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Wednesday, January 15, 2014

GIRLS BASKETBALL • SPORTS, B1

CULINARY CURATIVES

Gilbert leads Sycamore to win against Hampshire

The restorative power of comfort food Food, C1

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Bailey Gilbert

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More than 60 people treated at hospital

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Illinois EPA to visit landfill

Student: ‘It smelled like a dump’

FOUL ODOR CAUSES DISCOMFORT Landfill workers release smell while doing routine drilling

Firefighters respond at Cortland Elementary

By ANDREA AZZO aazzo@shawmedia.com

By KATIE DAHLSTROM kdahlstrom@shawmedia.com CORTLAND – Classes will return to normal today at Cortland Elementary School after foul odors from the nearby Waste Management landfill sickened teachers and students Tuesday. Firefighter/paramedics from around the area took people from the school to Kishwaukee Community Hospital, and hospital officials said more than 60 people in all were treated for low-level carbon monoxide exposure. William Zaver watched fellow students in his fourthgrade class develop sore throats after the overpowering odor moved through the school Tuesday morning. “I saw three people in my class get sick,” 10-year-old William said. “It smelled a lot like gas.” DeKalb District 428 staff noticed an odor at the elementary school just before 10 a.m., Superintendent James Briscoe said. Waste Management spokeswoman Lisa Disbrow said a contractor performing maintenance work at the landfill hit a pocket of old decomposing garbage, releasing the odor, but no methane gas, into the air. “Any future work will be performed only when favorable conditions exist or the school is not in session as we complete this construction project,” Disbrow said in a statement. “We hope to have this project completed in the next two weeks, again based upon favorable conditions.” Officials had not determined late Tuesday what chemicals caused the odor. Neither the school’s nor the landfill’s hydrogen sulfide monitors went off, and firefighters did not find carbon

See SCHOOL, page A5

Photos by Rob Winner – rwinner@shawmedia.com

A young boy on a stretcher Tuesday is taken from Cortland Elementary School in Cortland. A strong odor released from the nearby landfill got caught in the school’s ventilation system making staff and students nauseous.

8What happened A Waste Management spokesperson says crews doing routine drilling work punctured a pocket in the landfill filled with old trash, releasing gas with a heavy, sour odor that the wind carried to Cortland Elementary.

8Precautions Health officials suggest parents of Cortland Elementary School monitor their children for headaches, nausea and vomiting for about 24 hours.

8On the Web To view more photos and video from Tuesday’s incident at Cortland Elementary School, visit Daily-Chronicle. com.

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DaNee Walker leaves the school with her daughter, Paisley, 10, on Tuesday in Cortland. Emergency personnel from several fire departments responded, including Cortland, DeKalb, Sycamore, Maple Park, Elburn, Burlington, Hinckley and Genoa-Kingston.

I saw three people in my class get sick. It smelled a lot like gas.” William Zaver, Cortland Elementary School student

CORTLAND – Waste Management plans to resume construction work at its Cortland landfill when school is not in session or during favorable conditions, company spokesperson Lisa Disbrow said. The company will work with DeKalb School District 428 and DeKalb County officials to prevent a repeat of Tuesday’s incident, which caused more than 60 students and staff from Cortland Elementary School to be treated for carbon monoxide exposure. An outside contracting company was doing routine drillwork at the landfill Tuesday when crews hit a pocket in the garbage, causing a “strong odor” of old garbage to be released into the air. The wind then carried that odor to Cortland Elementary School, Disbrow said. Disbrow said she did not know the name of the construction company responsible. Prevailing winds pushed the odor to Cortland Elementary. The National Weather Service reported winds were blowing at 16 mph out of the southwest at 10:15 a.m. Tuesday from DeKalb’s Taylor Municipal Airport, which put the school downwind of the landfill. “We always try to take in to consideration the winds,” Disbrow said. “Unfortunately, that did not occur [Tuesday] morning. Winds changed direction and picked up.” Disbrow said the construction company has been working at the landfill since December and “was not paying attention to the prevailing winds” Tuesday. Part of the project, which it is hoped will be completed in two weeks, is upgrading the gas system that controls odors. Disbrow said it was not

See LANDFILL, page A5

City Council picks task force to tackle City Hall renovation By DEBBIE BEHRENDS dbehrends@shawmedia.com DeKALB – The issue of providing a tornado shelter for the residents of Southmoor Estates, a concern for city staff and the City Council, has been resolved with the help of Barb City Manor. Ellen Tyne, administrator of the retirement center at 680 Haish Blvd., said she plans to meet soon with management of the manufactured home community.

“We have an extremely solid building with a couple of areas that are great to use when there are tornado warnings,” Tyne said. “We felt we could handle having the folks from Southmoor here with us to keep them safe.” Now that the emergency shelter has been addressed, Mayor John Rey has created a task force to study options for renovating City Hall. Second Ward Alderman Bill Finucane and 5th Ward Alderman Ron Naylor are serving

on the task force with city staff. “There are several options on the table,” Naylor said. “This subcommittee will evaluate those options.” Naylor said one of the ma- John Rey j o r c o n c e r n s DeKalb i s t h e c o s t , mayor and how best to address long-range plans. According to information

provided to the council at its meeting as a Committee of the Whole on Monday, the city has $5.5 million budgeted for the renovation. Assistant City Manager Rudy Espiritu has said there are about $6 Ron Naylor million in tax 5th Ward increment fialderman nancing funds available for the project.

“We want to be sure the building will serve the residents for a long time, to be efficient, to be convenient,” Naylor said. Among the issues to be addressed are leaving council chambers, which also serves as a courtroom on Mondays, on the second floor, moving them to the first floor or moving them across Fourth Street to the annex building. “I think moving the council chambers to the first floor of this building is prefera-

Inside today’s Daily Chronicle Lottery Local news Obituaries

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National and world news Opinions Sports

ble,” Rey said. With no specific timeline in place, Naylor said it’s important to have the new city manager in place to be part of the discussion. Newly-hired City Manager Anne Marie Gaura’s first day with the city will be Jan. 21. “I’m hopeful that, within a couple of months,we should be able to make some decisions and hire an architect,” Naylor said. “Hopefully by mid-summer, we should have something in the works.”

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MORNING READ

Page A2 • Wednesday, January 15, 2014

8 DAILY PLANNER Today Business Networking International: 8 a.m. at 920 W. Prairie Drive, No. M, Sycamore. Home-schoolers activities: 8:45 to 11:45 a.m. in Sycamore. All ages. Hands-on classes and field trips. Contact Lisa at 815-748-0896 or gakers@tbc.net. Free Blood Pressure Clinic: 9 to 11 a.m. at Valley West Community Hospital, 11 E. Pleasant Ave., Sandwich. No appointment necessary. 815-786-3962 or www.valleywest. org. Men and Caregivers Networking Breakfast: 9 to 10 a.m. at Kishwaukee Community Hospital Cancer Center. Free. Open to those with cancer for discussion. No registration is required. For information, call 815-748-2958 or visit www.kishhospital.org/programs. Fresh Beginnings AA(C): 9:30 a.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800-4527990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. New Beginnings AA(C): 10 a.m. at 120 Main St., Kingston. 800-4527990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Kishwaukee Kiwanis: 11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Hopkins Park Community Room in DeKalb. www. KishKiwanis.org; email Amy Polzin at APolzin87@yahoo.com. Franklin HEA: Afternoon unit of the Homemakers Education Association. For meeting time and location, call Betty at 815-522-3361. Sycamore Rotary Club: Noon at Blumen Gardens, 403 Edward St., Sycamore. 24 Hour A Day Brown Bag AA(C): 12:05 p.m. at Newman Center, 512 Normal Road, DeKalb. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Kishwaukee Valley Heritage Museum: 1 to 5 p.m. at 622 Park Ave. in Genoa. Call 815-784-5559 for appointments other days. Memories of DeKalb Ag: 2 to 4 p.m. at Nehring Gallery, Suite 204, 111 S. Second St., DeKalb. Free admission and open to all. www. dekalbalumni.org. Weight Watchers: 5 p.m. weighin, 5:30 p.m. meeting at Weight Watchers Store, 2583 Sycamore Road, (near Aldi) DeKalb. Community Dinners: 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the Voluntary Action Center lunch site, 330 Grove St., DeKalb. The free, public dinners are served by volunteers. New sponsors are always welcome. call Nancy Hicks at 815-758-1678 to volunteer; call the main VAC office at 815-758-3932 to sponsor a meal. Safe Passage Domestic Violence support group: 815-7565228; www.safepassagedv.org. Came to Believe AA(C): 6 p.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Chess Game Play: 6 to 8 p.m. at Sycamore Public Library, 103 E. State St., Sycamore. Free, open chess game play. All ages and skill levels are welcome. info@ dekalbchess.com or visit www. DeKalbChess.com. Meditation Drop-In: 6 to 7 p.m. at Center for Integrative BodyWork, 130 N. Fair St., Sycamore. Reservations appreciated, not required. www.yourcfib.com, 815-899-6000 or info@yourcfib.com. Genoa Lions Club: 6:30 p.m. at Genoa Veterans Home, 311 S. Washington St. North Avenue Pass It On AA(C): 6:30 p.m. at North Ave. Baptist Church, 301 North Ave., Sycamore. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. American Legion Auxiliary, Bayard Brown Unit 337: 7 p.m. at Genoa Veterans Home, 311 S. Washington St. Narcotics Anonymous: 7 to 8 p.m. at United Church of Christ, 615 N. First St., DeKalb. 815-964-5959. www.rragsna.org. Sycamore Pumpkin Festival Committee: 7 p.m. on the lower level at Sycamore Center, 308 W. State St. Vendors and visitors are welcome. Bingo Night: 7:15 p.m. at Sycamore Veterans Club, 121 S. California St. 815-895-2679. Kishwaukee Concert Band rehearsals: 7:30 to 9 p.m. at Huntley Middle School, South Seventh and Taylor streets in DeKalb. No auditions necessary; the band is open to wind or percussion instrumentalists age 18 and older. 815-8994867 or 815-825-2350. Celebration Chorale practices: 8 p.m. Wednesdays at First United Methodist Church, 321 Oak St., DeKalb. Singers are invited. For information, call Sally at 815-7396087. Hopefuls AA(C): 8 p.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com.

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8 WHAT’S HAPPENING AT DAILY-CHRONICLE.COM? Yesterday’s Reader Poll results:

Today’s Reader Poll question:

Have you stuck with your New Year’s resolutions? So far, so good: 16 percent Nope, that’s over: 5 percent Didn’t make resolutions: 72 percent I resolve to make resolutions soon: 7 percent

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Vintage DeKalb sign not out for good Ek! That’s what’s missing from the vintage DeKalb Theatre sign restored and installed this fall at Debutantes School of Cosmetology and Nail Technology, 145 N. Third St. Debutantes’ owners were notified that two letters in the neon sign weren’t lighting up Tuesday morning and started making calls. “The neon is essentially a gas inside a glass tube,” co-owner Tom Rogers said. “Apparently, one of them has broken. I’m not sure if that’s vandalism, if it’s the extreme cold. This is new to us. At this point, it doesn’t really matter what it is.” Rogers said staff at Virgil Cook & Son Electrical assured him the problem wasn’t electrical, which left him searching for a contractor who specializes in neon. He reached out to Wagner Electric Sign Co. of Elyria, Ohio, the company that restored the marquee last year. Debutantes, and the city of DeKalb, already have invested quite a bit in the

VIEWS Jillian Duchnowski marquee and the image it’s meant to project downtown. Dubbed the “Theatre of Tomorrow,” the DeKalb Theatre opened in March 1949 and operated with a single screen until 1991. After the theater went out of business, several other businesses used the space and left the marquee dark. But Rogers and then-Alderman Brendon Gallagher encouraged city leaders to spend up to $90,000 to restore the landmark using proceeds from tax increment financing, which is a special taxing mechanism that sets aside taxes associated with increased property values for economic development. Rogers promised to pay the electricity to keep the sign lit, and is footing the bill for any repairs.

After the restored sign was unveiled just before Corn Fest, Rogers saw some online commenters – and the Daily Chronicle editorial board – question the wisdom of using economic development funds for the sign. But he said most of the direct feedback he received was overwhelmingly positive. “People just love the way it changes the street,” Rogers said. “It gives a feel to the downtown like: Wow, open for business, looking good. It’s been very encouraging. We’re trying to create an environment that is more inviting, that says: ‘Hey there are things happening in downtown DeKalb.’ ” So, if you drive by the marquee and wonder why part of the town’s name is missing, fear not: Things are still happening in DeKalb, and the sign should be back to its former glory soon.

• Jillian Duchnowski is the Daily Chronicle’s news editor. Reach her at 815-756-4841, ext. 2221, or email jduchnowski@shawmedia.com.

Missed paper? We hope not. But if you did and you live in the immediate area, please call Customer Service at 800-589-9363 before 10 a.m. daily. We will deliver your Daily Chronicle as quickly as possible. If you have questions or suggestions, complaints or praise, please send to: Circulation Dept., 1586 Barber Greene Road, DeKalb, IL 60115. To become a carrier, call ext. 2468. Copyright 2014 Published daily by Shaw Media. SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION Daily: $.75 / issue Sunday: $1.50 / issue Basic weekly rate: $5.25 Basic annual rate: $273 GENERAL MANAGER Karen Pletsch kpletsch@shawmedia.com ADVERTISING Display Advertising: ext. 2217 Fax: 815-756-2079 Classified Advertising: 815-787-7861 Toll free: 877-264-2527 NEWSROOM Eric Olson Editor eolson@shawmedia.com News: ext. 2257 news@daily-chronicle.com Obituaries: ext. 2228 obits@daily-chronicle.com Photo desk: ext. 2265 photo@daily-chronicle.com Sports desk: ext. 2224 sports@daily-chronicle.com Fax: 815-758-5059 REGIONAL PUBLISHER AND GENERAL MANAGER Don T. Bricker dbricker@shawmedia.com CIRCULATION Kara Hansen Group VP of Audience Development khansen@shawmedia.com

AP photo

Herbert Diess, research and development head of BMW, stands next to the new M4 coupe as he introduces the automaker’s new lineup Monday at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit.

8 TODAY’S TALKER

Performance cars center stage at auto show By DAVID RUNK The Associated Press DETROIT – People still want to have fun when they drive. That’s the message from automakers unveiling a bevy of performance cars in Detroit this week, such as the Corvette Z06, a trio of BMWs and the Mercedes-Benz GLA45 AMG small SUV. Despite the industry’s attention to fuel economy, these cars primarily want to make sure you enjoy the ride. A recovery in discretionary income is giving consumers reason to spend more on cars. And despite occasional spikes, gas prices have averaged between $3.50 to $3.60 nationwide for the past three years, a level more and more drivers have grown accustomed to. “Now we have the opportunity that people are going to buy the cars they really desire, that they really want,” says Jake Fisher, Consumer Reports’ automotive testing director, on the sidelines of the North American Inter-

national Auto Show. Fuel efficiency and price are major factors in car-buying decisions, but the improving economy is reinvigorating the market for high-powered cars. And it makes for some striking juxtapositions at the auto show, such as an all-electric version of Volkswagen’s compact VW Golf sharing the stage with the Golf R, which features 290 horsepower, 2.0-liter turbocharged engine. “They’re putting in the power,” Fisher says. “It’s not just the cars that people need.” A common theme among the performance cars shown in Detroit, though, is that power doesn’t have to mean pain at the gas pump. Even in its performance incarnation, VW estimates the Golf R’s highway fuel economy around 31 mpg with the six-speed manual transmission, up from 27 mpg. Still, that tiny Golf R propels a driver from zero to 60 mph in 4.9 seconds. “The performance vehicles of today

aren’t your big, V8 gas guzzlers of the past,” Joe Hinrichs, Ford’s head of the Americas, said. He notes the interest in performance goes beyond traditional sports cars. Ford sells performance derivatives of the Fiesta subcompact and Focus small car. Ford’s iconic performance car, the Mustang, is at the show. The newest version was revealed at a series of events last month. Mustang buyers will have three engines to choose from, including a 5.0-liter V8, with 420 horsepower, as well as some more fuel-efficient options. Past shows have been no stranger to performance introductions, both production cars and concept vehicles. Just last year in Detroit, Chevrolet took the wraps off its next-generation Corvette Stingray – on Monday the car was honored as North American Car of the Year. The win was followed by Chevrolet unveiling a hot new edition of the Stingray, called the Z06, with a staggering 625 horsepower.

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8CORRECTIONS Accuracy is important to the Daily Chronicle, and we want to correct mistakes promptly. Please call errors to our attention by phone, 815-756-4841, ext. 2257; email, news@daily-chronicle.com; or fax, 815-758-5059.

8DID YOU WIN? Illinois Lottery Tuesday Pick 3-Midday: 3-2-4 Pick 3-Evening: 8-5-4 Pick 4-Midday: 3-4-6-0 Pick 4-Evening: 7-7-7-9 Lucky Day Lotto-Midday: 2-3-5-15-31 Lucky Day Lotto-Evening: 4-12-15-19-39 Lotto jackpot: $11.25 million

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Powerball Powerball jackpot: $93 million

Retired police officer charged in fatal shooting in Fla. theater By TAMARA LUSH The Associated Press WESLEY CHAPEL, Fla. – Chad Oulson was described by friends as a man who loved dirt bikes and his baby daughter. Curtis Reeves was a retired Tampa police officer with numerous commendations who liked riding his motorcycle with his wife. The men’s lives collided in a movie theater altercation that left Oulson dead and Reeves in jail. Oulson was texting his daughter’s daycare, friends said, and Reeves got mad. “He must have just snapped,” neighbor Joe D’Andrea said of Reeves, describing him as friendly, “stand-up” guy. “I’m trying to put all of this together.”

Reeves’ personnel files from the police department show he led other agencies in gun safety training and received numerous letters of commendation for his leadership. During Reeves’ first court appearance Tuesday, Judge Lynn Tepper ordered the 71-year-old held without bond on a second-degree murder charge pending a bond hearing. Pasco County Sheriff’s officials said Reeves initially asked Oulson to stop texting at the theater in Wesley Chapel, a suburb about a half-hour north of downtown Tampa. Sheriff’s Detective Allen Proctor wrote that Reeves spoke to Oulson during the movie previews, then got up and informed management. When Reeves returned to his seat

“additional words were exchanged” and Oulson threw a bag of popcorn at Reeves, the report said. After officers read him his rights, Reeves told the detective that Oulson struck him in the face with an unknown object, and that’s when he removed a .380 caliber gun from his pants pocket. The report said Reeves fired the gun and struck Oulson once in the chest and that he “was in fear of being attacked.” Tepper said she found the evidence significant enough to warrant the no bond order. Reeves faces life in prison if convicted. He only spoke once during his court appearance, to say “yes, ma’am” to the judge when she asked him if he could afford to hire his own

attorney. Reeves, who appeared in court via a video link from the jail, appeared to be wearing a bullet proof vest without a shirt underneath. Reeves’ attorney, Richard Escobar, argued that his client should be released because of his deep ties to the community. Escobar said the probable cause document was “quite weak” and that Reeves was defending himself. “The alleged victim attacked him,” Escobar said, adding that Oulson threw something, possibly popcorn, at Reeves. “At that point in time he has every right to defend himself.” The judge said that throwing “an unknown object does not equal taking out a gun” and shooting someone.


Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

LOCAL

Wednesday, January 15, 2014 • Page A3

DeKalb County students invited to tech conference By DEBBIE BEHRENDS DeKALB – Students in third through 12th grades are invited to participate in the sixth annual Students Involved with Technology Conference on Feb. 22 at DeKalb High School, 501 W. Dresser Road. Denise Flemming, DeKalb School District 428’s teacher on special assignment for technology, is in charge of the conference, which is open to all area students. “Each year, we have 200 to 250 students attend,” Flemming said. “We’ve had students attend from other states, we’ve had home-school students and, last year, we had a large group from Burlington Central High School.” Although sessions aren’t scheduled until registration ends Jan. 24, Flemming said past sessions have included photo and video editing, geocaching, robotics, programming, remote sensing, Google Earth, logo design, wind energy, game development, mobile apps, multimedia design and more.

