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SATURDAY, JULY 6, 2013

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Chairman’s authority in jeopardy County Board considers sweeping rule changes that would diminish powers By KEVIN P. CRAVER kcraver@shawmedia.com WOODSTOCK – The powers of the McHenry County Board chairman would be significantly curtailed under proposed changes to the County Board’s rules. In one of the most sweeping sets of changes in recent memory, the Management Services Committee

will vote Monday to forward a list of 49 proposed changes for full County Board approval. About 10 of these rules would diminish the authority of the chairmanship, which has come under scrutiny over the past few years. The changes are aimed at the chairman’s term of office, the seat’s influence over committee memberships and the power to appoint to

boards and commissions. Another set of significant changes takes aim at the board’s structure itself by eliminating several committees. Chairwoman Tina Hill, R-Woodstock, likely will convene a Committee of the Whole meeting for the County Board to review the volume of changes before its voting meeting, where some changes almost certainly will be rejected. The Management

Services Committee is tasked with reviewing and revising board rules after the seating of the new board after each November election. The most controversial and significant change – imposing term limits on the chairman and vice chairman – goes against the advice of the McHenry County State’s Attorney’s Office. The County Board after each November election elects a chair-

Epilepsy patient finds seizure relief

man and vice chairman from among its 24 members. Under the new rules, the chairman and vice chairman would be limited to no more than three consecutive two-year terms. The state’s attorney’s office has opined that state law does not explicitly empower counties to impose term limits.

See CHAIRMAN, page A9

Francis OKs 2 popes for sainthood Moves show he will bend church tradition By NICOLE WINFIELD The Associated Press

Sarah Nader – snader@shawmedia.com

Phil Abraham is seen outside his apartment Thursday. Abraham was diagnosed with severe epilepsy at age 11. He recently saw Dr. Robert Kohn who gave him a vagus nerve stimulation treatment. There is an implant in his chest to help control his seizures. He now has about only one seizure every three weeks.

Therapy option improves quality of life for Island Lake man By OLIVIA GILBERTSEN ogilbertsen@shawmedia.com McHENRY – Phil Abraham had a healthy, normal childhood – until at age 11 he began having recurring seizures that sent him into a spiral of depression and memory loss. Thanks to a simple procedure, Abraham, now 51, is living a drastically better life. Abraham, of Island Lake, is one of 50 million people worldwide affected

by epilepsy. According to the Epilepsy Foundation of America, epilepsy is the third most common neurological disorder, with nearly 200,000 new cases diagnosed annually. “I can’t remember my first seizure at all,” Abraham said. “I was just kicking along like a normal kid and playing on the hood of my dad’s car. I was acting like Tarzan and hit my head on a tree branch. “I can’t recall much after that.” In the years since, Abraham has

been prescribed anti-convulsion medications, which have had only a small effect. He now takes five different medications for his seizures. “Even with his seizure control medication, he was still experiencing two to four seizures a week, taking nearly an hour to recover from each,” said Abraham’s wife of 18 years, Mary, 55.

See THERAPY, page A9

“The surgery was your average surgery; they just sliced open my chest and put the sucker in there.” Phil Abraham of Island Lake on vagus nerve stimulation therapy

VATICAN CITY – Pope Francis on Friday cleared two of the 20th century’s most influential popes to become saints, approving a miracle needed to canonize Pope John Paul II and waiving Vatican rules to honor Pope John XXIII. It was a remarkable show of papal authority and confirmed Francis’ willingness to bend church tradition when it comes to things he cares deeply about. Both popes are also closely identified with the Second Vatican Council, the Pope John 1962-65 meetings that Paul II brought the Catholic Church into modern times, an indication that Francis clearly wants to make a statement about the council’s role in shaping Pope John the church today. Francis approved a XXIII decree that a Costa Rican woman’s inexplicable cure from a deadly brain aneurism was the “miracle” needed to canonize John Paul. More significantly, he decided that John XXIII, who convened Vatican II, could be declared a saint even without a second miracle attributed to his intercession. The Vatican said Francis had the power to dispense with such requirements and could proceed with only one confirmed miracle to John’s name. The ceremony is expected before the end of the year. The date of Dec. 8 has been floated as likely, given

See SAINTHOOD, page A9

LOCALLY SPEAKING

ECONOMIC CORP. HIRES DIRECTOR Leaders of the Harvard Economic Development Corp. are hoping their new hire gets to lead a resurgence in development as the economy strengthens. The public-private partnership announced that it has brought on Charles Eldredge to serve as the executive director, Harvard EDC Chairman Roger Lehmann said. For more, see page B1.

Jen Nichols and her husband, Andrew Hogle

Lathan Goumas – lgoumas@shawmedia.com

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CRYSTAL LAKE: Youth basketball coach Andrew Hogle scheduled to undergo kidney transplant surgery. Sports, C1 Vol. 28, Issue 187

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Saturday, July 6, 2013 • Northwest Herald • NWHerald.com

Few Milwaukee clergy abuse victims get large sums By M.L. JOHNSON The Associated Press MILWAUKEE – Clergy sex abuse victims have long accused the Archdiocese of Milwaukee of spending more money on lawyers to protect itself than to care for those who suffered at the hands of abusive priests. An Associated Press analysis of documents released this week found most of the $30 million the archdiocese paid out through mid2012 went to victim settlements and therapy, but the bulk of it went to just a few victims – while hundreds of others got no money at all. The archdiocese released the records as part of a deal with victims suing it for fraud in federal bankruptcy court. The documents cover 88 settlements worth at least $6.6 million and provide the first detailed look at which victims were paid, how much and when. Until this week, the archdiocese had only released annual totals. The records support victims’ long-

8LOTTERY

time claim that Wisconsin for many years was among the more difficult states for them to get compensation. The main reason was a Wisconsin Supreme Court ruling in 1995 that made it nearly impossible to hold the church responsible for its priests’ actions. The court said the church was protected from negligence lawsuits by the First Amendment. No longer afraid of litigation, the archdiocese established a no-settlement policy that lasted until the national clergy abuse scandal erupted in 2002. “It was an appalling decision,” said Peter Isely, a longtime activist who now serves as the Midwest director for the Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests. “Because (Milwaukee victims) were raped and sexually assaulted by a priest, unlike anywhere else in the country, they could not exercise their civil rights and file their case in court.” It’s impossible to say for certain how much money clergy sex abuse victims have received from the Milwau-

kee archdiocese, because accounting before 2003 is questionable. Annual reports released by the archdiocese since then put the total cost of clergy sex abuse at $30.5 million as of June 30, 2012, with roughly $3 out of every $4 spent in the past decade going to victim settlements, therapy and other aid. An update for the fiscal year that just ended has not yet been compiled. While victims question the archdiocese’s totals, they can’t come up with their own because the archdiocese’s accounts and most settlement records are not public. The 6,000 pages of documents released Monday represent only one-tenth of the papers the archdiocese turned over to victims’ attorneys during the bankruptcy case. The rest are still sealed, and Jeff Anderson, who represents 350 of the approximately 570 people with bankruptcy claims, said many more files weren’t turned over. The files that have been made public, however, support victims’ claims that relatively few settlements were

made before 1995, almost none were paid after the state Supreme Court ruling that year and, even once mediation began in 2003, the archdiocese gave victims little room to negotiate. The largest settlement paid to victims abused by priests assigned to the Milwaukee archdiocese, nearly $16.7 million in 2006, went to 10 people in California who were abused while the priests were working there. It is among the largest per-victim awards in the nation, according to BishopAccountability.org, which tracks clergy abuse cases. In contrast, the records released this week show the typical payment to a victim in Wisconsin has been $50,000. Terry McKiernan, who helped found BishopAccountability.org and has spent more than a decade documenting the Roman Catholic church’s response to clergy sex abuse, said a number of factors can affect settlements, including the number of victims involved, public attention to the case and state caps on judgments against nonprofits.

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8WATER COOLER Roller coaster screams exceed decibel limit SANTA CLARA, Calif. – A Northern California roller coaster appears to have been a little too much fun. The Gold Striker at Great America in Santa Clara had to be taken offline this week because riders were screaming too loudly. The San Jose Mercury News reported that the shrieks were exceeding the decibel limit agreed upon in a settlement with Prudential Real Estate, which owns adjacent properties. So Great America had to cover a portion of the track in a sound-dampening tunnel. The wooden roller coaster reopened on Wednesday after the work was completed.

– Wire report

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Wonder Lake Ski Team members do flips off a ramp during the Wonder Lake Fourth of July Water Ski Show at Center Beach on East Lake Shore Drive.

8TODAY’S TALKER

Same-sex ruling has employers tweaking benefits By SAM HANANEL WASHINGTON – The Supreme Court’s landmark ruling on same-sex marriage has private employers around the country scrambling to make sure their employee benefit plans comply with the law. The affect of the decision striking down part of the federal Defense of Marriage Act is clear in the 13 states and the District of Columbia where gay marriage is currently legal, or soon will be: Same-sex married couples must be treated the same as other spouses under federal laws governing tax, health care, pensions and other federal benefits. But employee benefit ex-

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perts say the effect of the ruling remains murky in the other 37 states. The court left intact another provision of the federal anti-gay marriage law that allows one state not to recognize a same-sex marriage performed elsewhere. “What’s the federal government going to do when you have a valid marriage in New York and the couple moves to Texas? We don’t know the answer to that,” said Scott Macey, president of the ERISA Industry Committee that represents large employers. The confusion is creating uncertainty for many companies that operate nationwide and want to administer benefit plans in a uniform manner. “My members are all across the country,” Macey

said. “Most, if not all of them, would prefer to have a consistent rule across the country. They don’t want to worry about changing things from state to state.” For workers living in states that have legalized same-sex marriage, the Supreme Court’s decision means gay spouses are entitled to a host of benefits they were denied previously. The decision extends pension and Social Security survivor benefits to same-sex spouses, grants equal access to the Family and Medical Leave Act and gives employees married to same-sex spouses the guarantee of uninterrupted health care coverage under the federal COBRA health benefits program.

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Same-sex couples can also get the same tax break on health coverage that other couples have been receiving. Before the court’s ruling, same-sex spouses covered by employer health plans had to pay taxes on the benefits they received, which on average added up to an extra $1,000 year. And employees now will be able to seek reimbursement from flexible health spending accounts for the medical expenses of gay spouses. “This affects a thousand laws and regulations that touch employee benefits,” said Bruce Elliott, manager of compensation and benefits at the Society for Human Resource Management, an industry association.

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8CRISIS LINE Don’t know where to turn for help? Call the McHenry County Crisis Line at 800892-8900. The phone line is open 24 hours a day. It’s confidential and free. You also can visit the crisis line on the Web at www.mchenry-crisis. org.

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8STATE BRIEFS Chicago police lower age minimum for entry exam CHICAGO – The Chicago Police Department said 18-yearolds will be allowed to take this year’s entrance exam as part of an effort to increase the number of eligible applicants hoping to join the force. The Chicago Sun-Times reported Friday that the application age is being dropped from 25 to 18, while the new minimum age to become an officer will be 21. “By offering the exam at 18 and letting them enter at 21, it allows us to reach people as they are making major decisions about their career path,” said Chicago Police Department spokesman Adam Collins. “It allows us to increase the pool of eligible applicants.” The new requirements will take effect during the next entry exam that will be held later this year – although a test date and location and haven’t been set. The last test was given in 2010. The exam is typically offered once every few years. The change brings Chicago in line with other major metropolitan police agencies.

Two young boys critical after Chicago shootings CHICAGO – Chicago police are investigating a pair of separate shootings in parks that left two young boys critically wounded on the city’s South Side. The shootings Thursday night and early Friday were part of a spate of violence during the Fourth of July holiday. The boys, ages 5 and 7, were both in critical condition in a hospital in the Chicago suburb of Oak Lawn. No arrests had been made as of Friday afternoon. The 7-year-old boy was shot twice in the head around 7:30 p.m. Thursday when two men approached a group of people in a park and opened fire, police spokesman Hector Alfaro said. Then several miles away, 5-year-old Jaden Donald was shot around 12:40 a.m. Friday in a different park while playing with other children.

Woman’s foot severed in Chicago fireworks blast CHICAGO – Chicago police say a woman’s foot was severed while she watched fireworks on the city’s southwest side. Authorities said a 32-year-old woman lost her left foot around 11 p.m. Thursday. Her right foot also was injured. Meanwhile, a 34-year-old woman who was nearby also received fourth-degree burns to her left leg. Police spokesman Michael Sullivan said the women were hurt after they saw a “light” come toward them and explode as they watched fireworks in a park. The two are in serious condition at a hospital.

– Wire reports

Saturday, July 6, 2013 • Page A3

Quinn: Guns in bars ‘prescription for violence’ By SARA BURNETT The Associated Press CHICAGO – Gov. Pat Quinn went to the center of one of Illinois’ most popular entertainment districts Friday to try to sway lawmakers to support his changes to legislation allowing the concealed carry of firearms, saying letting people carry guns in some bars and restaurants is “a prescription for violence and disaster.” Standing outside Wrigley

Field, with the many bars and restaurants of Chicago’s Wrigleyville neighborhood as a backdrop, Quinn urged voters to call their legislators and tell them to support tougher restrictions he wrote into the bill, including a ban on guns in any place that serves alcohol. He said he wants places like Wrigleyville – where hundreds of thousands of visitors flock to see the historic ball field, catch a Cubs game and down a few beers – to remain safe and welcoming to

Chicago Alderman Mell reflects on Blago By JASON KEYSER The Associated Press CHICAGO – Retiring Chicago Alderman Dick Mell reflected Friday on his decades as a player in the city’s oldschool machine politics and said one of his only regrets is aiding the rise of son-in-law and former Gov. Rod Blagojevich, now in prison for corruption. Mell helped Blagojevich make it to Congress in 1996 and later the governor’s mansion, but the two men subsequently had a public falling out that Mell said left a “terrible schism” between himself and his daughter. He said he wished he had done things differently. With the benefit of hindsight, “I think that he would have probably stayed a state representative,” Mell said of his son-in-law. The 75-year-old Mell handed in his resignation letter this week after 38 years as alderman in the 33rd ward on Chicago’s North Side. It takes effect July 24. He spoke with reporters at City Hall Friday about key moments including the time in 1987 when he stood on his desk demanding to be recognized as a raucous City Council session battled over who would replace Mayor Harold Washington, who had died. Mell said his falling out with Blagojevich and the tur-

moil endured by his family continued to weigh on him. He said that and his wife’s death were two painful episodes that blemished what he otherwise regards as a lucky and fulfilling life. “It’s difficult to tell you how I really feel,” Mell said. But he said he hopes for Blagojevich that his 14-year federal prison sentence is reduced. Turning to the future, he said he hopes his daughter, state Rep. Deborah Mell, would get serious consideration as a possible replacement for him on the City Council. Mell said Friday that he has spoken with Emanuel about the possibility of his daughter succeeding him as alderman, but that there is “no understanding” between himself and the mayor that she will get the job. “I think she’s a very bright girl. I think she works very, very hard. But again, the mayor’s going to make that choice,” Mell said. “I will live with the choice that he makes.” Emanuel has promised an “open process” to choose a replacement, whom he hopes to have in office by July 24. “I am looking for a candidate with a strong background, solid ties to the community, and a willingness to tackle the tough issues facing Chicagoans,” Emanuel said in a statement this week.

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tourists. The measure approved by the Legislature currently bars guns only from businesses where liquor sales make up 50 percent or more of gross sales. “We want (visitors) to come together and celebrate. We want them to have a good time,” the Chicago Democrat said. “But we don’t want any incidents of violence in any bars or restaurants anywhere in Illinois.” Lawmakers are scheduled

to meet Tuesday to vote on an override of Quinn’s amendatory veto, which he issued earlier this week. Tuesday also is the deadline the 7th U.S. Circuit Appeals Court gave Illinois to pass a concealed carry law as part of a December ruling that the state’s ban was unconstitutional. All 49 other states have laws allowing public, concealed carry of firearms. The legislation approved in May was a hard-fought compromise between support-

ers of gun rights and those who fear allowing more guns on the streets will result in increased violence, particularly in Chicago. It passed both the House and Senate with the support of well more than the three-fifths majorities needed to override Quinn’s changes. Several of those lawmakers reacted angrily to Quinn’s actions, accusing him of playing politics in advance of a 2014 election in which he could face a Democratic primary.

Museum reorganizes amid money woes By TAMMY WEBBER The Associated Press CHICAGO – Matt von Konrat is animated as he talks about a plant specimen pulled from the vast botanical collection at the Field Museum of Natural History. Documentation shows it was collected in 1996 in a Colombian rainforest and tested for compounds that might be used to treat HIV, AIDS or cancer. “Imagine if you made some amazing drug discovery,” von Konrat says, sweeping an arm toward cabinets holding some of his department’s more than 3 million specimens, including ones collected by famed navigator Capt. James Cook in the 1770s. “You would know exactly where (the plant) came from and its exact identity” so you could find it again. Best known for impressive public displays such as Sue, the towering Tyrannosaurus rex that greets visitors in the lobby of its Lake Michigan campus, the Field Museum’s larger mission always has been behind-the-scenes research on its 25 million-piece – and growing – collection of birds, mammals, fish, plants, fossils and artifacts. Field scientists travel the globe to retrieve specimens that could produce medicines, document the effects of climate

AP photo

Matt von Konrat, curator of the botanical collection at Chicago’s Field Museum of Natural History, shows examples of the museum’s plant collection June 12 that includes about 3 million specimens from around the world. change or explain the secrets of genetics. But the 120-year-old museum, founded during the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition and named for department store magnate Marshall Field, now is setting the scientific world abuzz for another reason. Faced with almost $170 million in debt, the museum is cutting next year’s research budget 20 percent, including shrinking its science staff and merging departments. While natural history museums across the U.S. are under pressure to stay relevant to the public, the Field stands out for its financial woes, experts say, and for specula-

tion over whether the problems will affect its future as a pre-eminent research center. “It’s one of the great natural history museums of the world and has been for a very long time ... but it’s on the verge of not being so important,” said Michael Donohue, curator of the botany department at Yale University’s Peabody Museum. Since the beginning of the year, the museum’s anthropology, botany, geology and zoology departments have been merged into a single unit, and by the end of the year, its science staff likely will have been cut to 152, down from 170 earlier this year.

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NATION

Page A4 • Saturday, July 6, 2013

Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

Health insurers fear young people will opt out of coverage By KELLI KENNEDY The Associated Press

AP photo

Trayvon Martin’s mother, Sybrina Fulton, takes the stand Friday during George Zimmerman’s trial in Seminole County circuit court in Sanford, Fla. Zimmerman has been charged with second-degree murder for the 2012 shooting death of Trayvon Martin.

Relatives clash over 911 call in Trayvon Martin shooting The ASSOCIATED PRESS SANFORD, Fla. – Trayvon Martin’s mother and George Zimmerman’s mother clashed on the witness stand Friday over whether the screams for help that can be heard in the background on a 911 call came from the teenager or the neighborhood watch volunteer who shot him. “I heard my son screaming,” Sybrina Fulton, Martin’s mother, answered firmly after listening to a recording in which high-pitched wails could be heard. Moments later on the call, there was a gunshot and the crying stopped. Later in the day Friday, Gladys Zimmerman listened to the same recording and answered, “My son” when asked whose voice it was. Asked how she could be certain, she said: “Because it’s my son.” The conflicting testimony over the potentially critical piece of evidence came on a dramatic, action-packed day in which the prosecution rested its case and the judge

RL

rejected a defense request to acquit Zimmerman on the second-degree murder charge. The question of whose voice is on the recording could be crucial to the jury in deciding who was the aggressor in the confrontation that ended with Zimmerman killing the 17-year-old. The question sharply divided the two families: Martin’s half brother, 22-year-old Jahvaris Fulton, testified that the cries came from the 17-year-old. And Zimmerman’s uncle, Jose Meza, said he knew it was Zimmerman’s voice from “the moment I heard it. ... I thought, that is George.” In asking that the judge acquit Zimmerman, defense attorney Mark O’Mara argued that the prosecution had failed to prove its case. He said an “enormous” amount of evidence showed that Zimmerman acted in self-defense, and he argued that Zimmerman had reasonable grounds to believe he was in danger, and acted without

the “ill will, hatred and spite” necessary to prove second-degree murder. But prosecutor Richard Mantei countered: “There are two people involved here. One of them is dead, and one of them is a liar.” Mantei told the judge that Zimmerman had changed his story, that his account of how he shot Martin was “a physical impossibility,” and that he exaggerated his wounds. After listening to an hour and a half of arguments from both sides, Judge Debra Nelson refused to throw out the murder charge, saying the prosecution had presented sufficient evidence for the case to go on. The prosecution rested late in the afternoon after calling 38 witnesses over two weeks. Among them, earlier in the day, was Sybrina Fulton, who sat expressionless on the witness stand while prosecutors played the 911 recording of a Zimmerman neighbor urging a dispatcher to send police quickly.

MIAMI – Dan Lopez rarely gets sick and hasn’t been to a doctor in 10 years, so buying health insurance feels like a waste of money. Even after the federal health overhaul takes full effect next year, the 24-yearold said he will probably decide to pay the $100 penalty for those who skirt the law’s requirement that all Americans purchase coverage. “I don’t feel I should pay for something I don’t use,” said the Milwaukee resident, who makes about $48,000 a year working two part-time jobs. Because he makes too much to qualify for government subsidies, Lopez would pay a premium of about $3,000 a year if he chose to

buy health insurance. “I shouldn’t be penalized for having good health,” he said. Persuading young, healthy adults such as Lopez to buy insurance under the Affordable Care Act is becoming a major concern for insurance companies as they scramble to comply with the law, which prohibits them from denying coverage because of pre-existing conditions and limits what they can charge to older policy holders. Experts warn a lot of these so-called “young invincibles” could opt to pay the fine instead of spending hundreds or thousands of dollars each year on insurance premiums. If enough young adults avoid the new insurance marketplace, it could throw off the entire equilib-

rium of the Affordable Care Act. Insurers are betting on the business of that group to offset the higher costs they will incur for older, sicker beneficiaries. The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office estimates that about six million people of various ages will pay the tax penalty for not having insurance in 2014, the first year the law championed by President Barack Obama will be fully implemented. It’s hard to estimate how many of those will be the young and healthy adults insurers are trying to reach, but that subgroup makes up a very small portion of the overall market. Even though it’s small, experts say it could be enough to throw the system’s financing off-kilter.

Abortion a potential divider in Ga. race The ASSOCIATED PRESS ATLANTA – The four Georgia Republicans who want to succeed retiring Sen. Saxby Chambliss all call themselves conservatives who oppose abortion. Two are congressmen who recently voted in favor of a House bill to outlaw nearly all abortions beyond the 20th week after conception. Another candidate, a former secretary of state with her own national profile in the abortion debate, expressed support for the measure. Meanwhile, Rep. Paul Broun, an obstetrician, voted against it, saying it didn’t go far enough. That vote put him alongside abortion-rights advocates yet it garnered a de facto endorsement from a leading anti-abortion group in Georgia. The divide exposes fault lines in an already divisive

primary that some party figures worry could set up a repeat of 2012 losses in Missouri and Indiana, GOP-leaning states where Democrats successfully cast Republican Senate nominees as out of the mainstream based mostly on their views on abortion. Broun, a conservative who has called President Barack Obama a Marxist and who drew national attention last year when he declared evolutionary theory “lies from the pit of hell,” defends his outlier vote – just six Republicans voted against the bill – because the proposal contains exceptions for pregnancies that result from rape or incest. As he put it: “I am extremely disappointed that House Republican leadership chose to include language to subject some unborn children to needless pain and suffering.”

While Republicans rule state politics in Georgia, strategists in both parties say Broun pulls the GOP primary field further to the right. That potentially gives Democrats an opening for the 2014 election in a state that Obama lost by single digits in 2008 and 2012 at a time when an influx of minority voters is making Georgia fertile future ground for the president’s party. The GOP can’t afford to lose a Georgia seat it already holds as the party tries to gain the six seats necessary to win Senate control for the last two years of the Democratic president’s term. No Democrats have officially entered the race, though Atlanta philanthropy executive Michelle Nunn is mulling a bid. Her father, Democrat Sam Nunn, represented Georgia in the U.S. Senate.

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NATION

Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

Saturday, July 6, 2013 • Page A5

Obama’s toughest sell on Guantanamo: Senate Dems By DONNA CASSATA The Associated Press WASHINGTON – President Barack Obama’s hardest sell in his renewed push to close the U.S. detention center at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, may be members of his own party – moderate Senate Democrats facing tough re-election bids next year in the strongly Republican South. Obama has stepped up the pressure to shutter the naval facility, driven in part by his revised counterterrorism strategy and the 4-monthold stain of the government force-feeding Guantanamo prisoners on hunger strikes to prevent them from starving to death. Civil liberties groups and liberals have slammed Obama for failing to fulfill

his 2008 campaign promise to close the installation and find another home for the 166 terror suspects being held there indefinitely. Republicans and some Democrats in Congress have repeatedly resisted the president’s attempts to close the facility, arguing that the prisoners are too dangerous to be moved to U.S. soil, that Guantanamo is a perfectly adequate prison and that the administration has failed to offer a viable alternative. White House counterterrorism adviser Lisa Monaco lobbied House members in advance of several votes last month to no avail. The House delivered strong votes to keep Guantanamo open and to prevent Obama from transferring detainees to Yemen. Separate-

ly, the president’s recent appointment of a special envoy on Guantanamo, Cliff Sloan, has been met with a collective shrug on Capitol Hill. In the coming weeks, the Senate will again vote on the future of Guantanamo. All signs point to a bipartisan statement to keep the facility open despite a recent vow to end detention at the installation by two national security leaders – Sens. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., and John McCain, R-Ariz. “When you go out, you talk to average Americans about it, they want to keep them there, they want to keep the terrorists there, they don’t necessarily want to hold them here,” said Sen. Kelly Ayotte, R-N.H., a fierce proponent of keeping Guantanamo open.

Ayotte, who plans to push legislation on a sweeping defense policy bill later this summer, is likely to attract support from Republicans as well as several Democrats looking ahead to tight Senate races next year in Arkansas, Louisiana and North Carolina. Votes on the detention center will give these Democrats a high-profile chance to split with a president who is extremely unpopular in parts of the South. Consider Sen. Mark Pryor of Arkansas, one of the most vulnerable incumbents in next year’s congressional elections. Last November, he was one of nine Democrats to vote for prohibiting the use of any money to transfer terror suspects from Guantanamo, backing an amendment by Ayotte.

AP file photo

U.S. military guards walk within Camp Delta prison June 27, 2006, at the Guantanamo Bay U.S. Naval Base in Cuba. President Barack Obama’s hardest sell in his renewed push to close the U.S. detention center at Guantanamo Bay may be members of his own party – moderate Senate Democrats facing tough re-election bids next year in the strongly Republican South.

Furloughs begin for 650,000 Defense Department civilians By LOLITA C. BALDOR The Associated Press

AP photo

This aerial photo taken Wednesday shows Yarnell, Ariz., in the aftermath of the Yarnell Hill fire that claimed the lives of 19 members of an elite firefighting crew on Sunday. The wildfire has burned structures and forced evacuations as hundreds of firefighters work to contain the blaze.

