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Thursday, January 30, 2014

FAMILY-FRIENDLY COMEDY • A&E, C1

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Brian Regan to perform stand-up at Egyptian

Q&A: Ex-NIU linebacker talks about college reform

Gov. touts accomplishments Local legislators poke holes in State of State’s list of goals, deeds By DEBBIE BEHRENDS dbehrends@shawmedia.com

Pat Quinn

Web poll Do you think the state of Illinois is making a comeback? Vote at Daily-Chronicle. com.

Gov. Pat Quinn focused on ways to create jobs and trumpeted his accomplishments with election-year flair Wednesday in an annual speech that fell on the five-year anniversary of lawmakers booting his predecessor, now imprisoned ex-Gov. Rod Blagojevich, from office. Quinn talked about inheriting an office laden with problems, such as a mounting pension cri-

sis, fiscal issues and corruption. He detailed his work to a turn them around and laid out a plan stressing job creation and education for the five years ahead, a nod to his re-election campaign. His plan for jobs included adding a small-business advocate to his staff, slashing the $500 fee to start a limited liability company to $39, paying more attention to early education and prenatal care, doubling the number of monetary award program scholarships for college students

and investing in a new Chicago center for medical technology startups. Area Republican legislators were united in their opinions about what they heard. “The governor talked in pretty rosy terms, sugarcoating the truth,” said state Rep. Tom Demmer, R-Dixon. “Illinois has one of the highest unemployment rates in the country and a backlog of unpaid bills for many years. There’s a real disconnect there.” State Rep. Bob Pritchard,

R-Hinckley, said Quinn focused more on looking backward than what lies ahead. “It sounded like a campaign speech,” Pritchard said. “Illinois needs a bold vision for moving forward.” Pritchard said Quinn tried to take credit for job increases, but didn’t talk about unemployment. “He didn’t talk about out-migration,” Pritchard said. “People are voting with their feet.”

PROPANE PRICE SHOCK

Rob Winner – rwinner@shawmedia.com

Gary Metcalf of Conserv FS attaches a hose from his truck to a propane tank before filling it Monday at a DeKalb business. Frigid temperatures and an already limited supply of propane have caused prices to soar in swatches across the country, including DeKalb County. Prices have risen from about $3 a gallon to $5 a gallon. By KATIE DAHLSTROM DeKALB – Crystal Kleppetsch is bracing for a January heating bill of about $2,000, more than triple what it normally costs to heat her farmhouse in rural DeKalb. Kleppetsch uses propane to heat her home, making her one of millions affected by the propane shortage sweeping the country. “We’re doing everything we can to figure it out,” Kleppetsch said. “We keep [the thermostat] at 63 degrees and wear extra layers. We’ve

Frigid weather, high costs have DeKalb County feeling fuel shortage thought about cutting back on groceries and going to the food pantry, getting rid of a cellphone bill or the internet.” Frigid temperatures and an already limited supply of propane have caused prices to soar in swatches across the country, including DeKalb County. The propane supply already had

been depleted because the wet fall caused farmers to use more propane than usual to dry their crops before putting them in storage. Compounding the shortage, the Cochin pipeline, which provided propane to Minnesota suppliers, was shut down during the fall. Then the wave of subzero temperatures hit the Midwest, increas-

Few details given about Malta man’s attack on family By KATIE DAHLSTROM

See QUINN, page A4

AREA’S HOME HEATING BILLS RISING

kdahlstrom@shawmedia.com

Autopsy finished in fatal shooting

ing demand for the liquefied petroleum gas. Increased demand and shorter supply resulted in higher prices for the 5.5 million people the U.S. Department of Energy estimates use propane. Most of those customers are in the Midwest and the South. Brock Bentson, energy manager for Conserv FS, a company that supplies propane to more than 660 DeKalb County homes and businesses, said prices have risen from about $3 a gallon to $5 a gallon.

kdahlstrom@shawmedia.com DeKALB – Three local police officers were on paid administrative leave Wednesday after a Tuesday incident in which a DeKalb officer fatally shot a Malta man in the neck. DeKalb County Coroner Dennis Miller said Wednesday that Cameron D. Lupton, 28, had no visible injuries besides the gunshot wound. A bullet entered the right side of Lupton’s neck and came to rest in his left lung, Miller said. Toxicology test results will not be available for a couple of weeks. DeKalb police Chief Gene Lowery said police shot Lupton about noon Tuesday when they found him attacking his father and stepmother with a knife, and that all indications “In the are that the use preliminary of force was jus- investigation tified. there is no Lupton, who indication this lived on the 100 is anything block of South Third Street in other than a Malta, was a justifiable use 2004 graduate of force.” – Gene of DeKalb High School and, ac- Lowery, cording to his DeKalb police Facebook pro- chief file, had served in the U.S. Army. A Lupton family member declined to be interviewed Wednesday afternoon. Meanwhile, Illinois State Police spokesman Sgt. Jose DeJesus could not estimate how long the investigation into Tuesday’s incident would take. “There is no way to say how long this will take,” DeJesus said. “But I can tell you it will be investigated thoroughly.” Both Northern Illinois University and DeKalb police went to a home on the 1000 block of Quail Run in DeKalb after dispatchers overheard a disturbance there while talking with Charlotte Lupton, 67, about a well-being check she had requested for a nearby home. Charlotte Lupton and her husband, Carl Lupton, 57, were taken to Kishwaukee Hospital for multiple stab wounds. A hospital spokeswoman said Wednesday that the Luptons

See PROPANE, page A3 See SHOOTING, page A4

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MORNING READ

Page A2 • Thursday, January 30, 2014

8 DAILY PLANNER Today

Safe Passage Domestic Violence support group: 815-7565228; www.safepassagedv.org. Weekly Ladies’ Brunch: 8 a.m. at Fox Valley Community Center, 1406 Suydam Road, Sandwich. Cost for these women-only events is $4 for food and conversation, along with bottomless cups of coffee or tea. Back To Basics AA(C): 9:30 a.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb, 800452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub. com. Feed My Sheep Food Pantry: 10 a.m. to noon at Bethlehem Lutheran Church, 1915 N. First St. in DeKalb. All are welcome. Take Off Pounds Sensibly: 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. weigh-in and 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. meeting, Sycamore United Methodist Church, 160 Johnson Ave. Call Lydia Johnson, chapter leader, 815-895-4618. Open Closet: 5 to 7 p.m. at 300 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. Clothes and shoes for men, women and children. 815-758-1388. ESL and GED Classes: 6 to 8 p.m. at Esperanza en Unidad (Hope in Unity), 2225 Gateway Drive, Suite A. To register and for more information, call Dr. George Gutierrez at 815-970-3265. Keep It Simple AA(C): 6 p.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb, 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. One Day Café AA(C): 6 p.m. at Waterman United Methodist Church, 210 W Garfield St., 800452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub. com. Weight Watchers: 6 p.m. weigh-in, 6:30 p.m. meeting Weight Watchers Store, 2583 Sycamore Road (near Aldi), DeKalb. DeKalb County Amateur Radio Emergency Service: 7 p.m. on 146.73 megahertz. For information, call Bill Itter (N9EWA) at 815-895-2020. Sandwich Steppers AA(C): 7 p.m. at Fox Valley Community Center, 1406 Suydam Road, 800452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub. com. Free Fit Club: 7:30 to 9 p.m. at Sycamore Community Center, 138 Fair St., Sycamore. Featuring rotating cardio or yoga programs from various Beachbody workouts like P90X, Insanity, Turbo Fire, Body Gospel, Turbo Jam, Hip Hop Abs, Rev Abs and many others. Call 815-901-4474 or 815-5663580 for more information. A Friend Of Bill’s AA(C): 8 p.m. at Trinity Lutheran Church, 33930 N. State St., Genoa, 800-4527990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Any Lengths AA(C): 8 p.m. at Federated Church, 612 W. State St., Sycamore, 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Closed Discussion AA: 8 p.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb, 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Friday Sexaholics AnonymousDeKalb: 6:30 to 7:30 a.m. Fridays at Christ Community Church, 1600 E. Lincoln Highway, DeKalb. This 12-step recovery program is for Internet addiction. Contact: 815-508-0280. SA.org. Weight Watchers: 8:30 a.m. weigh in, 9 a.m. meeting Weight Watchers Store, 2583 Sycamore Road (near Aldi), DeKalb. Pass It On AA(C): 9:30 a.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb, 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Story time: 10 a.m. at Barnes & Noble, 2439 Sycamore Road in DeKalb. Free readings are open to the public. Narcotics Anonymous: Noon at 512 Normal Road in DeKalb; www. rragsna.org; 815-964-5959. There is a Solution Too AA: 12:05 p.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb, 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. ACBL Duplicate Bridge: 12:30 p.m. at Wildwood North Recreation Center, 1 Birch St. in Sandwich. 815-498-4405. Elburn Lions Club Bingo: Doors open at 5 p.m. at 500 Filmore St. Early Bird Bingo starts at 6:30 p.m., followed by the first of four progressive raffles. Regular Bingo games start at 7 p.m. and include two split the pot games. Food and drink are available for purchase. 630-365-6315. Bingo license B-04001. Peace vigil: 5 to 6 p.m. at Memorial Park at First Street and Lincoln Highway, DeKalb. DeKalb Interfaith Network for Peace and Justice Peace Circle follows at 6 p.m. 815-758-0796.

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

8 WHAT’S HAPPENING AT DAILY-CHRONICLE.COM? Yesterday’s Reader Poll results:

Today’s Reader Poll question:

Did you watch the State of the Union last night? No: 73 percent Yes: 18 percent No, but I caught the news: 9 percent

Vol. 136 No. 26

Do you think the state of Illinois is making a comeback? • Yes, things are improving • No, it’s about the same • No, things are getting worse

Total votes: 633

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Fed to slow pace of bond buying By MARTIN CRUTSINGER

At issue

The Associated Press WASHINGTON – Given the U.S. economy’s growing strength, the Federal Reserve pushed ahead Wednesday with a plan to shrink its bond-buying program, even though the prospect of reduced stimulus and higher interest rates has rattled global markets. The central bank said it will cut its monthly bond purchases starting in February by $10 billion to $65 billion. It also reaffirmed a plan to keep short-term rates at record lows to try to reassure investors that it will keep supporting an economy that’s stronger than at any point since the recession yet remains less than fully healthy. The Fed’s decision came in a statement after the final policy meeting of Ben Bernanke, who will step down Friday after eight years as chairman. He will be succeeded by Vice Chairwoman Janet Yellen. Most economists expect that under Yellen, the Fed will announce a string of $10 billion monthly reductions in bond purchases at each meeting this year, concluding with a final $15 billion cut in December. Still, if the American

The Federal Reserve’s bond purchases have been intended to keep long-term borrowing rates low to spur spending and growth. Its decision Wednesday to continue paring purchases signals the Fed’s belief that the economy is showing consistent improvement.

economy were to falter, the Fed has stressed that it might suspend its pullback in bond buying so it could keep aggressively holding down long-term loan rates. Many global investors fear that reduced Fed bond buying will raise U.S. interest rates and cause investors to move money out of emerging markets and into the United States for higher returns. Currency values in emerging economies have fallen over that concern. In response, central banks in emerging economies, from India to Turkey to South Africa, have been acting to counter any damage from the Fed’s pullback and the prospect of higher U.S. rates. They’ve been raising their own rates, hoping to control inflation, boost their

flagging currencies and keep investors from fleeing. But so far, those currencies have continued to weaken. Today, the government will issue its first estimate of economic growth in the October-December quarter. Analysts have estimated that the economy grew at a solid 3.3 percent annual rate last quarter after an even stronger 4.1 percent annual rate from July through September. Still, stocks fell after the Fed announced its decision. That was in part because of disappointing earnings from big U.S. companies and the jitters in emerging markets. The Dow Jones industrial average closed down 189 points. It had been down 127 points just before the Fed’s announcement. Disappointing earnings from big U.S. companies contributed to a sour mood on Wall Street. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note slipped to 2.68 percent. Some analysts said the Fed’s confidence in the U.S. economy appeared to outweigh any concern that the turmoil in emerging market economies might spill over into the United States and other developed nations.

8 TODAY’S TALKER

Fewer Monarchs being seen in Mexico By MARK STEVENSON The Associated Press MEXICO CITY – The stunning and little-understood annual migration of millions of Monarch butterflies to spend the winter in Mexico is in danger of disappearing, experts said Wednesday, after numbers dropped to their lowest level since record-keeping began in 1993. Their report blamed the displacement of the milkweed the species feeds on by genetically modified crops and urban sprawl in the United States, extreme weather trends and the dramatic reduction of the butterflies’ habitat in Mexico because of illegal logging of the trees they depend on for shelter. After steep and steady declines in the previous three years, the black-andorange butterflies now cover only 1.65 acres in the pine and fir forests west of Mexico City, compared to 2.93 acres last year, said the report released by the World Wildlife Fund, Mexico’s Environment Department and the Natural Protected Areas Commission. They covered more than 44.5 acres at their recorded peak in 1996. Because the butterflies clump together by the thousands in trees, they are counted by the area they cover. While the Monarch is not in danger of extinction, the decline in their population now marks a statistical longterm trend and can no longer be seen as a combination of yearly or seasonal events, experts said. The announcement came on the heels of the 20th anniversary of the North American Free Trade Agreement, which saw the United States, Mexico and Canada sign environmental accords to protect migratory species such as the Monarch. At the time, the butterfly was adopted as the symbol of trilateral cooperation. “Twenty years after the signing of NAFTA, the Monarch migration, the symbol of the three countries’ cooperation, is at serious risk of disappearing,” said Omar Vidal, the World Wildlife Fund director in Mexico. Lincoln Brower, a leading entomolo-

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A Monarch butterfly perches on a tree in December 2011 at the Sierra Chincua Sanctuary in the mountains of Mexico’s Michoacan state. The number of Monarch butterflies wintering in Mexico has plunged to its lowest level since studies began in 1993. gist at Sweet Briar College in Virginia, wrote that “the migration is definitely proving to be an endangered biological phenomenon.” “The main culprit,” he wrote in an email, is now genetically modified “herbicide-resistant corn and soybean crops and herbicides in the USA,” which “leads to the wholesale killing of the monarch’s principal food plant, common milkweed.” While Mexico has made headway in reducing logging in the officially protected winter reserve, that alone cannot save the migration, wrote Karen Oberhauser, a professor at the University of Minnesota. She noted that studies indicate that the U.S. Midwest is where most of the butterflies migrate from. “A large part of their reproductive habitat in that region has been lost due to changes in agricultural practices,

mainly the explosive growth in the use of herbicide-tolerant crops,” Oberhauser said. Extreme weather – severe cold snaps, unusually heavy rains or droughts in all three countries – have also apparently played a role in the decline. But the milkweed issue now places the spotlight firmly on the United States and President Barack Obama, who is scheduled to visit Mexico on Feb. 19, with events scheduled for Toluca, a city a few dozen miles from the butterfly reserve. “I think President Obama should take some step to support the survival of the Monarch butterflies,” said writer and environmentalist Homero Aridjis. “The governments of the United States and Canada have washed their hands of the problem, and left it all to Mexico.”

8DID YOU WIN? Illinois Lottery Wednesday’s drawing Pick 3-Midday: 9-0-3 Pick 3-Evening: 4-2-5 Pick 4-Midday: 4-9-0-7 Pick 4-Evening: 2-0-6-2 Lucky Day Lotto-Midday: 1-8-18-24-27 Lucky Day Lotto-Evening: 5-9-24-26-34 Lotto jackpot: $12.75 million Tuesday’s drawing Pick 3-Evening: 6-5-3 Pick 4-Evening: 0-9-3-3 Lucky Day Lotto-Evening: 9-11-27-33-39

Mega Millions Tuesday’s drawing Numbers: 7-16-28-53-60 MegaBall: 2 Megaplier: 3 Mega jackpot: $84 million

Powerball Numbers: 11-23-28-32-47 Powerball: 20 Power Play: 2 Powerball jackpot: $171 million

Obama’s executive omissions leave some allies angry The ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON – For some White House allies, the long list of executive actions President Barack Obama announced in his State of the Union address was marred by a few glaring omissions. Gay rights advocates are seething over Obama’s refusal to grant employment discrimination protections to gays and lesbians working for federal contractors, safeguards they have been seeking for years. And some immi-

gration overhaul supporters were disappointed that he did not act on his own to halt deportations, which have soared during his presidency and angered many Hispanics. On both issues, White House officials say the place for action is in Congress, where successful legislation would be far more sweeping than the steps the president could take by himself. But work on an employment nondiscrimination bill and an overhaul of the nation’s immigration laws is stalled

on Capitol Hill, leaving advocates perplexed as to why their calls for executive action did not fit into Obama’s vow to act “whenever and wherever” Congress will not. “In the absence of congressional action, an executive order that prohibits discrimination by contractors is a tailor-made solution to the president’s expressed aims,” said Fred Sainz, vice president of Human Rights Campaign, the nation’s largest gay advocacy organization. Sainz said his frustration with the White

House’s inaction on the issue was “growing by the day.” Ben Monterroso, executive director of the immigration organization Mi Familia Vota, said: “The president said he is going to use executive orders to act where Congress fails, and we expect him to do the same with immigration reform.” The criticism is particularly striking given that it is coming from two constituencies that have reliably supported the president. More than 70 percent of Hispanic

voters backed Obama in the 2012 presidential election, and the gay community has consistently praised him for his unprecedented support. For gay advocates, the frustration that came after the State of the Union was compounded by the fact that the president announced a minimum-wage executive order that in many ways mirrored the action they are seeking. The order raises the minimum hourly pay for new federal contractors from $7.25 to $10.10.


Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

LOCAL

Thursday, January 30, 2014 • Page A3

DeKalb Park District hires interim director director. “I think he’s a good character,” Young said. “I think it’s good to get someone from the outside to look at things.” About a year will have passed between Capek’s last day and the time a new director is hired, but board member Per Faivre said the decision to hire an outside interim director was not based on the timeframe. “This option would have been presented to us whenever we hired a search firm,

and I think it’s an opportunity we had to seize,” Faivre said. “It’s hard to see the condition of your roof from the inside of your house.” The board Wednesday also moved to suspend the stipends for assistant directors Lisa Wells Small and Bradley Garrison, who were receiving $1,250 and $600 a month, respectively, for the extra work they have been doing. Previous information provided by Young incorrectly had put their stipends at $1,400 and $700 monthly.

Kirkland eyes community-owned grocery

Inmate accused of hitting officer

By KATIE DAHLSTROM kdahlstrom@shawmedia.com DeKALB – A retired park district director from St. Charles will lead the DeKalb Park District until a permanent director can be hired in May, the park board decided Wednesday. Board members unanimously supported hiring Ray Ochromowicz, 58, of St. Charles, to be the part-time interim director. Ochromowicz will be paid $5,438 a month for

working 20 to 25 hours a week until the board can hire a permanent executive director. The board also approved an annual salary range of $110,000 to $120,000 for the Ray Ochromowicz new permanent executive director, who will be required to live within park district boundaries. An updated job description that stresses communication,

goal setting, teamwork and financial knowledge will be posted in the coming days. Ochromowicz said he will not apply to permanently fill the role that was vacated when Cindy Capek resigned in May because he is not looking for a full-time position. “I’m here to keep things floating until the new director is in place,” Ochromowicz said. “I look at it like I’m here to help.” Ochromowicz retired from the St. Charles Park District in

August after serving as director since January 2011. Before he joined the St. Charles Park District, he had a brief stint with the Park Ridge Park District, which was preceded by 23 years at the Bolingbrook Park District. According to Park Board President Phil Young, Ochromowicz was recruited and presented to the board by the Hazard, Young, Attea and Associates, the search firm the board engaged in November to find the new executive

By DEBBIE BEHRENDS dbehrends@shawmedia.com KIRKLAND – While Kirkland leaders are focusing on cleaning out the village-owned former grocery story, one idea has surfaced about what the next business to open there could be. Dan Kenney, executive director of DeKalb County Community Gardens, is suggesting opening a community-owned grocery store in the empty building the village purchased in December. Village leaders have set aside about $250,000 in tax-increment financing funds to renovate the building and formed an ad hoc committee to clear and renovate the building so it can be sold or rented. But Kenney plans to talk with village trustees in March about a community-owned grocery store, which could include an independent retailer, a cooperative, a school-based store or some combination of the three. The community would decide what works best, Kenney said. “The first step would be for the board to say they like the idea,” Kenney said. “Then we would hold a public meeting and see who shows up.” Kenney suggested potential partners in the project could be DeKalb County Community Gardens, KishHealth System, Kishwaukee College, Northern Illinois Center for Governmental Studies and

By ANDREA AZZO aazzo@shawmedia.com

Rob Winner file photo – rwinner@shawmedia.com

The former Kirkland Super Market was purchased by the village, which plans to redevelop it using tax increment financing. others. “I’m mostly interested in this project because of my interest in local foods, which generate more income for the local economy in terms of local ownership and economic development,” Kenney said. Recruiting companies to the area can leave a gap of sorts, Kenney said. “When it’s not good for

their bottom line, they move,” he said. Village Trustee John Pierce said he needed more information before making a decision on Kenney’s proposal. “I think it would be good to have a grocery store in town again, particularly for the elderly residents who have to rely on someone else to get their groceries,” Pierce said.

Although Village President Les Bellah is willing to listen, he said there’s a more pressing issue for the project. At Monday’s Village Board meeting, board members will consider an ordinance that declares everything inside the building as surplus property so it can be salvaged. “I can call the scrappers on Tuesday morning,” Bel-

lah said. “They’ll do a walkthrough to determine what they are going to sell and what they will scrap.” Bellah said the company, based in Rochelle, will pay the village $700 and remove everything in the building. “They will take everything off our hands,” Bellah said. “There’s nothing in there that’s helping us now.”

Prosecutors argue DeKalb man is ‘sexually violent’ By ANDREA AZZO aazzo@shawmedia.com DeKALB – Prosecutors have taken the first steps to have a 54-year-old DeKalb sex offender committed for psychiatric treatment after he spent four years behind bars for sexually abusing a 6-yearold he was babysitting. Carmen Protano, of the 1600 block of South Fourth Street, pleaded guilty to aggravated criminal sexual abuse Dec. 9, 2011, in DeKalb County; he was accused of sexually abusing a family

member over three years. Protano is in custody of the Department of Human Services at its Rushville Treatment and Detention Facility. If prosecuCarmen tors successfulProtano ly argue Protano is a violent sex offender under the Sexually Violent Persons Commitment Act, he would receive treatment in a secure facility until authorities believe he is no longer a

threat. “It’s a legal avenue the state can use to ensure the community, particularly young people, that someone should not be allowed to roam free once their term is up,” said Scott Mulford, press secretary for the Illinois State Attorney General. On Wednesday, DeKalb County Presiding Judge Robbin Stuckert found there was probable cause to believe Protano was a sexually violent person, which means authorities can hold him while they prepare for a trial that would

provide a final determination. Vasiliki Tsoflias, a clinical psychologist at Wexford Health Services, diagnosed Protano with pedophilic disorder based on his criminal history. Protano has been involved in sexual acts with numerous children, both boys and girls related and unrelated to him, since he was a teenager, Tsoflias testified Wednesday. Protano also pleaded guilty to a 1993 Florida battery charge, which Tsoflias said was sexual in nature.

He was ordered to seek sex offender treatment, but other than his word, Tsoflias had no proof Protano sought treatment. While in prison, Protano has not sought sex offender treatment, Tsoflias said. Assistant Public Defender Chip Criswell argued that the diagnosis was not valid because it only took into consideration Protano’s criminal charges rather than doing a mental evaluation. Stuckert disagreed, however. Protano’s next court date is March 20.

SYCAMORE – A 27-year-old Chicago man already in jail for a drug-induced homicide charge faces more felony charges after he allegedly hit a police officer Tuesday while on his way to the courthouse. Christopher Davis, formerly of the 800 block of West Hillcrest Drive, DeKalb, was charged with agg r a v a t e d Christopher battery to a Davis police officer and resisting a police officer. Police said when Davis was being escorted onto the elevator on his way to the DeKalb County Courthouse, he pulled away from a DeKalb County Sheriff’s officer and swung his elbow at him twice, bloodying the officer’s lip, court records show. Davis continued to resist until the officer unholstered his taser, at which time Davis stopped, court records show. Davis is in custody for allegedly supplying heroin to Melissa Ramon, 33, of DeKalb, who overdosed in a coin laundry bathroom March 5, 2013, and died three days later. If convicted of the drug-induced homicide charge, he would face between six and 30 years in prison. Davis’ is being held on $1.4 million bond. If convicted of the more serious new charge, aggravated battery to a police officer, he could face as many as seven years in prison. He is next due in court Thursday.

Local propane shipments coming from distant suppliers Gary Metcalf of Conserv FS prepares to fill a propane tank Monday at a DeKalb business. Gov. Pat Quinn on Monday declared a propane supply emergency in Illinois, where shortages of the heating fuel have driven up prices.

• PROPANE Continued from page A1 “I have never seen it this bad,” Bentson said. Gov. Pat Quinn on Monday declared a propane supply emergency in Illinois. The declaration means travel regulations for propane truck drivers will be loosened so they can drive to other states to fill their tanks. They will also be able to drive more in a 24-hour period. The declaration could help retailers such as Conserv FS keep up with the demand. “We’re currently able to get enough propane, but we have to go farther and farther to get it,” Bentson said. Normally, Conserv FS is able to get propane from suppliers in Rockford, Morris and Janesville, Wis., but the shortage has forced them to get shipments from as far away as Hattiesburg, Miss. AmeriGas, the largest propane supplier in America, has been rotating propane delivery in select markets across the country, according to spokesman Simon Bowman. He couldn’t say what markets

Rob Winner – rwinner@ shawmedia.com

were affected because of how quickly it changes, but said he expects things to return to normal in a couple of weeks when temperatures rise. A couple of weeks would bring Kleppetsch, an AmeriGas customer, dangerously close to an empty tank. It takes about 400 gallons of propane a month to heat the home Kleppetsch rents on Gurler Road. Last winter, she said her propane bills were around $600 a month. So she was ill-prepared for a $1,350

bill for December. She has about three weeks’ worth of propane left in her tank, but will have to pay the $850 remaining from her December bill before she can refill it. “I don’t know what to do,” she said. “I have no other choice than to use propane.” Even if she and her husband can piece together the money to pay for a previous month, it’s unclear how expensive the next batch of propane will be. Last week she

was told her tank could be filled for $5.50 a gallon, but this price is hardly guaranteed because of the frequent price fluctuation. Bentson also thinks relief should be on the way once temperatures go up and demand goes down, allowing propane reserves to rebuild. “I think the industry will be able to bounce back,” Bentson said. “I’m not sure what the low price will be, but we won’t see prices like we do now.”

