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Illinois health department is reporting widespread activity By DEBBIE BEHRENDS dbehrends@shawmedia.com Flu season is in full swing, and it’s not too late to get vaccinated. The Illinois Department of Public Health is reporting widespread influenza activity in Illinois, and Jane Lux, administrator for the DeKalb County Health Department, said local ac-

tivity is consistent with the rest of state. “Influenza is not a reportable disease, so we really don’t know how many cases there are in the county,” Lux said. “The only thing that needs to be reported is intensive care unit admissions, and the county hospitals have had none.” Lux said the Centers for Dis-

ease Control has a program for voluntarily reporting from several sites around the country. “That’s how they get their data,” she said. The CDC’s use of the word “widespread” means that more than half of the geographic regions in the state are reporting flu activity, “but not necessarily its severity,” Lux said.

Health department staff members talk with health care providers and schools, so they know when activity is occurring locally, Lux said. Although January is considered the peak flu season, Lux said it’s not too late to get vaccinated.

See FLU, page A6

Where to get a flu shot n Walk-in clinic at the DeKalb County Health Department, 2550 Annie Glidden Road, DeKalb. For information, call 815-758-6673. n Check with your health care provider, clinic or favorite pharmacy. n Find a vaccine provider at www.flu.gov. Click on the vaccination and prevention tab, scroll down to “Find where can I get a vaccine” and enter your ZIP code. n Costs vary at each location, and many will bill Medicare or private insurance providers.

Kishwaukee College, NIU strike transfer agreement

DIVERSITY C H A L L E N G E

By KATIE DAHLSTROM kdahlstrom@shawmedia.com

compared with a little more than 56 percent of the students. Less than 3 percent of educators in the district are black, compared with a student population that is 15 percent black. But the biggest disparity is in the Hispanic population. Although Hispanics account for more than 22 percent of students, only 4.6 percent of educators are Hispanic. Students also are much more likely to be taught by women than men: More than three-quarters of District 428 teachers are women. When the student population and the teacher population is so dissimilar, it can create some challenges because of the cultural differences, Assistant Superintendent Doug Moeller said.

MALTA – When Grace Martin decided to pursue a degree in journalism, she didn’t want to spend any more time at Kishwaukee College earning an associate degree. So after three years at the college, she made the jump this year to Northern Illinois University. But as the 21-year-old Byron resident started applying for jobs, she realized the time she spent at Kishwaukee only amounted to a partial college education. Three-classes shy of a degree, she had no credentials. “I realized I really missed out on not getting Voice your a college degree,” she said. opinion “I had done all that work, but it didn’t add up to anyDid you ever thing.” attend a comThanks to an agreement signed Friday, Martin and munity college? students like her will be Vote online at able to earn their associ- Daily-Chronicle. ate’s degree while continu- com. ing at NIU. Northern Illinois University President Douglas Baker and Kishwaukee College President Tom Choice signed a reverse transfer agreement Friday that will allow eligible NIU students who transfer from Kishwaukee without an associate degree to earn the two-year degree using credit from NIU courses. Of the 230 students who transferred from Kishwaukee to NIU last year, more than 100 transferred without a degree, according to Sedgwick Harris, Kishwaukee’s vice president of student services. “This agreement is for those students,” Harris said Friday during the signing ceremony at Kishwaukee’s Malta campus. “This tangible link is a way for students to have the best of both worlds.” Students who transfer with at least 37 credit hours from Kishwaukee will be able to take advantage of the agreement. NIU’s director of records and registration Jerry Montag said the university will start notifying students in the coming weeks that their NIU transcripts can be sent to Kishwaukee to be evaluated.

See DIVERSITY, page A5

See TRANSFER, page A6

Rob Winner – rwinner@shawmedia.com

Huntley Middle School teacher Billy Hueramo (center) works with eighth-graders Alejandro Bonilla (left) and Luis Soria on Tuesday. District 428 is trying to hire more minority, bilingual and male teachers.

D -428 officials seek to attract diverse teaching staff By KATIE DAHLSTROM kdahlstrom@shawmedia.com DeKALB – Billy Hueramo stopped teaching students in his classroom at Huntley Middle School this week and reported to the assistant principal’s office, where he found a chair waiting for him. After seven years in the district, Hueramo was promoted to assistant principal of the school. It’s an accomplishment that makes him beam with a pride he hopes will inspire his students. “This is my first time seeing a Latino as an administrator,” Hueramo said. “I love that students can look up to me and see me being successful.” Although there have been other minority administrators in the DeKalb’s School District 428, it’s easy to understand Hueramo’s view. Less than 5 percent of the

district’s teachers and administrators are Hispanic, based on data from the Illinois State Board of Education. ISBE data shows that although students in District 428 schools come from diverse backgrounds, their teachers and administrators are overwhelmingly white. As student demographics change in DeKalb County, school officials are making a concerted effort to find qualified minority candidates for teacher and administrator positions so the racial and ethnic backgrounds of educators more closely resembles that of their students. Educators say they believe it’s important for students to have positive role models with similar backgrounds.

State of the district About 91 percent of teachers and administrators in the District 428 are white,

Illinois governor candidates lukewarm on new gambling By SARA BURNETT The Associated Press CHICAGO – As another push gets underway to add five new casinos in Illinois and slot machines at Chicago’s two international airports, most of the candidates for governor in 2014 are lukewarm about the plan, despite supporters’ claims that it could bring in up to $1 bil-

lion a year for the financially struggling state. All four Republicans responding to a questionnaire from The Associated Press said they either oppose new gambling or support it only on a limited basis and with the backing of local governments. Two GOP candidates – state Sens. Kirk Dillard and Bill Brady – also stressed the need to protect

the horse racing industry and the agricultural jobs it supports. Gov. Pat Quinn, who is seeking re-election, has vetoed two previous gambling bills saying they didn’t include enough ethical protections. The Chicago Democrat also has said he will only sign legislation that provides sufficient oversight of a Chicago casino and directs new

revenues to education. The sponsor of the gambling expansion bill has scheduled a public hearing Tuesday in East St. Louis. State Rep. Bob Rita said it will be first in a series of hearings scheduled as the Illinois General Assembly begins its spring session next week.

See GAMBLING, page A6

AP file photos

(From left) Bruce Rauner, Kirk Dillard, Dan Rutherford and Bill Brady are running for the Republican nomination for Illinois governor in the March 18 primary election.

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MORNING READ

Page A2 • Saturday, January 25, 2014

8 DAILY PLANNER Today Weight Watchers: 7:15 a.m. weigh-in, 7:45 a.m. and 9 a.m. meetings at Weight Watchers Store, 2583 Sycamore Road (near Aldi), DeKalb. Overeaters Anonymous Walkand-Talk meeting: 8 to 9 a.m. at The Federated Church, 612 W. State St. in Sycamore. www. oa.org; Call Marilyn at 815-7514822. NICE Food and Clothing Center: 8:30 to 11 a.m. Saturdays, by appointment other days, at 346 S. County Line Road in Lee. This nondenominational food pantry serves the southwest part of DeKalb County and the southeast area of Lee County. 815-8242228. It Is What It Is AA(C): 9 a.m. at St. Catherine’s Church, 340 S. Stott St., Genoa. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. North Central Illinois Wild Rose Chapter of Women on Wheels: 9 a.m. at Elburn Town and Country Library, with breakfast at Papa G’s restaurant in Elburn. All women motorcycle riders are welcome. www. nciwildroses.com; Gigi Beaird at gbeaird@niu.edu or 815-7661206. As Bill Sees It AA(C): 9:30 a.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Learning to Live Al-Anon group: 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. at Newman Catholic Center annex, Normal Road in DeKalb; llc904@ hotmail.com. Narcotics Anonymous: 10 to 11 a.m. at United Church of Christ, 615 N. First St. in DeKalb. www. rragsna.org; 815-964-5959. Knights’ Saturday Burgers and More: 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at DeKalb Knights of Columbus Club: 1336 E. Lincoln Highway. Open to the public. Burger buffet: Noon to 2 p.m. at Genoa Veterans Home, 311 S. Washington St. The public is invited for lunch. Lightning games: 1:30 p.m. at Genoa Veteran’s Club, 311 S. Washington St.; www.genoavetshome.us or contact Cindy at crmcorn65@yahoo.com or 815751-1509. Back to Basics AA(C): 6:30 p.m. at Cortland Methodist Church, 45 Chestnut St., Cortland. Last Saturday is open meeting. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. AA Speaker Open Meeting: 8 p.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub. com. Saturday Night AA(C): 10 p.m. at 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub. com. Sunday Monthly Breakfast: 8 to 11 a.m. at the Sycamore Vet’s Club, 121 S. California St., Sycamore. Open to the public. Menu includes omelets, eggs to order, sausage, bacon, potatoes, pancakes, french toast, biscuits and gravy, toast, juice, coffee and milk. $7 for adults and $4 for children younger than age 12. 24 Hours a Day AA(C): 9:30 a.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub. com. Memories of DeKalb Ag: 2 to 4 p.m. at Nehring Gallery, Suite 204, 111 S. Second St., DeKalb. Free admission and open to all. www.dekalbalumni.org. Society for Creative Anachronism armored fighting practice: 4:30 p.m. behind Stevenson North at Northern Illinois University in DeKalb. For Middle Ages-Renaissance history re-enactors. Visit www.carraigban.org/ or call 815739-5788 or 815-986-5403. Bread & Roses women’s chorus practice: 5:45 to 8 p.m. at Westminster Presbyterian Church, 830 N. Annie Glidden Road in DeKalb. For information, call Patty Rieman at 815-7584897 or visit www.breadandroseschorus.org. Steps And Traditions AA(C): 6 p.m. at Masonic Hall, Route 23, Genoa. 800-452-7990; www. dekalbalanoclub.com. No Longer Hopeless AA(C): 7:30 p.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor, DeKalb. 800452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub. com. Any Lengths AA(C): 8 p.m. at Federated Church, 612 W. State St., Sycamore. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com.

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Woman gallops to Minn. horse’s rescue EDITOR’S NOTE Eric Olson Two things haven’t changed about

Copyright 2014 Published daily by Shaw Media.

Michelle Kilcullen since we were classmates at Lake Park High School in Roselle: She’s bold and she loves horses. She started taking riding lessons when she was in the sixth grade, once she was able to save up enough money to pay for them herself. “[Horses] were just my thing, I guess,” she said, “and when I started babysitting, I was able to start paying for my own lessons.” For a time, Kilcullen was a professional horse trainer who went to multiple horse shows and also gave riding lessons, she says. Today, she keeps her own horses on a five-acre farmette outside Kirkland where she lives with her husband, Vince; and their three children, Nikki, 14, Ty, 12, and Brooke, 10, all who attend Hiawatha schools. Until this week, there were three horses on the property. But while she was on her lunch break Monday, Michelle came across an ad for a horse for sale in Minnesota that showed obvious signs of neglect. The horse looked thin, the owner said in the ad he had a bad back. The horse had a thick coat of brown “winter hair” – a natural defense against the cold. “Even through that thick winter hair you could see ribs, hip bones, notches on his back, on his vertebrae, sunken face – that was evident just in the picture,” Michelle said. Michelle tried to find someone in the area who might be willing to take the horse, but within about two hours she’d made up her mind: She would take the next day off work, drive to Minnesota and bring that horse back with her. “You can tell when there’s somebody whose horse needs to go away from them,” Michelle said. “From the picture you could tell just how bad this horse was; in a picture they never look as bad as they are.” Vince was able to get the day off as well, and together they made the five-hour drive towing a small horse trailer she borrowed from a friend, Mary Jo Downen. The owner didn’t leave work to meet them, but allowed them to come onto the property to get the horse, she said. “Once you get on site and can see him, it’s worse because they look worse in person,” Michelle said. “It’s like a skeleton that you hung a cowhide over walking over to greet you.” The horse looked sullen. When he saw Michelle and Vince approaching, he managed only a few tentative steps forward. He had only a small shed for shelter, and Michelle said there was no evidence he had food or water available, although it looked like someone had sprinkled some grain in the pasture before their arrival. “I believe he was standing in that shed pretty much waiting to die,” Michelle said. “Just walking from the pasture to the driveway was … all he could take. He collapsed. “It took a lot to get him back up. Luckily, he realized we were there to help him.” They paid $100 for the horse and

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Michelle Kilcullen, of Kirkland, feeds Milo, an Arabian horse she bought from an owner in Minnesota. The horse was in rough shape when she got him, but is recovering now. left quickly. The drive home took 6½ hours, and it was tense, as they worried the horse wouldn’t survive the trip. They put wraps on his legs, covered him in blankets to keep him warm and made frequent stops to give him more water and to make sure he had enough hay. The horse did survive. Michelle was able to find and contact the horse’s previous owner, who told her that the horse was a 12-year-old Arabian. The Kilcullens have named him Milo and have already begun nurse him back to health. This isn’t the first horse rescue Michelle and her family have undertaken. They usually end in her finding the rehabilitated horses a new home. “I try to home them with people that I know, or kids that are in 4-H that have interest in the horse’s well-being who might not be able to afford a horse, but probably live on a farm,” she said. The animals can live for 30 years or more with proper care and feeding, so Milo should have some good years ahead of him. But it will be a while before Milo is fit for a new home, Michelle said. He needs to gain weight, get acclimated to a normal diet, have his teeth examined and put on a de-worming program before he can even be trained to hold a saddle and rider. In the meantime, Milo will be staying in Kirkland with the Kilcullens and their three other horses, Dylan, a 17-year-old brown and white painted horse; Ozark, a 3-year-old brown-andwhite painted; and Calvin, a 20-yearold black “appendix,” which is what they call a cross between a quarterhorse and a thoroughbred. Luckily for horses in northern Illinois, there are locally based organizations that care about the welfare of horses. The Woodstock-based Hooved Animal Humane Society (www.hahs. org) and Hooved Animal Rescue and Protection Society (www.harpsonline. org) in Barrington Hills both work to protect and rescue horses, including those in our area. In other areas, people like Michelle often have to take it

upon themselves to rescue animals they feel are endangered. “Stuff like this, really, it gets me,” Michelle said. “I don’t like to see people harm anybody, but kids and animals especially. “Animals can’t go anywhere for help.” High hopes for ’14: I had the privilege this week of speaking to the Kishwaukee Kiwanis Club about some of the top stories of 2013 and what’s ahead in 2014. It seems to me that the year ahead is filled with promise, in no small part because of all the new people who have taken on new leadership roles recently. In 2013, John Rey was elected mayor of DeKalb; Douglas Baker was hired as the 12th president at Northern Illinois University, and voters elected several new faces to local boards and councils. Just this week, Anne Marie Gaura took over as the new city manager in DeKalb. At the DeKalb Chamber of Commerce’s annual dinner Thursday at the new Faranda’s Banquet Hall (which looks great, by the way) some speakers had similar thoughts. Mike Larson made note of it as well. Larson is a past chamber board chairman who was inducted into the chamber’s hall of fame Thursday along with Michael Embrey, Carme Gregory, Tom Smith and the late Bob Brown Sr. “We’re right on the verge of starting a new era,” Larson said. “So let’s go after it in 2014.” Chamber Executive Director Matt Duffy also mentioned the possibilities of the year ahead in his remarks. “This is a time of change and I’m excited about what we can achieve,” he told the crowd. Many of us are looking forward to new and interesting times. We’ve got most of a new year ahead of us. Let’s all try to make the most of it.

• Eric Olson is the editor of the Daily Chronicle. Reach him at 815756-4841 ext. 2257, email eolson@shawmedia.com, or follow him on Twitter @DC_Editor.

NEWSROOM Eric Olson Editor eolson@shawmedia.com News: ext. 2257 news@daily-chronicle.com Obituaries: ext. 2228 obits@daily-chronicle.com Photo desk: ext. 2265 photo@daily-chronicle.com Sports desk: ext. 2224 sports@daily-chronicle.com Fax: 815-758-5059 REGIONAL PUBLISHER AND GENERAL MANAGER Don T. Bricker dbricker@shawmedia.com CIRCULATION Kara Hansen Group VP of Audience Development khansen@shawmedia.com BUSINESS OFFICE Billing: 815-526-4585 Fax: 815-477-4960

8CORRECTIONS Accuracy is important to the Daily Chronicle, and we want to correct mistakes promptly. Please call errors to our attention by phone, 815-756-4841, ext. 2257; email, news@daily-chronicle.com; or fax, 815-758-5059.

8DID YOU WIN? Illinois Lottery Friday Pick 3-Midday: 4-3-7 Pick 3-Evening: 0-2-0 Pick 4-Midday: 1-2-5-7 Pick 4-Evening: 6-8-1-8 Lucky Day Lotto-Midday: 4-6-15-17-22 Lucky Day Lotto-Evening: 4-12-21-30-34 Lotto jackpot: $12.25 million

Mega Millions Numbers: 22-45-46-47-65 MegaBall: 10 Megaplier: 5 Mega jackpot: $62 million

Powerball Powerball jackpot: $152 million

8LOCAL BRIEFS Third suspect arrested in DeKalb home invasion DeKALB – Police are still searching for the fourth suspect accused of robbing a man and a woman at gunpoint in November even as a third suspect made his first court appearance Friday. Anton T. Drake, 22, of the 100 block of Deerpath Road, Matteson, remained in DeKalb County Jail on Friday unable to post $25,000 bail. He is charged with home invasion, armed robbery and theft of more than $500. If convicted of either home invasion or armed robbery, he could be sentenced to between six and 30 years in prison. About 6:50 p.m. Nov. 21,

a man knocked on the door of an apartment in the 1100 block of Varsity Boulevard and four men then forced their way in when a resident answered, court records show. The group took cellphones, a computer, an Xbox system, a backpack, credit cards and other items, police said. All of Drake Antwon the suspects were armed, according to court records. Three others also are charged in connection with the incident, including Derrius L. Spencer, 20, of the 1000 block of Arcadia Drive, DeKalb;

Torree Fair, 21, of the 900 block of Fotis Drive, DeKalb; and Oliver P. Johnson, 20, of the 7100 block of South St. Lawrence Avenue, Chicago. Spencer hit the man over the head with a gun and threatened to shoot him, according to court records. Spencer and Fair were arrested last year, while Johnson remains at large. Spencer is expected to ask a judge to reduce his bond Feb. 4. Fair is next due in court Feb. 6, and Drake is next due in court Feb. 13.

Police: DeKalb parolee had heroin, pot, steroids DeKALB – A 45-year-old DeKalb man on parole for cocaine possession is accused of

having heroin, marijuana and anabolic steroids in his home, records show. DeKalb police and parole officials knocked on the door of Michael S. Johnson, of the 900 block of North Ninth Street, as part of a parole compliance check, court records show. Michael S. They smelled Johnson marijuana smoke when Johnson opened the door about 7:50 a.m. Thursday, court records show. They found about 0.55 grams of heroin and less than 0.35 ounces of marijuana, court records show. Johnson

was charged with unlawful possession of a controlled substance, unlawful possession of marijuana, unlawful possession of drug paraphernalia and unlawful possession of a hypodermic needle, court records show. Johnson was sentenced to 8 years in prison in 2008 for having or delivering cocaine in Kendall County, according to the Illinois Department of Corrections. He was paroled in July 2012 and it was scheduled to end July 2015. He remained in DeKalb County Jail on Friday, unable to post 10 percent of his bond, which was set at $10,000. His next court date is Feb. 27. – Jillian Duchnowski


LOCAL

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

Saturday, January 25, 2014 • Page A3

Exhibit revisits Haiti devastation Five Star Dollar to close in February By ANDREA AZZO

By DANA HERRA

If you go

aazzo@shawmedia.com

n What: “Fragments: Haiti Four Years after the Earthquake” exhibit n Where: NIU’s Anthropology Museum inside Cole Hall n When: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. The program series will feature guest speakers on Feb. 24, March and April. n Information: Visit www.niu. edu/anthro_museum.

Andrea Azzo – aazzo@shawmedia.com

The band Jan Sebon and Friends plays Haitian music Friday at Nothern Illinois University’s Anthropology Museum during the exhibit opening of “Fragments: Haiti Four Years After the Earthquake.” home from work when the earthquake struck. Concrete blocks knocked her unconscious, and she spent about 40 minutes trapped under the rubble before she was pulled out and sent to the hospital. “Only then I saw that it was everywhere,” Marie-Jeanne was quoted as saying. “That really struck me. That was very sad.” About 1.5 million people lost their homes because of the earthquake, and 86 percent of those homes were 20 years old or less, according to the exhibit. NIU President Doug Baker attended the grand opening and spoke about the importance of learning about these historical events.

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DeKALB – Since the 2010 earthquake, people don’t really hear about Haiti anymore, said Northern Illinois University graduate student Karl Kohler. Kohler attended the grand opening Friday of the exhibit, “Fragments: Haiti Four Years After the Earthquake,” at NIU’s Anthropology Museum inside Cole Hall. The event included many speakers and Haitian music from the band, Jan Sebon and Friends. The exhibit highlights the current conditions in Haiti, a poverty-stricken nation still recovering from the 2010 earthquake that killed more than 100,000 people. It also focuses on the 280,000 people still living in tents. “After the earthquake, it’s like Haiti doesn’t exist anymore,” Kohler said. “It’s great that Dr. [Mark] Schuller is bringing attention to it.” Schuller spent about a decade studying and traveling to Haiti and helped organize the exhibition. Those who visited the exhibit saw a display of hundreds of water bottles, each of which represented one death attributed to cholera. News reports indicate United Nations workers who visited Haiti brought cholera to the area, which killed at least 8,000 people. The exhibit also featured stories of survivors. One of them, identified only as Marie-Jeanne, was on her way

“I can only imagine, barely, what it was like to go through that earthquake,” Baker said. “This museum helps us understand and learn about it.” NIU student Shelby Devitt, a post-baccalaureate student pursuing a certificate in community leadership and civic engagement, learned that there is no public education in Haiti, leaving families to pay to have their sons, rather than their daughters, attend school. “To me, as a woman, I’m interested in women’s rights,” Devitt said. “It’s really disappointing.” Tracy Brindle, an NIU graduate student in history, said people should see the exhibit because it would make them more open-minded and understanding. “Sometimes, we live in a world where we’ve got our blinders on,” Brindle said, “but if we see how everyone else experiences the same world around us, then it moves us to reach out to different parts of the world.”

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at the gas station, but it’s not worth driving to Genoa or Belvidere just for a loaf of bread.” The village has bought the vacant building across the street, which used to be a grocery store, in hopes of attracting a buyer who will revive the business, but Shroyer is worried that will become “just another convenience store.” “[Five Star] is nice,” he said. “You can get what you need and it’s reasonably priced.” The Five Star building and lot are for sale, and Grant remains hopeful someone will come along with an interest in keeping the store open. “It’s been challenging, but it was fun,” she said. “I can’t regret it.”

ally won’t be any place left to shop.” The store carries an array of general necessities – toiletries, DVDs, school supplies, tools, kitchen utensils, toys and holiday items, just to name a few. “It started as a dollar store, but there’s no way a mom-and-pop operation can keep a dollar store,” she said. “It’s a nice village. The community tries to help you. They try to support you however they can.” Store regular Doug Shroyer said he will miss the little store when it closes. “It’s just nice to have someplace in town,” he said as he filled water cooler jugs at a bottled water station in the back of the store. “I hate paying $4 for a loaf of bread

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LOCAL & STATE

Page A4 • Saturday, January 25, 2014

8OBITUARIES LEROY E. COWAN Born: Dec. 16, 1933, in Naperville, Ill. Died: Jan. 23, 2014 LeRoy E. Cowan, 80, of Hinckley, Ill., passed away Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014, alongside his son. Born Dec. 16, 1933, in Naperville, the son of Edwin and Hildegarde (Brummel) Cowan, he married Rose Meisinger on June 14, 1958, in Naperville. He was an active member of St. John the Baptist Catholic Church. LeRoy served his country in the U.S. Air Force from 1953 to 1957. He was a lifelong farmer in the Hinckley area. LeRoy was a member of DeKalb County Farm Bureau, Knights of Columbus and Hinckley Lions Club. He is survived by his wife, Rose of Hinckley; children, Catherine Stoik of Pleasanton, Calif., Rita (Bill) Saunders of Arvada, Colo., Thomas Cowan of Geneva, Peter (Lisa) Cowan of Earlville and Edward (Juli) Cowan of Big Rock; nine grandchildren, Courtney and Hannah Stoik, Ryan Fox, Michaela, Jenna and Josiah Cowan, and Alyssa, Karrigan and Lindsey Cowan; and one sister, Nola Greenen of Crest Hill. He was preceded in death by his parents and one brother, Theodore. The funeral Mass will be celebrated at 10 a.m. Monday, Jan. 27, at St. John the Baptist Catholic Church in Somonauk, with the Rev. Thomas Brantman and the Rev. Donald DeSalvo celebrating. Burial will follow in St. John Catholic Cemetery Somonauk. The visitation will be from 3 to 7 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 26, at Turner-Eighner Funeral Home in Somonauk, with a prayer service at 6 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be directed to the charity of the donor’s choice. For more information or to sign the online guest book, visit www. EighnerFuneralHomes.com. To sign the online guest book, visit www.legacy.com/daily-chronicle.

AGNES CECILA FARRELL Born: July 20, 1915, in South Haven, Mich. Died: Jan. 2, 2014, in Toronto, Canada TORONTO – Agnes Cecila Farrell, 98, of Toronto, Ontario, Canada, died Jan. 2, 2014, in Toronto. Born July 20, 1915, in South Haven, Mich., a first-generation American, to the late Charles Swanson, of Sweden, and Matilda Barry, of Cavan County, Ireland. They moved to DeKalb in 1923. She resided in DeKalb, Ill., until 1991, when she moved to Toronto. Agnes attended Ellwood Grade School, DeKalb Township High School and two years at Northern Illinois State Teachers College (now Northern Illinois University). After working several places in DeKalb, including the former St. Mary’s Hospital and working military production lines during the Second World War, she retired from the Northern Illinois University library system in 1982. After her retirement, she remained active in the DeKalb community. She was a longtime member of the American Legion Auxiliary Unit 66, and a member of Catholic Daughters of the Americas. While living in Toronto, she was active in church activities, seniors programs and tutored in the literacy program. Her mixed heritage came to life routinely through an active and engaged interest in anthropology and other cultures. Her Swedish meatballs, “fruita soupa” and Irish soda bread were staples at family occasions, as were her spontaneous recitations of Irish limericks and songs. Still, she remained and will always be remembered as, a patriotic American; keeping up with American politics and society, debating the virtues of social justice, providing first-hand American history lessons from a long life lived and always making sure to cast

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her vote, even if from afar. Her wry humour, intelligence, warmth and historical perspective will be missed by all who knew her. She married the late Raymond Farrell of DeKalb in 1938. She also was predeceased by her son, Joseph P. Farrell. Agnes is survived by her daughterin-law, Joan; grandson, Michael; his spouse, Catherine Richens; and great-granddaughter, Mabel Ray; granddaughter, Jennifer, and her husband, James Cordon; and great-grandchildren, Guinevere and Gavin, all of Toronto. There are several relatives in the DeKalb and Chicago areas. A memorial service was held Friday, Jan. 17, at Humphrey Funeral Home – A.W. Miles Chapel Limited, 1403 Bayview Ave., Toronto. Entombment was at Mount Hope Cemetery, Toronto. The Rev. Frank Wagner of St. Ann’s Catholic Parish officiated both services. Condolences and memories may be forwarded through www. humphreymiles.com. To sign the online guest book, visit www.legacy.com/daily-chronicle.

