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BECK’S PFR INSIGHT MEETINGS

2020 STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS January 17, 2020 

RSVP for a meeting near you at BecksHybrids.com/PFR-Insight-Meetings

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Women at risk on farm How to prevent injuries on the job By Erica Quinlan

AGRINEWS PUBLICATIONS

AGRINEWS PHOTO/TOM C. DORAN

Combines roll through a central Illinois field harvesting corn in mid-December. The U.S. Department of Agriculture had the nation’s average corn yield at 168 bushels per acre and soybeans at 47.4 in the production summary released Jan. 10.

USDA finds more bushels Indiana yields down in 2019 By Tom C. Doran

AGRINEWS PUBLICATIONS

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s final 2019 crop production report found more corn and soybean bushels from earlier “I” state yield projections, but also noted significant declines from 2018 in Illinois and Indiana. Here are the estimates for Indiana, Illinois and Iowa. INDIANA The average corn yield of 169 bushels per acre was 20 less than in 2018 and four higher than the November projection. Total area planted was 5 million acres and 4.82 million acres were harvested compared to 5.12 million a year ago. Production was estimated at 814.58 million bushels after raising 967.68 million in 2018. USDA put the Hoosier State’s average yield at 51 bushels per acre, a two-bushel increase from the November projections and 6.5 below last year. The

Corn yields

(Bushes per acre) Illinois Indiana Year 2007 175 154 179 160 2008 174 171 2009 157 157 2010 157 146 2011 2012 105 99 2013 178 177 200 188 2014 175 150 2015 197 173 2016 2017 201 180 2018 210 189 2019 181 169

planted area was 5.4 million acres with a harvested area of 5.36 million compared to 5.96 million in 2018. Total production was estimated at 273.36 million bushels after producing 342.7 million a year earlier. ILLINOIS The corn yield was estimated at 181 bushels per acre, down 29 bushels from 2018 and 2 bushels

Soybean yields

(Bushels per acre) Year Illinois Indiana 2007 43.5 46 2008 47 45 2009 46 49 2010 51.5 48.5 2011 47.5 45.5 2012 43 44 2013 50 51.5 2014 56 55.5 2015 56 50 2016 59 57.5 2017 58 54 2018 63.5 57.5 2019 54 51

above the November estimate. Planted area was estimated at 10.5 million and corn for grain was harvested across 10.2 million acres. Production was projected at 1.85 billion bushels, down 19% from last year. The Prairie State soybeans are estimated to average 54 bushels per acre, 9.5 bushels lower than last year and three bushels higher than

the November estimate. The soybean planted area was estimated at 9.95 million acres with a harvested area of 9.86 million acres. Illinois harvested 10.5 million acres in 2018. Production was projected at 532 million bushels after producing 666.75 million last year. IOWA An average corn yield of 198 bushels per acre in Iowa was two above 2018 and six higher than the November estimate. About 13.5 million acres of corn were planted and 13.05 million acres were harvested. Harvested acres reached 12.75 million in 2018. Total production was projected at nearly 2.584 billion bushels. Iowa grew 2.499 billion bushels in 2018. The state’s average yield was pegged at 55 bushels per acre, one below last year and two more than the November estimate. Planted acres were set at 9.2 million and harvested acres of 9.12 million (9.83 million in 2018). Total production was projected at 501.6 million bushels after producing 550.48 million last year. See BUSHELS, Page A8

Farm Bureau sets legislative priorities By Erica Quinlan

AGRINEWS PUBLICATIONS

INDIANAPOLIS — Around 80 lawmakers mingled with Indiana Farm Bureau members at the organization’s annual legislative luncheon Jan. 9. “Today is a leadership development event for our county leadership,” said Katrina Hall, director of public policy at INFB. “We are giving them information about the best techniques for grassroots advocacy. That’s really what we’re built on. Our clout and influence for agriculture in rural Indiana really comes from our grassroots involvement.” Lt. Gov. Suzanne Crouch attended the lunch and spoke to the crowd. “Agriculture is such a big part of economic development here in Indiana,” Crouch said. “When I speak to rotaries and

AUCTIONS SEE SECTION B Vol. 42 No. 16

CONTACT AGRINEWS: 800-426-9438

“We want to ensure that rural Indiana and the Hoosiers who call it home have equal access to the technology in order to improve quality of life.” Lt. Gov. Suzanne Crouch chambers and I talk about big business, they don’t automatically think about agriculture. “But agriculture is big business in Indiana and contributes over $31 billion to our state’s economy. That’s why it’s so critical that Congress pass the USMCA. We need to go ahead and get things going.” Expanding rural broadband is another priority at the governor’s office this year, Crouch said.

“We want to ensure that rural Indiana and the Hoosiers who call it home have equal access to the technology in order to improve quality of life,” she said. Indiana Farm Bureau outlined its 2020 legislative priorities. Here are the highlights of what they hope to accomplish at the Statehouse this year: EXPAND HEALTH BENEFITS AVAILABLE TO INDIANA AGRICULTURE Key message: Indiana Farm Bureau asks the General Assembly to pass legislation allowing INFB to offer a non-insurance, high quality and more affordable health benefit plan to members — specifically those who are sole proprietors with fewer than two employees.

Eliminate injury risks By Erica Quinlan

AGRINEWS PUBLICATIONS

PEOSTA, Iowa — Female farmers face several unique work-related risks, said Charlotte Halverson, clinical director of AgriSafe Network, during a webinar. To combat this, women can identify prevention strategies to eliminate or reduce these risks. 4 KEY CONSIDERATIONS

2. Strength: n Wear sturdy foot attire to avoid slips, trips and falls. n Avoid repetitive motion work or modify work to reduce strain on joints. n Maintain strong bone density by appropriate calcium intake and exercise. AGRINEWS PHOTO/ERICA QUINLAN

Lt. Gov. Suzanne Crouch speaks at the Indiana Farm Bureau Legislative See BUREAU, Page A4 Luncheon Jan. 9.

Labor costs outpace farm revenue B9

See RISK, Page A11

1. Size and shape: n When possible, work with tools and equipment designed for smaller body frames. n Be aware of surroundings and risks when working with animals. n Seek personal protective equipment designed to fit your size and shape.

INSIDE

Meet the new Indiana State Fair Queen A3

PEOSTA, Iowa — Women are playing an increased role in production agriculture. They account for one-third of the management, ownership and work on farms and ranches. A major challenge continues to be access to protective equipment that meets the ergonomic needs of women. “One of the big challenges in women’s issues in agriculture tends to be providing the protective equipment that meets their needs on a lot of a different levels, and their ergonomic nee- Halverson ds,” said Charlotte Halverson, clinical director of AgriSafe Network, during a webinar. “We really want women and their employers, spouses and families to understand what some of these issues are and be aware of what is going on.” There are disparities in health care with rural women across the board, Halverson said. Sometimes women experience poorer health outcomes due to lack of screening opportunities. Other times challenges stem from lack of health insurance or nearby healthcare offices.

Indiana puts brakes on pig herd B12

3. Reproductive factors: n Read and understand information in precautionary statement on pesticides labels. See ELIMINATE, Page A11

AgriTrucker B8

From The Barns A12

Alan Guebert B9

Jerry Welch B10

Auction Calendar B1

Lifestyle B3

Business B10

Livestock B11

Calendar B2

Opinion B9

Classifieds B6

Weather A6

Farms For Sale B5

Zippy Duvall B9


A2 Friday, January 17, 2020 FAST FIVE: NATIONAL FFA CENTRAL REGION VICE PRESIDENT MAMIE HERTEL By Ashley Langreck

| INDIANA AGRINEWS | www.agrinews-pubs.com

Another Kentucky farmer admits crop insurance fraud L E X I NG T ON , Ky. (AP) — Another central Kentucky farmer has pleaded guilty in a crop insurance fraud scheme that a federal prosecutor

has called “pervasive and severe� in that region. Daniel Arvin pleaded guilty in federal court in Lexington in December to a conspiracy charge af-

ter admitting he claimed damage to his tobacco crop and then sold thousands of pounds of leaf under his mother’s name.

Arvin’s case is one of more than half a dozen prosecuted in the region over the last two years as part of a larger investigation. It includes the case

of Debra Muse, whose conduct prosecutors said caused the government to make $5.9 million in croploss payments in just two years.

AGRINEWS PUBLICATIONS

Five fast facts about Mamie Hertel, who was elected National FFA central region vice president in October at the National FFA Convention and Expo in Indianapolis. Her favorite leadership development event in FFA is creed speaking, which she participated in as a seventh- and eighthgrader, as well as when she was a freshman in high school. Hertel loves Taylor Swift and is a die-hard “Swiftie� with the dream of one day going to one of her concerts. She is a self-proclaimed chicken strip connoisseur who pretty much always orders them at restaurants. While her dad and brother rode motorcycles while she was growing up, she rode horses and competed in many horse shows and contests over the years. Her high school graduation class had a total of 11 students.

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CROP INSURANCE

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FAST FIVE: NATIONAL FFA EASTERN REGION VICE PRESIDENT TESS SEIBEL

Fresh off the challenges of 2019â&#x20AC;&#x201D;and with anticipated similar planting conditions in some areas for 2020â&#x20AC;&#x201D;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s smart to review additional crop insurance options. The RCIS Revenue Protection Policy with the Harvest Price Option, a private coverage, works in addition to federal crop insurance to increase protection from a drop in yield or price. Ask your crop insurance agent about the RCIS Revenue Protection Policy or visit RCIS.com today. RCIC is an equal opportunity provider. Some products not available in all states or counties. This is intended as a general description of certain types of insurance and services available to TXDOLĆ&#x201C;HGFXVWRPHUVSURYLGHGVROHO\IRULQIRUPDWLRQDOSXUSRVHV&RYHUDJHLVXQGHUZULWWHQLQDOOVWDWHVE\5XUDO&RPPXQLW\,QVXUDQFH&RPSDQ\$QRND01H[FHSWLQ0RQWDQDZKHUHKDLOFRYHUDJH LVXQGHUZULWWHQE\7UL&RXQW\)DUPHUV0XWXDO,QVXUDQFH&RPSDQ\0DOWD071RWKLQJKHUHLQVKRXOGEHFRQVWUXHGDVDVROLFLWDWLRQRIIHUDGYLFHUHFRPPHQGDWLRQRUDQ\RWKHUVHUYLFHZLWKUHJDUG WRDQ\W\SHRILQVXUDQFHSURGXFWRUVHUYLFHV<RXUSROLF\LVWKHFRQWUDFWWKDWVSHFLĆ&#x201C;FDOO\DQGIXOO\GHVFULEHV\RXUFRYHUDJHWHUPVDQGFRQGLWLRQV7KHGHVFULSWLRQRIWKHSROLF\SURYLVLRQVJLYHVD EURDGRYHUYLHZRIFRYHUDJHVDQGGRHVQRWUHYLVHRUDPHQGWKHSROLF\&RYHUDJHPD\YDU\E\VWDWH&RYHUDJHVDQGUDWHVDUHVXEMHFWWRLQGLYLGXDOLQVXUHGPHHWLQJRXUXQGHUZULWLQJTXDOLĆ&#x201C;FDWLRQV DQGSURGXFWDYDLODELOLW\LQDSSOLFDEOHVWDWHV5&,6LVDUHJLVWHUHGWUDGHPDUNRI5XUDO&RPPXQLW\,QVXUDQFH&RPSDQ\k5XUDO&RPPXQLW\,QVXUDQFH&RPSDQ\$OOULJKWVUHVHUYHG

By Ashley Langreck

AGRINEWS PUBLICATIONS

Five fast facts about Tess Seibel, who was elected National FFA eastern region vice president in October at the National FFA Convention and Expo in Indianapolis. Her favorite leadership development event is parliamentary procedure, and she had the chance to compete at the state and national levels with her FFA chapterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s parliamentary team. Seibel loves science and is a nursing student with the goal of one day becoming a nurse practitioner to help individuals in agricultural communities. She grew up on a beef cattle and calf operation that also included a vineyard. Before joining FFA, she never had been out of the country, but by the time her year of service as a National FFA officer is over, she will have traveled to four different continents just during her career as an FFA member. She is very afraid of chickens, and if someone is holding a chicken, she will make sure to be at least 10 feet away from them.

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Ashley Langreck can be reached at 800-426-9438, ext. 192, or alangreck@ agrinews-pubs.com. Follow her on Twitter at: @AgNews_Langreck.

AGRINEWS INDIANA EDITION USPS694-470 ISSN0745-7103 Serving Farm Families Throughout Indiana

Indiana AgriNews is published weekly for $30 per year by AgriNews Publications, 420 Second St., La Salle, Ill. Periodicals postage is paid at La Salle, IL 61301. Postmaster: Send address changes to Indiana AgriNews, 420 Second St., La Salle, IL 61301. Copyright 2020, AgriNews Publications, Illinois AgriNews and Indiana AgriNews agricultural weekly newspapers. No part of these publications may be reproduced in any form or by any means, mechanical, photocopying, or otherwise, without the express written permission of AgriNews Publications.

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www.agrinews-pubs.com | INDIANA AGRINEWS | Friday, January 17, 2020

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PROVIDED PHOTO

Claudia Duncan, Miss Vanderburgh County, was crowned the 62nd Indiana State Fair Queen.

Meet the new State Fair Queen By Erica Quinlan

AGRINEWS PUBLICATIONS

INDIANAPOLIS — Claudia Duncan, Miss Vanderburgh County, was crowned the 62nd Indiana State Fair Queen Jan. 5. Duncan is from Evansville. She graduated as valedictorian of Mater Dei High School and currently attends Purdue University, where she studies data science. She is involved in the Honors Mentor Program and the Women in Science Mentor Program and is a peer consultant at the Center for Career Opportunities. In her hometown, she is a parishioner of St. Joseph Catholic Church and gives back to 4-H as a project superintendent. She is a 10-year 4-H member and recipient of the Tenure Award. Duncan is the fourth representative from Vanderburgh County to be crowned Miss Indiana State Fair, following Karen Kosester in 1974, Tate Fritchley in 2016 and Becca Lax in 2017. Duncan will travel at least 10,000 miles this summer to help promote the Indiana State Fair. The top 10 finalists of the competition were: n 1st Runner-Up: Grace McCoy, Miss Elkhart County. n 2nd Runner-Up: Devin Hindes, Miss Newton County. n 3rd Runner-Up: Catherine Hall, Miss Shelby County. n 4th Runner-Up: Danielle Perry, Miss Posey County. n Elyona Dobrodt, Miss St. Joseph County. n Ellen Rohr, Miss Parke County. n Jessica Bradford, Miss Warrick County. n Abbigail Sprong, Miss Delaware County. n Riley Lamb, Miss Boone County. n Miss Congeniality: Devin Hindes, Miss Newton County. The 2020 Indiana State Fair will be held Aug. 7-23.

AGRINEWS PHOTO/ERICA QUINLAN

Christopher Peacock (left), senior accounts manager at Halderman Real Estate, and Michael Bonnell, area representative at Halderman, talk with a farm show attendee.

Halderman marks 90th year By Erica Quinlan

AGRINEWS PUBLICATIONS

WABASH, Ind. — Halderman Real Estate and Farm Management Services is celebrating its 90th anniversary in 2020. The company was founded in 1930 by Howard H. and Marie Halderman. They started the business in their home, vowing “To do for your farm what you would do if you had the time and the experience.” From two people, one client and a handful of farms to manage, the Halderman companies have grown to 50 full- and parttime staff members managing 650 farms across 19 states and two countries. They sell and acquire properties and perform over 800 appraisals annually. Howard Halder man and Robert Halderman are the third generation of leadership for the company. “We’ve continued to grow throughout the years in all three service lines,” said Howard, president of the company.

“We provide professional farm management. We’ve been doing that for 90 years — it’s where we started. We will continue to grow that organically, in the areas we currently serve, but also through expansion into new areas. “On the appraisal side, we continue to add professional appraisal staff. … We’ve made an effort over the last 20 to 25 years to continue to add certified general appraisers. We also want to make our services more efficient at the same time.” When it comes to real estate, Halderman plans to continue expanding auctions, private treaty sales and acquisitions. ENTERING THE DIGITAL AGE Howard has seen significant changes in the farm real estate auction industry over his career. “When we started doing farm real estate auctions, we would do them at the farm, on the property, and largely in one parcel,” he said. “That transitioned to the 1990s, where we started doing

them in off-site community facilities. We started doing multi-parcel sales. “We were using dry erase boards and hand writing bids on those, combined with a software program to make sure we had the best combinations on the boards. As we got into 2000s and 2010s, we transitioned to digital.” The advent of online bidding allows customers to make offers from anywhere in the world. “It’s been a transition for convenience using the technology that exists today,” Howard said. “It’s also been a transition to maximize sale prices for the seller, while at the same time allowing the bidders to buy what they want to buy.” Howard said that Halderman’s experienced employees, managers and office staff have propelled the company forward. “We celebrated the retirement of an area representative that had worked 60 years with the company this fall,” he said. “What that means to our clients is that they can plan on a consistent person who knows

the area intimately. We have new staff, but at the same time we still have an average tenure of over 20 years. “It’s a great testament to what my grandfather started 90 years ago and the culture we have here. But it’s also beneficial to our clients, because they get better knowledge and better service.” GIVING BACK IN 2020 Halderman is celebrating its anniversary by giving back to the communities it serves. Each area representative will receive a $90 matching gift to donate to a non-profit of their choice. “This will amplify the impact of their gift and is a way to give back to the local communities that give so much to Halderman,” Howard said. Learn more about the company at www.halderman.com. Erica Quinlan can be reached at 800-426-9438, ext. 193, or equinlan@agrinews-pubs.com. Follow her on Twitter at: @AgNews_Quinlan.

FAST FIVE: NATIONAL FFA PRESIDENT KOLESON MCCOY By Ashley Langreck

AGRINEWS PUBLICATIONS

Five fast facts about Kolesen McCoy, who was elected National FFA president in October at the National FFA Convention and Expo in Indianapolis. McCoy’s favorite career development event in FFA was the extemporaneous speaking contest because it helped improve his public speaking skills. He is a doughnut lover, and his favorite doughnuts are from Krispy Kreme. He once ate 12 original, freshly iced doughnuts in eight and a half minutes. McCoy’s father is in the military, his mother is a pre-school teacher, his older sister is an American Sign Language interpreter and his younger brother is in high school with a passion for art. Although McCoy has been very involved in the agriculture industry and currently is serving as the president of the National FFA, he didn’t come from a production agriculture background and was not involved with the agriculture industry until he was in high school. McCoy enjoys traveling, and whenever he has the opportunity to up and go somewhere, he jumps at the chance.

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Karen Plaut (left), dean of agriculture at Purdue University, presents the Halderman family with an award during Homecoming.

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Conference to focus on organic grain farming

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By Ashley Langreck

AGRINEWS PUBLICATIONS

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. — The annual Indiana Organic Grain Farmer Meeting will be Feb. 19-20 at the Beck Agricultural Center in West Lafayette. Michael O’Donnell, Purdue Extension organic and diversified agriculture educator, said the meeting started in 2016 as an informal half-day event to see how much interest there was in organic grain farming and transitioning to organic grain farming. O’Donnell said that because of growing interest in the organic

grain farming industry, the annual meeting has grown into a two-day conference. “T he first day of the workshop focuses on transitioning into or- O’Donnell ganic grain and is geared at those who are interested in getting in or already started transitioning to organic grain farming,” he said. O’Donnell said the first day of the conference isn’t just geared toward farmers interested in

organic farming, but those involved in farm management, agriculture lenders and individuals who have clients interested in learning how to transition their farm to an organic grain operation. “The second day typically covers more advanced topics on organic grain and marketing it,” he said. O’Donnell said besides several sessions featuring experts and farmers involved in the industry, there also will be a trade show featuring grain buyers, organic seed sellers and agriculture lenders. The conference also will have a session covering a research

PROVIDED PHOTO

update on organic no-tillage systems and a farmer panel featuring organic grain farmers from both Indiana and Illinois. O’Donnell said the conference serves as an opportunity for farmers, researchers and others associated with the organic grain industry to learn more. For more information or to register for the conference, visit www.purdue.ag/organicgrain2020. Ashley Langreck can be reached at 800-426-9438, ext. 192, or alangreck@ agrinews-pubs.com. Follow her on Twitter at: @AgNews_ Langreck.


A4 Friday, January 17, 2020

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AGRINEWS PHOTO/ERICA QUINLAN

Farm Bureau members eat lunch with legislators to discuss policies that affect their family farms.

Health care No. 1 goal for Farm Bureau By Erica Quinlan

INDIANAPOLIS — Rising healthcare costs are a major concern for Indiana Farm Bureau members, so the organization is focusing on legislation that would provide more affordable options to farm families. Through research and collaboration with other states, INFB developed a solution to benefit farmers who are sole proprietors. Sole proprietors do not qualify for group insurance plans — which are meant for farms with two or more employees. “As we’ve surveyed our mem-

bers, looked at National Agricultural Statistics Service data and polled, we know that at least 80% of farmers and farm families are sole propri- Hall etors,” said Katrina Hall, director of public policy at INFB. “The current statutory framework doesn’t work for what we need to provide for our members. That’s really the reason why we’re

pursuing this legislative solution.” The benefit plan INFB created would include office visits, prescription drugs, preventative and routine services, dental and vision, pediatric care and more. The bill has been drafted and is waiting to be assigned to a committee. Once it’s assigned, it will have a hearing during the General Assembly. In a survey conducted by INFB, 78% of respondents indicated that the cost of health care is important to the profitability of their business. Forty-eight percent under age 65 have chosen not to get treat-

ment for a health condition because of the cost. “We hear so many stories from young families who can’t afford health care — and it’s not just young families,” Hall said. “Especially with the ag economy as it is right now. Premiums can be crippling. “We’re really sensitive to that, and we hope that, overall, this improves health care and wellness in rural areas by giving people access to health care throughout their lifetime. We’re shocked by how many people we learned have no coverage.” If legislation passes, members will have to pass a health screen-

ing to gain access to the health benefit plan. Once members are accepted and pay their premiums, they will not be denied coverage as long as they continue to be an INFB member. While it may not be a solution for every farmer, Hall and other INFB leaders hope the health benefits package would ease the financial burden of health care for many.

BUREAU

tions on referendums to allow for more input and control by taxpayers.

LIMIT REFERENDUMS THAT BURDEN LANDOWNERS Key message: Indiana Farm Bureau supports the General Assembly limiting the use of referendums. They support putting more limits and restric-

local region. Local governments should not infringe upon the rights of property owners while making decisions about how local economic development will proceed in their area.

small-town Indiana.

IMPLEMENT LAND-USE PLANNING THAT PROTECTS FARMS AND FARMLAND WHILE PROMOTING RURAL ECONOMIC GROWTH Key message: The General Assembly should consider a balance between the incentives

for economic growth and the viability of farms in areas where agriculture is the foundation of the local economy.

AGRINEWS PUBLICATIONS

FROM PAGE ONE

PROTECT PROPERTY RIGHTS AND LOCAL CONTROL Key message: The General Assembly should respect the authority given to local governments to decide how economic development will occur in their

CONTINUE EXPANSION OF RURAL BROADBAND Key message: Ask the legislature to support the investment of state dollars in rural and

Erica Quinlan can be reached at 800-426-9438, ext. 193, or equinlan@agrinews-pubs.com. Follow her on Twitter at: @AgNews_Quinlan.

IMPROVE ASSESSMENT UNIFORMITY ACROSS THE PROPERTY TAX BASE Key message: Indiana Farm Bureau supports the General Assembly passing stipulations that bring more uniformity to property tax assessments. Erica Quinlan

On-farm grain storage, drying expands options By Tom C. Doran

AGRINEWS PUBLICATIONS

TONICA, Ill. — Bill Sherman III made the decision several years ago to invest in on-farm storage and now enjoys the flexibility and harvest efficiency the system provides. The fourth-generation corn and soybean grower and his father put up their first grain storage bin on his father’s nearby homestead in the early 1990s and another on his own homestead in 2001. Since that time, the Shermans continued to work with GSI and add on to the storage system. The main farm location now consists of nine dry and wet bins, continuous flow dryer, dump pit, overhead load-out, conveyors and total storage capacity of 350,000 bushels. He also has another 250,000 bushels at other farms, including his dad’s home place. “Some of them on the other farms we’ll put dry corn in from here, and we also put soybeans in some of them. I also raise seed soybeans and I store some of those. It just depends on the situation,” Sherman said. LONG-TERM PLAN He recommends expanding over time rather than an all-at-once investment. “I did not want to add bins all at once. I didn’t want to spend a bunch of money at one time, so we added as we could afford. You could spend a lot of money and lose land that you rent or something like that, so we did a little bit at a time and added as time went by. We have also added more land to our operation over time,” he added. The big step was made in 2013 when a GSI continuous flow dryer, additional grain storage and grain legs were installed on Sherman’s home site. One year later, Sherman had an overhead load-out

AGRINEWS PHOTOS/TOM C. DORAN

Bill Sherman III points out the GSI Vision dryer control system features near the continuous flow dryer on his farm near Tonica, Illinois. bin installed. Another bin was added in 2019. “I got tired of drying corn in drying bins. It’s pretty slow plus the capacity is very time-consuming and it’s a lot of work,” Sherman said. “This is our central drying location and we haul out of that bin and fill other bins with dry corn, therefore you don’t have to be checking and it’s easy to watch this one here and run it, especially at night here where I live. It’s worked out very well.” CONTINUOUS FLOW DRYER Sher man’s interconnected system through GSI is centered on a continuous flow dryer. A wet holding bin is connected with the continuous flow dryer and when the dryer “calls” the corn from the wet holding bin is moved into the dryer. The dryer holds 1,875 bushels of corn and rated to remove five points of moisture from that amount of corn in one hour. As the corn dries down, the dryer automatically unloads the corn and moves it to another designated storage bin. The drying system features a GSI Vision dryer control system allows operators to modify plenum and grain temperatures on-screen. The Vision system features a low voltage safety circuit and a safety

disconnect on every dryer. Each safety is monitored individually and its status displayed on-screen. The system also tracks the dryer’s history and all shutdowns are logged with time and date information. GSI’s optional Watchdog software program allows remote monitoring of dryer functions such as moisture, temperature and dryer status from a web-accessible device. The load-out has a 5,500 bushel capacity and can load 1,000 bushels onto a truck in a couple of minutes. “Our bins are plumbed into the dry leg which can shoot the grain into the overhead for load-out when we haul out to market it. It’s very handy. It’s probably the some of the best money I spent because with us having the bins at other farms you can run the dryer and put the corn directly from the dryer to the load-out and have a guy filling the bins on the other farms as the dryer is drying. You don’t have to handle it again,” Sherman said. One recommendation Sherman emphasized for those looking into upgrading with a dryer is electricity availability at the site. “We’re at the end of the line here. I probably would have built a bigger dryer but I didn’t know if

The wet and dry storage bins, continuous flow dryer, dump pit and overhead load-out are the culmination of a long-term plan Bill Sherman III had for his Tonica, Illinois, farm. I was going to be able to get enough power for the next size. Power availability is the most critical part. If you can’t get the power you might as well forget it,” he said. QUICK INSTALLATION T&S Quick Enterprises at Blackstone, a GSI dealer, installed Sherman’s grain storage system over the years, providing the continuit y needed to add-on over the years. “I got started with GSI because Quick Enterprises had done some work on a grain system for a friend of mine and he said he was pleased with the work they did that included installing a continuous flow dryer,” Sherman said. “Quick Enter pr ises’ service and everything is very, very good. I’ve had their service people come here at 10 o’clock at night

if I needed something and they got me going. They do everything they can to help you. They carry parts for the dryer. You can’t ask for much more than that. “Another nice thing is they do the concrete work, the bin erection and they can also wire it for you if you’d like. That meant a lot to me, just talking to one business. When you build the next bin they know what they did the previous time with wiring and different things. That’s one reason I went with them. I’ve been happy with them. I’ve been happy with the GSI bins and GSI dryer.” Sherman has found numerous advantages to investing in grain storage, drying and load-out system on his own farm. “Our family operation does not have livestock so having grain storage on the farms gives us the

flexibility to market our grain anyplace. You’re not locked into one elevator and it also lets me haul it, so it gives me work to do to spread out my workload throughout the year to keep me busy. That’s another advantage,” he said. “I have three semitrucks and it provides work for them. We don’t do any work for hire, we just haul our own stuff. “My philosophy is instead of writing a check to a grain elevator to do the work for you; I would rather do the work myself, control my own destiny, my own hours and build equity in my own grain system.” Tom C. Doran can be reached at 815-780-7894 or tdoran@agrinewspubs.com. Follow him on Twitter at: @AgNews_ Doran.


www.agrinews-pubs.com | INDIANA AGRINEWS | Friday, January 17, 2020

A5

Pioneer introduces new corn hybrids, soybean varieties By Martha Blum

AGRINEWS PUBLICATIONS

JOHNSTON, Iowa — Pioneer uses extensive testing that is consumer focused to select new corn hybrids and soybean varieties for its product lineup. “Pioneer is not just about bei ng i n the seed business. It’s about how we provide more profit potential for O’Connor our cus tomer s,” s a id Judd O’Connor, president, U.S. Com mercia l Bu si ness for Corteva Agriscience. “That’s why farmers like David Hula are breaking world records with Pioneer corn at 616 bushels per acre.” In addition, O’Connor said, farmers that planted Pioneer corn captured 10 national and 245 state yield contest awards for 2019. “Today, we’re announcing the advancement of 89 new corn and soybean products to commercialization,” he said. “This represents the culmination of hundreds of thousands of man hours, historic investments and expansion of our research and testing capabilities and the most rigorous local testing program we’ve ever had.” Pioneer is capturing not just more data, but better data, O’Connor said. “These 89 new corn hybrids and soybean varieties beat 10,000 other contenders during our multiyears long testing process,” he said. “Over the last decade, we’ve reduced our overall product development cycle 30% while expanding our breeding pipeline testing by 18 times-plus for corn,” he said. BRENT WILSON The testing process for Pioneer products starts with the field teams, said Br ent Wilson, leader of Wilson product management and agronomy for Pioneer. “These are agronomists who work with our customers who understand the key criteria that will make the product successful in a range of growing conditions throughout the country,” Wilson said. “We feed this information to the research team and they begin the process of sorting through this germplasm library to find the most elite products that will move to the marketplace,” he said. “We take a huge amount of data for soybeans about 45 billion data points and about 80 billion data points for corn and feed it into simulations all in an effort to identify those products that have the best chance to be successful in our customers’ fields,” Wilson said. “Those that are moved forward to field testing with our research team are grown at almost 50 multicrop research centers scattered throughout the Corn Belt from California to Pennsylvania and from Manitoba to Mississippi,” he said. “This testing begins the process of characterizing and understanding, which are the true long-term winners.” P ioneer resea rcher s look for consistent performance, ability to withstand key pests and diseases, the ability to stand up under changing weather conditions and the ability to produce year in and year out. “Yield is still a main criteria — a stable, consistent harvestable yield is what we’re looking for,” Wilson said. “Once research has identified the best winners, we move into the IMPACT system — the Intensively Managed Product Advancement, Characterization and Testing trials,” he said.

