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Group Creative Director: Steve Casey Art Director/Designer: Sarah Folkmann Copywriter: Jacob Guenther Photo Source: istock 182234141 Image Usage Rights: Royalty free Retoucher: Todd Carlson Prepress: Ryan Moede Art Producer: Kayla Laufenberg Account Manager: Kendra Moser Print Producer: Bill Schneck Project Manager: Anna Winberg Production Artist: Jennifer Beier

Syngenta: Golden Harvest Cover Wrap Teaser “Step One” Pub: Illinois Agri-News Indiana Agri-News Color: 4/C, nonbleed LV: 8.5" x 10.125" Martin Williams Job No: 9GHV01520_STEPONE_AGCWJLF_IAN LASER IS 100%

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You need products that work for your local conditions. Only Golden Harvest® brings you the powerful combination of: • unique genetics—bred, tested and proven locally • local agronomic expertise backed by E-Luminate,® our digital agronomy tool to help you place the right product in the right location • personal service from your local Golden Harvest Seed Advisor

Put our expertise to work for you. Contact your local Golden Harvest Seed Advisor. GoldenHarvestSeeds.com

Maximize your profit potential with Golden Harvest corn and soybeans. ©2019 Syngenta. Golden Harvest® is a trademark of a Syngenta Group Company.

1 inch gutter Group Creative Director: Franke+Fiorella Art Director/Designer: Franke+Fiorella Copywriter: Franke+Fiorella Photo Source: Franke+Fiorella Image Usage Rights: Franke+Fiorella Retoucher: Todd Carlson Prepress: Ryan Moede Art Producer: Franke+Fiorella Account Manager: Kendra Moser Print Producer: Bill Schneck Project Manager: Anna Winberg Production Artist: Jennifer Beier

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Talk to your local Seed Advisor today, or for more information go to GoldenHarvestYields.com Based upon results of 3rd party trialing, FIRST trials, Syngenta internal trials, and independent trials conducted by farmers. Performance assessments are based upon results or analysis of public information, field observations and/or internal Syngenta evaluations. ©2019 Syngenta. Important: Always read and follow label and bag tag instructions; only those labeled as tolerant to glufosinate may be sprayed with glufosinate ammonium based herbicides. Under federal and local laws, only dicamba-containing herbicides registered for use on dicamba-tolerant varieties may be applied. See product labels for details and tank mix partners. Golden Harvest® soybean varieties are protected under granted or pending U.S. variety patents and other intellectual property rights, regardless of the trait(s) within the seed. The Genuity®, Roundup Ready 2 Yield®, Roundup Ready 2 Xtend® and the Liberty Link® traits may be protected under numerous United States patents. It is unlawful to save soybeans containing these traits for planting or transfer to others for use as a planting seed. Golden Harvest® and Rooted in Genetics Agronomy & Service are trademarks of a Syngenta Group Company. Roundup Ready 2 Yield®, Roundup Ready 2 Xtend,® Genuity,® Genuity and Design and Genuity Icons are trademarks used under license from Monsanto Technology LLC. LibertyLink,® Liberty® and the Water Droplet logo are registered trademarks of BASF Corporation. HERCULEX® and the HERCULEX Shield are trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, LLC. HERCULEX Insect Protection technology by Dow AgroSciences. GT27 is a trademark of M.S. Technologies and BASF. Enlist E3™ soybean technology is jointly developed with Dow AgroSciences LLC and MS Technologies LLC. Enlist E3™ is a trademark of Dow AgroSciences LLC. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. MW 9GHV01503-AG225CC-B3-D1104 11/19 SM


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Ag risk program deadlines Sign up for Dairy Market Coverage, ARC/PLC plans By Tom C. Doran

AGRINEWS PUBLICATIONS

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. — Important signup deadlines for U.S Department of Agriculture risk management programs are approaching. The deadline to enroll in the Dairy Market Coverage program for 2020 is Dec. 13. Producers can sign up for the program at county Farm Service Agency offices and all dairy producers are eligible. DMC is a voluntary risk-management program that offers financial protection to dairy producers when the difference be tween the all milk pr ice and the average feed cost — the margin — falls below a certain dollGraff ar amount selected by the producer. Implemented as part of the 2018 farm bill, the program replaces the Margin Protection Program for Dairy. Dairy operators can select their own coverage level ranging from $4 to $9.50 per hundredweight in 50-cent increments. They can also select the coverage percentage of the dairy operation’s production history ranging from 5% to 95% in 5% increments. There is a $100 administrative fee to register for the program, but can be exempted for limited-resource, beginning, veteran, or disadvantaged producers. “Any dairy producer who hasn’t visited our office, time is getting short,” said William Graff, Illinois USDA-FSA executive director. “All dairy operations are eligible. They must have a production history determined by FSA. They have to be registered to participate during the sign-up.” As of Nov. 25, more than fourfifths of all U.S. dairy operations with established production history are enrolled. See DEADLINES, Page A2

SEE SECTION B

INSIDE

100 tons of poultry donated to food bank A3 Gene editing adds desirable traits to animals B7 Create holiday memories in the kitchen C4 AgriTrucker B5

Farms For Sale B8

Auction Calendar B1

Lifestyle C3

Business C7

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Vol. 42 No. 10

CONTACT AGRINEWS: 800-426-9438

Hemp is processed at a 22,000-square-foot facility in Kokomo, Indiana, owned by Third Wave Farms.

PROVIDED PHOTOS/THIRD WAVE FARMS

Hemp plant opens Drying, processing facility in Kokomo By Erica Quinlan

AGRINEWS PUBLICATIONS

KOKOMO, Ind. — Third Wave Farms opened a 22,000-squarefoot hemp drying and processing facility in Kokomo in November. The plant converts industrial hemp into a stable, storable and market-ready product. It has the capacity to process over 75,000 pounds of material a day. The ability to process the green hemp flower quickly is critical to helping farmers mitigate risk by ensuring their crops get dried quickly and are in a controlled, food-safe environment. “One of the biggest hurdles that our emerging industrial hemp industry faces is access to infrastructure to support farmers,” said Mike Lewis, cofounder of Third Wave. “We recognized early on that in order to bring quality grown hemp into the marketplace, we

The facility features a customized conveyor system that dries hemp to a stable moisture level. needed to have infrastructure to support post-harvest handling. “This drying facility will not only protect farmers’ crops in the short term but also provide an extra level of protection by allowing material to be stored and marketed when demand is at its peak.” The facility features a customized conveyor system that dries the hemp to a stable moisture percentage. From there, hemp is prepared for shipment to Third

Wave Farms’ extraction processing partners — where it will be turned into dozens of cannabinoid-based products for clients. “I am really excited about the future of hemp processing infrastructure in Indiana,” Lewis said. “This season was a huge success for us in terms of refining our production and processing equipment and systems. “Third Wave Farms current capacity at our Kokomo, Indiana, hub is 3,500 acres. In

2020, we intend to add three more hubs in support of Indiana farmers, which will handle up to 15,000 acres of production.” Lewis encouraged farmers interested in growing hemp to consider the risks and challenges associated with the crop. “This is still a rapidly evolving industry with lots of fluctuation and market uncertainty, so proceed with caution,” he said. “If we have learned anything this season, it is that the market and climate make this a volatile marketplace. “So, if you’re thinking about getting into the business, find the right partners and get ready for a fun ride. If you’re interested in supporting the growth of this industry, find people with good hearts and minds and buy their products. Find out what’s important to them.” Learn more about Third Wave at www.thirdwavefarms.com. Erica Quinlan can be reached at 800-426-9438, ext. 193, or equinlan@agrinews-pubs.com. Follow her on Twitter at: @AgNews_Quinlan.

Keeping kids safe on the farm By Erica Quinlan

Ploeckelman shared eight ways to keep the farm a fun, safe place to live and play.

AGRINEWS PUBLICATIONS

INDIANAPOLIS — Growing up on a farm may be fun, but worksites can be hazardous for children and young adults. Melissa Ploeckelman, outreach specialist at the National Children’s Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety, shared advice during a webinar sponsored by AgriSafe. “We know that kids raised on farms have space to run and play,” Ploeckelman said. “They learn the definition of work and are instilled with a sense of responsibility. “With that we know that, while farms are a lot of fun, they are also a very dangerous place. Usually child care isn’t available or affordable for farm families, so parents take their children into the worksite with them. “This creates a distraction while the adult is working, risking the adult’s life, as well as putting the child in a place of danger.”

Ploeckelman

GUARDIAN GUIDELINES 1. Set boundaries and rules — and

enforce them. 2. Provide supervision. 3. Assign tasks and jobs and provide training. 4. Mitigate hazards. 5. Provide fun activities for children. 6. Teach youth about responsibility. 7. Provide a role model. 8. Nurture the love of family and farming.

PROVIDED PHOTO/CENTRAL STATES CENTER FOR AGRICULTURAL SAFETY AND HEALTH

A child feeds chickens on a farm. Child safety is an important consideration on any farm where children live or visit.

An additional 250,000 youth are hired to work on farms. Even more children visit farms as an agritourism destination. On farms, the top three causes of fatal accidents in youth are BY THE NUMBERS Nearly 900,000 children live due to machinery, motor vehion farms in the United States, cles and drowning. The top three non-fatal causes according to the U.S. Census of injuries are from falls, aniBureau.

mals and machinery. Learn more about farm safety at www.agrisafe.org, or www. childagsafety.org. Erica Quinlan can be reached at 800-426-9438, ext. 193, or equinlan@agrinews-pubs.com. Follow her on Twitter at: @AgNews_Quinlan.


A2 Friday, December 6, 2019

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Corteva Agriscience launches digital LANDVisor Technology for ranchers and land managers I N DI A NA P OLIS — Corteva Agriscience announced the launch of LANDVisor, a new integrated technology solution that allows ranchers and land managers to implement a customized solution for accomplishing their land management goals. LANDVisor combines sophisticated imagery and data analytics with expert management advice to increase land productivity. The technology provides detailed information on forage productivity and vegetation including the density of desirable and undesirable plant species, identifying where and when herbicide treatments will be most beneficial. “Land managers and ranchers care about all their resources, and they manage all of them for both environmental and

DEADLINES FROM PAGE ONE

Just over 80% of Illinois’ 568 dairy operations with established production history have thus far enrolled in the program, and about 73% of Indiana’s 424 dairy operations are now enrolled, according to the USDA. ARC/PLC The sign-up deadline for the Agriculture Risk Coverage and Price Loss Coverage programs isn’t until March 15, 2020, but Graff recommends the sooner farmers sign up the better. “Illinois has more ARC/ PLC contracts than any other state in the nation. We’ll probably be around 160,000 contracts when it’s done. I know a lot of people are telling people to sit back and wait before they make their decision, but we can’t put 160,000 contracts through on the last day,” Graff said. “The nice thing about this is after you make your decision you’re not locked in until the March 15 deadline. If you make a decision and you decide two weeks later that you want to change your decision, you can come into the FSA office as long as it’s before March 15 and change your decision. “So, for these producers who are 90%, 95% sure of what program they’re going to take, ARC or PLC, you can take ARC county or PLC per farm per crop. Once you’re pretty sure what you’re going to do, come on in and get signed up because we’re going to get real busy and the March 15 deadline is going to come real quick.” The ARC/PLC sign-up deadline of March 15 also is sooner than in past years when it was set for the summer. “The March 15 deadline now is a whole new mindset for farmers to think about. We’re going to let people update their yields, but that deadline isn’t until Sept. 30,” Graff said. “If you would want to come in right now and make your yield update, we can take you in right now,” he added. ARC provides income support payments on historical base acres when actual crop revenue declines below a specified guaranteed level. PLC provides income support payments on historical base acres when the effective price for

AGRINEWS

economic sustainability,” said Damon Palmer, pasture and land management business leader at Corteva Agriscience. “LANDVisor gives them confidence that they are making optimum decisions. Providing customers with the latest integrated technology to sustainably manage their resources and maximize productivity is key to fulfilling our commitment to ensure progress.” LANDVisor allows producers to manage land for optimal productivity and environmental outcomes. Through key insights, this tool helps land managers make more informed, actionable decisions on the potential of their land, resulting in maximum return on investment. Left unchecked, lowvalue undesirable vegetation reduces forage production and profit potential for livestock grazers while also degrading wildlife habitat. Not only does LANDVisor give producers the

ability to target their in- age production for cattle LANDVisor in the Unit- also in other industries. vestment where it will and plant diversity for ed States and around the For more infor matworld for use in the range ion on LANDVisor, visit provide the greatest pro- wildlife. Corteva plans to expand and pasture business but LandVisor.Corteva.com. duction and environmental benefits, but it also extends the expert relationships with consultants and Corteva range and pasture specialists through progress tracking. Earlier this year, rancher K.C. Windham participated in a test of LANDVisor in a mesquite control BUSH HOG 2720 BATWING MOWER TRACTORS project on his ranch near RHINO TS12 STEALTH 12FT BATWING MOWER 1997 CIH 9330, 3PT, PTO, 4800 HRS Clyde, Texas. WOODS S20CD FLAIL SHREDDER 2014 CIH MAGNUM 310, PS, SUSP, 1150 HRS “With this program, you YETTER 3541 40FT ROTARY HOE 2010 CIH MAGNUM 335, PS, MFD, 1200 HRS don’t have to guess,” he said. GEHL 1540 FORAGE BLOWER 2012 CIH MAGNUM 290, PS, MFD, GUIDANCE. 1480 HRS “It gives you the tools to CENTURY 1300HD PULL TYPE SPRAYER 2015 CIH MAGNUM 240, CVT, SUSP, 1700 HRS make better decisions, lookNI 3722 MANURE SPREADER 2010 CIH MAGNUM 225, CVT, MFD, 2650 HRS ing at soils, where the plants NH 145 MANURE SPREADER 1991 CIH 7120, PS, TWD, 3900 HRS are and what improvement CIH L570 LOADER 2016 CIH FARMALL 70A, OS, MFD, LDR, 200 HRS you can make. LANDVisor WOODS 1050 3PT BACKHOE 2016 FARMALL 70A, OS, TWD, 353 HRS is a game changer.” PLANTERS 2015 JD 8320R, PS ILS, 1500 HRS In early 2020, LAND2017 JD DB20 8/15 2014 JD 8320R, IVT, ILS, 1900 HRS Visor will be available to JD 7200 6R30 2014 JD 8285R, IVT, ILS, 1600 HRS ranchers and land man2014 KINZE 4900 16R30, BULK, VAC, LIQ FERT 2013 JD 8235R, PS, MFD, 3400 HRS agers in the Southwest 2009 KINZE 3660 16/31 LIQ FERT 2007 JD 8430, PS, ILS, 4200 HRS to manage highly inva2004 KINZE 3600 12/23 2015 JD 7270R, IVT, TLS, 1200 HRS sive honey mesquite. As 2008 KINZE 3500 8/15 2006 JD 7920, IVT, MFD, 5800 HRS a significant consumer of 2004 JD 7320 PQ, TWD, 3350 HRS WHITE 6100 6R30 PLANTER, LIQ FERT water, honey mesquite out2004 JD 6420, PQ, MFD, 5300 HRS JD 1590 15FT NO-TILL DRILL, 2-PT competes native grasses 2006 JD 5525, OS, TWD, LDR, 3100 HRS 2004 GREAT PLAINS 1500 NO-TIL DRILL and desirable woody 1984 JD 4850, PS, MFD GREAT PLAINS 1006 10FT NO-TIL DRILL plants, reducing both for-

a covered commodity falls below its reference price. ARC and PLC are options available to operators and landowners who share the crop. Farm owners also have a one-time opportunity to update PLC payment yields beginning with crop year 2020. If the farm owner and producer visit the FSA county office together, FSA can also update yield information during that visit. Covered commodities include barley, canola, large and small chickpeas, corn, crambe, flaxseed, grain sorghum, lentils, mustard seed, oats, peanuts, dry peas, rapeseed, long grain rice, medium and short grain rice, safflower seed, seed cotton, sesame, soybeans, sunflower seed and wheat. Farmers wanting more information about the PLC/ ARC programs are encouraged to call their county FSA office. There also will be informational meetings to learn more about the program opportunities. “Please go to one of those informational meet-

ings to learn the difference, to figure out exactly what paperwork you’re going to need and exactly what you’re going to need for your yield update,” Graff said. To help expedite the PLC and ARC signup process, particularly for larger producers, Graff recommends contacting the county FSA office before stopping to sign up so the staff can have the appropriate farm files and other information ready. “That way if they say come in at 2 p.m. Thursday or 10 a.m. on Monday, they’re going to have your files and other information out and ready for you and that will make a quicker visit for you,” he said. “Also, call the county office for the dates and locations of the ARC/PLC informational meetings. That’ll help you figure out what you want to do.”

Check Out Our Used Equipment Inventory!

Tom C. Doran can be reached at 815-780-7894 or tdoran@agrinewspubs.com. Follow him on Twitter at: @AgNews_ Doran.

1976 JD 4430, QR, TWD, LDR, 5650 HRS 1997 AGCO WHITE 6175, PS, TWD, 2500 HRS 2011 JD 4730, 100FT BOOM, GUDANCE, 2400 HRS 2018 JD TS GATOR 250 HRS 2017 JD 825I 4S GATOR 100 HRS EQUIPMENT 2011 JD 2310 30FT SOIL FINISHER 2013 LANDOLL 9650 50FT FIELD CULTIVATOR CIH 200 24FT FIELD CULTIVATOR CIH TIGERMATE II 28FT FIELD CULTIVATOR JD 980 24FT FIELD CULTIVATOR 2016 CIH 335 TRUE TANDEM 28FT VT 2011 CIH 330 TRUE TANDEM 31FT VT GREAT PLAINS 3000TT 30FT VT WHITE 255 15FT DISC 2014 BRILLION WLS360 30FT MULCHER BRILLION WL03 21FT MULCHER DUNHAM LEHR 24FT MULCHER LANDOLL WFP28 28FT PACKER BRILLION XXL184 46FT PACKER KRAUSE 4400 36FT PACKER J&M TF212 28FT DOUBLE ROLLING BASKET UNVERFERTH 110 20FT SINGLE BASKET FARMHAND WP42 27FT CROWFOOT PACKER SUNFLOWER 4213 11 SH DISC CHISEL IH 720 5 BTTM PLOW HINIKER 6000 9 SH NH3 APP/CULTIVATOR 2016 NH 313 MOCO 2012 JD 630 MOCO 2015 JD 469 ROUND BALER 2011 NH ROLL-BELT 450U ROUND BALER

CIH 5100 SOYBEAN SPECIAL 20X8 BRILLION SS10 SEEDER, PULL TYPE COMBINES 2016 CIH 8240, RWA, RT, CHPPR, 1650/1350 HRS 2014 CIH 8230, RWA, RT, CHPPR, 1300/1000 HRS 2011 CIH 8120, RWA, RT, CHPPR, 2000/1500 HRS HEADS 2014 MAC DON FD75S 40FT DRAPER, IH WIDE THROAT 2007 CIH 1020 30FT GRAIN HEAD 2006 JD 635 HYDRAFLEX GRAIN HEAD 2001 JD 925F GRAIN HEAD 1989 JD 920 GRAIN HEAD 1998 JD 918F GRAIN HEAD, CM, SINGLE POINT JD 643 CORN HEAD CIH 1083 CORN HEAD 2012 GERINGHOFF RD800B, 8R30, HD, HH, JD ADAPTER MISC HEAD TRAILERS GRAIN CARTS & WAGONS UNVERFERTH 1115 XTREME, SCALES, TARP, LIGHTS 2002 KINZE 640, TARP, LIGHTS PARKER 4500 GRAN CART CONSTRUCTION 2012 BOBCAT E80, CAH, 2SPD, LONG ARM, HYD THUMB, 2875 HRS 2011 DEERE 310SK, OS, 4WD, 1800 HRS 2018 CASE TV380, CAH, 2SPD, ULTRA HI-FLO, 600 HRS 2015 BOBCAT T650, CAH, 2SPD, 1500 HRS 2015 BOBCAT T450, CAH, 2SPD, 1100 HRS BOBCAT 873, CAH, 2SPD, 3200 HRS

Sunflower • Wil-Rich • Killbros • Woods • Maurer Trailers • McFarlane 6407 North St. Rd. 15 Leesburg, IN 46538 7LP3RON_-HUHPLDK3RON_&XUWLV+DWÀHOG (574) 453-2411 | Fax: 574-453-2515 polkequipmentinc.com

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www.agrinews-pubs.com | INDIANA AGRINEWS | Friday, December 6, 2019

A3

FIELD NOTES: BY MYCOGEN SEEDS AGRONOMISTS

What we learned in 2019 By Melissa Bell

As this season ends and preparation for 2020 begins, it’s worth a look back at the good, the bad and the ugly of 2019. A year in review. When I reflect on the season, it went a little like this: Step 1: Plant into mud and cold, most likely in June. Step 2: Experience six-plus weeks of heat and drought. Step 3: Catch some cool temperatures to delay blacklayer and slow drydown as much as possible — and throw in a frost event across most of Bell the state just for additional insult. Step 4: Weather high winds, because what is more thrilling than watching a nitrogen-deficient, rootless crop try to stand? Step 5: Toss in a couple of snows for good measure. Add to all that a liquid propane shortage and grain elevators that closed at noon because of wet corn capacity. Not that yields have been stellar, but given the mess of the year, it continues to impress me that some places had any yield at all. In the spirit of Thanksgiving, I’m thankful for advances in plant breeding, the grit of farmers across the state and innovative farm equipment that allows farmers to get work done quickly. These things helped ease some of the pain Mother Nature inflicted throughout the year. Agronomic insights. At the end of any great challenge, we’re often called to reflect on what we learned. So, what can we can take away from 2019 from an agronomic standpoint and apply to future seasons? Anything we expected to happen, most often the opposite scenario played out. In some ways, this wasn’t all bad. For example, June-planted soybeans were deemed a failure at the time, especially for those accustomed to planting in April. Yet, amazingly, several 60-plus bushel yields were documented. This doesn’t mean, however, that I endorse planting soybeans in June going forward. Credit timely rains during seed fill with the many incidences of unexpected yield success. Switching gears to corn and the question that looms every year: Did fungicide pay? As is the answer most every production year, it paid in some areas and not so much in others, where fungicide treatments proved to be a investment wash. That’s because the crop lived longer and dried down slower, so farmers invested — or, depending on harvest progress, will invest — such dividends into LP. I continue to recommend working with your agronomist and seed dealer to assess the disease tolerance of the hybrids you select, making sure to scout at-risk acres that could benefit from a timely fungicide application. Be safe. We preach safety constantly, but farming continues to be one of the most dangerous occupations. Take the time to slow down and be mindful of safety precautions to prevent mistakes. Lastly, this season has been unkind to many, whether it be physical, mental, emotional, financial or a combination thereof. Far more are hurting with the stresses of the season than their pride will allow them to show. Checking on someone and reaching out may be among the most important things you do during this Thanksgiving season. Cheers to the close of 2019 and think positive as we get ready for 2020!

® Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. © 2019 Corteva.

A variety of poultry products was donated to Gleaners Food Bank of Indiana.

PROVIDED PHOTOS/INDIANA STATE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

100 tons of poultry donated to food bank By Erica Quinlan

AGRINEWS PUBLICATIONS

INDIANAPOLIS — The Indiana State Poultry Association donated more than 100 tons of poultry products to Gleaners Food Bank of Indiana the week of Thanksgiving. Giving back is a tradition that ISPA members celebrate yearround. This year, more than 900,000 eggs and 150,000 pounds of meat and egg products were donated, said Paul Brennan, president of ISPA. “I can’t express enough how generous our poultry industry is

and how proud I am of the farmers and processors involved in this incredible organization,” Brennan said. “T hey prov ide safe and healthy food options to consumers and continue to advance farm technology, all while donating products to countless Hoosiers throughout the year.” Lt. Gov. Suzanne Crouch led a ceremony at the Statehouse to celebrate the donation. “It is an honor to recognize our Hoosier poultry farmers with this tradition, which goes back 72 years,” Crouch said. “The products donated, not

only today, but throughout the year, will go a long way in ensuring our Hoosiers in need have fresh and nutritious food to consume.” Indiana is one of the top poultry-producing states in the United States. According to the National Agricultural Statistics Service, Indiana ranks No. 1 in duck production, No. 2 in chicken and egg production and No. 4 in turkey production. The poultry industry is a substantial economic driver for the state and contributes more than $12 billion in total economic activity.

The sector employs more than 12,000 Hoosiers. “Our ag economy in Indiana would not be where it is today without the hard work and dedication of our poultry producers,” said Bruce Kettler, director of the Indiana State Department of Agriculture. “They continue to increase economic value and expand the Hoosier supply chain, not only nationally, but globally, as well.” Erica Quinlan can be reached at 800-426-9438, ext. 193, or equinlan@agrinews-pubs.com. Follow her on Twitter at: @AgNews_Quinlan.

Lt. Gov. Suzanne Crouch (far left) poses for a photo with Indiana State Poultry Association board members and Indiana State Department of Agriculture Director Bruce Kettler. The ISDA donated 100 tons of poultry products to Gleaners Food Bank the week of Thanksgiving.

Protect grain quality after wet, cold harvest ASSUMPTION, Ill. — With wet, cold conditions being experienced in many parts of the Midwest, proper drying and storage is particularly important to protect grain quality as harvest is extended. Gray Woodruff, a grain conditioning expert and district manager with GSI, offers these recommendations: n Dry corn to 14% or dryer and soybeans to 12% or lower, if they are to be stored into the spring. Storing grain at higher moisture levels risks reduced quality and possible loss of

grain. n If frost damage is observed, lower the plenum temperature in your grain dryer to protect quality and, in severe cases, to avoid the brown to black caramelizing of the high sugar kernels. n Clean dryers more often than normally, and empty and re-start them every three days or as necessary, instead of the normal seven-day cycle. “This is necessary because of increased fines and debris caused by unusually late planting and wet, cold weather,” Woodruff

explained. n Segregate frost or otherwise compromised grain and sell or use it as soon as possible. “Grain with quality issues will have a much shorter storage life and will deteriorate quickly,” Woodruff said. “If the quality is good enough for feed, it needs to be used quickly.” n Follow standard grain storage best practices, but pay more attention to fines, check the grain more often and move it as soon as any out of condition issues are found.

Woodruff noted that farmers planning to store grain past June should maintain grain temperatures within 10 to 15 degrees of the outside air to avoid grain deterioration caused by condensation developing on grain bin interiors. “Always consult your local agriculture university for local recommendations as conditions vary widely, and what works in one state or area may not work in another,” he added. For additional information, consult your GSI dealer or visit grainsystems.com.

Biological products to improve plant performance R ESE A RCH T R I A NGLE PARK, N.C. — Plant Response Biotech and Koch Biological Solutions LLC have combined operations to form Plant Response Biotech Inc. The new venture will leverage both companies’ complementary capabilities, assets and product offerings. Plant Response Biotech is a plant biotechnology company specializing in plant innate immunity, plant physiology and nutrient use efficiency. It has developed several product candidates which are approaching commercial launch status in the areas of drought tolerance and plant health. Koch Biological Solutions focuses on developing sciencebased, live microbial and biologically derived chemistries

that improve plant performance at every stage of growth. Through various modes of action, its biological solutions perform directly on the plant or its environment to improve crop efficiency and nutrient uptake, maximizing yield potential. Tom Warner, chairman of the board for the new Plant Response Biotech, said both entities recognized the opportunity to combine their core capabilities. “These companies are naturally complementar y, and it made tremendous sense to bring the two together and create real synergy,” Warner said. “For example, both companies’ screening and validation platforms are complementary,

with the ability to define mode of action and identify the resulting cellular response.” He added Plant Response Biotech has a commercial team focused solely on biologicals, which will help advance Koch Biological Solutions’ product pipeline. “Plant Response Biotech, being a Spanish company, has a strong presence in Europe, and Koch Biological Solutions is well established in the U.S. Together, this new company has global potential,” Warner explained. Justin Hoppas, executive vice president for Koch Agronomic Services, said the formation of the new company supports Koch’s commitment to create value for customers and meet their evolving needs.

“We are pleased to combine our world-class R&D capability into a new entity with focused commercial capabilities and a globally recognized investor group,” he said. “We are excited to offer the marketplace 12 science-based products designed to mitigate abiotic stress, provide intrinsic y ield improvement, enhance plant innate immunity and increase nutrient use efficiency,” added Tom Snipes, CEO of Plant Response Biotech. Snipes said the new company will be headquartered in Raleigh and will have multisite operations with R&D in Hayward, California, as well as EMEA R&D and commercial operations headquartered in Madrid, Spain.


A4 Friday, December 6, 2019

| INDIANA AGRINEWS | www.agrinews-pubs.com

WINTER GETAWAY

Making a list for Christmas at the Zoo New additions in Indianapolis By Erica Quinlan

AGRINEWS PUBLICATIONS

INDIANAPOLIS — Whether you want to watch animals with your kids or enjoy a romantic, late-night stroll under the Christmas lights, there’s plenty to do at the Indianapolis Zoo this holiday season. Christmas at the Zoo will run daily through Dec. 30, closing Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. The zoo opens at noon, and Christmas at the Zoo activities go from 5 to 9 p.m., extended until 10 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays. “This year, we’ve added even more lights displays and additional opportunities for guests to meet Santa before Christmas,” said Carla Knapp, zoo spokeswoman. “Santa’s Village is our largest recent addition and has been hugely popular with guests. Our Tunnel of Lights has become the zoo’s most photo-worthy spot after dark. “Plus, kids can decorate cookies with Mrs. Claus, see Santa’s sleigh and reindeer, meet penguins and visit with the Jolly Old Elf himself.”

Here’s a list of 10 things to do at the zoo: 1.Listen to local choirs sing each night on Holiday Harmony Stage. 2. Visit the Hilbert Conservatory at the Indianapolis Zoo. It has a 5,000-square-foot indoor garden with holiday displays. 3. Indulge in holiday goodies from Santa’s Sweet Shop. 4. Ride the White River Junction Train to see Christmas lights, or take a spin on the carousel. 5. Make a gift for the animals. Visit the Simon Skjodt International Orangutan Center to create paper chains, which are used as enrichment for animals. 6. Warm up by a campfire inside Santa’s Village. 7. Get your photo taken with Santa Claus. 8. Explore the Snowflakery, a mirror maze that is full of wintry twists and turns. 9. Walk through the Tunnel of Lights. 10. Experience a penguin encounter from 6 to 8 p.m. daily. Learn more at www. indianapoliszoo.com.

Get your picture taken with Santa Claus at Christmas at the Zoo in Indianapolis. A cheetah (left) roam its territory at the zoo. Many of the animals, including brown bears and tigers, are active in the cold weather. PROVIDED PHOTOS/INDIANAPOLIS ZOO

Erica Quinlan can be reached at 800-426-9438, ext. 193, or equinlan@ agrinews-pubs.com. Follow her on Twitter at: @AgNews_Quinlan.

World of Corn Award to Robbins, Kettler By Tom C. Doran

AGRINEWS PUBLICATIONS

BLOOMINGTON, Ill. — The Illinois Corn Growers Association honored two individuals for their significant contributions to the industry. Jim Robbins and Bruce Kettler were presented with ICGA’s top award at the organization’s annual meeting Nov. 26 at the Asmark Agricenter. The World of Corn Award, now in its 29th year, was created to recognize the global importance of corn and specifically honor individual pacesetters that have made AGRINEWS PHOTO/TOM C. DORAN Illinois a leader in the corn Bruce Kettler (left) and Jim Robbins were recipients of the industry. Illinois Corn Growers Association’s World of Corn Award at the organization’s annual meeting Nov. 26 in Bloomington. JIM ROBBINS Robbins, of Peotone, farm and traveled interna- the organization.” represented ICGA District tionally to investigate new Robbins is conservation 1 as a director from 2003- opportunities. minded, implementing 2010, served as the secre“Jim Robbins has given a practices that help protary in 2009 and treasurer lot of time to this organi- tect his farm’s soil while in 2010. He was on the zation representing Illinois increasing outputs. The National Corn Growers corn farmers locally and practices include no-till Association Research and across the world. He de- soybeans and strip-tilling Development Action Team serves to be recognized for corn. in 2007, Production and his dedication to the indusHe enrolled in the NaStewardship Action Team try,” said ICGA President tural Resources Conserin 2009, Grower Services Ted Mottaz, Elmwood. vation Service ConserAction Team in 2010 and “Jim is a dedicated board vation Stewardship Proa representative to U.S.A. member who sees the value gram. Poultry and Egg Export in nurturing relationships His farm received the Council in 2010. and leaving things better northeastern Soil and Robbins also is inter- off for those that come Water Conservation Disested in the global mar- after him. His character trict Farm Family Conserkets. He has hosted in- is evident in events and vation Award. ternational visitors to his meetings held throughout He recently began a

three-year plan to hand down the operations of the farm to his nephew, Michael Robbins. His goal is to give Michael the same opportunity that he had without being too involved. His own father was proactive in handing down the farm before retiring himself. Outside of farming, Robbins is actively involved in his church and community. He served as vice president of the Pe ot one E duc at iona l Foundation and is a founding member of the Will County Farm Bureau Foundation. He enjoys being outside while bike riding and has made the Ag in the Classroom bike fundraiser and annual event. Robbins farms with his wife, Pam, who operates the auger cart during harvest. She is also a nursing instructor and healthcare provider. BRUCE KETTLER Kettler has been the Indiana State Department of Agriculture director since January 2018 after serving as public relations director at Beck’s Hybrids. He also serves in the Indiana Economic Development Corp. as agribusi ness development director. He previously served as the industry rep-

resentative for the ICGA board. “Bruce Kettler has done remarkable work for us over the years. Because of Bruce, we made connections at Beck’s and helped build up our goals and establish relationships. This connection has benefited the corn industry overall,” Mottaz said. “After serving on our board, the Indiana Department of Agriculture could not be getting a better director.” Kettler grew up in Ohio and served as the Ohio FFA president, as well as National FFA vice president. He graduated with a bachelor’s degree in agronomy from Ohio State University. He serves on the Ohio State University President’s Alumni Advisory Council, is a member of the board of trustees for Riverview Health in Hamilton County, Indiana, and formerly served on the board for Hamilton County’s Economic Development Corp. Kettler’s wife, Tammy, is senior director of corporate relations for Purdue University’s College of Agriculture. Tom C. Doran can be reached at 815-780-7894 or tdoran@agrinews-pubs. com. Follow him on Twitter at: @AgNews_Doran.

Boucher, Jones, Jibben receive ICGA awards By Tom C. Doran

AGRINEWS PUBLICATIONS

BLOOMINGTON, Ill. — The Illinois Corn Growers Association honored three individuals for their environmental, ethanol and media work during a Nov. 26 awards program. Matt Boucher, a Dwight farmer, was honored at ICGA’s annual meeting with the Environmental Award. Coleman Jones, a Fuels Technical Fellow for General Motors in North America, received the Ethanol Award for his work on the Ag Auto Ethanol alliance. The Media Award went to Betsy Jibben, a national reporter of the syndicated programs AgDay and U.S. Farm Report. Ted Mottaz, an Elmwood farmer and ICGA president, presented the awards. MATT BOUCHER Boucher owns and operates a fourth-generation family farm that grows

corn, soybeans, wheat and cover crops. According to his farm’s media page, even during a difficult year Boucher was quick to point out cover crops still needed to be planted. Boucher is active on social media and works closely with the Illinois Farm Families projects. He has written several blog posts for the site, which encourages conversations with the public about how farming works. While concerned about the public’s perception of farming, he also wants to help other farmers succeed with their conservation efforts. The Potential Ag division of his farm provides service to farmers with seeds, cover crop information and precision planting equipment. “Matt is dedicated to preserving his farm for future generations, and it is evident by the actions he takes on his operation. He also is not hesitant to share with the public what

he is doing. It has been an honor working with Matt over the years,” Mottaz said. Boucher and his wife, Heather, have three children. COLEMAN JONES Jones focuses in his General Motors position on petroleum and bio-derived fuels, especially properties, manufacturing processes, costs and interactions with vehicles. He supports GM engineering and public policy worldwide on fuel issues. He is co-chair of the AgAuto-Ethanol workgroup which works to improve the use of high-octane, low carbon fuels for vehicles. He also chairs the A merican Society for Testing Materials gasoline. “It has been a pleasure working with Coleman on ways to incorporate higher octane into the fuel in our vehicles. He works hard on bringing high-octane, low carbon fuels to Ag-AutoEthanol, and I am eager to

see his work pay off in the next couple years,” Mottaz said. Jones previously was a biofuel implementation manager where he led the rollout of the GM FlexFuel vehicles fleet culminating in 50% of U.S. vehicle sales being FlexFuel vehicles in 2012. He also has been a manger of fuels and lubricants for GM Powertrain. After completing his degrees in chemical engineering and materials science, his first GM position was at Powertrain Advanced Materials Development Center. BETSY JIBBEN Jibben received the Media Award for promoting Illinois agriculture and, specifically, Illinois corn and corn farmers. “We are happy to offer this recognition to Betsy. We have been very pleased with Betsy’s coverage of topics important to agriculture. I look forward to watching her reports,” Mottaz said. Jibben, who resides in

Indiana, graduated with a broadcast journalism degree from South Dakota State University in Brookings. She now travels across the country and covers different agricultural topics including policy, markets and features. She grew up in South Dakota where her parents grow row crops and have a cow-calf operation. “Betsy is always quick to respond to news from the ICGA. When she visits farmers in Illinois to get them on-camera she is respectful of their time and makes them feel comfortable while she interviews them. TV can be pretty intimidating, but we’ve heard from our members that Betsy always puts them at ease,” Mottaz noted. “Betsy’s coverage of issue important to corn, from trade to weather and harvest reports is indepth and on-point. We’re certainly lucky that she moved to Indiana where we can benefit from her proximity to our farms.”

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Always follow stewardship practices in accordance with the Product Use Guide (PUG) or other product-specific stewardship requirements including grain marketing and pesticide label directions. Varieties with BOLT® technology provide excellent plant-back flexibility for soybeans following application of SU (sulfonylurea) herbicides such as DuPont™ LeadOff® or DuPont™ Basis® Blend as a component of a burndown program or for double-crop soybeans following SU herbicides such as DuPont™ Finesse® applied to wheat the previous fall. Always follow grain marketing, stewardship practices and pesticide label directions. Varieties with the Glyphosate Tolerant trait (including those designated by the letter “R” in the product number) contain genes that confer tolerance to glyphosate herbicides. Glyphosate herbicides will kill crops that are not tolerant to glyphosate. Always follow grain marketing, stewardship practices and pesticide label directions. Varieties with the Genuity® Roundup Ready 2 Yield® (RR2Y) trait contain genes that confer tolerance to glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup® brand agricultural herbicides. Roundup® brand agricultural herbicides will kill crops that are not tolerant to glyphosate. Genuity®, Roundup® and Roundup Ready 2 Yield® are registered trademarks of Monsanto Technology LLC used under license. Individual results may vary, and performance may vary from location to location and from year to year. This result may not be an indicator of results you may obtain as local growing, soil and weather conditions may vary. Growers should evaluate data from multiple locations and years whenever possible. Varieties with the DuPont™ STS® gene (STS) are tolerant to certain SU (sulfonylurea) herbicides. This technology allows post-emergent applications of DuPont™ Synchrony® XP and DuPont™ Classic ® herbicides without crop injury or stress (see herbicide product labels). NOTE: A soybean variety with a herbicide tolerant trait does not confer tolerance to all herbicides. Spraying herbicides not labeled for a specific soybean variety will result in severe plant injury or plant death. Always read and follow herbicide label directions and precautions for use. Varieties with the LibertyLink® gene (LL) are resistant to Liberty® herbicide. Liberty®, LibertyLink® and the Water Droplet Design are trademarks of Bayer. DO NOT APPLY DICAMBA HERBICIDE IN-CROP TO SOYBEANS WITH Roundup Ready 2 Xtend® technology unless you use a dicamba herbicide product that is specifically labeled for that use in the location where you intend to make the application. IT IS A VIOLATION OF FEDERAL AND STATE LAW TO MAKE AN IN-CROP APPLICATION OF ANY DICAMBA HERBICIDE PRODUCT ON SOYBEANS WITH Roundup Ready 2 Xtend® technology, OR ANY OTHER PESTICIDE APPLICATION, UNLESS THE PRODUCT LABELING SPECIFICALLY AUTHORIZES THE USE. Contact the U.S. EPA and your state pesticide regulatory agency with any questions about the approval status of dicamba herbicide products for in-crop use with soybeans with Roundup Ready 2 Xtend® technology. ALWAYS READ AND FOLLOW PESTICIDE LABEL DIRECTIONS. Soybeans with Roundup Ready 2 Xtend® technology contain genes that confer tolerance to glyphosate and dicamba. Glyphosate herbicides will kill crops that are not tolerant to glyphosate. Dicamba will kill crops that are not tolerant to dicamba. Roundup Ready 2 Xtend® is a registered trademark of Monsanto Technology LLC used under license. Varieties with Enlist E3™ technology (E3) are jointly developed by Dow AgroSciences and MS Technologies™, L.L.C. The Enlist weed control system is owned and developed by Dow AgroSciences LLC. Enlist Duo and Enlist One herbicides are not registered for sale or use in all states or counties. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your area. Enlist Duo and Enlist One herbicides are the only 2,4-D products authorized for use in Enlist crops. Always read and follow label directions. P = Plenish® high oleic soybeans for contract production only. Plenish® high oleic soybeans have an enhanced oil profile and are produced and channeled under contract to specific grain markets. Growers should refer to the Pioneer Product Use Guide on www.pioneer.com/stewardship for more information. SCN = Resistant to one or more races of soybean cyst nematode.