BONNIE L. KITTLE Died: Jan. 22, 2014, in Steward, Ill. DeKALB – Bonnie L. Kittle, 65, of DeKalb, Ill., passed away peacefully Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2014, at her daughter’s home in Steward, Ill., surrounded by family members. Bonnie was known by many for her eight years of work at the Genoa Greenhouse and later for more than 30 years of service at Northern Illinois University. She retired from the College of Business at NIU in 2009. She was a dedicated and selfless mother who not only enjoyed helping others, but spent most of her free time volunteering for multiple local community organizations. Born in 1948, she is survived by her parents, Lester and Juanita Munk of Sycamore; three daughters, Tammy Kessel (Bill) of Steward, Tina Kittle of Jefferson City, Mo., and Teresa Peters; eight grandchildren, Amber Vanover (Shaun) of Jefferson City, Christopher Thurnau (Angela) of Glendale Heights, Adam Peters of DeKalb, Nicholas Thurnau of DeKalb, Codie Peters (Mary) of Jasper, Ind., Branden Kittle-Aikeley of Jefferson City, Toniya Crowley of Jefferson City and Stephanie Kessel of Steward; and five great-grandchildren, Myles, Adriana, Tristen, Mason and Aiden. Also included in her survivors are two brothers, Gary Munk of Genoa and Timothy Munk of Sycamore; one sister, Donna Kreitinger (Ken) of Genoa; seven nieces; and one nephew. The family would like to thank Kay Baker, Kathy Truman and Cheryl Rotza for their many years of friendship and devoted companionship throughout Bonnie’s life and during her battle against cancer. A memorial service will be at 5 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 25, at United Methodist Church in Genoa, with the Rev. Melissa Meyers officiating. In lieu of flowers, monetary contributions may be sent to the Estate of Bonnie Kittle at P.O. Box 56, Steward, IL 60553. To sign the online guest book, visit www.legacy.com/daily-chronicle.

EDWIN LAZELLE MCMURRAY Edwin Lazelle McMurray, 66, Kirkland, Ill., died Friday, Jan. 24, 2014, at OSF St. Anthony Medical Center in Rockford. Arrangements were entrusted to Olson Funeral & Cremation Services Ltd. A full obituary will run at a later date.

FIELD W. UTTER

Utter. Field was a veteran of the U.S. Marines, serving in World War II. He was a member of the Sycamore VFW, where he served as past post commander. He also was a life member of Sycamore Elks and a 57-year member of Salem Lutheran Church in Sycamore. Field joined the DeKalb County Sheriff’s Office as a deputy in 1950. In 1954, he spent four years working for the Veterans Administration. In 1958, he rejoined the DeKalb County Sheriff’s Office as chief deputy and he was elected DeKalb County sheriff in 1962. In 1966, Field was elected DeKalb County treasurer and was appointed as a probation officer in 1971. In 1974, he was appointed chief adult probation officer for the 16th Judicial Circuit. Survivors include his son, Robert (Susan) Utter of Cadiz, Ky.; two daughters, Karen (Terry) Morris of Sycamore and Marilyn Utter of DeKalb; six grandchildren, Leslie (Bill) Powers, Kristine Morris, Terrilynn Morris, Dawn Morris (Bill) Smith, John Utter and Molly (Kevin) Koertner; eight great-grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents; wife, Gladys, in 2002; and seven siblings, Mary Rote, Lillian Korleski, Doris Richter, Jane Ann Cradduck, Betty Utter, Russell Utter and Bob Utter. His funeral service will be at 10 a.m. Monday, Jan. 27, at Salem Lutheran Church in Sycamore, with the Rev. Robert Kinnear officiating. Burial will be at Elmwood Cemetery, Sycamore. The visitation will be from 3 to 7 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 26, at Butala Funeral Home and Crematory in Sycamore. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Barb City Manor or KishHealth Systems Hospice in care of Butala Funeral Home and Crematory, 1405 DeKalb Ave., Sycamore, IL 60178. For information or to sign the online guest book, visit www. ButalaFuneralHomes.com or call 815-895-2833. To sign the online guest book, visit www.legacy.com/daily-chronicle.

Randall R. Foster, 37, of the 100 block of Cotton Avenue, DeKalb, was charged Wednesday, Jan. 15, with trespass to land and arrested on an in-state warrant. Monique C. Scott, 21, of the 1700 block of South Seventh Avenue, Maywood, was charged Wednesday, Jan. 15, with possession of marijuana. Rashaud Ross, 21, of the 800 block of Fotis Drive, DeKalb, was charged Thursday, Jan.

day, Jan. 18, with aggravated battery. Marcus A. Staff, 26, of the 300 block of College Avenue, Rockford, was charged Saturday, Jan. 18, with possession of marijuana. Andrew D. Stinson, 20, of the 200 block of Hastings Way, Poplar Grove, was charged Saturday, Jan. 18, with underage drinking. Anthony D. Harper-Sampson, 24, of the 900 block of Fotis Drive, DeKalb, was charged Saturday, Jan. 18, with keeping a disorderly house.

ment aren’t so sure. December’s jobless rate fell to 8.6 percent from 8.7 percent the previous month, the Illinois Department of Employment Security said in its monthly report on statewide unemployment. The national unemployment rate for December was 6.7 percent, its lowest point since late 2008. The department said Friday that, even as the jobless

rate fell, Illinois lost a net 3,200 jobs in December. Officials blamed brutal cold for decreases in, among other areas, construction jobs. But they pointed out that the number of people in the state’s workforce was up by 62,200, or 1.1 percent, over a year earlier and that some key areas such as manufacturing saw significant gains in December. – Wire report

Sycamore Jonathan K. Crowley, 24, of DeKalb, was arrested Monday, Jan. 20, on a warrant for failure to appear in court on allegations of possession of drug equipment.

8STATE BRIEF Ill. unemployment drops, but state sheds jobs CHAMPAIGN – Illinois’ unemployment rate dropped in December, the fourth straight month of declines, the state Department of Employment Security said Friday. State officials said that, in spite of a reduction in the number of jobs in the state last month, the employment picture is improving. But experts outside state govern-

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Born: June 12, 1941, in Galesburg, Ill. Died: Jan. 23, 2014, in DeKalb, Ill. DeKALB – Cherie Kay Ziech, 72, of DeKalb, Ill., died Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014, at Kishwaukee Hospital, DeKalb. Born June 12, 1941, in Galesburg, the daughter of Benjamin Lyall and Gertrude (Gibb) Christy, Cherie married Neal E. Ziech on June 4, 1966, in LaGrange Park. Cherie was a graduate of Galesburg High School. She worked as the laboratory manager at LaGrange Memorial Hospital for more than 25 years. She is survived by her sons, Jeff (Sissy) Ziech of Rochelle and Roger (Megan) Ziech of Lake in the Hills; grandchildren, Nick, Cassidy, Brian, Kevin and Maeve; brother, Benjamin Lyall (Linda) Christy of Tulsa, Okla.; and several nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her husband, Neal; and her parents. The memorial service will be at 10 a.m. Monday, Jan. 27, at Oak Crest Chapel, 2944 Greenwood Acres Drive, DeKalb, with the Rev. Gary Park officiating. A private family burial will be at Mount Auburn Memorial Park, Stickney. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the Cherie K. Ziech Memorial Fund, sent in care of Anderson Funeral Home, P.O. Box 605, 2011 S. Fourth St., DeKalb, IL 60115. For information, visit www. AndersonFuneralHomeLtd.com or call 815-756-1022. To sign the online guest book, visit www.legacy.com/daily-chronicle.

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DeKALB – Field W. Utter, 93, of DeKalb, Ill., died Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014, at DeKalb County Rehab & Nursing Center, DeKalb. He was born Dec. 13, 1920, in Sycamore, the son of Field E. and Marguerite (Russell)

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16, with credit card fraud and theft of more than $500. Bruce E. Robbins, 67, of the 12100 block of South Route 47, Huntley, was arrested Thursday, Jan. 16, on an instate warrant. Garrick S. Bonds, 20, of the 900 block of Greenbrier Road, DeKalb, was charged Friday, Jan. 17, with possession of drug paraphernalia. Kenneth O. Thigpen, 20, of the 800 block of Spiros Court, DeKalb, was charged Friday, Jan. 17, with possession of marijuana. Daniel C. Phillips, 25, of the 11600 block of South Justine Street, Chicago, was charged Friday, Jan. 17, with trespass to land. Keith A. Doerr, 33, of the 1100 block of Market Street, DeKalb, was charged Satur-

CHERIE K. ZIECH

Born: Dec. 13, 1920, in Sycamore, Ill. Died: Jan. 23, 2014, in DeKalb, Ill.

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Note to readers: Information in Police Reports is obtained from the DeKalb County Sheriff’s Office and city police departments. Individuals listed in Police Reports who have been charged with a crime have not been proven guilty in court.

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NEWS

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

Saturday, January 25, 2014 • Page A5

District faces fierce competition and strict regulations • DIVERSITY Continued from page A1

AP photo

Emergency crews work at the scene of a massive pileup involving about 15 semitrailers and about 15 passenger vehicles and pickup trucks Thursday along Interstate 94 near Michigan City, Ind. At least three were killed and more than 20 people were injured.

Victims’ screams mark Ind. pileup By CHARLES D. WILSON The Associated Press MICHIGAN CITY, Ind. – Cars were mangled, and some were burned despite the blowing snow. Other vehicles were crushed between jackknifed semitrailers, so entwined that it was difficult to tell them apart. People were screaming, but emergency responders couldn’t see many of them as they quickly tended the victims amid frigid conditions. Within seconds, traffic along snow-covered Interstate 94 in northern Indiana had become a mile-long pile of debris after whiteout conditions swept in during Thursday’s evening commute. Three people were killed and nearly two dozen were injured. “It was such a devastating scene, you don’t know where to start,” said Coolspring Township Fire Chief Mick Pawlik, whose volunteer crew was among the first on the scene about 60 miles south of Chicago. “There were people in cars that you couldn’t even see,” Pawlik said during a news conference Friday. “But when people are stuck in their cars, they look at you like we’re

Moses. ‘Part the water. Save us.’ ” Rescue crews quickly set about prioritizing the victims. Who needed help first? And who was beyond help? Firefighters worked quickly to keep the victims warm while they extricated them. Just as importantly, Pawlik tried to take their minds off what had happened – even though the dead weighed on his and other first responders’ minds. “Those are the worst,” Pawlik said. “You sit there – they’re the last ones to get out but you know they’re there.” The chain-reaction collision near Michigan City was triggered by a sudden burst of heavy lake-effect snow that took drivers by surprise, said Indiana State Police Lt. Jerry Williams. Within about 45 seconds, dozens of vehicles – including numerous other trucks – were crashing into one another. The accident killed Chicago resident Jerry Dalrymple, 65, and a Michigan couple: Thomas Wolma, 67, and his 65-year-old wife, Marilyn, of Grand Rapids. More than 20 people were injured, including one who remained in critical condition Friday.

“Unless you can make a connection and [students] think you care about them, you’re not going to teach them anything,” Moeller said. “It’s important for kids to have someone in their lives they can look up to as a role model. They can say, ‘Wow, look, there’s someone successful who looks like me.’ ”

Challenges and solutions Moeller said the district faces two major obstacles as it seeks to recruit minority teachers and administrators: Fierce competition from other districts closer to Chicago and strict regulations on out-of-state candidates who want to become certified in Illinois. Last year, District 428 launched a diversity recruitment committee aimed at finding qualified minority and male candidates and encouraging them to apply for positions in the district. The committee was led by human resources director Connie Rohlman, who has worked in the school district for 23 years. Most of her time with the district was spent in schools. “I saw the disproportion between students and staff,” Rohlman said. “I really saw it was a need.” The recruitment committee includes administrators and teachers, a majority of which are minorities. Committee members travel to job fairs such as the one at Chicago State University, where a majority of the students are black. But District 428 isn’t the only one trying to attract minority teachers. “We’re finding there’s not a lot of minorities in the field of education, so we’re all fighting for the same candidates,” Rohlman said. As a black man, Ata Sha-

kir, a freshman academic literacy teacher at DeKalb High School, is among the most under-represented group in the district. He said he approaches all students the same regardless of their race, but that doesn’t mean he’s not aware of the condition of the district. “I don’t really dwell on race much,” Shakir said. “I’ve been black for 38 years, but I know for some of my students it is a defining factor. I recognize that there are some students who may or may not have had a black teacher before.”

Statewide Demographically, school districts across Illinois look similar to the DeKalb School District. Statewide, 83 percent of teachers are white, 7.1 percent are black, 5.3 percent are Hispanic, 1.3 percent Asian and less than 1 percent multiracial. The Illinois student body is half white, 17 percent black, 24 percent Hispanic, 4 percent Asian and 3 percent multiracial. DeKalb has made some gains in staff diversity in the past two years. Three bilingual teachers were hired through the Visiting Teacher program from Spain. Of the 62 staff members hired, eight were minorities and 13 were men. District officials also are attempting to recruit teachers and administrators from outside of Illinois, but this isn’t a clear path to increasing diversity because of requirements the Illinois State Board of Education places on candidates. Just because a candidate is certified to teach in another state does not automatically certify them in Illinois. DeKalb County Regional Superintendent Amanda Christensen said out-ofstate candidates often have to complete extra coursework before they can be

certified in Illinois because state requirements go above what is required in some other states. “You could say Illinois has one of the most rigorous programs,” Christensen said. District 427 Superintendent Kathy Countryman said the requiremens for out-of-state candidates can create a problem in her district, as well. “Some of the requirements are good, but some have become a barrier,” Countryman said. District 427 also is trying to align its student and staff population. Data from the district was incomplete for the past two years, but it was available for 2010, when 97 percent of Sycamore’s teachers were white compared with 81 percent of its students. “Our biggest challenge is finding bilingual candidates because the fastest-growing population is the Hispanic population,” Countryman said. “This can be our focus at times.” Hispanic students make up almost 9 percent of students in District 427. Both the DeKalb and Sycamore districts conduct diversity training to keep staff aware of how to approach changing demographics, such as being more aware of the varying home lives or backgrounds their students have. Hueramo said the diversity training is valuable, but added it’s not the same as the person-to-person connection. “It can be hard to build meaningful relationships with students and parents,” Hueramo said. “We bring that background knowledge of where those students came from. We see their parents working, but we want to show them school is important and we want them here.”

By the numbers Illinois staff: 83.3 percent white, 7.1 percent black, 5.3 percent Hispanic, 1.3 percent Asian, 0.8 percent multiracial Illinois students: 50.6 percent white, 17.6 percent black, 24.1 percent Hispanic, 4.3 percent Asian, 3 percent multiracial District 428 staff: 91 percent white, 2.9 percent black, 4.6 percent Hispanic District 428 students: 56 percent white, 15.2 percent black, 22.3 percent Hispanic, 2 percent Asian, 4.1 percent multiracial, 2 percent Asian, 4 percent multiracial District 427 staff: 97 percent white, 2.2 percent black, 0.4 percent Hispanic* *Based on 2010, latest year complete data was available. District 427 students: 81.4 percent white, 2.9 percent black, 8.9 percent Hispanic, 2.2 percent Asian, 4.3 percent multiracial District 429 staff: 96.3 percent white, 0 percent black, 0 percent Hispanic, 3.7 percent Asian District 429 students: 91 percent white, 0.7 percent black, 6 percent Hispanic, 0.8 percent Asian, 0.8 percent multiracial District 430 staff: 98.1 percent white, 0 percent black, 1.9 percent Hispanic District 430 students: 82.3 percent white, 0.1 percent black, 12 percent Hispanic, 1.1 percent Asian, 4.2 percent multiracial District 426 staff: 100 percent white District 426 students: 83.5 percent white, 1.3 percent black, 12.5 percent Hispanic, 0 percent Asian, 2.6 percent multiracial District 432 staff: 100 percent white District 432 students: 89.8 percent white, 0.1 percent black, 6.7 percent Hispanic, 0.2 percent Asian, 2.7 percent multiracial District 424 staff: 96.7 percent white, 0 percent black, 1.6 percent Hispanic, 0 percent Asian District 424 students: 83.4 percent white, 1.6 percent black, 13.9 percent Hispanic, 0.7 percent Asian, .3 percent multiracial District 425 staff: 98.3 percent white, 0 percent black, 0 percent Hispanic, 0 percent Asian District 425 students: 93.3 percent white, 1.3 percent black, 4.2 percent Hispanic, 0.3 percent Asian, 0.8 percent multiracial Source: Illinois School Report Cards


Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com NEWS Clean hands frequently About 300 students dually Unclear if any changes will be made attend college and university •GAMBLING • FLU Continued from page A1

Page A6 • Saturday, January 25, 2014

Continued from page A1

“Our push in September and October is to prevent it, but flu season continues through March and April,” Lux said. “The more people that get vaccinated, the better protected everyone is.” Lux said it takes about two weeks for the antibodies to build up in the body to develop immunity. Local pharmacists said they still are seeing people coming in for vaccines. “There has been a slight upswing of people coming in for the vaccine,” said Roger Stedman, DeKalb Walgreens pharmacist. “The number always picks up a little when there’s media attention.” Lux said people often are reminded they didn’t get vaccinated when they see or hear something in the news, or when someone they know gets sick.

Hy-Vee pharmacist Joe Jaszczak said numbers picked up a couple of weeks ago, but have slowed again. “It’s definitely not too late to get vaccinated,” Jaszczak said. “You can get the vaccine in April and then get one again at the beginning of the season next September.” Lux said that, along with the vaccine, it’s important to remember the three Cs – clean, cover and contain – are preventive measures. • Clean your hands frequently with soap and water, or use an alcohol-based sanitizer. • Cover coughs and sneezes with disposable tissues or by sneezing or coughing into your elbow. • Contain germs by staying home if you’re already sick. “That advice isn’t exciting,” Lux said, “but those three things are really important.”

• TRANSFER

Continued from page A1 Baker called the agreement “game-changing.” It has been in the works for a little more than six months. “There has not been a way for students to do this until now,” Baker said. “This partnership breaks down barriers to provide a seamless way for students to receive credit for work they’ve done.” About 300 students are dually enrolled at the college and the university, Choice said. “The bottom line is that we share students and our most basic mission is to provide quality education for those students,” Choice said. “The reverse transfer agreement will allow more of the students we share the opportunity to strive for success and, more impor-

Mexico City INBODEN’S approves MEAT MARKET N. 1st, DeKalb water law 1106756-5852 By ADRIANA GOMEZ LICON The Associated Press MEXICO CITY – “Drink the water.” It’s a suggestion alien to Mexico City residents who have long shunned tap water in favor of the bottled kind and to the throngs of tourists who visit the city each year, bringing with them fears of “Montezuma’s Revenge.” But a law recently approved by Mexico City’s legislators will require all restaurants to install filters so they can offer patrons free, drinkable water that won’t lead to stomach problems and other ailments. “We need to create a culture of water consumption,” said Dr. Jose Armando Ahued, health secretary for Mexico City. “We need to accept our water.” Bad tap water accounts in part for Mexico being the world’s top consumer of bottled water and – worse – soda, some 43 gallons a person a year. With an obesity epidemic nationwide, the city’s health department decided to back the water initiative. Mexico City officials said 65,000 restaurants will have six months to install filters once the bill is signed later this month. Health inspectors will make periodic visits and impose $125 to $630 fines to those not complying. The law doesn’t cover thousands of food stalls along Mexico City’s streets. Some restaurants already have filters. But when business consultant Jose Frank recently ate tacos with two colleagues at Yucatan Cravings in the Zona Rosa tourist district, they all had bottled water. “I’m afraid to drink the water for everything they say. I don’t feel secure. I prefer bottled,” Frank said. A general distrust of tap water is not without reason. The city’s giant 1985 earthquake burst water pipelines and sewers, increasing waterborne diseases, and officials blamed water supply systems for a spread of cholera in the 1990s.

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tantly, achieve it.” Lt. Gov. Sheila Simon also spoke during the ceremony, calling the agreement an obvious step in the right direction for the benefit of students and the state of Illinois. “When students leave college with credits but no credentials, they are less prepared for the workforce,” Simon said. “This reverse transfer agreement should be implemented at campuses across the state.” Martin is in her first year at NIU and plans to leave with a bachelor’s degree in journalism in a few years. Until then, because of the reverse transfer agreement, she’ll be able to show employers – and herself – that she accomplished something in her time at Kishwaukee. “When I apply for jobs this summer, I will be able to have that degree on my résumé,” Martin said.

The bill currently calls for adding casinos in Rockford, Danville, Chicago’s south suburbs and Lake County in addition to Chicago. It also would allow current and future casino licensees to apply for an online gambling license and add slot machines at the state’s horse-racing tracks and O’Hare and Midway international airports. It’s unclear if any changes will be made to the legislation. But supporters say it could generate between $400 million and $1 billion annually. The measure would put the bulk of revenue from brick-and-mortar gambling toward school funding. Brady, Dillard, state Treasurer Dan Rutherford and businessman Bruce Rauner are seeking the GOP nomination in the March primary. Rutherford, of Chenoa, said that in general, he doesn’t support expansion of gambling “simply to raise more state

revenue.” “If a gaming expansion bill was to be presented with proper regulation and sufficient oversight, I would be willing to entertain a discussion,” he said. Rutherford also said decisions about how to spend gambling revenue “should be part of a broader discussion of revenues and expenditures as we seek to return to fiscal stability.” Rauner stated in his questionnaire, and again during a debate in Peoria this week, that local communities should drive the decisions about where to add casinos. “I don’t gamble. I don’t like gambling,” the political newcomer from Winnetka said during the debate. “I believe casinos and gambling is here. We should allow our local governments to decide for themselves.” In the AP questionnaire, Rauner said any new gambling revenue should be invested in “the state’s top three priorities: education, infrastructure and lowering the tax burden.”


Opinions

Daily Chronicle • www.daily-chronicle.com • Page A7 • Saturday, January 25, 2014

8OUR VIEW

8SKETCH VIEW

Thumbs up to Fatty’s Pub and Grille

8LETTERS TO THE EDITOR A need to support child welfare

who provided critical funding and in-kind products to HFI, allowing us to support 50 DeKalb County To the Editor: families, including 90 children in Healthy Families Illinois (HFI), 2013. The 3M Community Support a program of Children’s Home Group chose Healthy Families + Aid, works toward preventing child abuse and neglect in DeKalb Illinois to benefit from proceeds of their 20th annual Closest to County by strengthening and stabilizing families, enhancing the the Pin contest in August. The HFI program awareness to 3M emquality of parent-child relationships, increasing access to com- ployees and financial support was a great boost as we began FY14. munity resources and improving In addition, we would like to all aspects of child health. thank DeKalb County Community While reflecting back on 2013, Mental Health Board, DeKalb the word “community” comes County Community Foundation, to mind, defined as a result Ideal Industries, KishHealth of sharing common attitudes, Foundation, Kishwaukee Unitinterests and goals. As it takes a ed Way, Target Store and the village to raise a child, and even Weingarz Family of Sycamore for strengthen a family, there are several organizations and groups their financial support; Sycamore

Elks Lodge 1392 and members for conducting the 10th annual holiday Angel Tree for 90 children in the program; handmade items from Susan Cera, Merlin’s 100 Mile knit-a-thon, Shabbona Knitters Group; and in-kind support from Hy-Vee, Kishwaukee YMCA, Little Caesars Pizza, Ollie’s Frozen Custard and Papa John’s. At-risk families in DeKalb County are in need of support now more than ever before. Poverty, joblessness and other factors have dramatially impacted our population over the last several years causing increased stress on already financially strained households. Unfortunately, these stressors have been shown to be linked

to child maltreatment creating a greater need for programs supporting child welfare such as Healthy Families Illinois. As we leap into 2014, I’d like to once again thank the community, and especially those listed above, for your support of the Healthy Families Illinois program, allowing us to continue our important work to reduce child abuse and neglect in DeKalb County. Please contact me at 815899-0137 if you would like more information about how you can help to strengthen families in DeKalb County. Kathy Hicks Children’s Home + Aid Healthy Families Illinois

A physician’s view on the sanctity of life Several years ago, I was consulted by a young woman who was 33 weeks pregnant and was on her way to Kansas to get an abortion. I informed her of the multiple options available to her outside of abortion, and she decided to go through with the pregnancy even though the child had hydrocephalus and would require neurosurgical intervention a few weeks after birth. She kept the baby and loves the beautiful child that has resulted. A couple of decades ago, I came into the pediatric intensive care unit on morning rounds and was told about a 4-year-old girl who had been hit by an ice-cream truck and was comatose and exhibiting little neurological function other than reactive pupils. I tested her pupillary reflexes, and both pupils were fixed and dilated. The staff indicated to me that this was something that must have just occurred. I grabbed the bed and, with some help, transported her quickly to the operating room for an emergency craniotomy. I was met along the way by a senior neurosurgeon who told me I was wasting my time and that, at best, we would end up with someone in a vegetative state. Nevertheless, we completed the operation, and a few days later, her pupils became reactive, and she eventually left the hospital. I saw her a few years ago walking through the hospital with her own 4-year-old little girl. She was neurologically fully intact and told me she had become somewhat of a celebrity because of the experience I just related. What do these two stories have in common? They both involve precious lives that easily could have been discarded. My entire professional life has been devoted to saving and enhancing lives. Thus, the thought of abortion for the sake of convenience does not appeal to me. I personally have met several people who told

VIEWS Ben S. Carson me their mothers had considered abortion but happily decided against it. Most of us instinctively want to protect helpless creatures and sometimes go to great lengths to do so. The TV commercials about abused animals are poignant, and as a society, we sometimes delay or cancel large construction projects to protect an “endangered” insect, amphibian or fish. Yet many of us turn a blind eye to the wanton slaughter of millions of helpless human babies, who are much more sophisticated than some of the other creatures, when nothing is at stake other than the convenience of one or both parents. I am not saying we should abandon our efforts to save baby seals and a host of other animals. I am saying: Shouldn’t we consider adding human fetuses and babies to the list? Watching the human fetus develop is awe-inspiring. In less than three months from conception, the little hands and feet are quite recognizable, and distinct facial features characterize cute but very tiny human beings. From Day One, neurons of the brain are proliferating at a rate that will yield a staggering 100 billion neurons by birth. In a matter of nine months from conception, we have a living, breathing, eating, vocal human being who just two months later is socially interactive. Some people oppose having pregnant women view ultrasonic pictures of their developing babies because they do not want an emotional bond to develop. Careful, unbiased contemplation, however, might yield the conclusion that such bonding is essential to the survival of

mankind. Successful farmers nourish and protect their growing crops, and if conditions threaten their crops, they do what is necessary to protect them. Rather than attack the analogy, think about how much more precious a human life is than a stalk of corn. It is important to try to understand the emotional state of young women seeking an abortion. Instead of judging and condemning them, we need to provide compassion and support. They need to be provided with easy access to adoption services and information about assistance available to them if they decide to keep the baby. I have visited many warm, inviting facilities around the country that exist solely for the purpose of helping these young women. It is equally, if not more, important to reach these young women before they become pregnant. Forget about those politically correct people who say all lifestyles are equal, and inform those young women about the true consequences of out-of-wedlock birth for those who are not financially independent. We need to make sure they understand that they can provide a much better life for themselves and their children when they plan ahead and value themselves appropriately. As a society, we cannot be afraid to discuss important social and moral issues. Our heritage as a nation is built on compassion, forgiveness and understanding. Courage is also vitally important, because those who stand on godly principles and values will be attacked. Attempting to characterize love and compassion for human life as a “war on women” is deceitful and pathetic. We the people must stop allowing ourselves to be manipulated by those with agendas that do not include regard for the sanctity of life.

• Ben S. Carson is professor emeritus of neurosurgery at Johns Hopkins University.