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Page A4 • Thursday, January 30, 2014

NEWS

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

House passes compromise farm bill By MARY CLARE JALONICK

How they voted

The Associated Press WASHINGTON – After years of setbacks, a nearly $100 billion-a-year compromise farm bill cleared the House on Wednesday despite strong opposition from conservatives who sought a bigger cut in food stamps. The five-year bill, which preserves generous crop subsidies, heads to the Senate, where approval seems certain. The White House said President Barack Obama would sign it. The measure, which the House approved 251-166, had backing from the Republican leadership team, even though it makes smaller cuts to food stamps than they would have liked. After wavering for several years, the GOP leaders were seeking to put the long-stalled bill behind them and build on the success of a bipartisan budget passed earlier this month. Leaders in both parties also were hoping to bolster rural candidates in this year’s midterm elections. House Speaker John Boehner did not cast a vote on the bill, a commonplace practice for a speaker, but he had issued a statement Monday saying it was “worthy of the

The House passed a compromise farm bill, 251-166, on Wednesday to reform and continue programs of the Department of Agriculture through fiscal 2018. Local Congressmen Randy Hultgren, R-14th District, and Adam Kinzinger, R-16th District, both voted in favor of the bill.

Source: The Associated Press

AP file photo

Combines harvest winter wheat in July 2009 on the Cooksey farm near Roggen, Colo. House lawmakers passed a massive, five-year farm bill Wednesday. There are goodies scattered through the bill for members from all regions of the country, including a boost in money for crop insurance popular in the Midwest. House’s support.” Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., voted for the bill despite concerns from some in her caucus that the bill cut too much from the food stamp program. The bill ultimately would cut about $800 million a year from the $80 billion-ayear food stamp program, or

8POLICE REPORTS

8STATE BRIEFS

Note to readers: Information in Police Reports is obtained from the DeKalb County Sheriff’s Office and city police departments. Individuals listed in Police Reports who have been charged with a crime have not been proven guilty in court.

Driver in Tollway death had been awake 35 hours

DeKalb city Heather C. Mendez, 33, of the 700 block of Normal Road, DeKalb, was arrested Monday, Jan. 20, on an instate warrant. Lauren A. Winters, 26, of the 800 block of West Hillcrest Drive, DeKalb, was charged Tuesday, Jan. 21, with trespass to land. Allison G. Hutchinson, 19, of the 1100 block of North 13th Street, DeKalb, was charged Tuesday, Jan. 21, with resisting, obstructing or disarming an officer. Patrick A. Regan, 23, of the 1100 block of North 13th Street, DeKalb, was charged Tuesday, Jan. 21, with resisting, obstructing or disarming an officer, criminal damage to property and domestic battery. Deon P. Grant, 25, of the 800 block of West Hillcrest Drive, DeKalb, was charged Tuesday, Jan. 21, with trespass to land. Tiffani M. White, 21, of the 800 block of State Street, DeKalb, was charged Wednesday, Jan. 22, with domestic battery. Fuad H. Abushaban, 23, of the 900 block of Fairway Drive, Naperville, was arrested Wednesday, Jan. 22, on an in-state warrant. Kyia L. Motley, 20, of the 800 block of Kimberly Drive, DeKalb, was arrested Wednesday, Jan. 22, on an in-state warrant.

Sandwich A 17-year-old boy was arrested Thursday, Jan. 16, on a DeKalb County warrant for failure to appear in court on a battery charge.

Sycamore Jonathan K. Crowley, 24, of DeKalb, was arrested Monday, Jan. 20, on a warrant for failure to appear in court on allegations of possession of drug equipment.

LaSalle County Benjamin D. Hapner, 29, of Somonauk, was charged Saturday, Jan. 25, with driving under the influence of alcohol.

WHEATON – DuPage County prosecutors said Wednesday that a truck driver being held on $150,000 bond for a crash that killed an Illinois Tollway worker and injured a state trooper had been on the job for more than 35 hours with less than four hours of sleep. Renato V. Velasquez of Chicago appeared in DuPage County court on charges of operating a commercial motor vehicle while impaired or fatigued and making a false report of record and duty status. The crash killed maintenance worker Vincent Petrella, 39, and critically injured Trooper Douglas Balder. The two were assisting a disabled truck. Velasquez was hauling steel coils weighing 14,000 pounds

around 1 percent. The House had sought a 5 percent cut. The legislation also would continue to heavily subsidize major crops for the nation’s farmers while eliminating some subsidies and shifting them toward more politically defensible insurance programs.

House Agriculture Chairman Frank Lucas, R-Okla., called the compromise a “miracle” after trying to get the bill passed for almost three years. An earlier version was defeated on the House floor in June after conservatives said the food stamp cuts were too modest and liberal Democrats said

each when his truck rammed into the stopped squad car along Interstate 88 near Aurora.

Coleman said. Judge Coleman’s decision Wednesday is a rare win for the defense, which has pressed for the government to shed more light on how investigators might have employed the kind of phone and Internet spying revealed by ex-government contractor Edward Snowden. Her pretrial ruling is in the case of 20-year-old Adel Daoud, a U.S. citizen from suburban Chicago. He denies allegations he took a phony car bomb from an undercover FBI agent in 2012, parked it by a Chicago bar and pressed a fake trigger.

Judge: Defense in terror case can see secret docs CHICAGO – The government can’t keep secret its request to conduct clandestine surveillance of an accused attempted terrorist, a federal judge ruled Wednesday in a potentially far-reaching decision that gives defense attorneys unprecedented access to records filed with a secret intelligence court. The ruling is the first time defendant’s lawyers will be given access to an application prosecutors submitted to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, or FISA, which was established in 1978 to monitor spying within in the United States, U.S. District Judge Sharon Johnson

Ill. lawmakers extend online betting law SPRINGFIELD – Illinois lawmakers approved an 11th-hour extension to an online betting law on Wednesday that will al-

they were too deep. The House later passed a bill with a higher, $4 billion cut, arguing at the time that the program had spiraled out of control after costs doubled in the past five years. But cuts that high were ultimately not possible after the Senate balked and the White House threatened a veto. The Senate had sought a cut of $400 million annually. Many House conservatives still voted against the bill – 63 Republicans opposed it, one more than in June. One of those conservative opponents was Rep. Marlin Stutzman, R-Ind. “It spends money we simply don’t have,” he said. But 89 Democrats supported it, bolstered by the lower cut in food stamps.

low horse racing tracks to keep their racing schedules intact this year. The measure passed the Senate 47-4 just moments after lawmakers officially reconvened for the year to hear Gov. Pat Quinn’s annual State of the State address, a day that customarily entails little else. The House voted 98-10 a short time later, and Quinn signed the bill Wednesday afternoon. The legislation allowing online betting had been set to expire Friday. The Illinois Racing Board had predicted major budget cuts without an extension, because money from the online betting composes about a third of its annual budget. That could have limited their oversight ability and forced racetracks to cut the number of horse races.

– Wire reports

Area lawmakers skeptical of minimum wage hike • QUINN Continued from page A1 The governor also didn’t address the state’s other major looming financial issue, including what he thinks should happen to a 2011 increase in the personal income tax that is set to expire in January 2015. He briefly mentioned the state’s backlog of unpaid bills, which is estimated to be about $6 billion by year’s end. He didn’t propose a new capital construction plan; the current one has been touted as one of his signature achievements. Instead, Quinn focused on issues affecting working people, a theme that’s been part of his 2014 campaign. He called to again double the earned income tax credit, something he did in 2011. He also reiterated his push to increase the minimum wage from $8.25 to at least $10 an hour, which coincides with a national Democratic strategy and has been a main issue among Republicans hoping to replace Quinn. The state minimum wage already is $1 higher than the national minimum, but Quinn said that increasing the mini-

AP photo

Gov. Pat Quinn delivers the State of the State address Wednesday to a joint session of the General Assembly in the House chambers at the Illinois State Capitol. mum would benefit the Main Street economy because for each $1 an hour increase in their income, minimum wage workers would have an extra $2,800 a year to spend in their communities. “They’re putting in long hours. Yet in too many instances, they are living in poverty,” he said of low-wage workers. “That’s not right. That’s not an Illinois value.” State Sen. Tim Bivins, R-Dixon, disagreed with Quinn’s proposal to increase

minimum wage. “Anytime you raise the minimum wage, you impact businesses,” Bivins said. “The question then becomes, can the businesses afford it?” State Sen. Dave Syverson, R-Rockford, said Quinn’s proposals on increasing the minimum wage, increasing the earned income credit and adding regulations on small employers requiring them to cover at least two earned sick days a year would hinder growth.

“There is very little discussion about doing things to grow those middle-class jobs,” Syverson said. “He may be sincere, unfortunately, he’s not correct.” “We’ve tried those theories for the last nine years in Illinois,” he said. “The things we’re doing aren’t working.” Quinn, a Chicago Democrat, highlighted other accomplishments during his tenure, including the state’s legalization of same-sex marriage and a pension overhaul designed to eliminate Illinois’ $100 billion unfunded liability – the worst in the nation – by cutting benefits for retirees and employees. Quinn has been reserved in taking credit for the reform plan, particularly since it’s prompted lawsuits from labor unions, the latest of which was filed Tuesday. The lawsuits say the plan is unconstitutional, but Quinn has said it will hold up to a court challenge. Still, he took a careful tone Wednesday, thanking legislators who voted and the committee that created the framework.

• The Associated Press contributed to this report.

8OBITUARIES DAVID L. RAND Born: Feb. 10, 1952, in DeKalb, Ill. Died: Jan. 27, 2014, in Kingston, Ill. KINGSTON – David L. Rand, 61, of Kingston, Ill., died Monday, Jan. 27, 2014, at his home surrounded by his loving family. Born Feb. 10, 1952, in DeKalb, the son of Lowell W. and Donna (Jensen) Rand, he married Karen Rich of Kingston on April 13, 1985. David attended the Esmond elementary school and graduated from Rochelle Township High School. He played baseball and basketball for several years and enjoyed many of his sons’ sports activities. He liked watching all sports, but especially the Chicago Cubs and Bears. For 26 years, David worked for Johnson Controls in Sycamore. He worked up until he was diagnosed with cancer five months ago. Survivors include his wife, Karen; two sons, Ryan (friend – Joselyn) of Palatine and Derek of Kingston; his faithful dog, Rueben; parents, Lowell and Donna Rand of DeKalb; one sister, Diane (Steve) Salsbury of Geneva; mother-in-law, Lorraine Rich of Genoa; and many aunts, uncles, sistersand brothers-in-law; nieces, nephews, great-nieces and -nephews; and cousins. The family would like to thank all the doctors, nurses and staff for the wonderful care and compassion they gave to Dave. His memorial service will be at 11 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 1, at Slater-Butala Funeral Home in Genoa, with the Rev. Judy Harris of First Congregational Church of Christ in DeKalb officiating. The visitation will be from 3 to 7 p.m. Friday at the funeral home. In lieu of flowers, memorials can be made to the KishHealth System Hospice or the KishHealth System Cancer Center in care of Slater-Butala Funeral Home, 132 W. Main, Genoa, IL 60135. For information or to sign the online guest book, visit www. ButalaFuneralHomes.com or call 815-784-5191. To sign the online guest book, visit www.legacy.com/ daily-chronicle.

Recipe for Romance Candle Lit Dinner, Music, Wine, Great Food

~Hillside Restaurant~ 121 N. 2nd St., DeKalb • 756-4749

Sign and read he online guet books at www.legacy.com/ Daily-Chronicle View a complete list of Daily Chronicle obituaries Click calendar dates for obits published in the last 30 days Keep up on obituaries that have already been printed in the newspaper or find other funeral-related services, including flowers and memorial Web pages provided by Legacy.com.

State’s Attorney’s Office to review report of investigation • SHOOTING Continued from page A1 requested she not release an update on their medical status. Meanwhile, an NIU police officer and two DeKalb police officers who were in the home at the time of the shooting are on paid leave. Lowery reiterated his backing of the officers’

actions Wednesday. “In the preliminary investigation there is no indication this is anything other than a justifiable use of force,” Lowery said. NIU police Chief Tom Phillips said the NIU officer entered the home with DeKalb officers after responding to the radio call. The NIU officer was in a hallway outside the room

where the knife attack and shooting occurred. Phillips said it is standard procedure for an officer to be placed on administrative leave in cases where an officer uses deadly force. Another NIU officer on the scene administered first aid to one of the victims, but was not at the scene at the time of the shooting, Phillips said.

The two DeKalb officers on leave could be reinstated before the state police finish their independent investigation, Lowery said, although he could not say when. Once the state police investigation is complete, the report will be handed over to the DeKalb County State’s Attorney’s Office for review, DeJesus said.

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Opinions

Daily Chronicle • www.daily-chronicle.com • Page A5 • Thursday, January 30, 2014

8OUR VIEW

8SKETCH VIEW

State of state was tone-deaf

Chris Christie in ’16? Don’t count him out His news coverage has been brutal. His poll numbers are dropping. His enemies inside and outside his party are crowing that his presidential ambitions are over, and some journalists agree. It would nonetheless be a mistake to count out New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie for the Republican nomination in 2016. The scandals that have plagued Christie lately may even, in a roundabout way, make him more likely to win the presidency. Some skepticism about Christie’s presidential chances predates the Fort Lee scandal (in which his subordinates are accused of orchestrating a traffic jam to punish an uncooperative mayor). It’s mostly based on the idea that Christie is too liberal to win the primaries. But Christie doesn’t cross any of the party’s red lines: He’s not prochoice, and he’s not for higher taxes. Sure, you can draw up a list of issues where he has been out of step with most Republicans. But the party’s last two nominees had longer lists, with more important issues on them. Mitt Romney had a recent history of supporting legal abortion, and his record on the top domestic issue of the past few years – health care – put him at odds with conservatives. Sen. John McCain had broken with them on taxes, guns, climate change, stem cells, immigration, campaign finance and more. Most of the past seven Republican nominations have gone to people to the left of the party’s center of gravity, and none of them to anyone on its right. Why is that? Think of the nominating contest as a competition for the affection of three groups: the activist-conservative base of the party (groups like the Club for Growth and the Family Research Council), the party regulars (people who consider themselves

VIEWS Ramesh Ponnuru “conservative” but not “very conservative”), and the party establishment (elected officials, campaign operatives, big donors). The base typically splits its vote among several candidates, including a few who don’t strike the regulars as commander-in-chief material. The establishment always picks someone who passes that test, and usually picks him early in the process, before the first primary votes are cast. (Unlike the base, it doesn’t display much imagination in making its choice.) So the establishment candidate usually wins. The 2016 primary season might not shape up this way, but that’s the way to bet. The race will almost certainly feature crowding on the right once again, and the establishment still seems to favor Christie over any of his competitors, even after the traffic scandal. In New Hampshire, Christie should do well, especially if Hillary Rodham Clinton dominates the Democratic field. In that case, independents will vote in the competitive Republican primary rather than the dull Democratic one, and they will surely back Christie over candidates running to his right. Christie was never going to have a coronation, however, and the primaries will still be a slog. Two early states, Iowa and South Carolina, aren’t great fits for him. Although he could appeal to a lot of Florida Republicans, he might be running against home-state favorites, such as Sen. Marco

Rubio and former Gov. Jeb Bush. If Bush runs – and his intentions aren’t at all clear – then Christie might have a real struggle holding establishment support. For now, however, Christie’s chances of winning the nomination seem better than those of anyone else. And his recent troubles may help him insofar as they cause him to discard a risky strategy. Before the past few weeks, he may have thought that after winning the nomination his sheer charisma would lead him to a general-election victory. Many Republicans think that it was Romney’s lack of charisma that lost him the presidency in 2012. That’s a mistake: The actual electoral difficulties of the Republican Party run much deeper than that. The traffic scandal makes it less likely that Christie will go down this blind alley. It has made the downside of his personality loom larger, and so will force him to base his campaign on something else. And because of the nature of the scandal, and the partisan reaction to it, that “something else” can’t just be his effectiveness as a manager of government or as a leader who can reach across the aisle. It seems to me, then, that the most promising path left open for Christie is to run as a Republican from outside the boardroom: someone who will tackle, in conservative ways, the issues that concern Americans in all income groups – from the affordability of health care to wage growth. If Christie does that, he will also be leading the way forward for his party.

• Ramesh Ponnuru is a Bloomberg View columnist, a visiting fellow at the American Enterprise Institute and a senior editor at the National Review.

8VIEWS

Real, stagnant state of the union is inescapable By MATT MILLER The Washington Post Can a president really be a “year of action” hero armed with just his “pen and phone”? Or is that a formula for what I call kinder, gentler decline? Those are the essential questions beneath the pomp and ceremony of the State of the Union. And maybe the paradoxical answer to both questions is “yes.” I’m always torn when watching a State of the Union speech. I agree with the vision of America that President Barack Obama laid out. Trouble is, I’ve agreed with it since I first heard Bill Clinton lay out the same vision when I followed Clinton into the White House as an aide in 1993. Yet in the years since, on virtually every metric progressives care about – save for expanded health coverage, once the dust finally clears from Obamacare – the measures of a good society have gone in the wrong direction. Wages are stagnant or shrinking. School rankings have sagged. College and health costs have soared. Our rates of child poverty lead the developed world. Decent jobs

remain scarce. The accident of birth weighs more heavily in dictating one’s destiny. All the compelling anecdotes or special guests in the chamber don’t change that. When I hear Obama cry that no one who works full time should live in poverty in America, it’s like Groundhog Day. Can I be alone in this reaction? I want to play the split screen with Bill Clinton saying exactly the same thing. It made sense then. It makes sense now. So how long does a wealthy, sane nation need to fix this? If 20 years isn’t good enough – two decades in which the economy nearly doubled in size in real terms – do we need 50 years? 100? The president faces obvious constraints. But is the illusion of meaningful action really the most effective strategy? I get that the White House wants to signal that it can still “do things.” I know the administration wants to use issues like the minimum wage to frame the midterm elections. Maybe their choice is understandable. And yet the real state of the union seems inescapable. In the face of enormous economic strains on the middle class, Republicans have no ideas, and Democrats have puny “pen and phone” ideas. The result is

little progress, paired with a rhetoric-reality gap among Democrats that’s rising even faster than our concentration of wealth. Consider some of the executive actions touted by the White House. The minimum wage measure is a big deal, even if it only applies to new federal contracts (and therefore to only a relative handful of workers). It’s an important effort to lay down a marker about a decent minimal reward for work. But a “summit on working families?” A review of federal job training programs six years into the president’s tenure? Asking CEOs to (pretty please) consider hiring the long-term unemployed? “Mobilizing” the private sector to offer more apprenticeships? Passing the tin cup to corporate foundations to help connect schools to the Internet? Look, I’m all for the bully pulpit. And these measures can surely do some modest good at the margins. But it is embarrassing for the leader of a great nation to be peddling these as meaningful “action.” Do foreign leaders watching think, “Well, they’re gridlocked, but one day they’ll get their act together.” Or do they think we’re institutionally incapable of renewal?

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We welcome original letters on public issues. Letters must include the author’s full name, address and day and evening phone numbers. We limit letters to 400 words. We accept one letter per person every 15 days. All letters are subject to editing for length and clarity. Email: news@daily-chronicle.com. Mail: Daily Chronicle, Letters to the Editor, 1586 Barber Greene Road, DeKalb, IL 60115. Fax: 815-758-5059.

Gov. Pat Quinn sounded tone-deaf in his declaration that “Illinois is making a comeback” in his State of the State address Wednesday. For example, Quinn’s claim that the job market is on the rebound stems from the fact that unemployment is three points lower than its bottom-of-thetrough level of 11.3 percent during the Great Recession. In December, unemployment in Illinois was measured at 8.6 percent, after the economy shed 3,200 jobs. That leaves Illinois with the second-worst jobless rate in the country, where it has been for months. Meanwhile, the Pew Charitable Trust projects Illinois will be dead last in job creation in 2014. The national unemployment rate is 6.7 percent. Contrary to the theme Quinn repeated time and again during his speech in Springfield, that hardly For the record sounds like “getting the job done.” Gov. Pat Quinn’s celebraQuinn also counted the tory State of the State talk courtship of internationof “getting the job done” in al businesses, including Illinois ignored the reality Japanese railcar maker of the state’s problems. Nippon-Sharyo, which decided to expand its operation in Rochelle. Media reports on Wednesday also confirmed that Schaumburg-based Cancer Treatment Centers had decided to move its corporate headquarters to Boca Raton, Fla., the same city where Office Depot Inc. plans to move its newly formed company. That company chose Boca Raton over Naperville. Quinn claimed credit for the pension reform legislation in which he had limited participation, a reform that will not stop the state’s finances from sliding into a deficit in the billions within a few years without cuts in spending or increases in revenue. Quinn talked of more spending – doubling the number of math scholarships for college students, expanding investment in roads, water systems and other infrastructure, and building the Illiana Expressway and a third airport south of Chicago. Then there was the obligatory section of the speech that included the buzzword “middle class,” but had little to nothing to do with middle-class taxpayers. Instead, Quinn called for mandatory earned sick days for Illinois workers, and an increase in the minimum wage to $10 an hour. Missing was any mention of the growing property tax burden homeowners face, and, as expected, the state’s income tax increase that is scheduled to “sunset” at the end of this year was not mentioned. Yet it is those middle-class taxpayers who work to pay the higher taxes to the state and the too-numerous local governments that always seem to need more money. It is also they who seem destined to foot the bill for the ambitious plans of a governor who insists that higher taxes, too-high unemployment and continued, nagging bulletins about fiscal crisis constitute “getting the job done.”

8 ANOTHER VIEW

God, graduation an uneasy mix for schools One doesn’t need a calendar anymore to know the end of another school year is approaching. Instead, look for the flurry of letters threatening school officials with legal action should someone so much as mention God during the graduation ceremony. A four-month warning has already been given to administrators of Norris City-Omaha-Enfield High School in southern Illinois. The American Humanist Association is threatening a lawsuit if the school doesn’t stop prayers from being offered during graduation ceremonies. It’s the first time Principal Matt Vollmann said there has been any complaint about the student-led prayer. The American Humanist Association maintains the prayer forces students to take part in a religious activity. So once again there is a clash between rights. The question becomes which should win: Freedom of speech or separation of church and state? It wouldn’t be fair to tell someone who disagreed with prayer at graduation to simply not attend the ceremony. This is a momentous event that should welcome those of all beliefs and all backgrounds. It is just as unfair to prohibit students from giving thanks and praise to those they consider instrumental in their journey: Parents, educators and, yes, God. It is what the courts have referred to as private speech versus government speech. The Supreme Court has said it is unconstitutional to invite clergy for the purpose of prayer, but has sent mixed messages about student-led prayers. The high court’s 1992 ruling made it clear schools cannot be the sponsors of graduation prayers because of the Establishment Clause of the Constitution. But it has said students can express themselves during such ceremonies and that expression might include prayer. Some schools have gone to the extreme of canceling graduation exercises entirely to avoid the issue. That is a misguided approach to take as well. What usually ends up driving schools’ decisions, then, is not tradition or majority desires but fear of litigation. It’s a shame the last lessons many high school seniors have to learn are constitutional and case law. The (Alton) Telegraph

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. – U.S. Bill of Rights, First Amendment


WEATHER

Page A6 • Thursday, January 30, 2014

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

7-DAY FORECAST

A clipper system will spread some light snow, mainly during the late morning with accumulations less than an inch. Winds will be on the increase as the front pushes through gusting up to 30 mph. Much colder air will arrive Friday before temperatures rebound Saturday. A storm system will come up from Texas/Oklahoma, bringing a better chance of heavier snow.

TODAY

TOMORROW

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

Cloudy, breezy and warmer; light snow

Cloudy and colder; a few snow showers

Cloudy and warmer with snow

Partly sunny, breezy and very cold

Mostly sunny and warmer

Increasing clouds; some snow late

Windy with some snow early; colder

30

18

20

12

20

20

17

10

15

2

0

6

8

3

Winds: SW 15-25 mph

Winds: NW 5-10 mph

UV INDEX

ALMANAC

Winds: N/NE 5-10 mph

Winds: NW 5-15 mph

Winds: W 5-15 mph

Winds: E/NE 10-15 mph

Winds: NW 5-15 mph

REGIONAL CITIES

REGIONAL WEATHER

DeKalb through 4 p.m. yesterday

Temperature High ............................................................. 19° Low ............................................................... -1° Normal high ............................................. 29° Normal low ............................................... 13° Record high .............................. 60° in 2013 Record low ............................... -12° in 1972

Precipitation 24 hours through 4 p.m. yest. ......... 0.00” Month to date ....................................... 1.31” Normal month to date ....................... 1.39” Year to date ............................................ 1.31” Normal year to date ............................ 1.39”

First

Full

The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. 0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme.

AIR QUALITY TODAY

Feb 6

Rockford 30/3

Source: Environmental Protection Agency

Dixon 30/5

What weather phenomenon is referred to as a ‘bowling ball’?

Joliet 30/13

La Salle 32/13

Evanston 31/11 Chicago 31/11

Aurora 30/9

WEATHER TRIVIA™ Q:

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Waukegan 29/6

Arlington Heights 31/7

DeKalb 30/10

Main ofender ................................................... N.A.

Streator 33/16

Hammond 34/10 Gary 30/14 Kankakee 31/14

Peoria 35/14

Pontiac 34/16

Watseka 32/16

Feb 14 Feb 22

NATIONAL WEATHER

Hi 30 44 29 30 34 30 30 31 31 29 33 31 30 32 32 40 29 30 30 38 32 30 29 30 30

Today Lo W 9 sn 27 pc 4 sn 4 sn 19 pc 7 sn 13 sn 14 sn 10 sn 14 sn 9 sn 15 sn 11 sn 14 sn 10 sn 17 c 7 sn 2 sn 3 sn 18 c 8 sn 11 sn 6 sn 4 sn 11 sn

Tomorrow Hi Lo W 17 4 c 33 25 sn 13 2 c 15 3 c 27 16 sn 18 5 c 20 8 sn 23 10 sn 17 6 sn 22 11 sn 15 4 sn 21 10 sn 19 7 c 20 8 sn 17 6 sn 24 11 sn 15 2 c 13 3 c 14 1 c 27 15 sn 15 4 sn 19 5 c 17 3 c 15 1 c 19 7 sn

RIVER LEVELS

WEATHER HISTORY

Last

The temperature at La Junta, Colo., rose from 5 degrees on the morning of Jan. 30, 1991, to a high of 50 degrees in the afternoon.

Jan 30

Lake Geneva 28/4

A: An upper-level storm separated from the main jet stream.

Sunrise today ................................ 7:10 a.m. Sunset tonight ............................. 5:07 p.m. Moonrise today ............................ 6:35 a.m. Moonset today ............................ 5:21 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ........................ 7:09 a.m. Sunset tomorrow ........................ 5:08 p.m. Moonrise tomorrow ................... 7:17 a.m. Moonset tomorrow ................... 6:36 p.m.

Kenosha 29/3

8 a.m. 10 a.m. Noon 2 p.m. 4 p.m. 6 p.m.

