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Clay Campbell

Riley Oncken

Serving DeKalb County since 1879

Thursday, January 2, 2014

MARCH PRIMARY • LOCAL, A3

MEN’S BASKETBALL • SPORTS, B1

Judge to rule on Campbell ballot issue

Huskies enter year with 4th-best defense in MAC

Birders gather for annual count By BRENDA SCHORY

Know more about birds, birding:

bschory@shawmedia.com

• Kane County Audubon – www.kanecountyaudubon.org • McHenry County Audubon – www.mchenryaudubon.org • DuPage Birding Club – www.dupagebirding.org • KROW Birders – https://www.facebook.com/ groups/144242675643241 • Cornell Lab of Ornithology – www.birds.cornell.edu • Illinois Audubon Society – www.illinoisaudubon.org • National Audubon Society – www.audubon.org

Birds of a feather flock together, they say, and so it is with birders, as the hardcore watchers bundle up on snowy December days to count their feathered friends. The National Audubon Society’s 113th Annual Christmas Bird Count this month yielded some exciting numbers, volunteers said, as counts in Kane, DuPage, McHenry and DeKalb counties documented the ups and downs of various spe-

cies. Birds are counted across North America from Dec. 14 through Jan. 5. Volunteers count birds in designated 15-mile diameter circles every year. Results are tabulated and reported to the Illinois Audubon Society. The society then will report to the National Audubon Society, which partners with Bird Studies Canada, the North American Breeding Bird Survey and the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology.

See BIRD COUNT, page A3

Shaw Media file photo

People look for birds on Nelson Lake during a bird walk on New Year’s Day 2013 at Dick Young Forest Preserve in Batavia.

Illinois preps for wolves By MICHAEL TARM The Associated Press

two medium-sized trucks and four pickup trucks. He said the duration of the snowfall made it difficult for snowplow drivers. It also didn’t make it any easier that he was running low on salt, he said. “This storm just brings you to your knees,” he said. Fred Busse, Sycamore public works director, said his crews normally let some snow build up before they go out to avoid continuously scraping little amounts of snow off the street, he said. He said snowplow drivers don’t have an easy job. “We only have 12 trucks. We can’t be in every neighborhood every 10 to 15 minutes,” he said. “It could be four hours until you get through everything.” Busse said people should expect this kind of weather in northern Illinois. His crews will continue to focus on plowing the main streets first, he said.

CHICAGO – The wolf was believed to be a lone male expelled by a pack in Wisconsin. The hunter who shot him in northwestern Illinois, allegedly keeping his skull as a trophy, was the first person in the state ever prosecuted for shooting a wolf under federal endangered species laws. The incident, resolved in 2013 when the hunter pleaded guilty and paid a $2,500 fine, comes amid evidence of a modest but perceptible uptick in the number of wolves roaming across the Wisconsin border into heavily populated and widely farmed Illinois. Illinois’ own once-thriving wolves were hunted to extinction by the 1860s. But since the first confirmed sighting in the state in 150 years, in 2002, wolf sightings have gone from rare to regular – with at least five in the last three years. “We used to joke with our counterparts in Wisconsin that, ‘Yeah, one day your wolves will be coming to Illinois,’” said Joe Kath, the endangered species manager at Illinois’ Department of Natural Resources. “Well, we’ve reached that day.” That has state wildlife officials contemplating another day – still way off – when there are so many wolves in Illinois they’ll have to ask residents to decide if they want to encourage the growth of a wolf population or strictly limit it, possibly through hunting or trapping. “It’s too early to ask the question, but it’s not too early to prepare for a time when the question might have to be asked,” said Kath. That preparation, he said, has already begun, including by drafting plans on how to manage wolf packs should they become established. The North American wolves, known as gray or timber wolves, have proven resilient.

See WEATHER, page A3

See WOLVES, page A4

Voice your opinion Do you think area streets have been cleared of snow and ice fast enough this season? Vote online at Daily-Chronicle.com.

Photos by Rob Winner – rwinner@shawmedia.com

A moped rider is seen traveling north Wednesday on North First Street in downtown DeKalb.

By ANDREA AZZO aazzo@shawmedia.com DeKALB – The ringing in of the new year wasn’t so pleasant for some local drivers Wednesday. In a 24-hour span from 3 p.m. Tuesday to 3 p.m. Wednesday, the DeKalb County Sheriff’s Office reported helping 18 cars in ditches. There also were four property damage-related car accidents and seven personal injury car accidents, said Gary Dumdie, DeKalb Sheriff’s chief deputy. None of the accidents involved drivers sustaining major injuries, Dumdie said. Nathan Schwartz, DeKalb County engineer, said a full force of crews worked since 6 a.m. Wednesday – despite it being a federal holiday – dealing with drifting, dry snow. “It [was] certainly a battle out there,” he said. “It [was] light snow, so that means with any sort of wind, snow was drifting and blowing onto the roads.”

A pair of snowplows remove snow Wednesday afternoon from Lincoln Highway traveling west in downtown DeKalb. It takes Schwartz’s crews about three hours to make a full round to clear roads. By the time they got back to the beginning of their route, it gave plenty of time for snow to accumulate or drift back onto the road, he said. The National Weather Service reported between 6 to 8 inches of

snow fell between Tuesday and Wednesday. Mark Espy, DeKalb assistant director of public works, said this was the worst storm so far this season. His crews were working since 4 a.m. Wednesday, and all the crews were out: 16 large trucks,

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Page A2 • Thursday, January 2, 2014

8 DAILY PLANNER Today Safe Passage Domestic Violence support group; 815-756-5228; www.safepassagedv.org. Weekly Ladies’ Brunch: 8 a.m. at Fox Valley Community Center, 1406 Suydam Road, Sandwich. Cost for these women-only events is $4 for food and conversation, along with bottomless cups of coffee or tea. Back To Basics AA(C): 9:30 a.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb, 800452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Feed My Sheep Food Pantry: 10 a.m. to noon at Bethlehem Lutheran Church, 1915 N. First St. in DeKalb. All are welcome. Sycamore History Museum Brown Bag Lunch Lecture: Noon to 1 p.m. at Sycamore Federated Church, 612 W. State St. Free local history presentation, coffee and cookies are offered to the public; donations are welcome. Contact Michelle Donahoe at Sychist@tbc.net or 815-895-5762. www.sycamorehistory.org. Stroke Support Group: 2 to 3:30 p.m. at the NIU Speech Language Hearing Clinic, at Bethany and Route 23 in the former Monsanto building. For patients, their families and other interested individuals. Contact Lilli Bishop at lbishop@ niu.edu. Take Off Pounds Sensibly: 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. weigh-in and 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. meeting, Sycamore United Methodist Church, 160 Johnson Ave. Call Lydia Johnson, chapter leader, 815-895-4618. Open Closet: 5 to 7 p.m. at 300 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. Clothes and shoes for men, women and children. 815-7581388. ESL and GED Classes: 6 to 8 p.m. at Esperanza en Unidad (Hope in Unity), 2225 Gateway Drive, Suite A. To register and for more information, call Dr. George Gutierrez at 815-9703265. Keep It Simple AA(C): 6 p.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb, 800-4527990; www.dekalbalanoclub. com. One Day Café AA(C): 6 p.m. at Waterman United Methodist Church, 210 W Garfield St., 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Weight Watchers: 6 p.m. weigh-in, 6:30 p.m. meeting Weight Watchers Store, 2583 Sycamore Road (near Aldi), DeKalb. DeKalb County Amateur Radio Emergency Service: 7 p.m. on 146.73 megahertz. For information, call Bill Itter (N9EWA) at 815-895-2020. DeKalb County Marines Corps League, officers, detachment and auxiliary: 7 p.m. at Sycamore Veterans Home, 121 S. California St. For information, contact Peter May at sneakypete2@hotmail.com or 815-761-7732, or call 815756-6625. www.dekalbcountymarines.com. Mourning After: 7 p.m. at Great Lakes Leadership Center, 526 N. Main St., Elburn, for young widows/widowers, and young adults who have lost their partner to death. Call Conley Outreach at 630-365-2880 for directions and monthly topics. Sandwich Steppers AA(C): 7 p.m. at Fox Valley Community Center, 1406 Suydam Road, 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Free Fit Club: 7:30 to 9 p.m. at Sycamore Community Center, 138 Fair St., Sycamore. Featuring rotating cardio or yoga programs from various Beachbody workouts like P90X, Insanity, Turbo Fire, Body Gospel, Turbo Jam, Hip Hop Abs, Rev Abs and many others. Call 815-901-4474 or 815-566-3580 for more information. A Friend Of Bill’s AA(C): 8 p.m. at Trinity Lutheran Church, 33930 N. State St., Genoa, 800452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Any Lengths AA(C): 8 p.m. at Federated Church, 612 W. State St., Sycamore, 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Closed Discussion AA: 8 p.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb, 800452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com.

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8 WHAT’S HAPPENING AT DAILY-CHRONICLE.COM? Yesterday’s Reader Poll results:

Today’s Reader Poll question:

Which of the following are you most likely to do this year? Eat healthier: 24 percent Save more money: 19 percent Spend more time with family: 6 percent Quit smoking: 2 percent Volunteer more: 49 percent Total votes: 358

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8 TODAY’S TALKER

Colorado pot industry’s opening day By KRISTEN WYATT The Associated Press DENVER – The nation’s first recreational pot industry opened in Colorado on Wednesday, kicking off a marijuana experiment that will be watched closely around the world. Already, it is attracting people from across the country. Some of the sights in Denver, the Mile High City, on the historic day:

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FROM THE JAILHOUSE TO THE POTHOUSE Less than a year ago, James Aaron Ramsey was serving a brief jail sentence for pot possession. On Wednesday, the 28-year-old musician, having driven from Missouri, was among the first to legally buy weed. He brought a guitar and strummed folk tunes for about 20 people waiting outside one dispensary for sales to begin, as light snow fell at times. “I’m going to frame the receipt when I go home,” Ramsey said with a smile. “To remind myself of what might be possible. Legal everywhere.” Others who were waiting in line shared their own pot incarceration stories over coffee and funnel cakes. “They made me go to rehab for marijuana, but I’d get out and see all my underage friends getting drunk all the time,” said 24-year-old Brandon Harris, who drove 20 hours from Blanchester, Ohio. “I had to do pee tests, probation visits, the whole thing. Trafficking conviction. Nineteen years old. For a plant, how stupid,” he said, shaking his head.

‘YOUR GRANDMOTHER’S POT CONNECTION’ Tinted windows on a black limousine idling outside one Denver dispensary showed another side of the newly legal weed market – people eager to try legal marijuana, but not ready to be seen publicly buying it. Addison Morris, owner of Rocky Mountain Mile High Tours, had 10 clients waiting in the limo who paid $295 for four hours of chauffeuring by a “marijuana concierge” who would help them choose strains and edible pot products. “We’re your grandmother’s pot connection,” the 63-year-old said. “We’re not the hippie stoners who are going to stand in this cold and party.” Morris said she’s booked through the end of February with out-of-state clients. Guests receive samples in designer bags before getting tours. Morris said she’s selling discretion. Guests are asked to leave cameras at home. They avoided the crowd at the dispensary, where younger shoppers noshed on funnel cakes and doughnuts from a food truck. Asked if her guests wanted any of the carnival-style treats, Morris recoiled. “Oh God no,” she said. “We’re going to Whole Foods for breakfast.”

WILL THERE BE ENOUGH? Not all marijuana users in Colorado are toasting the dawn of retail sales. Some medical marijuana patients groups say they’re worried about supply. That’s because the retail inventory

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Customer Adam Hartle smiles as he makes a cash transaction at 3D Cannabis Center, which opened as a legal recreational retail outlet Wednesday in Denver. Colorado began retail marijuana sales on Jan. 1, a day some are calling “Green Wednesday.” for recreational use is coming entirely from the preexisting medical inventory. Many in the industry warned patients to stock up before recreational sales began. Laura Kriho of the Cannabis Therapy Institute said she worries prices will spike and patients will be left paying more if they’re not able to grow their own. “We hope that the focus on recreational doesn’t take the focus away from patients who really need this medicine,” she said. Their fears weren’t misplaced. Some recreational shops closed early Wednesday because of dwindling supply, and customers grumbled about prices going up. For now, medical patients should have plenty of places to shop. Most of Colorado’s 500 or so medical marijuana shops haven’t applied to sell recreational pot.

AT LEAST THEY OPENED ON TIME Some Green Wednesday openings were grand, with coffee and live music awaiting early shoppers. Others were more slapdash. As in, not sure until the sun went down New Year’s Eve they’d have all their licensing and permitting to open. The Clinic marked the opening of sales by turning on a Bob Marley CD and hurriedly putting out inventory. Manager Ryan Cook didn’t get clearance to open until Tuesday evening. “Never thought we’d be able to get here, but we did it,” a bleary-eyed Cook said, hustling around his shop after a long night waiting for new packaging bags that comply with new Colorado regulations.

NOT EVERYONE WAITED Recreational sales weren’t legal until Wednesday, but pot has been legal and free to share in Colorado for more than a year. So marijuana aficionados gathered statewide to mark New Year’s Eve with a group toke to count down to when sales begin at 8 a.m. At one party, a 1920s-themed “Prohibition Is Over” gala in Denver, women wore sparkly flapper dresses and men donned suits and suspenders to gather around communal rigs to light up to-

gether. A jazz band played, TV monitors showed “The Untouchables” and revelers gathered around a craps table and several card tables. Most of the smoking was outside, but still the air was heavy with marijuana. “This is just pure joy,” said David Earley, a 24-year-old marijuana grower form Colorado Springs. “To be able to come out and smoke publicly, it’s truly amazing.”

THEY BRAVED LONG LINES ... Two hours. Three hours. Five hours. Marijuana shoppers Wednesday paid a price for shopping on the first day – long waits. Lines snaked down the street outside most pot shops, and the waiting crowds routinely gave a little cheer when shoppers emerged, bags in hand. “How long have we been here?” one marijuana shopper asked his buddies as they emerged from one shop. The sun was setting and the group from Olathe, Kan., hadn’t yet checked into their hotel. They’d arrived at the pot shop five hours earlier. The group was smiling, though. “To be able to buy this legally, a much better quality than anything I could get at home, and know it’s safe and OK? That’s a good thing,” said Chris Albrecht, a 25-year-old jazz drummer on his way to a ski vacation in Winter Park.

...AND WORSE WEATHER Marijuana shoppers were treated to a classic Colorado winter day Wednesday – surprising warmth and sunny skies, interrupted by snow showers and intermittent bursts of frigid wind and rain. Shoppers huddled in gear more frequently seen on ski slopes, then at times peeled off outer layers to T-shirts as they passed the time snacking on hot dogs and sharing stories about marijuana. One of the hungry shoppers was Andre Barr, of Niles, Mich., who picked up a hot dog and shivered during a gusty stretch of his wait. He said the mercurial weather didn’t bother him a bit. “This is a huge deal to me,” Barr said. “At home, I live in fear. Because you will go to jail for the crummiest amount. This feels like liberation.”

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8CORRECTIONS

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8DID YOU WIN? Illinois Lottery

Wednesday Pick 3-Midday: 3-5-2 Pick 3-Evening: 4-4-8 Pick 4-Midday: 6-0-2-7 Pick 4-Evening: 7-1-4-7 Lucky Day Lotto-Midday: 8-11-21-28-33 Lucky Day Lotto-Evening: 6-8-20-23-26 Lotto jackpot: $9.75 million

Mega Millions Tuesday’s drawing Numbers: 8-12-34-52-58 MegaBall: 8 Megaplier: 3 Mega jackpot: $61 million

Powerball Numbers: 15-24-40-48-52 Powerball: 23 Powerball jackpot: $50 million

Marketing efforts to uninsured youth ramp up By KELLI KENNEDY The Associated Press MIAMI – The so-called “young invincibles” are so important to the success of the Affordable Care Act that supporters and detractors are spending millions to reach them with racy ads, social media campaigns and celebrity endorsements. The president is even (gasp) asking their mothers to help convince them to sign up for insurance. The federal government and states running their own exchanges have launched marketing efforts for this crucial demographic of healthy young adults, but it’s unclear if the messages are getting through. Eric Fisher, a 28-year-old from Salt Lake City, said he still hasn’t seen any of the social media campaigns – one of which targets Utah residents with images of people snowboarding and rock climbing. He tried to sign up online when the federal marketplace first launched but couldn’t because of the long wait times

and other website glitches. He said he’ll try again at some point. He added that the historic health care overhaul isn’t a topic he and his friends spend much time talking about. “It’s not like a coffee table conversation,” Fisher said. According to a recent Harvard survey, many of Fischer’s peers are undecided. A poll by Harvard’s Institute of Politics shows about 40 percent of people between the ages of 18 and 29 are on the fence about whether to sign up, with the rest split fairly evenly between those likely to enroll and those who probably won’t. The survey of 2,000 young adults was conducted from Oct. 30 to Nov. 11, after the first month of enrollment on the health care exchanges and when sign-up problems were at their peak. Consisting of healthy college students and twenty-somethings, the socalled “young invincible” demographic is the holy grail of the Affordable Care Act. Insurers need their participation to offset the costs of covering

older, sicker Americans. If enough young people decide not to buy insurance through state or federal marketplaces, it could throw off the market’s equilibrium and cause insurance rates to rise dramatically the following year. Federal officials haven’t released detailed demographic information on who’s enrolled so far, so it’s not clear how many young people have signed up. Ad campaigns in many states are courting undecided young adults. In Colorado, a nonprofit group created a series of provocative “got insurance?” ads. One features a blonde standing next to a life-sized cut-out of celebrity heartthrob Ryan Gosling with the caption, “Hey girl, you’re excited about easy access to birth control and I’m excited about getting to know you. She got insurance.” Another touting “Brosurance” encourages men doing a keg stand not to tap into their beer money to cover medical bills. When the exchange launched, models wearing nothing but underwear and “Get Covered” signs passed out fliers in

downtown Denver. Arizona and Utah ads targeting weekend warriors and other athletes note the risks of getting hurt without health insurance. Shmuel Johnson, who works in Los Angeles at a small sound studio, hasn’t seen any ads or perused the state’s health exchange. “There’s this elitist attitude that [politicians] think they know what’s better for us than ourselves and that’s part of why I take issue with this. I’m being forced to do something that’s not necessarily in my best interest,” said Johnson, a 31-year-old who’s never had insurance. “I don’t need insurance, man. I’m healthy.” He’ll wait until March to enroll and says he’ll select the cheapest, lowest-level of coverage available simply to avoid the fine. Experts expect many young adults, like Johnson, to wait until March. In 2012, 18 million 19 to 34-year-olds lacked insurance – or 27 percent of all people in that age group, according to U.S. census data.


LOCAL

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Thursday, January 2, 2014 • Page A3

Winterfest to celebrate county nature By ANDREA AZZO aazzo@shawmedia.com GENOA – In a few weeks, Waterman resident Phil Nielsen will get to show off what he calls his “gentle giants” again. The University of Illinois Extension will host its annual Winterfest from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Jan. 18 at the Natural Resource Education Center in Russell Woods Forest Preserve, 11750 Route 72, Genoa. Nielsen, along with his son and daughter, twins Matthew and Sarah, will offer horse-drawn wagon rides for a freewill donation from 1 to 4 p.m. Two Belgian draft horses named Ted and Bob will push riders for about 10 to 15 minutes along a road that runs through the woods and Kishwaukee River, Nielsen said. “It’s a time to connect with nature and the things our grandparents would have seen,” he said. “Now, you have the chance to experience it being out in the winter landscape and [seeing] the beauty in it.” The event also will include an interpretive morning hike

If you go n What: Winterfest n When: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Jan. 18 n Where: Natural Resource Education Center in Russell Woods Forest Preserve, 11750 Route 72, Genoa at 10 a.m. and 3:30 p.m., a bird viewing window where extension educator Peggy Doty will discuss bird behavior, the annual reading of “The Mitten” by Jan Brett, makeand-take crafts throughout the day and snacks from The Prairie Gems 4-H Club, according to a University of Illinois Extension news release. All activities are free, but donations are accepted, the release states. Nielsen, who has been participating in Winterfest for many years, said his horses have muscular necks and chests which helps them pull riders with ease. “When you’re looking at the horses and see the amount of work they do, the gentle giant nickname really fits them,” he said. “It’s pleasant for everybody.”