Letters to the Editor Karen Pletsch – General Manager

Eric Olson – Editor

kpletsch@shawmedia.com

eolson@shawmedia.com

Dana Herra – MidWeek Editor dherra@shawmedia.com

Inger Koch – Features Editor ikoch@shawmedia.com

Jillian Duchnowski – News Editor jduchnowski@shawmedia.com

We welcome original letters on public issues. Letters must include the author’s full name, address and day and evening phone numbers. We limit letters to 400 words. We accept one letter per person every 15 days. All letters are subject to editing for length and clarity. Email: news@daily-chronicle.com. Mail: Daily Chronicle, Letters to the Editor, 1586 Barber Greene Road, DeKalb, IL 60115. Fax: 815-758-5059.

Thumbs up: To Fatty’s Pub and Grille in DeKalb for being awarded DeKalb Chamber of Commerce’s 2013 Business of the Year. The award was presented at the annual chamber dinner Thursday. Jeff Dobie opened Fatty’s in 1998 and has since grown the business to include off-site catering and employ more than 50 people. He also was recognized for the charitable work he and his employees do in the community, including Huskies for Hope, a fundraiser that has raised more than $30,000 for special education in DeKalb and Sycamore schools. Congratulations. Thumbs up: To silly mustaches. Students at Tyler Elementary School in DeKalb had a light-hearted fundraiser in which the children paid 75 cents each for stick-on mustaches. The proceeds helped purchase 21 pairs of gym shoes for students in need to use in gym class. What a fun, creative way to teach students about helping others. Thumbs down: To the continuing scourge of shootings on college campuses. On Tuesday, an engineering student at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Ind., shot and killed teaching assistant Andrew Boldt, a 21-year-old senior at the school. Then on Friday afternoon, a student at South Carolina State University was shot at a residence hall on that school’s campus in Orangeburg, S.C. Unfortunately, many people in DeKalb know first-hand about the traumatic effects of violence on campus. Our hearts go out to those affected, and we hope not to report more of these stories in the future. That does not appear to be in line with the trend, however. Thumbs up: To making animal rescue more efficient. Shelters in some parts of the country have more dogs, cats or puppies than they can handle, while others can’t keep up with local demand for a particular kind of pet. The ASPCA has launched a national database that allows shelters to see, contact and form partnerships with one another, making it easier to move pets from overcrowded shelters to those where they are more likely to be adopted. Thumbs down: To ever-escalating college tuition costs. The board of trustees at the University of Illinois voted Thursday to increase tuition for next year’s students by 1.7 percent. The increase in tuition and housing fees means that for many students, the cost of four years at the state’s flagship university will top $100,000. No doubt much of that money will be paid via loans, which the future alums of the school will spend years trying to repay.

8 ANOTHER VIEW

Europe should send message to Putin, Ukrainian leaders From the start of the recent turmoil in Ukraine, President Viktor Yanukovych said he was committed to democracy and to closer ties with the European Union, things that most of his fellow Ukrainians say they want. That pretense has now collapsed. Yanukovych’s decision in November not to sign a trade agreement with the EU and instead cut a deal with Russia sparked protests. These turned violent last week after the government announced new laws to criminalize demonstrations and make it easier to prosecute opposition politicians who support them. Police have shot dead at least two protesters. The new laws won’t just turn Ukraine toward Russia; they will turn Ukraine into a version of Russia. Following the example set by Vladimir Putin, they provide the tools for suppression of protest and political opposition at will. With these laws in effect, a $15 billion loan from Russia to use as a campaign fund, and opposition leader Yulia Tymoshenko in jail on trumped-up charges, the idea that elections next year could be free and fair is absurd. The new laws will also make it all but impossible for Ukraine to sign the EU trade deal – which Yanukovych said he still wants to do. The pact requires evidence of movement toward democracy and the rule of law. Under Yanukovych, the movement is in the other direction. The EU should respond for once with clarity and sense of purpose. Granted, its options are mostly limited to jawboning, but done with conviction, that isn’t worthless. It should tell Ukrainians that Europe will support them wholeheartedly once they have a government that chooses economic reform and the rule of law over corruption and oppression. And it should tell Ukraine’s leaders – both the government and its business allies – that their authoritarian path rules out closer economic cooperation. Up to now the EU has refused to say that Ukraine can one day join the bloc if it meets the union’s increasingly demanding membership requirements. Hesitation is understandable, especially with Ukraine in such turmoil, but Europe should say that, in principle, it is open to Ukraine’s eventual accession and that it desires closer economic cooperation in the meantime. Easing visa procedures for ordinary Ukrainians and encouraging exchanges would also send a powerful message of support – one that other countries stuck in post-Soviet limbo, such as Moldova and Georgia, would welcome, too. Bloomberg View

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. – U.S. Bill of Rights, First Amendment


WEATHER

Page A8 • Saturday, January 25, 2014

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

7-DAY FORECAST TODAY

A clipper system will move out of the area with colder air quickly moving in. Temperatures will start in the upper teens and quickly fall into the single digits by the evening. An arctic cold front will move through on Sunday spreading 1-2 inches of snow followed by an arctic air mass. Monday and Tuesday will see high temperatures below zero.

TOMORROW

Sunny & windy with areas of blowing snow

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

Cloudy & windy Sunny, windy & Sunny & bitterly Mostly sunny & with periods of bitterly cold cold a little warmer snow

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

Partly sunny & much warmer

Partly sunny & colder

15

23

-6

-5

7

22

20

0

-7

-18

-12

2

10

7

Winds: W/NW 10-20 mph

Winds: W/SW 5-15 mph

UV INDEX

ALMANAC

MONDAY

Winds: W/NW 15-25 mph

Winds: W 10-20 mph

Winds: W 5-15 mph

Winds: W/SW 5-15 mph

Winds: W 10-20 mph

REGIONAL CITIES

REGIONAL WEATHER

DeKalb through 4 p.m. yesterday

Temperature High ............................................................. 20° Low ............................................................... -9° Normal high ............................................. 28° Normal low ............................................... 13° Record high .............................. 63° in 1967 Record low ............................... -15° in 2008

Precipitation 24 hours through 4 p.m. yest. ......... 0.00” Month to date ....................................... 1.14” Normal month to date ....................... 1.19” Year to date ............................................ 1.14” Normal year to date ............................ 1.19”

Jan 30

First

Full

Feb 6

Feb 14

Lake Geneva 12/-6

The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. 0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme.

AIR QUALITY TODAY

Rockford 16/-2

Source: Environmental Protection Agency

Dixon 19/0

Where is the snowiest region in the world?

Joliet 21/1

La Salle 22/4

Evanston 19/2 Chicago 19/0

Aurora 19/-3

WEATHER TRIVIA™ Q:

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Waukegan 18/-3

Arlington Heights 18/0

DeKalb 15/0

Main ofender ................................................... N.A.

Streator 24/4

A: The mountain ranges of western North America.

Sunrise today ................................ 7:14 a.m. Sunset tonight ............................. 5:01 p.m. Moonrise today ............................ 1:45 a.m. Moonset today .......................... 12:01 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ........................ 7:13 a.m. Sunset tomorrow ........................ 5:02 p.m. Moonrise tomorrow ................... 2:50 a.m. Moonset tomorrow ................. 12:51 p.m.

Kenosha 19/-6

8 a.m. 10 a.m. Noon 2 p.m. 4 p.m. 6 p.m.

0-50 Good, 51-100 Moderate, 101-150, Unhealthy for sensitive groups, 151-200 Unhealthy 201-300 Very Unhealthy, 301-500 Hazardous

SUN and MOON

New

Janesville 14/-4

Hammond 19/3 Gary 22/2 Kankakee 24/1

Feb 22

On Jan. 25, 1821, thousands crossed the Hudson River from New York City to Hoboken, N.J., on ice that formed when the temperature dropped to 14 degrees below zero that morning.

Peoria 24/7

Pontiac 26/4

NATIONAL WEATHER

Hi 19 30 16 16 26 19 21 24 20 22 20 23 18 22 20 26 18 18 16 28 19 17 18 16 21

Today Lo W -3 pc 18 pc -5 pc -3 pc 5 pc -4 sf 1 sf 1 sf 3 pc 0 sn 4 pc 2 pc -1 sf 3 pc 3 pc 15 pc -3 sf -1 pc -2 pc 11 pc 1 pc 0 sf -3 sf -4 pc -1 pc

Tomorrow Hi Lo W 19 -10 sn 51 6 pc 19 -11 sn 18 -10 sn 36 -4 sn 19 -9 sn 24 -7 sn 30 -5 sn 23 -11 sn 27 1 sn 29 -12 sf 25 -5 sn 20 -7 sn 25 -8 sf 25 -11 sf 43 -3 c 18 -9 sn 18 -12 sn 18 -10 sn 41 -4 sn 23 -12 sn 21 -7 sn 18 -11 sn 17 -11 sn 23 -8 sn

RIVER LEVELS

WEATHER HISTORY

Last

City Aurora Belleville Beloit Belvidere Champaign Elgin Joliet Kankakee Mendota Michigan City Moline Morris Naperville Ottawa Princeton Quincy Racine Rochelle Rockford Springield Sterling Wheaton Waukegan Woodstock Yorkville

Watseka 24/2

Location

7 a.m. yest.

Kishwaukee Belvidere Perryville DeKalb

1.34 6.41 2.93

Flood stage

9.0 12.0 10.0

24-hr chg

-0.14 none +0.20

DRAW THE WEATHER Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

-10s -0s 0s 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

Cold Front

Warm Front

Stationary Front

T-storms Rain Showers Snow Flurries

City Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Boston Bufalo Charleston, SC Charlotte Chicago

Hi 48 34 33 35 22 52 45 19

Today Lo W 24 s 19 sn 14 sn 15 sn 3 sn 28 s 19 pc 0 sf

Tomorrow Hi Lo W 51 35 pc 24 23 pc 24 20 c 23 19 pc 17 11 sn 53 36 pc 46 31 pc 23 -8 sn

Ice

City Cincinnati Dallas Denver Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles

Hi 24 62 58 62 24 40 65 79

Today Lo W 3 sn 42 pc 32 s 39 pc 2 sn 33 s 41 s 54 pc

Tomorrow Hi Lo W 38 8 sn 70 37 s 53 16 s 70 50 s 37 0 sn 50 3 pc 63 41 s 72 52 pc

City Louisville Miami Minneapolis New Orleans New York City Philadelphia Seattle Wash., DC

Hi 30 72 4 58 30 32 50 34

Today Lo W 10 sf 57 pc 0 pc 40 s 16 sn 14 sn 35 pc 17 sn

Legend: W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow lurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Tomorrow Hi Lo W 45 15 pc 75 62 pc 16 -19 sn 61 50 pc 22 18 pc 20 19 c 49 37 pc 28 26 pc

Stormy Berenice, Jefferson Elementary School Mail your weather drawings to: Geoff Wells, 1586 Barber Greene Road, DeKalb, IL 60115

Forecasts and graphics, except WFLD forecasts, provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2014

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Lifestyle

SECTION B Saturday, January 25, 2014 Daily Chronicle

Features editor Inger Koch • ikoch@shawmedia.com

Hot Stuff Grow your own tea from your garden By SARAH WOLFE The Associated Press

W

hen temperatures fall, there’s nothing better than a piping hot cup of tea. And as craft and organic tea seeps into the mainstream, tea gardens are becoming a popular way for brew lovers to bypass the store and enjoy the benefits of herbal tea without additives or preservatives. “It just tastes and smells better,” says chef Kimmy Tang, who snips mint, lavender and lemongrass from her garden for herbal teas at her 9021PHO restaurants in Los Angeles. “I also know that it’s 100 percent organic. I don’t use any chemicals to help them grow, and I can taste the difference.” It may sound daunting, but British gardener and author Cassie Liversidge says many tea garden staples may already be at your fingertips. “Honeysuckle, mint, rosemary. They’re all quite common plants, but can be turned into tea,” says Liversidge, author of the forthcoming book “Homegrown Tea: An Illustrated Guide to Planting, Harvesting and Blending Teas and Tisanes” (St. Martin’s Griffin, March 2014). She and other tea gardeners offer the following tips to get your feet wet:

Growing First and foremost, no sprawling English estate is required here. Tea gardens come in many forms, and don’t even need to be in the ground. Tang grows her herbs in a vertical garden hanging on a wall behind her restaurants, while other city dwellers cramped for space use pots and other containers. All you need is dirt, water and some seeds. “A great way to get started is to buy a plastic indoor sun garden at Lowe’s or

Online Cassie Liversidge: www.cassieliversidge.com Amy Renea: www.anestforallseasons.com The Medicinal Gardening Handbook: www. medicinalgardening.wordpress.com 9021PHO: www.90210PHO.com

Home Depot, along with the seeds and pieces of dirt that expand with water,” says McCollonough Ceili, a 26-year-old author who grows lavender, sage, mint and other herbs outside her kitchen window in Tennessee. Liversidge recommends easy-to-grow plants like mint, lavender or chamomile for beginners. If you’ve already got those growing, take a stab at other popular tea ingredients like coriander, lemon balm, rose hips, hibiscus and jasmine. Keep the plants in an area that gets at least six hours of sunlight each day, rotate them often and monitor moisture per directions on the seed packet.

AP photos

This photo shows dandelion, rose hips and other dried plants that line the cupboards of authors Dede Cummings and Alyssa Holmes, who use them for homemade teas and healing salves. As craft tea seeps into the mainstream, tea gardens are becoming a popular way for brew lovers to bypass the store and enjoy tea’s benefits without additives or preservatives.

Harvesting & Drying Each plant is unique when it comes to harvesting. The flower tops are the most medicinal part of the rosemary plant, for example, so be sure to clip those off along with the leaves for tea, Liversidge says. Fennel is valued for its seeds, and those must be shaken out from the flowers once they turn brown. Snip flowers like chamomile at the base of their stems, not the top, so you can use the stems, leaves and petals in your brew, according to Liversidge. Many herbs can be used fresh, but drying them is a good way to keep your tea cupboard stocked through the winter. Tie them up and hang them in bundles to dry, or spread them out on a flat surface in the sun. A dehydrator or an oven at a temperature of 212 degrees Fahrenheit or lower can also be used.

This photo, provided by Amy Renea of A Nest for All Seasons, shows herbs being cut for tea. “With my lemongrass, I cut it and freeze it to keep the nutrients locked in,” says Tang. No matter the method, be sure to store your tea ingredients in airtight containers.

Brewing There are a few ways to brew your homemade tea, depending on the ingredients and personal preference. Hershey, Pa.-based writer and photographer Amy Renea prefers to “chop off big hunks” of fresh mint, lemon

balm, chamomile and sometimes stevia from her tea garden and put them right in the tea kettle. Once it’s reached boiling, pull the kettle off the heat and let it sit for a few minutes before pouring into your favorite tea cup. “I strain the tea through a small tea mesh strainer, but any strainer will do,” Renea says. Liversidge prefers filling empty tea bags with homemade ingredients – “then you’re not tempted to put too much water with it” – and letting them steep about three minutes before enjoying. For the freshest tea possible, she advises pouring fresh water into your tea kettle every time. It has more oxygen, which will bring out the tea’s flavor. Here is a recipe for a Vitamin C “power blend” tea from the forthcoming “Medicinal Gardening Handbook” (Skyhorse Publishing, May 2014) by Vermont gardeners and neighbors Alyssa Holmes and Dede Cummings: 1 part rose hips 1 part hibiscus 2 parts lemon balm 1 part dandelion blossoms 1/2 part rosebuds Pour into a quart jar and fill with boiling water. Cover and let steep for at least 15 minutes or up to eight hours. Strain before drinking.


LIFESTYLE

Page B2 • Saturday, January 25, 2014

Daily Chronicle / daily-chronicle.com

FAMILY TIME | Eight organization tips for your busy life

Tip of the week If you run a small business or you manage your family’s household, you know that time is a precious commodity, one that you never seem to have enough of. And despite your best efforts, you can’t create time. So how do you save it and make yourself more efficient? Organization is the key. To help people achieve this goal, professional organizer and author Barbara Reich has partnered with Brother International Corporation to help families and small businesses get organized and regain their sought-after lost time. Reich offers these tips to help you organize

your home or business: • Start small. If your home or office is completely disorganized, don’t try to accomplish everything at once. Start with a single project or location and work forward, building on your successes. • Group similar things together. It’s the only way you’ll know how much of something you have and when you’ll need more. Having multiple storage locations is a recipe for frustration and breeds a chaotic environment. • Label. Once you’ve purged your possessions and streamlined the storage space, use an electronic label maker to label the shelves, drawers, boxes and bins; it’s a great way to maintain the organization you’re worked so hard to create. • Store things where you use them. If you charge your phone by your bed, then that’s where the charger belongs. The printer paper and ink refills should be stored next to the printer and the glasses in the kitchen should be stored next to the refrigerator. You’ll be most likely to stay organized when conve-

nience dictates the designated storage spaces in your home or office. • Use one kind of storage container. Having uniform hangers, folders, bins, and boxes eliminates the visual noise. You’ll feel calmer when you can view your possessions without focusing on a mess of mismatched containers. • Put things back where they belong. Whether you’re talking about toys or tumblers, return them to their rightful place when you’re finished using them. It takes a few minutes a day to stay organized; eliminating clutter build up is the key. • Use a simple filing system. Even in this digital age, there is still plenty of paper traveling about. If you find yourself inundated with paper clutter, a simple filing system will ease the mess. Make sure to keep your filing process as easy as possible. You will be less likely to adhere to a complicated system. • Create a landing zone. Daily-use items such as keys, cell phones and wallets are easily lost. Set a basket or a tray near your doorway for an easy

location to drop these items when you come in the door. That way, when you need them again, you’ll know where to find them. – Brandpoint

Family movie night “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty” Rated: PG Length: 114 minutes Synopsis: A daydreamer escapes his anonymous life by disappearing into a world of fantasies filled with heroism, romance and action. When his job along with that of his co-worker are threatened, he takes action in the real world embarking on a global journey that turns into an adventure more extraordinary than anything he could have ever imagined. Violence/scary rating: 2.5 Sexual-content rating: 2 Profanity rating: 2 Drugs/alcohol rating: 2 Family Time rating: 2. Overall a pretty good family film. (Ratings are judged on a five-point

scale, with 5 being “bad for kids” and 1 being “fine for kids.”)

Book report “Grumpy Groundhog,” by Maureen Wright (author), Amanda Haley (illustrator) Ages: 3 to 7 Pages: 32 Synopsis: It’s Groundhog Day and everyone is gathered to find out if it’s time for spring. But Groundhog does NOT want to leave his cozy bed in his cozy den. Will the townspeople be able to coax him outside to do his job? Kids will love the humorous antics of Groundhog in this delightful rhyming tale from the author of “Sleep, Big Bear, Sleep.” – Two Lions

Did you know? According to a report in the NCHS Data Brief, only 1 in 4 U.S. children get the recommended daily amount of exercise (60 minutes).

– More Content Now

8MILESTONES

Photo provided

50th anniversary

Novak-Madsen

Mr. and Mrs. David Russell of Englewood, Fla., and Lake Mills, Wis., formerly of Genoa, celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary with a surprise party held Dec. 22 at Kishwaukee Country Club in DeKalb. The event was hosted by their children and included the renewal of their wedding vows ministered by Pastor James Freund of CrossWind Community Church in Genoa. David H. Russell and Conna D. Brauer were married Dec. 21, 1963, at Trinity Lutheran Church in Rockford. Conna is retired from the Genoa-Kingston School District where she worked as secretary. David also retired from the Genoa-Kingston School District where he was a teacher, varsity football coach and boys varsity track coach. The couple has four children, Chad (April) Russell of Byron, Shane (Julie) Russell of Germantown Hills, Stacy Glendenning of Sussex, Wis., and the late Jay Russell. They also have seven grandchildren, Collin and Abigail Russell; Sean, Alyssa and Ryan Russell and Jacob and Samantha Glendenning.

Jessica L. Novak and Michael L. Madsen were married in a double-ring ceremony Oct. 19, 2013, at Fox River Lutheran Church in Sheridan. The daughter of John and Sunny Stufflebeam of Serena, the bride is a 1997 graduate of Serena High School. She earned her bachelor’s degree in social work in 2002 and her master’s degree in social work in 2004, both from Aurora University. She is a licensed clinical therapist and certified alcohol and drug counselor (LCSW, CADC) employed at Centennial Counseling Center. The son of Lee and Blanche Madsen of Hinckley, the groom is a 1996 graduate of Hinckley-Big Rock High School. He is a truck driver, employed at J.B. Hunt Transport. Matron of honor was Karen Trofimchuk of Monee, a friend of the bride. Beth Aussem of Ottawa, Jaime Biagioni of Sheridan, Amy Figenbaum of Wedron and Angie Nimke of Ottawa were bridesmaids. Hannah Benson of Earlville was a junior bridesmaid. Best man was Joel Badal of Hinckley, a friend of the groom. Jacob Benson of Earlville, Ron Benson of Earlville, Mike Jendrzejczyk of Yorkville and Tyler Madsen of Yorkville were groomsmen. Flower girl was Hannah Benson of Earlville. The reception was held at the Knights of Columbus hall in Ottawa, and the newlyweds spent their honeymoon in Galena.

50th anniversary The Rev. and Mrs. Terrence O’Brien of DeKalb celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary on Jan. 25, 2014. Terry and Medeline were married at the East Whittier United Methodist Church in Whittier, Calif., by the Rev. Owen Geer. They have two children, Cleary Elizabeth O’Brien of Sydney, Australia, and Van (Jennice) O’Brien of DeKalb. They also have six grandchildren, Suzanne, Christian, Ethan and Emily Kirkendall of Sydney, Australia, and Avery and Julia O’Brien of DeKalb.

8NEW ARRIVALS Hammett

Salter

James and Amanda Hammett of DeKalb announce the birth of a daughter, Nora Rose Hammett, born Jan. 19, 2014, at Kishwaukee Hospital, DeKalb. She weighed 7 pounds, 11.3 ounces. Grandparents are Mark and Mary Ann Tadla of Oak Lawn and Clifford and Cathy Hammett of DeKalb.

Kathryn and Cody Salter of St. Charles announce the birth of a daughter, Campbell Caines, born Dec. 27, 2013, at Women’s Prentice Hospital Northwestern, Chicago. She weighed 7 pounds, 7 ounces, and was welcomed home by Jillian, 4. Grandparents are Luan and Greg Olson of Sycamore and Peggy and Bud Salter of Oregon. Madeline Olson of Macomb is a great-grandmother.

Waterman Boy Scouts spent a frigid weekend ice fishing on Shabbona Lake.

Scouts learn cold-weather skills while ice fishing After weeks of being inside and itching to get out and have some fun, the scouts of Boy Scout Troop 139 in Waterman traveled to Shabbona Lake Jan. 18 for some fishing. This was no everyday fishing trip; the boys, pelted with snow and blasted by wind, were bundled in layers of clothing carefully planned to keep the below-freezing temperatures at bay. On the frozen lake, 18 inches of ice separated the boys from the fish beneath. Assistant Scoutmaster Tim Tausch, Eagle Scout, helped each boy prepare a homemade ice fishing pole for the trip days before.

The boys carried their supplies onto the lake and set up an ice fishing hut to shield them from the elements. Though no fish were caught, the trip was a huge success; the Scouts learned a lot and are more prepared to compete in the upcoming Klondike Derby, when they will use their scouting skills in an overnight campout competition against other troops in the Three Fires Council Kishwaukee District. The troop plans to take high-adventure trips to Florida and Minnesota, funded by a Feb. 2 drive-thru pork chop dinner and a March 7 fish fry.

8IN UNIFORM McGinnis completes advanced training Army Pvt. Tim P. McGinnis has graduated from the Infantryman One Station Unit Training at Fort Benning, Columbus, Ga. The training consists of basic infantry training and advanced individual training. During the nine weeks of basic combat training, the soldier received training in drill and ceremonies, weapons employment, map reading, tactics, military courte-

sy, military justice, physical fitness, first aid skills, and Army history, core values and traditions. Additional training included development of basic combat skills and battlefield operations and tactics, and experienced use of various weapons and weapons defenses available to the infantry crewman. The advanced individual training course is designed to train infantry soldiers to perform reconnaissance operations; employ, fire and recover anti-personnel and

anti-tank mines; locate and neutralize land mines and operate target and sight equipment; operate and maintain communications equipment and radio networks; construct field firing aids for infantry weapons; and perform infantry combat exercises and dismounted battle drills, which includes survival procedures in a nuclear, biological or chemical contaminated area. McGinnis is the son of Tim McGinnis of Hinckley and is a 2005 graduate of Indian Creek High School.

8BRIEFS Castle Club plans ‘Mary Poppins’ trip Members of Castle Bank’s Castle Club are planning a trip to The Fireside in Fort Atkinson, Wis., on March 5, to see the hit Broadway musical “Mary Poppins.” The Fireside is celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2014. The Fireside is the first professional theater in Wisconsin to present a new production of this Tony Award-winning musical. The world’s favorite “practically perfect” nanny comes alive on the Fireside stage serving up more than a spoonful of music, dancing and laughter. Direct from Broadway and the National Tour, The Fireside’s production features all of the well-known popular songs, high-stepping dancing, and a treasure chest full of magic and mirth. The whole family will enjoy this musical fable. The dinner menu includes tomato bisque, chicken piccata and caramel apple cheesecake. The Klopcic family at The Fireside was named America’s Best Restaurant Family in 2006 by faculty of the Culinary Institute of America.

For more information or to make a reservation, call Mary Busch at 815-754-8091. Castle Club is designed for active adults age 50 or older and features exciting trips and activities, with opportunities to save on bank products and services.

Friends of DeKalb Library plan bus trip The Friends of the DeKalb Public Library are offering a bus trip to Washington D.C. from April 10 through 15. Travelers will enjoy two full-day guided tours of Washington D.C. plus an evening guided memorial and monuments tour. The group will visit Arlington National Cemetery including the Tomb of the Unknowns, Kennedy graves plus the Iwo Jima Memorial and a visit to the Smithsonian Institution. A visit of the Library of Congress also is planned. The trip cost is $549 and includes a $50 donation to the Friends of the DeKalb Public Library. For information and reservations, call Steven Johnson at Carder Travel at 815-756-1547.


LIFESTYLE

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

Saturday, January 25, 2014 • Page B3

Drought hasn’t affect quality of Melville wines The soil looked like charcoal. With an extreme drought in place, the Melville Vineyard, surrounding hills and every parcel of land that wasn’t irrigated by a sprinkler system looked like the lunar surface. This wasn’t the winter time Santa Rita Hills that I’d come to know. The sun blazed down brightly, there was no fog in the morning, the temperatures rose into the mid 70s and everywhere I went the same question was asked. When is it going to rain? Everyone wants water in the Santa Rita Hills. The state has experienced three years of drought – the most extreme being in the stretch from Santa Barbara to Paso Robles. This 125-mile span is where spectacular vineyards produce world-class wines. The drought hasn’t affected quality, though. The wines are still great.

Winemaker spotlight Even the trees lean to the right at Melville.

