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Thursday, October 24, 2013

Walnut board hears progress Report reviewed on new aggregation program By Nita Wyatt news@bcrnews.com

WALNUT—Walnut’s new Community Aggregation Electricity Program was reviewed by the village board at Monday’s meeting. Village residents had agreed in March 2012 by referendum to enter into a Community Aggregation Program to provide an alternative to ComEd for the supplying of electricity to village residents. The new program went into effect in July 2012. Mike Mudge of Rock River Energy Services Co., based in Oregon, Ill., manages the electricity program for the village and met with the village board at Monday’s meeting. Mudge said Walnut was one of the first communities in Illinois to implement an aggregation program. Currently there are more than 600 cities, villages, townships and counties in the state that have passed referendums and have these programs. At its inception, 500 customers in Walnut were transferred from ComEd to the new program, Mudge said. Currently, there are 458 customers participating in the community program. The idea of this program is to provide electricity at a lesser rate than the ComEd rate. The summer rate for ComEd was .06011 per kilowatt hour and the community program rate is .0484 KmH, he said. Mudge reported the 458 subscribers to the program have averaged a savings of $321.24 each, or $154,690.58 total. He also reported the contract signed was initially a two-year commitment and he has been working on bids for a new contract for the village program and also for a new contract for the village itself for the electricity needed for the municipal water and sewer works.

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Garbage doesn’t belong By Donna Barker dbarker@bcrnews.com

PRINCETON — News flash: The Princeton Recycling Center is not a dump site for garbage. At Monday’s meeting of the Princeton City Council, Commissioner Ray Mabry said 95 percent of residents are doing the right thing in what they bring to the recycling center, but it’s the remaining 5 percent who are the problem.

Last week was a tough week at the recycling center, Mabry said, with three separate incidents of people leaving garbage at the center. One night someone dropped off a bunch of furniture, including a sofa, recliners and dressers, plus some clothing. The night before that incident, someone dropped off automobile parts, Mabry said. If residents have a question about what is accepted at the recycling center, they can call city hall, Mabry said.

The information is also available on the city’s website. Mayor Keith Cain also addressed the recycling center issue, urging people to be responsible and to follow the guidelines set for acceptable items. “I’m pleading with the people out there. Let’s be adults and quit dumping junk there,” Cain said. “We aren’t a garbage site.”

See Garbage Page 4

BCR photo/Amelia Bystry

Are you kidding me? Harvest in Bureau County came to an abrupt halt Tuesday morning as rain and then snow stopped tractors and combines in their tracks. Tuesday’s precipitation kept many farmers out of the fields even on Wednesday. Though chilly temperatures will continue throughout the rest of the week, Bureau County should be done with any more snow, though the area could see some spotty rain showers, according to WQAD meteorologist James Zahara.

DePue to start charging fees for IVHS courses By Goldie Currie gcurrie@bcrnews.com

DEPUE — DePue students taking courses through the Illinois Virtual High School (IVHS) program will soon have to pay a fee per class. On Monday, Superintendent Randy Otto held a discussion with the school board about the option to begin charging up front fees to IVHS students, similar to fees charged to students taking courses through the Area Career Center (ACC) program. ACC students are currently charged an upfront fee of $150 per course, which is refunded to students who pass the course with an average grade or better. Otto explained there has been an increase in students now taking classes

through IVHS, which costs $225 per course. Right now, students are charged no fees to take courses through IVHS. Otto said about 20 students are currently enrolled in IVHS, which is costing the district budget around $4,000 — a price that is not refunded to the school. “And we don’t get any money upfront from the students,” Otto said. The school offers students the opinion of online courses for two reasons: the first, is for those interested in taking classes the school doesn’t offer. The second, is for students who are taking classes to make-up credits needed to graduate. Otto proposed the district begin charging a $50 fee per IVHS class, which would be refunded to students who passed the course.

“If they don’t pass we would keep the money as in the case of the ACC students,” he said. Board member Nickole Barto said students who were taking courses for credit recovery should have to pay the full price per course on their own. “I don’t have a problem with the kids who want to take something the school doesn’t offer,” she said. “They could pay a fee that we would reimburse like ACC as long as they got a passing grade in it.” The board concurred, and was in favor of charging IVHS students the full $225 to those taking courses for credit recovery, and $50 for students taking courses the school doesn’t offer. The $50 fee would be reimbursed to students who passed the

See DePue Page 4

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Clarifications/Corrections Did we get it right? Accuracy is important to us, and we want to correct mistakes promptly. If you believe a factual error has been made, call the Bureau County Republican at 815-8754461.

Seeking Sources What kind of great fall treats are you preparing in your kitchen? We’re hoping you’ll share your recipes with our readers. Recipe columnist Judy Dyke would like to feature one of your recipes in an upcoming edition of the Bureau County Journal. Send your recipes to her at judyd2313@frontier. com. You can also mail them to her attention at the BCR, P.O. Box 340, Princeton, IL 61356. ••• The BCR welcomes your story ideas and news tips. If you have an idea for a story, we’d love to hear it. Call 815-875-4461, ext. 229. ••• Has your farm received Centennial or Sesquicentennial Farm designation from the Illinois Department of Agriculture within the last few years? If so, give BCR Staff Writer Donna Barker a call at 815-875-4461, ext. 244. Not many people can trace their roots back so far on the same piece of land, and we enjoy telling your stories. The Bureau County Republican is located at 800 Ace Road, Princeton, Illinois 61356. Office hours are Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Phone: 815-875-4461 FAX: 815-875-1235 The BUREAU COUNTY REPUBLICAN (ISSN 0894-1181) is published tri-weekly (three times a week) by the Bureau County Republican, 800 Ace Road, P.O. Box 340, Princeton, IL 61356-0340. Periodical postage paid at Princeton, Illinois, 61356. POSTMASTER Send address changes to BUREAU COUNTY REPUBLICAN, PO Box 340, Princeton, IL 61356-0340.

BCR photo/Mike Vaughn

Making headway Vissering Construction workers attack the press box and bleachers at the Princeton High School football field as they make progress on a multi-faceted project, which will include new bleachers, a new press box and a new concession stand with restrooms. The current concession stand will be relocated to the southwest corner of the field and used for storage. The overall project will also include fire escape upgrades and the renovation of the school’s greenhouse.

Park board talks tax levy, park benches By Donna Barker dbarker@bcrnews.com

PRINCETON — The Princeton Park Board has adopted a preliminary tax levy which is basically flat with last year’s. At Monday’s meeting, park district attorney Bob Russell said the 2013 tax levy is money which will be received by the park district in the summer and fall of 2014. The tax levy is based on the district’s Equalized Assessed Valuation (EAV), which was $136,628,001 one year ago, compared to $148,632,159 two years

ago. In talking to Supervisor of Assessments Tom Sweeney, the 2013 EAV for the park district is expected to be basically the same as in the previous year, about $137 million, the attorney said. The proposed 2013 tax levy extension is $484,000 for the regular funds in the budget, plus another $811,725 for the general obligation bonds which will be issued by the park district. The estimated 2013 tax rate is about 35 cents for the regular funds, with another 59 cents for the bonds, for a total of about 94

cents. The 2012 tax rate totaled 95 cents. The proposed tax levy extension represents an overall decrease of about $14,530 from the previous year, Russell said. After the presentation and adoption of the preliminary tax levy, the board authorized Russell to send letters to the four local banks to seek bids for the needed general obligation bonds. A bond hearing will be held in November, with the bonds expected to be awarded at the park board’s Dec. 2 meeting. In other business at Monday’s meeting, executive director

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From Page 1 Mudge also noted customers of the aggregation program do receive calls from other companies trying to get their business. He urged customers to be very careful with these callers as some of them are simply asking for the customer’s account number and then switching the customer to a new provider without the actual consent of the individual. He wanted to assure all customers if they have any questions about their electricity service to contact Rock River Energy at 815732-4603. In other business at Monday’s meeting, the board opened the sealed bid for the 25-foot extension to the Hansen property. This extension was added to the original property and the sale of this 25-foot extension was published separately. The village received

Elaine Russell reported six new memorial park benches will be installed this fall along the Zearing Park walking path. Plus, another bench has been purchased and will be installed next year, along with hopefully more benches, Russell said. As reported earlier in the Bureau County Republican, there are 16 locations marked for the new benches, with those sites chosen in conjunction with future picnicking locations, future shade from newly planted trees and potential shelters around the pond.

The total cost of each memorial bench will be either $1,585 or $1,737, depending on the size of the memorial plaque purchased to go on the bench. Each bench is 6 feet long and will be installed on a concrete slab. In still other business at Monday’s meeting, recreation coordinator Nick Davis gave an update on the work and programs he has done since being hired in August, as well as future programs which he wants to consider for the future. Comment on this story at www.bcrnews.com.

a sealed bid from Ronald and Barb VonHolten in the amount of $700 for the purchase of this 25-foot extension. The VonHoltens were the successful bidders on the original Hansen tract. The board approved the sale of this additional property and passed the necessary ordinance approving this sale. The board reviewed the work which is continuing on the water tower maintenance project. Some additional welding and some other issues have required additional work. Because of these items, the project will probably take a little longer. Also, the changing weather conditions may cause the project to be extended slightly. The tower exterior will be pressure-washed and cleaned. The board wanted to assure residents the surrounding fire departments have been contacted with regard to the amount of water the village currently has in storage. Those depart-

ments are available to be called upon if an emergency situation should occur. Board member Aaron Staker reported the Community Improvement committees are continuing their work and requested the temporary committees be allowed to continue for six more months. The board agreed to this request. Staker also reported a community survey has been prepared and will be sent to all residents in the near future. Board member Tom Stone led a discussion regarding the possible authorization of golf carts and ATVs to be driven on village streets. After discussion by all members, the board agreed this item would be put on the agenda for the Nov. 4 board meeting. At that time, the board will review the current ordinances for village traffic and additional discussion will be held. Comment on this story at www.bcrnews.com.


3 Local Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Local

Thursday, October 24, 2013 • 3

Hydrants will be flushed in DePue DEPUE — The village of DePue will flush fire hydrants Oct. 29-30. If water is discolored, let run until clear.

Mabry candidate for county treasurer By Donna Barker dbarker@bcrnews.com

PRINCETON — Princeton resident Courtney Yates-Mabry has announced her candidacy for the office of Bureau County Treasurer. Mabry will run on the Republican Party ticket in the March 2014 primary election. Current county treasurer Nina Urbanowski, who has held the office for 20 years, has announced she will not seek re-election. In the press release announcing her candidacy, Mabry said she has worked under Urbanowski for the past eight years. During that time, she has gained a thorough understanding of how a wellfunctioning treasurer’s office should operate. She believes she can maintain that high standard of service while creating a more modern way of managing the county’s finances, Mabry said. “I’m going to truly miss working with Nina, I’ll have big shoes to fill,”

Mabry said. “I truly enjoy the work I do and will maintain the high standard that she has set.” Mabry Born and raised in Wyanet, Mabry is the daughter of Bruce and Shelley Yates. Mabry graduated in 2000 from Bureau Valley High School in Manlius. After graduation, she worked at Amsouth Bank in Fort Myers, Fla., before returning to Wyanet and beginning work at Citizens First National Bank. She later worked in the Bureau County Circuit Clerk’s office under Mike Miroux before moving to the treasurer’s office. “I just fell into something that I like to do,” Mabry said. “My time working with Nina has been an honor and a learning experience. It has made me the most qualified candidate to serve Bureau County.” She married her husband, Josh Mabry, in

2006. Her husband, a lifelong Princeton resident, works both at Pioneer Hi-Bred International and as a self-employed contractor. The Mabrys welcomed their children, twins Owen and Olivia, in June 2010, and attend Northwood Community Church in Peoria. Looking again at her decision to run for the office of county treasurer, Mabry said her time in the Bureau County Treasurer’s office, working directly under Nina Urbanowski, has taught her how to effectively manage the county finances as well as efficiently and effectively run and manage the office. At the same time, Mabry said she believes she can update the county treasurer’s office by using modern technology that would be more convenient for county taxpayers and would streamline and ease the way the county manages its finances. Comment on this story at www.bcrnews.com.

Food for Fines program to kick off By Goldie Currie gcurrie@bcrnews.com

SPRING VALLEY — The Richard A. Mautino Memorial Public Library is among several area libraries participating in the fourth annual Food for Fines amnesty program that will benefit local food panties. From Nov. 11 to Nov. 23, the library will accept canned or boxed non-perishable food donations for payment of overdue fines. Each donated food item pays $1 in library fines. Patrons can bring up to 25 food items to pay off $25 worth of overdue fees. Library director Barbara White said the program is beneficial in many ways for the community. “It gives our patrons an opportunity to take care of their fines at the library, and at the same time patrons can help someone else in need in the community with food,” she said. All food items collected at the library in Spring Valley will be delivered to Project Success of Eastern Bureau County’s Hall Township Food Pantry. “The program is nice to get area libraries working together for a common cause,” White said.

Other libraries taking part in the Food for Fines program include GravesHume Public Library of Mendota, LaSalle Public Library, Oglesby Public Library, Peru Public Library and Putnam County Public Library. Patrons who don’t have overdue fees, but wish to donate non-perishable food are welcome to do so. Patrons are asked to bring food donations to the circulation desk. “I would like to see most of our patrons with fines take advantage of this program, but realistically the number taking advantage of the program will probably be much lower,” White said. “However, whatever amount of food that is collected here at the library, it will definitely benefit someone.” Donated food is not accepted for lost or damaged books, replacement of cards or interlibrary loan fees. Because of food safety concerns, the pantries request items be in their original packaging. Damaged packages, outdated food or glass containers are not acceptable. Suggested food items include canned vegetables, fruit, soups, boxed stuffing mix, cereals, pasta mixes and canned meats.

For questions or more information, contact the Richard A. Mautino Memorial Public Library at 815-663-4741. Comment on this story at www.bcrnews.com.

BCR photo/Amelia Bystry

Weekend show Heather Brown handles one of several booths set up at the Oct. 19 craft and vendor show at the Bureau County Christian Center, known as the People’s Church, on the north edge of Princeton. As the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays approach, area residents are given opportunities throughout the area to look for creative gift and celebration ideas.

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BCR photo/Donna Barker

Browsing time An area resident takes time from her day to attend Saturday’s craft and vendor show sponsored at the Bureau County Metro Center in Princeton. The show offered browsers a wide variety of goods and services. In addition to having a good time shopping, participants also showed their support of the community by bringing canned goods to help stock the shelves at the local food pantry.

Garbage From Page 1 The mayor also asked people who may see someone dumping unwanted items at the recycling center to get the license plate number of the vehicle and to bring that information to the Princeton Police Station or city hall. City officials will take it from there, which could include issuing tickets, Cain said. The misuse of the recycling center has increased during the last couple years, possibly with increased costs for landfills, the mayor said. In other business at Monday’s meeting, Commissioner Joel Quiram requested an update on the city’s new water treatment plant, located in the city’s technology park. In response, City Manager Jeff Clawson said the new water treatment plant is about 99.9 percent completed. There are about 13 items left on the final punch list, with most of those items dealing with administrative issues. All the problematic things, like piping, have been resolved, he said. The only remaining issue is the extended warranty for the piping system since it wasn’t manufactured properly, Clawson said. The city will ask for some type of performance bond to guarantee the performance of the

pipes in the long term. But overall, everything is looking pretty positive with the new plant, the city manager said. In still other business, Commissioner Bob Warren requested an update on the Habanero’s Mexican Grill and Cantina building on South Main Street which was damaged by fire earlier this year. City Clerk Pete Nelson said he spoke with the owners of the building a couple weeks ago and it appears the insurance companies are beginning to soften a little bit in their conversations. There are some structural issues with a neighboring building which prevents the owners from moving forward with the demolition of the Habanero’s building. As soon as there is some guarantee about the coverage of any potential damage to the neighboring building, the demolition is expected go forward, Nelson said. Warren said the city faced a similar issue last year with the building on the South Main Street/Park Avenue West corner. That problem lasted eight months before the city stepped in and got something done. He doesn’t want the same thing to happen with the Habanero’s building, Warren said. Nelson said he would get an update for the council. Comment on this story at www.bcrnews.com.

BCR photo/Donna Barker

Braving the elements Employee Ron Baggs corrals the shopping carts in the Princeton Walmart parking lot during Tuesday afternoon’s snowstorm that hit the Bureau County area. The Princeton Water Treatment Plant recorded 1.5 inches of snow fell during Tuesday’s first snow of the season. WQAD meteorologist James Zahara said Tuesday’s snowfall actually ties the 1913 snow event as the third earliest date of a measurable snow in the Quad Cities area.

Princeton Council takes action on items By Donna Barker dbarker@bcrnews.com

PRINCETON — The Princeton City Council conducted the following business at Monday’s meeting in city hall: • Approved ambulance agreements with the Princeton Rural Fire Protection District and the Malden, Ohio and Bureau fire protection districts. Princeton Rural Fire Protection District will pay 90 percent of its annual tax levy to the city, or $100,000, whichever is greater. The Bureau Fire Protection District will pay $7,000 per year. The Malden Fire Protection District will pay $18,000 per year. The Ohio Fire Protection District will pay $17,655 per year. • Adopted an ordi-

DePue From Page 1 course with an average grade or better. A new policy is in the making and the board will take action on it at its November meeting. Also on Monday, the board reviewed and approved its Fiscal Year 2013 audit. Otto explained the auditor had found two weaknesses in the way checks and balances are recorded on the treasurer’s report and the bank reconciliations. Otto said he had already sat down with the school bookkeeper to come up with a way to fix the con-

nance authorizing the issuance of general obligation refunding bonds, Series 2010, in an aggregate principal amount not to exceed $515,000. On Tuesday, City Manager Jeff Clawson said the council looked at refinancing five separate bond issues at its Oct. 7 meeting, but the reason only one issue was addressed Monday with an ordinance was because of the type of bonds. The bonds addressed at Monday’s meeting were revenue bonds, which required the ordinance adopted by the council. The other four bond issues, combined with Monday’s bond issue, will be refinanced after all of the steps are completed, probably in January. The total savings

on the bonds, addressed at the Oct. 15 meeting, will generate $22,000 during the life of the bonds. However, the other four issues will generate about $300,000 over their lives, Clawson said. • Approved a request from Doug and Jodi Hansen to rezone property, located at approximately 1856 W. Railroad Ave., from Manufacturing M-2 to Residential R-1-A in order to use the building on the property for residential use. • Passed a resolution establishing depositories and authorities for city funds at Heartland Bank & Trust Company, Midland States Bank, Centrue Bank and Central Bank. • Approved payment of

siderations from the auditor. In other news, the board: • Approved a set tuition for out-of-district students for Fiscal Year 2014 to be $7,265. • Approved the purchase of an activity bus for an amount not to

exceed $14,000. • Approved the hiring of Brenda Salas as junior high dance coach, Angela Richardson as assistant junior high boys basketball coach and Peter Perkins as high school girls basketball coach. Comment on this story at www.bcrnews.com.

Wish this Courthouse Beauty Happy 65th! Love Charlie & family

bills as follows: $65,182 in Public Affairs and the Department of Accounts and Finances; $77,536 in the Department of Streets and Public Improvements; $127,000 in Public Health, Safety and Civil Defense; and $2,525,595 in Public Property Utilities, which included $1.2 million to Vissering Construction Company for work on the new water treatment plant. • Heard as Mayor Keith Cain proclaimed this week, Oct. 20-26, as the General Federation of Women’s Club’s Advocates for Children Week in Princeton. • Set trick or treat hours for 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Oct. 31. Comment on this story at www.bcrnews.com. IN LOVING MEMORY OF

CHRIS GRADY Oct. 31, 1948 to October 24, 2011

Our family chain is broken, and nothing seems the same, but as God calls us one by one, the chain will link again. We loved you so much Chris. We miss your happy smile and your kind gentle ways. Love from your Family, Mom, Karen & Paul Hopman, Gary & Deb Grady, Cathy & Jim Nickelsen & Families


5 Obit Records Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Obituaries Lawrence Cade Sr. PRINCETON — Lawrence R. Cade Sr., 83, of Princeton, formerly of Wyanet, died Sunday, Oct. 20, 2013, at Liberty Village in Princeton. Cremation rites were accorded. There will be no services. The Garland Funeral Home in Walnut is handling the arrangements.

Rita Adams RALEIGH, N.C. — Rita May Adams, 80, of Raleigh, N.C., passed away Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2013. She was born Oct. 6, 1933, in Princeton to Melvin and Juanita May. She was a member of Our Savior Lutheran Church. She was also a member of many civic organizations and clubs. Surviving is her husband of 52 years, Wayne Adams of Raleigh, N.C.; one son, Rita Adams Robert (Kim) Palmer of Raleigh, N.C.; one daughter, Sally Palmer of Murrells Inlet, S.C.; four grandchildren, Logan and Taylor Palmer, and Brooke and Justin Hobbs of Raleigh, N.C.; one sister, Carol (Rex) Bass of Enterprise, Ala.; one brother, Col. (retired) Robert C. (Susan) May of Accokeek, Md.; and numerous nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her parents; and two sons, Mark and Mike Adams. A memorial service will be at 11 a.m. Saturday at Our Savior Lutheran Church in Raleigh, N.C. The family will receive friends beginning at 9:30 a.m. prior to the service. Memorials may be directed to the Concordian Seminary Student Aid program and sent to Our Savior Lutheran Church, 1500 Glenwood Ave., Raleigh, NC 27608.

Police reports Spring Valley Police Aggravated assault

Carl J. Telford, 37, of Spring Valley was charged with aggravated assault in his home at 212 W. Cleveland St. at 12:42 a.m. Oct. 17.

Warrant arrest

Christina Mandujano, 43, of Spring Valley was picked up in her home at 320 E. Dakota St. at 5 p.m. Oct. 18 on a Putnam County warrant for failure to appear for driving under the influence.

Levi sentenced to one year in prison PRINCETON — Pamela S. Levi, 31, of Princeton was sentenced to one year in the Illinois Department of Corrections for the Class 4 felony of unlawful possession of a controlled substance, heroin on Oct. 10 by Associate Circuit Judge C. J. Hollerich. In addition to the prison sentence, Levi was ordered to pay fines, fees and court costs totaling $2,212 by June 27, 2014. The court found the offense was committed as a result of the use of a controlled substance. On Jan. 5, a DePue police officer stopped a vehicle operated by Levi for a violation of the Illinois Vehicle Code. In speaking with Levi, the police officer believed, based on his experience, that Levi was under the influence of a controlled substance. Levi consented to a search of her person where heroin in an amount less than one gram was found. Levi was then taken into custody and charged with possession of a controlled substance. Levi’s prior criminal record include Bureau County convictions for obstructing a peace officer in 2000 and retail theft in 2012.

Miceli receives prison sentence PRINCETON — Daniel P. Miceli, 26, of Princeton has been resentenced to one year in the Illinois Department of Corrections after he admitted to violating his probation by Associate Circuit Judge C. J. Hollerich. In addition to the resentencing to prison, Miceli was ordered to pay unpaid probation fees of $570 by June 27, 2014. Miceli had previously been placed on probation on May 11, 2011, for the Class 4 felony of unlawful possession of a controlled substance. On Dec. 23, 2010, Miceli was arrested by TRIDENT task force agents after the agents stopped a vehicle in which Miceli was a passenger. Miceli was searched pursuant to K-9 detection of a controlled substances in the vehicle. Heroin was found on Miceli in the amount less than one gram. Miceli has no prior criminal record.

Thursday, October 24, 2013 • Record & Obit • 5

Grand jury returns indictments PRINCETON — A Bureau County grand jury returned nine indictments when it met Oct. 15 at the Bureau Country Courthouse in Princeton. • Michael L. Donner, 62, and Roger D. Donner, 57, both of Aledo, were indicted for the Class 4 felony of false personation. They are accused of representing themselves to be a peace officer on Sept. 21. Michael Donner is free from custody, having posted 10 percent of a $25,000 bond. Roger Donner is free from custody, having posted 10 percent of a $20,000 bond. Investigator Gary Becket, with the Bureau County Sheriff’s Department, testified before the grand jury. • Kristopher Koch, 30, of Wyanet was indicted for three counts of aggravated criminal sexual abuse. He is accused of performing sexual acts with three Bureau County children between June 1, 2010,

and Nov. 30, 2010. Koch is in custody, with bond set at $40,000. Investigator Amy Reuter, with the Bureau County Sheriff’s Department, testified before the grand jury. • Lee A. Lumpkins Jr., 44, of Ladd was indicted for the Class 4 felony of driving while license revoked/subsequent offense. He is accused of driving a motor vehicle at a time when his license was revoked on Oct. 3. Lumpkins is in custody, with bond set at $20,000. Ladd Police Officer Brian Turpen testified before the grand jury. • Joseph L. Klemencic, 33, of Bureau was indicted for the Class 3 felony of failure to register as a sex offender. He is accused of failing to register as a sex offender on Sept. 14. Klemencic is in custody, with bond set at $10,000. Investigator Gary Becket, with the Bureau County Sheriff’s Department, testified before the grand jury.

• Zachary Hamilton, 21, of Buda was indicted for the Class 4 felonies of unlawful delivery of cannabis and unlawful possession of a controlled substance, heroin. He is accused of delivering cannabis and possessing heroin on Aug. 19. Hamilton is free from custody, having posted 10 percent of a $5,000 bond. Sgt. Mark Thatcher, with the Blackhawk Zone Task Force, testified before the grand jury. • There were three suppressed cases. The indictments were presented to the grand jury by State’s Attorney Patrick Herrmann, First Assistant State’s Attorney Anthony Sciuto and Assistant State’s Attorney Daniel Anderson. The indictments were returned before Judge C. J. Hollerich. Indictments are accusations against the defendants, who are presumed innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.

Meeting Minutes Neponset Village Board NEPONSET — The Neponset Village Board conducted the following business at its Oct. 16 meeting: • Approved the payment of bills as presented. The bill for mosquito spraying was quite high and it was suggested the board have the spraying company call the village clerk each time they come to spray next year so the village can keep better track of the costs. • Approved the additional cost of $2,1000 for a required single audit for 2013 due to the amount of money borrowed by the village from the government. There will probably have to be another single audit next year due to the timing of the village’s loan for the water treatment plant. The village has received a letter from the Environmental Protection Agency saying the village has passed the final inspection, is in compliance and moving along in the right direction. • Willett Hofmann will be the environmental consultants for the sewer treatment plant and Larry Griffiths will be the new A operator for the sewer treatment plant through Willett Hofmann. • Heard from trustee Mandy Mueller that she is looking into Homeland Security grants, but no information is available due to the government shutdown. • Trustee Eugene Costin reported no new business. • Trustee Ken Snyder reported his sister is going to contact the board to have another trailer put on her property and he will not be involved due to conflict of interest. • Trustee Barb Jannie reported on the Halloween party and trick or treating by hayrack. • Trustee John Pratt reported he was in contact

with a resident who had gasoline stolen from her lawnmower in her front yard. Pratt also reported Neponset Pride will buy the paint and then paint the community building on Nov. 9. Neponset Pride would like others to get the walls ready for the painting, Pratt said. • Trustee Wayne Gerrond reported Martin Engineering has asked for a compound meter for the water service on Route 34. Gerrond also distributed the first job description. He also distributed a list of residents who have not complied with the sewer ordinance and have not hooked up to the sewer system. Gerrond suggested the village send letters with options to hook up by May 1, 2014, to the residents. • The board voted to move forward with security cameras, with a maximum price of $1,200. • Mayor Carl Rohrig reported the laptops received from the grant, gotten for the village by Brent DeVenney, could cost more than $800 to get operating systems for them. The village clerk will contact Hewlett Packard to see if the village can get a copy of the original operation system cheaper through them. • The board agreed to put the movie projector back on the agenda for next month, along with the LP tank for the generator. • The board also discussed changing the board meeting time from

7 p.m. to 6 p.m. during the winter months, with further discussion set for the next meeting.