Pioneer ® brand products are provided subject to the terms and conditions of purchase which are part of the labeling and purchase documents. TM ® SM Trademarks and service marks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. © 2019 Corteva. PION9LOCL051


www.agrinews-pubs.com | INDIANA AGRINEWS | Friday, December 6, 2019

A5

Corn growers ICGA elects new leadership take issue with Super Bowl ad Leigh named new president By Tom C. Doran

AGRINEWS PUBLICATIONS

By Tom C. Doran

AGRINEWS PUBLICATIONS

BLOOMINGTON, Ill. — A beer company took a swipe at corn in a Super Bowl advertisement last February. Now it’s the corn farmers’ turn. Roger Sy, Illinois Corn Marketing Board chairman, said a television ad promoting Illinois corn will be featured in most Illinois television markets during the next big game in February. The Bud Light ad touted the product does not contain corn syrup as does other Sy beers. “Consumer education is one of our big items. We have to really work hard on letting the consumers know, the city people know who are so far removed from the farms that what we’re doing is the same thing we feed our families with. It’s safe, it’s affordable,” Sy, a Newman farmer, said. “There are all kinds of stories out there. Social media is one of the worst things that have happened. We need to get the truth out and show them that we’re sincere, we have a safe product and we’re the best game in town.” Farmers have taken plenty of hits during the dreadful growing season, topped by the trade war with China, the still-to-be signed trade deal with Mexico and Canada, and the need to expand the ethanol market. “We have to get over these humps. There are all of these hurdles. It’s like running a race. You jump over one hurdle. You might trip occasionally, but you just get up, keep trying and keep going with it,” Sy said during a break at a gathering of ICMB and Illinois Corn Gr ower s A s s o c iat ion members Nov. 26. ICMB collects and administers the corn checkoff money and uses the funds primarily for research, education and promotion. The farmer-based organization’s mission is to increase the profitability of corn production by developing and maintaining markets for corn and corn products. “Ethanol is always tops on our list. We’re seeing a lot more talk know about the low carbon, high octane type fuels, going away from just the term ethanol. We have started to get more interest. We have tests coming from Argonne Lab and others,” Sy said. ICMB also is focusing on additional infrastructure with more ethanol mix gasoline pumps. There are currently 2,000 pumps nationwide for E15 and it’s hoped that will eventually increase to 24,000. “We have the companies that make the pumps that are doing testing now where we can put a much higher level of ethanol into the pumps. We’re getting a lot of E15 out there now, but we’d love to see them even going to E25 or even E35 at the pumps so the infrastructure is there as we continue to work on it,” Sy said. “Right now ethanol is the cheapest way to get octane into your fuel that is out there, and I still think a lot of the alternatives are a few years down the road. So, until then, we’re still the best game in town.” TRADE The ICMB continues to encourage the completion of the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement and hopes a trade deal with China is resolved. “We’re hopeful with China. One day it seems like we’re getting there. The next day we’re not. They still need things. They’re still buying. A lot of our corn is still leaving in the form of protein

through livestock. China is a huge pork buyer,” Sy said. “They’re starting to buy more chicken because pork is going to run low everywhere. China has lost so many swine, equal to us, Mexico and Canada combined. “They’re not only exporting corn as corn, they’re getting pork. China is work i ng w it h dried distillers grains because they’re trying to build their herds back up. “China is also interested in the ethanol market. T hey want to clean up some of their cities and get the greenhouse gas emissions down. So, ethanol is our best game in town there. Everything is kind of co-mingled right now with the issues we’re working on.” Sy, who represents Clark, Coles, Cumberland, Crawford, Douglas, Edgar and Jasper counties on the ICMB along with this chairman duties, said, “It’s a pleasure doing this for all of the farmers in Illinois.”

BLOOMINGTON, Ill. — New leadership was elected to the Illinois Corn Growers Association Nov. 26. Bill Leigh was elected ICGA president. Joining the Minonk farmer in leadership roles are Randy DeSutter, Woodhull, vice president; Matt Rush, Fairfield, treasurer; and Keith Sanders, Vandalia, secretary. Leigh has served on the ICGA board for six years, most recently as vice president. He will continue his role as District 4 director for the duration of his term as president, serving members in Bureau, Lee, Marshall, Putnam, Stark, and Whiteside counties. Leigh also was reelected to a third term serving District 4. The Exports Committee will be led by Chairman Mike Homerding of Plainfield and Vice Chairman Kate Danner of Aledo. Elected to lead the Industrial Committee were Chairman Marty Marr of New Berlin and Vice Chairman Terry Smith of Clayton. Grassroots Committee leadership for the coming year are Chairman Ted Mottaz of Elmwood and Vice Chairman Sarah Hastings of Sidney.

AGRINEWS PHOTO/TOM C. DORAN

Bill Leigh (right), newly-elected Illinois Corn Growers Association president, and Ted Mottaz, outgoing president, address the membership following the election of officers Nov. 26 in Bloomington, Illinois.

“We’d like the trade issue resolved. The U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement looks like it’s close. A big issue I’d like to concentrate on is the high-octane, low-carbon fuel standard that the auto industry wants so they can create the next generation of liquid fuel engines. “They want a high-octane fuel so they can put turbo charging on it, make smaller engines, higher compression, greater torque, but they still have to meet the Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards and the pollution standards and that’s where the low carbon comes in. “That’s where ethanol comes in because ethanol has a really good octane score and a really nice low greenhouse gas score. So, we think we can team-up with the auto and oil industry to ensure that liquid fuels will be in our transportation fleet for years to come, we hope. “I think high octane, low carbon is going to be a real political struggle to work on, especially in an election year. But I think it is the next step for ethanol usage. As much growth as we did get, especially in the early years of the RFS, this could be equally as big.”

In addition to Leigh, five other directors were reelected and will continue in their positions as directors. They are Mike Homerding for District 1, Marty Marr for District 10, and Matt Rush for District 13. Reelected atlarge directors include Kate Danner of Aledo and Dave Rylander of Victoria. Leigh will continue to carry ICGA’s messages in his leadership role in promoting new demand, ethanol, trade and educating the non-farm community. He spoke with Agri- The Renewable Fuels News shortly after taking Standard calls for the production this year and his new post. beyond of 15 billion gallons What are some goals the orga- of ethanol. However, current nization has going forward? production is 14.2 to 14.4

billion gallons. There’s also been a large increase in the number of small refinery exemptions approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. “EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt allowed a bunch of small refinery exemptions and Administrator Andrew Wheeler did the same. Whether these refineries qualify as small is a good question because big oil owns a lot of these refineries. It’s had more of an effect on the diesel side, but it all effects how the demand for ethanol and the demand for biofuels have affected everyone. “The ethanol production number has actually peaked in last three or four years. If you look at the gallons of gasoline used and the gallons of ethanol used today, we’re at a 10% blend. “We pick a little bit up from the E85 and pick a little bit up from E15, but there aren’t really enough stations out there for E15 at this point. “E15 is a great way to get a little more octane and it helps the ag economy, but there are 2,000 E15 dispensers in the country and to really make a dent on that we need probably 20,000.” Tom C. Doran can be reached at 815-780-7894 or tdoran@agrinewspubs.com. Follow him on Twitter at: @AgNews_ Doran.

MEET GENIUS. PIONEER® VARIETY/BRAND

RM

COMPETITOR VARIETY/BRAND

NUMBER OF COMPARISONS

PERCENTAGE OF WINS

PIONEER YIELD ADVANTAGE (BU/A)

P25A96L

25

Beck’s

10

90%

4.8

P29A25X

29

Beck’s

14

71%

2.6

P29A85L

29

Beck’s

33

91%

3.8

P31A06L

31

Beck’s

21

95%

6.7

P31A22X

31

Beck’s

18

78%

3.4

P33A24X

33

Beck’s

11

91%

3.5

P39A58X

39

Beck’s

17

71%

2.4

P40A47X

40

Beck’s

33

70%

2.3

P42A96X

42

Beck’s

13

77%

2.1

See your local Pioneer sales professional for details. Visit us to see the latest harvest results near you. Pioneer.com/yield

Data is based on an average of 2017-2019 comparisons made in the United States through Nov. 17, 2019. Comparisons are against all competitors, unless otherwise stated, and within +/- 3 RM of the competitive brand. Product responses are variable and subject to any number of environmental, disease and pest pressures. Individual results may vary. Multi-year and multi-location data are a better predictor of future performance. DO NOT USE THIS OR ANY OTHER DATA FROM A LIMITED NUMBER OF TRIALS AS A SIGNIFICANT FACTOR IN PRODUCT SELECTION. Refer to www.pioneer.com or contact a Pioneer sales representative or authorized dealer for the latest and complete listing of traits and scores for each Pioneer® brand product. Pioneer® brand products are provided subject to the terms and conditions of purchase which are part of the labeling and purchase documents. TM ® SM Trademarks and service marks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. © 2019 Corteva. PION9LOCL051_TP


A6 Friday, December 6, 2019

| INDIANA AGRINEWS | www.agrinews-pubs.com

REGIONAL WEATHER

Outlook for Dec. 6 - Dec. 12

Shown is Friday’s weather. Temperatures are Friday’s highs and Friday night’s lows.

Rock Island 41/24

Chicago 39/25

©2019; forecasts and graphics provided by

SUNRISE/SUNSET Rise 7:05 a.m. 7:06 a.m. 7:07 a.m. 7:08 a.m. 7:08 a.m. 7:09 a.m. 7:10 a.m.

Decatur 44/25

Quincy 42/26

Springfield Date Dec. 6 Dec. 7 Dec. 8 Dec. 9 Dec. 10 Dec. 11 Dec. 12

Peoria 43/26

Set 4:34 p.m. 4:34 p.m. 4:34 p.m. 4:34 p.m. 4:34 p.m. 4:34 p.m. 4:34 p.m.

Champaign 43/24 Lafayette 42/25

Central Illinois: Friday: clouds and sun. Winds north-northwest 8-16 mph. Expect three to six hours of sunshine with fair drying conditions and average relative humidity 65%. Saturday: clouds and sun.

Fort Wayne 41/25

Muncie 44/27

Southern Illinois: Friday: clouds and sun. Winds north 6-12 mph. Expect three to six hours of sun with fair drying conditions and average relative humidity 70%. Saturday: times of clouds and sun. Winds east-southeast 4-8 mph.

Indianapolis 43/26 Terre Haute 45/25

Mt. Vernon 49/28

Vevay 46/27

Dec 4

Full

Last

PRECIPITATION New

Dec 11 Dec 18 Dec 25

GROWING DEGREE DAYS Illinois Week ending Dec. 2 Month through Dec. 2 Season through Dec. 2 Normal month to date Normal season to date

0 0 3825 0 3333

Indiana Week ending Dec. 2 Month through Dec. 2 Season through Dec. 2 Normal month to date Normal season to date

Northern Indiana: Friday: low clouds. Winds north-northwest 7-14 mph. Expect less than two hours of sunshine with poor drying conditions and average relative humidity 65%. Saturday: partly sunny; however, sunnier in the south.

Evansville 50/30

MOON PHASES First

Northern Illinois: Friday: partly sunny. Winds north-northwest 6-12 mph. Expect 4-8 hours of sunshine with fair drying conditions and average relative humidity 65%. Saturday: partly sunny. Winds south at 8-16 mph.

Gary 40/28

Springfield 44/26

East St. Louis 49/31

TEMPERATURES

Evanston 40/28 South Bend 40/26

Rockford 39/23

AGRICULTURE FORECASTS

0 0 3464 0 2898

Anna 50/32

Central Indiana: Friday: mostly cloudy. Winds north-northwest at 7-14 mph. Expect less than two hours of sunshine with poor drying conditions and average relative humidity 85%.

For 24-hour weather updates, check out www.agrinews-pubs.com Illinois Champaign Chicago Decatur E. St. Louis Evanston Joliet Mt. Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Rock Island Springfield

Today Hi/Lo/W 43/24/pc 39/25/pc 44/25/pc 49/31/pc 40/28/pc 42/22/pc 49/28/c 43/26/pc 42/26/pc 39/23/pc 41/24/pc 44/26/pc

Tom. Hi/Lo/W 43/34/pc 40/36/pc 44/35/pc 49/43/pc 41/38/pc 41/35/pc 47/36/pc 42/37/pc 46/39/pc 40/34/pc 41/38/pc 46/38/pc

Sun. Hi/Lo/W 50/38/c 47/36/c 51/38/c 57/41/c 48/37/c 48/38/c 53/44/c 50/36/c 50/35/c 46/33/c 49/33/c 51/38/c

Indiana Bloomington Carmel Evansville Fishers Fort Wayne Gary Lafayette Indianapolis Muncie South Bend Terre Haute Vevay

Today Hi/Lo/W 45/27/c 42/23/c 50/30/c 42/24/c 41/25/c 40/28/c 42/25/c 43/26/c 44/27/c 40/26/c 45/25/c 46/27/c

Tom. Hi/Lo/W 45/35/s 42/34/s 48/39/pc 41/32/s 41/31/s 42/36/pc 43/33/s 42/34/s 43/34/s 41/33/pc 44/34/s 44/33/pc

Sun. Hi/Lo/W 50/44/c 49/44/c 53/46/c 50/41/c 49/39/c 49/39/c 49/42/c 50/44/c 51/45/c 49/38/c 50/44/c 52/44/c

Southern Indiana: Friday: mostly cloudy; a shower during the morning in the west. Winds north-northwest at 6-12 mph. Expect two to four hours of sunshine with poor drying conditions and average relative humidity 70%.

SOUTH AMERICA A front will lead to showers and thunderstorms from Minas Gerais to Mato Grosso from Friday into early next week. Largely drier than normal farther south in Brazil into northern Argentina.

Weather (W): s–sunny, pc–partly cloudy, c–cloudy, sh–showers, t–thunderstorms, r–rain, sf–snow flurries, sn–snow, i–ice

Reducing Lake Erie’s harmful algal blooms Researchers study options COLUMBUS, Ohio — Several research teams, led by The Ohio State University, have concluded a three-year study evaluating the ability of agricultural management practices to reduce phosphorus causing harmful algal blooms in Lake Erie. In 2012, the United States and Canada set the goal of reducing phosphorus entering the lake by 40%. Now, researchers have a better understanding of what management practices need to be implemented, and what research still needs to be done to meet these goals by 2025. The majority of phosphorus entering Lake Erie originates from the

Maumee River watershed. More than 85% of the phosphorus entering the lake comes from agricultural sources such as fertilizer runoff. To address this, researchers are evaluating what agricultural management practices have potential to reduce this phosphorus, while supporting farmers to maintain profitability. “There’s a lot of edge-offield work going on that identifies successful practices in single fields. But when we scale up and ask how many of those practices need to be adopted over a wide area like the Maumee River watershed, that’s where we turn to our models,” said Jay Martin, project co-leader for the recent study and professor in Ohio State’s Department of Food, Agricultural and

Biological Engineering. The study, which was funded by the Ohio Department of Higher Education’s Harmful Algal Bloom Research Initiative, used five watershed models to help researchers determine the most effective approaches to combat algal blooms. Just as your local news uses models to forecast the weather, researchers use watershed models to project how different management techniques impact phosphorus entering Lake Erie. By layering five separate models over these practices, researchers are able to narrow in on the best solutions. Solutions are aimed at meeting reduction targets for two forms of phosphorus: total phosphorus and dissolved reactive phosphorus. Each spring, levels

adoption rates were most likely to be feasible solutions to model. “In this study, we wanted to be able to show policy makers a range of expectations if we implement certain conservation strategies,” said Margaret Kalcic, project co-leader and assistant professor in FABE. “Multiple models help us address uncertainty and gain confidence in our practices.” Results from the study showed progress in reducing phosphorus that is required to decrease harmful algal growth. However, none of the modeled scenarios met the reduction goals for dissolved reactive phosphorus. These results point to the need to further increase adoption of existing practices and research

of total phosphorus and dissolved reactive phosphorus affect the magnitude of harmful algal growth. Year-round levels of total phosphorus, which includes dissolved reactive phosphorus, lower oxygen levels in the lake and result in the annual dead zone in the central basin of Lake Erie. Resea rchers worked with a team of stakeholders to determine what management practices to analyze with the models. The stakeholder group had wide representation from agricultural groups, government agencies, nongovernmental organizations, and environmental groups. Together with researchers, these stakeholders helped determine what management practices and

alternative management practices, which is where researchers expect to focus their efforts next. “With the types of practices available to the farming community, we can make stronger strides reducing total phosphorus than with dissolved reactive phosphorus,” Martin said. “In the future, we need to develop management processes that are more effective at managing dissolved reactive phosphorus-processes that hold back or filter water.” The most promising scenarios called for a mix of in-field management like cover crops and subsurface fertilizer placement and the use of buffer strips to help filter field runoff. One mix of these practices met the reduction goal for total phosphorus.

Findings in Nutrient Loss Reduction Strategy report By Tom C. Doran

AGRINEWS PUBLICATIONS

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. — The 179-page Nutrient Loss Reduction Strategy Biennial Report provided a summary of efforts being conducted by partners and measurable findings for 2017-2018. Nitrate and total phosphorous yields for the eight major rivers draining Illinois were estimated. Here are some of the key findings: Q Annual statewide total phosphorous loads from point sources have been reduced by 4.3 million pounds when comparing 2018 discharges with 2011 baseline year levels. This represents at 24% reduction in phosphorus from point sources. Q For the five-year period of 2013-2017, the statewide water flow, nitrate-nitrogen loads and total phosphorous loads were estimated to be 13%, 7% and 26%, respectively, above the 1980-1996 baseline period. Much of the increase in nitrate load occurred in the Rock River, while much of the increase in total phosphorous load occurred in the Illinois River. Q Illinois EPA provided point source discharge of total nitrogen and total phosphorous for 2017. The statewide point source total nitrogen discharge was about 75 million pounds per year or about 14% less than the 2011 estimate. Point source total phosphorous discharge in 2017 was estimated to be 14 million pounds per year or about 22% less than the 2011 estimate of 18.1 million pounds per year. Q In general, 2012-2017 nitrate-nitrogen yields were similar to values calculated for 1997-2011.

Q For watersheds with nitrate-nitrogen yield greater than 11 pounds of nitrate-nitrogen per acre per year, changes in nitrate yield were correlated with change in water yield. Q For three watersheds in northwest Illinois — Mackinaw River, Spoon River and FlintHenderson — saw some reduction in nitrate-nitrogen yield that appears to be independent of water yield changes. Q Changes in estimation methods used for the Lower Illinois River and Lower Sangamon River resulted in lower estimates of nitrate-nitrogen loads for these watersheds. Q Reductions in total phosphorus yield in Chicago and Des Plaines River watersheds of between 15% and 27% corresponded to reductions in point source discharges in those watersheds. Q Conversely, increases in total phosphorus yield were calculated for the Upper Sangamon River, Macoupin Creek and several other watersheds. Q A survey found producers used the Maximum Return to Nitrogen strategy on corn acres in 2017 to help determine the amount of nitrogen to apply. In addition, producers used other industry-recommended techniques on 69% of their corn acres. In 2017, many producers considered two or more strategies before applying nitrogen to some corn acres; therefore, the sum of those percentages is greater than 100. Tom C. Doran can be reached at 815-780-7894 or tdoran@agrinews-pubs. com. Follow him on Twitter at: @AgNews_Doran.

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www.agrinews-pubs.com | INDIANA AGRINEWS | Friday, December 6, 2019

A7

Legan added to USMEF Executive Committee Rodibaugh receives service award TUCSON, Ariz. — The U.S. Meat Export Federation added Indiana Soybean Alliance board member Mark Legan, a farmer from Coatesville, Indiana, to its Executive Committee during its Strategic Planning Conference in Tucson. Legan accepted a position on the committee representing the Oilseed Producing sector. “Joining the USMEF Executive Committee is a great honor, and I’m looking forward to this great opportunity,” Legan said. “I’m proud to represent the farmers who produce oilseeds. T he USMEF works hard to expand markets for U.S. livestock producers. I work on both sides of that fence, and I believe I know the issues that concern row-crop farmers and livestock producers.” Legan and his wife, Phyllis, farm with their daughter, Beth, and son-inlaw, Nick Tharp. He grows soybeans and corn, plus he keeps 2,200 sows that produce approximately 60,000 pigs per year on his farm, Legan Livestock and Grain Inc., in rural Putnam and Hendricks counties. Legan has been farming since 1982. He has a bachelor’s degree in animal science and a master’s degree in agriculture from Purdue University. Legan worked as an educator for Purdue Extension from 1982 to 1988. Legan won the American Soybean A ssociation’s C on ser vat ion L egac y Award in 2014. He is a past president of the

Indiana Pork Producers Association, and he is a former board member for the National Pork Producers Council. Active in state government, Legan has worked w ith Indiana’s Board of Animal Health, the Indiana Department of Environmental Management’s Water Board and the Advisory Committee for the Indiana State Department of Agriculture. DANITA RODIBAUGH Also at the USMEF meeting, Danita Rodibaugh of Rensselaer, Indiana, was awarded with the group’s Distinguished Service Aw-

“I’m proud to represent the farmers who produce oilseeds.” Mark Legan COATESVILLE, INDIANA

ard, which recognizes individuals who have demonstrated outstanding leadership in the pursuit of USMEF’s export goals. Rodibaugh is a former USMEF chair and a longtime advocate for the U.S. red meat industry. Active in the management of a family farm operation that raises pigs, corn, soybeans

and wheat, Rodibaugh is a past president of the National Pork Board and served on the board of directors of both the National Pork Producers Council and Indiana Pork, the NPB Trade Committee and several committees focused on environmental stewardship. “I really admire the past recipients of the USMEF Distinguished Service Award, and I am humbled to receive such an honor,” Rodibaugh said. “I marvel at an organization like USMEF that can work with so many different agricultural sectors and bring them together to accomplish a common

goal. Looking back at my time as USMEF chair and as an officer, it’s that kind of collaboration that I am most proud of — working jointly and making key decisions together. I was truly blessed to have such an outstanding officer team when I was USMEF chair.” The USMEF is a diverse group that includes cattle, hog and sheep producers, oilseed producers, grain farmers, packers, processors, traders and supply and service companies. USMEF represents nine different sectors, all sharing a common interest in increasing exports of U.S. beef, pork and lamb.

USMEF is funded through membership dues, agricultural commodity checkoff programs and funds provided by the USDA. The organization is governed by an Executive Committee elected from the Board of Directors. USMEF is based in Denver and has 16 additional offices in key markets around the world. The mission of USMEF is “to increase the value and profitability of the U.S. beef, pork and lamb industries by enhancing demand for their products in export markets through a dynamic partnership of all stakeholders.”

2008 John Deere 2210L, John Deere 960, 26’-27’, 5 Demo GP SD2600, 26’, 10” New GP Turbo Max, 12’, New GP Max Chisel, 9 & 15 45’, Knock On Sweeps, Rear Bar Spike Harrow . . $8,500 Sp, Hyd. Disk Lev . $59,000 15’, 24’, 30’, 40’, Rolling Reel Shank, Chop Reel/Roll . . Call Hitch w/Hyd . . . . . $29,900 & Harrow. . . . . . . . . . . . Call

Gehl VT320 Cab w/Heat/AC, Gehl RS4-14 Aux Hyd, 66” Gehl AL650 Cab w/Heat & 2014 Great Plains 2400TM JD 2623VT 30’9”, Hyd Bask, Power Tach, High Flow . . Call Bucket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Call AC, 3 Sp, Power Tach . . . Call 24”, New Blades, Rolling Reel 19”-20” Blades. . . . . $36,000 & Harrow . . . . . . . . . $45,900

JUST IN

BRIEFS Banking laws sought to protect hemp, cannabis businesses PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Maine’s independent senator said it’s time for the federal government to update banking laws to reflect the rise of legal hemp and cannabis businesses. Sen. Angus King represents a state where legal adult use marijuana sales are likely to begin in early 2020. He said the U.S. Senate should protect those businesses by passing the Secure and Fair Enforcement Banking Act. King said the bill would make certain that legal hemp and cannabis businesses can have access to the same financial services as any other businesses. He said it’s important for states that have legalized medical and recreational marijuana. King said the changes would also benefit hemp farmers who “have done everything right,” but still lack access to financial services. The proposal already has passed the House of Representatives.

MacDon FD75 45’, JD $58,000 New MacDon FD130, FD135, Gehl R105 Open ROPS, Dual Gehl R260 Cab w/ Heat & AC, Gehl RT165 Cab w/Heat & FD140, FD145 . . . . . . . . . .Call T-Bar, Self-Leveling . . . . . Call Joystick, 2 Sp. . . . . . . . . . Call AC, Joystick Controls, Std Flow, Power Tach . . . . . . . . . . . Call

All 30’ & 40’ MacDon FD70s & CIH 2162s in Today’s Inventory for JD, CIH, & Lexion: $45,000 MacDon FD70 40’, Been Thru Our Shop, Field Ready

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John Deere 630F . $7,500 2013 JD 640FD 40’, Stubble 2007 Geringhoff RD830 JD, 2 2015 Claas 1820 Non Chop, 2015 Capello 1820 Chop, Lights, Extra Sickle. $45,000 Sensor, End Row Aug $16,500 1500 Ac, Kn Rolls . $49,900 Rigid, 3500 Ac, Stomp, End Row Augers, Head Cart. . . .$72,000

Water wars between southern states put focus on farmers ATLANTA (AP) — The ongoing court fight over water resources that involves Georgia, Florida and Alabama is now focused on Georgia farmers. WABE Radio reported that Florida has for years been critical both of metro Atlanta’s water use from the Chattahoochee River and farmers withdrawing water from the Flint River basin. But in recent weeks, the case has come to focus on the Flint River in Georgia and the farmers in the region. A central focus of the overall case: Florida accuses Georgia of using too much water, imperiling the Apalachicola Bay in the Panhandle and the oyster industry that relies on it. It wants a ruling from the U.S. Supreme Court that would limit how much water Georgia can use.

New Geringhoff PN1230F New MacDon C3012CF New Capello 1230F JD, Chop, 2008 Geringhoff NS830 2013 Geringhoff NS830 12R30, Folding, JD, End Row 12R30, Chop, Fold . . . . . Call Fold, End Row Aug . . . . . . Call JD, 2 Sensor . . . . . . $20,000 JD, 2 Sensor, True Sight Augers, 4 Sensor. . . . . . . Call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $45,000

Great Plains 1300-2175, GP NTS2507, 7’, Small Seeds GP 2N3010, 30’, No Till, 44 GP NP40L-17R30, 40’, 17 Unverferth 2600, Nutrimax End Wheel Drill 13’, 7.5” Sp, Bundle, Acre Meter . . . . . Call Row, 8” Spacing . . $23,000 Row, Ground Drive. $20,000 60’, 30” Sp, ISO, Dual Del Call Acre Meter . . . . . . . . . . Call

736W SR 32, Veedersburg, IN 47987 765-722-7040 For More Info & Pictures Visit:

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*Offer Subject to Change


A8 Friday, December 6, 2019

| INDIANA AGRINEWS | www.agrinews-pubs.com

Winter Getaway Dreaming of a green Christmas Dollinger farm features fresh trees, wreaths By Martha Blum

AGRINEWS PUBLICATIONS

SH A NNON, Il l. — Growing Christmas trees has spanned several generations of the Dollinger family, as well as multiple generations of customers. “We have second- and third-generation customers,” said Janie Dollinger, who operates Dollinger Christmas Tree Farm together with her husband, John, and their son, Mark, daughter-in-law, Shanna, and grandsons, Cooper and Maddex. “We have a customer that gets a decoration for a grave that her parents bought from us since 1967,” Janie said. “We recognize people right away even though we only see them once a year and they say ‘I want the same order as last year.’” The tree farm was established in 1956, when John’s dad, Ned, decided to plant Christmas trees. “Ned thought it would be a good job for John and his sister, Jill, to help plant trees and learn how to shear trees,” Janie said. “We have about 26 acres of trees here, and Mark has 15 to 20 acres of trees on his farm.” Trees in the field that are for sale are tagged with the price and the kind of tree. Several types of trees are available, including white pine, Scotch pine, Canaan fir, concolor fir, blue spruce, Norway spruce, Meyers spruce and Serbian spruce. “The Meyers spruce is relatively new; it is a pretty dark, green tree and they really hold their needles,” John said. “It has tendency to grow a little hairy and wild and some get cones on them and hold their cones.” “We specialize in bigger trees, so we have a lot of trees that are 10, 12 or 14 foot,” Janie said. “We just sent a 20-foot tree to a shopping center in Rockford.” The most popular tree sold at the farm is Canaan fir. “We sell from 600 to 700 trees a year,” John said. That requires the family to plant about 1,500 trees each year. In the past, new trees were interplanted at the farm; however, now the growers are working to clear cut an area for new tree plantings. “We are working on getting three acres clear cut then dig all the stumps, reseed it this summer and next year plant trees there,” John said. “We plant about three seedlings for every tree that is harvested,” Janie added. In addition to trees, the Dollingers sell about 600 wreaths each year. “It’s increased every year,” Janie said. “People like the variety of greens we use, they know they are fresh cut greens and we make custom wreaths for people.” The wreaths range in size from 6 inches up to 48 inches, as well as other shapes, including a cross, candy cane and this year, for the first time, a horse head. “We make something for everybody,” Janie said. A crew of workers makes wreaths at the Carroll County farm. “Judy has worked here 35 years, and she made the horse head wreath,” said Janie, who makes the 48-inch wreaths. “She has tied a lot of bows, and she recognizes most of the returning customers from year to year. “Mary is our main cutter, and she is the expert on 6-inch wreaths,” Janie said. “Everybody can make a 6-inch wreath, but Mary is the best.”

“Dena cuts boughs, and she can hop over to the wreath machine, too, because everybody here does more than one thing,” Janie said. “Rena is cutting greens, and Cathy has the patience of a saint when she is helping customers pick out ribbons for their wreath.” “Margaret works for us year around doing tree planting, tree shearing and she is our mechanic,” Janie said. “This place could not operate without Margaret, and she also designed the logo for our farm.” Janie has maintained a special book of wreath orders for many years. “People don’t just get a plain wreath for their door,” she noted. “They want the bow at 1 o’clock or 11 o’clock, and we keep track of that from year to year, including the ribbon.” The first 30 customers in the book are standing orders from one year to the next. “These are delivered to a cemetery or to their house,” Janie said. “We go to five cemeteries and we have maps of the cemeteries, so John knows where

If you go…

Dollinger Christmas Tree Farm is located at 23882 Payne Road, Shannon. The farm is open daily from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. from Nov. 6 through Dec. 22. For more information, call 815-864-2437, or go to www.dollingertreefarm. com.

to place the wreaths on easels and we do a cemetery saddle that goes over the stone.” Some of the customers have unique requests. “We sent greeting cards to all these people, and they come here to pick out a wreath,” Janie said. “Then we put all the wreaths on the customer’s bill, and that is her Christmas gift to them.” Another customer of the farm has wreaths mailed to several people located in many areas, including Minnesota and Kentucky. “The wreaths that are going to be mailed usually go out the Monday of Thanksgiving week,” Janie said.

GIFT SHOP In the gift shop, a variety of items are for sale that are made by local artisans and crafters. “This jewelry is made by Cathy, so that is why she works in this spot,” Janie said. “This seam ripper and walnut French rolling pin was made by a college guy from Lanark.” Other items include crocheted hats and stockings that could be used for gift cards or to hold silverware at a table place setting, popcorn raised by a 4-H and FFA member AGRINEWS PHOTOS/MARTHA BLUM from Pearl City, maple Janie Dollinger shows a sampling of the wreaths sold at Dollinger sy r up a nd ha nd made Christmas Tree Farm. soap. “I had a gallon of olive oil in the back of my pantry and I did not want to dump it so my girlfriend and I learned how to make soap,” Janie said. “The most popular soap is Northern Forrest, and it has such a pretty green color.” Martha Blum can be reached at 815-223-2558, ext. 117, or marthablum@ agrinews-pubs.com. Follow her on Twitter at: @AgNews_Blum.

John Dollinger loads branches into a wagon. The branches will be used to create wreaths.

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AUCTIONS

Auction Calendar Fri., Dec. 6

D Ranch, Sheridan Realty & Auction Co., 517-676-9800.

MONROVIA, IND.: Large Public Auction, 9 a.m., Ted Everett Auctioneers, 317-996-3929. DIXON, KY.: Farm Equipment, 10 a.m., Melrudd Farms, Mr. & Mrs. Larry Duncan, James R. Cash, 270-623-8466.

Thurs., Dec. 12

DAWSON, ILL.: Farm Equipment, 10 a.m., Hood Brothers Inc., Mike Maske Auction Service, 217-5193959. See p. B1 NEW VIENNA, OHIO: Farm Equipment, 10:30 a.m., Merle & Sylvia Henry, The Wendt Group, 614-626-7653. CARLISLE, IND.: Farm Auction, 11 a.m. EST, Phegley Farms, Inc., Jeff Boston Auction Service, LLC, 812-382-4440. See p. B4 LANGHAMAUCTIONEERS. HIBID.COM: 3 Online Auctions, bidding ends at 6 p.m., Langham Auctioneers Inc., 618-267-8400. See p. B1 CASS & HOWARD COUNTIES, IND.: 326 +/- Acres in 6 Tracts, 6:30 p.m., Walter Davis Trust, Halderman Real Estate & Farm Management, 800-424-2324.

Sat., Dec. 7

SULLIVAN, IND.: Retirement Farm Auction, 10 a.m. EST, Carter Farms, Inc., Jeff Boston Auction Service, LLC, 812-382-4440. MORGANFIELD, KY.: Farm Equipment, 10 a.m., Thomas Brothers, James R. Cash, 270-623-8466.

Mon., Dec. 9

EDINBURG, IND.: Retirement Auction, 10 a.m., David & Linda Muck, Ted Everett Auctioneers, 317-996-3929. See p. B4

Tues., Dec. 10

SHERIDANAUCTIONSERVICE. COM: Online Only Farm Equipment Auction, Double

Fri., Dec. 13

HERSCHER AREA DECEMBER CONSIGNMENT AUCTION MONDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2019 - 9:00 AM

DECEMBER 6, 2019 | B1 Reduction, 8 a.m., Ed’s Machinery LLC, Sullivan Auctioneers, LLC, 844-8472161. See p. B2 MONTICELLO, IND.: 163.85 +/- Acres in 2 Tracts, 1 p.m. EST, Kenneth Estes Trust, Schrader Real Estate & Auction Company, Inc., 800-451-2709.

Sat., Dec. 14

SULLIVAN, IND.: Estate Farm Auction, 11 a.m. EST, JTL Farm Operations, LLC, Jeff Boston Auction Service, LLC, 812-382-4440. See p. B4

Mon., Dec. 16

HERSCHER, ILL.: Herscher Area December Consignment, 9 a.m., Tom Witvoet Auction & Appraisal Services, 815592-3656. See p. B1 FRANKLIN, IND.: Retirement Auction, 10 a.m., Hendricks Agra, Ted Everett Auctioneers, 317-996-3929. See p. B4 FULTON COUNTY, IND.: 161 +/- Acres in 2 Tracts, 6:30 p.m., Smith, Halderman Real Estate & Farm Management, 800-424-2324.

MEMPHIS, MO.: Consignment & Inventory

See AUCTION, Page B4

AUCTIONS Upcoming REAL ESTATE DECEMBER

10 - 300± ACRES IN 8 TRACTS. Van Buren County (Paw Paw, MI). 193± acres of Grapes • Productive Tillable Land • 8± acres of Trellised/Irrigated Hops • Ranch Style Home plus 54’ x 90’ Heated/AC Shop. Contact 800-451-2709. 12 – 171.1± ACRES IN 3 TRACTS. Huntington County (Huntington, IN). Excellent Location • Abundance of Harvestable Timber • Recreation Potential • 3 Bedroom Home. Contact Ritter Cox 260-609-3306. 13 – 163.85± ACRES IN 2 TRACTS. White County (Brookston, IN). Excellent Location • Some Excellent Soils • Productive Farmland. Contact Jim Hayworth 765-427-1913 or Jimmy Hayworth 219-869-0329. 17 -42±ACRESIN2TRACTS.Allen County (Fort Wayne, IN). Potential Home, Farm, Estate Sites & Tillable Acres. Contact Jerry Ehle 866-340-0445.

FARM EQUIPMENT

DECEMBER

7 – FERTILIZER EQUIPMENT. Bluffton, OH. Contact Eric Ott 260-413-0787. 9 – FARM EQUIPMENT. Owosso, MI. Contact Ed Boyer 574-215-7653 or Ted Boyer 574-215-8100. 10 – FARM EQUIPMENT. Payne, OH. Contact Jerry Ehle 866-340-0445. 11 – FARM EQUIPMENT. Payne, OH. Contact Jerry Ehle 866-340-0445. 12 – FARM EQUIPMENT. Washington, IN. Contact Eric Ott 260-413-0787 or Brad Horrall 812-890-8255. 14 – FARM EQUIPMENT. Circleville, OH. Contact Ritter Cox 260-609-3306.

800-451-2709 SchraderAuction.com

16 –FARMEQIUPMENT.Mendon, MI. Contact Ed Boyer 574-215-7653 or Ted Boyer 574-215-8100. 17 – FARM EQUIPMENT. Walkerton, IN. Contact Arden Schrader 260-229-2442. 27 – FARM EQUIPMENT. Hicksville, OH. Contact Ritter Cox 260-609-3306. 30 – FARM EQUIPMENT. Plain City, OH. Contact Andy Walther 765-969-0401 or Eric Ott 260-413-0787. 31 –FARMEQUIPMENTCONSIGNMENT.Sturgis, MI. Contact Robert Mishler 260-336-9750, Eric Ott 260-413-0787, Ed Boyer 574-215-7653 or Ted Boyer 574-215-8100.