UNCORKED James Nokes The winds blow west to east off the frigid Pacific Ocean and rush up against their white bark and leafless branches. They cast a shadow across the tasting room and an adjacent block of densely planted pinot noir. Sixteen different pinot noir clones grow on the 120-acre estate where the vines are planted in north and south direction. The wind helps moderate temperature, yet the north and south rows help insulate the vineyard from getting too cold. But, the real story is the lack of water. A normal growing season has 15 inches of rain. The last two years combined to produce 14 inches of rain. This year trace amounts have fallen. The marine based, sandy loam soil at Melville could use a good soaking, for the growing season and just to get their

cover crop started. “The big story is the lack of water,” Melville tasting room assistant Jules Reuter said. “We are all concerned. All of California is in drought; from here to Paso Robles is extreme drought.” Everyone in the area is hoping February, traditionally the rainiest month on the calendar, has several rain events that ease the drought’s impact. Planted in 1997, the vines at Melville run deep and a drip system helps ensure their well-being. “The drought has caused all kinds of problems. This is an agricultural area not just for vines but for row crops,” Reuter said. “What that means is there will be a tremendous amount of pres-

sure put on the area’s water table. All the water required will be sucked out of the ground unless the water table is replenished. There are potentially a lot of big-time economic problems. Everything is tinder dry here. The vines are pretty sturdy though – we can always drip water them to make sure they are OK. We’re farmers. We don’t buy the grapes, we grow them.” Despite the weather conditions, 2013 turned out to be a solid harvest. “In 2013, despite the lack of rain, we got a great crop,” Reuter said. “There was perfect weather and we had large clusters and berries. It was an above-average crop last year. We had very even weather with high-quality fruit.”

What to buy Melville, Estate Chardonnay, Santa Rita Hills, 2012 ($26): Honeydew melon, Meyer lemon and a zesty, crisp freshness and a stone-like minerality make this a star. An absolute bargain at the price.

Melville, Estate Pinot Noir, Santa Rita Hills, 2011 ($34): A soft texture and pleasant mouthful, the star here is the herbal notes as lavender and rosemary stand out. There’s tea leaf and dark fruit notes. This is stand-out Pinot Noir that defines what is great about the Santa Rita Hills.

Wine 101 Melville winemaker Greg Brewer is a minimalist. The vineyard gets a full

representation at Melville as stems are included in the winemaking process. “We are growers, not makers, of wine,” Reuter said. “There is no new oak at all. Our barrels are at least 5 years old. All the flavor comes from the vineyard. We use the vines’ brown stems for the tannin, which is one of our signatures. Because we get good air flow in the vineyard it helps stems get brown and woody. It makes for great, ageable food wines with great acidity.”

• James Nokes writes a bi-weekly wine column for the Daily Chronicle. He’s been tasting, touring and collecting in the wine world for several years. Contact him at news@daily-chronicle.com.

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The Sycamore Chamber of Commerce is seeking vendors for the 2014 Sycamore Farmers Market.

Farmers market seeks vendors, performers The Sycamore Chamber of Commerce is seeking vendors for the 2014 Sycamore Farmers Market. The market is held Sundays, June through September, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the City Center Parking Lot located at the corner of Somonauk and Elm streets. The Sycamore Farmers Market has become a staple in the Sycamore community, attracting many to the downtown area every Sunday. This year’s market will once again provide the community with fresh, quality fare and an opportunity to buy their products locally. The market is also looking for crafters

and artists who wish to sell their goods. Fun activities for the whole family, including guest chefs, kids’ activities, live performances from local acts and more, will be present at the market as well. Anyone interested in becoming a vendor should contact the Sycamore Chamber at 815-895-3456 or visit the chamber office at 407 W. State St. to receive an application. All applications must be received by May 1. Anyone interesting in performing live entertainment for a one-hour set during the Farmers Market can contact Katelyn Fogle at kfogle@ sycamorechamber.com.

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LIFESTYLE

Page B4 • Saturday, January 25, 2014

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

Quilt drawing raises money for charity Roberta Schell of Kingston was the winner of the 2013 Classics Comfort Quilt, which was hand-pieced and quilted by Classics Club members, in a drawing held during the Annual Classics Club Holiday Party at Resource Bank in DeKalb. Open Door Rehabilitation Center of Sandwich received $1,225 in proceeds from the ticket sales. “The hard-working Classics Club quilters are to thank for the quilt donation,” Resource Bank Classics Adviser Sandi Frost said in a news release. “Every year they give their precious time

and effort to make a fantastic quilt, and every year I am amazed at how wonderful the quilt turns out.” Work will begin on the 2014 quilt very soon. Resource Bank’s Classics Club coordinates the annual project, which begins in February with a group lesson in square building. Each year a local charity is selected to receive the quilt. The Resource Bank Classics Club is an opportunity for people 55 and older to meet people and participate in parties, trips, and outings. For more information, call 815-756-6321.

Provided photos Roberta Schell of Kingston was the winner of the 2013 Classics Classics Club quilters Sally Davis, Chris Willert, Marvel Larson, Dorothy Smith, Louise Olson, Sadie Lunn and Sue Mullins are pictured with the quilt they made and auctioned off for charity. Comfort Quilt.

Lauren unveils Olympic uniforms – made in USA THE ASSOCIATED PRESS NEW YORK – Designer Ralph Lauren’s new Olympic opening ceremony uniform has lots of stars and stripes. It has lots of red, white and blue. And most importantly, it has a Made in America label. The new look features a knit patchwork cardigan emblazoned with big stars, an American flag, and the Olympic rings. Underneath, there’s a cream cotton turtleneck, white athletic pants, and black leather boots. There’s also a wool “reindeer hat”– with braided tassels – also in red, white and blue, of course. The most important feature, though, is its provenance – the United States. During the 2012 London games, Lauren’s uniforms were a point of controversy when it was revealed that much of them were made overseas, especially in China. Ralph Lauren Corp. got the message. “A dynamic mix of patriotic references in a classic color palette of red, white and navy defines the Ralph Lauren 2014 Team USA Opening ceremony uniform, which is proudly Made in America,” the company said in a statement Thursday.

Provided photos

Dorothy Lockard of Lockard Travel in Creston hosts bus trips in the United States and gives some of the proceeds from the trips to local nonprofits. Trips scheduled for 2014 are: Savannah, Jekyll Island and Beaufort in April; Niagara Falls and Toronto in June; New York City in August; and Nashville in September. For more information, call Lockard at 815-384-5325. ABOVE: Lockard presents a check to Lyle Headon to purchase a flag for Woodlawn Cemeteries Avenue of Flags, in memory of Robert R. Donaldson, the cemetery’s oldest veteran, from the War of 1812. BELOW LEFT: Since several seniors from the Hub City Seniors have traveled with Lockard, she presented a gift to Connie Daugherty for the senior center’s purchase of a new van. BELOW RIGHT: Lockard presents Creston Fire Chief Curt Ward with a gift to the Creston/Rochelle Fire Department.

AP photos

American hockey players Julie Chu and Zach Parise are wearing the official uniform for Team USA to be worn at the opening ceremony for the 2014 Winter Olympic games in Sochi, Russia.

Wedding insurance expands as price of nuptials increases By MICHAEL MELIA The Associated Press HARTFORD, Conn. – Worried about the groom getting cold feet? There’s an insurance policy for that. With the cost of the average American wedding reaching about $26,000, insurers have been selling a growing number of policies to protect against losses from extreme weather, illness and, in one firm’s case, even a sudden change of heart. Cheryl Winter spent $500 for Hartford-based Travelers Cos. Inc. to cover her daughter’s $50,000 destination wedding last October in New Orleans, where her biggest concern was a potential hurricane. The weather cooperated, but the limousine never showed up. Her daughter took a taxi cab to the church, and they used the insurance policy to claim the deposit money they couldn’t get back from the limo driver. “No one wants to be walking in the French Quarter in a long gown and high heels,” said Winter, who lives in the Houston area. The insurance is offered by a small number of U.S. companies. Insurers declined to provide data on the number of customers beyond saying they are growing steadily. It can cover losses from issues ranging from bankrupt wedding halls to cancelations forced by unexpected military deployments. Travelers says issues with vendors account for about a quarter of the claims, with most of those related to issues with photographers or videographers. For Travelers, an insurance giant with annual revenue of $26 billion, the policies will not make or break the bottom line. But the wedding insurance it began selling in 2007 also is a way to connect

with a couple who might later think of the company for home insurance and other life milestones. “It could be the beginning of a relationship with a young couple,” said Ed Charlebois, a Travelers vice president for personal insurance. Wedsafe, backed by Aon, also offers wedding insurance, which differs little from the specialty insurance that firms may offer for other kinds of events and celebrations. For parents concerned about a relationship souring before the exchange of vows, Fireman’s Fund Insurance Co. offers change of heart insurance. It’s been available since 2007, but the program administrator said the fraud rate soared in the early years as policies were bought for couples who were known to be fighting. That coverage now applies only if the bride or groom calls off the wed-

ding more than nine months beforehand. “Coverage does not exist once you hit the altar,” said administrator Rob Nuccio of R.V. Nuccio & Associates. “The only ones who were buying it were the ones who knew they would have a claim.” Kyle Brown, director of the Bakersfield, Calif.-based Bridal Association of America, said he recommends wedding insurance, but he estimates policies are taken out for less than half of 1 percent of the more than 2 million weddings held annually in the U.S. “Nobody likes to think about the bad side,” he said. Winter said some people told her insurance would be a waste of money for her daughter’s wedding, but she read various reviews and decided it was worth protecting the investment. She’s planning to buy a policy for another daughter’s wedding in 2015.

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Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

8ASTROGRAPH By BERNICE BEDE OSOL Newspaper Enterprise Association

TODAY – You can take risks without fear of failure in order to meet your goals. You will be sensitive, intuitive and focused in the year ahead. You are now ready to market your skills and ideas. Others will easily recognize the worth of your endeavors. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) – Don’t rock the boat today. You will have difficulty seeing eye-to-eye with others, so take some time to think about your future. Evaluate your motives honestly. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) – Travel with the goal of acquiring knowledge or information that will be of use to you. A romantic experience will uplift you at just the right moment. ARIES (March 21-April 19) – Financial opportunities will arise today. Develop your ideas and put your plans into action. Secret activities will have a very positive outcome. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) – Don’t be fooled into thinking that your personal life is stable or not subject to swift change. Prepare to be interrogated about your whereabouts. Your input at a logistical meeting will be much appreciated. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) – Now is the time to implement dietary changes and a new exercise routine. It would also be a good idea to take measures to alleviate the stress in your life. Don’t let anyone try to take advantage of you. CANCER (June 21-July 22) – It’s a good day to tie up loose ends on lingering projects. If you get involved in something that gives you purpose, you will gain respect for your convictions. You will likely attract an admirer. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) – You must keep a tight lid on your emotions today. Since you do not have all the facts, don’t act hastily. A positive attitude will yield the best results. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) – Interactions may lead to romantic encounters. If you are already in a relationship, work to deepen the connection. Do a thorough reconnaissance about something or someone of interest to you. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) – Re-evaluate how you want to proceed with the rest of your life. Consider your current position and focus on personal goals. Don’t talk yourself out of following your dreams. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) – You can have a good day as long as you avoid jumping to conclusions. Romance is possible if you aren’t too possessive. If you stay positive and pleasant, you’ll have fun and get results. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) – You may be confused if you are out of the loop about what is going on in your circle. Don’t let such a setback get to you. An older individual can help to improve your position. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) – Get involved in your community or volunteer for something that matters to you. New friendships can be made if you are outspoken at an event.

8SUDOKU

Saturday, January 25, 2014 • Page B5

Announcing pregnancy by text is disappointment Dear Abby: My daughter, who recently turned 21, sent me a two-word text message, “I’m pregnant.” She has been dating a marijuana-smoking young man for less than a year, and I’m disappointed by this outcome. Her sister, who is a year older, already has two children by two men. No, they weren’t raised by a harlot. I adopted them when they were early elementary-aged children. It’s not my fault. I’m disgusted by their choices. I haven’t talked with her yet. I won’t try to lecture her or tell her how she should live her life. The time for that is over. I feel it would be best to say nothing if I can’t be positive. Suggestions? – Disgusted in The South Dear Disgusted: It would be better if you said nothing to your daughter while you are angry, or you may say something you will regret. It would not be out of line, however, to text her back and ask, “How do you and ‘John’ plan to support the baby?” If you don’t plan to help her in any way, you should let her know NOW that she’ll be on her own. Dear Abby: Our 13-year-old is addicted to her phone. She stays on it for hours, and it’s affecting the time she goes to bed. She’s now starting to

DEAR ABBY Jeanne Phillips oversleep the alarm in the morning before school. She’s spoiled, and I’m afraid that removing or limiting phone privileges will lead to major problems with her protesting it. I don’t want truant officers or social workers coming to my house because my wife and I can’t discipline our kid. How do you handle a spoiled brat without involving outside agencies? She’s nice to people in school, but is lazy at home and totally self-centered. – Frustrated, Exhausted Dad Dear Dad: You and your wife created this “monster,” and now it’s your job to make things right. Of course your daughter won’t like it when you set rules, but you must establish some for her before your lack of parenting causes even more serious problems. Set the rules and stick with them. If she won’t follow them, there should be penalties for not doing so. Try this: Start with homework. When it’s done, she can have her phone for a period of time. Inform her that if she oversleeps because she was up too late on her phone, you will

take it at bedtime. And then follow through. Dear Abby: When parents who live many miles away from their adult children visit their homes, to what extent should they be treated as “guests”? When we visit our son, our daughter-in-law gets herself a snack and then sits down to eat it and watch TV, and there we sit. She never offers us a thing. Are we expecting too much or doesn’t she have any manners? Also, when we have a meal in their home, they get their own beverages and never mention anything about what is available to us. We’re not used to this kind of treatment. Have you any thoughts on how to handle this without causing any rift? – Disrespected in Michigan Dear Disrespected: Assume that your daughter-in-law behaves this way because she doesn’t know any better. As for your son, because he wasn’t raised this way, he is either thoughtless, rude or following his wife’s lead. Because you’re all family, things should be informal. The way to handle it is to speak up and tell your hosts that you’re hungry and/or thirsty, too. If it’s said with a smile, it shouldn’t cause a rift. Dear Abby: “Bill” and I have gone together for three years.

He’s a wonderful, sweet man who has never raised his voice to me. We have talked about taking our relationship to the next level. I’m hesitant because I suspect he’s a high-functioning alcoholic. Bill doesn’t seem to crave a drink when he’s with me, but he does crave being in bars in the company of men who sit for hours over drinks and then get out on the Interstate. I don’t want to be his mother or his hall monitor, but I have begun to suspect I shadow his denial. I’m afraid I have become his enabler. We are in our early retirement years and the thought that his drinking will get worse has made me afraid. I love Bill. I can’t seem to move forward, yet I resist walking away. We have discussed my feelings many times, and he says he has cut down the amount he drinks and there’s nothing to worry about. Yet, I have this sick feeling in the pit of my stomach. – Sick Feeling in Texas Dear Sick Feeling: Listen to your intuition. I don’t know how often Bill “craves” the company of men who sit for hours in bars becoming increasingly inebriated, but if it is more than “occasionally,” then I agree you may have cause for concern. Because of the language

in your letter, it appears you are already familiar with alcoholism and how it affects relationships. It would be a good idea for you to attend some Al-Anon meetings before your relationship with Bill goes further because he may be in denial about the importance of alcohol in his life. The meetings are easy to find; Al-Anon is listed in your phone directory and can be found at al-anon.org. Dear Abby: More and more I receive emails from people using the closing salutation “Best.” I feel this must be incorrect. Shouldn’t it be “Best Regards” or “Best Wishes”? To say simply “Best” seems somehow lacking. Best what? What is accurate? – Tandi in New Haven Dear Tandi: Closing a communication using “Best” is a shorthand version of saying “Best Wishes” or “Best Regards.” It’s acceptable in lessthan-formal communications, and is sometimes used when someone feels that ending their email without it would seem too cold and abrupt.

• Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby. com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Late-night snackers are prone to gaining weight Dear Dr. K: Is it true that eating late makes you gain weight? Dear Reader: I’d heard the same thing for decades, but I wasn’t sure it was true. I had to do some research to answer your question. Several recent studies have looked into this question. The results were not unanimous, but most studies show that eating late in the day does contribute to weight gain and other health problems. In one study, researchers found that eating a big breakfast and a small dinner is better for weight loss than eating a small breakfast and a large dinner. Ninety-three women

ASK DR. K Anthony L. Komaroff with metabolic syndrome participated in this study. (Metabolic syndrome is a set of risk factors that increases your risk for heart disease, stroke, diabetes and other health problems.) The women were randomly assigned to different diets. Group 1 ate a 700-calorie breakfast, 500-calorie lunch and 200-calorie dinner. In contrast, Group 2 ate a 200-calorie breakfast, 500-calorie lunch and 700-calorie dinner. After 12 weeks, the re-

searchers measured weight loss in both groups. Women in Group 1 lost significantly more weight than women in Group 2. The women in Group 1 also had lower insulin, glucose and lipid levels. This shows that this eating pattern benefits overall health, as well as weight loss. A problem with late-night eating is that most people tend to overeat at that time. We eat out of boredom, or fail to adjust our daytime calories to allow for a nighttime snack. Nighttime snackers are more likely to develop unhealthy eating habits, which can lead to weight gain. Another factor that may come into play is the

body’s circadian rhythm, or sleep-wake cycle. One study suggested that our body processes food differently at different times of day. Another recent study, by researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, found that the body’s circadian rhythm makes us hungrier in the evening. I’d bet the main reason that calories late in the day are burned less efficiently has to do with circadian rhythms. We 21st-century humans (the Homo sapiens species) and the Homo erectus and Homo ergaster species that preceded us go back 1-2 million years. Until the last few hundred years, all but the

most affluent of us didn’t have much light after the sun went down. That must have meant that we ate during daylight and went to sleep soon after sunset. I assume that over those 1-2 million years our bodies adapted to that reality. Our bodies probably are built to burn energy most efficiently at the time of day – for most of our history – we ate. Whatever the mechanism, eating late at night does appear to contribute to weight gain. If you’re trying to lose weight, put an end to those late-night snacks.

• Visit www.AskDoctorK. com to read more.

8TODAY’S WEEKEND PUZZLE ACROSS 1 Squirrel away 6 Low dice roll 11 Advertising ploy 16 Thick rope 21 Squander 22 Damp 23 Governed 24 Host with a book club 25 Organic compound 26 Skirt the issue 27 Gide or Previn 28 Bearings 29 Dog days in Dijon 30 Musical key (2 wds.) 32 Backbone 34 Crackers go-with 36 Beauty parlor special 38 Radius neighbors 40 Ms. Dunne 42 Is shy of 43 “— vincit amor” 45 Oil-well capper Red — 47 Bea Arthur sitcom 49 Pekoe packets (2 wds.) 52 “Dave” actor 53 Living fence 54 Width of a cir. 57 Urbana 11 58 Mexican buddy 59 Markets 60 Large movie ape 61 Duo — Vanilli 62 Blueprints 63 Lots and lots 64 Bat’s navigational system 65 NASA counterpart 66 Remain loyal 68 Beach toys 69 Modernized 70 Warrior princess 72 “Kon-Tiki” craft 73 Heads’ opposite 74 Condo buyer, maybe

75 Ice crystal deposit 77 Brand of spandex 78 High-IQ group 79 Overview 82 Brought on board 83 Leafy vegetable 84 Castle part 88 Misgiving 89 Vagabonds 90 Opinion 92 Travel on powder 93 “— Some Lovin’” 94 Clothes horse 95 Jamie Lee’s mom 96 Like amber 98 Be optimistic 99 Dark line on Mars 100 Small gulls 101 Respectable 102 Tunnel blaster 103 Made bales 104 Just manage (2 wds.) 105 South Seas wear 106 Quick raid 107 Windshield device 108 Raul’s brother 109 “— Accomp’ny Me” 111 Map feature 113 Felt under par 115 Important decades 119 St. Francis’ home 121 “The Zoo Story” penner 123 Aquamarine’s mineral 125 Baseball great Mel 126 Try to catch 127 Downward trend 129 Less noble 131 It makes scents 133 Prods along 134 Company avoider 135 Betel nut source 136 Cash, casually 137 Facetious tribute 138 Player’s rep 139 WXY phone buttons 140 Before due

DOWN 1 Wield a broom 2 Likes and dislikes 3 Purplish flower 4 Sault — Marie 5 Mint or cumin 6 Arbor 7 Fine cigar 8 Vaquero’s rope 9 Result 10 Watches carefully 11 Treeless region 12 Sled piece 13 Bygone 14 Debussy subject 15 Ben Jonson works 16 Good friend 17 — — of the action 18 Coffee — 19 Secures a contract

20 Codgers’ queries 31 Mushrooms 33 Chopin’s instrument 35 Electrical connectors 37 It merged with Exxon 39 Brackish 41 Fixes a manuscript 44 Enthusiasm, plus 46 Archaeological sites 48 Supplements 49 Cheap horologe 50 Beethoven’s “Fur —” 51 Poe’s middle name 52 Retail giant 53 Emulates Galen 54 Generous one

55 Beyond banal 56 Jibe with 58 Hang — — (turn) 59 Monsieur’s shout 60 Ferocious bear 62 Moon position 63 Clan leader 64 Hardens, as cement 67 Monotonous hum 68 Acts worried 69 Ms. Zellweger 71 Ignited 73 Alpine region 74 Fixed the pilot 76 Gentle slope 77 Defame 78 All uncles 79 Must 80 Civil War side 81 Entice

82 Phony surfer (hyph.) 83 Loggins or Rogers 85 German industrial center 86 Barely scraping by 87 Ale portions 89 Sweethearts 90 Ms. Streisand 91 Jacques, in song 94 Empire builder 95 Leap in a tutu 97 Mademoiselle’s school 99 Sandburg et al. 100 Sioux dwelling 101 Pop 103 Most sacred 104 “H.M.S. Pinafore” lyricist 105 Mountain ranges

106 Nitpicks 107 Thoreau’s pond 108 Wool coat 109 Google rival 110 Port near Kyoto 112 Queeg’s ship 114 Norwegian playwright 116 Generator part 117 — — costs 118 Digress 120 “La — Bonita” (Madonna song) 122 Meir contemporary 124 Glittery fabric 126 Paramedic’s skill 128 Cut timber 130 Jackie’s tycoon 132 Burns’ “— — Mouse”


Page B6 • Saturday, January 25, 2014

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com


COMICS

Daily / Daily-Chronicle.com Page Chronicle XX • Day, Date, 2012

Pickles

Brian Crane Pearls Before Swine

For Better or For Worse

Non Sequitur

Saturday, January 25, /2014 • Page B7 Northwest herald nwherald.com

Stephan Pastis

Lynn Johnston Crankshaft

Tom Batiuk & Chuck Hayes

Wiley The Duplex

Glenn McCoy

Beetle Bailey

Mort Walker Blondie

Dean Young & Denis LeBrun

Frank & Ernest

Bob Thaves Dilbert

Scott Adams

Monty

Jim Meddick Zits Hi and Lois

Rose is Rose

Pat Brady & Don Wimmer Arlo & Janis

Soup to Nutz

The Family Circus

Rick Stromoski Big Nate

Bill Keane

The Argyle Sweater

Scott Hilburn

Stone Soup

Grizzwells

Brianand & Greg Jim Borgman JerryWalker Scott

Jimmy Johnson

Lincoln Peirce

Jan Eliot

Bill Schorr


Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

Page B8 • Saturday, January 25, 2014

DEKALB Sycamore Rd. at Barber Greene Rd. (Northland Shopping Center) • 815-756-2592


SPORTS

Page C2 • Saturday, January 25, 2014

8PREP SCHEDULE TODAY

Boys Basketball DeKalb at Rochelle, 4:30 p.m. Girls Basketball Kaneland at Rochelle, 2:30 p.m. Burlington Central at GenoaKingston, 7:15 p.m. Wrestling Sycamore, Kaneland, DeKalb at Northern Illinois Big 12 championships at Sterling, 9 a.m. Boys Bowling DeKalb, Sycamore at Rockford Boylan Catholic Sectional, 9 a.m. Girls Bowling DeKalb at Rockford Guilford tournament, 9 a.m. Sycamore at Minooka tournament, 9 a.m.

MONDAY Girls Basketball Hiawatha at Rockford Christian Life, 6:45 p.m. Indian Creek at Pecatonica, 6:45 p.m. Ashton-Franklin Center at Hinckley-Big Rock, 7 p.m. Girls Bowling Sycamore, DeKalb, Kaneland at NI Big 12 tournament at Bowl Mor Lanes, 10 a.m.

8SPORTS SHORTS H-BR to host alumni basketball tournament Hinckley-Big Rock will host its annual alumni boys basketball tournament today at HinckleyBig Rock High School. The tournament will run from 8 a.m. through the championship, which begins at 5 p.m. The event will feature seven teams and 62 players, including nine players from the Royals’ 2013 squad. The graduation years represented are 1967 all the way through 2013. Admission is $3 for adults and $1 for students; seniors are free.

Four Huskies named Academic All-MAC Four Northern Illinois football players were named to the 2013 Academic All-Mid-American Conference team Friday – safety Dominique Ware, receiver Jacob Brinlee and fullbacks Rob Sterling and Ricky Connors. Sterling made the squad, which consists of 41 players, for the second straight season. All four players earned a GPA of 3.59 or higher, led by Brinlee’s 3.8. Offensive tackle Matt Krempel, guard Jared Volk, tight end Luke Eakes and defensive end Jason Meehan earned honorable mention spots.

NIU women’s tennis opens season with victory The Northern Illinois women’s tennis team opened its season with a 5-2 win over Lewis on Friday. Arantza De La Torre, Mary Malkin, Cristina Alvarez and Stephanie McDonald got singles wins for the Huskies. Nelle Youel and De La Torre won the No. 1 doubles match for NIU while McDonald and Haley Dekkinga earned a win at No. 2 doubles. “This was a good start for us,” NIU coach Ryun Ferrell said in a news release. “We didn’t get wins in matches that we’re used to getting them in, so it was good to see others step up and put the team ahead.”

Cubs, Wood avoid arbitration CHICAGO – The Cubs have agreed to a one-year contract with All-Star pitcher Travis Wood, avoiding arbitration. A person familiar with the situation said Friday that the deal is for $3.9 million. The person spoke on the condition of anonymity because the terms were not announced by the team. Wood was the Cubs’ most consistent starter last year and made the All-Star team, going 9-12 with a 3.11 ERA. Wood had filed at $4.25 million with the team countering at $3.5 million. The Cubs’ remaining arbitration-eligible players are pitcher Jeff Samardzija, second baseman Darwin Barney and outfielder Justin Ruggiano. – From staff, wire reports

Daily Chronicle / daily-chronicle.com

CLIPPERS 112, BULLS 95

NFL PLAYOFFS

Griffin, Clippers top Bulls

PRO BOWL Sunday At Honolulu Team Rice vs. Team Sanders, 6:30 p.m.

SUPER BOWL Sunday, Feb. 2 At East Rutherford, N.J. Denver vs. Seattle, 5:30 p.m.

NBA EASTERN CONFERENCE

By SARAH TROTTO The Associated Press CHICAGO – Blake Griffin had 26 points and 13 rebounds to lead the Los Angeles Clippers to a 112-95 victory over the Bulls on Friday night. Jamal Crawford added 19 points for the Clippers, who had six players score in double figures and shot 54 percent from the field – including 13 for Next 21 on 3-pointers. DeAndre Jordan vs. Charlotte, added 10 points 6 p.m. today, and 12 rebounds. CSN, Carlos Boozer AM-1000 scored 22 points for the Bulls, who snapped a three-game winning streak. The Clippers, playing without injured All-Star Chris Paul, have won four straight against the Bulls, and improved to 3-2 on their sevengame trip. The Bulls cut the lead to eight in the third quarter but Darren Collison answered with two quick baskets and the Clippers led 92-80 heading to the fourth. Los Angeles shot 10 for 14 on 3s and finished 64.1 percent overall from the field in the first half to take a 68-55 lead at the break. Jordan’s dunk gave the Clippers a 60-39 lead, their largest margin, with 3:52 left before halftime. The Clippers were 7 for 8 from beyond the arc in the first quarter to set a franchise record for 3s in a quarter. The Clippers led 41-26 after shooting 73.7 percent in the period. In the teams’ previous meeting, the Clippers routed the Bulls 121-82 on Nov. 24 for their worst loss of the season in the first game after Derrick Rose suffered a season-ending knee injury. The Clippers were averaging 105.4 points, fifth in the league. The Bulls were one of the NBA’s top defensive teams, holding opponents to 92.5 points a game before Friday.