Experts say expect bigger, fiercer wildfires in the West The ASSOCIATED PRESS LOS ANGELES – There’s a dangerous but basic equation behind the killer Yarnell Hill wildfire and other blazes raging across the West this summer: More heat, more drought, more fuel and more people in the way are adding up to increasingly ferocious fires. Scientists say a hotter planet will only increase the risk. More than two dozen wildland fires are burning from Alaska to New Mexico, fueled by triple-digit temperatures and arid conditions. In the Arizona mountain town of Yarnell, a blaze apparently sparked by lightning killed 19 members of an elite firefighting squad who had deployed their emergency shelters Sunday when erratic monsoon winds sent flames racing in their direction. While no single wildfire can be pinned solely on climate change, researchers say there are signs that fires are becoming bigger and more common in an increasingly hot and bone-dry West. “Twenty years ago, I would have said this was a highly unusual, fast-moving, dangerous fire,” said fire history expert Don Falk at the University of Arizona at Tucson, referring to the Yarnell Hill fire. “Now unfortunately, it’s not unusual at all.” Wildfires are chewing through twice as many acres per year on average in the United States compared with 40 years ago, U.S. Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell told a Senate hearing last month. Since Jan. 1, 2000, about

“Twenty years ago, I would have said this was a highly unusual, fast-moving, dangerous fire. Now unfortunately, it’s not unusual at all.” Don Falk History expert at the University of Arizona

145,000 square miles have burned, roughly the size of New York, New England, New Jersey, Delaware and Maryland combined, according to federal records. A draft federal report released earlier this year said climate change is stressing Western forests, making them more vulnerable to fires. What’s happening now “is not new to us,” said climate scientist Don Wuebbles of the University of Illinois, one of the main authors of the federal report. “We’ve been saying this for some time.” Communities nestled next to wilderness are used to girding for fire season, which typically occurs in the summer. Compared with decades past, however, the traditional fire season now lasts two months longer and first responders sometimes find themselves beating back flames in the winter. Rising temperatures all over the West, for one, have created dangerous, dry conditions. Over the past 35 years, Arizona has seen dramatic warming, with the state’s 10-year average temperature

jumping from 59.1 degrees Fahrenheit in 1977 to 61.4 degrees last year – an increase of 2.3 degrees. By comparison, the entire continental U.S.’ 10-year average temperature jumped only 1.6 degrees during the same period. Experts say every little spike in temperature makes a big difference. “Even a degree or so warmer, day in day out, evaporates water faster and that desiccates the system more,” said fire ecologist Steve Running of the University of Montana. In Arizona, where a drought has persisted for nearly two decades, the manzanita, evergreen, mount mahogany and oak in the Yarnell area were so crispy Sunday that a nearby state fire-monitoring station recorded a near-maximum level of potential fuel in area vegetation. In many places, decades of aggressively snuffing out wildfires also have led to a buildup of fuel ready to ignite. On top of that, more people are living in fire-prone areas near forests, grasslands and shrub lands, which complicates firefighting logistics. Over the past years, firefighters on the front lines have complained about how flames “go berserk in ways they never used to see,” Running said. Though the Yarnell Hill fire, at 13 square miles, was not considered huge compared with previous fires in Arizona, its ferociousness caught many off guard. Investigators said it appeared the Granite Mountain Hotshots were overrun by flames fanned by erratic winds.

8NATION BRIEF VP Biden to visit Arizona for firefighter memorial WASHINGTON – The White House says Vice President Joe Biden will travel to a memorial in Arizona for the 19 firefighters killed in a wildfire. Biden will attend the service Tuesday in the Prescott area. The White House hasn’t

released President Barack Obama’s schedule for next week. But it’s unusual for Obama and Biden to attend the same event outside Washington. Nineteen members of a highly skilled Hotshot crew were killed Sunday when a raging wildfire overran them on a mountain-

side northwest of Phoenix. It was the deadliest day for U.S. fire crews since 9/11. The fire in the town of Yarnell has destroyed more than 100 houses and burned about 13 square miles. Officials say the fire is mostly contained.

– Wire report

WASHINGTON – More than 650,000 civilian Defense Department workers will begin taking the first of their 11 unpaid days off next week, but the cut in salary they will see in the three months may pale compared to what officials worry could be larger scale layoffs next year. Roughly 85 percent of the department’s nearly 900,000 civilians around the world will be furloughed, according to the latest statistics provided by the Pentagon. But while defense officials were able to shift money around to limit the furloughs this year, there are widespread worries that if automatic budget cuts go forward for 2014, thousands of civilian, military and contract jobs could be on the chopping block.

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel is expected to provide senators with more details early next week on how the next wave of across-theboard budget cuts will affect the department, said Pentagon press secretary George Little. But while defense officials have not yet released details on the impact of the cuts, Gen. Ray Odierno, the Army’s chief of staff, has warned that as many as 100,000 more active-duty, National Guard and Reserve soldiers could lose their jobs if Congress allows billions of dollars in automatic budget cuts to continue next year. Initial hopes that the number of furlough days could be reduced have largely been dashed. Instead, talk is focused more on how to slash spending in 2014. The department can only force

workers to take 22 furlough days per year, thus the need for worker layoffs has been getting more traction to achieve savings. In the coming weeks, however, civilian employees ranging from top-level policy advisers to school teachers and depot workers will not be answering their phones or responding to emails for one day a week through the end of the fiscal year on Sept. 30. The department estimates the savings will be between $1.9 billion and $2.1 billion. Managers across the department have been given some flexibility in how they schedule the days off during each two-week pay period. But they also are dealing with complex legal requirements that in many cases prevent them from using military personnel to fill in for the absent civilians.

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NATION & WORLD

Page A6 • Saturday, July 6, 2013

Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

In Venezuelan capital, a ‘plague’ of motorcycles By PETER ORSI The Associated Press CARACAS, Venezuela – Ronald Alvarez was driving in chaotic, bumper-tobumper traffic when he heard a throaty buzz and insistent “Beep! Beep! Beep!” approaching rapidly from behind. Motorcyclists in Venezuela’s capital are known for zipping between lanes and taking off side mirrors, either inadvertently or with malicious intent if they feel a driver hasn’t left enough room. So Alvarez swerved to the side to open up space for this one, rear-ending a car that had slammed on its brakes in the process. “It is the worst plague there is right now in Caracas,” Alvarez fumed about the proliferation of motorcycles. Alvarez’s complaint is echoed by many residents of this capital of narrow streets, where the transportation in-

frastructure has been neglected for decades leading to traffic congestion so bad that it is almost always best navigated on motorcycle. A two-hour car drive to work can take less than half an hour on the back of a bike. The two-wheel invasion began about a decade ago with the arrival of Chinese-made motorcycles that sell for just a few hundred dollars, and has since exploded, causing Caracas residents to rant at the locust-like swarms of motorcycles that blow through red lights and ignore one-way traffic signs with impunity, becoming a serious public health and safety issue. Gangs of armed, twowheeled political shock troops backed by the government terrorize voters and break up opposition protests. Motorcycles are also favored by robbers and hit-men, and are involved in 90 percent of violent crimes in this mur-

Syrian army launches heavy barrage on Homs The ASSOCIATED PRESS BEIRUT – Syrian government troops unleashed a major artillery barrage on the city of Homs on Friday, hitting buildings near a 13th century mosque as they pressed an assault on rebel-held areas in the country’s strategic heartland. Opposition activists said Lebanese Hezbollah guerrillas had joined the fighting in Syria’s third largest city. If confirmed, it would be the first major involvement for the Iranian-backed group since it helped regime troops capture a key border town from the rebels last month. As the shells landed, thousands of civilians trapped in the city faced severe shortages of food, water and medicine, prompting the U.N. and opposition groups to warn of a humanitarian catastrophe. The rebels fighting to topple President Bashar Assad have suffered a series of setbacks recently, including the loss of the strategic town of Qusair near the Lebanese border last month. Despite recent shipments of more advanced weapons from Gulf Arab countries, they have been unable to score any major gains in the past few weeks. The powerful Hezbollah, a staunch ally of the regime, was instrumental in the regime’s victory in Qusair. Opposition activists say the group’s fighters have spread out in Homs and even parts of Aleppo in the north, propping up outstretched army troops. Emboldened, the regime has tried to build on its successes to further shore up its military position. On Saturday, it launched a major offensive on

Homs, a central city of about 1 million located on the road between the capital Damascus and regime strongholds on the Mediterranean coast. The fighting in Syria has increasingly taken on sectarian undertones as Assad enjoys support from many in his Alawite sect, an offshoot of Shiite Islam, while the rebels are mainly Sunnis. Activists, who consider Homs “the capital of the revolution,” say the regime wants to capture the entire city to include it in a future Alawite state stretching to the coast, where many believe Assad would take refuge in a last resort. “It appears the regime wants to take Khaldiyeh [district], no matter what the price,” said Tariq Badrakhan, an activist based in the northern district of Homs where the fighting was concentrated Friday. He said troops backed by pro-government militiamen and Hezbollah fighters were attacking the area from three sides with multiple rocket launchers, tanks and mortars. Online video showed shells slamming into buildings in the densely built-up area near the historic Khalid Ibn al-Walid mosque, famous for its nine domes and two minarets that tower over the skyline. The video, posted on Saturday, appeared consistent with AP’s reporting from the area. The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, a U.K.-based group that tracks the civil war in Syria through activists on the ground, said a woman and her three children were killed in the shelling on Khaldiyeh Friday evening. The eldest child was aged five.

8BRIEFS Custody dispute leaves mom stranded in Brazil BOSTON – Police in Brazil seized passports belonging to a mother and her 6-year-old daughter, stranding them in South America amid an international child custody dispute with the child’s father, the woman says. Shauna Hadden, a 33-year-old social worker from Agawam, Mass., said the trip was meant for her daughter, Ava Machado, to reconnect with the father she hadn’t seen in more than three years. The mother, who works for the state Department of Children and Families, said a Massachusetts court gave her full custody of Ava after the couple’s divorce in 2009. Hadden got a phone call from a friend in Brazil who knows both the mother and father, 32-yearold Donizete Machado, warning her not to make the last flight to meet Machado, her mother, Linda Hadden, said Friday. The friend said that Machado had plans to keep Ava and that the two shouldn’t make the rest of the trip. Instead of taking a flight

to southern Brazil, her daughter and granddaughter flew north to stay with friends in the northeastern city of Fortaleza. But June 6, federal police came to them with a court order and took both passports, according to Ava’s maternal grandmother.

S. African gov’t denies Mandela is ‘vegetative’ JOHANNESBURG – Nelson Mandela is in critical but stable condition, the South African government said Friday, while a close friend said the anti-apartheid leader was conscious and responsive earlier this week. The government reiterated that Mandela is not in a vegetative state, contrary to recent court documents. A court paper filed June 27 concerning Mandela family graves said affidavits would be provided from his physicians to show that Mandela “is in a permanent vegetative state.” A later filing dropped that phrase. Both court filings, however, said that Mandela’s breathing was machine assisted.

– Wire reports

AP file photo

Venezuelan firefighters give first aid to an unidentified man June 26 after he lost control of his motorcycle in Caracas, Venezuela. Venezuela is the world’s third-worst country for motor vehicle-related deaths with 37.2 per 100,000 inhabitants, according to a World Health Organization global road safety study published this year. derous city, according to an estimate by a prominent criminologist. In 2011 the government finally passed a law that was supposed to help crack down

on the lawlessness, but nearly two years later there’s practically zero enforcement and people say the problem is only getting worse. For many the motorcycle has become a po-

tent symbol of anarchy and ungovernability in a troubled nation. “For me, the problem of motorcyclists has become a matter of public health,” said Fermin Marmol Garcia, a criminologist who reached the 90 percent figure on motorcycles’ involvement in violent crime by analyzing data from the government and NGOs. “It’s no longer just a crime issue, a violence issue. It’s a matter of public health.” Venezuela is the world’s third-worst country for motor vehicle-related deaths with 37.2 per 100,000 inhabitants, according to a World Health Organization global road safety study published this year. Only the Dominican Republic and Thailand scored worse. It’s not clear how many of those involved motorcycles. But news of accidents are a constant on the radio, and one recent report said the more than a dozen hospitals in the

capital treat at least 100 motorcycle injuries a week — apiece. Spend an hour or so on the streets of Caracas, and you might see every conceivable traffic rule broken. Streams of up to 50 bikes zoom between lanes of motionless cars. Dozens park on the sidewalk, blocking pedestrians’ passage. Families of four ride a single motorcycle. Bikers mass under overpasses during storms, choking off traffic. “It’s like people transform when they get on a motorcycle,” said taxi driver Samuel Tarazon, who last year watched one flatten an elderly man in a crosswalk. “It’s such a violent manner of driving.” Police largely look the other way and some say they are among the worst offenders. Many government motorcycles circulate without license plates and are apparently not even registered.

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NEWS

Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

Saturday, July 6, 2013 • Page A9

Nicaragua and Venezuela offer asylum to Snowden By LUIS MANUEL GALENO The Associated Press

AP photo

A military attack helicopter flies near the presidential palace Friday in Cairo, Egypt.

Islamists push back in Egypt The ASSOCIATED PRESS CAIRO – Enraged Islamists pushed back Friday against the toppling of President Mohammed Morsi, as tens of thousands of his supporters took to the streets vowing to win his reinstatement and clashed with their opponents in violence that killed 30 and drove the divided nation toward an increasingly dangerous showdown. In a battle on a bridge over the Nile River in Cairo, gunfire rang out and flames leaped from a burning car as the rival camps threw volleys of stones and fireworks at each other. Military armored vehicles raced across the bridge in a counterattack on Morsi’s supporters. The clashes accelerated after the supreme leader of Morsi’s Muslim Brotherhood defiantly proclaimed that his

followers would not give up street action until the return of the country’s first freely elected president, swept out of power days earlier by the military. Morsi opponents called out the public to defend against the Brotherhood, deepening the battle lines. In scenes of mayhem, troops opened fire on peaceful pro-Morsi protesters. Islamists threw one opponent off a rooftop. “God make Morsi victorious and bring him back to the palace,” Brotherhood chief Mohammed Badie proclaimed before cheering supporters at a Cairo mosque in his first appearance since the overthrow. “We are his soldiers we defend him with our lives.” Badie said it was a matter of honor for the military to abide by its pledge of loyalty to the president, in what

appeared to be an attempt to pull it away from its leadership. “Your leader is Morsi. ... Return to the people of Egypt,” he said. “Your bullets are not to be fired on your sons and your own people.” Hours later, Badie’s deputy, Khairat el-Shater, considered the most powerful figure in the organization, was arrested in a Cairo apartment along with his brother on allegations of inciting violence, Interior Ministry spokesman Hani Abdel-Latif told The Associated Press. After the speech, a large crowd of Islamists surged across 6th October Bridge over the Nile toward Tahrir Square, where a giant crowd of Morsi’s opponents had been massed all day. Battles broke out there and near the neighboring state TV building.

Seizures caused memory loss for Abraham • THERAPY Continued from page A1 Because of the seizures, Phil Abraham is unemployed and is no longer able to drive. He also has memory loss due to the number of seizures he has experienced, said Abraham’s McHenrybased neurologist, Dr. Robert Kohn. That is because many seizures arrive in the hippocampus, the part of the human brain that controls short-term memory. Loss of overall memory is an indication that epilepsy is advancing and a clue that a patient could be helped by vagus nerve stimulation therapy, Kohn said. Vagus nerve stimulation therapy is a neurostimulation treatment option that aims to minimize the frequency of seizures. A pacemakerlike device – the size of a small watch and weighing less than an ounce – is implanted in the left side of the chest, and then a small threadlike wire connected to the device is run under the skin up the neck to the vagus nerve. “The device in the chest sends an electrical signal to the nerve. The vagus nerve sends signals to the brain and other organs,” Kohn said. “With vagus nerve stimulation therapy, electrical signals are sent almost constantly in order to decrease excitability in brain regions that are associated with epilepsy.” The surgery is outpatient

and usually takes about six weeks to six months to take effect, Kohn said. Phil Abraham, however, was hesitant to have the surgery. “It took Phil’s sister, a registered nurse, and Dr. Kohn, Phil’s neurologist, to convince Phil that vagus nerve stimulation therapy would be a good option for him,” Mary Abraham said. Phil Abraham said the surgery on Nov. 21, 2011, was not as bad as he expected. “The surgery was your average surgery; they just sliced open my chest and put the sucker in there,” he said. “The whole thing took about three hours including prep time.” Because of the device, Phil Abraham has cut his seizures down to as few as one a month. The implanted device contains a small battery, which needs to be replaced about every six years via a small surgical procedure. The battery sends the electrical charge to the vagus nerve consistently, Kohn said. “Before a seizure comes on, it will generally cause a stomach pain or nausea,” Kohn said. “When a patient who has received the procedure feels this, they can swipe a magnet over the battery which will increase the signal. This can often prevent the seizure from occurring.” Abraham uses his magnet often. “Now if I feel it coming, I can make the seizure go away,” said Abraham, smil-

ing. The effects the therapy had on Abraham’s character were apparent. “He was very disabled before vagus nerve stimulation therapy, and Mary was uncomfortable leaving him at home when she had to work,” Kohn said. “When I first met Phil, he was much more irritable and argumentative. I would even say he was unhappy. “Now, he has a very funny sense of humor, he’s clever, and he’s able to relate to people and hold a conversation.” Phil Abraham’s experience mirrors that of other patients who have seen fewer seizures with the device. It also can be used to treat patients with depression, Kohn said. “At six months, there is a 35 percent reduction in seizures, and at 10 years after surgery there is a 75 percent reduction in seizures,” Kohn said. “It is considered as effective as anti-convulsive medication.” Abraham now takes a lot of walks, enjoys music and going to rock concerts, riding his bicycle, swimming, playing the drums and being able to do more around the house. Those closest to Abraham also can see the difference. “I know he’s a lot happier now,” Mary Abraham said. “Whether it’s just riding his bike up to the store or having fun playing with our new kittens, Phil’s life has greatly improved thanks to this treatment.”

MANAGUA, Nicaragua – Presidents Daniel Ortega of Nicaragua and Nicolas Maduro of Venezuela said Friday they were willing to grant asylum to NSA leaker Edward Snowden. Snowden has asked for asylum in numerous countries, including Nicaragua and Venezuela. “As head of state, the government of the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela decided to offer humanitarian asylum to the young American Edward Snowden so that he can live [without] ... persecution from the empire,” Maduro said, referring to the United States. He made the offer during a speech marking the anniversary of Venezuela’s independence. It was not immediately clear if there were any conditions to Venezuela’s offer. In Nicaragua, Ortega said he was willing to make the same offer “if circumstances allow it.” Ortega didn’t say

what the right circumstances would be when he spoke during a speech in Managua. He said the Nicaraguan embassy in Moscow received Snowden’s application for asylum and that it is studying the request. “We have the sovereign right to help a person who felt remorse after finding out how the United States was using technology to spy on the whole world, and especially its European allies,” Ortega said. The offers came following a flap about the rerouting of Bolivian President Evo Morales’ plane in Europe earlier this week amid reports that Snowden might have been aboard. Spain on Friday said it had been warned along with other European countries that Snowden, a former U.S. intelligence worker, was aboard the Bolivian presidential plane, an acknowledgement that the manhunt for the fugitive leaker had something to do with the plane’s unexpected diversion to Austria.

It is unclear whether the United States, which has told its European allies that it wants Snowden back, warned Madrid about the Bolivian president’s plane. U.S. officials will not detail their conversations with European countries, except to say that they have stated the U.S.’s general position that it wants Snowden back. President Barack Obama has publicly displayed a relaxed attitude toward Snowden’s movements, saying last month that he wouldn’t be “scrambling jets to get a 29-year-old hacker.” But the drama surrounding the flight of Morales, whose plane was abruptly rerouted to Vienna after apparently being denied permission to fly over France, suggests that pressure is being applied behind the scenes. Spanish Foreign Minister Jose Manuel Garcia-Margallo told Spanish National Television that “they told us that the information was clear, that he was inside.”

Several changes seek to streamline the structure by eliminating 3 committees • CHAIRMAN Continued from page A1 Former Chairman Ken Koehler, R-Crystal Lake, served four terms as chairman before losing his bid for a fifth term to Hill in December. Calls to make the chairmanship popularly elected – as is done in DuPage and Kane counties – culminated last year in an unsuccessful referendum to change to a county-executive form of government like Will County has. Another set of changes goes against the chairman’s incumbency by taking away its ability to appoint the chairmanships of the County Board’s standing committees. Critics on the County Board have alleged the current system heavily favors the incumbent chairman, who can secure all but one of the votes needed for re-election with the power to choose the chairmen of the board’s 11 standing committees. Another change removes the chairman’s power to appoint the Committee on Committees that sets assignments for new members after each election. The chairman’s power over the committee process came into question earlier this year because of a controversy surrounding an appointment to the McHenry County Mental Health Board, which has come under fire over its size and spending practices. A reform-oriented committee’s pick to fill a vacancy was overwhelmingly defeated by the County Board, prompting Hill to advance her own candidate. The Public Health and Human Services Committee made another selection, but Hill exercised her prerogative to not bring him forward for a vote. County Board members approved Hill’s candidate.

Hill also wanted to replace a member of the public health committee, citing an alleged conflict of interest, but relented after board members expressed unease with the idea. One proposed rule change would require the chairman to first bring a nominee before the appropriate committee for appointments to 22 boards and commissions for which the chairman has the power to nominate under state law, but for which final approval rests with the County Board. Another change would raise the vote threshold to a three-fourths supermajority, or 18 out of 24 members, if the chairman wants to change a County Board member’s committee assignment against his or her will. Several other changes seek to streamline the County Board structure by eliminating two standing committees and a third minor one. Under the proposals, the Human Resources Committee would be abolished and its duties assumed by Management Services. The Building Projects Committee, which meets on an as-needed basis, would be absorbed as a subcommittee of Management Services. One of the minor committees, the Pollution Control Facility Siting Committee, would likewise be absorbed as a subcommittee of the standing Natural and Environmental Resources Committee. If approved, committee eliminations would not take effect until after the November 2014 election. While the County Board in past years has been resistant to making significant changes to its rules, that could change in the light of last November’s election, which resulted in nine seats – more than one-third of the County Board – changing hands. The turnover is the largest in at least 20 years.

Changing the rules A McHenry County Board committee is poised Monday to recommend 49 changes to the rules under which the County Board operates. A number of the rules are aimed at curtailing the power of the County Board chairman, such as: • Limiting the chairman and vice chairman to no more than three consecutive two-year terms. • Eliminating the chairman’s power to appoint the chairmen of the County Board’s standing committees. • Eliminating the chairman’s power to appoint the committee that meets after every November election to assign board members to their committees. • Raising the number of votes needed if the chairman wants to replace a committee member to a three-fourths supermajority, or 18 out of 24 members. • Codifying which appointments made by the chairman must be approved by a full County Board vote. Another significant structural change would eliminate two of the board’s 11 standing committees.

What’s next The Management Services Committee will vote to move the changes forward at its next meeting, which starts at 8:30 a.m. Monday at the county Administration Building, 667 Ware Road, Woodstock. Chairwoman Tina Hill, R-Woodstock, will likely call a Committee of the Whole meeting for the full board to review the rules.

On the Net You can view the resolution for Monday’s meeting and read the proposed changes at http:// shawurl.com/o2y.

Vatican analyst: Decision to canonize both popes was a ‘brilliant move to unify the church’ • SAINTHOOD Continued from page A1 it’s the feast of the Immaculate Conception, a major feast day for the church that honors Mary, to whom both saintly popes were particularly devoted. Polish prelates continue to press for October, to mark the 35th anniversary of the Polish-born John Paul’s election, but Vatican officials have suggested that’s too soon to organize such a massive event. The announcement came on a remarkable day melding papacies past and present: It opened with Francis and

Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI attending their first Vatican ceremony together, sitting side-by-side on matching papal chairs for the unveiling of a statue in the Vatican gardens. It continued with the publication of Francis’ first encyclical, a meditation on faith that was largely written by Benedict before he retired but was signed by Francis. And it climaxed with Francis’ decision to canonize two other predecessors. Each event, historic on its own, would have captured headlines. But the canonization announcement capped them all, reflecting the priorities of this unique pontifi-

cate that has already broken so many rules and traditions, from Francis’ decision to shun papal vestments to his housing arrangements, living in the Vatican hotel rather than the stuffy Apostolic Palace. The Rev. Thomas Reese, a Vatican analyst, said the decision to canonize both popes was a “brilliant move to unify the church,” given that each pope has his own admirers and critics. “With the joint announcement, Pope Francis is saying we do not have to choose between popes, we can honor and revere both as holy men who served the church well in

their times,” he wrote on his blog for the National Catholic Reporter newspaper. Vatican II, which John XXIII opened a year before his 1963 death, opened the church to people of other faiths and allowed for Mass to be celebrated in the languages of the faithful, rather than Latin. In the years since it closed in 1965, though, it has become a source of division in the church, with critics blaming a faulty interpretation of Vatican II’s true meaning on the fall in priestly vocations and the “crisis” in the church today. To anyone who has been paying attention, Francis’ de-

cision to canonize John Paul and John XXIII should come as no surprise: The Jesuit was made a cardinal by John Paul, who attended Vatican II, and is very much a priest of John’s legacy. On the anniversary of John Paul’s death this year, Francis prayed at the tombs of both John Paul and John XXIII – an indication that he sees a great personal and spiritual continuity in them. “Two different popes, very important to the church, will be announced saint together - it’s a beautiful gesture,” said the Rev. Jozef Kloch, spokesman for Poland’s Catholic bishops, who like most Poles

was overjoyed by the news of John Paul’s impending canonization but impatient to know the date. Francis will set the date at an upcoming meeting of cardinals. The Vatican spokesman, the Rev. Federico Lombardi, confirmed that the miracle that brought John Paul to the ranks of saints concerned a Costa Rican woman, Floribeth Mora, who on Friday broke months of silence to tell her story in public, surrounded by her family, doctors and church officials at a news conference in the archbishop’s residence in San Jose, Costa Rica.


Page A10 • Saturday, July 6, 2013

NATION

Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com


Opinion

John Rung President and Publisher

Dan McCaleb Group Editor

Jason Schaumburg Editor

Saturday, July 6, 2013 • Page A11 • Northwest Herald • NWHerald.com 8THUMBS UP, THUMBS DOWN

8SKETCH VIEW

Thumbs up for coach’s honors The Northwest Herald Editorial Board offers this week’s thumbs up and thumbs down: Thumbs up: To Marengo High School, for continuing to honor former basketball coach Homer “Bill” Barry. Assistant football coach Rob Kruse painted a mural this summer of Barry on the wall of the school’s gymnasium, which already was named for the former coach. Barry died in March 2008, about six weeks after the gym was dedicated to him. He is an Illinois Basketball Coaches Association Hall of Famer, holding a 573-211 record in 29 seasons at Marengo. Thumbs down: To Gov. Pat Quinn and his amendatory veto of the concealed-carry bill. Quinn’s action is nothing more than a political stunt to garner support as he heads into what likely will be a tough Democratic primary for governor in 2014. If Quinn had specific ideas and demands for the bill, he should have worked with lawmakers when the bill was being crafted instead of standing on the sidelines and watching. Thumbs up: To AdvantaClean, for cleaning up for free the flooding damage at the Midwest Center for Children’s Development, a Crystal Lake nonprofit that uses horses and other therapy techniques for children with disabilities. The facility sustained heavy flooding in late June after thunderstorms dropped several inches of rain in the area in a short time. Employees thought they might not be able to stay open after the flooding, or pay for its cleanup. JT Maier, president of AdvantaClean, said he did it because “it was the right thing to do.” We couldn’t agree more. Thumbs down: To McHenry County Judge Gordon Graham for sentencing a Crystal Lake man facing his fifth DUI charge to probation. Ronald Horst Abt pleaded guilty to aggravated driving under the influence, a Class 2 felony punishable by three to seven years in prison. Prosecutors were seeking a six-year sentence, but Graham decided on three years’ probation and 180 days in the McHenry County Jail, half of which are stayed if Abt complies with his probation. Our prisons are overcrowded and the state is broke, but when someone continually risks the lives of others by driving under the influence, something more than probation is warranted. Thumbs up: To all of the organizers and volunteers who helped put together the fantastic fireworks displays all over the area, which are a huge part of Fourth of July festivities. These displays are expensive, and with tight municipal budgets many have figured out creative means to fund fireworks displays for an entire town and its visitors to enjoy.

8IT’S YOUR WRITE Guns and criminals To the Editor: With all this gun control talk, I haven’t heard one politician say how they plan to take guns from criminals, only from law-abiding citizens. Why is it that Democrats are the ones pushing the gun issue so hard? Do they have a secret agenda? Want to solve the gay-marriage issue the easy way? Make all marriages against the law. Then only divorce lawyers and clergy will be disturbed.