Featured Farms

LAKE COUNTY, IN. 82.62± ACRES zoned R-3 & R-2, within Hobart. Woods & 65.1 acres cropland. House utilized as 2 rental units & pole barn. Call Matt Wiseman 219-689-4373 or Jim Hayworth 765-4271913. (JH/MWW03L) NEWTON COUNTY, IN. 156.9 +/- ACRES WITH 145.83+/- ACRES CROPLAND AND 10 +/- ACRES OF WOODS. Hunting and recreational opportunities with beautiful setting for a home. Southwest of Lake Village. Call Matt Wiseman 219-689-4373 (MWW11N). CASS COUNTY, IN 82.78 ACRES WITH 82.24 ACRES CROPLAND This tract has excellent soils and frontage on CR 325 South. Call Jim Hayworth at 1-888-8088680 or 1-765-427-1913 or Jimmy Hayworth at 1-219869-0329. (JH41C) CASS COUNTY, MI. 87± ACRES with 58.31 FSA acres tillable. Productive land with excellent areas for hunting and fishing. Frontage on Spring Fed Lake. 66’ Easement from Morton Street Call Ed Boyer 574215-7653. (EB12C-MI) NE WHITE COUNTY, IN - 2 GRAIN FARMS These farms have quality soils and high percentage of tillable land. These farms have excellent road frontage. Call Jim Hayworth at 1-888-808-8680 or 1-765-427-1913 or Jimmy Hayworth at 1-219-869-0329. (JH42WH) LAKE COUNTY, IN. 147.5± ACRES with 71.6 cropland acres of which 31.4 acres in CRP. Call Matt Wiseman 219-689-4373. (MWW12L) JASPER COUNTY, IN 160± ACRES WITH 143± ACRES CROPLAND and 14± acres of woods. 9± miles northeast of Rensselaer. Call Jim Hayworth 765-4271913 or Matt Wiseman 219-689-4373. (JH/MWW05J) MANY OTHER LISTINGS AVAILABLE

Retirement Farm Equipment Auction Thursday, December 12, 2019 • 10:00 a.m. 1694 Buffalo Mechanicsburg Road Dawson, IL 62520 COMBINE & HEADS: John Deere 9570 Combine, S#1H9570SEA0740305, 949/1280 hrs., 18.438” duals, 16.9-26” rear, 2 wheel drive, Mauer bin ext.; JD 608C Corn head, S#H0608CX731610; JD 625F Platform, S#H00625F720954; EZ Trail HD 25’ header transport; TRACTORS: JD 8400 MFWD Tractor, S#RW8400P013245, 3668 hrs., 18.4-46” duals, 38085R34 fronts; Power shift trans.; JD 7130 Premium MFWD Tractor, S#RW7130H029358, 1772 hrs., 18.4-38” single rear tires, 14.9-28 fronts, 3 outlets, 16 spd transmission, 540/1000 pto; JD 4455 Tractor, S#RW4455H004133, 2 wheel drive, 9795 hrs., overhauled at 4943 hrs., 2 outlets, 18.438” duals w/10 bolt hub mount duals, Quad range trans., C/IH 255 Front wheel assist utility tractor, diesel, ROPS, 2340 hrs., 11.2-24” rear tires, 3 point; SEMI & TRAILERS: Freightliner Semi Tractor, VIN#1FUJA9A851LG82170, 10 spd. trans., mechanical suspension; Stoughton 34’ aluminum grain trailer, VIN#1DW1A3423FS560701, ag hoppers, roll tarp, air suspension; EBY 20’ aluminum gooseneck livestock trailer, VIN#4AZLG2224Y2006971; Hillsboro flat bed gooseneck trailer, tandem axles, 20’ on flat, 4’ on tail; 30’ JD Planter trailer, round tube; TRUCKS: 2012 Ford F250 Pickup Truck, VIN#1FTBF2B68CE1337750, 68,000 miles, regular cab, 4x4, gas engine; 1984 GMC 7000 Grain truck, VIN#1GDL7D1G4EV519618, diesel engine,18’ bed, 10.00 20” tires; PLANTER: Kinze 3600 16-31” planter, Yetter coulters, residue managers, factory down pressure springs, insecticide, KPM2 Monitor, new bean plates & scrapers 1 season ago; GRAIN CART & WAGONS: Brent 472 Grain Cart; Ficklin 435 Gravity flow wagon w/16.5x16.1 tires; TILLAGE: JD 2210 Field cultivator, S#1NO2210LHB0740585, 30’, 5 bar harrow, new sweeps; Triple K 28’ Field cultivator, Danish tine, single tine harrow, dual rolling baskets; IH 496 disk, 17 ½’, 7.5” spacing, spike harrow; DMI Tiger II 5 shank riper, spike harrow; JD 12’ Culti Mulcher, outboard wheels, hydraulic lift; JD 400 Rotary hoe, 20’, endwise transport; JD 8-30” Row crop cultivator, C-shank, endwise transport; 30’ Chain link harrow w/cart; 12’ soil roller, no wheels; MOWERS: Woods BB60, 5’ 3 point mower; New Idea Model 617 9’ rotary disc mower; MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT: MK 8”x70’ swing away auger; Westfield 10”x31’ pto drive auger; Woods RB 1010-2, 10’ 3 point blade w/all 3 cylinders; Ag Krane, 3,000 lb., 3 point lift; 1,000 gallon poly tank w/5.5 Briggs on tandem Westlake trailer; 100 gal transfer tank w/12v. Pump; Corn Saver down corn cones w/hydraulic motors; (3) 500 gal fuel tanks, one with Fill Rite pump; 1,000 gal fuel tank with Fill Rite Pump; electric concrete mixer; 24’ bin sweep auger w/motor; McMillan hydraulic post hole digger 4 augers and extension 6”-16”; drawbar support; 3 point trip bucket; SHOP: Big 4 tire changer; Husqvarna 455 & 350 chain saws; Stihl MS 250 chain saw; Dewalt 7” grinder; kerosene space heaters; 3/4” drive socket set; Test Right bench mount drill press; NIB planter parts; 200’ 50 amp extension cord; 25 gal. 3 point ATV sprayer, 12v. Pump; 12” bin fans; (2) chemical transfer pumps w/meters; bolt bins; kerosene heater; portable air compressor; 8 hp Honda electric start engine; LIVESTOCK EQUIPMENT: Vermeer WR20, 8 wheel hay rake; round bale feeders; 12 & 20’’ metal feed bunks; (95) 2”x6½” & (72) 1½”x 6’ fiberglass poles; (3) Pride of the Farm mineral feeders; Trotter H/D bale feeders; several other cattle & horse bale feeders; ROUND BALES: (20) 5’x5’ grass/alfalfa, net wrap; Ag Tronics Hay moisture tester; ROUGH CUT LUMBER: 10’ lengths of rough cut oak, cherry, walnut & coffee lumber, 5/4”, in various widths, bandsaw cut;

Sellers: Hood Brothers Inc.

For more information contact John Hood (217) 306-5646 Bill (217) 622-4211

Mike Maske Auction Service

119 S. Lafayette St., Mt. Pulaski, Il 62548 (217) 519-3959 website: maskeauction.com • email: www.maskeauction@hotmail.com TERMS: Cash, credit card or approved check payable on the day of the auction. Registration videotaped and a valid photo ID is required to obtain a buyers number. Announcements sale day take precedence over printed material. Not responsible for accidents or property after sold. The hours listed on print advertising might be different from actual hours on sale day because of the timing of advertising. All efforts will be made to update internet websites. All purchased items must be removed from the sale site within 3 week from the day of the Auctions. Information and pictures for this auction can be seen on: maskeauction.com LOADER TRACTOR AVAILABLE ONE WEEK AFTER THE AUCTION Register at proxibid.com to bid online, live at this auction.

Located 12 miles West of Kankakee on State Rt. #17 to Road #13000 or 17 miles East of Dwight, IL on State Rt. #17 to Road #13000 or 4 miles North of Herscher, IL and 1 mile West to Road #13000. SALE ORDER: Starting with Farm, Hay Equipment & Miscellaneous at the same time. Featuring Retirement Closeout-Richard & Beverly Riechers To Be Sold Approx. 11:00 Am Starting With Combine, Tractors, Trucks, Trailers And Then Equipment. Please Be On Time - Bring A Friend-We Will Be Selling With Two Trucks In Different Rings At The Same Time. Due To Early Advertising Deadlines This Is A Partial Listing. There Will Be Much More Equipment By Auction Date. If You Would Like To Consign Your Equipment Or Be Put On The Mailing List, Please Call (815) 5923656 Ask For Tom Or Fax (815)426-2303. We Will Be Taking Consignments Up Until Auction Day. RETIREMENT CLOSEOUT - RICHARD AND BEVERLY RIECHERS-GRANT PARK, ILLINOIS JD 4640, 9960 Hours, 42” Tires, Wts., One Owner; JD 4430 W/148 Loader, 7730 Hours, Like New Tires; Case 2870, 6088 Hours, 20.8-34 Tires W/Duals, 3 PT, PTO, 4-Hyd.; Mitsubishi 4x4, dsl. 3 PT, PTO; 1991 JD 9600 Combine, W/duals, 4310/3251 Hours, One Owner, Nice; JD 930F Head W/Head Cart; JD 843 Low Tin Corn Head; JD 7200, 16R-30”, Vac, Liq. Fert, full no-tills; NH 6-Shank Inline Ripper, (Case 2500); 1996 JD 750 Grain Drill, 20’, Markers, Dolly Wheels; Progressive 2450 28% Applicator, 1000 Gal., 15-Blade; J&M 750 Grain Cart; Killbros 375 Wagon W/Conveyor, Killbros 375 W/Auger; JD 235 Disk, 25’; Glencoe Soil Finisher, 30’; JD 115 Blade, 3 PT.; Woods 315 Batwing Mower; Demco Tandem Axle Sprayer; JD 403 Mower; Clark Forklift, 3600#, LP; Pettibone Super #4 Forklift, 4x4; 1000 & 1500 Gallon Poly Tanks on Trailers; Hay Rack on JD Gear. TRUCKS-TRAILERS: 1996 IH S1900, 65650 Miles, Dsl., 13-Speed Trans., Wet Kit; 1997 Ford L8000, Dsl., 5+2 Trans., Single Axle; 2002 Mauer Trailer, 24’ Single Axle, W/Tarp; 1997 Jet Tandem Axle Trailer, 26’, W/ Tarp; Miller Tandem Axle Trailer, Tilt Top; Nelson Tandem Axle Excavator Trailer; Shop Mobile Trailer, W/ Welder-Generator, Torches and Air Compressor; Aluminum Truck Body, 53’. REGULAR CONSIGNMENTS TRACTORS: 1996 JD 7800, 2600 Hours, 2-Wheel, 42”Tires; JD 4020, Dsl., Side Counsel; JD 3020, Dsl., Side Counsel; JD 4230 W/Cab; JD 3020, Gas; IH 1256, Fender; JD 1050, Dsl., 4x4; Ford 1720, Dsl., W/Loader; JD 4100, Dsl., 4x4; Ford 3500, Gas, Loader, 3 PT, PTO; Ford 2000, Gas, Loader, 3 PT, PTO; AC 7000, Power Shift; $6900 Spent On Overhaul; IH 706, Gas; JD 60; White 2-135, 5300 Hours; Farmall 300 W/Fast Hitch; JD 5020; JD 2355; IH 186, Hydro, Cab; JD 4650, MFD, Does Not Move; JD 2550, MFD, W/Loader, Needs Work; MM U; IH 274, Dsl., W/1R Cult., Side Dresser, 3 PT; MF 35 W/Loader. RO GATOR 854 SPRAYER, 90’ BOOM, LOADED — NH 1281 SELF PROPELLED BALER-COLLECTOR SKIDSTEERS: Case SV185; NH LT190.B, W/Cab; Bobcat 873; Bobcat 863; Case 1845; Bobcat T550, 485 Hours. INDUSTRIAL: Case 580K, 3300 Hours, Cab, W/4-IN-1 Bucket; MF Forklift; Vermeer V350 Trencher W/ Backhoe. FARM EQUIPMENT: Kewanee 89 Mulcher, 20’; JD 1590 No-Till Drill, 10’, W/Grass Seed; C-IH 1200 Planter, 12R; JD 7200, 6R-30” Vac, Dry Fert.; No-Till; JD 7000, 6R-30”, No-Till; JD 7000, 4R-30”; C-IH LBX 430 Baler; C-IH 496 Disk, 24’; IH 475 Disk ,18’; Agco Tye 2020 Drill, No-Till, W/Markers; JD 2700, 7-SHK Disk Ripper; Krause Offset Disk, 15’, 26” Blades; MF Offset Disk, 12’, 26” Blades; Salford Vertical Till, 24’; JD 120 Chopper, 20’; MC Chopper, 20’; Gregson 1000 Gal. Sprayer, 60’ Booms; Pull Box Blade, 10’, Full Tilt; Brillion Land Commander, 5-SHK; Wilrich Disk Ripper, 5-SHK; JD 510 Disk Rippers, 5 & 7-SHK; Landoll Weatherproofer, 5-SHK; JD 550 Mulch Master, 15’; JD V-Ripper, 7-SHK; M&W 1165 EarthMaster, 7-SHK; M&W 1160 Earthmaster, 5-SHK; IH 720 Plow, 5B; 11-Blade 28% Applicator, 3 PT, W/1000 Gal. Pull Tank; Brady 950 Hydramill; 2-693 Corn Heads; JD 643 Corn Head; 2-JD 220 Grain Heads; IH 2350 Loader; Krause SS, 10-SHK; JD 122 Feed Wagon; Sunflower 4211 SS, 9-SHK; Sunflower 4211 SS, 6-SHK; Killbros 475 Grain Cart; IH 490 Disk, 21’; Landoll 2210 Disk Ripper, 6-SHK, W/Harrow; IH 5100 Drill, 21x7; C-IH 5300 Drill, 21x7; AC Disk, 18’; Glencoe SS, 5 & 9 SHK; JD 845 Cult., 12R-30”; Case SS, 7-SHK; JD 653A Bean Head; C-IH 575 Spreader; New Idea 213 Spreader; NH 354 Grinder; JD 1075 Gear; 3-M&W 10-Ton Gears; Several Misc. Gears; Several Wagon Boxes, Assorted Sizes; JD Hoes, 20’ & 30’; C-IH 183 Danish Cult. 6R-30”; Landoll 2320 Disk Ripper, 6-SHK, W/Rolling Basket; C-IH 900 Planter, 8R-30”, Liq. Fert, No-Till; KSI 1208-32 Conveyor; Batco 1535 Conveyor; C-IH 1044 Corn Head; Balzer Chopper 15’; IH 700 Plow, AutoReset, 6B; IH Pull Chisel, 10-SHK; Hardi Sprayer, 500 Gal., Tandem Axle; Brillion 16’ Optimizer Crumbler; Strom Inline Ripper, 9-SHK; Strom Inline Rippers, 5 or 6-SHK; Brillion CC500 Inline Ripper, 5 SHK; JD 200 Dirt Scraper; MC Chopper Windrower, 12’; JD 7000 Planter, 8R-30”, No-Till; JD 7000 16R Frame; JD 7200 12R Frame; IH 700 Pull Plow, 7B; Degelman Rock Picker; 3 PT V Blade; Krause Pull Chisel,10’; JD 7000 Planter, 4R Wide; IH 300 8R Hoe; Hancock Earthmover; JD Harrow, 24’; Aer-way 15’ 3 PT; Noble Cult., 8R30”; Kewanee Cult., 8R-30”; Brillion SS 11-SHK; Knight 2300 Reel Auggie Feed Wagon; NH 116 Haybine, Hydra Swing, 12’; Hiniker FC, 24’, 3 PT; Vermeer Backhoe, 3 PT; Long Backhoe, 3 PT; Case Plow, 5B; Oliver Plow, 5B; M&W V-Ripper, 5-SHK; M&W V-Ripper, Auto-Reset, 5-SHK; Metor Snowblower, 8’, 3 PT, 540 PTO; JD 2R Cult. Off B; Phoenix Rolling Harrow, 24’, Like New; JD Pull Plow, 5B; Cushion Air 1000 Grain Vac; Brillion Cult., 6R; DMI Harrow, 30’; Bush Hog Chisel, 3PT, 11-SHk; Buffalo Stalk Chopper, 8R-30”, 3 PT; Tandem Manure Tank, 2500 Gal.; Davis Hoe; Snowco 36”Grain Cleaner. TRUCKS-TRAILERS: 1975 Chevy C-65 Grain Truck; 1972 GMC 6500 Grain Truck; 1992 Diamond D3 Horse Slant Trailer, W/Dressing Room; 2-Kiefer Built Aluminum Gooseneck Livestock Trailers. MISCELLANEOUS: JD 404 Engine; Gehl 1580 Silage Blower; Great Plains 15’Drill Markers; Misc. Coulters; Misc. Chisel Shanks; Metal Rafters; JD Corn Head Tin; Skid Steer Rock Buckets; Hayracks; Telephone Posts; Quick Hitches; JD Front & Rear Wts.; JD 7000 Planter Units; JD 7200 Planter Units; Generators, Dsl., LP & PTO; Fence Posts, 4”& 6”; 4-1400-24 16 Ply Unused Tires; 4-1300-24 16 Ply Unused Tires; 20.8-38 Duals; 18.4-42 Duals; 2-Pairs 480x50 Duals; JD Dual Hubs for JD 4630 & 4640; Adams Vertical Fertilizer Blender, Stainless Steel. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ACCIDENTS OR ITEMS AFTER PURCHASE LOADER TRACTORS ON GROUNDS - TRUCKING AVAILABLE - LUNCH ON GROUNDS TERMS OF SALE: Payment to be made on day of Auction with cash or cashier’s check. No exceptions! Driver’s License-ID required for Personal Checks. All Personal and Business checks must be accompanied with a current Bank Letter of Credit made to Tom Witvoet Auction Service. Only exception will be if you are known by the Auction Company and prior credit has been established. Anyone that does not pay on day of Auction will be charged a 3% Buyer’s Premium Fee with the minimum of $25.00 and no maximum. Nothing shall be removed until paid in full. All equipment must be removed within 30 days. Any equipment left after 30 days will be charged a $40.00 storage fee per item per day. All announcements made day of Auction take precedence over all printed material. SALE CONDUCTED BY: TOM WITVOET AUCTION & APPRAISAL SERVICES HERSCHER, IL. PHONE (815) 592-3656 FAX (815) 426-2303 AUCTIONEERS-LIQUIDATORS-APPRAISERS “THE MOST COMPLETE AUCTION SERVICE” IL LICENSE #041000444 View pictures and full Auction list at www.auctionzip.com CLIP AND SAVE - THIS AD WILL ONLY APPEAR ONCE

SELLING REGARDLESS OF PRICE! BID NOW! • ONLINE AUCTIONS! • langhamauctioneers.hibid.com Bidding open now through Thursday, December 12 at 6:00 PM (CST)

KAUFMAN BINDERS U.S.A TRACTOR AND TOY COLLECTION

Inspection Site/Dates: 5455 Alhambra Road, Alhambra, IL 62001 (approx. 3 mi. S of IL Route 140) Friday, Nov. 29th from 10AM-5PM (CST) Saturday, Nov. 30th from 10AM-5PM (CST) Sunday, Dec. 1st from 1-5PM (CST)

Larry & Sharon have been active IH Collectors for over 30 years. They have decided to sell their extensive collection. This HUGE auction will consist of Farmall Tractors, Parts, Memorabilia and Toys. Join us for the preview Thanksgiving Weekend at the Kaufman Farm.

Kaufman Farms Larry & Sharon Alhambra, IL

0% F 30% Du inancing ea 70% De ferred u t Auction Must ha ntil 06/01/202 0 ve p approv rior al

The Kaufman’s have rented their beautiful farm and will sell their well-maintained line of Machinery, Equipment and Trucks. Don’t Miss this one! 2000 International 9200i Semi Tractor, 2011 Cascadia Freightliner Semi Tractor, 2007 Wilson Hopper Bottom Trailer, 2015 Wilson Hopper Bottom Trailer, Tractors, Case IH 7240 Magnum FWD Tractor Case IH 9370 4WD Tractor, Case IH 2388 Axial Flow Combine, Case IH 2208 Corn Head, Case IH Terra Flexhead Platform, Brent 776 Grain Cart, Lely Roterra Power Harrow, Case IH 2500 Ecolo-til Ripper, Yetter Rotary Hoe, Anhydrous Bar, Landoll 7430-29 Vertical Till, Unverferth 1225 Rolling Harrow w/baskets, Landoll Tilloll 876, International 700 7-Bottom Plow, International 735 Vari-Width 5-Bottom Plow, Legend Bush Hog 2615, Case International 5400 Mulch-Til Grain Drill, Unverferth Seed Wagon, Kinzee 2300 16-31 Planter w/Model 3000 Kinzee Monitor, Flatbed Trailers, Van Trailers, Storage Containers, Tools, Parts, Etc.

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John Deere Collector Auction

Longtime Restoration Artist is selling restored John Deere Muscle Tractors: JD 4020 (1250 hrs.), 4320, 5020 and 6030. Numerous Vintage JD Lawn & Garden C o l l e ct i o n Tractors: Patios: 110 (Spruce Blue); 110 (Patio Red); 112 (April Yellow); 120 (Patio Red) and 140 (Sunset Orange). JD 110; (3) 110 Round Fenders; 112; (2) 140; (3) 210; (2) 212; one has tiller, 214; (2) 216; (2) 318; 332 Diesel 3-pt; 739x 4WD All-wheel steer; 3038e 4WD w/Loader, Tiller, Blade, Aluminum Trailer; 6212 Zero Turn w/vac. Tillers, Tilt 50 & 80 Carts, Wheel Weights, Decks, Sprayer Syst. Shop Tools and Misc. parts. Like New- EbbTide Capione 210 Boat and Trailer.

LANGHAM

Hal (618) 410-6286 Ty (618) 267-8400 Nate (618) 292-9412 Complete Catalog and photos • langhamauctioneers.hibid.com


B2 Friday, December 6, 2019

| INDIANA AGRINEWS | www.agrinews-pubs.com

Auction Conducted By:

FRI., DECEMBER 13 @ 8:00 A.M. ED’S MACHINERY LLC INVENTORY REDUCTION

COMBINES: '13 JD S670 2wd combine, 2,255 eng./1,566 sep. hrs; '08 JD 9670STS 2wd combine, 2,760 eng./2,071 sep. hrs; '09 JD 9570STS 2wd combine, 2,267 eng./1,460 sep. hrs; '98 CIH 2388 2wd combine, 3,754 eng./2,699 sep. hrs; '06 C-IH 2377 2wd combine, 2,928 eng./2,125 sep. hrs; C-IH 1660 2wd combine, 4,718 hrs; IH 1660 combine, 4,495 hrs. HEADS: '14 MacDon 45’ flex draper hd; IH 820 platform; JD 643 6R30� corn head. TRACTORS: '12 JD 9410R 4WD tractor, PS, 2,974 hrs; '08 JD 8330 MFWD tractor, 5,915 hrs; '11 JD 7215R MFWD tractor; '93 JD 8770 4WD tractor; '90 JD 4955 2wd tractor, 6,025 hrs; '83 JD 4650 2wd tractor; '93 JD 4560 MFWD tractor, 11,218 hrs; JD 4440 2wd tractor, shows 4,770 hrs; JD 4240 2wd tractor; '67 JD 5020 2wd tractor; JD 3020 2wd tractor; '64 JD 3020 2wd tractor, 6,324 hrs; JD 3020 2wd tractor; C-IH MX240 MFWD, 11,446 hrs – as is; IH 1256 Wheatland 2wd tractor; IH 1086 2wd tractor; IH 806 2wd tractor; IH 560 2wd tractor; Case 2390 2wd tractor, 5,680 hrs; Case 2390 2wd tractor, 5,201 hrs; 2005 JD 4010 MFWD compact tractor, JD 410 loader, 573 hrs; Cub Cadet 7274 MFWD tractor, 885 hrs; Deutz 7145 MFWD tractor; Tractor King 254 MFWD tractor, 565 hrs. TILLAGE EQUIPMENT: Landoll 33’ vertical tillage tool; Landoll 29’ vertical tillage tool; Landoll 2205 12’ disc-ripperX; Landoll 1510 9-shank inline ripper; Sunflower 42’ field cultivator; Sunflower 29’ field cultivator; JD 980 24’ field cultivator; C-IH 4300 28’ field cultivator; 2004 JD 650 32’ disk; 2007 Wishek 862NT 14’ disk; C-IH 3900 22’ disk; C-IH 3900 26’ disk; IH 496 disk; White 273 22’ disk; C-IH PTX600 30’ flexwing chisel; JD 915 7-shank ripper; JD 915 5-shank ripper; M&W 1475 7-shank disc-ripper; DMI 42’ crumbler; 22’ harrow w/hyd. fold; JD 400 15’ rotary hoe; Yetter 30’ rotary hoe; JD 2800 5-bottom plow; JD 1000 3-bottom plow; JD 40-bottom rollover plow. DRILLS: GP 1205NT 12’ no-till drill; C-IH 5100 12’ drill; C-IH 15’ no-till drill; C-IH 5400 20’ drill; C-IH 5100 12’ drill; Brillion 8’ 3-pt. drill. PLANTERS: JD 1790 CCS 16/32 planter; JD 7200 12R30� planter; JD 7000 6R30� planter; GP YP1625 planter; Kinze 2000 6/11 planter; White 8523 12/23 planter. HAY EQUIPMENT: '15 JD 569 round baler; '08 JD 568 round baler; '97 JD 566 round baler; JD 535 round baler; JD 530 round baler; JD 385 round baler; Kuhn FC353RGC mo-co; '14 JD 946 moco; '05 JD 530 mo-co; JD 936 mo-co; JD 916 mo-co; NH 1465 mo-co; NH 415 haybine – as is; IH 550 haybine; Vicon KM321 10’ mo-co; Kidd 450; Tube-Line inline bale wrapper; NH 166 hay inverter; Krone 4-basket hay tedder. TRUCKS & TRAILERS: '84 Peterbilt dump truck – salvage title; '96 IH 9400 truck; Ford single axle dump truck; Tyler 4330 fertilizer spreader truck; Mertz 3275 fertilizer spreader truck; Reitnour 48’ flatbed trailer; Hillsboro 24’ gooseneck flatbed trailer. FEED WAGONS & GRINDER MIXERS: Knight 3450 mixer feed wagon; Knight 5042 mixer feed wagon; Roto 414-4B mixer feed wagon; Supreme 700 mixer feed wagon; Supreme 600 mixer feed wagon; Kelly Ryan feed wagon; NH 358 grinder mixer; NH 355 grinder mixer; JD 750 grinder mixer; JD 750 grinder mixer; JD 700 grinder mixer; Gehl MX100 grinder mixer; ArtsWay grinder mixer . GRAIN HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Kinze 1300 grain cart; Brent 876 grain cart; Brent 774 grain cart; Lucknow 612 grain cart; Killbros 1400 grain cart; Killbros 350 gravity wagon; Freisen 220 seed tender. SPRAYERS & APPLICATORS: Red Ball 670 pull-type sprayer; Fast 7420 pull-type sprayer; AgChem 6103 TerraGator floater; Case-IH NPX5300 17-knife NH3; DMI 9-knife NH3 applicator. MANURE HANDLING EQUIP.: Badger 8700 slurry tank; Balzer 6000 slurry tank w/applicator; Frontier MS1243 manure spreader; Gehl 250 manure spreader; NH 145 manure spreader; NI 3626 manure spreader; N-Tech 2000 slurry tank. MISC. FARM EQUIPMENT: Bush Hog 12715 15’ batwing mower; Hanson PL12 silage facer; 6’ tiller for skidsteer; AgTronics 8108CV weigh wagon; Heider 6’x12’ barge wagon 80780; JD Z520A ZTR mower; Land Pride AT3590 mower 32386; Feed Train 6250 bulk feed bin 31364; Field roller; JD display – as is; Detroit Diesel generator. CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT: Bobcat T250 skidsteer; Case 430 skidsteer; JD 317G skidsteer; NH L232 skidsteer; Cat 926E wheel loader; Cat 914G wheel loader; JD 444 wheel loader; Volvo L50 wheel loader; Case 580D backhoe; Cat TH62 telehandler; Ditch Witch 7610DD trencher; ME 300 mini-excavator.

HELD AT ED’S MACHINERY FACILITY, 17920 US HWY 136, MEMPHIS, MO 63555 CONSIGNED BY LOCAL DEALERS & FARMERS

)+ 

Merle Oberholtzer (660) 341-8234: '13 NDE 1652 vertical mixer. Steven Yoder (217) 246-9829: Kelly Ryan 5X12-14 feed wagon. Ivan Troyer (641-722-3038: Arts-Way 325 grinder mixer; 5-section harrow. Jason Ketchum: C-IH 240 16’ disk, hyd. fold, new bearings. Jeffery Wayne Leyda (641) 208-0156: JD 980 26’ field cultivator. Doug Small (660) 988-4287: '75 JD 4430 2wd tractor; Komatsu PC200LC excavator, 46� bucket w/thumb, 8,899 hrs. Avinash Bisnauth (718) 578-2317: JD 7’ 3-pt. blade. Rick Jones (319) 461-6528: Bush Hog 9’ 3-pt. blade w/hyd.; Lackender 48� pallet forks. Gerald Myers (660) 998-5189: Sitrex 10wheel rake; NH 851 round baler; NH 55 bar rake; Hesston StackHand 10; IH 4-section rotary hoe; MF 620 14’ disk; Glencoe 18.5’ field cultivator; Kory gravity wagon; Heider auger wagon; 6�x13’ auger. Janus Farm • Charles (217) 9274291: Bulan gravity wagon. Doug Neisen (573) 406-7528: Kent 27’ field cultivator. Edward Zimmerman (573) 6332135: C-IH 4800 24’ field cultivator. Rabe Farms – Ryan (217) 242-1737: '05 New Holland 84C 35’platform. Brandon Sands (660) 216-5053: JD 220 disk. Larry Sanders (660) 651-6407: IH 983 8 row corn head. Lapp’s Loader Service (717) 575-9759: New 10-16.5 & 12-16.5 skidsteer tires; New 42� & 48� pallet forks; New skidsteer buckets; New quick attach skidsteer plates; New skidsteer bale spears. Ron Long (660) 457-3871: 30� trackhoe bucket. Gerald Myers (660) 998-5189: Leon 9’ front blade; B&W receiver hitch; Stack mover; 1,000 gal. poly tank; 2-24 tire on JD 8-bolt rim. Mark Movall (712) 660-1338: 8-38 duals off 1466 tractor. Larry McCracken (660) 341-8089: Kuhn hay rake; 3-pt. round bale unroller; Cattle catch chute. Steve Weohr (660) 3415168: Bush Hog 7’ pull-type mower; Air tank. Leroy Oberholtzer (660) 216-9759: (8) 20.8-42 tires. Roman Schlabach (641) 872-2445: Winch off dozer. Eldon Yoder (217) 322-8640: Cattle hoof trimming chute. Jonathon D Yutzy (641) 929-3113: HD 1.75 yd. dumpster. Paul Zimmerman (660) 883-5353: JD 245 loader w/bucket & bale spear, joystick, mounting brackets off JD 2750 tractor. Tim Zeiset (660) 299-0445: (2) 710/70R38 tires.

PLEASE NOTE:

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Detailed equipment info, photos sellers' contact information can be found @

www.SullivanAuctioneers.com

For equipment questions, call Ed’s Machinery:

(660) 883-5501

TWO-DAY • NO-RESERVE

CONSIGNMENTS ARE ARRIVING DAILY— PLEASE FOLLOW OUR WEBSITE FOR UPDATES!

EVERY ITEM SELLS AT ABSOLUTE AUCTION WITH NO MINIMUMS OR RESERVES!

DEALER & FARMER AUCTION

THURSDAY & FRIDAY, DECEMBER 19 & 20, 2019 @ 9:00 A.M. CST BOTH DAYS

AUCTION TO BE HELD AT SULLIVAN AUCTIONEERS’ HAMILTON, ILLINOIS FACILITY. PHYSICAL ADDRESS: 1066 US HWY 136 E, HAMILTON, IL 62341 COMBINES: ’19 JD S780, 90/70 hrs; ’18 JD S770, 675/525 hrs; ’17 JD S680, 708/567 hrs; ’16 JD S680, 1,277/880 hrs; (2) '15 JD S690's on tracks, 1,890/1,447 hrs; ’15 JD S680, 1,209/900 hrs; ’15 JD S680, 1,251/1,021 hrs; ’15 JD S680, 1,631/1,206 hrs; ’15 JD S680, 1,850/1,395 hrs; ’15 JD S680, 1,229 hrs; ’15 JD S680, 1,575 hrs; ’14 JD S680, 2,137/1,656 hrs; ’14 JD S680, 2,451/1,545 hrs; ’13 JD S680, 1,463/1,088 hrs; ’13 JD S680, 2,062/1,548 hrs; ’13 JD S680, 2,150/1,400 hrs; ’13 JD S680, 3,100/2,100 hrs; ’12 JD S680, 1,821/1,286 hrs; ’14 JD S670 1,120/861 hrs; ’13 JD S670, 1,361/883 hrs; ’13 JD S670, 2,084/1,512 hrs; ’13 JD S670, 2,200/1,700 hrs; ’13 JD S670, 3,400/2,408 hrs; ’12 JD S670, 936/641 hrs; ’17 JD S660, 805/550 hrs; ’15 JD S660, 1,412/1,007 hrs; ’13 JD S660, 1,573/1,061 hrs; ’09 JD 9870STS, 3,000/2,500 hrs; ’07 JD 9860STS, 3,005/1,980 hrs; ’06 JD 9660STS, 3,534/2,391 hrs; ’05 JD 9660STS, 4,200/3,400 hrs; ’04 JD 9660STS, 2,748/1,882 hrs; ’07 JD 9560STS, 2,068/1,458 hrs; ’14 Gleaner S78, 1,445/1,051 hrs; C-IH 7088, 2,593/1,901 hrs; C-IH 2388; C-IH 1680. HEADS: ’19 JD 716C; ’13 JD 616C; ’17 JD 612C; (2) '15 JD 618C 20"; ’15 JD 612FC; ’14 JD 612C; ’13 JD 612C; (2) ’12 JD 612C; ’15 JD 606C; ’14 JD 645FD; (2) '15 JD 640FD; ’14 JD 640FD; ’13 JD 640FD; (2) ’12 JD 640FD; ’05 JD 630F; ’04 JD 635F; ’11 MacDon FD70 45’; ’09 MacDon FD70 40’; ’12 Gleaner 8R30�; C-IH 3406; C-IH 3408; C-IH 3162 30’ draper. TRACTORS: ’17 JD 9620RX, 1,086 hrs; ’16 JD 9570RT, 807 hrs; ’13 JD 9510RT, 2,675 hrs; ’12 JD 9510RT, 3,061 hrs; ’15 JD 9420R, 1,274 hrs; ’13 JD 9460R, 3,164 hrs; ’12 JD 9410R, 2,464 hrs; ’17 JD 8370RT, 741 hrs; ’18 JD 8345R, 848 hrs; ’18 JD 8320R, 437 hrs; ’18 JD 8320R, 697 hrs; ’16 JD 8320R, 1,570 hrs; ’16 JD 8320R, 1,910 hrs; ’15 JD 8320R, 1,350 hrs; ’14 JD 8310R, 3,062 hrs; ’18 JD 8270R, 470 hrs; ’18 JD 8245R, 506 hrs; 10 JD 9630, 2,900 hrs; ’04 JD 9520T, 5,787 hrs; ’13 C-IH 190 Magnum, 1,321 hrs; ’09 CIH 105U w/loader, 867 hrs; ’10 JD 6190R, 1,300 hrs; ’18 JD 6110M w/loader, 250 hrs; ‘18 JD 6110M, 368 hrs; JD 7810 2wd, 6,030 hrs; JD 6420 w/loader, 4,518 hrs; JD 6310; JD 8400; JD 4320; Cat 85E, 3,800 hrs; C-IH 9350 4wd; Case 2294. SPRAYERS & APPLICATORS: ’15 JD R4038 sprayer, 2,095 hrs; ’15 JD R4038 sprayer, 2,047 hrs; ’09 JD 4830 sprayer, 2,250 hrs; (2) Fast 9518 pull-type sprayers; Blu-Jet 17-knife NH3; (2) Trinity 1,450 nurse tanks. Grain Carts: J&M 1151 on tracks; J&M 875; Brent 644 wagon; Brent 640 wagon; Demco 650 wagon. Planters & Drills: ’99 Kinze 3600 12/23; JD 1780 16/31; Frontier 7’ drill; ’17 Unverferth Pro400 tender. Tillage: Krause 5630 42’ field cult.; JD 2200 32’ field cult.; J&M TF212 32’ basket; JD 200 42’ basket; McFarlane 30’ reel disk; Great Plains 7-shank inline ripper. Balers & Mowers: ’16 JD 569 Premium baler; ’07 JD 568 baler; ’15 JD HX15 batwing; Bush Hog 2615 15’ batwing. WEBB FARM RETIREMENT: ’10 JD 9530 4WD, 1,962 hrs; ’10 JD 9430 4wd, 1,864 hrs; ’08 JD 8430 MFWD, ILS, PS, 3,550 hrs; ’09 JD 5095M w/loader, 1,450 hrs; ’17 JD S670, 600/400 hrs; ’14 JD 608C; ’10 JD 630F; Kinze 3600ASD 16/31 planter; Demco 1050 grain cart; ’17 Great Plains 40’ TurboMax; (2) DMI 44’ field cult; (2) JD 512 disc-rippers; JD 637 disk; DMI 5310 NH3 bar; (2) Woods batwing mowers; etc. HODDE FARM RETIREMENT: ’13 JD 8285R MFWD, 418 hrs; ’90 JD 8760 4WD, 4,737 hrs; ’76 JD 4630, 7,743 hrs; ’04 JD 1690CCS air seeder; ’11 JD 2700 disc-ripper; Landoll 850 soil finisher; Brent 572 grain cart. TRUCKS & TRAILERS: ’07 KW W900L sleeper; ’03 KW W900 sleeper; ’03 KW T800 daycab; ’98 JD 53’ flatbed w/ramps; ’09 Hensley bulk feed trailer; ’09 Wilson 42’ hopper bottom; 45’ flatbed tender trailer; ’12 Ford F250 XLT; (2) KES auction toppers; ’11 KK 16’ office trailer; ’94 Wilson 32’ alum. livestock trailer. CONSTRUCTION: ’07 JD 270D LC excavator; Terex TXC340-1 excavator; Cat 350L excavator; Komatsu D65EX-12 dozer; Komatsu D61PX-23 dozer; Komatsu D51PX-22 dozer; Cat 621B scraper; (2) Fiat 260B scrapers; Remco 16’ offset disk; ’12 JD 310J backhoe; ’06 Cat 416D loader; Cat D6R dozer; Terex TA40 haul truck; Terex 4066B haul truck; Bomag BW213PD roller; Case 586E forklift; Case 585C forklift; Sellick SG60R forklift; Case 450CT skid steer; Daewoo SL75-V mini-excavator.