0-50 Good, 51-100 Moderate, 101-150, Unhealthy for sensitive groups, 151-200 Unhealthy 201-300 Very Unhealthy, 301-500 Hazardous

SUN and MOON

New

Janesville 29/3

City Aurora Belleville Beloit Belvidere Champaign Elgin Joliet Kankakee Mendota Michigan City Moline Morris Naperville Ottawa Princeton Quincy Racine Rochelle Rockford Springield Sterling Wheaton Waukegan Woodstock Yorkville

Location

7 a.m. yest.

Kishwaukee Belvidere Perryville DeKalb

1.24 6.25 3.01

Flood stage

9.0 12.0 10.0

24-hr chg

-0.01 +0.08 +0.07

DRAW THE WEATHER Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

-10s -0s 0s 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

Cold Front

Warm Front

Stationary Front

T-storms Rain Showers Snow Flurries

City Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Boston Bufalo Charleston, SC Charlotte Chicago

Hi 40 29 29 29 27 39 35 31

Today Lo W 22 s 23 s 18 s 24 s 24 pc 27 pc 18 s 11 sn

Tomorrow Hi Lo W 52 36 pc 41 32 pc 43 28 pc 40 28 c 33 17 sf 50 39 pc 51 29 pc 19 6 c

Ice

City Cincinnati Dallas Denver Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles

Hi 33 62 38 60 32 44 71 66

Today Lo W 25 pc 47 pc 21 r 53 pc 25 pc 20 c 48 pc 52 c

Tomorrow Hi Lo W 36 30 sn 71 50 pc 30 12 sn 71 61 c 31 23 sn 30 16 sn 60 39 pc 66 50 pc

City Louisville Miami Minneapolis New Orleans New York City Philadelphia Seattle Wash., DC

Hi 38 77 16 52 29 29 46 30

Today Lo W 28 pc 68 sh -11 sn 44 pc 24 s 21 s 38 sh 23 s

Legend: W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow lurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Tomorrow Hi Lo W 38 35 i 81 71 sh 8 0 pc 65 55 pc 38 30 pc 38 30 pc 44 31 sh 46 33 pc

Partly sunny and snowy Amelasky, Littlejohn Elementary School Mail your weather drawings to: Geoff Wells, 1586 Barber Greene Road, DeKalb, IL 60115

Forecasts and graphics, except WFLD forecasts, provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2014

OAK CREST DeKalb Area Retirement Center www.oakcrestdekalb.org

“Make things happen...” I always said when I was ready for retirement, Oak Crest would be the place for me but I wasn’t sure if it would fit in my budget. So, I was pleasantly surprised to find that life at Oak Crest was more affordable than I imagined. Oak Crest has it all! With beautiful surroundings, great people and exciting events, I feel Marilyn Sjoholm right at home. I know, you’re sitting there right now thinking you could put off a decision of this magnitude for another month, maybe even another year. Just remember, while you’re busy waiting, the clock is ticking. You’ve heard that old saying that there are two kinds of people, those who wait for things to happen and those who make things happen. I’ve always been independent and deciding on life at Oak Crest means I’m still making things happen. Oak Crest affords me the opportunity to maintain my independence while securing my future. Why wait? Marilyn Sjoholm, Resident since May 2012

For more information call (815) 756-8461 or visit us on the web at www.oakcrestdekalb.org


Sports

The Northern Illinois men’s basketball team needed two late free throws to beat Kent State. PAGE B2

SECTION B Thursday, January 30, 2014 Daily Chronicle

Sports editor Ross Jacobson • rjacobson@shawmedia.com

8MORNING KICKOFF

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL: NORTHERN ILLINOIS 65, KENT STATE 43

Defense leads NIU to win over Kent St. By STEVE NITZ snitz@shawmedia.com

AP photo

Colter glad he’s face of college athlete union bid Kain Colter (above) is the perfect front man for the College Athletes Players Association. Colter is the ideal student-athlete: playmaker as quarterback and receiver, three-time Big Ten all-academic honoree, polished speaker. “God has blessed me with the ability to be a natural-born leader whether it’s as a quarterback, team captain or leader outside of the football field,” Colter told The Associated Press on Wednesday. “This is something I’m truly passionate about.” Colter, who played at Northwestern, and the United Steelworkers have announced plans to form the first labor union for college athletes. Colter said at Tuesday’s news conference in Chicago that football and basketball players help generate hundreds of millions of dollars for schools, coaches and administrators, but the NCAA gives them little or no say about financial compensation or how to improve their own safety. Colter told the AP he loved his experience at Northwestern, but he has long believed the system is broken. He comes from an athletic family. His father, Spencer Colter, was a safety on Colorado’s 1990 national championship team. His uncle, Cleveland Colter, was an All-America safety at Southern California. Colter said he was moved to action after a conversation with his teacher in a summer class called Modern Workplace. The class was studying the history of labor unions, and the teacher asked him why college athletes didn’t unionize, considering all the money their sports generate. – Wire report

DeKALB – There were times throughout Wednesday night’s game against Kent State where the Northern Illinois bench chanted “D-up! D-up! D-up!” Then the chant would switch to “Defense! Defense!, Defense!” The NIU players on the floor seemed to have that in

mind anyway, as the Huskies defeated the Golden Flashes, 65-43, and improved to 8-10 overall and 4-4 in Mid-American Conference play. The 43 points Kent State finished Kathi Bennett w i t h i s t h e lowest output of the season for a Huskies opponent. The Golden Flash-

es came into the contest averaging just 52.1 points a game, the worst total in the MAC, but NIU still held Kent State to about nine points below its season average. “I just thought our ball screen D was great. I thought Jenna [Thorp] in the first half, she stopped their posts from scoring,” NIU coach Kathi Bennett said. “Second half they got rolling a little bit, but Jenna really did a great job

Next for N. Illinois Northern Illinois at Western Michigan, 3:30 p.m. Saturday bringing the double, knowing when to double. Just made a huge difference on the defensive end.”

8KEEP UP ONLINE Follow us on Facebook and Twitter Want the latest from the area’s prep sports scene? Follow our coverage on Facebook by searching for DC Preps or on Twitter at twitter.com/dc_preps. Follow our NIU athletics coverage on Facebook by searching for Huskie Wire or on Twitter at twitter.com/HuskieWire.

See HUSKIES, page B2

NORTHERN ILLINOIS FOOTBALL

Not wasting any time

8WHAT TO WATCH Men’s college basketball Cincinnati at Louisville, 6 p.m., ESPN Florida at Mississippi State, 6 p.m., ESPN2 Providence at Marquette, 6 p.m., FS1 Bryant at Robert Morris, 7 p.m., ESPNU Purdue at Michigan, 8 p.m., ESPN UCLA at Oregon, 8 p.m., ESPN2 Saint Mary’s (Calif.) at San Diego, 9 p.m., ESPNU Pro basketball Cleveland at New York, 7 p.m., TNT L.A. Clippers at Golden State, 9:30 p.m., TNT Golf PGA Tour, Phoenix Open, first round, at Scottsdale, Ariz., 2 p.m., TGC European PGA Tour, Dubai Desert Classic, second round, at Dubai, United Arab Emirates, midnight, TGC

On the offensive end, the Huskies found open open shooters all night off dribble penetration into the lane against Kent State (3-16, 0-8 MAC), and had success with their jump shots. NIU finished the night shooting 48 percent from the field, taking advantage of the quickness guards like Danny Pulliam and Amanda Corral possess.

Rob Winner – rwinner@shawmedia.com

Northern Illinois offensive lineman Shane Evans, a former offensive tackle for Prairie Ridge, enrolled a semester early and is working out on campus, the only player in his class to do so.

Prairie Ridge grad Evans enrolls early, follows in LB Folliard’s footsteps By STEVE NITZ snitz@shawmedia.com

D

eKALB – Shane Evans remembers the first Division I letter he received. It was at the end of his freshman year at Prairie Ridge in Crystal Lake, and the letter was from the University of Arkansas. As Evans’ career as an offensive tackle unfolded, the letters and offers kept rolling in. Evans started every

More online For a video interview with Shane Evans, discussing his recruiting process and decision to attend NIU, log on to HuskieWire.com. game during his four years at Prairie Ridge, winning a Class 6A state championship in 2011. He’s the only four-

year starter in school history. Plenty of offers came in, including ones from Northern Illinois, Indiana, Cincinnati, Toledo, Boise State, Ball State and Western Michigan. Back in October, Evans verbally committed to NIU. And before the first semester of his senior year, he made the decision to take an extra class so he had the option of graduating a semester early, something he actually thought about back during his freshman year.

Evans is already enrolled at NIU and working out on campus, the only one in his class to do so. “The way I looked at it, senior year, a lot of kids are taking easy classes towards the end of the year,” Evans told the Daily Chronicle. “So why waste an extra semester doing nothing when I can be up here taking harder classes, getting closer to my major and working out for my college program.”

See EVANS, page B8

Q&A WITH FORMER NORTHERN ILLINOIS LINEBACKER JORDAN DELEGAL

Delegal supports NU’s attempts to unionize Jordan Delegal played linebacker at Northern Illinois from 2009 to 2011 and now works for Paragon Marketing Group in Chicago. The Daily Chronicle talked with Delegal about college football reform and Northwestern’s recent attempt to form a union. Below is an edited transcript.

Daily Chronicle: Why do you support Northwestern players’ recent efforts and attempt to unionize? Jordan Delegal: I support them because we relate on so Shaw Media file photo many different levels. There Former Northern Illinois linebacker Jordan Delegal (right) supports the comes a time where enough Northwestern football players’ recent efforts and attempt to unionize is enough. We have all these different documentaries college football.

that talk about [the NCAA], all these investigations that happen from the players’ side of things. But nobody really comes at the guy making the rules. Especially for them to come together for a real policy, not just for money. DC: Was this something you had heard about or talked about when you were playing at NIU? JD: At NIU we’re a little bit different than Northwestern. We’re a smaller school, so the funding is a bit different. It’s a bigger conference versus a smaller conference. It’s a little bit different when you hear it from somebody who has all those things that we don’t have. It’s

the difference between the haves and have-nots. When somebody actually speaks out about it on a smaller scale, people kind of dust it under the rug, but when somebody’s on a bigger scale and is a part of those [BCS] conferences, people start listening then. We spoke about it, but there weren’t many things we could do about it as a player and as a smaller mid-level conference. Everybody talks about it from high school to college, but once you get to college it’s a little bit different. They are talking about it now and providing awareness.

See DELEGAL, page B8


SPORTS

Page B2 • Thursday, January 30, 2014

8PREP SCHEDULE TODAY Boys Basketball Kaneland at St. Edward, 7:30 p.m. Girls Basketball Earlville at Hiawatha, 6:45 p.m. Indian Creek at Serena, 6:45 p.m. Somonauk at Hinckley-Big Rock, 7 p.m. Wrestling Genoa-Kingston hosts triangular with Richmond-Burton, Harvard, 5:30 p.m. Sycamore at Sterling, 6 p.m. Boys Swimming Elgin at DeKalb-Sycamore, 5 p.m.

FRIDAY Boys Basketball Indian Creek at Newark, 6:45 p.m. Serena at Hiawatha, 6:45 p.m. Paw Paw at Hinckley-Big Rock, 7 p.m. Sycamore vs. DeKalb at NIU Convocation Center, 8 p.m. Girls Basketball Sycamore vs. DeKalb at NIU Convocation Center, 6 p.m. Kaneland at Yorkville, 7 p.m. Wrestling Genoa-Kingston at Rockford Lutheran tournament, 5 p.m. Kaneland at Batavia, 5:30 p.m. DeKalb at St. Charles East, 7 p.m.

SATURDAY Boys Basketball Polo at Indian Creek, 7 p.m. Sycamore at Morris, 7 p.m. Kaneland at DeKalb, 7 p.m. Genoa-Kingston at North Boone, 7:15 p.m. Girls Basketball IMSA at Kaneland, 2:30 p.m. Winnebago at Genoa-Kingston, 3 p.m. Girls Bowling Sycamore, DeKalb at Dixon tournament, 9 a.m. Girls Gymnastics DeKalb at Independent Conference meet at Oswego, TBA

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

MAC MEN’S BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

MAC STANDINGS

NIU beats Kent State DAILY CHRONICLE STAFF Northern Illinois men’s basketball rallied from a 14-point second-half deficit and Travon Baker made two free throws with five seconds remaining to help NIU to a 5049 victory over Kent State on the road. Aksel Bolin scored a gamehigh 14 points and Baker added 11 for the Huskies (8-11, 2-5 MAC). “It was a great comeback and a great team win,” NIU coach Mark Montgomery said. “We had three guys score in double figures and Kent State only had one, so our defensive effort was very good. When we got behind in the second half, we didn’t panic, we just said, ‘Let’s get three stops in a row,’ and we were able to keep plugging away.” Junior center Jordan Threloff finished with 10 points and a game-high eight rebounds for NIU, which lost in overtime to Kent State at home earlier in the season. NIU travels to Ball State for a 1 p.m. tipoff Saturday against the Cardinals.

Toledo 83, Miami (Ohio) 70:

At Oxford, Ohio, Justin Drummond scored 16 points and grabbed 11 rebounds as Toledo pulled away from Miami (Ohio) for a victory. The Rockets opened the second half on a 17-5 run to extend its lead, 54-38, and maintained a double-digit lead for the rest of the game. Drummond scored eight straight points during the run. Nathan Boothe added 14 points and J.D. Weatherspoon had 13 for Toledo, which shot 55 percent from the field and won its sixth straight game.

Buffalo 84, Western Michigan 63: At Buffalo, N.Y., Javon McCrea scored 20 points as Buffalo cruised past Western Michigan. Buffalo shot 52 percent from the floor and won the rebound battle 41-27. Shannon Evans had 17 points, Justin Moss and Joshua Freelove added 14 apiece and Will Regan chipped in with 10 points and eight boards.

Ohio 71, Central Michigan 67: At Athens, Ohio, Maurice Ndour scored 21 points and grabbed 11 rebounds as Ohio came back from an 18-point second-half deficit to beat Cen-

tral Michigan. Ohio trailed 48-30 with less than 15 minutes to play, but then went on a 21-3 run to tie the game at 51 with 8 minutes left.

Eastern Michigan 69, Bowling Green 57: At Ypsilanti, Mich., Glenn Bryant came off the bench to score a career-high 26 points and grab 10 rebounds to lead Eastern Michigan to a victory over Bowling Green. Mike Talley had 12 points, four assists and five rebounds for the Eagles. Daylen Harrison and Ray Lee each added 10 points.

Akron 73, Ball State 46: At Akron, Ohio, Demetrius Treadwell and Nick Harney led the way for Akron with 15 points each in a victory over Ball State. After falling behind early, Akron used a 24-2 run through the middle of the first half to build a 35-19 lead at the break. The Zips started slow again in the second, but rolled off 15 straight points to open a 24-4 run which led to their biggest advantage at 66-38.

• The Associated Press contributed to this report.

NFL PLAYOFFS

West Division Con. Overall W L W L Toledo 6 1 18 2 EMU 4 3 12 8 WMU 4 3 11 8 NIU 2 5 8 11 Ball State 1 6 4 15 CMU 0 7 7 12 East Division Con. Overall W L W L Akron 6 1 14 6 Ohio 5 2 15 5 Buffalo 5 2 11 6 Miami 4 3 8 10 B. Green 3 4 9 11 Kent State 2 5 11 9 Wednesay’s results Northern Illinois 50, Kent State 49 (OT) Eastern Michigan 69, Bowling Green 57 Toledo 83, Miami 70 Ohio 71, Central Michigan 67 Buffalo 84, Western Michigan 63 Akron 73, Ball State 46 Saturday’s games Northern Illinois at Ball State, 1 p.m. Toledo at Ohio, noon Central Michigan at Western Michigan, 1 p.m. Eastern Michigan at Miami, 1 p.m. Akron at Kent State, 5 p.m.

Northwestern upsets No. 14 Wisconsin

Lemon leads Bradley past Illinois State PEORIA – Walt Lemon, Jr. hit his first field goal with less than 10 minutes to play and scored 16 of his 20 points down the stretch as Bradley broke away late in the game to defeat Illinois State 64-45 on Wednesday night. Lemon was 0 for 5 from the field when his 3-pointer with 9:36 remaining broke open a one-point game for the Braves (9-13, 4-5 Missouri Valley Conference). Bradley launched a 12-0 run to make what had been a close game (six ties, five lead changes) look lopsided by the end.

6-time All-Star Berkman retiring from baseball HOUSTON – Six-time All-Star Lance Berkman is retiring after 15 seasons in the major leagues. Berkman almost left the game last offseason before signing with the Texas Rangers. He then had another injury-plagued season and was limited to 73 games. The 37-year-old Berkman was Houston’s first-round draft pick in 1997 out of Rice, and played 12 seasons for the Astros. He played 1,879 career games, all but 287 for Houston, finishing a .293 career hitter with 366 home runs and 1,234 RBIs. – Wire reports

Sunday At East Rutherford, N.J. Denver vs. Seattle, 5:30 p.m.

NBA EASTERN CONFERENCE Central Division W L Pct GB Indiana 35 9 .795 — Bulls 22 22 .500 13 Detroit 18 27 .400 17½ Cleveland 16 29 .356 19½ Milwaukee 8 37 .178 27½ Atlantic Division W L Pct GB Toronto 24 21 .533 — Brooklyn 20 23 .465 3 New York 18 27 .400 6 Philadelphia 15 31 .326 9½ Boston 15 33 .313 10½ Southeast Division W L Pct GB Miami 32 13 .711 — Atlanta 23 21 .523 8½ Washington 22 22 .500 9½ Charlotte 19 27 .413 13½ Orlando 12 35 .255 21

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct GB San Antonio 33 12 .733 — Houston 31 17 .646 3½ Dallas 26 21 .553 8 Memphis 23 20 .535 9 New Orleans 19 26 .422 14 Northwest Division W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 36 10 .783 — Portland 33 12 .733 2½ Denver 22 21 .512 12½ Minnesota 22 22 .500 13 Utah 16 29 .356 19½ Pacific Division W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 32 15 .681 — Golden State 27 18 .600 4 Phoenix 26 18 .591 4½ L.A. Lakers 16 29 .356 15 Sacramento 15 29 .341 15½ Wednesday’s Results Bulls at San Antonio (n) Oklahoma City 112, Miami 95 Toronto 98, Orlando 83 Philadelphia 95, Boston 94 Detroit at Atlanta, ppd. Minnesota 88, New Orleans 77 Phoenix 126, Milwaukee 117 Houston 117, Dallas 115 Charlotte at Denver (n) Memphis at Sacramento (n) Washington at L.A. Clippers (n) Today’s Games Phoenix at Indiana, 6 p.m. Cleveland at New York, 7 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Golden State, 9:30 p.m. Friday’s Games Milwaukee at Orlando, 6 p.m. Atlanta at Philadelphia, 6:30 p.m. Memphis at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Oklahoma City at Brooklyn, 7 p.m. Sacramento at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Toronto at Denver, 8 p.m. Charlotte at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m. Golden State at Utah, 9:30 p.m. Tuesday’s Results New Orleans 100, Cleveland 89 Detroit 103, Orlando 87 New York 114, Boston 88 Houston 97, San Antonio 90 Memphis 98, Portland 81 Washington 88, Golden State 85 Indiana 104, L.A. Lakers 92

8SPORTS SHORTS

MADISON, Wis. – Drew Crawford scored a season-high 30 points, JerShon Cobb added all 10 of his points in the second half and Northwestern upset cold-shooting No. 14 Wisconsin 65-56 on Wednesday night. It was Northwestern’s first win over the Badgers in Madison since 1996. The smooth Crawford glided around the court for tough shots – none harder than a 3 off a curl with Wisconsin’s Josh Gasser’s hand in his face to give Northwestern (11-11, 4-5 Big Ten) a 13-point lead. Wisconsin (17-4, 4-4) turned up the pressure late to get within six with 41 seconds left. But Traevon Jackson lost the ball on a drive with 23 seconds left to seal the Badgers’ fate.

SUPER BOWL

NHL WESTERN CONFERENCE

AP photo

Blackhawks’ goalie Corey Crawford (left) sweeps the puck out of the net as Calgary Flames’ Sean Monahan celebrates his team’s winning goal during overtime Tuesday in Calgary, Alberta. The Flames beat the Blackhawks, 5-4.

BLACKHAWKS

Blackhawks losing momentum Note to readers: Wednesday’s game between the Blackhawks and Vancouver Canucks did not finish before press time. Head to Daily-Chronicle.com/sports to read more about the Hawks’ road game. By SETH GRUEN Chicago Sun-Times VANCOUVER, B.C. – After losing Tuesday night in Calgary on the first of a six-game, seven-day road trip for the Blackhawks that takes them to the Olympic break, the team’s game against the Canucks on Wednesday in Vancouver served as a crossroads. Heading into Wednesday night’s contest the Hawks were riding a four-game losing streak, their worst since 2012. The game would either serve to spin the Hawks even further out of control or give them the confidence they need

head into the break with momentum. Luckily quality teams like Vancouver have brought out the best in the Hawks. Before the four-game skid, the Hawks won two straight games over Western Conference-leading Anaheim and Boston, which sits second in the Eastern Conference. “We knew we were playing some pretty tough teams and we raised our level of play and we just haven’t done that against anybody else,” captain Jonathan Toews said of the wins over the Ducks and Bruins at the Hawks’ morning skate Tuesday. While Tuesday’s wild 5-4 overtime loss was ridden with Hawks mistakes, recent history shows the team has been able to bounce back quickly on long road trips. Earlier this season, the

Hawks began their Circus Trip by getting smoked, 5-1, Nov. 19 in Colorado. But the team proceeded to win six straight. That included a 2-1 win Nov. 23 over Vancouver, the second win of the streak. And by accounts of some in the Hawks’ locker room, the combination of playing a heated rival like the Canucks and the team togetherness the road provides might provide the Hawks with a much-needed spark. “We played them a month or so ago and there was still a lot of stuff going back and forth,” Kris Versteeg said of the Canucks. “I know when I was here in ’09 and ’10 those playoff series were awfully heated. “The camaraderie built on the road. You’re around the guys a lot more. At home it’s

basically go to the rink and go home. I think being around the guys and building that tight-knit kind of feeling definitely always helps.” But to win on the road, the Hawks know it’s important to manage ice time. Coach Joel Quenneville likes to use four lines but has noticed of late the team hasn’t played consistently line-toline. “We like to say we are a four-line team and we’ve got four lines who are hard to play against and I think that’s been very sporadic,” Quenneville said. “On the road especially we haven’t seemed to get that consistency and we’re looking to establish that here.” With a win Wednesday, Quenneville would move into third place on the NHL’s alltime wins list.

Corral scores 11 of her team-high 13 in 2nd half • HUSKIES Continued from page B1 “Tonight I just tried to penetrate the gaps and then kick to the shooters. Just looked to get them open a lot,” said Pulliam, the Huskies’ junior point guard. “A lot of stuff to get

[Amanda Corral] some shots, get her legs under and start hitting, knocking down shots.” Six Huskies finished with at least nine points. Corral led NIU with 13, Ashley Sneed finished with 12 while Thorp and Natecia Augusta each had 10. Pulliam and Ally Lehman finished with nine points apiece.

Corral had 11 of her 13 points in the second half. “The second half I just tried to work on my mid-range game more,” said Corral, the Huskies’ leading scorer on the season. “ ... I kind of was denied in the first half a little bit. That was fine with me because my teammates were getting open

shots. I just took the open shot when I got it.” The win gets the Huskies back on the right track in league play. NIU had lost three of its past four heading into Wednesday. The Huskies will play at Western Michigan on Saturday. Tip-off is 3:30 p.m.

Central Division GP W L OT Pts St. Louis 52 36 11 5 77 Blackhawks 55 32 10 13 77 Colorado 52 33 14 5 71 Minnesota 55 29 20 6 64 Dallas 53 24 21 8 56 Nashville 55 24 23 8 56 Winnipeg 55 25 25 5 55 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts Anaheim 55 39 11 5 83 San Jose 53 34 13 6 74 Los Angeles 55 30 19 6 66 Vancouver 54 27 18 9 63 Phoenix 53 25 18 10 60 Calgary 53 19 27 7 45 Edmonton 55 17 32 6 40

GF 180 194 153 133 154 136 155

GA 119 154 137 135 157 166 162

GF 184 165 133 137 154 124 144

GA 134 126 116 138 160 169 190

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 52 34 15 3 71 159 115 Tampa Bay 53 31 17 5 67 157 131 Toronto 55 28 21 6 62 158 170 Montreal 53 28 20 5 61 131 134 Detroit 53 23 19 11 57 135 149 Ottawa 53 23 20 10 56 150 167 Florida 53 21 25 7 49 129 164 Buffalo 52 14 30 8 36 101 152 Metropolitan Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 53 37 14 2 76 171 128 N.Y. Rangers 55 29 23 3 61 141 139 Philadelphia 54 26 22 6 58 147 158 Carolina 53 24 20 9 57 134 150 Columbus 53 26 23 4 56 154 151 Washington 53 24 21 8 56 153 158 New Jersey 54 22 21 11 55 127 135 N.Y. Islanders56 21 27 8 50 158 187 Two points for win, one point for OT loss Wednesday’s Results Blackhawks at Vancouver (n) N.Y. Rangers 2, N.Y. Islanders 1 San Jose at Edmonton (n) Today’s Games Montreal at Boston, 6 p.m. Florida at Toronto, 6 p.m. Washington at Columbus, 6 p.m. Tampa Bay at Ottawa, 6:30 p.m. New Jersey at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Minnesota at Colorado, 8 p.m. San Jose at Calgary, 8 p.m. Buffalo at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Philadelphia at Anaheim, 9 p.m. Pittsburgh at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m. Friday’s Games N.Y. Islanders at N.Y. Rangers, 6 p.m. St. Louis at Carolina, 6 p.m. Washington at Detroit, 6:30 p.m. New Jersey at Nashville, 7 p.m. Vancouver at Winnipeg, 7:30 p.m. Tuesday’s Results Calgary 5, Blackhawks 4, OT Boston 6, Florida 2 Toronto 3, Tampa Bay 2 Philadelphia 5, Detroit 0 Ottawa 3, Columbus 2 Washington 5, Buffalo 4, OT Montreal 3, Carolina 0 St. Louis 3, New Jersey 0 Nashville 4, Winnipeg 3 Phoenix 3, Los Angeles 0 Minnesota 4, Anaheim 2


SPORTS

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

The

Insider

BOYS BASKETBALL NOTEBOOK

Aves becoming Barbs’ utility player By ROSS JACOBSON

A closer look at the boys basketball scene

SPOTLIGHT ON ... LUKE DAVIS III DeKalb, sophomore center Davis had the best game of his short varsity career, posting 29 points and 17 rebounds Saturday in the Barbs’ win over Rochelle.

WHAT TO WATCH FOR Indian Creek at Newark, 6:45 p.m., Friday The top two teams in the Little Ten will battle in a defacto conference title game. Sycamore vs. DeKalb at NIU Convocation Center, 8 p.m. Friday This one doesn’t need much of an explanation.