Judge to rule on GOP ballot issue By JILLIAN DUCHNOWSKI jduchnowski@shawmedia.com SYCAMORE – DeKalb County Judge William Brady expects to rule Tuesday on whether Clay Campbell will be on the Republican ballot for DeKalb County Board District 3. Campbell, a local defense attorney and former DeKalb County State’s Attorney, is appealing a Dec. 13 decision by the DeKalb County Election Board upholding opponent Riley Oncken’s objection to his nominating petition for the March primary. Whatever Brady’s decision, either side could appeal it to the Illinois Second District Appellate Court in Elgin. Oncken, who presently is a District 3 County Board member, is seeking re-election and objected to Campbell’s nominating petition because the addresses listed on his voter registration and driver’s license weren’t in District 3. Campbell acknowledged the addresses haven’t been updated, but argued he presently lives in District 3 and legally is eligible to run there. Oncken and Campbell presented about 90 minutes of testi-

Clay Campbell

Riley Oncken

mony Dec. 13 to the three-member Election Board. DeKalb County Clerk Doug Johnson and Luan Olson, of the DeKalb County Circuit Clerk’s Office, voted to remove Campbell from the ballot, while Stephanie Klein, chief assistant for the DeKalb County State’s Attorney’s civil division, voted to leave him on the ballot. Campbell appealed their decision. At a court appearance Tuesday, Oncken requested time to respond to Campbell’s appeal, while Campbell urged Brady to act quickly to limit the affect on his campaign. Military and overseas voters ballots can be mailed starting Jan. 31, with in-person absentee voting starting Feb. 6, according to the DeKalb County Clerk & Recorder’s Office website. Brady lives in County Board District 3, but neither Campbell nor Oncken objected to him ruling on the matter.

Local residents understand • WEATHER Continued from page A1 “You’ve got to understand there’s going be some snowpacked streets,” Busse said. “If someone has to drive out two or three blocks to get out to the main road, at least they get out.” Local residents understand that snowplow crews are tied up. Sycamore resident Andy Sharp used

DeKalb

his snowblower three times Wednesday, so he knows how much crews have to work to keep the entire county’s roads clear. “There are only so many trucks,” he said. “I think they’re doing OK.” DeKalb resident Jean Greensley, a fan of the winter season and cold weather, said residents should learn to deal with the weather. “It’s winter,” she said. “It’s supposed to be this way.”

Rob Winner file photo – rwinner@shawmedia.com

Last year, visitors to Genoa’s Winterfest at the Russell Woods Forest Preserve rode in a wagon drawn by two Belgian draft horses owned by the Nielsen family of Waterman, including twins Sarah Nielsen (left) and Matthew Nielsen.

125 group members stay in touch on Facebook • BIRD COUNT Continued from page A1 In DeKalb County, the KROW Birding Group did the count, said Mike Andrews of DeKalb. The circle includes Glidden Road, Kingston, Kirkland, Genoa, Sycamore and a corner of Malta. “The best bird of the day was a field sparrow – which does not belong here in the winter,” Andrews said. “We also counted a pileated woodpecker. That has never been recorded in the count here before. We have a new tiny population of pileated woodpeckers that have discovered DeKalb County.” The group has about 125 members who stay in touch on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ groups/144242675643241. “It’s an informal group, we have no meetings or gatherings – we just share information,” Andrews said. KROW stands for Kishwaukee Riparian Oaks Watershed, a name Andrews said he thought up while paddling down the Kishwaukee River one day. “It had to spell KROW,” he said. The McHenry County Audubon group counted 58 species, said Rob Gough of McHenry. “We counted 8,559 individuals, which was way down from our usual 11,000plus because we had no open water,” Gough said. “We lacked a lot of the water fowl that we normally got. We did get eagles, and a Bonaparte’s gull and a lot of Lapland longspurs. But none of the winter finches, which we had kind of hoped to get with the winter weather.” Genoa resident Karen Lund, who belongs to the McHenry group, said num-

Shaw Media file photo

People look for birds on Nelson Lake during a bird walk on New Year’s Day 2013 at Dick Young Forest Preserve in Batavia.

If you go: n Who: DuPage Birding Club n What: Hummingbird expert Nancy Carroll presents “Our Flying Jewels.” n When: 7:30 p.m. Jan. 9 n Where: Faith Lutheran Church, 41 N. Park Blvd., Glen Ellyn n Why: To learn more about hummingbirds. n Cost: Free bers were down because it snowed all day. “Our team had one screech owl and a yellow-rumped warbler,” Lund said. In DuPage County, birders reported two new species, said Jeff Chapman of Woodridge, a member of the DuPage Birding Club. “The American pipit and a pileated woodpecker,” Chapman said. “The pipit was counted at Fermilab. They normally migrate to southern Illinois by this time, so this was new.” The pileated woodpecker – made famous by the cartoon character Woody the Woodpecker – was counted in the Elsen’s Hill area of the West DuPage Woods in Winfield. “That is a bird that was not found in the Chicago area for years and years,” Chapman said of the large black woodpecker, known for the brilliant red crest on its head and the bold white stripes on its face and neck. “In the last 10 years, it’s

started to move in,” Chapman said. “It kept getting closer to us, and we finally got them in our area.” Other species with good showings were bald eagles, American robins and eastern bluebirds, Chapman said. “In 20 years, we had zero bluebirds, and this year we had 88,” Chapman said. “We never had one bald eagle until the last 10 years. We counted 25 of them, which broke our record of 20 in 2010.” They also counted 52 great blue herons, breaking its previous high count of 39 in 2006, Chapman said. The Fermilab count, which is half in Kane and DuPage counties, is shared by volunteers from Chapman’s group and the Kane County Audubon Society. Jon Duerr of St. Charles, a member of the Kane group, said 78 species were counted. “It was a record-breaking year for great blue herons, eastern bluebirds and eagles,” Duerr said. “It’s always

exciting to see the eagles flying back and forth across the river. It’s one of the feel-good stories about how the eagle population ... [is] taking advantage of the clean waters of the Fox River now and finding enough to eat here.” To the uninitiated, counting birds might seem like an impossible task – but Duerr and Chapman said it is important work done that will show local trends among bird populations for scientists to study. “It’s been done since 1900. That’s 113 years,” Chapman said. “It provides reliable data on a yearly basis where you can start to notice trends. We can clearly see an increase in eastern blue birds and an increase of Cooper’s hawks. Cooper’s hawks were nonexistent in the 1980s, and now you can see 30 and 40 of them.” For Duerr, compiling information year after year provides solid data about bird species and habitat. “The broad strokes are really quite striking,” Duerr said. “In Kane County, it’s 38 years of looking at something in the same area.” For example, the closing up of the area’s landfills over the last couple of decades has resulted in fewer gulls, Duerr said. “Ten thousand gulls frequented Settlers Hill landfill,” Duerr said. “That free food is no longer there.” Bird counts also documented the decline in the American crow population, still devastated by West Nile virus that hit in 2002. “The crow population in DuPage was especially hard hit by West Nile, and they have not recovered,” Chapman said. “Our high count of all time was 1,500 in 1998 …. Last year we saw 75. This year, we only saw 56 crows.”

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LOCAL & NATION

Page A4 • Thursday, January 2, 2014

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

14 taken to hospitals after Minneapolis fire By JEFF BAENEN The Associated Press MINNEAPOLIS – A billowing fire engulfed a three-story building with several apartments near downtown Minneapolis early Wednesday, sending more than a dozen people to hospitals with injuries – some critical – ranging from burns to trauma associated with falls. An explosion was reported about 8:15 a.m., and within minutes a fire raged through the building, said Robert Ball, a spokesman for Hennepin County Emergency Medical Services. Paramedics, amid subzero temperatures, responded to find victims on the ground, some with injuries that suggested they may have fallen multiple stories. “It’s not clear whether people were pushed out of the building from the explosion, or whether they fell or jumped out of windows to escape,” Ball said. No fatalities have been reported, but authorities weren’t sure whether any residents were still inside the building. Its roof had partially collapsed, making it too dangerous for firefighters to enter and sweep the premises, said Assistant Minneapolis Fire Chief Cherie Penn. Penn said 14 people were taken to hospitals, and six were considered to be critically hurt. Ten victims, including three in critical condition, were taken to Hennepin County Medical Center suffering from burns, broken bones or both, hospital spokeswoman Christine Hill said.

AP photo

Firefighters work the scene where a fire engulfed several apartment units Wednesday in the Cedar Riverside neighborhood in Minneapolis. Authorities say at least 14 people have been hurt. Penn said victims also were taken to Fairview University hospital, where a spokeswoman said she couldn’t release any information. Officials said it wasn’t immediately clear what caused the fire. CenterPoint Energy spokeswoman Becca Virden said there were no natural gas leaks in the area. Plumes of thick, whitish-gray smoke could be seen rising from the building

Wednesday morning, which has a grocery store on the ground floor and two levels of apartments above it. Flames could be seen through third-story windows, and the frigid air was filled was the acrid smell of smoke. Abdikadir Mohamed, whose uncle owns the grocery store, watched the scene in silence, struggling to put his thoughts into words. “This is bad,” he said. Firefighting efforts were

hampered by the cold weather. As firefighters aimed their hoses at the flames, water gushed from windows and doorways, forming icicles on window frames and leaving the street slick and icy. The facade of the building and trees out front were also coated with a layer of ice. Ball said the frosty conditions were creating an additional set of hazards for the 55 firefighters on the scene. “While heat-related ill-

nesses are common for firefighters, now you combine that with the rapid onset of frostbite or hypothermia when they come out and they’re wet and exposed to bitter cold temperatures,” he said. Minneapolis Fire Chief John Fruetel said the fire was essentially out by late Wednesday afternoon. He said none of the fire crew members was hurt, saying they did a great job under “extreme conditions.” Abdi Warsame, a Minneapolis City Councilman-elect for the area, said the victims were members of the city’s large Somali community. He called on other residents to come together to support the victims. Outgoing Minneapolis Mayor R.T. Rybak told reporters he was “deeply concerned” about the fire. “I’m also deeply grateful for the firefighters and other crews who came out here and kept it from getting worse,” he said. A mosque that is next door to the gutted building appeared to escape any obvious structural damage. Abdisalam Adam, the imam at Islamic Civic Society of America & Masjid Dar Al-Hijrah, watched the firefighting efforts and said he was praying for those affected by the fire. “It’s devastating and very sad,” he said. The Minnesota chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations said it was monitoring the fire in case the mosque was targeted, said MN-CAIR board member Zuhar Ahmed.

Drafting plans on how to manage wolf packs has already begun • WOLVES Continued from page A1 Their numbers in the lower 48 states fell to a few dozen by 1970 but dramatically rebounded with federal protections and wildly successful reintroduction programs in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Montana, Idaho, Oregon, Washington and Wyoming. Wolves weren’t threatened by extinction in Alaska, which by far has the most – 7,000 to 11,000 wolves – of any U.S. state. Minnesota is second with 2,200 wolves. In Wisconsin, which shares a 150-mile border with Illinois, wolf numbers went from few to none in the 1970s to more than 800 today. The core of Wisconsin’s wolf population is in its forested north. But Kath not-

8OBITUARIES DORIS L. SWEDBERG CLEW Born: Oct. 20, 1923, in Sycamore, Ill. Died: Dec. 29, 2013, in Alamo, Texas SYCAMORE – Doris L. Swedberg Clew, 90, formerly of Sycamore, died Sunday, Dec. 29, 2013, at her home in Alamo, Texas. She was born Oct. 20, 1923, in Sycamore, the daughter of Alonzo “Lon” Dagg and Ruth (Stroberg) Dagg. She was baptized and confirmed from Salem Lutheran Church, Sycamore. She attended Sycamore schools. In 1950, she married Norman Swedberg, and they made their home in Sycamore for 41 years. After Norman’s death in 1991, she became a full-time winter Texan. In 1998, she married Johnnie W. Clew, and they lived in San Antonio, Texas, until his death in 2001. After his death, she moved to Alamo. Doris enjoyed fishing and traveling with her husbands. Doris was employed for many years at Knodle’s Electric and then at Duplex Products. She worked for many years in food service. She retired in 1987. She was a past President of VFW Auxiliary Post #5768 in Sycamore (195758) and served on the Sycamore Library Board. Doris is survived by her son, Roger (Deborah) of Sycamore; grandson, Jamie (Kristina Keaton)

ed the wolves have on their own moved south, and one pack is near Beloit, Wis., only miles from Illinois. Also, lone wolves can leave their packs and roam more than 500 miles away in search of potential mates. Several shootings of wolves have occurred in JoDaviess County, which hugs the Wisconsin border in northwestern Illinois. That was where Earl Sirchia, of Elgin, killed the wolf that drew the scrutiny of federal prosecutors. He was accused of taking the wolf’s skull, and prosecutors said investigators had a photo he’d taken of himself with the dead wolf. Sirchia faced a maximum one-year prison sentence but instead pleaded guilty. No one answered calls from The

Associated Press to a phone number listed for Sirchia. His Bartlett-based attorney, Robert J. Krupp, hung up when the case was mentioned. In another case from 2011 in the same county, Jason T. Bourrette and his friend Perry Vesely, both of Hanover, were hunting on Crazy Hallow Road when they saw what they thought was a coyote – which are legally hunted year-round – tossing a mole up and down in its jaws, according to police reports. After Bourrette shot and killed it, Vesely cursed and said, “Ya know, this could be a wolf,’” he later told an investigator. In the interview, he added about wolves: “I’m sure sooner or later we’re going to have a pile of them down here, I’m afraid.” Differences between wolves and coyotes can

be difficult to spot, especially at a distance. But wolves are typically twice as large as coyotes, weighing as much as 115 pounds, and have larger muzzles and shorter, more rounded ears. Bourrette and Vesely were charged under state conservation law, but the charges were later dismissed. Earlier in 2013, the U.S. government declared victory in a four-decade campaign to rescue the gray wolf and lifted the federal protection in the Great Lakes area, including far-northern Illinois. But killing wolves anywhere in Illinois is still prohibited. Enough wolves are now roaming into Illinois that hunters need to remain cautious, and Kath said it was possible that wolves could eventually, years from now,

of Cortland; granddaughter, Tamara (Jonathan) Burriell of Sycamore; and great-grandchildren, Dalton, Bridget, Lily, MaKenna and Tanden; two stepdaughters, Carol Boethel and Laura Clericuzio; sister-in-law, Helen Dagg of Fremont, Ohio; brother-inlaw, Joe Minnegan of Sycamore; several nieces and nephews; and her devoted caregiver, Delma Martinez. Doris was preceded in death by her two husbands; her parents; her brother, Charles Dagg; her sister, Lois Minnegan; and two stillborn sons.

The visitation will be at 10 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 4, with funeral services at 11 a.m. at Salem Lutheran Church, 1145 DeKalb Ave., Sycamore, with burial to follow in Elmwood Cemetery. Arrangements were made by Olson Funeral & Cremation Services, Ltd., Quiram Sycamore Chapel. Information: www.olsonfh.com or 815-895-6589.

Cox, 86, of Sycamore died peacefully Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2013, at her home. Her memorial service will be at 1 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 5, at the Butala Funeral Home and Crematory, 1405 DeKalb Ave., Sycamore. Memorials for Ruth Cox can be made to the KishHealth System Hospice in care of the Butala Funeral Home and Crematory, 1405 DeKalb Ave., Sycamore, IL 60178. For information or to sign the online guest book, visit www. ButalaFuneralHomes.com.

RUTH B. ‘RUDY’ COX Died: Dec. 18, 2013, in Sycamore, Ill. SYCAMORE – Ruth B. “Rudy”

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become commonplace in the state. There are plenty of whitetail deer, Midwestern wolves’ favorite food, in Illinois. But only 14 percent of Illinois land is suitable habitat for wolves, which prefer forests, according to a 2013 study by Southern Illinois University Carbondale. The northwest, west-central Illinois and the southern tip of the state were deemed most suitable. And then there is the wolf’s by most accounts undeserved reputation as bloodthirsty – see “Little Red Riding Hood” – that points to the main factor in wolves’ future prospects in Illinois: humans. “It’s really not that they can’t survive in Illinois. They could,” said Kath. “The question is, will the general public allow them to survive?”

8LOCAL BRIEF Workshop to focus on profiting from small acres MALTA – A workshop called “Putting Small Acres to Work” will be held from 8 a.m. to noon Jan. 18 at the Kishwaukee College Conference Center, 21193 Malta Road, Malta. Participants may attend two general sessions and choose one breakout session to help develop new ideas to profit from small acres, according to a University of Illinois Extension news release. The sessions include “YearRound Growing,” “Organic Vegetable Production,” a sheep and goat production breakout session and a soil management breakout session. The cost is $10 a person and $5 for each additional family member. Register by Jan. 14 by calling 815-758-8194. For information, visit extension. illinois.ed – Andrea Azzo

Sign and read he online guet books at www.legacy.com/ Daily-Chronicle View a complete list of Daily Chronicle obituaries Click calendar dates for obits published in the last 30 days Keep up on obituaries that have already been printed in the newspaper or find other funeral-related services, including flowers and memorial Web pages provided by Legacy.com.

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A&E

Daily Chronicle • www.daily-chronicle.com • Page A5 • Thursday, January 2, 2014

KSO urges donations to endowment fund The Kishwaukee Symphony Orchestra, now in its 37th concert season, has launched an endowment campaign, “Keeping the Symphony ‘Sound.’” The KSO Endowment Fund was initiated to raise funds for the orchestra. The orchestra is funded by grants, contributions, and fundraising, with lesser support from ticket sales and advertising. The Douglas C. & Lynn M. Roberts Family Foundation has agreed to match the first $20,000 in contributions to the KSO Endowment Fund as part of the campaign. Contributions to the endowment help build a lasting source of revenue for the orchestra. The endowment has reached more than $130,000 prior to matching funds; the ultimate goal is to reach $200,000 before any interest is used. “The KSO board and I are grateful for the

community’s support of our orchestra. We are well on our way toward reaching our goal,” KSO president Ann Tucker said in a news release. “Every dollar is doubled for the first $20,000 of this campaign, and we are over halfway to that mark. We encourage donors to make end-of-the-year tax-deductible donations now for us to maximize the matching grant.” The KSO is 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. For information about contributions to the KSO Endowment Fund, contact Dan Templin of the DeKalb County Community Foundation at 815-748-5383 or dan@dekalbccf.org. Contributions to the Kishwaukee Symphony Orchestra Endowment Fund can be made via the DeKalb County Community Foundation, 475 DeKalb Ave, Sycamore, IL 60178, or at www.kishorchestra.org. Provided photo

Quintet completes Christmas project

NIU Art Museum Director Jo Burke (center) accepts an Award of Excellence from IAM Board President Dave Becker (right) and Executive Director Donna Sack (left).

NIU museums receive several state awards Provided photo

The Kishwaukee Brass Quintet completed the Just Make It Happen Brass Christmas Project for 2013 at the DeKalb County Jail on Dec. 17. Pictured (from left) are John D. Smith, Tom Sims, Sheriff Roger Scott (host), Jerry Zar, Mike Duffy and Ed Harvey. The quintet also gave Christmas performances at Target Foundation-sponsored preschool educational programs at Little Lambs Preschool in DeKalb, Children’s Learning Center in DeKalb and The Growing Place in DeKalb, and at Hope Haven homeless shelter, Barb City Manor and DeKalb County Court Watch.

8BRIEFS CCT schedules auditions for ‘Jungle Book’ Children’s Community Theatre is inviting children, ages 7 to 17, to audition for its spring production of Disney’s “The Jungle Book.” The show, based on the animated Disney version of a Rudyard Kipling tale, tells the story of a young boy, Mowlgli, raised in the jungle by a family of wolves. The cast of characters features the fearsome man-eating tiger Shere Khan, the sinister python Kaa, the hipster orangatang King Louie Mowgli’s protector, the panther Baggeera, and his best friend Baloo the bear. A jungle full of characters rounds out the cast, including elephants, monkeys, vultures and more. CCT will hold auditions for the show from 6 to 9 p.m. Jan. 12 and 6:30 to 9 p.m. Jan. 13 at First United Methodist Church, Fourth and Oak streets in DeKalb. The show will be presented March 28 through 30 at Sycamore High School. For more information about CCT or this show, visit www. CCTonstage.com.

Indian Valley band begins rehearsals for 2014 A new year is here and the Indian Valley Community Band, comprised of intergenerational musicians from around the Fox Valley area, is back rehearsing Monday evenings, from 6 to 7:20 p.m., at the Sandwich Middle School Band Room, 600 S. Wells St. New members are always welcome and there are no auditions. Even if you haven’t played in years, get out your instrument and be inspired. The band’s goal is to bring together musicians, young and old, to play and perform concert band music for the sheer enjoyment of playing for themselves and the audiences who attend their concerts. Especially needed are percussionists and a bass drummer. For more information stop in at any rehearsal or call Jean at 630-552-3875.

