks, I had worn “school colors” on Game Day, to no avail. So, I decided to change pace, and wore Tulsa colors yesterday. As was the case in the classic sports comedy, “Celtic Pride,” I decided I was the “Bad Luck Guy.” So, I tried to jinx the opposition by taking on their colors. Pretty stupid, right? Yeah, especially when I had a ribbon cutting to attend as a member of the ISU Extension Council. All of the staff was nicely decked out in their own Cardinal and Gold, and they even played the Cyclone fight song. And, when it was time to cut

Newton Daily News Editorial Board Bob Eschliman Editor Kelly Vest Prod./Circulation

Friday, September 27, 2013

the ribbon, there I am, the only guy wearing blue. But, if you check the scores from last night, you will see it worked. The Cyclones won in a rather dominant fashion defensively, and their offense finally looked like it was beginning to click. So, obviously, it was the blue shirt I wore all day. Right? The eye rolls I’ve no doubt elicited from you are sign enough of the real topic I’d like to quickly discuss today. And that is the idea of paying top-tier Division I athletes to play their respective sports. I’m pretty much with Iowa State athletic director Jamie Pollard on this one. Like high school, college is about one thing: getting an education. An education that would be very expensive to those studentathletes were they just students. Granted, there are some pretty stupid aspects of the NCAA rules that should be addressed. But, paying football and basketball players isn’t the answer. Like all other endeavors in life we call “careers,” there are dues to be paid. In my case, as a journalist, it was the four years I worked as a entry-level staff writer and then as a sports editor at a small weekly newspaper, making less than $20,000 a year. I ate a lot of top ramen and really cheap — and nasty-tasting

— macaroni and cheese from a box. I also didn’t have a lot of disposable income. I was lucky because I had an apartment (a furnished efficiency) where all of the utilities (and cable TV) were included in the rent. After that, I moved into a job at the best newspaper in Iowa, making $25,000 a year. Three years after that, I was editor of a news magazine making substantially more. And, less than a decade after that, I was the publisher of a newspaper. That’s not how it works out for most journalists. But, if you work really hard — and pay your dues — it’s definitely in the realm of possibility. Sure, I didn’t take a beating from the Oklahoma University defensive line on Saturday, and then got up early for classes on Monday, barely able to move. But, moving on to the NFL and making a minimum of $500,000 a year isn’t in my realm of possibility, either. Like everyone else, college athletes have to pay their own dues. And in the meantime, they need to just shut up and put their nose to the grindstone. As one successful NFL coach once said, “It’s time to put on the big-boy pants and go to work.” ••• If you’re reading this, thank a teacher. If you’re reading it in English, thank a soldier, sailor, airman or Maine.

The First Amendment

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. Jeff Holschuh Ad Director Brenda Lamb Business Mgr.

Opinions expressed in letters and columns are those of the writers and do not represent the views of the Newton Daily News.

Give Us Your Views

Letters to the Newton Daily News should not exceed 400 words and should include the writers’ name, address and daytime telephone number. All letters are subject to editing for grammar and punctuation, or to remove potentially libelous material. Send letters to P.O. Box 967, Newton, IA 50208, or to newsroom@newtondailynews.com via email.


Local News

Friday, September 27, 2013

Page 5A

Skilled Iowa

Golden Apple

Continued from Page 1A

Continued from Page 1A

The more people who take the test, the closer Newton gets to reaching that goal. Many of those who took the test were taking it in the hopes of securing a better job, or to provide themselves another leg up in the all-too-competitive employment market. The rest were business and community leaders who took the test to get a better understanding of it and how it could apply to their hiring practices in the future. The NCRC is a product of Iowa-based ACT Inc. and is meant to be a “portable credential” to demonstrate the certificant’s achievement and level of workplace employability skills in three distinct disciplines. This is measured through ACT’s WorkKeys assessments in: * Applied Mathematics, • Locating Information, and • Reading for Information. These assessments, which may be performed on a computer, or in a paper-and-pencil format, are 55-minute examinations of 33 or 38 questions in length. They measure “real world” skills many employers believe are critical to job success. Test questions are based on situations in the everyday work world. In Iowa, hundreds of potential employers now recognize the NCRC as part of their hiring processes, including roughly 300 in the region that includes Jasper County. This is part of the privately funded Skilled Iowa program offered by Iowa Workforce Development. Through Skilled Iowa, the NCRC assessments are offered free of charge to any Iowan, regardless of income or employment status. Likewise, WorkKeys remedial training programs and retesting for the NCRC assessments are also

Other students acknowledged the principal’s strength in the face of the Stage IV lung cancer she battled last year, talking about how her concern remained with her students throughout the process and how she kept them up-to-date on her treatment and successes. As for Langstraat, she was visibly shocked at the thunderous applause that greeted her upon entering the award ceremony. When she took the stage, her first move was to share the credit with the rest of the faculty and staff of the district. “I don’t take credit for a whole lot of things … I’m a team player,” Langstraat said. “Those shirts they’re wearing, ‘No one will fight for our students like us,’ that’s the truth … All those teachers in the back, they deserve this too.” She went on to explain the school is her second family, education her true calling, and that she saw herself as being the fortunate one for getting to wake up each day and go to a job she loved. The Golden Apple Award is given by WHO-HD and Allied Insurance once a month to an educator who is nominated by his or her students. The organizations receive thousands of letters each year, judge each one, and have to narrow the field to the person who they deem is the best fit for the recognition.

Continued from Page 1A $5. Previously it was $10 and $5 to club members. The second big thing is there will no longer be food vendors present. Booster

offered free to any Iowan. “Middle-skill jobs — those requiring more than a high school diploma up to an associate degree — account for more than 50 percent of available jobs in Iowa, yet only 33 percent of the workforce has the necessary skills to fill these roles,” Iowa Workforce Development Director Teresa Wahlert said during an earlier interview about Skilled Iowa. “The Skilled Iowa Initiative works to increase skill levels of Iowa’s workforce — which helps people find great jobs, companies find skilled workers and our state’s economy grow and prosper.” Sarmento reminds residents of Newton and Jasper County that the DMACC Newton Campus is a yearround NCRC testing site. To schedule a time to take the test, call DMACC at (641) 791-3622.

Club Fundraising Chair Wendy Jenkins explained why the change happened. “The first two weeks did not warrant enough business for the vendors to be profitable, therefore we will not be providing them for the rest of the season,” Jen-

Is your future worth two hours? For more information contact The Newton Daily News Jeff Holschuh 641-792-3121 ext. 300

For more information contact The Newton Daily News Jeff Holschuh 641-792-3121 ext. 300

vendors at tailgates, they will be hosting another trivia night fundraiser event. The event will be at 7 p.m. Friday, Nov. 15, at the McCann Center. Teams may sign up by contacting Jenkins a pwjenkins@mchsi.com.

Open House Saturday, Sept. 28th 9:00am - 5:00pm

Grand Prize Drawing at 5pm Winner gets a $100 Gift Card

Open House Specials

good only on September 28th • Two Gallon Iowa grown mums

3 for $2900

• All Iowa, Iowa State & UNI merchandise will be 20% Off • All spring & summer merchandise will be 30% Off marked prices

Get ready for fall with our big selection of... • Fresh Iowa grown pumpkins and gourds • Straw Bales • Fall flags & yard art • Halloween & Thanksgiving decorations We’ve lived in Newton for almost 13 years and we love this town! Our family is looking forward to serving this great community for many years to come!

Mon-Fri 8:30am - 5:30pm • Saturday 9:00am - 5:00pm Sunday Closed

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kins said. “Fans may still park and tailgate for $5, and may bring their own food/ drinks to enjoy in the parking lot or grab a bite to eat from the concession stand inside the stadium.” While the club may no longer be offering up food

COUPON

Boosters

Submitted Photo About a dozen community business leaders and residents participated in a special Skilled Iowa testing day Thursday at the DMACC Newton Campus.

Expires October 8, 2013

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Hours: Mon. - Fri. 7 am - 5:30 pm; Sat. 8 am - 2 pm; Closed Sunday


Diversions

Page 6A

DENNIS THE MENACE

BABY BLUES

PEANUTS

THE BORN LOSER

FAMILY CIRCUS

Friday, September 27, 2013

Mom-to-be wants husband to join her on the wagon DEAR ABBY: I’m three months pregnant. Before I got pregnant, my husband and I enjoyed having wine with dinner or a margarita when we were out on the town. We didn’t drink to excess, but have enjoyed alcohol in moderation. Obviously, I can’t drink anymore, but my husband carries on like nothing has changed. I’m becoming resentful every time we go out to eat. I asked him once if he’d quit drinking until our baby arrives. He looked shocked and said, “Why? I’m not pregnant.” I guess I feel left out because he’s having fun. I want him to suffer with me, and this is really getting on my nerves. Any advice? — RESENTFUL IN TENNESSEE DEAR RESENTFUL: Yes. If you feel you are missing out on “fun” if you can’t drink, you have a potential alcohol problem. Tell your husband that when he drinks in front of you, it makes you crave alcohol, and ask again that he respect your feelings and not do it. A considerate husband and father-to-be should respect that you are doing the heavy lifting (literally) and help all he can. DEAR ABBY: I’m a 28-year-old man who was born disabled. I have not had a date in years. I’d like to date and have a girlfriend, but when women look at me, all they see is my wheelchair. I’m a good person, well-mannered, respectful, caring and compassionate. Any advice you can offer would be appreciated. — LONELY IN ILLINOIS DEAR LONELY: I’m glad you wrote because it’s important that you not allow yourself to be isolated. Get out and participate in activities you enjoy that include like-minded people. While you may have been born disabled, I’m sure you have abilities and talents that would be welcomed if you choose to volunteer them. If you haven’t already, search the various online dating sites for both disabled and nondisabled individuals or contact a disability advocacy organization for guidance or to help you get access. Seek advice within the disabled community (in per-

son or online) from individuals who have more experience with dating than you do. They can also help you navigate any physical barriers that might prevent you from dating, if that’s an issue. There’s a saying, “Seek and ye shall find,” and it applies in your situation. I wish you the best of luck. DEAR ABBY: My husband’s much older sister has no problem calling to ask for money, but never calls just to say hello or to see how he’s doing. This has been going on for almost 10 years. She’ll tell us she or her sons need it for bills or school expenses. He has talked to her about it, but nothing has changed. We both work hard, while she refuses to ask the children’s father for a cent. Should we continue to give her money because it may affect our nephews if we don’t? — AUNT IN THE SOUTH DEAR AUNT: That you have tolerated this for 10 years tells me you and your husband are kindhearted and responsible people, and I respect that. However, fathers have a legal responsibility to support their children, and your sister-in-law should make sure it happens whether that involves hiring an attorney to help or applying for funds from the state to see her boys are taken care of. If you must give her money, give her enough for a consultation with an attorney because “Sissie” appears to have been using you.

GARFIELD

MARVIN

DILBERT

ZITS

PAJAMA DIARIES

JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU

Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and 3x3 block. Use logic and process elimination to solve the puzzle. The difficulty level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest). Rating: BRONZE

© 2013 Janric Enterprises Dist. by creators.com

Solution to 9/25/13

ALLEY OOP

9/26/13


Friday, September 27, 2013

Page 7A

Newton Lions Club flipping pancakes for puppies Saturday

Mark Your Calendar: Sept. 27-Oct. 3 Catch a Film • Capitol II Theater in Newton: “Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs 2” (PG) — Fri.: 7 p.m.; Sat. and Sun.: (2:15), (4:30), 7 p.m.; Mon.: (2:15 p.m.); Wed. and Thurs.: 7 p.m. “The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones” (PG-13) — Fri.: 7:15 p.m.; Sat.: (2), (4:35), 7:15 p.m.; Sun.: (4:35), 7:15 p.m.; Mon.: (2); Wed. and Thurs.: 7:15 p.m. “Gravity” (PG-13) — Thurs.: 10 p.m. “Bully” — 1 p.m. Sunday. Free showing. Sponsored by Congregational United Church of Christ. (Matinee times in parenthesis)

Special to the Daily News Members of the Newton Lions Club will be flipping pancakes Saturday at their annual fall pancake breakfast. Each year the club selects a charity or charities to award the breakfast proceeds to. For this event, the club has selected Lions Leader Dogs for the Blind, which has a unique Newton connection. Lions clubs originated in the United States in 1917. By 1920, Lions became international with the establishment of the first club in Canada. Today, Lions Clubs International is the world’s largest service club organization. Lions have 1.35 million members in more than 46,000 clubs worldwide. Lions are in every corner of the world, existing in more than 207 countries and geographic areas. The current Newton Lions Club was chartered in October 2009 after having a 25-year absence of Lions in the community. In 1925, Helen Keller, a deaf and blind person, addressed the Lions Clubs International convention in Cedar Point, Ohio, and challenged Lions to become “knights of the blind in the crusade against darkness.” Since then, Lions have worked tirelessly to aid the blind and visually impaired. While historically this has been a main focus of the service clubs, they do much more. The overall mission of the Lions clubs is to empower volunteers to serve their communities, meet humanitarian needs, encourage peace, and promote international understanding. In 1939, three Lions club members founded Leader Dogs for the Blind, a guide dog training school located in Rochester Hills, Mich. It is the second guide dog school founded in the U.S. and has paired more than 14,000 dogs with the visually impaired worldwide, making it one of the largest organizations of its kind. Leader Dogs is a nonprofit organization. All expenses, including room and board, airfare, and the dog itself, are offered free of charge. An applicant, after being accepted into the program, travels to Leader Dogs’ headquarters and must

Go Guide

• Valle Drive-In: “Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs 2” (PG) and “The Smurfs 2” (PG) Gates open at 6:30 p.m. daily; main feature begins at 7:30 p.m.

Coming Up • Nick Knudsen and Chris Sutliff with JJ Express — Show begins at 9 p.m. Friday at the First Avenue Speakeasy in Newton. No cover. • Bison Day — The Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge will host Bison Day from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. Activities include guided bus tours through the bison enclosure, archeological and Native American displays, a weaver’s guild demonstration, arts and crafts, games, a rope-making demonstration, a book signing by area authors and a bison chip throwing contest. • Karaoke at Scoreboard — 9 p.m. to midnight every Thursday at the Scoreboard Bar & Grill in Newton.

Have an upcoming event? Call (641) 792-3121 Nicole Wiegand/Daily News Former Newton resident Michael Stout crosses a street in downtown Des Moines with his guide dog, Arrow. Arrow will assist Michael in traveling to and from his new job in Des Moines which begins on Monday. The Newton Lions Club will be holding a fundraising pancake breakfast from 7 to 10 a.m. Saturday at the Jasper County Senior Citizens Center with all proceeds from the breakfast going to the guide dog puppy program at the Newton Correctional Release Center.

spend from 19 to 26 days of training with his or her new dog, after which the dog belongs to the applicant officially. In 2002, Leader Dogs for the Blind began a relationship with Iowa Prisons. The first to participate was North Central Correctional Facility at Rockwell City. In 2010, the Correctional Release Center in Newton and the Fort Dodge Correctional Facility began their partnerships with Leader Dogs for the Blind. Selected inmates in these facilities are paired with puppies which will eventually go on to be trained as guide dogs for the blind. The raising of a puppy in a prison is like puppy kindergarten, but it is also very instrumental. The puppy learns basic commands such as sit, stay, down, come, and heel. It receives socialization by having lots of interaction with humans, other dogs, and even sometimes other animals. When a puppy graduates puppy kindergarten after about a year, it goes on to Leader Dogs for the Blind in Rochester,

Michigan, which is like a high-end college. At puppy college they receive more extensive training such as curb work, traffic work and much more that is not available except from certified trainers. Prison personnel are also instrumental in the success of the program. Sometimes merely a love for animals allows for a little common ground with prisoners and personnel. The prisoners appreciate this link to society. It allows them the chance to do something positive with their time as well as a sense of pride knowing they are giving back and helping someone else. The goal is to eventually help improve the life of a blind person by pairing them up with a Leader Dog and enabling them to live more independently. The Correctional Release Center at Newton has had a total of 28 puppies so far. Four have gone on to Leader Dogs for the Blind school, one was a career change for medical reasons, and ten are currently being raised at Newton. Donations pay for the expenses incurred for the care of

the puppies while they are at the prison. The cost per puppy is $500. The Newton Lions Club’s fundraising pancake breakfast will be from 7 to 10 a.m. Saturday at the Jasper County Senior Citizens Center at 702 E. Third St. S. in Newton with all proceeds collected benefiting the Leader Dog puppy program at the Newton prison. The cost of the meal is $5 for those ages 12 and up and $3 for children age 11 and younger. The all-youcan-eat meal consists of buttermilk pancakes, scrambled eggs, sausage links and beverages. Two local businesses, Cappy’s Tire & Auto Service and Newton Clinic P.C. Physicians & Surgeons, donated all of the food for the breakfast so that 100 percent of the proceeds will go to the prison puppy program. The public is invited to attend the breakfast. Those interested in learning more about the Lions or who would like to donate to Leader Dogs for the Blind may contact Newton Lions Club president Jack Ayres at (641) 792-4330.

Academic Achievements Marshalltown Community College BAXTER — Charles David Fenech graduated with honors with an associate in applied science degree in broadcast/mass media studies. Samantha Jo Petty received an associate in arts degree in liberal arts and an associate in applied science in early childhood education. KELLOGG — Hollis Anderson graduated with honors and received an associate in arts degree. Tami K. Ferch received an associate in applied science degree in nursing. Adam Michael Geerdes and Jessica Caroline Hotchkin both graduated with honors and

received associate in arts degrees. LYNNVILLE — Jason Allen Scull graduated with honors and received a diploma in machine tool technology trades practitioner. Krysta Reed Van Maanen received a diploma in dental assisting. NEWTON — Shawna Marie Guthrie graduated with honors and received a diploma in medical assisting. Lance Andrew Holloway graduated with honors and received a diploma in practical nursing. Katie Jan Kolpin graduated with honors and received a diploma in dental assisting. Justin David Wilson received an associated in applied science degree in

computer network management. Upper Iowa University Kathryn Weston of Newton graduated with a bachelor of arts in human services and a minor in psychology in June. Purdue University Catherine Farver of Newton earned a bachelor of science degree from the College of Science. Ellsworth Community College Christopher Nash of Monroe graduated with an associate of arts degree in health/PE/recreation/ sports management.

Birchard attends Newton Manufacturing sales meeting, trade show Special to the Daily News Diane Birchard, a promotional advertising consultant representing Newton Manufacturing Company in Newton, recently attended the second annual Newton Manufacturing National Sales Meeting & Trade Show in Nashville, Tenn. The event kicked off with a reception dinner where more than 150 Newton representatives, guests and employees enjoyed reconnecting. Newton Manufacturing Company recognized and celebrated the successes and longevity of many of its sales representative’s commitment and passion. The weeklong event, held at the Sheraton Music City Hotel, included presentations by both Newton Manufacturing and several of their premier suppliers. Presentations offered insights on tools, products and trends to help representatives grow their business and were designed to sharpen the consultants’ ability to reach target audiences with creative and relevant product ideas. More than 45 nationally recognized promotional product suppliers were there to show the latest and most popular trending products that are available in today’s market. Newton sales representatives were able to touch and feel the products and speak directly to the supplier representatives regarding trends and popular uses. Birchard has been a promotional consultant in Newton and the surrounding area since 1998 and can be reached at (641) 831-4668 or djb@pcpartner. net.

LIHEAP applications to be accepted beginning Nov. 1 Applications will be taken starting Nov. 1 for the 2013-2014 Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program, and The Red Rock Area Community Action Program at 115 N. Second Ave. E. Suite A in Newton will be taking applications from Nov. 1 through April 30, 2014 (Oct. 1 for households with elderly/disabled member). The program is funded by the Department of Health and Human Services through the Iowa Department of Human Rights/DCAA and has been established to help qualifying low-income Iowa homeowners and renters pay for a portion of their primary heating costs. Applicants will need to furnish some form of identification, a copy of their most recent heating and electric bill, telephone bill, and proof of all household members’ gross income for the past three months or for the past calendar year. The assistance is based on household income, household size, type of fuel and other factors. Eligibility for participation is established according to the following federal income guidelines: Maximum income guidelines are as follows (household size and annual income): 1, $17,235; 2, $23,265; 3, $29,295; 4, $35,325; 5, $41,355; 6, $47,385. For households with more than six members, add $6,030 for each additional member.


Page 8A

Friday, September 27, 2013

Jenkins Continued from Page 1A seemed liked the entire town shut down everything to get to that stadium and support their team, led by John.” “I will always be proud to call John a friend, and the state of Iowa is a much better place because of his efforts.” Frontotemporal Dementia Those years of hosting camps, watching football tapes and leading the team to the post-season are now over for John. A few years ago, he was diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia, a disease commonly known as Pick’s Disease. It’s rare. Only 5 to 10 percent of total patients who suffer from dementia have FTD, a brain disorder resulted from a progressive deterioration of the frontal lobe, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. Additional proteins to the frontal lobe cause drastic behavior and mood changes, a decline in language capabilities and eventually affect memory, but unlike Alzheimer’s disease, FTD begins at an earlier age, between 45 and 65, and progresses more rapidly. When John had started showing symptoms of dementia, difficulty with social interaction and uncharacteristic moods and behaviors, Jo and the boys recognized something was terribly

Submitted Photos Above: John Jenkins celebrates with Cody Simbro (44) while the players rush the field after defeating West Des Moines Valley at home in 2002. (Photography by Chris Bollhoefer) Left: John receiving the Lifetime Achievement Award with Ron Rhoads from the National College Football Hall of Fame. Right: John and youngest son James at a football practice in 2006. Bottom: (back row): Jake, Jason, James, Jo and John. (front row): Chloe, Jenney, Josie and Alex together in 2012.

wrong and sought help. His wife, Jo, was relentless with those in the medical field and insists getting help was vital to reducing the symptoms and continuing a functioning lifestyle. “He’s very happy, easy going, and it’s because we got help right away. That’s what is important, is that people recognize the symptoms and seek help,” Jo said. John is now on medication that helps his mood and behavior; however, the disease itself continues to worsen. It is evident his short-term memory is almost gone, while the long-term memories deteriorates every day. He faintly remembers their first house by the stadium, but he cannot recall making ice cream the day before. New Routine Writing a book about life, being the grandfather he wanted to be and enjoying the leisure of retirement with his family are dreams that can no longer be fulfilled. Like each family that struggles with dementia, the Jenkins have learned to adapted to a new routine. “A lot of the things he taught the boys about perseverance and doing the right thing, even when it’s not easy, are put into play now as they help their mom,” current head coach Ed Ergenbright said. The family has come to accept the unfortunate, but it was really hard at first, youngest son James said. John visits Willowbrook Adult Day Center five days a week, and he and

Jo enjoy spending evenings and weekends with family. “Willowbrook is a godsend to our community, and other facilities we have in this community are phenomenal,” Jo said. They especially love to spend time with the three granddaughters, Alex, Chloe and Josie. “He loves to watch children shows with Josie, and I just get a kick out of watching them laugh,” Jo said. “It’s those little moments that I love. I’ve learned to slow time and not to get wrapped up in the busy world.” The couple have started going to football games again. On Fridays, they go to Newton home games, cheer on the Cardinals and watch James assistant coach as his dad once did. On Saturdays, they travel to Oskaloosa, cheer on the Statesmen and see Jake assistant coach where his dad once starred. All three sons are certified and have coached since graduating high school, and there was nothing that could have made John more proud than to have his sons coach. Although he could not elaborate, John said, “The boys coaching made me proud. Absolutely.” Adjusting “It’s been hard on everyone in our family because he’s always been the rock, and he always gave the best advice. He was always good at stepping back from a situation, making it relatable or helping people make good decisions,” Jake said. “It’s hard not to

have the advice anymore. We’re not capable to have those conversations.” “What I miss most are our deep conversations about our shared philosophy. He gets real lucid and tells me to keep trying,” Jo said. Despite the disease, John’s math skills have yet to falter, and he still corrects Jo on her spelling. He hasn’t lost his navigation skills yet, either. Coach Jenkins is still a coach at heart. There are a few things that help make the change a little bearable, like knowing how many young lives John touched, how much goodness and help are out there and that all of his knowledge, wisdom and goodness were once put to good use. Faith is a key factor in helping the Jenkins family right now too. “We get by with the grace of God, and without faith we couldn’t go anywhere,” Jo said. “Having this happen in a small town has also been a blessing, because the town has embraced us.” John had always said that we can’t control the elements in life, but we can control how we react to them. “We can adjust to anything,” he said. Coach Jenkins’ contributions to the young lives of his players had a trickle-down effect on the entire community. Whether a parent, teacher or student, the town has been influenced for the better because of the set of morals John taught students. His passion to help athletes succeed both on and off the field was the guiding light for the team and the town for a joyous 17 years. By installing in them the lessons, fundamentals and tools to make their dreams come true, Coach Jenkins continues to have a positive effect on anyone who has the pleasure of knowing him. Although John has begun to lose many of those priceless, long-term memories — like going to Hawaii, coaching the Shrine Bowl or salmon fishing with the boys — his family, friends and players remember every memory vividly. “Before a playoff game, during my sophomore year, all the coaches were going around and shaking our hands while we were stretching. Coach J was so intense that he shook my hand and then smacked me in the back of the head as he walked by. It almost knocked me over,” Bollhoefer laughed. “His intensity was unmatched by anyone I have ever met. At that moment, I laughed. I knew that I would run through a brick wall for a guy like that. His intensity was one of my favorite parts of playing football for him. It was truly an honor.” John Jenkins’ commitment, dedication and compassion will remain unforgettable.