THIS IS AN ABBREVIATED LISTING...VISIT OUR WEBSITE DAILY FOR UPDATES INCLUDING DETAILED LISTING, OWNERS’ CONTACT INFO. & COLOR PHOTOS:

www.SullivanAuctioneers.com

AUCTION MANAGERS: LUKE SULLIVAN (309) 371-5214 & MATT SULLIVAN (309) 221-7001 Sullivan Auctioneers, LLC • Toll Free (844) 847-2161 • Lic. #444000107 www.SullivanAuctioneers.com


www.agrinews-pubs.com | INDIANA AGRINEWS | Friday, December 6, 2019

B3

MOWREY AUCTION COMPANY DECEMBER 18, 2019 • 7:00 A.M. MILFORD, IL 815-889-4191

Many Absolute Items. 4 Farmer Closeouts. Accepting Consignments

ANNUAL TOY AUCTION TO FOLLOW, APPROXIMATELY 5:00 P.M. TRACTORS ABSOLUTE JD 9330 #017772 620-70R32 4HYD TL QH SHOWING 7479HRS 04 JD 8420 #RW8420P026819 MFWD 480-80R50 W/ DUALS 4404HRS JD 8300 #022622 MFWD 18.4R46 6014HR JD 4960 #RW4960P003386 MFWD 18.4R46 W/ DUALS JD 3010 UTILITY #41726 18.4-30 STANDARD CIH 315 480R50 DUALS FRT DUALS 5 REMOTES 1530HRS CIH 9110 #17900750 P.S. 18.4R38 W/ DUALS SHOWING 5530HRS 78 IH 986 #U18982 6310HR IH 784 #2653680TYD IH 656 #201745 DIESEL WF IH 1486 #2650138U13641 1981 WHITE 2-155 #297200-414 18.4-38 4878 HOURS ONE OWNER IH 350 UTILITY “AS IS” CAT 55 #7DM01310 10 FRT SC WTS 18” TRACKS MM #525766 “AS-IS” AC 7080 20.8-38 “AS IS” OLIVER 1850 #22778 WF DIESEL AS-IS TRACTORS 10 JD 9630 #1RW9630PCAP017878 800/70R38 W/ DUALS 3398HRS JD 9560RT #1RW9560RHDP902914 36” BELTS 5HYD PTO PREM CAB LEATHER INTERIOR 4075HR V-NICE 10 JD 8345R #1RW8345RKAD005854 MFWD 480/80R50 W/ DUALS 380/80R38 W/DUALS IVT ILS PREMIUM CAB LEATHER 2637HRS VERY NICE! 09 JD 8330 #RW8330P041500 MFWD 420/90R30 480/80R46 W/ DUALS 3533HR 10 JD 8320R #1RW8320RVAD006891 MFWD 480/80R50 2882HRS 12 JD 8285R #1RW8285RHCP061300 MFWD 380/80R38 480/80R50 W/ DUALS 2635HRS VERY NICE.!!!! JD 8270R #1RW8270RCFP104395 ‘15 MFWD P.S. 380/85R34 480/80R46 8 FRT WTS 1400LB INSIDE INNER REAR WTS PREM CAB W/ ACTIVE SEAT 3PT HITCH 989HRS JD 8245R P.S. 480R46 DUALS BIG PUMP 4 REMOTES 1317HRS JD 7920 #RW7920D032719 18.4R46 W/ DUALS MFWD 380-85R34 IVT 1265 HRS JD 7710 #P010154 18.4R42 6669HRS 14 JD 7210R #TED082909 MFWD 480-80R46 W/ DUALS IVT ILS 2187HRS JD 4520 #8949 2WD 7358HR 80 JD 4440 #032252 2WD CIH STX275 ACCU-STEER #JEE0098577 18.4R42 W/ DUALS 3PT PTO P.S. 4082HR 97 CIH 9330 #JEE0067731 18.4R42 4HYD TL QH 1000PTO 5422HR CIH 9260 #JCB0027124 520/85R42 OLIVER 1600 #135401-607 AS IS!! MF 399 MFWD AC 200 COMBINES ABSOLUTE 17 JD S680 #1H0S680SLH0795350 520-85R42 DUALS 4X4 620-R26 CM TS AS CHOPPER 26’ UNLOAD 5SPEED PRO DRIVE 1279/873HRS 14 JD S670 #765323 20.8R42 W/ DUALS 2WD 600/70R28 CM AS TS 22’ HI CAP UNLOAD 5 SPD FEEDER HOUSE PRO DRIVE 1897/1437HRS 11 JD 9870 #741256 520-80R42 DUALS 2WD 28L-26 CM 5 SPD FEEDER HOUSE TS CHOPPER 26’ HI CAP UNLOAD PRO DRIVE 2582/1608HRS 09 JD 9770 STS #H09770S730451 18.4 x 42 BULLET ROTOR CAH F& CM SPH HICAP UNLD CHOPPER BIN EXT W/ TIP UPS 3275/2198HRS 08 JD 9770 #728125 20-8R42 W/ DUALS CM CHOPPER 22’ HI CAP UNLOAD EXT WEAR ATU STEERING WHEEL JD BIN EXT. 2403/1742HRS 06 JD 9760 #H09760S716170 20.8-38 DUALS 2WD CM CHOPPER 2860/3855HR 05 JD 9760 STS #H09760S712565 20.8R42 W/ DUALS 2WD 28L-26 CM TS CHOPPER 22’ HI CAP UNLOAD 3100/2065HRS 01 JD 9650 STS #H09650S691856 18.4R42 W/ DUALS 2WD 16.9-26 CM CHOPPER 20’ UNLD LG MBE 4243/2846HR 98 JD 9610 #677854 18.4R42 2WD 16.9-26 CHOPPER 20’ UNLD MBE 3966/2645 HRS 07 JD 9560 STS #H09560S720890 480-80R38 2WD CHOPPER C.M. 4794/3189HRS 89 JD 9500 18.4-42 W/ DUALS 2WD HIGH HOURS 89 JD 4435 #52568 23.1-26 3062HR JD 4425 #46054 23.1-26 2142HRS 06 LEXION 570R #J5760324 20.8R42 W/ DUALS 2WD 1570HRS V-NICE COMBINES 15 JD S680 #1H0S680STF0776851 520-85R42 DUALS 4X4 28L-26 CHOPPER POWER CAST TAIL BOARD 2630 DISPLAY LEATHER INTERIOR 5 SPEED FH 26’ UNLOAD POWER FOLD BIN 1341/978 HRS VERY NICE.!!! “FIELD READY” 15 JD S680 #1H0680SLF0776584 520-85R42 DUALS, 2WD, CHOPPER, 5 SPEED FH CM, AS, TS, 975-719 HOURS. VERY NICE.!!!!! 99 JD 9510 #680472 30.5-32 2WD 17’ UNLD CHOP 4880/3570 HRS “VERY NICE” 95 JD 9600 2WD DUALS 3700/2547HRS 88 MF 550 HYDRO CHOPPER #J06705 23.1-26 REAR WTS 4075HR 1-OWNER V-NICE CORNHEADS ABSOLUTE 12 JD 612C #1H00612CCCC746214 12R30 KNIFE ROLLS HYD DECK PLATES 96 JD 693 #665595 6R30 6 - JD 643 #620569 6R30 2PTO STAN STAN FOX 3R CORN HEAD CORNHEADS 16 JD 612 #785256 12R30 HYD DECK KNIFE ROLLS 2PTO SPH CIH 2208 #HAJ0018408 8R30 KNIFE ROLLS HYD DECK PLATES 2PTO V-NICE GRAINHEADS ABSOLUTE JD 930 #667096 01 JD 925F “FULL FINGER” 91 JD 925F #641257 JD 635F #711227 CIH 2020 #Y9ZC51087 25’ 16 MACDON FD-75 HEAD #289655 40’ SPH FIELD READY 14 MACDON FD75 F FLEX DRAPER #253415 35’ 3” CUT FA CIH HOOK-UP 05 LEXION F540 #44100202 40’ FA FULL FINGER AUGER “VERY NICE” AGCO DRAPER #01170 35’ SINGLE PT H/U 2PTO POLY DIV HEAD CARTS 2042 HI SPD HEAD CART W/LTS & BRAKES 840 HI SPD HEAD CART W/LTS & BRAKES 440 HEAD CART 441 HEAD CART TILLAGE ABSOLUTE JD 910 RIPPER 7X 14’ W/ DRAG HARROW 03 JD 726 FINISHER #N00726X005839 30’ 9” 5 BAR SPIKE JD 630 DISC #13785 29’ 7.25” JD 510 5X 09 CIH 330 VERTICAL TILL #JFH0044601 34’ IH 4600 F CULT #0250C003233 24’ 08 KRAUSE 4850-21’ DOMINATOR #1663 07 KRAUSE 4850-18’ DOMINATOR #1491 KRAUSE DISC #3438 21’ 9” SPACING WHITE 274 RF DISC 28’ BLUE JET 4X RIPPER BRILLION XL144 CULTIPACKER #175081 36’ MF 820 DISC 19’ TILLAGE 12 JD 2623 DISK #1N02623XAC0750136 33’ 9” SPACING V-NICE JD 2623VT #1N02623VCC0750570 26 1/2’ W/ ROLL BASKETS

JD 2310 MULCH FINISHER #1N02310XCA0740210 ‘11 45’9” HARROW W/ ROLLING BASKET JD 714 DISC CHISEL PLOW 9X JD 637 DISC #X005828 29’ 3” 9” SPACING JD 200 CRUMBLER #N0200X001320 ‘04 32’ LIGHTS JD 2800 PLOW 17-KRAUSE 4855-11 DOMINATOR #B0186 V-NICE KRAUSE 3131 FINISHER #1821 31’ LANDOLL 2200 DISC CHISEL #9400189 7SK M&W 1815 ROTARY HOE #3726 15’ M&W 7X AUTO RESET V-RIPPER MCFARLAND HDL26 CHAIN HARROW #5642 24’ 16 SUNFLOWER 5056-49 #AFCS50560DZ500099 49’ 6” SPACING V-NICE UNVERFERTH 225 ROLLING HARROW #A60320126 26’ UNVERFERTH 1225 #610100 37’ LIGHTS 08 UNVERFERTH 1225 #A48910132 31’ DOUBLE ROLLING HARROW WHITE 273 DISC 22’ 9” SPACING 04 CIH 200 TIGERMATE II F CULT #JFH0013648 45’ SPIKE HARROW CASE 4600 FIELD CULT #0624132 30’ SPIKE HARROW CASE 4300 F. CULT #625899 28’ SPIKE HARROW DMI FIELD CULT #820320 35 1/2’ COIL HARROW W/ REAR HITCH DMI 730 7X ECOLO-TIGER DISC RIPPER #522467 W/ HYD LEVELER BRILLION LAND COMMANDER LCS7-2 #91604 7SK BRILLION 25’ FLAT FOLD MULCHER BRENT CPS 7X DISC RIPPER #B17360115 LONG 10’ OFFSET DISC PLANTERS & DRILLS ABSOLUTE 05 JD 1790 PLANTER #A01790E710156 12-23 CCS FINGER PICK UP NO TILLS HD SPRINGS MARKERS TRU COUNT AIR CLUTCHES DRAW BAR HITCH PULL CAST CLOSING WHEELS GROUND DRIVE 350 COMP TRAC MON FOLD BOX 97 JD 1770 #H01770A670228 16R30 LIQUID FERT HYD DRIVE PLANTERS & DRILLS JD 7000 PLANTER 4R30” W/DRY FERT JD 1530 15’ NO TILL DRILL #A01530X690155 15 MF 9222 #ACGW92220FH222183 12R30” AIR PUMP BOOKS PNUEMATIC DOWN PRESSURE VAC PLANTER “LIKE NEW” FORAGE ABSOLUTE JD 750 GRINDER #00212 JD 700 GRINDER #001622 ARTSWAY 500A GRINDER MIXER W/ SCALE NI 3638 TANDEM MANURE SPREADER NH 166 HAY INVERTER GEHL 8335 TMR FEED MIXER GEHL 135 GRINDER W/HAYLOAD AUG FORAGE TANDEM HITCH FOR A HAYRAKE “UNUSED” OGDEN HAYRAKE 8WHL NH 355 GRINDER W/ PTO MC STALK CHOPPER #58712 20’ 1000 PTO SPRAYERS 15 JD R4030 #6727 380/90R46 90’ BOOM 800GAL SS TANK SS PLUMBING HYD ADJ CHEM IND SF2 SWATH 7”MOUNTED SCREEN 1610 ENG HRS:: 426 SPRAY HOURS. 07 JD 4720 SPRAYER #NO472X005380 380-R46 90’ BOOM 800 GAL TANK CHEMICAL INDUCTOR 4752 RUN HRS TERRAGATOR 6103 #63034605 1800 GAL SS TANK TERRA SHIFT TRANS FALCON CONTROLLER 60/80’ BOOMS 30” SPACING FOAMER 2WD 1000/50R25 4888HRS V-NICE FAST NITROGEN APPLICATOR 8100 9 KNIFE 1000 GAL TANK V-NICE “LIKE NEW” WAGONS & GRAINCARTS ABSOLUTE 2 - FICKLIN 4500 CENTER DUMP WAGON W/SHERLOCK ROLL TARP BRENT 320 GRAIN CART #0896 WAGONS & GRAINCARTS 01 UNVERFERTH 9200 #B18870101 1000BU 35.5L-32 NEW FLIGHTING V-NICE! 19 EZ TECH GRAIN CART #NA 30.5L32 ROLL TARP 1000PTO “UNUSED” EZ TRAIL 500 GRAIN CART #EGC500Z011970230 1000 PTO KILBROS 490 AUGER CART #1926 KILBROS 350 WAGON W/EXTENTIONS J&M 435 GRAIN CART V-NICE GEHL FEED WAGON CAT/ORTHMAN 897 CART #2994-6 RECENT GEAR BOX 24” TRACKS 2 - BRENT 640 WAGON SEVERAL GRAVITY WAGONS MOWERS & CUTTERS 2 - ‘17 JD HX15 MOWER V-NICE LANDPRIDE 15-60 ROTARY CUTTER 5’ 540PTO INDUSTRIAL ABSOLUTE JD 544C PAYLOADER #DH544CB507872 8’ BKT Z-BAR 17.5-25 6529 HRS JD 317 SKID STEER HIGH HRS BOBCAT T250 TRACK SKID STEER CAH IH TD15 DRESSER DOZER #NA 10’ BLADE 20” TRACKS 1228HRS INCORRECT INDUSTRIAL CASE 580M #JJG0280788 C/A 4WD TLB 7478HRS JD 310J BACKHOE #T0310SJ178994 CAH 4WD EXT-A-HOE POWERSHIFT PILOT CONTROLS 3RD VALVE SHOWING 3738HR MISC. ABSOLUTE DEGELMAN ROCK PICKER #6972 LARGE PITT EXPRESS GRAIN AUGER DRIVE OVER DEGELMAN R570S ROCK PICKER #10357 GMC BIG WHLS ‘84 DETROIT ENG FORD F550 SERVICE TRUCK #1FDAF57F52EC06801 DUALLY 4WD 4SPD MANUAL W/ OVERDRIVE 159341 MILES CUB CADET 7254 L&G #1B253G10007 MFWD 60” DECK 239HRS MISC 9 PANELS 1 GATE 24’ LONG 5.5’ TALL 8 PANELS 1 GATE 24’ LONG 5.5’ TALL NI 1R PICKER DMI PULL TYPE ANHD APP 12X NITOR 17 KNIFE APPLICATOR 1000 GAL PROPANE TANK ON WHLS 3 - RED WAGON FEEDER SEVERAL 7’ - 8’ - 10’ - 12’ BOX BLADES SEVERAL 3PT BLADES & SNOW BLADES 86 IH S1900 GRAIN TRUCK #1HTLDUXP5CHA14330 1 OWNER LOW MILES 86 IH S1900 GRAIN TRUCK #1HTLDUXP8GHA14435 1 OWNER LOW MILES 12 PETERBILT SEMI #1XPHD49X1CD144618 13 SPD 3.55 REAR ENDS 600,000 MILES ON CHASIS---454,000 MILES ON ENG----COMPLETE DELETE SYSTEM 450HP RED TOP CUMMINS ENG 713421 MILES CALL EUGENE FOR MORE INFO 217-520-4419 13 PETERBILT SEMI #1XP4A49X8DD184963 13 SPD 3.55 REAR END 330,000 MILES ON MOTOR COMPLETE DELETE SYSTEM ---WHITE CALL EUGENE FOR MORE INFO 217-520-4419 19 NEVILLE 53’ DOUBLE DROP TRL 12 IH PROSTAR 430HP 10SPD #CJ619363 11 DODGE RAM 3500HD 4000R DUMP TRUCK CUMMINS DIESEL AUTO #BG558353 NEW 9’ DUMP BED PJ TRL #1326299 20’X6” CHANNEL EQ. 72LB. 2-7000 POUND ELECTRIC SPRING 2’ DOVETAIL W/5’ FOLD UP RAMPS PJ TRL #1326300 20’X6” CHANNEL EQ. 2 5/16 ADJUSTABLE (14,000 LB) 2-7000 POUND ELECTRIC SPRING 2” DOVETAIL W/5’ FOLD UP RAMPS

BUY, SELL, TRADE DAILY

PJ TRL #1326298 ‘20 CARHAULER 22’X6” 14,000 LB ELECTRIC / SPRING 2’ DOVETAIL W/5’ FOLD UP RAMPS PJ TRL #1326296 24’X6” CHANNEL EQ 2 5/16” ADJUSTABLE (14,000 LB)2-7000 LB ELECTRIC SPRING 2’ DOVETAIL W/5’ FOLD UP RAMPS 09 BUSHOG 4430 4X4 56HRS All Items Absolute. From Local Dealer, for more information call Jon at 815-471-4191 19 JD 5045E #1PY5045EEJJ106107 14.9-28 2WD 12HRS W/ WARRANTY 12 JD 3320 #1LV3320HPCH810909 MFWD 43X16-20 27X8.5-15 300X LOADER 72D AUTOCONNECT DECK EHYDRO 639HRS V-NICE 09 JD 2305 #LV2305H522229 MFWD 62C MID MOUNT DECK 200CX LOADER 273HRS V-NICE 15 JD 2032R #1LV2032RLFH115360 62” MID MOUNT DECK W/ H130 LOADER MFWD 23X8.5-12 14-17.5 HYDRO 169HRS V-NICE 05 CIH MXM130 #ACM251592 18.4R38 14.9R28 W/ LOADER MFWD 3267HRS 02 CIH MX240 #JJA0116691 MFWD 380/85R34 480/80R46 W/ DUALS 5887HR KUBOTA BX1860 #51138 ‘10 MFWD W/ LA203 LOADER 54” DECK HYDRO 533HRS V-NICE 15 JD 608C #1H00608CVFX775171 8R30 HYD DECK SPH 1PTO KNIFE ROLLS 83 JD 444 #568165 LTOB 4R38 V-NICE 08 CIH 3208 #Y8S018064 8R30 2PTO NEW CHAINS/KNIFES 300 ACRES AGO 09 CIH 2608 #676568007 8R30 CHOPPING KNIFE ROLLS HYD DECK PLATES 2PTO 07 CIH 2408 #CBJ032665 8R30 HYD DECK PLATES “NEW KNIFES NEW AUGER” V-NICE 09 JD 635F #H00635F731512 LOW STONE SS FLOOR FFA FA POLY DIV SPH 1PTO 09 JD 635F #H00635F730442 LOW STONE SS FLOOR FFA FA POLY DIV SPH 1PTO 08 JD 635F #726369 SPH FF AUG LOSTONE SS FLOOR FA 1PTO 08 JD 635F #725163 HYDRA FLEX HISTONE SPH CM DRIVE 07 JD 635F #H00635F721806 HIGH STONE SS FLOOR FFA FA POLY DIV SPH 1PTO 04 JD 635F #H00635F706929 FFA HI STONE SS FLOOR FA POLY DIV SPH 1PTO 04 JD 635F #H00635F706756 LOW STONE SS FLOOR FFA FA POLY DIV SPH 1PTO 14 MACDON FD75 #244282 40’ CIH HOOK UP FFA FA POLY DIV 1PTO KRAUSE 4850-12’ DOMINATOR JD 1770 24R 04 WHITE 8200 #HL20200141 12R30 YETTER NO TILL INSECT VAC SM 3000 MON BOOK BEAN AND CORN DISC PLATES 1000PTO PUMP V-NICE 10 JD 4930 #N04930X008031 380/105R50 120’ BOOM 1200GAL SS TANK 15” SS PLUMBING 5- POSITION HIGH FLOW AUTO BOOM LEVELING SYS W/ 5 SENSOR TRACTION CONTROL W/ 2600 DISP STARFIRE 3000 REC SF1 5968HR 06 JD 4920 #N04920X004201 380/105R50 100’ BOOM 1200 GAL SS TANK FOAM MARKERS 4053HRS V-NICE 05 HARDI CM750 SPRAYER #12070 750 GAL TANK 20” SPACING TRIPLE NOZZLES 12.3-42 1000PTO DRIVE PUMP 06 HARDI 3000 #30-0176 800 GAL TANK 80’ BOOM 320/90R46 CHEMICAL INDUCTOR HARDI NAV 3000 MONITOR 10 KINZE 850 GRAIN CART #508039 ROLL TARP V-NICE 03 KINZE 850 GRAIN CART #505403 W/ SCALES V-NICE 98 J&M 620-14 GRAIN CART #6336 04 BRENT 1084 #B20600144 18.4X42 ROLL TARP 07 UNVERFERTH 3750 SEED TENDER #D47470211 6”X18’ CONVEYOR ROLL TARP 11HP HONDA ENG ELECTRIC BRAKES BUSHOG 2615 15’ BATWING 03 JD 240 SKIDSTEER #T00240A915591 OROPS 66” BUCKET 3000HRS AS-IS 18 JD TX 4X2 GATOR #1M04X2XDPJM132512 BLOCK AD *NO TITLE* 01 JD 9300 #H040717 710-70R38 W/ DUALS 1 SET OF 450 REAR INNER WTS 3 SETS OF 450/ 1 SET OF 165 REAR OUTER WTS 4HYD DIFF LOCK 24SPD 3990HR V-NICE 91 JD 8760 #H006805 4WD 18.4R42 W/ DUALS 3PT TL QH 4HYD PTO 24 SPD ATU STEERING DIFF LOC 6647HR V-NICE 94 JD 4760 #H006285 18.4R42 W/ DUALS 3HYD TL QH 2WD QUAD RANGE 7991HR Call Jayce Block at 563-212-1975 for more information 07 JD 9560 STS #720612 18.4-42 W/ DUALS 2WD CM CHOPPER MBE 2300/1620HRS V-NICE Call Chris at 217-556-1384 for more information. All three items selling absolute! GLEANER R52 #R5258088 30.5L-32 16.9-26 4X4 STAN BIN EXT AG LEADER MON 2706/2007HR GLEANER 4RW #043625710 GLEANER 800 #1683345F 16’ Farmer Closeout #1 Tom & Deb Bayston. All equipment is low houred & used on small acreage. The equipment was always shedded and serviced. Please attend for a great line up of JD Equipment. Equipment is to sell at approximately 10:00 AM CST in Milford, IL. Call 815-471-7806 for more information. ’96 JD 8400 #RW8400P007229 18.4-46 W/DUALS 2 SETS 450 REAR WTS 1 SET 165 WTS 3HYD TL Q-HITCH 14.9-34 FRT FENDERS 16 FRT WTS DELCAB 5865 HRS V-NICE JD 5410 #LV5410S241556 2WD 16.9-30 3 SETS REAR WTS 3HYD TL Q-HITCH W/JD 520 LOADER–JOYSTICK 850 HRS V-NICE ’09 JD 9570 #H09570S730692 30.5-32 2WD 18.4-26 CM AS CHOPPER 20’ UNLOAD MBE GS Y-M 2141-1327 HRS ’98 JD 693 CORNHEAD #676666 2PTO HYD DECK STAN ROLLS ’09 JD 625F #730339 LOSTONE EZ TRAIL 26’ HEAD CART ’96 JD 1760 12R30 PLANTER #01760R0665518 VAC HD SPRINGS NT W/250 COMP TRAC MONITOR V-NICE J&M 750 GRAINCART #5198 30.5-32 V-NICE FICKLIN 231 WAGON W/JD 720 GEAR JD 1075 RUNNING GEAR SETUP W/3 SEED TOTES JD MX7 3PT MOWER #8948 540 PTO ALLOWAY 1410 SWING AWAY AUGER HYD LIFT 540 PTO 10” X 60’ PNEUMATIC SEED BLOWER FILL SYSTEM 16 HP BRIGGS ENGINE KOMATSU #20 3500 LB FORKLIFT LP SIDE SHIFT SHOWING 687 HRS V-GOOD 16’ BUMPER HITCH TANDEM AXLE TRAILER NO RAMPS 2” BALL ’92 KW T-600 3176 CAT ENG 9 SPD W/’07 18’ KUHN ALUMINUM BED & HOIST 285-75R 24.5 AIR RIDE REAR HITCH ’84 GMC GENERAL 300 CUMMINS ENG 10 SPD W/SCOTT 18’ BED & HOIST 285-75R 24.5 AIR RIDE REAR HITCH FRONTIER PALLET FORKS TRANSFER PUMP 3PT CEMENT WEIGHT BOX JD 2600 SCREEN W/SF2 ACTIVATION - STARFIRE 3000 GLOBE MISC JD & IH REAR WTS Farmer Closeout #2 David Hruska. “Attention Mark” 309-825-8464 96 JD 8100 #004376 MFWD 16.9R28 3HYD TL QH 18.4R42 W/ DUALS FRT FENDERS 14FRT WTS ATU STEERING WHL W/ STARFIRE ITC GLOBE BROWN BOX DISP 4333HR V-NICE 06 JD 9560 STS #715896 MBE 30.5L32 2WD CHOPPER 2075/1397HRS V-NICE

BID ONLINE

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SUNFLOWER 6630 VT #248-29 29’ 22” BLADES V-NICE UNVERFERTH 6500 GRAIN CART 2 AXLE HEAD TRAILER Farmer Closeout #3 Dennis McTaggart Estate Sam Martin, Executor of Estate For more info, contact Eric @ 815-383-1551 Sells Approx: 11:00AM ’11 CIH 7088 #YAG004830 20.8R38 DUALS 2WD 480-70R30 FT RT CHOPPER BIN EXT RED LEATHER CAB 2190/1600 HRS PRO 600 Y-M MONITOR ’13 GERINGHOFF 8R30” NORTHSTAR ELITE XL #73830 W/ROLLER CONES V-NICE ’07 CIH 2020 35’ FLEX #CBJ021570 3” CUT FA UNVERFERTH HT 36’ HEAD CART W/LIGHTS ’90 FORD VERSATILE 846 #451880 18.4-R38 MICHELINS “LIKE NEW” EZ STEER 12 SPD SYNCHRO 3PT 4HYD 8107 HRS V-NICE ’93 CIH 7140 MFWD #47676 18.4-42 W/DUALS 380-85R30 20 FRT WTS 1 SET 450 REAR WTS 3HYD TL 10375 HRS EZ STEER JD 4020 3150024 18.4-34 ROPS WF 1 HYD TL Q-HITCH DIFLOC 631 HRS (INCORRECT) BRENT 874 #B17540133 30.5-32 CIH 4300 #620312 53’ F CULT 3 BAR COIL HARROW CIH 4700 42’ F CULT 3 CAR COIL HARROW REAR HITCH BRILLION XXL-184 44’ X-FOLD #196391 2-PARKER 250 BU WAGONS 16.5-16.1 2-200 BU RED WAGONS POCLAIN LC80 EXCAVATOR W/ 2 BUCKETS H&S 270 MANURE SPREADER #14934 2-H&S HAY FEEDER WAGONS INDUSTRIAS AMERICA HAY FEED WAGON NH 166 HAY INVERTER BUSHHOG 2615 LEGEND 15’ BATWING 540 PTO KINZIE 2600 16-31 PLANTER #610749 NO TILLS LIQUID TANKS MONITOR KINZIE 2700 24R30” #750040 W/REAR HITCH TRASH WHEELS 1.6 BOXES W/ INSECT PROGRESSIVE 500 GAL POLY FOLLOW BEHIND TANK TO TW 117 W/ HYD PUMP KORY KT 260 2-BOX SEED TOTE W/HONDA ENG ’92 DODGE 250 2WD SERVICE TRUCK FULLY EQUIPPED: WELDER, GENERATOR, TOOLS, TORCH, VICE ’86 PETE 359 3406 CAT 10 SPD 36” BUNK SPRING RIDE 285-70R24.5 BUDD WHEELS WET KIT ’97 MAC 30’ FLAT BOTTOM ALUMINUM DUMP TRAILER AIR RIDE ROLL TARP ’83 GMC TANDEM #GDS7048900505695 3208 NON TURBO CAT ALLISON AUTOMATIC AIR BRAKES W/20’ OMAHA BED HOIST Farmer Closeout #4 Equipment runs, moves, just not pretty. All equipment sells as-is! IH 3788 2+2 #9740 18.4R38 3HYD 1PTO TL QH SHOWING 5351HR AS IS! IH 3288 W/ LDR AS-IS! IH 856 #20067 18.4-34 3PT 2HYD 2PTO WF SHOWING 7997HR AS IS! GLENCOE SOIL FINISHER 18’ CIH 5400 15’ DRILL #JAG00447405 W/ YETTER NT CADDY Sigel Equipment. Call Gene for more information 217-254-3349 93 JD 7800 #H002619 P.S. 2WD 480-80R42 JD 5425 #345740 MFWD 16.9R28 6FRT WTS CAH POWER REV 4169 HRS JD 210C #768140 2WD 17.5L-24 TL 3PT ROPS 8’ BKT 4285HR IH 3688 IH 684 MFWD W/ LDR MF 1105 #9B54299 18.4-38 8293HR FORD T1520 UTILITY #NA DIESEL HYDRO MFWD 6’ MOWING DECK NH 110LT LDR W/ QUICK TACH 5’ BKT JOYSTICK CONTROL 0388HR JD 1650 #1331 2WD 16.9-28 ROPS W/CANOPY 00 JD 9550 #685558 30.5L32 2WD CHOPPER DUAL SPREADER MBE L.L. 5017/3359 HRS ---(SPENT $30,000 SINCE 2015) 88 JD 7720 #626853 MBE 30.5L32 SINGLE CHAFF SPREADER CHOPPER 4809 HRS CIH 1688 #122162 MBE 30.5L32 18.4-26 4WD CHOPPER 5016HRS 2 - JD 444 C-H IH 864 #19074 6R38 93 JD 925 JD 920 #655842 JD 918 #631078 JD 915 #645550 JD 635F #731538 JD 218 & 216 2 - CIH 2020 35’ FA FFA JD 970 MULCHER 28’ JD 635 DISC #001461 34’ 9’ SPACING JD 235 DISC #25775 26’ 9” SPACING CIH 735 5X PLOW IH 490 DISC 24’ 7.5” SPACING NI 5212 DISC CONDITIONER BLU JET PULL TYPE RIPPER 7SK KILLBROS CRUMBLER #D20020108 32’ KUHN E1102 TILLER SUNFLOWER 6332 SOIL FINISHER 24’ 3 BAR W/ROLLING BASKET IH 6000 DISC CHISEL BRILLION 15’ MULCHER JD 7240 6-11 NT COULTERS 2 - JD 7100 11R20 LIFT ASSIST WHEELS JD 7000 8R38 YETTER NO-TILL COMBOS JD 7000 4-38 KINZE 2600 #610405 16R30” NO TILL COULTERS KPM 3000 MON W/ BOOK TYE NO TIL DRILL 15’ 8” SPACING NO TILL CADDY JD 1590 15’ GRAIN DRILL #735642 10” SPACING IH 5100 GRAIN DRILL MC STALK CHOPPER #44928 15’ 1000PTO PRECISION PULL BEHIND SPRAYER UNVERFERTH 630 WAGON BUSHOG 2720 20’ BATWING JD 4710 LDR BACKHOE BOBCAT 185 SKID STEER BOBCAT 190 SKID STEER NH L190 SKIDLOADER JD 512 LOADER FITS 5055 TRACTOR - NEW JD 400 LOADER FITS 4000 SERIES TRACTOR - NEW JD D160 LOADER JD D100 LOADER FITS 3038 JD 46 BACKHOE SEVERAL LOADER BRACKETS HARROW SPIKES AND SPRINGS GUAGE WHEELS OFF JD 2100 RIPPER PAIR OF 18.4-46 10 BOLT DUALS 3 - GRAPPLE IH ROCK TRAP OFF 1688 COMBINE PALLET OF JD PLANTER SEED DISC SEVERAL OTHER PALLETS OF MISC PARTS

FINANCING AVAILABLE

Directions: In Illinois - Interstate All New Buyers Must Have Current Bank Letter of Credit 57 to Exit 272 (Buckley). Go east to Register or Must be Known by Auction Co. approximately 21 miles to Milford. At Before Receiving Buyers Number. 4-way stop go north two blocks to “No Titled Vehicles” Consignments Are Welcome!! Frederick Street. East one block. In Indiana - State Route 18 west of Fowler Buy-Sell-Trade Daily • Needing Good Clean Machinery 18 miles. Local - State Route 1 to north Call for More Information • Ask For Jon Or Jim Mowrey 815-889-4191 - Fax: 815-889-5365 edge of Milford. Go east 1/8 mile.

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NEXT AUCTION MARCH 18, 2020


B4 Friday, December 6, 2019

| INDIANA AGRINEWS | www.agrinews-pubs.com

AUCTION FROM PAGE B1

Phegley Farms, Inc FARM AUCTION Thursday, December 12th @ 11:00 A.M. EST Carlisle, IN (40 mi. southwest of Terre Haute)

LOCATION: 4331 W Co Rd 750 S, Carlisle, IN 47838. DIRECTIONS: - from Carlisle, IN and US 41, take St. Rd 58 west 4 miles to CR 400 W, turn south for ½ mile to CR 750 S, turn west & go ¼ mile to Farm; OR from Graysville, IN and St. Rd. 154, take St. Rd. 63 south 4 miles to Merom and St. Rd. 58, turn south and proceed 9 miles to CR 400 W, turn south for ½ mile to CR 750 S, turn west & go ¼ mile to Farm. This sale features many 1-owner, shedded, and well maintained pieces of equipment. Plan to be on time! No misc.; sale will last approx. 1 ½ hrs. For complete listing and 100’s of photos, visit bostoncentury.com Online bidding will be available at bostoncentury.hibid.com on select items. TRACTORS: 2013 CIH 235 “Magnum” MFWD, 19/4 “P.S.” auto steer ready, 3pt, CAT II/III fast hitch, (3) PTO’s, (4) SCV’s plus “PB”, front & rear weights, 46” rear Firestone radial duals, 34” front Firestone radial singles w/ fenders, diff lock (very nice, 2141 hrs, 235 eng. hp, SN ZDRD04219); 1994 Ford/ Versatile 9480, 4x4, bareback w/ CAH, 12-spd gear drive, “Cummins” 855 eng., (4) SCV’s, and 20.8R42 FS radial duals (nice, 300 eng. hp, only 4318 hrs, SN D100705); COLLECTOR TRACTOR: 1968? Int. 1256 “Survivor” w/ 3-pt, dual PTO, (2) SCV’s, (2) pr. of rear weights, (12) frt. weights and 18.438’s (10,651 hrs, major O/H @ 3500 hrs; this is a 1-owner w/ original paint, SN 11969S-Y); COMPACT DIESEL: Kubota 2620 HSD 4x4 w/ 3pt, PTO, p.s., “Hydro”, 60” hyd. lift deck, industrial tread rubber, and ldr. prep pkg (26-eng. hp, 869 hrs, SN 5661); COMBINE, HEADS, CARRIERS: 2003 CIH 2388, 4x4 combine w/ “Specialty Rotor”, 2-spd hydro, 2-spd chopper, 2-spreaders, rock trap, “Field Tracker”, “Ag Leader” PF3000, hopper ext, 21’ auger, 2-spd 4x4, 20.8-42 F.S. radial duals, 18.4-26 rear (2200 / 3254 hrs); 2009 CIH 3408 “Poly” C.H. w/ hyd. deck plates, “Field Tracker”; 2005 CIH 1020, 30’ platform, dual drive and updated “Field Tracker”; UF HT30, 30’ carrier; 6R down corn reel; PAN and DITCHER: Soilmover 95RF, 9.5 yard pan w/ front dolly (original, nice, 1-owner, low usage); Amco 12”, 3-pt, 540 ditcher; TILLAGE: 2014 CIH 200, 36’ field cultivator w/ rolling basket (nice, very low acres); N.H./DMI ST440, 34’x7 ½” hyd. leveling finish disk w/ Rem. 3-bar spike harrow; DMI “Tiger-Two” 5-sh. disk/ripper w/ leveling bar; Landoll 21’, 17-sh. disk chisel; IH 183, 12x30 flat-fold danish-tyne cult.; IH 700, 6-16’s sm. plow; Brillion 13’ cultipacker; (2) Brillion 4’ cultipacker (pups); CART and GRAIN HANDLING: nice J&M 875-18 cart w/ lg. 1000, hyd. spout, tarp and “Terra-Turbo” rubber, red; Bradford 335 gravity wagon w/ KB 12 T gears, and 9:00-20 rubber; Feterl drive-over pit (can be hyd. drive or elec.); DMC “Hi-Cap 44” rotary screen grain cleaner; Grain-O-Vator 2-comp. feed cart; IH 140 wagon gears; JD 5-T gears w/ 14’ bed, and hoist; JD 953 gear; PICKUP: 2012 GMC “Sierra” 1500, 4x4, W/T, reg. cab w/ 8’ bed, 5.3L V-8, auto, tilt, cruise, A/C, tow pkg, and more (white w/ dark titanium cloth int., 1-owner, 76,845 miles as of 11-18); SERVICE TRUCK: 2008 Dodge 2500, ¾ T reg. cab 4x4 w/ 8’ Knapheide bed, 5.7L V-8, auto, vinyl seat, tilt, cruise, air, 8650 GVW, tow pkg, and more (white, 95k); HOPPER BOTTOMS: 2004 Timpte 33.5’x66”x96”, “Ag Hoppers”, spring ride, roll tarp, 24.5’s; 1997 Timpte 32’x60”X96”, “Ag Hoppers”, spring ride, tarp, 24.5’s; SEMI’S and GRAIN TRUCK: 2010 Int. “Pro Star” tandem day cab w/ 385 HP “Cummins” ISX, Eaton-Fuller “Ultra Shift”, “Air Ride” cab and susp., 172” W.B., PW, PL, and more (white, 578K); 2000 Freightliner FL112 tandem day cab w/ 400-HP ISM, 10-spd. trans, “Air Ride” susp., 185” W.B., A/C, alloy wheels, 11R22.5 rubber (red, 133K, NOTE: Yes, the miles are supposed to be correct); 1977 Int. 1600, s.a. grain truck w/ F.G. hood, 15’ Allied wood side/floor bed, 52” sides, hoist, 345 V-8, 5 & 2, 9:00-20 rubber (white and red, only 42k orig. 1-owner miles); DUMP TRUCK: 1978 Chev C65, s.a. w/ 366 V-8, 5 & 2, 9’ steel dump bed, hoist, 9:00-20’s (shows 58k?); MISC.: Hahn 770 Hi-Boy 3-whl. sprayer w/ 310-gal. s.s. tank and Ford 4-cyl. diesel (needs slave cyl.); 1999 Kawasaki “Prairie” 300 auto, 2-WD ATV; trailer load of Wade Rain 4”, 6”, and 8” alum. irrigation pipe in 30’ sticks (trailer included). Sellers: LeAnn Ring, Regina Hamilton, Denis Phegley, & Dale Phegley TERMS: All items sold As-Is.

Boston Auctions (812) 382-4440

“A Farmer, Working For Farmers” Lic# AU01027041

ESTATE FARM AUCTION

Saturday, December 14th at 11:00 A.M. EST SULLIVAN CO. FAIRGROUNDS Sullivan, IN (25 mi. south of Terre Haute)

Seller: JTL Farm Operations, LLC Due to the passing of John Leminger, we will sell the following.

LOCATION: 1301 E. Co. Rd. 75 N., Sullivan, IN 47882. DIRECTIONS: from the Courthouse Square, take E. Washington St. east 1 mile. This sale features several low houred pieces of machinery! For complete listing and 100’s of photos, visit bostoncentury.com Online bidding will be available at bostoncentury.hibid.com on SELECT items. TRACTORS: 2009 New Holland T8030, MFWD w/ CAH, “Super Steer”, “Powershift”, 3-pt, CAT 3 / 4 fast hitch, 1000 PTO, (4) SCV’s plus “PB”, front G.Y. 380/85R34 duals w/ fenders, rear G.Y. 480/80R46, 10-bolt duals, (10) front weights & (1) pr. of rear (nice, only 907 orig. hrs, just serviced, 270 eng hp); 2008 New Holland T8040, MFWD w/ CAH, “Super Steer”, “Powershift”, 3-pt, CAT 3 / 4 fast hitch, (3) PTO’s, (4) SCV’s plus “PB”, front G.Y. 380/85R34 duals w/ fenders, rear G.Y. 480/80R46, 10-bolt duals, (10) front weights, (1) inside, (1) outside, pr of rear weights (nice, only 1183 orig. hrs, just serviced, 333 eng. hp); COLLECTOR TRACTOR: Int. 1566 Turbo/Diesel “Survivor” w/ factory cab, 3-pt, PTO, (2) SCV’s, (10) front weights, (1) pr. of wheel weights, & 20.8-38’s (original); COMBINE / HEADS / CARRIERS: 2003 CIH 2388, 4x4 combine, AFS yield monitor, hopper ext, 2-spreaders, 2-spd 4x4, 30.5-32 F.S. rice tires & 18.426 rear F.S. (1-owner, 376 sep/634 eng. hrs … Yes, it’s true, SN JJC0274294); CIH 2208-30, 8R30 “Poly” cornhead (SN HAJ034326); Kelderman? 8R down corn reel (new last fall); CIH 1020-30’ table (SN JJC0327097); CIH 1020-25’ table (SN JJC0329538); UF 30’ & 25’ head carriers; PLANTER / SEEDER / DRILL: Kinze 4900, 16x30 “Ground Drive”, bulk fill, no-till vac. planter w/ “Digi-Star” scales, 2-pt, markers, hyd. weight transfer, row clutches, pneu. down pressure, reduced dia. gauge wheels, corn & bean meters, section control, ISO compliant (1-owner, 748 total ac., SN 104123); John Deere 1990 CCS, 30’x7 ½” air seeder, ISO compliant, ground drive, blockage monitor, cab pop. adj., C.I. closing wheels, markers, (1-owner, only 3184-total ac., SN DJGF765192); JD 750, 15’x7 ½” no-till drill w/ down press, dolly wheels; TENDER: New in 2017 J&M LC390 “Speed Tender” on tri-axle, b.h. trailer, “TruTrak V-Belt”, remote control, Honda elec. start motor & pump, roll tarp (very nice, 1-owner); TILLAGE: CIH 3950, 25’x7 ½” finish disk w/ rear hitch & hyds (rear 20 ½”, frt. 21 ¾”); CIH 330 Turbo “True Tandem”, 28’ V.T. disk w/ hyd. leveling & depth control, rolling basket; JD 980, 24’ p.t. field cult. w/ rear hitch & hyds; UF 220, 30’ dble basket crumbler; DMI 2500, 5-sh., 3-pt, no-till ripper; IH 19’ Mix-N-Till finish tool; Kew. 14’ wing-disk; MF 9’ wheel disk; & more; GRAIN TRUCKS: 1996 GMC “TopKick” twin screw w/ front air tag, 20’ Kann alum bed w/ 72” sides, & cargo doors, twin cyl. hoist, CAT 3116 (215-hp) diesel, E.F. 9-spd, air brakes, power divider, A/C, 11R22.5 drive tires (sharp, clean inside & out, 297K, white); 1975 Ford LN800, 10-wh., air bag tandem, 22’ steel bed, 60” sides, hoist, 391 V-8, 5 & 2-spd (shows 62k, red); PETERBILT: 1984 Peterbilt 359 conv. “day cab”, twin screw w/ CAT 3106, E.F. 9-spd, W.B. 194”, alloy wheels, 22.5’s, rear “Air Ride”, true miles unknown, brown; HOPPER BOTTOM: 1974 Dorsey 34’ alum sided w/ roll tarp, & 22.5’s; SERVICE TRAILER: 2007 American Hauler 7000-lb, 16’, 2-axle enclosed service trailer, slant front, w/ Miller AC/DC, 18-hp Onan twin cyl welder / gen., 250-gal. s.s. fuel tank w/ metering pump, tool boxes, bolt/storage bins, cord reel, vise, alloy wheels, rear ramp door plus side entry (nice); CARTS / WAGONS / AUGER: Killbros 1400, 750- bu. cart, lg. 1000, hyd. spout, tarp & 30.5-32’s; E-Z Trail 500, 500-bu. cart, sm. 1000, & 18.4-26’s; KB 500 gravity wagon w/ KB gears, ext. tongue; 14’ grain wagon; 13’ wagon auger; & Buhler 1070, 70’x10” swing-away; HAY and LIVESTOCK EQUIP.: Claas “Rollant 66”, 4x5 round baler w/ net wrap, & alarm (nice); 2001 Corn Pro 16’ 2-axle LS trailer w/ bumper hitch; Gehl 100 grinder; Oliver 620 wire baler; large 3-pt square bale carrier; 3-pt bale spear; 3-pt, 540PTO, seeder; JD 28’ impl. trailer (no floor); & 6’, 3-pt R.M. LOAD OUT: Loader tractor will be available day of sale and Sunday, Dec. 15th from 1–4 EST. TERMS: All items sold As-Is.