Pioneer, said the new P1359A M hybrid has been a consistent performer i n t he I M PA Schmoll CT trials across a lot of the Corn Belt. “It has high yield potential and stable agronomic traits,” Schmoll said. “We are introducing 24 new Enlist3 soybean varieties, and P26T23E is really a leader in mid-group II,” he said. JERRON SCHMOLL “It offers a wide range of Jerron Schmoll, product life cycle manager for adaptation from the east“These are on farmers’ fields, under their soil conditions, their management and under their weather conditions to provide a true world check for corn and soybeans.” The Pioneer field staff evaluates the hybrids and varieties to understand how they might fit in different geographies. “This process is extensive and pretty rigorous,” Wilson said. “Of the hundreds of products that go into IMPACT, less than 20% come out as commercial products and end up in a Pioneer bag.”

ern to western Corn Belt, and it has great standability and soybean cyst nematode tolerance.” CHRIS ZWIENER “Last year, we offered Qrome products across a broad geography in the U.S., and the new product advancements continue to build on the Qrome product portfolio,” said Chris Zw iener, product life cycle manager for Pioneer. “Qrome is the most optimized balance of insect protection and agronomic performance in the Pioneer brand corn product portfolio.” Qrome products feature dual modes of action for both above- and be-

low- ground insect protection. “The highlights of P1185 i nclude consistent yieZwiener ld with top end yield potential,” Zwiener said. “It is a shorter stature plant that helps reduce some of the risk associated with severe weather events that could result in brittle snap, root lodging and stalk lodging. The shorter stature also reduces crop residue and the strong roots give the prod-

uct the ability to withstand adverse conditions while continuing to deliver consistent performance across a range of environments.” The P1185 hybrid is a yellow food grade option for some geographies, he said. “It has very good test weight and excellent grain quality,” he said. “It has performed very strongly during the last several years of research from Indiana to Nebraska.” For more information, go to www.Pioneer.com/US. Martha Blum can be reached at 815-223-2558, ext. 117, or marthablum@ agrinews-pubs.com. Follow her on Twitter at: @AgNews_Blum.

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A6 Friday, January 17, 2020

| INDIANA AGRINEWS | www.agrinews-pubs.com

REGIONAL WEATHER

Outlook for Jan. 17 - Jan. 23

Shown is Friday’s weather. Temperatures are Friday’s highs and Friday night’s lows.

Evanston 35/26 South Bend 36/33

Rockford 34/22 Rock Island 34/15

Chicago 35/22

©2020; forecasts and graphics provided by

SUNRISE/SUNSET Rise 7:17 a.m. 7:17 a.m. 7:17 a.m. 7:16 a.m. 7:15 a.m. 7:15 a.m. 7:14 a.m.

Decatur 43/28

Quincy 44/18

Springfield Date Jan. 17 Jan. 18 Jan. 19 Jan. 20 Jan. 21 Jan. 22 Jan. 23

Peoria 40/27

Set 5:00 p.m. 5:01 p.m. 5:02 p.m. 5:03 p.m. 5:04 p.m. 5:06 p.m. 5:07 p.m.

Champaign 40/31 Lafayette 42/37

Jan 17

New

Jan 24

Muncie 43/41

Southern Illinois: Friday: rain; breezy to the east. Winds east-southeast 8-16 mph. Little or no sunshine with a 60% chance of precipitation and poor drying conditions. Average relative humidity 90%. Saturday: windy.

Indianapolis 43/41

Mt. Vernon 51/44

Terre Haute 46/42

Vevay 42/39

Evansville 52/48

PRECIPITATION

First

Feb 1

Central Illinois: Friday: rain, except ice changing to rain in the north. Winds southeast 12-25 mph. Little or no sunshine with a 75% chance of precipitation and poor drying conditions. Average humidity 85%.

Fort Wayne 37/34

MOON PHASES Last

TEMPERATURES

Gary 39/33

Springfield 44/29

East St. Louis 46/22

AGRICULTURE FORECASTS

Full

Feb 9

GROWING DEGREE DAYS Illinois Week ending Jan. 13 Month through Jan. 13 Season through Jan. 13 Normal month to date Normal season to date

5 5 3834 0 3333

Indiana Week ending Jan. 13 Month through Jan. 13 Season through Jan. 13 Normal month to date Normal season to date

1 1 3478 0 2898

Anna 52/41

Today Hi/Lo/W 40/31/r 35/22/sn 43/28/r 46/22/r 35/26/sn 33/24/sn 51/44/r 40/27/i 44/18/r 34/22/sn 34/15/i 44/29/r

Tom. Hi/Lo/W 36/8/sf 30/7/sf 38/9/sf 37/12/s 32/6/sf 30/2/sf 44/15/pc 35/5/sf 29/9/sf 25/1/sf 20/-7/sf 37/10/pc

Sun. Hi/Lo/W 26/7/pc 21/8/pc 26/8/pc 29/12/c 20/9/pc 17/7/pc 33/12/pc 23/9/pc 27/8/pc 17/4/pc 12/-3/pc 27/9/pc

Indiana Bloomington Carmel Evansville Fishers Fort Wayne Gary Lafayette Indianapolis Muncie South Bend Terre Haute Vevay

Today Hi/Lo/W 45/43/r 36/35/sn 52/48/sh 37/35/sn 37/34/sn 39/33/sn 42/37/sn 43/41/sn 43/41/sn 36/33/sn 46/42/r 42/39/r

Tom. Hi/Lo/W 47/15/c 41/11/sf 48/19/pc 42/11/sf 40/17/sf 36/12/sf 39/11/sf 45/15/sf 46/20/sf 35/17/sf 44/13/c 47/17/r

Sun. Hi/Lo/W 33/14/c 25/11/pc 35/18/pc 25/9/pc 27/12/c 25/15/pc 28/10/pc 29/13/pc 29/12/c 27/16/sf 30/13/pc 32/17/pc

Late, prevent planting options By Tom C. Doran

AGRINEWS PUBLICATIONS

EAST PEORIA, Ill. — Fifty-five percent of Illinois corn acres were yet to be planted by June 2 and farmers began to weigh the options of planting regardless of the later dates or taking the prevent plant program. Gary Schnitkey, University of Illinois agricultural economist and farm management specialist, said at the Illinois Farm Economics Summit that prevent plant would have yielded higher returns than planting corn in many situations in Illinois. “Unless you have unusual circumstances, take prevent plant, particularly in the second or third week of June,” Schnitkey said. An early June analysis indicated a $48 per acre advantage to plant corn versus prevent plant. An updated analysis in early December showed a $98 per acre disadvantage planting corn compared to prevent plant. The December analysis included higher yields, lower prices, increased drying costs and policy changes not enacted in early June. If prevent plant becomes an issue in the future, Schnitkey suggested that the default decision should be to take a prevent plant payment once final plant date of June 5 in most of Illinois and May 31 in the far southern portion of the state has been reached for corn if: n A Revenue Protection, RP with harvest price exclusion, or Yield Protection policy with a high coverage level has been chosen. n There is not expected to be a Market Facilitation Program or similar programs only targeted at planted acres. n Harvest prices are not expected to be higher than projected prices by 50 cents per bushel. Schnitkey presented six lessons from 2019 regarding plant or prevent plant.

point in time. Up to June 5 you have to plant if it’s fit. After June 5, it’s the farmer’s Schnitkey decision a nd it doesn’t matter what the conditions are. “We have to realize some of the bias of individuals with vested interests that are providing the information to farmers. Share-rent landowners have legitimate concerns for prevent planting if they don’t have crop insurance. “If they don’t have crop insurance, there’s no return to the share-rent landowner if no planting occurs. I would suggest that you may want to get those share-rent landowners on crop insurance. “I’ve heard farmers who had their cash-rent landowners pressure them for planting. I don’t see any legitimate concern for a cash-rent landowner wanting that land planted, particularly with corn. “You may be doing things worse to the ground than not. Input suppliers want to see planting occur. “Crop insurance companies really don’t want to make prevent plant acres because they’re the biggest payments that can be made. “Try to look at the decision objectively, which is hard to do because it is a very emotional decision. Develop a plan for prevent plant beforehand with a strong presumption not to plant if you have a high coverage level once you reach June 5, particularly if there are no storing or drying facilities on-farm.”

bean prevent plant. “Corn acres were only down 1% from 2018 to 2019. Soybean acres year over year went down 16%. U.S. prevent plant acres increased from nearly 1.9 million in 2018 to 19.259 million in 2019. “Areas that didn’t have prevent plant planted more corn. Areas with large prevent plant, reduced corn acres. Most everyone reduced soybean acres. Acreage changes that happened in 2019 are consistent with economics.” LESSON 4 “It’s hard to beat U.S. Department of Agriculture yield forecasts. The resources USDA devotes to yield estimates are large and include many methods including satellite imagery. “USDA forecast an average corn yield of 166 bushels per acre in June and 167 bushels per acre in November. Don’t bet on short crops until you see them.” LESSON 5 “Market Facilitation Program was introduced as a new policy in June. In a USDA press release on June 10, USDA Secretary Sonny Perdue said, ‘I urge farmers to plant for the market and plant what works best on their farm, regardless of what type of assistance programs USDA provides.’ “The press released went on to state farmers needed to plant in order to receive MFP payments. Per acre MFP payments ranged from $50 to $87 per planted acre in Illinois. “There was a 15% top off on RP prevent plant payments. There was a $15 per acre MFP payment for planting cover crops on prevent plant farmland. Government aid netted out to be about the same for planting and prevent plant. “This administration does not want to influence planting decisions with aid, but we’re not sure about future administrations. There’s a good chance of MFP payments in 2020, but how it’s built into cash rent is problematic. Commodity Credit Corp. authority was used for MFPs, and how future administrations use CCC authority will be interesting to see.”

LESSON 2 “Future prices are unbiased indicators of price in the future. The December 2019 CME corn contract averaged $4.50 in June and $3.90 in October. June prices already had a significant weather premium built in, and we probably should not have expected more. “If you’re going to do something because of price, price some of it. Don’t bet on short crops. LESSON 1 Many, myself included, be“Midwest farmers have a lieved prices could go up LESSON 6 bias against prevent plant. if we had lower acres and “Build in higher drying It’s a good thing that we lower yields.” costs if you plant in June. want to plant because Also, expect harvest diffithat’s what farmers do. LESSON 3 culties.” After June 5, you can take “All farmers are reacting prevent planting. to the same incentives. All Tom C. Doran can be “It does not matter if farmers saw the corn was reached at 815-780-7894 June 6 is a beautiful day more profitable than soy- or tdoran@agrinews-pubs. and the ground is fit, it’s the beans, and corn prevent com. Follow him on Twitter farmer’s decision at that plant is better than soy- at: @AgNews_Doran.

Barn fire kills 300,000 hens at Michigan poultry farm OTSEGO TOWNSHIP, Mich. (A P) — About 300,000 hens died in a barn fire at a southwestern Michigan poultry farm. The blaze started about 11 a.m. Jan. 3 at the farm in Otsego Tow nship, WWMT-TV reported.

Southern Indiana: Friday: rain; arriving during the afternoon in the west. Winds east-southeast 7-14 mph. Little or no sunshine with a 65% chance of precipitation and poor drying conditions. Average humidity 80%.

SOUTH AMERICA Largely dry across Argentina, Uruguay and far southern Brazil this weekend. A front can trigger scattered showers and storms across these areas early next week.

Weather (W): s–sunny, pc–partly cloudy, c–cloudy, sh–showers, t–thunderstorms, r–rain, sf–snow flurries, sn–snow, i–ice

Lessons learned in 2019

The barn was destroyed. About 250,000 hens in a second barn were unharmed. Otsego Township is about 160 miles west of Detroit. About 50 people who work at the cage-free farm

were evacuated, according to Konos Inc. spokesman Brian Burch. The farm will be at reduced production for the near future, he said. Fire crews were forced to truck in water to battle the blaze.

Northern Indiana: Friday: a wintry mix in the south and west; a bit of morning snow, then snow and sleet in the north and east. Winds east-southeast 8-16 mph. Little or no sunshine with a 55% chance of precipitation. Central Indiana: Friday: a little snow, sleet and rain at times; periods of rain, beginning after temperatures rise above freezing in the south. Winds east-southeast 8-16 mph. Little or no sunshine.

For 24-hour weather updates, check out www.agrinews-pubs.com Illinois Champaign Chicago Decatur E. St. Louis Evanston Joliet Mt. Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Rock Island Springfield

Northern Illinois: Friday: ice, then rain in the south; icy mix in the west. A wintry mix, accumulating 1-3 inches in the north and with little or no accumulation to the east. Winds east-southeast 8-16 mph.

Corn spill forms smooth path on Minnesota railroad tracks CRYSTAL, Minn. (AP) — Bushels and bushels of corn spilled from a freight train and formed a smooth, yellow path for more than a third of a mile on railroad tracks in a northern Minneapolis suburb. T he spill happened in Crystal, Minnesota,

on the Canadian Pacific line. The Star Tribune reported the corn stretched for about 2,000 feet. Assuming the corn was about 1.5 inches deep the entire way, the Tribune estimated the spill would amount to about 900 bushels. That’s ab-

out $3,400 worth of corn on Jan. 7 prices at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. Crews are working to clean up the spilled corn, Canadian Pacific Railway spokesman Andy Cummings told The Associated Press on Jan. 7.


www.agrinews-pubs.com | INDIANA AGRINEWS | Friday, January 17, 2020

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A7


A8 Friday, January 17, 2020

| INDIANA AGRINEWS | www.agrinews-pubs.com

Trade looks for clarity after USDA report By Tom C. Doran

AGRINEWS PUBLICATIONS

MINNEAPOLIS — Trader expectations and the crop production estimates went in opposite directions, and it could be June before questions are answered. The highly anticipated U.S. Department of Agriculture’s final 2019 crop production report featured unexpected increases in national corn and soybean yield averages. The report also noted significant unharvested acreage of corn in Michigan, Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin, and soybeans yet to be harvested in Michigan, North Dakota and Wisconsin. Those areas may be resurveyed in the spring once producers are able to finish harvesting. Ami Heesch, CHS Hedging market analyst, provided her take on the USDA crop production and supply and demand reports in a Minneapolis Grain Exchange-hosted teleconference Jan. 10. Entering the report, market analysts’ average corn yield estimate

BUSHELS FROM PAGE ONE

UNITED STATES Corn for grain production in 2019 was estimated at 13.7 billion bushels, down 5% from the revised 2018 estimate. The average U.S. yield was estimated at 168 bushels per acre, 8.4 bushels below the 2018 yield of 176.4 bushels per acre.

was 166 bushels per acre across 81.3 million harvested acres. Did USDA concur? “USDA didn’t change much on the corn. Yields were raised to 168 bushels per acre, which is not so friendly, but overall our ending stocks ended up being 18 million bushels less, which helped the corn market out a little bit. Harvested acres were 81.5 million. “We may see corn try to percolate on that going forward as we get more clarification on some of that in future reports. It may take until June to get some of that done.” The average soybean yield estimate by analysts prior to the report was 46.5 bushels per acre, and USDA came out with 47.4. Soybean ending stocks were also projected to be reduced to 431 million bushels, but USDA kept it unchanged at 475 million. “There wasn’t a lot changed on the soybean balance sheet. 2018 -2019 product ion wa s down a little bit, and 20192020 was unchanged at the end after juggling a few things w ith lower ing impor ts and increasing the yield from last Area harvested for grain was estimated at 81.5 million acres, up less than 1% from 2018. U.S. soybean production in 2019 totaled 3.56 billion bushels, 20% less than in 2018. The average yield per acre was estimated at 47.4 bushels, down 3.2 bushels from 2018. Harvested area was down 14% from 2018 to 75 million acres. RESURVEY USDA’s National Agricultural

“USDA didn’t change much on the corn. Yields were raised to 168 bushels per acre, which is not so friendly, but overall our ending stocks ended up being 18 million bushels less, which helped the corn market out a little bit”

It’s anticipated that Brazil will have a record-high corn crop. Can you provide an update on what’s happening there? “At 101 million metric tons, it is a fairly good crop. USDA left that unchanged from the last few reports. They’re worried about their safrinha corn crop. “Brazil got some rain across some of the dry areas and they’re expecting more beneficial rain in the next week, as well, and it’s probably going to help the corn in some of those drier areas. “The critical time is April for the later planted second crop Ami Heesch, market analyst corn, but I think right now it CHS HEDGING will be all of what they had last year at 101 million metric tons, month and reducing acreage a as well. So, it’s on par with that if not improved as we go forward little bit. “All in all, I think the soybean over the next month if they get report is probably somewhat more rain.” neutral. Some of the information that we were expecting, we got. USDA left Brazil soybean producUSDA will look at the signing tion at a record 123 million metric of the trade deal and what all of tons. “I know there are estimates that entails and if we can find anymore clarity. Then the mar- out that at 124.5 million. So, ket focuses on South America they’re at record levels for soyweather, and then the March 30 beans. Last year, Brazil proplanting intentions is our next duced 117 million metric tons. “So, even at 123, we’re well biggie for market direction.” Statistics Service will re-contact respondents who previously reported acreage not yet harvested in Michigan, Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin in the spring, once producers are able to finish harvesting remaining acres. If the newly collected data justifies any changes, NASS will update the Jan. 10 estimates in a future report. Stocks estimates are also subject to review since unharvested production

was included in the estimate of on-farm stocks. When producers were surveyed for the Crop Production 2019 Summary, there was significant unharvested acreage of corn in Michigan, Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin; and soybean acreage not yet harvested in Michigan, North Dakota and Wisconsin. The unharvested area and expected production were included in the totals re-

over what they had last year. That just puts the U.S. in some really serious competition with South America again having a fairly decent crop as far as pedaling soybeans to China.” What impact could the resurvey in Michigan, Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin have on the balance sheet going forward? “North Dakota especially has an awful lot of snow, and I think even when they were picking away at harvesting their corn before this last snow event some of the guys got quite a bit and they’re telling me now they’re just kind of done. “I’m not sure how much they will get from that resurvey because a lot of it is under snow, especially in North Dakota and western Minnesota, Michigan and those guys. It may change a little bit, but it might for tough for them to get real good clarity on that.” Tom C. Doran can be reached at 815-780-7894 or tdoran@ agrinews-pubs.com. Follow him on Twitter at: @AgNews_ Doran. leased on Jan. 10. As a result of this work, NASS may release updated acreage, yield, production and stocks estimates for corn and soybeans later this spring. Because farmers’ ability to complete harvest is impacted by winter weather, timing of the re-contacts and subsequent publication schedule will be announced at a later date. Tom C. Doran

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Always follow stewardship practices in accordance with the Product Use Guide (PUG) or other productspecific stewardship requirements including grain marketing and pesticide label directions. Varieties with BOLT® technology provide excellent plantback flexibility for soybeans following application of SU (sulfonylurea) herbicides such as DuPont™ LeadOff® or DuPont™ Basis® Blend as a component of a burndown program or for double-crop soybeans following SU herbicides such as DuPont™ Finesse® applied to wheat the previous fall. Always follow grain marketing, stewardship practices and pesticide label directions. Varieties with the Glyphosate Tolerant trait (including those designated by the letter “R” in the product number) contain genes that confer tolerance to glyphosate herbicides. Glyphosate herbicides will kill crops that are not tolerant to glyphosate. Always follow grain marketing, stewardship practices and pesticide label directions. Varieties with the Genuity® Roundup Ready 2 Yield® (RR2Y) trait contain genes that confer tolerance to glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup ® brand agricultural herbicides. Roundup ® brand agricultural herbicides will kill crops that are not tolerant to glyphosate. Genuity ®, Roundup ® and Roundup Ready 2 Yield® are registered trademarks of Monsanto Technology LLC used under license. Individual results may vary, and performance may vary from location to location and from year to year. This result may not be an indicator of results you may obtain as local growing, soil and weather conditions may vary. Growers should evaluate data from multiple locations and years whenever possible. Varieties with the DuPont™ STS® gene (STS) are tolerant to certain SU (sulfonylurea) herbicides. This technology allows post-emergent applications of DuPont™ Synchrony® XP and DuPont™ Classic® herbicides without crop injury or stress (see herbicide product labels). NOTE: A soybean variety with a herbicide tolerant trait does not confer tolerance to all herbicides. Spraying herbicides not labeled for a specific soybean variety will result in severe plant injury or plant death. Always read and follow herbicide label directions and precautions for use. Varieties with the LibertyLink® gene (LL) are resistant to Liberty ® herbicide. Liberty ®, LibertyLink® and the Water Droplet Design are trademarks of Bayer. DO NOT APPLY DICAMBA HERBICIDE IN-CROP TO SOYBEANS WITH Roundup Ready 2 Xtend® technology unless you use a dicamba herbicide product that is specifically labeled for that use in the location where you intend to make the application. IT IS A VIOLATION OF FEDERAL AND STATE LAW TO MAKE AN IN-CROP APPLICATION OF ANY DICAMBA HERBICIDE PRODUCT ON SOYBEANS WITH Roundup Ready 2 Xtend® technology, OR ANY OTHER PESTICIDE APPLICATION, UNLESS THE PRODUCT LABELING SPECIFICALLY AUTHORIZES THE USE. Contact the U.S. EPA and your state pesticide regulatory agency with any questions about the approval status of dicamba herbicide products for in-crop use with soybeans with Roundup Ready 2 Xtend® technology. ALWAYS READ AND FOLLOW PESTICIDE LABEL DIRECTIONS. Soybeans with Roundup Ready 2 Xtend® technology contain genes that confer tolerance to glyphosate and dicamba. Glyphosate herbicides will kill crops that are not tolerant to glyphosate. Dicamba will kill crops that are not tolerant to dicamba. Roundup Ready 2 Xtend® is a registered trademark of Monsanto Technology LLC used under license. Varieties with Enlist E3™ technology (E3) are jointly developed by Dow AgroSciences and MS Technologies™, L.L.C. The Enlist weed control system is owned and developed by Dow AgroSciences LLC. Enlist Duo and Enlist One herbicides are not registered for sale or use in all states or counties. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your area. Enlist Duo and Enlist One herbicides are the only 2,4-D products authorized for use in Enlist crops. Always read and follow label directions.

COME HIGHER YIELDS. 2019 PIONEER® BRAND A-SERIES SOYBEAN PERFORMANCE FROM INDIANA Thanks to an unprecedented commitment to research and extensive local testing, Pioneer® brand A-Series soybeans are delivering outstanding, consistent performance year after year. See how the A-Series soybeans advantage is bringing higher yields to farms near you. Go.Pioneer.com/TheAnswerIsA

2.2

BU/A YIELD ADVANTAGE

COMPARISONS

WINS

339

68%

P = Plenish® high oleic soybeans for contract production only. Plenish® high oleic soybeans have an enhanced oil profile and are produced and channeled under contract to specific grain markets. Growers should refer to the Pioneer Product Use Guide on www.pioneer.com/stewardship for more information. SCN = Resistant to one or more races of soybean cyst nematode.

Pioneer ® brand products are provided subject to the terms and conditions of purchase which are part of the labeling and purchase documents. TM ® SM Trademarks and service marks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. © 2019 Corteva. PION9SOYB060

Data is based on an average of 2019 comparisons made in Indiana through Nov. 4, 2019. Comparisons are against all competitors, unless otherwise stated, and within +/- 3 RM of the competitive brand. Product responses are variable and subject to any number of environmental, disease and pest pressures. Individual results may vary. Multi-year and multi-location data are a better predictor of future performance. DO NOT USE THIS OR ANY OTHER DATA FROM A LIMITED NUMBER OF TRIALS AS A SIGNIFICANT FACTOR IN PRODUCT SELECTION. Refer to www.pioneer.com or contact a Pioneer sales representative or authorized dealer for the latest and complete listing of traits and scores for each Pioneer® brand product. Pioneer® brand products are provided subject to the terms and conditions of purchase which are part of the labeling and purchase documents. TM ® SM Trademarks and service marks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. © 2019 Corteva. PION9SOYB060_TP


www.agrinews-pubs.com | INDIANA AGRINEWS | Friday, January 17, 2020

A9

SHAW MEDIA PHOTO/SCOTT ANDERSON

Did you get your crops out before 2020? A farmer harvests corn near the intersection of Route 17 and Interstate 39 near Lostant, Illinois, on Jan 8. A half dozen tractors and wagons were harvesting the corn. The field is owned by Peter Voss of Orland Park.

