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Serving Bureau County Since 1847

Saturday, May 25, 2013

OK on federal aid By Barb Kromphardt bkromphardt@bcrnews.com

Home and business owners in Bureau County can now apply for federal help in recovering from the torrential rains that drenched the county in mid-April. On Wednesday, Gov. Pat Quinn announced Bureau and 13 other counties were approved for the aid. These counties were added to the 11 counties already approved for federal aid last week. “This action will help speed assistance to people who suffered flood damages and help them begin rebuilding their lives,” Quinn said. The request for federal help was supported by damage assessment documentation that identified 14 homes in the area that were destroyed and 202 that suffered major damage. Thousands of additional homes were also affected by the floods. The federal disaster declaration makes assistance available to flood victims, including grants to individuals and households to help with temporary housing, home repairs or replacement and other disasterrelated expenses, as well as low-interest SBA loans to residents and businesses. Bureau County ESDA coordinator Kris Donarski was pleased with the announcement. “We had so many people in our county with flooding in their basements,” she said. “Not just inches of water, but feet.” To apply for assistance, residents should either register online at http:// disasterassistance.gov, or call the Federal Emergency Management Agency at 800-621-3362, or 800-4627585 (TTY). Comment on this story at www.bcrnews.com. Year 167 No. 63 Two Sections - 32 Pages

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PMH cuts women’s unit By Terri Simon tsimon@bcrnews.com

PRINCETON — There will be no more pink and blue booties. Proud parents and grandparents will no longer admire the newest addition to the family through the glass of the hospital’s nursery. The squall of a newborn brought into the world won’t be heard.

It is an end of an era at Perry Memorial Hospital (PMH) in Princeton. PMH CEO Rex Conger announced Thursday the city-owned hospital will close its Women’s Healthcare Unit, which includes obstetrics, labor, delivery and nursery services. The expected closure date is Jan. 1, 2014. The decision was not an easy or a quick one.

“We believe almost everyone recognizes health care is dynamic and constantly changing,” Conger said. “Health care facilities and providers across the nation are impacted by these changes and are attempting to adjust, so they can continue to serve the health care needs in their area.”

See PMH Page 4

BCR photo/Goldie Currie

Banking on the past Manlius Historical Society President Bob Andersen stands in front of the old First State Bank of Manlius’ safe deposit boxes on Thursday during a public opening of the bank. Since 2009, the historical society has worked on the restoration of the old bank, located on Maple Avenue in downtown Manlius. The society’s goal is to get it back to its’ original state before it closed in 1933. Along with the bank’s old memorabilia inside the building, the historical society has included memorabilia of all things Manlius. The bank is open for the public to see and tour 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Thursdays and Saturdays.

Three arrested for check cashing/burglary ring By Goldie Currie gcurrie@bcrnews.com

PRINCETON – Local law enforcement agencies have assisted in the capture and arrest of three Waukegan men who were responsible for stealing, forging and cashing numerous business and payroll checks in communities throughout LaSalle, Bureau, Whiteside and DeKalb counties. The check cashing/burglary ring was internationally connected to financial crimes in Georgia, Tennessee, Kentucky, Alabama, Texas, Arkansas, Mississippi, Wisconsin and Illinois and were responsible for hundreds of thou-

sands of dollars in financial institution fraud. Fernando Sanchez-Guizar, 38, was arrested on a federal fugitive from justice arrest warrant on the offense of bank fraud out of the U.S. Eastern District Count of Wisconsin. Nicolas Armando ChavezGarcia, 30, was arrested on a felony arrest warrant out of Maury County, Tenn., for theft (bank fraud) and Joel GaytanSandoval, 31, was arrested in connection with a burglary arrest warrant out of Williamson County, Tenn., as well as federal fugitive arrest warrant for bank fraud. All three subjects are currently detained in the Lake County Jail in Waukegan, pend-

ing extradition to their respective jurisdictions. According to a press release issued by the Mendota Police Department, throughout March and April, the stolen and forged checks were presented to financial institutions throughout northern Illinois. The three men used fraudulent identifications cards from out of state to pass the checks. Criminal investigations are still ongoing locally, and criminal charges are pending against all three men after each respective state’s attorney’s office is able to review each case, according to the press release.

See Arrests Page 4

For breaking news, sports and current weather conditions, go to bcrnews.com


2 Local 2 • Saturday, May 25, 2013

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Bureau County

Republican 800 Ace Road, Princeton, Illinois 61356

Clarifications/Corrections

Architect Wayne Nowlan points out some characteristics of the new addition for the Tiskilwa Public Library at an open house Tuesday night. Construction is expected to start this summer on the 3,800-square-foot addition that will eventually become the main library.

Did we get it right? In a story on Page 5 in Thursday’s Bureau County Republican, the victim of a fatal crash on Interstate 80 was identified as a male, however, Tzantera Tyler BachDalton was a female. The BCR regrets the error.

BCR photo/Lyle Ganther

Auction Calendar May 25-27 – Three-day Memorial Day estate sale, antiques, collectibles, automobiles, furniture, decoys, firearms, coins, Indian collection, 10 a.m., 1635 N. Main St. (Tumbleson Auction Center), Princeton, Tumbleson Auction Co., auctioneers. May 28 – Mary Ewalt, farmland, 10 a.m., auction held at 104 W. Main St. (Malden Fire Station), Malden, Rediger Auction Service, auctioneers. June 1 – Al Pascoe, large amount of tools, toolrelated items and outdoor items, 10 a.m., 2017 Sixth St., Peru, Tumbleson Auction Co., auctioneers. June 2 – Clifford and Pearl Evelhoch estate, appliances, antiques, collectibles, household, beer signs, guns, tools, outdoor, coins and paper money, 10 a.m., 421 E. Cleveland St., Spring Valley, Bradleys’ and Immke Auction Service, auctioneers. June 2 – Mike Kallas estate, real estate, tractor, shop equipment and antiques, 10 a.m., 126 W. Fifth St., Kewanee, Tumbleson Auction Co., auctioneers. June 3 – Jack Rooney, restaurant equipment, accessories, antiques, household, 10 a.m., 120 N. Main St., Cherry, Tumbleson Auction Co., auctioneers. June 8 – Rich Bartman, real estate, 10 a.m., 87 S. Sixth St., Princeton, Tumbleson Auction Co., auctioneers. June 11 – Art and Donna Johnson Estate, real estate, 5:30 p.m., 136 N. Washington St., Sheffield, Rediger Auction Service, auctioneers. The Bureau County Republican is located at 800 Ace Road, Princeton, Illinois 61356. Office hours are Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Phone: 815-875-4461 FAX: 815-875-1235 The BUREAU COUNTY REPUBLICAN (ISSN 0894-1181) is published tri-weekly (three times a week) by the Bureau County Republican, 800 Ace Road, P.O. Box 340, Princeton, IL 61356-0340. Periodical postage paid at Princeton, Illinois, 61356. POSTMASTER Send address changes to BUREAU COUNTY REPUBLICAN, PO Box 340, Princeton, IL 61356-0340.

Tiskilwa residents learn about new library addition Details reported on $1 million project at open house By Lyle Ganther lganther@bcrnews.com

TISKILWA — The history of the Tiskilwa Public Library will be restored as the current building is slated to be renovated, and an addition will be constructed onto the 105-year-old structure. Architect Wayne Nowlan of ATSE Consultants of Peoria told about 20 people gathered at an open house Tuesday night the 3,800-squarefoot addition will be attached to the current 1,800-square-foot

library. The addition will hopefully be enclosed by November of this year, Nowlan said, since bids from contractors for the nearly $1 million project won’t be opened until May 30. Nowlan said plans for the existing library to become a community meeting place will also include the removal of the current drop ceiling to reveal the original tin ceiling with ornamental period lighting. Also, the current non-operational clock and the bell tower on the library building will be removed during the renovation process. Nowlan added there would be an interior ramp from the new addition to the existing library with an exteri-

or ramp located at the building’s north side for handicap accessibility. There would also be two handicapped parking spots in front of the new addition that would be the main entrance into both buildings. Library board members recently received word they would be getting a grant of about $500,000 from the Illinois State Library, with the remaining funds coming from about $265,000 in savings the board has accumulated over the years, and a $200,000 loan from a local bank to be repaid over 20 years. The final loan amount will depend on the best bid received from a contractor. Rich Foss, library board president, said

board members are really excited about the addition because the process first began in 2001 to either build a new structure or renovate the existing building. “We knew it would cost less to build new, but we didn’t want to abandon this historic building constructed in 1908,” added Nancy Johnston, the library board’s vice president. The board purchased two lots to the east of the current library and removed two buildings on them to prepare for a new building. A referendum to issue $1.8 million in bonds for a new library was rejected in 2010 by the voters. Board members were discouraged until the

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summer of 2011 when Foss discovered the state was offering new construction grants for historic libraries that were more than 100 years old. One of the stipulations of the grant application was that the library building couldn’t have undergone any major modifications to even apply for the construction grant. Another requirement was the library had to own the property where the building was situated, which meant in Tiskilwa the village had to transfer ownership of that land to the library board in order to apply for the grant. Even though the library board members knew in 2012 they would likely get the grant, they wanted to reduce costs for the project in order to have enough money for the local share of the project. Tiskilwa Library Board members went to Toulon to talk to board members there, since a new library was built in that village for less than $1 million. As a result of this discussion, board members decided to hire another architect because the firm hired for the failed referendum had indicated they couldn’t reduce the costs for the project to less than $1 million. Foss said Tiskilwa Public Library’s application was one of 15 libraries in Illinois to be accepted. There were 60 libraries who applied for the construction grants. “It has been a long journey, but I am very proud of the board members sticking to it,” said Foss. He indicated former library board member Nancy Huber had also worked long and hard on this project. Comment on this story at www.bcrnews.com.


3 Local Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Local Farmers Market set to open PRINCETON – The taste of the summer season will come alive soon as the Bureau County Farmers Market is expected to open for business today, Saturday. The Market is located at 935 N. Main St., which is the southeast corner of Elm Place and Main Street. It is open from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. through October. The market will also be held on Tuesdays (starting in June). The hours for the Tuesday evening markets will be from 3 to 6 p.m. The first Saturday of each month will be Community Day where local crafters offer their goods for sale. Also local organizations will sponsor a cook out during lunch hours. Regular vendors, who represent local produce farms, will offer fresh produce and homemade products at the Market. The variety of produce offered varies throughout the growing season. Local produce farmers marketing their goods through the Farmers Market appreciate the support of area communities. The Market is supported by the Bureau County Farm Bureau, the Princeton Chamber of Commerce and the City of Princeton. Vendors can still register to sell at the market. Products will be allowed from producers from Bureau, LaSalle, Lee, Whiteside, Henry, Stark, Marshall and Putnam counties. Call the Farm Bureau at 815875-6468 for more information. For more information selling your local arts and crafts, please call Kay Cushman at 815-915-8075.

Saturday, May 25, 2013 • 3 News tips/story ideas? — Contact Bureau County Republican Senior Staff Writer Donna Barker at (815) 875-4461, ext. 244, or email her at dbarker@bcrnews.com.

Get your news now! — You no longer have to wait for Tuesday, Thursday or Saturday to get your news. Check out www.bcrnews. com for daily updates.

Mayor disagrees with two-week delay $9,100 drainage contract with new engineering firm tabled By Lyle Ganther lganther@bcrnews.com

PRINCETON — Mayor Keith Cain verbally scolded four commissioners Monday night after they voted to table a drainage contract with Farnsworth Group to evaluate the sanitary and storm sewer issues in various parts of town. The evaluation will include the recent flooding issues in the Dover Road/Euclid Avenue area and Greencroft/Metro Center area. The cost estimate totals about $9,100. The engi-

neering firm would then make recommendation for fixes to the city’s sanitary and storm sewer issues in these areas of town, said Princeton City Manager Jeff Clawson. It would take 60-90 days to put together an evaluation for the permanent fixes. Commissioner Joel Quiram said this was a huge issue for the city with many sewer lines in town being more than 100 years old. Cain said delaying this drainage agreement would only delay the project that needs to move forward in light of the flooding around town in April. Some commissioners felt the city had paid another engineer-

ing firm to study this issue in the past and paid for improvements that didn’t help. Commissioners Bob Warren and Ray Mabry said they wanted to get more information before approving the contract. Resident Laura Favia said (during a public comment period at the end of the meeting), she has been waiting for five years for city officials to address these issues and felt waiting two more weeks to deal with the issue of changing an engineering firm wasn’t acceptable to her. “Two hours is too long for me,” she said, indicating the delay may last another year or even two more years. The vote to table the

contract was approved on a 4-1 vote with Cain voting against the motion. In other business, commissioners voted to place a stop sign at the intersection of Dallas Street and Eastmor Drive and held first readings on ordinances dealing with registering kegs to deter underage drinking of alcohol at parties and establishing a social host liability laws to send a clear message to adults providing alcohol to underage youth isn’t acceptable in Princeton. Princeton Police Chief Tom Root said these ordinances would make adults responsible if they served alcohol to underage persons

How to build a high school By Barb Kromphardt bkromphardt@bcrnews.com

SPRING VALLEY – In April, voters approved a $32 million referendum to build a new Hall High School just north of the current facility. Now comes the hard work for the school board. One of the first decisions the board has to make is whether to hire a construction management firm to supervise the project, or to go with a general contractor, who would be chosen by the bidding process. At Wednesday’s meeting, the board heard more than three and one-half hours of presentations from six management companies who had several things in common. All of them were located closer than the Minneapolis-based Kraus-Anderson Construction Co., which made a presentation at the May 7 meeting as the preference of the project’s architect, Healy, Bender & Associates of Naperville. The companies stressed their commitment to put

as many local people to work on the project as possible, and a few companies even touted their close personal ties to the school and the community. Pete Mangieri from Mangieri Companies of Peoria said Mangieri does the most work of any company within a twohour radius of Peoria. He said the company has done work totaling $137 million, and they have 15 more projects under contract. Mangieri said a construction manager is not an extra layer but rather replaces the general contractor. He said a construction manager will give a proposed cost for the project, and then hold to it. Andy Mrowicki of HR Green in Yorkville said he, Matt Jereb and Eric Carls were all from the Illinois Valley, and they looked forward to working alongside “friends and family.” The company offers construction administration instead of construction management,

The board will meet at 5:15 p.m. June 5 to make a final decision regarding a construction manager. and Mrowicki said some of the benefits included independent oversight of the project and the lowest risk to the district. Nick Papanicholas Jr. of Nicholas and Associates in Mount Prospect said 90 percent of the company’s annual sales were in the construction of K-12 Illinois schools. Papanicholas discussed the two construction manager options, saying the construction manager at risk required his company to provide the bond, which made it easier for smaller subcontractors to bid on the project.

Several previous residents were part of the group presenting for Leopardo Companies of Hoffman Estates. President Rick Mattioda said it was good to come back to his hometown. Mattioda said Hall graduates Tony Orlandi and Jason Samolinski would be on-site every day monitoring the project. Derek Ward of Gilbane Building Co. of Chicago said his company is the largest construction management company for K-12 education in the country. Ward said the compa-

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at parties held in their homes. Princeton Tourism/Marketing Director Joni Hunt gave a presentation on some directional signs to be erected around town to give tourists an idea where the city’s assets are located. She said 30 signs, some small and some larger, would be placed around Princeton after permits were allocated from the Illinois Department of Transportation for the signs. Hunt also indicated signs welcoming visitors to Princeton that are situated at the entrances to town would also be replaced. Comment on this story at www.bcrnews.com.

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ny often builds next to existing buildings and has strategies and procedures to deal with the issues. The final presenter was David Binkley of George Sollitt Construction Co. in suburban Wood Dale. The company is currently working on the new technology center at IVCC, and Binkley said they have strong ties with the local contracting community and labor. Binkley said he would like to continue with the IVCC project team on the Hall project to maintain continuity. The board will meet at 5:15 p.m. June 5 to make a final decision regarding a construction manager. Comment on this story at www.bcrnews.com.


4 Local 4 • Local • Saturday, May 25, 2013

PMH From Page 1 Conger said the past 10 years has been filled with many changes — most if not all affecting the facility’s bottom line. On April 30 — the end of the hospital’s fiscal year, PMH showed a year-to date loss of more than $640,000. Regulatory changes, changes in patient volumes, payer mix and significant reductions in state and federal reductions are many of the issues which helped PMH make the tough decision to close the Women’s Healthcare Unit, which employs 12 staff members. Conger said PMH is expecting to receive about $546,000 less in reimbursement from Medicare this year and about $600,000 less in state reimbursements. “Perry is anticipating at least $1.1 million less in reimbursement during their current fiscal year, while trying to provide the same level of quality care and customer service,” Conger said. In the last 10 years, Perry’s volume of deliveries has declined by 38 percent, with the hospital seeing less than 100 babies born each year for the last two years. Half of those patients used Medicaid as their source of

Arrests From Page 1 Princeton Police Chief Tom Root could not give further details of the case as the investigation is ongoing, however, he was able to confirm the men had cashed checks in the Princeton area. He was not able to release which businesses were involved.

payment; the state, which is significantly behind in the payment of its claims, reimburses PMH, on average, 17 cents for every dollar’s worth of care provided. “The result is that Perry’s Women’s Healthcare Unit ... is no longer able to support itself,” Conger said, adding last year’s loss in the unit was $500,000. Conger said the hospital is constantly looking at ways to create additional revenue and limit expenses. He said PMH is not looking at closing other units or limiting other services, rather “We are looking to add some new services that could provide additional volume and revenue,” he said, adding PMH’s Emergency Room will still be able to perform emergency deliveries. Regarding the 12 staff members who work in the women’s unit, Conger said they will be able to apply for other positions in the hospital, and PMH will do everything it can to help those staff members through the transition. “PMH is committed to continuing to provide the highest level of care and customer service to our patients, and we regret this change is necessary,” Conger concluded. Comment on this story at www.bcrnews.com.

According to the Mendota Police Department press release, the arrest and capture of the three men was made possible by coordinated efforts of FBIGreen Bay, Wis., Waukegan, Sterling, Peru, Streator, Ottawa, Sycamore, LaSalle, Spring Valley, Fairview, Tenn., LaVergne, Tenn., and Mendota. Comment on this story at www.bcrnews.com.

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

PHS opts for new tech program By Goldie Currie gcurrie@bcrnews.com

PRINCETON – Princeton High School will be moving in a new technology direction next year with the online program Google Apps for Education. Principal Andy Berlinski reported to the school board on Wednesday how the program will better assist students and staff. “This is something that is rapidly coming into the forefront within the public education sector,” he said. Currently, the high school has a licensing program with Microsoft for the use of documents, spread-

By Terri Simon tsimon@bcrnews.com

PRINCETON — It’s been at least 20 years since Princeton Elementary School District has raised its book fees, paid at the beginning of each school year. But at this week’s PES Board meeting, the board decided to tack on a technology fee for all students, which will result in older elementary students having their own one-on-one technology device. PES Superintendent Tim Smith explained the multi-year recommendation, driven primarily by

OGLESBY — The next meeting of the Bureau-LaSalle Tea Party will be Tuesday at the Elks Lodge, 800 E. Walnut in Oglesby.

tech fee. The sixth- and seventh-graders will pay $100, which includes that personal device. • The 2016-17 school year will see kindergarten through fifth grade pay the $50 fee, with sixth-, seventh- and eighth-graders paying $100. The program will continue at these rates henceforth. Smith said at the end of the students’ eighthgrade year, the students will be able to keep their own one-on-one personal device. Smith likened that device to an iPad. Dubbed a Chrome Book, Smith said the Google device meets the needs of the students’

curriculum, including Internet and the ability to download apps. Smith also said those students who are eligible for fee waivers would still be issued their own personal device. The board approved the technology fee increase. Board member Doris Hamilton was absent from the meeting. In other business, the board noted the teacher retirement open house is from 4 to 6 p.m. Tuesday at Logan West, and the staff institute, breakfast and service awards are at 8 a.m. Thursday. Comment on this story at www.bcrnews.com.

Doors open at 6:30 p.m., and the meeting begins at 7 p.m. The meeting is open to all, and while donations are welcomed, there is no

charge. Charlie Kirk will be the guest speaker. He is the founder and executive of Turning Point USA, a national student

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the district’s technology committee. • Beginning in the upcoming school year (2013-14), each student — kindergarten through eighth grade — will be required to pay a $50 tech fee. • In 2014-15 school year, kindergarten through fifthgrade students, plus the seventh- and eighth-graders will still pay the $50 tech fee. Sixth-graders will pay a $100 fee and be given their own one-on-one, personal technology device. • In 2015-16, kindergarten through fifth grade, plus the eighth-graders, will continue to pay the $50

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In other news, the board: • Approved Hopkins & Associates as the district’s auditor for $8,950. • Approved Tim Ciesielski and Michael Fredericks as summer painters, and Kathy Johnston and Scott Vrana as summer custodians. • Approved the resignation of Deb Dullard as guidance counselor and Elaine McVety as social studies teacher, both effective June 2017; Vanessa Judd as freshmen volleyball coach and Vicki Thimens as special education paraprofessional. Comment on this story at www.bcrnews.com.

