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Thursday, February 13, 2014

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‘Our Planet in Focus’ is theme of 4-day event

Accountants to build Cortland’s budget By ANDREA AZZO aazzo@shawmedia.com CORTLAND – An independent accounting firm has made sure all Cortland’s bills are paid and will build the town’s next budget after town leaders ousted the appointed treasurer. Cortland Town Mayor Russ Stokes relieved former Treasurer Mark Davenport of his duties Jan. 31 after the accounting firm, Lauterbach and Amen LLP, issued

ter way to go,” Lanning said. “It’s not that much more money [to pay the firm] than what we were paying the treasurer.” Under Davenport’s watch, the town government had several unpaid bills from vendors including ComEd, which had said it would shut off service if payments were not made, according to a review of the treasurer or budget officer report.

Firm hired after town’s treasurer relieved of duties a report showing Cortland had multiple past due invoices and payments. Trustees approved the removal during their meeting Monday, and the town does not currently have any outstanding payments or bills, Stokes said. “As soon as we recognized the problem, we worked with

staff to make sure past due payments were brought up to financial speed,” Stokes said. “I’m conRuss Stokes fident everything’s fine.” Stokes hired the firm Jan. 1 to review of the treasurer’s

office. The town is paying Lauterbach and Amen LLP $100 an hour to finish the review and to perform Cortland’s treasurer duties themselves. So far, Cortland has paid the firm $2,300 for work in January, said Cheryl Aldis, Cortland town clerk. Davenport’s salary was roughly $49,000 in the cur-

rent fiscal year, which ends April 30, Stokes said. Previous Mayor Robert Seyller appointed Davenport, with trustees’ approval, in June 2012, after seven people applied for the job. Cortland Trustee Chuck Lanning said he fully supports the mayor’s decision. “In my opinion, it’s a bet-

See CORTLAND, page A6

Obama signs the order for wage boost Federal contract workers to earn $10.10 an hour By JULIE PACE The Associated Press

Monica Maschak – mmaschak@shawmedia.com

Eight-graders Ricky Ross Jr. (right) and Jack Sunderlage work on an in-class assignment in a computer lab Monday at Hiawatha Middle School. Next year, students across Illinois will participate in PARCC testing. By KATIE DAHLSTOM kdahlstrom@shawmedia.com DeKalb County students will be guinea pigs for a standardized test this spring that is changing the way schools measure their performance. School districts across DeKalb County are preparing for the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College Careers test which will replace the Illinois Standard Achievement Test and the Prairie State Achievement Exam next year. Sandwich School District 430, Hinckley-Big Rock School District 429, DeKalb School District 428, Indian Creek School District 425, Sycamore School District 427 and Hiawatha School District 426 will administer the test in April to various grades in both paper and electronic form. Across Illinois, 677 school districts will take part in the field test for the PARCC exams this spring. In the spring of 2015, 18 states, including Illinois and Washington, D.C., will take the actual tests. As with the ISAT or PSAE, the test will measure students’ knowledge in math and English in third through 11th

grade. The similarities nearly end there. Unlike the annual ISAT or PSAE, PARCC will be administered twice a year, is designed to be taken on the computer and is built around the Common Core, a curriculum Illinois adopted in 2010. School districts won’t be told their results after the field test as it is designed to measure the questions, not the students. Local school officials believe the test also will be a measure of how equipped they are for the new exam. “I think it’s going to be a challenge definitely because of the technology and comfort,” District 426 Superintendent Sarah Willey said.

Technology PARCC assessments were originally intended to be administered entirely on computer, but some school districts will be able to take them using paper and pencil after concerns over school districts’ technological readiness surfaced. Locally, district leaders are spending time and money to prepare. DeKalb School District 428 could spend $1.1 million to upgrade its computers and its network in order to be able to adminis-

ter the test. The money will come from the $21 million construction grant the district received. Sandwich’s $238,750 state technology loan won’t be allotted to improving technology for PARCC, but for making sure the district’s computers run at all. Curriculum Director Wally Marquardt said the district has the infrastructure “backbone” to administer the test, but doubts the district’s computers can handle it. “The field test is going to be a rude awakening to see what our capabilities are,” Marquardt said. “If anything, it will scare us into getting ready in a hurry.” Willey believes her district is ready, although students will have to take the test in shifts rather than all at once because of the district doesn’t have enough computers for the roughly 550 students who will have to take the test.

Results Since the Common Core was adopted, standardized tests have changed from yearto-year to integrate the new curriculum.

See ASSESSMENTS, page A6

WASHINGTON – President Barack Obama increased the minimum wage for a few hundred thousand federal contractors on Wednesday, then pressed the divided Congress to pass broader legislation that would apply to all workers. Obama declared, “It’s the right thing to do.” Obama first announced the executive order to boost some contractor wages during his State of the Union address last month. He signed the measure Wednesday in a White House ceremony where he was flanked by Americans who would make more money if lawmakers take more sweeping action. White House officials concede that the executive order, which raises the hourly wage from $7.25 to $10.10, only applies to a small percentage of the more than 2 million federal contractors. But officials are hoping it generates momentum for Obama’s proposal on Capitol Hill, particularly as both parties try to focus on issues like income inequality and economic mobility. “Raising the minimum wage is good for business, it’s good for workers and it’s good for the economy,” Obama said. The president first called on Congress to increase the minimum wage last year, but the effort languished on Capitol Hill. White House officials said they’re working with lawmakers on a legislative strategy to tackle the issue this year, but it’s unclear when a bill might be voted on or whether it would pass. The executive order for federal contractors goes into effect next year but only applies to new contracts. The White House said the order requires that employees who work for tips make at least $10.10 overall. It also prevents contract workers from being paid less than others if they have disabilities affecting their productivity. A recent survey by the National Employment Law Project found that 77 percent of government contract employees who work in food service, retail or janitorial service earn less than $10 an hour. About 4 in 10 of those workers depend on public assistance programs such as food stamps and Medicaid, the study by the worker advocacy group found.

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8 DAILY PLANNER Today Safe Passage Domestic Violence support group; 815-7565228; www.safepassagedv.org. Weekly Ladies’ Brunch: 8 a.m. at Fox Valley Community Center, 1406 Suydam Road, Sandwich. Cost for these women-only events is $4 for food and conversation, along with bottomless cups of coffee or tea. Back To Basics AA(C): 9:30 a.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb, 800-4527990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Feed My Sheep Food Pantry: 10 a.m. to noon at Bethlehem Lutheran Church, 1915 N. First St. in DeKalb. All are welcome. Malta HEA: Afternoon unit of the Homemakers Education Association. For meeting time and location, call Carolyn at 815-8252174. Take Off Pounds Sensibly: 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. weigh-in and 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. meeting, Sycamore United Methodist Church, 160 Johnson Ave. Call Lydia Johnson, chapter leader, 815-895-4618. Kishwaukee Symphony Orchestra Board of Directors: 4:45 p.m. at The National Bank & Trust Co., 155 N. Third St. in DeKalb. Contact Amanda Lake, KSO business manager, at 815-756-3728 or ksomgr@kishorchestra.org. Open Closet: 5 to 7 p.m. at 300 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. Clothes and shoes for men, women and children. 815-758-1388. ESL and GED Classes: 6 to 8 p.m. at Esperanza en Unidad (Hope in Unity), 2225 Gateway Drive, Suite A. To register and for more information, call Dr. George Gutierrez at 815-970-3265. Keep It Simple AA(C): 6 p.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb, 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. One Day Café AA(C): 6 p.m. at Waterman United Methodist Church, 210 W Garfield St., 800452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub. com. Weight Watchers: 6 p.m. weigh in, 6:30 p.m. meeting Weight Watchers Store, 2583 Sycamore Road (near Aldi), DeKalb. Franks Evening HEA: Part of the Homemakers Education Association. For meeting time and location, call JoAnn at 815-7868786. Nite Owls HEA: This evening unit is part of the Homemakers Education Association. For meeting time and location, call Sharon at 815-758-6712. American Legion Post 99: 7 to 9 p.m. at Sycamore Veterans Memorial Home, 121 S. California St. SycamoreAmericanLegion.org. Bayard Brown American Legion Post 337: 7 p.m. at Genoa Veterans Home, 311 S. Washington St. DeKalb County Amateur Radio Emergency Service: 7 p.m. on 146.73 megahertz. For information, call Bill Itter (N9EWA) at 815-895-2020. Grieving Parent Support Group: 7 p.m. at Great Lakes Leadership Center, 526 N. Main St., Elburn. Call Conley Outreach at 630-365-2880 for directions and monthly topics. Sandwich Steppers AA(C): 7 p.m. at Fox Valley Community Center, 1406 Suydam Road, 800452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub. com. Free Fit Club: 7:30 to 9 p.m. at Sycamore Community Center, 138 Fair St., Sycamore. Featuring rotating cardio or yoga programs from various Beachbody workouts like P90X, Insanity, Turbo Fire, Body Gospel, Turbo Jam, Hip Hop Abs, Rev Abs and many others. Call 815-901-4474 or 815-5663580 for more information. A Friend Of Bill’s AA(C): 8 p.m. at Trinity Lutheran Church, 33930 N. State St., Genoa, 800-4527990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Any Lengths AA(C): 8 p.m. at Federated Church, 612 W. State St., Sycamore, 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Closed Discussion AA: 8 p.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb, 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Friday Sexaholics Anonymous-DeKalb: 6:30 to 7:30 a.m. Fridays at Christ Community Church, 1600 E. Lincoln Highway, DeKalb. This 12-step recovery program is for Internet addiction. Contact: 815-508-0280. SA.org. Weight Watchers: 8:30 a.m. weigh in, 9 a.m. meeting Weight Watchers Store, 2583 Sycamore Road (near Aldi), DeKalb.

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’50s TV comic genius, Sid Caesar, dies By LYNN ELBER The Associated Press LOS ANGELES – Sid Caesar, the TV comedy pioneer whose rubber-faced expressions and mimicry built on the work of his dazzling team of writers that included Woody Allen and Mel Brooks, died Wednesday. He was 91. Family spokesman Eddy Friedfeld said Caesar, who also played Coach Calhoun in the 1978 movie “Grease,” died at his home in the Los Angeles area after a brief illness. “He had not been well for a while. He was getting weak,” said Friedfeld, who lives in New York and last spoke to Caesar about 10 days ago. Friedfeld, who with Caesar wrote the 2003 biography “Caesar’s Hours: My Life in Comedy, With Love and Laughter,” learned of his friend’s death in an early morning call from Caesar’s daughter, Karen. In his two most important series, “Your Show of Shows,” 1950-54, and “Caesar’s Hour,” 1954-57, Caesar displayed remarkable skill in pantomime, satire, mimicry, dialect and sketch comedy. And he gathered a stable of young writers who went on to worldwide fame in their own right – including Carl Reiner, Neil Simon, Larry Gelbart (“M-A-S-H”), and Allen. “He was one of the truly great comedians of my time and one of the finest privileges I’ve had in my entire career was that I was able to work for him,” Allen said in a statement. Reiner, who was a writer-performer on the breakthrough “Your Show of Shows” sketch program, told KNX-AM Los Angeles that he had an ability to “connect with an audience and make them roar with laughter.” In a statement, Reiner called Caesar “inarguably the greatest pantomimist, monologist and single sketch comedian

AP file photo

Sid Caesar, of “Your Show of Shows,” arrives May 5, 2002, at NBC’s 75th anniversary celebration in New York. Caesar, whose sketches lit up 1950s television with zany humor, died Wednesday. He was 91. who ever worked in television,” adding that the actor-comedian was a great flame who attracted “all the comedy moths” including Brooks and Simon. Friedfeld said Caesar always shared the acclaim. “Sid was an innovator, he and his team. He was very careful about never taking credit alone. He believed in his co-stars and his writers,” he said. “They created the amazing vehicles for him to be creative.” While best known for his TV shows, which have been revived on DVD in recent years, Caesar also had success on Broadway and occasional film appearances, notably in “It’s a Mad Mad Mad Mad World.” If the typical funnyman was tubby or short and scrawny, Caesar was tall and powerful, with a clown’s loose limbs and rubbery face, and a trademark mole on his left cheek. But Caesar never went in for clowning or jokes. He wasn’t interested. He insisted

that the laughs come from the everyday. “Real life is the true comedy,” he said in a 2001 interview with The Associated Press. “Then everybody knows what you’re talking about.” Caesar brought observational comedy to TV before the term, or such latter-day practitioners as Jerry Seinfeld, were even born. The son of Jewish immigrants, Caesar was a wizard at spouting melting-pot gibberish that parodied German, Russian, French and other languages. Some compared him to Charlie Chaplin for his success at combining humor with touches of pathos. Caesar performed with such talents as Howard Morris and Nanette Fabray, but his most celebrated collaborator was the brilliant Imogene Coca, his “Your Show of Shows” co-star. Reiner went on to base his “Dick Van Dyke Show” – with its fictional TV writers and their temperamental star – on his experiences there. Simon’s 1993 “Laughter on the 23rd Floor” and the 1982 movie “My Favorite Year” also were based on the Caesar show. Increasing ratings competition from Lawrence Welk’s variety show put “Caesar’s Hour” off the air in 1957. In 1962, Caesar starred on Broadway in the musical “Little Me,” written by Simon, and was nominated for a Tony. He played seven different roles, from a comically perfect young man to a tyrannical movie director to a prince of an impoverished European kingdom. In 1976, he put his pantomime skills to work in Brooks’ “Silent Movie.” But he later looked back on those years as painful ones. He said he beat a severe, decades-long barbiturate and alcohol habit in 1978, when he was so low he considered suicide. “I had to come to terms with myself. ‘Yes or no? Do you want to live or die?’ ” Deciding he wanted to live, he recalled, was the “first step on a long journey.”

8 TODAY’S TALKER

Bit by bit, macho stereotypes lose ground By DAVID CRARY The Associated Press NEW YORK – Traditionally, the American male was measured against the stoic hero who shook off all doubts, vanquished all foes and offered women a muscular shoulder to cry on. But that was before feminism, gayrights activism, metrosexuals. Husbands took on a greater share of housework and child care. The military welcomed women and gays. A romantic movie about gay cowboys, “Brokeback Mountain,” won three Oscars. And this week, the ground shifted under the hyper-masculine realm of America’s most popular pro sport – the National Football League, it seems, will soon have its first openly gay player. Off the playing field, in their daily lives, countless American men are trying to navigate these changes. For some, it’s a source of confusion and anxiety. “Men are conflicted, ambivalent,” said James O’Neil, a psychology professor at the University of Connecticut who has written extensively on men’s struggles over gender roles. “On one hand they’ve been socialized to meet the old stereotypes.” he said. “On the other hand, particularly for men in their 30s and 40s, they begin to say, ‘That’s not working for me. It’s too stressful.’ They’re looking for alternative models of masculinity.” But for other Americans, the upheaval is a good thing. “Ultimately, confusion about modern masculinity is a good thing: It means we’re working past the outmoded definition,” wrote journalist and blogger Ann Friedman in a nymag.com article last fall titled “What Does Manhood Mean in 2013?” After World War II, at least on the surface, there seemed to be an overwhelming consensus of what American manhood was all about. It was typified by Gary Cooper and John Wayne on the movie screen, by the GIs on America’s foreign battlefields, by the executives with homemaker wives and no corporate worries about gender diversity. The feminist movement that emerged in the 1960s fractured this consensus and fueled significant, although gradual, changes in many Americans’ perceptions of gender roles and stereotypes. By now, although women remain underrepresented as CEOs, they comprise close to half the enrollment in U.S. medical and law schools, and are

Missed paper? We hope not. But if you did and you live in the immediate area, please call Customer Service at 800-589-9363 before 10 a.m. daily. We will deliver your Daily Chronicle as quickly as possible. If you have questions or suggestions, complaints or praise, please send to: Circulation Dept., 1586 Barber Greene Road, DeKalb, IL 60115. To become a carrier, call ext. 2468. Copyright 2014 Published daily by Shaw Media. SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION Daily: $.75 / issue Sunday: $1.50 / issue Basic weekly rate: $5.25 Basic annual rate: $273 GENERAL MANAGER Karen Pletsch kpletsch@shawmedia.com ADVERTISING Display Advertising: ext. 2217 Fax: 815-756-2079 Classified Advertising: 815-787-7861 Toll free: 877-264-2527 NEWSROOM Eric Olson Editor eolson@shawmedia.com News: ext. 2257 news@daily-chronicle.com Obituaries: ext. 2228 obits@daily-chronicle.com Photo desk: ext. 2265 photo@daily-chronicle.com Sports desk: ext. 2224 sports@daily-chronicle.com Fax: 815-758-5059 REGIONAL PUBLISHER AND GENERAL MANAGER Don T. Bricker dbricker@shawmedia.com CIRCULATION Kara Hansen Group VP of Audience Development khansen@shawmedia.com BUSINESS OFFICE Billing: 815-526-4585 Fax: 815-477-4960

8CORRECTIONS Accuracy is important to the Daily Chronicle, and we want to correct mistakes promptly. Please call errors to our attention by phone, 815-756-4841, ext. 2257; email, news@daily-chronicle.com; or fax, 815-758-5059.

8DID YOU WIN? Illinois Lottery Wednesday Pick 3-Midday: 1-9-7 Pick 3-Evening: 6-0-1 Pick 4-Midday: 4-3-4-2 Pick 4-Evening: 0-4-1-8 Lucky Day Lotto-Midday: 11-15-22-25-37 Lucky Day Lotto-Evening: 3-5-6-8-13 Lotto jackpot: $14.25 million

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AP file photo

John Wayne appears in a scene from the movie “True Grit” in 1969. In mid-20th century America, at least on the surface, there seemed to be an overwhelming consensus of what manhood was all about. being welcomed into military combat units. During the same period, perceptions of manhood and masculinity also have evolved. Surveys show that husbands are handling far more housework and childcare than they used to, although still less than their wives. Soccer icon David Beckham proved that a male sports star with a celebrity wife could embrace nail polish and flamboyant fashion without losing his fans. “The women’s movement showed that women didn’t want to be restricted by their gender role, and it’s opened things up for men to not be restricted as well – they can be stay-at-home dads, they can be nurses,” said Bonnie Gra-

benhofer, a vice president of the National Organization for Women, though from her perspective the pace of change has been “agonizingly slow.” Fatherhood remains a key element in the discussion of masculinity, and there seems to be broad support for encouraging fathers to be more engaged in child-rearing than they were in the past. As evidence, Christopher Brown, president of the National Fatherhood Initiative, notes that the military is investing more energy these days in supporting soldiers’ roles as parents. “Fathers are really embracing that broader role,” said Brown. “It’s become accepted that they can share more of the work, and more of the joy.”

8NATION BRIEF Ancient baby DNA suggests tie to Native Americans NEW YORK – The DNA of a baby boy who was buried in Montana 12,600 years ago has been recovered, and it provides new indications of the ancient roots of today’s American Indians and other native peoples of the Americas. It’s the oldest genome ever recovered from the New World. Artifacts found with the body show the boy was part of the Clovis culture, which existed in North America from about 13,000 years ago to about 12,600 years ago and is named for an archaeological site near Clovis, N.M. – Wire report


LOCAL

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Officials seeking support to start road extension By AL LAGATTOLLA alagattolla@shawmedia.com Looking to drum up support for a road project they said would benefit students in the Kaneland area, a Kane County Board member and a state representative took their message to Monday’s Kaneland School District 302 board meeting. County Board member Melisa Taylor, R-Sugar Grove, joined state Rep. Bob Pritchard, R-Hinckley, in talking about the Dauberman Road extension, a long-discussed project in Big Rock Township. “We are trying to jumpstart this project,” said Pritchard, who added that “unfortunately, the County Board has been focused on projects farther north.” Dauberman Road would be extended south to Granart Road, with a bridge crossing over railroad tracks. That would solve a safety issue, Taylor and Pritchard said. It affects Kaneland because the Big Rock Fire Department is among those that provide emergency services to Kaneland High School. Taylor said emergency vehicles often are forced to go miles out of the way because of long waits for trains.

Taylor said they were seeking feedback from residents who would be affected. “We want you to critique it,” Taylor said, looking at those in attendance at the meeting, including visitors and Kaneland school board members. Visitors asked about the cost, which Pritchard said at one time was $12 million to $15 million, but he added that “was years ago.” School board member Tony Valente wondered whether that would add to the traffic for Kaneland students, but Pritchard said there already was a lot of traffic, and he didn’t see that it would be increased. Board member Gale Pavlak said it wouldn’t be as big an impact on Kaneland students, as it is in the Hinckley-Big Rock district. Taylor and Pritchard distributed a resolution to board members, seeking their support. The resolution requests the Kane County Board to prioritize the project and authorize the Kane County Transportation Department to begin “a study outlining the scope of the project, costs and other considerations.” Taylor said it was a first step. “The entire dream will not be done overnight,” she said.

Golf outing raises funds for narcolepsy By DEBBIE BEHRENDS dbehrends@shawmedia.com KIRKLAND – Howard and Mindy Manka hope to spare other families the months of medical testing and uncertainty over their child’s health. The Kirkland parents of three boys spent more than two years taking their middle son, Parker, 10, to doctors before he was diagnosed with narcolepsy and mild cataplexy. Parker’s struggle began in May 2011 when he was treated with antibiotics for strep throat. “After finishing the course of antibiotics, he started sleeping all day,” said Parker’s mom, Mindy Manka. “He never fully recovered.” She said some research has indicated that strep throat sometimes “wakes up” the narcolepsy gene. “At first we thought he was just growing. He would sleep eight to 12 hours a day, wake up, eat and go back to sleep,” Mindy Manka said. When they realized Parker’s sleep pattern wasn’t changing, they took him to their pediatrician, who ordered tests. All the tests showed normal results, but they knew something was amiss. After many more visits to pediatricians and neurologists, and several sleep studies and tests, they received a diagnosis Aug. 1 from a doctor at Lurie Children’s Hospital in Chicago. Part of the difficulty in getting a diagnosis, Mindy Manka said, is that the condition seems to be more rare in children, and very little is known about it. “That day was bittersweet,” said Howard Manka, who struggles to talk about his son’s condition. “We finally had a diagnosis, but it was hard because there’s no cure for it.” Narcolepsy, he explained, is an autoimmune disease caused by the loss of brain cells that produce hypocretin, the substance that regulates sleep cycles. Cataplexy is a sudden loss of muscle control while awake, usually

Extinguish Narcolepsy! Golf Outing n When: May 10; 11:30 a.m. shotgun start; 5 p.m. buffet dinner n Where: Whisper Creek Golf Club, 12840 Del Webb Blvd., Huntley n Cost: Golf and dinner, $100; dinner only, $35. Sponsorships available ranging from $250 to $15,000. n Info: Visit www.wakeupnarcolepsy.org or contact Howard Manka at hmanka01@gmail.com or 815-570-1369. triggered by strong emotions, such as laughing or crying. Narcolepsy affects 1 in about 2,000 Americans, according to Wake Up Narcolepsy, a Massachusetts nonprofit. Although there is no cure, Howard Manka said drug treatments are available. “It’s just trial and error to see what works for each person,” he said. Parker knows something is wrong, but doesn’t understand it, Mindy Manka said. “The school district has been very supportive since we got a diagnosis,” she said. Because so little is known about the disease and support is scarce in the Chicago area, Howard Manka, with help from his fellow firefighters at the Kirkland Fire Department, is coordinating a May 10 golf outing to raise awareness and funds for research. The outing, at Whisper Creek Golf Club in Huntley, will start at 11:30 a.m. with a shotgun start and end with an all-American barbecue buffet dinner at 5 p.m. The event also will feature Nicole Jeray, LPGA touring professional, who also has narcolepsy. According to her website, nicolejeray.com, she developed severe and classic symptoms of narcolepsy during her third year on the tour. “We’re going to help get the cause out there using our resources in the fire service,” said Kirkland Fire Chief Chad Connell. “We can touch a lot of people, so we’re going to help out as best we can through those channels.”

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D-428 will conduct preschool screenings DeKALB – DeKalb School District 428 will provide free screenings for children from birth to preschool at Tyler Elementary School, 1021 Alden Circle. Screenings for educational and speech/language components, as well as vision and hearing, will be from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. March 20 and 8 to 11 a.m. March 21. To schedule an appointment, call 815-754-2361.