USDA sees hike in soybean prices By Tom C. Doran

bushels per acre, up 0.5 bushels led by increases for Illinois and Indiana. WASHINGTON — Slightly n Soybean supplies are relhigher production was offset atively unchanged as lower on the demand side to keep beginning stocks and imports average farm price projections offset higher production. With within the range of previous crush and export forecasts unU.S. Department of Agriculture changed, ending stocks are prosupply and demand estimates jected at 475 million bushels. reports. n Foreign oilseed 2019-2020 Here are highlights of the production is up 0.2 million USDA world agricultural supply tons to 467.2 million, with and demand estimates report higher sunflower seed proreleased Jan. 10. duction partly offset by lower cottonseed, rapeseed and palm Soybeans: USDA increased the sea- kernel. son-average price for 2019-2020 n Lower global vegetable oil by 15 cents from last month to $9 production paired with inper bushel. Why? creasing demand results in a n The increase from the previ9% year-over-year decline in ous month is in part reflecting vegetable oil stocks. Other nostronger soybean oil prices. The table oilseed changes include soybean oil price forecast was a 0.5-million-ton increase to increased 3 cents to 35 cents Chinese soybean crush due to per pound. a higher-than-expected pace to n Soybean production is estidate. mated at 3.56 billion bushels, up 8 million on a higher yield. Corn: The season-average price n Harvested area is estimated received by producers was left unat 75 million acres, down 0.6 changed from last month to $3.85 million from the previous foreper bushel. Why? cast, with the largest reductions n Beginning stocks were infor North Dakota and South creased by 107 million bushels Dakota. reflecting upward revisions n Yield is estimated at 47.4 to both on-farm and off-farm AGRINEWS PUBLICATIONS

Supply and demand CORN (2019-2020 marketing year) Total corn supply: 15.962 billion bushels Exports: 1.775 billion bushels Feed, residual use: 5.525 billion bushels Food, seed, industrial use: 6.77 billion bushels Ethanol and byproducts: 5.375 billion bushels Ending U.S. corn stocks: 1.892 billion bushels SOYBEANS (2019-2020 marketing year) Total soybean supply: 4.482 billion bushels Seed, residual: 128 million bushels Exports: 1.775 billion bushels Crush: 2.105 billion bushels Ending U.S. soybean stocks: 475 million bushels

stocks as of Sept. 1 as reported in the grain stocks report. n Corn production is estimated at 13.692 billion bushels, up 31

million as a higher yield more than offsets a reduction in harvested area. n Total corn use is up 155 million bushels to 14.07 billion. Exports were lowered by 75 million bushels to 1.775 billion, reflecting the slow pace of shipments through December and the lowest level of outstanding sales as of early January since the 2012-2013 marketing year. n Feed, seed and industrial use was lowered 20 million bushels, with lower projected corn used for starch, glucose and dextrose and high fructose corn syrup. n Feed and residual use was raised by 250 million bushels to 5.525 billion, based on indicated disappearance during the September-November quarter and the 2018-2019 marketing year as reflected by the grain stocks report. n With use rising more than supply, 2019-2020 corn stocks were lowered by 18 million bushels to 1.892 billion bushels. n Foreign corn ending stocks were lower, mostly reflecting reductions for China and Brazil. Global corn stocks, at 297.8 million tons, are down 2.8 million.

Wheat: USDA left the season-average farm price at $4.55 per bushel. Why? n Feed and residual use was increased by 10 million bushels on lower than expected second quarter stocks reported in the latest grain stocks report. n Seed use was down 1 million bushels reflecting the 20202021 wheat planted area. n Ending stocks are projected at 965 million bushels, down 9 million from the December report. n Foreign production for the 2019-2020 marketing year is dropped 1 million tons led by a 1-million-ton reduction for Russia on updated government production data and a 0.5-million-ton decrease for Australia reflecting the severe drought conditions in parts of the country. n With foreign supplies falling and total use increasing, foreign ending stocks were lowered by 1.2 million tons to 261.8 million. Tom C. Doran can be reached at 815-780-7894 or tdoran@ agrinews-pubs.com. Follow him on Twitter at: @AgNews_ Doran.

Stored grain supplies below 2018 levels By Tom C. Doran

AGRINEWS PUBLICATIONS

WASHINGTON — Corn, soybean and wheat stocks were all down year-over-year in the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s quarterly grain stocks report released Jan. 10. U.S. corn stored in all positions on Dec. 1, 2019, totaled 11.4 billion bushels, down 5% from Dec. 1, 2018. Of the total stocks, 7.18 billion bushels are stored on farms, down 4% from a year earlier. Off-farm stocks, at 4.21 billion bushels, are down 6% from a year ago. The September-November 2019 indicated disappearance is 4.52 billion bushels, compared with 4.54 billion bushels during the same period last year. U.S. soybeans stored in all positions on Dec. 1, 2019, totaled

3.25 billion bushels, down 13% from Dec. 1, 2018. Soybean stocks stored on farms totaled 1.53 billion bushels, down 21% from a year ago. Off-farm stocks, at 1.73 billion bushels, 5% lower than last December. Indicated disappearance for September-November 2019 totaled 1.22 billion bushels, up 8% from the same period a year earlier. All U.S. wheat stored in all positions on Dec. 1, 2019, totaled 1.83 billion bushels, down 9% from a year ago. On-farm all wheat stocks are estimated at 519 million bushels, up 3% from last December. Off-farm stocks, at 1.31 billion bushels, are down 13% from a year ago. The September-November 2019 indicated disappearance is 512 million bushels, 35% above the same period a year earlier.

NATIONAL CAPACITY Capacity of off-farm commerCorn Stocks by Position cial grain storage in the nation Dec. 1, 2018 and 2019 (1,000 bushels) totaled 11.6 billion bushels on 2018 2019 Dec. 1, 2019, up 1% from the preState On-farm Off-farm On-farm Off-farm vious December total. The largest increase occurred in Kansas Illinois 1,100,000 971,861 930,000 833,860 where an additional 25 million Indiana 600,000 264,442 510,000 229,382 bushels of capacity was added Iowa 1,370,000 810,661 1,330,000 814,428 since Dec. 1, 2018. Other notable increases were Soybean Stocks by Position shown in Wisconsin, where capacity increased 15 million bushels, Dec. 1, 2018 and 2019 (1,000 bushels) and Iowa, Minnesota, Missouri 2018 2019 and South Dakota, which were all State On-farm Off-farm On-farm Off-farm up 10 million bushels from 2018. Iowa and Illinois remained Illinois 325,000 344,369 265,000 320,662 the two largest off-farm storIndiana 190,000 105,866 150,000 103,749 age capacity states during 2019 Iowa 250,000 277,503 220,000 294,157 with 1.51 billion and 1.5 billion bushels, respectively. Kansas was the third largest followed by Off-farm storage facilities to- est number of facilities include Nebraska and Minnesota. These five states accounted for 52% of taled 8,378 on Dec. 1, 2019, Iowa with 860, Illinois with 840, the nation’s off-farm storage ca- down 1% from the Dec. 1, 2018, Kansas with 700, Minnesota estimate. States with the larg- with 555 and Nebraska with 492. pacity on Dec. 1, 2019.

AgriGold customers post impressive yields in corn yield contest ST. FRANCISVILLE, Ill. — Farmers who chose AgriGold corn hybrids captured six national awards and 50 state level awards in the National Corn Growers Association’s 55th annual 2019 National Corn Yield Contest. AgriGold’s 56 combined national and state contest winners across 17 states, nine production categories and 15 hybrids had verified yields averaging more than 296 bushels per acre, compared to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service projected national yield average of 169.5 bushels per acre for 2019. At the national level, the AgriGold brand won three first,

one second and two third place yields: n Bridget Dowdy from Valdosta, Georgia, won first place Conventional Irrigated Class with a verified yield of 552 bushels per acre with A6499STX. n Dustin Dowdy from Valdosta, Georgia, won first place No-Till Irrigated Class with a verified yield of 432 bushels per acre with A641-54 VT2PRO. n Ben Price from Chillicothe, Missouri, won first place Conventional Non-Irrigated Class with a verified yield of 323 bushels per acre with A6572 VT2RIB. n Justin Borges from Marshall,

Missouri, won second place NoTill Non-Irrigated Class with a verified yield of 310 bushels per acre with A646-12 VT2PRO. n Jonathan Borges from Marshall, Missouri, won third place No-Till Non-Irrigated Class with a verified yield of 305 bushels per acre with A6659 VT2RIB. n Michelle Dowdy-Deese from Valdosta, Georgia, won third place Conventional Irrigated Class with a verified yield of 393 bushels per acre with A64106 VT2PRO. John Kermicle, AgriGold brand manager, said these results can be attributed to the high yield potential of AgriGold’s

elite genetics and advanced trait technology, the farmers’ knowledge and skills and the in-field support customers receive from AgriGold’s agronomic team. “I’d like to congratulate each of these winners and all 155 of AgriGold contest participants,” Kermicle said. “It’s no secret 2019 was a year full of challenges, but their boldness and determination are why they’re here. Anyone who sets out to push performance and increase yields deserves to be recognized.” The National Corn Yield Contest is an annual contest available to all NCGA members that gives corn growers the opportu-

nity to compete alongside other farmers to grow the most corn per acre. The contest was created to encourage the development of new, sustainable and innovative management practices resulting in higher yields and to show the importance of using sound cultural practices in corn production — while helping to feed and fuel the world. AgriGold is looking forward to honoring all winners during the 2020 Commodity Classic in San Antonio, Texas. To learn more about AgriGold’s growing roster of Yield Masters and portfolio of winning corn hybrids, visit agrigold.com.


A10 Friday, January 17, 2020

| INDIANA AGRINEWS | www.agrinews-pubs.com

Beef brand market expanding DENVER — Two years after it was relaunched, the “Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner.” brand has had a reach of more than 1 billion consumers with drool-worthy and informative digital marketing and social media content. Funded by the Beef Checkoff and developed by the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, the “Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner.” brand aims to inspire families to explore their culinary talents with nutritious and delicious beef, while connecting consumers with stories of the farmers and ranchers who raise real beef. Today, the “Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner.” brand is reaching more consumers more frequently and more effectively than ever before. According to market research, when people are aware of “Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner.,” they are more likely to eat beef more often and feel good about purchasing and preparing beef for their families. “For a brand to have a reach of more than 1 billion in today’s crowded marketing environment is a major milestone,” said Laurie Munns, a cattle rancher from Hansel Valley, Utah, and Federation Division chairman, at the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association. “This achievement also demonstrates the equity of the brand and its ability to continue to meet the needs of today’s discerning consumers. It’s clear that consumers want more information about beef’s great taste, its powerful nutrition profile and the hardworking farmers and ranchers that raise the beef they eat.” Since the introduction of the brand more than 25 years ago, NCBA has continued to evolve marketing strategies and adapt to changing media landscapes. This evolution included a shift away from television advertising to focus on digital marketing efforts. Specifically, during the past two years, the “Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner.” brand has developed and executed several successful integrated digital marketing campaigns. A few highlights include: n Rethink the Ranch: Introduced in 2017 in conjunction with the relaunch of the “Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner.” brand, this campaign featured the people behind beef. From farm to plate and everything in-between, this video series gave consumers a look inside the lives of real farmers and ranchers and how they continue to produce more high-quality beef more sustainably than ever before. n Nicely Done, Beef: This ongoing campaign highlights beef’s greatest assets — it’s pleasurable eating experience, the amazing people who raise beef and the nutrients beef provides. These messages are delivered through a consistent “nicely done” theme, including “Nicely done, beef. You prove that meat substitutes are just that. Substitutes.” And “Nicely done, beef. You build strong muscles. No protein shake required.” n The Right Way: Lunched in October, this recent campaign from “Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner.” introduces consumers to the Beef Quality Assurance program, a Beef Checkoff-funded voluntary program ensuring U.S. beef is produced under stringent animal care standards, resulting in safe, high-quality meat. n Drool Log: To celebrate the holiday season, “Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner.” put a spin on the iconic Yule Log with a new mouthwatering video. The two-hour long video features a prime rib roast cooking to perfection on a rotisserie over an open flame. n Chuck Knows Beef: In addition to these, and many other campaigns, “Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner.” created the first all-knowing beef virtual assistant, Chuck Knows Beef in 2018. Powered by Google Artificial Intelligence, Chuck can serve up recipes and answer a variety of beef-related questions — from nutrition, cut and cooking information to how beef is raised. Chuck can be accessed on a computer or smart phone at ChuckKnowsBeef.com or through Amazon Alexa or Google Home smart devices. To learn more about “Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner.” and see the brand’s latest marketing campaigns, visit BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com.

AGRINEWS PHOTOS/MARTHA BLUM

Trevor Toland (right) and Carson Welsh check on a group of heifers grazing at River Oak Ranch. Although the cattle have only been grazing the pasture for a short time, Welsh said he can already see a big difference from utilizing a rotational grazing system.

Time of transition Cattleman sets goal to give young producer opportunities By Martha Blum

AGRINEWS PUBLICATIONS

MACOMB, Ill. — Moving cattle through the managed intensive grazing system and monitoring the forage growth at River Oak Ranch will be the responsibility of Carson Welsh this year. The operation, owned by Trevor and Jane Toland, includes 250 grazing acres, 50 paddocks and nine ponds. The process to transfer the management of the system was started by the Tolands in February 2019. “The main thing was for me to get out of the responsibility,” said Trevor Toland, who recently turned 76. While on vacation, the couple started by using t-charts that included a plan with advantages, disadvantages and costs. “We did about six charts, and we started seeing the light for what we thought would be best which was a full lease,” Toland said. “I wanted to help someone get started, and I didn’t just want to think about profit,” he said. “I wanted to find a middle ground between making some money and being able to replace some of the equipment, but I didn’t want it to be difficult for the lessee.” This was a challenging process, Toland said, because there were not many guidelines to follow. “I wanted it to feel like a good opportunity for a young person,” he said. “Trying to find a per acre grazing rental cost is almost impossible because the range is huge.” “I looked online for ideas on how to write a lease, and I found some suggestions and forms,” Jane Toland said. “We had a lot of things to think about.” As the couple started to put together some numbers, they contacted Travis Meteer, University of Illinois Extension commercial educator, and Nic Anderson, business developer for the Illinois Livestock Development Group. “We talked for two to three hours, and they helped with suggestions,” Trevor Toland

Trevor and Jane Toland look over their lease agreement they developed for their grazing operation in McDonough County. The couple worked for several months to write the lease so they had time to think about all the details that were required to help a young cattlemen get started on their farm. said. “They were really important in getting this done by telling us what they thought would work well and some things that weren’t going to work, as well.” As a result, the Tolands decided to offer a lease agreement that included all the buildings, working facilities, pasture and equipment they own to run an operation such as tractors, manure spreader, bale hauler, hay racks, ATV, Kubota and so forth. “We included a sheet that lists the operations and responsibilities for both the lessee and the lessor,” Toland said. “For example, the fence repair and all gates and buildings are my responsibility, and if the lessee wants to put in temporary fencing to split a paddock, that’s his responsibility.” The lease includes a map of the entire farm and areas that are available for grazing. “I’m sure as the year goes along, we’ll probably find things we didn’t get in the lease,” Toland said. “So, we have a big blank area, and at the end of the year, we’ll see what worked and what didn’t.” The Tolands offered the lease to Welsh after interviewing five candidates interested in the opportunity. “One of the first qualities we wanted was somebody who knows how to work and knew cattle,” Trevor Toland said. “Carson knows how to work, and that was the first thing that impressed us.” “The second most impressive

thing about Carson is he’s a verbal learner, so if I tell him something, he knows it and that’s going to be important going forward as he learns how to handle these pastures and the situations here,” Toland said. “I’m confident he’s going to do a really good job.” The east fork of the LaMoine River runs through the farm which was purchased by Toland’s parents in 1951. “We’ve lived here since 1972, and we wouldn’t be here if it wasn’t for my parents,” he said. “Before them, this place had never been paid for by anyone because they all went broke.” Toland has managed his pastures with rotational grazing for many years. “The high intensity started in 2001 when I retired from teaching,” he said. “In 2006, we used the Environmental Quality Incentives Program to put ramps in the ponds, build exterior fences, add interior fencing and we drilled a new well.” For too long, Toland said, cattlemen have been focused on making money per animal. “Cattlemen have been focused on weaning weights and yearling weights instead of focusing on what we can make per acre grazing and how to do it,” he said. “That’s why we’ve been so slow adopting managed intensive grazing systems.” “This farm is what a lot of guys would call junk land with the flood plain and white timber soils,” he said. “So, if you can

make $100 to $200 per acre on this ground, that’s pretty amazing.” For the past 11 years, Toland has had a custom grazing agreement with Black Gold Ranch and Feedlot. “T here were years they brought 120 head of cattle here in April and never saw the cattle again until they picked them up at the end of December,” he said. “That was really appreciated by me that someone trusted me that much.” Welsh’s family operates Welsh Cattle Co. near Blandinsville. “We have a 500-cow herd that includes purebred Angus, purebred Simmental and cows that are Simmental or Angus-based,” said Welsh, 21. “We have an annual bred heifer sale, and we also sell and lease bulls privately.” The young cattleman already has started to learn about managed intensive grazing with a group of 69 heifers he has winter grazing on the leased pasture. “You can tell just having heifers here for a month the big difference there is by rotating them,” Welsh said. “I’ve always run my cows with dad’s herd, so I applied for this lease because I saw it as a very good learning opportunity to have my own deal,” said Welsh, who signed a five-year lease for the operation. “An intensive managed grazing system needs cattle, but at other times you don’t need as many cattle, so you need quite a few head of cattle, so you can make adjustments,” Toland said. “The clincher for us choosing Carson is we were really impressed with his background, family, their size of operation and the flexibility to make adjustments.” “I could see Carson being here for a long time as an operator and maybe eventually as an owner,” he said. While serving as the president of the Illinois Beef Association, Toland said he met a lot of cattlemen who were getting ready to retire. “They didn’t have a clue about what to do, except sell out and quit,” he said. “I think it’s important for guys like us to figure out a way to make transition happen.” Martha Blum can be reached at 815-223-2558, ext. 117, or marthablum@agrinews-pubs. com. Follow her on Twitter at: @AgNews_Blum.

Added benefits enhance cattle marketing program KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Designed to identify superior Herefordinfluenced feeder cattle, the Hereford Advantage program now offers additional benefits to add value to feeder cattle. With these enhancements, cattlemen using Hereford bulls can provide value beyond genetic merit through health and management practices. New components of the program are backed by documented market price advantages, giving producers a great opportunity to increase their bottom line. Established by the American Hereford Association, this tagging program is now offered in conjunction with IMI Global, an industry-leading source for third-party verification of food

production practices in North America. “The Hereford Advantage program serves as a valuable tool for commercial cattlemen using Hereford bulls to set themselves apart in a competitive market,” said Trey Befort, AHA director of commercial programs. “Cattle feeders are looking for healthy cattle that have been managed properly and that will perform in the yard and on the rail. The Hereford Advantage program helps to identify cattle that will check those boxes and reward producers who are working to do so.” Requirements include: n Source and age. n Genetic merit. n Minimum of 50% Hereford

genetics. n Bull battery ranking in top 50% of breed for CHB$ profit index. n Bull ownership transferred. n Vaccination program n Two rounds of preweaning vaccinations. n BQA certification. To be part of the Hereford Advantage, download the enrollment form at HerefordAdvantage.com and submit the completed form to IMI Global. Program cost is $3 per head — no minimum enrollment required — which includes verification and program electronic identification tag costs. Additional programs offered through IMI Global such as the Non-Hormone Treated Cattle

and Verified Natural Beef programs can be added with just an on-site audit fee plus travel expenses. During the enrollment process, an expected progeny difference and profit index summary for the submitted bull battery will be developed and provided to producers, allowing them to track genetic merit to make future selection decisions. Participating producers will also receive additional marketing support and exposure through this program. Qualifying cattle will be listed on the AHA’s feeder cattle listing page and cattle information will be communicated to a growing list of interested feeder cattle buyers.


www.agrinews-pubs.com | INDIANA AGRINEWS | Friday, January 17, 2020

RISK

slightly ahead of the other. n Bending knees and lifting stretched arms. TOP TIPS n Turning feet and arms n Take stretching breaks. n Good back posture with leg muscles, keeping rather than twisting the n Vary tasks every 20 to when standing, walking head in a neutral position. FROM PAGE ONE back. 30 minutes when possible. and sitting. n Avoid locking knees. To learn more about agn Standing with feet apart n Finding help to lift n Carrying objects close â&#x20AC;&#x153;They usually have less at shoulder width, one foot heavy objects. ricultural safety practices, to the body, not with outaccess to health care than their urban counterparts,â&#x20AC;? Halverson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most of that has to do with geography and possibly insurance coverage. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We know there are a limited number of healthcare providers that focus on womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s health. Rural communities are strugJohnDeere.com/6M gling with keeping healthcare providers across the JohnDeere.ca/6M board, whether they be specialty practices or general practitioners.â&#x20AC;? Women can help prevent injuries on the farm by considering and implementing safe ergonomic practices. Ergonomics is defined as the study of how people work in their environment, Before we even hit the drawing board, we talked with farmers, and designing the job to fit HHWRZQHUVDQGPRUHWROHDUQZKDWWKH\QHHGLQDPLGVL]HXWLOLW\WUDFWRU the worker, Halverson said. Contributing factors to Visit your John Deere dealerWRH[SHULHQFHWKHWUDFWRU\RXGHVLJQHGÉ&#x2019;ZLWKPRUH injuries include: YLVLELOLW\EHWWHUPDQHXYHUDELOLW\DQGPRUHRSWLRQVWRW\RXUQHHGV n Lifting objects that are too heavy. n Repeated reaching overhead. n Awkward working positions and body postures. Reimagined by you. For you. n Continual repetition of a specific work process. n Vibration from hand tools. n Static load on arms and upper body muscles. n Inadequate design or size of hand tools. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Women have anatomical and physiological differences that may place them at risk for farm injuries,â&#x20AC;? Halverson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Females are, on average, shorter than males and have more adipose tissue. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Females also have narrower shoulders, wider hips and proportionally have shorter legs and arms than their male counterparts. On average, the upper body strength in a woman is 40% to 75% less than in males. Lower body strength is 5% to 30% less than males.â&#x20AC;? Prevention strategies can help protect muscles, tendons and ligaments.

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The 6M.

ELIMINATE FROM PAGE ONE

n Wear appropriate personal protective equipment based on the product label or when working around animals. n Reduce exposures with proper laundering of personal or family members clothing. 4. Stress factors: n Establish support systems which may include family, friends or online blogs. n Seek assistance from healthcare professional for symptoms that may indicate depression or anxiety. GENERAL RISK PREVENTION STRATEGIES 1. Exposure to heat and sun: n Wear sun-safe hats and clothing. n Use sunscreen with SPF of 30 or higher at all times in all seasons. 2. Longer hair styles and ponytails can be caught in equipment: n Secure longer hair above neckline in hat or band to prevent entanglement. 3. Respiratory exposure: n Wear NIOSH-approved two-strap or cartridge respirator in appropriate size to fit your facial structure. 4. Chronic noise exposure: n Wear NIOSH-approved hearing protection. n Choose hearing protection type and contour to fit your ear canal. Erica Quinlan

Talk to your doctor

n Discuss your farmrelated risks. n Ask questions relative to pesticide exposure and appropriate personal protective equipment. n Review sleep and rest patterns. n Discuss stress issues. n Seek routine screenings for early signs of heart disease, breast, uterine, and ovarian cancer and diabetes. Source: AgriSafe Network

ADVERTISEMENT Financing Information & Trait Stewardship Responsibilities Notice to Farmers for Ro u n d u p R e a d y 2 Xt e n dÂŽ S oy b e a n s Advertisement A customer can participate in Prepay Early Cash Discount, John Deere Financing and HarvestPlan Fixed 0% financing programs BUT NOT ON THE SAME UNIT OF SEED/DOLLAR. Bayer reser ves the right not to pay any commission, incentive, rebate, refund, discount or other promotional payment on units of eligible products under this program where the sale is executed via an online electronic point-of-sale system unless approved by Bayer in writing. XtendiMax ÂŽ herbicide with VaporGrip ÂŽ Technology is a restricted use pesticide for retail sale to and use only by Certified Applicators or persons under their direct supervision. ALWAYS READ AND FOLLOW DIRECTIONS FOR USE ON PESTICIDE LABELING. It is a violation of federal and state law to use any pesticide product other than in accordance with its labeling. XtendiMa xÂŽ herbicide with VaporGripÂŽ Technology and cotton with XtendFlexÂŽ Technology may not be approved in all states and may be subject to use restrictions in some states. Check with your local Monsanto dealer or representative or U.S. EPA and your state pesticide regulatory agency for the product registration status and additional restrictions in your state. For approved tank-mix products and nozzles visit XtendiMaxApplicationRequirements.com Monsanto Company is a member of Excellence Through StewardshipÂŽ (ETS). Monsanto products are commercialized in accordance with ETS Product Launch Stewardship Guidance, and in compliance with Monsantoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Policy for Commercialization of Biotechnology-Derived Plant Products in Commodity Crops. This product has been approved for import into key export markets with functioning regulatory systems. Any crop or material produced from this product can only be exported to, or used, processed or sold in countries where all necessary regulatory approvals have been granted. It is a violation of national and international law to move material containing biotech traits across boundaries into nations where import is not permitted. Growers should talk to their grain handler or product purchaser to confirm their buying position for this product. Excellence Through StewardshipÂŽ is a registered trademark of Excellence Through Stewardship. ALWAYS READ AND FOLLOW DIRECTIONS FOR USE ON PESTICIDE LABELING. IT IS A VIOL ATION OF FEDER AL AND STATE LAW to use any pesticide product other than in accordance with its labeling. N OT A L L fo r m u l a ti o n s of d i c a m b a o r glyphosate are approved for in-crop use with Roundup Ready 2 XtendÂŽ soybeans. ONLY USE FORMUL ATIONS THAT ARE SPECIFICALLY LABELED FOR SUCH USES AND APPROVED FOR SUCH USE IN THE STATE OF APPLICATION. Contact the U.S. EPA and your state pesticide regulatory agency with any questions about the approval status of dicamba herbicide products for in-crop use with Roundup Ready 2 XtendÂŽ soybeans. Roundup Ready 2 Xtend ÂŽ soybeans contains genes that confer tolerance to glyphosate and dicamba. Glyphosate will kill crops that are not tolerant to glyphosate. Dicamba will kill crops that are not tolerant to dicamba. Glufosinate will kill crops that are not tolerant to glufosinate. Contact your Monsanto dealer or refer to Monsantoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Technology Use Guide for recommended weed control programs. I n d i v i d u a l r e s u l t s m a y v a r y, a n d performance may vary from location to location and from year to year. This result may not be an indicator of results you may obtain as local growing, soil and weather conditions may vary. Growers should evaluate data from multiple locations and years whenever possible. ALWAYS READ AND FOLLOW PESTICIDE LABEL DIRECTIONS. Roundup Ready 2 XtendÂŽ, Roundup Ready PLUSÂŽ, VaporGripÂŽ and XtendiMaxÂŽ are registered trademarks of the Bayer Group. ChannelÂŽ and the Arrow DesignÂŽ and Seedsmanship At WorkÂŽ are registered trademarks of Channel Bio, LLC. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. Š2019 Bayer Group. All rights reserved. For approved tank-mix products and nozzles visit XtendiMaxApplicationRequirements.com

A11

visit www.agrisafe.org. Erica Quinlan can be reached at 800-426-9438, ext. 193, or equinlan@ agrinews-pubs.com.