LeBlanc, a seventh-grader, said she enjoyed being a presenter. “It’s really fun, because you get to help other kids and give them things they can use for school,” LeBlanc said. After their presentations, the girls were able to attend other sessions. Grace Flemming said she attended Motion Power Point and Kindle sessions. Although she said it was a little scary at first, Malta Elementary fifth-grader Audrey Rey plans to be a presenter again this year. “We’re doing a presentation about Mine Craft,” Rey said. The $25 fee, which includes the T-shirt and all the sessions, also includes lunch, a snack and opportunities to win prizes. The conference began in Bloomington in 2000, and takes place simultaneously in several locations. To register, visit sitconference.org or contact Flemming at denise.flemming@dist428. org or 815-754-2209. More information also is available at District 428’s Facebook page.

Students Involved with Technology Conference

dbehrends@shawmedia.com

n When: Feb. 22 n Where: DeKalb High School, 501 W. Dresser Road n Cost: $25 which includes technology sessions, hands-on activities, a T-shirt, lunch and a snack n Register: The deadline to register is Jan. 24. Register at sitconference.org or contact Denise Flemming at denise.flemming@ dist428.org or 815-754-2209.

File photo by Rob Winner – rwinner@shawmedia.com

Founders Elementary School students Iain Skaret (left), 8, and Nick Glover, 9, watch the robot they helped create with Legos as it completes a task during a presentation at last year’s Students Involved with Technology Conference at DeKalb High School. SIT is a forum where kids in grades three through 12 can demonstrate technology tools they have learned in school or that they are interested in. “This is a conference for students, by students,” Flemming said. “Everyone receives a booklet and a T-shirt. The day opens with a keynote

speaker and then the students select which 30-minute sessions they want to attend. All the sessions are conducted by students.”

“Every half-hour, there’s a new session to attend,” she said. She said she schedules between 40 to 60 sessions. Flemming’s daughter,

Grace, and Megan LeBlanc presented a website called Prezi.com. “There are templates on it to build presentations for school or work,” said Grace Flemming, a sixth-grade student. “We presented twice, and it was a little nerve-wracking at first, but it was fun,” she said. This year, the team is planning to present a website called NoteFlight.com, music notation software.

Police arrest, charge man who fled scene of Plank Road crash By ANDREA AZZO aazzo@shawmedia.com SYCAMORE – A 46-yearold DeKalb man accused of walking away from Saturday’s crash on Plank Road that injured a Sycamore woman was arrested early Tuesday after a family member tipped off police. Francisco Ortega, of the 1300 block of Pleasant Street, was charged with leaving the scene of a personal-injury accident and driving without a driver’s license or insurance. If convicted of the most serious charge, he would face up to three years in prison.

Ortega’s brother, Sixto Ortega, called the DeKalb County Sheriff’s Office about 2:50 a.m. Tuesday to tell them his brother was the driver of the pickup truck which rear ended a Chevrolet Malibu driven by Debra Terpin, 53, of Sycamore, court records show. Terpin said she was treatFrancisco ed for a minor Ortega concussion after the crash, which happened about 6 a.m. Saturday, when a semitrailer hit an icy patch and went off the road. The

semi jack-knifed, its trailer was blocking the road, which caused Terpin to swerve out of the way and into a snow bank, police said. While Terpin’s vehicle was in the snow bank, police said it was rear-ended by a Ford F-150 pickup driven by Francisco Ortega, who ran from the scene after the crash. Police went to Ortega’s home just before 3 a.m. Tuesday, and he admitted to driving the pickup, saying he lost control because of icy conditions and fled because he was worried he had injured someone while driving without a license or insurance, court records

show. The car is registered to Francisco Ortega’s wife, Estefania Ortega, records show. Francisco Ortega told police he got out of the pickup and walked to Casey’s General Store in Sycamore, where he got a ride to work. He said he put his head down to avoid being seen when the car drove past police. Francisco Ortega was being held in the DeKalb County Jail on Tuesday morning, unable to post 10 percent of his $5,000 bond. He indicated he would hire an attorney to represent him. His next court date is scheduled for Feb. 13.

Photo provided

Debra Terpin’s Chevrolet Malibu was struck by a pickup truck while Terpin was avoiding a semitrailer that was jack-knifed Saturday morning on Plank Road.

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NEWS

Page A4 • Wednesday, January 15, 2014

8OBITUARIES MARJORIE L. ANDERSON Born: Jan. 5, 1928, in Tama, Iowa Died: Jan. 11, 2014, in DeKalb, Ill. DeKALB – Marjorie L. Anderson, 86, of DeKalb, Ill., and formerly of Elgin, died Saturday, Jan. 11, 2014, at Oak Crest DeKalb Area Retirement Center in DeKalb. Born Jan. 5, 1928, in Tama, Iowa, the daughter of Marion and Julia (Upah) Ray, Marjorie married Warren Anderson on April 6, 1947, in Iowa. Marjorie was a member of Burlington United Methodist Church. Marjorie and Warren raised their family in their home in Elgin, where they lived for more than 50 years. She loved taking care of her home and working outdoors. She loved going on long and short trips with her husband and family. She was a member of Beta Sigma Phi International Sorority in Elgin. Marjorie loved the history of Elgin and worked with historical house walks in Elgin. One of her favorite things was singing in the choirs at Desert Hot Springs, Calif., trailer park, where she and Warren wintered for many years. After retirement, Marjorie enjoyed going to breakfasts and lunches with her retirement group from Safety Clean and the Retired Teachers Group. Marjorie is survived by three wonderful sons, of whom she was very proud, David (Mary) of Marengo, Steven (Ann) of Las Cruces, N.M., and Mark (Carrie) of DeKalb. She was the proud and loving grandmother to seven boys and one girl, Gus, Eric, Jennie, Jeremy (Kami), Jonathan (Tanya), Ryan (Becca), Jonathan (Starr) and Curtis (Laura); great-grandmother of eight, Veronica, Alana, Ella, Luka, Arianna, Aleksei, Carly, and a new one due soon. She also is survived by one sister, Betty (Al) Goddard of Florida, and many nieces and nephews that meant so much to her. Marjorie was preceded in death by her husband, Warren Anderson in 2010; and five brothers and sisters, Dorothy, Onille, Lester, Charles and Robert. A memorial celebration is planned for 11 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 18, at Burlington Methodist Church, 195 W. Center St., Burlington. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to KishHealth System Hospice, in memory of Marjorie Anderson, 2727 Sycamore Road, DeKalb, IL 60115. To sign the online guest book, visit www.legacy.com/daily-chronicle.

LLOYD H. BOESTER Lloyd H. Boester, 78, of Genoa, Ill., passed away Sunday, Jan. 13, 2014, at Kishwaukee Hospital, DeKalb. Memorial service will be at 11 a.m. Wednesday, Jan. 22, at Olson Funeral & Cremation Services Ltd., Cooper-Quiram Chapel, 202 E. Main St., Genoa, with the Rev. Robert Kinnear officiating; memorial visitation from 10 to 11 a.m. at the funeral home. Visit www.legacy.com/daily-chronicle.

GLADYS L. DOLDER Born: Nov. 2, 1925, in Waterman, Ill. Died: Jan. 10, 2014, in Shabbona, Ill. WATERMAN – Gladys L. Dolder, 88, of Waterman, Ill., died Friday, Jan. 10, 2014, at Prairie Crossing Living & Rehab Center in Shabbona. Born Nov. 2, 1925, in Waterman, the daughter of Gust and Serena (Olson) Swanson, she married Robert Dolder on Aug. 24, 1944. Gladys was a graduate of Shabbona High School. She was a homemaker, employed at Grahams Grocery and Waterman State Bank. Bob and Gladys moved to Stone Lake, Wis., after retirement. After the death of Bob, she moved back to Waterman. The past few years, she was a resident of the nursing home in Shabbona. Survivors include a son, Gary Dolder of Waterman; daughter, Janette Vipond of North Richland Hills, Texas; two grandchildren, Holly (Charles) Thompson of Eugene, Ore., and Mark (Maria) Vipond of Austin, Texas; brotherView a complete list of Daily Chronicle obituaries by clicking on the calendar dates

in-law, Jim (Theresa) Dolder; four great-grandchildren, Abigayle Thompson, Brian Vipond, Ashley Vipond and Sarah Vipond; and four nieces and nephews, Paul (Carol) Dolder, Lynn (Patrick) Upton, Diane (Keith) Allen and David (Karla) Lorenz. Gladys was preceded in death by her parents; husband, Robert; sister, Bessie St. Clair; and son-inlaw, Russell Vipond. No services are scheduled at this time. Cremation arrangements were completed by Jacobson Funeral Home in Shabbona. To sign the online guest book, visit www.legacy.com/daily-chronicle.

GARY M. KELM Born: Oct. 25, 1955, in St. Charles, Ill. Died: Jan. 12, 2014, in Sycamore, Ill. SYCAMORE – Gary M. Kelm, 58, of Sycamore, Ill., died Sunday, Jan. 12, 2014, at his home. Born Oct. 25, 1955, in St. Charles, the son of Edward and Evelyn (Kroeger) Kelm, Gary lived in St. Charles until 1986. He then moved to the Sycamore area and farmed the family farm for many years. Survivors include his two brothers, Stephen (Lennis) Kelm of St. Charles and John Kelm of Sycamore; one sister, Patricia (Jeffrey) O’Brien of Sycamore; stepdaughter, Mindy (Scott) Heath of Sycamore; special caregivers, Mary Niceley, Diane Hongisto and Denise Grzesiakowski; and loyal dog companions, Cody and Nick. He was preceded in death by his parents. His funeral service will be at 12:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 16, at Butala Funeral Home and Crematory in Sycamore, with the Rev. Jeremy Heilman officiating. Burial will be at Elmwood Cemetery, Sycamore. The visitation will be from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Thursday at the funeral home. In lieu of flowers, memorials can be made for TAILS Humane Society in care of Butala Funeral Home and Crematory, 1405 DeKalb Ave., Sycamore, IL 60178. For information or to sign the online guest book, visit www. ButalaFuneralHomes.com or call 815-895-2833. To sign the online guest book, visit www.legacy.com/daily-chronicle.

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Economy tops list for GOP gubernatorial hopefuls By SARA BURNETT The Associated Press CHICAGO – All four Republican candidates for Illinois governor said fixing the state’s economic woes would be among their top priorities if they win – an issue they’ll be trying to distinguish themselves on in a state that’s home to one of the nation’s highest unemployment rates and a multibillion-dollar backlog of overdue bills. In response to a campaign questionnaire from The Associated Press, the four contenders – state Sens. Bill Brady and Kirk Dillard, state Treasurer Dan Rutherford and Winnetka businessman Bruce Rauner – cited the need to cut spending, lower taxes, get people back to work by creating a more business-friendly climate – and “all of the above.” While

offering only a few specifics, the four will no doubt be pressed on the issue in a series of upcoming debates leading up to the March 18 primary. “Jobs. Jobs. And Jobs,” wrote Rutherford, of Chenoa, a former vice president for ServiceMaster Co., in response to an AP question asking for each candidate’s top three priorities if elected. “Illinois government finances are dire and our state is universally considered unfriendly to business. Building an environment that job creators are seeking and putting people back to work will help solve a lot of Illinois’ financial and social ailments.” Those ailments include an unemployment rate of 8.7 percent as of November, the most recent date for which numbers are available. It was the third straight month

that the rate dropped, but it was still above the national unemployment of 7 percent for the same month. Lawmakers took steps last month to fix another massive fiscal problem, approving a plan supporters say will eliminate Illinois’ $100 billion unfunded pension liability over 30 years. But the state isn’t counting on any of those savings for at least another year – and it’s possible the courts could find the new law unconstitutional and throw it out. Meanwhile, a temporary income tax increase approved by Democrats in 2011 is set to be rolled back Jan. 1, 2015. The Governor’s Office of Management and Budget recently projected a loss of about $2 billion in revenue during the fiscal year that begins July 1 if that rollback occurs.

Drive, DeKalb, was charged Sunday, Jan. 5, with domestic battery. Ciara L. Pickens, 20, of the 2000 block of Alpha Court East, DeKalb, was charged Sunday, Jan. 5, with domestic battery. Briana R. Pickens, 21, of the 2000 block of Alpha Court East, DeKalb, was charged Sunday, Jan. 5, with domestic battery. Tyesha A. Lane, 29, of the 1100 block of Lewis Street, DeKalb, was arrested Sunday, Jan. 5, on an in-state warrant. Jamika C. Smith, 20, of the 800 block of Edgebrook Drive, DeKalb, was arrested Monday, Jan. 6, on an in-state warrant. Garrett A. Boyd, 21, of the 1300 block of Knolls Avenue South, DeKalb, was charged Monday, Jan. 6, with criminal

defacement of property. Jacob T. Hinkle, 20, of the 1100 block of Sycamore Road, DeKalb, was charged Monday, Jan. 6, with criminal defacement of property. Richard D. Gregoire, 31, of the 2300 block of Eves Circle East, DeKalb, was charged Tuesday, Jan. 7, with ingesting toluol or acetone.

8POLICE REPORTS Note to readers: Information in Police Reports is obtained from the DeKalb County Sheriff’s Office and city police departments. Individuals listed in Police Reports who have been charged with a crime have not been proven guilty in court.

DeKalb County Phillip M. Barnes, 34, of the 200 block of West Navaho Avenue, Shabbona, was arrested Sunday, Jan. 12, on a warrant alleging possession of drug equipment.

DeKalb city Darrell M. Johnson, 27, of the 800 block of Pappas Drive, DeKalb, was charged Sunday, Jan. 5, with trespass to land. Cortez T. Allen, 22, of the 800 block of West Hillcrest

Northern Illinois University Joshua J. Katrein, 19, of DeKalb, was charged Sunday, Jan. 12, with driving under the influence of drugs and possession of marijuana. Jessica L. Katrein, 18, of DeKalb, was charged Sunday, Jan. 12, with possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia.

8BRIEF Boy, 12, opens fire at NM school; 2 wounded ROSWELL, N.M. – A 12-yearold who shot two classmates in a Roswell middle school was stopped by a teacher who walked up to him and asked him to put down his shotgun, according to officials. One student was critically injured and another is in serious condition after Tuesday morning’s shooting at Berrendo Middle School. State police said the shooter was a seventh-grader. Gov. Susanna Martinez said a teacher “quickly stopped” the suspect by walking up to him and asking him to put down the firearm, which he did.

– Wire report

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Born: Jan. 9, 1927, in Urbana, Ohio Died: Jan. 12, 2014 KINGSTON – Edward Earl Zirkle, 87, of Kingston, Ill., passed away Sunday, Jan. 12, 2014. Born Jan. 9, 1927, in Urbana, Ohio, the son of Earl and Lulu Florence (Weaver) Zirkle, he married Marlene Zugin; she preceded him in death Dec. 24, 1996. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II. He worked for Hampshire Specialty Products as a process engineer. He is survived by his children, Sue Ann (John) Podgorski of Kingston, Raymond Charles (Marianne) Zirkle of Racine, Wis., and Robert (Angela) Zirkle of Grayslake; brother, Raymond Philip Zirkle of Putman Valley, N.Y.; eight grandchildren, Nicole (Ernesto) Rodriguez, Christopher (Heather) Podgorski, Anna (Antonio) Davila, Joseph (Laura) Podgorski, John (Rebecca) Podgorski, Sean Zirkle, Patricia (Justin) Lowrance and Bradley Zirkle; five great-grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents; daughter, Stephanie Bagnuolo; two brothers, Bernard and Emil Zirkle; and sister-in-law, Dorothy Zirkle. Funeral services will be at noon Saturday, Jan. 18, at Olson Funeral & Cremation Services, Cooper Quiram Chapel, 202 E. Main St., Genoa, with the Rev. E. Timothy Frick officiating. The visitation will be from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, at the funeral home. For information, call 815-7842518. To send a condolence or share a memory, visit www. olsonfh.com. To sign the online guest book, visit www.legacy.com/daily-chronicle.

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Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

Wednesday, January 15, 2014 • Page A5

Landfill less than 1 mile from Cortland school

Huge budget bill attempts to show Congress’ mettle

• SCHOOL Continued from page A1 monoxide at the school. An inspector from the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency’s Bureau of Land will visit the site today, agency spokeswoman Kim Biggs said. Biggs said Waste Management officials described a heavy, sour odor. The wind carried that odor to the school less than a mile to the northeast, where it got caught in the ventilation system, Briscoe said. “Our ventilation system is good, but it was just so concentrated,” Briscoe said. “We opened doors, and it wasn’t long before you couldn’t smell anything.” Despite school officials’ efforts, 63 students and staff reported headaches, nausea, vomiting and other symptoms and went to Kishwaukee Hospital in DeKalb. About 530 students attend Cortland Elementary. The nausea students and staff reported feeling Tuesday morning was because of minor carbon monoxide exposure, said Dr. Michael Kulisz, chief medical officer for KishHealth System. Kulisz suggested parents monitor their children for headaches, nausea and vomiting for about 24 hours. Fresh air is the first course of treatment, but parents should use their judgment about whether they need to bring children into the emergency room to be given oxygen, he said. According to Cortland Assistant Fire Chief Kelly Davis, when emergency crews first responded to the scene their tests for air quality showed no levels of any con-

By ANDREW TAYLOR The Associated Press WASHINGTON – A chastened Congress is putting aside the crisis-driven budget battles of the past three years, embracing a $1.1 trillion spending bill that restores or smooths the sharpest edges of the automatic cuts imposed as a result of its own dysfunction. The huge election-year legislation preserves the downward trajectory on government spending demanded by Republicans. Yet the bipartisan measure steaming through Congress also preserves President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul and stricter regulation of financial markets – and deflects the most significant attempts by Republicans to rewrite environmental rules and force other changes. Lawmakers hope the compromise will show disgruntled voters before next fall’s midterm election that Washington – especially its unpopular Congress – can perform its most basic function of responsibly,, funding the government. The bravado that prompted tea party Republicans to force a government shutdown in hopes of derailing “Obamacare” is long gone, replaced by an election-year desire to focus attention on the administration’s troubled rollout of the health care law instead of lurching from crisis to crisis.

Photos by Rob Winner – rwinner@shawmedia.com

Parents pick up their children Tuesday from Cortland Elementary School in Cortland. BELOW: An adult is seen on a stretcher being wheeled into a Sycamore Fire Department ambulance outside the school.

taminants such as carbon monoxide. “Our air quality monitoring showed no levels of anything at all,” Davis said. “Not from the initial sweep through the time the last units left the scene.” The low levels of carbon monoxide were detected using an oximeter on students and staff who reported feeling ill. The doctor on the scene

recommended those patients be taken to the emergency room, Davis added. Parents were told Tuesday afternoon that they could pick up their children before the scheduled dismissal time if they wished, and those who could not be picked up early were taken to the cafeteria, where the ceilings are higher, until buses could take them home at the normal time.

“I got a voicemail from the school saying there was an issue,” said Chris Fowler as he walked his son Rowan, 8, out of the school. “It smelled like a dump,” said Rowan, a second-grade student. Firefighter/paramedics from several departments responded, including Cortland, DeKalb, Sycamore, Genoa-Kingston, Maple Park, Rochelle, Elburn, Burlington and Hinckley. Equipment on the scene included nine ambulances, three fire engines and one rescue squad, and they carried more than 30 emergency personnel. Fire officials cleared the scene around 3 p.m. after being there for four hours, Davis said.

• Daily Chronicle News Editor Jillian Duchnowski contributed to this story.

There could still be bumps in the road. Congress needs to raise the government’s borrowing cap by the end of February or early March, and it’s unclear how big of a battle that will be. As for the compromise spending bill, the massive measure funds the operations of virtually every federal agency, making cuts and additions reflecting the trade-offs of divided government. While delivering relief from painful budget cuts and caps known as sequestration, it still imposes a 3 percent cut on agency budgets relative to those approved last year before automatic reductions lopped about $60 billion from them. The measure doesn’t contain in-your-face victories for either side. The primary achievement is that there is an agreement in the first place. Last year’s collapse of the budget process was followed by a 16-day government shutdown and another brush with a disastrous default on U.S. debt. After the shutdown and debt crisis last fall, House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan, R-Wis., and Senate Budget Committee Chairman Patty Murray, D-Wash., struck an agreement to avoid a repeat of the 5 percent cut applied to domestic agencies last year and to prevent the Pentagon from absorbing about $20 billion in new cuts.

