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Thursday, May 16, 2013

Wyanet reinstates annual pick-up day By Becky Kramer news@bcrnews.com

WYANET – The Wyanet Village Board took action on several items at Tuesday’s meeting, including deciding to reinstate a general garbage pick-up for the community. The village board had decided last year to no longer fund the general garbage pick-up, commonly known as junk days. Further information on the reinstated service will be available as soon as the dates have been set. Also at Tuesday’s meeting, Kerry Jaggers addressed the board about water damage to his building incurred during the recent flooding. He questioned whether or not FEMA is involved and also addressed the board about what future plans are to address this problem. Village Clerk Shelly Teske informed Jaggers and the board that she and Village Engineer Jack Kusek met Tuesday with IEMA representatives. IEMA will be coming to town to check on damages. After that, they will make the decision as to whether or not Wyanet qualifies for assistance. Another resident addressed the board regarding a Maple Street property which has not had the grass mowed. The village ordinance states that if the grass is more than eight inches tall, the village can mow the grass and put a lien on the property. The board approved having the village employees mow the lawn. President Bruce Hand reported the water main break on Main Street cost the village approximately $10,000 to repair. Building and Equipment Committee Chairman John Swarczewski reported the board purchased a John Deere lawn tractor for the cost of $6,400. Bids are also being accepted for a dump truck.

Changes coming to county dental clinic County still seeking federal disaster designation By Donna Barker dbarker@bcrnews.com

PRINCETON — Adjustments are being made with the dental clinic operated through the Bureau/Putnam County Health Department. At Tuesday’s meeting of the Bureau County Board, board member Loretta Volker gave an update on the county’s dental clinic, saying the Bureau County Board of Health has studied the funding and adult utilization of the county’s dental clinic

for the past 18 months. That study shows adult utilization of the clinic continues to dwindle, Volker said. Since Medicaid no longer covers adult dental care, the Board of Health has made the decision to offer adult dental services on a sliding scale based on the income of the adult, Volker said. Decisions reached by the health department were not made lightly, she said. Also, with the continuing decrease in the adult utilization of the clinic, the full-time services of the current dentist is no longer

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needed, Volker said. The current dentist has been released from his contract with the health department, as well as with LaSalle and Henry counties who subcontract dental services through the Bureau/ Putnam County Health Department, she said. Dental services will now be provided by several area dentists who have served the clinic in the past and are now willing to volunteer their time at the clinic, Volker said. As before, there will still be appointments set for certain days of each week, she said.

See Clinic Page 2

Open house planned for Tiskilwa Library Bids for Tiskilwa Library addition due in May By Lyle Ganther lganther@bcrnews.com

See Wyanet Page 2 Year 167 No. 59

NEWSSTAND PRICE 75¢

BCR photo/Becky Kramer

Envisioning the next step Brenden Piacenti concentrates on his choices in creating a summer hat during Monday’s children’s “Hat Parade” program at the Tiskilwa Public Library. Following the craft time and book reading time, about 15 children and program leaders headed outdoors for a parade down Main Street. The children’s programs at the Tiskilwa library are free and open to the public.

TISKILWA — Tiskilwa residents can see the building plans and ask questions about a new addition to the existing library costing less than $1 million at an open house set for 6:30 p.m. Tuesday at the library. Tiskilwa Library Board President Rich Foss told Tiskilwa Village Board members at their meeting Tuesday night that bids for the project are due to be open in May with ground being broken this summer for the addition. “We want to occupy it by next spring or summer,” he said. The addition will be at ground level and placed on empty lots to the east of the existing library, added Foss. An inside ramp will connect the new addition and the existing library instead of having an exterior ramp in a $1.8 million plan rejected by voters in 2010. Village board members voted to waive building permit fees for the library’s addition, but to charge for monthly water and sewer usage. Board members have received word they will receive a $504,000 Illinois Public Library Construction Grant to fund 51 percent of the building project. The remaining $486,000 for the project will come from savings accumulated by the library board over the years, $35,000 in donations from private individuals and a line of credit from a local bank, said Foss. The village had transferred ownership of the lots for the addition to the library about a year ago since the building had to be owned by the library instead of the village as it had been since the library was created in 1908.

See Library Page 4

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2 Local 2 • Thursday, May 16, 2013

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Bureau County

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Clarifications/Corrections Did we get it right? Accuracy is important to us, and we want to correct mistakes promptly. If you believe a factual error has been made, call the Bureau County Republican at 815-8754461. BCR photo/Donna Barker

Seeking Sources Are you an area man who has his own “man cave?” You know ... an area in your home, basement or garage reserved just for you. Or maybe you are the wife of a “man cave” owner? Either way, the Bureau County Republican wants to share your “man cave” with other readers in an upcoming special section in the BCR. Call BCR Senior Staff Writer Donna Barker at 815875-4461, ext. 244, or email her at dbarker@ bcrnews.com. ••• May 21 is National Waiters and Waitresses Day which recognizes the value and importance of a good waiter or waitress. The BCR would like to do a story about a waiter or waitress who enjoys their job and would be willing to share their career with other BCR readers. Contact BCR Staff Writer Goldie Currie at 815-875-4461, ext. 236, or email her at gcurrie@bcrnews.com.  ••• The Bureau County Republican is located at 800 Ace Road, Princeton, Illinois 61356. Office hours are Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Phone: 815-875-4461 FAX: 815-875-1235 The BUREAU COUNTY REPUBLICAN (ISSN 0894-1181) is published tri-weekly (three times a week) by the Bureau County Republican, 800 Ace Road, P.O. Box 340, Princeton, IL 61356-0340. Periodical postage paid at Princeton, Illinois, 61356. POSTMASTER Send address changes to BUREAU COUNTY REPUBLICAN, PO Box 340, Princeton, IL 61356-0340.

Celebrating Nursing Home Week Residents and staff at Liberty Village in Princeton celebrate National Nursing Home Week with a balloon launch Monday morning in front of the facility. The purple and green balloons used for Monday’s launch are the colors of Liberty Village’s Bounce Back program offered for people who need rehabilitation and recovering assistance before returning to their homes. Among the other special activities planned for the week at Liberty Village are karaoke singing, mini golf games, a water rodeo, fishing, a scarf demonstration and ice cream social.

Wyanet From Page 1 Trustee Joe Law requested the board buy eight gallons of paint to paint the buildings at the park. The price per gallon cannot exceed $50. The buildings will be green on the bottom and tan on top. The new roofs

on the buildings will also be green when they are installed. In still other business, the board approved an ordinance that amends the current liquor license ordinance to now allow a Class E liquor license to include all liquors. Last month, the board heard from Casey’s requesting its liquor license be

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changed to include the sale of alcohol other than beer and wine. Following a lengthy closed session to discuss personnel, Village President Bruce Hand reported that all allegations against an employee have been deemed unfounded and no further action will be taken. Hand indicated the village board reviewed the advice given by the village lawyer during the session. Also following closed session, Hand thanked

Clinic From Page 1 “The health department’s services for children and adults are not going to be affected with the changes that were determined by the Board of Health,” Volker said. “Oral health is very important for Bureau and Putnam counties’ residents. The dental clinic is surviving and we expect to thrive under the new model.” Volker said the Board of Health will continue to monitor the utilization patterns at the dental clinic and determine how to best provide services while remaining fiscally responsible to the county board, as well as to the citizens of Bureau and Putnam counties. In other business at Tuesday’s meeting,

trustee Tom Odell for his service on the board. Odell lost the recent village president race to Hand and therefore gave up his seat on the board. Village Clerk Shelly Teske swore in the recently re-elected trustees and president, Bruce Hand, Marilyn Johnson, Joe Law, Kim Rich and John Swarczewski. In new business the board approved several resolutions dealing with the Wyanet Festival in July. The board approved

closing Route 6 and 34 for the parade and also granted the Community Club a liquor license for the weekend. Also the board approved using $40,000 in Motor Fuel Tax for road repairs within the village. A request by Z Tour to use the park on July 20 with no fee was approved. The next meeting of the Wyanet Village Board will be at 7 p.m. June 11 in the village hall. Comment on this story at www.bcrnews.com.

the board heard from Bureau County Emergency Services and Disaster Agency (ESDA) coordinator Kris Donarski on the progress being made on getting federal disaster designation for Bureau County due to the April 17-18 heavy rains and flooding that hit the area. Bureau County is one of 49 counties in Illinois to already have received state disaster area designation. Donarski said she and other local government officials are now working on getting the county declared a federal disaster area. She and local officials have met with members of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, Illinois Emergency Management Agency and Small Business Administration and shown them some of the worst-

hit homes and areas in the county. There are two parts to the federal declaration process, Donarski said. Individual assistance covers home and business repairs, while public assistance covers things like road and bridge repair as well as government buildings. Though Bureau County was not among the initial 11 counties declared to be federal disaster areas on May 10 by President Barack Obama, that does not mean Bureau County will not get the designation, Donarski said. “They’ve approved those first 11 counties and will move on to the other counties to see if they will be added on,” she added. “I don’t know how long that will take.” Comment on this story at www.bcrnews.com.


3 Local Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Local

Thursday, May 16, 2013 • 3

Meeting cancelled SPRING VALLEY — The city of Spring Valley Public Health and Safety Committee meeting scheduled for 6:30 p.m. today, Thursday, has been cancelled and will be rescheduled for a later date. Questions may be directed to the city clerk’s office at 815-664-4221.

DePue will wait until next tornado season for sirens By Goldie Currie gcurrie@bcrnews.com

DEPUE – Although DePue’s ongoing siren project is making progressive strides, the village board has learned their sirens won’t be in the ground and ready to blare until next tornado season. Chamlin and Associates engineer Don Bixby met with the board on Monday and explained new sirens take anywhere from 12 to 18 weeks to be delivered. “Nobody stocks them. Nobody inventories anything. They want you to order it and then they build them,” he said. “Obviously we’re going to miss this whole season. We are looking at next year’s tornado season when we’d have things in and operational.” The plans and specs for the project are still underway and are about 90 to 95 percent completed, according to Bixby. He said final plans will be completed once details from a recent meeting with village president Eric Bryant, village fire chief Steve Rauh and a communications representative are finalized and put together.

In the meantime, Bixby recommended the village put together an “alternates list” of items that could be purchased if the siren bids come in lower than the $100,000 grant money the village has to spend. “With the grant money, you want to spend it all,” he said. Items Bixby suggested was putting out contract bids for removing the old sirens once the new ones were in place or purchasing a generator for the radio base as a back-up when the electricity might fail. “It’s whatever might be an advantage to the community,” he said. Board trustee Dan Hoffert said if a generator is purchased to make note it would include an automatic transfer vs. a manual transfer. “The cost difference isn’t huge, but it’s well worth whatever you’d spend,” he said. Once the old sirens are removed, Bixby said they will be salvage and available to the village if it wishes to scrap the materials. The village will be installing a siren in Oak Brook, replacing the siren in White City and moving the siren

location near the village shed to Firemen’s Park. In other news, the board: • Reorganized and sat new board members Bill Laicoff and Chuck Casford. • Approved the hiring of Mark Olszewski as full-time village police officer and Brad Foster as part-time village police officer. • Accepted a bid from Scheri Electric for $89.70 to upgrade the lighting in the wastewater treatment plant. • Approved a special event liquor license for the DePue Men’s Club. • Approved a $100 donation for Healthy Kids Camp at St. Margaret’s Hospital in Spring Valley. • An electronic recycling drive will take place in the village from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. Bryant warned the company organizing the drive will charge people wishing to recycle old televisions. The price will be anywhere from $15 to $25. “You can recycle televisions, it’s just going to cost you,” he said. • Board trustee Gerald Favero reminded the public the village has an ordinance against dumping grass clippings on the street. Comment on this story at www.bcrnews.com.

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Remembering the past Richard Dorsch (left) and Paula Morrow (right) portray local historical community leaders Darius Miller and Margaret D. Trimble, respectively, during Saturday’s National Train Day at the Princeton Amtrak Railroad Depot and the neighboring Darius Miller Park. As told by the actors, Trimble wrote a letter to Miller in 1910 asking if he could help Princeton update its train depot, which he did. A new depot was built and dedicated in December 1911. Other activities during Saturday’s event included music by the local Barbershoppers group, a historic train display and food vendors.

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PRINCETON — Perry Memorial Hospital in Princeton is recognizing National Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Week, May 19-25,. A banquet for area EMS providers will be held Tuesday in the PMH cafeteria in recognition for the dedication and services they provide. The provision of Emergency Medical Services is a vital public service and EMS providers are ready to provide lifesaving care to those in need 24 hours

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4 Local 4 • Local • Thursday, May 16, 2013

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Obituaries Lois Erickson OHIO, Ill. — Lois Erickson, 87, of Ohio, Ill., passed away Monday, May 13, 2013, at St. Margaret’s Hospital in Spring Valley. She was born Jan. 16, 1926, in Ohio, Ill., to Seth and Mary (Schultz) Anderson. She graduated from Ohio High School in 1945. She was a farm wife and mother. She golfed and belonged to Green River Country Club in Walnut. Lois married James Robert Erickson on Nov. 30, 1947, in Dixon. He died on May 8, 2004. She was a member of Ohio Lutheran Church.

Thomas Stevens Jr. SPRING VALLEY — Thomas Joseph Stevens Jr., 25, of 212 W. Dakota St., Spring Valley, died Monday, May 13, 2013, in his home. He was born June 23, 1987, in Peru to Tom and Connie (Marlett) Stevens. He worked in maintenance and computer tech at the Spring Valley Nursing Center. He attended Illinois Valley Community College and loved computers and playing chess. Surviving are his

Joseph Soldati CHERRY — Joseph L. “Bluto” Soldati, 64, of Cherry passed away Sunday, May 12, 2013, at St. Mary’s Hospital in Rochester, Minn., following an extended illness. Joseph was born Dec. 28, 1948, in Spring Valley to Delio and Loretta (Padgett) Soldati. He was a class of 1967 graduate of Hall High School and attended a heavy equipment operator’s trade school in Texas for two years. He married Lynn Hegland on Oct. 27, 1967, in Princeton. He worked as a pipe insulator for Sprinkman in Peoria and also worked as a laborer for Local 393. He was a member of the U.A.W. at Sauer-Danfoss where he worked for over

Library From Page 1 Ron Behrends and Dave Forristall talked to village board members about the replacement of the sidewalk in front of Indian Valley Inn and Valley Market this summer that is estimated to cost about $10,000. Tiskilwa Community Association members will pay for the cost of the materials needed for the project, estimated to cost about $10,000. Village board members approved TCA using a village backhoe and truck to haul the old concrete away for the project, estimated to take about a week to 10 days to complete. Board members also

Lois is survived by her two daughters, Sandra (Don) Watson of Walnut and Sally Lois (Dave) TayErickson lor of Princeton. Also surviving are 10 grandchildren, Denise (John) Pikula, Susan (Kevin) Goyke, Deanna (Pete) Prescott, Angie Taylor, Cherie Taylor, Staff Sgt. Brad Taylor, Eric (Leah) Taylor, Phillip Erickson, Courtney Erickson and Tammie (Tim) Sayler; and nine greatgrandchildren.

She was preceded in death by her parents; her husband; one son, Richard James Erickson in 1984; one sister; and one brother. Services will be at 11 a.m. Saturday at the Norberg Memorial Home, Princeton, with the Rev. Katie Voigt officiating. Burial will follow in Elm Lawn Memorial Park, Princeton. The family will receive friends from 5 to 7 p.m. Friday at the funeral home. Memorials may be directed to the donor’s choice. Online condolences may be left at www.norbergfh.com.

mother, Connie (Ron) Thompson of Spring Valley; his father, Thomas (Cristy) Stevens Sr. of Tonica; one son, Rylan Stevens; his best friend and mother of Rylan, Jolene Kaszynski of Peru; three sisters, Katherine (Justin) Carrier of North Carolina, Alayna Stevens of Tonica and Angelica Marlett of Spring Valley; four brothers, Joshawa (Katelyn Welsch) Thompson of Spring Valley, Alex Marlett of Spring Valley, Jeremiah Marsala of Spring Valley and Ryan Stevens of Tonica;

one niece and nephew, Sophia and Landon; his paternal grandparents, Mel and Rose Stevens of Peru; and aunts, uncles and cousins. He was preceded in death by his maternal grandparents. Services will be at 7 p.m. Friday in the Hurst Funeral Home, LaSalle, with the Rev. Betty Delgado officiating. Visitation will be from 4 to 7 p.m. Friday in the funeral home. Cremation rites will follow and burial of his ashes will be at a later date in Miller Cemetery in Spring Valley.

35 years. He was a member of Millwrights Local 1693. He was a life-time member of Holy Joseph Trinity CathoSoldati lic Church in Cherry and was a volunteer for the Cherry Fire Department for 30 years, where he had served as chief for one term. He had served on the Cherry Village Board as trustee for 30 years. He was a member of the Cherry Booster Club. He enjoyed fishing, hunting, gardening and his grandchildren. He is survived by his wife, Lynn Soldati of Cherry; two sons, Joseph J. (Maribeth) Soldati of Arlington and Christopher D. (Shantel) Soldati of Cherry; three grandchil-

dren, Morgan and Madison of Cherry, and Devin of Arlington; and one brother, Dean (Mary Beth) Soldati of LaMoille. He was preceded in death by his parents. Services will be at 11 a.m. Saturday in the Fiocchi Funeral Home, Cherry, with the Rev. Robert Spilman officiating. Interment will be in the Ladd Cemetery. Visitation will be from 4 to 7 p.m. Friday at the funeral home. Memorials may be directed to the wishes of his family. Pallbearers will be: Harry Deacon, Mike Stuckert, Howard Raef, Ken Bodnum, Robert McCook, Tim Fonderoli and Joe Wenzel. See more obituaries on Page 5.

decided to keep the flower boxes on Main Street in this block after the project is finished instead of removing them as well as having the flower box in front of the current library be relocated to allow for the handicapped accessible parking spaces and ramps for the library addition. Board members decided to spend around $10,000 to repair various creek areas around the village damaged by the recent flooding. If Bureau County is declared a federal disaster area, the village may be able to recoup these funds, said Mayor Randy Philhower. Money will be placed in the village’s appropriation ordinance for this work in the next fiscal year that started

May 1. With Strawberry Festival being moved back one week to June 15 this year due to cold spring temperatures not allowing strawberries to grow, the village’s clean-up day is set for June 21. Philhower also told board members that it will cost about $48,000 to replace two filters and new sand at the village’s sewer plant and work at the water tank should be finished in June after the power company connects electrical lines. On Wednesday, trustee Kim Rich reminded residents that extra garbage needs to be tagged or they will be billed by the village. Comment on this story at www.bcrnews.com.

SV’s waters have receded, but the problems remain By Brock Cooper news@bcrnews.com

SPRING VALLEY – The flood water may be receding, but the damage done has taken its toll on the Spring Valley wastewater treatment plant. The direction taken with repairs will depend on the amount of federal money that may eventually become available. “Everything is so much in the air,” Alderman Tom Nesti said at Monday’s council meeting. The recent flood took its toll on the plant and the city has to decide if it’s worth building a brand new plant or fixing the issues at the old one. Currently, Bureau County has not been declared a disaster area like LaSalle County and that means the amount of federal money is limited. Mayor Walk Marini said he recently spoke with

federal legislators and discovered that counties that had people displaced from their homes were named first and that Bureau County will likely make the cut soon. “We were somewhat assured that we’ll be declared a federal disaster area,” Marini said. The wastewater treatment plant was undergoing renovations from a federal IKE grant, which was awarded after Hurricane Ike brought nonstop heavy rains in September 2008. That work has been postponed while the city decides its next move. City Engineer Larry Good said he contacted the grant agency to see if the money could be rerouted for the current flood damage, but it can’t. There could be future grant opportunities, but it’s too early to tell. The city council will

also seek a 120-day extension for a long-term control plan for the water and sewer system that is due June 8. Given the flood, Good wanted have a better handle on the flood impact and not be hurried to meet the deadline. Superintendent of Public Works John Schultz said he met the officials from the Federal Emergency Management Agency about the treatment plant. They will visit the wastewater treatment plant soon to examine the damage themselves. There will be a Public Health and Safety Committee meeting at 6:30 p.m. today, Thursday, and a Finance Committee, Water and Sewer Committee and Streets and Alleys Committee meetings beginning at 6:30 p.m. May 23. Comment on this story at www.bcrnews.com.

Arlington Park and Shelter Project hosts fried chicken dinner ARLINGTON — A fried chicken dinner, sponsored by Arlington Park and Shelter Project Committee, will be served from 4 to 8 p.m. Tuesday at Bruno’s in Cherry. The dinner will include one-quarter fried chicken, fries and cole slaw. Carry-outs will be available and the cost is $7 per order. A bake sale and raffles will be offered. All proceeds benefit the Arlington park shelter project.


5 Obit Records Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Thursday, May 16, 2013 • Record & Obit • 5

John Ziegler

William Wimbiscus Jr.

Richard Von Holten

Sheryl Cotter

Mary Crain

TISKILWA — John Stephen “Steve” Ziegler, 62, of Tiskilwa passed away at 10:10 p.m. Wednesday, May 8, 2013, in Kewanee Care Home as the result of complications of a massive stroke he suffered April 13, 2013, at his home. He was born Oct. 11, 1950, in Princeton to Howard F. and Carolyn I. (Allen) Ziegler Sr. and lived his entire life on the same farm in rural Tiskilwa. He was a 1968 graduate of Tiskilwa High School. He was of the Protestant faith and served a six-year hitch with the Army Reserve Unit based in Princeton, beginning in 1969, achieving the rank of drill sergeant. He married Addie Kathleen “Kathy” Canary of Chillicothe July 29, 1978, and she survives in Tiskilwa. They would have celebrated their 35th anniversary this year. He is survived by two sons, Jonathan Luke Ziegler of Tiskilwa and Jacob Paul Ziegler of Peoria. Survivors also include two brothers, Howard (Cathy) Ziegler Jr. of Carbondale and Craig Ziegler of Tiskilwa; a nephew, Chad Heilstedt of Henry; and a special aunt, Ruth Ziegler of Tiskilwa. He was preceded in death by his parents, grandparents, and several aunts and uncles. He grew up with a determined work ethic and always had more work planned ahead of him than a normal man ever had time for. He farmed the home place until retiring in 1997, was a farrier into the 1990s, having taken instruction with Oklahoma State Horse Shoeing School, roasted whole hogs for wedding receptions and family gatherings in the local area for a number of years, and enjoyed hunting raccoons behind a couple of hounds in his “spare time.” He was an avid outdoorsman and enjoyed all varieties of hunting, including morels every spring. He was the resident butcher for Marshall-Putnam Locker for many years before purchasing the establishment in 1993. He then worked in the meat department of Sullivan’s supermarket in Princeton before retiring in 2011. He was a member of the former Bureau County Sheriff’s Posse and the Bradford Saddle Club. Per his wishes, his body has been donated to science and cremation rites will be accorded with burial in Mount Bloom in Tiskilwa at a later date. A memorial service will be at 11 a.m. Saturday at the Tiskilwa Community Church with a celebration of his life following until 1 p.m. Memorials may be directed to his family. The Norberg Memorial Home in Princeton is in charge of arrangements

SPRING VALLEY — William James Wimbiscus Jr., 86, passed away Tuesday, May 14, 2013. Born Aug. 29, 1926, to Judge William J. and Mae (Walsh) Wimbiscus of Spring Valley, he married Eleanor Bruder Sept. 24, 1955. She survives. He was a 1944 graduate of St. Bede Academy and then served in the U.S. Army during World War II. After graduating from the University of Illinois in 1949 with a bachelor of science degree in law, he then earned a juris doctor in law from DePaul University College of Law in 1951, passing the Illinois State Bar exam while still a student. He was admitted to practice before the U.S. District Court Northern District of Illinois in 1951, the U.S. Supreme Court in 1972 and the U.S. Court of Appeals Seventh Circuit in 1981. He joined his father, Judge William J. Wimbiscus Sr., at the Wimbiscus Law Firm in 1951. The firm was established in 1917 and continues to this day. He also served as Spring Valley City Attorney from 1965 to 1981 and DePue Village Attorney from 1975 to 2010. He was a member of Illinois State Bar Association, past president and member of Bureau County Bar Association and a member of LaSalle-Peru-Oglesby Bar Association. He was a member and past president of St. Margaret’s Hospital Board of Directors, as well as a member of Hall Township High School Education Foundation, Prairieland Home Care Advisory Committee and Dominic O’Berto Post 182 of the American Legion. He donated legal services to many community and civic organizations. Also surviving are six children, John (SangHui), Sarah, Bill (Sara), Tom (Maureen), Neal and Mary (Phillip) Telfer; one brother, Judge James (Jude) Wimbiscus; one sister, Jane Johnson; 11 grandchildren; and numerous nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents; his stepmother, Leona (Mason) Wimbiscus; and one brother, Robert (Donna) Wimbiscus. Services will be at 11 a.m. Friday at the Barto Funeral Home, Spring Valley. Internment at Mount Olivet Cemetery will be private. Visitation will be 4 to 8 p.m. today, Thursday at the funeral home, with a prayer service conducted by the Spring Valley American Legion at 6:30 p.m.