POWER RANKINGS 1. Sycamore (14-3, 4-0 Northern Illinois Big 12 Conference East) Spartans still top dog in area 2. Indian Creek (11-5, 5-0 Little Ten Conference) T’wolves receive No. 1 seed in Little Ten tournament 3. Genoa-Kingston (13-7, 3-1 Big Northern Conference East) Cogs get back into things at North Boone Saturday. 4. Kaneland (9-6, 2-2 NI Big 12) Knights travel to DeKalb on Saturday 5. DeKalb (8-13, 1-3 NI Big 12) Barbs got nice win over Rochelle 6. Hinckley-Big Rock (5-13, 2-3 LTC) Royals looking to make a move as postseason nears. 7. Hiawatha (1-9, 0-4 LTC) Hawks still winless in Little Ten.

rjacobson@shawmedia.com Pat Aves is one of just a few seniors that play a lot of minutes for the Barbs. “Outside of Rudy Lopez, Pat probably has the most varsity minutes,” DeKalb coach Dave Rohlman said. “He’s a very tough kid.” Rohlman said Aves gave the Barbs great energy in Saturday’s win over Rochelle, the first Northern Illinois Big 12 East win for DeKalb this season. While Aves has gone back and forth from starter to reserve, Rohlman said he’ll start Friday against Sycamore at the NIU Convocation Center in DeKalb. “He’s a baseball guy so we use that kind of analogy of the utility player,” Rohlman said. “He can do a little bit of everything for us. A lot of times we require him to guard the opponent’s best man. He’s one of those solidas-a-rock, steady kind of guys you need to be successful.”

Indian Creek hitting stride Indian Creek has been playing some of its best basketball since the Timberwolves went just 2-2 at the Plano Christmas Classic. “One of the things I’ve been pleased with, especially since Christmas, is we’re really understanding what our roles are on this team,” Indian Creek coach Joe Piekarz said. “We have a lot of quality players on this team.

Rob Winner – rwinner@shawmedia.com

Rockford Christian’s Aaron Johnson (left) and Nolan Gazouski (right) pressure Indian Creek’s Garrett Post (center) during a Dec. 23 game at the Plano Christmas Classic. We’re starting to get there now.” Garrett Post, who adds another inside threat along with Garrison Govig, is actually the Timberwolves’ leading rebounder at more than 10 rebounds a game. Piekarz also lauded the play of Stephen Muetze for his defensive intensity. Friday’s matchup against Newark will likely give Indian Creek its toughest test in

the Little Ten and could determine the conference champion with both teams undefeated. “We know Newark’s history and we know they’re a very solid team,” Piekarz said. “We need to be able to play our basketball game. We know that if we play good solid defense, which we’ve done this season, and we’re disciplined with what we do ... we tend to be in a lot of basketball games.”

DeKalb-Sycamore comes at right time For almost a week the entire midwest has been forced to largely stay inside. The polar vortex made its unwelcomed return, canceling what would’ve been an exciting slate of girls and boys basketball games in DeKalb County on Friday, Monday and Tuesday. Gyms were empty, basketball hoops went unused, wrestling mats sat unrolled, our video camera stayed plugged into the charger. Winter is never easy in Chicago. And few of them have been harsher than this one (and it’s not

VIEWS Ross Jacobson over). That’s why the DeKalb-Sycamore game Friday at the Convocation Center in DeKalb couldn’t have come at a better time. The area needs an event to look forward to, a four-hour period of excitement and a night that will bring us some much-needed distraction from the cold that has taken away our sports fun from

much of the past week. Truthfully I’m looking forward to seeing the Convo packed for the first time since ... well, last year’s DeKalb-Sycamore double-header. And I’m expecting a spirited atmosphere that releases all of the pent-up energy that 4,000-plus fans have been harboring. If there’s one absolute truth in our local sports scene, the DeKalb-Sycamore game brings out the biggest crowd and the most school spirit. A recent snowstorm won’t diminish the charisma around the rivalry, even if Spirit Week was cut short and many

early practices were canceled. The Convo will be rockin’ and two great games are on tap. The countdown to Friday is almost over, so get out of the house and take a drive over to NIU. I can’t say for certain which teams will win or who will come out on the losing end. But I know for a fact that the video camera is charged and ready.

• Ross Jacobson is the sports editor of the Daily Chronicle. He can be reached via email at rjacobson@shawmedia.com and follow him on Twitter @RossJacobson.

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DeJesus, Kaneland grad Crosby highlight ProForce baseball clinic By KEVIN DRULEY kdruley@shawmedia.com BATAVIA – David DeJesus will wear a darker shade of blue on his cap and uniform in 2014 than most of last baseball season. On Saturday afternoon, a handful of grade-schoolers clad in Cubs gear looked the other way. Then again, many youngsters gazed at the turf or a side wall of ProForce Sports Performance Training, anyway, as DeJesus’ clinic concluded. ProForce owner Chris Browning incorporated strength training stations after DeJesus – now a Tampa Bay Rays outfielder after spending 2012 and part of 2013 with the Cubs – happily lent his expertise alongside a few minor leaguers. “Just to get these guys out and be around other professionals, they can learn something, pick something up and maybe that’ll get them to the next level in their career,” DeJesus said. “We just want to be tools they can use, and we’re excited to help them out.” DeJesus, who lives in Wheaton during the offseason, is planning a second clinic from 1 to 3:30 p.m. Feb. 8. The event is designed for players in grades five to 12, and will be divided into middle and high school groups. Blending in with the ProForce staff and clientele for the past 3½ years, DeJesus credits Atlanta Braves minor league outfielder Dan Brewer for introducing him to Browning and his staff. A Lyons Township graduate now residing in Chicago, Brewer lived in Batavia with his mother when the New York Yankees drafted him in 2008. “I feel like I keep moving farther and farther away from Batavia, but keep coming out here,” Brewer said. “I wouldn’t train anywhere else.” Detroit Tigers minor league left-hander Casey

Thursday, January 30, 2014 • Page B3

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Former Cubs David DeJesus lent his expertise alongside a few minor leaguers, including former Kaneland standout and Detroit Tigers minor league pitcher Casey Crosby, at a clinic at ProForce in Batavia. Crosby, a Kaneland alum, recently adopted the latter refrain. Crosby trained independently in each of his past five offseasons in professional ball before Geneva products and ProForce regulars Pat Schiller and Brad Allen told him about Browning’s “Train Insane” headquarters at 501 W. Fabyan Parkway. A shoulder impingement limited Crosby to 13 starts and 57⅔ innings with Triple-A Toledo in 2013, so he’s especially encouraged to find his new regimen providing a “night and day” difference. “Doing stuff on my own,” Crosby said, “you don’t realize you don’t push yourself as much as you do if somebody’s in there telling you what to do and doing the

right things.” Last month, the Tigers announced plans to move Crosby to the bullpen. Although he made three spot starts in June 2012, struggles and injuries that prompted Tommy John elbow surgery earlier in his career ultimately steered the organization’s decision. Crosby, who eventually could return to the starting rotation pending his performance, is eager for another chance in spring training. He previously pitched in relief in the Arizona Fall League in 2011 and in past spring trainings. “It’s lots of fun, and it’s an adrenaline rush,” said Crosby, 25. “You’ve got to be ready every day, which is what I love, too.”

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Page B4 • Thursday, January 30, 2014

*

NFL PREVIEW

PRESENTED BY

POWER RANKINGS

How all 32 NFL teams stack up heading into the Super Bowl, by Hub Arkush: Demaryius Thomas

Richard Sherman

Cam Newton

Colin Kaepernick AP photo

AP photo

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1. Seattle Seahawks

2. Denver Broncos

3. San Francisco 49ers

4. Carolina Panthers

How will Richard Sherman and company handle the hype?

Can Demaryius Thomas and Julius Thomas make plays on Sherman and Earl Thomas?

QB Colin Kaepernick has the tools, but does he have the head?

QB Cam Newton has one more leap to make, will offseason get him there?

Jimmy Graham

Aaron Rodgers

Denver Broncos cornerback Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie talks with repor scheduled to play the Seattle Seahawks in Super Bowl XLVIII on Sunday in

BEARS’ 2014 TARGETS: CORNERBACKS

Looking for

Larry Fitzgerald

Vince Wilfork AP photo

AP photo

AP photo

AP photo

5. New England Patriots

6. New Orleans Saints

7. Green Bay Packers

8. Arizona Cardinals

With Rob Gronkowski, Vince Wilfork, Tommy Kelly and Jerod Mayo, what might have been?

With or without TE Jimmy Graham, Saints must improve 25th-ranked ground game?

Fit here if QB Aaron Rodgers, LB Clay Matthews had stayed healthy.

Need more offense to run with Seahawks and 49ers.

Andrew Luck

Melvin Ingram

Bears won’t be big spenders if Tillman leaves via free agency By KEVIN FISHBAIN

DeSean Jackson

kfishbain@shawmedia.com

Mike Zimmer AP photo

AP photo

AP photo

AP photo

9. Indianapolis Colts

10. San Diego Chargers

11. Philadelphia Eagles

12. Cincinnati Bengals

Must find a ground game to go with QB Andrew Luck.

If he stays healthy, LB Melvin Ingram is the next big thing.

What a shock, WR DeSean Jackson wants more money.

How will loss of coordinator Mike Zimmer impact defense?

Cornerback is an odd position for the Bears when it comes to free agency. It’s not as clear-cut as safety and defensive end in terms of seeking veteran help, and the Bears could just bring back Charles Tillman and Zack Bowman and be good to go at the position, along with Tim Jennings and Isaiah Frey. Obviously, that’s easier said than done, but also the No. 1 reason they wouldn’t be a player on the cornerback market. Other things to consider: cornerbacks are expensive, the Bears already have a $5.25 million cap hit dedicated to the position for Jennings next season and cornerback is a generally deep position to draft. However, it’s far from certain that the Bears bring back Tillman, arguably the best cornerback in franchise history. In a new-look 2014 defense, we might see more

press coverage, too, which Bears’ decision-making. For this exercise, we’ll Tillman is not coming Bears won’t break the cornerback, and therefore bidding wars for Alterraun Grimes and Aqib Talib. Here are five somewhat radar cornerbacks who Bears’ price range, and a starter to replace Tillma Vontae Davis: The Illino seemed to turn his career getting traded from Miami lis. In 2013, he was ranked cornerbacks on Pro Footba quarterbacks completing of passes in his direction. interceptions and started 2013. Davis said he wants Indy, and the Colts want

Dominique Rodgers-Croma watch the Broncos’ corner the Super Bowl. He began would retire if they won, looking for a long-term are the third team of his 2013 fifth among corners 28 in April. The 6-foot-2 passes defensed in five

23. St. Louis Rams 13. Pittsburgh Steelers Why can’t this offensive line ever stay healthy?

14. Kansas City Chiefs Feels like best is still yet to come from running back Jamaal Charles.

15. Houston Texans Last overall No. 1 was defensive end Mario Williams over quarterback Vince Young.

16. Bears

How much longer can they wait for quarterback Sam Bradford?

24. Buffalo Bills Defensive coordinator Mike Pettine, off to coach Browns, is a bigger loss than you think.

The Denver Broncos will play the Seattle Seahawks on Sunday in Super Bowl XLVIII. Shaw Media’s Hub Arkush and Tom Musick discuss:

25. Tennessee Titans This has to be the most nondescript team in the league.

26. Atlanta Falcons Scott Pioli is an interesting hire as assistant general manager, how does it make Falcons better?

How do they avoid defensive end Julius Peppers being a cap casualty?

27. Minnesota Vikings

17. Baltimore Ravens

28. Jacksonville Jaguars

All-star coaching staff around coach John Harbaugh and Gary Kubiak?

How much are they willing to spend on free-agent running back Maurice Jones-Drew?

18. Miami Dolphins

29. Tampa Bay Buccaneers

New general manager Dennis Hickey was third choice at best.

19. New York Jets Telling you, Mike Vick could happen here.

20. Dallas Cowboys Now Scott Linehan’s the answer ... why doesn’t coach Jason Garrett quit?

21. Detroit Lions Back seven on defense still needs a lot of work.

22. New York Giants Is running back David Wilson done, or is 2014 finally his year?

Where’s the pass rush if Jared Allen and Kevin Williams leave?

Lovie Smith has the horses to play his defense, but what will Jeff Tedford’s offensive scheme be?

30. Cleveland Browns Pettine is a good coach but he was the Browns’ fifth or sixth choice.

31. Oakland Raiders When the Raiders aren’t suing the NFL, their cheerleaders are suing them.

32. Washington Redskins Whether quarterback RG3 is a player you can build around or not, running back Alfred Morris is.

Could Have a V-8

Seahawks, Broncos get a chunk in my mouth and I’m not absolutely positive what it is. And speaking of smooth – we call that a segue in the media biz – all four coordinators are Musick: Hub, my first queshigh-stepping into this Super tion is whether you think Bowl coming off great seasons. I should go with smooth or Perhaps the hottest name in chunky guacamole for the big the group is Denver offensive game. My second question is coordinator Adam Gase, who, about the game itself. We’ll at 35, with only one year on the see a thousand stories about job, is so new and smooth I’m Pete Carroll and John Fox in not even sure he’s shaving yet. the next few days, but I doubt Seahawks defensive coordinawe’ll read nearly as much tor Dan Quinn also is just wrapabout the coordinators. Who ping his first year on the job would get your vote for top but has been around longer and assistant? Denver has Adam been shaving for a while. Both Gase (offense) and Jack Del Rio were hot names on the head (defense), while Seattle features coaching search front until all Darrell Bevell (offense) and the jobs filled. Dan Quinn (defense). Where’s the edge between Arkush: Definitely smooth. the NFL’s No. 1 offense and No. Always creeps me out when I 1 defense? Perhaps the slightest

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SUPER BOWL XLVIII

Page B6 • Thursday, January 30, 2014

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

SUPER BOWL FACTS AND FIGURES AT STAKE National Football League Championship for the Vince Lombardi Trophy. PARTICIPANTS Denver Broncos (AFC) and Seattle Seahawks (NFC). This the seventh appearance for the Broncos (2-4) and second appearance for Seattle (0-1). SITE MetLife Stadium, East Rutherford, N.J. This is the first Super Bowl played in the New York area. SEATING CAPACITY 82,500 DATE Sunday KICKOFF 5:30 p.m. NETWORK COVERAGE By FOX-TV to more than 200 stations throughout the United States. Westwood One Radio to 600 stations within the United States. The Armed Forces Television will also provide broadcast to 175 countries throughout the world. The game will be distributed internationally by the NFL and NFL International to more than 185 countries and broadcast in 30 different languages. PLAYERS SHARE Winners: $92,000 a man. Losers: $46,000 a man. PLAYER UNIFORMS Denver will be the home team and has its choice of wearing its colored or white jersey. OVERTIME At the end of regulation playing time, the referee will immediately toss a coin at the center of the field, according to rules pertaining to the usual pregame toss. The captain of NFC team (the visiting team) will call the toss. After a three-minute intermission after the end of the regular game, play will continue by 15-minute periods with a two-minute intermission between each such overtime period with no halftime intermission. The teams will change goals between each period, there will be a two-minute warning at the end of each period. Both teams must have the opportunity to possess the ball once during the extra period, unless the team that receives the opening kickoff scores a touchdown on its initial possession, in which case it is the winner. If the team that possesses the ball first scores a field goal on its initial possession, the other team shall have the opportunity to possess the ball. If (that team) scores a touchdown on its possession, it is the winner. If the score is tied after (both teams have a) possession, the team next scoring by any method shall be the winner. OFFICIAL TIME The scoreboard clock will be official. OFFICIALS There will be seven officials and five alternates appointed by the Commissioner’s office. TROPHY The winning team receives permanent possession of the Vince Lombardi Trophy, a sterling silver trophy created by Tiffany & Company and presented annually to the winner of the Super Bowl. The trophy was named after the late coach Vince Lombardi of the two-time Super Bowl champion Green Bay Packers before the 1971 Super Bowl. The trophy is a regulation-size silver football mounted in a kicking position on a pyramid-like stand of three concave sides. The trophy stands 20¾ inches tall, weighs 6.7 pounds and is valued more than $25,000. The words “Vince Lombardi” and “Super Bowl XLVIII” are engraved on the base along with the NFL shield. ATTENDANCE To date, 3,652,409 have attended Super Bowl games. The largest crowd was 103,985 at the 14th Super Bowl at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, Calif. – The Associated Press

SEATTLE SEAHAWKS (15-3) vs. DENVER BRONCOS (15-3)

AP file photo

Atlanta Falcons’ Gerald Riggs (42) gets tripped up as Bears defenders Mike Singletary (50), Dave Duerson (22), and Steve McMichaels converge during a Nov. 24, 1985 game at Soldier Field.

What’s in a nickname? VIEWS Jim Litke JERSEY CITY, N.J. – They don’t have a secret handshake, decoder rings or their own clubhouse. But even Groucho Marx, who refused to join any club that would have him, would have loved to get into the “Legion of Boom.” It’s not just the coolest club – with the coolest nickname – in the NFL at the moment. It’s also the most exclusive. You don’t have to be an All Pro-caliber cornerback or safety, as Seattle’s Richard Sherman or Earl Thomas are, but it helps. Membership is limited to the four starters, four backups and three assistant coaches who work in the Seahawks defensive backfield – the back end of the best defense in the league this season. Once accepted, you get bragging rights, a T-shirt and a floor mat to lay in front of your locker. It may not sound like much, but ... “Be honest,” said Seattle’s Byron Maxwell, who stepped into a starting corner role when front-liner Brandon Browner was suspended indefinitely for substance abuse. “When you were little, if you heard the name ‘Legion of Doom,’ right away you’d say, ‘That’s a group I want to be part of.’ ” Yet there’s a group even the members of the “LOB” long to join. It’s the short list of great defensive squads with great nicknames that terrorized opponents AND went on to win Super Bowls. The best-ever moniker, “Monsters of the Midway,”

belonged to arguably the best defense ever, the 1985 Bears. The 1986 Giants “Big Blue Wrecking Crew” probably should have won more than one. Ditto, perhaps for Miami’s “No-Names,” who won theirs the season after Dallas Cowboys coach Tom Landry described them this way – “A bunch of no names I really don’t know anything about” – and then beat them in the 1972 Super Bowl. Two of the longest-lasting, Pittsburgh’s “Steel Curtain” and Dallas’ “Doomsday Defense” both won more than one in the 1970s. But just as long is the list of those that didn’t. Minnesota’s’ “Purple People Eaters” appeared in four of the first 11 Super Bowls, and wound up losing every one. Denver’s “Orange Crush” of late 1970s fame brought the franchise to their first championship, but went home empty-handed. So did Miami’s second entry, the “Killer Bs,” so named because the last names of six of the unit’s 11 starters began with that letter. Two more, the St. Louis’ “Fearsome Foursome” and the Jets’ “New York Sack Exchange” never made it to a championship at all. The eight current members of the “LOB” are young enough to rattle off the names of a few of their celebrated predecessors, but either don’t know their fates or don’t believe in omens. Truth be told, they’re all too consumed right now trying to fashion a legend of their own. The one thing all of them agree on is the founding member. “I did a radio interview a year or two ago talking about styles of play,” safety Kam Chancellor recalled, “and I was saying, ‘When we go to attack guys, we want to

lay the boom on ’em.’ Fans who were listening started coming up with names for us. There was a bunch of ’em, I looked ’em over and said, ‘Not this one, not this one, or this one.’ “But when someone said ‘Legion of Boom,’ ” he added, “I had to admit, it was pretty catchy. ‘Legion’ sounded pretty important, and the ‘boom’ was how we played, so we ran with it. “The really important part is that we, as a unit, were already connected. The brotherhood was already there. The trust, the drive, the passion was already there,” Chancellor said, “and ‘Legion of Boom’ turned out to be the icing on the cake.” So it was Chancellor, then, that came up with the T-shirts and mats. “No,” Chancellor laughed. “I got to give Sherm the credit for that. He’s the one that went the extra mile.” You might think the “LOB” unit within a unit would make the rest of the defense jealous. “No,” said linebacker Heath Farwell. “Just the opposite. They earned it. Those guys are an inspiration. The way they practice, the way they push each other to get better every day, it’s the kind of thing the rest of us can feed off.” But a moment later, Farwell changed his tune.

“OK, I have to admit: the nickname really is pretty cool. We – the linebackers – tried calling ourselves ‘The Regulators,’ ” he added, “but so far it hasn’t stuck.” Thomas thinks that’s because nicknames have to happen organically. “You don’t give yourself one. You just don’t,” he said. “It has to come from somebody else, and it has to reflect something about you. ... All of us in the (defensive backfield) love flying around and lowering the boom, so as soon as we heard it, we all just said, ‘Yeah, it’s a good fit.’ ” The Thomas who plays for Denver – that would be Demaryius Thomas, the Broncos’ 6-foot-3, 230-pound wide receiver – reluctantly agreed. “They call themselves the ‘Legion of Boom’ for a reason,” he said. “They are very physical. Everybody hits and makes tackles. Everybody plays aggressively.” But would they be just as fearsome by any other name? The question was put to backup corner Walter Thurmond. “How about ‘Nation of Domination?’ ” he replied. “Nah, Thurmond added a moment later, “we didn’t really consider any others.”

• Jim Litke is a national sports columnist for The Associated Press. Write to him at jlitke@ap.org.

SUPER BOWL XLVIII NOTES

Denver’s Colquitt born to boot football The ASSOCIATED PRESS JERSEY CITY, N.J. – When it comes to punting, Denver’s Britton Colquitt was born to boot the football. Colquitt’s father, Craig, won two Super Bowl rings while punting for the Pittsburgh Steelers during a seven-year NFL career. His uncle, Jimmy, punted for Seattle in 1985, and his older brother, Dustin, is currently Kansas City’s punter. “It’s really crazy,” said Britton, in his fifth season with the Broncos. “When you grow up around it, that’s what you know. All I see is Pittsburgh Steelers’ Super Bowl stuff on the wall. It was kind of normal to me. In my mind, and even in Dustin’s mind, it was always attainable and was kind of the norm. If you look at other families in the NFL, their kids play and they’re successful. It’s a belief that they have. “It’s like any other family business and that’s ours. I am thankful for it.” He has talked to his father several times since the Broncos won the AFC championship and received texts with small remind-

ers to keep him focused: words of wisdom such as “Stick to the basics” and “You’ve made it here. You know what you’re doing.” “He wants it (for me),” Britton said. “He’s like a schoolboy right now. He’s more thrilled than anybody.” Uncle Peyton: With the Super Bowl in New York/New Jersey, the Manning brothers can spend a little time together. Peyton Manning said Wednesday that he saw Eli on Tuesday night and met his niece, Lucy, for the first time. She was born just before training camp began. “I enjoyed that time as an uncle last night,” Peyton said. Peyton Manning also found interesting the Super Bowl connection with his brother that wasn’t so obvious. Eli Manning won his second title with the New York Giants in Indianapolis while Peyton was still playing for the Colts. Now big brother gets a chance at a second title in Eli’s home stadium. “That is a pretty unique and ironic situation,” Peyton said.

OPENING LINE Denver by 1 RECORD VS. SPREAD Seattle 12-5-1; Denver 12-6 SERIES RECORD Broncos lead 34-19 AP PRO32 RANKING Seahawks, No. 1; Broncos, No. 2 LAST MEETING Broncos beat Seahawks 31-14, Sept. 19, 2010 LAST GAME Seahawks beat 49ers 23-17; Broncos beat Patriots 26-16 SEAHAWKS OFFENSE OVERALL (17), RUSH (4), PASS (26) SEAHAWKS DEFENSE OVERALL (1), RUSH (7T), PASS (1) BRONCOS OFFENSE OVERALL (1), RUSH (15), PASS (1) BRONCOS DEFENSE OVERALL (19), RUSH (7T), PASS (27) STREAKS, STATS AND NOTES Super Bowl features matchup of NFL’s top-rated offense (Denver) and league’s No. 1 defense (Seattle) – sixth time that has happened. Team with top defense has won four of previous five, with only exception being Denver falling to San Francisco, 55-10, in 1990. ... Only once have teams ranked first in yards gained and allowed met in Super Bowl: 11 years ago when defense-minded Tampa Bay routed Oakland 48-21. ... Teams were AFC West rivals until Seahawks moved to NFC West for 2002 season. ... Seattle playing in second Super Bowl in team history, having lost to Indianapolis in only other appearance in 2006 game. ... Seahawks’ Pete Carroll in first Super Bowl as coach. ... QB Russell Wilson has 27 wins in first two seasons, including playoffs, which ties him with Pittsburgh’s Ben Roethlisberger for most in Super Bowl era. Could join Roethlisberger, New England’s Tom Brady and St. Louis’ Kurt Warner as only QBs to win Super Bowl within first two seasons. Wilson had 101.2 passer rating, only QB in NFL history with 100plus rating in rookie and second seasons. ... RB Marshawn Lynch, who created stir during week by cutting short media availabilities, rushed for 1,257 yards and 12 TDs this season, his third straight with at least 1,200 yards and 10 or more scores. Has run for six TDs and has four 100-yard rushing performances in six career playoff games. Needs 5 yards rushing to pass Shaun Alexander (564) for most in franchise postseason history. ... WR Percy Harvin was knocked out of NFC divisional playoff game against New Orleans with concussion, but has been medically cleared. Has yet to play in full game while healthy in first season with Seahawks. ... WR-PR Golden Tate led Seahawks with career-high 64 catches and 898 yards, while Doug Baldwin had 778 yards receiving in regular season and caught six passes for 106 yards in NFC championship game. ... CB Richard Sherman highlighted Seahawks defense that led NFL in takeaways (39), INTs (28), points allowed (231), total defense (273.6 yards) and pass defense (172 yards). Sherman’s eight INTs led league, first Seahawks player to do so since Eugene Robinson in 1993. He tipped pass intended for Michael Crabtree that was intercepted by Malcolm Smith to seal NFC title game win over San Francisco. ... K Steven Hauschka made 33 of 35 FGs in regular season & led NFC with franchise-record 143 points. Has converted all six FG attempts in playoffs. ... Broncos playing in seventh Super Bowl, tied with New England for third-most in NFL history and just one behind Dallas and Pittsburgh. ... Denver has won its last two Super Bowl appearances, both coming in consecutive years (1998 and ’99) with John Elway, now team’s executive VP, at QB.

– The Associated Press


SUPER BOWL XLVIII

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com Brian Urlacher AP file photo

Thursday, January 30, 2014 • Page B7

Ditka to Urlacher: ‘Let it go’ By PATRICK FINLEY Chicago Sun-Times NEW YORK – Whether Brian Urlacher has recovered from his messy split with the Bears, he and the team need to find mutual peace, Mike Ditka said Wednesday. The Hall of Famer should know. After 20 years of hard feelings following his own departure from the Bears in 1993, the former coach and star tight end renewed his relationship with the team last year, going to dinner with chairman George McCaskey and CEO Ted Phillips.