BOURBON, IND.: 221.89 Acres in 4 Tracts, 7 p.m., Wilfred & Violet Gottschalk Farm, Ball Auction & Realty, Inc., 574-342-8299. See p. B4

Tues., Dec. 17

WALKERTON, IND.: Farm Equipment, 10 a.m. EST, Don & Doreen Van Dierendonck Farms, Schrader Real Estate &

Auction Company, Inc., 800-451-2709. See p. B4

Wed., Dec. 18

MILFORD, ILL.: Large Year End Auction, 7 a.m., Annual Toy Auction to follow at approx. 5 p.m., Mowrey Auction Co., Inc., 815-8894191. See p. B3

Thurs., Dec. 19

HAMILTON, ILL.: Dealer & Farmer Auction, 9 a.m., Sullivan Auctioneers, LLC, 844-847-2161. See p. B2

LAND AUCTION 221.89 Acres – Offering in 4 Parcels

Section 3 & 34, Bourbon Township, Marshall County, Indiana Property Location: From Bourbon- 2 miles West on US 30 to Fir Road, then North 2 miles to E 9th Rd, then West half mile to Farm. Watch for Ball Auction & Realty, Inc. signs. TOTAL OF 197.49 ACRES OF HIGHLY PRODUCTIVE FARMLAND 16.75 Acres of Woodland - Older Barn BUY ONE - ANY COMBINATION OR ALL - Walkovers Welcome

MONDAY – DECEMBER 16, 2019 at 7:00 P.M.

Auction Site- Matchette Center – 805 N Harris St., Bourbon, IN (Main St. to E College St., then East two blocks) Parcel 1 – 19 Acres, more or less with approximately 18.31 acres tillable. Predominate soils are Rensselaer and Brady. Frontage along the South side of 9B Road. Parcel 2 – 82.89 Acres, more or less with approximately 78.5 acres tillable. Predominate soils are Rensselaer and Crumstown. Frontage along the North side of 9B Road and the South side of 9th Road. Ditch located on the property. Parcel 3 – 96 Acres, more or less with approximately 93.4 acres tillable. Predominate soils are Rensselaer, Whitaker and Houghton muck. Frontage along the North side of 9th Road. Ditch located on the property. Barn measures 36 x 68. Parcel 4 – 24 Acres, more or less with approximately 16.75 acres of woodland and the balance in tillable land. Access provided by a 50’ deeded strip on the North side of 9th Road. 10% Earnest Money Deposit Day of Auction

FAMILY OWNED FOR OVER 150 YEARS Wilfred and Violet Gottschalk Farm

BALL AUCTION & REALTY, INC 302 E. Center St. – Bourbon, IN 46504 574-342-8299 or ballrealtygroup.com

LARGE PUBLIC RETIREMENT AUCTION MONDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2019 AT 10 AM

HENDRICKS AGRA - CHRIS (317) 908-9283 6178 E STATE RD 44, FRANKLIN, IN 46131 2 MILES EAST OF FRANKLIN ON STATE RD 44 ONLINE BIDDING WILL BE AVAILABLE AT PROXIBID.COM/TEDEVERETT C/IH MX240, MFWD, AUTO STEER READY, 3400 HRS · C/IH 7140, MFWD, DUALS, WEIGHTS, AUTO STEER READY, 5411 HRS · JD 4430 W/ CAB, PS, WEIGHTS, DUALS, 10186 HRS, S/N 071512 · NH TC30 W/ LDR, MFWD, 565 HRS · FORD 575E W/ CAB, 4WD, BACKHOE, 4 IN 1 BUCKET, 12”, 18” & 30” BUCKETS, 4133 HRS · CLARK CGP25 FORKLIFT, LP, PNEUMATIC TIRES · CASE 2588, 4WD, AUTO STEER READY, CHOPPER, ROCK TRAP, DUALS, 2604/1948 HRS, S/N 301912 · C/IH 2208 CORNHEAD, S/N HAJ0003654 · C/IH 1020 GRAIN HEAD, 30’ · UNVERFERTH HT30 HEAD CART · UNVERFERTH HT25 HEAD CART · KINZE 3600 16/32 PLANTER, NO-TILL, BULK FILL · NI 6-ROW PLANTER, LIQUID, KINZE UNITS · C/IH 4300 FIELD CULTIVATOR W/ MINI TILL & HARROW, 25’ · JD 8-ROW CULTIVATOR W/ S-TINES · KRAUSE 1925 DISK W/ HARROW, ROCK FLEX, 21’ · JD 400 ROTARY HOE, END TRANSPORT, 20’ · JD 11-SHANK CHISEL PLOW, PULL-TYPE · JD 1450 5X PLOW · JD 1350 5X PLOW · 2005 APACHE A5850 SPRAYER, AUTOSTEER, AUTO SHUT OFF, 90’ BOOMS, RAVEN 440, 1442 HRS · DMI 28 APPLICATOR, 15-KNIFE, 1300-GAL, PULL-TYPE · DMI APPLICATOR, 8-SHANK, HYD FOLD · CLARK ANHYDROUS APPLICATOR, 11-SHANK · RAVEN ANHYDROUS COOLER FLOW METERS · HINICKER ANHYDROUS COOLER FLOW METERS · J&M 875 AUGER CART W/ SCALES · 250 BU GRAVITY WAGON · (2) GRAVITY WAGON ON JD RUNNING GEAR, 165 BU · FETERL 12X60 AUGER · HOPPER AUGER W/ ELECTRIC MOTOR · JD WAGON GEAR · P&H WAGON GEAR · FLAT BED HAY WAGON · 6’ BOX BLADE, 3PT · BEFCO MD266-T50 TILLER, 3PT, 66” · WOODS 3180 BATWING · WOODS BB60 ROTARY MOWER, 3PT · 2005 DODGE 3500 CREW CAB, DIESEL, 4X4, 144871 MILES · 2000 INTERNATIONAL DAYCAB, N-14 CUMMINS, 10-SPD · 1999 INTERNATIONAL DAYCAB, N-14 CUMMINS, 10-SPD · 1988 KENWORTH, 350 CUMMINS, 9-SPD, 18’ FLAT BED · 2012 DRAKE HOPPER TRAILER, 38’ · 2001 WILSON HOPPER TRAILER, 39’ · 1981 LANDOLL GOOSENECK TRAILER, 35’ · 1978 DONAHUE GOOSENECK TRAILER, 36’, 3-AXLE, HYD TAIL, HYD JACK · 2007 BUMBER HITCH TRAILER, 14’ · 1991 BUMPER HITCH TRAILER, 18’ · 1974 DONAHUE DUMP TRAILER, 12’ · SULLAIR 185 AIR COMPRESSOR W/ JD DIESEL ENGINE · MILLER ROUGHNECK 1E STICK WELDER · HIGH VOLUME SAND BLASTING EQUIPMENT · SELF CONTAINED PTO HYDRAULIC SYSTEM · 750-GAL FUEL TANK W/ DUAL PUMPS · 500-GAL FUEL TANK W/ PUMP · 3500-GAL POLY TANK · (3) 2500-GAL POLY TANKS · 2500-GAL POLY WATER TANK · 1000GAL ALUMINUM WATER TANK ON TRAILER Ted Everett & Kurt Everett, Auctioneers, Monrovia, Indiana OFFICE: 317-996-3929 Ted Everett, AU#01013141, 317-370-3113, Kurt Everett, AU#08701600, 317-691-4937 Jeremy Edwards, AU#09100129, 765-366-4322 Austin Jordan, AU11300118, 317-432-1338

Auctioneer’s Note: Don is retiring from farming. This is a good line of well maintained equipment. Don’t miss this ABSOLUTE Auction!!

TRACTORS • SPRAYER • COMBINE • PLATFORMS • CORN HEAD • 2006 John Deere 8330 MFWD tractor, IVT, 480/80R46 duals, 420/90R30 front duals, 4 remotes, quick hitch, pto, inside, outside, rear weights, front weights, 4717 hrs • 2000 John Deere 8410 MFWD tractor, powershift, 18.4R46 duals, 4 remotes, quick hitch, pto, inside rear weights, front weights, integrated auto steer, 7987 hrs • 1987 John Deere 4450 MFWD tractor, powershift, 18.4R42 duals, 2 remotes, quick hitch, pto, inside rear weights, 8220 hrs • 1968 John Deere 2510 gas, NF tractor, 15.5x38 tires, syncro, dual remotes, 3pt, pto, John Deere 45 loader, 6046 hrs • 2009 John Deere 4730 sprayer, 380/105R50 tires, 800 gal SS, 100’ boom, boom height, 5 sensors, 2097 hrs • Dual spacers for JD sprayer • (4) 20.8R38 tires & rims for JD sprayer • (6) 380/105R50 take offs • 46” take offs • (2) 46” rims • 2000 John Deere 9650 STS combine, RWD, 20.8R42 duals, 480/80R30 rears, chopper, contour master, rear camera, 4014 eng 2681 sep • Wheat grates for 9650 • 1996 John Deere 893 corn head, hyd deck plates • 8 row down corn reel • 2001 John Deere 930F grain platform • John Deere 925F grain platform • Air reel for JD 925F platform • Unverferth HT30 head transport • Unverferth HT25 head transport • (2) 25’ sickles PLANTERS • NO-TILL DRILL • VERTICAL TILLAGE DISC • TURBO-TILL • ZONE BUILDER • DISCS • PLOWS • DISC CHISEL • 2009 16/32 John Deere 1790 planter, CCS Seed Delivery, no-till, seed firmers, pneumatic down pressure • 2003 16x30 John Deere 1770

Fri., Dec. 20

HAMILTON, ILL.: Dealer & Farmer Auction, 9 a.m., Sullivan Auctioneers, LLC, 844-847-2161. See p. B2

Fri., Dec. 27

ST. ANNE, ILL.: Farm Machinery, 8 a.m., St. Anne Consignment Auction & Equipment Sales, 815-4278350.

Fri., Jan. 10

MT. AYR, IND.: 110 +/- Acres, 10 a.m. CST, Hodges

& Davis, P.C., Jenkins Realtors, Inc., 219-866-5908.

Wed., Feb. 19

TERRE HAUTE, IND.: 6 +/Acres, 2 p.m., Roger & Kathy Sturgeon, Johnny Swalls, 812-495-6119.

Multiple Dates

SEE AD: Upcoming Auctions & Featured Farms, Schrader Real Estate & Auction Company, Inc., 800-4512709. See p. B1

Prepare barn heaters for winter ASSUMPTION, Ill. — Maintaining the proper environment in swine barns is essential for protecting animal health and promoting productivity. Austin Zimmer man, sales engineer for Automated Production Systems, offers the following recommendations to prepare barn heaters before winter arrives: n Blow dust and debris out of heaters with compressed air or a leaf blower tool. This will help promote efficient, as well as safe operation of the units. n Make sure the ignitor, sail switch and flame sensor are not covered with carbon or dust. Carbon can build up as a byproduct of the burner. n Move the flame probe ground wire to the burner to ensure the heater func-

tions properly. n Activate the heater from the room ventilation controller, which is important to make certain that the controller is communicating correctly. n Watch the heater with the service door open to confirm the proper start-up sequence: The fan motor starts and sail switch engages; the ignitor starts and glows red hot; the flame ignites when the gas value opens; and the ignitor turns off. “If any part of the startup sequence does not successfully complete, producers should troubleshoot the failure or if necessary, contact their dealer,” Zimmerman said. For additional information, contact your AP dealer or visit www.automatedproduction.com.

LARGE PUBLIC RETIREMENT AUCTION MONDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2019 AT 10 AM

DAVID & LINDA MUCK (317) 512-4141 8460 WEST 600 SOUTH, EDINBURG, IN 46124 FROM EAST OF FRANKLIN ON STATE RD 44, TURN SOUTH ON 750 W (SHELBY COUNTY) TO CO. RD. 800 W, GO SOUTH TO CO. RD. 600 S, GO WEST 1/2 MILE, AUCTION ON NORTH SIDE OF ROAD ONLINE BIDDING WILL BE AVAILABLE AT PROXIBID.COM/TEDEVERETT JD 4850, MFWD, DUALS, WEIGHTS, 3204 HRS, S/N 011248 · JD 4640, QUAD RANGE, DUALS, WEIGHTS, 8116 HRS, S/N 07070R · JD 4630, POWER SHIFT, DUALS, WEIGHTS, 7681 HRS, S/N 26730R · JD 4455, 2WD, 5601 HRS, S/N 008874 · JD S550 COMBINE, PREMIUM CAB & LIGHTING, CONTOUR MASTER, CHOPPER, AG LEADER, AUTO STEER, 1224/754 PRE-HARVEST HRS, S/N 1H0S550SEC0745691 · JD 606C CORNHEAD, 6-ROW, 36”, S/N 740169 · JD 625F GRAINHEAD, LONG & SHORT DIVIDERS, S/N 775081 · (2) UNVERFERTH HT25 HEAD CARTS · KELDERMAN 6-ROW CORN HEAD REEL · 3PT HEAD MOVER · KINZE 3600 12/24 PLANTER, S/N 621234 · KINZE 2600 PLANTER, 12-ROW, 36”, LIQUID, NO-TILL, S/N 610887 · SUNFLOWER 4211 DISK CHISEL, 9-SHANK · JD 220 DISK, 18’ · WHITE 4-18 PLOW · JD 15’ ROTARY HOE · LANDOLL RIPPER, 5-SHANK, 3PT · JD 845 CULTIVATOR, 8-ROW, FLAT FOLD, DANISH TINE · JD CULTIVATOR, 4-ROW · PHILLIPS 3003 ROTARY HARROW, 30’ · EZ TRAIL 700 GRAIN CART, CENTER AUGER · KILLBROS 385 GRAVITY WAGON · KILLBROS 350 WAGON W/ AUGER ON JD RUNNING GEAR · KILLBROS 350 WAGON ON JD RUNNING GEAR · MAYRATH 10X62 SWING AWAY AUGER · DMI 3200 ANHYDROUS APPLICATOR, 11-KNIFE, 36”, HINIKER CONTROL · 2006 APACHE AS1010, AUTO STEER, SWATH CONTROL, 100’ BOOMS, 1722 HRS · JD 250 SPRAY CART, 45’ BOOMS · WESTENDORF FORKLIFT, 3PT · UNVERFERTH 3PT HEAD CARRIER · (2 SETS) CHEM FARM SADDLE TANKS, 200-GAL · 20.8X38 DUALS · FLATBED ON JD RUNNING GEAR, 10’ · 1993 WHITE GMC WIA64TES, SLEEPER, 60 DETROIT ENG, 9-SPD, AIR RIDE, VIN 655197 · 1987 KENWORTH W900, DAYCAB, 350 CUMMINS, 13-SPD, AIR RIDE, VIN 345097 · 2015 DRAKE HOPPER BOTTOM TRAILER, 34’, AIR RIDE, VIN 356031 · 2010 DRAKE HOPPER BOTTOM TRAILER, 34’, AIR RIDE, VIN 356034 · 1998 UTILITY 32’ FLAT SEMI TRAILER W/ 1500-GAL POLY TANKS, CHEMICAL INDUCTOR W/ PUMP, VIN 396208

Ted Everett Auctioneers, Monrovia, Indiana Office: 317-996-3929 Ted Everett, AU#01013141, 317-370-3113, Kurt Everett, AU#08701600, 317-691-4937 Jeremy Edwards, AU#09100129, 765-366-4322, Austin Jordan, AU#11300118, 317-432-1338 SEE OUR WEBSITE AT TEDEVERETT.COM FOR MORE INFORMATION

AUCTION LOCATION: 3154 S. 700 E., Walkerton, IN 46574 NT planter, 600 gal fert tank, Yetter row cleaners, rubber spike closing wheels, pneumatic down pressure, Smart boxes, 20/20 Precision, row flow & air force • 1999 15’ John Deere 1560 no-till drill, dolly wheel hitch • 2pt hitch for JD drill • 31’ Landoll 7431 vertical tillage disc, rear basket, front gang wheels • 24’ Great Plains 2400 Turbo-Till, spider wheels & rear basket, (200 acres on front blades) • 5 shank Unverferth Zone Builder in line ripper, 3pt, coulters, spring reset • 19.8’ John Deere 235 wing fold disc • 15’ Kewanee 610 wheel disc • 7 btm John Deere 2450 on land plow • 4 btm John Deere 555 pull type plow • 9 shank AC disc chisel, Unverferth leveler SEED RUNNER • GRAIN CART • STAR FIRE 3000 GLOBES & SCREENS • FERTILIZER TANKS • BLADE • GRAVITY WAGONS • Unverferth 2750 Seed Runner seed tender, tandem axle, belt conveyor, Honda GX340 elec start motor, scale • Parker 710 grain cart, 30.5x32 tires, corner auger, rear & auger cameras, small 1000 pto • (3) John Deere Star Fire 3000 globes, (1) w/RTK • (3) John Deere 2600 screens, (1) w/auto shut off • Starfire 300 receiver w/light bar • Outback guidance system (light bar) • 2500 gal poly cone bottom tank w/stand • (3) 2500 gal poly tanks • 1600 gal Snyder poly tank • 1000 gal poly ribbed tank on Clark gear • 7’ John Deere 3pt blade • 400 Bushel Parker Wagon w/brakes & 2 unload doors • EZ Flow gravity wagon w/JD 953 gear • (2) 125 bu gravity wagons, (1) w/hyd auger • (14) John Deere suitcase weights • Front fuel tank & brackets • (5) Rumix rolling storage cabinets • (8) HID light ceiling fixtures • (2)

NAT Gas infared heaters • 125 gal fuel tank w/pump & auto shutoff nozzle • 60 gal single stage air compressor • Misc 22.5 + 24” semi tires & rims • 3” electric transfer pump w/motor • 10” Feteral hopper transfer auger w/motor • Aluminum hyd tank for wet kit • 16 bean units for 1770 SEMI-TRACTORS • HOPPER BOTTOM TRAILER • DUMP TRAILERS • DROP DECK TRAILER • ALUMINUM TRAILER W/ FERTILIZER TANKS • 10 TON TRAILER • GRAIN TRUCK • PICKUPS • 2009 Freightliner Columbia semi-tractor, day cab, Detroit Series 60, 30K on rebuilt motor, Eaton 10sp, air ride, 11R22.5 tires, 700,000 miles • 1987 Kenworth T-800 semi-tractor, Cat 425, 8sp, air ride, wet kit, alum rims, 11R22.5 tires • 1983 Mack R686 semi-tractor, Mack 300, 5sp air shifter, wet kit, 11R22.5 tires • 1995 Timpte 40’ alum hopper bottom grain trailer, spring ride, commodity hoppers, roll tarp • 1993 Ravens 39’ frameless alum dump trailer, air ride, poly liner, 285/75R24.5 tires • 22’ East alum dump trailer, spring ride • 1989 Fontaine 45’ drop deck trailer, 255/70R22.5 tires • City 40’ alum straight trailer, (5) 925 gal poly ribbed tanks, plumbing, inductor • Beaver Creek 20’+4’ beaver, 10 ton trailer, dual wheel tandem, ramps, elec brakes, like new LT 235/85R16 tires • 1981 GMC Tandem grain truck, 600 bus, gas, fresh overhaul • 2006 Dodge Ram 2500 SLT pickup, 4x4, Cummins, auto, 222,704 miles • 1995 Dodge 1500 SLT, 360 motor, Auto, 4x4, 227,500 miles • 12 ½ x 6 ½ utility trailer, single axle, full ramp • 1990 Interstate detachable lowboy trailer, 20ft well, 35 ton

OWNER: Don & Doreen Van Dierendonck Farms, 219-575-1013 • AUCTION MANAGER: Arden Schrader, 260-229-2442

Call for brochure or visit website

Boston Auctions (812) 382-4440

“A Farmer, Working For Farmers” Lic# AU01027041 AC63001504 • AU01050022

ONLINE BIDDING AVAILABLE

800-451-2709 • schraderauction.com


www.agrinews-pubs.com | INDIANA AGRINEWS | Friday, December 6, 2019

B5

New law targets independent truckers Suit challenges labor legislation By Don Thompson ASSOCIATED PRESS

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — The California Trucking Association on Nov. 12 filed what appears to be the first lawsuit challenging a sweeping new labor law that seeks to give wage and benefit protections to workers in the so-called gig economy, including rideshare drivers at companies such as Uber and Lyft. The legislation violates

federal law and would deprive more than 70,000 independent truckers of their ability to work, the association said. Many would have to abandon $150,000 investments in clean trucks and the right to set their own schedules in order for companies to comply with a law it says illegally infringes on interstate commerce. “Independent truckers are typically experienced drivers who have previously worked as employees and have, by choice, struck out on their own. We should not deprive them of

that choice,” association CEO Shawn Yadon said in a statement. The law set to take effect Jan. 1 makes it harder for companies to classify workers as independent contractors instead of employees, who are entitled to minimum wage and benefits such as workers compensation. “We expect big corporate interests — especially those who have misclassified their workers for years — to take this fight back to the place they know they can delay justice for workers: the courts,” the bill’s author, Democratic

Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez of San Diego, said in a statement. Her office said it’s apparently the first such lawsuit, although Uber, Lyft and DoorDash have said they will spend $90 million on a 2020 ballot measure opposing the law if they can’t negotiate other rules for their drivers. Uber also said it will keep treating its drivers as independent contractors and defend that decision in court if needed. The law could also affect construction workers, janitors and home health aides. But the law’s effect on ridesharing and meal delivery

drivers has received the most attention because those companies pay their drivers on a per-ride basis and don’t provide benefits such as health insurance and paid leave. The law implements a legal ruling last year by the California Supreme Court regarding workers at the delivery company Dynamex. The court set a new, three-prong test for companies to use when determining how to classify their workers. To be labeled a contractor, a worker must be free from control of the company; performing

work “outside the usual course of the hiring entity’s business;” and engaged in an independently established trade, occupation or business of the same nature as the work they are performing. The lawsuit was filed in federal court in San Diego the same day the University of California, Berkeley, Labor Center estimated that the law will apply to nearly two-thirds of independent contractors, including truck and taxi drivers, janitors and maids, retail workers, grounds maintenance workers and childcare workers.

NHTSA criticized for lax oversight of autonomous cars By David Koenig

AP BUSINESS WRITER

WASHINGTON — The nation’s road-safety regulator is under fire again for what critics call lax oversight of tests involving autonomous vehicles. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration doesn’t give enough direction to companies developing automatous cars, the chairman of the National Tra nspor t ation Safety Board said Nov. 19. Senators quizzed the NHTSA’s acting administrator on why the agency hasn’t set standards for automatic braking and

steer ing systems t hat are becoming more common, and why the agency hasn’t confronted Tesla about w idely sha red hacks that let drivers take their hands off the steering wheel. NHTSA’s acting administrator, James Owens, told lawmakers that his agency is assessing autonomous vehicle technology and researching how people interact with it.

He said, however, that the agency fears it could stifle innovation if it goes too far in regulating technology that is still evolving. The comments at a hearing of the Senate Commerce Committee came one day after the transportation safety board blamed a distracted occupant for letting an autonomous Uber test car strike and kill a pedestrian last year.

T he board accused NHTSA of failing to adequately oversee autonomous-vehicle testing. Board member Jennifer Homendy accused NHTSA of putting technology ad-

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U.S. On-Highway Diesel Fuel Prices Price per gallon Nov. 25: $3.066 Change from week ago: -0.008 Change from year ago: -0.195

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2011 Peterbilt 384, 386,600 miles, 450 hp, 10 speed, 196” wheel base, 3.73 ratio, Aluminum wheels, Clean Southern Truck, 100% tires, DEF deleted. . . . . . . $39,500.00

A Load on Us.... is a Load OFF You! We Move Fertilizer & Fuel Tanks Email: stribtrk@casscomm.com

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration

plans to make sure the companies have safeguards in place — for instance, to make sure operators are paying attention while the vehicles are moving.

2011 Peterbilt 384, 647,394 miles, 450 hp, 10 speed, Aluminum wheels, Clean, Southern Truck, 100% Tires, 200” wheel base, 3.73 ratio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $36,500.00

MARK STRIBLING TRUCKING, INC.

FUEL GAUGE

vancement above saving lives. The NTSB recommended that NHTSA require car developers to submit safety reports, and that NHTSA review the

Jeremy Lewis ~ Mitch Allen John Allen www.allentrucksales.com 2019 Chevrolet K3500 Crew Cab & Chassis, LT Pkg., 6.6 Duramax, Allison Auto, Leather Int., Htd Seats, Navigation, Dual Tanks (63.5 Gallon), Full Pwr., Alum. Wheels, Knapheide Alum Flat Bed w/Gooseneck, Rr. Receiver, Underbody Boxes, Just In! . . . . STK# 19143

2020 Chevrolet K2500HD Crew Cab Short Bed 4x4, High Country Deluxe Pkg., Sunroof, 6.6 Gas, 6 Speed Auto, Roof Marker Lamps, Plow Prep., Z71, Gooseneck & 5th Wheel Provisions, New Gas Engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . STK# 20000

2019 Chevrolet K3500 Crew Cab Short Bed 4x4, LTZ, 6.6 Duramax, Allison, Full Pwr., Htd. & Cooled Lthr., Navigation, Spray In Liner, Z71, Plow Prep., Big Rebates! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .STK# 19111

2019 Chevrolet K3500HD Crew Cab Short Bed 4x4, LTZ Pkg., 6.6 Duramax, Allison Auto, Full Pwr., Htd Leather, Navigation, Roof Marker Lamps, Plow Prep, Z71 Pkg., Just In!. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . STK# 19096

2019 Chevrolet K2500HD Crew Cab Short Bed LTZ, 6.6 Duramax, Allison Auto, Htd. & Cooled Lthr., Sunroof, Navigation, Spray In Liner, Z71, Big Incentives! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . STK# 19025

2020 GMC K3500 Crew Cab Short Bed 4x4, 6.6 Gas, Auto, Full Pwr., Convenience Pkg., Factory Gooseneck, Plow Prep, X31 Off Road Pkg., Dual Batteries, Roof Marker Lamps, JUST IN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NICE PRICED UNIT!

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2989 Industrial Blvd. • Crawfordsville, IN 47933

40 miles West of Indianapolis @ I74 & 231

Stk. #11806. 2014 Freightliner Cascadia, Cummins ISX, 450hp, 10spd, Jake, Air Ride, 431K Miles, 179”wb, Alum Wheels, Very Nice Truck! Warranty!!

Stk. #11754. 2011 Volvo VNL, Cummins ISX, 400hp, 10spd, Jake, Air Ride, 490K Miles, 3.58 Ratio, 173”wb, AC, Tilt, Cruise, Good Tires, Lease Maint, Warranty Included!

Stk. #11758. 2013 Freightliner Cascadia, Detroit DD15, 450hp, Ultrashift, Air Ride, 189”wb, Alum Wheels, 470K Miles, AC, Tilt, Cruise, Jake, Warranty!

Stk. #11744M. 2014 Freightliner Cascadia, Detroit DD13, 435hp, 13 Spd Automatic, Air Ride, Jake, 490K Miles, 3.58 Ratio, 178”wb, Lease Maint, Three Avail.

Stk. #11802M. 2014 Peterbilt 384, Paccar MX13, 430hp, Ultrashift Trans, Air Ride, Jake, Aluminum Wheels, New Paint, 326K Miles, 183”wb, Cruise, PW! Several Available!

Stk. #11763. 2012 Freightliner Cascadia, Detroit DD13, 450hp, 10spd, Air Ride, 501K miles, Jake, 3.55 Ratio, 179”wb, Chrome Bumper, New Clutch, PW, Tilt, Cruise, Warranty Included!

Stk. # 11797. 2014 Peterbilt 384, PACCAR MX13, 430hp, Ultrashift Trans, Jake, Air Ride, Alum Wheels, 344K Miles, 183”wb, 3.36 Ratio, PW, Cruise, Tilt. Several Available! Pricing Varies!

Stk. #11809. 2012 Freightliner Cascadia, Detroit DD13, 410hp, Autoshift, Air Ride, Only 248K Miles, PW, Jake, Tilt, Cruise, 184”wb, Alum Wheels, Chrome Bumper!

Stk. #11790M. 2013 Kenworth T800, Cummins ISX, 450hp, 13spd, Jake, 651K Miles, 3.70 Ratio, 215”wb, 63” Flattop, AC, Alum Fronts, Lease Maintained. Nice Truck!

Stk. #11781M. 2013 Freightliner Cascadia, Detroit DD13, 450hp, Ultrashift Trans, Air Ride, Jake, Alum Wheels, 438K miles, Excellent Tires, Lease Maintained! Clean!!

Stk #TM439. 2020 Neville Built, 42’ Tank Trailer, Spring Ride, 2 - 3200 gal Norwesco Tanks, 15’ Center Platform, Spring Ride, Alum Wheels. Nice Trailer! FET Included!

Stk. #11800. 2014 Peterbilt 384, PACCAR MX13, 430hp, Ultrashift Trans, Jake, Air Ride, Alum Wheels, 345K Miles, 183”wb, 3.36 Ratio, PW, Cruise, Tilt. Several Available!

$36,900

2015 Chevrolet K2500HD, Double Door Long Bed 4x4, LTZ Pkg., 6.0 Liter, Htd. & Cooled Leather, Full Power, Locking diff., Trailering Pkg., 1 Owner, 16K Miles, Immaculate! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $38,995

2013 Chevrolet K2500HD Regular Cab Long Bed 4x4, W/T Pkg., 6.6 Duramax, Allison, PW/PL, TW/CC, Locking Diff., Trailering Pkg., 1 Owner, 66K Miles, Just In! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $27,995

2018 GMC K2500HD Crew Cab Short Bed 4x4, Denali Pkg., 6.6 Duramax, Allison, Full Pwr., Heated & Cooled Lthr., Spray In Liner, 20” Chrome Wheels, New Tires, 27K Miles, 1 Owner, Local Trade, We Sold New! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $57,995 STK# G9089A

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2019 GMC K3500 Crew Cab Short Bed 4x4, Denali, 6.6 Duramax, Allison Auto, Full Pwr., Htd. & Cooled Leather, Sunroof, Dual Alt., Roof Marker Lamps, Z71 Pkg.! Save Big! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . STK# G9048

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2020 GMC K2500HD Crew Cab Short Bed 4x4, Denali, 6.6 Duramax, Allison Auto, Full Power, Htd & Cooled Lthr., Factory Gooseneck, Spray In Liner, Navigation, Snow Plow Prep! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . STK# G0001

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2014 Chevrolet K3500 Crew Cab Short Bed 4x4, LTZ Pkg., 6.6 Duramax, Allison Auto, Htd. & Cooled Lthr., Sunroof, Navigation, B&W Gooseneck, Spray In Liner, Z71 Pkg., New BF Goodrich Tires, Z71 Pkg., 1 Owner, We Sold New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$31,995 STK# 20008A

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GMC K3500 Crew Cab, SLE Pkg., 6.6 Duramax, Allison 2019 GMC K2500HD Double Door Short Bed 4x4, SLE Auto, PW/PL, TW/CC, Locking Diff., New Moritz Flat Bed, Pkg., 6.0 Liter Gas, Auto, Full Pwr., 18” Chrome Wheels, Fully Serviced & Ready for Fall! . .STK# A1822 $19,995 Z71 Pkg., Plow Prep., Preferred Plus Gas Pkg., Looking Diff., Trailering Pkg., Just In! 2 In Stock. . . . STK# G9101

$34,500

2016 GMC K2500HD Crew Cab Short Bed 4x4, Denali, 6.6 Duramax, Allison Auto, Full Pwr., Sunroof, Navigation, Spray In Liner, We Sold New! New Rubber! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $44,995 STK# G9092B

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B6 Friday, December 6, 2019

| INDIANA AGRINEWS | www.agrinews-pubs.com

Livestock

New swine show debuts Event separate from World Pork Expo By Jeannine Otto

AGRINEWS PUBLICATIONS

PROVIDED PHOTOS

Pam and Bob Janssen have raised children, crops, cattle and pigs on their grain and livestock farm near Minonk, Illinois. Pam Janssen is the current president of the Illinois Pork Producers Association.

Thinking globally, locally Janssen sets priorities as IPPA leader By Jeannine Otto

AGRINEWS PUBLICATIONS

MINONK, Ill. — When she’s not being a livestock and grain farmer, a mom, a grandma or the president of the Illinois Pork Producers Association, Pam Janssen can be found at her sewing machine. “That’s my sanity. That’s my go-to when I say, ‘OK, everybody, leave me alone. I just need peace and quiet and my sewing machine,’” Janssen said. The mother of three and grandmother of two stepped into a whirlwind when she took over as president of the Illinois Pork Producers Association almost a year ago. “The trade issue has hit us hard. With the price of livestock and the price of grain, some farmers are really struggling to keep going. I think a lot of us understand what President Trump is doing and why he’s doing it and it needed to be done. It’s just that it’s time to help us recover now and get this accomplished. Get the USMCA passed and signed. Get something done with China. We need to get that done,” Janssen said. The threat of African swine fever continues to be a top priority and a concern for Janssen, on a professional and on a personal level. “ASF, if it comes to this country, we’re done. It will be a sad day in the U.S. pork industry,” Janssen said. Janssen has been a member of the Illinois Pork Producers Association board since 2010. So, she’s not unfamiliar with the duties of what those leaders do and the issues the industry faces, both on a state level and at the national level. Janssen said she sees her role as keeping the ship steady through rough waters and continuing the projects that have been started. “You can’t really change anything during the course of your year. You kind of guide it along. Everything is already set in motion. You have to keep that forward motion going, plus deal with the things that come up unexpectedly,” she said. One example of that is dealing with keeping producers informed and upto-date on ASF. “We have to turn our attention to that, but we still have to be able to do the things we have started from the previous year,” Janssen said. She and her husband, Bob, are the sixth generation on their family farm. They have three children, Ben, Kim and Brian, and two grandchildren, Brooklyn and Noah. They have around 200 head of sows on their far-

FAST FIVE: PAM JANSSEN 1. Are you the first female president of the IPPA? I am the third woman to serve as president of IPPA. Ellen Fugate Hankes was the first woman to serve as IPPA president. She was followed by Jill Appell. 2. What piece of advice will you give the next president? You need to sit and listen to all of the information before making a decision on anything. Make sure you know all of the facts and everything that’s going on with an issue before you make a decision. 3. How many hours a week, on average, do you spend doing IPPA presidential things? It depends on what’s going on, so it’s tough to put a number on it. I’m always thinking about it. I woke up the other night at 3 a.m. because I thought of a question about ASF. 4. What is one IPPA project

row-to-finish swine operation, all on site. They also finish around 200 head of feeder cattle and raise corn, soybeans, wheat and alfalfa. Their pigs are marketed to Rantoul Foods in Rantoul. With the duties on the farm, Janssen said it’s easy sometimes to get tunnel vision and only pay attention to the immediate issues on the farm or in the immediate area. As president of the IPPA, she’s had to think globally, as well as locally. “We are on a Midwest farm. We know what’s going on in the world, but we still are in our own little world. As president, you have to stay on top of what is happening with trade and those issues, with foreign animal disease issues and other things that are going on that concern the swine industry,” Janssen said. She credits the IPPA staff for keeping her and

that you enjoy? Our Pork Power program. We are always accepting donations, in animals and money, so we can continue to donate ground pork to food banks throughout Illinois. They distribute that pork to their clients. 5. What is your favorite pork recipe? Pork loin. I put a rub on it. If it’s a really busy day or if I’m in a hurry, I use the Shake ‘n Bake pork seasoning, then wrap it tightly in aluminum foil and bake it in the oven. I throw in potatoes for baked potatoes and I’ll fix another vegetable on top of the stove right before the loin is ready and dinner is done. Final thought? We will survive. We just need to get our trade issues wrapped up and solved, keep ASF out of the country and keep our consumers standing beside us and not against us.

other board members upto-date and informed on the latest developments, from the local, county and state level to the national and international level. “It’s a good thing we have a wonderful office staff. They stay on top of things,” she said. With a board largely made up of working farmers, Janssen said the work the IPPA staff in Springfield does helps board members juggle their involvement with the organization and their farm duties. “The office staff does a lot, and they have taken over a lot of the responsibilities because we all are out here trying to keep our farms going,” she said. One of her favorite projects is talking to those who don’t farm and don’t raise livestock about what she does on the farm. It’s the one-to-one communication that she sees as

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so important for building bridges to consumers. “I do more of just talking to people and just explaining. You don’t have to be trained on telling somebody what you do. You already know what you do so you just tell them. It’s very easy to talk to people and explain it,” she said. Janssen babysits her grandson, Noah, two afternoons a week and often has her granddaughter, Brooklyn, out with her on the farm, too. Janssen said she’ll be ready to hand off the president’s role when the IPPA board meets at the Illinois Pork Expo to appoint new officers. “I will be ready to hand it off to the next generation on the board. It’s like with the grandkids. You get that younger generation and it sparks that fire inside to see what’s coming in the future,” she said. Jeannine Otto can be reached at 815-2232558, ext. 211, or jotto@ agrinews-pubs.com. Follow her on Twitter at: @AgNews_Otto.

INDI A NA POLIS — When June 2020 rolls around, young swine showpeople will pack their showboxes, load the pigs and turn their cars, trucks and trailers a different direction. “The Exposition is the live swine show that was formerly held in conjunction with the World Pork Expo. It is now a separate event,” said Cassie Godwin. In 2019, to prevent any possible introduction of the deadly African swine fever into the United States, the National Pork Producers Council canceled the World Pork Expo. The expo is traditionally conducted in early June at the Iowa State Fairgrounds in Des Moines. In 2020, the two events will be conducted separately. The Exposition will take place June 7-13, 2020, at the Indiana State Fairgrounds in Indianapolis. “Looking at 2020, NPPC, NSR, Certified Pedigreed Swine and the American Berkshire Association assessed the situation. They decided, from a strategic standpoint, just to best mitigate any sort of risk of ASF, it was best to separate the swine show from any sort of trade show,” Godwin said. Godwin said the health and welfare of the pigs — from showpigs of the Exposition to the non-show swine at home on farms of those attending the World Pork Expo — was the top priority for those making the decision to separate the events. “To mitigate any risk of introducing African swine fever — or any foreign animal disease — into the U.S., it was in

the best interests of all the parties to separate the trade show from the live swine show,” she said. Jim Monroe, assistant vice president of communications for the National Pork Producers Council, said NPPC plans to conduct the World Pork Expo in 2020 in Des Moines. The 2020 World Pork Expo is planned for June 3-5. “The NPPC board of directors will review plans at the regularly scheduled board meeting in December and formal announcements about World Pork Expo will be made after that meeting,” Monroe said. Godwin said entr y deadlines and more information will be available in January 2020. The set up of the Exposition will be similar to the shows formerly held during World Pork Expo. “We will have the junior show and the open show, then the open sale. We’ll still have a livestock judging contest, activities and things like that for the junior exhibitors. We will have vendor spaces and boutiques, but there won’t be the full trade show that is typically at the World Pork Expo,” Godwin said. She said the vendor event will feature National Junior Swine Association sponsors and show supply vendors. Godwin said the feedback so far has been positive. “We are very excited about the future of the Exposition. We think our partnership with the Indiana State Fairgrounds will be very beneficial long term and our membership seems to be very excited as well,” she said. For updates and more information about the 2020 Exposition, go to ht t ps://nat iona l s w i ne. com. For updates and more information about the 2020 World Pork Expo, go to https://nppc.org.


www.agrinews-pubs.com | INDIANA AGRINEWS | Friday, December 6, 2019

B7

Livestock

Gene editing Demand for goat meat on rise adds desirable traits to animals Technology offers opportunity to improve disease resistance By Martha Blum

AGRINEWS PUBLICATIONS

DAVIS, Calif. — Gene editing provides a way to precisely knock out undesirable traits or introduce desirable traits in animal breeding programs. “It opens up new opportunities to bring in useful things like disease resistance,” said Alison Van Eenennaam, Extension specialist, animal biotechnology and genomics in the Department of Animal Science at the University of California-Davis. “Gene editing involves the use of proteins that cut the double-stranded helix of DNA in a particular genetic location,” said Van Eenennaam during a webinar hosted by the National Beef Cattle Evaluation Consortium. “Once they’ve cut the cells try to repair the double-stranded break because nature doesn’t like that.” As a result, Van Eenennaam said, you can break the gene so the protein is no longer expressed, which is called a knockout. “You can also intentionally insert a piece of DNA between the break which is called a donor template,” she said. “So, maybe you’d like to bring the allele for polled into a breed that has horns.” Or, Van Eenennaam said, breeders might want to improve heat tolerance of dairy cattle or eliminate the protein responsible for mad cow disease. “You could offer the allele for improved meat tenderness, or you might want to introduce a gene that gives resistance to mastitis,” she said. “A lot of work has been done in China to produce tuberculosis-resistant cattle,” she said. “Tuberculosis is human transmissible, and it is quite a problem in the United Kingdom where it’s getting spread by badgers.” Van Eenennaam discussed a project that involved introducing the polled allele into dairy breeds. “Most dairy breeds are not naturally polled,” she said. The research project included a homozygous polled bull. “We crossed him with a group of horned Herefords at UC Davis, and the calves did not grow horns,” Van Eenennaam said. “We’ve been following the six calves – one female and five males – for the last two years to evaluate their health,” she said. “We found the calves had no horns and otherwise they were healthy and phenotypically unremarkable.” The university researchers have been doing public outreach about the use of gene editing. “I think we have to have a public discussion about the use of this technology,” Van Eenennaam said. “We took one of the calves to a public outreach event to explain the difference between polled and horned cattle.” During the event, the university representatives surveyed the audience about the use of gene editing. One of the questions was “What percentage of animal products like milk, meat and eggs currently come from animal produced by using genetic engineering?” “There is only one approved genetically-engineered animal, which is a fast-growing salmon that has never been sold in the U.S.,” Van Eenennaam said. “So, the correct answer to the question is zero.” However, before the presentation, Van Eenennaam said, the vast majority of the audience thought 75% of the products come from animals that have been genetically engineered. “We said clearly in the presentation there was none,” she said. “We still had people that don’t be-

lieve that message because there’s a perception that a lot of our animals are genetically engineered.” The researchers also asked the audience “How do you feel about the use of genome editing to address an animal welfare concern?” “We used the example of polled and 88% of the respondents were either strongly or moderately supportive of using gene editing to address an animal welfare concern,” Van Eenennaam said. “Gene editing is not going to replace conventional breeding because we’re still going to be using genetic selection and do traditional genetic evaluation,” she said. “Where it has a place potentially is to introduce useful alleles as in the case of polled or bring in useful variations from other species.” Martha Blum can be reached at 815-223-2558, ext. 117, or marthablum@ agrinews-pubs.com. Follow her on Twitter at: @AgNews_Blum.

