Page 1

SPECIAL Section Women in Business MAY 2018

Page 45

fine art FOCUS McHenry photographer Beth Genengels captures life beneath the surface

Women of Distinction Meet the class of 2018-19 Page 37

Mum 117 Crystal Lake’s eco-conscious boutique

Stage Craze Summer guide to concerts and plays Page 24

Page 26 1 | MAY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 1

www.nwherald.com/magazine

4/30/18 12:38 PM


We do the designing. You do the living.

2 | MAY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 2

Creating stunning landscapes for your life and everyone in it.

847-658-3883 barnnurserylandscape.com 8109 S Rt 31, Cary IL 60013 www.nwherald.com/magazine 4/30/18 12:38 PM


www.nwherald.com/magazine

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 3

41 North Williams St. Downtown Crystal Lake (parking in rear) 815.455.3600 | dalzelljewelers.com MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | MAY 2018 | 3 4/30/18 12:38 PM


INSIDE

A&E 8 DIVING DEEPER McHenry photographer Beth Genengels captures life beneath the surface 12 LITERARY LOVE Librarians, purveyors of the written word share list of life-changing reads 18 LOST TRADES NO MORE Local artisans keep ‘handmade’ at the heart of their businesses 22 ART AROUND TOWN Hundreds of artists, crafters to showcase work in local summer festivals 24 STAGE CRAZE Concerts and musicals coming to a venue near you

HOME & LIFESTYLE 26 RETAIL AS AN ART FORM Crystal Lake boutique offers unique, carefully curated items

DINING & ENTERTAINING 30 CREATIVE COCKTAILS Best bars for mind-blowing mixology

HEALTH & WELLNESS 32 ART THERAPY The creative process of healing

BUSINESS & CIVIC

18 LOST TRADES NO MORE

Local artisans keep ‘handmade’ at the heart of their businesses

37 WOMEN OF DISTINCTION Meet the 2018-19 class of courageous, compassionate and committed McHenry County women 42 INVESTING IN PEOPLE Crystal Lake Chamber of Commerce president Mary Margaret Maule shows unbridled commitment to community 45 SPECIAL SECTION: WOMEN IN BUSINESS From business owners and entrepreneurs to artists and educators, get to know the leading ladies in our communities

FAMILY IN FOCUS 56 SUBURBAN SUPERDAD: Diary of a manly ‘dance dad’

TRAVEL 60 THE GLASS-HALF-FULL GUY: Finding unorthodox art on your adventures 66 HOMES SWAP Trade your way around the world

OUT & ABOUT 68 ENCHANTING EVENINGS Weekends at the Shores of Turtle Creek transform into wizardly world of Harry Potter 74 CALENDAR See what’s happening in McHenry County this month!

4 | MAY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 4

www.nwherald.com/magazine

4/30/18 12:38 PM


If you receive a cancer diagnosis,

   

At Centegra Health System, an experienced team creates a personalized treatment plan to help you get the most out of life. From state-of-the-art surgery and chemotherapy to radiation treatment and a

We’re Here When you Need Us

full range of support services — the care you need is here for you.

Learn more at CENTEGRA.org/cancer

www.nwherald.com/magazine Š 2018 Centegra Health System. All rights reserved. ONC31169

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 5

MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | MAY 2018 | 5

4/30/18 12:38 PM


Editor's Note Though I’ve always appreciated performance art, I don’t have a single acting or dancing bone in my body. However, as youth and ignorance – or, more likely, a shallow talent pool – would have it, a lack of skill in the theater arts didn’t stop me from becoming the Wicked Witch of the West in my elementary school’s production of “The Wizard of Oz.” (Quite an ambitious undertaking by my fifth grade drama teacher, I might add.) Apparently, I was a perfect fit for the witch, as it only required the memorization of a couple of lines and a knack for cackling outweighed the need for a quality singing voice. I pulled off a decent performance as the Wicked Witch, and I even had fun doing it despite the nerves. My dance training experience is even sparser, having attended a handful of classes as a kid – and, somehow, I always managed to accompany my “friend with rhythm.” In class, I often mirrored the likes of a comedic sidekick rather than a worthy opponent. The stage wasn’t for me, it turns out. I have always been more of a behind-the-scenes sort of gal than an in-the-spotlight type, which is probably what brought me to journalism, writing and photography to begin with. But, I have the utmost admiration for the actors, singers and dancers who put themselves out there for the world to see (and judge). Similarly

to performance art, through writing and photography, you invite the outside world in to view, appreciate and criticize your work, and thus criticize YOU at your most vulnerable. So, in this month’s A&E edition, we’re sending some love to those who have the courage to create: in theater, photography and the literary arts. Our cover story features McHenry photographer Beth Genengels whose passion has led her to explore the art form beneath the surface – via underwater photography. Find out more about the photographer’s work and upcoming projects, on page 8. We’ve combed the county for the best theatrical performances and concerts to mark on your summer calendars, and in “Books That Left Their Mark,” on page 12, McHenry County’s librarians and other purveyors of the written word offer their list of life-changing reads. Thanks for reading,

McHenry County Magazine Published by Shaw Media 7717 S. Route 31 Crystal Lake, IL 60014 Phone: 815-459-4040 mchenrycountymagazine@shawmedia.com

DIRECTOR OF MARKETING AND SPECIALTY PUBLISHING Laura Shaw 630-427-6213 lshaw@shawmedia.com

EDITOR

Kara Silva, Editor

Kara Silva 630-427-6209 ksilva@shawmedia.com

DESIGNER Allison McCaleb 815-526-4485 amccaleb@shawmedia.com

on the

COVER

Professional photographer Beth Genengels is diving deeper to capture clients beneath the surface. Through underwater photography, the McHenry resident creates beautiful fine art portraits. Find out more about the artist’s work, on page 8. Salon Services by MARIO TRICOCI Hair - CALVIN Makeup - ANDI Photos by RON McKINNEY

6 | MAY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 6

NICHE ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Jaclyn Cornell 630-845-5234 jcornell@shawmedia.com

CORRESPONDENTS Jonathan Bilyk, Kelsey O’Connor, Aimee Barrows, and Allison Horne

PHOTOGRAPHER Ron McKinney and Nancy Merkling

McHenry County Magazine is available by subscription for $24 a year. If you would like each month’s edition mailed to your home, send payment information and address to McHenry County Magazine, 7717 S. Route 31, Crystal Lake, IL 60014 or via email at subscriptions@shawmedia. com.

www.nwherald.com/magazine

4/30/18 12:38 PM


Pregnancy Increases the Risk of Developing Varicose Veins Varicose veins often form during pregnancy, due to the drastic physiological changes that take place. Research has indicated that the more pregnancies a woman experiences, the more likely she is to develop vein disease. Women who have had 3 or more children are almost guaranteed to develop varicose veins as a result.

Varicose Veins Are More Than a Cosmetic Concern Vein treatment is often misunderstood as a cosmetic procedure. However, vein disease is a serious condition that requires medical intervention. If left untreated, varicose veins are likely to produce persistent pain, fatigue, and swelling of the legs and ankles. In some cases, more severe and life-threatening consequences may occur.

Treatment is Simple + Easy! Our vein treatment is minimally invasive, practically painless and takes less than an hour, allowing for quick treatment 6 weeks after pregnancy.

Insurance Accepted • Varicose & Spider Vein Treatment • Venous Ulcer Treatment Endovenous Laser Therapy • Ultrasound Guided Sclerotherapy • Surface Sclerotherapy Board Certified Vein Specialists • No Double Booking • Over 10,000+ Treated Patients

F OR A CO NS UL TA TI ON - CA LL 8 47.2 77.9100 O R VIS IT WWW.IVSVEI NS .C OM MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | MAY 2018 | 7 2 22 85 P EPPER RD. SU ITE 1 05 . L AK E BARRI NGTON, IL 6 00 10

www.nwherald.com/magazine

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 7

4/30/18 12:38 PM


Diving deeper McHenry photographer Beth Genengels captures life beneath the surface

8 | MAY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 8

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

| By JONATHAN BILYK www.nwherald.com/magazine

4/30/18 12:38 PM


" The purpose of photography is to prove we lived. I am creating an heirloom to carry on that legacy. ... [Photos] are proof that you were here. And I am here to celebrate your presence." - Beth Genengels, professional photographer

T

he moment of reckoning for Beth Genengels arrived the moment she held her breath, and dipped her camera into the pool.

swimming pool, Genengels then set about obtaining the necessary gear and assembling a submergible backdrop. With everything in place, however, she still needed to steel herself for that harrowing moment when she must unlearn everything she knew about expensive cameras and water, and intentionally submerge the most important and expensive tool she owns.

As a professional photographer, Genengels had for years built up a dazzling portfolio of portraits and artistic photographs, highlighting many of the things she loved.

“I have found that my passion with photography falls wherever two paths of my life have joined,” says the McHenry resident.

“You buy the bag, you do the water test, but I’m not sure anything can prepare you for the first time you need to sink a $4,000 investment,” Genengels says.

Most of the time spent as a professional photographer has meant finding new approaches to capturing models and portrait subjects in ways that incorporate Genengels’ two greatest pursuits (other than photography), which date back to her childhood.

While a number of photographers grow up bitten by the shutterbug, Genengels had actually had the goal of being mostly on the other side of the lens. As a child, she wanted to become a ballet dancer. In high school, however, she was introduced to aviation, and chose to pursue a degree in aviation at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale.

“I love to photograph dancers, but I also love incorporating aviation,” Genengels says. But in more recent months, Genengels’ passion has taken a “dive” in a more aqueous and challenging direction. The artist hopes to begin capturing willing clients beneath the surface as an underwater photographer.

After graduation, she became an intern at Trans World Airlines. And it was during that time that she became hooked on photography, as she would often lend a hand to TWA’s staff photographer, Garry Rose.

After taking a class on underwater photography in 2017, she says that the subject left her stirred. Beginning with recruiting two willing nieces to serve as her photo subjects at her parents’

www.nwherald.com/magazine

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 9

“I find it curious that even when you turn your back on creativity, it has a way of coming back to you,” she says. - Continued on page 10

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | MAY 2018 | 9

4/30/18 12:38 PM


- Continued from page 9 After the TWA internship, however, she continued pursuing a career in aviation. She lived in Florida and taught for a time there, before returning home to McHenry County, where she ended up meeting the man she ended up marrying. It was at that point, as she and her husband started a family and welcomed three children, that aviation was firmly stowed away, and her commitment to photography truly blossomed, “with every sweet smile of their little faces,” she says. She still maintains her licensing and certification, but has thrown herself headlong into building her professional photography business, which is now based out of the old mill building at 4105 W. Crystal Lake Road in McHenry.

Though she enjoys fully capturing each person’s unique personality in a variety of ways, Genengels is going even deeper, way beneath the surface, to offer clients the option to participate in underwater shoots. The photographer is learning how to coach subjects to capture the best light and movement, and does so by adjusting to sunlight patterns and even the kinds of clothing subjects will wear while underwater. “Certain fabrics move better in water than others,” she says. “I like movement in my dancer images in the studio, and I’m sure that’s why I’m so drawn to the movement of fabric underwater.” As for the subjects themselves, she says that she is learning to help them overcome natural impulses when in the water, such as closing their eyes and splaying their arms and legs. “We usually need to discuss poses and movements above water because I am not able to communicate or direct them underwater,” she says.

Today, Genengels specializes in portraits and artistic shoots for families, children, seniors, dancers and expectant mothers, in particular. However, she has recently started working with a partner on weddings, as well.

This summer, Genengels will begin offering underwater photo sessions to clients, hoping – particularly – to land opportunities for underwater maternity shoots.

“I aim for a deeper, more emotional portrait – often a character study, if you will,” she says.

“There is something so natural about the association of the element and childbirth,” Genengels says.

She notes that some of her favorite shoots have involved images that she’s taken of her children for competitions, as well as a senior photo session she shot involving a young man who would soon leave to pursue a degree in aviation.

While some photographers may lament the growth of smartphone “photography” in recent years, Genengels says the medium has, in some ways, enriched demand for her services, and has continued to challenge her to raise the level of artistry in her work, as more people learn to recognize truly memorable photography.

“We shot all around Galt Airport,” she says. “To make it even better, he wore his great grandfather’s World War II pilot’s uniform for part of it. It lent its theme to my character portraits.”

“The purpose of photography is to prove we lived,” she says. “I am creating an heirloom to carry on that legacy. But, at a minimum, please continue to take those decent pictures. They are proof that you were here. And I am here to celebrate your presence.”

Through the years, Genengels says that she has learned and developed a “particular style,” enabling her to take on the shoots she “knew were the right fit for me.” “In perspective, you realize there is a photographer and a client for everyone, but not everyone is necessarily your client,” she says. “It’s all about the fit.”

Photo by Ron McKinney 10 | MAY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 10

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

www.nwherald.com/magazine

4/30/18 12:38 PM


u MARY BETH HARPER FROM????? JOB: Director, Elmhurst Public Library Read: “Pride and Prejudice” by Jane Austen

“The book that has had the greatest impact on my life is ‘Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen. I read it for the first time for an English class in my senior year in high scho

www.nwherald.com/magazine

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 11

MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | MAY 2018 | 11

4/30/18 12:38 PM


A LOVE LETTER TO THE LITERARY ARTS:

BOOKS THAT LEFT THEIR MARK | By SHONDA DUDLICEK

Books can offer insight, empower, uplift, nourish the soul, make you think and challenge your beliefs. Whether you’re an avid reader or average a book a year, it’s difficult to forget the books that have left their mark. From librarians to brick-and-mortar bookstore owners and clerks, here are the recommended life-changing reads offered by local purveyors of the written word:

12 | MAY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 12

u NICOLE STEEVES JOB: Director, Fox River Grove Public Library District READ: “Bunnicula” by James Howe “I read ‘Bunnicula’ for the first time more than 30 years ago. It was love at first read (and second and third …). It was scary and thrilling and full of bravery and fierce friendship. As years passed, and other books came along, it stayed a great memory, but not something that was at the forefront of my mind. Then, about five years ago, I read it to my daughter when she reached the age that I had been when I first read it. It was still funny and exciting, and she loved it, too (always a highlight for a librarian mom). What made it especially meaningful, though – and why it leapt to mind when asked for the book that had the greatest impact – was that it read like a template for so many of the pop culture joys of my life. ‘Buffy the Vampire Slayer,’ ‘The Magicians’ by Lev Grossman, Kelly Link’s short stories, ‘The Master and Margarita’ by Mikhail Bulgakov, and even ‘The Night Circus’ by Erin Morgenstern – my ride-or-die favorites – all evoke the same scares and laughs and loyalty that ‘Bunnicula’ does. Revisiting it showed just how strongly it shaped my tastes, and I’m pretty satisfied with that!”

u KARIN THOGERSEN Crystal Lake resident JOB: Young adult and reference librarian, Huntley Area Public Library READ: “The Hero and the Crown” by Robin McKinley “I read [‘The Hero and the Crown’] several times before I had to return it to our library, and eventually bought my own copy because I loved it so much. It’s about an underappreciated, awkward young woman with a royal pedigree, who lacks the courtly manners, ambition and magical gifts of her family. … and I related to her because I was also tall, quirky and tonguetied in social situations. We both preferred the company of animals to humans (especially dogs, cats and horses) and could lose ourselves in our research. Finding yourself, or characters like yourself, in books can be so valuable – especially for those who are having trouble finding ‘their people’ outside of books. It’s a wonderful experience to feel like an author has written about you or specifically for you, and to fall in love with characters, or new worlds, or discover that others share the same enthusiasm for the things about which you are passionate.”

u MARY RYAN Woodstock resident JOB: Head of youth services, Woodstock Public Library READ: “The Three Questions” by Jon J. Muth “I stumbled upon this picture book in a bookstore in Annapolis two days after a hurricane. The shop had no power, but was open anyway, which made the discovery just a bit magical. Jon J. Muth’s gorgeous watercolors illustrate a story about a boy named Nikolai with three questions: ‘When is the best time to do things?’ ‘Who is the most important?’ and ‘What is the right thing to do?’ When he does not get satisfactory answers from his friends, he goes to see Leo, the wise turtle. Leo is a nod to Leo Tolstoy, author of the short story that inspired Muth’s work. Through the events of the story, Nikolai realizes that he has been living the answers to his questions, even though he did not know the way to put them into words. It is the kind of book that can just as easily be read to a room full of teenagers or adults as a room full of children. It teaches a timeless lesson patiently and without patronizing the reader. I love many picture books, but I only own a few, and this is one of them.”