Sheffield Village Board SHEFFIELD — The Sheffield Village Board met on Oct. 7 and conducted the following business: • Approved an ordinance regulating the usage of ATV, UTV and golf carts on village streets and roadways. • Approved to deny the request by St. Patrick’s Church to pay for mud jacking 18 squares of sidewalk. The village has no policy on mud jacking of sidewalks. • Engineer Michael Richetta informed the board that excess/loose gravel had been swept from the seal coated streets and only one bid had been received for the curbing project and it had come in at almost twice the estimated cost. He advised the board to rebid in the spring. The project was tabled until next spring. • Village employees reported to the Bureau County Sheriff’s Department that someone had done “donuts” on the west end of the cemetery. • The board looked at state bids for possibly replacing one of the pickup trucks and squad car. The board requested more specific costs before any action would be taken. • A public meeting was held prior to the regular

Chris Grady

October 31, 1948 - October 24, 2011

Today recalls the memory Of a loved one gone to rest, And those who think of him today Are those who loved him best. The flowers we lay upon his grave May wither and decay, But the love for him who lies beneath Will never fade away. We miss you, Chris.

board meeting. Only one public member was in attendance. • There was a question regarding trailers and mobile homes that could be in violation of an ordinance for not being on hard surfaces. • A letter will be sent to zoning regarding the property along the highway near the tracks. • Superintendent Leif Porter requested permission to purchase an auger for the tractor/mower and had a bid from Holland’s for $1,176. The auger would be needed to install the wood posts for the new reflective stop signs. A trustee stated he had an auger the village could use if it would fit on the tractor. • The Water Committee met on Sept. 26. The committee recommended the board look into hand held electronic recorder and long-term replacement of water meters. • The board would like to schedule a representative from a water meter company to speak about meter accuracy at the first meeting in November. • Porter reported that a new TV was installed in the community center, the cemetery was doing the last clean up and mowing. Alleys are being graveled and bushes trimmed back in streets and alleys, Mike Minnaert is helping with garbage. Also, blacktop patching is continuing on streets and water meters were read and some still are not operating.


6 Perspective 6 • Thursday, October 24, 2013

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Perspective Bureau County

Republican

Serving Bureau County Since 1847

Sam R Fisher

Terri Simon

Publisher

Editor

Learning while experiencing As ideas for columns rarely come to my mind until the day before they are due (which is a stressful and difficult deal for me), a friend suggested I check out an operation I wasn’t quite familiar with and see what sort of inspiration came my way for the next column rotation. While I was a little hesitant with this idea at first, he was quick to say he could pull a few strings and COMMENTARY get me in at the Ladd Elevator Co. I shrugged at the idea at first and even placed the consideration in the back of my mind until the date of my next column was beginning to come in sight and, of course, I was once again clueless on a topic. Going out on a whim, I finally agreed. A grain elevator is serious business in the midst of harvest season, so I figured it would be interesting to witness the ins and outs of farmers hauling crops in from fields and workers weighing, pricing and testing crops as they moved across a scale. Oddly enough, I picked the afternoon to sit-in on the season’s first snow fall. As you might guess it, not a whole lot was going on that day. Most farmers were home by the time I had made my way to Ladd through the huge, wet snowflakes. Even when things don’t go as planned or don’t work out as envisioned, reporters have to improvise, move on and see what they can pull from an experience. As I drove into the deserted business and sloshed my way through the mud into the door, I was greeted by several friendly faces. As I called for the man I was suppose to sit down and talk to, three men pointed at once to where he was sitting in his office in the way back. He was quick to push a co-worker to sit down and share a little bit about how an elevator business functions. I’ve lived in Bureau County for three years, but before that lived in Lansing, Mich., where elevators are far and few between. Therefore, the very basics of what happens at an elevator were interesting tidbits for me to write down in my notebook. Reporters are a resource for the basics on several topics, so this experience was just adding a page to my knowledge about farming, harvesting and the process of drying corn. I’m sure it was humorous for the elevator employees to see a short reporter walk in with a giant red purse and ask questions about why it’s important to dry to corn and just really how hot grain dryers can be. Getting to see old pictures of when the elevator moved to its current location in the early ‘70s was interesting and learning that 3.6 million bushels of corn and soybeans can be held at that location is, I think, just too big of a thought to really wrap my mind around. I asked employees what they liked most about working at the elevator and some just smiled and rubbed their fingers together while others explained it was a great business to work for and was close to home. I wish I could have witnessed the hurry scurry part of the business. The employees all explained the regular hectic conditions that happen on a non-snowy day during harvest season. They all welcomed me back to elevator when the weather was a little sunnier and when wives of farmers were going to be bringing in a feast. While I just laughed at the offer and politely said thank you, it just might not be the last time they see this short little reporter with the big red purse walk through their door. BCR Staff Writer Goldie Currie can be reached at gcurrie@bcrnews.com.

Goldie Currie

First Person Spencer Thomas Parry City: Princeton. Where did you grow up: Princeton. Family: Mom, Kim; stepdad, Steve; dad, Tim; brothers, Christian and Aiden; stepbrother, Zeke; sister, Addison. Pets: Vinny the dog. Occupation: Sophomore at PHS. What is the last song you listened to: “What Does the Fox Say.” What is the last book you read: “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows.” What is the last television show you watched: “Walking Dead.” If you were stranded on a desert island and could have just

one meal for the rest of your life, what would it be: Chicken Parmesan. If you were stranded on a desert island and could take only one thing with you, what would it be: My iPad. What is your favorite local restaurant: Park Tavern. If someone handed you a million dollars, how would you spend it: A college education

because that’s about what it costs. People would be surprised to know that you: Successfully ordered my own debit card online at the age of 8. What is your favorite thing about the city you live in: Haunted Fairgrounds this time of year. If you could change one thing about your town, what would it be: More to do for high school students.

TO Letter THE Editor

A chilling comparison To the Editor, Recently I did some research on the Columbine school shooting for a psychology class, and the parallels between Littleton, Colo., and Princeton, Ill., were chilling. When I read the research by Mai and Alpert regarding the rigid stereotypes of masculinity at Columbine High School, and their huge division between the “jock culture” and the “nerds,” I felt very concerned about our kids in Princeton. There is no doubt that Princeton is a “sports community.” If you’re not an athlete and you are male, you have two choices: to join the “nerds” or to join the

“thugs.” Either way you are going to be ridiculed. The “nerds” are called effeminate and the thugs are called pot heads. The truth is we have just as many “jocks” in Princeton who are drinking or doing drugs, but it tends to be swept under the rug “for the good of the team.” Our adolescent boys are struggling to find their way as men by watching their fathers. And, it all starts out on the Zearing Park soccer field with our pre-school students. Time and time again I have witnessed parents screaming at small children to be more aggressive, to get in there, to try harder. These parents are teaching our kids that the most important thing in

life is to be a winner, at any cost. My son’s class, for example, has many talented athletes. They should be commended for their dedication and hard work. However, many of these kids have had opportunities in life that our non-athletic boys have not had available to them. These athletic boys have had more positive male role models, more time playing catch in the backyard and greater access to expensive traveling sports teams. Does this mean that they should feel guilty? No, not at all. But perhaps a little understanding passed down from their parents would be helpful. My son’s class, while having an abundance of excellent athletes, also

has, in my opinion, the greatest amount of bullying amongst boys. Maybe it is time we took a good look at the correlation here and spent some time teaching our kids about respect and tolerance. The school has done a great job this year of hosting bullying prevention programs to try and prevent physical violence between our boys. As parents, we need to take a look at what we are teaching our boys about being masculine in a violent world. If becoming a man in this town means being the best, the strongest and the meanest, we have some serious problems facing us in the very near future. Jamie Libby Princeton

Letters Policy The Bureau County Republican will print letters of interest to our readers. Send letters to: Readers opinions, P.O. Box 340, Princeton, IL 61356; fax (815) 875-1235; or email to opinion@bcrnews.com. Letters may be edited for length or clarity. Correct names and hometowns must be included with letters to be published. Telephone numbers are needed to verify the authenticity of letters but will not be published.

When & Where Anniversaries: Typically runs one week before the anniversary unless specified. Auction calendar: Information provided by local auctioneers. Runs in the Thursday Bureau County Journal and the Saturday Bureau County Republican. Births: Runs in the Saturday Bureau County Republican. Business & Agriculture: Runs in the Thursday and Saturday Bureau County Republican.

Education: Runs each publication, space permitting. Events Calendar: Runs each publication, space permitting. Letters to the Editor: Runs each publication. Opinions of 500 words or less. Make Someone Happy: Runs each publication. Obituaries: Runs each publication. Perspective: Runs each publication.

PeaceBuilders: Runs in the Thursday paper during the school year. Police reports: Runs each publication, space permitting. Religion Page: Runs in the Thursday paper. Wedding/engagements: Runs every other Thursday. Call the Bureau County Republican at (815) 875-4461 with any questions about deadlines or when a particular news item will publish.


7 Life Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Life&Arts Community Notes Halloween Parade SPRING VALLEY — The annual Spring Valley Halloween Parade sponsored by the Spring Valley Lions Club will begin at 1 p.m. Saturday. Registration will take place from 12 to 12:45 p.m. at the Spring Valley Patient Accounts Billing Office parking lot, West St. Paul Street, Spring Valley. All children in pre-kindergarten through sixth grade can participate. Prizes will be awarded for the nest costumes in each grade level. The parade will begin in the parking lot and proceed east on St. Paul Street to the mini park where judging will take place. For more information, contact Barb Fulara at 815-663-1119.

Craft show TONICA — The Tonica Volunteer Fire Department will host a craft show from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday at the fire department on Route 251 on the north end of Tonica. There will be a door raffle. All proceeds go to the fire department.

Halloween party MINERAL — The Mineral-Gold Fire Department will host a Halloween party from 5 to 7 p.m. Sunday at the fire department. There will be contests, games, prizes and food.

Octoberfest supper LADD — The Ladd Men’s Club will host an Octoberfest supper from 4 to 8 p.m. Monday at the Ladd Moose Club Lodge. The menu will be pork loin and brats plus all the traditional German side dishes. A free hot dog plate is available for children ages 8 and under. There will also be free delivery for Ladd residents. Al Pottinger and the Lincolnaires will entertain from 5 to 7 p.m. Tickets are $12 each. All proceeds benefit community of Ladd. Call 815-3032859 or 815-894-2557 for tickets and information.

Dedication ceremony TAMPICO — The dedication ceremony for the Ronald Reagan Boyhood Statue and Memorial Walkway will take place at 1:30 p.m. Nov. 3 at Reagan Park in Tampico. J. David Arnold, president of Eureka College, will be the speaker. For more information, contact Joan Johnson at 815-622-8705 or garyjoan@thewisp.net. Refreshments will be served in the Tampico Historical Society Museum following the ceremony.

Thursday, October 24, 2013 • 7 Religion — Lots of area churches are hosting dinners, craft and vendor shows and welcoming a new pastor. See Page 9.

Wedding Aisle – Area couples share their engagement and weddings announcements. See Page 8.

Rotary donates $10,680 to End Polio Now PRINCETON — Princeton Rotary raised $3,560 with the Gates Foundation matching these dollars two-for-one, for a total of $10,680 to benefit the Rotary International End Polio Now campaign at its Princeton Rotary Foundation dinner on Oct. 22. Rotary International’s End Polio Now efforts have led to a polio-free India. The last case of polio recorded there was in Janurary 2011. In 1988, there were 125 polio-endemic countries and 71 polio-free contries. Today, there are only 3 polio-endemic countries and 193 poliofree countries. Every 60 cents given to End Polio Now pays for one child’s vaccination. The $10,680 raised by Princeton Rotary and the Gates Foundation will pay for 17,800 polio vaccines. Princeton Rotarian John Weborg shared his story. He was 15 years old when he was affected by polio. He had come home to Pender, Iowa, after a fishing trip and felt nauseous. The family doctor was called, and he instructed Weborg’s mother to watch him for more symptoms. Overnight, Weborg had a fever and pain in his leg. “We called the doctor back to the farm,” Weborg said. “He never even opened his bag. He put his hand on my neck, and it wouldn’t bend. He stood up and couldn’t

Photo contributed

Princeton Rotarians and their guests hold their fingers together to symbolize how close Rotary is to eradicating polio. The Princeton Rotary and the Gates Foundation raised $10,680 for End Polio Now. even face my mother and said ‘I’m afraid he has polio.’” Weborg was taken to Sioux City, Iowa for treatment by Dr. Harrington. “Dr. Harrington said to my father, ‘I do not want you to go home for two weeks. I don’t know what type of polio he will have. All we can do is watch and wait.’ That’s what I mean when I say that polio is biological terrorism,” Weborg said. When the polio had finally stopped spreading through Weborg’s body, he was paralyzed from the waist down. “Then it was time to start physical therapy,” said Weborg. “I have never in my life had pain equal to that of physical

therapy for polio.” Weborg never knew if he would be able to walk again. The goal of his therapy was not for him to be able to walk, but for him to be able to raise his leg to a 90-degree angle without the aid of anesthetics. “The doctor asked, ‘John, do you want to get out of bed?’ He never used the word walk, which I now understand was because he would have been promising more than he knew he could deliver,” said Weborg. Weborg’s therapy included hydrotherapy and a daily ritual of trying to walk using metal pipes and collapsing. “Recovery is a matter of willpower and per-

sistence,” said Weborg. “And you always discover progress by accident. You do something today that you didn’t do yesterday, but you can’t plan for it.” After 10 weeks of hospitalization and physical therapy, Weborg was able to walk again, and without the aid of braces. Today Weborg has post-polio syndrome and scoliosis brought on by polio. He experiences more fatigue these days and requires the aid of a cane, but can still walk on his own. For more information on the Princeton Rotary and how to contribute to End Polio Now, contact Princeton Rotary President Phil Kaufmann at 815-872-2261.

Memorial service PRINCETON — Perry Memorial Hospital and Bureau Valley Volunteer Hospice will honor the memory of those patients that passed away in their care during the past year during a service at 2 p.m. Nov. 3 in the lower level conference room of the hospital. This service is open to anyone who has experienced a loss. A memorial card, which will be read during the service, may be completed. To receive a card or for more information, call Connie Sutton at 815-876-4433. Light refreshments will be served after the service.

Stroke detection screening PRINCETON — The Bureau County Farm Bureau is offering wellness screening from 8:35 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 4 at 535 Elm Place, Princeton. Stroke Detection Plus, a mobile vascular screening company, uses ultrasound technology to detect blockages in arteries and vessels of the body. The screenings performed include: carotid arteries, abdominal aortic aneurysm, peripheral artery disease and osteoporosis. The cost for Farm Bureau members is $100 and $135 for community members. Appointments are required. To set up an appointment, call 1-877-7328258.

Make Someone Happy • Happy birthday to George Woosnam. From Our Table bunch at the Methodist church. • Happy birthday today, Thursday, to John Donofrio. Love, Grandpa and Grandma. • Happy birthday on Saturday to Allen Losey. Love, Dad and Betty Ann. • Happy birthday to the Recipe Lady, Judy Dyke. From your friends and family.

thank you!

I want to say thank you to the following people that helped us sell Homestead Festival 50/50 raffle tickets before and during the Homestead weekend. The Homestead lead couples and I thank you for your support and time spent selling tickets. This year’s sale was a big success in part because of the time you gave volunteering to help out a great cause. I look forward to next year; let’s sell $20,000.00 worth next year!!! Mary Wallis andreW Wallis Mike Vrana debbie Vrana rex ChaMberlain aMi ChaMberlain bill nelson dorothy nelson traCy Makransky riCk Clary JiM Miller karen Miller keVin GloVer Patti sChMitt andreW sChMitt daniel sChMitt JaMie sMith Jason sMith

rendel russell kyle MCMillan Jodi MCMillan rex lasson sherri Murray toM WaGner diane WaGner triCia MusselMan Cindy MusselMan daVe biddix Cheryl biddix sue Fandel Callie snyder tad sMith Paul britt lynn Farrell GreG Farrell

I hope I didn’t miss anyone and if I did please excuse me. Thanks Everyone H. Scott Wallis 2013 homestead Festival 50/50 raffle Chair


8 Life 8 • Thursday, October 24, 2013

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Thanks Neighbor

Uher-Kammueller William and Beth Uher of Tiskilwa are announcing the engagement of their daughter, Michelle Elizabeth, to Nicholas James Kammueller. He is the son of James and Debbie Kammueller of Peoria. The bride-elect is a graduate of St. Bede Academy, Quincy University and the University of Illinois at Springfield. She is employed by the Illinois Association of School Boards. Her fiancé is a graduate of Dunlap High School and Bradley University. He is employed by the Illinois Department of

Greatly appreciated To the Editor, I would like to thank whoever it was that paid for our dinner at Red’s on Saturday night, Oct. 18. Your generosity was greatly appreciated. Jeannie Jarigese Buda

Thank you for support To the Editor, Many thanks to our wonderful guests who support our recent spaghetti supper. And thanks to those who supported our special project of the silent auction. We deeply appreciate all of your support for our fundraisers and look forward to seeing you in the spring. Carol Allicks President, ALA 125 Princeton

IVCIL workshop LASALLE — The Illinois Valley Center for Independent Living and Family Matter PTIC will hold a free special education workshop from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Nov. 7 in the IVCIL conference room. The program, positive interventions and IDEA: new opportunities for teaching

Commerce and Economic Opportunity. The couple will be married June 21, 2014, in Peoria.

Mr. and Mrs. Brandon (Melissa) Ackerman

Read-Ackerman

and learning, will teach about functional behavior assessments, teaching expected behaviors and positive behavior interventions in the IEP. Registration is due by Oct. 31. To register, call Marla at 815-224-3126, ext. 23 or register online at www.ivcil.com.

Melissa Read of Princeton and Brandon Ackerman of Walnut were united in marriage July 20 in the Christ Community Church in Princeton by Pastor Brian Strom. Nuptial music was provided by Sheila Johnsen, pianist. Torri Price, friend of the couple, was the matron of honor. Bridesmaids were Katie Dye, friend of the couple, Jessica Ackerman, sister of the groom, Carina Gonet, friend of the couple, and Hope Crouch, friend of the couple. Emma Dye, friend of the couple, was the flower girl. Andrew Ackerman, brother of the groom, served as best man. Groomsmen were Jesse Benson, friend of the cou-

‘Saints & Sinners’ PERU — St. Joseph’s Finance Committee will be producing “Saints & Sinners,” a comedy, to raise funds. The performance is at 7 p.m. Nov. 1 at St. Joseph’s Church in Peru, on 5th and Schuyler streets. This is a one-person play written by Vicki Quade

Michelle Uher and Nicholas Kammueller

of the Chicago troupe, Nuns4Fun. Tickets are $35 and a portion of the proceeds will go to the Franciscan Sister of the Sacred Heart who served St. Joseph’s parish. For tickets or more information, call St. Joseph’s Rectory at 815-223-0718.

ple, Chip Read, brother of the bride, Michael Read, brother of the bride, and Eli Crouch, friend of the couple. Ushers were Andy Dye and Kurt Garvin, friends of the couple. Mason Farrell, cousin of the groom, was the ring bearer. A reception to honor the couple was held at the Grand Bear Lodge. After a wedding trip to Cancun, Mexico, the couple is making their home in Princeton. The bride is a 2008 graduate of Judy University. She is employed Mr. and Mrs. Greg (Kayla) Bankes by Princeton Christian Academy. The groom is a 2010 graduate of St. Ambrose Kayla Jane and Greg nah Austin. Sofia was the University. He is Michael Bankes were flower girl. employed by Cargill. united in marriage Aug. Ben Clausen served 17 at A Hundred Acre as best man. GroomsOrchard in Princeton. men were James Bankes, The bride is the daugh- Tony Biagoni, Nick Dykter of Katrina Allen and stra, Josh Bopes, Noah Benjamin Decamp. The Ozburn, Jimmy Nelson, groom is the son of Kathy Brian Dhom and John The New Bedford chapBankes and the late Rich- Patrick McHugh. Liam ter of Royal Neighbors ard Bankes. was the ring bearer. of America invited the The bride wore a long, A reception to honor community for an afterstrapless, white and flowy the couple was held at A noon of bingo on Oct. gown with beading all Hundred Acre Orchard. 7. Prizes were supplied down the side. She carThe bride graduatby the members along ried white gerbera daises ed from Yorkville High with cookies and drinks. and wheat. School in 2010 and is Helen Hardesty called Rachel Barona, sis- attending dental school. the bingo numbers. After ter of the groom, was She is a full-time nanny the games, refreshments the matron of honor. and student. were served. There was Bridesmaids were Annie The groom is a 2005 good conversation with Clausen, Darci Bankes, graduate of Princecommunity friends and Yohanna Enders, Vanes- ton High School. He is the event was enjoyed sa Karper, Laura Bank- employed by Express by all. es-Clark, Jordan Clark, Flighting and is also a Photo contributed Brittney Clark and Han- firefighter for Malden.

Bankes

Bingo in New Bedford

Forum to discuss RICL proposal MENDOTA — The Illinois Commerce Commission has scheduled a second public forum to gather comments on the proposal from Rock Island Clean Line (RICL) to construct, operate and maintain a transmission line. The forum will begin at 7 p.m. Monday in the Men-

dota High School Gym, 152 N. 4453rd Rd. or 152 East U.S. Highway 52, Mendota. People who signed up to provide comments at the initial public forum, but did not have a chance to speak will be given the opportunity to make comments first. Additional speakers will

be given an opportunity to provide public comments if time allows. Rock Island Clean Line LLC submitted a petition with the ICC Oct. 10, 2012 to act as a transmission public utility and to construct, operate and maintain a 500 mile overhead High Voltage Direct Current

transmission line. Oral and written comments will be accepted at the meeting. Comments may also be submitted through the ICC website, www.icc.illinois. gov/docket/comment, or by calling 1-800-5240795. The docket for the case is 12-0560.

••• Items for the Life & Arts section can be emailed to news@bcrnews.com.

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9 Life Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Thursday, October 24, 2013 • Life & Arts • 9

Religion Briefs Fall bazaar and supper

A supper of homemade soups, sandwiches and cookies will be served. The program will be “Walking Through Doors of Opportunity.” There is no need to R.S.V.P. and there is no fee to attend. For more information, call Sue Scruggs at 815875-1446.

BUREAU — The First Congregational Church of Bureau will host its annual fall festival bazaar and supper today, Thursday, in the church fellowship hall. The bazaar and bake sale will begin at 3 p.m. There will be a raffle of miscellaneous items. The supper will be served from 4 to 6:30 p.m. the menu includes chicken casserole, salads, rolls, homemade pies, desserts and beverages. The cost is $8 for adults, $4 for children ages 6-12 and free for children under 5. Carryouts are available. Tickets will be available at the door.

Craft, bake sale PRINCETON — Christ Community Church, 1719 S. Euclid Ave., Princeton, is hosting its third annual craft and bake sale from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Nov. 2. Coffee, hot chocolate and soft drinks as well as lunch items will be available for shoppers to purchase. There will be handmade items and a variety of direct selling companies. For more information or for a list of participating vendors, call the church office at 815-879-3227 or visit Facebook.

Celebrate recovery LASALLE — Grace United Methodist Church, 1345 Chartres St., LaSalle, will host a Celebrate Recovery meeting every Friday evening at the church. A meal is served at 6 p.m. followed by a meeting and worship at 7 p.m., small group sessions at 8 p.m. and Solid Rock Cafe at 9 p.m. All are welcome to attend. For more information, call 815223-1001.

Fall luncheon OHIO — The Immaculate Conception Church will hold its fall luncheon from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday at the Ohio Catholic Church Hall. There will be food and raffles. Raffle tickets are available from any church member or at the door. Adult tickets are $7, student tickets are $4 and preschoolers are free.

Ham dinner WYANET — The Wyanet United Methodist Women will host their autumn ham dinner from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Sunday at the church, 112 W. Main, Wyanet. They will serve ham, potatoes, vegetables, salads, desserts and drinks. The cost for adults is $8, for children Ages 6-12 $4 and free for children under 5 years old.

Bishop’s visit PRINCETON — The Rev. J. Alberto Morales, OSB, the 9th Bishop of the Diocese of Quincy will visit St. Jude’s Anglican Church, 101 Bryant Wood, Princeton, on Sunday. Morales will officiate at the 10:15 a.m. Holy Communion Service with assistance from the Rev. Fr. Kyrill Esposito, OSB. A reception and luncheon will follow at the church.

Photo contributed

Breakout competes in Iowa

St. Matthew’s calls new pastor PRINCETON — St. Matthew’s Lutheran Church on Dover Road in Princeton has announced the calling of its new pastor. In a special congregational meeting held on Sept. 8, the members voted to call Pastor Scott Schmidt as their new pastor. Schmidt comes to St. Matthew’s from All Saints Lutheran Church in Byron and prior was the pastor at Trinity Lutheran Church in Manlius. He will lead his first Sunday service on Oct. 27.

Harvest dinner MALDEN — The Malden United Methodist Church will host its annual Harvest Dinner from 4 to 7 p.m. Sunday. The menu will consist of roast turkey and dressing, mashed potatoes and gravy, vegetables, Jell-o salad, dessert and beverage. Suggested donation for the meal is $8 for adults and $4 for children 12 years old and under. Carryouts will be available.

Harvest Glow Walk CHERRY — The Harvest Glow Walk will take place from 5 to 7 p.m. Sunday

Rake in the SAVINGS

PRINCETON — Christ Community Church, 1719 S. Euclid Ave., Princeton, will hold its third annual Christmas craft and vendor market from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Nov. 2. There will be unique one of a kind items from local artisans, creative gift ideas, door prizes, silent auction and a bake sale.

at Holy Trinity Church hall in Cherry. There will be food, fun and a walk along a glowing path to celebrate harvest season. Dress accordingly. For more information, call Lori Brown at 815-993-8314 or Alice Ring at 815-3037551.

Smorgasbord and bake sale ARLINGTON — St. Patrick Church Altar and Rosary Society will sponsor the annual smorgasbord and bake sale from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Nov. 3 in Bishop Franz Hall. The menu is turkey and dressing, ham, mashed potatoes and gravy, vegetables, salads, dessert and beverage. Tickets for adults are $8, for children under 12 are $3 and free for children under 5. Dinner and raffle tickets can be purchased at the door. Carry-outs are available.