Local Education

Friday, September 27, 2013

Page 9A

Newton fifth-graders learn value of art By Ty Rushing Daily News Staff Writer If you saw mobs of fifth-graders out of class and patrolling the streets on Wednesday, have no fear. They were out learning. In what is becoming a popular annual event, fifth-grade students from Aurora Heights and Woodrow Wilson elementary schools visited different sites around Newton to learn about various sculptures, statues, memorials, murals and landmarks. This is done to help spur the children’s civic pride and allow them to gain a greater appreciation for the arts. One of the key components of this year’s tour was the prevention of vandalism. “Over the years, kids have been able to make connection with local art,” AH fifth-grade teacher Jack Crandell said. “It allows them to see art in a different way. The docents have talked about the effects of vandalism and how it hurts art. When we get back, the kids, I hear them talk about it. It really seems to diminish the acts of vandalism, because they are more aware of the arts and the artists.”

Ty Rushing/Daily News Docent JaneAnne Cotton explains the history of “Sir RustA-Lot,” the dragon sculpture that resides on the lawn of the Newton Public Library, to Jack Crandell’s fifth-grade class from Aurora Heights Elementary.

Mary Bruhn served as one of the docents and played a crucial role in the anti-vandalism talk. She provided the students with an example by telling the history of the “Love at First Sight” sculpture by Neal Deaton, which was moved from Sersland Park to Skiff Medical Center. “The sculpture was vandalized,” she said. “It was very valuable, and I guess Neal took it (back), and it took him about three months to repair it. They needed to find a new safe site for it, and they moved it to Skiff. It’s not outside anymore. It’s across from radiology.” According to the most recent estimates by the

district, there are 228 fifth-grade students at both AH and WW. Students at both schools seemed to take to the anti-vandalism message and expanded their artistic views as well. “We learned about how the (sculpture) had been taken out because it had been damaged,” WW fifth-grader Anthony Moran said. “We (also) learned that copper can turn green when it’s not cleaned a lot.” “There is a whole a bunch of different art that people can come and look at,” AH fifth-grader Sydni Followill said. “And a whole bunch of different artist made them,

and they’re about different things. We’ve (also) learned about the people that made them.” The tour showcased more than a dozen works of art and had stops in downtown, the Jasper County Historical Museum, Newton Senior High School, the arboretum and the library. Every docent gave unique information and some used personal stories to enhance the experience. Marta Ford, dressed in fatigues at the Jasper County Veteran Memorial. Sue Pickett, who was in charge of the “Newton Print shop” mural on the side of the Daily News circulation building, brought along her husband Bud. Bud explained the printing process show in the mural in great detail. While each stop was informative and had its own fun factor, the most popular stop seemed to be “Sir Rust-A-Lot,” the giant, metal-dragon sculpture located on the lawn of Newton Public Library. “Every artist puts their name on their project that they do,” Jessie Johnson said. “And on the lizard, it was hard to find their name and it was on the foot.

Hall Monitor What’s Cooking for the Week of Sept. 30 - Oct. 4 Newton Schools Breakfast Menu Monday: Cereal, Teddy Grahams, 100% juice and milk. Tuesday: Pancake wrap and syrup, Trix yogurt, 100% juice and milk. Wednesday: Egg and cheese on a croissant, 100% juice and milk. Thursday: Breafast pizza, 100% juice and milk. Friday: Low-fat Poptart,100% juice and milk. Newton Schools Lunch Menu Monday: Ravioli, spinach salad, carrot sticks, pineapple and garlic bread. Tuesday: Fajita chicken wrap with lettuce and cheese, seasoned rice, cauliflower and broccoli with dip and a banana. Wednesday: Pepperoni pizza, steamed corn, mixed romaine salad and an applesauce cup. Thursday: Crispito with chili and cheese, green beans, fresh cantaloupe and BB muffin squares. Friday: Shrimp poppers, baked tater tots, steamed vegetables, orange slices and a breadstick. What’s Happening for the Week of Sept. 30 - Oct. 4 Newton Senior High School Monday: No school; 6 p.m. junior varsity football at Grinnell. Tuesday: 4:30 p.m., eighth grade volleyball and 8th grade football at Berg Middle School; 4:30 p.m., girls and boys varsity cross country at Knoxville; 5:30 p.m. ninth grade and junior varsity volleyball at Dallas Center-Grimes; 7 p.m. varsity volleyball at Dallas Center-Grimes. Wednesday: 6:30 to 7:30 p.m., boy scouts at Aurora Heights gym. Thursday: 4 p.m., junior varsity and varsity boys golf at Norwalk; 4:30 p.m., girls varsity cross country at Perry; 5 p.m., girls varsity swim meet at Ankeny Centennial; 6 to 8 p.m., drama performance at the Newton High School Auditorium. Friday: 4:45 p.m., ninth grade football at Dallas Center-Grimes; 6 to 8 p.m., drama performance at the Newton High School Auditorium; 7:30 p.m. varsity football at Dallas Center-Grimes.

Kids Say...

The Newton Daily News asked Fifth-grade students from Aurora Heights Elementary the following question:

What is your favorite type of art? “My favorite type of art is abstract.”

“Abstract. I just like abstract art.”

Jacob Aldrich

Alex Johnson

“Painting and drawing stuff.”

Raniesha Daring

“My favorite type of art is drawing, painting and sketching mostly.” Patience Farmer

Transitional Care Suites at Park Centre A WesleyLife Community in Newton

BALANCE CLINIC Preventing Falls-One Step at a Time A FREE Balance Clinic - open to the public Private suites with private baths and kitchenettes

Date:

October 1, 2013

Time:

9:30-11:30 (Open House)

Place:

Park Centre – Garden Room

Address: 500 First Street North - Newton Cost:

• •

FREE FREE

• • •

FREE FREE FREE

FREE Balance assessments Balance practice sessions every 15 minutes Assistive device evaluations Vision screening Medication evaluations (bring along your medication list)

Snacks, refreshments, and door prize drawing

Park Centre is Medicare certified so your skilled rehabilitation stay may be

100%

covered by Medicare Therapy available 7 days per week as well as on-site Aqua Therapy

To learn more call

641-791-5000

Dr. Thomas Hayden O.D.

NEWTON EYE CLINIC

500 First Street North • Newton, IA 50208


Page 10A

Friday, September 27, 2013

More Open Houses On Page B8

9:00am Start

Fall Open Houses Saturday, September 28th

New Price!

Open 9:00AM9:45AM

217 W. 4th St. S. $69,900

First Choice Realty

BIRKENHOLZ REALTY

Open 9:00AM10:00AM

836 E. 10th St. S. $137,500

Cute 2+BR, 1+BA home. Fenced backyard. Motivated seller.

3BR/3bath, 2 double garages, 1/2 acre

Shown By: Sheryl Briggs 641-840-0993 Doyle & Devoe

Shown by Deb Cross 641-521-8598 First Choice Realty

New Price!

Open 9:00AM10:00AM

1123 W. 9th St. S. $119,000

3BR/1bath, nearly ½ acre, lots of trees/privacy

Open 9:00AM10:00AM

Shown by Les Morgan 641-840-3826 First Choice Realty

708 E. 14th St. N. $69,900

2BR/1Bath, Harwood floors, Large back yard

Open 9:00AM10:00AM

550 S. 13th Ave E. $105,000

4BR/2bath, over 2,000 sq.ft. of living space. Shown By: Mark Siddall 641-521-2643 First Choice Realty

Shown by Dan Kelley 641-521-9260 First Choice Realty

Price reduced

Open 9:00AM10:00AM

1023 W. 2nd St. S. $79,900

2BR/1Bath, New kitchen, wood floors.

Open 9:00AM10:00AM

Shown By: Jason Morgan 641-792-6600 First Choice Realty

Open 9:00AM10:00AM

2 Holiday Ct. $119,900

713 S. 2nd Ave W. $129,900

4BR/2.5Bath, enclosed front porch, newer kitchen.

Open 9:00AM10:00AM

Nice 3BR/1.5BA Ranch on Private Drive Shown By: Krista Clark 641-521-7442 CENTURY 21 Signature Real Estate

1233 S. 6th Ave. E. $134,500

Move in ready 3BR ranch w/2 car attached garage. New roof in 2011. Spacious family room plus LR. Shown By: Caren DeVoe-Clevenger 641-792-5999 Doyle & Devoe

Remodeled 3 bedroom ranch on large private yard.

Shown By: Barb Barr 641-521-0512 RE/MAX Real Estate Concepts

Shown By: Ed Siddall 641-791-7600 First Choice Realty

Open 9:00AM10:00AM

209 W. 16th St. N. $69,900 MLS #65075

Open 9:00AM10:00AM

Open 9:00AM10:00AM

305 E. 28th St. S. $129,900

Split level home on lrg corner lot. 4BR, 2.5BA, 2 car garage. Main level laundry.

314 W. 4th St. S. $129,900 MLS # 65158

Larger than it looks, 3 bed 3 bath home. 3 garage.

Open 9:00AM10:00AM

Shown By: Barb Barr 641-521-0512 RE/MAX Real Estate Concepts

Open 9:00AM10:00AM

1439 N. 7th Ave. E. $129,900

3BR home located on cul-desac. Family room in LL w/4th BR potential. 3-seasons room.

Great Buy! 2-3 BR/ 2 BA Home

Shown By: Kathy Macy 641-521-1495 RE/MAX Real Estate Concepts

Open 9:00AM10:00AM

Shown By: Susie Otcheck-Hulin 641-990-5280 Doyle & Devoe

Shown By: Larry Rose 641-521-3107 Doyle & Devoe

206 E. 17th St. Pl N. $99,000

922 N. 10th Ave. E. $94,700

Move in ready, nice 3BR home. Mature trees & granite counters. Shown By: Shawn Preston 641-891-5549 Doyle & Devoe

New Price!

Open 9:00AM10:00AM

1404 S. 8th Ave. E. $92,000

New roof, vinyl siding, & windows. Beautiful hardwood floors & appliances included.

Open 9:00AM10:00AM

Shown By: Kevin McCartney 641-792-5657 Doyle & Devoe

504 W. 14th St. N. $51,500

2BR, 1BA, vinyl siding, newer laminate flooring, newer furnace, large deck, fenced yard, & 1-car garage.

Open 9:00AM10:00AM

Shown By: Sherri Newton 763-291-1444 Doyle & Devoe

602 E. 4th St. S. $80,000

Open 9:00AM10:00AM

508 W. 15th St. N. $109,900

5 BR w/newly finished LL, w/

905 E. 12th St. N. $125,900

Nice 3BR split level home. Spacious family room & screened-in porch on main level.

Open 10:00AM- 1413 N. 8th Ave. Pl. E. 11:00AM $127,900 MLS# 65018

Quiet, clean & comfortable! 4 bedrooms, 2-car garage, 2 BA.

Open 10:00AM11:00AM

family room! Formal dr., 2 BA, nice back yard, MANY UPDATES!

Park-like 1.65 acres on edge of town. Recently updated kitchen & family room area.

Shown By: Bruce Showalter 641-521-0605 RE/MAX Real Estate Concepts

Shown By: Shawnda Nine 641-521-5162 Home Buyers Marketing II, LLC

Shown By: Jo Jenkins 641-521-0302 RE/MAX Real Estate Concepts

1010 N. 5th Ave. W. $214,000

1.64 acres in town tucked away in secluded location! 3 garages, mother-in-law quarters, GORGEOUS!

Price reduced!

Open 10:00AM11:30AM

Shown By: Shawnda Nine 641-521-5162 Home Buyers Marketing II, LLC

Shown By: Dennis Combs 641-792-1212 Network realty

Shown By: Sheryl Briggs 641-840-0993 Doyle & Devoe

3212 S. 12th Ave W. $269,000 MLS #65129

Special Home, Updates include Windows & Roof.

New Price!

Open 10:00AM10:45AM

Open 9:30AM10:30AM

204 E. 4th St. S. $79,900

Open 10:00AM12:00PM

Shown By: Judy Ogier 641-521-7778 Advantage Real Estate

2408 N 6th Ave E.

Reduced to Bargain Price $219,900.00!!! Outstanding location, great front porch, oversize 3 car garage, two level deck, and patio. New kitchen counter top and tile. Many recent upgrades! MAKE AN OFFER!!!!

Shown By: Dick Boggess 641-521-3378 Birkenholz Realty

New Price!

Open 10:15AMAfternoon

with AuctioN of household items

1514 S. 13th Ave. E. $174,900

3BR, 3BA move in ready ranch. Main floor laundry. Oversized garage plus space for RV parking!

Shown By: Caren DeVoe-Clevenger 641-792-5999 Doyle & Devoe

Open 10:15AM11:15AM

305 N. 19th Ave. W. $135,000

Brick ranch w/3BR on main level & 2BA. Enclosed 3-seasons porch. Newer furnace & A/C.

Shown By: Shawn Preston 641-891-5549 Doyle & Devoe

Open 10:15 AM11:15 AM

409 E. 8th St. S. $104,000

Ranch w/2-car garage. Professionally landscaped yard, 18x20 family room addition, & newer furnace & A/C!

Shown By: Kevin McCartney 641-792-5657 Doyle & Devoe

Open 10:15 AM11:15 AM

610 West 16th St. N. $99,900

Sellers Motivated! Stop by and see what this cute & cozy ranch has to offer!

Shown By: Susie Otcheck-Hulin 641-990-5280 Doyle & Devoe

Open 10:15 AM11:15 AM

606 S. 14th Ave. W. $88,900

Nicely updated ranch, 2BR, 1BA, breezeway, some basement finishing, & large BY.

Shown By: Sherri Newton 763-291-1444 Doyle & Devoe


Local Sports

Friday, September 27, 2013

Newton

Daily News

Area runners take on challenging PCM cross country course By Jocelyn Sheets Daily News Sports Editor MONROE — There was one glitch at the 2013 PCM Invitational cross country meet Thursday. Times for the girls’ varsity/junior varsity races are 25 seconds short because of a clock-operator error, according to PCM head coach Eric Karr. “Other than that, we had a great home meet,” Karr said. “For our varsity boys and girls, they didn’t have the times I was hoping for, but that didn’t really surprise me. I worked them incredibly hard on Monday and Tuesday, not to mention our course is not even close to easy. “Effort wise, form wise, mental toughness wise, they are right where I want them. I reminded our kids that the race that counts is in a month, and that race is based on places not times.” North Polk captured the boys’ varsity title with 46 points. Knoxville was a distant second with 90 points. Collins-Maxwell/Baxter was the top local team, finishing seventh with 183 points, followed by Pella Christian with 188 points and Lynnville-Sully with 236 for eighth and ninth, respectively. Prairie City-Monroe’s Mustangs ended up 13th at their home meet with 341 points. Colfax-Mingo was 14th with 374 points. The meet was held at Gatewood Golf Course in Monroe. Ballard claimed the top honors in the varsity girls’ race with 68 points. Lynnville-Sully finished second with 87 points. CMB took fifth with 153 points and Pella Christian placed eighth with 216 points. The PCM Mustang girls finished ninth with 242 points. Colfax-Mingo was 11th with 256 points in the field of 13 teams. CMB’s Mark Deutsch turned in the top performance by area runners in the boys’ race. Deutsch ran the 5K distance in 19 minutes, 7.81 seconds. Jacob Lensing of Pella Christian earned the 10th-place medal in 19:12.62. Colin Thomason of CMB ran 16th in 19:43.30. Lynnville-Sully’s No. 1 runner of the day was Canyon Kuhlmann in 19:47.49. PCM’s Matt Chizek had the early lead in the race, which was won by Peter Smith of North Polk in 17:20.55. Chizek earned the final medal of the race for 25th in 20:02.79. Joining Chizek for the Mustangs were Chris Ellens in 81st in 22:13, Mark Bruxvoort in 139th in 24:47, Connor Brey in 144th in 25:13, and Lucas Rains in 161st in 26:55. Deutsch and Thomason led the CMB Raiders to

Jocelyn Sheets/Daily News Early in the boys’ varsity race Prairie City-Monroe’s Matt Chizek (933) has the lead in Thursday’s PCM Invitational cross country meet at Gateway Golf Course in Monroe. Chizek ended up finishing 25th on the day to lead the Mustangs.

seventh place. Calvin Jones placed 52nd in 21:13.28, Drake Caple finished 69th in 21:50.36, and Brock Johnston was 77th in 22:07.67. Others running for the Raiders and placing were: 88. Jacob Hallett, 22:38.18, 90. Eric Hall-Flooden, 22:42.90, 103. Connor Johnson, 23:09.35, 126. Lincoln Brown,

24:00.78, 176. Curtis Jones, 29:40.41. “I couldn’t be more happy with our teams tonight. They raced well, competed at a high level, and they all did the very best they could tonight. None of my athletes were happy with their times,” said Jerry Meinerts, CMB head coach. “I don’t want to make excuses for them, but this is a difficult, hilly course on a hot-windy afternoon. The conditions were not the best for running fast times. But, they showed a lot of heart and competed right where they should be this time of the season. I’m excited where we are right now in our training,” Meinerts added. Pella Christian’s No. 2 runner on the day was Grant Dunsbergen, finishing 30th in 20:19. Jonathan Beltman placed 46th in 20:51, Scott Haveman was 54th in 21:22, and Samuel Dahm was 70th in 21:55. Sam Lensing placed 115th in 23:28, David Dykstra placed 148th in 25:23 and Alex Vink was 173rd in 28:42. Running unattached, but from Pella Christian, were: 95. Gabriel Soler, 22:45, 142. Zack Shen, 24.57, 156. Kelvin Ouyang, 26:08. “Our athletes had great races. It wasn’t a fast course for times. The course was very challenging and hilly,” said Jocelyn Meinders, Pella Christian head coach. “Our team looked very competitive, both in the boys’ race and girls’ race, with the other schools at the meet. “Jacob had another strong showing resulting in a medal. Grant continues to compete well .” Combining with Kuhlmann for Lynnville-Sully’s team score were Ben Trettin in 63rd at 21:33.23, Talon Woods in 64th at 21:35.59, Jake Brand in 66th at 21:39.05, and Nic Lirio in 89th at 22:39.49. Others running for the Hawk boys were: Luke PCM INVITE See Page 3B Jocelyn Sheets/Daily News At left, Lynnville-Sully’s Alexa Vander Leest (831) leads a pack of girls , including CMB’s Chasity Moody (685) up a small hill during Thursday’s PCM Invitational cross country meet. The races were on Gateway Golf Course in Monroe.

Turning the Page

A life without Mo Rivera When I came up with the concept of “Turing the Page”, the basic idea for the column was to give you an avenue through which I would look ahead to upcoming events in By Dustin Turner sports or culture for Daily News that matter. Sports Writer With the MLB postseason a mere few days away and my Red Sox having clinched the division for the first time in six years, I expected to want to write about the phenomenal regular season I

have had with this collection of unshaven, misbehaving bunch, but I fould myself at a loss for words, and as you can imagine, that doesn’t happen much. Something else has been weighing on my mind, and it has to do with the last player in Baseball history to wear Jackie Robinson’s famous No. 42 — Mariano “the Sandman” Rivera. There are two reasons that the all-time great has been on my mind. One of them is an overall positive and the other is a total negative that absolutely confounds me. TURNER See Page 2B

Richardson, Wimberly carry Iowa State past Tulsa TULSA, Okla. (AP) — Sam Richardson completed 26 of 41 passes for 255 yards and two touchdowns, and Aaron Wimberly ran for 137 yards on 19 carries to help Iowa State beat Tulsa 38-21 on Thursday night. Jeff Woody had three short scores, and the Cyclones took advantage of four Tulsa turnovers to improve to 1-2. Tulsa dropped to 1-3. Tulsa quarterback Cody Green lost control twice on exchanges with a running back in the first half, then dropped a ball behind him attempting to pass on the first possession of

the second half. He was replaced a series later by redshirt freshman Dane Evans, who failed to generate any offense. Green returned in the fourth quarter, throwing a 26-yard touchdown pass to Thomas Roberson before being intercepted on his next possession. Green finished 18 of 31 for 237 yards with two touchdowns and the interception. Iowa State took a 7-0 lead on a 13-play, 89-yard drive capped by Woody’s 1-yard blast. Tulsa tied it on Trey Watts’ 1-yard run. The evenly played first half ended knotted at 14.