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

www.nwherald.com/magazine

4/30/18 12:38 PM


u BETH RYAN Crystal Lake resident JOB: Director, Johnsburg Public Library READ: “Last Rung on the Ladder� by Stephen King (A short story in the collection “Night Shift�)

SPRING INTO SUMMER

Ž�‘’ ’�“ ‘’” •ƒ�“‘  ––—�•  �• ˜

“I’ve been an avid reader since I was 4. At different points in my life different books and different authors really affected me. At age 4, it was Clifford; at age 9, it was Nancy Drew and Trixie Belden; at age 12, it was Judy Blume books; and in high school and college, it was books by Stephen King. The first Stephen King book I read was ‘Christine.’ I can’t recall what drew me to that title, but I loved it – not for the horror, but for the back and side stories and the characters. From that point on, I devoured his works. At some point, I read ‘Night Shift,’ which is one of his collections of short stories that was originally published in 1978. The majority of the book is your typical King horror, supernatural genre, but this story stands out because it’s so atypical. It’s a sweet, sad and powerful story about a brother reminiscing about his sister when they were kids – so atypical Stephen King that 10 years after I first read it, I had to do research to track it down because I didn’t trust myself that King had written it. So, why has this short story had the biggest impact on me? Couple of reasons – I love this story, first, because it’s an excellent story, but a close second is because if anyone read it without knowing who the author was they would never guess Stephen King. It’s an excellent reminder to look beyond stereotypes and to expand your horizons. In high school and college you feel so labeled and pigeonholed, but this diversion from the usual seems extra rebellious and inspiring ... and in this day and age sometimes that’s the best we can hope for.� - Continued on page 14

Thomas A. Lutz, MD, RVT, RPVI Stephen C. Sorenson, MD, RVT, RPVI Specializing in the Treatment of: Varicose Veins  Spider Veins Venous Ulcers  Lymphedema Cosmetic Facial & Hand Veins

Vein Specialists of Illinois, a llocally ll owned, d iindependent d d medical practice is a leader in non-surgical, personalized treatment of venous disorders. VSI serves our community with two convenient locations in Lake Zurich and Elgin. Trusted professionals Dr. Sorenson and Dr. Lutz, Diplomates of the American Board of Venous and Lymphatic Medicine have a combined 30 years experience. Utilizing the most current equipment and latest techniques to treat varicose and spider veins, VSI professionals will change the way you look and feel with non-surgical               

You are always Number One at VSI. If you are experiencing any of the following symptoms, you may have vein disease:    

Leg Pain/Aching Leg Swelling Leg Rashes Heavy/Tired Legs

  

Itching Dark Spots Restless Legs

847.852.4194 VSIveins.com www.nwherald.com/magazine

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 13

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Bring this ad in for a FREE initial screening of varicose and spider veins. ($325 Value!) †  ‡    ˆ  Â?  ˆ  ‰  

847.852.4194 VSIveins.com

�  Š‹Œ‹­Š

       Â? Â? Â? Â? ­€ ‚Â? Â? ƒ    Â? Â?  „ Â… Â?  €

                       

                  

SM-CL1525648

New Patient  

Š 2018 Vein Specialists of Illinois

MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | MAY 2018 | 13

4/30/18 12:38 PM


- Continued from page 13

“You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view … until you climb into his skin and walk around in it.” - Atticus Finch to his daughter, Scout, in “To Kill A Mockingbird”

14 | MAY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 14

u MARY ROBINSON Crystal Lake resident JOB: Library technical assistant and facilitator of Bookies Book Group, Crystal Lake Public Library READ: “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee “I have loved this book each time I have read it during my life: The astonishing first time; the times I read it out loud to my kids with tears making it hard to get to the end; the time I was privileged to read and journal about it along with my high school sophomore for her English assignment; and the time I read it with our Crystal Lake Public Library book club, the Bookies, and had the joy of seeing it with fresh eyes through the wonderful insights provided by our 18 members. The masterful storytelling of Harper Lee never fails to inspire and move me with its lessons of love, understanding and humanity. The book’s most important lesson speaks to my heart every time I read it. Atticus Finch to his precocious daughter Scout: ‘You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view … until you climb into his skin and walk around in it.’” u ARLENE LYNES Woodstock resident JOB: Owner, Read Between the Lynes bookstore in Woodstock READ: “Simple Abundance” by Sarah Ban Breathnach “I read this book for the first time in my mid-30s, then again and again, over the course of the past 20 years. This book had a profound effect on me in that it was the first time I truly examined my life, my likes and dislikes, and helped me to craft a life of simplicity, beauty and comfort based on what I valued and revered in life.”

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

u CAROL DOLIN Buffalo Grove resident JOB: Assistant director, Algonquin Area Public Library District READ: “The Count of Monte Cristo” by Alexandre Dumas “I am told I have enjoyed stories, songs and books from the time I was a baby. We did not have much money growing up, but my parents sang, talked and read to my four siblings and me from the start. We also had fabulous librarians in our rural school who pointed us to great literature if we showed any interest at all. Often our classroom teachers did not have time to spend with strong students, so we spent a lot of time with the librarians when they sent us to the library so as to make the best use of our time. My high school librarian pointed me to many great books and one of the books that made the greatest impacts on me is ‘The Count of Monte Cristo.’ I read as many translations as I could put my hands on during my teens and early 20s. The characters and relationships intrigued me as did the variations in words used in the translations and how seemingly simple changes in language subtly changed the focus of the story. Still, the futility of the pursuit of revenge remained constant, and it resonated with my natural tendency to let things go. It can still be a struggle to hold people accountable without holding a grudge, but I think this early study helps me to strike a healthy balance and treat people with kindness. There were many important books before and since, but ‘The Count of Monte Cristo’ is a title from my early life that stands out as having had a lasting impact.”

www.nwherald.com/magazine

4/30/18 12:38 PM


50th ANNUAL u JEANNETTE SCOTT Cary resident JOB: Public services assistant and readers’ advisory, Cary Area Public Library READ: “Anne of Green Gables” by L. M. Montgomery “As a child, ‘Anne of Green Gables’ by L.M. Montgomery was the book that gave me the opportunity to escape from my own home life into the life of orphan Anne Shirley who was adopted at the age of 11 and started a new life in the fictional town of Avonlea on Prince Edward Island. I looked forward to immersing myself in her adventures from her childhood and into adulthood in continuing books written about her by the author. This book was the launch pad for my journey as an avid life-long reader. READ: “The Glass Castle” by Jeannette Walls As an adult, ‘The Glass Castle,’ a memoir by Jeannette Walls, gave me confirmation in print that I was not alone in my struggle growing up in a dysfunctional alcoholic family. The author gave me comfort and affirmation that one can overcome the cards that life deals you at birth. Since reading this book many years ago, I have encountered other readers of this story who identified with Ms. Walls’ childhood and were given the courage to share their stories and move forward after being inspired by this memoir. These are two books that I always recommend to patrons in our library who want to be inspired by their reading.”

Mark Your Calendars! FALL DIDDLEY® 2018 Sat., October 13th • 9am - 5pm Sun., October 14th • 9am - 4pm Boone County Fairgrounds Belvidere, Illinois

Featuring over 300 Crafters and Artists Quality Handcrafted Work KING R A P E E R F AND N! ADMISSIO

Plus: Bake Sa l Plant Sa e 50/50 R le affle!

Sunday, May 20, 2018 Historic Woodstock Square 10am–4pm VISIT OUR BAKERY FOR SOME TASTY TREATS! Sponsored by Volunteers of The Mental Health Resource League for McHenry County. See our web site for a coloring contest form. www.fairdiddley.com SM-CL1524777

www.nwherald.com/magazine

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 15

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | MAY 2018 | 15

4/30/18 12:38 PM


STRONG & RELIABLE. Like our Trust and Wealth Management Services. In a sea of change, we are your rock—a solid foundation strategically guiding you toward your financial goals. From estate planning to retirement success, you can count on Home State Bank—the only bank in McHenry County with an on-site Trust department—to provide steadfast advice and expertise to plan your financial future.

Wealth Management and Trust Services Investment Management for Individuals, Families and Institutions • Expert research and analysis • Portfolio evaluation and focus

Certified Financial Planning • Comprehensive plans for life, college and retirement

Trust and Estate Administration • Locally directed and determined

Court Supervised Guardianship • Minors • Disabled adults

Call Mark Weber at 815-788-3404 to schedule a private consultation.

611 S. Main Street, Crystal Lake, Illinois 60014

16 | MAY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 16

www.nwherald.com/magazine

4/30/18 12:38 PM


Are you looking for Extreme Adventure with Extreme Community Impact? Girl Scouts off Northern Illinois invites you y to go g

June 2, 2018

Pheasant Run Resort

Opportunites for all to:

Over the Edge 4 Girl Scouts is an amazing event for ANYONE 11 and over who wants to make a difference in the lives of girls! No prior experience necessary!

> Rappel > Sponsor > Support > Volunteer > DONATE

Go to girlscoutsni.org/ote to get started today! Funds raised at this event support GSNI’s commitment to offering girls in need the opportunity to be Girl Scouts and access to all Girl Scout-related activities and programs.

Sponsored by: Shaw Media | Challenger Lighting Co., Inc. | Northwestern Medicine | Elgin State Bank www.nwherald.com/magazine MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | MAY 2018 | 17 St. Charles Bank & Trust Co. | Siepert & Co., LLP | Chicago Regional Council of Carpenters MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 17

4/30/18 12:38 PM


Lost trades no more

Local artisans keep ‘handmade’ at the heart of their businesses | By KELSEY O’CONNOR

There’s something uniquely satisfying about creating something with your own two hands. It can be a creative outlet, a productive diversion to pass the time, and, sometimes, a source of income. McHenry County Magazine writer Kelsey O’Connor chatted with two local artisans about their craft, what inspires them and how they turned a hobby into a business.

JEN WARD | THE CRYSTAL COLLECTIVE After curating a crystal collection for decades, Jen Ward launched her own bohemian-chic jewelry line out of her Maple Park home. The brand is sold throughout the McHenry County area and features a selection of gemstone necklaces, bangles, charm bracelets and more. KELSEY O’CONNOR: What appeals to you about making jewelry? JEN WARD: I always made jewelry as a hobby, but I never really had the confidence to sell it. I loved being able to create what I see in my head. I also love creating and wearing one-of-a-kind pieces. O’CONNOR: How does it feel to have customers buying your creations? WARD: My first market was the first Fairfield Market in 2015. I was stunned by the reception, and I continue to be. I get a lot of positive feedback about how I display my pieces. I like to create an interesting setting that juxtaposes the natural world with the industrial world. O’CONNOR: How would you describe the style of your jewelry? WARD: I think my style is simple, dainty, bohemian chic. O’CONNOR: What types of products do you currently sell? WARD: I sell earrings, necklaces and bracelets from crystals, semiprecious gemstones, gold fill and sterling silver metals. I also sell vegan antlers, terrariums with air plants and crystals, and crystal clocks.  O’CONNOR: Where do you find inspiration? WARD: I draw inspiration from nature. I love trees, the woods, plants and sunshine. The gemstones are from my personal collection. I go to rock shows and hand pick a lot of specific pieces. O’CONNOR: Is this your full-time job? WARD: Yes! I spend more than 40 hours a week designing, creating, marketing and managing social media. O’CONNOR: What’s the most rewarding part of running your own artisan business? WARD: I love seeing people enjoy my creations and how happy something I made can make someone.

• The Crystal Collective is sold online at Fairfield Market and The Two Gingers Vintage Events in the spring and summer and at Brush in Cary. For more information, visit www.crystalcollectivejewelry.com. 18 | MAY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 18

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

www.nwherald.com/magazine

4/30/18 12:38 PM


LINDA PASKIEWICZ | OUT ON A WHIM BIRDHOUSES Linda and her husband, Jim, took their love of vintage finds and turned it into a small business that sells whimsical, handmade birdhouses at local craft shows. Their unique creations reflect a variety of interests, from birdhouses made to look like an arcade game, circus tent, vintage car, and many more. O’CONNOR: How did you get started creating birdhouses? PASKIEWICZ: We started four years ago. We were both newly retired and looking for something interesting to do. We both like vintage things and crawling through flea markets. This was really our own idea just based on our own interests. O’CONNOR: What’s it like working with your husband on this project? PASKIEWICZ: My husband is my true partner. I could never do this without him. It’s really nice to have something that we have in common now that we’re retired from teaching. It’s really fun, we always have our eyes open for things to buy. O’CONNOR: What are your roles when it comes to creating the birdhouses? PASKIEWICZ: I design them. I figure out what we’re going to do based on what I find and what I’m interested in. He goes and buys all the wood then we both go down to the workshop and build them - Continued on page 20

No matter what the groundhog says, you’ll be warm at Hearthstone 1 and 2 Bedroom Apartments Chef Prepared Meals Fitness Center Call 815-321-2110 for information. Or visit us at hearthstonewoodstock.org

www.nwherald.com/magazine

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 19

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | MAY 2018 | 19

4/30/18 12:38 PM


Essential Care for Furs & Fine Outerwear Sheer Sensation York Signature Style Natural and Veloured Silver Blue Ice Mink Jacket

- Continued from page 19 together. Then, he brings them upstairs and I prime and paint them and then they go back to him where he finishes them with three coats of varnish so they don’t fade and they weather well. O’CONNOR: Where do you find inspiration? PASKIEWICZ: Mostly, I find vintage and refurbished things online and at antique shops. I shop on eBay and at vintage places for creative materials we can use. O’CONNOR: What’s the reaction been like from customers?

Professional Services It’s time for professional, on-site services for your fur, shearling, leather, cashmere, and skiwear garments. Drop-off during service hours, or call for a pick-up by York’s own driver. All Store Labels Welcome.

PASKIEWICZ: It’s been very good! One of the very first customers we had from 2016 just bought her fifth one from us. O’CONNOR: What’s the best part of creating and selling these birdhouses? PASKIEWICZ: I like to go to the shows and see people’s reactions. I was an art major in college, and I never used it professionally. Instead, I went back to school got my master’s in teaching. It’s rewarding to be able to do something that people consider somewhat artistic. That’s the best part, going back to my roots.

Elmhurst City Centre 630-832-2200

Connect: YorkFur.com/subscribe

• Out on a Whim birdhouses are sold at craft fairs throughout McHenry County. For more information, visit www.facebook.com/ OutOnAWhimBirdhouses.

On-Site: Storage • Cleaning • Repairs • Alterations • Restyling

20 | MAY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 20

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

www.nwherald.com/magazine

4/30/18 12:38 PM


Discover Working World We work with the best companies in McHenry and Lake Counties

Stop by our office or discover our website: www.workworld.com

POSITIONS AVAILABLE RIGHT NOW: BILLING CLERKS • DATA ENTRY CLERKS • AP/AR CLERKS SHIPPING CLERKS • GENERAL OFFICE • OPERATIONS COORDINATORS • ADMIN ASSISTANTS • RECEPTIONISTS REFER A FRIEND AND EARN $150 • PAID HOLIDAYS INSURANCE AVAILABLE • COMPUTER TRAINING AVAILABLE WEEKLY PAY • ALL SHIFTS AVAILABLE

PART-TIME • FULL TIME • DIRECT HIRE • TEMP HIRE COLLEGE STUDENTS WELCOME

Looking for your next adventure?