8ANOTHER VIEW

Frank M. Garner

Know rules of the road

Change at Metra

Lake in the Hills

If you’re an avid bicyclist, you’ve probably silently – or not so silently – cursed a motorist whose driving you thought put you in danger. It’s important that motorists and bicyclists who travel together on streets, roads and highways every day know how to share the road and follow the rules. However, there’s a surprising lack of knowledge on both sides about what those rules are, and there’s a lot of resentment and frustration from both groups. The League of Illinois Bicyclists, a statewide non-profit organization, has come up with an entertaining way to do so. The league, with assistance from Secretary of State Jesse White, Lt. Gov. Sheila Simon and Illinois Department of Transportation Secretary Ann Schneider, plans to launch the online “Illinois bicycle safety quiz challenge” at bikesafetyquiz.com. The (Freeport) Journal-Standard

To the Editor: After the recent revelations about the severance deal between Metra and former CEO Alex Clifford, I appreciate state Rep. Jack Franks’ ongoing efforts to bring transparency and accountability to the suburban rail provider. Metra is paying Mr. Clifford almost three times what he is contractually owed to leave his position early and doing so under the cloak of a confidentiality agreement. Franks is working to protect taxpayers by demanding hearings into Metra’s practices, and immediate reforms to make them more

accountable. It is enough of an insult to taxpayers when organizations such as Metra are found to be spending our tax dollars so carelessly. It is even more galling that this organization can hide the details of how it spends our very limited resources behind a legal firewall. Alex Clifford was hired to clean up Metra after years of malfeasance. How many more times will we be let down before we demand wholesale change at Metra? Franks is right to push for greater accountability by requiring the election of Metra’s Board of Directors. I encourage Franks to continue to investigate and push for real change at Metra. Ron Eck Jr. Woodstock

Drive with awareness To the Editor: I took my grandsons to the park the other day. We rode our bikes to make the 1-mile trip. Our path took us across Crystal Lake Road, and we crossed at the pedestrian-activated yellow flashing light. As has happened many times, we were in the crosswalk, and I realized that the car approaching us was not going to stop, although the driver had plenty of time to do so.

How to sound off We welcome original letters on public issues. Letters must include the author’s full name, home address and day and evening telephone numbers. We limit letters to 250 words and one published letter every 30 days. All letters are subject to editing

Cars approaching from the opposite direction already had stopped. Being in the middle of the street with two small boys and three bicycles with a car driving directly toward us was a pretty scary situation. It only takes us 20 to 30 seconds to cross the road. Is that so much time that you are willing to risk killing or injuring us to avoid the wait? Are you so focused on your destination that you are unaware of others around you? When I took driver’s education, I was taught that a vehicle is a lethal weapon and needs to be driven with that awareness. Cars still kill people. Since we live in a community, we all need to be aware and courteous to those around us. Most of the drivers on Crystal Lake Road stop at the yellow flashing light, and I appreciate their courtesy. However, it would only take one driver

for length and clarity at the sole discretion of the editor. Submit letters by: • E-mail: letters@nwherald.com • Mail: Northwest Herald “It’s Your Write” Box 250 Crystal Lake, IL 60039-0250

in too much of a hurry to not slow or stop for a few seconds to alter our lives forever. Please don’t be that driver. Peg Bolm McHenry

Church confusion To the Editor: Having been raised in Catholic schools, I believe there is much good in the doctrines. However, I fail to understand why St. Elizabeth Ann Seton believes that it cannot tolerate a Boy Scout who is gay when the Catholic Church’s priests have been molesting young parishioners for decades and were provided cover by the higher echelons of the Church. What the priests were doing seems far more malignant than a young Boy Scout who is bothering no one and trying to better himself through scouting. John E. Small Crystal Lake

Yo-Yo Ma helps bring injured Marine back to music WASHINGTON – Last weekend, I found myself at the most moving musical performance I’ve ever seen. It was completely unexpected. It happened at the Aspen Ideas Festival. Please don’t roll your eyes at the thought of a Rocky Mountain version of Davos Man, that species of climber who jets to hard-to-reach places for frenzied networking, chilled chardonnay and competitive tweeting, all under the cover of intellectual edification. The heaviest lift of the day was deciding between “What Can Iraq Tell Us About the Future of Democracy in the Middle East?” and “The 21st Century Diplomatic Toolbox: Soft Power, Economic Statecraft, and Technology.” As I was weighing those options, grace intervened. On the morning of June 28, I decided against opening my mind to world peace and instead opened my eyes and ears to Yo-Yo Ma, the world’s foremost cellist, who was appearing on a panel with

the humdrum title “Arts, Veterans, and Health Care.” One reason to go was that I’d missed Ma’s performance at the opening session. Friday’s session wouldn’t be an encore. Ma would be one of four panelists answering a moderator’s questions, Aspen’s regulation format. Still, Ma on any subject is better than a fellow from the Council on Foreign Relations. At the session, much of the talking was left to a U.S. Marine Lance Cpl. Timothy Donley. He had been a guitar player until February 2012, when an improvised explosive device in Afghanistan took both legs, depriving him of a lap, and maimed an arm. Instead, thanks to Ma and Musicorps, a group of volunteer professional musicians, Donley began singing with the famed cellist last year as he was recovering at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. For Donley, who had locked

Editorial Board: John Rung, Dan McCaleb, Jason Schaumburg, Kevin Lyons, Jon Styf, Kate Schott, Stacia Hahn

VIEWS Margaret Carlson himself away upon his return from Afghanistan, performing with Ma has been part of a long journey back to life, one without the career he planned or the family he hoped to have. At times, he thought he couldn’t go on and resisted the extended hand of professional musicians who wanted to help. After many pleas, he finally said yes, began voice lessons, and his despair began to lift. Ma was on the panel because of his decision to use his gift to do more than fill concert halls around the globe. Healing through music is why he’s now as likely to be playing in Danville, Ky., and Akron, Ohio, as in Paris or Rome. As part of Musicorps – founded by the composer

8THE FIRST AMENDMENT

Arthur Bloom, who was also on stage – Ma helps give injured veterans something to live for through music. The group has done wonders with state- of-the-art prosthetics that allow a pianist who has lost a hand to play Beethoven. Ma’s been playing for 53 years – his “tiger parents” started his lessons at age 4. By age 7, he had played for President John F. Kennedy. As he entered middle age (here in the story, he pats his potbelly), he realized he could keep amassing wealth and honors – including 16 Grammys, the Glenn Gould Prize and the Presidential Medal of Freedom – or he could expand his commitment to helping others. He founded the Silk Road Project Inc., which supports integrating art into life, a goal he also is pursuing as the 2013 artist-in-residence at the Aspen Institute. This is how Ma found himself in a small auditorium in Aspen, sitting in a straight-backed chair, having

discovered in the second half of his life a much deeper level of happiness. At the end of the discussion, Ma took up his cello, Bloom moved over to a piano and Donley wheeled himself to the microphone. Ma played “America the Beautiful,” Donley sang the second verse in his strong tenor voice, and then the audience joined in. There is still a lot of pain in Donley’s life. But today he feels richer than any Davos Man: “I’m a 21-year-old kid on stage with Yo-Yo Ma, right? How much better does it get?” When the music stopped, there was a pause as the audience swallowed its tears, and then a standing ovation – for Donley for thriving, for Ma for playing, and for themselves for having the good fortune to witness a moment of such unexpected joy.

• Margaret Carlson is a Bloomberg View columnist.

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.


Saturday, July 6, 2013 Northwest Herald Page A12

Weather TODAY

SUN

MON

TUE

WED

THU

FRI

86

88

89

86

84

82

80

Partly sunny with isolated storms

Mostly sunny and seasonal

Mostly sunny and seasonal

Hazy, hot and humid with isolated storms Wind:

Hazy, hot and humid with isolated storms

Wind: SW 10-15 mph

SW 10-15 mph

71

Wind:

Mostly cloudy with scattered storms Wind:

SW 10-15 mph

S 10-15 mph

Partly sunny with scattered storms

73

ALMANAC

71

Wind:

Wind:

NNE 10 mph

N 10-15 mph

70

64

63

62

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

at Chicago through 4 p.m. yesterday

Harvard 85/65

Belvidere 86/66

TEMPERATURE HIGH

Wind:

WNW 10-15 mph

Crystal Lake 86/71

Rockford 88/66

LOW

McHenry 85/66

Hampshire 85/66

90

Waukegan 82/65 Algonquin 85/65

Oak Park 84/69

St. Charles 86/71

DeKalb 86/71

88

Dixon 86/65

Aurora 84/65

Sandwich 84/65

39

Today will be hot and humid with hazy skies and a chance of storms. Highs will be in the mid- to upper 80s with a heat index at, or will feel near, 90. Heat and humidity will continue into next week. Sunday, isolated storms are possible with an increasing chance of storms through Wednesday ahead of a front.

LAKE FORECAST WATER TEMP: Chicago Winds: S at 4-8 kts. 86/68 Waves: 0-1 ft.

67

Orland Park 84/67 Normal high

84°

Normal low

63°

Record high

103° in 2012

Record low

46° in 1972

POLLEN COUNT

REGIONAL CITIES

TREES GRASSES

PRECIPITATION 24 hours through 4 p.m. yest.

0.00”

Month to date

0.02”

Normal month to date

0.50”

Year to date

28.48”

Normal year to date

17.03”

WEEDS MOLD

FOX RIVER STAGES as of 7 a.m. yesterday Flood

Fox Lake

SUN AND MOON

Current

24hr Chg.

--

5.31

-0.21

Nippersink Lake

--

5.17

-0.17

Sunrise

5:24 a.m.

New Munster, WI

10

9.77

-0.73

Sunset

8:32 p.m.

McHenry

4

4.19

-0.26

Moonrise

4:10 a.m.

Algonquin

3

1.92

-0.16

Moonset

7:13 p.m.

Today

MOON PHASES New

First

Jul 8

Jul 15

Full

City

Last

Jul 22

Jul 29

AIR QUALITY Friday’s reading

0-50 Good; 51-100 Moderate; 101-150 Unhealthy for sensitive groups; 151-200 Unhealthy; 201-300 Very Unhealthy; 301-500 Hazardous Source: http://www.epa.state.il.us/air/aqi/index.html

UV INDEX TODAY The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.

9a

10a 11a Noon 1p

2p

3p

NATIONAL CITIES

4p

Hi/Lo/W

Albuquerque Anchorage Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Billings Boise Boston Charlotte Cincinnati Cleveland Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit El Paso Fairbanks Fargo Green Bay Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Jacksonville Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles Louisville Memphis

94/71/pc 65/55/sh 80/71/t 85/72/s 94/72/s 82/63/pc 91/62/s 96/75/t 86/71/t 76/67/pc 82/69/pc 96/74/s 92/64/t 89/72/s 83/69/pc 95/76/pc 76/52/pc 86/66/t 85/67/s 88/69/s 93/75/pc 80/66/pc 89/72/t 89/70/s 104/87/pc 79/64/pc 78/69/t 87/71/t

Today City

Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York Norfolk Oklahoma City Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, OR Reno Richmond Sacramento Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Seattle Sioux Falls St. Louis St. Paul Tampa Tucson Wash., DC Wichita

Hi/Lo/W

89/80/pc 82/67/pc 87/71/pc 78/68/t 84/74/t 92/78/s 89/73/s 95/70/s 92/74/pc 94/76/s 105/87/pc 86/69/pc 81/58/s 94/62/s 92/72/pc 88/56/s 91/69/s 96/74/s 71/65/pc 68/56/pc 78/58/s 87/70/pc 87/69/pc 87/70/t 91/74/t 100/79/pc 92/76/s 94/71/s

Sunday

Monday

City

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

City

Arlington Hts Aurora Bloomington Carbondale Champaign Chicago Clinton Evanston Galesburg Joliet Kankakee Mt. Vernon Naperville Peoria Princeton Rockford Rock Island Springfield Waukegan Wheaton

85/68/pc 84/65/pc 86/66/pc 84/65/t 82/65/pc 86/68/pc 84/65/pc 82/68/pc 87/66/pc 84/66/pc 84/66/pc 83/63/t 84/66/pc 87/66/pc 85/66/pc 88/66/pc 88/67/pc 85/66/pc 82/65/pc 84/67/pc

85/71/pc 86/68/pc 87/68/pc 87/69/pc 87/68/pc 86/70/pc 86/69/pc 83/71/pc 88/70/pc 84/68/pc 88/68/pc 86/66/pc 85/68/pc 88/69/pc 86/69/pc 86/70/pc 89/70/pc 86/71/pc 83/68/pc 86/70/pc

90/72/t 90/72/t 90/72/pc 93/72/pc 89/71/pc 88/73/t 91/72/pc 87/73/t 90/72/pc 87/72/t 88/73/t 93/70/pc 87/72/t 91/73/pc 89/73/t 89/70/t 91/74/pc 91/73/pc 87/70/t 88/72/t

Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Beijing Berlin Brussels Buenos Aires Cairo Cancun Dublin Geneva Hong Kong Islamabad Istanbul Kabul Kingston Lima London Madrid

Today

Today Hi/Lo/W

89/76/t 74/56/s 89/76/t 114/84/s 95/74/s 74/53/s 75/56/pc 59/39/c 93/72/s 89/79/t 70/56/pc 81/55/s 87/81/r 108/81/s 84/76/s 97/65/s 90/79/t 67/55/pc 79/55/s 102/70/pc

City

Hi/Lo/W

Manila Melbourne Mexico City Montreal Moscow New Delhi Paris Rome Santiago Sao Paulo Seoul Singapore Stockholm Sydney Tel Aviv Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

88/77/t 55/39/sh 69/54/t 84/68/pc 82/60/pc 91/81/pc 74/62/pc 84/67/s 61/37/pc 79/57/s 88/70/pc 88/79/c 73/57/pc 62/40/s 84/68/s 90/77/pc 83/68/pc 75/55/pc 81/64/t 80/55/pc

NATIONAL FORECAST -10s

-0s

0s

10s

20s

30s

40s

50s

60s

70s

80s

90s

100s 110s

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice

5p

0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very high; 11+ Extreme

Forecasts and graphics, except WFLD forecasts, provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2013

Showers T-storms

Rain

Flurries

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8COMMUNITY NEWS

ANOTHER LANE SHIFT FOR RIVER ROAD McHENRY – Another traffic shift will happen on River Road as the Charles J. Miller Road project crosses the halfway point. Lanes are expected to be reconfigured and traffic shifted on Tuesday, according to an alert sent out by the construction operations manager. Drivers are advised to give themselves extra time to get through the work zone. The construction is part of a two-phase project that will widen the two-lane Charles Miller Road to four lanes and build a second two-lane bridge over the Fox River to create two lanes of traffic in each direction. Officials expect this phase of the project to be completed by Oct. 15. Work began in November. For information and to sign up for updates on the project, visit charlesmillerroad.com. Emails will be sent to those that sign up alerting them where and when construction activities and potential traffic delays will occur.

SECTION B Saturday, July 6, 2013 Northwest Herald

Breaking news @ www.NWHerald.com

Harvard EDC hires director Eldredge expresses optimism that economy will continue to rebound By SHAWN SHINNEMAN sshinneman@shawmedia.com HARVARD – Leaders of the Harvard Economic Development Corp. are hoping their new hire gets to lead a resurgence in development as the economy strengthens. The public-private partnership announced this

week that it has brought on Charles Eldredge to serve as the executive director, a position left unfilled since the last director stepped down more than six months ago, Harvard EDC Chairman Roger Lehmann said. “We thought it best to leave it open the way the economy was,” Lehmann

said. “There are signs of the economy improving, so we thought this was the time for us to have an executive director working for us.” Created in 2001, the Harvard EDC works with existing and potential area employers and produces marketing materials to facilitate growth in the community.

It’s funded predominately by a board of eight area employers, seven of which give $5,000 a year. The city of Harvard kicks in $25,000 a year, and the EDC brings in an additional $6,000 to $8,000 a year from other members.

See DIRECTOR, page B2

Charles Eldredge will serve as the executive director of the Harvard Economic Development Corp. Eldredge will work in a part-time capacity with the organization.

POI TRICKS AND PINWHEELS Residents, performers enjoy Nippersink’s Music & Arts Festival

– Emily K. Coleman

LIVING HISTORY PLANS OPEN HOUSE RINGWOOD – A Living History open house tour gives participants a chance to step back in time to the 1850s and World War II. Attendees get to tour the restored Greek revival house and learn more about the Powers and Walker families that called the area home in the 1850s. Volunteers will be there to answer questions, offer tours and demonstrate skills. There also will be several presentations focusing on the history of the house. The event will be from noon to 4 p.m. July 14 at Glacial Park’s Powers-Walker House, 6201 Harts Road, Ringwood. At 2 p.m., there will be a remembrance of the Schaefer and Steinmetz families, who previously lived in the house. The event is free. Registration is not required. For information, call Prairieview Education Center at 815-479-5779 or visit www. mccdistrict.org.

– Olivia Gilbertsen

8LOCAL BEST BET

MATINEE EVENT AT MARENGO LIBRARY MARENGO – A Saturday Matinee event at the MarengoUnion Library will feature the 1966 romantic comedy “How to Steal a Million,” starring Audrey Hepburn and Peter O’Toole. The show will begin at 2 p.m. at the library, 200 S. State St., Marengo. In the film, an art forger’s daughter enlists a society burglar to help steal one of her father’s sculptures from a museum before it is discovered to be a fake. Movie snacks will be provided, and registration is not required. For information, call 815-5688236 or visit www.muld.org.

8LOCAL DEATHS Albert Ronne Baumann 74, formerly of Woodstock Miriam Lydia Eggum 95, formerly of Woodstock Joanne S. Simes of Hebron OBITUARIES on page B3

Photos by Kyle Grillot – kgrillot@shawmedia.com

Cody Kobuch of Johnsburg performs poi tricks while listening to The Miles Burning Band on Friday at the Nippersink Music & Arts Festival in Spring Grove. TOP: Jimmy Spadaro, 3, of North Aurora plays with pinwheels at the festival. The festival offers two days of folk, Americana, Bluegrass and rock music along Nippersink Creek.

Nonprofit plans housing for veterans Fire chief: TLS Veterans wants to remove old units for permanent, affordable ones By EMILY K. COLEMAN ecoleman@shawmedia.com McHENRY – A nonprofit is looking to provide affordable housing to veterans in McHenry. The McHenry City Council annexed a property at the southeast corner of Ridge Road and Route 120 earlier this week. The nonprofit TLS Veter-

ans hopes to tear down the two homes there and build three new eight-unit, two-story buildings that would provide permanent affordable housing, Deputy City Administrator Doug Martin said. The plan will go before the city’s Planning and Zoning Commission at its July 25 meeting. The commission usually makes a recommendation to

the council the same day as the hearing. TLS Veterans has an office at 5330 W. Elm St. in McHenry and a transitional housing center called New Horizons in Hebron, which houses 30 to 45 veterans a year, according to its website. The council on Monday night also approved permanent variances for two new tattoo parlors in McHenry with a 5-2 vote. Aldermen Andy Glab and Jeff Schaefer voted “no.” The two businesses, which are involved in other

areas besides tattooing, have been operating for the past few months on temporary variances as they made their way through the zoning process. The House of Glass, 2906 W. Route 120, was operating as a smoke shop before it expanded into tattooing. Jean Fontaine operated a tattoo parlor just outside the city limits at 4412 S. Hi Point Road before moving to his current location at 1210 N. Green St., where he operates a gallery with a tattoo parlor in the back.

Richmond votes down assault weapons ban By EMILY K. COLEMAN ecoleman@shawmedia.com RICHMOND – A ban on assault weapons likely won’t come up again, the Richmond village president said. After two and a half hours of public comment at the Richmond Village Board meeting Wednesday, the board unanimously killed a proposed assault weapons ban. The board had decided

to bring the measure up following the passage of a concealed-carry bill that includes a provision giving municipalities 10 days from enactment to pass bans on semi-automatic assault-style weapons. But there’s disagreement over whether the provision applies to non-home-rule communities such as Richmond. That was one of the arguments raised by the ban’s

opponents who crowded into Richmond’s Village Hall. “There was a fairly good cross section of local residents, as well as people who traveled from longer distances in order to speak at the meeting,” Village President Pete Koenig said. Some questioned why Richmond, a town of less than 1,900 people, needed a ban and raised concerns about how that would affect those crossing through the

town on Route 12 on their way to Wisconsin. Others worried a ban would limit their ability to protect themselves and their families. The idea behind the “shell ordinance” was to keep the village’s options open beyond the 10-day deadline, Koenig said before the meeting. The village could amend or abolish a ban after the deadline; it just wouldn’t be able to enact one.

Bonus program a success McHenry Township considers renewal By EMILY K. COLEMAN ecoleman@shawmedia.com McHENRY – A program designed to reward officers for working more shifts has helped keep the McHenry Township Fire Protection District’s costs down, its chief said. The district’s board implemented the officer shift bonus program six months ago, and so far, it’s a success, Fire Chief Tony Huemann said. The board will evaluate the program and consider whether to renew it at the end of the year. Under the program, captains and lieutenants who work five 12-hour shifts in a month get paid an extra $100.

See BONUS, page B2


LOCAL&REGION

Page B2 • Saturday, July 6, 2013

Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

FOX RIVER GROVE: PICNIC GROVE PARK CELEBRATION

FRG to hold fireworks Saturday, offer shuttle buses NORTHWEST HERALD FOX RIVER GROVE – The village will have its annual fireworks celebration Saturday at Picnic Grove Park. To ensure safe travel for both pedestrians and drivers, there will be no parking on any of the roads within the

Picnic Grove subdivision, the village said in a news release. Parking restrictions also will apply to several roads near Picnic Grove Park. The police department will block traffic at the completion of the fireworks on Birch Lane from the 600 block to Harding Avenue to allow

pedestrians to exit. Spectators will be allowed to enter the Picnic Grove Park between 5:30 and 9 p.m. Once the fireworks are about to begin, no one will be allowed to enter through the gates, according to the news release. Food and beverages will

Accident sends two to hospital, but injuries not serious

not be allowed to be carried into the park, the village said. Food and drinks are available to buy. No pets are allowed in the park. Free shuttle buses will be available throughout the village. Route 1 will include Vic-

toria Woods, Hunters Farm and Welch’s subdivisions and will stop at Victoria Drive and Tiffany Lane, Camilla Place and Jasmine Way, Victoria Drive and Jasmine Way, Bridle Path Lane and Saddle Lane, and Saddle Lane and Morgan Lane. Route 2, the Foxmoor

Route, will stop at Old Hunt Road and Plum Tree Road, Old Hunt Road and Lexington Road, Foxmoor Road and Yorkshire Drive and the Algonquin Road Fire Station. Route 3, the south Route, will stop at Algonquin Road School, Lions Park and the Commuter/Metra lot.

DISTRICT 154

Marengo High School’s new principal ready to begin work By STEPHEN Di BENEDETTO sdibenedetto@shawmedia.com

Jim Dallke – jdallke@shawmedia.com

A two-car accident at Walkup Road and Berry Court in Crystal Lake sent two people to the hospital Friday. The head-on collision, involving a pickup truck and a four-door sedan, occurred around 1:30 p.m. Friday. The injuries did not appear to be serious, according to the McHenry County Sheriff’s office.

MARENGO – Angela Fink took the helm this week as Marengo High School’s new principal, after making the switch from a top administrator role in Waukegan. Fink arrived at the school July 1 for her first official day, after the Marengo District 154 school board selected her to replace former Principal Scott Shepard, who left the school after five years to become the principal at Crys-

Work to start at former Dobyn’s House site By EMILY K. COLEMAN McHENRY – The demolition of the wooden broadwalk and piers at the vacant Dobyn’s House site will start next week, a deputy city administrator said. The McHenry City Council awarded the project to Shoreline Creations of Wonder Lake, the low bidder at

$12,200, at its last meeting. Two of the three bids came in below the $20,000 the project was estimated to cost, according to council documents. It will take about two weeks for the work to be completed, Deputy City Administrator Bill Hobson said. The goal is to have the site open to the public by the city’s Sidewalk Sales Day on

July 20. “We hope to have a nice clean site where people can walk down to the point and enjoy the river,” Hobson said. The city eventually hopes to sell the property, at 1202 N. Riverside Drive, which it bought for $550,000 from the Charles J. Miller family trust in October. The property has sat vacant since a 2009 fire destroyed the landmark

building and the restaurant it housed. City staff had – at the request of the Riverwalk Foundation – looked into salvaging the broadwalk and piers. After having a contractor take a look, staff decided that with the switch from private to public, the improvements would have to be significant and weren’t financially feasible, Hobson said.

UNION: DONATION DEADLINE

Historical society’s White Elephant sale nears NORTHWEST HERALD UNION – The deadline for donations to the July 14 “White Elephant” sale is Wednesday. The sale has become a pivotal part of the McHenry County Historical Society’s fundraising effort. Items range from vintage clothing

to a combination microfiche/ microfilm reader for budding genealogists. There also are garden tools, furniture, new and vintage books, glassware, seasonal merchandise, games, sporting equipment and tables of odds and ends. The sale runs from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Schuette Building, next door to the museum.

No early birds will be allowed. Only checks and cash will be accepted. Donations may be dropped off at the historical society museum, 6422 Main St., during regular business hours, 9 a.m to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. No broken or soiled items or items that have been recalled or contain hazardous

materials will be accepted. Large appliances, antiquated computers and electronic items, medical supplies and children’s items such as cribs, car seats and used stuffed animals will not be accepted. The society reserves the right to reject items because of duplication, condition or disposal costs.

Program helps department keep costs down • BONUS Continued from page B1 If they work seven shifts, they get a $200 bonus. At the same time, the department has “virtually eliminated” overtime by working with employees so that when shifts are traded, it doesn’t put someone into overtime, Huemann said. “We are doing everything we can to keep the cost down of running this fire department,” he said. “Instead of paying people time and a half or hiring full time, we’re trying to keep

“We are doing everything we can to keep the cost down of running this fire department. Instead of paying people time and a half or hiring full time, we’re trying to keep this department part time.” Tony Huemann, McHenry Township fire chief this department part time.” It also rewards officers, who have other full-time jobs, for taking more time away from their families and aids the department in meeting the other goal it set for the year, having an officer on each engine and ambulance that goes

out, he said. Huemann said they felt having officers present to supervise and manage incidents was necessary. Since the program was created at the beginning of 2013, the department has paid out $14,000, about half of the

$28,800 maximum the program could pay out. That’s much less than hiring full-time officers, Huemann said. The department doesn’t have an estimate on what it would cost to hire a full-time officer because it has never done so, but battalion chiefs – of which the department has two and is looking to hire a third in a month or two – earn around $90,000, he said. Using that salary and the multiplier the district uses to calculate benefits, one full-time officer would cost the district no more than $133,200 a year.

Continued from page B1 In all, the EDC brings in between $66,000 and $68,000 a year from about 40 members. Eldredge, who has experience serving on several public agencies including the McHenry County Economic Development Corp., will work in a part-time capacity. His workload depends on the amount of prospective growth in the community, Lehmann said. Eldredge is optimistic that he will be kept busy.

“A development director can’t affect the business cycle,” he said. “But what he can do is when there are opportunities, make them most effective for the people that would like to locate there, and for the community.” He added that areas where development was strong before the recession have rebounded the strongest. “In farther-out areas, it’s going to take a little longer,” Eldredge said. “But I think the progression is clear. The economy, particularly the development economy, is starting to rebound.”