Maple Park police awarded Flame of Hope Trophy MAPLE PARK – The Maple Park Police Department was awarded the Flame of Hope Trophy at the annual Special Olympics’ kickoff event in Normal. With fundraising activities coordinated by Jim and Colleen MacRunnels of Elburn, the

department raised more than any other agency in Illinois. Maple Park police will have their name in the No. 1 position on this years’ shirt. The department raised more than $63,000 in 2013. Since 2011, Maple Park has raised more than $120,000 for Special Olympics. The trophy is proudly displayed in the village office, and will travel to The Pub, Bootleggers, Casey’s General Store and Honest Auto, community businesses that have supported the department’s events.

Competitions open to 11th District students WASHINGTON, D.C. – Rep. Bill Foster, D-Ill., is inviting students from the 11th Congressional District to participate in the 2014 Congressional Art and STEM Competitions. For the art competition, stu-

Thursday, February 13, 2014 • Page A3

dents should submit one original piece of two-dimensional work, no bigger than 28-by28-by-4 inches framed. Entries can be dropped off until April 25 at Foster’s offices in Aurora or Joliet. Office locations and contact information can be found at foster.house.gov/ contact/offices. Artwork will be displayed in a temporary gallery space ending with a reception where the winner and three runners-up will be announced. The winner will receive two round-trip tickets to Washington, D.C., for the unveiling of their work, which will hang in the Capitol complex for the next year. Three runners-up will be chosen and their artwork will be featured in Foster’s offices. More information is available at foster.house.gov/services/ art-competition.

Additionally, this year will mark the first Congressional Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Academic Competition, allowing students to compete by creating and exhibiting their software application for mobile, tablet or computer devices on a platform of their choice. The deadline for submissions is April 30, and winners will be announced May 24. The winning application will be featured on the U.S. House of Representatives’ website. The competitions are open only to high school students who reside in the Illinois 11th Congressional District or who are eligible to attend public high school in that district. For more information, including full entrance and submission instructions, visit foster.house. gov/stem-competition. – Daily Chronicle


Page A4 • Thursday, February 13, 2014

8OBITUARIES CLAIRE LYNN PERSONETTE Born: Dec. 27, 1951, in Elgin, Ill. Died: Feb. 10, 2014, in Sycamore, Ill. SYCAMORE – Claire Lynn Personette, 62, of Sycamore, Ill., was called home to her Lord on Monday, Feb. 10, 2014, at home with her husband, sister-in-law and friend at her side during the final stages of cancer. Claire was born Dec. 27, 1951, in Elgin, the daughter of Warren McCarthy and Mary Riley. She grew up in Crystal Lake, went to St. Thomas Catholic School through eighth grade and graduated from Crystal Lake High School in 1970. She graduated from Northern Illinois University with a degree in earth science in 1976. In 1973, Claire married Gary, the love of her life, in Crystal Lake. During her life, Claire was involved with Cub Scouts as a den mother and a round table leader. She co-coached AYSO Soccer, and was a teacher in the cities of Kirkland, Sycamore, Oregon and Farmington. She also coached girls junior high basketball and went on to work at Northern Illinois University in various departments. She worked as a youth minister at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Sycamore, where she organized and went on two Habitat for Humanity trips to Michigan, was the director of RCIA and a choir member. Also, she was a lay associate of the Missionaries of the Sacred Heart. Claire enjoyed acting, being in plays and was involved in three Stage Coach Players productions. She loved to travel and went to Brazil, France and Ireland to kiss the Blarney stone. One summer, she even hiked 135 miles on the Appalachian Trail. She also took three canoe trips to Ontario, Canada – one with her family and the other two as a volunteer chaperone. She also was a master gardener. Claire enjoyed being with people and traveling the world. She was loved by many and she also loved many. The outpouring of support the past few months of her life brought people from all over the country to

visit her and encourage her on her journey home to her final destination – to be with her Lord. She will be remembered by her husband of more than 40 years , Gary; and was a cherished mother by her two adult children: Matthew (Somranchana) of Lombard and Andrew (Bruna) of Tivoli, N.Y. In addition to raising their two children, she also is survived by four grandchildren: Helena, Alexander and Benjamin of Lombard, and Luca of Tivoli. Survivors also include her sisters, Janice, and Terry Bryant (Blake) of Crystal Lake; and brothers, Michael of Sycamore, Patrick (Barb) of Prescott Valley, Ariz., and Dennis (Peggy) of Crystal Lake. Her funeral Mass will be celebrated at 11 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 18, at St. Mary’s Catholic Church, 244 Waterman St., Sycamore. A luncheon and time for fellowship will follow at the Parish Activity Center. Her visitation will be from 4 to 7 p.m. Monday, Feb. 17, at Butala Funeral Home and Crematory, 1405 DeKalb Ave., in Sycamore. A prayer service will be recited at 6:45 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorials can be made to the Christian Appalachian Project, P.O. Box 55911, Lexington, KY 40555-5911. For information or to sign the online guest book, visit www. ButalaFuneralHomes.com or call 815-895-2833. To sign the online guest book, visit www.legacy.com/daily-chronicle.

NICK STRIGLOS Born: July 21, 1935, in DeKalb, Ill. Died: Feb. 10, 2014, in Decatur, Ill. DECATUR – Nick Striglos, 78, of Decatur, Ill., passed away Monday, Feb. 10, 2014, at Imboden Creek Living Center in Decatur. Born on July 21, 1935, in DeKalb to Gus and Demetra Mitchell (Jean) Striglos, Nick graduated from Northwestern University with a degree in business administration and married Patricia Joan Grant shortly thereafter. In 1960, when Nick was 25, the couple relocated to Decatur to start their family and founded a typewriter sales and repair business, which grew into Striglos Office Equipment, Computer Center of Decatur and Haines & Essick’s, and

8POLICE REPORTS Note to readers: Information in Police Reports is obtained from the DeKalb County Sheriff’s Office and city police departments. Individuals listed in Police Reports who have been charged with a crime have not been proven guilty in court.

DeKalb city Jovonnie D. Stamps, 27, of the 400 block of West Division Street, Villa Park, was charged Thursday, Feb. 6, with criminal damage to property. Hallie A. Garcia, 21, of the first block of Fillmore Lane, Streamwood, was charged Friday, Feb. 7, with underage drinking. David J. Kosrow, 19, of the 700 block of Lucinda Avenue, DeKalb, was charged Friday, Feb. 7, with underage drinking and resisting, obstructing or disarming an officer.

Ian C. Vonbrendel, 22, of the 900 block of Ridge Drive, DeKalb, was charged Friday, Feb. 7, with resisting, obstructing or disarming an officer. Hailey D. Gist-Holden, 19, of the 900 block of Edgebrook Drive, DeKalb, charged Friday, Feb. 7, with keeping a disorderly house. Brian M. Wahl, 20, of the 800 block of Edgebrook Drive, DeKalb, charged Saturday, Feb. 8, with keeping a disorderly house.

MIAMI – Production of thousands of classified documents sought by the attorney for convicted terrorism plotter Jose Padilla is holding up his resentencing in the case, a federal judge was told Wednesday. Assistant U.S. Attorney Brian Frazier told U.S. District Judge Marcia Cooke it will take two months to disclose about 4,700 Defense Department documents that Padilla’s attorney wants. The exact nature of those documents is unknown, but Padilla was held for more than three years without charge as an enemy combatant at a Navy brig before he was indicted in Miami. Padilla’s attorneys have claimed he was mistreated and subjected to psychological duress at the brig, something the Pentagon has long denied. Cooke said she will set a firm resentencing date at an April hearing “and bring this matter

was ultimately brought under The Striglos Companies, Inc., umbrella. In 1972, Nick established Contemporary Properties to develop top-quality residential environments for the aging and mentally ill. Believing wholeheartedly in the value of creating and maintaining a vibrant Decatur community, where he lived, worked and raised his family, Nick devoted himself to countless elected, appointed and volunteer positions. Nick was elected a member of the Decatur City Council where he served for two terms. During that time, Nick chaired the original Decatur Public Building Commission, leading the efforts to gain approval for and build the Macon County Law Enforcement Center in downtown Decatur in 1988. He further extended his civic involvement during his service as a Macon County Commissioner. He was voted to be a delegate to the Republican National Convention in Houston in 1992, and San Diego in 1996. He was appointed by Illinois Gov. Jim Edgar to lend his expertise to the Illinois Housing Development Authority where he advocated for affordable, thoughtful low-income housing for residents throughout Illinois. Nick is survived by his three adoring children and their spouses, Scott Grant Striglos, and his wife, Shannon Theresa O’Brien Striglos, of Decatur, Jamie Dean Striglos Kolovadis, and her husband, Konstantinos Kolovadis, of Decatur and Patricia Emily Striglos, and her husband, Paul Scanlan, of London, U.K. Nick’s eight grandchildren, Demetra Victoria Striglos, Nicholas Grant Striglos, Patricia Sierra Scanlan, Gregory Antimahos Kolovadis, Nicholas Pantelis Kolovadis, Grant Stephen Scanlan, Augustus Michael Striglos and Emily June Scanlan survive him; as well as his cousins, Angie Striglos Panos, Georgia Striglos Dawson, Helen Striglos Waskoskie, William Striglos; and Nick’s former wife, Patricia Myles. Also surviving Nick are many beloved nieces and nephews. His wife and the mother of his three children, Patricia Joan Striglos, preceded Nick in death in 1982; as did his parents, Gus and Jean Striglos; sisters, Helen Striglos Shatto and Beatrice Striglos Lundy; and brother, Constantine Anagnos who

died in Brest, France, in August 1944. An avid golfer, Nick achieved two holes in one. He enthusiastically collected duck decoys and 19th century French advertising posters. Among Nick’s greatest passions were the Chicago Cubs, whose games he watched from boyhood through to this past season. Aside from his devotion to his family and community, Nick deeply valued his many friendships. Nick’s family wishes to thank the staff at Imboden Creek Living Center and Community Home Environmental Learning Project for the loving care they provided Nick and the consoling support they gave Nick’s family during his final months. After a private family graveside service and burial, the family will receive friends from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 14, at Scovill Golf Course Banquet Facility, 3909 W. Main St., Decatur, followed by a celebration of life service with lunch after. In lieu of flowers, the family would be grateful if memorials would be forwarded to the Macon County Conservation District Foundation or CHELP in Decatur. To sign the online guest book, visit www.legacy.com/daily-chronicle.

HENRY JAMES ‘HANK’ TWOMBLY Born: May 2, 1930, DeKalb, Ill. Died: Feb. 10, 1914 CHERRY VALLEY – Henry James ‘Hank’ Twombly, 83, of Cherry Valley, Ill., died Monday, Feb. 10, 2014. He was born May 2, 1930, in DeKalb, the son of Leonard (Doc) and Jesse Twombly. Henry started working at a small DeKalb neighborhood meat market at the age of 14 to help support his family. He continued working as a journeyman meat cutter and meat department manager at various supermarkets in and around DeKalb, Belvidere and Rockford until 1958. He then started as a construction electrician with his older brother Donald at Twombly Electric in DeKalb until 1962. He was employed by various electrical contractors around the DeKalb area as a journeyman electrician from 1962 until 1967 when he started working at Northern Illinois University as a staff electrician. Hen-

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ry worked at this position until 1992 when he retired. In 1944, at the age of only 14, Henry joined the Illinois State Militia by reporting to them that he was 18 years of age. He furnished his own brand new Indian motorcycle and then later a Harley Davidson motorcycle and was an active member of the motorcycle police during the war time. Henry was a 50-year member of the Masons, a 50-year member of the Tebala Shriners, and a 50-year member of the Illinois Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW). His wife. Sonja. was the love of his life. At age 16. he met her for the very first time at a local dance hall. He went home that very night and told his mother that he met the woman he was going to marry. Henry and Sonja were married two years later and just celebrated their 65th wedding anniversary Nov. 28 at Lindenwood Union Church with family and friends. Henry also was very proud of his children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren, and was happiest surrounded by family and friends in what he called his “circle of love.” Henry never met a stranger that didn’t soon become a friend. He always preferred a hug over a handshake and everyone who knew him knew this about him. He definitely had the gift of gab and was never at a loss for words. He will be sorely missed and forever in the hearts of friends and family. Survivors include his wife, Sonja (Johnson) Twombly of Cherry Valley; son, Gregory (Sheryl) Twombly of Wenatchee, Wash.; daughter, Tamara (John) Bloom of Rockford; son, Richard (Melisa) Twombly of DeKalb; grandchildren, David (Jake Burciaga) Twombly, Caryn Twombly, Rhya (Matthew) Miller, Joanna (Andrew) Wiser, Rachel (John) Lancaster, Corey (Laura) Twombly and Bret Twombly; great-grandchildren, Lindy Miller, Theodore Miller, Troy Lancaster, Henry Wiser, Wesley Wiser, Shelby Lancaster and Brennan Twombly; along with several nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents, Leonard and Jesse Twombly; brothers, Donald and Leonard (Babe) Twombly; and son, Daniel Twombly. The funeral service will be at 10:30 a.m. Friday, Feb. 14, at Lindenwood

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Hope A. Shriver, 18, of the 2700 block of Wendarm Court, Peoria, was charged Monday, Feb. 10, with battery. Damion D. Love, 22, of the first block of West Ridgeland Avenue, Waukegan, was arrested Tuesday, Feb. 11, on an in-state warrant.

to a conclusion,” presumably later this year. “Mr. Frazier, we’ve been on this one for a while,” the judge said. Padilla, 43, was originally sentenced in 2008 to a little more than 17 years in prison for terrorism support and conspiracy convictions. The case is back before Cooke because the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in 2011 that the sentence was too lenient, given Padilla’s lengthy criminal record as a Chicago gang member and terrorist training at an al-Qaida camp in Afghanistan. “He is far more sophisticated than an individual convicted of an ordinary street crime,” the appeals judges said. Since the appeals court’s ruling, the case has been in limbo. Padilla attorney Michael Caruso said obtaining the necessary documents for the resentencing hearing is “a long and arduous” process. – Wire report

Union Church in Lindenwood, with the Rev. Les McClelland officiating. Cremation will follow services at the Finch Crematory. The visitation will be from 4 to 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 13, with a Masonic Service at 6:45 p.m. at Ronan-Moore-Finch Funeral Home, 310 Oak St., DeKalb, IL 60115. In lieu of flowers, memorials can be made to the family to be established at a late date. Arrangements were entrusted to: Ronan-Moore-Finch Funeral Home. To send an online condolence, visit www.ronanmoorefinch.com; 815758-3841. To sign the online guest book, visit www.legacy.com/daily-chronicle.

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8BRIEFS Fla. man executed in boy’s rape, murder STARKE, Fla. – A man was executed Wednesday night in Florida for raping and killing a 9-year-old boy 18 years ago, a death that spurred the victim’s parents to press nationwide for stronger sexual predator confinement laws and better handling of child abduction cases. Juan Carlos Chavez, 46, was pronounced dead at 8:17 p.m. Wednesday after a lethal injection at Florida State Prison, according to Gov. Rick Scott’s office. Chavez made no final statement in the death chamber, but did submit a statement laced with religious references in writing. He moved his feet frequently after the injection began at 8:02 p.m. but two minutes later stopped moving. Chavez abducted Jimmy Ryce at gunpoint after the boy got off a school bus Sept. 11, 1995, in rural Miami-Dade County. Testimony showed Chavez raped the boy, shot him when he tried to escape, then dismembered his body and hid the parts in concrete-covered planters.

Gov. Quinn unveils $5.2B Medicaid waiver plan CHICAGO – Gov. Pat Quinn has released a five-year plan to restructure Illinois’ Medicaid program. The so-called “Path to Transformation” Medicaid waiver was posted online this week. If approved by the federal government, it would allow the state to obtain $5.2 billion in federal funds over five years to update the state’s health care infrastructure. Quinn’s office said it would shorten waiting list for services to the disabled, expand mental health and addiction treatment services, and lower long-term costs. The proposal aims to create more supportive housing for Medicaid clients and to consolidate nine programs that now serve different categories of disabled people. Public hearings are set for Friday in Springfield and Feb. 20 in Chicago. The plan will be submitted to the federal government March 12.

SIU campus unveils public-address system CARBONDALE – Southern Illinois University is touting its new emergency public-address system that officials said will quickly alert students of potential dangers on the school’s Carbondale campus. WSIL-TV reports the outdoor system will notify students of natural disasters such as tornadoes or other threats including an on-campus gunman. The university’s facilities overseer, Brad Dillard, said the system is capable of distributing any of 13 pre-recorded alerts as well as live messages as situations warrant. The university already had a system of mass text messages and email alerts to students, although administrators said the public-address method will allow for faster warnings. – Wire reports

Most states lag in health insurance sign-ups By KEVIN VINEYS and RICARDO ALONSO–ZALDIVAR The Associated Press WASHINGTON – Most states are still lagging when it comes to sign-ups under President Barack Obama’s health care law, but an Associated Press analysis of numbers reported Wednesday finds a dozen high-achievers getting ahead of the game. Huge disparities are emerging in how well states are living up to federal enrollment targets, and that will help determine if the White House reaches its unofficial goal of having 7 million signed up by the end of March, six weeks away. Connecticut is the nation’s top performer, signing up more than twice the number of residents it had been projected to enroll by the

AP file photo

Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius greets visitors Feb. 3 after a news conference on enrollment in affordable health coverage in Cleveland. end of January. Massachusetts, which pioneered the approach Obama took in his law, is at the bottom of the list,

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having met only 5 percent of its target. Six Republican-led states – Florida, Idaho, Maine, Mich-

igan, North Carolina, and Wisconsin – are on pace or better. Residents are signing up despite strong political opposition to the health care law in some of those states. The administration said Wednesday about 1 million people signed up for private insurance under the health law in January, extending a turnaround from early days when a dysfunctional website frustrated consumers. January marked the first time since new health insurance markets opened last fall that a national monthly enrollment target was met. All in all, from Oct. 1 through Feb. 1, nearly 3.3 million people signed up. “It’s very, very encouraging news,” said Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius. “We’re seeing a healthy growth in en-

rollment.” Still, the goal of 7 million by the end of March seems like a stretch. Also, officials are unable to say how many of those who signed up were previously uninsured – the ultimate test of Obama’s hard-fought overhaul. And they don’t know how many have sealed the deal by paying their premiums. The numbers showed an uptick in the number of young adults signing up, now 25 percent of the total. Officials expect a last-minute surge of 18to 34-year-olds before the end of open enrollment on March 31. Their premiums are needed to help with the cost of care for older adults. Overall, 4 in 5 of those signing up were eligible for financial assistance with their premiums or out-of-pocket expenses.

Ill. lawmakers want to tweak concealed carry law Lee Enterprises newspapers. State Rep. Bill Mitchell, a Forsyth Republican, wants to cut the number of required training hours in half for people who want a concealed carry permit and eliminate a provision that requires concealed carry permit owners to undergo additional training when they renew their license. He also wants to allow some people with concealed-carry permits from other states to continue to carry the weapons in Illinois. But Rep. Brandon Phelps,

The ASSOCIATED PRESS SPRINGFIELD – Illinois lawmakers are considering a series of changes to amend the state’s new concealed carry legislation, even though the first concealed carry permits haven’t been issued. Some of the proposals would make it easier to get a permit, while others would expand the list of locations where people would be allowed to carry weapons. Others would tighten restrictions, according to a report by The Springfield bureau of

a Harrisburg Democrat who was the chief sponsor of the original legislation, said he believes it’s too early to tweak the law. “Everybody needs to take a deep breath,” he said. “This is monumental legislation. Let’s let it go into effect and see what it’s like before we try to change it.” He said he doesn’t think many of the concealed carry provisions will get much traction during the legislative session. Still, Rep. Scott Drury, a Highwood Democrat, said

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he thinks the law should be changed. He wants to change what he says is ambiguity in the current statute to make sure concealed weapons aren’t brought into businesses where there’s gambling or alcohol. “The changes that I’m making are just technical changes to clarify the law where I think there’s vague language,” he said. Illinois’ law bans carrying concealed firearms in places such as schools, child-care facilities, courthouses, public transportation, college

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Teacher Todd Johnson oversees eight-grader Cole Dunbar’s work on an in-class assignment in a computer lab Monday at Hiawatha Middle School. Next year, students across Illinois will participate in PARCC testing.

Districts will have to adapt to timeframe • ASSESSMENTS Continued from page A1 The changes, Marquardt said, means school districts don’t have the data to measure students’ annual growth. The jump to PARCC adds another year of data officials can’t compare. “It’s like apples and oranges,” Marquardt said. “The only real comparison we have

is looking at other districts in the state.” Districts also will have to adapt to the timeframe for administering the new assessment. PARCC assessments will be administered twice a year, a performance based assessment in mid-March to early April and an end of year assessment in late April into May. The short window to

complete the two assessments concerns McGuire because he’s not sure how well it will measure student performance. “Any test is only as good as the information you get out of it,” McGuire said. “If it tells us how our students are doing then it will be good, but with the two testing windows so close together, I’m not sure how much it will tell us.”

Report: Town received late payment notices • CORTLAND Continued from page A1 The report also said Cortland received notices from the Illinois Department of Employment Security for outstanding amounts due for unemployment payouts; a notice from DeKalb County that the budget or estimated revenues and certification of budget or appropriation had not been filed by Jan. 13; and one of the town’s

insurance policies, brokered by Assurance, expired Jan. 1. Stokes said Lauterbach and Amen LLP will help put together next year’s budget, a job function normally done by the treasurer. Trustees need to approve the budget before May 1. Town leaders plan to have about $2.4 million on hand April 30, after spending $4.7 million and bringing in $3 million in the current fiscal year, accord-

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Daily Chronicle • www.daily-chronicle.com • Page A7 • Thursday, February 13, 2014

8OUR VIEW

8SKETCH VIEW

Deserving of a warm thanks

8 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR ‘Redskins’ name least of nation’s worries To the Editor: Record national debt. High unemployment. A sluggish economy. The Affordable Care Act and it’s failures. Millions of illegal immigrants needing to be deported. Terrorism, both within our borders and across the globe. Syria. Iran. N. Korea. China. Al-Qaeda. Do any of these subjects ring a bell with you? They all seem pretty important to me. Separate from the political argument for a moment and just focus on the subjects themselves. When is the last time you read/heard the news and it didn’t include at least one of those items. Pretty much impossible to do, isn’t it? And what subject has taken an apparent more-important role by our federal representatives? Football. Yep, that’s right. That is not a typo. I mean football. Why? The Washington Redskins name. The Redskins have been contacted by our government in an attempt to persuade, if not order, them to change their name. A business, owned by an individual, is being told to change their name because, in their opinion, it is “offensive”. What is “offensive” is that our government is even approaching this subject. We have numerous, far more important issues that need attention. Not to mention, this team does not “represent” our government – it is a football team! Even the majority of the group assumed to be offended have stated that not only are they not offended, they never really paid attention or cared anyway. So, what governmental agenda are we having to deal with now? The Illinois football team was attacked for their representation of a Native

American. Florida State has been attacked for their representative as well. It is getting ridiculous. In my opinion, as I suggested when our own Sen. Durbin decided to drift from real topics of concern and dive into a football issue, these types of representatives need to lose their jobs. They apparently cannot identify real issues, so they feel the need to make them up. I support Redskins owner Daniel Snyder, and I not only hope, but pray, that he will stand up to government bullying and make it clear that he will not change the name. And as for what I find offensive, being a lifelong Bears fan, I think being a “Green Bay Packer” should be against the law or at least moved to a different division! Earl Gable Sycamore

Illinois spending vs. savings To the Editor: According to many reports, Illinois’ recently passed pension reform bill will do far less than originally projected to help the State’s pension crisis. Studies and newly published findings show that the savings estimates touted by supporters of this legislation are off the mark. A recent article in Crain’s Chicago Business refers to the Civic Federation of Chicago’s website, which states “while sponsors of the bill estimated state taxpayers would have to contribute $1.2 billion less than previously required when the law is fully implemented in 2016, the latest figures from Gov. Pat Quinn’s office come in more than half a billion dollars short of that.” In reality, the latest statements from the pension fund actuaries indicate that the savings to taxpayers is closer to $756 million for fiscal

year 2016, almost $500 million short of the bill’s initial $1.2 billion savings estimate. So what does this mean to every resident in Illinois? In short, higher interest rates when the state needs to borrow money, we will continue to have the worst credit rating in the nation and a continual shortfall in funding of vital services. Three years ago Springfield leadership passed a 67 percent income tax increase, selling the idea that it was a temporary hike to help the state pay its bills and get its pension system back to solvency. This increase generated $7.5 billion a year, and yet our state continues to have the worst pension funding levels in its history. With the sunset of this tax fast approaching, many are concerned that this increase will become permanent. Pension modifications passed last session will not provide enough budget savings to solve the deficit, which will balloon after the temporary tax increase expires because we have not fixed our poor spending habits. Quinn failed to outline in his State of the State address what his plans are for the temporary tax increase. Much of his speech focused on increasing spending and creating new programs and services. Moreover, he did not illustrate how his administration plans to pay for additional and current growing expenses. Over the past 10 years Illinois has been plagued with poor fiscal management. Illinois should not be toying with new taxing methods and more spending on programs. Rather we should focus on controlling spending and making the state friendly to business by having a stable tax structure that is competitive with other states. State Rep. Joe Sosnowski R-Rockford

Pondering Obama, Republicans and free trade Trade-promotion authority is the rare issue where President Barack Obama is closer to congressional Republicans than Democrats. Rep. Dave Camp, the Republican chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, told me he’s eager to give that authority to Obama and to the next president. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, a Democrat, said he won’t let it happen. Supporters of free trade should hope that Obama and Camp win this one. But they should also reconsider whether trade-promotion authority ought to be as central to their game plan as it has been the past few decades. When Congress passes trade-promotion authority, it says that if the president submits a trade agreement it will get an upor-down vote, with no amendments, within three months. The idea is that other countries will be more likely to make a trade deal with the U.S. if they know the terms won’t be renegotiated on Capitol Hill. For a long time, this procedure really did promote trade liberalization, and Camp appeals to this record in making his case. “Every president since FDR has had this authority,” he told me. He thinks renewing the authority will help talks over a freetrade deal among 12 Pacific Rim countries succeed, and enable other agreements in the

VIEWS Ramesh Ponnuru future. And if presidents aren’t given that authority? “There are other avenues to negotiate new markets with, and other countries don’t have our systems of government,” he said. In other words: Countries will make deals with China or Russia, not the U.S. Even so, the old argument for trade-promotion authority has lost some of its force. K. William Watson, who studies trade for the Cato Institute, a libertarian research group, argued in December that passing the trade-promotion authority just to conclude the Trans-Pacific Partnership didn’t make sense. Talks were already well underway, and could be slowed down by the new negotiating demands Congress would make as a condition for passing the authority. Watson points out that the standard procedure for freeing trade requires winning two votes in Congress: First the authority has to be granted, and then the final deal passed. “Why have the same debate twice?” he asks. It’s actually worse than that, because it’s harder to get the trade-promotion authority than to enact a deal. Congress hasn’t granted the authority

since 2002, when a Republican House passed it by a 215-212 vote. It lapsed in 2007. Yet Congress has been able to pass several notable trade agreements by wide margins since then. In 2011, a free-trade deal with Colombia got 262 votes in the House, one with South Korea got 278, and one with Panama got 300. Watson concedes that, at this point, the Obama administration can’t walk away from its demand for trade-promotion authority without sending a bad signal about its resolve to complete trade deals. But that resolve is, in fact, in question. A few days after Reid said trade-promotion authority was going nowhere, he had a long meeting with Obama. Afterward, Reid said that trade hadn’t even come up. Which brings us back to Watson’s point. If Obama negotiates a free-trade deal in the Pacific, he will have to hit up his fellow Democrats in Congress again to approve it. It might have been better for the president to dispense with trade-promotion authority altogether: to get an agreement and then move straight to a vote. That way he wouldn’t have to make so many requests, and create so many chances to be turned down. • Ramesh Ponnuru is a Bloomberg

View columnist, a visiting fellow at the American Enterprise Institute and a senior editor at the National Review. Reach him at rponnuru@bloomberg.net.