Let us take you there.

www.work-world.com | www.staffingsmiles.com Crystal Lake 14 N. Walkup Ave.

815-455-4490

www.nwherald.com/magazine

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 21

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Fox Lake 28 E. Grand Ave.

847-587-2442 MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | MAY 2018 | 21

4/30/18 12:38 PM


Art around town Hundreds of artists, crafters to showcase work in local summer festivals, fairs | By AIMEE BARROWS

Summer is a great time to add some new home décor pieces to spice up your space, and you won’t have to travel far from home to find high-quality fine art and whimsical crafts this season. McHenry County hosts several arts and craft fairs every summer, and all of your favorites are returning this year. In addition to enjoying time with family and friends at these events, by purchasing one-of-a-kind creations, you’ll be supporting independent local artists from across the Midwest. 

FAIR DIDDLEY

WHEN: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, May 20 WHERE: Historic Woodstock Square One of the biggest annual fairs in McHenry County is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, and it promises to be the biggest and best yet. More than 300 juried artists will display original, handcrafted folk art, jewelry, pottery, woodcarvings, fine art and much more. The free event is sponsored by the Mental Health Resource League for McHenry County, and all proceeds will benefit local nonprofit agencies that provide mental health services. For more information, visit www.mhrl.org/fairdiddley.

22 | MAY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 22

NORTHERN ILLINOIS SHEEP AND FIBER FESTIVAL (formerly known as Spring

Fiber Fling) WHEN: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, June 2, and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, June 3 WHERE: McHenry County Fairgrounds, 11900 Country Club Road, Woodstock Visitors to this festival will learn about spinning, weaving, sewing, quilting and more. Three buildings on the fairgrounds will be packed with artisans, crafters and fiber-related vendors. Guests can purchase their own fiber art supplies or buy finished handmade products. Other scheduled events include daily sheep shearing and sheep herding demonstrations. Tickets cost $3 a person, and children under age 7 will be admitted free of charge. For more information, visit www.mchenrycountyfair.com. ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

www.nwherald.com/magazine

4/30/18 12:38 PM


ART ON THE FOX

WHEN: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, June 16, and Sunday, June 17 WHERE: Riverfront Park, 201 N. Harrison St., Algonquin

Spring storms can bring UNEXPECTED COSTS

McHenry County’s preeminent juried fine arts show returns this Father’s Day weekend along the banks of the beautiful Fox River. Between 30 and 40 artists from all over the Midwest will showcase photography, ceramics, glasswork, woodwork, jewelry, paintings and more at the 11th annual event. Check out the free entertainment, including live music from local musicians, artist demonstrations and spoken word and poetry readings from McHenry County College on the central gazebo stage both days. Families can spend some quality time together with hands-on art activities or by going on a scavenger hunt in the Picasso Tent. Art on the Fox is sponsored by the Algonquin Public Arts Commission. For more information, visit www.artonthefox.org.

MCHENRY ARTS AND CRAFTS IN THE PARK

WHEN: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, July 21 WHERE: Veterans Memorial Park, 3400 Pearl St., McHenry About 100 of the Midwest’s finest crafters will be at Arts and Crafts in the Park – part of McHenry’s Fiesta Days – displaying florals, pottery, jewelry, photography and more. Festival attendees can watch artists create work on site, and local food vendors also will be in the park. For more information, visit www.mchenryfiestadays.com.

Black Diamond electricians can help you prepare with the installation of a whole home automatic standby generator. Call today to learn more about special financing options available on our whole home generators as well as our heating, cooling, & indoor air quality products.

(866) 418-3136

BlackDiamondToday.com License #058-140555

SM-CL1520531

www.nwherald.com/magazine

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 23

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | MAY 2018 | 23

4/30/18 12:38 PM


STAGE CRAZE

s coming Concerts and musicaralyou to a venue ne e OWS rnRR onMEHo lisAI E BA By Al | By

McHenry County stages come alive over the summer. This season, residents will be treated to a wide variety of live music and theatrical performances. From the story of legendary musician Johnny Cash and the Midwest Mozart Festival to free municipal band concerts and everything in between, you don’t have to travel far from home to find highquality entertainment for everyone. Here’s a look at just some of the stage performances and concerts you can experience in McHenry County this summer.

MAY

'SYLVIA’

WHEN: 8 p.m. May 4, 5, 11, 18 and 19; and 3 p.m. May 13 and 20 WHERE: Raue Center for the Arts, 26 N. Williams St., Crystal Lake Written by A.R. Gurney and directed by Joe Lehman, “Sylvia” is a comedy about relationships and growing older, told through the unlikely story of a man, his wife and a dog. Tickets cost $35.50, but discounts are available for students and Raue members. For tickets or more information, call 815-356-9212 or visit www.wsrep.org.

CATHY GROCHOWSKI

WHEN: 1:15 to 2:15 p.m. Friday, May 18 WHERE: Lakeside Arts Park at the Dole, 401 Country Club Road, Crystal Lake Join local guitarist and vocalist Cathy Grochowski for an intimate performance in “The Listening Room.”

AN EVENING OF DANCE WITH THE JUDITH SVALANDER DANCE THEATRE WHEN: 7 p.m. Saturday, June 9 WHERE: Woodstock Opera House, 121 Van Buren St., Woodstock

LEO KOTTKE

WHEN: 8 p.m. Friday, May 18, and Saturday, May 19 WHERE: Woodstock Opera House, 121 Van Buren St., Woodstock An evening of folk, jazz and blues performed by Kottke, who is a renowned acoustic guitarist best known for his finger-picking style. Tickets cost $30. For tickets or more information, call 815-3385300 or visit www.woodstockoperahouse.com.

JUNE

SUMMER CONCERT IN THE PARK SERIES WHEN: 7 p.m. Tuesdays, running June 5 through Aug. 7 WHERE: Main Beach, 300 Lakeshore Drive, Crystal Lake Bring the family to the beach for an evening of free live music from a different regional band each week. Musical genres include everything from classic rock to country to Motown and more. Food and beverages are allowed on the beach.

WOODSTOCK CITY BAND CONCERTS WHEN: 7:30 p.m. Wednesday nights, running June 6 through July 25 WHERE: The park in the Square, Woodstock Enjoy a different music theme each week at this free concert series by the Woodstock City Band, which is one of the oldest city bands in the country. This is the 134th year of the popular, family-friendly series.

24 | MAY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 24

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Students from the Judith Svalander Dance Theatre will perform scenes from the contemporary ballet “Call Me Eduardo,” pieces from the classic ballet “Paquita,” and the character piece “Austrian Suite.” Tickets cost $25 for adults and $18 for students. For tickets or more information, call 815-338-5300 or visit www.woodstockoperahouse.com.

CARY PARK DISTRICT CONCERTS IN THE PARK WHEN: 7 p.m. Thursdays, running June 14 through July 19 WHERE: Lions Park, 1200 Silver Lake Road, Cary Free concerts featuring a variety of music from a different band each week. For more information, visit www.carypark.com.

'VANYA AND SONIA AND MASHA AND SPIKE’ (presented by the Town Square Players) WHEN: 8 p.m. Friday, June 15, and 22; 8 p.m. Saturday, June 16, and 23; and 2 p.m. Sunday, June 17, and 24 WHERE: Woodstock Opera House, 121 Van Buren St., Woodstock Winner of the 2013 Tony Award for Best Play, this is the story of three middle-aged siblings who navigate various challenges in their lives. Tickets cost $13-$23. For tickets or more information, call 815-338-5300 or visit www.woodstockoperahouse. com.

WOODSTOCK FOLK FESTIVAL

WHEN: Noon to 6 p.m. Sunday, July 15 WHERE: The park in the Square, Woodstock Enjoy an afternoon of folk music by Annie and the Hedonists, Gathering Time, The Donna Herula, Jon Spiegel and Chris Walz Trio, and many more. Admission is free, but donations are appreciated.

www.nwherald.com/magazine

4/30/18 12:38 PM


FOX RIVER GROVE ‘ROCK THE ROUTES’

LAKE IN THE HILLS ROCKIN’ RIBFEST

WHEN: 1 to 9 p.m. Saturday, June 16 WHERE: Stone Hill Center, 900 Northwest Hwy., Fox River Grove

WHEN: Thursday, July 12, through Sunday, July 15 WHERE: Sunset Park, 5200 Miller Road, Lake in the Hills

Live music from several bands, craft beer and food from some of your favorite local restaurants, along with lots of activities for the kids. Check the website for specific information about the bands that will perform. For more information, visit www. carygrovechamber.com.

Too White Crew, Michael Jackson tribute “Who’s Bad,” Little River Band and Libido Funk Circus will headline the main stage at this four-day celebration, which also features the best ribs from local vendors, as well as vendors from Texas, Georgia and Ohio. For more information, visit www. lithribfest.com.

ALGONQUIN SUMMER CONCERT SERIES WHEN: 7:30 p.m. Thursdays, running June 21 through Aug. 19 WHERE: Riverfront Park, 201 N. Harrison St., Algonquin Enjoy free live music featuring a wide variety of music genres from different bands, along with a different food truck each week. For more information, visit www.algonquin.org.

JULY

CORKY SIEGEL’S CHAMBER BLUES

WHEN: 8 p.m. Saturday, July 14 WHERE: Woodstock Opera House, 121 Van Buren St., Woodstock An evening of Americana music that will draw from blues, folk and classical styles, performed by Siegel, who is a harmonica virtuoso and composer. Indian percussion and a string quartet will accompany Siegel. For more information, call 815-338-5300 or visit www.woodstockoperahouse.com.

'SNOWFALL’

'RING OF FIRE: THE MUSIC OF JOHNNY CASH’

WHEN: 7 p.m. Monday, July 30 WHERE: Raue Center for the Arts, 26 N. Williams St., Crystal Lake

WHEN: 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 3 p.m. Sundays, running July 6 through Aug. 12 WHERE: Raue Center for the Arts, 26 N. Williams St., Crystal Lake

A new drama, written by award-winning playwright Robin Brooks, tells the story of what happens when a woman and her boyfriend become stuck in their new home after a snowstorm. Drama ensues when the boyfriend’s ex and her new husband also get stranded. Admission is free. For more information, call 815.356.9212 or visit www.rauecenter.org or www.wsrep.org.

Johnny Cash’s life story told through some of his biggest hits. The musical explores themes of faith, love, struggle and success that Cash experienced on his rise to the top of the music world. Tickets cost $35.50. For tickets or more information, call 815-356-9212 or visit www.rauecenter.org.

www.nwherald.com/magazine

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 25

AUGUST

AUGUST CONCERT SERIES

WHEN: 7:30 p.m. Wednesdays, Aug. 1, 8, 15 and 22 WHERE: Historic Woodstock Square, Woodstock The city’s free concert series continues in August with a different band each week.

MIDWEST MOZART FESTIVAL

WHEN: Sunday, Aug. 5, and 12 WHERE: Woodstock Opera House, 121 Van Buren St., Woodstock Enjoy Mozart’s Third Symphony, Symphony No. 41 (“Jupiter”) and many other masterpieces by one of the greatest composers of all time. For more information, call 815-338-5300 or visit www.midwestmozart.org.

GAELIC STORM

WHEN: 8 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 16 WHERE: Woodstock Opera House, 121 Van Buren St., Woodstock An evening of rocking Irish music from one of the most popular multi-national touring rock bands. Audiences will be treated to traditional Celtic songs, as well as rock, pop and folk favorites. Tickets cost $30. For more information, call 815338-5300 or visit www.woodstockoperahouse.com.

MCHENRY ROTARY BLUES, BREWS AND BBQ WHEN: 5 to 11 p.m. Friday, Aug. 17; 3 to 11 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 18; and 11:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 19 WHERE: Petersen Park, 4300 Petersen Park Road, McHenry A three-day blues festival featuring some of the best blues musicians in the Chicago area and a home-brew competition. Check the website for a complete music lineup and schedule. For more information, visit www.mrbbb.com.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | MAY 2018 | 25

4/30/18 12:38 PM


Retail as an art form Crystal Lake boutique offers unique, carefully curated items By KELSEY O’CONNOR Photos by NANCY MERKLING Mum 117 defies definition. The new shop is both an ecoconscious boutique and carefully curated art exhibit. There’s home décor, clothing, accessories, books, fine art and more, all creatively displayed throughout its Crystal Lake location. “It’s what would be termed a lifestyle store where we don’t have just one specific thing, like home or clothing or baby,” explains owner Lynn Lourie. “It’s more of a concept where if you’re into this modern lifestyle, you can find all sorts of things here.” Lourie opened the downtown shop in October 2017, and carries a variety of merchandise categories, including accessories, home, clothing, pet, baby, fine art, and more. The shop is already receiving a warm welcome from the community, says Lourie. “Everybody’s been very excited,” she says. “They say that it’s very unique, it’s very curated, and our displays are very artistic.” Lourie’s decades-long background in the arts laid the foundation for her future in retail. She taught art at McHenry County College and was art department chair for 26 years. “It’s probably one of the driving forces of the store,” she says. “I wanted to do something that combined things I love, like art and shopping. I thought it would be so different from education.” At Mum 117, Lourie handpicks every item that goes into the store, from the soy candles to the books, to the letterpress greeting cards. How does she decide if an item makes the cut? It all depends on how she feels about it. “If it’s here, I really love it,” she says. “I wanted to have a store where the major criteria is that I find it artistic and cool, so it’s here.”

26 | MAY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 26

HOME & LIFESTYLE

www.nwherald.com/magazine

4/30/18 12:38 PM


Lourie’s artistic side runs in the family. Three of her five children are active in the arts, as was her husband. She and her husband have applied their artistic talents to seven different houses they’ve remodeled in the area, experiences that help Lourie guide her customers as they decorate their own homes. Though aesthetics are important, Lourie also thinks about the ethics of the goods she’s selling. In particular, she looks for items that are sustainably sourced, fair trade, or made from recycled materials. For instance, the shop features products by BIDK, a Danishdesigned home goods line that’s made from recycled paper, natural sand and other biodegradable materials. “I do try to source things that are as green as possible,” says Lourie. “Our commitment to the environment is very important to me.” She’s also partial to products with a social impact. Right now, the shop is stocked with handmade dog collars and leashes by Brooklyn-based Found My Animal. The brand’s mission is to promote pet adoptions and welfare by donating to animal rescue organizations. “It’s important to me where your dollar goes,” she says. “I think we all need to make a greater impact. You have to start somewhere and we do as much as possible.” But above all, the items need to fit her unique, modern style. Lourie specifically tries to find things that can’t be purchased elsewhere in the area or even online. - Continued on page 28 www.nwherald.com/magazine

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 27

HOME & LIFESTYLE

MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | MAY 2018 | 27

4/30/18 12:39 PM


- Continued from page 27 That makes finding new products for the store into something like a treasure hunt. She does most of her purchasing twice a year at gift markets in New York, Atlanta and Las Vegas. “It has to immediately grab me and be something different that you can’t find anywhere else,” she says. Some of these items are proprietary to Mum 117. For instance, the shop carries a line of pillows by K Studio. The handpainted decorative pillows, made by a mother-daughter team in Michigan, are only sold in three places in Illinois: two Chicago boutiques and Mum 117. Lourie has lived in the McHenry County area for the past 43 years and currently resides in Crystal Lake. As a small business owner, she’s very active in the community, and participates in year-round events with the Downtown Crystal Lake association. This deep involvement with the community allows her to better understand what the public is looking for,

28 | MAY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 28

and cater to those tastes and desires. “We tailor everything to our individual community,” she says. “What’s important to me is to kind of discover what the customers in Crystal Lake are looking for and meet their needs.” Another crucial aspect of the store is delivering a personalized experience for their customers. The friendly staff offers free gift-wrapping, shipping, easy returns, or guidance as patrons browse the shop’s selection. “We really stress great customer service here,” says Lourie. “I think that’s one of the places where a small store can differentiate itself from a big online retailer like Amazon. When you walk in here, people know your name.” Lourie knows quite a few names of residents who frequented her first local business. A decade ago, she opened Mum Floral and Design in Crystal Lake, a flower shop that carried merchandise and freshly cut blooms.