Northern Illinois University was honored with several awards by the Illinois Association of Museums at its annual conference. The non-competitive awards acknowledged a variety of educational programming, exhibits, promotional material and special projects. The competitive awards honored excellence and dedication in the field including volunteers, professionals and institutions. The Jack Olson Gallery of the NIU School of Art won an Award of Merit for the exhibition “Tagged: Exploring Modern Graffiti.” The NIU Art Museum received an Award of Excellence for two exhibitions: “Vice and Virtue,” curated by Peter Olson, and “Map-

ping: Measuring Across Place and Period...,” organized by graduate students in the exhibition and interpretation class taught by Jack Olson Gallery Director Peter Van Ael. The NIU Anthropology Museum won the Superior Achievement Award for its student-produced exhibition, “Trowels & Fair Trade: Revealing the Underground Railroad and Contemporary Slavery,” curated by Ashlee Craig and Kweku Williams. The Illinois Association of Museums is a statewide association of cultural organizations that includes art and history museums, arboreta, nature centers, zoos and aquariums and planetariums.


A&E

Page A6 • Thursday, January 2, 2014

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

Grave marker project helps bury the blues By ALAN SCHER ZAGIER The Associated Press ST. LOUIS – Blues guitarist Tommy Bankhead rubbed shoulders with some of the genre’s royalty, from Howlin’ Wolf and Elmore James to Albert King and Sonny Boy Williamson. But visitors to the overgrown St. Louis cemetery where Bankhead was buried more than a decade ago would never know his musical legacy. Or his name. Be it neglect, inattention or hard times, Bankhead’s family never added a grave marker to his burial plot. That will soon change thanks to the Killer Blues Headstone Project, a nonprofit effort to bring belated recognition to long-forgotten blues musicians. Though the group has posthumously honored musicians as far away as California, its efforts are concentrated in a fertile blues corridor that stretches from the Mississippi Delta through St. Louis, north to Chicago and Michigan. “These guys gave so much to America via music,” said Aaron Pritchard, the project’s vice president. “They deserve a headstone.” Pritchard, 33, grew up on rock ‘n’ roll and discovered the St. Louis blues scene after high school but stopped playing music for a living to raise his two small children. A

AP photo

Aaron Pritchard wipes off a headstone on Dec. 4 after laying the marker on the previously unmarked grave of blues musician Aaron Sparks in Crestwood, Mo. Pritchard is part of the Killer Blues Headstone Project, a nonprofit effort to posthumously honor sometimes long-forgotten blues musicians with grave markers. The group has laid 22 headstones to date, with several more complete but awaiting placement. retail manager by day, Pritchard must be equal parts musicologist, cultural historian, archivist and Internet detective for the blues genealogy project. Several years ago, he met a kindred spirit in Steven Salter of Whitehall, Mich., whose own search for his musical idols began with a detour to the Chicago area while en route to the New Orleans Jazz and

Heritage Festival. After stopping at the graves of McKinley Morganfield, better known as Muddy Waters, and Chester Burnett (aka Howlin’ Wolf), Salter found an unmarked grave for blues pianist Otis Spann. A letter bemoaning Spann’s fate to a blues magazine ignited a successful fundraiser and convinced Salter to launch the headstone project in 2008.

“I figured if I didn’t get to see them while they were alive, I could at least stop by their gravesites and pay my respects,” the 62-year-old said. “When I got there, there was nothing but a piece of grass.” While heartfelt, the project’s efforts remain modest. They have laid 22 headstones, with several more completed but awaiting placement. The flat grave markers cost between $300 and $400 each and are engraved with the artist’s dates of birth and death, along with images of keyboards, saxophones, musical notes or guitars. There’s no shortage of candidates: The project’s website lists another two dozen late musicians whose earthly whereabouts are unknown. And Pritchard carries a dog-eared reference book that lists the vital statistics of more than 1,400 blues players, organized by state. The headstone project follows the path of earlier efforts like the Mount Zion Memorial Fund, which emerged two decades ago when the Mississippi church where blues legend Robert Johnson was buried faced foreclosure. Record label executives and musicians such as John Fogerty and Bonnie Raitt led the efforts to honor Johnson, James and other prominent names. The Killer Blues project, by contrast, tends to seek out the less famous sidemen, musicians such as

Bankhead, a fixture on the St. Louis blues scene who nonetheless had to make ends meet by also working as a sheriff’s deputy and a security guard. Several appreciative family members, including his youngest daughter and her two children, attended an October benefit concert to raise money for Bankhead’s marker. “I really appreciate what they’re doing for the people,” said Willette Hare, who dated Bankhead. “I thought it was marvelous.” In early December, the project honored Aaron “Pinetop” Sparks, a hard-living boogie-woogie piano player credited with writing the standard “Every Day I Have the Blues” before his death in 1935 at age 27. Sparks’ grave was unmarked for another 78 years before Pritchard laid a stone at a historically black cemetery in suburban St. Louis. While some of the project’s graveside ceremonies lead to late-night jam sessions, the Sparks service was somber and simple, with only Pritchard, the cemetery superintendent and several reporters present. Once the stone was secured, Pritchard placed his iPhone on the ground, Sparks’ signature rollicking song filling the silence. ——— Online: Killer Blues Headstone Project: www.killerblues.net

Hollywood poised for best-ever box-office year By JESSICA HERNDON AP Film Writer LOS ANGELES – Despite a string of summertime flops, Hollywood is expected to have a banner year at the domestic box office, coming in just shy of $11 billion, the largest annual take ever. But because of higher ticket prices, actual attendance at North American theaters remained flat after a decade of decline. With the current domestic box-office tally nearly 1 percent ahead of last year at

this time, 2013 could surpass 2012’s overall haul of $10.8 billion by more than $100 million, according to box-office tracker Rentrak. High-profile flops such as “The Lone Ranger,” ‘’After Earth,” ‘’R.I.P.D.” and “Turbo” were offset by mega-hits like “Fast & Furious 6” and “Iron Man 3,” which consistently filled theaters last summer. More recently, Warner Bros.’ space epic “Gravity” has earned $254 million domestically, Lionsgate’s sci-fi

sequel “The Hunger Games: Catching Fire” has grossed $378 million and fantasy prequel “The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug” has brought in $150 million for Warner Bros. A strong holiday slate is also boosting the year’s box-office total. “There has virtually been every kind of genre of film available,” said Rentrak box-office analyst Paul Dergarabedian. “You have blockbusters like ‘Hobbit’ and esoteric, challenging films like ‘Nebraska,’ ‘Dallas

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Buyers Club’ and ‘Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom.’ All of these films get people to the movies.” But the National Association of Theater Owners projects that the actual number of tickets sold domestically in 2013 will remain about the same as last year’s 1.36 billion. That’s down from the all-time high of 1.57 billion admissions in 2002. In 2011, the domestic box-office gross sunk to a 16-year low, dropping 3.5 percent from 2010 to $10.2 billion.

But 2012 saw the industry rebound with a $10.8 billion total, thanks to hits like Disney’s “The Avengers” and Warner Bros.’ Batman finale “The Dark Knight Rises.” Both films screened in 3-D, a profit-boosting perk that saw a huge increase in popularity following 2009’s “Avatar.” But the public’s appetite for the heightened technology has eased, leaving Hollywood to search for other ways to counter audience drain. Entertainment available on countless portable

devices continues to threaten multiplex attendance, as do advanced home theater systems and video-on-demand services offering original premium programming and feature films the same day as their theatrical release. But Hollywood is fighting back with the premium multiplex experience. Movie attendance may be tepid, but the audience is willing to pay more for theater extras, which keep the bottom line growing, even as admissions remain flat.

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Opinions

Daily Chronicle • www.daily-chronicle.com • Page A7 • Thursday, January 2, 2014

8OUR VIEW

8SKETCH VIEW

New Year’s wish list for Springfield

8VIEWS

Fight inertia and keep New Year’s resolutions By CASS R. SUNSTEIN Bloomberg View Many New Year’s resolutions are about redemption. Maybe you aren’t the sort of person you want to be. Maybe you procrastinate; maybe you’re impatient or impulsive. Maybe you haven’t taken steps that would enable you to make your life better – with more time off from work, a vacation in a gorgeous setting, an adventure or two. On New Year’s Eve, you resolve to make a change. But within a month, you’re back to your normal patterns. How come? Some clues can be found in a study with the revealing title “Everyone Believes in Redemption.” The paper, by the economists Robert Letzler of the Federal Trade Commission and Joshua Tasoff of Claremont Graduate University, doesn’t involve New Year’s resolutions. But it demonstrates that people suffer from both unrealistic optimism and inertia, which make it hard for them to carry out their plans. Letzler and Tasoff gave the participants in their study an opportunity to earn $20 by redeeming a mail-in form. The subjects were instructed to print out a “certification page,” which they were required to include with their form. Participants also were asked to predict the likelihood that they would send in the form. As it happens, their responses were wildly optimistic. Actual redemption rates ended up being about 50 percent lower than what the participants predicted. In other words, they resolved to mail in the form, and they fully expected to do so – but ultimately they didn’t.

Can anything be done to help? Letzler and Tasoff tried three different interventions. First, they informed people about the low redemption rates of earlier participants. But this information, helpful though it would seem, had no effect on people’s optimism about what they would themselves do or on the likelihood they would mail in the form. Second, Letzler and Tasoff sent people emails to remind them of the approaching deadline for redemption. The researchers had reason to think this intervention would be effective, because reminders have been found to work in (for example) getting people to pay their bills and to come to doctor appointments. But in the case of the rebates, reminders had no effect. People ignored them. Finally, Letzler and Tasoff eliminated the requirement that subjects print out and submit a certification page as part of the redemption process. This was the only intervention that worked. By making things easier, they increased redemption rates by about 20 percent. The important lesson here is that simplification brought people’s predictions closer in line with reality by changing their behavior, not their beliefs. Once the process became a bit easier, people became more likely to take action and make good on their predictions. When people are unrealistically optimistic about what they will do, Letzler and Tasoff conclude, it is because they don’t pay enough attention to the costs and burdens involved. When they resolve

to act, and when they make inaccurate predictions about their own behavior, the benefits of action are salient, but the costs are not. Consider New Year’s resolutions in this light. It’s easy to resolve to be more altruistic, to exercise greater self-control, to be more patient, or to enhance one’s life, but it’s costly to do these things. Suppose you aren’t always as generous and kind as you would like to be, or that you have trouble resisting temptation, or that you don’t give yourself enough time off. If so, it’s probably because it’s costly to do those things, and it’s hard to anticipate those costs and burdens in advance. The best remedy is to find ways to reduce such costs and burdens. If you want to be more altruistic, you might set up automatic monthly gifts to your favorite charity. If you want to increase your self-control, you might alter your environment so that you run into temptations less often – for example, by keeping less food in your refrigerator. Months or even weeks after New Year’s, many people learn that optimism and inertia are a potent combination. To overcome them, it helps to make redemption automatic – or at least a lot simpler.

• Cass R. Sunstein, a Bloomberg View columnist, is the Robert Walmsley University professor at Harvard Law School and a former administrator of the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs.

8VIEWS

Seven U.S. women who made a difference in 2013 By JOANN WEINER

Whether it was by showing courage when confronting a personal tragedy, by reminding us of the collective tragedies Americans have faced over the decades or merely by proving there’s no stopping women from reaching the top, these U.S. women made us think about what is important in our own lives. • Myrlie Evers-Williams, for keeping America’s focus on the work that still needs to be done to advance civil rights. The year began on a joyful note when Evers-Williams delivered the invocation for President Barack Obama’s second inauguration, making the 80-year-old activist the first woman to lead the prayer at the ceremony. Evers-Williams’ speech set the tone for a year of tragic and triumphant remembrances, from the 50th anniversary of the assassinations of her husband, NAACP leader Medgar Evers, and of President John Kennedy, to the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, led by civil rights champion the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., and the 150th anniversary of President Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation. • Gabrielle Giffords, for pressuring Americans to do something about the thousands of innocent people who die each year because someone shot them with a gun. On Jan. 30, Giffords, a former U.S. representative from Arizona, got all of America’s attention when she told Congress that “Too many children are dying. Too many children.” The 43-yearold Giffords spoke just weeks after a young man who was barely out of his teenage years shot and killed 20 children at Sandy Hook Elementary School, and two years after she had been shot in the head while holding a town hall meeting outside a Safeway in Tucson. She and her husband, former astro-

naut Mark Kelly, co-founded Americans for Responsible Solutions to try to reduce gun violence. • Robin Roberts, for not allowing cancer to derail her career and making it easier for others to face their own health issues. On Feb. 20, Roberts returned to her desk at ABC’s “Good Morning America” following a successful bone marrow transplant. Roberts had already battled breast cancer in 2007. Roberts, 53, allowed the public to follow her treatment through video updates on “GMA” and her own diaries. • Sheryl Sandberg, for creating a movement that encourages women to believe that they deserve a place at the table – even if they sometimes have to excuse themselves to drive their kids to soccer practice. In March, Sandberg, Facebook’s 44-year-old chief operating officer, published a manifesto titled “Lean In” (co-written with Nell Scovell) that argued that women need to change the way they perceive their place in the working world. Her book led thousands of women to launch “lean in” groups where they challenge one another to negotiate for what they deserve, to not give up their careers just because they wish to have a family, and to seize leadership roles because they have earned them. • Janet Yellen, for proving the best-qualified person for the job is often a woman. For much of last summer, Washington’s Fed watchers argued about whether Yellen, a Fed vice chairwoman, or Harvard professor Larry Summers would be the best person to succeed Ben Bernanke as chair of the Federal Reserve. In many ways the debate was a distraction, as there was never any doubt that Yellen has the qualifications to head the most powerful central bank in the world. She’s been a member of the Fed’s Board of Governors, chairman of the Council

of Economic Advisers and president of the San Francisco Federal Reserve Bank. If confirmed, Yellen, who has a reputation as a fighter against high unemployment, would become the first woman to lead America’s 100-year-old central bank. • Kathleen Sebelius, for her ferocious defense of Obama’s signature legislative achievement. On Oct. 1, Americans were supposed to be able to purchase health insurance online through HealthCare.gov, but computer glitches caused the site to crash, thus allowing just a handful of people to sign up for insurance that day. Two months later, the site is functioning much better and the Obama administration announced Sunday that more than 1.1 million people have chosen an insurance plan. Sebelius, 65, secretary of Health and Human Services, has staunchly defended the Affordable Care Act and refused calls to resign following the flawed website rollout and has shown a flexibility to change the law when such change is needed to ensure its survival. • Mary Barra, for breaking another glass ceiling in the corporate world. More than 100 years after the first car rolled out of its factory, General Motors has put a woman in the driver’s seat and made the automotive industry another place where women have risen to the top. Barra, 52, who holds engineering and business degrees, is a career GM executive, with stints in human resources and product development. When she becomes CEO in January, Barra will bring to 22 the number of women who lead Fortune 500 companies.

• Joann Weiner teaches economics at George Washington University and contributes to The Washington Post’s She The People blog. She has worked as an economist at the U.S. Treasury Department.

Letters to the Editor Karen Pletsch – General Manager

Eric Olson – Editor

kpletsch@shawmedia.com

eolson@shawmedia.com

Dana Herra – MidWeek Editor dherra@shawmedia.com

Inger Koch – Features Editor ikoch@shawmedia.com

Jillian Duchnowski – News Editor jduchnowski@shawmedia.com

We welcome original letters on public issues. Letters must include the author’s full name, address and day and evening phone numbers. We limit letters to 400 words. We accept one letter per person every 15 days. All letters are subject to editing for length and clarity. Email: news@daily-chronicle.com. Mail: Daily Chronicle, Letters to the Editor, 1586 Barber Greene Road, DeKalb, IL 60115. Fax: 815-758-5059.

Welcome to 2014, an election year for statewide offices, including governor, state representatives and one-third of our state senators. Obviously, with it being an election year, it will be less likely for those seeking office to say or do anything that might lose them votes. Which means it could be a long and unproductive 2014 in Springfield. Wait, sounds like 2013. And 2012. Anyway, even against all odds, we have a wish list of things we’d like to see happen in state government this year. • Allow the “temporary” income tax increase to expire Jan. 1, 2015. In 2011, a lame duck General Assembly passed personal and corporate income tax increases to help pay off a backlog of unpaid bills. The personal tax rate jumped to 5 percent from 3 percent. If allowed to expire, the rate will decrease to For the record 3.75 percent in 2015. • Squash all talk of a We hope the Local progressive income tax. Government ConsolidaIn a progressive – or tion Commission offers graduated – structure, high- substantial and meaningful er earners pay a ways to eliminate needless larger percentage of levels of government their income than lower in Illinois and that the earners. Some Democrats General Assembly takes in Springfield are – not steps toward enacting surprisingly – pushing for consolidation. a progressive tax. However, any change from a flat tax would require amending the Illinois Constitution. • Fix Illinois’ business climate. Business-by-business negotiated deals are bad for Illinois and are unfair to other businesses, particularly small businesses, which represent a large part of the economy. Continuing to give some big employers major tax breaks while not doing the same for others is not a viable long-term solution for Illinois’ poor business climate. • We have more units of government than any state in the nation. We could use fewer. The Local Government Consolidation Commission, which state Rep. Jack Franks, D-Marengo, chairs, is due soon to release its report on consolidating government. We hope the commission offers substantial and meaningful ways to eliminate needless levels of government in Illinois and that the General Assembly takes steps toward enacting consolidation.

8 ANOTHER VIEW

Economic wheel spins as textile jobs return In his pre-vacation press conference, President Barack Obama put out the notion that 2014 could be a breakthrough year. Outgoing Federal Reserve Chairman Benjamin Bernanke last week announced the central bank’s optimism. And daily headlines report encouraging developments with increasing frequency. One of the more telling indicators of economic recovery in recent days appeared in the Wall Street Journal, which reported on a hopeful trend: Chinese and other Asian textile manufacturers were relocating operations to the American South. At least four plants in Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina have opened or are in the works, because of a curious shift in economic details. It’s now cheaper to produce yarn in the United States – largely because of lower energy costs – and ship it to Latin American fabricators, who thanks to the North American Free Trade Agreement return finished goods to the states duty free. We’re a long way from a convincing reversal of fortune. As of November, the Journal reported, the Bureau of Labor Statistics counted 114,900 textile jobs in the United States, compared with 477,300 about 20 years ago. Still, it seems to be a viable trend. And, perhaps it’s just one of those inevitable points in the cycle of industrial evolution and disruption. For decades, the American textile business was centered in the northeastern states. In the latter half of the 20th century, businesses headed south to take advantage of cheaper labor costs. And then, of course, even cheaper labor could be found overseas. Now the circle comes back around. And perhaps you’ve also noticed the recent heart-tugging TV ads from Kia Motors, which tout the Korean company’s vehicles now made in a plant in Georgia. Much has been made in the political arena in recent years about offshoring of American jobs. These developments might be indicating that economic recovery and thus better times for American workers are gaining traction. Kansas City Star

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. – U.S. Bill of Rights, First Amendment


WEATHER

Page A8 • Thursday, January 2, 2014

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

7-DAY FORECAST

Our storm system will move east of the area allowing for very cold and dry air to ilter in. A snow lurry or two is possible, but most of the snow will remain near Lake Michigan. Cold air moves in Friday with temperatures running 15-20 degrees below normal. Warmer weather arrives Saturday, but more light snow arrives late in the day.

TODAY

TOMORROW

Mostly cloudy, windy and very cold

Sunny and bitterly cold

SUNDAY

MONDAY

Partly sunny, Mostly cloudy, Mostly cloudy breezy and very breezy and very and warmer, cold cold afternoon snow

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

Partly sunny and continued very cold

Partly sunny and a little warmer

10

12

28

11

-5

-5

18

-12

9

8

-10

-16

-12

12

Winds: N 10-20 mph

Winds: S 10-15 mph

UV INDEX

ALMANAC

SATURDAY

Winds: SW 10-20 mph

Winds: N/NW 10-15 mph

Winds: W/NW 10-20 mph

Winds: W/NW 5-15 mph

Winds: S 10-20 mph

REGIONAL CITIES

REGIONAL WEATHER

DeKalb through 4 p.m. yesterday

Temperature High ............................................................. 18° Low ................................................................ 8° Normal high ............................................. 28° Normal low ............................................... 14° Record high .............................. 52° in 2007 Record low ............................... -14° in 1968

Precipitation 24 hours through 4 p.m. yest. ......... 0.12” Month to date ....................................... 0.10” Normal month to date ....................... 0.06” Year to date ............................................ 0.10” Normal year to date ............................ 0.06”

Last

Jan 15

Jan 23

The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. 0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme.

AIR QUALITY TODAY

New

Jan 30

Rockford 10/-14

Source: Environmental Protection Agency

Dixon 11/-16

How fast does a large snowlake

Joliet 16/-10

La Salle 12/-12

fall?