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The current goal is to get every teacher trained in the new program before next school year. Training has already began, and there is a plan to host 13 additional training session this summer for both beginner and advanced Google users. Berlinski said the program will also allow teachers to build websites where they will be able to post assignments for students who may have missed their class and need to make up the assignment. The students will be able to pull the assignments from the websites and see teachers’ notes that they may have missed in class.

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sheet and PowerPoint programs, which teachers and students use for work or homework assignments. The new Google Apps will provide the same programs online at no cost. Goggle Apps for Education will benefit teachers who want to work from home, since they can login anywhere and have access to all documents. The new apps program will also eliminate the computer compatibility issues students and teachers currently have when using different versions of Microsoft. “It’s 100 percent across the board completely compatible,” said Berlinski.

118 N. Tremont Kewanee, IL 61443 309-852-2434 Ext. 33


5 Obit Records Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Saturday, May 25, 2013 • Record & Obit • 5

Harold Kutter

Alan Walker Sr.

Rita Hopkins

MENDOTA — Harold Kutter, 96, passed away Wednesday, May 22, 2013, in the Mendota Lutheran Home. Born Nov. 29, 1916, in LaSalle to Gottlieb and Jennie (Reese) Kutter, he married Elaine R. Peters Sept. 10, 1941. She preceded him in death on April 11, 2013. He graduated from LaSalle-Peru High School in 1935. He retired from farming in 1966 and then worked for Sundstrand Corp., retiring in 1982. He was a member of St. John Lutheran Church on the Hill. Surviving are two daughters, Judy (Lloyed) Marlar of Bolingbrook and Lynn (Robert) Kinney of Rockford; one sister-in-law, Arlet Lunn of Stroudsburg, Pa.; one brother-in-law, Dale Peters of Mendota; one nephew, Barry (Madelon) Lunn of Saylorsburg, Pa.; one stepgranddaughter; and three stepgreat-grandchildren. He was also preceded in death by one sister, Mildred Kutter; an aunt, Hazel Reese; and one brother-in-law, Robert Lunn. Services will be at 11 a.m. today, Saturday, in St. John’s Lutheran Church on the Hill in rural Hollowayville with the Rev. Kim Lee-Brown officiating. Burial will be in the Peru City Cemetery following a luncheon in the church. Visitation will be one hour prior to the services today, Saturday, in the church. The Hurst Funeral Home is assisting the family. Memorials may be directed to St. John’s Lutheran Church on the Hill or the American Cancer Society.

LAMOILLE — Alan J. Walker Sr., 84, of LaMoille passed away Tuesday, May 21, 2013, at OSF St. Francis Medical Center in Peoria. Born Nov. 1, 1928, in Mendota to Howard and Lucy (Geisey) Walker, he married Joyce Smith July 3, 1954, in Mendota. She survives. He graduated from LaMoille High School in 1946 and attended LPO College for two years. He worked as a mailman for the U.S. Postal Service in the LaMoille area for 27 years, retiring in 1991. He served in the U.S. Army during the Korean War. He was a member of V.F.W. Post 4079, American Legion of LaMoille and the First Congregational Church. He was a Boy Scout master for Troop 59. Also surviving are one son, Alan “Pete” (Janet) Walker Jr. of LaMoille; two daughters, Kathleen (Jay) Lynch of Anchorage, Alaska, and Gwendolyn “Wendy” (Jessie) Edington of Ladd; nine grandchildren; 10 great-grandchildren; and one sister, Janice Minkler of LaMoille. He was preceded in death by his parents and one brother. Services will be at 11 a.m. today, Saturday, at the First Congregational Church of LaMoille with the Rev. Chris Johnson officiating. Burial will be in Union Cemetery, LaMoille, with full military rites conducted by Mendota V.F.W. Post 4079. Visitation was held Friday at the church. Memorials may be directed to the First Congregational Church of LaMoille. The Schwarz Funeral Home in Mendota is in charge of arrangements.

Rita Ann Hopkins passed away peacefully at home on Mother’s Day, May 12. 2013. She was born and raised in Walnut, graduated from Walnut Community Grade School and High School (1949) and then graduated from West Suburban Hospital School of Nursing, Oak Park (1952). She was a flight attendant for United Airlines from 1952 to Rita 1957 and flew the Los Angeles-Honolulu Hopkins route for the last three years. She was united in marriage on May 5, 1957, to Donald M. Hopkins, M.D., at the Walnut United Methodist Church. She and her husband lived in Rochester, Minn., from 1957 to 1963 and then for two years at the U.S. Naval Hospital in Boston, Mass. She was a resident of Sacramento, Calif., since 1965 and was involved in community activities of the First United Methodist Church, Girl Scouts, Rio Americano and Jesuit High School parent organizations, as well as the Sacramento Medical Society Auxiliary. Her life revolved around her faith, loving family and wonderful friends. She enjoyed collecting Early American antiques, reading, gardening and arranging flowers. Preceding her in death were her parents, Amelia (Schroeder) and Elmer “Bobby” Langford; her sister and brother-in-law, Inez Mae and Ernest George Norden; one brother, Claude Robert Langford; and one sister-in-law, Louise Marie Langford (wife of Jay Langford). Rita Ann is survived by her husband and their four children, Ann Marie Beach (John) of Johnston, S.C., Mary Lea Kelley (Stephen) of Nashua, N.H., Robert Jay Hopkins, M.D., (Joyce) of Frederick, Md., and Stephen James Hopkins, M.D., (Anne Marie) of Copperopolis, Calif.; 15 grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; one son, Irvin Jay Langford of Sheffield; and one sister-in-law, Dorothy Tuckerman Langford (wife of Claude Langford) of Forsyth, Ill. She is also survived by many nieces, nephews and their children. At Rita Ann’s request, there will not be a memorial service. There will be a graveside service later this summer for family and friends at the cemetery in Walnut. Memorials have been established at the Walnut United Methodist Church, 111 Liberty St., Walnut, IL 61376; and the First United Methodist Church, 2100 J St., Sacramento, CA, 95816. The Garland Funeral Home in Walnut is in charge of arrangements. Online condolences may be left at www.garlandfuneralhome.com.

Elsie Meyer

Anthony Morris MANLIUS — Anthony “Tony” Lynn Morris, 49, of Manlius, formerly of Sheffield, passed away at 2:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 22, 2013, at the Spring Valley Inn in Ladd. He was born Nov. 13, 1963, in Princeton to Charles Donald and Virginia Mae (Watson) Morris. He was a graduate of Western High School. He had been employed at LCN in Princeton. He served as a specialist in the U.S. Army. Surviving are two daughters, Rieley Morris of Hennepin and Olivia Morris of Hennepin; and three brothers, Steve Morris of Sheffield, Tim Morris of Sheffield and Thomas Morris of Manlius. He was preceded in death by his parents and two brothers, Larry and Bob Morris. Services will be held at a later date. Visitation will be from 5 to 7 p.m. Friday at the GrantJohnson Funeral Home in Princeton. Memorials may be directed to his children. The Grant-Johnson Funeral Home in Princeton is in charge of arrangements.

PERU — Elsie R. Meyer, 91, formerly of Ladd, died at 4:41 p.m. Tuesday, May 21, 2013, in Manor Court of Peru. Born Oct. 24, 1921, in Ladd to Louis and Olivia (Fanti) Zaccanti, she married Harry “Hebs” Meyer Nov. 24, 1951. He preceded her in death on July 28, 1972. She worked at Westclox and then Graphic’s in Ladd until her retirement. She was a member of St. Benedict’s Church in Ladd. Surviving are two sisters, Lorraine Steinbach of Collinsville and Ann Koenen of Peru; and several nieces and nephews. She was also preceded in death by two brothers, one sister and three sisters in infancy. A Mass of Christian burial will be at 11 a.m. today, Saturday, in Holy Trinity Church, Cherry, with the Rev. Patrick Fixsen officiating. Burial will be in the Ladd Cemetery. Obituary deadlines Visitation will be one hour prior to the services Deadlines for obituaries are 2 p.m. Monday for Tuestoday, Saturday, in the church. day’s paper, 2 p.m. Wednesday for Thursday’s paper The Hurst Funeral Home in Ladd is handling and 2 p.m. Friday for Saturday’s paper. arrangements.

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6 Perspective 6 • Saturday, May 25, 2013

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Perspective Bureau County

Republican

Serving Bureau County Since 1847

Sam R Fisher

Terri Simon

Publisher

Editor

My favorite story of all When I think back on my journalism career, the number of stories I’ve covered is overwhelming. Spanning the past 20 years or so, I’ve conducted thousands of interviews in and around Bureau County. Thousands. Needless to say, it’s been very interesting, enlightening. I’ve learned so much from so many people. I wish I could remember every single person who has sat across the table from me and my reporter’s notebook, but when I reflect through the Terri Simon years, there are some moments that have etched themselves into my memory ... • Interviewing Michael Jordan in the Chicago Bulls’ locker room. • Countless representatives, senators, governors — even today’s president of the United States, long before he threw his hat in the presidential ring. • Gallant people who have battled cancer and many other diseases, and sadly, just as many brave folks who have fought those same battles and ultimately lost. • Superintendents, CEOs, mayors, board members, trustees ... and their good and difficult moments as they attempt to do what’s right ... in most cases. • Winners and losers of every contest imaginable — both whose voices are important. • People who are ecstatic about a particular event, and those who have been devastated by tragedy or loss. • Storm damage, vehicle crashes, fires ... I guess I could go on and on, and truly, I feel privileged to have been a part of these folks’ lives, trusting me to tell you about themselves. But here’s the reason for this column: In my travels, many people will ask me what my favorite story has been throughout all these years. Which one has touched my soul and caused me to hold that particular interview close to my heart? The answer is easy, and it’s the same response I give to anyone who asks. My favorite story? It’s any story that includes a U.S. veteran. Don’t misunderstand. Those interviews are often the most difficult ones of all, yet when I leave the veteran’s home ... when I sit in front of this computer to write their story ... when I see that story on the pages of this newspaper ... my heart always skips a beat or two, a knot ultimately forms in my throat, and more than once, I’ve wiped a few stray tears away that can’t stop rolling down my cheeks. Veterans’ stories are all very different, yet all the same. Usually, the veteran has no desire to chat with me, which causes me to gently urge the conversation forward. At first we talk about anything but the elephant in the room — his/her military service, but ultimately once that veteran feels comfortable with me, he/she will begin to open up. I know it’s going to happen because almost without exception, I begin to see a faraway look in the veteran’s eyes, almost as if he/she is revisiting moments in their own memory. If I’m lucky and on top of my game, that military person takes me along on the journey. The words are real — often never spoken before. They come slowly, methodically as the memories return. I’ve seen their eyes fill with tears, their chins begin to tremble. I’ve seen the proud men and women relive some horrific moments, in hopes I can capture their words to help you, the reader, understand. Often, there are no need for any words or questions from me; their story from their perspective shouldn’t be interrupted. And then it’s finished. The tears are gone, and the faraway look has vanished. We are back to the present ... and again, I am forever changed by the words of a veteran. Monday is Memorial Day — a day to honor our fallen military men and women, each who had their own story to tell. May we never forget. BCR Editor Terri Simon can be reached at tsimon@ bcrnews.com.

Jennifer Bacorn City you live in: Princeton. Where did you grow up: Princeton. Family: Husband Corey; sons Noah, 6, and Ethan, 4. Pets: A dog named Koda. Occupation: Bureau County Clerk’s office. What is the last song you listened to: Luke Bryan’s “Crash My Party.” What is the last book you read: the “Hunger Games” series.

First Person What is the last TV show you watched: “The Voice.” If you were stranded on a desert island and could only take one thing with you, what would it be: My family. What is your favorite local restaurant: Didoughs. If someone handed you a mil-

lion dollars, how would you spend it: Help my family and friends and as many charities as I can. If you were stranded on a desert island and could have just one meal for the rest of your life, what would it be: Pizza. Pizza is my favorite food, and I try not to have it very often anymore. People would be surprised to know that you: I have lost 100 pounds. What is your favorite thing about the city you live in: The history behind the town. If you could change one thing about your town, what would it be: More job opportunities.

Thanks for our time together They are some of my fondest memories of growing up. My family, which consisted of my parents, my sister, me, and for several years my grandparents, were not a particularly active bunch. Oh, I remember a few summers playing Dad’s Club softball, and we were killer backyard croquet players ... but we were mostly a sedentary bunch. Set us around a table with a deck or two of cards and games of 500, contract rummy, pinochle or — my particular favorite, Demon — would go on for hours and hours. But probably our favorite activity was watching television. Now as hard as this might be for some of you to believe, there used to be just three television stations. And, believe it or not, you either watched a program when it was broadcast, or you waited and hoped for summer reruns. My family, all six of us, would agree on a program and settle in to watch it together. We’d laugh together and talk

Barb Kromphardt COMMENTARY together about the programs and the antics of the characters. We’d watch Westerns and situation comedies together. And family dramas like “The Waltons” and “Little House on the Prairie” were big favorites. And one of our all-time favorites, whether it was on at 9 p.m. Saturdays or Mondays, or 7 p.m. Wednesdays, was “The Carol Burnett Show.” My gosh did she make us laugh. Her and Harvey Korman and Lyle Waggoner and Vicki Lawrence. Oh, and that Tim Conway! Boy, his old man routine cracked us up, right along with watching Harvey try to hold in his laughter. I’m sure the adults in the room might have laughed with a slightly different perspective, but even the kids in the room could appreciate the comedy of Mr. Tudball and Mrs. Wiggins, or the soap opera

parody, As the Stomach Turns. But the movie parodies were the best. Carol as Scarlett O’Hara in “Went With the Wind” with the curtain rod was hysterical, and my favorite was the take-off on an old Bette Davis movie I’d never heard of “A Stolen Life.” Good old Pat commenting on how the foghorn called her name, “Hi, Patsy!” It was recently announced Carol Burnett will receive the 2013 Mark Twain Prize for American Humor. She will join an illustrious group that Richard Pryor, Bill Cosby, Steve Martin, George Carlin, Carl Reiner, Bob Newhart and Tina Fey. I was glad to read the announcement the other day, mostly because of the memories it brought back of my family sitting around the old Zenith. Four of us are gone, and memories are all that I have left. So thanks and congratulations to Carol Burnett. I, too, am so glad we had this time together. BCR Staff Writer Barb Kromphardt can be reached at bkromphardt@bcrnews.com.

Letters Policy The Bureau County Republican will print letters of interest to our readers. Send letters to: Readers opinions, P.O. Box 340, Princeton, IL 61356; fax (815) 875-1235; or email to opinion@bcrnews.com. Letters may be edited for length or clarity. Correct names and hometowns must be included with letters to be published. Telephone numbers are needed to verify the authenticity of letters but will not be published.


7 Wedding & Celebrations Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Saturday, May 25, 2013 • Weddings & Celebrations • 7

2013

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8 Life 8 • Saturday, May 25, 2013

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Life&Arts

Birth announcements — Meet the newest arrivals to the Bureau County Area on Page 9. Birth announcements run each Saturday.

Education — Bureau Valley North students receive hands on experience studying the echinoderms on Page 10.

PROMise sale keeps promise with proceeds

Photo contributed

Fiste speaks to Optimist Club Eagerly awaiting the Festival 56 season is Zack Fiste (left), newly named production director for Festival 56. Fiste was recently introduced to the Optimist Club by club member Gary Browning (right). Fiste has served in various capacities since the inception of Festival 56 and after attending Webster University in Webster Grove, Mo., majoring in stage production he returns with his degree and is ready to continue his work with Festival 56. He explained the many responsibilities he has in putting on the shows.

Community Notes Charity walk MALDEN — Malden Grade School will conduct a charity walk for SIDS of Illinois in honor of Evelyn Longville at the school on Thursday. For more information, call the school at 815-643-2436.

Memorial Day BBQ OHIO — A Memorial Day BBQ will begin at 11:30 a.m. Monday at Ohio High School, 103 Memorial St. The cost is $5 a plate, which includes a hamburger, brat or hot dog, chips, baked beans and drink. Games will follow.

Kick-off event PERU — The American Cancer Society Relay for Life team from Eureka Savings Bank will hold its summer kick-off fundraiser from 5 to 9 p.m. June 4 at MarkAllen’s American Kitchen, 1402 Peoria St. in Peru. The event will include vendors, local artists, raffles, food and a drink special. All proceeds will support the team.

PRINCETON — Each year the teens around the area look forward to attending their prom and, of course, finding that special dress. Proms can be expensive and for many families in today’s financially challenging times can mean disappointment. In an effort to help families deal with the high cost of prom and other fancy occasions, Amy Thompson, a member of the First United Methodist Church of Princeton had an idea. She asked the Church’s Council on Ministries, “What if we ask for prom dress donations and sell them at affordable prices so that anyone who needs a prom dress could buy one? The proceeds from the sale could benefit local benevolences who are involved in helping people.” From that inspired thought the “PROMise Sale” was born. From June 2012 to March 2013 people donated their gently worn special occasion dresses resulting in 566 donated dresses by the day of the sale. Shoes, dresses, handbags, and even wedding and bridesmaids dresses were on display the morning of March 2. “Young ladies, their moms and boyfriends,

Photo contributed

Christine Compton (left) from Living Works Suicide Walk, Amy Thompson “PROMise Sale” organizer, Pastor Tom Ostrander from the First United Methodist Church of Princeton and Pastor Kim Lee-Brown from the Princeton Ministerial Association receive checks from money raised during the sale. lined up before 9 a.m. to insure getting in on the deals,” Thompson said “Girls had smiles from ear to ear as they purchased their dream dress. It was so much fun to watch and be a part of the excitement!” Living Works Suicide Walk and the Princeton Ministerial Association each received a check for $657.40 as Thompson fulfilled her promise to use the proceeds to help the Princeton community. “We are so very grateful to the following businesses for their incredible support and generosity of coupons: Bead Buzz,

Apollo Theater, Guys n’ Gals, Jillian’s, Habanero’s, Marien Mae, Designs by Liana Rae, Skin Dimensions and Le Soleil Tanning,” Thompson said. “Also, gift certificates were offered as door prizes by Prime Quarter restaurant, Mark Allen’s restaurant and Skin Dimensions. The Closet helped the PROMise sale through the use of their clothing racks and Graphic Images of Princeton donated event T-shirts and banners. In addition to Liana Hall donating coupons for alterations she also donated her expertise for the day to assist the young ladies with fashion and alteration advice. The United Methodist Women of the First United Meth• Happy birthday on Monday to Sam Fisher. From odist Church of Princeton provided morning and your friends at Princeton Rotary. • Happy birthday on Monday to my wife, Linda afternoon refreshments.” The PROMise sale has Catton. From you husband, Bob. • Happy birthday Mom. From, Kim and Dianna. • Happy birthday Grandma Catton. From, Kelsey and Andrew.

Make Someone Happy

Meeting cancelled

already been scheduled for next year and it is promised that next year will be bigger and better. Thompson shared this story: “A young lady came in with her family. You could tell that they were struggling financially. The young lady was able to buy a dress, shoes and all of her accessories for $13. Her face said all! She was so excited and beautiful. That is why the PROMise Sale is so important, to give the dream of going to Prom a chance to someone who otherwise might not have the opportunity.” “So, before you stuff that dress back in the closet never be worn again, donate it for the “2014 PROMise Sale”! You never know, your dress may be the ‘one’ to make the difference in someone’s life!”

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Notice to abate weeds, litter, and motor vehicle parts on vacant lots and lots with unoccupied structures. Notice informing all owners and persons in control of any vacant lot or any lot with an unoccupied structure that the growth of weeds and the existence of litter or motor vehicle parts on any such lot is contrary to the ordinances of the village. Should the weeds ever grow to more than ten inches in height, or should litter accumulate or motor vehicle part exist, the village may cut the weeds or remove the litter and motor vehicle parts located thereon without further notice and the owner or person in control shall be liable to the village for its costs. Published in the Bureau County Republican May 25 and June 1, 2013.