HOME & LIFESTYLE

After closing that business, she took a three-year sabbatical then set up shop in Barrington in 2015. She ran her boutique there for two years before deciding to bring Mum 117 back to Crystal Lake. “As much as I enjoyed Barrington, one of the things I really wanted to do was come back to Crystal Lake,” she says. “I’m very much a Crystal Lake person. I love knowing all of our customers and I love knowing and supporting the community, so we’re really excited to be back home.”

MUM 117 37 N. Williams St. | Crystal Lake 815-526-3733 www.mum117.com

www.nwherald.com/magazine

4/30/18 12:39 PM


YOU ARE THE

STAR!

Create the future of your dreams by planning the details, today. Write your script with professional support for a production uniquely YOU! Collaborating with Dorion-Gray Retirement Planning is a partnership. Combine your dreams with practical plans that can withstand life’s adventures.

Dorion-Gray Retirement Planning, Inc. Crystal Lake – Vernon Hills – Warrenville

800 244 9373 • DorionGray.com Securities offered through Securities America, Inc. member FINRA/SIPC. Advisory services are offered through Securities America Advisors, Inc. Dorion-Gray Retirement Planning, Inc. located at 2602 IL Route 176, Crystal Lake, IL, 60014-225 and 977 Lakeview Parkway, Suite 150, Vernon www.nwherald.com/magazine MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | MAY 2018 | 29 Hills, IL 60061-1476. Dorion-Gray is not affiliated with Securities America companies. MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 29

4/30/18 12:39 PM


The craft cocktail scene is booming – and evolving.

Best bars for mind-blowing mixology

Gone are the days of pre-made mixes and watereddown drinks. Today’s cocktails are all about creative combinations, locally sourced ingredients and photo-worthy presentation. Luckily for local cocktail connoisseurs, bars and restaurants throughout the area have embraced the mixology trend and are serving up an array of inventive, and delicious, concoctions. Here are some of the most creative cocktails found at local bars and restaurants.

| By KELSEY O’CONNOR

SPICED MULE

| JASTERS CRAFT BEER AND COCKTAIL It’s tough to find a bar menu nowadays that doesn’t feature a Moscow mule. But Jasters Craft Beer and Cocktail in Crystal Lake is changing up the classic formula. Its impressive selection of craft cocktails features a version made with spiced rum and a combination of ginger and cinnamon-infused simple syrups, and topped off with lime juice and soda. • 414 W. Virginia St., Crystal Lake jastersbar.com

GIN AND JUICE

| BOLD AMERICAN FARE This cozy Algonquin eatery offers an array of surprising and delicious cocktails. Belly up to the bar and order up one of its expertly crafted drinks, such as the Gin and Juice, which features a charred pineapple puree with Bombay Sapphire, St. Germaine, Cointreau and a prosecco float. • 8 S. Main St., Algonquin boldamericanfare.com

LYCHEE MARTINI

| SAKURA If you’re in the mood for sushi and a cocktail, head to Sakura in McHenry. The Japanese restaurant whips up a tempting array of rolls and drinks. There are several varieties of martinis, including a lychee version. The fruit, common in Southeast Asia, is the star of the show. Both the juice and the fruit are blended with Kai premium vodka for a light and refreshing sip. • 2302 N. Richmond Road, McHenry sakuramchenry.com

30 | MAY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 30

DINING

www.nwherald.com/magazine

4/30/18 12:39 PM


MUDSLIDE

| THE VILLAGE SQUIRE You can skip dessert with this decadent drink. The Mudslide at this McHenry favorite will surely satisfy any sweet tooth. The milkshake-inspired boozy beverage includes vanilla ice cream, Kahlua, vodka and Bailey’s Irish Cream, all blended until it’s thick. It’s served in a glass drizzled with chocolate and topped with whipped cream. • 4818 Northwest Highway, Crystal Lake | 4512 W. Elm St., McHenry | 480 Randall Road, South Elgin | thevillagesquire.com

MANGO JALAPEÑO MARGARITA

| ADDISON’S STEAKHOUSE AND SPORTS BAR This signature drink is the perfect amount of spicy and sweet. The steakhouse’s house made jalapeño-infused tequila brings the heat, while the Grand Marnier, mango puree and freshly squeezed lime juice mellows everything out for a refreshingly balanced cocktail. Garnished with a salted rim and sliced jalapenos, it’s sure to be a go-to drink this summer. • 335 Front St., McHenry addisonssteakhouse.com

For quality, handcrafted spirits head slightly beyond county lines for a one-ofa-kind cocktailing experience. VISIT: COPPER FIDDLE DISTILLERY WHERE: 532 W. State Rte. 22, Suite 110, Lake Zurich TRY: CREAMY TOMMY All the cocktails at this Lake Zurich spot are made with its handcrafted, small batch spirits. For something a little different, try the Creamy Tommy. It blends the distillery’s barrel-aged and botanical-infused Tom Gin, cream soda, orange bitters and a fresh orange slice for a drink that’s both original and nostalgic. Cocktails are $8 each, and there are plenty to choose from, including the Bartender’s Challenge, where “you ask” and they create.

Info: copperfiddledistillery.com

www.nwherald.com/magazine

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 31

DINING

MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | MAY 2018 | 31

4/30/18 12:39 PM


The healing power of

A

art therapy

dult coloring is all the rage these days, with mandalas, intricate landscapes and even “Where’s Waldo”-esque hidden objects tucked away in the black-and-white templates of the oh-so-popular books. These adult coloring books actually have roots in art therapy, which is a creative method used as a therapeutic technique in a variety of forms for many different ages. “This is so much more than just a silly coloring thing,” says Jose Alcantara, art therapist with the Alexian Brothers Health System and Center for Emotional Wellness. “It’s really beyond that.” Art therapy can be used in two ways: to diagnose a patient by discovering what’s ailing them through what they create, and also as a calming, therapeutic technique to heal or cope with an issue. “Art therapy can drown out all the noise and clear one’s mind,” says Dr. Todd Lendvay, clinical psychologist with ProActive Behavioral Services in Algonquin. “You can really get a better understanding of what’s going on in the mind and get answers on what’s going on in your life with art therapy.” Art therapists will often analyze whatever creation a patient makes to discover any deeper issues they may not be able to put into words or express otherwise. Lendvay will have a patient draw a house, tree and person, and how the patient depicts these things can say a lot. For

32 | MAY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 32

| By ALLISON HORNE

example, if the tree bears no leaves or flowers, it can represent depression, while a hole in the tree can be an indication of trauma. “Art therapy can help us access the deeper mechanisms, psyche and into their soul to see how they’re feeling,” Lendvay says. “We can use art therapy as a way of diagnosing what’s going on.”

they feel better when they do it, forget about their problems, and go into another world for awhile where it’s peaceful. It’s like doing yoga, meditation or a form of prayer. It’s a grounding technique.” Alcantara says it’s even possible to expand past coloring books if someone is finding coloring books helpful for their state of mind.

Lendvay and Alcantara have found success with art therapy for those struggling with anxiety, depression or a loss, and Alcantara has seen it work with patients with dementia, Parkinson’s disease and even those in hospice.

“I might try painting at home if you find coloring books soothing,” he says. “Maybe grab clay and make shapes or take pictures. Even cooking is the same thing – you’re mixing different materials and putting it together.

The art medium used really depends on the struggles the client is experiencing. Art therapy is generally a more unstructured format, and media can range from sand trays and puppet shows to clay, drawing and painting.

“We’re constantly judging ourselves and comparing it to high art or museum art, but this is an opportunity to study ourselves and say, ‘it makes us feel good so I don’t care.’”

“Certain materials work for different cases,” Alcantara says, noting that someone who is anxious would need some sort of control in his or her medium, like colored pencils or something with more lines. Whereas someone that is hyper may not work well with clay or watercolor. Adult coloring books are one medium that have thrust art therapy into the spotlight as a resource for anxious people. They can be as simple as mandala books, or even scenery and sayings, and can be used with colored pencils, crayons or any other coloring utensil.

Whether it is hospice or dementia patients, a child struggling with a loss or even someone overcoming anxiety by using a coloring book at home, art therapy is a resource that can help tap into feelings that may be difficult to put into words. “It’s a natural language, really,” Alcantara says. “When we’re dealing with day-to-day stress, we get further and further away from the core shell of ourselves. People need to reconnect to their unfolding story, whether dying or an adolescent. “There’s a story to tell; you just need art as a vehicle to tell it.”

“Coloring is really a meditative relaxation technique,” Lendvay says. “People like it because HEALTH & WELLNESS

www.nwherald.com/magazine

4/30/18 12:39 PM


Excellence in Neurology Close to Home At Northwest Neurology we are committed to access, excellence and patient-centered care. Our neurologists take extra time to listen to you, and we explain the latest treatments in understandable terms. With residency and fellowship training from of the country’s finest medical centers, our neurologists are bringing expert care close to home. We believe patient-centered care is more than an idea. We involve you and your family in the decision making. Treating each patient like a member of the family, we utilize the latest, most advanced treatments available in multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis, neuropathy, ALS, Parkinson’s disease, migraine, epilepsy, stroke and more. Most services neurology patients need are available on site at Northwest Neurology offices, including EEG, EMG, infusion, and MRI. Call today for an appointment, and see a specialist in as little as 24 hours.

See a in specialist s as little a 24 hours

NORTHWEST NEUROLOGY 1529824

THE NORTHWEST NEUROLOGY DIFFERENCE: • More specialized care • Patient centered treatment

• Same day access to appointments and on-site services

Access better care close to home: 535 Congress Parkway, Suite 250, Crystal Lake, IL 60014

PROGRAMS: • Headache and Migraine • Sleep Program • Ms center • Epilepsy & Seizure Disorder

100 W. Higgins Road Suite H-45, South Barrington, IL 60010 1900 Hollister Drive Suite 201, Libertyville, IL 60048

• Women’s Neurology • Concussion • Neuromuscular: ALS, Myasthenia Gravis & Neuropathy 800 Biesterfield Road Suite 635, Elk Grove Village, IL 60007

3701 Algonquin Road Suite 800, Rolling Meadows, IL 60008

• Alzheimer’s and Memory Center • Parkinson’s Disease & Movement Disorders • Neuro-Rehabilitation • Neuro-Hospitalist Services 22285 N. Pepper Road Suite 401, Lake Barrington, IL 60010

535 Congress Parkway Suite 250, Crystal Lake, IL 60014

796 Skokie Blvd Northbrook, IL 60062

www.northwestneuro.com | 847-882-6604 MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 33

4/30/18 12:39 PM


MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 34

4/30/18 12:39 PM


EXPERIENCE A WORLD OF FLAVOR!

• Grilling • Roasting • Low & Slow • Baking • Smoking • Amazing Results!

THE BIG GREEN

EGG!

FREE ASSEMBLY & LOCAL DELIVERY! X

Rt. 31

14

Family Owned & Operated In Crystal Lake Since 1959 424 W. Terra Cotta Ave. (Rt. 176 & Oak) Crystal Lake • www.Gulgren.com

Rt.

815-459-4380

Oak St.

sales • service • parts

Rt. 176

SM-CL1525501

www.nwherald.com/magazine

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 35

MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | MAY 2018 | 35

4/30/18 12:39 PM


36 | MAY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 36

www.nwherald.com/magazine

4/30/18 12:39 PM


of WOMEN distinction COURAGEOUS, COMPASSIONATE AND COMMITTED

Introducing the Women of Distinction class of 2018-19 By MELISSA RUBALCABA RISKE Photos by NANCY MERKLING Several years ago, McHenry County Magazine began a tradition of honoring women who have offered their talents to the community. They have created nonprofit organizations, commanded local advisory boards, participated in volunteer opportunities outside of their own workplaces and, most of all, continue to lead by example. Each year, we solicit nominations from community leaders, local business professionals and our own readership. And, through this process, we discover that our communities are full of inspiring women. This month, we continue the tradition with McHenry County Magazine’s Women of Distinction class of 2018-19. We’re introducing our honorees in this issue, paying tribute to them at an event May 10, and – in each month that follows – we will tell the complete story of every one of these outstanding local ladies. - Continued on page 38

www.nwherald.com/magazine

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 37

BUSINESS & CIVIC

MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | MAY 2018 | 37

4/30/18 12:39 PM


of WOM distinc

BOBBI BAEHNE | MCHENRY

GERI CONDON | MCHENRY

REGINA BELT-DANIELS | CRYSTAL LAKE

Think Big Go Local

McHenry City Council

Crystal Lake Elementary School District 47

Geri Condon is dedicated to the betterment of her community. While serving as alderwoman for the McHenry City Council, Condon works tirelessly to represent McHenry residents. And through her business, Capture Your Path, she serves the community as a professional counselor.

Whether she is in the classroom or on stage, Regina Belt-Daniels inspires others and makes an impact on those around her.

Bobbi Baehne devotes herself to helping fellow entrepreneurs through her digital marketing firm, Think Big Go Local. Since launching the business five years ago, she has become a leading expert in digital marketing as a social media strategist. In addition to her work with clients, she has attended conferences across the country and hosted many training sessions. Her talents also are utilized through volunteerism, including working as a committee member for McHenry Fiesta Days, and serving as the chairwoman for the McHenry Economic Development Commission Commission. She also is on the board of directors for the McHenry County College Alumni Committee.

38 | MAY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 38

Additionally, she volunteers with several organizations, including the McHenry County Suicide Prevention Task Force, where she is committed to helping her neighbors in their greatest hours of need. She also is passionate about helping those struggling with drug addiction and mental health issues. She spends much of her time trying to make a positive impact on those in need.

BUSINESS & CIVIC

For more than 30 years, she has worked with students – including 28 years as a special education teacher – for Crystal Lake Elementary School District 47. Some of her most treasured items are the letters and notes that she has received from students and parents through the years, thanking her for her hard work and dedication to her students. For just as many years, she has found a home in community theater where she has written, directed and acted in various productions. She also is a longtime member of the Woodstock TownSquare Players and co-founder of Shakespeare Shorts.

www.nwherald.com/magazine

4/30/18 12:39 PM


f OMEN tinction

ELIZABETH FELT WAKEMAN LAKE IN THE HILLS

SHIRA GREENFIELD | SOUTH ELGIN

LORI HARMS | MCHENRY

Centegra Health System

Adult and Child Therapy Services

Wakeman Law Group PC

As the clinical manager of behavioral health services at Centegra Health System, Shira Greenfield manages the daily operations for outpatient programs treating mental illness, yet her work in the field goes far beyond the scope of her desk. She is an advocate for those with mental health issues, donating time to walks and fundraisers as a means of increasing awareness and understanding.

As an attorney, Elizabeth Felt Wakeman works hard to ensure her clients are treated fairly and she strives to find an effective solution for each case. Outside of her law practice, she is dedicated to her community. She is a founding member of the Lake in the Hills Parks and Recreation Board, which was created to organize and oversee recreational activities within the village. Through the board, she has been instrumental in shaping policies and introducing standards for programming. She also is a founding member of the People for Parks Foundation, a former Lake in the Hills Village board member and, as a small business owner, she has put countless hours toward various events and programming.

www.nwherald.com/magazine

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 39

In her private counseling practice, Greenfield works with individuals and families. She was an instrumental part of the development of the McHenry County Crisis Response Team and, through the years, she has been a pillar of support for those facing challenging times.