Evanston 20/1 Chicago 16/-2

Aurora 16/-14

WEATHER TRIVIA™ Q:

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Waukegan 18/-5

Arlington Heights 18/-5

DeKalb 10/-12

Main ofender ................................................... N.A.

Three or four mph.

Jan 7

Full

Lake Geneva 12/-11

Streator 16/-7

A:

Sunrise today ................................ 7:23 a.m. Sunset tonight ............................. 4:35 p.m. Moonrise today ............................ 8:02 a.m. Moonset today ............................ 6:35 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ........................ 7:23 a.m. Sunset tomorrow ........................ 4:36 p.m. Moonrise tomorrow ................... 8:46 a.m. Moonset tomorrow ................... 7:49 p.m.

Kenosha 16/-8

8 a.m. 10 a.m. Noon 2 p.m. 4 p.m. 6 p.m.

0-50 Good, 51-100 Moderate, 101-150, Unhealthy for sensitive groups, 151-200 Unhealthy 201-300 Very Unhealthy, 301-500 Hazardous

SUN and MOON

First

Janesville 10/-11

Hammond 17/-1 Gary 18/1 Kankakee 18/-4

Peoria 12/-7

Pontiac 18/-5

NATIONAL WEATHER

Hi 16 21 10 10 18 16 16 18 11 18 6 16 16 16 10 10 17 10 10 14 8 16 18 14 16

Today Lo W -14 sf 3 c -11 c -13 sf -2 sf -11 sf -10 sf -4 sf -14 c 4 sf -18 pc -8 sf -9 sf -10 sf -13 c -6 pc -3 sf -17 c -14 c -3 c -17 c -8 sf -5 sf -10 sf -12 sf

Tomorrow Hi Lo W 13 10 s 25 19 s 9 9 s 13 11 s 17 14 s 12 11 s 15 13 s 15 12 s 14 12 s 18 12 pc 17 15 s 17 14 s 14 11 s 16 14 s 15 13 s 22 18 s 15 13 s 11 7 s 13 11 s 20 16 s 13 12 s 13 11 s 14 11 s 9 9 s 13 11 s

RIVER LEVELS

WEATHER HISTORY The temperature at Haleakala’s summit dropped to a frigid 14 on Jan. 2, 1961. Hawaii is known as a tropical paradise, but the high mountains can be surprisingly cold.

City Aurora Belleville Beloit Belvidere Champaign Elgin Joliet Kankakee Mendota Michigan City Moline Morris Naperville Ottawa Princeton Quincy Racine Rochelle Rockford Springield Sterling Wheaton Waukegan Woodstock Yorkville

Watseka 18/-3

Location

7 a.m. yest.

Kishwaukee Belvidere Perryville DeKalb

1.21 6.10 2.60

Flood stage

9.0 12.0 10.0

24-hr chg

+0.07 +0.07 -0.01

DRAW THE WEATHER Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

-10s -0s 0s 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

Cold Front

Warm Front

Stationary Front

T-storms Rain Showers Snow Flurries

City Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Boston Bufalo Charleston, SC Charlotte Chicago

Hi 50 44 43 25 10 59 52 16

Today Lo W 21 sh 19 c 17 sn 8 sn -3 sn 33 r 25 sh -2 sf

Tomorrow Hi Lo W 40 24 s 21 10 sn 20 8 s 14 -1 sn 8 2 sf 45 26 s 36 18 s 14 12 s

Ice

City Cincinnati Dallas Denver Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles

Hi 30 44 50 53 22 12 61 80

Today Lo W 9 sn 26 s 30 s 31 pc 5 sf 1 s 43 s 54 s

Tomorrow Hi Lo W 20 13 s 51 37 s 59 20 s 54 36 s 20 14 s 32 22 pc 62 44 s 73 49 s

City Louisville Miami Minneapolis New Orleans New York City Philadelphia Seattle Wash., DC

Today Hi Lo W 34 14 sn 83 66 pc -2 -11 pc 57 31 pc 31 14 sn 38 18 c 48 39 r 46 20 sh

Legend: W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow lurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Tomorrow Hi Lo W 26 19 s 71 62 pc 14 9 pc 45 37 s 16 5 sn 19 6 sn 47 33 r 25 17 s

Earthquake Hannah, Cornerstone Christian Academy Mail your weather drawings to: Geoff Wells, 1586 Barber Greene Road, DeKalb, IL 60115

Forecasts and graphics, except WFLD forecasts, provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2014

OAK CREST DeKalb Area Retirement Center www.oakcrestdekalb.org

“Been there, done that...” I hate to admit it and probably shouldn’t but I don’t like to clean and tend a yard. I’ll be honest; I have better things to do with my Jan Nelson time. I would rather travel, visit with friends, take long walks and pursue my other interests. I love everything that Oak Crest offers and my family and I are especially appreciative that Oak Crest has taken much of the work and worry out of my future. Been there, done that pretty much sums up life before Oak Crest. Haven’t been there, haven’t done it yet sums up life now. Come and enjoy the Oak Crest experience. For more information call (815) 756-8461 or visit us on the web at www.oakcrestdekalb.org.


Sports

Kyler Elsworth and No. 4 Michigan State defeat No. 5 Stanford, 24-20, for the Spartans’ irst Rose Bowl victory in 26 years. PAGE B4

SECTION B Thursday, January 2, 2014 Daily Chronicle

Sports editor Ross Jacobson • rjacobson@shawmedia.com

8MORNING KICKOFF

KANELAND

Schedule begins to heat up Knights to play at the United Center Saturday afternoon

AP file photo

AP sources: Smith has deal to coach Tampa Bay TAMPA, Fla. – Former Bears coach Lovie Smith is set to take on the challenge of rebuilding the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Two people familiar with Smith’s plans said Wednesday night that the coach has reached an agreement to fill the opening created by the firing of Greg Schiano after a 4-12 finish. The people spoke to The Associated Press on the condition of anonymity because an official announcement hasn’t been made. One of the sources also said that former Minnesota Vikings coach Leslie Frazier will be the Bucs’ defensive coordinator. The 55-year-old Smith will replace Schiano, fired Monday after going 11-21 in two seasons in Tampa Bay. Frazier also was fired Monday. Smith was 81-63 in nine seasons with the Bears, leading the 2006 team to the Super Bowl – where the Bears lost Indianapolis. He was fired a year ago after the Bears finished 10-6 and missed the playoffs for the fifth time in six seasons. Smith was Tampa Bay’s linebackers coach under Tony Dungy from 1996 to 2000, then spent three seasons as the St. Louis Rams’ defensive coordinator on Mike Martz’s staff. Smith will take over a team that made strides on defense after acquiring cornerback Darrelle Revis and safety Dashon Goldson last spring, however the offense sputtered badly after the abrupt benching and subsequent release of quarterback Josh Freeman. – Wire report

More online For all your prep sports coverage – stories, features, scores, photos, videos and more – log on to Daily-Chronicle.com/dcpreps.

By JAKE POWERS jpowers@shawmedia.com The Kaneland boys basketball team will head into Saturday’s matchup against Geneva at the United Center on a high note. The Knights (7-3) dropped their first game of the Plano Christmas Sandy Bressner – sbressner@shawmedia.com Classic, then strung together three Kaneland’s Connor Fedderly shoots a 3-point- consecutive wins to earn a ninther during a Ken Peddy Windmill City Classic place finish in the tournament. More game against Batavia on Nov. 27 in Batavia. importantly, though, Kaneland built

momentum heading into a tough stretch of its schedule. Coach Brian Johnson structured the schedule to match up his team against some of the top competition in the area. “We’re gonna have a good test here on Saturday against Geneva, who is in my opinion one of the better teams in the state of Illinois,” Johnson said. “And then you throw on top of that Morris, who’s going to be in the championship (at Plano), and then Burling-

ton Central after that, who’s in the final four. We’ve got a tough schedule, and it was made that way for a purpose.” The matchup against Geneva (123), which will be at 2 p.m Saturday at the United Center, was a long time in the making. Johnson, who is in his fifth season as Kaneland’s coach, jumped at the opportunity to play at the venue. “My first year we did the same thing with [Geneva], and then with the conference change and their schedule, we kind of delayed it,” Johnson said. “Then last year (Geneva coach) Phil (Ralston) approached me about playing the game, so it was a no-brainer.”

SOCHI OLYMPICS

NORTHERN ILLINOIS

Kane on U.S. roster By SETH GRUEN sgruen@suntimes.com Hours before the U.S. hockey team for the Sochi Olympics was announced Wednesday, Blackhawks winger Patrick Kane made every attempt at humility. He feigned that he didn’t know whether he was named to the 25-man roster. In reality, he was showing respect to the selection process. There never was a doubt that Kane would make the team. He is, after all, the face of USA Hockey. “The thing about the tournament is it’s two weeks,” Kane said after practice. “It’s not like you’re building a franchise or you have a face of the team or anything. You’ve got to come together quick as a group, and I think the biggest thing in these tournaments is goaltending.” Pushed to talk about the upcoming tournament, Kane looked back. At the Vancouver Olympics in 2010, Kane, who was 21 at the time, played in one of the most memorable goal-medal games in Olympic history. Sidney Crosby’s goal at 7:40 of overtime lifted Canada over the United States. “Definitely a lot of highs and lows in that game,” Kane said. “I think the emotions were very up and down. It’s amazing when we tied it up, it feels like you’re on top of the world and the goal is in your back pocket. And then they come back and score, rip your heart out.” But this time, the playing field will be more level. Canada won’t be the home team, and the U.S. team has 13 players with Olympic experience.

8WHAT TO WATCH Pro hockey Blackhawks at N.Y. Islanders, 6 p.m., CSN Patrick Kane, named Wednesday to the U.S. hockey team for the Sochi games next month, and the Hawks take on the Islanders in New York. Also on TV... Pro basketball Boston at Bulls, 7 p.m., CSN+ College football Sugar Bowl, Oklahoma vs. Alabama, 7:30 p.m., ESPN Men’s basketball Wisconsin at Northwestern, 6 p.m., ESPN2 Michigan at Minnesota, 6 p.m., BTN Penn at George Mason, 6:30 p.m., NBCSN Saint Mary’s (Calif.) at Gonzaga, 8 p.m., ESPN2 California at Stanford, 8 p.m., FS1 Women’s basketball Northwestern at Nebraska, 8 p.m., BTN Prep football All-America Game, 3 p.m., ESPN

8KEEP UP ONLINE Follow us on Facebook and Twitter Want the latest from the area’s prep sports scene? Follow our coverage on Facebook by searching for DC Preps or on Twitter at twitter.com/dc_preps. Follow our NIU athletics coverage on Facebook by searching for Huskie Wire or on Twitter at twitter.com/HuskieWire.

See KNIGHTS, page B3

See KANE, page B2 AP photo

Northern Illinois guard Aaric Armstead (right) tries to take the ball from Iowa State guard Matt Thomas during the second half of Tuesday’s game at Hilton Coliseum in Ames, Iowa. The Huskies (5-6) are allowing only 67.5 points a game, fourth best in the Mid-American Conference, so far this season.

Dogged defense MAC standings West Division W L Pct. Toledo 12 1 .923 E. Michigan 7 5 .583 C. Michigan 6 5 .545 W. Michigan 6 5 .545 N. Illinois 5 6 .454 East Division W L Pct. Ohio 9 3 .750 Kent State 9 4 .692 Buffalo 6 4 .600 Akron 7 5 .583 Bowling Green 6 6 .500 Miami (Ohio) 4 6 .400

NIU enters ’14 with 4th-best ‘D’ in MAC By STEVE NITZ snitz@shawmedia.com DeKALB – Dontel Highsmith remembers when the Northern Illinois men’s basketball team was told about the new rules designed to curb hand-checking in college basketball. The reaction was a surprise. “We all looked up, we were all like, what is this?” Highsmith said. “Usually, if somebody gets past you, you bump them a little bit,” he added. “But that’s a foul now.” Around college basketball, there have been challenges and inconsistencies with the new way officiating has been handled.

More online For all your Northern Illinois University sports coverage – including stories, features, scores, photos, videos, blogs and more – log on to HuskieWire.com. However, the Huskies’ opponents have had trouble putting the ball into the basket this season, and NIU men’s coach Mark Montgomery thinks his group has handled the changes well, despite the inconsistencies they present.

See HUSKIES, page B3

AP file photo

Blackhawks forward Patrick Kane will have an opportunity for more Olympic memories after it was announced Wednesday that he is on the U.S. roster for the 2014 Games next month in Sochi, Russia.


SPORTS

Page B2 • Thursday, January 2, 2014

8PREP SCHEDULE TODAY Boys Bowling Sycamore at Ottawa, 4 p.m.

BULLS

NFL PLAYOFFS

Bulls like their chances in bad East By JOE COWLEY

FRIDAY

jcowley@suntimes.com

Girls Basketball Genoa-Kingston at Sycamore, 7 p.m. Newark at Hinckley-Big Rock, 7 p.m. Wrestling Sycamore at Harvard’s double dual meet, 10 a.m.

CHICAGO – Pulling down rebounds never has been a problem for big man Taj Gibson. Pulling punches? That’s always the stumbling block for the Bulls reserve. So of course he was going to all but guarantee a playoff spot for himself and his teammates on the same night that they had an awful loss to the Toronto Raptors. Why the bravado? “ ‘Cause the East is terrible, man, look at it,” Gibson said. “Then look at what we’ve done against the two top teams in the East (Miami and Indiana). We’ve played them as tough as anyone, so we feel like there’s no doubt we can get into the playoffs. “Once we get there, I mean we are no strangers to the playoffs. We know how to win games on that stage, in hostile environments. We just have to figure things out now, in this regular season.”

SATURDAY Boys Basketball Kaneland vs. Geneva at United Center, 2 p.m. Marengo at Genoa-Kingston, 7:15 p.m. Girls Basketball Indian Creek at Woodstock, 1:15 p.m. Rockford Boylan at DeKalb, 2:30 p.m.

8SPORTS SHORTS Elks Hoop free-throw shooting contest Saturday

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

Next vs. Boston, 7 p.m. today, CSN+, AM-1000 Therein lies the problem. Gibson is right, the Eastern Conference is terrible. But the Bulls are right there in that mix of bad, sitting at 12-18. And although they have split their first two games with both Indiana and Miami, sitting and 8-14 Taj Gibson against everyone else doesn’t exactly scream threat in the playoffs. Not when they can’t keep a consistent lineup in there from game to game, and more importantly, not when they can’t find a consistent way to close out games. Whether it’s one player or done as a unit, the Bulls still are searching for that fourth-quarter knockout punch.

Nate Robinson and Marco Belinelli aren’t walking through that door anytime soon, after both were key clutch players last season before walking in free agency. And of course Derrick Rose once again is lost for the season after tearing the meniscus in his right knee Nov. 22. That basically leaves a Help Wanted: Closer. Experience needed. “You can’t really say that it’s a matter of one guy closing out games for us,” Gibson said. “It’s about our team figuring it out, figuring it out how to get stops when it counts. It’s about stopping them and keeping our momentum going, and we haven’t been able to do that consistently. “It’s about counting on the guy next to you at the end of the day, count on the guys that are out there with you. That’s what we have to improve on and look forward to.” They had it Monday in Memphis. With the Grizzlies making a fourth-quar-

ter surge, D.J. Augustin hit a 3-pointer with 8:49 left in the game, made two free throws at the 7:13 mark and then hit another clutch 3-pointer with 5:52 left. Kirk Hinrich did hit a big 3-pointer with 3:34 left to stretch the Bulls lead back to 10, but it came off an Augustin assist because of the attention he drew. Although Augustin has been a huge pickup, if he’s the one that has to play late-game savior for the Bulls, especially with All-Stars such as Joakim Noah, Carlos Boozer and Deng on the roster, well, Gibson’s playoff prediction could fall very short. “We have to figure out how to win games right now,” Gibson said. “I know what we can do in the playoffs, but the problem is now. We can have Luol back and healthy, everyone, but if we can’t figure out how to win games, it’s not going to do us any good. “We will. That I’m confident of.”

SYCAMORE – Children ages 8 to 13 can compete in the Elks Hoop Shoot Free-Throw Contest on Saturday at the Sycamore High School gymnasium. The free contest will have divisions for boys and girls, based on age on April 1, according to a news release from event organizers. Registration begins at 9:30 a.m. First-place winners in each division will advance to district, state and regional competition. Regional winners qualify for a trip to compete at the Hoop Shoot National Finals to April 10 through 13 in Springfield, Mass. Trophies will be awarded for first, second and third place in all age groups. Pizza and soft drinks will be served at noon. For more information, call Katrina Mathey at 815-739-4662.

GRENOBLE, France – Formula One great Michael Schumacher’s condition was stable but still critical overnight as he remained unconscious after a brain injury suffered in a skiing accident, his manager said Wednesday. Sabine Kehm told reporters that his condition has not changed since doctors said he showed small signs of improvement Tuesday, after his second operation. Schumacher, who turns 45 on Friday, suffered critical head injuries when he fell and struck a rock while skiing Sunday morning during a family vacation at Meribel in the French Alps. His 14-year-old son, Mick, was with him in a group of friends when the accident happened. – Staff, wire reports

DIVISIONAL Saturday, Jan. 11 Green Bay, San Francisco or New Orleans at Seattle, 3:35 p.m. Cincinnati, Indianpolis or Kansas City at New England, 7:15 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 12 Philadelphia, Green Bay or San Francisco at Carolina, 12:05 p.m. Indianapolis, Kansas City or San Diego at Denver, 3:40 p.m. (CBS)

CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS Sunday, Jan. 19 AFC, 2 p.m. NFC, 5:30 p.m.

PRO BOWL Sunday, Jan. 26 At Honolulu TBD, 6:30 p.m.

SUPER BOWL Sunday, Feb. 2 At East Rutherford, N.J. AFC champ vs. NFC champ, 5:30 p.m.

NBA EASTERN CONFERENCE Central Division W L Pct GB Indiana 25 6 .806 — Detroit 14 19 .424 12 Bulls 12 18 .400 12½ Cleveland 10 21 .323 15 Milwaukee 7 24 .226 18 Atlantic Division W L Pct GB Toronto 15 15 .500 — Boston 13 18 .419 2½ Brooklyn 10 21 .323 5½ Philadelphia 10 21 .323 5½ New York 9 21 .300 6 Southeast Division W L Pct GB Miami 24 7 .774 — Atlanta 18 14 .563 6½ Washington 14 15 .483 9 Charlotte 14 19 .424 11 Orlando 10 21 .323 14 Southwest Division W L Pct GB San Antonio 25 7 .781 — Houston 21 13 .618 5 Dallas 19 13 .594 6 New Orleans 14 16 .467 10 Memphis 13 17 .433 11 Northwest Division W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 25 6 .806 — Portland 25 7 .781 ½ Minnesota 16 16 .500 9½ Denver 14 17 .452 11 Utah 10 24 .294 16½ Pacific Division W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 22 12 .647 — Phoenix 19 11 .633 1 Golden State 20 13 .606 1½ L.A. Lakers 13 19 .406 8 Sacramento 10 20 .333 10 Wednesday’s Results Dallas 87, Washington 78 Toronto 95, Indiana 82 Minnesota 124, New Orleans 112 Philadelphia 114, Denver 102 L.A. Clippers 112, Charlotte 85 Today’s Games Boston at Bulls, 7 p.m. Orlando at Cleveland, 6 p.m. Golden State at Miami, 6:30 p.m. Brooklyn at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m. New York at San Antonio, 7:30 p.m. Memphis at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Milwaukee at Utah, 8 p.m. Charlotte at Portland, 9 p.m. Philadelphia at Sacramento, 9 p.m.

AP photo

A Detroit Red Wings fan coated with snow watches during the third period of the NHL Winter Classic against the Toronto Maple Leafs on Wednesday at Michigan Stadium in Ann Arbor, Mich. The Maple Leafs won, 3-2, in a shootout.

NHL WINTER CLASSIC

Leafs top Wings in snowy Classic By LARRY LAGE The Associated Press ANN ARBOR, Mich. – A lot of winter. Very little classic hockey. Light snow swirled down in the Big House, making it tough to push the puck through piles of the white stuff on a sheet of ice where football usually is played. Teeth-chattering temperatures and a brisk wind were factors, too, that made the NHL’s Winter Classic much more of an event than a game.

