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Serving Bureau County Since 1847

Tuesday, July 9, 2013

17 and voting? By Goldie Currie gcurrie@bcrnews.com

PRINCETON – A new state law now allows 17 year olds to vote in primary elections if they turn 18 by the general election day. Gov. Pat Quinn signed legislation last week as part of his agenda to increase participation in democracy and ensure every voice is heard in Illinois, according to a press release issued by Quinn’s office. “Our democracy is strongest when more voters raise their voices at the ballot box,” Quinn stated. Kate Morrow, a recent Princeton High School graduate, said the new law does not make sense. “I understand that it allows the voter to have a choice in who they will be voting for when they’re actually 18, but I also know very few 17 year olds who have the time, interest and patience to put into researching a large panel of candidates for a primary,” she said. Morrow said this new law might be one that does nothing because 17 year olds won’t vote anyway. “But it opens a door for both uninformed and immature voters, which tips the balance of this country’s democratic system,” she said. “I definitely believe that young people should have a say, but ultimately, the voting age is 18, and this just adds a feeling of ‘conditionality’ to the law, which may have wider repercussions.” Although Bureau County Clerk Kami Hieronymus understands Quinn’s concept of letting 17 year olds have a better say in their voting, she strongly believes it won’t make much of a difference in

See 17 year olds Page 4 Year 167 No. 82 One Section - 20 Pages

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How fast is too fast?

Illinois looks at increasing the speed limit By Donna Barker dbarker@bcrnews.com

PRINCETON — Motorists on certain Illinois interstates and highways could see higher speed limits in the future. The Illinois Generally Assembly has passed Senate Bill 2356 which would increase speed limits on Illinois’ rural freeways and certain highways from 65 miles per hour to 70 miles per hour. The bill was sent on June 20 to Gov. Pat Quinn’s desk for consideration.

According to the Illinois General Assembly website, the bill would provide the maximum speed limit outside an urban district for any vehicle to be 70 miles per hour on any interstate highway, as well as on all or part of other highways designated by the Illinois Department of Transportation. The affected highways would need to have at least four lanes of traffic and have a separation between the roadways moving in opposite directions. The proposed law does have an opt-out ordinance option for urban counties.

On Monday, Bureau County Sheriff John Thompson said he’s not opposed to the increased speed limit change. When he learned to drive, the speed limit on interstates was 70 miles per hour, and the speed limit on secondary roads was 65 miles per hour. Legislators are just trying to put the speed limit back to where things used to be, the sheriff said. In his opinion, the biggest mistake made by lawmakers was allowing semi trucks to travel at the same speed as the other vehicles, Thompson said.

See Speed limit Page 4

BCR photo/Phyllis Fargher

Pulling for a lot of fun in Walnut Guither’s Tree Service’s tug of war team gives it their all on Saturday during the second annual Dave Guither Tugfest in Walnut — a test of strength and a lot of fun during the village’s annual Walnut Hometown Celebration held during the Fourth of July weekend. See more photos on Page 2.

Summer needs hit food pantry Lanham: A bittersweet endeavor By Donna Barker dbarker@bcrnews.com

SHEFFIELD — Summer months can be a challenge for families because children are home and not receiving their breakfast and lunch at school, according to Mary Lanham, manager of the Western Bureau County Food Pantry. On Monday, Lanham said the local food

pantry is there to help meet some of those summer needs. Actually, the number of people served through the Western Bureau County Food Pantry has stayed fairly steady with about 75 to 80 households served each month. About 55 percent of those households are families with children 18 years and younger. There is also a significant number of elderly people who come for assistance

from the food pantry, Lanham said, and it’s very difficult for them to come and ask for help. There are also unemployed people and underemployed people seeking help. There are also households in which one of the adults has lost his/her job. There are people with no health insurance, and sometimes, a medical need takes the money which would have been used otherwise for food, she said.

See Food pantry Page 4

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2 Local 2 • Tuesday, July 9, 2013

Bureau County

Republican 800 Ace Road, Princeton, Illinois 61356

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Clarifications/Corrections Did we get it right? Accuracy is important to us, and we want to correct mistakes promptly. If you believe a factual error has been made, call the Bureau County Republican at 815-8754461.

Seeking Sources Summer is upon us, and the Bureau County Republican is anxious to see your vacation photos. When you’re packing your suitcase for an upcoming excursion, remember to pack a copy of the BCR too. When you get to your destination, have someone take a photo of you holding the newspaper. It’s always fun if you can stand in front of a landmark or something interesting at your destination. When you get home, email the photo and some information about your trip to BCR Associate Editor Rita Roberts at rroberts@bcrnews.com. Make sure you tell us who is in the photo and where your photo was taken. We’ll be happy to show your friends, family and neighbors where you went on your most recent vacation. Where in the World is the BCR? Hopefully, it’s in your suitcase and ready to go on a fun-filled journey, filled with memory-making moments. ••• The Bureau County Republican is located at 800 Ace Road, Princeton, Illinois 61356. Office hours are Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Phone: 815-875-4461 FAX: 815-875-1235 The BUREAU COUNTY REPUBLICAN (ISSN 0894-1181) is published tri-weekly (three times a week) by the Bureau County Republican, 800 Ace Road, P.O. Box 340, Princeton, IL 61356-0340. Periodical postage paid at Princeton, Illinois, 61356. POSTMASTER Send address changes to BUREAU COUNTY REPUBLICAN, PO Box 340, Princeton, IL 61356-0340.

Bigfoot Band Camp ... a music, arts and camping festival By Dixie Schroeder dschroeder@putnamcountyrecord.com

MCNABB – Music, art and lots of fun will be the agenda at the third annual Bigfoot Band Camp on July 25-28 at the Putnam County Conservation area in rural McNabb. More than 30 national, regional and local acts will be performing live on two stages throughout this four-day and threenight classic event. Producer of the event, Sean Dunn of Band Camp Productions wants people to know this is a family event. “We have worked extremely hard to make this affordable for families,” said Dunn. “From the food to the camping to the entertainment and parking, there will be something for everyone. We will have local police, ambulance and weather-watchers on site to ensure security and safety for our event attendees.” Dunn also wants the public to know there is

a wide variety of music styles that will be featured at the concert. “Festival-goers will see and hear rock, blues, country and western,” he said. “That is just the start of it. With two stages going, it will be non-stop entertainment.” Dunn said Band Camp Productions, a concert and festival production company, has signed some of the biggest and most cutting edge performing artists to perform at this year’s event. Headlining acts will include Kashmir who performs “The Led Zeppelin Show.” Frank Livingston, as Jimmy Page, nails every aspect of this performance and sound in exact detail, he said. The Voodoo Fix is a national rock-n-roll act from Los Angeles. The Voodoo Fix is scheduled on Friday night. For the rockabilly fans, The Krank Daddies will be performing. For the true

blues fans, Jimmy Nick and Don’t Tell Mama will be on hand. As a youngster, Nick was a finalist in the Chicago Blues Guitar Sling Challenge in 2012 and the winner of the River City Blues society’s blues competition in Memphis, Tenn. Also from Chicago, who just finished playing at the Taste of Chicago and Milwaukee’s ‘Summerfest, is Overman, a highdemand festival band. Another performer is Burlesque Le’Moustache. If you have seen the History Channel’s “American Pickers,” you will know Danielle, also known in the burlesque world as Dannie Diesel. She choreographs her very own burlesque troupe from the Quad Cities with her sister Molly Tov as emcee. They will be performing a new show on the main stage July 27. Other bands signed to perform include Audiobon, Dogs of Fortune, Red Sulfur Springs, Machine

Have a green thumb? Help Us We need you to volunteer in Princeton this summer. Grow! Join our team and help make our town beautiful!

Gun Moses and Tassel Bros. There will also be hoop/dance performers, yoga, interactive art, and of course, the Bigfoot himself. Acts are still being added to the performance list each day. Food and merchandise vendors will also be present. Hennepin United Methodist Church will feature its fresh handpopped kettle corn and the local competition BBQ team, Always Smokin Something, will be on hand. The McNabb Fire Department will again be attending to ensure public safety and providing water activities to keep everyone and the site hydrated. The ILCHASE.org

team will again be on site at the Bigfoot Band Camp making sure everyone attending the event is safe from weather threats. New this year, the ILCHASE team will be streaming live video of select performances to the Bigfoot Bandcamp website at www.bigfootbandcamp.com. For more information on this mix of music, art and creativity, visit the website or the Facebook page or call 773942-3220. Tickets are on sale through Rudy’s Liquors in LaSalle and also online at the website. Gates will open on July 25 at 5 p.m., and the event ends on July 28 at 11 a.m.

let our Family Take Care of your Family Before it gets really hot call us for an air conditioner clean & check or replace your old unit with a new American Standard. CAll TodAy!

For more information on this great opportunity, please contact the Princeton Tourism and Visitors Bureau by calling (815) 875-2631.

Financing available to Qualified Buyers.

Electrical Contractors • Heating & A/C Contractor • Farm • Commercial • Residential • Industrial • Maintenance

Electric 815-643-2354 • HVAC 815-643-2631


3 Local Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Local

Tuesday, July 9, 2013 • 3 News tips/story ideas — Contact BCR Senior Staff Writer Donna Barker at 815875-4461, ext. 244, or e-mail her at dbarker@bcrnews.com.

Have you seen a pet left in a hot car? Protecting four-legged friends from the heat By Goldie Currie gcurrie@bcrnews.com

PRINCETON – Leaving a pet inside a vehicle on a hot summer day can be a deadly decision. As the heat inside a vehicle quickly rises, pets suffer irreversible organ damage and eventually death, according to the Humane Society of the United States. On a warm day, temperatures inside a vehicle can rise to dangerous levels. The Humane Society gives an example saying on an 85-degree day, the temperatures inside a vehicle with the windows open can reach 102 degrees within 10 minutes. After 30 minutes, the temperatures will reach 120 degrees. Even when the temperature outside is a balmy 72 degrees, the temperatures inside

a car can rocket to a fatal 116 degrees in less than an hour. Leaving a pet in the vehicle can also risk the possibility of receiving a misdemeanor charge. Princeton Police Chief Tom Root confirmed his department has taken complaints from people who have witnessed someone leaving a pet inside a vehicle on a hot day. He said most calls are from someone who left their pet in the vehicle while they’ve gone in to do some shopping in Walmart. When this happens, usually the officer will locate the vehicle owner within the store to be questioned. Root said leaving pets in the vehicle is a cruelty to animals, and people can be ticketed with a misdemeanor. According to the ASPCA, which works to provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to animals, symptoms of overheating in pets include excessive panting or difficulty breath-

ing, increased heart and respiratory rate, drooling, mild weakness, stupor or even collapse. The ASPCA said animals with flat faces, like Pugs or Persian cats, are more prone to heat stroke since they cannot pant as effectively. These pets, along with the elderly, overweight and those with heart or lung diseases, should be kept in air-conditioned rooms as much as possible. Another thing to remember during the heat is not to leave animals lingering on hot asphalt. According to the ASPCA, being close to the ground, a pet’s body can heat up quickly and sensitive paw pads can burn. The ASPCA warns if it’s suspected that a pet is suffering from heat stroke, get help from a veterinarian immediately. If someone witnesses a pet left in the vehicle in the heat, they are encouraged to contact their local police station. Comment on this story at www.bcrnews.com.

Tips for keeping pets safe this summer • Sunburn is a hazard for pets who spend time outdoors. Use a pet-safe sunscreen to protect pets from the sun’s rays, which can cause skin cancer especially of the ears and nose. • Keep pets inside moving cars during travel. Letting dogs travel with their head outside the open car window is dangerous. Flying particles and debris can cause eye damage, and some pets have fallen out of moving vehicles. • Dogs should never ride unsecured in the back of pickup trucks, regardless of how slow the vehicle is moving. • Take pets on walks in the early mornings or late evening, not in the heat of midday, and remember that hot pavement can burn the pads of pet’s paws. • Make sure pets have plenty of fresh water. Change it several times a day. Source: The Humane Society of the United States.

Check out the BCR online at www.bcrnews.com.

There will be a celebration of BoB & Clara oloffson’s 60th wedding anniversary and andy & Emily oloffson’s recent nuptials on Sat., August 3, 2013, at 5:00 P.M. at the VFW Hall in Wyanet

Would appreciate a RSVP at 815-699-2459 by July 21st Your presence is the only present desired

Is there an issue out there that has you troubled? — If so, why not consider writing a Letter to the Editor. Contact BCR Editor Terri Simon for details.

Looking back ... moving on By David Giuliani Shaw Media Service

The message is simple these days from Dixon city officials: Everything’s good now, so let’s move on. This follows last year’s scandal, in which federal authorities found out former city Comptroller Rita Crundwell made off with $53 million over a couple of decades. In April, the city revealed that then-Dixon Public Works Director Shawn Ortgiesen racked up $13,521 in personal expenses on his city-issued credit card from April 2007 to March. By the time he was caught, he had paid back only $4,890. Some critics blame these scandals on Dixon’s commission form of government. They say part-time commissioners, who have executive authority over designated departments, aren’t qualified to run the city on a day-today basis. But Commissioner Dennis Considine said in a city council meeting the other day that most people in Dixon seem to favor retaining the commission form of government. He, like most of his colleagues, resisted the idea of hiring a city administrator who would have day-to-day control of government, with the council overseeing the administrator and setting policies. Most cities have administrators these days, especially those the size of Dixon. But Considine doesn’t want any one person to have too much power. Commissioner Jeff Kuhn had simi-

lar fears. He questioned whether an administrator should have power over day-to-day operations, saying he already had daily conversations with supervisors of his designated departments about what is done and what needs to be done. Commissioner Colleen Brechon wondered whether an administrator would get in the way of an already efficient system. Mayor Jim Burke, however, favored a powerful administrator. Police Chief Danny Langloss, who recently received the title of “special assistant to the council,” is proposing hiring an administrator but is apparently seeking to reduce the commission’s authority over day-to-day matters. Ideally, he said at the council meeting, commissioners would let department heads handle day-to-day operations with the oversight of an administrator. Since May, a task force has been meeting to consider different forms of government. The panel is expected to make a recommendation on the form of government best for Dixon. The recommendation will be nonbinding, but city officials have talked about putting it on the November 2014 ballot. But they’re none too excited about changing the form of government. And they’ve had that feeling for a while. In October – six months after the

See Dixon Page 5

BARN TOUR WHITESIDE COUNTY I

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JULY 13-14, 2013 Saturday, July 13, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, July 14, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

www.whitesidecountybarntour.com The 2013 tour begins at the RKR & Associates, 9585 Henry Road, Morrison, where you will find our first barn. RKR is a landscape nursery so be sure and check out the beautiful landscaping around the property, too. The tour will include a total of ten barns and one historic site. Leaving RKR, barn enthusiasts will meander west towards barns 2-5. You will see a variety of interesting architectural styles in the first five barns. The Whiteside County Cattleman’s Association will be grilling hamburgers and hotdogs at barn #5. Seating will be available for you to enjoy your lunch. After lunch, you will visit barn #6 that will also have antique farm equipment. Stop #7 is a historical site - the Albany Indian Mounds. Originally made up of 96 burial mounds, the site is older than either the Cahokia or Dickson Mounds. The site has a parking lot and picnic shelter, walking trails, and interpretive signs. The tour concludes with four more barns. Along with the barns, you will see more antique farm equipment and livestock. Admission: $20 per vehicle - No Advance Sales (admission includes tour book and map) Tour starts at RKR & Associates, 9585 Henry Road, Morrison, IL Whiteside Co. Farm Bureau - 100 East Knox St., Morrison, IL 815-772-2165 • wcfb@frontiernet.net

www.whitesidecountybarntour.com

Sponsored by:


4 Local 4 • Local• Tuesday, July 9, 2013

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Here is what

Savoring Sunday’s sundaes in Seatonville!