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• LANDFILL Continued from page A1 possible that the current gas system was not working. She said she did not know what gases or chemicals were released with the old garbage odor. Neither the landfill’s nor the school’s hydrogen sulfide monitors went off, and Disbrow said methane was not released during the incident. Waste Management officials were in contact with the DeKalb County Health Department and the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency on Tuesday. Landfill officials said crews began filling in the area emitting the odor as soon as they discovered the problem, and an IEPA inspector will visit the site today, agency spokes-

woman Kim Biggs said. According to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, methane can only be produced when oxygen is no longer in the landfill. Common landfill gases include methane, carbon dioxide, nitrogen and carbon monoxide. “The odors are a result of natural degradiation of organic matter found in ordinary garbage,” Disbrow said. None of the workers on scene at the landfill became ill, Disbrow said. She described it as an isolated incident. “We’re committed to not allowing this type of act to occur during these unfavorable conditions,” she said.

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Page A6 • Wednesday, January 15, 2014

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Opinions

Daily Chronicle • www.daily-chronicle.com • Page A7 • Wednesday, January 15, 2014

8OUR VIEW

8SKETCH VIEW

Students’ safety should be top priority

‘Small government’ intrudes on life, death Marlise Munoz was 33 when she died. She was at home when she collapsed from an apparent blood clot in her lungs. It was an hour or more before her husband, Erick, found her. He said doctors pronounced her brain dead, though John Peter Smith Hospital in Fort Worth, Texas, citing privacy concerns, has declined to confirm that diagnosis. It is, at any rate, nearly a month and a half since this happened, yet Marlise remains hooked up to life support. Her mother wants her removed. Her father wants her removed. Her husband wants her removed. He says his wife – like him, a paramedic – specifically said she never wanted to be kept alive by artificial means. But the hospital has refused the family’s requests, citing a Texas law that prohibits taking a pregnant woman off life support. And Marlise, the doctors found, was 14 weeks along. As it happens, this family’s plight is the inverse of another that has recently transfixed the nation. Marlise’s family wants her removed from life support, but the family of 13-year-old Jahi McMath fought to keep her attached. McMath was declared brain dead by a hospital in Oakland, Calif., after complications from surgery to remove her tonsils. This triggered a legal struggle that was resolved last week when the hospital released Jahi to the coroner and the coroner released her to her mother’s custody. Jahi is now receiving “treatment” at an undisclosed facility and her

VIEWS Leonard Pitts family says her condition is improving. It seems unlikely. The cessation of neurological function is not some “technical” death. Experts say that in such cases, the brain liquefies, which would seem to be about as dead as you can get. So one suspects Jahi’s family is simply seeing what it needs to see. That said, who can blame them? Who among us has the right to foreclose their prayers or the wisdom to draw some hard and fast line beyond which faith becomes foolishness and steadfastness an excuse to ignore reality? Who among us in the same situation would want somebody to substitute their judgment for ours -- particularly if that somebody was some politician who’d never met us or our loved one? This is what makes the situation in Texas particularly galling. Why is the state – not a doctor, not a faith leader, but the state – interposing itself in one of the most wrenching and intimate moral choices a family can ever make? What gives it the right? There is a political paradox here. Texas, of course, is a very red state. As such, it prides itself on small government. The idea that citizenry functions best under the least government interference is an article

of faith and the prime directive of the Republican Party. But the state’s interference in this family drama highlights the loophole in that ethos. Its advocates want small government when it comes to regulating firearms, the environment, education, business and taxes. But when it comes to regulating your personal morality, the same people suddenly want government to be the opposite of small. They want it big enough to peek over your shoulder, the better to ensure your choices line up with its ideas of right and wrong. Thus it is no accident the party of small government is also the party of anti-gay legislation and trans-vaginal ultrasounds. Or that, in making the most anguished decision of his life, Erick Munoz finds himself saddled with help he did not ask for and does not need. His father-in-law, Ernest Machado, told The New York Times the state has made his daughter “a host for a fetus.” Indeed. In seeking to protect a life not yet viable outside the womb, it has reduced its mother to a thing, and robbed her family of its right to say a dignified and proper farewell. And that paradox glows like neon. Sometimes small government isn’t nearly small enough.

• Leonard Pitts is a columnist for The Miami Herald, 1 Herald Plaza, Miami, Fla., 33132. Readers may contact him via e-mail at lpitts@miamiherald.com.

8VIEWS

French merely pretend to be blasé about sex scandals By JOSHUA KEATING Slate WASHINGTON – The old stereotype is that puritanical American voters obsess about their leaders’ sex lives while the French can’t be bothered. Take, for instance, the contrast between Bill Clinton, whose extramarital affair dominated American politics for years, and Francois Mitterrand, who was somehow able to spend most of the nights of his presidency staying with a second family without the press, public or political opposition taking notice. (Both “widows” attended his funeral.) But for a country that supposedly doesn’t care about politicians’ sex lives, we seem to hear an awful lot about French politicians’ sex lives. A policy address by deeply unpopular President Francois Hollande this week was overshadowed by tabloid reports that he has been having an affair with actress Julie Gayet. First lady Valerie Treirweiler has been hospitalized for unclear reasons. Hollande was supposed to be Monsieur Normal, an appealingly bland return to sanity after the tabloid distractions of the

Nicolas Sarkozy years. But his messy personal life has been on display almost from the beginning with his partner, Trierweiler, carrying on a very public feud with Hollande’s ex, former presidential candidate Segolene Royal. It’s true that 77 percent of French voters say the affair should be a personal matter and 84 percent say it won’t change their (very negative) opinion of Hollande. But with all due respect to the French, I don’t buy this for a second. The gossip magazine Closer sold out the issue featuring photos of Hollande pulling up to Gayet’s apartment. The first question at this week’s press conference, which was supposed to be devoted to policy issues, from the head of the Presidential Press Association, was whether Trierweiler is still first lady. (Hollande ducked it.) It’s true that the mainstream media in France was slow to jump on this until the Closer photos forced the issue, but the blogosphere has been buzzing about Holland and Gayet for almost a year. To be sure, the French aren’t quite Americans yet. It’s almost impossible to imagine the global-media-dominating seismic Drudgequake that would result

Barack Obama were ever photographed being dropped off by motorcycle at a Hollywood starlet’s apartment. The U.S. hasn’t even elected an unmarried president since James Buchanan, much less one who has had relationships with three different very famous women, none of whom he has married. But in terms of the media’s attitude toward what’s acceptable to cover about presidents, things haven’t actually been this way in the U.S. for that long. John F. Kennedy and Franklin Roosevelt would find today’s U.S. media about as uncomfortable as Mitterrand. U.S. voters are fairly realistic about this, with the majority saying that greater scrutiny rather than falling morals are the reason why there are more political sex scandals today. The French may never have been quite as blasé about political sex as they like to pretend, but a number of factors including the Internet and the British and American tabloid media’s insatiable hunger for French sex scandals are making it harder for the mainstream French media to downplay these stories or for French citizens to act like they’re not interested.

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Jillian Duchnowski – News Editor jduchnowski@shawmedia.com

We welcome original letters on public issues. Letters must include the author’s full name, address and day and evening phone numbers. We limit letters to 400 words. We accept one letter per person every 15 days. All letters are subject to editing for length and clarity. Email: news@daily-chronicle.com. Mail: Daily Chronicle, Letters to the Editor, 1586 Barber Greene Road, DeKalb, IL 60115. Fax: 815-758-5059.

Parents, teachers and neighbors have a right to be outraged about the rancid odor from the Waste Management landfill that made people sick at Cortland Elementary School on Tuesday. The landfill is less than a mile from the school, and concerns about the air quality are not new. People expressed concerns about the school site when District 428 built and opened it five years ago. They arose again in 2010, when an air quality test showed hydrogen sulfide in the air outside and inside the school (it was later found to be at safe levels.) Concerns about air quality have been consistently part of the argument about the wisdom of expanding the landfill by 349 acres to accept more than 1,800 tons of trash daily, six times more than it does now. Again and again, parents and community members have been assured by experts and studies that For the record the children and staff at the school are safe. The message District 428 officials consistently has been that in the past have been air quality is within accept- criticized for their decision able levels and monitoring to build a school so close devices have been installed to a landfill site. They to ensure it stays that way. have an obligation to take Those studies and assurwhatever steps are necesances have been an importsary to protect everyone ant part of our decision to support the expansion of the who uses the school from environmental hazards. If landfill in this space. Even the firefighters who they can’t do it, then close arrived on the scene at Cor- the building. tland Elementary on Tuesday said they detected no sign of contaminants such as carbon monoxide. But 63 students and teachers from Cortland went to the emergency room at Kishwaukee Hospital after the patients complained of sore throats, nausea and vomiting as a result of the heavy, sour odor that filled their school. That is simply unacceptable. Many of people were taken to the hospital no doubt out of an abundance of caution, but nonetheless, they required medical care for low-level exposure to carbon monoxide. Health officials thus far seem unable to pinpoint what the people at the school were exposed to, a question that deserves an answer. To a teacher who has faith that District 428 will provide a safe work environment, and a parent who entrusts their child to the district’s care on a daily basis, this is about as serious as it gets. Waste Management officials said they are good neighbors, but Tuesday’s mass transport to the hospital wasn’t the work of a good neighbor. Company officials need to demonstrate to the district and the public that this sort of fiasco can be prevented in the future. District 428 officials in the past have been criticized for their decision to build a school so close to a landfill site. They have an obligation to take whatever steps are necessary to protect everyone who uses the school from environmental hazards. If they can’t do it, then close the building. The stakes are too high to treat this as a fluke occurrence and move on.

8 ANOTHER VIEW

How to test states’ poverty-fighting ability The way to defeat poverty in America, Republican Sen. Marco Rubio said, is to let the states lead the fight. Here’s how to tell if he’s serious about that. Rubio’s basic premise, that the federal government has been inefficient at the job, is sound: Despite the impressive success of the anti-poverty programs created 50 years ago – including food stamps, greater Social Security benefits and federal subsidies for poorer school districts – the United States still has almost 50 million people living in poverty. The U.S. spends more per resident on social programs than the average for developed countries, but gets worse results. The senator’s proposed solution – replacing federal anti-poverty programs with block grants for states to use as they see fit – has a certain appeal, too. As Rubio, of Florida, puts it, why should we assume that what works in Tallahassee makes sense for Topeka? But there are practical reasons to be wary of giving states unconstrained control over federal anti-poverty money. Few states can match the federal government’s resources to plan, monitor and analyze programs, including investigating their abuse. And if the U.S. government surrenders all control over that money, it’s hard for it to remain accountable to taxpayers for how the dollars are spent. A more fundamental rejoinder to Rubio’s plan is that the nature and causes of poverty don’t vary from state to state nearly as much as the political will to alleviate it does. As it stands, Rubio’s proposal for blanket state autonomy looks less like a recipe for reducing poverty than a way to abdicate federal responsibility. If the senator is right that state leaders can do a better job of designing effective anti- poverty programs, he should give them a chance to prove it. Bloomberg News

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. – U.S. Bill of Rights, First Amendment


WEATHER

Page A8 • Wednesday, January 15, 2014

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

7-DAY FORECAST

Temperatures will be on a bit of a roller coaster through the rest of the workweek. A much colder air mass arrived last night and will linger through today. It will turn warmer again tomorrow. Another cold front will move through later tomorrow and tomorrow night with some snow showers, followed by another rather cold air mass for Friday.

ALMANAC

TODAY

TOMORROW

FRIDAY

Clouds and sun, breezy and colder

Windy with a chance for a snow shower

Partly sunny, breezy and colder

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

Snow or lurries Not as cold with possible; not as sunshine cold

MONDAY

TUESDAY

Partly sunny

Cloudy, brisk and colder

17

30

11

19

32

32

23

14

5

8

12

22

17

4

Winds: WNW 10-20 mph

Winds: WSW 12-25 mph

UV INDEX

Winds: WNW 10-20 mph

Winds: NW 8-16 mph

Winds: WSW 10-20 mph

Winds: WNW 7-14 mph

Winds: NW 10-20 mph

REGIONAL CITIES

REGIONAL WEATHER

DeKalb through 4 p.m. yesterday

Temperature High ............................................................. 34° Low .............................................................. 27° Normal high ............................................. 28° Normal low ............................................... 13° Record high .............................. 42° in 1996 Record low ............................... -12° in 1994

Precipitation 24 hours through 4 p.m. yest. ........ Trace Month to date ....................................... 0.90” Normal month to date ....................... 0.74” Year to date ............................................ 0.90” Normal year to date ............................ 0.74”

New

Jan 23

Jan 30

The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. 0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme.

AIR QUALITY TODAY

Rockford 16/13

Source: Environmental Protection Agency

Dixon 17/13

Q:

What type of weather causes the most traic accidents?

Joliet 20/17

La Salle 19/16

First

WEATHER HISTORY

Feb 6

On Jan. 15, 1780, ice in the New York Harbor was thick enough to allow the transport of heavy cannons. While river ice can stop boat traic, it may create possibilities.

Streator 21/18

Peoria 21/17

Hammond 21/17 Gary 22/16 Kankakee 21/17

Hi 17 28 16 16 22 17 20 21 18 21 19 21 19 20 19 24 17 15 16 24 18 19 17 16 19

Today Lo W 15 pc 22 s 11 pc 13 pc 17 s 15 pc 17 pc 17 s 15 pc 16 sf 18 s 18 s 15 pc 17 s 15 pc 21 s 13 pc 13 pc 13 pc 19 s 14 pc 15 pc 13 pc 14 pc 16 pc

Tomorrow Hi Lo W 31 5 c 43 12 pc 30 2 c 30 4 c 36 9 pc 32 5 c 32 7 pc 34 10 pc 32 4 c 33 15 pc 32 1 c 33 8 pc 33 6 c 34 7 c 32 5 c 38 5 pc 30 8 c 30 2 c 30 4 c 39 7 pc 30 3 c 32 6 c 34 6 c 30 5 c 32 6 c

RIVER LEVELS

Pontiac 22/19

NATIONAL WEATHER

Evanston 19/16 Chicago 19/15

Aurora 17/15

WEATHER TRIVIA™

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Waukegan 17/13

Arlington Heights 17/15

DeKalb 17/14

Main ofender ................................................... N.A.

Rain.

Jan 15

Last

Lake Geneva 15/12

A:

Sunrise today ................................ 7:20 a.m. Sunset tonight ............................. 4:49 p.m. Moonrise today ........................... 4:48 p.m. Moonset today ............................. 6:36 a.m. Sunrise tomorrow ........................ 7:20 a.m. Sunset tomorrow ........................ 4:50 p.m. Moonrise tomorrow .................. 5:44 p.m. Moonset tomorrow .................... 7:12 a.m.

Kenosha 17/12

8 a.m. 10 a.m. Noon 2 p.m. 4 p.m. 6 p.m.

0-50 Good, 51-100 Moderate, 101-150, Unhealthy for sensitive groups, 151-200 Unhealthy 201-300 Very Unhealthy, 301-500 Hazardous

SUN and MOON

Full

Janesville 16/12

City Aurora Belleville Beloit Belvidere Champaign Elgin Joliet Kankakee Mendota Michigan City Moline Morris Naperville Ottawa Princeton Quincy Racine Rochelle Rockford Springield Sterling Wheaton Waukegan Woodstock Yorkville

Watseka 22/18

Location

7 a.m. yest.

Kishwaukee Belvidere Perryville DeKalb

1.74 6.95 2.94

Flood stage

9.0 12.0 10.0

24-hr chg

+0.06 +0.29 -0.01

DRAW THE WEATHER Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

-10s -0s 0s 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

Cold Front

Warm Front

Stationary Front

T-storms Rain Showers Snow Flurries

City Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Boston Bufalo Charleston, SC Charlotte Chicago

Hi 40 48 49 48 33 63 53 19

Today Lo W 23 pc 38 pc 31 r 36 s 21 sf 30 pc 25 c 15 pc

Tomorrow Hi Lo W 44 31 s 44 32 pc 42 28 pc 42 32 c 30 25 c 48 34 s 44 28 s 31 7 c

Ice

City Cincinnati Dallas Denver Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles

Hi 29 57 54 60 25 35 65 85

Today Lo W 19 sf 38 s 28 s 38 s 19 sf 29 s 44 s 53 s

Tomorrow Hi Lo W 36 18 pc 64 32 s 47 23 pc 68 41 s 34 15 pc 38 11 pc 66 43 s 85 53 s

City Louisville Miami Minneapolis New Orleans New York City Philadelphia Seattle Wash., DC

Hi 31 73 20 52 50 50 51 49

Today Lo W 22 pc 51 c 19 sn 32 s 37 pc 36 pc 38 c 31 r

Legend: W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow lurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

FIND US ON:

Tomorrow Hi Lo W 38 20 pc 62 43 s 24 -7 sn 57 41 s 43 31 pc 43 31 pc 51 36 c 41 31 pc

Hurricane Alex, Malta Elementary School Mail your weather drawings to: Geoff Wells, 1586 Barber Greene Road, DeKalb, IL 60115

Forecasts and graphics, except WFLD forecasts, provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2014

Schedule your petʻs appointment today!

We O f f e r ! g n i d r a Bo

Sheri Askew , DVM

815-748-8040

“We treat your pet like our own!” 13669 East Route 38, DeKalb (0.2 miles east of Somonauk Rd.)


The Kaneland boys basketball team escapes with a victory over Marmion in nonconference action. PAGE B2

SECTION B Wednesday, January 15, 2014 Daily Chronicle

Sports editor Ross Jacobson • rjacobson@shawmedia.com

8MORNING KICKOFF

BOYS BASKETBALL: INDIAN CREEK 50, HINCKLEY-BIG ROCK 42

IC’s late run thwarts H-BR upset bid By TRAVIS ZUELLIG sports@daily-chronicle.com AP photo

Obama honors Heat for 2nd straight title WASHINGTON – For President Barack Obama, seeing the Miami Heat on Tuesday at the White House was like deja vu. A year after congratulating LeBron James and company on winning their second league title, Obama was doing it again. And so soon. James, Dwyane Wade, Chris Bosh, their teammates and coaches earned another White House visit by following that championship with another last year. They topped the San Antonio Spurs in a series that went the full seven games. A big basketball fan and recreational player, Obama described in detail how the Heat rallied from behind with less than a minute on the clock to win Game 6 before clinching in the seventh. “This group has now won twice but it’s gone to the finals three times and, sometimes, it feels like they’re still fighting for a little respect,” Obama said, adding: “I can relate to that.” The Heat won NBA titles in 2006, 2012 and last year. During an East Room ceremony, Obama also praised the team’s off-court actions. The players visited wounded service members recuperating at an area military hospital before they came to the White House. Obama said it’s an example of the charitable work Heat players do year-round, including raising nearly $2 million last year for charities at home. “So bottom line is: outstanding athletes, outstanding organization, outstanding team but also outstanding members of their community,” Obama said. He wished them “great luck” for the rest of the current season, “unless they’re playing the Bulls,” Obama’s hometown and favorite NBA team. Coach Erik Spoelstra presented Obama with a commemorative championship trophy that lists the players’ names as well as Obama’s. The president also received an autographed basketball and jersey with the number “44” and “POTUS” on the back. – Wire report

8WHAT TO WATCH Pro basketball Bulls at Orlando, 6 p.m., CSN Utah at San Antonio, 7 p.m., ESPN Denver at Golden State, 9:30 p.m., ESPN Pro hockey Washington at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m., NBCSN Golf European PGA Tour, Abu Dhabi Championship, first round, at Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, 3 a.m., TGC Men’s college basketball Notre Dame at Maryland, 6 p.m., ESPN Michigan State at Northwestern, 6 p.m., BTN Purdue at Illinois, 8 p.m., BTN Tennis Australian Open, second round, at Melbourne, Australia, 8 p.m., 2 a.m., ESPN2

SHABBONA – After Hinckley-Big Rock’s Jacob Ryan knocked down a 3-pointer to give the Royals a one-point lead early in the fourth quarter, the Indian Creek boys basketball team needed to counter with a run of its own. The Timberwolves ran off nine consecutive points and the defense didn’t allow another bucket as the Timberwolves won, 50-42, Tuesday night in a Little Ten Conference match-

high 19 points and 11 rebounds to lead Indian Creek (10-5, 4-0). “We were trying to get me moving a little more tonight so we didn’t have to fight so hard,” Govig said. “[It made] us harder to guard and got the guards open shots.” The game was close throughout. H-BR led twice in the contest – the first lead was at 17-16 in the second quarter. The second lead was the biggest as the Royals finally got over the hump after cutting the lead to four multiple times. Trailing 41-35 entering the

fourth quarter, H-BR (4-12, 1-2) went on a 7-0 run to give them a 42-41 lead. The run was capped by the aforementioned Ryan 3. “[To keep it close] really wasn’t the goal. Obviously, you want to be in the game in the fourth quarter,” H-BR head coach Bill Sambrookes said. “That has been a struggle for us all year long. So, this is a game where we were in there.” Noah Holm ended the Royals’ run with a bucket to take the lead right back. Next, Govig knocked down

a shot in the lane and free throws from Holm, Govig, and Garrett Post closed out the contest. “Keep battling. They are a very scrappy team and we knew that it would be a tough game tonight. They were not going to go away so we were prepared for that,” Piekarz said. “It was just nice to see when they took the lead, to make some good plays down the stretch and be able to hang on.”