Tyler Bozak scored the winning shootout goal and Jonathan Bernier made two saves in the heart-pounding final moments, lifting Toronto to a 3-2 victory over Detroit on Wednesday in front of 105,591 fans – the largest crowd to watch a hockey game. “I was just lucky to get a stick on it and keep it low enough,” Bozak said. The Red Wings were not as fortunate in the closely contested spectacle that was altered in a lot of ways because of the

conditions. Detroit captain Henrik Zetterberg appeared to have good chance in overtime with the puck in the Maple Leafs’ end and defenseman Cody Franson on his left side. The horn, however, sounded to stop play at the 2:30 mark of the extra period so that both teams played into a 10-plus mph wind for an equal amount of time. “I think I would have had a clear breakaway,” Zetterberg said. The game also was halted

midway through the third period so that the teams could switch sides. In the shootout, skaters for both teams attempted shots with the wind in their face toward the same net – or end zone. After a slew of skaters with shovels cleared the ice after overtime, Pavel Datsyuk scored Detroit’s only goal in the shootout and teammate Tomas Tatar was foiled on his team’s third and final attempt because he couldn’t control the puck on the snow-covered surface and didn’t even get a shot off.

Saad, Leddy Ottawa’s Ryan doesn’t make cut left off roster Representing USA U.S. HOCKEY

By LARRY LAGE

The Associated Press

Schumacher stable but brain injury still critical

Saturday Kansas City at Indianapolis, 3:35 p.m. New Orleans at Philadelphia, 7:10 p.m. Sunday San Diego at Cincinnati, 12:05 p.m. San Francisco at Green Bay, 3:40 p.m.

WESTERN CONFERENCE

AP’s Martin remembered as mentor, friend, talent ATLANTA – Known as a master of his craft, longtime Associated Press photographer Dave Martin collapsed on the field of the Georgia Dome after taking one of his signature photos: the coach getting doused by his players. The 59-year-old Martin suffered an apparent heart attack and died early Wednesday morning after working the sidelines at Texas A&M’s 52-48 win over Duke in the Chick-Fil-A Bowl. Friends and colleagues remembered Martin as a largerthan-life character who was always happy to share advice with fellow photographers who he often outshot. Martin covered nearly every major news event in the South over the past 30 years – including Hurricane Katrina and the Gulf oil spill – and he traveled to sporting events around the world and to conflicts in Afghanistan, Haiti and Iraq. His award-winning visual storytelling was splashed across countless newspaper front pages and the covers of Sports Illustrated and other magazines.

WILD CARD

ANN ARBOR, Mich. – USA Hockey used to have it relatively easy picking players for the Olympics. Not anymore. Bobby Ryan helped the United States earn a silver medal in 2010 in Vancouver and only 10 NHL players – from all countries – have Bobby Ryan more goals than he does this season for the Ottawa Senators. But unless Ryan gets a spot in place of an injured player, he won’t have a chance to help the Americans go for gold in Sochi. “We did not pick the best 25 players,” general manager David Poile said Wednesday after the roster was announced. “We picked the best 25 players that we thought gave us a chance to compete and win the gold medal.”

Forwards: David Backes, Dustin Brown, Ryan Callahan, Patrick Kane, Ryan Kesler, Phil Kessel, T.J. Oshie, Max Pacioretty, Zach Parise, Joe Pavelski, Paul Stastny, Derek Stepan, James van Riemsdyk and Blake Wheeler Defensemen: John Carlson, Justin Faulk, Cam Fowler, Paul Martin, Ryan McDonagh, Brooks Orpik, Kevin Shattenkirk and Ryan Suter Goalies: Jonathan Quick, Ryan Miller and Jimmy Howard And with goaltending and grit, the Americans might have some assets to help them compete with the defending champion Canadians along with the talented and extremely motivated Russians on their home soil. “There is a lot of guys that can skate well and on the bigger sheet, that’ll be huge,” defenseman Jame van Riemsdyk said after helping Toronto beat Detroit, 3-2, in a shootout

in the Winter Classic. Kessel’s sister, Amanda, was selected to the women’s team Wednesday. Ryan was perhaps the most surprising omission on the 25-man roster. Jack Johnson and Erik Johnson, a pair of defensemen who played in the Vancouver Games, also didn’t make the cut. Ryan has 18 goals this season – trailing only two U.S.-born players – is among league leaders with 36 points and has scored at least 30 times in four previous years. “If you’re talking about the Johnsons and if you’re talking about Bobby Ryan, they’re fabulous hockey players,” Poile said. “And if I can say this the right way, this is the first time that we’re having to make similar decisions that Canada has had to make for years. “We’re leaving off top, top players.” Jimmy Howard appears to be the Americans’ third goaltender behind Jonathan Quick and Ryan Miller.

• KANE Continued from page B1 The 2010 roster had three such players as the Americans rode the hot goaltending of Ryan Miller through the tournament. Notably absent from the U.S. roster are Hawks winger Brandon Saad and defenseman Nick Leddy. Saad was considered to be on the bubble and Leddy a long shot. But that will give them time to rest for the Hawks’ stretch run, when they could be called upon to play heavy minutes. Although Hawks coach Joel Quenneville acknowledged that playing in the Olympics is special, he also said the players who go to Sochi will need to be watched carefully when they return. “We wish them all the best, and [there’s] nothing wrong with them playing,” Quenneville said. “When they do get back, you have to keep an eye on them and see how they’re doing. Rest is going to definitely be a priority at a critical time in the season.”

NHL WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts Blackhawks 42 28 7 7 63 St. Louis 39 27 7 5 59 Colorado 39 24 11 4 52 Dallas 39 20 12 7 47 Minnesota 42 20 17 5 45 Winnipeg 42 19 18 5 43 Nashville 40 18 18 4 40 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts Anaheim 42 29 8 5 63 San Jose 40 25 9 6 56 Los Angeles 41 25 12 4 54 Vancouver 41 23 11 7 53 Phoenix 39 20 10 9 49 Calgary 40 14 20 6 34 Edmonton 42 13 24 5 31

GF 158 139 114 115 97 114 95

GA 115 93 100 113 109 121 119

GF 137 131 110 111 120 96 109

GA 106 104 83 97 120 126 143

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 40 26 12 2 54 117 86 Tampa Bay 39 23 12 4 50 110 93 Montreal 41 23 14 4 50 103 94 Toronto 42 21 16 5 47 118 120 Detroit 42 18 14 10 46 109 120 Ottawa 42 17 18 7 41 118 135 Florida 41 15 20 6 36 96 130 Buffalo 40 11 25 4 26 71 113 Metropolitan Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 42 29 12 1 59 131 96 Washington 40 20 15 5 45 122 119 Philadelphia 40 20 16 4 44 105 111 New Jersey 41 17 16 8 42 97 103 N.Y. Rangers 41 20 19 2 42 96 109 Carolina 40 15 16 9 39 96 118 Columbus 40 17 19 4 38 109 117 N.Y. Islanders 41 13 21 7 33 107 138 Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss Wednesday’s Results Toronto 3, Detroit 2 (SO) Tampa Bay at Vancouver (n) Thursday’s Games Blackhawks at N.Y. Islanders, 6 p.m. Nashville at Boston, 6 p.m. Carolina at Washington, 6 p.m. Winnipeg at Ottawa, 6:30 p.m. Los Angeles at St. Louis, 7 p.m. Buffalo at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Montreal at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Colorado, 8 p.m. Columbus at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Edmonton at San Jose, 9:30 p.m.

NCAA FOOTBALL BOWL SCHEDULE WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS Heart of Dallas Bowl North Texas 36, UNLV 14 Gator Bowl Nebraska 24, Georgia 19 Capital One Bowl South Carolina 34, Wisconsin 24 Outback Bowl LSU 21, Iowa 14 Rose Bowl Michigan State 24, Stanford 20 Fiesta Bowl Baylor vs. UCF (n) TODAY’S GAME Sugar Bowl Alabama (11-1) vs. Oklahoma (10-2), 7:30 p.m. (ESPN) FRIDAY’S GAMES Cotton Bowl Missouri (11-2) vs. Oklahoma State (10-2), 6:30 p.m. (FOX) Orange Bowl Ohio State (12-1) vs. Clemson (10-2), 7 p.m. (ESPN)


PREPS & NIU

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

The

Insider

Thursday, January 2, 2014 • Page B3

NOTEBOOK

Smaller, quicker lineup for DeKalb By ROSS JACOBSON

A closer look at the boys basketball scene

rjacobson@shawmedia.com Last year, the DeKalb boys basketball team’s size inside did a lot for the Barbs defensively. Teams were more hesitant to attack the paint. This year, with Andre Harris and Jake Smith graduated, DeKalb often goes with a smaller, quicker lineup that is more dependent on having solid perimeter defense. Guards Ethan Conroy and Pat Aves also have shown they aren’t afraid to step in front and draw offensive fouls. “Ethan provides some great defense for us, he took three charges the other night in a loss,” DeKalb coach Dave Rohlman said. “He understands the game very well and maybe, again, getting used to the pace of it, but mentally clearly a varsity basketball player.”

SPOTLIGHT ON ... ERIC PHILLIPS Hinckley-Big Rock, senior Phillips scored a Plano tournament-record 44 points in a triple-overtime loss to Sandwich. The previous record of 42 had been set earlier in the day.

WHAT TO WATCH FOR

Royals dealing with lack of depth

Kaneland vs. Geneva at United Center, 2 p.m. Saturday The Knights get a rare chance to play in a professional stadium when they take on Geneva in a nonconference matchup. Marengo at Genoa-Kingston, 7:15 p.m. Saturday The Cogs get back into conference play and look to put their struggles at the Plano tournament behind them.

Monica Maschak – mmaschak@shawmedia.com

DeKalb’s Micah Fagerstrom shoots over a Geneseo defender in the first quarter of a Chuck Dayton tournament game Friday in DeKalb. The Barbs won, 73-69.

Hinckley-Big Rock coach Bill Sambrookes already had the tough task of replacing five starters heading into the season. On top of that, the returner who earned the most minutes on last year’s team, Tom Sanders, did not come out this season because of back problems he suffered during soccer. Recently, senior Andy VanLanduyt suffered a torn ACL during an indoor soccer game in what Sambrookes called a freak accident. Right now, the Royals only have nine active players. “It’s hard to simulate some of the things in games in practice because we just don’t have the bodies to do that,” Sambrookes said. “So we’re a little limited as far as that. But we’ve got to work through that, that’s just an obstacle. Shouldn’t be an excuse.”

POWER RANKINGS 1. Sycamore (9-3, 2-0 NI Big 12 East) Spartans rebound from tough loss to Richmond-Burton. 2. Kaneland (7-3, 1-1 NI Big 12) Knights have won three in a row. 3. Genoa-Kingston (9-4, 3-0 BNC East) Cogs struggled with shooting at Plano. 4. Indian Creek (5-7, 2-0 Little Ten) Timberwolves dominated H-BR at Plano. 5. DeKalb (5-9, 0-2 NI Big 12) Barbs gained lots of experience at Dayton tournament. 6. Hinckley-Big Rock (4-9, 1-1 LTC) Up-and-down tournament at Plano for Royals. 7. Hiawatha (1-6, 0-2 LTC) Hawks had long holiday break.

Plano tournament a mixed bag for local teams With three teams ranked in the top 11 of the Plano Christmas Classic bracket, expectations were high for local teams. But after the conclusion of the tournament Monday, it’s safe to say not many expected Kaneland’s ninth-place finish to be the highlight. Hinckley-Big Rock, Indian Creek, Kaneland and GenoaKingston went a combined 7-9 over the week-long tournament. Each team got behind the proverbial eight ball early with

VIEWS Ross Jacobson losses in its first game. However, there were positives for every team coming out of the tournament that annually gives teams a good barometer of where they’re at heading into the second half of the season. Kaneland lost a tough game to Newark at the outset, but

then rebounded to win its next three games of the tournament, including a couple close matches against Dixon and Mendota. Indian Creek went 2-2, but played maybe its best game of the season in a 61-37 win over H-BR in the final game of the tournament. We’ll see if that spurs any momentum heading into Little Ten Conferene play. Genoa-Kingston fought shooting woes all tournament, but still led Kaneland at halftime and came out on the right side of a

one-point game against Forreston. H-BR’s Eric Phillips set a tournament record with his 44-point effort against Sandwich in a three-overtime loss. The Plano tournament isn’t the most important moment of a team’s season, but it still can help push a team in one direction or the other.

• Ross Jacobson is the sports editor of the Daily Chronicle. He can be reached via email at rjacobson@shawmedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @RossJacobson.

Former Western Sun rivalry renewed • KNIGHTS Continued from page B1 Johnson knows his team will have its hands full with a tough Geneva team that is coming off a tournament championship in the East Aurora Holiday Tournament. “We’re going to have to figure out what we’re going to do and hopefully we’re going to come out and compete,” Johnson said. “That’s all you can ask for.” Senior forward John Pruett is looking forward to renewing the old Western Sun Conference rivalry. He said the Knights have been looking forward to the game all year, both because of the opponent and the change of scenery. “We used to play Geneva,” Pruett said. “They were our rival. Geneva is a premier team in the area and the state.”

The rivalry game will be further amplified by the opportunity to play on NBA hardwood. “I’ve been [to the United Center] before for a (Bulls) game and it’s crazy,” Pruett said. “I could only imagine how it’s going to be playing on the court.” Pruett will only have to wait a few more days before the dream of competing in the arena will become a reality. Johnson views the game as a strong step for Kaneland’s basketball program. “It’s cool, the kids love it,” Johnson said. “My goal this year was to bump up our schedule and do some things that were neat that the kids can remember.” Given the way the two teams have been playing as of late, the matchup is looking like it will be a memorable one. Pruett, along with se-

nior guard Ty Carlson, have emerged as leaders for a Kaneland team that has had to play recently without guard Dylan Vaca and 6-foot-5 center Jacob Gomes, both out with injuries. Johnson hopes to have Vaca (wrist) and Gomes (ankle) back by the end of the month. In the meantime, Pruett, Carlson and Co. will look to build on their final three games in Plano and establish a consistent high level of play, something Johnson said the Knights have been lacking. Johnson hopes his team will recognize Saturday’s game as a model for how the postseason games will shape up. “We’re trying to get a regional atmosphere,” Johnson said. “Granted, the United Center’s not going to be packed, but it’s still a big gym. It’s going to be an awesome experience, the boys are all excited about it.”

Added height helps NIU on defense Next

• HUSKIES Continued from page B1 Heading into 2014, NIU’s average of 67.5 points allowed is fourth best in the Mid-American Conference. Before Tuesday’s 99-63 loss at No. 13 Iowa State, the Huskies were giving up 64.3 points a contest, which led the MAC. NIU still has its troubles on the offensive end, ranking 10th in the league, averaging 66 points a contest. But on the defensive end, the 5-6 Huskies have been efficient, despite the fact referees are calling fouls at a higher rate. “We have to adjust. Every game’s a different challenge; every official’s different,” Montgomery said. “I thought early we struggled with it, but as of late officials have been

✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓

vs. Bethune Cookman, 7 p.m. Friday, AM-1360 very consistent, so it’s been easier to play.” It helps that NIU has some size this year in centers Jordan Threloff (6-foot-9) and Pete Rakocevic (6-11). NIU’s rebounding margin of plus-4.7 is second in the conference. Montgomery said his team is playing a man-to-man defense about 70 percent of the time, but one adjustment he’s made because of the new rules also is playing some zone as well to stay out of foul trouble. “It’s effective, makes other teams change what they do,” Montgomery said. “It changes the rhythm of the game, you

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guard more of an area. The challenge of playing a zone defense is still rebounding the ball.” Threloff added that with the new rules, playing help-side defense is of extra importance. “They are calling quick fouls, so you can’t just leave a guy out on an island,” he said. “So everyone has to help everyone, there’s five guys working as a unit.” To Montgomery, defensive success comes down to having each other’s back, trusting each other and just buying into the system. “Buying in to the defensive drills we’re doing in practice,” Montgomery said. “They’re buying into. If we’re going to be in a game and win it, it’s going to come down to our defense and rebounding.”

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PRO & COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Page B4 • Thursday, January 2, 2014

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

ROSE BOWL: NO. 4 MICHIGAN STATE 24, NO. 5 STANFORD 20

BOWL ROUNDUP

Spartans Rose Bowl champs

’Huskers beat No. 23 ’Dogs in Gator Bowl

1st Rose victory since 1988 for Big 10 champs

The ASSOCIATED PRESS

By GREG BEACHAM The Associated Press PASADENA, Calif. – When Kyler Elsworth soared over the pile to deliver the final hit of Michigan State’s season, the storybook ending came with a moral. After so many years outside the spotlight, the Spartans are in nobody’s shadow anymore. And for the first time in 26 years, they’re Rose Bowl champions. Connor Cook passed for a career-high 332 yards and hit Tony Lippett with a tiebreaking 25-yard touchdown pass early in the fourth quarter, leading No. 4 Michigan State to a 24-20 victory over No. 5 Stanford on Wednesday night in the 100th Rose Bowl. Cook also threw a TD pass to Trevon Pendleton, and Jeremy Langford rushed for 84 yards and a score for the Big Ten champion Spartans (13-1), who finished their season with 10 straight wins and their first Rose Bowl victory since 1988. Michigan State overcame its first double-digit deficit of the entire season along the way, and the Spartans’ FBSbest defense capped a dominant season with one more old-school, smash-mouth performance befitting the centennial celebration of the Granddaddy of Them All. “It’s a special time for all Spartans, and we came here in force,” coach Mark Dantonio said. “I’m very happy for our football team, the resilience we showed all season long.” Michigan State’s defense yielded only 159 yards in the final three quarters and ended it by stopping the Pac-12

AP photo

Michigan State linebacker Kyler Elsworth gives quarterback Connor Cook a hug after their 24-20 win against Stanford in the Rose Bowl on Wednesday in Pasadena, Calif. champion Cardinal (11-3) on fourth-and-1 near midfield with 1:46 to play, stuffing a run play up the middle. Elsworth, a fill-in starter for suspended senior linebacker Max Bullough, hurdled the pile to deliver an electrifying, head-on hit to fullback Ryan Hewitt while his teammates helped out below. “When I saw their offensive linemen’s stance, I knew the way to make a play was to go over the top,” said Elsworth, selected the game’s defensive MVP. The huge Michigan State contingent in the Rose Bowl stands roared at the play, and even the stone-faced Dantonio visibly celebrated. “I get a little excited at the Rose Bowl,” Dantonio deadpanned. The Spartans have long labored behind Michigan, Ohio State and even Wisconsin among the Midwest’s top programs, but Dantonio’s seven-year rebuilding project in East Lansing has put them on top of the Midwest this season

with a perfect run through conference play. After knocking off the unbeaten Buckeyes in the league title game, Michigan State earned the Big Ten’s second Rose Bowl win since 2000. Tyler Gaffney ran for 91 yards and an early TD for Stanford, and linebacker Kevin Anderson returned an interception 40 yards for a score late in the first half. But the Cardinal couldn’t follow up last season’s success in Pasadena with back-to-back Rose Bowl wins, managing just three points from their offense after the first quarter. And Gaffney could only watch as Hewitt was stopped on Stanford’s final play. “You have to give it to Michigan State for stuffing that,” said Gaffney, who managed just 24 yards after the first quarter. “Everybody in the building knew exactly what was coming. A run was coming up the middle, and it was a test of wills, and they got the better of us.” Cook led in his own inimi-

table fashion, making incredible plays and huge mistakes along the way. Along with his costly interception to Anderson, he also threw two passes that went through the hands of Cardinal defenders, and an interception in the third quarter was wiped out by a defensive holding call. But when the Spartans needed big plays in the second half, Cook repeatedly delivered, finishing 22 for 36. “When we got down, guys were always helping each other,” Cook said. “We’re such a balanced team.” Kevin Hogan beat Wisconsin in last year’s Rose Bowl, but he couldn’t match Cook, going 10 for 18 for 143 yards and a key interception for Stanford. A mere 112 years after the game considered the first Rose Bowl was played in a park elsewhere in Pasadena, Stanford and Michigan State engaged in an old-fashioned slugfest in the venerable stadium that will host the BCS title game Monday night.

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. – Tommy Armstrong Jr. connected with Quincy Enunwa for two touchdowns, including a 99-yarder in the third quarter, and Nebraska held on to beat No. 23 Georgia, 24-19, in the rain-soaked Gator Bowl on Wednesday. Playing in their 50th bowl, the Cornhuskers (9-4) ended a four-game losing streak against teams from the Southeastern Conference. The streak included a 45-31 loss to Georgia in the Capital One Bowl last season. The rematch was much different. Nebraska did a solid job against running back Todd Gurley, who ran for 125 yards and a touchdown last year. Gurley finished with 86 yards on the ground. Gurley was more effective in the passing game, catching seven passes for 97 yards and a score. His 25-yard scoring receptions on the first play of the fourth quarter cut Nebraska’s lead to 24-19. But the Huskers stopped Georgia (8-5) twice on fourth down in the closing minutes. Rantavious Wooten and Arthur Lynch dropped fourthdown passes that ended drives in the red zone.