WALNUT — Richard Raymond Von Holten, 88, of Walnut passed away Sunday, May 12, 2013, at his home surrounded by his family. Born Dec. 11, 1924, in rural Rock Falls to Otto and Margaret (Whyte) Von Holten, he married Rosetta Wallace Nov. 24, 1946, at Immanuel Lutheran Church of Rock Falls. She survives. He attended Advance Grade School, Mekeel Grade School and Walnut High School. He also served as president of the board at Mekeel School. He served in the Army as a radio/radar operator during World War II in the South Pacific theatre. He was a member of the Walnut American Legion. He farmed north of Deer Grove and many years north of Walnut and later worked for PAG/Cargill Seeds south of Walnut, until his retirement. He was a former member of Immanuel Lutheran Church of Rock Falls where he was active in the church choir, council and Lutheran Brotherhood. At present he was a member of the New Life Lutheran Church of Sterling. Also surviving are two sons, Bruce (Charlotte) Von Holten of Walnut and Bradd (Emily) Von Holten of Walnut; six daughters, Becky (Marvin) Larson of Rowlett, Texas, Susan (Dave) Lauritzen of Wyanet, Rhea Von (Mel Klinkenberg) Holten of Walnut, LuCindy (Bob) Foss of Walnut, Coleen (Clifton) Hon of Cincinnati, Ohio, and Colette (Scott) Odell of Rockwall, Texas; 16 grandchildren; 19 great-grandchildren; five sisters, Marie Schulte, Ellen (Boots) Spencer, Betty Ann Oberle, Marge Parker and Euryth Vickrey; and many nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents; and six brothers, Leo, James, John, Eugene, Robert “Bob” and Don. Services will be at 10:30 a.m. today, Thursday, at the New Life Lutheran Church, Sterling, with Pastor William Sullivan officiating. Burial will be in the Coloma Township Cemetery, Rock Falls. Visitation was held Wednesday at the McDonald Funeral Home, Rock Falls. Memorials may be directed to New Life Lutheran Church in Sterling.

CLINTON, Iowa — Sheryl Kay Cotter, 69, of Clinton, Iowa, lost her battle with cancer on Tuesday, May 14, 2013, at Mercy Living Center – North in Clinton, Iowa, with her husband at her side. She was born on Sept. 24, 1943, in Spring Valley to Leslie Kohl Stites and Agnes (Craig) Stites. She married her soul mate, William Sheryl Patrick Cotter from Tiskilwa, on June 6, Cotter 1964. Sheryl worked at Rock Island Arsenal, Clinton Corn Processing Co., and Mount Saint Clare Speech and Hearing Center. She was also a member of the JW Chapter of PEO. Although her life was cut short, she was able to live it to the fullest. She enjoyed spending time with family and friends and she especially loved to tryout new recipes on her guests. She also enjoyed playing bridge and visiting with her six grandchildren. Sheryl is survived by her loving husband, Bill of 48 years; two daughters, Leslie Ewers of Cumming, Ga., and Kathy (Mike) Lang of Des Moines, Iowa; two brothers, Roger Stites and Michael (Nancy) Stites; and her sister, Shirley (Dr. William) Nied. She was preceded in death by her mother and father. Her funeral services will be at 11 a.m. Friday at Prince of Peace Catholic Church. Visitation will be from 9 a.m. until the time of Mass at the church. Burial will be in the Clinton Lawn Cemetery. Casket bearers are her six grandchildren, Sam, Ben and Allie Ewers, and Kohl, Connor and Cameron Lang. The Clinton Chapel of Snell-Zornig Funeral Homes & Crematory is in charge of arrangements. Online condolences may be expressed by visiting her obituary at www. snellzornig.com. Thank you to all the family and friends, including the Ninth Avenue North crew, for looking after Sheryl and Bill during this heartbreaking time. In addition, the family wishes to thank the staff at Mercy Living Center – North for their compassion and care. Sheryl greatly appreciated all of the visitors she had during her illness, it warmed her heart. In lieu of flowers, memorials can be given to Prince of Peace Parish Building Fund or the Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Iowa or a charity of your choice.

PRESCOTT, Wis. — A celebration of life for Mary Christine (Bence) Crain, 64, of Prescott, Wis., who passed away at 7:04 a.m. Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013, at her home after a long battle with cancer, will be at 11 a.m. Saturday in the Elm Lawn Memorial Chapel in Princeton. A luncheon will follow the service at the home of Mike and Kathy Smith, 13701 1250 East St., Wyanet. She was born May 18, 1948, to Earl and Betty (Coble) Bence. She is survived by her four children, Lisa (Loren) Burton of Manlius, Eric (Sherry) LaCroix of Prescott, Wis., Donald (Melissa) LaCroix of Mondovi, Wis., and Sandra Novak of Prescott, Wis.; one brother, Kenneth (Sharon) Bence of Princeton; one sister, Kathleen (Michael) Smith of Wyanet; 13 grandchildren; four nieces and two nephews; five great-nieces and nine great-nephews; and one great-great-nephew. She was preceded in death by parents; her maternal and paternal grandparents; and two special couples, Lil and Martin, and Jack and Ann Willis.

Mildred Drake PRINCETON — Mildred “Loraine” Drake, 90, of Princeton passed away on Tuesday, May 7, 2013, in Zearing. She was born June 7, 1922, in Stafford, Va., to William and Rosa (Baber) Shackleford. She graduated high school in Virginia and went on to business school in Washington, D.C. There, she met Donald E. Drake from Princeton and they were married Feb. 3, 1949. He died Feb. 25, 2002. After moving to Illinois, she spent her time being a homemaker and farm wife. She was passionate about gardening and being outside and she was happiest doing things for her family. She showed her endless love by her actions to those closest to her and was beloved by those who knew her also. Loraine is survived by her three children, James Edward (Terrie) Drake of Princeton, Barbara Jean Borys of Princeton and Karen Sue (Steve) James of Salem, Wis. Also surviving are nine grandchildren, David and Daniel Drake, Shirley (the late Jim) Morse, Ben Borys, Sarah (Steve) Lawyer, Peter (Heidi) James, and Adam, Mark and Sarah James; and nine great-grandchildren, Matt, Sam, Lizzie and Erica Lawyer, and Ali, Austin, Maddy, McKenzie and Brooklynn Borys. Surviving as well is one sister-in-law, Charlotte (the late Bill) Shackleford, and her family of Virginia. She was preceded in death by her parents, husband, an infant granddaughter, and brothers and sisters. A memorial service will be at 7 p.m. May 24 at the Princeton Wesleyan Church with Pastor Doug Kirkpatrick officiating. Visitation will be held prior to the service from 5 to 7 p.m. at the church. Memorials may be directed to 1033 Ambulance Service.

WYANET — Gerald “Jerry” J. Clift Sr., 65, of Wyanet passed away at 9 a.m. Monday, May 13, 2013, at his home in Wyanet. He was born June 18, 1947, in Henry to James and Virginia (Cayton) Clift. He was a machinist and farmer. Survivors include two sons, Jerry (Lori) Clift Jr. of Wyanet and Luke Clift of Wyanet; one daughter, Shelly Clift of Princeton; and five grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents. Services will be at 10 a.m. Saturday at the Grant-Johnson Funeral Home, Princeton, with Pastor Willy Minnix of the Bureau Township Community Church, rural Wyanet, officiating. Burial will be in Oak Hill Cemetery, Tiskilwa. Visitation will be from 5 to 7 p.m. Friday at the funeral home. Memorials may be directed to St. Margaret’s Hospice in Spring Valley.

Marie Vetter HOOPPOLE — Marie S. Vetter, 74, of Hooppole died Tuesday, May 14, 2013, at OSF St. Francis Medical Center in Peoria. Services will be at 10:30 a.m. Monday at the Zion United Methodist Church, Hooppole, with the Rev. Dan Wright, pastor, officiating. Burial will be in the Hooppole Cemetery. Visitation will be from 4 to 7 p.m. Sunday at the Garland Funeral Home in Walnut.

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6 Perspective 6 • Thursday, May 16, 2013

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Perspective Bureau County

Republican

Serving Bureau County Since 1847

Sam R Fisher

Terri Simon

Publisher

Editor

The perpetual student It sounds cliché to say you are never too old to learn something new every day, but this is a philosophy I actually live by. I completed my formal education in 2005 when I finally graduated with my master’s degree in cultural anthropology. Yet, the student in me is alive and well and continues to seek out new information constantly. In particular, I am very active about participating in ongoing education that is relevant to my field of work, cooking and innkeeping. One would assume that having been in business for more than eight years now, I kind of know what I’m doing, but in a COMMENTARY constantly changing world, the game of doing business constantly changes. And in order to stay relevant, you have to keep up with what is new, adapt and put these new procedures into practice. First off, and I believe this pertains to just about any profession out there, conferences and educational seminars are always being held. And more and more often, these are being held as webinars that you can take from the comfort of your own home right on your own computer, so you don’t even have to invest in travel expenses to participate. We religiously attend our annual Illinois Bed and Breakfast Association meetings every spring, and without fail, I return home with a ton of new information and a renewed sense of enthusiasm for the work we do. Barring catastrophe, I will never miss one of these meetings. It is not only a benefit of membership but a unique opportunity to pick the minds of others in the same business and glean valuable experience from them. And truth be told, innkeepers are a very fun bunch to hang around with. Second, there are numerous resources out there via social media and the Internet to keep abreast of new trends in any industry you may be involved in. I follow many pages on both Twitter and Facebook that pertain to innkeeping and cooking. And it doesn’t hurt to keep up with what your competitors are doing. It enables you to see what is working or not working, so you can stay competitive. I would like to issue a word of caution with the Internet. Just because it is online, doesn’t mean it is true. Make sure your resources are legitimate, and make sure you cross reference stories. Anyone can post anything online, and that can make it quite difficult to discern fact from fiction. Finally, don’t be afraid of becoming a returning student. Classes exist for returning students through many community colleges and vocational schools that are geared toward the specific needs of the returning student, for example “Using the Internet 101” or “Computer 101.” These types of courses are often held nights or weekends to fit around a busy work and/or family schedules, and they can be cost effective ways of acquiring new skills that can really make a difference in how you compete with those who are coming straight out of school. I myself recently completed a culinary certification through the International Association of Culinary Professionals. The program involved studying 25 different books related to food and cooking and then completing and passing an exam with 200 questions and three essays. Once I qualified to enter the program, which took me six years, I had one year to prepare for and pass the exam. I like to joke that it was like taking the bar exam for cooking because the topics were so wide and the specific questions random. It was intense, but I’m glad I did it, and I learned a lot. Did it make me a better chef or make me more credible to those dining with us? Probably not, but it did give me new information to use when teaching cooking classes

Monika Sudakov

Kathy Waca City you live in: Princeton. Where did you grow up: Princeton. Family: Husband Charlie; three children, Jennifer Bacorn, Eric Waca and Chris Waca; seven grandchildren. Pets: One dog. Occupation/student: Deputy clerk at the Bureau County Clerk’s office for 26 years. What is the last song you listened to: “Itsy Bitsy Spider”. What is the last book you read:

First Person A biography on Barbara Bush. What is the last TV show you watched: The Chicago Bulls. If you were stranded on a desert island and could only take one thing with you, what would it be: My family. What is your favorite local restaurant: Monicals.

If someone handed you a million dollars, how would you spend it: Share it with my children and grandchildren. If you were stranded on a desert island and could have just one meal for the rest of your life, what would it be: Pizza. People would be surprised to know that you: I am close to retirement age. Yeah! What is your favorite thing about the city you live in: I love small town life. If you could change one thing about your town, what would it be: After cleaning up my home and church basement, I feel we need an updated sewer system!

Turning around into tomorrow Turn around once, turn around twice, turn around three times, and tomorrow is here. A few weeks ago, our daughter Anjee and her husband Dan and their two girls, Addi, 5, and Emma, 4, were at our house for a visit. Addi and I were searching for treasures in the back of Grandma’s closet when she found the navy blue graduation cap worn by her mother when she graduated from high school. Addi put the cap on her head and I adjusted it just right. Addi looked at herself in the mirror, twirled around a couple times and ran to the living room to show her parents. Her folks clapped and cheered for Addi as she pretended to be a high school graduate. As I watched that little family, I couldn’t help but remember when Anjee wore that cap for real in a commencement exercise held at the Bollman Fieldhouse in New Bedford, before the new Bureau Valley High School building was built. I looked at Addi now wearing that same graduation cap, with the same long blond hair and bright blue eyes as her mother’s. Addi is, as they say, the spitting image of her mom. But 5-year-olds don’t stay in one

Donna Barker COMMENTARY place for very long, and soon Addi was finished with her twirling and skipped back down the hallway to find more treasures in Grandma’s closet. Though the whole little scene took maybe two or three minutes, for me it was one of those moments which almost stood still. I turned to follow Addi down the hallway, but stopped mid-step, turned and walked back into the living room. I knew I needed to share with Addi’s folks something which most every parent of a high school graduate already knows. “This (pointing toward Addi in her graduation cap) is going to happen tomorrow,” I said. “It may not feel like tomorrow right now, and in reality it’s another 13 years away, but when your little girl’s high school graduation comes, you will realize how quickly all those tomorrows came and went and became today.” In the next few weeks, hundreds of high school seniors will gradu-

which is invaluable, and it gave me a sense of accomplishment to have completed it. Sometimes that personal satisfaction is worth every penny and every minute of investment that you put in. I would also argue that by always trying to learn something new you set a great example for your kids. I have had several occasions to spend time with young people talking about what I do, and many are surprised to find out that I didn’t come to my profession until a little later in my academic

ate from Bureau County schools. There will be parties and cheers, camera flashes and lots of hugs. But there may also be some very tender moments for parents as they seem to turn around once, turn around twice and turn around three times and see that their little kindergartner has somehow become a high school graduate. As parents, we work and plan and worry and hope to get our kids to their high school graduations in one piece, with smiles and confidence as they head out the door to college, to jobs, to the military, to more dreams. I remember wondering if I had done enough, helped enough, stood back enough, prayed enough to prepare my kids for heading out the door. I remember taking a deep breath and letting go. So graduates, if your moms and dads get a little choked up when they see you put on your cap and gown, if their eyes get a little misty, remember to be gentle with them and let them hurt just a bit before your celebration begins. That so distant tomorrow has become today for them. BCR Senior Staff Writer Donna Barker can be reached at dbarker@ bcrnews.com.

career. I convey to them that the very act of learning is valuable, and everything you learn is useful in some capacity, so never stop. You’d be amazed at the impact this has had with them. Who knows, you might just inspire someone to achieve something they thought impossible, and that would be truly remarkable. Monika Sudakov is the chef and innkeeper at the Chestnut Street Inn in Sheffield. She can be reached at monikaandjeff@chestnut-inn.com.


7 Life Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Life&Arts

Thursday, May 16, 2013 • 7 Open house — An open house to honor Deacon John Murphy for his 25 years of service will be held Saturday. See Page 10.

Students recognized — Area students have been recognized for their recent accomplishments. See who they are on Page 9.

Community Notes Meeting set KEWANEE — The Henry County Genealogical Society will meet at 1:30 p.m. Monday in the second floor meeting room of the Kewanee Public Library. Don Schmidt will give a presentation on “Stark County Families and History,” the new history of Stark County was published in February 2013. All are welcome.

Photo contributed

Pictured is a photo of the 1976 downtown Spring Valley fire of Steinberg’s Furniture Store.

Gene Scheri will present program on SVFD’s history on Tuesday SPRING VALLEY — Fire Chief Emeritus Gene Scheri will present a program at the Spring Valley Historic Association Museum at 7 p.m. Tuesday. Scheri, who has been a member of the Spring Valley Volunteer Fire Department for more than 50 years, will discuss some of the highlights of the SVFD’s 127-year history. There is no

charge to attend the event. The SVHA Museum is located at 201 W. St. Paul St., Spring Valley, and is open Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. or by appointment. Memberships are $15 a year per individual and $20 a year per family. Membership forms may be downloaded from www.spring-valley.il.us. For more information, call 815-830-4303.

Manlius High School reunion MANLIUS — The Committee for the Grand Reunion  II of Manlius High School has announced the Bureau Valley High School Show Choir will perform at that event. The committee has also

announced Helen Hermes Conway, who was formerly the head of the music department at the former Manlius High School, will be the honored guest. The reunion will be at noon Saturday at Hunter’s Ridge Golf Course,

three miles south of Princeton on Route 26. The building is handicapped accessible. Reservations can be made by calling Gail Etheridge at 815-6264731  or Jim Carlson at 815-332-5916.

Memorial Day activities in Neponset NEPONSET — Neponset American Legion Post 875 will hold its annual Memorial Day program at 11 a.m. May 27 in the Neponset Community Building. This year’s guest speaker is Sam Rice from Toulon. He is a Vietnam veteran that served 14 months as an infantryman. He was highly decorated for valor and service with eight commendations with the rank of sergeant when discharged. He currently lives in Toulon with his wife and has three sons. As a dedicated person he has served as Past 16th District Commander, past commander Toulon American Legion, member of Toulon American Legion and member of Toulon V.F.W. The American Legion will present the colors and Neponset Grade School student Victoria Crofton will lead the Pledge of Allegiance. Carol Gerrond will be the accompanist to the National Anthem. The invocation will be presented by Ron Toliver, pastor of the Congregational Church. The Lincoln Gettysburg Address will be read by

Neponset Grade School student Jessica Crofton and Tom Blake will read the Roster of Graves listing Neponset area veterans dating back to the War of 1812. Audio and music will be provided by Gregg Gunning of Neponset. After the program, Post 875 will present military ceremonies to honor veterans buried at both Floral Hill and West cemeteries, then will conclude with Taps. Several days before Memorial Day, Jon Pickering will coordinate the setting of the Avenue of Flags at Floral Hill Cemetery to honor some 155 veterans buried there. Wendell Yepsen will coordinate the settings of small flags at grave markers of all veterans in Floral Hill and West cemeteries. Flags will also line Scott Park and downtown Commercial Street. The American Legion Post is asking Neponset residents to fly the American flag on Memorial Day to express appreciation to all veterans and current members of the Armed Forces.

The Neponset Historical Society will serve a luncheon after the completion of the program. Student Victoria Crofton will lead the Pledge of Allegiance.

Benefit planned WALNUT — A Trivia Night Benefit for Cora Peters will be held June 8 at the Walnut Park Shelter. Check-in will be at 6 p.m. The cost is $100 per table (10-person teams). To reserve a table, call Candy Lind at 815-3799394 or 815-866-1297. Concessions will be available. To donate or volunteer to help, call Julie Estrada at 815-303-2523. Cora was diagnosed with synovial sarcoma in the summer of 2009. She has had several surgeries and rounds of chemo and radiation and continues fighting. This benefit will help with medical bills.

Donations wanted PRINCETON — The Princeton Veterans Group will begin accepting donations of good used items for an upcoming rummage sale in June. To donate items, call Brad Oeder at 815-866-9349 or the American Legion Post at 815-872-1171 and leave a message. Arrangements can be

made to pick up larger donations such as couches, TVs, tables/chairs, computers, etc. by calling the above numbers. Small kitchen appliances will be accepted if in good working order. This is a major fundraiser for the group so they can continue their veterans work in the local area.

Scouts meeting SPRING VALLEY — Spring Valley Cub Scout Pack 3133 will hold a spring recruitment and information night Wednesday at the Spring Valley City Hall Park Shelter. The program will start at 6:30 p.m. with an informational meeting for parents and games/ activities for boys. In case of rain, event will be held in the Spring Valley Com-

munity Room at City Hall. Pack 3133 is open to all boys in grades 1-5 from Spring Valley and surrounding areas. Boys can join at any level regardless of whether they have been involved in scouting previously. For more information, contact Sally Johll, Cubmaster, at svpack3133@gmail. com or 815-664-2487.

Building open MANLIUS — The First State Bank building at 122 E. Maple Ave. in downtown Manlius will once again be open from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. May 23 and 25. Hours will be the same each week from then on. In June the hours may be added to; notice will be given of any changes in hours open.

Make Someone Happy • Happy 14th birthday on Friday to Rachel Jensen. We love you forever, Mom, Dad and Abby.

Andersons note 70th wedding anniversary Mr. and Mrs. LaVerne Anderson are celebrating their 70th wedding anniversary today, Thursday. LaVerne Anderson and the former Maxine Carroll were married May 16, 1943, in Princeton. They are the parents of five children, Wayne, Linda (Jerry) Harris, Terry, Andy and Bob. They also have five grandchildren, 13 greatgrandchildren and four great-great-grandchildren. ••• Visit the BCR online at www.bcrnews.com.

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8 Life 8 • Life & Arts • Thursday, May 16, 2013

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Photo contributed Photo contributed

BCUW awards grant to Buddy Bags program Bureau County United Way recently awarded a $500 Community Impact Grant to Buddy Bags. Buddy Bags is a program that provides food to at-risk children on the weekends. To donate, volunteer or for information about Buddy Bags, contact Mark Frank at 815-875-2249. The United Way’s mission is to increase the organized capacity of people to care for one another. The BCUW may be reached at 815-872-0821. Pictured (front row, from left) are Genevieve Charry, Rachel Denton and Angie Turpen; and (back row) Karin Tunis, Dani Regal, Amy Peterson, BCUW Board Member Judson Lusher and Gerri Frank.

Royal Neighbors install 2013 officers Prophetstown Royal Neighbors of America Adult Chapter 516 installed officers for the 2013 year at its March meeting. New officers include (front row, from left) Betty Dennis, recorder/treasurer; Sheila Raser, flag bearer; Gladys Swanson, chancellor; Connie Murphy, vice president; and Donna Brooks, marshal; and (back row) Anita Stickel, member; Anna Mae Johnson, unselfishness; Janet Morris, courage; Kathy Rase, president; Alice Grimes, modesty; Mary Church, assistant marshal; Alice Manon, faith; Esther Kuelper, past president; and event planner Terry L Gaskill, FICF (partially hidden). Absent from photo, Pat Uhler, endurance. Chapter 516 meets on the third Tuesday of the month in the early. Call Gaskill for more information at 815-535-3665 and call Royal Neighbors National Headquarters at 1-800-627-4762 for more information on beneficial membership for the whole family or go to www.royalneighbors.org for more information.