AP file photo

Blackhawks left wing Patrick Sharp celebrates his goal against the Colorado Avalanche on Dec. 27 at the United Center.

BLACKHAWKS IN SOCHI

Security on Hawks’ minds But most not overly concerned about safety in Sochi By MARK LAZERUS mlazerus@suntimes.com Niklas Hjalmarsson knows there are security concerns in Sochi for the Olympics. He knows there have been deadly bombings in Volgograd, some 600 miles northeast of Sochi, and that the militant group taking credit has threatened a “surprise” for Sochi. He knows Sochi is near the volatile North Caucasus region. But when Hjalmarsson, his dad and his brother – all of whom are going to Russia next month – talk about the Olympics, they don’t focus on the concerns surrounding the Games, but rather the excitement. “I haven’t really been reading into that as much as some other guys, maybe,” Hjalmarsson said. “But obviously, you’re aware of it. I’m trusting the security they’re going to have there, and I think there’s no doubts for me, personally, going there. If people stop going because of threats like that, I think the terrorists are going to win.” But for many fans and athletes, fear has overtaken anticipation as the Games draw near. The United States even plans to have two warships in the Black Sea – the body of water on which the resort town of Sochi sits – at the ready to evacuate American officials and athletes in the event of a terrorist attack. And the NHL

Next vs. Winnipeg, 6 p.m. Sunday, CSN, AM-720 will have extra security for its players in Russia. Phoenix Coyotes goaltender Mike Smith told reporters this week “it’s not worth it” to take his family with him to Sochi, and players around the league have echoed the sentiment. However, most players are remaining cautiously optimistic, including the 10 Blackhawks making the trip. “Obviously, we know what happened, right?” Marian Hossa, who’ll play for Slovakia, said of the bombings. “But maybe the awareness will be even higher because of that, and the security’s going to be even tighter, from what I heard. I’m sure they’re going to make sure everything’s going to be secured really well.” Hossa’s family is not going to Sochi, but he said that’s because it’s too difficult logistically with his two young daughters, one of them a 2-month-old. That’s the same reason Patrick Sharp is going solo. Patrick Kane, meanwhile, is bringing his mother, one of his sisters and his girlfriend. “They understand what’s going on,” Kane said. “It’s their choice to go over there, and they wanted to. I’ll take the support, for sure.”

Kane and Hossa said their coaches had sent out emails explaining what to expect in Sochi, and that lengthy security measures for fans – friends and family included – were mentioned. Russian President Vladimir Putin said Jan. 17 that officials “will try to make sure that the security measures aren’t too intrusive or visible, and that they won’t put pressure on the athletes, guests and journalists.” With bombings in the region, blatant threats on the Games, and a massive hunt on for so-called “Black Widows” who may be looking to avenge the deaths of their husbands or other family members, the players – just like the 200,000plus other expected visitors to Sochi – can only hope those security measures are effective. As Team Canada coach Mike Babcock said, he’s going to worry about hockey, and let those in charge of security worry about security. “You hear it,” Kane said of the threats. “You’re obviously going to hear different things and read different articles. To be honest with you, if I’m worried about that, my head’s in the wrong area. I have to worry about going over and trying to play the game, and doing as well as I can for my country. You hear different stuff, and obviously you’re going to be scared at first and think a little bit about it. And you hope everything gets figured out.”

GM says he has no doubt Ventura is the right man

Central Division W L Pct GB Indiana 33 8 .805 — Bulls 21 21 .500 12½ Detroit 17 26 .395 17 Cleveland 16 27 .372 18 Milwaukee 8 34 .190 25½ Atlantic Division W L Pct GB Toronto 22 20 .524 — Brooklyn 19 22 .463 2½ New York 16 27 .372 6½ Boston 15 30 .333 8½ Philadelphia 14 29 .326 8½ Southeast Division W L Pct GB Miami 31 12 .721 — Atlanta 22 20 .524 8½ Washington 20 21 .488 10 Charlotte 19 26 .422 13 Orlando 12 32 .273 19½

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct San Antonio 33 10 .767 Houston 29 16 .644 Dallas 25 20 .556 Memphis 21 20 .512 New Orleans 17 25 .405 Northwest Division W L Pct Oklahoma City 34 10 .773 Portland 32 11 .744 Denver 20 21 .488 Minnesota 20 21 .488 Utah 14 29 .326 Pacific Division W L Pct L.A. Clippers 30 15 .667 Golden State 26 17 .605 Phoenix 24 17 .585 Sacramento 15 26 .366 L.A. Lakers 16 28 .364

GB — 5 9 11 15½ GB — 1½ 12½ 12½ 19½ GB — 3 4 13 13½

Friday’s Results L.A. Clippers 112, Bulls 95 Orlando 114, L.A. Lakers 105 Toronto 104, Philadelphia 95 Brooklyn 107, Dallas 106 Oklahoma City 101, Boston 83 Cleveland 93, Milwaukee 78 New Orleans 103, Detroit 101 San Antonio 105, Atlanta 79 New York 125, Charlotte 96 Memphis 88, Houston 87 Washington at Phoenix (n) Indiana at Sacramento (n) Minnesota at Golden State (n) Today’s Games Bulls at Charlotte, 6 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Toronto, 6 p.m. Oklahoma City at Philadelphia, 6:30 p.m. Houston at Memphis, 7 p.m. Atlanta at Milwaukee, 7:30 p.m. Indiana at Denver, 8 p.m. Washington at Utah, 8 p.m. Minnesota at Portland, 9 p.m. Sunday’s Games San Antonio at Miami, noon L.A. Lakers at New York, 2:30 p.m. Orlando at New Orleans, 5 p.m. Phoenix at Cleveland, 5 p.m. Brooklyn at Boston, 5:30 p.m. Detroit at Dallas, 6:30 p.m. Portland at Golden State, 8 p.m. Denver at Sacramento, 8 p.m.

NHL WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts Blackhawks 53 32 9 12 76 St. Louis 50 34 11 5 73 Colorado 50 32 13 5 69 Minnesota 53 28 20 5 61 Dallas 51 23 20 8 54 Nashville 52 23 22 7 53 Winnipeg 52 23 24 5 51 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts Anaheim 53 38 10 5 81 San Jose 51 33 12 6 72 Los Angeles 52 29 17 6 64 Vancouver 52 26 17 9 61 Phoenix 50 23 18 9 55 Calgary 51 17 27 7 41 Edmonton 52 15 31 6 36

GF 189 173 147 127 148 127 144

GA 146 116 129 130 153 153 153

GF 179 162 132 130 143 114 132

GA 130 123 110 130 152 161 183

EASTERN CONFERENCE

people in charge are the right people to get them to their end Continued from page C1 goals,” Hahn said. But through the extremes The club’s poor performanc- of 2012 and ’13, Ventura’s leades made some question Ventu- ership “was unwavering. His ra’s ability, but not Hahn’s. communication, ability to “You lose 99 games there’s teach at big-league level, engoing to be questions like that, thusiasm, baseball intellect – where this organization is all the things we looked for in headed and why they think the a manager – were the same at

• WHITE SOX

our highest highs and lowest lows,’’ Hahn said. “That level of stability is what we want in the dugout.’’ Ventura said going through last season was the toughest thing he’s dealt with “player wise” and that it only solidified his passion and love for the job. Hahn said he has no doubt Ventura is the right man

for the job. Continuity is key through the current transition process. Ventura agrees. “It is a group of people that will be there for an extended period of time,” Ventura said. “Is someone going to pick us to win our division? Probably not, just because of the age and the guys that we have. Does that mean we can’t? No.

8WEEKEND TV SPORTSWATCH TODAY’S SCHEDULE Pro basketball Bulls at Charlotte, 6 p.m., CSN Pro hockey Anaheim vs. Los Angles, at Dodger Stadium, 8:30 p.m., NBCSN College football Senior Bowl, 3 p.m., NFLN Men’s basketball Ohio at Eastern Michigan, 10 a.m., ESPNU Iowa at Northwestern, 11 a.m., BTN Florida St. at Duke, 11 a.m., ESPN Virginia Commonwealth at La Salle, 11 a.m., ESPN2 Xavier at Providence, 11 a.m., FS1 George Washington at George Mason, 11 a.m., NBCSN Syracuse at Miami, noon, CBS Vanderbilt at Texas A&M, noon, ESPNU West Virginia at Oklahoma St., 1 p.m., ESPN2 Villanova at Marquette, 1 p.m., FS1 Tennessee at Florida, 3 p.m., ESPN Northern Iowa at Loyola, 3 p.m., CSN Western Kentucky at LouisianaLafayette, 3 p.m., ESPN2 Saint Joseph’s at Richmond, 3 p.m., NBCSN Wisconsin at Purdue, 4 p.m., BTN Pittsburgh at Maryland, 5 p.m., ESPN2 Michigan at Michigan St., 6 p.m., ESPN Connecticut at Rutgers, 6 p.m., ESPNU Southern Illinois at Missouri St., 7 p.m., CSN+

LSU at Alabama, 7 p.m., ESPN2 Georgetown at Creighton, 7 p.m., FS1 Kansas at TCU, 8 p.m., ESPNU BYU at Gonzaga, 9 p.m., ESPN2 San Diego St. at Utah St., 10 p.m., ESPNU Women’s basketball Indiana at Iowa, 6 p.m., BTN Golf PGA Tour, Farmers Insurance Open, third round, noon, TGC; 2 p.m., CBS Extreme sports X Games, 1 p.m., ESPN; 3 p.m., ABC; 8 p.m., ESPN Women’s basketball Florida International at AlabamaBirmingham, 11 a.m. Auto racing United Sportscar Championship, Rolex 24, start of race, 1 p.m., FOX Motorsports AMA Supercross, 9:30 p.m., FS1 College hockey Men’s, Northeastern at Notre Dame, 6 p.m., NBCSN College wrestling Minnesota at Iowa, 1 p.m., BTN Soccer FA Cup, fourth round, Liverpool at Bournemouth, 6:30 a.m., FS1 FA Cup, fourth round, Kidderminster at Sunderland, 9 a.m., FS1 Rugby USA Sevens, pool play, 1 p.m., NBCSN; 3 p.m., NBC MMA UFC, featherweights, Darren Elkins (18-3-0) vs. Jeremy Stephens (22-9-0);

lightweights, Donald Cerrone (21-6-0) vs. Adriano Martins (25-6-0); heavyweights, Stipe Miocic (10-1-0) vs. Gabriel Gonzaga (16-7-0); lightweights, Benson Henderson (19-3-0) vs. Josh Thomson (20-5-0), 7 p.m., FOX Boxing Junior middleweights, Jermell Charlo (22-0-0) vs. Gabriel Rosado (21-7-0); champion Lamont Peterson (31-2-1) vs. Dierry Jean (25-0-0), for IBF junior welterweight title, 8 p.m., SHOW Heavyweights, Bryant Jennings (17-0-0) vs. Artur Szpilka (16-0-0); champion Mikey Garcia (33-0-0) vs. Juan Carlos Burgos (30-1-2), for WBO junior lightweight title, 8:45 p.m., HBO

Bradley at Evansville, 1 p.m., CSN Illinois at Indiana, 2 p.m., BTN Harvard at Dartmouth, 3 p.m., NBCSN Minnesota at Nebraska, 5 p.m., BTN Clemson at North Carolina, 5 p.m., ESPNU California at UCLA, 7 p.m., ESPNU Utah at Arizona, 7 p.m., FS1 Women’s basketball Michigan St. at Ohio St., 11:30 a.m., BTN Minnesota at Penn St., noon, CBS South Carolina at Vanderbilt, 1 p.m., ESPN2 Northern Illinois at Bowling Green, 3 p.m., CSN (same-day tape) Tennessee at Texas A&M, 3 p.m., ESPN2 Georgetown at St. John’s, 5 p.m., FS1 SUNDAY’S SCHEDULE Dayton at Saint Joseph’s, 5 p.m., Pro hockey NBCSN N.Y. Rangers at New Jersey, Golf 11:30 a.m., NBC PGA Tour, Farmers Insurance Winnipeg at Blackhawks, 6 p.m., Open, final round, noon, TGC; 2 p.m., CSN CBS Tennis Extreme sports Australian Open, men’s championX Games, 1 and 8 p.m., ESPN ship, 2 a.m., ESPN Rugby Pro basketball USA Sevens, semifinals, teams San Antonio at Miami, noon, ABC L.A. Lakers at New York, 2:30 p.m., TBD, 1 p.m., NBCSN; finals, teams TBD, 3:30 p.m., NBC ABC Bowling Brooklyn at Boston, 5:30 p.m., ESPN PBA, Tournament of Champions, Pro football 11 a.m., ESPN NFL Pro Bowl, 6:30 p.m., NBC Auto racing Men’s basketball Fordham at Massachusetts, 11 a.m., United Sportscar Championship, Rolex 24, 6 a.m., FS1 NBCSN

Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 49 31 15 3 65 141 109 Tampa Bay 51 30 16 5 65 150 126 Montreal 51 27 19 5 59 128 129 Toronto 53 27 21 5 59 151 163 Detroit 51 23 18 10 56 131 139 Ottawa 51 22 19 10 54 144 159 Florida 51 20 24 7 47 122 154 Buffalo 49 13 29 7 33 92 142 Metropolitan Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 51 36 13 2 74 168 125 N.Y. Rangers 53 27 23 3 57 132 135 Columbus 50 26 20 4 56 148 140 Philadelphia 52 25 21 6 56 141 152 New Jersey 52 22 19 11 55 124 125 Carolina 50 22 19 9 53 125 142 Washington 51 22 21 8 52 143 154 N.Y. Islanders 53 21 25 7 49 151 175 Two points for win, one point for OT loss Friday’s Results New Jersey 2, Washington 1 Detroit 4, Montreal 1 Colorado 3, Florida 2 Ottawa at Carolina, ppd., schedule conflict Nashville at Calgary (n) Phoenix at Edmonton (n) Today’s Games Ottawa at Carolina, 11 a.m. St. Louis at N.Y. Islanders, noon Boston at Philadelphia, noon Washington at Montreal, 6 p.m. Colorado at Tampa Bay, 6 p.m. Buffalo at Columbus, 6 p.m. Toronto at Winnipeg, 6 p.m. Pittsburgh at Dallas, 7 p.m. Anaheim vs. Los Angeles, 8:30 p.m. Minnesota at San Jose, 9:30 p.m. Sunday’s Games Winnipeg at Blackhawks, 6 p.m. N.Y. Rangers vs. New Jersey, 11:30 a.m. Florida at Detroit, 4 p.m. Nashville at Edmonton, 7 p.m. Phoenix at Vancouver, 7 p.m.

MEN’S BASKETBALL AP TOP 25 Today’s Games No. 2 Syracuse at Miami, noon No. 3 Michigan St. vs. No. 21 Michigan, 6 p.m. No. 4 Villanova at Marquette, 1 p.m. No. 5 Wichita St. at Drake, 7:05 p.m. No. 6 Florida vs. Tennessee, 3 p.m. No. 7 San Diego St. at Utah St., 10:05 p.m. No. 8 Kansas at TCU, 8 p.m. No. 9 Wisconsin at Purdue, 4 p.m. No. 10 Iowa at Northwestern, 11 a.m. No. 11 Oklahoma St. vs. West Virginia, 1 p.m. No. 14 Kentucky vs. Georgia, 12:30 p.m. No. 16 Iowa St. vs. No. 22 Kansas St., 12:45 p.m. No. 18 Duke vs. Florida St., 11 a.m. No. 20 Pittsburgh at Maryland, 5 p.m. No. 24 Baylor vs. Texas, 12:30 p.m. No. 25 Oklahoma at Texas Tech, 3 p.m. Sunday’s Games No. 1 Arizona vs. Utah, 7 p.m. No. 13 UMass vs. Fordham, 11 a.m. No. 15 Cincinnati at Temple, 3 p.m. No. 23 Memphis vs. South Florida, 1 p.m.


Sports

Mike James and the Bulls lose to the Clippers, 112-95, snapping a three-game winning streak. PAGE C2

SECTION C Saturday, January 25, 2014 Daily Chronicle

Sports editor Ross Jacobson • rjacobson@shawmedia.com

8WHAT TO WATCH

KANELAND FOOTBALL

TE Slamans opts for WIU By KEVIN DRULEY kdruley@shawmedia.com AP photo

Pro hockey Anaheim vs. Los Angeles, 8:30 p.m., NBCSN LOS ANGELES – The Los Angeles Kings and the Anaheim Ducks are skating on solid ice at Dodger Stadium. Southern California’s NHL teams conducted separate practices under cloudy skies in Chavez Ravine on Friday, testing the ice sheet for their landmark outdoor game. The temperature was significantly lower than on the recent 80-degree days leading up to tonight’s meeting in the first warm-weather outdoor game in NHL history. The Los Angeles weather was practically ideal for this unlikely outdoor event – as long as no rain fell. “This is the crown jewel for hockey in Southern California,” Ducks defenseman Ben Lovejoy said. “We both live in a great part of the world, and this will be a great showcase for how far hockey has come in this area.” The rest of the preparations for the outdoor game also neared completion, including a cordon of palm trees just behind the open center-field fence. There’s a ball hockey court between the mound and the backstop, while a beach volleyball court is in left field and a performance stage in right. The boards, benches and glass were trucked in from the Winter Classic in Ann Arbor, Mich., but the ice has been built up patiently over the past 10 days. The league’s ice-making crew covered the sheet in a heat-reflecting blanket during the day and worked through the night to establish a game-worthy surface. NHL facilities guru Dan Craig’s improbable ice sheet actually has been among the smoothest aspects of this strange chapter in the league’s expansion of its outdoor slate this season. Although Southern California’s growing hockey fan base embraced the novelty of the concept, the league overpriced tickets for the event, forcing reductions to avoid the embarrassment of a non-sellout. But the hiccups likely will be forgotten when fans get a look at the ice in the middle of baseball’s third-oldest active park. “I’ve been asking for an outdoor game here for a long time,” Ducks captain Ryan Getzlaf said. “I’m just glad I don’t have to go out and freeze my butt off at one of these.” Dodger Stadium took on a carnival atmosphere, but the event is more than a mere sideshow. The Kings – the home team in this scenario – realize they’ve got two points at stake after losing 2-1 to the NHL-leading Ducks in Anaheim on Thursday night. – Wire report

8KEEP UP ONLINE Follow us on Facebook and Twitter Want the latest from the area’s prep sports scene? Follow our coverage on Facebook by searching for DC Preps or on Twitter at twitter.com/dc_preps. Follow our NIU athletics coverage on Facebook by searching for Huskie Wire or on Twitter at twitter.com/HuskieWire.

Tyler Slamans has only versed himself briefly in Western Illinois’ offense. He just took an official visit to the school this month, and committed Thursday to play football there. Still, his experience in a multi-faceted attack throughout high school encourages the Kaneland senior tight end he’ll be fine. Although moving the ball doesn’t figure to be as seamless as it could seem back home, Slamans is confident he can put himself in whatever position he needs to. “I feel like it has helped with being in a good program like Kaneland,” said Slamans, who navigated an injury-plagued senior season. “I think it’ll definitely help in the future with knowing how to get things

More online For all your prep sports coverage – stories, features, scores, photos and more – log on to Daily-Chronicle.com/dcpreps. done and go out and win some football games.” Western Illinois, part of the NCAA Division I FCS, could use the jolt. The Leathernecks finished 4-8 in 2013 and are seeking their first winning season since 2010. If the program is to return to prominence, Slamans could leapfrog some friends along the way. Knights senior defensive tackle Justin Diddell recently committed to fellow Missouri Valley Football Conference school Indiana State, while Aurora Christian senior safety/wide receiver also will be in the confer-

ence at South Dakota. Roberts and Slamans’ fathers grew up together, and their sons formed a quick bond through faith and football. “We’ve been together since we were little babies,” said Slamans, who has grown to 6-foot-3 and 230 pounds. “Noah’s definitely my best friend.” Slamans said he had offers from three Division II programs and an NAIA school. He was expecting an offer from Southern Illinois, another MVFC member, but canceled a visit scheduled for this weekend after committing to WIU. “I really liked it there. The coaches are awesome. They got a new staff last year. They really know what they’re doing, and I can’t wait,” Slamans said. “It’s going to be sweet.” Slamans plans to study exercise science in the first step toward an eventual career as a chiropractor.

Shaw Media file photo

Kaneland tight end Tyler Slamans eyes an oncoming DeKalb defender in an Oct. 4 game in DeKalb. Slamans committed Thursday to play football at Western Illinois University this fall.

WHITE SOX

NIU FOOTBALL

Ventura gets an extension By DARYL VAN SCHOUWEN dvanschouwen@suntimes.com

Monica Maschak – mmaschak@shawmedia.com

Northern Illinois recruit Peter Deppe went through a different recruiting process as a high school punter compared to other football recruits.

SUMMER CAMPER

Recruiting process a different journey for punters, specialists By STEVE NITZ snitz@shawmedia.com DeKALB – It’s tough for Peter Deppe to remember exactly how many kicking camps he went to last summer. He calls that time “camp season,” when he goes around and shows off his skills. Hundreds of specialists from around the nation do the same thing, fighting for the few precious scholarships that are offered to special teamers these days. “I would say about seven to 10 (camps this past summer),” said Deppe, a senior punter and kicker

More online For all your Northern Illinois University sports coverage – including stories, features, scores, photos, videos, blogs and more – log on to HuskieWire.com. at Almont (Mich.) High School, who’s in town for his official visit to Northern Illinois. “It was a lot. It was a busy summer.” Deppe verbally committed to NIU about halfway through the 2013 season, as the Almont, Mich., native was impressed with the program’s

recent winning tradition. Over the summer, he spent his time going to various camps around the Midwest, including the Kohl’s National Invitational Scholarship Camp in Wisconsin. It’s a prestigious event where players have to earn an invitation, and where members of the Kohl’s staff will choose the participants for the Under Armour All-American Game. Kohl’s hosts numerous showcase camps, and according to their kicking camps website, 93.5 percent of FBS programs have at least one specialist on their roster who has attended a Kohl’s camp.

See NIU, page C7

CHICAGO – Much has been made of Robin Ventura’s desire to manage, even though he made it clear in September he wanted in for the long run. Any doubts about that – and general manager Rick Hahn’s desire to have Ventura lead the Sox into the next several years– were cleared away when the Sox announced before the opening ceremonies at SoxFest 2014 that Ventura had agreed to a multiyear extension. Ventura, who signed a threeyear deal as a surprise hire by Ken Williams before the 2012 season, has one year Robin Ventura left on that deal. The Sox did not announce terms of this one, which is believed to be for two years and would take him through 2016. Ventura’s laid-back demeanor has a way of masking his desire to manage. When he turned down an extension during spring training last year, after the Sox finished second in the AL Central, some took that to mean that he wasn’t in it for the long haul. But all he wanted was the Sox to be sure they knew he was their guy. Ninety-nine losses and looking ragged doing it didn’t change Hahn’s mind. “The decision he made was a selfless one that allowed me the latitude to get comfortable,” Hahn said. “I thought that was awfully special. It speaks to what kind of man he is and makes this decision easier.” Paul Konerko, who has played for a variety of managers, including Jerry Manuel, Ozzie Guillen and Ventura, called the extension “a great move for the White Sox” because of Ventura’s manner. “He just doesn’t miss on how to handle guys and treat guys,” Konerko said. “Stern with them, and can get his point across, but for a team of this makeup it’s a good fit. The fact that he’s committed to this is great for him, but I think it’s better for the White Sox.’’ It made sense to extend Ventura and keep him out of lame duck status during a rebuild year that will see growing pains for numerous young players. Only five managers are entering the final year of their contracts – Ron Roenicke, Fredi Gonzalez, Ron Washington, Clint Hurdle and Kirk Gibson – and the extension relieves Ventura of having to answer questions about his future. “We work in sports. The length of our contract really is just indicative of how long we get paid when something goes wrong,’’ Hahn said. “We still have to perform. The length of the contract is nice … but at the end of the day it’s performance that dictates decisions.’’

See WHITE SOX, page C2


SPORTS

Page C2 • Saturday, January 25, 2014

8PREP SCHEDULE TODAY

Boys Basketball DeKalb at Rochelle, 4:30 p.m. Girls Basketball Kaneland at Rochelle, 2:30 p.m. Burlington Central at GenoaKingston, 7:15 p.m. Wrestling Sycamore, Kaneland, DeKalb at Northern Illinois Big 12 championships at Sterling, 9 a.m. Boys Bowling DeKalb, Sycamore at Rockford Boylan Catholic Sectional, 9 a.m. Girls Bowling DeKalb at Rockford Guilford tournament, 9 a.m. Sycamore at Minooka tournament, 9 a.m.

MONDAY Girls Basketball Hiawatha at Rockford Christian Life, 6:45 p.m. Indian Creek at Pecatonica, 6:45 p.m. Ashton-Franklin Center at Hinckley-Big Rock, 7 p.m. Girls Bowling Sycamore, DeKalb, Kaneland at NI Big 12 tournament at Bowl Mor Lanes, 10 a.m.

8SPORTS SHORTS H-BR to host alumni basketball tournament Hinckley-Big Rock will host its annual alumni boys basketball tournament today at HinckleyBig Rock High School. The tournament will run from 8 a.m. through the championship, which begins at 5 p.m. The event will feature seven teams and 62 players, including nine players from the Royals’ 2013 squad. The graduation years represented are 1967 all the way through 2013. Admission is $3 for adults and $1 for students; seniors are free.

Four Huskies named Academic All-MAC Four Northern Illinois football players were named to the 2013 Academic All-Mid-American Conference team Friday – safety Dominique Ware, receiver Jacob Brinlee and fullbacks Rob Sterling and Ricky Connors. Sterling made the squad, which consists of 41 players, for the second straight season. All four players earned a GPA of 3.59 or higher, led by Brinlee’s 3.8. Offensive tackle Matt Krempel, guard Jared Volk, tight end Luke Eakes and defensive end Jason Meehan earned honorable mention spots.

NIU women’s tennis opens season with victory The Northern Illinois women’s tennis team opened its season with a 5-2 win over Lewis on Friday. Arantza De La Torre, Mary Malkin, Cristina Alvarez and Stephanie McDonald got singles wins for the Huskies. Nelle Youel and De La Torre won the No. 1 doubles match for NIU while McDonald and Haley Dekkinga earned a win at No. 2 doubles. “This was a good start for us,” NIU coach Ryun Ferrell said in a news release. “We didn’t get wins in matches that we’re used to getting them in, so it was good to see others step up and put the team ahead.”

Cubs, Wood avoid arbitration CHICAGO – The Cubs have agreed to a one-year contract with All-Star pitcher Travis Wood, avoiding arbitration. A person familiar with the situation said Friday that the deal is for $3.9 million. The person spoke on the condition of anonymity because the terms were not announced by the team. Wood was the Cubs’ most consistent starter last year and made the All-Star team, going 9-12 with a 3.11 ERA. Wood had filed at $4.25 million with the team countering at $3.5 million. The Cubs’ remaining arbitration-eligible players are pitcher Jeff Samardzija, second baseman Darwin Barney and outfielder Justin Ruggiano. – From staff, wire reports

Daily Chronicle / daily-chronicle.com

CLIPPERS 112, BULLS 95

NFL PLAYOFFS

Griffin, Clippers top Bulls

PRO BOWL Sunday At Honolulu Team Rice vs. Team Sanders, 6:30 p.m.