RutH Wood from Wyanet, IL had to say about her care at Perry Memorial Hospital…

Taylor Tieman of Princeton carefully adds caramel syrup to her ice cream sundae at the free dessert night at the Congregational Church in Seatonville. The event, which also included children’s games, was held as a kick-off to the church’s upcoming Vacation Bible School, which will be held from 9 to 11:30 a.m. July 15-19. BCR photo/Barb Kromphardt

Speed limit From Page 1 Whatever the speed limit, drivers need to pay close attention when driving, even more attention at any increased speed, Thompson said, adding public safety is always the main factor. The Illinois House approved the speed limit increase bill with an 85 to 30 vote. The Senate approved the bill on a 41 to 6 vote. Voting in favor of the bill was Rep. Frank Mautino (D-76th) of Spring Valley. Voting against the bill was Rep. Don Moffitt (R-74th) of Galesburg. On Monday, Mautino said he voted in favor of the bill because it would help bring Illinois into line with surrounding states that have 70 mph speed limits on their interstates. The increased speed limit in Illinois would help conform speed limits when crossing state lines. The change to increased speed limits would affect only the rural interstate areas and exclude the urban areas, he said. On Monday, Moffitt said this was a difficult vote for him. He did take into consideration neighboring states with higher speed limits, and he contacted his constituents for their input, including four different

Food pantry

From Page 1 As far as needs at the food pantry, Lanham said the recent Stamp Out Hunger food drive held by the local post office was a huge help for the food pantry. There was a great variety of things collected, which was nice for the families to get something different. The food pantry just ran out of those collected items last week, she said. The food pantry always has a need for the basics, like cereal, Lanham said. There is also a need for personal hygiene items which families can’t buy with their Link cards, things like shampoo, toothpaste and deodorant. Those things are almost like luxury items for the food pantry to be able to give families, she said. The board of directors for the food pantry is trying to move toward healthier food items for families. The board has asked the food pantry to give small

trucking firms in his district. The general consensus from the trucking firms was their trucks ran more efficiently between 62 and 65 mph, and the trucking firms would continue to run their trucks in that range, Moffitt said. He also contacted the Midwest Truckers Association, expecting the association to be in favor of the increased speed, but the association was neutral, Moffitt said. The association spokesperson said the dangerous situation was a few years ago when there was a split speed limit for trucks and other vehicles, with trucks having a 55 mph speed limit and cars having a 65 mph speed limit. The association’s concern was that the proposed speed limit would be uniform for cars and trucks, which it would be, Moffitt said. No one contacted him asking him to vote in favor of the bill, Moffitt added. For him, the overriding issue was public safety. If vehicles are going faster, it will take that much longer for them to stop. Also, since many drivers often drive over the 65 speed limit now, then how fast would the traffic being going with a 70 mph speed limit, Moffitt asked. Comment on this story at www.bcrnews.com.

bags of fresh fruit to people, but that practice has been discontinued during the summer months because the food pantry does not have enough refrigeration to keep the fruit in good condition. The board has also asked that frozen vegetables be given to families. Hopefully, the food pantry will receive fresh garden produce this summer to distribute like it did last year, Lanham said. The small communities within the food pantry region have been very generous in their support of the food pantry, both in their monetary and food/supply donations to the pantry and also as volunteers. Lanham said the food pantry has a great group of volunteers who range in age from fourth grade to 80 years old. They work hard and are good-hearted. They stock shelves and help carry supplies out to cars for the patrons. They have a good time together while helping others, she said. Working at the Western Bureau

17 year olds From Page 1 voter turnout. Hieronymus confirmed voter turnout in Bureau County is very low, due in part by voters not wanting to choose between parties. “We just don’t have a good turnout in the primary elections,” she said. As for voters registration in Bureau County, it will cause one more step in the program currently used in Hieronymus’ office. Hieronymus said the current program will have to be changed, and one extra step will have to be

County Food Pantry can be a bittersweet-kind of thing, she said. “I’m sad that so many people are in this condition, worrying about how they will feed their children or themselves,” Lanham said. “But it’s so heartwarming to know that we all are looking out for each other. I think small towns are good at that.” Located at 123 S. Main St. in Sheffield, the Western Bureau County Food Pantry serves people in Buda, Sheffield, Mineral, Neponset and Manlius, though some people in Manlius are served through the Tri-County Opportunities Council food pantry in Princeton. The food pantry is open Wednesdays from 9 to 11 a.m. and from 4 to 6 p.m. Generally, people can come to the food pantry once a month, but people with unexpected emergency situations won’t be turned away, Lanham said. Comment on this story at www.bcrnews.com.

added to calculate the ages of young registers. The system will somehow have to override registered voters who are 17 and will have to calculate to confirm they will turn 18 by the general election. “It’s going to be another step for us to track and make sure that they are qualified to vote,” she said. Quinn signed the bill at Adlai E. Stevenson High School in Lincolnshire. The bill was proposed and pushed by a civics teacher and several students from the school. According to FairVote, 20 other states permit 17 year olds to vote in the primary election. Comment on this story at www.bcrnews.com.

“The staff was very attentive and kept a close eye on me during my inpatient stay at Perry. I appreciated Dr. Pratt’s proactive treatment. The food was also very good and there was a nice variety from which to choose. I have now been going to Perry’s Lab for testing. The Lab staff is efficient and the service is quick”.

Experience the quality and compassionate care and service at Perry Memorial Hospital.

530 Park Avenue East Princeton, IL 61356 815-875-2811 www.perrymemorial.org Proud To Be Your Hospital!


5 Obit/Records Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Obituaries Mary May PRINCETON — Mary E. Jensen May, 95, of Princeton died peacefully at 11 a.m. Saturday, July 6, 2013, at Perry Memorial Hospital, Princeton, surrounded by family members. Born Mary Eileen Devine on March 6, 1918, near Mary May Deer Grove, she was one of eight children of William and Catherine Devine. She attended St. Mary Grade School in Sterling then the “Advanced” Country School. She was a speaker at her eighth-grade graduation. She attended Bishop Muldoon High School in Rockford for two years, staying with her maternal grandmother. After her grandmother’s passing, she returned to complete her high school education at what is now Sterling Newman Catholic High School, graduating in 1936. She was awarded a scholarship to St. Mary’s of the Woods College. She taught in the St. Mary’s Grade School in Sterling for three years. She married William P. Jensen on Nov. 22, 1939, in Tampico in a ceremony performed by her uncle, Monsignor John McGuire. Mary and Bill moved to Princeton in 1941. Together they would have 10 sons, William, Robert, John, James, Gary, Gregory, Lawrence, Kevin, Thomas and Steven. Mr. Jensen died on Sept. 6, 1961. She then married Harry W. May on Dec. 30, 1973. He died on Sept. 11, 1989. Surviving are nine sons, William (Judy), John, Greg (Joanne Sheldon) and Larry, all of Princeton, Robert of Chicago, James (Teresa) of Plano, Gary (Deb) of Dublin, Ohio, Thomas of Peoria and Steven (Pam) of Rockford. She is also survived by one brother, Robert (Virginia) Devine of Rockford; a very special niece, Mary Ann (Michael) Velasquez of Rock Falls who was raised by the family from birth to age 2; 24 grandchildren; 46 great-grandchildren; four great-great grandchildren; and many nieces and nephews. Also preceding her in death were her parents; one son, Kevin; four grandchildren; three sisters; and three brothers. Mary began working at Perry Memorial Hospital in 1960 as a nurse’s aide during her husband Bill’s illness. She would continue working there for 32 years during which she would become a ward clerk. After retiring from Perry Memorial Hospital, she would continue helping others by serving as a home health care aide for many years. She

Edwin Dennis PRINCETON — Edwin J. “Ed” Dennis, 85, of Princeton passed away Sunday, July 7, 2013, at the Illinois Veterans Home in LaSalle. Born April 30, 1928, in Chicago to Joseph and Anna (Delygler) Domoszewski, he married Helen Golemba Jan. 6, 1950, in Chicago. She preceded him in death Edwin Dennis in 1988. He then married Mary Fulton-Neuhalfen Nov. 20, 1993, in St. Joseph Church in Henry. She survives. He graduated from Lane Tech High School in Chicago in 1946 and served in the U.S. Navy during the end of World War II. He worked as a carpenter for Accurate Home Supply, retiring in 1990. He was a member of St. Louis Catholic Church and the Order of Eagles. Also surviving are two daughters, Marcia (George) Michehl of Lake Zurich and

would also receive training and became a service provider of the Bureau County Hospice during this time. She continued helping others well into her 80s frequently serving clients who were younger than she. Through her work at the hospital and in home health care, she would become well-known for her caring and compassion for others. Raised a devout Catholic, Mary was a longtime member of St. Louis Catholic Church dating back to the year she and husband Bill moved to Princeton. At the time of her death she was the oldest member of the St. Louis parish. She was a member of the St. Louis Altar Guild and the Council of Catholic Women. Her husband Bill was a trustee of St. Louis parish at the time of the construction of the current church. Despite tragedies and losses that befell the family including a tornado that destroyed the family farm buildings in 1959, a fire that destroyed the family home in 1960, the loss of her first husband a year later, and the tragic losses of a son and grandchildren, Mary held firmly to her faith and always trusted that our Lord had reasons for these events. Even in what seemed like the darkest of time, she would point out to family that there were still reasons to be thankful and hopeful. Mary was a proud member of the DAR, obtaining membership after a 30-year journey into her ancestry. She was named Princeton’s “Mother of the Year” in 1960. She was also a longtime member of the Bureau County Home Extension, the Perry Memorial Auxiliary, the Bureau County Senior Citizens Association and Princeton Elks Lodge 1461. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 10 a.m. Thursday at St. Louis Catholic Church, Princeton, with Father Jeffrey Stirniman officiating and Deacon John Murphy assisting. Burial will be in Calvary Cemetery, Sterling. Visitation will be from 4 to 8 p.m. Wednesday at the Norberg Memorial Home, Princeton, with a rosary at 7:45 p.m. Memorials may be directed to a charity of the donor’s choice. The family would like to gratefully acknowledge Dr. Martin Faber, Father Jeffrey Stirniman, the nurses and staff at Perry Memorial Hospital and Colonial Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center, and the Alternatives for Older Adults for their compassion and care for our beloved Mary during the past year. Online condolences may be left at www.norbergfh.com. Laura (George) Pillion of Carol Stream; four grandchildren, Scott (Sarah) Michehl, Kevin Michehl, Brian (Christy) Pillion and Jason (Mallori Harrington) Pillion; three great-grandchildren, Tess and Zachary Michehl, and Hannah Pillion; three stepchildren, Elizabeth (Bryant) Fahrow of Bourbonnais, Michele (Mike) Oelrich of Cape Coral, Fla., and George (Nancy) Neuhalfen of Malden; five stepgrandchildren, Elissa Tuttle, Courtney (Adam) Sager, and Michael, McKenzie and Levi Oelrich; and one stepgreat-grandchild, Ayla Sager. He was also preceded in death by his parents, two brothers and three sisters. A memorial Mass of Christian Burial will be at 11 a.m. Friday at St. Louis Catholic Church, Princeton, with Father Jeffrey Stirniman officiating. Burial will be private and at a later date. The family will receive friends from 10 to 11 a.m. Friday at the church. Memorials may be directed to the Illinois Vetarans Home in LaSalle. The Norberg Memorial Home, Princeton, is in charge of arrangements.

Obit deadlines

Deadlines for obituaries are 2 p.m. Monday for Tuesday’s paper, 2 p.m. Wednesday for Thursday’s paper and 2 p.m. Friday for Saturday’s paper.

Tuesday, July 9, 2013 • 5

Road show Thursday in Utica UTICA – The Illinois Office of Tourism is ramping up for the 2013 Illinois Road Show, and Utica is on the schedule. Each year IOT hits the road to share compelling economic and social benefits of Illinois’ travel and tourism with industry partners and media. The Road Show will be at Starved Rock State Park Lodge at 3 p.m. Thursday. This year, they’re put-

ting the “show” in Road Show which will expand Road Show to five full days and include a social media component to encourage more consumer engagement along the way. They will be traveling the state in a fully-wrapped, branded Road Show bus; making an impact in each region by meeting with media and stakeholders and visiting more attractions and events.

The theme of this year’s Road Show is the “Illinois Travel Effect” – highlighting how travel positively affects individuals and businesses through relationship building and increased productivity. Industry news throughout Illinois will be announced, including the latest visitor and economic impact numbers and upcoming statewide tourism initiatives.

Summer energy assistance available ROCK FALLS — Tri-County Opportunities Council is operating the Summer Energy Assistance Program under the direction of the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity. The Summer Energy Assistance program provides a one-time payment of $150 directly to the electric vendor on behalf of the household. The program is designed to assist those households who are at risk during the hot summer months. According to the state of Illinois, those households are those that have a member 60 years of age or older, disabled, a child under 5 years old or households that have a medical need for summer assistance. To receive assistance, a household must prove it meets the income

Dixon From Page 3 Crundwell scandal came to light but before Ortgiesen’s surfaced – council members seemed fine with the way things were. “I certainly believe in the form of government we have,” Considine said in an interview. “It works as well as any form of government. I’m positive about it.” Brechon also was happy. “The city of Dixon has the best of all worlds,” she said. “The council has very dedicated members. Shawn Ortgiesen is the city engineer, involved in all aspects of city business. He is very competent. I am very confident working with him and the city attorney.” Kuhn said he had no “preconceived notions,” but added, “I have some trouble believing that if we had a city manager, none of this would have happened.” Kuhn, Brechon and

guidelines, have proof the energy bills are in the applicant’s name, provide photocopies of all household members’ Social Security cards and medical cards. The program runs from July 15 through July 26 or until funds are depleted. The gross income for a household for 30 days prior to the date of application cannot exceed the following: One person household, $1,436; two person household, $1,939; three person household, $2,441; four person household, $2,944; five person household, $3,446; and six person household, $3,949. To find the nearest location to apply, call Tammy Saenz/LIHEAP director at 800-323-5434 from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Considine have been on the commission a couple of years. Commissioner David Blackburn, who has served two decades, has become much more silent since the Crundwell scandal. But he did speak up at the recent council meeting, saying he missed someone with Ortgiesen’s

experience. No scientific polls have been taken about Dixon residents’ view on their form of government. Is Considine’s assessment correct – that most people are happy with the way things are? Or Brechon’s view – that Dixon already has an efficient system? Comment on this story at www.bcrnews.com.

Need to Get Away? Trip To Branson

November 12-16, 2013

9 shows: Johnny Mathis; Mel Tillis; Bretts, Presleys, Show Boat; 3 Redneck Tenors; Rankin Bros; Doug Gabriel; Hughes Bros; includes hotel, motor coach, meals, a stop at Lambert’s Cafe, home of the throwed rolls, $795 PP

*

scenic Door counTy, Wis.

September 18-20, 2013

*

2 Plays, meals, fish boil, shopping, Washington Island, winery, hotel, $495 PP

LincoLn Legacy July 30-31, 2013

Despicable Me 2 (PG)

Digital Presentation Tue-Thu . . . . . . . . . 4:30 7:15

The lone RangeR (PG-13)

Digital Presentation Tue-Thu . . . . . . . . . 4:00 7:00 Showtimes good 7/5/13 thru 7/11/13 .

455 South Main • 815-875-1707 www.apolloprinceton.com

Overnight Lincoln Legacy in Springfield, New Salem, Lincoln Museum, Home, Capital, etc. Includes motor coach, hotel, meal, $159 PP Call for Information Don & Sandra Watson, owners

D&S Tours

206 E. N. St., Box 223, Walnut, IL Call Toll Free, 877-904-8687 www.dsbustours.com


6 Persepctive 6 • Tuesday, July 9, 2013

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Perspective Bureau County

Republican

Serving Bureau County Since 1847

Sam R Fisher

Terri Simon

Publisher

Editor

From the editor’s desk Patriotism rang through the area last week, as we celebrated another Fourth of July. I hope you had the opportunity to spend some time with family and friends during the holiday. It’s not often the newspaper’s editorial department gets a holiday off, so this was especially sweet! There were some wonderful fireworks displays throughout the area. I hope you had the chance to attend at least one of these events. While there is always talk from those who wish the fireworks shows were bigger and longer, there is a remedy to that situation. It’s called opening your Terri wallet and donating to the cause. As we all Simon know, a fireworks display is not a cheap endeavor, so if you’d like to see bigger and better shows, you can always help financially. On the flip side of the fireworks coin, please take a moment to thank the folks who orchestrated/sponsored your local fireworks event. It takes a lot of time, energy and money to pull this festive and patriotic display off, and they deserve a pat on the back. On behalf of the Bureau County Republican, please know we appreciate your efforts. ••• Have you picked up your copy of our increasinglypopular Illinois Valley Living magazine yet? If not, you’ll want to get one soon. This Summer 2013 edition is jam-packed with stories about the people, places and things that make the Illinois Valley a special place to live. We’re already working on our fall edition, so if you have any story ideas, please feel free to send me an email at tsimon@bcrnews.com. One thing to note in our summer edition, is our new Women of Distinction Award. Illinois Valley Living is asking you to nominate a woman from the Illinois Valley who goes the extra mile to enhance the life of others in our area. You can find a nomination form in the magazine or online at www.iilinoisvalleyliving.com. The deadline to nominate someone is 5 p.m. Aug. 1. After all the nominations are received, a panel of women from outside the area will select those Women of Distinction to be honored at a special luncheon on Oct. 17 at Deer Park Country Club in Oglesby. It will be a great event with lunch, speakers, special awards and great give-aways — all to honor the wonderful women in the area who make a difference. Give me a call at 815-875-4461, ext. 229, or email me at tsimon@bcrnews.com if you have any questions. ••• How does your garden grow? While I haven’t picked anything out of my garden yet, it’s looking great. The Napa cabbage is almost ready, and it won’t be long for the cucumbers, peppers, tomatoes and eggplants. This is just an idea, but if you find yourself with produce to spare, remember your local food pantries. Most of them accept fresh produce, and I guarantee there are folks who use those services who would enjoy the fruits (and vegetables) of your labor. Also, don’t forget your older neighbors and friends who might not be able to get out in the garden. I’m sure they would appreciate it too. For me, part of the fun of gardening is sharing with others. ••• Have you had time this summer to sit on the front porch, the backyard deck, the patio? If not, try to carve out some time to do so. We’ve become a nation who pulls the shades, locks the doors and turns on the computer or the TV. What if we turned off the TV/computer, unlocked the doors, refused to pull down the shades and decided to spend our summer evenings outside, while being serenaded by the crickets? Sounds just about perfect to me. Thought for the day: “The best kind of friend is the one you could sit on a porch with, never saying a word, and walk away feeling like that was the best conversation you’ve had.” Anonymous. ••• Have a great week. And remember ... you are important to me and the BCR. BCR Editor Terri Simon can be reached at tsimon@bcrnews.com.