Women at our BEST OGLESBY — Women at our BEST invites area women to attend its next meeting from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Monday at Oglesby Union Church, 100 W. Walnut St. The evening’s events will include a presentation by Kathy Glascock, owner of Girlfriends The Bra Specialists, vocal selections by Sarah Senica and a message by guest speaker, Carolyn Kost. There is no charge for the event. Free nursery service is provided during the event along with home-made refreshments.

Seatonville Church hosts homecoming SEATONVILLE — The Seatonville Congregational Church Independent will be hosting the 85th annual Homecoming on Nov. 3. Sunday school will be moved to 9 a.m. and the worship service will be at 10:30 a.m. The former pastor, Billy Howell, will bring the message. Following the morning service, there will be a potluck dinner for all. Bring a dish to pass.

World Community Day PRINCETON — Church Women United will celebrate World Community Day at 6 p.m. Nov. 1 at the First Lutheran Church in Princeton. All women are invited to attend.

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Lindsey Patrick (left), Addy Kerr, Joseph Patrick, Scott Patrick (instructor), Christian Schaffer, Clayton Brown, Doug Harper and Pastor Jeffery Patrick attended the Mellenia Martial Arts Tournament in Camanche, Iowa on Oct. 12. More than 190 students participated in the tournament. All of the breakout students placed fifth or higher. Breakout Van Orin will be hosting its second annual Invitational Tae Kwon Do Tournament on Nov. 16.

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10 10 • Thursday, October 24, 2013

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com


11 Sports Thursday, October 24, 2013 • 11 On line — Princeton and Mendota met in 1A sectional soccer Wednesday. IHSA cross country regionals on tap Saturday. Visit www.bcrnews.com for details.

2013 BCR Golfer of the Year

Mr. Consistency By Kevin Hieronymus khieronymus@bcrnews.com

Zach Hicks is not a real flashy golfer, one that will post incredibly low scores after another. What he will do is post consistent scores, day after day, meet after meet, week after week. While he broke out with a career-round of 1-under at Deer Valley this season, he was at 40 time after time. For that consistency and his leadership qualifies, Hicks is the 2013 BCR Male Golfer of the Year. Unlike a lot of sports when you are competing against a team, Hicks said the game of golf can be a simple game of mind over matter. “Golf is kind of a different sport. You have your own mind to play. It’s you against everybody else, but it’s kind of you vs. you,” he said. “It’s nice to have that consistency.” He was meet medalist 10 times with a streak taking top honors five times in a row. He advanced to the sectional level in Class 2A shooting an 83 at the LaSalle Regional. “His consistency was by far his biggest strength,” PHS coach Duane Price said. Another attribute which makes Hicks is his leadership. He was a team leader in every way, leading by example with his play and his concern and care for all teammates. It was never about Hicks, but rather how his team did. “Every golf coach would be

See Hicks Page 12

BCR photo/Kevin Hieronymus

Princeton senior libero Mollie Bates makes a dive for a ball to the corner Tuesday night at Sherrard.

Volleyball: PHS def. Sherrard 25-14, 25-9

• 40.3 average. • Class 2A Sectional qualifier. • 10-time meet medalist. • 5 medalists in a row. • Shot a career low, 1-under 35 at Deer Valley. • Princeton senior captain.

khieronymus@bcrnews.com’

BCR photo/Mike Vaughn

SHERRARD — The Princeton Tigresses wrote the final chapter of their first year in Three Rivers Conference volleyball with a 25-14 25-9 win at Sherrard Thursday. The win clinched the league championship in the TRAC South division, finishing at 11-1. Sherrard came in two losses, in position to force a share of the crown with the Tigresses. Princeton wouldn’t have any part of it. They won the first set in convincing fashion and charged out to a 7-0 lead in the second. “The girls are proud of our program and want to leave their mark on that board in Prouty (Gym),” PHS coach Andy Puck

said. “I am so proud of my girls when they execute what we work on in practice. (Tuesday) and the whole conference has been a huge example of this.” Senior Ashley Farraher served four straight points to break open the first set. Alicia Poss delivered the first point with a push shot and Hailey Schultz followed with a kill. Farraher served up an ace and Abby Jaques’ hit made it 17-10. The Tigresses cruised from there, Becca Hult delivering a block for game point at 25-14. Michelle Kelly served up the first seven points of the game in the second set as the Tigresses rolled to the sweep.

See Tigresses Page 13

Red Devils looking to punch playoff ticket By Kevin Hieronymus

7:30 p.m. Friday Princeton at Hall

By Kevin Hieronymus

Princeton senior Zach Hicks was a model of consistency this season, always shooting right around the 40.0 mark. He also had a strong attribute being a team leader.

BCR Game of the Week

0-8, 0-5

Tigresses clinch TRAC South championship

The Zach Hicks File:

khieronymus@bcrnews.com

5-3, 3-2

At a glance: The Red Devils would secure their first playoff appearance since 2009 with their sixth win. ... The long time rivals did not meet last year with Hall entering the Big Rivers Conference in 2012. PHS won their last meeting in 2011, the Tigers’ last victory to date.

SPRING VALLEY — After taking a year off, the Hall Red Devils and Princeton Tigers will do battle once again on the gridiron. Hall made its departure a year early to the former Big Rivers football conference in 2012 and Princeton followed with the league expansion of the Three Rivers Conference,

which brought back football. Not only does the BCR Game of the Week renew an ages old rivalry that Bureau County fans circle on their calendars, it comes with playoff implications and seeding for Hall. The Red Devils have become playoff eligible by winning their last two games over St. Bede and Kewanee to improve to 5-3. They would like to seal the deal with

win No. 6, though they likely would have enough playoff points to get there with five wins. “We have talked to the kids all week about how important it is to keep the momentum going into the playoffs, that we really need to get that sixth win and take a four-game win streak into week 10,” Hall coach Randy Tieman said. “I believe that we will come ready to play.

We didn’t get to play Princeton last year and that has always been a big rivalry game for us. Our guys are looking forward to starting the rivalry up again.” Second-year Princeton head coach Jesse Snyder, who was a Tiger assistant the last time the teams met, said it’s exciting to have the opportunity to renew the rivalry.

See Game Page 14

Golf grows on El Paso-Gridley’s Colmone Ken Colmone never played golf for Hall High School, receiving nine varsity letters in football, basketball and baseball. When he moved to El Paso to take a teaching job, they built a home on the El Paso Golf Course. His oldest son, Jake, took a liking to golf and El Paso-Gridley

Kevin Hieronymus HIERONYMUS’ HYPOTHESIS

High School needed a golf coach. He took the job, or as

he readily admits, no one else wanted it. It’s been good move for both parties. On Saturday, Colmone’s EPG golf squad captured the IHSA 1A State Championship in Bloomington. The Titans defeated Winnetka North Shore Country Day by nine strokes (647-656) to take the title.

What made that feat most special is he got to share the moment with his son, Kyle, who as a sophomore was the No. 2 man for the Titans at state with a 162. “It’s tough enough coaching let alone having your son part of the team, but in the end it was all worth it,” said Colmone, a 1981 Hall gradu-

ate, who also coaches EPG baseball. “Winning a state title was definitely the highlight of my career. Winning a state championship is every coach’s dream. I’m just glad mine came true.” The Titans were state runners-up in a rain-shortened meet in 2012. They have now

See Hieronymus Page 13


12 Sports 12 • Thursday, October 24, 2013

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

2013 All-BCR Boys Golf Team

BCR Male Golfers of the Year

2013 — Zach Hicks, Princeton 2012 — Hunter Schultz, Princeton 2011 — Cole Evenson, Princeton 2010 — Collin Slattery, Princeton 2009 — Nick Rounds, Hall; Collin Slattery, Princeton 2008 — Nick Rounds, Adam Doll, Hall 2007 — Nick Rounds, Hall 2006 — Mason Kimberley, Princeton 2005 — Danny Nelson, Kenney Jones, PHS 2004 — none selected 2003 — Kyle Castner, Princeton 2002 — Kyle Castner, Princeton 2001 — Brad Pinter, Hall 2000 — none selected 1999 — Tony Andreoni, St. Bede; Tim Eckberg, BV; Brad Pinter, Hall. 1998 — none selected 1997 — James Thompson, Hall

One team and seven individuals qualified for the boys sectional golf meets this fall. Here’s a look at the area’s leading linksters:

First team Joe Dudek (SB, jr.): Grabbed a sectional berth as the fifth individual (87) out of the Putnam County Regional. The Three Rivers All-Conference golfer was second on the Bruins with a 42.5 average. Zach Hicks (Princeton, sr.): The 2013 BCR Golfer of the Year led all area golfers with a 39.6 average for the regular season, finishing at 40.3 overall. He was medalist or received a medal in nine of 19 events this season. He was an individual sectional qualifier in Class 2A, leading the Tigers with an 83 at the LaSalle Regional. Pete Mautino (Hall, sr.): The senior co-captain of Hall led the Red Devils with a 40.9 clip. His third-place round of 81 at the Putnam County Regional enabled the Red Devils to secure a sectional berth with a third-place finish. The TRAC All-Conference golfer led the Red Devils in 15 of 19 meets. Jarret Olson (SB, so.): The Bruins’ sophomore cub led St. Bede with a 42.0 average per nine holes. He also qualified for 1A sectionals for the second year as the second advancing individually from the Putnam County Regional with an 84. He earned TRAC All-Conference honors. Ryan Young (BV, sr.): It was Young man’s game at Bureau Valley, where the senior from Bradford led the Storm with a 43 average. He was the Storm’s No. 1 man his junior and senior year, and he qualified for sectionals in both. He was meet medalist four times and earned TRAC Second Team honors.

Joe Dudek

Zach Hicks

Pete Mautino

Jarret Olson

Ryan Young

Hicks

From Page 11

Griffin Kozeal

Ian Nichols

thrilled to have six Zachs on his varsity roster,” Price said. “In addition to medal (83) in the Three Rivers Conference a strong work ethic, Zach Meet and qualified for 2A sectionals. was a consistent golfer who Carded a 43.2 average for the season. remained selfless throughAnthony Truckenbrod (St. Bede, jr.): out the season. Zach’s Led the Bruins with a ninth-place medal community service and (83) in the Three Rivers Meet at Spring sincere care for his teamCreek. Averaged 43.0 for the season. mates is extremely tough Logan Twidell (BV, sr.): Capped his to replicate,” Prices said. career for BV by advancing to sectionals As the lone senior on the for the first time. Like teammate Young, BV PHS squad, Hicks took his coach Dan Gustafson said Twidell improved leadership role to heart. greatly throughout the season, averaging “We didn’t really have 45. other seniors to pool around like in past years,” he said. “It was different. But it was also kind of Amboy/LaMoille — Jake Lucas. nice, because I could cater Hall — Ryan Ott (jr.), Nick Scheri (sr.), to the younger kids and Matt Hoscheid (fr.). PHS — Colin Pierson (fr.), Miles Rose (jr.). show them what you can St. Bede — Jack Kunkel (so.). Joe Kim do to be a better golfer (jr.), Brady Donahue (jr.). See Hicks Page 13

Colby Robbins

Second team Griffin Kozeal (Amboy/LaMoille, jr.): The junior from LaMoille High School led all area golfers with a fourth-place showing (81) in the Three Rivers Conference meet. He led the Clippers co-op with a 43 average, missing out on sectionals by one stroke. Ian Nichols (Princeton, jr.): “Shorty” picked up where he left off last postseason and had a solid junior season, averaging 42.1 He placed ninth (84) in the Three Rivers Conference Meet. Qualified for sectionals with a fourth place individual 2A regional finish. Season highlight may have been an eagle 3 on the 365-yard 14th hole at Spring Creek in the Three Rivers Meet. Colby Robbins (Princeton, fr.): The future is bright for the PHS frosh. He led the Tigers with a seventh-place

A. Truckenbrod

Logan Twidell

Honorable mention

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13 Sports Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Volleyball roundup

Noah Harrison shows the 9-point buck he got hunting with his father, Brad, in the DNR Youth program.

A happy Lady Devil Nation By Kevin Hieronymus

wanted them too all season. They finally figured out how to win.” St. Bede coach Dawn Williams said the Lady Bruins have to Megan Nation summed up her stop giving games away. They fax report of her Hall Lady Devils’ served deep holding the 24-19 match with St. Bede Tuesday best lead in Game 2 and made sevwith a smiley face and two words: eral errors to follow. “Happy coach.” “We had great stats, but Her Lady Devils put a smile on we also had 20 hitting errors her face with a stunning, come and 8 service errors at crucial from behind 15-25, 26-24, 25-22 Megan Nation points in the match,” she said, win over the Lady Bruins at the noting her team’s 38 kills, 37 Academy. The Lady Devils held assists, 11 aces and 89 digs as off six match points in Game 2, a team. rallying from a 24-19 deficit. Game 3 Hall (4-27, 2-10) got contribuwas tied at 19 before Hall used a 6-3 tions from a lot of players including to close out the match. Vanessa Olivares (7 assists, 5 kills, Nation said the Lady Devils put everything behind them after a rough 2 aces, 7 digs), Brooke Keegan (9 assists, 5 kills, 3 aces, 10 digs), Ellie first set and never gave up in either Herrmann (4 kills, 2 aces, 3 blocks, the second or third set when things 4 digs), Kaylee Golden (8 digs), Lexi didn’t look good. Piccatto (13 digs) and Brenna Faletti “They played relaxed and started (18 digs). having some fun,” she said. “We For St. Bede (15-18, 5-6), Morgan played to win. We usually play not to Bosnich had 31 assists and 11 points, lose. I’m very, very proud of them. Morgan King had 11 points, three aces It’s only our second conference win and 23 digs, Emma Perona had 11 but my girls are playing like I have khieronymus@bcrnews.com

Photo contributed

Youth hunt nets first buck I have thought for a long time the DNR’s programs for youth deer season and OUTDOOR COLUMNIST youth duck season have been excellent to get fathers and my first deer,” Noah said sons out to hunt smiling. Brad said he together. This year is no would never forget that exception. day because he was there This year’s youth deer with his son. season found Noah HarNow we have to wait until rison and his dad, Brad, Cade gets his first deer. out in the timber bright • The IDNR special and early Saturday trout season got off to morning. They got into a good start Saturday their buddy stand before with 175 - 200 fishermen 7 a.m. and got ready taking advantage of the to hopefully see some load of trout that was put deer. Noah is going to be in the Hennepin Canal spoiled because in a half Parkway lagoon. Apparhour’s time, they spotently they were pretty ted a nice buck walking successful, many of them toward them. getting their limit of five The buck continued trout. On Sunday, there to walk their way, even walking underneath them. were quite a few fishermen,  but they didn’t When he got about 20 take a count. This ceryards past, Brad grunted tainly a good program a little. The buck stopped for local fishermen that and looked back. Noah like to catch trout. The didn’t wait. He pulled DNR will do this again in the trigger on his 20 April. gauge H&R single shot • Opening weekend for and placed a well aimed duck season fared pretty shot at the buck. He good. Quite a few woodran about 25 yards and ies, teal, gadwalls, and crashed. mallards were harvested. Noah and Brad got Now we need a three-day out their stand after 10 blizzard in the Dakotas minutes and headed for to send more our way. the deer. When they got • The Bureau County to him, he had already Pheasant Forever Youth expired. Then the impact hunt is this Saturday for set in. They didn’t realize ages 12-18. Youths will how big he was. He was a big buck with nine points. hunt behind an experience hunter and dog. Brad then called his Still have a few openings. brother, Curt, to let him Call Eric Paull at 815know Noah had dropped 646-4844. a buck and to come and • Next week, the PHS help. Curt showed up Sportsman’s Club plans along with Noah’s brother, Cade, to help drag the to have an archery shoot animal back to the truck. at Time on the Water in Spring Valley. Curt and Cade offered Lee Wahlgren is the their congratulations to BCR outdoor columnist. Noah who was still shakContact him at pdub52@ ing. Brad told me Noah gmail.com. had tears of joy. “I got

Lee Wahlgren

Hicks

Thursday, October 24, 2013 • Sports • 13

From Page 12 faster, more mentally. I’m not a great golfer, but I try to keep my head in it as much as I can. And I know if I wold have been taught that my freshmen year and learned that faster, it would have helped my process.” It was a disappointing not being able to achieve his goal and reach state, falling six strokes short at the Freeport 2A Sectional. “It was an emotional battle. It was hard to fight

off tears because that was my last match in high school at least,” said Hicks, who would like to play golf in college. Hicks is not sure he’s the best golfer in his family. He may give those honors to his sister, Arraia, a PHS sophomore golfer. “I think if she just practices, she’ll end passing me pretty soon. She’s a natural at it. If she can get the mental game, she’ll be good,” he said. Comment on this story at www.bcrnews.com

Three Rivers Volleyball standings South Division.............. MP GP Princeton......................11-1 23-5 Orion............................9-2 18-6 Sherrard.......................8-3 16-9 St. Bede........................5-6 15-12 Kewanee.......................4-7 8-15 Hall.............................2-10 4-21 Rockridge.....................1-11 6-22 Tuesday’s matches Princeton d. Sherrard 25-14, 25-9 Hall d. St. Bede 15-25, 26-24, 25-22 Orion d. Rockridge 25-11, 25-9 North Division............... MP GP Newman........................11-1 22-8 Erie............................. 11-2 23-9 Bureau Valley................8-5 20-13 Fulton...........................7-7 16-17 Riverdale......................6-7 15-16 Morrison.......................5-9 14-20 Prophetstown................4-9 12-21 Amboy......................... 1-12 7-25

Tigresses

From Page 11 Farraher finished with 13 points and five aces. Kelly chipped in 14 assists and 10 points. Poss led the hitters with six kills and Schultz added four. Senior libero Mollie Bates had a team-high eight digs. • Tiger tales: The championship is the eighth in school history, include five in the full NCIC conference, one divisional and one in the three-team league. ... Sherrard won both underclass matches, defeating the PHS sophomores (14-15-1, 6-6) 25-17, 25-14 and the PHS freshmen (7-22-1, 3-9) 25-14, 22-25, 15-2. … PHS will take a 28-7 record into the postseason as the No. 2 seed of the Streator 3A regional. The Tigresses will face Morris at 7 p.m. Tuesday. LaSalle-Peru (26-3) is the top seed. Comment on this story at www. bcrnews.com

Hieronymus

Alex Mazzarisi, 11, of Princeton, shows the belt after defeating the over 70-pound ring side world champion in Coal Valley.

points with four aces, Olivia Mueller had nine kills, Clarie Dudek had eight kills and Hanna Bima had seven kills and a block. Riverdale 2, Bureau Valley 1: The Storm took the middle set 25-17, but couldn’t put things together in the first (18-25) or third (13-25) at home Tuesday. Lindsey Hoffert (6 kills) and Valerie Reuter (5 kills) led the Storm at the net. Jehna Thomas led the Storm with seen points to go with on ace. Kalie Rumbold and Hoffert added five points each with Sydney Lebahn collecting 20 assists, four points and two aces. Midland 2, LaMoille/Ohio 0: The Tri-County Conference’s Timberwolves got the best of the Little Ten’s Lady Lions Monday, handing visiting LaMoille/Ohio a 25-14, 25-21 defeat on Monday. Shiela Browning (8 kills) and Alyssa Martin (7 kills) led the Lady Lions up front Ragen Forbes scooped up 14 digs and Erin Bennett had 14 assists. Comment on this story at www. bcrnews.com

BCR photo/Kevin Hieronymus

Princeton’s Michelle Kelly makes a pass in Tuesday’s match at Sherrard.

From Page 11 won three regionals in a row, two sectionals and conference tournaments in a row. EPG will be in the hunt again next year as they return four of their top five scorers. • The little champ: Last month, I wrote about little Alex Mazzarisi, 11, of Princeton, a mighty mite when it comes to boxing. In his latest bout, the Logan sixth-grader defeated the over 70-pound ring side world champion in the Battle in the Valley in Coal Valley. He will be fighting Nov. 16 at the American Legion in Rock Falls. Alex and his father, Steve, invite any interested youth to join them in training at Rios Boxing Club in Peru. • High flyer: DePue’s Carlos Acosta moved into the all-time scoring leaders for soccer in IHSA history at No. 13 with 124 career goals. He had 41 this year. The all-time leader is Carlos Posada

of Crete Monee, who had 177 from 2007-11, including 68 as a senior. • Brother-sister act: Mount Mercy University senior cross country runner T.J. Mosbach and sophomore Liz Mosbach of Ladd were named as the Midwest Collegiate Conference Runners of the Week. It was the fourth time T.J. has received the honor this year. • Parting shots: Former Bureau Valley Storm standout Nick Davis (class of 2005) is the new recreational director for the Bureau County Metro Center. ... Condolences to the family of John Piccatto. He was a diehard Cardinals fan and his widow, Jane, joked the Cardinals waited until Game 6 to clinch the NLCS on Friday so they could all watch it on TV, because they were at the visitation Wednesday. Here’s hoping they give them a good World Series to watch, too. Kevin Hieronymus is the BCR Sports Editor. Contact him at khieronymus@bcrnews.com


14 Sports 14 • Thursday, October 24, 2013

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

The Playoff Picture

​Pigskin Previews — Week 9 Fulton (4-4, 2-3) at Bureau Valley (3-5, 2-3)

Game time: 7:30 p.m. Friday, Manlius BCR insider: The Storm is playing for pride, knocked out of the playoffs by a stunning defeat at Riverdale last week. It was Riverdale’s first win of the year. Fulton, however, is playing for the playoffs, and need a win to get in. The winner would finish in third place in the TRAC North. Last week: Fulton beat A/L 37-13; BV lost to Riverdale 36-28. Last year: Fulton 38-13. All-time series: BV 8-2. Radio: WZOE 98.1 FM.

Sherrard (3-5, 1-4) at St. Bede (5-3, 2-3)

Game time: 7:30 p.m. Friday. BCR insider: The Bruins had two tough weeks with losses to Rockridge and Hall, but became playoff eligible last week. Now they’d like to seal the deal with win No. 6 Friday. They may not have playoff points (combined number of opponent wins) to go in with just five wins. If they qualify, it would mark the Bruins’ third straight playoff appearance. Sherrard becomes the third new opponent for St. Bede this year following Rockridge

and Orion, now as TRAC South rivals. Last week: Sherrard lost to Newman 49-6; SBA beat Orion 34-22. Last year: Did not play. All-time series: 0-0. Radio: WSOG 88.1 FM.

For Week 9, we bring in Jesse Brandt, basketball coach and AD at Princeton. He’s also has a strong football background as the starting quarterback for three playoff teams at Stockton, including quarterfinal and semifinal appearances.

Princeton (0-8, 0-5) at Hall (5-3, 3-2)

Game time: 7:30 p.m. Friday, Nesti Stadium. BCR insider: Hall needs a win to secure a playoff bid, though it should have more than enough playoff points to make it. See more info in the BCR Game of the Week preview. Last week: PHS lost to Rockridge 62-35; Hall beat Kewanee 28-27. Last year: Did not play. Last meeting: 2011, PHS 33-26. All-time series: Hall 51-30-1. Radio: WZOE 1490 AM, WAJK 99.3 FM.

Other games

Morrison at Riverdale Newman at Amboy/ LaMoille Erie/Prophetstown at Orion Kewanee at Rockridge Mercer County at Annawan/Wethersfield Byron at Mendota Geneseo at LaSallePeru — Kevin Hieronymus

Kevin Hieronymus BCR Sports Editor Last week: 7-3. Season: 57-23. Week 9 Fulton over Bureau Valley Hall over Princeton Newman over A/L E/P over Orion Rockridge over Kewanee St. Bede over Sherrard A/W over Mercer County Byron over Mendota Geneseo over L-P Riv. Valley over Ridgewood

Game

Brent Jamison BCR Correspondent Last week: 9-1. Season: 54-26. Week 9 Fulton over Bureau Valley Hall over Princeton Newman over A/L E/P over Orion Rockridge over Kewanee St. Bede over Sherrard A/W over Mercer County Mendota over Byron Geneseo over L-P Riv. Valley over Ridgewood

From Page 11 “Rivalries create great atmosphere and tradition,” he said. The Red Devils will face a Princeton team who has lost 19 straight games and been outscored 38176 this year. The Tigers, however, showed much renewal last week, outscoring undefeated and state-ranked Rockridge

Jesse Brandt Princeton High School Last week’s guest: 6-4. Season: 53-27. Week 9 Fulton over Bureau Valley Princeton over Hall Newman over A/L Orion over E/P Rockridge over Kewanee St. Bede over Sherrard Mercer County over A/W Byron over Mendota Geneseo over L-P Riv. Valley over Ridgewood

22-12 in the second half. While it was a good step in the right direction, Snyder said the Tigers have to continue to build upon the successes they’ve had the last two weeks. “It may not seem like it in the public eye, but we work every week to be that much better than we were the day before. Should we be satisfied with those successes? Absolutely not. We have to contin-

Here’s a look at the playoff picture for the IHSA postseason football scene heading into Friday’s Week 9 games. Who’s in: Rockridge (8-0), Geneseo (7-1), Sterling Newman (7-1), Annawan/Wethersfield (7-1), Stark County (7-1), Erie/Prophetstown (6-2) and Kewanee (6-2). All of these area teams have clinched a playoff berth with six wins. Who’s eligible: Hall (5-3), River Valley (5-3), St. Bede (5-3). Both Hall (38) and River Valley (39) would have enough playoff points (combined number of opponents win) to get in with five wins. Both are favored on Friday — Hall plays Princeton (0-8), River Valley has Ridgewood (2-6). Of the three, St. Bede needs to secure their playoff bid with their sixth win over Sherrard (3-5) on Friday. It is only guaranteed 34 playoff points, more depending who wins Friday. Who needs a win: Orion (4-4), Fulton (4-4) and Sterling (4-4). Orion would be a shoe-in with a win and 39-plus playoff points, but Fulton (35) and Sterling (32-38) could be left out even with their fifth wins. Who’s out: Amboy/LaMoille (2-6), Bureau Valley (3-5), Dixon (2-6), L-P (1-7), Mendota (3-5), Ottawa (3-5), Princeton (0-8), Sherrard (3-5) and Streator (2-6). • Note: The IHSA Football Playoff Pairing Show will return to Comcast SportsNet Chicago, airing live from 8 to 10 p.m. Saturday. The show, which will reveal the brackets and first round match-ups of all 256 playoff qualifiers across eight classes, can also be viewed via live interactive stream online at www.nfhsnetwork.com/channels/ illinois/ ]IHSA.tv. — Kevin Hieronymus

ue to work for our team, school and community,” said Snyder, whose Tigers will come into the game a little banged up. The last time they met, both teams brought in 0-6 records for the very first time in the century-old rivalry. Princeton won the meeting 33-26, their last win before embarking on its current 19-game skid. Comment on this story at www.bcrnews.com

3 Rivers South.......... . Conf. Overall Rockridge....................... 5-0 8-0 Kewanee..........................4-1 6-2 Hall................................ 3-2 5-3 St. Bede.......................... 2-3 5-3 Orion.............................. 3-3 4-4 Sherrard..........................1-4 3-5 Princeton........................ 0-5 0-8 3 Rivers North........... .Conf. Overall Sterling Newman.............. 5-0 7-1 Erie-Prophetstown.............5-1 6-2 Bureau Valley.................. 2-3 3-5 Amboy/LaMoille............... 2-3 2-6 Fulton............................. 2-4 4-4 Morrison..........................1-5 2-6 Riverdale.........................1-4 1-7

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15 NASCAR Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Thursday, October 24, 2013 • 15

Next up Sprint Cup Race: Goody’s Headache Relief Shot 500 Where: Martinsville Speedway When: Sunday, 1:30 p.m. (ET) TV: ESPN 2012 Winner: Jimmie Johnson

McMurray takes checkered flag at Talladega Second non-Chase driver Sprint Cup victory in a row In winning the Camping World RV Sales 500 at Talladega Superspeedway on Sunday, Jamie McMurray became the second-straight nonChase driver to win a Sprint Cup race this season. It was the first time since 2006 that non-Chase drivers won back-to-back Chase races. In ‘06, Tony Stewart and Brian Vickers won at Kansas and Talladega, respectively, then Stewart won another two straight, at Atlanta and Texas. McMurray’s win, his first since 2010 at Charlotte and the seventh of his career, came a week after Brad Keselowski surged to victory at Charlotte Motor Speedway. McMurray won at Talladega from an unlikely position — holding the lead halfway through the final lap. Just as it looked as if eventual secondplace finisher Dale Earnhardt Jr., with plenty of drafting help in the form of Austin Dillon, was about to make a move on McMurray off Turn Two, third-running Dillon and fourth-running Ricky Stenhouse Jr. wrecked. That brought out the caution flag and sealed the win for McMurray as

NASCAR set the finishing order by how the drivers were running when the yellow flag was displayed. Behind the leaders, Jimmie Johnson, with a 13th-place finish, took the points lead from Matt Kenseth, who finished 20th after leading 32 laps earlier in the race. Other than the lastlap crash, the race was far from typical for Talladega. There was no “Big One” crash, and instead of running in a big pack in the closing laps, the leaders wound up running single-file in the outside groove, and essentially finished where they were running when the race was flagged for the Stenhouse-Dillon crash. Earnhardt, who finished second, said he didn’t make a move earlier because he feared no one would go with him and he’d drop to the back of the pack. “I was in perfect position to be patient and wait as long as I wanted to,” Earnhardt said. “So that’s why we didn’t go any sooner than that. I just can’t anticipate a caution coming out every single time we run at Talladega race on the last lap, so I just

Harold Hinson for Chevrolet

Jamie McMurray celebrates his victory in the Camping World RV Sales 500 at Talladega. assumed it would go to checkered, and was planning my move on the back straightaway.” McMurray said he was doing all he could to keep Earnhardt at bay. “When I got to the lead, I was trying to enter (the corners) a little bit lower so we weren’t using so much race track, so that if everyone behind me would follow, maybe the bottom line wouldn’t develop and move up as fast,” he said. “Every time I entered lower, I would get away from (Earnhardt), and I feel like he was getting more of a run on me off the

corner. “As those laps counted down, I was kind of trying to do something different each lap so that he couldn’t prepare for it.” When the running order was sorted out, Stenhouse finished a Cup-career-best third, followed by Paul Menard. Chase contender Kyle Busch was fifth, with non-Chase drivers David Ragan, David Gilliland and Martin Truex Jr. taking positions six through eight. All told, six of the top eight spots went to nonChase drivers, a reversal of the usual scenario in the Chase.