9 Life Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Saturday, May 25, 2013 • 9

Gunbergs to note 55th wedding anniversary Mr. and Mrs. Bob Gunberg of Princeton will celebrate their 55th wedding anniversary. Bob Gunberg and the former Carol Ann Vaughan were married May 31, 1958. They are the parents of two children, Barb Metzger of Princeton and Robert Gunberg of Ypslanti, Mich. They also have four grandchildren and one great-grandchild. The couple worships at Bureau Township Church and are very active volunteers. They both help at The Closet, Our Table and Mobile Meals. They love to take bike rides around their neighborhood. Family is important to them, and their love shows in everything they do togeth-

Mr. and Mrs. Bob Gunberg er. They love to travel and visit friends and family. Cards may be sent to the couple at: 2560 Timberline Drive, Princeton, IL 61356.

Starkeys to note 50th wedding anniversary Mr. and Mrs. Jim Starkey of 106 W. Route 6, Seatonville, will celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary. Jim Starkey and the former Nancy Piccatto were married June 1, 1963, in the Seatonville Congregational Church Independent in Seatonville. Their attendants were Patricia Galetti, Betty Croissant, Darwin Croissant and Tom Pottinger. The couple are the parents of three children, Jim (Rachel) Starkey Jr. of Princeton, Ron (Shelly)

Mr. and Mrs. Jim Starkey Starkey of Cedar Point and Laurie (Brian) Ernat of Dimmick. They also have 12 grandchildren.

••• Online anniversary forms are available at www. bcrnews.com/forms.

Words tWisting on the page?

Birthday Party Cook Violet Ruth (Wirick) Cook of Spring Valley recently celebrated her 100th birthday. Violet was born May 15, 1913, in Streator to Violet Cook John and Elizabeth (Peacock) Wirick. She has three daughters, Rosemary Promenschenkel and Elizabeth Moore, both of Streator, and Ruth Irwin of Oglesby. She also has 12 grandchildren, 28 great-grandchildren and 29 greatgreat-grandchildren.

Wine tasting PRINCETON — The fifth annual wine and beer tasting event, sponsored by the American Red Cross of Bureau County, will be from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. June 14 at A Hundred Acre Orchard and Market, two miles west of Princeton off Route 6. Participants will be able to sample beer and wine from around the country and appetizers from local food vendors. The evening will feature an art auction at 7 p.m. and wine pull. Tickets for the wine tasting are $15 in advance or $20 at the door. For advance tickets, call 815-879-2231 or stop by the Prouty Building or Central Bank in Princeton, Spring Valley City Bank or Citizens First State Bank in Walnut.

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Births Announced Aragon Solorio Carlson Armando Adolfo Aragon and Maria de Jesus Solorio of DePue are the parents of a daughter, Amairii Yahaira, born May 14 at St. Margaret’s Hospital in Spring Valley. She weighed 7 pounds, 4 ounces, and measured 19 inches in length. Maternal grandparents are Maria Ramirez and Rafael Solorio of Green Bay, Wis. Paternal grandparents are Maria Evgenia Barajas and Armando Aragon.

Mauch Lane Mauch and Erin Henkel of Mendota are the parents of a daughter born May 18 at Illinois Valley Community Hospital in Peru.

Fry Jeremy and Lori (Romanelli) Fry of LaMoille are the parents of a son, Jeremy Allen, born May 21 at St. Margaret’s Hospital in Spring Valley. He weighed 8 pounds, 12 ounces, and measured 19 1/2 inches in length. He was welcomed home by two brothers, Giovanni, 7, and Edward, 6, and one sister, Jenna, 11. Maternal grandfather is John Romanelli of Arlington. Paternal grandparents are Orville and Denise Fry of LaMoille. Greatgrandparents are Delbert and Sylvia Fetzer of Mendota.

Novero Jason and Gretchen (Conrao) Novero of Spring Valley are the parents of a daughter born May 20 at Illinois Valley Community Hospital in Peru.

Andy and Jennifer (Philhower) Carlson of Lombard are the parents of a daughter, Elyssa Grace, born May 12 at Elmhurst Memorial Hospital in Elmhurst. She weighed 6 pounds, 9 ounces, and measured 20 inches in length. She was welcomed home by two sisters, Emma, 3 1/2, and Eliana, 1 1/2. Maternal grandparents are Dave and Cheryl Philhower of Kasbeer. Paternal grandparents are Alan and Teresa Carlson of Princeton. Greatgrandparents are Marrietta Anderson, Elizabeth Philhower and Marvin Dabler, all of Princeton.

Leon Eddie Leon and Alicia Reyes of DePue are the parents of a daughter, Jazmine Giselle, born May 12 at St. Margaret’s Hospital in Spring Valley. She weighed 6 pounds, 7 ounces, and measured 19 1/2 inches in length.

McCoy Mitch and Katrina (King) McCoy of Princeton are the parents of a daughter, Makaylee Jennae, born May 17 at St. Margaret’s Hospital in Spring Valley. She weighed 7 pounds, 13 ounces, and measured 20 inches in length. She was welcomed home by one sister, Myla McCoy, 2 1/2. Maternal grandparents are Gerald and Jeannie King of Princeton. Paternal grandparents are Dennis and Cindy McCoy of Amboy. Great-grandparents are Verna Lange of Princeton, Walter and Sally King of Princeton, and Donald and Sandra Schamberger of Amboy.

Buffalo Days LaMoille, Illinois

June 7th, 8th & 9th A Family Event! • Live Bands! • A Big Parade! • Buffalo Burgers! FrIday, June 7 4:00 PM 5:00 PM 5:30 PM 6:00 PM 8:00 PM

Fun On The Run Games, $10 Wristbands from 4PM to close Jana’s Fun Fair Furry Friends Petting Zoo, sponsored by AgView FS, LaMoille Lil’ Baby Buff Winners Announced Jr. Miss Prairie Princess Pageant - Grade 6 - 8 Prairie Princess Pageant - Grades 9 - 12 Band “united Grove Theory” in the entertainment Tent

Saturday, June 8 8:00 AM 8:00 AM 11:00 AM 12:00 PM 12:00 PM 1:00 PM 2:00 PM 3:00 PM 8:00 PM 9:00 PM

Antique Tractor Show, Allen Grounds Buffalo Stampede 5K Run/Walk - Registration 7:00 AM at high School Buffalo Day Parade, Main Street Fun On The Run Games, $10 Wristbands all day Vendor Fair and Silent Auction - Allen School Grounds Kiddie Tractor Pull - Outdoor basketball court, Jr. high Band “Al Pottinger and the Lincolnaires” in the entertainment Tent Talent Show - Allen Jr. high Stage Band “Snap Shot” in the entertainment Tent Free Outdoor Big Screen Movie, “The Lorax” West side of the Baptist Church

Sunday, June 9 9:00 AM 12:00 PM 2:00 PM 3:30 PM 5:30 PM

Pancake Breakfast - Lions Club Fun On The Run Games, $10 Wristbands all day Band “The Steve Sharp Band” in the entertainment Tent Live Auction 50/50 Drawing

For more details visit: www.buffalodays.org


10 Life 10 • Life & Arts • Saturday, May 25, 2013

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Photo contributed

Learning about echinoderms Photo contributed

Sgt. Brody Hall thanks Bureau Valley Last November, Bureau Valley South students in Ashley Stabler’s first-grade class wrote servicemen thanking them for their service. U.S. Army Sgt. Brody Hall, originally from Princeton, recently visited the classroom to express his appreciation. Sgt. Hall, an Army Ranger, is a also Ranger instructor for the tactical mountain phases. Hall thanked the class for the cards and told them the soldiers really appreciated them. He explained the decorations on his uniform to the kids, where he has been in the world and what his jobs have been in the Army.

Students in the eighth-grade science classes at Bureau Valley North have been learning about echinoderms. The students were able to get their hands on a sea star, which is one example of an echinoderm, and locate both the external and internal parts.

BCR photo/Hal Adkins

LaMoille names 2013 prom king and queen Garrett Geuther and Brittany Chasteen were named LaMoille High School’s prom king and queen on April 27.

Photo contributed

St. Louis School names April Cyberstars St. Louis School students nominated by their classroom teachers for being good role models of their faith and for good manners during the month of April are (from left) Corbin Sluis, Merrick Davis, Michaela Crowe, Hallie Taets, Christian Harmon and James Erwin.

CANAL FUN DAY

Monday, May 27th

Hosted by: Tiskilwa Community Association & Illinois Valley Whitetails Unlimited Sponsored by: The Bureau County Republican

Saturday - June 1, 2013 8:00 am to 12:00 pm $

14 ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT .99

“Grill Out Food” • 10:30am - 9pm Tax & gratuity not included.

paradicecasino.com If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, crisis counseling and referral services can be accessed by calling 1-800-GAMBLER (1-800-426-2537).

Hennepin Canal Lock 11 Day Use Area 2 Miles North of Tiskilwa Registration begins at 8:00 am Fishing Derby 9:00 - 11:00 am • Lunch at 11:00 am Prizes Awarded after Lunch Bring your lawn chairs and fishing equipment. Some bait will be available.

• FISHING DERBY • FREE FOOD • DOOR PRIZES • MINNOW GUESSING CONTEST • CASTING CONTEST • CRITTER RACES • SCAVENGER HUNT


11 Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Saturday, May 25, 2013 • 11

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12 12 • Saturday, May 25, 2013

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

THANK yOu for your support of

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13 Sports Saturday, May 25, 2013 • 13 Summer camp guide — See page 15 for a list of upcoming area summer sports camps.

Seneca Sectional: Beecher 5, St. Bede 2

Beecher picks off Bruins at sectional By Kevin Hieronymus

“We did some things we haven’t done all year” • John Bellino, St. Bede coach

khieronymus@bcrnews.com

SENECA — The St. Bede Bruins had a great baseball season, winning its first nine games of the year, taking a 17-2 record into the postseason. Thursday was not one of those great days. The Bruins committed five errors in the field, had two runners picked off first base and two more runners thrown out at the plate, dropping the Seneca 2A sectional semifinal to Beecher 5-2. “Got to give them a lot of credit. We did not play as well as we can, but we did not get the big hits today. We’ve been struggling with the bats lately, just didn’t seem to be in sync,” St. Bede coach John Bellino said. “We had some chances early and just didn’t execute. We did some things we haven’t done all year. The ones at first (base), I don’t understand. It happens. They executed.” St. Bede catcher Logan Bima homered with one out in the bottom of the second to tie the game at 1, a blast well over the right field fence.

The next batter, Brandon Pietrowski was hit by a pitch and Jake Postula then hit a bloop single to load the bases with one out. DH Stephen Ebener forced Postula at second and was then picked off first base as the Bobcats escaped a bases-loaded jam. In the third, Bobby Morrow doubled and Sam Lucas was hit by a pitch. Brad Groleau lined a double off the Irish cloverleaf marker on the right field fence, triggering a Bruin relay around the bases. Morrow slid in safely with Lucas on his tail. The Bobcats executed a 9-3-2 relay to gun down Lucas at the plate. Beecher used another relay in the fourth, this one via a 7-5-2 connection, to throw out Postula at the plate after a double by Ebener.

See Bruins Page 15

BCR photo/Kevin Hieronymus

Sam Lucas tries to follow St. Bede teammate Sam Lucas into homeplate on a third-inning double by Brad Groleau, but was tagged out by Beecher catcher Michael Takacs Thursday at Seneca. Morrow scored to give the Bruins a 2-1 lead.

BCR photos

Bureau Valley’s Logan Hoffert (left) and Hall senior Landon Piccatto compete in the heat of the 300 hurdles in Thursday’s prelims of the IHSA 1A State Track and Field Meet at O’Brien Stadium in Charleston. Hoffert won the heat with a time of 40.27, fifth overall. Piccatto did not advance. Hoffert also advanced in the triple jump and as a member of the Storm’s 4x400 relay. Finals will be held Saturday.

Hoffert batting a thousand By Kevin Hieronymus khieronymus@bcrnews.com

CHARLESTON – If Logan Hoffert was playing baseball, he’d be batting one thousand competing in the IHSA Class 1A Boys State Track and Field Meet. The Bureau Valley senior went three for three in Thursday’s prelims at O’Brien Stadium on the campus of Eastern Illinois University, qualifying in all three events he competed in — the triple jump, the 300 hurdles and the 4x400 relay. Hoffert will be joined in Saturday’s 1A finals, looking to make his way up to the medal stand, with teammates Ryan Taylor, Tucker Schoff and Daniel Trone in the 4x400 and with St. Bede’s Steven Gualandri in the 300 hurdles. Hall sophomore Al Baldonado will run in Saturday’s finals of the 3200 meters, which has no prelims. Princeton’s Austen Stewart will represent Bureau County in the 2A finals competing in the high jump. “It was an unbelievable day,” said Hoffert, who added he didn’t dream he’d make it in all three events. “I didn’t think I’d make it in the triple jump. I was just happy to be there.” Hoffert was first in his flight and sixth overall in the triple jump with a personal best of 42-10 1/2 and won his heat of the 300

“It was an unbelievable day. I didn’t think I’d make it in the triple jump. I was just happy to be there.” • Logan Hoffert, BVHS senior hurdles, ranked fifth overall with a time of 40.27. He also ran the lead leg of the 4x400 relay that finished third in its heat with time of 3:32.11 to grab the ninth and last spot in the finals, just 0.14 seconds ahead of Newton. All in all, a good day’s work. “Logan being ranked sixth going into the finals in the triple is great. He had a personal best and started his day off on the right foot,”BV coach Nick Hartz said. “Ever since conference, I’ve just been going up,” said Hoffert, who had a personal best by five inches. “I’m peaking at the right time, I couldn’t be happier about it.” Hoffert’s 300 race, Hartz said, was a great one, despite competitors falling like dominoes around him. “He ran smart and while he had kids falling around him, he stayed focused and finished strong,” Hartz said.

See State Page 14

State scorecard Area state track and field finalists

Bureau Valley (1A): Logan Hoffert (triple jump, 1st in flight, 6th overall, 42-10 1/2; 300 hurdles, 1st in heat, 4th overall, 40.27); 4x400 relay (3rd in heat, 9th overall, 3:32.11). Hall (1A): Al Baldonado (no prelims; seeded 20th in 3200, 10:00.47). Princeton (2A): Austen Stewart (high jump, cleared 6-3). St. Bede (1A): Steven Gualandri (300 hurdles, 2nd in heat, 6th overall, 40.42).

Non-finalists

Amboy/LaMoille (1A): Cooper Nelson (300 hurdles, 3rd in heat, 11th overall, 41.24). Bureau Valley (1A): Kristian Konneck (200, 8th in heat, 27th overall, 23.61); 4x800 relay (6th in heat, 15th overall, 8:36.1). Hall (1A): Landon Piccatto (triple jump, 10th in heat, 18th overall, 41-0 3/4; 300 hurdles, 9th in heat, 33rd overall, 43.76).

St. Bede’s Steven Gualandri advanced in the 300 hurdles.

Down the Fairway

Spring Creek Junior Golf Program set for 2013 By Kevin Hieronymus khieronymus@bcrnews.com

The 2013 Spring Creek Junior Golf Program will kick off with the Junior Golf Camp from June 3-7. Beginners will meet from 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. and intermediates from 9:45 to 10:45 a.m.

A new high school shortgame clinic is being offered the week of June 3-7 with three lessons for $45. A complimentary golf clinic will be held at 4 p.m. on June 4. The junior golf league will be held June 10, June 14, June 24, June 28 and July 1. Spring Creek will hold sever-

al junior tournaments including the Illinois Valley Junior Golf Championship on July 30. For more information, call the pro shop at 815-894-2137 or visit www.springcreek-golfcourse.com. • Bruin Golf Classic: The 17th annual Bruin Golf Classic, sponsored by the St. Bede

Academy Bedan Club, will be played June 1 at Spring Creek Golf Course in Spring Valley. All proceeds will be used to support the mission of St. Bede Academy.  The event includes 18 holes of golf, cart rental, lunch, dinner, refreshments and a gift. Awards will be given in men’s

and women’s divisions. Checkin will be at 10:30 a.m. followed by lunch and a shotgun start at 11:30 p.m. with a four person scramble format. Cost is $80 payable by May 30. Please register by contacting Dave Montez at 815-664-

See Golf Page 18


14 Sports 14 • Sports • Saturday, May 25, 2013

State

From Page 13 Taylor was determined to get the Storm’s 4x400 relay into the finals after missing out in the 4x800. It becomes the first relay in school history to qualify for finals. “It was awesome to make it because it was really close. It’s definitely going to be remembered,” said Taylor, who ran the second leg of the Storm’s relay. “That means so much to me. I know we were all so happy,” Hoffert said. “There’s been so many great relays in BV history. It’s an honor to be the first BV relay to medal. I’m just so grateful.” “I’m so proud of all the boys. Just a great day,” Hartz said. Gualandri placed second in the first heat of the 300 hurdles, sixth overall with a time of 40.42 to take his spot alongside Hoffert in Saturday’s finals. The best time of the day in the 300 hurdles belonged to Trenton Wesclin senior Jason Bliven, who clocked a 40.03 in the third heat. Hall senior Landon Piccatto (triple jump, 300 hurdles) failed to advance as did Bureau Valley senior Kristian Konneck (200).

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

2A prelims: Princeton’s Stewart was one of 14 competitors in 2A to clear 6-3 in the high jump, to advance to Saturday’s finals. The top nine will be medal. Stewart placed fourth in 2011 in Class 1A and is happy to get another shot at a state medal. “I’m just glad to make it back here again and having a great time doing something I love,” Stewart said. “My jumps felt really good today and some of the technical mistakes I made at sectionals I didn’t make today and I’m just hoping that continues (Saturday.” “What a great accomplishment. It was like 9 o’clock and he was already in the finals. A big relief,” PHS coach Dan Foes said. “We didn’t know what the height was going to be and it turned out to be 6-3, certainly a comfortable height for him. A great accomplishment for a great kid.” Notes: When told he better medal to keep up with his sister, Lindsey, once again, who placed third in the long jump in last week’s girls State finals, Hoffert laughed, and “She’s a great athlete and I love her to death.” Comment on this story at www.bcrnews.com

Junior high track

Tradition runs at Ladd, St. Louis By Kevin Hieronymus khieronymus@bcrnews.com

Shaw Media Service photos/Alex Paschall

Princeton’s Austen Stewart (above) soars in 2A high jump while Ryan Taylor (below left) helped the Bureau Valley 4x4 relay run down a state finals berth.

Tradition was continued in junior high track this spring. Madi Quinn has had quite the run for Ladd Grade School. She has qualified for the ISEA State Track and Field Meet in the hurdles every year since fifth grade. She has medaled in both the hurdles and vault since the sixth grade. The Ladd girls have placed in the top Lydia Mead 14 teams at State the past two years, finishing 13th out of 61 teams this year. Quinn was the Bureau County hurdles champion with a time of 17 seconds. Lydia Mead continued school tradition for Princeton St. Louis, qualifying for IESA 1A competition in the 800 meters with a time of 2:41 at the recent Sectional Meet at Hall High School. This is the seventh year in a row that St. Louis School has had qualifying students attend state in this event.

See Junior high Page 18

Photo contributed

State track and field qualifiers for Malden Grade Schools were (kneeling, left) Aleesha Foster and Kendra Cain; (and standing) Austin Henderliter, Taylor Hall, Jayda Ramsey and Mikayla Wilhelm

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15 Sports Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Saturday, May 25, 2013 • Sports • 15

Bruins

From Page 13 The Bruins base-running woes continued in the fifth when Beecher’s Zach Aring used the ol’ fake to third, throw to first to pick off Groleau to get out of a basesloaded jam. “Those are momentum killers and they give more momentum to us, especially when they have runners on third base,” Beecher coach Brandon Dubois said, noting Aring calls the pick-off plays on his own. Beecher scored three runs on three hits in the fifth, helped by an errant Bruin pick-off play, to take a 4-2 lead. Third baseman Mike Pignatello had the big blow with a two-run double to chase a tiring Bruin starter Damin Smith from the mound. “(Smith) didn’t have his good stuff. Don’t ask me why. He had plenty of rest. He was able to keep them in bay. You keep a team to five runs you’re supposed to win,” Bellino said. The Bobcats used three Bruin errors to add a run in the seventh to go up 5-2. Down to their last out, the Bruins mounted a two-out rally in the bottom of the seventh. Morrow singled and Lucas walked. When the count reached 3-0 on Groleau, Beecher coach Brandon Dubois elected to take the bat out of the Bruins’ No. 3 hitter’s hands. The intentional walk

Diamond roundup

PC to play for two sectional titles By BCR Sports Staff sports@bcrnews.com

BCR photo/Kevin Hieronymus

St. Bede senior catcher Logan Bima gets a warm welcome after slugging a second-inning homer Thursday at Seneca. put the tying run on base, but Aring retired clean-up hitter Austin Schwab on a fielder’s choice to end the game. “That 3 hitter, I thought he was pretty much on everything. I didn’t want Zach to lay one down the middle that he turns on it, maybe he hits a double and two runs score,” Dubois said. “I felt the hitter behind him wasn’t as strong and I decided to put him on, especially when it’s 3-0. I was debating on it when he started the at-bat, but once it got 3-0 I put them on.” With the loss, the Bruins end their season at 19-3, ending a successful run for the seniors who left their mark on the Bruins’ program. St. Bede will return just two juniors from this year’s team. “Great season, great bunch of kids. Great seniors. We’re going to miss them,” Bellino said. “Obviously we don’t have

too many coming back. Some of the seniors, been with me three years, some of them for two years. They’ve been a good bunch.” Beecher evened its record to .500 at 14-14, awaiting the winner of Friday’s semifinal between Chicago Christian and El Paso-Gridley in Saturday’s finals. “At this point records are out the window. We’re what 3-0 now, 3-0,” said Dubois, adding it feels surreal to reach the sectional finals. • Notes: Spring Valley native Ken Colmone, a 1981 graduate of Hall High School, is the head coach at El PasoGridley, who faced Chicago Christian in Friday’s sectional semifinal. His Comets handed St. Bede its first loss (5-4) of the year on April 22. Colmone guided the Comets golf team to a state runner-up finish last fall.