Local Sports

Page 2B

Friday, September 27, 2013

Raiders take four-set HOI conference win at Colfax By Dustin Turner Daily News Sports Writer COLFAX — Playing hard is the most any coach can ask for. Colfax-Mingo volleyball coach Brian Warrick came away from his team’s four-set loss (25-13, 25-18, 21-25, 25-19) to Collins-Maxwell/Baxter on Thursday night displeased with the loss, but at the same time, he was proud of his players’ hustle, something he said has not been on full display at certain points this season. “The girls played hard. They gave it their maximum effort. We had a couple slow times, but overall, we played hard,” Warrick said. “We kept balls alive that other times, we haven’t kept them alive because we haven’t played as hard as we did tonight. We scored points when we hit the ball in. We just didn’t hit enough.” Meanwhile, Scott Ranck’s CMB team has been on a roll, with this the team’s second straight Heart of Iowa Conference win of the week. It appears the team is starting to figure some things out. “I am really proud of how far our girls have come and how they have responded to situations so far this year. It is always good to get the win,” Ranck said. “We have pulled our record up to .500, a place CMB volleyball hasn’t been in five years. The girls are really excited about that and are starting to see that the hard work they have put in during the off-season, as well as the regular season, is starting to pay off. “ Set 1 started with a 1-0 lead in favor of the Tigerhawks after CMB’s dig went into the net. A kill by Payge Jurgens made the score 1-1. Abbie Haupert racked up back-to-back kills to give the Raiders an edge. Alex Hiavacek hit on an ace to make it 4-2. The

Tigerhawks saw a few of their kill attempts sail past the end line, falling behind 8-3. Katie Ziesman pushed the ball over the net to take a 9-3 lead. C-M got the ball back in their possession, and a kill attempt by Jurgens missed the mark to bring the home team within four. CM’s next serve was out. A diving dig by Haupert later in the set put the Raiders ahead 13-6. Following that dig and subsequent kill, Warrick called for a timeout. Coming out of the timeout, Mackenzie Schmitz hit an ace. A later ace by Ziesman gave CMB a 16-8 lead. C-M had a tip over the net by Jade Lewis followed by an ace by Riley Thompson to make it a seven point set. One of the Tigerhawks crossed over the line on a play at the net to give the visitors the ball back. An ace by Hannah McWhirter made it 19-10. Abbey Applegate hit an ace that was followed by a vicious spike by Haupert to make it 2411. C-M picked up a late ace by Allison Teed, but CMB closed out the set 25-13. Jurgens kicked off the second set for the Raiders with an ace. Later, a kill gave the Tigerhawks a 4-2 lead. CMB fought back to claim a 5-4 lead, but the Tigerhawks tied it back at five. A C-M dig sailed wide, giving CMB a 6-5 lead. C-M rallied back and reclaimed the lead on an ace by Lewis. A couple hits by CMB went into the net, making it 8-6. Haupert powered home a spike to pull within one. CMB retook the lead at 10-9. The two teams traded blows until CMB called a timeout after falling behind 16-14. It was the Raiders in possession of the ball when Applegate took control with her serves. She hit two straight aces and forced difficult returns. Up 20-16, she put away another ace, forcing Warrick to use a timeout. With Lewis serv-

ing, C-M got back within three points, but a couple balls flew into the net for the Tigerhawks, giving CMB a 25-18 win. The third set began with the Raiders hitting one into the net, which was followed by a service error by the Tigerhawks. C-M got the ball right back when the Tigerhawks also missed a serve. Brodka spiked one home, giving the Tigerhawks a 5-1 lead. Another ace by Teed made it 8-4. Thompson scored a kill on the next point. Two points later, Jurgens hit a kill to pull within three. C-M pulled away, and an ace by Amy Russell gave it a six-point edge. An ace to put the Tigerhawks up seven, and CMB coach Scott Ranck called for a timeout. With the Tigerhawks one point away from a third-set victory, the Raiders began to rally. CMB pulled within three points, but a ball into the net forced the match to continue to a fourth set. “They played hard all night, but it seemed like they were tougher in Set 3,” Warrick said. “The first set, I looked up at one point, and we were down 19-11, and it didn’t feel like we were playing bad enough to be behind that much. We were playing well, and it was weird how we fell behind.” Feeding off the momentum from their third-set win, the Tigerhawks jumped out to a 2-0 lead. CMB fought back to win the next three points, and the match was tied at four after a C-M serve sailed into the net. A kill by Dakota Brodka gave C-M a 5-4 lead. With Ziesman serving, CMB took a 9-6 lead, and an ace made it 10-6. At 116, C-M called another timeout. C-M got the next two point out of the timeout, but fell behind 19-11 after three aces by Jurgens. Haupert hit two straight kills to make it 22-11. At 24-12, CMB

Dustin Turner/Daily News Abbey Applegate serves up one of her eight aces for Collins-Maxwell/Baxter in the team’s win over Colfax-Mingo on Thursday.

rallied for seven straight points, before the match ended on a service error. “We came out playing very well the first set. The girls really got excited when Abbie Haupert thundered a hit to the floor towards the end,” Ranck said. “Second set, we started a little slow, and I called time out when we were down 14-16. The team responded by passing the ball well while Abbey Appelgate served up four or five aces. We came out really flat the third set and played catch-up. Credit C-M for not giving up and taking advantage of our mistakes. The fourth set, the girls really stepped it up, we got our serving going once again, and MacKenzie Schmitz was dead on with her setting for our hitters.” Despite the team’s effort, the loss is the headline for the Tiger-

hawks. Warrick saw some specific places for improvement, and he’s confident the team will work through those areas. “We have some stuff to work on, but we’ll get there. We need to work on a lot of transition stuff, positioning,” Warrick said. “The other team hit at us, and we left some gaps open. It’s things the girls know what to do, it’s just a matter of practicing it.” Applegate stuck out on the night, hitting 20-for-22 serving with eight aces. She also had two kills and eight digs. Haupert led in kills and digs with 14 digs and 11 kills. Jurgens had eight kills and two blocks. She also had four aces, hitting 13-for-15 serving. Schmitz led with 17 assists. Schmitz stood out serving as well, hitting 14-for-17 with four aces.

Turner: Sad to see Rivera ending his Hall of Fame career in Houston Continued from Page 1B First, as a Red Sox fan, I am sad to see the great Mo hang up his cleats. He was always the most classy individual on the baseball diamond. He never showed anybody up. Mo went about his business with a certain confidence that he didn’t need to show you up. In an era of elaborate celebrations from a guy who just pitched one-ninth of a baseball game, Mo ended every save with a cool high five and a sigh of relief. Other closers have feigned intimidation, the Giants’ Brian Wilson had the now-infamous “beard” and former Red Sox great Jonathan Papelbon was famous for pursing his lips and taking about a year and a half to deliver a pitch,

but Mo never needed to do that. He was a humble man from Panama who realized not only how good he was, but how lucky he was to have his job — a job he would hold for 19 seasons. Red Sox fans love to hate the Yankees, but there have been two or maybe three guys over the past 20 years that have gained the ultimate respect from “the Nation”, and one of them is the Sandman. I will miss Mo for two reasons — his greatness, and the fact that for the last 10 years or so, we have pretty much owned him. What has me upset is not Rivera’s timing or the fact that he’s leaving, but my grudge is with MLB. When the league first came up with the idea for a daily interleague game, I was in favor of

it, because it’s nice to see different teams get the opportunity to play your team. However, MLB should have changed its mind on this particular matchup. Instead of Rivera ending his career in the new Yankee Stadium, a house he helped build, against a team he has faced more than any other (cough, cough Boston, cough, cough) in front of 60,000 people, he is forced to spend the weekend in baseball’s equivalent to the middle of nowhere — Houston. The Astros played a game recently that went head-to-head with the NFL’s Sunday games and received a TV rating of 0. Nobody watched. No-bod-y. Rivera may very well have a save chance on Sunday, his last of a career amassing more than 600, and that save would

Middle school runners compete at PCM Invitational By Jocelyn Sheets Daily News Sports Editor MONROE — Collins-Maxwell/Baxter’s Shasta Moody won the middle school girls’ two-mile race at Thursday’s PCM Invitational cross country meet. Moody ran the race in 14 minutes, 41.71 seconds on the Gatewood Golf Course in Monore. Moody led the CMB middle school girls to the team title with 38 points. Prairie CityMonroe was second at its own meet with 51 points. Colfax-Mingo placed sixth with 121 points. “Two years ago we didn’t have a single girl out for middle school cross country. Now, second place at our home meet, it’s amazing, just amazing,” said Eric Karr, PCM cross country coach. There were five individual medals awarded in each of the races. PCM’s girls and the CMB girls’ each collected two of those medals. Along with Moody for CMB, Brenna Thomson finished fifth in 15:41.52. Ellie Steenhoek claimed third for PCM in 15:10.66, followed by teammate Baylee Smith in fourth at 15:30.78. “Ellie and Baylee led the way again going step-for-step until the last 50 meters. The seventh-grade girls then finished strong to get us the points we needed,” Karr said. “On the boys’ side, another strong race by Brady North, placing seventh.”

come against one of the most destitute baseball cities ever known to Man. The second Rivera said he was retiring, which was all the way back in February, MLB should have changed this for everyone’s sake. Instead, Mo will be forced to close the door in front of maybe 20,000 people in a city that means nothing to his personal history. With that being said, I am sad to see Mo go. It’s truly the end of an era of class and dominance for New Yorks No. 1 baseball team. Jeter is one foot out the door, and the great Rivera will no longer don the pinstripes. I can’t say I’m going to miss the heartbreak of watching them dance in the postseason, but the drama of a Red Sox-Yankees playoff game will probably never be the same

Middle School Volleyball

Pella Christian won the boys’ team title with 43 points. Collins-Maxwell/Baxter placed fourth with 83 points. Pella Christian was led by Nathan VerMeer, who finished second in 13:38.35, just behind Knoxville’s Blake Lee (13:26.88). CMB’s Max Van Mannen placed third in 13:53.02, followed by Colfax-Mingo’s Jonathan Jacobs at 13:55.94. Taking the fifthplace medal was Pella Christian’s Noah Van Maanen in 14:06.27. Here are the results for the area middle schools:

PCM: Girls-3. Steenhoek, 4. Smith, 15. Payton Schut, 17:00, 20. Sara Dudley, 17:37, 23. Kayleigh Fenton, 17:46, 26. Allison Stafford, 20:19, 49. Alex Inskeep, 22:26, 52. Maddy Buys, 23:04. Boys-7. Brady North, 14:37, 24. Brendon Vanderpool, 16:27, 35. Jonathon Heath, 17:34. CMB: Girls-1. Moody, 5. Thomson, 7. Grace Girard, 16:16.51, 14. Lauren Ratliff, 17:00.00, 21. Faithyna Leonard, 17:40.26, 29. Katie Garber, 19:35.74, 38. Whitney Spencer, 20:40.45, 48. Callie Haupert, 22:24.48, 50. Saylor Wattonville, 22:48.95, 51. Veronica Gregory, 22:51.99. Boys-3. Van Mannen, 22. Ian Thomson, 16:18.76, 23. Dalton Heer, 16:19.22, 32. Austin Galbraith, 17:14.26, 40. Derrick Klemme, 18:34.90, 45. McCade Gowdy, 19:36.80, 49. Addison Swaab, 20:30.63. Colfax-Mingo: Girls-19. Ilia Hostetter, 17:29.47, 26.Payton Rhone, 18:24.77, 30. Colleen Craig, 19:37.25, 31. Cassie Craig, 19:46.22, 45. Jordan Atwood, 22:07.28. Boys-4. Jacobs, 33. Nic Duffy, 17:22.89, 34. Jacob Frier, 17:26.86, 42. Chris Stuva, 19:15.18. Pella Christian: Girls-8. Claire Milligan, 16:28, 10. Josie Te Grotenhuis, 16:41, 27. Abby Te Grotenhuis, 18:43, 56. Hannah Dykstra, 30:40. Boys-2. VanMeer, 5. Van Maanen, 11. Lucas Bandstra, 14:55, 17. Martin Landazurri, 16:01, 26. Sam Carmichael, 16:42, 31. Michael Munoz, 17:12. Lynnville-Sully: Girls-none. Boys-25. Lucas Roland, 16:32.87, 48. Jared Bassett, 20:03.85, 50. Brett Maasdam, 20:40.67, 51. Mason Dunsbergen, 21:13.22.

Dave Hon/Daily News Tegan Simmons, an eighth-grade Newton Volleyball player, prepares to set the ball as it comes over the net.


Friday, September 27, 2013

Page 3B

PCM Invite: Coaches pleased with efforts by runners on hilly, challenging course Continued from Page 1B Jones in 107th at 23:13.18, Jim Trettin in 118th at 23:36.22, Bayley Morvant in 137th at 24:40.06, Lucas Smith in 163rd at 27:15.63, Kordell Mueller placed 168th in 27:51.68, and Lauri Ryypoe was 171st in 28:14.11. “This course can be a real challenge, if you’re not able to run hills effectively, both uphill and downhill. It’s really like a roller coaster ride that doesn’t have much of a flat section, just always going up and down and turning corners. Add in a return of 80 degree temps and strong wind and all the runners were in for a battle tonight,” said Darin Arkema, Lynnville-Sully head coach. “We had a couple of tough workouts, running and lifting weights, earlier in the week, so kids maybe had some soreness or tight muscles and didn’t feel real fresh tonight.” Jimmy Abel was the first Colfax-Mingo Tigerhawk to finish the race. Abel was 51st in 21:11.68, then Chris Stuva came across in 120th in 23:42.85. Ahn Hyeongyeop placed 135th in 24:33, Ryan McLain placed 138th in 24:44.74, and Adam Teed finished 160th in 26:50.93. K.C. Huffman was 164th in 27:76.69, and Will Dunsbergen was 170th in 28:01.19. “This was not our best night, when considering times but this seemed to be the consensus of all coaches,” said Zach Tomas, Colfax-Mingo coach. “I think the warm and windy temperatures plus the hilly course led to the slower times. Even though times were not great the efforts from kids was and I think this meet will make us better moving for-

Jocelyn Sheets/Daily News Prairie City-Monroe’s Amber Beener (917), on the right, battles another runner for position early in the girls’ varsity 4K race at Thursday’s PCM Invitational cross country meet in Monroe.

Now carrying adorable kids costumes just in time for

ward.” Tomas said the Tigerhawk squads were short-handed a bit. For the boys, Cameron Lantry was ill. For the girls, Carley Hodgson was gone on a family trip and Dakota Hostetter, who is ranked 10th in Class 1A, was playing volleyball. “The rest of the team stepped up and kept us very competitive,” Tomas said. Kennedi Hostetter led the Tigerhawk girls, earning the 23rd medal in a race featuring four other ranked runners. Kennedi Hostetter ran the 4K race in 18:30.89. Iva Moore finished 4th in 18:58.71, followed by Sara Lahart in 76th at 21:29.76, Donita Fatland in 87th at 22:02.81, and McKJocelyn Sheets/Daily News enzie Cogley in 101st Colfax-Mingo’s Jimmy Abel (657), at left, comes up the fi nal hill to the finish line in Thursat 23:12.55. Breawna day’s PCM Invitational cross country meet. At right, Colin Thomson (713) runs in the middle Schroder was 103rd part of the 5K race for CMB on the Gateway Golf Course in Monroe. in 23:36.42, Cassie Craig was 110th in 23:56.72, and Jordan Atwood was127th in 26:43.19. gressive downhill, and attacking uphill.” Prairie City-Monroe’s girls placed two in the The varsity girls’ race was won by Iowa Class 3A’s top-ranked Abby Kohut-Jackson of Ballard in medals at their home meet. Rachel Peter led the 15:55.11. Addie McKee of Davis County is ranked Mustangs with an eighth-place finish in 17:35.90, followed by Rachel Stafford in 13th at 18:00.82. 12th in Class 2A, and she was second in 16:42.69. Kayla Schakel finished 90th in 22:11.20 just Lynnville-Sully’s Alexa Vander Leest paced the Hawks to second place as a team. Vander Leest ahead of PCM teammate Shelby Palm in 22:11.80. is ranked 30th in Class 1A, and ran the race in Amber Beener placed 125th in 26:11.56. CMB’s Heather Jessen earned the 24th-place 17:21.71 for the sixth-place medal. Teammate Tara medal, running the 4K course in 18:32.53 to lead the Vos, ranked 25th in 1A, placed 10th in 17:42.75. Cori Rice was Lynnville-Sully’s No. 3 runner, fin- Raiders to fifth place as a team. Chasity Moody finishing 14th in 18:03.09. Karli Roozeboom picked up ished 28th in 18:42.88, followed by Stephanie Twohey the final medal of the race, placing 25th in 18:37.91. in 39th at 19:25.26, Mackenzie Klemme in 41st at 19:27.75, and Chantel Maxwell in 45th at 19:39.62. Elizabeth Van Manen took 46th in 19:41.79. Others running for CMB were: 49. Anna Jones, Others running for Lynnville-Sully were: 53. Line Ascanius, 20:10.53, 71. Kasiah Ehresman, 19:54,74, 92. Courtney Clapper, 22:18.13, 106. 21:09.95, 77. Alexis Hardenbrook, 21:30.83, 86. Elizabeth Jones, 23:42.44, 114. Veronica Condon, Kristine Jaennette, 21:55.52, 88. Kristy Sevcik, 24:33.11, 115. Raine Young, 24:33.35, 121. Jacquelyn Staudt, 25:31.66. 22:08.02. Pella Christian was paced by Chloe Dembski, “The girls got a little revenge from our home meet last week by beating Davis County tonight,” who captured the 21st-place medal in 18:25. MorArkema said. “In their last three races the girls have gan Anderson finished 47th in 19:47, and Andrea been first once and second twice, so they are racing Carballo placed 55th in 20:18. Damaris Worthingstrong. The boys had a long time since their last race ton was 59th in 20:27, and Abby Van Soelen finished at Ballard because we didn’t get their race in at our 74th in 21:19. Marina Shannon was 75th in 21:28, home meet. I saw a lot of improvement from them, followed by Danielle Nardini in 112th at 24:21, and especially on the hills. All of them were being ag- Brianna Van Donselaar in 130th at 26:53.

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.....................................$1,750.00 SCHOOL SPECIALITY INC......E ........................................$487.36 SCHUSTER, TODD....SE..$40.00 SCHWABE, STEPHANIE.......SE ............................................$0.50 SCHWARCK, LYNN. .SE.$508.29 SCIENCE CENTER OF IOWA SE.....................................$44.50 SCOTT ELECTRIC.....S....$81.07 SCRIMAGER, BRIAN.............SE ........................................$200.00 SD TIMING & PRODUCTION LLC................S...............$280.00 SELOVER, LAURA.....SE..$40.00 SHARP, LISA........SE.......$40.00 SHIRTCHAMP.COM...S..$777.12 SIGN PRO........SE..........$710.00 SIMON, PAULETTE.. .SE.$16.00 SIOUX CITY COMM SCHOOL DISTRICT.........T..........$6,880.50 SMARTSIGN..........S.......$270.00 SMITH, BETH.........SE......$32.60 SMITH, TAMI........SE......$254.34 SMITH, TIM........SE........$270.00 SMITH, TYLER.......SE......$50.85 SMITHS QUALITY RENTAL INC SE...................................$400.50 SNAI ASSOCIATION MANAGER SE...................................$125.00 SNAPPY POPCORN CO INC...S ..........................................$50.00 SNA.............SE...............$115.25 SOCIAL STUDIES SCHOOL SERVICE.........S.............$821.40 SOFTWARE UNLIMITED INC.SE .....................................$4,100.00 SOMETHING UNIQUE INC......S ........................................$386.40 SOUTH TAMA COMM SCHOOL DISTRICT.........T..........$8,014.32 SOUTHEAST POLK COMM SCHOOL DISTRICT..................T ...................................$78,929.45 SPAHN & ROSE LUMBER. . .S/R .....................................$1,302.35 SPENCE, JENNY.....SE......$1.90 SPORT SUPPLY GROUP INC.S ........................................$743.81 SPORTS PAGE GRAFX...........S ........................................$153.00 SPORTS PAGE.......S....$425.00 SPRINGER PEST SOLUTIONS INC.................U...............$105.00 SQUIRE, JOE.......SE........$15.77 STEENHOEK-SHAWVER, JENNY...................SE...............$2.45 STEPS TO LITERACY LLC......S ..........................................$99.38 STORE FOR HOMES. .S.$840.00 STRAYER, TIM.......SE.....$11.45 SUBWAY...........SE...........$25.00 SWANK, DEBBIE....SE.....$64.98 TALBOT, JEFF.........SE....$14.40 TARGET.............S............$33.22 TEACHER DIRECT. .S.$1,400.24 TEACHER SYNERGY INC.......S ..........................................$63.45 TEACHER’S DISCOVERY S $157.88 TEACHING STRATEGIES........S .....................................$2,632.24 TECH 4 LEARNING....S..$660.36 TIMECLOCK PLUS.E.$34,955.24 TRAINLAND USA....SE...$113.50 TROPHIES PLUS.....S.....$98.68 TURNER, WENDY..SE. .$201.26 UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE.........SE..............$1,000.00 UNIVEST CAPITAL INC...........S ........................................$798.00 US BANK...........SE.........$153.04 US TOY COMPANY...S. .$119.75 VALIANT...........S..............$40.52 VANBROGEN, BRENDA........SE ..........................................$11.15 VANDERVELDEN, MARVIN. .SE ........................................$100.00 VANDUSSELDORP, DEE ANN SE.......................................$1.85 VANMANEN, KEVIN. .SE..$90.00 VANWYK, NANCY...SE. .$806.11 VANZANTE, CHAD. .SE..$115.00 VERNE SIMMONDS INC..........S ........................................$420.00 VERNIER SOFTWARE & TECHNOLOGY...........S............$773.45 VERNON COMPANY..S .$285.70 VERWERS, TONYA....SE...$2.00 VINK, KAREN...........SE......$3.02 VIPS.............E.............$2,890.08 VIRAVONG, SACDKA............SE ........................................$220.60 WADE, CORY......SE........$14.80 WADZINSKI, ROBERT..SE.$3.95 WALMART STORES INC.........E .....................................$5,272.12 WALTON, PATRICIA...SE...$0.10 WARNICK, JONATHAN.........SE ..........................................$50.00 WATHEN, KAREN......SE....$2.20 WAUKEE HIGH SCHOOL......SE ........................................$125.00 WAYNE DENNIS SUPPLY CO S/R...............................$1,144.11 WEARMOUTH, WHITNEY.....SE ............................................$0.90 WELLS, JUSTIN....SE.....$100.00 WESTWOOD GOLF COURSE SE...................................$250.00 WETERS AUTO REPAIR & LP SE.....................................$14.00 WHEELER, LUANN......SE..$0.60 WHITE, BECKY.....SE.....$500.00 WHITE, DAVID........SE.....$72.00 WHITE, JESSICA......SE.....$0.20 WILCOX, JONI........SE.......$7.00 WILKINS, NICHOLAS............SE ........................................$931.68 WINDSTREAM IOWA COMMUNICATIONS..........U........$170.15 WOOD ROOFING CO............SE .....................................$2,140.14 WOODWARD-GRANGER COMM SCH DIST....T.....$965.79 WORLD’S FINEST CHOCOLATE S...................................$1,020.00 WORTHINGTON, MELINDA. .SE ............................................$7.99 WRIGHT, CHRIS.......SE.....$0.10 WURTH BAER SUPPLY COMPANY.............S/R............$554.25 ZEE MEDICAL INC....S...$304.25 ZEHR, ERIC..........SE.....$103.12 DISTRICT TOTAL .$1,576,810.39 KEY: D = DEBT E = SUPPLIES/EQUIPMENT R = REPAIRS S = MISC. SUPPLIES U = UTILITIES SE = MISC. SERVICES T = TUITION S/R = SUPPLIES/REPAIRS C = CONSTRUCTION September 27