Letters to the Editor Karen Pletsch – General Manager kpletsch@shawmedia.com

Dana Herra – MidWeek Editor dherra@shawmedia.com

Inger Koch – Features Editor ikoch@shawmedia.com

Eric Olson – Editor eolson@shawmedia.com

Jillian Duchnowski – News Editor jduchnowski@shawmedia.com

We welcome original letters on public issues. Letters must include the author’s full name, address and day and evening phone numbers. We limit letters to 400 words. We accept one letter per person every 15 days. All letters are subject to editing for length and clarity. Email: news@daily-chronicle.com. Mail: Daily Chronicle, Letters to the Editor, 1586 Barber Greene Road, DeKalb, IL 60115. Fax: 815-758-5059.

This winter has been cold. Really cold. Tonguesticking-to-the-flagpole cold. Many of us are willing to brave it for only the few seconds it takes to run from our cars to work or the store. Then we run – or at least speed walk – back. It’s rarely fun to go outside in the bitter cold, unless you’re dressed like you’re preparing to explore Antarctica and you have some really cool toy outside that you can’t wait to use. There are people, however, whose jobs depend on braving the cold and winter weather conditions. We are writing to show our appreciation. Some, such as firefighters, law enforcement and EMTs/emergency personnel, brave the elements for our protection. When others are running away, they For the record rush in. For that, and all the frozen fingers that have come Working as the snow with it, we thank them. piles up and temperatures Some, such as those who dip is rarely fun, but there drive the snowplows, come are many in the commuout when things get really nity who swallow their bad. They clear and salt apprehension and do it on and sand our roads so we a regular basis to ensure can get where we need to that our community runs go. They certainly get paid, smoothly. but it’s a pretty selfless job working overnight to plow and clear the roads so they’re driveable the next day. And, more often than not, the thanks we give them is either tailgating them down the road or complaining that they didn’t clear the road we live on soon enough. For enduring that, and being the nameless and faceless reason that most of us have been able to arrive safely at our destinations this winter, we thank them, too. While we’re at it, thanking a nameless and faceless group that works overnight to provide a service, we’ll thank the newspaper delivery teams. They’re on the roads many times when the roads are the worst, trying to keep you informed despite the conditions. The same goes for the mailcarriers and the heating and HVAC specialists or construction workers who are there when you need them. Working as the snow piles up and temperatures dip is rarely fun, but there are many in the community who swallow their apprehension and do it on a regular basis to ensure that our community runs smoothly. For them, and all those who we missed in our assuredly incomplete list, we thank you. And we hope the community, when they see you, give you thanks, too.

8 ANOTHER VIEW

The law is also a mandate The Obama administration Monday announced that it was delaying, once again, enforcement of the Affordable Care Act “employer mandate.” Yes, Republicans have done everything they can to impede implementation of this law. Yes, their “solution” – gutting the individual mandate – is an awful idea. And, yes, their public response to the administration’s action was predictably over-the-top. But none of that excuses President Obama’s increasingly cavalier approach to picking and choosing how to enforce this law. Imagine how Democrats would respond if a President Rand Paul, say, moved into the White House in 2017 and announced he was going to put off provisions of Obamacare he thought might be too onerous to administer. The Treasury Department released rules Monday for medium and large employers, which under the ACA are supposed to chip in for their employees’ health care. The law says they were supposed to have provided health coverage to full-time employees by Jan. 1 or pay fines to help defray the government’s costs of covering them. Last summer, in response to business concerns that the rules weren’t ready, Treasury delayed these requirements for a year. That was already a stretch of governmental discretion, but it was defensible given the law’s complexity and the relatively small consequences of delaying this particular mandate. This week, Treasury changed the rules again: medium-size businesses will get another year before they must comply, and large businesses will have a softer coverage target to meet next year. This delays any bad press or bad feelings engendered by the mandate beyond the 2014 election. The administration claims legal wiggle room in the Internal Revenue Code, which allows the Treasury secretary to make “needful rules and regulations” about tax collection, including those “as may be necessary by reason of any alteration of law.” Treasury has used this provision to justify smoothing out the phase-in of other laws. But the administration is unilaterally making distinctions between large businesses and medium ones; the latter group, which will get hit hardest and scream loudest when the employer mandate kicks in, will be treated more leniently. The law is also explicit that the government should be enforcing penalties already; that’s the plainest interpretation of Congress’ intent. The administration shouldn’t dismiss that without exceptionally good reason. Fear of a midterm shellacking doesn’t qualify as good reason. The Washington Post

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. – U.S. Bill of Rights, First Amendment


WEATHER

Page A8 • Thursday, February 13, 2014

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

7-DAY FORECAST

Another weak storm system will move through late Thursday and Thursday night bringing nothing more than a few lurries along with breezy conditions. Colder air will move in Friday as Canadian high pressure builds south. A storm system will arrive late Saturday with periods of snow, mainly in the 1-2 inches range.

TODAY

TOMORROW

Mostly cloudy & breezy; passing lurry

Partly sunny, breezy & cold

SUNDAY

MONDAY

Cloudy with Cloudy w/ Mostly sunny & rain changing to afternoon snow; warmer snow late 1-2” possible

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

Partly sunny and cooler

Partly sunny, breezy & mild

33

20

21

27

36

34

42

13

-2

12

19

25

24

33

Winds: S/SW 10-15 mph

Winds: NW 10-20 mph

UV INDEX

ALMANAC

SATURDAY

Winds: E/SE 5-10 mph

Winds: S 10-15 mph

Winds: W/SW 10-15 mph

Winds: SW 5-10 mph

Winds: S 10-20 mph

REGIONAL CITIES

REGIONAL WEATHER

DeKalb through 4 p.m. yesterday

Temperature High ............................................................. 15° Low ............................................................... -8° Normal high ............................................. 32° Normal low ............................................... 16° Record high .............................. 68° in 1999 Record low ............................... -13° in 1967

Precipitation 24 hours through 4 p.m. yest. ........ Trace Month to date ....................................... 0.51” Normal month to date ....................... 0.55” Year to date ............................................ 1.83” Normal year to date ............................ 2.03”

New

Feb 22

Mar 1

The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. 0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme.

AIR QUALITY TODAY

Rockford 34/4

Source: Environmental Protection Agency

Dixon 34/4

Do Canadians own more snowblowers or air conditioners?

Joliet 34/8

La Salle 36/6

Evanston 34/10 Chicago 34/15

Aurora 33/4

WEATHER TRIVIA™ Q:

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Waukegan 33/8

Arlington Heights 34/12

DeKalb 33/13

Main ofender ................................................... N.A.

50 percent more air conditioners.

Feb 14

Last

Lake Geneva 33/5

Streator 35/7

A:

Sunrise today ................................ 6:54 a.m. Sunset tonight ............................. 5:25 p.m. Moonrise today ........................... 4:34 p.m. Moonset today ............................. 5:47 a.m. Sunrise tomorrow ........................ 6:52 a.m. Sunset tomorrow ........................ 5:26 p.m. Moonrise tomorrow .................. 5:32 p.m. Moonset tomorrow .................... 6:19 a.m.

Kenosha 33/7

8 a.m. 10 a.m. Noon 2 p.m. 4 p.m. 6 p.m.

0-50 Good, 51-100 Moderate, 101-150, Unhealthy for sensitive groups, 151-200 Unhealthy 201-300 Very Unhealthy, 301-500 Hazardous

SUN and MOON

Full

Janesville 34/3

Hammond 35/9 Gary 36/18 Kankakee 34/10

Mar 8

A gale-whipped blizzard on Feb. 13, 1899, dumped up to 3 feet of snow from Massachusetts to Delaware. The mercury at Tallahassee, Fla., dropped to 2 degrees below zero.

Peoria 36/8

Pontiac 36/8

NATIONAL WEATHER

Hi 33 45 34 34 35 33 34 34 35 34 38 34 34 35 36 38 31 34 34 38 37 34 33 33 34

Today Lo W 4 sf 25 pc 3 sf 5 sf 15 pc 6 sf 8 pc 10 pc 5 sf 12 pc 6 c 8 pc 7 sf 7 c 6 c 17 c 8 sf 2 sf 4 sf 15 c 5 sf 9 sf 8 sf 7 sf 5 sf

Tomorrow Hi Lo W 19 -3 c 35 13 sn 16 -4 c 16 -2 c 24 3 sf 19 0 c 21 2 c 22 3 sf 18 -1 c 21 5 sf 20 0 c 21 4 c 20 1 c 21 2 c 19 -1 c 27 7 sn 19 2 c 16 -5 c 16 -3 c 27 5 sn 18 -3 c 21 1 c 19 0 c 16 0 c 20 0 c

RIVER LEVELS

WEATHER HISTORY

First

City Aurora Belleville Beloit Belvidere Champaign Elgin Joliet Kankakee Mendota Michigan City Moline Morris Naperville Ottawa Princeton Quincy Racine Rochelle Rockford Springield Sterling Wheaton Waukegan Woodstock Yorkville

Watseka 34/10

Location

7 a.m. yest.

Kishwaukee Belvidere Perryville DeKalb

1.23 6.41 2.73

Flood stage

9.0 12.0 10.0

24-hr chg

none -0.01 +0.01

DRAW THE WEATHER Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

-10s -0s 0s 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

Cold Front

Warm Front

Stationary Front

T-storms Rain Showers Snow Flurries

City Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Boston Bufalo Charleston, SC Charlotte Chicago

Hi 43 40 34 36 32 48 38 34

Today Lo W 29 pc 33 sn 27 sn 32 sn 23 c 33 pc 24 sn 15 sf

Tomorrow Hi Lo W 52 31 s 40 30 pc 41 25 sf 38 28 sn 30 15 sn 60 44 s 49 31 pc 23 6 c

Ice

City Cincinnati Dallas Denver Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles

Hi 38 63 62 62 36 46 74 79

Today Lo W 22 pc 42 s 35 pc 43 s 20 pc 24 pc 50 pc 56 s

Tomorrow Hi Lo W 35 10 sn 68 37 s 58 40 pc 71 45 pc 29 7 sn 41 25 pc 75 54 pc 82 56 s

City Louisville Miami Minneapolis New Orleans New York City Philadelphia Seattle Wash., DC

Hi 38 75 30 55 36 36 52 34

Today Lo W 26 pc 53 pc -4 sn 41 s 32 sn 28 sn 41 r 29 sn

Legend: W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow lurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Tomorrow Hi Lo W 39 14 sn 73 59 pc 15 -5 pc 66 49 s 40 28 pc 40 27 pc 49 38 r 40 29 sf

Blue skies Jose, Jefferson Elementary School Mail your weather drawings to: Geoff Wells, 1586 Barber Greene Road, DeKalb, IL 60115

Forecasts and graphics, except WFLD forecasts, provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2014


Sports

Rick Renteria is the new face of the Cubs’ rebuilding process. Pitchers and catchers report for spring training today in Mesa, Ariz. PAGE B2

SECTION B Thursday, February 13, 2014 Daily Chronicle

Sports editor Ross Jacobson • rjacobson@shawmedia.com

8MORNING KICKOFF

NORTHERN ILLINOIS 88, CENTRAL MICHIGAN 63

Huskies rout Chippewas By STEVE NITZ

Next

snitz@shawmedia.com AP photo

Yankees star Jeter to retire after 2014 season NEW YORK – Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter said he will retire after this season “with absolutely no regrets,” ending one of the greatest careers in the history of baseball’s most storied franchise. The 39-year-old New York captain posted a long letter on his Facebook page Wednesday saying that 2014 will be his final year. A 13-time All-Star who has led the Yankees to five World Series championships, Jeter was limited to 17 games last season while trying to recover from a broken left ankle suffered during the 2012 playoffs. “I know it in my heart. The 2014 season will be my last year playing professional baseball,” he wrote. “I have gotten the very most out of my life playing baseball, and I have absolutely no regrets,” he said. Jeter was the last link to the powerful Yankees teams that won three straight World Series crowns from 1998 to 2000. Longtime teammates Mariano Rivera and Andy Pettitte retired after last year. – Wire report

DeKALB – In its past three wins, Northern Illinois had to put together big comebacks. In recent victories over Kent State, Ball State and Miami (Ohio), the NIU men’s basketball team trailed by double digits before fighting back for wins. Wednesday was a different story. The Huskies only trailed for a short period in the first half of an 88-63 victory over Mid-American Conference West Division bottom-dweller Central Michigan. “That’s uncharted waters right there. It’s a lot easier,” NIU coach Mark Montgomery said with a smile. “Our guys jumped out and they maintained their focus, and they kept expanding on the lead.” NIU improved to 11-12 and 4-6 in the MAC. The 11 wins are the most since the 2005-06 season. It’s also the Huskies’ fourth win in their past five games.

at Akron, 6 p.m. Saturday, AM-1360 NIU led early, taking a 7-4 lead after an Aaron Armstead 3. Central Michigan fought back and took a 23-21 lead on a Chris Fowler 3 with 8:37 left before halftime. But the Huskies regained the lead on a Pete Rakocevic layup just more than two minutes later. The Huskies started to pull ahead, and went into halftime leading 38-29. NIU got off to a quick start in the second half, taking a 15-point advantage on a Darrell Bowie layup and Travon Baker jumper, and didn’t look back. Bowie led NIU with 19 points, with Aaric Armstead adding 17. Jordan Threloff finished with 14 and Daveon Balls had 11. It was Threloff’s fifth double-digit scoring effort in his past seven games. He went 4 of 8 from

the field and 6 for 6 from the line, capping his night with two late dunks, one in which he received a technical for hanging on the rim a little too long. “Just kind of finding my groove again,” Threloff said. “I had a start at the beginning of the year where I had a couple double-digit games, then I was just on a little slow streak. My teammates had confidence in me; coach had confidence in me.” Threloff added seven rebounds and Bowie and Armstad each had eight to lead NIU, which outrebounded the Chippewas 39-19. “They’ve got some nice players, some good size inside, which we don’t have yet in our program, and they were able to expose that. But you can only expose that with really good coaching and being able to have good spacing,” CMU coach Keno Davis said. “We’re not a great rebounding team, but teams don’t beat us by 20. We might be getting beat on the boards by two or three.”

Monica Maschak – mmaschak@shawmedia.com

Northern Illinois’ Daveon Balls shoots in the second half of Wednesday night’s game against Central Michigan at the NIU Convocation Center in DeKalb. The Huskies won, 88-63.

GIRLS BOWLING: FREEPORT SECTIONAL

NORTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BASEBALL

Spartans ready to roll after pep talk Tennessee Titan offers advice on handling adversity

8WHAT TO WATCH Pro basketball Brooklyn at Bulls, 7 p.m., TNT

By ROSS JACOBSON

Joakim Noah, coming off his first triple-double of the season, an the Bulls (26-25) host Deron Williams and the Nets (23-26) at the United Center.

See the Winter Olympics TV schedule on Page B4. Also on TV... Pro basketball Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m., TNT Men’s basketball Northwestern at Michigan St., 6 p.m., BTN Louisville at Temple, 6 p.m., ESPN Arkansas at Missouri, 6 p.m., ESPN2 UNC Ashville at Radford, 6 p.m., ESPNU Drexel at Charleston, 6 p.m., NBCSN Minnesota at Wisconsin, 8 p.m., ESPN Colorado at UCLA, 8 p.m., ESPN2 Southern Miss. at AlabamaBirmingham, 8 p.m., CSN Tennessee St. at Belmont, 8 p.m., ESPNU St. John’s at Seton hall, 8 p.m., FS1 San Diego St. at Saint Mary’s (Calif.), 10 p.m., ESPNU Golf PGA Tour, Northern Trust Open, first round, 4 p.m., TGC Women’s basketball West Virginia at Oklahoma, 6 p.m., FS1 Illinois at Iowa, 8 p.m., BTN

8KEEP UP ONLINE Follow us on Facebook and Twitter Want the latest from the area’s prep sports scene? Follow our coverage on Facebook by searching for DC Preps or on Twitter at twitter.com/dc_preps. Follow our NIU athletics coverage on Facebook by searching for Huskie Wire or on Twitter at twitter.com/HuskieWire.

rjacobson@shawmedia.com

Center on Fourth Street. Now, with mounds and mounds of snow on the ground and bone-chilling temperatures outside, the Huskies have been able to hold practices at the Chessick in preparation for the 2014 season, which begins this weekend, when the defending Mid-American Conference West Division champs face Minnesota in a three-game neutral-site series at Camelback Ranch in Glendale, Ariz. – the spring training home of the White Sox and Los Angeles Dodgers. NIU is able to lay out an infield and duplicate game situations in a space where the size is closer to a normal playing field. Mathey compared old practice situations to a football team practicing on a 60-yard field or a basketball team preparing on a half court.

SYCAMORE – Not many of the girls on the Sycamore bowling team knew who Jason Schepler was before Wednesday afternoon. But the Spartans, who took third place in last week’s regional and advanced to Saturday’s sectional in Freeport, gathered around a small table at Four Seasons Sports and listened to what the 2008 Sycamore alumnus and current Tennessee Titan had to say about dealing with failure, consistently supporting teammates and visualizing success. “Every time I mess up I take it really hard and I can’t let go of it,” freshman Alexis Kolberg said. “So when he said he separates himself from [his mistakes], I’ll take that into consideration a lot.” Sycamore has seen its share of both success and failure this season. Coach Andy Hampton said the Spartans excelled in dual matches, but struggled in tournaments throughout the season. When Sycamore was 11th out of 12 teams after the first game Saturday, Hampton thought the tournament would follow a similar storyline. But aided by bowling at their home alley, Sycamore rallied to place third behind Marengo and Belvidere North and claim a sectional spot.

See NIU BASEBALL, page B3

See SPARTANS, page B3

Monica Maschak – mmaschak@shawmedia.com

Northern Illinois sophomore Tommy Hook catches for the pitchers during baseball practice Wednesday at the Chessick Practice Center in DeKalb. The Huskies are enjoying the bigger space the new facility provides, allowing them to be more efficient practices.

SPACE TO GROW IN New practice digs give Huskies much-needed room to work By STEVE NITZ snitz@shawmedia.com DeKALB – When Northern Illinois baseball coach Ed Mathey thinks back to the beginning of his tenure, some late nights come to mind. Mathey, about to begin his 12th season as the Huskies’ skipper, remembers evenings at the NIU Campus Recreation Center during the cold weeks of practice his first two seasons, the winters of 2003 and 2004. Mathey’s team would start practice at 10:30 at night, and didn’t get done until around 2 a.m. “You try to get 30 guys in, 35 guys into a practice, you need space,” Mathey said. “You need nobody around because baseballs can hurt people.” For Mathey and the rest of his players, things are looking a heck of a lot better these days. This week, Mathey

More online For all your Northern Illinois University sports coverage – including stories, features, scores, photos, videos, blogs and more – log on to HuskieWire.com.

spoke to the Daily Chronicle inside the spacious, brand-new Chessick Practice Center. The building was built with football in mind, but NIU’s baseball program is taking full advantage of it as well. At the start of Mathey’s tenure, his players were either using the campus rec center or Chick Evans Fieldhouse. The past few years the Huskies also have been able to use the DeKalb Recreation

SOCHI WINTER OLYMPICS

Defending champ’s time too slow SOCHI, Russia – Sometimes it’s hard to know what to do with yourself when you’re in unfamiliar territory. Shani Davis crossed the finish line Wednesday, looked at his time, took in the strange fact that he wasn’t in first place and bowed his head. The speedskating world didn’t know what to do, either, and come to think of it, Chicago probably had trouble AP photo figuring out how to act. Chicago native Shani Davis of the U.S. looks dejected after competing Davis with a gold medal in the men’s 1,000-meter speedskating race Wednesday at the Adler around his neck after the Arena Skating Center in Sochi, Russia. 1,000 meters – that’s supposed

VIEWS Rick Morrissey to be like clockwork, right? Correct. It’s something we’ve come to count on every four years. The 31-year-old Chicago native was chasing history Wednesday, trying to become the first U.S. male speedskater to win gold in the same event in three straight Winter Olympics. Instead, the prerace favor-

ite finished a shocking eighth, almost three-quarters of a second behind gold medalist Stefan Groothuis of the Netherlands. Davis also won gold at the 2006 and 2010 Olympics. Now, nothing seems certain anymore. For example, I’m not counting on the swallows returning every year to Capistrano. “This one hurts me a lot,” Davis said. But not for the reason you might think.

See MORRISSEY, page B4


SPORTS

Page B2 • Thursday, February 13, 2014

8PREP SCHEDULE TODAY Girls Basketball Hinckley-Big Rock vs. Harvest Christian Academy in Class 1A Hinckley-Big Rock Regional final, 7 p.m. Indian Creek vs. LaMoille in Class 1A Earlville Regional final, 7 p.m. Sycamore at Morris, 7 p.m. DeKalb at Kaneland, 7 p.m.