Copyright 2013/Distributed by Universal Uclick

Harold Hinson for Chevrolet

Jimmie Johnson, driving the No. 48 Chevrolet, moved to first place in the Sprint Cup standings with his 13th-place finish at Talladega.


16 16 • Thursday, October 24, 2013

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

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17 checkered flag Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Thursday, October 24, 2013 • Checkered Flag Challenge • 17

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18 Legals 18 • Legals • Thursday, October 24, 2013

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

LegalNotices UNITED STATES OF AMERICA STATE OF ILLINOIS COUNTY OF BUREAU IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN THE MATTER OF) THE ESTATE OF ) GORDON ) RICHMOND, ) Deceased ) NO. 13-P-86 CLAIM NOTICE Notice is given of the death of GORDON RICHMOND of the Village of Wyanet, Illinois. Letter of office were issued on August 23, 2013 to Kim J. Curley, 14224-8th Ave. Court South, Tacoma, WA 98444, whose attorney is William T. Surin, Armstrong & Surin, 724

Columbus St., Ottawa, IL 61350-5002. Claims against the estate may be filed in the Office of the Circuit Clerk, Probate Division, Downtown Courthouse, Ottawa, Illinois 61350, or with the representative, or both, on or before April 30, 2014. If a claim notice is mailed or delivered personally to a creditor of the decedent, the creditor’s claim may be filed on or before the date stated in that notice, if later than the date shown above. Any claim not filed within the time allowed is barred. Copies of a claim filled with the Clerk must be mailed or delivered to the Representative and to the Attorney within

ten days after it has been filed. Published in the Bureau County Republican Oct. 17, 24 and 31, 2013. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT BUREAU COUNTY, ILLINOIS IN PROBATE ESTATE OF ) RAYMOND E. ) STOBIERSKI, ) Deceased ) NO. 2013-P-97 CLAIM NOTICE Notice is given of the death of Raymond E. Stobierski. Letters of Office were issued on October 11, 2013 to Theresa A. Hughes, 630 Park Avenue West, Princeton, Illinois as

ANNUAL TREASURER’S REPORT CITY OF SPRING VALLEY FISCAL YEAR ENDING APRIL 30, 2013

Independent Executor, whose attorneys are Russell, English, Scoma & Beneke, P.C., Ten Park Avenue West, Princeton, Illinois 61356. Notice is given to Amanda Robinson and Ronald Stobierski, heirs who are named in a Petition filed in the above proceeding to probate a Will, and whose names or addresses are not stated in the Petition, that an Order was entered by the Court on October 11, 2013, admitting the Will to probate. Within 42 days after the effective date of the original Order of admission you may file a Petition with the Court to require proof of the Will by testimony of the witness-

REVENUE SUMMARY: Property Taxes – 1,715,204.46; Utilities Tax – 369,042.69; State Income Tax – 453,449.42; State Sales Tax- 404,971.89; State Motor Fuel Tax- 133,582.23; State Replacement Tax – 48,958.59; Licenses, Permits,Fees,Fines & Forfeitures – 73,011.70; Water Utilities – 881,039.81; Sewer Utilities – 757,767.54; Refuse & Disposal Charges – 369,275.78; Telecommunications Tax – 56,236.29; Franchise Tax – 82,937.05; Hotel/Motel Tax – 6,331.60; State of Ill. Use Tax – 88,230.98; Grants – 403,642.23; Tower Rent – 32,420.; Donations – 4,600.; Interest – 21,807.18; GNMA Investment Principal & Interest – 755,316.14; Seizures – 438,187.; Corp. Tax – 70,909.38; Miscellaneous – 433,784.38 TOTAL REVENUES: $7,600,706.34 COMPENSATION SUMMARY: Christine N. Adelmann – 70.; Kyle J. Adelmann – 85.; Jennifer A. Antkowiak – 75..; Marie K. Argubright – 3,638.45;John E. Armstrong – 180.; Amber M. Backus – 275.;Rachel M. Bailey – 90.; Susan A. Ballerin – 2,700.; William C. Banks – 7,000.08; Robert J. Baracani – 51,110.12; Kenneth M. Bergagna – 43,215.18; Marcus J. Biagioni – 810.75; Nicholas J. Biagioni – 6,205.13; Tina L. Biagioni – 10,938.56; Todd A. Bogatitus – 2,259.; John Boroski – 6,000.; Audrey Bradshaw – 4,012.66; Doug E. Burcham – 62,546.23; Morgan Burcham – 558.;Jacob R. Bush – 21,887.18; Larry Butkus – 180.; Thomas M. Caldera – 30,872.22; Alexandria K. Carlson – 755.63; Gregory S. Case – 740.25; Michael A. Case – 740.25;Adam J. Curran – 57,932.88; Brandon Czubachowski – 315.; Ann D. Darwish – 225.; Julie A. Dean – 3,116.63; Randy S. Dean – 6,302.10; Shelly Delafont – 2,625.; Michael John Dergance – 822.50; Gabriella J. Dhesse – 2,455.75; Madison M. Dhesse – 1,619.78; Gregory A. Dodd – 6,601.77; Sherri L. Donavan – 3,682.27; Christine Drag – 150.; Ann M. Draper – 424.88; Jacob E. Eilers – 13,968.05; Matt Eilers – 164.50; Ellen L. Entwhistle – 135.; Harold R. Entwhistle – 36,659.63; Ryan A. Ferrari – 43,432.63; Andrea M. Fouke – 220.; Richard R. Fouke – 210; Thomas J. Francisco – 763.75; Victoria L. Frank – 1,757.26; Richard L. Fuerholzer – 810.75; Richard E. Fusinatto – 5,950.; Ricky M. Gaeta – 33.; Jeffrey E. Gaither – 23,100.; Daniel L. Gillette – 19,800.; Jacob E. Graham – 14,494.46; Jeremiah M. Graham – 476.45; Timothy L. Greene – 59,132.40; Lisa A. Hallen – 210.; Tadd C. Hammerich – 33,755.63; Charles L. Hansen – 5,950.; Rebecca Hansen – 56,347.25; Ruth Ann Hedgespeth - 12,806.49.; Wesley M. Herrmann – 411.25; Roland Himes – 19,182.; Rachell M. Hoehn – 3,911.24; Jeanne M. Holdcraft – 180.; Linda A. Hrovat – 2,409.02; Chris Insco – 1,069.25; Gregory D. Jacobsen – 175.; Phyllis H. Jacobson – 210.; Dana M. Jauch – 630.; Edward K. Jauch – 59,170.79; James R. Jones – 235.; Jaclyn R. Kain – 901.31; Sarah M. Kinkin – 12,469.77; John E. Klopcic – 475.; Elizabeth A. Klopcic – 210.; Karen K. Klopcic – 240.; Daniel P. Krysiak – 40,092.33; John A. Kusek – 60.; Adam Ladgenski – 1,609.75; Deborah K. Ladgenski – 29,225.70; Joseph M. Ladgenski – 188.; Luke J. Ladgenski – 1,386.50; Bernard J. Larsen – 55,121.09; Gregory F. Lauf – 1081.; Nicholas Lee Lavanway – 1,257.25; Geralyn C. Loebach – 2,651.14; Mark A. Manicki – 9,780.; Walter Marini – 6,000.; Mary A. Martin – 12,000.; Tanner McCormick – 1,732.51; Daniel J. McFadden – 5,850.; Gene D. Montgomery – 60.; Mardy Jo Moreno – 35,535.22; John R. Narczewski – 6,000.;Douglas J. Narczewski – 50,663.85; Diane R. Nelson – 205.; Thomas . Nesti – 6,000.; Mary M. Nielsen – 36,247.36; Brian A. Nolasco – 2,442.; Jeffrey A. Norton – 56,602.70; Donald J. Noy – 423; Gregory A. Oseland – 165.; Lisa M. Padilla – 35,372.96; Emily A. Passini – 90.; Joshua M. Pellegrini – 54,453.045;Dustin Pennell – 1,390.14; David T. Peterson – 500.; Julia G. Peterson – 225.; Rick J. Piscia – 2,013.06; Thomas G. Quartucci – 27,808.32; Jason Quinn- 3,819.25; Nicole E. Richardson – 1,155.01; Michael S. Richetta – 5,600.; Christian T. Rios – 6,490.89; Joseph l. Rogel – 164.50; Kendall L. Rush – 212.44; Tim Samolinski – 12,000.; Kevin D. Sangston - 76,516.37; Tari Sangston – 13,710.30; Gene L. Scheri Jr. – 1,963.; Stephanie W. Schoeph – 105.;Lauren Schroeder – 30.; John P. Schultz – 68,928.65; Scott R. Shilkuski – 881.25.; Katie L. Sment – 1,952.73; Patricia L. Sment – 8,819.62; Abigail L. Smith – 1,160.57; Arthur L. Smith – 13,292.63; Jacqueline M. Smith – 150.; Nathaniel D. Smith – 1,141.19; Audrey A. Smoode – 14,202.90; Laurie J. Smudzinski – 90.; Nicholas J. Smudzinski – 55,679.11; Emily A Sobin – 2,270.38; William C. Sommer – 70,367.40; Jaclyn M. Sonnenberg – 923.79; Matthew J. Stank – 56,557.58; Nancy Stank – 36,876.47.; Jeremy S. Stevens – 260.; Elizabeth C. Struna – 1,129.50; Michael J. Stuckert – 19,745.04; James J. Taliano – 5,850.; Andrew J. Taylor – 265.; Billie J. Taylor – 265.; Edward G. Templeton – 1,257.25; Patricia Terando – 35,535.20; Matthew R. Turpen – 1,528.69; Anthony Urbanski – 2,528.64.; Mark S. Victor – 90.; Patricia A. Wallaert – 37,195.09; Patrick J. Watson – 15,521.46; Philip A Whaley – 120.; Barbara J. White – 19,684.08; Eric White – 4,815.94; Sue Yopchick – 4,086.50; Raymond L. Younger – 150.; Brian T. Zebron – 15,450. TOTAL COMPENSATION: $ 1,880,045.47 EXPENDITURE SUMMARY: Payment Processing Center – 5,230.; American Fam. Life Assur. – 4,770.; IV Credit Union – 33,800.; Ill State Disbursement Unit – 15,849.; Federal EFT Payment – 394,539.; Granville National Bank – 5,200.; IMRF

es to the will in open Court or other evidence, as provided in Section 6-21 of the Probate Act (755 ILCS 5/6-21). You also have the right under Section 8-1 of the Probate Act (755 ILCS 5/8-1) to contest the validity of the Will by filing a Petition with the Court within six months after admission of the Will to probate. Claims against the Estate may be filed in the office of the Circuit Clerk, Bureau County Courthouse, Princeton, Illinois 61356, or with the representative, or both, on or before April 28, 2013, or if mailing or delivery of a notice from the representative is required by Section 18-3 of the Probate Act

of 1975, the date stated in that notice. Any claim not filed by that date is barred. Copies of a claim filed with the Clerk are to be mailed or delivered to the representative and to the attorney within ten (10) days after it has been filed. Dated this 21st day of October, 2013 s/ Mary C. Dremann Bureau County Circuit Clerk Published in the Bureau County Republican Oct. 24, 31 and Nov. 7, 2013. LEGAL NOTICES The Bureau County Republican brings you the public and legal information you have a right to know and stay informed!

LEGAL The foregoing is a complete list of receipts, expenditures, and final balances for the fiscal year July 1, 2012 to June 30, 2013. /s/Donna Foster Treasurer Ladd Public Library District CERTIFICATION: I, Rita Martinkus, President of the Ladd Public Library District, Bureau County, Illinois, do hereby certify that the above is a true copy of the Annual Treasurer’s Report for the fiscal year July 1, 2012 to June 30, 2013. /s/Rita Martinkus, President Ladd Public Library District ACCOUNT BALANCES Checking Account $20,334.60 CD Balance 40,000.00 Hunt Savings 7,601.76 Regular Savings 7,593.82 TOTAL $75,530.18 Fund Balance 2012 $69,305.76 + Revenue $54,720.55 $124,026.31 -Expenditures $48,496.13 Fund Balance 2012 $75,530.18 Published in the Bureau County Republican Oct. 24, 2013.

EFT Payment – 185,564.;Police Pension Fund – 55,134.;Illinois Dept. of Revenue – 86,946.; Abby Ferguson – 3,000.; Ace In The Hole – 5,214.; Advanced Asphalt – 44,614.; Albrecht Well Drilling Inc. – 11,588.; All Traffic Solutions – 5,025.; Ameren Energy Marketing – 94,599.; Amerenip – 128,912; AUCA Rockford MC Lockbox – 4,913; Arch Hopkins & Assoc., CPA’s – 21,650.; Arther J. Gallagher RMS. Inc. – 77,575. ; Atty Edward Kulek – 14,000.; Badger Meter, Inc. – 25,150.; Blanco Kays Eyecare – 5,000.; Health Care Service Corp. – 317,881.; Bonnell Industries Inc. – 18,500.; Brandt Builders Inc. – 31,915.; Brennan & Stuart, Inc. – 2,511.; Brown, Hay & Stephens, LLP – 76,113.; C7H Excavating Inc. 347,894.; Carquest Auto Parts Store – 3,916.; Central Parts Warehouse – 5,051.; Chamlin & Associates, Inc. – 141,612.; Chicago International Trucks – 4,087.; Citizens 1st Nat’l Bank –97,156; City of Peru – 2,800.; Communications Direct, Inc. – 3,845.; Companion Life – 38,405.;Connecting Point Computer Ctr – 8,262.; Cosgrove Distributors – 6,304.; Cruz Concrete, Inc. – 72,447.; Cummins Central Power LLC – 3,829.; D & L Sales & Consulting – 3,762.; D & M Landscaping – 35,682.; Debo Ace Hardware – 4,429.; Doubet’s Auto Sale – 15,100.; Elan Technologies, Inc. – 24,200.; Flow-Technics – 25,356; Aramark Company – 7438.; Great Lakes Scrip Center – 4,804.; Green Chevrolet – 22,621.; Halm Electrical Contracting – 4,153.; Happy’s Super Service – 34,672.; Harris Computer Systems – 13,215.; Heartland Bank – 12,565.; Howard L. White & Associates – 8,154.; I.V.C.C. – 20,998.; ID Networks – 9,390.; Il. Direc. Of Employ. Security – 14,418.; Illinois Valley Business Equip. – 4139.; Illinois Environmental Protect – 355,256.; Illinois Valley Waste Service – 379,914.; Illinois Municipal League – 25,774.; Illinois Public Risk Fund – 52,210.; Illinois State Police – 366,230.; Illinois Valley Fence & Pool – 2,700.; In-Pipe Technology Company – 66,000.; Intoximeters – 6,024.; IVAC – 7,906.; Jacob & Klein , LTD – 5,514.; JBR Earthscapes, Inc. – 52,180.; Jonathan Parks – 8,000.; JTB Spring Valley , LLC – 90,295.; Ladd CC School District #94 – 18,998.; Lasalle Office Supply – 3,698.; Lasalle County Circuit Clerk – 6,550.; Lasalle Police Dept. – 21,406.; Lee County Landfill – 14,080.; Luby Equipment Services – 2,646.; Mautino Dist. Co. – 5,342.; McClure Engineering Assoc. – 157,247.; Mean Metal Guns – 5,842.; ; Menards – 6,441; Micro-Comm. Inc. – 3,892.; Midwest Testing Services – 3,270.; MILCO-Spring Valley, LLC – 6,630.; North American Salt Co. – 19,053.; North Central Il. Council – 10,185.; PRIMEVEST – 160,000.; Process Solutions, Inc. – 19,177.; Raymond R. Nolasco – 6,299.; Revere Electric – 18,867.; Riverstone Group, Inc. – 4,128.; Shell Fleet Plus – 26,717.; ; Spring Valley City Bank –119,244.; Spring Valley Autobody – 3,709.; Spring Valley Boosters – 4,000.; Spring Valley CC School Dist #99 – 22,128.; Spring Valley Historic Assoc. – 5,000.; Standard Equipment Company – 3,351.; Staples Credit Plan – 2,537.; Starved Rock Communications – 6,958.; Stuart Tree Service – 6,740.; .; Ten/Thirty Three Ambulance – 56,036.; TEST – 16,083.; The Bank of New York Mellon – 121,614.; The Stough Group – 30,032.; Toedter Oil Co. – 18,517.; Tonozzi Law Office – 43,614.; Town & Country Services – 4,890.; Trident Insurance Services – 4,285,; Trovero Construction – 2,520.; U.S. Postal Svc – 12,115. USA Bluebook – 6,460.; Utility Equipment Co. – 6,276.; Val-Matic Valve & Mfg Corp – 3,110. ; Valley Coin – Jewelry-Pawn Inc. -3,800.; Valley Ford – 8,141.; Viking Chemical – 56,235.; VISA – 10,976.; Vortex Technologies Inc. – 3,015.; Watchguard Video – 4,832.; HD Supply Waterworks, LTD – 12,152.; Wells Fargo Advisors – 174,219.; Western Sand & Gravel Co, LLC – 2,712.; Wozniak Concrete Finishing Co. – 24,021.; All other disbursements in amounts less than ($2,500).- $718,275. TOTAL VENDORS: $6,131,964. COMBINED STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS, DISBURSEMENTS, AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE - CASH BASIS - ALL GOVERNMENTAL AND EXPENDABLE TRUST FUNDS Year Ended April 30, 2013 (Excerpt from Comptroller Report) GENERAL SPECIAL DEBT CAPITAL ENTERPRISE FIDUCIARY REVENUE SERVICE PROJECT Fund Balance Beg. Year 80,728 906,521 34,514 30,866 8,321,963 3,239,330 Revenues 2,301,903 1,537,404 77,384 108 2,731,015 286,460 Expenditures 2,104,145 1,317,264 115,092 3,260 2,083,025 177,839 Oper. Tsfrs. In -0-045,000 -099,000 -0Oper. Tsfrs Out 112,996 31,004 -0-0 -0-0Bond Proceeds -0-0-0-0-0-0Other -0-0-0-0-0-0Fund Balance End of Year $ 165,490 $1,095,657 $41,806 $ 27,714 $9,068,953 $3,347,951 Subscribed and sworn to this 10th day of October , 2013. John ‘Jack’ Boroski - Treasurer I, Rebecca L. Hansen, Clerk of the City of Spring Valley, Bureau County, Illinois, do hereby certify that the above is a true copy of the Annual Treasurer’s Report for the fiscal year ending April 30,2013 Rebecca L. Hansen - Clerk Published in the Bureau County Republican Oct. 24, 2013.


19 Biz Ag Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Thursday, October 24, 2013 • 19

Business&Ag

Business story ideas? — Contact Bureau County Republican reporter Lyle Ganther at 815-875-4461, ext. 273, or email him at lganther@bcrnews.com.

Ag story ideas? — Contact Bureau County Republican Senior Staff Writer Donna Barker at 815-875-4461, ext. 244, or email her at dbarker@bcrnews.com.

White Trash Gallery opens in LaSalle

BCR photo/Lyle Ganther

Mary Carper (left) talks with her son, Tom Carper of Macomb, in her room in the Bounce Back Neighborhood at Liberty Village of Princeton, which recently opened to handle short-term residents recovering from a surgery or illness.

Liberty Village opens Bounce Back PRINCETON — Liberty Village of Princeton has opened its new Bounce Back Neighborhood. The expansion of Liberty Village is part of its continuum of care campus, said Lori Frick, marketing/sales direc-

tor at Liberty Village of Princeton. “We tell people to call ahead to reserve a room if they are having an elective surgery,” added Frick. “They can start their therapy. This area will accept Medicare and private pay

short-term residents.” The neighborhood consists of 13 private suites and 14 companion suites. Each suite has a flat screen television and a mini refrigerator. Three of the private suites also have a built-in lift in the ceil-

ing for short-term residents who reside there while recovering from a surgery or an illness. The neighborhood also has its own dining room, TV room and media room with a drop down screen and full kitchen.

LASALLE — Jenny Hoehn opened White Trash Gallery last week at 139 Gooding St. in LaSalle from 7 to 10 p.m. Kristine’s Shower just celebrated 11 years of handmaking bath and skincare products in 2013. Hoehn began in 2002 in her home formulating soaps and bath bombs. Today Hoehn and her Kristine’s Shower team meet the demand for her natural, handmade line with the same “small batch” techniques that made Kristine’s Shower famous. Although the pairing of

the art of making bathbombs, soaps, etc., with fine art may seem somewhat unlikely, these two are determined to make it work. White Trash Peg, as Hoehn has become known, has shown in art galleries across the United States (New York, San Francisco and other major cities), as well as internationally in Paris and Berlin. White Trash Gallery will showcase White Trash Peg’s work as well as serve emerging and established artists in North Central Illinois and beyond.

Starting business workshop planned OTTAWA — Starting a Business in Illinois will be presented by Illinois Valley Community College’s Illinois Small Business Development Center from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday at the Ottawa Center, 321 W. Main St. The workshop, intended for those not yet in business, covers registering a

business name, obtaining a tax ID number, choosing appropriate forms of insurance, keeping records, choosing a legal form of ownership and other issues. ISBDC Director Bev Malooley will be the instructor. To register or learn more, call (815) 224-0427 or go to www.ivcc.edu/cec. Cost is $35 per person.

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20 Accuweather 20 • Thursday, October 24, 2013

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

From you, for you

We want to hear from you – From you, for you is an interactive page for readers to share their photos, questions and comments. For information on how to submit a story, question or comment, contact BCR Copy Editor Sarah Maxwell at smaxwell@bcrnews.com.

Out& about Images from Tuesday’s snow. Photos by Donna Barker and Amelia Bystry

5-day Planner Today

Tonight

High 44

Low 25

Friday

High 49

Saturday

Low 37 High 56

Sunday

Low 32 High 53

Weekly weather This year High Oct. 22

38

One year ago

Low

Prec.

High

Prec.

29

.34

66

54

.46

High

Low

85 (1947)

26 (1952) 18 (1952)

Oct. 21

54

32

.04

69

39

0

86 (1947)

Oct. 20

66

40

T

55

39

0

85 (2003) 24 (1948)

Oct. 19

53

38

T

52

43

.10

86 (1953)

20 (1972)

Oct. 18

49

41

0

52

43

.15

87 (1950)

20 (1952)

Oct. 17

59

43

.09

67

50

1.02

86 (1956)

28 (1992)

Oct. 16

51

46

0

73

43

0

85 (1956)

30 (1952)

Source: National Weather Service Reporting Station, Princeton asterisk means new record high temperature

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Low 47

Sunrise.............................................................. 7:20 a.m. Sunset...............................................................6:05 p.m. Moonrise..........................................................10:27 p.m. Moonset...........................................................12:23 p.m. Last

New

First

Full

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Nov. 3

Nov. 9

Nov. 17

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Low 36 High 58

Sun & Moon

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1

“PRSRT.STD.” US POSTAGE PAID NO. 486 PRINCETON, IL 61356 SHAW MEDIA

VOL. 8 NO. 14

Thursday, October 24, 2013

Dressing up for a spooky-good time Ghosts and goblins, cowboys and princesses, superheroes and nurses will be on the streets this weekend when children dress up for annual Halloween parties and parades in their communities, including, in part, the communities of Princeton and Spring Valley. Parents and children can check with their local leaders for details of that community’s trick or treat hours, as well as any community parties which may be planned. For the extremely brave in heart, the annual Nightmare on Fairgrounds Road concludes this Saturday evening at the Bureau County Fairgrounds in Princeton. Whether candy seekers or thrill seekers, the coming days will offer Halloween fun for all ages. BCR file photo

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2 2 • Thursday, October 24, 2013

Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

— FEATURES —

3 Hometown beat All about you 4 Calendar 4 5 Food court 6 Library corner 9 Entertainment 12 Sports Healthy living 14 16 Marketplace

Sports See Pages 12-13

EXPERIENCE MAKES THE DIFFERENCE With a history of delivering exceptional health care and evidence of successful out comes, Heartland of Henry is your Proven Leader in post-hospital stays.

Five-Star Quality Rated

Volume 8 No. 14 The Bureau County Journal is published weekly on Thursday at 800 Ace Road, P.O. Box 340, Princeton, IL 61356 by the Bureau County Republican

All rights reserved. Copyright 2013.