World Language Organization installs new officers for 2013-14 Buda Township High School Alumni OGLESBY — Illinois Valley Community College’s World Language Organization (WLO) recently held its eighth annual meeting and new officer installation. New WLO officers for the 2013-14 academic year are Teirra Fulkerson of Grand Ridge,

program executive, and Alexander Groh of Ottawa, membership executive. Installed as part of the Spanish language ceremony were new Sigma Delta Mu members Alex Groh of Ottawa, Amy Lester and Carlie Quinn of Spring Valley, Shawna

Wilcox of Peru, Teirra Fulkerson of Grand Ridge, Georgia Farris of Streator, Stacey Mounce of Manville and Blake Slutz of LaMoille. Zeta of Illinois Chapter of Sigma Delta Mu is the National Spanish Honor Society for the first two years of college.

Association to hold annual dinner

BUDA — The Buda Township High School Alumni Association will hold its annual dinner meeting May 25 at Hidden Lake Country Club, Sheffield. Social time will be at

5 p.m. followed by the dinner at 6 p.m. Honored guests will be the Class of 1953. Also being honored will be the Class of 1963, members of Western who attended Buda High

School. A payment of $20 per person should be returned no later than Sunday to: Dona Becker, P.O. Box 123, LaMoille, IL 61330.

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9 Life Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Thursday, May 16, 2013 • Life & Arts • 9

Crossroads High School students take trip to Creation Museum TISKILWA — Students from Crossroads High School took an out-ofstate trip recently that was a culmination of their studies in science and history. The students went to the Creation Museum in Petersburg, Ky., and the Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati, Ohio. Throughout the year, students have been investigating the evolution controversy. This year, the interdisciplinary studies at Crossroads High School focused on American history. Students gained a greater insight into the experiences and contributions of black Americans, their trials and tri-

umphs, in a variety of ways. In addition to this field trip, the students engaged in a number of other experiences this year to understand how black and white people interacted with each other throughout American history. They visited the Lincoln Museum in Springfield in November and recently attended a presentation by author and speaker Clarice Boswell entitled “Pre-Civil War Quilts: Their Hidden Codes to the Freedom of Slaves through the Underground Railroad,” which was sponsored by the Tiskilwa Library and hosted at the Tiskilwa Historical Society.

Crossroads students also read the “Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass” and Mark Twain’s “Huckleberry Finn,” and they viewed the preeminent PBS documentary “Eyes on the Prize” on the Civil Rights movement. As a climax, the students have been preparing “Walk, Don’t Ride,” a one-act drama with music by Peter Manos, as their year-end performance. “We were thrilled to find a play that allows the students to step into the shoes of various leaders in the Civil Rights movement, each telling their story,” said drama teacher Elizabeth Jones.

Photo contributed

Crossroads High School students at the Creation Museum include (from row, from left) Clayton Brown, Morgan Cole (alumna), Elisabeth Porter, teacher Elizabeth Jones, teacher Yasmeen Bouwman, Thomas Cook; and (back row) Jeffrey Scott (standing), Elizabeth Henrikson, Dominique Morris and Reuben Horst.

Photo contributed Photo contributed

Bradford Junior High Scholastic Bowl competes The Bradford Junior High Scholastic Bowl team including (front row, from left) Jessica Sears, Alissa Johnson, April Atkins, Jared Code; and (back row) Delaney Johnston, Kendra Selby, Jacob Painter, Dalton Hancher, Brianna Endress, Robert Rouse and coach Angela Stange placed second in the April 24 regional tournament in Princeville. Participating schools were Princeville, Bradford, Galva and Stark County. Princeville placed first and will compete in sectionals. Bradford had a record of four wins and three losses for the season. The team placed third in the BVEC Tournament on March 12.

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Hall High School prom court announced This year’s Hall High School prom court includes first runners-up Roosvelt Fuentes (from left), the son of Roosvelt and Cecilia Fuentes of Spring Valley, and Erica Loveland, the daughter of Pete and Sandra Loveland of Spring Valley; queen Ashley Keegan, the daughter of Tom and Shelly Keegan of Ladd; king Tim Perez, the son of Mary Perez of Spring Valley; and second runners-up Taylor Galassi, the daughter of Marc and Dani Galassi of Cherry and Nathan Tonozzi, the son of Don and Lori Tonozzi of Spring Valley. The Hall High School prom, sponsored by the Class of 2014, was held April 27 at the Oak Ridge Golf Club. This year’s theme was “Hollywood Nights.” Class sponsors are Ann Maller and Teresa Colmone.

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10 Life 10 • Life & Arts • Thursday, May 16, 2013

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Religion Briefs Vacation Bible School TISKILWA — Enrollment has begun for the Tiskilwa Community Vacation Bible School which will be from 6 to 8 p.m. June 17-20. All Tiskilwa churches are involved,

Canadian performer to share ‘songs of faith for small, tall’ PRINCETON — Over the past 10 years, Bryan Moyer Suderman has logged many thousands of miles, mostly by train, with a soul full of music and communities eager to listen and sing along. At 6 p.m. May 22, he will be sharing his “songs of faith for small and tall” at the Evangelical Covenant Church, 24 N Main St. in Princeton. Suderman has a knack for writing songs that are at once simple, catchy, profound and fun for all ages. Since the release of his first CD “God’s Love is for Everybody” in 2002, his songs have become favorites of families and congregations across North America and beyond. His “SmallTall Music” ministry (www.smalltallmusic. com) has been his “flexible full-time” vocation since 2003, and “New World Coming,” his most recent CD release, is a compilation drawn from five studio albums over the past 10 years. Suderman loves to sing and people of all ages love to sing along, whether in congregational settings, intimate house concerts or large conferences. Christian Week magazine has described his music as “melodious, guitar-driven folk with simple lyrics that tell important biblical stories and theological truths.” Audiences respond to the warmth of his voice, the contagious nature of his songs, and his signature interactive style of singing and song leading. Suderman lives near Toronto, Ontario, with his wife and son. The public is invited to attend this free concert. A free-will offering will be collected during the evening. For more information, call 815878-5487. The concert is cohosted by Happy Hands Preschool, the Evangelical Covenant Church and the Willow Springs Mennonite Church in Tiskilwa.

and kids from age 4 through the eighth grade are invited. To enroll, call Sherrie at 815-6464156.

Open house to honor Deacon John Murphy PRINCETON — An open

house to honor Deacon John Murphy will be from noon to 3 p.m. Saturday at Harkrader Hall, St. Louis Catholic Church, 606 S. Gosse Blvd. in Princeton. Deacon John Murphy of Tiskilwa was ordained as a Permanent Deacon

for the Diocese of Peoria on May 21, 1988, at St. Mary’s Cathedral, Peoria, and has served the Catholic church for 25 years. He is assigned to St. Louis Parish in Princeton, St. Mary’s Parish in Tiskilwa and St. Margaret’s Hospital

in Spring Valley as chaplain. The open house is being held to celebrate his 25 years of service.

Christian Book Club PRINCETON — First Lutheran Church of Princeton Christian Book Club meets the

second Tuesday of every month from noon to 1:30 p.m. in the church library at 116 N. Pleasant St. The selection for May is “Grace” by Richard Paul Evans. Call the church office 815-875-1685 with any questions.  All are invited to attend.


11 Sports Thursday, May 16, 2013 • 11 On the web — Visit www.bcrnews.com/ sports for more sports, including St. Bede senior cager Mo Dean signing with Sauk Valley and regional/softball tournament updates in scoreboard.

Baseball: Mendota 5, Bureau Valley 3

Trojans hold off Storm rally this time By Bill Schwabenland sports@bcrnews.com

MANLIUS – The Bureau Valley Storm rallied late once this season to beat the Mendota Trojans. It occurred in the first game of an April 27 doubleheader on the very same baseball field. And so the hosts in this Oregon Regional quarterfinal game showed inklings of possibly doing the same thing again, on Monday afternoon. But the sixth-seeded Trojans (7-19) ultimately held on, behind the 1-2 pitching punch of senior starter Trae Blumhorst’s 4 1/3 innings and freshman reliever Garet Zinke’s 2 2/3 scoreless innings of relief, to down fifth-ranked Bureau Valley, 5-3. “I thought we came out a little flat today,” said BV coach John Matlick. “We’ve kind of done that on Mondays this year. It must be the day off on Sunday that has gotten to us. We didn’t come out throwing strikes, and really, Mendota had (only) one hit that first inning. And that (bad result) breaks your back.” Mendota ultimately rode a four-run first inning to the postseason victory.

“Big win. It’s our first regional win in three years,” said Mendota coach Aaron Sester. “So it’s a big win for the kids, going in the right direction. They learned how to win a close game. And, come playoff time, you’ve got to do that. Exciting, happy for the kids.” To start the game, the Trojans recorded only a single base hit, a two-run single to center by Blumhorst, but took advantage of a Bureau Valley fielding error and five walks – including a pair with the bases loaded – to take a 4-0 lead before the Storm offense even swung a bat. Only a great, diving catch by center fielder Josh Mead off the bat of Mendota leadoff man Jaron Robinson, hitting the second time around, prevented the Trojans from scoring at least two – probably three – more runs in the top of the game’s first frame. “We’ve struggled this year with striking out and swinging at bad pitches,” said Sester. “So, one thing we worked on the last couple days (was) just taking good pitches and waiting for theirs, being patient at the plate. Give credit to our kids.”

See Storm Page 13

BCR photo/Mike Vaughn

Out at the plate Bureau Valley catcher Ashley Phillips hangs on for the putout at the plate when Storm center fielder Dana Kepner threw out Erie/Prophetstown’s Stephanie Thulene in Monday’s regional game in Manlius. E/P won 15-3. Visit www.bcrnews.com for the game story.

Regional softball: St. Bede 7, Somonauk 1

Lady Bruins protect the ‘house’ By Derek Johnson sports@bcrnews.com

PERU — After a tense first inning Tuesday night, the Lady Bruins’ bats woke up delivering them a 7-1 win against Somonauk in the first round of the St. Bede 2A softball regional. Starting pitcher Lainie Schweickert pitched all seven innings earning a win against the Lady

Panthers talented freshman Bayley Krantz. St. Bede catcher Lydia Stariha recorded her first career home run in the effort. The Lady Bruins will play in Saturday’s championship game, drawing the winner of Wednesday’s Princeton-Mendota game. “It’s something everybody on the team has really wanted since the first practice. I got a taste of it this year in basketball and you

just want to feel it again and go further,” Stariha said. Somonauk loaded the bases in the first inning but Schweickert managed to get out of the inning unscathed. “It was really hot in the first inning. I definitely settled in after that. I got loose,” said Schweickert, adding having pressure build early helped get the Lady Bruins going.

See Lady Bruins Page 13

Area girls out for some heavy medal By Kevin Hieronymus khieronymus@bcrnews.com

BCR photo/Mike Vaughn

Mendota’s Cody Zinke slides safely into third base when the ball eluded the Storm’s Bryce Hansen in the seventh inning. Zinke scored to put the finishing touches on the Trojans’ 5-3 win in regional play Monday in Manlius.

If the seeds hold up, Bureau County athletes are in line for some more state medals in this weekend’s IHSA State Track and Field Meet in Charleston. Princeton junior Zoe Mead has the top seeds Zoe Mead from Bureau County schools, seeded fourth in both the 400 (58.59) and 800 (2:17.45). She will be joined by teammate Phoenix Smallwood (long jump, triple jump) in the 2A

Meet which starts Friday. Taking to the big blue track first, in 1A, will be Bureau Valley’s Lindsey Hoffert (long jump, 200) and Regan Weidner (3200). They will be joined by Neponset’s Freya Block, a senior from Kewanee, who is top-seeded in the shot put (39-9) and second in the discus (132-7). Mead has the unique double and one that promises to be most challenging. She will run the 800 meters approximately at 10:34 a.m. and could have just a half hour to turn around for the 400. “Zoe said that she felt very loose

See State Page 13

Girls State Track & Field Meet Schedule of events: Thursday - 1A field events, 10 a.m., track prelims, 11 a.m. Friday - 2A field events, 8 a.m., track prelims: 10 a.m. Saturday - 1-2A field/ track finals, 10 a.m.

Area state qualifiers

Bureau Valley (1A): Lindsey Hoffert (seeded 6th in

long jump, 17-0 1/2; 31st in the 200, 27.55), Regan Weidner (seeded 13th in 3200, 12:00.4); Sydney Lebahn (tied fort 11th in discus, 108-9). Kewanee (1A): Freya Block, from Neponset (seeded 1st in shot, 39-9; 2nd in discus, 132-7). Princeton (2A): Phoenix Smallwod (seeded 19th in long jump, 16-8; 11th in triple jump, 35-6 1/2); Zoe Mead (seeded 4th in 800, 2:17.45; 4th in the 400, 58.59).

James deals with life out of the circle All Heidi James has ever wanted to do on the softball field is pitch. She started out pitching at age 8 or 9 and pitched every year since. This year, however, the PHS senior had to leave the pitching circle all together when an assortment of hip and rib ailments, left her physically unable to. When she tried to pitch, she

Kevin Hieronymus HIERONYMUS’ HYPOTHESIS

faced a week of adjustments from the chiropractor just to get her body back together again. “It completely shuts her

down physically where she can’t even play the game. She can’t run, she can’t bend when it happens,” said her father and coach Bob James. “One of the tough things for me as a parent and coach, as many years I saw the kid try to perfect the craft of pitching and all the time and effort put into it and kind have it taken away by injury (is tough), but that’s part of the game and part of

the things that happen been pitching all my life.” with it.” She admits her softball The reality of leaving life is a little less stressful pitching behind began to these days, not having to sink in last summer and carry the weight of the fall when her ailments team on her shoulders. would flare up every She is channeling all her time she pitched. James, Heidi James energy instead to her who went 14-7 with a offensive and defensive 2.37 ERA last year and part of the game. has won 25 games over her James has slid in full-time career, said it was a struggle to See Hieronymus Page 13 deal with at first, “because I’ve


12 Sports 12 • Sports • Thursday, May 16, 2013

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Morel of the story: it’s over Lee Wahlgren

The end is drawing near for one of my favorite seasons. The weather sort of OUTDOOR COLUMNIST postponed our mushroom season, but several people have had constantly in the center some good luck this last bullseye. week. I had a couple The club presented of friends drop by and two people with awards. give me some tasters. Vern Sondgeroth was They were so good. I just presented the “Friend wished the season lasted of the Club Award” for a little longer. I had some the support he has given in the morning with egg to the youth. He orgaand cheese and then nized several cookouts to in the evening on a big benefit the club, and he cheeseburger. It doesn’t has gone to Black Bear seem what recipe you Lodge for several years use, they make a meal in a row. At camp, he so much better. The sad has taken several of our thing is, my sources tell young fishermen in his me, that the season is boat and has guided sevjust about over. Guess eral others to the various we’ll just have to wait for fishing spots. He used his next year. experience to help the Tuesday night, the kids with their gear. He PHS Sportsman’s Club always has his fillet knife had their year-end banready to teach our youth quet. Boy, I tasted some the proper way to fillet a great venison recipes. fish. Thank you for your Everyone went home generous help. with full stomachs. This This year’s Mike Smallyear, I found out that wood Outdoorsman’s we had some very good Award went to Aaron marksmen and ladies. Carrow. He is the second Both in trapshooting and in the family to receive archery, we had several the award. He is the young men and ladies youngest son of a great prove their marksmanoutdoor family. He has ship. In trap, we had hunted and fished with a few in the 20s and his family, Mike, Mary in archery, they were See Wally Page 13

Storm back on the home track By Kevin Hieronymus

Boys Track and field sectionals at a glance

khieronymus@bcrnews.com Most of the area track and field boys teams will assemble in Manlius for the Bureau Valley 1A Sectional meet. Amboy/LaMoille will compete at Oregon and Princeton will run in 2A at Plano. BV senior Logan Hoffert used some home-cooking to capture three conference championships in the Three Rivers Meet last week at Manlius and will look for more of the same with the rest of the Storm on Friday. Hoffert, who medaled at state in 2012 with a seventh-place finish in the long jump, has run the qualifying time in the 300 IH. The Storm’s 4x4 has also run qualifying time and its 4x800 as well as Kristian Konneck (100) are close. “It will be a tough meet but hopefully, the kids are ready to compete. We have been working for this meet all year and hopefully, it will bring the success the kids are looking for,” BV coach Nick Hartz said. One athlete who has been running consistently at the state standard is Steve Gualandri in the 300 IH. In his last four meets he has run under 41 seconds with his best at 40.34. “His prospects of getting to the state meet are really good if he concentrates on running his race and focusing on his performance and not any other individual he would be running against. I like to preach running against the clock and taking care of the things that the athlete has control of,” SBA coach Mike Skoflanc said. Hall senior Landon Piccatto (triple jump) and junior Collin Aimone (long jump) are returning state qualifiers. Piccatto is the BCR Honor Roll leader in both the long jump (20-0 1/4) and

At Bureau Valley (1A)

Teams: Bureau Valley, DePue, Erie/ Prophetstown, El Paso-Gridley, Fieldcrest, Flanagan/Cornell, Fulton, Hall, Henry, LowpointWashburn, Morrison, Ohio, Putnam County, Riverdale, St. Bede, Sterling Newman. Schedule: Field events start at 4 p.m., prelims at 4:30 p.m. and finals at 6:30 p.m.

At Oregon (1A)

Area teams: Amboy/LaMoille. Schedule: Prelims start at 4 p.m., finals at 6 p.m.

At Plano (2A)

Teams: Aurora Central Catholic, Coal City, Fairbury Prairie Central, Geneseo, IMSA, L-P, Mendota, Morris, Ottawa, Plano, Pontiac, Princeton, RI Alleman, Sandwich, Streator. Schedule: Field events start at 4 p.m., track semis start at 5 p.m. • Advancement: Top two places and those meeting qualifying times advance to state. State qualifying standards (1A and 2A) and area athletes who have met them: Shot put (49-0 1A, 50-11 2A) — none. Discus (143, 148) — none; High jump (6-3) — Austen Stewart (P) 6-4. Triple jump (42-0, 43-8) — none. Pole vault (13-0, 13-3) - none. 100 (11.14, 11.04) — none. 200 (22.94, 22.54) — none. 400 (51.74, 50.84) — none. 800 (2:01.24, 1:50.04) — none. 1600 (4:37.24, 4:30.44) — none. 3200 (10:04, 9:49.24) — none. 100 HH (15.54, 14.94) — none. 300 LH (42.0, 40.44) — Steven Gualandri (SB) 40.34), Logan Hoffert (BV) 41.22. 4x100 (44.64, 43.54) — none. 4x200 (1:33.74, 1:31.74) — none. 4x400 (3:31.74, 3:27.44) — BV 3:30.98. 4x800 (8:24.24, 8:15.24) — none.

BCR photo/Mike Vaughn

Bureau Valley’s Kristian Konneck wraps up a first-place finish in the 4x400 Monday in Manlius. the storm will return to the home track for Friday’s sectionals. triple jump (41-7 1/2). Other top area hopefuls are Hall sophomore Al Baldonado, the BCR Honor Roll leader in the 1600 (4:52.89) and 3200 (10:09.06), and St. Bede weightmen Michael Slingsby and freshman John Barnes. At Plano (2A): Princeton competes at the 2A level for the second year in a row, heading north to Plano. PHS senior Austen Stewart looks for the state trip that eluded him a year ago at the Ottawa sectional. He was sectional champion and placed fourth at State in 1A as a sophomore. PHS coach Dan Foes is also optimistic about the chances for juniors Caleb Strom in the 100, 200, and

long jump and Zach Andersen in the 3200 and 1600, and freshman Kai Tomaszewski in the 400. Stewart is the only Tiger to have met qualifying standards, clearing 6-4 outdoors. He went 6-8 indoors.

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13 Sports Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

State

From Page 11

and relaxed at the Sectional in the 400 so the 800 was a good warmup for her. Of course, that was the first time we really ran that double all year in an intense meet,” PHS coach Pat Hodge said. “As they say, we’ll take them one event at a time and see what happens.” Hodge notes there is a little more cushion in the 800, which take 12 girls to the finals as opposed to nine in the 400. Mead will be joined in both races by Aurora Central Catholic freshmen Karina Liz, who beat Mead in both at sectional. Mead, who went to state as part of PHS’ 4x800 relays the past two years, becomes the first PHS qualifier in the 800 since Jennifer Moss in 1991 and the first to go down in the 400 since Hannah Pinter in 1994. Smallwood did not medal at state in 2A last year and is eager to make the most out of her second chance. She makes her third trip in the triple and second in long jump. “I went down last year and didn’t finish as well as I hoped I

Wally

From Page 12

Jo, and Ryan, on many of the Sportsman’s Club outings. Whether it’s deer, turkey, or catching a lot of fish, Aaron and his family are very active and good at what they do. He again will travel to Canada in a couple of weeks to try his skill this year. Congratulations, Aaron. • The local chapter of Ducks Unlimited had its popular Crawfish Boil last weekend and it was another success. They cooked about 800 pounds of the little critters and about 400 people were in attendance. The raffles and live auction went well and hunters went home with about 10 shotguns and two handguns. A new event this year was a garage sale and it was popular. The big interest was the tier raffle. Starting at the bottom and working up, the final item was a Beretta A400 12-gauge shotgun. The DU officials seemed to be pleased with the outcome and look forward to next year. Lee Wahlgren is the BCR Outdoor Columnist. Contact him at pdub52@ gmail.com

Seeing blurry or blind SpotS?

Thursday, May 16, 2013 • Sports • 13

would. Second chance this year,” said Smallwood, who was sectional champ in the triple jump and runner-up in the long jump. Smallwood did not play soccer this year to be able to concentrate fully on track, setting her sights on adding her name in the PHS corridor of champions as a state medalist. “That’s something I’m striving for,” she said. “And I still have the school record in long jump I’m pushing for, but I’m trying to keep a clear mind when I’m down there and not focused on this and let myself jump. I know I can do it, I just got to let myself do it.” Smallwood, who has been a picture of consistency, should be in good shape, Hodge said, if she’s able to maintain her season’s bests. He said she showed she can compete at the top level with her performances at the Illinois Top Times meet indoors and the fact she has improved her best marks since then also bodes well. The Storm’s Hoffert and Weidner landed two medals each last year and look to bring back more this year. Both, however, have had to endure though injuries throughout the season and have been unable to turn in peak performances thus far.

Lady Bruins

From Page 11 “We want to hold them to a minimum of runs. We, obviously got out of the first inning with no runs so, that’s always good. But, we got pumped up. We were also hitting very well, too. Lydia got her first home run. That was good,” added Schweickert, who had nine strikeouts. “You can’t overlook any team. They came out strong you know taking advantage of different plays and I am really happy our team was able to get out of (the inning) with no real damage done,” Stariha said. The game was scoreless entering the bottom of the second inning. Mo Dean led off firing a base hit into left field. Dean then took second on a passed ball. Tara Kunkel followed by reaching first on a fielder’s choice with Dean subsequently scoring on a bad throw from short to first base. With Kunkel in scoring

“It wasn’t a great season,” said Hoffert, who was the 2012 State runner-up in the long jump and placed ninth in the 400. “It was pretty rough. I had an ankle injury coming into it. Progressively, I got better. I’m starting to peak now.” Weidner pulled out of the 1600 meters at sectional, nursing a sore back, and will focus on the 3200. She placed third a year ago with a time of 11:30.91 running behind a pair of seniors and takes the 13th seed (12:00.04) to Charleston. Their classmate, Lebahn, was also the runner-up in the discus (108-9) and stands tied for the 11th seed going in, two feet off the ninth and final medal placing. BV coach Dale Donner believes all three Storm athletes have the potential to medal and two are past medalists. “Of course we all know that Regan and Lindsey both medaled last year, but it is forgotten that Sydney grew up around the State track meet,” he said. “I think she has attended about five State meets to watch her sisters compete.  She will find it very familiar there and hopefully be able to relax.  They have all worked hard and we are very excited to seem them reap the benefits of their hard work.”

position, Abby Nowakowski hit a single to get the RBI. Nowakowski worked the bases and when Christine Daley rolled one to first base, Nowakowski scored while Daley was thrown out at first. Two batters later, Stariha faced Krantz with two away and cranked a line drive home run to leftcenter field to put the Bruins up 4-0. She had never homered before and had to be instructed by her dad, St. Bede first base coach Mike Stariha, to slow down when she came around the base. “I really wasn’t aiming to hit one. I didn’t know it until my dad told me. I was really excited because it’s my first one ever…at any level,” she said. The Bruins added some insurance in the bottom of the third, scoring three runs on three hits and stranding one base runner. The Panthers only run came on an RBI double from Marissa Guzmon in the top of the sixth.