See HOOPS, page B2

SYCAMORE 47, HAMPSHIRE 29

LEADING THE WAY

Monica Maschak – mmaschak@shawmedia.com

Sycamore’s Bailey Gilbert goes up for a shot Tuesday during the Spartans’ 47-29 victory in Sycamore.

Gilbert, Sycamore pull away from Hampshire in home victory By ANTHONY ZILIS sports@daily-chronicle.com SYCAMORE – The Sycamore girls basketball team couldn’t quite find its offensive rhythm early in Tuesday’s game against Hampshire. Aside from Bailey Gilbert, the Spartans scored just 12 points in the first half. Fortunately for Sycamore, Gilbert was hitting on all cylinders early. The junior scored 16 first-half points before several other Spartans began hitting shots in the second half to give the Spartans a 47-29 win.

FULL-COURT PRESS For the latest analysis of local high school basketball, check out this week’s Full-Court Press vidcast, including an interview with Sycamore senior point guard Jake Winters. Log on to daily-chronicle.com/dcpreps. “It’s something that you’ve got to do when you’re a leader,” Gilbert said. “You’ve got to bring your team up with you, good or bad, and just try

your best.” Gilbert has become a go-to scorer for Sycamore this season, and Tuesday, she shot her team out of an early slump. She scored eight of Sycamore’s 13 first-quarter points to give the Spartans a 13-7 lead, and she knocked down 6-of-8 free throws in the first half. Lauren Goff also knocked down two 3-pointers early. Gilbert finished with 21 points while Goff chipped in with 11. “We came out a little sluggish, but we picked up steam as we went along

in the game,” Sycamore coach Brett Goff said. “Bailey wasn’t sluggish. She got to the line a lot in the first half because she was being aggressive.” The Spartans offense became multifaceted in the second half, when senior Julia Moll and sophomore Lauren Goff each scored five points and Kayley Aase added four of her own. Meanwhile, the Spartans were able to hold 6-foot-2 Hampshire sophomore Emma Benoit, an offensive focal point for the Whip-Purs (7-10), to only four points in the game.

See SYCAMORE, page B2

NORTHERN ILLINOIS MEN’S BASKETBALL

Rakocevic happy to be playing, closer to home By STEVE NITZ

Up next

snitz@shawmedia.com

Kent State at Northern Illinois, 7 p.m. today, AM-1360

8KEEP UP ONLINE Follow us on Facebook and Twitter Want the latest from the area’s prep sports scene? Follow our coverage on Facebook by searching for DC Preps or on Twitter at twitter.com/dc_preps. Follow our NIU athletics coverage on Facebook by searching for Huskie Wire or on Twitter at twitter.com/HuskieWire.

up against their rivals. “We did a nice job of handling adversity in the second half when [H-BR] took that one point lead and they had a lot of momentum going,” Indian Creek coach Joe Piekarz said. “I was reGarrison Govig ally happy to see how were handled that adversity in the second half.” Junior center Garrison Govig finished with a game-

More online For all your Northern Illinois University sports coverage – including stories, features, scores, photos, videos, blogs and much more – log on to HuskieWire.com.

DeKALB – Sacramento, Calif. is 2,044 miles from Chicago. A flight is roughly four hours, and that’s if one is lucky enough to find a nonstop trip. Eventually, it became too much for Pete Rakocevic. The 6-foot-11 Northern Illinois junior center played two seasons at Sacramento State, but the long distance from the Windy City – he grew up near Midway Airport – was a big reason he decided to transfer from Sacramento State to NIU after the 2011-12 season.

During his two years out in northern California, the trips back home for holidays were rare. Now, his parents, Momo and Denise Rakocevic, are able to make it out to pretty much every home game and watch him in some road contests as well. “It really is true, there’s no place like home,” Rakocevic said. “Being able to go out to dinner with my family after games, seeing them in the stands, playing for a guy like coach Montgomery, it’s really relaxing.” DeKalb is the third stop in Rakocevic’s post-high school career.

See RAKOCEVIC, page B4

Monica Maschak – mmaschak@shawmedia.com

Northern Illinois center Pete Rakocevic keeps the ball out of reach of James Madison defenders during a Nov. 15 game at the Convocation Center in DeKalb.


SPORTS

Page B2 • Wednesday, January 15, 2014

8PREP SCHEDULE TODAY Boys Basketball Marengo at Genoa-Kingston, 7:15 p.m. Boys Swimming DeKalb-Sycamore at Woodstock North triangular w/ Byron, 5 p.m. Boys Bowling DeKalb at Streator, 4 p.m. Girls Bowling Sycamore at Ottawa, 4 p.m. DeKalb at Streator, 4 p.m. Kaneland at Ottawa, 4 p.m.

THURSDAY Girls Basketball Somonauk at Indian Creek, 6:45 p.m. Morris at Sycamore, 7 p.m. Hinckley-Big Rock at Leland/ Earlville, 7 p.m. Genoa-Kingston at North Boone, 7:15 p.m. Wrestling Morris at Kaneland, 5:30 p.m. Genoa-Kingston at Stillman Valley triangular, 5:30 p.m. Sycamore at DeKalb, 7 p.m. Girls Bowling Sycamore at Sterling, 4 p.m. Kaneland at IMSA, 4:15 p.m. Girls Gymnastics DeKalb at Neuqua Valley, 6 p.m.

FRIDAY Boys Basketball Newark at Hiawatha, 6:45 p.m. DeKalb at Morris, 7 p.m. Sycamore at Rochelle, 7 p.m. Yorkville at Kaneland, 7 p.m. LaMoille at Hinckley-Big Rock, 7 p.m. Genoa-Kingston at Richmond-Burton, 7:15 p.m. Girls Basketball Kaneland at DeKalb, 7 p.m. Wrestling Genoa-Kingston at Woodstock, 5:30 p.m.

8SPORTS SHORTS Harmon named NIU tight ends/fullbacks coach Northern Illinois has officially hired Craig Harmon as its tight ends/fullbacks coach. Harmon replaces Tim Polasek, who spent one season in DeKalb before accepting the offensive coordinator job at North Dakota State. Harmon spent the 2013 season as the tight ends coach at Wisconsin-Whitewater, which won the Division III national title. It’s a homecoming of sorts for Harmon, who was a quarterback for the Huskies from 1998 to 2000 before transferring to Quincy. Harmon was the quarterback when the Huskies broke their 23-game losing streak Oct. 17, 1998, in a 16-6 victory over Central Michigan. He was a graduate assistant at NIU under Joe Novak in 2004 and 2005. “It’s like coming home,” Harmon said in a news release. “My family and I couldn’t be happier about returning to NIU. The program means a lot to me. As a player there, we were on the ground floor of starting to turn the program around. Coming back in ’04 and ’05 as a graduate assistant, it was a different atmosphere. To see all the hard work that the past players and coaches put in to become the program that is here now is unbelievable. I’m excited to be a part of it and continue the success.”

Cubs unveil Clark, their first mascot CHICAGO – The Cubs’ newly minted mascot made his debut at a pediatric developmental center of a hospital near Wrigley Field. Clark, a young bear wearing a Cubs jersey and backward blue baseball cap, was accompanied Monday at Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center by a dozen team prospects. The mascot is named after the North Side Chicago street on which Wrigley Field is located. Team officials said they held focus groups before deciding on Clark, and fans told them they wanted a more family-friendly atmosphere at Wrigley Field. Clark will greet fans at Wrigley before and during games, and the mascot will have a Twitter account and Facebook page. – Staff, wire reports

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

PREP ROUNDUP

NFL PLAYOFFS

DeKalb bowling downs McHenry had a 631 series and a high game of 231. Will Todtz (223 game), Ranzy Collins (219) and Gabe Olade (204) also contributed.

By DAILY CHRONICLE STAFF sports@daily-chronicle.com DeKalb boys bowling won two games and the overall series from McHenry in a nonconference meet. The Barbs topped McHenry, 3,8373,798, overall. Michael Belluzzi led the way with a 726 series and games of 245, 255 and 226. Jack Berry recorded a 668 series, including games of 255 and 244 while Seth Pinne

BOYS BASKETBALL: KANELAND 49, MARMION 47

Kaneland holds off Marmion By DENNIS D. JACOBS sports@daily-chronicle.com AURORA – Kaneland somehow survived losing a 15-point lead, losing its leading scorer to five fouls, and missing a shot on its final possession of the game Tuesday to escape Marmion’s Alumni Hall with a 49-47 nonconference victory. The Knights (9-5) led 37-22 with two minutes left in the third quarter, but the Cadets (7-10) went on a 15-1 run over the next three minutes to pull within one. Marmion tied the game at 47 with 48 seconds left on a 3-pointer from the top Ty Carlson of the key by Michael Sheehan. Kaneland took a timeout to draw up a play for the last shot and point guard Drew David found senior Ty Carlson on a back-door cut. Carlson missed the shot, but was able to grab the rebound on the other side of the rim. “Coach [Brian] Johnson had a great play call there,” Carlson said. “Drew made a great pass. I missed the first one but I jumped back and got the second one.” The “second one” came from the free-throw line as Carlson was fouled on the rebound. He hit a pair of free throws with 1.3 seconds left to give Kaneland the win. “Ty’s been clutch all year long,” Johnson said. “It really started at [the] Plano [Christmas Classic] when he’s been feeling it and it’s kind of rolled all the way through. He made some big free throws and was playing a position and a play we usually run for John [Pruett] and he was able to execute on that.” Carlson actually scored the last seven points of the game for the Knights, all on free throws, so he wasn‘t feeling any trepidation stepping to the line with the game in the balance. “I felt pretty confident,” Carlson said. “Once I hit the first one and we got the lead, it felt pretty good.” Kaneland needed Carlson to step up because Pruett fouled out with four minutes left in the game after scoring 16 points. “The first three quarters we played really hard and John Pruett was outstanding in my opinion,” Johnson said. “When he goes, we look pretty good, and I challenged him today and he stepped up. I’m very proud of how he responded.” Marmion struggled out of the gate, falling behind 8-0. The Cadets went scoreless for the first five minutes and the only 5 points they scored in the first quarter came from senior guard Michael Murphy off the bench. Marmion didn’t get any points from a starter until Tyler Maryanski’s steal and jam midway through the second quarter.

BOYS BASKETBALL Spartans win again: Sycamore defeated Hampshire, 67-57, on the road in a nonconference game.

LATE MONDAY GIRLS BASKETBALL Knights lose to Plano: Kaneland lost, 44-

41, to Plano. Brittany Kemp finished with 11 points, six rebounds for the Knights. Hawks lose to Serena: Hiawatha lost, 7028, to Serena on the road.

WRESTLING Cogs lose twice: At Winnebago, Winnebago defeated Genoa-Kingston, 48-21. Rockford Lutheran also defeated the Cogs, 66-15. G-K senior Joe Murray posted two wins on the night.

BULLS ANALYSIS

Chicago Sun-Times It’s been quite the last week for the Bulls. Their season-best five-game winning streak ended Monday night, they’re comfortably back in the mix for a playoff spot in the victory-challenged Eastern Conference, and besides Nazr Mohammed’s sprained finger, they’re about as healthy as they’ve been since Derrick Rose went down for the year with an injured right knee on Nov. 22. In the day-by-day world of coach Tom Thibodeau, it really hasn’t been any better than that this season. At least that’s what the players and Thibodeau are selling lately. “Everyone on this team is focused and believes in each other,” reserve center Taj Gibson said. “And we believe what the locker room says. We understand we can do a lot of great things.” Those are all cute phrases that overachieving teams like to throw around. If “great things” means winning a firstround playoff series, then, yes,

the Bulls are very capable. But in the big picture, this season couldn’t have been more disastrous, and the front office might not have a big enough broom for the cleanup. The mess is the roster, and how to flip it around as quickly as possible so that it can contend in a conference that could be there for the taking with Miami’s dynasty possibly heading for a Final Act. And it comes with a huge leap of faith that is Rose. While a growing minority seems to feel that the Bulls can no longer trust a player whose knees continue to betray him, that’s exactly what they are doing. Rose is still the foundation that the house will be built on. “What we’ve done in the long run is we’ve given ourselves an opportunity going forward to create flexibility and to put together a complete roster, and with depth,” VP of basketball operations John Paxson said last week, when explaining the Deng trade. “Again, with the idea of guys that can compliment Derrick and can play well with

Derrick.” That means looking forward to meetings with soonto-be free agents like LeBron James and Carmelo Anthony, and trying to sell them on taking that leap of faith on Rose as well. Basically, an upcoming offseason that will define the Paxson/Forman Era. No pressure. And if the duo fails to land a star the magnitude of Anthony or James? There is a consolation prize. The Bulls would love to nab Lance Stephenson from the Pacers, move Jimmy Butler to the three and add highly-touted Nikola Mirotic with Carlos Boozer amnestied. A talented roster, but still not a great one. Definitely a group of players that can throw around phrases like “focused” and “we understand we can do a lot of great things.” Because that’s what an overachieving team which has no chance of winning a ring sounds like.

• Joe Cowley is a sports reporter for the Chicago SunTimes. He can be reached at jcowley@suntimes.com.

Ryan’s 17 points led the Royals. Dutch Schneeman also finished in double figures

CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS Sunday AFC, 2 p.m. NFC, 5:30 p.m.

PRO BOWL Sunday, Jan. 26 At Honolulu TBD, 6:30 p.m.

SUPER BOWL Sunday, Feb. 2 At East Rutherford, N.J. AFC champ vs. NFC champ, 5:30 p.m.

EASTERN CONFERENCE Central Division W L Pct Indiana 30 7 .811 Bulls 17 19 .472 Detroit 16 22 .421 Cleveland 13 24 .351 Milwaukee 7 30 .189 Atlantic Division W L Pct Toronto 19 17 .528 Brooklyn 15 22 .405 New York 15 23 .395 Boston 13 26 .333 Philadelphia 12 25 .324 Southeast Division W L Pct Miami 27 10 .730 Atlanta 20 18 .526 Washington 17 19 .472 Charlotte 16 23 .410 Orlando 10 28 .263

GB — 12½ 14½ 17 23 GB — 4½ 5 7½ 7½ GB — 7½ 9½ 12 17½

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct San Antonio 30 8 .789 Houston 25 14 .641 Dallas 23 16 .590 Memphis 18 19 .486 New Orleans 15 22 .405 Northwest Division W L Pct Portland 28 9 .757 Oklahoma City 28 10 .737 Denver 19 18 .514 Minnesota 18 19 .486 Utah 13 26 .333 Pacific Division W L Pct L.A. Clippers 26 13 .667 Golden State 25 14 .641 Phoenix 21 16 .568 L.A. Lakers 14 23 .378 Sacramento 13 23 .361

GB — 5½ 7½ 11½ 14½ GB — ½ 9 10 16 GB — 1 4 11 11½

Tuesday’s Results Indiana 116, Sacramento 92 Charlotte 108, New York 98 Memphis 90, Oklahoma City 87 Cleveland at L.A. Lakers (n) Today’s Games Bulls at Orlando, 6 p.m. Charlotte at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Miami at Washington, 6 p.m. Toronto at Boston, 6:30 p.m. Sacramento at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Memphis at Milwaukee, 7 p.m. Houston at New Orleans, 7 p.m. Utah at San Antonio, 7 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Cleveland at Portland, 9 p.m. Denver at Golden State, 9:30 p.m. Dallas at L.A. Clippers, 9:30 p.m. Thursday’s Games Brooklyn vs. Atlanta at London, England, 2 p.m. New York at Indiana, 6 p.m. Oklahoma City at Houston, 8:30 p.m. Monday’s Results Toronto 116, Milwaukee 94 Houston 104, Boston 92 New York 98, Phoenix 96, OT Washington 102, Bulls 88 San Antonio 101, New Orleans 95 Dallas 107, Orlando 88 Utah 118, Denver 103

NHL WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts Blackhawks 49 30 8 11 71 St. Louis 45 32 8 5 69 Colorado 46 29 12 5 63 Minnesota 49 25 19 5 55 Dallas 45 20 18 7 47 Nashville 48 20 21 7 47 Winnipeg 48 20 23 5 45 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts Anaheim 48 35 8 5 75 San Jose 47 29 12 6 64 Los Angeles 47 28 14 5 61 Vancouver 47 24 14 9 57 Phoenix 46 21 16 9 51 Calgary 47 16 25 6 38 Edmonton 48 15 28 5 35

GF 177 163 135 118 127 113 133

GA 135 100 117 122 139 143 146

GF 161 150 120 123 135 105 126

GA 119 117 96 115 143 148 169

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Monica Maschak – mmaschak@shawmedia.com

Sycamore’s Lauren Goff drives to the hoop during the second quarter of Tuesday’s game in Sycamore.

Sycamore starts 4th with 15-4 run • SYCAMORE Continued from page B1 Sycamore (12-4) went on a 15-4 run to start the fourth quarter to lead, 43-24, and the Spartans showed just how dangerous they can be when they hit their offensive stride. “This year, we have several different [offensive threats], and we’re learning to trust

each other more,” Moll said. “That makes it even easier because they have to sag off of [Gilbert] and help with our other players, because we can do anything in this offense. Then, Bailey gets an open shot and, like coach said, she’s been on fire for this whole season.” After losing twice to Hampshire last season, the young Spartans showed Tuesday just how far they’ve come in

a year. “I wasn’t too worried [early],” Moll said. “I knew we could come out of the gate at any time. I think we’re that good of a team, to be able to turn on a switch, and I think we proved that tonight. We were still leading at halftime, and I think we came out and just, metaphorically, put our foot on their neck. We kind of put it away.”

Indian Creek outrebounds Hinckley-Big Rock, 32-19 • HOOPS Continued from page B1

Saturday Seattle 23, New Orleans 15 New England 43, Indianpolis 22 Sunday San Francisco 23, Carolina 10 Denver 24, San Diego 17

NBA

Bulls need an offseason clean-up By JOE COWLEY

DIVISIONAL

with 10 points. Eric Phillips chipped in with nine points. H-BR next will play Friday against LaMoille. For Indian Creek, Post finished with 10 points and seven rebounds. Nick Bald-

win scored nine points. The Timberwolves dominated the glass by outrebounding the Royals, 32-19. The Timberwolves next will play Tuesday against Paw Paw.

“The conference games are going to keep getting tougher the more and more we win and the better we play,” Govig said. “So we need to keep playing better and better every game.”

Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 46 29 15 2 60 132 102 Tampa Bay 47 28 15 4 60 136 113 Montreal 47 26 16 5 57 118 111 Toronto 48 23 20 5 51 132 146 Detroit 46 20 16 10 50 118 127 Ottawa 47 21 18 8 50 134 146 Florida 46 18 21 7 43 109 141 Buffalo 45 13 27 5 31 80 125 Metropolitan Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 47 33 12 2 68 152 112 Washington 46 22 16 8 52 137 137 Philadelphia 47 24 19 4 52 125 132 N.Y. Rangers 48 24 21 3 51 119 126 New Jersey 48 20 18 10 50 112 118 Columbus 46 22 20 4 48 129 131 Carolina 46 19 18 9 47 111 130 N.Y. Islanders48 18 23 7 43 132 156 Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss Tuesday’s Results Colorado 3, Blackhawks 2, OT Toronto 4, Boston 3 Tampa Bay 2, N.Y. Rangers 1 San Jose 2, Washington 1, SO Philadelphia 4, Buffalo 3 New Jersey 4, Montreal 1 Florida 4, N.Y. Islanders 2 Ottawa 3, Minnesota 0 St. Louis 2, Phoenix 1 Nashville 4, Calgary 2 Edmonton at Dallas (n) Today’s Games Buffalo at Toronto, 6:30 p.m. Washington at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m. Vancouver at Anaheim, 9:30 p.m. Thursday’s Games Detroit at N.Y. Rangers, 6 p.m. Nashville at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Montreal at Ottawa, 6:30 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. San Jose at Florida, 6:30 p.m. Los Angeles at St. Louis, 7 p.m. Edmonton at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Boston at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. New Jersey at Colorado, 8 p.m. Winnipeg at Calgary, 8 p.m. Vancouver at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Monday’s Results Calgary 2, Carolina 0 Columbus 3, Tampa Bay 2 Winnipeg 5, Phoenix 1 Los Angeles 1, Vancouver 0


Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

Wednesday, January 15, 2014 • Page B3

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SPORTS

Page B4 • Wednesday, January 15, 2014

MAC STANDINGS

UP NEXT FOR NIU MEN’S BASKETBALL WHO Kent State (10-5, 1-1 MAC) at Northern Illinois (7-7, 1-1 MAC) WHEN 7 p.m. today, NIU Convocation Center RADIO AM-1360 WLBK, FM 98.9 LAST MEETING NIU defeated Kent State, 67-65, on Jan. 30, 2013 SCOUTING THE GOLDEN FLASHES NIU and Kent State will play each other twice this season, because of the MAC’s expanded 18-game conference format. When these two met last year, former Huskie guard Abdel Nader hit a pull-up jump shot with 2.2 seconds remaining to give NIU a two-point win. The Golden Flashes have won 20 or more games in each of the past four seasons and have a good shot to do it again. Three players average in double figures for the Flashes – guards Kris Brewer (11.9 points a game) and Derek Jackson (10.9), as well as forward Darren Goodson (10.8). OUTLOOK NIU struggled to score in Sunday’s win over Bowling Green but gave up only 36 points, the lowest point total the Huskies have allowed since 1991. NIU allows only 64 points a game, which ranks 37th in the country. Losing leading scorer Dontel Highsmith (torn ACL) is tough, but freshman Aaric Armstead has taken his place in the starting lineup and averaged 8.0 points and 3.0 rebounds in the past three games. This is the second contest in a string of four crossover games for NIU. The Huskies will play their first MAC West opponent on Jan. 22, when they visit Toledo.

– Steve Nitz, snitz@shawmedia.com, Twitter – @SNitz_DDC

West Division Con. Overall W L W L EMU 2 1 10 6 WMU 2 1 9 6 Toledo 1 1 13 2 NIU 1 1 7 7 CMU 0 2 7 7 Ball State 0 2 3 10

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

WHITE SOX

Dodgers, Yankees emerge as leaders in Tanaka sweepstakes By DARYL VAN SCHOUWEN

Monica Maschak – mmaschak@shawmedia.com

Northern Illinois center Pete Rakocevic posts up in the first quarter of a Nov. 15 game against James Madison at the Convocation Center.

Rakocevic’s younger brother being recruited by Huskies • RAKOCEVIC Continued from page B1 After graduating from St. Laurence in Burbank in 2009, he spent a year of postgraduate prep school out at Wilbraham & Monson Academy in Massachusetts. He was just 17 when he graduated, and figured he could draw some higher interest after a year of prep school after being recruited by mid-major programs in high school. There was interest from Michigan and Notre Dame, but it eventually cooled off. Rakocevic wanted a place where he could avoid redshirting and step in. He went out to California, where he averaged 1.9 points a game as a freshman at Sacramento State and 1.3 points a contest as a sophomore. Rakocevic was forced to sit out last season because of NCAA transfer rules, but brought some much-needed size to the Huskies this season. He’s playing 16.6 minutes a game after sitting out the 2012-13 campaign, averaging 4.4 points through the Huskies’ first 14 games. “I think if he puts on another 15 pounds in the offseason and keeps working on his explosion, he has a chance to play some basketball after college,” NIU coach Mark

Montgomery said. “You don’t find 6-11, 6-10, 7-foot guys walking around.” Rakocevic has helped provide depth behind fellow transfer Jordan Threloff, but will play some power forward at times when Threloff is on the floor. He’s glad to finally be back on the floor after his long journey. “Last year was tough because there were so many nail-biters and games within five points that we lost, and I felt like we could have won,” Rakocevic said. “We were relatively young. Last year was tough for me, not playing, especially since we were struggling. That’s when most guys want to be on the court because they feel like they can help.” When Rakocevic’s career is over following next season, there could be another Rakocevic heading in to DeKalb. His younger brother, Nick, is a sophomore at St. Joseph High in Westchester. He’s already received an offer from NIU among other Division-I interest, and has been able to make it out to a number of home games. “I told him that right now this is a team that’s starting to rebuild. He would love coach Montgomery,” Pete said. “That’s what he asked me about more than anything, are the coaches.”

East Division Con. Overall W L W L Akron 2 0 10 5 Buffalo 2 0 8 4 Ohio 1 1 11 4 Kent State 1 1 10 5 Miami 1 1 5 8 B. Green 0 2 6 9 Today’s games Kent State at Northern Illinois, 7 p.m. Central Michigan at Bowling Green, 6 p.m. Miami at Akron, 6 p.m. Buffalo at Toledo, 6 p.m. Ball State at Ohio, 7 p.m. Saturday’s games Ohio at Northern Illinois, 7 p.m. Toledo at Akron, 10 a.m. Miami at Ball State, 1 p.m. Kent State at Buffalo, 5 p.m. Eastern Michigan at Central Michigan, 6 p.m. Sunday’s game Bowling Green at Western Michigan, 1 p.m.

NIU leaders Points a game Highsmith...................... 10.5 Bowie ............................... 9.6 Baker .................................7.7 Field goal percentage Maric ............................. 66.7 Highsmith..................... 53.9 Threloff ......................... 52.2 Rebounds a game Bowie .............................. 7.4 Threloff ........................... 5.4 Bolin ................................ 4.9 Assists a game Baker ............................... 2.4 Balls.................................. 1.6 Highsmith........................ 1.1

Chicago Sun-times While coveted free agent Masahiro Tanaka’s desire is to pitch in the major leagues, just where he wants to do so remains a mystery. As the Jan. 24 deadline to sign the right-hander draws nearer, the Los Angeles Dodgers and New York Yankees continue to be the best bets to sign him to a contract most believe will be worth in the $100 million range over six or seven seasons. The White Sox met with Tanaka and his representatives last week in Los Angeles. The Sox’ contingent included executive vice president Ken Williams, general manager Rick H a h n a n d Masahiro manager Rob- Tanaka in Ventura. Absent from the meeting was chairman Jerry Reinsdorf, which one source with close ties to the Sox suggests the team’s interest in Tanaka might be more warm than hot. While the Sox say it would be a mistake to draw a conclusion from that, Tanaka’s price tag might cool their interest if one industry source’s prediction that Tanaka will get $140 million is correct. There is also a $20 million posting fee the team that signs Tanaka must pay to his Japanese team, the Rakuten Golden Eagles. Tanaka’s wife, Mai Satoda, is an entertainment star in Japan whose career might cause him to favor the Dodgers and Yankees. A report in Japan said the West Coast is her top choice. The Sox, Cubs, Boston Red

Sox, Seattle Mariners and Arizona Diamondbacks are said to be very interested, despite the huge money it would take to sign someone who hasn’t thrown a pitch in the majors. A major-league scout said Japanese import Yu Darvish’s success with the Texas Rangers has raised Tanaka’s stock, ‘‘but you can’t forget how quickly Dice-K [Daisuke Matsuzaka] faded with the Red Sox, and this guy has similar traits to Dice-K – not very big and a heavy workload at a young age [25].’’ Tanaka was 24-0 with a 1.27 ERA for Rakuten last season. In seven seasons in Japan, he is 99-35 with a 2.30 ERA. The Yankees need starting pitching more than the Dodgers, and the Mariners need more of everything to justify their $240 million signing of second baseman Robinson Cano. The Cubs also need pitching, and the Sox would have a formidable one-two punch at the top of their rotation with Chris Sale and Tanaka. ‘‘Expect a bidding war to take place, and it could get crazy,’’ an industry source said. ‘‘But will [Tanaka] just take the money or pick a place that is comfortable?’’ Notes: The Sox opened a three-day hitting minicamp Tuesday at their spring-training base in Glendale, Ariz. The event was expected to give first-year hitting coach Todd Steverson and manager Robin Ventura up-close looks at new players Jose Abreu, Adam Eaton and Matt Davidson, as well as Josh Phegley and prospects Marcus Semien, Courtney Hawkins, Jared Mitchell, Trayce Thompson and Keenyn Walker.

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Thru Jan. 31st, 2014!


Food

SECTION C Wednesday, January 15, 2014 Daily Chronicle

Features editor Inger Koch • ikoch@shawmedia.com

Culinary y curatives

Oatmeal Batter Bread

As winter drags on, comfort food can have restorative power, plain and simple By PHYLLIS RICHMAN

Oatmeal Batter Bread

The Washington Post

12 servings; one 1-pound loaf

O

ne winter many years ago, I came home from Florida with a fever and chills. I took myself to bed and dozed, dreaming of the one medicine I knew would work. Where could I get it? I could barely sit up, much less poke around the kitchen for noodles and carrots, celery and onion, a plump chicken and a pot big enough to hold them all. I needed chicken soup, the surefire curative for my sore throat and virus, or at least the palliative. I had another problem, too. Because I’d been away for a week, not only was my refrigerator empty, but I had no restaurant notes. I was a bedridden restaurant critic with no immediate prospect of a restaurant to review for that week. By dinnertime, I’d identified the obvious solution to my problem: I’d write a column on chicken soup. I started calling to find out who delivered. A box of Kleenex, a warm quilt and a bowl of chicken soup. That’s what comfort food means to me. But I’m not everyone. For others, comfort food might just as easily be a chilled bowl of ice cream as a hot bowl of soup. Mashed potatoes are a natural. So are meatballs, rice pudding and applesauce. Every culture has its comfort foods; in ours, they are most commonly what is otherwise known as nursery food: Jell-O, custard, oatmeal without lumps. In addition to being soft, their color is neutral, and most likely they are basically a starch. (What can out-comfort chocolate pudding or tapioca?) Everything about comfort food is soothing. Supporting that idea, most comfort foods require little chewing and are bland enough to leave your taste buds asleep. That leaves Thai food and Indian food behind, at least for many Americans. Still, every comfort food rule has an exception, which explains chili. When you veer from the straight and narrow, you’ll find subcategories of comfort food, and exceptions to that rule about nursery food. The smooth puree edges into the creamy: chicken potpie or tuna noodle casserole. Those segue into soft meats: chicken, meatloaf, meatballs. Chocolate is its own category. So what we are talking about here is food that is quiet in its mood, its effect and its impact, even when it crunches rather loudly. It is beloved food, food that makes us feel good. If we hadn’t come across it, we would have had to invent it. Which is what I did, they say. I don’t really believe I created the term, but the Oxford English Dictionary and some Webster’s dictionaries give me credit. They attribute the first print mention of “comfort food” to an article in the Washington Post Magazine in 1977. I wrote that article. I used the term to describe shrimp and grits. Since then – if not before – it has been one of my favorite food descriptors. Naturally, I was delighted to be asked to write about comfort food again, 36 years after that 1977 introduction.

This bread (above) is easy to make, needs only a single rise and is remarkably low in fat. 1 cup warm whole or 2 percent milk (105 to 115 degrees) 1/4 cup honey or packed light brown sugar 1 packet (1/4 ounce) active dry yeast 1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour 1 large egg, lightly beaten 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt 3/4 cup whole-wheat flour 1/2 cup old-fashioned or steelcut rolled oats (do not use quick-cooking oats), plus more for optional garnish Combine the milk, honey or brown sugar and the yeast in the bowl of stand mixer or a mixing bowl, stirring until the yeast has dissolved. Let the mixture rest for 5 minutes. Grease an 8-by-4-by-2-inch loaf pan with cooking oil spray. Add the all-purpose flour, egg, oil and salt to the yeast mixture. Beat on low speed until combined, stopping to scrape down the sides of the bowl as needed. Increase the speed to high; beat for 3 minutes. Stop to scrape down the sides of the bowl. The dough will be very sticky. Use a wooden spoon to stir in the whole-wheat flour and oats until well incorporated; this will take some arm strength. Transfer the batter to the loaf pan, spreading it evenly. Cover, and set it in a warm place to rise for at least 1 hour or until doubled in size. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Uncover the loaf pan; sprinkle the bread with some oatmeal, if desired. Bake for about 15 minutes, then tent loosely with aluminum foil. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes or until the bread sounds hollow when lightly tapped. Uncover; immediately transfer the bread (in the loaf pan) to a wire rack to cool for at least 20 minutes before serving, or cool completely before storing.

Citrus-Lemon Grass Rice Pudding

Nutrition: Calories per serving 160, fat 3 g, saturated fat 1 g, cholesterol 20 mg, sodium 100 mg, total carbohydrates 29 g, dietary fiber 2 g, sugar 6 g, protein: 5 g.

Washington Post photos

Citrus-Lemon Grass Rice Pudding 8 servings (9 cups) Creamy and delicately perfumed, this version of rice pudding provides a cool lift at the end of a meal. 5 inches lemon grass, smashed, then finely chopped 3 cups low-fat (2 percent) milk 3 1/2 cups canned, well-shaken coconut milk (two 13.5-ounce cans; do not use low-fat) 1 1/2 cups sugar 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt 1 1/2 cups uncooked medium-grain white

rice, preferably arborio, rinsed with cold water and drained well 1 1/2 tablespoons finely grated zest from a mixture of lemon, lime and orange, plus optional zest for garnish 1 teaspoon vanilla extract or vanilla bean paste 1/8 teaspoon ground cardamom Use cooking oil spray to grease the inside/ insert of the slow-cooker. Wrap up and tie the lemon grass in a piece of cheesecloth (for infusing). Place it in a medium, heavy-bottomed saucepan, along with the milk, coconut milk, sugar and salt, over medium heat. Once the mixture is hot but not boiling, pour it into the slow-cooker (including

the lemon grass sachet). Stir in the rice. Cover and cook on low for 2 hours; the mixture will be bubbling at the edges. Remove from the heat; discard the lemon grass sachet, then stir in the zest, the vanilla extract or paste and the cardamom. Cool slightly, then divide among individual bowls. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate until well chilled. Discard the wrap; garnish with the optional zest, if desired. The pudding will thicken further as it cools.

Nutrition Per serving: 520 calories, 8 g protein, 74 g carbohydrates, 23 g fat, 20 g saturated fat, 5 mg cholesterol, 180 mg sodium, 0 g dietary fiber, 38 g sugar.

More comforting creations Phyllis Richman shares three more of her favorite comfort foods: a tender and creamy Green Bean and Scallion Torta, a savory and satisfying Swiss Steak, and a homey Griswold Inn New England Lobster Potpie that is chock-full of corn, carrot, fennel, onion, celery and fresh herbs. Page C2


FOOD

Page C2 • Wednesday, January 15, 2014

Daily Chronicle / daily-chronicle.com

Potpie, Swiss steak among comfort foods Griswold Inn New England Lobster Potpie

Washington Post photo

Griswold Inn New England Lobster Potpie 3 to 4 servings The Griswold Inn of Essex, Conn., dates to 1776. In addition to its Americana, evident in each room, its restaurant celebrates New England seafood. Besides the star ingredient, this homey dish is chock-full of corn, carrot, fennel, onion, celery and fresh herbs. 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 medium carrot, trimmed, scrubbed well and cut into 1/2-inch pieces 2 large ribs celery, cut into 1/2-inch pieces 1 medium white onion, cut into 1/2-inch pieces 1 medium fennel bulb, trimmed, cored and cut into 1/2-inch pieces 2 cloves garlic, minced

1 tablespoon tomato paste 2 cups chardonnay 3 cups water or lobster broth, plus 1/4 cup water for brushing 2 large potatoes, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch pieces 4 cups (frozen/defrosted or from 3 ears) corn kernels 1 tablespoon chopped fresh tarragon 1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil Kosher salt Freshly ground white pepper 2 cups heavy cream Cooked meat from two 1 1/4-pound lobsters (10 to 12 ounces; See Note) 1 sheet (9 ounces) frozen/defrosted puff pastry, preferably Dufour brand 1 large egg, for brushing Heat the oil in a medium saucepan over

medium heat. Once the oil shimmers, add the carrot, celery, onion, fennel and garlic, stirring to coat. Cook for about 8 minutes or until the mixture begins to brown a little. Clear a small space at the center of the pan and add the tomato paste. Cook for a minute or two, then add the wine and stir to incorporate those ingredients, scraping up any browned bits from the bottom of the pan. Cook until the liquid has reduced by half, then stir in the 3 cups of water or lobster broth, the potatoes and corn. Cook for at least 20 minutes or until the liquid has reduced by half. The potatoes should be barely tender. Add the tarragon and basil, then season with salt and pepper to taste. Stir in the cream; cook for 15 minutes or until the liquid has reduced by half, then stir

4 to 6 servings

Unsalted butter, for the souffle dish 8 ounces fresh green beans, trimmed Kosher salt 6 large eggs 1/4 cup whole or low-fat (2 percent) milk Freshly ground black pepper 1/2 cup freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese

Nutrition Per serving (based on 4): 1,120 calories, 30 g protein, 93 g carbohydrates, 64 g fat, 37 g saturated fat, 280 mg cholesterol, 650 mg sodium, 12 g dietary fiber, 12 g sugar.

4 servings This is not the stuff you’ll find in a TV dinner tray. Savory and satisfying, these steaks can be pan-fried or oven-baked. Serve with mashed potatoes.

Washington Post photo

Steaming the torta inside a slow cooker helps create a tender, creamy texture. You’ll need a 6-cup souffle dish, a round rack to rest it on and a slow-cooker large enough to contain the dish. If you don’t have a rack, make a thick coil using crumpled aluminum foil.

Add the (live) lobsters, head first. Cover and cook for 10 minutes, then use tongs to transfer to the lobster to a large bowl of cold water and ice cubes. Once the lobsters have cooled, crack the tails, claws and knuckles to retrieve the meat, cutting it into 1/2-inch chunks. To make lobster broth, transfer the lobster heads and any cracked shell to a large saucepan. Cover with at least 5 cups of water. Bring to a boil over high heat; cook for 10 to 15 minutes, then strain; discard the lobster heads and shells – or use a head for a striking garnish.

Swiss Steak

Green Bean and Scallion Torta

Green Bean and Scallion Torta

in the lobster meat. Remove from the heat. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Use cooking oil spray to grease a medium-size souffle dish. Place on a rimmed baking sheet. Cut the puff pastry to fit just inside the rim of the dish. Pour the potpie mixture into the dish, then cover with the puff pastry, trimming off the excess. (Reserve for another use, if desired.) Combine the remaining 1/4 cup of water and the egg to create an egg wash; brush it onto the puff pastry and discard the rest. Use a sharp knife to create a small hole at the center of the pastry or cut a few slits in the top. Bake for 7 to 10 minutes, until golden brown. Let the potpie rest for 5 minutes before serving. NOTES: To cook the lobsters, bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat.

1/2 cup finely chopped scallions, white and light-green parts 1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil Grease the inside of the souffle dish with a little butter. Place the rack inside the slow-cooker. Bring a large saucepan of water to a boil over high heat. Add the green beans and a generous pinch of salt. Cook for about 7 minutes or until the beans are bright green and tender. Drain the beans in a colander and immediately rinse under cool running water. Pat them dry, then arrange them in the bottom of the souffle dish. Whisk together the eggs and milk; season with a small pinch of salt and a generous sprinkling of pepper. Pour slowly into the souffle dish. Gently stir in the

cheese, scallions and basil. Pour 2 cups of very hot/justboiled water into the slow cooker, then place the souffle dish on the rack in the slow cooker. Cover and cook on high for 1 1/2 to 2 hours or until a knife inserted into the center of the torta comes out clean. Remove the dish from the slow cooker. Run a knife around the edge of the torta to help dislodge it from the souffle dish, then carefully slide it onto a serving plate. Cut into wedges; serve warm or at room temperature.