VICES..............SE..........$274.29 ARNOLD MOTOR SUPPLY......E .......................................$405.74 AUTO JET MUFFLER CORP.S/R .......................................$442.04 B & H PHOTO VIDEO.E.$120.50 BALLARD COMM SCHOOL DISTRICT...........T.............$1,470.75 BARNES, ROBERT....SE...$0.15 BARR, NICHOLE....SE...$300.00 BARTELLO, JESSICA.SE.$75.01 BARTELS, MARY....SE..$252.79 BARTHOLOMEW, JARROD. .SE ...........................................$0.45 BAUER, SCOTT.....SE.....$40.00 BAUMANN, ELIZABETH........SE ..........................................$70.41 BAXTER COMM SCHOOL DISTRICT...........T............$78,747.30 BECKMAN GALLERY............SE ........................................$159.34 BENCHMARK EDUCATION CO S......................................$187.00 BENEDICT, MICHAEL...........SE ..........................................$10.85 BEST BUY.........S...........$249.00 BIEGHLER, CHRISTOPHER .SE ..........................................$69.95 BIEHN, JEFF........SE..........$0.13 BISHER, JERRY....SE...$100.00 BLACK HILLS ENERGY...........U ..................................$10,256.44 BOUND TO STAY BOUND BOOKS...........S...............$12.05 BOYLE, MARIAN......SE.....$1.35 BRECKENRIDGE, KRISTIN...SE .........................................$28.90 BROICH, SHELLY...SE..$300.00 BROOKER CORPORATION.S/R .......................................$309.25 BROWN & SAENGER .S.$330.17 BROWN’S SHOE FIT .S.$480.00 BYRUM, TRACI....SE.........$4.70 CH MCGUINESS CO INC.....S/R .........................................$44.43 CALLAGHAN, ROBERT.........SE ....................................$5,000.00 CAM COMMUNITY SCHOOL DISTRICT........T..........$2,941.50 CARDINAL LANES..SE..$165.00 CARDINAL PDC....S...$1,250.00 CARDINAL TROPHIES AND AWARDS......S...............$559.00 CARPENTER, KERI. .SE....$0.50 CARR, KIMBERLY....SE....$3.00 CENTER FOR EDUCATION & EMPLOYMENT LAW. .S..$159.00 CITRIX ONLINE LLC.. .S.$110.00 CITY OF NEWTON LANDFILL.U .........................................$30.00 CITY OF NEWTON WATERWORKS........U............$4,068.72 CITY OF NEWTON................SE ..................................$54,894.90 CIVIC CENTER.....SE......$20.00 CLAIM AID CONSULTING CORP SE...............................$3,114.70 CLEAR CREEK AMANA COMM SCHOOL DIST......T....$5,406.30 CLEMENTS, ED......SE....$13.25 CLUTE, BILLIE......SE......$52.99 COLLABORATIVE LEARNING INC..............S..............$1,473.80 COLLEGE COMM SCHOOL DISTRICT...........T................$151.02 COLOR CREEK.....S...$1,897.95 COMMUNICATIONS ENGINEERING CO....SE...$39,148.00 COMPANION CORPORATION .S .......................................$799.00 COOK PLUMBING SERVICES LLC.............S...................$64.67 COPPER CREEK CINEMAS..SE .......................................$105.00 CORY, MARLA.......SE.....$33.00 COUNCIL BLUFFS COMM SCHOOL DIST.....T.....$7,097.94 CREECHER FEATURE INC. .SE .......................................$295.20 CROSON, CRISTY....SE..$40.00 CROSS DILLON TIRE LINCOLN S..................................$1,039.20 CRS ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY...............S.................$520.00 CUPPLES, BUDDY...SE..$52.55 CURTIS, TERRY....SE...$115.00 DAKTRONICS INC .S.$34,417.00 DAMMAN, LISA......SE.....$21.50 DANCEWEAR SOLUTIONS.....S .......................................$333.80 DANNCO INC. . .S........$5,862.30 DARRAH, JANELLE.SE...$18.85 DAVENPORT COMM SCHOOL DISTRICT........T........$10,449.18 DAVIS, GREG....SE.......$270.00 DC SPORTS.......S.........$578.00 DEJONG, EMILY.....SE....$24.65 DELAGE LANDEN..E..$1,100.00 DELL MARKETING.E.$25,255.50 DEMCO INC........S.........$929.38 DES MOINES AREA COMM COLLEGE.......T.......$122,922.00 DES MOINES IND COMM SCH DIST..........T...............$12,809.73 DES MOINES REGISTER......SE ..........................................$33.00 DHS CASHIER 1ST FLOOR. .SE ...................................$33,762.94 DIAMOND VOGEL PAINT CENTER..............S/R.............$351.44 DICKEY, WILLIAM....SE...$90.00 DISCOUNT ELECTRONICS.....S ........................................$128.75 DOBEL, CHRIS.......SE.....$90.00 DODD AND SON’S TRASH SERVICE...........U...............$3,306.00 DOLLENS, GREG....SE....$47.50 DON’S TOWN & COUNTRY.....E ........................................$737.95 DOUGAN, JEANANN.............SE ........................................$200.00 DOWNEY, RANDY......SE...$0.25 DRAKE, RONI.........SE.......$0.35 DUBUQUE COMM SCHOOL DISTRICT.........T........$14,100.65 EARL MAY SEED & NURSERY. . S......................................$179.00 EARTHGRAINS BAKING CO INC.............S................$1,595.75 EAST MARSHALL COMM SCHOOL DISTRICT..T.$8,003.64 EDUCATIONAL INNOVATIONS INC...............S.................$175.89 ELBERT, ANDREW...SE.$261.45 ELS, LEANN........SE.........$11.55 ENYART, SCOTT....SE...$776.81 EXLEY, LAURA.......SE.....$54.85 EZ LEASE INC.......E.......$100.00 FAREWAY.......S..........$1,935.49 FARVER’S TRUE VALUE.....S/R ........................................$808.65 FARVER, CAROL......SE...$57.93 FASTENAL COMPANY............S ........................................$910.59 FIELD, THOMAS........SE....$4.85 FITZGERALD, DONALD........SE ........................................$256.88 FLINN SCIENTIFIC INC...........S ........................................$312.09 FLOOR STORE.......SE.....$30.00 FOGLESONG, JULIE .SE..$90.00 FOLLETT EDUCATIONAL SERVICES...........S................$102.96 LIBRARY REFOLLETT SOURCES........S.........$5,074.79 FORBES OFFICE SOLUTIONS... E..................................$2,225.26 FORBES, SUSAN.....SE...$74.45 FORE SEASONS GOLF PRACTICE CTR.........SE..........$150.00 FOREMAN, JACQUELINE.....SE .........................................$27.97 FOREST CITY COMM SCHOOL DISTRICT.......T..........$10,701.00 FORSYTH, CHRISTINE.........SE ........................................$601.59 FORT DODGE SENIOR HIGH SE..................................$100.00 FOUR OAKS OF IOWA.............T ...................................$34,825.47 FOX, AMANDA.......SE......$34.20 FRANCISCO, JULIE..SE.$141.59 FREESE, JAYNE.....SE...$257.82 FREIGHTLINER OF DES MOINES INC.......S..........$210.84 FREVERT-RAMSEY-KOBES.SE ....................................$4,576.83 GALVAN, JOSEPH......SE...$0.45 GARVIS, SCOTT...SE..$2,097.72 GBC............S....................$20.81 GEARHART, JILL......SE...$38.18 GERLACH, CODEE. . .SE...$0.60 GILBERT COMM SCHOOL DISTRICT.............T............$2,414.10 GILBERT, JAMES.....SE...$40.00 GOODING, JACKIE.....SE...$8.00 GORZNEY-COMER, JOLENE..... SE...................................$146.03 GRALNEK DUNITZ CO.........S/R ........................................$120.80 GREAT AMERICAN OPPORTUNITIES..........S................$669.30 GRIMM, MARLYS....SE..$890.00 GRINNELL SAFE & LOCK CO INC...........S/R.................$119.00 GRINNELL-NEWBURG COMM SCHOOL........T..........$10,295.25 HAMILTONS RADIATOR & GLASS INC.........R..........$434.96 HAMMEN, JED......SE.....$100.00 HAMMOND AND STEPHENS CO.............S....................$167.27 HARDING, TERRY...SE..$100.00 HARWOOD, JORGE...SE.$50.00 HAUGAN, MIRANDA.SE.$600.00 GAVENHILL, JOE....SE....$90.00 HAYDEN-MCNEIL.....S...$285.06 HEALY, BRYAN......SE.....$43.85 HEARTLAND AEA.....S...$587.00 HEARTLAND TEXTBOOK SERVICES.........S..................$712.75

GILBERT, JAMES.....SE...$40.00 GOODING, JACKIE.....SE...$8.00 GORZNEY-COMER, JOLENE..... SE...................................$146.03 GRALNEK DUNITZ CO.........S/R ........................................$120.80 GREAT AMERICAN OPPORTUNITIES..........S................$669.30 GRIMM, MARLYS....SE..$890.00 GRINNELL SAFE & LOCK CO INC...........S/R.................$119.00 GRINNELL-NEWBURG COMM SCHOOL........T..........$10,295.25 HAMILTONS RADIATOR & GLASS INC.........R..........$434.96 HAMMEN, JED......SE.....$100.00 HAMMOND AND STEPHENS CO.............S....................$167.27 HARDING, TERRY...SE..$100.00 HARWOOD, JORGE...SE.$50.00 HAUGAN, MIRANDA.SE.$600.00 GAVENHILL, JOE....SE....$90.00 HAYDEN-MCNEIL.....S...$285.06 HEALY, BRYAN......SE.....$43.85 HEARTLAND AEA.....S...$587.00 HEARTLAND TEXTBOOK SERVICES.........S..................$712.75 HENDRICKSON GREENHOUSE S......................................$747.10 HERCULIFT.........S......$6,621.99 HERMITAGE ART COMPANY INC................S..................$64.76 HERWEHE APPAREL.S.$416.00 HEWITT’S SERVICE CENTER LTD............S/R................$235.00 HILAND DAIRY.....S...$13,907.36 HILL, COLETTE.....SE......$62.35 HINTZ, MELISSA.....SE....$33.60 HIRTA PUBLIC TRANSIT......SE ........................................$148.00 HODGE, REGGIE......SE.....$5.90 HOPKINS SPORTING GOODS.S .....................................$1,743.62 HOPKINS, STEPHEN .SE.$62.36 HOPWOOD, CHRIS....SE...$0.05 HORN, JAMES......SE.....$566.84 HUEBNER, DEBRA.................SE ........................................$152.38 HURT, KAREN......SE.......$52.11 HY VEE INC........S.......$3,968.03 ILA/IASL..........S................$26.00 INDEPENDENCE COMM SCHOOL DISTRICT..................T ...................................$56,005.86 INDIANOLA COMM SCHOOL DISTRICT........T.........$16,959.23 INFINITE CAMPUS INC.........SE ...................................$34,959.00 INGLE, DAN.........SE..........$2.95 INSPIRATION SOFTWARE INC S......................................$756.00 INSTRUMENTALIS PRODUCTS CO................S...................$59.00 INTERSTATE BATTERY OF UPPER IA...........S/R............$328.75 INTERSTATE MUSIC. .S.$361.16 IOWA ACTE.......SE........$200.00 IOWA ASSN OF ALTERNATIVE EDUCATION......SE........$930.00 IOWA ASSN OF SCHOOL BUSINESS OFFICIALS....SE..$350.00 IOWA COMMUNICATIONS NETWORK...........SE.............$348.63 IOWA FFA FOUNDATION......SE .....................................$1,424.00 IOWA PORTABLE TOILET SERVICES............S...............$120.00 IOWA PUPIL TRANSPORTATION.................SE..........$780.00 IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY...SE ........................................$591.00 IOWA TESTING PROGRAMS.SE ...................................$10,274.31 IOWA-DES MOINES SUPPLY INC.............S.....................$90.98 ISEBA...........SE...........$6,025.42 JACK, MYRON......SE.......$90.00 JACOBSEN, COLLIN.............SE ........................................$195.00 JACOBUS, LARRY....SE.$210.00 JANSMA, JANET.....SE...$140.55 JAYMAR BUSINESS FORMS INC.............S...................$732.82 JOCHEMS, LAURA....SE..$24.45 JOHN DEERE FINANCIAL.......S ........................................$129.96 JOHNSON CONTROLS INC....S .....................................$8,630.00 JOHNSON, DOUG....SE...$50.00 JOHNSON, TROY.....SE.....$4.19 JOHNSTON COMM SCHOOL DISTRICT.........T..........$6,666.75 JORDAN, DAVID......SE......$2.60 JOSTENS..........SE...........$20.25 JOY, STEVEN......SE........$17.55 JP DRAIN CLEANING & PLUMBING.............SE................$349.85 JW PEPPER & SON INC..........S .....................................$2,902.33 KABEL BUSINESS SERVICES SE...................................$381.60 KALKHOFF, DAVID....SE..$40.00 KCOB AM/FM.........SE....$125.00 KELLY, MIKE........SE......$200.00 KILIAN, MARK.......SE.......$95.00 KIRKPATRICK, DEAN............SE ........................................$100.00 KLYN, JEFF..........SE........$11.20 KOZELISKI, CHRIS..SE..$115.00 KRASS, DANIELLE.....SE...$6.70 KRUSE, LEAH.......SE.........$9.55 L & L CUSTOM TOPS.R.$125.20 LAKESHORE........E........$752.87 LANGUAGE TECH...SE..$191.36 LARSON, DENNIS....SE.....$1.00 LASER RESOURCES..............E ....................................$3,498.16 LAUTERBACH BUICK PONTIAC SE................................$4,513.65 LEARNING POST.....S....$233.29 LEARNING RESOURCES........S ........................................$150.92 LINE LOGIC.........S.........$268.10 LINN, LEANNE.......SE........$4.99 LOCKWOOD, JIM.....SE...$30.55 LOTHE, MARY........SE.....$12.45 LUCAS, DAWN......SE.......$13.76 LUCK, LYNDSI......SE.....$600.00 LYNAM, SCOTT.....SE......$12.95 LYNNVILLE-SULLY COMM SCHOOL DIST....T...$103,633.76 MG LAUNDRY CORP............SE ........................................$118.00 MACKERMAN, MARK.SE.$62.30 MADISON ALL4YOU LLC........S ........................................$958.83 MADISON NATIONAL LIFE INSURANCE CO INC. . .SE.$108.82 MADSON, MIKE.....SE......$90.00 MAHASKA BOTTLING CO.......S ........................................$967.42 MANATTS........R.............$178.20 MAPES, TERRY......SE.......$3.50 MARK’S DANCEWEAR............S ........................................$102.40 COMM MARSHALLTOWN SCHOOL DIST.....T......$7,373.56 BROS DIST CO..........S MARTIN ...................................$43,359.87 MASS, KYLE........SE..........$8.70 MATTINGLY MUSIC STORE.S/R ........................................$388.94 MAXWELL, STACEY....SE..$1.95 MAYER-JOHNSON LLC...........S ........................................$135.99 MCDERMOTT, CINDY...........SE ..........................................$26.55 MCDERMOTT, STEVEN........SE ........................................$159.00 MCGRAW HILL SCHOOL PUBLISHING.........S........$199,436.31 MCLENNAN, MEGAN.SE .$55.14 MCNEER, DAVID......SE...$13.90 MENARDS.........E.............$29.92 MIDWEST BUS PARTS INC....S .....................................$1,885.37 MIDWEST INDOOR AIR QUALITY LLC............S...........$6,030.00 MILLER, DANIEL......SE..$100.00 MINNESOTA CLAY USA..........S ........................................$557.67 MIRR, RON.........SE.......$400.00 MNJ TECHNOLOGIES DIRECT INC.................S.................$31.27 MIT DISTRIBUTING......S..$82.03 MUELLER, JEREMY...SE.$62.20 MUNSON, TAMMY.....SE..$22.60 MUSCATINE HIGH SCHOOL...S ..........................................$30.00 NAPA AUTO PARTS..S/R.$10.49 NATIONAL FFA ORGANIZATION............SE...............$383.82 NAYLOR, KELLY.......SE.....$0.85 NCEF............SE...........$1,054.09 NDA SUMMER CAMPS............S .....................................$3,233.00 NEOPOST INC.......S......$570.09 NETSUPPORT INC....S..$628.72 NEW CENTURY FS INC..........S ...................................$24,253.00 NEWS PRINTING CO............SE .....................................$1,085.77 NEWTON ARBORETUM & BOTANICAL GARDEN...........SE ..........................................$50.00 NEWTON AUX POLICE RESERVES..........SE...........$180.00 NEWTON CLINIC....SE...$360.00 NEWTON COMM SCHOOL DISTRICT.............SE.........$3,629.18 NEWTON MANUFACTURING..S ........................................$466.90 NEWTON PARKS DEPARTMENT..............S..............$745.00 NEWTON SEED STORE......S/R ........................................$228.20 NICHOLS CONTROLS & SUPPLY INC.............S.............$25.02 NIHART, JEFF........SE......$90.00