He attended Bears practice in August, and last month finally had his No. 89 retired at Soldier Field. Urlacher, still seemingly wounded by the Bears’ low contract offer last offseason that led to his retirement, said Tuesday he is “indifferent” about a proper send-off. “I don’t know why people let this stuff get in the way,” Ditka said Wednesday. “It takes a long time sometimes. “It’s narrow-mindedness that causes it more than anything else. “He is one of the greatest Bears that ever played the game at the linebacker position. Recognize that, honor him for that and re-

Mike Ditka AP file photo

spect him. “And let it go.” Ditka, who works for ESPN, said “The Old Man,” George Halas, “would have loved” Urlacher. “He played in the mold of Bill George and all the other guys we had, [Dick] Butkus,” he said. “Maybe some guys had better skills at certain things, but he certainly played great football for the Bears.

Seattle wears the villain’s hat for SB

AP file photo

Jay Cutler (6) was drafted by the Denver Broncos in 2006 and traded to the Bears in 2009, opening the door for Peyton Manning to come to the Broncos, who will play in the Super Bowl a year after signing Manning.

REVISITING THE JAY CUTLER TRADE

Trade molds Bears, Broncos By PATRICK FINLEY Chicago Sun-Times

J

ERSEY CITY, N.J. – Chris Kuper still remembers sitting in his living room five years ago and texting Jay Cutler, wondering the rumors were true: that the quarterback wanted to be traded from Denver. “I think he ultimately wanted to stay here,” the Broncos guard said Wednesday. “But he said there was so many he-said-she-saids that it’s hard to decipher what was real and what wasn’t.” Cutler, discouraged that new coach Josh McDaniels had discussed acquiring Matt Cassel, requested a trade. He was dealt to the Bears on April 2, 2009. “The last guy you’d think would be sent off woulda been Jay,” Kuper said. “He’s the quarterback – and you just don’t find quarterbacks like that. “You just can’t trade ’em out.” Without Cutler’s departure, the Broncos, stuck in a mediocre morass with Kyle Orton and Tim Tebow at the controls, might not have parted with their coach, general manager or star wide receiver Brandon Marshall. Peyton Manning, however, might never have donned orange. It’s a compelling Chicago parlor game, even before you consider the Broncos used the Bears’ draft picks to eventually help land defensive end Robert Ayers and, more importantly, wideouts Demaryius Thomas and Eric Decker. If Jay stays in Denver, does Marshall? Are the Broncos here this week, preparing to play the Seahawks in Sunday’s Super Bowl? “It’s almost like they got rid of the whole offense,” said kicker Matt Prater, one of four active Broncos to play

AP file photo

Former Bears quarterback Kyle Orton (18) was traded to the Denver Broncos along with two first-round picks and a third-round pick for Jay Cutler and a fifth-round pick. in the team’s Cutler era. “But it’s in the past – and now it’s worked out for the best.” Kuper – selected in 2006, along with Cutler, tight end Tony Scheffler, Marshall and defensive end Elvis Dumervil – figured the Broncos’ Super Bowl trip would come with that core group. Prater thought the quarterback would lead them. “It’s definitely always a shock,” he said, “when your franchise quarterback gets traded.” The deal netted the Broncos quarterback Kyle Orton, two first-round picks and a third-rounder (they gave Chicago a fifth), and altered the direction of both franchises. “We were a pretty tight group,” Kuper said. “At that time, we thought we had a young core of really good players on offense, and we were kinda starting to scratch the surface there. “So it was kinda devastating when our group got blown up a little bit.” The Broncos went 8-8 in 2009, with Orton starting all but one game. Marshall was traded to Miami during the offseason – about a year after the Cutler

deal – and would later rejoin his friend on the Bears in 2012. “Brandon Marshall was traded for two second-round picks?” Prater said, still indignant. A 4-12 2010 season got McDaniels fired. “It was a learning experience, for the four guys that are still here,” linebacker Wesley Woodyard said. “It was a challenge for all of us to continue to be better pros. “We had a lot of losing seasons there. “We learned how to appreciate the wins a lot more, and continue to fight harder to try to win.” The next year brought Tebow Mania, an 8-8 regular season and a playoff berth that belied the fact the Broncos were outscored on the season by 81 points. Then Manning signed. They’ve gone 26-6 in the regular season since, losing in last season’s divisional round and making this year’s Super Bowl. “I mean, that’s the reason you get a guy like that on your team – to give you chances to win games like this,” said cornerback Champ Bailey, another Cut-

ler Era holdover. “He’s the best to ever do it. “I haven’t played against a better quarterback, so I’m just glad he’s part of our organization now – because he definitely has a big part of why we’re here. “And I love him to death.” Kuper said he “didn’t think we were going to get to the Super Bowl as soon as we did,” even in a quarterback’s league. “Peyton gets in here and transforms our whole team,” he said. “He took over at quarterback, took over the offense.” Broncos players still see traces of Cutler in the game’s most famous player. “When you have a quarterback like Jay and Peyton, they don’t make too many mistakes,” Prater said, though Bears fans might disagree. Kuper liked teaming with both quarterbacks –”I enjoyed Jay’s demeanor; He was very constant with his emotions,” he said – and sees one similarity between the two. “They’re very competitive,” he said. Only one, though, has something to play for this week.

JERSEY CITY, N.J. – Down at the end of a hotel hallway, about 50 people gathered along with a dozen television cameras to record the thoughts of a running back who doesn’t much like the idea of sharing his thoughts. Marshawn Lynch was in true Beast Mode, though he surely couldn’t appreciate the irony he was actually helping fuel the insatiable beast that is the media surrounding the Super Bowl at a time the game was in need of another good story line. “I’m here, man,” Lynch said. “So, I don’t have to pay the fine, boss.” Lynch likely succeeded in that mission, escaping the wrath of the NFL for not speaking with the media. But the image of him glaring out from beneath a hat and hoodie, gold headphones on top of his head, may be one that sticks this week with the Seattle Seahawks, just as sure as Richard Sherman’s postgame rant did the week before. They’re the designated bad guys in this Super Bowl. And they seem to be enjoying the role. “What is there to get?” asked receiver Doug Baldwin. “He doesn’t like talking to the media.” Worse crimes have been committed, of course, and there are more than enough other players on the Seahawks to fill the void. Sherman himself has emerged as a loquacious spokesman for the team, showing a great depth of thought while answering all questions that have come his way. But a team built behind a ferocious defense by a coach who left the college ranks under a cloud has some rough edges around it. Chief among them is the suspension of seven Seattle players for substance-abuse or performance-enhancing drugs violations by the NFL since 2011. Matched up against Peyton Manning’s great season and his quest for a second Super Bowl ring late in his career, and it’s easy enough to paint the Seahawks in the role of villain. “We don’t worry about reputations and things like that,” said Sherman, who himself was suspended by the league last season for PEDs before winning an appeal. “We worry about football and we have a tremendous football team that goes out there and executes week in and week out. At the end of the day this is the NFL and that’s all that matters.” At the end of the day, the Seahawks are in the Super Bowl, too, which is all that matters to any NFL team. They’ve also got a bit of a different take on the teammates they spend most waking hours with than the media that gets a glimpse just here and there of their varied personalities. That showed with their spirited defense of Sherman in the wake of his tirade against Michael Crabtree fol-

VIEWS Tim Dahlberg lowing the spectacular play that beat the San Francisco 49ers and put the Seahawks in the Super Bowl. And they were more than happy to line up in support of Lynch’s right to do whatever he wants leading up to the big game. “He’s a misunderstood person, a great guy off the field,” linebacker Bobby Wagner said. “He’s been through a lot in his life and sometimes the media puts words in your mouth and makes a guy mad. He’s not the person you want to make mad.” Still, it was telling that the first two questions to coach Pete Carroll at his Wednesday news conference weren’t about how to defend Manning or stop the touchdown scoring machine that is the Denver Broncos. Instead, they were about Lynch’s refusal to talk and the perception that the vaunted Seattle defense was built on the backs of players taking banned PEDs. Carroll’s answers often meander on any topic, and this one was no different. He talked about how his team is young but is learning from its mistakes and that he doesn’t mind allowing them to be individuals as long as they stay within the team concept. He said the coaching staff has constantly preached the message of having to play clean, despite the suspension as recently as last month by cornerback Brandon Browner for substance abuse and cornerback Walter Thurmond in late November for the same thing. “I’m not concerned about the message,” Carroll said. “We would like to do right and get better, so we’re trying to improve and learn from everything that comes along.” What comes along next is the biggest game any of the Seahawks have ever played. Much has been made of the fact it’s the first Super Bowl any of them will play in, and they’ve made much of their intention to play it as physical as any game they’ve ever played. Odds are they’ll deliver on that promise, though that’s no guarantee of success against Manning and Denver’s precision offense. Seattle isn’t likely to win a shootout, but most handicappers like the Seahawks to win their first Super Bowl trophy if the defense plays like it has all season and Lynch runs the ball effectively. If that happens, all the talk about bad behavior will suddenly go away. And chances are Lynch might even have something to say about that.

• Tim Dahlberg is a national sports columnist for The Associated Press. Write to him at tdahlberg@ap.org.

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Page B8 • Thursday, January 30, 2014

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Plenty of issues need to be fixed

NOTRE DAME

Notre Dame plans $400M project at football stadium By TOM COYNE

• DELEGAL Continued from page B1 DC: What are the main issues, from a player’s perspective, that need to be fixed? JD: One is the medical side. There are a ton of guys that put it all on the line to be great in a sport. Obviously you want the medical portion of it because we put our body out there on a daily basis. Two, not only medical, but the professional development. A lot of guys who come out of school, if they graduate ... a lot of these guys aren’t ready for the real world. It’s not typical for a student-athlete to have those internships, those externships, those different opportunities where they are able to exercise their business skillsets and professional skillsets. That’s something that needs to be looked into as well. Those are my two solid standpoints. I don’t think we need to just outright pay people for what they do, but we need to provide a network of former athletes ... or even business owners who love to hire student-athletes, where they are able to get these guys and develop them professionally. It would be like Business 101. DC: You mention the missed opportunities you have in getting internships and externships, is that because you had summer training and football-related things? JD: A large portion of it is those voluntary, but mandatory practices that we have in the summer. We’re really not able to go home ... everybody’s situation is different. For the redshirt freshmen guys, they want to play that next year because they are development guys, so they’ll stay [on campus]. For other guys, you want to stay a step ahead of competition, so there may be a [position competition] that you want to get ahead in. They don’t realize that these internships make sense as well. At the time, you really don’t focus on it because your main goal is to win the league, win your conference championship, go to the best bowl game and then ultimately go to the NFL. You’re not really thinking about those things. I prepared for what I knew was coming, but some guys still don’t prepare for it. DC: Do you know NIU teammates who are struggling with health issues or professionally? JD: I will never speak names, but not only at NIU but guys who are from Miami, who put all their eggs in one basket and they are struggling. They are struggling professionally because they can’t find jobs that fits their initiatives. But then I have some guys who are doing a great job, who are going to medical school, who are trying to be doctors and trying to be lawyers. It really depends on the person. I could never say because of football I wasn’t able to accomplish my dreams. No, not at all. It is because of football I was able to go to college and expand my mind. I used this vehicle to get out of my parents’ situation. I’m from a very bad neighborhood in Miami, Fla., and I was able to get out of there because of this game and I love this game. Now do I think things could’ve been different, yeah of course. You have to live in the moment and try to do the most networking that you can and if the NCAA can mandate different programs to where they can grow players over the summer or in the spring or somehow, that would really help the future for these guys. DC: Do you think eventually players will get a share of the money down the line? JD: They need to. It’s a billion-dollar industry that’s driven off of unpaid employees. Think of any established company that you’ve ever seen that didn’t pay their employees or the coverage of their employees when they put them out to work every single day.

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The Associated Press

Rob Winner – rwinner@shawmedia.com

Northern Illinois offensive lineman Shane Evans followed former Prairie Ridge teammate Sean Folliard’s advice and enrolled early at the DeKalb campus.

Evans sought Folliard’s advice • EVANS Continued from page B1 It’s the second straight season Prairie Ridge coach Chris Schremp has had a player enroll early at NIU. Last season, linebacker Sean Folliard came to DeKalb in January, participated in spring drills and contributed as a freshman, finishing the year with 20 tackles and two tackles for loss. Schremp has gotten to know NIU’s coaching staff well and said the Huskies fit everything Evans was looking for. It’s a competitive program that looks to be on the rise and close to his home in McHenry County. “Coach (Kevin) Kane and

I were kind of buddies on texting and calls back and forth and voice messages quite a bit over the past couple years,” Schremp said. “Kevin Kane recruited both Shane and Sean, got to know him pretty well. It’s been interesting dealing with the hundreds of coaches who have called and emailed.” Evans also sought Folliard’s advice on coming to campus early. “He said it was the best thing for him. He said he really got around the guys, got to meet every one of them,” Evans said. “Once summer rolled around and all the other freshmen were rolling in, he had a leg up and he was in shape, stronger and ready, and already in the system basically.”

SOUTH BEND, Ind. – Notre Dame’s iconic football stadium will be flanked by three massive buildings under a $400 million project that will also create nearly 4,000 premium seats at the “House that Rockne Built.” The plans for the buildings were presented to the university’s board of trustees during their meeting Wednesday in Rome. The Rev. John Jenkins, the university’s president, called it “the most ambitious building project in the 172-year history of Notre Dame,” saying more space was needed to accommodate the university’s broadening research activity. “What’s exciting about this project is it brings together athletics, faculty and academics, research and a student center, so it’s an integrated model,” Jenkins said. The new buildings will add about 750,000 square feet and

will house a student center, the anthropology and psychology departments, and a digital media center and music and sacred music departments. The side facing Touchdown Jesus won’t be changed. The buildings on the east and west sides of the stadium will rise nine stories and include premium seating, increasing the capacity of Notre Dame Stadium from 80,795 to more than 84,000, although widening seats on the benches could cut down the number of seats. The press box will also move from the west to the east side. The south building will be six stories high and include a hospitality area. The student center will include a recreation center and allow the university to turn the existing Rolfs Sports Recreation Center into the practice home for the men’s and women’s basketball teams. Jenkins said the university will seek donations to fund the project. He said construc-

tion would begin next year at the earliest and would take nearly three years. Jenkins said adding the research buildings to the stadium will avoid campus sprawl, and he and athletic director Jack Swarbrick said it sends a message about the importance of academics and athletics. “It’s such a powerful symbol given what’s going on in college athletics right now, that you can take the stadium and say we believe in the integration of athletics into academics, and here’s the living proof,” Swarbrick said. The work isn’t expected to make any significant changes to the inside of the 84-year-old stadium, though Jenkins said there’s still no decision on whether to add video boards for instant replay or switch to an artificial playing surface. Swarbrick said a decision on the playing surface will be made soon. New grass had to be installed three times last year.

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A&E

SECTION C Thursday, January 30, 2014 Daily Chronicle

Features editor Inger Koch • ikoch@shawmedia.com

N A G E R N A I R B Comedian brings his family-friendly show to the Egyptian By DEBBIE BEHRENDS dbehrends@shawmedia.com

B

rian Regan always has been funny. He said his parents and seven siblings are funny and like to make each other laugh. It wasn’t until he was in college, though, that he had that “aha moment” when he realized he liked making people laugh and he just might be able to make a living doing it. Regan brings his family-friendly standup comedy to DeKalb’s Egyptian Theatre at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 6. Tickets cost $39.75 each and can be purchased by visiting www.egyptiantheatre.org or calling the box office at 815-758-1225. Regan didn’t always plan to be a comedian. “As a senior in high school, I thought to myself, ‘I should be an accountant,’” he said. “After a few accounting classes, I decided I didn’t want to be an accountant, so I switched to communication and

If you go What: Brian Regan When: 7:30 p.m. Feb. 6 Where: Egyptian Theatre, 135 N. Second St., DeKalb Tickets: $39.75 at 815-758-1225 or www. egyptiantheatre.org

theater arts.” He said one of his first classes in the new major was a speech class. He decided to make his speeches funny, just for the heck of it. Getting laughs from his classmates, he said he remembers walking back to his dorm room thinking he never felt that good after an accounting class. Regan said he started seeking out opportunities to make people laugh and became an emcee for any event that would have him. Although he didn’t graduate until 17 years later, Regan said his parents were supportive of his decisions. “They respected I was an adult and making a decision. I admire them for that.”

Known as a comedian with “clean” material, Regan said it’s not really a conscious decision; it’s just the way his mind works. He said he’s inspired by everyday life. “You see something, you hear something, you experience something or read something and you have a eureka moment when you realize, that’s funny or that can be funny. “Once you have the idea, the craft portion kicks in. You put some scaffolding around it, give it some words, a beginning, a middle and an end,” Regan said. He admits he’s not the type of comedian that can sit down with a blank piece of paper and write jokes. ”I don’t know how to fill that out,” he said. No matter what his process is, Regan is among David Letterman’s favorite comedians. Regan has appeared on his show 26 times, more than any other comedian. “I just love the fact that he likes my comedy and allows me to come on his show as often as he does. He says really

nice things about my comedy and I’m thrilled to be able to do his show,” Regan said. He said he likes a lot of different comedians – Richard Pryor, George Carlin, Steve Martin, Maria Bamford, Gary Gulman, Bill Burr, Chris Rock. “A lot of people are doing some interesting things. The more unique it is, the more I like it,” he said. Regan also appeared on Jerry Seinfeld’s web series “Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee.” “Nothing is scripted, nothing is planned,” Regan said. “It’s just two people in a car, doing what the title says.” Regan said he would love to do a TV show, but it’s difficult to convince network executives. “They’ll always listen to me,” he said. “They say ‘thank you very much for coming in today.’ I walk out the door and that’s the end of it.” But, he said, people are taking matters into their own hands, so “we’ll see.”


A&E CALENDAR

Page C2 • Thursday, January 30, 2014 STAGE STAGE NIU School of Theatre and Dance’s “The Underpants”: 7:30 p.m. Jan. 30 to Feb. 1 and Feb. 6 to 8, 2 p.m. Feb. 2, Huntley Middle School, 1515 S. Fourth St., DeKalb. Tickets: $16, adults; $13, seniors; $8, students. 815-7531600 or www.niu.edu/theatre. Sycamore High School’s “The Diary of Anne Frank”: 7:30 p.m. Feb. 13, 14, 15, and 2 p.m. Feb. 15, Sycamore High School Auditorium, 555 Spartan Trail, Sycamore. Tickets: $6 at www. syc427.org, 815-899-8160, ext. 2173, or at the Sycamore High School Box Office. Indian Valley Theatre’s “Fox on the Fairway”: 7 p.m. Feb. 20 through 22, 1 p.m. Feb. 23, Fox Valley Older Adults Center, 1406 Suydam Road, Sandwich. Dinner theater catered by Allesandria’s Italian Dining. For mature audiences only. Tickets: $26. www. indianvalleytheatre.com. Stage Coach Players’ “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat”: 7:30 p.m. March 13 through 15, 2 p.m. March 15 and 16, Egyptian Theatre, 135 N. Second St., DeKalb. www. stagecoachers.com. Stage Coach Players’ “Cheaper by the Dozen”: 7:30 p.m. May 8 through 10 and 15 through 17, 2 p.m. May 18, Stage Coach Theatre, 126 S. Fifth St., DeKalb. www.stagecoachers.com. Stage Coach Players’ “12 Angry Jurors”: 7:30 p.m. June 5 through 7 and 12 through 14, 2 p.m. June 15, Stage Coach Theatre, 126 S. Fifth St., DeKalb. www.stagecoachers.com. Stage Coach Players’ “How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying”: 7:30 p.m. July 10 through 12 and 17 through 19, 2 p.m. July 13, Stage Coach Theatre, 126 S. Fifth St., DeKalb. www.stagecoachers.com. Stage Coach Players’ “Arsenic and Old Lace”: 7:30 p.m. Aug. 14 through 16, and Aug. 21 through 23, 2 p.m. Aug. 24, Stage Coach Theatre, 126 S. Fifth St., DeKalb. www.stagecoachers.com. Stage Coach Players’ “Urinetown The Musical”: 7:30 p.m. Sept. 11 through 13 and 18 through 20, 2 p.m. Sept. 14 and 21, Stage

Coach Theatre, 126 S. Fifth St., DeKalb. www.stagecoachers. com. ART ART NIU School of Art Faculty Biennial: Through Feb. 15, NIU Art Museum, Altgeld Hall, College Avenue and Castle Drive, DeKalb. Closing reception: 4:30 to 6 p.m. Feb. 12. Gallery hours: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, noon to 4 p.m. Saturday. Information: www.niu.edu/artmuseum or 815-753-1936. Special programming schedule: All events take place in Room 315, Altgeld Hall, unless otherwise noted. • Feb. 1: 1 to 4 p.m., Karen Brown, Guided Art Critique Workshop (bring a work of your art to explore privately, as well as publicly) • Feb. 4: 12:10 to 12:50 p.m., Michael Barnes, “Searching for Dry Land,” artist slide talk • Feb. 5: 12:10 to 12:50 p.m., Rebecca Houze, “Home as Living Museum: Ethnographic Display and the 1896 Millennial Exhibition in Budapest,” slide lecture • Feb. 6: 5 to 5:50 p.m., Peter Olson and Catherine Raymond, “Birds & Buddhas: Writing For and Illustrating Academic Journals,” informal slide talk • Feb. 10: 5 to 5:50 p.m., Sarah Evans, “Cindy Sherman’s Scenes of Production,” slide lecture • Feb. 11: 5 to 5:50 p.m., Michael Rea, “Stacking Metaphors,” artist slide talk • Feb. 12: 4:30 to 6 p.m., Closing Reception, NIU Art Museum, first floor, west end Altgeld Hall Kishwaukee College Art Gallery’s “Animal Sign/Animal Minds II” and “Two But Not Two” exhibitions: Through March 5, KC Art Gallery, 21193 Malta Road, Malta. Artists’ receptions: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Jan. 30 and 5 to 8 p.m. Feb. 28. Gallery hours: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday, Tuesday and Frida; 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday. Free. www.kishwaukeecollege.edu. Kish Art to the Community: 7 to 9 p.m. Fridays, Feb. 1 through 28, DeKalb Area Women’s Center, 1021 State St., DeKalb. Invitational group exhibition of con-

temporary artworks by current Kishwaukee College students. Variety of art forms including painting, drawing, photography, metals, ceramics, digital art and video. Free; open to the public. Also open by appointment. Closing reception: Feb. 28. Information: 815-758-1351 or dawc@ niu.edu “Play: Stories, Mementos and Fun”: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays, Sycamore History Museum, 1730 N. Main St., Sycamore. Exhibition explores leisure moments and how we remember them through stories, objects and experiences. Admission: $5 a person, free for members and children younger than 14. www.sycamorehistory. org. 815-895-5762. DeKalb Area Agricultural Heritage Association Exhibit Gallery: 2 to 4 p.m. Wednesdays and Sundays, Labor Day through Memorial Day, or by appointment, Nehring Gallery, 111 S. Second St., Suite 204, DeKalb. Free. www.daaha.inc@gmail. com. 815-756-8737. COMEDY COMEDY Comedian Brian Regan: 7:30 p.m. Feb. 6, Egyptian Theatre, 135 N. Second St., DeKalb. Tickets: $39.75 at www.Livenation. com, www.egyptiantheatre.org, 815-758-1225 or the Egyptian Theatre box office. www.BrianRegan.com.

REGIONAL Zanies Comedy Night Club – St. Charles: Various dates at Pheasant Run Resort, 4050 E. Main St. Visit www.stcharles.zanies.com for acts, prices and showtimes. 630-584-6342. EVENTS EVENTS “Best Picture” Film Series: 7 p.m., Egyptian Theatre, 135 N. Second St., DeKalb. Tickets: $7, adults; $5, students and seniors. Ticket package available for $42, adults; $30, students and seniors. www.egyptiantheatre. org. Schedule: Feb. 4 – “An American in Paris” Feb. 8 – “Sound of Music” (1 p.m.

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and 7 p.m.) Feb. 11 – “Annie Hall” Feb. 18 – “Amadeus” Feb. 25 – “Shakespeare in Love” NIU College of Ed’s Diversity in Film series: 3 to 5:45 p.m. Tuesdays, Faraday 144, NIU, DeKalb. Faculty will moderate discussions following the films. Information: 815-753-1948 or email cedu@niu.edu. Schedule: Feb. 4 – “Pariah” Feb. 18 – “Boys Don’t Cry” March 18 – “Crash” April 15 – “The Interrupters” April 29 – “Fruitvale Station” Sycamore Music Boosters’ A Note to Remember: 7 to 11 p.m. Feb. 8, Blumen Gardens, 403 Edward St., Sycamore. Adults only. Music, hors d’oeuvres, raffles and auction. Tickets: $20. 815-751-8388. Impact Wrestling Road to Lockdown World Tour: 7:30 p.m. Feb. 8, NIU Convocation Center, 1525 W. Lincoln Highway, DeKalb. Tickets: $15 to $65, available at the Convo Center Box Office, www.ticketmaster. com or 800-745-3000. Fans who purchase a $65 ticket will meet select Impact Wrestling superstars at an early-entry autograph session at 5:30 p.m. Circus Spectacular: 7 p.m. March 4, NIU Convocation Center, 1525 W. Lincoln Highway, DeKalb. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. Tickets: $18 to $24 at Convo Center box office or www.2014Circus.com. Tickets on sale at noon Jan. 24. ALPHA: Friends of Antiquity Lecture Series: 7:30 p.m., Jack Arends Visual Arts Building, Room 102, NIU, DeKalb. Free. 815-787-6478. Schedule: • March 6: “The Long Lost Tomb of King Herod the Great at Herodium” • April 3: “When the Greeks Ruled: Egypt After Alexander the Great” Jack Hanna’s “Into the Wild” Live: 3 p.m. April 6, Egyptian Theatre, 135 N. Second St., DeKalb. Tickets: $15 to $35. www.egyptiantheatre.org. MUSIC MUSIC Jazz clarinetist Anat Cohen: 1:15 p.m. Feb. 1, Concert Hall, Music Building, NIU, DeKalb. Part of

Clarinet Cornucopia. Tickets: $20 at www.cornucopia.niu.edu or 815-753-1450 St. Olaf Band: 7 p.m. Feb. 7, DeKalb High School, 501 W. Dresser Road, DeKalb. Tickets: free for students; $10 for adults and seniors. Tickets available the night of the concert, in advance at www.stolaftickets.com or by calling 800-363-5487. Gaelic Storm: 7:30 pm. Feb. 15, Egyptian Theatre, 135 N. Second St., DeKalb. Tickets: $25 to $37 at 815-758-1225, www.egyptiantheatre.org or the Egyptian Theatre box office. Kishwaukee Symphony Orchestra’s ADM Young Artists Concerto Competition Winner Concert: 7:30 p.m. Feb. 22, Boutell Memorial Concert Hall, NIU Music Building, 550 Lucinda Ave., DeKalb. Tickets: $15, adults; $10, seniors and students; $5 children younger than 12. www.kishorchestra.org. William Yang: 7 p.m. March 8, Sandwich Opera House, 140 E. Railroad St., Sandwich. Tickets: $15 to $25. 815-786-2555. www.sandwichoperahouse.org. Billy Currington’s “We Are Tonight” tour with special guests Brett Eldredge and Chase Rice: 7:30 p.m. March 20, NIU Convocation Center, 1525 W. Lincoln Highway, DeKalb. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Tickets: $28.50 to 35.50 at Convo Center box office, all Ticketmaster outlets, Ticketmaster.com or 800-7453000. Tickets on sale at 10 a.m. Jan. 24. Kishwaukee Symphony Orchestra’s Spring Concert: Shostakovich and Steel: 7:30 p.m. May 3, Boutell Memorial Concert Hall, NIU Music Building, 550 Lucinda Ave., DeKalb. Tickets: $15, adults; $10, seniors and students; $5 children younger than 12. www.kishorchestra.org. ONGOING ONGOING Art Attack – School of Art in Sycamore: 215 W. Elm St. Classes for children and adults. www.sycamoreartattack.org or 815-899-9440. Northern Illinois University Community School of the Arts: NIU Music Building, 400 Lucinda

Ave., DeKalb. Classes in music, art and theater for children and adults. www.csa.niu.edu or 815753-1450. Bread & Roses women’s choral group rehearsals: 5:45 to 8 p.m. Sundays, Westminster Presbyterian Church, Annie Glidden Road, DeKalb. www.breadandroseschorus.org. Indian Valley Community Band: 6 to 7:20 p.m. Mondays, Sandwich Middle School Band Room. Area musicians who enjoy playing for pleasure are invited; there are no auditions. Open Mic: 8 p.m. Mondays, sign-in at 7:30 p.m., The House Cafe, 263 E. Lincoln Highway, DeKalb. Bands and singers perform for 12 minutes. 815-787-9547. DeKalb Festival Chorus rehearsals: 7:15 to 9:15 p.m. Mondays during the school year, NIU Music Building. www.dekalbfestivalchorus.org. Contact conductor Seth Houston at seth@sethhouston.com or 303815-0648. Kishwaukee Barbershop Harmony Singers rehearsals: 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Tuesdays, First Congregational Church, 615 N. First St., DeKalb. Open to men of all ages. 815-895-5955 or 815899-8383. Prairie Echoes Chorus rehearsal: 7:30 to 10 p.m. Tuesdays, St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 900 Normal Road, DeKalb. Singing, food, friendship and fun. Kishwaukee Concert Band rehearsals: 7:30 to 9 p.m. Wednesdays, band room at Door 16 of Huntley Middle School, 1515 S. Fourth St., DeKalb. Allvolunteer band for anyone age 18 or older who has played a wind or percussion instrument in the past. No auditions needed. 815899-4867 or 815-825-2350. Thursday Blues Nights: 8 p.m. first Thursday each month at The House Cafe, 263 E. Lincoln Highway, DeKalb. “The Way” acoustic coffee house: 6 to 8:30 p.m. first Saturday each month, DeKalb Christian Church, 1107 S. First St. 815-758-1833 or tomndcc@ aol.com.