Factual Accuracy: Accuracy is important to us, and we want to correct mistakes promptly. If you believe a factual error has been published, please bring it to our attention. Call the Bureau County Republican at 815875-4461 or email at news@bcrnews.com.

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3 Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

Thursday, October 24, 2013 • 3

Your hometown beat Meeting Calendar Oct. 28 Buda Village Board, 7 p.m., village hall Bureau Valley School Board, 7 p.m., high school library Cherry Village Board, 7 p.m., village hall DePue Village Board, 7 p.m., village hall Ohio High School Board, 7 p.m., library Ohio Village Board, 7 p.m., village hall Princeton Elementary School Board, 7 p.m., library Spring Valley City Council, 7 p.m., council chambers

Auction Calendar Oct. 26 — Carol M. Andriotis Living Trust, real estate, 10 a.m., 7369 1300 East St., Tiskilwa, Rediger Auction Service, auctioneers. Oct. 26 — Crank Estate, collector cars, car parts and car-related items, tools, lanterns and related, 10 a.m., 1635 N. Main St., (Tumbleson Auction Center), Princeton, Tumbleson Auction Co., auctioneers. Oct. 27 — Harold Zinke Estate, large toy auction, 10 a.m., 1635 N. Main St., (Tumbleson Auction Center), Princeton, Tumbleson Auction Co., auctioneers. Oct. 29 — Jeno Bonucchi Estate, primitives, tools, antiques and collectibles, 10 a.m., 420 Laughlin St., Granville, Tumbleson Auction Co., auctioneers. Nov. 2 — David White, automobile, furniture, tools, glassware and household, 10 a.m., 434 Griswold St., Princeton, Tumbleson Auction Co., auctioneers. Nov. 3 — Mary Toellen, appliances, furniture, antiques, collectibles, household, lawn and garden, 10 a.m., 211 E. Hennepin St., Mark, Tumbleson Auction Co., auctioneers. Nov. 7 — Joseph J. Flaherty Estate, farmland, 10:30 a.m., 2160 3400 East Road, Arlington, McConville Realty, auctioneers. Nov. 9 — Gladys Boyer Estate, real estate and personal property, 10 a.m., 314 Bailey Court, Princeton, Tumbleson Auction Co., auctioneers. Nov. 11 — Linda Griggs, farmland, 10 a.m., auction held at Ag View FS Inc., 7226 IL Route 40, Buda, Rediger Auction Service, auctioneers. Nov. 14 — Linda A. Griggs, Lois M. Arnold, Ronald E. Arnold and Steve Arnold, farmland, 10 a.m., auction held at Buda Community Building, Buda, Johnson Auction Service, auctioneers. Nov. 22 — Mary Norton Davidson Trust, farmland, 10 a.m., auction held at Neponset Community Building, West Commercial Street, Neponset, Rediger Auction Service, auctioneers. Nov. 25 — Frederick Cluskey, farmland, 10 a.m., auction held at Saratoga Township Building, 28 Main St., Camp Grove, Rediger Auction Service, auctioneers.

Seeking Sources The Bureau County Republican is anxious to see your vacation photos. When you’re packing your suitcase for an upcoming excursion, remember to pack a copy of the BCR too. When you get to your destination, have someone take a photo of you holding the newspaper. It’s always fun if you can stand in front of a landmark or something interesting at your destination. When you get home, email the photo and some information about your trip to BCR Associate Editor Rita Roberts at rroberts@ bcrnews.com. Make sure you tell us who is in the photo and where your photo was taken. We’ll be happy to show your friends, family and neighbors where you went on your most recent vacation. Where in the World is the BCR? Hopefully, it’s in your suitcase and ready to go on a fun-filled journey, filled with memory-making moments.

Halloween tips for parents, homeowners When parents want to know what do with their kids, they visit the What To Do With The Kids website at www.whattodowiththekids.com. This is also a popular place to visit when planning Halloween festivities. Their Halloween collection includes tips on how to create a haunted house, throw a spooktacular Halloween party featuring party invitations and Halloween crafts to entertain the kids. The kids can have their faces painted easily with a simple yet creative design and your jack-o-lantern will be the envy of the neighborhood when using one of our unique pumpkin stencils. Here are a few tips that will hopefully prepare parents for make the evening fun for everyone. • Encourage the kids to use facial makeup instead of a mask. Spend the extra dollar and purchase quality makeup. You don’t want your kid to have that same look weeks later. • If possible, design the costume to accommodate a sweater or even a jacket underneath depending on the weather. • Make sure that all costumes and accessories are flame resistant. • Carry extra bags to dump candy in so the kids don’t get overly tired. • If you have more than one kid to supervise, try bringing a wagon or cart to unload the candy in as they go door to door. • If you’re taking other kids with you, set out the rules before you leave and make sure they understand. • Instruct the kids to stay with

you and off the lawns and out of the gardens. • Remind kids to say thank you, even if they don’t like the candy. • Be prepared to carry their props after a while. • Inspect all candy when you get home. Throw away homemade, unwrapped or open candy. • Bring a flashlight and give them glow sticks to wear. • Don’t let them walk in the middle of the streets. Cars will still travel on roads Oct. 31. • If the front light is out but they have Halloween decorations, there is a good chance that they have no more candy. • If the lights are out and don’t have any decorations, the people are most likely hiding in the back and have no candy to give. • Carry a small, portable first aid kit for those little cuts and injuries. • Many people bring their dogs with them and dress them up in costumes such as a hot dog or a devil. Instruct the kids to ask the owner if they can pet the animal before they do. There is a good chance that the animal is embarrassed to be in a costume and may want to take it out on a kid. • When the kids go to the door, stay close by and watch carefully. • Set a strict curfew for older kids that go out on their own. • Kids are never to go into the house unless you know them. • If you have to drive, slow down more than usual. • Give the kids a snack before they go out. They won’t complain

about being hungry and want to eat the candy. Here are a few tips for homeowners on Halloween: 1. Keep the path to your door clear of all obstacles and well lit. 2. Don’t terrorize the kids. It’s all about fun and not making them wet their pants. 3. Be extremely careful with the candle in your pumpkin so that nothing bursts into flames, including a kid’s costume. Consider using a battery powered light or glow sticks. 4. Use flashlights, glow sticks or electric lights with the power cord safe and secured. 5. If you have a dog, keep it in another room and away from the door. 6. If you’re going to give candy, give only store bought and wrapped items such as chocolate bars, chips, etc. Loose candy will be thrown out by the parents. 7. Alternative giving can include pencils, erasers or stickers with a Halloween theme. 8. If you’ve spent a lot of time on your Halloween display, you may want to consider putting some sort of safe fencing around it so that everyone can enjoy it without it being trampled. 9. Halloween candy is magically calorie and fat free on Oct. 31 so feel free to use the “one for you, one for me” rule. 10. Check out our website for more tips and special effects. Discover what to do with your kids at whattodowiththekids.com.

Upcoming Halloween activities The following towns will hold Halloween activities: • Buda —Mason Memorial Public Library will host a Halloween party at 11 a.m. Oct. 26. Children in kindergarten through eighth grade are invited to paint pumpkins and listen to Halloween stories. Trick or treating will be from 5 to 7 p.m. Oct. 31. Hot dogs and chips will be also be served during those hours at the fire station, put on by the village. • Dover — Trick or treating will be from 5 to 7 p.m. Oct. 31. • Ladd — The Ladd Recreation Board will sponsor a Halloween costume parade and party on Oct. 26. Children and grandchildren of Ladd residents are invited to participate. The parade will line up at 1 p.m. in North Central Bank’s parking lot and proceed south on Main Street to the Ladd Community Center where hot dogs, chips and cookies will be served to the children. Halloweenthemed activities and treats are planned. In case of inclement weather, all activities will be held inside the Community Center. Trick or treating will be from 5 to 7 p.m. Oct. 31. • LaMoille — The LaMoille-Clarion Public Library’s Halloween story hour will be at 10 a.m. Oct. 26. Cara,

Libby and Evan will entertain with stories, a craft and snacks. Children in second grade and younger are asked to be accompanied with a parent or guardian. • Manlius — Trick or treating from 5 to 7 p.m. Oct. 31. • Mineral — The Mineral-Gold Fire Department will host a Halloween party from 5 to 7 p.m. Oct. 27 at the fire department. There will be contests, games, prizes and food. • Princeton — The Princeton Optimist Club will hold a Halloween costume judging and parade at 10 a.m. Oct. 26 at Soldiers and Sailors Park for children ages 6 months to 12 years. The pumpkin races will be at noon on the corner of Main and Marion streets in downtown Princeton. The Princeton Public Library youth services’ Halloween party will be at 4:30 p.m. Oct. 31. The event will include games and crafts available for pre-K to fifth grade. There will also be costume prizes for funniest, prettiest, scariest and judge’s choice costumes. At 6:30 p.m. Zombie Night will be held for junior and senior high school students. A post trick-or-treating party with games, activities and costume prizes for the best zombie, funniest, prettiest and judge’s choice costumes. Trick or

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treating in Princeton will be 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Oct. 31. • Sheffield — Trick or treating will be 5 to 7 p.m. Oct. 31. The Sheffield American Legion Post will serve hot dogs and have a costume judging at 7 p.m. Oct. 31 at the fire station. • Spring Valley — The annual Spring Valley Halloween parade sponsored by the Spring Valley Lions Club will be at 1 p.m. Oct. 26, with registration from noon to 12:45 p.m. in the parking lot of the Spring Valley Patient Accounts Billing Office on West St. Paul Street in Spring Valley. All children pre-kindergarten through sixth grade are welcome to participate. Prizes will be awarded for the best costumes in each grade level. Trick or treating will be from 5 to 7 p.m. Oct. 31. • Walnut — The Walnut Community Club will host a Halloween party from 1 to 3 p.m. Oct. 26 at the Walnut Community Building. There will be hot dogs, chips and drinks. A costume contest will be at 2 p.m. Everyone will receive a treat bag. The Walnut Public Library will host a Halloween-themed story hour at 9:30 a.m. Oct. 30. Trick or treating in Walnut will be from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. Trick or treating at Walnut Manor will be from 6 to 7:30 p.m.

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4 4 • Thursday, October 24, 2013

Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

All about you Calendar Fundraiser planned MALDEN — Malden Grade School will host an event to raise funds for new playground equipment on Saturday, Oct. 26, at the Princeton Moose Lodge. Doors will open at 4:30 p.m. with dinner being served from 5 to 7 p.m. The cost for the dinner is $16 for adults, $12 for ages 4-17 and free for 3 and under. There is a $5 entry fee for those choosing not to eat dinner. The dinner event will also include a live auction, silent auction and DJ. Tickets are available by calling Malden Grade School at 815-6432436.

Halloween party MINERAL — The Mineral-Gold Fire Department will

host a Halloween party from 5 to 7 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 27, at the fire department. There will be contests, games, prizes and food.

Craft show TONICA — The Tonica Volunteer Fire Department will host a craft show from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 27 at the fire department on Route 251 on the north end of Tonica. There will be a door raffle. All proceeds go to the fire department.

Octoberfest supper LADD — The Ladd Men’s Club will host an Octoberfest supper from 4 to 8 p.m. Monday, Oct. 28, at the Ladd Moose Club Lodge. The menu will be

Anniversaries

pork loin and brats plus all the traditional German side dishes. A free hot dog plate is available for children ages 8 and under. There will also be free delivery for Ladd residents. Al Pottinger and the Lincolnaires will entertain from 5 to 7 p.m. Tickets are $12 each. All proceeds benefit community of Ladd. Call 815-303-2859 or 815-894-2557 for tickets and information.

World Community Day PRINCETON — Church Women United will celebrate World Community Day at 6 p.m. Friday, Nov. 1, at the First Lutheran Church in Princeton. All women are invited to attend. A supper of homemade soups, sandwiches and cookies will be served. The program will be “Walking Through Doors of Opportunity.” There is no need to R.S.V.P. and there is no fee to attend. For more information, call Sue Scruggs at 815-875-1446.

Births

Trivia night

50th Conner — Jason and Florence Conner of Mr. and Mrs. William F. Nelson of Princeton, Oct. 19. Martinsville, daughter, Oct. 11. Ganschow — Scott and Meghan Ganschow, daughter, Oct. 10. Gerber — Shawn and Sepha (Vanchiesong) Gerber of Princeton, daughter, Oct. 12. Oct. 24 • Saylor Jilderda Kizzee — Shawn Kizzee and Jane Rindal of Cedar • Amanda Walters • Reece Jilderda Point, son, Oct. 14. • Aimee Kiesewetter • Francis Jorgensen Pinter — Matthew and Rachel (Zemanek) Pinter • Madyson Kmetz • Crystal Kingsley of Ladd, son, Oct. 11. Oct. 25 • April Fairley Salisbury — Scott and Shelby (Crabtree) • Aaron Nelson • Kathy Snow Salisbury of Sheffield, daughter, Oct. 12. • Joni Childers • Kayla Hammond Sterling — Zach Sterling and Dacia Nelson of • Susan Lauritzen Oct. 28 Princeton, daughter, Oct. 14. • Luann Schaecher • Brianna Orozco Wright — Matthew and Courtney (Ziegler) Wright • Grace Pierson • Bruce Emmerson of Princeton, son, Oct. 10. • Ronald Davis • John Paul Schultz • Dom DelFiacco • Muriel Benson • Briana Butler • Chris Lutz • Lee Anna Browne • Anita Reed • Heather McComber • Emma Kruse-Carter Becker — Lorraine Jane Becker, 92, of Sublette, • Paula Tiggemann Oct. 29 formerly of Dixon, Oct. 9. • Jim Scarpaci • Kaitlyn Hildebrand Blumhorst — Todd Blumhorst of Tucson, Ariz., • Ryan Brucker • Sally Martenson formerly of Mendota, Sept. 29. Oct. 26 • Dale Vincent Borsch — Julie Borsch, 45, of Princeton, Oct. 11. • Vickie Walters • Jeannette Philhower Cade — Lawrence R. Cade Sr., 83, of Princeton, Oct. 20 • Catherine Maloney• Johnathon Hohertz Davis — Karen Lynn Davis, 66, of Eldridge, Iowa, Burress Oct. 30 formerly of Eldorado, Oct. 5. • Brian Webber • Wendy Michlig Piccatto — John T. Piccatto Sr., 72, of Spring Oct. 27 • Carol Koehler Valley, Oct. 14. • Brenda Guntorius • Mary Lasure Pillion — George J. Pillion Jr., 85, of Princeton, • Jack Coulter • Deb Baker formerly of Chicago and Lake Thunderbird, Oct. 14. • Dick Olds • Colleen Renwick Pipgrass — Eugene “The Piper” Pipgrass formerly of Princeton, Sept. 20. ••• Schuster — Koda Thomas Schuster, 1 month, of Hannibal, Mo., Oct. 14. Visit us online at www.bcrnews.com

Birthdays

Death Notices

Presents the Broadway Musical

Book by

Allan Knee

Fundraiser LADD — Project Success will hold a Rip’s Night fundraiser from 4:30 to 8 p.m. Monday, Nov. 4, at Rip’s in Ladd. All proceeds will go to the Hall Township food pantry. A free dessert will be offered to those who bring in a food item for the pantry.

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Musical tribute PRINCETON — Festival 56 will host the Legacy Girls, a special Andrews Sisters musical review, at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 2, at the Grace Performing Arts Center, 316 S. Main St., Princeton. The trio performs the hits of the famous Andrews Sisters — “Lullaby of Broadway,” “Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy,” “Don’t Fence Me In,” etc. Individual tickets are $18. For tickets, call 815-879-5656 or visit www.festival56.com. Fall box office hours (beginning Oct. 22) are noon to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday.

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SHEFFIELD — The First United Church of Christ in Sheffield will host its monthly community coffee from 7 to 10 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 2 in U.C.C. Parish Hall.

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SHEFFIELD — There will be a trivia night for the Sheffield Veteran’s Park playground fundraiser at 7 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 2, at St. Patrick’s Catholic Church Hall in Sheffield. Teams of up to 10 members can participate. Cost is $100. Drinks and snacks will be available for purchase. There will be a 50/50 raffle. To register in advance, call Toni Pickard at 815-3032334. Registration may also be done at the door.


5 Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

Thursday, October 24, 2013 • 5

Food court Always glad to see the month of October when pumpkin is so prevalent and so many good recipes come to mind of pies, cakes, cookies and about any thing else you can do with pumpkin.

Pumpkin Patch Pie 1 medium pie pumpkin (about 3 pounds) 1/3 cup sugar, divided 1 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon, divided 1/8 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg 3 eggs, lightly beaten 1 5-ounce can evaporated milk 1/2 cup milk Pastry for 9-inch single crust pie Wash pumpkin; cut a 6-inch circle around stem. Remove top and set aside. Remove loose fivers and seeds from the inside and discard or save seeds for toasting. In a small bowl, combine 1/3 cup sugar, 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon and salt, sprinkle around inside of pumpkin. Replace the top. Place in a greased 15-by-10-by-1inch baking pan. Bake at 325° for 1 1/2 hours or until very tender. Cool. Scoop out pumpkin, puree in a blender until smooth. Place 2 cups pureed pumpkin in a large bowl. Add the ginger, nutmeg and the remaining sugar and cinnamon. Stir in the eggs, evaporated milk and milk. Line a 9-inch pie plate with pastry. Trim pastry to 1 1/2 inches beyond edge of plate. Flute edges or decorate with pastry leaves. Pour filling into crust. Cover edges with foil. Bake at 375° for 75 to 80 minutes or until a knife inserted near the center comes out clean. Cool on a wire rack.

Pumpkin Cheesecake with Sour Cream Topping 1 1/2 cups graham cracker crumbs 1/4 cup sugar 1/3 cup butter, melted Filling 3 8-ounce packages cream cheese, softened 1 cup packed brown sugar

1 15-ounce can solid pack pumpkin 1 5-ounce can evaporated milk 2 tablespoons cornstarch 1 1/4 teaspoons ground cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg 2 eggs, lightly beaten Topping 2 cups (16 ounces) sour cream 1/3 cup sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract Additional ground cinnamon In a small bowl, combine crumbs and sugar, stir in butter. Press into the bottom and 1 1/2 inches up the sides of a greased 9-inch springhare pan. Bake at 350° for 5 to 70 minutes or until set. Cool for 10 minutes. In a large bowl, beat the cream cheese, brown sugar, pumpkin, milk, cornstarch, cinnamon and nutmeg until smooth. Add eggs; beat on low speed just until combined. Pour into crust. Place pan on a baking sheet. Bake at 350° for 55 to 60 minutes or until center is almost set. In a small bowl, combine the sour cream, sugar and vanilla, spread over filling. Bake 5 minutes longer. Cool on a wire rack for 10 minutes. Carefully run a knife around edges of pan to loosen; cool 1 hour longer. Chill overnight. Let stand at room temperature 30 minutes before slicing. Sprinkle with cinnamon. Refrigerate leftovers.

Pumpkin Torte 1 18 1/4-ounce package yellow cake mix 1 15-ounce can solid pack pumpkin, divided 1/2 cup milk 4 eggs 1/3 cup canola oil 1 1/2 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice, divided 1 8-ounce package cream cheese, softened 1 cup confectioners’ sugar 1 16-ounce carton frozen whipped topping, thawed 1/4 cup caramel ice cream topping 1/3 cup chopped pecans, toasted In a large bowl, combine the cake mix, 1 cup pumpkin, milk eggs, oil and 1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice, beat on low speed

for 30 seconds. Beat on medium for 2 minutes. Pour into two greased and floured 9-inch round baking pans. Bake at 350° for 25 to 30 minutes or until a toothpick inserted near the center comes out clean. Cool for 10 minutes before removing from pans to wire racks to cool completely. In a large bowl, beat cream cheese until light and fluffy. Add the confectioners’ sugar, and remaining pumpkin and pumpkin pie spice, beat until smooth. Fold in whipped topping. Cut each cake horizontally into two layers. Place bottom layer on a serving plate; spread with a fourth of the filling. Repeat layers three times. Drizzle with caramel topping, sprinkle with pecans. Store in the refrigerator.

Ginger Streusel Pumpkin Pie 1 sheet refrigerated pie pastry 3 eggs 1 15-ounce can solid pack pumpkin 1 1/2 cups heavy whipping cream 1/2 cup sugar 1/4 cup packed brown sugar 1 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon each ground allspice, ground nutmeg and ground cloves Streusel 1 cup all-purpose flour 1/2 cup packed brown sugar 1/2 cup cold butter, cubed 1/2 cup chopped walnuts 1/3 cup finely chopped crystallized ginger

On a lightly floured surface small pastry. Transfer pastry to a 9-inch pie plate. Trim pastry to 1/2 inch beyond edge of plate. Flute edges. In a large bowl, whisk the eggs, pumpkin, cream, sugars, cinnamon, salt, allspice, nutmeg and cloves. Pour into pastry shell. Bake at 350° for 40 minutes. In a small bowl, combine the flour and brown sugar, cut in butter until crumbly. Stir in walnuts and ginger; gently sprinkle over filling. Bake 15 to 25 minutes longer or until a knife inserted near center comes out clean. Cool on a wire rack. Refrigerate leftovers.

Pumpkin Oat Muffins 1 cup all-purpose flour 1/2 cup packed brown sugar 2 teaspoons baking powder 1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon baking soda 1 egg, lightly beaten 3/4 cup canned pumpkin 1/4 cup milk 1/4 cup canola oil 1 cup old fashioned oats 1/2 cup raisins Topping 1/3 cup packed brown sugar 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour 3/4 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice 1 tablespoon cold butter In a large bowl, combine the first six ingredients. Combine the egg, pumpkin, milk and oil; add to the dry ingredients, just until moistened. Stir in oats and raisins. Fill greased or paper-lined muffin cups two thirds full. In a small bowl, combine

Judy Dyke GRANDMA JUDY’S CAFE

the brown sugar, flour and pie spice; cut in butter until crumbly. Sprinkle 1 rounded teaspoonful over each muffin. Bake at 375° for 15 to 20 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean. Cool for 5 minutes before removing from pan to a wire rack. Serve warm. Makes 1 dozen.

Pretty Pumpkin Cinnamon Buns 2 tablespoons active dry yeast 1/2 cup warm water (110 to 115) 4 eggs 1 cup shortening 1 cup canned pumpkin 1 cup warm milk (110 to 115) 1/2 cup sugar 1/2 cup packed brown sugar 1/3 cup instant vanilla pudding mix 1/3 cup instant butterscotch pudding mix 1 teaspoon salt 7 to 8 cups all-purpose flour Filling 1/4 cup butter, melted 1 cup packed brown sugar 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon Icing 3 tablespoons water 2 tablespoons butter, softened 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 2 cups confectioners’ sugar 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla

extract In a large bowl, dissolve yeast in warm water. Add the eggs, shortening, pumpkin, milk, sugars, pudding mixes, salt and 6 cups flour; beat until smooth. Stir in enough remaining flour to form soft dough (dough will be sticky). Turn out onto a floured surface; knead until smooth and elastic, about 6 to 8 minutes. Place in a greased bowl, turning once to grease top. Cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled, about 1 hour. Punch dough down divide in half. Roll each portion into a 12-by-8-inch rectangle. Brush with butter. Combine brown sugar and cinnamon; sprinkle over dough to within 1/2 inch of edge. Roll up jelly roll style, starting with a long side; pinch seams to seal. Cut each into 12 slices. Place cut side down in two greased 13-by-9-inch baking pans. Cover and let rise until doubled, about 30 minutes. Bake at 350° for 22-28 minutes or until golden brown. In a small bowl, combine the water, butter and cinnamon. Add confectioners’ sugar and vanilla; beat until smooth. Spread over buns. Serve warm. If you have any recipes you would like to share with all of our other readers, you can email them to me at judyd2313@frontier.com. Happy baking!