BUSINESS & CIVIC

Lori Harms continually makes a difference in the lives around her, most notably through her work with Adult and Child Therapy Services, where she has served on the board, aided with fundraising and served on the finance committee. Her leadership and philanthropy have been an important part of the organization’s success. When Harms sees a need, she helps address it by rolling up her sleeves and getting involved in such projects as the fresh vegetable garden and sensory garden at Autumn Leaves senior care memory facility.

MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | MAY 2018 | 39

4/30/18 12:39 PM


of WOMEN distinction

PATTI LUTZ | CRYSTAL LAKE

SUE MILLER | MCHENRY

CAROLE PETERS | MARENGO

Crystal Lake Chamber of Commerce

Coldwell Banker The Real Estate Group

United Way of Greater McHenry County

Patti Lutz has been called a “a true servant leader” and, whether she is serving as board member or volunteering with her local church, she gives of herself while also mentoring others.

The accolades certainly demonstrate the hard work and dedication Sue Miller has shown through the years as a Realtor. From being named Realtor of the Year to other top honors, Miller’s hard work shines through.

For a number of years, Lutz served as a board member for the Crystal Lake Chamber of Commerce. She also has worked on the finance committee and as an ambassador, stepping up to collaborate on programs and special events. No matter the situation, whether she is crunching numbers or helping out with an event, Lutz shows compassion for others, leaving a lasting impact on those around her.

40 | MAY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 40

But, beyond her hard work in the real estate industry, Miller is known for spending countless hours helping out with the McHenry Area Chamber of Commerce and the McHenry School District 15 Education Committee. Her leadership and ability to guide and mentor others have made a lasting impact on those she has served through years.

BUSINESS & CIVIC

Carole Peters has led a multi-faceted and successful career, from her work in the banking industry to time spent in real estate where she was known as the “Singing Realtor.” In her latest career move as the executive director for the United Way of Greater McHenry County, she is revitalizing the agency. From successful fundraising campaigns to community engagement, Peters is making a difference. Outside of her professional life, Peters has spent several years working with the education programs at St. John’s Lutheran Church Sunday School in Marengo, where she has served on committees, and worked on worship services and holiday programming for children.

www.nwherald.com/magazine

4/30/18 12:39 PM


Get a glowing, summer-ready look with a FREE MAKEOVER Merle Norman Cosmetics 726 Northwest Hwy. Fox River Grove, IL 60021 847-462-1504 M-F 10:00-6:00 Sat 10:00-4:00 Sun Closed

merlenorman.com © 2018 Merle Norman Cosmetics, Inc.

  

ERIN SMITH | LAKEWOOD Options Clearing Corporation

                

In her career and in her community, Erin Smith is recognized as an accomplished leader. While working full time and raising a family, she completed her master’s degree and went on to have a successful career working for noteworthy companies. Today, she is First Vice President for financial services company Options Clearing Corporation. Both as a village trustee and as village president, Smith has served the community where she grew up and where she and her husband raised their family.

C O C K TA I L R E C E P T I O N S

C AT E R E R S

She volunteers with various organizations in the community and, through the years, she has taken on many leadership positions.

WEDDINGS

C O R P O R AT E / F U N D R A I S E R S

PA R T I E S / S H O W E R S

224.512.4292 | BarringtonsWhiteHouse.com Barrington’s White House, 145 West Main Street, Barrington, IL 60010 SM-CL1519764

www.nwherald.com/magazine

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 41

BUSINESS & CIVIC

MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | MAY 2018 | 41

4/30/18 12:39 PM


INVESTING IN PEOPLE

Crystal Lake Chamber of Commerce president Mary Margaret Maule shows unbridled commitment to community By MELISSA RUBALCABA RISKE

F

rom a small Italian town nestled outside of Naples to the communities in McHenry County, Mary Margaret Maule knows how to utilize her talents and truly make a difference in the lives of others. Many will recognize Maule from her role as the president of the Crystal Lake Chamber of Commerce, where – for the last four years – she has been at the helm of the organization that aims to provide support, programming and education to the members of the business community and beyond. But Maule has been working to support the business community in McHenry County long before she took charge of the chamber. Maule directed the Small Business Development Center at McHenry County College, where she consulted those who were creating and modifying business plans. That’s where Vicki Nielsen first met Maule. Nielsen quickly noticed how thorough Maule was as she reviewed and assisted with business plans. “She helped us to think of things we might not have, had we not walked in the door,” Nielsen says. “She helped you look at big goals and the nuts and bolts, as well. She truly made a difference in people’s lives.” Born the eighth of 10 children, Maule isn’t afraid to forge her own path and has built a career through hard work. Maule grew up in Gurnee and attended a small private school where her father, Louis Vasseur, volunteered as the physical education teacher. Maule

says one of her dad’s sayings was “You’ve got to show up, suit up and pick up the rope because the load is a lot lighter if everybody’s pulling.” It is a message that inspires Maule and her commitment to making her community better, whether that means giving her time to local boards and programs or making sure the small business owner has the right tools and a business plan to succeed. When she and her husband were stationed outside of Naples, Italy, during his time with the U.S. Navy, Maule and another military wife created the Cottage Industries, a program coaching fellow military spouses to help maintain work skills. She also taught classes to members of the military. Whether she is working one-on-one or standing in front of a crowded room, Maule admits she’s comfortable in the classroom and enjoys teaching. Though her husband has retired, two of their children followed their father’s footsteps by entering the service. Maule remains committed to supporting veterans with a special focus on mental health support. She initiated a writers group called Voices of Veterans to encourage veterans to express themselves in writing. Maule also has a special interest in helping children and has lent her time as a past board member for the Court Appointed Special Advocates, or CASA, to assist children in the family court system. Today, she serves as president of the board of Big Brothers, Big Sisters of McHenry County, as

well. Maule says her mother, Mary, spent 14 years in the foster care system. Maule’s mother is the inspiration behind her work to help children, Maule says. While her work and community commitments keep Maule busy, she makes a point to find time for her favorite hobby, riding her motorcycle. Most weekends she sheds her suits for her favorite riding clothes, maps a course and takes the back roads where she can enjoy the ride. “Nothing beats a good road, a full tank of gas and a good playlist,” Maule says.

2017 Sponsors

42 | MAY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 42

BUSINESS & CIVIC

www.nwherald.com/magazine

4/30/18 12:39 PM


Teaching the TOOLS of

Success T Photo by Nancy Merkling

By Melissa Riske Rubalcaba

aking what he learned through his business success, Brad Burgess now spends his days helping other businesspeople improve their operations and sales, thus leading to an increase in profits.

During his more than 20-year career working for leading technology manufacturing companies in technical sales and sales management, Burgess adopted tools and methodologies to help his sales success. He developed The Mindshare Manager to share those keys to success, combining online resources and in person sales consulting services. While executive leadership development is important, his focus goes beyond the business owner and leaders to ensure the sales team has the tools and skills they need. Burgess says there should be an emphasis on fundamental sales mechanics, and that by using the right sales strategies, a business can generate predictable and sustained revenue growth. He especially enjoys working with new companies to help develop an effective sales model and strategy, and helping business owners to identify and focus their priorities. His services range from company-wide workshops to one-on-one coaching. For Burgess, it’s important to listen and provide honest feedback as he offers his services. Burgess has published two books. Trench Warfare: Winning the Battle for Mindshare in Channel Sales, offers insights, strategies and tools to help sales people. His Start-up Business Plan: A Workbook with Resource Guide offers entrepreneurs a sensible business planning tool.

START-UP BUSINESS PLAN

This simple, easy-to-use Workbook is intended to provide entrepreneurs and existing small business owners a sensible business planning tool that encourages development of critical business elements today, with the ability to continue building the plan as time and circumstances dictate.

TRENCH WARFARE

Winning the Battle of Mindshare in Channel Sales Based on the “4 Tips for Succeeding in Channel Sales”, TRENCH WARFARE, provides the insights, strategies, and tools that will position you ahead of the competition.

NOW AVAILABLE ONLINE! www.nwherald.com/magazine

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 43

As more women take leadership roles in businesses, Burgess welcomes the opportunity to help small and mid-sized businesses, especially those that might not have a built-in support network, to start increasing revenue through a focused, account driven sales process. Burgess emphasizes that his workshops and mentoring aren’t simply based on theories. His years of experience served as the foundation to develop The Mindshare Manager’s proven success tools, and provide authenticity to his teaching. Though he’s closed his share of large sales through the years, today, he says his greatest satisfaction is helping others achieve their vision of success.

THE MINDSHARE MANAGER P.O. Box 1591 • Crystal Lake www.themindsharemanager.com 708-306-6629 MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | MAY 2018 | 43

4/30/18 12:39 PM


Celebrating women who make a difference.

BMO Harris Bank is proud to sponsor the recognition of McHenry County’s Women of Distinction. Your achievements inspire us – and make our community a better place to live, work and grow.

BMO Harris Bank N.A. Member FDIC

44 | MAY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 44

bmoharris.com

www.nwherald.com/magazine

4/30/18 12:39 PM


WOMEN WOMEN in business 2018

From business owners and entrepreneurs to artists and educators, get to know the leading ladies in our communities. Photos by JANET KAY

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 45

4/30/18 12:39 PM


Lynda Walsh, Michele Walsh & Lori Hills Owners

S

tep inside Shay Boutique to discover unique women’s clothing, jewelry, home furnishings, and accents. Owners Lynda Walsh, Michele Walsh and Lori Hills have pooled their expertise and backgrounds to create a friendly boutique known for fashion-forward pieces that help customers make a statement. Whether you’re shopping for a gift, or the perfect piece to update and refresh your wardrobe or home, there’s always something new at Shay. Lynda says the secret of Shay’s success is the staff’s ability to connect with their great clientele, and being part of a supportive community. For the owners of Shay, helping customers find something they love is the greatest reward.

Shay Boutique 30 N. Williams St. Crystal Lake 815-444-6460 ShayBoutiques.com

46 | MAY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 46

Dream Destinations, Real Expertise

Neelie Kruse, CTC

President and Founder

W

hether your dream vacation is relaxing on a beach, cruising to Alaska or an unforgettable adventure in Europe, Neelie Kruse, CTC and her team at Cary Travel Express, can make it happen.

A travel professional with more than 38 years of industry experience, Kruse has had a lifelong passion for travel. In 1989, she opened Cary Travel Express, which offers an array of services that include planning family vacations and honeymoons, from cruises and safaris to Disney, and assisting with destination weddings. With first-hand knowledge of the world’s most exciting destinations, Kruse and her team can create dream vacations to fit any destination, any budget. Since many clients want their trips to include enhanced experiences, the agents at Cary Travel Express are experts in creating unique itineraries, such as a trip to Italy which not only includes visits to must-see places, but also an Italian cooking class and wine pairing, or dinner at the home of a local family. Cary Travel Express has earned a reputation for outstanding service. For the last two years they’ve been chosen as an Apple Crystal Travel Agency by Apple Vacations, and as a “Best of the Fox” Travel Agency for more than twelve years. It’s that personalized service and attention to detail, that brings customers back time and again, to have their dreams turned into the perfect vacation.

Cary Travel Express

9 Jandus Road, Cary, 60013 847-639-3300 CaryTravelExpress.com www.nwherald.com/magazine

4/30/18 12:39 PM


Join Us On A Creative Journey

Nancy Merkling & Janet Kay PHOTOGRAPHERS

I

n everything they do as photographers, Nancy Merkling and Janet Kay believe their clients should be heard and understood. “It’s about blending visions - your ideas with our artful skills,” says Janet Kay, Lead Photographer for Nancy Merkling Productions. “Our goal is for your expectations to be exceeded along a creative journey with NMP.” The photography of Nancy Merkling Productions covers commercial, headshots, events, weddings and portraits. NMP is also home to Merkling’s photography instruction and the ‘4th Fridays’ Art Event at Starline Factory. “Having a career in the art world has its yin and yang, but we seriously love that being creative in almost every detail of what we do, is not just encouraged, but rarely capped,” Merkling says. “Brainstorming and problem solving sessions with our team are the perfect balance of challenge and fun.” Being self employed entrepreneurs in the arts, the two realistically talk about the challenges in today’s industry. Merkling said that being a photographer is the fun part, but also being the business owners thickens the plot. “Not to be discouraged, it just means that every day

Nancy Merkling PRODUCTIONS

www.nwherald.com/magazine

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 47

we have to work hard and a little smarter than the day before. And we really do love what we do!” Nancy Merkling Productions has studios in two exclusive locations for their stylized shoots - Starline Factory in Harvard and Dole Mansion in Crystal Lake. NMP also shoots outside the studios on location for commercial, headshots, events, weddings and portraits. Merkling’s love of helping others shines in her photography workshops and one-on-one sessions. Whether you are an aspiring photographer, a seasoned professional or just interested in learning more about the way cameras work, Nancy thrives on hearing your individual goals with your photography and helping you reach them. Merkling also opened an art event ‘on the side’ seven years ago. The ‘4th Fridays’ Art Event at Starline Factory happens nine times a year bringing in 600 - 1000 people each event. She says ‘4th Fridays’ Art Event at Starline Factory is like no other art experience you’ve ever encountered. “Classy, fun and for everyone. It’s a night out you will return to.”

NMP | Nancy Merkling Productions

Two Locations : Starline Factory, 306 W Front St., Harvard Dole Mansion, 401 Country Club Rd, Crystal Lake 815-347-8535 MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | MAY 2018 | 47 www.NancyMerkling.com

4/30/18 12:39 PM


Erica Cody Owner

E

rica Cody’s personal health journey inspired her to bring more resources to her community. A former mechanical engineer who believes in the benefits of holistic health care, Cody opened Northwest Medical Thermography, to offer radiationfree health screening alternatives. Thermography uses digital infrared thermal imaging to view the body. It is useful for preventive care providing images that can alert doctors and patients to health risks years before symptoms appear. Thermograms are interpreted by a thermologist, a medical doctor similar to a radiologist, who has training in thermography. Cody’s experience with thermography began in 2011, when she discovered lumps in her breast. Seeking a screening method that would not expose her to radiation led her to digital infrared thermal imagining. After learning her lumps were fibrocystic, she committed to making thermography available to others navigating their health care journey.

Fall in love with Jazzercise!

Karen Grassly OWNER

I

n 2019, Jazzercise will celebrate their 50th year as one of the world’s leading dance-based fitness programs.

If the idea of Jazzercise conjures up images of women in leotards and legwarmers think again, says Karen Grassly. “We’ve been constantly evolving the Jazzercise method and continue to do so by adding new moves and new classes.”

In her classes, you’ll find women of all ages and fitness levels, enjoying a high-intensity full body workout choreographed to current Top 40 music. Jazzercise recently launched GirlForce, offering young women ages 16-21 a reduced rate membership. “We think our classes can be a fun, safe place for girls to get fit and discover how great a challenging workout feels.” Grassly discovered Jazzercise 20 years ago and knew she’d found the answer to her search for a fitness routine that was fun, effective and kept her motivated. She has been teaching the program for 16 years and owns Jazzercise Crystal Lake, McHenry and Woodstock Fitness Centers. She says she wants women to know that exercise can and should be fun! She and her team of instructors provide an effective, motivating and energizing experience with each class.

Northwest Medical Thermography

22000 N. Pepper Rd., Ste. I, Lake Barrington, 60010 224-600-3216 nwmtclinic.com

48 | MAY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 48

Jazzercise

9225-E Trinity Dr., Lake in the Hills 1203 Adams Dr., McHenry 2306 S. Eastwood Dr., Woodstock www.jazzercise.com www.nwherald.com/magazine

4/30/18 12:39 PM


Face the future with confidence

Heidi L. Alten, AIF

Sherry McGowan Director

V

Jennifer Johnson, AIF

isiting Angels Living Assistance Services brings encouragement and respite care to families and their loved ones in the McHenry County, greater Barrington, Palatine and Lake Zurich regions. Since 2011, owner Sherry McGowan has provided dependable, trustworthy care that families can count on. She and her staff see everyone as an individual and create customized care plans to meet the needs of clients and their families.