ST. CLOUD, Minn. (AP) — Fresh goat is on the menu at Midnimo Restaurant in St. Cloud, an offshoot of Midnimo Grocery & Halal Meat that opened about a year and a half ago. It’s the only place in St. Cloud that sells locally raised halal goat meat, according to Ahmed Abdi, a member of the Somali community who is advocating for more local goat farms with the help of the University of Minnesota Extension. What’s available elsewhere is frozen meat processed in Australia or New Zealand. But that meat is often more than six months old and is difficult to prepare. When boiling the meat, Abdi said, the water has to be dumped out at least twice and often has a strong smell. “We shouldn’t have to get meat from across the world,” said Noor Yussuf, owner of Midnimo. Yussuf works with a Somali farmer from Central Minnesota who raises goats. The fresh halal meat is popular; more than 90% of Yussuf’s goat sales are fresh meat, he said. But that farmer is unique in his processing of halal goats, the St. Cloud Times reported. “He’s at capacity. It’s not a large-scale sustainable model,” said Serdar

Mamedov, an Extension educator. Mamedov is working with Abdi and others to connect the local Somali community with goat producers in Central Minnesota.

25,000 GOATS, 42 MILLION TURKEYS The demand for goat meat exists. The supply doesn’t — but it could. For many Somalis, goat meat is a staple, not a specialty item. “Access to goat meat is very important because… it’s part of the traditional cuisine,” Mamedov said. There are about 15 East African grocery stores in St. Cloud and each store could likely sell 15 to 25 goats per week to meet demand, Mamedov estimated. Using an average estimate of about 300 goats per week, the St. Cloud area could support selling about 15,600 goats per year, which is about two-thirds of the meat goats that are available in the entire state of Minnesota at any given time. U.S. Department of Agriculture statistics show the number of goats raised in the state is just a sliver compared to Minnesota’s most prominent livestock or poultry product — turkeys. About this time last year, there were 25,000

meat goats in Minnesota. Meanwhile, there were 2.3 million cattle, 14.2 million chickens and 42 million turkeys in the state. Goats could provide a boon to local farmers similar to turkeys or chickens, which Minnesota exports across the country, Abdi said. “This could be a big opportunity,” he said. “These new immigrants are the consumers, especially the Somali population.” Why aren’t there more local goat farmers? Many reasons, of course. “Since most of the grocery stores are operated by Somali immigrants, the language barrier (exists) most of the time and because there might only

be one person working in the store — or two — it prevents them from making connections or exploring other available opportunities,” Mamedov said. Some of it also comes down to farmers being afraid to ask the “stupid questions” such as “What is halal?” and “How do I raise goats as halal?” That’s why relationship-building is so important, Mamedov said. Mamedov, Abdi and Abdiaziz Odiriye, executive director of Community Grassroots Solutions, started meeting with area farmers in the last few months to talk about the demand for halal goats — and what partnerships might look like.

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Finding land biggest hurdle to getting into farming RED WING, Minn. (AP) — Vegetable farmer Kristin Pearson started her own farm in southeastern Minnesota two years ago — and quickly learned how many complicated details are involved. “One step could take two, three, four weeks,” she said last month at a gathering of farmers and farm advocates at a farmland access summit in Red Wing. Even with the challenges Minnesota farmers are facing this season — trade wars, economic uncertainty and tough weather conditions — some young people still want to get into farming. But it’s not easy, so a variety of nonprofits, government agencies and others have joined together to help with one key part of it: finding land. The Minnesota Department of Agriculture estimates about half of Minnesota farmland will change owners over the next 20 years. And still, connecting farmers who want to begin — or grow — their operations with land to use is a complicated equation.

The Farmland Access Hub, a newly created coalition of nonprofit and other farm advocacy organizations to support beginning farmers in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Iowa, is stepping into that void. The program is funded by a three-year grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and supports four farmland access navigators — mentors for lessseasoned farmers — who know the ropes. Program participants gathered in Red Wing to talk about land access and how to address it, just days ahead of a related conference on farm viability, Minnesota Public Radio News reported. PAIRING FARMERS WITH NAVIGATORS A “farmland access navigator” can coach and mentor farmers like Pearson through things like lease agreements, buying land or applying for loans. Pearson had been renting land in Oronoco in southeastern Minnesota and worked with

farm navigator Brett Olson as she looked for something to buy. “He offered a lot of support throughout this process,” she said, adding that she’s now signed a purchase agreement for some land. Olson said Pearson called him up one day with the news and thanked him. “And I was like, ‘What did I do?’” Olson said. “And she said, ‘You were there. You were helpful in just showing up and saying: Did you think about this? Did you think about that?’” Olson, who works for the rural advocacy group Renewing the Countryside, said the farm navigator program should be expanded. So far, the program has mostly focused on smaller-scale operations, but farmland access can be a barrier for those wanting to grow corn and soybeans, too. “We need 20 (or) 30 navigators out there in just Minnesota alone,” he said. Navigator Kate Edwards, who helps farmers in Iowa and works part-time for Renewing

the Countryside, said a lot of the work involves helping people through the emotional ups and downs of farming. “I’ve been there,” said Edwards, who is a farmer herself and talked about having to start over after the land she had been renting became unavailable. One recent situation Edwards said she helped with involved identifying an existing resource for a young farmer. He was looking for land, and Edwards asked him if he knew anyone who farmed. His grandfather, he told her. “I said, ‘Well, have you told him you want to farm?’ He said, ‘Well, no,’” she said. “Thanksgiving was coming up. I literally said, ‘Over the Thanksgiving meal, tell one of your family members that you want to farm.’” The story has a happy ending, Edwards said: A relative told the young farmer he could lease his grandfather’s land the next year, and there are plans underway for the young man to eventually own the land himself.

“As navigators, we’re not necessarily telling people what to do. We’re helping them find the resources that they already have access to in a lot of ways,” she said. ENSURING FARM VIABILITY The farm access discussion took place ahead of a larger National Farm Viability Conference that took place in Red Wing last month. Thom Peterson, Minnesota’s agriculture commissioner, participated in the discussion, and said there’s been a lot of interest in programs aimed at helping beginning farmers, including a tax credit, loan programs and a website that connects retiring farmers with beginning farmers. Peterson hears his share of bad news, especially when it comes to the dairy industry. But he said a recent monthly report on the number of dairy farms in the state showed 11 farmers had quit while five started, giving him hope. “I’m excited about the people who want to get into farming every day,” he said.

Combination of Enlist One, Liberty herbicides recommended INDIANAPOLIS — To give farmers the best control of tough and resistant weeds, Corteva Agriscience and BASF are recommending the use of Liberty and Enlist One herbicides on Enlist E3 soybean and Enlist cotton acres. These two leading herbicides offer exceptional control of broadleaf weeds including waterhemp, pigweed, kochia, marestail and ragweed species. “The combination of Enlist One plus Liberty herbicide is lights out on tough pigweed and waterhemp,” said Shawna Hubbard, Corteva Agriscience trait herbicide product manager. “Using both products postemergence will help farmers get the cleanest fields they’ve seen in years in areas infested with tough weeds. That’s why Liberty herbicide is now Corteva’s recommended glufosinate for use with the Enlist weed control system.”

MULTIPLE MODES Enlist E3 soybeans and Enlist cotton give farmers flexibility in their herbicide selection with tolerance to 2,4-D choline in Enlist herbicides, glufosinate in Liberty herbicide, and glyphosate. This allows farmers and applicators to employ multiple herbicide sites of action. These herbicides offer a strong combination featuring flexibility for farmers. Growers have trusted Liberty herbicide to deliver consistent weed control with its unique patented formulation. It has consistently controlled broadleaves and grasses on millions of acres for many years and has no known resistance in U.S. row crops. By using Enlist and Liberty herbicides on the same acre, farmers will obtain superior weed control while helping sustain the long-term efficacy of both herbicides. They give farmers options:

“Farmers need flexibility and options in their herbicide programs to control resistant weeds.” Kate Greif, herbicide product manager BASF

Spray these two products at one time with a tank mix of Enlist One plus Liberty herbicide or in planned sequential passes of Liberty herbicide and Enlist Duo herbicide. “Farmers need f lexibility and options in their herbicide programs to control resistant weeds,” says Kate Greif, BASF Liberty herbicide product manager. “Utilizing multiple, effective sites of action in a planned program delivers consistent performance this season, while increasing the long-term sustainability of these chemistries for

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According to University of Illinois research, selection for glyphosate-resistant waterhemp within four to six years was 83% less likely in a field where 2.5 modes of action were used than in a field where only 1.5 modes of action were used. In addition, because of the inherent stability of 2,4-D choline, adding Liberty herbicide in the tank with Enlist One herbicide does not increase the potential for volatility due to acidification. Retailers, applicators and farmers also can feel confident adding qualified AMS products listed on EnlistTankMix.com to optimize performance. Liberty herbicide — like Enlist herbicides — is now part of the Enlist Ahead rewards program. This means farmers can earn an additional rebate when pairing Liberty herbicide with Enlist herbicides on Enlist crops. See Enlist.com or your crop protection retailer for details.


www.agrinews-pubs.com | INDIANA AGRINEWS | Friday, December 6, 2019

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Lebanon, IN (765) 482.2303 05 CIH-2388 2103 R hrs. 2670 eng. Hrs., 4wd, chopper, new 30.5x32 tires, field ready, been through shop, $42,500 Call 217-556-5807 2011 CIH-5088. FT, RT, power fold ext., 2 spd. feeder/ hydro, chopper, Pro 700 mapping, & YieldSense yield monitor, EZ steer auto guide w/FM750. 30.5x32, 1694/1270 hrs. Well and always maintained shedded, records available. See Peo. CL for pics. $89,000; 2012 25' 3020 platform. Full finger, 3" knife, poly skids, long/short dividers. $10,000. Call or text 309-635-4162 2011 JD-9570 STS, 1173 eng. 788 sep. duals, long auger, premium cab, extensive maint. records, Always shedded, Lowpoint, IL. Call 309-645-9076 2017 JD-630FD, LIKE new, low acres, excellent condition. $64,000. Call 8125-483-4899 Cih 2388 2006, 2327 sep hours, duals, 18.4x42, 21ft unloading auger, 3 cylinders on feeder house, yield monitor, remote view camera, ex cond., w/ 1083, corn head, $63,500. 309-825-1056 CIH-1020 30' HEAD, new wabble box & cycle, 3” cut, Field serial number tracker, JJC0223749, $6,500; CIH 20' head, serial number JJC0089617 $2,500; Call 618-883-2578 or 618-780-3445

Off Patent GT (Glyphosate Tolerant) Soybeans Different Maturity Ranges available. Treated or nonTreated - Realistically Priced! Call for details. 618-667-6401, 618-407-3638, 618-407-3637

1984 JD-8650, 8700-hours, good shape, $28,000. 1978 JD-4440, 9200-hours, 2000 on overhaul, like new tires, $28,000. 217-304-1764 2005 CIH-MX285, 6900 hrs., duals, wts. Guidance ready, $52,500 Call 618-407-6875 2009 CASE-95C UNTILTY tractor 4WD 1350-hrs., rear weights, mechanical wheel shuttle, 12-spd. 540/1000 PTO $32,000. obo (618)895-2116 Case 9270, Cummins power, real nice, $40,000. 217-254-6276

CIH-7150 NEW TRANS A/C and interior, 20.8x42 duals, $31,500 Call 618-407-6875

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>All Grains >Any Condition > Immediate Response Anywhere >Trucks and Vacs Available CALL FOR A QUOTE TODAY PRUESS ELEVATOR, INC (800) 828-6642

High capacity Westfield Augers End of Year Best Prices Bunker Hill Supply Co Hutsonville, IL 618-563-4464

(2) LIKE NEW used 6614 & 614 Walinga vacs, 1 reconditioned 6614 Walinga vac, all new parts, Call 815-739-5993 New& Used REM & Kongskilde grain vacs. Used Kongskilde 2000, 1000, 500 grain vacs. Cornwell Equipment, Arthur, IL 217-543-2631

2009 NECO D16120 Screenless Grain Dryer, 230 volt 3-ph.,with upgraded hp. on motors, NG or Propane, 4' legs, cooling floors, Gravity fill with catwalk, Very Good Condition. Available Nov. 25th. $65,000. OBO Owner's # 309-238-6445 Dealer's # 815-878-8770

Leb. Spray Center, IN (765) 481.2044 Pendleton, IN (765) 778.1991 Plymouth, IN (574) 936.2523

3-ACRES INCLUDES GRAIN elevator w/80-ft. scales, office, 3 storage buildings & bins, etc. 6 miles East of LeRoy, IL $220,000. 309-825-5017

Remington, IN (219) 261.4221 Terre Haute, IN (812) 234.2627

BROCK 60' diam. Commercial bin, 95,000-bu., many many extras. $68,000. 319-350-0020, lv careful phone #.

Wilmington, OH (937) 382.0941 Winamac, IN (574) 946.6168 Wingate, IN (765) 275.2270

NEW AND USED grain drying fan and heaters. Call for current stock and shipping schedule. Amprode, relative humiditytemperature meter with belt holster. Includes; Corn and soybean equilibrium moisture charts included. 4149 Bin Service. Redelman Greensburg, IN 812-663-3164

1978 FAIR TWIN rotor snow blower, 8' wide, 1000 PTO, pics avail., $4,400 obo Call 309-525-2388

2-UNVERFERTH 530 wagonsgreen, roll tarps, brakes on all 4 wheels. Exc. cond. $10,000. ea. 815-674-4091 or 815-674-4640. BRENT-540 GREEN WAGON, good tarp, can deliver, $5,500 Call 815-878-7901 Retiring: Kilbros 1400 grain cart, 2002 ........................ $11,000. 309-314-1384

Retiring: JD 4960 tractor, FWA w/new Remand engine, 1991 .........................$45,000. 309-314-1384, call for pictures

LS-779039

Generators: used, low hr takeouts. 20KW to 2000KW. Dsl, Propane, Nat. Gas. 701-3719526. abrahamindustrial.com Winco Generators. PTO portables and eng. sets available, Large Inventory. Albion, IL. Waters Equipment. 618-445-2816

'88 FORD L-9000, 18' Wheeler grain bed, air tail-gate, 505 Cummins 9-spd roll-tarp white cab, red bed, $20,000 Call 618-604-7678 1992 GMC Topkick, Cat engine, 10ft bed, new paint, good condition, $7500. 618-528-8744 2001 INTERNATIONAL-4900 HT, 6x4, AR, 16,000 front, 40,000 rear, 22'x72”, Kann grain box, 3-pc. tailgate w/metering, 22.5 tires steel disc, 9 spd., DT 466/250 HP, 37,500 mi., never driven in winter, last of 3, estate. Call 765-366-2257 Crawfordsville IN.

Bane-Welker.com greendrills.com (740)756-4810 Hizey Farm Service LLC

Iroquois Equipment Bush Hog Dealer

Harms Land-Rollers, Brand New! 12 - $6,800, 14 -7,300, 16 - $8,000 , 24 - $14,800, 32 - $17,500, 42-$21,500 Any size Available. 715-234-1993

Onarga, IL. 815-351-8124 *New/used Bush Hog mowers on hand. *Full line of Bush Hog parts.

KINZE-3600 12-ROW $55,000. One PLANTER, owner. Precision monitor system, zone till planting system with liquid fertilizer, Martin row cleaners & closing wheels. New bean units. Used on 1500 acres. 500 gallon stainless steel Chem Farm tanks available for $1500. (765)652-3558

*Fast, low rate shipping. We can help keep your Bush Hog mower running like new! 26.5x25 Payloader tires set of 4, $1500. 618-214-2194 JD 600 part sprayer w/good 219 diesel engine, $2600. 618-214-2194

5X6 net wrapped Grass hay or large squares of alfalfa for horses and dairy cows. (217)370-4342 QUALITY HAY AND STRAW FOR SALE, big & small squares, delivery available, Call us David 815-685-5344 Mike 815-685-9646

We Repair Baler Knotters on your Farm! Service Calls also available for farm equipment! Used Rakes & New Tedders for Sale! Kings Repair, Marshall IN 765-597-2015

CIH-9170, 20.8x42's 85%, recent eng. work, $34,500 Call 618-407-6875

2009 BESTWAY 1200 Sprayer, 80ft. boom, Raven 440 control and Bestway section control, 320/90/R46 tires, little use, exc. condition, $23,000. 309-208-2800.

Cat 613C scraper-3208- 6 spd4700 hrs- good operating cond.$18000 spent on repairs in last 2 yrs, $25000.00. 217-822-2214

MILLER self-propelled sprayer, Model 4240, 1000gallon tank, 90ft booms, Ag Leader Integra Monitor, lots of options, 720-hours, like good cond., $160,000-obo. Delivery Possible. 814-322-8090

We Manufacture All Steel Irrigation Bridges! Abbott Fabrication Winamac, IN 574-225-1326 Shop: 574-946-6566

LOOKING TO BUY: 16 Row JD or Hiniker cultivator. Please Call or Text 309-303-2391

2013 CIH-870 14' 7-shank w/ 7in. Pts. ripper, obc-gang. Single pt. depth control wear shins, less than 4000 ac worth of use, Exc Cond. $35,000 Call 309-266-2800. GREAT PLAINS turbo till, 30' model 3000TT, serial # GP4833NN, blades & bearing recently replaced, HD frt. 191/2” rear 19-5/8” Exc. Cond., $22000 Call 815-674-5481 JD-637 32ft Disc; JD-630 25ft disk, excellent condition, 618-528-8744 M&W EARTHMASTER-1165 5shank, new pts. Leveler, good blades, can deliver, $4,600. call 815-878-7901

Lincolnland Agri-Energy, LLC Buying Corn Clint Davidson Commodity Mgr 10406 N 1725th St Palestine, IL 618-586-2321 or 888-586-2321

FOR SALE GRAIN Bin Drying System, 42' Shivvers Drying System w/level dry & computer system & Cross Augers, 2 turbo Fans & Burners, 26hp a piece, Call 217-821-6232 for price GSI FANS 25hp - 50hp Centrifugal fans 60% OFF. Brush Enterprises, Bethany, IL 800-373-0654 GSI FLOORING New-Weather: 18' , 21' , 24' Floor. 50% off. While They Last. Call Place Order. Brush Enterprises, Bethany, IL 1-800-373-0654 NEW GT RECIRCULATING Batch Grain Dryers. Cornwell Equipment. (217)543-2631

2005 FREIGHTLINER COLUMBIA 120, Air Ride Tandem Axle; 14L Detroit Engine; 12,000 lb Front Axle Weight; 40,000 lb Rear Axle Weight; Very Nice 641,000 Miles, 10 Spd. Trans, $28,500. 217-924-4405 8-5pm. 2007 PETERBILT 357, Cab and Chassis Allison auto, Hendrickson suspension, tandem axle, Cummins engine, 161,000 miles, 330-hp., $48,500. 217-924-4405 8-5pm.


C2 Friday, December 6, 2019

| INDIANA AGRINEWS | www.agrinews-pubs.com

Lifestyle KITCHEN DIVA

Host a holiday cookie party By Angela Shelf Medearis

conversation. I suggest each person bring three to fourI love cookies all year-round, dozen cookies, two dozen to but I especially love all the exchange and one or two dozen wonderful varieties of holiday for the sample plate. Suggest cookies at Christmastime. that they wrap each dozen that Hosting family and friends for they are bringing separately. a cookie exchange party is a n Avoid duplication of cookwonderful way to start or conies and recipes by sending out tinue a holiday tradition. invites a few weeks ahead of A cookie exchange is a great time, asking guests to RSVP way to host a party and get and tell you about the cookies a variety of baked goods and they plan to bring, and remindsome new recipes with the least ing them to bring an empty amount of expense. take-home container. This party is a wonderful way n Ask guests to bring copies to collect the personal stories of their recipes to pass around behind the cookies. Sharing with a little information about stories also acts as an icethe connection to the cookie. breaker and a way for guests to Having a list of the ingredients get to know each other. also ensures that people with You also can host a cookie food allergies can protect their “bake and exchange” party. health. Keep each recipe on its Since everyone is so busy, buyown plate. ing good quality cookie mixes n Create a separate sample and having the guests come cookie and exchange cookie over to stir them up, bake and area — either ends of a table or decorate them can become a on separate small tables — that party activity. provides easy access to the Here are a few tips for hosttreats from all sides. ing a cookie party exchange: Hosting family and friends for a cookie exchange party is a wonderful way to n Invite eight to 12 people for © 2019 King Features Synd., the best variety of cookies and Inc. start or continue a holiday tradition

Basic Sugar Cookie Dough This cookie dough can be made three days ahead, wrapped tightly and chilled, or frozen for up to three months. The cookies also can be baked and left undecorated two weeks ahead, wrapped tightly and frozen. You can use the roll-and-cutout cookies and sprinkle sugar, chopped nuts, mini chocolate chips, chopped candy canes and such on top. Use the slice-andbake cookie variation to make sandwich cookies using Nutella, nut butters or jams as a filling. Or you can use a different topping or sandwich filling for each dozen. INGREDIENTS 2 3/4 cups all-purpose flour 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon baking soda

1 cup unsalted butter (2 sticks), at room temperature 1 cup granulated sugar 1 large egg 1 teaspoon vanilla extract PROCEDURE In a medium bowl, whisk flour, salt and baking soda together. In a separate bowl, use an electric mixer to beat the butter and sugar until wellcombined and fluffy, about 3 minutes. Add egg and vanilla and beat until just combined. Reduce speed to low and gradually blend in the flour mixture; mix until just combined. For roll-and-cut cookies: Form dough into two equal-sized balls and flatten into discs. Wrap both in plastic and chill at least 1 hour.

Position oven racks in the upper and lower thirds of the oven and heat to 350 degrees. Prepare a well-floured surface and a well-floured rolling pin to help keep the dough from sticking. Working with one disc at a time, roll dough to 1/4 inch thick. Cut out as many cookies as possible with cookie cutters. If dough becomes too soft, chill until firm. Arrange cookies 1 1/2 inches apart on two ungreased baking sheets and chill 15 minutes. Gather scraps, form into a small disc, and chill until firm. Bake cookies until golden brown at edges, rotating baking sheets and switching position on racks halfway through, 16 to 18 minutes. Transfer to cooling racks to cool completely. Roll out the second disc of dough and scraps — reroll scraps only once —

and bake on cooled baking sheets. Transfer to racks to cool completely. Decorate, if desired. For slice-and-bake cookies: Halve dough and form into two logs, 1 1/2 inches in diameter. Wrap logs in plastic and roll to form a more uniform round shape. Chill at least 2 hours. Position oven racks in the upper and lower thirds of the oven and heat to 350 degrees. Slice cookies into 1/4-inch-thick rounds and arrange 1 1/2 inches apart on ungreased baking sheets. Bake cookies until golden brown at edges, rotating baking sheets and switching position on racks halfway through, 16 to 18 minutes. Transfer to cooling racks to cool completely; decorate, if desired.

A milestone for ag, food and rural perspective By Harwood D. Schaffer and Daryll E. Ray

selected columns in their newsletters, forward links for our column to members of their When we began writing this listservs, or publish selected column nearly 20 years ago, columns on their website. In the idea that we would author a given year, our columns are 1,000 columns seemed incomaccessed on our website more prehensible. After all, we were than 500,000 times by people in our mid-50s and who knew in more than 50 countries what our health would be in around the world. our 70s. But our health reWe have never asserted a mained good, and today we are copyright on the column bewriting our 1,000th column. cause when we were working In 2000, Daryll had begun for a land-grant university we to write, print and distribute saw the dissemination of our “Policy Matters,” a publication policy research as a part of our that he sent to congressional responsibilities as researchers members and staff, as well as and faculty members. other ag economists and memIn our retirement, we are bers of farm organizations. The still inspired by the land-grant process of producing and mail- mission. The column results ing each issue was tedious and in invitations to speak to farm expensive. groups and policymakers Harwood had just arrived around the world. at the Agricultural Policy In the beginning, we had Analysis Center after 30 years the benefit of the material as a parish pastor and 10 years Daryll had written for “Policy as the publisher and editor of a Matters,” but after six weeks, country weekly newspaper. he said to Harwood, “How are He said weekly newspaper we going to find enough maeditors needed a good quality terial to write a column every column that analyzed rural week?” and agricultural policy and It turns out that it isn’t as suggested that Daryll write hard as we feared. In fact, we a shorter weekly version of have the opposite problem — “Policy Matters” that would there are more ag, food and provide the kind of information rural issues that we can write that farmers need and can use. about than we have columns in But it wasn’t until Daryll a year. received a letter from Barbara At first, Daryll was listed as Ross, rural life director of the the author with assistance from Diocese of Jefferson City, that we Harwood. Later, Harwood was followed through on the idea. added as the second author, Barbara wrote that she was and with Daryll’s retirement, recommending Daryll to the Harwood became the lead aupublisher of the MidAmerica thor. Farmer/Grower to succeed Though the listing of the Harold Breimyer who wrote authorship has changed over more than 2,000 agricultural the years, two things have repolicy columns — a record we mained the same: the process probably will not match. Daryll and the perspective. soon received a letter from the publisher, and our first column THE PROCESS was written for the first week Almost every conversation in July 2000. we have is centered on current If we were to take the time agricultural issues. In these disand energy to write the column, cussions we work through the Daryll wanted to make sure issues seeking to identify what that it had maximum exposure. we can say that will add to the To do that we established the information that farmers and www.agpolicy.org website, consumers need in responding where each column is posted. In to the issues they face. addition, we send a column link Often, we do this for multito the people and publications ple issues in a given week. Out that are on our listserv. of that mix, we then focus on Over the years, other farm writing the column. publications have picked up Using the ideas generated our column, printing it in their in our discussions, Harwood paper every week. Others use writes the first draft of the col-

ment tools are the best choice. To reiterate, neither type of support program would be necessary if supply and demand quantities responded as quickly to reduced prices as is suggested by the graphs in economics textbooks. Many economic activities result in consequences that are not priced into the cost of the product. These are called externalities, and they can be both positive and negative. THE PERSPECTIVE From a policy perspective, the Our policy perspective problematic externalities are is built on the insights of the negative ones that impose Henry Agard Wallace, editor significant costs on others. of “Wallace’s Farmer” and The brown dust that blew secretary of agriculture, 1933through Washington, D.C., on 1940, under Franklin Delano Roosevelt, as well as the policy March 21, 1935, was a negative externality caused by the perspective of the New Deal. combination of poor soil manUnderlying everything we agement practices and a severe write is the recognition that drought. food is different from other The need for the Des Moines products; it is a necessity for life. Without access to adequate Water Works to build a new treatment plant to remove nifood people suffer from undertrates from the city’s drinking nutrition and die. water supply was caused by the That means if we have a leaching of fertilizer from farm choice between policies that fields upstream. That is an exresult in the production of too much food or too little, we will ternality that is not priced into the cost of a bushel of corn. vote for policies of abundance Whether it is through regevery time and then figure ulations or some other mechout how to manage the excess anism, we believe there is a capacity and resulting producneed for policies that seek to tion. In conducting our analytical minimize significant negative work, we depend upon the con- externalities. When it comes to who detercepts of traditional agricultural mines what to produce, we vote economics: price elasticities of for consumers every time. If supply and demand, externalithey want cage-free eggs, GMOties and consumer preference. free grains, or humanely raised The low price-elasticity of both supply and demand means meat animals, then that is what farmers need to produce. that markets do not self-corThe last principle we want to rect much in the face of low identify in this 1,000th column prices that result from policies designed to provide consumers is “Thou shalt not beggar thy with a safe, abundant supply of neighbor.” Stated simply, we are not interested in developing polfood. That leaves us with two icies that are designed to enable general policy options: price one set of farmers to put another support programs or income set of farmers out of business. support programs. As we stand at this mileIncome support programs stone, we express our gratitude are the more expensive of the to our colleagues, publishers, two and generally leave farmreaders and supporters for ers in a weakened financial making it possible for us to condition as evidenced by the have spent the last 19 years current situation in U.S. agridoing something we love, writculture. ing this column. Price support programs are Without you, none of this less expensive, provide a meawould have been possible. sure of safety in the case of a Thanks. crop failure like 2012 and require more finesse in management. We believe price support © 2019 Agricultural Policy programs using supply manage- Analysis Center. umn and emails it to Daryll, who reads the column, making changes to the draft where necessary. He then sends the edited column back to Harwood. Some of the time, it takes only a single round to get the column ready for publication. Other times, we bat it back and forth numerous times before we are comfortable sending it out.

‘Walking Dead’ was inspired by dairy farm By Kirby Adams

LOUISVILLE COURIER JOURNAL

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Kentucky is known for bourbon, bluegrass, the Kentucky Derby, Muhammad Ali – and zombies. That’s right, zombies. And not to incite an apocalypse, but even if you don’t care a lick about comic books or the “undead,” we’ll bet a dumpster full of rotting flesh that you’ve heard of “The Walking Dead.” Told in comic books and on a long-running television series — Season 10 premiered on AMC recently — “The Walking Dead” follows a cop named Rick who wakes up out of a coma in the middle of a zombie battleground. He goes on to lead an unlikely group of survivors as they search for a safe place to hold out until the apocalypse blows over. Fans of this pop culture phenomenon range from geeky teenage boys to successful middleaged women. And in case you’ve been living under a tombstone, the co-creators of this post-apocalyptic tale are a couple of school friends from Cynthiana, Kentucky, about 90-miles outside of Louisville. “There is nothing like the spirit of support you get from Kentuckians, we love goin’ out for Kentucky,” Tony Moore, the original illustrator of “The Walking Dead” comics, told The Courier Journal. “It’s a support that I haven’t seen anywhere else in the world. It’s awesome.” We assure you, this Kentucky success story has a lot more to it than just a world overrun by zombies, including how growing up on a dairy and tobacco farm in the Bluegrass State shaped his world view. He said the long stretches of solitude made the perfect environment for cultivating a creative young mind to explore the dark and disturbing depths of the gory and grim, as well as superheroes and other warriors of the world. After graduating from Harrison County High School in 1997, Moore wasn’t sure he could follow his artistic passion staying put in the Commonwealth. “I thought I would have to move to New York City or Los Angeles until I realized that a guy named David Mack who was doing a book called ‘Kabuki, Circle of Blood’ lived in Florence, Kentucky,” he said. “When I realized that he could do that from there, I knew I could do what I wanted to do from wherever.” Moore went on to nearly complete his bachelor’s degree in drawing from the University of Louisville’s Hite Art Institute before abandoning his studies to pursue his career illustrating comics. Without question, this comic book artist is best known for his work on “The Walking Dead,” which he co-created with fellow Kentuckian Robert Kirkman. There’s a holiday in Cynthiana, where they grew up, called “The Walking Dead Day” and a large green sign on the side of the highway celebrating the comic book artist and writer. But there is a lot more to Moore’s career than the stumbling and lurching world of zombies. Although he ended his regular interior artist duties on “The Walking Dead” with Issue 6, he continued to contribute to the title as the cover artist through Issue 24 and also illustrated the covers for the first four collected volumes of the series. Moore was twice nominated for the comics industry’s prestigious Eisner Award, and Steve Beshear made Moore a Kentucky Colonel, following in the footsteps of his grandfather. “The honor is important to me because I feel I have achieved something within my state’s cultural identity,” Moore said. “I like being able to say that’s who I am. It’s where I am from.” His artistic success has made him a sought after celebrity in Kentucky, but the world wants Moore, too. Along with his wife, Kara, and their 9-year-old daughter, it’s not uncommon for the Kentucky artist to travel to 15 comic book conventions a year. Many are located in alluring locations like France, The Netherlands, Chile, Sweden and Australia.


www.agrinews-pubs.com | INDIANA AGRINEWS | Friday, December 6, 2019

C3

Lifestyle TO YOUR GOOD HEALTH

Skin rash, joint pain, flu-like symptoms, headaches and fatigue are some complaints from patients who’ve had the recently approved Shingrix vaccine.

Beware of vaccine’s side effects By Dr. Keith Roach

I received the first dose of Shingrix this week and had pretty severe side effects, though in the range of what can be expected: high fever at 101.5 degrees, intense shivering, a severe headache and 12 hours of extreme fatigue. The entire reaction began 11 hours after the shot and ended 18 hours after that. I am 61 and in excellent health, taking only 25 mcg of levothyroxine daily. I have a few questions that I hope you can answer. I’ve tried looking at the clinical trial results for Shingrix, but I am not qualified to understand the information as presented. 1. Is it likely that I’ll have a similar — or worse? — reaction to the second shot? The package insert says one can react to the first, second, neither or both. 2. Are both injections identical? 3. When I had chickenpox as a child, I was way sicker than the average kid. Related? 4. If I get shingles, do I have a higher risk for a severe case? Compared with the previous one-time vaccine Zostavax, the new twodose Shingrix vaccine is much more effective. However, it does have a higher risk of side effects. You have had the most common side effect, though only 10% of people will have symptoms as bad as yours. These symptoms are caused by your body mounting an inflammatory response to the glycoprotein in the vaccine. The new vaccine does not contain a live virus. You clearly have a robust system to fight off infection. To answer your questions in order: You are at higher risk for a similar reaction for the second shot. I would plan your day accordingly, and premedicate with Tylenol, even though it may make the vaccine slightly less effective. The second vaccine is identical to the first. I have read reports that there have been shortages of the vaccine. I would guess that you are at lower risk for viral complications — such as infection of the eye, brain or lungs — but at higher risk for symptoms due to your own system, such as high fever. In many cases, the body’s response to infection can be as damaging as the infection itself. Last year I was treated for gout and was prescribed allopurinol at 100 mg once a day. Approximately five to six months after I started taking it, I became lethargic and was not feeling myself — I am a very young 77-yearold — and suddenly lost my sense of taste. I was taken off the medicine and still have little taste sensation other than citrus fruits, apples and spices. I was told that this could last for months, years or forever. Do you have any suggestions for me? I am eating as before, hoping that I will recover my taste. I certainly found that allopurinol can cause loss of taste sensation, but the Food and Drug Administration case reports don’t say how long it can last. Unfortunately, I can’t find any reliable way — or even plausible way — to increase the likelihood of getting your taste sensation back. Dr. Roach regrets that © 2019 North America Synd., Inc.

CHOW LINE

ANTIQUES & COLLECTING

Handling diabetes during the holidays I was recently diagnosed with diabetes and am not sure how to manage my disease as I go through the holiday season. Do you have any tips on what steps I can take to navigate through the holidays while keeping my diabetes in check? Holidays can present special challenges for those who live with diabetes, particularly as people look for ways to either avoid temptation or make better choices while they navigate all the indulgences of the season, said Jenny Lobb, a family and consumer sciences educator for Ohio State University Extension. Whether it’s dealing with busy schedules, extra stress, family gatherings, or holiday eating, the holiday season brings many extra gatherings, social events, and shopping, which leave us with even less time for healthy lifestyle habits such as exercise, she said. “Towards the end of the year, many people really do celebrate a holiday ‘season,’ with multiple holidays occurring

from October to January, many of which have a heavy focus on foods that are often high in sugar, sodium, fat, and calories,” Lobb said. “Since research shows that weight gained during the holidays doesn’t usually come off later in the year, it’s important to focus on ‘weight maintenance’ through quality diets and physical activity during the holidays.” With that in mind, Lobb and other CFAES food and nutrition experts offer the following tips to help you enjoy the holidays while managing your diabetes: n Cut stress and stay active. Stress causes our bodies to stay in a constant state of “fight or flight.” In response, our bodies release hormones that affect the way our bodies release and use glucose. This can cause blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels to remain high and be more difficult to manage. One way to deal with that is through physical activity, which helps reduce stress and helps our

bodies control blood glucose. Go for a walk after eating a holiday meal, or clear the table after the meal. This will get you active and prevent mindless munching. n Plan ahead. Stick to your healthy meal plan, plan menus in advance, and take diabetes-friendly foods to gatherings. n When eating a holiday meal, try to consume only the amount of carbohydrates that you’d normally consume and don’t skip meals or snacks earlier in the day to “save” carbs for later. This will make your blood glucose more difficult to control. n Keep desserts in check. Share a dessert, make desserts that you’ve modified to be healthy, or politely decline dessert when you know you’ve reached your limit. n Watch your meal portion sizes. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Tracy Turner, 364 W. Lane Ave., Suite B120, Columbus, OH 43201, or turner.490@ osu.edu.

This tiny billiard table is actually a box to hold matches. It was auctioned for $834.

Tiny table meets its match By Terry and Kim Kovel

What is the difference between a match strike, match safe, match case and match holder? They all were made in the 19th century to hold wooden matches. A match strike is a small vase kept on a table. It holds matches with the heads up. There is a rough surface used to strike the match and get a flame. A match safe or case is a rectangular box about the length of the wooden match. The box has a hinged cover that snaps shut to avoid letting the matches be accidently lit. The first wooden matches were not the safety matches used today. The match safe was often made of sterling silver with elaborate raised decoration. It was carried in a suit pocket or purse and used to light a cigar or

cigarette. The match holder usually was used in the kitchen. It was kept on a shelf or hung on the wall. An advertisement was sometimes on the front; it held a bunch of wooden matches used to light the stove. Don’t be surprised if you find that the match names are misused. Many people call them all “match holders.” This small 2-by-3 5/8-by-2-inch miniature pool table is a match holder for a table. It is made of brass, felt and ivory. The lid slides open, and there is a striking surface on the side. Its unique shape led to a price of $834 at a Wm Morford Antiques auction in New York. For more collecting news, tips and resources, visit www.Kovels.com. © 2019 King Features Synd., Inc.

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C4 Friday, December 6, 2019

| INDIANA AGRINEWS | www.agrinews-pubs.com

Lifestyle DONNA’S DAY: CREATIVE FAMILY FUN

Ham it up with leftovers

Bring kids to center of holiday decorating By Donna Erickson

INDIANAPOLIS — Now that Thanksgiving is over, is your fridge full of leftover ham? Are you so tired from Black Friday shopping that you can’t even think about cooking a meal for you or your family? Indiana Pork has the answer: Quick and easy recipes to use that leftover ham that are simple to make and something everyone will love. Indiana’s 3,000 pig farmers are proud to raise their animals with We Care principles. These principles make clear the industry’s values in food safety, animal well-being, people, community outreach and protection of both the environment and public health. Want to know more about pig farming? Visit www.ForkMorePork.com to have your questions answered.

Cooking with your children will provide many wonderful memories and quality family time.