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6 6 • Thursday, October 24, 2013

Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

Library Corner care law. Roush will also patrons to donate old for $1. ing. To R.S.V.P., stop by e-books and/or e-audioPRINCETON — Today, discuss the enrollment DVDs that no longer are The library’s current the library or call 309books from the OMNI Thursday, Oct. 24, adult process of the ACA. watched at home. The fundraiser for the new Consortium. For ques895-7701. The library’s craft night (for ages 10 The program is free and HVAC unit is Celebrating library is closing out its tions call 815-663-4741. phone is a phone/fax, so and up) will take place open to the public. There is a book sale VHS section and would Home – Just in time for at 6:30 p.m. Participants patrons are reminded to going on at the library PERU — The story like to amp up the DVD the holidays with bakwill learn how to make wait through the funny where patrons can pura milk jug skeleton and time program for chilsection. ing and gift shopping. ring until the librarian chase 10 items for $1. help the library recycle dren ages 3 to 5 years LASALLE — Tuesday, The fundraiser offers answers. The library will also be their milk jug igloo from old will be held at 10:30 Oct. 29, the LaSalle the purchasing of home LADD — Preschool the summer reading pro- selling gift cards again a.m. every Wednesday. Public Library will host story times are back in decor, candles and prethis year as a fundgram. All materials will Children will enjoy stosession. Story times are Deb Roush, in person mixed cookie dough. For raiser for the holiday be supplied. held at 10:30 a.m. on the ries, sing songs and counselor of the Trithose really short on season. Gift cards are Monday, Oct. 28, the first and third Monday enjoy crafts. To accomCounty Opportunities time, there are already available for many of Monday Night Movie of each month. They modate families, proCouncil, who will talk baked and ready to eat the area businesses begins at 6:30 p.m. in are geared toward chilgrams are flexible, and about the Affordable goodies all individually and online businesses. the Matson Meeting dren ages 3-5, who are families are welcome to Care Act and what it wrapped and gift boxed. The gift cards that are Room and will feature accompanied with a parbring younger or older Stop in at the library and means. The program purchased give differa biography picture on ent or guardian. children to the probegins at 6 p.m. Patrons check-out some of the ent percentages of the one of baseball’s greatOHIO — Saturday, grams. For more inforare encouraged to items Celebrating Home est in honor of the World cost back to the library. Oct. 26, the Ohio Public mation or to register, attend and learn about has to offer. The first order is due Series. Library will host its call 815-223-0229. The library encourages the new federal health by noon Friday, Nov. 8, Tuesday, Oct. 29, the annual Halloween party with delivery on Nov. 20. at 10 a.m.. The library preschool story hour The second order will and craft will feature will have games, activibe due by noon Friday, Halloween and mumties, food and a costume Cherry Library — Village Hall, Cherry; Librarian: Eileen Pinter. Dec. 6, with delivery by mies. The fun begins at contest. Ladd Public Library — 125 N. Main St., Ladd, 815-894-3254; Librarian: Amy Dec. 20. Order sheets 10:30 a.m. Also Tuesday, Also, the library is sellBosi. that list which gift cards a program on Moroccan ing butter braids as a LaMoille Clarion Library — 81 Main St., LaMoille, 815-638-2356; Librarian: are available may be cuisine with local chef fundraiser. Orders can Joyce Sondgeroth. picked-up at the library. Monika Sudakov of be placed with any board Leepertown Township Library — 201 E. Nebraska St., Bureau, 815-659Payment for the gift Chestnut Street Inn in member or at the library. 3283; Librarian: Rose M. Thompson. cards must be done at Sheffield will be at 6:30 Orders will arrive by Mason Memorial Library — 104 W. Main St., Buda, 309-895-7701; Librarian: the time of ordering by p.m. Nov. 18. Jeannie Jarigese. cash or check. Wednesday, Oct. 30, WALNUT — Mineral-Gold Public Library — 120 E. Main St., Mineral, 309-288-3971; LAMOILLE — the Widmark Wednesday Wednesday, Oct. 30, the Librarian: Connie Baele. Saturday, Oct. 26, the Movie will begin at 6:30 Walnut Public Library Neponset Public Library — 201 Commercial St., Neponset, 309-594-2204; LaMoille-Clarion Public p.m. and feature a murwill host a HalloweenLibrarian: Carissa Faber. Library’s Halloween derous love triangle themed story hour at Ohio Township Library — 112 N. Main St., Ohio, 815-376-5422; Librarian: story hour will be at 10 in a backwoods bar: 9:30 a.m. David Sprung. a.m. Cara, Libby and Suspense, romance, The library is also sellPrinceton Public Library — 698 E. Peru St., Princeton, 815-875-1331; Evan will entertain with drama and plot twists ing VHS tapes. Patrons Librarian: Julie Wayland. stories, a craft and are sure to ensue. are invited to fill a groRaymond A. Sapp Memorial Library — 103 E. Main St., Wyanet, 815-699snacks. Children in secThursday, Oct. 31, cery bag for $1. Librarian 2342; Librarian: Linda Kurth. ond grade and younger the youth services Michele McAlvey chalRichard A. Mautino Memorial Library — 215 E. Cleveland St., Spring Valley, are asked to be accomHalloween party begins lenges patrons to discov815-663-4741; Director: Barb White. panied with a parent or at 4:30 p.m. There will er the various crafts that Selby Township Library — 101 Depot St., DePue, 815-447-2660; Librarian: guardian. be games and crafts can be made out of old Marcia Broady. Also, students in available for pre-K to VHS tapes. Patrons are Sheffield Public Library — 136 E. Cook St., Sheffield, 815-454-2628; fourth through eighth fifth grade. Also there also invited to check-out Librarian: Sue Lanxon. grades are invited to will be costume prizes the ongoing book sale Tiskilwa Library — 119 E. Main St., Tiskilwa, 815-646-4511; Librarian: Karyn take part in the Rebecca for funniest, prettiest, at the library. The sale Stark. Caudill Young Reader’s scariest and judge’s includes many current Walnut Public Library — 101 Heaton St., Walnut, 815-379choice costumes. At 6:30 Book Award program. titles, as well as, older 2159; Librarian: Michele McAlvey. p.m. Zombie Night will be The program offers 20 titles, non-fiction pieces held for junior and senior nominees, who must and Christian titles. Fill If you would like to include your news on our Library Corner read at least three to high school students. a bag for $1. Patrons are page, send your items to Goldie Currie at gcurrie@bcrnews. vote for their favorite. A post trick-or-treating also encouraged to fill com. For more information, call Currie at 815-875-4461, ext. Stop by the library for party with games, activibag of the library’s old 236. more information. ties and costume prizes audio books on cassette The library continues for the best zombie, to add new titles to the funniest, prettiest and judge’s choice costumes. collection each week. What did the Greek say Patrons are encouraged SPRING VALLEY — to the theater buff? to stop in and see what’s Monday, Oct. 28, the “Min chasete afto to new. young adult book club theamatiko gegonos!” * BUDA — Saturday, will meet from 5 to Oct. 26, the Mason 5:30 p.m. and discuss Learning Stage presents: Memorial Public Library “The 5th Wave” by Rick will host a Halloween Yancey. party at 11 a.m. Childrenwww.edwardjones.com Any patron of the in kindergarten through library who is intereighth grade are invited ested in e-books and/ to paint pumpkins. or e-audiobooks needs Halloween stories will to contact the library A Theater Bus Tour to Chicago, are constant: so their library cardFor many also of us,be ourread. goalsPatrons in life remain including: encouraged and to R.S.V.P. barcode is entered into financial independence providing for family. A visit to the National Hellenic the library knows the library’s system.Striking a so balance between saving for goals, such Museum how many pumpkins The patron will then as education and retirement, and allocating money - A multi-course family-style will be needed for paintbe able to download

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7 Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

Thursday, October 24, 2013 • 7

Sending holiday cheer to service members worldwide MAGNOLIA — Making sure those serving in the nation’s Armed Forces receive their presents and care packages in time for the holidays is a priority for friends and family members of military personnel serving around the world and for the U.S. Postal Service. “We want to remind our customers about these important mailing dates,” said Magnolia Postmaster Yvone Mercer. “This will help ensure cards, letters and packages arrive in time for the holidays.” Helping to get packages on their way, the Postal Service offers a discount on its largest priority mail flat rate

box at $14.85. The price includes a $2 per box discount for military mail being sent to air/ army post office, fleet post office and diplomatic post office (APO, FPO, DPO) destinations worldwide. Priority mail flat rate boxes are available at no cost at local post offices, or can be ordered online at shop.usps.com. Postage, labels and customs forms can be printed online anytime using Click-N-Ship. To ensure timely delivery of holiday wishes by Dec. 25, send cards and packages to military APO, FPO, DPO addresses overseas no later than the mailing dates in the graph.

Use the Military Care Kit to send presents and/or care packages With Priority Mail supplies as the packaging of choice for families preparing care packages for service members overseas, the Postal Service created a free “Military Care Kit” based on the items most frequently requested by military families. The kit contains: Two Priority Mail APO/FPO Flat Rate Boxes, two Priority Mail Medium Flat Rate Boxes, Priority Mail tape, Priority Mail address labels and appropriate customs forms. To order the kit, call 800-610-8734. Guidelines for packing, addressing, and shipping items to U.S. troops can be found at usps.com/ship/apo-fpo-guidelines.htm. To order flat-rate boxes featuring the “America Supports You” logo, go to store.usps.com.

Forum will discuss RICL proposal MENDOTA — The Illinois Commerce Commission has scheduled a second public forum to gather comments on the proposal from Rock Island Clean Line (RICL) to construct, operate and maintain a transmission line. The forum will begin at 7 p.m. Oct. 28 in the Mendota High School Gym, 152 N. 4453rd Rd. or 152 East U.S. Highway 52, Mendota. People who signed up to provide comments at the initial public forum, but did not have a chance to speak will be given the opportunity to make comments first. Additional speakers will be given

an opportunity to provide public comments if time allows. Rock Island Clean Line LLC submitted a petition with the ICC Oct. 10, 2012 to act as a transmission public utility and to construct, operate and maintain a 500 mile overhead High Voltage Direct Current transmission line. Oral and written comments will be accepted at the meeting. Comments may also be submitted through the ICC website, www.icc.illinois.gov/ docket/comment, or by calling 1-800-524-0795. The docket for the case is 12-0560.

Priority Mail Express First-Class Parcel Military Mail Letters Priority Airlift Mail Space Standard Available Post Service and Cards Mail (SAM)3 (PAL)2 (PMEMS)1

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APO/FPO AE ZIPs 090-092

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1 PMEMS is available to selected military/diplomatic post offices. Check with your local Post Office to determine if this service is available to an APO/FPO/DPO address. 2 PAL is a service that provides air transportation for parcels on a space-available basis. PAL is available for Standard Post items not exceeding 30 pounds in weight or 60 inches in length and girth combined. The applicable PAL fee must be paid in addition to the regular surface price for each addressed piece sent by PAL service. 3.) SAM parcels are paid at Standard Post prices with maximum weight and size limits of 15 pounds and 60 inches in length and girth combined. SAM parcels are first transported domestically by surface and then to overseas destinations by air on a space-available basis.

Addressing the package 1.) Write out the service members full name in the address. 2.) Include the unit and APO/ FPO/DPO address with the 9-digit ZIP Code (if one is assigned). For example: Example 1: CPT JOHN DOE UNIT 2050 BOX 4190 APO AP 96278-2050

Example 2: SGT ROBERT SMITH PSC 802 BOX 74 APO AE 09499-0074 Example 3: SEAMAN JOSEPH SMITH USCGC HAMILTON FPO AP 96667-3931

Example 4: MSG JANE DOE CMR 1250 APO AA 09045-1000 3.) Include a return address. The Postal Service receives no tax dollars for operating expenses and relies on the sale of postage, products and services to fund its operations.

Dress donations being accepted PRINCETON — The First United Methodist Church of Princeton is accepting donations of new and gently used prom, pageant, bridesmaid and evening dresses as well as

accessories including jewelry, purses, and shoes for the second annual PROMise Sale on March 1, 2014. The purpose of this event is to provide an opportunity for girls to find

the prom dress of their dreams at a very affordable price. Proceeds from this charitable event will be given to Living Works Suicide Prevention Walk and FUMC youth programs.

Dress donations can be dropped off at the First United Methodist Church in Princeton located at 316 S. Church St. For more information, call 815-8722821.

We would like to say...

Thanks! NIE Retail Partners PRINCETON Beck’s Express Nelson Drug Store Princeton Gas Road Ranger Shell Express Somewhere Else Sullivan’s Food Sullivan’s Gas Town’s End Cafe Wal-Mart CHERRY Cherry Country Store LA MOILLE Fast Stop

PERU Ankiewiez’s Deli Hyvee Gas Station SHEFFIELD Royal Supermarket SPRING VALLEY A&M Mini Market Johnson Pharmacy Thompson Drug Store Valley News Video Vision TISKILWA Valley Market

When you purchase the Bureau County Republican from one of these retail partners, a portion of the purchase price is donated to the Bureau County Republican’s Newspapers In Education program.

Italvibras USA Inc. would like to invite you and your family to enjoy a safe and Happy Halloween with us here at our Princeton Office. 1940 Vans Way Princeton, IL 61356 We open at 8:00am and close at 5:00pm. Come by throughout the day on October 31st with your little ones to pick up a Halloween Surprise! Cookout at lunchtime of hotdogs and burgers so the kids can fuel up before the big night! We want to keep the trick or treaters safe and warm for this Halloween Celebration.


8 8 • Thursday, October 24, 2013

Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

Apples • pumpkins Honey • Gourds perenniAls • BreAds

SATURDAYS 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. TUESDAYS 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Open until end Of OctOber

new locAtion! Corner of Main & Elm (935 N. Main St.)


9 Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

Thursday, October 24, 2013 • 9

Entertainment

River Valley Players present ‘Little Women’ the musical HENRY — River Valley Players will present the production of “Little Women” the musical on Oct. 26 and 27, and Nov. 1, 2 and 3 at St. Mary’s Community Center, 1301 Second Ave. in Henry. “Little Women” follows the adventures of Jo, Meg, Beth and Amy March as they grow up in Civil War America. The beloved story of the March sisters is timeless and deals with issues that are as relevant today as when they were written. This literary classic has been brought to life as an exhilarating musical with glorious music and heart. “Little Women” embodies the complete theatrical experience, guaranteeing a night filled with laughter, tears and lifting

of the spirit. This powerful score soars with the sounds of personal discovery, heartache, and hope, and is the sound of true America finding its voice. The Saturday and Sunday performances will be $28.50, which includes the show, a three-course meal and three beverage choices. For Saturday performances, doors will open at 6 p.m. with dinner beginning at 6:30 p.m. For Sunday performances, doors will open at noon, with dinner beginning at 12:30 p.m. Nov. 1 will be family night. Tickets for family night are $17, which includes the show. Concessions will be available before the show and at intermission. For school

groups attending on family night, tickets will be offered at a discounted price of $15 when a teacher reserves tickets in advance. The cast includes Deanne Crook (Jo March), Gary Talsky (Professor Bhaer), Tara Kunkel (Amy March), Christine Gaspardo (Meg March), Samantha Farb (Beth March), Jane Knapp (Marmee March), Ken Williamson (Mr. Laurence), Robert Gibson (Laurie Laurence), Karen Lesman (Aunt March and Mrs. Kirk), and Derrik Gaspardo (Mr. John Photo contributed Brooke). Pictured above are (sitting left to right): Samantha Farb, Deanne Crook, ChrisFor tickets, contact tine Gaspardo, and Tara Kunkel and (standing left to right) Jane Knapp, Ken Judy Schwiderski at 309- Williamson, Gary Talsky, Robert Gibson, Derrik Gaspardo and Karen Lesman. 364-3403 or email rivervalleyplayers@yahoo. com.

Stage 212 announces casting call

LASALLE — Auditions for Stage 212’s production of “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling bee” are at 7 p.m. Nov. 1 and Nov. 2 at the theater, 700 First St., LaSalle. Director Scot Smigel will be casting five men and four women. Audi-

Photo contributed

The Legacy Girls will perform at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 2 at the Grace Performing Arts Center. They will present a special Andrews Sisters musical revue

Legacy Girls show pays tribute to the music of the Andrew Sisters PRINCETON — Festival 56 will present the Legacy Girls, a special Andrews Sisters musical revue, at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 2 at the Grace Performing Arts Center, 316 S. Main St. in Princeton. With comedic flair, tight three-part harmonies and synchronized choreography, the perfectly costumed trio performs the hits of the famous Andrews Sisters, like “Don’t Sit Under the Apple Tree,” “Chattanooga Choo Choo,” “Don’t

Fence Me In,” “Lullaby of Broadway,” and “Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy.” The Legacy Girls was formed in 2006. When the three women, who had originally simply been friends singing together in a church choir, were told their singing had a big band feel to it and they sounded like the Andrew Sisters, they decided to bring that music to life as a performance group. In their concert the Legacy Girls present an entertaining tribute to the

IVCC plans first homecoming in decades OGLESBY — Illinois Valley Community College will celebrate its first homecoming in decades on Nov. 2, the day after the Peter Miller Community Technology Center grand opening. IVCC-LPO Homecoming offers alumni and friends the opportunity to “come back to the hill for a weekend full of fun activities,” said Tracy Morris, associate vice president for student services. The celebration includes tours of the new building, a cookout and activities, and women’s and men’s basketball games. Guests wearing IVCC apparel will get into the games for $1; those wearing LPO or Apaches apparel will get in free. The day will conclude with a social gathering at Claudette’s, 253 E. Walnut St., Oglesby. Visit www.ivcc.edu/homecoming for updates.

music that uplifted and unified a nation during World War II. Tickets to the concert are $18. They can be purchased online at www. festival56.com, by phone at 815-879-5656, ext. 11, or at the Festival 56 box office at the Grace Theatre. Fall box office hours, beginning Oct. 22, are Tuesday through Saturday, noon to 5 p.m. The Grace is completely accessible and ample free parking is available nearby. ••• To submit items, email news@bcrnews.com

tioners will be taught part of a song to perform and will be asked to read from the script. No preparation is necessary, and familiarity with the script is not required to audition. Scripts will be available to read at the box office during regular

office hours. Call 815224-3025 for details. For more information, contact producer Ellen Marincic at 815-3263707. “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee” will be presented from Jan. 24 to Feb. 2.

Got Drugs? Turn in your unused or expired medication for safe disposal Saturday, October 26, 2013

Sponsored by: CPASA-Community Partners Against Substance Abuse, Princeton Police Department, Bureau County Sheriff’s Office, Spring Valley Police Department, Putnam County Sheriff’s Office, Buda Police Department, Wyanet Police Department, Walnut Police Department, DePue Police Department, Granville Police Department, 10:00am to 1:00pm Ladd Police Princeton Police Department Department 605 Elm Place, Princeton, IL

Disposal locations

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Buda Village Hall 105 Main Street, Buda, IL

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Wyanet Rescue Building 101 S. Maple St., Wyanet, IL

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Captain phillips (PG-13) Digital Presentation

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insidious: Chapter 2 (PG-13) Digital Presentation

Fri . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:30 7:15 Sat & Sun . . . . . . . 1:45 4:30 7:15 Mon-Wed . . . . . . . 4:30 7:15 Thu . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:30 7:15 9:15 Showtimes good 10/25/13 thru 10/31/13 .

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Village of Granville 316 S McCoy Street, Granville, IL

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DePue Village Hall 111 West 2nd Street, DePue, IL

For more information, please visit www.dea.gov


10 • Pro Pigskin Challenge • Thursday, October 24, 2013

Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

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Route 89 North Spring Valley 815-664-4512

PRIZES and THE LOCAL GRAND PRIZE PACKAGE ALSO PLAY THE SURVIVOR GAME FOR A CHANCE AT A GRAND PRIZE

24 HOUR TOWING SERVICE

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Spring Valley Ford

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• Brakes • Tune-Ups • Diagnostics

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(Includes y Lube and Oil) l k e we Sponsored by e z i pr

1790 N. Euclid Avenue • Princeton, IL 61356 www.leeswater.com • 815-875-2506

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Thursday, October 24, 2013 • Pro Pigskin Challenge • 11

Rachel Dean Gateway Services 9-6 66-41 Carolina Detroit Kansas City New England New Orleans Philadelphia San Francisco Oakland Cincinnati Denver Arizona Green Bay: 35 Seattle

Steve Sandholm Anytime Fitness - Princeton 9-6 55-52 Carolina Detroit Kansas City New England New Orleans Philadelphia San Francisco Pittsburgh Cincinnati Denver Atlanta Green Bay: 24 Seattle

Tom Bickett Combined Cleaning 8-7 62-45 Carolina Detroit Kansas City New England New Orleans Philadelphia San Francisco Pittsburgh Cincinnati Denver Atlanta Green Bay: 27 Seattle

Lisa Turner Lee’s Water 10-5 57-50

Carolina Detroit Kansas City New England New Orleans Philadelphia San Francisco Pittsburgh Cincinnati Denver Atlanta Green Bay: 42 Seattle

Heath Terando Tiger Town Trading Post 7-8 61-46 Carolina Detroit Kansas City New England New Orleans Philadelphia San Francisco Oakland Cincinnati Denver Atlanta Green Bay: 31 Seattle

Ray Ferrari Spring Valley Ford Last Week 11-4 Overall Season 66-41 Carolina Detroit Kansas City New England New Orleans NY Giants San Francisco Pittsburgh Cincinnati Denver Atlanta Green Bay: 27 Seattle

John Aden LaMoille Auto Care Center 9-6 63-44 Carolina Detroit Kansas City New England New Orleans Philadelphia San Francisco Pittsburgh Cincinnati Denver Arizona Green Bay: 23 Seattle

Kevin Hieronymus BCR Sports Editor 8-7 74-33 Carolina Detroit Kansas City New England New Orleans NY Giants San Francisco Pittsburgh Cincinnati Denver Arizona Green Bay: 34 Seattle

Phyllis Fargher BCR Advertising Coordinator 10-5 65-42 Carolina Detroit Kansas City New England New Orleans Philadelphia San Francisco Pittsburgh Cincinnati Denver Atlanta Green Bay: 21 Seattle

Ashley Oliver BCR Multi Media Consultant 7-8 58-49

Help me in Congratulating Ashley & Nathan Oliver on a handsome baby boy. Chase Michael was born October 22nd. He weighs 7 lbs., 15 oz. and is 20 3/4” long. Welcome to the World Chase!

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Home of Your Truck Headquarters Some vehicles priced more. Price subject to change.

no

sign-Up FEEs

Valid w/coupon only. see club for details.

Ebay SalES and ESTaTE ClEanouTS

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815-872-1111 815-780-0630

1101 N. MaiN PriNcetoN, iL 61356 tigertowntradingpost@yahoo.com

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444 South Main St., Princeton, IL 815-915-8378 • anytimefitness.com

• Vendor Space • Estates • Ebay Services • Consignments

Located in the Old Windchimer Building


10 • Pro Pigskin Challenge • Thursday, October 24, 2013

Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

• Sales & Service • Commercial & Residential • Water Softeners • Drinking Water Systems

Oil Change

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A weekly prize will be awarded to our “Top Picker of the Week” Play every week for a chance at the Grand Prize Package at season’s end

TRIP FOR 2 TO HAWAII!

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with Elegance

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LaSalle 2nd & Joliet Street Open 7 Days a Week Free Layaway

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Mon-Fri 8:30-5:30 • Sat 8-1 Now accepting

BUREAU & PUTNAM AREA RURAL TRANSIT

877-874-8813 • www.RideBPART.org

Route 89 North Spring Valley 815-664-4512

PRIZES and THE LOCAL GRAND PRIZE PACKAGE ALSO PLAY THE SURVIVOR GAME FOR A CHANCE AT A GRAND PRIZE

24 HOUR TOWING SERVICE

Troy Hodapp of Princeton

Spring Valley Ford

YOU COULD

Like us on Facebook

• Brakes • Tune-Ups • Diagnostics

Week 7’s Winner

(Includes y Lube and Oil) l k e we Sponsored by e z i pr

1790 N. Euclid Avenue • Princeton, IL 61356 www.leeswater.com • 815-875-2506

www.kinetico.com

Thursday, October 24, 2013 • Pro Pigskin Challenge • 11

Rachel Dean Gateway Services 9-6 66-41 Carolina Detroit Kansas City New England New Orleans Philadelphia San Francisco Oakland Cincinnati Denver Arizona Green Bay: 35 Seattle

Steve Sandholm Anytime Fitness - Princeton 9-6 55-52 Carolina Detroit Kansas City New England New Orleans Philadelphia San Francisco Pittsburgh Cincinnati Denver Atlanta Green Bay: 24 Seattle

Tom Bickett Combined Cleaning 8-7 62-45 Carolina Detroit Kansas City New England New Orleans Philadelphia San Francisco Pittsburgh Cincinnati Denver Atlanta Green Bay: 27 Seattle

Lisa Turner Lee’s Water 10-5 57-50

Carolina Detroit Kansas City New England New Orleans Philadelphia San Francisco Pittsburgh Cincinnati Denver Atlanta Green Bay: 42 Seattle

Heath Terando Tiger Town Trading Post 7-8 61-46 Carolina Detroit Kansas City New England New Orleans Philadelphia San Francisco Oakland Cincinnati Denver Atlanta Green Bay: 31 Seattle

Ray Ferrari Spring Valley Ford Last Week 11-4 Overall Season 66-41 Carolina Detroit Kansas City New England New Orleans NY Giants San Francisco Pittsburgh Cincinnati Denver Atlanta Green Bay: 27 Seattle

John Aden LaMoille Auto Care Center 9-6 63-44 Carolina Detroit Kansas City New England New Orleans Philadelphia San Francisco Pittsburgh Cincinnati Denver Arizona Green Bay: 23 Seattle

Kevin Hieronymus BCR Sports Editor 8-7 74-33 Carolina Detroit Kansas City New England New Orleans NY Giants San Francisco Pittsburgh Cincinnati Denver Arizona Green Bay: 34 Seattle

Phyllis Fargher BCR Advertising Coordinator 10-5 65-42 Carolina Detroit Kansas City New England New Orleans Philadelphia San Francisco Pittsburgh Cincinnati Denver Atlanta Green Bay: 21 Seattle

Ashley Oliver BCR Multi Media Consultant 7-8 58-49

Help me in Congratulating Ashley & Nathan Oliver on a handsome baby boy. Chase Michael was born October 22nd. He weighs 7 lbs., 15 oz. and is 20 3/4” long. Welcome to the World Chase!

1503 Olympic Rd. • Princeton, IL COUPON • COUPON • COUPON • COUPON

New Customer speCial

$

• Lube, 5 qts. oil & filter • Multi-Point inspection • Top off all fluids • Motorcraft Synthetic Blend • Check all belts & hoses

21

95

plus tax

We want your business!

Spring Valley Ford

Route 89 North Spring Valley 815-664-4512 • www.springvalleyford.com

Home of Your Truck Headquarters Some vehicles priced more. Price subject to change.

no

sign-Up FEEs

Valid w/coupon only. see club for details.

Ebay SalES and ESTaTE ClEanouTS

Heath Terando

815-872-1111 815-780-0630

1101 N. MaiN PriNcetoN, iL 61356 tigertowntradingpost@yahoo.com

®

444 South Main St., Princeton, IL 815-915-8378 • anytimefitness.com

• Vendor Space • Estates • Ebay Services • Consignments

Located in the Old Windchimer Building


12 Sports 12 • Thursday, October 24, 2013

Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

Sports Senior Spotlight Ashley Farraher Name: Ashley Farraher. Nickname: Ashweenie and Ferrari. School: Princeton High School. Date/place of birth: Sept. 21, 1995. Hometown: Princeton. Family: Tim (dad), Julie (mom) and Jake (brother). Sports: Volleyball and cheerleading. Favorite sport and why: Volleyball, I love playing with all my friends. Likes: Happy people, my friends, shopping, laughing and playing volleyball. Dislikes: Meatloaf, snow and spiders. Person with the greatest influence on my athletic career (and why): My parents, they always keep me positive. Person with the greatest influence in my life: Rebecca Hult. If stranded on a deserted island, I would have my: Cell phone, Caleb and my puppy. The CD in my player at home/car is: A mix CD. People would be surprised to know: I still sleep with my stuffed frog I got from Becca in third grade. I stay home to watch: Pretty Little Liars. The funniest person I’ve ever met: Caleb Dickens. What they’ll say about me at school after I graduate: That I was always positive. Most embarrassing moment: Crashing my car in front of Piehls. Most unforgettable moment: When I surprised my grandparents in Florida. Ultimate sports fantasy: Play a game of sand volleyball with Misty May Treanor.​ What I would like to do in life: Be successful. Three words that best describe myself: Fun, blonde and happy.

BCR photos/Kevin Hieronymus

Ashley Farraher’s ultimate sports fantasy would be to play a game of sand volleyball with Olympic Gold Medalist Misty May Treanor.

Costume Party Oct. 26, 7pm - 11 pm Free admission • Snacks provided

Ashley Farraher

Trick or TreaT

$1 cans Of beer $2 bOttles Of beer

$100 cash prize fOr best cOstume

Fairgrounds • Princeton, Illinois

Oct. 26 & 27, 2013 The Public 8:30 a.m. - 4 p.m. SAT. 8:30 a.m. - 3 p.m. SUN.

BUY - SELL - TRADE

- Per Federal and State Laws -

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC! 5:30 pm to 6:30 pm, Oct. 31

Modern & Antiques

Haunted Hallway and Lots of Candy!

HEALTHCARE AND REHABILITATION CENTRE - CARTRIDGES & RELATED ITEMS FREE PARKING

815-875-3347 • fax: 815-875-2012 515 Bureau Valley Parkway, Princeton, IL www.colonialcarecentre.com

12927 IL Hwy 26 • Princeton, IL 61356 • 815-879-6531 (Website coming soon)

Sauk Trail Gun Collectors, Inc. William Fritz • 309-689-1934


13 Sports Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

Thursday, October 24, 2013 • 13

Wyaton Hills Golf Course ST. BEDE Girls golf: Members of the St. Bede girls golf team (front row, from left) are Nikita Dodda, Aiko Mendoza, Tess Montez, Gabby Mendoza, Sydney Eustice, Cassidy Donnelly, Taylor Hamer and Stephanie Boehm.

ST. BEDE Boys golf: Members of the St. Bede boys golf team (front row, from left) are Gabe Braboy   Colin Giordano, Ernie Steinz, Chris Sampson, Min Hwang, Joe Kim, Anthony Truckenbrod, Brady Donahue, Joey Dudek, Adam Schwartz, Jack Kunkel  and Jarret Olson.