NAPA AUTO PARTS..S/R.$10.49 visees under the will whose idenNATIONAL FFA ORGANIZAtities are reasonably ascertainTION............SE...............$383.82 able, or thereafter be forever September 27, 2013 NAYLOR, KELLY.......SE.....$0.85Friday, barred. NCEF............SE...........$1,054.09 Notice is further given that all perNDA SUMMER CAMPS............S sons indebted to the estate are .....................................$3,233.00 requested to make immediate NEOPOST INC.......S......$570.09 payment to the undersigned, and NETSUPPORT INC....S..$628.72 creditors having claims against NEW CENTURY FS INC..........S the estate shall file them with the ...................................$24,253.00 clerk of the above named district NEWS PRINTING CO............SE court, as provided by law, duly .....................................$1,085.77 authenticated, for allowance, and NEWTON ARBORETUM & unless so filed by the later to ocBOTANICAL GARDEN...........SE cur of four months from the sec..........................................$50.00 ond publication of this notice or NEWTON AUX POLICE REone month from the date of mailSERVES..........SE...........$180.00 ing of this notice (unless otherNEWTON CLINIC....SE...$360.00 wise allowed or paid) a claim is NEWTON COMM SCHOOL DISthereafter forever barred. TRICT.............SE.........$3,629.18 Dated this 3rd day of September, NEWTON MANUFACTURING..S 2013 ........................................$466.90 Karl Peters NEWTON PARKS DEPARTExecutor of estate MENT..............S..............$745.00 11366 Red Bridge St. Monroe, IA 50170 NEWTON SEED STORE......S/R Lee M. Walker ........................................$228.20 ICIS PIN No: AT0008212 NICHOLS CONTROLS & SUPAttorney for executor PLY INC.............S.............$25.02 Walker, Billingsley, & Bair NIHART, JEFF........SE......$90.00 208 N. 2nd Ave W. THE IOWA DISTRICT COURT Newton, IA 50208 JASPER COUNTY Date of second publication 27th IN THE MATTER OF THE day of September, 2013 ESTATE OF September 20, 27 AVIS M. KREAGER, Deceased NOTCE OF SPECIAL Probate No. ESPR036380 ASSESSMENT NOTICE OF PROBATE OF WILL, OF APPOINTMENT OF NEWTON, IOWA Notice is hereby given that the EXECUTOR, AND NOTICE TO Newton City Council approved CREDITORS Schedule 13-3: Assessments for To All Persons Interested in the the Expenses of Nuisance AbateEstate of Avis M. Kreager, Dement has been filed with the ceased, who died on or about November 22, 2011: Jasper County Treasurer under the authority of Iowa Code You are hereby notified that on §364.12. The assessments may the 9th day of September, 2013, be paid in full or in part without inthe last will and testament of Avis terest within thirty days, and M. Kreager, deceased, bearing thereafter all unpaid special asdate of the 6th day of November, 2003, was admitted to probate in sessments bear interest at the rate specified by the council. All the above named court and that properties are located within the Jonathan I. Otto was appointed City of Newton, Iowa. executor of the estate. Any action Schedule 13-3. to set aside the will must be Name Address brought in the district court of said county within the later to ocParcel Id Total Amount to be Assessed cur of four months from the date Krier, Nathan 427 N 8 Ave E of the second publication of this 0827377009 $100.00 notice or one month from the Beeler, Todd 922 E 9 ST N date of mailing of this notice to all 0827427002 $100.00 heirs of the decedent and devisees under the will whose idenMcKee, Brad & Ashley 1029 N 9 Ave E tities are reasonably ascertain0827431006 $200.00 able, or thereafter be forever Lester, Virginia 1500 E 6 ST S barred. 1303202011 $150.00 Notice is further given that all perCupples, Allen Jr 1409 E 7 ST S sons indebted to the estate are requested to make immediate 1303202021 $150.00 September 27, October 4 payment to the undersigned, and creditors having claims against CITY OF LAMBS GROVE the estate shall file them with the SPECIAL COUNCIL MEETING clerk of the above named district SEPTEMBER 18, 2013 court, as provided by law, duly Meeting was called to order by authenticated, for allowance, and Mayor Bill Perrenoud at 6:40 p.m. unless so filed by the later to ocRoll call: Tom Clark, Ken cur of four months from the secSlothouber, Cindy Humke, Kevin ond publication of this notice or Parsons, and Kent DeGoey one month from the date of mailpresent. Absent: None. ing of this notice (unless otherGuests: Robert Farrell, Dan wise allowed or paid) a claim is Kunkel, Clarence Planner and thereafter forever barred. th Gordon Brand Dated this 24 day of August, New Business: 2013 a. Robert Farrell, property owner Jonathan I. Otto of 106 Park Lane and contractor Executor of estate Dan Kunkel shared the plans for 3315 Dunham Dr SW a new garage, driveway, and Cedar Rapids, IA 52404 ideas how to handle runoff isLee M. Walker sues. Neighbors Clarence PlanICIS PIN No: AT0008212 ner and Gordon Brand expressed Attorney for executor their concerns for lot line and Walker, Billingsley & Bair nd runoff issues. Slothouber moved 208 N 2 Ave W and was seconded by DeGoey to Newton, IA 50208 accept the garage when moved 6 Date of second publication 27th inches to the north and with imday of September, 2013 proved runoff plans. Clark September 20, 27 moved and was seconded by THE IOWA DISTRICT COURT Slothouber to amend the motion JASPER COUNTY to include that Robert Farrell ensures guidelines for maximum IN THE MATTER OF THE square footage is followed. Upon ESTATE OF roll call vote, the amendment carELSIE LOGUE, Deceased Probate No. ESPR036374 ried unanimously. Upon roll call NOTICE OF PROBATE OF vote, motion carried unanimousWILL, OF APPOINTMENT OF ly. Parsons moved and was secEXECUTOR, AND NOTICE TO onded by Slothouber to adjourn CREDITORS at 7:15 p.m. Upon roll call vote, To All Persons Interested in the Estate of Elsie Logue, Deceased, motion carried unanimously. who died on or about August 8, Next City Council meeting to be 2013: held October 3, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. Minutes submitted by Christina You are hereby notified that on Machin, City Clerk. the 27th day of August, 2013, the Mayor last will and testament of Elsie Logue, deceased, bearing date of Bill Perrenoud the 9th day of January, 2013, City Clerk was admitted to probate in the Christina Machin September 27 above named court and that Dixie Casady was appointed executor Statement of Ownership, of the estate. Any action to set Management and Circulation aside the will must be brought in 1. Publication Title: Newton Daily New the district court of said county 2. Publication Number: 390-120 within the later to occur of four 3. Filing Date: 9/12/13 months from the date of the sec4. Issue Frequency: Monday - Frid ond publication of this notice or Except Jan. 1st, Memorial Day, Ju one month from the date of mail4th, Labor Day, Thanksgiving a ing of this notice to all heirs of the Christmas. decedent and devisees under the 5. Number of Issues Published Ann will whose identities are reasonally: 256 ably ascertainable, or thereafter 6. Annual Subscription Price: $127.8 be forever barred. 7. Complete Mailing Address Notice is further given that all perKnown Office of Publication 200 1 sons indebted to the estate are Ave. E., PO Box 967, Newton, requested to make immediate 50208-3716 payment to the undersigned, and Contact Person Dan Goetz creditors having claims against Telephone 641-792-3121 the estate shall file them with the 8. Complete Mailing Address of Hea clerk of the above named district quarters or General Business Office court, as provided by law, duly Publisher 200 1st Ave. E., PO B authenticated, for allowance, and 967, Newton, IA 50208-3716 unless so filed by the later to oc9. Full names and Complete Maili cur of four months from the secAddresses of Publisher, Editor, a ond publication of this notice or Managing Editor one month from the date of mailPublisher ing of this notice (unless otherDan Goetz wise allowed or paid) a claim is 200 1st Ave. E., PO Box 967 thereafter forever barred. Newton, IA 50208-3716 Dated this 23rd day of August, Editor 2013 Bob Eschliman Dixie Casady 200 1st Ave. E., PO Box 967 Executor of estate Newton, IA 50208-3716 815 W. 6th St. S Managing Editor Newton, IA 50208 Bob Eschliman Lee M. Walker 200 1st Ave. E., PO Box 967 ICIS PIN No: AT0008212 Newton, IA 50208-3716 Attorney for executor 10. Owner Walker, Billingsley & Bair News Printing Company 208 N 2nd Ave W 200 1st Ave. E., PO Box 967 Newton, IA 50208 Newton, IA 50208-3716 Date of second publication 27th Shaw Media Company day of September, 2013 444 Pine Hill Dr., PO Box 487 September 20, 27 Dixon, IL 61021 THE IOWA DISTRICT COURT 11. None JASPER COUNTY 12. Tax Status Not applicable 13. Publication Title: Newton Da IN THE MATTER OF THE News ESTATE OF 14. Issue Date for Circulation Da SHIRLEY I. PETERS, Deceased Below: September 2012- August 201 Probate No. ESPR036378 NOTICE OF PROBATE OF 15. Extent and Nature of Circulation WILL, OF APPOINTMENT OF a. Total Number of Copies (Net pre run) Average No. Copies Each Iss EXECUTOR, AND NOTICE TO During Preceding 12 months: 3814 CREDITORS No. Copies of Single Issue Publish To All Persons Interested in the Nearest to Filing Date: 3707 Estate of Shirley I. Peters, Deceased, who died on or about Aub. Paid Circulation (By Mail and Ou gust 21, 2013: side the Mail) (1) Mailed Outside-County Paid Su You are hereby notified that on scriptions Stated on PS Form 354 the 4th day of September, 2013, Average No. copies each issue duri the last will and testament of preceding 12 months: 101 Shirley I. Peters, deceased, bearing date of the 14th day of DeNo. copies of single issue publish cember, 1989, was admitted to nearest to filing date: 93 (2) Mailed In-County Paid Subscr probate in the above named court tions Stated on PS Form 3541. and that Karl Peters was appointAverage no. copies each issue duri ed executor of the estate. Any acpreceding 12 months: 229 tion to set aside the will must be brought in the district court of No. copies of single issue publish said county within the later to ocnearest to filing date: 206 (3) Paid Distribution Outside the Ma cur of four months from the date Including Sales Through Dealers a of the second publication of this Carriers, Street Vendors, Coun notice or one month from the Sales, and Other Paid Distributi date of mailing of this notice to all heirs of the decedent and deOutside USPS®. visees under the will whose idenAverage no. copies each issue duri preceding 12 months: 3244 tities are reasonably ascertainNo. copies of single issue publish able, or thereafter be forever nearest to filing date: 3167 barred. (4) Paid Distribution by Other Class Notice is further given that all persons indebted to the estate are of Mail Through the USPS. requested to make immediate Average no. copies each issue duri preceding months: 0 payment to the undersigned, and No. copies of single issue publish creditors having claims against nearest to filing date: 0 the estate shall file them with the c. Total Paid Distribution (Sum of 1 clerk of the above named district court, as provided by law, duly (1), (2), (3), and (4)) authenticated, for allowance, and Average no. copies each issue duri preceding 12 months: 3574 unless so filed by the later to ocNo. copies of single issue publish cur of four months from the secnearest to filing date: 3466 ond publication of this notice or d. Free or Nominal Rate Distributi one month from the date of mailing of this notice (unless other(By Mail and Outside the Mail) wise allowed or paid) a claim is (1) Free or Nominal Rate Outsid County Copies included on PS Fo thereafter forever barred. 3541 Dated this 3rd day of September, Average no. copies each issue duri 2013 preceding 12 months: 18 Karl Peters Executor of estate No. copies of single issue publish 11366 Red Bridge St. nearest to filing date: 18 (2) Free or Nominal Rate outsid Monroe, IA 50170

Public Notices THE IOWA DISTRICT COURT JASPER COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF Ann Charlton Greulich, Deceased Probate No. ESPR036371 NOTICE OF PROBATE OF WILL, OF APPOINTMENT OF EXECUTOR, AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS To All Persons Interested in the Estate of Ann Charlton Greulich, Deceased, who died on or about April 14, 2013: You are hereby notified that on the 21st day of August, 2013, the last will and testament of Ann Charlton Greulich, deceased, bearing date of the 11th day of July, 2006, and the First Codicil to said Last Will and Testament dated April 19, 2010 was admitted to probate in the above named court and that PETER CHARLTON GREULICH was appointed executor of the estate. Any action to set aside the will must be brought in the district court of said county within the later to occur of four months from the date of the second publication of this notice or one month from the date of mailing of this notice to all heirs of the decedent and devisees under the will whose identities are reasonably ascertainable, or thereafter be forever barred. Notice is further given that all persons indebted to the estate are requested to make immediate payment to the undersigned, and creditors having claims against the estate shall file them with the clerk of the above named district court, as provided by law, duly authenticated, for allowance, and unless so filed by the later to occur of four months from the second publication of this notice or one month from the date of mailing of this notice (unless otherwise allowed or paid) a claim is thereafter forever barred. Dated this 24th day of September, 2013. PETER CHARLTON GREULICH Executor of estate 1234 Candlewood Hill Road Northbrook, IL 60062 Gregory L. Kenyon ICIS PIN No: AT0004181 Attorney for executor Bradshaw Law Firm 801 Grand Avenue, Suite 3700 Des Moines, IA 50309-8004 Date of second publication 4th day of October, 2013 September 27, October 4

NITZ, DAVID.........S....... $100.00 NOBLE FORD OF NEWTON .S/R ........................................$387.31 NOBLE, JASON.....SE....$300.00 NORRIS, VERA.......SE.....$50.00 NORSOLV..........S/R.......$400.80 NORVELL, JENNIFER...........SE ..........................................$42.62 NORWALK HIGH SCHOOL......S ........................................$180.00 NPC INTERNATIONAL..S.$32.49 O’HALLORAN INTERNATIONAL INC..........S/R...............$1,117.39 O’KEEFE ELEVATOR .R.$206.00 O’REILLY AUTOMOTIVE STORES INC.....S/R....$1,298.08 O’ROAKE, CHERYL..SE.$328.63 OFFICE DEPOT.......S.....$110.90 OLSON, GLEN........SE.......$0.40 OMNI CHEER......S.........$671.89 ORIENTAL TRADING CO INC .S ........................................$398.64 OSKALOOSA COMM SCHOOL DISTRICT.........T..........$3,634.74 OSWALT, DAVID......SE...$10.85 OZINGA, LAURIE.....SE......$9.05 PJ DELI...........SE.............$88.00 PANOSH, GEORGE...SE..$40.00 PATEL, MAHESH......SE...$11.40 PATTERSON INTERPRISES...S .....................................$4,655.07 PC & MAC EXCHANGE...........E ..................................$14,731.00 PCM COMMUNITY SCHOOL DISTRICT.........T........$60,482.86 PELLA CHRISTIAN HIGH SCHOOL...........T.............$70.00 PERFECTION LEARNING CORP S......................................$313.52 PERFORMANCE SIGN & DESIGN............S..............$2,457.93 PERRY COMMUNITY SCHOOL DISTRICT..........SE...........$80.00 PERSPECTIVE CONSULTING PARTNERS LLC. . .SE..$8,000.00 PETERS, WILLIAM....SE..$96.50 PETERSON, JAY....SE...$150.00 PETERSON, JULIE.....SE...$3.45 PICK, NATHAN.....SE.... $100.00 PIERCE, BRANDY.....SE....$1.50 PIZZA RANCH.......S.......$449.25 PLUMBMASTER INC. .S.$735.18 POLITO, TREVOR....SE..$200.00 POSTMASTER......SE..$1,868.00 PRESTO-X LLC........U...$404.35 PRIMARY CONCEPTS.............S ........................................$158.26 PROCENKO, LEO.....SE...$41.05 PUBLIC FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT INC..........SE........$500.00 QUICK, SHERRI......SE.....$17.60 QUILL CORP.......E......$3,097.41 RABEDEAUX, STEVEN.........SE ..........................................$43.75 RAINEY, LORI........SE........$0.25 RANARD, SUSANNE. .SE.$21.97 REALLY GOOD STUFF INC.....S ........................................$576.87 REDALEN, ED.......SE.....$138.00 REECE, MICHELLE....SE...$0.10 REINHART INST FOODS INC..S ........................................$657.49 REMEDIA PUBLICATIONS INC S......................................$706.95 REYNOLDS, DARCEY...........SE ..........................................$24.51 RHOADS, BRUCE.....SE...$19.60 RICKERS, TERRY....SE...$34.70 RICKETTS, VICTORIA...........SE ....................................$1,250.92 RIEMAN MUSIC INC.............S/R .....................................$3,044.65 RIGGS PRINTING.....S...$388.75 ROSE, STACY........SE.......$1.80 ROSS, TINA.........SE........$40.00 SADLER POWER TRAIN INC S/R..................................$541.83 SAFE AND CIVIL SCHOOLS. . .S .....................................$9,333.92 SAI.............SE..................$95.00 SAMSON LAWN CARE, JIM..SE ........................................$245.00 SAMSON, LORI......SE......$62.55 SAX ARTS AND CRAFTS........S .....................................$1,460.01 SCHMIDT, STEVE. . .SE..$115.00 SCHOLASTIC BOOK FAIRS....S ........................................$409.48 SCHOLASTIC INC...S..$1,224.93 SCHOOL BUS SALES.E.$129.89 SCHOOL DINING SYSTEM...SE .....................................$1,750.00 SCHOOL SPECIALITY INC......E ........................................$487.36 SCHUSTER, TODD....SE..$40.00 SCHWABE, STEPHANIE.......SE ............................................$0.50 SCHWARCK, LYNN. .SE.$508.29 SCIENCE CENTER OF IOWA SE.....................................$44.50 SCOTT ELECTRIC.....S....$81.07 SCRIMAGER, BRIAN.............SE ........................................$200.00 SD TIMING & PRODUCTION LLC................S...............$280.00 SELOVER, LAURA.....SE..$40.00 SHARP, LISA........SE.......$40.00 SHIRTCHAMP.COM...S..$777.12 SIGN PRO........SE..........$710.00 SIMON, PAULETTE.. .SE.$16.00 SIOUX CITY COMM SCHOOL DISTRICT.........T..........$6,880.50 SMARTSIGN..........S.......$270.00 SMITH, BETH.........SE......$32.60 SMITH, TAMI........SE......$254.34 SMITH, TIM........SE........$270.00 SMITH, TYLER.......SE......$50.85

NEWTON COMMUNITY SCHOOL DISTRICT Paid Bills - June 1-30, 2013 VENDOR........DESC.....AMOUNT A TEAM APPAREL.S...$1,004.75 ACE EDUCATIONAL SUPPLIES S........................................$26.55 ADA BADMINTON & TENNIS. .S ........................................$323.95 ADAMOWSKI, TRACEY.........SE ........................................$400.00 ADVENTURELAND................SE .....................................$2,972.00 AGILE SPORTS TECHNOLOGIES............S..............$2,508.00 AGOCS, LOUIS......SE......$95.00 AHLERS & COONEY PC.......SE .....................................$1,430.50 ALL AMERICAN SPORTS CORP E.....................................$474.97 ALLEN ENTERPRISES INC.....S ....................................$4,075.06 ALLIANT UTILITIES INC..........U ..................................$42,801.25 AMADEO, MARK...SE......$90.00 AMAZON.........S...........$3,264.27 AMENSON, BOB......SE....$20.85 AMES COMMUNITY SCHOOL DISTRICT........T...........$2,065.44 AMES ENVIRONMENTAL INC SE..................................$600.00 AMSAN LLC.....S.........$5,152.95 AMSTERDAM PRINTING & LITHO............S..............$298.21 AOSNC LLC.......SE.......$131.25 APPLE COMPUTER INC..........E ..................................$26,740.73 ARAMARK UNIFORM SERVICES..............SE..........$274.29 ARNOLD MOTOR SUPPLY......E .......................................$405.74 AUTO JET MUFFLER CORP.S/R .......................................$442.04 B & H PHOTO VIDEO.E.$120.50 BALLARD COMM SCHOOL DISTRICT...........T.............$1,470.75 BARNES, ROBERT....SE...$0.15 BARR, NICHOLE....SE...$300.00 BARTELLO, JESSICA.SE.$75.01 BARTELS, MARY....SE..$252.79 BARTHOLOMEW, JARROD. .SE ...........................................$0.45 BAUER, SCOTT.....SE.....$40.00 BAUMANN, ELIZABETH........SE ..........................................$70.41 BAXTER COMM SCHOOL DISTRICT...........T............$78,747.30 BECKMAN GALLERY............SE ........................................$159.34 BENCHMARK EDUCATION CO S......................................$187.00 BENEDICT, MICHAEL...........SE ..........................................$10.85 BEST BUY.........S...........$249.00


Sales, and Other Paid Distribution Outside USPS®. Average no. copies each issue during preceding September 12 months: 3244 27, 2013 Friday, No. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date: 3167 (4) Paid Distribution by Other Classes PERSONAL of Mail Through the USPS. Average no. copies each issue during preceding months: 0 NARCOTICS No. copies of single issue published ANONYMOUS nearest to filing date: 0 Meets Sunday, c. Total Paid Distribution (Sum of 15b Wednesday and Friday (1), (2), (3), and (4)) Average no. copies each issue during 7:00 PM in Basement of preceding 12 months: 3574 St. Stephan's Episcopal No. copies of single issue published Church nearest to filing date: 3466 d. Free or Nominal Rate Distribution Northeast (By Mail and Outside the Mail) (1) Free or Nominal Rate OutsideCounty Copies included on PS Form GARAGE SALE 3541 Fri. Sept. 27th 8am-5pm Average no. copies each issue during Sat. Sept. 28th 8am-Noon preceding 12 months: 18 No. copies of single issue published Truck bed tool box, mens, nearest to filing date: 18 women & young adult (2) Free or Nominal Rate outside- name brand clothing, scrap County Copies Included on PS Form booking and craft supplies, 3541 machine, stereo Average no. copies each issue during weight preceding 12 months: 0 with CD player and speakNo. copies of single issue published ers, clarinet, 35mm Sony nearest to filing date: 0 (3) Free or Nominal Rate Copies camera & zoom lense, oak Mailed at Other Classes Through the quilt rack, oak shelves, USPS twin bookcase headboard Average no. copies each issue during with frame, bedding, coffee preceding 12 months: 2 No. copies of single issue published table, walker with hand brakes, older TV with oak nearest to filing date: 2 (4) Free or Nominal Rate Distribution cabinet, dining table with 4 Outside the Mail chairs, Xbox and games, Average no. copies each issue during books and misc. items. preceding 12 months: 0 809 E 18th St N No. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date: 0 GARAGE SALE e. Total Free or Nominal Rate Distribution Fri. Sept. 27th 9am-?? Average no. copies each issue during Sat. Sept. 28th 8am-Noon preceding 12 months: 20 canvas scenery No. copies of single issue published 30x42 print, 20x33 Sir Lancelot nearest to filing date: 20 f. Total distribution picture, 2 entertainment Average no. copies each issue during centers, 2 end tables, preceding 12 months: 3594 No. copies of single issue published loads of VHS & DVD's, PS1 player with lots of nearest to filing date: 3486 g. Copies not Distributed games, kids boardgames, Average no. copies each issue during small Keurig coffeemaker, preceding 12 months: 75 No. copies of single issue published regular coffeemaker, seasonal decorations some nearest to filing date: 75 h. Total metal, housewares, cosAverage no. copies each issue during tume jewelry, too much to preceding 12 months: 3669 No. copies of single issue published mention. 605 E 8th St N nearest to filing date: 3561 i. Percent paid MOVING SALE Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months: 99% Fri. Sept. 27th 8am-4pm No. copies of single issue published Sat. Sept. 28th 8am-Noon nearest to filing date: 99% reclining sofa, 16. Publication of Statement of Own- Leather ership will be printed in the 9/27/13 is- hide-a-bed love seat, dinsue of this publication ing table and chairs, rail17. Signature and Title of Editor, Pub- road pictures, model train lisher, Business Manager, or Owner items, Hawkeye and NewDaniel A. Goetz 9/12/13 I certify that all information furnished ton collectibles, baskets, on this form is true and complete. I un- collectors scale dollhouse, derstand that anyone who furnishes car mats, toddler treefalse or misleading information on this form or who omits material or informa- house, Wii remote charger, tion requested on the form may be stereo, speakers, and lots subject to criminal sanctions (includ- of misc. ing fines and imprisonment) and/or 1906 N 2nd Ave E civil sanctions (including civil penalties). Northwest September 27

Public Notices

IN THE IOWA DISTRICT COURT FOR Jasper COUNTY EQUITY NO. EQCV118487 ORIGINAL NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. William F. Straight; Citifinancial Inc.; Nancy M. Straight; Skiff Medical Center; and Parties in Possession, Defendants. To the above-named Defendants: Nancy M. Straight You are notified there was on 7/25/2013 filed in the Office of the Clerk of the above-named Court a Foreclosure Petition, which prays for foreclosure of a mortgage in favor of the Plaintiff on the property described herein and judgment in rem in the amount of $84,028.35 plus interest at the rate of 3.25% per annum from 2/1/2013, such amount equaling $7.48 per day, the costs of the action including title costs of $225.00, and reasonable attorney fees and that said sums be declared a lien upon the followingdescribed premises from 4/5/2003, located in Jasper County, Iowa, to-wit: Parcel "A" of part of the Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section Twenty-one, Township Eighty-one North, Range Nineteen West of the 5th P.M., Jasper County, Iowa, as appears in the plat of survey of record in Book 970 at Page 451 in the Office of the Recorder of said County that the mortgage on the abovedescribed real estate be foreclosed, that a special execution issue for the sale of as much of the mortgaged premises as is necessary to satisfy the judgment and for other relief as the Court may deem just and equitable. The attorney for the Plaintiff is David M. Erickson, whose address is The Davis Brown Tower, 215 10th Street, Suite 1300, Des Moines, Iowa 50309-3993, Phone: (515) 288-2500, Facsimile: (515) 243-0654. NOTICE THE PLAINTIFF HAS ELECTED FORECLOSURE WITHOUT REDEMPTION. THIS MEANS THAT THE SALE OF THE MORTGAGED PROPERTY WILL OCCUR PROMPTLY AFTER ENTRY OF JUDGMENT UNLESS YOU FILE WITH THE COURT A WRITTEN DEMAND TO DELAY THE SALE. IF YOU FILE A WRITTEN DEMAND, THE SALE WILL BE DELAYED UNTIL SIX MONTHS FROM ENTRY OF JUDGMENT IF THE MORTGAGED PROPERTY IS YOUR RESIDENCE AND IS A ONEFAMILY OR TWO-FAMILY DWELLING OR UNTIL TWO MONTHS FROM ENTRY OF JUDGMENT IF THE MORTGAGED PROPERTY IS NOT YOUR RESIDENCE OR IS YOUR RESIDENCE BUT NOT A ONE-FAMILY OR TWO-FAMILY DWELLING. YOU WILL HAVE NO RIGHT OF REDEMPTION AFTER THE SALE. THE PURCHASER AT THE SALE WILL BE ENTITLED TO IMMEDIATE POSSESSION OF THE MORTGAGED PROPERTY. YOU MAY PURCHASE AT THE SALE. You must serve a motion or answer on or before the 17th day of October, 2013, and within a reasonable time thereafter, file your motion or answer, in the Iowa District Court for Jasper County, Iowa, at the County Courthouse in Newton, Iowa. If you do not, judgment by default may be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Petition. If you require the assistance of auxiliary aids or services to participate in court because of a disability, immediately call your district ADA coordinator at 515-2863394. (If you are hearing impaired, call Relay Iowa TTY at 1-800-735-2942.) Disability coordinators cannot provide legal advice. Clerk of the Above Court, Jasper County Courthouse Newton, Iowa IMPORTANT YOU ARE ADVISED TO SEEK LEGAL ADVICE AT ONCE TO PROTECT YOUR INTERESTS. 27th day of September, 2013 Date of Third Publication September 13, 20, 27

3 FAMILY Garage Sale Fri. Sept. 27th 8am-5:30pm Sat. Sept. 28th 8am-Noon Ceiling fan, fishing poles, boy's clothes size 12 to young men (American Eagle, Fox, Aeropostal), clocks, cameras, recumbent exercise bike, portable DVD player and wireless headphones, Nintendo Gameboy Advance & games, household items, women's clothing – leather coat, TV's and VCR's, boys baseball sliding shorts, winter coats, jeans, and misc. 155 N 35th Ave W Southeast

GARAGE SALE Thurs. Sept. 26th 5pm-8pm Fri. Sept. 27th 9am-1pm Sat. Sept. 28th 9am-1pm Drop off you unwanted newspapers, towels, bottles or cans for the Animal Rescue League (JCARL) 1621 S. 12th Ave E. GARAGE SALE/FARM Sale Thurs. Sept. 26th 8am-5pm Fri. Sept. 27th 8am-5pm Equipment: 1956 MSTO 35 tractor/gas no power stearing TTO, Tow, Hi low- HiLo-Range; brush hog rotary cutter 5', slip clutch, sq 600; SEMCO weed sprayer 55 gallon, 3) 2-4' booms, hand held sprayer, 8' scape blade; JD 160 riding lawn mower, 12.5 hp; Bachtold 5 wheels brush and grass cutter; push lawn mower; Stihl chain saw, 300 gal gas tank on elevated metal stand; earthquake gas post hole diggers; large dog house, aluminum extension ladder, metal fence post, round wood fence post, rolls of new barbed wire & woven wore fencing tools, kerosene heater, many log chains, chain hoist, step ladders, cutting torch equipment, empty oxygen & acetylene tank, large size metal stand grinder on stand, wheelbarrow, many tools, plumbing parts, garden tools, electrical parts, many sizes of nuts, nails, and washers, and much much more! 1914 Monarch Ave Reasnor Rd South (Hwy S-74) to Monarch Ave, turn East ½ mile on gravel Rd HERITAGE MANOR Garage Sale Sat. Sept. 28th 10am-2pm To benefit the resident's activity fund. Visit with JCARL's adoptable helps looking to find their Forever Homes!! 1743 S 8th Ave E (Front Lot at Heritage Manor)

Page 5B Southwest

GARAGE SALE Fri. Sept 27th 2pm-6pm Sat. Sept. 28th 8am-1pm Brand name girls clothing & shoes NB-5T, boys clothing NB-3T (Gap, Gymboree, etc.), Brand name Women's clothing (Gap, Banana Republic, J Crew), maternity clothes, shoes, purses & accessories, single jogging stroller, double stroller, crib bedding, toys, books, misc children's & household items. 1214 S 15th Ave W

PET CARE

HOOVES AND Paws Pet Services In home pet care for all pets, 35 years experience. Feeding, walking, clean up, and much more. Affordable rates, Newton and surrounding areas. I do have references, please call Donna at 641-5217324 SATELLITE

GARAGE SALE Fri. Sept. 27th 8:30am-5:30pm Sat. Sept. 28th 8:30am-12:30pm Glass door knobs, collectible blue canning jars, sea shells, old tilt top drawing table, pictures and picture frames, Christmas decorations, Halloween items, booksvintage school and children's Christian fiction, cooking magazines, tackle box, Pyrex, Corning Ware, silverware, utensils, cookie cutters, pottery, fabric, felt, collectible sewing items, jars and cards of buttons, thread, craft items, doilies, fancy pillow cases, sheets, T-shirts, dolls, toys, knick knacks, and free items. 718 S 3rd Ave W SERVICE DIRECTORY HOME IMPROVEMENTS

FREE

RENTALS

DOG TO good home, 4yr old female shih-tzu mix, weighs about 6lbs., adorable, house broken, perfect lap dog and loves to cuddle. Comes with leash, food, bowl. Portable Kennel, local in Newton 521-3755.