Harvard • Kenneth D. Richter, 19, 119 Bullard St., Poplar Grove, was charged Sunday, April 7, with three counts of felony theft. • A 15-year-old Harvard boy was charged Saturday, May 4, with theft. • Osvaldo G. Gonzalez, 22, 200 E. Diggins St., Harvard, was charged Sunday, May 5, with domestic battery. • A 14-year-old Harvard boy was charged Tuesday, May 7, with disorderly street gang conduct. • Daniel J. Shadle, 54, 710 Dewey St., Harvard, was charged Monday, May 27, with domestic battery. • Trudy A. Shadle, 53, 710 Dewey St., Harvard, was charged Monday, May 27, with driving under the influence, driving with a breath-alcohol content of more than 0.08 percent and driving with no headlights when required. • Juan Francisco Serrano-Casas, 37, 206 W. Thompson St., Harvard, was charged Friday, May 31, with unlawful possession of a controlled substance and improper walking on roadway. • Two 16-year-old Harvard boys and one 15-year-old Harvard boy were charged Friday, May 31, with possession of marijuana. Lake in the Hills • A 17-year-old Lake in the Hills girl was charged Wednesday, June 5, with possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of marijuana less than 2.5 grams. • A 15-year-old Lake in the Hills girl was charged Wednesday, June 5, with possession of drug paraphernalia. • Ryan M. Walker, 21, 647 David St., Lake in the Hills, was charged

Thursday, June 6, with possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of marijuana less than 2.5 grams. • A 17-year-old Lake in the Hills boy was charged Thursday, June 6, with two counts of criminal damage to property. • A rear window on a vehicle parked in the 1500 block of Adams Street was smashed, according to a report filed Friday, June 7. • An air conditioner was damaged in the 500 block of Huron Trail, according to a report filed Friday, June 7. • The windshield of a vehicle in the 1500 block of Adams Street was damaged, according to a report filed Friday, June 7. • Matthew L. Graf, 23, 87 Hilltop Drive, Lake in the Hills, was charged Saturday, June 8, with driving under the influence of alcohol, driving with a breath-alcohol content of more than 0.08 percent, speeding and driving without a seat belt. • A radar detector, laptop and cash were taken from a vehicle in the 1300 block of Cunat Court, according to a report filed Saturday, June 8. • Danielle N. Peckham, 27, 3 Hithergreen Court, Algonquin, was charged Sunday, June 9, with possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of marijuana. • Donald M. Syvlie, 42, 150 Judson St., Bensenville, was charged Sunday, June 9, with two counts of domestic battery. • A global positioning system and cash were removed from an unlocked vehicle in the 1400 block of Adams Street, according to a report filed Monday, June 10. • A 14-year-old Hampshire boy was charged Tuesday, June 11, with two counts of domestic battery.

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90 applicants for her strong educational leadership, the news release states. Shepard served as the high school’s principal since 2008, overseeing numerous improvements to school curriculum, including the digital one-to-one learning initiative. Fink has master’s degrees from Saint Xavier University and Aurora University. She is currently pursuing a doctorate in educational leadership at Concordia University. She was unavailable for comment Friday.

8POLICE REPORTS

McHENRY: DEMOLITION

ecoleman@shawmedia.com

tal Lake South High School in District 155, according to a District 154 news release. Fink served as the principal for Waukegan High School’s Brookside campus beginning in 2011, after working as the school’s associate principal. The high school serves about 4,300 students between two campuses in the northeast suburb. Fink will oversee about 820 students in Marengo’s single high school district. The district board appointed Fink in June out of a pool of

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LOCAL&REGION

Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

ELGIN: SUMMER EVENT

Elgin church to host annual Greek Fest NORTHWEST HERALD ELGIN – St. Sophia Church, 525 Church Road, will present its 35th annual summer Greek Fest from Friday to July 14. The fest will be open for lunch from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday and then again from 5 to 11 p.m. for dinner. Faxedin and emailed orders of more than $50 are available for pickup. On July 13 and 14, the fest will open at noon and run until 11 p.m. July 13 and 10 p.m. July 14. The fest, which traditionally attracts more than 12,000

If you go n What: 35th annual summer Greek Fest n When: Friday to July 14; 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday and then again from 5 to 11 p.m. for dinner; July 13 and 14, the fest will open at noon and run until 11 p.m. July 13 and 10 p.m. July 14 n Where: St. Sophia Church, 525 Church Road, Elgin n Cost: Admission is $2. people, is open to the public. Admission is $2. In addition to authentic Greek cuisine such as gyros, Grecian chicken, souvlaki, moussaka and pastitsio, there will be saganaki, Greek fries, fried calamari and Greek salad. American fare also will be available.

After dinner, attendees can unwind at the Greek Kafenio, where many traditional Greek sweets, such as baklava and loukoumathes, can be found. Children can enjoy games and inflatable rides, including a Euro-Bungee. Rides will not be open during the lunch

period Friday. Unlimited rides are available from noon to 4 p.m. July 13 and 14 for $15. A “Sounds of Greece” DJ will play music July 12 and 13, and adults may enjoy a full bar. The live band Hellas 2000 will provide traditional and modern Greek music during the evening of July 14. St. Sophia’s Agape Dance Troupe also will perform traditional Greek dances in full costume all weekend. A marketplace will feature crafts, jewelry, books, icons, purses and more. For information, call 847888-2822 or visit www.st-sophia.com

VOLO: AUTO MUSEUM SHOWCASE

Hot Rods for Huntington’s Disease rescheduled NORTHWEST HERALD VOLO – The Hot Rods for Huntington’s Disease event at the Volo Auto Museum has been rescheduled for July 13. The charity event will be from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the museum, 27582 Volo Village Road. The event will have a wide range of antique hot rods, muscle cars and even two hearses.

The event will include hundreds of souped-up cars and vintage classic vehicles, live music, a 50/50 raffle and a silent auction. Players from the Chicago Bliss also will be present. The money raised from Hot Rods for Huntington’s Disease will be sent to the Huntington’s Disease Society of America. The money will be used for research, support groups and home care. Huntington’s disease

is a genetic, neurological degenerative brain disease. The public can register cars for the show for $20 or enter the baggo contest, which is $40 per team. General admission costs $13.95 for adults and $8.95 for children. To donate to the Huntington’s disease cause online, visit www.firstgiving.com/ fundraiser/danielle-karlson/hotrods-for-huntingtons-disease-hot-rod-reg.

If you go n What: Hot Rods for Huntington’s Disease n When: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. July 13 n Where: Volo Auto Museum, 27582 Volo Village Road, Volo n Cost: The public can register cars for the show for $20 or enter the baggo contest, which is $40 per team. General admission costs $13.95 for adults and $8.95 for children.

8PUBLIC ACCESS MONDAY

Crystal Lake

The Huntley Plan Commission meeting scheduled for Monday has been canceled. The next scheduled meeting is 6:30 p.m. July 22 at Huntley Village Hall, 10987 Main St.

The District 300 Finance Committee meeting scheduled for Tuesday has been canceled. The next scheduled meeting is at 5 p.m. July 17 at the Administration Building, 300 Cleveland Ave., Carpentersville

Marengo City Council When: 7 p.m. Monday Where: Marengo City Hall, 132 E. Prairie St.

Dorr Township monthly meeting When: 7 p.m. Tuesday Where: 1039 Lake Ave., Woodstock

McHenry County Board Management Services Committee When: 8:30 a.m. Monday Where: Administration Building, 667 Ware Road, Woodstock

TUESDAY District 15 school board When: 7:30 p.m. Tuesday Where: Central office, 1011 N. Green St., McHenry District 46 school board When: 7 p.m. Tuesday Where: Prairie Grove Junior High School library, 3225 Route 176,

8OBITUARIES ALBERT RONNE BAUMANN Born: June 6, 1939; in Fargo, N.D. Died: July 4, 2013; in Woodstock MISSION, Texas – Albert Ronne Baumann, 74, of Mission, Texas and formerly of Woodstock, died Thursday July 4, 2013, at Centegra Hospital – Woodstock. He was born June 6, 1939, in Fargo, N.D., to Albert and Isabel (Anderson) Baumann. He married Marguerite Fitzgerald. He was formerly employed by Union Special in Huntley. He graduated from Worsham College in 1987 with a degree in mortuary science and was a former partner at Schneider-Leucht-Merwin & Cooney Funeral Home. He was a former member and past Exalted Ruler of the Woodstock Elks. He was a resident of Tropical Valley Acres in Mission, Texas, and served as president and as a member of the board. He was a member of St. Paul’s Catholic Church in Mission. He enjoyed golf and fishing. He was an avid White Sox fan. He also enjoyed playing cards with family and friends and solving sudoko puzzles. Mostly he will be remembered as a great husband, father and grandfather. He is survived by his wife; a son, Kenneth Baumann; a daughter, Kimberly (Jason) Sheckells; a sonin-law, Kevin Simes; six grandchildren, Parker Simes and Jacqueline Simes, Bryan and Stephanie Huffar and Jessica and Alexander Baumann; and a sister, Maryann

Fox Lake Village Board When: 6:30 p.m. Tuesday Where: Village Hall, 66 Thillen Drive Fox River Grove Public Works Committee When: 7 p.m. Tuesday Where: Village Hall, 305 Illinois St. Harvard Fire Protection District regular trustee meeting When: 6 p.m. Tuesday Where: 502 S. Eastman St. Island Lake Board of Fire and Police Commission

Baumann. He was preceded in death by a daughter, Kathryn A. Simes on July 28, 2004; and his parents. The visitation will be from 1 to 5 p.m. Sunday, July 7, at Schneider-Leucht-Merwin & Cooney Funeral Home, 1211 N. Seminary Ave., Woodstock. The visitation will continue from 9 a.m. Monday, July 8, until the funeral service at 11 a.m., also at the funeral home. Inurnment will be in Linn-Hebron Cemetery in Hebron. In lieu of flowers, memorials to the charity of the donor’s choice would be appreciated. For information, contact Schneider-Leucht-Merwin & Cooney Funeral Home at 815-338-1710 or visit www.slmcfh.com. Sign the guest book at www. NWHerald.com/obits

MIRIAM LYDIA EGGUM Died: July 2, 2013; in Monroe, Wis. MONROE, Wis. – Miriam Lydia Eggum, 95, formerly of Woodstock, died Tuesday, July 2, 2013, at Azura Hospice in Monroe, Wis. Funeral arrangements are pending at Schneider-Leucht-Merwin & Cooney Funeral Home, 1211 N. Seminary Ave., Woodstock. For information, call the funeral home at 815-338-1710.

ANTHONY VERNON FICK Born: June 25, 1949; in Chicago Died: June 30, 2013; in Woodstock McHENRY – Anthony Vernon Fick, 64, of McHenry, died Sunday, June 30, 2013, at Crossroads Care Cen-

When: 7:30 p.m. Tuesday Where: Village Hall, 3720 Greenleaf Ave. Johnsburg Planning and Zoning Commission When: 7 p.m. Tuesday Where: Village Hall, 1515 Channel Beach Ave. Lake in the Hills Committee of the Whole When: 7:30 p.m. Tuesday Where: Village Hall, 600 Harvest Gate McCullom Lake Village Board When: 7 p.m. Tuesday Where: Village Hall, 4811 W. Orchard Drive McHenry Landmark Commission When: 7 p.m. Tuesday Where: McHenry City Hall classroom, 333 S. Green St. Nippersink Public Library District board When: 7 p.m. Tuesday Where: Nippersink Public Library, 5418 Hill Road, Richmond

ter in Woodstock of complications from a stroke. He was preceded in death by his parents, Oscar and Geneva Fick; and a sister, Patricia Catalano. Tony was born in Chicago on June 25, 1949, to Oscar and Geneva (Sobieski) Fick. He graduated from Grant High School in Fox Lake in 1967. During his years in high school, he was all-conference in football and wrestling and a member of the varsity band (saxophone), thespians, a cappella and student council. After high school, he attended the Merchant Marine Academy. He worked summer construction to pay for his education and graduated from Carthage College in 1973 with a degree in elementary education with a minor in mathematics. He was the first in his family to graduate from college. He married Mary O’Laughlin on June 27, 1987, at Grace Lutheran Church in Richmond. He obtained his insurance license in 1974, serving the McHenry County area for 39 years. He was a former member of the Jaycees and the Moose Lodge. He coached peewee football in McHenry and defense at Marian Central High School. He was a member of Shepherd of the Hills Church in McHenry. He was an excellent card player, enjoyed a game of chess and playing golf with his many friends. He was a diehard Bears and Cubs fan. Survivors include his wife, Mary

Spring Grove Economic and Development Commission When: 6:30 p.m. Tuesday Where: Spring Grove Village Hall, 7401 Meyer Road Spring Grove Police Pension Board When: 8 a.m. Tuesday Where: Police conference room, 7401 Meyer Road Volo Village Board When: 7:30 p.m. Tuesday Where: Village Hall, 500 S. Fish Lake Road

WEDNESDAY Rural Woodstock Public Library District secretary’s audit When: 5:45 p.m. Wednesday Where: Woodstock Public Library, 414 W. Judd St. Rural Woodstock Public Library District board meeting When: 7 p.m. Wednesday Where: Woodstock Public Library, 414 W. Judd St.

Fick; his children, Matthew (Julie) Fick, Shannon (James) Darling, Sara (Daniel) Bowman, Kristie (Joseph) Demayo and Sandra (Jaime) Gladish; three brothers, Oscar (Jeanie) Fick, Curtiss (Sherri) Fick and Michael (Mary Ellen) Fick; a sister, Bonnie (Craig) Stratton; 13 grandchildren, Raegan, Kaitlyn, Austin, Logan, Ryann, Miles, Daniel, Arabella, Nathanial, Edward, William, Arthur and SheaLeigh; and numerous nieces and nephews. The visitation will be from 4 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, July 10, at Colonial Funeral Home, 591 Ridgeview Drive, McHenry. The memorial service will be at 10 a.m. Thursday, July 11, at Shepherd of the Hills Lutheran Church, 404 N. Green St., McHenry. Interment will be private for the family. In lieu of flowers, memorials in Tony’s name may be made to Shepherd of the Hills, 404 N. Green St., McHenry, IL 60050. A scholarship fund for Carthage College will be set up in his name. For information, contact Colonial Funeral Home at 815-385-0063 or visit www.colonialmchenry.com. Sign the guest book at www. NWHerald.com/obits

JOANNE S. SIMES Died: July 2, 2013 HEBRON – Joanne S. Simes, of Hebron, died Tuesday, July 2, 2013. Arrangements are pending. For information, call Northern Illinois Funeral Services at 847833-2928.

Saturday, July 6, 2013 • Page B3

8FUNERAL ARRANGEMENTS Albert Ronne Baumann: The visitation will be from 1 to 5 p.m. Sunday, July 7, at Schneider-Leucht-Merwin & Cooney Funeral Home, 1211 N. Seminary Ave., Woodstock. The visitation will continue from 9 a.m. Monday, July 8, until the funeral service at 11 a.m., also at the funeral home. Inurnment will be in Linn-Hebron Cemetery in Hebron. For information, call the funeral home at 815-338-1710. William “Bill” Boetsch: The memorial visitation will be at 9 a.m. Saturday, July 6, and will conclude with a memorial service at 10:30 a.m. at Kahle-Moore Funeral Home, 403 Silver Lake Road, Cary. For information, call the funeral home at 847-639-3817. Phyllis Carolyn Butow: Graveside services will be at 11:30 a.m. Thursday, July 25, at Memorial Park Cemetery, 9900 Gross Point Road, Skokie. Jack A. Clark Jr.: The visitation will be from 3 to 9 p.m. Sunday, July 7, at DeFiore-Jorgensen Funeral Home, 10763 Dundee Road, Huntley, and from 9:30 a.m. until the funeral Mass celebration at 10:30 a.m. Monday, July 8, at St. Mary Catholic Church, 10307 Dundee Road, Huntley. Burial will be private in Memory Gardens Cemetery, Arlington Heights. For information, call 847-515-8772. Kathleen Coghlan: The graveside service will be at 11 a.m. Saturday, July 6, at Crystal Lake Memorial Cemetery, with a luncheon to follow at the Crystal Lake Holiday Inn, 800 S. Route 31. Charles H. Coleman: The funeral Mass will be celebrated at 10 a.m. Monday, July 8, at Our Lady of Assumption Catholic Church, 2222 Shopiere Road, Beloit, Wis. Burial will be in Pinnacle Hill Cemetery, Roscoe. The visitation will be from 5 to 7 p.m. Sunday, July 7, at McCorkle Funeral Home – Rockton Chapel, 767 N. Blackhawk Blvd., Rockton. Norm Craig: A memorial service will be from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. Saturday, July 13, at the Chapel at Windridge Memorial Park, Cary. Gerald “Jerry” A. Draffkorn Sr.: The funeral services will be at 10:30 a.m. Saturday, July 6, at The Church of Holy Apostles, 5211 Bull Valley Road, McHenry. Burial will be in Christ the King Cemetery in Wonder Lake. For information, call 815-6261131. Anthony Vernon Fick: The visitation will be from 4 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, July 10, at Colonial Funeral Home, 591 Ridgeview Drive, McHenry. The memorial service will be at 10 a.m. Thursday, July 11, at Shepherd of the Hills Lutheran Church, 404 N. Green St., McHenry. Interment will be private for the family. For information, contact Colonial Funeral Home at 815385-0063. Dorothy Gaydoul: The visitation will be from 9 a.m. Saturday, July 6, until the service at 11 a.m. at Ahlgrim & Sons Funeral and Cremation Services, 330 W. Golf Road, Schaumburg. Interment will be in Memory Gardens Cemetery, Arlington Heights. For information, call the funeral home at 847-8825580. Richard T. Hoffman Jr.: A celebration of Richard’s life will be at 11 a.m. Saturday, July 27, at Trinity Lutheran Church in Pell Lake, Wis. A gathering of friends will be from 10 a.m. Saturday, July 27, until the services at the church. Robert Hurley: The visitation will be from 4 to 8 p.m. Sunday, July 7, at Kisselburg-Wauconda Funeral Home, 235 N. Main St., Wauconda. Prayers will start at the funeral home at 10:30 a.m. Monday, July 8, proceeding to Transfiguration Parish, 348 W. Mill St., Wauconda, with a Mass of Christian Burial at 11 a.m. Interment will follow in Prairie Grove Cemetery. For informa-

tion, call 847-526-2115. George Richard Jackson Jr.: The visitation will continue from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, July 6, at Anderson Laws & Jones Funeral Home in Harlan, Ky. Interment will be in Park Howard Cemetery in Wallins Creek, Ky. For information, call the funeral home at 815-385-2400. William “Bill” Charles Kuester: The memorial service will be 11 a.m. Saturday, July 6, at St. Paul’s United Church of Christ, 485 Woodstock St., Crystal Lake. Immediately following the service, a luncheon will be served at the church. For information, call Saunders & McFarlin Funeral Home at 815943-5400. J. Scott LaGreca: A memorial service will be at 11 a.m. Saturday, July 6, in Arizona at Shepherd of the Hills Lutheran Church, 16150 E. El Lago Drive, Fountain Hills, Ariz. For information, call Justen Funeral Home & Crematory at 815-385-2400. Toby Shussin Levin: A public memorial gathering has been set to celebrate her life and is open to her many friends and loved ones from 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday, July 14, at Wolfe Lake Condominiums Party Room, 4820 Park Commons Drive, Minneapolis. Wilbur F. Munch: The memorial gathering will be from 10 to 11 a.m. Saturday, July 13, at Saunders & McFarlin Funeral Home, 107 W. Sumner St., Harvard. The memorial service will be at 11 a.m. Saturday, July 13, at the funeral home. There will be a graveside service at Evergreen Cemetery in Evergreen Park at 11 a.m. Tuesday, July 16. For information, call the funeral home at 815-943-5400. Leon Stanley Nowak: A memorial service will be at 1 p.m. Saturday, July 6, at West Ridge Community Church in Elgin. Ronald A. Payne: The visitation will continue from 9:30 a.m. until the funeral service at 10:30 a.m. Saturday, July 6, at First Congregational Church, 11628 E. Main St., Huntley. Burial will be in Union Cemetery, Union. For information, call 847-515-8772. Eric A. Peterson: The funeral services will be at 11 a.m. Saturday, July 6, at Haase-Lockwood & Assoc. Funeral Home in Genoa City, Wis. Interment will be in East Delavan Cemetery. Harold Francis Schaefer: There will be a memorial Mass celebration at 10 a.m. Monday, July 8, at St. John the Baptist Catholic Church in Johnsburg. For information, call 847-6588197. Dorothy L. Schifferer: The visitation will continue from 9 a.m. Saturday, July 6, until the funeral service at 10 a.m. at Apostolic Christian Church, Elgin. Burial will follow in Lakewood Memorial Park. For information, call Laird Funeral Home at 847741-8800. Joy P. Smith: The memorial visitation will begin at 2 p.m. and conclude with a service at 4 p.m. Saturday, July 6, at Kahle-Moore Funeral Home, 403 Silver Lake Road, Cary. For information, call the funeral home at 847-639-3817. Theresa E. “Tess” Tacchi: Friends and family will gather at 9:45 a.m. Saturday, July 6, at St. Margaret Mary Catholic Church, 111 S. Hubbard St., Algonquin, for a funeral Mass celebration at 10 a.m. Interment will be in All Saints Cemetery in Des Plaines. For information, call 847-253-5423. Patricia Wagner: The visitation will continue from 9 a.m. Saturday, July 6, at Colonial Funeral Home, 591 Ridgeview Drive, McHenry, until prayers at 10 a.m., leaving for the funeral Mass celebration at 10:30 a.m. at St. Mary of the Assumption Catholic Church, 1401 N. Richmond Road, McHenry. Interment will be in St. Mary’s Cemetery in McHenry. For information, call the funeral home at 815-385-0063.

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More reviews at PlanitNorthwest.com

MINI–REVIEWS & LOCAL SHOWTIMES OF CURRENT MOVIES

Saturday, July 6, 2013 • Page B4 LOCAL SHOWTIMES

ON SCREEN NOW

“After Earth” HH½ STARRING: Jaden Smith, Will Smith, Sophie Okonedo PLOT: A father and son (real–life father and son Will and Jaden Smith) are the only survivors when a spaceship crash lands on Earth one thousand years after humanity has abandoned the planet. With the father critically wounded, the son must make a perilous journey into an unfamiliar wilderness to save them. RATING: PG–13 for science–fiction action violence and some disturbing images TIME: 1 hour, 40 minutes VERDICT: Will Smith handpicked the disgraced M. Night Shyamalan to direct this science–fiction adventure, and Shyamalan delivers his best film since “The Village.” Granted, that’s awfully faint praise, but at least Shyamalan has turned things around. Despite the futuristic trappings, this is an old–fashioned wilderness survival story that carries the usual symbolism of a young protagonist’s symbolic journey into manhood.

– Jeffrey Westhoff, Northwest Herald

“The Bling Ring” HHH

STARRING: Katie Chang, Israel Broussard, Emma Watson PLOT: Inspired by actual events, a group of fame–obsessed teenagers use the Internet to track celebrities’ whereabouts in order to rob their homes. RATING: R for teen drug and alcohol use, and for language including some brief sexual references TIME: 1 hour, 30 minutes VERDICT: Everything’s relative. And so, given that a film currently at the box office is about Americans encouraged by their own government to indulge their homicidal urges one night a year – we’re talking about “The Purge” – it’s tempting to hail the clueless young burglars in “The Bling Ring,” by comparison, as veritable humanitarians. After all, they’re not out to kill or even hurt anyone. All they want is your designer shoes, your cute tops, your Rolex watches, jewelry, credit cards and cash. And unless you’re a fashionable young Hollywood celebrity, they’ll probably leave you alone anyway, because you’re not cool enough to rip off. Not that Sofia Coppola’s latest film, based on a true story about a band of affluent, celebrity–obsessed teen burglars in suburban Los Angeles, isn’t chilling. It is, and not only because it displays the soulless nature of our fame–obsessed youth culture. It’s also the fact that Coppola doesn’t judge these kids. It’s an intentional choice, and perhaps an artful one, but it makes the whole enterprise a little depressing. You think, couldn’t we have had just a BIT of condemnation here? Besides these kids’ stunning lack of awareness that they were actually, like, committing crimes, and might actually, like, get caught, and go to, like, jail (which they eventually did), what’s stunning about the story is how easy the crimes were to commit. The burglars used sites like TMZ to determine whether celebs were away from home. Addresses were readily available, and Google Earth showed the gates and doors. And many people, it seems, leave doors open – or as Hilton did, leave keys under the mat. – Jocelyn Noveck,

The Associated Press

“Despicable Me 2” HHH STARRING: Voices of Steve Carell, Kristin Wiig, Miranda Cosgrove, Benjamin Bratt PLOT: A spy agency recruits retired supervillain Gru (Carell) to track down a criminal mastermind who has stolen a nasty virus. Gru’s three adopted daughters hope to set him up with his new spy partner (Wiig). RATING: PG for rude humor and mild action TIME: 1 hour, 38 minutes VERDICT: While not as fresh or surprising as the 2010 original, this sequel otherwise suffers little drop in quality. The same creative team brings another dose of snazzy visuals, pleasing sentimentality and raucous comedy, with the madcap Minions delivering a ton of slapstick. The filmmakers integrate the 3–D effects into the comedy, turning the computer–animated cartoon into a delightful carnival ride. – Jeffrey

Westhoff, Northwest Herald

“Fast & Furious 6” HH½ STARRING: Vin Diesel, Paul Walker, Dwayne Johnson, Michelle Rodriguez PLOT: A federal agent (Johnson) recruits the hard–driving crew led by Diesel and Walker to take on a gang of high–tech hot–rodders stealing military equipment across Europe. The catch is that Diesel’s dead girlfriend (Rodriguez) is actually alive and part of the new gang. RATING: PG–13 for intense se-

THEATERS Classic Cinemas Woodstock 209 Main St., Woodstock, 815–338–8555 www.classiccinemas.com AMC Lake in the Hills 12 Randall Road, Lake in the Hills, 800–fandango www.amctheatres.com/LakeHills McHenry Downtown Theatre 1204 N. Green St., McHenry, 815–578–0500 http://cyouatthemovies.com Regal Cinemas 5600 W. Route 14, Crystal Lake, 800–fandango www.regmovies.com

RATINGS

HHHH – Excellent HHH – Recommended HH – Not recommended H – Awful quences of violence and action and mayhem throughout, and for some sexuality and language TIME: 2 hours, 10 minutes VERDICT: The longer the strangely durable “Fast & Furious” series goes on, the harder it is to hate. Although the sprawling cast plays every scene with straight faces, it becomes increasingly clear the actors are in on the joke. Don’t miss the shocking tease during the credits that makes “Fast & Furious 7” a must–see. –

Jeffrey Westhoff, Northwest Herald

“The Hangover III” HHH STARRING: Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms, Zach Galifianakis, Justin Bartha PLOT: This time, there’s no wedding. No bachelor party. What could go wrong, right? But when the Wolfpack hits the road, all bets are off. RATING: R for pervasive language including sexual references, some violence and drug content, and brief graphic nudity TIME: 1 hour, 40 minutes VERDICT: “Daring” isn’t a word you would use very much to describe 2011’s “The Hangover Part II,” the disappointingly lazy, beat–for–beat rehash of the wild and wildly successful original “Hangover” from 2009. And yet, here we are with part three, which runs a different sort of risk by going to darker and more dangerous places. It dares to alienate the very audience that made “The Hangover” the highest– grossing R–rated comedy of all time. Director and co–writer Todd Phillips signals early and often that he’s much more interested than ever before in exploring matters of real consequence rather than simply mining them for brash laughs. – Christy

Lemire, The Associated Press

“The Heat” HHH

STARRING: Sandra Bullock, Melissa McCarthy, Marlon Wayans, Michael Rappaport PLOT: An uptight FBI special agent (Bullock) must partner with an out of control Boston PD detective (McCarthy) to capture a mysterious drug kingpin. RATING: R for pervasive language, strong crude content and some violence TIME: 1 hour, 57 minutes VERDICT: A game Bullock joins with McCarthy and her “Bridesmaids” director Paul Feig in a raunchy female take on the buddy cop formula. As long as their opposing personalities clash, Bullock and McCarthy are hilarious. The formula dictates they eventually become friends, and the flint between the stars eases just as the cop story becomes predictable. The third act disappoints, but the bickering that precedes it may make you laugh until you cannot breathe.