The Putnam County baseball and softball teams will play for a double play Saturday. Both have reached the Sweet 16 and will play in Saturday’s sectional finals. Host Putnam County scored all 10 runs in the third inning to break open Thursday’s 1A sectional baseball semifinals, defeating Chicago Holy Trinity 11-0. The Panthers will face Grant Park at 1 p.m. Saturday in Hennepin. In softball, PC pitcher Shelby Yepsen blanked 3-0 to send the Lady Panthers BCR photo/Dixie Schroeder into Saturday’s sectional finals in Varna vs. PC’s Xavier Warren gets Newark at 11 a.m. At Monmouth: Annawan/Wethersfield flipped at the plate Thursday. PC upended Holy defeated Aledo Mercer County 7-1 in the Monmouth 2A baseball sectionals, advanc- Trinity 11-0 to advance to ing to Saturday’s finals against Eureka. sectional finals.

Summer camp guide PHS summer soccer

PRINCETON — The Princeton Tiger soccer team will be meeting at 5 p.m. at the old children’s home practice field on Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays in June and from July 8-18. The Tigers will play at Byron on July 18 and travel to the Bradley Team Camp July 21-25. For more information, contact coach Jason Bird at 815-719-0086.

Hall basketball camp

SPRING VALLEY — There will be four sessions for the 2013 Hall Red Devils Basketball Camp. The high school camps will run from 9 a.m. to noon June 3-7, June 10-14 and June 17-21. The junior high camp will meet from 10:30 a.m. to noon June 17-21. Forms are available at the school office. For more information, contact coach Mike Filippini at 815-664-2100, ext. 229.

are limited this year. Brochures are available at PHS. For more information, contact coach Andy Puck at 815-8753308 or 815-878-1418.

PHS girls basketball camp

PRINCETON — The 2013 Princeton Tigresses Basketball Camp will be held July 8-11 at Logan Junior High School. There are sessions for grades 3-5, grades 6-8, grades 9-12. Cost is $55. Registration forms are available at all area schools. For more information, contact PHS at 815-875-3308.

PHS boys basketball camp

PRINCETON — The 2013 Princeton Tiger Basketball Camp will be held June 10-13 at Princeton High School. There are sessions for grades 3-5, grades 6-8, grades 9-10 and grades 11-12. Cost is $55. Registration forms are available at PHS and are due by June 3. For more information, contact PHS at 815-875-3308.

PHS volleyball camp

PRINCETON — The 2013 Princeton Tigresses Volleyball Camp will be held June 10-13 at Logan Junior High School. There are sessions for grades 4-6, grades 7-8, grades 9-10 and varsity. Cost is $65 or $50 per camper from the same family. Due to a change of location, camp spots

BV volleyball camp

MANLIUS — The Bureau Valley Volleyball Camp will be held June 10-13 for girls entering grades 3-12. Cost is $40. For more information, contact coach Abbi Bosnich at 815-343-9597.

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16 16 • Saturday, May 25, 2013

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

ANNUAL DRINKING WATER QUALITY REPORT

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of The sources of drinking water (both tap water and Spring Valley’s Water Quality Report will contaminants does not necessarily indicate that bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, not be hand delivered this year. Copies are ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water water poses a health risk. More information about available at the City Clerk’s office at travels over the surface of the land or through the contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPAs Safe Drinking Water ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals 215 North Greenwood Street. Hotline at (800) 426-4791. and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can In order to ensure that tap water is safe to pickup substances resulting from the presence of drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit the animals or from human activity. SPRING VALLEY amount of certain contaminants in water provided Contaminants that may be present in source water IL0111000 by public water systems. FDA regulations establish include: limits for contaminants in bottled water which Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and Annual Water Quality Report for the period of January 1 to must provide the same protection for public bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment December 31, 2012 health. plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock This report is intended to provide you with important Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants operations, and wildlife. information about your drinking water and the efforts made in drinking water than the general population. by the water system to provide safe drinking water. Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result The source of drinking water used by undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS from urban storm water runoff, industrial or or other immune system disorders, some elderly and domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas SPRING VALLEY is Ground Water infants can be particularly at risk from production, mining, or farming. For more information regarding this report contact: infections. These people should seek advice about Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a drinking water from their health care providers. variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm CITY OF SPRING VALLEY EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen water runoff, and residential uses. the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other 815-664-4221 Organic chemical contaminants, including microbial contaminants are available from the Safe or synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). by-products of industrial processes and petroleum If present, elevated levels of lead can cause TEST, Inc. production, and can also come from gas stations, serious health problems, especially for pregnant 815-224-1650 urban storm water runoff, and septic systems. women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre Radioactive contaminants, which can be associated with service lines and home plumbing. el agua que usted bebe. Tradúzcalo ó hable con alguien naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas We cannot control the variety of materials used in que lo entienda bien. production and mining activities. plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the Source Water Information potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for Source Water Name Type of Water Report Status Location drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your A W. SECOND ST. WELL 10 (11379) GW ________ ________________________________________ water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to A 10 PONSETTI DR. WELL 11 (11380) GW ________ ________________________________________ minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead. Source Water Assessment We want our valued customers to be informed about their water quality. If you would like to learn more, please feel welcome to attend any of our regularly scheduled meetings. The source water assessment for our supply has been completed by the Illinois EPA. If you would like a copy of this information, please stop by City Hall or call our water operator at __________________. To view a summary version of the completed Source Water Assessments, including: Importance of 815-224-1650 Source Water; Susceptibility to Contamination Determination; and documentation/recommendation of Source Water Protection Efforts, you may access the Illinois EPA website at http://www.epa.state.il.us/cgi-bin/wp/swap-fact-sheets.pl.

Source of Drinking Water

NOTICE SPRING VALLEY RESIDENTS

Based on information obtained in a Well Site Survey published in 1992 by the Illinois EPA, several potential secondary sources with in 1,000 feet of the wells were indentified.The Illinois EPA has determined that the Spring Valley Community Water Supply's source water is not susceptible to contamination. This determination is based on a number of criteria including: monitoring conducted at the wells, monitoring conducted at the entry point to the distribution system, available hydrogeologic data on the wells, and land use activities proximate to the wells..Furthermore, in anticipation of the U.S. EPA's proposed Ground Water Rule, the Illinois EPA has determined that the Spring Valley Community Water Supply is not vulnerable to viral contamination. This determination is based upon the evaluation of the following criteria during the Vulnerability Waiver Process: the community's wells are properly constructed with sound integrity and proper siting conditions; a hydrogeologic barrier exists which should prevent pathogen movement; all potential routes and sanitary defects have been mitigated such that the source water is adequately protected; monitoring data did not indicate a history of disease outbreak; and the sanitary survey of the water supply did not indicate a viral contamination threat. Because the community's wells are constructed in a confined aquifer, which should prevent the movement of pathogens into the wells, well hydraulics was not considered to be a significant factor in the susceptibility determination. Hence, well hydraulics were not evaluated for this ground water supply.

2012

Lead and Copper

Regulated Contaminants Detected

Definitions: Action Level Goal (ALG): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. ALGs allow for a margin of safety. Action Level: The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow. Date Sampled MCLG Action Level 90th # Sites Over Units Violation Likely Source of Contamination Lead and Copper (AL) Percentile AL Copper

09/13/2011

1.3

1.3

0.0258

0

ppm

N

Lead

09/13/2011

0

15

5.39

1

ppb

N

Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives; Corrosion of household plumbing systems. Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits.

Water Quality Test Results

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal or MCLG: The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety. Maximum Contaminant Level or MCL:

The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

Maximum residual disinfectant level goal or MRDLG:

The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.

Maximum residual disinfectant level or MRDL:

The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.

Definitions:

The following tables contain scientific terms and measures, some of which may require explanation.

ppb:

micrograms per liter or parts per billion - or one ounce in 7,350,000 gallons of water.

na:

not applicable.

Avg:

Regulatory compliance with some MCLs are based on running annual average of monthly samples.

ppm:

milligrams per liter or parts per million - or one ounce in 7,350 gallons of water.

Regulated Contaminants Disinfectants and Disinfection ByProducts Chlorine

Collection Date

Highest Level Range of Levels Detected Detected

12/31/2012

1

0.6 - 0.9333

Haloacetic Acids HAA5

09/13/2011

1.59

1.59 - 1.59

Fluoride

10/12/2011

1.16

1.16 - 1.16

Iron

10/12/2011

0.049

0.049 - 0.049

Sodium

10/12/2011

86

86 - 86

Radioactive Contaminants

Collection Date

Combined Radium 226/228

05/24/2011

2.16

Gross alpha excluding radon and uranium

04/24/2008

2.2

MCLG

MCL

Units

MRDLG = 4

MRDL = 4

ppm

Violation Likely Source of Contamination N

Water additive used to control microbes.

No goal for 60 ppb N By-product of drinking water disinfection the total Not all sample results may have been used for calculating the Highest Level Detected because some results may be part of an evaluation to determine where compliance sampling should occur in the future Total Trihalomethanes 09/13/2011 15.32 15.32 - 15.32 No goal for 80 ppb N By-product of drinking water disinfection (TTHM) the total Not all sample results may have been used for calculating the Highest Level Detected because some results may be part of an evaluation to determine where compliance sampling should occur in the future Collection Highest Level Range of Levels MCLG MCL Units Violation Likely Source of Contamination Inorganic Date Detected Detected Contaminants

Highest Level Range of Levels Detected Detected

4

4.0

ppm

N

Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories.

1.0

ppm

N

This contaminant is not currently regulated by the USEPA. However, the state regulates. Erosion of natural deposits.

ppm

N

Erosion from naturally occuring deposits: Used in water softener regeneration.

MCLG

MCL

Units

Violation Likely Source of Contamination

2.16 - 2.16

0

5

pCi/L

N

Erosion of natural deposits.

2.2 - 2.2

0

15

pCi/L

N

Erosion of natural deposits.


17 Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Saturday, May 25, 2013 • 17

ANNUAL DRINKING WATER QUALITY REPORT Source of Drinking Water

DE PUE IL0110300 Annual Water Quality Report for the period of January 1 to December 31, 2012 This report is intended to provide you with important information about your drinking water and the efforts made by the water system to provide safe drinking water. The source of drinking water used by DE PUE is Ground Water

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pickup substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include: Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife. Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPAs Safe Drinking Water Hotline at (800) 426-4791. In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. FDA regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health. Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population.

Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS Bruce Yuvan Name _________________________________________ or other immune system disorders, some elderly and infants can be particularly at risk from 815-878-2117 Phone _________________________________________ Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a infections. These people should seek advice about variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen water runoff, and residential uses. the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other Organic chemical contaminants, including microbial contaminants are available from the Safe synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). by-products of industrial processes and petroleum el agua que usted bebe. Tradúzcalo ó hable con alguien If present, elevated levels of lead can cause production, and can also come from gas stations, que lo entienda bien. serious health problems, especially for pregnant urban storm water runoff, and septic systems. women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components Radioactive contaminants, which can be associated with service lines and home plumbing. naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas We cannot control the variety of materials used in production and mining activities. plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the Source Water Information potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for Source Water Name Type of Water Report Status Location drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your WELL 2 (11336) GW ________ ________________________________________ water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe WELL 3 (11337) GW ________ ________________________________________ Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead. Source Water Assessment We want our valued customers to be informed about their water quality. If you would like to learn more, please feel welcome to attend any of our regularly scheduled meetings. The source water assessment for our supply has been completed by the Illinois EPA. If you would like a copy of this information, please stop by City Hall or call our water operator at __________________. To view a summary version of the completed Source Water Assessments, including: Importance of 815-878-2117 Source Water; Susceptibility to Contamination Determination; and documentation/recommendation of Source Water Protection Efforts, you may access the Illinois EPA website at http://www.epa.state.il.us/cgi-bin/wp/swap-fact-sheets.pl. For more information regarding this report contact:

Based on information obtained in a Well Site Survey published in 1989 by the Illinois EPA, one "potential" source is located within 1,000 feet of the wells.The Illinois EPA has determined that the Depue Community Water Supply's source water is not suspectibile to contamination. This determination is based on a number of including: monitoring conducted at the wells; monitoring conducted at the entry point to the distribution system; available hydrogeologic data on the wells; and land use proximite to the wells.Furthermore, in anticipation of the U.S. EPA's proposed Ground Water Rule, the Illinois EPA has determined that the Depue Community Water Supply is not vulneraible to viral contamination. This determination is based upon the evaluation of the following criteria during the Vulnerability Waiver Process: the community's wells are properly constructed with sound integrity and proper siting conditions; a hydrogeologic barrier exists which should prevent pathogen movement; all potential routes and sanitary defects have been mitigated such that the source water is adequately protected; monitoring data did not indicate a history of disease outbreak; and the sanitary survey of the water supply did not indicate a viral contamination threat. Because the community's wells are constructed in a confined aquifer, which should prevent the movement of pathogens into the wells, well hydraulics was not considered to be a significant factor in the susceptibility determination.

2012

Lead and Copper

Regulated Contaminants Detected

Definitions: Action Level Goal (ALG): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. ALGs allow for a margin of safety. Action Level: The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow. Lead and Copper Date Sampled MCLG Action Level 90th # Sites Over Units Violation Likely Source of Contamination (AL) Percentile AL Copper

1.3

1.3

0.241

0

ppm

N

Water Quality Test Results

Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives; Corrosion of household plumbing systems.

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal or MCLG: The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

Maximum Contaminant Level or MCL:

The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

Maximum residual disinfectant level goal or MRDLG:

The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.

Maximum residual disinfectant level or MRDL:

The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.

Definitions:

The following tables contain scientific terms and measures, some of which may require explanation.

ppb:

micrograms per liter or parts per billion - or one ounce in 7,350,000 gallons of water.

na:

not applicable.

Avg:

Regulatory compliance with some MCLs are based on running annual average of monthly samples.

ppm:

milligrams per liter or parts per million - or one ounce in 7,350 gallons of water.

Regulated Contaminants Disinfectants and Disinfection ByProducts

Collection Date

Highest Level Range of Levels Detected Detected

MCLG

MCL

Units

MRDLG = 4

MRDL = 4

ppm

Violation Likely Source of Contamination

Chlorine

12/31/2012

1.3

0.085 - 1.5

Haloacetic Acids HAA5

09/19/2011

1.48

1.48 - 1.48

0.022

0.022 - 0.022

2

2

ppm

N

Discharge of drilling wastes; Discharge from metal refineries; Erosion of natural deposits.

1.01

0.982 - 1.01

4

4.0

ppm

N

Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories.

0.074

0.074 - 0.074

1.0

ppm

N

This contaminant is not currently regulated by the USEPA. However, the state regulates. Erosion of natural deposits.

1

0.843 - 0.843

10

ppm

N

Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sewage; Erosion of natural deposits.

238

141 - 238

ppm

N

Erosion from naturally occuring deposits: Used in water softener regeneration.

0.011

0.011 - 0.011

N

This contaminant is not currently regulated by the USEPA. However, the state regulates. Naturally occurring; discharge from metal

N

Water additive used to control microbes.

No goal for 60 ppb N By-product of drinking water disinfection the total Not all sample results may have been used for calculating the Highest Level Detected because some results may be part of an evaluation to determine where compliance sampling should occur in the future Total Trihalomethanes 08/09/2011 13.5 13.5 - 13.5 No goal for 80 ppb N By-product of drinking water disinfection (TTHM) the total Not all sample results may have been used for calculating the Highest Level Detected because some results may be part of an evaluation to determine where compliance sampling should occur in the future Inorganic Collection Highest Level Range of Levels MCLG MCL Units Violation Likely Source of Contamination Contaminants Date Detected Detected Barium Fluoride Iron Nitrate [measured as Nitrogen] Sodium Zinc Radioactive Contaminants Combined Radium 226/228

Collection Date

Highest Level Range of Levels Detected Detected 1

1.02 - 2.06

10

5

5

ppm

MCLG

MCL

Units

0

5

pCi/L

Violation Likely Source of Contamination N

Erosion of natural deposits.


18 MP 18 • Sports • Saturday, May 25, 2013

Golf

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

From Page 13

4668, sending a check payable to St. Bede Academy to Dave Montez at 610 North Mary Street, Spring Valley, IL, 61356 or registering at Spring Creek, 815-894-2137. Young Life Golf: The Young Life is sponsoring a golf fundraiser on June 7 at Hunter’s Ridge Golf Course. The goal is to raise $15,000 for Young Life, a Christian organization for area youth. Golfers participating in the event who are taking donations include: Luke Heaton, Jim Scruggs, Norm Femrite, Rick Peacock, Ken Musselman, Buc Grey, Ron Behrends, Lisa Petersen, Sue Haley, Jeff Hunt, Chris Ringenberg, Dave Enbom and Scott Smith. Make checks payable to Young Life at PO Box 83, Princeton. For more information, contact Buc Grey at 815-878-5874. PMH scramble: The Perry Memorial Hospital Foundation Annual Golf Scramble will be held June 14 at Hunter’s Ridge Golf Course with a noon shotgun start. Registration begins at 11 am. The fee is $90 per person which includes green fees, cart, gift for each golfer, door prizes, raffle prizes and dinner. For more information, contact Denny Miller at 815-876-4495. • Jimmy D Golf Day: The 31st Annual Jimmy D Golf Day will be held July 14 at Spring Creek and Deer Park Country Club in Oglesby. The outing is named for Jimmy DeAngelo, who died in 1983 art the age of 37 after fighting cancer. The proceeds from this event will be devoted to the building of the surgical center currently under construction at St. Margaret’s Hospital. Last year’s event raised $20,480 and in 30 years has raised more than $620,000. The golfer donation is $90 prepaid or $100 if paid on July 14, which includes cart rental, green fees, refreshment and door prizes. Golfers will play in sixsomes. For more information, call Diane Janz at 815664-7260. • Big I Junior Classic: The Hartauer Insurance Agency will sponsors a qualifying

General Terms and Policies The Bureau County Republican reserves the right to classify correctly, edit, reject or cancel any advertisement at any time in accordance with its policy. All ads must be checked for errors by the advertiser, on the first day of publication. We will be responsible for the first incorrect insertion, and its liabilities shall be limited to the price on one insertion. LINE AD DEADLINES: • Tuesday, BCR deadline Monday 9 am • Thursday, BCR and BCR Journal deadline Tuesday, 12 pm • Saturday, BCR deadline Friday, 9 am We Accept 815-875-4461 Need To Get The Word Out? We Can Help You Get It Out Right Here! Give Us A Call 815-875-4461

Junior high

PHS basketball meetings

- 200 Employment 228 • Help Wanted DETASSELERS NEEDED! Check this site for upcoming training dates: www. bickettdonnerhelms.com Malden Grade School is seeking applicants for VOLLEYBALL COACH. Contact Mike Patterson for additional information, 815-643-2436 or mikepatt30@gmail.com

FIND IT RIGHT HERE!

From Page 14

PRINCETON — There will be a meeting for all boys (incoming freshman through seniors) interested in playing basketball at Princeton High School at 3 p.m. Wednesday in the auditorium. See coach Jesse Brandt, coach Michael Fredericks, or coach Eric Tinley with any questions. There will also be a meeting for all girls (incoming freshman through seniors) interested in playing basketball at PHS at 3 p.m. Tuesday in the school cafeteria. Call coach Kevin Hieronymus at 815-866-9402 with any questions.