Create holiday memories by cooking with children By Monica Nyman

recipes call for milk, yogurt, or cheese. When you When it comes to invite your children into cooking with kids, some the kitchen, you can desigparents might envision nate age-appropriate tasks, warm images of their like mixing milk into a child happily working batter or sprinkling cheese alongside them on a deli- on top of vegetables. cious dish. Other parents Key nutrients including might picture a big mess, protein, calcium, phosa time crunch, and barely phorus, potassium, and edible food. vitamin D are what make The truth is, most dairy foods such a dietary kids enjoy helping in the star. Dairy foods are an kitchen, and parents can important part of the diet use this to their advanbecause these nutrients tage. Time spent in the help build strong bones kitchen allows families to and teeth in children. bond. Parents can use this The kitchen is also a time to encourage their great learning lab bechildren to include healthy cause parents can introfoods in their diets, startduce health and nutrition ing with dairy foods. to their children. They The holiday season is can talk about balanced the perfect time to put diets, healthy eating traditional recipes and habits, and how food can kids together to create help young bodies grow. wonderful memories in Beyond nutrition the kitchen. Schedules knowledge, parents can are more exible, alreinforce concepts taught lowing time to create a in school. Counting the tasty dish without feeling number of ingredients rushed and stressed. can help with addition or Many classic holiday learning fractions.

Ham Pizza Snacks Servings: 10 INGREDIENTS 1 7 1/2-ounce package refrigerated biscuit dough Nonstick cooking spray 1/4 cup pizza sauce 2/3 cup ham diced 2/3 cup mozzarella cheese shredded PROCEDURE Spray cookie sheet with nonstick spray. Separate biscuits and flatten on cookie sheet, leaving space between so edges do not touch. Spread 1 teaspoon pizza sauce on each biscuit. Top each biscuit with 1 tablespoon of diced ham and 1 tablespoon shredded cheese. Bake in a 400 degrees oven for 8 to 10 minutes or until biscuits are light brown and cheese is melted.

Pizza Stuffed Crescent Rolls This kid-friendly recipe is loaded with gooey mozzarella cheese and pepperoni. Serve warm with marinara sauce for dipping or send them in your child’s lunchbox for a nutritious and ďŹ lling lunch.

if desired. Bake for 10 to 14 minutes or until golden brown. Serve with warm marinara sauce for dipping, if desired. Nutrition facts: Calories, 240; fat, 14 grams; protein, 8 grams; calcium, 8% Recommended Dietary Allowance.

Servings: 8 stuffed rolls INGREDIENTS 1 8-ounce can of crescent rolls 1/2 cup pepperoni slices (about 24 slices) 4 mozzarella cheese sticks cut in half 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted Italian seasoning for sprinkling on top Garlic powder for sprinkling on top Marinara sauce, heated for dipping (optional) PROCEDURE

Hot Ham and Pepper Cheese Hoagies Servings: 4 INGREDIENTS 8 ounces ham thinly sliced 4 hoagie buns sliced lengthwise 1/4 cup spicy brown mustard 1/4 cup mayonnaise low-fat 4 1-ounce slices pepper jack cheese 1/2 cup lettuce shredded 1 tomato thinly sliced

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Unroll crescent rolls onto a baking sheet. Separate into triangles. Place pepperoni on the widest side of the triangle. Place 1/2 mozzarella stick on top of the pepperoni. Roll the wide end to the smaller tip of the crescent roll, making sure to tuck in the corners. Brush top with melted butter and sprinkle Italian seasoning and garlic powder,

PROCEDURE Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Spread inside surfaces of buns with mustard and mayonnaise. Layer ham and cheese on bottom halves of buns; top with lettuce and tomato. Top with remaining bun half; wrap hoagies in foil and heat in 350 degrees oven until cheese is melted, about 15 minutes.

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Mama’s Hot Chocolate This classic drink can warm up the entire family on winter cold days. Serve this hot chocolate as is,

Discussing the change of mass that occurs when melting butter, boiling water, or baking cake batter can help reinforce science lessons. Social studies can be brought into the kitchen by sharing stories of family recipes passed down from generation to generation. Even if everything does not go perfectly, try to keep the mood light. Do not cry over spilled milk or an egg that gets more smashed than cracked. These skills will eventually come, and cooking with your child will provide many wonderful memories and quality family time. For more information on the health beneďŹ ts of dairy or to ďŹ nd dairy and kid-friendly recipes, visit www.stldairycouncil.org.

as mini pinecones and moss. In today’s more relaxed Here’s the fun: style, why not bring the Arrange holikids into the center of day-themed items in the holiday decorating with center of the base, then you, and make the complace glass shade, vase or ing month a do-together chimney tube over it. Set season of creativity, enin the middle of your dintertaining and giving? ing-room table, or wherTo get kids started, ever you wish to display here’s a whimsical cenit. Add greens or other terpiece that combines a decorative items around variety of objects to tell a the outside of the base. story or suggest a holiday For example: wintry theme to adorn 1. Set a miniature deca dining-room table or orative pine tree with mantel. Look for a clear tiny decorations dusted glass hurricane or a clear with snow in the middle. glass wide vase you may Around the outside, crehave tucked away in your ate a village scene with storage closet. mini houses and ďŹ guThen choose small rines from your kids’ toy holiday items and images bins or your ornament that express the way you collection. celebrate the season, 2. School-age kids might along with nature ďŹ nds. enjoy decorating the Then bring out stored glass by painting designs ornaments, mini strings with permanent paint of battery-operated lights pens or acrylic paint in or candles. squeeze bottles. Here’s the stu you 3. Set a pillar candle inneed for each arrangeside by itself and let the ment: light sparkle through colQ One tall and wide — orful at-sided marbles about 12 by 5 inches that you glue randomly — clear glass hurricane around the outside of the shade, a similar size glass shade. Use thick, plain, clear glass vase, quick-setting glue for or a glass chimney tube, best results. When the available at craft and dis- candle glows at mealcount stores. time, it will remind your Q A tray, a large round child that he or she was plate or a wide, shallow the one who placed the bowl for the base. marbles just so! Q Small keepsake holiday or themed items, Š 2019 Donna Erickson toys, artiďŹ cial greens distributed by King or nature ďŹ nds, such Features Synd.

Monica Nyman is a registered dietitian and senior nutrition educator with the St. Louis District Dairy Council. or dress it up with some festive toppings. Servings: 4 INGREDIENTS 1/2 cup granulated sugar 3 cups low-fat milk 4 tablespoons cocoa powder 1 cup evaporated milk Pinch of salt Marshmallows (optional) PROCEDURE In a small saucepan, combine sugar, cocoa, salt, milk and evaporated milk. Stir. Heat over medium heat until mixture comes to a simmer. Pour into your favorite mug and top with marshmallows (optional) Nutrition facts: Calories, 280; fat, 10 grams; protein, 15 grams; calcium, 30% RDA.

Create holiday magic with a whimsical centerpiece.

Source: Ashley Jones, Central Middle School.

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www.agrinews-pubs.com | INDIANA AGRINEWS | Friday, December 6, 2019

Calendar

SENIOR NEWS LINE

Thieves stole credit card number

DECEMBER

By Matilda Charles

CLARK COUNTY Dec. 10 – Fall 2019 Gardening Class – Basics of Butterfly and Bird Gardening: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. EST, Clarksville Middle School, 101 Ettels Lane, Clarksville, Ind.; 812-2831423. Dec. 13 – Agricultural Outlook 2020: 7:30 to 10 a.m. EST, Clark County 4-H Fairgrounds Food Stand, 9608 Highway 62, Charlestown, Ind.; 812-256-4591.

GRANT COUNTY Dec. 7 – Grant County 4-H Council Winter Craft Show: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. EST, Grant County Fairgrounds Community Building, 1403 E SR 18, Marion, Ind.; grantces@purdue.edu.

HARRISON COUNTY Dec. 6 – Harrison/Crawford Cover Crop Workshop: 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. EST, Harrison County Extension office, 247 Atwood St., Corydon, Ind.; 812-738-4236. Dec. 7 – Mini 4-H Saturday with Santa: 9 a.m. to noon EST, Harrison County Extension office, 247 Atwood St., Corydon, Ind. Dec. 9 – Holiday Tarts for Kids: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. EST, Government Center, 245 Atwood St., Corydon, Ind.; 812-738-4236. Dec. 12 – Junior Leaders Bell Ringing: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. EST, Harrison County Extension office, 247 Atwood St., Corydon, Ind. Dec. 13 – Agricultural Outlook 2020: 11 a.m. EST, Harrison County Extension office, 247 Atwood St., Corydon, Ind.; 812-738-4236. Dec. 14 – Hauling Livestock Workshop: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. EST, Harrison County Extension office, 247 Atwood St., Corydon, Ind.; 812-7384236. Dec. 20 – Produce Safety Alliance Grower Trainings: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST, Harrison County Extension office, 247 Atwood St., Corydon, Ind.; safeproducein.com.

JENNINGS COUNTY

Winter Farm Breakfast Meeting The Winter Farm Breakfast Meeting will be from 7:30 to 11 a.m. CST Dec. 13 at Cornerstone Community Church, 605 Maple St., Kouts. Bill Johnson will give weed management updates, Kelly Heckaman and Bryan Overstreet from Purdue Extension will discuss the weather, and Bob Yoder from Purdue Extension will present 2019 soybean highlights. For more information, call 219-465-3555. Cattle Association & Purdue Beef Meeting: Noon to 2 p.m. EST, Mitchell Community Building, 1755 Hancock Blvd., Mitchell, Ind.

MARION COUNTY Dec. 6-8 – Hoosier Beef Conference: Indiana State Fairgrounds, 1202 E. 38th St., Indianapolis, Ind.; hoosierbeefcongress.com. Dec. 17-19 – Indiana Farm Equipment and Technology Expo: Indiana State Fairgrounds, 1202 E. 38th St., Indianapolis, Ind.; Indianafarmexpo.com

NEWTON COUNTY Dec. 12 – Women’s Enrichment Series: 6 to 8 p.m. CST, Old Colonial Inn, 216 N. 3rd St., Kentland, Ind.

NOBLE COUNTY Dec. 6 – Festival of Cookies, Candles and Crafts: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. EST, Noble County Extension Office/County Complex – South, 2090 N. State Road 9, Suite D, Albion, Ind.

Dec. 9 – Commercial CCH’s at Southeastern Purdue Ag Center: 8 a.m. to noon EST, Southeast Purdue Agriculture Center, 4425 E. 350 N, Butlerville, Ind.; 812689-6511.

ORANGE COUNTY

LAWRENCE COUNTY

PORTER COUNTY

Dec. 14 – Area 2 Indiana Beef

Dec. 13 – Winter Farm Breakfast

Dec. 12 – Agricultural Outlook 2020: 6 p.m. EST, Orange County Community Center, 1075 N. Sandy Hook Road. Paoli, Ind.; 812-723-7107.

Meeting: 7:30 to 11 a.m. CST, Cornerstone Community Church, 605 Maple St., Kouts, Ind.; 219-465-3555.

PULASKI COUNTY Dec. 19 – 4-H Volunteer Training: 7 to 8 p.m. EST, Bethel Bible Church, 6966 IN14, Winamac, Ind.

SCOTT COUNTY Dec. 12 – Agricultural Outlook 2020: 7:30 a.m. EST, Scott County Celebration Hall, 1524 N. Gardner St., Scottsburg, Ind.; 812-752-8450.

Sometimes what you think is a scam phone call isn’t. Sometimes it’s the real thing — like the call I got today. When the phone rang, I didn’t rush to answer. The foreign-sounding man who left a message said that he needed to verify certain recent transactions on one of my credit cards. The only reason I paid attention was that this same thing happened to me 15 years ago. Still, I was leery. Instead of calling back at the number he left, I called the number on the back of my card and asked for the fraud department. Sure enough, my card number had somehow gotten out and people were busily trying to make purchases all over

Protect yourself from potential credit card fraud. the country — at that very moment. By that time, the attempts to make fraudulent purchases had exceeded $4,000. The man immediately canceled my card and said that another one would arrive at my door within 48 hours. I asked him how this could happen. My card was in my hand. I don’t keep a list of credit cards on my computer. I shred documents that have personal information. I don’t use the card at

small mom-and-pop places — which was my mistake 15 years ago — because their security isn’t always the best. I don’t use the card at ATMs that might have a skimmer. I hadn’t fallen for any scammer tricks over the phone. I hadn’t clicked links in any suspicious emails. So, how did that number get out? He couldn’t tell me. He said it happens far too often, and it’s nothing the card owner has done. I suspect that a few months from now we’ll learn that there has been another massive security breach, similar to the Target breach of 2013 where the information on 40 million cards was stolen. © 2019 King Features Synd., Inc.

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TIPPECANOE COUNTY Dec. 11 – ServSafe Food Protection Manager Course and Examination: 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. EST, Tippecanoe County Extension office, 3150 Sagamore Parkway South, Lafayette, Ind.; www.cvent. com/d/ybqvjq.

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VANDERBURGH COUNTY Dec. 10 – Southwest Indiana Seed Treatment Conference: 7:30 a.m. to noon CST, Vanderburgh County 4-H Fairgrounds, 201 E. Boonville New Harmony Road, Evansville, Ind.

WASHINGTON COUNTY Dec. 12 – Agricultural Outlook 2020: 11 a.m. EST, Washington County Government Building, 806 Martinsburg Road, Salem, Ind.; 812-883-4601.

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C6 Friday, December 6, 2019

| INDIANA AGRINEWS | www.agrinews-pubs.com

OPINION

WHAT’S TRENDING These are this week’s most read stories on the AgriNews website: 1. The next generation of farmland prices: Seven issues affecting values 2. Historic harvest: ‘A big first for

Huntington University’ 3. Nutrien Ag Solutions expands digital platform

4. Nature’s tillage tools: Undisturbed soil draws earthworm activity 5. Ag Coast of America expanding

What’s your opinion? Send correspondence to: Letters, Indiana AgriNews, 420 Second St., La Salle, IL 61301; or email: letters@agrinews-pubs.com

Time for giving thanks

Zippy Duvall American Farm Bureau Federation

We now gather together as friends and family to give thanks for our blessings as Americans and to kick off the Christmas holiday season. For many farm families, this season is a muchneeded opportunity to restore our sense of purpose and gratitude for the farming and

ranching life. Gratitude may seem ironic to some in agriculture this year. We’re dealing with a perfect storm of challenges: a trade war, bad weather and low prices for several commodities. As farm debt rises, so does farm stress. It can all seem like too much to handle, and it certainly will be a cloud over the holiday for too many in farm country. I’ve been there: feeling that no matter how hard you work, it’s not enough, and knowing that this could be a hard candy Christmas. But life on the farm is still pretty sweet. It is a blessing to be able to farm and ranch and raise our families on the land. Whatever comes our way — fat or lean — it’s important to be grateful. Even if our sock has a hole in it, it still helps us stay warm. When we look back on our lives, we see that some of our best times, our best memories, are from the lean times. It’s then that we focus on what really matters. Some of my family’s best stories are from the years when we didn’t have as much. But we always had a good meal and a good time together. We could even laugh at some of our hardships and the funny ways we coped with them. I bet your family has those memories and stories, too. As the clutter of commercialism is cleared away, we are brought closer to our families, and I’m brought closer to my Lord. It gives us a chance to be grateful for our health, to give thanks for the meal in front of us, and to appreciate our loved ones, even if they might drive us crazy sometimes. As we gather around the table, let’s draw out our friends and family members and pay attention to how they’re really doing. Look for signs of stress, such as a personality change or a major change in health or appearance. Be a good listener and try to help those who are struggling to find hope. Hope is the bailing wire of our lives in agriculture, holding things together for another year. This is also a time when we begin to think even more about our plans for the year ahead. Even in the worst of times, that’s a source of hope for most farmers and ranchers. Farmers are always looking at what they can do differently next year. Whether the current farm economy has us scaling back or scaling up, we can look for ways to turn today’s challenges into tomorrow’s opportunities — to prepare our farms and ranches for what’s ahead. There’s so much we don’t control in agriculture, but there’s also a lot that we do. The meal on the holiday table is what gives me hope, because it wouldn’t be possible without our farmers and ranchers. The world needs us. As we carve the turkey and cut a slice of pie, let’s think of each serving as a slice of hope — and a blessing. We still live in the land of plenty. We still have so much to be grateful for.

The sour mess of Dean’s downfall While many in the U.S. dairy sector focus on why the nation’s largest milk bottler, Dean Foods, filed for bankruptcy Nov. 12, the smart money — if there is any smart money left after four years of crushingly low milk Farm & Food prices — is focused on what’s next. File What’s next is what’s always next when your Alan Guebert business is built on shrinking markets, declining margins and a relentless rise in production: more tough times. Dean Foods’ crack-up, though, is so big and its market presence is so broad that what happens next to it will impact dairy farmers, processors, bankers and coop members alike from Boston to Minneapolis. Maybe worse is that this sour mess was predictable, if not avoidable. And, in fact, it was predicted by Peter Hardin, the publisher and editor of The Milkweed, a monthly dairy newspaper based in Brooklyn, Wisconsin. On the front page of its January 2019 edition, Hardin asked in blaring red ink, “Dean Foods: Preparing for Bankruptcy???” As the three question marks attest, Hardin doesn’t do nuance. He does, however, do his homework. In late 2018, Hardin came across a note in a Dean Foods’ quarterly Securities and Exchange Commission filing that reported the company had created something called the “Dean Foods Receivables Securitization Facility.” That “facility” allowed Dean to place “$450 million… beyond the reaches of the bankruptcy process.”

From 1979 to 2017, U.S. fluid milk consumption dropped from 247 pounds per person to 149 pounds. Worse, sales of non-dairy “milks” like soy, almond, palm and oat ballooned 61% from 2013 to 2017.

Walmart and Costco. That streamlining already means fewer, freestanding processors like Dean and, in turn, even fewer milk marketing cooperatives and dairy farmers. In a way, Dean Foods is just the first, hulking victim. Volunteering to be the second might be Dean’s largest fluid milk supplier, Dairy Farmers of America, which is now in “advanced discussions” to buy Dean. On the surface, DFA’s move makes sense. After all, Dean is the biggest milk buyer from DFA’s 14,000 farmer-members Why, Hardin wrote, would Dean Foods and still owes DFA $172.9 million for “cook up an Ivy League MBA scam to milk it bottled, but never paid for. shaft suppliers and lenders by hiding up But DFA and Dean have a checkered to $450 million in liquid assets” from past. In 2007, both — and others — were “the bankruptcy process?” sued by farmers who alleged antitrust vioThe answer — 94-year-old Dean Foods lations between the cooperatives and the was headed into the tank — also pointed processors. to the dairy sector’s overall failing health. “Neither company admitted wrongAfter decades of rising competition, doing,” notes Food Dive, a website that increased corporate consolidation, and tracks food news, “but Dean Foods setgrowing integration between dairy cooptled for $140 million in 2011. DFA settled eratives and corporate processors, hardly for $168 million in 2013.” anyone in the fluid milk business is able As such, dairy farmers from the East to make any money nowadays. Coast to the Midwest should ask themIn fact, the market is bleeding itself selves two questions. white. From 1979 to 2017, U.S. fluid milk First, if Dean and DFA already have consumption dropped from 247 pounds a failed past and a rocky current relaper person to 149 pounds. Worse, sales of tionship, how will DFA make any money non-dairy “milks” like soy, almond, palm bottling and selling milk without lowerand oat ballooned 61% from 2013 to 2017. ing the price it pays for members’ milk it Compounding those struggles are hopes to bottle? major food sellers like Walmart. In 2019, Secondly, who exactly is DFA going Walmart began to buy, bottle and sell to sell its members’ now-cheap milk its own milk. In the process, it began to? Deans Foods’ biggest customer was to eliminate regional milk bottlers and Walmart. So, who’s left? fluid milk-selling farmers from its supply The answers aren’t pretty. Then again, chain. spilled milk never is. That trend will continue. It won’t be long before American farmers become as Farm & Food File is published weekly commoditized as milk and chicken, since through the U.S. and Canada. Source the food they’ll grow will be for specific material and contact information are farm-gate-to-dinner-plate giants like posted at www.farmandfoodfile.com.

Soybeans at your holiday dinner table Whether ham, turkey, chicken, beef or fish take center stage at your holiday dinner table, you can thank soybeans. Why? Because livestock, poultry and fish rely on protein from soybean meal to grow into that tasty bounty. Doug Livestock and poultry Schroeder producers are the largest customers for Illinois soyIllinois beans and feed for animal Soybean agriculture represents the top market for soybeans Association today. In total, over 70% of the soybeans grown in the United States end up in livestock feed, so you and I can enjoy high quality protein not only around the holidays, but all year long. High-quality protein meal and hulls comprise nearly 80% of crushed soybeans, which feed pigs, poultry, fish, beef and dairy cattle. Pigs eat nearly 79% of the soybean meal fed in Illinois, while poultry consumes about 64% of the soybean meal fed in the United States. Meat exports represent the fastest growing category of soybean meal use, with U.S. pork exports generating a market value of $120.4 million to Illinois soybeans in 2018. Beef and pork exports alone add 85 cents per bushel to the price of soybeans. Not only does feeding Illinois soy-

bean meal add value to the crop, but exporting meat, poultry and dairy also increases demand and market value for soybeans. As the worldwide demand for meat and poultry continues to expand, especially in developing countries, buyers continue to demand quality, safe meat and look to the United States as a consistent supplier. This, in turn, benefits soybean growers in Illinois as livestock and poultry production and exports ensure markets for our soybeans. To continually tap into new markets and strengthen those already existing, the Illinois Soybean Association checkoff program supports meat export growth through the U.S. Meat Export Federation and the U.S.A. Poultry and Egg Export Council. The partnerships we have with USMEF and USAPEEC benefit soybean growers like you and me by breaking down barriers between U.S. products and international customers. One of the ways ISA supports USMEF is through pork promotion in Mexico. This investment has positive impacts on Mexican consumers as their pork consumption continues to increase at an annual rate of 3.3%. Beyond that, U.S. pork exports to Mexico have set volume and value records and ISA is proud to back USMEF’s efforts. ISA also backs USAPEEC because soybeans are a vital part of poultry diets – in fact, one out of every six bushels of

soybeans produced in the United States – making it vital that we continue to support the poultry industry. A primary USAPEEC project we support is Gulfood, a trade show in Dubai, where ISA helps sponsor a pavilion and booth for poultry and egg cooking demonstrations. In addition to our support of USMEF and USAPEEC, ISA also supports the World Initiative for Soy in Human Health, which creates demand for soy in public and private sectors globally. WISHH trains people in developing countries on using soy for economic and nutritional advantages to improve diets and health. These initiatives also encourage the growth of food and animal production industries. By creating demand for meat and poultry, USMEF, USAPEEC and WISHH initiatives not only help Illinois soybean farmers, they also help our neighbors who are livestock producers. We appreciate these opportunities for ISA to support farmers all across our state. This holiday season, I’ll enjoy dinners with my family and be thankful for the noble soybean, along with the farmers and livestock producers who helped put the meals on our table. To learn more about ISA’s support of USMEF, USAPEEC and WISHH, visit ilsoy.org. Doug Schroeder is chairman of the Illinois Soybean Association Board of Directors.

Zippy Duvall is the president of the American Farm Bureau Federation.

AGRINEWS

INDIANA EDITION — USPS694-470 ISSN0745-7103

Serving Farm Families Throughout The State of Indiana Publisher — Lynn Barker LBarker@agrinews-pubs.com | 815-220-6983 Published weekly by: AGRINEWS PUBLICATIONS A division of: SHAW MEDIA Indiana AgriNews is published weekly for $30 per year by AgriNews Publications, 420 Second St., La Salle, Ill. Periodicals postage is paid at: La Salle, IL 61301. Postmaster: Send address changes to Indiana AgriNews, 420 Second St., La Salle, IL 61301.

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C7

Business

Market data FOR WEEK ENDING NOVEMBER 29, 2019

Futures Prices This Last This week week Chg. week CATTLE HOGS DEC 19 121.20 118.67 2.53 DEC 19 62.02 FEB 20 126.20 123.85 2.35 FEB 20 68.17 APR 20 126.37 124.17 2.20 APR 20 73.92 JUN 20 117.72 115.32 2.40 MAY 20 79.75 AUG 20 115.35 113.02 2.33 JUN 20 85.60 OCT 20 116.72 114.35 2.37 JUL 20 86.15

Last week Chg. 61.22 67.65 73.70 79.85 85.07 85.42

0.80 0.52 0.22 -0.10 0.53 0.73

3.00 3.42 3.87 4.13 4.12 4.15

MILK CLASS III NOV 19 20.36 DEC 19 19.30 JAN 20 18.81 FEB 20 18.13 MAR 20 17.73 APR 20 17.47

20.36 18.78 18.30 17.75 17.40 17.32

0.00 0.52 0.51 0.38 0.33 0.15

CORN DEC 19 3712 3686 26 MAR 20 3812 3784 28 MAY 20 3856 3836 20 JUL 20 3902 3886 16 SEP 20 3880 3884 -4 DEC 20 3910 3924 -14

SOYBEANS JAN 20 8766 MAR 20 8912 MAY 20 9056 JUL 20 9182 AUG 20 9230 SEP 20 9222

8970 9112 9250 9370 9406 9394

-204 -200 -194 -188 -176 -172

CHICAGO WHEAT DEC 19 5474 5152 322 MAR 20 5416 5186 230 MAY 20 5446 5226 220 JUL 20 5426 5240 186 SEP 20 5476 5310 166 DEC 20 5564 5420 144

K.C. WHEAT DEC 19 4386 MAR 20 4470 MAY 20 4550 JUL 20 4612 SEP 20 4690 DEC 20 4810

4240 4332 4404 4480 4572 4706

146 138 146 132 118 104

BRENT CRUDE OIL JAN 20 64.06 63.39 0.67 FEB 20 60.49 62.37 -1.88 MAR 20 59.85 61.63 -2.78 APR 20 59.35 61.13 -1.78 MAY 20 58.95 60.73 -1.78 JUN 20 58.57 60.37 -1.80

ETHANOL DEC 19 JAN 20 FEB 20 MAR 20 APR 20 NAY 20

1.435 1.410 1.429 1.449 1.480 1.480

0.035 0.002 -0.020 -0.020 -0.020 -0.020

FEEDER CATTLE JAN 20 142.27 MAR 20 143.02 APR 20 144.97 MAY 20 146.15 AUG 20 151.02 SEP 20 151.65

139.27 139.60 141.10 142.02 146.90 147.50

1.470 1.412 1.409 1.429 1.460 1.460

Stocks of Agricultural Interest

This Last 52-wk week week high

ADM AGCO BASF BG CF

42.93 78.13 18.71 53.38 46.21

42.87 47.16 79.71 81.39 19.18 20.98 54.08 62.92 44.95 55.15

This Last 52-wk week week high

CTVA 26.02 25.54 32.78 DD 64.81 65.83 85.66 DE 168.05 175.38 180.48 FMC 97.96 97.23 99.34 MOS 19.05 18.16 37.33

Export Inspections (MIL BU.) This Year Cumulative Cumulative Cml. week ago this year year ago % diff. WHEAT 420.813 287.676 12354.28 10106.951 22.24 CORN 604.592 1182.033 5598.81 13166.330 -57.48 SOYBEANS 1942.761 1123.243 14383.34 12212.587 17.77

Livestock Summary % diff. This Last Year week year week week ago ago ago Hog Slaughter-est 11000 HD 2343 2758 2530 -15.05 -7.39 Cattle slaughter-est 1000 HD 556 662 641 -16.01 -13.26 MEAT PRICES This week Last week Change Pork Cutout Bellies Loins Hams Yld Gr 3 Choice Beef Select Beef 5-Mkt Fed Cattle Live 5-Mkt Fed Cattle Carcass

83.93 81.43 99.14 106.21 74.00 72.78 83.13 90.61 232.20 233.83 210.03 212.94 118.21 115.96 186.80 183.56

-2.50 -7.07 1.22 -7.48 -1.63 -2.91 2.25 3.24

OKLAHOMA CITY This week Last week Change Low High Low High Low High FEEDER STEER 4-5 Wt Mf 1’S 5-6 Wt Mf 1’S 6-7 Wt Mf 1’S 7-8 Wt Mf 1’S 8-10 Wt Mf 1’S

147.50 141.75 132.00 132.00 139.00

182.00 144.75 162.00 140.25 148.25 133.00 146.25 133.00 145.00 130.50

172.50 2.75 170.00 1.50 157.50 -1.00 156.00 -1.00 144.00 8.50

9.50 -8.00 -9.25 -9.75 1.00

CASH HOGS CARCASS PRICES This week Last week Change National

42.99 41.90 1.09

USDA National Grain Market Review Compared to last week, cash bids for soybeans and corn were lower. Wheat was higher and sorghum was mixed. Ethanol production for the week ending Nov. 22 increased to 1.059 million barrels, an increase of 26,000 barrels a day. Ethanol stocks were reported at 22.3 million barrels, a decrease of .237 million barrels. Monday's corn harvested was at 84%, 12% below the five-year average. Soybean harvest was at 94%, 3% behind the five-year average. For the week ending Nov. 21, an increase of 31.8 million bushels of corn export sales for 20192020 were reported, with an increase of 61.1 million bushels of soybean exports sales. Wheat was steady to 14 cents higher. Corn was 3/4 to 11 1/4 cents lower. Sorghum was 10 cents lower to 9 cents higher. Soybeans were 11 to 35 cents lower.

CORN Kansas City US No 2 truck Yellow Corn was 3/4 to 5 3/4 cents lower from 3.67 3/4-3.75 3/4 per bushel. Omaha US No 2 Yellow Corn was 3 to 4 cents lower from 3.473.51 per bushel. Chicago US No 2 Yellow Corn was 5 3/4 to 7 3/4 cents lower from 3.77 3/4-3.86 3/4 per bushel. Toledo US No 2 rail Yellow corn was 5 1/4 to 5 3/4 cents lower from 3.92 3/4-3.93 1/4 per bushel. Minneapolis US No 2 Yellow corn rail was 11 1/4 cents lower at 3.38 1/4 per bushel.

OILSEEDS Minneapolis Yellow truck

soybeans were 35 cents lower at 8.39 per bushel. Illinois Processors US No 1 Yellow truck soybeans were 11 to 19 cents lower from 8.84-8.97 per bushel. Kansas City US No 2 Yellow truck soybeans were 19 to 24 cents lower from 8.37-8.57 per bushel. Illinois 48 percent soybean meal, processor rail bid was 7.20 lower from 293.80-297.80 per bushel. Central Illinois Crude Soybean oil processor bid was 0.07 to 0.32 points lower from 29.2730.12 per cwt.

WHEAT Kansas City US No 1 Hard Red Winter, ordinary protein rail bid was 7 1/2 cents higher from 5.33 1/2-5.43 1/2 per bushel. St. Louis truck US No 2 Soft Red Winter terminal bid was 14 cents higher at 5.68 per bushel. Minneapolis and Duluth US No 1 Dark Northern Spring, 14.0 to 14.5 percent protein rail, was not quoted. Portland US Soft White wheat rail was steady to 5 cents higher from 5.85-5.95 per bushel.

SORGHUM US No 2 yellow truck, Kansas City was 10 cents lower at 5.94 per cwt. Texas High Plains US No 2 yellow sorghum was 8 cents lower to 9 cents higher from 6.13-6.57 per cwt.

OATS US 2 or Better oats, rail bid to arrive at Minneapolis 20 day was 1 to 5 cent lower from 2.79 1/23.62 1/2 per bushel.

U.S. stock indexes hit more record highs The Associated Press

Investors capped a day of light trading on Wall Street ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday by serving up another set of stock market record highs. The S&P 500, Dow Jones Industrial Average and Nasdaq composite closed at all-time highs for the third straight day Nov. 27.

And the Russell 2000 index of smaller companies hit its highest level in a year. Stock indexes have been breaking records in recent weeks as the U.S. and China have signaled that negotiations aimed at resolving their costly trade war are going well. The Dow gained 42.32 points, or 0.2%, to 28,164.

Farmers boost trade in Taiwan Hoosiers ‘meet the people who buy our soybeans’

INDIANAPOLIS — As part of a U.S. Soybean Export Council event, a small group of Hoosiers visited Taiwan to strengthen farm trade relationships. Indiana Soybean Alliance CEO Courtney Kingery and Indiana State Department of Agriculture Director Bruce Kettler joined Nancy Cline of Kirklin and Jim Douglas of Flat Rock, both farmers and ISA board members, in representing the state for USSEC’s 50th anniversary of working with Taiwan. “It was a real interesting trip. It was very valuable in that we actually were able to meet the people who buy our soybeans,” Cline said. “I think these relationships are of prime importance. We talked about many things. They were interested in hearing about the way we tend our land. We were also able to ascertain what needs Taiwan has. I think those face-toface meetings of building trust and confidence in one another is really going to be valuable.” During the trade mission and conference, the Hoosier delegation visited Taiwanese food processors and government officials. The team discovered that, despite obvious differences, there are many similarities that tie the two countries together. “If you relate this back to the farm, we really don’t do a lot of business with people we don’t know. It’s really the same way with international customers,” Douglas explained. “They want to come to Indiana and get out on the farm and see the operation and see the crops growing. They want us to visit their country; see what they’re doing with the product. Again, it’s a relationship, and it just takes years to build trust and establish the trade that we need.” This trip comes shortly after trade representatives from Taiwan visited Indiana in September to sign agreements to buy millions of metric tons of U.S. soybeans and corn.

ISA directors signed an agreement with the Taiwan Vegetable Oil Manufacturers Association to sell between 2.6-2.9 million metric tons, equivalent to 96-97 million bushels, of soybeans in 2020 and 2021. The net value of these purchases is estimated at $1-$1.1 billion. “When we look at our relationships with Taiwan, this really builds on results of that September visit when they were in Indiana with a trade delegation and agreed to buy millions of tons of U.S. soybeans,” Kingery said. “Coming out of that, Taiwan made a commitment to buy 2.5-3 million metric tons of soybeans. That is roughly equivalent to 97 million bushels of soybeans. “We have a partner that is that strong and is committed to use our soybeans. That has a direct impact on market access for Hoosier farmers.” Taiwan imports all of its soybean needs for its 23 million consumers. In 2018, the United States supplied 86% of that market share. “They want a dependable product of high quality,” Douglas reported. “They just want a reliable source. They can’t run their factories without product. They’ve found the U.S. to be a reliable provider.” “Trade agreements are negotiated by the federal government. They lay out the rules, they lay out what the agreement is going to look like,” said ISDA Director Kettler. “Unless you have these relationships, you’re not going to get the business. So, good business is still done by creating good relationships with people.” USSEC brings together U.S. soybean producers, merchandisers, commodity shippers, allied agribusinesses, processors and agricultural organizations to build a preference for U.S. Soy throughout the world. USSEC receives funding from a variety of sources including soy farmer checkoff dollars invested by the USB and various state soybean councils; cooperating industry; and the American Soybean Association’s investment of costshare funding provided by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Foreign Agriculture Service.

Retiring ISA CEO receives FFA Degree INDIANAPOLIS — Retiring Indiana Soybean Alliance and Indiana Corn Marketing Council CEO Jane Ade Stevens received an Honorary American FFA Degree during the National FFA Organization’s annual convention in Indianapolis. This award is given to those who advance agricultural education and FFA through outstanding personal commitment. The National FFA Organization works to enhance the lives of youth through agricultural education. Without the efforts of highly dedicated individuals, thousands of young people would not be able to achieve the success that, in turn, contributes directly to the overall well-being of the nation. “I’m a big believer in the leadership training and opportunities FFA provides for young people across the country,” Ade Stevens said. “I am honored to receive this award from FFA, and I’m doubly honored that I should receive this award during the 50th anniversary of young women being allowed to participate in FFA. I’ve always been an advocate of opportunities for women in agriculture, and I’m very happy to see so many involved here at the convention.” Ade Stevens has worked with the Indiana corn and soybean

checkoff organizations for more than 30 years. She has served as CEO for the groups since 2010. Ade Stevens last day with ISA and ICMC is Dec. 31. Courtney Kingery, who was raised on a farm in White County, was named the checkoffs’ new CEO in August, and she began her service on Oct. 1. The Honorary American FFA Degree is an opportunity to recognize those who have gone beyond valuable daily contributions to make an extraordinary long-term difference in the lives of students, inspiring confidence in a new generation of agriculturists. Members of the National FFA Organization’s board of directors approved the nomination. All recipients will receive a certificate and medal, and their names will be permanently recorded. The National FFA Organization provides leadership, personal growth and career success training through agricultural education to 669,989 student members who belong to one of 8,630 local FFA chapters throughout the United States, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The FFA is supported by 344,239 alumni members in 2,051 alumni chapters throughout the United States.

Grant for climate-positive agriculture WILMINGTON, Del. — Corteva Agriscience announced a $500,000 commitment to create the Corteva Agriscience Climate Positive Challenge to catalyze a movement toward climate-positive agriculture. The grant program will be launched next year and reward efforts that offset carbon emissions and protect the environment while sustaining farms and farmers. The challenge grants will provide financial rewards to farmers who are already advancing innovative climate-positive practices for collaborating with local environmental groups, universities, growers or others in the ag value chain to help scale the effort beyond their own acres. “We understand the challenges farmers around the world are facing as it relates to trade, policy and weather challenges,” said James Collins Jr., CEO of Corteva Agriscience. “These reasons are our primary drivers for announcing this now — to provide incen-

tives for those farmers that have a keen eye for scaling their practices.” Collins first introduced the concept of climate-positive agriculture at last year’s World Food Prize. Since then, the company had meetings with farmers and organizations representing every facet of agriculture and food production on the forefront of advancing agricultural sustainability. The discussions explored what it would take to create a carbon-negative and climate-positive agriculture industry around the world. “Clearly, there’s a thirst and passion to collaborate and coordinate so that we can best tackle what is undoubtedly the biggest challenge of our lifetimes,” Collins said. Corteva is already working toward creating market-driven financial incentives for farmers. The company’s subsidiary, Granular, is collaborating with Nori, the world’s leading carbon dioxide removal marketplace.

Changes in psychology Commodity Insight Jerry Welch

Frequently — several times a week, actually — I post articles on InsideFutures.com regarding the Big Four, stocks, bonds, currencies and commodities. A week ago, I posted an article entitled “Two Sound Bites Today,” where I posed this question: How fast can a commodity

change a trend? But I should have asked: How fast can any market change a trend? My column this week will touch on the latter not the former question. In the article from InsideFutures. com, I stated the following: “Three days ago, coffee futures hit a 13-day low. Today, coffee futures are at a new four-month high. Be careful being short commodities, here ‘in the hole.’ Be careful.” And this week, coffee hit an 11month high. The point I am making is when the psychology of a market suddenly changes from bearish to bullish, or vice versa, price trends change just as quickly. It now seems the psychology and price trend for coffee has changed to that of a bull after working lower since the fall of 2016. However, I also argue the market psychology for most all paper markets, stocks, bonds and the dollar have been skewed to the buy side of the ledger for an unusually long period. Since the trade war began 20 months ago, being long paper markets has done well because “if you were not long, you were wrong.” This year, with a month to go before the calendar reads 2020, being long commodities or hard assets has been the very opposite. And most all analysts believe the same scenario will be seen in the New Year, just as it was in 2019. It will be a year where paper markets do well and commodities do not do so well. Still, history shows clearly that a market can change trend rapidly when it is weighed too heavily on the short, or long, side of the ledger. With that thought in mind, allow me to recap what unfolded this week with the world’s best performing stock, ArtGo, the marble-mining company listed on the Hong Kong Exchange that rose 3,800% in 2019. Everyone was loaded up to the gills with long positions in ArtGo. In one wild and crazy day this week, the market psychology for ArtGo changed from manic to depressive, from wildly bullish to wildly bearish. The psychology changed overnight from “Let me in!” to “Get me out!” From businessinsider.com: “ArtGo shares had formed what some experts viewed as a disconnect from the company’s fundamental performance. The share price hit 85 times the company’s revenue, higher than some of the world’s buzziest tech companies. Marble prices haven’t jumped in 2019, and ArtGo’s revenue for the first half of the year was half that of the year-ago period. Yet shares soared through the second half of the year.” The discrepancy led the activist investor David Webb to issue a “bubble warning” in September about ArtGo’s shares, The Journal reported. Webb also asked Hong Kong’s Securities and Futures Commission to investigate the run-up. And the day after that news article hit the wires, shares of ArtGo fell 98%, wiping out $5.7 billion in market value. Yes, the world’s best performing stock in 2019 that rose 3,800% fell 98% overnight. Historically, such white-knuckle declines on the Hong Kong Exchange are not that unusual. On the same day that shares of ArtGo were decimated, shares of Kasen International Holdings, a small-cap stock, dropped 91% before trading was halted. The market psychology for shares of both firms changed abruptly to say the least. When market psychology changes, it is generally because the trade was, “too crowded.” When a market becomes too crowded with bulls, it is vulnerable to turning lower and, at times, dramatically so. When a market becomes too crowded with bears, the same thing can happen on the upside. History shows that “crowded trades” are fickle, subject to a change of direction in the blink of an eye and should be avoided. The market psychology today is ice-cold bearish commodities because of the trade with China. If the war ends — and it will — those pressing the short side of commodities will face an abrupt change of psychology and quickly discover that a host of entrenched bearish trends have morphed into newly emerging bull trends. And that means, “if you are not long, you will be wrong” when it comes to hard assets, or commodities. But for that to take place, a trade deal with China needs to be signed. Or, weather issues have to surface. In my view, this is no place to turn bearish hard assets. No place at all.