– Jeffrey Westhoff, Northwest Herald

“The Internship” H½ STARRING: Vince Vaughn, Owen Wilson, Rose Byrne PLOT: After losing their jobs as watch salesman, a pair of hapless 40– somethings (Vaughn and Wilson) scam their way into Google’s intern program. They compete with college students 20 years their junior for full–time jobs at the Internet giant. RATING: PG–13 for sexuality, some crude humor, partying and language TIME: 1 hour, 59 minutes VERDICT: Both a particularly lazy comedy for producer and co–writer Vaughn and a two–hour recruitment ad for Google. Director Shawn Levy and Vaughn attempt to recreate the slobs vs. snobs appeal of such ’80s comedies as “Revenge of the Nerds” and “Meatballs” but fail because the script lacks any attitude besides piety for the glories of Google. You shouldn’t have to pay to see this movie; Google should pay you. –

Jeffrey Westhoff, Northwest Herald

“The Lone Ranger” H½ STARRING: Johnny Depp, Armie Hammer, William Fichtner

PLOT: Native American warrior Tonto recounts the untold tales that transformed John Reid, a man of the law, into a legend of justice. RATING: PG–13 for sequences of intense action and violence, and some suggestive material TIME: 2 hours, 29 minutes VERDICT: But Verbinski’s film, stretching hard to both reinvent an out–of–date brand and breathe new life in the Western with a desperate onslaught of bloated set pieces, is a poor locomotive for Depp’s eccentric theatrics. For 2 ½ hours, the Jerry Bruckheimer–produced “Lone Ranger” inflates, subverts and distorts the conventions of the Western until, in an interminable climax, the big–budget spectacle finally, exhaustingly collapses in a scrap heap of train wreckage. “The Long Ranger” is, alas, a runaway train. A filmmaker of great excess, Verbinski’s ricocheting whimsy here runs off the rails. Flashback–heavy plot mechanics, occasionally grim violence (bullets land in bodies with the loudest of thwacks, a heart gets eaten) and surrealistic comedy add up to a confused tone that seems uncertain exactly how to position Depp’s Tonto in the movie, to say nothing of Armie Hammer’s wayward Lone Ranger. – Jeffrey

Westhoff, Northwest Herald

“Man of Steel” HH

STARRING: Henry Cavill, Amy Adams, Michael Shannon, Russell Crowe PLOT: While still coming to grips with his powers and reeling from the revelation that he is an alien from the planet Krypton, novice superhero Clark Kent (Cavill) must face a war criminal (Shannon) from his home world, a villain with all of Superman’s powers but none of his morality. RATING: PG–13 for intense sequences of science–fiction violence, action and destruction, and for some language TIME: 2 hours, 23 minutes VERDICT: After 2006’s bland “Superman Returns” failed to reignite the most venerable of superhero franchises, Warner Bros. and director Zack Snyder (“300”) try to shake up the hero’s mythos with a reboot that takes bold liberties with his origin story. Most of Snyder’s decisions are completely wrong for the stolid character. He creates a jittery, harsh and loud would–be blockbuster, a boilerplate alien invasion tale that happens to include Superman. The few times Cavill is permitted to act like Superman, he is endearingly, quietly heroic. Cavill doesn’t deserve David S. Goyer’s overwrought script and Snyder’s wrongheaded direction. – Jeffrey Westhoff, Northwest

Herald

“Monsters University” HHH STARRING: Voices of Billy Crystal, John Goodman, Helen Mirren PLOT: Years before working at Monsters Inc., Mike (Crystal) and Sulley (Goodman) are rival freshmen at Monsters University. A crisis in their academic career forces them to become partners, but can they become friends? RATING: G TIME: 1 hour, 42 minutes VERDICT: This prequel to the 2001 Pixar gem “Monsters Inc.” is a solid and affable family comedy. It lacks the originality and heart of the early Pixar features, problems that have been niggling at the studio lately. Overall this is a spoof of campus comedies, “Revenge of the Nerds” in particular, and it generates a good deal of laughs with the inept members of Mike and Sulley’s fraternity. This prequel is fine for what it is. It’s just difficult to forget what Pixar movies once were. – Jeffrey

Westhoff, Northwest Herald

“Much Ado About Nothing” HH½ STARRING: Amy Acker, Alexis Denisof, Fran Kranz PLOT: A modern retelling of Shakespeare’s classic comedy about two pairs of lovers with different takes on romance and a way with words. RATING: PG–13 for some sexuality and brief drug use TIME: 1 hour, 47 minutes VERDICT: The lack of polish gives director Joss Whedon’s film its charm. The history of Shakespeare movie adaptations is littered with stiff productions that crack under the weight of its sacred material. That, thankfully, is definitely not an issue to Whedon’s slinky, unadorned “Much Ado,” which, if anything, is too light. – Jake Coyle, The Associ-

ated Press

“Now You See Me” HH STARRING: Jesse Eisenberg, Mark Ruffalo, Woody Harrelson, Dave Franco, Isla Fisher PLOT: An FBI agent and an Interpol detective track a team of illusionists

who pull off bank heists during their performances and reward their audiences with the money. RATING: PG–13 for language, some action and sexual content TIME: 1 hour, 56 minutes VERDICT: At the start of “Now You See Me,” a magic–themed heist movie with a high–powered cast including Morgan Freeman, Michael Caine, Mark Ruffalo, Jesse Eisenberg and Woody Harrelson, you really want to believe. The idea is fresh, the introductory scenes enticing. Plus, the actual magic performances that anchor the film are fun. But the dialogue turns formulaic, the plot gets increasingly hard to follow – even a film about magic needs an underlying logic – and character development seems to come to an utter halt. It all builds up to a dramatic reveal at the end, one that you weren’t expecting. But by then, you’ve disengaged. – Jocelyn

Noveck, The Associated Press

“The Purge” H½

STARRING: Ethan Hawke, Lena Headey, Max Burkholder PLOT: A family is held hostage for harboring the target of a murderous syndicate during the Purge, a 12–hour period in which any and all crime is legalized. RATING: R for strong disturbing violence and some language TIME: 1 hour, 25 minutes VERDICT: Characters are frequently urged to “release the beast” in “The Purge,” a high–concept home–invasion shocker set in a future where one night a year, all crime is legal. But what should be a clammy exercise in claustrophobic, queasy tension becomes, in the hands of writer/director James DeMonaco, an underpowered compendium of overfamiliar scare tactics and sledgehammer–subtle social satire. The intriguingly nightmarish premise may well rustle up a decent opening weekend for a picture that comes with the imprimatur of producer Michael Bay before the lukewarm word of mouth hastens its trip to DVD and VOD. – Neil Young, The

Hollywood Reporter

“This Is The End” HHH STARRING: Jay Baruchel, Seth Rogen, Jonah Hill PLOT: While attending a party at James Franco’s house, Seth Rogen, Jay Baruchel and many other celebrities are faced with the apocalypse. RATING: R for crude and sexual content throughout, brief graphic nudity, pervasive language, drug use and some violence TIME: 1 hour, 47 minutes VERDICT: The seemingly exhausted gross–out comedy genre gets a strange temporary reprieve with “This Is The End,” an unlikable but weirdly compelling apocalyptic fantasy in which a bunch of young stars and stars–by–affiliation jokingly imagine their own mortality. A sort–of “The Day of the Locust” centered on successful comic actors, rather than down–and–outers, facing a conflagration in Los Angeles, this is a dark farce that’s simultaneously self–deprecating, self–serving, an occasion to vent about both friends and rivals and to fret about self–worth in a cocooned environment. With everyone here officially playing themselves, the result is like a giant home movie and a reality horror show, different enough from anything that’s come before to score with young audiences. “This Is The End” goes places you don’t expect it to, exploring the guys’ rifts and doubts and misgivings just as it wallows in an extravagant lifestyle that inevitably attracts public fascination. It also expresses the anxiety and insecurity of comics conscious of the big issues in life they are expected either to avoid or make fun of in their work. Rogen and Goldberg take the latter approach here, in an immature but sometimes surprisingly upfront way one can interpret seriously. Or not. – By Todd

McCarthy, The Hollywood Reporter

“White House Down” HH STARRING: Channing Tatum, Jamie Foxx, Maggie Gyllenhaal PLOT: While on a tour of the White House with his young daughter, a Capitol police officer springs into action to save his child and protect the president from a heavily armed group of paramilitary invaders. RATING: PG–13 for prolonged sequences of action and violence including intense gunfire and explosions, some language and a brief sexual image TIME: 2 hours, 17 minutes VERDICT: Staggeringly implausible, cartoonishly comical, Roland Emmerich’s “White House Down” is refreshingly dumb. Refreshing because carefree action absurdity, once the province of the summer cinema, is on the outs. Solemnity –

“DESPICABLE ME 2” Saturday, June 6 AMC Lake in the Hills 12 – 2D: 9:15, 10:00, 10:30, 11:15, 11:45 a.m., 12:25, 1:50, 2:25, 2:55, 5:25, 5:55, 7:55, 8:25, 10:30, 12:00 a.m.; 3D: 10:45 a.m., 1:20, 4:00, 6:30, 8:55, 11:30 p.m. Classic Cinemas Carpentersville – 2D: 11:00 a.m., 12:00, 1:15, 2:15, 3:30, 4:30, 5:45, 6:45, 8:00, 9:00, 10:15 p.m.; 3D: 12:30, 2:45, 5:00, 7:15, 9:30 p.m. Classic Cinemas Woodstock – 2D: 11:00 a.m., 1:15, 3:30, 5:45, 8:00, 10:15 p.m.; 3D: 12:00, 2:15, 4:30, 6:45, 9:00 p.m. McHenry Downtown Theatre – 1:00, 4:00, 6:30, 9:00 p.m. McHenry Outdoor Theater: 9:20 p.m. Regal Cinemas – 2D: 10:00 a.m., 12:00, 12:30, 1:50, 3:20, 4:40, 5:50, 7:10, 8:20, 9:50, 10:50, 11:30 p.m.; 3D: 10:40 a.m., 11:20 a.m., 1:10, 4:00, 6:30, 9:00 p.m.

10:30 p.m.

“MONSTERS UNIVERSITY” Saturday, June 6 AMC Lake in the Hills 12 – 2D: 10:35 a.m., 1:10, 3:55, 6:40, 9:15, 11:50 p.m.; 3D: 9:55 a.m., 12:35, 3:10 p.m. Classic Cinemas Carpentersville – 2D: 11:00 a.m., 12:00, 1:20, 3:40, 6:00, 8:20 p.m.; 3D: 2:20, 4:40, 7:00, 9:20 p.m. Classic Cinemas Woodstock – 2D: 11:00 a.m., 12:00, 1:20, 3:40, 6:00, 8:20 p.m.; 3D: 2:20, 4:40, 7:00, 9:20 p.m. McHenry Downtown Theatre – 1:15, 4:15, 6:45, 8:45 p.m. McHenry Outdoor Theatre – 9:20 p.m. Regal Cinemas – 2D: 10:10, 10:50 a.m., 1:00, 1:40, 3:50, 6:40, 7:20, 9:40 p.m.; 3D: 4:30, 10:20 p.m.

“NOW YOU SEE ME” Saturday, June 6

“THE HEAT” Saturday, June 6 AMC Lake in the Hills 12 – 9:20 a.m., 12:10, 3:30, 5:15, 6:15, 8:00, 9:00, 10:45, 11:40 p.m. Classic Cinemas Carpentersville – 12:00, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30, 10:00 p.m. Classic Cinemas Woodstock – 12:00, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30, 10:00 p.m. Regal Cinemas – 10:30 a.m., 1:20, 2:30, 4:10, 5:20, 7:00, 8:10, 10:00, 11:00 p.m.

“IRON MAN 3” Saturday, June 6 Regal Cinemas – 1:25, 10:45 p.m.

“THE LONE RANGER” Saturday, June 6 AMC Lake in the Hills 12 – 9:45, 10:40 a.m., 1:00, 2:00, 4:15, 5:20, 7:45, 8:45, 9:45, 11:15 p.m. Classic Cinemas Carpentersville – 12:00, 12:50, 3:05, 3:55, 6:10, 7:00, 9:15, 10:05 p.m. Classic Cinemas Woodstock – 12:30, 3:35, 6:40, 9:45 p.m. McHenry Downtown Theatre – 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 p.m. Regal Cinemas – 10:15, 11:40 a.m., 12:50, 1:30, 3:00, 4:20, 5:00, 6:50, 7:50, 8:40, 10:10, 11:10 p.m.

AMC Lake in the Hills 12 – 1:05 p.m. Regal Cinemas – 2:25, 5:15, 8:15, 11:15 p.m.

“STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS” Saturday, June 6 Regal Cinemas – 10:20 a.m., 4:25, 7:45 p.m.

“THIS IS THE END” Saturday, June 6 AMC Lake in the Hills 12 – 4:20, 7:05 p.m. Classic Cinemas Carpentersville – 12:35, 2:55, 5:15, 7:35, 9:55 p.m. Regal Cinemas – 10:05 a.m., 1:05, 3:45, 6:35, 9:20 p.m.

“WHITE HOUSE DOWN” Saturday, June 6 AMC Lake in the Hills 12 – 9:30 a.m., 12:30, 2:50, 5:50, 8:50, 11:45 p.m. Classic Cinemas Carpentersville – 12:40, 1:10, 3:35, 4:05, 6:30, 7:00, 9:25, 9:55 p.m. Classic Cinemas Woodstock – 1:10, 4:05, 7:00, 9:55 p.m. Regal Cinemas – 10:25, 11:05 a.m., 2:05, 5:05, 8:25 p.m.

“WORLD WAR Z” “MAN OF STEEL”

Saturday, June 6

Saturday, June 6

AMC Lake in the Hills 12 – 2D: 3:45, 6:25, 9:10, 11:55 p.m.; 3D: 11:00 p.m. Classic Cinemas Carpentersville – 2D: 11:40 a.m., 2:15, 4:50, 7:25, 10:00 p.m. Classic Cinemas Woodstock – 2D: 11:45 a.m., 2:20, 4:55, 7:30, 10:05 p.m. Regal Cinemas – 2D: 10:55 a.m., 1:55, 4:45, 7:55, 10:55, 11:25 p.m.

AMC Lake in the Hills 12 – 2D: 10:10 a.m., 1:15, 4:30, 7:40, 11:10 p.m. Classic Cinemas Carpentersville – 12:00, 1:00, 3:00, 4:00, 6:00, 7:00, 9:00, 10:00 p.m. Classic Cinemas Woodstock – 12:45, 3:45, 6:45, 9:45 p.m. McHenry Outdoor Theater: 11:20 p.m. Regal Cinemas – 12:45, 3:55, 7:05, even for caped, flying men in tight– fitting trousers – is in. But there’s an inarguable, senseless pleasure in watching Jamie Foxx, as the president of the United States, kicking a terrorist and shouting: “Get your hands off my Jordans!” Hail to the chief, indeed. “White House Down” follows Antoine Fuqua’s “Olympus Has Fallen,” released in March, as the second movie this year to imagine an assault on 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. The two films are very similarly plotted, but “White House Down” is notably less serious, more content to loosen the strings and acknowledge its own inherent preposterousness. – By Jake Coyle,

The Associated Press

“World War Z” HHH STARRING: Brad Pitt, Mireille Enos, Daniella Kertesz PLOT: United Nations employee Gerry Lane traverses the world in a race against time to stop the zombie pandemic that is toppling armies and governments, and threatening to destroy humanity itself. RATING: PG–13 for intense frightening zombie sequences, violence and disturbing images TIME: 1 hour, 56 minutes VERDICT: Might there be a real zombie apocalypse one day? The way zombies have invaded our pop culture the past several years, it’s maybe a bit less implausible than it once was. What IS increasingly quite plausible, alas, is a global pandemic, and “World War Z,” the long–awaited Brad Pitt thriller, cleverly melds that real–life threat into the more fanciful zombie premise. Talk about more bang for your buck: Once you’ve settled back into your seat after a good snarling zombie chase, there’s nothing like the

thought of a SARS outbreak to get the blood racing again. Despite the much–discussed production delays and budget overruns, this movie, based on the 2006 novel by Max Brooks (son of Mel), is pretty much what you’d want in a summer blockbuster: scary but not–too–gross zombies, a journey to exotic locales, a few excellent action scenes and did we mention Pitt? As Gerry Lane, a former U.N. investigator called upon to save the planet, Pitt is a calm, intelligent presence amid the insanity. The most impressive scene is at the beginning, as the streets of Philadelphia are suddenly overrun by packs of wild, raging zombies. For an hour, the action is swift: North Korea, Israel, a harrowing plane crash. The final act takes place on a dramatically smaller scale, and at a slower pace. Oh, a reminder: Turn off those cellphones. After all, it’s not just your movie– going partner you’ll annoy here. Cellphones also happen to awaken zombies. Consider yourself warned.

– Jocelyn Noveck, The Associated Press McHenry Downtown Theatre $1 KID SUMMER SERIES ROBOTS WED, JULY 10 @ 10:00 AM

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DESPICABLE ME 2 (PG-13) (98 minutes)

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MONSTERS UNIVERSITY (G) (110 minutes)

Fri & Sat: 1:15, 4:15, 6:45, 8:45 Sun–Thurs: 1:15, 4:15, 6:45


Saturday, July 6, 2013 • Page B5

Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

July 6&7

Welcome to Plan!t Weekend planitnorthwest.com

Top 3 Picks! JULY 6 NIPPERSINK ARTS & MUSIC FESTIVAL E. SOLON ROAD, SPRING GROVE This is the second day of the festival with musicians playing a range of Folk, Americana, Bluegrass, and Rock on two stages along the Nippersink Creek. Representing artists from 7 states, Nippersink will include a rich variety of the finest fiddlers, banjo players, string, funk and jam bands. Tickets are $45 each. Music starts at 9 a.m..

1

Autumn and PlanitNorthwest.com bring you the most complete listing of events for you and your family each week! Please email Autumn at asiegmeier@shawmedia for the Planit calendar or questions.

List-a-mania! ■ AUTUMN SIEGMEIER, PLANITNORTHWEST.COM

I love all lists, from the ones I make to help keep myself organized to those in magazines, such as “Top 10 Foods All Nutritionist RecomJULY 7 mend.” So what happened when this avid list CARY FARMERS’ MARKET maker encountered the mother lode of all pop METRA COMMUTER LOT, CARY culture lists? The skies opened, a bright light shone down on a certain special magazine and This Farmers Market offers a wide selection of angels started singing “Like a Rolling Stone.” fresh fruits and vegetables, meats, cheeses, baked Really. goods, herbs, flowers, plants and much more. Runs Sundays through September 29. From 9:00 One of my favorite magazines, Entertainment Weekly, is featuring the top 100 all-time a.m. to 1:00 p.m. greatest movies, television, music, books and theater (top 50 with this category) in their carygrovechamber.com current issue. On the EW Channel on Sirius, I had heard passionate debates over the highest ranked ones in the different categories, what made the list and what was omitted. I know JULY 7 that the Golfer in My Life, Son and Daughter INDEPENDENCE DAY PARADE will roll their collective eyes when they hear CONCERT AND FIREWORKS me say this: I am not that opinionated. On DOWNTOWN CRYSTAL LAKE these topics. I definitely have strong ideas of Parade begins at 1 p.m. at City Hall, with many how things should be done in my own small favorites returning, and includes the Jesse White realm of home and work, but for entertainment, I take more of a “I like what I like and you can Tumbling Team, Crystal Lake Strikers, the South Shore Drill Team and the Sinful Saints. The Crystal like what you like” approach. For me, these EW Lake Community Band and Voices in Harmony will lists act as a great guide for things I might have missed and make me smile when my favorites perform at Main Beach Bandshell at 7 p.m. Later, the Fireworks will be at Main Beach starting at dusk. are highly ranked. nippersinkfestival.com

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clchamber.com (parade and fireworks info) and crystallakeparks.org (concert info)

Please note; we try to be as accurate as possible with our events but things are subject to change without notice. Check the listing and confirm before heading to an event.

Some personal highlights were: Pride and Prejudice: This Jane Austen classic is ranked #3 on the books list and it is my favorite. I love this so much that I have to

refrain from rereading it every six months. The love story of Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Darcy is that good. The Wire: This HBO show is their top pick for television series. I have never seen it but it is Son’s favorite. I checked the years it was on and I am pretty impressed, that at his age when it originally aired, he realized it was such an intense and complex show. This could be my next binge watching series. Bob Dylan: Since the Golfer and I both agree Bob is the best musician/songwriter ever, we were very happy to see two of his albums in the top 30 and Don’t Look Back, the documentary about his 1965 tour of England, is in the sublist of 10 Great Documentaries. Of course, there are many more of my favorites mentioned including The Sopranos, Rushmore, Purple Rain and To Kill a Mockingbird. If you get a chance, pick up a copy or go online to see the complete lists. You may agree or disagree with the rankings but these will certainly remind you of forgotten favorites and provide you with a few new ones to add to your Netflix queue or scope out at the library. And for those of you curious about the ten foods that all nutritionist recommend, they include almond milk, oatmeal, quinoa, lemon water, avocado, nuts and dark berries. Enjoy this holiday weekend! Autumn

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ADVICE

Page B6 • Saturday, July 6, 2013

Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

Teen gets a distant feeling Strength training can be from closest family members important part of fitness

Dear Abby: I’m 14, and for as long as I can remember, my family has never really been “together.” We exist with each other physically, but have never connected in a loving way. I can’t remember my father ever smiling at my mom or being happy. There seems to be an undercurrent of hostility or resentment in our relationships with each other. The lack of love in our house is palpable. I wonder sometimes what it’s like to eat dinner together at night, and what it’s like to see parents kiss because they love each other – not a stressed, distant, obligated contact. I finally asked my mother, “Why don’t you ever hug me?” Her answer was, “Because I can’t remember the last time you tried to hug ME.” I’m crying as I write this. Why doesn’t my mother understand kindness is necessary and should not be conditional? – Troubled Girl In Florida Dear Troubled Girl: Your mother may have been raised in a loveless home and not know how to easily demonstrate affection. Or her marriage to your father could be so unhappy she has shut down. You are a perceptive girl, and it is understandable you are “troubled.” But the only person who can answer the

DEAR ABBY Jeanne Phillips question you have asked me is your mother, who appears to need to receive kindness and affection before she will be able to give it. Make an effort to hug her more and the situation may improve. How very sad. Dear Abby: I’m a 33-year-old man who has screwed up his marriage. I stupidly had a fling with my wife’s 16-yearold cousin and got in trouble for it. I never lied about it because I knew it was wrong, and I am deeply sorry for it. It happened more than a year ago. I ended up serving time in jail. I love my wife. She is my best friend. We have no kids, just some great dogs and horses. We were very close until I went to jail, and the last day I was in there I got served with divorce papers. I can’t blame her for how she feels. She says she loves me but she’s too hurt to continue. I love her, and I’m devastated I can’t fix this. I have known her for 20 years, and she means so much to me. I want to save our marriage, and for the past year I have expressed repeatedly how sorry I am. Any advice? – Sorry In Tennessee Dear Sorry: Tell your wife

(if the divorce isn’t final) you are willing to do anything to save your marriage, and ask her if she would be willing to go to couple’s counseling with you. Under the circumstances, her feelings are entirely understandable. If there is any love for you left in her heart, counseling may help to get your relationship back on track. However, if she refuses, you will have to accept her decision and go on with your life, having learned a very expensive lesson. Dear Abby: I am a 23-yearold gay male who is interested in doing drag. Due to being unable to find work, I am hoping I can turn performing in drag into a source of income. I am not afraid to perform in front of crowds of people, so this could be a good idea. Do you think it is? – Potential

Superstar In Philadelphia Dear Potential Superstar: It’s not a bad idea. Your next step is to audition to see if you have the ability and the looks to succeed. While drag is a narrow niche of show business, some performers have had successful careers in that area – and you might, too. You’ll never know if you don’t give it a try. I wish you luck.

• Write Dear Abby at www.dearabby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

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lebrating 25 years of caring ith based private practice doctors you can trust ified Medical Care for the Whole Family since 1988 by appointment 815-459-2200 learn more on our web site at www.caringfamilysc.com

Dear Dr. K: I exercise regularly, running or playing tennis several times a week. I’d like to add strength training to my routine. Anything I should know before I start? Dear Reader: Strength training should be part of everyone’s exercise routine. I ignored it for years and just did aerobic exercise. Despite substantial aerobic exercise every day, and my resulting cardiovascular fitness, I noticed my muscle bulk slowly shrinking. Strength training increases muscle mass, tones muscles and strengthens bones. It helps you maintain the strength you need for everyday activities – lifting groceries, climbing stairs or rising from a chair. What’s more, it helps prevent or treat a variety of conditions, including osteoporosis, back pain, arthritis, diabetes, heart disease and obesity. Strength-training exercises build muscle by making them strain against an opposing force. Examples include pushing against a wall, lifting a dumbbell or pulling on a resistance band. Try to do strengthening exercises for all major muscle groups (legs, hips, back, chest, abdomen, shoulders

ASK DR. K Dr. Anthony Komaroff and arms) at least twice a week. Start with one set – usually 8 to 12 repetitions of the same movement – per session. Over time, work your way up to two to three sets a session. Here are some more tips to keep your strength training safe and effective: (1) Warm up and cool down for five to 10 minutes. Walking is a fine way to warm up; stretching is an excellent way to cool down. (2) Focus on form, not weight. Align your body correctly and move smoothly through each exercise. Poor form can prompt injuries and slow gains. (3) The first weight you start to lift should be a weight you can lift eight times in succession. If you can’t do that, you’ve started with too much weight. (4) Keep challenging your muscles. When it feels too easy, add weight. (5) Concentrate on slow, smooth lifts and equally controlled descents. Take three seconds to lift a weight.

Hold it for one second. Then take four seconds to slowly drop the weight. Controlling the downward movement of the weight is as important to building muscle strength as lifting up the weight. (6) Don’t be concerned if you have a little muscle soreness after you start strength training. That’s normal, and it should go away. (7) On the other hand, if the training causes sudden sharp pain anywhere, don’t try to “push through the pain.” Talk to a physical therapist or trainer; something is wrong, and you could make it worse by pushing too hard. (8) Pay attention to your breathing. Exhale as you work against resistance by lifting, pushing or pulling; inhale as you release. (9) Give your muscles at least 48 hours to recover between strength-training sessions. You can do a lot to protect your health with regular strength training – done right.

• Write to Dr. Komaroff at www.askdoctork.com or Ask Doctor K, 10 Shattuck St., Second Floor, Boston, MA 02115.

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MCC’s Fast Track program gives you the advantage you need to compete for jobs in today’s workforce. • Ideal for adult students and career-track graduates • Majority of students become employed or received one or more promotions since starting Fast Track • Classes preselected, and registration is handled for you • Attend class only once or twice per week; evening and weekend classes available Degrees: For those looking to enhance their careers or prepare for a management position Plus new certiicates in: n: • Business Management (online option available) • Computer Numeric Controls (CNC) • Construction Management • Advanced Manufacturing • Manufacturing Management • Architectural and Engineering Design • Network Security (online) Earn a certiicate while working toward a degree: “I received a promotion and doubled my salary • Business and Management Principles Certificate thanks to The Fast Track!” – Lindsey • Organizational Leadership Certificate • Construction Codes Certificate • Manufacturing Supervision Certificate • Manufacturing Processes Certificate • Bookkeeping (one semester, now on Saturdays!) For more information, call (815) 479-7831 | www.mchenry.edu/fasttrack


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

Saturday, July 6, 2013 • Page B7


Page B8 • Saturday, July 6, 2013

Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com


COMICS

Northwest Herald/NWHerald.com

Pickles

Brian Crane Pearls Before Swine

For Better or For Worse

Non Sequitur

Saturday, July 6, 2013 • Page B9

Stephan Pastis

Lynn Johnston Crankshaft

Tom Batiuk & Chuck Hayes

Wiley The Duplex

Glenn McCoy

Beetle Bailey

Mort Walker Blondie

Dean Young & Denis LeBrun

Frank & Ernest

Bob Thaves Dilbert

Scott Adams

Monty

Jim Meddick Hi and Lois

Rose is Rose

Pat Brady & Don Wimmer Arlo & Janis

Soup to Nutz

The Family Circus

Rick Stromoski Big Nate

Bill Keane

The Argyle Sweater

Scott Hilburn

Stone Soup

Grizzwells

Brian & Greg Walker

Jimmy Johnson

Lincoln Pierce

Jan Eliot

Bill Schorr


Page B10 • Saturday, July 6, 2013

LOCAL&REGION

Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com


Sports

SECTION C Saturday, July 6, 2013 Northwest Herald

Breaking news @ www.NWHerald.com

Sports editor: Jon Styf • jstyf@shawmedia.com

ON CAMPUS Barry Bottino

As excited as we are for July 11 and for everything to change for us, we have to stay even-keeled and realize that something can happen and life could go on for a little longer like this.” – Andrew Hogle, who is awaiting a kidney transplant

Lathan Goumas – lgoumas@shawmedia.com

Alden-Hebron girls basketball coach Jen Nichols and her husband, Andrew Hogle, watch players during an open-gym basketball practice in June at AldenHebron. Hogle is schedule to receive a kidney transplant Thursday, and Nichols will donate a kidney the same day.