Financial Advisor

Financial Advisor Exemplar Financial Network

W

hen Heidi L. Alten, AIF, Financial Advisor says true wealth is much more than numbers on a balance sheet, she speaks from the heart, and from her own personal experience. The one-time receptionist was inspired to become a financial advisor as she saw first-hand how money management can be life-changing. Whether it’s helping clients achieve financial stability, save for their children’s education, or plan for retirement, the financial advisors at Exemplar Financial Network are making a difference.

McGowan is committed to serve clients because of her own experiences as daughter, caregiver and advocate for her aging parents. That journey inspires her daily to help others through effective support for their unique needs. Visiting Angels aims to match each care recipient with an “angel” who can visit a loved one, bringing joy, integrity, companionship and personal care, when families find they need another layer of support.

The staff at Exemplar Financial Network and Exemplar Accounting and Tax Advisors believes the success of their business is because of their relationships with clients. Jennifer Johnson, AIF Financial Advisor, says by getting to know her clients personally, she can understand their dreams and aspirations, and work with them to build a plan to help meet those goals. With the right plan in place, clients may possibly find financial confidence in their future. Exemplar Financial Network offers a full range of products from retirement and estate planning, to education funding and risk management plans. Johnson, AIF, says that offering fully integrated wealth management services with a tax and accounting firm means she and her fellow financial advisors at Exemplar can truly understand the full scope of their client’s finances.

We’ve expanded and moved – stop in and visit us anytime!

Securities and advisory services offered through Cetera Advisor Networks LLC, member FINRA/SIPC. Cetera is under separate ownership from any other named entity.

Exemplar Financial Network

413 E. Terra Cotta Ave., Crystal Lake 815-459-4550

www.exemplarfn.com www.nwherald.com/magazine

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 49

SM-CL1524618

630 Kenosha St., Walworth, WI 800-822-3642

Visiting Angels Living Assistance Services

228 Florence St., Crystal Lake 815-479-0312 visitingangels.com/crystallake MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | MAY 2018 | 49

4/30/18 12:39 PM


Achieve, Believe and Create your beauty career with us!

Cindy Heidemann Founder and Owner

T

he A.B.C. School of Cosmetology, Barbering, Esthetics & Nail Technology is owned and operated by Cindy and Art Heidemann and their daughter, Becky Engels of Lake In The Hills. The name, which stands for “Achieve, Believe, Create,” (and also Art, Becky and Cindy), says it all. Together with their creative educational specialists, they bring over 40 years of business experience to form a solid force in the beauty industry. Since 2004, A.B.C. has brought “quality education at affordable pricing” to McHenry County and surrounding areas. Their graduates are sought after by salons throughout Illinois, Wisconsin and Indiana. Program curriculums cover current industry techniques, ethics, Illinois law and various business topics. Top instructors offer training with personal attention to each student’s needs. Flexible scheduling, bilingual programs, and various financial plans make A.B.C. an industry leader. Hands-on teaching, through the use of visual aids and physical adaptations, make their programs both unique and among the top in the state. Continuing Education Programs (in-house and online), Licensure Restoration, Master and Instructor Programs are

Cindy Werba

Tracy Bartlett

Educational Director

Administrator

also available for licensed technicians. Heidemann’s “if you believe, you can achieve,” approachable attitude resonates throughout the school. As of April 2018, she is celebrating 20 years in the industry. At A.B.C., knowledge is power and through knowledge, confidence is promoted. Students are guided to broaden their horizons, set goals and achieve them. Cindy is a nail tech at heart and her passion for the industry is an addictive force of energy to students, no matter what their field. Her innovative classes are sought after throughout the Midwest, California, and Las Vegas. New students and seasoned technicians flock to A.B.C. for cutting edge training. To Heidemann, the sky is the limit, and encourages each technician, no matter what their field of study, to be their best. She is active in local chambers and the community. A.B.C. is a vocational partner with most McHenry, Kane, DuPage, and Cook County high schools. The A.B.C. crew can often be found volunteering at various public events. A.B.C. also offers a full menu of public salon and spa services. So don’t delay, call today or stop in for further information.

A.B.C. School of Cosmetology, Barbering, Esthetics & Nail Technology 9213 S. Route 31, Lake in the Hills 847-458-6500 www.abccosmoschool.com 50 | MAY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 50

www.nwherald.com/magazine

4/30/18 12:39 PM


Empowering Women.

Dr. Jennifer Pishotta Over the years, we have proudly watched as the women in our communities build businesses, leave legacies, improve lives, and lead as only a strong woman can. We believe in you. We support you.

amcombank.com

Chiropractic

A

fter witnessing firsthand the benefits of chiropractic care on her young daughter, Dr. Jennifer Pishotta was inspired to help others. She created TLC Chiropractic, which specializes in pediatrics and women’s health. The letters TLC stand for “Transforming Lives Compassionately,” as that is Dr. Pishotta’s goal.

Chiropractic care can help a body naturally heal. Dr. Pishotta loves working with infants who may have trouble nursing or with ear infections, or helping women regulate their hormones and work through fertility issues. She provides an individualized approach to healthcare and says seeing each patient transition to wellness is remarkable. Chiropractic care can truly be life changing and Dr. Pishotta continues to keep up with the latest research to provide patients of all ages with the best care possible.

Woodstock 815.338.2300 McHenry 815.385.5556 Huntley 847.669.0777 Member FDIC

www.nwherald.com/magazine

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 51

Crystal Lake 815.479.8600

TLC CHIROPRACTIC TLC Chiropractic

14 Miller Road, Lake in the Hills 224-678-7334 www.TLCchiroLITH.com

Luann Bauer Luann Bauer

W

hen Luann Bauer, a breast cancer survivor, opened LuLu’s Wiggin’ Out in 2005, she had a clear goal in mind. “I wanted to help other women who were going through what I went through to feel good about themselves,” she said. LuLu’s Wiggin’ Out still brings that warm-hearted touch to downtown Crystal Lake. The boutique is known for their fun and unique clothing, accessories, hats and wigs. They offer over 100 styles of high quality synthetic wigs, hairpieces, human hair, and heat friendly options. LuLu’s is consistently named as one of McHenry County’s favorite women’s clothing boutiques, and Bauer credits her great staff. “They’re just wonderful, very compassionate and caring. Our goal is to make a woman feel beautiful, no matter what she’s going through,” said Bauer.

LuLu’s Wiggin’ Out 63 N.Williams St., Crystal Lake, IL 815-356-9900 www.luluswigginoutboutique.com SM-CL1524718

MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | MAY 2018 | 51

4/30/18 12:39 PM


THE C OMMUNITY FOUNDATION FOR McHENRY COUNTY AN AFFILIATE OF THE CHICAGO COMMUNITY TRUST

Samantha Wagner Owner

OUR REGION’S COMMUNITY FOUNDATION

Algonquin Lake

Lakemoor

hether you have a project for your business, school, or need invitations printed, Minuteman Press has the time and talent to meet your print and graphic needs. The staff at Minuteman Press has the expertise to see your project from the initial stage to fully designed and finished, all at an affordable price.

Lake

McHenry

Owners Samantha and Brad Wagner took charge of the business after the passing of their mother, Jeannie, in 2014. They have worked hard to build upon the business’ solid foundation. Samantha says the greatest satisfaction is delivering a finished project that will help their clients reach their objectives. The modern print industry is focused on making a physical impression on the target market. Minuteman Press staff has knowledge to provide clients with the newest and best applications.

Holiday Hills

Richmond

Algonquin

835 Virginia Road, Suite G Crystal Lake 815-477-2700 www.minutemancl.com

52 | MAY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 52

McCullom

Oakwood Hills Prairie Grove

Spring Grove

Union

Sunnyside

Wonder Lake

Bull Valley

Cary

Chemung

Greenwood

Huntley

Woodstock Crystal

Harvard

Johnsburg

Hebron

Lake in the

The Community this Hills Lakemoor Foundation Lakewood congratulates Marengo McCullom year’sMcHenry “Women ofMcHenry Distinction” class of 2018- Hills Lake Shores Oakwood Pistakee Barrington 2019. Highlands We celebrate Port these women who Prairie have Grove Richmond Ringwood SpringCounty Grove and Sunnyside made a difference in McHenry look Trout Valley Union Wonder Lake Woodstock

forward to paying tribute to them at the awards

Algonquin

Crystal Lake

luncheon on May 10th.

Lake in the Hills

Fox River Grove

Lakemoor

Greenwood

Lakewood

Marengo

McCullom Algonquin Bull Valley Cary Chemung Connecting People who Care with Causes that Matter Crystal Lake Fox River Grove Greenwood Harvard 338-GIVE | www.mccfdn.org Hebron (915) Holiday Hills (4483) Huntley Johnsburg Lake in the Hills

Minuteman Press

Lake in the

Port Barrington

Fox River Grove

Crystal

Marengo

McHenry Shores

Ringwood

Trout Valley

Chemung

Greenwood

Lakewood

Pistakee Highlands

Lake

Cary

Fox River Grove

Hills

W

SM-CL1524624

Bull Valley

Lake

Lakemoor McHenry

Lakewood

McHenry Shores

Pistakee Highlands Richmond Trout Valley

Marengo

Union

Oakwood Hills

Port Barrington

Ringwood

McCullom

Prairie Grove

Spring Grove Wonder Lake

Sunnyside Woodstock

www.nwherald.com/magazine

4/30/18 12:39 PM


Miracles Do Happen

Elizabeth Kline, RTT

Manager of Cancer Services

W

orking and walking side by side with cancer patients is second nature to Elizabeth Kline. Her experience goes well beyond her training at the University of Chicago Hospitals and Roosevelt University. A Radiation Therapist for over 20 years, she has helped thousands of cancer patients. Elizabeth’s foundation of caring for cancer patients is about personal connections. This was learned early after losing both her younger sister and mother to leukemia while she was in training.

The heartbreaking experience galvanized Elizabeth’s motivation to make a difference in the lives of cancer patients and their loved ones. And she is doing just that at Metro Chicago Surgical Oncology (MCSO) in Wilmette. MCSO is a landmark in cancer care, which provides superior treatment and compassionate care for patients. At MCSO, Elizabeth is able to provide the highest level of care in a peaceful and healing environment. Elizabeth’s belief that she is helping her patients battle cancer while also making a positive difference in their lives, brings her absolute joy. At MCSO, Elizabeth works with and supports a high functioning team utilizing state of the art technology.

Elizabeth and her expert team of medical professionals have mastered the prone breast technique, utilizing the most innovative prone breast positioning board (shown above) and cutting-edge radiotherapy techniques. Elizabeth’s compassionate onsite team consists of worldrenowned Timothy Hollister MD, Radiation Oncologist (Dr. Hollister held the first NAPBC breast center accreditation in Chicago); technically savvy Patrick McGill Mullin, RTT; and highly skilled Vanessa Cervantes, CMA Coordinator (Vanessa is pictured above as the prone immobilization device model). The MCSO Radiation Oncology Center is conveniently located and the team is proud to be one of the few suburban cancer centers to offer the prone breast technique, in which the goal is to greatly reduce lung and heart toxicities for patients undergoing breast radiation treatments. At MCSO, Elizabeth is reaching heights she never imagined as a hands-on manager while she provides the highest level of service to her patients and team. Lastly, she would like to offer some advice to never give up hope. Miracles do happen; she sees them every day.

Metro Chicago Surgical Oncology, LLC 3201 Old Glenview Road, Suite 100 Wilmette, IL 60091 (847) 512-1857 www.mscodoctors.com

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 53

4/30/18 12:39 PM


Donna Armstrong-Lowe

Debbie J. Thompson OWNER

T

hompson Spring Grove Funeral Home is committed to providing compassion, respect and quality service at an affordable price. A preplanned service can spare your family difficult decisions at the time of death, and lasting peace of mind that they’ve acted in accordance with your wishes.

Prearrangements can be simple or detailed. Funeral Director Debbie Thompson and her staff are happy to meet with you in your home, or at Thompson’s beautiful facility. A member of the Better Business Bureau, Thompson offers a variety of prepayment programs that guarantee today’s prices, control cost, and avoid emotional overspending. A full service funeral home, Thompson offers cremation, traditional funerals, cemetery and monument services. Established in Spring Grove, serving McHenry and Lake Counties, and beyond. ~ No distance is too great.

Thompson Spring Grove Funeral Home

8103 Wilmot Road, Spring Grove 815-675-0550 www.ThompsonSpringGrove.com 54 | MAY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 54

Owner

T

he Donna Lowe Salon is adorned with photos of models of all ethnicities. This expresses Donna Lowe Armstrong’s dream: to provide patrons with a sense they belong, are welcome, and will receive the utmost in professional care. Donna opened in 2016, after seeing a need in Mc Henry County for a salon with the expertise to serve clients of all ages and ethnicities. Despite the expanding local demographics, no salon specialized in curly/textured hair for the entire family. The Salon offers guidance and education to families raising children of different ethnicities. The team consults to ensure clients like and can maintain their style. Services include hair color, cuts and styling for natural, relaxed, straight and curly hair. Protective styles: such as braids, crochets, sew-in extensions and more. The talented barber provides fades and long and short styles. Donna dreamed of a place family can feel heightened inner beauty through embracing their outer beauty. Some dreams do come true!

Donna Lowe Salon & Barber Shop

252 S. Randall Road, Algonquin 224-558-3216 www.donnalowesalon.com

Kay Bates

President/McHenry Area Chamber of Commerce

K

ay Bates has been working in the chamber of commerce industry for 21 years, and she never grows tired of seeing how the chamber can help guide new businesses toward success, resulting in a strong business community. Bates works alongside members guiding them to consider the McHenry Area Chamber as an advertising tool to use for growing their businesses. Whether it’s Chamber newsletters, networking opportunities or creative advertising, Bates encourages her members to expect a rate of return for their involvement with the Chamber. She loves seeing businesses succeed. “I love the entrepreneur,” she says. “These are the risk-takers in our business community; these are the folks who make local economies move!”

If she had to offer advice to someone looking to open his or her own business, she says that it’s imperative to “make certain you have support at home, and a few dollars in the bank before taking the risk of starting your own company.”

McHenry Area Chamber of Commerce 1257 N. Green St., McHenry 815-385-4300 www.mchenrychamber.com

www.nwherald.com/magazine

4/30/18 12:39 PM


No Limit to Learning

Teri Plazak Owner

F

or Teri Plazak, food brings family together. It is the foundation for her catering business and two successful restaurants. Inspired by a dream, Teri, her husband, Chris and their son John, strive to stay at the forefront of menu trends, providing wholesome, delicious meals for families to enjoy. And the rumors are true; they offer free food delivery, which customers can order by phone or online.

Customers enjoy visiting Breaking Bread where they’ll find an eclectic collection of articles from the community on display, while enjoying lunch or dinner made with the freshest, brightest ingredients. It’s a recipe that brings customers back, whether it’s for a meal, or to order catering for a baptism, graduation, wedding shower and other special occasion.

Christina Haggerty

Vice President of Marketing, Communications and Development

F

or Christina Haggerty, education can bring transformations and there is no limit to the learning process. With strong support for education and a firm belief in the difference it can make in someone’s life, there is no doubt that Haggerty enjoys her role as Vice President of Marketing, Communications and Development for McHenry County College.

Founded in 1967 McHenry County College opened its doors to serve 312 full-time and 1,045 part-time students, with popular programs such as secretarial science, mechanical drafting and business administration. In the past 50 years, and now with over 6,000 credit students, the college has grown considerably in size, and in class and degree offerings. Last year alone, more than 30,000 people visited the Crystal Lake campus for classes, personal enrichment programs and special events. Haggerty joined MCC in 2008, bringing with her more than 20 years of experience with marketing communications, brand strategy and event management. Her ability to lead goal-oriented teams and her work on campaigns to support fiscal and strategic growth helped her achieve a seat at the leadership table. She is proud to be a woman serving in a senior leadership position. As a leading community college, MCC stands ready to respond to the shifting demands of the community and the emerging needs of its workforce, Haggerty says.