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TTG Equipment, LLC Bluffton, IN


A12 Friday, January 17, 2020

| INDIANA AGRINEWS | www.agrinews-pubs.com

From the Barns A mild winter start The holidays are now behind us and winter hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been too hateful so far. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s getting dark a little later each day and for that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m grateful. Basketball season is in full swing, so thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good number of evenings to be spent at one of the local gymnasiums watching grandchildren participate. Planning for next yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s crops of corn and calves has taken up most of my oďŹ&#x192;ce time lately and thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a huge lineup of broken toys outside of our shop that need mended before spring gets underway. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been considerable talk of frost seeding on pastures and hay meadows, but we will need some frost ďŹ rst. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve still got plenty of manure to pump and so we keep close watch on the nighttime lows to see if the ground will freeze enough to do some injecting of manure. Pumping in the winter is tricky. It has to be frozen enough that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not too slick to run, but not froze so much that you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t pull the plow. Also, if you have much hose laid out, it takes considerable time to blow the manure out of the hose each night so the hose and pumps wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t freeze when you shut down. Sometimes the simplest thing to do is just keep the pumps and plow running all night. I need to get better at astronomy because the night sky in the winter is magniďŹ cent and we may be seeing a little of it if the weather cooperates. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been weaning the calves and getting the cows preg checked and vaccinated as time and space at the feedlot have allowed. We did the toughest bunch to gather last week while all of my junior cowmen were oďŹ&#x20AC; of school for the holidays. It was a good thing we had lots of help. After two rounds of gathering and shots, the cows and their not-so-stupid calves donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have much interest in willingly running into the pens and needed extra encouragement for this third gather. We took full advantage of the 50-degree January weather so the gather and next day preg check wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t too hard on the crew or the seasoned veterinarian who did the sleeving. Our good vet raised a house full of nowgrown daughters, so an occasional exposure to six or more half-grown rowdy cowboys is an experience Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m sure he relays to his lovely wife while they are sitting beside the ďŹ re at dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s end. The winter weather has been excellent for cattle in the feedlot. Feed consumption and health couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be much better. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got a couple of groups of cattle we brought up from our Georgia ranch and started outside on pasture. We fought with these calves to stay healthy until we moved them into the barn. They seemed to keep passing a low grade respiratory deal around, but have been perfect once they moved indoors. Nate and I have a feeling they were hanging out in a couple of wet spots in the pasture, drinking the water there and passing bugs back and forth. We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know for sure, but those wet holes are marked for extinction before the next

Committee. I have become acutely aware of the condition and cost of our county highways. We have enough operating money to rehab â&#x20AC;&#x201D; grind, add new base, shape, oil and chip â&#x20AC;&#x201D; about 18 miles of our 180 miles of county roads per year. That means those roads need to last 10 years before another rehab. With the cut-through car traďŹ&#x192;c and heavy agricultural ASTORIA, ILL. traďŹ&#x192;c that we have, I Roads need repairs think we will continue to ďŹ ght a losing battle. GreetGrain haulers no longer ings from River Oak! use 2 tons or gravity wagons, but all semis. Happy Crop equipment has more New than doubled lately in size Year! It is and weight. So, those are another ďŹ ne winter issues that I am sure many counties have. There will day. I use be more bridge closings, winter loosely, of course, as well, due to the cost of meaning it is winter on replacement. the calendar, only. We Can we keep old man sure have enjoyed the last winter away a few more month and our winter weeks? Hope to at least grazing program is now going to pass 40 days and ďŹ nish oďŹ&#x20AC; the grazing year. Be safe if he strikes before perhaps even 50. The our next visit. heifers look terriďŹ c on the stockpile and are very Trevor Toland MACOMB, ILL. much in the knowledge of how rotational grazing This is sad goodbye works. They only pay attention to ATVs and We have man when they know wound they are ready for a new down paddock. I have never our year had northern plains cattle here at arrive in the late fall and Slykhuis winter before, so I am Farms and really impressed with the have put hair on these girls. Wow, the winter they have lots of nice hair feeding in full swing. I and now it is permed with am still limit feeding the the showers and them brood herd to an extent, licking each other or but I am making sure they themselves. are not getting short on I am busy with brush energy. December weather cutting, fence repair and has been somewhat completely reorganizing tranquil, and this is all the shop and our fencing leading up to the start of corner in the machine the calving season. There shed. It has been too have been a few early many years since these calves show up on the last things have been done. few days of December, We have sold all the but most of them will wait young home-raised cattle, until the ďŹ rst week of and the six leader cows January to get started. have earned the right to As we look back on this stay here as part of the past year and reďŹ&#x201A;ect on new staďŹ&#x20AC;. It is a wellthe highs and lows, we deserved honor for them. think about how upside Our other custom-grazed down the spring was. It cattle were loaded out was followed by a growing on the 27 and 30, so it summer and it made for seems very quiet. Carson a productive year. In this is learning the landscape past decade, agriculture and the buildings, so and farming has made Jane and I can actually some signiďŹ cant advances take some late Christmas in how we raise crops and to the Rockford and livestock. Beef quality has Milwaukee grandkids. made some remarkable The custom 24-cow group progress. Consumers have spent 21 days on the tasted the product and stockpiled STF 43/red they like it. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not just clover 10 acres. We split it the U.S. consumers either; in half with a temporary. itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the whole world. I We could have spent a few looked back at some more days there, but the carcass data and close 1.5 inch rain last weekend outs of my own. I can also made us pull out. We see a signiďŹ cant change still coddle the STF 43 in how the cattle perform. compared to KY 31. It had Maybe not so much in a good year, but it was ďŹ nishing weight, but slow to establish, so we quality grade has made will see what it looks like some advancements. next year. We hope that trend will I serve as the chairman continue along with the of our McDonough rest of the industry. County Road and Bridge Last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s calf crop is grazing season. Linda and I are planning to spend a couple of days at the National Cattlemenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Beef Association convention in San Antonio, provided we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have another â&#x20AC;&#x153;polar vortexâ&#x20AC;? like last year. One thing about the weather and plans here on the ranch: both are subject to change! Steve Foglesong

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time to time as I share our work and goings on, we own and manage a diversiďŹ ed beef operation in Southern Illinois near Creal Springs in Williamson County. Seems like we have our hand in almost all aspects of beef production. We maintain a registered Angus cowherd, as well as an Angus based commercial herd. Calving takes place in both the spring and fall during calving windows. From the registered herd, Dad markets a number of bulls each year into Southern Illinois, Western Kentucky and Tennessee, serving as herd sires at their new homes. Heifer development continues to be part of our program, for ourselves and other producers who want us to get theirs bred and ready to go. We do some ďŹ nishing and most always have some fat cattle on hand to sell, usually selling truck loads to Tyson in Joslin. RALEIGH, ILL. During the spring and Back to write again summer, we often have stocker calves grazing. After If we do that, it will be several on annual grasses that years in we have planted for that hiatus, speciďŹ c purpose, and it is I am honored to not unusual to see several be asked to hundred cattle growing once again on those nutritious blends. Our primary become a contributor to the From the focus, though, is on Barns report for AgriNews. backgrounding feeder cattle. Virtually every I penned many columns month of the year, we are over a multi-year period bringing in new cattle, prior to taking over the usually high-risk cattle reins as president of the to get straightened out. Illinois Beef Association At the same time, we are in 2011. After completing selling or shipping out my term leading that multiple loads of ready to organization in 2013, I go feeders, so there seems have been quietly and to be a constant ďŹ&#x201A;ow of steadily working here at cattle in and out of this the family beef operation. place. We have pretty I have enjoyed following much been maintaining the other contributorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; around 1,500 head on since then, reading about feed, and I think it is safe their respective stories to say that over the last and activities at their beef year we will have turned farms. 4,000 to 5,000 head. Although many of you Never seems to be any already know me, no slack time, and we most doubt there are many always feel we stay behind new readers who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t, and canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t keep up with so perhaps it would be all that needs to be done. a good idea to update We keep plugging away everyone on myself and at it, because thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how our workings here at the weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re made, and we know Beasley farm. Alongside my father, Dale, and the this work is important as other membersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; of the we raise and feed cattle crew, whom you will hear to feed the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s beef and learn about from consumers. I will share

on its last leg of ďŹ nishing. We are doing some ultrasound work this week to establish when the ďŹ rst dates of shipping will begin. The market is starting to strengthen, and we hope for a bountiful harvest. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s with heavy heart that I must say this is my last article. It has been a great pleasure inviting you as readers in our home and sharing the thoughts and management of our everyday living. Those of you readers that live on or operate a farm know ďŹ rsthand that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not all sunshine and rainbows. The things we see on TV are not necessarily reality. The things we do behind the scenes can be most challenging and frustrating, but the lifestyle of farming and raising animals is by far the greatest gift the world can give us. Always be thankful and may God bless. Todd Slykhuis

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some of what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done lately and look forward to doing that over the new year. Fall calving went very well. We didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to pull a calf, and I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think we have lost any calves either. That has to be a record for us, and one that will be hard to repeat. Most of the cows have been grazing a mix of oats, radishes and cereal rye that was sown back in August. After an unusually long dry spell in September and October, we ďŹ nally got some forage growth and have been getting some good pasturing out of this, and I hope to get a few more weeks out of it. We have been strip grazing it, and that has worked very well for us. It is breeding season of course, and the bulls are in and doing their job. A number of the cows we have been AI breeding. This year, we have been doing it via natural heat detection. My brother, Brett, and nephew, David, who is a junior in high school, wanted to ďŹ&#x201A;ush some cows this fall, so they selected two of our premier cows. A good number of eggs were collected, and some of those were placed into recipient cows. So far, it looks like that may have been successful. The rest of the eggs were frozen for future use. Bulls were semen tested in early December. A number of those were kicked out with the cows and also into some local cooperator herds. Others that were pre-sold were delivered. Two bulls recently sold are getting ready to head to their new home in Tennessee. Pretty much all we have left are the 15-month old bulls that most likely will sell next spring. So, we have deďŹ nitely stayed busy, but despite the tough times, we do love caring for these cattle. God continues to bless us and make provision for us, and we are always mindful of his wonderful love. Look forward to sharing with you again next month. Jeff Beasley CREAL SPRINGS, ILL.

Products Use Notice for â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Choose Resultsâ&#x20AC;? Advertisement for Roundup ReadyÂŽ Xtend Crop System Monsanto Company is a member of Excellence Through ÂŽ Stewardship (ETS). Monsanto products are commercialized in accordance with ETS Product Launch Stewardship Guidance, and in compliance with Monsantoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Policy for Commercialization of Biotechnology-Derived Plant Products in Commodity Crops. This product has been approved for import into key export markets with functioning regulatory systems. Any crop or material produced from this product can only be exported to, or used, processed or sold in countries where all necessary regulatory approvals have been granted. It is a violation of national and international law to move material containing biotech traits across boundaries into nations where import is not permitted. Growers should talk to their grain handler or product purchaser to confirm their buying position for this product. Excellence Through StewardshipÂŽ is a registered trademark of Excellence Through Stewardship. herbicide with XtendiMax ÂŽ VaporGrip ÂŽ Technology is part ÂŽ of the Roundup Ready Xtend Crop System and is a restricted use pesticide. ALWAYS READ AND FOLLOW PESTICIDE LABEL DIRECTIONS. It is a violation of federal and state law to use any pesticide product other than in accordance with its labeling. XtendiMaxÂŽ herbicide Technology with VaporGripÂŽ and products with XtendFlexÂŽ Technology may not be approved in all states and may be subject to use restrictions in some states. Check with your local product dealer or representative or U.S. EPA and your state pesticide regulatory agency for the product registration status and additional restrictions in your state. For approved tank-mix products and nozzles visit XtendiMax Application Requirements.com. NOT ALL formulations of dicamba or glyphosate are approved for in-crop use with Roundup Ready 2 XtendÂŽ soybeans. ONLY USE FORMULATIONS THAT ARE SPECIFICALLY LABELED FOR SUCH USES AND APPROVED FOR SUCH USE IN THE STATE OF APPLICATION. Contact the U.S. EPA and your state pesticide regulatory agency with any questions about the approval status of dicamba herbicide products for in-crop use with Roundup Ready 2 XtendÂŽ soybeans or cotton with XtendFlexÂŽ Technology. Roundup Ready 2 Xtend ÂŽ soybeans contain genes that confer tolerance to glyphosate and dicamba. Glyphosate will kill crops that are not tolerant to glyphosate. Dicamba will kill crops that are not tolerant to dicamba. Contact your seed brand dealer or refer to the Monsanto Technology Use Guide for recommended weed control programs. Bayer and Bayer Cross Design, Roundup Ready 2 Xtend ÂŽ, Roundup Ready ÂŽ, VaporGrip ÂŽ ÂŽ and XtendiMax are registered trademarks of Bayer Group. Š2020 Bayer Group. All rights reserved. MDIC-19040-ILAN-0120-LC


INDIANA AGRINEWS | www.agrinews-pubs.com

AUCTIONS

Auction Calendar Mon., Jan. 20

OREGON, ILL.: Ogle County Farmers Consignment, 9 a.m., Janssen Ag Services LLC, Kaufman Auction Service, 815-6772781. See p. B2 HUNTINGTON COUNTY, IND.: 40 +/- Acres, 6:30 p.m., Harrell Family Farm, Halderman Real Estate & Farm Management, 800424-2324.

Tues., Jan. 21

PULASKI COUNTY, IND.: 120 +/- Acres in 2 Tracts, 6:30 p.m., Carl McCormick & Phyllis McCormick Living Trust, Halderman Real Estate & Farm Management, 800-4242324.

Thurs., Jan. 23

ELKHART, ILL.: Farm Equipment, 10 a.m., Rick & Vickie Harbarger, Mike

Maske Auction Service, 217-519-3959. See p. B1 WINAMAC, IND.: 150 +/Acres, 6 p.m. EST, Doug & Cheryl Podell, Schrader Real Estate & Auction Company, Inc., 800-4512709. DELAWARE COUNTY, IND.: 126.6 +/- Acres, 6:30 p.m., Richard L. Jolliffe Credit Trust, Halderman Real Estate & Farm Management, 800-424-2324.

Tues., Jan. 28

CASS COUNTY, IND.: 57 +/- Acres in 3 Tracts, 6:30 p.m., Kasch, Halderman Real Estate & Farm Management, 800-424-2324.

Mon., Feb. 3

LEESBURG, IND.: Annual Farm Equipment Auction, 9:30 a.m. EST, Polk Equipment, Inc., 574-4532411.

Classified Ads inside JANUARY 17, 2020 | B1 MARSHALL COUNTY, IND.: 114 +/- Acres in 4 Tracts, 6:30 p.m., Arlo M. Secrist Revocable Living Trust (Estate), Halderman Real Estate & Farm Management, 800-424-2324. See p. B2

Tues., Feb. 4

NEW PARIS, IND.: Annual Late Model Ag & Construction Equipment Auction, 8:30 a.m. EST, Polk Auction Company, 877-9154440. See p. B2 LINCOLN, ILL.: Farm Equipment, 10 a.m., Dale Lessen Estate, Mike Maske Auction Service, 217-5193959. See p. B1 & B2 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, IND.: 195 +/- Acres in 4 Tracts, 6:30 p.m., RunyanHollingsworth Farm, Halderman Real Estate & Farm Management, 800424-2324.

Mon., Feb. 10

ROCKVILLE, IND.: 195 +/Acres in 3 Tracts, 6 p.m., Chris Cox Booe & Marty

Arkansas announces closure of hog farm near Buffalo River LIT TLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Arkansas officials announced Jan. 6 that the closure of a hog farm near the Buffalo River has been completed, months after striking a deal with the facility’s owners.

FAST FIVE: NATIONAL FFA SECRETARY KOURTNEY LEHMAN By Ashley Langreck

AGRINEWS PUBLICATIONS

Five fast facts about Kourtney Lehman, who was elected National FFA secretary in October at the National FFA Convention and Expo in Indianapolis. Her favorite leadership development event is employment skills, which also is known as job interview, because she loves to talk with people, which is essential in the contest. Lehman taught herself how to play the accordion. Lehman is an avid karaoke fan, and she enjoys not only participating in karaoke, but also watching and listening to it. As a child, the first word she ever uttered was “moo,” which was quite appropriate since she grew up on a dairy farm. She loves to cook, and her go-to dish is anything she can make in her bread machine, including breadsticks and cinnamon bread.

1

2 3 4

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C&H Hog Farms Inc. has received $6.2 million in state and private funds that were held in escrow since last August and the state in return now holds a conservation easement for the property.

To place your own advertisement, call 800-426-9438

Under the agreement, the state will be responsible for the closure of the waste ponds at the property. The 6,500-hog farm had been the source of controversy since it was permitted several years ago.

Thursday, January 23, 2020 • 10:00 a.m.

1020 700th Street, Elkhart, IL 62634 (Located 5 miles east of Elkhart, IL) Rick Harbarger has decided to retire from farming and sell the below listed farm equipment on the farmstead located 5 miles east of Elkhart, IL where his family has worked for over 60 years. DIRECTIONS: Travel east of Elkhart, IL on Cunty Road 700 (Elkhart-Mt. Pulaski Blacktop) 4 miles; follow the signs. COMBINE & HEADS: 2008 JD 9670 Combine, 96705926837, 2200/1700 hrs, 18.4-38” duals; JD 625F Platform, S# H00625F730790; JD 893 Corn Head, S# 893X720382; EZ Trail HT 25 Head Transport; EZ Trail 20’ Head Transport; TRACTORS: JD 4955 MFWD Tractor, S# 4955P007886, 6700 hrs., power shift trans., 18.4-46” duals, 3 outlets; 1983 JD 4850 Tractor, S# RW4850P006236, 2 wheel drive, 3 outlets, power beyond, 18.4-42” duals, power shift transmission; JD 4640 Tractor, S# 4640M105830R, 2 wheel drive, 3 outlets, 8.4-42” duals, quad range transmission, selling with 280 loader; JD 4010 Tractor, S# 21T36884, no cab, wide front, diesel, 1 outlet; 1956 Farmall 400 Tractor, S#, narrow front; 1956 Minneapolis UB Special, S#09106002, wide front standard drawbar; 1948 Ferguson TE 20 Gas Tractor, needs work; TRUCK & TRAILER: 1992 White Aero WCA Semi Tractor VIN#4V1VDBCF4NN652279340,000 mile, Eaton 9 spd trans., new Jost 5th wheel plate, ; 1994, 34’, Jet Grain Trailer VIN# 1J9G30209RH009351; 2001 Double L Utility Trailer VIN#482UU18291A016347; WAGONS & GRAIN CART: Demco 850 Grain Cart, 30.5-32” tires; roll over tarp; 150 bu. gravity flow wagon, 10 ton gear w/ hydraulic seed auger; PLANTER & SEED CART: JD 1770NTXP 16-30” Planter, S#1770N710113, pneumatic down pressure, Keyton seed firmers, Yetter combo units, box extensions, Travis HCS 2200 Seed Tender, 3 season old, Honda engine, scales; TILLAGE: JD 726 Soil Finisher, N00726x007164, 25’ knock off sweeps, 5 bar spike harrow; JD 1710A disk chisel, 11’; 26’ hydraulic fold Harrowgator; JD 5-16” plow; JD 8-30 “ row crop cultivator; MOWERS: JD HX 15 Batwing mower, 8 tires, chains; AUGERS: Mayrath 10”x61’ swing away auger; MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT: Rhino 1400, 3 point, 10’ blade; Meteer Down Corn Reel; JD side rail weights; 1,000 gallon fuel tank; Pallet forks for 280 loader; extra bucket w/280 brackets;

Ratcliff (Sarah Warner Farm), Allen Auction & Real Estate, 765-585-0116. See p. B2

Thurs., Feb. 13

HALDERMANAUCTION. COM: Online Only, 37.15 +/- Acres Bartholomew County, bidding opens 2/12 at 8 a.m. & closes 2/13 at 4 p.m., M3 Farms LLC, Halderman Real Estate & Farm Management, 800-424-2324. See p. B2 PRINCETON, IND.: 204 +/Acres in 7 Tracts, 7 p.m. EST, Frank & Marlene Brittingham, Schrader Real Estate & Auction Company, Inc., 800-4512709. See p. B2

Tues., Feb. 18

MONTICELLO, IND.: 245 +/Acres in 2 Tracts, 12 Noon

Eastern, Brad Neihouser, 765-427-5052. See p. B1 NEWTON COUNTY, IND. & IROQUOIS COUNTY, ILL.: 948 +/- Acres in 10 Tracts, 6:30 p.m. CST, BushDowell Trust, Halderman Real Estate & Farm Management, 800-424-2324.

Wed., Feb. 19

TERRE HAUTE, IND.: 6 +/Acres, 2 p.m., Roger & Kathy Sturgeon, Johnny Swalls, 812-495-6119.

Tues., Feb. 25

VERMILION COUNTY, ILL.: 95 +/- Acres in 3 Tracts, 6:30

Sat., Feb. 29

BUSHNELL, ILL.: Farm & Construction Equipment Consignment, 9 a.m., Bedwell Farm Equipment, 309-772-2343.

Sat., March 7

DECATUR COUNTY, IND.: 503 +/- Acres in 8 Tracts, 6:30 p.m., Thornburg Farm, Halderman Real Estate & Farm Management, 800424-2324.

Thurs., Feb. 27

p.m. CST, Walter R. Swift Family Trust, Halderman Real Estate & Farm Management, 800-424-2324.

PARIS, ILL.: Multi-Consignor Farm Retirement Auction, 10 a.m., Henry Setzer Farms, Phil Landes Farms, Tucker Wood Auctions, 217-822-2386.

Multiple Dates

SEE AD: Upcoming Auctions & Featured Farms, Schrader Real Estate & Auction Company, Inc., 800-4512709. See p. B1

AUCTIONS Upcoming REAL ESTATE

JANUARY

15 – 63± ACRES IN 3 TRACTS. Randolph County (Farmland, IN). Quality Farmland with Good Road Frontage • Available for 2020 Crop Rights • Great Income Producing Farm • Beautiful CountryStyle Homesites • Just outside of Farmland along SR 32. Contact Mark Smithson 765-744-1846. 22 – 70± ACRES IN 2 TRACTS. Whitley County (Columbia City, IN). Tillable & Wooded Land • Possible Building Sites • 2020 Farming Rights. Contact Ritter Cox 260-609-3306. 23 – 150± ACRES IN 1 TRACT. Pulaski County (Winamac, IN). 13± Miles SW of Winamac, IN • 8± Miles SE of Francesville, IN • Irrigated Farm • Quality Land. Contact Jim Hayworth 765-427-1913 or 888-808-8680 or Jimmy Hayworth 219-869-0329. 27 – 69.5± ACRES IN 3 TRACTS. Allen County (Hoagland, IN). Tillable and Wooded Acres • 2 Story, 5 Bedroom Farm Home and Outbuildings • Access off Marion Center Rd. Contact Jared Sipe 260-750-1553 and Mike Roy 260-437-5428. 30 – 171± ACRES IN 5 TRACTS. Henry County (Straughn, IN). 150± FSA Crop Acres • 2020 Crop Rights to Buyer • Includes Quality Cyclone & Crosby Soils with a Whole Farm Corn Index of 142.8 • Top Agricultural Area - 1 mile from I-70 Interchange at Exit 131 • Farmstead with Brick Ranch Home and Barns • Fenced Pasture, Woods & Running Stream. Contact Andy Walther 765-969-0401.

FEBRUARY

5 - 28± ACRES IN 16 TRACTS. Elkhart County (Nappanee, IN). Historic Amish Acres • Round Barn Theatre • Large Restaurant • Kitchens and Bakery. Contact Roger Diehm 260-318-2770. 6 – 304 ACRES. Logan Co., OH. Contact 800-451-2709. 12 – 234.5± IN 6 TRACTS. Frankin County (Bath, IN) . 204± FSA Crop Acres • 2020 Crop Rights to BUYER • TOP SOILS – Whole Farm Corn Index of 164.2 • 3 miles to the INDIANA/OHIO State Line • GREAT LOCATION in TOP AGRICULTURAL AREA! • (2) Country Homes including FARMSTEAD with multiple barns

• Potential Wooded Building Site. Contact Andy Walther 765-969-0401. 13 – 204± ACRES IN 7 TRACTS. Gibson County (Princeton, IN) • 122± Tillable Acreage (FSA) • Alford Soil • Wooded Acreage • Hunting Tracts • Grain Storage • Machine Sheds/Shop. Contact Brad Horrall 812-890-8255.

FARM EQUIPMENT

JANUARY

27 – FARM EQUIPMENT. Three Rivers, MI. Contact Ed Boyer 574-215-7653 or Ted Boyer 574215-8100.

FEBRUARY

10 – FARM EQUIPMENT. Wolcott, IN. Contact Jim Hayworth 765-427-1913 or Arden Schrader 260-229-2442. 17 – FARM EQUIPMENT. Reading, MI. Contact Ed Boyer 574-215-7653 or Ted Boyer 574-215-8100. 19 – FERTILIZER EQUIPMENT. Greenville, OH. Contact Jim Hayworth 765-427-1913 or Arden Schrader 260-229-2442. 22 – FARM EQUIPMENT. Columbia City, IN. Contact Ritter Cox 260-609-3306.

Featured Farms

NE WHITE COUNTY, IN - 2 GRAIN FARMS These farms have quality soils and high percentage of tillable land. These farms have excellent road frontage. Call Jim Hayworth at 1-888-808-8680 or 1-765-427-1913 or Jimmy Hayworth at 1-219-869-0329. (JH42WH) LAKE COUNTY, IN. 147.5± ACRES with 71.6 cropland acres of which 31.4 acres in CRP. Call Matt Wiseman 219-689-4373. (MWW12L) JASPER COUNTY, IN 160± ACRES WITH 143± ACRES CROPLAND and 14± acres of woods. 9± miles northeast of Rensselaer. Call Jim Hayworth 765-4271913 or Matt Wiseman 219-689-4373. (JH/MWW05J) NE WHITE COUNTY, IN. These farms have quality soils and high percentage of tillable land. These farms have excellent road frontage. Near Burnettsville, IN. Call Dean Retherford 765-427-1244. (DRETH03WH) MANY OTHER LISTINGS AVAILABLE

800-451-2709

SchraderAuction.com

Rick & Vickie Harbarger, Owners (217) 737-0375

Mike Maske Auction Service 119 S. Lafayette St., Mt. Pulaski, Il 62548 (217) 519-3959 website: maskeauction.com email: www.maskeauction@hotmail.com TERMS: Cash, credit card or approved check payable on the day of the auction. Registration videotaped and a valid photo ID is required to obtain a buyers number. Announcements sale day take precedence over printed material. Not responsible for accidents or property after sold. The hours listed on print advertising might be different from actual hours on sale day because of the timing of advertising. All efforts will be made to update internet websites. All purchased items must be removed from the sale site within 3 week from the day of the Auctions. Information and pictures for this auction can be seen on: maskeauction.com LOADER TRACTOR AVAILABLE ONE WEEK AFTER THE AUCTION

Tuesday, February 4, 2020 10:00 a.m.