Giving and receiving Kidney surgeries to end long journey for CL couple By JEFF ARNOLD jarnold@shawmedia.com CHICAGO – At first, Andrew Hogle wanted nothing to do with accepting a kidney from a complete stranger. There were too many concerns, too many unknowns. Hogle feared that perhaps if he were paired with a stranger in the transplant process, he would somehow receive a lessthan-perfect kidney because he was younger and in better shape while another recipient would receive a better organ. Like the one his wife, Alden-Hebron girls basketball coach Jen Nichols, has to offer. The plan from the beginning was for Nichols to donate to her husband even though her blood type wasn’t an exact match. That way, the couple figured, all of their questions about an already life-changing procedure would be answered. But when their insurance company declined to cover the cost of the surgery be-

cause the difference in blood type made the procedure experimental, Hogle learned if he wanted to receive a kidney to replace the one that he’s had issues with since his early 20s, he’d likely have to accept it from someone he didn’t know. On Thursday, Hogle – a coach with the Illinois Magic AAU basketball program and former Jacobs basketball player – is scheduled to undergo kidney transplant surgery at Northwestern Memorial Hospital. Twenty minutes later, Nichols also will go in for surgery, donating the kidney she intended for Andrew for a total stranger who – like Hogle – is in need. Just a month ago, the Crystal Lake couple were exploring options. Three weeks ago, they learned they had been accepted into a couples match program that groups donors and recipients together, creating perfect pairs. Doctors at Northwestern said the program has a 99 percent success rate. The only catch: No one knows who they

are being paired with and possibly never will. What begins as a process charted out on paper becomes one built around specifics from a series of lab tests and other medical measurables, making certain that what appeared to be a perfect fit in the beginning really is. For Hogle, who learned in October he would need a new kidney within the next year, the procedure requires a certain level of faith. “It’s a huge relief and it’s very exciting,” Hogle said Wednesday, seated in a crowded lobby on the second floor of the hospital where his surgery will take place. “But at the same time, you don’t want to get too excited because so much can happen. “As excited as we are for July 11 and for everything to change for us, we have to stay even-keeled and realize that something can happen and life could go on for a little longer like this.”

CLC graduate Pollock helps Madison Coll. finish strong The start and end of Nathan Pollock’s sophomore baseball season at Madison (Wis.) College were both memorable, but for different reasons. Pollock can still remember the team’s March trip to Florida. “I think I struck out 10 times in seven games,” said Pollock, a Crystal Lake Central graduate who will continue his career at NCAA Division I Western Illinois. “I wanted to hit 1.000. Once I realized I wouldn’t be able to do that, it made it a “We bounced lot easier.” Pollock and the back well. Our Wolfpack both hit confidence went their stride, especially in May when through the roof.” the team made a strong run through Nathan Pollock the NJCAA DiviMadison College sion II World Sebaseball player and CL ries in Enid, Okla., finishing third in Central graduate the nation. Madison (43-13) went 10-3 in the postseason and was sparked by a 2-0, firstround loss to North Iowa Area Community College in Oklahoma. “We realized we had to get our bats going,” said Pollock, who is playing this summer with the Crystal Lake Cardinals. “We bounced back well. Our confidence went through the roof.” Pollock batted .333 at nationals with four RBIs and three runs scored. He helped Madison outscore teams 33-4 in four consecutive wins through the consolation bracket, including an 8-2 victory against top-ranked LSU-Eunice, the eventual national champion. “We played our behinds off,” Pollock said. Batting fifth most of the season as the starting right fielder, Pollock earned second-team All-N4C conference honors while hitting .355 with a team-best 22 stolen bases in 23 attempts. Pollock also led the team with 13 doubles while compiling 32 RBIs, scoring 39 runs and posting a .446 on-base percentage. He helped the Wolfpack reach 40 or more wins for the fourth consecutive season and win its third N4C title in a row. But when Pollock describes his biggest improvement as a player, it is in an underappreciated part of the game. “I would say bunting,” Pollock said. “My first year here, I thought I knew how to bunt.” Thanks to Madison’s coaching staff, Pollock sharpened his skills and led the team with 22 sacrifice bunts this season.

See SURGERIES, page C2 See ON CAMPUS, page C2

‘Too good to be true’ for Marmion, NU grad CHICAGO – On every one of his soccer teams, Gerardo Alvarez was a playmaker. Club teams. Playmaker. Marmion Academy. Playmaker. Northwestern. Playmaker. On Saturday, that role will change, as will Alvarez’s life. He will share the field with global superstar Lionel Messi and a slew of other internationally famous soccer players as part of a “Messi & Friends” charity match at Soldier Field. “I’m still thinking it’s too good to be true,” said Alvarez, a 2003 graduate of Marmion. “I’m not fully going to believe it until I’m on the field. “On most of the teams I’ve ever played on, I’ve always been the playmaker, the creative mind. On this team, I already know I have to connect the passes and let those guys do the magic.”

VIEWS Tom Musick Because every one of those guys – starting with Messi – is a magician. Then again, Alvarez’s story contains some magic, as well. Up until a few weeks ago, Alvarez figured his competitive soccer-playing days were in his personal rearview mirror. He had been an all-state player at Marmion, where he earned Kane County Chronicle All-Area honors, and he carried that success to Northwestern, where he was named Co-Big Ten Freshman of the Year in 2003 and finished his college career with 28 goals, including nine game-winners. Great teams. Great memories. But, like a soccer ball, time rolls on.

Fast forward to the summer of 2013. Alvarez, 28, was working as a branch manager at Chase Bank in Woodridge (after all, the guy has a degree from Northwestern). His phone rang. On the other line was his old college coach, Tim Lenahan, who had been tabbed to be an assistant coach for one of the squads in the Messi charity game. It turned out that Messi & Friends needed a few extra players to fill out the rosters. The gist of the conversation went something like this: Lenahan: Are you free? Alvarez: Are you kidding? Since then, Alvarez has started his mornings with training runs before heading to work. He wants to be as ready as possible for his once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. At the same time, Alvarez is not stressed about playing

alongside Messi, 26, who already is a four-time FIFA Ballon d’Or award winner as the world’s best player. Alvarez is smiling. He’s laughing. He’s marveling at life’s wild surprises. Wouldn’t you be? “It’s comical that I’m going to step on the same field as Messi,” Alvarez said with a chuckle. “Only in America do you walk out of the office as a branch manager on a Friday, and you lace up your boots and you play with Messi on a Saturday.” Alvarez played coy as he brought up the subject with his father, Enrique, an avid soccer fan who lives in Yorkville. The gist of the conversation went something like this: Son: Did you hear about the game with Messi at Soldier Field? Do you want to go?

See MUSICK, page C5

AP photo

Lionel Messi waves to fans June 29 at the end of an exhibition soccer match between Messi & Friends and the Rest of the World in Medellin, Colombia. Another Messi & Friends match takes place Saturday at Soldier Field.

THE DAILY FEED Tweet from last night

What to watch

“It Just Got Real: @kobebryant has unfollowed @DwightHoward within the last hour.”

Soccer: Messi All-Stars vs. World All-Stars, 5:55 p.m., ESPN Lionel Messi is the focal point of an exhibition match featuring international and local players at Soldier Field.

– @DarrenRovell Follow our writers on Twitter: Tom Musick – @tcmusick Jeff Arnold – @NWH_JeffArnold Joe Stevenson – @NWH_JoePrepZone

Really?

3-pointers Baltimore’s Chris Davis, who has hit 32 homers, says the record he is chasing is Roger Maris’ 61, which Davis believes is the real record. “He was the last guy to do it clean,” Davis told ESPN’s Mike and Mike. From Twitter @DwightHoward

Dwight Howard reportedly changed his mind a few times Friday night before deciding to go to the Houston Rockets, according to Yahoo Sports. Here are a few others he reminds us of: 1. Brett Favre 2. Billy Donovan 3. Beaker (Muppets)


SPORTS

Page C2 • Saturday, July 6, 2013

Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

8SPORTS SHORTS

NBA NOTES

Tennis Classic sign-up ends Sunday night

Howard says he’s going to Houston

Registration for the McHenry County Tennis Classic closes at 11:59 p.m. Sunday. The Classic includes divisions for adults as well as boys and girls in singles and doubles. The singles tournament runs Thursday to July 14, the mixed doubles tournament runs July 14 to 17, and the doubles tournament runs July 18 to 21. For registration information, visit theracketclub.org.

Iguodala will sign with Warriors Howard.

The ASSOCIATED PRESS Dwight Howard said he is signing with the Houston Rockets. The All-Star center posted a message on Twitter on Friday night saying he thought Houston was “the best place for me.” “I am excited Dwight about joining the Howard Rockets and I’m looking forward to a great season,” he added. The Lakers confirmed earlier Friday that Howard would be leaving after one season. “We wish him the best of luck on the remainder of his NBA career,” general manager Mitch Kupchak said in a statement. USA Today first reported Friday that Howard would join the Rockets, where he would join All-Star James Harden to give the Rockets a potentially potent inside-outside combination. Dallas, Golden State and Atlanta were the other suitors interested in

Iguodala to Warriors: At Oakland, Calif., the Golden State Warriors have landed a coveted free agent – just not the one everybody was talking about. The Warriors reached an agreement with swingman Andre Iguodala on a $48 million, four-year deal Friday, two people with knowledge of the situation said. The people spoke on the condition of anonymity to The Associated Press because NBA rules prevent confirmation of moves until July 10. One person said the Warriors cleared more than $24 million in salary cap space by sending Richard Jefferson, Andris Biedrins and Brandon Rush to the Utah Jazz along with a package of draft picks. Yahoo Sports, which first reported the deal, said the Warriors were only taking back Kevin Murphy and his nonguaranteed $788,000 deal for next season. Utah also will receive multiple draft picks from Golden State, including its 2014 and 2017 first-round picks. The Warriors had hoped to sign Dwight Howard.

Hogle’s surgery to last 5 hours, Nichols’ 3 hours • SURGERIES Continued from page C1 On Wednesday, Hogle and Nichols left their Crystal Lake home at 5 a.m., wading through the morning rush hour crawl on Interstate 90 to be in Chicago for lab testing by 7. From there, Hogle underwent a chest X-ray before he and Nichols both had echocardiograms just to make sure there were no issues eight days before the surgeries were scheduled to take place. Then both sat through a series of meetings, making certain they understood exactly what will take place the day of their surgery, before meeting with one of the surgeons who will oversee the procedure. “This is probably the first time in my life I’ve been excited to be at a doctor’s office,” Nichols said Wednesday. “I got poked three times today, and I didn’t complain once because I know it’s for such a good cause.” Throughout the day, the couple went through various tests and informational meetings, seated in a room with as few as five other people and as many as 30 others. At different times, Hogle found himself glancing around at the faces of the other patients, unsure whether they were recipients like him or donors like Nichols. The match program is one built around strict confidentiality with each individual required to sign off on whether they’ll reveal who they are matched with as part of the couples group. At times, Hogle admitted, not knowing can be difficult. “You look at everyone in the room and say, ‘Geez, I wonder if that’s them,’ ” Hogle said. “Then Jen gets word that she’s donating to a ‘him’ and so every male that walks by, you’re wondering if that could be him. So you’re left kind of wondering.” In addition to the four couples, each group also includes a good Samaritan, a donor who is part of the program with the lone mission of helping save the life of another person. Each individual goes through similar tests, making sure they remain a good fit for the match program. For Nichols, being part of the match group is a perfect lesson in teamwork.

“You hope that they’re all as committed and as excited as you are,” said Nichols, who went through four rounds of blood testing sessions Wednesday. “At any point, any of us donors could decide we don’t want to go forward with it and that could completely change the outcome of the transplant. “So it’s one of those things you have to know what you’re working with, but stay positive at the same time.” On Thursday, Hogle’s surgery will last five hours while Nichols’ procedure will last only three. Hogle will remain hospitalized for two days afterward to make certain there are no complications, while Nichols will likely be released the next day. Once those are completed, the couple will need to participate in periodic checkups, making sure Hogle’s new kidney is functioning properly and Nichols’ remaining kidney is working fine on its own. As unnerving as their journey to this point has been at times, Hogle and Nichols say they will go into their respective surgeries at peace, knowing their lives are about to change for the better. For Hogle, who began experiencing kidney issues in his early 20s, undergoing the transplant removes much of the uncertainties he has faced since last October. His medical condition has forced him to step away from coaching for the past several months. But once his recovery is complete, he, Nichols and Hogle’s 13-year-old son, Joe, hope they can enjoy life together as a family for the first time. “Since last October, it’s just been day to day where we just change our life and make it work,” Nichols said. “Now, it’s like, wow – it’s all going to change in a week.” One question that remains is whether they’ll learn the identity of the other donor. Hogle understands that person could choose to remain anonymous. “I think it will be easier if we end up not knowing because you want to be so grateful to that person,” Hogle said. “If they don’t want to be acknowledged for doing such an amazing thing, it kind of takes a little pressure off of you.”

Hernandez grand jury to hear from shooting victim

AP photo

New Boston Celtics coach Brad Stevens takes part in a news conference Friday at the team’s training facility in Waltham, Mass.

8VIEWS

Stevens perfect fit for young Celtics By JOHN FEINSTEIN Special to The Washington Post Brad Stevens sat in a hotel coffeeshop in February on a cold Saturday morning killing time before his Butler basketball team played later that day against George Washington at Smith Center. “I guess the only thing I know for sure about the future is that I’ll be coaching against someone here in Washington,” he said with a laugh about the possibility of Butler leaving the Atlantic 10 Conference for the new Big East. “The only thing I don’t know is which building I’ll be coaching in.” Verizon Center turned out to be the building. But the opponent won’t be Georgetown. It will be the Wizards. In one of the more stunning coaching moves in years, the Boston Celtics hired Stevens as their coach Wednesday. To everyone in basketball, Danny Ainge’s way-outside-the-box decision came from nowhere. Stevens’ name had never been mentioned. At 36, he is unquestionably one of basketball’s great young coaches, but if he left Butler – considered a big if by everyone in the sport including Stevens – it was considered a given that it would be for one of the college jobs: Indiana, Duke, North Carolina, Kansas. The list might not even have been that long. Stevens had already turned down several big-time openings – including UCLA this past spring – after becoming one of the game’s bright lights in the wake of Butler’s back-toback trips to the national title game in 2010 and 2011. The thought that Stevens’ next stop might be in the NBA crossed very few minds. He loved coaching at Butler. He had grown up in the Indianapolis area, gone to college there and worked there – first as the young corporate executive he is often mistaken for, then as a coach at Butler for 13 years: the first seven as an assistant; the last six as the boss. He won 166 games in those six years helming Butler, an average of just less than 28 victories a season. If he had maintained that average for the next 30 seasons – granted, easier said than done – he would have been at 1,000 victories at 66, the same age Mike Krzyzewski, the college game’s all-time winningest coach (957 wins) is right now. There’s no doubt that money played some role in this decision. Butler was reportedly paying him about $1.2 million a year and his contract was

through 2022. That’s very good money with lots of job security. But the Celtics, according to several reports, will pay him $22 million over the next six years, meaning his salary will at least triple. Stevens has two young children and that kind of money will create a lot of financial security for them. What’s more, if the NBA doesn’t work for him, athletic directors will line up around the block for the chance to return him to the college game. Clearly, Stevens isn’t being handed the keys to a very good team. Ainge made the decision to go back to square one on draft night when he agreed to trade Kevin Garnett (who is older than Stevens), Paul Pierce and Jason Terry to the Brooklyn Nets for, in essence, three No. 1 draft picks. As of now, the Celtics are Rajon Rondo and a bunch of reasonably good role players. The days of the Big Three – Garnett, Pierce and Ray Allen – that led the Celtics to an NBA title in 2008 and the finals in 2010 are long gone. If the Celtics make the playoffs next season, Stevens should be coach of the year. More likely, they’ll be in the lottery and they can begin restocking with the first of the nine draft picks they now own in the next five drafts. That’s one reason this is such a brilliant hire. The Celtics are going to be a young team and Stevens will be the perfect young coach to mold them in the same kind of tough-minded, get-after-iton-defense culture that he nurtured so well at Butler. It’s worth remembering that one person who didn’t believe in the notion that a great college coach can’t become a great NBA coach was Red Auerbach. In 1990, he flew to Washington to meet secretly with a relatively young college coach who had made a name for himself by taking his team to four Final Fours and two national championship games in five years. Mike Krzyzewski almost took the job Auerbach offered that day – “because it was the Celtics and because it was Red Auerbach,” he said – but ultimately stayed at Duke. Auerbach wasn’t around to woo Stevens, but there’s no doubt that Ainge was able to sell him on the fact that, even when they are rebuilding, the Celtics are still the NBA’s signature franchise. Under Stevens, they will no doubt become The Celtics again. And you can bet, that, somewhere in the Boston Garden in the sky, Auerbach just lit up a cigar.

HARTFORD, Conn. – A Connecticut man who says he lost an eye after being shot by Aaron Hernandez in February was ordered Friday to appear before a grand jury in Massachusetts that is considering the murder case against the former New England Patriots tight end. Superior Court Judge Joan Alexander in Hartford ordered Alexander Bradley to appear July 17 in Fall River, Mass., where a grand jury is looking into allegations Hernandez orchestrated the shooting of Odin Lloyd, according to a clerk for the court. Lloyd, a 27-year-old semi-pro football player for the Boston Bandits, was found slain June 17 near Hernandez’s home in North Attleborough, Mass. Prosecutors say Hernandez arranged Lloyd’s shooting because he was upset at him for talking to certain people at a nightclub. Hernandez has been charged with murder in district court in Massachusetts but a grand jury indictment or probable cause hearing would be necessary for him to face trial on felony charges. Hernandez, 23, has pleaded not guilty.

Every takes lead; Lefty misses cut at Greenbrier WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS, W.Va. – The first page of the Greenbrier Classic leaderboard is filled with golfers who’ll get to do something they’re unaccustomed to lately: Playing on the weekend. Matt Every shot an 8-under 62 on Friday for a one-stroke lead over five other players midway through the Greenbrier Classic. Every needed just 26 putts during his best round of the year and is at 9 under for the tournament on the Old White TPC course. One stroke behind him at 8 under are Russell Henley (65), Bill Lunde (66), Daniel Summerhays (67), Steven Bowditch (67) and first-round co-leader Johnson Wagner (70). Others advancing to the weekend include Kenny Perry at 5 under and Tom Watson at 3 under. Phil Mickelson missed the cut.

Sagan wins Tour stage; Vande Velde out ALBI, France – Slovakian rider Peter Sagan won the hilly seventh stage of the Tour de France in a sprint finish on Friday, and Daryl Impey kept the overall race lead. Sagan held off a challenge from John Degenkolb of Germany to clinch his first stage victory in this year’s Tour and extend his lead in the contest for the sprinters’ green jersey. Italian sprinter Daniele Bennati was third. Veteran American rider Christian Vande Velde of Lemont pulled out after being caught up in an early crash – one of several that have marred a nervy start to the 100th edition of the showcase race. – Staff, wire reports

Iowa’s Fiedorowicz ranked No. 5 tight end in nation by ESPN’s Kanell • ON CAMPUS Continued from page C1 Pollock is passing on the skill when he teaches camps for 13- and 14-year-old players. “We worked on it a lot at Madison,” he said.

Hand it to this Hawkeye: Johnsburg grad C.J. Fiedorowicz has started 17 consecutive games for Iowa’s football team and made 45 catches last season.

Before the 2013 season has even started, he is drawing plenty of attention. Fiedorowicz was named the nation’s No. 5 tight end last month by ESPN college football analyst Danny Kanell on the cable network’s College Football Live show. Fiedorowicz, a 6-foot-7, 265-pound senior, was called the best blocker of the group by Kanell, who chose Washington’s Austin Sefarian-Jen-

kins as the top tight end. Fiedorowicz averaged 9.6 yards a catch last season and caught one touchdown. Last month, Fiedorowicz also was named to the 2013 College Football Performance Awards’ Tight End Trophy Watch List. CFPA uses scientific rankings to determine a player’s overall impact on his team and honors top players each season. The CFPA winners

will be announced Jan. 8, 2014. The Hawkeyes, who were 4-8 last season, open the 2013 campaign Aug. 31 against Northern Illinois. Academic all-star: Woodstock grad Thomas Wilson, a senior shortstop at Missouri Southern State, was one of 33 athletes chosen for the 2013 NCAA Division II Capital One Academic All-America Baseball Team. Wilson, a psychology ma-

jor, compiled a 4.0 grade-point average. He previously played at Elgin Community College. In two seasons at Missouri Southern, Wilson started all 104 games for the Lions. While helping the team to a 3422 record this spring, Wilson batted .304 with 25 RBIs and 12 stolen bases. Wilson’s contributions helped MSSU win the Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletics Association Tournament for the first time since

1992. The team also advanced to the NCAA tournament for the first time since 2001. • Barry Bottino writes a weekly column and a blog about local college athletes for the Northwest Herald. Write to him at BarryOnCampus@ hotmail.com, check out his On Campus blog at McHenryCountySports.com and follow him on Twitter @BarryOnCampus.


PRO TENNIS & POKER

Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

Saturday, July 6, 2013 • Page C3

WORLD SERIES OF POKER

Much has changed since Moneymaker won ’03 Main Event By KEN RITTER The Associated Press

AP photo

Novak Djokovic (left) speaks with Juan Martin del Potro after Djokovic won their Wimbledon semifinal match Friday in London.

WIMBLEDON: MEN

Epic victory for Djokovic No. 1 seed outlasts del Potro to reach final vs. Murray By EDDIE PELLS

Friday at Wimbledon

The Associated Press LONDON – Novak Djokovic might win Wimbledon this year. Juan Martin del Potro will not. No matter how it ends, both men will always have their spot in one of the most memorable matches in the storied history of the All England Club. Slugging back and forth over a semifinal-record 4 hours, 43 minutes of backbreaking tennis Friday, top-seeded Djokovic emerged with a 7-5, 4-6, 7-6 (2), 6-7 (6), 6-3 victory to move one win away from his seventh major title. “One of the most epic matches I’ve played in my life,” Djokovic said. On Sunday, Djokovic will play second-seeded Andy Murray, who defeated No. 24 Jerzy Janowicz, 6-7 (2), 6-4, 6-4, 6-3, to make his second straight Wimbledon final and move one win away from becoming the first British man in 77 years to capture his country’s home tournament. This will be their third meeting in the last four Grand Slam finals. Murray won at the U.S. Open last year, and Djokovic won in Australia this year. On Murray’s mind every bit as much, however, will be his 7-5, 7-5 win on Centre Court last year in the Olympic semifinals. “I’ll take that thought to my head when we play on Sunday,” Murray said. With skies starting to darken, the Murray match was interrupted for a half-hour while the roof was closed over Centre Court. Murray protested the delay, saying there was still sunlight left. He had other reasons, too. He had just rolled off five straight games to close out the third set after falling behind 4-1. “It’s a tough situation,” Murray said. “There were probably 45 minutes of light left. I’d like to think this is an outdoor event and you try to play as much as you can outdoors. But I managed to regain focus. I took a shower, talked to the guys a little bit and got back to it.” The late finish came courtesy of what had been billed as the undercard, but turned into something much better. Del Potro and Djokovic played the longest

LONDON – A look at Wimbledon on Friday: Men’s semifinals results: No. 1 Novak Djokovic beat No. 8 Juan Martin del Potro, 7-5, 4-6, 7-6 (2), 6-7 (6), 6-3; No. 2 Andy Murray beat No. 24 Jerzy Janowicz, 6-7 (2), 6-4, 6-4, 6-3. Stat of the day: 4 hours, 43 minutes – Length of the Djokovic-del Potro semifinal, the longest semifinal in Wimbledon history. Quote of the day: “I don’t know if the rest of the players can play like us today.” – del Potro on the high level of play in his marathon loss to Djokovic. Women’s final Saturday: No. 15 Marion Bartoli vs. No. 23 Sabine Lisicki Men’s final Sunday: No. 1 Novak Djokovic vs. No. 2 Andy Murray – The Associated Press semifinal in Wimbledon history. The match came up only five minutes short of the 2008 five-set final between Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal that’s generally considered the greatest match played on Centre Court – and perhaps anywhere. Djokovic and del Potro spent the entire, sun-drenched afternoon exchanging huge groundstrokes, long rallies and even a few laughs during their marathon, which covered five sets, 55 games, two tiebreakers and 368 points. “I think this match is going to be memory for a few years,” del Potro said. “We play for four hours and a half on a very high level. We didn’t make too many errors. I don’t know if the rest of the players can play like us today.” Eighth-seeded del Potro, back in a Grand Slam semifinal for the first time since winning the 2009 U.S. Open, saved two match points in the fourth-set tiebreaker, then won the final four points to take it 8-6. Shortly after, the match hit the 4-hour mark, guaranteeing it would surpass the 1989 match between Boris Becker and Ivan Lendl – a 4-hour, 1-minute affair – as the longest semifinal in Wimbledon’s long history. It’s not the first time Djokovic has

been involved in one of these. His 2012 Australian Open victory over Nadal lasted 5 hours, 53 minutes. Only a month ago, Nadal outlasted Djokovic at Roland Garros in a semifinal that went 4 hours, 37 minutes. “When you feel good physically, when you know you’re fit and you don’t feel a huge fatigue, that gives you mental confidence, obviously,” Djokovic said. Sliding on the grass-turned-dirt behind the baseline, doing the occasional splits and, at one point, diving for a shot, then laying on the ground, face-down in despair, Djokovic put on a stellar show, filled with 80 winners but also lots of counterpunching, always making his 6-foot-6 opponent hit one more shot. Despite the pressure of the match, both players took it for what it was: sports entertainment at its finest. Del Potro played to the crowd and also exchanged a few fun back-and-forths with his opponent. In the sixth game of the fourth set, the Argentine chased down a drop volley and flicked a forehand down the line. His momentum carried him to the other side of the court and the shot was called out. Should he challenge? “He asked me, ‘What’s going on?’ I said, ‘Listen, if I was you, I would challenge,’ ” Djokovic recounted. “He said, ‘No, but you know it’s out and don’t waste my challenge.’ I said, ‘OK, you decide whatever you want. But truly, I’m not lying to you.’ ” All this was done with smiles on their faces. Del Potro opted against the challenge but won the fourth set anyway, putting his 4-6 lifetime record in five-setters against Djokovic’s mark of 18-7. Djokovic’s fitness played a big role in landing him the decisive break in the fifth set. It came with del Potro serving behind 4-3. With the score 15-all, Djokovic hit a drop shot-lob combo to close out a breathtaking 22-shot rally. Del Potro dropped his hands onto his knees and clearly hadn’t regained his wind on the next point, when he sliced an easy backhand into the net. Two points later, Djokovic had the break, and the 5-3 lead.

WIMBLEDON: WOMEN

Allergic Lisicki awaits Bartoli, grass By CHRIS LEHOURITES The Associated Press LONDON – Sabine Lisicki is allergic to Wimbledon, sort of. Not the town in southwest London, and not the All England Club. But she does have hay fever, making her hypersensitive to the very grass for which the tournament is so famous. That affliction, of course, won’t stop her from playing in the Wimbledon final Saturday, when either she or Marion Bartoli will end up with a first Grand Slam title. “I learned how to cope with that,” Lisicki said Friday. “In the beginning, the first time I was here, which was, what, five years ago, I really was struggling with the allergies. But by now I know what to do, what to take, to calm those allergies down. I’m on medication.”

She also knows what to do on the tennis court when she steps onto the finely manicured lawn on Centre Court. On Thursday, the 23rd-seeded German rallied from a 3-0 deficit in the third set to beat Agnieszka Radwanska and reach her Sabine first major fiLisicki nal. She did the same thing in the fourth round, when she eliminated defending champion Serena Williams. “I had a lot of challenges on my way to the finals with players being aggressive, players who were very solid, moving very well,” Lisicki said. “So it will be another challenge.” Saturday’s match will be only the second time in the 45-year Open era that two

women who have never won a Grand Slam trophy will play for the championship at the All England Club. And it’s difficult to say who has the edge. Bartoli has been in this position before, reaching the 2007 Wimbledon final before losing to Venus Williams. And she hasn’t lost a set so far this year, winning all six of her matches in straight sets. But Lisicki is 3-1 against Bartoli, including a win at Wimbledon two years ago when the 23-year-old German reached the semifinals. “A final of a Grand Slam is always a matter of details. Maybe a point here, a point there will make the difference,” said Bartoli, now 28 and much more experienced than the last time she made it this far. “Maybe someone who is a bit more gutsy than the other player, someone who is having a better day than the others.”