TO Letter THE Editor

‘City of Pumps’

A blessing or a disaster?

To the Editor, For Princeton to grow we cannot ignore any longer what lies beneath the ground; it’s sewers. I’ve heard it said many cities have sewer back up issues – and it’s true. These comments, however, make it sound as though it’s a valid excuse for our problems; it isn’t. My overriding concern is our problem; how it affects our residents; and how we’re going to fix it. In 2003 two department heads addressed the city council on the condition of our 175 miles of sanitary sewer lines. They said we could be losing 50 percent of our sewer line capacity due to structural defects, sags in the lines, cracks, holes and misaligned pipes. They said, “The dilemma of the sanitary sewers has always been the same … undersized, underestimated and underground.” Since their presentation, the city has spent $40 million on various projects. Of this amount nothing that wasn’t mandated by the state of Illinois was spent on improving our sewer lines. There was work on lift stations and sewer extensions benefiting Greencroft, and a retention pond was built, but the root of our problem, our underground sewer lines, were all but ignored. Most everyone would like to see the city grow. The city owns property marketed for growth. To support the new water plant the city predicted that within 6.5 years, Princeton’s population will grow to 8,124. Assume for a minute this is accurate. What will it mean to an already stressed system if 424 people are added to our city and given access to our sewers? We can’t handle our current population as it is. Think about it; we put 12 pumps out, even if there’s a threat of heavy rain. No one should experience sewer back up, but many do. It’s the result of inadequate planning and neglect. It’s an underground, outof-sight problem that’s been set aside in favor of visual projects developed for the yet unfulfilled promise of growth which, if it occurs, could have an adverse effect on the quality of life of many more residents. The city is currently studying the flooding issues in the northeast area of town and in Greencroft. It’s needed, but it’s not enough. If we’re going to fix the totality of the problem, we need to perform a city-wide inspection of all sewer lines. Group them into five categories, from worse to best; the worse needing immediate attention. We then address the worst by determining how much it’ll cost to fix and then find a way to pay for it. When the worst are fixed, we move to the second worse and so on.  We can’t ignore the problem any longer. It’s either a priority or it’s not. If it’s not, then community pride has diminished. If it’s not, we will have gone from being known as the once proud City of Elms and where Tradition meets Progress … to the City of Pumps. Commissioner Joel Quiram Princeton

To the Editor, In the Catholic Post, it states the face of the Diocese of Peoria will change July l when the first stage of major parish reorganization resulting from the ongoing “GROWING In Faith Together” takes effect. You have to wonder what is going to happen in the second stage, or the third or fourth stage. Instead of “GROWING in Faith Together,” I see in many areas parishioners “LOSING their Faith Together.” When I was the ADA director years ago, we had 198 Catholic churches in the Diocese of Peoria; now I find that we have only 158 Catholic churches in the Diocese, and that is not counting the losses when the churches merge. When I was the ADA director for St. Thomas More in Dalzell, we had 128 families that attended our church. After closing our church and re-opening it a year later, there are not more than 20 families that attend St. Thomas More Catholic Church today. Many families were disheartened because of what happened to our church and quit going to church or went to protestant churches in the area. St. Benedict’s in Ladd was closed like St. Thomas More in Dalzell, and now Ladd has no church to go to since St. Benedict’s has been torn down and the decision to sell the  church hall is pending. I also hear many who belong to the “Knights of Columbus” have quit that organization too. As of July 1, 2014, we, too, will be merged with Holy Trinity Church in Cherry. We may be merged, but people in Dalzell will not travel many more miles to go to Cherry, when they can go to St. Bede or St. Joseph’s  in Peru. St. Bede is  just 1.5  miles down the road from Dalzell. We are trying to tell Father Pat Fixsen who now has to travel to Dalzell from Cherry and then has to travel to Arlington, along with serving Holy Trinity in Cherry, that we would be satisfied not merging and to continue what he presently does, giving us the opportunity to fulfill our religious duties. I also read where the Spring Valley churches will be merged into The Nativity of Our Lord Church (really what is St. Anthony’s presently). I see nothing wrong with Father Robert Spilman handling all the masses in the other churches in Spring Valley — Sts. Peter and Paul and The Immaculate Conception, like Father Pat Fixsen who has to travel to Dalzell and Arlington. Father Spilman will not have to travel to other towns  because all the churches are in one town — Spring Valley. If one priest in Milwaukee, Wis., services seven churches and Father Pat Fixsen has to travel to Dalzell and Arlington, then Father Spilman can handle the three churches in Spring Valley, and those churches will not have to closed or sold eventually. I really feel mergers through “GROWING in Faith Together” is going to be a disaster. Will the mergers of the churches into one church, destroy the other churches

that have been in operation for many, many years? Carlo Olivero Dalzell

Who are you really? To the Editor, That’s kind of a personal and hard question isn’t it? I want to share with you a little about who I was. How intimate and personal should one get? We don’t even share with our significant other some things about ourself. Doesn’t the divorce rate and brokenness of relationships show that we are not a very honest people? We all have dark secrets. But Jesus said in Matthew 10:26 “There is nothing concealed that will not be disclosed, or hidden that will not be made known.” What I’m going to share with you isn’t to solicit pity. In the past I indulged in enough of my own self-pity with consequences that still linger today. My mother died when I was 1-1/2. My siblings and I were taken from my father when I was 4 and put into a children’s home. At the age of 11 my brother and I were separated from my sisters. I was sexually molested at a young age. (12? I didn’t think to write down the date!) I was very confused and angry in my youth. I started drinking at the age of 17. I became addicted to pornography at a young age. I was arrested seven times for being drunk and disorderly, once for drunk driving. Once I had my stomach pumped because of possible alcohol poisoning. My brother committed suicide when he was 26. I was diagnosed as being manic-depressed in my early 30s, later diagnosed as being bi-polar. Physically and mentally I’m still reaping some of the consequences of my past. I was diagnosed as having chronic fatigue four years ago and had to step out of the workplace three years ago. Many research their family tree. The Bible says that God “will punish the sins of the fathers down to the third and fourth generation of those who hate Him.” Do you blame God for the family you were born into? Or if you were born into a loving family, do you take it for granted? Ether way, take the time to read Ezekiel Chapter 18 to see “who you really are.” I don’t know if Nicodemus grew up in a loving family or a strict religious family, but Jesus said to him, “You must be born again.” Jesus doesn’t promise us a problem-free life as Christians. He himself was crucified and tradition says all his disciples were martyred for their faith. I described to you who I was before I received Christ as my Lord and Savior. Are you a good person? No, not really. Maybe according to this world’s standards but according to God’s standard “our righteous acts are like filthy rags.”Isaiah 64:6. In Ezekiel’s day, they offered up sacrifices because they understood its significance which ultimately pointed to and was fulfilled in Christ. But sadly to many, these sacrifices were a ritual with no personal application. Who are you really? Ted Roberts Princeton

First Amendment “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof, or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press, or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.” Constitution of the United States, 1789


7 Life Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Tuesday, July 9, 2013 • 7

Life&Arts

People in the news — See what local residents are up too and in the news this week. See Page 8.

Weather/Safety program — The DePue Fire Department presents program to DePue Girl Scout troupe. See Page 10.

Community Notes Meetings cancelled PRINCETON — There will be no business meetings for the American Legion Woman’s Auxiliary Unit 125 of Princeton during July and August, nor will there be any workshops during these months. Meetings will resume at 7 p.m. Sept. 11 at the Legion home. For more information, call 815-872-7891.

Donations/returns

Photos contributed

Five Princeton High School graduates received the Rotary Swan-Eickmeier scholarship for $1,000 to be used for tuition, room and board, fees or books/media. LEFT: Pictured is: Joe Park (left), committee member; Emmalee Sears, scholarship recipient; Roger Eickmeier; Genevieve Prushinski, scholarship recipient; and Roger Gustafson, committee member. RIGHT: Pictured is: Roger Eickmeier (left); recipients Andrew Birkey, Kate Morrow and Kathryn Krieger; and Roger Swan.

Princeton Rotary presents Swan-Eickmeier scholarships PRINCETON — The Princeton Rotary Club has awarded Swan-Eickmeier scholarships to five Princeton High School students. The Rotary has been awarding the scholarships to Princeton High School seniors for 13 years. The scholarship is named for Roger Swan and Roger Eickmeier, long-time Rotarians and leaders in the community. The $1,000 non-renewable scholarship is paid directly to a graduating senior who intends to pursue a two-year or four-year college degree. The scholarship funds must be applied to the cost of tuition, room and

board, fees, or books/ media. Selection is based on academic achievement, extra-curricular activities, community service, letters of recommendation, and a 500-word essay expressing how Rotary service and ideals will play a role in their life. Over the 13 years, 48 scholarships have been awarded for a total of $48,000. Funds for the scholarships are raised via various club fundraising activities. The following Princeton High School seniors received Swan-Eickmeier Rotary Scholarships this year. Kathryn Krieger will be

attending Hope College in Holland, Mich. She intends to study vocal music education and performance, with emphasis on becoming a high school choir director. Kate Morrow will be attending Tufts University in Boston, Mass. Her goal is to major in international relations with plans to pursue graduate studies where she can focus on diplomacy. Someday she would like to work in the state department. Andrew Birkey will be attending Gustavus Adolphus College in St. Peter, Minn. He will be studying history. He wants to write and hopes to someday be a college professor.

Genevieve Prushinski will be attending Bradley University in Peoria. She will be pursuing studies in dietetics and psychology. She intends to become a registered dietician and continue to pursue further studies in dietetics. Emmalee Sears, after completing her four-year undergraduate program, plans to apply to a twoyear physician assistant program, hoping for an internship, in order to specialize in orthopedic surgery. The Swan-Eickmeier Scholarship is another way for members of Rotary to show their interest and support for our young people.

Princeton Veterans Group holds breakfast PRINCETON — The Princeton Veterans Group served its semiannual pancake breast on June 2 at the Princeton Legion home. Cooking for the event were Rich Fulkerson, Skipp Munn, Terry DeSalle, Mike Arnett and Brad Oeder. Servers included John Cutich, Hector Gomez, Tom Geihl, Ray Larson, Eldon Entwhistle, Commander David Ohlson, George Dall, Brian Lucas and Tom Burke. The American Legion Woman’s Auxiliary also

assisted at the event. Anyone interested in joining the Legion, V.F.W. or AMVETS should attend a business meeting on any of the following dates: V.F.W. Post 4323, first Wednesday of the month at 7 p.m.; Legion Post 125, second Wednesday of the month at 7 p.m.; and AMVETS Post 180, third Wednesday of the month at 7 p.m. All meetings are held at the post home, 1549 W. Peru St. in Princeton. For more information, call 815-872-1171.

The percussion section is featured on this program, performing a section solo, ”Pistachio,” a Latin piece with many percussion instruments. Also on this program are “Nessun

Bake sale PRINCETON — The gals of Delta Kappa Gamma, International Teaching Society of Bureau County, will host a bake sale from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday at Soldiers and Sailors Park in Princeton. Proceeds will go to scholarships for those going into the teaching profession and also to Freedom House.

VBS in Manlius MANLIUS — The churches of Manlius will sponsor vacation Bible school from 9 to 11 a.m. July 16-19 at the First Baptist Church of Manlius. For more information, or to register, call Trinity Lutheran Church at 815-445-2073.

Meeting SPRING VALLEY — Dominic OBerto Post 182, American Legion, will hold its monthly meeting at 6 p.m. Thursday at the Knights of Columbus Club Rooms, 207 W. St. Paul St., Spring Valley.

Lipid profile and glucose screening SPRING VALLEY — St. Margaret’s Hospital will offer a lipid profile and glucose screening from 7 to 9 a.m. Wednesday in the hospital’s first floor presentation room. The $20 fee includes a check of

cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL and LDL. A twelve-hour food and beverage fast is recommended for more accurate results. Registration is recommended by calling St. Margaret’s at (815) 664-1486.

Ahoy, Kids!

Don’t miss the chance to see FESTIVAL 56’s swashbuckling performance of

AnD HAVE ...

Lunch with a Pirate!

Photo contributed

Guests enjoy a pancake breakfast June 2 at the Princeton Legion home. This semi-annual breakfast is a major fundraiser for the Princeton Veterans Group to continue their veterans work at the LaSalle VA home and other facilities in the area.

Princeton Community Band concert on Sunday PRINCETON — The Princeton Community Band will present the fourth concert of the season at 6 p.m. Sunday at Soldiers and Sailors Park in Princeton.

PRINCETON — American Legion Post 125 of Princeton is no longer accepting donations of canes, crutches, shower benches, walker, etc. However they would like the return of borrowed hospital equipment belong to the Legion and wheelchairs are especially needed to be returned if no longer needed. Items can be left in the vestibule with a name and phone number.

Dorma” by Puccini, a Latin dance feature ”El Festivo” and ”Pageantry Overture” by John Edmundson. The following Sunday, July 21, the Princeton Community Band

will present the world premiere of Robert Sheldon’s “The Red Covered Bridge,” commissioned by the band and written especially for the city of Princeton and Bureau County.

••• Items for the Life & Arts section can be emailed to news@bcrnews.com.

Join us on Sunday, July 21 at 12 pm at Princeton High School Come dressed as your favorite Pirate! Play Pirate games & learn Pirate songs! Explore Ships, Pirates & Treasure Islands! A learning adventure brought to you by LEARnInG STAGE, the education committee of the Princeton Theatre Group. The committee’s mission is to enhance audience understanding, appreciation and enjoyment of live theater, particularly the productions of its sibling, FESTIVAL 56.

Lunch Adventure & Show ticketS: $25 for kids; $40 for adults SeASon ticket hoLderS Add the Lunch Adventure: $12 for kids; $14 for adults Ticket discounts are applicable.

Tickets available at the Festival 56 box office: 815-879-5656

Learning

Stage

LS


8 Life 8 • Life & Arts • Tuesday, July 9, 2013

Monier, Conor Mooney, Krista Naaktgeboren, Emily Phillips, Joshua Renner, Danae Ross, Amber Shipp and Keaton Wagenknecht. Juniors: Nellie Benavidez, Nicole Bornsheuer, Justin Buckman, Lacey DeVenney, Paul Donovan, Kane Eastwood, Joseph Fisher, Phillip Hedges, Nathan Holmberg, Katelin Johnson, Sabrina Johnson, Alexis Kruse, Martin McMahon, David Miller, Francis Monier, Kaitlyn Moreland, Josephine Mueller, Colton Peterson, Sadie Reinbeck, Kelly Sierens, Farrah Staples Ryan Taylor, Daniel Trone, Logan Twidell, Michelle Vainowski, Glenda Valle and Hope Wollerman. Sophomores: Blake Balensiefen, Jedidiah Barnes, Mark Bauer, Carlie Bickett, Rachel Brummel, Annika Carter, Brynley Colby, Garret Dabler, Julia Edlefson, Riley Francis, Ashlyn Gibson, Tyler Gonigam, Ashley Guenther, Salvador Guerrero III, Lindsey Hoffert, Garrett Jackson, Cassie Johnson, Thomas Johnston Sydney Lebahn, Charles Lotspeich, Rachel MacNaughton, Josh Mead, Breanna Moon, Keegan Mooney, Parker Neuhalfen, Lucie Reisberger, Valerie Reuter, Caitlin Scott, Sean Shepard, Corinne Wagenknecht, Haley Wierzbicki and Taylor Zemke. Freshmen: Savanna Bell, Stephanie Christian, Madalyn Dahl, Trey Dale, April Eastwood, Rusty Fargher, Anna Harshman, Justin Holmberg, Abbey Howes, Darcy Kepner, Jessica Loudenburg, Ashlee Nicole, Samantha Stocking, Alex Strader and Kalynn Sullivan.