C8 Friday, December 6, 2019

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IT TAKES HEART. Grit and determination got you here. Faith will keep you going. You were made for this.


A2 Friday, December 6, 2019

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Corteva Agriscience launches digital LANDVisor Technology for ranchers and land managers I N DI A NA P OLIS — Corteva Agriscience announced the launch of LANDVisor, a new integrated technology solution that allows ranchers and land managers to implement a customized solution for accomplishing their land management goals. LANDVisor combines sophisticated imagery and data analytics with expert management advice to increase land productivity. The technology provides detailed information on forage productivity and vegetation including the density of desirable and undesirable plant species, identifying where and when herbicide treatments will be most beneficial. “Land managers and ranchers care about all their resources, and they manage all of them for both environmental and

DEADLINES FROM PAGE ONE

Just over 80% of Illinois’ 568 dairy operations with established production history have thus far enrolled in the program, and about 73% of Indiana’s 424 dairy operations are now enrolled, according to the USDA. ARC/PLC The sign-up deadline for the Agriculture Risk Coverage and Price Loss Coverage programs isn’t until March 15, 2020, but Graff recommends the sooner farmers sign up the better. “Illinois has more ARC/ PLC contracts than any other state in the nation. We’ll probably be around 160,000 contracts when it’s done. I know a lot of people are telling people to sit back and wait before they make their decision, but we can’t put 160,000 contracts through on the last day,” Graff said. “The nice thing about this is after you make your decision you’re not locked in until the March 15 deadline. If you make a decision and you decide two weeks later that you want to change your decision, you can come into the FSA office as long as it’s before March 15 and change your decision. “So, for these producers who are 90%, 95% sure of what program they’re going to take, ARC or PLC, you can take ARC county or PLC per farm per crop. Once you’re pretty sure what you’re going to do, come on in and get signed up because we’re going to get real busy and the March 15 deadline is going to come real quick.” The ARC/PLC sign-up deadline of March 15 also is sooner than in past years when it was set for the summer. “The March 15 deadline now is a whole new mindset for farmers to think about. We’re going to let people update their yields, but that deadline isn’t until Sept. 30,” Graff said. “If you would want to come in right now and make your yield update, we can take you in right now,” he added. ARC provides income support payments on historical base acres when actual crop revenue declines below a specified guaranteed level. PLC provides income support payments on historical base acres when the effective price for

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economic sustainability,” said Damon Palmer, pasture and land management business leader at Corteva Agriscience. “LANDVisor gives them confidence that they are making optimum decisions. Providing customers with the latest integrated technology to sustainably manage their resources and maximize productivity is key to fulfilling our commitment to ensure progress.” LANDVisor allows producers to manage land for optimal productivity and environmental outcomes. Through key insights, this tool helps land managers make more informed, actionable decisions on the potential of their land, resulting in maximum return on investment. Left unchecked, lowvalue undesirable vegetation reduces forage production and profit potential for livestock grazers while also degrading wildlife habitat. Not only does LANDVisor give producers the

ability to target their in- age production for cattle LANDVisor in the Unit- also in other industries. vestment where it will and plant diversity for ed States and around the For more infor matworld for use in the range ion on LANDVisor, visit provide the greatest pro- wildlife. Corteva plans to expand and pasture business but LandVisor.Corteva.com. duction and environmental benefits, but it also extends the expert relationships with consultants and Corteva range and pasture specialists through progress tracking. Earlier this year, rancher K.C. Windham participated in a test of LANDVisor in a mesquite control BUSH HOG 2720 BATWING MOWER TRACTORS project on his ranch near RHINO TS12 STEALTH 12FT BATWING MOWER 1997 CIH 9330, 3PT, PTO, 4800 HRS Clyde, Texas. WOODS S20CD FLAIL SHREDDER 2014 CIH MAGNUM 310, PS, SUSP, 1150 HRS “With this program, you YETTER 3541 40FT ROTARY HOE 2010 CIH MAGNUM 335, PS, MFD, 1200 HRS don’t have to guess,” he said. GEHL 1540 FORAGE BLOWER 2012 CIH MAGNUM 290, PS, MFD, GUIDANCE. 1480 HRS “It gives you the tools to CENTURY 1300HD PULL TYPE SPRAYER 2015 CIH MAGNUM 240, CVT, SUSP, 1700 HRS make better decisions, lookNI 3722 MANURE SPREADER 2010 CIH MAGNUM 225, CVT, MFD, 2650 HRS ing at soils, where the plants NH 145 MANURE SPREADER 1991 CIH 7120, PS, TWD, 3900 HRS are and what improvement CIH L570 LOADER 2016 CIH FARMALL 70A, OS, MFD, LDR, 200 HRS you can make. LANDVisor WOODS 1050 3PT BACKHOE 2016 FARMALL 70A, OS, TWD, 353 HRS is a game changer.” PLANTERS 2015 JD 8320R, PS ILS, 1500 HRS In early 2020, LAND2017 JD DB20 8/15 2014 JD 8320R, IVT, ILS, 1900 HRS Visor will be available to JD 7200 6R30 2014 JD 8285R, IVT, ILS, 1600 HRS ranchers and land man2014 KINZE 4900 16R30, BULK, VAC, LIQ FERT 2013 JD 8235R, PS, MFD, 3400 HRS agers in the Southwest 2009 KINZE 3660 16/31 LIQ FERT 2007 JD 8430, PS, ILS, 4200 HRS to manage highly inva2004 KINZE 3600 12/23 2015 JD 7270R, IVT, TLS, 1200 HRS sive honey mesquite. As 2008 KINZE 3500 8/15 2006 JD 7920, IVT, MFD, 5800 HRS a significant consumer of 2004 JD 7320 PQ, TWD, 3350 HRS WHITE 6100 6R30 PLANTER, LIQ FERT water, honey mesquite out2004 JD 6420, PQ, MFD, 5300 HRS JD 1590 15FT NO-TILL DRILL, 2-PT competes native grasses 2006 JD 5525, OS, TWD, LDR, 3100 HRS 2004 GREAT PLAINS 1500 NO-TIL DRILL and desirable woody 1984 JD 4850, PS, MFD GREAT PLAINS 1006 10FT NO-TIL DRILL plants, reducing both for-

a covered commodity falls below its reference price. ARC and PLC are options available to operators and landowners who share the crop. Farm owners also have a one-time opportunity to update PLC payment yields beginning with crop year 2020. If the farm owner and producer visit the FSA county office together, FSA can also update yield information during that visit. Covered commodities include barley, canola, large and small chickpeas, corn, crambe, flaxseed, grain sorghum, lentils, mustard seed, oats, peanuts, dry peas, rapeseed, long grain rice, medium and short grain rice, safflower seed, seed cotton, sesame, soybeans, sunflower seed and wheat. Farmers wanting more information about the PLC/ ARC programs are encouraged to call their county FSA office. There also will be informational meetings to learn more about the program opportunities. “Please go to one of those informational meet-

ings to learn the difference, to figure out exactly what paperwork you’re going to need and exactly what you’re going to need for your yield update,” Graff said. To help expedite the PLC and ARC signup process, particularly for larger producers, Graff recommends contacting the county FSA office before stopping to sign up so the staff can have the appropriate farm files and other information ready. “That way if they say come in at 2 p.m. Thursday or 10 a.m. on Monday, they’re going to have your files and other information out and ready for you and that will make a quicker visit for you,” he said. “Also, call the county office for the dates and locations of the ARC/PLC informational meetings. That’ll help you figure out what you want to do.”

Check Out Our Used Equipment Inventory!

1976 JD 4430, QR, TWD, LDR, 5650 HRS 1997 AGCO WHITE 6175, PS, TWD, 2500 HRS 2011 JD 4730, 100FT BOOM, GUDANCE, 2400 HRS 2018 JD TS GATOR 250 HRS 2017 JD 825I 4S GATOR 100 HRS EQUIPMENT 2011 JD 2310 30FT SOIL FINISHER 2013 LANDOLL 9650 50FT FIELD CULTIVATOR CIH 200 24FT FIELD CULTIVATOR CIH TIGERMATE II 28FT FIELD CULTIVATOR JD 980 24FT FIELD CULTIVATOR 2016 CIH 335 TRUE TANDEM 28FT VT 2011 CIH 330 TRUE TANDEM 31FT VT GREAT PLAINS 3000TT 30FT VT WHITE 255 15FT DISC 2014 BRILLION WLS360 30FT MULCHER BRILLION WL03 21FT MULCHER DUNHAM LEHR 24FT MULCHER LANDOLL WFP28 28FT PACKER BRILLION XXL184 46FT PACKER KRAUSE 4400 36FT PACKER J&M TF212 28FT DOUBLE ROLLING BASKET UNVERFERTH 110 20FT SINGLE BASKET FARMHAND WP42 27FT CROWFOOT PACKER SUNFLOWER 4213 11 SH DISC CHISEL IH 720 5 BTTM PLOW HINIKER 6000 9 SH NH3 APP/CULTIVATOR 2016 NH 313 MOCO 2012 JD 630 MOCO 2015 JD 469 ROUND BALER 2011 NH ROLL-BELT 450U ROUND BALER

CIH 5100 SOYBEAN SPECIAL 20X8 BRILLION SS10 SEEDER, PULL TYPE COMBINES 2016 CIH 8240, RWA, RT, CHPPR, 1650/1350 HRS 2014 CIH 8230, RWA, RT, CHPPR, 1300/1000 HRS 2011 CIH 8120, RWA, RT, CHPPR, 2000/1500 HRS HEADS 2014 MAC DON FD75S 40FT DRAPER, IH WIDE THROAT 2007 CIH 1020 30FT GRAIN HEAD 2006 JD 635 HYDRAFLEX GRAIN HEAD 2001 JD 925F GRAIN HEAD 1989 JD 920 GRAIN HEAD 1998 JD 918F GRAIN HEAD, CM, SINGLE POINT JD 643 CORN HEAD CIH 1083 CORN HEAD 2012 GERINGHOFF RD800B, 8R30, HD, HH, JD ADAPTER MISC HEAD TRAILERS GRAIN CARTS & WAGONS UNVERFERTH 1115 XTREME, SCALES, TARP, LIGHTS 2002 KINZE 640, TARP, LIGHTS PARKER 4500 GRAN CART CONSTRUCTION 2012 BOBCAT E80, CAH, 2SPD, LONG ARM, HYD THUMB, 2875 HRS 2011 DEERE 310SK, OS, 4WD, 1800 HRS 2018 CASE TV380, CAH, 2SPD, ULTRA HI-FLO, 600 HRS 2015 BOBCAT T650, CAH, 2SPD, 1500 HRS 2015 BOBCAT T450, CAH, 2SPD, 1100 HRS BOBCAT 873, CAH, 2SPD, 3200 HRS

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Tom C. Doran can be reached at 815-780-7894 or tdoran@agrinewspubs.com. Follow him on Twitter at: @AgNews_ Doran.

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ELKHART CO. Doug Wenger 574.535.5677

Schaefer Inc 260.410.0503 Bob Purlee, DSM 260.414.2301 Bob Hulvey 260.410.8248 Milt & Mark Dennis 260.437.9541

Dennis Smeltzer 574.215.1143 Kenny Shaum 574.354.3302 FULTON CO. Thomas Bearss 574.835.1085

/DairylandSeed

@DairylandSeed

CONTACT YOUR LOCAL DAIRYLAND SEED REP TODAY! HUNTINGTON CO. KOSCIUSKO CO. NEWTON CO. ST JOSEPH CO. Brad Blinn DK Lash LLC Scott Nelson John Ginter 260.917.0375 574.551.7746 765.490.0699 574.654.8327 Matt Gilbert 260.413.3465

Sponseller Bros 574.551.9650

Robert Dennis 210.672.3171

Stump Farms 574.371.7350

Andy Rice 260.248.7633

Ron Harter, DSM 260.760.2480

JASPER CO. Joe Klaus, DSM 812.455.1006

LA PORTE CO. Schlundt Ag Supply 219.716.1216 MARSHALL CO. Gochenour Ag Svc 574.453.0469 Gen-Tech Farm Seed 574.952.6623

NOBLE CO. Jason Lutter 260.705.5387 Foxwood Farms 260.336.2219 Kunce Bros 260.797.2459 PORTER CO. Aaron Freyenberger 219.252.1533 PULASKI CO. Niki Clemons 574.242.0663

/DairylandSeed

WABASH CO. Bob Shultz 260.571.6588

Brad Anderson 574.870.5119

Jared Cordes 260.571.2032

Gary Freiburger, KAM 260.433.5125

Rosen Farms 260.750.4357

STEUBEN CO. H Steve & Harold Hornbrook 260.316.6910

Daniel Musselman 260.571.4447

Trent Rager 260.905.6647

Troy Baer, DSM 260.571.3025

WHITLEY CO. Ashbaugh Family Farms 260.433.0382 Hinen Family Farms 260.213.8891

Clarence Rathbun 260.330.0747

™ ® SM}ī­ÌÐĉ­īāĮ­ĊÌĮÐīŒðÆÐĉ­īāĮďå#ďœæīďwÆðÐĊÆÐĮș#ķqďĊĴďīqðďĊÐÐīș­ĊÌĴìÐðī­Ũăð­ĴÐÌ ÆďĉĨ­ĊðÐĮďīĴìÐðīīÐĮĨÐÆĴðŒÐďœĊÐīĮȘɭǡǟǠǨďīĴÐŒ­Ș}ìÐ'ĊăðĮĴœÐÐÌÆďĊĴīďăĮřĮĴÐĉðĮďœĊÐÌÅř#ďœ æīďwÆðÐĊÆÐĮOO'ĊăðĮĴ'ǢɯĮďřÅЭĊĮœÐīÐþďðĊĴăřÌÐŒÐăďĨÐÌÅř#ďœɁæīďwÆðÐĊÆÐĮ­ĊÌTw}ÐÆìĊďăďæðÐĮȘ 'ĊăðĮĴ#ķď­ĊÌ'ĊăðĮĴZĊÐìÐīÅðÆðÌÐĮ­īÐĊďĴīÐæðĮĴÐīÐÌåďīĮ­ăÐďīķĮÐðĊ­ăăĮĴ­ĴÐĮďīÆďķĊĴðÐĮȘďĊĴ­ÆĴ řďķīĮĴ­ĴÐĨÐĮĴðÆðÌÐīÐæķă­Ĵďīř­æÐĊÆřĴďÌÐĴÐīĉðĊÐðå­ĨīďÌķÆĴðĮīÐæðĮĴÐīÐÌåďīĮ­ăÐďīķĮÐðĊřďķī ­īЭȘ'ĊăðĮĴ#ķď­ĊÌ'ĊăðĮĴZĊÐìÐīÅðÆðÌÐĮ­īÐĴìÐďĊăřǡșǣȭ#ĨīďÌķÆĴĮ­ķĴìďīðšÐÌåďīķĮÐœðĴì'ĊăðĮĴ ÆīďĨĮȘďĊĮķăĴ'ĊăðĮĴìÐīÅðÆðÌÐă­ÅÐăĮåďīœÐÐÌĮĨÐÆðÐĮÆďĊĴīďăăÐÌȘăœ­řĮīЭÌ­ĊÌåďăăďœă­ÅÐăÌðīÐÆĴðďĊĮȘ


A2 Friday, December 6, 2019

| INDIANA AGRINEWS | www.agrinews-pubs.com

Corteva Agriscience launches digital LANDVisor Technology for ranchers and land managers I N DI A NA P OLIS — Corteva Agriscience announced the launch of LANDVisor, a new integrated technology solution that allows ranchers and land managers to implement a customized solution for accomplishing their land management goals. LANDVisor combines sophisticated imagery and data analytics with expert management advice to increase land productivity. The technology provides detailed information on forage productivity and vegetation including the density of desirable and undesirable plant species, identifying where and when herbicide treatments will be most beneficial. “Land managers and ranchers care about all their resources, and they manage all of them for both environmental and

DEADLINES FROM PAGE ONE

Just over 80% of Illinois’ 568 dairy operations with established production history have thus far enrolled in the program, and about 73% of Indiana’s 424 dairy operations are now enrolled, according to the USDA. ARC/PLC The sign-up deadline for the Agriculture Risk Coverage and Price Loss Coverage programs isn’t until March 15, 2020, but Graff recommends the sooner farmers sign up the better. “Illinois has more ARC/ PLC contracts than any other state in the nation. We’ll probably be around 160,000 contracts when it’s done. I know a lot of people are telling people to sit back and wait before they make their decision, but we can’t put 160,000 contracts through on the last day,” Graff said. “The nice thing about this is after you make your decision you’re not locked in until the March 15 deadline. If you make a decision and you decide two weeks later that you want to change your decision, you can come into the FSA office as long as it’s before March 15 and change your decision. “So, for these producers who are 90%, 95% sure of what program they’re going to take, ARC or PLC, you can take ARC county or PLC per farm per crop. Once you’re pretty sure what you’re going to do, come on in and get signed up because we’re going to get real busy and the March 15 deadline is going to come real quick.” The ARC/PLC sign-up deadline of March 15 also is sooner than in past years when it was set for the summer. “The March 15 deadline now is a whole new mindset for farmers to think about. We’re going to let people update their yields, but that deadline isn’t until Sept. 30,” Graff said. “If you would want to come in right now and make your yield update, we can take you in right now,” he added. ARC provides income support payments on historical base acres when actual crop revenue declines below a specified guaranteed level. PLC provides income support payments on historical base acres when the effective price for

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economic sustainability,” said Damon Palmer, pasture and land management business leader at Corteva Agriscience. “LANDVisor gives them confidence that they are making optimum decisions. Providing customers with the latest integrated technology to sustainably manage their resources and maximize productivity is key to fulfilling our commitment to ensure progress.” LANDVisor allows producers to manage land for optimal productivity and environmental outcomes. Through key insights, this tool helps land managers make more informed, actionable decisions on the potential of their land, resulting in maximum return on investment. Left unchecked, lowvalue undesirable vegetation reduces forage production and profit potential for livestock grazers while also degrading wildlife habitat. Not only does LANDVisor give producers the

ability to target their in- age production for cattle LANDVisor in the Unit- also in other industries. vestment where it will and plant diversity for ed States and around the For more infor matworld for use in the range ion on LANDVisor, visit provide the greatest pro- wildlife. Corteva plans to expand and pasture business but LandVisor.Corteva.com. duction and environmental benefits, but it also extends the expert relationships with consultants and Corteva range and pasture specialists through progress tracking. Earlier this year, rancher K.C. Windham participated in a test of LANDVisor in a mesquite control BUSH HOG 2720 BATWING MOWER TRACTORS project on his ranch near RHINO TS12 STEALTH 12FT BATWING MOWER 1997 CIH 9330, 3PT, PTO, 4800 HRS Clyde, Texas. WOODS S20CD FLAIL SHREDDER 2014 CIH MAGNUM 310, PS, SUSP, 1150 HRS “With this program, you YETTER 3541 40FT ROTARY HOE 2010 CIH MAGNUM 335, PS, MFD, 1200 HRS don’t have to guess,” he said. GEHL 1540 FORAGE BLOWER 2012 CIH MAGNUM 290, PS, MFD, GUIDANCE. 1480 HRS “It gives you the tools to CENTURY 1300HD PULL TYPE SPRAYER 2015 CIH MAGNUM 240, CVT, SUSP, 1700 HRS make better decisions, lookNI 3722 MANURE SPREADER 2010 CIH MAGNUM 225, CVT, MFD, 2650 HRS ing at soils, where the plants NH 145 MANURE SPREADER 1991 CIH 7120, PS, TWD, 3900 HRS are and what improvement CIH L570 LOADER 2016 CIH FARMALL 70A, OS, MFD, LDR, 200 HRS you can make. LANDVisor WOODS 1050 3PT BACKHOE 2016 FARMALL 70A, OS, TWD, 353 HRS is a game changer.” PLANTERS 2015 JD 8320R, PS ILS, 1500 HRS In early 2020, LAND2017 JD DB20 8/15 2014 JD 8320R, IVT, ILS, 1900 HRS Visor will be available to JD 7200 6R30 2014 JD 8285R, IVT, ILS, 1600 HRS ranchers and land man2014 KINZE 4900 16R30, BULK, VAC, LIQ FERT 2013 JD 8235R, PS, MFD, 3400 HRS agers in the Southwest 2009 KINZE 3660 16/31 LIQ FERT 2007 JD 8430, PS, ILS, 4200 HRS to manage highly inva2004 KINZE 3600 12/23 2015 JD 7270R, IVT, TLS, 1200 HRS sive honey mesquite. As 2008 KINZE 3500 8/15 2006 JD 7920, IVT, MFD, 5800 HRS a significant consumer of 2004 JD 7320 PQ, TWD, 3350 HRS WHITE 6100 6R30 PLANTER, LIQ FERT water, honey mesquite out2004 JD 6420, PQ, MFD, 5300 HRS JD 1590 15FT NO-TILL DRILL, 2-PT competes native grasses 2006 JD 5525, OS, TWD, LDR, 3100 HRS 2004 GREAT PLAINS 1500 NO-TIL DRILL and desirable woody 1984 JD 4850, PS, MFD GREAT PLAINS 1006 10FT NO-TIL DRILL plants, reducing both for-

a covered commodity falls below its reference price. ARC and PLC are options available to operators and landowners who share the crop. Farm owners also have a one-time opportunity to update PLC payment yields beginning with crop year 2020. If the farm owner and producer visit the FSA county office together, FSA can also update yield information during that visit. Covered commodities include barley, canola, large and small chickpeas, corn, crambe, flaxseed, grain sorghum, lentils, mustard seed, oats, peanuts, dry peas, rapeseed, long grain rice, medium and short grain rice, safflower seed, seed cotton, sesame, soybeans, sunflower seed and wheat. Farmers wanting more information about the PLC/ ARC programs are encouraged to call their county FSA office. There also will be informational meetings to learn more about the program opportunities. “Please go to one of those informational meet-

ings to learn the difference, to figure out exactly what paperwork you’re going to need and exactly what you’re going to need for your yield update,” Graff said. To help expedite the PLC and ARC signup process, particularly for larger producers, Graff recommends contacting the county FSA office before stopping to sign up so the staff can have the appropriate farm files and other information ready. “That way if they say come in at 2 p.m. Thursday or 10 a.m. on Monday, they’re going to have your files and other information out and ready for you and that will make a quicker visit for you,” he said. “Also, call the county office for the dates and locations of the ARC/PLC informational meetings. That’ll help you figure out what you want to do.”

Check Out Our Used Equipment Inventory!

Tom C. Doran can be reached at 815-780-7894 or tdoran@agrinewspubs.com. Follow him on Twitter at: @AgNews_ Doran.

1976 JD 4430, QR, TWD, LDR, 5650 HRS 1997 AGCO WHITE 6175, PS, TWD, 2500 HRS 2011 JD 4730, 100FT BOOM, GUDANCE, 2400 HRS 2018 JD TS GATOR 250 HRS 2017 JD 825I 4S GATOR 100 HRS EQUIPMENT 2011 JD 2310 30FT SOIL FINISHER 2013 LANDOLL 9650 50FT FIELD CULTIVATOR CIH 200 24FT FIELD CULTIVATOR CIH TIGERMATE II 28FT FIELD CULTIVATOR JD 980 24FT FIELD CULTIVATOR 2016 CIH 335 TRUE TANDEM 28FT VT 2011 CIH 330 TRUE TANDEM 31FT VT GREAT PLAINS 3000TT 30FT VT WHITE 255 15FT DISC 2014 BRILLION WLS360 30FT MULCHER BRILLION WL03 21FT MULCHER DUNHAM LEHR 24FT MULCHER LANDOLL WFP28 28FT PACKER BRILLION XXL184 46FT PACKER KRAUSE 4400 36FT PACKER J&M TF212 28FT DOUBLE ROLLING BASKET UNVERFERTH 110 20FT SINGLE BASKET FARMHAND WP42 27FT CROWFOOT PACKER SUNFLOWER 4213 11 SH DISC CHISEL IH 720 5 BTTM PLOW HINIKER 6000 9 SH NH3 APP/CULTIVATOR 2016 NH 313 MOCO 2012 JD 630 MOCO 2015 JD 469 ROUND BALER 2011 NH ROLL-BELT 450U ROUND BALER

CIH 5100 SOYBEAN SPECIAL 20X8 BRILLION SS10 SEEDER, PULL TYPE COMBINES 2016 CIH 8240, RWA, RT, CHPPR, 1650/1350 HRS 2014 CIH 8230, RWA, RT, CHPPR, 1300/1000 HRS 2011 CIH 8120, RWA, RT, CHPPR, 2000/1500 HRS HEADS 2014 MAC DON FD75S 40FT DRAPER, IH WIDE THROAT 2007 CIH 1020 30FT GRAIN HEAD 2006 JD 635 HYDRAFLEX GRAIN HEAD 2001 JD 925F GRAIN HEAD 1989 JD 920 GRAIN HEAD 1998 JD 918F GRAIN HEAD, CM, SINGLE POINT JD 643 CORN HEAD CIH 1083 CORN HEAD 2012 GERINGHOFF RD800B, 8R30, HD, HH, JD ADAPTER MISC HEAD TRAILERS GRAIN CARTS & WAGONS UNVERFERTH 1115 XTREME, SCALES, TARP, LIGHTS 2002 KINZE 640, TARP, LIGHTS PARKER 4500 GRAN CART CONSTRUCTION 2012 BOBCAT E80, CAH, 2SPD, LONG ARM, HYD THUMB, 2875 HRS 2011 DEERE 310SK, OS, 4WD, 1800 HRS 2018 CASE TV380, CAH, 2SPD, ULTRA HI-FLO, 600 HRS 2015 BOBCAT T650, CAH, 2SPD, 1500 HRS 2015 BOBCAT T450, CAH, 2SPD, 1100 HRS BOBCAT 873, CAH, 2SPD, 3200 HRS

Sunflower • Wil-Rich • Killbros • Woods • Maurer Trailers • McFarlane 6407 North St. Rd. 15 Leesburg, IN 46538 7LP3RON_-HUHPLDK3RON_&XUWLV+DWÀHOG (574) 453-2411 | Fax: 574-453-2515 polkequipmentinc.com

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DZǩǩȘǫǬǯȘǩǪǯǬ ADAMS CO. Lynn Selking 260.301.0010

ALLEN CO. Roemke Farms 260.450.2025

Dan Abnet 260.525.0333

Meyer Inc 260.402.3612

Reinhard Bros Farms 260.525.0386

Schaefer Inc 260.410.0503 Bob Purlee, DSM 260.414.2301 Bob Hulvey 260.410.8248 Milt & Mark Dennis 260.437.9541

/DairylandSeed

@DairylandSeed

CONTACT YOUR LOCAL DAIRYLAND SEED REP TODAY! BENTON CO. CASS CO. FULTON CO. JASPER CO. A & J Nally LLC Larry & Joe Troyer Thomas Bearss Joe Klaus, DSM 765.490.2459 574.721.0500 574.835.1085 812.455.1006 CARROLL CO. Maxwell Farms 765.202.0601 Alternative Ag Services & Consultants 765.404.2098

Zachary Green 574.205.2279 Brandon Beck, DSM 765.431.0553 CLINTON CO. Keith Batt 765.650.1122 FAYETTE CO. Jacob Pfeiffer 765.265.1066

HENRY CO. Michael Cuskaden 812.593.1864

MONTGOMERY CO. New Ross Grain 765.366.3536

HUNTINGTON CO. Brad Blinn 260.917.0375

NEWTON CO. Scott Nelson 765.490.0699

Matt Gilbert 260.413.3465 Robert Dennis 210.672.3171 Andy Rice 260.248.7633

PULASKI CO. Niki Clemons 574.242.0663 PUTNAM CO. Roger Rudolph, DSM 260.908.3972

/DairylandSeed

WABASH CO. Bob Shultz 260.571.6588

WELLS CO. Isch Seeds LLC 260.273.0817

Jared Cordes 260.571.2032

Travis Sills 260.375.6040

Rosen Farms 260.750.4357

WHITE CO. Layer/Roth Farms 574.278.7521

Daniel Musselman 260.571.4447 Clarence Rathbun 260.330.0747

Steve Thomas 765.427.0323

Troy Baer, DSM 260.571.3025

™ ® SM}ī­ÌÐĉ­īāĮ­ĊÌĮÐīŒðÆÐĉ­īāĮďå#ďœæīďwÆðÐĊÆÐĮș#ķqďĊĴďīqðďĊÐÐīș­ĊÌĴìÐðī­Ũăð­ĴÐÌÆďĉĨ­ĊðÐĮďīĴìÐðīīÐĮĨÐÆĴðŒÐďœĊÐīĮȘɭǡǟǠǨďīĴÐŒ­Ș}ìÐ'ĊăðĮĴœÐÐÌÆďĊĴīďăĮřĮĴÐĉðĮďœĊÐÌÅř#ďœæīďwÆðÐĊÆÐĮOO'ĊăðĮĴ'ǢɯĮďřÅЭĊĮ œÐīÐþďðĊĴăřÌÐŒÐăďĨÐÌÅř#ďœɁæīďwÆðÐĊÆÐĮ­ĊÌTw}ÐÆìĊďăďæðÐĮȘ'ĊăðĮĴ#ķď­ĊÌ'ĊăðĮĴZĊÐìÐīÅðÆðÌÐĮ­īÐĊďĴīÐæðĮĴÐīÐÌåďīĮ­ăÐďīķĮÐðĊ­ăăĮĴ­ĴÐĮďīÆďķĊĴðÐĮȘďĊĴ­ÆĴřďķīĮĴ­ĴÐĨÐĮĴðÆðÌÐīÐæķă­Ĵďīř­æÐĊÆřĴďÌÐĴÐīĉðĊÐðå­ĨīďÌķÆĴðĮ īÐæðĮĴÐīÐÌåďīĮ­ăÐďīķĮÐðĊřďķī­īЭȘ'ĊăðĮĴ#ķď­ĊÌ'ĊăðĮĴZĊÐìÐīÅðÆðÌÐĮ­īÐĴìÐďĊăřǡșǣȭ#ĨīďÌķÆĴĮ­ķĴìďīðšÐÌåďīķĮÐœðĴì'ĊăðĮĴÆīďĨĮȘďĊĮķăĴ'ĊăðĮĴìÐīÅðÆðÌÐă­ÅÐăĮåďīœÐÐÌĮĨÐÆðÐĮÆďĊĴīďăăÐÌȘăœ­řĮīЭÌ­ĊÌåďăăďœă­ÅÐăÌðīÐÆĴðďĊĮȘ


A6 Friday, December 6, 2019

| INDIANA AGRINEWS | www.agrinews-pubs.com

REGIONAL WEATHER

Outlook for Dec. 6 - Dec. 12

Shown is Friday’s weather. Temperatures are Friday’s highs and Friday night’s lows.

Rock Island 41/24

Chicago 39/25

©2019; forecasts and graphics provided by

SUNRISE/SUNSET Rise 7:05 a.m. 7:06 a.m. 7:07 a.m. 7:08 a.m. 7:08 a.m. 7:09 a.m. 7:10 a.m.

Decatur 44/25

Quincy 42/26

Springfield Date Dec. 6 Dec. 7 Dec. 8 Dec. 9 Dec. 10 Dec. 11 Dec. 12

Peoria 43/26

Set 4:34 p.m. 4:34 p.m. 4:34 p.m. 4:34 p.m. 4:34 p.m. 4:34 p.m. 4:34 p.m.

Gary 40/28

Champaign 43/24 Lafayette 42/25

Springfield 44/26 Mt. Vernon 49/28

Fort Wayne 41/25

Muncie 44/27

First

Dec 4

Full

Last

Evansville 50/30

PRECIPITATION New

Dec 11 Dec 18 Dec 25

GROWING DEGREE DAYS Illinois Week ending Dec. 2 Month through Dec. 2 Season through Dec. 2 Normal month to date Normal season to date

0 0 3825 0 3333

Indiana Week ending Dec. 2 Month through Dec. 2 Season through Dec. 2 Normal month to date Normal season to date

Southern Illinois: Friday: clouds and sun. Winds north 6-12 mph. Expect three to six hours of sun with fair drying conditions and average relative humidity 70%. Saturday: times of clouds and sun. Winds east-southeast 4-8 mph.

Vevay 46/27

MOON PHASES

0 0 3464 0 2898

Anna 50/32

Today Hi/Lo/W 43/24/pc 39/25/pc 44/25/pc 49/31/pc 40/28/pc 42/22/pc 49/28/c 43/26/pc 42/26/pc 39/23/pc 41/24/pc 44/26/pc

Tom. Hi/Lo/W 43/34/pc 40/36/pc 44/35/pc 49/43/pc 41/38/pc 41/35/pc 47/36/pc 42/37/pc 46/39/pc 40/34/pc 41/38/pc 46/38/pc

Sun. Hi/Lo/W 50/38/c 47/36/c 51/38/c 57/41/c 48/37/c 48/38/c 53/44/c 50/36/c 50/35/c 46/33/c 49/33/c 51/38/c

Indiana Bloomington Carmel Evansville Fishers Fort Wayne Gary Lafayette Indianapolis Muncie South Bend Terre Haute Vevay

Today Hi/Lo/W 45/27/c 42/23/c 50/30/c 42/24/c 41/25/c 40/28/c 42/25/c 43/26/c 44/27/c 40/26/c 45/25/c 46/27/c

Tom. Hi/Lo/W 45/35/s 42/34/s 48/39/pc 41/32/s 41/31/s 42/36/pc 43/33/s 42/34/s 43/34/s 41/33/pc 44/34/s 44/33/pc

Northern Indiana: Friday: low clouds. Winds north-northwest 7-14 mph. Expect less than two hours of sunshine with poor drying conditions and average relative humidity 65%. Saturday: partly sunny; however, sunnier in the south. Central Indiana: Friday: mostly cloudy. Winds north-northwest at 7-14 mph. Expect less than two hours of sunshine with poor drying conditions and average relative humidity 85%.

For 24-hour weather updates, check out www.agrinews-pubs.com Illinois Champaign Chicago Decatur E. St. Louis Evanston Joliet Mt. Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Rock Island Springfield

Northern Illinois: Friday: partly sunny. Winds north-northwest 6-12 mph. Expect 4-8 hours of sunshine with fair drying conditions and average relative humidity 65%. Saturday: partly sunny. Winds south at 8-16 mph. Central Illinois: Friday: clouds and sun. Winds north-northwest 8-16 mph. Expect three to six hours of sunshine with fair drying conditions and average relative humidity 65%. Saturday: clouds and sun.

Indianapolis 43/26 Terre Haute 45/25

East St. Louis 49/31

TEMPERATURES

Evanston 40/28 South Bend 40/26

Rockford 39/23

AGRICULTURE FORECASTS

Sun. Hi/Lo/W 50/44/c 49/44/c 53/46/c 50/41/c 49/39/c 49/39/c 49/42/c 50/44/c 51/45/c 49/38/c 50/44/c 52/44/c

Southern Indiana: Friday: mostly cloudy; a shower during the morning in the west. Winds north-northwest at 6-12 mph. Expect two to four hours of sunshine with poor drying conditions and average relative humidity 70%.

SOUTH AMERICA A front will lead to showers and thunderstorms from Minas Gerais to Mato Grosso from Friday into early next week. Largely drier than normal farther south in Brazil into northern Argentina.

Weather (W): s–sunny, pc–partly cloudy, c–cloudy, sh–showers, t–thunderstorms, r–rain, sf–snow flurries, sn–snow, i–ice

Reducing Lake Erie’s harmful algal blooms Researchers study options COLUMBUS, Ohio — Several research teams, led by The Ohio State University, have concluded a three-year study evaluating the ability of agricultural management practices to reduce phosphorus causing harmful algal blooms in Lake Erie. In 2012, the United States and Canada set the goal of reducing phosphorus entering the lake by 40%. Now, researchers have a better understanding of what management practices need to be implemented, and what research still needs to be done to meet these goals by 2025. The majority of phosphorus entering Lake Erie originates from the

Maumee River watershed. More than 85% of the phosphorus entering the lake comes from agricultural sources such as fertilizer runoff. To address this, researchers are evaluating what agricultural management practices have potential to reduce this phosphorus, while supporting farmers to maintain profitability. “There’s a lot of edge-offield work going on that identifies successful practices in single fields. But when we scale up and ask how many of those practices need to be adopted over a wide area like the Maumee River watershed, that’s where we turn to our models,” said Jay Martin, project co-leader for the recent study and professor in Ohio State’s Department of Food, Agricultural and

Biological Engineering. The study, which was funded by the Ohio Department of Higher Education’s Harmful Algal Bloom Research Initiative, used five watershed models to help researchers determine the most effective approaches to combat algal blooms. Just as your local news uses models to forecast the weather, researchers use watershed models to project how different management techniques impact phosphorus entering Lake Erie. By layering five separate models over these practices, researchers are able to narrow in on the best solutions. Solutions are aimed at meeting reduction targets for two forms of phosphorus: total phosphorus and dissolved reactive phosphorus. Each spring, levels

of total phosphorus and dissolved reactive phosphorus affect the magnitude of harmful algal growth. Year-round levels of total phosphorus, which includes dissolved reactive phosphorus, lower oxygen levels in the lake and result in the annual dead zone in the central basin of Lake Erie. Resea rchers worked with a team of stakeholders to determine what management practices to analyze with the models. The stakeholder group had wide representation from agricultural groups, government agencies, nongovernmental organizations, and environmental groups. Together with researchers, these stakeholders helped determine what management practices and

adoption rates were most likely to be feasible solutions to model. “In this study, we wanted to be able to show policy makers a range of expectations if we implement certain conservation strategies,” said Margaret Kalcic, project co-leader and assistant professor in FABE. “Multiple models help us address uncertainty and gain confidence in our practices.” Results from the study showed progress in reducing phosphorus that is required to decrease harmful algal growth. However, none of the modeled scenarios met the reduction goals for dissolved reactive phosphorus. These results point to the need to further increase adoption of existing practices and research

alternative management practices, which is where researchers expect to focus their efforts next. “With the types of practices available to the farming community, we can make stronger strides reducing total phosphorus than with dissolved reactive phosphorus,” Martin said. “In the future, we need to develop management processes that are more effective at managing dissolved reactive phosphorus-processes that hold back or filter water.” The most promising scenarios called for a mix of in-field management like cover crops and subsurface fertilizer placement and the use of buffer strips to help filter field runoff. One mix of these practices met the reduction goal for total phosphorus.

Findings in Nutrient Loss Reduction Strategy report By Tom C. Doran

AGRINEWS PUBLICATIONS

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. — The 179-page Nutrient Loss Reduction Strategy Biennial Report provided a summary of efforts being conducted by partners and measurable findings for 2017-2018. Nitrate and total phosphorous yields for the eight major rivers draining Illinois were estimated. Here are some of the key findings: Q Annual statewide total phosphorous loads from point sources have been reduced by 4.3 million pounds when comparing 2018 discharges with 2011 baseline year levels. This represents at 24% reduction in phosphorus from point sources. Q For the five-year period of 2013-2017, the statewide water flow, nitrate-nitrogen loads and total phosphorous loads were estimated to be 13%, 7% and 26%, respectively, above the 1980-1996 baseline period. Much of the increase in nitrate load occurred in the Rock River, while much of the increase in total phosphorous load occurred in the Illinois River. Q Illinois EPA provided point source discharge of total nitrogen and total phosphorous for 2017. The statewide point source total nitrogen discharge was about 75 million pounds per year or about 14% less than the 2011 estimate. Point source total phosphorous discharge in 2017 was estimated to be 14 million pounds per year or about 22% less than the 2011 estimate of 18.1 million pounds per year. Q In general, 2012-2017 nitrate-nitrogen yields were similar to values calculated for 1997-2011.

Q For watersheds with nitrate-nitrogen yield greater than 11 pounds of nitrate-nitrogen per acre per year, changes in nitrate yield were correlated with change in water yield. Q For three watersheds in northwest Illinois — Mackinaw River, Spoon River and FlintHenderson — saw some reduction in nitrate-nitrogen yield that appears to be independent of water yield changes. Q Changes in estimation methods used for the Lower Illinois River and Lower Sangamon River resulted in lower estimates of nitrate-nitrogen loads for these watersheds. Q Reductions in total phosphorus yield in Chicago and Des Plaines River watersheds of between 15% and 27% corresponded to reductions in point source discharges in those watersheds. Q Conversely, increases in total phosphorus yield were calculated for the Upper Sangamon River, Macoupin Creek and several other watersheds. Q A survey found producers used the Maximum Return to Nitrogen strategy on corn acres in 2017 to help determine the amount of nitrogen to apply. In addition, producers used other industry-recommended techniques on 69% of their corn acres. In 2017, many producers considered two or more strategies before applying nitrogen to some corn acres; therefore, the sum of those percentages is greater than 100. Tom C. Doran can be reached at 815-780-7894 or tdoran@agrinews-pubs. com. Follow him on Twitter at: @AgNews_Doran.

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