923 2000th Street, Lincoln, IL 62656 (Located 4 miles northwest of Lincoln, IL) Due to the passing of Dale Lessen the below listed farm equipment will be sold on the Lessen farmstead located 4 miles northwest of Lincoln, IL. DIRECTIONS: Travel northwest of Lincoln, IL on Old Rt 121 approximately 3 miles to 2000th street. At 2000th St. travel west 1 mile; the Lessen farmstead is on the left; follow the signs. COMBINE & HEADS: 2019 JD S760 Combine, S# 1H0S760SCK0805155, Brand New in the Fall of 2019, Expect to have less than 200 engine hours, 2 wheel drive, 520/85R42” duals, 600/70R28 rear, 22.5’ auger, premium cab; 2018 MacDawn FD135 Draper Head, S# 333205-18 (2 season); JD 608C Corn Head, S# 1H608CHCCX745880, 8-30”; EZ Trail 880 Header Transport & EZ Trail 20’ Header Transport; TRACTORS: 2013 JD 8335R tractor, S# RW8335REDD079462, MFWD, 1,530 hrs., 480/80R50 tires, dual, 380/80R38 front, fenders, 4 outlets, Cat 4 18,300 hitch, 60 gal. pump, IVT Trans., ILS suspension, 9L IT4 compliant engine, Premium Command View II cab, 10 front weights, 1,500 lb. inside weights; 2008 JD 8330 tractor, S# RW8330P030394, MFWD, 1,860 hrs., 480/80R50 tires, 380/80R38 front, fenders, Cat 4 15,200 lb. hitch, 60 gal. pump, power shift transmission, Green Star ready, 4 outlets; 1997 JD 8100 tractor, S# RW8100P012551, 2 wheel drive, 4,376 hrs., 18.4-46” tires, 11:00-24” fronts, 1500 lb. wts inside rear, 4 front wts., 3 hydraulic outlets, Deluxe Cab Command Arm; 1995 JD 8100 tractor, S# RW8100P002302, 2 wheel drive, 4,158 hrs., 18.4-46” tires, 4 hydraulic outlets; 1977 JD 4430 Cab Tractor, S#63066R, 2 outlets, 18.4-38” tires, quad range trans., JD 2640 tractor, S# 237070T, 2 outlets, shows 3500 hrs, w/146 loader; JD 5055E tractor, S# 1PY5055ETHH102925, 87 hrs., 9/3trans., ROPS, 16.9-28 rear tires, 2 wheel dirve,7.50-16 fronts; (2) Ag Leader RTK receivers & monitors, sold separately. TRUCK & TRAILERS: 2013 Chevy HD2500 1GC2KYE88DZ14883, 4x4, Duramax diesel, extended cab, 195,000 miles; 20’, tandem axle dump trailer, 14,000GVW, deluxe tailgate, ramps; small home built mower trailer; WAGONS & GRAIN CART: (2) Kill Bro./Unverferth 1065 gravity flow wagons, roll tarps, S#’s 3176107 & 108, green in color; (2) Kill Bro./Unverferth 1065 gravity flow wagons, roll tarps, S#’s 31760121 & 122, red in color; J & M 875 Grain Cart, S#4866, roll tarp, 30.5-32” tires, camera; J & M gravity flow wagon, 200 bu., light duty gear; PLANTER & SEED CART: 2012 JD 1770NT planter; S# 1A01770MPCM750112, 16-30” planter, Precision clean sweep residue managers, Center fill hoppers, spike closing wheels, insecticide, CCS seed delivery, pneumatic down pressure, 2 row disconnect; EZ load Seed tender, 4 place, 9 hp Honda engine; TILLAGE: DMI 5310, 16 row NH3 Applicator, NH3Equalply delivery system; J & M Torsion Flex TF212 rolling baskets, S# 2545; Aerway F-200, 20’ soil aerator, S#20000229; Blue Jet 5 leg, 3 point sub-soiler, gauge wheels; Krause 2860, 11’ disk chisel w/3 bar harrow; JD 20’ Model 400 rotary hoe, endwise transport; JD 1450, 5-16” plow; MOWERS: Woods Model 180, 15’ batwing mower, S# 1246385, 1,000 rpm, chains, 8 solid tires; Woods BB720X 3 point mower, S#5251009; JD sickle bar mower w/7’bar; Batchtold mower; SHOP RELATED: Oxy-acetylene torch set; 20 ton shop press; Atlas ETC 10 tire machine; ACM 60R car lift; cherry picker engine hoist; AUGERS: M&K 10”x61’ swing away auger w/mechanical hopper; Westfield 8”x30’ hydraulic belt conveyor; Westfield 10”x31’ truck auger w/7.5 hp electric motor; 8”x30’ auger w/electric motor; MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT: Hyster S50X fork lift, S# D187U16201W, 3 stage cylinder, LP fuel, 240” reach, 4,250 lb. cap.; Kunz 5’ pull type box scraper, outboard wheels; Allied 8’ snow blower, 540 pto; Used 66x43.00-25” floater tires; (2) 100 gallon diesel transfer tanks, 12 volt; 3 point head mover; floor standing drill press; chop saws; hand held FM radios;

Dale Lessen Estate- Sarah Lessen Executor

For more information contact Bill Lessen (217) 306-4147

Mike Maske Auction Service

119 S. Lafayette St., Mt. Pulaski, IL 62548 (217) 519-3959 website: maskeauction.com email: www.maskeauction@hotmail.com TERMS: Cash, credit card or approved check payable on the day of the auction. Registration videotaped and a valid photo ID is required to obtain a buyers number. Announcements sale day take precedence over printed material. Not responsible for accidents or property after sold. The hours listed on print advertising might be different from actual hours on sale day because of the timing of advertising. All efforts will be made to update internet websites. All purchased items must be removed from the sale site within 3 week from the day of the Auctions. Information and pictures for this auction can be seen on: maskeauction.com LOADER TRACTOR AVAILABLE ONE WEEK AFTER THE AUCTION Register at proxibid.com to bid online, live at this auction.


B2 Friday, January 17, 2020

| INDIANA AGRINEWS | www.agrinews-pubs.com

Soil health training finds common ground

Calendar JANUARY ALLEN COUNTY Jan. 21 – Creating Pomanders: 1 to 3 p.m. EST, Allen County Extension office, 4001 Crescent Ave., Fort Wayne, Ind. Jan. 25 and Feb. 1 – Hunter Education Class: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. EST, Allen County Extension office, 4001 Crescent Ave., Fort Wayne, Ind.

FULTON COUNTY Jan. 22 – Farm Winter School, Session 3 –Indiana State Police, with Trooper Brad Weaver: 7:30 to 9 p.m. EST, Rochester High School Vocational Ag Room, 1 Zebra Lane, Rochester, Ind.; 574-2233397. Jan. 29 – Farm Winter School, Session 4 – Agriculture in Afghanistan, with Cindra Chastain and Larry Temple: 7:30 to 9 p.m. EST, Rochester High School Vocational Ag Room, 1 Zebra Lane, Rochester, Ind.; 574-2233397.

HARRISON COUNTY Jan. 18 – Harrison County Cattlemen’s Association Annual Meeting: 4 to 6 p.m. EST, Talmage Windell Memorial Agricultural Building, 341 S. Capitol Ave., Corydon, Ind. Jan. 21 – Cooking Under Pressure Class: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. EST, Harrison County Extension office, 247 Atwood St., Corydon, Ind. Jan. 23 – Bob Ross Oil Painting Workshop: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. EST, Harrison County Extension office, 247 Atwood St., Corydon, Ind.; 812-738-4236. Jan. 23 – Timber Marketing for Home and Woodland Owners: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. EST, O’Bannon Woods State Park, 7234 Old Forest Road, Corydon, Ind. Jan. 28 – ServSafe Restaurant Food Safety Management Class: 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. EST, Harrison County Extension office, 247 Atwood St., Corydon, Ind.; 765-494-6794.

LAPORTE COUNTY Jan. 17 – Produce Safety Alliance Grower Training: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST, Pinney Purdue Agricultural Center, 11402 S. County Line Road, Wanatah, Ind.; safeproducein.com.

Landscape Management The 2020 Professional Landscape Management School will be from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. CST Jan. 30 and 31 at Ivy Tech Community College, 3501 N. First Ave., Evansville. The two-day conference for green industry professionals focuses on current, research-based, best-management practices. Leading experts and specialists will be speaking on various topics, such as insect and pest management, plant health care, weed control, and more. Continuing educational credits will be requested for pesticide applicators, arborists, and IAH license holders. Register by visiting tinyurl.com/yjl85ekm. ORANGE COUNTY Jan. 18 – Cow/Calf Improvement Seminar: Selection: 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. EST, Orange County Community Center, 1075 N. Sandy Hook Road, Paoli, Ind.; 812-275-4623.

PULASKI COUNTY Jan. 25 – Steer and Commercial Heifer Weigh-in/Tagging: 9 to 11 a.m. EST, Pulaski County Fairgrounds, Old St. Rd 14 E, Winamac, Ind.

SPENCER COUNTY Jan. 22 – Evaluating Your 2018 Farm Bill Options: 6 to 8 p.m. CST, Spencer County Youth & Community Center, 1101 E. County Rd. 800 N, Chrisney, Ind.

ST. JOSEPH COUNTY Jan. 21 and 28 – Dining with Diabetes: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. EST, Howard Park, 219 S. St. Louis St., South Bend, Ind.; 574-235-9604; bit.ly/ diningwithdiabetes0120.

TIPPECANOE COUNTY Jan. 29 – ServSafe Food Protection Manager Course and Exam: 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Columbus Twp - Bartholomew County

ONLINE ONLY

AUCTION

AT HALDERMANAUCTION.COM

EST, Tippecanoe County Extension office, 3150 Sagamore Parkway South, Lafayette, Ind.; www.cvent. com/d/2yqt3b.

VANDERBURGH COUNTY Jan. 27 – Purdue Extension Vanderburgh County Annual Extension Meeting: 6 to 8 p.m. CST, 4-H Center, 201 E. Boonville-New Harmony Road, Evansville, Ind.; 812867-4935. Jan. 30 and 31 – 2020 Professional Landscape Management School: 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. CST, Ivy Tech Community College, 3501 N. First Ave., Evansville,. Ind.; edustore@purdue.edu; tinyurl.com/yjl85ekm.

WHITLEY COUNTY Jan. 25 – 4-H Skating Party: 2 to 4 p.m. EST, Happy Valley Skating Center, 625 W. Old Trail Road, Columbia City, Ind. Jan. 29 – Farm Bill Informational Meeting: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. EST, Whitley County 4-H Center, 680 W. Squawbuck Road, Columbia City, Ind.; 260-244-6266, ext. 2; or 260-244-7615.

progress in southern Health Training Over the Illinois, western Indiana in 2015 to inlast few years, and northern Kentucky. crease the numthe term “soil The next round of trainber of farmers, health” has ing will be offered in retailers, advisbecome a ers and conserva- northwestern Illinois and buzz word tion practitioners eastern Iowa, beginning among many in March 2020. who understand Illinois farmThe current trainings the science of ers. But what are organized and funded soil health and is soil health? Haley the management by University of Illinois The Natural changes required Extension, The Nature Resource Haverbackto transition into Conservancy, Zea Mays Conservation Gruber Foundation, Illinois Corn this system. Service defines Growers and the Illinois This intensive soil health as the University Sustainable Agriculture training model continued capacprovides six two- Partnership. ity of soil to func- of Illinois Extension In the next training, day sessions over tion as a vital topics will include soil 18 months to a living ecosystem structure, chemistry and group of a new cohort of that sustains plants, aniconservation practitioners biology; cover crop semals and humans. Cornell University adds and farmer advisers. lection, management and The overarching goal that a healthy soil can be termination; planting used productively without of the program is to form and tillage equipment; a new network of local adversely affecting its field day demonstrations and regional “soil health training, along with comfuture productivity, the ecosystem, or the environ- specialists,” with a communication and outreach mon grounding in knowl- strategies. Certified Crop ment. edge and experience Viewing soils as a livAdvisors will receive that can demonstrate ing ecosystem reflects a continuing education and promote a systems shift in the way that we units throughout the approach to soil health manage our agricultural training. among Illinois farmers systems. and landowners. Agricultural manageHaley Haverback-Gruber The third round of ment practices change the is a University of Illinois Advanced Soil Health physical (percent sand, Extension watershed outsilt and clay; bulk density; Training is currently in reach associate. percent organic matter), chemical (pH, N, P, K, micronutrients, cation exchange capacity) and biological properties that affect soil function. +/The use of cover crops, Tracts from 37 to 79 Acres - Quality Farmland - Mostly Tillable reduced tillage and improved nutrient management can improve soil functionality. However, the transition into this complex system is accompanied by a set of producAuction Location: Parke Co. 4H Fairgrounds tion management changes, 1472 N US 41 - Rockville, IN 47872 which can be difficult to Sellers: Chris Cox Booe & Marty Ratcliff (Sarah Warner Farm) navigate. Fortunately, new a training program was For more info, maps, developed to guide in this Allen Auction & Real Estate terms & photos, visit Jay Allen process. www.auctionzip.com Lisa Allen, Sales Agent Auctioneer/Broker ID 18034 The American Kishia Linville, Sales Agent License # AU01040045 Farmland Trust initiated Call for FREE color brochure! 765-585-0116 Kristen Allen, Sales Agent the first Advanced Soil

FARM REAL ESTATE AUCTION 195 Acres - 3 Tracts

Parke County, Indiana - Penn Twp February 10 - 6 PM IN Time

2019 JD S760 Combine

Ogle County Farmers Consignment Auction January 20, 2020 at 9am

(Brand new in the fall of 2019)

Auction Location: Janssen Ag Services LLC 4779 S. Daysville Rd, Oregon IL 61061 Directions: Approx. 5 miles South of Oregon IL on Daysville Rd to site or 7 miles North of Franklin Grove on Daysville Rd. Tractors ~ Equipment ~ Planters ~ Drills ~Wagons Tillage ~ Industrial ~ Trucks ~ Trailers Live internet bidding with Proxibid & Level Contact Sean Janssen for more information on the equipment at 815-677-2781 or email janssenagservices@gmail.com Financing available for qualified buyers through CNH Industrial capital or Ag Direct. A signed credit application & Pre approval before sale day required call Cash Reichling for details. 608-574-4179 Follow us on facebook at https://www.facebook.com/JanssenAgServicesLLC Go to web sites for complete and pictures www.calkaufmanauction.com or www.auctionzip.com use auctioneer # 28362 Auction conducted by

Dale Lessen Estate Aucon Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2020 Lincoln, IL

Call Bill Lessen (217) 306-4147

+/-

37.15 Acres of Tillable Land Bidding Opens: February 12th 8 a.m. Bidding Closes: February 13th 4 p.m. Dave Bonnell: 812.343.4313 | Michael Bonnell: 812.343.6036 Owner: M3 Farms LLC Auctioneer: Michael Bonnell, IN Auct. Lic. #AU11200036, HRES IN Lic. #AC69200019

HLS# PDB-12466 (20)

800.424.2324 | halderman.com

Maske Aucon Service (217) 519-3959 119 S. Lafayee St., Mt Pulaski, IL www.maskeaucon.com

Inspection Dates:

Cal Kaufman

Auctioneers Lenny Bryson

Brent Schmidgall

Don’t Miss This Action-Packed Day in Northern Indiana!

11am - 1pm CST Tuesday, January 21 Monday, February 3

ANNUAL LATE MODEL AG

&

construction equipment

Located Between Princeton And Petersburg AUCTION LOCATION: Gibson Co. Fairgrounds Exhibit Hall, 409 N Embree St, Princeton IN 47670. DIRECTIONS TO PROPERTY: From Princeton: Take Hwy 65 north approx 7 mi. to Ford Rd (Co Rd 500 N) turn east & proceed 4 mi. to the property. From Petersburg: Take Hwy 56 west 6.7 miles to the jct of Hwy 56 & Hwy 65, continue on Hwy 65 1.5 miles to Coal Haul Rd (N Co Rd 700 W) turn south 2.5 miles to the property.

122± Tillable Acreage (FSA) • Alford Soils • Wooded Acreage • Hunting Tracts • Grain Storage • Machine Sheds/Shop OWNER: Frank & Marlene Brittingham SALE MANAGER: Brad Horrall, 812-890-8255

AC63001504, AU01005815

Call for color brochure or visit our website

800-451-2709

www.schraderauction.com

Auction

Bourbon Township Marshall County

February 3rd - 6:30 P.M. - Bourbon Senior Center

114± Acres

February 4 at 8:30 AM EST 72435 State Road 15 - New Paris, IN TRACTORS - COMBINES - PLANTERS - HAY EQUIPMENT TILLAGE EQUIPMENT - SKIDSTEERS - EXCAVATORS WHEEL LOADERS - COMPACT TRACTORS - DOZERS MOWERS - ATVs - SNOW REMOVAL EQUIPMENT TRACTOR RA PARTS - VEHICLES - SEMI TRUCKS - TRAILERS SKID STEER ATTACHMENTS - TRACTOR LOADERS S Accepting ts COMBINE HEADS - MANURE SPREADERS Consignmen 3 ry a ru b Fe l ti un LIVESTOCK EQUIPMENT - GRINDERS/MIXERS S @ 5 PM AND GRAIN CARTS - GRAVITY WAGONS - AUGERS MUCH

THOUSANDS of Pieces of Equipment

MORE!

4 TRACTS

Good Soils with Drainage Outlet Running Through Property

Jon Rosen: 260.740.1846 Owner: Arlo M. Secrist Revocable Living Trust (Estate) Auctioneer: Russell D. Harmeyer, IN Auct. Lic. #AU10000277, HRES IN Lic. #AC69200019

#AC30900108 #AU10200076

For Online Bidding, Listing & Photos, See Our Website HLS# JRR-12462 (20)

800.424.2324 | halderman.com

www.polkauction.com

1.877.915.4440


www.agrinews-pubs.com | INDIANA AGRINEWS | Friday, January 17, 2020

B3

Lifestyle TO YOUR GOOD HEALTH

ANTIQUES & COLLECTING

CHOW LINE

While it may be helpful to some people with osteoarthritis, turmeric should be used with caution in people on warfarin or other anticoagulants.

Turmeric may be helpful for arthritis pain

This Canadian chair sold for $1,200, well over the estimated price.

By Dr. Keith Roach

I am 88 and have had osteoarthritis in my hands and knees since I was in my 50s. I began taking Tylenol and Advil for pain. But on a recommendation from a health food store clerk, I started taking turmeric. Since that first dose, I have never had to take any pain medication again. I also have not had a knee replacement. My specialist is very pleased with my condition and encourages my use of turmeric. I plan to up the dose from 150 mg daily because of research that shows its benefits in avoiding Alzheimer’s disease. Turmeric has been shown to be helpful in some people with osteoarthritis and is unlikely to have serious side effects. However, Dr. Roach stomach upset is possible, and turmeric should be used with caution in people on warfarin or other anticoagulants. However, there is no good evidence showing that turmeric prevents or treats dementia. I have been hearing a lot about making yogurt at home. Is homemade yogurt a recipe for food poisoning? Homemade yogurt is easy to make, can be more healthy than store-bought as it has very little sugar and can be made very safely with minimal precautions. The key is to make sure the milk is fresh and sterile, then to carefully add in healthy bacteria. All you need to do is boil fresh milk to a bare simmer, to kill any unhealthy bacteria. Cool it down to 100 to 110 degrees, which is an optimal temperature for growth of the healthy bacteria that help prevent the growth of unhealthy bacteria or yeast. Stir in a few tablespoons of plain yogurt with active healthy bacterial cultures and keep it in a warm place for six to 12 hours or so. You can use the yogurt you just made as the starter for the next batch. Add in some pureed fresh fruit and you have a healthier, tastier and cheaper yogurt than you can buy at the store. I take 40 mg of lisinopril for high blood pressure. One doctor told me to take a 40-mg tablet in the morning, while another said to take 20 mg in the morning and 20 mg in the evening. Will separating the dosage better control my blood pressure? On average, mine is 130/75. For lisinopril in particular, taking the medication twice daily showed a better reduction in blood pressure than once daily, according to a study performed last year. People who took lisinopril twice daily had about a 10point systolic, 4-point diastolic improvement in BP control, so your blood pressure might be more like 120/71 if you started taking it in two doses, if you are similar to the subjects in the study — that sounds like a big drop to me, despite the study results. People who are doing just fine on once-daily lisinopril don’t need to change. Don’t make any changes in your medication without discussing it with your own doctor. Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@ med.cornell.edu. © 2020 North America Synd., Inc.

Throw away any food and bottled water that may have come into contact with floodwater.

PROVIDED PHOTO

If in doubt, throw it out Winter flooding potential leads to food safety concerns The forecast calls for warm temperatures, thunderstorms, and the potential for a couple of inches of heavy rain, even though it’s January. I’ve recently moved into a new home in an area that’s been subject to flash floods. If my home floods, what do I do with the food in my fridge and pantry? If your home becomes flooded, it is important that you throw away any food that might have come into contact with floodwater. That includes cartons of milk, juice, or eggs and any raw vegetables and fruits. In fact, unless they were in a waterproof container, any food in your home that came into contact with floodwater needs to be thrown out. Floodwater can seep into and contaminate food packaged in plastic wrap or cardboard, or stored in containers with screw-on caps, snap lids, or pull tops, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service. The best way to avoid the potential for foodborne illness in such cases is to throw away all food not contained in waterproof packaging. That includes any food in your pantry, cabinets, fridge and freezer that came into contact with floodwater. Canned goods also need to be inspected for damage due to flooding. Throw away any cans with swelling, leakage, punctures, or deep rusting, or those that are crushed or

severely dented and can’t be opened with a can opener. Foodborne bacteria can cause illness. Symptoms will occur usually within one to three days of eating the contaminated food. However, symptoms also can occur within 20 minutes or up to six weeks later, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. In the case of a power outage without flooding, keep the refrigerator and freezer doors closed as much as possible. If not opened, a refrigerator without power will keep food cold for about four hours. A half-full freezer will hold its temperature for about 24 hours, and for 48 hours if the freezer is full, the USDA says. If the power is out more than four hours, you can store refrigerated food in a cooler with dry ice or block ice. You can also use dry ice or block ice in the fridge to keep it as cold as possible during an extended power outage, according to the FDA. The USDA and the FDA offer these other tips for safe food handling after a power outage: n Check the temperature inside of your refrigerator and freezer. Throw away any perishable food such as meat, poultry, seafood, eggs, or leftovers that have been above 40 degrees for two hours or more. n Check each item separately. Throw away any food that

feels warm to the touch or has an unusual odor, color, or texture. n Check frozen food for ice crystals. The food in your freezer that partially or completely thawed can be safely refrozen if it still contains ice crystals or is 40 degrees or below. Remember, when in doubt about the safety of the food item, throw it out. Never taste the food to decide if it is safe to eat, the USDA says. Refrigerated food should be safe as long as the power was out for no more than four hours and the refrigerator door was kept shut, according to the FDA. Experts agree: One way to be prepared in the event of an extended power outage is to keep a few days’ worth of ready-to-eat food that doesn’t require cooking or cooling. And keep a supply of bottled water stored where it will be safe from floodwater. Chow Line is a service of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Tracy Turner, 364 W. Lane Ave., Suite B120, Columbus, OH 43201, or turner.490@osu. edu.

DONNA’S DAY: CREATIVE FAMILY FUN

Use salt to paint a wintry watercolor By Donna Erickson

Let it snow, wherever you live, with this colorful watercolor art project your young kids will enjoy indoors on a wintry day this month. Grains of salt sprinkled over watercolor drawings mimic snowflakes to change your budding artist’s landscape drawing. While the watercolor paint is still wet, a sprinkle of salt creates dimension and transforms the look of the painting to a snowy winter scene. When young children explore and create with this salty technique, the activity is bounded only by their imagination. Here’s the stuff you’ll need: n Watercolor or heavy art paper. n Small brush. n Water in a small dish. n Washable watercolor paint cakes in a tin such as Crayola brand, or watercolors that come in tubes that you dilute with water. n Inexpensive table salt or kosher salt. Here’s the fun: Paint a picture with the watercolor paints. While the paint is still wet, lightly sprinkle salt here and there or over chosen portions of the painting. As it absorbs the paint, it creates little crystal-like designs. Let dry completely. Rub or shake off loose salt. Encourage your painter to sign the art. Frame and display. To make a scene of wintry bare trees using masking tape: First, grab some scissors and masking tape. Cut thin and thick strips from the masking tape for a tree

PROVIDED PHOTO

Salt is a fun, experimental tool to use when watercolor painting. or trees and adhere to a plain sheet of watercolor paper. Start with a wide strip for the trunk and add thinner strips off the sides for the branches. You might want to cut pieces to make a circle for a sun or full moon to tape near the top of the paper. Cut in a sliver for a half moon. Paint over the paper using natural wintry colors.

Sprinkle some salt over the paint while still wet. Let dry completely. Shake off loose salt and carefully remove the tape to reveal the trees, sun or moon or whatever you created. It’s always a moment of surprise. © 2020 Donna Erickson distributed by King Features Synd.

Canadian chairs have a different style By Terry and Kim Kovel

Ever see an old chair that seems different — the parts are a little more curved, the stretchers between the legs have more shape and the seat seems a little low? The informal slat-back chairs made in Canada and what would become the United States in the 17th and early 18th centuries are often very different looking. Both countries had slat-backs, but Canada was influenced by formal French designs, made in the American colonies by the English. The back of the Canadian chair made in the late 17th century and later had three or four double scroll slats. The American chair had three to six horizontal slats that were almost straight. The turned arms of the Canadian chair went through the seat to the stretcher, where it ended in a point. The American chair’s arms went to the seat. Legs that looked like a string of sausages were used in Canada, while in America, the legs were plain round or square rods, perhaps with a small foot. But the easiest clue is the seat. A Canadian chair seat is woven splint that is 15 inches from the floor. It was made to hold a cushion that raised the seat to 16 or 17 inches, the height of an American chair seat. At a Skinner auction in Boston, a late-18th-century Canadian chair that was painted black sold for $1,200 — more than twice the estimate. I have an old steamer trunk made by John H. Dick, Chicago. I don’t know anything about the trunk and can’t find any information on this company. John H. Dick was in business in Chicago and made trunks and other travel bags in the late 1880s and later. Steamship travel became popular in the late 1800s and wealthy travelers took several trunks of clothing and other items. A steamer trunk is a flattop trunk not more than 14 inches high that could fit under the bunk. Travelers also used larger flat-top bureau or dresser trunks, tall wardrobe trunks fitted with hangers and drawers, dome-top trunks and small trunks for special items. Trunks by Louis Vuitton or other famous makers sell for high prices, often thousands of dollars, but more common flattop steamer trunks sell for $10 to $50. CURRENT PRICES Pewter dish, overlapping leaves, handle, J. Despres, Avallon, 8 x 18 inches, $60. Match holder, monkey, standing, dressed, butcher clothes, etched apron, kettle, 2 1/2 x 4 inches, $175. Whiskey bottle, cut glass, flat hob star plug stopper, notched handle, ray-cut base, W.C. Anderson, 9 1/2 inches, $420. American flag, 13 stars, Confederate southern cross, red, blue, white, 1925, 61 3/4 x 35 inches, $720. TIP: Ultrasonic cleaners for jewelry are now sold for home use. Be careful — the vibrations can damage stones. Never use them with pearls, opals, lapis or peridot. Be very careful with costume jewelry, too, as “stones” could be real or glass, or even plastic. For more collecting news, tips and resources, visit www. Kovels.com. © 2020 King Features Synd., Inc.


B4 Friday, January 17, 2020

| INDIANA AGRINEWS | www.agrinews-pubs.com

Lifestyle

Keep your resolutions going strong

Healthy dorm dining options By Angela Shelf Medearis

By Monica Nyman

Every year, millions of Americans, excitedly promise themselves that Jan. 1 will be the day for big changes — to be financially fit, to eat better, to lose weight and to get healthy. Making New Year’s resolutions can be fun, but the thrill tends to fade as regular life resumes. However, adding glass of milk to meals or snacks is a simple way to help keep those resolutions going strong throughout 2020. Milk packs a nutritional punch. You would have to eat three-quarters ounce of salmon, 10 cups of raw spinach, two hard-boiled eggs, one cup of kidney beans, one-third cup of almonds and one small banana to match the amounts of vitamins A and D, calcium, phosphorus, riboflavin and potassium found in one 8-ounce glass of milk. No matter the type of cow’s milk selected, they all deliver a unique package of high-quality protein and essential nutrients. This includes three of the four nutrients lacking in the diets of many Americans: calcium, vitamin D and potassium. The only differences among the cow’s milk found on grocery store shelves are the fat content and calorie levels. With all the fad diets sweeping us into 2020 and the emerging interest in plant-based eating, many Americans believe that plant-based beverages offer the same nutrition as real milk. In truth, many alternative beverages are nutritionally lacking and filled with additives. You’ll find just three ingredients listed on a container of cow’s milk: natural milk and vitamins A and D. For more information on the health benefits of dairy, visit www.stldairycouncil.org. Monica Nyman is a registered dietitian and senior nutrition educator with St. Louis District Dairy Council.

Golden Gouda Mushroom Soup INGREDIENTS 1/2 cup butter 1/2 cup all-purpose flour 1/2 teaspoon pepper 1/2 tsp ground allspice 1 carton (32 ounces) chicken broth 1 cup milk 1/2 cup heavy whipping cream 1/2 pound sliced fresh mushrooms 3 garlic cloves, minced 2 cups shredded smoked Gouda cheese Chives and smoked paprika for garnish PROCEDURE In a large saucepan, melt butter. Stir in the flour, pepper and allspice until smooth. Gradually add in broth, cream and milk. Bring to a boil. Add mushrooms and garlic. Reduce heat. Simmer 5 to 6 minutes or until mushrooms are tender. Add cheese. Cook and stir until melted. Garnish with chives and paprika. Nutrition facts: Calories, 450; fat, 35g; protein, 24g; calcium, 41%.