FRIDAY Boys Basketball Indian Creek at Somonauk, 6:45 p.m. Morris at DeKalb, 7 p.m. Rochelle at Sycamore, 7 p.m. Kaneland at Yorkville, 7 p.m. Leland-Earlville at HinckleyBig Rock, 7 p.m. Richmond-Burton at Genoa-Kingston, 7:15 p.m. Girls Basketball Sycamore at Kaneland, 6 p.m. Genoa-Kingston at Harvard, 7:15 p.m.

NEBRASKA 67, ILLINOIS 58

NBA

Cornhuskers shoot down Illini By ERIC OLSON

Next

The Associated Press LINCOLN, Neb. – Shavon Shields scored a career-high 33 points, making all 15 of his free throws for Nebraska’s best performance at the line in 32 years, and the Cornhuskers defeated Illinois, 67-58, on Wednesday night. The Huskers (13-10, 5-6 Big Ten) pulled away with the help of a defense that held Illinois to two field goals over the last 6:57. Terran Petteway added 16 points as the Huskers raised their record to 11-1 at Pinnacle Bank Arena. Shields bettered his previous high of 29 points against Penn State last season. He made 8 of 12 shots from the field, and his 15-for-15 night at the line was the best for Ne-

vs. Ohio St., 7 p.m. Saturday, BTN, AM-670 braska since Jack Moore made all 15 of his against Oklahoma State in 1982. The Huskers were 24 of 27 from the line, 14 of 17 in the second half. Rayvonte Rice scored 23 points to lead the Illini (1411, 3-9), which Rayvonte Rice shot 37 percent and has lost nine of its past 10. Nnanna Egwu had 12 rebounds for Illinois, which is in the middle of a stretch of playing on the road in three of four games.

SATURDAY Boys Basketball North Boone at Indian Creek, 6:45 p.m. Hillcrest at Kaneland, 7:30 p.m. Girls Bowling DeKalb, Kaneland, Sycamore at Freeport Sectional, 12:30 p.m. Wrestling DeKalb at Class 3A Barrington Sectional Sycamore, Kaneland at Class 2A Pontiac Sectional Genoa-Kingston at Class 1A Byron Sectional

8SPORTS SHORTS Board considers if college players are employees CHICAGO – A federal agency kicked off the first in a series of hearings Wednesday on whether to approve a bid by Northwestern University football players to unionize, and both sides acknowledged the key question was whether college athletes can be considered employees. During a National Labor Relations Board hearing in Chicago, lawyers for the proposed union and the university agreed that if college football players qualify as employees, they can legally form the first-of-its-kind union and if not, they can’t.

Bears bump Meyer to line coach, add Kim to staff LAKE FOREST – The Bears promoted Pat Meyer to offensive line coach Wednesday and added martial arts expert Joe Kim to their coaching staff. Meyer served as assistant line coach last season, with Aaron Kromer serving as offensive line coach and offensive coordinator. Kromer still will be heavily involved with the line. But Meyer gets a loftier title. Kim, a Taekwondo expert, was hired as assistant strength/skill development coach. He has 21 years of experience as a consultant and assistant strength coach.

Jordan’s wife gives birth to twin daughters CHARLOTTE, N.C. – Michael Jordan has more to be happy about than just the improved play of his NBA franchise. His wife, Yvette, has given birth to the couple’s identical twin daughters, Jordan’s spokeswoman Estee Portnoy said. Portnoy said Tuesday night Yvette Jordan, 35, gave birth to Victoria and Ysabel on Sunday in West Palm Beach, Fla.

NCAA proposes rule change to slow up-tempo offense Not so fast, college football offenses. A proposed change by the NCAA rules committee would prohibit offenses from snapping the ball until at least 10 seconds had run off the 40-second play clock, slowing down the up-tempo, no-huddle attacks that have been making defenses dizzy. The rule allows defenses time to make a substitution without the offense changing players and with no fear the ball will be snapped before 29 seconds are left on the play clock. An exception will be made for the final two minutes of each half, when the offense can snap the ball as quickly as it wants. – Wire reports

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

The Huskers got a scare when Shields hobbled to bench with 7:46 left with a tweaked knee. He went to the locker room for treatment and came back less than a minute later. Right after checking back in, he went strong to the basket, got fouled and completed a three-point play for a 55-49 Nebraska lead. Nebraska missed four of its first five shots of the second half, then scored 10 straight points to go up 44-40. It was the last of 11 lead changes in the game. Shields converted a threepoint play and finished the run with a smooth move in the lane, taking a step toward Jon Ekey and then fading back for a one-handed jumper from the free-throw line. Rice made the play of the

game when he stole a pass from Petteway and drove the length of the floor, taking the ball around his back before going under the hoop for a left-handed layup with 8:19 left. The Illini couldn’t build off the razzle dazzle, however. Walter Pitchford answered on the other end with a 3-pointer to start a game-clinching 13-3 run. The Huskers led 31-30 at the half after Nathan Hawkins rebounded Rice’s missed free throw with 5 seconds left and passed to Ray Gallegos, who drove to the basket around Egwu for a layup just before the buzzer. Tracy Abrams, who came as the Illini’s second-leading scorer at 11.5 points a game, got into foul trouble and was held to three points. He was 0 for 4 from the field and is now 2 for 17 in his past three games.

CUBS SPRING TRAINING

Five things to look for: By ANDREW SELIGMAN The Associated Press CHICAGO – Theo Epstein never said the overhaul would be easy. As he enters his third year as president of baseball operations, more struggling appears to be in store for the Cubs. The Cubs are eyeing their fifth straight losing season, which would be the longest such run for them in three decades, while they wait for their top prospects to develop in the minors. With that in mind, here are five things to look for as they open spring training with pitchers and catchers reporting today: Youth is served: The Cubs’ top four prospects – infielder Javier Baez, outfielder Albert Almora, third baseman Kris Bryant and outfielder Jorge Soler – will be in camp together for the first time. Get a look while you can, because they appear headed to the minors before Opening Day. But their progress will be one of the biggest stories this spring and beyond as the Cubs try to produce their first winning season since 2009. New leadership: The Cubs hired Rick Renteria to replace fired manager Dale Sveum because he is known for his work with young players. Many fans were hoping the Cubs would land Joe Girardi. But if Renteria can get the most out of Starlin Castro and Anthony Rizzo while establishing a proper environment for the arrival of the prized prospects, Epstein and general manager Jed Hoyer will take that. If nothing else, the record can’t get any worse, can it? The Cubs are coming off a two-year run under Sveum in which they went 127-197 and produced more losses in a pair of seasons than at any other time in their cursed history. They’ve dropped 288 games the past three years. Nice pad: Well, look at that. The Cubs have a shiny home. Check that, they have a shiny new spring training home. While the renovations at Wrigley Field remain stalled because of legal wrangling with the neighboring rooftop owners about changes that could obstruct their views, the team will be playing in fancy digs at least while they’re in Arizona. Voters in Mesa approved a $99 million outlay of public money for the stadium complex in 2010 for a new facility that figures to be a major upgrade. It keeps the Cubs on one site throughout spring training for the first time in decades. They’d move from Fitch Park to HoHoKam Stadium once games began. Time to rebound: Castro’s and Rizzo’s struggles last season went a long way toward Sveum getting shown the door. Now, it’s time for them to step up. In Castro’s case, that means regaining the form that made him a two-time All-Star. There were too many lapses in the field. His batting average dropped to a career-low .245, and among shortstops, Castro and the White Sox’s Alexei Ramirez tied for the major league lead with 22 errors. Rizzo saw his home run total increase from 15 to 23 last season, but he played in 160 games compared to just 87 in 2012. He also saw his average dip from .285 to .233. See ya Samardzija? Pitcher Jeff Samardzija agreed to a one-year, $5.3 million contract Saturday, avoiding arbitration, but his longterm future remains up in the air. The 29-year-old, right-hander is a candidate to be traded.

Rebuild Renteria’s now By GORDON WITTENMYER gwittenmyer@suntimes.com MESA, Ariz. – Rick Renteria is the new face of the Cubs’ rebuild. That was all but assured the day Dale Sveum was fired after only two seasons as the hand-picked, playerdevelopment manager, an acknowledgment of the biggest mistake made by Theo Epstein’s front office in its first two years. The significance of the latest heralded player-development manager was underscored when reports of underspending on the baseball operation were confirmed in the failed run at coveted free-agent pitcher Masahiro Tanaka. Epstein isn’t hiding where his third-year rebuilding plan sits as pitchers and catchers report to spring training today. He has a waiver-claim roster of castoffs and hopefuls that should cost less than $70 million by Opening Day (roughly $85 million total, including money still owed on traded players). “We’re not trying to pull the wool over anyone’s eyes. We’ve been a last-place team,” Epstein said recently. “We haven’t accomplished our baseball goals. Our business plan, a lot of it’s still in front of us, yet to be executed, and I believe that we’re going to execute on both fronts.” When? Between rooftops, split TV deals, big debt-service bills and apparent profit-taking by ownership, there’s no reason to believe the already-delayed promises of big resources for baseball ops suddenly will appear anytime soon. That puts an even greater premium on Renteria being the prospect whisperer he’s supposed to be. Any progress this club makes in the foreseeable future might rely almost

MESA, Ariz. – The Cubs unveiled their state-of-theart spring training facility in the desert Wednesday as chairman Tom Ricketts remained hopeful that work on their historic home in Chicago will begin soon. “We’re working toward a point that it can get done,” Ricketts said Wednesday. “Everybody’s talking. Everyone has incentives to see us get to that point. And we’re optimistic that we’ll get to the finish line on that pretty soon. But it’s a process. We just got to play through it.” Ricketts spoke at the ribbon-cutting for Cubs Park in Mesa, Ariz., their new publicly funded stadium and training complex. Pitchers and catchers report today, and players will be greeted by a sparkling new facility. In Chicago, not much has

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct San Antonio 38 15 .717 Houston 36 17 .679 Dallas 32 22 .593 Memphis 29 23 .558 New Orleans 23 29 .442 Northwest Division W L Pct Oklahoma City 42 12 .778 Portland 36 16 .692 Minnesota 25 28 .472 Denver 24 27 .471 Utah 19 33 .365 Pacific Division W L Pct L.A. Clippers 36 18 .667 Golden State 31 21 .596 Phoenix 30 21 .588 L.A. Lakers 18 34 .346 Sacramento 18 35 .340

GB — 2 6½ 8½ 14½ GB — 5 16½ 16½ 22 GB — 4 4½ 17 17½

Wednesday’s Results Memphis 86, Orlando 81 Dallas 81, Indiana 73 Toronto 104, Atlanta 83 Brooklyn 105, Charlotte 89 San Antonio 104, Boston 92 Cleveland 93, Detroit 89 Sacramento 106, New York 101 (OT) Minnesota 117, Denver 90 Houston 113, Washington 112 New Orleans 102, Milwaukee 98 Utah 105, Philadelphia 100 Miami at Golden State (n) Portland at L.A. Clippers (n) Thursday’s Games Brooklyn at Bulls, 7 p.m. Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m. All-Star break begins

WESTERN CONFERENCE

AP photo

New Cubs manager Rick Renteria throws out a ceremonial first pitch during the Cubs’ annual baseball convention Jan. 17 in Chicago. exclusively on an approach used by the A’s and Royals, who built on the hope of impact prospects and scrapheap free agents. Welcome to your first bigleague managing job, Rick. He said he’s prepared – “I think I have to be” – and a strident optimist. “My personality’s not going to change.” But even one of his biggest supporters, Padres general manager Josh Byrnes, recognizes the difference the former Padres bench coach will face in his first major market as a player, coach or manager. “I agree, it’s different,” Byrnes said. “Even me interacting with the media about [the Cubs’ hiring], it’s sort of a higher level of scrutiny than the norm in San Diego. “I hate to oversimplify it. He’s a great guy. He loves the game. And winning is the best thing he can do to build credibility in the marketplace. But the players will respond to him.” Renteria isn’t the first manager to believe he’s prepared for what Epstein calls the “idiosyncrasies” of the Cubs job. Veteran managers Dusty Baker and Lou Piniella said they did, too, only to admit afterward they had

no idea how different this fishbowl is. But Renteria also has a secret punishing side in his nature, according to those who have known him long. It’s either a byproduct of his tough upbringing in Compton, Calif., or his tougher road to a big-league career as an undersized infielder. “Oh, no, he’ll crack the whip,” said former Padres and current Diamondbacks GM Kevin Towers, who hired Renteria with the Padres. “He’ll set some standards, and they’re going to live by it. And if not, he’ll jump them. “He’s a foxhole guy. Rick Renteria is one of those guys if I’m going to a battle or a fight, I’m going to stop and pick him up. He’ll have my back.” Whether he has a chance with this club – this process – is another matter. For now, he’ll be scrutinized for the progress made by Starlin Castro, Anthony Rizzo and Darwin Barney – and eventually a pipeline of prospects. “My personality is suited to younger players,” he said. “I’ve got four kids. I’ve been raising kids my whole life. These are going to be my kids now.”

Ricketts still optimistic about work The Associated Press

Central Division W L Pct GB Indiana 40 12 .769 — Bulls 26 25 .510 13½ Detroit 22 30 .423 18 Cleveland 20 33 .377 20½ Milwaukee 9 43 .173 31 Atlantic Division W L Pct GB Toronto 28 24 .538 — Brooklyn 24 26 .480 3 New York 20 32 .385 8 Boston 19 35 .352 10 Philadelphia 15 39 .278 14 Southeast Division W L Pct GB Miami 36 14 .720 — Atlanta 25 26 .490 11½ Washington 25 27 .481 12 Charlotte 23 30 .434 14½ Orlando 16 38 .296 22

NHL

WRIGLEY FIELD

By ANDREW SELIGMAN

EASTERN CONFERENCE

changed. The $500 million overhaul to Wrigley Field remains on hold. The Cubs want to install a 650-square-foot sign in right field with a guarantee that the neighboring rooftop owners won’t slow construction with a lawsuit. The project funded by the team also would also include a Jumbotron Tom Ricketts in left field and upgrades throughout the stadium for players and fans along with a hotel across the street. The rooftop owners, who hand over a percentage of their revenue to the team, are balking amid concerns about blocked views. At the Cubs’ annual fan convention last month, Ricketts said there was progress but also compared the owners to neighbors peering through the living

room window to watch Showtime and then charging others to get a look. That didn’t sit well with the rooftop owners and negotiations stalled. “Everyone has an incentive to get it done,” Ricketts said Wednesday. “I think everyone wants to see this get to the finish line, and we’re working toward it.” Getting the project in Mesa completed wasn’t easy, either. The Cubs discussed moving to Naples, Fla. Instead, they’re staying in Mesa after voters in 2010 approved a $99 million outlay of public money for the stadium complex, a redo of next-door Riverview Park and infrastructure. The new ballpark has the largest seating capacity in the Cactus League at 15,000, and it includes some features reminiscent of Wrigley Field such as arched steelwork, a brick wall behind home plate and a green scoreboard with a clock.

Central Division GP W L OT Pts St. Louis 57 39 12 6 84 Blackhawks 60 35 11 14 84 Colorado 58 37 16 5 79 Minnesota 59 31 21 7 69 Dallas 58 27 21 10 64 Winnipeg 60 28 26 6 62 Nashville 59 25 24 10 60 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts Anaheim 60 41 14 5 87 San Jose 59 37 16 6 80 Los Angeles 59 31 22 6 68 Phoenix 58 27 21 10 64 Vancouver 60 27 24 9 63 Calgary 58 22 29 7 51 Edmonton 60 20 33 7 47

GF 196 207 174 145 164 168 146

GA 135 163 153 147 164 175 180

GF 196 175 139 163 146 137 153

GA 147 142 128 169 160 179 199

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 57 37 16 4 78 176 125 Tampa Bay 58 33 20 5 71 168 145 Montreal 59 32 21 6 70 148 142 Toronto 60 32 22 6 70 178 182 Detroit 58 26 20 12 64 151 163 Ottawa 59 26 22 11 63 169 191 Florida 58 22 29 7 51 139 183 Buffalo 57 15 34 8 38 110 172 Metropolitan Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 58 40 15 3 83 186 138 N.Y. Rangers 59 32 24 3 67 155 146 Philadelphia 59 30 23 6 66 162 167 Columbus 58 29 24 5 63 170 161 Washington 59 27 23 9 63 171 175 Carolina 57 26 22 9 61 144 158 New Jersey 59 24 22 13 61 135 146 N.Y. Islanders60 22 30 8 52 164 200 Two points for win, one point for OT loss Olympic Break Play resumes Tuesday, Feb. 25

MEN’S BASKETBALL AP TOP 25 Wednesday’s Results No. 1 Syracuse 58, No. 25 Pittsburgh 56 No. 6 Villanova 87, DePaul 62 No. 8 Duke at North Carolina, ppd. No. 14 Kentucky 64, Auburn 56 No. 20 Memphis 76, UCF 70 No. 24 Connecticut 83, South Florida 40 Today’s Games No. 9 Michigan St. vs. Northwestern, 6 p.m. No. 13 Louisville at Temple, 6 p.m. No. 18 Creighton at Butler, 6 p.m. No. 21 Wisconsin vs. Minnesota, 8 p.m. No. 23 SMU at Rutgers, 6 p.m. Friday’s Game No. 2 Arizona at Arizona St., 8 p.m. Saturday’s Games No. 1 Syracuse vs. N.C. State, 2 p.m. No. 3 Florida at No. 14 Kentucky, 8 p.m. No. 5 San Diego St. vs. Air Force, 7:05 p.m. No. 7 Kansas vs. TCU, 3 p.m. No. 8 Duke vs. Maryland, 5 p.m. No. 10 Cincinnati vs. Houston, 2 p.m. No. 11 Iowa St. vs. Texas Tech, 12:45 p.m. No. 12 Saint Louis vs. VCU, 1 p.m. No. 16 Iowa at Penn St., noon No. 17 Virginia at Clemson, 11 a.m. No. 19 Texas vs. West Virginia, 7 p.m. No. 20 Memphis vs. No. 24 Connecticut at the XL Center, Hartford, Conn., 11 a.m. No. 22 Ohio St. at Illinois, 7 p.m. No. 25 Pittsburgh at North Carolina, noon Sunday’s Games No. 4 Wichita St. at Evansville, 4 p.m. No. 6 Villanova at No. 18 Creighton, 4:07 p.m. No. 9 Michigan St. vs. Nebraska, 3 p.m. No. 13 Louisville vs. Rutgers, 5 p.m. No. 15 Michigan vs. No. 21 Wisconsin, noon No. 23 SMU at Temple, 1 p.m.

Ennis’ 35-footer keeps Syracuse unbeaten PITTSBURGH (AP) – Tyler Ennis made a 35-footer at the buzzer and No. 1 Syracuse remained unbeaten with a 58-56 victory over No. 25 Pitt on Wednesday. Syracuse (24-0, 11-0 ACC) and Wichita State are the only undefeated teams in Division I. With the Orange down by one with 4.4 seconds left, Ennis caught the inbounds pass and dribbled up the court before hitting the shot over two defenders.


PREPS & COLLEGES

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

Thursday, February 13, 2014 • Page B3

SYCAMORE FOOTBALL

Hunt, Stinnett to St. Ambrose Close friends to be roommates at NAIA D-II school in Iowa By ROSS JACOBSON rjacobson@shawmedia.com Between basketball games in the pool, fishing trips and football practices, Michael Stinnett and Josh Hunt have hung around together a lot over the past four years. The two Sycamore seniors were close enough friends that Daily Chronicle file photo Stinnett sometimes would find Sycamore defensive end Josh Hunt (left) tackles Geneseo running Hunt over at his pool even when he wasn’t home. back Rayce Singbush in the first quarter on Sept. 20 in Sycamore.

Now, even after high school graduation this spring, the two will remain close as both signed Monday to play football at St. Ambrose University (Iowa). “Obviously, it was a pretty big factor. I wanted to keep playing football with the guys on this team and I’m able to play with one,” Stinnett said. “I’ll be rooming with Josh. It’s going to be fun.” Hunt, a defensive end,

Sycamore roster sports 4 sophomores, 2 freshmen • SPARTANS Continued from page B1 Their scores over the final two games were better than any other team in the tournament. “What happened on Saturday, none of my thoughts even included the possibility that we were going to advance,” Hampton said. “They took it upon themselves that second game and never looked back.” Much of the inconsistency has come from Sycamore’s youth. When the Spartans travel to Freeport on Saturday, they will bring a team of four sophomores and two freshmen, most likely the youngest team in the state. But the team has used its collective youth to foster greater team chemistry. They have team bonding activities every Friday, and Hampton describes the girls as a “group of sisters.” “I think the team is closer and we bowl every Saturday. [On junior varsity] we didn’t,” sophomore Baylee Ricker said. “We’re all going to be together for the rest of our years (at Sycamore), so we know that we’re going to grow up together.”

and Stinnett, a safety, were two of the main contributors for a stingy Spartans defense that helped Sycamore to its best season in school history, notching 12 consecutive wins and a Northern Illinois Big 12 East title before losing to Montini in the Class 5A state semifinals. Both mentioned the campus and facilities as attractive options for choosing St. Ambrose, an NAIA Division II school located in Davenport, Iowa. Specifically, Hunt said he liked the ability to get an education from a private school while also living in a more-populated area in the

Quad Cities. Stinnett, an all-area firstteam selection, said he will remain at safety while Hunt, an all-area second-team pick, likely will move to an outside linebacker spot in St. Ambrose’s 3-4 defensive scheme. Although it’s highly unlikely their dorm room will feature a swimming pool, the shared football memories are sure to continue for Hunt and Stinnett. “It’s always been a dream,” Hunt said. “I’m just glad I still have four more years left to do what I love doing and get a good education along with it.”

PREP ROUNDUP

T’wolves top Polo TUESDAY’S LATE RESULTS GIRLS GYMNASTICS Whisenhunt, Morreale to The Indian Creek boys basketball team rebounded state: DeKalb/Sycamore’s By DAILY CHRONICLE STAFF

Photo provided

The Sycamore girls bowling team poses for a picture with Tennessee Titans player Jason Schepler, a Sycamore alumnus. The Spartans will be competing Saturday in the Freeport Sectional. Hampton said the new regional format was likely an advantage for his young team to get its feet wet in another pressure tournament setting before moving on to sectionals. The competition will only

get better as Freeport and Rockford Guilford both are state-ranked. But like Schepler told the team before Wednesday’s practice, its thoughts should solely be on its own performance.

“We can’t concern ourselves with what [other teams] do. The only thing we can control is us,” Hampton said. “Let’s focus on us, let’s concentrate on us and we’ll see where the dice shake out.”

from a loss to Mooseheart with a 84-79 overtime victory against Polo on Wednesday. Garrett Post led the Timberwolves (14-8) with 22 points and 15 rebounds, and Noah Holm added 20 points. “Polo is 20-5 on the season. It was a great rebound effort after a tough game against Mooseheart [Tuesday] night,” Indian Creek coach Joe Piekarz said. “I was really proud of the execution and effort we had as a full team.” Hiawatha wins: Hiawatha defeated LaMoille, 46-38, at home in a Little Ten Conference matchup. Evan Williams led the Hawks (2-14, 1-4 LTC) with 14 points, Alex Flores had 12 and Mike Mercado added 10.

Meredith Whisenhunt and Alison Morreale each qualified for the state meet in individual events in Tuesday’s Wheaton-Warrenville South Sectional. Whisenhunt took third in the vault with a 9.4 and Morreale was fifth in the balance beam with a score of 9.225. At-large qualifiers will be announced Monday. DeKalb/Sycamore took fifth overall as a team, finishing behind team champion Geneva.

BOYS BASKETBALL Hawks drop nonconference game: Hiawatha lost to Ashton-Franklin Center, 81-48, in Ashton. Mike Mercado led the Hawks with 22 points.

GIRLS BASKETBALL GIRLS BASKETBALL Hawks’ season comes to an T’wolves advance to final: Indian Creek defeated end: In the Class 1A Rockford Earlville-Leland, 46-23, in the Christian Life Regional quarClass 1A Earlville Regional terfinal, Rockford Christian semifinals. Life defeated Hiawatha, 50-16.