Call about our

outrageous rent speCial

$

Walnut Creek apartments

SERVICES SELL FAST

One Low Monthly Rate Advertised for One Month in the Newton Daily News, Jasper County Advertiser, and online!! $60 for a 1” Space, each additional 1/2” is $5 more! Reach Thousands of Customers Weekly!!!

Gutter cleaning. Call 641-792-6375

For More Information, (641)792-3121 ext. 301

HAIR SERVICES

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

SELL YOUR SERVICES with the

Service Directory!!

One Low Monthly Rate Advertised for a month in the Newton Daily News, Jasper County Advertiser and online! $60 for a 1” space, each additional 1/2” is $5 dollars more! Reach thousands of customers weekly! For More Information, call (641)792-3121 x 301. LAWN CARE

FALL LEAF CLEANUP Residential & Commercial Curbside Vacuum Pickup -orComplete Lawn Cleanup JaFar Lawn Service Jim Farland (641) 521-2765 PAINTING

HORNING'S PAINTING: Interior & exterior painting Drywall Repair & Texturing Free Estimates 641-791-9662

“FREE”

641-792-3443 EASY KEEP Mgt No Pets (CIHRA Avail)

$525 - $575 Includes water, sewer, trash

1,2, AND 3 BR apts available in Newton, Baxter, and Grinnell. Rental Assistance & Utility allowance available Onsite laundry No Pets This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer Equal Housing Opportunity Handicap Accessible Apply online at www.tlpropertiesiowa.com or Call 800-394-1288

2 BEDROOM apartment, security entrance, heat, water, and garage furnished. Coin operated laundry, no pets. DeHeer Properties, 641-791-7913 2BR/1BR APTS Water/Heat included Grd level Laundry on Site Baxter Property Management 641-227-3143 CLEAN 1 bedroom apartment with appliances, heat & water furnished, walking distance to square, laundry facilities, newly remodeled. Cats with approval and pet deposit. Very quiet building, ready to move into. (641) 792-8182 FOR RENT: Smaller commercial retail/office space. $350 month, (W. 3rd St. S.) 641-521-0002

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

wireless internet and mediacom cable.

Controlled Access Building On-Site Laundry

INVESTORS

The Newton Daily News recommends that you investigate every phase of investment opportunities. We suggest you consult your own attorney or ask for a free pamphlet and advice from the Attorney General's Consumer Protection Division. Hoover Building, Des Moines, IA 50319. 515-281-5926.

EMPLOYMENT

DOMINO'S IS now hiring.

FULL-TIME HANDYMAN/ Maintenance Tech $12.50/hr. To start, full benefit package. General household maintenance and grounds upkeep. Apply online: www.tlpropertiesiowa.com or call 888-488-4601 SOMEONE TO haul grain this fall. Full or part time. CDL required. Call 641521-7705 WIC INSURANCE is looking for a licensed insurance agent or will train the right person. Insurance license will be required. Position will be to provide customer service for existing personal lines accounts as well as soliciting new business. Competitive wages and benefits included. Send resume to: lennyw@wins-corp.com or fax to 641-275-9038. WANTED

ATV TIRES – 2-24-8-11 also 2-24-10-11. 521-5352 CANS & Bottles for the Jasper County Animal Rescue League (JCARL). Drop them off at 1621 S. 12th Ave. E. FRUIT – Grapes, peaches, pears, or apples that anyone has too much of. 515994-2226

EMPLOYMENT

1ST MONTH FREE Starting at $300 with 13th Mo.

(approx. 900 sq ft.)

641-521-8217

Leaf Proof Gutter Covers,

792-0910

– MUST SEE – Beautiful 2 bedroom apts.

ROBERT’S APARTMENTS

Attic fans & ventilation

315 1st St. S., Newton

Call now for details 515-291-2846 or Call Will 641-990-7938 Both Complexes Next to New Hy-Vee Satellite Available 510 E. 17th St. S.

TRAVEL

Flexible Short

Peck Properties, LLC

2 Br $500/mo. • 1st Month Free with 13 mo lease

912 1st Ave. W., Newton

INSULATION

100

1 month Term Lease Available rent Bristol Square Apartments st

1st floor handicapped accessible unit

Attic & side walls.

• Free Heat & Laundry 24 Hours • Access Free Wi Fi & Exercise Equipment in Community Room • Limited Access Entry • Off Street Parking • CIRHA Vouchers Accepted

somerfield apartments

Service Directory!!!

Flat roof repair & coating. Chimney repair & removal. Soffit & fascia repair & cover. General Repairs

Clean, Modern, Quiet 1 Bedroom Apartment

RENTALS

2 Br $455-$480/mo. • 1st Month Free with 13 month lease on selected units

with the

LEAKY ROOF, Missing Shingles???

Downtown Living

EMPLOYMENT

Due to recent growth and added positions Caleris has immediate openings for:

Customer Service and Technical Support Representatives in the Newton and Marshalltown Locations. *English speaking positions available *French/English Bilingual Positions Available *Spanish/English Bilingual Positions Available • No Sales involved • Inbound Customer Service • Excellent Benefit Package offered after probationary period • On the Job Training Positions available in multiple departments. Interview with us to find out more!

Apply to caleris.com/employment (319) 531-6480 EOE

At WesleyLife, we believe that living a wellbalanced life with attention to mind, body and spirit is essential to aging well. We encourage older adults to live a healthy and independent lifestyle, focusing on their abilities, potential and passions.

CNA

Full time overnights and part time evening positions are available at Park Centre. A passion for working with older adults is essential. Prior experience preferred but not required. Please apply in person at Park Centre, 500 1st Street North, Newton, IA or online at www.wesleylife.org. EOE. Drug and Tobacco-free work environment.

a quality conscious organization with over 40 years of dependable service, is seeking an individual for (door-to-door) hand distribution of our telephone directories.

For This Position We Offer: In Return, We Are Looking For An 1. Competitive Salary 2. Transportation Provided 3. Expenses Paid 4. 401-K Plan w/ company match 5. Medical, Dental/Vision & Life Ins

Individual With These Abilities:

1. Physical ability to walk long distances and carry up to 40 lbs 2. Valid Drivers License 3. Overnight Travel Required

SEND RESUME TO:

Hanson Directory Service, Inc. PO Box 786, Newton, IA 50208 Email hanson@hansondirectory.com

Rock Communications • Maintenance Technician • Truck Driver (Part Time)

Rock Communications specializes in the production and printing of high-impact, full-color retail insert ads. We are currently looking for candidates for a full-time Maintenance Technician and a part-time Truck Driver at our Newton, Iowa, operation. Maintenance Technician (Nights) Duties include: Perform preventative maintenance, predictive maintenance and troubleshooting of printing, bindery and prepress equipment. Mechanical and electrical troubleshooting skills, basic math, computer, and communication skills are essential. Completion of maintenance program at vocational/ technical school or recognized apprenticeship program in industrial mechanical maintenance desired. Printing industry experience preferred. Truck Driver (Part Time) Responsibilities include truck driving, loading/unloading trucks, verifying and packaging of freight, and delivery from our Newton facilities and within the local area. CDL Class A preferred with air brakes endorsement and driving experience required. Pre-employment background check and drug screen required. EOE. Apply online at careers.rockcommunications.com OR in person at 1117 E 14th Street North in Newton.

Questions call 515-343-5362


Page 6B

Friday, September 27, 2013

RENTALS

FOR SALE

FOR SALE

APARTMENTS AVAILABLE

2 SLEEPING bags $7.50 ea., men's insulated snow suit (like new) $10, 2 padded kitchen chairs $8 or 2/$15. 641-792-9912

STEEL PIPE, cable, rerod, all-thread rod, angle iron, trailer house frame 34' long, old Chevy wheels & parts, 16.5-8 bolt truck wheels w/tires, new complete gasket set for S.B. Chevy. 641-793-2955

1 & 2 bdrm units in Newton & Monroe! Priced $450-$600 $200 Security Deposits Pet Friendly (some restrictions) W/D Hookups Central Air Dishwasher Private covered Patio or Balcony with storage Laundry Facility onsite (641)792-6939 EHO

forestview@perryreid.com

COMMERCIAL AND Office Space Available

A beautiful newly renovated property, private offices, with shared amenities, shared staff, and shared synergies. If you are interested in “Being Green” you will want to check us out. Hawkeye Stages 641-792-3232 Rick or Melissa for more information

COURTYARD APTS.

Welcome Home! 2 BR Apartments $395-$450 780 SF 3 BR Townhomes $575-$650 1000 SF 641-521-2222

HOUSE FOR rent in Newton, newly remodeled, 2bdrm, new appliances, basement waterproof system, references required, Teacher Discount, No pets 515-210-4142 NEW 2BEDROOM ground floor duplex, easy access w/garage, stove & fridge. $485, references. 641-7924388 ONE BEDROOM, ONE Bath Upper-Level Condo. Includes One-Stall Garage. $525/Month + Utilities & Deposit. 319-350-4507 SPECIAL PRICE Would you pay $1 for your 1st months rent? Then receive the th 13 month FREE! 641-792-3443 No Pets (CIRHA Accepted) FOR SALE

14 FT ALUMINUM Fishing boat and trailer, Johnson 6 HP gas motor, bow mount foot controlled trolling motor, hand controlled trolling motor, depth and fish finder, swivel seats, hand crank bow mount anchor. $1,800. 641-792-0378. Leave message. 1999 GRAND Marquis GS 140K, V8, $1000 Firm, Great car inside and out, selling as I prefer a smaller car, have owned only 2 months..Trade in an option. 641-714-9464 2 PAIR (4 panels) curtains each panel 48x84 floral patterns on black back ground $20. 641-792-4878

4 KANSAS Speedway tickets. Oct. 5 Nascar Nationwide Series $75 ea. Oct. 6 Nascar Spirit Cup Series $125 ea. 641-521-6569 4 TIRES P265-70R-16 $150 obo. Honda Ex Scooter-Electric $125 obo. 792-2143

4000 WATT 8 hp generator $400. 641-792-4858 50 CALIBUR Knight rifle, muzzle loader, T-bolt with case $275 obo. 641-5213839 BUNK BED & chest, oak, sturdy, nice $150 641-7926351 FENTON BASKETS – 2 White milk glasses w/ruffled edge - $10 each or 2 @$15, 1966 Metal Snoopy in the Music Box $15, Glass Baskets – small to medium size – etched design some are fluted on top $7 each or 3 at $20, 1991 Long Berger Basket Story $15. 792-8017 GREEN BAY Packer's Coat (Large) $75 obo. 641417-8078 KEG TAP $25, Portable 9” DVD Player (Sylvania-like new) $35, Gold's Gym Workout Vest (includes weights) $50, Coby MultiMedia Speakers $20, Left Behind Books – Kids Series (#1-38) $35. 515-3137803

WOMEN'S XL Suede Jacket like new $10, Men's dress slacks 34x32 2pr $5 ea., Table mount shop grinder $20, Utility pump $20, 2 lamps w/pewter trim $20 for pr, White stove hood w/lite like new $15, Dirt Devil cordless stick vac. $8, 2 trailer hitches w/ball $20 ea., Bread maker $20 obo, Louvered tailgate for full size plu $150 obo. 641-831-9571 REAL ESTATE

FOR SALE on contract. 2 bedroom with attached garage, all new appliances. Large fenced in back yard, extensive remodeling. $3000 minimum down payment, $360 a month. 307 E 22nd St S. Call 641-7927170 to see. HOUSE FOR sale: 2 Bedroom brick house, attached garage, cement driveway, big corner lot, has been appraised, 201 E 23rd St N. 641-521-0700 MOBILE HOMES for Sale Financing available. Newer 2 bedroom 3 bath mobile home located in deer run estates in Colfax. 515-6749065 or 563-357-0487

PICKUP TOPPER, Unicover full version, silver w/black trim, 80” x 70” $100. 641-792-7923 or 641-831-9072 SLEEP NUMBER bed (twin), new bed frame. 641-521-3607 SNOW TIRES (4) Chrysler/Mopar Nokain – 225/55 R17. Mounted on American racing wheels/mags brushed aluminum winter studded $200 obo. 503-640-1860

SNOW WAY V Plow- one ton truck mounting, new cutting blade. $4,000. 641792-4332 SONY SOUND system, only 1 ½ years old, 4 small, 1rectangle, and 1 floor speaker, $75 for all. 641569-3586

1999 HARLEY Davidson XL CH Sportster, red & black, runs good, 24,000 miles, $4000 call for details, after 2:30pm 641521-7165

2002 Ford Mustang: $3900 Silver, 2-door. 3.8L V6 engine 4 speed automatic. Power door locks, windows, mirrors and driver's seat. AC, tilt wheel, and single disc CD player & AM-FM radio. New in 2013: 4 tires (rear are snow tires), Interstate battery and rear brake pads. Clean interior. Purchased this car one year ago and have driven it only 1,500 miles. 207,000 miles. All reasonable offers will be considered. 641-831-8250 (Newton)

1951 CHEVY Pick Up, ½ ton, 350 engine, 350 tranny, PS, PD brakes, Black, $10,500. 641-792-4541

1968 BLUE Ford Mustang Convertible. 60,000 miles, 289 Automatic. 641-7924481 or 641-521-7813

1997 FORD Conversion Van. Heavy ½ ton, great for towing. New front end and front tires. Runs great. $2400. 515-778-2792 1999 ARTIC Cat 4-wheeler ATV, like new, runs great! $1950. 641-831-3821. No calls after 8 pm. 1999 CHEVY Corvette, red, convertible, automatic, 71,000 miles, Corvette canvas fitted cover, excellent condition, must see!! $23,500 Please call 641831-3042 1999 LANDAU by Georgie Boy, Class A 32', 1 slide, Ford V10, 38,000 miles, clean, 2 roof airs, 2 furnaces, awning, Gen TV leveling jacks air ride on front, 50 amps, and back up camera. $19,000 641787-1009

2002 GRAY, extended cab Chevy Silverado. Fully loaded with towing package, leather, heated seats, automatic seats, mirrors, etc. 207k miles and some very minor dents/scratches. Engine runs perfect. Recently fully detailed and new battery. $7,000 OBO. Contact Cody if interested at 515-681-1373

2007 32 FT Jayco Eagle travel trailer w/front kitchen. 2 super slides, king size bed. Full size sofa bed. Table makes into bed. Lots of kitchen cabinets including full size pantry, coat closet and double closet in bedroom. Very good condition. New tires. One owner. Nonsmokers. Never had pets in it. Always covered in winter. Includes stabilizer/sway bar. $15,500 OBO. Call 641236-0133 for appointment to see.

2007 CHEVY COBALT, RED, 121,2112 MILES. IN GREAT SHAPE. PERFECT FOR ANYONE WANTING A FABULOUS RUNNING CAR WITH UNBEATABLE GAS MILEAGE. WE ARE ONLY SELLING BECAUSE OUR FAMILY IS GROWING AND WE UPGRADED TO A LARGER VEHICLE. ASKING $4,000 OBO. CALL (409) 789-3825

TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (Sept. 30). It will be a year of mazes and mysteries with many rewards along the way. Your keen powers of observation help you avoid dead ends and keep you moving forward. Study intensifies in October. You’ll receive a certification. Business succeeds in November. January and May are your best financial months. Your love signs are Gemini and Virgo. Your lucky numbers are: 40, 3, 5, 17 and 9. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). You want to learn, and others want to teach. Make sure they start with the

SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). You are hoping for a certain outcome, but are you ready for it? In order for this bit of good luck to alight in your life and really take hold, you have to be ready, not getting ready. Do the work it takes to be ready.

TWO Taurus SHO's. 1993 Ford Taurus SHO: 81200+ one owner miles. Manual 5 speed overdrive transmission. All options except sunroof. Ultra red crimson color. Very clean, good to excellent condition. Included owners manual, Ford repair manual, Chiltion repair manual, purchase papers, repair records, original floor mats, and 1993 magazine articles. Vehicle is ready to drive anywhere. 1995 SHO: Parts car with lots of good parts. Bad engine and automatic transmission. Good Body, glass, wheels, and more. Asking $5900 for both cars. 641791-2220.

Whether you’re looking to buy or sell, the Classifieds is always your best bet. Check our listings daily, or call

792-3121ext. 301 to place an ad of your own.

Newton Daily News Jasper County Advertiser 200 1st. Ave. E. Newton advertising@newtondailynews.com www.newtondailynews.com

REAL ESTATE

See Additional Listings and Visual Tours at:

DoyleDeVoe.com

NewtonIowaRealty.com

Visit us on the web to view complete listings! 112 E. 4th St. S. • Newton, IA 50208

641-792-4880

Call Today!!

Your Attention Please: If your goal was to buy a house while the interest rates were low NOW is the time; Interest Rates are steadily climbing. We’re here to help you find your Forever Home! • Sincerity • Truthfulness • Experience • Professionalism

Lisa McKinney 641-521-7245 lisa.mckinney7245@gmail.com

Susan K. Forbes 641-791-2360 BestMove4Homes.com

Koni Bunse 641-417-0113 hometonewton.com

Judy Ogier 641-521-7778

Price reduced!

$305,000! 8458 Hwy T38 N. Grinnell, iA (10 minutes NW of Grinnell)

DAEWOO-DD802L DOZER $20,000. 641-792-4332

Astrograph

fundamentals, because otherwise you might get too frustrated and give up before you’ve made any real progress.

GET LUCKY In The CLASSIFIEDS!

REAL ESTATE

Monday, September 30, 2013

The Leo moon declares, “Bring on the fun and games!” as the day skips along at a lighthearted pace. Be careful, though. Like a rough child who doesn’t quite know the limits, the Leo moon can be the kind of playmate who pushes into hurtful territory. Keep your sense of humor, and be ready to defend your boundaries when things go too far.

AUTOMOTIVE

2008 SUNSET Creek by Sunny Brook, 27' travel trailer, 12' slide out, walk in shower, regular size bed, sofa, and table make into a bed. 2 platform rockers and TV included, electric front jack, good condition, $13,000. Call 641-7924935

AUTOMOTIVE

MATTRESS – box spring set, twin size, clean, good cond., $90 641-792-6351 MAYTAG TRUCKS #2 – 1917 “Model T” #3 – 1948 Semi - $40 each or 2 at $75. Pampered Chef Ginger Bread House Kit #1800 Train Kit – Never been used – New in box $15 each or 2 at $25, Maytag 1935 Canopy Express Mason Car $35 each or 2 at $65. 641-275-7600

AUTOMOTIVE

pany of happy children and the young at heart because they spark your joy. The more you’re around the spirit of youth the younger you’ll feel.

helpers. There are also quite a few people who think they are helping or are trying to help, but they are misguided. Your job today is to guide them.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). You’ll invigorate a tired situation with one small change -- that’s all it takes! This small shift in your behavior is like a key that opens a castle and the whole new world inside of it.

CANCER (June 22-July 22). There will be much good and a little bad in the day. You’ll appreciate how both remain distinct and stay in their own category so that the bad won’t sully the good.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21). The tone of your voice will make all of the difference in how you are received today. People will listen to you because you choose the kind way even when that’s not the most obvious choice.