Vanilla Nutmeg Steamer

INGREDIENTS 1/2 cups 2% milk 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 teaspoon honey or sugar PROCEDURE

Mix all ingredients in a small pan. Heat milk mixture over mediumhigh heat until scalding — bubbles form around edge of pan. Serve in a mug. Nutrition facts: Calories, 213; fat, 8g; protein, 12g; calcium, 34%.

A perfect traditional Greek pork chop, called brizola in Greece, is crunchy on the outside and juicy on the inside. The trick is in the marinade.

Small changes build healthy eating habits Kitchen Diva Angela Shelf Medearis

A new year brings about a desire for change, so let’s start with your health. When it comes to our daily meal routine, change can sometimes be

challenging. Studies have shown that it takes from two to eight months to form a new habit. You can create a positive eating “habit” by making small changes over time, like eliminating sugary drinks and high-sodium foods. Consider making healthy changes that reflect your personal preferences, culture and traditions. Think of each change as a “win” as you build good habits and find solutions that reflect your new healthy eating style. Use these tips courtesy of My Plate — www.choosemyplate. gov/start-small-changes — to find little victories that work for you.

Greek Pork Chops with Veggie Rice Servings: 4 INGREDIENTS 1 pound pork cutlets (or 4 boneless pork chops) 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 1/2 cup orange juice 2 teaspoons soy sauce 1 tablespoon dried oregano 2 cloves garlic (peeled and minced) 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon black pepper 1/4 teaspoon dried crushed red pepper 4 (1/4-inch-thick) orange slices PROCEDURE Make a marinade for the pork by combining 1 tablespoon of the oil, the orange juice, soy sauce, oregano and garlic in a glass bowl or re-sealable plastic bag; mix well. Cover bowl, if using, and refrigerate the pork chops for at least 4 hours or overnight. Remove the pork chops from

MAKE HALF YOUR PLATE FRUITS AND VEGETABLES Focus on whole fruits more often than drinking 100% juice. Snack on fresh, frozen, canned or dried fruits instead of cookies, brownies or other sugar-sweetened treats. Offer whole fruits without saturated fat, sodium or added sugars as dessert. Vary your veggies to include green, red and orange choices. Add fresh, frozen or canned vegetables to salads, side dishes and recipes. Prepare your vegetables without sauces, gravies or glazes to lower the amount of sodium, saturated fat and added sugars. MAKE HALF YOUR GRAINS WHOLE GRAINS Choose whole-grain foods more often than refined grains. Make at least half the amount of grains you eat each day whole grains. Find high fiber, whole-grain foods by reading the Nutrition Facts label and ingredients list. Some common whole grains include oatmeal, whole-wheat flour and popcorn.

the marinade and discard the marinade. Sprinkle pork chops with the salt and the black and red pepper. Place a large skillet on the stove over high heat. When hot, add the remaining tablespoon of oil to the skillet. Add the pork chops to the pan, waiting about 30 seconds between each addition. Cook about 3 minutes on each side until crispy. Set pork chops aside on a plate and add the orange slices to the pan; cook on each side about 30 seconds. Serve pork chops over a bed of Mixed Veggie Rice and top with the orange slices.

Mixed Veggie Rice If using leftover, already cooked vegetables, add them to the hot cooked rice immediately, cover and let them come up to temperature for 3 to 5 minutes before serving. Servings: 4 to 6 INGREDIENTS 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 cup uncooked long grain rice

MOVE TO LOW-FAT AND FATFREE DAIRY Choose low-fat or fat-free milk and yogurt. Buy low-fat or fat-free cheese more often than regular cheese. Regular cream cheese, butter and cream are not in the dairy food group because they have little or no calcium. They also are high in saturated fat.

The start of a new year means that many students are headed back to college. One of the downsides of college life is the dreaded “freshman 15” — the extra pounds that many students gain from poor eating habits. Establishing good eating habits as a college student may help form the basis for how and what you eat later in life. Eating fruits and vegetables boosts your immune system and helps ward off illness, calcium helps you build bones to avoid problems later in life, and eating breakfast contributes to academic performance. But don’t forget that food is to be enjoyed. Eating and preparing foods with others builds community and can help alleviate the stress of college life. There are quick, easy and healthy eating options if you’re faced with dining in your dorm room. Don’t have a stove or oven? Don’t despair. Here are some quick, easy and healthy ideas for dorm rooms with only a small refrigerator and microwave: n Combine fresh or frozen fruit, yogurt and fruit juice for a breakfast smoothie. You don’t need a blender — just put ingredients in a jar and shake vigorously. n Top a fresh salad with grilled or oven-roasted chicken strips, include fruits and milk to make this a quick meal. n A easy and filling meal could include low-sodium canned soup, whole-wheat crackers with a single serving of hummus and milk. n Another meal option is a mozzarella stick, canned threebean salad and milk. n Tasty options include canned chili. Add a fresh salad or baby carrots with hummus, fruit and milk for a complete meal. If you don’t have time to make a fresh salad, add canned or frozen and thawed vegetables to the chili. n Wrap it up! Spread a wholewheat tortilla with drained and mashed canned beans, salad greens, chopped red pepper and salsa. Serve with canned fruit and yogurt to make a complete meal. n Make a fresh salad with pre-packaged salad greens, canned beans, nuts and a lowfat dressing. For a complete meal, add tuna or salmon in one-serving pouches, wholewheat crackers, canned or fresh fruit and milk to the menu. Here’s an easy and healthy recipe for a Veggie Burrito Bowl for lunch or dinner. Have a great new school year and remember to eat healthy. © 2020 King Features Synd., Inc.

VARY YOUR PROTEIN ROUTINE Mix up protein foods to include seafood, beans, nuts, seeds, soy, eggs, lean meats and poultry. Select seafood twice a week, including fish and shellfish. Add beans or peas, unsalted nuts and seeds, and soy in main dishes and snacks. When planning your daily meals, try healthy new ways to prepare family favorites. This recipe for Greek Pork Chops With Veggie Rice incorporates fresh fruit and juices into savory dishes and mixes grains and vegetables. Angela Shelf Medearis is an award-winning children’s author, and the author of seven cookbooks. © 2020 King Features Synd., Inc.

1/2 onion, diced 2 cloves garlic, minced 2 teaspoons dried oregano 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon ground black pepper 2 cups water (or 1 cup water and 1 cup low-sodium chicken or vegetable broth) 2 cups frozen mixed vegetables or 2 cups fresh, diced vegetables. PROCEDURE In a large saucepan over mediumhigh heat, add the oil. Add in the rice, onion, garlic, oregano and the salt and pepper. Cook, stirring, for 2 minutes to toast the rice. Pour in the water and/or the broth. Stir and bring the rice to a boil. Add the vegetables; return to a boil. Reduce heat to low and cover pot with a tight-fitting lid. Do not remove lid during the cooking process! After 15 minutes, cut off the heat and let the rice sit, covered, for another 5 minutes to steam. Fluff rice and vegetables with a fork and serve immediately.

Veggie Burrito Bowl Servings: 1 INGREDIENTS 1 cup cooked brown rice (or frozen pre-cooked brown rice) 1/2 (15-ounce) can black beans or pinto beans, drained and rinsed 2 to 3 tablespoons salsa 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon black pepper 1 tablespoon plain Greek yogurt 1 tablespoon shredded cheddar or Mexican-blend cheese Toppings as desired PROCEDURE Prepare brown rice according to package instructions. In a microwave-safe bowl, combine rice, black beans, mild or hot salsa, and salt and pepper. Microwave on high for 30 to 60 seconds, or until heated through. Add select toppings, such as diced avocado, diced tomato, guacamole, pico de gallo, sautéed veggies, cooked shredded or cubed chicken, tofu, chickpeas or corn. Top off your burrito bowl with Greek yogurt and cheese, with a drizzle of salsa and a dollop of guacamole or sliced avocado, if desired.


www.agrinews-pubs.com | INDIANA AGRINEWS | Friday, January 17, 2020

FARMS

FOR SALE

ADVERTISE YOUR FARMLAND FOR SALE

UPCOMING AUCTIONS Huntington County, IN: January 20 â&#x20AC;¢ 40+/- Acres - 1 Tract *ABSOLUTE AUCTION* Contact: Jon Rosen 260.740.1846 or Rick Johnloz 260.827.8181

Pulaski County, IN: January 21 â&#x20AC;¢ 120+/- Acres - 2 Tracts Contact: AJ Jordan 317.397.3086 or Larry Jordan 765.473.5849

Call Your Local AgriNews Representative or 800-426-9438 Ext. 113

LAND FOR SALE IN INDIANA

Montgomery County â&#x20AC;¢ 170A, 165 tillable, near Linden. â&#x20AC;¢ 12.99 Ac, 12.79 tillable, 6 miles S of Waynetown.

Newton County â&#x20AC;¢ 137.08 A, 130.75 Tillable, 3.7 CRP, W of Brook.

Boone County â&#x20AC;¢ 76.96A, 76.22 tillable

Quality farmland located 2.5 miles southwest of Thorntown. Sale Pending

-Farmland Sales - Farmland Investments & Management - Sale Leaseback Options For more information go to hagemanrealty.com

HAGEMAN REALTY

18390 S. 480 W. Remington, IN 47977 219-261-2000

LaPorte County, IN: January 22-23 â&#x20AC;¢ 111 Acres - 1 Tract +/-

*ONLINE ONLY* BIDDING OPENS 1/22 - 8 A.M. CST & BIDDING CLOSES 1/23 7:30 P.M. CST Contact: Larry Smith 219.716.4041 or Kelsey Sampson 219.608.4341

Delaware County, IN: January 23 â&#x20AC;¢ 126+/- Acres - 1 Tract Contact: Chris Peacock 765.546.0592 or Lauren Peacock 765.546.7359

Cass County, IN: January 28 â&#x20AC;¢ 57 Acres - 3 Tracts +/-

Contact: AJ Jordan 317.397.3086 or Larry Jordan 765.473.5849

Marshall County, IN: February 3 â&#x20AC;¢ 114+/- Acres - 4 Tracts Contact: Jon Rosen 260.740.1846

Montgomery County, IN: February 4 â&#x20AC;¢ 195+/- Acres - 4 Tracts Contact: Sam Clark 317.442.0251 or Jim Clark 765.659.4841 or Gary Bohlander 765.794.0221

Bartholomew County, IN: February 12-13 â&#x20AC;¢ 37+/- Acres - 1 Tract *ONLINE ONLY* BIDDING OPENS 2/12 - 8 A.M. & BIDDING CLOSES 2/13 AT 4 P.M. Contact: Dave Bonnell 812.343.4313 or Michael Bonnell 812.343.6036

Boone County, IN: February 13 â&#x20AC;¢ 157 Acres - 2 Tracts +/-

Contact: Brett Salyers 419.806.5643 or Sam Clark 317.442.0251or Jim Clark 765.659.4841

Newton County, IN and Iroquois County, IL: February 18 â&#x20AC;¢ 948+/- Acres - 10 Tracts â&#x20AC;¢ Contact: John Bechman 765.404.0396 Wabash County, IN: February 20 â&#x20AC;¢ 77+/- Acres - 1 Tract Contact: Jon Rosen 260.740.1846 or AJ Jordan 317.397.3086 or Larry Jordan 765.473.5849

B5

The Nation's Leading Landowner Services Company

FOR SALE BY BIDS â&#x20AC;¢ Bids due Friday, January 31, 2020 by 2:00 PM EST, Contact Agent for details!

167.5± Acres, Vigo County, Indiana â&#x20AC;¢ Quality tillable ground with good soils â&#x20AC;¢ Excellent road frontage â&#x20AC;¢ High volume of woodland acres with potential for recreational use A-15684

116.30± Acres, Vigo County, Indiana â&#x20AC;¢ Pattern-tiled farm ground â&#x20AC;¢ Wooded land with recreational use â&#x20AC;¢ Quality soils A-15701

100.88± Acres, Vigo County, Indiana â&#x20AC;¢ Excellent location just south of Terre Haute and very near Highway 41 â&#x20AC;¢ Productive Soils â&#x20AC;¢ Ample road frontage A-15692

574± Acres, Gibson County, Indiana â&#x20AC;¢ Productive farm land - open to farm in 2020 Â&#x2021;([FHOOHQWURDGIURQWDJHDQGÃ&#x20AC;HOGDFFHVVLEOLW\ â&#x20AC;¢ Commercial/residential development potential A-15734

213.93± Acres, Sullivan County, Indiana â&#x20AC;¢ Excellent hunting Â&#x2021;/DUJHODNHWRHQMR\Ã&#x20AC;VKLQJDQGZDWHUIRZO â&#x20AC;¢ Merchantable timber A-15698

345± Acres, Edgar County, Illinois â&#x20AC;¢ Highly Productive Soils â&#x20AC;¢ Investor-Grade Farms â&#x20AC;¢ Large tracts with excellent road access A-15691

554± Acres, Gibson County, Indiana Â&#x2021;/HYHOPRVWO\UHFWDQJXODUÃ&#x20AC;HOGV â&#x20AC;¢ Open to farm in 2020 â&#x20AC;¢ Ample road frontage A-15696 and A-15697

344.56± Acres, Coles County, Illinois â&#x20AC;¢ Highly productive soils with high yields â&#x20AC;¢ Pattern-tile â&#x20AC;¢ Excellent road frontage A-15706

263± Acres, Vigo County, Indiana â&#x20AC;¢ High volume of woodland acres with potential for recreational use â&#x20AC;¢ Quality tillable acres with productive soils â&#x20AC;¢ Great location near Terre Haute A-15700

221.10± Acres, Coles County, Illinois â&#x20AC;¢ Investor-grade farm â&#x20AC;¢ Highly-productive soils â&#x20AC;¢ Excellent road frontage A-16295

For more information visit: www.FarmersNational.com/PrincetonFarms Bid Forms and Information Booklets (available in January 2020) For additional information on these listings, please contact: Steve Lankford, Agent

FEATURED LISTINGS St. Joseph County, IN: 60+/- Acres â&#x20AC;¢ Contact: Julie Matthys 574.310.5189 Porter County, IN: 115 Acres â&#x20AC;¢ Contact: Julie Matthys 574.310.5189 +/-

St. Joseph County, IN: 38+/- Acres â&#x20AC;¢ Contact: Julie Matthys 574.310.5189

Business: (812) 360-0209 â&#x20AC;¢2ϪFH  

SLankford@FarmersNational.com â&#x20AC;¢ www.FarmersNational.com/SteveLankford

Kyle Spray, Agent

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KSpray@FarmersNational.com â&#x20AC;¢ www.FarmersNational.com/KyleSpray

FOR SALE BY BIDS â&#x20AC;¢ Bids due Friday, January 31, 2020 by 2:00 PM EST, Contact Agent for details!

Experience. Knowledge. Professionalism. For over 90 years. For more information, visit halderman.com

716.5± Acres, Vermilion County, Illinois â&#x20AC;¢ Rare Opportunity â&#x20AC;¢ Elite/premier contiguous acreage â&#x20AC;¢ Approximately 682 FSA tillable acres â&#x20AC;¢ Highly productive soils - majority Drummer and Flanagan with 143 Soil PI A-16193

2,180± Acres, Douglas County, Illinois â&#x20AC;¢ Once in a lifetime opportunity! â&#x20AC;¢ Elite/premier contiguous acreage â&#x20AC;¢ Approximately 2,000 +/- tillable acres systematically/pattern tiled â&#x20AC;¢ Highly productive soils - majority Drummer and Flanagan with soil PI 140+ A-18260 and A-18261

For more information visit: www.FarmersNational.com/PrincetonFarms Bid Forms and Information Booklets (available in January 2020) For additional information on these listings, please contact: Kyle Rule, AFM/Agent

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KRule@FarmersNational.com â&#x20AC;¢ www.FarmersNational.com/KyleRule HRES IN Auct. Lic. #AC69200019, IL Lic. #417.013288 MI Lic. #6505264076 AUCTIONEER: RUSSELL D. HARMEYER, IN Auct. Lic. #AU10000277, IL Auct. Lic #441.002337 & OH Auct. Lic. #2001014575

4 YEAR OLD ¾ Angus, ¼ Simmental Bull For Sale, Call 815-761-6074 ATTENTION COMMERCIAL CATTLEMEN are you looking for true calving ease Angus bulls with high performance or sound functional maternal bred Angus females join us Feb. 1st 2020 at 1pm for our annual production sale at Toulon IL. Call or text Chad, 309-883-2348 for catalog request or video at horsleybrothers.com

BRED HEIFERS, SPRING calving, BLK, BWF and Red Angus. 618-528-8744

PUREBRED RED ANGUS bull, born March 5, 2018, $2,000. 513-284-6760 RED AND BLACK ANGUS BULLS. (618)528-8744

WANTED TO BUY complete herds of Dairy Cattle, also buying, Steers, and Heifers Call 715-216-1897

(2) FRIESEN PROTEIN bulk tanks, 5-1/2 ton, $1,500/ ea. Call 815-539-7117 HESSTON-10 STACKER W/MOVER, $2,500; Call 815-539-7117

www.FarmersNational.com

Real Estate Sales â&#x20AC;¢ Auctions â&#x20AC;¢ Farm and Ranch Management â&#x20AC;¢ Appraisals â&#x20AC;¢ Insurance â&#x20AC;¢ Consultations Oil and Gas Management â&#x20AC;¢ Forest Resource Management â&#x20AC;¢ National Hunting Leases â&#x20AC;¢ FNC Ag Stock

Case IH 3408 corn head, always shedded, very good condition, $19,700-obo. 618-790-3884

GT SOYBEANS FOR SALE, Call 765-719-3995 OPEN POLLINATED SEED corn, out produces Hybrids for silage. $67 per bu. Plus shipping. 217-857-3377

Off Patent GT (Glyphosate Tolerant) Soybeans Different Maturity Ranges available. Treated or nonTreated - Realistically Priced! Call for details. 618-667-6401, 618-407-3638, 618-407-3637

1957 FARMALL-450, Call 812-881-8752

2003 JD-7810, 2320 hrs., MFWD, duals, 740 loader, 3-SCVs, 540/1000 PTO, $87,200. Call (815)405-4020 2004 VERSATILE-2425, 3300 hrs., exc cond., $72,500, OBO retiring. 563-357-4300 2005 CIH-MX285, 6900 hrs., duals, wts. Guidance ready, $52,500 Call 618-407-6875 2008 JD 5525 MFD, 764 hours, cab, 2 remotes, plus loader joy stick, economy pto, 38k, obo. 217-621-6117


B6 Friday, January 17, 2020

| INDIANA AGRINEWS | www.agrinews-pubs.com

2009 CASE-95C UTILITY tractor 4WD 1350-hrs., rear weights, mechanical wheel shuttle, 12-spd. 540/1000 PTO $32,000. obo (618)895-2116 CASE-4890 CAH, 3-pt., PTO, 4 remotes, duals, starts and runs great, $18,000 Call 309-734-2706 or 309-337-2706 JD-7830 MFD, IVT Trans, frt susp., active seat, higher hrs., nice, $42,500 715-574-4561 JD-8285R MFD, duals, frt duals optional, auto track ready, exceptional, some warranty, $94,500 Call 715-572-12344 JOHN DEERE-8270R, 2011, 3200 hrs, MFW, IVT, looks like new, always shedded, $119,000. Call 812-483-4899

1996 HAGIE-284, Only 2401 hr, 4WD, 80' boom w/triple nozzle body on 15" center, (2) 400 gal. tanks, TeeJet lightbar, AgLeader Edge mon., 5-sec. boom auto shutoff, Exc. tire, Always shedded & very nice $35,000 obo, Text/call 765-426-3914 HAHN HIGH BOY sprayer, 200 gal. Ss tank, Wisconsin eng., 12 30” rows, w/cart, $500. Call 815-257-6423 MILLER SELF-PROPELLED SPRAYER, Model 4240, 1000gallon tank, 90ft booms, Ag Leader Integra Monitor, lots of options, 720-hours, like new cond., $160,000-obo. Delivery Possible. 814-322-8090

DAMAGED GRAIN WANTED STATEWIDE We Buy Damaged Grain In Any Condition Wet or Dry Including Damaged Silo Corn At Top Dollar We have vacs & trucks Call Heidi or Mark

Northern AG SERVICE, INC. 800-205-5751 WANTED DAMAGED GRAIN WE PAY TOP DOLLAR!

Ag Gypsum for Sale

through Clean Green Soil Amendments, LLC. (309)337-6242 or email cleangreensoil@gmail.com

New Steel Storage tanks available Capacity up to 50,000 gal. 618-553-7549, 562-4544 www.dktanks.com TANKS: STAINLESS. PIPE For Culverts 10-inch to 10ft DIA. 618-553-7549, 618-562-4544, www.dktanks.com

1994 JD-310D, 4x4, Cab, extend-a-hoe, new batteries & rubber, showing 5,860 hrs., from estate, $15,500 Call 309-734-2706 or 309-337-2706

FARM LOANS. We have the Best term/interest rates avail. Fixed rates, 5-25 yrs. 618-5282264 c, 618-643-2264, The BelRay Co, Don Welch and Jeff Welch, McLeansboro, IL

1998 CAT. D3C, series 3, hydro, cab, 6 way, new batteries, showing 7,581 hrs., $16,500. Call 309-734-2706 or 309-337-2706 NEW HOLLAND-L455 KUBOTA diesel, 2040 hours, new tires, one year old bucket, $8,250. Call 309-238-6445

CALL FOR A QUOTE TODAY PRUESS ELEVATOR, INC (800) 828-6642 Lincolnland Agri-Energy, LLC Buying Corn Clint Davidson Commodity Mgr 10406 N 1725th St Palestine, IL 618-586-2321 or 888-586-2321

High capacity Westfield Augers End of Year Best Prices Bunker Hill Supply Co Hutsonville, IL 618-563-4464

New& Used REM & Kongskilde grain vacs. Used Kongskilde 1000 & 500 grain vacs. Cornwell Equipment, Arthur, IL 217-543-2631

Crawfordsville, IN (765) 866.0253 Eaton, OH (937) 456.6281

For sale by owner, 475Ac's, Pope Co., IL 25 mi's NE of Paducha KY Consist of 340 Ac's till. cropland, 25 Ac's pasture, & over 100 Ac's of hard wood timber. 40,000 bu. Grain storage, large barn, large field & exc deer hunting, w/good lease income. Open crop lease for 19, price below appraised value, 618-528-8744

>All Grains >Any Condition > Immediate Response Anywhere >Trucks and Vacs Available

Georgetown, OH (937) 378.4880

2009 NECO D16120 Screenless Grain Dryer, 230 volt 3-ph.,with upgraded hp. on motors, NG or Propane, 4' legs, cooling floors, Gravity fill with catwalk, Very Good Condition. Available Nov. 25th. $65,000. OBO Owner's # 309-238-6445 Dealer's # 815-878-8770

La Crosse, IN (219) 754.2423 Lebanon, IN (765) 482.2303 Leb. Spray Center, IN (765) 481.2044 Pendleton, IN (765) 778.1991 Plymouth, IN (574) 936.2523

BUY

Wilmington, OH (937) 382.0941 Winamac, IN (574) 946.6168

Bane-Welker.com

TRADE Tr y

CLASSIFIED

IT WORKS!

greendrills.com (740)756-4810 Hizey Farm Service LLC Harms Land-Rollers, Brand New! 12 - $6,800, 14 -7,300, 16 - $8,000 , 24 - $14,800, 32 - $17,500, 42-$21,500 Any size Available. 715-234-1993 JD-7000 RECONDITIONED PLANTERS; 4-row 30”, 3-pt, $2,850; 8-row 30” $6,850; JD7200 4-row 30” $3,150. All repainted, NICE, can send pics Call 309-242-6040 KINZE 3600-ASD 16-30”, loaded, low acres, 2012, $72,500. Call 563-357-4300

AGRINEWS WEBSITE

Lacklender 72in Heavy-Duty Brush Cutter for Skid Loader. $1,850. 319-209-0305

5X6 net wrapped Grass hay or large squares of alfalfa for horses and dairy cows. Delivery to your farm. (217)370-4342

We Repair Baler Knotters on your Farm! Service Calls also available for farm equipment! Used Rakes & New Tedders for Sale! Kings Repair, Marshall IN 765-597-2015

1992 GMC Topkick, Cat engine, 10ft bed, new paint, good condition, $7500. 618-528-8744

Onarga, IL. 815-351-8124 *New/used Bush Hog mowers on hand. *Full line of Bush Hog parts.

LS-779039

SELL

1990 CHEVY TOP KICK, 427 engine, 14-ft. Grain box. Call 815-471-8088

Iroquois Equipment Bush Hog Dealer

Wingate, IN (765) 275.2270

2015 Schulte XH 1500, Series 3, 15' cutting width, tandem axles on main frame and single on wings, laminated tires, small 1000-rpm., pto, 1/4” thick stump jumpers and double safety chains, always shedded, top condition, $18,500. 319-209-0305

FARMALL-560 DIESEL, 99% original owned by same family since 1963, runs good, 15.5x38 rear tires @ 20%, TA works, $4,200 obo Toms antiques 618-292-7187

1989 PETERBILT-379, 13SPD. 60” sleeper, 3406 Cat., 90% rears, 160K on OH, w/'86 Merritt Livestock, 96x48, $30,000 both; 1989 FORD F600, 6.6 diesel, 9' bed, goose neck set up, 159K $3,500 Call after 5 (815)761-1523

3-ACRES INCLUDES GRAIN elevator w/80-ft. scales, office, 3 storage buildings & bins, etc. 6 miles East of LeRoy, IL $220,000. 309-825-5017

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2018 White 9924 VE, 24Row30in. w Camso Tracks, Precision Technology, speed tube, Delta Hydraulic Down Force, Keetons, 2-75bu seed tanks, markers, hyd. jack, 20/20 Gen. 3 Flat Screen 10” monitor, Dawn GFX hydraulic row cleaners, copperhead Ag Furrow closing w/reels, corn & bean seed disks, new cond., low acres, $240,000 319-209-0305

Generators: used, low hr takeouts. 20KW to 2000KW. Dsl, Propane, Nat. Gas. 701-3719526. abrahamindustrial.com Winco Generators. PTO portables and eng. sets available, Large Inventory. Albion, IL. Waters Equipment. 618-445-2816

Retiring: JD 4960 tractor, FWA w/new Remand engine, 1991 .........................$45,000. 309-314-1384, call for pictures

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2006 KINZE-3500 PLANTER, 8-16, coulters, insecticide, corn & bean meters, good tires, very clean. $37,500. (765)404-0846

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1999 PETERBILT-379 RED day cab, wet kit. Great rubber, Cummins N14, 500 hp, 32000 mi on overhaul, 660,000 mi. $38,000 Call 309-781-1899 2005 FREIGHTLINER COLUMBIA 120, Air Ride Tandem Axle; 14L Detroit Engine; 12,000 lb Front Axle Weight; 40,000 lb Rear Axle Weight; Very Nice 641,000 Miles, 10 Spd. Trans, $28,500. 217-924-4405 8-5pm.

2006 DMI NH 30' ST250 field cultivator, spring tine harrow, w/rear hitch, $13,500 obo Call 812-242-0701 2007 BLUJET SUBTILLER II, 7 shank, low acres, near new cond., $8,900, Buda IL Call 636-887-5431 IH NUMBER 48 18' disc w/cylinder good blades & tires, $1,200 Call 217-369-9098 JD-637 32ft Disc; JD-630 25ft disk, excellent condition, 618-528-8744 M&W 2200 EARTHMASTER, 9-shank on 2' centers, 5 bar harrow, auto reset, non folding, $10,500 Call 815-692-3100

1995 JOHN DEERE-750 no till drill 20' wide 2 point hook up 7.5 spacing Dawn HD markers has seed tube sensors with monitor $16,900 obo Call 260-367-1895

1999 PETERBILT-378 RED day cab, Cat-C15, 475 hp., great rubber, 850,000 mi. $34,000 Call 309-781-1899

2018 J&M LC290 Seed Tender, Long Elevator Conveyor, w/8”belt, tarp, scales and Talc Auger, color tan, and always shedded. $24,500 319-209-0305

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www.agrinews-pubs.com | INDIANA AGRINEWS | Friday, January 17, 2020

B7

Lifestyle

Preserves open for disabled veteran hunters By Dave Fopay

MATTOON JOURNAL-GAZETTE

CH A R LESTON, Ill. (AP) — It wasn’t long before Winston Woodard received a bit of teasing, along with praise, for his ongoing success at a newly undertaken activity. Still dressed in his hunting gear, including a crossbow, but also seated in an all-terrain wheelchair, Woodard said he got a deer his first time hunting, with the day’s hunt marking his second success. He said he didn’t hunt before an organization that helps injured veterans connected him with the activity. “It’s the fact that I was able to do it,” he said. Woodard and fellow veteran Josue Cordova were able to hunt recently at Warbler Ridge Conservation Area, located between Lake Charleston and Fox Ridge State Park south of Charleston.