Nutrition Per serving (based on 6, using low-fat milk): 130 calories, 11 g protein, 5 g carbohydrates, 8 g fat, 3 g saturated fat, 220 mg cholesterol, 250 mg sodium, 2 g dietary fiber, 1 g sugar.

2 tablespoons vegetable oil 2 tablespoons flour 1 teaspoon smoked Spanish paprika (pimenton) or Hungarian sweet or hot paprika 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more as needed 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, plus more as needed Four 5-ounce beef cube steaks (may substitute two 10-ounce cube steaks, each cut in half) 1 can (14 1/2 ounces) diced tomatoes with basil, oregano and garlic, with their juices 1 rib celery, cut on the diagonal into thin slices 1 medium carrot, trimmed, scrubbed well and cut crosswise into thin rounds 1 small onion, cut into thin slices that are separated into rings 1/4 cup water

Swiss Steak Washington Post photo

Line a large plate with a few layers of paper towels. Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in a large, heavy skillet (not cast iron) over medium-high heat. Meanwhile, stir together the flour, paprika, salt and pepper in a wide, shallow bowl. Dip each cube steak into the flour mixture to coat evenly and well, shaking off any excess. Once the oil shimmers, add two or three of the coated steaks. Fry until golden brown on both sides, then transfer to the lined plate. Repeat to cook all of the steaks, using the remaining tablespoon of oil. Drain/wipe out the fat in the

skillet, then return the skillet to medium-high heat. Add the tomatoes and their juices, the celery, carrot, onion and water. Once the mixture comes to a boil, stir, then return all the meat to the pan and reduce the heat to medium-low. Cover and cook for 1 1/4 hours or until the meat is tender. Taste, and add salt and pepper as needed. Serve the Swiss steak hot, with the vegetable mixture and its sauce. VARIATION: Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Prepare and brown the cube steaks as directed above. Transfer them to an 8-cup-capacity

baking dish. In the same skillet, combine the tomatoes and their juices, the celery, carrot, onion and water over medium-high heat; scrape the bottom to dislodge any browned bits, then pour the mixture evenly over the meat in the baking dish. Cover tightly with aluminum foil and bake for 1 hour or until the meat is tender.

Nutrition Calories per serving (pan-fried) 300, fat 13 g, saturated fat 3 g, cholesterol 60 mg, sodium 500 mg, total carbohydrates 12 g, dietary fiber 2 g, sugar 5 g, protein: 33 g.


ADVICE & PUZZLES

Page C4 • Wednesday, January 15, 2014

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

Angry dad wants to learn to control emotions Dear Abby: I’m a dad in my 30s and I have a problem. I have been battling anger issues since I was a kid. I have been finding myself getting more and more worked up with my kids. When they misbehave, I lose it and yell at them. It is the way I was raised; however, I feel even worse afterward. I really want to break this habit. I don’t want the only memories my children have of me to be images of my red face and bugged-out eyes hollering at them. Do you have any guidelines I can follow to get a better handle on my anger? – Loud Dad in West Virginia Dear Loud Dad: Yes, I do. And I’m glad you asked me because

DEAR ABBY Jeanne Phillips it’s important that you find other ways of relieving your frustration than taking it out on your children. It is not only counterproductive, it is extremely destructive. When a bigger person yells at a smaller person, the message is often lost because the smaller person (in your case, your children) simply shuts down out of fear that physical violence might follow. You should not ignore your feelings when your children act up. Rather, you need to find another manner

for expressing your emotions. My booklet “The Anger in All of Us and How to Deal With It” offers suggestions on redirecting angry feelings in a healthy way. It can be ordered by sending your name and mailing address, plus a check or money order for $7 (U.S. funds), to Dear Abby – Anger Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. Shipping and handling are included in the price. Dealing with anger calmly and with reason is more effective than lashing out. Expressing your feelings is healthy when it’s done with a few well-chosen words that make your point. As you have already learned, exploding in anger serves no constructive purpose and

only makes you feel worse afterward. Sometimes when people are angry or frustrated about other things, they can lose control of their temper. In situations like these, it is important to evaluate the source of what might really be irritating you before misdirecting your anger at someone who is blameless. There are healthy ways of dealing with anger and frustration. Developing the control to express emotions verbally without being abusive or calling names is one of them. Another is to say a prayer (“Please Lord, don’t let me lose my temper!”) before opening your mouth. Leaving the room, going for a walk or

short run can be helpful. Unhealthy ways that should be avoided include getting into your car when you are angry, or using alcohol or drugs to calm you. My booklet offers many other suggestions for dealing with anger and frustration, and I hope it will be helpful to you. However, if it isn’t, then you should discuss your problem with a mental health professional. It’s important to get a handle on your feelings so your children won’t grow up thinking that verbal abuse is a normal way to handle their emotions.

• Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Sexually active women must find the right pill Dear Dr. K: I’ve recently become sexually active and I’m planning to go on the pill. But there are so many different types of birth control pills. Which one is right for me? Dear Reader: I don’t know enough about you to give an answer that’s right for you. From my general remarks about these pills, I’m hopeful you can pinpoint the ones that seem right for you – and discuss them with your doctor. Birth control pills can be divided into two basic categories: combined pills and minipills. Most birth control pills are combined pills. They contain a combination of two types of female sex hormones: the hormone estrogen and a

ASK DR. K Anthony L. Komaroff progestogen (a group of hormones that includes progesterone). Minipills contain a progestogen, but no estrogen. The estrogen in combined birth control pills prevents ovulation, the release of a mature egg from a woman’s ovary. Combined birth control pills also thicken cervical secretions, creating a barrier that makes it difficult for sperm to get into the uterus. They produce changes in the tubes that carry the egg from the ovaries to the uterus. And they make it hard for a fertilized egg to implant in

the uterus. These effects are caused by the progestogen. Combination birth control pills are 98 to 99 percent effective in preventing pregnancy. The more estrogen, the better the birth control effect. Unfortunately, the more estrogen, the higher the likelihood of side effects such as high blood pressure or headaches. Minipills do not prevent ovulation as effectively as combination pills because they don’t contain estrogen. They mainly act by thickening secretions of the cervix and making it hard for a fertilized egg to implant in the uterus. They are about 98 percent effective. Minipills need to be taken exactly as directed. Even missing one pill can greatly reduce their

effectiveness. Combination birth control pills are available in three subtypes: monophasic, biphasic and triphasic. Monophasic pills contain a constant amount of estrogen and progestogen. With biphasic and triphasic pills, the dose varies over the course of the month. For most women, monophasic birth control pills are a good first option. They work as well as the more expensive and more complicated biphasic and triphasic products. Minipills are a good option if you have a reason to avoid estrogen. The most common reasons are a tendency to develop blood clots, smoking and current breastfeeding. That’s because estrogen

increases the tendency for blood clots. In smokers, even if they’ve never had a problem with blood clots in the past, starting on estrogen increases the risk for clots – and of the heart attacks and strokes caused by them. Estrogen reduces the amount of breast milk, so estrogen-containing birth control pills normally are not recommended in women who are breast feeding. It may take some trial and error to find the best birth control pill for you. Try to achieve the right hormonal balance – just enough to prevent pregnancy, but not enough to cause side effects.

• Visit www.AskDoctorK. com to read more.

Washing one’s hands helps keep away the flu Dr. Wallace: I read in your column that washing your hands is very important to help avoid colds and the flu. I know it’s the flu season now, and since I am very involved with a lot of school and family activities, I really need to stay well. Do you have any information on whether or not anti-bacterial soap is necessary for washing your hands? – Tommy, St. Louis, Mo. Tommy: A doctor in West Virginia also responded to the column on hand washing. He sent me the following excellent advice that will help you stay active and healthy: Dr. Wallace: I’m glad that you inform your readers that the best way to avoid catching a cold or the flu is to wash one’s hands frequently

’TWEEN 12 & 20 Robert Wallace (at least four times daily) especially before eating. Please allow me to inform your readers of the proper hand-washing technique. Warm water is not required, and any soap will do the job. Rubbing soapy hands for a minimum of 20 seconds is necessary. It’s the friction of rubbing the hands together that is most important. Wood County elementary students in our state of West Virginia were encouraged to wash their hands frequently as a project started by St. Joseph’s Hospital in Park-

8ASTROGRAPH By BERNICE BEDE OSOL Newspaper Enterprise Association

TODAY – Progressive motion will get you where you want to go in the coming months. Expect emotional issues to be brought out into the open. Clear up any matter that is keeping you from getting what you want. Use emotional tactics to win personal battles. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) – Keep everything out in the open so you can deal with issues as they arise. You must clear up any misunderstandings with alacrity. Turn a negative into an opportunity. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) – Don’t waste the day. There is too much to do, and too little time. Secrets are apparent, and they must be considered before you make a decision based on limited information. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) – Take a chance and try something unique. Offer help and look for ways to utilize what you have to offer in more diverse ways. Romance will lead to happiness. ARIES (March 21-April 19) – Avoid altercations. Partnership problems will escalate if you aren’t willing to compromise. A common-sense approach to work and money will pay off. Keep your life simple. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) – Take a chance, and present what you have to offer. Showing your skills and expertise will be far more effective than talking about them. Actions speak louder than words. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) – You’ll be tempted by an offer that may not be legitimate or that is based on hearsay rather than facts. Step back before you suffer a loss. CANCER (June 21-July 22) – Relationships, partnerships and mingling with people who share your interests and concerns will bring about unusual and exciting opportunities. Love is on the line, and romance will seal the deal. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) – Watch your back today, especially when dealing with financial, legal or medical issues. Take some time to confabulate with trusted allies before taking a chance on someone or something you know too little about. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) – Your suggestions will be well-received. Do your best to help out, but don’t let anyone take you for granted. Friendships will grow, and people from your past will reappear. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) – Stay calm and rely on your knowledge and ability to deliver information with intelligence and passion. Don’t allow anger or emotional tension to come between you and your goals. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) – Enjoy the moment, take part in unique activities and develop relationships that will be of use to you in the future. Alterations to your living arrangements will be comforting. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) – Keep an eye on your personal papers and concerns. Be prepared to make a sudden and unexpected move should anyone stand between you and your goals. Protect your assets.

ersburg. During the project, absenteeism fell by 1 percent. This doesn’t seem like much, but 125 more students a day were in the classroom being educated rather than being home and sick in bed! Health professionals agree that proper hand washing is the best preventive medicine for children, teens and adults. Besides colds and flu, other ailments, including infections and diarrhea, are easily transmitted by human hands. – Dr. J.M., Charleston, W.Va. Dr. Wallace: I’m 18 and so is my so-called boyfriend. We’ve dated for over a year and started having sex five months ago. I was a virgin and my boyfriend is the only one I’ve been sexually active with. I just found out that my

8SUDOKU

“boyfriend” has been having sex with other girls. My best friend told me because two of the girls are friends with her cousin. When I confronted him, Joe denied it, but then the next day he admitted his sexual flings with four other girls in the last two months. He was also a virgin when we started our sexual relationship, and I was under the impression we were going to be faithful to each other – wrong! I have dropped him and will never go out with him again. He used protection most of the time, but a few times in the last month or so he didn’t. I’m positive that I’m not pregnant, but it’s the possibility of having a sexually transmitted infection

that bothers me, and in fact, I feel dirty and scared. Should I gamble that I am not infected, or should I see a doctor to be sure? I can’t go to our family doctor because he goes to our church and I would be embarrassed to tell him about my sexual affair. – Nameless, Davenport, Iowa. Nameless: You should see a doctor immediately. Talk to a female counselor or physical education teacher, and ask her to recommend a female gynecologist. You will feel more comfortable discussing your situation with her. Please do this as soon as possible. You don’t want to take a risk with your health.

• Email Dr. Robert Wallace at rwallace@galesburg.net.

8CROSSWORD

BRIDGE Phillip Alder

Are your cards in the right place? When an average golfer gets a birdie (one under par), it is anticipated that he will make a mess of the next hole. But not a pro. However, what do you think is the worst score by a pro immediately after making a hole in one? In golf, you try to place your ball well for your next shot. This also applies in bridge. Are your cards meshing well or badly with partner’s hand? Look only at the North hand. South opens one heart, North raises to two hearts, and South rebids two spades. What should North do now? Before you answer that question, what does South’s two-spade rebid show? It indicates a hand too strong to pass out two hearts, but too weak to jump to four hearts. He is showing four spades and a hand with six losers (here, one spade, one heart, three diamonds and one club). South is asking North to look in particular at his holdings in the majors. North has a useful spade queen, four trumps (a ninecard fit is much better than an eight-carder) and an ace. Yes, he has only seven high-card points and 4-3-3-3 distribution, but since his hand has those three pluses, he should jump to four hearts. Agreed, on a bad day, declarer will lose three diamonds and one heart, but the odds make this game worth bidding, and it succeeds here. Late last year in Australia, at a European tour event (yes, in Australia), one golfer had a hole in one. On the next hole, a par four with no water, he had an 11.


COMICS

Daily / Daily-Chronicle.com Page Chronicle XX • Day, Date, 2012

Pickles

Brian Crane Pearls Before Swine

For Better or For Worse

Non Sequitur

Wednesday, January 15, 2014 • Page C5 Northwest herald / nwherald.com

Stephan Pastis

Lynn Johnston Crankshaft

Tom Batiuk & Chuck Hayes

Wiley The Duplex

Glenn McCoy

Beetle Bailey

Mort Walker Blondie

Dean Young & Denis LeBrun

Frank & Ernest

Bob Thaves Dilbert

Scott Adams

Monty

Jim Meddick Zits Hi and Lois

Rose is Rose

Pat Brady & Don Wimmer Arlo & Janis

Soup to Nutz

The Family Circus

Rick Stromoski Big Nate

Bill Keane

The Argyle Sweater

Scott Hilburn

Stone Soup

Grizzwells

Brianand & Greg Jim Borgman JerryWalker Scott

Jimmy Johnson

Lincoln Peirce

Jan Eliot

Bill Schorr


LEARNING

Page C6 • Wednesday, January 15, 2014

8BRIEFS

Daily Chronicle / daily-chronicle.com

Cell Phones for Soldiers

One of DeKalb School District 428’s largest academic showcases just got bigger. The first-ever combined DeKalb Middle School/10th annual Clinton Rosette Science Fair will be held at 7 p.m. Feb. 7 in the DeKalb High School Field House. Judging will take place from 5 to 7 p.m. and the exhibits will then be open to the public for viewing from 7 to 8 p.m. The schools are still in need of judges for the event. No experience is required. Inexperienced judges will be paired with experienced judges. For more information, send email to Karla. Pabian@dist428.org or Roger.Christensen@ dist428.org. Concessions will be provided by the CRMS Builder’s Club.

Local students earn American FFA Degrees Michael Long, a sophomore agribusiness major and a soil and crop science minor from Big Rock, and Samuel Kimpan, a sophomore electrical engineering major from Hinckley, were among 15 students at the University of Wisconsin-Platteville to earn their American FFA Degree. The American FFA Degree is awarded to FFA members who have demonstrated the highest level of commitment to FFA and made significant accomplishments in their supervised agricultural experiences. About 3,500 degrees are handed out each year at the National FFA Convention. That number represents less than half of 1 percent of all FFA members, making it one of the organization’s highest honors.

Lopez graduates from Western Illinois James Joseph Lopez, a 2008 graduate of Genoa-Kingston High School, graduated from Western Illinois University on Dec. 14. He received a Bachelor of Science in physical education K-12. His future plans include pursuing a career in the area and also becoming an athletic coach.

James Lopez

Franklin named Presidential Scholar at AIB College of Business Robin Franklin of DeKalb has been honored as a Presidential Scholar at AIB College of Business for the Fall 2013 term. To qualify as a Presidential Scholar, Franklin attained a grade point average of 3.80 or higher for the term. Franklin is earning Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration at AIB.

AIB College of Business is located in Des Moines, Iowa.

State museum association names student of the year The 2013 Illinois Association of Museums Graduate Student of the Year Award was presented to Northern Illinois University anthropology student Ashlee Craig. Craig began working with the NIU Anthropology Museum in 2010 as an undergraduate collections volunteer. The quality of her work was recognized, and she was promoted to museum supervisor before being hired on as the Anthropology Museum’s graduate assistant in 2012. Craig was lead curator for two exhibits on campus: “Fast Food Nation 10,000 B.C.,” displayed at the Holmes Student Center, and “Trowels & Fair Trade: Revealing the Underground Railroad and Contemporary Slavery” at the Anthropology Museum, which garnered an Award of Superior Achievement from IAM. She also worked as a graphic designer for “Rarely Seen Southeast Asia,” an exhibition displayed at the Anthropology Museum and curated by NIU Professor Emeritus Richard M. Cooler.

IVVC names students of the month Indian Valley Vocational Center of Sandwich, recently announced its December 2013 list of Students of the Month. This recognition program spotlights students from its 13 onsite programs, and cosmetology and fire science. The December 2013 IVVC Students of the Month are: Auto Body Repair – David Garcia, Sandwich High School; Automotive Technology – Zachary Fordon, Sandwich High School; Computer Technology – Jonathan Martin, Sandwich High School; Construction Technology – Noe Guzman, Plano High School; Cosmetology – Cinthia Lopez, Sandwich High School; Culinary Arts – Joseph Zielinski, Earlville High School; Drafting & Design – Morgan Haick, Sandwich High School; Early Childhood Development – Reagan Maly, Earlville High School; Fire Science – Jarrod Johnson, Sandwich High School; Graphic Communications – Kira Wallace, Indian Creek High School; Health Occupations, CNA – Karla Valdiviezo, Sandwich High School; Health Occupations, Exploring Medical Careers – Katherine Lappe, Sandwich High School; Law Enforcement – Ruby Chavez, Plano High School; Sports Medicine/Management – Peter Medlin, Sandwich High School; and Welding & Fabrication – Greg Rogers, Somonauk High School. IVVC is owned and operated by 11 school districts.

Photo provided

Eighth graders from team Great Expectations at Sycamore Middle School display old cell phones they have collected for Cell Phones for Soldiers, a nonprofit company that recycles the phones and uses the money to buy prepaid calling cards for soldiers stationed overseas. The collection of old cell phones will continue until the end of the school year. Phones can be dropped off at the middle school office. Pictured are Tyler Hull, Jared Bunge, Grant Minnihan, Rosemary Nelson and Sophia Melton.

8DEAN’S LIST Following is a list of local college students who were named to the fall Dean’s List:

Beloit College

AIB College of Business

East Tennessee State University

Jacob Jouris of DeKalb Gail Anderson of Sycamore Liana Beauchamp of Kingston Hailee De Wild of Kingston Jennifer Evans of DeKalb Justin Fox of Somonauk Suzanne Geisler of DeKalb Tyler Grace of Earlville Stephanie Huber of Sycamore Michael Madden of Sycamore Sean McIntyre of Genoa Paige Pierson of Sandwich Maggie Sampson of Sandwich Lisa Stueber of Sycamore Henry Weberpal of Sycamore Lucy Wrenn of Sycamore Karly Zucker of DeKalb

4. 1.

The words of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. helped to change the world. His words still inspire people today. He was born on January 15, 1929 in Atlanta, Georgia. His father was the minister of the Ebenezer Baptist Church, as was his father before him. Because Martin and his father had the same name, the family called him M.L.

When M.L. was young, he played with all the children who lived in his Atlanta neighborhood. But when they reached school age, the white children went to a school for white children only, and M.L. was sent to a school for black children. After the first day of school, M.L. and his white friends were never allowed to play together again. Standards Link: History: Students identify the people honored in commemorative holidays.

= = = =

A D E G N

= = = =

2.

3.

1.

3.

4.

As M.L. grew up, he saw more and more examples of segregation. He also saw his father and others speak out against hatred and segregation. These people taught M.L. about the power of words. He learned that words could heal or hurt. “When the history books are written, someone will say there lived black people who had the courage to stand up for their rights.” – Dr. Martin Luther King

ANSWER: 301

Select a headline from today’s newspaper and rewrite it to say just the opposite. How many more ways can you rewrite that headline. How does the impact of the words change when you write the headline different ways? Standards Link: Character Education: Students identify character traits in others.