LAS VEGAS – It’s been a decade since a 27-year-old accountant from Tennessee with the name Moneymaker ran the tables at the Main Event of the venerable World Series of Poker and helped launch a card room boom that echoes to this day. “If I can win it, anyone can,” Chris Moneymaker said after winning $2.5 million in a 2003 tournament he qualified for through an online gambling site. Moneymaker doesn’t think a novice has a chance anymore to take the top prize, which tournament official Seth Palansky said could amount this year to $9 million, depending on the number of players who ante up the $10,000 entry fee to play in the marquee event beginning this weekend. “That was the truth back then,” Moneymaker said in a telephone interview. “The game is a lot different now. In today’s game there are a lot of different levels of poker, a lot of trickeration in bet-sizing.” Moneymaker said he made up the tricky word. When Moneymaker won, the tournament was at the old Binion’s Horseshoe Hotel & Casino in downtown Las Vegas. Now it’s hosted by Caesars Entertainment Corp. at its Rio All Suites Hotel & Casino just off the Las Vegas Strip, and viewed by millions on cable TV. Play will narrow to nine finalists July 15, then stop until Nov. 4. The final table on that date will be televised by ESPN. Now 37 and a father of three, Moneymaker has competed in every World Series of Poker since he won the coveted championship bracelet. Not once has he finished in the money. But he has ridden a wave of popularity in the game to make millions playing and appearing at other tournaments around the world, and with commercial sponsorships. “I don’t think the average Joe could come in off the street anymore and win,” Moneymaker told The Associated Press. “The biggest difference is the playing styles and the creativity of the players.” And the number of poker pros, celebrities, sports stars and newcomers. More than 65,000 signed up before Wednesday, Palansky said, including players from all 50 states and 77 other countries. The all-time record is 75,672 entries in 2011. The overall prize pool this year could approach $70 million. Defending champion Greg Merson, previous winners Pius Heinz of Germany and Jonathan Duhamel of Canada, and poker personalities Phil Hellmuth, Daniel Negreanu and Phil Ivey are 44th annual

AP file photo

2003 World Series of Poker Main Event champion Chris Moneymaker plays a hand at the 2006 World Series of Poker in Las VeMain Event entrants. Actors Jason Alexander, Kevin Pollak, Ray Romano and Jennifer Tilly, Vancouver Canucks goaltender Roberto Luongo, Norway Olympic ski champion Petter Northug and pro snowboarder Torstein Horgmo are also entered. Merson, now 25, of Laurel, Md., topped a field of 6,600 players last year to win $8.5 million. There hasn’t been a repeat winner since Johnny Chan won in 1987 and 1988. His tournaments attracted fewer than 170 players. The poker frenzy that followed Moneymaker’s win was fed by players who honed their skills on the Internet. It faded a bit after a U.S. government crackdown on Internet poker in 2011, but has gotten a boost in recent months as states including Nevada, New Jersey and Delaware established rules for online gambling. “Internet poker is a net positive because it teaches players who want to try their skills here,” Palansky said. The tournament spokesman noted that many players from countries such as Italy, France and Spain learned to play online at home. The World Series of Poker also plans to go live with its Internet poker site sometime later this summer, Palansky added. The live tournament remains an ultimate challenge because of the head-to-head competition and diverse field. The game, No Limit Texas Hold’em, has made card-dealing terms like “flop,” “turn,” and “river” widely known to TV viewers. “What’s so tough is you have so many degrees of skill level and you mash them all together,” said Moneymaker, who topped 838 players to win in 2003. “A table of nine pros, you know pretty much what’s going on,” he said. “The average player today may be better than the average player 10 years ago, but 10 times the amount of players doesn’t mean 10 times as many good players.”


PRO BASEBALL

Page C4 • Saturday, July 6, 2013

Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

RAYS 8, WHITE SOX 3

AMERICAN LEAGUE CENTRAL DIVISION W L PCT Detroit 47 38 .553 Cleveland 45 41 .523 Kansas City 40 43 .482 Minnesota 36 47 .434 White Sox 34 49 .410 EAST DIVISION W L PCT Boston 53 34 .609 Baltimore 48 39 .552 New York 47 39 .547 Tampa Bay 47 40 .540 Toronto 42 44 .488 WEST DIVISION W L PCT Oakland 51 36 .586 Texas 50 36 .581 Los Angeles 41 44 .482 Seattle 38 48 .442 Houston 31 56 .356

Sox fall, waste 2 solid MLB debuts The ASSOCIATED PRESS ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. – In a disappointing loss to the Tampa Bay Rays, the White Sox took some solace that they had a couple of players make successful major league debuts Friday night. Catcher Josh Phegley drove in two runs, and Simon Castro pitched three shutout innings in their first big-league games, but all of it came after the Rays had jumped on Sox starter Dylan Axelrod in a five-run second inning of a 8-3 win over Tampa Bay. It was the seventh loss in nine games for the Sox. “It was kind of a strange feeling,” said Phegley, who drove in the Sox’s first run with a fifth-inning single off Jeremy Hellickson. “It’s the same game; you try to tell yourself that, but it was just a different atmosphere, and it was exciting and stressful and nerveracking all at the same time. I wish it would have went a little better for us, but it was an experience.” Hellickson (8-3) won his fourth consecutive start, and Jose Molina and Kelly Johnson homered during the Rays’ big inning against Axelrod, who gave up nine hits in 12/3 innings. Desmond Jennings and Luke Scott each had three of Tampa Bay’s 14 hits. “I threw some balls up and they’re hot right now, so I’ll just try to turn the page and think about my next start,”

Next for the Sox Sox at Tampa Bay, 6:15 p.m. Saturday, Fox, AM-670 said Axelrod (3-5). “I didn’t feel like I was throwing horrible pitches, but it was obviously not good enough.” Hellickson gave up one run, six hits and struck out nine in seven innings, helping the Rays win for the sixth time in seven games. Axelrod, who has given up 10 homers in 221/3 innings over his past five starts, allowed five runs. The Sox were down 7-0 by the time Phegley got his first hit and RBI. “It felt like kind of a weight lifted,” Phegley said. “[Hellickson] was really getting me with that changeup, kind of a good pitch for him. But just to get the bat on the ball and see it go though there. ... I guess I lucked out.” Phegley and center fielder Blake Tekotte, recalled from Triple-A Charlotte before the game, were both in the starting lineup. Castro allowed singles to Scott and Yunel Escobar, but struck out four of the next 10 hitters he faced. “I just feel blessed that I finally got the chance, and I’m enjoying it,” said Castro, who has spent 7½ seasons in the minor leagues.

CUBS NOTES

Control abandons Samardzija in loss By MEGHAN MONTEMURRO mmontemurro@shawmedia.com CHICAGO – Fastball command can be Jeff Samardzija’s nemesis on the mound. When Samardzija has good command, it’s tough for hitters to make contact. That wasn’t the case, however, Friday against the Pirates. Samardzija struggled keeping the ball down in the zone, and Pittsburgh Jeff made him regret miss- Samardzija ing his spots, touching him for five runs in six innings. Without an effective fastball in his arsenal, Samardzija wasn’t able to pitch aggressively . Samardzija (5-8) didn’t allow a home run, but he fell behind in the count too often and failed to put away batters in the times he was ahead. “Mix that with being behind in the count and you’re going to be in a battle with hitters all day,” Samardzija said. “When you’re in the middle of the game and understand that, you have to find ways to get outs. I thought I finished strong.” All-Star selections: The National League and American League All-Star teams will be announced Saturday, with the announcement coming at 5:30 p.m. on FOX. The Cubs will likely only

have one player on the NL team, and manager Dale Sveum believes that player should be starting pitcher Travis Wood. Although Wood has a 5-6 record, his 2.69 ERA ranks 11th in the majors. Wood also hasn’t received much run support. The Cubs average 3.18 runs when Wood is on the mound, tied for seventh worst in baseball. Wood has allowed more than three runs in only two of his 17 starts. “He’s our All-Star,” Sveum said. “He’s been the most consistent pitcher. He hasn’t had a bad outing. Knock on wood. I don’t care who you are, it’s hard to go out there and not have a hiccup along the way.” Injury update: Outfielder David DeJesus has started hitting off a tee, but it’s too soon to determine when he could be back in the lineup. DeJesus (right shoulder sprain) worked off a tee before Friday’s game against the Pirates three weeks after injuring his shoulder when he crashed into the wall at Citi Field. “He’s able to do some things, raise his arm over his head, so there’s a lot of things going good,” Sveum said. “It’s still a progression, but there’s no timetable at all.” Brian Bogusevic (hamstring) is still being evaluated, Sveum said, and remains day to day. He is one of three center fielders currently on the DL along with DeJesus and Ryan Sweeney (rib fracture).

KANSAS CITY, Mo. – Tommy Milone shut out Kansas City for eight innings, and then got in just enough trouble in the ninth to ensure that Grant Balfour would have a nice, easy save chance. Balfour gave up a run-scoring single to Billy Butler before retiring the final two batters of the game Friday night, preserving the A’s 6-3 victory and notching his 40th consecutive

GB — ½ 9 12½ 20

NATIONAL LEAGUE

AP photo

The Cubs’ Starlin Castro wipes his face Friday after he was picked off second base by Pirates catcher Russell Martin in the eighth inning of the Cubs’ 6-2 loss at Wrigley Field.

PIRATES 6, CUBS 2

No end to miscues INSIDE THE CUBS Meghan Montemurro CHICAGO – The elimination of dumb onfield mistakes is one of the most noticeable differences between the best teams in baseball and the worst. The Cubs could learn a thing or two from the Pirates, co-owners of the best record after Friday’s 6-2 win at Wrigley Field. The number of boneheaded plays the Cubs (36-48) have committed this season is approaching their win total, and they were at it again against Pittsburgh. “In baseball, every mistake stands out,” manager Dale Sveum said. Shortstop Starlin Castro was responsible for the most glaring miscue. With the Cubs trailing by four runs in the eighth inning, Castro, on second after a two-out double, was easily – and embarrassingly – picked off by Pirates catcher Russell Martin, who delivered a laser throw from home. It ended the inning, and the Cubs went down quietly in the ninth. “It’s not a smart play,” Castro said. “I feel really, really bad. That can’t happen. … I try to be aggressive, but that can’t happen.” When Sveum was questioned about the play, he was rightly exasperated by Castro’s decision to take such a large lead when he would likely score on a hit. Castro’s mistake was the Cubs’ third avoidable miscue. Center fielder Dave Sappelt took a terrible route on Neil Walker’s fly ball in the third, resulting in a triple. Walker later scored to give the Pirates the lead. The Cubs gifted the Pirates (53-32) another run that same inning when catcher Dioner Navarro tried to throw out Garrett Jones on a steal of second as Jose Tabata struck out for the second out. Instead, the throw was off-target and Andrew McCutchen, who was at third base, scored easily, credited with stealing home. “I think we have what it takes, but unfortunately it hasn’t been working out the way we want it to go,” Navarro said. In the toughest division in baseball with three teams – the Pirates, Cardinals and Reds – owning three of the best records in the majors, a combined 152-102, the Cubs have no chance at staying competitive if they don’t play better against their NL Central rivals. The Cubs have been awful in the division with an 11-26 record. Their .297 winning percentage is the lowest in the majors by any team

PIRATES 6, CUBS 2 Tipping point: The Pirates hit the ball hard against Cubs starter Jeff Samardzija, and they scored three runs in the third inning which turned a one-run deficit into a 4-2 lead. Pittsburgh never relinquished the lead. On the mound: Samardzija’s outing lacked consistent command. He gave up seven hits through two-plus innings and when the Pirates weren’t hitting the ball off him, Samardzija walked them. He left the game after throwing 103 pitches (only 59 strikes) in six innings. Samardzija allowed five runs on nine hits with five walks, one intentional and three strikeouts. At the plate: The Cubs’ only runs against left-hander Francisco Liriano and the Pirates came courtesy of Scott Hairston’s two-run homer in the second inning, which gave them a 2-1 lead. Dioner Navarro went 2 for 4 while Starlin Castro’s eighth inning double marked the Cubs’ only other hit of the game. Under the radar: The Cubs dropped to 6-40 this season when allowing four or more runs. Most of their struggles have come against division opponents. Although the Cubs are 25-22 outside the National League Central, they own a 11-26 record within the division. – Meghan Montemurro against its own division. Yes, even worse than the Marlins and Astros. “We understand we need to put a solid game together when we play them and bring our A game against those top three teams on the top of our division,” pitcher Jeff Samardzija said. “ … You can’t give them windows of opportunities. They take advantage of them. They don’t give cheap outs. They don’t make mistakes on the base paths so therefore you’ve got to be on the top of your game too.” The Cubs have given no indication they’re capable of doing that. Samardzija’s struggles getting Pirates starting pitcher Francisco Liriano out highlighted the Cubs’ problems: an RBI single after intentionally walking the No. 8 hitter in the second and a four-pitch walk to start the sixth. And the Cubs still have 39 games remaining against division opponents. Buckle up. “If you want to beat these good teams on the top of your division, pitchers can’t get hits, pitchers can’t get walked,” Samardzija said. “Bottom line.” • Meghan Montemurro covers the White Sox and Cubs for Shaw Media. Write to her at mmontemurro@shawmedia.com. Read the Sox Insider and Inside the Cubs blogs at NWHerald.com and on Twitter @Sox_Insider and @InsideTheCubs.

Balfour ties Oakland record for consecutive saves save to tie Dennis Eckersley’s franchise record. Yankees 3, Orioles 2: At New York, Vernon Wells singled in the winning run in the ninth inning, helping Ivan Nova and New York beat Baltimore for the Yankees’ season high-tying fifth straight win. Tigers 7, Indians 0: At Cleveland, Rick Porcello pitched seven sharp innings, Jhonny Peralta drove in two runs and Detroit beat Cleveland for the sixth consecutive time.

GB — 5 5½ 6 10½

Friday’s Games Tampa Bay 8, White Sox 3 N.Y. Yankees 3, Baltimore 2 Detroit 7, Cleveland 0 Toronto 4, Minnesota 0 Seattle 4, Cincinnati 2 Texas 10, Houston 5 Oakland 6, Kansas City 3 Boston at L.A. Angels, (n) Saturday’s Games White Sox (Sale 5-7) at Tampa Bay (M.Moore 11-3), 6:15 p.m. Baltimore (Tillman 10-2) at N.Y. Yankees (Pettitte 5-6), 12:05 p.m. Minnesota (Pelfrey 3-6) at Toronto (Dickey 8-8), 12:07 p.m. Oakland (J.Parker 6-6) at Kansas City (E.Santana 5-5), 1:10 p.m. Detroit (Ani.Sanchez 6-5) at Cleveland (Carrasco 0-3), 3:05 p.m. Seattle (Bonderman 1-2) at Cincinnati (Latos 7-2), 3:10 p.m. Houston (Keuchel 4-5) at Texas (Darvish 8-3), 6:15 p.m. Boston (Dempster 5-8) at L.A. Angels (Williams 5-4), 9:05 p.m. Sunday’s Games White Sox at Tampa Bay, 12:40 p.m. Baltimore at N.Y. Yankees, 12:05 p.m. Detroit at Cleveland, 12:05 p.m. Minnesota at Toronto, 12:07 p.m. Seattle at Cincinnati, 12:10 p.m. Oakland at Kansas City, 1:10 p.m. Houston at Texas, 2:05 p.m. Boston at L.A. Angels, 7:05 p.m.

MLB ROUNDUP

The ASSOCIATED PRESS

GB — 2½ 6 10 12

Blue Jays 4, Twins 0: At Toronto, Jose Bautista hit his 20th home run, Mark Buehrle pitched seven shutout innings to win for the first time in three starts, and Toronto snapped a three-game skid. Rangers 10, Astros 5: At Arlington, Texas, Nelson Cruz hit a grand slam, Nick Tepesch took a shutout into the sixth inning and Texas beat Houston. NATIONAL LEAGUE Phillies 5, Braves 4: At Phila-

delphia, Humberto Quintero and Ryan Howard hit home runs to give Cliff Lee a five-run cushion, and Philadelphia held on for a victory over Atlanta. Nationals 8, Padres 5: At Washington, Wilson Ramos drove in three runs, Gio Gonzalez won his third straight start and Washington defeated San Diego. Cardinals 4, Marlins 1: At St. Louis, Jake Westbrook worked seven strong innings, and Allen Craig had two RBIs for

a lineup that spoiled Jacob Turner’s homecoming early in St. Louis’ victory over Miami. Mets 12, Brewers 5: At Milwaukee, Kirk Nieuwenhuis drove in a career-best five runs to pace New York.

INTERLEAGUE Mariners 4, Reds 2: At Cincinnati, Nick Franklin and Michael Saunders homered to lead Seattle over Cincinnati in the Mariners’ first visit to Great American Ball Park.

CENTRAL DIVISION W L PCT Pittsburgh 53 32 .624 St. Louis 51 34 .600 Cincinnati 49 37 .570 Cubs 36 48 .429 Milwaukee 34 51 .405 EAST DIVISION W L PCT Atlanta 49 37 .570 Washington 44 42 .512 Philadelphia 42 45 .483 New York 36 47 .434 Miami 32 53 .376 WEST DIVISION W L PCT Arizona 44 41 .518 Colorado 42 44 .488 Los Angeles 40 44 .476 San Francisco 39 45 .464 San Diego 40 47 .460

GB — 2 4½ 16½ 19 GB — 5 7½ 11½ 16½ GB — 2½ 3½ 4½ 5

Friday’s Games Pittsburgh 6, Cubs 2 Philadelphia 5, Atlanta 4 Washington 8, San Diego 5 Seattle 4, Cincinnati 2 N.Y. Mets 12, Milwaukee 5 St. Louis 4, Miami 1 Colorado at Arizona, (n) L.A. Dodgers at San Francisco, (n) Saturday’s Games Pittsburgh (Morton 1-1) at Cubs (E.Jackson 4-10), 3:05 p.m. Miami (Eovaldi 1-0) at St. Louis (J.Kelly 0-3), 1:15 p.m. San Diego (Marquis 9-4) at Washington (Zimmermann 12-3), 3:05 p.m. Seattle (Bonderman 1-2) at Cincinnati (Latos 7-2), 3:10 p.m. Atlanta (Hudson 4-7) at Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 7-5), 6:15 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Fife 3-2) at San Francisco (Bumgarner 8-5), 6:15 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Marcum 1-9) at Milwaukee (Gallardo 6-8), 6:15 p.m. Colorado (Pomeranz 0-1) at Arizona (Miley 4-7), 9:10 p.m. Sunday’s Games Pittsburgh at Cubs, 1:20 p.m. Seattle at Cincinnati, 12:10 p.m. Atlanta at Philadelphia, 12:35 p.m. San Diego at Washington, 12:35 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Milwaukee, 1:10 p.m. Miami at St. Louis, 1:15 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at San Francisco, 3:05 p.m. Colorado at Arizona, 3:10 p.m.

PIRATES 6, CUBS 2 Pittsburgh ab SMarte lf 6 Walker 2b 4 McCtch cf 4 GJones 1b 4 GSnchz 1b 1 PAlvrz 3b 5 RMartn c 3 Tabata rf 5 Mercer ss 2 Liriano p 3 HRndn p 0 Borbon ph 1 Strop p 0 Totals 37

Chicago r 2 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

Pittsburgh Chicago

h 3 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 13

bi 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 5

Sappelt cf StCastr ss DNavrr c ASorin lf Ransm 3b Rizzo 1b Hairstn rf Barney 2b Smrdzj p HRdrgz p

ab 4 4 3 4 2 3 3 3 2 0

r h bi 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Totals

29 2 4 2

013 010 010 — 6 020 000 000 — 2

DP–Pittsburgh 1, Chicago 1. LOB–Pittsburgh 13, Chicago 4. 2B–R.Martin (16), St.Castro (19). 3B–Walker (3), G.Jones (1), Tabata (1). HR– Hairston (7). SB–S.Marte 2 (25), McCutchen (18), G.Jones (2). S–Liriano. IP

H

R

9

4

2

2

4

7

6 1 1 1

9 1 3 0

5 0 1 0

5 0 1 0

5 1 1 0

3 1 0 0

Pittsburgh Liriano W,8-3 Chicago Samardzija L,5-8 H.Rodriguez H.Rondon Strop

ER BB SO

HBP–by Samardzija (R.Martin). Umpires–Home, Vic Carapazza; First, Gary Cederstrom; Second, Kerwin Danley; Third, Lance Barksdale. T–2:48. A–38,615 (41,019).

RAYS 8, WHITE SOX 3 Chicago ab De Aza lf 5 AlRmrz ss 3 Morel 1b 1 Rios rf 3 C.Wells rf 1 A.Dunn dh 3 Viciedo ph 1 Kppr 1b-2b 4 Gillaspi 3b 4 Bckm 2b-ss 4 Phegly c 3 Tekotte cf 4 Totals 36

r 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 3

Chicago Tampa Bay

h 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 2 2 1 1 10

bi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 3

Tampa Bay ab 5 4 0 2 4 4 4 4 1 4 5

r h bi 2 3 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 2 1 0 1 2 1 3 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 2 1 1 1

DJnngs cf Joyce lf Fuld lf Longori 3b Loney 1b WMyrs rf Scott dh YEscor ss SRdrgz ss JMolin c KJhnsn 2b Totals

37 8 14 8

000 010 002 — 3 050 210 00x — 8

DP–Tampa Bay 1. LOB–Chicago 7, Tampa Bay 13. 2B–Rios (19), Gillaspie (9), Beckham (9), W.Myers (3), Scott (9). HR–J.Molina (2), K.Johnson (12). SB–De.Jennings 2 (13). CS– Tekotte (1). SF–Phegley, W.Myers. Chicago Axelrod L,3-5 Troncoso Purcey Si.Castro Tampa Bay Hellickson W,8-3 C.Ramos

IP

H

R

12/3 21/3 1 3

9 2 1 2

5 2 1 0

ER BB SO 5 2 1 0

0 2 3 2

1 2 1 4

7 2

6 4

1 2

1 2

0 0

9 1

WP–Purcey 2. Umpires–Home, Ted Barrett; First, Alfonso Marquez; Second, Scott Barry; Third, Mike DiMuro. T–3:25. A–15,825 (34,078).


AUTO RACING & SOCCER

Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

Saturday, July 6, 2013 • Page C5

NASCAR NATIONWIDE: FIRECRACKER 250

Kenseth pulls away at Daytona By JENNA FRYER The Associated Press DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. – Matt Kenseth pulled away from traffic on the final restart of Friday night’s Nationwide Series race, cruising to a comfortable win at Daytona International Speedway. The race was on pace to be one of the fastest in Daytona history until a late accident brought out a red-flag stoppage that lasted nearly 10 minutes. There were Matt only two laps Kenseth remaining when the race resumed and Kenseth paired up with defending Truck Series champion James Buescher on the restart. The two easily broke away from the pack, leaving everyone else racing for third place. Kenseth and Buescher weren’t challenged to the finish, with Kenseth taking the win and Buescher finishing second. It was a turn of events after the tandem of Sam Hornish Jr. and Joey Logano had dominated to lead 64 of the 101 laps. “It didn’t matter who I was pushing or who was pushing me, we couldn’t run with those two,” Kenseth said of Logano and Hornish. “But with [Buescher] pushing me, we could. We had speed. So it was important to keep him with me. He did a really good job up getting us up to the lead and putting us in a position to try to win, so I wanted to make sure I stuck with him. “He did a really, really good job pushing there.” Buescher stayed put once on Kenseth’s bumper. “We got together and went right to the front. I knew then I had to stay committed to him until the end of the race or as long as we could with the restarts,” Buescher said. “He was the first car all weekend we’ve been able to push for a long period of time.” Third went to Elliott Sadler, who picked up a $100,000 bonus from series sponsor Nationwide as the highest finishing driver in the “Dash 4 Cash” program.

AP photo

Kyle Busch stands by his car in the garage after qualifying for the pole position for Saturday’s NASCAR Sprint Cup race at Daytona International Speedway.

NASCAR SPRINT CUP: COKE ZERO 400, 6:30 P.M. SATURDAY, TNT

Busch, Kenseth sweep front row JGR teammates top 2 qualifiers for Daytona race By JENNA FRYER The Associated Press DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. – Kyle Busch and Matt Kenseth had two of the strongest cars in the season-opening Daytona 500 but had nothing to show for it after a pair of engine failures. The Joe Gibbs Racing duo is determined not to let that happen Saturday night in their return to Daytona International Speedway. Busch and Kenseth swept the front row in Friday qualifying, with Busch turning a lap at 193.723 mph to win the pole. Kenseth was second at 193.299. It’s Busch’s third pole of the season, 13th of his career, but first ever

for a restrictor plate race. “I’ve not had many opportunities for me to win poles at restrictor plate races, so I’ve got to thank the team, all the guys at Joe Gibbs Racing that did such a good job building a slick race car,” Busch said. “It’s a team effort coming to these places and having great race cars. I’m really excited to be starting up front, especially with my teammate Matt Kenseth on the front row with us.” Kenseth led 86 laps at Daytona in February and was out front with teammates Busch and Denny Hamlin right behind him when his engine failed. Two laps later, Busch was headed to the garage with his own race-ending failure. “We were lined up 1-2-3 when I broke and Kyle broke shortly after that,” Kenseth said. “Our plate stuff has been really fast this year. Qualifying doesn’t always mean a lot at a superspeedway, but it’s nice to start up front. Hopefully we can keep it up and stay in front of any potential trouble.” Clint Bowyer qualified second and

Michael Waltrip Racing teammate Martin Truex Jr. was fifth as Toyota drivers took four of the first five spots. MWR team co-owner Michael Waltrip was seventh. It was a strong showing for the Toyota drivers, who have battled various engine woes all season as manufacturer Toyota Racing Development has struggled to find the right balance of speed and durability. Kenseth was pleased with the showing. “They are always looking to get more power and you are always trying to get better reliability,” Kenseth said. “A huge part of our success all year has obviously been our engines and TRD. They are a very important piece not only to our success at Joe Gibbs Racing but also Michael Waltrip Racing.” Bowyer then interrupted Kenseth. “It’s not really fair. Yours was better than mine,” Bowyer said of being outqualified by the JGR duo. Kasey Kahne prevented a Toyota sweep by wedging his Chevrolet in

at fourth. He’s had terrible results at plate tracks this year because he was wrecked in the Daytona 500 and at Talladega by Busch. On Saturday, Kahne will start in the row behind Busch. But Busch wasn’t expecting intentional payback. “That’s a real legitimate question?” Busch said when asked if he was concerned about Kahne. “I think we know that Kasey is a lot better than that. No, it doesn’t have any worry or concern on me.” Paul Menard was sixth in a Chevrolet, and MWR co-owner Michael Waltrip was seventh in another Toyota. Daytona 500 winner Jimmie Johnson was eighth, followed by rookie Ricky Stenhouse Jr. and his RoushFenway Racing teammate Greg Biffle as the highest-qualifying Fords. Danica Patrick wound up 11th in her return to Daytona, where she became the first woman to start from the pole in the season-opening Daytona 500.

INDYCAR: POCONO

Kanaan in position to win IndyCar Triple Crown By DAN GELSTON The Associated Press

AP photo

Tony Kanaan prepares for a test session Thursday for Sunday’s Pocono IndyCar 400 in Long Pond, Pa.