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Hieronymus

From Page 11 at shortstop where she anchors the Tigresses defense and has become the table-setter for the offense as leadoff hitter, batting .424 with 18 runs scored. Batting leadoff bring it’s own stress, James said, who feels “like a Guinea pig because I’ve got to the first one up there.” Bob James said his daughter hasn’t had said much about it, just keeping it all inside. “I think with her competitiveness and knowing some of the success she has had in the past, she knows she would have given us more depth and better long-term wise would have helped Madison (freshman pitcher Menzel) a lot. She would haven’t had to carry the brunt of the load this year.” Kevin Hieronymus is the BCR Sports Editor. Contact him at khieronymus@bcrnews.com

BCR photo/Mike Vaughn

BV’s Josh Mead slides into second base safely Monday with a stolen base.

Storm

From Page 11 BV proceeded to chip away, though, at that 4-0 deficit, notching single runs in the second, fourth, and fifth innings. Josh Renner led off the second with a walk, stole second, moved to third base on an Andrew Harshman groundout, and scored on an RBI single by Trevin Kennedy off the first baseman’s glove. Harshman beat out an infield single with one out in the fourth. Kennedy and Rokey both walked to load the bases, thus turning over the BV lineup. Mead hit an RBI sacrifice fly to center field, scoring Harshman, to make it a 4-2 Mendota lead. With one out in the fifth, Bryce Hansen reached on an infield error, moved to second base on a wild pitch, stole third, and came around to score on an errant throw down the left field line, and suddenly, it was 4-3, Trojans. Next up, Blumhorst’s time on the mound ended when he walked Wagenknecht on a full count. Blumhorst labored through 4 1/3 innings, throwing 102 pitches, allowing three runs (two earned) on five hits and five walks, while striking out five. Enter the freshman Zinke, who got a called third strike and a groundout to second to end the Storm threat. With two out in the bottom of the sixth, BV got

100

$

a hit-by-pitch followed by yet another walk, but both runners were stranded when Mattingly flied out to right field. “Offensively, we battled. We had ourselves in situations to succeed,” said Matlick. “We had guys on second base, and we just needed that break-through hit to maybe take the momentum and maybe tie it up or take the lead. And Mendota did a nice job of stopping that, from us capitalizing on.” Mendota added a big insurance run in the top of the seventh when Cody Zinke, who had walked, boldly advanced from first to third on Robinson’s groundout to short, then raced quickly home on the errant throw to third base. BV starter Wagenknecht took the loss, allowing four runs (two earned) on one hit and five walks in 2/3 inning. Kyle Rokey did a great job of relief pitching for the Storm (6-15), yielding only one unearned run over the final six and 1/3 innings, allowing six hits and six walks, while striking out three Trojans. Blumhorst, who supplied a first inning tworun single to center, reached base all four times for Mendota, was the winning pitcher. This was Mendota’s first regional tourney victory since a crazy, 10-9, twoday, 11-inning, 4:09 marathon victory over Oregon on May 20-21, 2009.

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14 NASCAR 14 • Thursday, May 16, 2013

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Next up

Sprint Cup Race: Sprint All-Star Race Where: Charlotte Motor Speedway When: Saturday, 7:30 p.m. (ET) TV: SPEED 2012 Winner: Jimmie Johnson

Matt Kenseth’s Southern 500 victory puts him close to top 20 in all-time Cup wins Among the good things that have come with Matt Kenseth’s midcareer move is a chance to add a cherished Darlington victory to his already impressive racing resume. The 41-yearold driver, who left his longtime employer Roush Fenway Racing to drive the No. 20 Toyota for Joe Gibbs Racing, led only 17 laps at Darlington Raceway in Saturday night’s Southern 500, but one of them was the big one, as he ran his career victory total to 27 and captured his firstever win at NASCAR’s oldest superspeedway. “I don’t know that I’ve had a win that feels bigger than this at this moment,” he said after Saturday’s race. “This is obviously a really historic race track. The Southern 500 is one of the most storied and historic races anywhere, not just in NASCAR. It’s pretty cool to be able to stand in Victory Lane at this place, the same spot where all the other great drivers stood.” After 11 races this season, Kenseth has three victories, the other two coming at Las Vegas and Kansas, along with two poles, and has led 782 laps, compared to three wins, one pole and 480 laps led for all of last season. For NASCAR drivers, few tracks challenge

them as much as Darlington, the egg-shaped, 63-year-old place known as the track “Too Tough to Tame.” Kenseth is no exception. “I remember when I first came here and ran it Labor Day,” Kenseth said. “It was 90 degrees. The track is so slick and slow, a five-hour race. It was just a crazy, grueling, difficult race. “It’s a tricky track. There’s a lot of tradition here. To be able to win a race at a track like this, especially the Southern 500, man, it’s big. In my Rainier Ehrhardt/Getty Images for NASCAR mind, it’s one of the biggest races we have of the Matt Kenseth celebrates his Southern 500 win in Victory Lane. year. It’s just a special place to win at.” strong run over the final car for much of the as far as on the race friends over there. He And he’s now six victo10 races. race. He led 265 laps, track,” said Kahne, who certainly doesn’t want ries shy of being among Kenseth said he’s not but tangled with Kasey dropped to 17th. to create more work for the top 20 in all-time concerned. Kahne racing for the Busch didn’t comthose guys.” Cup wins. “I think the goal of lead after a late-race ment on the incident With Kenseth’s win, “I’m trying to look a race team and an restart, then had a flat with the driver of the and the reduction in forward, and not back,” organization is to never tire and fell to sixth at No. 5 Chevrolet that he penalties from his he said. “Certainly, peak,” he said. “I think the finish. once drove, but his crew team’s infraction at KanI’ve been fortunate and it’s to continue to keep It was similar to the chief Dave Rogers said sas Speedway from 50 blessed throughout my getting better. That’s week before at TalladeBusch was upset by the to 12, he’s now third in career to have great one thing I’ve seen over ga, when Kenseth domiturn of events. the standings, 59 points race teams, great people (at Joe Gibbs Racing) nated but fell to eighth “He’s pretty torn behind leader Jimmie working on the cars, pretty much from Day in the final two laps. up that they’re racing Johnson, who finished great sponsors, the whole One. They’re not standHe said he sympahard and Kahne tore fourth at Darlington. thing. ing still. thized with Busch. up another car,” RogKenseth’s crew chief, “I got the good job. I “They’re always try“It’s crushing when ers said. “This is the Jason Ratcliff, did have got the easy job. They ing to build a better car. you lead all day like that third time we’ve been to sit out the Darlington give me cars that are this (Toyota Racing Develop- and don’t come home involved in an incident win, with Wally Brown fast and drive like this; it ment) is trying to build with a win,” he said. with Kasey, and all of taking over his duties. sure is a lot of fun.” a better engine. With Kahne seemed aggraus over here have a ton Two other teams with With his strong start this team, driving this vated with Busch, of respect for that procrew members susthis season, some in the car, I feel like the sky’s especially after being gram. Kyle thinks the pended because of rules sport have questioned the limit.” involved in a late-race world of Kasey Kahne, infractions didn’t fare whether Kenseth and his Saturday at Darlingwreck with him for the and I think (Kahne’s nearly as well at DarNo. 20 team are peaking ton, it was Kenseth’s second straight week. crew chief) Kenny Fran- lington. Brad Keselowski too soon, as winning the teammate Kyle Busch “I’ve never touched cis is a great guy, and finished 32nd, and Joey championship requires a who had the dominant the guy in my life Kyle still has a ton of Logano was 22nd. Copyright 2013/Distributed by Universal Uclick

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Thursday, May 16, 2013 • Checkered Flag Challenge • 15

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16 Biz Ag 16 • Thursday, May 16, 2013

Business&Ag

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com Business story ideas? — Contact Bureau County Republican reporter Lyle Ganther at 815-875-4461, ext. 273, or email him at lganther@bcrnews.com.

Central Bank Illinois honored Jason Judd of Hennepin waits for the chocolate to harden on two dip cones at Grandma Rosie’s Sweet Treats, which recently opened at the former Tastee Freeze on West Peru Street in Princeton. BCR photos/Lyle Ganther

Grandma Rosie’s Sweet Treats opens Hennepin couple take over longtime business By Lyle Ganther lganther@bcrnews.com

PRINCETON — Jason and Jenny Judd of Hennepin are the new owners of a longtime Princeton business that also has a new name. The Judds recently purchased Tastee Freez on West Peru Street from Gerald and Pam Miller and renamed it Grandma Rosie’s Sweet Treats. “We started this business in a trailer,” said Jenny Judd. “We went to fairs and festivals for the last three years. We came to Princeton for the Bureau County Fair and to Mendota for the TriCounty Fair. We went all over.” Jenny, who worked at a Hennepin restaurant for

Jenny and Jason Judd of Hennepin are the owners of Grandma Rosie’s Sweet Treats, which opened in the former Tastee Freeze on West Peru Street in Princeton. two years before going around in their food trailer, said, “We always wanted a place to call home for our business. This has been a staple in Princeton and we thought what a better place to start our business than here.”

The Judds still serve the restaurant’s famous barbecues plus shakes, etc. “We have the same kind of ice cream with different names on the menu,” she said. The first day of business for Grandma Rosie’s was May 6 with a grand opening planned for Saturday. The hours the business will be open are 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sundays through Thursday and from 11 a.m. until 10 p.m. on Friday and Saturday nights. Grandma Rosie’s has a Facebook page. It can be reached at 815-915-6634. Jenny Judd credited Jason’s cousin, Frankie Boggio, with helping them get the doors open at Grandma Rosie’s Sweet Treats. “We couldn’t have done anything without him,” she said. “He was a big part.” Comment on this story at www.bcrnews.com.

ABO installs Dr. Castelein as president-elect The American Board of Orthodontics (ABO) installed Dr. Paul Castelein, an orthodontist from Princeton, as presidentelect May 7 during the ABO President’s Dinner. This event was held in c o n j u n c t i o n Dr. Castelein with the 2013 annual session of the American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) in Philadelphia, Pa. Castelein earned his D.D.S. from Loyola University in 1966 and then served in the U.S. Navy, attached to the U.S. Marine Corps, for two years. After his military service, Castelein spent two years teaching clinical dentistry and then pursued his postdoctoral education in orthodon-

tics at Northwestern University, earning his master’s degree in 1972. Castelein has maintained a private orthodontic practice in Princeton since 1972. He is an adjunct clinical professor in the Department of Orthodontics at the University of Iowa College of Dentistry in Iowa City, Iowa. “Orthodontics has been my passion since finishing my orthodontic residency,” Castelein said. “Becoming board certified was a process I began when I started my orthodontic practice in Princeton. There were several board-certified orthodontic faculty members at Northwestern University who encouraged board certification to each of the residents and encouraged me to become board certified.

Serving as a director to the American Board of Orthodontics has been a life-changing experience and the highlight of my career.” Castelein is a past president of the Illinois Society of Orthodontists, the Edward H. Angle Society of Orthodontists, the Angle Midwest Component of the Edward H. Angle Society of Orthodontists and the Illinois Valley Dental Society. Castelein also served as a director to the Midwestern Society of Orthodontists from 1992 to 1995. He is a member of the AAO, a diplomat of the ABO, a member of the College of Diplomats of the American Board of Orthodontics and a fellow of the American College of Dentists and the World Federation of Orthodontists.

Central Bank Illinois was recently ranked in the 2012 Top 15th percentile of community banks by Seifried and Brew LLC. To be recognized with this ranking, Central Bank demonstrated exemplary performance of balancing risk and reward on the bank’s Seifried and Brew Total Risk/Return Composite Ranking. This in-depth analysis includes an internal evaluation of the bank’s liquidity, capital level, credit risk and earnings report. In their ranking announcement, Seifried and Brew stated, “Considering the economic

headwinds and increasing regulatory reform faced by community banks in recent years, ranking in the Top 15th percentile of community banks is an achievement only attained by top performing banks. At Seifried and Brew, we believe that conservative, traditional community banking is the strength of our financial system, and the Top 15th percentile received by Central Bank is setting the standard of excellence and raising the bar for community banks across the country.” John Dubois, Central Bank president and

CEO, added, “Central Bank is pleased to be recognized as a strong financial institution, allowing us to meet the needs of our customers and the communities served. We thank the community for its support and welcome your relationships.” Central Bank Illinois is headquartered in Geneseo, with branch offices in Andover, Fulton and Princeton, and a loan production office in Prophetstown. Founded in 1907, the company has grown to more than $469 million in assets and remains committed to community banking.

Horace Mann agent opens office OTTAWA — Horace Mann representative Cindy Musselman and CSM Financial for Educators have opened a new office to serve their educator customers and employees. “As your full-time Horace Mann represen-

sunday may 19 2-4 pm Church Hall in Cherry • DeSSertS • DrinkS • Bingo • raFFLeS • Cotton CanDy

tative, I understand the needs of our local educational community,” said Cindy Musselman. “Together, Horace Mann Insurance Co. and I are committed to helping secure your family’s future through a lifetime of changing

needs.” The office is located at 628 Columbus St., Suite 413 in Ottawa. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. or by appointment. The phone number is 815-434-0300 or her cell number is 815879-0300.

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17 Biz Ag/Legals Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Thursday, May 16, 2013 • Business & Ag • 17

Photo contributed

North Central Bank donates to IVCC North Central Bank of Hennepin recently donated $500 to the Illinois Valley Community College Peter Miller Community Technology Center capital campaign. IVCC President Jerry Corcoran (left) accepts the check from North Central Bank President David Ward. “More than a dozen district financial institutions have contributed to the campaign, and we will recognize each of them prominently on a donor wall near the main entrance to the new building,” said Corcoran.

Property Transfers The following property transfers were recently recorded at the Bureau County Recorder of Deeds’ office in the Bureau County Courthouse: April 22, 2013

Eureka Savings Bank of Mendota to Derek Whited, warranty deed, part of Lots 49-50 in Tiskilwa, $500. Dan and Paula Ellberg to Allen Foes, warranty deed, part of Sections 1

and 6 in Arispie Township, $685,500. Frederick Cluskey to Anthony, Beth, Jennifer and Karl Koehler, trustee’s deed, part of Section 32 in Milo Township, $1,434,000.

​Photo contributed

Central Bank donates to IVCC Central Bank of Princeton recently donated $1,000 to the Illinois Valley Community College Peter Miller Community Technology Center capital campaign. IVCC President Jerry Corcoran (left) accepts the check from Community Bank President Rick Clary. “The generous response we’ve seen from district financial institutions such as Central Bank is evidence of their belief the PMCTC will have a significant impact on the local economy,” said Corcoran.

Ag story ideas? — Contact Bureau County Republican reporter Barb Kromphardt at 815-875-4461, ext. 242, or email her at bkromphardt@ bcrnews.com.

LegalNotices NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given by the Board of Trustees of the Buda Fire Protection District, Bureau County, Illinois, that a tentative Budget for said District for the fiscal year beginning on May 1, 2013, is on file and conveniently available to public inspection at the Buda Fire Station in the District from and after the date of this publication. Notice is further hereby given that a Public Hearing on said Budget will be held at 7:00 p.m., June 3, 2013, at the Buda Fire station located in said District, and final action may be taken thereon. Dated this 13th day of

May, 2013. Board of Trustees Buda Fire Protection District Published in the Bureau County Republican May 16, 2013. PUBLICATION NOTICE On June 1, 2013, the following business Storm’s Bait Shop changed its residence address from 210 E. State Street, PO Box 23, Tiskilwa, IL 61368 to 231 South Randolph Street, Princeton, IL 61356. Dated this 13th day of May, 2013. /s/Kamala S. Hieronymus Bureau County Clerk Published in the Bureau County Republican May 16, 2013.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 13TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT BUREAU COUNTY - PRINCETON, ILLINOIS JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ) ASSOCIATION ) Plaintiff, ) -v.) CATHY A. MICHAEL A/K/A CATHY ANN ) MICHAEL, et al ) Defendant ) 12 CH 38 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 7, 2013, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 11:30 a.m. on June 11, 2013, at the office of Russell, English, Scoma & Beneke, P.C., Ten Park Ave. West, PRINCETON, IL, 61356, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: LOT 6 IN ROSENOW SECOND SUBDIVISION, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF THE SOUTH PART OF LOT 98 IN THE ORIGINAL TOWN, NOW CITY, OF PRINCETON, ALL LYING AND BEING SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF BUREAU, IN THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. Commonly known as 651 EAST CENTRAL AVENUE, PRINCETON, IL 61356 Property Index No. 16-16-228-002. The real estate is improved with a 1 story home with an attached garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof

of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Visit our website at service. atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 p.m. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 476-5500. Please refer to file number PA1208594. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 4765500 Attorney File No. PA1208594 Case Number: 12 CH 38 TJSC#: 33-6042 I531176 Published in the Bureau County Republican May 9, 16 and 23, 2013. NOTICE OF HEARING ON CHANGING THE EXISTING ZONE BOUNDARIES TO ADD TERRITORY WITHIN THE CITY OF SPRING VALLEY IN THE BUREAU/PUTNAM AREA ENTERPRISE ZONE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a public hearing will be held on Tuesday, May 28th 2013 at 6:00 p.m. at the City of Spring Valley, 215 North Greenwood, Spring Valley, IL. This hearing is for the purpose of considering the merit of adding new territory for the Zone in the City of Spring Valley for the creation

of a new senior living development. The public hearing will address the boundary of the proposed Enterprise Zone addition of the Enterprise Zone, tax incentives, and other programs, which should be established in connection with the Enterprise Zone. Maps of the proposed addition to the boundary of the current Enterprise Zone will be available for public inspection in the office of the North Central Illinois Council of Governments, Ottawa, IL from 8:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. All persons desiring to appear and be hard with regard to the said proposed Enterprise Zone addition may appear and be hard at the time and place above specified. Also, anyone desiring to express comments on the proposed Enterprise Zone addition without attending the public hearing may do so by sending correspondence to the Bureau/Putnam Area Enterprise Zone Administrator, 613 West Marquette St. Ottawa, Illinois 61350 or e-mailing to bpez@ncicg.org Published in the Bureau County Republican May 16, 2013. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 13TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT BUREAU COUNTY - PRINCETON, ILLINOIS BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP Plaintiff, -v.MARIA PEREZ A/K/A MARIA R. PEREZ, et al Defendant 12 CH 00013 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on May 17, 2012, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 11:30 a.m. on June 14, 2013, at the office of Russell, English, Scoma & Beneke, P.C., Ten Park Ave. West, PRINCETON, IL, 61356, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: LOT ELEVEN (11) IN BLOCK SEVEN (7), SECOND PARK SUBDIVISION TO THE VILLAGE OF DEPUE, COUNTY OF BUREAU AND STATE OF ILLINOIS, EXCEPTING AND RESERVING, HOWEVER, THE UNDERLYING COAL AND FIRECLAY TOGETHER WITH THE RIGHT TO DIG, MINE AND REMOVE SAME FROM THE SURFACE OF SAID PREMISES. SITUATED IN BUREAU COUNTY, IN THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. Commonly known as 307 E. 3RD STREET, DEPUE, IL 61322 Property Index No. 17-35-476-002. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calcu-

lated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-12-03288. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-12-03288 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Case Number: 12 CH 00013 TJSC#: 33-11937 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I533389 Published in the Bureau County Republican May 16, 23 and 30, 2013.


18 Farm Safety 18 • Farm Safety • Thursday, May 16, 2013

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Prevent farm accidents by being safe on the farm and on the road! Many occupations are hazardous, few more so than agricultural labor. Farmers recognize that they must be diligent in their efforts to prevent nonfatal and fatal injuries. According to the most recent statistics, farmers face a fatality rate of 25.1 for every 100,000 workers. In 2008, 456 farmers and farm workers lost their lives to work-related injuries. What’s particularly risky about agricultural work is that it tends to be a family profession. That puts all members of the family at risk for injury. On average, 113 youth under the age of 20 die annually from farmrelated injuries. Tractor rollover injuries, inhalation of chemical pesticides and lacerations from farm equipment top the list of prime agriculture-related occupational injuries. With scores of different mechanical equipment and chemicals, not to mention

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lengthy exposure to the elements on a normal working day, the risk of injury is considerable. There are key ways to prevent injuries on the farm. Here are a few considerations. • Proper training of new employees on the use required equipment is essential. If certification is needed, be sure employees have been trained and practice on equipment prior to independent use. Safety gear should be used at all times, when required. Workers should be careful to keep hair tied back to prevent entanglement in equipment. • Care should be used when working in the elements. Workers should be properly dressed for the temperature and conditions. Beverage breaks should be taken so that dehydration is not a risk. • Knowledge of chemical pesticides and fertilizers should be fully understood. Safety equipment, such as ventilators, eye

guards and gloves, should be used when handling caustic chemicals. • Machinery should be maintained according to OSHA and other federal guidelines. Equipment in good working order is less likely to cause injury. • Caution should always be used around livestock. • Operating equipment when impaired is a hazard in any profession. Alcohol and drug use do not mix in a farm setting. Individuals who seem intoxicated should not be allowed to work. • Children and adolescents should be carefully monitored around the farm. Because of their developing bodies, youngsters should not be allowed to do any activity that is overly strenuous and might tax growing bodies, such as heavy lifting. • There should be training in general first aid and CPR so that help can be given to an injured worker before a response team is able to make it to the location.