Photo contributed

Wyaton Hills Friday Night Mixed League The Tree Huggers won the Wyaton Hills Friday Night Mixed League. Team members are Carl Prokes (from left) Cindy Fundell, who is standing in for her husband Ron, Denny Miller, Nancy Bland, Tom Carr, Linda Halberg and Mick Towne.

ST. BEDE tennis: Members of the St. Bede tennis team (front row, from left) are Gabi Hilgart, Lauren Silfies, Maritsa Hermosillo, Molly Considine, Hayden Sartin; and (back row) Emma Wilke, Rachel Dose, Grace Kinsella, Jordan Brolley, Desiree Jordan and Mercedes Brayton.

ST. BEDE cross country: Members of the St. Bede cross country team (front row, from left) are Johnny Kerasotes, Thea Mauck,  Holly Gregorich, Annie Needs, Julia Pohar, Sadie Long and H. Wang; (second row) Leo Lopez, Laura Sickley, Katy Kennamer, Morgan Knoblauch, Raley Mauck, Anna Jereb, Photo contributed Destiny Kwiatek, Lexie Miranda, Sophie Carus  and Adam Hunter; and (back row) Felipe Takeasu, Jeff Barnes, Abram Yucus, Brent Koogler, Jacob ConCentral Bank won20 theyears Wyaton Hills Thursday Night don, Jacob Hockings, Garrett Barto, Jeremiah Celebrating of quality and service! HYDRAULIC DOORS JohnLadies League. Team members are (front row, from son, Andrew Lopez  and Joey Chai. left)Vicki Mongan, Pam Tippner, Nancy Pierson, Nita Wyatt, Kathy Clark and Carolyn Barkley.

& Snow Tight! WyatonWind, HillsRain Ladies League

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St. Bede volleyball: Members of the St. Bede varsity volleyball team (front row, from left) Sadie Long, Morgan King and Katie Joerger; (middle row) Julia Pohar, Emma Perona, Rachel Cessna, Michelle Reese, Madison Billhorn and Samantha Whalen; (back row) coach Dawn Williams, Christine Perona, Claire Dudek, Olivia Mueller, Hanna Bima, Raley Mauck and coach Stefanie Kaufmann.

St. Bede FOOTBALL: Members of the St. Bede varsity football team (front row, left) are Derrick Scarpaci, Baylee Hopps, Justin Shaw, Matt Szczepaniak, Jack Shields, Braidy Shipp and Brandon Edens; (second row) Joe Arriaga, Jack Brady, Sam Halm, Michael Slingsby, Michael Manning, Jonathon Dose, Connor MacDavitt and Spencer Barnes; (third row): Josh Elnicki, Juan Flores, Dakotah Baker, Bryant Eustice,  Dexter Baker, Fermin Sajuan, Joey Acosta, Andre Hurr and Brandon Hanson; and (back row) Josh Nelson, Brandon Glynn, Sam Bennett, Michael Bellino, Andrew Pyszka, John Barnes, Nick Needs and Brady Booker.

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• Full Access • No Maintenance • 10-Year Warranty on Door Structure

Photo contributed

2-Man League champs Tony Gonzales (left) and Tom Carr won the Wyaton Hills Monday Night 2-Man League.

• Safe & Strong • Weather Tight • Hassle-Free • Ag & Residential

duSK - Fireworks

Cost: $ 3.00 Per Person

Food available: hot dogs, brats, chips, Pop, Water, hot chocolate & hot cider

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PowerLift Doors of Illinois 32625 1360 N. Ave. • Spring Valley, IL

815-663-3942

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14180 1800 East St., Princeton

Fruits

Vegetables

Wines

www.ahundredacresorchard.com


14 Keeping Healthy 14 • Keeping Healthy • Thursday, October 24, 2013

Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

Four numbers you need to know for good health (BPT) — When it comes to health by the numbers, you probably already know to keep an eye on your cholesterol level, body mass index (BMI) and blood pressure. But are you aware of another medical marker that directly impacts these others? Advanced Glycation End-products (AGEs) are markers for the aging of our internal organs, tissues and body systems. Research shows that AGEs are linked to nearly every chronic disease we face today, such as obesity, kidney, heart and eye disease, and dementia.

“While cholesterol, body mass index and blood pressure are familiar and relevant health indicators, AGEs are the critical fourth medical marker that everyone should know,” says Pat Baird, registered dietitian and A.G.E. Foundation board member. “AGEs impact how long and how well you live as they age your body from the inside out.” AGEs develop naturally in our body and can be ingested through certain foods, including browned, sugary and processed foods. When people con-

sume too many of these foods, higher than normal levels of AGEs build up in the body’s tissues and accelerate the aging process internally. You can lower AGEs in your diet by avoiding charred and blackened foods, extending cooking time and incorporating more water (e.g., steaming, poaching, boiling) and acidic marinades (e.g., lemon or lime-based) into your food preparation, according to the A.G.E. Foundation. Choosing colorful foods that include healthy iridoids, like noni, blueberries, olives and

cranberries as well as consuming the supplemental beverage TruAge Max, can effectively lower AGEs. Additionally, receiving a full eight hours of sleep allows the body to fight AGE accumulation and managing physical and emotional stress curbs the production of AGEs. “Being aware of these four critical medical markers — cholesterol, body mass index, blood pressure and AGEs — can be the first step to a better and healthier life,” Bairdd said. “Simple lifestyle changes like exercising for 30 minutes a day,

eating a healthy diet rich in whole grains, fruits and vegetables, quitting smoking and regularly monitoring your health can help to lower or maintain

the level of AGEs in your body and reduce your risk for chronic diseases.” For more information, visit www.AGEFoundation.com.

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15 Keeping Healthy Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

Thursday, October 24, 2013 • Keeping Healthy • 15

Adding in, not just cutting out, is key to better eating habits (BPT) — When you think of eating right, does your mind immediately turn to what you should cut out of your diet? The list of things you might consider giving up can be long and daunting. As important as it might be to cut out some foods, don’t overlook the importance of the things you should add in, such as quality ingredients, appealing flavors and textures, and satisfying portions. “Setting our focus on what we shouldn’t eat only sets us up for failure,” says Cracker Barrel Chef Bill Kintzler. “Cutting out and depriving ourselves shifts our focus from the positive choices we should be making, including choosing foods that are satisfying.”

Ways to add in and win Managing calories and lessthan-healthy food choices makes sense. But if you think food has to lack taste, enticing texture and overall appeal to be “better for you,” you’re

simply incorrect. Ultimately, if your diet is unsatisfying, disappointing and just doesn’t taste good, you won’t be able to stick with it. Instead of emphasizing what you’ll leave out and resigning yourself to bland food, think of ways to add to the appeal and taste of what you eat. For example, if you rely on breakfast smoothies to help you reduce your caloric intake during the day, be sure to add items that include fiber - such as a handful of spinach or kale. Reducing the amount of salt in your diet? Turn to other seasonings that don’t add calories, but can enhance food’s flavor and that deliver other benefits. For example, cinnamon adds a warm, homey flavor to dishes. Marinades and spice blends can be a great way to add flavor to meats, fish and even veggies without adding fat, calories or salt. And replace high-calorie toppings with fresh fruit, which adds flavor to everything from pancakes to plain yogurt.

Don’t feel left out when you dine out Many people trying to eat well assume they can’t eat out at all. While you may have to give up your favorite food options in favor of ones that have lower calorie counts or smaller portions, abandoning some of your eating out isn’t an option for many people. Instead, make dining-out choices that maximize the satisfaction of the experience. For example, the new Wholesome Fixin’s meals at Cracker Barrel Old Country Store are fun and flavorful with calorie counts that can fit into your daily dietary goals. The meals deliver the value, taste and quality that guests expect from Cracker Barrel with better-for-you ingredients that are lower in calories. The foods emphasize more choices and flavors with fewer calories; all breakfast options are less than 500 calories, lunch and dinner less than 600.

“Wholesome Fixin’s are a great example of balancing calorie count with satisfaction,” Kintzler said. “Each menu item is not only lower in calories but also is high-quality.” Whenever you dine out, look for options with calorie information — many restaurants have added this to their menus. Eating quality foods is even

more important when you’ve reduced your calorie intake. “Just cutting calories is not enough,” Kintzler said. “Food is simply food. Setting our focus on what we shouldn’t do, what we shouldn’t eat, sets us up for failure. We should start thinking about what we can do, instead of obsessing over what we shouldn’t.”

Fall allergies or falling prey to chronic asthma or COPD? (BPT) — Twenty-two million Americans, many of whom are children, suffer from the frightening acute attacks and long-term disabilities of chronic asthma. Millions more adults face the increasing burdens and life-altering effects of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which includes both emphysema and chronic bronchitis. Managing these conditions effectively means truly understanding when and how to use the necessary medications. “The numbers are staggering; more than half a million patients undergo hospitalizations each year from poorly controlled asthma alone,” said Don Smart, a specialist pharmacist in the Express Scripts Pulmonary Therapeutic Resource Center (TRC). “For chronic asthma alone, regular use of the right medications could help reduce the rate of hospitalizations by 43 percent; 56 percent for COPD.” Asthma and COPD are two distinct breathing conditions. Asthma typically develops during childhood. Symptoms like coughing and wheezing are due

to inflammation and swelling of the airways, making breathing very difficult. Asthma medications play an important role in keeping symptoms under control. Long-term medications keep asthma under control when used on a day-to-day basis, while short-term medications act as “quick-relief” options that treat symptoms once they start. COPD traditionally is a disease impacting adults and is often a result of smoking. Tobacco smoke irritates the airways and eventually makes breathing a challenge. This leads to chronic coughing and shortness of breath. While COPD gets progressively worse, especially with continued smoking, asthma rarely results in progressive decline in lung function if treated properly. “Being aware of what may bring on an asthma attack is half the battle,” Smart said. “A person’s work environment (occupational asthma), allergens in their environment, exercise or infections could all prompt coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath and chest tightness.”

Greenfield

As a specialist pharmacist, Smart works with patients with pulmonary illnesses to provide one-on-one counseling, often clearing up the confusion between chronic asthma and COPD. For patients with either asthma or COPD, effective disease management is essential. Smart offers some tips that will help patients improve lung function and reduce the severity of their condition while helping them stay active. • Do it right: Proper inhaler technique is important to get the most out of the treatment. Make sure that your doctor or pharmacists explain how to use it correctly. It’s also a good idea to rinse your mouth out after using inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) to avoid an oral infection. • Use the right amount, every time: Like any medication, always use as directed. Adherence to inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and long-acting bronchodilators is important for controlling asthma and slowing down the progression of COPD. Make sure not to overuse quick-relief medications, known as shortacting beta agonists (SABA), which can lead to an increased

heart rate and nervousness. • Monitor your symptoms: Recognize the intensity and frequency of your asthma symptoms. Asking some simple questions may help determine how well you are managing your condition. Here are some questions from the asthma treatment guidelines that may help: Does my asthma wake me up at night? Have I started reaching for my rescue inhaler more than three times per week? Does my asthma limit me in my normal daily activi-

Mendota Community Hospital

What SeparateS US From the reSt?

H EALTHCARE AND REHABILITATION CENTRE • 300+ Years of Licensed Nurse

Comforts of Home Security of Community

Experience On Staff • 90% Rehab to Home Rate Contact Lou Anne Kenwick, • State-of-the-art Therapy equipment RN Administrator • Free Wi-Fi lkenwick@managcare.com • Excellent food; restaurant style dining To Make a • We Accept Many Managed Plans EALTH ARE AND Care EHABILITATION ENTRE Difference in Your • Medicare Certified Loved One’s Life!

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Allen Van, M.D.

sheltered care • Three delicious meals • 24 hour nurse staff & emergency call system • Activity programs & outings • Weekly housekeeping • Personal laundry • Special events daily

Retirement Living at its Best!

senior apartments • Flexible Studio, 1 & 2 bedroom apartments • Up to 940 square feet • Utilities, security, parking • Options for meals and activities

Call for more information & a tour

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508 Park Ave. East, Princeton, IL • www.greenfieldhome.org

ties and routines? • Have a plan: Develop a written asthma action plan with your physician. Outlining your treatment goals will help prevent disease progression (in COPD); improve your tolerance for exercise; and minimize complications, exacerbations, and adverse effects of treatment. For more information and additional ways you can avoid harmful drug interactions, visit Express Scripts’ Healthcare Insights blog at lab.expressscripts.com.

C

R

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Board Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon with a specialization of the spine To make an appointment with Dr. Van please call

815-539-2663 www.mendotahospital.org

HEALTHCARE AND REHABILITATION CENTRE The Difference is the Care 515 Bureau Valley Parkway, Princeton, IL 815-875-3347 • fax: 815-875-2012 www.colonialcarecentre.com

HEALTHCARE AND REHABILITATION CENTRE


16 • Marketplace • Thursday, October 24, 2013

General Terms and Policies

-100Announcements

The Bureau County Republican reserves the right to classify correctly, edit, reject or cancel any advertisement at any time in accordance with its policy. All ads must be checked for errors by the advertiser, on the first day of publication. We will be responsible for the first incorrect insertion, and its liabilities shall be limited to the price on one insertion.

103 • Card of Thanks

LINE AD DEADLINES: • Tuesday, BCR deadline Monday 9 am • Thursday, BCR and BCR Journal deadline Tuesday, 12 pm • Saturday, BCR deadline Friday, 9 am We Accept 815-875-4461

THANK YOU The kindness and generosity shown to all of us at the time of Howard's death was much appreciated. Many thanks also for the beautiful sympathy cards we received. Sincerely The Family of Judge C. Howard Wampler

104 • In Memoriam IN LOVING MEMORY OF LOUIS ZIEGLER ON OUR ANNIVERSARY October 23rd would have been our 64th Wedding Anniversary. I was just 18 and your were a very handsome 24 year old. I loved you then I love you now Missing you Your Wife PS: Great Grand Son born on your birthday

Find your next job right here! In the Classified • bcrnews.com/jobs

EstatE auction Real estate & PeRsonal PRoPeRty

saturday, nov. 23, 2013 10:00 am

27854 3000 e. street, lamoille Illinois

located 1 mile north of lamoille Il. on lamoille Road Real estate Consists of a two story ten Room Country Home located on 2.34 acres Contact auction service to View Property or With Questions

MargarEt M. Marshall, Deceased

BEckEr auction sErvicE la moille Illinois 815-638-2686

Nurse PractitioNer Morrison Community Hospital is looking for a Nurse Practitioner to provide primary care for patients in our Family Care Clinic focusing on wellness promotion and illness prevention. Morrison Community Hospital is a not-for-profit health care organization providing high-quality general medicine services. The Mission of Morrison Community Hospital is to improve the health of residents, focusing on personalized care. MCH offers a competitive salary and benefit package. Qualified Candidates must be currently licensed in the State of Illinois as a Registered Nurse Practitioner. Morrison Community Hospital 303 N Jackson Street Morrison, Il 61270 www.morrisonhospital.com 815-772-4003

Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

108 • Lost & Found

228 • Help Wanted

228 • Help Wanted

228 • Help Wanted

228 • Help Wanted

FOUND GLASSES Found: women's glasses @ Women of Distinction Luncheon in Oglesby. Please come to the Bureau County Republican to identify or call 815-8754461

CHURCH SECRETARY, 9am-1pm, Monday-Friday. Must be self-starter and able to work independently. Application form available a.m. at First Presbyterian Church, 320 Park Avenue East, Princeton. Applications due by Nov. 1st. Questions: call 1815-303-8622

JANITORIAL PRINCETON AREA Leading Janitorial company is interviewing for General Cleaners in the Princeton area. Part-time, 6pm-10pm, $8.50/hour. For more info call 800543-8034 & dial ext. 403. Leave your name & phone # after the message or apply at: www.dsicorporation.com

Part-time Evening COOK needed. Now Taking Applications. Apply in person @ Garden Room Grill, 809 North Main, Princeton

THE TISKILWA RURAL FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT, Is accepting applications for the position of parttime EMT's. Interested individuals may contact Randy Philhower at 815303-4481. Applicant packets are available, and must be returned by November 1, 2013

- 200 Employment 227 • Drivers OTR Drivers needed. Peterbuilt equipment. 2 years experience required. Tanker experience preferred but will train. No hazmat. Competitive pay & benefits. Call 815-376-2792

JANITORIAL PRINCETON AREA Leading Janitorial company is interviewing for General Cleaners in the Princeton area. Part-time, Monday-Friday evenings, $8.75/hour. For more info call 800-543-8034 & dial ext. 426. Leave your name & phone # after the message or apply at: www.dsicorporation.com

EHS Coordinator Unytite, Inc. has an immediate opening for an EHS Coordinator. Job Duties Include: • Enforce all Safety Programs including training, accident investigation and various record keeping • Lead the Safety and Environmental Monthly Audits • Maintain all applicable Environmental Reports We offer a competitive salary, Our benefits include Medical, Dental, Life, Disability, 401K plan, paid vacation and holidays. Qualified applicants send resume and salary requirements to: Unytite Inc. One Unytite Drive Peru, IL 61354 Attention Human Resources chundley@unytite.com EOE

Quality Director MCH has a full-time opening for a Director of Quality Management. Under the direct supervision of the CEO, coordinates and directs Quality Programs, Risk Management Activities, Utilization Review, Infection Control, Safety, Pharmacy/Therapeutics and Case Management (Internal and Community). Serve as liaison between Morrison Community Hospital and Risk Management Investigations, Professional Services and Legal Affairs. Minimum of three years health system experience in Quality Improvement processes. Computer experience with a variety of software required. Baccalaureate degree required, preferably in health related sciences. Must have the ability to develop, coordinate, implement and evaluate the effectiveness of quality programs for the health care system. Must be able to assess compliance with standards of external regulatory agencies relating to quality and appropriateness of patient care. Morrison Community Hospital is a not-for-profit health care organization providing high quality general medicine services. The Mission of Morrison Community Hospital is to improve the health of residents, focusing on personalized care. MCH offers a competitive compensation package. Director, Human Resources Morrison Community Hospital 303 N Jackson Street Morrison, IL 61270 815-772-4003

FIND YOUR JOB right here in the Bureau County Republican Classified!

SEASONAL HELP NEEDED!!!! Peru/Princeton/Ottawa General Labor Clerical Warehouse 1st/2nd shifts Apply online at: www.trnstaffing.com

PROMOTE JOB OPENINGs Call 815-875-4461

COLLECTIBLE CARS, CAR PARTS And TOOL AUCTIOn

The Following Collector Cars, Car Parts and Tools will be sold at the Tumbleson Auction Center, 1635 North Main Street, Princeton, IL, Located 100 miles West of Chicago, IL just off INT 80, Exit 56, South on Rt. 26. (Behind the Sherwood Antique Mall) on:

SATURdAY, OCT. 26, 2013 TIME:10:00 A.M.

View Listing & Photos on website: www.tumblesonauction.com COLLECTOR CARS, CAR PARTS & CARRELATEd ITEMS: 1929 4 Door Pierce Arrow Straight 8-Engine Turns-Dual Side Mounts- Nice Interior- 29,000 Miles (Title & Keys); 1936 Ford 3 Window Coupe V-8-Solid Body & Floors (Engine Turns) w/34371 Miles (Title & Keys); 1938 Ford 2 Door Sedan V-8Solid Body & Floors (Engine Turns) w/80077 Miles (Title & Keys); 1940 Ford Bus Coupe V-8Solid Body & Floors (Engine Turns) w/84949 Miles (Title); 1955 Cadillac 4 Door V-8 w/ Air, Power Windows & Seats (Engine Stuck & Body Has Rust) w/66192 Miles (No Title); Tons of Parts-New & Used-Mostly 1920’s & 1940’s Ford; Stromberg Carbs; Wheels From 1920’s-40’s; Fenders; Rare: Porcelain Spark Plugs, Brass Gas Head Lights Head & Brass Lights for Stutz; Head & Tail Lights 1920’s-1940’s; Pre-Electric to 1940’s Horns; Assorted Bumper Guards in Boxes; Motor Meters; Hubcaps; Hudson & Ford Radiators-1920’s & 30’s; Lots of Engine, Brake Trans Parts-Ford 1930’s& 1940’s; Cans of Old Oil; Jacks; License Plates; Reo Step Plate; Mint Packard Wall Thermometer; Old Tires & Hubcaps; Spark Plugs; Car & Shop Manuals; License Plates; Oil & Gas Cans; Funnels; Westinghouse Auto Lamp Metal Cabinets; Auto Light TOOLS, LAnTERnS And RELATEd: John Deere Rider 317 Lawnmower; Old Tools, Adv. Cans (Oil, Antifreeze & Etc), Old Highway Safety Kits, Burgess Flashlight Battery Vendor Box, Parts Cabinet, Insulators in Original Boxes, Many Wood/Metal Woodworking Planes, Many New in the Package Tools, Many Old RR Signal/ Lanterns and Various Barn Lanterns, KokenSt. Louis Iron Foot Rest, Brass Shell Casings

CRAnK ESTATE,

KICKAPOO, IL TUMBLESOn AUCTIOn COMPAnY 815-872-1852 AUCTIONEERS: TOM AND MARY TUMBLESON / TIFFANY FOES E-mail: ttauction@yahoo.com TERMS: CASH OR CHECK

Visit us at www.bcrnews.com for the stories that people are talking about!

FIND WHAT YOU’RE LOOKING FOR right here in the Bureau County Republican Classified!

Promote Your Job Openings Right Here! 815-875-4461

ESTATE AUCTION

The Following will be sold at the ON SITE LOCATION of 211 E. Hennepin Street in Mark, IL on:

SUNDAY, NOV. 3, 2013 TIME: 10:00 A.M.

View Listing & Photos on website: www.tumblesonauction.com APPLIANCES & FURNITURE: Whirlpool Refrigerator; Amana Smooth Top Stove; GE Microwave; Lg. Toshiba TV; Hoover Vacuum Cleaner; Area Rugs; 3 Drawer Antique Dresser; Round Oak Pedestal Table & 6 Chairs; 3 Piece Matching Bedroom/Dresser Set; Several Nice Glass Front China & Curio Cabinets Including Corner Glass Front Curio Cabinet; Cedar Chest; Beige Furniture Including: Lazy Boy Rocker/Recliner, Chaise Lounge, Matching Sofa & Loveseat; Stick Hall Tree; Wood Vanity & Mirror; Dressing Mirror; Several Dressers/ Chest of Drawers; Nice King Size Bed; Occasional Chairs; Lg. Wall Mirror; Wood Fern Stand; 2 Bamboo Shelves; Wood Pedestal Dining Table &Chairs; Wood Desk & Chair; 2 Blue Upholstered Rockers; Bent Wood Rocker; Day Bed; Wood Bar Stools; Wood TV Trays; Many Floor & Table Lamps; Several End Tables/ Coffee Table; Wood Glider Rocker w/ Footstool; Quilt Rack; Sewing Machine ANTIQUES, COLLECTIBLES, HOUSEHOLD & LAWN & GARDEN: Lladro Figurines; Green Depression; Noritake China Set-Rima Pattern; Goblets & Stemware; Lg. Dept.56 Snow Baby Collection, Precious Moments & Boyd’s Bear Collection-Figurines & Stuffed Bears; LARGE Art Glass Collection Including: Nice Vases, Red Glass Pcs., Chickens & Roosters; Pfaltzgraft Blue &White Dishware & White Set; Linens, Bedding & Towels; Indian Women Collector Plates & Collector Dolls; Many Pieces of Milkglass; Modern Leaded Glass Lamps; Many Figurines & Decorator Items; Beam Bottles; Pictures; Usual Line of Kitchenware Items Including Sm. Appliances; New Honda Pressure Washer; Many Yard Decorations, Bird Baths & Garden Benches; Several Patio Furniture Pcs; Hand & Garden Tools; Electric Blower; Yard Cart; Step Ladders; Usual Garden & Garage Items SELLER:

MARY TOELLEN,

Mark, IL TUMBLESON AUCTIONCOMPANY, PRINCETON, IL Email: ttauction@yahoo.com Or Phone: 815-872-1852 AUCTIONEERS: TOM AND MARY TUMBLESON LIC #040000396-397 & TIFFANY FOES LIC #041.001601

bcrnews com


232 • Business Opportunities ********** THE CLASSIFIED Advertising Department of the Bureau County Republican Does not have the opportunity to fully investigate the credibility of each advertiser appearing within these columns. If an offer sounds “too good to be true” it probably is. Proceed with caution if you are asked to send money or to give a credit card number. Proceed with caution in calling 900 phone numbers. All phone numbers prefixed by”900” are charged to the CALLER. Charges may be assessed on a “per minute” basis rather than a “per call” basis. The Bureau County Republican Classifieds makes every effort to qualify these charges for the reader. If you have a concern about an advertiser, please contact: Better Business Bureau 330 North Wabash Chicago, IL 60611 312 832-0500

- 400 Merchandise 434 • Miscellaneous Sales FIREWOOD All hardwoods split, ready to burn. Available all year around. 20 years experience. Full size truck bed. 815-875-1552

YOU NEVER KNOW WHAT YOU MIGHT FIND right here in the Bureau County Republican Classified!

441 • Wanted to Buy

441 • Wanted to Buy

442 • Lawn & Garden

442 • Lawn & Garden

Wanted: 1 or 2, good, used, narrow Whitewall tires, size 225R60-16”. Call 815-303-6695

WANTED: Full size frame and headboard in good condition. Call 815-646-6665

PROMOTE your Garage Sales Call 815-875-4461

Wanting to sell your car? Call 815-875-4461

TWIGGY'S TREE FARM HUGE EVERGREEN SALE 3'-5' Average All in nursery pots $15 to $30 ALL TYPES. 815-303-8158

NEED AG PRODUCTS AND SERVICES? Check the Bureau County Republican for everything from equipment to services.

PUBLIC AUCTION

The Following will be sold at the ON SITE LOCATION of 434 Griswold Street in Princeton, IL on:

SATURDAY,NOV. 2, 2013 TIME: 10:00A.M.

View Listing& Photos on website: www.tumblesonauction.com AUTOMOBILE: 2005 4 Door V-6 Mercury Sable GS-Auto & Air w/43,000 miles (One Owner) FURNITURE: 2 China Curio Cabinets; 2 Matching Suede Chairs; Sofas & Sofa Chairs; Small Drop Leaf Table & Chairs; Dining Room Table w/Six chairs & Hutch; Two Three Piece Bedroom Sets Including Red Paint & Dark Pine; Console Sewing Machine; Wood Desk & Chair; Cedar Chest; Sanyo Color TV & Other; Lamps; Pictures; Oak Fern Stand; Card Tables & Chairs; Book Case/Entertainment Center; Coffee & End Tables; Sm. Wood Gun Cabinet; Patio Table &Chairs; Lawn Chairs TOOLS, GLASSWARE & HOUSEHOLD: Toro Riding Mower; Ariens 5 Hrp Snow Blower; Yard Sweeper; Steel Yard Cart; Craftsman Tool Box; Hand, Electric & Garden Tools; C Clamps; Saws; Table Saw; Floor Jack; Step Ladder; Electric Cords; Jumper Cables; Sm. House Safe; Oreck Vacuum; Carpet Shampooer; Precious Moments; Cut Glass; H.P Cups & Saucers, Flo Blue; Chocolate Pot Set; Set Of China Dishes; Sterling Candle holders; Bedding; Usual Line of Kitchen Including: Microwave, Sm. Kitchen Appliances, Silverware, Dishes SELLER:

DAVID R. WHITE,

PRINCETON, IL TUMBLESON AUCTION COMPANY, PRINCETON, IL Email: ttauction@yahoo.com Or Phone: 815-872-1852 AUCTIONEERS: TOM AND MARY TUMBLESON & TIFFANY FOES

PUBLIC AUCTION BUREAU COUNTY FARMLAND 40 +/- ACREs MACON TOwNshIP

The following described farmland will be offered by PUBLIC AUCTION. Sale day location: Ag View FS, Inc., 7226 IL Rte. 40, Buda, IL 61314. OPEN TENANCY 2014

MONDAY, NOv. 11, 2013 10:00 A.M.