Chamber outing Princeton Chamber of Commerce Director Kim Frey (left) and chamber ambassadors Katrina Corrie and Amy Johnson measure the closest golf ball to the hole after a golf ball drop from a helicopter at the annual chamber golf outing on May 17. Ryne Sondgeroth was the winner of the golf ball drop and took home $1,000. tournament for the 45th Trusted Choice B I Junior Classic on June 21 at Spring Creek. The tournament is open for all junior golfers whose birthday does not occur before August. Winners of the event will earn a spot in the Illinois finals in Pekin. Entry forms are available at local golf courses or by contacting Dick Martuzzo at 815-223-1795. • Braida Memorial: The 4th annual Jay Braida Memorial Golf Open will be held July 13 at Hunter’s Ridge. This year’s recipient is Danny Gelsomino, a 1987 Princeton High School graduate and father of two battling cancer. Entry fee is $60, including 18 holes of golf, cart, dinner and prizes. Dinner ticket is $15. Used golf balls and prizes are needed. For more information, visit jaybraidamemorial@gmail.com or check their Facebook page.

228 • Help Wanted AWESOME SUMMER JOB Team Corn Detasseling is hiring workers for Summer Detasseling. Work with your friends this summer. Local Pick-Up Sites in Wyanet, Princeton, Spring Valley, DePue, Malden, Ohio & Ladd. Age 12 and up. Earn from $7.75 to $10 per hour depending on your ability. Attendance Bonus Available. Season starts around July 5th to 10th and runs 8 to 15 days. Transportation Provided. For applications call: 866-898-8326 or 815875-8100 or on the web at: www.Teamcorn.com

Be Apart of Something Special. Join our Team Today!

• Warehouse & Delivery • Sales & Design Please apply at 200 N. Main St. Kewanee, IL or send your resume to employees@goodsfurniture.com

Scoreboard

Mead placed 22nd in at the IESA State Track Meet in East Peoria. • LaMoille’s Bret Dannis became the third IESA seventh-grade champion from Allen School, joining discus throwers Russell Buettner (2010) and Cory Schallhorn (1999). • Area coaches are reminded to submit season’s bests to be included in the annual BCR Honor Roll as well as pictures of state qualifiers.

Softball

Midland 1A Sectional

Baseball

Gardner 1A Sectional (moved to Hennepin)

Thursday: Grant Park 5, Arlington Heights Christian Liberty Academy 3 Putnam County 11, Chicago Holy Trinity 0 Saturday: Title - Putnam County (18-9) vs. Grant Park (16-5), 10 a.m. Lisle 1A Super-Sectional Monday: winners Gardner, Hanover sectionals 1 p.m. Seneca 2A Sectional

Thursday: Beecher 5, St. Bede 2. Friday: Game 2 - Palos Heights Chicago Christian (30-6) vs. El Paso-Gridley (20-3). Saturday: Title - Beecher (14-14) vs. winners 2, 2 p.m. Beecher 100 030 1 - 5 4 0 St. Bede 011 000 0 - 2 9 5 WP: Aring (7ip, 9h, 2r, 2er, 6k, 3w, 2hbp). LP: Smith (4.1ip, 4h, 4er, 6k, 2w). RP: Groleau (2.2ip, 0h, 1r, 0er, 4k, 1w, 1hbp). Hitting for SBA (19-3): Morrow ss (2-3, 2b), Lucas cf (1-3, hbp), Groleau rf-p (1-3, 2b, rbi), Schwab 2b (0-4), Bima c (1-3, hr, rbi), Pietrowski 3b (2-3), Postula lf (1-2, 2b), Smith p-2b (0-1), Ebener dh (1-2, 2b), Bellino 1b (0-2), Brady ph (0-1). Totals: 26-2-9-2. LOB: 12. E: Smith, Schwab, Bellino 2, Morrow. Lisle 1A Super-Sectional

Monday: Lisle, Seneca sectional winners 1 p.m.

Tuesday: Newark 5, West Prairie 4. Wednesday: Game 2 - (1) Putnam County 3, Princeville 0. Saturday: Title - Newark (18-6) vs. (1) Putnam County (20-6), 11 a.m. DeKalb 1A Super-Sectional

Monday: Midland, Dakota sectional winners, 11 a.m. Oregon 2A Sectional

Saturday: Title - St. Bede (21-5) vs. Stillman Valley, 11 a.m. Lisle 2A Sectional

Thursday: Game 1 - Lake Forest Woodlands Academy vs. Chicago Gordan Tech. Game 2 - Melrose Park Walther Lutheran vs. Aurora Central Catholic. Saturday: Title - winners 1-2. 11 a.m. DeKalb 2A Super-Sectional

Monday: Oregon, Lisle sectional winners, 1 p.m.

Recreational golf

Wyaton Hills Ladies Day

May 21 Play Day: Guess your score. 1. Nita Wyatt, 2. Carolyn Barkley, 3. Millie Dean, Judy Farley, Beth Bickerman, Phyliss Miller. Chip-ins: Rosalie Hobbs. Low putts: Millie Dean. Wyaton Hills Wednesday Men’s

Standings: Michlig Energy 3-1; LaPorte Mowing 3-1; Princeton Redi Mix  3-1; Edward Jones  2-2; Hillview 1-3; Wyaton Hills 0-4. Low gross: Max Halberg Jr., Gary Patterson, Troy Torri 40. Low net: Troy Torri 

31. Flag Events: Bill Kaiser long drive #6; Jeff Stocking closest to pin #5. Birdies: Gary Patterson #1, #7; Cory Bickett #7. Ladies Thursday night League

Standings: Mike Electric 3-1; Central Bank  3-1; White Way  2.5-1.5; McCall Chiropractic  2-2; Wyaton Hills  1.5-2.5; Scentsy  0-4. Flag events: Peg Carr longest putt #5; Anna Flaig  longest drive #8. Low gross: Deb M, Michelle Coble 45. Low net: Lori Torri 30. Hidden Lake Ladies

May 22 Play of the Day: Count only par 4s. Championship flight: Karen Taylor 32. A Flight: Kathy Rakestraw, Patsy DeFauw 32. B Flight: Janice Mueller 34. C Flight: Debbie Zenger 40. Field winners: Low gross: Sally Riley 41. Low Net: Dorine Motley, Carlene Hebel 33. Low putts: Virginia Moore 12. Birdies: Carlene Hebel #3. Chip-ins Virginia Moore #8. Signs: Longest Drive C Flight #1 - Peggy Tautkus; longest Drive B Flight #4 - Mae Britt; Longest Drive A flight #6 - Pat Lebahn. Spring Creek Ladies

May 1 Play of the Day: Odd holes. Class A: 1. Koppens, 2. Lori Kierski. Low gross - Yuvan/Kierski. /low net - Koppens. Low putts - Kierski. Class B: 1. Banks, 2. Weistart. Low gross/ low net - Banks. Low putts- Jan Dagraedt. Class C: 1. Samolski, 2. Schoeb. Low gross/low net/low putts - Samolski.

Promote Your Job Find YOur next JOb rigHt Here! Openings Here! In the ClassIfIed • bCrnews.Com/jobs Call 815-875-4461 SUMMER HELP WANTED Dupont/Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc. Who: College and High School Students What: Pollinating corn When: July 10 – 31st (Dates may vary slightly) Where: DuPont Pioneer Research Center 2 miles north of Princeton on Hwy 26 Competitive wages: Based on age and previous field experience. Benefits: • Earn good money while working just a fraction of your summer vacation. • Meet new friends

Who do you contact: Alan Reeverts 815-875-6523 Ext. 121 If interested, please call by June 1st.

Zearing Child Enrichment Center Is seeking qualified candidates for:

full timE tEaChEr position (Teacher qualified)

please Call 815-875-2335

ask for Heidi, heidil@mtco.com or visit our website at: zcec.org EOE

NOW HIRING IN PRINCETON Production Technician II: Responsibilities include: seed field planting and maintenance; harvest; return and rework; compliance with ISO Work Instructions and Quality Plan requirements; and warehousing. Required to work overtime hours including weekends and other shifts during seasonal peaks. Maintenance Technician: Assures proper set-up, calibration, operation, and maintenance of equipment, machines, and facilities. Assists with some electrical maintenance work and ensures quality standards and timelines are met. Requires 3-5 years experience. For more details and to apply, search for jobs 1260 and 1206 online:

www.pioneer.com/careers EOE/AA


228 • Help Wanted

228 • Help Wanted

THE BUREAU COUNTY REPUBLICAN Is accepting applications for a part-time INSERTER in our distribution department. Applicants should be reliable, self-directed, have mechanical ability and able to work flexible hours but generally Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday, afternoon into evening, approximately 20-25 hours per week. Duties would be to assemble and package newspapers for distribution by machine as well as by hand. Must be able to stand for extended periods of time. Some lifting is required. Candidate must have a valid driver's license and an excellent work/ attendance record. Applications are available at the front office of the Bureau County Republican at: 800 Ace Road, Princeton, IL 61356. NO phone calls please

MATERIAL HANDLERS Warehouse positions available. Full-time, starting at $12 per hour plus shift premiums for 2nd and 3rd shift. All positions include Sunday. Incentive pay for your hard work. Full benefit package including medical, dental, vision, 401k, and much more. Apply 24 hours per day, 7 days a week, at: Ace Hardware, 2123 North Euclid Avenue, Princeton, IL. EOE

FIND YOUR JOB right here in the Bureau County Republican Classified! NOW HIRING RN's/LPN's Country Comfort Retirement homes Assisted Living/Alzheimer's Special Care of Henry & Princeton, have the following Nursing positions available: Staff Nurses Day/Evening or combination. 4 hours shifts and/or on call. Full/parttime PRN. Nurse Manager Of Henry & Princeton, 4 hours/week, days and on call. Supervisory experience required. Full medical package at no cost (must average 30 hours/week to qualify). Salaries starting at $21/hour to $26/hour. Apply in person at: 615 Patricia Lane in Henry, Monday-Friday, 9am-4pm

HARD TO FIND THAT RIGHT PERSON FOR THAT JOB OPENING? The Bureau County Republican Classified can reach just the right person you are looking for to fill that job opening. Call 815875-4461

232 • Business Opportunities ********** THE CLASSIFIED Advertising Department of the Bureau County Republican Does not have the opportunity to fully investigate the credibility of each advertiser appearing within these columns. If an offer sounds “too good to be true” it probably is. Proceed with caution if you are asked to send money or to give a credit card number. Proceed with caution in calling 900 phone numbers. All phone numbers prefixed by”900” are charged to the CALLER. Charges may be assessed on a “per minute” basis rather than a “per call” basis. The Bureau County Republican Classifieds makes every effort to qualify these charges for the reader. If you have a concern about an advertiser, please contact: Better Business Bureau 330 North Wabash Chicago, IL 60611 312 832-0500

- 400 Merchandise

448 • Pets & Livestock

441 • Wanted to Buy Wanted to Buy: used golf cart and used electric typewriter. Both in good working condition. Call 815-442-3500

442 • Lawn & Garden TWIGGYS TREE FARM Spring Specials! *Bradford Pears, 8', $30 *Pink Ponys, big 2', $15 *Japanese Maples, 5-6”, $40 All in nursery pots and ready to load into your vehicles. 815-303-8158 Open Sundays TWIGGYS TREE FARM Windbreak/Privacy Screen Tree Special! *Concolor Fir *Norway Spruce *Canadian Hemlock *White Pine *Southwest White Pine *Serbian Spruce All at 3' average + in nursery pots & ready to load into your vehicle! ONLY $15.00 While they last only! 815-303-8158 (Bradford Blacktop 1/4 mile west of Yankee Lane) WILL DO:

9 year old Quarter Horse Mare, sorrel with white star. $500. Call 815-875-2995 or 815-875-7630 Baby Doll South Down Lambs. Great pets for the barn yard. Males $250; Females $400. Call 815-878-7558 CHIWEENIE PUPPIES $200 each. Call 815-875-3693 or 815-878-7832 DONATE NOW! “The animals are crying” Tri-County Humane Society. LaSalle, Bureau, Putnam Counties. Call 815-875-6145 or 815-872-9781 or send donation to: PO Box 1601, LaSalle, IL 61301 Free to a Good Homes. Pot Belly Pig, 2 year old female, about 100lbs, black, good health. Also: 2 gray Donkeys, 1 female, 1 male. Call 630-341-1663

450 • Under $1000

450 • Under $1000

450 • Under $1000

2 8' Toppers for pickups. $50 each. Call 815-303-1803

946 Dell all-in-one printer, copier, fax photo printer. works great. $25. Call 815-663-0122

Fly weight wheel chair, $125; Maytag washer, $75; 2 Berkline electric recliners, $100 each. Call 815-876-7320

2001 Chrysler Town & Country, $1,000 or best offer. Call 815-872-6501

FIND IT RIGHT HERE!

Coffee table, black iron with 46"x22" oval glass top, $50. Excellent condition. Call 815-872-5806

Kitchen cabinets & counter top, $800. Call 815-878-9690

NEED EXTRA CASH?? Routes are available delivering the Bureau County Republican in Princeton, Sheffield, Spring Valley, Tiskilwa and Walnut. Delivery days are Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday mornings by 7:00 am. No Collecting Involved. Ask About Our $25 Sign-On Bonus. For more information, please call Tom Long, District Manager (815) 875-4461 Ext. 235

450 • Under $1000 10” Jet Table Saw, $400; Skill Router, $125; Jet Mortice Machine, $80. Call 309-238-2464

Garden Rototilling, Lawn and weed mowing. Call 815-875-1670

18' Cape Dory sail boat/ fiberglass hull, cabin$800; 8 boxes of very nice boys clothes size 6-10, $60. 815-866-1066

YOU’LL FIND IT right here in the Bureau County Republican Classified!

1997 Nissan Maxima runs very good. $600. Call 815-876-7023

800 Ace Road PO Box 340 Princeton, IL 61356 815-875-4461 Fax 815-875-1235

Business Directory Marketplace

10 off %

items over $20 with this ad!

Grand Plaza Antiques, Etc.

WYANET LOCKER, INC.

218 RAILROAD AVE. WYANET, IL

531 S. Main St., Princeton, IL 61356 • 815-437-2856

Th-F-Sat 12 pm-5pm • Rest of the week by Appointment by Luck or Chance

We do Upholstery Work With 30 Years of Experience Specializing in Furniture, Old & New, Ornate & Carved

BOB’S DRYWALL, PAINT, ETC CUSTOM SAWMILL SERVICES Native Hardwood Lumber Sales Carving Wood & Turning Stock Joe Murray 7544 1900 East Tiskilwa, IL 61368

815-876-6988

Kernans’ Lawn Service 815-303-9665 cell: 815-303-9664

Sign a 1 year contract, receive last mowing FREE Commercial & Residental Lawn Mowing & Lawn Rolling Free Estimates - Senior Discounts • Fully Insured 15% Off Seniors & New Customers

Free estimates • Fully insured

T P.O. BOX 33 • Malden, IL 61337

815-866-6858

Bob Cmolik

• Drywall • Paint • Texturing • Bathrooms • Plaster Repair • Remodeling • Tiling 19 Aztec Circle, Putnam, IL 815-342-1385 bcmolik@yahoo.com

10% off We do Upholstery Work items over $20 with With 30 Years of Experience this ad! Specializing in Furniture, Old & New, Ornate & Carved

(815) 699-2208 Scott Sabin, Owner

Wholesale & Retail Meats

Pat Wood, Owner

wyanetlocker.com

ExtErior homE improvEmEnt spEcialist

Call for a free appointment!

Over 30 Years Experience!

John Engstrom (815) 699-2318 12327 1550 N. Ave. • Wyanet

New Business Now Open!

Grand Plaza Antiques, Etc.

L&L Sporting Goods

531 S. Main St., Princeton, IL 61356 815-437-2856 • Th-F-Sat 12 pm-5pm

By Appointment Only

815-915-8277

Rest of the week by Appointment by Luck or Chance

Timber Falls Tree Service

•Tree Trimming & Removals •Stump Grinding •Lot & Land Clearing •Fully Insured •Seasoned Firewood •24 Hour Service

Princeton, IL • 815-875-3100 Clint Hassler 815-303-8451 RT Piper 815-866-2637

Residential • Commercial • Sales • Installation • Service Sectional Steel Doors • Automatic Door Openers

Toll Free

(877) 324-9517

AUTHORIZED DEALER

(815) 872-2615

To add your listing to this page contact us at (815) 875-4461, Ext. 278


450 • Under $1000

614 • Car Sales

768 • Homes For Sale

856 • Apartment Rentals

999 • Legal Notices

999 • Legal Notices

999 • Legal Notices

999 • Legal Notices

Tan recliner, new condition $75; pressure washer, 1650psi, new in box $85; 40 gallon rain barrel $25. Call 815-663-1231

2007 Honda Pilot 4x4, 92,000 miles, new tires, 8 passenger, 6 CD changer, XM, excellent condition. $13,900. 309-713-6217

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT BUREAU COUNTY, ILLINOIS IN THE INTEREST ) OF ) NICHOLAS S. ) DECKER ) A Minor ) No. 2013-JD-6 NOTICE OF PUBLICATION TO: Michael S. Decker 5292 Wyandof Place Hillard, OH 43026 And To All Whom It May Concern: TAKE NOTICE THAT ON May 17, 2013, an Amended Petition for Adjudication was filed under the Juvenile Court Act of 1987 by Donna J. Engels, Assistant Bureau County State’s Attorney, in the Circuit Court of Bureau County entitled “ In The Interest Of Nicholas S. Decker, A Minor” and that in Courtroom Number 110, at Bureau County Courthouse, 700 South Main Street, Princeton, Illinois on June 6, 2013, at 9:00 a.m., or as soon thereafter as this cause may be heard, an adjudicatory hearing will be held upon the petition to have the child declared to be a ward of the court under that Act. The Court has authority in this proceeding to take from you the custody and guardianship on the minor. Now, unless you appear at the hearing and show cause against the petition, the allegations of the petition may stand admitted as against you and each of you, and an order of judgment entered. /s/Mary C. Dremann Clerk of the Circuit Court Published in the Bureau

County Republican May 25, 2013.

ADVERTISE YOUR VEHICLE SALE HERE! In the Classified. Just call 815-875-4461.

PRINCETON 441 East Marion. 2 bedroom. $550. Heat, water, garbage. Laundry. No pets. Available June 1st. Call 309-288-3008

************ HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL?

PRINCETON This 3 bedroom home was built in 2001. It appraised at $134,000. All appliance's stay: stove, microwave, refrigerator, dishwasher, washer and dryer. Vaulted ceilings, central air. Full basement, 10'x10' deck, fireplace. Master bath has whirlpool tub, two car attached garage. ONLY $127,000 plus seller will even pay closing cost. This is a final price for quick sale. 815-238-5278

each instance specifying the ground of objection. Thomas A. Tonozzi, Clerk Hall Township Clerk Published in the Bureau County Republican May 25, 2013.

CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT BUREAU COUNTY, ILLINOIS ESTATE OF ) ELSIE J. JACKSON, ) DECEASED ) NO. 2013-P-52 CLAIM NOTICE Notice is given of the death of Elsie J. Jackson. Letters of office were issued to Judith K. Harris of 22263 1365 N Avenue, Princeton, Illinois 61356 as Independent Executor whose attorneys are Angel, Isaacson & Tracy, 111 Park Avenue East, Princeton, Illinois 61356. Claims against the estate may be filed in the Office of the Clerk of the Court, Bureau County Courthouse, 700 South Main Street, Princeton, Illinois 61356, or with the Independent Executor, or both, on or before November 25, 2013, or, if mailing or delivery of a notice from the Independent Executor is required by Section 18-3 of the Probate Act of 1975, the date stated in that notice. Any claim not filed on or before that date is barred. Copies of a claim filed with the clerk must be mailed or delivered to the Independent Executor and to the attorneys within 10 days after it has been filed. Dated this 21st day of May, 2013. Angel, Isaacson & Tracy Attorneys for Estate 111 Park Avenue East Princeton, IL 61356 815-875-6551 Published in the Bureau County Republican May 25, June 1 and 8, 2013.