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19 Farm SAfety Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

Thursday, May 16, 2013 • Farm Safety • 19

Safety essential when visiting a farm The nursery rhyme does not state, “Old MacDonald had a farm and on this farm there was a bunch of dangerous things.” But maybe it should? Farmers perform an essential service, providing food and other products that consumers commonly take for granted. The inner workings of a farm are something to treat with respect. Most of the families who live and work on a farm understand the potential hazards of such an environment. However, individuals visiting a farm may be unaware of these dangers. According to the organization Kids Health, the age groups at greatest risk for injury on farms are children ages 3 to 4 and teenagers ages 13 to 14. Most injuries can be prevented, though, with a little education and precautionary measures. Machinery There are many different forms of machinery on a farm to help keep it working efficiently. These items can pose serious safety risks. Although tractors are the type of farm equipment that causes the most injuries, some adults still think it is safe to allow children to ride along. Injuries that may result from farm machinery include pinching of clothing or parts of the body, where a person may become trapped in the gears or components of equipment; cuts from equipment that shears crops; bruising or cuts from projectiles thrown by mowers or other field

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Animal feces may contain bacteria, and there may be other microorganisms on the animals themselves. It is a smart idea to always wash your hands after handling a farm animal to prevent the spread of disease. Here are some other precautions that can be taken when visiting a farm. • Don’t allow children to wander around unsupervised. • Rides on farm equipment should be discouraged. • Before starting machinery, operators equipment; and crushing or trapping injuries should locate children and other guests and clear them from the work area. from machinery that falls or tips over. • Don’t allow children near machinery. Animals • Children under the age of 16 should not Part of the excitement of visiting a be allowed to operate any farm vehicles. farm is seeing and petting the animals. • Watch for hand tools or other equipment, Although many animals may be docile and domesticated, they can still be unpredictable. and keep children away from them. • Do not touch animals unless a farm worker Children should understand that animals allows it. Then follow his or her instructions. may unintentionally cause injuries. It may • Don’t provoke farm animals or attempt be in a horse’s defense mechanism to kick to startle them. when it is scared. To avoid such injuries, • Supervise children around ponds, feeding never approach animals from behind. Also, troughs or manure lagoons. It only takes a when baby animals are present, a female few inches of water to pose a drowning risk. may be protective of her brood and go on Farms are interesting places to visit, the defensive. Another inadvertent injury that may occur especially for children. Safety should always is from bacteria or viruses from the animals. be a priority when visiting a farm. Your Source of Farm Products Through The Years

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20 Accuweather 20 • Thursday, May 16, 2013

Bureau County Republican • bcrnews.com

From you, for you

We want to hear from you – From you, for you is an interactive page for readers to share their photos, questions and comments. For information on how to submit a story, question or comment, contact BCR Associate Editor Rita Roberts at rroberts@bcrnews.com.

Todd Borsch of Princeton submitted this picture of St. Matthew’s Lutheran Church in Princeton, taken around 1955.

A trip down Memory Lane “A trip down Memory Lane” is an opportunity for BCR readers to submit their long ago photos from yesteryear. If you’d like to share an old photograph with other BCR readers, send your photo along with pertinent information to BCR Associate Editor Rita Roberts at the BCR, P.O. Box 340, Princeton, IL 61356 or email to: rroberts@bcrnews.com.

5-day Planner Today

Tonight

High 80

Low 61

Friday

High 81

Saturday

Low 64 High 86

Sunday

Low 67 High 86

Weekly weather This year High May 14

One year ago

Low

Prec.

95*

57

0

High 81

Prec.

47

0

High

Low

92 (1962)

39 (1953) 36 (1954)

May 13

70

40

0

75

50

0

94 (1956)

May 12

58

36

0

67

54

T

98 (1956) 33 (1960)

May 11

59

44

0

81

50

0

93 (2011)

34 (1949)

May 10

61

47

0

72

46

0

93 (2011)

30 (1966)

May 9

71

62

.20

66

48

0

92 (1963)

29 (1966)

May 8

81

53

0

70

55

0

92 (1963)

33 (1960)

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Source: National Weather Service Reporting Station, Princeton asterisk means new record high temperature

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Low 68 High 77

Low 65

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1

“PRSRT.STD.” US POSTAGE PAID NO. 486 PRINCETON, IL 61356 SHAW MEDIA

VOL. 7 NO. 43

Thursday, May 16, 2013

The good ol’ days Harold Steele of rural Princeton demonstrates the use of the antique corn sheller process, as he will also do during this weekend’s spring preview planned by the Bureau Valley Antique Club. Steele and his wife Margie will host the event at their farm, located on the northeast outskirts of Dover. The event is set for 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, with no admission charged. Other demonstrations at Saturday’s spring preview will include sheep shearing, hand-cranked ice cream making, stone grinding of corn and wheat, rope making, loom weaving, and treadle-powered wood cutting. Antique cars and motorcycles will be displayed; a lunch stand and sitting areas will be available. As a special feature an Armed Forces Day program is set for 1 p.m., with guest speaker Don Elmore who was a helicopter pilot during the Vietnam War. BCR file photo

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2 2 • Thursday, May 16, 2013

Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

Here is what

RutH Wood from Wyanet, IL had to say about her care at Perry Memorial Hospital…

— FEATURES —

3 Hometown beat All about you 4 Calendar 4 5 Library corner 6 Food court 7 Around the county On the road 8 10 Sports 12 Marketplace

“The staff was very attentive and kept a close eye on me during my inpatient stay at Perry. I appreciated Dr. Pratt’s proactive treatment. The food was also very good and there was a nice variety from which to choose. I have now been going to Perry’s Lab for testing. The Lab staff is efficient and the service is quick”.

On the road See Pages 8-9

Experience the quality and compassionate care and service at Perry Memorial Hospital.

Volume 7 No. 43 The Bureau County Journal is published weekly on Thursday at 800 Ace Road, P.O. Box 340, Princeton, IL 61356 by the Bureau County Republican

All rights reserved. Copyright 2013.

Factual Accuracy: Accuracy is important to us, and we want to correct mistakes promptly. If you believe a factual error has been published, please bring it to our attention. Call the Bureau County Republican at 815875-4461 or email at news@bcrnews.com.

530 Park Avenue East Princeton, IL 61356 815-875-2811 www.perrymemorial.org Proud To Be Your Hospital!


3 Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

Thursday, May 16, 2013 • 3

Your hometown beat Meeting Calendar ​May 20 Bureau Valley School Board, 7:30 p.m., administration building Cherry School Board, 6:30 p.m., school meeting room LaMoille School Board, 7:30 p.m., high school office Princeton City Council, 7 p.m., council chambers Princeton Park District, 4:30 p.m., Bureau County Metro Center Sheffield Village Board, 7 p.m., Sheffield Community Center Walnut Village Board, 7 p.m. village hall

May 21 Bradford School Board, 7 p.m., junior high computer lab Ladd School Board, 7 p.m., library Ohio Grade School Board, 7 p.m., library

May 22 Princeton High School Board, 6 p.m., library

May 23 E911, 7 p.m., Emergency Telephone System Boardroom Malden Village Board, 6 p.m., village hall

Auction Calendar May 18 – Kerchner Trust, farmland, 10 a.m., auction held at 15212 IL Hwy 92 (Green River Country Club), Walnut United Country Dahl Real Estate, auctioneers. May 18 – Miscellaneous sellers, antiques, collectibles, and household, 9:30 a.m., 401 W. Main St. (The Shed), Wyanet, Rediger Auction Service, auctioneers. May 25-27 – Three-day Memorial Day estate sale, antiques, collectibles, automobiles, furniture, decoys, firearms, coins, Indian collection, 10 a.m., 1635 N. Main St. (Tumbleson Auction Center), Princeton, Tumbleson Auction Co., auctioneers. May 28 – Mary Ewalt, farmland, 10 a.m., auction held at 104 W. Main St. (Malden Fire Station), Malden, Rediger Auction Service, auctioneers. June 2 – Clifford and Pearl Evelhoch estate, appliances, antiques, collectibles, household, beer signs, guns, tools, outdoor, coins and paper money, 10 a.m., 421 E. Cleveland St., Spring Valley, Bradleys’ and Immke Auction Service, auctioneers. June 11 – Art and Donna Johnson Estate, real estate, 5:30 p.m., 136 N. Washington St., Sheffield, Rediger Auction Service, auctioneers. June 18 – Lorena Wallace Estate, land auction, 7 p.m., sale held at Arnie’s Happy Spot, Deer Grove, Wallace Land Co., auctioneers.

Seeking Sources Are you an area man who has his own “man cave?” You know ... an area in your home, basement or garage reserved just for you. Or maybe you are the wife of a “man cave” owner? Either way, the Bureau County Republican wants to share your “man cave” with other readers in an upcoming special section in the BCR. Call BCR Senior Staff Writer Donna Barker at 815-875-4461, ext. 244, or email her at dbarker@bcrnews.com. ••• May 21 is National Waiters and Waitresses Day which recognizes the value and importance of a good waiter or waitress. The BCR would like to do a story about a waiter or waitress who enjoys their job and would be willing to share their career with other BCR readers. Contact BCR Staff Writer Goldie Currie at 815-875-4461, ext. 236, or email her at gcurrie@bcrnews.com.

May is Older Americans Month A meeting with the National Council of Senior Citizens resulted in President John F. Kennedy designating May 1963 as Senior Citizens Month, encouraging the nation to pay tribute to older people across the country. In 1980, President Jimmy Carter’s proclamation changed the name to Older Americans Month, a time to celebrate those 65 and older through ceremonies, events and public recognition. Here are some statistics about older Americans, as provided by the Census Bureau. • 41.4 million - The number of people who were 65 and older in the United States on July 1, 2011, up from 40.3 million on April 1, 2010 (Census Day). In 2011, this group accounted for 13.3 percent of the total population. • 92.0 million - Projected population of people 65 and older in 2060. People in this age group would comprise just over one in five U.S. residents at that time. Of this number, 18.2 million would be 85 or older. • 2.4 million - Projected number of baby boomers in 2060. At that time, the youngest baby boomers would be 96 years old. • 2056 - The year in which, for the first time, the population 65 and older would outnumber people younger than 18 in the U.S. • Nearly 17 percent - Projected percentage of the global population that would be 65 and older in 2050, up from 8 percent today. In 2005, Europe became the first major world region where the population 65 and older outnumbered those younger than 15. By 2050, it would be joined by Northern America (which includes Canada and the United States), Asia, Latin

CHICAGO — Summer break is quickly approaching for high school and college students and many of them will be searching for summer jobs. The Better Business Bureau serving Chicago and Northern Illinois is warning students about job scams that could result in a loss of money and a waste of time. These could include work-at-home jobs paying high salaries for simple work and sales or pyramid schemes. “Searching for jobs is not always easy and what may sound too good to be true probably is,” said Steve J. Bernas, president and CEO of the Better Business Bureau serving Chicago and Northern Illinois.

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the population 65 and older in 2012 who had earned a bachelor’s degree or higher. •   58 percent - Percentage of people 65 and older who were married in 2012. • 26 percent - Percentage of people 65 and older in 2012 who were widowed. • 70.3 percent - Percentage of citizens 65 and older reporting casting a ballot in the 2008 presidential election. Not statistically different from those 45 to 64 (69.2 percent), people 65 and older had the highest turnout rate of any age group. • 80.7 percent - Percentage of householders 65 and older who owned their homes as of fourth quarter 2012. • 53,364 - The number of people 100 years old and older counted by the 2010 Census. • 20.7 - For every 100 centenarian women, the number of centenarian men in 2010. • 43.5 percent - In 2010, percentage of centenarian men who lived with others in a household, the most common living arrangement for this group. For their female counterparts, the most common living arrangement was residing in a nursing home (35.2 percent). • 3.29 - Number of centenarians per 10,000 people in North Dakota in 2010. North Dakota was the only state with more than three centenarians per 10,000 people. • 17.6 percent - Percentage of Florida’s population 65 and older in 2011, which led all states. • 45.5 percent - Percentage of the population of Sumter County, Fla., that was 65 or older in 2011, which led all of the nation’s counties.

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America and the Caribbean and Oceania (which includes Australia and New Zealand). • $33,118 - The 2011 median income of households with householders 65 and older, not significantly different from the previous year.  • 8.7 percent - The percent of  people 65 and older who were in poverty in 2011, statistically unchanged from 2010.  There were 3.6 million seniors in poverty in 2011.  • $170,128 - Median net worth for householders 65 and older in 2010, down from $195,890 in 2005. • 9.2 million - Estimated number of people 65 and older who were veterans of the armed forces in 2011. • 16.1 percent - The percentage of people 65 and older who were in the labor force in 2010, up from 12.1 percent in 1990. These older workers numbered 6.5 million in 2010, up from 3.8 million in 1990. By 2011, this rate had increased to 16.2 percent. • 22.3 percent - The percentage of people 65 and older in Alaska in the labor force in 2011. Labor force participation rates for people 65 years and over ranged from 22.3 percent in Alaska to 12.5 percent in West Virginia. • 44.3 percent - Among those 65 and older who worked in 2011, the percentage who worked fulltime, year-round. Among states and equivalents, the District of Columbia had the highest rate, at 62.2 percent. • 81.1 percent - Proportion of people 65 and older in 2012 who had completed high school or higher education. • 24.3 percent  - Percentage of

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“Job hunters need to take appropriate measures to avoid being deceived by scams.” The BBB offers some tips for students when looking for summer job opportunities: • If you are offered a job without a formal interview or job application, it is most likely a scam. Do not provide any personal or financial information, as it can lead to identity theft. • If the employer does not provide you with the details of the job in writing, be wary. When you have details in writing, be sure to read them carefully and ask questions. • If the employer does not have

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4 4 • Thursday, May 16, 2013

Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

All about you Anniversaries 70th Mr. and Mrs. Blake Morris of Dover, May 8.

Birthdays May 16 • Todd Olin • John Fitzgerald • Michael Stauffer May 17 • Jennifer Vermost • Gary Wagner May 18 • Melody Boswell • Sheila Wester • Amber Whipple • Penny Marie Wright • Roland Johnson • Travis Johnson May 19 • Jazmine Menees • Codi Randale Swanson • Liz Downey • Renee Turczyn • Alice Maddy

• Eric Farrell • Kailee Lynn Piacenti • Tori DeWaele May 20 • Brett Gee • Laura Wyatt • Gina Muratori • Debbie Williams • James Albrecht • Mike Wilkenson • Nancy Burcham May 21 • Deb Bowyer • Lynn White • Rodney Pinter May 22 • Nikki Dingman • Todd Ryan • Angie Balensiefen • Kara Hudson • Eric T. Pratt

Births Bivins — Jacob and Timberly (Miller) Bivins of Malden, son, April 3. Schlenz — Doug and Angel (McInnes) Schlenz of Spring Valley, daughter, May 3. Taylor — John and Jamie (Gillman) Taylor of Princeton, son, May 1. Turigliatti — Josh and Hope (Smith) Turigliatti of LaSalle, daughter, May 1.

Death Notices Arch — Mary Louise Arch, 92, of Princeton, May 8. Bates — Mary Ann (Pape) Bates, 81, of Hot Springs, Ark., formerly of Princeton, May 8. Daughtery — Ronald E. Daughtery, 68, of Sheffield, May 4. Donahue — Mary Emma Donahue, 86, of Mineral, April 12. Drake — Mildred “Loraine” Drake, 90, of Princeton, May 7. Erdman — Bonnie S. Erdman, 70, of Bradford, May 10. Fredenhagen — David Cushing Fredenhagen, 84, of Tiskilwa, May 4. Hand — George R. Hand, 82, of Princeton, May 6. Hepp — Nadine K. Hepp, 71, of Princeton, May 6. Kropf — Connie Jean Kropf, 55, of Tampico, May 9. Martin — Michael “Mack” Wade Martin, 64, of Princeton, May 11. Mitchell — Frank David Mitchell, 71, of Spring Valley, May 12. Oberschelp — David M. Oberschelp, 74, of Mendota, May 7. Peterson — Doris V. Peterson, 85, of Dixon, formerly of Amboy, May 6. Rawling — Randall E. Rawling, 56, of Monticello, Miss., formerly of Bureau, April 22. Rieker — Donald M. Rieker, 63, of Carol Stream, May 2. Schmutz — Connie Jo (Fox) Schmutz, 55, of Princeton, May 12. Schubert — Claudia H. Schubert, 91, of Princeton, formerly of Henry, May 7. Sizemore — Sharon K. Sizemore, 66, of East Moline, formerly of Mineral, May 9. Ziegler — John Stephen “Steve” Ziegler, 62, of Tiskilwa, May 8.

Calendar Book fair SPRING VALLEY — The St. Margaret’s Auxiliary will a book fair from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday, May 16, and 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, May 17, in the hospital’s lower lobby. There will be hundreds of books and gifts available for purchase. For more information, call 815-664-1130.

Garage, bake sale PRINCETON — The People Church, 3525 N. Main St., Princeton, will host a garage sale and bake sale from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday, May 17, and from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, May 18, at the church. Proceeds will go to the youth mission trip in July.

Bluegrass jam PRINCETON — A bluegrass, gospel and country music jam will be from 6 to 10 p.m. Friday, May 17, at the First Lutheran Church at 116 N. Pleasant St. in Princeton. Jams will continue the third Friday of each month. Players and listeners are welcome. Snacks and soft drinks available. For more information, call 815875-2057.

able. As a special feature, an Armed Forces Day program is set for 1 p.m. with guest speaker Don Elmore who was a helicopter pilot during the Vietnam War.

Car wash WALNUT — The Walnut Cub Scout and Boy Scout troops will host a car wash from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, May 18, in the Citizens First State Bank parking lot. Washes are $5 for cars, $7 for vans. Lunch will be available for purchase. The event is sponsored by Panther Outdoor Maintenance Services Inc. All proceeds will go toward fees for day camp.

Spring preview DOVER — The Bureau Valley Antique Club will hold a spring preview on the farm of Harold and Margie Steele, located at the northeast outskirts of Dover from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, May 18. Admission is free. Demonstrations will include the use of the antique corn sheller, sheep shearing, hand-cranked ice cream making, stone grinding of corn and wheat, rope making, loom weaving and treadle-powered wood cutting. Antique cars and motorcycles will be displayed; a lunch stand and sitting areas will be avail-

PRINCETON — The First Lutheran Church will present the fifth annual Old Wheels Show from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, May 18, in the church parking lots at 116 N. Pleasant St. in Princeton. This year the show will feature the Corvette. Other activities include a train for the children to ride, food and beverages, a bake sale and music. To enter a vehicle in the show, call the church office at 815-875-1685.

Breakfast planned OHIO — The Ohio Booster Club will hold an all-you-can-eat pancake and sausage breakfast from 8 a.m. to noon Sunday, May 19, in the Ohio Schools auditorium. Tickets are $5 for adults and senior citizens, and $4 for students under 12, with preschool free.

Rod and custom show LASALLE — The Last Chance Swap Meet and Rod and Custom Car Show will be from 6 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, May 19, at the LaSalle Speedway, Route 6, east of LaSalle. Open to all makes and models of cars, race cars and motorcycles. Rain or shine. Show car entry is $5. Vendors spaces $20. Admission is $3, 12 and younger free with adult. Car corral is $8 with one admission. Free parking and a full concession stand. For more information, contact Bob Beenenga at 815228-3177 or 815-442-3275.

PRINCETON — The Princeton Moose Lodge will host a bingo night at 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 21. Doors will open at 5 p.m. and sandwiches will be available for purchase. The lodge will continue to host bingo the first and third Tuesday of each month. For more information, call the lodge at 815879-5261.

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WALNUT — A Trivia Night Benefit for Cora Peters will be held Saturday, June 8, at the Walnut Park Shelter. Check-in will be at 6 p.m. The cost is $100 per table (10-person teams). To reserve a table, call Candy Lind at 815-379-9394 or 815-8661297. Concessions will be available. To donate or volunteer to help, call Julie Estrada at 815303-2523. Cora was diagnosed with synovial sarcoma in the summer of 2009. She has had several surgeries and rounds of chemo and radiation and continues fighting. This benefit will help with medical bills.

Garden Faire and Walk UTICA — The annual Garden Faire and Walk sponsored by the Utica Garden Club will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, June 8 and from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, June 9 in downtown Utica. There will be a great variety of garden and craft vendors and a plant sale with reasonably priced perennials, annuals, herbs and vegetables from the club members’ gardens. The Garden Walk includes a self-guided tour of private gardens. Tickets can be purchased for $8 at the Garden Faire. Rain or shine. For more information, email: club@ uticagardenclub.org or call 815667-4856 or 815-252-4573.

Bingo PRINCETON — The Princeton Moose Lodge will host a bingo night at 7 p.m. Tuesday, June 18. Doors will open at 5 p.m. and sandwiches will be available for purchase. The lodge will continue to host bingo the first and third Tuesday of each month. For more information, call the lodge at 815879-5261.

Bluegrass jam

Bingo

A. Randolph Comba

PRINCETON — The Princeton Moose Lodge will host a bingo night at 7 p.m. Tuesday, June 4. Doors will open at 5 p.m. and sandwiches will be available for purchase. The lodge will continue to host bingo the first and third Tuesday of each month. For more information, call the lodge at 815-879-5261.

Benefit planned

Old Wheels Show

Benefit LADD — The fourth annual “Texas B.B.Q” will be from 4 to 8 p.m. Friday, May 17, at the Ladd Community Building. Menu includes brisket, barbecued chicken, roast pork, baked beans, Cole slaw, potatoes, dessert and beverage. The event is a fundraiser for the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation to conduct research and support the programs that improve and extend lives of those with Cystic Fibrosis. Tickets are $10 for adults, $5 for ages 7-12 and free for children under 6. Reservations are not necessary, but appreciated. For advanced tickets, call 815-8942936. The Ladd Community Building is one block west of the bowling alley.

Bingo

PRINCETON — A bluegrass, gospel and country music jam will be from 6 to 10 p.m. Friday, June 19, at the First Lutheran Church at 116 N. Pleasant St. in Princeton. Jams will continue the third Friday of each month. Players and listeners are welcome. Snacks and soft drinks available. For more information, call 815875-2057.

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5 Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

PRINCETON – Today, Thursday, May 16, The Bureau County Retired Teachers Association will meet at noon in the library meeting room. Also, at 6:30 p.m. Ken Schroeder will teach Computer Basics Class 1 in the youth services room. Praise and Coffee will meet at 6:30 p.m. in the library meeting room. On Monday, May 20, the Monday Night Movie begins at 6:30 p.m. The movie was one of the most critically acclaimed movies of 2003. The New Zealand hit combines Maori tribal traditions with the timely “girl power” of a vibrant new millennium. Despite the discouragement of her gruff and disapproving grandfather, who nearly disowns her because she is female and therefore traditionally disqualified from tribal leadership, 12-year-old Pal is convinced she is a tribal leader and sets out to prove it. On Tuesday, May 21, United Healthcare will meet at 9:30 a.m. in the library meeting groom. Also, WUNT will meet at 6:30 p.m. in the local history room. On Wednesday, May 22, Nook First Generation Basics Workshop will be at 2 p.m. in the library meeting room. Bring fully charged device and Princeton library card. Also, Widmark Wednesday begins at 6:30 p.m. and will feature “Garden of Evil” in the library meeting room. WALNUT – Walnut Public Library has teamed up with Vintage Tech Recyclers to host a cell phone recycle drive. It’s time to empty the junk drawers and help out the library. Drop cell phones off at the library, located at 101 Heaton St. If the library is closed, leave it in the drop box. Recycling old cell phones keeps toxic materials out of landfills. Drop-off is free and there is no limit on the number of

Thursday, May 16, 2013 • 5

phones brought in. All proceeds from recycling old phones will go toward the library’s new furnace and air conditioner. The library is also looking to host a large electronics recycle drive during the spring townwide garage sale. This includes old computers, printers, monitors, TVs, microwaves, etc. SPRING VALLEY – The Richard A. Mautino Memorial Library is hosting a book, VHS and books on cassette sale. All items are 10 cents each. Story time is held from 5:30 to 6 p.m. on Tuesdays in the children’s room at the library. There is a story and craft-related project during this time for preschool through second grade children. A parent must accompany their child. The event is free of charge. The children’s library is getting ready for the Summer Reading Program, which has been themed “Have book–Will Travel.” Registration is set from June 3 to 8. During this week, librarians will help complete the registration, set-up a goal for each child and sign each child up for the events and activities they wish to participate in during the program. If unable to attend during this week, come in as soon as possible in June to get started. New books in the library’s adult collection include: “The Mystery Woman” by Amanda Quick, “12th of Never” by James Patterson, “The Hit” by David Baldacci, “Best Kept Secret” by Jeffrey Archer, “The Blossom Sisters” by Fern Michaels, “Wedding Night” by Sophie Kinsella, “Fly Away” by Kristin Hannah, “Sand Castle Bay” by Sherryl Woods and “Starting Now” by Debbie Macomber. TISKILWA – On Monday, May 20, the Tiskilwa Public Library

Library Corner will host a book club/ dinner discussion at Local libraries carry DVD to 5:30 p.m. over “Peaches for Father Francis” by help parents detect stuttering Joanne Harris. In this sequel to “Chocolat,” Vianne Rocher returns to the beautiful French village of Lansquenet, in which eight years ago she opened a chocolate shop and first learned the meaning of home. On Tuesday, May 21, Tiskilwa residents are invited to an open house at 6:30 p.m. to inform of the library’s new expansion project. The library recently received an Illinois Public Library Construction Grant, which will enable the library to rebuild and refurbish the existing building. The library is also pleased to announce e-Books through OmniLibraries are now offered. Library patrons are encouraged to call ahead to set aside a time to register an account with their reading device. Contact the library at 815-646-4511 or tisklib@ comcast.net. LAMOILLE– The LaMoille-Clarion Public Library’s hours were changed from noon to 6 p.m. on Mondays and Wednesdays. New books added to the library’s collection include: “Daddy’s Gone a Hunting” by Mary Higgins Clarks, “Orphan Train” by Christina Baker Kline, “The Storyteller” by Jodi Picoult, “Garden of Stones” by Sophie Littlefield, “The One and Only Ivan” by Katherine Applegate, “Llama Llama Nighty Night” by Anna Dewdney, “Red Truck” by Kersten Hamilton and “Even Monsters Need Haircuts” by Matthew McElligott. For those who have considered purchasing an electronic device, but aren’t sure where to start, maybe the library can help. Visit the library and try out a Nook, Kindle, Google Nexus, iPad or laptop.