Breaking Bread Catering & Deli

638 Northwest Highway, Cary (847) 516-2223 230 W. Virginia, Ste. 250, Crystal Lake (815) 893-6510 breakingbreadrestaurants.com

SM-CL1524804

www.nwherald.com/magazine

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 55

McHenry County College

8900 U.S. Highway 14, Crystal Lake (815) 455-3700 www.mchenry.edu MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | MAY 2018 | 55

4/30/18 12:39 PM


SUBURBAN SUPERDAD:

DIARY OF A MANLY ‘DANCE DAD’ | By JONATHAN BILYK

It’s a question I’ve been afraid to ask for a while, and it centers on Antonin Dvorak. If you don’t know who that is, you can Google search it, or you can trust my assurances that Dvorak is one of the greatest composers to ever live. Saying that, naturally, brings me back to my question. It’s been growing for quite some time, quietly, in the background of my thoughts, as Spotify plays through my headphones, and the rock musicians that still populate my playlists increasingly take a back seat to other genres, like classical. As I’ve gotten older, my appreciation for classical music has grown. I’ve discovered that I can identify quality classical music, and can admit with some degree of certainty that I actually have a favorite classical composer. But what does this mean? On one hand, it could mean – and this is the preferred answer – that my opinion has achieved a high degree of cultural sophistication. On the other hand, however, it could mean (and result in a harsh reaction from my inner younger person) that the man has merely grown old. A similar conundrum emerged last December as I took in the 18th showing of “The Nutcracker” ballet in the last six years. Many people – and men, in particular – would rather visit the dentist than sit through a single ballet performance, let alone more than a dozen. A decade ago, despite my growing affinity for classical music and other markings of acculturation (or aging), I would have been among the number of men who would choose a dental office chair to a theater auditorium seat. Though, I like to think, being something of a pseudo-Renaissance man, that I would have undeniably preferred two evenings at the ballet before ever preferring a day devoted to allowing a dental hygienist poke around my mouth with sharp metal instruments. Regardless, fast-forward three decades, and – for the past six years – I’ve chosen to sit in a dark 56 | MAY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 56

theater for three consecutive nights in December and applaud the physical feats, artistry and athletic prowess displayed by impressive ballet dancers in sequined costumes, as they perform the holiday tradition handed down to us from composer Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky.

to the amount of money transferred from my bank account.) But give me a few more years. While my inner uncouth younger, former self needs a bit of time to process it all, he may yet just come around – especially if a T-shirt is part of the deal.

Why? Because, for the past six years, those dancers have included my daughter and her friends, who have done nothing but impress me with their commitment to their art, dancing simply for the love of performance and for the off-chance that they might bring a smile to someone’s face. (Particularly if that someone may have thought, several years ago, that he’d prefer a dental exam to the ballet.)

 Jonathan Bilyk writes about the triumphs and travails of being a modern-day dad who legitimately enjoys time with his family, while tolerating a dog that seems to adore him. He also doesn’t really like the moniker “Superdad” because it makes it sound like he wants to wear his undergarments on the outside of his pants. (Also, the cape remains on back order.)

At this point, I’ve shied away from the moniker “Dance Dad.” (Though, admittedly, if my daughter’s dance teacher is reading this, a T-shirt bearing that term might be a nice gesture relative FAMILY IN FOCUS

www.nwherald.com/magazine

4/30/18 12:40 PM


Become

a f an!

INTRODUCING AN

All New embrace Day Program

Follow McHenry County Magazine at facebook.com/McHenryCountyMagazine.

PEACE OF MIND FOR YOU, ENRICHMENT FOR THE ONES YOUR LOVE. The award winning embrace Memory Care Program at Fox Point Manor is proud to bring to you an all new Day Program for persons with memory loss.

PLEASE CALL 815-669-4386 TO SCHEDULE A PERSONAL TOUR TODAY!

Are You An Artist?

See your work in the pages of McHenry County Magazine! To submit an entry to Artist Showcase (see page 36), email artwork, title of piece, name and village of residence of artist, a two- to three-sentence description of the piece, short bio and artist photo to McHenryCountyMagazine@shawmedia.com, subject head “Local Artist Submission.”

www.nwherald.com/magazine

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 57

MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | MAY 2018 | 57

4/30/18 12:40 PM


SUMMER HAS NEVER SOUNDED SO GOOD GOOD.

2018 EVENTS

PRESENTED BY GEORGE WILLIAMS COLLEGE OF AURORA UNIVERSITY

Sunday, June 24, 4 p.m.

Saturday, July 7, 7:30 p.m.

COMMUNITY SHOWCASE WITH THE

BRUCE HORNSBY & THE NOISEMAKERS

LAKE GENEVA SYMPHONY

LAKESIDE MATINEE

Saturday, July 14, 7:30 p.m.

WYNONNA & THE BIG NOISE With her rich and commanding voice, Wynonna has sold over 30 million albums spanning a remarkable 34-year career from the mother/ daughter duo The Judds to her latest sound, which encompasses country, Americana, blues, soul and rock.

Bring the entire family to enjoy the orchestral scores of your favorite films such as “Pirates of the Caribbean,” “Forrest Gump,” “Superman,” “Lord of the Rings,” “Frozen,” “Gladiator” and “Star Wars.”

Drawing from a wellspring of diverse American musical traditions, the singer/pianist/composer has created a large, adventurous and accomplished body of work in contemporary music and employed a vast array of stylistic approaches.

Saturday, July 21, 7:30 p.m.

Sunday, July 29, 4 p.m.

Saturday, August 11, 7:30 p.m.

BARITONE NATHAN GUNN CHICAGO PHILHARMONIC

RALPH’S WORLD

THREE DOG NIGHT

Get ready to visit the pop rock planet radiating with high-energy tunes and the silliest atmosphere. Join indie rocker Ralph Covert and band on a musical adventure that will have the kids dancing and laughing all afternoon, as well as entertaining parents and grandparents alike.

“Joy to you and me!” Don’t miss the iconic Grammy-nominated group, with a legacy spanning close to five decades, performing their greatest hits such as “Shambala” and “One,” and No. 1 singles “Joy to the World,” “Mama Told Me (Not to Come)” and “Black and White.”

AN EVENING OF LOVE SONGS America’s leading in-demand baritone and Grammy Award-winning superstar Nathan Gunn has performed in numerous roles in renowned international opera houses and as a distinguished soloist with symphony orchestras worldwide.

TICKETS ARE ON SALE NOW FOR ALL SUMMER EVENTS AT MUSICBYTHELAKE.COM. P L AT I N U M SPONSOR

GOLD SPONSORS

www.nwherald.com/magazine Performances takeCOUNTY place onMAGAZINE the shores of Geneva Lake in Williams Bay, Wisconsin (seven miles from downtown Lake Geneva). 58 | MAY 2018 | MCHENRY

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 58

4/30/18 12:40 PM


                                           

 & 

 

Relax! WE COME TO YOU! zippyshell.com Call Ken for free quote.

Moving & Storage  

www.nwherald.com/magazine

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 59

 

MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | MAY 2018 | 59

4/30/18 12:40 PM


The Glass-Half-Full Guy:

FINDING UNORTHODOX ART ON YOUR ADVENTURES | By PETER STADALSKY

G

oing to shows and museums is an exciting way to experience new destinations. Art and music express the heart of a culture, so seeing artwork in other places can expand your overall outlook and inspire creativity. Through my travels, I’ve stumbled upon unique cultural phenomena in unexpected places.

Here are some unorthodox ways to take in local art and music on your travels: 

STREET ART

That’s right, there is a world of impressive art beyond territorial tagging and teenage angst spray-painted on bridges. While you can find enticing graffiti in the U.S., many countries around the world actually support and designate portions of a city or town to be artistically tagged. There is a famous artist, Blu, whose work you can find all across Europe on the sides of buildings. I’ve seen entire blocks of a city flowing with color and imaginative designs. On many occasions, I’ve run into areas with prolific street art and have spent part of my day meandering through neighborhoods enjoying the kaleidoscope of creativity.

SMALL FESTIVALS

With the power of social media, it’s a bit easier to find the bizarre little festivals in a nowhere town. But you don’t always need to peruse the internet and plan ahead. If you check around with locals, at coffee shops or even with your server, you’ll eventually stumble upon a gem. Years ago, I strolled into Winchester, England, on a whim and ended up at the Hat Fair. The festival consisted of an improv performer and acrobatic ukulele players with top hats and mustaches, as well as a grown man being wheeled around in a bathtub with a giant rubber ducky. You never know what you’ll find, from the Baby Jumping Fiesta in Spain  PUBS to the World Toe Wrestling Contest in England. It’s good to get a little weird There’s nothing quite like wandering into a tiny pub as music spills from its sometimes. seams. It’s always a mixed bag, dropping into a town and finding a pub; I’ve  STREET MUSICIANS seen some of the best and worst comics and musicians in my life. Nonetheless, you can’t go wrong in a dim, shanty hangout filled with good company. The B.B. King, Rod Stewart and Jewel all have one thing in common – they started out their careers as street performers. Never underestimate the talent of a lone museums and circus will always be around, so make sure to carve out a little time to catch a slice of some of the world’s less polished acts. busker (street performer) playing the streets of a small-town market place. You can still find famous folk artist Glen Hansard of Ireland, strumming on the streets of Dublin. There is hidden talent and mesmerizing virtuosos all around u Peter Stadalsky us, not just on the radio and music streaming services. And there is something is an adventurer. special that happens when a musician puts his or her soul into a song that may He shares his travel never be heard again. Galway, Ireland, and Market Street in London are hubs of experiences with a some of the most unique and enticing street musicians I’ve ever seen. “glass-half-full” view of the world.

60 | MAY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 60

TRAVEL

www.nwherald.com/magazine

4/30/18 12:40 PM


LLOYD’S PAINT & PAPER

MAY 23RD – MAY 26TH

EVERYTHING UP TO 25% OFF!

& INTERIOR DESIGN STUDIO

Vickie ie Peter, P , Sherry Sh Staudt, Sta udt, Ber Bernade Bernadette nadette nade tte Goul Gould d and an AI Gould of the Crystal Lake Lloyd’s

SM-CL1525170

MON-SAT 7:30-5:30 • THURS 7:30-8:00 73 N. Willams St. | Downtown Crystal Lake

815 459-1160 www.lloydspaintnpaper.com *All Discounts are from our everyday regular pricing. Cash, check or credit card only.

Lakeside Arts Park at the Dole | Presents

1st Friday Art Show

SUMMER COOKING CAMP Around the World in 3 Days

5:00 PM - 8:00PM | $5 Suggested Donation Your financial contribution supports the historic preservation of the Dole Mansion & Lakeside Arts Park programs.

Sponsored by: This 3-day camp includes globe-trotting destinations to America, Asia, & Mexico. Future chefs cook up cuisines from foreign lands while learning techniques and kitchen skills in our professional kitchen.

May 4th - Crystal Lake District 47 school show June 1st - Felissa Onixt, William Stone, & Community Show Journal October 5th - Crystal Lake Photo Club & Dangerous Lullabies IV

L A K E S I D E A R T S PA R K AT THE DOLE

www.nwherald.com/magazine

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 61

Tuesday, June 19th – Thursday, June 21st Session 1: 9:00am-12:00pm | Ages 8-10

Session 2: 1:00pm -4:00pm | Ages 11-13

REGISTER NOW ONLINE

LakesideArtsPark.org Lakeside Legacy Foundation, a 501(c)3 charitable organization.

401 Country Club Road, Crystal Lake, IL 60014 | 815.455.8000 TRAVEL

MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | MAY 2018 | 61

4/30/18 12:40 PM


Advanced Dialysis Care Ultimate Comfort

Unsurpassed Patient Care is Our Commitment Dialysis Centers Centers McHenry & Crystal Crystal Lakes Lake Dialysis What makes our clinics special? • All schedules available, flexible hours. • In-center and home peritoneal dialysis • • •

Mohammad Zahid MD, FACP, FACN

• •

options to meet all our patients’ needs. DIRECTV, iPads, and wireless internet. Contoured chair with heat and massage. Emergency generator for backup power. Latest Fresenius 2008-K dialysis machines. Conveniently located close to hospital.

62 | MAY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

Contact us for a tour of our state-of-the-art facilities. McHenry Dialysis Center 4209 W. Shamrock Ln, Unit A McHenry, IL 60050 Tel: (815) 344-8512 Crystal Lake Dialysis Center 6298 Northwest Hwy, Suite 300 Crystal Lake, IL 60014 Tel: (815) 477-0825 www.nwherald.com/magazine www.americanrenal.com

SM-CL1521761

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 62

4/30/18 12:40 PM


g n i r p “S

f o e m i t is the

s t c e j o r p “ plans & - Leo Tolstoy

At Whispering Hills, we have all you need to gr ow. A plethora of annuals, perennials, evergreens , shade trees, and more await. Mulch on over an d see what’s in store.

s during From patio barbecue on those the summer, to fires scaping crisp fall nights; hard mily fa s les enables price e. ad m memories to be

CTOR

AUTHORIZED CONTRA

We believe the best room in the house is the garden; each season brings about a new portrait of color and charm. With over 25 years of experience, we pride ourselves on using only the highest quality plant material and workmanship. Making your home beautifully flourish year round is our specialty.

Northwest Highway

14 Rakow Rd.

Visit our website for more information! www.whisperinghillsnursery.com Route 31 in Crystal Lake

www.nwherald.com/magazine

Visit us on Facebook

847.658.5610

31

1/4 mile south of Rakow Rd. on Rt. 31

X Whispering Hills

MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | MAY 2018 | 63

SM-CL1517912

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 63

4/30/18 12:40 PM


RING SAVINGS SP

$75 OFF *See below for terms

Goodbye, muddy floors.

We’re making Spring Cleaning easier! Enjoy our exclusive Professionally Trained

Top-Quality Cleaning Tools

Consumer Protection

Customized Cleans

Our PROs gain experience through hands-on training and our MaidPro University advanced online courses.

Our PROs are bonded and insured, guaranteeing protection for homeowners.

$75 OFF

$25 OFF YOUR 1ST, 3RD, AND 5TH CLEANINGS

Our PROs use cleaning tools and supplies from top brands, giving your home its best clean yet.

we customize each service to fit your home, needs, and preferences.

Use Code: SPR18MUD

Call 847.264.9227 or visit maidpro.com 64 | MAY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 64

www.nwherald.com/magazine

4/30/18 12:40 PM


www.nwherald.com/magazine

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 65

MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | MAY 2018 | 65

4/30/18 12:40 PM


HOME SWAP W hen your bucket list is full of destinations you’d love to visit, it can be hard to decide where to start and which ones to prioritize. From New York and Los Angeles to Paris and Tuscany, there’s a world of unique experiences. The price tag associated with wanderlust often gives people pause, but the sharing economy has introduced alternative travel options, like home swapping, which can help make travel affordable.

Here are some of the benefits of using your own house to travel the world:

FLEXIBLE TRAVEL OPTIONS If you’re new to home swapping, joining a network can help you get started. After creating a custom profile, you can reach out to your matches and arrange a swap.

LIFESTYLE AMENITIES

home is being cared for can help make travel more fun.

BIGGER BUDGET When you swap homes with someone, you’re saving a significant amount on accommodations. Aside from the membership cost to join a network, typically a few hundred dollars a year, you don’t have to worry about shelling out the daily rates and fees that come with more traditional lodging.