Put your ad in for FREE Items $1,000 or less can run FREE for 1 week. Limit of 5 lines. Up to 3 items with price and price totaling under $1,000. 1 ad per household per week. No commercial ads, firearms or animal sales. Go to: bcrnews.com, to place an ad. Use category merchandize and bargains or E-mail information to: classified@ bcrnews.com (include your name, address & phone number) No Phone Calls! Used electric stove, white with black top. Very good condition. Call 815-3031038, after 5pm

460 • Garage Sales LAKE THUNDERBIRD 2 miles North of Putnam, 2 miles West of Rt. 29. Friday, Saturday, May 24, 25; 8am–4pm. ANNUAL GARAGE & BAKE SALE. Maps, Bake Sale & additional garage sales at the club house PRINCETON 215 North Chestnut Street Thursday, May 23, 4 pm - 7 pm; Friday, May 24th, 9 am – 6 pm; Saturday, May 25th, 9 am - Noon PRINCETON 416 West Hudson. Thursday & Friday, May 30 & 31. 8am4pm. Queen size bedding & a lot of MISC. items. PRINCETON 527 North Euclid Avenue. Friday, May 24, 9am-5pm; Saturday, May 25 9am-1pm. Lots of misc.; furniture, collectibles PRINCETON 674 Park Avenue East. Thursday, May 30, 3pm-7pm; Friday, May 31, 8am-3pm. Lia Sophia jewelry, Longaberger, household items, bike rack, boy's & girl's clothes, toys, DVDs, books, stuffed animals. Price to Sell! PRINCETON 903 Elm Place. Friday, May 24, 9am-3pm; Saturday, May 25, 9am-12pm. Toro 22” SP mower, extension ladder, Twilight snowmen dishes, old decanters, office chair, treadmill, Kirby vacuum/attachments, puzzles, books & lots more RURAL PRINCETON. 16466 2625 E Street. Go East on Route 6, over 180, around curve, down hill & up, first blacktop to left (telephone station on corner) Signs will be posted. Thursday, Friday, May 23, 24; 7am-6pm. Saturday, May 25, 7am-3pm. HUGE GARAGE SALE LINDA BICKETT'S Household crafts, bake goods, VCR movies & cases, silverware, dishes, much, much more! Rain or Shine! WYANET 118 West 3rd Street. Friday, Saturday, May 24, 25; 8am-3pm LARGE GARAGE SALE

PROMOTE your Garage Sales Call 815-875-4461

- 700 Real Estate For Sale 767 • Mobile Home Sales Mobile Home For Sale $2,000 down, $372.22 a month for 5 years. Newly painted, new carpets. 3 bedroom. Great wooded lot. Payment includes lot rent, water & garbage pick up. For Showing Call 815-303-2948

**************** PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call, HUD tollfree at 800 669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 800 927-9275

DO YOU HAVE A LOT TO Sell? The Bureau County Republican Classified can help you sell it!

775 • For Sale by Owner MINERAL 420 North Lincoln. Aluminum exterior 1628 sq. ft. 3 bedroom, living room, 2 bath, kitchen with appliances, family room with gas fireplace, 2 car unattached garage, patio/deck/2-air units/2-gas furnaces. Corner lot 132x81. Appraisal Price $66,000. Call 815488-2717/815-894-2715

DO YOU HAVE A PLACE TO Sell? The Bureau County Republican Classified can help you find the right person to move in.

- 800 Real Estate For Rent 852 • Mobile Home Rental 2 Bedroom Moblie Home $470 a month plus deposit. Call 815-875-9900

856 • Apartment Rentals HENNEPIN one bedroom apartments furnished and unfurnished. All utilities included. Smoke free. No pets. Call 815-925-7139 or 815-925-7086 HENNEPIN PARKVIEW APARTMENT. LARGE 2 BEDROOM, CLEAN, SMALL QUIET TOWN, GARAGE, BASEMENT, SINGLE LEVEL, WASHER DRYER HOOKUP. CALL 815-925-7509 or 815-343-5018 PRINCETON 20 East Peru Street. 1 bedroom apartments. Appliances, water, gas and garbage included. $425 + security. Call 815-303-3805

Land For Sale www.capitalag.com

Capital Agricultural Property Services, Inc.

630-434-1838

PRINCETON Large 2 bedroom/1 bath. Stove, refrigerator, garbage provided. Centrally located. Central air/heat. Off street parking. 815-780-0630 PRINCETON Large, 2 bedroom, 1st floor. Central air, garage. $575 per month. Call 815-875-1923 PRINCETON Large, one bedroom, off-street parking, laundry facility, no pets. $450 + electric. Call 815-875-2918

DO YOU HAVE A PLACE TO RENT? The Bureau County Republican Classified can help you find the right person to move in.

858 • Homes for Rent BEAUTIFUL LAKE THUNDERBIRD 42 Fairoaks. Putnam, 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, 2 car Garage. Fully furnished, nice deck in back. $750 a month, utilities not included. 708-420-2060 DEPUE Small, 2 bedroom house. 505 East Street. $450 per month. Call 815-664-2808 Princeton RENT-TO-OWN 424 West Crown Street Single Story Ranch 2 Bedroom/1 Bath 1 Car Garage All redone inside All On 1 Floor ,Nice Yard $590/month Available immediately! 815-875-6254 Houselady@comcast.net .

866 • Wanted to Rent WANTED: Small house & garage for older single man. Rent, Contract, for Long Term. Payment guarantee. Have references. Putnam 630-661-4729

PROMOTE YOUR Rental Call 815-875-4461

HALL TOWNSHIP BUREAU COUNTY, ILLINOIS AND HALL TOWNSHIP ROAD DISTRICT BUREAU COUNTY, ILLINOIS NOTICE OF DETERMINATION Pursuant to an Illinois Act in regard to Wages of Employees on Public Works, the Board of Trustees of Hall Township, Bureau County, Illinois, and the Highway Commissioner of the Hall Township Road District, Bureau County, Illinois, did on May 16, 2013, determine and adopt the prevailing rate of wages paid generally to employees engaged in work on public works in said Hall Township. The prevailing wage rate so determined is the same rate as that established by the Illinois Department of Labor for Bureau County, Illinois, effective May 1, 2013. Such determination is now effective and a copy is available upon request either from Thomas A. Tonozzi, Hall Township Clerk, 222 E. St. Paul St., Spring Valley, Illinois 61362, or from Robert F. Russell, attorney for Hall Township, Ten Park Avenue West, Princeton, Illinois 61356. Any person affected by said determination may object in writing, within 15 days of the date of publication of this Notice, by filing a written notice either with the Hall Township Clerk or the Hall Township Road District Clerk at the above address or with the Illinois Department of Labor, in

Covered Bridge Realty

Call Leslie H. “Chip” Johnston 815-875-2950 Bureau Co., IL 2 lots, each on Lake Arispie. LaSalle Co., IL 30± ac., home, woods, river front.

Call Timothy A. Harris at 815-875-7418 Will Co., IL 185± ac., adj. to University Park. CAPS offers farmland management real estate sales & acquisitions appraisal & consulting services

$179,900

$135,000

$89,900

www.c21coveredbridge.com 815-872-7434 • 100 S. Main St., Princeton Each Office is Independently Owned & Operated

Garage Sales? Advertise Here!

-600Transportation 614 • Car Sales ******* $$ CASH PAID $$ We pay top dollar for junk (cars, machinery, etc.) Call 815-878-9353

815-875-4461

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON THE BUDGET OF THE WYANET FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT Notice is hereby given that a tentative Budget and Annual Appropriation Ordinance for the Wyanet Fire Protection District, Bureau County, Illinois, for the fiscal year beginning May 1, 2013, and ending April 30, 2014, will be posted and conveniently available to public inspection at the Fire Station, Rescue Unit Building and at Citizens First State Bank’s Wyanet Branch Office, all located in said District, from and after 9:00 o’clock a.m., May 21, 2013. Notice is further given hereby that a Public Hearing on said Budget and Annual Appropriation Ordinance will be held at 7:45 o’clock p.m., July 15, 2013, at the Wyanet Rescue Unit Building, in this District, and that final hearing and action on this Ordinance will be taken at the Meeting to be held at the Wyanet Rescue Unit Building at 8:00 o’clock p.m., July 15, 2013. Dated this 21st day of May, 2013. /s/ Michael R. Smith, Secretary Published in the Bureau County Republican May 25, 2013.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT BUREAU COUNTY, ILLINOIS EUREKA SAVINGS BANK, a corporation ) organized and doing business under and ) by virtue of the Illinois Savings Bank Act ) Plaintiff, ) vs. ) JERRY L. FALETTI, ) Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants,) Defendants. ) No.-12-CH-113 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled Court, in said cause, on February 22, 2013, John E. Thompson, Sheriff of Bureau County, will on June 12, 2013, at the hour of 10:00 a.m., at 700 S. Main Street, Princeton, IL, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the following described real estate situated in Bureau County, Illinois, commonly known as 625 E. Erie Street, Spring Valley, Illinois, Property Index No. 18-35-334010. The property is subject to general real estate taxes which are a lien upon the real estate, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate and easements and restrictions of record and unpaid water bills. The subject property is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the Court. Sale terms: This is an “AS IS” sale for “cash.” The successful bidder must deposit ten (10%) down by cash or certified funds and the balance of the purchase price prior to the date of confirmation of sale. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The real estate is residential real estate. The property will NOT be open for inspection. The judgment was $18,731.26. Prospective purchasers are admonished to check the court file to verify this information. For information, contact Plaintiff’s Attorney: Todd L. Martin, Martin Law Office, 812 Washington, P.O. Box 177, Mendota, IL 613420177, (815) 539-3711 Published in the Bureau County Republican May 11, 18 and 25, 2013.


999 • Legal Notices

999 • Legal Notices

999 • Legal Notices

999 • Legal Notices

999 • Legal Notices

CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT BUREAU COUNTY, ILLINOIS In the Matter of the ) Estate of DALE W. ) WAUGAMON, ) Deceased ) No 2013-P-45 CLAIM NOTICE Notice is given of the death of DALE W. WAUGAMON of 12555 Illinois Highway 26, Princeton, IL 61356. Letters of Office were issued on May 7, 2013 to PAULA WAUGAMON, 12555 Illinois Highway 26, Princeton, Illinois 61356, as independent administrator, whose attorneys are LOUIS E. OLIVERO & ASSOCIATES, 1615 Fourth Street, Peru, Illinois 61354. Claims against the estate may be filed in the Office of the Circuit Clerk, Probate Division, Bureau County Courthouse, Princeton, Illinois 61356, or with the representative, or both, within six months from the date of first publication of this notice. If claim notice is personally mailed or delivered to a creditor of the above estate, then claim must be filed in the above entitled cause within three months from the date of mailing or delivery, whichever is later. Any claims not filed within the above periods are barred. Copies of a claim filed with the Clerk must be mailed or delivered to the representative and to the attorney within ten days after it has been filed. The estate will be administered without court supervision unless under Section 28-4 of the Probate Act (755 ILCS 5/28-4) any interested person terminates independent administration

at any time by mailing or delivering a petition to terminate to the clerk. A copy of a form of a petition to terminate independent administration may be obtained from the Clerk of the Court at the above address. LOUIS E. OLIVERO & ASSOCIATES Attorneys for Estate 1615 Fourth Street Peru, Illinois 61354 Telephone: 815/224/2400 Published in the Bureau County Republican May 11, 18 and 25, 2013.

g. Modification of Mortgage Dated: January 17, 2013 h. Modification of Mortgage Recorded: 4-10-13 as Document No 2013R02239 NOW, THEREFORE, unless you, all NonRecord Claimants, and Unknown Owners, Defendants, file your answer to the Complaint for Foreclosure in this cause or otherwise make your appearance therein, in the Circuit Court of the Thirteenth Judicial Circuit, Bureau County, Illinois, held in the Bureau County Courthouse, in the City of Princeton, 700 S. Main Street, on or before June 25, 2013, default may be entered against you and each of you at any time after that day and a Judgment for Foreclosure may be entered in accordance with the prayer of the Complaint for Foreclosure. /s/Mary C. Dremann Circuit Clerk Barash & Everett, LLC 211 West Second Street Kewanee, Illinois 61443 Telephone: 309/852-5555 Fax: 309-853-8135 Published in the Bureau County Republican May 25, June 1 and 8, 2013.

Spring Valley, Bureau County, Illinois; Excepting the underlying coal and fireclay with the right to dig, mine and remove the same without entering upon or occupying any part of the surface of said premises. The property is subject to general real estate taxes which are a lien upon the real estate, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate and easements and restrictions of record and unpaid water bills. The subject property is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the Court. Sale terms: This is an ”AS IS” sale for “cash.” The successful bidder must deposit ten (10%) down by cash or certified funds and the balance of the purchase price prior to the date of confirmation of sale. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The real estate is residential real estate. The property will not be open for inspection. The judgment was $83,895.46. Prospective purchasers are admonished to check the court file to verify this information. For information, contact Plaintiff’s Attorney: Todd L. Martin, Martin Law Office, 812 Washington, P.O. Box 177, Mendota, IL 61342-0177, (815) 5393711 Published in the Bureau County Republican May 11, 18 and 25, 2013.

Insurance 9,545.75 Professional fees 1,000.00 Trustees’ salaries 2,300.00 Expense and training of members 3,538.50 Fuel 1,705.00 Miscellaneous items 1,354.35 DISBURSEMENTS - Fire Department $61,227.81 AMBULANCE SERVICE Repair to equipment and vehicles $ 4,624.15 Repair and improvement to buildings 9,487.03 Purchase of equipment and supplies 38,688.74 Utilities 4,556.54 Insurance 7,414.00 Professional fees 1,000.00 Trustees’ salaries 2,300.00 Expense and training of members 5,581.00 Fuel 1,187.22 Miscellaneous items 708.47 DISBURSEMENTS Ambulance Service $75,547.15 TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS $ 136,774.96 RECAPITULATION Total Receipts $443,434.94 Total Disbursements 136,774.96 Balance $306,659.98 Balance on Hand: Fire Dept. Account No. 20010146, Citizens First State Bank, Wyanet Office $57.41 Fire Dept. General Account No. 20009331, Citizens First State Bank, Wyanet Office 85,477.21 Fire Dept. Petty Cash Account No. 20075574 Citizens First State Bank, Wyanet Office 554.42 Fire Dept., Equipment Account No. 1001079653, Centrue Bank 14,958.54 Rescue Unit Account No. 20477044, Citizens First State Bank, Wyanet Office 49.09 Rescue Unit General Account No. 20009307, Citizens First State Bank, Wyanet Office 25,816.22 Rescue Unit Equipment Account No. 20009315, Citizens First State Bank, Wyanet Office 39,167.16 Rescue Unit Certificate of Deposit No. 2131024468 Centrue Bank 103,548.55 Rescue Unit Certificate of Deposit No. 20212 37,031.38 Balance on Hand in Accounts $306,659.98 /s/ Lee Schroeder Treasurer Subscribed and sworn to before me this 20th day of May, 2013. /s/ Daniel F. Tracy Notary Public STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF BUREAU ) I, Michael R. Smith, Secretary of the Wyanet Fire Protection District do hereby state that the foregoing financial statement is a true and correct copy of the entitled 2012 - 2013 ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT WYANET FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT, Bureau County, Illinois, which was passed by the Trustees of the Wyanet Fire Protection District on May 20, 2013. /s/ Michael R. Smith Subscribed and sworn to before me this 20th day of May, 2013. /s/ Daniel F. Tracy Notary Public Published in the Bureau County Republican May 25, 2013.

NOTICE Notice is hereby given that the Members of the County Board of Bureau County, Illinois, will meet at the Court House in Princeton, Illinois, in Regular Session on Tueday, June 11, 2013 at 6:30 p.m. and that all claims must be filed with the County Clerk of said County on or before Friday, May 31, 2013. /s/ Kamala S. Hieronymus County Clerk Published in the Bureau County Republican May 25, 2013. NOTICE Public Notice is hereby given that on May 8, 2013, a certificate was filed in the Office of the County Clerk of Bureau County, Illinois, setting forth the names and post office addresses of all of the persons owning, conducting and transacting the business known as J & K Express located at 1002 Lora Avenue, Princeton, IL 61356. Dated this 8th day of May, 2013. /s/Kamala S. Hieronymus Bureau County Clerk Published in the Bureau County Republican May 11, 18 and 25, 2013.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT BUREAU COUNTY, ILLINOIS PEOPLES NATIONAL BANK ) OF KEWANEE, ) Plaintiff, ) vs. ) DOTTIE M. KULON, ) UNKNOWN OWNERS and NONRECORD ) CLAIMANTS, ) Defendants. ) IN CHANCERY CASE NO. 13-CH-44 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE BY PUBLICATION The requisite Affidavit for Publication having been filed, notice is herby given you, all Non-Record Claimants, and all Unknown Owners, Defendants in the above-entitled cause, that the above-entitled cause, that the above entitled Mortgage Foreclosure action was filed on May 17, 2013 and is now pending. 1. The names of all Plaintiffs and the Case Number are identified above. 2. The Court in which this action was brought is identified above. 3. The names of the titleholders of record are Dottie M. Kulon. 4. A legal description of the real estate suffi cient to identify it with reasonable certainty is as follows: North Half of Lot Twelve (12) in Block Four (4) in the Village of Ohio, formerly known as the Village of Albrecht, all lying and being situated in the County of Bureau in the State of Illinois 5. A common address or description of the location of the real estate is as follows: 116 N. Main Street, Ohio, IL 61349 6. An identification of the Mortgage sought to be foreclosed is as follows: a. Names of Mortgagors: Dottie M. Kulon b. Name of Mortgagee: Peoples National Bank of Kewanee c. Date of Mortgage: April 28, 2004 d. Date of Recording: April 29, 2004 e. County Where Recorded: Bureau County, Illinois f. Recording Document Identification: Book 1166, Page 514

Notice of Public Hearing Bureau Putnam Area Rural Transit RE: Capital Assistance Grant Application, Addition of Rolling Stock Capital. I. Notice is hereby given that a public hearing will be held by Bureau Putnam Area Rural Transit, on behalf of the Bureau County Public Transportation Program. Date: 6/10/2013 Time: 10:00 Room: Main Conference Room Place: Gateway Services, Inc. For the purpose of considering a project for which financial assistance is being sought from the Illinois Department of Transportation, pursuant to its Capital Grants Program. The project is generally described as follows: A. Project Description: Bureau-Putnam Area Rural Transit on behalf of Bureau County is seeking grant funding through the FY 2013 Illinois Jobs Now Downstate Transit Improvement Program for the acquisition of seven (7) clean emission paratransit vehicles. Funds being requested through this grant is $365,000.00. B. Relocation: Relocation Assistance will not be required. C. Environment: This project is being implemented to minimize environmental impacts. D. Comprehensive Planning: This project is in conformance with comprehensive transportation planning in the area. E. Elderly and Handicapped: All new facilities included in this project will be accessible to the elderly and handicapped. II. At the hearing, Bureau-Putnam Area Rural Transit will afford an opportunity for interested persons or agencies to be heard with respect to the social, economic, and environmental aspects of the project. Interested persons may submit orally or in writing evidence and recommendations with respect to said project. III. Bureau-Putnam Area Rural Transit requests that any hearing impaired person wishing to attend this Public Hearing notify Mike Neuenkirchen, Transit Administrator, at (815)875-4548 ext. 271 at least one week before the scheduled hearing date so that arrangements can be made to provide an interpreter. IV. A copy of the application for a state grant for the proposed project will be made available for public inspection on behalf of Bureau County at Gateway Services, INC., 406 S. Gosse Blvd, Princeton, Illinois 61356. Mike Neuenkirchen, Transit Administrator 406 S. Gosse Blvd, Princeton, Illinois 61356 (815) 875-4548 ext. 271 Published in the Bureau County Republican May 25, 2013. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT BUREAU COUNTY, ILLINOIS EUREKA SAVINGS BANK, a corporation ) organized and doing business under and ) by virtue of the Illinois Savings Bank Act ) Plaintiff, ) vs. ) JERRY L. FALETTI, ) Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants, ) Defendants. ) No.-12-CH-113 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled Court, in said cause, on February 22, 2013, John E. Thompson, Sheriff of Bureau County, will on June 12, 2013, at the hour of 10:00 a.m., at 700 S. Main Street, Princeton, IL, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the following described real estate situated in Bureau County, Illinois, commonly known as 625 E. Erie Street, Spring Valley, Illinois, Property Index No. 18-35334-010. Lot Two (2) in Block Twenty-Six (26) in O’Beirne’s First Addition to the City of

2012 - 2013 ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT WYANET FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS COUNTY OF BUREAU ) I, Lee Schroeder, Treasurer of the Wyanet Fire Protection District, in the County of Bureau and State of Illinois, upon my oath state that the following is a true statement of all monies received and disbursed by me as Treasurer of such Wyanet Fire Protection District, for the fiscal year beginning on May 7, 2012, (being the first Monday in May, 2012) and ending on May 5, 2013, (being the Sunday next preceding the first Monday in May, 2013). ITEMS OF RECEIPT FIRE DEPARTMENT Balance on hand per last report $89,836.66 Additional Receipts Bureau County Collector $ 65,779.08 IL Dept. of Revenue 2,330.65 Interest 349.01 Donation 322.00 Refunds 3,657.99 RECEIPTS - Fire Department $ 162,275.39 AMBULANCE SERVICE Balance on hand per last report $ 215,906.26 Additional Receipts Bureau County Collector $ 62,861.81 Interest 268.48 Refunds 2,123.00 RECEIPTS - Ambulance Service $ 281,159.55 TOTAL RECEIPTS $ 443,434.94 ITEMS OF DISBURSEMENT FIRE DEPARTMENT Repair to equipment and vehicles $ 17,928.72 Repair and improvement to buildings 3,845.55 Purchase of equipment and supplies 14,920.60 Utilities 5,089.34