ARIES (March 21-April 19). Be willing to get excited about nothing. If you can be happy, interested and enthusiastic for no good reason, you’ll understand how to be in charge of your life and joy.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19). People who try to control too much are not fun to be around. Your day will go beautifully as long as you let people be who they are and let yourself become who you want to be.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20). There’s a “one step forward, two steps back” feeling to the start of this week. That doesn’t mean you’re not making progress. What you’re doing is a dance, not a race.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). Is it falling apart, or is it falling into place? Sometimes it’s hard to tell the difference. So before you make a move to pick up the pieces, stand back and observe how everything settles.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). You’ll enjoy the com-

GEMINI (May 21-June 21). The world is full of

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LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Not having the luxury of a plan or any time to prepare for the day’s practical challenges will turn out to be a blessing. You’ll be at your best when you are forced to improvise.

ranch home on hard surface road • Completely remodeled with beautiful landscaping • 3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms • 1920 Main Floor Sq. Ft. • 2.3 acre lot includes heated shop & steeled barn Call Todd at 641.751.8620 NEW List Price: $305,000

HOUSE FOR SALE Dorothy Failor Estate

Bonnie McGinley, Executor of the Estate of Dorothy Failor, is soliciting written bids forthe purchase of a house located at 625 E. 5th St. S., Newton, IA 50208. Annual taxes are $682.00. House sold “as is”. Legal Description: Lot 8, Block 13, Commununity Heights. Terms: Total bid must be received by 4pm on October 9, 2013, at the office of Caldwell & Brierly, PLLC, 211 First Ave. West, Newton, IA 50208. Bids must include bidder’s name, address, phone number and the total amount bid. The top five(5) bidders will be notified and invited to attend second round of bidding to be held on October16,2013at the office of Caldwell & Brierly, PLLC, as shown above at 3:00pm.Ten percent (10%) of sale price due immediately after the sale, with the balance due at closing. Closing on or before December 1, 2013.( Seller reserves the right to decline any and all bids.) Buyer to receive Abstract showing market able title and warranty deed. For more information contact Randy Caldwell at (641)792-4160.

Open House

Saturday, Sept 28th 10:00am-Noon

2408 N 6th Ave E, Newton, IA

Reduced to Bargain Price $219,900.00!!! Outstanding location, great front porch, oversize 3 car garage, two level deck, and patio. New kitchen counter top and tile. Many recent upgrades! MAKE AN OFFER!!!!

Call Dick Boggess, Broker Associate 641-521-3378 for more information.

BIRKENHOLZ REALTY


Friday, September 27, 2013

Page 7B

Sports Calendar Today High School Football Grinnell at Newton 9th, 4:45 p.m. Grinnell at Newton, 7:30 p.m. Colftax-Mingo at Ogden, 7 p.m. Lynnville-Sully at Southeast Warren, 7 p.m. CMB at Nevada, 7:30 p.m. Pella Christian at Sigourney, 7:30 p.m. PCM at Interstate 35, Truro, 7:30 p.m. Saturday Girls’ Swimming NCMP at West Des Moines Valley Invitational High School Volleyball Newton, PCM at Nevada tournament, 8:30 a.m. Newton JV at Indianola tournament, 8:30 a.m. Monday Girls’ Swimming Marshalltown at NCMP, 5:30 p.m. High School Football Newton JV at Grinnell, 6 p.m. High School Volleyball Lynnville-Sully at Belle Plaine, 6 p.m. Van Meter at CMB, 7:30 p.m. Cross Country Colfax-Mingo, CMB at Nevada, 5 p.m. Tuesday High School Volleyball Newton at Dallas Center-Grimes, JV/9th matches 5:30 p.m., varsity 7:15 p.m. South Hamilston at Colfax-Mingo, 7:30 p.m. Pella at Pella Christian, 7:15 p.m. Saydel at CMB, 6:30 p.m. North Polk at PCM, 7 p.m. Cross Country Newton, Lynnville-Sully, Pella Christian, PCM at Knoxville, 4:30 p.m. Newton middle school at Knoxville, 4:15 p.m., Middle School Football Grinnell at Newton 8th, 4:30 p.m. Newton 7th at Grinnell, 4:30 p.m. Middle School Volleyball Newton 7th at Bondurant-Farrar, 4:30 p.m. Bondurant-Farrar at Newton, 4:30 p.m.

Jocelyn Sheets/Daily News Lynnville-Sully’s Canyon Kuhlmann (837) concentrates as he runs in front of a group in the final mile of Thursday’s PCM Invitational cross country meet at Gateway Golf Course in Monroe. Kuhlmann finished 19th and was the No. 1 runner for the Hawks on Thursday.

“Rally” Round the Cards Swing Your Towel With Cardinal Pride Friday, September 27th

Newton Cards vs Grinnell

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Page 8B

Friday, September 27, 2013

Fall Open Houses

Continued Open Houses from page A10

Saturday, September 28th BIRKENHOLZ REALTY

First Choice Realty New Price!

Open 10:30 AM11:30 AM

1009 E. 19th St N. $134,900

Open 10:30 AM11:30 AM

704 E. 24th St. S. $82,000

Open 10:30 AM11:30 AM

3BR/1Bath, Large 2 ½ car garage, full basement.

Impeccable 3BR/1.75BA Split-Foyer w/ 2 Car Garage Shown By: Krista Clark 641-521-7442 CENTURY 21 Signature Real Estate

2206 S. 7th Ave E. $79,900

Open 10:30 AM11:30 AM

2BR/1Bath, New kitchen, large living room Shown By: Mark Siddall 641-521-2643 First Choice Realty

Shown By: Ed Siddall 641-791-7600 First Choice Realty

705 E. 20th St. S. $99,900

Open 10:30 AM11:30 AM

510 N. 8th Ave E. $64,900

3BR/2bath, .6 acre, main floor laundry, fenced yard

2BR/1BA, Hardwood floors, 1.5 car garage

Shown By: Deb Cross 641-521-8598 First Choice Realty

Shown By: Dan Kelley 641-521-9260 First Choice Realty

New Price!

Open 10:30 AM11:30 AM

Open 10:30 AM11:30 AM

Open 11:30 AM12:30 PM

1330 Crescent Dr. $65,000

Open 10:30 AM11:30 AM

530 W. 9th St. N. $46,000

2BR/1BA, Dbl detached garage, New furnace & air.

2BR/1BA, updated kitchen, easy access to Hwy 14 & I-80.

Shown By: Les Morgan 641-840-3826 First Choice Realty

Shown By: Jason Morgan 641-792-6600 First Choice Realty

712 E. 15th St. N. $164,900

Open 10:30 AM11:30 AM

515 S. 3rd Ave. W. $183,500

Updated 4 BR Home. Great Yard w/ Pool.

Beautifully updated sprawling ranch.4 BR, 2 BA

Shown By: Kathy Macy 641-521-1495 RE/MAx Real Estate Concepts

Shown By: Barb Barr 641-521-0512 RE/MAx Real Estate Concepts

1106 E. 17th St. S. $199,900

3BR home w/many updates throughout. Fenced BY w/ fire pit area, deck & patio. Shown By: Sherri Newton 763-291-1444 Doyle & Devoe

Open 11:30 AM12:30 PM 1202 S. 16th Ave. W. $179,900

Open 10:30 AM11:30 AM

1110 E. 15th St. S. $112,000

Open 10:30 AM11:30 AM

3BR ranch home w/ 1.5 BA, family room on mail level, wooden deck, sauna, shed w/ elec., fenced-in yard. Shown By: Larry Rose 641-521-3107 Doyle & Devoe

Open 11:00 AM12:00 PM

940 High Ave $325,000 MLS # 64999

Beautiful Victorain mansion ornate woodwork. New furnaces & A/C

Open 11:15 AM12:15 PM

4BR home w/many updates. Eatin kitchen, formal dining room, & spacious family room.

Shown By: Susie Otcheck-Hulin 641-990-5280 Doyle & Devoe

820 S. 5th Ave. W. $117,000

Open 11:30 AM12:30 PM

6657 E. 78th St. S. $179,900

1218 1st Ave E. $65,000

Newer Furnace, AC & Roof Shown By: Bruce Showalter 641-521-0605 RE/MAx Real Estate Concepts

Shown By: Barb Barr 641-521-0512 RE/MAx Real Estate Concepts

Beautiful, Brick on 2.47 fenced acres just NW of town. New granite & updates in kitchen & master BA renovation. Shown By: Jo Jenkins 641-521-0302 RE/MAx Real Estate Concepts

Open 11:30 AM12:30 PM

223 W. 4th St S. $160,000 MLS # 65019

Open 10:30 AM11:30 AM

Open 11:30 AM12:15 PM

207 W. 10th St. S. $59,400

3BR, 2BA berm home w/ outbuildings on 5 acres m/l. Peaceful setting.

Hardwood floors, built-ins, & lots of beautiful woodwork. Nice SW location w/fruit trees!

Shown By: Sheryl Briggs 641-840-0993 Doyle & Devoe

Shown By: Shawn Preston 641-891-5549 Doyle & Devoe

2008 N. 4th Ave. E. $99,900

4BR, fenced BY, & updated kitchen w/ oak cabinetry & quartz countertops.

Ranch in Berg area w/lrg eat-in kitchen, 2-car garage, 5 BR, 2 BA, & finished LL!

Shown By: Kevin McCartney 641-792-5657 Doyle & Devoe

Shown By: Shawnda Nine 641-521-5162 Home Buyers Marketing II, LLC

Open 11:30 AM12:30 PM

2009 N. 3rd Ave. E. $106,500 MLS# 64903 Updated 3 BR ranch includes attached garage.

Shown By: Dennis Combs 641-792-1212 Network Realty

New Price!

Open 12:00 AM1:00 AM

712 W. 12th St. S. $136,000

Open 12:00 PM1:00 PM

607 W. 5th St. S. $86,500

3BR, 2.5 BA home in S.W. Newton, heated sun porch, master BA w/jet tub, family room w/bar.

Turn Key Home, Fenced yard/ 2 Car Garage.

Shown By: Larry Rose 641-521-3107 Doyle & Devoe

Shown By: Kathy Macy 641-521-1495 RE/MAx Real Estate Concepts

Open 12:00 PM1:00 PM

602 E. 15th St S. $99,900 MLS # 65076

Open 12:30 PM1:30 PM

407 W. 14th St N. $84,900

Open 12:30 PM1:30 PM

Immaculate 3BR, 3BA brick ranch w/open floor plan. New radon mitigation system & waterproofed LL.

2 BR bungalow w/ oak kitchen w/ appliances included. Fenced yard w/storage shed & 2 car garage. Shown By: Kevin McCartney 641-792-5657 Doyle & Devoe

Enjoyable 3 BR ranch w/ finished lower level. Shown By: Barb Barr 641-521-0512

RE/MAx Real Estate Concepts

1313 W. 13th St. S. $212,900

Shown By: Shawn Preston 641-891-5549 Doyle & Devoe

New Price!

Open 12:30 PM1:30 PM

503 E. 25th St. S. $74,900 MLS # 65057

Refurbished and newly listed 3 BR Ranch w/ hardwood floors & 2 BA. Shown By: Jo Jenkins 641-521-0302 RE/MAx Real Estate Concepts

Open 12:00 PM1:00 PM

516 S. 3rd Ave W. $52,000

Open 12:45 PM1:45 PM

1505 W. 13th St. S. $209,400

3 garage spaces, lots of potential

3BR ranch in nice SW location. Main floor laundry, remodeled BA in 2012, & fenced BY.

Shown By: Bruce Showalter 641-521-0605 RE/MAx Real Estate Concepts

Shown By: Sheryl Briggs 641-840-0993 Doyle & Devoe

Open 1:00 PM2:00 PM

1208 W. 9th St. S. $98,500 MLS# 64941

Convenient SW location! Many updates, attached garage. Shown By: Dennis Combs 641-792-1212 Network Realty

Come on over

You’re Invited! Saturday, September 28th

Open 1:30 PM2:30 PM

1112 S. 8th Ave. E. $73,500

Want room for TOYS?? Stop to see!! Shown By: Kathy Macy 641-521-1495 RE/MAx Real Estate Concepts


Community

Friday, September 27, 2013

Newton

Daily News

Spaying, neutering curbs pet overpopulation, makes pets healthier Lisa Gibbons Special to the Daily News The most common surgeries performed in small animal veterinary medicine are spays and neuters. Traditionally, dogs and cats are altered to assist in population control. While the Humane Society of the United States reports about 6-8 million animals are admitted annually into shelters across the country, it also estimates 3-4 million of these animals are euthanized each year due to the lack of available homes. This astounding number does not account for stray animals living and dying alone “on the streets.” Health concerns and extending the quality of pets’ lives have also become a major incentive to altering our pets. Many serious health risks can be minimized or prevented altogether with spaying and neutering — especially if done at an early age.

Submitted Photo Mike “ScratchDub” Husted and Brandon “KissDa Cook” Cook will be performing in a free all-ages show at the Capitol II Theater after tonight’s football game.

Local musicians giving free show to help Capitol II Theater By Ty Rushing Daily News Staff Writer Is there anything better than the word free? There aren’t many things that are, and tonight, after the Cardinals square off against Grinnell, citizens are invited to a free all-ages show at the Capitol II Theater featuring local talent. Brandon “KissDa Cook” Cook will be rapping, and

Mike “ScratchDub” Husted will be doing a DJ set. The theater will have concessions for sale, and freewill donations will be accepted. Cook is excited about the chance to perform for his hometown and help out the theater. “The whole idea was for it to be a community project,” Cook said. “I had a vision to help out the movie theater in my own

way and also to have a positive show in Newton. I put two and two together and thought, ‘I might as well talk to the Bleeker family.’” Cook said the Bleekers were very open-minded about the idea, but they wanted to make sure it was a family friendly show before agreeing to do it. MUSICIANS See Page 2C

Health Benefits There are many health benefits to having your pet altered. A study done in May of 2013 revealed that pets that live in the states with the highest rates of spaying/neutering also live the longest.  According to the report, neutered male dogs live 18 percent longer than un-neutered male dogs and spayed female dogs live 23 percent longer than unspayed female dogs, The report goes on to add that in Mississippi, the lowest-ranking state for pet longevity, 44 percent of the dogs are not neutered or spayed.  Part of the reduced life span of unaltered pets can be attributed to their increased urge to roam,

exposing them to fights with other animals, getting struck by cars and other mishaps.   Another contributor to the increased longevity of altered pets involves the reduced risk of certain types of cancers.  Unspayed female cats and dogs have a far greater chance of developing pyrometra (a fatal uterine infection), uterine, breast and other cancers of the reproductive system.    Medical evidence indicates that females spayed before their first heat cycle are typically healthier. (Many veterinarians now alter dogs and cats as young as eight weeks of age.)  Male pets that are neutered eliminate their chances of getting testicular cancer, and it is believed they have lowered rates of prostate cancer, as well. Behavior Benefits Many undesirable behaviors can occur when pets are unaltered.  Dogs are usually much more assertive and are prone to urine marking than neutered dogs.  Although it is most often associated with male dogs, this can also happen in female dogs.   Intact male cats have an extremely strong urge to spray. Spaying or neutering your dog or cat should reduce urine-marking and may stop it all together. The simplest solution is to alter them before the behavior of spraying is learned.  According to the Veterinarian Medical Association neutering solves 90 percent of all marking issues, even cats that have been doing it for awhile.  It can also minimize howling, the urge to roam and fighting with other males. PETS See Page 2C

Gene Vande Lune heads up veteran’s memorial By Matthew Nosco Daily News Staff Writer “I’d been around, and a lot of other towns had a memorial to the veterans. Prairie City didn’t have anything like that, and I knew it’d be a good idea.” Gene Vande Lune is a Prairie City resident, Army veteran from the Korean War, and the man responsible for much of the planning and implementation in securing a veteran’s memorial for the community. Gene had heard about funds coming into several different community organizations as part of a community member’s will. Several churches, along with the Lion’s Club, were going to receive funding that they could use for various projects. After the Lion’s Club, of which Gene is a member, had allocated funding to several different projects it was working on, there was still some money left over. He

came forward and proposed the memorial in the town square. “For a lot of people, like those in Korea and Vietnam, they didn’t get much recognition for what they did,” Gene said. The memorial was a way to remedy that in Prairie City, helping to honor those that served, in any time period or conflict. A committee was put together to help plan the memorial, and while Gene wasn’t on the committee, he was incredibly active in offering his advice and guidance to the project. After a while the reins of the project were

handed over and in May of 2011, the Veterans Memorial was purchased from Watts Monument Co. and installed by them. Gene saw the opportunity to continue raising funds for the project, as well as bestow individual recognition for community veterans, so he went about selling bricks. He had determined that if 100 people were to buy a single brick at $100 each, that they would have enough funding to continue with the memorial. He put out a call to pledge in the paper and in no time he had 100. Then he had 120. Eventually he had right around 160 pledges, far exceeding his original goal. “We’ve got the information and everything for around 150 of them so far,” Gene said. “We still have a few pledges that we’re waiting on.” The memorial bricks being purchased represent a huge cross section of veterans, from those

Matthew Nosco/Daily News Gene Vande Lune lays a brick in front of the existing Veterans Memorial in Prairie City to demonstrate how they will appear when all of the bricks are laid. Applications for area veterans, and donations for the memorial are still being accepted.

that are still on active duty in the services to long-dead POW and MIA veterans as well as the famous Herschel Briles from World War II. “There’s applications in the grocery stores, the barber shop and the Roberts brothers,” Gene said. “There isn’t going to be an end. After

they’re installed, people can still sign up to get a brick.” Although the application process will be ongoing, Gene hopes that people will try to get them in before the bricks are placed in the spring of 2014. After that they will have to wait until there are 10 applications at a time for the engrav-

ers to come out, which could take significantly longer. Applications for Prairie City area veterans and donations to the project can be sent to PO Box 1, Prairie City, IA. 50228. Staff writer Matt Nosco may be contacted at (515) 674-3591 or at mnosco@ newtondailynews.com.


Community

Page 2C

Donations Drives for JCARL

Friday, September 27, 2013

Musicians Continued from Page 1C “We rehearsed for their daughter’s slumber party as a way to figure out sound, and they loved it, and so they pursued it,” he said. Cook said he has been rapping for about four years, he does it for fun and has no plans to become famous. He also describes himself as a “motivational rapper” and likes to focus on positive things in his rhymes. He said he is also grateful his church, Come As You Are Newton or CAYA, lent him sound equipment and Todd Stein lent him lighting equipment. He doesn’t want to reveal too much about how the performance will go, but he promises it won’t be the “typical rap show.” “The outcome is in God’s hands,” Cook said. The show is scheduled to start once the football game ends or 10 p.m., whichever comes first at the Capitol II Theater on the east side of the square. Staff writer Ty Rushing may be contacted at (641) 792-3121, ext. 426, or at trushing@newtondailynews.com.

Pets Submitted Photos Above: Cline Tool recently hosted a donation drive for the Jasper County Animal Rescue League. Cline Tool presented the league with the items as well as a check for $292 to be used toward the medicine fund to help sick and injured animals. Below: Smart Style at Wal-Mart hosted a donation drive during the month of August for the Jasper County Animal Rescue League. Start Style donated supplies and $140 to benefit the league medicine fund for a dog in need.

Continued from Page 1C In both dogs and cats, the longer you wait, the greater the risk you run of the surgery not doing the trick because the behavior is so ingrained. Other behaviors that can be corrected by spay/neuter include: • Roaming, especially when females are “in heat.” • Aggression: Studies also show that most dog bites involve dogs who are unaltered. • Barking excessively, mounting, and other dominance-related behaviors. While getting your pets spayed/neutered can help curb undesirable behaviors, it will not change their overall personality. Financial Benefits When you factor in the long-term costs potentially incurred by a non-altered pet, the savings afforded by spay/neuter are clear. Caring for a pet with reproductive system cancer or pyometra can easily run into the thousands of dollars — five to 10 times as much as a routine spay surgery. Additionally, unaltered pets can be more destructive or high strung around other dogs.  Serious fighting is more common between unaltered pets and can incur high veterinary costs.  In Newton and most other communities you will receive a discount on your pet license fees if your pet is altered. Community Benefits • Communities spend millions of dollars to control unwanted pets. • Animal shelters around the country are overburdened with surplus pets. • Stray and homeless dogs and cats get into trash containers, urinate and defecate on private lawns and/or public property. • Some stray dogs and cats scare away or kill wildlife and birds. Spaying or neutering is an important decision for pet owners and it can be the single best decision you make for your pets long-term welfare.

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Friday, September 27, 2013

Page 3C

Worship Together Ashton Chapel Next to Ashton Park, near intersection of Hwy 330 and F17 (8887 W. 122nd St. N., Mingo, IA) Sunday School 9:00am; Worship 10:00am. Pastors: Larry Craig and Mark Eddy Bar None Cowboy Church Building next to Culver’s Newton, David Rex, Pastor, 641-5214354, 7pm Thursdays. Music featured each week. www.barnonecowboy churchofiowa.com Baxter Evangelical Free Church East Avenue, Baxter, Eugene Bucklin, Pastor, 10:00am Worship, 5:30pm FCYF, 7:00pm Wednesday prayer mtg. Bethany United Church of Christ 5627 N. 95th Ave. W., Baxter, (one mi. E. of Baxter on Station St.) Pastor Wanda Seydel. Sunday after Labor Day through Memorial Day: 8:30 Junior Choir; 9:15 Sunday School; 10:30 Worship. Sunday after Memorial Day through Labor Day: 9:30 Worship; Women’s Fellowship First Thursday 2pm. Sunday’s in July feature 10:30 prayer and study of the Lords Prayer. Bible Missionary Church 909 N. 95th Ave. E. 641-840-2093 Pastor Lucas. Sunday School 9:45am, Morning Worship 10:45, Evening Service 6:00pm. Mid-week Service 7:00pm Center Friends Northeast of Newton, Karen Mendenhall, pastor, Dallas Gilreath, pastor, Cheri Doane, assistant pastor; 9:30am Sunday school, 10:30am Worship. Call 641-792-2473. Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) Prairie City, 9:00am Sunday school, 10:00am Worship. Christian Life Church 421 S. 2nd Ave. W., Interim Pastor James Miller; Phone Number: 641-521-9294. Coffeetime 9:30am, Worship 10:00am. Lunch Served at noon. Bible Study: Tuesday 10:00am. Christian Reformed Church Prairie City, Matthew McClure, pastor; 9:30am Worship, 10:45am Sunday school, 6:30pm Worship. E-mail:pcrc@dwx.com Jasper County Church of Christ 1100 N. 3rd Ave. E., 9:30am Bible classes, 10:30am & 1:30pm Worship; Thursday evening 7:00pm Bible Study. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints 1405 N. 11th Ave. E., Branch President-Gregory O. Rivers, 316 E. 8th St. S., Newton, IA 50208. 9:30am Sacrament meeting, 10:40am Sunday School & Primary, 11:45am Priesthood, Relief Society & Young Women. Colfax United Methodist Church S. Locust St. & Division St., 515-674-3782. 10:00am Sunday School, 10:00am Family Worship. Rev. R.D. Streeter Community of Christ 1805 S. 8th Ave. E., 791-7834, Bill Conklin, pastor, Church School Classes 9:30am; Worship Service 10:30am; Wednesday Prayer Service 7:00pm. Community Heights Alliance Pastor Cory Stout, Senior Pastor; Pastor John Patterson, Associate Pastor; Tyler Kramer, Youth Pastor; Mike Osterbauer, Pastor of Worship and Young Adults. Sunday Worship Services 8:30am, 11am & 6pm; Sunday School 9:45am; Sr. High Youth Group Wednesday 7:45pm; Wednesday Prayer Meetings 6am, noon & 6:45am; Jr. High Youth Group 6:30pm; Awana 6:30pm; Saturday Night Alive, first Sat. of each month at 7:00pm. Nursery available for most events. Handicapped accessible. 2500 S. 13th Ave. E. 792-1620. www.communityheights.org. Congregational United Church of Christ-Baxter 217 S. Main Baxter, Rollin Watters, pastor, Sunday School 9:30am, Regular worship service, 10:30am

Congregational United Church of Christ-Newton 308 E. 2nd St. N., Newton, Rev. Jessica Petersen-Orwenyo, Pastor; Sunday Worship 10:00am, Nursery provided; Fellowship Time 11:00am. Accessible to all. Bible Study Wednesdays 10:00am. Christian Education for children of all ages Wed. 6:00pm(infant-8th grade). 1st and 3rd Wednesdays of each month 7:00pm - Adult Christian Education. No matter who you are or where you are on life’s journey, you are welcome here! facebook.com/NewtonUCC Cornerstone Bible Fellowship 1000 E. 12th St. S., Newton; Pastor Steve Bundy, Associate Pastor Brian Keeton. Sunday School 9am, Sunday Worship 10:15am, 6:30pm youth group on Sunday, 7pm Wed Bible study, Faith Baptist Prairie City, 9:30am Bible School, 10:30am Worship, 6:00pm Gospel service, 7:00pm Wed., Bible study. First Assembly of God 1029 E. 19th St. N., Newton, www.newtonassembly.com; Pastor Don Hayes, senior pastor; 9am Sunday School, 10am Worship, 7pm Wed. mid-week service. First Baptist Church Colfax, Rev. Phil Butler, pastor, 674-3752. Family Fellowship 9:00 am; Sun. School 9:15 am; Morning Worship 10:30 am; Eve. Service 6:00 pm. Wed., 7:00 pm Hour of Power.