SUPER BOWL Sunday, Feb. 2 At East Rutherford, N.J. Denver vs. Seattle, 5:30 p.m.

NBA EASTERN CONFERENCE

By SARAH TROTTO The Associated Press CHICAGO – Blake Griffin had 26 points and 13 rebounds to lead the Los Angeles Clippers to a 112-95 victory over the Bulls on Friday night. Jamal Crawford added 19 points for the Clippers, who had six players score in double figures and shot 54 percent from the field – including 13 for Next 21 on 3-pointers. DeAndre Jordan vs. Charlotte, added 10 points 6 p.m. today, and 12 rebounds. CSN, Carlos Boozer AM-1000 scored 22 points for the Bulls, who snapped a three-game winning streak. The Clippers, playing without injured All-Star Chris Paul, have won four straight against the Bulls, and improved to 3-2 on their sevengame trip. The Bulls cut the lead to eight in the third quarter but Darren Collison answered with two quick baskets and the Clippers led 92-80 heading to the fourth. Los Angeles shot 10 for 14 on 3s and finished 64.1 percent overall from the field in the first half to take a 68-55 lead at the break. Jordan’s dunk gave the Clippers a 60-39 lead, their largest margin, with 3:52 left before halftime. The Clippers were 7 for 8 from beyond the arc in the first quarter to set a franchise record for 3s in a quarter. The Clippers led 41-26 after shooting 73.7 percent in the period. In the teams’ previous meeting, the Clippers routed the Bulls 121-82 on Nov. 24 for their worst loss of the season in the first game after Derrick Rose suffered a season-ending knee injury. The Clippers were averaging 105.4 points, fifth in the league. The Bulls were one of the NBA’s top defensive teams, holding opponents to 92.5 points a game before Friday.

AP file photo

Blackhawks left wing Patrick Sharp celebrates his goal against the Colorado Avalanche on Dec. 27 at the United Center.

BLACKHAWKS IN SOCHI

Security on Hawks’ minds But most not overly concerned about safety in Sochi By MARK LAZERUS mlazerus@suntimes.com Niklas Hjalmarsson knows there are security concerns in Sochi for the Olympics. He knows there have been deadly bombings in Volgograd, some 600 miles northeast of Sochi, and that the militant group taking credit has threatened a “surprise” for Sochi. He knows Sochi is near the volatile North Caucasus region. But when Hjalmarsson, his dad and his brother – all of whom are going to Russia next month – talk about the Olympics, they don’t focus on the concerns surrounding the Games, but rather the excitement. “I haven’t really been reading into that as much as some other guys, maybe,” Hjalmarsson said. “But obviously, you’re aware of it. I’m trusting the security they’re going to have there, and I think there’s no doubts for me, personally, going there. If people stop going because of threats like that, I think the terrorists are going to win.” But for many fans and athletes, fear has overtaken anticipation as the Games draw near. The United States even plans to have two warships in the Black Sea – the body of water on which the resort town of Sochi sits – at the ready to evacuate American officials and athletes in the event of a terrorist attack. And the NHL

Next vs. Winnipeg, 6 p.m. Sunday, CSN, AM-720 will have extra security for its players in Russia. Phoenix Coyotes goaltender Mike Smith told reporters this week “it’s not worth it” to take his family with him to Sochi, and players around the league have echoed the sentiment. However, most players are remaining cautiously optimistic, including the 10 Blackhawks making the trip. “Obviously, we know what happened, right?” Marian Hossa, who’ll play for Slovakia, said of the bombings. “But maybe the awareness will be even higher because of that, and the security’s going to be even tighter, from what I heard. I’m sure they’re going to make sure everything’s going to be secured really well.” Hossa’s family is not going to Sochi, but he said that’s because it’s too difficult logistically with his two young daughters, one of them a 2-month-old. That’s the same reason Patrick Sharp is going solo. Patrick Kane, meanwhile, is bringing his mother, one of his sisters and his girlfriend. “They understand what’s going on,” Kane said. “It’s their choice to go over there, and they wanted to. I’ll take the support, for sure.”

Kane and Hossa said their coaches had sent out emails explaining what to expect in Sochi, and that lengthy security measures for fans – friends and family included – were mentioned. Russian President Vladimir Putin said Jan. 17 that officials “will try to make sure that the security measures aren’t too intrusive or visible, and that they won’t put pressure on the athletes, guests and journalists.” With bombings in the region, blatant threats on the Games, and a massive hunt on for so-called “Black Widows” who may be looking to avenge the deaths of their husbands or other family members, the players – just like the 200,000plus other expected visitors to Sochi – can only hope those security measures are effective. As Team Canada coach Mike Babcock said, he’s going to worry about hockey, and let those in charge of security worry about security. “You hear it,” Kane said of the threats. “You’re obviously going to hear different things and read different articles. To be honest with you, if I’m worried about that, my head’s in the wrong area. I have to worry about going over and trying to play the game, and doing as well as I can for my country. You hear different stuff, and obviously you’re going to be scared at first and think a little bit about it. And you hope everything gets figured out.”

GM says he has no doubt Ventura is the right man

Central Division W L Pct GB Indiana 33 8 .805 — Bulls 21 21 .500 12½ Detroit 17 26 .395 17 Cleveland 16 27 .372 18 Milwaukee 8 34 .190 25½ Atlantic Division W L Pct GB Toronto 22 20 .524 — Brooklyn 19 22 .463 2½ New York 16 27 .372 6½ Boston 15 30 .333 8½ Philadelphia 14 29 .326 8½ Southeast Division W L Pct GB Miami 31 12 .721 — Atlanta 22 20 .524 8½ Washington 20 21 .488 10 Charlotte 19 26 .422 13 Orlando 12 32 .273 19½

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct San Antonio 33 10 .767 Houston 29 16 .644 Dallas 25 20 .556 Memphis 21 20 .512 New Orleans 17 25 .405 Northwest Division W L Pct Oklahoma City 34 10 .773 Portland 32 11 .744 Denver 20 21 .488 Minnesota 20 21 .488 Utah 14 29 .326 Pacific Division W L Pct L.A. Clippers 30 15 .667 Golden State 26 17 .605 Phoenix 24 17 .585 Sacramento 15 26 .366 L.A. Lakers 16 28 .364

GB — 5 9 11 15½ GB — 1½ 12½ 12½ 19½ GB — 3 4 13 13½

Friday’s Results L.A. Clippers 112, Bulls 95 Orlando 114, L.A. Lakers 105 Toronto 104, Philadelphia 95 Brooklyn 107, Dallas 106 Oklahoma City 101, Boston 83 Cleveland 93, Milwaukee 78 New Orleans 103, Detroit 101 San Antonio 105, Atlanta 79 New York 125, Charlotte 96 Memphis 88, Houston 87 Washington at Phoenix (n) Indiana at Sacramento (n) Minnesota at Golden State (n) Today’s Games Bulls at Charlotte, 6 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Toronto, 6 p.m. Oklahoma City at Philadelphia, 6:30 p.m. Houston at Memphis, 7 p.m. Atlanta at Milwaukee, 7:30 p.m. Indiana at Denver, 8 p.m. Washington at Utah, 8 p.m. Minnesota at Portland, 9 p.m. Sunday’s Games San Antonio at Miami, noon L.A. Lakers at New York, 2:30 p.m. Orlando at New Orleans, 5 p.m. Phoenix at Cleveland, 5 p.m. Brooklyn at Boston, 5:30 p.m. Detroit at Dallas, 6:30 p.m. Portland at Golden State, 8 p.m. Denver at Sacramento, 8 p.m.

NHL WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts Blackhawks 53 32 9 12 76 St. Louis 50 34 11 5 73 Colorado 50 32 13 5 69 Minnesota 53 28 20 5 61 Dallas 51 23 20 8 54 Nashville 52 23 22 7 53 Winnipeg 52 23 24 5 51 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts Anaheim 53 38 10 5 81 San Jose 51 33 12 6 72 Los Angeles 52 29 17 6 64 Vancouver 52 26 17 9 61 Phoenix 50 23 18 9 55 Calgary 51 17 27 7 41 Edmonton 52 15 31 6 36

GF 189 173 147 127 148 127 144

GA 146 116 129 130 153 153 153

GF 179 162 132 130 143 114 132

GA 130 123 110 130 152 161 183

EASTERN CONFERENCE

people in charge are the right people to get them to their end Continued from page C1 goals,” Hahn said. But through the extremes The club’s poor performanc- of 2012 and ’13, Ventura’s leades made some question Ventu- ership “was unwavering. His ra’s ability, but not Hahn’s. communication, ability to “You lose 99 games there’s teach at big-league level, engoing to be questions like that, thusiasm, baseball intellect – where this organization is all the things we looked for in headed and why they think the a manager – were the same at

• WHITE SOX

our highest highs and lowest lows,’’ Hahn said. “That level of stability is what we want in the dugout.’’ Ventura said going through last season was the toughest thing he’s dealt with “player wise” and that it only solidified his passion and love for the job. Hahn said he has no doubt Ventura is the right man

for the job. Continuity is key through the current transition process. Ventura agrees. “It is a group of people that will be there for an extended period of time,” Ventura said. “Is someone going to pick us to win our division? Probably not, just because of the age and the guys that we have. Does that mean we can’t? No.

8WEEKEND TV SPORTSWATCH TODAY’S SCHEDULE Pro basketball Bulls at Charlotte, 6 p.m., CSN Pro hockey Anaheim vs. Los Angles, at Dodger Stadium, 8:30 p.m., NBCSN College football Senior Bowl, 3 p.m., NFLN Men’s basketball Ohio at Eastern Michigan, 10 a.m., ESPNU Iowa at Northwestern, 11 a.m., BTN Florida St. at Duke, 11 a.m., ESPN Virginia Commonwealth at La Salle, 11 a.m., ESPN2 Xavier at Providence, 11 a.m., FS1 George Washington at George Mason, 11 a.m., NBCSN Syracuse at Miami, noon, CBS Vanderbilt at Texas A&M, noon, ESPNU West Virginia at Oklahoma St., 1 p.m., ESPN2 Villanova at Marquette, 1 p.m., FS1 Tennessee at Florida, 3 p.m., ESPN Northern Iowa at Loyola, 3 p.m., CSN Western Kentucky at LouisianaLafayette, 3 p.m., ESPN2 Saint Joseph’s at Richmond, 3 p.m., NBCSN Wisconsin at Purdue, 4 p.m., BTN Pittsburgh at Maryland, 5 p.m., ESPN2 Michigan at Michigan St., 6 p.m., ESPN Connecticut at Rutgers, 6 p.m., ESPNU Southern Illinois at Missouri St., 7 p.m., CSN+

LSU at Alabama, 7 p.m., ESPN2 Georgetown at Creighton, 7 p.m., FS1 Kansas at TCU, 8 p.m., ESPNU BYU at Gonzaga, 9 p.m., ESPN2 San Diego St. at Utah St., 10 p.m., ESPNU Women’s basketball Indiana at Iowa, 6 p.m., BTN Golf PGA Tour, Farmers Insurance Open, third round, noon, TGC; 2 p.m., CBS Extreme sports X Games, 1 p.m., ESPN; 3 p.m., ABC; 8 p.m., ESPN Women’s basketball Florida International at AlabamaBirmingham, 11 a.m. Auto racing United Sportscar Championship, Rolex 24, start of race, 1 p.m., FOX Motorsports AMA Supercross, 9:30 p.m., FS1 College hockey Men’s, Northeastern at Notre Dame, 6 p.m., NBCSN College wrestling Minnesota at Iowa, 1 p.m., BTN Soccer FA Cup, fourth round, Liverpool at Bournemouth, 6:30 a.m., FS1 FA Cup, fourth round, Kidderminster at Sunderland, 9 a.m., FS1 Rugby USA Sevens, pool play, 1 p.m., NBCSN; 3 p.m., NBC MMA UFC, featherweights, Darren Elkins (18-3-0) vs. Jeremy Stephens (22-9-0);

lightweights, Donald Cerrone (21-6-0) vs. Adriano Martins (25-6-0); heavyweights, Stipe Miocic (10-1-0) vs. Gabriel Gonzaga (16-7-0); lightweights, Benson Henderson (19-3-0) vs. Josh Thomson (20-5-0), 7 p.m., FOX Boxing Junior middleweights, Jermell Charlo (22-0-0) vs. Gabriel Rosado (21-7-0); champion Lamont Peterson (31-2-1) vs. Dierry Jean (25-0-0), for IBF junior welterweight title, 8 p.m., SHOW Heavyweights, Bryant Jennings (17-0-0) vs. Artur Szpilka (16-0-0); champion Mikey Garcia (33-0-0) vs. Juan Carlos Burgos (30-1-2), for WBO junior lightweight title, 8:45 p.m., HBO

Bradley at Evansville, 1 p.m., CSN Illinois at Indiana, 2 p.m., BTN Harvard at Dartmouth, 3 p.m., NBCSN Minnesota at Nebraska, 5 p.m., BTN Clemson at North Carolina, 5 p.m., ESPNU California at UCLA, 7 p.m., ESPNU Utah at Arizona, 7 p.m., FS1 Women’s basketball Michigan St. at Ohio St., 11:30 a.m., BTN Minnesota at Penn St., noon, CBS South Carolina at Vanderbilt, 1 p.m., ESPN2 Northern Illinois at Bowling Green, 3 p.m., CSN (same-day tape) Tennessee at Texas A&M, 3 p.m., ESPN2 Georgetown at St. John’s, 5 p.m., FS1 SUNDAY’S SCHEDULE Dayton at Saint Joseph’s, 5 p.m., Pro hockey NBCSN N.Y. Rangers at New Jersey, Golf 11:30 a.m., NBC PGA Tour, Farmers Insurance Winnipeg at Blackhawks, 6 p.m., Open, final round, noon, TGC; 2 p.m., CSN CBS Tennis Extreme sports Australian Open, men’s championX Games, 1 and 8 p.m., ESPN ship, 2 a.m., ESPN Rugby Pro basketball USA Sevens, semifinals, teams San Antonio at Miami, noon, ABC L.A. Lakers at New York, 2:30 p.m., TBD, 1 p.m., NBCSN; finals, teams TBD, 3:30 p.m., NBC ABC Bowling Brooklyn at Boston, 5:30 p.m., ESPN PBA, Tournament of Champions, Pro football 11 a.m., ESPN NFL Pro Bowl, 6:30 p.m., NBC Auto racing Men’s basketball Fordham at Massachusetts, 11 a.m., United Sportscar Championship, Rolex 24, 6 a.m., FS1 NBCSN

Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 49 31 15 3 65 141 109 Tampa Bay 51 30 16 5 65 150 126 Montreal 51 27 19 5 59 128 129 Toronto 53 27 21 5 59 151 163 Detroit 51 23 18 10 56 131 139 Ottawa 51 22 19 10 54 144 159 Florida 51 20 24 7 47 122 154 Buffalo 49 13 29 7 33 92 142 Metropolitan Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 51 36 13 2 74 168 125 N.Y. Rangers 53 27 23 3 57 132 135 Columbus 50 26 20 4 56 148 140 Philadelphia 52 25 21 6 56 141 152 New Jersey 52 22 19 11 55 124 125 Carolina 50 22 19 9 53 125 142 Washington 51 22 21 8 52 143 154 N.Y. Islanders 53 21 25 7 49 151 175 Two points for win, one point for OT loss Friday’s Results New Jersey 2, Washington 1 Detroit 4, Montreal 1 Colorado 3, Florida 2 Ottawa at Carolina, ppd., schedule conflict Nashville at Calgary (n) Phoenix at Edmonton (n) Today’s Games Ottawa at Carolina, 11 a.m. St. Louis at N.Y. Islanders, noon Boston at Philadelphia, noon Washington at Montreal, 6 p.m. Colorado at Tampa Bay, 6 p.m. Buffalo at Columbus, 6 p.m. Toronto at Winnipeg, 6 p.m. Pittsburgh at Dallas, 7 p.m. Anaheim vs. Los Angeles, 8:30 p.m. Minnesota at San Jose, 9:30 p.m. Sunday’s Games Winnipeg at Blackhawks, 6 p.m. N.Y. Rangers vs. New Jersey, 11:30 a.m. Florida at Detroit, 4 p.m. Nashville at Edmonton, 7 p.m. Phoenix at Vancouver, 7 p.m.

MEN’S BASKETBALL AP TOP 25 Today’s Games No. 2 Syracuse at Miami, noon No. 3 Michigan St. vs. No. 21 Michigan, 6 p.m. No. 4 Villanova at Marquette, 1 p.m. No. 5 Wichita St. at Drake, 7:05 p.m. No. 6 Florida vs. Tennessee, 3 p.m. No. 7 San Diego St. at Utah St., 10:05 p.m. No. 8 Kansas at TCU, 8 p.m. No. 9 Wisconsin at Purdue, 4 p.m. No. 10 Iowa at Northwestern, 11 a.m. No. 11 Oklahoma St. vs. West Virginia, 1 p.m. No. 14 Kentucky vs. Georgia, 12:30 p.m. No. 16 Iowa St. vs. No. 22 Kansas St., 12:45 p.m. No. 18 Duke vs. Florida St., 11 a.m. No. 20 Pittsburgh at Maryland, 5 p.m. No. 24 Baylor vs. Texas, 12:30 p.m. No. 25 Oklahoma at Texas Tech, 3 p.m. Sunday’s Games No. 1 Arizona vs. Utah, 7 p.m. No. 13 UMass vs. Fordham, 11 a.m. No. 15 Cincinnati at Temple, 3 p.m. No. 23 Memphis vs. South Florida, 1 p.m.


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Page C4 • Saturday, January 25, 2014

Saturday, January 25, 2014 • Page C5

PRESENTED BY

SEASON IN REVIEW

SENIOR BOWL: 3 P.M. TODAY, NFLN

Garoppolo’s confidence keeps growing

SUPER BOWL XLVIII: SEATTLE SEAHAWKS VS. DENVER BRONCOS

Diem: Perfectionism drives Manning to win Ryan Diem spent 11 seasons protecting Peyton Manning. Next week, Diem will be able to spend his Sunday evening cheering for Manning. Both players helped the Indianapolis Colts to win Super Bowl XLI against the Bears, and now the retired offensive tackle hopes to see his old teammate win ring No. 2. Life after football has been busy for Diem, who grew up in Carol Stream and played at Northern Illinois before the Colts made him a fourth-round Ryan Diem draft pick in 2001. Diem has launched a start-up tech company called CloudOne, and he is involved in several charities, including the Allie & Friends Golf Classic in Lake in the Hills. To learn more about Allie & Friends, which has raised more than $1 million in its first nine years to fight pediatric cancer, visit www.allieandfriends.org. This year’s 10th anniversary tournament will be May 5 at Boulder Ridge Country Club. Diem spoke this week about his old quarterback and Super Bowl mania:

What one word best describes Peyton Manning? Perfectionist.

Why? Everything that he does is measured and calculated and studied and researched and thought through, very thoroughly. It’s just precision, you know? Perfect.

Was it ever to the point where his perfectionism got on your nerves? (Laughs) Only when we were in our stance for 30 seconds, as the play clock is running down, our legs are starting to burn, and he’s still trying to make some changes out there. But, no, you’ve got to appreciate a guy that puts that kind of effort into everything he does, especially on the football field when he’s steering the ship back there. He was second to none as far as the study and time he puts into his craft. Constantly, he’s watching film. It’s always – road trips, on the plane, some guys are watching movies. He wouldn’t even consider it. He’s watching film and he’s studying and he’s asking guys questions, trying to find any little angle where he can take advantage of a weakness in a defense.

So when you’re down in that stance while he’s calling audibles or fake audibles, what burns the most, your quads? The quads burn. Amongst ourselves on the offensive line, we kind of make our own joke calls. ‘Check leg burn!’ ‘Check quads on fire!’ Just goofing around. The reality is you appreciate what he’s doing back there because he’s got a lot of information to process. He gets you in the right situation at the right time. It’s key.

As an offensive lineman, you’re noticed basically only if

OFFENSIVE LINE

SPECIAL TEAMS

OFFENSIVE LINE REVIEW:

EIU QB gets last-minute invite to Mobile

GROUP MAKES QUANTUM LEAP

A

AP photo

Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning exhales as he talks to the media after practice Thursday at the team’s training facility in Englewood, Colo. The Broncos are scheduled to play the Seattle Seahawks in Super Bowl XLVIII on Feb. 2.

VIEWS Tom Musick you mess up. And if you mess up, the face of the franchise is going to get hit. Was it ever stressful to step back and realize that your job was to protect Peyton Manning? There is certainly a lot of pressure. That’s our role, though. As an offensive lineman, you know that going in. You know that you’re not going to be featured on the top 10 plays on SportsCenter. You’re not going to have big stories written about you on the cover of Sports Illustrated. … Like you said, you’re protecting the franchise back there. There is a lot of stress that comes with that, but with repetition and preparation, you’re ready for it. Accidents happen. Sometimes you make mistakes and the quarterback’s going to take a hit once in awhile. But I thought we did a pretty good job of keeping him clean and upright. Certainly, it’s still paying off for him. He’s still playing in his prime here, and what are we at, year 17, 18?

Eighteen. That’s unbelievable. But to your point about offensive linemen getting recognized for making mistakes, I would get a call from my grandmother after games sometimes, and she’d be like, ‘Hey, I saw you on TV! A face shot, up close!’ That was never a good thing. (laughs)

You played in two Super Bowls. Describe Super Bowl week from a player’s perspective. What’s the biggest distraction you have to battle? I think the biggest distraction is definitely media day. It’s just a circus. Have you been down there for that?

No, but we’ll have someone there this year. I think it drives the legitimate football reporters as crazy as it drives the players. Oh, yeah. Because it’s more about the late-night talk show guys and their people, and just non-sports people that are there to make a scene and try to create news. It’s fun, but it’s kind of like, OK, I just want to get to the game. You’re down there all week. You’re trying to stick to the normal routine of what your normal work week is

like during the season, except you’re transplanted down to a different location, you’re living out of a hotel, your family is there, sort of, in and out, so you get to see them a little bit. It’s just really a challenge to move the whole operation to a different location and stick to the same routine because you’ve got to be bused around everywhere, you’re in a different facility. All of that stuff, you’ve got to kind of put aside.

After a Super Bowl practice, could you even go out to dinner or was it too crazy? You’re kind of separated from all of that. When we were in Miami, we were staying in Fort Lauderdale at a nice resort right on the beach. It was a nice bonus, but again, somewhat of a distraction. … You could go out and grab dinner with your family or a couple of the guys, but for the most part, you’re holed up in that hotel. You’ve got meetings. They keep you really busy. There’s not a chance to really get out and get in trouble.

Bears guard Kyle Long awaits to walk out on stage at the NFL Pro Bowl Draft on Wednesday Kapolei, Hawaii.

s stunning as the play of backup quarterback Josh McCown was and the development in Jay Cutler, by any measure the biggest surprise of the 2013 season in Chicago was the upgrades on the offensive line. In one offseason general manager Phil Emery and coach Marc Trestman plugged in four new starters: Jermon Bushrod, Matt Slauson, Kyle Long and Jordan Mills, and along with returning center Roberto Garza, the Bears went from one of the two or three worst lines in the NFL to a top-10 to 15 unit. The Bears improved from the 27th ranked team in the league in pass protection to fourth, a huge move in Trestman’s offense, but the fact is they also went from 10th in the league running the ball to 16th. The dropoff in the run game is attributable as much or more to the change in schemes and by design as it is to the line’s blocking. But the Bears did struggle badly in short yardage run situations. It also is worth noting that the improvement was a lot more scheme than talent upgrades. As individuals, Bushrod, Long and Mills all were average to well-below average, Garza was just above middle of the road and only Slauson consistently was above average. A lot of the improvement also came from the fact that on 27 percent of the offensive snaps, the Bears deployed offensive tackle Eben Britton as a sixth offensive linemen, and Britton actually graded out as well or better than all but Slauson and Garza. The outstanding production is made all the more impressive by the fact that both Long and Mills stepped in as rookies and started every game. It also was a huge boon to this group that all six starters (including Britton) were available for every snap of the season until Mills went down with a foot injury early in the final game of the season against the Packers.

Do you think this Super Bowl will help define Peyton Manning’s legacy, or is that something that already has been set? It certainly could add to it. I think had he retired after his neck injury and decided not to come back, I think he’d have a great legacy and a great story. Everything he’s done since that has been icing on the cake. It’s just added to his story. It’s been said several times and written all the time, there’s this monkey on his back about the playoffs and ‘Peyton versus Brady’ and all that stuff. Well, he’s not playing against Tom Brady. He’s playing against the Patriots defense. They’re good, and [Bill] Belichick is an excellent game planner. The fact of the matter is that Peyton’s legacy is set, man. He’s the greatest of all time. He might not have all the rings as some other people, but that’s a team thing. I mean, I’m not saying we weren’t a good enough team to do it, but that particular day, that particular situation, it just didn’t work. But I think he’ll go down as the greatest of all time. No question.

• Shaw Media sports columnist Tom Musick can be reached at tmusick@shawmedia.com a nd on Twitter @tcmusick.

AP file photo

GRADE For the season this unit earned a solid B. Stats can be a little misleading and one of the reasons sacks were down as much as they were again was scheme, and Trestman preaching to his quarterbacks to check down and take a small gain quickly rather than take a sack. The lack of physicality is another issue that keeps it from being considered in the B+ or A ranges. CONTRACT SITUATIONS The big question here is the status of free-agent Garza. In addition to being the second best individual performer in the group, he is a team leader and captain who made all of the line calls. He will turn 35 years old in March, has had knee issues in the past and the Bears are stressed at best by the salary cap. With the re-signing of Slauson immediately after the season, the other four starters are all tied up for three or four more years.

2014 NEEDS If the Bears are unable to or choose not to re-sign Garza, they will need a new starter at center. Taylor Boggs was the backup last year and dressed for every game, but he never took a snap and is an unknown quantity. Long is an outstanding young man and wonderful prospect who made strides during his rookie year, but who also has a long way to go just to catch up to Slauson. You have to be happy for him being named a replacement in the Pro Bowl, but there are dozens of more deserving guards in the league. The Bears also need to determine how far they can trust Mills. Finding a 16-game starter with your fifthround draft choice is a coup, but the reality is he was one of the lowest-rated tackles in the league. James Brown continues to be an interesting developmental prospect at guard and tackle so depth on the line other than at center is not a huge concern. – Hub Arkush, harkush@suntimes.com

SPECIAL TEAMS REVIEW:

UNIT AMONG LEAGUE’S BEST AGAIN

U

nder coach Lovie Smith and the leadership of Dave Toub and with kicker Robbie Gould and return specialist Devin Hester, the Bears had a reputation for some of the best special teams play in the NFL. With the departure of Smith, Toub chose to leave and accept the same job in Kansas City under coach Andy Reid, who he worked for in Philadelphia before coming to the Bears, and current Bears coach Marc Trestman hired Joe Decamillis away from the Cowboys as special teams and assistant head coach. In the first year under Trestman and Decamillis, the Bears’ special teams remained strong again. The return game and Hester took a nice step forward. After finishing the 2012 season 27th in punt return average and 32nd returning kickoffs, the Bears decided the Hester wide receiver experiment was over and he strictly would be a return man in 2013. Hester responded and the team improved to second in punt return average and 16th returning kickoffs. Hester improved from a 25.9-yard kick return average and a long of 40 in 2012 to 27.6 and a long of 80 in 2013, and made even more dramatic gains returning punts, moving from an 8.3-yard average with a long of 44 to 14.2 with a long of 81 and a touchdown in 2013. Coverage teams remained solid, as well, with the Bears first in the league covering punts in 2012 and fourth covering kickoffs, and then finishing sixth in the league covering kickoffs and first in punt coverage in 2013. Robbie Gould’s season will unfairly be remembered by a

missed 47-yard field goal attempt in overtime in Minnesota when he in fact remained one of the league’s best kickers. Gould hit on 26 of his other 28 attempts, including all six of his other attempts between 40 and 49 yards, and hit on 3 of 4 from 50-plus yards with his lone miss on a 66-yard attempt. Punter Adam Podlesh had an off year in 2013. He was 18th in the NFL in 2012 with a 39.4 net punting average and 34 punts dropped inside the 20 with only six touchbacks. In 2013, he fell to 29th in net punting average with a 37.9-yard mark and 27 punts inside the 20, but onlytwo touchbacks. Coverage specialists Eric Weems, Blake Costanzo and Sherrick McManis all werw extremely productive, with McManis leading in tackles. GRADE This group gets a B for being solid to excellent in all phases of special teams, with the exception of Podlesh’s punting. It is hard to give the overall unit any more than a B when the punter was among the weakest in the league. CONTRACT SITUATIONS The Bears moved quickly to re-sign Gould in the week immediately after the end of the season and made him the highest paid placekicker in the league. It is well deserved as Gould remains the third most accurate kicker in the history of the NFL, and first among active kickers pending the return of Nate Kaeding.