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Parents eagerly anticipate the moment when their child first begins to talk.  But for some parents, it is a time of anxiety because their child struggles to get words out. The DVD, Stuttering and Your Child: Help for Parents, helps parents detect stuttering and take action toward helping their child and is available at most local libraries including, Mason Memorial Public Library in Buda, Ladd

Public Library, Mineral Gold Public Library, Ohio Public Library, Princeton Public Library, Sheffield Public Library, Richard A. Mautino Memorial Library in Spring Valley, Tiskilwa Public Library, Walnut Public Library and Raymond A. Sapp Memorial Township Library in Wyanet. Produced by the nonprofit Stuttering Foundation, the film describes what kinds of stuttering young children may

exhibit, how parents can help at home and the role of a speech pathologist in evaluating and treating children who stutter. Strategies parents can use to help reduce stuttering are also given throughout the DVD and include reducing the number of questions they ask the child, focusing on taking turns during conversations and making time to read or talk with the child in a relaxed manner. 

The Nexus, iPad and laptop are not available for checkout, but visitors will have the opportunity to try them while in the library. These items have been made possible through the Eliminate the Digital Divide Grant. The library also has become a member of the OMNI consortium, which allows patrons to borrow eBooks and downloadable audio books. Summer is right around the corner! This year’s summer reading theme is “Have Book–Will Travel.” Beginning in June, story hours will be on Tuesdays with Cara and

Evan. More information will be released soon. OHIO – The Ohio Public Library is taking names of those interested in a basic computer class. Sign up at the library to be added to the list. The library’s book club is reading “Stay Close” by Harlan Coben this month. The club meets at 1 p.m. on the first Tuesday of the month in the library. Interested readers are welcome to stop by and join the club. LADD – The library continues to hold its preschool story times at 10:30 a.m. on the first

and third Mondays of each month. The program is designed for ages 3-5. All children must be accompanied by a parent or guardian. Each session consists of stories, activities and a craft. PERU – The Peru Public Library holds a story time for children ages 3-5 at 10:30 a.m. every Wednesday. Children hear stories, sing songs, dance and learn finger plays. Registration is not required. For more information visit www.perulibrary.org or call 815-2230229, ext. 5.


6 6 • Thursday, May 16, 2013

Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

Food court Tex-Mex Lasagna

These are some main dishes that are quick to fix. You can prepare a meal in minutes using soups and Judy 1 1/2 pounds ground round other things to hurry up your dishes. 1 teaspoon jarred minced garlic Dyke 1 15-ounce can black beans, rinsed and drained GRANDMA JUDY’S CAFE 1 8-ounce package shredded sharp cheddar, divided 2 teaspoons chili powder 1/4 cup butter 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin 4 bone in chicken breasts, skinned 1 10-ounce can diced tomatoes with green chilies, 1/2 teaspoon salt drained 1/2 teaspoon pepper 1 8-ounce container sour cream 1 1/2 cups buttermilk, divided 1 16-ounce bottle chunky salsa 3/4 cup all-purpose flour 6 skinned and boned chicken breasts, about 2 1/2 6 10-inch flour tortillas 1 10 3/4-ounce can cream of mushroom soup, pounds Preheat oven to 425°. Cook beef and garlic in a 2 teaspoons seasoned salt undiluted large non-stick skillet over medium high heat, stir- 2 tablespoons canola oil Paprika ring until beef crumbles and is no longer pink. Drain. 1 10 1/4-ounce can cream of mushroom soup Garnish: lemon wedges Preheat oven to 425°. Melt butter in a lightly greased Combine beef mixture, black beans, 1 cup cheese 1 8-ounce package 1/3 less fat cream cheese 13-by-9-inch baking dish in a 425° oven. Sprinkle and next 5 ingredients. Line a lightly greased 9-by- 1/2 cup dry white wine chicken with salt and pepper. Dip chicken in 1/2 13-inch baking dish with 2 tortillas. Spoon 1/3 of beef 1 0.7-ounce envelope Italian dressing mix cup buttermilk and dredge in flour. Arrange chicken, mixture over tortillas. Repeat layers twice. Sprinkle 1 8-ounce package sliced fresh mushrooms breast sides down in baking dish. Bake for 15 minutes. with remaining cheese. Bake at 425° for 15 minutes 6 frozen extra large sandwich style biscuits Turn chicken and bake 10 more minutes. Stir together or until cheese melts. Sprinkle chicken with seasoned salt. Cook chicken, remaining 1 cup buttermilk and cream of mushroom in batches, in hot oil in a large skillet over medium soup, pour over chicken, sprinkle with paprika and high heat 2 to 3 minutes on each side or just until bake 10 more minutes, shielding chicken with alumibrowned. Transfer chicken to a 5-quart slow cooker, num foil to prevent excessive browning, if necessary. 1 pound ground chuck reserving drippings in skillet. Add soup, white wine 1 pound lean ground pork and Italian dressing mix to hot drippings in skillet. 1 14.5-ounce can diced tomatoes with basil, Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly 2 to 3 oregano and garlic, drained minutes or until cheese is melted and mixture is 1/3 cup marinara sauce 2 extra large bags boil in bag white rice smooth. Sprinkle mushrooms over chicken in slow 1/3 cup Italian seasoned breadcrumbs 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour cooker. Spoon soup mixture over mushrooms. Cover 1 large egg, lightly beaten 2 teaspoon chili powder, divided and cook on low 4 hours. Stir well before serving. Pre1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon salt pare biscuits according to package directions. Serve 1 teaspoon pepper 1/4 teaspoon pepper chicken mixture over biscuits. 1/2 cup (2 ounces) shredded mozzarella cheese 4 1/2-inch thick boneless pork loin chops Preheat oven to 375°. Stir together ground chuck 2 tablespoons canola oil and pork in a large bowl. Process diced tomatoes in a 1/2 cup bottled barbecue sauce blender or food processor 5 seconds or until slightly 1/4 cup frozen chopped onion chunky, stopping to scrape down sides as needed. Stir 1 10-ounce package frozen seasoning blend 2 teaspoons cornstarch Prepare rice according to package directions, keep tomatoes, marinara sauce and next 4 ingredients into 2 cups chopped precooked chicken warm. Meanwhile, combine flour, 1 teaspoon chili ground beef mixture just until combined. Shape into a 1 10 3/4-ounce can cream of chicken soup powder, salt and pepper in a shallow dish. Dredge 9-by-5-inch loaf. Place meat loaf on a wire rack in an 1 10 3/4-ounce can cream of mushroom soup pork chops in flour mixture. Heat oil in a large non- aluminum foil-lined jelly roll pan. Bake at 375° for 1 1 10-ounce can diced tomatoes and green chilies stick skillet over medium high heat. Add chops and hour. Top with mozzarella cheese and bake 15 more 1 teaspoon chili powder cook 2 minutes on each side or until golden. Combine minutes or until center is no longer pink. Let stand 5 1/2 teaspoon garlic salt 12 6-inch corn tortillas barbecue sauce, onion, 1/4 cup water and remaining 1 minutes before serving. 2 cups (8 ounces) shredded cheddar cheese, divided teaspoon chili powder, pour over chops. Cover, reduce Preheat oven to 350°. Stir together first seven ingreheat and simmer 8 minutes or until chops are done. dients. Tear tortillas into 1-inch pieces. Layer one Remove chops from pan and keep warm. Combine third of tortilla pieces in a lightly greased 13-by-9-inch 1 3to 4-pound shoulder pork roast cornstarch and 2 teaspoons and 2 teaspoons water, baking dish. Top with one third of chicken mixture 1 18-ounce bottle barbecue sauce stirring until smooth. Add cornstarch mixture to sauce and 2/3 cup of cheese. Repeat layers twice. Bake at 1 12-ounce can Coca Cola soft drink in pan, cook, stirring constantly, 1 minute. Divide rice 350° for 32 minutes or until casserole is thoroughly Place pork roast in a 6-quart slow cooker. Pour barevenly among plates, place chops over rice, and spoon heated and bubbly. becue sauce and cola over roast. Cover with lid and sauce evenly over chops. cook on high 6 to 7 hour or until roast is tender and This will give you a few dishes that are easy to shreds easily. Serve with slaw and steak fries. I like to use the slow cooker plastic liners, sure saves a lot try. If you need to reach me, or if you have recipes of work cleaning up the slow cooker of all that sticky you would like to share, email me at judyd2313@ 1 12-ounce box shells and cheese frontier.com. mess. 1 pound ground beef 1 teaspoon chili powder 1/4 teaspoon ground cumin 1 15-ounce can kidney beans, rinsed and drained 1 14.5-ounce can diced tomatoes with mild green chilies 2 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley Prepare shells and cheese according to package directions. Meanwhile brown beef in a 12-inch-by 2 1/2-inch-deep non-stick skillet or Dutch oven over medium high heat, stirring often, for 8 minutes or Hosted by: until no longer pink, drain and rinse under hot running water. Return beef to skillet, stir in chili powder Tiskilwa Community Association and cumin. Cook 2 minutes. Add beans, tomatoes and 1/4 cup water. Cook 5 to 8 minutes or until most of & Illinois Valley Whitetails Unlimited liquid has evaporated. Stir prepared pasta into beef Sponsored by: The Bureau County Republican mixture, and sprinkle with chopped fresh parsley. Serve immediately. This is good using the Velveeta shells and cheese original box mix.

Buttermilk Baked Chicken

Creamy Slow Cooker Chicken

Tomato – Basil Meatloaf

Smothered Pork Chops over Rice

King Ranch Chicken Casserole

Slow Cooker BBQ Pork

Chili Cheeseburger Mac-and-Cheese

CANAL FUN DAY

Smothered Enchiladas 2 1/2 pounds ground beef 1 1.25-ounce package mild taco seasoning mix 1 4.5-ounce can chopped green chilies, divided 2 10 1/4-ounce cans cream of chicken soup 8 8-inch flour tortillas 2 cups (8 ounces) shredded cheddar cheese Garnishes: salsa, sour cream, green onion curls, chopped fresh cilantro Preheat oven to 350°. Cook ground beef in a large skillet, stirring until it crumbles and is not longer pink, drain. Stir in taco seasoning mix and half of chopped green chilies, set aside. Stir together remaining green chilies, soup and sour cream. Pour half of soup mixture into a lightly greased 13-by-9-inch baking dish. Spoon beef mixture evenly down centers of tortillas, roll up. Place, seam sides down, over soup mixture in baking dish, top evenly with remaining soup mixture and cheese. Bake at 350° for 25 minutes or until thoroughly heated. Garnish as desired.

Saturday - June 1, 2013 8:00 am to 12:00 pm

Hennepin Canal Lock 11 Day Use Area 2 Miles North of Tiskilwa Registration begins at 8:00 am Fishing Derby 9:00 - 11:00 am • Lunch at 11:00 am Prizes Awarded after Lunch Bring your lawn chairs and fishing equipment. Some bait will be available.

• FISHING DERBY • FREE FOOD • DOOR PRIZES • MINNOW GUESSING CONTEST • CASTING CONTEST • CRITTER RACES • SCAVENGER HUNT


7 Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

Thursday, May 16, 2013 • 7

Around the county Z Tour bike ride returning to Princeton this summer PRINCETON — On July 20, the Zearing Child Enrichment Center will again sponsor the “Z Tour Bike Ride,” a bicycle road ride originating in Princeton and including surrounding communities. The event will begin at Zearing Park in Princeton and will include the registrant’s choice of a 10-mile, 29-mile, 40-mile, 50-mile, 62-mile or 100mile ride on specified routes throughout Bureau County. The event will feature themed refreshment stops, mobile emergency first aid, water, air and bike transportation. At the conclusion of the ride, each rider will be provided a complimentary lunch at Zearing Park. Additionally, a limited quantity of Z Tour Bike Ride dri-fit sport T-shirts and cycling socks will be available for purchase. A

commemorative Z Tour Bike Ride jersey will also be made available for purchase. Brian Church, Z Tour director, remarked, “We are really looking forward to continue to build on the success of the first two events. This year, we are hoping to host at least 400 riders. Our steering committee strongly believes that this area has some of the best cycling roads in Illinois and an organized road ride like Z Tour will showcase our local merchants and the surrounding communities. It is also a great way to promote benefits and services offered at the Zearing Child Enrichment Center.” To register and ride in the event, visit z-tour.org or the Facebook page Z Tour Bike Ride. Questions can be sent via email to ztourinfo@gmail.com.

First-ever Memorial Day Poker Run PRINCETON — The first-ever Memorial Day Poker Run will be May 27. The Poker Run will begin with a rolling thunder ride in conjunction with the Princeton Memorial Day parade. Check-in begins at 9 a.m. at the Princeton Inn with the parade beginning at 10 a.m. The last bike in will be 5 p.m. Dinner will follow the card draw in Malden at the Feed Store.

The cost will be $20 for singles and $30 for a couple. Music will be provided by Josh Hisle. All proceeds from this event will go to the Wounded Warrior Foundation with $100 going to the winner of the poker run. For more information, contact Mike Robinson at princetonrt@gmail.com or call Mike at 815-8781861.

Annual drama camp PRINCETON — The Prairie Arts Council has announced registration for the 11th annual children’s summer drama camp for children entering grades 2-9. Camp runs for three hours, Monday through Friday, for two weeks. Two camp sessions will run June 10-21, one from 9 a.m. to noon and the other from 2 to 5 p.m. There will also be a morning camp running July 8-19 if there is sufficient interest. The camp cost is $85 with special rates for siblings. Need-based schol-

arships are also available upon request for those who meet the criteria. To register, contact camp director Rachel Gorenz at 815-876-6284 or email hildigard@hotmail.com. Payment is expected by June 1. Checks and registration forms can be returned to Rachel Gorenz, 1009 S. Main St., Princeton, IL 61356.

Memorial Day services LADD — Harold E. Russell Post 938, American Legion, Ladd will host Memorial Day services on May 27 at the following locations: 8 a.m. — Ray Barto Memorial Park, Seatonville; 8:30 a.m. — Berean Cemetery; 9 a.m. — Cherry Miner’s Cemetery, Cherry; 9:45 a.m. — Calvary Cemetery, Arlington; 10:15 a.m. — Greenfield Cemetery, LaMoille; 11:15 a.m. — Dalzell Memorial Park, Dalzell; 11:45 a.m. — Ladd Cemetery, Ladd; and 12:15 p.m. — War Memorial Park, Ladd. The guest speaker will be U.S. Air Force Col. Kevin Anderson (retired). The public is invited and encouraged to attend. In case of inclement weather, some of the above services may be cancelled. The Cherry program will move to Holy Trinity Church Hall; the War Memorial Park program will move to the Ladd Community Center; and the Greenfield Cemetery program will move to Allen Junior High School. OHIO — A Memorial Day Mass will be at 8 a.m. May 27 at Immaculate Conception Church in Ohio. A rosary will be recited after the Mass at St. Mary’s Cemetery. BUDA — Buda American Legion Post 261 will conduct Memorial Day services at 10 a.m. May 27 at Hopeland Cemetery, west of Buda. Traditional military services will be provided by the Buda American Legion and Auxiliary. The guest speaker will be Tom Mott, who retired with the rank of senior master sergeant after 22 years active duty in the U.S. Air Force. Also speaking will be Frank Gebeck II, a senior at Bureau Valley High School and last year’s Boy’s State candidate. A tribute to a veteran will be given by Dean Barnett. In case of inclement weather, the service

will be moved to Bureau Valley South Junior High School in Buda. PRINCETON — American Legion Post 125 of Princeton, along with VFW Post 4323 and AMVETS Post 180, will perform Memorial Day honors for their fallen comrades beginning at Oakland Cemetery at 8 a.m. From there, the group will go to Elm Lawn Memorial Park for services there and then on to Dover Prairie Repose on Route 34 and then to the Malden City Cemetery. After the graveside services, the group will meet at the parking lot behind the former Nelson’s Drug Store to line up for the parade that steps off at 10:30 a.m. Memorial Day ceremonies will begin at Soldiers and Sailors Park at 11 a.m. with retired Command Sgt. Maj. Tom Root as guest speaker. Root is also the current Princeton Police chief. Legion Post 125 Commander David Ohlson will be master of ceremonies. All times are approximate. American Legion Woman’s Auxiliary Unit 125 of Princeton will also participate in Memorial Day services by presenting floral arrangements at the gravesides at Oakland and Elm Lawn, and also participate in the parade and ceremonies at the Solders and Sailors Park. Members of the Auxiliary are reminded to wear the blue service uniform and comfortable shoes. After the ceremonies at Soldiers and Sailors Park, the public is invited to return to the Legion Hall at 1549 W. Peru St. for light refreshments served by the Princeton Woman’s club. Members of the Princeton DAR group will also participate in Memorial Day ceremonies along with the Legion, VFW, AMVETS and American Legion Woman’s Auxiliary Unit 125. For more information, call Commander David Ohlson at 815-579-2001 or the Legion Post at 815-

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In recognition, North Central Behavioral Health Systems shares some tips to improve your own mental health: Accept yourself: Everyone has something to offer and everyone is entitled to respect. Keep active: Even a 30 minute walk each day makes a surprising difference. Keep in contact: Good friends will always be there for each other. We don’t have to cope on our own all the time. Relax: Try to make time to relax. Find something that you enjoy that works for you. Even 10 minutes of downtime during a stressful day can help you manage stress better. Talk about it: Anyone can feel isolated and overwhelmed by problems. Talking about it always helps. If you feel unable to talk to those close to you, then you can call NCBHS at 815.224.1610.

For more tips, visit www.ncbhs.org or call 815.224.1610

872-1171 and leave a message. DEPUE — A Memorial Day Mass will be at 9 a.m. May 27 at St. Mary’s Cemetery in DePue. Those attending the event should bring lawn chairs.  In case of rain, Mass will be in the church. Everyone is invited to coffee and doughnuts after Mass in the church hall. NEW BEDFORD — The New Bedford Royal Neighbors of America will conduct its annual Memorial Day services at the Greenville-Fairfield Cemetery, known as Union Cemetery of New Bedford, at 2 p.m. June 2. VAN ORIN — Memorial Day services will be at 10 a.m. May 27 at the Bache Chapel in Van Orin. The Civil Air Patrol will post colors. There will be music and a speaker. Refreshments will be served in the fellowship hall after the service. NEPONSET — Neponset American Legion Post 875 will hold its annual Memorial Day program at 11 a.m. May 27 in the Neponset Community Building. This year’s guest speaker is Sam Rice from Toulon. He is a Vietnam veteran that served 14 months as an infantryman. He was highly decorated for valor and service with eight commendations with the rank of sergeant when discharged. He currently lives in Toulon with his wife and has three sons. As a dedicated person he has served as Past 16th District Commander, past commander Toulon American Legion, member of Toulon American Legion

and member of Toulon V.F.W. The American Legion will present the colors and Neponset Grade School student Victoria Crofton will lead the Pledge of Allegiance. Carol Gerrond will be the accompanist to the National Anthem. The invocation will be presented by Ron Toliver, pastor of the Congregational Church. The Lincoln Gettysburg Address will be read by Neponset Grade School student Jessica Crofton and Tom Blake will read the Roster of Graves listing Neponset area veterans dating back to the War of 1812. Audio and music will be provided by Gregg Gunning of Neponset. After the program, Post 875 will present military ceremonies to honor veterans buried at both Floral Hill and West cemeteries, then will conclude with Taps. Several days before Memorial Day, Jon Pickering will coordinate the setting of the Avenue of Flags at Floral Hill Cemetery to honor some 155 veterans buried there. Wendell Yepsen will coordinate the settings of small flags at grave markers of all veterans in Floral Hill and West cemeteries. Flags will also line Scott Park and downtown Commercial Street. The American Legion Post is asking Neponset residents to fly the American flag on Memorial Day to express appreciation to all veterans and current members of the Armed Forces. The Neponset Historical Society will serve a luncheon after the program.

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8 8 • Thursday, May 16, 2013

Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

On the road David Rogers’ Big Bugs invades the Morton Arboretum LISLE – Larger-than-life insects are invading Chicagoland this summer, as The Morton Arboretum celebrates the world of bugs with David Rogers’ Big Bugs exhibition. Through Sept. 8, the Arboretum will be a hive of activity highlighting our insect world. Stare up in amazement at 12 largerthan-life insect sculptures and feel what it’s like to be a bug! On display will be an oversize bee hive, lady bug, assassin bug, damselfly, spider, daddy long legs, praying mantis, dragon fly, grasshopper and three ants - some nearly 10 feet tall. The sculptures are built using natural materials including willow, cedar, walnut, and other woods, supported by metal armatures. “When you’re standing in the shadow of these giant sculptures, you really get a feel for what it’s like to be a bug,” says Mary Samerdyke, manager of interpretation. “This exhibit helps you see bugs in a new way and appreciate the many ways bugs help us even when we don’t realize it! Kids of all ages really respond to David Rogers’ Big Bugs and it’s exciting to see visitors experiencing new things—such as insect petting zoos or edible bugs — and having fun while learning.” To celebrate the exhibition, the Arboretum is offering interactive, bugthemed activities all summer long. Throughout the summer, kids can pick up their free Official Bug Detective Guide and uncover the truth about bugs as they explore the exhibit. Continue exploring the world of bugs in the Children’s Garden through our self-guided drop-in programs. In June, test your skills in a bug board game and make a ladybug mask at our Lovely Ladybugs program. Then learn about ants and make an a-mazeing craft at Ants in Your Plants. In July, check out Splendid Spiders, where you can discover where spiders live and how they help gardens. Then, at Grand Grasshoppers, learn all about grasshoppers and why they’re

so noisy. Come August, it’s all about bugs with wings. At From Water to Wings, learn about dragonflies and make a winged craft. At Butterflies and Blossoms, find out facts about butterflies and create a disguise. This September, it’s Mantis Mania: Spotting these camouflaged creatures can be harder than you think! Find out some of the unique habits a mantis has and make a camouflaged creature to take home. At Busy Bees, buzz around like a busy little honey bee, make a bee mask and find out what all the buzz is about. Children’s Garden drop-in programming is sponsored by Navistar. The Morton Arboretum is an internationally recognized outdoor tree museum on 1,700 acres. Plant collections, scientific research and education programs support the mission to plant and conserve trees and other plants for a greener, healthier and more beautiful world. Designed with natural landscapes, the grounds include the award-winning, four-acre interactive Children’s Garden, the oneacre Maze Garden, plus specialty gardens, 16 miles of trails and nine miles of roads. Visitor experiences include the open-air tram ride, guided walks, Arbor Day celebrations, concerts, art shows, Fall Color Festival, and special exhibits. The Arboretum welcomes more than 800,000 visitors annually and serves more than 35,600 members. Located 25 miles west of Chicago in Lisle, the Arboretum is open daily 7 a.m.