Foursquare Church 1510 S. 8th Ave. E., Pastor Dottie Black and Associate Pastor Dustin Black, 9:45 a.m. Sunday morning worship service, 6:30 p.m. Sunday night Sunday School and prayer meetings 10 a.m. Tuesdays and Fridays, 7 p.m. Wednesday and 9:15 a.m. Sunday until service time. Grace Church “A Family Of Friends”, 1620 N. 11th Ave E., Newton; Pastor Dan Hayton; Sunday Morning Refreshments 9:30 am, Worship Service with nursery care 10:00 am. The Edge: 5 yr olds to 5th grade & The Kids Community Pre School age, Sunday at 10:00am. Experience God Bible Study Wed. at 7am; Life Student Ministries Wed. 6:45-8pm 641-792-1793 www.gracenewton.com

Iron Sharpens Iron Church 1305 E. 10th St. S. Newton Cheryl Palmer - Minister 10:00am Sunday Morning Worship. Bible study and fellowship follow morning service. Mid-week Service 7pm Wednesday with Merlin Hamilton.

Newton Christian Reformed Church 511 S. 5th Ave. E., Aaron Gunsaulus, Pastor, 9:30 am Morning worship, 10:50 am Church school, 6:00 pm Sunday Evening worship.

Kellogg Christian (Disciples of Christ) 321 Bolton St., Kellogg, 10:30 am Worship.

New Life Community Church of the Nazarine 605 W. 8th St. N., P.O. Box 1021, Rev. Lauris Meek, Sunday School 9:30 am, Morning Worship 10:30 am, Sunday Evening 6:00 pm, Wed. Children’s Night & TNT (Teen) 7:00 pm, Junior quizzing 7:00 pm, Thurs. Youth 7:00 pm , Thurs. Bible Study & Prayer 7:00 pm, Fellowship Hall. Nursery for all services. Parsonage 792-6171 or Church 792-5363.

Kellogg United Methodist 417 2nd St., Kellogg, Pastor Tim Morgan, Sunday School 9:30am nursery, kids, young adult, middle adult & adult classes; 10:30am Morning worship; Worship Lit Saturday’s 7:00pm; Open Hand Supper 3rd Saturday of the month 6:00pm. Killduff United Methodist Rev. Randall McNeer, Worship 10:45am Communion first Sunday of each month.

Grinnell Church of Christ 1402 3rd Ave., Grinnell, Iowa 50112, Bible study Sunday 9:30 a.m., Wednesday 7:00 p.m., Worship services Sunday 1030 a.m. grinnellcoc@netins.net or www.grinnellcoc.com

Living Word Fellowship Doug Bradey, Pastor, 321 E. Robinson St., Knoxville 641-828-7119, Wed. Night Service: 6pm prayer, 7pm worship, 6:15pm Fuzion Youth Service; Sun. Morning Service: 8:30 am prayer, 9 am Life Groups, 10 am Worship Service, Nursery and Children’s Ministry available.

Haven Vineyard Church 207 1st Ave. E, Newton; Pastor Caz & Jane Cibula; 641-526-3157; 10 am Sunday Service.

Lynnville Friends Mark Porter, Pastor, 9:00 am Morning Worship, 10:30 am Sunday School, 6:30 pm Bible Study Hour.

Our Savior Lutheran Missouri Synod 1900 N. 4th Ave. E., Rev. John M. Moore, Pastor, Sunday Worship 9:00 am; Adult Bible Study Sundays 10:30 am; Sunday School Kingdom Quest 10:30 am; High School Youth Group Sunday 10:30 am & Wednesdays 7:00 pm; www.oursavlutheran. com (641( 792-1084.

First Baptist Church (Newton) 620 S. 8th Ave. E., phone: 7927113.Web:www.NewtonFirstBaptist.com and on facebook. Pastor Aaron Loree, Family Education Time 9:00a.m., Powerkidz infants - 5th grade 9:00 a.m.; Sunday School for teens 9:00a.m.; Worship Service 10:15a.m. Men’s group meets on the first Sat. of every month at 7:30pm. First Baptist 810 S. Commerce, Monroe, Senior Pastor Shank, Youth Pastor Jason Burns. 9:30 am Sun. School, 10:30 am Worship, 6:00 p Evening service, 6 p.m. Christians in Action grades 6-12, Wed. Awana at 6:15 p.m. during school year, Wed. Bible Study & Prayer 8:15 pm during school year & 8 p.m. during summer. First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) 314 E. 2nd St. N. Pastor Mark Young. Sunday: 9:00 a.m. Faith Village & Sunday School. 10:15 Worship. 11:30am coffee fellowship. 5:45pm Wed; Family Unity Night. Thurs; 6:00 Choir Practice, 7:10 Atonement Practice. www.fccnewton.org 641-792-5850, Nursery provided. First Church of Christ Scientist 616 6th Ave., Grinnell, 10:30 am Services. First Lutheran Church - ELCA 309 E. 3rd St. N., Newton. Pastor Zachary Bey. Sunday Worship at 9:30 am; Sunday School and Fellowship to follow at 10:45 am; High School Youth Group every other Wednesday evening. 641-792-3934. All are welcome! First Presbyterian 220 N. 2nd Ave. E., Newton Intern Pastor Linda CurtisStolper. Adult Sunday School 9:00am;Worship 10:30am; Fellowship 11:30am; Nursery provided. Handicapped accessible. Everyone Welcome! Mens group 1st & 3rd Thursdays 6:30 am & 9am; 9am Adult Sunday School; 792-2790; www.newton1stpresbyterian.org First United Methodist 210 N 2nd Ave E., Rev. Gary Marzolf 8:30 AM Traditional Worship, 9:30 AM Fellowship 9:45 AM Sunday School. 11:00 AM Contemporary Worship. 6:00 PM Youth Group. Handicapped Accessible. Nursery Provided. 9:00 am “First Church on The Air”- KCOB www. newtonfirst.org

Newton Church of The Way 2306 S. 3rd Ave E., 792-7300 Pastor Steve Heerema. Sunday Morning: 7:45 Classic; 9:00 and 10:30 Ignite, Nursery during both Ignite Services (for newborn through 2 years old). Journey 252 Children’s Ministry 10:30am (for children 3 years through 6th Grade) The Way Café 8:30 to 10:30am, 5:00-7:00pm Prayer of Blessing, Wednesday 6:30 – 8:30pm Route 146 Youth, Saturday Nite Ignite 7:00-8:00pm Everyone Welcome! Other various group studies and classes are offered. Check out our Facebook page, our weekly bulletin on our website, or call/email the office for more information. Email: info@theway146.com Web: www.newtonway.org

Pleasant Hill United Methodist Church 151 60th Ave, Prairie City Rev. Medea Saunders Sunday 9:30 a.m. Worship Service;10:30 a.m. Sunday School pcumc@q.com 515-994-2354

Heart of Worship 14283 Hwy F62, Lynnville Pastor Tom Pool, Worship: 9 a.m., Children’s Church: 9:45 a.m. Fellowship: 10:15 a.m., Sunday School: 10:45 a.m.

Metz Community 3253 W. 62nd St. S., Newton, 791-9568, Pastor David Rex; Sunday School 9:00 am. 10:10 am service.

Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, ELCA 1409 S. 8th Ave. E., Pastor Ken Ahntholz, 9:00 am Sunday School; 10:15 am Worship, easy access - no steps.

Mingo United Methodist 202 W. Main, Mingo, Rev. Kurt DeVance, 515-339-8819; Children’s Sunday School - 9:30 am and Adult Sunday School - 9:45 am. Church time is 10:45 am.

Hope Assembly of God 126 W. State St., Colfax, Sunday school 10 am, Worship service 11 am, Sunday Evening Prayer Service 6:30 pm. 641-674-3700.

Monroe Presbyterian Church 115 So. Main, Monroe, Rev. Ann Rouse, Sonlight Service 8:00 am; 9:00 am church school, 10:00 am Traditional Worship, communion on 1st Sunday of month, 6:00 pm Session Committees 2nd Sunday of month, 7:00 pm Session Meeting 2nd Sunday of month.

Howard Street Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) Rev. Tom Burns, pastor. 10:30 am Morning worship. Sunday school 9-10am all ages; K-5 Wed after school; Jr. High & High School 7-8pm; Howard and Locust Colfax. Immaculate Conception Catholic Church 305 E. Howard St., Colfax, 515674-3711; Decaon Joe Dvorak; 11:00am Sunday Mass, 9:00am Wednesday Communion Service; www.immaculateconceptioncolfax.org Immanuel Baptist (GARB) 1300 N. 4th Ave. E., Ken Van Loon, Pastor, 9:30 am Sunday school, 10:45 am Worship, 6:00 pm Worship, Wed 6:30-8:00 pm Youth, 6:30 pm Wednesday Awana Clubs (during school year), 7:00 pm Wednesday Prayer Fellowship. Call 792-4470. Ira United Church Karen Fausch, pastor, 9:00 am Worship, 10:15 am Sunday School.

Monroe United Methodist 407 N. Monroe St., Monroe, 641259-2822; Pastor Stephen Taylor; Jubilee Service 8:15 am; Sunday School 9:00 am; Worship 10:15 am; Office Hours: Mon. Thurs. 8-Noon; monroeum@iowatelecom.net New Life Baptist Church 124 E. Howard St., Colfax, 515-674-3103, Sunday School 9:45 am, Worship Service 10:45, Evening Service 6 pm, midweek service 7 pm Wednesdays. Independent Fundamental Baptist Church. Newton Baptist Temple (A Fundamental Independent Church) 621 E. 12th St. N., Ross McIntyre, pastor. 10:00 am Sunday School, 11:00 am Worship, Wednesday and Sunday 6:00 pm Worship, Bus transportation available, 6:00 pm Wednesday Bible study.

Pleasantview United Methodist 8454 S. 28th Ave. E., Newton, Pastor Tim Morgan; 9:00 am worship; 10:15 am Sunday School. Prairie City Church of the Brethren 12015 Hwy S 6G, Corner of S 6G & F70 W, 5 miles south of Prairie City on S6G, 515-9942940; Mon., Tues., Thurs. & Fri. 8:15-11:15 am; Pastor Timothy Peter; Sunday: 9:30am Worship Service/Children’s Church; Nursery provided. Sunday School will resume in fall. Prairie City First Reformed Church 300 E. 5th St., P. O. Box 178, 515-994-2250, frcprairiecity@ aol.com; 9:30 am Worship, 10:50 am Sunday School. Prairie City United Methodist Church 706 W. McMurray, Prairie City Rev. Medea Saunders Sunday 8:30 a.m. Praise Service;10:15 Coffee Chat; 10:45 Traditional Worship. Office hours 8:30 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. M-TH pcumc@q.com 515-994-2354 Rock Creek Hickory Grove Church 3 1/2 miles north of Rock Creek Lake, 9:15 am fellowship, 9:30 am Sunday School, 10:30 am worship. Reasnor United Methodist Rev. Randall McNeer, Worship 8:45am. Communion first Sunday of each month. Sacred Heart Catholic Church 1115 S. 8th Ave. E., Rev. William Reynolds, pastor, Saturday: 5:30 pm Mass, Sunday: 9:00 am Mass.

Salvation Army 301 N. 2nd Ave. E., Captains Jeff and Mikey Carter, Sunday - 9:45 am Sunday school, 10:45 am Worship. Seventh Day Adventist 1409 S. 8th Ave E., Newton Pastor Joshua Plhocky Saturday Services 9:00 am; Worship 11 am Sabbath school, Prayer Meeting Thursday Eve at 7:00 pm Solid Rock Church 115 Main St., Reasnor; Pastor John Hlad 641-842-2440; Sunday Bible study all ages 9:30 a.m.; 10:30 a.m. worship; Wednesday Bible study all ages 7 p.m. St. Aidan’s Anglican Church 4900 Meredith Dr., (NW 46th Ave.), Des Moines, The Bishop L.W. Faulk, 9:10 am Morning prayer, 9:30 am Holy communion. St. Luke United Methodist 501 E. 19th St. N., Pastor Rev. Audrey Young, 8:00 am worship followed by Coffee time. 9:15 am Sunday School for all ages, including two adult classes. 10:30 am Worship followed by Coffeetime. 641-792-5736 St. Andrew’s Lutheran Church 5 mi. west of Sully, Pastor Nancy J. Pick, Worship 9:30 am; Adult Forum 10:15 am; Women of the ELCA meet 1:30 pm on the 2nd Wednesday of the month; Church Council meets 2nd Tuesday of the month at 7 pm.; Contact Parish office 641-798-4651. St. Stephen’s Episcopal 223 E. 4th St. N., Newton, ph. 792-6971. Rev. John Thorpe, Rector, Rev. Merle Smith, Deacon; Sunday 8:00 am Holy Eucharist & 10:00 am Holy Eucharist; Mon. - Thurs. 7:30 am Morning Prayer; Wed. 5:00 pm Evening Prayer. Sully Community Church Pastor Jerry Morningstar, 9:30 am Sunday school, 10:30 am Worship, 5:00 pm Quiz team practice; 6:00 pm Worship, Thursday night adults, youth 7:00 pm. Sully Christian Reformed Pastor Brian Ochsner. 9:30 am Morning worship, 6:00 pm Evening worship, 10:45 am Sunday School. 9:30 am Tues. Coffee Break for women, Nursery and preschool classes provided. 7:15 pm Wed - Gems, Cadets and High School Youth, Prayer for Country - everyone welcome. 8 Bible studies call 594-4440.

Sully First Reformed Church Rev. Wayne Sneller, senior pastor, Diana Scandridge, Youth & Education Director. 9:30 am Worship, 11:00 am Sunday school, 6:00 pm Worship; Thursday Night Family Night 7:00 pm Sept. - March. www.sullyfrc.org United Pentecostal 813 E. 7th St. N., Rev. Robert A. Shaw, pastor, 10:00 am Sunday Worship, 6:00 pm Sunday Worship, Prayer and Bible study Tuesday 6:30, Super & Youth Church Wednesday starts 7:00-8:00. United Presbyterian 209 N. 2nd Ave. E., Rev. Donald Freeman, 9:30 am Sunday School, 10:30 - 11:30 am worship service (broadcasted live on KCOB radio); 11:30 am Fellowship; Wednesday choir rehearsal 6:00 p.m.; Nursery provided on Sundays. Westfield Community Church 4164 20th St., Grinnell, Pastor Jann Braaksma, Sunday, 9:30 a.m. Sunday School; Sunday 10:30 a.m. Worship; Wednesday, 6:30 p.m. Youth Group; www.westfieldwitness.org Wittemberg Church Rt. 1, Newton, pastor Rev. Roger K. Swanson 10:15 am Worship.

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Page 4C

Friday, September 27, 2013

Assisted Living Week at Newton Village

Submitted Photos Newton Village celebrated Assisted Living Week on Sept. 8-14 with the theme “Homemade Happiness” and an art show featuring many Newton Village tenants’ handmade goods, including Joan Hackathorn’s dolls (above), work by whittler Charles Lester (top right) and paintings by Clarice Thompson.

This Week at the Library

Computer classes, crafts, e-reader assistance and more By Nicole Lindstrom Newton Public Library Affordable Care Act: Health Insurance Marketplace No doubt you’ve been starting to hear about the new Health InsuranceMarketplace, a key part of the health care law that will be open for business on Oct. 1. But you probably still have questions. The best place for the latest, most accurate, information on the Marketplace is the updated website, HealthCare.gov. At the site, you can learn what it is, who can apply for insurance, how to get insurance, how to lower your costs, and more. You can participate in an online web chat on the website (Healthcare.gov) or call a toll free number, 1-800-

318-2596, to speak with a trained customer service representative. The library has Internet access workstations available for patrons and handouts to help you get started with the Health Insurance Marketplace. The library advises those not familiar with the Internet to bring a trusted friend or family member along to help, library staff will be unable to assist in the enrollment process. Computer Classes The library has released its schedule for upcoming computer classes. See it at www. newton.lib.ia.us/ser vices/ classes. Thanks to the Jasper Community Foundation grant we received, we are now

able to offer classes throughout the day and in the evenings in the library meeting room with new laptops. In October, we will be offering Computers for Beginners (no experience necessary) from 10 to 11 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 8; 2 to 3 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 10; and 2 to 3 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 30. We will also offer set-up an email account on and 9 to 10 a.m. Friday, Oct. 18. If you would like to register for a class contact the Information Desk at (641) 7924108. Adult Craft: Recycled Tee At 6 p.m. Monday, Sept. 30, we will be recycling old Tshirts into scarves, bracelets and work-out tanks. Partici-

pants must bring their own shirt(s) to recycle and register for the program in advance. Register by calling the Information Desk at (641) 7924108. Coffee & Movie: ‘42’ Join us for a showing of “42” in the library meeting room at 10:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 2. Synopsis: In 1947, Branch Rickey put himself at the forefront of history when he signed Jackie Robinson, breaking Major League Baseball’s infamous color line. But the deal also put both Robinson and Rickey in the firing line of the public, the press and other players. Facing blatant racism from every side, Robinson was forced to dem-

onstrate tremendous courage and restraint by not reacting in kind. Instead, Number 42 let his talent on the field do the talking — ultimately winning over fans and his teammates, silencing his critics, and paving the way for others to follow. Trouble with Your E-Reader? The library is offering one-on-one tech time on Mondays and Tuesdays. If you want to learn more about your e-reader device, sign up for a half-hour appointment at the Information Desk by calling (641) 792-4108. We can help you to check out ebooks, change your settings, download and delete apps, and more

The Reading Link

Without safe boundaries, we have no direction By Christine Pauley Reading Specialist Boundaries, learning and literacy interweave themselves into who we become. I can’t learn well if I don’t know where boundaries are, nor if the boundaries suffocate me. Parents and educators constantly strive to keep opportunities balanced. Children seek to test boundaries for though they want to be in control, they fear they are. Safe boundaries help us know what we can count on and without them we have no direction. Childhood expectations become adult expectations. Boundaries help form values and goals, which lead to what opportunities we accept. At about age 10, we lock in on our basic values. Our guiding light often comes from sources that hurt us. We may close our minds and refuse to listen to new ideas. Ideas are reasoning power which allow us to grow in understanding about the concepts of what is right

and wrong. We cannot make changes unless we understand that what we are now — is not what we have to be. Life is not a continuous exciting event. Life is making goals and growing towards them and literacy helps us to reach higher values and goals. Society benefits, we benefit, and success comes. Today, every three to five years, major value differences are programmed, rather than every generation. Children unconditionally absorb everything. Basic personality forms in our first three to four years. What we are now is what we were when we were value programmed during those early years, unless we made purposeful changes to our system. Who we choose as heroes help form our values. Mindsets are formed by commonly shared experiences. Society today often takes its heroes down leaving the young with no role models.  Heroes aren’t perfect, but they challenge us to be better. I enjoyed

three major heroes in my young life: my maternal grandfather, my pastor, and Hopalong Cassidy of the movies. They all made major differences in my life. Who were your heroes? Group values come from shared experiences and our emotions. We are not to be trapped in our value system, we are to use it. Values come from thinking about the models we see and forming goals. Children may be financially supported, but emotionally abandoned. Learning requires discovering connections through meaningful materials. We need to be selective in what we allow to enter our short term memory or there may be a traffic jam. A “significant emotional event” is the only time an adult changes and only the individual defines this event.  Part of success is meeting change directly. Literacy helps us in the journey of changes in our lives and keeps it from being too frightening. One part of being alive is to learn how to handle our own anger,

but also how to handle other people’s anger. Rather than arguing with feelings we discuss facts and opinions. Literacy means we explore by asking questions and telling the person what we hear, so they can tell us if what we hear is what was said. It is empathizing and admitting we are wrong when we are. Values are who we are. Answering questions such as: Do you want to make big money? Is salary more important to you than enjoying your job? Is it important to you to advance in a job? Is expressing yourself creatively important to you? Do you desire to help others? Your values shape your goals. Howard Figler, an expert on career guidance at the University of Texas, says, “Once you discover your values, you can look for job experiences where you can satisfy them...” This includes deciding on volunteer experiences. So seek what is important to you. Do you want to help society and contribute

to the betterment of the world? Do you choose to be involved in helping other people, individually or in small groups? Voting is an overlooked power that helps decide courses of action, policies, etc.  Do you choose to persuade and invest in people towards the common good? Are you willing to change your own attitude or opinion and help others change theirs? Do you pursue knowledge, truth and understanding? Are you willing to listen to an “expert” and at times be the “expert” in a given field? How do you engage in creative works (art, dance, music, writing, etc.)? Do you appreciate the beauty of ideas? Do you find time to help others in their work and allow others to help you in your work? Literacy is not waiting for retirement to do all the good you hope to do. Literacy helps you figure out how to do some now and more later. Another way to look at the opportunities you choose are whether you

like: co-operation versus competition; conformity versus individuality; leadership versus followership; popularity versus isolation. Values derive from many things such as parent’s attitudes towards: quitting or excelling, grades, sibling comparisons, standards, responsibilities, money values, community service, and appearance. Values come from the similarities or contrasts among what is expected at school and what is done at home. Children interweave values of teachers, peers, parents, and others. They form values about the worth of competition and how to treat each other by what they see. Is winning the goal or is doing your best the goal? Self-esteem comes from values and whether you can live up to them or not. We form values and reform values all of our life. When we have quality values we tend to be better people. Literacy partners with values. Until next week — Christine Pauley

NDN-09-27-2013  

Newton Daily News

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