OPEN TENANCY 2014

FARM LOCATION: 5 miles south of Buda, IL on IL Rte. 40 to Kentville Road (700N) then west ½ mile to farm (north side of blacktop) or the W ½ of the E ½ of the SW ¼ of Section 28, Macon Township, Bureau County, Illinois FARM DEsCRIPTION: 40 +/- acres with 39.8 +/- tillable. Tillable soils include Osco (48%), Muscatine (42%) and Plano (10%). The Crop Productivity Index for optimum management is 139.5. 2012 taxes paid in 2013 were approximately $29.56 per tillable acre. Parcel is part of Tax ID #20-28-300-002. Plat locations, Aerial Photos, soil Maps and other information available @ rickrediger.com TERMs AND CONDITIONs: 1.) This parcel will be sold on a per surveyed acre basis. 2.) Survey provided by Seller. 3.) The successful bidder will be required to enter into a standard purchase agreement contract. A Buyer’s Premium of 1% of the high bid will be charged to the buyer and added to the bid amount to arrive at the contract purchase price. 10% of the contract purchase price will be due immediately following the auction. The balance will be due and payable on or before December 11, 2013. 4.) The seller shall provide a title insurance policy in the amount of the purchase price of the subject property. 5.) The estimated 2013 real estate taxes due and payable in 2014 will be credited by the Seller to the Buyer. All subsequent real estate taxes will be the responsibility of the Buyer. 6.) The property is being sold in “AS IS” condition, with no implied warranties of any kind. 7.) The information is believed to be accurate. However, we strongly urge all prospective buyers to thoroughly research all pertinent data and to draw their own conclusions. 8.) All announcements made the day of the sale take precedence over any previously printed material. 9.) For additional information or to view the property contact Rick Rediger, Auctioneer at 815-699-7999 or Scott Brummel.

LINDA GRIGGs

Seller: Attorney for Seller: Michael English 10 W Park Avenue, Princeton, IL 61356 1.815.875.4555 Number System will be Used – I.D. Required Not Responsible for Accidents Auction conducted by:

REDIGER AUCTION sERvICE Rick Rediger, Auctioneer 815-699-7999 www.RickRediger.com

BRUMMEL REALTY LLC Scott Brummel, Broker 630-553-3200 www.BrummelRealty.com

AUCTIONEERS: RICK REDIGER • JON MOON • JEREMY REDIGER

LARGE ESTATE TOY AUCTION

Auction to be held at the Tumbleson Auction Center, 1635 North Main Street, Princeton, IL, Located 100 miles West of Chicago, IL just off INT 80, Exit 56, South on Rt. 26. (Behind the Sherwood Antique Mall) on:

SUNDAY, OCT. 27, 2013 TIME: 10:00 A.M. (Preview: 8:00 A.M.)

View Full Listing & Photos on website: www.tumblesonauction.com LARGE Collection of Star Wars, Older Fisher Price, Farm Toys, Fire Trucks, Construction Toys, Various Old Toy Trucks, Semis, Cars Including Buddy L, Structo, Tonka, Nylint, Marx, Nascar, Matchbox & Hot Wheels, Midge Toys, Carnival Chalkware Pieces, Quality PEZ Collection, Lionel Trains,Track & Accessories, Hallmark Kiddie Cars, Holiday Barbies-NIB AND MORE!!!!!!! TOY COLLECTION FROM THE

HAROLD ZINKE ESTATE,

COMPTON, IL AND OTHERS TUMBLESONAUCTION COMPANY, PRINCETON, IL Email: ttauction@yahoo.com Or Phone: 815-872-1852 AUCTIONEERS: TOMAND MARY TUMBLESON & TIFFANY FOES

Visit us at www.bcrnews.com REAL ESTATE AUCTION

The following described Real Estate will be offered at Public Auction located at the property, 7369 1300 E ST., Tiskilwa, IL 61368 Look for this and upcoming Auctions on www.rickrediger.com

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2013 10:00 A.M.

GENERAL DESCRIPTION: Located at 7369 1300 E. St., Tiskilwa, IL Bureau County – Frame built, 2 story home and outbuildings on 2 acres. The main level consists of kitchen, formal dining and living room. There is natural woodwork and many built-ins. Second story has 4 bedrooms and full bathroom. On a full basement, walk up attic, gas forced air heat, central air and propane. Private water and sewer. Tax I.D. number is 21-30-400-002. Brief legal description is PT NE SE B 1480 P 350 D 10-4918. TERMS AND CONDITIONS: 1) The successful bidder will be required to enter into a standard real estate purchase contract with 10% of the purchase price due immediately following the auction. The balance will be due and payable on or before November 26, 2013. 2) The seller shall provide a title insurance policy in the amount of the purchase price of the subject property. 3) The property is being sold in “as is“ condition, with no warranties of any kind. 4) The information is believed to be accurate. However, we strongly urge all prospective buyers to thoroughly research all pertinent data and to draw their own conclusions. 5) All announcements made the day of the sale take precedence over any previously printed advertised terms or conditions. 6) To view the property contact Rick Rediger – Auctioneer at 815-699-7999. OPEN HOUSE – Thursday, October 3rd – 5 to 6 p.m. Seller:

CAROL M. ANDRIOTIS LIVING TRUST, Dated December 28, 2000

Attorney for Seller: Mary Lynn May, 708 S. Pleasant, Princeton, IL 61356, 815-875-3808. Not Responsible for Accidents I.D. Required

ESTATE AUCTION

REDIGER AUCTION SERVICE Wyanet, IL 815-699-7999 Auctioneer: Rick Rediger

TUESDAY, OCT. 29, 2013

PUBLIC AUCTION STARK COUNTY FARMLAND

The Following will be sold at the ON SITE LOCATION of 420 Laughlin Street in Granville, IL on:

TIME: 10:00 A.M.

View Listing on website: www.tumblesonauction.com PRIMITIVES & TOOL RELATED: Lg. Amount of Scrap Metal, Wood & Scrap Pile of Electric Motors; 8 & 48 Drawer Wood Nail Cabinets; Lg. Sharpening Stone & Motor; Wood Fruit Press; Top Only to Sellers Cabinet; 20 Drawer Wood Storage Cabinet; Misc Wood Brls; Galvanized Wash Tub & Handles; Pepsi Crates; Safety Deposit Boxes; 7 Drawer Metal Office Desk; Lg. Wagon Jack; Keen Kutter Table Top Meat Grinder; Shoe Lathe; Burlap Sleeping Cot; Wood House Gutters; Metal Bed; Wood Ironing Boards; Motorized Grinding Wheels; Seed Planters; Used Electrical Boxes; Drop Cords; Nuts & Bolts; Hand Cement Trowels; Electrical Items; Lg. Assortment of Copper & Brass Fittings; Hand Tools; Lg. Vise From Chas. Parkorbo Meriden, Conn; Old Flashlights; Pipe Wrenches & Threader ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES: Mahogany Dining Room Set w/ 6 Chairs & 2 Leaves; 2 Card Tables & 4 Chairs; 5Wood Card Table Chairs; White Kitchen Cabinet w/Glass Doors & Flour Bin; 2 Drawer Enamel Table; Misc. Bottles Including Star Union; Lg. Group of Fruit Jars; Cheese Boxes; Milk Bottles; Books- Zane Grey; Westclox Alarm Clocks & Others; Picture Frames; 5 Gal Pickle Jar; Brass Torches; Misc. Lights & Fixtures; Old X-mas Ornaments & X-mas Tree Rotating Lights; 2-One Gal Crocks; Wire Metal Milk Crates; Canes; Old Purses; Silverware; Old Marbles; Old License Plates1920’s; Some Local Adv. Pieces; Union Leader Tobacco Tin; Wall Mirrors &Others; Sheet Music; Buttons; Wall Pockets; Jadite Mixing Bowl; Lg. Assortment of Yarn & Crochet Thread & Rug Thread; Wood Baskets; Clothes Pins; Rug Beater; Table Top Philco Radio; Souvenir Plates; Records; Trivets; Picnic Basket; Lg. Amount of Ceramic Plant Vases; Punch Bowl & Cups; Misc Coins Including Tavern Token, 1885 Morgan Dollar; Unmarked Roseville Vase; Shirley Temple Pitcher; Lg. Royal Doulton Mug; Milkglass; Usual Line of Kitchenware Items; Please Note: Many Boxes Yet to Be Unpacked!!!! This is a LARGE AUCTION. Please Note Date and Time!

JENO BONUCCHI ESTATE/SELLER: MARGARET BONUCCHI,

GRANVILLE, IL TUMBLESON AUCTIONCOMPANY, PRINCETON, IL Email: ttauction@yahoo.com Or Phone: 815-872-1852 AUCTIONEERS: TOM AND MARY TUMBLESON LIC #040000396-397 & TIFFANY FOES LIC #041.001601

117.76 +/- ACReS VALLeY TOwNShIP

On behalf of Fred Cluskey the following described farmland will be offered by PUBLIC AUCTION. Sale day location: Saratoga Township Building, 28 Main St., Camp Grove, IL 61424. OPeN TeNANCY 2014

MONDAY, NOV. 25, 2013 10:00 A.M.

OPeN TeNANCY 2014

FARM LOCATION: South of Wyoming, IL on IL Rte 91, 3 ½ miles to Road 300N then West 4 miles to Twp Road 1600E. Watch for signs. NE ¼ of the SE ¼ Section 15 and S ½ of NW ¼ Section 23, Valley Township, Stark County, IL. FARM DeSCRIPTION: TRACT I: 35.76 +/- acres located in Section 15 of Valley township. 34.84 +/- tillable acres with soils including Sawmill, Elburn and Drummer. The Crop Productivity Index for optimum management is 140.7. Tax ID # 0815-400-005. 2012 taxes paid in 2013 were $1,136.04. No improvements. Extensive tile work in the last two years. TRACT II: 82 +/- acres located in Section 23 of Valley Township. 79.15 +/tillable acres with soils including Plano, Elburn, Drummer, Flanagan, Catlin and Saybrook. The Crop Productivity Index for optimum management is 141. Tax ID #08-23-100-002. 2012 taxes paid in 2013 were $2,814.30. 3.9 acres CRP waterways. Newly constructed 60’ waterway in 2013. Extensive tile work in the last two years. No improvements. COMMeNTS: Recent reconstructed water way work on Tract II with extensive tile work on both tracts with in the last 2 years. Tile maps available with the sale catalog. Plat locations, Aerial Photos, Soil Maps and other information available @ rickrediger.com TERMS AND CONDITIONS: 1.) These parcels will be sold separately and on a per surveyed acre basis. 2.) Survey provided by Seller. 3.) The successful bidder will be required to enter into a standard purchase agreement contract. A Buyer’s Premium of 1% of the high bid will be charged to the buyer and added to the bid amount to arrive at the contract purchase price. 10% of the contract purchase price will be due immediately following the auction. The balance will be due and payable after January 2, 2014 and on or before January 6, 2014. 4.) The seller shall provide a title insurance policy in the amount of the purchase price of the subject property. 5.) The estimated 2013 real estate taxes due and payable in 2014 will be credited by the Seller to the Buyer. All subsequent real estate taxes will be the responsibility of the Buyer. 6.) The property is being sold in “AS IS” condition, with no implied warranties of any kind. 7.) The information is believed to be accurate. However, we strongly urge all prospective buyers to thoroughly research all pertinent data and to draw their own conclusions. 8.) All announcements made the day of the sale take precedence over any previously printed material.9.) For additional information or to view the property contact Rick Rediger, Auctioneer at 815-699-7999 or Scott Brummel. Seller:

FReDeRICK CLUSKeY

Attorney for Seller: Robert Russell 10 W Park Avenue, Princeton, IL 61356 1.815.875.4555 Number System will be Used – I.D. Required Not Responsible for Accidents Auction conducted by: ReDIGeR AUCTION SeRVICe BRUMMeL ReALTY LLC Rick Rediger, Auctioneer Scott Brummel, Broker 815-699-7999 630-553-3200 www.RickRediger.com www.BrummelRealty.com


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Business Directory Marketplace

ExtErior homE improvEmEnt spEcialist

Over 30 Years Experience!

Call for a free appointment!

John Engstrom • 815-699-2318 12327 1550 N. Ave. • Wyanet, Illinois

Ron SchafeR SeRvice and RepaiR appLiance RepaiR fuRnace & a/c

815-876-6135 BOB’S DRYWALL, PAINT, ETC

Bob Cmolik

• Bathrooms • Plaster Repair • Remodeling • Textured Ceilings • Tiling 19 Aztec Circle, Putnam, IL 815-342-1385 bcmolik@yahoo.com

Timber Falls Tree Service

•Tree Trimming & Removals •Stump Grinding •Lot & Land Clearing •Fully Insured •Seasoned Firewood •24 Hour Service

WYANET LOCKER, INC. 218 RAILROAD AVE. WYANET, IL

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Grand Plaza Antiques, Etc. 531 S. Main St., Princeton, IL 61356 815-437-2856 • Th-F-Sat 12 pm-5pm

Rest of the week by Appointment by Luck or Chance

• Business Cards • Envelopes • Booklets • Forms • Pamphlets • Letterheads For all your printing solutions call

875-4461

(815) 699-2208 Scott Sabin, Owner

Pat Wood, Owner

Wholesale & Retail Meats

800 Ace Road PO Box 340 Princeton, IL 61356 815-875-4461 fax 815-875-1235

wyanetlocker.com

ExtErior homE improvEmEnt spEcialist Residential • Commercial • Sales • Installation • Service Sectional Steel Doors • Automatic Door Openers Call for a free appointment!

John Engstrom (815) 699-2318 12327 1550 N. Ave. • Wyanet

Over 30 Years Experience!

• Wedding Invitations • Napkins • Matchbooks • Thank You’s For Quality Carlson Craft Products See

Princeton, IL • 815-875-3100 Clint Hassler 815-303-8451 RT Piper 815-866-2637

10% off items over We do Upholstery Work $20 with With 30 Years of Experience this ad! Specializing in Furniture, Old & New, Ornate & Carved

Toll Free

AUTHORIZED DEALER

(877) 324-9517

(815) 872-2615

52001-1102 Jerry Thompson Electrical Service Directory

Free estimates • Fully insured

T P.O. BOX 33 • Malden, IL 61337

800 Ace Road PO Box 340 Princeton, IL 61356 815-875-4461 fax 815-875-1235

add your listing to this page contact us at

815-866-6858

(815) 875-4461, Ext. 278


450 • Under $1000 1995 Nissan Sentra bright green, solid body, brand new windshield, $400. For more info call 815-200-2334 2 Recliners very good condition. $100 each. Call 309-238-1618 4 good used portable humidifiers. 1 large $20; 1 medium $10, 2 small $5 each. Call 815-303-6695 5 drawer chest of drawers, all wood painted red (26”x42”x16”) with sports logos on knobs. $40. Call 815-222-7946 (Princeton) 6'x12' flatbed trailer, $900. Call 815-872-0452 Amana gas range and mounted microwave, used 14 years, $150; Maytag dishwasher, $50. Call 815-481-2800

460 • Garage Sales

615 • Truck Sales

Older Johnson 6hp outboard motor & 2 gas cans, $175. Call 815-257-7011

MARK 508 North Saint Paul Street. Saturday, Sunday, October 26, 27; 8am-4pm. Infant, kids & adults clothes and coats. Lamps, vases, chairs, infant swing, infant chair. LOTS of toys, etc.

1998 FORD F150, extended cab XLT, 4.6 liter, V8, tonneau cover, trailer tow, white, very clean $6,700. Call 309-883-0093

PRINCETON 2304 South Euclid. Thursday, October 24, 4pm-7pm; Friday, October 25, 8am-4pm; Saturday, October 26, 8am12pm. Multi-Family Sale. Heated Garage. 1979 Caprice, kitchen items, Christmas decorations, wall pictures, linens, towels, Man Stuff, tools, Camo, Western Show saddle, jewelry, clothes and much more

1997 Fatboy $6,500 or best offer. Call 815-274-0924

Rough sawed slabs of maple, $10 a piece. Call 815-878-9931 Swivel desk chair, $15; car seat like new, $15. Call 815-878-5851

************ HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL? Put your ad in for FREE Items $1,000 or less can run FREE for 1 week. Limit of 5 lines. Up to 3 items with price and price totaling under $1,000. 1 ad per household per week. No commercial ads, firearms or animal sales. Go to: bcrnews.com, to place an ad. Use category merchandise and then bargains or E-mail information to: classified@ bcrnews.com (include your name, address & phone number) No Phone Calls!

PRINCETON 24 South Vernon. Saturday, October 26, 8am-1pm. Boy toddler clothes, knickknacks, old books, other various items PRINCETON 715 West Clark. Thursday, October 24 , 4pm-6pm; Friday, October 25, 9am-Noon

Wood Pellet stove heater, 42,000 BTU, like new. $600. Call 815-872-1816

Lift chair (Burgundy), $250. Call after 3pm, 815-875-2162

451 • Free

-600Transportation

New, never used fire bricks, 8-7/8” long x 73/8: wide x 2-1/2 tall, $1 each. Call 815-303-7984

6 Kittens, ready to go to good homes. Litter trained. Call 815-719-3307

614 • Car Sales

Oak china hutch from Steinbergs. 7'x4'x2', with lighted upper cabinet. Tons of storage in lower. $100. Call 815-646-4421

Free Hammond Organ Call 309-463-2279

open house Sun., Oct. 27 • 12-2PM

210 Elm St., Spring Valley MLS#08442962 - $85,000 3-bedroom, 1 bath, partially finished basement, lots of potential! Host- Cindy Funfsinn

YOU NEVER KNOW WHAT YOU MIGHT FIND right here in the Bureau County Republican Classified! You could find furniture, appliances, pets, musical instruments, tools, anything. You might even find a kitchen sink!

******* $$ CASH PAID $$ We pay top dollar for junk (cars, machinery, etc.) Call 815-878-9353

ADVERTISE YOUR VEHICLE SALE HERE! In the Classified. Just call 815-875-4461.

Open HOuses SAT, OcT 26 1:00 - 2:00 PM

2:15 - 3:15 PM

455 Adams St., Tiskilwa

454 E. Lincoln, Princeton

Harvest REALTY

AND DEVELOPMENT

Ray Mabry, Broker

815-878-1981 • harvestrealtyprinceton.com

2409 4th St., Peru

767 • Mobile Home Sales 3 Bedroom Mobile Home for sale. $2,000 down, $188.02 plus lot rent of $210 per month for 3 years. Call 815-303-2948 MAPLE ACRES 2 bedroom. Buddy, 14'x70'. Good condition. Call 815-872-1825 PRINCETON double wide mobile home for sale. 3 bedroom, 2 full bath, open floor concept. $20,000 or best offer. If interested please call 815-875-7668 or 815-875-1282 PRINCETON Maple Acres. 1990 Mobile Home. 14'x68', 3 bedroom. Refrigerator/stove. $14,000. Call 815-915-5304

856 • Apartment Rentals

858 • Homes for Rent

DOVER Route 34, 4 miles to Princeton conveniences. 1,700 square feet, large corner lot, central air, hardwood floors, fireplace, decks, pool, attached garage, enclosed porch. You gotta see to appreciate the low $55,000 price. Call 815-872-0211

PRINCETON Fritz Apartment for rent. Quiet living, heat/water furnished, 2 bedroom, living room/ dining room/kitchen/bath. Starting at $600 per month, includes carport. References and deposit required. 815-879-6021

PRINCETON 1 bedroom, excellent location, lower level. Laundry hook-up, water & appliances furnished. Garage. Lease, deposit. No pets. $450. Call 815-894-2163

- 800 Real Estate For Rent 856 • Apartment Rentals PRINCETON Coachlight Apartments has a 1 bedroom apartment, 1st floor for $450. Call 815-878-7965 LADD 2 bedroom. 1-1/2 bath. Central air, washer/ dryer hook-up. $595. Call 815-224-3816. Broker Owned. www.curtainrentals.com PRINCETON 1 bedroom, recently remodeled. Great neighborhood. Lease, deposit. $425. 810 South Euclid. Call 217-766-8497 PRINCETON Apartment. Utilities furnished. Upstairs, $600. Phone 815-875-1336 PRINCETON Like New 2 bedroom, 2 bath, central air, laundry room, garage. Security deposit. 815713-0234/630-632-4113

Covered Bridge Realty

Open HOuse • Sun. 1-3

1043 Lora Ave., Princeton

Wonderful spacious home with private backyard and finished lower level. $150,000 www.c21coveredbridge.com 815-872-7434 • 100 S. Main St., Princeton Each Office is Independently Owned & Operated

r ber you Remem dchild, ran child, g ephew n niece or with a

Dominic Vasquez

E E R F . y a hd ad 1st Birt

October 3, 2012 Love you bunches! Mommy & Daddy

815-223-1088

1-800-414-5788

Price reduced!

FARMLAND AUCTION 208 First St., Malden MLS#08227882 $94,900 Lovely Ranch home on 3 lots, 2 car attached garage, partially finished basement.

Call Wendy Fulmer at 815-252-8280

2409 4th St., Peru

815-223-1088

1-800-414-5788

153.56+/- Acres HENRY COUNTY Osco Twp, Sec 8 6½ miles N. of Andover IL

WeD., NOv. 20, 2013

Sealed Bid Auction SOILS: Osco, Muscatune, Sylvan, Elco-Atlas No Buildings

To place your FREE Happy 1st Birthday ad in the Bureau County Republican please send us the following: • Baby’s Name:_____________________________________ • Birth Date:________________________________________ • Salutation:________________________________________ • Contact Name_____________ Day Phone:_____________ *Picture will be returned only if a self-addressed stamped envelope is included.

One Ad Per Child Please

Soy Capital Ag Services

Douglas Fehr, Broker Norman Bjorling, Broker David Klein, Auctioneer Lic.441.001928 www.SoyCapitalAg.com Call For Brochure 309-687-6010

OPEN HOUSE Sun., Oct. 27 • 1-3 135 & 145 Sycamore St. Tiskilwa $119,900

800 Ace Road • P.O. Box 340 • Princeton, IL 61356 815-875-4461 • www.bcrnews.com/classifieds

858 • Homes for Rent MINERAL Very nice, 1,500 sq. ft. 3 bedroom apartment, 2 bathroom, 1 car garage. No pets/No smoking! $550/month, includes water/garbage. Annawan Schools. Required: Application, References, Deposit ($550), 1 year. lease. Call 309-288-3403

PROMOTE YOUR Rental Call 815-875-4461

PRINCETON 118 West Marquette. For Sale or Rent. 2 small bedrooms, half basement, 2 car attached garage. Central air. $650. Call 815-879-6021 Princeton Responsible Credit? Low Income? RENT-TO-OWN 809 North Euclid Street 3 Bedroom/1-1/2 Bath 1 Car Garage All redone inside $550/month Available immediately! 815-875-6254 Houselady@comcast.net .

Find Your Next Home Right Here!

815-875-4461 lleyhomesh oisva ow i. llin .co w w

oisvalleyhomeshow.com • www.illinoisvalleyhomeshow.com • www.illinoisvalleyhomeshow.com • www.illinoisvalleyhomeshow.com .illin ww •w

Buckets for sale, clean, 5 gallon buckets with lids, $4 each; cigar boxes, $1 each. Call 815-664-4557

- 700 Real Estate For Sale

**************** PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call, HUD tollfree at 800 669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 800 927-9275

768 • Homes For Sale

m

ADVERTISE GARAGE SALES OR YARD SALES! The Bureau County Republican can promote your garage sale or yard sale to let everyone know about the treasures you have for sale. Just call 815-875-4461 and we’ll help you “Clean Up!”

616 • Motorcycles

767 • Mobile Home Sales

•w

DONATE NOW! “The animals are crying” Tri-County Humane Society. LaSalle, Bureau, Putnam Counties. Call 815-875-6145 or 815-872-9781 or send donation to: PO Box 1601, LaSalle, IL 61301

450 • Under $1000

www.illinoisvalleyhomeshow.com • www.illinoisvalleyhomeshow.com • www.illinoisvalleyhomeshow.com • www.illinoisvalleyhomeshow .co m

448 • Pets & Livestock

EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY

OPEN HOUSES Sunday, Oct. 27th 11:30 AM - 1:30 PM

EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY

305 - 307 S. Walnut - Wyanet

1 PM - 3 PM

115 S. Gosse - Princeton

2 PM - 4 PM

25 S. Church - Princeton

New Listing! $79,500 Princeton! 15’x16’ sun porch. 2 BR. Roof ‘06. Furnace/AC ‘05. Driveway ‘07. Full basement. 15’x21’ living room. #08468258

New Listing! $78,000 Ottawa Home! Adorable 4 BR. 20’x10’ Living room w/ woodburning FP, updated kitchen, family room. Full basement. #08468285

New Listing! $84,900 Contemporary Style Home! Princeton. No steps. Move Lots of updates, thermal in Condition! Oak kitchen. windows, new septic, CA lots of storage, main laundry, & More! On a 1.8 acre lot. Garage & shed. Appliances Walkout lower level. Wooded nego. #08467928 view. #08346771

Country Home on 1.1 Ideal Location! Lovely 4 BR, Acres! Well maintained, 3 bath home. New carpet & open & sunny floor plan. paint 2012. Windows 2010. New windows. Water proof Full partially finished dry basement. Hardwood floors. 2 basement. FP in LR 14’ x BR. Come Look! #08412598 23’. #08387407

1221 North Main – Princeton, IL

815-875-1221

www.illinoisvalleyhomeshow.com

16702 IL Rt 40 Sheffield

304 E. Front St. Wyanet

1118 S. Church St. Princeton

32 S. Euclid Ave. Princeton

1203 N. Main St. Princeton

Commercial Lot Just Off I-80 $75,000

3 BD, 2 BA, Large Yard, Agent Owned $69,600

Main Floor MB, Victorian Accents, Recent Rehab $109,900

3 BD & 2 Full BA, Large Garage, Newer Siding & Windows $89,900

4 Unit Investment RE, Parking, Great Exposure $177,000

Tom Hall

Broker Associate

815-872-0080

104 N. Main Princeton, IL

www.thepropertymerchants.com

Call 815-878-8508


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com bcrnews.com/jobs

BCR-10-24-2013  

Bureau County Republican