Photos contributed

until sunset. Learn more at mortonarb.org. Nonmember admission rates to The Morton Arboretum are $12 for adults ages 18-64 ($8 on Wednesday), $11 for seniors ages 65 and over ($7 on Wednesday), $9 for children ages 2-17 ($6 on Wednesday) and free for children under age 2. Parking is free with admission.

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Princeton • 815-659-3282 South out of Princeton on Route 26 for about a mile; turn right at blue tourist activities sign; follow our signs.


9 Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

Thursday, May 16, 2013 • 9

Events bring Illinois history to life

• June 13 - Vicksburg Campaign lecture: Dr. Mark DePue brings to life this major Civil War battle. 7 p.m. Free. Reserve a seat at www.presidentlincoln.illinois.gov. • July 2 - Gettysburg lecture: Dr. Mark DePue explains the battle that was a turning point in the Civil War. 7 p.m. Free. Reserve a seat at www.presidentlincoln.illinois.gov.

Apple River Fort State Historic Site, Elizabeth • July 6 - Independence Day: Independence Day was one of the two biggest holidays on the frontier. Join the Fort people for amateur theatricals, political speeches and maybe some dancing. Also, the Declaration of Independence will be read. 1 to 4 p.m. Free. • Aug. 10 - Healing & Mourning: Apple River Fort mourns the man it lost in battle with Black Hawk and the other man it lost during the celebration afterward. Free.

Bishop Hill State Historic Site, Bishop Hill • May 17-19 - Quilt Show: Fans, Feathers, and Flowers, A dazzling display of color will fill the Colony School. Quilts may be antique, miniature, patchwork, appliqué, or something else. Admission is $3. Special quilt exhibits at VagnHall Galleri and the Steeple Building. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. the first two days; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. the third day. 309-927-3851. • June 8 - Honor Flight Benefit: fundraiser, auction, music, dinner. Proceeds benefit the Honor Flight of the Quad Cities. Starts at 3 p.m. • June 22 - Midsommar Music Festival: Join a lively Swedish tradition to celebrate the summer solstice with music, workshops and a center stage concert. A Maypole

Black Hawk State Historic Site, Rock Island • May 28 - Artifacts and arrowheads:  Experts display artifacts, demonstrate how to make arrowheads and help identify visitors’ artifacts. Free. 7:30 p.m. • Aug. 31 – Sept. 1 Labor Day Weekend Pow Wow:  Native American dances and music, as well as food and crafts.

Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site, Collinsville • May 19 - Kids Day: hands-on activities, games, crafts, storytelling and more, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free. • May 25 - Nature/Culture Hike: Three miles through various ecozones with an archaeologist and a naturalist. Bring water and insect repellent and dress for the weather. 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Canceled in case of rain. Free. • June 9 - Raptor Awareness Show: by World Bird Sanctuary.

Learn about native birds of prey through a demonstration and flight show. 2 p.m. Free. • June 16 - Lecture: by Dr. Dan Hechenberger on “Authentic Illinois Indian History and Culture: Do Illinois Schools Teach It?” 2 p.m. Free. • June 23 - Summer Solstice Sunrise Observance at reconstructed Woodhenge:  Arrive by 5:20 a.m. to hear an explanation of the discovery, form and function of this ancient post

Indian artists will display and sell works of fine art, sculpture, jewelry, beadwork, pottery, etc. Saturday and Sunday 9 a.m.- 5 p.m. Free.

circle monument used as a calendar by the Mississippians. No ceremonies will be conducted. Free. • July 12 - Art show preview reception: Judging and awarding of prizes to the artists participating in Contemporary Indian Art Show, hors d’oeuvres and refreshments. $17 (CMMS members) $22 (others) per person. Registration required by calling 618-344-7316. • July 13-14, Contemporary Indian Art Show: More than 25 American

Dana-Thomas House State Historic Site, Springfield • June 15 - Attention to Detail: an in-depth tour of the Dana-Thomas House State Historic Site. Suggested donation is $20. Limited to 15 par-

ticipants, 10:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. • June 15 - Of Glass and Wood: a tour of the Dana-Thomas House that focuses exclusively on the art glass and furnishings of the home. Suggested donation is $15. Limited to 15 participants, 1:15 p.m. to 2 p.m. • June 29 - Attention to Detail: an in-depth tour of the Dana-Thomas House State Historic Site. Suggested donation is $20. Limited to 15 participants, 10:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.

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Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum, Springfield

will be decorated. A barn dance will be held in the evening. Music from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Pole decorating and procession at 4 p.m. Barn dance at 7 p.m. Free. 309-927-3311. • July 13 - 22nd annual Country Antique Market: Quality antiques including primitives, country, folk art, pottery and much more are available on the lawn of the Colony School. This event will benefit a Bishop Hill organization. $5 admission. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 309-9273042 or 309-927-3037. • July 28 - Antique Car Show: A great antique and classic car show. Registration starts at 9 a.m., with judging at noon. 309-932-2474. • Aug. 17-18 - Clay and Fiber Fest: Demonstrations include pottery making and firing, spinning and weaving techniques and broom making. Hands-on activities include spinning and weaving. Enjoy a soup supper on Saturday. 309927-3008. • Aug. 17 - Pie and Ice Cream Social: Join this fund raiser for the Bishop Hill Heritage Association, held in the Village Park. 1- 4 p.m. 309-927-3899. • Sept. 14, Old Settlers’ Day - This event celebrates the 167th anniversary of the Colony and the 117th year of the Old Settler’s Association. A traditional chicken dinner is served at 11:30 a.m., followed by a band concert at 12:15 p.m., and a program featuring Colony descendants at 1:30 p.m. 309-927-3044.

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SPRINGFIELD – Historic sites across Illinois plan events this summer that will bring history to life and entertain people of all ages. The events, which are mostly free, range from historic reenactments to plays to art fairs. The Illinois Historic Preservation Agency encourages Illinois residents and visitors to take advantage of these wonderful opportunities.

• BROWNING • BROWNING • BROWNING • BROWNING • BROWNING • BROWNING •


10 Sports 10 • Thursday, May 16, 2013

Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

Sports Senior Spotlight Sheila Ferguson Name: Sheila Ferguson. School: Princeton High School. Date/place of birth: Jan. 27, 1995. El Paso, Texas. Hometown: Princeton. Family: Andy Romagnoli, Lety Moreno-Romagnoli and Giovanni Romagnoli (brother). Sports: Soccer. Favorite sport and why: Soccer. I love the aggressiveness. Favorite food and where to get it: Menudo from mom’s or grandma’s kitchen. Likes: Theater, food, books, and the color yellow. Dislikes: People who chew with their mouth open. Person with the greatest Influence on my athletic career (and why): My mother; she’s encouraged me to keep trying and never quit. Person with the greatest influence in my life (and why): My tia, Mague, because she has an inspirational story. If stranded on a deserted island, I would have my: Chapstick and Bible. The CD in my player at home/car Is: Mumford and Sons. People would be surprised to know: I don’t find Brad Pitt attractive. I stay home to watch: Criminal Minds and Bones. When I need luck for a big game, I: pray to do my best. The funniest person I’ve ever met (and why): Ben Finley, because his facial expressions are priceless. What they’ll say about me at school after I graduate: She loved theater. Most embarrassing moment: When my swimsuit bottoms fell down on a water ride at a water park. Most unforgettable moment: When I finished my introduction speech as Miss Gulch telling the audience to turn their cellphones off during the Wizard of Oz and when I finished the whole audience cheered for me. Ultimate sports fantasy: Meet Chicharito from Mexico’s soccer team. What I would like to do in life: Get a BFA in acting and become an actress. Three words that best describe myself: Outgoing, independent, dramatic.

Grand Opening Wed, May 15 Finders Keepers Resale Store

BCR photo/Jeff Schlesinger

Sheila Ferguson loves to play soccer because she loves the game’s aggressiveness. Her ultimate sports fantasy would be to meet Mexico soccer star Chicharito.

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11 Sports Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

Thursday, May 16, 2013 • Sports • 11

I​ ESA State Track and Field qualifiers

Bureau Valley North Storm Bureau Valley North state track qualifiers are (front row, left) Payton Moore, A.J. Hockings, Caje Peterson, Jay Edlefson, Tiana Kennedy, Marissa Mungia, and Emily Fordham; and (back row) Gailen Gibson, Preston Balensiefen, Austin Wierzbicki, Michael Eastwood, Alex Cady, Hunter Sebby, Drew Baker, Jason DeWaele, Hunter Schoff, Josie Lind, Megan Hunt, and Nataleigh Nugent.

Bureau Valley South Storm

BCR photo/Hal Adkins

The Bureau Valley South eighth-grade girls and seventh-grade boys track and field teams finished first at sectional and the seventh-grade girls finished second. BVS state qualifiers are (bottom row, left) Haley Weidner, Addison Moreland, Cassidy Olds, Saige Barnett, Nicole Wirth, Paige Foster, Alex Geary, Katelyn Splitt; (middle row) Sabrina Webb, Casey Mecum, Kaylee Towne, Heather Williams, Tasha Richardson, Niquel Eilts; (and back row) Devon Johnston, Nate Paup-Caudill, Kale Barnett, Corbin Endress and Morgan Strader.

LaMoille Allen

BVS 4x400

IESA state qualifiers from LaMoille Allen Grade School for 2013 were (from left) Caleb Sarff, Austin Walker, Austin Lundquist, Brenna Rieker, and Bret Dannis, the seventh-grade hurdles champion.

The Bureau Valley South 4x400 relay team of Kaylee Towne (from left), Heather Williams, Sabrina Webb, and Casey Mecum placed fifth at state. Webb also placed second in the high jump, and Mecum was seventh in the 400.

Bradford Panthers The Bradford Junior High track team qualified five girls for the IESA 1A state track meet. They are (front row, left) Brianna Endress and Savannah Wall; and (back row) Laura Rouse, Jenna Ehnle and Hannah Dries.

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12 • Marketplace • Thursday, May 16, 2013

General Terms and Policies The Bureau County Republican reserves the right to classify correctly, edit, reject or cancel any advertisement at any time in accordance with its policy. All ads must be checked for errors by the advertiser, on the first day of publication. We will be responsible for the first incorrect insertion, and its liabilities shall be limited to the price on one insertion. LINE AD DEADLINES: • Tuesday, BCR deadline Monday 9 am • Thursday, BCR and BCR Journal deadline Tuesday, 12 pm • Saturday, BCR deadline Friday, 9 am We Accept 815-875-4461

YOU NEVER KNOW WHAT YOU MIGHT FIND right here in the Bureau County Republican Classified!

- 200 Employment 228 • Help Wanted Looking For: COOKS Weekends & nights a must. Serious Inquiries Only. Apply in person: Pizza Cellar, 402 South Main, Princeton. No Phone Calls!! BARTENDER Needed Samms Bar & Grill in Hennepin. Apply in person between 11am-4pm UPTOWN GRILL Now Hiring! Bartenders, Cooks, Dishwashers and Part-time Laundry. Flexible Schedules; Paid vacations; Health Insurance; Retirement Benefits. Apply in person: 601 First Street, LaSalle CULVER'S OF PRINCETON Now accepting applications for Entry-Level Management For details or to apply, visit: www.culvers.jobs

FIND IT RIGHT HERE!

Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

228 • Help Wanted

228 • Help Wanted

228 • Help Wanted

228 • Help Wanted

DETASSELERS NEEDED! Check this site for upcoming training dates:

AWESOME SUMMER JOB Team Corn Detasseling is hiring workers for Summer Detasseling. Work with your friends this summer. Local Pick-Up Sites and Fields. Age 13 and up. Earn from $7.75 to $10 per hour depending on your ability. Attendance Bonus Available. Season starts around July 5th to 10th and runs 8 to 15 days. Transportation Provided. For applications call: 866-898-8326 or 815875-8100 or on the web at: www.Teamcorn.com

TS Staffing is currently accepting applications for the following positions: General Labor; Machine Operators; Assembly; Warehouse; Clerical. Applicants must be able to pass pre-employment drug screen and background check. Please apply in person at: 418 South Main Street, Princeton, IL 61356. Hours: 8:00am-5:00pm, Monday-Friday

WOOD FRAMER'S Needed Must be willing to climb & work with heights; 2 year minimum experience required; Hourly pay according to experience; Insurance option. Apply at: American Eagle Buildings, Inc., 405 South East Street, Annawan, IL 61234

www. bickettdonnerhelms.com POSITIONS OPEN: PreSchool Teacher and Fifth Grade Teacher for 2013-2014 school year. Send resume with references and copy of teaching certificate to: Principal Kristal LeRette Bureau Valley South Elementary, 220 Stewart Street, PO Box 277, Buda, IL 61314. Deadline: May 24, 2013

YOU’LL FIND IT right here in the Bureau County Republican Classified!

SUMMER HELP WANTED Dupont/Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.

TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING Are you ready for a new career as a professional truck driver? 95% job placement rate! Non-traditional job market for women! You can start your new job in four weeks! NO PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE NECESSARY!!!

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PROMOTE JOB OPENINGs The Bureau County Republican Classified can help you promote your job openings and get your business full staffed. Call 815-875-4461

Who: College and High School Students What: Pollinating corn When: July 10 – 31st (Dates may vary slightly) Where: DuPont Pioneer Research Center 2 miles north of Princeton on Hwy 26 Competitive wages: Based on age and previous field experience. Benefits: • Earn good money while working just a fraction of your summer vacation. • Meet new friends

Who do you contact: Alan Reeverts 815-875-6523 Ext. 121 If interested, please call by June 1st.

Due to the opening of our new Bounce Back Neighborhood we are looking for motivated team players for the following positions:

Maintenance Assistant

Full Time & Part Time summer help Apply in person or on our website: www.simplythefinest.net Liberty Village of Princeton 140 N. Sixth Street Princeton, IL 61356

Millwright/Welder Position (Bradford) We are a general contractor looking for several experienced full time millwrights and a millwright supervisor. • 3-5 years millwright experience (ag industry preferred) • Travel required 4-6 months of the year with per diems • Shop fabrication and local millwright work the rest of the year • Mig and Stick welding experience required • Must not be afraid of heights • Valid Driver’s license required • Extra pay for a valid Class A CDL • OSHA 10 hr preferred • We are a drug free workplace that performs preemployment and random drug testing • Wage: $12-$20/hr based on experience, additional • $3-5/hr for supervisor position • Full time benefits included Macon General Contractors 201 Bonita Ave • Bradford, IL 61421 309-897-8216 Contact Adam to send your resume & get more job details.

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NEED EXTRA CASH?? Routes are available delivering the Bureau County Republican in Princeton, Sheffield, Spring Valley, Tiskilwa and Walnut. Delivery days are Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday mornings by 7:00 am. No Collecting Involved. Ask About Our $25 Sign-On Bonus. For more information, please call Tom Long, District Manager (815) 875-4461 Ext. 235

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receive excellent pay and SERVE TO Serve LEARN. benefits. in the money Nationalfor Guard. Call Earn college, 1-800-GO-GUARD train for a career, or visitexcellent nationalguard.com receive pay and

benefits. Serve in HELP WANTED the National Guard. Call DRIVERS 1-800-GO-GUARD DRIVERS orEXPERIENCED visit nationalguard.com

$1500 Sign-On BONUS ! Regional LTL Opportunities in HELP WANTED Bridgeview, IL! Earn up to DRIVERS $1100 or more per week. Excellent Home Time! EXPERIENCED DRIVERS www.driveffe.com $1500 Sign-On BONUS ! 855-356-7119

Regional LTL Opportunities in Owner Operator: Now Hiring Bridgeview, IL! Earn up to CDL-A Owner Operators. $1100 orIncentive. more perCompetitive week. Sign-On payExcellent package. HomeLong Time! Haul Freight. Paid loaded and www.driveffe.com empty 855-356-7119 miles. Also hiring

The Greatest Business & Consign Used Boats! Adventure of Your Life! 217-793-7300 Company Teams. Call 866-938Prerequisites are: Intelligence, Owner Hiring 7803 Operator: or apply Now online at theboatdock.com Courage & Discipline. www.drivenctrans.com. CDL-A Owner Operators. Exceptional career opportunity, Sign-On Incentive. Competitive 800 Ace Road PO Box 340 Princeton, IL 61356 BUSINESS Driver - One Cent Raise after no foolishness. See for yourself 815-875-4461 Fax 815-875-1235 pay6 and package. Long $0.03 Haul 12 months. OPPORTUNITIES at: www.gbaoyl.com Enhanced Freight. PaidQuarterly loaded Bonus. and The Greatest Business Daily miles. or Weekly Pay, CAMPERS/RVS empty Also hiring Hometime Options. CDL-A, Adventure of Your Life! Teams. Call 866-938Colman’s RV We buy/consign Company 3 months OTR exp. 800-414Prerequisites are: Intelligence, 7803 or apply online at used Campers & RV's! 9569 www.driveknight.com Courage 217-787-8653 & Discipline. www.drivenctrans.com. Exceptional career opportunity, www.colmansrv.com

AVERITT OFFERS CDL-A DRIVERS a Strong, Stable, Profitable Experienced AVERITTCareer. OFFERS CDL-A Drivers and a Recent GradsStable, DRIVERS Strong, Excellent Weekly Profitable Benefits, Career. Experienced Hometime, Paid Training. 888Drivers and Recent Grads 362-8608 AverittCareers.com. Excellent Benefits, Equal Opportunity EmployerWeekly

LEGAL SERVICES

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Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

228 • Help Wanted THE BUREAU COUNTY REPUBLICAN Is accepting applications for a part-time INSERTER in our distribution department. Applicants should be reliable, self-directed, have mechanical ability and able to work flexible hours but generally Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday, afternoon into evening, approximately 20-25 hours per week. Duties would be to assemble and package newspapers for distribution by machine as well as by hand. Must be able to stand for extended periods of time. Some lifting is required. Candidate must have a valid driver's license and an excellent work/ attendance record. Applications are available at the front office of the Bureau County Republican at: 800 Ace Road, Princeton, IL 61356. NO phone calls please

229 • Professional/ Clerical NOW HIRING RN for PM shift. Competitive wage. Long term care experience preferred. No mandatory overtime. Apply in person: Monday through Friday, 8am to 4pm. Heritage Health 1301 21st Street Peru, IL EOE

PROMOTE JOB OPENINGs Call us to find out how we can help. 815-875-4461

230 • Work Wanted Bookkeeping & Personal Assistant Services available. Short or long term services available. General ledger, accounts payable, accounts receivable, payroll, 20 years experience. Professional & Reliable. Please reply to: Box 303 Bureau County Republican PO Box 340, Princeton, IL 61356

232 • Business Opportunities ********** THE CLASSIFIED Advertising Department of the Bureau County Republican Does not have the opportunity to fully investigate the credibility of each advertiser appearing within these columns. If an offer sounds “too good to be true” it probably is. Proceed with caution if you are asked to send money or to give a credit card number. Proceed with caution in calling 900 phone numbers. All phone numbers prefixed by”900” are charged to the CALLER. Charges may be assessed on a “per minute” basis rather than a “per call” basis. The Bureau County Republican Classifieds makes every effort to qualify these charges for the reader. If you have a concern about an advertiser, please contact: Better Business Bureau 330 North Wabash Chicago, IL 60611 312 832-0500

- 300 Services 320 • Misc Services

*WANTED* Old barns to dismantle for the lumber. Over 200 barns taken down in the area. Experienced, insured. Call anytime 815-303-7658

Thursday, May 16, 2013 • Marketplace • 13

- 400 Merchandise

Beck’s Convenience Stores is looking for a

442 • Lawn & Garden

Chief finanCial OffiCer

Successful candidate will manage all aspects of financial and accounting activity including, but not limited to, P&L and balance sheet reporting & analysis, short-term and long-term planning & forecasting, project modeling & ROI analysis. Identify in advance potential risks and opportunities and work with appropriate functional areas across the company to develop solutions. Responsibilities and Accountabilities • Proactively monitor P&L activity. • Prepare monthly and annual P&L plan by store. Provide appropriate level of detail to identify main underlying causes of variances. • Assist with development of the annual and long-range capital budget. Work with administrative and operations management to identify and justify appropriate capital investment needs to properly support growth of the organization. • Analyze the feasibility and estimate the financial performance of key initiatives and projects. • Identify profit opportunities for management and recommends corrective action based on trend results and analysis. • Develop, analyze and help to implement business strategies. • Develop and manage analytical tools to improve the profit performance of the company. • Conduct various financial analysis projects and tasks as assigned. • Able to multi-task and employ problem solving skills. Position Requirements: • Bachelor’s degree required, in Finance or Accounting preferred • MBA (or CPA) preferred • Eight or more years in finance or accounting environment • Must be a self-starter who can work well within various situations (from well defined to unstructured) and proactively identify business improvement areas. • Possess excellent written and verbal communications skills. We offer a competitive salary, insurance, 401k and Employee Stock Ownership Plan. Send Resume to: 850 E. Thompson, Princeton, IL 61356

WILL DO: Garden Rototilling, Lawn and weed mowing. Call 815-875-1670

442 • Lawn & Garden TWIGGYS TREE FARM Purple Beech Tree, 4', $20; Pin Oak/White Oak, 5', $15; Red Buds 4' $20; Perennials $3. 815-303-8158 Open Sundays

Visit us at www.bcrnews.com

2 DAYS - LARGE ESTATE AUCTIONS

Held at: Tri County Fairgrounds, Mendota, IL Restrooms • Lunch available Go to Auctionzip.com For Full Listing and Photos

THUR., MAY 16, 2013 STARTING 5:00 P.M.

MODERN FURNITURE, HOUSEHOLD, SHOP TOOLS, GARAGE AND YARD

SAT., MAY 18, 2013 10:00 A.M. START

ANTIQUES, PRIMITIVES, COLLECTIBLES AMMO & FIREARMS ITEMS COLLECTOR BOOKS ,FARM MANUALS,FARM TRACTOR BOOKS MODERN FURNITURE

CLARK AND LOIS HOUSTED, Cornell, IL HOwARD AND MARIAN MARSHALL ESTATE, Peru, IL AND OTHERS. Estate of

Terms: cash/good check. Proper ID to register for bid number. Not responsible for items after sold.

Free Classified Advertising for all items valued under $1,000!

E-mail items for sale to: classified@bcrnews.com

PUBLIC AUCTION

The following items will be offered at Public Auction located at “The Shed” 401 W. Main St., Wyanet, IL 61379 Look for this and upcoming auctions on rickrediger.com

SATURDAY, MAY 18, 2013 9:30 A.M.