Chessick Practice Center gives Huskies a ‘wow factor’ • NIU BASEBALL Continued from page B1 Outfielders are able to take fly balls inside the building, which is 65 feet tall in the center and 45 feet on the sidelines. Mathey said that works fine even with the building’s white ceiling. “That’s OK for me. It forces the outfielders to concentrate a little more and really focus,” he said. “The outfielders right now, we’ll find out, but right now they feel like maybe when they get outside there’s a volleyball coming at them, just because of the difference in the white ceiling and the white ball compared to outside.” And the late-night practices certainly are a thing of the past. NIU has been able to hold normal afternoon practices, and players can even come in and work out on their own. “Usually over winter break we don’t get too many opportunities to come in and get ground balls,” said NIU

stantial for us. When we’re in the rec, I think the most we can throw is about 120 feet,” Anderson said. “In our throwing program, we work up to about 180. And then in the early winter we’ll even get to like 300 feet, which is the whole football field. Having a facility like this is really unbelievable for us, especially the (pitching) staff.” Seniors such as Anderson will only have the benefit of the Chessick Center for one season, but Mathey said the facility already has helped in Monica Maschak – mmaschak@shawmedia.com recruiting. “It’s only been open since NIU’s Brian Sisler, a 2012 DeKalb High alumnus, takes batting practice October, but every kid that Wednesday at the Chessick Practice Center in DeKalb. we’ve walked through looks at [the facility], I call it the ‘wow were times when the group shortstop Brian Sisler, a 2012 factor,’ ” Mathey said. “And had to throw at the campus DeKalb High alumnus. “This for me, development, not only winter break we got to do that, rec before heading over to [strength-wise] in the Yordon Chick Evans to get running so that was really nice.” Center, to be able to develop, in. From a pitcher’s standthat’s the meat and potatoes When it came to working point, they’re able to get their out arms, pitchers like Ander- of what you want to talk to the running in on the track that kids about. son weren’t able to get a full surrounds the football field. “You can come here and long toss in at the campus rec, Eli Anderson, who was NIU’s whereas now there’s plenty of develop, you can develop top starter last season and your game in here on a yearspace in the Chessick. will start the season opener round basis. So that’s a huge “We have the ability to against the Gophers at 2 p.m. long toss. That’s pretty subFriday, said in the past there thing.”

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SOCHI OLYMPICS

Page B4 • Thursday, February 13, 2014

8WHAT TO WATCH

AP photo

Women’s downhill gold medalists Dominique Gisin (left), of Switzerland, and Tina Maze, of Slovenia, hold hands Wednesday during a flower ceremony at the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics in Krasnaya Polyana, Russia.

ROUNDUP

Maze, Gisin win gold in women’s downhill By FRED LIEF The Associated Press SOCHI, Russia – The gold market enjoyed big gains at the Sochi Olympics on Wednesday, getting an unexpected boost from the women’s downhill. Tina Maze of Slovenia and Dominique Gisin of Switzerland were declared co-gold medalists, the first time in Olympic Alpine history a race was won in a tie. On a day that had little to do with winter – temperatures hit 63 degrees – the two friends covered the 1.69-mile Rosa Khutor course in 1 minute, 41.57 seconds. A tearful Lara Gut of Switzerland won the bronze, 0.1 seconds back. “I’m sure glad I’m going to share this gold with Tina,” Gisin said. The favorites, Maria Hoefl-Riesch of Germany and Julia Mancuso of the U.S., were afterthoughts. Hoefl-Riesch, eyeing a record-equaling fourth Olympic Alpine gold, finished 13th while Mancuso was eighth. Five other sports awarded gold medals on Day 6 of the Olympics: figure skating pairs, luge, Nordic combined, snowboarding and speedskating. Among the other gold medalists were speedskater Stefan Groothuis, who added to the mighty haul of the Dutch at the oval; Eric Frenzel of Germany, who has been the steadiest in Nordic combined the past two years; and Kaitlyn Farrington of the United States, who defeated defending champion Torah Bright in the women’s halfpipe. Alpine skiing: Gisin is becoming an old hand at these kinds of outcomes – two of her three downhill victories have been ties. She also is having a far better Olympics than the one in Vancouver, where she went tumbling and airborne in the downhill. This was Gisin’s first major medal. Maze won two silvers in Vancouver, and was hardly troubled about splitting the pot of gold. “It’s even more interesting because it’s not a usual thing,” said Maze, who started 30 minutes after Gisin. “It’s something special.” Figure skating: Tatiana Volosozhar and Maxim Trankov maintained Russia’s long tradition in pairs, winning gold in their home Olympics. Teammates Ksenia Stolbova and Fedor Klimov took silver. Russia or the Soviet Union had won gold in 12 straight Olympics in the event before the streak ended four years ago. “I think tonight all of the country will celebrate this beautiful victory,” Trankov said. Speedskating: The Dutch ruled at the oval again, with Groothuis taking the gold in the 1,000 meters and upsetting two-time Olympic champion Shani Davis of the U.S. Groothuis won in 1 minute, 8.39 seconds and was followed by Denny Morrison of Canada and 500 champion Michel Mulder of the Netherlands. The Dutch have won 10 of 15 medals through the first five events. Davis was eighth, denied in his bid to become the first man to win the same speedskating event at three straight Olympics. Snowboarding: Farrington posted a score of 91.75 during her second run, just good enough to beat Bright’s 91.5. 2002 Olympic champion Kelly

Clark took bronze to give the United States another medal. Men’s hockey: Sweden showed off its deep offensive talent in its Olympic opener, getting two goals from Erik Karlsson and one from Henrik Zetterberg in a 4-2 win over the Czech Republic. Switzerland also won, but needed a late deflection to beat Latvia 1-0. The Swiss scored with 7.9 seconds left, and Simon Moser was credited with the goal that appeared to carom off a Latvian player in front of the net. Women’s hockey: Canada defeated the U.S. in women’s hockey 3-2 in a preview of the expected gold medal match. Meghan Agosta scored twice for Canada and assisted on Hayley Wickenheiser’s goal. This was the fifth time these teams have met in the Olympics, but the first since women’s hockey was added to the Winter Games in 1998 that they have played in the preliminary round. In the day’s other game, Finland beat Switzerland, 4-3.

SOCHI WINTER OLYMPICS Men’s hockey: Slovakia vs. United States, 6:30 a.m., NBCSN (Live) Men’s hockey: Russia vs. Slovena, 6:30 a.m., MSNBC (Live) Men’s figure skating: Short program, Part 1, 9 a.m., NBCSN (Live) Men’s curling: Canada vs. Denmark, 9 a.m., MSNBC (Live) Men’s figure skating: Short program, Part 2, 10:45 a.m., NBCSN (Live) Men’s hockey: Canada vs. Norway, 11 a.m., USA (Live) Women’s hockey: Sweden vs. Russia, 11 a.m., MSNBC Men’s biathlon: 20k individual gold medal final; Luge: Team relay gold medal final runs, 2 p.m., NBC Hockey: Game of the day, 4 p.m., NBCSN Women’s curling: United States vs. Japan, 4 p.m., CNBC Men’s figure skating: Short program; Men’s freestyle skiing: Slopestyle gold medal final; Women’s speedskating: 1,000 gold medal final; Women’s skeleton: Competition, 7 p.m., NBC Women’s short track: 500 gold medal final; Men’s short track: 5,000 relay competition, 11:05 p.m., NBC Men’s hockey: Czech Republic vs. Latvia, 2 a.m. (Friday), MSNBC (Live) Men’s curling: United States vs. Germany, 2 a.m. (Friday), NBCSN Women’s curling: United States vs. Denmark, 4 a.m., USA (Live) Men’s cross-country: 15k classical gold medal final, 4 a.m. (Friday), NBCSN

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

Davis among U.S. stars left empty-handed • MORRISSEY

Medals table

Continued from page B1

Through Wednesday (32 of 98 events) He was aware of the G S B Tot chance at history Wednesday, Nation Norway 4 3 5 12 but he said afterward it Canada 4 4 2 10 wasn’t what he was ponder4 2 4 10 ing as he dug his skate in the Netherlands ice behind the starting line. United States 3 1 5 9 “It wasn’t the thing I was Russia 2 4 3 9 looking to do,” he said. “If Germany 6 1 1 8 I win the race, great, and I Austria 1 4 0 5 make history, that’s great. Switzerland 3 0 1 4 But first and foremost, I Slovenia 1 1 2 4 wanted to win the race. I Sweden 0 3 1 4 wanted to win the gold medal. France 1 0 2 3 If I did that and made history, Czech Republic 0 2 1 3 that’s wonderful. I wasn’t Japan 0 2 1 3 able to do it, so I’m pretty sad Italy 0 1 1 2 – not about making history Belarus 1 0 0 1 but winning the medal, more Poland 1 0 0 1 than anything.’’ Slovakia 1 0 0 1 Adding to his pain is the South Korea 1 0 0 1 realization that America Australia 0 1 0 1 usually only turns it eyes China 0 1 0 1 toward him once every four Finland 0 1 0 1 years. He has a good life, a Britain 0 0 1 1 fulfilling life, but one of the Latvia 0 0 1 1 greatest skaters in Olympic Ukraine 0 0 1 1 history probably can walk down Michigan Avenue and not get noticed. That’s the way it is. He has won four Olympic medals, including two silvers in the 1,500, and he has made lots of money in Europe. But in the United States, skating is reserved for hockey players and to people in sequins. That’s why eighth place hurt so much Wednesday. “When the world stage is watching, with the Americans and NBC and things like, I just wasn’t able to do it,” he said. “So I’m very disappointed in that, but I’m a competitor.” It has been a bad few days

for U.S. Olympic icons. Bode Miller, the favorite in the men’s downhill, finished eighth Sunday. Shaun White, the dominant snowboarder of his generation, finished fourth in the halfpipe Tuesday. And now Davis, the clear favorite in the 1,000. The speed that always seems to carry him in the last lap was nowhere to be found in Sochi. Davis said he’d have to watch film to see exactly what happened, but it looked like he had a power failure at the worst time possible. There was some talk of slow

ice from other competitors, but everybody was skating on the same surface. “I honestly couldn’t tell you what’s going on, what was wrong, but obviously I need to figure something out, and I have to do it pretty quick, or it’s going to be the same thing in the 1,500,” Davis said of Saturday’s race. “And that would be very, very, very, very bad.” He doesn’t sound like a guy who plans on retiring any time soon, though there has been outside speculation that he might. He has done a lot for his sport. Gone are the days when he was looked upon as being different, a curiosity, a black speedskater in a world dominated by whites. That went away a long time ago in Europe, where they just knew him as “Shani Davis, a skater from Chicago,” he said. Now he’s just a superstar skater who wants to keep going in circles. “I love skating,” he said. “I love trying to prove not only to myself but to the world that I’m the best skater alive, I’m the fastest man out there. I’m going to continue to do that until my body doesn’t allow me to.” In the days leading up to the Games, Davis had said this was his time. Nobody had any reason to believe otherwise. Forgive us for not setting our watches by it now.

• Rick Morrissey is a Chicago Sun-Times sports columnist. Write to him at rmorrissey@suntimes.com.

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SECTION C Thursday, February 13, 2014 Daily Chronicle

Features editor Inger Koch • ikoch@shawmedia.com

green

LENSfilm festival ‘Our Planet in Focus’ is theme of 4-day event there. They will be in the evenings and they’ll be totally free. It will be two days on campus and two days off campus so the students are getting the benefit of it and the community is getting the benefit of it. We’re doing it on-campus after 7 o’clock so the community can park for free.

By CURTIS CLEGG Shaw Media

S

hort films will be a prominent part of the fourth annual Green Lens Environmental Film Festival, which is themed “Our Planet in Focus.” “This year we are focusing on shorts, so anything under 30 minutes, which has allowed us to see and show more variety of films,” said Melissa Burlingame, festival director. “We also have a category for feature films and we received over 20 feature films.” There will be three categories of short films, shown over a four-day period from Feb. 24 through Feb. 27 at locations both on and off the Northern Illinois University campus. The festival is hosted by NIU’s Institute for the Study of the Environment, Sustainability, and Energy (ESE Institute) and the Division of Outreach, Engagement, and Information Technologies. All of the festival’s film screenings and associated activities are free and open to the public. Burlingame sat down with Shaw Media to discuss the goals and the films of this year’s festival.

Shaw Media: What is your role with the Green Lens Film Festival? Burlingame: I am one of the co-directors. I make sure everything goes according to plan, and I manage who is doing what, and when.

How did you get involved? I am the outreach and communications coordinator for the Institute for the Study of the the Environment, Sustainability, and Energy. It’s home of the environmental studies program.

How long have you been involved with the film festival? Since this beginning. This is the fourth year of the film festival, and the second year of the festival in its current format. The first two years we purchased films and showed them, and last year (festival registrar) Gillian King-Cargile approached me about turning it into a competition festival, and that involves a lot more work.

Did you grow up with an interest in the environment? Without knowing so, yes. I didn’t realize how early I was interested in the environment until just a couple years ago. It always seemed natural to me. I have always been interested in recycling and not wasting and sustainable urban planning. When I was in sixth grade I designed a sustainable city. They asked us to design

What are the categories of films in this year’s festival? The features is anything over 30 minutes, and there are three shorts categories: narrative, documentary, and student. The category that got the most entries there was documentary.

Melissa Burlingame a city, and mine was a sustainable city. It had dirt roads and the golf course served as recreation and flood management and habitat. Life takes you on different paths and I didn’t realize until my mid-twenties that it (her career path) didn’t click and I should be working on the environment.

How did the festival get started? My boss, Melissa Lenczewski, approached me when I was the grad assistant and said, “We should do a film festival,” and I said “OK.”

What is the theme this year? We have the “Planet in Focus” theme because it’s the Green Lens festival.

What is the goal of the festival? Getting people interested in making a difference, no matter how small. When we are choosing films to show, we’re not only looking at the scores the judges gave them but considering if they have a positive message. They’re not all “gloom and doom” because that doesn’t motivate people to make a change. We’re looking for something with the message, “We can do something, no matter how small.”

Do gloom and doom films have any place in the festival? I have a sociology background, so knowing what I know of human behavior I can say that it’s OK to give people the gloom and doom so that they know what’s going on but if they’re not presented with a way that they can make an impact, they’re just going to file it away and not do anything. It needs to have a message of, “This is what’s wrong, and this is how you can fix it.”

Where and when can people see the films? It’s Feb. 24 through the 27th. On that Tuesday we’re showing some films in Cole Hall and I’m waiting for confirmation from O’Leary’s that we’ll be showing films

Were there submissions from local filmmakers? They are from all over the country – all over the world, actually. The student winner is from Chicago.

How many films will be screened? Probably 16, maybe 17. Altogether that is about five hours of films. One of the films we’re showing is one minute.

What are some of the topics that filmmakers are exploring this year? The things that are coming to mind is deforestation in South America, and water was a big theme. Water rights, water availability, and water contamination. Also, community farming and sustainable farming was huge. We had a couple on the effects of war on the environment, which was really interesting. We had one that we’re doing as a screener’s choice, meaning that it didn’t make it into the top three but we all loved it so much that we want to share it with the community. The quality of the filming isn’t the greatest and there are some parts that are shaky, but the content was amazing. It’s called “A Will for the Woods.” ... All the films were good, but this one’s the one that we couldn’t stop thinking about.

What events do your partners have planned? We’re working with the DeKalb Public Library on that Tuesday, the 25th, to work on their Tales for Twos and their teen program and we’re going to do some environmental projects with them and we also have books to give away.

Will you have Q&A sessions with the filmmakers? We’d like to, but just with the winners. Since most of the winners live out of state we’ll probably see if we can Skype with them, and hopefully the student winner from Chicago will drive out.

Where can people go to get more information and schedules? They can visit www.niu.edu/greenlens.

SCHEDULE: Monday, Feb. 24 Festival Kick-off, 6 to 9 p.m. at O’Leary’s Irish Pub, 260 E. Lincoln Highway. Showing feature film screener’s choice “A Will for the Woods.” What if our last act could be a gift to the plant, a force for regeneration? Musician, folk dancer and psychiatrist Clark Wang prepares for his own green burial, determined that his final resting place will benefit the earth. After the film, Green Lens will host a panel discussion on how to Take Action in Illinois.

Tuesday, Feb. 25 Youth events – 9:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. at DeKalb Public Library, 309 Oak St. Youth craft events and book giveaways. 7 to 10 p.m. at Cole Hall on the Northern Illinois University campus. Showing feature film winner “Growing Cities.” Driven from their hometown by its poor health, the filmmakers set out to discover how other cities feed themselves. Along the way, they meet city dwellers fundamentally challenging the way this country produces food – from urban homesteaders trying to make ends meet to backyard gardeners fighting for their rights to grow food, they find city farming is about more than just good produce. After the film, Green Lens will host a panel discussion on local foods and share ways that community members can get involved.

Wednesday, Feb. 26 7 to 10 p.m. at Cole Hall Showcases for student shorts and narrative shorts, including the winner. Showing the feature film runner up “Tipping Point.” Sean Callebs travels the Amazon from Macapa to Manaus, Altamira and Parauapebas to reveal the people and the ecosystem that supports them and to answer the question “Can the Amazon survive economic success?”

Thursday, Feb. 27 6 to 11 p.m. at O’Leary’s Irish Pub Closing day of the festival includes a variety of events: Showcasing documentary shorts, an environmental fair, art exhibit and a wrap party with hors d’oeuvres served. Door prizes include NIU women’s basketball game tickets, NIU men’s basketball game tickets, foursome game of golf certificate at Klein Creek in Winfield, free bowl from Noodles & Company, free sandwich from Potbelly Sandwich Shop, gift basket from Cracker Jax, Los Rancheros gift card, no-chip shellac manicure from Studio 1 Salon, book set from Usborne Books and a gift from Moxie.


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Page C2 • Thursday, February 13, 2014

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Daily Chronicle / daily-chronicle.com

things to do this weekend of your life on Friday, or over the weekend. It can be a night of watching movies together, going out to eat, making a special meal or whatever your romantic heart desires.

Friday is Library Lovers Day, a day of library appreciation. If you can, head to your local library on that day, or on Saturday. Many libraries will be holding special events, so check to see if anything is planned.

Affairs of the heart Love is in the air – Valentine’s Day is Friday. Do something special for the love

Sycamore High School’s “The Diary of Anne Frank”: 7:30 p.m. Feb. 13, 14, 15, and 2 p.m. Feb. 15, Sycamore High School Auditorium, 555 Spartan Trail, Sycamore. Tickets: $6 at www. syc427.org, 815-899-8160, ext. 2173, or at the Sycamore High School Box Office. NIU School of Theatre and Dance’s “Intimate Apparel”: 7:30 p.m. Feb. 13 through 15, 2 p.m. Feb. 16, Diversions Lounge, Holmes Student Center, NIU. Tickets: $6 at 815-753-1600 or www.niu.edu/theatre. Indian Valley Theatre’s “Fox on the Fairway”: 7 p.m. Feb. 20 through 22, 1 p.m. Feb. 23, Fox Valley Older Adults Center, 1406 Suydam Road, Sandwich. Dinner theater catered by Allesandria’s Italian Dining. For mature audiences only. Tickets: $26. www. indianvalleytheatre.com. NIU School of Theatre and Dance’s “Woyzeck”: 7:30 p.m. Feb. 20 through 22 and Feb. 27 through March 1, 2 p.m. Feb. 23 and March 1, Huntley Middle School Auditorium, 1515 S. First St., DeKalb. Tickets: $16, $13 for seniors, $8 for students, at 815-753-1600 or www.niu.edu/ theatre/. “Lightwire: The Show”: 2 p.m. March 2, Egyptian Theatre, 135 N. Second St., DeKalb. Tickets: $10 to $25. www.egyptiantheatre.org. Stage Coach Players’ “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat”: 7:30 p.m. March 13 through 15, 2 p.m. March 15 and 16, Egyptian Theatre, 135 N. Second St., DeKalb. www.

This weekend is the Great Backyard Bird Count. You are encouraged to watch a particular area for 15 minutes and record your findings. People from across the continent will be participating, and it helps scientists keep track of the bird population. Go to http://gbbc.birdcount. org/ for more information.

At the movies

The need to read

STAGE STAGE

Bird watch

The big movies opening this weekend are “About Last Night,” an R comedyromance starring Kevin Hart, Michael Ealy, Regina Hall and Joy Bryant; “RoboCop,” a PG-13 remake of the cult classic starring Joel Kinnaman, Gary Oldman and Michael Keaton; and “Winter’s Tale,” a PG-13 version of Mark Helprin’s novel starring Colin Farrell, Jessica Brown Findlay, Russell Crowe and Jennifer Connelly.

stagecoachers.com. Stage Coach Players’ “Cheaper by the Dozen”: 7:30 p.m. May 8 through 10 and 15 through 17, 2 p.m. May 18, Stage Coach Theatre, 126 S. Fifth St., DeKalb. www.stagecoachers.com. Stage Coach Players’ “12 Angry Jurors”: 7:30 p.m. June 5 through 7 and 12 through 14, 2 p.m. June 15, Stage Coach Theatre, 126 S. Fifth St., DeKalb. www.stagecoachers.com. Stage Coach Players’ “How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying”: 7:30 p.m. July 10 through 12 and 17 through 19, 2 p.m. July 13, Stage Coach Theatre, 126 S. Fifth St., DeKalb. www.stagecoachers.com. Stage Coach Players’ “Arsenic and Old Lace”: 7:30 p.m. Aug. 14 through 16, and Aug. 21 through 23, 2 p.m. Aug. 24, Stage Coach Theatre, 126 S. Fifth St., DeKalb. www.stagecoachers.com. Stage Coach Players’ “Urinetown The Musical”: 7:30 p.m. Sept. 11 through 13 and 18 through 20, 2 p.m. Sept. 14 and 21, Stage Coach Theatre, 126 S. Fifth St., DeKalb. www.stagecoachers.com. ART ART NIU School of Art Faculty Biennial: Through Feb. 15, NIU Art Museum, Altgeld Hall, College Avenue and Castle Drive, DeKalb. Gallery hours: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, noon to 4 p.m. Saturday. Information: www.niu.edu/artmuseum or 815-753-1936. Special programming schedule: Kishwaukee College Art Gallery’s “Animal Sign/Animal Minds II” and “Two But Not Two” exhibi-

The NBA All Star Game is Sunday night, which means that the weekend will see other fun, such as the slam dunk contest, the rising stars game and more. Go to www.nba.com/allstar/ for information.

– More Content Now

tions: Through March 5, KC Art Gallery, 21193 Malta Road, Malta. Artists’ reception: 5 to 8 p.m. Feb. 28. Gallery hours: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday, Tuesday and Frida; 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday. Free. www. kishwaukeecollege.edu. Kish Art to the Community: 7 to 9 p.m. Fridays through Feb. 28, DeKalb Area Women’s Center, 1021 State St., DeKalb. Invitational group exhibition of contemporary artworks by current Kishwaukee College students. Variety of art forms including painting, drawing, photography, metals, ceramics, digital art and video. Free; open to the public. Also open by appointment. Closing reception: Feb. 28. Information: 815-758-1351 or dawc@niu.edu “Play: Stories, Mementos and Fun”: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays, Sycamore History Museum, 1730 N. Main St., Sycamore. Exhibition explores leisure moments and how we remember them through stories, objects and experiences. Admission: $5 a person, free for members and children younger than 14. www.sycamorehistory. org. 815-895-5762. DeKalb Area Agricultural Heritage Association Exhibit Gallery: 2 to 4 p.m. Wednesdays and Sundays, Labor Day through Memorial Day, or by appointment, Nehring Gallery, 111 S. Second St., Suite 204, DeKalb. Free. www.daaha.inc@gmail. com. 815-756-8737. COMEDY COMEDY

REGIONAL Zanies Comedy Night Club – St.

NIU student wins contest with his own composition By JAMI KUNZER jkunzer@shawmedia.com Kyle Krause knew his first year at Northern Illinois University that he’d compete in the Concerto Competition with his own composition. Now a senior, the 22-year-old from Marengo has become the first to win the competition by performing a concerto he wrote. Krause, who has been composing music since age 10, took the honor in stride. “I started writing [the concerto] about a year ago, but I was planning it for awhile,” he said. As for his natural ability to compose music, he said, “It comes to you or it doesn’t.” Krause debut the concerto on Wednesday in front of the NIU Philharmonic Orchestra at Boutell Concert Hall. Krause, who is majoring in piano performance and composition at NIU, performed along with three soloists, basically those students selected as the most talented for the semester. Excited about the performance, Krause said he was definitely prepared. “When I first started [writing] it was more like a hobby,” he said. “I was really into the performing side because I’m a pianist. It was kind of like a side thing. In college, it really grew on me, and I started favoring it. My goals are still to be a pianist, but I’d rather focus more on composition.” Krause said he’d like to eventually teach composition at a university. His parents, Walter and Kimberly Krause of Marengo, can’t help but boast about his recent honor.