Hester is a free agent and unlikely to return for no reason other than salary-cap constraints. With massive upgrades needed on defense, the Bears cannot afford to pay Hester what he’s worth as one of the game’s premiere returners if the job can be filed by a youngster making near the minimum. McManis and Costanzo also are free agents, as is Patrick Mannelly, the NFL’s best long snapper. Weems carries a $1.6 million salary-cap hit in 2014 and could be a cap casualty. 2014 NEEDS The Bears will almost certainly bring serious competition to the punting spot in training camp this year even though Podlesh is signed for two more years, and if Mannelly retires, the Bears will need to make finding his replacement a priority. Mannelly has been so good for so long that his value is often overlooked. – Hub Arkush, harkush@suntimes.com

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By KEVIN FISHBAIN MOBILE, Ala. – Regardless of what the unknown team sought when asking Jimmy Garoppolo: “Name as many things as you can do with a brick in a minute,” the personnel folks probably were impressed with how the Eastern Illinois quarterback handled his interview. “All the questions have a purpose behind them,” Garoppolo said from the Senior Bowl, laughing about the odd question he received. “Sometimes you don’t know what they are, you’ve just got to answer truthfully, really.” A linebacker until his junior year at Rolling Meadows High School, Garoppolo didn’t receive a single Division I offer. Four years later, his performance in the East-West Shrine game last week earned him a last-minute invitation to today’s Senior Bowl – a long journey that continues to be positive for Garoppolo. “Last week helped me out,” he said when asked about dealing with the “stigma” of being an FCS quarterback playing with the big boys. “You guys talk about it, scouts talk about it, but I’m done with that. … We’re all on the same playing field, same playing level.” “I think it’s a pretty neat deal,” said Jaguars offensive coordinator Jedd Fisch, who worked extensively with the quarterbacks on the South team. “The opportunity to have an Auburn pass rusher lined up and a Florida State pass rasher, a Georgia corner, now all of a sudden he’s playing with a different group two weeks in a row and two different offenses in a row. I think it’s pretty cool to watch his development.” Many considered Garoppolo the second-best quarterback in Mobile during the week, just behind Fresno State’s Derek Carr. He has an incredibly quick release, something he honed with quarterbacks coach Jeff Christensen of Throw it Deep. Garoppolo said after the first practice that in terms of areas of improvement, coaches wanted him to work on his footwork, since he was “fairly new” to the three-, five- and seven-step drops. “It’s a repetition thing,” he said. “Once you start doing it so much, you get used to it.” Fisch acknowledged that it’s tough to work on a technique in only one week, but he seemed impressed with Garoppolo’s footwork. “I think his footwork’s been pretty good,” he said. “I think he’s done a nice job, throws with a nice face with good feet, so it’s pretty neat to see.”

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Bears running back Matt Forte (left) celebrates his touchdown run against the Cincinnati Bengals with teammate Jermon Bushrod during the second half on Sept. 8 at Soldier Field. The Bears went from one of the two or three worst lines in the NFL to a top-10 to 15 unit, writes Hub Arkush.

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AP file photo

Eastern Illinois quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo smiles on the sideline during a game against Tennessee Tech on Nov. 2 at O’Brien Field in Charleston. His performance in the East-West Shrine game last week earned him a last-minute invitation to today’s Senior Bowl – a long journey that continues to be positive for Garoppolo.

“Each day, I have noticed a trend in a way, that his confidence has continued to improve and therefore his charisma has showed up. He has a nice presence about himself.” Jedd Fisch Jacksonville Jaguars offensive coordinator

Garoppolo knows that although he might have the moxie that coaches want in a quarterback, he needs to show he has the physical tools, as well. “If you’re a leader, they’ll know you’re a leader by how you act on the field,” he said about the balancing act. “If you can throw the ball, they’ll know that by the end of the day. You’ve just got to come out here, be yourself and compete.” A Bears fan, Garoppolo said Jay Cutler is his favorite Chicago quarterback. The two might differ in personality, but Cutler has plenty of confidence, something Garoppolo said he knows he needs to show during the draft process, and he can gain that more with his arm than his words. “If you belong, you belong. If you don’t, you’re going to stick out and people are going to know that you don’t belong,” he said. As the days went by in Mobile, Fisch saw a trend. Maybe Garoppolo read the articles about his rising draft stock, but more likely, he saw what he was capable of against top competition. “Each day, I have noticed a trend in a way, that his confidence has continued to improve and therefore his charisma has showed up,” Fisch said. “He has a nice presence about himself.”

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Page C6 • Saturday, January 25, 2014

SPORTS

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

PGA TOUR: FARMERS INSURANCE OPEN

Spieth takes the lead By DOUG FERGUSON The Associated Press

AP photo

Rafael Nadal celebrates after defeating Roger Federer in a semifinal at the Australian Open tennis championship Friday in Melbourne, Australia.

AUSTRALIAN OPEN

Nadal advances to final By JOHN PYE

in Sunday’s final, would give Nadal a 14th Grand Slam title MELBOURNE, Australia – A look at and make him the first man to win all four majors at least the 12th day of the Australian Open twice in the Open era. tennis championships on Friday: Nadal missed the 2013 AusWeather: Occasional showers, tralian Open during a sevhigh of 79 degrees. en-month layoff for illness and Semifinal winner: Men: No. 1 a knee injury, but returned to Rafael Nadal win the French and U.S. Opens Semifinal loser: Men: No. 6 Roger among his 10 titles for the seaFederer son and finished the year at Final winers: Women’s doubles: No. 1. He won the Australian No. 1 Sara Errani and Roberta Vinci Open in 2009, beating Federer Final losers: Women’s doubles: in the final, and lost in a fiveNo. 3 Ekaterina Makarova and Elena set, 5-hour, 53-minute 2012 final to Novak Djokovic after Vesnina ousting Federer in the semis. Playing today: Women’s final: In other years, he’s struggled No. 4 Li Na vs. No. 20 Dominika with injuries – it’s the only Cibulkova. Men’s doubles final: Lukasz Kubot and Robert Lindstedt Grand Slam tournament he hasn’t won at least twice. (14) vs. Eric Butorac and Raven “It’s really, really emotional Klaasen. Boys final: Alexander for me to be back on this court, Zverev (1) vs. Stefan Kozlov (2). and to be able to play another Girls final: Elizaveta Kulichkova (4) final – tonight I played the best vs. Jana Felt. match of the tournament,” he said, elaborating later: “Very in 11 Grand Slam matches, 7-6 emotional moments in the Rod (4), 6-3, 6-3, in 2 hours and 24 Laver Arena in the past, very minutes against the 17-time emotional moments this year major winner. especially because (this) is the A win over another Swiss, Grand Slam that I really had No. 8-seeded Stan Wawrinka, more problems in my career.”

Friday Down Under

The Associated Press MELBOURNE, Australia – The way Rafael Nadal managed to somehow retrieve a forehand midway through the second set shocked even Roger Federer, who has been on the receiving end of the Spaniard’s unbelievable shots more than anyone else in Grand Slams. It was a tipping point in their Australian Open semifinal. Federer had lost the first-set tiebreaker but still was throwing his whole arsenal at Nadal. At 15-30 in the sixth game of the second set, Federer thought he’d wrong-footed Nadal with a volley deep into the left corner. Nadal lunged for a desperate forehand, swinging just as the ball was about to bounce for the second time and angling it back over the net. Federer, in good position but not expecting he’d need to play another shot, framed a volley. It gave Nadal a breakpoint, and he quickly broke Federer for the first time in the match. He completed his 23rd win in 33 head-to-heads, and ninth

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SAN DIEGO – Jordan Spieth turned out to be the star attraction Friday playing with Tiger Woods at Torrey Pines. Spieth again showed game well beyond his 20 years with a 9-under-par 63 on the North Course, giving him a oneshot lead over Stewart Cink going into the weekend at the Farmers Insurance Open. Cink drilled a 3-wood from 280 yards onto the green at the par-5 ninth on the tougher South Course for a two-putt birdie and a 71. Woods rarely gets upstaged at Torrey Pines, where his eight professional wins include the 2008 U.S. Open. But in his first competition in six weeks, Woods hardly looked the part as the de-

fending champion. He did not make birdie on any of the par 5s for the second straight day, and a three-putt bogey on the par-5 ninth hole on the North gave him a 71. He was nine shots behind. Phil Mickelson’s ailing back wasn’t much better, Tiger Woods though Lefty plodded along and shot 73 on the South to finish eight shots out of the lead. Mickelson contemplated pulling out to rest his back, and said only that he would give it a shot Saturday depending on how he felt. It was the first time Spieth has played with Woods in a tournament – they played a practice round together at the Presidents Cup last fall – and

the Texan felt and played as if it was any other round on the PGA Tour. Then again, the first time he played with Mickelson, Spieth closed with a 62 at the TPC Boston last year, a round that led Mickelson to call Presidents Cup captain Fred Couples and lobby for Spieth to be picked for the team. In both cases, Spieth was more interested with the score than the audience. “Any time you can shoot a lower score than a 66 or 65 and you can really get it deep and be in a zone and not worry about what your score is ... that’s special,” Spieth said. “That’s proving that I can play my best golf when it matters on a PGA Tour venue. Each time you can do that, you get more and more confident that you can do it more often.”

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Informally known as “The Grateful Dead of Creole Music,” Creole Stomp features Swamp Pop, Cajun, Zydeco & Louisiana Creole music led by French speaking Creole accordionist and fiddler, Dennis Stroughmatt. Tickets are $25 for adults, $20 for seniors and $15 for students. Show starts at 8 p.m. sandwichoperahouse.org January 25 Haunted Tour Egyptian Theatre, DeKalb

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Join Mark Dorsett and Deb Eineke for this haunted tour of the historic Egyptian Theatre. Includes behind the scenes backstage tour and psychic impressions of the theatres permanent residents by psychic medium, Rev. Mark Dorsett. Tickets are $35 each. Event starts at 8 p.m. egyptiantheatre.org

January 26 Sizzling Sunday Discovery Center Museum, Rockford Immerse yourself in the captivating rhythms of Mexico and explore culture, food, and fun. Live music by Frank Calvagna. Admission is $8 per person. Event is from 1 to 4 p.m. discoverycentermuseum.org

3 Please note; we try to be as accurate as possible with our events but things are subject to change without notice. Check the listing and confirm before heading to an event.

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SPORTS

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

Saturday, January 25, 2014 • Page C7

Q&A WITH KANELAND’S DYLAN VACA

Knights guard chomping at the bit to return Kaneland sophomore guard Dylan Vaca was expected to be a big contributor to the Knights boys basketball team this season, but the sharpshooter from Sugar Grove has seen his progress stalled by a broken right wrist. Vaca, though, hopes to return to the Knights’ lineup soon to boost Kaneland for the stretch run. Shaw Media sports editor Jay Schwab and Vaca discuss the recovery timetable, what he’s been working on while wearing a cast and the Knights’ leadership. The following is an edited transcript:

Where are you at with your [wrist] health? I’m really at the last stage. I get my cast off next week, so after that,

depending on how it feels and everything, I’m going to try to get back around two weeks after the 30th, when I get my cast off. So I should be back around middle of February.

Some reward for taking a charge, right?

Tell me about the play when you got hurt.

It’s been hard. It really stinks sitting out this many games, especially in the middle of the season. … You just want to be out there playing and Dylan Vaca helping the team, but I’m just excited to get back to playing and looking forward to the rest of the season.

Well, we were in our first game at the Plano Christmas tournament Dec. 26. We were playing Newark, and at the end of the second quarter, I was guarding their point guard, and I took a charge, and I kind of just fell back and landed on my wrist trying to brace my fall. I just landed wrong with all that weight. I hadn’t broken a bone before. … It hurt really bad and I couldn’t play the rest of the game, and I went to the doctor afterward, and he said it was broke.

COWBOYS

Brent gets 180 days in jail, probation By SCHUYLER DIXON The Associated Press DALLAS – Former Dallas Cowboys player Josh Brent avoided prisFriday and instead was sentenced to 180 days in jail and 10 years of probation for a drunken car crash that killed his friend and teammate, Jerry Brown. Brent was convicted Wednesday of intoxication manslaughter for the December 2012 crash on a suburban Dallas highway that killed Josh Brent Brown, who was a passenger in Brent’s car. Brent could have been sentenced to up to 20 years in prison. He also was fined $10,000. Brent, 25, closed his eyes when the judge read the jury’s verdict. He was kept in custody after the hearing. One of his attorneys, Kevin Brooks, described the former defen-

sive tackle as “somber.” “I’m really kind of overwhelmed with the results,” Brooks said. “It’s kind of what we’ve been fighting for from Day 1. I’m happy for Josh. Josh is still sad and grieving and that’s something he’s going to carry with him the rest of his life.” Brent’s family members and supporters cried and hugged as the courtroom emptied after the hearing. His mother, LaTasha Brent, spoke briefly as she left the courthouse, saying she was there to support her son. Brown’s mother, Stacey Jackson, wasn’t in the courtroom when the verdict was read. She publicly forgave Brent, and said during Thursday’s sentencing proceedings: “He’s still responsible, but you can’t go on in life holding a grudge. We all make mistakes.” Jackson was the last witness the jury heard, and lead prosecutor Heath Harris said her testimony probably helped Brent get probation.

Yeah, I guess so.

What’s it been like to have to sit these several weeks?

What’s rehab like? What can you really be doing now? Right now, I have my cast on, so I go to practice and work on my left

hand because that’s one of the things I really need to work on so I can get my left hand better. But after my cast is off, I don’t think I’ll need much rehab for my wrist. I think I’ll just have to wait a couple weeks until it strengthens back.

When you do return, what do you think you’ll add to the mix? When I return, I hope to add more shooting to the team because that’s something we need. We have John [Pruett] attacking the rim and leading the team right now. I think when I get back, I can add more depth to our shooting and, hopefully, add more scoring, but we have had some kids on the the team step up.

Ty Carlson has hit so many big shots this year. How clutch is that kid? Ty is a special player. He’s a three-sport athlete. He’s always in shape, always busy with sports. That just shows you how hard he works. In practice, he just wants to take that shot. He’s always one of the first ones in the gym practicing his shot, so he deserves it. You can tell he puts a lot of work in.

What are you most looking forward to about the rest of the year? Just getting back with my team and finishing out the year strong, trying to win the conference and, hopefully, go farther in the playoffs this year because we have a really strong senior class this year. I’m hoping we can get a lot farther.

MEN’S BASKETBALL: BUFFALO AT NIU

Deppe likely will redshirt

Gametime: 1 p.m. today at NIU Convocation Center Radio: AM-1360, 98.9-FM Last meeting: Buffalo defeated NIU, 67-46, on Jan. 8. Scouting the Bulls: Buffalo (9-6, 3-2 Mid-American Conference) was knocked off on the road Thursday against Ball State, falling 71-68. The Bulls already have beaten NIU (7-10, 1-4) once this season, and have won eight straight games against the Huskies. Buffalo is led by senior forward Javon McCrea, who is second in the MAC in both points (17.4) and rebounds (9.5) a game. Senior guard Joshua Freelove averages 12.5 points and Will Regan is at 10.5. The Bulls’ first-year coach is former Duke All-American Bobby Hurley, who won national championships with the Blue Devils in 1991 and 1992. Outlook: After winning at Bowling Green on Jan. 12, the Huskies have lost three in a row in MAC play. Today’s game will be the Huskies’ fifth against a MAC East opponent. In league play, the Huskies have gotten a nice boost from Travon Baker, who’s averaging 11.6 points a game. The sophomore had a nice outing in Wednesday’s 77-68 loss to Toledo, with a career-high 17 points. It was the first time since Dec. 18 that the Huskies had four players in double figures, with Darrell Bowie scoring 16 points, Jordan Threloff adding 14 and Aaric Armstead putting in 10. – Steve Nitz, snitz@shawmedia.com

• NIU Continued from page C1 “You have to be there,” Deppe said of the scholarship camp. At the camp, Deppe and the other punters were charted on distance, hang time and get-off time – the period from where a punter catches a ball to when he kicks it. After the camp, Kohl’s rated the 6-foot-2, 190-pound Deppe as the No. 7 punter in the nation. Deppe said he had interest from schools such as Michigan State, Rutgers, Notre Dame and Iowa State, and noted that NIU’s interest began when he went to the Huskies’ own recruiting camp last summer. Some of the other top-rated punters on Kohl’s list are committed to schools such as Mississippi, Alabama, Michigan State, Ohio State and Notre Dame. However, as highly rated as Deppe is, he will not be on scholarship as a true freshman. Instead, he’s getting a preferred walk-on spot and the

plan is to be on scholarship as a redshirt freshman in 2015. With schools having a limit of 85 scholarships, earning a scholarship as a freshman specialist can be difficult, especially when a school already is using one on a punter. That’s the case with NIU and senior Tyler Wedel. Deppe said earning a scholarship right away depends on the school and what its need is. Deppe, who said he did not have a punt returned his senior season at Almont and had 12 of his 19 punts land inside the 20-yard line, doesn’t think redshirting is a bad route. “I’ve heard from Jamie Kohl, I’m good friends with him. He basically runs the whole Kohl’s kicking operation,” Deppe said. “He said it’s good to get into a school and for your first year redshirt and be the backup, just kind of get into the swing of things and roll in the next year and be the starter. I feel like that’s why this is such a good option for me.”


Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

Page C8 • Saturday, January 25, 2014 control and skidding.

• Slowly accelerate and decelerate: Applying engine power slowly to accelerate is the best method for regaining traction and avoiding skids. Don’t try to get moving in a hurry, and take extra care and time to-slow down when stopping. • Invest in a set of dedicated winter tires for your vehicle: Winter tires, like the Hankook Winter i*cept evo, are speciically designed to provide improved traction in cold, snowy and icy conditions. Whether your vehicle is front, rear or all-wheel drive, winter tires can ofer an additional element of performance to get you through those tricky winter driving months.

Tips to Keep You Trekking this Winter Winter is in full swing, and with the magical season come the potentially unpleasant snow, ice and slippery conditions that can make driving a challenge. But, even in this less-than-ideal driving weather, Americans are ready to take on what Mother Nature throws their way. Even though 63 percent of Americans say icy roads are their top winter driving concern, 76 percent also say they are comfortable driving in snow, according to Hankook Tire’s Winter Gauge Index.

• Check your tread to beat the snow: Worn or insuicient tread can cause skidding during the winter season, so it is important to make sure your tires are ready for the winter conditions before hitting the road. A quick way to do this is to check your tires’ tread depth indicators. Tread depth indicators are small raised bars that run in-between a tire’s tread blocks. When a tire’s tread is worn down to these indicator bars, it’s time to change to a new set of tires. By preparing for winter’s snowy surprises, you can keep on rolling throughout the slippery season.

And, if Americans are right - 41 percent of all Americans polled expect more snow this winter, as compared to last year - there will be plenty of opportunity to drive through a winter wonderland. Conident and prepared is the resounding tune among drivers, and that’s not just in the area of getting behind the wheel in slick conditions; Seventy-one percent of Americans spend less than one hour digging their car out of the snow and nearly half (49 percent) maintain their driveway themselves, according to the survey. So, clean up that driveway, embrace the cold weather and get out and enjoy the winter season. Before hitting the road for the ski slopes or embarking on a winter excursion, keep in mind Hankook’s top winter driving tips: • Keep your tires ‘aired up’: Ensure your tires are properly inlated. For every 10 degree Fahrenheit change in outside temperature, your tire’s inlation pressure will change by about 1 pound per square inch (psi). Improperly inlated tires can lead to poor traction, decreased

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Dr. Dan Monaghan Every patient is special. Every injury or painful condition is unique in presentation and recovery. I will seek the cause of your symptoms and customize your care with the integration of the science of chiropractic, the technology of emerging physiotherapies, and the art of hands-on care.

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For a Healthy Body & Healthy Life

815.758.9999 www.drdaninc.com

504 N Main Street • Sycamore/Rochelle 815-901-7653 • sycamoreballet.com

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CLASSIFIED

Daily Chronicle / daily-chronicle.com

Saturday, January 25, 2014 • Page D1 Saturday, January 25, 2014

“It’s all about the timing!” Photo by: Andrea

Upload your photos on My Photos – DeKalb County’s community photo post! Photos on My Photos are eligible to appear in print in Daily Chronicle Classified. Go to Daily-Chronicle.com/myphotos

Driver

LOOK! We respect Home time! $2,500-$5,000 Sign-On Bonus Great Home time Teams/Owner Ops welcome Call Now! 888-616-0368 or 815-599-1089 Administrative

HEALTH SERVICES SECRETARY - FT Oak Crest DeKalb Area Retirement Center Qualified candidates will be a High School Graduate with at least two years experience as a secretary, possess strong computer skills in Excel and Word and be capable of learning additional software programs. Responsibilities will include staffing, payroll processing, assisting staff with computer skills, resident billing, and additional secretarial tasks. Benefits include insurance, time off with pay, and 403B retirement program. Submit resume to Sharon Cox at scox@oakcrestdekalb.org or apply in person at 2944 Greenwood Acres Dr, DeKalb, IL 60115 Applications will be accepted until February 7, 2014.

Automotive Tech RARE OPPORTUNITY Alan Browne Chevrolet is growing and growing fast. Business has been booming and we are looking for two technicians. We provide a wonderful benefits package and the top pay around for the right person. Call 815-784-2511 to set up an appointment interview. Ask for Jim.

CLERICAL B95 Radio is looking for an experienced full-time clerical person for data entry, billing & reception. Mail resume to Tana Knetsch, 2201 N. 1st St, DeKalb, IL 60115 or email tana@b95fm.com. For more info go to www.b95fm.com. WDKB is an equal opp'ty employer.

MANUFACTURING ENGINEER Raynor Garage Doors is hiring a Manufacturing Engineer with experience in the design of dies and tool for roll formers. Bachelor's degree (BA) in an engineering related field plus 7 years minimum in a manufacturing environment involved in roll forming technologies. Knowledge of Word Processing software; Spreadsheet software; CAD (Solidworks preferred) and ERP System. Send Cover letter and resume to: 1101 E. River Rd. Dixon, IL 61021 or email employment@raynor.com

Raynor Garage Doors, a leading supplier of residential and commercial garage doors and openers has an immediate opening for an OverThe-Road Semi Driver. The qualified candidate must possess a valid CDL with at least two years of verifiable recent over the road driving experience. Must have good communication skills and also have a good driving record. Candidate must meet all federal DOT requirements, including Drug and Alcohol screening and be at least 21 years old. Candidates must posses a passport or obtain one within 60 days of employment. Heavy lifting is required. Raynor offers a competitive compensation package and benefits, including medical, dental, life, and 401(k). If you are interested in an exciting career with a solid organization, please send resume and cover letter to: Attn: Human Resources 1101 E. River Road Dixon, IL 61021 Fax 815/285-7133 E-mail: employment@raynor.com EOE

RN - Part-time

ALWAYS INVESTIGATE BEFORE INVESTING ANY MONEY

Provide medication training & supervision to direct care staff. Monitor health of adults with developmental disabilities & complete nursing documents in accordance with State regulations. 26 hrs/wk, which includes oncall. Min. 2 yrs RN. MS Office skills required. Apply on our website, www.ohinc.org or in-person at:

Contact the Better Business Bureau www.chicago.bbb.org - or Federal Trade Commission www.ftc.gov

Opportunity House 202 Lucas St., Sycamore 815-895-5108 EOE

Cortland

Fri, Sat, Sun 10am-4pm

NEWSPAPER DELIVERY Earn up to $1000 A Month! Looking for Contractors to deliver newspapers early mornings 7 days per week. Routes now available in DeKalb County. Please Call 815-526-4434

53 W. Carol Ave. 40 Years of Treasures Jewelry, furniture, glassware, appliances, tools, snowblowers,

KATHY'S ESTATE SALES 847-363-4814 Advertise here for a successful garage sale! Call 815-455-4800 Driver

Swine Wean Pig Driver

Attractive Gift booklet, Historical Quotes of “Freedom & Liberty” from Aristotle to George Washington. Free by request: freedom-2-liberty.com

CDL not required but beneficial. Flexible hours necessary. Able to lift 50 lbs, able to pass DOT physical requirements. Able to bend & squat for a limited amount of time. Email letter of interest or resume to: kimp@bethanyswine.com

RN / LPNs Accurate Home Care, LLC is the best fit for career-oriented Health Care professionals looking for the flexibility that only home care can provide. We offer the training and support that you need to provide the best possible care to patients. We are currently recruiting for highly skilled, compassionate, motivated and dedicated RN/ LPNs to work with a client in Sycamore! We have days and overnight hours available. Qualified candidates will have at least a year of nursing exp.

CAT – LOST South DeKalb County. Large neutered male, mostly white with big brown patches and brown Maine Coon tail. May still have red collar. If seen, please call at 815-501-9724. Reward for safe return. We miss him. Have you seen or know what happened to him?

CAT - ORANGE & WHITE TABBY Female, no front claws. Found before Christmas in DeKalb. 210-861-0015

CAT ~ LONG HAIRED

Blue/grey, fluffy, shy. Found Sunday, Jan 19 at Maplewood & 11th St in DeKalb. Please call: 630-774-8812

We are also accepting clients in DeKalb Co. Call 866-214-3800 for more information!

Prom/Bride's Maid Dress - Size 14, made in California, cinnamon color, Cost $200, Asking $50 OBO. 815-786-8127

ELECTRIC STOVE White, G.E., 30”, Self Cleaning Oven, Excellent Condition $75. 815-739-3030 Professional Pizza Oven by Baker's Pride, on metal stand, controls to 700º - $100 OBO 815-790-0407 aft/early evenings Whole House Humidifier Kenmore – Quiet Comfort, 14 gal., Service Manual & New Filters Included - Like New, Retails $269, Asking $30. 815-901-1633

LOVESEAT - 1800's Victorian loveseat. Original dusty rose upholstery and Mahogany wood. Very good condition. $350. See photo online. 815-899-7043

Apply online & learn more at www.accuratehomecare.com EOE/AA

LINE COOK Experienced Line Cook needed.

Share It With Everyone by Placing a HAPPY AD!