An organization called Healing of Our American Heroes teamed with the Grand Prairie Friends, the conservation area’s owner, to make the hunt possible. With Healing of Our American Heroes’ efforts, people who suffered disabling injuries during their military service are able to hunt and fish with the organization’s connections, supplying equipment and other efforts. The recent visit to Warbler Ridge marked one of the first times the organization conducted a hunt outside of its home base in McLean County, group leader Tom Huffington said. Woodard, a resident of Oak Lawn, said he was injured in a motor vehicle accident while serving in the Army in 1997. He said the tight-knit nature of Healing of Our American Heroes reminds him of the camaraderie of the military.

“How better to do our mission than to help people heal? It’s part of what we do.” Sarah Livesay, director GRAND PRAIRIE FRIENDS

“I totally appreciate it because I don’t get a lot of opportunities to get out,” he said of the group’s efforts. “It definitely takes me home, in ways.” Cordova, who lives in New Lenox and is the president of a chapter of the Paralyzed Veterans of America, didn’t get a deer during the day’s hunt but said the experience and the location were both “wonderful.” “It’s great being out there,” he said. Cordova also was injured in a motor vehicle accident, during 1995 while he was in the Air Force.

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He said an uncle introduced him to hunting in 2006 and “I’ve been hooked ever since.” He agreed with Woodard about the companionship and the chance to be outdoors are benefits of the help of Healing of Our American Heroes. “Opportunities like this, I’m grateful,” Cordova said. “That makes for a wonderful time.” The Urbana-based Grand Prairie Friends purchased several different tracks of land and began efforts to restore them to their natural state to develop Warbler Ridge. GPF Director Sarah Livesay said she contacted Huffington after learning about Healing of Our American Heroes so they could arrange for the hunt to take place there. She said outreach programs such as the hunting event go along with the group’s other missions of promoting conservation and preservation.

“How better to do our mission than to help people heal?” Livesay said. “It’s part of what we do.” Huffington said Healing of Our American Heroes started eight years ago with six hunters and it now works with hundreds from several states. Any veteran who meets the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs designation of at least a 10% disability qualifies for the group’s programs, he said. That includes non-physical injuries such as post-traumatic stress disorder. The organization covers the costs of transportation and most of the gear needed, and hunters get to keep the meat from their hunts, he also said. “We look at who we think needs to hunt the most, who will benefit the most,” Huffington said. He said there’s information on the group’s Facebook page for veterans who are interested in participating in the program.

Farmer back on job after losing leg in auger accident By Nick Hytrek

SIOUX CITY JOURNAL

PENDER, Neb. (AP) — Catching up with Kurt Kaser was a lot easier when he had to use a walker. Now that he’s back on two feet again, good luck. “I got elected in the last two or three weeks to take back the hog chores,” the Pender farmer said with a chuckle before admitting that he had elected himself for the job. He’s not going to complain. He’d much rather be out and about, walking on two legs instead of being stuck inside his house while his damaged left leg healed. Kaser gained notoriety in 2019 as the farmer who cut through flesh and muscle with his pocket knife to free his leg after it had become caught in a grain auger. His new year begins with him back on his feet, adjusting to a second prosthetic leg as he goes about his daily chores. Some days are better than others, depending on how much time he spends on his feet and climbing on and off of farm equipment. “Sometimes it hurts real bad, sometimes it doesn’t hurt much at all. Sometimes I don’t even realize it,” Kaser told the Sioux City Journal. “I wish it didn’t have that numb feeling, but I guess that’s just the way it is.” The 63-year-old farmer shrugs as he talks matterof-factly about life since losing his leg below the knee. If not for his quick action on April 19, the story could have had a tragic ending. A quick recap: While moving grain into a bin on his farm, Kaser’s left foot became caught in a grain auger, and it began pulling him in. While struggling against the pull, Kaser saw the bone protruding from his leg and the empty joint where his foot had been attached. He pulled out his pocket knife and cut through his

damaged muscles, tissue and nerves to free his leg, then dragged himself about 200 feet to his office to call his son Adam, a member of Pender’s fire and rescue squad. While recovering in a Lincoln, Nebraska, hospital, he was interviewed about his ordeal by an Omaha TV station. After the story aired on May 10, journalists from across the country and several countries called for interviews. The reporters have stopped calling, Kaser said. They’ve missed a heck of a recovery story. Told after his accident that it would be at least six to eight months before it would be possible to fit him with a prosthetic leg, Kaser received his first one in only four months. With a few adjustments, he was back on his feet and walking with little need for therapy. Daily tasks such as cooking dinner and doing dishes became much easier with his hands free, no longer needed to maneuver the walker he used in order to get around on one leg. “It was great,” Kaser said. “You could carry something from Point A to Point B instead of sliding everything around.” He’d already resumed working in his shop before receiving his prosthesis. Now with the artificial limb, he could take more of an active role in farming 1,500 acres, finishing 3,000 hogs and running a trucking company with Adam and the hired help. He helped with harvest this fall, even running that same auger unloading corn into grain bins. There was no hesitation, he said, no mental hurdles to clear the first time the auger started rotating. It’s back to work as normal, or maybe it’s more accurate to say work as usual. “It will never feel normal,” he said of his leg.

SENIOR NEWS LINE

One of the freedoms of retirement is getting to choose where to live. Rather than being tied to a specific location due to work or school commitments, the entire world suddenly becomes a potential place to retire.

Best, worst states for retirement By Matilda Charles

Bankrate’s study of the best and worst states for retirement pegs Nebraska, Iowa, Missouri, South Dakota and Florida as the top five. It’s easy to just take a list such as this and call the movers, but it’s the details that matter. All 50 states in the study were ranked in terms of affordability, crime, culture, weather and wellness. Nebraska, at the top of the list, had a rating of only 14 for affordability, but did well on the other criteria. Missouri, third on the list, was No. 1 for affordability, but only average or below average ratings on the other benchmarks. Kentucky, at No. 6, came in at a respectable 9 for both affordability and crime. Its downfall was culture, which rated only a 46. At the bottom of the list, while New York scored very high for culture, it had the worst affordability rating. So, how to decide where to retire? Not with a list like this. To pinpoint a location where you’ll be happy in retirement, you need to get to know the area in person. Go there. Stay as long as you can, at least through a vacation. Make contacts. Call real estate agents and tour homes to see what you can get in your price range. Contact the medical center and see if they have what you need. Check Hospital Compare on medicare.gov. Read the local newspaper. Visit the police department and ask about crime, as opposed to believing a study. Check the nearest college for senior classes. Drive around and look for depressed areas. Is there a senior center with interesting activities? Do the math. Can you afford your new location? Are there part-time work options if you need more money? Deciding where to retire really does mean visiting the location and doing your homework. © 2020 King Features Synd., Inc.

NOTICE OF MEETING OF THE MEMBERS OF INDIANA PORK PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION, INC. JANUARY 28, 2020 • Indianapolis, Indiana The undersigned, President of Indiana Pork Producers Association, Inc. (the “Association”), a corporation existing under the Indiana Nonprofit Corporation Act of 1991, as amended, hereby gives notice of a regular meeting of the members of the Association (“the Meeting”), to be held at the offices of the Indiana Farm Bureau, 225 S. East St. Indianapolis, Indiana, at 11:00 a.m., on Tuesday, January 28, 2020. The meeting is being held for the following purposes: 1. The election of directors for the Indiana Pork Producers Association Board of Directors 2. The election of Pork Producer delegate candidates for the 2021 National Pork Board (Pork Act) Delegate body. 3. To consider and to discuss any other business properly to come before the members. This Notice is being provided to the members of the Association in accordance with the Association’s Amended and Restated Articles of incorporation and Bylaws. All Indiana pork producers are invited to attend. Any producer age 18 or older, who is a resident of the state and has paid all assessments due may be considered as a delegate candidate and/ or participate in the election. All eligible producers are encouraged to bring with them a sales receipt proving that hogs were sold in their name and the checkoff deducted. For more information, contact the Indiana Pork Producers Association, 8425 Keystone Crossing, Suite 220, Indianapolis, IN 46240, call (317) 872-7500 or email Josh Trenary at jtrenary@inpork.org.

Nick Maple • President • Indiana Pork Producers Association, Inc.


B8 Friday, January 17, 2020

| INDIANA AGRINEWS | www.agrinews-pubs.com

New vehicle sales in U.S. down 1.3% in 2019, but still healthy DETROIT (AP) — New vehicle sales in the United States fell 1.3% last year, but the numbers still passed the healthy 17 million mark for the fifth straight year. Automa kers sold 17.05 million new cars, trucks and SUVs in 2019. Although buyers spent more on vehicles, companies had to prop up sales

with record discounts, according to analysts. Following a long trend, 69% of new vehicles sold last year were trucks or SUVs, with truck sales up 2.6% from a year ago. Car sales fell once again, by 10.1%, according to Autodata Corp. Sales at General Motors fell 2.5% for the year as a

40-day strike by the United Auto Workers union cut into inventories in the fourth quarter. Ford sales fell 3.2%, while Fiat Chrysler sales dropped 1.4%. Sales at Toyota fell 1.8% and Nissan sales tumbled almost 10%. The Edmunds.com auto pricing site predicted that more than half the new ve-

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OPINION

www.agrinews-pubs.com | INDIANA AGRINEWS | Friday, January 17, 2020

B9

WHAT’S TRENDING These are this week’s most read stories on the AgriNews website: 1. Illinois groups awarded Farm Aid grants 2. Reducing nitrogen runoff: Cover crops help solve problem

5. Water quality a community issue: Investments necessary to make improvements

3. Farmers join to harvest for late friend 4. Lessons learned in 2019: Late, prevent planting options

What’s your opinion? Send correspondence to: Letters, Indiana AgriNews, 420 Second St., La Salle, IL 61301; or email: letters@agrinews-pubs.com

Crime on rise in rural areas I was in a session taking notes about digital farming at a conference in Monheim am Rhein, Germany a couple of years ago when I received a text from my mom. Although well Rural Issues into the workday Cyndi Young- on the other side of the pond, I Puyear knew it was 2 a.m. in the heartland of America. I was overwhelmed with a sense of dread when I opened the text and saw a picture of a structure fire. My mom had taken the picture of my dad watching the house where he had grown up burn to the ground. It was heartbreaking. The little farmhouse was a mile down the road from my parents’ home. No one was living there, but a few family heirlooms, tools and other items were inside and lost in the fire. Someone driving along the highway early in the morning had seen the blaze and called the local volunteer fire department. The house was fully engulfed by the time the crew arrived, so there wasn’t much they could do but keep the fire from spreading. There was evidence that the house had been broken into and the firemen and the insurance investigator, a former fire marshal, agreed the fire had been deliberately set, but the structure was completely destroyed, so it was hard to prove. And proving it was arson would only mean another case that local law enforcement would not have time or manpower to investigate to ensure the responsible party is held accountable. Someone had tried unsuccessfully to set fire to a rural church in the county that same night, but as is the case in many rural counties, the sheriffs’ office is extremely understaffed. Small rural communities experience many of the same problems as bigger towns and cities. Rural areas are not immune to substance abuse, arson, homelessness and violent crimes. However, smaller tax bases mean fewer dollars for personnel, technology, training, tools and equipment. There is often nothing local law enforcement can do except put out the fire and move on, so to speak. Although I have a pretty good idea who set this fire and tried to set another, proving it wouldn’t change that what is left of the house where my daddy was raised and where I spent so many hours with family and with my grandparents is nothing but charred ruins. The arsonist, or arsonists, did not and could never burn the memories of grandma’s open arms at the back door with her welcoming words, “Come here honey and give me some sugar.” I have a heart full of memories and that is enough. I am grateful that no life was lost in the fire and none of the volunteer firemen who came in the wee hours of a September morning to fight the blaze were injured. Criminal activity is on the rise in many rural areas. A recent string of burglaries in my home county saw burglars so bold they robbed one house while people were sleeping in their living room recliners. Report suspicious activity. Let your neighbors know when you see an unfamiliar vehicle or something that doesn’t “feel” right. Lock your house. We’re going to have to work together “out in the county” to protect ourselves and curtail this rise in rural criminal activity.

SNAP an economic generator Before the year loses its fresh, youthful promise, let’s look at some recent research to, hopefully, address a nagging problem carried over from 2019. For months last year, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Farm & Food Perdue defended three proposed rule changes File to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Alan Guebert Program that will remove an estimated 3.7 million recipients from the program. The proposed changes were — and still are — strongly opposed by House and Senate Ag Committee Democrats who rejected SNAP changes during the 2018 farm bill debate. Perdue persisted, though, and is now poised to implement most by administrative fiat. One will go into effect April 1. This change, according to SNAP’s administrators at the U.S. Department of Agriculture, will limit states’ ability to issue waivers for “single, able-bodied adults” to receive SNAP benefits. By itself, the new rule will remove an estimated 755,000 people from SNAP. Secretary Perdue claims the change is needed because, “What we want to do is increase employment…” While he didn’t wink when offering that explanation — the rule’s clear intent is to cut costs, not put people to work — there’s a bigger problem with his “want.” In May 2019, the Economic Research Service published a SNAP analysis that completely undermines the secretary’s claim while confirming what SNAP research has proven for years: SNAP is an

economic engine in every community where its dollars flow; cutting it drains its horsepower. The latter makes sense for two reasons. First, anytime the federal governments sends $58.3 billion, SNAP’s estimated costs in 2019, it’s going to make a big splash — especially in poor communities. Also, food assistance recipients, literally, spend every SNAP penny they get. In turn, says the ERS, the spending creates one job for every $10,000 in SNAP spent in their community. That means that if Secretary Perdue knew what his department already knows he would not be advocating budget cuts to an important job generator in poor and rural communities. And in tough times or in tougher places, SNAP’s economic impact is far bigger, ERS explains. “During the Great Recession (2008 to 2011) the impacts of SNAP redemptions per dollar spent were larger than impacts per dollar spent on other federal or state government transfer payments combined — including Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid, unemployment insurance compensation, veterans’ benefits and other government transfer payments…” That’s right. The SNAP program not only creates jobs, in the past it has — dollar-for-dollar — had a larger economic impact than all other major “federal or state” government transfer payments “combined.” As such, the planned cuts to SNAP will, according to USDA’s own analysis, limit economic growth and kill more local jobs than Perdue’s cuts will ever create or fill with “able-bodied adults.”

But, to be fair, critics point out, program spending for all USDA food assistance ballooned from $37.6 billion in 2008 to, at the Great Recession’s peak, $79.9 billion in 2013. It ballooned for two obvious reasons. First, that’s exactly what you should expect in times of widespread economic calamity; all assistance spending climbs during tough times. Also, SNAP participation rates rose from below 70% in many states to near 90% when eligible recipients simply showed up to claim benefits they qualified for. Today, however, SNAP’s estimated 2019 cost is 27% lower than in 2013 even though the national participation rate remains a historically high 85%. The participation rate for USDA’s federal crop insurance program was 86% in 2016. So, SNAP costs continue to fall; SNAP is an enormously important economic generator in every community, oftentimes more important than all other government programs combined; and every $10,000 in SNAP money spent creates one job. With that pedigree, why is USDA, the People’s Department, defying its own research to enact new, restrictive rules that will harm both SNAP recipients and the communities where they live? The answer defies common sense, but at its heart you’ll find more cultural engineering than ag engineering. Farm & Food File is published weekly through the U.S. and Canada. Source material and contact information are posted at www.farmandfoodfile.com.

Labor costs outpace farm revenue While most Americans were joyfully wishing each other a happy New Year and trying to remember the words to “Auld Lang Syne,” many farmers were worried about what 2020 would bring. As of Jan. 2, farmers Zippy Duvall who use the H-2A visa program to hire legal workers from other American Farm Bureau countries are required to pay higher wages on Federation top of already-inflated wages for H-2A employees. This year’s increase averages 6% nationwide. In some areas, it will be nearly 10%. These increases in the H-2A program’s Adverse Effect Wage Rate come at a time when farmers can hardly afford it. We have increasing competition from imported produce grown with cheap foreign labor, a trade war that has decimated our exports, weather disasters and a farm economy that continues to be challenging. Already, over the last five years, the national average H-2A wage has gone up 17%. Meanwhile, revenues for fruits and nuts are up only 3%, and revenues for vegetables and melons have not increased at all. That means any increase must come out of the farmer’s own pocket. For many,

that pocket is empty. But the Labor Department does not consider agriculture’s ability to absorb the additional costs when it implements annual changes to the wage rate. The average H-2A Adverse Effect Wage Rate for 2020 is $13.99 per hour for farm work in the United States. And that’s on top of paying for workers’ housing and transportation to and from their homes. Compare that cost to Canada where workers are paid between $8.72 and $11.55 per hour for their work on fruit and vegetable farms, or Mexico and Central and South America where workers are paid a fraction of that amount. It’s hard for a U.S. farmer to compete with foreign growers when their labor costs are so much lower than ours. There are sectors of agriculture that cannot even use the H-2A program because it requires that the work be seasonal. Year-round farmers such as dairy farmers and mushroom growers have no legal way of meeting their labor needs when there are too few U.S. workers who are willing to fill those jobs. The word “sustainability” is often used these days, referring of course to worthy environmental goals. But farms cannot be sustainable if labor costs continue to outpace and outstrip farm revenue. Already, American farms of all sizes, but especially small and medium-sized farms, are at the point where many do

not see a future in labor-intensive agriculture. That’s bad for farmers. It’s bad for rural economies where agriculture is a primary economic driver. It’s bad for businesses that serve farmers, such as banks or transportation companies. And, worst of all, it’s bad for every citizen of this country, as we become more reliant on imported food. Farm Bureau is asking the U.S. Senate to recognize the urgent need for legislation that improves the H-2A program for all farms, including addressing the rising Adverse Effect Wage Rate and providing solutions for year-round agriculture. As we make our New Year’s resolutions, most of us settle on a goal we’ve been putting off for too long, perhaps years or even decades. For the past 20-plus years, agriculture has urged Congress to pass agricultural labor reforms that help all farms meet their labor needs and help them compete with foreign producers. It’s time for Congress to make — and keep — a New Year’s resolution to solve this problem. We simply cannot continue on the current path. We resolve to work with Congress to pass legislation that addresses the needs of all farms and prevents further erosion of our ability to grow our food here in our own country. Zippy Duvall is the president of the American Farm Bureau Federation.

Cyndi Young-Puyear is farm director and operations manager for Brownfield Network.

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B10 Friday, January 17, 2020

| INDIANA AGRINEWS | www.agrinews-pubs.com

Business

Market data Bull markets for commodities FOR WEEK ENDING JANUARY 10, 2020

Futures Prices This Last This week week Chg. week CATTLE HOGS FEB 20 127.42 124.72 2.70 FEB 20 67.25 APR 20 127.95 125.67 2.28 APR 20 74.12 JUN 20 119.77 117.67 2.10 MAY 20 80.72 AUG 20 117.27 115.55 1.72 JUN 20 86.17 OCT 20 119.40 117.75 1.65 JUL 20 86.92 DEC 20 122.00 120.45 1.55 AUG 20 85.97

Last week Chg. 68.55 75.15 81.40 87.10 87.25 86.45

-1.30 -1.03 -0.68 -0.93 -0.33 -0.48

MILK CLASS III JAN 20 17.03 FEB 20 16.98 MAR 20 17.31 APR 20 17.32 MAY 20 17.31 JUN 20 17.43

16.93 17.02 17.25 17.23 17.21 17.32

0.10 -0.04 0.06 0.11 0.10 0.11

-8 -4 2 22 20 14

SOYBEANS JAN 20 9350 MAR 20 9460 MAY 20 9590 JUL 20 9710 AUG 20 9750 SEP 20 9722

9304 9414 9552 9676 9716 9694

46 46 38 34 34 28

CHICAGO WHEAT MAR 20 5644 5544 100 MAY 20 5664 5576 88 JUL 20 5682 5604 78 SEP 20 5736 5672 64 DEC 20 5820 5764 56 MAR 21 5880 5846 34

K.C. WHEAT MAR 20 4946 MAY 20 5022 JUL 20 5096 SEP 20 5172 DEC 20 5274 MAR 21 5374

4750 4826 4902 4980 5086 5194

196 196 194 192 188 180

BRENT CRUDE OIL 64.98 68.60 -3.62 MAR 20 APR 20 64.25 67.76 -3.51 MAY 20 63.63 67.05 -3.42 63.02 66.38 -3.36 JUN 20 JUL 20 62.39 65.66 -3.27 61.86 65.02 -3.16 AUG 20

ETHANOL FEB 20 MAR 20 APR 20 MAY 20 JUN 20 JUL 20

1.363 -0.019 1.382 -0.018 1.404 -0018 1.404 0.005 1.404 0.005 1.404 0.005

FEEDER CATTLE JAN 20 147.60 MAR 20 147.45 APR 20 150.05 MAY 20 151.20 AUG 20 156.30 SEP 20 156.97

143.35 142.67 145.52 147.02 152.45 153.45

4.25 4.78 4.53 4.18 3.85 3.52

CORN MAR 20 3856 3864 MAY 20 3926 3930 JUL 20 3994 3992 SEP 20 4004 3982 DEC 20 4026 4006 MAR 21 4124 4110

1.344 1.364 1.386 1.409 1.409 1.409

Stocks of Agricultural Interest

This Last 52-wk week week high

ADM AGCO BASF BG CF

43.95 73.79 18.23 55.66 44.77

46.02 47.20 77.14 81.39 18.62 20.98 57.94 59.65 46.08 55.15

This Last 52-wk week week high

CTVA 28.35 28.40 32.78 DD 59.71 62.16 85.47 DE 173.43 175.55 180.48 FMC 98.00 99.23 101.95 MOS 20.62 20.76 33.91

Export Inspections (MIL BU.) This Year Cumulative Cumulative Cml. week ago this year year ago % diff. WHEAT 345.109 263.918 14846.05 12940.992 14.72 CORN 550.930 501.565 8601.83 18474.243 -53.44 SOYBEANS 963.830 682.518 21744.43 17309.583 25.62

The first weekly newspaper column I penned for 2019 was entitled “Commodities will rule and stocks drool in 2019.” I stated boldly in the final para“The new Commodity graph, year, 2019, should Insight present aggressive investors and tradJerry Welch ers with some low risk, high probability opportunities with a host of commodity markets. I also predict that in 2019, commodities will rule while stocks drool.” As it turned out, stocks rose approximately 30% in 2019, their best performance since 2013. Commodities, per se, on the other hand, were woefully weak in most cases until the final month of the year, when they finally caught a bid and closed a tad higher. In 2019, stocks ruled and commodities drooled — the opposite of my forecast. But now, a new year has arrived, and a new decade, as well. And, for kicks and giggles, here are some startling facts about the single best performing asset in the decade of the “twenty tens.” That asset, of course, was bitcoin. From Bloomberg News with a headline that blared “Bitcoin’s 9,000,000% rise this decade leaves the skeptics aghast” — and, yes, that is not a misprint. The gain for Bitcoin in the last decade was 9 million percent. Bloomberg News stated, “Emerging out of the ashes of the financial crisis, Bitcoin was created as a bypass to the banks and government agencies mired in Wall Street’s greatest calamity in decades. At first, it was slow to

break through, muddied by a slew of scandals: fraud, thefts and scams that turned away many and brought closer regulatory scrutiny. But once it burst into the mainstream, it proved to be the decade’s best-performing asset.” Bloomberg News stated, “The largest digital token, trading around $7,200 (each) has posted gains of more than 9,000,000% since July 2010, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.” However, Bitcoin first came into existence on Halloween 2008 by someone named Satoshi Nakamoto. At the time, I understand that 1 cent — a penny — could have bought 3 bitcoins. One U.S. dollar could have bought 300 bitcoins. Bitcoin showed little volatility from 2008 to 2016. In 2010, it never traded over 39 cents — yes, cents — but in July 2017, it popped over the $1,000 level. Shortly later, intense volatility was unleashed and roller-coaster trading quickly ensued. In late 2017, bitcoin rose to $19,783 level, but in late 2018, was back down to a bit over $3,000. In the summer of 2019, it was back up to $13,800 and now trades around $8,200. A host of forecasts are calling for bitcoin to take off to the upside in 2020, with a possible assault on new all-time historic highs. Obviously, a 9,000,000% rise is a solid return on any investment. Still, you had to stomach, to sit through the volatility that unfolded over the following years. Also keep in mind that the single hardest question to answer when trading or investing is this: When to get out with a profit? Or, a loss? It is a question that has no clear answer. It all comes down to how much heat you can tolerate when the market position begins to cause pain. But for a moment think about a

Harvest Heroes

Livestock Summary MEAT PRICES This week Last week Change Pork Cutout Bellies Loins Hams Yld Gr 3 Choice Beef Select Beef 5-Mkt Fed Cattle Live 5-Mkt Fed Cattle Carcass

72.14 73.78 88.10 83.27 67.85 71.26 68.16 65.17 210.38 209.09 206.84 205.49 124.00 124.85 198.64 197.04

-1.64 4.83 -3.41 2.99 1.29 1.35 -0.85 1.60

Mosaic announces winners of contest

CASH HOGS CARCASS PRICES This week Last week Change National

50.48 50.59 -0.11

Eastern Corn Belt Direct Feeder Cattle Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Kentucky and Ohio Reported sales this week, 2,130; last week, holiday; last year, 2,805. Demand moderate. Supply included 100% over 600 pounds, 64% heifers. Feeder Steers Medium, Large 1 Avg. Avg. Delivery Head Wt. Price (FOB) 80 648 146.86 Current 80 667 142.10 Current 300 800 138.25 May Feeder Steers Medium, Large 1-2 825 130.00 Feb 300

Feeder Heifers Medium, Large 1 210 700 130.00 Jan-Feb Feeder Heifers Medium, Large 1-2 62 775 127.65 Current 200 825 124.94 Current 611 725 121.40 Mar 260 750 129.00 Mar

USDA National Grain Market Review Compared to last week, cash bids for wheat were mixed, while corn, sorghum and soybeans were lower. For the week ending Jan. 2, an increase of 6.4 million bushels of corn export sales for 2019-2020 was reported. with an increase of 13.1 million bushels of soybean exports sales, and an increase of 3 million bushels wheat export sales. Ethanol production for the week ending Jan. 3 reported a decrease of 4,000 barrels per day to 1.062 million barrels. Ethanol stocks increased 1.4 million barrels at 22.5 million barrels. Wheat was 16 1/4 cents lower to 8 3/4 cents higher. Corn was 7 cents to 11 1/4 cents lower. Sorghum was 6 cents to 15 cents lower. Soybeans were 7 3/4 cents to 12 3/4 cents lower.

CORN Kansas City US No 2 truck Yellow Corn was 8 1/4 cents lower from 3.88 1/4-3.93 1/4 per bushel. Omaha US No 2 Yellow Corn was 7 to 11 cents lower from 3.733.83 per bushel. Chicago US No 2 Yellow Corn was 8 1/4 cents lower from 3.95 1/4-3.96 1/4 per bushel. Toledo US No 2 rail Yellow corn was 8 1/4 to 11 1/4 cents lower from 4.03 1/4-4.06 1/4 per bushel. Minneapolis US No 2 Yellow corn rail was 7 1/4 cents lower at 3.53 1/4 per bushel.