Hoop dreams

Provided photo

Kyle Krause, a senior at Northern Illinois University, is the first to win the NIU Concerto Competition by performing a concerto he wrote. Of their three children, all have found success playing piano and organ. At age 20, Ryan Krause also is studying composition and piano performance at NIU and plays the piano for an area church. And 17-year-old Kevin Krause also plays piano at an area church. “We’re pretty jazzed,” Walter Krause said. “It’s been a long road with the kids. They’re all gifted in one way or another.” Kyle Krause became a fan of classical music when he attended a symphony in Rockford. All of the Krause children began piano lessons at about age 5, wanting to follow in their father’s footsteps. “I play a little jazz piano but nothing as serious or complicated as what the kids are doing,” Walter Krause said. “They’re all farther advanced than me. ... You never know where it’s going to lead.”

Charles: Various dates at Pheasant Run Resort, 4050 E. Main St. Visit www.stcharles.zanies.com for acts, prices and showtimes. 630-584-6342.

or the school office at 815-8955215. NIU College of Ed’s Diversity in Film series: 3 to 5:45 p.m. Tuesdays, Faraday 144, NIU, DeKalb. Faculty will moderate discussions following the films. Information: 815-753-1948 or email cedu@niu.edu. Schedule: Feb. 18 – “Boys Don’t Cry” March 18 – “Crash” April 15 – “The Interrupters” April 29 – “Fruitvale Station” Circus Spectacular: 7 p.m. March 4, NIU Convocation Center, 1525 W. Lincoln Highway, DeKalb. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. Tickets: $18 to $24 at Convo Center box office or www.2014Circus.com. Tickets on sale at noon Jan. 24. ALPHA: Friends of Antiquity Lecture Series: 7:30 p.m., Jack Arends Visual Arts Building, Room 102, NIU, DeKalb. Free. 815-787-6478. Schedule: • March 6: “The Long Lost Tomb of King Herod the Great at Herodium” • April 3: “When the Greeks Ruled: Egypt After Alexander the Great” Jack Hanna’s “Into the Wild” Live: 3 p.m. April 6, Egyptian Theatre, 135 N. Second St., DeKalb. Tickets: $15 to $35. www.egyptiantheatre.org.

EVENTS EVENTS

MUSIC MUSIC

“Best Picture” Film Series: 7 p.m., Egyptian Theatre, 135 N. Second St., DeKalb. Tickets: $7, adults; $5, students and seniors. Ticket package available for $42, adults; $30, students and seniors. www.egyptiantheatre. org. Schedule: Feb. 18 – “Amadeus” Feb. 25 – “Shakespeare in Love” Wooden Box Theater’s “Beatles Nite 4”: 4 p.m. Feb. 15, Ellwood House Visitor Center, 509 N. First St., DeKalb. Event features live theatrical performance, poetry, local fashion modeling and live music. Admission: $5 at the door. Information: www.facebook.com/ events/1456701574557812. “Saints & Sinners Bingo”: 7:30 p.m. Feb. 15, Sandwich Opera House, 140 E. Railroad St. Tickets: $20 each from Denise Ramos at 815-498-9163 or online through Feb. 12 at www. stjbsom.org. The event is a fundraiser for Somonauk’s St. John the Baptist Catholic Church sesquicentennial celebration in 2015. “Movie Bingo”: 2 p.m. Feb. 16, preceded by a 1 p.m. hot dog lunch, St. Mary’s of Sycamore, 322 Waterman St. Tickets: $15 for seniors, 60 and older; general admission, $20 in advance or $25 at the door from Roseanne Dwyer at 630-267-0757, the parish office at 815-895-3275

NIU Community School of the Arts Honors Recital: 1:30 p.m. Feb. 15, Recital Hall, Music Building, NIU, DeKalb. Six young musicians will perform. Free; open to the public. Gaelic Storm: 7:30 pm. Feb. 15, Egyptian Theatre, 135 N. Second St., DeKalb. Tickets: $25 to $37 at 815-758-1225, www.egyptiantheatre.org or the Egyptian Theatre box office. Kishwaukee Symphony Orchestra’s ADM Young Artists Concerto Competition Winner Concert: 7:30 p.m. Feb. 22, Boutell Memorial Concert Hall, NIU Music Building, 550 Lucinda Ave., DeKalb. Tickets: $15, adults; $10, seniors and students; $5 children younger than 12. www. kishorchestra.org. William Yang: 7 p.m. March 8, Sandwich Opera House, 140 E. Railroad St., Sandwich. Tickets: $15 to $25. 815-786-2555. www.sandwichoperahouse.org. Billy Currington’s “We Are Tonight” tour with special guests Brett Eldredge and Chase Rice: 7:30 p.m. March 20, NIU Convocation Center, 1525 W. Lincoln Highway, DeKalb. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Tickets: $28.50 to 35.50 at Convo Center box office, all Ticketmaster outlets, Ticketmaster.com or 800-7453000. Tickets on sale at 10 a.m. Jan. 24. Kishwaukee Symphony Orchestra’s Spring Concert: Shosta-

kovich and Steel: 7:30 p.m. May 3, Boutell Memorial Concert Hall, NIU Music Building, 550 Lucinda Ave., DeKalb. Tickets: $15, adults; $10, seniors and students; $5 children younger than 12. www.kishorchestra.org. ONGOING ONGOING Art Attack – School of Art in Sycamore: 215 W. Elm St. Classes for children and adults. www.sycamoreartattack.org or 815-899-9440. Northern Illinois University Community School of the Arts: NIU Music Building, 400 Lucinda Ave., DeKalb. Classes in music, art and theater for children and adults. www.csa.niu.edu or 815753-1450. Bread & Roses women’s choral group rehearsals: 5:45 to 8 p.m. Sundays, Westminster Presbyterian Church, Annie Glidden Road, DeKalb. www.breadandroseschorus.org. Indian Valley Community Band: 6 to 7:20 p.m. Mondays, Sandwich Middle School Band Room. Area musicians who enjoy playing for pleasure are invited; there are no auditions. Open Mic: 8 p.m. Mondays, sign-in at 7:30 p.m., The House Cafe, 263 E. Lincoln Highway, DeKalb. Bands and singers perform for 12 minutes. 815-787-9547. DeKalb Festival Chorus rehearsals: 7:15 to 9:15 p.m. Mondays during the school year, NIU Music Building. www.dekalbfestivalchorus.org. Contact conductor Seth Houston at seth@sethhouston.com or 303815-0648. Kishwaukee Barbershop Harmony Singers rehearsals: 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Tuesdays, First Congregational Church, 615 N. First St., DeKalb. Open to men of all ages. 815-895-5955 or 815899-8383. Prairie Echoes Chorus rehearsal: 7:30 to 10 p.m. Tuesdays, St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 900 Normal Road, DeKalb. Singing, food, friendship and fun. Kishwaukee Concert Band rehearsals: 7:30 to 9 p.m. Wednesdays, band room at Door 16 of Huntley Middle School, 1515 S. Fourth St., DeKalb. Allvolunteer band for anyone age 18 or older who has played a wind or percussion instrument in the past. No auditions needed. 815899-4867 or 815-825-2350. Thursday Blues Nights: 8 p.m. first Thursday each month at The House Cafe, 263 E. Lincoln Highway, DeKalb. “The Way” acoustic coffee house: 6 to 8:30 p.m. first Saturday each month, DeKalb Christian Church, 1107 S. First St. 815-758-1833 or tomndcc@ aol.com.

8BRIEFS Dinner theater offers chance to win two rounds of golf What’s better than a comedy about golf? A chance to win a gift certificate for two 18-hole rounds with a cart. Mark your calendars for next weekend’s Ken Ludwig comedy, “Fox on the Fairway,” presented by Indian Valley Theatre. Edgebrook Golf Course of Sandwich has donated a gift certificate for a raffle during IVT’s “Fox on the Fairway” dinner show. Tickets cost $1 a piece and the winner will be drawn at intermission during the Feb. 23 show. Raffle tickets can be purchased during any of the shows. Shows will be held Feb. 20 through 23 at Fox Valley Older Adults Center, 1406 Suydam Road, Sandwich. Dinner begins at 7 p.m. and the show at 8 p.m. on Thursday Friday and Saturday. On Sunday, dinner is at 1 p.m. and the show at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $26 and can be ordered at www.indianvalleytheatre. com. The deadline to order tickets has been extended to Tuesday. For questions or more information, send email to foxonthefairway@gmail. com. The show is for mature audiences only.

Kish College schedules auditions for spring play Auditions for Kishwaukee College’s spring production of “Love Minus,” by Mary Gallagher will be held at 7 p.m. Feb. 26 and 27 in the Kishwaukee College Theater

(B1205). Copies of the script are on reserve at the Kishwaukee College Library. Auditioners are required to read the script before auditioning. Roles for two women and two men are available. The Kishwaukee College production of “Love Minus” will be staged at 7:30 p.m. April 23 through 26 in the Kishwaukee College Theater. “Love Minus” is a romantic comedy that follows four young professionals in New York City: Karla, Lydia, Nick and Alan. Chance encounters and witty dialogue illustrate the varied views of love, romance and sex in contemporary relationships. For more information on the auditions or the play, contact Nadine Franklin at 815-825-2086, ext. 2720, or at nadine.franklin@kishwaukeecollege.edu.

Young musicians to give honors recital Six young musicians will perform at the annual Honors Recital at Northern Illinois University at 1:30 p.m. Saturday. They are the recipients of a talent scholarship awarded by the NIU Community School of the Arts. The recital is in the Recital Hall in the Music Building and is free and open to the public. Auditions for the six awards are held in January every year. Those auditioning must play their pieces from memory before a team of three judges. Each awardee receives $250. Since the talent scholarship program started in 1996, the

program has awarded 108 talent scholarships to talented young people in the community. Ranging in age from 10 to 16, the recipients will perform works by Beethoven, Squire, Bruch and Mozart. At the elementary age level, Reilly Farrell (piano), 10, is a fourth-grader at St. Mary School in DeKalb. He is the son of Robb and Tammy Farrell and studies piano with Marilyn Montzka. Karl Peterson (guitar), 10, is a fifth-grader at North Elementary School in Sycamore. He is the son of Craig and Doris Peterson and studies guitar with Eric Schroeder. At the junior age level, Joon Park (violin), 12, is a sixth-grader at Sycamore Middle School. He is the son of Tim Campbell and Seunghee Shin and studies violin with Karen Weckerly. Kjelden Breidenbach (cello), 14, is an eighth-grader at Sycamore Middle School. He is the son of Bob and Julie Breidenbach and studies cello with Linc Smelser. At the senior level, Emma Olson (piano), 15, is a sophomore at Sycamore High School. She is the daughter of Ken and Janet Olson and studies piano with Marilyn Montzka. Madeline Alvendia (viola), 16, is a junior at Oswego East High School. She is the daughter of Stephanie and Walter Alvendia and studies viola with Ann Montzka-Smelser. The NIU Community School of the Arts offers lessons, classes and ensembles in music, art and theater. For more information, visit www. csa.niu.edu or call 815-753-1450.


A&E

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

Thursday, February 13, 2014 • Page C3

Young pianists to perform with orchestra Two young pianists won the 2014 Arthur D. Montzka Young Artists Concerto Competition and will perform with the Kishwaukee Symphony Orchestra in its Feb. 22 concert. Colin Choi, 12, will play the first movement from Piano Concerto in A Minor by Edvard Grieg. Sean Choi, 13, will play the first movement of Piano Concerto No. 3 by Sergei Prokofiev. Colin is a seventh grader at Wood Oaks Junior High School in Northbrook. He began his piano studies at age 5 and is a student of Sueanne Metz. Colin has won awards in numerous competitions, including first place in the North Shore Music Teachers’ Association Competition, the Illinois Music Association Contest, the Chinese Fine Arts Society Competition, and the Sejong Music Competition. He also was a prizewinner at the Illinois State Music Teachers Association Competition, the Chicago Area Music Teachers Association Sonata Festivals, the Grandquist Music Competition in the Olympic Division, and the New Music National Young Artist Competition. In 2009, he was chosen

rine aquarium. Sean Choi is an eighth grader at Wilmette Junior High School in Wilmette. He also studies piano with Sueanne Metz. Sean has won competitions including Honorable Mention at the Music Teachers National Association, first place at the Confucius Music Festival, Honorable Mention at the Emilio Del Rosario Concerto Competition, and first place at the DePaul Concerto

Colin Choi

Sean Choi

to perform at the Kennedy Center for the International Youth Praise Festival. In 2010, he performed at Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall as a winner of the International Chopin Celebration Competition. Colin also was the winner of the 2011 DePaul Concerto Festival for Young Performers and performed as a soloist with the Oistrach Symphony Orchestra. His performance was broadcast on Chicago’s WFMT 98.7 classical radio station. Colin also was awarded first place in the Emilio del Rosario Concerto Competition and performed with the Harper Symphony Orchestra.

In August 2013, he won third place and the best performance for contemporary music award at the Los Angeles Young Musician International Competition. Most recently, Colin was chosen as the winner of the piano category in the open division at the Walgreens National Concerto Competition. He also has made frequent public appearances, including performances at the Chicago Cultural Center, the Parisian Salon Concert Series at the Northbrook Library, and the Grand Piano Haus. Colin also enjoys playing the acoustic drums, basketball, and video games, and keeping his ma-

NIU play ‘Woyzeck’ trys to understand murderer “We’re not trying to justify a murderer but rather to understand him,” director Alexander Gelman said about the Northern Illinois University School of Theatre and Dance upcoming play, “Woyzeck.” Opening Feb. 20, “Woyzeck” tells the story of Franz Woyzeck, a lowly German soldier and wigmaker who is slowly driven to insanity and who kills his common-law wife in a fit of jealous rage. In the world of the play, “Woyzeck” is considered morally lacking by his superiors because he lives in abject poverty. He is bullied, belittled and taken advantage of by his commanding officers, his cohorts and the people closest to him. When he must take odd jobs to earn extra money, he is further dehumanized. A doctor pays him to experiment on him and is thrilled when Woyzeck begins to hear voices and exhibit signs of acute paranoia. The doctor does nothing to stop his downward emotional spiral. Playwright Georg Büchner wrote “Woyzeck” as a seemingly disconnected collection of scenes in 1836, but died

before he completed the work. The play has been reworked and adapted by numerous authors since his death, including adaptations for movies in 1979 and 1994. This NIU version of the play was adapted by the director. According to Gelman, his adaptation orders the short scenes as he believes Büchner would have, had he been able to finish the play. Although the play is visually presented as set in the late 19th century, Gelman said it is really not set in a time period. “The play is episodic, dreamlike, even nightmarish,” he said in a news release. “In the same way we juxtapose things in our dreams, every image has some significant meaning – like I can set someone in a white wig next to someone in a suit of armor and each has a contribution to what is experienced.” “Woyzeck” runs Feb. 20 through 23, and Feb. 27 through March 1. Performances will take place at Huntley Middle School Auditorium, 1515 S. Fourth St., in DeKalb. Performances will start at 7:30 p.m. on weekdays

‘Intimate Apparel’ presented at NIU The Northern Illinois University School of Theatre and Dance will present “Intimate Apparel,” by award-winning playwright Lynne Nottage, this weekend. The play begins at 7:30 p.m. today through Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday in the Holmes Student Center Diversion Lounge on the NIU campus. Set in 1905 New York, “Intimate Apparel” examines ideas of love, sacrifice and the breaking of conventions at the turn of the last century. Central character Esther Mills is a shy African-American seamstress, living in a boarding house for women and making a comfortable living creating intimate apparel for a wide range of clients, including characters from the historic Tenderloin District, Lower East Side tenements, and high class Fifth Avenue. As her fellow boarders come and go, she longs to have a husband and a future. Though she has strong feelings for the Hasidic shopkeeper from whom she buys cloth, they both know a relationship

is impossible. Even though the play is set in the early 1900s, director Kay Martinovich said the play is all about empowerment. “The thing that strikes me most,” she said in a news release, “is the idea of a woman having choices in her life and feeling like she doesn’t – and by the end of the play, she realizes that she does have choices about how she wants to be in the world.” Martinovich said that in her vision of the play, she explores forbidden love and the difference between romantic and sexual relationships. As a visiting assistant professor and professional director, this is her directorial debut with NIU students. She believes the production is unique. “This is a student production. It’s all undergraduate. But I never feel that,” she said in the release. General admission tickets cost $6. Tickets and more information are available by calling the box office at 815753-1600 or visiting www.niu. edu/theatre.

and Saturdays. Sunday and second-Saturday matinee shows will start at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $16 for adults, $13 for seniors and $8 for students. Tickets and additional information are available at the NIU School of Theatre and Dance box office at 815-7531600, or online at www.niu. edu/theatre. This production is not affiliated with DeKalb School District 428.

Competition. He has played with the Oistrach Symphony Orchestra, the Chicago Area Music Teachers Association Roberta Savler Contest, and placed third at the North Shore Music Teachers’ Association and first at the Sejong Music Competition. He also won awards at the Grandquist Music Competition. Besides piano, he has won first prize (2010 and 2008), second prize (2009) and Honorable Mention (2011) for

cello at the Confucius Music Festival, and placed second twice at the Society of American Musicians competition. Other than music, Sean enjoys swimming, and he is on the NASA Wildcat Aquatics swim team. The concert will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Boutell Memorial Concert Hall at Northern Illinois University. Tickets cost $15 for adults, $10 for seniors and students and $5 for children younger than 12.

The Youth Service Bureau Presents...

Royal Children’� Ball Please join us for an enchanted evening filled with family fun, music and dancing, crafts, and other royal activities that will surely captivate your princes and princesses!

When: Friday, March 14, 2014 from 6-9pm Where: Altgeld Castle on the campus of Northern Illinois University Tickets: $15 per person; please contact YSB for group sales of 6 or more tickets Available at the following locations: YSB – 330 Grove Street, DeKalb, IL (815) 748-2010 www.dcysb.com

YSB Events Presented By:


ADVICE & PUZZLES

Page C4 • Thursday, February 13, 2014

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

Woman quiet about breast exam for family Dear Abby: Earlier this year, my sister “Kathy” was diagnosed with breast cancer. She underwent a double mastectomy, chemo and radiation, and will begin reconstructive surgery soon. Because of her diagnosis she encouraged me to visit my doctor for an exam. When I did, they found a lump, which needs further testing. I have chosen not to share this with my family because my sisters and parents have been deeply affected by Kathy’s diagnosis, and I don’t want to cause them needless worry. My husband is angry and

DEAR ABBY Jeanne Phillips he said that because Kathy is their favorite they wouldn’t be concerned anyway. I thought it was insensitive and cruel to me, but more to the point, I felt he wasn’t thinking about how upset my doing so might make my family. Am I wrong to feel this way? – Needs Further Testing

Dear Needs Further Testing: Certainly not. Your husband’s comment illustrates

the importance of keeping one’s mouth firmly shut if one can’t think of something helpful or supportive to say. It almost appears that he is angry at you for the questionable test result. I can’t blame you for not wanting to upset your already stressed family at this point, but if more testing confirms that you, too, have breast cancer, I think it’s important that you let them know – especially your sisters, who might want to be screened sooner than later. I hope your husband’s apparent inability to support you emotionally during this

difficult time is an aberration, but if it’s not, you will need to find support elsewhere. Dear Abby: Is there some sort of etiquette regarding inquiring about someone’s country of origin? While making polite conversation with a customer in my retail shop, I noticed she had an accent and asked where she was from. She became very evasive and seemed offended that I had asked. She actually refused to answer my question. I tried to recover from the awkward situation, but I can’t help but feel I insulted

her somehow. Was I wrong to ask? – Friendly Retailer in Kansas City Dear Retailer: Perhaps. Some immigrants to this country feel the question you asked is a very personal one. There can be various reasons for it. The person may feel selfconscious about his or her accent, and you can’t know the political situation in the person’s country of origin or whether he or she has encountered bias because of where he or she came from.

• Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Proper posture, position prevents neck pain Dear Dr. K: I spend most of my day at my desk. Can you describe the correct ergonomics to help reduce my neck pain? Dear Reader: I’m glad you asked, because I’ve spent all of this day writing my columns, and my neck hurts. I’m not very good at following the advice I’m about to give you. For readers not familiar with the term, “ergonomics” is the science of using our bodies (primarily bones and muscles) for a particular task in the safest and most efficient way. It teaches us about how best to arrange our homes and workplaces. If, like me, you spend much of the day at your desk, good ergonomics means setting up

ASK DR. K Anthony L. Komaroff your chair, desk and computer in a way that encourages healthy neck and back positioning. When working at your computer or desk, keep your head balanced directly over your spine as much as possible. Set your chair height so both your feet can rest on the ground. Sit with your buttocks far back in your chair, using a small pillow to support your lower back if needed. (I’ve put a detailed illustration of an “ergonomically friendly” workspace on my website.)

No matter how perfect your office-chair posture, it’s important to get up and move around every half-hour. Prolonged sitting has been linked to worsening of neck pain. Stretching can help, too. Shrug your shoulders up and down, or lean your head to each side while pulling the opposite shoulder down. I’ve done that today between writing each column. It loosens up the body and clears the mind. If you spend a lot of time on the phone, avoid leaning your head to one side. This is also important when you use a cellphone even if you aren’t sitting at your desk while you speak. A headset, earbuds or speakerphone are good options to help keep your head

in a stress-free position for hands-free talking. Sit up straight when reading. Hold the document or book up so you don’t need to bend over. Use your armrests to help support it. Or use a document holder that props the material upright if you are reading or typing from a written document at your desk. For writing, adjust your chair and desk so you needn’t bend over. Or place your paper on a slant board that raises it slightly off the desk and keeps it at a comfortable angle. What we do with our bodies each day has changed greatly in the past century. A century ago, most of us in the United States worked

on farms. We were outdoors all day. The work typically required more physical movement and more strength than is required of us today – and it was more likely to produce major injuries. Yet much of that work, too, involved lots of repetitive motions, and there were no ergonomic scientists to help. But the people who figured out which way of performing those repetitive motions seemed easiest on their bodies also felt better at the end of the day.

• Dr. Komaroff is a physician and professor at Harvard Medical School. Visit www. AskDoctorK.com to send questions and get additional information.

Take a chance and converse with your crush Dr. Wallace: I’m really attracted to a certain boy at school. I have been doing everything I can to attract his attention, but nothing works because he is very shy. I smile at him in the hall when we pass, but all he does is stare at me. Help! What should I do? Do you think that he is telling me to buzz off? – Nameless, Moline, Ill. Nameless: It could be, but you’ll never know unless you have a chance to talk with him. The next time you meet him face to face in the hall, walk up to him and say that you would like to know him better, and ask him to call you within a day or two. Then hand him your telephone number written clearly so he won’t make a mistake when he calls you.

’TWEEN 12 & 20 Robert Wallace Dr. Wallace: I’ve got a very serious problem, and I really need your advice. I make promises with family members and close friends, and then I break these promises. This has caused a lot of friction with people I love. Please tell me what I can do to stop breaking promises. Last week, my best friend told me that she was going to buy a purple sweater for her boyfriend’s 17th birthday. Purple is his favorite color. She made me promise that I wouldn’t tell her boyfriend because she really wanted it to be a big surprise. I didn’t

8ASTROGRAPH By BERNICE BEDE OSOL Newspaper Enterprise Association

TODAY – This is the year to highlight your versatile workplace skills. Your status will improve if you continue to work diligently. Information is available that could have an important impact on your future. Listen carefully for tidbits that will enable you to make sound financial decisions. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) – Your outgoing nature and vivid imagination will lead to an unusual adventure. Explore the possibilities and turn something you enjoy doing into a profitable endeavor. Believe in your ability, talent and skills. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) – Jump-start your career. Concentrate on self-improvement and utilizing your skills differently and effectively. This will improve your confidence and protect your position while escalating your chance to advance. ARIES (March 21-April 19) – You will make great achievements if you take advantage of a new opportunity. Don’t waste time in contemplation; start the ball rolling. Your direct approach will bring good results. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) – Don’t pressure others to do things your way. Keep the peace and avoid confrontations if you want to gain control. Pursue your ideas in secret and present them only when you’re confident of your success. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) – Step into the spotlight and share your thoughts and plans. You’ll attract interest, enthusiasm and contributions from onlookers who will help you develop and promote your ideas. CANCER (June 21-July 22) – It’s time to take a realistic look at your savings and investments. Determine what will give you the best opportunity to increase your wealth and make it the focus of your strategy. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) – Avoid conflicts, lie low and refrain from making a hasty decision that will leave you in a vulnerable position. An emotional reaction may be difficult to control, but it will only make matters worse if you fail to rein yourself in. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) – You may feel that information is being withheld from you. Patience and perseverance will be necessary to determine what has been going on behind the scenes. Ask direct questions. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) – Let your imagination wander and your curiosity lead the way. Your thirst for knowledge will enable you to explore and expand a wide variety of interests. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) – Resist the urge to take control. You may give the wrong impression or offend someone who has more to offer than you realize. Patience will be required. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) – You’ll be enticed by exotic destinations or adventure. Participate in community activities and see what kind of excitement you can find. Follow your heart. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) – Today’s emphasis will be on money matters. You will have good luck in your financial planning. Examine all your options. Get facts firsthand to ensure that you make the best choice possible.

keep my promise. Her boyfriend and I attend the same church, and last Sunday we were talking after the services. Since his birthday was only four days away, I told him, “Happy Birthday” and he said thanks. I then said that his girlfriend had bought him a really nice gift. He then said, “I hope she didn’t spend a lot of money.” Then I said that she probably did because it was a really nice sweater. Well, when my best friend found out that I broke my promise, she was livid, and said our friendship is over. I’m sure we will patch things up at a later time, but before we do, I want to be positive I will never break another promise to anyone ever again. Please help me. – Nameless, Orange

8SUDOKU

County, Calif. Nameless: Everyone breaks a promise occasionally, but in your case it’s a regular habit. What are the consequences of a stream of broken promises? • You annoy, anger, hurt and often alienate the people around you. Friends get angry because they counted on you and are hurt because they take the broken promise as a personal dig. • You create constant anxiety for yourself. When you promise to do something with two different people for the same night, you may feel you’ve bought yourself some time to smooth out the situation. But you’ve also given yourself the worry of how to wriggle out of it.