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 66

Those savings can add up to more fun in your destination, giving you a bigger budget to spend on things like attractions, activities, local events, souvenirs and dining. Splurge on tickets for a Broadway show during your stay in New York City, or bring a private chef in to prepare your group a memorable meal.

Swapping can have you feeling like your accommodations were tailor-made for your lifestyle. For example, if you’re The peace of mind planning a family vacation, swapping with another family whose home for exchange is packed with toys, books, of knowing your high chairs and strollers can make life much easier.

Many people are surprised to learn that you don’t have to make the traditional one-for-one home exchange. The Love Home Swap network, for example, adds flexibility by letting people accumulate points to use at a later date. For instance, if you’re away for the holidays, you can open your home up for stays and earn points to use for a future getaway.

66 | MAY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

Trade your way around the world

Common amenities you’d find in a house are a big convenience, too. Having a full kitchen at your disposal can help you save on dining costs, while multiple bedrooms keep everyone happy.

LOCAL EXPERIENCES When people swap their homes, they often feel more connected to each other’s travel experiences. When you arrive, you’re likely to find local tips and recommendations from your co-swapper, from favorite cafés, restaurants and attractions to reliable transportation, cleaning and babysitting services. Staying in an authentic neighborhood can also lead to a deeper, more unique appreciation for the destination. You’ll have the chance to share your hometown love, too, by leaving your guests recommendations in return. Introducing people to your neighborhood can help you see it in a new light.

TRAVEL

www.nwherald.com/magazine

4/30/18 12:40 PM


Sunrooms

Conservatories

Porch Conversions

815 459 9078

www.northwesternsunrooms.com

Extra Living Space with our PORCH WINDOWS 75% Screened Air Flow Air and Water Tight in Secs

Helping Honeymooners

since 1984

1142 N Green St • McHenry 815-385-6900 www.worldwidetraveler.net

Woodstock’s # 1 Choice For Downtown Fitness Studio AN EVEN EXCHANGE Since somebody else is going to be settling into your home while you’re gone, there’s no need to hire a house sitter. You can exchange minor maintenance tasks with your co-swapper, such as watering each other’s plants, and you’ll have eyes and ears on your space while you’re away in case anything happens. The peace of mind of knowing your home is being cared for can help make travel more fun. While it might seem counterintuitive to open your home up to a stranger, working with a trusted network can ease worries. Love Home Swap offers ID verification, a secure website, peer reviews and an around-the-clock customer service team to help people enjoy their home swapping experience.

By North American Press Syndicate

TRX Suspension Training • Circuit Training • Yoga • Kelebells • Ropes • Boxing • Barre • Cycling • Tai Chi • Strength & Cardio Training • Karate/Tae Kwon Do

“Personalized workouts with the individual aenon you deserve”

LEARN MORE

Fitness For Life

For further information or to start planning your own swap, visit www.LoveHomeSwap. com and browse destinations and available homes.

Woodstock Square Mall 110 South Johnson Street 815-206-2222

FitnessForLifeWoodstock.com

Free Trial Class No Iniaon Fee

SM-CL1526586

www.nwherald.com/magazine

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 67

TRAVEL

MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | MAY 2018 | 67

4/30/18 12:40 PM


Weekends at the Shores of Turtle Creek transform into wizardly world of Harry Potter | By SHONDA DUDLICEK

68 | MAY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 68

OUT & ABOUT

www.nwherald.com/magazine

4/30/18 12:41 PM


On weekends, the Shores of Turtle Creek in Spring Grove transform into the world of Harry Potter. The venue’s popular themed event, Wizardly World Evening in the Great Hall, is a dead ringer for Hogwarts school in J.K. Rowling’s beloved “Harry Potter” series. Anna Niklarz, managing partner, came up with the idea to recreate Universal Studios’ The Wizarding World of Harry Potter for the children who couldn’t get to Florida or California to experience the theme park in person. “My older daughter loves Harry Potter and read all the books and had them memorized,” Niklarz says. “She’s the reason why we went there. Her love inspired us to do that here.” Rotating actors play out interactive classroom scenes after dinner. Some nights Hermione Granger may recreate potions. Another night, Diane, an apprentice of Professor Sybill Trelawney, might lead a Divination class on tea-leaf reading. Or, for prizes, Sirius Black will ask trivia questions, like “What is the number of species of purebred dragons?” Muggles and wizards alike enter Café Platform 9 3/4 for “witch-brewed” butter beer and pumpkin juice. Characters in full attire mingle, and sometimes it’s difficult to tell who’s a guest and who’s working the crowd. - Continued on page 70

www.nwherald.com/magazine

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 69

OUT & ABOUT

MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | MAY 2018 | 69

4/30/18 12:41 PM


- Continued from page 69 Niklarz dressed as Dobby, complete with pointy ears. Some wear Hogwarts or Quidditch T-shirts; others go hardcore with wands, wigs and capes. The Adams family of Roscoe came as Hagrid (Don), Ron Weasley (Donnie, 12) and Molly Weasley (Kelly). Don is not 8 feet, 6 inches tall like Hagrid, but he did wear a curly black wig and beard. Kelly and Donnie, both redheads, didn’t need wigs. Six-year-old Charlie Burns of Woodstock, won everyone over with his Harry Potter costume, complete with a red lightning bolt scar and round glasses that covered half his face. Clutching his wand, he says his aunt really likes Harry Potter, and they’ve read the books and watched the movies together. Guests climb the stairs to the Great Hall, enter through a curtain and their houses are selected by the Sorting Hat, all under Hermione’s watchful eye. Guests join their housemates at the tables for dinner and songs from the eight movies play as elves bring out food: bangers and mash, chicken, sausage, corn and rolls. “Some are definitely ‘Harry Potter’ experts,’” Niklarz says of the guests. “I had some correcting me on the setup of the table, saying it’s not the same in the movie. I did have the largest table for the most popular house. But I’m just trying to squeeze everyone in for dinner!” Tickets cost $45, and events take place from 8 to 11 p.m. Fridays, 4 to 7 p.m. Saturdays and 3 to 6 p.m. Sundays. To register, visit www. eventbrite.com and search “Shores of Turtle Creek.”

70 | MAY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 70

OUT & ABOUT

www.nwherald.com/magazine

4/30/18 12:41 PM


Kid consensus: A ‘heavenly’ Harry Potter exp erience By M

IA DUDLICEK, ag e 13 I consider myself to be quite the “H arry Potter” fan, naturally, when m so, y mom told me ab out the story she writing, I was intr was igued. I thought it was pr etty cool that An na Niklarz, the ev managing partne ent’s r, would transport all of the incredib elements of “Har le ry Potter” that sh aped my childhood and the childhood , s of many others , into such a spec occasion. ial The Wizardly Wor ld Ev amazing experienc ening in the Great Hall was an e for me, as it wou ld super fan looking for a fun way to sp be to any series end a Friday nigh t. It’s astounding to see so many peop le sharing my interests in the sa me when I realized th place, and it warmed my heart at something impo rtant to me is just important to othe as rs. There was so muc h to take in, from the getting completel y decked out in “H other guests arry Potter” garb the decorations th to at I know only to o well. For me, it was he avenly.

www.nwherald.com/magazine

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 71

OUT & ABOUT

MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE | MAY 2018 | 71

4/30/18 12:41 PM


TICKETS 847 577 2121• WWW.METROPOLISARTS.COM

2 0 1 8  2 0 1 9 S e a s o n

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 72

4/30/18 12:41 PM


Our family has a new addition.

RAY CHEVROLET 1529373

Bigger family means Better selection. At Ray and Raymond Auto Group, we understand what it means to come from a big family. That’s why we take pride in providing our customers with a large selection of over 2,000 * vehicles. Well, now our selection is even larger with the addition of Ray Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram. With even more makes and models to choose from we now feel more confident than ever that every customer will leave with a vehicle they love. We’ve been proudly serving Lake County, McHenry County, and Southern Wisconsin for over 65 years. The way we see it, the more choices you have, the better the chance you’ll love what you pick. With the addition of Ray Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram to our family of dealerships we can guarantee you and your family will love what you drive home in.

F O X

&

L A K E

A N T I O C H

Ray Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram • Ray Chevrolet • Fox Lake, IL | Raymond Chevrolet • Raymond Kia • Antioch, IL *Based on Ray & Raymond Auto Group combined inventory.

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 73

4/30/18 12:41 PM


CALENDAR MAY 2018

DINE WITH YOUR DOG MONDAYS WHEN: 5 to 10 p.m. Mondays in May WHERE: Broken Oar, 614 Rawson Bridge Road, Barrington

MOTHER’S DAY MARKET WHEN: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, May 12 WHERE: Mixin Mingle Woodstock, Cass Street, Woodstock

Starting in May, guests can bring their dog to Broken Oar for Dine with Your Dog (weather permitting.) The event will take place every Monday Night on the Lawn after 5 p.m. For more information, visit www.brokenoar.com.

Attendees to the gifting event during Mother’s Day weekend – and during the Woodstock Farmer’s Market – will be able to shop for a mix of handmade items, artist’s work and specialty gifts from a variety of vendors. For more information, visit www.mixinmingle.com.

‘NATIVE FLORA AND WILDLIFE’ WATERCOLOR EXHIBIT WHEN: Exhibit runs through June 3 WHERE: Lost Valley Visitor Center at Glacial Park, Rt. 31 and Harts Road, Ringwood

PADDLE IN THE PARK WHEN: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, May 12 WHERE: Lake Atwood Shelter at The Hollows, 3804 U.S. Hwy 14, Cary

Visitors will be able to test paddle canoes, kayaks or Stand-up paddleboards from local retailers to find the right one. Enjoy demonstrations of paddling and rescue techniques, paddle a voyageur canoe and learn about local canoe and kayak clubs, paddling opportunities, outfitters and adventures CARRIAGE (OPEN) HOUSE available in the Midwest. There is a one-time fee WHEN: 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. May 9-11; and10 a.m. of $5 a person for all instructional clinics and/ to 4 p.m. May 12 or to test watercrafts. New this year, the fee WHERE: Carriage House Antiques and Good includes entry to win door prizes from vendors. Stuff, 21 E. Crystal Lake Ave., Crystal Lake There also will be live music by award-winning musician Jerry Vandiver. The Carriage House will host a spring open house, featuring sales, drawings, food CELEBRATION AND MEMORIAL OAK PLANTING and fun. For more information, visit www. WHEN: 10 a.m. Saturday, May 12 thecarriagehouseantiques.com. WHERE: McConnell Road Park, 2004 Greenview FOOD AND WINE PAIRING – Drive, Woodstock CHAMPAGNES AND SPARKLING Participants will help the Land Conservancy WINES of McHenry County plant our memorial oaks WHEN: 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, May 11 at McConnell Road Park in Woodstock. Park WHERE: Loyola University Retreat and Ecology Campus, 2710 S. Country Club Road, Woodstock on Greenview Drive, just southeast of the intersection of Serenity Lane, and follow the The dinner starts with a champagne reception paved path into the park. For more information, and hand-passed appetizers. The five-course visit www.conservemc.org. dinner will be paired with champagne and MOTHER’S DAY SPRING sparkling wines from around the world. The cost is $80 a person. For more information, visit WILDFLOWER HIKE WHEN: 9 to 10:30 a.m. Sunday, May 13 www.luc.edu. WHERE: Ryder’s Woods, 750 E. Kimball Ave., Woodstock “Native Flora and Wildlife” is a juried exhibit of nearly 30 vibrant watercolors featuring a diverse array of local native species, including wildflowers, songbirds, butterflies, reptiles and birds of prey. The works were painted by members of the Lakes Region Watercolor Guild.

Call me today! Sound advise may help you save! Richard Hedlund Financial Advisor

*Securities offered through IBA Securities, a division of Broker Dealer Financial Services Corp. (BDFS), Member SIPC. Investment advisory service offered through Investment Advisors Corp., an SEC Registered Investment Advisor. McHenry County Investment Services and McHenry Savings Bank are not affiliated with BDFS. NOT FDIC INSURED - NO BANK GUARANTEE - MAY LOSE VALUE

Enjoy a beautiful spring day with family and learn about various native wildflowers on the guided hike. The cost is $5 a person online and $10 a person on the day of the event. To register or for more information, visit www.ConserveMC.org. RIDE OF SILENCE - CRYSTAL LAKE WHEN: 7 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, May 16 (arrive at 6:45 p.m.) WHERE: Meet near Crystal Lake City Hall and the Fire Station (101-121 W. Woodstock St., Crystal Lake The Ride of Silence will honor those who have been injured or killed riding their bicycles, and it also advocates for motorists to safely share the road with cyclists. This is a worldwide event with more than 400 locations participating. The event is free. For more information, visit www.rideofsilence.org. KNOCK ON WOOD CONCERT WHEN: 7 p.m. Saturday, May 19 WHERE: Faith Community UCC church, 2023 Rt. 176 (at Bayview Beach Road), Prairie Grove Knock on Wood, a countywide clarinet choir will present its spring concert. A few of the selections that will be played are “Prayer from Hansel and Gretel,” a jazz version of “Country Gardens” and “Procession of the Nobles.” The concert is free and there will be a reception following the concert. For more information, email the director, Kevin Sutherland, at knockonwoodcc@gmail.com. CHILDREN’S CAKE DECORATING CLASS WHEN: 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, May 19 WHERE: Woodscreek Park, 1420 Willow Tree, Crystal Lake Those ages 8 to 18 are invited to make a themed cake to take home. All supplies are included. Registration is required. The cost is 40 for residents and $45 for non-residents. FRIENDS OF THE MCHENRY PUBLIC LIBRARY SPRING USED BOOK SALE WHEN: 9 to 5 p.m. Saturday, May 19; and noon to 4 p.m. Sunday, May 20 WHERE: McHenry Public Library, 809 N. Front St., McHenry Come browse thousands of hardcovers, paperbacks, children’s books, DVDs and CDs during the Friends of the McHenry Public Library Spring Used Book Sale. Proceeds will help fund library programs and services. There will be a special preview sale for Friends members from 6 to 8 p.m. May 17. For all sales, there will be a $10 fee to bring in scanners. Sunday is the $5 per bag sale. For more information, visit www. mchenrylibrary.org.

SM-CL1521758

74 | MAY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 74

OUT & ABOUT

www.nwherald.com/magazine

4/30/18 12:41 PM


Everybody Needs Help Sometimes

In a crisis? Just need to talk? Can’t find help?

McHenry County Helping Numbers McHELP App is a quick click to reach immediate crisis support and information via text or voice. Anonymous access to trained, licensed crisis counselors in times of emergency, concern, anxiety or need. The app can be downloaded from Apple Store or Google Play.

Centegra Crisis Services serves as the first point of contact for callers in need of immediate assistance for mental health emergencies. Crisis line professionals are also available to help people with intense personal, family and/or marital problems. 1-800-892-8900

nt

al

rd

Me

McHenry County Mental Health Board 620 Dakota Street Crystal Lake, IL 60012 815.455.2828

y enr Co

ty un

Empowering Minds

McH

nt

H e a lt h B

oa

rd

Transforming Lives

oa

Me

al

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 75

The McHenry County Mental Health Board is able to assist with questions regarding mental health and substance abuse resources available in McHenry County. 815-455-2826

y enr Co

ty un

Empowering Minds

McH

United Way 211 is available 24/7 to make referrals to health and human service agencies — from mortgage, rent, and utility assistance to food banks, child care, health services, job training, clothing, emergency shelter, counseling and much more. 2-1-1

Transforming Lives

www.MC708.org

H e a lt h B

4/30/18 12:41 PM


#home #elements #gifts #art&books #clothing #baby

76 | MAY 2018 | MCHENRY COUNTY MAGAZINE 37 north williams street

MC Magazine May 2018_USE.indd 76

crystal lake, illinois 60014

(815)526-3733

www.nwherald.com/magazine mum117.com

4/30/18 12:41 PM

MC Mag May 2018  
MC Mag May 2018