Review: ‘Labor Day’ is intense, exquisitely photographed By ANN HORNADAY

‘Labor Day’

HH

The Washington Post “Labor Day” turns out to be aptly titled, and not only because it transpires over the course of one hot-and-heavy summer’s end in the mid-1980s. In this intense, exquisitely photographed domestic potboiler, both Kate Winslet and Josh Brolin deliver studiously serious performances, trying mightily not to betray how hard they’re working to overcome the preposterous story in which they find themselves. Adapted by Jason Reitman from a novel by Joyce Maynard, this sexually charged wish-fulfillment fantasy – complete with troubling masochistic and Oepidal undertones – arrives with people already buzzing about its standout scene, in which Brolin’s charismatic exconvict teaches Winslet’s depressive, agoraphobic housewife how to bake a peach pie (never before has the word “crumbing” been quite so erotically charged). But that turns out to be just one of the

Starring: Kate Winslet, Josh Brolin, Gattlin Griffith Plot: Depressed single mom Adele and her son, Henry, offer a wounded fearsome man a ride. As police search town for the escaped convict, the mother and son gradually learn his true story as their options become increasingly limited. Rating: PG-13 for thematic material, brief violence and sexuality Running time: 1 hour, 51 minutes

AP photo

This image released by Paramount Pictures shows Josh Brolin (left) and Kate Winslet in a scene from “Labor Day.” many gemutlich talents of Frank, who first meets Adele (Winslet) and her 13-year-old son, Henry (Gattlin Griffith), when they take a rare out-

ing to buy school clothes. Having recently escaped from prison, Frank forces himself into their car and proceeds to hold

them hostage in their airless, unkempt house. Soon, the taciturn, rough-hewn dreamboat is changing the oil in Adele’s car, teaching Henry how to throw a baseball, waxing the floors and even ironing. It’s not for nothing that, back in the variety store, he emerged from behind a rack of super-hero comics. If only Reitman, best know for such comedies as “Juno,” “Up In

the Air” and “Young Adult,” had brought some wit or swiftness to bear on Maynard’s painfully trite and retrograde plot, which only grows more contrived with the introduction of a creepily precocious girl whom Henry fatefully befriends at the local library. But “Labor Day” has been staged so handsomely, its actors delivering such alternately seductive and solemn performances, that the blame seems most fairly assigned to the source material, which resorts to facile captivity fantasies and cheap psychology, rather than the characters’ own contradictions, to make its dramatic points. It’s difficult to believe a word of “Labor Day,” but then again you don’t have to in order to luxuriate in Winslet and Brolin’s bubbling, steaming chemistry. Still, between this, “Revolutionary Road” and “Mildred Pierce,” it seems past time for Winslet to cast off the sackcloth and ashes of suburban angst and live it up a little. A girl can’t live on pie and penance alone.

Review: ‘That Awkward Moment’ is average at best By JESSICA HERNDON AP Film Writer As Zac Efron tears up and professes his love to a pert blonde who gave it up on the first night, it’s clear the story line of romantic comedy “That Awkward Moment” has gone too far. This is not because Efron’s leading lady isn’t captivating or that a fella can’t fall in love swiftly. But this revelatory moment required a compelling buildup – and an actor who could carry it out believably. For his first film, writerdirector Tom Gormican attempts a chick flick from a male point of view. But unlike successful films of this kind, such as “High Fidelity,” ‘’Awkward Moment” unfolds like a college thesis with a big budget. Jason (Efron) is a Manhattan pretty boy who designs

AP photo

Miles Teller (from left), Michael B. Jordan and Zac Efron are pictured in a scene from “That Awkward Moment.” book covers. He believes in having a “roster” of women and picks them up at bars and takes them home that night. Though he occasionally calls

for round two, he keeps women at a safe, commitment-free distance. Miles Teller plays Jason’s quirky best friend, co-worker

and fellow lothario, Daniel. Though he’s not as handsome as Jason, he has no problem hooking ladies with his wit and with the help of wingwoman Chelsea (Mackenzie Davis). The third link in the guys’ crew is Mikey (Michael B. Jordan, “Fruitvale Station”), a doctor who married his college sweetheart at 23. He’s the voice of reason – level-headed, loyal and romantic. But when he finds out wife Vera (Jessica Lucas) is cheating on him, he can’t understand where his perfect life plan went wrong. Determined to lift their pal’s spirits, Jason and Daniel take Mikey to a bar and encourage him to become their lady-killing cohort as they all make a pact to stay relationship-free. Unfortunately, they all end up breaking the pact: Jason falls for sassy publisher Ellie

(Imogen Poots); Daniel realizes he wants to be more than friends with Chelsea; and Mikey begins sleeping with his wife again. Though “Awkward Moment” is predictable, it’s not a complete disappointment. It’s satisfying for a lover of formulaic rom-coms. There are amusing moments of absurdity involving Viagra and urination. And sweet bits, like Jason’s surprise tour of Ellie’s dream Gramercy Park apartment. And there’s an attempt to inject some heaviness as Ellie’s father dies. But despite Jason and Ellie’s budding romance, Jason is a no-show at Ellie’s father’s funeral. As a result, Ellie cuts him off. But Gormican fails to show Jason’s efforts to get Ellie back and falls short of making Efron’s character anything but selfish and egocentric. So when Jason cries in front of a

bookstore full of people while declaring Ellie’s “the one,” it’s unconvincing. Set against lofty talents like Jordan and Teller (fresh off the top Sundance award for his “Whiplash”), Efron comes off as little more than a pretty face. Luckily, his comedic timing is on target, though most of the jokes here are unnecessarily crass and forced. Each emerging actress possesses a refreshing charm and on-screen easiness. But Davis’ grace and lure, though she wasn’t completely believable as a romantic match for Teller’s Daniel, make her the one to watch. With much of the soundtrack consisting of 1980s new wave that would make John Hughes proud, the tunes are the only potential cult classic trait here. Well, that and tying everything up with a neat “love conquers all” bow.


Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

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Thursday, January 30, 2014 • Page C3

KC Gallery hosts unique dual exhibition The Kishwaukee College Art Gallery is hosting two exhibitions through March 5. One is a small group show titled “Animal Sign/Animal Minds II” that features the work of five artists. The second show is “Two But Not Two” and features the work of Kryssi Staikidis, who also is one of the five artists in the group show. There will be two Artists’ Receptions for this unique dual show: a daytime reception from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. today and an evening reception from 5 to 8 p.m. Feb. 28. The Kishwaukee College Art Gallery viewing hours are 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday, Tuesday and Friday and 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday. The Kishwaukee College Art Gallery and both receptions are free and open to the public. The group show, “Animal Sign/Animal Minds II,” consists of a series of paintings of identical size in which each artist has created works that focus on “animals” and their own visualization and interpretation of the subject. Each of the artists are from various parts of the United States or New Zealand and bring a unique perspective to their work that is informed by their familial and cultural experiences. The overall animal con-

Provided photo

The Kishwaukee College Art Gallery is hosting two exhibitions through March 5. One is a small group show titled “Animal Sign/Animal Minds II” that features the work of five artists. The second show is “Two But Not Two” and features the work of Kryssi Staikidis, who also is one of the five artists in the group show. Pictured is a work by Melanie Yazzie from the “Animal Sign/Animal Minds II” exhibition, titled “Sombra Girl” (acrylic on canvas). cept for the show was initiated by artist Melanie Yazzie, who has two works included in the exhibition. Yazzie is an associate professor of art at the University or Colorado in Boulder and is Navajo/ Dine of the Salt Water Clan and Bitter Water Clan of the Dine – Navajo People

of North Eastern Arizona. Her works are included in permanent collections across the U.S. and in Australia and have been exhibited around the world. She has conducted classes at the Pont-Aven School of Art in France. Sue Pearson is a Norfolk Islander (near New Zealand)

Sycamore High presents ‘The Diary of Anne Frank’ The Sycamore High School Theater Department will present its winter play, “The Diary of Anne Frank,” on Feb. 13 through 15. “The Diary of Anne Frank” is a story of courage and hope of a young girl who hid in the Secret Annex with her family and four others to escape the Jewish prosecution during World War II and the time of the Holocaust. This plays was adapted from “Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl,” edited by Otto Frank, and reflects the hardships these families faced during their two years in hiding. The fact Otto Frank had a hand in writing and working on the book, and later this play, demonstrates to truth to the story. Viewers see not only the hardships and fear, but Anne’s ability to look at the good in the situation. Instead of dealing with everything in fear, she saw it as another adventure to overcome and lived in the hope of survival. Often taught in classrooms, this story is often told. The cast includes Victoria Smith as Anne Frank, Jordan Peterson as Otto Frank, Lauren Brazeau as Edith Frank, Anna McComb as Margot Frank, Andrew McComb as Peter Van Daan, David Boyer as Mr. Van Daan, Adrianna Acosta as Mrs. Van Daan, Alex Baccheschi as Mr. Dussel, Shianna Thompson as Miep Gies and Michael Poorten as Mr. Kraler. Merri Bork, Sarah Houdek and Tommy Phetmeuangmay as understudies. Tech staff includes Jake Pisarski as stage manager, Jordyn Shultz as assistant stage manager, Kayla Doyle Emani Brinkman on props, Anne Malecki and Emilee Mitchell on costumes, Olivia

Lohse and Brittany Moudy on hair and make-up, Hunter Thomas and Zaven Torian on sound and Bella Bliujus on lights. The play is directed by Natalie Boone and tech directed by David Olson and Ralph Helm. Show times are 7:30 p.m.

Feb. 13, 14 and 15 and 2 p.m. Feb. 15 at the Sycamore High School Auditorium, 555 Spartan Trail. Tickets cost $6 and can be purchased online at www. syc427.org, by phone at 815-899-8160, ext. 2173, or by visiting the Sycamore High School Box Office.

and a descendent of the mutineers of the HMS Bounty and the Tahitian women who joined them on Pitcairn Island. She also has exhibited internationally in the U.S., Europe, Australia and across the Pacific Islands. Her work often includes flying fish, which are abundant in the waters near Norfolk and Pitcairn and which she has adopted as a visual metaphor for her being. The fish weave between the different layers of ocean waters and the air just as her consciousness moves between the physical and spiritual spaces of her awareness. Kate Walker is a New Zealander who is a research scholar and adjunct professor at Boise State University in Idaho. She also has exhibited her work internationally. For “Animal Designs,” she has created works that use familiar parade characters that are placed in ordinary situations to offer a humorous, satirical critique on contemporary consumer culture, economic issues and potential social disruptions.

Barbara Penn is a professor of 2D art at the School of Art at the University of Arizona. Her works have been exhibited across the western and southwestern U.S. as well as across Europe. She was an artist-in-residence at Orsa Graphic Print Studio in Sweden in 2011. Her work uses literary, poetic and everyday sources in paintings, drawings and combined media installations – which she merges with personal and socio/political themes. The final artist in the group exhibition is Kryssi Staikidis who holds an Ed.D. in art and art education from Teachers College, Columbia University in New York City, a MFA in Painting from Hunter College in NYC, and a BS in anthropology and art history from Columbia University in NYC. She has published more than 20 journal articles on her area of research in indigenous pedagogy, art studio practice as a site for research, and visual culture/critical pedagogy in the classroom. In her solo exhibition,

“Two But Not Two,” Staikidis draws from her experience studying under two contemporary Guatemalan Maya painters, Pedro Rafael González Chavajay and Paula Nicho Cúmez, from whom she began to focus her work on personal and cultural narratives. The current series examines her own cultural hybridity and the memories and oral histories told to her by relatives who remember crossing continents from Russia escaping pogroms, and first trips to the United States from Greece. The paintings in this series feature her dog, who acts as a guide through their small Midwestern odyssey. For more information on the dual exhibitions, contact Steven Hoover, director of the Kishwaukee College Art Gallery at 815-825-2086, ext. 5611, or at steven.hoover@ kishwaukeecollege.edu.

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Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

Renowned college band to perform at DHS The St. Olaf Band, dubbed “one of America’s preeminent bands” by The New Yorker, will perform in DeKalb on Feb. 7 as part of its 2014 national tour. The band’s repertoire includes David Maslanka’s “A Child’s Garden of Dreams,” “Overture for Band” by John Heins, the second movement from Persichetti’s Symphony No. 6, and Dan Welcher’s “Zion.” Founded in 1891, the St. Olaf Band is an ensemble noted for superb musicianship. Under the leadership of conductor Dr. Timothy Mahr, the St. Olaf Band performs the very best compositions and transcriptions for symphonic band. It is the oldest music organization at St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minn., and has toured nationally since 1904 and internationally since 1906. In October 2011, the St. Olaf Band performed for King Harald and Queen Sonja of Norway during their visit to St. Olaf

College. The band also played for the royals when they visited the campus in 1995; after that visit the band toured Norway with the St. Olaf Choir and St. Olaf Orchestra in commemoration of the centennial of Norway’s peaceful separation from Sweden. In March 1997, the St. Olaf Band was one of four college and university bands from the United States invited to perform for the American Bandmasters Association annual convention in San Diego, Calif. The band also performed during the opening concert of the 2004 National Convention of the Music Educators National Conference in Minneapolis. In 2013, the St. Olaf Band was selected through a blind adjudication process as one of only 10 collegiate wind ensembles to perform at the College Band Directors National Association (CBDNA) national conference at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

Conductor Timothy Mahr is a nationally recognized composer with more than 60 works to his credit, including “The Soaring Hawk,” for which he received the ABA/Ostwald Award. Mahr has guest-conducted a number of professional and award-winning ensembles, including the United States Air Force Band and the United States Army Field Band, as well as intercollegiate and allstate bands in over 25 states. He is the principal conductor of the Minnesota Symphonic Winds, a featured ensemble at the 2008 Midwest Clinic, the largest international band conference in the world. The concert will take place at 7 p.m. Feb. 7 at DeKalb High School. Tickets are free for students and cost $10 for adults and seniors. Group rates are available for groups of 10 or more. Tickets are available on the night of the concert, in advance at stolaftickets.com or by calling 800-363-5487.

The world-renowned St. Olaf College Band will perform at DeKalb High School on Feb. 7. Several DHS alumni belong to the college’s music programs. Provided photo

Young singers can join CSA Children’s Choir at NIU Children, ages 7 to 15, are welcome to join the CSA Children’s Choir, which meets for weekly rehearsals from 4:45 to 6:15 p.m. in the Music Building at Northern Illinois University. Singers have fun singing and learning together. Break time is a part of every rehearsal, allowing for singers to get to know each other. In addition to concerts at the end of each semester, the choir offers special performances and events. The choir sings a wide variety of music from all over the world. Director Mary Lynn Doherty works on helping the singers develop their voices by working on breath support, healthy vocal production and increased stage

Provided photo

The CSA Children’s Choir meets for weekly rehearsals from 4:45 to 6:15 p.m. in the Music Building at Northern Illinois University. performance skills at each rehearsal. Music literacy is a high priority for members of both groups.

In April, the singers have the chance to work with renowned choir director and composer Nick Page, who

will be at NIU for a residency funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. The residency

concludes with a Community Sing on April 5 in the Concert Hall. Doherty is a children’s choral conductor with 20 years of experience working with community and school choral groups. She is active as a clinician and guest conductor for elementary, middle and high school choral festivals throughout the region. She is an associate professor and coordinator of music education for the School of Music at Northern Illinois University. “Singing gives kids the chance to communicate in positive ways,” Doherty said in a news release. “We are lucky to have excellent music programs in our schools. However, this choir gives the

children wonderful musical opportunities that they will not get anywhere else.” The CSA Children’s Choir is one of seven ensembles offered this spring by the NIU Community School of the Arts. Other ensemble opportunities include a full orchestra, two string orchestras for young players, steelband, guitar and ukulele. Other learning opportunities include lessons and classes in music and art. The program is sponsored by the College of Visual and Performing Arts. Teachers are faculty and students in the NIU School of Music and Art. For more information, call 815-753-1450 or visit www.csa. niu.edu.

8BRIEF

‘The Fox and the Fairway’

NIU Annuitants to see ‘Gypsy’ Feb. 6

Debbie Merkel (left) of Sandwich and Gina Palmer of Lombard rehearse a spirited scene for Indian Valley Theatre’s dinner theater production of “The Fox and the Fairway,” coming to Sandwich in February. Shows will be held at Fox Valley Older Adults Center, 1406 Suydam Road, Sandwich, at 7 p.m. Feb. 20 through 22 and 1 p.m. Feb. 23. Tickets cost $26 and can be ordered online at www.indianvalleytheatre.com. For questions or more information, email foxonthefairway@gmail.com or call 888-365-8889.

The Northern Illinois University Annuitants Association will travel to Chicago Shakespeare Theatre on Navy Pier to see an evening performance of “Gypsy” on Feb. 6. Seats are still available. This classic musical is inspired by memoirs of the burlesque dancer Gypsy Rose Lee. Tony Award nominee Louise Pitre makes her Chicago Shakespeare debut as Rose, the most infamous of all stage mothers. Pitre’s career high-

lights include many critically acclaimed performances in the theater, on television and concert stages across North America and Europe. The group will depart from NIU at 3 p.m. and Oak Crest DeKalb Area Retirement Center at 3:15 p.m. Attendees can spend time at Navy Pier for dinner (on their own) and/ or visit the Stained Glass Museum at Navy Pier. Following the 7 p.m. show, the bus will return to DeKalb. For reservations or information, call Carder Travel at 815-756-1547.

Provided photo

NIU College of Ed offers Diversity in Film series Northern Illinois University’s College of Education invites students, faculty, staff and community members to attend its ongoing Diversity in Film series. The free series of contemporary films covers topics depicting race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender, ability and their intersections. All movies will be shown in Faraday 144 from 3 to 5:45 p.m. Faculty will moderate discussions following the films.

Feb. 4: “Pariah” A Brooklyn teenager juggles conflicting identities and risks friendship, heartbreak and family in a desperate search for sexual expression. This feature film is a stunning and candid view into the challenges of being

honest with oneself, one’s peers and one’s family. (2011)

Feb. 18: “Boys Don’t Cry” Based on actual events, director Kimberly Peirce’s powerful, often harrowing drama stars Hilary Swank as Brandon Teena, a transgender person searching for love and acceptance in a small Midwestern town. Swank’s performance earned her an Academy Award for Best Female Actor. (1999)

March 18: “Crash” Winner of an Oscar for Best Picture, “Crash” exposes the deep-seated prejudices and assumptions in all people. In post-9/11 Los Angeles, tensions erupt when the lives of a Brentwood housewife, her district attorney husband, a Persian shopkeeper, two cops, a pair of carjack-

ers and a Korean couple converge during a 36-hour period. Considered one of the most important films about diversity in the new century. (2004)

April 15: “The Interrupters” This powerful documentary follows Ceasefire, a Chicago-based group – staffed by former gang members – that is dedicated to wiping out urban violence. The organization treats violence like an infection and seeks to eradicate the root cause. (2011)

April 29: “Fruitvale Station” This dramatic rendering of a real-life tragedy recounts

the final hours of Oscar Grant, shot by San Francisco transit police on New Year’s Day, 2009. In portraying the energy Oscar brought to life, the film mourns the tragic loss of a unique soul. The film has already won several awards and is being considered for several Academy Award nominations. (2013) Faculty moderators are Monique Bernoudy, James Cohen, Joe Flynn, Connie Fox, Molly Holmes, Becqui Hunt and Mike Manderino. For more information, call 815-753-1948 or email cedu@ niu.edu.

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ADVICE & PUZZLES

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Thursday, January 30, 2014 • Page C5

Daughter acts like winner, feels like loser Dear Abby: I’m a 27-yearold woman who still lives at home. I do it so I can help my mom with my five nieces and nephews. Their mother passed away suddenly in 2009 at the age of 30. My mom and stepdad kept them rather than scatter them to fathers who don’t appear very interested in them. Since my sister’s death I have earned two degrees, entered the health care field and have lost almost 140 pounds. Despite what I have accomplished, I feel I have nothing to show for myself. When I point my accomplishments out to myself, they don’t seem like a heck of a lot. What can I do so I can stop feeling like a loser? – Lost in The Northeast Dear Lost: A loser? From where I sit, you appear to be not only a caring daughter,

DEAR ABBY Jeanne Phillips but also an intellectually accomplished young woman who is being very hard on herself. If you feel you haven’t accomplished a lot, I have to question the yardstick you’re using. It’s time you discussed your feelings with a licensed mental health professional who can help you understand what is causing your low self-esteem. If you do, it may help you be kinder to yourself, because what’s currently going on in your head is unfair to you and destructive. Dear Abby: I work in a buffet restaurant. I wish you would alert your readers to how

waste increases the costs at restaurants like this one. And then people complain because the cost of the food goes up! I have seen customers stick their fingers or used utensils into pans of food to taste it before serving themselves. And instead of the tongs we provide, they use their hands to help themselves to chicken, bread, etc. The fact is that once anyone touches the food with his or her hands or eating utensil, the restaurant is required by the health code to dispose of the entire pan of food. This causes tremendous waste. Customers also overfill their plates only to throw half the food away. It makes me sad because so many people in this world are hungry. I have seen children run around, making a mess of the

dessert bar, and especially the ice cream and drink stations. Their parents seem to think it’s “cute.” I wish you would remind your readers to use common sense when dining out and to PLEASE control their children. The parents should serve food to their little ones who don’t know better. – Frustrated Buffet Worker, Pueblo, Colo. Dear Frustrated: Children can’t practice behavior they haven’t been taught, and parents who don’t take the time to explain proper behavior to their little ones are shirking their responsibility. As to adults who have so little understanding of hygiene – or consideration for others – that they put their hands or used utensils into food that is meant for

others, well – perhaps after being reminded that it raises the prices they have to pay, they’ll think twice about it. But don’t bet on it. Dear Abby: I was wondering what is the appropriate level of give and take in a friendship? I notice that in some relationships I am always giving and never receiving, where in others I am always receiving. How do you know when a balance is reached? – Jake in Albany, Ga. Dear Jake: There is give and take in all healthy relationships. A “balance is reached” when you can give without feeling used, and take without feeling guilty that you’re being given too much.

• Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Healthy diet minimizes sugars, fats and salt Dear Dr. K: Are there any foods that don’t belong in a healthy diet? Dear Reader: There sure are – and like me, you probably eat them now and then. You’ve heard me say it before: Unhealthy foods are not like poison, where you swallow and then die. They become unhealthy when you have them regularly. An occasional hot fudge sundae won’t kill you – if it did, I wouldn’t be here. But a hot fudge sundae every evening is a bad idea. Harvard nutrition scientists have compiled the following list of foods you should keep to a minimum. Eating these foods regularly can set the stage for life-threatening illnesses such as heart disease, high blood

ASK DR. K Anthony L. Komaroff pressure, diabetes, and even some cancers: • Added sugar. Whether it’s white granulated sugar, brown sugar, high-fructose corn syrup, corn sugar or honey, sugar contains almost no nutrients and is pure carbohydrate. When you eat a lot of sugar, you are filling up on empty calories. Also, sugar-rich foods often are chosen instead of healthy foods that contain important nutrients and fiber. Added sugar causes your blood sugar (and your mood and energy levels) to rise and fall like a roller coaster. That

puts a strain on your pancreas and increases your risk of developing diabetes. Foods with lots of “invisible” sugar, like soft drinks and other sugar-sweetened beverages, are major sources of added sugar. • Dairy fat. There are “good” fats and “bad” fats. We need the good fats in our diet, but we should minimize the bad fats. Ice cream, whole milk and cheese are full of saturated fat and some naturally occurring trans fat. Both saturated fat and trans fat are bad fats. They can increase the risk of health problems, notably heart disease. So choose nonfat or lowfat milk and reduced-fat cheeses. • Baked sweets. Cookies, snack cakes, doughnuts,

pastries and other treats are hard to pass up. But commercially prepared versions are packed with processed carbohydrates, added sugar, unhealthy fats and often salt. Yes, I had pumpkin pie at Thanksgiving. But I’ve gone “cold turkey” on pumpkin pie since then. • White carbohydrates, such as bread, pasta, potatoes, rice, cookies, cake or pancakes. If you enjoy these foods, opt for whole-grain versions. At least to my palate, there now are delicious whole-grain flours and pastas available. • Processed and high-fat meats such as bacon, ham, hot dogs and many lunch meats are less healthy than protein from fish, skinless chicken, nuts, beans, soy and

whole grains. Eat fresh red meat sparingly and select the leanest cuts. • Salt. Try to limit your sodium intake to fewer than 2,300 mg (less than one teaspoon of salt) per day, or fewer than 1,500 mg if you are over age 50, have high blood pressure, diabetes or chronic kidney disease. Your body needs a certain amount of sodium, but too much can increase blood pressure and the risk of heart disease and stroke. You can eat foods that are both good for you and delicious – and the occasional culinary sin won’t kill you. I’m living proof.