BRIDGE Phillip Alder

It isn’t easy to change this pattern of undependability. Psychologist Bernard Dunne of Smithtown, N.Y., urges that you begin trying to confront issues on the basis of how you really feel and learn to take the consequences immediately. This doesn’t mean you should yawn in someone’s face and tell her she’s boring. It does mean thinking twice before promising to call her later in order to avoid talking to her now. Beyond that, the solution is simply not to make any more promises that you don’t fully intend to keep.

• Email Dr. Robert Wallace at rwallace@galesburg. net. He will answer as many letters as possible in this column.

8CROSSWORD

Trying not to assume what is not needed Eric Temple Bell, a mathematician and science fiction writer who was born in Scotland but lived most of his life in the United States, said, “Euclid taught me that without assumptions there is no proof. Therefore, in any argument, examine the assumptions.” That certainly applies at the bridge table. During any deal, each participant makes assumptions based on the bidding and cards played. The more accurate these assumptions, the more likely that person is to win. When this deal was originally played, West made an assumption that proved to be invalid and cost his partnership a game contract. After West opened one spade and two passes followed, South leapt straight to four hearts, the contract that he hoped he could make. West led the diamond queen. East overtook with his ace, dropping South’s king. Then East shifted to the spade jack. When South played low, West, assuming that his partner had a second spade, encouraged with his 10. Now East did the best he could by shifting to a club. Perhaps West could ruff, or maybe this would cut South off from the dummy. Here, though, declarer won with dummy’s ace, played a heart to his ace, returned the trump three to dummy’s eight, and ran the clubs for an overtrick. West did not need to assume that East had two spades. It could not have cost to overtake the spade jack with his queen and cash the spade ace. Then he would have given East a spade ruff to defeat the contract.


COMICS

Daily / Daily-Chronicle.com Page Chronicle XX • Day, Date, 2012

Pickles

Brian Crane Pearls Before Swine

For Better or For Worse

Non Sequitur

Thursday, February 13, 2014 • Page C5 Northwest herald / nwherald.com

Stephan Pastis

Lynn Johnston Crankshaft

Tom Batiuk & Chuck Hayes

Wiley The Duplex

Glenn McCoy

Beetle Bailey

Mort Walker Blondie

Dean Young & Denis LeBrun

Frank & Ernest

Bob Thaves Dilbert

Scott Adams

Monty

Jim Meddick Zits Hi and Lois

Rose is Rose

Pat Brady & Don Wimmer Arlo & Janis

Soup to Nutz

The Family Circus

Rick Stromoski Big Nate

Bill Keane

The Argyle Sweater

Scott Hilburn

Stone Soup

Grizzwells

Brianand & Greg Jim Borgman JerryWalker Scott

Jimmy Johnson

Lincoln Peirce

Jan Eliot

Bill Schorr


Thursday, February 13, 2014 “Happy Valentines Wishes!” from Holly Photo by: Ernestine

Upload your photos on My Photos – DeKalb County’s community photo post! Photos on My Photos are eligible to appear in print in Daily Chronicle Classified. Go to Daily-Chronicle.com/myphotos

Spring Will Be Here Soon! Positions open for the following: Rental Booking Agent / Inventory Processor Garden Center Sales Position Landscape Construction & Maintenance (work begins 3/15) Garden Center Grounds Crew (work begins 3/15) Detail-oriented. Strong customer service skills. Ability to multi-task. Email resume to: info@blumengardens.com Blumen Gardens 403 Edward Street, Sycamore 815-895-3737

NEWSPAPER DELIVERY Earn up to $1000 A Month! Looking for Contractors to deliver newspapers early mornings 7 days per week. Routes now available in DeKalb County. Please Call 815-526-4434

Dog Kennel - Large, enclosed, plastic, wire door & vents 26"H x 35"W x 19"w. $35. 224-402-1637

Full time position Clinical Experience Required Great Schedule Great Place to Work

Kishwaukee Medical Associates

SNOW BLOWER - MTD yard machine snowblower, 5.5 horsepower, 22" clearance, compact 2 stage. Works great! $90. 847-489-0254

CAT – LOST South DeKalb County. Large neutered male, mostly white with big brown patches and brown Maine Coon tail. May still have red collar. If seen, please call at 815-501-9724. Reward for safe return. We miss him. Have you seen or know what happened to him?

KITTEN - LOST Grey and white kitten with tiger stripe back. Extra large paws. Neutered and front declaw. Name is Momo, lost 1/25 on Cynthia Pl, DeKalb. Call 815-757-7257

INFANT AND PRESCHOOL TEACHERS FT - Must have completed ECE or Child Development Degree. Experience needed. SUBSTITUTE - Must have H.S. Diploma and exp. a must. Apply in Person: Land of Learning Child Care 1645 Bethany Rd. Sycamore www.landoflearning.org 815-899-8991

DRIVERS – PART TIME South Elgin company has 3 part time positions to fill. Minimum of 2 days per week, same day return trip. Non-CDL Class C license required. Apply at: Clesen Brothers, 1050 Center Dr, South Elgin, IL or call 847-695-1500, ask for Dave or Erik

Farm Operations Monsanto Waterman Research 8350 Minnegan Rd., Waterman, IL. (near Dekalb) Farm Operations position open for candidate well qualified in the safe operation & maintenance of agricultural equipment and knowledgeable in row crop agriculture. Applicants must possess or have ability to attain Pesticide App License. Flexible hours. Must be at least 21 and pass pre-employment drug test. Apply in person at above address M-F 8-4:30pm. EOE/AA Employer M/F/D/V

WOULD SAVING 50-90% On your Prescription Drugs interest you? Go to medfreedom.net Then visit http://tonyp.bidformymeds.com and see how much you can save.

I Buy Old Envelopes Stamps

815-758-4004

Check out the

in the back of today's Classified

A-1 AUTO

Will BUY UR USED CAR, TRUCK, SUV,

MOST CASH WILL BEAT ANY QUOTE GIVEN!! $400 - $2000 “don't wait.... call 2day”!!

New mens black steel toe Jesse James work shoes, 9 ½. $35 815-748-7693 Wedding Set - size 7. Diamond one small on each side, Band-four small $400 815-762-5760

Residential door hardware 6 bed/bath door knobs, 3 hall closet door knobs, 2 dummyknobs, 10 bi-fold door pulls, 30 removal pin door hinges 3 - 1/2”, 5/8” round. 12 removal pin door hinges 4” 5/8” round, 4 exterior door knobs w/ deadbolts all polished brass/hardware included asking $50 815-508-0406 Shelving: grocery store shelving, approx. 20ft long, very strong, $200 Call Steve 815-970-3055

Printer Hewlett-Packard Desk-jet 1010 series - like new w/ink $20 815-748-3276 STEREO - Fisher stereo with speakers, 5 CD changer, radio, cassette and cabinet. $75. 224-402-1637 TV - 20" TVs with built in DVD player. Older, box style TV. Works great! Great for kids bedroom. $15 Call 224-402-1637

For Junk Cars, Trucks & Vans with or without titles. 630-817-3577 or 219-697-3833

2002 PONTIAC GRAND AM 4 door sedan, 4 cyl, 110K miles. New tires, runs great! $3000/obo 815-899-4014

2007 FORD FOCUS SE Metallic gray, 57K miles. Automatic/power windows and lock. Great condition and very clean!

Reduced $9000 For More Details Call

815-701-3301

2001 CHEVY TAHOE Loaded with extras, ps, pdl, heavy duty tow pkg, leather int, spacious backseat, upgraded tires, 230K freeway miles. Bluebook $6400, sell for $5500. 815-549-1205 2004 Cadillac SRX - Exc. Cond., Luxury Ed., New Tires, AWD, 107k Mi. $9,995 815-751-9006

Cragar SS Rims 14” X 10” wide No Peeling (2) Rims $75.00 815-501-2755 after 4 pm.

You Want It? We've Got It! Classified has GREAT VARIETY!

Wood Burning Stove Sun Oak cast iron, pot belly wood burning stove 38” high 16” wide 815-286-3502 8am-8pm.

OSTER - Mix Master With all accessories: grinder, blender ... & book. $35.00 815-762-5760

877-264-2527 Daily-Chronicle.com

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Distribution Assistant Wanted

At Your Service Directory

815-814-1224

WE PAY THE BEST!

Advertise here for a successful garage sale! Call 815-455-4800

Great for filming real estate, etc. Also for dangerous inspections. Call Steve 815-217-5594

Need Help Rebuilding, Repairing or Replanting?

or

815-575-5153

www.Daily-Chronicle.com Have Pro Video Quadcopter

815-814-1964

WANTED!

Collections

DESK - Totally Refinished Desk Mahogany inlays in top 8 drawers - including middle drawer. Brass handles 42” width / 29” height. $175. 815-825-2275

ILLINOIS CONCEALED CARRY Illinois Concealed Carry Classes, Maple Park www.pureamerican.us

Little Tikes Talking Kitchen - Like new, one owner, includes food and dishes. $40. 815-568-6162

Will assist in all aspects of the daily distribution of the newspaper, including delivery of open routes, ride alongs with Independent Contractors and assisting with service issues. Overnight and early morning hours available. Flexible days and hours available, $12/hr to start plus mileage reimbursement. ACI Midwest is an equal opportunity employer. Please submit resume and work history to: dstamper@acicirculation.com or call 630-594-7918

In peaceful Ellen Oaks Beautiful brick/cedar 3 BR, 2 1/2 BA ranch on 1/2 acre lot w/ mature trees, remodeled 2008, hdwd, carpet, ceramic flrs, furn, A/C, deck, quality counters & SS appl. w/1st flr laundry, FP, full bsmt, 2 1/2 car gar., Syc school Dist. Price - $218,000. 815-739-1734 or 815-895-4480

Will beat anyone's price by $300.

!! !! !!! !! !!

954 W. State Street Sycamore, IL 60178 Send Resume or Apply in Person DRIVER: must be 21+, have valid DL w/ clean record, lift 50+ daily, pass drug, bkgrd, & FBI tests. Apply: SHS, 551 Spartan Trail, Sycamore

1990 & Newer

Will pay extra for Honda, Toyota & Nissan

CLEANING PERSON

CMA (Certified Medical Assistant)

Power Lift Chair- Reclining In good condition. $100 obo 815-751-6519

New MTD Electric Start Kit for 5 HP Tecumseh 4-Cycle Engine $100 815-748-7693

PT to FT position needed for Kelly's Custom Services located in Sycamore. 8am-?. Must have valid Drivers License and cell phone. No exp. necessary. Will train right person.

Call Kelly at: 815-739-9101 or email: kellyscustomservices@ comcast.net

Mobility chair by Invacare - Pronto M51 model. Good condition. $475. 815-751-6519

I BUY CARS, TRUCKS, VANS & SUVs

Publisher's Notice: All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation of discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD tollfree at 1-800-669-9777. The tollfree telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 23RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DEKALB COUNTY - SYCAMORE, ILLINOIS Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. PLAINTIFF Vs. Scott A. Oplt; et. al. DEFENDANTS 12 CH 00018 NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on 12/12/2013, the Sheriff of DeKalb County, Illinois will on 3/27/14 at the hour of 1:00PM at Public Safety Building, 150 North Main Sycamore, IL 60178, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of DeKalb and State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: PIN 03-19-384-015 Improved with Residential COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 219 S. Emmett Street Genoa, IL 60135 Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the property is a condominium and the foreclosure takes place after 1/1/2007, purchasers other than the mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee's attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all informa-

ify tion. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 151701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: Codilis & Associates, P.C., 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-11-41678. I589966 (Published in the Daily Chronicle, February 11, 18 & 25, 2014.)

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 23RD JUDICIAL DISTRICT DEKALB COUNTY, ILLINOIS CITIMORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff, -v.DAVID GLITTENBERG, et al Defendant 12 CH 327 NOTICE OF SHERIFF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on October 10, 2013, the Sheriff of DeKalb County will at 1:00 PM on March 13, 2014, at the DeKalb County Courthouse, at the DeKalb County Public Safety Building, 150 North Main Street, front door entrance, Sycamore, IL, 60178, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 2925 GREENWOOD ACRES, Dekalb, IL 60115 Property Index No. 08-12101-003 The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $272,208.19. Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; the balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff's attorney: HAUSELMAN, RAPPIN & OLSWANG, LTD. , 39 South LaSalle Street - Suite 1105, CHICAGO, IL 60603, (312) 3722020. Please refer to file number

12-2222-19811. I588590 (Published in the Daily Chronicle, February 6, 13 & 20, 2014.)

PUBLIC NOTICE AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 23RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COUNTY OF DEKALB-SYCAMORE, ILLINOIS JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. LAURENS RIJK and SHELLY RIJK aka SHELLY L. RIJK, Defendants. 12-CH-207 Property Address: 1333 Whitetail Ln., Sandwich, IL 60548 PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to the Judgment of the above Court entered on January 10, 2013 in the above-entitled cause, the following described real estate, to wit: Permanent Index Number: 1925-225-009 Commonly known as: 1333 Whitetail Ln., Sandwich, IL 60548 will be offered for sale and sold at public vendue on February 27, 2014, at 1:00 p.m., at the Public Safety Building, 150 North Main, Sycamore, Illinois. The Judgment amount is $322,312.53. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: The bid amount, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, shall be paid in certified funds immediately by the highest and best bidder at the conclusion of the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate, and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to the Plaintiff. The Sale is further subject to confirmation by the Court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. For information, contact the Plaintiff's Attorney: Heavner, Scott, Beyers & Mihlar, LLC, 111 E. Main St., Decatur, Illinois 62523 (217) 422-1719. The purchaser of a condominium unit at a judicial foreclosure sale, other than a mortgage, who takes possession of a condominium unit pursuant to a court order or a purchase who acquires title from a mortgage shall have the duty to pay the proportionate share, if any, of the common expenses for the unit which would have become due in the absence of any assessment acceleration during the 6 months immediately preceding institution of an action to enforce the collection of assessments, and which remain unpaid by the owner during whose possession the assessments accrued. If the outstanding assessments are paid at any time during any action to enforce the collection of assessments, the purchaser shall have no obligation to pay any assessments which accrued before he or she acquired title. If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay

gage pay the assessments required by the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5 (g-l) If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee's attorney. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 151701 (c) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. Note: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act you are advised that the Law Firm of Heavner, Scott, Beyers & Mihlar, LLC, is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. James A. Coale Attorney for Heavner, Scott, Beyers & Mihlar, LLC I589405 (Published in the Daily Chronicle, February 6, 13 & 20, 2014.)

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 23RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DeKALB COUNTY-SYCAMORE, ILLINOIS SANTANDER BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION PLAINTIFF VS DEREK HARTMANN A/K/A DEREK C. HARTMANN; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR COMPASS MORTGAGE INC.; DEFENDANTS 13 CH 144 1711 SOUTH 7TH STREET DEKALB, IL 60115 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE ACT ***THIS DOCUMENT IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT ON A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE*** PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered by said Court in the above entitled cause on December 12, 2013, DEKALB COUNTY SHERIFF in DEKALB County, Illinois, will on March 27, 2014, in 150 N. Main Street, Sycamore, IL 60178, at 1:00PM, sell at public auction and sale to the highest bidder for cash, all and singular, the following described real estate mentioned in said Judgment, situated in the County of DEKALB, State of Illinois, or so much thereof as shall be sufficient to satisfy said Judgment: TAX NO. 08-26-355-010 COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 1711 SOUTH 7TH STREET DEKALB, IL 60115 Description of Improvements: ONE STORY SINGLE FAMILY HOME WITH A ONE CAR ATTACHED GARAGE The Judgment amount was $124,272.51. Sale Terms: This is an "AS IS" sale for "CASH". The successful bidder must deposit 25% down by certified funds; balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. NO REFUNDS. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate, water bills, etc., and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to plaintiff. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the bid amount, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Prospective bidders are

FOR SALE – ALL BRICK HOME

WANTED CONSIGNMENTS FOR 30TH ANNUAL

LELAND LIONS CLUB FARM MACHINERY AUCTION

TRUCKS, CARS, LAWN & GARDEN EQUIPMENT, TOOLS & MISCELLANEOUS FARM ITEMS www.lelandlionsclub.com

*

Deep, Deep Yard with this 3 Bedroom Home. Huge Garage. Estate Sale at $98,000

SATURDAY MARCH 15th, 2014 9:00 AM Consignments now being accepted for listing and advertising by calling one of the committee members listed below. Items must be listed by February 21st, to be properly advertised. Further items will be welcome for consignment until 5:00 p.m. Thursday before sale. Accepting consignments Saturday, March 8th - Thursday, March 13th. No consignment deliveries accepted after March 13th. All items must be saleable. 1 Piece or a Full Line - Multi-State Buyers & Advertising Donated items will also be Welcome and Appreciated * NO FURNITURE OR APPLIANCES * RACK ITEMS MUST BE FARM RELATED ITEMS ONLY!! * LAWN & GARDEN ITEMS MUST RUN * NO PICKUP BED LINERS OR FIBERGLASS TOPPERS!! * NO UNSEALED LIQUIDS!! SALE COMMITTEE AUCTION RATE PER CONSIGNER Rick Hecathorn . . . . . . . . . . . . . 815-405-9248 All individual items (except rack items) $24 Ron Johnson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 815-228-2198 or less will be a donation to the Lions Club. Randy Johnson . . . . . . . . . . . . . 815-830-0820 $25 - $100 - 20% Brent Dannenberg . . . . . . . . . . 815-228-5629 $101 to $500 - 15% Nate Gudmunson. . . . . . . . . . . 815-970-0001 $501 to $2000 - 10% Mark Newsom . . . . . . . . . . . . . 815-792-8701 $2001 and over 6% Jim Elliott. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 815-343-2527 or maximum $400 per item Eric Danielson. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 815-621-9765 No Sales: 2% Min $20, Max. $100 per item Duane Rickert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 815-495-9248 $40 surcharge per rack Matt Blocker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 630-417-2745 $15.00 PER TIRE Drop-Off Fee Email consignments to rjbj58@kwisp.com (Duals Excluded) Titled Vehicles – Commission or Buy Back – Min. $100

NO TITLE - NO SALE

Fax consignments to (815) 498-2570 Consignments Listed By February 21st. Will Appear on Sale Bill.

“WHERE REAL BUYERS MEET REAL SELLERS” OVER A MILE OF MACHINERY TO CHOOSE FROM!

B67740

Contact the Better Business Bureau www.chicago.bbb.org - or Federal Trade Commission www.ftc.gov

BLUMEN GARDENS OPENINGS

SYCAMORE Immediate Occupancy

!! !! !!! !! !!

ALWAYS INVESTIGATE BEFORE INVESTING ANY MONEY

CALL NEDRA ERICSON, REALTOR 815-739-9997

FOR SALE – TOWNHOME EASY LIVING Snow & Ice Removal All Done *

Ranch Townhome with English Basement 2BR, 2BA, Large Kitchen, Formal Dining Rm + Living Rm + Sun Rm.

CALL NEDRA ERICSON, REALTOR 815-739-9997


CLASSIFIED

Daily Chronicle / daily-chronicle.com sp osp admonished to check the court file to verify all information. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DYAS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For Information: Visit our website at http:\\service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only - Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff's Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel. No. (312) 372-2060. Please refer to file #PA1304767 Plaintiff's attorney is not required to provide additional information other than that set forth in this notice of sale. I589069 (Published in the Daily Chronicle, February 13, 20 & 27, 2014.)

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE TWENTY THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DEKALB COUNTY, ILLINOIS THE NATIONAL BANK & TRUST COMPANY Plaintiff, vs. ARTURO SANCHEZ, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, Defendants. CASE NO. 13 CH 215 NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment for Foreclosure entered by the Court in the above entitled cause the property hereinafter described or so much thereof as shall be sufficient to satisfy said judgment, shall be sold to the highest bidder. 1. The name, address and telephone number of the person to contact for information regarding the real estate is: Jeffrey L. Lewis Klein, Stoddard, Buck & Lewis LLC 2045 Aberdeen Court Sycamore, IL 60178 (815) 748-0380 2. The common address and other common description, if any of the real estate is: 1216 STATE STREET, DEKALB, IL 60115

COMMON ADDRESS: 233 Judy Lane, Cortland, Illinois 60112 P.I.N.: 09-20-101-034 The real estate is improved with a single family residence. THE JUDGMENT AMOUNT WAS: $138,160.64 Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds; the balance, by certified funds, is due within twenty four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "as is" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representations as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. Pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512, the amounts of any surplus bid will be held by the sheriff until a party obtains a Court Order for its distribution, or for 60 days following the date of the entry of the order confirming sale, at which time, in the absence of an order directing payment of the surplus, it may be automatically forfeited to the State without further notice. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 151701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: Johnson, Blumberg & Associates, LLC, 230 W. Monroe St., Chicago, IL 60606, telephone 312-541-9710. Please refer to file number IL 13 6574. Johnson, Blumberg, & Associates, LLC 230 W. Monroe Street, Suite 1125 Chicago, Illinois 60606 Ph. 312-541-9710 Fax 312-541-9711 JB&A # IL 13 6574 I588677 (Published in the Daily Chronicle, February 13, 20 & 27, 2014.)

GENOA DELUXE 2 BEDROOM 1 bath, remodeled, appl. Counrty setting, close to downtown Genoa. 815-784-4606 ~ 815-901-3346

PUBLIC NOTICE

Shabbona ~ Spacious 2BR Newly painted, W/D hook-up. No dogs, $640/mo + security. 847-738-2334

Stone Prairie 2BR, 2BA APT. Washer & dryer, central air, fireplace, exercise center. Cat friendly. Private fishing. $765/mo.