Katelyn Bolander of Sycamore Alexandria Caruso of Sandwich Karrah Kuykendall of Sandwich David Ruud of Sycamore

North Central College Allison Anderson of DeKalb Valerie Gravelle of Genoa Alyssa Hepker of Sycamore Daniel Petras DeKalb Patrick Rourke of DeKalb Alejandra Soto of Cortland

Standards Link: Sentence Structure: Students are able to write complete sentences.

Emily Banigan of Hinckley Angela Brown of Genoa Ashley Covington of Kingston Brandon Creed of Waterman Rachel Crews of DeKalb Carole Fleetwood of Malta Brianna L Hooker of Sycamore Alexis Kathalynas of Genoa Hannah Knox of Sycamore Matthew Loellke of Sycamore Amanda Panozzo of Sycamore Angela Parillo of Sycamore Elizabeth Peregrine of DeKalb Kelly Rooney of Hinckley Mason Rueger of DeKalb Ariel Smith of DeKalb

William Woods University

Southeast Missouri State University

Ashley Black of Cortland

Sarah Gibble of Sycamore

For more than 20 years, Martin Luther King spoke out against _______ and segregation. During these years, he was arrested, had his ______ bombed, and was accused of being “un-American.”

Quiz a friend or family member with the following statements. If they don’t know the answers, you can use today’s Kid Scoop to be the teacher! All the answers can be found on today’s Kid Scoop page.

In 1963, Dr. King gave his famous “I Have a Dream” speech in Washington, D.C. “I have a dream that one day in Alabama little black boys and black girls will _____ hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and __________.”

1. Where was Martin Luther King born?

2. From which college did Dr. King receive his Ph.D.?

Standards Link: History: Students understand the achievements of famous people.

2.

Standards Link: History: Students understand the importance of individual action.

Standards Link: Mathematical Reasoning: Students use strategies, skills and concepts in finding solutions.

Western Illinois University

Monmouth College

Sadly, just four _______ later, Dr. King was shot and killed in Memphis, Tenn. But his words live on.

M.L. decided right then and there that someday he would try to change the world. He wanted to make it a place where white children and black children could play together and enjoy the same rights.

O R S U Y

Victoria Huber of Somonauk

In 1964, the ______ Rights Act was passed, granting equal rights to black Americans and Dr. King received the Nobel Peace _______.

M.L. was very sad when his friends would no longer play with him. He asked his mother why they couldn’t. She talked about why the family didn’t ride streetcars, why there was a WHITES ONLY sign on the elevator at City Hall, why there were restaurants that refused to serve black people, and theaters that allowed blacks to sit only in the balcony. She said that it was simply because some white people didn’t understand that we all deserve equal treatment.

Junior Seth Sanderson of Malta

Jessica J. Schafer of DeKalb

Augustana College

© 2014 by Vicki Whiting, Editor Jeff Schinkel, Graphics Vol. 30, No. 5

University of Evansville

MARTIN CIVIL BOSTON EBENEZER MARBLES ALABAMA LUTHER KING DREAM SPEECH WHITE IMPACT BOYS PLAY HEAL

Find the words in the puzzle, then in this week’s Kid Scoop stories and activities.

3. In 1964 Dr. King was awarded an important prize. What was it called?

4. In what year was the Civil Rights Act passed?

E T G H E R E W O P O B F N O T S O B W A O E O I E P L A Y L Y M N L K R U D E

1964

1968

1970

5. What was the name of the famous speech Dr. King gave in Washington D.C.?

A S A B E M L T S T B C R A R Z A H I

I

A A T N S P E E C H M C I V I L H R R W A G N T C A P M I D

6. Give at least one example, recounted in today’s Kid Scoop page, of Martin Luther King’s courage.

Standards Link: Letter sequencing. Recognized identical words. Skim and scan reading. Recall spelling patterns.

Just Like Martin

Look through today’s newspaper for examples of people acting in a way that reminds you of Martin Luther King. Select one person and write a paragraph explaining how that person is somewhat like Martin Luther King. Standards Link: Writing Applications: Write descriptions that use details to present unified impressions of people.

Kid Scoop Sponsored By

Leadership What are the qualities of a good leader? Who do you know that is a good leader?

DOWNTOWN SYCAMORE

7. In what year was Dr. King shot and killed?

1964

1968

1970

8. Words were one tool Dr. Martin Luther King used to bring about social change.

True

False

ANSWERS 1. Atlanta, GA 2. Boston University 3. Nobel Peace Prize 4. 1964 5. “I Have a Dream” 6. Continuing to speak for civil rights even after being arrested and having his home bombed. 7. 1968 8. True. (He did use actions, too. He helped with the bus boycott. He was arrested. He led protests.)

Judges sought for DeKalb science fair

Standards Link: Reading Comprehension: Demonstrate comprehension by identifying answers in text.


CLASSIFIED

Daily Chronicle / daily-chronicle.com

Wednesday, JanuaryWednesday, 15, 2014 • Page C7 January 15, 2014

“Sunset Through My Heart” Photo by: Heather F.

Upload your photos on My Photos – DeKalb County’s community photo post! Photos on My Photos are eligible to appear in print in Daily Chronicle Classified. Go to Daily-Chronicle.com/myphotos

A-1 AUTO

Assistant Property Manager and Leasing Consultant Industry leader, Related Management, is seeking an experienced Assistant Property Manager and Leasing Consultant for our 228 unit tax credit family site in DeKalb, IL. Responsibilities include leasing, marketing, resident retention, rent setting, recertifications, resident relations, billing, file management and advertising. Experience with leasing and affordable housing strongly preferred. Must be able to work on Saturdays. Leasing Salary $10$12 pr hr, Asst Property Manager Salary $12-$14 pr hr. Email resumes to: tday@related.com EOE Auto

SERVICE MANAGER Auto Dealership seeks service manager to oversee 2 mechanics. Experience with diagnosis is a must. $20 per hour. Email: tom5266@ameritech.net Superior Car Credit, DeKalb 815-754-0403

AUTO TECHNICIAN

TAKE AIM INC. Inst. James Carson Certified Concealed Fire Arms Instructor www.Take-Aim.net Now offering classes

Young Female Senior in wheelchair needs upbeat, patient, super organized helper to assist with housekeeping, daily living, errand and clutter. 25 hrs./wk. Car required. Lucy: 815-758-3873

ALWAYS INVESTIGATE BEFORE INVESTING ANY MONEY

Contact the Better Business Bureau www.chicago.bbb.org - or Federal Trade Commission www.ftc.gov

NEWSPAPER DELIVERY Earn up to $1000 A Month! Looking for Contractors to deliver newspapers early mornings 7 days per week. Routes now available in DeKalb County. Please Call 815-526-4434

Well established, busy, auto repair shop seeking a qualified Front End Alignment Technician. Applicant must have a minimum of ten years experience and be ASE certified. Please email resume to sycamorejob@yahoo.com

Send cover letter and resume to Bob Shipman at Opportunity House, Inc., 202 Lucas Street, Sycamore or apply on-line at www.ohinc.org and e-mail to jobs@ohinc.org.

Will BUY UR USED

Fridge, white side by side, water & ice maker, $300 630-730-8070

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Great for a bad back, like new! $100/obo 815-909-8905

WILL BEAT ANY QUOTE GIVEN!! $400 - $2000 “don't wait.... call 2day”!!

I BUY CARS, TRUCKS, VANS & SUVs 1990 & Newer Will beat anyone's price by $300.

Cash register and food exp a plus. 15-30 hrs per week. Tue-Fri. DeKalb area. Send your info to: Send your contact info to bakery102-employment@yahoo.com

You Want It? We've Got It!

www.HuskieWire.com

877-264-2527

All NIU Sports... All The Time

Daily-Chronicle.com

Classified has GREAT VARIETY!

Part-Time Environmental Health Practitioner

815-814-1964 or

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For Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans No Title, No Problem. Same Day Pick-Up. 630-817-3577

Sycamore – 1 Lg BD, appliances, & W/D, $550/mo. + sec. & utilities. No pets. 815-895-6747 leave message

Stone Prairie 2BR, 2BA APT. DeKalb 2BR Starting $640

Hillcrest Place Apts.

220 E. Hillcrest. 815-758-0600 hillcrestplaceaptsdekalb.com DEKALB - 2BR 1BA Apt Avail Now Updated Kitch & Bath, W/D in bldg 830 Greenbrier $600/mo Call Pittsley Realty (815)756-7768 DEKALB - 323 S 11th St, 3br, 1ba, AC, W/D, Avail 2/1, 1st + sec, $695, 847-845-4021

DEKALB - SPACIOUS MARKET APARTMENTS Starting @ $599, 2 Bedroom $683, 3 Bedroom Near the heart of NIU. Incl gas and forced air heat. Off street parking, lush grounds, on site laundry room. Outdoor pool, tennis and basketball courts, patios and balconies. Cats OK. 815-758-7859 DeKalb - Upper 1BR, Heat Included Quiet tenant, no smoking, private entrance, street parking, $625/mo. 847-845-6639 DeKalb – 3BR / 1BA Lower Apt Washer/dryer hook-up $925 1st/lst/sec. Sec 8 welcome 815-739-6170 DEKALB ADULT, QUIET, REFINED Building. 2 Bedroom Apt with homey environment. Car port. For mature living. Excellent Location! No pets/smoking. Agent Owned. 815-758-6712

Hinckley ~ Rimsnider Road Becherer Farm, approx 80 acres. 76.6 tillable acres with 2 story farm house and ranch house. $1,725,600. 859-630-5920

GROUND LEVEL APARTMENT 1-2 Bedroom ground level unit of house with new carpeting and freshly painted. Appliances included. Near 7th and Lincoln DeKalb. $600 per month. 815-827-3434 duffpropertiesllc@gmail.com DEKALB: 2BR Apts.-$750/m. Incl. heat, water, garb. & cable. W/D on premises. Nice Neighborhood. Ready ASAP! 815-756-1424

Dumbbells, 15 lb, 20 lb, 25 lb, Set for $30. 815-793-1473 Ice Skates, Ladies Size 10. $10. 815-793-1473

DEKALB COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT Requires Bachelor of Science degree with at least 30 semester hours of Basic Sciences.

Roller Blades, Ladies Size 10. $15. 815-793-1473

For details and an application, go to www.dekalbcounty.org, Job Opportunities link.

Skiis, Ladies Cross County, Poles, Boots size 8. $15. 815-793-1473

Equal Opportunity Employer

Distribution Assistant Wanted

GENOA -1 BR. IN TOWN References required. No pets. $490/mo. 815-784-2232

GENOA 2 BEDROOM

DEKALB 1 BEDROOM Available Dec/Jan. Close to NIU, Free heat & water, quiet lifestyle. Varsity Square Apts. 815-756-9554 www.glencoproperties.com BIG APARTMENTS, LESS MONEY! Rochelle: 15 minutes from DeKalb 1 BR & 2BR Starting at $530 Recently updated! Affordable heat. Walk to shops! (815) 562-6425 www.whiteoakapartments.net Now accepting Visa, M/C, Discover

Will assist in all aspects of the daily distribution of the newspaper, including delivery of open routes, ride alongs with Independent Contractors and assisting with service issues. Overnight and early morning hours available. Flexible days and hours available, $12/hr to start plus mileage reimbursement.

2005 SATURN ION $3000, 87,000 miles, Air, CD player, fair condition, 5 speed. Call Ron at 815-761-7519

ACI Midwest is an equal opportunity employer.

2007 FORD FOCUS SE

CORTLAND 2BR, 2BA, W/D, DW AVAILABLE NOW! TOWNSEND MANAGEMENT 815-787-7368

Metallic gray, 57K miles. Automatic/power windows and lock. Great condition and very clean!

Send your Help Wanted Advertising 24/7 to:

Please submit resume and work history to: dstamper@acicirculation.com or call 630-594-7918

Reduced $9000

Safety Coordinator

For More Details Call

815-701-3301

Join Dart Container Corporation the world's largest foam cup manufacturer and one of the leading producers of quality foodservice packaging products.

Laing Mgmt. 815-758-1100 or 815-895-8600

www.dart.jobs Dart Container Corporation 310 S. Evergreen, North Aurora, IL 60542 EOE m/f/v/d

Appl, 1 bath, clean, residential neighborhood, available 2/1. $795/mo. 815-758-6580 DEKALB 3 BEDROOM, 1 BATH Newly Remodeled Ranch. All appl, bsmt,1.5 car garage, $1150/mo + security. 815-751-2650

Sycamore Lower 2BR ~ Newly

DeKalb- Nice 3 BR home, hardwood floors, 1 ½ car garage, nice yard. $900/month. No smoking or pets. 815-757-2064

Remodeled, A/C, gas heat. W/D on site. No pets. Off St parking. $725/mo + sec. 815-895-9280 Sycamore. 2BR Apartment $700. Nice Area. 1-car garage. 815-761-1775 815-761-1783

DeKalb. Cozy cottage. Rustic knotty pine. Frplc. 1BR, 1BA. $500/mo +dep, gas & elec. Also, 300SF attchd storage & 3 season area. New carpet, paint. Small pets ok. Avail 1/5. 815-739-3740

Cortland 2BR Townhouse

DEKALB: Newer beautiful single family house near NIU: 3-bed 2.5bath 1900 sq ft, 2-car-garage, master-suite, large yard, basement, $1500. Call 847-594-7610

Basement, 1.5 bath, W/D hook-up, no pets/smoking, $835/mo. Sr Discount Avail. 815-501-2555

CORTLAND 3BR, 2BA TH Fireplace, 2 car gar, all appl incl W/D, $1200/mo + sec. For more info call Anthony 630-730-8070 DEKALB 2 BR 1.5 BA condo near I-88, shopping, NIU. All appliances, garage, central air. Small pets OK. $975. 630-485-0508

Appliances, dining room, no pets. $700/mo + sec, tenant pays electric. 815-301-5644

GENOA DELUXE 2 BEDROOM 1 bath, remodeled, appl. Counrty setting, close to downtown Genoa. 815-784-4606 ~ 815-901-3346

DeKalb 271A Par Five Dr. 2BR TH, 2BA. Gas fireplace, large 1200 sq ft unfinished bsmt, W/D, 2 car gar, open view to golf course. $1200/mo or $1175/mo w/2 year lease. Lawn maintenance and snow removal incl, available Feb 1st, pets neg. 815-761-7467 DeKalb Newer 2BR on Cul-De-Sac Quiet neighborhood, all appl, W/D, walk-in-closets, no pets, $950/mo + 1st/last/sec. 815-739-4442

Dekalb: Tilton Park Area Lovely remodeled 2BR, 1BA, w/den, A/C, all appl., deck, fenced in yard, 2 car gar., avail 2/1, no smoking, pets neg., $800/mo. 630-675-4485

LELAND 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH Pets allowed, 1 car garage, $800/mo+ sec. 815-793-0739

DEKALB ~ 1515 STONEFIELD

SYCAMORE ~ 3BR, 2.5BA

ROCHELLE - Newer Rural Rochelle 2-bedroom Penthouse, quiet lifestyle living, tenant pays electric. $435.00 MOR R.E. 815-739-5785

Sycamore: 2BR condo, 2BA, granite tops, SS appl in kitch, fire pl, patio, W/D in mud rm, 2 car attch gar., $1100/mo. 708-906-2951

ROCHELLE ~ 2 BEDROOM

Send your Classified Advertising 24/7 to: Email: classified@ shawsuburban.com Fax: 815-477-8898 or online at: www.daily-chronicle.com

Email: helpwanted@ shawsuburban.com Fax: 815-477-8898

The Knolls

NOTICE BY PUBLICATION NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU, LUIS CASTRO OR ALL PUTATIVE FATHERS, of Said Minor, respondents, and to all whom it may concern, that a Petition was filed under the Juvenile Court Act by the DeKalb County State's Attorney in the Circuit Court of DeKalb County, on August 6, 2013; and that in the courtroom usually occupied by Honorable Judge Ronald Matekaitis, an adjudicatory hearing shall be held upon said Petition on February 21, 2014, at 9:00 a.m. or as soon thereafter as this case may be heard, to have the minor declared to be a ward of the Court, and for other relief under the Juvenile Court Act. The Court has authority in this case to take from you the custody and guardianship of the above named minor and to terminate parental rights, and if the petition requests termination of parental rights the parent may lose all parental rights to the child and the parent will not be entitled to further written notices of publication notices in this case except as required by Supreme Court Rule 11. UNLESS YOU APPEAR at the above named hearing and show cause to the contrary, AN ORDER OR JUDGMENT BY DEFAULT MAY BE ENTERED AGAINST YOU FOR THE RELIEF ASKED IN THE PETITION. January 14, 2014 /s/ Maureen A. Josh CLERK OF THE COURT (Published in the Daily Chronicle, January 15, 22 & 29, 2014.)

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE TWENTY-THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DEKALB COUNTY, ILLINOIS City of DeKalb vs. Milojka Miskin, Dragon Miskin, Douglas Johnson d/b/a Tax Lien Investments, Discover Bank, Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants. 13 MR 235 Notice of Publication The City of DeKalb, an Illinois Municipal Corporation, has filed a Petition for Remediation/Demolition relating to a certain parcel of property legally described as: 315 N. Tenth Street, DeKalb, Illinois 60115 The North 57 feet of Lots 9 and 10 in Block 14 in Gilson's Addition to the Original Village (Now City) of DeKalb, according to the Plat thereof recorded March 18, 1856 in Book "A" of Plats, Page 21, in DeKalb County, Illinois.

WINTER STORAGE RV's, Campers & Boats - Indoor & secure, West of Sycamore. Owner resides on property 815-825-2571

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE TWENTY THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DE KALB COUNTY, ILLINOIS JUVENILE DIVISION IN THE INTEREST OF JOSEPH HICKS A Minor

("the Property"). All persons who claim an interest in such Property are and shall be required to file and enter their appearance in this matter. Notice is given to all unknown owners and non-record claimants, or any party not listed in the abovecaption who claims any interest in the Property or the proceeds of this litigation, that the City has commenced this action seeking fee simple ownership of the Property, and other relief. Unless you file your appearance in this cause in the office of the Circuit Clerk of DeKalb County, Sycamore, Illinois on or before the 7th day of February, 2014, a default judgment and other relief may be granted as prayed for by the Plaintiff. City of DeKalb, By: Dean M. Frieders, City Attorney Attorney Dean 6282902

M.

Frieders

Waterman Garden Apt. Community 215 East Duffy Road

Hot new deluxe townhomes.

1 and 2 bdrm units Kitchen Appl., Comm. Room, Laundry Facility

2 & 3 Bedrooms. Garage, C/A, Basement. Pets?

Must be 62 years of age or older, or handicap/disabled, regardless of age.

Starting at $645

815-757-1907

FOR SALE – TOWNHOME EASY LIVING

FOR SALE – ALL BRICK HOME

No. 13 JA 35

Parcel Identification Number: 0823-258-011

Sycamore TH Like New 2BR Great location! 2BA, 2 car garage, skylights, appl, W/D, C/A, $935. No pets. 815-758-0123

2 bedroom duplex, appliances, W/D hook-up, $500/mo. 815-562-7368

Remodeled, available now. Clean and quiet, $550/mo. 815-758-6580 ~ 815-901-3346

SYCAMORE Duplex 2BR, CA, Deck, new decorating & furnace. $870 Also Homes. Betsy Smith 815-895-2488 ~ 815-751-1025

Sycamore Newer 2 Story Luxury TH on quiet Arbor Lane. 3BR, 2.5BA. Full fin bsmt, 2 car gar, great room w/fireplace, W/D. No pets/smoking. $1300 + Assoc. 847-343-3333

Fox Brier Townhouse available. All appliances include W/D. 1 car garage, balcony, $1100/mo. Barry 815-757-9040

MALTA ~ 1 Mo Rent FREE!

3BR, 1BA, stove, fridge, full basement, a/c, 2 car detached garage $1000 per/mo + sec dep, no pets 815-768-8879

3BR Townhome, 2 full bath, W/D. 2 car garage, $1100/mo. 815-228-6252 Sycamore - Luxury 2BR 2BA Condo Granite, SS, Fireplace, 2C Gar. Available NOW! 954 Arvle Circle Call Pittsley Realty (815)756-7768

Snow & Ice Removal All Done

Professionally Managed by PPM, LLC. This Institution Is An Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer. Phone 815-264-3492 TDD 800-525-0857

*

FOR RENT!