Yellow truck soybeans were 8 3/4 to 12 3/4 cents lower from 9.41 1/2-9.54 1/2 per bushel. Kansas City US No 2 Yellow truck soybeans were 7 3/4 to 12 3/4 cents lower from 9.15 1/29.38 1/2 per bushel. Illinois 48 percent soybean meal, processor rail bid was 2.80 to 3.80 lower from 300.80301.80 per bushel. Central Illinois Crude Soybean oil processor bid was 0.60 to 0.85 points lower from 34.1434.89 per cwt.

WHEAT Kansas City US No 1 Hard Red Winter, ordinary protein rail bid was 1 cent lower from 5.80 1/45.90 1/4 per bushel. St. Louis truck US No 2 Soft Red Winter terminal bid was 5 cents higher at 6.3 per bushel. Minneapolis and Duluth US No 1 Dark Northern Spring, 14.0 to 14.5 percent protein rail, was 16 1/4 cents lower to 8 3/4 cents higher from 6.72-7.02 per bushel. Portland US Soft White wheat rail was 5 cents lower to 5 cents higher from 6.10-6.20 per bushel.

SORGHUM US No 2 yellow truck, Kansas City was 6 to 15 cents lower from 6.22-6.31 per cwt. Texas High Plains US No 2 yellow sorghum (prices paid or bid to the farmer, fob elevator) was 14 to 15 cents lower from 6.39-6.75 per cwt.

OILSEEDS

OATS

Minneapolis Yellow truck soybeans had no comparison at 8.93 3/4 per bushel. Illinois Processors US No 1

US 2 or Better oats, rail bid to arrive at Minneapolis 20 day was 5 cents lower to 4 cents higher from 3.33-3.52 per bushel.

Mack Trucks to lay off 300 at plant MACUNGIE, Pa. (AP) — Mack Trucks plans to lay off 305 employees at its assembly plant north of Philadelphia, the company said Jan. 8. Mack blamed the layoffs at its Lower Macungie Township plant on a downturn in the heavyduty truck market. They will take effect at

the end of February. The cuts represent about 13% of the plant’s payroll. Mack said last month that it would need to slow production to cope with reduced demand. Mack expects the North American truck market to be down nearly 30% this year.

9 million percent return on your investment. Buying $100 worth of bitcoin on Halloween 2008 could have led to a gain of $90 million before the end of the decade. If reluctant to risk $100 because money is hard to come by and instead plunked $1 down, that would have returned $9 million before the end of the decade. And if $1 was too much to risk and instead you bought 10-cents worth, a measly dime, that would have led to a $900,000 gain. As Bloomberg News so aptly stated, such gains leave me “aghast.” Few expect commodities per se to do much on the upside here in the new year. But yours truly is convinced that climate change issues this year will be numerous across the globe supporting food stuff markets. I also believe that a signed trade deal with China will be revolutionary for U.S. agriculture as it will be “newfound demand” and underpin grain and livestock prices for the next few years. In the entire Big Four — stocks, bonds, currencies and commodities — the market with the most extreme cycle is commodities. And that is because sudden changes in weather, fires or natural disasters and so on can lead quickly to much lower supplies and sharply higher prices. All my work suggests loudly that commodities per se are on the cusp of bottoming in 2020-2021 and moving higher into 2035. My lean is for major bull markets for commodities to unfold in the new year and beyond, allowing U.S. grain and livestock producers to experience the biggest agriculture boom in history. The year and decade ahead will be historic and highlighted by climate change challenges and newly found demand from China and emerging economies.

JOLI PIERSON PHOTO

Mason County, Illinois, 4-H Federation members Bryleigh Morris (from left), Karley Kramer, Skylar Stark, Joslyn Stone and Lauren Curless were part of a special gift-giving event held at the ADM facility in Havana, Illiinois. Drivers, including Eric Stelter (right) received a pair of work gloves, candy or snack, and a special informational brochure from Illinois Farm Bureau that helps people understand how to recognize and address mental and emotional health crises.

4-H members spread holiday cheer with important message HAVANA, Ill. — 4-H members are showed their thanks to area farmers in a big way during the holiday season. Mason County 4-H Federation members partnered with the Mason County Farm Bureau on a holiday community service project. The 4-H members wanted to thank farmers and those in the agricultural industry workforce for all they do to help feed the world. They also wanted to use the opportunity to share an important message from the Illinois Farm Bureau to help anyone struggling with daily stress, anxiety, depression, addiction or other mental health challenges. The 4-H members handed out gifts to truck drivers and farmers who were hauling loads of grain to the Havana ADM facility. The snowman-themed, wrapped gifts consisted of candy and snacks along with a pair of gloves, which were donated by the Havana Farm & Home Store. Attached to each wrapped package was a card from the Mason County Farm Bureau titled “Stronger Together.” Inside the card, the recipients found information on crisis signs and symptoms and resource information to seek in a time of mental or emotional health crisis. According to Illinois Farm Bureau, one in five adults in the United States has a mental health disorder in any one year. Almost 15 million Americans suffer from depression. Farmers are great at taking care of our land and livestock, but not

always at taking care of themselves. The message from the Illinois Farm Bureau encourages farmers and their families to take time to put themselves first. Anxiety disorders are the most common mental health issue in the U.S. Depression and anxiety are highly treatable with medication, therapy and lifestyle changes. Over 60 grain trucks rolled through the ADM facility in a twohour time span on Dec. 12. This busy grain contract time allowed the youth to reach a large number of farmers and drivers. STRONGER TOGETHER Crisis signs and symptoms as listed in the “Stronger Together” brochure are: n Decline in care of crops, animals and farm — for farmers. n Changes in sleeping and eating habits. n Poor concentration. n Excessive drinking. n Thoughts of suicide. n Constant fatigue. n Neglect of personal appearance. n Withdrawal from friends and family. If you or someone you know is struggling with daily stress, anxiety, depression, addiction or other mental health challenges, you are not alone. Reach out and ask for help. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is 1-800-273-TALK. Text TALK to 741-741 to text with a trained counselor from the Crisis Text Line for free, 24/7. Farm Aid Farmer Hotline is 1-800-FARMAID.

TAMPA, Fla. — Last fall, The Mosaic Company hosted a contest called “Harvest Heroes” through its MicroEssentials fertilizer brand. Growers across the country were invited to nominate their Harvest Heroes to acknowledge those who go above and beyond to make the harvest season successful. The 10 winners of the contest will receive a voicemail recording from legendary farm broadcaster Max Armstrong, as well as a “Harvest Essentials” prize package. Winners were Randy Arends, Melvin, Illinois; Ben Brockmeyer, Lebanon, Missouri; Keith Champlin, Holcomb, Missouri; Larry Kummer, Auburn, Indiana; Kurt Kummerfeldt, Nashua, Montana; Gary Michel, Evansville, Indiana; Marvin Moeller, Eldridge, Iowa; Brent Rogers, Scott City, Kansas; Spencer Sage, Champaign, Illinois; and Kevin Wolf, Franklin Grove, Illinois. STORIES SHARED Meaningful stories were shared to recognize the positive impact these Harvest Heroes made in their community, such as: n Randy Arends of Melvin, Illinois, was nominated by his wife of 37 years. She wrote, “I am nominating him not for the extraordinary, but in his faithfulness in the ordinary. He is an amazing father to our son, Steve, who is a survivor of traumatic brain injury resulting from a car crash that killed our other son, Greg, 16 years ago. Randy is Steve’s main caregiver, as well as a wonderful farmer, and makes participation in our farm possible for Steve.” n Spencer Sage of Champaign, Illinois, was nominated because he helped out family members in their times of need. His nominator wrote, “Spencer stepped up when my brother had a heart transplant and I had back surgery. Spencer and my son-in-law took the bull by the horn, so to speak, and did most of all the farming with very limited help. Both of us are doing better now, but both of the boys kept this family farm together and running great. If not for them this farm would have failed.” n Kevin Wolf from Franklin Grove, Illinois, was nominated by his daughter, Megan. She wrote, “My Harvest Hero is my dad. From a very young age, all I remember is his dedication to our family farm. He works full-time outside the farm and spends every other moment in the field. We go to bed and he is out there, and when we wake up, he is already up and getting it all done. He is the hardest-working person I have ever known.” To learn more, visit MicroEssentials. com.


www.agrinews-pubs.com | INDIANA AGRINEWS | Friday, January 17, 2020

B11

Livestock Record payout for predator losses

2020 Stakeholders Summit May 7-8

DUBUQUE, Iowa (AP) — A Jan. 13 hearing was scheduled for a Dubuque man charged with neglecting livestock and failing to properly dispose of dead animals. Cesar Gonzalez, 31, faces nearly three dozen counts, according to Dubuque County court records. The records don’t list the name of an attorney who could comment for him. Several of the 26 animals rescued from the Dubuque farm earlier this month were in poor health, officials said. “The surviving animals all appeared malnourished and skinny,” a court document says. “The bones and rib cages of the animals could be seen. The animals had matted hair. The food and water was dirty and poor quality.” The animals removed included horses, a pony, goats, sheep, pigs and geese.

and CEO. “Attendees will leave the 2020 summit primed and prepared with the tools they need to take action and be part of any and all conversations that could impact the future of animal agriculture and their business.” U.S. Farm Report’s Tyne Morgan will reprise her role as event moderator. As the host of the longest-running syndicated program focused on agriculture and rural life, Morgan brings viewers the latest agriculture and market related news by diving into stories impacting not only farmers and ranchers, but rural America. Growing up in rural Missouri, Morgan attended the University of Missouri-Columbia, where she majored in agriculture journalism, with an emphasis in broadcast. For questions about the summit, call 703-5625160, or email summit@ animalagalliance.org.

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Man charged with neglecting livestock

A R L I NGT ON, Va . — Registration is now open for the Animal Agriculture Alliance’s 2020 Stakeholders Summit, themed “Primed & Prepared.” Now in its 19th year, the alliance’s annual summit brings together thought leaders in the industry to discuss hot-button issues and out-ofthe-box ideas to connect everyone along the food chain, engage influencers and protect the future of animal agriculture. The 2020 event is set for May 7-8 at the Renaissance Arlington Capital View Hotel in Arlington, Virginia. Early registration discounts are available through Jan. 31. To register, visit summit. animalagalliance.org. “What makes the summit special is our focus on marking sure our attendees walk away with actionable tools and solutions to challenges they face,” said Kay Johnson Smith, alliance president

e Bred for Livestock Performanc DE

BOZEMAN, Mont. (AP) — The state of Montana has made more payments to ranchers for livestock killed by predators in 2019 than any previous year. The Montana Livestock Loss Board has paid ranchers more than $247,000. The claims were made on more than 360 animals killed by mountain lions, grizzly bears or wolves. Officials said 2019 was the third consecutive year a new record was set for the payouts. The number of losses to grizzly bears almost doubled the losses to wolves, board Executive Director George Edwards said. The Montana Legislature approved an increase in funding for the Livestock Loss Board from $200,000 to $300,000 in 2019.

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Register R egister to to attend attend a ffree ree s seminar eminar n near ear you. Register to attend a free seminar near you.VALLEY, IL FEB. 6 - SPRING JJAN. AN. 2 22 2-B BELLEVILLE, ELLEVILLE, W WII 10:00 1 0::0Jan. 0 AM AM21Borlands Bo- rDecatur, lands T Tavern ave ILr n 12:00 PM Wagon JJAN. A N. 2 23 3 - The C CHAMPAIGN, HA MPAIRestaurant GN, IIL L Jan. 22 Albany, WI 9 9:00 :00 AM A10:00 M Parkland PaAM rklaAlbany nd Applied ApLions pliedClub Tech Tech Ctr Ctr JJAN. ANJan. .2 25 5 -23 JJOHNSON O-HSpring NSON C CREEK, REEK,WI W WII Green, 10:00 AM Arthur’s Supper Club 1 0:00 A MM ilford H i ll s 10:00 AM Milford Hills Jan. 24 - Champaign, IL JJAN AN 25 5-P ARIS, IL PARIS, 9:00 AM Strategic Farm Marketing Office 8:30 Tuscany Restaurant 8 :30 Jan. AM MT usc-aAustin, ny R estau urant 24 MN 11:00 AM Pizza 28 LENA, JAN. .2 8-L ENARanch , IIL L Jan. 27 - Royalton, MN The Rafters Restaurant 9:00 AM MT he R afters R est taura ant 11:30 AM American Legion JJAN. ANJan. .2 9 -27 M COMBMN , IIL L 29 MACOMB, -AFrost, 9:00 AM Julie’s Bar & Grill 9 :00 A MB uffalo oW ild Wings g 9:00 AM Buffalo Wild Jan. 28 - St. James, MN JAN. 29 - ROCKFAL LLS, IL ROCKFALLS, 9:00 AM Home Town Cafe 9:00 Candle 9 :00 AM andle Light g t Inn Jan. 28 -C Whitewater, WI 10:00 AM 841 Brewhouse 29 WII JJAN. AN. 2 9 JJANESVILLE, ANESVILLE, W Jan. 28 - Macomb, IL 10:00 AM 1 0:AM 00 A M SSidelines idWild elineWings s 9:00 Buffalo JJAN. AN. 3 0 - -JJUDA, U DA, W I 30 WI Jan. 28 Pierz, MN 11:30 AM Brickyard Bar 1 0 :0 0 A M JJuda uda C ommunity C enter 10:00 AM Community Center Jan.29 29- -Randolph, Randolf, WI Jan. WI JJAN. AN10:00 .10:00 3 1 -AM SSHELBYVILLE, HFeil’s EFeil’s LB Y VILLE , IIL L 31 Supper Club AM Supper Club 9:00 AM Monicals 9 : 00 A MM nicalsIL Jan. 29 -o Lena, 9:00 AM The Rafters Restaurant FEB. COVINGTON, F EB. 1 - C OVINGTON, IIN N Jan. 30 - Melrose, MN 9:00 AM The Beef House 9 :0AM 0A M ((EST) EST) T hBuffet eB eef&H ouse 11:30 Cornerstone Restaurant F EJan. B. 4 -30 G I-BMt. SONHoreb, C ITY, WI IIL L FEB. GIBSON CITY, 10:00 AM State Bank of Cross Plains 9 :0 00 A MT he SSandtrap andtrap 9:00 AM The Jan. 31 - Shelbyville, IL FEB.BROOKVILLE, F EB.- 49:00 B RO OK VILLE, IIN N AM Monical’s 9:00 AM Korners Kountry KItchen 9 :0 0 A MJan. K orn31 er-s El K oPaso, untry K ILItchen 9:00 AM El Paso Golf Club FEB. GOSHEN, F EB. 5 - G OSHEN, IIN N Jan. 31 - Covington, IN 9 :00 A M9:00 JJoanna’s oaAM nnaThe ’s F aBeef milyHouse R estaurant 9:00 AM Family Restaurant FEB. F EB. 31 5 --P PONTIAC, ONTIAC, IIL L Jan. Greenwald, MN 11:30 AM Greenwald Pub 9:00 Bull’s Restaurant 9:00 AM AM Baby Baby B ull’s R estaurant Feb. 33 -- Brookeville, Brookville, IN Feb. IN FEB. MATTOON, IL FEB7:30 . 5 AM -Korners M ATTKountry OKountry ON,Kitchen IL Korners 7:30 AM 9:00 9:0Feb. 0 AM AM4 Downtown D wntown Diner DineIN r -o Middlebury, F9:00 EB.AM SCHIItalian OCTRestaurant ON, WI WI FEB. 5 - Rulli’s SCHIOCTON, Feb. 4 - Shiocton, WI 9:00 River 9:09:00 0 AM AM RiRiver ver Rail R ail AM Rail

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9:00 AM Verrucchi’s Restaurant Feb. 4 - Pontiac, IL FEB. - STRASBURG, IL 9:00 AM 6Baby Bull’s Restaurant 45- -Assumption, Feb. Fremont, WIIL Bldg Community 9:00Feb. AM Strasburg 6:309:00 PM AM GSIHahn-A-Lula Learning Center FEB. 6 - FREMONT, FREM MONT, WI Feb.45- -Assumption, Fremont, WIIL Feb. 9:00 AMLearning Hahn-A-Lula Hahn-A-L Lula Hahn-A-Lula 6:309:00 PM AM GSI Center Feb. 5 Strasburg, FEB. FEB. 7 - LITCHFIELD, LITCHFIE ELDIL , IL L 9:00 AM Strasburg Community Building 7:30 AM 7:330Feb. AM Maverick’s M eriick’s Steaks SValley, teaks &ILSpirits Spirits 6 a- vSpring 9:00 FEB. AMBVerrucchi’s FEB . 8 - EL EL PASO, PARestaurant SO, IL IL Feb. 6 Litchfield, ILlu 9:00 9:00 AM AM El El Paso Paso Golf Golf Club C ub 7:30 AM Maverick’s Steaks and Spirits FEB. - ST. FEB6 . 11 1-1Monticello, ST. ROSE, ROSE, IL IILL Feb. 6:9:00 00 PM PAM M Popeye's PMonticello opeye's Chop CGolf hopClub 6:00 House Feb. IL FEB.711 1-1 Rockford, TIPTON, IN FEB. - TIPTON, 9:00 AM The Machine Shed 9Feb. :00 AM A7M- Pizza PParis, izza Shack ShIL ack 9:00 9:00 AM Tuscany Restaurant FEB. 12 12 - BLOOMINGTON, BLOOMINGTON, IL IL FEB. Feb. 7 Tipton, IN 9:000 AM AM Avanti’s Avanti’s 9:00 9:00 AM Pizza Shack FFeb. EB. 12 110 2 - -NASHVILLE, NSt. ASH VILLE IL FEB. Rose, IL, IL 9:06:00 0 AM AMPM LiPopeye’s ttle Nashville NashChop ville House Restaurant 9:00 Little Restaurant Feb. 11 Aledo, IL FEB. 12 12 - GALESBURG GALESBURG FEB. 9:00 AM VFW 11:3Feb. 0 AM AM11Side Si-dGalesburg, e Trax Trax Bar Bar and anIL d Grill Grill 11:30 11:30 Bar FEBAM . 13 13Side RTrax OCK FOand RDGrill , IL IL FEB. - ROCKFORD, Feb. 11 Bloomington, ILd, 9:00 AM AM The The Machine Machine Shed, She 9:00 9:00 AM Avanti’s F EB. 11 13--Nashville, GENESEO,ILIL IL FEB. 13 GENESEO, Feb. 9:0011:30 1AM 1:30Little AMNashville Sweet Peas PeRestaurant as Grill Grill AM Sweet Feb. 12 Gibson City, FEB. 13 13 - ALEDO, ALEDO, IL ILIL FEB. 9:00 AM The Sandtrap 9:00 AM AM VFW VFW 9:00 Feb. 12 - Geneseo, IL 11:30 Sweet Grill FEB . 14 14AM M ONTPeas ICEL LO, IL IL FEB. - MONTICELLO, 9:0Feb. 0 AM AM13Monticello M-oSycamore, nticello Golf GolfIL Club 9:00 Club 9:00 AM FFeb. EB 15 1513- -BOONVILLE, BBoonville, OONVILLEMO , MO MO FEB 9:00 AM Isle of Capri Casino Restaurant 9:00 9:00 AM AM Isle Isle of of Capri Capri Casino Casino Restaurant Restaurant Feb. 18 Arthur, IL FEB. FEB. 19 19 - GILMAN, GILMAN, IL IL 9:00 AM Yoder’s Kitchen 9:00 AM 9:00Feb. AM Boondocks B18 oo-nd ocks Bar BarIL& Grill Grill Gilman, 9:00 AM FEB. 19 FE B.Boondocks 19 - ARTHUR, ARTHBar UR,& IL IGrill L Feb. 20 Champaign, 9:00 9:00 AM AM Yoder’s Yoder’s Kitchen KitcheIL n 9:00 AM Champaign Country Club

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B12 Friday, January 17, 2020

| INDIANA AGRINEWS | www.agrinews-pubs.com

Livestock

More exports needed as big pig numbers continue By Jeannine Otto

AGRINEWS PUBLICATIONS

DES MOINES, Iowa — U.S. pork producers are keeping barns and packing plants full, and that isn’t stopping anytime soon. The big question, that also won’t go away anytime soon, is where will all that pork go? If U.S. and Chinese trade officials and administrations can get their issues ironed out, U.S. pork will continue going to China and to other parts of Asia that have been impacted by African swine fever. “Just to give you an idea of the kind of exports we’ve been looking at, I’m tracking not only U.S. exports to China, but also the other countries and entities that have exportable surplus, primarily the EU, Canada and Brazil,” said Bob Brown, president of Bob Brown Consulting in Edmond, Oklahoma. Brown was one of four livestock market analysts who spoke on a Pork Checkoff-sponsored media call following the release of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s fourth-quarter Hogs and Pigs report in December. Brown pointed out that U.S. exports have continued to be strong, though producers themselves may not be seeing the financial

Indiana puts brakes on pig breeding herd By Jeannine Otto

AGRINEWS PUBLICATIONS

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. — Indiana pork producers continued doing what they know best — raising pigs. But with plentiful pig numbers now and into the next few months, they are putting the brakes on the breeding herd. Indiana’s breeding hog herd, as of Dec. 1, 2019, stood at 250,000 sows and gilts, down from 260,000 the same time last year. The state’s farrowings for the SeptemberNovember time frame were at 120,000 head of animals farrowed, down from 130,000 a year ago. December-February farrowing intentions, at 120,000, were down slightly from a year ago at 125,000 farrowings. The March-May intentions were even with a year ago, at 120,000 animals intended to farrow and the same actual number a year ago. Indiana’s market hog herd showed a large increase, at 4.050 million animals on Dec. 1, compared with 3.990 million animals the same time a year ago. BY CATEGORY The under 50 pound category was at 1.07 million animals compared with 1.035 million animals a year ago. The 50 to 119 pound pig category dropped from 1.225 million animals the same time a year ago to 1.110 million animals as of Dec. 1. The 120 to 179 pound category was at 880,000 animals versus 820,000 animals a year ago. The 180 pound and over herd stood at 990,000 animals as of Dec. 1, 2019, versus 910,000 animals on Dec. 1, 2018. Indiana pigs saved per litter dropped slightly in the September-November time period, with producers saving 10.5 pigs per litter versus 10.6 the same time a year ago. The SeptemberNovember pig crop was at 1.260 million, compared to 1.378 million a year ago. Jeannine Otto can be reached at 815-2232558, ext. 211, or jotto@ agrinews-pubs.com. Follow her on Twitter at: @AgNews_Otto.

benefits from that. “It’s kind of a shame that we are in this large export time — even though we have record production, we are probably shipping record amounts overseas — and hog producers, so far, really have not gotten to benefit from that,” Brown said. Brown said the numbers show that exports from the countries with surplus pork show China has been actively buying. “In the month of October, which is the last actual data we have for all four of those entities, pork exports to China just exploded. They were all over 275,000 metric tons, which was a new record high, and up 126% from the same month a year ago.” In November, China lifted a ban on pork and beef imports from Canada, and Brown expressed the hope that the EU volume may spread out over other exporting nations. “We can hopefully look forward to those kinds of volumes again, but spread out a little more evenly among the countries now that Canada can ship to China again and hopefully we’ll get some trade issues resolved with China and the USA can also ship more pork,” Brown said. Those big pig and little pig numbers look to continue.

The U.S. swine breeding herd, as of Dec. 1, was at 6.461 million, up 2.1% from a year ago and a marked increase over the pre-report estimate of up 1.6%. The September-November farrowings were at 3.166 million litters, down 1.2%, and that was estimated to be steady at 100% of the same time a year ago. December-February farrowing intentions, at 3.129 million, was up 1% from a year ago and above the pre-report estimates of up 0.4%. The March-May farrowing intentions, at 3.147 million, was up 0.4%, a decrease from pre-report estimates of up 1.1% from actual farrowings the same time a year ago. The September-November pig crop, at 35.101 million, set a new record. That number was up 1.8% from a year ago and was expected to be up 2.9%. The September-November pigs saved per litter was at 11.09 pigs, up 3% from a year ago, and also was expected to be up 2.9%. That number is a record for the quarter. As of Dec. 1, 2019, U.S. pork producers had 77.338 million pigs on hand, a record for the quarter, up 3% from a year ago and slightly above pre-report estimates of up 2.9%.

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RISK

slightly ahead of the other. n Bending knees and lifting stretched arms. TOP TIPS n Turning feet and arms n Take stretching breaks. n Good back posture with leg muscles, keeping rather than twisting the n Vary tasks every 20 to when standing, walking head in a neutral position. FROM PAGE ONE back. 30 minutes when possible. and sitting. n Avoid locking knees. To learn more about agn Standing with feet apart n Finding help to lift n Carrying objects close â&#x20AC;&#x153;They usually have less at shoulder width, one foot heavy objects. ricultural safety practices, to the body, not with outaccess to health care than their urban counterparts,â&#x20AC;? Halverson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most of that has to do with geography and possibly insurance coverage. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We know there are a limited number of healthcare providers that focus on womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s health. Rural communities are strugJohnDeere.com/6M gling with keeping healthcare providers across the JohnDeere.ca/6M board, whether they be specialty practices or general practitioners.â&#x20AC;? Women can help prevent injuries on the farm by considering and implementing safe ergonomic practices. Ergonomics is defined as the study of how people work in their environment, Before we even hit the drawing board, we talked with farmers, and designing the job to fit HHWRZQHUVDQGPRUHWROHDUQZKDWWKH\QHHGLQDPLGVL]HXWLOLW\WUDFWRU the worker, Halverson said. Contributing factors to Visit your John Deere dealerWRH[SHULHQFHWKHWUDFWRU\RXGHVLJQHGÉ&#x2019;ZLWKPRUH injuries include: YLVLELOLW\EHWWHUPDQHXYHUDELOLW\DQGPRUHRSWLRQVWRW\RXUQHHGV n Lifting objects that are too heavy. n Repeated reaching overhead. n Awkward working positions and body postures. Reimagined by you. For you. n Continual repetition of a specific work process. n Vibration from hand tools. n Static load on arms and upper body muscles. n Inadequate design or size of hand tools. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Women have anatomical and physiological differences that may place them at risk for farm injuries,â&#x20AC;? Halverson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Females are, on average, shorter than males and have more adipose tissue. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Females also have narrower shoulders, wider hips and proportionally have shorter legs and arms than their male counterparts. On average, the upper body strength in a woman is 40% to 75% less than in males. Lower body strength is 5% to 30% less than males.â&#x20AC;? Prevention strategies can help protect muscles, tendons and ligaments.

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ELIMINATE FROM PAGE ONE

n Wear appropriate personal protective equipment based on the product label or when working around animals. n Reduce exposures with proper laundering of personal or family members clothing. 4. Stress factors: n Establish support systems which may include family, friends or online blogs. n Seek assistance from healthcare professional for symptoms that may indicate depression or anxiety. GENERAL RISK PREVENTION STRATEGIES 1. Exposure to heat and sun: n Wear sun-safe hats and clothing. n Use sunscreen with SPF of 30 or higher at all times in all seasons. 2. Longer hair styles and ponytails can be caught in equipment: n Secure longer hair above neckline in hat or band to prevent entanglement. 3. Respiratory exposure: n Wear NIOSH-approved two-strap or cartridge respirator in appropriate size to fit your facial structure. 4. Chronic noise exposure: n Wear NIOSH-approved hearing protection. n Choose hearing protection type and contour to fit your ear canal. Erica Quinlan

Talk to your doctor

n Discuss your farmrelated risks. n Ask questions relative to pesticide exposure and appropriate personal protective equipment. n Review sleep and rest patterns. n Discuss stress issues. n Seek routine screenings for early signs of heart disease, breast, uterine, and ovarian cancer and diabetes. Source: AgriSafe Network

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visit www.agrisafe.org. Erica Quinlan can be reached at 800-426-9438, ext. 193, or equinlan@ agrinews-pubs.com.

John Deere Dealers See one of these dealers for a demonstration

AHW, LLC Crawfordsville, IN Rockville, IN Williamsport, IN

Castongia Tractor Fowler, IN Rensselaer, IN Valparaiso, IN

GreenMark Equipment, Inc. LaGrange, IN Monticello, IN Winamac, IN

TTG Equipment, LLC Bluffton, IN

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