• Visit www.AskDoctorK. com to send questions and get additional information.

The age difference is a bit too great for you Dr. Wallace: I’m 15 and in the 10th grade. The guy I’m seeing is 19, has graduated from high school and is a full-time student at Valparaiso University. I met him at a restaurant this summer. He was our waiter, and he asked me for my phone number, so I gave it to him. The rest is history. My parents are not happy with this relationship because of the age difference. Our age difference is not a problem to us because we are emotionally in tune. Age is just a number. We are

’TWEEN 12 & 20 Robert Wallace extremely fond of each other and are thinking of a future together. My own parents met when my mom was 19 and my dad was 23, and they have been married over 20 years. My parents have a four-year age difference, so why is our four-year difference such a problem? – Nameless, Valparaiso, Ind.

8ASTROGRAPH By BERNICE BEDE OSOL Newspaper Enterprise Association

TODAY – Concentration will be the key if you want to meet your goals this year. You must not allow yourself to be distracted by other people or personal problems. Think carefully about your motivations and make pragmatic decisions that will lead to the highest rewards. It’s time to start putting yourself first instead of catering to the demands of everybody else. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) – You may feel depressed today if you allow unpleasant memories to keep you brooding. Don’t place limitations upon yourself by refusing to get involved in something new. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) – You can earn some extra money if you make intelligent use of your creative talents. Explore the possibility of a small business venture and consider looking for a partner. ARIES (March 21-April 19) – You stand to make significant gains through a female contact. Traveling for business will be fruitful. You will communicate comfortably and effectively. Be ready to help children with any problems they might experience. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) – Estrangement from your lover is a strong possibility. Avoid involvement in secret affairs that may damage your reputation. Read personal papers carefully at this time. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) – Your ability to communicate with charm will help you attract the partner of your choice. This is a good time to formulate and complete contracts and agreements. CANCER (June 21-July 22) – A romance can develop through work-related functions or business trips. Be wary, as this connection may damage your reputation and set you back professionally. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) – Socializing and travel should be on your agenda. You will make a great impression if you turn on the charm and reveal your outgoing nature. Gambling for entertainment will be fun for you. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) – Real estate will turn out to be lucrative. You can make changes to your home that will increase its value. Take time to investigate an issue that may be causing anxiety in an older relative. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) – Catch up on email today. Discuss any personal problems that are bothering you with your relatives. Get involved in humanitarian groups that are important to you. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) – Professional advancement is on the horizon. Your consistent ability to finish work on time will enable you to set a good example, and you will receive recognition. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) – It’s a good time to ask for favors. You should join a group with a humanitarian cause. Your reputation will grow based on the company you choose to keep. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) – Put some extra time, effort and money into beautifying your home environment. Investments can be lucrative if you make careful choices. Don’t allow family members to upset you.

Nameless: When both members of a couple have turned 18 and are no longer in high school, chronological age diminishes in importance. But the four-year age difference from 15 to 19 is significant in terms of physical, social and emotional maturity. I’m aware that you feel comfortable in your relationship with this boy, but I agree with your parents that the age difference is a bit too great. Dr. Wallace: I read in a magazine that the nicotine and tar levels in cigarettes have declined a lot in the

8SUDOKU

last 25 years. If that’s true, cigarettes shouldn’t be as dangerous today as they were then. So why, then, are we still being hyped that smoking is bad? It seems like cigarettes are safer than they once were. I’m interested in this because I’m a smoker who has tried to quit a dozen times, but failed. I’m also concerned about my health. – Rosie, Nashville, Tenn. Rosie: Since you are concerned about your health, you must find a way to give up your smoking habit. It’s true that tar and

nicotine levels are lower today, but smoking is still dangerous and potentially deadly. That’s because American smokers (especially women) now smoke more cigarettes, inhale them more deeply, and start smoking at a much earlier age. In fact, according to the University of California Wellness Letter, smoking-related death rates are higher today than ever before even with lower tar and nicotine.

• Email Dr. Robert Wallace at rwallace@galesburg.net.

8CROSSWORD

BRIDGE Phillip Alder

What do you respond with game values? Yesterday, we looked at the Truscott two-no-trump response over an opponent’s takeout double after partner has opened one of a major. I said that it shows at least fourcard support for the major and game-invitational values. But what does responder do with game-forcing cards – today’s North hand, for example? There are two sensible solutions. You can still respond two no-trump, promising game-invitational strength or more. If opener signs off in three of his major, responder raises to game. Or, if you do not like the ambiguity, you can respond three no-trump. Discuss it with your partner. In this deal, South would probably bid four spades over two no-trump, hoping that his singleton will prove useful. Against four spades, West leads the queen of hearts. How should declarer plan the play? First, South must count his losers. There are four: one in each suit. Next, he checks winners. There are five spades, two hearts, two diamonds and a club or two – enough to get home as long as the defenders do not take their four tricks first. The careless declarer wins trick one and immediately plays a trump. However, West wins and returns a heart. Suddenly, South has those four unavoidable losers. The more thoughtful declarer realizes he must do something about his heart loser immediately. So, he wins the first trick in his hand and leads a club. East takes dummy’s queen with his ace and returns a heart, but South wins on the board and discards his last heart on the club king. Then he draws trumps as quickly as possible.


COMICS

C6 •• Day, Thursday, January 30, 2014 Page XX Date, 2012

Pickles

Brian Crane Pearls Before Swine

For Better or For Worse

Non Sequitur

orthwest h/erald / nwherald.com DailyNChronicle daily-chronicle.com

Stephan Pastis

Lynn Johnston Crankshaft

Tom Batiuk & Chuck Hayes

Wiley The Duplex

Glenn McCoy

Beetle Bailey

Mort Walker Blondie

Dean Young & Denis LeBrun

Frank & Ernest

Bob Thaves Dilbert

Scott Adams

Monty

Jim Meddick Zits Hi and Lois

Rose is Rose

Pat Brady & Don Wimmer Arlo & Janis

Soup to Nutz

The Family Circus

Rick Stromoski Big Nate

Bill Keane

The Argyle Sweater

Scott Hilburn

Stone Soup

Grizzwells

Brianand & Greg Jim Borgman JerryWalker Scott

Jimmy Johnson

Lincoln Peirce

Jan Eliot

Bill Schorr


CLASSIFIED

Daily Chronicle / daily-chronicle.com

Thursday, January 30, 2014 • Page D1 Thursday, January 30, 2014

“Brrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrwoof!” Photo by: Carrie

Upload your photos on My Photos – DeKalb County’s community photo post! Photos on My Photos are eligible to appear in print in Daily Chronicle Classified. Go to Daily-Chronicle.com/myphotos

CAT - ORANGE & WHITE TABBY

NURSES & CNAs

Administrative

HEALTH SERVICES SECRETARY - FT Oak Crest DeKalb Area Retirement Center Qualified candidates will be a High School Graduate with at least two years experience as a secretary, possess strong computer skills in Excel and Word and be capable of learning additional software programs. Responsibilities will include staffing, payroll processing, assisting staff with computer skills, resident billing, and additional secretarial tasks. Benefits include insurance, time off with pay, and 403B retirement program. Submit resume to Sharon Cox at scox@oakcrestdekalb.org or apply in person at 2944 Greenwood Acres Dr, DeKalb, IL 60115 Applications will be accepted until February 7, 2014. MANUFACTURING ENGINEER Raynor Garage Doors is hiring a Manufacturing Engineer with experience in the design of dies and tool for roll formers. Bachelor's degree (BA) in an engineering related field plus 7 years minimum in a manufacturing environment involved in roll forming technologies. Knowledge of Word Processing software; Spreadsheet software; CAD (Solidworks preferred) and ERP System. Send Cover letter and resume to: 1101 E. River Rd. Dixon, IL 61021 or email employment@raynor.com

Production Assistant/ Office Support Manufacturer in DeKalb is seeking a full-time, hourly, assistant to work with our Production departments preparing cut sheets, labels, inventory control and to support the shipping function. Basic computer skills, strong attention to detail, good math skills and strong communication skills are required. If interested please send resume to: P.O. Box 965 DeKalb, IL 60115

Looking to join a team that looks out for you? Prairie Crossing Living & Rehab Center is now hiring Nurses & C.N.A.'s. Expanding our team. Limited shifts available. Competitive pay, small, family oriented facility. Please apply at: PRAIRIE CROSSING LIVING & REHAB 409 W. Comanche Ave. Shabbona, IL 60550 815-824-2194

RN - Part-time Provide medication training & supervision to direct care staff. Monitor health of adults with developmental disabilities & complete nursing documents in accordance with State regulations. 26 hrs/wk, which includes oncall. Min. 2 yrs RN. MS Office skills required. Apply on our website, www.ohinc.org or in-person at:

Opportunity House 202 Lucas St., Sycamore 815-895-5108 EOE

Driver

Swine Wean Pig Driver CDL not required but beneficial. Flexible hours necessary. Able to lift 50 lbs, able to pass DOT physical requirements. Able to bend & squat for a limited amount of time. Email letter of interest or resume to: kimp@bethanyswine.com

ROAD CREW HELP WANTED Travel to trade shows. Lifting required. Set up displays at trade shows nationwide. Call our office 815-754-7418 or apply within at TC Development & Design, 210 W. Stephenie Dr, Cortland, Mon-Fri 8-4:30.

CAT ~ LONG HAIRED

Blue/grey, fluffy, shy. Found Sunday, Jan 19 at Maplewood & 11th St in DeKalb. Please call: 630-774-8812

Burlington, IL Estate Sale 2/1 & 2/2 10am-4pm

Accurate Home Care, LLC is the best fit for career-oriented Health Care professionals looking for the flexibility that only home care can provide. We offer the training and support that you need to provide the best possible care to patients.

525 S. MAIN ST.

We are currently recruiting for highly skilled, compassionate, motivated and dedicated RN/ LPNs to work with a client in Sycamore! We have days and overnight hours available. Qualified candidates will have at least a year of nursing exp.

Kathy's Estate Sales 847-363-4814

Apply online & learn more at www.accuratehomecare.com EOE/AA

HUNTLEY INDOOR GARAGE SALE Business equipment & supplies, shelving units, 5 sets table / 4 chairs, fridge, 2 desks, 2 computers & equipment, Craftsman workbench, Image 516V fitness systems, dumbbell set (20-95 lbs) & rack, rolling scaffolding, antique radio, collectibles, Barbie dolls, much misc. 10514 Rt. 47, Huntley Next to Papa G's FRI 8-3, SAT 8-1 Advertise here for a successful garage sale! Call 815-455-4800

Whole House Humidifier Kenmore – Quiet Comfort, 14 gal., Service Manual & New Filters Included - Like New, Retails $269, Asking $30. 815-901-1633

ALWAYS INVESTIGATE BEFORE INVESTING ANY MONEY

Contact the Better Business Bureau www.chicago.bbb.org - or Federal Trade Commission www.ftc.gov

I BUY CARS, TRUCKS, VANS & SUVs

Lazy Boy recliner chair, like new, $90 815-793-1473 Sofa: Dark Brown corduroy sofa, great condition $60 815-793-1473

1990 & Newer Will beat anyone's price by $300.

RADIAL ARM SAW

Craftsman, 10” Great Condition. Great for furniture making $45 OBO. 815-827-3692

Will pay extra for Honda, Toyota & Nissan Commode Toilet Seat Chair for an adult. Height adjustable. Practically new. Just used for only one week. Extremely clean. $15.00 815-751-0115

Power Chair GT ~ Pride Jazzy Red, needs batteries, good condition, no chair lift, $400. 779-777-5254

We are also accepting clients in DeKalb Co. Call 866-214-3800 for more information!

WOULD SAVING 50-90% On your Prescription Drugs interest you? Go to medfreedom.net Then visit http://tonyp.bidformymeds.com and see how much you can save.

!!!!!!!!!!!

Grill: 3 burner propane grill w/propane tank $70 815-793-1473 Mulching lawn mower, w/bag, great condition $90 815-793-1473

RN / LPNs

NEWSPAPER DELIVERY Raynor Garage Doors, a leading supplier of residential and commercial garage doors and openers has an immediate opening for an OverThe-Road Semi Driver. The qualified candidate must possess a valid CDL with at least two years of verifiable recent over the road driving experience. Must have good communication skills and also have a good driving record. Candidate must meet all federal DOT requirements, including Drug and Alcohol screening and be at least 21 years old. Candidates must posses a passport or obtain one within 60 days of employment. Heavy lifting is required. Raynor offers a competitive compensation package and benefits, including medical, dental, life, and 401(k). If you are interested in an exciting career with a solid organization, please send resume and cover letter to: Attn: Human Resources 1101 E. River Road Dixon, IL 61021 Fax 815/285-7133 E-mail: employment@raynor.com EOE

Female, no front claws. Found before Christmas in DeKalb. 210-861-0015

Coffee table, end table, dresser, $35 815-793-1473 Kitchen Table & 4 Chairs $50. 815-784-2857

LOVESEAT - 1800's Victorian loveseat. Original dusty rose upholstery and Mahogany wood. Very good condition. $350. See photo online. 815-899-7043

Earn up to $1000 A Month! Looking for Contractors to deliver newspapers early mornings 7 days per week. Routes now available in DeKalb County. Please Call 815-526-4434

China, fine porcelain White Lace, 37 pcs., incl., teapot, cream, sugar, platter, soup/salad plates, bowls $120/set 847-830-9725 Magazines: loaded w/advertisements, great shape, $5/book Look, Post, & Companion 847-515-8012

Craftsman 5HP, electric start, single stage, great shape, $150 815-757-5790

815-814-1964 or

815-814-1224 !!!!!!!!!!!

A-1 AUTO

Will BUY UR USED CAR, TRUCK, SUV,

Barbie Doll clothes - play or bridal gowns. $3.00 to $30.00. Somonauk 815-797-1063

WANTED!

MOST CASH WILL BEAT ANY QUOTE GIVEN!! $400 - $2000 “don't wait.... call 2day”!!

815-575-5153

I Buy

We Pay The Best!

Old Envelopes

For Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans No Title, No Problem. Same Day Pick-Up. 630-817-3577

Stamps

Harley Davidson Screaming Eagle Slip On Mufflers - EPA stamped. Off of 2011 Ultra Classic Limited. 15,000 miles on them - excellent condition. $300 firm. Call 815895-6096 - leave message.

Collections 815-758-4004 Bathroom Sink & Vanity Cabinet, Light Oak, Perfect Condition $30. 815-748-5215 Door Hardware – 6 bed/bath knobs, 3 hall/closet knobs, 2 dummy knobs, 10 bi-fold door pulls, 30 removal pin door hinges (3-1/2”, 5/8” round), 12 removal pin door hinges (4”, 5/8” round) & 4 exterior door pulls w/ deadbolts; all polished brass & all hardware included. Asking $50 815-508-0406

CAT – LOST South DeKalb County. Large neutered male, mostly white with big brown patches and brown Maine Coon tail. May still have red collar. If seen, please call at 815-501-9724. Reward for safe return. We miss him. Have you seen or know what happened to him?

Dell XPS All-In-One PC 20" (Intel Core 2 Duo CPU, 2.0 GB DDR2 RAM, 220 GB Hard drive). HD monitor, integrated webcam, CD/DVD burner, Windows 7 Ultimate. Includes wireless keyboard and mouse. $345 obo. 815354-3460 DVD/CD PLAYER 7 Disc, JVC, $40. Hampshire area. 847-830-9725

Get Bears news on Twitter by following @bears_insider

TV 32” Insignia Flat front, large in back (a little older) used only in guest rm. $40 847-830-9725

2007 FORD FOCUS SE Metallic gray, 57K miles. Automatic/power windows and lock. Great condition and very clean!

Reduced $9000 For More Details Call

815-701-3301

DIRECTOR OF ALZHEIMERS SERVICES

Handicap Ramp Van 2006 Dodge Grand Caravan 156k mi. $13,900. Leave msg. 815-756-2564

DeKalb County Rehab & Nursing Center seeks director for 38 bed Alzheimer's Unit. This is a full time, salaried position to coordinate the integration of medical, social, psychological and spiritual aspects of resident care. Licensed nurse or C.N.A. helpful. This is a “handson” position and requires a working knowledge and understanding of the unique needs of persons with Alzheimers.

Your online destination for all things DeKalb County

Minimum of 5 years experience, including 2 years of management working with persons with Alzheimers or other dementia. OR Registered Nurse with at least one year of experience working with persons with Alzheimers. Job Standard Includes: Strong interpersonal and communication skills. Ability to plan and conduct education programs and support groups. Supervisory experience. Initiative, organizational and decision making abilities. Creativity and willingness to face challenges. Flexibility with scheduling. If you are passionate about meeting the unique needs of persons with Alzheimers, contact Cathy Anderson, Administrator at canderson@dekalbcounty.org. No phone calls please. Apply at:

DeKalb County Rehab & Nursing Center 2600 North Annie Glidden Road DeKalb, Illinois 60115 EOE

PlanitDeKalbCounty.com

Publisher's Notice: All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation of discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD tollfree at 1-800-669-9777. The tollfree telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

PUBLIC NOTICE

PUBLIC NOTICE

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 23RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DEKALB COUNTY - SYCAMORE, ILLINOIS U.S Bank National Association, as trustee, for J.P. MORGAN Mortgage Trust 2005-S1 PLAINTIFF Vs. Adam Cholewiak a/k/a Adam W. Cholewiak; et. al. DEFENDANTS 12 CH 00127 NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on 11/14/2013, the Sheriff of DeKalb County, Illinois will on 2/27/14 at the hour of 1:00PM at Public Safety Building, 150 North Main Sycamore, IL 60178, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of DeKalb and State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: PIN 09-20-278-002; (09-20200-008/007 Underlying Pin) Improved with Residential COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 4811 Clover Avenue n/k/a 153 E. Clover Avenue, Cortland, IL 60112 Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the property is a condominium and the foreclosure takes place after 1/1/2007, purchasers other than the mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee's attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 151701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: Codilis & Associates, P.C., 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-10-05951. I584299

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 23RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DEKALB COUNTY - SYCAMORE, ILLINOIS The National Bank & Trust Company PLAINTIFF Vs. Allison M. LaPorta; et. al. DEFENDANTS 13 CH 00279 NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on 9/26/2013, the Sheriff of DeKalb County, Illinois will on 2/27/14 at the hour of 1:00PM at Public Safety Building, 150 North Main Sycamore, IL 60178, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of DeKalb and State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: PIN 09-29-256-019 Improved with Residential COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 123 E. Robinson Avenue, Cortland, IL 60112 Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the property is a condominium and the foreclosure takes place after 1/1/2007, purchasers other than the mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee's attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all informa-

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE TWENTY THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DEKALB COUNTY, ILLINOIS THE NATIONAL BANK & TRUST COMPANY Plaintiff, vs. ARTURO SANCHEZ, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, Defendants. CASE NO. 13 CH 215 NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment for Foreclosure entered by the Court in the above entitled cause the property hereinafter described or so much thereof as shall be sufficient to satisfy said judgment, shall be sold to the highest bidder. 1. The name, address and telephone number of the person to contact for information regarding the real estate is: Jeffrey L. Lewis Klein, Stoddard, Buck & Lewis LLC 2045 Aberdeen Court Sycamore, IL 60178 (815) 748-0380 2. The common address and other common description, if any of the real estate is: 1216 STATE STREET, DEKALB, IL 60115 3. The legal description of the real estate: PIN: 08-23-278-044 4. A description of the improvements on the real estate: Residential real estate 5.The time and place of the sale is: A. February 27, 2014 at 1:00 pm B. DeKalb County Sheriff's Office, 150 North Main Street, Sycamore, IL 60178 6. The terms of the sale are: A. The sale shall be by public auction. B. The sale shall be by open verbal bid. C. The sale shall be conducted by the Sheriff of DeKalb County. D. The sale shall be cash. E. The sale shall be "as is" condition without any representation or warranty as to the condition of the property. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court.

Deep, Deep Yard with this 3 Bedroom Home. Huge Garage. Estate Sale at $98,000

CALL NEDRA ERICSON, REALTOR 815-739-9997

FOR SALE – TOWNHOME EASY LIVING

OGLE COUNTY, ILLINOIS SELLING AS 1 PARCEL Sale to be held: The Auction Shed 900 South Division Ave Polo, IL 61064 155 Acres MOL in Sections 9 & 10 of Pine Creek Township, Ogle Co., IL. OPEN TENANCY 2014! FARMLAND & TIMBER GROUND Consists of 86.75 Acres MOL Tillable; 68.41 Acres MOL Timber Land GREAT HUNTING, HARD FRONTAGE ROAD; LOCATED NEXT TO WHITE PINES STATE PARK and just 8 miles west of Oregon, IL- The Ogle County Seat Tax I.D. # 15-09-400-008 & 15-10-300-001 2012 Taxes $ 702.54 For More Information Contact: Lenny Bryson- Auctioneer Harriet Sheely & 900 South Division Ave Cecil Sheely Trust Polo, IL 61064 Alvina Glenn, Trustee Ph) 815-946-4120 Attorney: Kim Krahenbuhl WilliamsMcCarthy 607 Washington Street Oregon, IL 61061 815-732-2101 For photos, aerials, soil maps, and terms & conditions, visit www.lennybrysonauctioneer.com

PUBLIC NOTICE

*

LOCAL NEWS WHEREVER YOU GO! Up-to-date news, weather, scores & more can be sent directly to your phone! It's quick, easy & free to register at Daily-Chronicle.com

Monday, February 17th, 2014 at 11:00 am

(Published in the Daily Chronicle, January 16, 23 & 30, 2014.)

FOR SALE – ALL BRICK HOME

(Published in the Daily Chronicle, January 16, 23 & 30, 2014.)

LAND AUCTION

ify tion. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 151701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: Codilis & Associates, P.C., 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-13-16067. I584300

Snow & Ice Removal All Done *

Ranch Townhome with English Basement 2BR, 2BA, Large Kitchen, Formal Dining Rm + Living Rm + Sun Rm.

CALL NEDRA ERICSON, REALTOR 815-739-9997


CLASSIFIED

Page D2 • Thursday, January 30, 2014

7. Title will be conveyed without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff subject to all general real estate taxes which are a lien upon the real estate, in addition to those which have not yet become due and payable, and special assessments and special taxes, if any, and easements, covenants, conditions, zoning laws and drainage ditches, feeders, laterals and restrictions of record. 8. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the Purchaser shall receive a certificate of sale which will entitle Purchaser to a deed to the real estate subject to court confirmation of the sale. 9. The property will NOT be open for inspection. THE NATIONAL BANK & TRUST COMPANY OF SYCAMORE BY: /s/Jeffrey L. Lewis One of its Attorneys Prepared by: JEFFREY L. LEWIS #06257559 Klein, Stoddard, Buck & Lewis, LLC 2045 Aberdeen Court Sycamore, IL 60178 (815) 748-0380 mailto:jlewis@kleinstoddard.com

BIG APARTMENTS, LESS MONEY! Rochelle: 15 minutes from DeKalb 1 BR & 2BR Starting at $530 Recently updated! Affordable heat. Walk to shops! (815) 562-6425 www.whiteoakapartments.net Now accepting Visa, M/C, Discover

Cortland Estates $300 1st Month's Rent 3 BR Apartments Dishwasher On-Site Laundry Facility Playground Washer & Dryer Connection 6 months free cable if you sign a lease by 2/28/14 230 McMillan Court Cortland, IL 60112

815-758-2910 income restriction apply

DEKALB 1 BEDROOM Available Dec/Jan. Close to NIU, Free heat & water, quiet lifestyle. Varsity Square Apts. 815-756-9554 www.glencoproperties.com

Daily Chronicle Classified 877-264-2527

DEKALB 1 BEDROOM

DeKalb 2BR's $650-$700

Appliances, gas heat, C/A, ceiling fans, garage, no pets/smoking. $785, avail now. 630-697-9102 DeKalb – 3BR / 1BA Lower Apt Washer/dryer hook-up $925 1st/lst/sec. Sec 8 welcome 815-739-6170

DEKALB QUIET 2 BEDROOM

1 bath, parking, laundry. NO pets/smoking, Agent Owned. 815-756-2359 - 815-758-6712

DeKalb Quiet Studio 1, 2, 3BR

Waterman Garden Apt. Community 215 East Duffy Rd, Single Story Building

1 and 2 Bedroom, Income Based Community Room, Laundry Facility Must be 62 years of age or older, or handicap/disabled, regardless of age.

Professionally Managed by PPM, LLC. This Institution Is An Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer. Phone 815-264-3492 TDD 800-525-0857

Stone Prairie 2BR, 2BA APT.

Sycamore Newer 2 Story Luxury TH on quiet Arbor Lane. 3BR, 2.5BA. Full fin bsmt, 2 car gar, great room w/fireplace, W/D. No pets/smoking. $1300 + Assoc. 847-343-3333

Laing Mgmt.