St. Louis School awards

competed in the State Horsebowl contest. Horsebowl is a team event in which youth answer equine-related questions in a quiz bowl format. The team includes Kiersten Pratt, Stephanie Stocking of Spring Valley, Natalie Stocking of Spring Valley, Hayleigh Olson of Ladd and Renee Scaggs of Princeton. Although the team did not place in state competition, they were one of only two teams from the region selected to compete. Kiersten Pratt was the fourth highest individual scorer in the Senior Horsebowl division at

People in the news Jacob Bauer

Ryan Kelsey PERU — Ryan Kelsey, a 2013 graduate of St. Bede Acdemy, has been awarded an Army ROTC Federal Scholarship to North Central College. Each year, a scholarship board convened by the U.S. Army Cadet Command selects a small number of the best scholars, athletes and leaders from high school senior classes from across the Nation to receive an Army ROTC Federal Scholarship at their school of choice. The applicants are numerous, the selection criteria rigorous and the competition is daunting. Winners possess the qualities and attributes that demonstrate exceptional potential as a future leader. If they complete the ROTC program and earn a college degree, they will commission as an officer, prepared to lead America’s sons and daughters in what is arguably the most professional and powerful military force the world has ever known. The scholarship covers all tuition, mandatory fees and book costs and for Ryan it is worth a total value of about $120,000.

SAN ANTONIO, Texas — Air Force Airman Jacob R. Bauer graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San AntonioLackland, San Antonio, Texas. Bauer completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force. Bauer is the son of Tamara Bauer of Princeton. He earned distinction as an honor graduate. He is a 2012 graduate of Princeton High School.

Alfonso Mendez COLUMBIA, S.C. — Army Pfc. Alfonso J. Mendez has graduated from basic combat training at Fort Jackson, Columbia, S.C. During the nine weeks of training, Mendez studied the Army mission, history, tradition and core values, physical fitness and

the state competition. The Bureau County 4-H Horsebowl and Hippology teams are coached by volunteer Jeanna Ohda, with assistance from volunteer Heather Pierson. 4-H is a program of University of Illinois Extension. The mission of University of Illinois Extension is to provide practical education you can trust to help people, businesses and communities solve problems, develop skills and build a better future. University of Illinois Extension provides equal opportunities in programs and employment.

received instruction and practice in basic combat skills, military weapons, chemical warfare and bayonet training, drill and ceremony, marching, rifle marksmanship, armed and unarmed combat, map reading, field tactics, military courtesy, military justice system, basic first aid, foot marches and field training exercises. Mendez is the son of Kelsi McClure of Princeton. He is a 2012 graduate of Depue Unit School.

A’Seret Dokubo NEW ORLEANS, La. — A’Seret Dokubo, formerly of Tiskilwa, received the Special Education Teacher of the Year award for Dolores T. Aaron Academy in New Orleans, La. Dokubo has been teaching in New Orleans for the past two years as a member of Teach for America. Dolores T. Aaron Academy, previously named Reed Elementary, is located in East New Orleans and was destroyed by Hurricane Katrina. Dokubo is the daughter of Teresa Colby-Dokubo and granddaughter of Betty Brokaw of Tiskilwa.

Come Celebrate 40 Years With Us!

U LN

T MA N

40th anniversary

WM

R

Christian Conduct for 4th Quarter — Ally Murrary, Dylann Hall and Rebecca Prushinski. Spirit of St. Louis Award — Delaney Krich, Michael Ellis, Hailee Pembleton, Madison Richards, Rachel Cook, Allyson Murray and Michaela Crowe. Pope Francis Award for Excellence in Religion — Jordan VanderVenter, Morgan Richards, Thomas Makransky, Madison Krich, Luke Peacock, Lydia Mead and Joseph Peacock. St. Cecelia Award for Excellence in Music — Brennan Roden, Madison Krich, Tim Daluga, Ryan Gee and Julia Prushinski. St. Sebastian Award for Excellence in Physical Education — Morgan Richards, Madison Krich, Luke Peacock and Rebecca Prushinski. Blessed Mother Theresa Service Award — Lydia Mead, Maggie Hoeffliger and Courtney Cook. St. Isadore Award for Excellence in Computer — Delaney Krich, Hailee Pembleton, Debbie Daluga, Luke Peacock, Nicole Carlone and Ryan Gee.

Hippology Contest. In Hippology, members compete individually to test their knowledge of equine-related topics. They participate in a written test, as well as several stations at which they must identify images related to equine science. Kiersten Pratt participated in the Intermediate Hippology Division and placed second in the state in that division. Stephanie Gripp of Sheffield participated in the Junior Hippology Division and placed sixth in the state in that division. The Bureau County Senior Horsebowl team

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St. Louis School had an awards ceremony on May 30 to honor students for their achievements throughout the year. Principal’s Honor Roll — First Honors: Rebecca Prushinski, Michaela Crowe, Magdalen Daluga, Dylann Hall, Courtney Pointer, Rodrigo Villalobos and Allyson Murray. Second Honors: Katy Anderson, Ryan Gee, Margaret Hoeffliger, Ian Legner, Helen Moore, Joseph Peacock, Nicole Carlone, Lydia Mead and Hallie Taets. President’s Award for Educational Excellence — Rebecca Prushinski DAR Good Citizenship Award — Rebecca Prushinski American Legion Award — Katy Anderson Perfect Attendance — Alex Jagers, Matthew Peacock, Luke Peacock and Victoria Pembleton. Cecil Grey Thompson Scholarship — Ryan Gee May Cybstars — Annabell Hoffert, Andrew Peacock, Hailee Pembleton, Matthew Peacock, Emily Irizarry, Andrew Wright and Julia Prushinski.

PRINCETON — Members of the Bureau County 4-H Horsebowl/ Hippology Team competed at the Illinois State Horsebowl, Hippology and Horse Speech contests held May 4-5 on the University of Illinois campus. In the State Horse Speech Contest, Kiersten Pratt of Arlington participated in the Senior Individual Speech division. Her speech about equine parasites, “Bots, Roundworms and Mites, Oh My!” placed first in the state. Two Bureau County 4-H members participated in the State 4-H

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Second Semester 2012-2013 High Honor Roll Seniors: Nicki Butler, Aubrey Coble, Tyler DeBrock, Whitney Forward, Kim Hanke, Andrew Harshman, Logan Hoffert, Hannah Holland, Alexis Jutton, Trevin Kennedy, Hunter Klemme, Brian Lange, Emily Mathew, Thomas Monier, Christopher Pickard, Cortnie Riordan, Hannah Shearburn and Brandi Vance. Juniors: Jeremiah Blackert, Kristin Davis, Katelyn DeBrock, David Dzurisin, Samantha Haney, Andrew Jacobs, Janelle Norden, Kalie Rumbold, Adare Schoff, Tucker Schoff, Andrew Smith, Allisa Stoller and Christy Williams. Sophomores: Sarah Berger, Haley DeVoss, Kristyn Ehnle, Irini Petros Chase Pierce Alison Siltman, Lea Stetson and Regan Weidner. Freshmen: Katelynn Aukes, Breonna Balensiefen, Harrison Brousseau, Emma Deppen, Courtney Ehnle, Justin Fisher, Kylee Green , Jenna Hansen, Chelsea Higgins, Mariah Klemme, Richard Lootens, Jay Norden, Yulian Osorio, Ashley Phillips, Kaitlyn Ptasnik, Kyle Reilly and Emily Wall. Honor Roll Seniors: Miranda Altizer, Carl Anderson, Patrick Blackert, Jacob Bohm, Briana Butler, Dustin Cassidy, Brandi DeWaele, Alyssa Fairbanks, Jami Frasure, Stephanie Hedges, Dacia Henning, Calaura Hockings, Nate Horrie, Catherine Johnson, Brett Kepner, Kristian Konneck, Samantha

Bureau County 4-H members compete in state horse contests

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Honor Roll Krieger, Josh Lewis, Bureau Valley Michael Lotspeich, Alexis Maloney, Nicholas Massa, High School Cody Mattingly, Jordan

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

nursing home

379-2131

Community Picnic st Sunday, July 21 12–2 p.m.

Music by “Bill & Toni” WalnutManorNursingHome.com 308 S. Second Street, Walnut


9 Life Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Tuesday, July 9, 2013 • Life & Arts • 9

Photos contributed

Duck Stamp contest Bureau Valley High School students competed in the Federal Junior Duck Stamp Contest for the state of Illinois. Students were given the opportunity to learn about the importance of the wetlands, the important characteristics of wetland habitats and the individual characteristics of their chosen waterfowl. The students researched their bird as well as a variety of waterfowl artists. They then used a variety of skills in techniques in acrylics, colored pencils, ebony pencil and oil pastels to create a picture of their chosen waterfowl. Group 4, which consists of sophomore, juniors and seniors, earned 22 or of the possible 25 state awards. LEFT: Group three students are Sidney Kolb (left), Kian Cookson, Breonna Balensiefen, Savanna Bell, Mariah Klemme, Lucie Riesberger and Emily Wall. RIGHT: Group four students are Rachel Mac Naughton (front row, from left), Hope Wollerman, Haley Wierzbicki, Christy Williams and Monique Lopez; (middle row) Samantha Krieger, Jackie Phillips, Lea Stetson, Daniel Trone, Claudia McHenry, Lily Gould and Amber Shipp; and (back row) Justin Anderson, Riley Michael, Federico Papa, Deston Boaz, Jake Heidenriech, Sal Guerrero and Rachel Brummel.

Lions reconstruct entryway

Honor Roll Gutierrez, Alania Hannon, John F. Kennedy Kallie Hansen, Cearra Fourth Quarter 2012-2013 High Honor Roll Eighth grade: Leah Bell, Hailey Bicket, Stephanie Boehm, Megan Bolelli, Coltin Carboni, Ashley Choate, Nathan Diaz, Daniel Elias, Dominick Elliott, Christopher Enriquez, Marco Gonzalez, Timothy Herrmann, Kylie Huettemann, Kaitlyn Huston, Ellen Jacobs, Alec Jones, Micah Laster, Joseph Marenda, Isaac Marquez, Teresa Montez, Hayden Nielsen, Anais Ortiz, James Perona, Allison Ploch, Jordan Redd, Alyse Ruda, Joshua Ruda, Ein Spencer, Dylan Struck, Diamond Villugus and Emily Wines. Seventh grade: Shawna Abriam, Lizbeth Aldana, Lauren Bulak, Alexis Castelan, Kaelyn Condon, Kora Cruz, Brandon deJong, Mackenzie Delaney, Nathaniel Draper, Catherine Drumheller, Kyle Duever, Cassidy Gagliardo, Kylee Golgin, Hallee Heredia, Karissa Insco, Cassidy Jablonski, Jordan Kraml, Amanda Kunkel, Nataliea Lopez, Noah Martin, Gunner McCormick, Kaitlyn Miller, Camila Ortega, Adan Ruiz, Alan Ruiz, Spencer Sipe, Faith Sommer, Emme Taliani, Jenna Tonozzi, Brant Vanaman and Cade Wozniak. Sixth grade: Michelle Arrate, Juan Avila, Brooke Bianchi, Tori Bogatitus, Shannon Casey, Jamal Dahir, James DeAngelo, Paisley Dhesse, Sean Domkuski, Gianna Elias, Erik Enriquez, Morgan Filippini, John Fousekas, Tristan GonzalezMitchell, Carlo

Harris, Matti Heiden, Anna Herrmann, Devan Janssen, Richard King, Alexandria KinkinRacicot, Samantha Kohr, Rayme Loehr, Samuel Lucas, Autumn LucasAndreoni, Emily Lupo, James Mautino, Hailey Newtown, Lorenzo Olivares, Sara Perkins, Giuseppina Piccolo, Dominic Pinter, RoseMarie Puentes, Rylee Reed, Chance Resetich, Elian Rivera, Gertrude Savitch, Warren Shilkuski, Christian Stefaniak, Marlene Vazquez, Alex Wertz, Chloe Wozniak and Emily Wozniak. Fifth grade: Cecilia Alana, Anna Argubright, Stephanie Arteaga, Paige Blackburn, Alexander Castaneda, Caden Cradle, Sarah Croasdale, Dillon deJong, Jeffrey Delaney, Bentley Delhotal, Abigail Draper, Kaitlin Duever, Sara Ely, Janessa Floyd, Hanna Goodrum, Averi Hansen, Kendall Hansen, Toby Harper, Hanah Hart, Kennedy Keegan, Addison Konczak, Gracie Martinaitis, Pablo Morales, Olivia Novero, Nathaniel Nunley, Leonardo Ochoa, Kelton Pelzer, Maxwell Puentes, Grant Resetich, Regina Scarpaci, Madeline Spayer, Andrew Vanko, Hannah Vanko, Aleksander Vasic, Roas Villagomez and Jacob Wilson. Honor roll Eighth grade: Carson Corpus and Teresa Sajuan. Sixth grade: Alec Boehm, Nathaniel Cotton Jedidiah Delhotal, Anthony Floyd, James Kellerman and Tatiana Leal. Fifth grade: Stephanie Cassel, Marcus Saeoharn and Sonya Ventura.

Diabetes meeting set PRINCETON — An informational meeting about diabetes will be held at 6 p.m. today, Tuesday, at the White Oak Classroom at Perry Memorial

Hospital. This meeting provides information and support to those who are dealing with diabetes. Contact Marcia Hartwig at 815-876-4449 to register.

Members of the Malden Lions Club and volunteers removed the concrete slabs from the outside entryway on the alley, south doorway and doorway into the gymnasium. All of the concrete, forming and paint will be donated by the Malden Lions and local craftsman at no cost to the school. Photo contributed

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10 Life 10 • Life & Arts • Tuesday, July 9, 2013

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Weather/safety program presented Josef Vasquez, a member of the DePue Fire Department, presented a weather/fire safety program to members of Girl Scout Troop 1618, DePue, at the end of April. His talk included safety tips during a tornado and flooding. ABOVE: Also pictured (in no particular order) are Krystal Lopez, Zoe Sellers, Madilynn Blish, Olivia Sellers, Bailey Sellers, Precious Saechao, Jamaziae Hodges, Promise Giacometti and Lily Learned. Anyone wishing to join the group may contact Toreen Learned at 815-878-7831. LEFT: Zoe Sellers (from back), Lily Learned and Bailey Sellers feel how heavy a fireman’s jacket is. Photos contributed

Photo contributed

Bureau County United Way holds annual meeting The Bureau County United Way held its 41st annual meeting May 21 at the Ye Olde Underground Inn in Princeton. The BCUW provides funding to 15 local non-profit member agencies, provides referral services, Impact Grants, and community service projects such as the Christmas for Kids Toy Drive. Pictured are Rex Chamberlain (from left) of Tetra Research, Donor Acknowledgement; Allan Beaber, Community Partner Award; Kim Frey, 2013 Campaign Co-Chairperson; Judson Lusher, Volunteer of the Year; Frank Wolsfeld of ServiceMaster, Community Partner Award; Sandra Kennedy, Service Award for 30 years of service; and Steve Frey, 2013 Campaign Co-Chairperson.

Stage 212 to perform ‘Grease’ LASALLE — Stage 212 in LaSalle has announced the dates for its performances of “Grease” to be July 19 to July 21, July 26 to July 28 and Aug. 2 to Aug. 4. Friday and

Saturday performances begin at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday matinees begin at 2 p.m. Tickets will be available to the general public for $20 each beginning July 1. The box offices is open Mon-

day 4 to 6 p.m., Wednesday 1 to 4 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Tickets may also be reserved over the phone with Visa, MasterCard or Discover. Call 815224-3025 for details.

Perry Memorial Hospital

Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Clinic Orthopedic Surgeon Dr. Kirk Green Dr. Green, Board Certified Orthopedic Surgeon, is providing a wide scope of orthopedic care and orthopedic surgical services at Perry Memorial Hospital. He is pleased to provide all follow-up care to previous patients, as well as accepting new patients. Convenient appointments are available Monday through Friday.

Photo contributed

Princeton Veterans group raise flag The Princeton Veterans group recently participated in a formal flag raising at the Harold Steele farm during Steele’s annual farm day program. Steele had several old tractors, cars, motorcycles and farm equipment on display. Don Elmore was the guest speaker and told his experiences during the Vietnam War while flying helicopters. Steele served during World War II as an army officer and was awarded the Silver Star for his actions. Pictured from left are: Terry DeSalle, Beverly Neff, George Sebastian and Brad Oeder. ••• Items for the Life & Arts section can be emailed to news@bcrnews.com.

Come and experience the compassionate and quality care of the Perry Orthopedic and Sports Medicine clinic and meet Dr. Green. Call 815-876-3033 to schedule your appointment.

530 Park Avenue East Princeton, IL 61356 815-875-2811 www.perrymemorial.org

Proud To Be Your Hospital!