ANTIQUES AND COLLECTIBLES Marble top commode; oak washstand; washstand w/towel bar; wardrobes; blanket chests; maple dresser w/hankie drawers; 4 and 5 drawer chests; bed frames; vanity w/mirror; buffet; drop leaf table; oak pedestal table; 3 sections of barrister bookshelves; parlor tables; misc. wood chairs; wood rockers; spinning wheel; coat rack; floor lamps; drying racks; what not shelves; bench; oak framed mirror; framed pictures and prints; 8 gal western crock; misc crocks and bowls; wicker fern stands; plant stands; treadle base; costume jewelry; books; linens; Precious Moments; Several AnnaLee dolls; clear and colored glass pieces; carnival glass; amethyst glass; sets of china; painted and decorative bowls and plates; vases; planters; Pyrex; kerosene lamps; shakers; table service; pewter items; New handmade quilts and quilt tops; braided rugs; violin w/case; Silvertone quitar w/case; harmonica; chicken nest; baby dolls and Shirley Temple (rough condition); child’s ironing board; toy dishes; HOUSEHOLD ITEMS Calypso auto washer; maple table w/chairs; game table w/chairs; upholstered sofas and chairs; recliners; televisions; file cabinets; decks; bedroom sets; table lamps; microwaves; small kitchen appliances; pots and pans; utensils; corning ware; dishes; fruit jars; towels; linens; material; holiday decorations; hand and power tools; metal lawn chairs; exercise bike; wheel chair; bird baths; gazing ball on stand; trellis; Number System Will Be used – I.D. Required TERMS: CASH OR GOOD CHECK – Not Responsible for Accidents

ZERENNA BRANDTS NANCY SALZMANN, POA, Mineral BRADLEY ESTATE, Wyanet Sellers:

The shed is full !

BECKER AUCTION SERVICE La Moille, IL 61330 • 815-638-2686

THREE DAY MEMORIAL WEEKEND ESTATE AUCTION

Auction to be held at the Tumbleson Auction Center, 1635 North Main Street, Princeton, IL, Located 100 miles West of Chicago, Il just off INT 80, Exit 56, South on Rt. 26. (Behind the Sherwood Antique Mall) on:

SATURDAY, MAY 25, SUNDAY, MAY 26 & MONDAY, MAY 27, 2013 TIME: 10:00 A.M. (Preview: 8:00 A.M.) Each Day **SPECIAL PREVIEW OF ALL THREE DAYS: FRIDAY, MAY 24, 2013 TIME: 4:00-6:00 P.M.** View Full Listing, Photos & Absentee Bid on website: www.tumblesonauction.com

SATURDAY, MAY 25

Nice Primitive & Antique Furniture; Heywood Wakefield; Schwinn Typhoon Bicycle; Lg. Cast Iron Tractor/Machinery Seat Collection (Over 125); Sm. Iron Wheel Coffee Grinder Marked Landers, Frary & Clark; Stoneware Including Sleepyeye; Kitchen Primitive Items, Milk Bottles, Jewel Tea, Sellers Jars, Copper Boilers & Copper Pcs, Trinkets, Bullet & Adv Pencils, Fountain Pens, Lighters, Padlocks w/ Keys, Playing Cards, Candy Containers; Sm. Cuckoo Clocks; Large Collection of Lamp Shades & Chimneys; Old Light Fixtures/ Auto Lites; Old Dolls-Storybook, Celluloid & Composition; Longaberger Basket; Lg. Collection of 45 & 78 Records From Military, Veterans & National Guard Show

SUNDAY, MAY 26

AUTOMOBILES: 2009 Toyota Camry XLE Sedan w/ Only 12, 000 Miles, 1966 Convertible V-8 Red Mustang w/ Red Interior & White Top w/ Approx. 52,000 Miles, 1947 Ford Flat Head V-8 Stick Shift 2-Door Sedan w/ 61,000 Miles; FURNITURE and ANTIQUES: Victorian, Oriental, Antique & Quality Modern Furniture; Oriental Carpets; Lg. Group of Sterling Silver Including Flatware Sets; LG. Collection of Carnival Glass; Waterford; Several Sets of Lenox China; Lamps; Clocks; Pottery Including Roseville, Rookwood, Weller; Flo Blue; Lladro; Ladies Items, Linens, Purses, Perfume Bottles; Diamond & Costume Jewelry

MONDAY, MAY 27

Over 100 DECOYS Including Walker, Elliston, Illinois River, WI & Michigan, Calls & Various Prints; Approx. 150 FIREARMS (Long Guns & Handguns) Including Winchester, Remington, Colt, German, Ruger, Browning, S&W, Mossberg & Others; Cap Guns, Pocket & Hunting Knives; Belt Buckles; Framed Gun Ad Prints; COINS -Peace & Morgan Silver Dollars, Kennedy Halves, Proof Sets, Indian Head Pennies and Foreign Coins; INDIAN COLLECTION: Native American Items Collected over the last 40 years including Sioux and Ojibwa (Porcupine Quill Baskets, Moccasins, Beadwork Pcs, Hair Roaches, Belts, Ladies Pow Wow Dress, Pipe Bags, Birch Baskets, Birdhouses, Paintings and MORE! 10% Buyer’s Premium & Proxibid Available for this Auction Day Only!

HAROLD ZINKE ESTATE, Compton, IL MARjORIE STRONg ESTATE, First National Bank of Ottawa, IL Trust Dept., RAMOND MILLER, Morris, IL & OTHERS TUMBLESON AUCTION COMPANY, PRINCETON, IL Email: ttauction@yahoo.com Or Phone: 815-872-1852 AUCTIONEERS: TOM AND MARY TUMBLESON LIC # 040000396-397 & TIFFANY FOES LIC #041.001601

REDIGER AUCTION SERVICE Wyanet, IL 815-699-7999 Auctioneers: Rick Rediger Jon Moon Jeremy Rediger

PUBLIC AUCTION

BUREAU COUNTY FARMLAND BERLIN TOWNSHIP, SECTION 21 81+/- Acres

For complete sale information go to www.rickrediger.com The following described farmland will be offered by Public Auction. Sale day location: Malden Fire Station, 104 W. Main St., Malden, IL 61337 on: SUBJECT TO 2013 LEASE

TUESDAY, MAY 28, 2013 10:00 A.M.

SUBJECT TO 2013 LEASE

DESCRIPTION: 81+/- acres located SE ¼ of Section 21, Berlin Township, Bureau County, Illinois. 62.6 +/- acres tillable with soils including Catlin, Sawmill, Buckhart, Sable and Muscatune. Tax ID # 11-21-400-001. Taxes paid in 2012 were $1,432.12. Crop productivity index for optimum management on tillable soils is 134.9. SOLD SUBJECT TO 2013 LEASE Plat locations, Aerial Photos, Soil Maps and other information available @ rickrediger.com TERMS AND CONDITIONS: 1.) This parcel will be sold on a per surveyed acre basis. 2.) Survey provided by Seller. 3.) The successful bidder will be required to enter into a standard purchase agreement contract. A Buyer’s Premium of 1% of the high bid will be charged to the buyer and added to the bid amount to arrive at the contract purchase price. 10% of the contract purchase price will be due immediately following the auction. The balance will be due and payable on or before June 21, 2013. 4.) The seller shall provide a title insurance policy in the amount of the purchase price of the subject property. 5.) The 2012 real estate taxes due and payable in 2013 will be paid by the Seller. The 2013 taxes due and payable in 2014 shall be prorated to the date of closing. All subsequent real estate taxes will be the responsibility of the buyer. 6.) The 2013 lease shall be prorated on a March 1, 2013 – February 28, 2014 calendar to date of closing. 7.) The property is being sold in “AS IS” condition, with no implied warranties of any kind. 8.) The information is believed to be accurate. However, we strongly urge all prospective buyers to thoroughly research all pertinent data and to draw their own conclusions. 9.) All announcements made the day of the sale take precedence over any previously printed material.

MARY EWALT

Seller: Attorney for Seller: Mike English Russell, English, Scoma and Beneke, P.C. 10 Park Avenue West, Princeton, IL 61356 815-875-4555 Number System will be Used – I.D. Required Not Responsible for Accidents Auction conducted by: REDIGER AUCTION SERVICE BRUMMEL REALTY LLC Rick Rediger, Auctioneer Scott Brummel, Broker 815-699-7999 630-553-3200 www.RickRediger.com www.BrummelRealty.com


14 • Marketplace • Thursday, May 16, 2013

448 • Pets & Livestock Baby Doll South Down Lambs. Great pets for the barn yard. Males $250; Females $400. Call 815-878-7558 DONATE NOW! “The animals are crying” Tri-County Humane Society. LaSalle, Bureau, Putnam Counties. Call 815-875-6145 or 815-872-9781 or send donation to: PO Box 1601, LaSalle, IL 61301

450 • Under $1000 (2) used (12 & 35 gallon) Fish tanks, $25 both; assorted golf clubs, $35 for all. 815-872-0514, after 6pm or leave message

450 • Under $1000

451 • Free

460 • Garage Sales

Exercise Equipment Total Gym 1500 Exercise System, great condition, includes manuals. $100. Call 815-875-4385

FREE TO A GOOD HOME Guinea Pig with a cage Call John, 815-876-6083

PRINCETON 509 North Main. Friday, Saturday, May 17, 18, 7am-3pm; Sunday, May 19, 10am3pm. COME ONE!! COME ALL!! Yard sale! Will have a little bit of everything. From clothes to toys and books galore, plus a whole lot more

Ping Rapture golf clubs, 3 & 5 wood, Javln shafts, $75 each. Call 815-8721906, leave message for call back Singer Sewing Machine, Slant-O-Matic, 503 Special, with attachments and cabinet. $125. Call 815-875-1903 ************ HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL? Put your ad in for FREE

Brown velvet sofa $75; easy chair $40; chest of drawers $30. Call 815-875-8737

Items $1,000 or less can run FREE for 1 week. Limit of 5 lines. Up to 3 items with price and price totaling under $1,000. 1 ad per household per week. No commercial ads, firearms or animal sales. Go to: bcrnews.com, to place an ad. Use category merchandize and bargains or E-mail information to: classified@ bcrnews.com (include your name, address & phone number) No Phone Calls!

Diamond cut tool box, for full size pick-up. $85 firm. Phone 815-915-8092

451 • Free

3 push mowers $45, $75, $125. Call 815-894-3397 3 quality office desks $100 each; Padded office chair $50; Solid Oak desk chair $50. 309-287-1258 in Tonica Bakers rack $65; Longaberger baskets, $25 each. Call 815-875-2637

Eclipse 1100HR/A elliptical, 15 " stride, $100; black microwave 1.6 Cu. Ft, 1200 Watts, $25. Call 815-878-1812

Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

Free Kittens (3) preferably to indoor homes. Litter trained. Call 815-379-2616

460 • Garage Sales PRINCETON 11 South Pleasant Street. Friday, May 17, 8am-4pm; Saturday, May 18, 8am-2pm. HUGE ANNUAL GARAGE SALE! Hand Corn Sheller, Railroad Lanterns, Machinist Tools, Beer Glass Sets & Memorabilia, Glassware & Collectibles, Longaberger Baskets, Ladies Clothing, Household Items, DVD's & CD's, Books, Garden & Hand Tools, MISC. Toys PRINCETON 1124 West Clark Street. Friday, Saturday, May 17 & 18; 8am5pm. MULTI-FAMILY SALE. Large men's clothing, 2XL women's clothes, antiques, housewares, books, garden/yard items

ADVERTISE YOUR GARAGE SALE HERE! In the Classified. Just call 815-875-4461.

-600Transportation 614 • Car Sales ******* $$ CASH PAID $$ We pay top dollar for junk (cars, machinery, etc.) Call 815-878-9353

PRINCETON 203 North Homer. Thursday, May 16, 8am-4pm. One Day Only. Multi-Family Sale. Baby clothes, dehumidifier, misc. Rain date: Friday, May 17

ADVERTISE YOUR VEHICLE SALE HERE! In the Classified. Just call 815-875-4461.

PRINCETON 461 Griswold Street. Thursday, May 16, 4pm–7pm; Thursday, May 23, 4pm-7pm. Rescheduled due to rainout. Lots of items, furniture, décor, adult, children, teen clothing & décor, jewlery, children & adult books. Lots of new items added

1985 Honda Gold Wing, great condition. Runs good. 1200cc. $3,000 firm. Call 815-878-4158

616 • Motorcycles

2000 SUZUKI GZ250 red, new tires & battery, saddle bags. Excellent condition. $1,600. Come & See! Call 815-866-5882

- 700 Real Estate For Sale 767 • Mobile Home Sales Mobile Home For Sale $2,000 down, $372.22 a month for 5 years. Newly painted, new carpets. 3 bedroom. Great wooded lot. Payment includes lot rent, water & garbage pick up. In beautiful Bureau. For Showing Call 815-303-2948 **************** PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call, HUD tollfree at 800 669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 800 927-9275

775 • For Sale by Owner PRINCETON fully updated, 1,236 sq feet, fenced double corner lot, 2-3 bedroom. 428 North Church Street. 815-876-8036

- 800 Real Estate For Rent

Visit us at www.bcrnews.com for the stories that people are talking about! r ber you Remem dchild, n ra child, g ephew n niece or with a

Jenna Seibert

FRdEay E ad.

April 10, 2012

1st Birth

Love, Mommy and Daddy

856 • Apartment Rentals HENNEPIN one bedroom apartments furnished and unfurnished. All utilities included. Smoke free. No pets. Call 815-925-7139 or 815-925-7086 HENNEPIN PARKVIEW APARTMENT. LARGE 2 BEDROOM, CLEAN, SMALL QUIET TOWN, GARAGE, BASEMENT, SINGLE LEVEL, WASHER DRYER HOOKUP. CALL 815-925-7509 or 815-343-5018

Find Your Next Home!

To place your FREE Happy 1st Birthday ad in the Bureau County Republican please send us the following: • Baby’s Name:_____________________________________ • Birth Date:________________________________________ • Salutation:________________________________________ • Contact Name_____________ Day Phone:_____________ *Picture will be returned only if a self-addressed stamped envelope is included.

One Ad Per Child Please

800 Ace Road • P.O. Box 340 • Princeton, IL 61356 815-875-4461 • www.bcrnews.com/classifieds

Covered Bridge Realty

Open HOuse • Sun. 1:30-3:30 304 W. Hudson Street

www.c21coveredbridge.com 815-872-7434 • 100 S. Main St., Princeton Each Office is Independently Owned & Operated

Business Directory Marketplace

T

FREE ESTIMATES • FULLY INSURED Residential • Commercial • Sales • Installation • Service Sectional Steel Doors • Automatic Door Openers

P.O. BOX 33 • Malden, IL 61337

815-866-6858

Timber Falls Tree Service

•Tree Trimming & Removals •Stump Grinding •Lot & Land Clearing •Fully Insured •Seasoned Firewood •24 Hour Service

Princeton, IL • 815-875-3100 Clint Hassler 815-303-8451 RT Piper 815-866-2637

WYANET LOCKER, INC. 218 RAILROAD AVE. WYANET, IL

10% off items over We do Upholstery Work $20 with With 30 Years of Experience this ad! Specializing in Furniture, Old & New, Ornate & Carved

Grand Plaza Antiques, Etc. 531 S. Main St., Princeton, IL 61356 815-437-2856 • Th-F-Sat 12 pm-5pm

Rest of the week by Appointment by Luck or Chance

Free estimates • Fully insured

T

Wholesale & Retail Meats

Pat Wood, Owner

wyanetlocker.com

ExtErior homE improvEmEnt spEcialist

Call for a free appointment!

John Engstrom (815) 699-2318 12327 1550 N. Ave. • Wyanet

To

AUTHORIZED DEALER

(877) 324-9517

(815) 872-2615

Kernans’ Lawn Service 815-303-9665 cell: 815-303-9664

Sign a 1 year contract, receive last mowing FREE Commercial & Residental Lawn Mowing & Lawn Rolling Free Estimates - Senior Discounts • Fully Insured 15% Off Seniors & New Customers

• Business Cards • Envelopes • Booklets • Forms • Pamphlets • Letterheads For all your printing solutions call

875-4461

(815) 699-2208 Scott Sabin, Owner

Toll Free

P.O. BOX 33 • Malden, IL 61337

815-866-6858

800 Ace Road PO Box 340 Princeton, IL 61356 815-875-4461 fax 815-875-1235

BOB’S DRYWALL, PAINT, ETC CUSTOM SAWMILL SERVICES Native Hardwood Lumber Sales Carving Wood & Turning Stock

Over 30 Years Experience!

Joe Murray 7544 1900 East Tiskilwa, IL 61368

815-876-6988

add your listing to this page contact us at

Bob Cmolik

• Drywall • Paint • Texturing • Bathrooms • Plaster Repair • Remodeling • Tiling 19 Aztec Circle, Putnam, IL 815-342-1385 bcmolik@yahoo.com

(815) 875-4461, Ext. 278


Bureau County Journal • bcrnews.com

PRINCETON 441 East Marion. 2 bedroom. $550. Heat, water, garbage. Laundry. No pets. Available June 1st. Call 309-288-3008 PRINCETON New Luxury Apartment. Very large, modern, 2 bedroom with walk-in closet, garage & appliances included. $795 a month + utilities. Must see! Phone 815-878-1984

e

Princeton RENT-TO-OWN 424 West Crown Street Single Story Ranch 2 Bedroom/1 Bath 1 Car Garage All redone inside All On 1 Floor ,Nice Yard $590/month Available immediately! 815-875-6254 Houselady@comcast.net .

.com • www.illino ow i sv h s

Looking for a new place to live? The Bureau County Republican Classified is a great source to help you find your next place to call home.

Open HOuses EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY

sunday, May 19

EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY

a

yh

es om EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY

OPEN HOUSES

EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY

Saturday, May 18th 10 AM - 12 PM

1265 N. 6th - Princeton

12:15 PM - 2:15 PM

1030 Sunshine Dr. - Princeton

2:30 PM - 4:30 PM

103 S. Plum - Princeton

Sunday, May 19th 11 AM - 1 PM

612 E. Peru - Princeton

1 PM - 2 PM

208 S. Main - Ohio 207 N. Main - Walnut

1:15 PM - 3:15 PM

460 Anita Ln. - Princeton

2 PM - 3 PM

204 N. Pleasant - Ohio 106 5th St. - Walnut

how.com • www.illinoisvalleyhomeshow.com • www.illinoisvalleyhomeshow.com • www.illinoisvalleyhomeshow.com • www.illinoisvalleyhomeshow.com

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858 • Homes for Rent

DEPUE Small, 2 bedroom house. 505 East Street. $450 per month. Call 815-664-2808

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PROMOTE YOUR Rental Call 815-875-4461

PRINCETON upper, 1 bedroom, efficiency apartment. Utilities included. $425/month. Deposit required. Call Robin @ 815872-3456

Need To Get The Word Out? We Can Help You Get It Out Right Here! Give Us A Call 815-875-4461

11:00 AM - 1:00 PM 612 E. Peru St., Princeton

Fine Historic Residence on 1.4 acres 6 BR’s, 3 Baths with 3900 sq. ft. 3 Fireplaces & Beautiful Woodwork. Newly Remodeled Kitchen & Baths. New High Velocity Heating & Cooling. MLS #08337438

1:15 - 3:15 PM 460 Anita Lane, Princeton

Great Home! Great Location! 4 BR’s, 3 Baths with 2586 sq. ft. plus Finished Basement almost doubles the space. New AC, 2012. New furnace & HWH, 2010. MLS #08324923 Landmark Realty • Roxana Noble • 815-878-7171

Open HOuses EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY

saturday, May 18

EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY

10:00 AM - 12:00 PM 1265 N. 6th St., Princeton

New Listing! $79,000 New Listing! $95,000 Local Freshly painted, hardwood Bar For Sale! Profitable floors, main floor bath & turn key business with laundry. 2 BR. Furnace & CA inventory and all contents. new in 2004. Detached 2 car Many updates w/ bldg & garage. #08336225 equipment. #08336220

Unique Home! 4 BR, 2.5 baths with 2041 sq.ft. Master BR suite with its own living room. 3-season Porch. 2 Garages. MLS #08307561

New Listing! $299,900 New Listing! $225,000 One of Princeton’s Finest Country Home Near Van Orin! Residences on 1.4 acre. 6.5 acres w/ beautiful 3 BR 38’ front porch, 3 FP. Newly home. Outbuildings - 40’x64’ remodeled kitchen & baths pole bldg, shop, bin, crib & (3). PLUS MORE! #08337438 shed. #08340347

12:15 - 2:15 PM • PRICE REDUCED! 1030 Sunshine Dr., Princeton

New Listing! $142,900 New Listing! $78,000 New 2013 kitchen, updated In Ladd! Great home on electric & plumbing, 2 car landscaped corner lot. 2 car attached garage. In ‘07 roof, garage. All new windows, siding, windows & furnace. remodeled LR, Hardwood Large porch. #08339504 floors. 2 BR. #08339572

1221 North Main – Princeton, IL

815-875-1221

www.illinoisvalleyhomeshow.com

This condo might look like others on the outside, but it’s one-of-a-kind inside. Spacious open floor plan. Recent custom remodeling. Stainless steel appliances. New carpeting. Don’t miss this one! MLS #08272395

2:30-4:30 PM 103 S. Plum St., Princeton

Solidly Built Custom Home. 4 BR’s, 2 Bath. Beautiful hardwood floors. 2 car garage with attached covered patio. Full dry basement. MLS #08332689 Landmark Realty • Roxana Noble • 815-878-7171

OPEN HOUSES 1517 S. Main St. Princeton $250,000

815-872-0080

104 N. Main Princeton, IL

www.thepropertymerchants.com

810 N. Beech St. Princeton $89,900

32 S. Euclid Ave. Princeton $95,000

Your Next Home Could Be Found Right Here!

815-875-4461 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 13TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT BUREAU COUNTY PRINCETON, ILLINOIS JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ) ASSOCIATION ) Plaintiff, ) -v.) CATHY A. MICHAEL A/K/A CATHY ANN ) MICHAEL, et al ) Defendant ) 12 CH 38 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on March 7, 2013, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 11:30 a.m. on June 11, 2013, at the office of Russell, English, Scoma & Beneke, P.C., Ten Park Ave. West, PRINCETON, IL, 61356, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 651 EAST CENTRAL AVENUE, PRINCETON, IL 61356 Property Index No. 16-16-228-002. The real estate is improved with a 1 story home with an attached garage. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Visit our website at service.atty-pierce.com. between the hours of 3 and 5 p.m. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300, CHICAGO, IL 60602. Tel No. (312) 4765500. Please refer to file number PA1208594. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc. com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. PIERCE & ASSOCIATES One North Dearborn Street Suite 1300 CHICAGO, IL 60602 (312) 476-5500 Attorney File No. PA1208594 Case Number: 12 CH 38 TJSC#: 33-6042 I531176 Published in the Bureau County Republican May 9, 16 and 23, 2013.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 13TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT BUREAU COUNTY PRINCETON, ILLINOIS BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., AS SUCCESSOR ) BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS ) SERVICING, LP F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE ) HOME LOANS SERVICING LP ) Plaintiff, ) -v.) MARIA PEREZ A/K/A MARIA R. PEREZ, et al ) Defendant ) 12 CH 00013 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on May 17, 2012, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 11:30 a.m. on June 14, 2013, at the office of Russell, English, Scoma & Beneke, P.C., Ten Park Ave. West, PRINCETON, IL, 61356, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 307 E. 3RD STREET, DEPUE, IL 61322 Property Index No. 17-35-476-002. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds/ or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-12-03288. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-12-03288 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Case Number: 12 CH 00013 TJSC#: 33-11937 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I533389 Published in the Bureau County Republican May 16, 23 and 30, 2013.

Sunday, May 19 • 1:00 - 3:00 PM 423 W. Putnam Princeton $68,900

520 W. Crown St. Princeton $79,900

1620 N. Euclid Princeton $110,000

455 Adams St. Tiskilwa $109,900 LI NE ST W IN G!

PRINCETON 1 bedroom, recently remodeled. Great neighborhood. Lease, deposit. $425. 810 South Euclid. Call 217-766-8497

858 • Homes for Rent

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Thursday, May 16, 2013 • Marketplace • 15


16 • Marketplace • Thursday, May 16, 2013

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