Laing Mgmt. 815-758-1100 or 815-895-8600

SYCAMORE - 2 Bedrooms, 1-1/2 Bath, hardwood, DW, Washer & Dryer, basement storage. $875 @ 202 S. Maple. 630-443-9072

Sycamore 1 Bedroom Wood style floors, laundry on site. A/C, off St. parking, cats? $545/mo. 815-756-2064 SYCAMORE 2 bdrm, 1 ba, upper, new flooring / paint, laundry, pets ok, $675 +util. 815-751-3982

4. A description of the improvements on the real estate: Residential real estate 5.The time and place of the sale A. February 27, 2014 at 1:00 pm B. DeKalb County Sheriff's Office, 150 North Main Street, Sycamore, IL 60178 6. The terms of the sale are: A. The sale shall be by public auction. B. The sale shall be by open verbal bid. C. The sale shall be conducted by the Sheriff of DeKalb County. D. The sale shall be cash. E. The sale shall be "as is" condition without any representation or warranty as to the condition of the property. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. 7. Title will be conveyed without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff subject to all general real estate taxes which are a lien upon the real estate, in addition to those which have not yet become due and payable, and special assessments and special taxes, if any, and easements, covenants, conditions, zoning laws and drainage ditches, feeders, laterals and restrictions of record. 8. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the Purchaser shall receive a certificate of sale which will entitle Purchaser to a deed to the real estate subject to court confirmation of the sale. 9. The property will NOT be open for inspection. THE NATIONAL BANK & TRUST COMPANY OF SYCAMORE BY: /s/Jeffrey L. Lewis One of its Attorneys Prepared by: JEFFREY L. LEWIS #06257559 Klein, Stoddard, Buck & Lewis, LLC 2045 Aberdeen Court Sycamore, IL 60178 (815) 748-0380 mailto:jlewis@kleinstoddard.com

DEKALB 1 BEDROOM Available Dec/Jan. Close to NIU, Free heat & water, quiet lifestyle. Varsity Square Apts. 815-756-9554 www.glencoproperties.com BIG APARTMENTS, LESS MONEY! Rochelle: 15 minutes from DeKalb 1 BR & 2BR Starting at $530 Recently updated! Affordable heat. Walk to shops! (815) 562-6425 www.whiteoakapartments.net Now accepting Visa, M/C, Discover

CORTLAND 2BR, 2BA CONDO Huge Apt, all new, quiet, clean, all appl incl W/D in Apt. Secure bldg, call for showing. 815-758-6580

AVAILABLE NOW! Newly remodeled 2 Bedroom CALL FOR DETAILS 815-245-6098 ~ 815-923-2521 Sycamore Studio w/Garage. A/C. Laundry. Clean & Quiet. $450/mo. J & A RE 815-970-0679 SYCAMORE: NEWER 2BR Upper. CA. DW. W/D on Site. Off-Street Prkg. No pets. $695 Incl. Water & Garbage. J&A RE 815-970-0679

Fireplace, 2 car gar, all appl incl W/D, $1200/mo + sec. For more info call Anthony 630-730-8070

Hillcrest Place Apts.

220 E. Hillcrest. 815-758-0600 hillcrestplaceaptsdekalb.com DEKALB - downtown upper front apartment. 2 bedrooms, cute, clean and quiet. Energy efficient furnace and central air, new appliances $600 per month plus utilities 630-327-7147

DEKALB - SPACIOUS MARKET APARTMENTS Starting @ $599, 2 Bedroom $683, 3 Bedroom Near the heart of NIU. Incl gas and forced air heat. Off street parking, lush grounds, on site laundry room. Outdoor pool, tennis and basketball courts, patios and balconies. Cats OK.

University Village Apts. 722 N. Annie Glidden Rd. 815-758-7859

DEKALB 1 BEDROOM With study, stove, fridge, heat incl. 815-748-4085 DEKALB 2BR, 1.5BA DUPLEX

All appl, D/W, W/D, C/A,1 car garage, $975/mo. 815-494-0861

(Published in the Daily Chronicle, January 30, February 6 & 13, 2014.)

DEKALB ADULT, QUIET, REFINED Building. 2 Bedroom Apt with homey environment. Car port. For mature living. Excellent Location! No pets/smoking. Agent Owned. 815-758-6712

PUBLIC NOTICE

DeKalb Newer 2BR Duplex

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 23RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DEKALB COUNTY - SYCAMORE, ILLINOIS GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC, PLAINTIFF vs. RUTH R. RATKE; GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC; COVENTRY TOWNHOMES OF NORTH FIELD FARMS COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION, INC.; DEFENDANT 13 CH 244 Address: 233 Judy Lane, Cortland, Illinois 60112 Judge Thomas Doherty NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on October 17, 2013, I, Sheriff of DeKalb County, Illinois, will on March 13, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 PM at the DeKalb County Public Safety Building, 150 N. Main Street, Sycamore, IL, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of DeKalb, State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate:

Sycamore E. State St.

CORTLAND 3BR, 2BA TH

DeKalb 2BR's $650-$700

Quiet neighborhood, appl, W/D. Walk-in-closets, no pets, $950/mo + 1st/last /sec. 815-739-4442

DeKalb Newer 2BR Duplex Quiet neighborhood, appl, W/D. Walk-in-closets, no pets, $950/mo + 1st/last /sec. 815-739-4442

DEKALB 2 BR 1.5 BA condo near I-88, shopping, NIU. All appliances, garage, central air. Small pets OK. $925. 630-485-0508

DeKalb/Summit Enclave 2BR 1.5BA, W/D, garage, no pets, no smoking, $950/mo + sec dep. 630-654-9756 SYCAMORE - 3 BR, 2 BA Townhouse w/ Garage. Just minutes from City of DeKalb and NIU. Clean townhouse with fresh paint and new carpet. Only $1080/mo. No pets. Leave message at 630-452-9080.

Sycamore TH Like New 2BR Great location! 2BA, 2 car garage, skylights, appl, W/D, C/A, $935. No pets. 815-758-0123

DeKalb 3BR, 2BA, C/A, All Appls incl Dishwasher, Wash/Dryer, 1 car gar. $1000/mo + sec dep + util. Jerry (630) 441- 6250

DeKalb ~ The Knolls Sub. 3BR, 1.5BA, D/W, W//D, 1 car garage, $995/mo + 1st , last sec. Available Now. 815-751-3806 Sycamore – 1 Lg BD, appliances, & W/D, $550/mo. + sec. & utilities. No pets/smoking. 815-895-6747 leave message

DeKalb 4 Bedroom, 1.5 Bath on College Ave. Available Immed. $1200 + 1st, last security, no pets. 815-757-5079 Dekalb South 4th street, 2BR, kitchen, C/A, 1 flr., W/D, private driveway, quiet, $770/month 815-758-1518 GENOA - FARM HOUSE FOR RENT 4 bedroom, 1 bath, rural Genoa. 815-970-0884 for information!

HINCKLEY 3BR,1BA Appl, W/D, $1000/mo + sec. 630-707-0466 DEKALB QUIET 2 BEDROOM

1 bath, parking, laundry. NO pets/smoking, Agent Owned. 815-756-2359 - 815-758-6712

Sycamore 3BR, 2BA, updated, stove, fridge, dishwasher, W/D, A/C garage, available March 815-758-0079

DeKalb Quiet Studio 1, 2, 3BR Lease, deposit, ref, no pets. 815-739-5589~815-758-6439 DeKalb quite 1BR upper $675 all utilities included, no smoking, 1st month & security. Avail March 1. 815-757-4276 or 815-757-4277

SYCAMORE

Finished Basement. Available Immediately. All utilities + laundry. $600. 815-501-8842

DEKALB, NEW DELUXE 2BD APTS Laundry in units. Free water, NO PETS, Appliances. Ready NOW. $1025/month. 815-757-5546 Chronicle Classified 877-264-2527

Downtown on Lincoln Hwy. Contact Bill @ 630-202-8836

KIRKLAND, 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom apts $425- $550- $625. Tenants pay all utils. A few 2 & 3 Bd w/ WD hook-up. 1St, last & Sec. No Pets. 1 year Lease . Re/Max Classic (815) 784-2800

3. The legal description of the real estate: PIN: 08-23-278-044

is:

DeKalb Approx 800 Sq Ft

Sycamore-DeKalb Ave Store, Office 2070 sq. ft. 815-895-6960

PlanitDeKalbCounty.com Your online destination for all things DeKalb County

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 23RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DEKALB COUNTY - SYCAMORE, ILLINOIS Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. PLAINTIFF Vs. Scott A. Oplt; et. al. DEFENDANTS 12 CH 00018 NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on 12/12/2013, the Sheriff of DeKalb County, Illinois will on 3/27/14 at the hour of 1:00PM at Public Safety Building, 150 North Main Sycamore, IL 60178, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of DeKalb and State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: LOT 5 IN BLOCK 2 IN C. A. BROWN'S ADDITION TO THE CITY OF GENOA, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN BOOK "C" OF PLATS, PAGE 63, ON AUGUST 15, 1905, IN DEKALB COUNTY, ILLINOIS. PIN 03-19-384-015 Improved with Residential COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 219 S. Emmett Street Genoa, IL 60135 Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the property is a condominium and the foreclosure takes place after 1/1/2007, purchasers other than the mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee's attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 151701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: Codilis & Associates, P.C., 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-11-41678. I589966 (Published in the Daily Chronicle, February 11, 18 & 25, 2014.)

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 23RD JUDICIAL DISTRICT DEKALB COUNTY, ILLINOIS CITIMORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff, -v.DAVID GLITTENBERG, et al Defendant 12 CH 327 NOTICE OF SHERIFF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on October 10, 2013, the Sheriff of DeKalb County will at 1:00 PM on March 13, 2014, at the DeKalb County Courthouse, at the DeKalb County Public Safety Building, 150 North Main Street, front door entrance, Sycamore, IL, 60178, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: LOT 3, IN BLOCK 1, IN KISHWAUKEE PARK AREA 3, IN PART OF SECTION 12, IN TOWNSHIP 40 NORTH, RANGE 4 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AUGUST 18, 1978, IN BOOK ''R'' OF PLATS, PAGE 98, AS DOCUMENT NO. 414499, AND CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION RECORDED MARCH 15, 1979 AS DOCUMENT NO. 419253, IN THE CITY OF DEKALB, IN DEKALB COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as 2925 GREENWOOD ACRES, Dekalb, IL 60115 Property Index No. 08-12101-003 The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $272,208.19. Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction;

the balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff's attorney: HAUSELMAN, RAPPIN & OLSWANG, LTD. , 39 South LaSalle Street - Suite 1105, CHICAGO, IL 60603, (312) 3722020. Please refer to file number 12-2222-19811. I588590 (Published in the Daily Chronicle, February 6, 13 & 20, 2014.)

PUBLIC NOTICE AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 23RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COUNTY OF DEKALB-SYCAMORE, ILLINOIS JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. LAURENS RIJK and SHELLY RIJK aka SHELLY L. RIJK, Defendants. 12-CH-207 Property Address: 1333 Whitetail Ln., Sandwich, IL 60548 PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to the Judgment of the above Court entered on January 10, 2013 in the above-entitled cause, the following described real estate, to wit: Lot 64 of Sandhurst, a Subdivision of part of the Northeast Quarter of Section 25, Township 37 North, Range 5 East of the Third Principal Meridian, according to the Plat thereof recorded October 17, 1990 in Book "U" of Plats, Page 97 as Document No. 90009392 and Certificates of Correction recorded August 30, 1991 as Document No. 91008818 and September 17, 1991 as Document No. 91009512, all situated in the City of Sandwich, DeKalb County, Illinois. Permanent Index Number: 1925-225-009 Commonly known as: 1333 Whitetail Ln., Sandwich, IL 60548 will be offered for sale and sold at public vendue on February 27, 2014, at 1:00 p.m., at the Public Safety Building, 150 North Main, Sycamore, Illinois. The Judgment amount is $322,312.53. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: The bid amount, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, shall be paid in certified funds immediately by the highest and best bidder at the conclusion of the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate, and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to the Plaintiff. The Sale is further subject to confirmation by the Court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. For information, contact the Plaintiff's Attorney: Heavner, Scott, Beyers & Mihlar, LLC, 111 E. Main St., Decatur, Illinois 62523 (217) 422-1719. The purchaser of a condominium unit at a judicial foreclosure sale, other than a mortgage, who takes possession of a condominium unit pursuant to a court order or a purchase who acquires title from a mortgage shall have the duty to pay the proportionate share, if any, of the common expenses for the unit which would have become due in the absence of any assessment acceleration during the 6 months immediately preceding institution of an action to enforce the collection of assessments, and which remain unpaid by the owner during whose possession the assessments accrued. If the outstanding assessments are paid at any time during any action to enforce the collection of assessments, the purchaser shall have no obligation to pay any assessments which accrued before he or she acquired title. If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5 (g-l) If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee's attorney.

Thursday, February 13, 2014 • Page C7 gag gag ey IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 151701 (c) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. Note: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act you are advised that the Law Firm of Heavner, Scott, Beyers & Mihlar, LLC, is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. James A. Coale Attorney for Heavner, Scott, Beyers & Mihlar, LLC I589405 (Published in the Daily Chronicle, February 6, 13 & 20, 2014.)

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 23RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DEKALB COUNTY - SYCAMORE, ILLINOIS RBS Citizens NA, successor by merger to CCO Mortgage Corp. PLAINTIFF Vs. Martha Aguayo; Unknown Owners and Nonrecord Claimants DEFENDANTS 13 CH 00447 NOTICE BY PUBLICATION NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU: Unknown Owners and Nonrecord Claimants; That this case has been commenced in this Court against you and other defendants, praying for the foreclosure of a certain Mortgage conveying the premises described as follows, to-wit: LOT 8 IN BLOCK 24 IN 12TH ADDITION TO HILLCREST SUBDIVISION ON A PART OF PARCEL "A" OF THE ELLWOOD FARM PLAT ON SECTIONS 14 & 15, TOWNSHIP 40 NORTH, RANGE 4 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED ON JULY 1, 1966 IN PLAT BOOK "N", PAGE 76 AS DOCUMENT NO. 333706 SITUATED IN DEKALB COUNTY, ILLINOIS. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 303 Ridge Drive, Dekalb, IL 60115 and which said Mortgage was made by: Martha Aguayo, the Mortgagor(s), to CCO Mortgage Corp., as Mortgagee, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds of DeKalb County, Illinois, as Document No. 2005012111; and for other relief; that summons was duly issued out of said Court against you as provided by law and that the said suit is now pending. NOW, THEREFORE, UNLESS YOU file your answer or otherwise file your appearance in this case in the Office of the Clerk of this Court, Maureen A. Josh Clerk of the Circuit Court 133 W. State Street Sycamore, IL 60178 on or before March 17, 2014, A DEFAULT MAY BE ENTERED AGAINST YOU AT ANY TIME AFTER THAT DAY AND A JUDGMENT MAY BE ENTERED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PRAYER OF SAID COMPLAINT. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 DuPage # 15170 Winnebago # 531 Our File No. 14-13-32381 NOTE: This law firm is deemed to be a debt collector. I589956 (Published in the Daily Chronicle, February 13, 20 & 27, 2014.)

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 23RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DeKALB COUNTY-SYCAMORE, ILLINOIS SANTANDER BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION PLAINTIFF VS DEREK HARTMANN A/K/A DEREK C. HARTMANN; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR COMPASS MORTGAGE INC.; DEFENDANTS 13 CH 144 1711 SOUTH 7TH STREET DEKALB, IL 60115 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE ACT ***THIS DOCUMENT IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT ON A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE*** PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered by said Court in the above entitled cause on December 12, 2013, DEKALB COUNTY SHERIFF in DEKALB County, Illinois, will on March 27, 2014, in 150 N. Main Street, Sycamore, IL 60178, at 1:00PM, sell at public auction and sale to the highest bidder for cash, all and singular, the following described real estate mentioned in said Judgment, situated in the County of DEKALB, State of Illinois, or so much thereof as shall be sufficient to satisfy said Judgment: LOT 19 IN THE PLAT OF BLOCK 9 OF COLONIAL SUBDIVISION, A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 26, TOWNSHIP 40 NORTH, RANGE 4 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AUGUST 23, 1960, AS DOCUMENT NO 302019, IN PLAT BOOK "L" PAGE 31, IN DEKALB COUNTY, ILLINOIS. TAX NO. 08-26-355-010 COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 1711 SOUTH 7TH STREET DEKALB, IL 60115 Description of Improvements: ONE STORY SINGLE FAMILY HOME WITH A ONE CAR ATTACHED GARAGE The Judgment amount was $124,272.51. Sale Terms: This is an "AS IS" sale for "CASH". The successful bidder must deposit 25% down by certified funds; balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. NO REFUNDS. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate, water bills, etc., and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to plaintiff. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the bid amount, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all informa-

ify tion. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (1) and (g)(4). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DYAS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For Information: Visit our website at http:\\service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only - Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff's Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel. No. (312) 372-2060. Please refer to file #PA1304767 Plaintiff's attorney is not required to provide additional information other than that set forth in this notice of sale. I589069 (Published in the Daily Chronicle, February 13, 20 & 27, 2014.)

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE TWENTY THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DEKALB COUNTY, ILLINOIS THE NATIONAL BANK & TRUST COMPANY Plaintiff, vs. ARTURO SANCHEZ, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, Defendants. CASE NO. 13 CH 215 NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment for Foreclosure entered by the Court in the above entitled cause the property hereinafter described or so much thereof as shall be sufficient to satisfy said judgment, shall be sold to the highest bidder. 1. The name, address and telephone number of the person to contact for information regarding the real estate is: Jeffrey L. Lewis Klein, Stoddard, Buck & Lewis LLC 2045 Aberdeen Court Sycamore, IL 60178 (815) 748-0380 2. The common address and other common description, if any of the real estate is: 1216 STATE STREET, DEKALB, IL 60115 3. The legal description of the real estate: PARCEL 1: LOT 8 IN BECKMAN'S SUBDIVISION OF LOT "A" OF BECKMAN'S ADDITION OF THE CITY OF DEKALB, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN BOOK "C" OF PLATS, PAGE 16, ON OCTOBER 26, 1898, IN DEKALB COUNTY, ILLINOIS. PARCEL 2: THAT PORTION OF LARSON'S SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN BOOK "B" OF PLATS, PAGE 109, NORTH OF A LINE 168 FEET NORTH OF AND PARALLEL WITH THE NORTH LINE OF MARKET STREET AND SOUTH OF LOTS 8 AND 9 OF LOT "A" OF BECKMAN'S SUBDIVISION, ALL IN SAID CITY OF DEKALB, DEKALB COUNTY, ILLINOIS. PIN: 08-23-278-044 4. A description of the improvements on the real estate: Residential real estate 5.The time and place of the sale is: A. February 27, 2014 at 1:00 pm B. DeKalb County Sheriff's Office, 150 North Main Street, Sycamore, IL 60178 6. The terms of the sale are: A. The sale shall be by public auction. B. The sale shall be by open verbal bid. C. The sale shall be conducted by the Sheriff of DeKalb County. D. The sale shall be cash. E. The sale shall be "as is" condition without any representation or warranty as to the condition of the property. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. 7. Title will be conveyed without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff subject to all general real estate taxes which are a lien upon the real estate, in addition to those which have not yet become due and payable, and special assessments and special taxes, if any, and easements, covenants, conditions, zoning laws and drainage ditches, feeders, laterals and restrictions of record. 8. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the Purchaser shall receive a certificate of sale which will entitle Purchaser to a deed to the real estate subject to court confirmation of the sale. 9. The property will NOT be open for inspection.

Judge Thomas Doherty NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on October 17, 2013, I, Sheriff of DeKalb County, Illinois, will on March 13, 2014 at the hour of 1:00 PM at the DeKalb County Public Safety Building, 150 N. Main Street, Sycamore, IL, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of DeKalb, State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: LOT E-2 OF COVENTRY TOWNHOMES OF ASPEN DRIVE PHASE THREE, A RESUBDIVISION OF LOT 74 OF CORTLAND ESTATES-UNIT FOUR, LOCATED IN PART OF THE NORTH 1/2 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 40 NORTH, RANGE 5 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED JULY 26, 2005 IN PLAT CABINET 9, AT SLIDE NO. 157-B, AS DOCUMENT NO. 2005014375, SITUATED IN THE TOWN OF CORTLAND, THE COUNTY OF DEKALB, AND THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. COMMON ADDRESS: 233 Judy Lane, Cortland, Illinois 60112 P.I.N.: 09-20-101-034 The real estate is improved with a single family residence. THE JUDGMENT AMOUNT WAS: $138,160.64 Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds; the balance, by certified funds, is due within twenty four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "as is" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representations as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. Pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512, the amounts of any surplus bid will be held by the sheriff until a party obtains a Court Order for its distribution, or for 60 days following the date of the entry of the order confirming sale, at which time, in the absence of an order directing payment of the surplus, it may be automatically forfeited to the State without further notice. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 151701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: Johnson, Blumberg & Associates, LLC, 230 W. Monroe St., Chicago, IL 60606, telephone 312-541-9710. Please refer to file number IL 13 6574. Johnson, Blumberg, & Associates, LLC 230 W. Monroe Street, Suite 1125 Chicago, Illinois 60606 Ph. 312-541-9710 Fax 312-541-9711 JB&A # IL 13 6574 I588677 (Published in the Daily Chronicle, February 13, 20 & 27, 2014.)

PUBLIC NOTICE LOOKING FOR DBE'S! Curran Contracting Company is seeking IDOT approved DBE subcontractors, suppliers, & trucking companies for the 02/28/2014 IDOT letting! Plans & Specs are available at www.dot.state.il.us or email estimating@ currancontracting.com (815) 455-5100 (Published in the Daily Chronicle, February 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 17, 18, 19, 20 & 21, 2014.)

PUBLIC NOTICE SQUAW GROVE TOWNSHIP Regular Meetings: 2nd Tuesday of the month 7 p.m. Hinckley Community Building 120 Maple St., Hinckley, IL Annual Meeting: April 8, 2014 7 p.m. with regular meeting to follow Hinckley Community Building 120 Maple St., Hinckley, IL (Published in the Daily Chronicle, February 13, 2014.)

THE NATIONAL BANK & TRUST COMPANY OF SYCAMORE BY: /s/Jeffrey L. Lewis One of its Attorneys Prepared by: JEFFREY L. LEWIS #06257559 Klein, Stoddard, Buck & Lewis, LLC 2045 Aberdeen Court Sycamore, IL 60178 (815) 748-0380 mailto:jlewis@kleinstoddard.com (Published in the Daily Chronicle, January 30, February 6 & 13, 2014.)

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 23RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DEKALB COUNTY - SYCAMORE, ILLINOIS GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC, PLAINTIFF vs. RUTH R. RATKE; GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC; COVENTRY TOWNHOMES OF NORTH FIELD FARMS COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION, INC.; DEFENDANT 13 CH 244 Address: 233 Judy Lane, Cortland, Illinois 60112

DISH TV Retailer Starting $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) Broadband Internet starting $14.95/month (where available.) Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 1-800-256-1057 RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT ONLINE AUCTION, 100+ Hobart 60 Quart Mixers Restaurants Nationwide, See website for locations near you. Sold to Highest Bidder! Bid online thru 2/17, www.SoldTiger.com

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ILLINOIS CONCEALED CARRY Illinois Concealed Carry Classes held at Maple Park American Legion. www.pureamerican.us Having a Birthday, Anniversary, Graduation or Event Coming Up? Share It With Everyone by Placing a HAPPY AD!

Buying? Selling? Renting? Hiring? To place an ad, call 877-264-2527

Daily Chronicle Classified 877-264-2527

Daily Chronicle Classified

MS. MICHELLE PSYCHIC READER PALM, TAROT & CRYSTAL READINGS Starting at $20 For your privacy parking & entrance in the back. Accepts all major credit cards. Walk-ins are welcome.

2022 Sycamore Ave. DeKalb

Call today for an appt. 815-721-2582 1 COMPLIMENTARY QUESTION ANSWERED FREE BY PHONE

JOBS, JOBS and MORE JOBS! No Resume? No Problem! Monster Match assigns a professional to hand-match each job seeker with each employer! This is a FREE service! Simply create your profile by phone or online and, for the next 90-days, our professionals will match your profile to employers who are hiring right now!

CREATE YOUR PROFILE NOW BY PHONE OR WEB FREE!

1-800-266-6204 or

Daily-Chronicle.com/jobs No Resume Needed! Call the automated phone profiling system or use our convenient online form today so our professionals can get started matching you with employers that are hiring - NOW!

FREE Money!

FREE Classified Ad! Sell any household item priced under $400.

Visit Daily-Chronicle.com/PlaceAnAd or use this handy form.

Headline:___________________________________________

Description:_________________________________________ __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ Asking Price (required):________________________________ Best Time To Call:____________________________________ Phone:_____________________________________________ NAME:_____________________________________________ ADDRESS:__________________________________________ CITY__________________________STATE_____ZIP________ DAYTIME PHONE:____________________________________ E-Mail:_____________________________________________

Upgrade Your Ad ! Add Bold $5 ! Add A Photo $5 ! Add an Attention Getter $5 ! ! !

Mail to: Free Ads P.O. Box 250 Crystal Lake, IL 60039-0250 ! Sell an item priced Email: classified@shawsuburban.com over $400 - $26

Ad will run one week in the Daily Chronicle and on Daily-Chronicle.com. One item per ad. Offer excludes real estate, businesses & pets, other restrictions may apply. We reserve the right to decline or edit the ad.

Daily Chronicle / daily-chronicle.com


DDC-2-13-2014