Fox Brier Townhouse available. All appliances include W/D. 1 car garage, balcony, $1100/mo. Barry 815-757-9040

815-758-1100 or 815-895-8600

DEKALB: 2BR Apts.-$750/m. Incl. heat, water, garb. & cable. W/D on premises. Nice Neighborhood. Ready ASAP! 815-756-1424

Sycamore - 2BR 1BA Apt Avail Now Updated Kitch & Bath, W/D in bldg 1611 Maness Ct. $625/mo Call Pittsley Realty (815)756-7768

GENOA DELUXE 2 BEDROOM

SYCAMORE 2 bdrm, 1 ba, upper, new flooring / paint, laundry, pets ok, $675 +util. 815-751-3982

Malta- 2 BD ground floor, clean, W/D hook-ups 815-981-8117

JOBS ANNOUNCEMENTS STUFF VEHICLES REAL ESTATE SERVICES Daily Chronicle Classified and online at: www.Daily-Chronicle.com

DeKalb – Duplex, 4BR, 3BA, 2 car garage, large yard. In the Knolls $1250/mo 1st/lst/sec 815-739-6170 Dekalb: Lrg. Ranch duplex w/3BR, 2BA, full bsmnt, 2 car attch. gar., lndry hookup, new interior, no pets/smoking $1000/mo. 815-464-8646 Syc – 3 BD, 1 ¼ BA, LR, DR, FR, BSMT, No pets, no smoking. $950/mo + utilities 1st/lst/sec AVAIL 2/1 815-325-0444

DeKalb 3BR ~ New Carpet/Paint W/D, FR, garage, $785/mo. 4BR, $1200/mo. No pets/smoke Agent 815-766-2027

DeKalb 4 Bedroom, 1.5 Bath on College Ave. Available Immed. $1200 + 1st, last security, no pets. 815-757-5079 Dekalb: Tilton Park Area Lovely remodeled 2BR, 1BA, w/den, A/C, all appl., deck, fenced in yard, 2 car gar., avail 2/1, no smoking, pets neg., $800/mo. 630-675-4485 Genoa: 2BR, 1BA, 1 car gar., W/D, fridge, stove, new appl., $825/mo. 1st+sec., pets OK w/add. Dep., Avail 2/1 815-355-9245

Sycamore Duplex 1510 Pine St. 3BR, FR/basement, porch, garage. $995/mo + sec. No pets/smoke. Agent 815-766-2027 Sycamore Large, Older 10 Room Farmhouse, 3.5 NE, garden, pets, fenced yard, wooded lot. Auto-Gen backup power. Appl, $725/mo, $500 deposit. 312-320-7472 Sycamore Quiet 2BR Farmhouse W/D hook-up, garage, off St. prkg. $695/mo + dep + ref. NO PETS. 815-793-2664

SYCAMORE ROOM

Available immediately. Utilities included, $95/wk. 630-650-1180

WINTER STORAGE RV's, Campers & Boats - Indoor & secure, West of Sycamore. Owner resides on property 815-825-2571

SYCAMORE - 2 bedroom, hardwood floors, upgraded kitchen, washer and dryer, basement - $875 at 202 Maple, Sycamore - 630-443-9072

Malta- Cozy, comfortable 1 BD Upper, off street parking. Non-smoker.

Remodeled, available now. Clean and quiet, $550/mo. 815-758-6580 ~ 815-901-3346

SYCAMORE ~ 3BR, 2.5BA

DEKALB 3 BEDROOM, 1 BATH Newly Remodeled Ranch. All appl, bsmt,1.5 car garage, $1150/mo + security. 815-751-2650

Syc near North School 2BR, Gar, Bsmnt, Appl. No pets/smoking. $800/mo+1st/last/sec. Discount on first month's rent. 815-517-1018

MALTA 2 BEDROOM Full bath, appliances, built-in cabinets, hardwood floors. $535/mo. 815-751-5228

ROCHELLE ~ 2 BEDROOM

Sycamore 2 BD, 2 BA, Condo $1050 (River Edge). Check out properties at tv-realty.com or call Tom (815) 378-7962

Washer & dryer, central air, fireplace, exercise center. Cat friendly. Private fishing. $765/mo.

DeKalb: 1BR upper, appl., C/A, water incl., no pets or smoking, $490/mo. 815-393-4438

KIRKLAND, 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom apts $425- $550- $625. Tenants pay all utils. A few 2 & 3 Bd w/ WD hook-up. 1St, last & Sec. No Pets. 1 year Lease . Re/Max Classic (815) 784-2800

Get Bears news on Twitter by following @bears_insider

Sycamore - Luxury 2BR 2BA Condo Granite, SS, Fireplace, 2C Gar. Available NOW! 954 Arvle Circle Call Pittsley Realty (815)756-7768

DeKalb Newer 2BR Duplex Quiet neighborhood, appl, W/D. Walk-in-closets, no pets, $950/mo + 1st/last /sec. 815-739-4442

DEKALB - 2BR 1BA Apt Avail Now Updated Kitch & Bath, W/D in bldg 830 Greenbrier $600/mo Call Pittsley Realty (815)756-7768

CAN'T GET ENOUGH BEARS NEWS?

SYCAMORE - 3 BR, 2 BA Townhouse w/ Garage. Just minutes from City of DeKalb and NIU. Clean townhouse with fresh paint and new carpet. Only $1080/mo. No pets. Leave message at 630-452-9080.

DEKALB ADULT, QUIET, REFINED Building. 2 Bedroom Apt with homey environment. Car port. For mature living. Excellent Location! No pets/smoking. Agent Owned. 815-758-6712

1 bath, remodeled, appl. Counrty setting, close to downtown Genoa. 815-784-4606 ~ 815-901-3346

DEKALB - downtown upper front apartment. 2 bedrooms, cute, clean and quiet. Energy efficient furnace and central air, new appliances $600 per month plus utilities 630-327-7147 DeKalb - Upper 1BR, Heat Included Quiet tenant, no smoking, private entrance, street parking, $575/mo. 847-845-6639

2BR TH, 2BA. Gas fireplace, large 1200 sq ft unfinished bsmt, W/D, 2 car gar, open view to golf course. $1200/mo or $1175/mo w/2 year lease. Lawn maintenance and snow removal incl, available Feb 1st, pets neg. 815-761-7467

DEKALB 2 BEDROOM

Hillcrest Place Apts.

220 E. Hillcrest. 815-758-0600 hillcrestplaceaptsdekalb.com

DeKalb 271A Par Five Dr.

With study, stove, fridge, heat incl. 815-748-4085

Lease, deposit, ref, no pets. 815-739-5589~815-758-6439

(Published in the Daily Chronicle, January 30, February 6 & 13, 2014.)

Sandwich: 1111 E. Railroad Lot #39, 2BR, 1BA, very good condition, car space & shed $5000, 708-383-5423

DEKALB 2 BR 1.5 BA condo near I-88, shopping, NIU. All appliances, garage, central air. Small pets OK. $925. 630-485-0508

Daily Chronicle / daily-chronicle.com

PUBLIC NOTICE Sycamore E. State St. AVAILABLE NOW! Newly remodeled 2 Bedroom CALL FOR DETAILS 815-245-6098 ~ 815-923-2521 SYCAMORE: NEWER 2BR Upper. CA. DW. W/D on Site. Off-Street Prkg. No pets. $695 Incl. Water & Garbage. J&A RE 815-970-0679

CORTLAND 3BR, 2BA TH Fireplace, 2 car gar, all appl incl W/D, $1200/mo + sec. For more info call Anthony 630-730-8070 DeKalb 2 BD, 1.5 BA, Townhome $1100 (Summit Enclave). Check out properties at tv-realty.com or call Tom (815) 378-7962 Find !t here! PlanitDeKalbCounty.com

DeKalb - 3Bd 2Ba House 2C Gar, Fireplace, Basement 204 Hollister, $1250/mo Call Pittsley Realty (815)756-7768 DEKALB - Like new! 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath, plus office 2-story single family home in Devonaire Farms close to NIU. Master bedroom suite with large walk-in closet. First floor laundry / mud room with washer and dryer, attached 2-car garage with opener. Formal dining and family room. Ceramic tile floors in all baths and kitchen. Large kitchen with SS appliances, central air, and full (unfinished) basement. Professionally painted. Available now. 1 year lease minimum, $1500/month + utilities. First last security and references. 815-739-3597 DeKalb - Nice 3 BR home, hardwood floors, 1 ½ car garage, nice yard. $900/month. No smoking or pets. Avail Feb. 815-757-2064

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 23RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DEKALB COUNTY - SYCAMORE, ILLINOIS U.S Bank National Association, as trustee, for J.P. MORGAN Mortgage Trust 2005-S1 PLAINTIFF Vs. Adam Cholewiak a/k/a Adam W. Cholewiak; et. al. DEFENDANTS 12 CH 00127 NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on 11/14/2013, the Sheriff of DeKalb County, Illinois will on 2/27/14 at the hour of 1:00PM at Public Safety Building, 150 North Main Sycamore, IL 60178, or in a place otherwise

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plac designated at the time of sale, County of DeKalb and State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: LOT 110 IN NEUCORT LAKES UNIT THREE, A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE SOUTH 1/2 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 40 NORTH, RANGE 5, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED FEBRUARY 6, 2004 IN PLAT CABINET NO. 9, AT SLIDE NO. 92-D AS DOCUMENT NO. 2004002345, IN DEKALB COUNTY, ILLINOIS PIN 09-20-278-002; (09-20200-008/007 Underlying Pin) Improved with Residential COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 4811 Clover Avenue n/k/a 153 E. Clover Avenue, Cortland, IL 60112 Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the property is a condominium and the foreclosure takes place after 1/1/2007, purchasers other than the mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee's attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN AC-

CORDANCE WITH SECTION 151701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: Codilis & Associates, P.C., 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-10-05951. I584299 (Published in the Daily Chronicle, January 16, 23 & 30, 2014.)

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 23RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DEKALB COUNTY - SYCAMORE, ILLINOIS The National Bank & Trust Company PLAINTIFF Vs. Allison M. LaPorta; et. al. DEFENDANTS 13 CH 00279 NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on 9/26/2013, the Sheriff of DeKalb County, Illinois will on 2/27/14 at the hour of 1:00PM at Public Safety Building, 150 North Main Sycamore, IL 60178, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of DeKalb and State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: LOT 107C IN ROBINSON FARM P.U.D. - UNIT II, RESUBDIVISION OF LOT 107, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF LOT 107 OF ROBINSON FARM PUB UNIT II, A PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT BEING A RESUBDIVISION OF LOTS 25, 26, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33 AND 34 IN ROBINSON FARM PUD PHASE I AND PART OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 29, TOWNSHIP 40 NORTH, RANGE 5 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT RECORDED JUNE 19TH, 2007 AND RECORDED IN PLAT CABINET 10, SLIDE NO. 24-C AS DOCUMENT NO. 2007010733, IN TOWN OF CORTLAND, DEKALB COUNTY, ILLINOIS. PIN 09-29-256-019 Improved with Residential COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 123 E. Robinson Avenue, Cortland, IL 60112 Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS"


CLASSIFIED

Daily Chronicle / daily-chronicle.com condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the property is a condominium and the foreclosure takes place after 1/1/2007, purchasers other than the mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee's attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 151701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: Codilis & Associates, P.C., 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-13-16067. I584300 (Published in the Daily Chronicle, January 16, 23 & 30, 2014.)

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE TWENTY THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DEKALB COUNTY, ILLINOIS THE NATIONAL BANK & TRUST COMPANY Plaintiff, vs. ARTURO SANCHEZ, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, Defendants. CASE NO. 13 CH 215 NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment for Foreclosure entered by the Court in the above entitled cause the property hereinafter described or so much thereof as shall be sufficient to satisfy said judgment, shall be sold to the highest bidder. 1. The name, address and telephone number of the person to contact for information regarding

gar ng the real estate is: Jeffrey L. Lewis Klein, Stoddard, Buck & Lewis LLC 2045 Aberdeen Court Sycamore, IL 60178 (815) 748-0380 2. The common address and other common description, if any of the real estate is: 1216 STATE STREET, DEKALB, IL 60115 3. The legal description of the real estate: PARCEL 1: LOT 8 IN BECKMAN'S SUBDIVISION OF LOT "A" OF BECKMAN'S ADDITION OF THE CITY OF DEKALB, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN BOOK "C" OF PLATS, PAGE 16, ON OCTOBER 26, 1898, IN DEKALB COUNTY, ILLINOIS. PARCEL 2: THAT PORTION OF LARSON'S SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN BOOK "B" OF PLATS, PAGE 109, NORTH OF A LINE 168 FEET NORTH OF AND PARALLEL WITH THE NORTH LINE OF MARKET STREET AND SOUTH OF LOTS 8 AND 9 OF LOT "A" OF BECKMAN'S SUBDIVISION, ALL IN SAID CITY OF DEKALB, DEKALB COUNTY, ILLINOIS. PIN: 08-23-278-044 4. A description of the improvements on the real estate: Residential real estate 5.The time and place of the sale is: A. February 27, 2014 at 1:00 pm B. DeKalb County Sheriff's Office, 150 North Main Street, Sycamore, IL 60178 6. The terms of the sale are: A. The sale shall be by public auction. B. The sale shall be by open verbal bid. C. The sale shall be conducted by the Sheriff of DeKalb County. D. The sale shall be cash. E. The sale shall be "as is" condition without any representation or warranty as to the condition of the property. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. 7. Title will be conveyed without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff subject to all general real estate taxes which are a lien upon the real estate, in addition to those which have not yet become due and payable, and special assessments and special taxes, if any, and easements, covenants, conditions, zoning laws and drainage ditches, feeders, laterals and restrictions of record. 8. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the Purchaser shall receive a certificate of sale which will entitle Purchaser to a deed to the real estate subject to court confirmation of the sale. 9. The property will NOT be open for inspection. THE NATIONAL BANK & TRUST COMPANY OF SYCAMORE BY: /s/Jeffrey L. Lewis One of its Attorneys

ey Prepared by: JEFFREY L. LEWIS #06257559 Klein, Stoddard, Buck & Lewis, LLC 2045 Aberdeen Court Sycamore, IL 60178 (815) 748-0380 mailto:jlewis@kleinstoddard.com (Published in the Daily Chronicle, January 30, February 6 & 13, 2014.)

mp LAW OFFICES OF IRA T. NEVEL, LLC Ira T. Nevel - ARDC #06185808 175 North Franklin St. Suite 201 Chicago, Illinois 60606 (312) 357-1125 Pleadings@nevellaw.com AA # 13-04100 I585131 (Published in the Daily Chronicle, January 16, 23 & 30, 2014.)

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWENTY-THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COUNTY OF DEKALB, STATE OF ILLINOIS FIFTH THIRD MORTGAGE COMPANY, Plaintiff(s), vs. KORY B. KRIBS AND STACY L. KRIBS, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA AND WILLOW GLEN HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, UNKNOWN TENANTS, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, Defendant(s). 13 CH 444 PUBLICATION NOTICE The requisite Affidavit for Publication having been filed, notice is hereby given to you: WILLOW GLEN HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, NONRECORD CLAIMANTS, UNKNOWN TENANTS and UNKNOWN OWNERS, Defendants in the above entitled suit, that said suit has been commenced in the Circuit Court of DeKalb County, Chancery Division, by the said Plaintiff, against you and other Defendants, praying for foreclosure of a certain Real Estate Mortgage conveying the premises described as follows, to wit: LOT 122 OF WILLOW GLEN P.U.D., PHASE 3, A PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT OF PART OF LOTS F, G, J AND L OF THE AWE FARM PLAT OF SECTION 30, TOWNSHIP 42 NORTH, RANGE 5, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED MAY 7, 1996 IN BOOK "Z" OF PLATS, PAGE 150 AS DOCUMENT NO. 96006621, SITUATED IN DEKALB COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Tax Number: 03-30-132-007 commonly known as 722 COTTONWOOD CIR., GENOA, IL 60135; and which said Real Estate Mortgage was made by KORY B. KRIBS AND STACY L. KRIBS, and recorded in the Office of the DeKalb County Recorder as Document Number 2009013640 AND RE-RECORDED DOCUMENT NUMBER AS 2013014952; that Summons was duly issued out of the said Court against you as provided by law, and that the said suit is now pending. Now, therefore, unless you, the said named Defendant, file your answer to the Complaint in the said suit or otherwise make your appearance therein, in the office of the Circuit Court of DeKalb County, located at 133 WEST STATE STREET , SYCAMORE, IL 60178, on or before the February 18, 2014, default may be entered against you at any time after that day and a judgment entered in accordance with the prayer of said Complaint.

PUBLIC NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE CERTIFICATE NUMBER: 2010-00153 TO: JC FARLEY GENERAL CONTRACTORS INC, ROBERT AMASON, GEORGE MEINEL, LINDA MEINEL, GABRIELLE AMASON, MICHAEL AMASON, DARRYL DRAPER, MARY JANE MEINEL, AND ALL UNKNOWN OWNERS, OCCUPANTS, BENEFICIARIES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, OR PARTIES INTERESTED . A Petition for Tax Deed on the premises described below has been filed in the Circuit Court of DE KALB County, Illinois, as Case Number 13-TX51. On 06/24/2014, at 9:00 AM, the Petitioner will make application to such Court in SYCAMORE, Illinois, for an Order on the petition that a tax deed be issued if the real estate is not redeemed from the sale. The real estate is described as follows, to wit: 08-02-354-009 and was sold on 11/04/2011, for general taxes for the year 2010. The period of redemption will expire on 05/23/2014. PRAIRIE STATE SECURITIES, LLC PETITIONER (Published in the Daily Chronicle, January 30, 31 & February 1, 2014.)

PUBLIC NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE CERTIFICATE NUMBER: 2010-00244 TO: RAYMOND SHIFFLETTE, RAYMOND SHIFFLETTE, CITIFINANCIAL SERVICES INC, CITIFINANCIAL INC, DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE JANSON INVESTMENT CO, AND ALL UNKNOWN OWNERS, OCCUPANTS, BENEFICIARIES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, OR PARTIES INTERESTED. A Petition for Tax Deed on the premises described below has been filed in the Circuit Court of DE KALB County, Illinois, as Case Number 13-TX53. On 06/24/2014, at 9:00 AM, the Petitioner will make application to such Court in SYCAMORE, Illinois, for an Order on the petition that a tax deed be issued if the real estate is not redeemed from the sale. The real estate is described as follows, to wit: 08-23-203-013 and was sold on 11/04/2011, for general taxes for the year 2010.

AT YOUR R SERVICE Visit the Local Business Directory online at Daily-Chronicle.com/localbusiness Call to advertise 877-264-2527

K&J

Thursday, January 30, 2014 • Page D3

r ge ye The period of redemption will expire on 05/23/2014. LAND OF LINCOLN SECURITIES, LLC PETITIONER (Published in the Daily Chronicle, January 30, 31 & February 1, 2014.)

PUBLIC NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE CERTIFICATE NUMBER: 2010-00245 TO: MARK SHIELDS, WILLIAM BAKER, FRANCES BAKER-SHIELDS, MS INVESTMENT GROUP INC, AND ALL UNKNOWN OWNERS, OCCUPANTS, BENEFICIARIES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, OR PARTIES INTERESTED . A Petition for Tax Deed on the premises described below has been filed in the Circuit Court of DE KALB County, Illinois, as Case Number 13-TX-52. On 06/24/2014, at 9:00 AM, the Petitioner will make application to such Court in SYCAMORE, Illinois, for an Order on the petition that a tax deed be issued if the real estate is not redeemed from the sale. The real estate is described as follows, to wit: 08-23-254-010 and was sold on 11/04/2011, for general taxes for the year 2010. The period of redemption will expire on 05/23/2014. PRAIRIE STATE SECURITIES, LLC PETITIONER (Published in the Daily Chronicle, January 30, 31 & February 1, 2014.)

PUBLIC NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE CERTIFICATE NUMBER: 2010-00555 TO: CARMEN RYDBERG, MELANIE PLATT, EDWARD PTAK, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC, GMAC MORTGAGE LLC, COUNTRY VIEW TOWNHOMES ASSOCIATION, CENTRAL BUYER CORPORATION, AND ALL UNKNOWN OWNERS, OCCUPANTS, BENEFICIARIES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, OR PARTIES INTERESTED. A Petition for Tax Deed on the premises described below has been filed in the Circuit Court of DE KALB County, Illinois, as Case Number

y, 13-TX-54. On 06/24/2014, at 9:00 AM, the Petitioner will make application to such Court in SYCAMORE, Illinois, for an Order on the petition that a tax deed be issued if the real estate is not redeemed from the sale. The real estate is described as follows, to wit: 19-25-253-026 and was sold on 11/04/2011, for general taxes for the year 2010. The period of redemption will expire on 05/23/2014. LAND OF LINCOLN SECURITIES, LLC PETITIONER (Published in the Daily Chronicle, January 30, 31 & February 1, 2014.)

PUBLIC NOTICE ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS DATE: January 28, 2014 PROJECT: Reroofing Work @ Jefferson Elementary School for DeKalb C.U.S.D. #428, DeKalb, Illinois LOCATION: Jefferson Elementary School, 211 McCormick Drive, DeKalb, Illinois 60115 OWNER: DeKalb Community Unit School District #428, 901 South 4th Street, DeKalb, Illinois 60115 ARCHITECT: Richard L. Johnson Associates, Inc., 4703 Charles Street, Rockford, Illinois 61108, Tel: 815/ 398-1231, Fax: 815/ 398-1280 SCOPE: Bids will be received for a single contract for all Work. PRE-BID MEETING: All prospective General Contractors are urged to attend a pre-bid meeting at 3:30pm, Monday, January 27, 2014, at Littlejohn Elementary School, 1121 School St., DeKalb, Illinois 60115. DATE DUE: All prospective General Contractors are urged to attend a pre-bid meeting at 3:30pm, Tuesday, February 4, 2014, at Jefferson Elementary School. PRE-BID SITE VISIT: Contractors are required to survey the existing conditions prior to bidding. ACCESS TO BIDDING DOCUMENTS: Bidding Documents are on file for reference at the following locations: Office of the Architect, Rockford, IL NIBCA (N. Ill. Bldg. Contractors Assn), Rockford, IL

), Bidding Documents may be secured from the office of the Architect. Plans and Specifications are available for download at www.rljarch.com under "Bidders". DEPOSIT REQUIRED: Bidders may secure up to two (2) sets of bidding documents by submitting a non-refundable check for $50.00 per set, plus an additional $10.00 per set if documents are to be mailed. BID FORM: Bids shall be submitted in duplicate on forms issued by Architect. BID SECURITY: Bids shall be accompanied by a Bid Security of at least 10% of the total amount of the base bid and all additive alternate bids. This may be in the form of a certified check, cashier's check, bank draft or bid bond, payable to the Owner as a guarantee that should the bidder be awarded the Work, the bidder will enter into a contract with the Owner and will furnish the proper performance and payment bond within the time limit set by the Owner. Bid securities will be returned to all other bidders when the successful bidder files a proper performance and payment bond and the contract is executed by the Owner. If the successful bidder fails to file such contract and performance and payment bond, the amount of his bid security shall be forfeited to the Owner as liquidated damages. WAGE RULES: Each craft, type of worker and mechanic needed to execute the Contract shall be paid the prevailing wage rate for the locality in which the work is performed, in accordance with all federal laws and laws of the State as well as local ordinances and regulations applicable to the work hereunder and having force of law. PERFORMANCE BOND: A performance and payment bond for the full amount of the Contract will be required of the successful bidder. All costs associated with the bond shall be included in the bid amount. RIGHTS RESERVED BY OWNER: The Owner reserves the right to waive any irregularities and/or reject any or all bids when, in the opinion of the Owner, such action will serve the best interests of the Owner. WITHDRAWAL OF BIDS: No bid may be withdrawn for a period of 60 days after the opening of bids without written consent of the Owner.

By order of DeKalb Community Unit School District 428 (Published in the Daily Chronicle, January 28, 29 & 30, 2014.)

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CLASSIFIED

Page D4 • Thursday, January 30, 2014

Daily Chronicle / daily-chronicle.com

ONE LOW PRICE, PLAIN AND SIMPLE, ALWAYS! WE DON’T BELIEVE THE PRICE ON A VEHICLE SHOULD BE DEPENDENT UPON A PERSON’S ABILITY TO NEGOTIATE!

#3628

DEMONSTRATOR VEHICLE VEHIC CLE

2014 SILVERADO 1500 LT

2014 VOLT MSRP OUR DISCOUNT

#3367

DEMONSTRATOR VEHICLE V EHICLE

CREW CAB, 4X4

$37,660 $5,156

$41,615 $5,004 $750 $500 $1,0003 $1,5002

MSRP OUR DISCOUNT REBATES BONUS CASH TRADE-IN REBATE LOYALTY CASH

OUR BEST PRICE

$32,504

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OUR BEST PRICE

$32,861

1

#326 #3264

#3752

NEW 2014 CRUZE LT MSRP OUR DISCOUNT REBATES LOYALTY CASH

NEW 2014 MALIBU LS

$19,540 $1,184 $1,000 $5002

$23,240 $1,280 $1,750 $5002

MSRP OUR DISCOUNT REBATES LOYALTY CASH

OUR BEST PRICE

OUR BEST PRICE

$16,856

$19,710

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Just A Sample of Our Pre-Owned Vehicles at One Low Price CARS

TRUCKS

2013 CHEVROLET CRUZE LTZ, 3309P .........................................$18,7904

2008 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 1500 WORK TRUCK, 3809B ......... $14,9994

2013 NISSAN ALTIMA, 3756P................................................... $16,4904

2006 GMC SIERRA 1500, 3918A .............................................. $12,7904

2013 CHEVROLET IMPALA LTZ, 3312P ...................................... $17,990

2007 FORD F-150, 3463A ........................................................ $20,7904

2013 FIAT 500, 3576P ..............................................................$11,990

2007 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 3500HD, 3757P .......................... $24,5904

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‘13 CHEVY SPARK

2010 BUICK LACROSSE CXS, 2354A ...........................................$20,999

4

2013 CHEVROLET CRUZE 1LT, 3379P ........................................ $17,9904 2012 NISSAN SENTRA, 3516A .................................................. $13,9994 2013 CHEVROLET MALIBU LTZ, 3790P ...................................... $19,3994

#3726P

VANS & SUV’S 2013 CHEVROLET CAPTIVA LT, 3252P ........................................ $20,9994

2013 CHEVROLET SONIC LT, 3724P ........................................... $11,9994

2012 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SXT, 3349A............................... $14,9994

2013 CHEVROLET SPARK LT, 3725P .......................................... $11,9994

2013 GMC ACADIA DENALI, 3996A............................................ $42,999

2012 NISSAN SENTRA, 3025A .................................................. $12,9904

2006 GMC ENVOY, 3621B ......................................................... $14,9904

2012 VOLKSWAGEN JETTA SEDAN TURBO DIESEL, 3676A .......... $18,9994

2012 GMC TERRAIN SLE-1, 3746A............................................. $22,7904

$

179

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/MO5

ZERO MONEY DOWN!

Check Out the DeKalb Sycamore Chevy Cadillac GMC Advantages!

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ACTUAL CASH VALUE FOR YOUR TRADE

NON-COMMISSIONED SALES CONSULTANTS

5-DAY MONEY BACK GUARANTEE ON EVERY PRE-OWNED VEHICLE

ONE LOW PRICE, PLAIN & SIMPLE, ALWAYS!

D EKALB SYCAMORE C HEVROLET . CADILLAC . -,C

6

1925 Mercantile Dr, Sycamore, IL www.DeKalbMotors.com

(815) 748-0930 Price includes all applicable rebates; excludes tax, title, license and dealer fees; see dealer for details. 2Must be a current owner of 1999 or newer GM vehicle. Take retail delivery by 2/28/14. See dealer for details. 3Must be a current owner/lessee of a 1999 model year or newer GM vehicle and trade in a 1999 model year or newer vehicle. Take retail delivery by 1/31/14. See dealer for details. 4Exludes tax, title, license and dealer fees. See dealer for details. 5With approved credit; payment based on 2.99% APR for 75 months $0 due at signing. Excludes tax, title, license and dealer fees. See dealer for details. 6Pre-owned vehicles must be returned within 5 days or 150 miles in the same condition as when purchased to receive a full refund.

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DDC-1-30-2014