11 Sports Tuesday, July 9, 2013 • 11 Tiger Classic — The Tiger Tennis Classic will be held June 20 and June 27 at Princeton High School. See Page 12.

NFHS addresses batter interference

BCR photo/Mike Vaughn

Spring Valley beats Peru

INDIANAPOLIS — Changes to high school baseball rules will include an additional example of how a batter can interfere with the catcher’s ability to field or throw. This year’s rules changes were approved by the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) Baseball Rules Committee at its June 2-4 meeting in Indianapolis. The rule changes were subsequently approved by the NFHS Board of Directors. “The committee felt that the game is in a very good state,” said Elliot Hopkins, NFHS director of sports and educational services and staff liaison for baseball. The committee voted to add “including backswing interference” to Rule 7-3-5c to address that specific type of batter interference. The rule now reads, “A batter shall not interfere with the catcher’s fielding or throwing by making any other movement, including backswing interference, which hinders action at home plate or the catcher’s attempt to play on a runner. The committee also revised Rule 6-1-3 to state that the pitcher’s entire pivot foot must be in contact with or directly in front of and parallel to the pitcher’s plate. The committee also established several points of emphasis for the 2014 season, including malicious contact, coaching attire and umpire authority and enforcement. “These are topics that I get calls and e-mails about during the course of a season,” Hopkins said. “I share those with the committee and if they are seeing the same types of problems, then the red flag goes up.” Contact or a collision is considered to be malicious if: 1. The contact is the result of intentional excessive force; 2. The contact occurs close to the bag or home plate or above the waist of the receiving player; or 3. There was intent to injure. Malicious contact can occur without these conditions if determined by the umpire, but these provide a starting point. Even with cutbacks for uniform funds, coaches

Spring Valley hurler Payton Plym throws a pitch during Saturday’s District 20 9-10 American Division game with Peru at Ladd. Spring Valley won 7-2.

See Rules Page 12

‘42’ brings back fond baseball memories On a rainy evening my wife Jeanne and I attended the movie “42,” the Jackie Robinson story that is bringing a new generation of fans to know the African-American athlete who integrated Major League Baseball when he joined the Brooklyn Dodgers in the spring of 1947. The Brooklyn Dodgers’ General Manager Branch Rickey chose Jackie Robinson over other Major Leagueready players and future teammates such as Roy Campanella and Don Newcombe because he wasn’t as nice or soft and would be better equipped to deal with the hate and the intolerance. When Jackie got the offer to sign with the Dodgers, he was more excited about his pay increase than the historical implications. It was no accident that Jackie would play in Brooklyn because of the multicultural and ethnic diversity there. Jackie could not live or eat with the team because of racial tensions. He lived in Brooklyn with the Nazarene Congregational Church with the assistant Rev. Lacy Covington and his family. When Robinson took the field in 1947, he was a real pioneer because that was a time when Black Americans had fought and died for their

Darrell Alleman COMMENTARY country in World War II, but they returned home to a country with separate drinking fountains, toilets and a ban on Negroes in the Major Leagues. In the movie there are scenes of racist fans heckling Robinson and many of his own teammates signing a petition demanding Robinson not be allowed to join the Dodgers. Branch Rickey had hired the fiery manager Leo Durocher to manage the team who he thought was the right manager at this time. But Leo was suspended for the entire season for having an affair with a married actress. So Rickey turned to Burt Shoton to manage the team. Burt had retired two years earlier from managing the Cleveland Indians, and promised his wife he would never put a uniform on again. But Rickey told him he did not have to wear a uniform and he could manage like Connie Mack did for the Philadelphia A’s team, so he took on the job.

Jackie was a very exciting player to watch. He could steal any base. He would take big leads, while dancing up and down daring the pitcher to try to pick him off. When he needed to steal home, he would slide, taking the catcher out. The pitcher would throw at his head, knocking him down just about every at bat, while umpires would call him out when he was safe on close plays. Robinson’s son, Jack, who served in the Vietnam War was a heroin addict. Jackie made impassioned speeches about the dangers of drugs at churches after his son died. Jackie died in 1972, just a year after his son died in a car accident. Jackie and his son are buried in Cypress Hills Cemetery. The inscription on Robinson’s tombstone is: “a life is not important except in the impact it has on other lives.” There is a statue of Pee Wee Reese and Jackie Robinson with Pee Wee’s arm around Jackie that stands outside of MCU Park in the Coney Island section of Brooklyn. At the first game Brooklyn played at in Cincinnati in 1947, the Cincinnati dugout and crowd booed, cursed and hollered at Jackie when his name was announced and he came out of the dugout. After

a few moments of this, Pee Wee went over to Jackie and put his arm around him. I saw Jackie play at Wrigley Field only three times. At one game, Russ Meyers, a Cubs pitcher from Peru, threw a wild pitch that got away from the Cubs catcher and when Meyers tried to catch the ball back from the catcher, Jackie took him out and was safe. When Meyers got up, he lashed out at Robinson. I always liked to hear Jackie interviewed over the radio, he had such a pleasing voice. I subscribed to the Sporting News Weekly newspaper in 1945 and still have them through and into the 1950s. When the movie ended, I stood up and announced to my wife Jeanne that this was the best movie I had ever seen. I love baseball so much and to see the old baseball uniforms with their stockings showing, the 1940s and ‘50s beautiful cars and the men and women fans in the stands all wearing hats. This era of baseball and the times was the best to be alive. I am thankful to have lived through these times. Darrell Alleman of Granville can be reached at Putnam County Record, P.O. Box 48, Granville, IL 61326.


12 Sports 12 • Sports • Tuesday, July 9, 2013

Rules From Page 11 should still be dressed in a similar fashion to the players as a means of helping umpires recognize members of the coaching staff. The final point of emphasis deals with umpires’ authority. The committee noted that coaches must set the example of appropriate behavior so the team and its fans can follow. Disputing the umpire’s calls, failing to comply with an umpire’s command, exaggerating the time for offensive conferences, gamesmanship and challenging the umpire’s authority cannot be tolerated, the committee stated. “We want coaches to be role models for civility,” Hopkins said. “The umpire has to make a final decision and the coach has to handle it with class and character.” Baseball is the fourthmost popular sport for boys at the high school level, according to the 2011-12 NFHS Athletics Participation Survey, with 474,219 participants nationwide. The sport ranks third in school sponsorship with 15,838 schools offering the sport.

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Rec Report

Sports Shorts

Tiger Tennis Classic July 20, 27

Youth football camp

The 2013 Tiger Tennis Classic will be held July 20 and July 27 at Princeton High School. Doubles play will take the courts the first weekend with matches beginning at 8 a.m. There will be divisions for men’s open, men’s over 40, women’s, mixed and youth including 14 and under, 16 and under and 18 under depending of number of participants. Singles play will be held July 27 with divisions for men’s open, men’s 40 and over, women’s and youth. Entry deadline for doubles in July 18 and July 25 for singles. Fees are $14 per person for singles, $12 for doubles per person and $10 for 18 and under. For more information, call Rick Peacock at 815-878-6120 or visit www.tigertennisclassic.com Manlius Rolle Bolle: In a rare Tuesday night Rolle Bolle in Manlius, top honors in the Manlius Rolle Bolle came down to a coin flip with Coleen VanKerreBroeck, Harold Oloffson and Rob Morey taking first place. Second went to Kristine DeBrock, Kenny Rodgers and Tyler DeBrock, third went to Lisa Marchand and Riley DeBrock, rolling with two bolles, fourth place to Ann Marie Chapman, M.J. Michlig and Richard Huffaker. and fifth place went to Tony Marchand and Jeff Tourville, rolling two bolles. Olds-Bohm 5K: The fifth annual Nancy Jo Olds-Bohm 5K run/walk will be held Saturday. Registration forms are available at www.oldsbohm5k.com. Race registration and packet pickup will be at the Wyanet Memorial Park, from 5 to 7 p.m. Friday and on race day from 7 to 7:45 a.m. The 5K and 1 mile memory walk will begin at 8 a.m. The kid’s fun run will begin immediately following the 5K at approximately 9 a.m. For more information to participate, purchase raffle

tickets or to become a sponsor, contact Karen Russell at 815-699-2474 or Margaret DeVenney at 815-454-9602. Other upcoming races include: the Onyx Dash for Cash 5K in Ottawa on July 20 (contact: www.actgive.com), the Tiskilwa Pow Wow Days 5K (contact 815646-4624 or janel_w@hotmail.com), the Bureau Valley Booster Club Color Race on Aug. 3 (getmeregistered.com) and the Music in Motion 5K in Sterling (www. musicinmotion5k.org), all on Aug. 3. Fastpitch Church League: Make-up games are being planned for this week. Bureau Township and UMC remained tied atop the league at 3-0. They are followed by Bunker Hill (2-2), St. Matthew’s (2-1), Princeton Bible (1-1), People’s Church (0-3) and St. Louis/Covenant (0-4). Starved Rock Runners clinic: The Starved Rock Runners Club’s running clinics will be held at 6 p.m. at Baker’s Lake every Monday until Aug. 12. There is a kids clinic for ages 7-18 and a women’s clinic for females 18-and-over. For more information, contact Michele Gaeta at maples1401@hotmail.com. Miracles Happen Golf Outing: The fourth annual Miracles Happen III Golf Outing will take place July 20 at Senica’s Oak Ridge Golf Course. The cost is $65 per golfer for the four-person scramble until July 13. Registration after this date will be $75. Registration begins at noon with a shotgun start at 1 p.m. There will be a chicken dinner followed by awards at 6 p.m. Players registered and paid for prior to Saturday will be entered into a raffle for $100 at Hy-Vee. To register or for more information, contact Jennifer or Steve Sines, 3105 E. Fifth Road, Lot C, LaSalle 61301, at 815-228-1574, or by contacting sines9@aol.com.

SPRING VALLEY — The Hall Red Devil Youth Football Camp will be held from 9 to 10:30 a.m. July 15-19 at the Hall practice field. Cost is $30 per camper with each additional family member at $15. Registration made payable to Hall High School Football may be sent to Hall High School Football, 800 W. Erie St., Spring Valley, IL. 61362.

IVYFL sign-ups SPRING VALLEY — Illinois Valley Youth Football League sign-up and physical forms are available for the 2013 season at Heartland and Bank Trust locations in Spring Valley and DePue. Registration forms must be turned in by Monday. For more information, call Jack Boroski at 815-664-4577.

PHS running nights PRINCETON — Any Princeton High School student interested in cross country this Fall or aerobic training for other sports is invited to meet at the Zearing Park shelters on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays from July 8 to Aug 2. The Monday and Friday runs will be in the evenings at 6:30 p.m. The Wednesday runs will be in the mornings at 9 a.m. The distances to be run at each session will be determined by each athlete’s experience and fitness level.

Scoreboard Baseball

District 20 Minor League American Tournament at Ladd

Friday: Spring Valley 9, Bi-County 3. Saturday: Ottawa 13, Mendota 3; Spring Valley 7, Peru, 2. Sunday: Bi-County 11, Ottawa 8; Peru 6, Mendota 5. Monday: Game 5 - Spring Valley vs. Bi-County, 6 p.m. Game 6 - Peru vs Ottawa, 8 p.m. Tuesday: Game 7 - Winner 6 vs. loser 5, 6 p.m. Wednesday: Title- Winners 5-7, 6 p.m. Thursday: If necessary, 6 p.m. District 20 Little League American Tournament at Mendota

Saturday: Ottawa 8, Spring Valley 3. District 20 Junior Tournament at Washington Park, Peru

Saturday: Oglesby 5, Mendota 4. Spring Valley 20, LaSalle 11: Sunday: Peru 7, Bi-County 3; Spring Valley 24, Oglesby 22. Monday: Game 11 - Spring Valley vs. Bi-County, 6 p.m. Tuesday: Game 12 - Winners 9-11, 6 p.m. Wednesday: If necessary, 6 p.m.

Limited-time offer available only to new Frontier Internet customers, including current voice-only customers. Must subscribe to a qualifying package of Frontier residential local service with features, long distance and new High-Speed Internet with speeds up to 6Mbps. Actual speeds may vary. Service subject to availability. $49.99 Internet installation fee waived for self-install. Price guaranteed for 24 months. A $9.99 broadband processing fee upon disconnection of service applies. Up to 12Mbps available in limited areas. Taxes, governmental and other Frontier-imposed surcharges apply. New Frontier customers are subject to credit approval. Frontier reserves the right to withdraw this offer at any time. Other restrictions apply. ©2013 Frontier Communications Corporation.

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13 Where in the Worlds Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Tuesday, July 9, 2013 • 13

Where in the World is the BCR?

Join the fun – Take a picture of your friends and family holding a copy of the BCR and send it to us to be included in this feature. Girl Scout Troop 4011 celebrated 100 years of Girl Scouting with a trip to Panama City Beach, Fla. The troop includes girls from Peru, Princeton, Wyanet and Sheffield. Included in photo are leaders Rose Whitcher, Sherri Conner and Loretta Jill Carrington, and Scouts Rebecca Foster, Emma Glafka, Payton Glafka, Caitlyn Starr, Sabrina Cisketti, Alyssa Newsom, Kyssa Newsom and Karyssa Newsom.

Max Swinford holds a copy of the BCR while visiting his granddaughter, Katie, and great-grandson, Lucas Ford Halon, who is being held by his greatgrandmother, Betty Swinford. Next to Katie is Randy Swinford, a proud grandpa.

​ ob and Susan Johnson of rural Buda took along B a copy of the BCR to the Ritz-Carlton in the Grand Cayman Island in May. Steve Warren (right) of Wyanet took along a copy of the BCR when he went to Ocala, Fla., to visit his close friend Ernie O’Bryan. While in Ocala, Steve played in the Make A Wish Foundation golf tournament. Along with the BCR, Steve is holding the trophy he won for closest to the pin.

Nate Horrie, a 2013 Bureau Valley High School graduate, is pictured with a copy of the BCR as the sun sets at Kaanapali Beach in Maui. The Horrie family of Bradford traveled to Hawaii in June. They enjoyed snorkeling at Maui and Lanai, surfing at Waikiki and watching the sunrise above the clouds on top of Mount Haleakala.

Brennan Roden of Princeton wears a traditional Seminole dress while standing in front of an exhibit depicting a traditional “chickee” or thatched hut at the St. Lucie County Regional History Center in Fort Pierce, Fla.

Ron and Lorraine Happach of Sheffield took along a copy of the BCR to their grandson’s, Jordan Happach, graduation from the University of Advanced Technology. Jordan is the son of Mathew and Janelle Happach of Lebanon, N.H. Also pictured (holding paper) is Marie Urheil of Annawan, also Jordan’s grandmother.

Preston Balensiefen, and Tyler and Morgan Wood are pictured with a copy of the BCR when they visited Duck Commander in West Monroe, La. They also visited historic Civil Rights sites and swam in the Gulf of Mexico during a recent trip through the Deep South with their grandparents, Pete and Mary Ellen Nelson.

Mary and Clint Michael of Princeton took along a copy of the BCR when they went to Europe in May. Here they are in front of the Eiffel Tower standing in line to take an evening cruise on the Seine River in Paris, France.