CAPITAL ONE BOWL No. 8 South Carolina 34, No. 19 Wisconsin 24: At Orlando, Fla., Connor Shaw was responsible for five touchdowns, including three passing, and South Carolina outlasted Wisconsin (9-4). The senior was selected the game MVP after picking apart the Badgers’ defense, completing 22 of 25 passes for 312 yards. Shaw also had rushing and receiving scores. The game also turned out to be the final college contest for South Carolina star defensive end Jadeveon Clowney, who

AP photo

Nebraska coach Bo Pelini holds the trophy after the Cornhuskers defeated No. 23 Georgia in the Gator Bowl on Wednesday in Jacksonville, Fla. Nebraska won, 24-19. said afterward that he would forgo his senior season to enter the NFL draft. South Carolina (11-2) won its third straight bowl game to cap its third straight 11-win season.

OUTBACK BOWL No. 14 LSU 21, Iowa 14: Tampa, Fla., Jeremy Hill ran for 216 yards and two touchdowns, helping LSU and inexperienced quarterback Anthony Jennings hold off Iowa (8-5). Craig Loston’s fourth-quarter interception stopped a potential tying drive, giving Hill a chance to put the game out of reach by carrying four times for 87 yards on a 92-yard march that gave LSU (10-3) a 21-7 lead.

HEART OF DALLAS BOWL North Texas 36, UNLV 14: At Dallas, Derek Thompson threw for 256 yards and two touchdowns, Brelan Chancellor scored twice and North Texas (9-4) dominated the second half to beat UNLV (7-6).

PACKERS

Healthier Pack a problem for foes By GENARO C. ARMAS The Associated Press GREEN BAY, Wis. – The gang’s back together, mostly, for the Packers in the playoffs. Aaron Rodgers and Randall Cobb pulled off a fourth-down stunner last week against the Bears in each player’s first game back from injury. Now imagine what Green Bay can do with the franchise quarterback and speedy receiver practicing without limitations for a full week, joining Jordy Nelson, James Jones and Eddie Lacy on the list of playmakers. Just in time for Sunday’s matchup against the San Francisco 49ers in an NFC wildcard game. “It’s going to be tough for defenses to play us, the way they’re going to approach the game as far as are they going to try to take the pass away, or

are they going to try to take the run away,” Cobb said Wednesday. “So, we (pose) a pretty obvious threat, I think.” No need to think about it. After a roller-coaster season, the Packers (87-1) are brimming with confidence. They took the NFC North title by winning three Aaron Rodgers of their last four games, and getting help from collapses by the Lions and Bears. Rodgers and Cobb helped seal a third straight division crown by connecting on an unlikely 48-yard touchdown pass on fourth-and-8 with 38 seconds left. With Rodgers back, anything is possible. “He runs our offense at a very, very high level,” coach

Mike McCarthy said. “When he’s on the field we’re different.” The left collarbone injury that kept him out for seven games is fine, so much so that McCarthy has no worries about him for practice this week. McCarthy isn’t worried about the leg injury that kept Cobb out, either. In fact, Rodgers was bothered more by cramping in his calves. He was facing his first game action in nearly two months. But Rodgers said his legs are fine, too. “Well, myself and Randall are back, that helps. We had a couple good connections on Sunday. It’s doing the stuff we want to do,” Rodgers said. “We want to be an up-tempo team, we want to get a lot of plays run, we want to try to wear the defense down a little bit.”

TEXANS

O’Brien known for work with QBs By KRISTIE RIEKEN The Associated Press HOUSTON – Bill O’Brien worked closely with Tom Brady when he was a Patriots assistant. He’s now set to return to the NFL to coach Houston, and he’s a long way from Brady. The Texans have the No. 1 draft pick, and O’Brien might find himself having to groom a rookie quarterback. Two people familiar with the negotiations, speaking to The Associated Press on the condition of anonymity because an official announcement hadn’t been made, said Tuesday night that O’Brien reached an agreement to coach the Texans. He is expected to be introduced Thursday. He inherits a team filled with talent, but whose biggest problem is at quarterback. Veteran Matt Schaub, Houston’s starter since 2007, was benched after six games. Case

Keenum took over after that, but his lack of success showed he wasn’t the answer either, and the team finished on a 14game skid. A number of talented quarterbacks could be available in May’s draft. Louisville’s Teddy Bridgewater, 2012 Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Manziel of Texas A&M, Bill O’Brien and Fresno State’s Derek Carr, younger brother of Houston’s first-ever draft pick, David Carr, are among the top-rated quarterbacks expected to be in the draft. O’Brien spent 2007 to 2012 as offensive assistant under Bill Belichick at New England. O’Brien was the team’s quarterbacks coach from 2009 to 2011, and Brady threw for 5,235 yards and 39 touchdowns in the 2011 regular season, when the Patriots went to the Super Bowl.

But his success with quarterbacks didn’t begin or end with Brady. In 2001 he was the offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach at Georgia Tech and worked with George Godsey. Godsey broke school records for yards passing (3,085) and completions (249) and led the ACC with 257.1 yards passing a game. His success in grooming quarterbacks continued at Penn State in 2012. Under O’Brien’s tutelage, senior Matt McGloin made remarkable improvement. He led the Big 10 in yards passing (3,271), completions (270) and touchdown passes (24). McGloin increased his completion percentage from 54.1 to 60.5 percent from 2011 to 2012. McGloin won the Burlsworth Trophy as the nation’s best player who began his career as a walk-on, and signed with the Oakland Raiders, for whom he started six games in 2013.

Announce your Wedding in Celebrations Each Saturday in the Daily Chronicle Visit Daily-Chronicle.com/forms or Email Celebrations@Daily-Chronicle.com or Call 877-264-2527


ADVICE & PUZZLES

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

Thursday, January 2, 2014 • Page B5

Family feuds over child of sister facing jail Dear Abby: My sister “Nicole” faked several pregnancies to keep her boyfriends around until they wised up. She is now really pregnant by a married man. Nicole has a long criminal history and has been in and out of jail for various offenses. She’s now facing drug charges that could land her in jail for the next 10 or 15 years. If she’s found guilty, my mother will get custody of the baby so it won’t have to stay in foster care. My parents are in their late 50s and financially capable, but they’re not in the best of health. Mom plans to raise the child until Nicole gets out of prison because my sister “always wanted to be a mom.” My husband and I have been discussing adopting a child and would love to adopt Nicole’s baby. If we did, we’d

DEAR ABBY Jeanne Phillips get a child and could provide the love, safety and security my sister cannot. And the child would get a stable home. Mom feels Nicole “deserves” to be a mom, despite the fact that she’s going to jail and flits from man to man searching for someone to love her. How can I get my mother to see that the needs of this baby HAVE to come first? She should be more concerned with this innocent baby than her drugged-out daughter. Am I wrong to feel hurt and think my mother is choosing her over me? – Heartbroken in Alabama Dear Heartbroken: Stop

personalizing this as a choice your mother is making between you and your sister. Try instead to make her understand how traumatic it will be to a child who could be as old as 10 or 15 to be handed over to a virtual stranger who has no job, no money and a long uphill climb to try and build a future. Your sister may have always dreamed of motherhood, but the most important part of being a parent – aside from loving a child – is being PRESENT. If your sister is found guilty, she will be absent long after her child’s primary attachments will have formed. If this doesn’t convince your mother to change her mind, you will have no choice but to accept her decision and consider adopting another child.

P.S. Perhaps your father will understand that what you’re proposing makes sense and will speak on your behalf. Dear Abby: I’m in my late 20s, single and have no children. I have lived on my own since I was 18. I own my home, my car and have no credit card debt, but my mother refuses to acknowledge me as an adult. When I do simple chores or cook meals, she acts surprised. She constantly pleads with me to move back home because she insists I can’t take care of myself and refuses to discuss it any further than belittling me. My friends say what she’s doing constitutes abuse. I’m not sure I agree, but I do think it is rude and manipulative. How can I deal with her condescending attitude when I’m

with her? – At My Wit’s End Dear Wit’s End: Most parents strive to make their children independent. Your mother may want you home not because you can’t take care of yourself but because she doesn’t want to live alone. I wouldn’t call that abuse but I do consider it to be selfish and self-serving. You should not sacrifice your lifestyle to live with someone as manipulative as your mother. When she attacks, laugh and deflect her with humor. Assure her that as incompetent as she thinks you are, you’re “muddling through.” And if she persists, point out that if she doesn’t ease up, she’ll be seeing less of you.

• Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Pregnancy with twins can be challenging Dear Dr. K: I just found out I’m pregnant with twins. How will this pregnancy be different from my last one? Dear Reader: Congratulations! Along with double the diapers and late-night feedings, you’ll experience double the love, laughs and fun. But, yes, you will have to deal with some challenges. In the United States, twins occur in one out of every 35 births. Twins can be fraternal or identical. Fraternal twins occur when two eggs are fertilized. This produces two embryos; they are not identical, and may not even be the same gender. In fact, fraternal twins are genetically no more similar than other siblings. In contrast, identical twins develop from a single egg

ASK DR. K Anthony L. Komaroff that cleaves, or splits, after it is fertilized. The two halves of the cleaved egg separate, creating two embryos that are genetically identical. A multiple pregnancy differs from a singleton pregnancy in several ways. For example: • Pregnancy symptoms, such as morning sickness and breast enlargement, may be more severe. • You’ll gain a substantial amount of weight. Pregnancy is the one time in most women’s life that a doctor suggests that they gain weight. You’ll

be advised to gain between 35 and 45 pounds if your weight was in the normal range to start with. Many doctors recommend gaining an average of 1.5 pounds per week during the second and third trimesters. • Symptoms of later pregnancy may occur earlier and be more severe. Your heavy, stretched uterus will place pressure on your organs. This may cause fatigue, shortness of breath, heartburn, constipation, pelvic discomfort, urinary leakage, back pain and hemorrhoids. • Complications are more common. These include pre-term labor, premature rupture of the amniotic membranes, pre-eclampsia, placenta previa, prolonged

labor and newborn problems. • You’ll have a higher chance of premature delivery. Many twins are born at 37 to 38 weeks of gestation. • Twins are more likely to be born with low birth weight (less than 5.5 pounds). • You’ll be at increased risk for developing anemia due to deficiencies of iron and certain vitamins. That’s why women carrying twins are prescribed relatively high doses of iron and folic acid supplements. • You’ll also be at increased risk of developing high blood pressure and high blood sugar during pregnancy, a fatty liver, and blood clots in the veins of your pelvis and legs. Having said this, these complications are still unusual and can be treated.

Your doctor will use ultrasound throughout your pregnancy to monitor the growth and development of the fetuses. Ideally, both babies should have similar growth and weight gain. Ultrasound also provides valuable information about the position of the fetuses. This information is especially important at the time of delivery. It can help determine whether it will be safest for you to deliver vaginally or by cesarean section. So this pregnancy may well be somewhat more challenging than previous pregnancies. But you’ll have two wonderful children.

• Visit www.AskDoctorK. com to read more.

Get over the game your own mind is playing Dr. Wallace: Michael and I had been a twosome for over seven months. For the first couple of months, we had great times together, but then things changed and I no longer looked forward to going out with him. Last week, I made up my mind to end our relationship. I spent hours concocting a final farewell so I wouldn’t let him down too hard. Even though I was dumping him, I sort of felt sorry for him and wanted our separation to be as painless as possible.

’TWEEN 12 & 20 Robert Wallace Last night, when we were at a restaurant, I was planning to spring our separation on him. You can imagine how dumbfounded I felt when, before I could say my piece, he said, “I really don’t want to hurt your feelings, but this will be our last date because I’m going to start dating a girl who goes to my

8ASTROGRAPH By BERNICE BEDE OSOL Newspaper Enterprise Association

TODAY – Your discipline will enable you to follow through on your plans. Your integrity will make a good impression. You will be ready to let go of the past and jump into the future. Don’t allow anyone to hold you back. Now is the time to invest in yourself and your goals. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) – Share your ideas with people who can help you to succeed. Focus on making shrewd business decisions. Hard work will be rewarded in the end. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) – Expect to give as much as you get. Solidify a partnership that will improve your future. Participating in clubs or organizations will lead to opportunity. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) – You are likely to feel unfulfilled if you haven’t put your needs first. Consider changes that you can make to improve your attitude. A trip will be informative. ARIES (March 21-April 19) – Don’t be tempted to join exclusive clubs that will cost you top dollar. If you’ve been flaky recently, an argument is likely. You will need to make concessions to make amends. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) – Remain impervious to irritations. There is no reason to argue. Stay positive and focus on productivity. You will receive as much as you contribute. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) – If you want a job done, do it yourself. Take initiative and work independently. A personal connection may turn out to be shallow. Before taking it too far, ask questions. CANCER (June 21-July 22) – Don’t walk on eggshells around a certain someone. Be honest, and clear the air. You need to decisively move forward while feeling good. You don’t need to change your values to accommodate someone unworthy. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) – There is much to anticipate in the new year. You have great ideas that can become lucrative if you act now. It’s time to implement changes. Rearranging your furniture may be a start. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) – That little extra effort will make all the difference in terms of a hobby or your work. Don’t be pressured into spending more than you can afford. If you stick to a budget, you will benefit. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) – Don’t allow anyone to aggravate you today. Think carefully about what you really want. Stop waffling and make a decision so that you may move forward. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) – No one else should be dictating what you should do. Be prepared to defend your point of view. If you don’t take control of your life this year, it will be your own fault. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) – Take a careful and honest look at your finances. Don’t bother gambling today. There will be ample opportunity to make money this year, but foolish or reckless decisions will lead to losses.

church.” You could have knocked me over with a feather! I didn’t know whether to laugh or to cry so I started crying. Think about the scene – I was planning to stop seeing Michael and had spent hours on how I would do it with the least amount of pain. Then he turns around and tells me that he’s ending our relationship because he has found another girl that he thinks about more than me. That’s hard to take. Now I feel miserable and my self-esteem has been

8SUDOKU

bruised. What I can’t figure out is why I feel this way. After all, our relationship has ended – that’s what I wanted. And because I felt sorry for him, I wanted the separation to be painless for him – and it was. I should be happy, but somehow I’m not. Why am I feeling this way? – Nameless, Santa Rosa, Calif. Nameless: You have already answered your own question; your self-esteem has been bruised. Regardless of the fact that you wanted out, being told that you had

fallen into second position with Michael was a shock. So was learning that he must have been feeling the same as you about the relationship losing its zip. You just have to let it go and be happy that you’re out of a relationship that had run its course. There’s really nothing to get over except the games your own mind is playing with you. Soon enough, it will be something to laugh about.

• Email Dr. Robert Wallace at rwallace@galesburg.net.

8CROSSWORD

BRIDGE Phillip Alder

My favorite call of last year In yesterday’s column, I described how Peter Fredin from Sweden analyzed an auction to deduce the look of the other three hands, then drove into a laydown slam that was missed by his opponents in a team match. Today, here is my favorite call of last year. It happened too late for the International Bridge Press Association awards, but is surely a front-runner for this year’s. It was originally described by Marek Wojcicki, for many years the coach of the Polish open team. The deal arose during last October’s Cavendish Invitational Pairs in Monaco. Look at only the West hand, which was held by Bartosz Chmurski. With neither side vulnerable, your partner opens three clubs (some 5-9 high-card points with six strong or seven respectable clubs) and South overcalls three hearts. What would you have done? What do you think Chmurski did? At two tables at least, West psyched with three spades. However, one East could not take a joke. After North-South reached seven hearts, East sacrificed in seven spades. This was doubled and down 12 for minus 3,200! Most players bid some number of clubs, but 17 of the 29 pairs reached a grand slam. (Seven no-trump was reached twice, seven hearts 13 times, and seven diamonds twice.) Chmurski did best of all. He doubled three hearts for penalty! He planned to run to clubs if North redoubled, but North thoughtlessly passed. Three hearts doubled and made with four overtricks was worth only 930, not even as good as a small slam with an overtrick.


Page B6 • Thursday, January 2, 2014

Thursday, January 2, 2014 • Page B7

NFL PREVIEW

PRESENTED BY

POWER RANKINGS

BEARS ANALYSIS

Lineup statistics illustrate demise of Bears’ defense

How all 32 NFL teams stack up heading into the playoffs, according to Hub Arkush:

By KEVIN FISHBAIN kfishbain@shawmedia.com

Golden Tate

Cam Newton AP photo

Colin Kaepernick

Demaryius Thomas

AP photo

AP photo

AP photo

1. Seattle Seahawks

2. Carolina Panthers

3. San Francisco 49ers

4. Denver Broncos

Team to beat, but need to worry if Panthers or 49ers come to visit.

Defense is for real, but can offense generate enough points?

Is Colin Kaepernick ready for his encore?

Is the defense good enough to go all the way?

Jimmy Graham

LeGarrette Blount

Andy Dalton

AP photo

Andre Ellington AP photo

AP photo

AP photo

5. New England Patriots

6. Cincinnati Bengals

7. New Orleans Saints

8. Arizona Cardinals

Bill Belichick is coach of the year, but now they need a few more horses.

If they finally get a playoff win, what happens when they go on the road?

A bit of Bengalitis here too. Can they win on the road?

Wrong year to be third-best wild card in NFC.

T.Y. Hilton

Knile Davis

Aaron Rodgers

H. Rick Bamman – hbamman@shawmedia.com

The play of backup quarterback Josh McCown (above) after Jay Cutler was injured was one of the highlights of coach Marc Trestman’s first season as coach of the Bears.

Chip Kelly AP photo

AP photo

AP photo

AP photo

9. Philadelphia Eagles

10. Indianapolis Colts

11. Kansas City Chiefs

12. Green Bay Packers

Coach Chip Kelly and QB Nick Foles ready to take a huge step up in class?

11-5 with wins over 49ers, Seahawks, Broncos and Chiefs, could be tough out in playoffs.

2-5 down the stretch; one and done in playoffs?

Aaron Rodgers is back, but still needed a gift from Bears to make playoffs.

13. San Diego Chargers

23. Buffalo Bills

How come nobody’s talking about the job Mike McCoy did here?

14. Pittsburgh Steelers

Good things happening here if they can keep E.J. Manuel healthy.

24. Tennessee Titans

6-2 finish has 2014 arrow pointing up.

15. Bears

Franchise appears to be floundering; surprised Munchack survived Black Monday.

More offseason issues than any other team in the league.

16. Baltimore Ravens

25. Atlanta Falcons

Will silly Joe Flacco contract keep them from fixing the rest of the offense?

26. Minnesota Vikings

With help on both lines, these guys bounce right back.

17. Miami Dolphins

Leslie Frazier deserved better. What is the plan at QB?

27. Jacksonville Jaguars

Expect coach Joe Philbin to survive, but GM Jeff Ireland in real trouble.

Nice second half for Gus Bradley, but still need big upgrades on both sides of ball.

18. New York Jets So Rex Ryan will be back, but what’s next with Mark Sanchez?

19. Dallas Cowboys

28. Tampa Bay Buccaneers If they hire a coach before the GM, nothing will change.

29. Cleveland Browns

Any chance at all owner Jerry Jones figures out he’s the problem?

Looks like owner Jimmy Haslam, CEO Joe Banner are problem, not Rob Chudzinski.

20. Detroit Lions Right choice on new head coach could mean instant contender.

21. New York Giants

30. Oakland Raiders Owner Mark Davis leaves Dennis Allen hanging until next week.

Giants actually finished 7-3. Get them a franchise running back and sky’s the limit.

22. St. Louis Rams

31. Washington Redskins Mike Shanahan wasn’t the answer, but ’Skins definitely NOT better without him.

32. Houston Texans

Have second and 13th picks in first round, RG III the gift that keeps on giving.

Bill O’Brien will have them contending again immediately.