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999 • Legal Notices

999 • Legal Notices

999 • Legal Notices

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT BUREAU COUNTY, ILLINOIS PEOPLES NATIONAL BANK ) OF KEWANEE, ) Plaintiff, ) vs. ) PAUL R. SWANSON, JR., GUINEVERE ) SWANSON, UNKNOWN OWNERS ) and NONRECORD CLAIMANTS, ) Defendants. ) IN CHANCERY CASE NO. 13-CH-45 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE BY PUBLICATION The requisite Affidavit for Publication having been filed, notice is herby given you, all Non-Record Claimants, and all Unknown Owners, Defendants in the above-entitled cause, that the above-entitled cause, that the above entitled Mortgage Foreclosure action was filed on May 21, 2013 and is now pending. 1. The names of all Plaintiffs and the Case Number are identified above. 2. The Court in which this action was brought is identified above. 3. The names of the titleholders of record are Paul R. Swanson, Jr and Guinevere Swanson. 4. A legal description of the real estate suffi cient to identify it with reasonable certainty is as follows: A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN A PART OF THE NORTH HALF OF SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP 16 NORTH, RANGE 8 EAST OF THE FOURTH PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, BUREAU COUNTY, ILLINOIS, MORE PARTICULARLY BOUNDED AND DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS AND BEARINGS ARE FOR THE PURPOSE OF DESCRIPTION ONLY: BEGINNING AT A “P.K.” NAIL AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 19; THENCE NORTH 89˚ 47’ 38” EAST, ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 19, A DISTANCE OF 2572.15 FEET TO A “P.K.” NAIL AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 19; THENCE NORTH 89˚ 47’ 21” EAST, ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 19, A DISTANCE OF 45.68 FEET TO THE WEST LINE OF THE HENNEPIN CANAL PARKWAY; THENCE SOUTH 35˚ 49’ 30” EAST. ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID PARKWAY, 305.97 FEET TO AN IRON ROD; THENCE IN A SOUTHEASTERLY DIRECTION ALONG SAID PARKWAY, CURVING TO THE LEFT WITH A RADIUS OF 1239 FEET, A DISTANCE OF 579.16 FEET TO AN IRON ROD ON THE EAST LINE OF THE WEST HALF OF THE WEST HALF OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 19; THENCE SOUTH 01˚ 12’ 34” EAST, ALONG THE EAST LINE OF THE WEST HALF OF THE WEST HALF OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 19, A DISTANCE OF 719.16 FEET TO AN IRON ROD; THENCE SOUTH 88˚43’ 27” WEST, 3241.37 FEET TO THE WEST LINE OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 19; THENCE NORTH 00˚ 50’ 03” WEST, ALONG THE WEST LINE OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 19, A DISTANCE OF 1387.80 FEET TO THE PLACE OF BEGINNING; EXCEPTING THEREFROM THE FOLLOWING TRACT OF LAND:

COMMENCING AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP 16 NORTH, RANGE 8 EAST OF THE FOURTH PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN; BUREAU COUNTY, ILLINOIS; Thence running south 150 feet; THENCE EAST 123 FEET; THENCE NORTH 150 FEET; THENCE WEST 123 FEET; SUBJECT, HOWEVER TO THE EASEMENT OR RIGHT-OF-WAY OF THE PUBLIC OVER THE NORTH 50 FEET AND THE WEST 33 FEET OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PREMISES FOR PUBLIC HIGHWAY PURPOSES; AND ALSO EXCEPTING THEREFROM THE FOLLOWING TRACT OF LAND: A PART OF THE NORTH HALF OF SECTION 19 TOWNSHIP 16 NORTH, RANGE 8 EAST OF THE FOURTH PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 19 AND THE SOUTH RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF U.S. ROUTE 6 AND 34, RUNNING THENCE IN AN EASTERLY DIRECTION ALONG THE SOUTH RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF U.S. 6 AND 34 A DISTANCE OF 1723.0+ FEET TO A CONCRETE RIGHT-OF-WAY MARKER; RUNNING THENCE SOUTHERLY 55.0 FEET TO A CONCRETE RIGHT-OF-WAY MARKER, RUNNING THENCE NORTH 89˚ 32’ EAST ALONG THE SOUTH RIGHT-OFWAY LINE OF SAID U.S. ROUTE 6 AND 34 A DISTANCE OF 590.0 FEET TO AN IRON ROD, THE SAID IRON ROD BEING THE POINT OR PLACE OF BEGINNING, RUNNING THENCE NORTH 89˚ 32’ EAST ALONG THE SOUTH RIGHT-OFWAY LINE OF SAID U.S. ROUTE 6 AND 34 A DISTANCE OF 272.9 FEET TO AN IRON ROD, RUNNING THENCE SOUTH A DISTANCE OF 610.2 FEET TO AN IRON ROD, RUNNING THENCE WEST 75.5 FEET TO AN IRON ROD, RUNNING THENCE SOUTH 5˚ 49’ WEST 65.5 FEET TO AN IRON ROD, RUNNING THENCE NORTH 88˚ 54’ WEST 175.5 FEET TO AN IRON ROD, RUNNING THENCE NORTH 1˚ 18’ WEST 669.9 FEET TO THE POINT OR PLACE OF BEGINNING, SAID TRACT CONTAINING 3.981 ACRES, MORE OR LESS, ALL SITUATED IN COUNTY OF BUREAU IN THE STATES OF ILLINOIS. 5. A common address or description of the location of the real estate is as follows: 12346 US Hwy 34 & 6, Wyanet, IL 61379-9539 6. An identification of the Mortgage sought to be foreclosed is as follows: a. Names of Mortgagors: Paul R. Swanson, Jr and Guinevere Swanson b. Name of Mortgagee: Peoples National Bank of Kewanee c. Date of Mortgage: May 1, 2008 d. Date of Recording: May 14, 2008 e. County Where Recorded: Bureau County, Illinois f. Recording Document Identification: 2008R026354, Book 1350, Page 74 NOW, THEREFORE, unless you, all NonRecord Claimants, and Unknown Owners, Defendants, file your answer to the Complaint for Foreclosure in this cause or otherwise make your appearance therein, in the Circuit Court of the Thirteenth Judicial Circuit, Bureau County, Illinois, held in the Bureau County Courthouse, in the City of Princeton, 700 S. Main Street, on or before June 25, 2013, default may be entered against you and each of you at any time after that day and a Judgment for Foreclosure may be entered in

accordance with the prayer of the Complaint for Foreclosure. /s/Mary C. Dremann Circuit Clerk Barash & Everett, LLC 211 West Second Street Kewanee, Illinois 61443 Telephone: 309/852-5555 Fax: 309-853-8135 Published in the Bureau County Republican May 25, June 1 and 8, 2013. VILLAGE OF NEPONSET NEPONSET, ILLINOIS ORDINANCE NO. 705 AN ORDINANCE MAKING APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE CORPORATE PURPOSES OF THE VILLAGE OF NEPONSET, ILLINOIS, FOR THE FISCAL YEAR COMMENCING ON THE FIRST DAY OF MAY, A.D. 2013 AND ENDING ON THE THIRTIETH DAY OF APRIL, A.D. 2014 BE IT ORDAINED BY THE PRESIDENT AND BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE VILLAGE OF NEPONSET, BUREAU COUNTY, ILLINOIS: That the following sums of money, or as much thereof as may be authorized by law, be, and the same are hereby appropriated for all corporate purposes for the fiscal year beginning the first day of May, 2013 and ending the thirtieth day of April, 2014, and the objects and purposes for which said appropriations are made, and the amounts hereby appropriated for such purposes are as follows, towit: GENERAL FUND General Government Advertising $500 Bank Fees $140 Business Expenses $120 Community Building Refund $150 Accounting $350 LegalFees $3,500 Professional Fees $3,500 Electricity $4,000 Equipment Rental $400 Facility & Equipment $2,400 Fuel $5,800 Insurance $15,000 Membership Dues $300 Mowing $3,000 Building Improvements $1,600 Postage $450 Office Supplies $3,000 Telephone $1,500 Office Salaries $19,000 Employee Salaries $ 5,500 Payroll Tax $13,500 Unemployment Tax $2,500 Contingencies $2,000 Bonuses $1,000 Picnic Day $1,400 New Building $3,000 Park Facilities $4,000 Donations $480 Miscellaneous Expense $3,500 Public Safety Communications $300 Payroll $37,000 Other $800 Public Works Equipment Repairs $2,500 Street, Alley & Sidewalk Repairs $2,000 Contingencies $1,000 Miscellaneous Expense $2,000 TOTAL $147,190 WATER, SEWER, GARBAGE Electricity $489 Engineering Fees $21,412 Engineering Fees $10,000 EPA Loan Sewer Plant (principle) $39,515 EPA Interest (Sewer Plant) $16,091 Garbage & Recycling $35,400 Lab Testing Fees $3,000 Maintenance $1,101

999 • Legal Notices

Meter Reading $500 Mileage Reimbursement $3,000 Miscellaneous $538 NPDES Permit $2,500 Office Supplies $1,418 Outside Contracted Service $2,370 Payroll Expense $33,851 Postage $500 Repairs $4,556 Sewer Bond Sinking Fund $1,576 Sewer Costs $250 USDA Loan $7,000 USDA Interest Expense $27,405 Water Treatment Plant $569,830 Water Chemicals $6,247 Water Lien Fees $ 47 Water Repairs $14,625 Water Supplies $16,034 TOTAL $819,575 MOTOR FUEL TAX Professional Fees $3,000 Repairs & Maintenance $5,140 Supplies $5,300 Advertising/Material Testing $300 TOTAL $ 13,740 SPECIAL REVENUE FUND Audit $ 5,231 Insurance Expense $ 5,994 TOTAL $ 11,225 This ordinance shall be in full force and effect from and after its passage, approval and publication in pamphlet form according to law. Presented, passed and approved on a roll call vote this 15th day of May, 2013. Aye Nay Absent Board of Trustees: Barb Jannie X Wayne Gerrond X John Pratt X Amanda Mueller A Ken Snyder X Eugene Costin X APPROVED: By: Carl C. Rohrig, President ATTEST: By: Karen Ingles Village Clerk Published in the Bureau County Republican May 25, 2013. REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS (RFP): TEMPORARY EMPLOYEE SERVICES, SOLICITATION NO. 08-2013 RFP PROJECT DESCRIPTION: the recruitment and placement of temporary employees in maintenance and clerical work for the Bureau County Housing Authority. CONTACT PERSON: Bart Niemuth, Executive Director; (815) 879-8106, e-mail: bart@bcha1.com HOW TO OBTAIN THE RFP DOCUMENTS: (1) Connect to direct internet link below and follow directions: https://nahro.economicengine.com/ requests.html?company_id=31345 . (2) If you have any questions pertaining to our online marketplace, call customer support at 1-866526-9266, or email customer support at support@ economicengine.com They are available from 9 a.m. Eastern to 4:00 p.m. Pacific. PRE-PROPOSAL CONFERENCE: Wednesday May 29, 2013; 10:00 am CDT at 444 South Church Street, Princeton, IL 61356. SUBMITAL DEADLINE: *Wednesday, June 19, 2013, 3:00 p.m. CDT. Bureau County Housing Authority 444 South Church Street Princeton, IL 61356 *(The proposed costs must be entered within the aforementioned Internet site and the “hard copy” proposal must be received in-hand and timestamped by the Agency by no later than 3:00 p.m. CDT on this date). Published in the Bureau County Republican on May 18 and 25, 2013.

E-mail items for sale to: classified@bcrnews.com


23 Biz Ag Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Saturday, May 25, 2013 • 23

Business&Ag

Ag story ideas? — Contact Bureau County Republican reporter Barb Kromphardt at 815-875-4461, ext. 242, or email her at bkromphardt@bcrnews.com.

It’s spring, and sign-up times are here!

Crop insurance and prevented planting SPRINGFIELD – Weather across the Midwest has slowed planting this spring. For crop insurance, the final planting date for corn in most of Illinois is June 5. The final planting date for soybeans in the upper third of Illinois is June 15. For the lower two-thirds of Illinois it is June 20. Here are some basic guidelines for farmers unable to plant because of an insurable cause of loss by the final planting date. They may: • Plant during the 25 day late planting period. There is a 1 percent reduction per day of the yield guarantee. • Not plant a crop and receive a prevented planting payment. • After the late planting period ends, plant the acreage to another crop and receive a reduced prevented planting payment. The most important thing farmers should do if they are unable to plant the crop by the final planting date is contact their crop insurance agent to review their policy and options before making a decision. To qualify for a prevented planting payment, the affected acreage must be at least 20 acres or 20 percent of the crop acreage in the insured unit. Prevented planting is not available on group insurance policies. Replant payments may also be available for land that was planted that does not have an adequate stand. Contact your insurance agent if you believe acreage should be replanted. The insurance company must give written permission to replant, abandon or destroy the crop. Crop insurance is sold and delivered solely through private crop insurance agents. Contact a local crop insurance agent for more information about the program. A list of crop insurance agents is available at all USDA Service Centers or on the RMA web site at www. rma.usda.gov/tools/agents/.

Business story ideas? — Contact Bureau County Republican reporter Lyle Ganther at 815-875-4461, ext. 273, or email him at lganther@bcrnews.com.

This spring has been extremely challenging for farmers. After an early spring of significant rainfall amounts in late April, the rain has lifted (for now), warmer weather has arrived and planting season is underway. With a later start than usual, farmers have been diligently working the ground and planting all day and into the night to quickly get their crops in the ground. I know this time of year, especially now, is extremely busy for our producers. However, I would like to remind everyone that June 3 is fast approaching and is the closing date to enroll in the Average Crop Revenue Election (ACRE) program. All producers may choose to enroll in either the Direct and CounterCyclical (DCP) Program or ACRE for the 2013

Justina Boggio COMMENTARY crop year. This means that producers who enrolled in ACRE for 2012 may elect to enroll in DCP in 2013, or vice versa. The deadline to enroll in DCP is Aug. 2. If your farm was enrolled in the ACRE program for 2012, FSA-658 Record of Production and Yield form must be completed and returned to the County Office before July 15. Failure to do so may result in ineligibility. More recent news Celebrating 20 years in the office, USDA announces Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) Sign-Up. Landowners and producers can now enroll in Continuous CRP with the General CRP Sign-up starting May 20 and Celebrating 20conyears

tinuing through June 14. Environmentallysensitive land devoted to certain conservation practices, including but not limited to, grass waterways, filter strips, riparian buffers and wetland restoration practices may be enrolled in CRP at any time under continuous sign-up. Offers for continuous sign-up are automatically accepted provided the land and producer meet certain eligibility requirements. These offers are not subject to competitive bidding. However, general CRP offers are subject to competitive bidding. Offers willquality be ranked of andaccording service! to the Environmental Benefits Index (EBI). FSA collects data (primarily based on location, soils information and selected conservation practice) and determines the environmental indices for the of quality and service!

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land offered. ture. America’s farmers FSA ranks each eligible and ranchers have the offer in comparison to all opportunity to make a other offers and selects positive impact on their from that ranking. After communities by taking the sign up ends, the Sec- part in the 2012 Census retary of Agriculture will of Agriculture. Conducted decide where to make the every five years by the EBI cutoff. U.S. Department of AgriProducers may consult culture’s (USDA) National with FSA and Natural Agricultural Statistics SerResource Conservation vice (NASS), the Census (NRCS) staff on how to is a complete count of all maximize EBI points and U.S. farms, ranches and increase the likelihood those who operate them. that their offer will be Please take the time accepted. and fill out the 2012 CenTo offer land for the sus of Agriculture if you continuous or general haven’t done so already. sign-up, producers should The May 31 deadline is contact their local FSA almost here. office. Justina M. Boggio is the One last thing I would county executive director like to mention is the HYDRAULIC at the Bureau County FSA DOORS 2012 Census of AgriculOffice.

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24 Accuweather 20 • Saturday, May 25, 2013

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Area towns announce Memorial Day services ARLINGTON — Harold E. Russell Post 938, American Legion, Ladd will host Memorial Day services at 9:45 a.m. Monday at Calvary Cemetery. BUDA — Buda American Legion Post 261 will conduct Memorial Day services at 10 a.m. Monday at Hopeland Cemetery, west of Buda. Traditional military services will be provided by the Buda American Legion and Auxiliary. The guest speaker will be Tom Mott, who retired with the rank of senior master sergeant after 22 years active duty in the U.S. Air Force. Also speaking will be Frank Gebeck II, a senior at Bureau Valley High School and last year’s Boy’s State candidate. A tribute to a veteran will be given by Dean Barnett. In case of inclement weather, the service will be moved to Bureau Valley South Junior High School in Buda. CHERRY — Harold E. Russell Post 938, American Legion, Ladd will host Memorial Day services at 9 a.m. Monday at the Cherry Miner’s Cemetery. DALZELL — Harold E. Russell Post 938, American Legion, Ladd, will host Memorial Day services at 11:15 a.m. Monday at the Dalzell Memorial Park. DEPUE — A Memorial Day Mass will be at 9 a.m. Monday at St. Mary’s Cemetery in DePue. Those attending the event should bring lawn chairs.  In case of rain, Mass will be in the church. Everyone is invited to coffee and doughnuts after Mass in the church hall. DOVER — American Legion Post 125 of Princeton, with VFW Post 4323 and AMVETS Post 180, will perform Memorial Day honors at the Dover Prairie Repose on Route 34 at approximately 8:45 a.m. on Monday. LAMOILLE — Harold E. Russell Post 938, American Legion, Ladd, will host Memorial Day services at 10:15 a.m. Monday at Greenfield Cemetery.

LADD — Harold E. Russell Post 938, American Legion, Ladd, will host Memorial Day services on Monday at the following times: 8:30 a.m. — Berean Cemetery; 11:45 a.m. — Ladd Cemetery, Ladd; and 12:15 p.m. — War Memorial Park, Ladd. The guest speaker will be U.S. Air Force Col. Kevin Anderson (retired). The public is invited and encouraged to attend. In case of inclement weather, some of the above services may be cancelled. The Cherry program will move to Holy Trinity Church Hall; the War Memorial Park program will move to the Ladd Community Center; and the Greenfield Cemetery program will move to Allen Junior High School. MALDEN — American Legion Post 125 of Princeton, with VFW Post 4323 and AMVETS Post 180, will perform Memorial Day honors at approximately 9:15 a.m. Monday at the Malden City Cemetery. MANLIUS — Memorial Day services will be at 10 a.m. Monday at Mullin Memorial Park. Visitors are encouraged to bring lawn chairs. NEPONSET — Neponset American Legion Post 875 will hold its annual Memorial Day program at 11 a.m. Monday in the Neponset Community Building. This year’s guest speaker is Sam Rice from Toulon. He is a Vietnam veteran that served 14 months as an infantryman. The American Legion will present the colors and Neponset Grade School student Victoria Crofton will lead the Pledge of Allegiance. Carol Gerrond will be the accompanist to the National Anthem. The invocation will be presented by Ron Toliver, pastor of the Congregational Church. After the program, Post 875 will present military ceremonies to honor veterans buried at both Floral Hill and

West cemeteries, then will conclude with Taps. The Neponset Historical Society will serve a luncheon after the completion of the program. NEW BEDFORD — New Bedford Royal Neighbors of America will conduct its annual Memorial Day services at the Greenville-Fairfield Cemetery, known as Union Cemetery of New Bedford, at 2 p.m. June 2. OHIO — A Memorial Day Mass will be at 8 a.m. Monday at Immaculate Conception Church in Ohio. A rosary will be recited after the Mass at St. Mary’s Cemetery. PRINCETON — American Legion Post 125 of Princeton, along with VFW Post 4323 and AMVETS Post 180, will perform Memorial Day honors beginning at 8 a.m. Monday at Oakland Cemetery. From there, the group will go to Elm Lawn Memorial Park for services. The group will also take part in the parade which steps off at 10 a.m. by the former Nelson’s Drug Store on Main Street. Memorial Day ceremonies will begin at Soldiers and Sailors Park at 10:30 a.m. with retired Command Sgt. Maj. Tom Root as guest speaker. Root is also the current Princeton Police chief. Legion Post 125 Commander David Ohlson will be master of ceremonies. All times are approximate. American Legion Woman’s Auxiliary Unit 125 of Princeton and Princeton DAR members will also participate in the services. After the ceremonies at Soldiers and Sailors Park, the public is invited to return to the Legion Hall at 1549 W. Peru St. for light refreshments served by the Princeton Woman’s club. SEATONVILLE — Harold E. Russell Post 938, American Legion, Ladd, will host Memorial Day services at 8 a.m. Monday at Ray Barto Memorial Park. SHEFFIELD — Memorial Day services will be at 10 a.m. Monday at the

Veteran’s School Park. Sgt. James Constantine, returning from Afghanistan, will speak as will Richard Block. There will be a military salute. The American Legion Auxiliary will serve cookies and lemonade after the service. SPRING VALLEY – American Legion Memorial Day services will be at 2 p.m. Monday at Valley Memorial Park, located at 13312 Route 89. TAMPICO — Tampico American Legion Post 574 will conduct services at 10 a.m. Monday at St. Mary’s Catholic Cemetery. A salute and TAPS will be performed. Then they will proceed to the Tampico Memorial Cemetery for a salute and TAPS. TISKILWA — Memorial Day services will be at 10 a.m. Monday at East Park. All veterans are invited to join in the honor guard. VAN ORIN — Memorial Day services will be at 10 a.m. Monday at the Bache Chapel in Van Orin. The Civil Air Patrol will post colors. There will be music and a speaker. Refreshments will be served in the fellowship hall after the service. WYANET — The Wyanet Memorial Day parade will start at 10 a.m. Monday at the United Methodist Church. Services will be held in Forest Hill Cemetery and conducted by VFW Post 6634 and Auxiliary. The Wyanet Historical Society will sponsor an ice cream and sandwich social after the services at the Wyanet Memorial Park. WALNUT — Memorial Day services will be at 11 a.m. Monday at the Walnut Cemetery. Walnut American Legion Past 179 is in charge of the program. The ceremony will be at the cemetery, rain or shine. In case of rain, participants should bring umbrellas. The Legion Color Guard and the Walnut Boy Scouts and Cub Scouts will be marching from downtown, through the Avenue of Flags, beginning at 10:30 a.m.