14 14 • Tuesday, July 9, 2013

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

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com bcrnews.com/jobs


General Terms and Policies

228 • Help Wanted

The Bureau County Republican reserves the right to classify correctly, edit, reject or cancel any advertisement at any time in accordance with its policy. All ads must be checked for errors by the advertiser, on the first day of publication. We will be responsible for the first incorrect insertion, and its liabilities shall be limited to the price on one insertion. LINE AD DEADLINES: • Tuesday, BCR deadline Monday 9 am • Thursday, BCR and BCR Journal deadline Tuesday, 12 pm • Saturday, BCR deadline Friday, 9 am We Accept 815-875-4461

-100Announcements 110 • Special Notices PRIVATE HUNTING SHARE For Sale In established private waterfowl hunting club. SERIOUS INQUIRES ONLY TO: PO BOX 24, Princeton, IL 61356

- 200 Employment 228 • Help Wanted RETAIL SALES POSITION OPEN. Customer service experience necessary. Send resume to: Box 304 Bureau County Republican PO Box 340, Princeton, IL 61356

CHURCH SECRETARY, 9am-1pm, Monday-Friday. Must be self-starter and able to work independently. Application form available a.m. at First Presbyterian Church, 320 Park Avenue East, Princeton. Applications due by July 20th. Questions: call 1815-303-8622 THE CITY OF PRINCETON is now taking applications for a full-time position at the Police Department/ City Hall. Applications should be familiar with dispatching police officers and handling emergency calls for service. Other duties to include: data entry, filing, records and ordinance violations. This position requires multi-tasking and extensive customer service. The ability toj professionally interact with the general public and different agencies related to Law Enforcement is essential. Applicants must be proficient in MS Office/Word/Excel and typing (40) wpm is necessary. LEADS certification is mandatory. Hours of work are 8am-4:30pm, Monday-Friday. Applications can be picked up at the Princeton Police Department and returned no later than close of business on July 22 at 4:30pm TRUCK DRIVER Hiring Midwest Regional Drivers with Class A CDL and at least 6 months experience. Home on weekends and assigned trucks. We offer competitive pay & benefits including health insurance & vacation pay. Apply in person or call: 815-224-2223. BP Transportation, (Fleet owner for MCT), 3535 North 30th Road, I-80, Exit 73/Plank Road, (Next to Big Apple Restaurant). Peru, IL

PROMOTE JOB OPENINGs We can help get your business fully staffed. Call 815-875-4461

Jessica strader

it’s been 9 years and still seems like yesterday. Love you and miss you, from all of us. Position available for

Nurse PractitioNer 32 hours/week

Eligibility for position include: Health Insurance, Dental Insurance & Pension Medical Office experience preferred. Send Resume: Box B230 Bureau County Republican PO Box 340, Princeton, IL 61356 Equal Opportunity Employer

232 • Business Opportunities

448 • Pets & Livestock

********** THE CLASSIFIED Advertising Department of the Bureau County Republican Does not have the opportunity to fully investigate the credibility of each advertiser appearing within these columns. If an offer sounds “too good to be true” it probably is. Proceed with caution if you are asked to send money or to give a credit card number. Proceed with caution in calling 900 phone numbers. All phone numbers prefixed by”900” are charged to the CALLER. Charges may be assessed on a “per minute” basis rather than a “per call” basis. The Bureau County Republican Classifieds makes every effort to qualify these charges for the reader. If you have a concern about an advertiser, please contact: Better Business Bureau 330 North Wabash Chicago, IL 60611 312 832-0500

8 adorable friendly Kittens, 6 weeks old. Free to a good home. A mixture of cream, gold and white; male and female. Located north of Ohio. Call Karen at 815-376-2253

ADVERTISE YOUR SERVICES RIGHT HERE! The Bureau County Republican can promote your services and let people know you are out there wanting there business. Just call (815) 875-4461 and let us help.

- 400 Merchandise 441 • Wanted to Buy WANTED TO BUY a boat trailer for a 14' Jon Boat. Call 815-303-3164

DONATE NOW! “The animals are crying” Tri-County Humane Society. LaSalle, Bureau, Putnam Counties. Call 815-875-6145 or 815-872-9781 or send donation to: PO Box 1601, LaSalle, IL 61301

450 • Under $1000 12' V Bottom, Sea Nymph boat & trailer, motor guide electric motor, set of oars, $375. Call 815-915-8092 12,000 BTU window air conditioner $110, 1 year. old; 220 air conditioner $75; Little Tyke double easel $10. 815-664-2236 78” blue, King Hickory, 3 cushion, couch, $75; blue Lane recliner, $100. Both excellent condition. Call 815-875-2377

450 • Under $1000

450 • Under $1000

460 • Garage Sales

619 • Boats

John Deere STX 38" riding lawn mower. $200. Call 815-638-2071

Whirlpool electric dryer, good condition, $50. Call 815-379-2337

16' Pontoon boat, 30hp engine, good shape. Call 815-546-2677

KX65 Kawasaki, excellent condition. $1,000 or best offer. Call 815-878-0575

451 • Free

Leblanc Clarinet. Back to School Special, $490. Cleaned, new pads and play tested by Professional. Call 815-878-7399

Liquidating large supply of craft material & ties for quilts, etc. Free for the taking! New Bedford area. Call 815-445-3171

PRINCETON 1720 South Main. Thursday, Friday, July 11, 12: 8am-5pm. LARGE MULTI-FAMILY SALE. Ladies work scrubs, misc. holiday decorations, knickknacks, household items, clothes of all sizes

Like new ladies golf set, Wilson 2-wedge, with Northwestern woods, $200 or best offer. Call 815-878-9690 Manual meat slicer, $30; electric meat slicer $50. Call 815-539-7670 Old Cedar chest $25; ladder stands $25, spinning wheel with 48” wheel $40. Call 815-915-5844 Singer, electric sewing machine, cabinet, stool, $250; antique pot belly stove from caboose, $225. 815-872-1219 ************ HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL? Put your ad in for FREE

Couch & formal chair. Pick up in Dalzell. Cash only. Must go soon! Excellent condition. $150. Call/text 630-399-6929

Items $1,000 or less can run FREE for 1 week. Limit of 5 lines. Up to 3 items with price and price totaling under $1,000. 1 ad per household per week. No commercial ads, firearms or animal sales. Go to: bcrnews.com, to place an ad. Use category merchandize and bargains or E-mail information to: classified@ bcrnews.com (include your name, address & phone number) No Phone Calls!

Girls 20" Trek bicycle, excellent condition. $95; Sony Trinitron 27" CRT Television $85. Call 815-878-1729

Victorian wood door, with 2 arc windows, 811/2”x34”x2”, $50; Igloo dog house (medium), $85. 815-545-6242

8'x15' outdoor dog kennel, $150. Call 815-915-3720 Barely used Acer all in one no tower touch screen computer. Speakers and Camera integrated. $400 firm. Call 815-445-3831 Black Chevy Malibu truck deck - fits 99-2000, good shape $35; Buchan Stoneware pieces, $325 for all. 815-663-8210

460 • Garage Sales ARLINGTON 104 West Lincoln Avenue (on Rt. 89). Friday, Saturday, July 12, 13; 8am-4pm. MULTI-FAMILY SALE. Combining households. Furniture, curtains, bedding, pictures, TVs, antiques, clothes, etc. Too much to list. Don't miss it PRINCETON 103 North Linn. Thursday, Friday, July 11, 12; 8:30am-5pm. Multi-Family Sale. Lots of stuff PRINCETON 16466-2625 E Street. (Go east on Rt 6, over I-80, around curve, down hill & up, 1st blacktop road to left, telephone station on corner) Just follow the signs. Linda Bicket'ts. Thursday, Friday, Saturday, July 11, 12, 13; 7am-6pm. BIG GARAGE SALE. This is a benefit sale for Richard Goodrum to help on medical expenses. Bean bag game boards, new turkey cooker, golf bag/clubs, hunting supplies & lots of camo clothing & shoes, Xmas & Halloween items, lots of good clothing, this is a big & nice sale. Rain or Shine. All in machine shed. 815-875-2929

ADVERTISE YOUR GARAGE SALE HERE! In the Classified. Just call 815-875-4461.

PRINCETON 438 Griswold. Thursday, July 11, 4pm-7pm; Friday, July 12, 8am-4pm; Saturday, July 13, 8am-12pm. Yard Sale. Snare drum, pink head, footboard, printers, basement window, books, games & toys and lots of misc. Weather permitting PRINCETON 701 Linnwood Drive. Thursday, Friday, Saturday, July 11 12, 13; 8am-4pm. MOVING SALE. Christmas trees, decorations, lights, Santas. Some Easter & Fall decorations. Living room furniture PRINCETON 910 North Pleasant Street. Thursday, July 11, 10am-3pm; Friday, July 12, 9am-3pm. MOVING SALE-Inside. Furniture, household items. Priced to sell!

-600Transportation 614 • Car Sales ******* $$ CASH PAID $$ We pay top dollar for junk (cars, machinery, etc.) Call 815-878-9353 2001 Honda Civic, 4 door sedan. 5-speed manual, only 122,000 miles, $3,500. 815-878-2853

- 700 Real Estate For Sale 767 • Mobile Home Sales 1993 Skyline mobile home, 28'x52', 3 bedroom 2 bath. This beautiful home features a new master bath garden tub, new skirting, new carpeting. Situated on a spacious lot within a friendly, quiet community just minutes from Princeton's shopping district. Financing available and affordable monthly payments! Call 815-875-1502 to see this lovely home **************** PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call, HUD tollfree at 800 669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 800 927-9275

Join the Helpful Team! Ace Hardware is accepting applications for the following positions Material Handlers: • Second and Third shift positions • Full time starting at $12.00 per hour plus .55 or .60 shift premium • Plus Incentive pay for your hard work • Must be able to lift up to 70 lbs. All have a Sunday thru Thursday work schedule Professional Truck Drivers: • Valid Class “A” CDL with HAZMAT endorsement • 1 year on-road tractor-trailer driving experience (all weather conditions) with a minimum of 100,000 road miles • No moving violations within the last 24 months • Applicants must be able to pass a DOT physical, drug screen and background check as outlined in DOT regulations • Superior customer service skills • Some heavy lifting is required to assist dealers with deliveries • Overnight travel is limited Benefits: • Full benefits package including Medical, Dental, Prescription Drug, Vision, Disability pay, Life Insurance, and Paid Time Off after 90 days • 401k with generous company contributions • Flexible spending accounts • Merchandise discounts Applications may be obtained 24 hours a day at the Princeton Ace Retail Support Center or you may apply on line at www. acehardware.com – careers. Princeton Retail Support Center 2123 N. Euclid Princeton, IL 61356 EOE

Independent ContraCt Bundle Hauler The Bureau County Republican is looking for a driver to deliver carrier, store and news rack bundles. Late night/early morning delivery Monday, Wednesday & Friday nights. A dependable car and proof of insurance is required. Must pass MVR check. For more information, please call Tom Long, District Manager (815) 875-4461, Ext. 235

800 Ace Road, Princeton, IL 815-875-4461


768 • Homes For Sale

858 • Homes for Rent

858 • Homes for Rent

999 • Legal Notices

999 • Legal Notices

999 • Legal Notices

FORECLOSED HOUSE FOR SALE. Dover, 305 West Washington Street. $9,900. Call 309-6915900, for details

COUNTRY HOME NORTH OF PRINCEON 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 4 car garage. Large yard. $700/ month + deposit. 815-878-3542

MALDEN For sale by owner. 1988 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 14”x70”, 24x30 garage, on 0.75 acre with updates. Located on quiet street. Must call in advance to see. $29,500. Call 815-915-3507

PRINCETON 2 bedroom, no pets, available immediately, security deposit, $575/month. Call 815303-2665

PRINCETON For Rent/Sale or Rent to Own. 4 bedroom/2 bedroom tri-level home. Nice size lower level family room, no pets. 624 Aleta. $1,150 per month plus utilities. Call 815-739-6842 for application. Broker Owned

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, BUREAU COUNTY, ILLINOIS ESTATE OF ) Margaret M. Marshall, ) deceased ) Case No. 2013-P-62 CLAIM NOTICE Notice is given of the death of Margaret M. Marshall of LaMoille, County of Bureau, State of Illinois. Letters of Office were issued on July 1, 2013, to Christian B. Engels, 008 North

37th Road, Mendota, IL 61342, whose attorney is Bernard L. Engels, Whitmore and Engels, 704 Jefferson Street, P.O. Box 196, Mendota, IL 61342-0196. Claims against the Estate may be filed with the Office of the Circuit Clerk, Probate Division, Bureau County Courthouse, Princeton, IL 61356, or with the representative, or both, within six months of first publication date. If a claim notice is mailed or delivered person-

ally to a creditor of the decedent, the creditor’s claim may be filed on or before the date stated in the notice, if later than the date shown above. Any claim not filed within the time allowed is barred. Copies of a claim filed with the Clerk must be mailed or delivered to the Representative and to the Attorney within ten days after it has been filed. Published in the Bureau County Republican July 9, 16 and 23, 2013.

RURAL PRINCETON 2 story Victorian Home. For handyman or investor! Needs to be completed. With most of all costly hard to do work already done. 4 bedroom, new kitchen, oak pocket doors and flooring, fireplace, stained glass windows, etc. etc. 2+ acres, 4 car garage. 815-878-1018

Looking for a new place to livE? Let the Bureau County Republican Classified help you find it.

770 • Open House OPEN HOUSE FOR SALE BY OWNER. Saturday, July 13th – 12pm-3pm. 538 East Marion Street, Princeton. 3 bedroom, 2 bath ranch. Charming! Newly remodeled in 2011. Spacious newly landscaped backyard. Decks, Hot Tub - A must see!! Call 815-3038055 - $118,500

776 • Commercial Property FIRST FLOOR OFFICE, 2ND FLOOR APARTMENT. Garage. Courthouse Square. Call 815-875-4706

- 800 Real Estate For Rent 856 • Apartment Rentals HENNEPIN completely FURNISHED one bedroom apartment. All utilities included. Smoke free. No pets. Call 815-925-7086 or 815-925-7139 PRINCETON 1 bedroom, recently remodeled. Great neighborhood. Lease, deposit. $425. 810 South Euclid. Call 217-766-8497 PRINCETON 2 bedroom apartment. Laundry on site, $515 per month, lease, deposit required. Call 309-238-0168 PRINCETON 2 bedroom, upstairs, with appliances, No pets. Newly remodeled. Call 815-872-0065 PRINCETON Duplex 1 bedroom, with appliances, $650 a month plus utilities. Available August 1st. Call 815-872-0065 PRINCETON Large, one bedroom, off-street parking, laundry facility, no pets. $450 + electric. Call 815-875-8100 PRINCETON Very nice 2 Bedroom, 1 bath with central air. Excellent location. First floor with front door parking. Refrigerator, stove, washer and dryer, water, sewer and garbage pickup included. Some small pets possible. $575 per month. 1st month and deposit with lease. Please call 805-868-9752 or 870-405-1968

Princeton crossings APArtMent coMMunity • 1 & 2 BR Units • Laundry Facilities, Kitchen Appliances Stop, Smile & Lease!! Professionally managed by Professional Property Management, LLC. Ph. 815-872-1380 TDD 800-525-0857 This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer

PRINCETON 2 bedroom. Neat & clean. Stove and refrigerator. New furnace, central air. Low utilities. Washer, dryer. Good location. Nice yard. References required. Call 815875-3166/ 815-875-3861 PRINCETON 3 bedroom, 2 bath, references required. $590 a month. Call 815-878-4689

PROMOTE YOUR Rental We can help! Call 815-875-4461

859 • Condo/Duplex Rent PRINCETON For Rent/Sale or Rent to Own. 3 bedroom/2 bath Duplex for rent. Recently refreshed with new paint and carpet, appliances included, finished basement, no pets. 309 West Franklin. $850/ month plus utilities. Applications being taken for immediate occupancy. Broker Owned. Call 815-739-6842

Garage Sales? Promote Them Here!

815-875-4461 ESTATE AUCTION

The Following will be sold at the ON SITE LOCATION of 1822 Fulton Street in Peru, IL on:

WED.,JULY 10, 2013 TIME:4:00 P.M.

ViewListing & Photos on website: www.tumblesonauction.com FURNITURE: 1940’SThree Piece Bedroom Set w/ Dbl Bed &Dresser; 1950’s Bedroom Set; Single Maple Bed; Kitchen Table w/ 4 Chairs; Two Matching Green Sofa Chairs; Zenith Color TV w/ Stand; Microwave; End Tables; Night Stands; Stereo; 1950’s Yellow Floral Chair; Flat Top & Camel Back Trunks; Gold 1950’s Sofa; Card Table & Chairs; Girls Schwinn Bicycle COLLECTIBLES & HOUSEHOLD: 3 Gal Blue Ribbon Crock; Old Patchwork Quilt; Many Nice Pieces of Doilies, Crocheted Items & Needlework; Towels, Linens, & Bedding; 1800’s Confirmation Picture; Old Valentines; Old Purses; Candlewick; Hand Painted Plates & Pieces; Blue Thumb Print Dishes; Green Glasses; Pressed Glass; Wheat Pattern Stoneware Dishes; Cast Iron Skillet; 8 Place Setting of Community Plate Silverware; Child’s Doll Buggy & Bed w/ Dolls; Tools

DOROTHY PIKUL ESTATE, PERU, IL

TUMBLESON AUCTION COMPANY 815-872-1852 AUCTIONEERS: TOMAND MARY TUMBLESON& TIFFANY FOES E-mail: ttauction@yahoo.com TERMS: CASH OR CHECK

ESTATE AUCTION

The Following Antiques & Primitives from the Harold Zinke Estate will be sold at the ON SITE LOCATION of 638 Church Road in Compton, IL 61318 (One Mile South of Compton, IL - Watch for Signs) on:

SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2013 TIME:10:00 A.M.