Could Have a V-8

Daunting task in 2014 Marc Trestman scored well in many areas in his first season as Bears coach, specifically in overseeing the dramatic improvement of one of the league’s weakest offenses and a significant thawing of the icy relationship Lovie Smith had with the Bears’ faithful. A completely objective look at the Bears’ 2013 season, however, shows the team also took some significant steps backward. Smith was fired for going 10-6 in his ninth year as the head coach but failing to make the playoffs. Is it reasonable to laud Trestman for going 8-8 and also failing to make the playoffs after getting blown out in Week 16 by the Eagles and then losing at home on the last day of the season to the Packers when one win would have clinched the division title? Although Trestman should be applauded for the almost surreal growth of Josh McCown, upgrades to Jay Cutler and significant gains on offense, as the boss, he also has to shoulder the weight for the descent of one of the league’s better defenses under Smith to one of the worst in the NFL. Where does general manager Phil Emery fit in all of this? Irrespective of what Brian Urlacher may or may not have had left, the decision to not bring him back doesn’t look very good right now. Would it be different if D.J. Williams and Lance Briggs had stayed healthy? Perhaps, but the fact is the last really good

BEARS INSIDER Hub Arkush game the Bears’ defense had was against Seattle in 2012 – until the final minutes when Urlacher’s season ended with a hamstring injury. Urlacher is irrelevant, though, because his tank was near empty, and the real problem is where does the defense go from here? Week 1 starters Corey Wootton, Henry Melton, Williams, James Anderson, Tim Jennings, Major Wright and Charles Tillman are free agents, as is recent addition Jeremiah Ratliff. Youngsters Chris Conte, Shea McClellin, Jon Bostic and Khaseem Greene have been disappointing, at best, and that’s probably too kind to Conte and McClellin. Julius Peppers had his worst year as a pro and appears to have lost something, and counting on Briggs to stay healthy in his mid-30s is now a crapshoot. There isn’t a single player to rebuild the “D” around as the offseason begins. Remember that as impressive as the offensive turnaround and the complete rebuilding of the offensive line were, Cutler, McCown, Matt Forte and Brandon Marshall were in place for Trestman to build around. It also is impossible to ignore that although Trestman has earned our trust

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as a man who knows offense, Cutler, McCown, Matt Slauson and Roberto Garza are free agents, and Emery has a tough call to make on what to do about Cutler. Lost in the tremendous upward and downward mobility of the offense and defense has been the fact that Joe DeCamillis’ special teams suffered a precipitous drop from where they were under Dave Toub, and Devin Hester also is a free agent after eight years with the Bears. Here is one more disturbing truth about these 2013 Bears: The winning percentage of their 16 opponents was .465, giving them the softest schedule of the six teams that finished 8-8. The only good news there is that earns them the 14th pick in the 2014 draft when they could have picked as low as 19th, where the Dolphins (8-8) stand. A bit more alarming is the fact that of the 13 teams with worse records than them, only the Lions played an easier schedule. For all the excitement these Bears created at 3-0, 4-2 and, even, 8-6, once the balance sheet is laid bare in front of us, it is hard to call this season a success or these Bears anything more than somewhat below average. The trip into this offseason is as paved with uncertainty as any we’ve seen in a number of years. • Hub Arkush covers the Bears for Shaw Media and HubArkush.com. Write to him at harkush@shawmedia.com.

When Marc Trestman and Phil Emery evaluate Mel Tucker and the Bears’ defense, they’ll have to decide how much injuries played a factor in the debacle that was the 2013 “D.” According to the NFL’s official stats, the Bears used 265 unique lineups on defense, which is not abnormal – they used 275 in 2012. But with so many starters going down, the Bears used their most common defensive lineup only 3.42 percent of the time, sixth-fewest in the league, and had 15 different starting lineups. However, that lineup (35 plays) was only seen primarily in Week 17 – it’s the nickel defense look with Jeremiah Ratliff, Lance Briggs, Shea McClellin, Isaiah Frey and the rest of the regular starters, so that group is a bit of an anomaly. The notable lineup that shows how the Bears’ defense was completely hampered by injuries has 11 players we didn’t see together the last 13 weeks of the season. The Bears ran 32 plays with their Week 1 base defense: Julius Peppers, Corey Wootton, Henry Melton, Stephen Paea, D.J. Williams, James Anderson, Briggs, Tim Jennings, Charles Tillman, Major Wright and Chris Conte. That group allowed 1.94 yards a carry on 17 runs and 2.59 yards a play. When Melton tore an ACL, then Williams a pectoral muscle and Tillman a triceps, the unit deteriorated. For the first three weeks, though, it was effective. The run defense was ranked ninth in the league. For comparison purposes, the base defense with Shea McClellin, Landon Cohen, Jon Bostic, Khaseem Greene and Zack Bowman played 15 snaps together, and allowed an ugly 11.36 yards a run play. That same base defense, but with Tillman in for Bow-

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Bears linebacker Lance Briggs watches the Packers’ offense come to the line Sunday at Soldier Field. Briggs missed seven games this season because of a shoulder injury. man and Paea in for Cohen, allowed 15.36 yards a rush on eight run plays. The defensive formations that had at least seven plays with Melton in the lineup did not allow more than 4.7 yards a carry. The six most-used formations that had Williams at middle linebacker each allowed fewer than 3.8 yards a carry. Melton’s backup, Nate Collins, played well before he tore an ACL in Week 5. Teams didn’t rush for more than 3.75 yards a carry against the five most common defenses with Collins in the lineup. By season’s end, with Melton, Collins and Williams all on I.R., and Briggs having missed seven games, the Bears were allowing 5.3 yards a pop. The fact that the Bears defended the run better with those interior players in the lineup is not a surprise, but

the difference between certain formations is staggering. For those calling for vast changes to the defense, such as a new coordinator or switching to a 3-4, there is some evidence – albeit, only three games – where this group performed well. And, with this new, high-scoring offense, the Bears don’t need to have a top-10 defense to be a contender. The Bears, though, championed the “next man up” mantra on loop, and as Nate Collins said Monday, injuries can only be an excuse for so long, especially when a defense is historically bad. “All teams go through injuries,” he said. “I feel like, yes, we probably got hit worse than other teams, but at the same time, everyone has backups, everyone has reserves and you’re always as strong as your weakest link in a sense.”

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Bowe cleared to play; Fisher hurt By DAVE SKRETTA The Associated Press KANSAS CITY, Mo. – Chiefs receiver Dwayne Bowe was cleared to play in Saturday’s wild-card playoff game against Indianapolis after suffering a concussion, though the status of linebacker Tamba Hali and right tackle Eric Fisher remains uncertain. Fisher hurt his groin near the end of Tuesday’s practice, while Hali has been dealing with some swelling in his knee. Neither of them participated fully in Wednesday’s workout. Bowe suffered his concussion in a loss to the Colts two weeks ago at Arrowhead Stadium. He was hit in the neck area late in the game by LaRon Landry, and even though he

finished the game and even attended a practice the next week, Bowe said he never quite felt right. He was diagnosed with a concussion and sat out last week’s overtime loss at San Diego, when the Chiefs – assured of their playoff seed – chose to rest many of their starters. “I’m fine, you know. Just had a little minor headache,” Bowe said Wednesday. “I didn’t feel as bad as some guys felt. I just felt tired. So I got some rest and I’m ready to go.” Bowe, who signed a $56 million, five-year deal in the offseason, is second on the team behind running back Jamaal Charles with 57 catches for 673 yards and five touchdowns this season. “I’m just ready to go,” he

said. “Big-time players want to make big-time plays in big-time games. These are the games you have to show up. Everything on the line.” Although the Chiefs had not yet ruled out Fisher for Saturday’s game, it appeared Donald Stephenson was preparing to start for the seventh time this season. Stephenson made three starts while Fisher was dealing with a shoulder injury, and has started the past four games at right tackle while Branden Albert was out with a hyperextended knee. “That was my goal this offseason, just be one of the five best blockers,” Stephenson said. “I worked on that and I treated myself as if I was a starter and it’s paid off for me.”

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COMICS

B8 • Day, Thursday, January 2, 2014 Page XX Date, 2012

Pickles

Brian Crane Pearls Before Swine

For Better or For Worse

Non Sequitur

orthwest h/erald / nwherald.com DailyNChronicle daily-chronicle.com

Stephan Pastis

Lynn Johnston Crankshaft

Tom Batiuk & Chuck Hayes

Wiley The Duplex

Glenn McCoy

Beetle Bailey

Mort Walker Blondie

Dean Young & Denis LeBrun

Frank & Ernest

Bob Thaves Dilbert

Scott Adams

Monty

Jim Meddick Zits Hi and Lois

Rose is Rose

Pat Brady & Don Wimmer Arlo & Janis

Soup to Nutz

The Family Circus

Rick Stromoski Big Nate

Bill Keane

The Argyle Sweater

Scott Hilburn

Stone Soup

Grizzwells

Brianand & Greg Jim Borgman JerryWalker Scott

Jimmy Johnson

Lincoln Peirce

Jan Eliot

Bill Schorr


Thursday, January 2, 2014 “Gizmo waking up” Photo by: Robert

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Great for a bad back, like new! $100/obo 815-909-8905

COLLECTION AGENCY No Experience Required. Full-time debt collector positions available at RFGI in Sycamore. Starting at $20K/Year...Plus: Excellent Commission! Benefits No Weekends/Half Fridays Fast paced, energetic, professional and competitive environment. Apply at: 1628 DeKalb Ave/Sycamore or call (815) 895-8963

CAT – LOST South DeKalb County Area, near Howison, McGirr and Perry, but could be anywhere. Large neutered male, mostly white with brown patches and brown Maine Coon Tail. Was wearing a red collar. If you see him, please call my people at 815501-9724. Reward for safe return. We miss our big boy. Have you seen him or know what happened to him? Thank you.

2007 FORD FOCUS SE Metallic gray, 57K miles. Automatic/power windows and lock. Great condition and very clean!

$9,250/obo For More Details Call Very large black cat w/white spotting down his neck Sweet & friendly Found in Edgebrook, Sycamore 815-895-3445 ask for Donna

815-701-3301

!! !! !!! !! !!

I BUY CARS, TRUCKS, VANS & SUVs 1990 & Newer Will beat anyone's price by $300. Will pay extra for Honda, Toyota & Nissan

A-1 AUTO

815-814-1964 or

815-814-1224

PLANT MANAGER Custom Injection Molding Company w/ 16 machines. 3 shift / 24 hour operation. 5 years experience minimum req. IQMS/ERP skills helpful but not required. Salary commensurate w/ experience. Insurance, 401K, AFLAC. Send resume w/ salary req. to: Quad, Inc. 810 Progressive Lane South Beloit, IL 61080

!! !! !!! !! !!

Advertise here for a successful garage sale! Call 815-455-4800

CAR, TRUCK, SUV,

DRYER - Maytag Electric Dryer. Have never had a problem with it. Super size capacity. $150 and you take away. Call 815-751-0504

Antique bar clamps, 4 ft wooden bar clamps. Marked The Black Bros. Mendota, IL. $65 815-7618121 ALWAYS INVESTIGATE BEFORE INVESTING ANY MONEY

Contact the Better Business Bureau www.chicago.bbb.org - or Federal Trade Commission www.ftc.gov

NEWSPAPER DELIVERY Earn up to $1000 A Month! Looking for Contractors to deliver newspapers early mornings 7 days per week. Routes now available in DeKalb County. Please Call 815-526-4434

Having a Birthday, Anniversary, Graduation or Event Coming Up? Share It With Everyone by Placing a HAPPY AD!

Will BUY UR USED

File Cabinet - 2 Drawer Good condition, beige $40. 815-751-0504

MOST CASH WILL BEAT ANY QUOTE GIVEN!! $400 - $2000 “don't wait.... call 2day”!! * 815-575-5153 *

Daily Chronicle Classified 877-264-2527

DVD Cabinet - Solid Oak DVD

Open Cabinet (no door) 24”W x 36”H x 6”D. LIKE NEW! 4 shelves, can fit over 200 DVDs, $50. 847-659-1852 Formica Kitchen Table and 4 chairs. $50 Call 815-784-2857 Queen-size Bedroom Set w/black finish. Incl head & foot bds, night stand, 6 drawer dresser, mattress & box spring w/ frame. Eamil for appt. to view in Sycamore: las1213@frontier.com. $300

Need Help Rebuilding, Repairing or Replanting? Check out the

At Your Service Directory in the back of today's Classified

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 23RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DEKALB COUNTY - SYCAMORE, ILLINOIS PNC Bank National Association PLAINTIFF Vs. Thomas Jacobsen a/k/a Thomas M. Jacobsen; et. al. DEFENDANTS 08 CH 00527 NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on 4/12/2012, the Sheriff of DeKalb County, Illinois will on 2/13/14 at the hour of 1:00PM at Public Safety Building, 150 North Main Sycamore, IL 60178, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of DeKalb and State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real

TABLE & CHAIRS Very sturdy and level pine table with one leaf and 6 cushioned chairs. Sits 4 with leaf removed. Table has scratches & many marks from use by children but no broken pieces. Cushions could use reupholstering. $50. call or text 815-341-9580

(Published in the Daily Chronicle, January 2, 9 & 16, 2014.)

PUBLIC NOTICE

White clawfoot tub, stylish clawfoot tub in good shape. Outside refinished and orginal from a Chicago rehab. PU Kingston $395. call 815-751-5673

WE'VE GOT IT! Daily Chronicle Classified 877-264-2527

Daily Chronicle Classified 877-264-2527 www.Daily-Chronicle.com

Try on a NEW YOU ..and find out more about our upcoming

Phlebotomy Training that starts on

February 10, 2014! Information session details for Phlebotomy Technician: Monday, January 6, 2014 6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.

NO RESERVE AUCTION OF COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE

Room # A1330 21193 Malta Road, Malta, IL 60150

THE FOLLOWING REAL ESTATE WILL BE OFFERED AT A NO RESERVE AUCTION HELD ON SITE AT 2901 WEST MAIN STREET, (RT. 64) ST. CHARLES, ILLINOIS. (½ MILE WEST OF RANDALL ROAD ON RT. 64 AT THE INTERSECTION OF RT 64 & CAMPTON HILLS ROAD.

For more information, please call 630-541-3600, ext. 8610 and ask for Kent!

TUESDAY, JANUARY 14TH AT 11:00 A.M.

CALL 630-808-0231 FOR MORE INFORMATION

NEWSPAPER DISTRIBUTION ACI Midwest is seeking qualified applicants for full and part-time positions to assist in the distribution of local newspapers in Kane, DeKalb & McHenry counties.

District Contract Manager (DCM) The DCM will manage the distribution within a geographic area for ACI Midwest, LLC responsible for negotiating contracts with Independent Contractors, managing delivery fees, and achieving service targets. This is a salaried position. Market salary provided commensurate with experience. Previous supervisory experience required. Previous newspaper distribution experience is a plus. Must have reliable transportation, proof of insurance and valid driver's license. Typical work schedule begins at 1 am.

District Assistant District Assistant will assist in all aspects of the daily distribution of the newspaper, including the delivery of open routes, ride-alongs with Independent Contractors and assisting with service issue. Typical work schedule begins at 1 am. This is an hourly position with mileage reimbursement. Must have reliable transportation, proof of insurance and valid driver license. ACI Midwest is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Please submit resume and work history to: dstamper@acicirculation.com

ng estate: PIN 09-20-352-009 Improved with Residential COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 15 N. Spruce Street, Cortland, IL 60112 Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the property is a condominium and the foreclosure takes place after 1/1/2007, purchasers other than the mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee's attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The successful pursole chaser has the responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 151701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: Codilis & Associates, P.C., 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-08-34001. I582161

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 23RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DEKALB COUNTY - SYCAMORE, ILLINOIS Illinois Housing Development Authority PLAINTIFF Vs. Monica J. Waller a/k/a Monica Waller; et. al. DEFENDANTS 11 CH 00168 NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on 10/24/2013, the Sheriff of DeKalb County, Illinois will on 1/30/14 at the hour of 1:00PM at Public Safety Building, 150 North Main Sycamore, IL 60178, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of DeKalb and State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: PIN 09-06-176-060 Improved with Single Family Home COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 1523 Timberwood Court, Unit 31-2, Sycamore, IL 60178 Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is sub-

THIS 2 ACRE COMMERCIAL PROPERTY IS IMPROVED WITH 5 COMMERCIAL RENTAL UNITS. TOTAL SQ. FOOTAGE OF THE BUILDING IS 14,219 SQ.FT. 2 UNITS ARE CURRENTLY LEASED WITH 3 UNITS VACANT. THIS PROPERTY HAS A 30 CAR PARKING LOT, RT. 64 FRONTAGE WITH A VERY HIGH TRAFFIC COUNT. CURRENT REAL ESTATE TAXES $26,935.00. TAX PARCEL #09-29300-059, KANE COUNTY. THIS PROPERTY HAS AN ASSESSED VALUATION OF $929,946.00. INTEREST RATES ARE AT A ALL TIME LOW. TALK TO YOUR LENDER NOW. COME WITH A VISION TO SEE WHAT THIS PROPERTY CAN DO FOR YOU AND BID YOUR PRICE AT AUCTION.

subj prope y ject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the property is a condominium and the foreclosure takes place after 1/1/2007, purchasers other than the mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee's attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 151701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: Codilis & Associates, P.C., 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-10-43113. I579303 (Published in the Daily Chronicle, December 19, 26, 2013 & January 2, 2014.)

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 23RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DeKALB COUNTY-SYCAMORE, ILLINOIS U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT, DATED AS OF AUGUST 1, 2004, 2004-CB6 TRUST, C-BASS MORTGAGE LOAN ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-CB6, Plaintiff, -v.CATALINA SALAZAR, et al Defendant 12 CH 679 NOTICE OF SHERIFF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on October 10, 2013, the Sheriff of DeKalb County will at 1:00 PM on January 23, 2014, at the DeKalb County Courthouse, at the DeKalb County Public Safety Building, 150 North Main Street, Sycamore, IL, 60178, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 821 NORTH 14TH STREET, Dekalb, IL 60115 Property Index No. 08-23227-010 The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $140,361.45. Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; the balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale The

property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff's attorney: POTESTIVO & ASSOCIATES, P.C. , 223 WEST JACKSON BLVD, STE 610, Chicago, IL 60606, (312) 263-0003. Please refer to file number C1393939. I581479

the Court file to verify all information. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 151701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: Codilis & Associates, P.C., 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-11-30497. I582163 (Published in the Daily Chronicle, January 2, 9 & 16, 2014.)

Hinckley ~ Rimsnider Road Becherer Farm, approx 80 acres. 76.6 tillable acres with 2 story farm house and ranch house. $1,725,600. 859-630-5920

(Published in the Daily Chronicle, December 26, 2013, January 2 & 9, 2014.)

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 23RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DEKALB COUNTY - SYCAMORE, ILLINOIS JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association PLAINTIFF Vs. Cesar Aviles; et. al. DEFENDANTS 13 CH 00149 NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on 11/7/2013, the Sheriff of DeKalb County, Illinois will on 2/13/14 at the hour of 1:00PM at Public Safety Building, 150 North Main Sycamore, IL 60178, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of DeKalb and State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: PIN 03-30-230-009 Improved with Single Family Home COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 226 Central Avenue, Genoa, IL 60135 Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the property is a condominium and the foreclosure takes place after 1/1/2007, purchasers other than the mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee's attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The successful purthe sole chaser has responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check

DEKALB 1 BEDROOM Available Dec/Jan. Close to NIU, Free heat & water, quiet lifestyle. Varsity Square Apts. 815-756-9554 www.glencoproperties.com BIG APARTMENTS, LESS MONEY! Rochelle: 15 minutes from DeKalb 1 BR & 2BR Starting at $530 Recently updated! Affordable heat. Walk to shops! (815) 562-6425 www.whiteoakapartments.net Now accepting Visa, M/C, Discover

DeKalb 1 & 2BR Starting $540

Hillcrest Place Apts.

220 E. Hillcrest. 815-758-0600 hillcrestplaceaptsdekalb.com DeKalb - 1BR Apt Avail NOW $500/mo, Includes heat & Internet. W/D in building, 831 Kimberly Call Pittsley Realty (815)756-7768 DeKalb - 1BR Apt Avail NOW $540/mo, across from Huntley Park W/D in building, 505 S. Second St. Call Pittsley Realty (815)756-7768 DEKALB - 2BR 1BA Apt Avail Now Updated Kitch & Bath, W/D in bldg 830 Greenbrier $600/mo Call Pittsley Realty (815)756-7768

DEKALB - SPACIOUS MARKET APARTMENTS Starting @ $599, 2 Bedroom $683, 3 Bedroom Near the heart of NIU. Incl gas and forced air heat. Off street parking, lush grounds, on site laundry room. Outdoor pool, tennis and basketball courts, patios and balconies. Cats OK.