You will be responsible for administrating and coordinating all of the plant safety and training programs, administer, organize and maintain all required documentation, investigate safety incidents, promote safety throughout and improve plant safety results.

For immediate consideration please apply online at

DEKALB 2-3 BEDROOM

DEKALB – 3BR, 1BA, 1400 sq. ft., full bsmnt, 2 car gar., lrg yrd., $1200/mo. 1st/last/sec. 815-758-1498

We are in need of a Safety Coordinator.

Qualified applicants must have a Bachelor degree in Occupational Safety or two years of previous Occupational Safety experience, one year previous experience with OSHA regulations, experience with CPR, First Aid, Fire Protection, and Hazmat preferred, able to prioritize and multi-task, strong interpersonal and organizational skills, computer skills, and able to work across multiple shifts when needed.

DeKalb - 3Bd 2Ba House 2C Gar, Fireplace, Basement 204 Hollister, $1250/mo Call Pittsley Realty (815)756-7768

Sycamore - 2BR 1BA Apt Avail Now Updated Kitch & Bath, W/D in bldg 1611 Maness Ct. $625/mo Call Pittsley Realty (815)756-7768

University Village Apts. 722 N. Annie Glidden Rd.

DEKALB

Bowling Ball, Ladies 11 lb., Bag, Shoes size 10. $20. 815-793-1473

Average of 22.5 hours / week

Washer & dryer, central air, fireplace, exercise center. Cat friendly. Private fishing. $765/mo.

Sandwich – House for rent

RUSSELL TERRIOR TO LOVING FAMILY ONLY

Male, very lovable and spoiled. 8 years old, very friendly and good with kids, has to be center of attention. 815-762-6054

GENOA 2 BEDROOM 1 bath, appliances, W/D, C/A, 1 car garage, no pets/smoking. $800/mo. 815-784-3411

income restriction apply

Magazines – 1960s Carcraft, Hot Rod, etc. Over 70 plus, $50 for all 815-827-3692

Golden Retriever found running on I-88 near Maple Park on Saturday 1/11. Very friendly. Has collar, no tags. Taken to Tails Humane Society. Call Tails at 815-758-2457

Dekalb: Lrg. Ranch duplex w/3BR, 2BA, full bsmnt, 2 car attch. gar., lndry hookup, new interior, no pets/smoking $1000/mo. 815-464-8646

* 815-575-5153 *

!!!!!!!!!!!

GM 2009-2011 2.0 liter LFN Turbocharger with downpipe, exhaust manifold and duct work $375 815-260-1636

DeKalb Summit Enclave 2 lrg BR, 2 lrg BA, W/D, 2 car gar. $1100/mo + $1000 deposit. No pets/smoking 847-373-0602

3 BR Apartments Dishwasher On-Site Laundry Facility Playground Washer & Dryer Connection 6 months free cable if you sign a lease by 2/28/14

CAR, TRUCK, SUV,

Will pay extra for Honda, Toyota & Nissan

Back To Life Machine

DeKalb – Duplex, 4BR, 3BA, 2 car garage, large yard. In the Knolls $1250/mo 1st/lst/sec 815-739-6170

$300 1st Month's Rent

!!!!!!!!!!! DESK - Totally Refinished Desk Mahogany inlays in top 8 drawers - including middle drawer. Brass handles 42” width / 29” height $200. Call 815-825-2275

DAIRY BULL CALVES (2), 9 weeks old - $145.00, 5 weeks old $115.00, very healthy. 815-748-3782.

CAT – LOST South DeKalb County Area, near Howison, McGirr and Perry, but could be anywhere. Large neutered male, mostly white with brown patches and brown Maine Coon Tail. Was wearing a red collar. If you see him, please call my people at 815501-9724. Reward for safe return. We miss our big boy. Have you seen him or know what happened to him? Thank you.

Cortland Estates

MOST CASH

Vintage Magnavox Micromatic record player console $85, Call 815-748-2797.

Equal Opportunity Employer/Drug Free Workplace

BAKERY COUNTER HELP

14 Karat Gold Diamond Anniversary Band $125, valued at $249 815-793-1473

Sleeper Sofa $50, Call 815-748-2797.

Human Resource Manager HR professional needed to oversee Human Resource functions for 115 employees. Bachelor's degree in Human Resource Management or related business degree and at least 3 years of experience required. Demonstrate knowledge of employment/labor laws and regulations and benefits administration. Knowledge of computer programs including spreadsheets and data bases a must. Good communications skills essential. Competitive pay and benefits.

Advertise here for a successful garage sale! Call 815-455-4800

CORTLAND ~ 2BR DUPLEX Bsmt, appl, W/D hook-up, garage. No pets/smkg, $800/mo + lease, deposit & ref. 815-758-6439

Deep, Deep Yard with this 3 Bedroom Home. Huge Garage. Estate Sale at $98,000

Ranch Townhome with English Basement 2BR, 2BA, Large Kitchen, Formal Dining Rm + Living Rm + Sun Rm.

CALL NEDRA ERICSON, REALTOR 815-739-9997

CALL NEDRA ERICSON, REALTOR 815-739-9997

*

Beautiful 3BR, 2.5 BA End Unit Townhome, Full Basement, 2nd floor laundry, Private master bath w/walk-in closet. $1200/month.

CALL Marilyn Yamber 815-758-7368 Yamber Real Estate & Property Management

/


CLASSIFIED

Page C8 • Wednesday, January 15, 2014 FRIEDERS LAW, LLC dean@frieders.com

PUBLIC NOTICE

(Published in the Daily Chronicle, January 15, 2014.)

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE TWENTY-THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DEKALB COUNTY, ILLINOIS City of DeKalb vs. Milojka Miskin, Midwest Tulsa Property, Inc., Sabre Ventures, LLC, Belvidere National Bank and Trust Company, Lienquest III, LLC, Alpine Bank and Trust Company, Discover Bank, Unknown Owners and NonRecord Claimants. 13 MR 237 Notice of Publication The City of DeKalb, an Illinois Municipal Corporation, has filed a Petition for Remediation/Demolition relating to a certain parcel of property legally described as: 1015 and 1017 Market Street, DeKalb, Illinois 60115 Lot 8 and the West 1/2 of Lot 9 in Block 10 in Gilson's Addition to the Original Village (Now City) of DeKalb, Situated in DeKalb County, Illinois. Parcel Identification Number: 0823-256-011 ("the Property"). All persons who claim an interest in such Property are and shall be required to file and enter their appearance in this matter. Notice is given to all unknown owners and non-record claimants, or any party not listed in the abovecaption who claims any interest in the Property or the proceeds of this litigation, that the City has commenced this action seeking fee simple ownership of the Property, and other relief. Unless you file your appearance in this cause in the office of the Circuit Clerk of DeKalb County, Sycamore, Illinois on or before the 7th day of February, 2014, a default judgment and other relief may be granted as prayed for by the Plaintiff. City of DeKalb, By: Dean M. Frieders, City Attorney Attorney Dean M. 6282902 FRIEDERS LAW, LLC dean@frieders.com

Frieders

/

(Published in the Daily Chronicle, January 15, 2014.)

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE TWENTY-THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DEKALB COUNTY, ILLINOIS City of DeKalb vs. Milojka Miskin, Dragon Miskin, Douglas Johnson d/b/a Tax Lien Investments, Discover Bank, Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants. 13 MR 238 Notice of Publication The City of DeKalb, an Illinois Municipal Corporation, has filed a Petition for Remediation/Demolition relating to a certain parcel of property legally described as: 305 N. Fifth Street / 429 Oak Street DeKalb, Illinois 60115 The East 1/3rd of Lot 4 in the East 1/3 of the Southerly 8 feet of Lot 5; all in Block 26 in the Original Town (Now City) of DeKalb; according to the Plat thereof recorded December 19, 1953 in Book "A" of Plats, Page 8-1/4 Situated in the County of DeKalb and State of Illinois. Parcel Identification Number: 0823-180-015 ("the Property"). All persons who claim an interest in such Property are and shall be required to file and enter their appearance in this matter. Notice is given to all unknown owners and non-record claimants, or any party not listed in the abovecaption who claims any interest in the Property or the proceeds of this litigation, that the City has commenced this action seeking fee simple ownership of the Property, and other relief. Unless you file your appearance in this cause in the office of the Circuit Clerk of DeKalb County, Sycamore, Illinois on or before the 7th day of February, 2014, a default judgment and other relief may be granted as prayed for by the Plaintiff. City of DeKalb, By: Dean M. Frieders, City Attorney Attorney Dean M. 6282902 FRIEDERS LAW, LLC dean@frieders.com

Frieders

/

(Published in the Daily Chronicle, January 15, 2014.)

PUBLIC NOTICE

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BID Dekalb County Facilities Management is taking Intent to Respond Letters for our Contract Cleaning Services until January 20, 2014, 4:00pm. All letters of Intent must be submitted by email to jscheffers@dekalbcounty.org. Letters of Intent may be acquired by emailing jscheffers@dekalbcounty.org. Once the letter of Intent is received, Dekalb County Facilities will have until January 23, 2014, 4:00pm to send the Bid Specifications to the Responders. Bids must be received by February 14, 2014, 12:00pm. Bid openings will be February 14, 2014, 2:00pm in the Legislative Center, 200 North Main Street, Sycamore, Il., Freedom Conference Room. (Published in the Daily Chronicle, January 15, 16 & 17, 2014.)

PUBLIC NOTICE PURSUANT TO 10 ILCS 5/12-1, THIS NOTICE IS INTENDED TO COMPLY WITH THE FEDERAL VOTING ACCESSIBILITY ACT. ON MARCH 18, 2014, A GENERAL PRIMARY ELECTION WILL BE HELD AT ALL NORMAL POLLING PLACES IN AND FOR DEKALB COUNTY. SHOULD VOTERS REQUIRE SPECIAL ACCOMMODATION, PLEASE CONTACT THE DEKALB COUNTY CLERK'S OFFICE AT 815.895.7147 TO REGISTER TO BE A DISABLED VOTER AND/OR RECEIVE INFORMATION REGARDING ACCESSIBILITY OPTIONS AT EACH POLLING LOCATION. /s/ DOUGLAS J. JOHNSON DEKALB COUNTY CLERK (Published in the Daily Chronicle, January 15, 2014.)

All comments received by Friday, January 30, 2014 at 4:00 p.m. at the City of DeKalb Annex Building will be duly noted and considered prior to final adoption of the on Monday, February 3, 2014.

(Published in the Daily Chronicle, January 15 & 22, 2014.)

PUBLIC NOTICE Next Generation 9-1-1 Consultant 9-1-1 Northern Illinois Next Generation Alliance (9-1-1 NINGA) will accept sealed proposals for a qualified Next Generation 9-1-1 Consultant. The 9-1-1 Systems participating in 9-1-1 NINGA are Boone County, Bureau County, Carroll County, DeKalb County, JoDaviess County, Lee County, McHenry County, Ogle County, Stephenson County, Whiteside County, and Winnebago County. Responses are due at the following address by 11:00 am CST on Friday, February 28, 2014. Rockford Fire 9-1-1 Office Attn: Sandy Stansell 204 S. First Street Rockford, IL 61104 To request a copy of the RFP please send an email to ninga911@gmail.com (Published in the Daily Chronicle, & The MidWeek, January 15, 2014.)

AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE BECOME AN AVIATION MAINTENANCE TECH. FAA APPROVED TRAINING. FINANCIAL AID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL AIM 800-481-8312. AUCTION United Rentals equipment selling at no reserve, internet auction on Jan 21. Bid now on trucks, trailers, Telehandlers & boom lifts at www.purplewave.com

The public involvement procedures used in the development of the TIP satisfy the program-ofproject requirements of the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) Section 5307 Program. The documents are available at the following locations: - City of DeKalb Annex Building 223 S. 4th St., Suite A, DeKalb, IL 60115 - DSATS website: http://www.dsats.org. The DSATS Policy Committee will consider the adoption of the TIP Amendment at a public meeting on Wednesday, January 22, 2014 at 3 p.m. at the DeKalb Municipal Annex Building in the large conference room, 223 S. Fourth St., Suite A, DeKalb, IL 60115. All questions and comments, written or oral, should be directed to: Attn: Brian Dickson DSATS/City of DeKalb 223 S. 4th St. Suite A DeKalb, IL 60115

DeKalb County Government is seeking proposals from qualified consultants to prepare a comprehensive application to the State of Illinois before December 31, 2014 for an Enterprise Zone within DeKalb County. Part of the scope of work will be to assist the County in determining the best areas to be included in the Enterprise Zone and collecting data to address the program's qualifying criteria. This project is being overseen by the DeKalb County Economic Development Corporation on behalf of DeKalb County Government. Questions about the complete scope of work and how proposals should be submitted should be directed to Paul Borek at 815-895-2711 or email borek@dcedc.org. The deadline for proposals is at 2:00pm on February 3, 2014. (Published in the Daily Chronicle, January 15, 18 & 22, 2014.)

Daily Chronicle Classified 877-264-2527

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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, SIXTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, DEKALB COUNTY, ILLINOIS CAUSE NO. 13-TX-55: TO THE FOLLOWING NAMED PERSONS (AND IF DECEASED, TO THEIR UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES), AND TO THE STATE OF ILLINOIS, AND TO ALL INTERESTED DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES THEREOF, INCLUDING AMONG OTHERS DEKALB COUNTY CLERK, DEKALB COUNTY STATE'S ATTORNEY , ILLINOIS ATTORNEY GENERAL, ILLINOIS DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE, ILLINOIS DIVISION OF EMPLOYMENT SECURITY, ILLINOIS PUBLIC AID FIELD CONSULTANT, ILLINOIS DEPT OF EMPLOYMENT SECURITY, STATE OF ILLINOIS DEPT OF HEALTHCARE & FAMILY SERVICES (PUBLIC AID) GENERAL COUNSEL, AND TO OCCUPANTS, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND PARTIES INTERESTED IN THE PARCELS HEREINAFTER NAMED: Parcel Number 08-27-279-027 08-27-279-027 08-27-279-027 08-27-279-027 08-27-279-029 08-27-279-029 08-27-279-029 08-27-279-029 09-17-328-001 09-17-329-009 09-17-376-011 09-28-351-013 09-28-351-013 09-33-100-007

Owners/Parties Interested PROTANO, CHESTER CITY OF DEKALB THE NATIONAL BANK & TRUST CO PROTANO, GUIDO & CHESTER J THE NATIONAL BANK & TRUST CO CITY OF DEKALB PROTANO, CHESTER PROTANO, GUIDO & CHESTER J M & I REGIONAL PROPERTIES LLC M & I REGIONAL PROPERTIES LLC M & I REGIONAL PROPERTIES LLC JPMORGAN CHASE CORTLAND-I-88 LLC CORTLAND-I-88 LLC

Cert Number 2010-00280 2010-00280 2010-00280 2010-00280 2010-00281 2010-00281 2010-00281 2010-00281 2010-00317 2010-00323 2010-00324 2010-00388 2010-00388 2010-00396

09-33-100-007

JPMORGAN CHASE

2010-00396

11-03-126-010

SOUTH POINTE GREENS, INCSTRATTON, GEORGE S. PRESIDENT LAKE COUNTY GRADING COMPANY,LLC VANGUARD HOMES LLC LAKE COUNTY GRADING COMPANY,LLC VANGUARD HOMES LLC LAKE COUNTY GRADING COMPANY,LLC VANGUARD HOMES LLC OPTIMUM FINANCIAL INCBAUMBACK, JASON PRESIDENT CITIZENS FIRST NATIONAL BANK D & S MAINTENANCE JOHNSON, DOUGLAS J

18-33-351-030 19-25-252-014 19-25-252-014

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877-264-2527 www.Daily-Chronicle.com

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If it rains on your sale, we will run your ad again the next week for FREE!

PUBLIC NOTICE

15-14-102-033 15-14-102-033 15-14-107-007 15-14-107-007 15-14-107-008 15-14-107-008 18-33-351-030

Visit the Local Business Directory online at Daily-Chronicle.com/localbusiness Call to advertise 877-264-2527

DAILY CHRONICLE CLASSIFIED

2010-00456

Street Or Common Address 1205 S. 4TH ST. 1205 S. 4TH ST. 1205 S. 4TH ST. 1205 S. 4TH ST. S. 4TH ST. S. 4TH ST. S. 4TH ST. S. 4TH ST. HIBISCUS AVE. MAGNOLIA AVE. WILDFLOWER ST. STRATFORD AVE. STRATFORD AVE. OFF PRESTON ST. & LEXINGTON AVE. OFF PRESTON ST. & LEXINGTON AVE. SOUTH POINTE DR.

2010-00504 2010-00504 2010-00506 2010-00506 2010-00507 2010-00507 2010-00541

PRAIRIE ST. & HINCKLEY RD. PRAIRIE ST. & HINCKLEY RD. CHRISTENSEN ST. CHRISTENSEN ST. CHRISTENSEN ST. CHRISTENSEN ST. 470 E. MARKET ST.

2010-00541 2010-00554 2010-00554

470 E. MARKET ST. LATHAM ST. LATHAM ST.

DeKalb County Government Request for Proposals Consultant for Enterprise Zone

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Daily Chronicle Classified

The DeKalb-Sycamore Area Transportation Study is the metropolitan planning organization (MPO) for all or portions of the City of DeKalb, the City of Sycamore, the Town of Cortland, and DeKalb County. The DSATS FY14-18 Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) Highway Amendment #5 will be available for public review and comment from Wednesday, January 15, 2014 to Friday, January 30, 2014. The TIP represents planned transportation improvements for Fiscal Years 2014-2018. The TIP is a short-range capital improvements program outlining a 4-year schedule of projects that have been locally approved by DSATS to receive federal funding. This TIP Amendment adds an IDOT project for improvements to the UP railroad crossing on IL-23 south of I-88 to the DSATS TIP.

Having a Birthday, Anniversary, Graduation or Event Coming Up?

AT YOUR YOUR SERVICE (815) 748-2367 Brian.dickson@cityofdekalb.com

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC REVIEW OF THE DEKALB SYCAMORE AREA TRANSPORTATION STUDY'S (DSATS) FY14-18 TRANSPORTATION IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM (TIP) HIGHWAY AMENDMENT #5

Daily Chronicle / daily-chronicle.com

TAKE NOTICE THAT THE ABOVESAID PARCELS WERE SOLD ON NOVEMBER 4, 2011, FOR GENERAL TAXES FOR THE YEAR 2010 AND PRIOR YEARS, AND THAT THE PERIOD OF REDEMPTION FROM SUCH SALE EXPIRES JUNE 19, 2014. TAKE FURTHER NOTICE THAT A PETITION FOR ORDER DIRECTING ISSUANCE OF TAX DEEDS HAS BEEN FILED IN THE ABOVESAID CAUSE AS TO THE ABOVE-NAMED PARCELS BY DE KALB COUNTY, AS TRUSTEE, AND THAT ON JULY 7, 2014 AT 9:00 AM, SAID PETITIONER WILL APPLY FOR AN ORDER THAT A TAX DEED ISSUE AS TO EACH ABOVESAID PARCEL NOT REDEEMED ON OR BEFORE JUNE 19, 2014. /S/ DEKALB COUNTY AS TRUSTEE, PETITIONER. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT THE COUNTY CLERK ADDRESS: 110 E SYCAMORE STREET, SYCAMORE, IL 60178 TELEPHONE: (815) 895-7149 (Published in the Daily Chronicle, January 15, 22 & 29, 2014.)

Phone:_____________________________________________ NAME:_____________________________________________ ADDRESS:__________________________________________ CITY__________________________STATE_____ZIP________ DAYTIME PHONE:____________________________________ E-Mail:_____________________________________________

Upgrade Your Ad ! Add Bold $5 ! Add A Photo $5 ! Add an Attention Getter $5 ! ! !

Mail to: Free Ads P.O. Box 250 Crystal Lake, IL 60039-0250 ! Sell an item priced Email: classified@shawsuburban.com over $400 - $26

Ad will run one week in the Daily Chronicle and on Daily-Chronicle.com. One item per ad. Offer excludes real estate, businesses & pets, other restrictions may apply. We reserve the right to decline or edit the ad.

DDC-1-15-2014  
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