Bathroom Sink & Vanity Cabinet, Light Oak, Perfect Condition $30. 815-748-5215

DEKALB

Apply in person:

PJ's Courthouse Tavern 202 W State St, Sycamore

DON'T NEED IT? SELL IT FAST! Daily Chronicle Classified 877-264-2527

Daily Chronicle Classified Call 877-264-2527

DIRECTOR OF ALZHEIMERS SERVICES

WOULD SAVING 50-90% On your Prescription Drugs interest you? If so, call 213-550-2255 Then visit http://tonyp.bidformymeds.com and see how much you can save. Daily Chronicle Classified It works.

DeKalb County Rehab & Nursing Center seeks director for 38 bed Alzheimer's Unit. This is a full time, salaried position to coordinate the integration of medical, social, psychological and spiritual aspects of resident care. Licensed nurse or C.N.A. helpful. This is a “handson” position and requires a working knowledge and understanding of the unique needs of persons with Alzheimers.

SAT, JAN 25 9-2 2719 GREENWOOD ACRES DRIVE Furniture, beds, glassware Everything Must Go!

Priced For QUICK SALE!

DVD/CD PLAYER 7 Disc, JVC, $40. Hampshire area. 847-830-9725 TV 32” Insignia Flat front, large in back (a little older) used only in guest rm. $40 847-830-9725

Dresser – Wood, Chest Style, 5 drawers, Oval mirror attached $75. 815-739-3030 Kitchen Table & 4 Chairs $50. 815-784-2857 Kitchen Table- Light wood, w/4 chairs & cushions. $50 firm 815-751-3531 Lazy Boy recliner chair, like new, $90 815-793-1473

Sofa & Loveseat Set: 3 cushion sofa, 2 cushion loveseat matched. Sell as a set. Quality furniture. $250 815-758-7366 Sofa: Dark Brown corduroy sofa, great condition $60 815-793-1473 TV Console Table- Dark wood $40 firm 815-751-3531

Grill: 3 burner propane grill w/propane tank $70 815-793-1473 Mulching lawn mower, w/bag, great condition $90 815-793-1473

Will BUY UR USED

Old Envelopes Stamps Collections

CAR, TRUCK, SUV,

MOST CASH

815-758-4004

WILL BEAT ANY QUOTE GIVEN!! $400 - $2000 “don't wait.... call 2day”!! * 815-575-5153 *

We Pay The Best! 2005 SATURN ION $3000, 87,000 miles, Air, CD player, fair condition, 5 speed. Call Ron at 815-761-7519

2007 FORD FOCUS SE Metallic gray, 57K miles. Automatic/power windows and lock. Great condition and very clean!

For Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans No Title, No Problem. Same Day Pick-Up. 630-817-3577

Harley Davidson Screaming Eagle Slip On Mufflers - EPA stamped. Off of 2011 Ultra Classic Limited. 15,000 miles on them - excellent condition. $300 firm. Call 815895-6096 - leave message.

Reduced $9000 For More Details Call

815-701-3301

RADIAL ARM SAW

Craftsman, 10” Great Condition. Great for furniture making $45 OBO. 815-827-3692

Power Chair GT ~ Pride Jazzy Red, needs batteries, good condition, no chair lift, $400. 779-777-5254

TV - Sanyo 32" (not HD) $100 OBO; College/dorm size fridge $60; 6 ft. oak lighted curio cabinet-mirrored back and glass shelves $150; 1 wicker loveseat $75; 3 wicker chairs $55 each. Please call 815-895-3673

Craftsman 5HP, electric start, single stage, great shape, $150 815-757-5790

You Want It? We've Got It! 877-264-2527 Daily-Chronicle.com

FOR SALE – TOWNHOME EASY LIVING Snow & Ice Removal All Done

Handicap Ramp Van 2006 Dodge Grand Caravan 156k mi. $13,900. Leave msg. 815-756-2564

!!!!!!!!!!!

I BUY CARS, TRUCKS, VANS & SUVs

Publisher's Notice: All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation of discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD tollfree at 1-800-669-9777. The tollfree telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

1990 & Newer Will beat anyone's price by $300. Will pay extra for Honda, Toyota & Nissan

DeKalb. Like “New” Ranch $114K 1522 Oakwood. Location! Adolph Miller RE 815-756-7845

*

815-814-1964 or

815-814-1224

Sandwich: 1111 E. Railroad Lot #39, 2BR, 1BA, very good condition, car space & shed $5000, 708-383-5423

!!!!!!!!!!!

Deep, Deep Yard with this 3 Bedroom Home. Huge Garage. Estate Sale at $98,000

Ranch Townhome with English Basement 2BR, 2BA, Large Kitchen, Formal Dining Rm + Living Rm + Sun Rm.

Apply at:

CALL NEDRA ERICSON, REALTOR 815-739-9997

CALL NEDRA ERICSON, REALTOR 815-739-9997

2600 North Annie Glidden Road DeKalb, Illinois 60115 EOE

I Buy

Recliner - Beige $40 firm 815-751-3531

If you are passionate about meeting the unique needs of persons with Alzheimers, contact Cathy Anderson, Administrator at canderson@dekalbcounty.org. No phone calls please.

DeKalb County Rehab & Nursing Center

A-1 AUTO

WANTED!

Metal Futon Frame, Black, In good shape. $15. 815-901-1407 Sycamore.

Classified has GREAT VARIETY! Coffee table, end table, dresser, $35 815-793-1473

FOR SALE – ALL BRICK HOME

Minimum of 5 years experience, including 2 years of management working with persons with Alzheimers or other dementia. OR Registered Nurse with at least one year of experience working with persons with Alzheimers. Job Standard Includes: Strong interpersonal and communication skills. Ability to plan and conduct education programs and support groups. Supervisory experience. Initiative, organizational and decision making abilities. Creativity and willingness to face challenges. Flexibility with scheduling.

DESK - Totally Refinished Desk Mahogany inlays in top 8 drawers - including middle drawer. Brass handles 42” width / 29” height $175. Call 815-825-2275

China, fine porcelain White Lace, 37 pcs., incl., teapot, cream, sugar, platter, soup/salad plates, bowls $120/set 847-830-9725

Restaurant

Having a Birthday, Anniversary, Graduation or Event Coming Up?

Complete Bedroom Set-Off white laminate. Dresser w/mirror, chest of drawers, 2 night stands, full size mattress & boxspring $300 815-751-3531 Couch & Matching Love Seat, Light Green in color, Very Good Condition - $225. 815-739-3030

*

Need Help Rebuilding, Repairing or Replanting? Check out the

At Your Service Directory in the back of today's Classified

DEKALB 1 BEDROOM Available Dec/Jan. Close to NIU, Free heat & water, quiet lifestyle. Varsity Square Apts. 815-756-9554 www.glencoproperties.com

Would you like to subscribe or do you have a question about your delivery?

Need To Contact Us?

(800) 589-9363 To place a Classified Ad

877-264-CLAS (2527) For Retail Advertising

815-756-4841 Do you have a News Tip or Story Idea?

815-756-4841


CLASSIFIED

Page D2 • Saturday, January 25, 2014

BIG APARTMENTS, LESS MONEY! Rochelle: 15 minutes from DeKalb 1 BR & 2BR Starting at $530 Recently updated! Affordable heat. Walk to shops! (815) 562-6425 www.whiteoakapartments.net Now accepting Visa, M/C, Discover

Cortland Estates

Sycamore - 2BR 1BA Apt Avail Now Updated Kitch & Bath, W/D in bldg 1611 Maness Ct. $625/mo Call Pittsley Realty (815)756-7768 SYCAMORE 2 bdrm, 1 ba, upper, new flooring / paint, laundry, pets ok, $675 +util. 815-751-3982

Sycamore 321 S. Walnut St. 1BR, patio, yard, W/D on site. $580/mo + 1st mo & sec. $35 appl fee for credit and background check. Off St parking, utilities incl, no smoking, pets allowed with dep. 815-895-8901

Chairman, Sycamore Plan Commission

SHABBONA, RT 30 COMMERCIAL PROPERTY FOR LEASE

(Published in the Daily Chronicle, January 25, 2014.)

1.) 140' X 80' Storage facility w/ 40' x 40' office space & 80' x 37' Fenced area w/ rail. 2.) 1000' x 32' Storage building w/100' x 48' fenced area. 3.) 1300 SQ FT Retail Facility 4.) 800 SQ FT Metal storage bld Call EINSELE REAL ESTATE 815-824-2600 or betheinsele@yahoo.com for Additional Information.

$300 1st Month's Rent 3 BR Apartments Dishwasher On-Site Laundry Facility Playground Washer & Dryer Connection 6 months free cable if you sign a lease by 2/28/14

WINTER STORAGE RV's, Campers & Boats - Indoor & secure, West of Sycamore. Owner resides on property 815-825-2571

income restriction apply

AVAILABLE NOW!

Remodeled, A/C, gas heat. W/D on site. No pets. Off St parking. $725/mo + sec. 815-895-9280

CORTLAND 3BR, 2BA TH

220 E. Hillcrest. 815-758-0600 hillcrestplaceaptsdekalb.com

Fireplace, 2 car gar, all appl incl W/D, $1200/mo + sec. For more info call Anthony 630-730-8070

DEKALB - 2BR 1BA Apt Avail Now Updated Kitch & Bath, W/D in bldg 830 Greenbrier $600/mo Call Pittsley Realty (815)756-7768

DEKALB 2 BR 1.5 BA condo near I-88, shopping, NIU. All appliances, garage, central air. Small pets OK. $925. 630-485-0508

DEKALB - 323 S 11th St, 3br, 1ba, AC, W/D, Avail 2/1, 1st + sec, $695, 847-845-4021

DEKALB - SPACIOUS MARKET APARTMENTS Starting @ $599, 2 Bedroom $683, 3 Bedroom Near the heart of NIU. Incl gas and forced air heat. Off street parking, lush grounds, on site laundry room. Outdoor pool, tennis and basketball courts, patios and balconies. Cats OK.

University Village Apts. 722 N. Annie Glidden Rd. 815-758-7859 DeKalb - Upper 1BR, Heat Included Quiet tenant, no smoking, private entrance, street parking, $575/mo. 847-845-6639

DEKALB 2 BEDROOM Appliances, gas heat, C/A, ceiling fans, garage, no pets/smoking. $785, avail now. 630-697-9102 DeKalb – 3BR / 1BA Lower Apt Washer/dryer hook-up $925 1st/lst/sec. Sec 8 welcome 815-739-6170 DEKALB ADULT, QUIET, REFINED Building. 2 Bedroom Apt with homey environment. Car port. For mature living. Excellent Location! No pets/smoking. Agent Owned. 815-758-6712

DEKALB GROUND LEVEL APARTMENT 1-2 Bedroom ground level unit of house with new carpeting and freshly painted. Appliances included. Near 7th and Lincoln DeKalb. $600 per month. 815-827-3434 duffpropertiesllc@gmail.com

DeKalb Newer 2BR Duplex Quiet neighborhood, appl, W/D. Walk-in-closets, no pets, $950/mo + 1st/last /sec. 815-739-4442

DEKALB QUIET 2 BEDROOM

1 bath, parking, laundry. NO pets/smoking, Agent Owned. 815-756-2359 - 815-758-6712

DeKalb Quiet Studio 1, 2, 3BR Lease, deposit, ref, no pets. 815-739-5589~815-758-6439 DEKALB: 2BR Apts.-$750/m. Incl. heat, water, garb. & cable. W/D on premises. Nice Neighborhood. Ready ASAP! 815-756-1424 GENOA -1 BR. IN TOWN References required. No pets. $490/mo. 815-784-2232

GENOA 2 BEDROOM Appliances, dining room, no pets. $700/mo + sec, tenant pays electric. 815-301-5644

GENOA DELUXE 2 BEDROOM 1 bath, remodeled, appl. Counrty setting, close to downtown Genoa. 815-784-4606 ~ 815-901-3346 KIRKLAND, 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom apts $425- $550- $625. Tenants pay all utils. A few 2 & 3 Bd w/ WD hook-up. 1St, last & Sec. No Pets. 1 year Lease . Re/Max Classic (815) 784-2800 Malta- Cozy, comfortable 1 BD Upper, off street parking. Non-smoker. Malta- 2 BD ground floor, clean, W/D hook-ups 815-981-8117 ROCHELLE - Newer Rural Rochelle Penthouse, quiet 2-bedroom lifestyle living, tenant pays electric. $435.00 MOR R.E. 815-739-5785

ROCHELLE ~ 2 BEDROOM

Remodeled, available now. Clean and quiet, $550/mo. 815-758-6580 ~ 815-901-3346

DeKalb 271A Par Five Dr. 2BR TH, 2BA. Gas fireplace, large 1200 sq ft unfinished bsmt, W/D, 2 car gar, open view to golf course. $1200/mo or $1175/mo w/2 year lease. Lawn maintenance and snow removal incl, available Feb 1st, pets neg. 815-761-7467 Sycamore - Luxury 2BR 2BA Condo Granite, SS, Fireplace, 2C Gar. Available NOW! 954 Arvle Circle Call Pittsley Realty (815)756-7768 Sycamore Newer 2 Story Luxury TH on quiet Arbor Lane. 3BR, 2.5BA. Full fin bsmt, 2 car gar, great room w/fireplace, W/D. No pets/smoking. $1300 + Assoc. 847-343-3333

DeKalb – Duplex, 4BR, 3BA, 2 car garage, large yard. In the Knolls $1250/mo 1st/lst/sec 815-739-6170 Dekalb: Lrg. Ranch duplex w/3BR, 2BA, full bsmnt, 2 car attch. gar., lndry hookup, new interior, no pets/smoking $1000/mo. 815-464-8646

GENOA 2 BEDROOM 1 bath, appliances, W/D, C/A, 1 car garage, no pets/smoking. $800/mo. 815-784-3411 Syc – 3 BD, 1 ¼ BA, LR, DR, FR, BSMT, No pets, no smoking. $950/mo + utilities 1st/lst/sec AVAIL 2/1 815-325-0444 Syc near North School 2BR, Gar, Bsmnt, Appl. No pets/smoking. $800/mo+1st/last/sec. Discount on first month's rent. 815-517-1018 SYCAMORE - 2 bedroom, hardwood floors, upgraded kitchen, washer and dryer, basement - $875 at 202 Maple, Sycamore - 630-443-9072

DeKalb - 3Bd 2Ba House 2C Gar, Fireplace, Basement 204 Hollister, $1250/mo Call Pittsley Realty (815)756-7768 DEKALB - Like new! 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath, plus office 2-story single family home in Devonaire Farms close to NIU. Master bedroom suite with large walk-in closet. First floor laundry / mud room with washer and dryer, attached 2-car garage with opener. Formal dining and family room. Ceramic tile floors in all baths and kitchen. Large kitchen with SS appliances, central air, and full (unfinished) basement. Professionally painted. Available now. 1 year lease minimum, $1500/month + utilities. First last security and references. 815-739-3597

DEKALB 2-3 BEDROOM Appl, 1 bath, clean, residential neighborhood, available 2/1. $795/mo. 815-758-6580 DEKALB 3 BEDROOM, 1 BATH Newly Remodeled Ranch. All appl, bsmt,1.5 car garage, $1150/mo + security. 815-751-2650

DeKalb 4 Bedroom, 1.5 Bath on College Ave. Available Immed. $1200 + 1st, last security, no pets. 815-757-5079

DEKALB 842 SOUTH 1 st St. Large 4BR, 2BA, large yard, bsmt. W/D hook-up. 815-758-4615 or 815-375-4615 Dekalb: Tilton Park Area Lovely remodeled 2BR, 1BA, w/den, A/C, all appl., deck, fenced in yard, 2 car gar., avail 2/1, no smoking, pets neg., $800/mo. 630-675-4485

Sandwich – House for rent 3BR, 1BA, stove, fridge, full basement, a/c, 2 car detached garage $1000 per/mo + sec dep, no pets 815-768-8879 Sandwich Waterfront Lake Holiday 3BR,1 car gar.W/D hookup,FP, pets OK. $1,275/mo, avail now. 773-510-3643 ~ 815-509-7975

Sycamore Quiet 2BR Farmhouse W/D hook-up, garage, off St. prkg. $695/mo + dep + ref. NO PETS. 815-793-2664

SYCAMORE ROOM

Available immediately. Utilities included, $95/wk. 630-650-1180

2BR, 2BA APT. Washer & dryer, central air, fireplace, exercise center. Cat friendly. Private fishing. $765/mo.

or use this handy form.

Public Notice is hereby given that on January 14, 2014 a certificate was filed in the Office of the County Clerk of DeKalb County, Illinois, setting forth the names and post office addresses of all of the persons owning, conducting and transacting the business known as Awn-Q Courier-Delivery Service located at 220 N. Juniper St., Cortland, IL 60112.

PUBLIC NOTICE

DeKalb/Syc/Cortland. Office/Shop/ Warehouse. Price & Size vary! Adolph Miller RE 815-756-7845

ASSUMED NAME PUBLICATION NOTICE

PUBLIC NOTICE Public Notice is hereby given that the Plan Commission of the City of Sycamore will hold a Public Hearing on Monday, February 10, 2014 at 7:00 PM at the Sycamore Center (City Council Chambers), 308 West State Street, Sycamore, Illinois to consider the vacation of a portion of an alley located between East High Street and East Ottawa Street and being west of Terrace Drive. Information regarding the proposed alley vacation is available for public inspection at the City Clerk's Office, 308 West State Street, Sycamore, Illinois. The subject property is legally described as: THAT PART OF THE ALLEY, AS SHOWN ON THE PLAT OF LAMOND'S ADDITION TO SYCAMORE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN BOOK "C", PAGE 62, LYING WESTERLY OF THE NORTHERLY EXTENSION OF LOT 1 AND EASTERLY OF THE NORTHERLY EXTENSION OF THE WEST LINE OF LOT 4, ALL IN SAID LAMOND'S ADDITION, IN THE CITY OF SYCAMORE, DEKALB COUNTY, ILLINOIS. All interested parties are invited to attend the public hearing or submit written comments to the City Clerk's Office at 308 West State Street, Sycamore, IL 60178. John Lewis

Public Notice is hereby given that on January 15, 2014 a certificate was filed in the Office of the County Clerk of DeKalb County, Illinois, setting forth the names and post office addresses of all of the persons owning, conducting and transacting the business known as HOLLYWOOD ADVENTURES located at 807 Ridge Dr. Apt. #1119, DeKalb, IL 60115.

Headline:___________________________________________

Description:_________________________________________ __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ Asking Price (required):________________________________ Best Time To Call:____________________________________ Phone:_____________________________________________ NAME:_____________________________________________

Dated January 15, 2014 /s/ Douglas J. Johnson DeKalb County Clerk & Recorder

ADDRESS:__________________________________________

(Published in the Daily Chronicle, January 18, 25 & February 1, 2014.)

CITY__________________________STATE_____ZIP________

JOBS ANNOUNCEMENTS STUFF VEHICLES REAL ESTATE SERVICES Daily Chronicle Classified and online at: www.Daily-Chronicle.com

PUBLIC NOTICE STATE OF ILLINOIS IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 16TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COUNTY OF DEKALB IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MARY M. MONTGOMERY, Deceased. IN PROBATE No. 2014 P 1 NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION NOTICE TO HEIRS AND LEGATEES OF WILL ADMITTED AND NOTICE FOR CLAIMS

DAYTIME PHONE:____________________________________ E-Mail:_____________________________________________

Upgrade Your Ad ! Add Bold $5 ! Add A Photo $5 ! Add an Attention Getter $5 ! ! !

Mail to: Free Ads P.O. Box 250 Crystal Lake, IL 60039-0250 ! Sell an item priced Email: classified@shawsuburban.com over $400 - $26

Ad will run one week in the Daily Chronicle and on Daily-Chronicle.com. One item per ad. Offer excludes real estate, businesses & pets, other restrictions may apply. We reserve the right to decline or edit the ad.

NOTICE is given of the death of MARY M. MONTGOMERY. Letters of Office were issued on January 8, 2014 to DANA FETTERS, who is the legal representative of the estate. The attorney for the estate is Gary L. Ecklund, 4023 Charles Street, Rockford, IL 61108.

AT YOUR YOUR SERVICE NOTICE is given to the UNKNOWN HEIRS who are the descendants of FRANCIS M. MONTGOMERY and MARY MONTGOMERY and UNKNOWN HEIRS who are the descendants of WILLIAM P. GRIDER and FANNY M. GRIDER, who are named in a Petition, filed in the above proceeding and whose names or addresses are not stated in the Petition, that an Order was entered by the Court on January 8, 2014 granting Independent Administration of the decedent's estate. This means that the Independent Administrator will not have to obtain court orders or file estate papers in court during probate. The estate will be administered without court supervision, unless an interested person asks the court to become involved. Within 42 days after the effective date of the original order of admission any heir or legatee may file a petition with the court to require proof of the will by testimony of the witnesses to the will in open court or other evidence, as provided in Section 6-21 of the Probate Act (755 ILCS 5/6-21). Under Section 28-4 of the Probate Act of 1975 (Ill.Rev.Stat. 1979, ch. 110 1/2, par. 28-4) any interested person may terminate independent administration at any time by mailing or delivering a petition to terminate to the clerk of the court. However, if the petitioner is a creditor, independent administration will be terminated only if the court finds that termination is necessary to protect the petitioner's interest.

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STATE OF ILLINOIS IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 16TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COUNTY OF DEKALB IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MARY M. MONTGOMERY, Deceased. IN PROBATE No. 2014 P 1 ________________________, on oath states: 1. On ___________________, 20___, an order was entered granting independent administration to _____________________. (Executor or Administrator) 2. I am an interested person in this estate as _________________ (heir) _____________________________________________________ (non-residuary legatee) (residuary legatee) (creditor) _________________________________________. (representative) 3. I request that independent administration be terminated. _____________________________ (Signature of petitioner) Signed and sworn to before me _______________________, 20___ _____________________________ Notary Public

K&J

Claims against the estate may be filed on or before July 20, 2014, that date being at least six (6) months from the date of first publication, or within three (3) months from the date of mailing or delivery of Notice to creditors, if mailing or delivery is required by Section 183 of the Illinois Probate Act, 1975, as amended, whichever date is later. Any claim not filed by the requisite date stated above shall be barred.

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Claims against the estate may be filed in the Office of the DeKalb County Circuit Clerk--Probate Division at the DeKalb County Courthouse, Sycamore, IL 60178, or with the estate legal representative, or both.

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Copies of the claims filed with the Circuit Clerk's Office--Probate Division, must be mailed or delivered to the estate legal representative and to his/her attorney within ten days after it has been filed. DATED: January 14, 2014.

Laing Mgmt.

DAILY CHRONICLE CLASSIFIED

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In print daily Online 24/7

A petition in substantially the following form may be used to terminate independent administration:

SYCAMORE Duplex 2BR, CA, Deck, new decorating & furnace. $870 Also Homes. Betsy Smith 815-895-2488 ~ 815-751-1025

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ASSUMED NAME PUBLICATION NOTICE

(Published in the Daily Chronicle, January 18, 25 & February 1, 2014.)

Sycamore E. State St.

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Sell any household item priced under $400.

PUBLIC NOTICE

/s/ Douglas J. Johnson DeKalb County Clerk & Recorder

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Daily Chronicle / daily-chronicle.com

/s/ Gary L. Ecklund Gary L. Ecklund, Attorney Name: Gary L. Ecklund Attorney for Estate Address: 4023 Charles Street City: Rockford, IL 61108 Telephone: 815 229-5333 (Published in the Daily Chronicle, January 25, February 1 & 8, 2014.)

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Daily-Chronicle.com/jobs

Saturday, January 25, 2014 â&#x20AC;˘ Page D3


CLASSIFIED

Page D4 • Saturday, January 25, 2014

Daily Chronicle / daily-chronicle.com

1st Annual certified pre-owned event DUE TO record new car sales, we have an abundance of locally owned vehicles priced to sell immediately.

‘12 mazda 2

‘02 FORD EXPLORER

‘13 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SXT

#3912A

#3577P

$

#3421P

$

10,990

1

$

5,900

LOCAL OWNER, ONLY 36K MILES, FWD, ALL POWER, KEYLESS ENTRY, PRICED TO SELL!

15,990

1

LOCAL OWNER, 120K MILES, 4WD, ALL POWER, REMOTE KEYLESS ENTRY, PRICED TO SELL!

1

LOCAL OWNER, ONLY 38K MILES, FWD, ALL POWER, UCONNECT, BUCKET SEATS, STOW ‘N GO, PRICED TO SELL!

$," &+.,$ $+(" $) #!/ +% ')- * ‘12 NISSAN SENTRA

‘08 CHEVY MALIBU LT

#3516A

$

#3439A

$

13,999

9,990

1

ONLY 27K MILES, FWD, ALL POWER, PRICED TO SELL!

!

3

ON EVERY PRE-OWnED VEHICLE

NON-COMMISSIONED SALES CONSULTANTS!

#3755P

$

1

LOCAL OWNER, 91K MILES, FWD, 17” WHEELS, XM SATELLITE RADIO, PRICED TO SELL!

5-DAy money back guarantee

!

‘13 NISSAN ALTIMA

15,999

1

LOCAL OWNER, ONLY 32K MILES, FWD, ALL POWER, BLUETOOTH HANDS-FREE SYSTEM, PRICED TO SELL!

! 30-DAY EXCHANGE !

4

ACTUAL CASH VALUE FOR YOUR TRADE!

A Sample of Pre-Owned Vehicles at One Low Price CARS

TRUCKS

2013 CHEVROLET CRUZE LTZ, 3309P .........................................$18,7901

2008 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 1500 WORK TRUCK, 3809B ......... $14,9991

2013 NISSAN ALTIMA, 3756P................................................... $16,4901

2006 GMC SIERRA 1500, 3918A .............................................. $12,7901

2013 CHEVROLET IMPALA LTZ, 3312P ...................................... $17,9901

2007 FORD F-150, 3463A ........................................................ $20,7901

2013 FIAT 500, 3576P ..............................................................$11,9901

2007 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 3500HD, 3757P .......................... $24,5901

‘13 CHEVY SPARK

2010 BUICK LACROSSE CXS, 2354A ...........................................$20,9991 2013 CHEVROLET CRUZE 1LT, 3379P ........................................ $17,9901 2012 NISSAN SENTRA, 3516A .................................................. $13,9991 2013 CHEVROLET MALIBU LTZ, 3790P ...................................... $19,3991

#3726P

VANS & SUV’S 2013 CHEVROLET CAPTIVA LT, 3252P ........................................ $20,9991

2013 CHEVROLET SONIC LT, 3724P ........................................... $11,9991

2012 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SXT, 3349A............................... $14,9991

2013 CHEVROLET SPARK LT, 3725P .......................................... $11,999

1

2013 CHEVROLET EQUINOX LT, 3853P ....................................... $24,9991

2012 NISSAN SENTRA, 3025A .................................................. $12,9901

2013 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SXT, 3401P............................... $16,9991

2012 VOLKSWAGEN JETTA SEDAN TURBO DIESEL, 3676A .......... $18,9991

2012 GMC TERRAIN SLE-1, 3746A............................................. $22,7901

$

179

/MO2

ZERO MONEY DOWN!

One Low Price, Plain & Simple, Always! D EKALB SYCAMORE C HEVROLET . CADILLAC . -,C

1925 Mercantile Dr, Sycamore, IL www.DeKalbMotors.com

(815) 748-0930 Exludes tax, title, license and dealer fees. See dealer for details. 2With approved credit; payment based on 2.99% APR for 75 months $0 due at signing. Excludes tax, title, license and dealer fees. See dealer for details. 3Pre-owned vehicles must be returned within 5 days or 150 miles in the same condition as when purchased to receive a full refund. 4Pre-owned vehicles must be returned within 30 days and same condition as when purchased to receive a full refund to use towards any vehicle.

1

DDC-1-25-2014