University Village Apts. 722 N. Annie Glidden Rd. 815-758-7859

DeKalb 1BR, w/study stove, fridge, heat included. 815-748-4085 DEKALB ADULT, QUIET, REFINED Building. 2 Bedroom Apt with homey environment. Car port. For mature living. Excellent Location! No pets/smoking. Agent Owned. 815-758-6712

DEKALB EAST SIDE 3BR lower off st. prkng, $550/mo + utilities and deposit, reference, cat OK 815-758-2872 DEKALB for Rent 3BR Apt upstaris $750 5 BD House $1100/mo. 815-739-4536

DEKALB GROUND LEVEL APARTMENT 1-2 Bedroom ground level unit of house with new carpeting and freshly painted. Appliances included. Near 7th and Lincoln DeKalb. $600 per month. 815-827-3434 duffpropertiesllc@gmail.com DeKalb. 1st Floor. 1BR. $525+ Location! Quiet Neighborhood. Adolph Miller RE 815-756-7845

FOR SALE – EASY LIVING

FOR SALE – ALL BRICK HOME

Snow & Ice Removal All Done *

PROPERTY CAN BE SHOWN BY CONTACTING AUCTIONEERS AT 815-739-3703. TERM’S FOR AUCTION: $20,000.00 DOWN ON AUCTION DAY. CLOSING UPON COURT APPROVAL. BUYER WILL PAY ALL 2013 AND 2014 REAL ESTATE TAXES UP TO CLOSING DATE. DEED TRANSFER, TITLE COMMITMENT IN SELLERS NAME PROVIDED BY SELLERS. A 10% BUYERS PREMIUM WILL BE ADDED TO THE FINAL BID TO DETERMINE THE FINAL CONTRACT PRICE. PROPERTY BEING OFFERED AS IS, WITH OUT ANY CONTINGENCIES TO FINANCING APPRAISAL OR ANY OTHER TYPE OF CONTINGENCIES. ANNOUNCEMENTS MADE DAY OF SALE TAKE PRECEDENCE OVER ALL OTHER. ALMBURG AUCTIONEERING INC. LIC#440.000771 MALTA, ILLINOIS. 815-739-3703. All our auctions with pictures are advertised worldwide @ www.almburgauctions.com

Appraisals Real Estate Liquidators 815-825-2727 Malta, IL

Deep, Deep Yard with this 3 Bedroom Home. Huge Garage. Estate Sale at $98,000

RANCH TOWN HOME with Sun Room & Full Basement. Quality, Quality, Quality

CALL NEDRA ERICSON, REALTOR 815-739-9997

CALL NEDRA ERICSON, REALTOR 815-739-9997

*


CLASSIFIED

Page B10 • Thursday, January 2, 2014 HINCKLEY ~ 3BR,1BA

GENOA 2 BEDROOM DUPLEX C/A, W/D, full basement, garage. Pets negotiable, $875/mo + sec. 815-751-1332

GENOA LARGE 2 BEDROOM A/C, W/D hook-up, no pets. Available Jan 1st, $700/mo. 847-683-3442

HINCKLEY 2BR, 1.5BA Stove, fridge, D/W, W/D. NO PETS. $755/mo + sec. Water sewer, garb incl. 815-739-1250

MALTA 1 Mo Rent FREE! 2 bedroom duplex, appliances, W/D hook-up, no pets, $595/mo. 815-562-7368 Malta- Cozy 1 BD Upper, efficiency off street parking. Non-smoker. Utilities included in rent. Malta- 2 BD ground floor W/D hook-ups 815-981-8117 ROCHELLE - Newer Rural Rochelle Penthouse, quiet 2-bedroom lifestyle living, tenant pays electric. $435.00 MOR R.E. 815-739-5785

Rochelle Large Upper 3BR Heat paid. Formal dining, large kit, encl front & back porch, 2 car gar. $760/mo, 1st, last, sec with small pet dep, no smkg. 815-757-1045

Appl, W/D, $1000/mo + sec. 630-707-0466 SYCAMORE 3BR, FR, $995 2BR $950, 2BR, $850. Apts $600-$795. Betsy Smith 815-751-1025 ~ 815-895-2488

Plano House Rental to Share For Working Lady. Private bath and kitchen privileges + parking. 630-234-0497

Sycamore. 1000 SF shop with 600 SF office. Full bath. Heat, A/C. 9 ft OH Door. $600/mo. J & A RE 815-970-0679

WINTER STORAGE RV's, Campers & Boats - Indoor & secure, West of Sycamore. Owner resides on property 815-825-2571

PUBLIC NOTICE

SHABONA, 2 BR UPPER, QUIET & CLEAN, Priv. Prkg., $595/mo. 815-979-7012

Stone Prairie 2BR, 2BA APT. Washer & dryer, central air, fireplace, exercise center. Cat friendly. Private fishing. $765/mo.

Laing Mgmt. 815-758-1100 or 815-895-8600 Sycamore - 2BR 1BA Apt Avail Now Updated Kitch & Bath, W/D in bldg 1611 Maness Ct. $625/mo Call Pittsley Realty (815)756-7768

SYCAMORE ~ 2BR, 1BA

Within walking distance of downtown, parks and schools. 1st/last/sec. 630-854-6161

Waterman: efficiency apt., $450/mo., 1st, last, $150 dep., NO pets, 815-761-0308

DeKalb Newer 2BR on Cul-De-Sac Quiet neighborhood, all appl, W/D, walk-in-closets, no pets, $950/mo + 1st/last/sec. 815-739-4442 Sycamore - Luxury 2BR 2BA Condo Granite, SS, Fireplace, 2C Gar. Available NOW! 954 Arvle Circle Call Pittsley Realty (815)756-7768

Sycamore TH Like New 2BR Great location! 2BA, 2 car garage, skylights, appl, W/D, C/A, $935. No pets. 815-758-0123

SYCAMORE ~ 3BR, 2.5BA Fox Brier Townhouse available. All appliances include W/D. 1 car garage, balcony. $1100/mo. Barry 815-757-9040

The Knolls Hot new deluxe townhomes. 2 & 3 Bedrooms. Garage, C/A, Basement. Pets?

Starting at $645

815-757-1907 CORTLAND ~ 2BR DUPLEX Bsmt, appl, W/D hook-up, garage. No pets/smkg, $800/mo + lease, deposit & ref. 815-758-6439

DeKalb Summit Enclave 2 lrg BR, 2 lrg BA, W/D, 2 car gar. $1100/mo + $1000 deposit. No pets/smoking 847-373-0602

DeKalb ~ The Knolls Sub. 3BR, 1.5BA, D/W, W//D, 1 car garage, $975/mo + 1st , last sec. Available Jan. 815-751-3806

CORTLAND 2 BEDROOM 1 bath, W/D, 1.5 car garage. Pets OK, $900/mo + security. 815-970-1321 DeKalb - 3Bd 2Ba House 2C Gar, Fireplace, Basement 204 Hollister, $1250/mo Call Pittsley Realty (815)756-7768 DEKALB 3 BEDROOM, 1 BATH Newly Remodeled Ranch. All appl, bsmt,1.5 car garage, $1150/mo + security. 815-751-2650

DeKalb 4 Bedroom, 1.5 Bath on College Ave. Available Immed. $1200 + 1st, last security, no pets. 815-757-5079 Dekalb: Tilton Park Area Lovely remodeled 2BR, 1BA, w/den, A/C, all appl., deck, fenced in yard, 2 car gar., avail 2/1, no smoking, pets neg., $800/mo. 630-675-4485

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 23RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DEKALB COUNTY - SYCAMORE, ILLINOIS PNC Bank National Association PLAINTIFF Vs. Thomas Jacobsen a/k/a Thomas M. Jacobsen; et. al. DEFENDANTS 08 CH 00527 NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on 4/12/2012, the Sheriff of DeKalb County, Illinois will on 2/13/14 at the hour of 1:00PM at Public Safety Building, 150 North Main Sycamore, IL 60178, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of DeKalb and State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: A PART OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 40 NORTH, RANGE 5, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT A POINT WHICH IS 396 FEET NORTH AND 1280.41 FEET EAST OF THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 20, (WHICH POINT OF BEGINNING IS ALSO THE INTERSECTION OF THE CENTER LINE OF PINE STREET AND THE WEST LINE OF SPRUCE STREET IN CORTLAND); THENCE WEST ALONG THE CENTER LINE OF PINE STREET, 137 FEET TO THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE TRACKAGE CONVEYED TO REX DAILEY AND WIFE BY DEED RECORDED AS DOCUMENT NO 244670 IN BOOK 227, PAGE 467; THENCE SOUTH ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID DAILEY TRACK AND ALONG THE SOUTHERLY EXTENSION OF SAID EAST LINE, 336.6 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY LINE OF THE RIGHT OF WAY OF THE CHICAGO AND NORTHWESTERN RAILROAD (WHICH NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE IS 70 FEET NORTHERLY OF THE CENTER LINE OF THE EAST BOUND TRACK AS MEASURED AT RIGHT ANGLES TO SAID CENTER LINE); THENCE EASTERLY ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE, 139.38 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE WEST LINE OF SPRUCE STREET, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN BOOK "A" OF PLATS, PAGE 8 1/2, AFORESAID; THENCE NORTH ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID SPRUCE STREET; 361.02 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, IN DEKALB COUNTY, ILLINOIS, (EXCEPTING, HOWEVER, SO MUCH THEREOF AS IS SITUATED NORTH OF A LINE COMMENCING ON THE WEST LINE OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PREMISES AT A POINT 166 FEET SOUTH OF (AS MEASURED ALONG SAID WEST LINE OF SAID PARCEL) THIS CENTER LINE OF PINE STREET, AND RUNNING THENCE EAST 136.8 FEET TO A POINT ON THE EAST LINE OF SAID PARCEL, WHICH IS 166 FEET SOUTH OF (AS MEASURED ALONG SAID EAST LINE) THE CENTER LINE OF PINE STREET, SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF DEKALB, STATE OF ILLINOIS. PIN 09-20-352-009 Improved with Residential COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 15 N. Spruce Street, Cortland, IL 60112 Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the property is a condominium and the foreclosure takes place after 1/1/2007, purchasers other than

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purc the mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee's attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 151701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: Codilis & Associates, P.C., 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-08-34001. I582161 (Published in the Daily Chronicle, January 2, 9 & 16, 2014.)

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 23RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DEKALB COUNTY - SYCAMORE, ILLINOIS Illinois Housing Development Authority PLAINTIFF Vs. Monica J. Waller a/k/a Monica Waller; et. al. DEFENDANTS 11 CH 00168 NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on 10/24/2013, the Sheriff of DeKalb County, Illinois will on 1/30/14 at the hour of 1:00PM at Public Safety Building, 150 North Main Sycamore, IL 60178, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of DeKalb and State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: UNIT 31-2 IN WOODGATE OF SYCAMORE CONDOMINIUM NO. 1 AS DELINEATED ON THE SURVEY OF PART OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 40 NORTH, RANGE 5, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDEN, IN DEKALB COUNTY, ILLINOIS, (HEREINAFTER REFERRED TO AS "PARCEL") WHICH SURVEY IS ATTACHED AS EXHIBIT A TO DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM MADE BY CENTURA DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, A CORPORATION OF ILLINOIS, RECORDED IN THE OFFICE OF THE RECORDER OF DEEDS OF DEKALB COUNTY, ILLINOIS AS DOCUMENT NO. 37533 AS AMENDED FROM TIME TO TIME; TOGETHER WITH ITS UNDIVIDED PERCENTAGE INTEREST IN SAID PARCEL (EXCEPTING FROM SAID PARCEL ALL THE PROPERTY AND SPACE COMPRISING ALL THE UNITS THEREOF AS DEFINED AND SET FORTH IN SAID DECLARATION AND SURVEY). PIN 09-06-176-060 Improved with Single Family Home COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 1523 Timberwood Court, Unit 31-2, Sycamore, IL 60178 Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the property is a condominium and the foreclosure takes place after 1/1/2007, purchasers other than the mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1).

(g ). If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee's attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 151701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: Codilis & Associates, P.C., 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-10-43113. I579303 (Published in the Daily Chronicle, December 19, 26, 2013 & January 2, 2014.)

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 23RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DeKALB COUNTY-SYCAMORE, ILLINOIS U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT, DATED AS OF AUGUST 1, 2004, 2004-CB6 TRUST, C-BASS MORTGAGE LOAN ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-CB6, Plaintiff, -v.CATALINA SALAZAR, et al Defendant 12 CH 679 NOTICE OF SHERIFF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on October 10, 2013, the Sheriff of DeKalb County will at 1:00 PM on January 23, 2014, at the DeKalb County Courthouse, at the DeKalb County Public Safety Building, 150 North Main Street, Sycamore, IL, 60178, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Lot 4 in Block 3 of W.L. Ellwood's addition to the City of Dekalb, being a Subdivision of part of the Northeast Quarter of Section 23, Township 40 North, Range 4, East of the Third Principal Meridian, according to the Plat thereof recorded in Book 'B' of plats, Page 114, in Dekalb County, Illinois. Commonly known as 821 NORTH 14TH STREET, Dekalb, IL 60115 Property Index No. 08-23227-010 The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $140,361.45. Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; the balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff's attorney: POTESTIVO & ASSOCIATES, P.C. , 223 WEST JACKSON BLVD, STE 610, Chicago, IL 60606, (312) 263-0003. Please refer to file number C1393939.

I581479 (Published in the Daily Chronicle, December 26, 2013, January 2 & 9, 2014.)

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 23RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DEKALB COUNTY - SYCAMORE, ILLINOIS JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association PLAINTIFF Vs. Cesar Aviles; et. al. DEFENDANTS 13 CH 00149 NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on 11/7/2013, the Sheriff of DeKalb County, Illinois will on 2/13/14 at the hour of 1:00PM at Public Safety Building, 150 North Main Sycamore, IL 60178, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of DeKalb and State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: THE EAST 50 FEET OF LOT 3 IN BLOCK 2 IN PATTERSON'S 3RD ADDITION TO THE VILLAGE (NOW CITY) OF GENOA, TOGETHER WITH THE NORTHERLY 1/2 OF THE ALLEY, NOW VACATED, ABUTTINGSAID PREMISES ON THE SOUTHERLY SIDE THEREOF, SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF DEKALB, IN THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. PIN 03-30-230-009 Improved with Single Family Home COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 226 Central Avenue, Genoa, IL 60135 Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the property is a condominium and the foreclosure takes place after 1/1/2007, purchasers other than the mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee's attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting

Daily Chronicle / daily-chronicle.com spon bility xp g any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 151701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff's attorney: Codilis & Associates, P.C., 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-11-30497. I582163 (Published in the Daily Chronicle, January 2, 9 & 16, 2014.)

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 23RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DEKALB COUNTY - SYCAMORE, ILLINOIS GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC, PLAINTIFF vs. OCTAVIANO ORTEGA; MARIA DEL SOCORRO ORTEGA; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, DEFENDANTS 13 CH 407 PUBLICATION NOTICE The requisite affidavit for publication having been filed, notice is hereby given to you, OCTAVIANO ORTEGA; MARIA DEL SOCORRO ORTEGA; and UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS, Defendants in the above entitled suit, that the said suit has been commenced in the Circuit Court of the 23rd Judicial Circuit, DeKalb County, Illinois by the plaintiff against you and other defendants, praying for the foreclosure of a certain mortgage conveying the premises described as follows to wit: LOT 1 IN HARTMANN & THOMAS SUBDIVISION, BEING A RESUBDIVISION OF LOT 5 IN BLOCK 4 IN HENDEE'S SECOND ADDITION TO SANDWICH, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED JULY 31, 2000 IN BOOK "Z" OF PLATS, PAGE 561 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER 00009987, IN DEKALB COUNTY, ILLINOIS. COMMON ADDRESS: 319 Joles Street, Sandwich, Illinois 60548 P.I.N.: 9-26-403-008 and which said mortgage was signed by OCTAVIANO ORTEGA, MARIA DEL SOCORRO ORTEGA, mortgagors, to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Countrywide Home Loans, Inc., as Mortgagee, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds of DeKalb County as Document No. 2006008911; and for such other relief prayed; that summons was duly issued out of the Circuit Court of DeKalb County against you as provided by law, and that the said suit is now pending. NOW THEREFORE, UNLESS YOU, the said above defendants, file your answer to the Complaint in said suit or otherwise make your appearance therein, in the Office of the Clerk of this Court in DeKalb County at 133 W. State St., Sycamore, IL 60178 on or before the February 3, 2014, default may be entered against you at any time after that day and a judgment entered in accordance with the prayer

pr yer of said complaint. Circuit Clerk Johnson, Blumberg, & Associates, LLC 230 W. Monroe Street, Suite 1125 Chicago, Illinois 60606 Ph. 312-541-9710 Fax 312-541-9711 JB&A # IL 13 8534 I581880 (Published in the Daily Chronicle, January 2, 9 & 16, 2014.)

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 23RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DeKALB COUNTY-SYCAMORE, ILLINOIS NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC PLAINTIFF VS ANTHONY HAWKING A/K/A ANTHONY P HAWKING; NORMA CARCAMO; THE RICHLAND TRAILS HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS ; DEFENDANTS 13 CH 438 238 WEST MEADOW DRIVE CORTLAND, IL 60112 NOTICE BY PUBLICATION NOTICE IS GIVEN YOU, ANTHONY HAWKING A/K/A ANTHONY P HAWKING ; NORMA CARCAMO; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS ; defendants, that this case has been commenced in this Court against you and other defendants, asking for the foreclosure of a certain Mortgage conveying the premises described as follows, to wit: LOT 32 IN RICHLAND TRAILS, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE SOUTH HALF OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER AND PART OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 40 NORTH, RANGE 5 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT OF RICHLAND TRAILS RECORDED JUNE 18, 2007 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER 2007010715, CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION RECORDED AS DOCUMENT NUMBER 2007015993 IN DEKALB COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 238 WEST MEADOW DRIVE, CORTLAND, IL 60112 and which said Mortgage was made by, ANTHONY HAWKING A/K/A ANTHONY P HAWKING ; NORMA CARCAMO; Mortgagor (s), to M.E.R.S., INC., AS NOMINEE FOR DHI MORTGAGE COMPANY, LTD., Mortgagee, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds of DEKALB County, Illinois, as Document No. 2009014645; and for other relief. UNLESS YOU file your answer or otherwise file your appearance in this case in the Office of the Clerk of this County, Maureen A. Josh DeKalb Cnty Circuit Clerk 133 W. State Street Sycamore, Illinois 60178 on or before February 3, 2014, A JUDGMENT OR DECREE BY DEFAULT MAY BE TAKEN AGAINST YOU FOR THE RELIEF ASKED IN THE COMPLAINT. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES Attorneys for Plaintiff Thirteenth Floor 1 North Dearborn Chicago, Illinois 60602 Tel. (312) 346-9088 Fax (312) 346-1557 PA 1316320 I582238 (Published in the Daily Chronicle, January 2, 9 & 16, 2014.) Breaking News available 24/7 at Daily-Chronicle.com

PUBLIC NOTICE LOOKING FOR DBE'S! Curran Contracting Company is seeking IDOT approved DBE subcontractors, suppliers, & trucking companies for the 01/17/2014 IDOT letting! Plans & Specs are available at www.dot.state.il.us or email estimating@ currancontracting.com (815) 455-5100 (Published in the Daily Chronicle, December 30, 31, 2013, January 2, 3, 6, 7, 8, 9 & 10, 2014.)

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF BOARD MEETINGS Notice is hereby given that the Victor Township Drainage District #1 has scheduled public board meetings at the Victor Township Building located at 8478 Suydam Road, Leland, IL 60531 on any Tuesday in January, 2014 through December, 2014 at 8:00 a.m. for the purpose of conducting any business that comes before the Drainage District board, including, but not limited to, the payment of bills, and authorization of work to be done. Dated this 30th day of December, 2013 by Dale L. Stockley, Attorney for Victor Township Drainage District (Published in the Daily Chronicle, January 2, 2014.)

PUBLIC NOTICE ASSUMED NAME PUBLICATION NOTICE Public Notice is hereby given that on December 17, 2013 a certificate was filed in the Office of the County Clerk of DeKalb County, Illinois, setting forth the names and post office addresses of all of the persons owning, conducting and transacting the business known as WHEN DOODIE CALLS located at 370 N. Cedar St., Waterman, IL 60556. Dated December 17, 2013 /s/ Douglas J. Johnson DeKalb County Clerk & Recorder (Published in the Daily Chronicle, December 19, 26, 2013 & January 2, 2014)

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December 5, 2013 Commonwealth Edison Company ("ComEd") notifies the public that on December 2, 2013, it filed with the Illinois Commerce Commission (the "Commission") a Petition under Sections 8-406.1 and 8-503 of the Illinois Public Utilities Act for a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity to install, operate, and maintain an overhead 345 kilovolt ("kV") electric transmission line in Ogle, DeKalb, Kane, and DuPage Counties. ComEd's request is pending before the Commission as Docket No. 13-0657. ComEd's Petition and other materials filed therewith may be viewed (subject to any Protective Order) online, at http://www.icc.illinois.gov/docket/casedetails.aspx?no=13-0657, or at ComEd's office located at Three Lincoln Centre, Oakbrook Terrace, Illinois. Additional information concerning the project is available online at www.ComEd.com/GrandPrairieGateway. All parties interested in this matter may obtain information with respect thereto either directly from ComEd or by addressing the Chief Clerk of the Illinois Commerce Commission, 527 East Capitol Avenue, Springfield, Illinois 62706. COMMONWEALTH EDISON COMPANY By: Anne R. Pramaggiore President and CEO, Commonwealth Edison Company (Published in the Kane County Chronicle, January 2, 2014.)

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