5-day Planner Today

Tonight

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0

96 (1956)

37 (1963)

May 21

81

63

0

75

53

0

91 (1964)

33 (2002)

May 20

86

63

1.63

90

62

0

92 (1975)

32 (1954)

May 19

90

64

0

93

62

0

94 (1975) 40 (1953)

May 18

82

58

0

87

54

0

94 (1964) 33 (2002)

May 17

79

63

.01

80

45

0

94 (1962) 37 (2002)

May 23

Source: National Weather Service Reporting Station, Princeton asterisk means new record temperature

Celebrate Spring in a new Home!

Single family homes for sale in an age restricted community.

The unique features of The Villas include: • Spacious 2 Bedroom • Maintenance Free Exterior Floor Plans • Grounds Maintenance • Full-size Kitchen • Invitations to Events at • Attached Garage Retirement Campus Call for more information and to schedule your tour.

Liberty Village www.simplythefinest.net

Princeton 815-875-6600

Low 64 High 82

Low 64

Sun & Moon This year

High

Wednesday

Peru 815-224-2200

Streator 815-672-1900

COVER YOUR BASES!

Don’t wait until the heat of the season to find out your system isn’t running efficiently. Call today to SCHEDULE YOUR CLEAN & CHECK

Last

New

First

Full

May 31

June 8

June 16

June 23

Greenfield Retirement Living at its Best!

Air Conditioning & Heating

404 W. Main St. McNabb, IL PLUMBING & HEATING Air 815-882-2111 Conditioning & Heating www.grassersplumbingheating.com

Sunrise............................................................... 5:31 a.m. Sunset................................................................8:19 p.m. Moonrise...........................................................9:08 p.m. Moonset............................................................5:58 a.m.

State ID No 58-100249

Licensed sheLtered care and senior apartments

815-872-2261

508 Park Avenue East • Princeton, IL


1

We Remember A Tribute to Those We Have Lost This Past Year

Saturday, May 25, 2013


2 2 • We Remember • Saturday, May 25, 2013

Nathan Adkins Vivian Adkins Lowell Albee, Jr. Doris Albrecht Wilbur Albrecht Dalys Albright Eva Alexander Marie Alexander Santina Alfano Charles Allen Albert ‘Al’ Anderson Clifford Anderson Ethel Anderson Jeanette Anderson Kenneth Anderson Terry Anderson Verna Anderson Wilma Anderson Margaret Ary John Bacorn June Bader Henry F. Balensiefen John Bales Beryl Barkman Bernice Bartel Bernadine Bartman Edward Bartman Kenneth Bartolucci We remember...

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.comBu

Robert Bass Lawrence Batten Eleanor Beams Iris Beaner John Beatty James Beckman Grace Bell William Bell Raymond Benoit Laura Bergeron Antoinette Bernabei Donna Bernabei Fran Bernardoni James Bertrand Marian Bickett Barbara Bill Donald Bill Donna Bivins Kim Blades Lester Blaine Thomas Blanford, Jr. RosElla Blessman Ruth Blosser Carol Bodnum Wayne Boehle Gerald Boes Danny Bogott Bill Bomleny Large enough to serve you, small enough to care.

First State Bank of Van Orin

Jeno Bonucchi H John Bortak M Brandon Bowman S Gladys Boyer J Grace Brandenburg E Walter Brasen W Lloyd Brenneman R Anna Mae Bright-Dyer M Verna Broers G Kenneth Brooks L Gertrude Bryant C William Buchanan H J Shirley Burden P Joan Burger J Vera Burger M Geraldine Burwell R Gregody Buss M Jessica Byrd D Lois Cade L Danny Cain B R. ‘JoAnn’ Cain D Thomas Caldera R Margaret Caliendo M Lois Campbell M Gary Carl Sharon Carley Doris Carlson Neil Carr AlwAys in Our MeMOry

e.j. cattani & son, inc. Crane & Heavy Equipment Rentals

Van OrIn, Il • 815-638-2111

Malden Banking Center Member FDIC

Malden, Il • 815-643-2121

“Your Independent Community Bank”

Funeral

Homes

LaSalle-Peru • Ladd • Tonica • Wenona 815-223-0380

Office: 815-894-2348

Ladd, Illinois 61329

Fax: 815-894-2201

P


3

omBureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Hope Casford Margaret Cass Steven Christian Jack Christianson Eleanor Church William Cinnamon Rev. John Clausen r Mary Colgan Gregory Colmone Lois Conner Chad Cooper Harriet Cooper Joseph Corsolini Patricia Cotter Jerry Coulter Mary Crain Richard Craine Mary Cresto Dale Croisant Laura Crowe Brittney Curtis Dorothy Daniel Ruth Danielson Mary Davidson Mary Davidson

y

1

Saturday, May 25, 2013 • We Remember • 3

Mary Davidson Jeanette Davis Lula Day Beverly Dean Lois Dean Mina DeAngelo Marie DeBates Peter DeBernardi, Jr. Carol DeCraene-Reiff Mitchell ‘Mick’ DeFauw James Denholm Terry Lee Devins Timothy Diamond Harriet Dickinson Otto Dobbeke Mary Donahue Robert G. Donahue Lee Dorff Marylu Doyle Robert Doyle John ‘JC’ Dresser Cloe Driscoll Lenore Drummer Edwin Dumolyn Anna Duncan

BCR—Memorial Day Tributes May 25, 2013 Size: 2 col. x 1.5” Black & White Proof: denise.ward@central-bank.com

Your “Local” Independent Insurance Agents...

Honoring those who live in our hearts and memories. Chris Kieffer 200 Ace Rd., Suite 5 Princeton, IL 61356 815-875-6565 www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC

Princeton Redi-Mix “Producers of Quality Concrete”

533 E. Railroad Ave. • Princeton, IL

300 Capitol Building Springfield, Illinois 62706 (217) 782-0140

FRANK J. MAUTINO

Dave Yepsen • 815-875-6079 717 S. Main St. • Princeton, iL

Business H Auto H Home H Health H Life

We Remember With Appreciation

Keith Cain - Manager

815-875-3359

Emily Dunn Tom Durham Rev. Susan Eckhoff Anna Eickmeier Homer Eiler Stella Eiler Lyle Eiten Vivian Eitutis Bernandine Elgin Carl Ellberg, Jr. Betty Ellis Margaret Emmerson Doris Engels Roy Epperson Jack Erickson Dorothy Etheridge Helen Eustice Monte Ewalt Evelyn Farley Eileen Fay Shrirley Fay Nancy Fenton Roland Fisher Thelma Fisher Henry Flitz

317 S Main St., Princeton 815-875-3461 www.central-bank.com Member FDIC

STATE REPRESENTATIVE - 76th Representative District District Office - Spring Valley 221 E. St. Paul St. • (815) 664-2717

Cherish The Memories Of Those You Love

r

Malden CeMetery Malden, Illinois


4 4 • We Remember • Saturday, May 25, 2013

Phillip Flood Frank Fogel Leo Foletti Michael ‘Nuco’ Fonderoli Lillie Fordham Merlin Foster Marion Fredrickson Eldon ‘Audy’ Fritsch Leo Fuertges Delores Ganschow Beulah Belle Ganther Conrad Gebeck Nellie Gebhart Doris Gerdes Edna Giacomelli Marian Gingerich Bertha Girard Margaret Glassburn Bernadine Goble Terrance Goldsmith SFC Jeremy R. Gonzalez Rev. Kevin Gorman Martin Granfield Jack Grant Philip Green

Greenfield

Retirement Living at its Best!

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.comBu

Gail Greene Dorothy Griffin Mark Gualandri Jack Gugerty Evelyn Gunden Betty Halberg Carolyn Hall William Hall Delores Hamblock Edna C. Hammitt William Hamrick Josephine Hand Robert Haney Ann Hansen George Hansen Lamurle Hanson David Harris James Harshbarger Nina Hartz Dennis Harvel H. Clifford Heaton Richard Hedrich Norman Heeren Doreen Heilstedt Dale Henderliter

L

Honoring those who live in our hearts & memories.

Licensed Sheltered Care & Senior Apartments 508 Park Ave. East • Princeton, IL • 815-872-2261

811 E. Peru St. Princeton, IL 61356

815-875-3819 Fax 815-875-3901

www.flowersbyjuliaprinceton.com

Your “Local” Independent Insurance Agents...

Sam Schiera • 815-872-6502 Business H Auto H Home H Health H Life

Lawrence Henderson, Sr. D Dorothy Herbert D Frances Herbolscheimer L Hubert Hewitt C Rev. Joseph Heyd C Kathleen Hildebrand C Charity Hill D Dennis Hornback D Gerald Horton G Lloyd Horton M Dora Hostetler R Carolyn Howard R W Esther Hubbard Mark Hudson R Melvin Huettemann B Melvin Hult C Parker Humphrey J Michael Hussey M R Eunice Ioder Katie Ioder D Elsie Jackson H Samuel Jackson H Joyce Jacobson M Carole Joanne Jaggers B L Paul Jais Diller-roD, iNC.

815-875-3389 • 701 E. Peru St. • Princeton, IL Service. Knowledge. Selection. Financing. Delivery.

Cherish the Memories

P

815-875-3661 Dr. Jeff 516 S. Pleasant, Princeton Martin

Mon., Wed., Fri. 8am - 6pm; Tues. 1pm - 7:30pm; Sat. 8am - Noon; Closed Thursday

Estimates Available.

Pump sales & service Homes, Farms & Business

Ohio, Illinois • 815-376-2811


5

omBureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

. Diana James Daniel Jenkins r Leonard Jesiolowski Carol Johnson Carrie Johnson Clifford Johnson Dolores Johnson Donna Johnson Gregory Paul Johnson Margaret Johnson Robert Johnson Roland Johnson William Johnson Robert Johnsten Berniece Johnston Carol Joiner Judith Jones Mary Lou Jones Robert Jones Dorothy Jontz Homer Jontz Hilda Kaler Michael Kargl Beverly Kasbeer Lowell Kearns

L

Locally Owned Dealership For Over 75 Years

Saturday, May 25, 2013 • We Remember • 5

Althea Keleher Pearl Kemppa Francis Kennard Bonita Kepner M. Elaine Kerchner James Kidd, Jr. Mabel Kidd Joyce Killen Sally Kitterman Lawrence Klein Robert Knutson Forrest Koenen, Jr. Patrick Kohr Theodore Kontos Karl Krauss, Jr. John Krogulski Alice Kropf Curvin Kropf Albert Kulupka Elaine Kutter David Lafferty Joanne Lamchick Dale ‘Pepsi’ Larkey John Larson Jesse Leathers Johnson Agency

Louis Ledesma Robert Lenihan Clifford Lewis Betty Lindelof Michael Linley Donald Lolli Stephanie Lomedico Lois Long Richard Longbein Evelyn Longeville Lyna Loos Joseph Lorenzi Hazel Lou Leonard Lourdeau Maxine Lucas Daniel Lule Robert J. Lunn Eleanor Lyons Beverly Magnuson Mary Magnuson John Maller Paul Maloney Rita Maloney Corinne Manning David Manning Keeping COMMUNITY in banking!

REAL ESTATE • INSURANCE • AUCTION SERVICES FARMS • HOMES • CROP INSURANCE

340 N. Metcalf Ave. • Amboy, IL 61310 815-857-2513 or 800-957-2513 www.wgleffelman.com

Equipment Co. Providing Sales & Service to Illinois & Iowa Since 1971 Pressure Washers, Parts Washers, Car & Truck Washes 17 W. Peru St., Princeton 815-875-4564 • 1-800-553-5201 www.hotsyofprinceton.com

Robert K. Johnson • Robert H. Johnson Kyle Johnson • Myrene Carper 135 S. Main Street • Sheffield, Illinois 61361 Office Phones: 815-454-2840 or 800-454-2716 E-mail: j.agency@mchsi.com

Hodge Welding All Types Welding

We Remember

Structural & Sheet Fabricating • Ornamental Iron Work 1102 W. Peru St., Princeton • 815-875-2493

We’re here for you! hbtbank.com

Create Your Style For Less... Corner of Joliet &

PERU  OGLESBY  PRINCETON Streets SPRING VALLEY Second  DEPUE

LaSalle, IL 815-224-8875 www.turkfurniture.com


6 6 • We Remember • Saturday, May 25, 2013

Jerry Manning Bertha Marciniak Colleen Marquis Gerald Marsh Helen Marsh F. David Marshall Betty Jo Martin Maybeth Martin Lisa May Lula May Patricia May Vivian May Joanne McCauley Richard McComber Charlotte McConnell E. Berneice McCoy Philip McGinnes Bret McKee Jim McLain Dona McMahon Donald McNally Fred Meisenheimer Grace Metcalf Robert Michel Charles Miller Donna Miller Franklin Miller Jeffrey Miller 530 Park Avenue East Princeton, IL 61356 815-875-2811 www.perrymemorial.org

Forever in our thoughts

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.comBu

John Miller Lawrence Miller Martha Miller Jan Monier Thomas Monier Corey Moodie Kevin Moore William Morel Phyllis J. Morey Betsy Lou Morgan Alice Morris Alta Morris Elza Moses Wayne Mowers A. Charles Mueller Donal Murphy Lloyd Murphy Helen Murray LaVerne J. Murray Nancy Nagel John Nally Jr. Katherine Neff Eileen Neis John Neis Harold Newhalfen Mark Newman Ryan Niedziela Shirley Notschaele KRAMER’S KITCHEN N’ CATERING Contact Mary or Mindy Kramer for a consultation 815-872-2715 • www.kramers-kitchen.com

421 South Main Street •Princeton, Illinois Mon-Tues 8am-3pm; Wed-Fri 8am-8pm; Sat 7am-3pm

Carl Olson Mary Olson Jacqueline Osborn Conni Otto Evelyn Otto Robert Ouellette Rita Pakula Kenneth Palmer Mary Patnode Yvonne Patterson Shirley Pearce Tony Pease Irene Pence Robert Perez Sr. Billie Peterson Roger Peterson Dorothy Philbrook Nancy Phillips Lucille Pinter Roberta Pinter Harlan Piper Donald ‘Chooch’ Pirch Eleanor Pitcher Lucile ‘Sally’ Pletsch Donald Podulak John Pogliano, Jr. John Pogliano, Sr. Dolores Pohnan Remembering those who have passed

Sisler’s

Quality Service Since 1908 • Ice Cream • Ice Cubes

Ohio, Illinois • 815-376-2913

D N M R P B N R R D B J B R M N D D L S E P E R J


7

omBureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

22069 US Hwy 34 Princeton, IL 61356

815-875-2808

GARLAND FUNERAL HOME & MONUMENT CO. www.garlandfuneralhome.com Route 92 East • Walnut, IL • 815-379-2010

Robert Roberts Alfred Rod Patricia Rod Charles Ross Merle Rossman James Rountree Ronald Sampo Wesley Samuelson Tim Sapp Chad ‘Chaddy’ Sarver Carol Savage James Say Hazel Schafer Colleen Schaill Richard Schertz Virginia Schisler Conrad Schmidt Leslie Schoff Jerry Schulte Clarence Schultz Stephen Schuneman Paul Scoma Veda Scott Janice Seeds Ivon Sharkey Al Cioni Ford inC.

Minnie Shipp Virginia Sibley Rita Siddles Billy Sims, Sr. Danny Sissel Carole Smith William Smith Audrey Smoode Jerome Spaniel Maxine Specht David Spellious Annette C. Spero Gerald Spires Alberta Spohn Ray Staker Jay Staples Dale Staples Arthur Stickel Agnes Stites Allen Stone Lila Stone Dennis Stout Margaret Stout Kay Strousse Michael Strunk Ronald H. Behrends Financial Representative

Life • Health • Auto • Home • Farm Commercial • Annuities • Crop Hail

No baloney with Al Cioni!

815-339-2511 504 S. McCoy • Granville

Flower Shop

Cemetery Bouquets • Hanging Baskets Custom Designed Floral Arrangements Bronze Memorials • Pet Cemetery

224 W. Main St., Tiskilwa • (815) 646-4121 0513-194

Dana Pomeroy-Link Norman Porter Mary Potthoff Richard Presthus, Sr. Peter Primo Brandon Putts Nellenah Puyear Ronald Raef Richard Raguza Delores ‘Babe’ Rakestraw Brandon Ransom John Rasmussen Bobby Ratliff Randall Rawling Martin Reiker Norman Resor Dorothy Rett Donald Reynolds Lois Richards Sarah Richards Elinor Rici h Paul Riebe Ethyle Riley Raymond Ringenberg Janice Roach

Saturday, May 25, 2013 • We Remember • 7

Share The MeMorieS of Your Loved oneS State Bank of Cherry

Mon. - Fri. 9-5; Sat. 9-3 and Sun. 12-3 Rts 6 & 89, 1 mile North of SPRING VALLEY, IL 61362

Phone (815) 663-7211

Member FDIC

Cherry, IL 815-894-2345 or 1-800-447-9138 www.statebankofcherry.com


8 8 • We Remember • Saturday, May 25, 2013

Janyce Stuckert Janet Stuepfert James Suarez, Sr. Margaret Sutcliffe Imogene Swanson Jack Swanson Gerald Taber Elvera Taets Mary Taets Dianne Tauchen Rebecca Tautkus Eleanor Taylor Mary Taylor Celina Terando Donald Terando Edward Thompson Thelma Thorson Jean Tillinghast Richard Tillinghast Kathleen Tonozzi Emma Tornow Delores Towne Hazelmae Townsend

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Bob Travis Richard Trotter James Twidell George VanLoo Donald Velker Naomi Vereecke Mark Verstraete John Vowels, Jr. Andrew Wall Lorena Wallace Lee Walters Dale Waugamon Lee Waugamon, Sr. Larry Webber John Weber Eugene West Curtis Westfall

Lois Wetzell Lucile White Mildred Wiese Janice Williams LeRoy Wirth Dennis Wooden Billie Jean Wortz David Yepsen George Young Charles Young Sherri Zemke Doug Ziegler Jeanne Zoran Jan Zukowski Mildred Zupancic The preceding is a list of those loved ones who passed away during the last year as published in the Bureau County Republican.

Oakland Cemetery

West end of Park Avenue West

Your peace of mind is assured at Oakland Cemetery and Elm Lawn Memorial Park. Perpetual care of your single or multiple site is guaranteed by the City of Princeton. For more information call the superintendent’s office at (815) 872-4231.

Memorials or donations may be directed to either cemetery.

Elm Lawn Memorial Park Corner of Warren and Knox

Remember your loved one with a living memorial. Purchase a tree along with a granite memorial in remembrance of your loved one.

Oakland Cemetery’s Memorial Tree Program

Granite Memorial Placed Here

Multi-tiered pricing structure for any new tree orders through the Oakland Cemetery Memorial Tree Program.

For all information including tree varieties and memorial information call 815-872-4231.

BCR-05-25-2013  

Bureau County Republican

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