ViewListing on website: www.tumblesonauction.com COLLECTION OF PRIMITIVE ITEMS AND TOYS: Like New Two Person Jacuzzi Hot Tub; Many Old Antique Tools; Machinery Seats; Several Hand Made Antique Barn Board Cabinets; Several Beer Signs, Lights, Trays &Glasses; Old Games; Many Pictures & Frames; Corn Dryers; Several Glass Showcases; Old Primitive Post Office Cabinet marked w/Keen Kutter; Cookie Jars; Kerosene Lamps; Dolls & Doll Buggy; Meat Grinders; Coffee Grinders; Old Golf Clubs & Drivers; Hand Scales; Flat Irons; Cow Bells; Clocks; Scythes (For Cutting Grass); Many Boxes of Various Toys PLEASE NOTE: This Is A Large Auction With Many More Items Too Numerous To List!! Lunch Stand by Lion Club-Paw Paw, IL

HAROLD ZINkE ESTATE, Compton, IL TUMBLESON AUCTION COMPANY 815-872-1852 AUCTIONEERS: TOMAND MARY TUMBLESON& TIFFANY FOES E-mail: ttauction@yahoo.com TERMS: CASH OR CHECK

LARGE AUCTION!!

PRIChARd EsTATE & OThERs

ANTIqUEs, COLLECTAbLEs & mORE!!!!

sAT., JULy 13, 2013 10:00 am start

711 N. railroad st., seatonville IL 61359 (formerly st. Gertrude’s Church & Hall) Go to auctionzip.com for full sale bill & photos sale by

bURkART & hANsEN AUCTION sERvICE

ESTATEAUCTION

TheFollowing will be sold at the ON SITE LOCATION OF 101 West Mill Road in Sheffield,IL on:

SAT., JULY 13, 2013 TIME: 10:00 A.M.

ViewListing & Photos on website: www.tumblesonauction.com AUTOMOBILE: 2005White Chevy Malibu Classic, 4 Cylinder-Auto w/ 126,000 Miles APPLIANCES, PATIO/WICKER FURNITURE, ANTIQUE & MODERN FURNITURE: Crosley Side By Side Freezer Refrigerator; Maytag Electric Range; Amana Matching Washer & Dryer; Glass Top Patio Set w/Four Chairs & Umbrella; 8 Piece Wicker Porch Furniture Set Including: Glass Top Wicker Table w/4 Chairs, Sofa, Love Seat, Coffee Table, Rocker & Lamp; 4 Piece Wicker Porch Set; Metal Out Door Lounge; Wicker Fern Stand; Antique to Include Mostly Oak: Three Drawer Dresser, Library Table, Spindle Leg Glass Ball Feet Table, Commode, Heavy Carved Leg Square Thrashing Table, Four Mission Chairs, Dresser, Rocker, Lyre Chair, 1940s China Cabinet, Duncan Phyfe Table & Dresser w/ Mirror; MODERNFURNITURE: Ethan Allen to Include: Dining Room Table &Four Chairs, Hutch & Tea Cart; Maple to Include: Four Piece Bedroom Set, Dbl Bed, Kitchen Table & 4 Chairs, Book Case Desk, Revolving Bookcase Table, Drop Leaf End Table & TV Cabinet; Pine to Include: Hutch, Corner Hutch, Dressing Mirror, Four Drawer Chest & Painted Drop Leaf Bench Table; Sofa; Two Green Velvet Swivel Chairs, 2-Beige Sofa Chairs & Other Misc. Chairs; Red Upholstered Lift Chair; Glass Mirrored Curio Cabinet; Many Picture Frames; Table & Floor Lamps; Sm. Electric Organ; Sony TV; Hallway bench; Coat Hook & Bench; Quilt Rack; Flat Front Modern China Cabinet; 3 Cedar Chests; Sewing Stand; Doll Buggy; Flat Top Trunk; Child’s Desk; Ping Pong Table; Two Single Beds STERLING SILVER FLATWARE, ANTIQUES, COLLECTIBLES &HOUSEHOLD: 12 Place Setting of International Sterling Silver Flatware; Many Quilts, Linens & Table Covers; Collection of Costume Jewelry; Many Vinegar Cruets; Many Pieces of Isabel Bloom; Hand Painted Plates& Other Pieces; Set Of Noritake ChinaFairmont Pattern; Iron Stone Pitcher& Bowl; Glass Bell Collection; Willow ware Dishes; Longaberger Baskets; Milkglass, Red Glass & Other Glassware Pieces; Pewter Items; Collection ofModern Salt Glaze Pottery; Set of Oneida Silverware; Modern Gone With The Wind table Lamp & Other Lamps; Japan China Dishes & Nikko China Christmas Dishes; Child’s Tea Set; Andrea Figurines; Many Modern Picture Frames; Cookbooks; Electric Roasters; Many More Items Too Numerous to Mention!!!

BETTY ELLIS ESTATE, SHEFFIELD, IL

TUMBLESON AUCTION COMPANY, PRINCETON, IL Email: ttauction@yahoo.com Or Phone: 815-872-1852 AUCTIONEERS:TOM AND MARY TUMBLESON LIC # 040000396-397 & TIFFANY FOES LIC #041.001601

PUBLIC AND LEGAL NOTICES The Bureau County Republican Classified MarketPlace brings you the public and legal information you have a right to know. Check out each publication for information about your community and stay informed!

Visit us at www.bcrnews.com

ESTATE AUCTION

The Following will be sold at the ON SITE LOCATION of 17 Dallas Street in Princeton, IL on:

FRIDAY,JULY 19, 2013 TIME:10:00 A.M.

View Listing & Photos on website: www.tumblesonauction.com 2006 SILVER 4 DOOR PONTIAC G-6 w/ 58,978Miles FURNITURE AND COLLECTIBLES: Bistro Tables & Bar Stools; Maple Kitchen Tablew/ 5 Chairs; Sofa; End Tables; Sofa Table; Recliner; Drop Leaf Table; BentwoodChair; Vacuum Cleaner; Glass Coffee Table; Color TV & Cabinet; MapleDresser; Church Folding Chair; Plastic Patio Items; Headboard; 2 IndianTomahawks; Copper Boiler; Antique Toaster; Lamps; Pictures; Mirrors; AppleComputer; JD Toys & Others; Roasters & Misc. Glassware & Dishes

ROBERTA PINTER ESTATE, PRINCETON IL

TUMBLESON AUCTION COMPANY 815-872-1852 AUCTIONEERS: TOMAND MARY TUMBLESON & TIFFANY FOES E-mail: ttauction@yahoo.com TERMS: CASH OR CHECK

PUBLIC AUCTION

The following items will be offered at Public Auction located at “The Shed”, 401 W. Main St., Wyanet, IL 61379 Look for this and upcoming auctions on rickrediger.com

SATURDAY, JULY 20, 2013 9:00 A.M.

TRACTORS *1989 John Deere 4755 Tractor, 2 wd, 5000+ engine hours, 18.4-42’s w/ axle duals, 3 pt, quick hitch, 3 remotes, power shift, full set weights, 2 owners; *1979 John Deere 4440 tractor, 2 wd, 8000+ hrs, 18.4-38’s w/axle duals, 3 pt, 2 remotes, nice condition; *Case 580 Back hoe, gas engine, runs with a knock, “as is”; *Minneapolis-Moline Super M670, #29904060, LP tractor, WF, 3 pt, 18.4-34’s, 2 remotes, pto; *Oliver Super 88 diesel, #10910, WF, runs, 15.5-38’s; *Massey Ferguson 50, #181402, gas tractor, NF, 13-26’s, 1 remote 3 PT; *Oliver 770 gas tractor, #68911, NF; *Case SC, #5105741, NF, good paint, runs; *Farmall H, gas, #106863, NF; *Farmall Super M, #26030, NF, new paint, nice; *Farmall 560 LP, #15031, WF, 2 point; *Farmall Super M, no engine, NF; *Ford 8N, 3 pt, umbrella runs; *Farmall A, #1627, WF, w/Wood belly mower, runs; *Allis Chalmers WD, gas, NF, new paint, will run; *John Deere 850 diesel, 2250 engine hours, 3 pt, rops, JD loader w/JD 72” RM finishing deck; Yanmar 336 diesel tractor, 3 pt, rear hyd., w/JD 72” RM finishing deck; *Case 1270, 4184 hrs, #1005928, 20.8-38, 2 remotes, 1000 PTO; TILLAGE & SPRAYERS *Bestway Field Pro 4 Sprayer, 60’ booms, Outback Foamer, Triple nozzle bodies, Flowback system, Controller, 320/85R38 tires, very clean; *CIH 3900 Disc, 18’ #0183822, 7 ½” space, rear hitch, nice condition; *DMI Tiger Mate 24’ cultivator, new shovels, 3 bar coil tyne, factory rear hitch; *Kewanee 14’ offset disc, 24” knotch blades, heavy and nice; *Sukup 8R30 ridge cultivator; *IH 4RW RM cultivator; *McFarland 30’ 5 bar spike harrow, RM; *John Deere 7000 6R30 planter, new openers, new marker disc, Yetter managers, nice planter; Great Plains Solid Stand 15’ No Till Drill; *9’ culti-mulcher; Kewanee 12; disc; *JD 2 bottom plow on steel; *International 2 bottom and 3 bottom Trip Plows on rubber; AUGERS AND EQUIPMENT *Waldinga 510 grain vac w/ attachments; *Westfield 10” – 61’ Swing Away Auger, Nice; *Mayrath 72’ x 8” PTO auger; *Hutchinson 12” – 4’ truck auger, electric; *Vermeer 1250 Chipper, diesel, feed control, starts and runs great; *Rhino SE 15-48 Batwing, 15’, hard tires; *Woods Brushbull 72”, 3 pt mower, like new; *Woods 88, 7’ RM , 3 pt, PTO, Tiller; *Little Rhino 3 pt blade; 1981 Chevy C70 w/New Leader L20 Limebox, 427 mror, 5 speeed, 2 speed axle; *Swenson fertilizer spreader, 6 ton, walking tandems; BALERS AND HAY EQUIPMENT *JD 14T square baler; *New Holland 56 hay rake; *Ford 7’ sickle mower; *New Holland 268 square baler; *IH 46 baler; *New Idea 299 MoCo; WAGONS AND GRAIN CARTS *M&W 4300A Gravity Wagon; *Ficklin CA 14000 Auger Cart, 24.5-32 tires and roll tarp; *Kilbros 690 Auger Cart; *2 - 2004 444 Brent Gravity wagons, rear brakes, nice; *2 - 2001 444 Brent Gravity wagons, rear brakes, nice; *Bradford Big Boxer gravity box & gear; *BII 335A gravity box and gear; *Bradford box w/hyd auger; TRUCKS, TRAILERS AND BOAT *1998 Ford F-150 XLT, RCLB, 2WD, Runs Good; *1973 Ford F-50, 2WD, 107,000 mi, good tires, strong engine; *Great Dane 40’ flatbed semitrailer; *Diamond D 24’ livestock trailer; *18’ tandem axle flat trailer; *2007 Interstate 7’ x 14’ enclosed trailer; *lawn and garden trailers; *1993 Bayliner Classic 1600CT, 16’, Open Bow, New Upholstery, Runs Good; MOTORCYCLES, ATV’S, LAWN MOWERS & CARTS *1982 Yamaha 1100, 10,500 actual miles, excellent condition; *1985 Honda Big Red 250, 3 wheeler, original; *JD 425 AWS lawn mower w/60” deck, nice; *Honda 400 EX, ATV w/aluminum wheels, runs good; *Polaris 300cc, 2 x 4, runs; *Yamaha Radian 750cc motorcycle, runs; *Ag Fab lawn vac & trailer, like new; *Cub Cadet 1450 w/snow blower; *Murray 12 hp 38”; JD RX75 w/bagger; *Yard Machine 14 ½ hp, 42”; *JD 145 22 hp, 48”, transmission problem, 244 hrs; *Craftsman 15 ½ hp, 42” w/ft snow plow; Simplicity Regent 38”; Huskee 15 gal pull sprayer w/boom; *2 – Breaking Carts – good condition; harness; PEDAL TRACTORS *IH 1466, WF; *JD 4020, WF; *JD 20 Series, NF; *JD 30 Series, NF, *JD 50 Series, NF; IH 856, NF; JD 70 DIESEL, NF; There also will be a few hayracks loaded with tools and miscellaneous. Watch www.rickrediger.com for additional consignments and pictures Number System Will Be used – I.D. Required TERMS: CASH OR GOOD CHECK – Not Responsible for Accidents

REDIGER AUCTION SERVICE Wyanet, IL 815-699-7999 Auctioneers: Rick Rediger - Jon Moon - Jeremy Rediger


999 • Legal Notices

999 • Legal Notices

999 • Legal Notices

999 • Legal Notices

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 13TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT BUREAU COUNTY, ILLINOIS FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK, ) A Federally Chartered Savings Bank, ) Plaintiff, ) V. ) DANA S. DICKENS, Vk/a DANA S. ) BIRKEY, GREGORY SCRALLHORN, ) UNKNOWN OWNERS and ) NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, ) Defendants. ) No.2012-CH-120 NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE OF REAL ESTATE MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT PURSUANT to a judgment heretofore entered by the said Court in the above entitled cause, John E. Thompson, Sheriff of Bureau County, Illinois, will on Monday, the 29th day of July, 2013, at the hour of 10:00 a.m., in the Lobby of the Bureau County Courthouse, 700 South Main Street, Princeton, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following described premises and real estate in the said judgment mentioned: Parcel 1: A tract of land located in part of the Northeast Quarter of Section 4, township 16 North, Range 9 East of the Fourth Principal Meridian, Bureau County, Illinois, described as follows, and bearings are for the purpose of description only: Commencing at an iron rod at the Southeast Corner of the Northeast Quarter of said Section 4; thence North 01 degrees 49 minutes 34 seconds West along the East Line of the Northeast Quarter of said Section 4 a distance of 594 feet to an iron rod, said iron rod being the place of beginning for the tract to be described; thence North 89 degrees 29 minutes 10 seconds West 327.60 feet to a point; thence North 0 1 degrees 49 minutes 34 seconds West 267.60 feet to a point; thence Easterly to a point on the East Line of the Northeast Quarter of said Section 4 that is 267.60 feet Northerly of the point of beginning; thence Southerly along the East Line of the Northeast Quarter of Section 4 to the point of beginning. Excepting therefrom the following described real estate: Commencing at an iron rod at the Southeast Corner of the Northeast Quarter of said Section 4; thence North 0 1 degrees 49 minutes 3 4 seconds West, along the East Line of the Northeast Quarter of said Section 4, a distance of 594.00 feet to an iron rod. Said iron rod being the place of beginning for the tract to be described; thence North 89 degrees 29 minutes 10 seconds West, 197.63 feet to an iron rod; thence North 00 degrees 58 minutes 00 seconds West, 174,44 feet to iron rod; thence North

89 degrees 15 minutes 00 seconds East 58.39 feet to an iron rod; thence North 00 degrees 45 minutes 00 seconds West, 67.76 feet to an iron rod; thence North 89 degrees 15 minutes 00 seconds East, 135.22 feet to an iron rod on the East Line of the Northeast Quarter of said Section 4; thence South 0 1 degrees 49 minutes 3 4 seconds East, along the East Line of the North-east Quarter of said Section 4, a distance of 246.60 feet to the place of beginning, all lying and being situated in the County of Bureau, in the State of Illinois. Parcel 2: A tract of land located in part of the Northeast Quarter of Section 4, Township 16 North, Range 9 East of the Fourth Principal Meridian, Bureau County, Illinois, described as follows, and bearings are for the purpose of description only: Commencing at an iron rod at the Southeast Comer of the Northeast Quarter of said Section 4; thence North 0 1 degrees 49 minutes 34 seconds West along the East Line of the Northeast Quarter of said Section 4 a distance of 594 feet to an iron rod, said iron rod being the place of beginning for the tract to be described; thence North 89 degrees 29 minutes 10 seconds West, 197.63 feet to an iron rod; thence North 00 degrees 58 minutes 00 seconds West, 174.44 feet to an iron rod; thence North 89 degrees 15 minutes 00 seconds East, 58.39 feet to an iron rod; thence North 00 degrees 45 minutes 00 seconds West, 67.76 feet to an iron rod; thence North 89 degrees 15 minutes 00 seconds East, 135.22 feet to an iron rod on the East Line of the Northeast Quarter of said Section 4; thence South 0 1 degrees 49 minutes 34 seconds East, along the East Line of the Northeast Quarter of said Section 4, a distance of 246.60 feet to the place of beginning. Said property is commonly known as 17643 2100 East Street, Princeton, Illinois. Permanent Index Nos. 16-04-200-008 and 16-04200-010 The person to contact for information regarding this property is: Konni Rodeghier, First Federal Savings Bank 633 LaSalle Street, Ottawa, IL Phone: (815) 434-3500 Terms of the Sale: This is an “As Is” sale for “Cash.” The successful bidder must deposit Ten (10%) Per Cent down by cash or certified funds, and the balance of the purchase price by certified funds within 24 hours. The property is subject to general real estate taxes, covenants, conditions, restrictions, easements of record, special assessments, if any levied against the property, unpaid water bills, and is offered for sale without representation as to quality or quality of title and without recourse to Plaintiff. The sale is further subject to confirmation

by the Court. Upon payment in full of the purchase price, the purchaser will receive a Certificate showing the amount of the bid, the description of the property sold, and the time when the purchaser will be entitled to a deed for such property unless the property is redeemed according to law. The property is not available for inspection prior to sale. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER) YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(c) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THE LAW FIRM OF ARMSTRONG & SURIN IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. WITNESS: Mary C. Dremann, Circuit Clerk of Bureau County, Illinois, at Princeton, Illinois /s/ Mary C, Dremann WILLIAM T. SURIN Armstrong & Surin 724 Columbus St, Ottawa, IL 61350 (815) 434-4323 aslawqmchsi.com ARDC #02777622 Published in the Bureau County Republican July 9, 16 and 23, 2013.

AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE TRACT ABOVE DESCRIBED RUNNING THENCE WEST ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID TRACT, A DISTANCE OF 283 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 127 FEET, THENCE EAST 13 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 82 FEET TO THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID TRACT ABOVE DESCRIBED, THENCE EAST 267 FEET TO THE EAST LINE OF SAID TRACT, THENCE NORTH ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID TRACT, 200 FEET TO THE PLACE OF BEGINNING, EXCEPTING THEREFROM THE EAST 60 FEET OF EQUAL AND EVEN WIDTH OFF OF SAID LOT 2, ALL LYING AND BEING SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF BUREAU, IN THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. P.I.N. 19-10-326-006. Commonly known as 119 NORTH STREET, NEPONSET, IL 61345. The improvement on the property consists of a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the condominium Property Act Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. For information call Sale Clerk at Plaintiff’s Attorney, FISHER and SHAPIRO, LLC, 2121 Waukegan Road, Bannockburn, Illinois 60015. (847) 291-1717. Refer to File Number 10-038013. I547529 Published in the Bureau County Republican July 9, 16 and 23, 2013.

10-038013 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 13TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COUNTY OF BUREAU PRINCETON, ILLINOIS JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ) ASSOCIATION; ) Plaintiff, ) vs. ) JAMES V. JACOBS; JANET L. JACOBS; ) Defendants, ) 10 CH 41 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on November 15, 2012, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Wednesday, August 14, 2013, at the hour of 9:00 a.m. in the office of HB Wilkinson Title Co., 108 Park Avenue West, Princeton, Illinois 61356, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described mortgaged real estate: THAT PART OF LOTS 2 AND 3 IN THE NORTH BELT OF THE VILLAGE OF NEPONSET, ILLINOIS AND ALSO BEING IN THE SOUTHWEST ONE QUARTER OF SECTION 10, TOWNSHIP 15 NORTH, RANGE 6 EAST OF THE FOURTH PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING

NOTICE OF MATERIAL LETTING Sealed proposals will be received by the Village of Cherry in the office of the Village Clerk at 105 S. Main Street, Cherry, IL 61317 until 10:00 a.m. on Thursday, July 18, 2013 for furnishing materials required in the maintenance of Section 13-00000-00GM and at that time publicly opened and read. Project shall consist of furnishing and applying in place Bit. Materials (Cover & Seal Coat) – HFE 150 and Cover & Seal Coat Aggregate (CA-16). Proposals shall be submitted on forms furnished by the Local Agency which may be obtained at the office of Chamlin & Associates, Inc., 3017 Fifth Street, Peru, IL 61354 and shall be enclosed in an enveloped marked “Material Proposal, Section 13-00000-00-GM”. The right is reserved to waive technicalities and to reject any or all proposals. A proposal guaranty in the proper amount, as specified in BLRS Special Provision for Bidding Requirements and Conditions for Material Proposals, will be required. Bid Bonds will not be allowed as proposal guaranties. The successful bidder at the time of execution of the contract will not be required to deposit a Continued on page 18

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999 • Legal Notices

999 • Legal Notices

Continued from page 17 contract bond for the full amount of the award. The proposal guaranty check will be held in lieu thereof. Failure on the part of the contractor to deliver the material and perform the work specified will be considered just cause to forfeit his surety as provided in Article 108.10 of the Standard Specifications. BY ORDER OF: PRESIDENT & BOARD OF TRUSTEES VILLAGE OF CHERRY Published in the Bureau County Republican July 9, 2013.

is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-12-34489. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-12-34489 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Case Number: 12 CH 00125 TJSC#: 33-8859 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I544181 Published in the Bureau County Republican July 2, 9 and 6, 2013.

The Bid Opening will be on Friday, July 19, 2013 at 10:30 a.m. at Princeton High School, 103 S. Euclid Avenue, Princeton, Illinois 61356. At this time the Bids will be publicly opened and read. A Performance and Payment Bond in the full amount of the contract will be required. A Bid Security of 10% of the Bid is required with the proposal. The Contractor must pay the Prevailing Wage Rates for all work per Illinois Law. It is the policy of Princeton High School District 500 to provide equal opportunity to all qualified businesses in the awarding of contracts and accordingly promotes the utilization of diversified businesses to the maximum extent feasible in any contract issued against this solicitation to bid. There will be a Pre-Bid Meeting of all interested bidders. Any bidder submitting a bid on this project are encouraged to attend this meeting. Location and time are as follows: Location: Princeton High School 103 S. Euclid Avenue Princeton, Illinois 61356 Date/Time: Wednesday, July 10, 2013 @ 10:30 a.m. The Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, to waive irregularities in the bidding procedure, or accept the Bid that in its opinion will serve its best interest. Any such decision shall be considered final. The Owner reserves the right to set aside a Bid from a Contractor who, in the Owner’s opinion, does not exhibit past experience equal to the size and scope of this project. The bidder shall have a written sexual harassment policy in place in full compliance with Section 2-105 of the Illinois Human Rights Act. PREVAILING WAGE LAW: The Contract calls for the construction of a “public work,” within the meaning of the Illinois Prevailing Wage Act, 820 ILCS 130/.01 et seq. (“the Act”). The Act requires contractors and subcontractors to pay laborers, workers and mechanics performing services on public works projects no less than the current “prevailing rate of wages” (hourly cash wages plus amount for fringe benefits) in the county where the work is performed. The Department publishes the prevailing wage rates on its website at: http://www. state.il.us/agency/idol/rates/rates.HTM. All contractors and sub-contractors rendering services under

this contract must comply with all requirements of the Act, including but not limited to, all wage, notice and record keeping duties. Obtain Bidding Documents (maximum 3 sets) after June 28, 2013 at: BHFX, LLC 30W250 Butterfield Road Warrenville, Illinois 60555 P: 630-393-0777 F: 630-393-0888 http://planroom.bhfx.net/pnonline Warrenville@bhfx.net A refundable deposit for the drawings and specifications of $100.00 per set is required. Published in the Bureau County Republican July 9, 2013.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT BUREAU COUNTY, ILLINOIS MICHAEL SPANOS, ) Petitioner, ) vs ) JAMIE JACKSON, ) Respondent. ) 2013-F-26 NOTICE OF PENDENCY OF ACTION NOTICE is hereby given to the named respondent, Jamie Jackson, of the Petition for Sole Custody filed in the above case on May 30, 2013, and that she is the named respondent in the above entitled case pursuant to the provisions of Illinois Revised Statute, and that the above entitled Petition is now pending in said court and the day on which a default may be entered against said respondent is August 9, 2013; that the following information applies to said proceeding: 1. The name of the petitioner and the case number are identified above. 2. The court in which said action was brought is identified above. 3. The last known address for the respondent, Jamie Jackson, is 319 North Chestnut Street, Princeton, IL 61356 Mary C. Dremann Clerk of the Circuit Court of Bureau County, Illinois Attorney Bradley P. Popurella, ARDC #6275711 Wimbiscus Law Firm, PC 102 East St. Paul Street Spring Valley, IL 61362 Telephone (815) 664-4151 Published in the Bureau County Republican July 9, 16 and 23, 2013. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 13TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT BUREAU COUNTY - PRINCETON, ILLINOIS JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ) ASSOCIATION ) Plaintiff, ) -v.- ) DEBORAH A. FAUGHN A/K/A DEBORAH ) ANN FAUGHN A/K/A DEBBY FAUGHN, et al ) Defendant ) 12 CH 00125 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on April 4, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 11:30 a.m. on August 14, 2013, at the office of Russell, English, Scoma & Beneke, P.C., Ten Park Ave. West, PRINCETON, IL, 61356, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: LOT 13 IN BLOCK 4 IN MCDONALD’S SUBDIVISION TO THE VILLAGE OF WALNUT, ALL LYING AND BEING SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF BUREAU, IN THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. Commonly known as 212 S. SECOND STREET, WALNUT, IL 61376 Property Index No. 03-08-456-009. The real estate

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ADVERTISEMENT FOR BID The Board of Education, Princeton High School District 500, 103 South Euclid Avenue, Princeton, Illinois 61356 will receive sealed bids for: NEW BLEACHERS, SITE UTILITIES AND MISCELLANEOUS GENERAL WORK AT AT PRINCETON HIGH SCHOOL PROJECT NO. 13068

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION OF REAL ESTATE Case No. 2012-CH-120 On July 29, 2013, at 10:00 a.m. certain real estate commonly known as 17643 2 100 East Street, Princeton, Illinois, will be sold at public auction as is to the highest and best bidder for cash in the Lobby of the Bureau County Courthouse, 700 South Main Street, Princeton, Illinois, 61356, The property consists of a single family residence and will be sold “As Is.” Contact: Konni Rodeghier at (815) 434-3500 for further information about this property. The property is not available for inspection prior to sale. Formal Notice of this Judicial Sale of Real Estate will be found in the Legal Notices section of this newspaper with the above case number. Published in the Bureau County Republican July 9, 16 and 23, 2013.

10-038013 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 13TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COUNTY OF BUREAU PRINCETON, ILLINOIS JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ) ASSOCIATION; ) Plaintiff, ) vs. ) JAMES V. JACOBS; JANET L. JACOBS; ) Defendants, ) 10 CH 41 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on November 15, 2012, Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Wednesday, August 14, 2013, at the hour of 9:00 a.m. in the office of HB Wilkinson Title Co., 108 Park Avenue West, Princeton, Illinois 61356, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described mortgaged real estate: P.I.N. 19-10-326-006. Commonly known as 119 NORTH STREET, NEPONSET, IL 61345. The improvement on the property consists of a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the condominium Property Act Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, by certified funds. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. For information call Sale Clerk at Plaintiff’s Attorney, FISHER and SHAPIRO, LLC, 2121 Waukegan Road, Bannockburn, Illinois 60015. (847) 291-1717. Refer to File Number 10-038013. I547529 Published in the Bureau County Republican July 9, 16 and 23, 2013.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 13TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT BUREAU COUNTY PRINCETON, ILLINOIS JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ) ASSOCIATION ) Plaintiff, ) -v.) DEBORAH A. FAUGHN A/K/A DEBORAH ) ANN FAUGHN A/K/A DEBBY FAUGHN, ) et al ) Defendant ) 12 CH 00125 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on April 4, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 11:30 a.m. on August 14, 2013, at the office of Russell, English, Scoma & Beneke, P.C., Ten Park Ave. West, PRINCETON, IL, 61356, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 212 S. SECOND STREET, WALNUT, IL 61376 Property Index No. 03-08-456-009. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-12-34489. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-12-34489 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Case Number: 12 CH 00125 TJSC#: 33-8859 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I544181 Published in the Bureau County Republican July 2, 9 and 16, 2013.


19 Kid Scoop Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Tuesday, July 9, 2013 • Kid Scoop • 19

© 2013 by Vicki Whiting, Editor Jeff Schinkel, Graphics Vol. 29, No. 30

iss Viola Swamp is the meanest substitute teacher ever. She appears in class one day after a classroom of students are not so nice to their teacher. Did something sinister happen to their teacher? The students begin to wonder!

etlands are areas of land nd atterr that are covered by water and d at least part of the year. Wetland habitats include freshwater and salt water marshes, wet meadows and vernal pools. They are some of the most productive places on earth. They are defined by the type o off soil plants the so oil il aand nd dp lant lant ntss fo ffound foun ound und an aand d th he presence off wa water. p pr esen es een ncee o wate ter. te r.

Unscramble the title of this book. Then, check it out at your local library this summer!

• P Provide Prov Pr ovid ffood ov d and d shelter helltter ffor orr w wildlife. ildl il ldl dliffe. e. Absorb • Ab A bso so and slow excess ceess runoff runof unof offf during d rriing du ng rainy rai a ny sseasons easo ea son so nss aand n nd d help h he elp lp prevent floods. lp Filter • Fi F iltte toxins and wastes out of water. Provide protection and nourishment for the young off • Pr rov o go many ma ny species. Provide • Pr P ov v a resting place for migratory birds. Provide • Pr P ov a natural area where humans can go for relaxation elaxat el axatio ax atio at ion and an nd rrecreation.

Look through the newspaper for headlines and articles about water. These can include rivers, lakes, oceans, streams and the watershed. Make a collage poster using these articles.

Swamps are wetlands that are always covered with water and have lots of trees, grasses and wildlife. Connect the dots to discover one of the most famous swamp creatures. 1 42

41

3

2

4 5

6 7

Find the words in the puzzle. Then look for each word in this week’s Kid Scoop stories and activities. C O V W E G N O P S

E R R E A W I S K E S D N A L T E W W F S D L F I L E O C I

O P B A I N L R L L

I Y M T E L Y W E D

L W P A I R T A A L

T E E P W R E E N I

R T M O U S E C R W Standards Link: Letter sequencing. Recognized identical words. Skim and scan reading. Recall spelling patterns.

Look through today’s newspaper and find three to five facts that you think not too many people know. Create a question for each fact. See how many people know these facts.

Standards Link: Reading Comprehension: Ask questions to demonstrate comprehension.

Standards Standard ds Link: Reading Comprehension: Compreh hension: Follow simple p written wrritten directions.

8

40

These are the largest 39 reptiles in North America. They are 38 36 37 believed to be over 36 35 200 million years 35 old. Once nearly 31 33 31 extinct, they can live 34 32 between 35 to 50 years in the wild.

WETLANDS REPTILES WILDLIFE SWAMPS FILTER PILLOW CEREAL SPONGE WATER MOUSE RAINY CLEAN SOIL WISK WET

9 10 9 28 29

27

11

30 3

24 23

25

26

22

20 21

18

16 17

12 14

15

13

Imagine you are exploring a creepy swamp in a canoe late one night. There is a bubbling sound, and out of the water rises a ... Finish this story.

19

Thank you to the businesses listed below for sponsoring Kid Scoop and promoting literacy through our N.I.E. Program R

State Bank of Cherry Member F.D.I.C

Walnut Family HealtH Center

131 Jackson Street, Walnut, Illinois

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PRINC OF

New Members Welcome 11:45 a.m. Tuesdays at Princeton Elks Club

PRINCETON POLICE DEPARTMENT

★ ★

815-663-2211

Princeton Rotary Club

Dance Academy

ON ET

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621 South Main Street Princeton, IL 61356 815.872.0830

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IL

MEMBER FDIC

Main Street

CITY

2139 N. Main St., Princeton, IL 800 W. Dakota St., Spring Valley, IL

121 Railroad Avenue Princeton, IL 61356

LIN OIS

Cherry, IL 894-2345 or 1-800-447-9138 www.statebankofcherry.com


20Accuweather 20 • Tuesday, July 9, 2013

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

From you, for you

We want to hear from you – From you, for you is an interactive page for readers to share their photos, questions and comments. For information on how to submit a story, question or comment, contact BCR Editorial Assistant Sarah Maxwell at smaxwell@bcrnews.com.

Julie Hollinger of Holy Trinity Church Cherry submitted this newspaper clipping from 1966 showing Janice (Guerrieri) Guerrini of Spring Valley (from left), Pat Hewitt of Cherry, Mike Schneider of LaSalle, Fran (Pelke) Hewitt of Cherry and Maureen (Baldini) Judge of Michigan at the bedside of Elsie Kolb, a local teacher.

5-day Planner Today

Tonight

High 90

Low 72

Wednesday

High 85

Thursday

Low 64

High 82

Low 63

Weekly weather July 7

93

High 84

Saturday

Low 63

High 86

Low 64

Sun & Moon This year

High

Friday

Low 70

One year ago Prec.

High

0

Records

Low

Prec.

103

75

0

High

Low

105 (1957) 52 (1950)

July 6

86

63

0

103

79

0

103 (2012) 50 (1979)

July 5

87

62

0

102

75

0

102 (2012)

July 4

87

59

0

101

81

0

101 (2012) 52 (2008)

July 3

76

57

0

98

75

0

98 (1983) 48 (1945)

48 (1951)

July 2

76

57

0

99

72

0

100 (1957) 48 (2001)

July 1

79

58

0

93

73

0

108 (1956) 50 (1948)

Source: National Weather Service Reporting Station, Princeton asterisk means new record temperature

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