LONG POND, Pa. – Tony Kanaan holds IndyCar’s version of the golden ticket. He’s driving for more than another win at Pocono Raceway – he’d move one victory closer toward earning $1 million. All Kanaan has to do is win at Pocono and Fontana to become the openwheel series’ Triple Crown winner. He won the first leg when he broke through for his first Indianapolis 500 victory in May. Oh, he took home $2,353,500 for winning Indy. Still, a million bucks for winning

three races isn’t too shabby, either. “A million dollars is always welcome, I have to say,” a laughing Kanaan said. “I’m really not thinking about the million dollars. I’m thinking, let’s go one at a time. If I win here, I’m getting closer, but it’s not guaranteed yet.” No, Kanaan didn’t put his pinkie against his lips like Dr. Evil when talking about the potential $1 million payday. But he’s the only driver eligible for the Triple Crown title and the prize money that goes with the feat. So he may as well go ahead and win Sunday’s 400-mile race at Pocono. “We’ll try and take the opportunity,” he said. While $1 million doesn’t seem like

much in a sports world where top athletes command $20 million in salary, IndyCar offers meager purses and Kanaan has won only $55,000 this season. That’s a few free throws for LeBron James. A driver who wins two of the three can win a $250,000 bonus from promotion sponsor Fuzzy’s Vodka. IndyCar ran a Triple Crown at Indianapolis, Pocono and Ontario from 1971 to 1980 and from 1981 to 1989 at Indy, Pocono and Michigan. Only Al Unser won all three races in a single season, in 1978. “Winning them all was a great gift,” Unser said. “We thought we accomplished the world when we won all three.” Unser won four 500-mile races in

a row with an Ontario victory in 1977 and wins in 1978 at Indy, Pocono and Ontario. Unser drove for Parnelli Jones in 1977 and Jim Hall in 1978. He’s rooting for Kanaan to match his feat, just like he pulled for him to at long last win at Indy. “I think Tony’s a good racer,” Unser said. “I’m an old-timer and I thought he was going to be another Lloyd Ruby and just keep racing and racing at Indy and never get to drink the milk or get his photo with the Borg-Warner trophy in Victory Lane. He knew the Speedway didn’t owe him anything like the announcers said it did. He won based on his talent, his racing skills and the team’s hard work.”

ANDRETTI FAMILY Alvarez’s family from Argentina INDYCAR: Mario wants to race with son, grandson MUSICK • Continued from page C1

Dad: Nah. Son: You should go. Dad: Nah. Son: What if I told you I was playing? “I thought he was joking,” Enrique Alvarez said. “I said, ‘You’ve got to be kidding.’ ” He wasn’t. “We’re still in shock,” Enrique Alvarez said. For Alvarez to play in the star-studded game would be a big deal regardless, but especially because his family is from Argentina. They moved here in 1991. Messi, of course, is from Argentina. You should see him again in the World Cup and the Olympics as he pur-

sues more milestones in his already remarkable career. As for Saturday, Enrique and Miriam Alvarez will be at Soldier Field to see their son. Other relatives will watch elsewhere. The game will be on ESPN starting at 5:55 p.m. It would be wrong for Alvarez’s parents to say that Saturday’s game will make them proud of their son. They already were proud of him. They have been proud of him for a long time. “We’re happy for him,” Enrique Alvarez said. Gerardo Alvarez is happy, too. He has tried to explain the significance of Saturday’s opportunity to non-soccer fans who might be unfamiliar with Messi. “Take whatever sport is

your favorite sport,” Alvarez said. “Or take your icon, your idol, growing up. And try and picture getting a phone call and asking you to go on the field and play with this person in his prime.” Alvarez laughs again. He jokes that he hopes to sign with a European team after this. “I think the only thing that can top this is meeting the pope,” Alvarez said. Ah, yes. Pope Francis. He’s from Argentina, too. Who knows? Maybe he’ll call next week.

• Northwest Herald sports columnist Tom Musick can be reached at tmusick@shawmedia.com and on Twitter @ tcmusick.

By DAN GELSTON The Associated Press LONG POND, Pa. – Mario Andretti wants one more race, family style. At 73, Andretti has been long retired from racing, and one of open wheels all-time greats hasn’t turned a competitive lap since a spectacular crash during practice for the 2003 Indianapolis 500. Andretti, though, hasn’t completely put the idea of one final race out of his mind. He’s serious when he says he wants to team up with son, Michael, and grandson, Marco, for an endurance race like the Rolex 24 Hours of Daytona or 24 Hours of Le Mans. “I’d do it,” Mario Andretti

AP photo

Marco Andretti (above) would like to team with his grandfather, Mario, in an endurance race. said. “There’s no point in me coming back unless there’s a compelling reason.” And there’s no more compelling reason than family ties on the track. Don’t start dreaming of the greatest comeback in motor sports just yet. There’s one big hitch.

“Marco would do it. Michael doesn’t want to do it,” Mario said. “He’s much younger than I am and he says he’s too old. You figure that out. But if I can convince Michael to do it, I’ll do it. I would. I still have the competitive spirit, which is good.” His grandfather’s dream of an Andretti reunion seemed like fun for 26-year-old Marco, who posted fast practice times this week at Pocono Raceway. The third-generation driver said Mario would be “up to the task,” of becoming a tagteam partner in the annual races. “He would start and finish and dad and I would do all the brunt work,” Marco Andretti said.


Page C6 • Saturday, July 6, 2013

Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com


PRO HOCKEY & FINE PRINT

Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

BLACKHAWKS

FIVE-DAY PLANNER

Rozsival, Handzus will be back Emery, Stalberg out; Khabibulin returns By TOM MUSICK tmusick@shawmedia.com CHICAGO – The Blackhawks resigned a pair of veterans and added another Friday while saying goodbye to two more members of their Stanley Cup championship team. Michal Rozsival and Michal Handzus will be back when the puck drops next season. Viktor Stalberg and Ray Emery will be elsewhere. To replace Emery, the Hawks agreed to a one-year deal with 40-year-old goaltender Nikolai Khabibulin, who won 90 games for the Hawks from 2005 to 2009. The roster moves were announced Friday during a busy day of free-agent signings across the league. Much of the Hawks’ offseason work already had been complet-

and a .923 save percentage. Although the departures of Stalberg and Emery will weaken the Hawks, their decisions to sign with other teams were expected. Stalberg signed a four-year deal with the Nashville Predators after a quiet playoff run that included two stints as a healthy scratch, while Emery signed a one-year deal with the Philadelphia Flyers because they offered him the opportunity to make more starts in net. It’s likely that Stalberg’s exit could create an opportunity for one of the Hawks’ young forwards. Ben Smith spent most of the season with the Rockford IceHogs of the AHL but filled in for Marian Hossa during a playoff game, while Brandon Pirri, Jeremy Morin and Jimmy Hayes are among other prospects eager for a chance. If Khabibulin fails to earn the No. 2 goaltender job, the Hawks could turn to Finnish prospect Antti Raanta as the backup option to No. 1 starter Corey Crawford.

ed after they had re-signed Bryan Bickell and Nick Leddy to multiyear contracts while trading Dave Bolland and Michael Frolik to clear salary-cap space. Rozsival, 34, agreed to a two-year contract after tallying 12 assists in 27 regular-season games and four assists in 23 playoff games. His deal means that the Hawks will return all seven of their top defenseman: Duncan Keith, Brent Seabrook, Niklas Hjalmarsson, Johnny Oduya, Rozsival, Leddy and Sheldon Brookbank. Handzus, 36, thrived with the Hawks after he was acquired as part of a midseason trade with the San Jose Sharks. He notched six points in 11 regular-season games with the Hawks before adding 11 points in 23 playoff games. Khabibulin’s starts have diminished in the past few seasons, but he might be effective in small doses. In 12 appearances this season with the Edmonton Oilers, he went 4-61 with a 2.54 goals-against average

NHL

Senators lose star, acquire another By LARRY LAGE The Associated Press Daniel Alfredsson bolted from the Ottawa Senators to sign with the Detroit Red Wings, sensing that was the best move he could make in his drive to win a championship before his career ends. “It’s all about trying to get the Stanley Cup,” he said. It is for Jarome Iginla, too. Iginla signed a one-year deal with the Eastern Conference champion Boston Bruins on Friday night. The longtime Calgary Flames and short-time Pittsburgh Penguins forward will make $1.8 million guaranteed and can make up to $6 million with Boston. The Senators, refusing to settle after losing Alfredsson, responded with a bold move to acquire Bobby Ryan from the Anaheim Ducks.

moves to try to extend their postseason streak to 23 and reach the Stanley Cup finals for the first time since 2009. Soon after adding Alfredsson, the Red Wings agreed to terms on a $24.5 million, five-year contract with 30-year-old center Stephen Weiss. The Toronto Maple Leafs, coming off their first postseason appearance since 2004, also made a statement by signing New Jersey Devils forward David Clarkson to a $36.75 million, seven-year deal and keeping first-line center Tyler Bozak with a $21 million, five-year deal. Tampa Bay, which cleared salary cap by buying out 33-year-old Vincent Lecavalier, agreed to a $25 million, five-year deal with 29-year-old center Valtteri Filppula to essentially replace its captain.

NHL teams made a big splash on the first day of free agency with a slew of signings and some trades. Less than a year after the league’s latest lockout, many teams spent big bucks on free agents despite knowing they will have to deal with a smaller salary cap next season. Bobby Ryan Ilya Bryzgalov and Jaromir Jagr were among the notable names hoping teams whiffed on other free agents and signed them soon. The Columbus Blue Jackets were among the big spenders, signing Nathan Horton to a $37.1 million, seven-year contract. Detroit, like Columbus, is heading to the Eastern Conference next season. The Red Wings made

HORSE RACING ARLINGTON PARK ENTRIES Saturday’s post time: 1 p.m. First, $10,500, Claiming $7,500, 3 yo’s & up, F & M (fillies and mares), Six Furlongs 1 Anychanceatadance Torres 124 9-2 2 Torbo’s Bank Roman 119 6-1 3 Lil Miss Richie Baird 119 5-2 4 Bari’s Pulpette Desormeaux 122 10-1 5 Killin Them Softly Esquivel 114 4-1 6 My Tee Time Felix 122 7-2 7 Featherinthebreeze Homeister Jr. 122 20-1 8 Real Dee Perez 122 10-1 Second, $16,000, Maiden Claiming $25,000-$20,000, 3 yo’s & up, F & M (fillies and mares), Five Furlongs 1 Orphanellie Esquivel 117 20-1 2 Raja Breeze Diego 121 15-1 3 Lilly Kisses Montalvo 121 15-1 4 Wapanucka Meza 122 8-1 5 Wildcat Devil Felix 122 4-1 6 Tactical Katie Contreras 122 3-1 7 Nevrmesswithrichie Vigil 121 5-2 8 Cartiac Arrest Roman 121 7-2 Third, $23,000, Claiming $25,000, 3 yo’s & up, Six And A Half Furlongs 1 Iolanda’s Perfect Perez 121 4-1 2 Sheriff Bart Martinez 118 10-1 3 Levy Torres 121 3-1 4 Rare Courage Esquivel 116 5-1 5 Richard’s Tune Roman 118 10-1 6 You’re My Buddy Mena 121 7-2 7 Badger Bay Geroux 121 10-1 8 Rafale (GB) Desormeaux 118 6-1 Fourth, $29,000, Claiming $50,000-$40,000, 3 yo’s & up, Six Furlongs 1 Doimakeyahappy Hill 124 4-1 2 Helooksthepart Homeister Jr. 119 5-1 3 Isle of Skye Geroux 122 2-1 4 Dina Boy Torres 119 15-1 5 Emile Montalvo 119 9-2 6 Kipling’s King Martinez 121 7-2 7 My Contender Lantz 118 10-1 Fifth, $17,000, Claiming $14,000-$12,000, 3 yo’s & up, One And One Sixteenth Miles (Turf)

6 Bet Seattle Martinez 122 10-1 7 Cherokee Lord Diego 118 12-1 8 Hogy Emigh 124 3-1 9 Global Power Desormeaux 118 10-1 Ninth, $40,000, Allowance, 3 yo’s & up, Six Furlongs 1 Reigning Catfish Martinez 118 5-1 2 Ghetto Cat Hill 121 9-2 3 Powerful Zen Desormeaux 121 6-1 4 Rappin Robby Emigh 121 10-1 5 He’saruler Torres 118 6-1 6 Radiant Day Perez 121 3-1 7 Vbreeze Diego 118 15-1 8 He Gone Geroux 121 10-1 9 Two Lions Esquivel 116 6-1 Tenth, $42,000, AOC $80,000, 3 yo’s & up, F & M (fillies and mares), Five And A Half Furlongs (Turf) 1 Remembermealways Perez 122 15-1 2 Kip Berries Martinez 124 3-1 3 Bounding Bi Torres 122 12-1 4 Little Nip Emigh 122 10-1 5 Taty’s Gold Roman 122 6-1 6 Wild Hope Perez 122 30-1 7 Palazzo Babe Geroux 122 7-2 8 Canopy Lane Hill 121 15-1 9 Kepi Mena 122 8-1 10 Cat Lore Baird 122 8-1 11 Goldway Esquivel 117 15-1 12 Royal Posh Desormeaux 122 15-1 Eleventh, $39,000, Allowance, 3 yo’s & up, One Mile (Turf) 1 Peso Desormeaux 122 4-1 2 Endurance Geroux 119 12-1 3 Tens Wild Martinez 122 30-1 4 Gabriel’s Cat Mena 121 7-2 5 Dancing Rock Esquivel 117 8-1 6 Ransom Canyon Torres 122 5-2 7 Evan’s Calling Baird 119 10-1 8 World Traveler Colvin 112 15-1 9 Franklin County Sukie 122 30-1 10 Conspiracy Hill 122 5-1 11 Breaking Ball Baird 122 3-1 12 Greengrassofyoming Mena 119 9-2 13 He’s Got to Run Esquivel 117 30-1

1 Amazing Results Perez 121 6-1 1a Hoodlum Mena 121 6-1 2 Snapped Perez 121 10-1 3 Name Dropper Roman 121 20-1 4 Voy Por Uno Mas Esquivel 114 15-1 5 Exchanging Kisses Torres 121 5-2 6 When Willy Win Geroux 121 12-1 7 Hapman Felix 121 6-1 8 Grizzled Robert Martinez 120 6-1 9 Denham Emigh 121 6-1 10 Mystic Desormeaux 121 6-1 Sixth, $11,500, Maiden Claiming $15,000-$10,000, 3 yo’s & up, F & M (fillies and mares), Six Furlongs 1 Calypsos Vengeance Perez 121 12-1 2 Don’tputmeonhold Diego 121 10-1 3 Pine Lake Esquivel 116 9-2 4 Nicosia Homeister Jr. 121 8-1 5 Where’s Wanda Lantz 121 10-1 6 Starttheballrollin Colvin 117 5-1 7 Neeli Berlyn Emigh 124 5-2 8 Ambitious Dancer Contreras 121 6-1 9 Vanity Royal Perez 124 8-1 Seventh, $20,000, SOC $20,000-$10,000, 3 yo’s & up, One and A Half Miles (Turf) 1 Bluegrass Jam Roman 121 12-1 1a Sir Kipling Colvin 114 12-1 2 Fire Cloud Geroux 121 8-1 3 Bluegrass Jet Perez 121 12-1 4 Doug Junior Esquivel 116 20-1 5 Perfectly At Home Perez 121 12-1 6 Professor Palmer Diego 121 5-2 7 Ultimate X. Desormeaux 121 4-1 8 Prairie Breeze Felix 121 12-1 9 Mec Dancer Contreras 124 9-2 10 Lemonade Kid Emigh 121 10-1 11 Bluegrass Bull Mena 121 8-1 Eighth, $100,000, Arlington Sprint, 3 yo’s & up, Five And A Half Furlongs (Turf) 1 Que Posse Homeister Jr. 118 6-1 2 Saint Leon Baird 118 5-2 3 Yankee Injunuity Hill 118 10-1 4 Batito Geroux 118 20-1 5 Chamberlain Bridge Mena 118 4-1

ARLINGTON PARK RESULTS Payouts based on $2 bet except for Trifecta (.50) and Superfecta (.10) Friday’s results First - Purse $29,000, Claiming $50,000-$40,000, 3 yo’s & up, Six Furlongs 3 Brown Eyes Blue Graham $10.20 $5.60 $3.00 2 You Bought Her Desormeaux $4.60 $2.80 4 Death by Chocolate Martinez $2.10 Race Time: 1:12.84 $2 Exacta (3-2), $34.20; $0.10 Superfecta (3-2-4-5), $34.50; $0.50 Trifecta (3-2-4), $23.60 Second - Purse $10,500, Claiming $5,000, 3 yo’s & up, Six Furlongs 1 Devout Diva Graham $5.40 $3.40 $3.20 5 Bonnie Felix $5.80 $4.40 4 Autumn Splendor Emigh $6.20 Race Time: 1:11.47 $2 Daily Double (3-1), $36.60; $2 Exacta (1-5), $41.20; $0.10 Superfecta (1-5-4-3), $78.09; $0.50 Trifecta (1-5-4), $68.25 Third - Purse $39,000, Maiden special weight, 2 yo, Five Furlongs 4 Bad Boy Peter Desormeaux$4.00 $2.80 $2.40 6 Solar Flair Torres $3.60 $2.60 1 Bobby Mac Vigil $2.80 Race Time: :58.92 $2 Daily Double (1-4), $17.40; $2 Exacta (4-6), $13.80; $0.10 Superfecta (4-6-1-2), $5.88; $0.50 Trifecta (4-6-1), $8.35; $1 Pic 3 (3-1-4), $58.40 Fourth - Purse $14,000, SOC $10,000-$5,000, 3 yo’s & up, Six Furlongs 1 A Shot Away Emigh $4.00 $2.80 $2.20 2 Telma Sanchez $5.80 $3.60

7 Retail Reger Roman $4.20 Race Time: 1:11.50 $2 Daily Double (4-1), $13.40; $2 Exacta (1-2), $17.00; $0.10 Superfecta (1-2-7-4), $12.34; $0.50 Trifecta (1-2-7), $24.60; $1 Pic 3 (1-4-1), $19.80 Fifth - Purse $48,000, Allowance, 3 yo, Five Furlongs (Turf) 4 (dh)I’m Already Sexy Geroux $4.00 $4.20 $3.00 2 (dh)Flower Spell Graham $2.60 $2.80 $2.40 1 Stoupinator Martinez $3.00 Race Time: :58.50 $2 Daily Double (1-2), $5.40; $2 Daily Double (1-4), $12.20; $2 Exacta (2-4), $11.60; $2 Exacta (4-2), $15.80; $0.10 Superfecta (2-4-1-3), $10.86; $0.10 Superfecta (42-1-3), $14.35; $0.50 Trifecta (2-4-1), $6.75; $0.50 Trifecta (4-2-1), $9.20; $1 Pic 3 (4-1-2/4), $11.40; $0.50 Pic 4 (1-4-1-2/4), $17.35 Sixth - Purse $16,000, SOC $14,000-$7,500, 3 yo’s & up, Five And A Half Furlongs 4 Luck With a Kiss Esquivel $3.40 $2.60 $2.20 5 Toro Grande Desormeaux $3.40 $2.40 2 Go Doug Go Felix $2.60 Late Scratches: Can’t Stop Ravin Race Time: 1:04.31 $2 Daily Double (2-4), $5.40; $2 Daily Double (4-4), $10.40; $2 Exacta (4-5), $11.40; $0.10 Superfecta (4-5-2-1), $2.64; $0.50 Trifecta (4-5-2), $7.30; $1 Pic 3 (1-2/4-4/6), $9.00 Seventh - Purse $24,000, Maiden Claiming $50,000$40,000, 3 yo’s & up, About One Mile (Turf) 5 Welcome Aboard Desormeaux$4.40 $2.80 $2.40 4 Wifeonthewarpath Castro $3.00 $2.60

1 Eu Te Pego Graham $2.80 Late Scratches: Nicosia, Niagara Lady Race Time: 1:40.57 $2 Daily Double (4-5), $10.00; $2 Exacta (5-4), $13.40; $0.10 Superfecta (5-4-1-2), $15.12; $0.50 Trifecta (5-4-1), $8.10; $1 Pic 3 (2/4-4/6-3/5/9), $8.70 Eighth - Purse $14,000, Claiming $16,000, 3 yo’s & up, About One Mile (Turf) 10 Tripping Desormeaux$10.20 $5.00 $3.60 12 J J’s Classic Graham $4.20 $3.40 4 Dani Nikki Geroux $6.40 Late Scratches: Blooming Flower Race Time: 1:38.97 $2 Daily Double (5-10), $32.00; $2 Exacta (10-12), $32.60; $0.10 Superfecta (10-12-4-2), $251.69; $0.50 Trifecta (1012-4), $78.95; $1 Pic 3 (4/6-3/5/9-10), $23.90 Ninth - Purse $10,500, Claiming $7,500, 3 yo’s & up, Six And A Half Furlongs 7 Lisa’s Mad Again Esquivel $6.40 $3.60 $3.00 2 Gostosa Contreras $5.80 $4.80 3 Secret Violet Graham $4.40 Race Time: 1:19.37 $2 Daily Double (10-7), $33.00; $2 Exacta (7-2), $52.80; $1 Super High 5 Jackpot (7-2-3-5-1), $599.60 Carryover $18,619.00; $0.10 Superfecta (7-2-3-5), $39.25; $0.50 Trifecta (7-2-3), $61.30; $1 Pic 3 (3/5/9-10-7), $43.10; $0.50 Pic 4 (4/6-3/5/9-10-7), $45.25; $0.50 Pic 5 (2/44/6-3/5/9-10-7), $88.05; $1 Pic 6 (1-2/4-4/6-3/5/9-10-7), $1.40; $1 Pic 6 (1-2/4-4/6-3/5/9-10-7), $373.20; $0.10 Pick 9 Jackpot (3-1-4-1-2/4-4/6-3/5/9-10-7), $394.49 Carryover $27,655.00

GOLF PGA TOUR GREENBRIER CLASSIC Friday At The Greenbrier Resort, The Old White TPC Sulphur Springs, W.Va. Purse: $6.3 million Yardage: 7,287; par 70 Second Round Matt Every 69-62—131 -9 Daniel Summerhays 65-67—132 -8 Bill Lunde 66-66—132 -8 Steven Bowditch 65-67—132 -8 Russell Henley 67-65—132 -8 Johnson Wagner 62-70—132 -8 Ben Curtis 67-66—133 -7 Greg Owen 67-66—133 -7 Tommy Gainey 62-71—133 -7 Jonas Blixt 66-67—133 -7 Jimmy Walker 69-65—134 -6 Tag Ridings 65-69—134 -6 Brendon de Jonge 66-68—134 -6 James Driscoll 66-68—134 -6 Jordan Spieth 67-67—134 -6 D.H. Lee 66-68—134 -6 Kenny Perry 68-67—135 -5 D.A. Points 70-65—135 -5 Ted Potter, Jr. 69-66—135 -5 Brian Davis 67-68—135 -5 Kevin Chappell 67-68—135 -5 Chad Campbell 69-66—135 -5 Matt Jones 69-66—135 -5 Rory Sabbatini 70-65—135 -5

Saturday, July 6, 2013 • Page C7

Louis Oosthuizen Bill Haas Neal Lancaster Brendan Steele Morgan Hoffmann Martin Flores Jeff Overton Pat Perez Erik Compton Ben Crane Jason Kokrak David Lingmerth Brian Stuard Davis Love III Scott Stallings Bubba Watson George McNeill Tom Watson Alistair Presnell Peter Hanson Webb Simpson Tim Petrovic Jin Park Richard H. Lee John Senden Charlie Wi Dicky Pride Brian Harman Luke List K.J. Choi Scott Brown Justin Leonard Tom Gillis Bryce Molder Gary Christian Robert Streb

67-68—135 68-67—135 65-71—136 66-70—136 69-67—136 71-65—136 68-68—136 71-65—136 69-67—136 66-70—136 66-71—137 71-66—137 71-66—137 67-70—137 70-67—137 68-69—137 66-71—137 68-69—137 68-69—137 66-71—137 64-73—137 69-68—137 64-73—137 68-70—138 70-68—138 73-65—138 72-66—138 68-70—138 71-67—138 71-67—138 66-72—138 68-70—138 67-71—138 71-67—138 71-67—138 69-70—139

-5 -5 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -1

Andres Romero D.J. Trahan Shawn Stefani Carl Pettersson Billy Horschel Ryan Palmer Cameron Percy Andres Gonzales Jim Herman Michael Kim Brad Fritsch James Hahn Chez Reavie Fabian Gomez Gary Woodland Nick Watney Cameron Tringale Graham DeLaet William McGirt Troy Matteson Brad Adamonis

68-71—139 70-69—139 70-69—139 69-70—139 69-70—139 68-71—139 71-68—139 71-68—139 72-67—139 70-69—139 68-71—139 72-67—139 70-69—139 70-69—139 69-70—139 72-67—139 73-66—139 69-70—139 69-70—139 69-70—139 68-71—139

-1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1

EUROPEAN PGA TOUR FRENCH OPEN Friday At Le Golf National (Albatross) Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, France PUrse: $3.91 million Yardage: 7,331; Par: 71 Second Round Fabrizio Zanotti, Paraguay 68-68—136 Thomas Bjorn, Denmark 68-69—137 Soren Kjeldsen, Denmark 69-68—137

Richard Sterne, South Africa Simon Dyson, England Stephen Gallacher, Scotland G. McDowell, Northern Ireland Graeme Storm, England Eduardo De La Riva, Spain Richard Green, Australia Scott Jamieson, Scotland Felipe Aguilar, Chile Alejandro Canizares, Spain Jamie Donaldson, Wales David Howell, England Richie Ramsay, Scotland Kristoffer Broberg, Sweden Chris Doak, Scotland Scott Henry, Scotland James Morrison, England Matthew Nixon, England Gareth Shaw, Northern Ireland Lee Slattery, England Marc Warren, Scotland Bernd Wiesberger, Austria Also Soren Hansen, Denmark Matteo Manassero, Italy Luke Donald, England Anders Hansen, Denmark Martin Kaymer, Germany Ian Poulter, England G. Fernandez-Castano, Spain Miguel Angel Jimenez, Spain Matt Kuchar, United States Francesco Molinari, Italy

68-69—137 70-68—138 68-70—138 69-69—138 70-68—138 72-67—139 69-70—139 69-70—139 68-72—140 71-69—140 70-70—140 69-71—140 69-71—140 72-69—141 71-70—141 73-68—141 69-72—141 68-73—141 72-69—141 71-70—141 69-72—141 70-71—141 75-67—142 73-69—142 71-73—144 66-78—144 68-76—144 73-71—144 74-71—145 69-76—145 70-75—145 71-74—145

TEAM

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

PITTSBURGH 3:05 p.m. WGN AM-720

PITTSBURGH 1:20 p.m. WGN AM-720

at White Sox 7:10 p.m. WCIU AM-720

L.A. ANGELS 7:05 p.m. CSN AM-720

L.A. ANGELS 7:05 p.m. WGN AM-720

at Tampa Bay 6:15 p.m. Fox AM-670

at Tampa Bay 12:40 p.m. CSN AM-670

CUBS 7:10 p.m. CSN AM-670

at Detroit 6:08 p.m. WCIU AM-670

at Detroit 6:08 p.m. CSN AM-670

KANSAS CITY 2 p.m. ESPN

CLUB AMÉRICA* 7:30 p.m. ESPN2

at New York 2 p.m. WCIU

WASHINGTON 11:30 a.m.

* U.S. Open Cup

ON TAP SATURDAY TV/Radio

MAJOR LEAGUE LACROSSE 7 p.m.: Charlotte at Boston, ESPN2

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL Noon: Baltimore at N.Y. Yankees or Minnesota at Toronto, MLBN 3 p.m.: Pittsburgh at Cubs, WGN, AM-720 5:30 p.m.: All-Star Game Selection Show, Fox 6 p.m.: White Sox at Tampa Bay, Fox, AM-670 9 p.m.: Colorado at Arizona or Boston at L.A. Angels, MLBN

HIGH SCHOOL LACROSSE 8 p.m.: Under Armour All-America Game, ESPNU

MOTORSPORTS 2 p.m.: AMA, RedBud National, NBC 3 p.m.: AMA, RedBud National, NBCSN

SOCCER

AUTO RACING 7 a.m.: Formula One, qualifying for Grand Prix of Germany, NBCSN 2 p.m.: American Le Mans Series, Northeast Grand Prix, ESPN2 5 p.m.: NHRA, qualifying for Summit Racing Equipment Nationals, ESPN2 6:30 p.m.: NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Coke Zero 400, TNT

10:45 a.m.: FIFA U-20 World Cup, quarterinal, France vs. Uzbekistan, ESPNU 1:45 p.m.: FIFA, U-20 World Cup, quarterinal, Spain vs. Uruguay, ESPNU 6 p.m.: Exhibition, Messi All-Stars vs. World All-Stars, ESPN 10 p.m.: MLS, Seattle at Vancouver, NBCSN

GOLF

TENNIS

7 a.m.: European PGA Tour, French Open, third round, TGC Noon: PGA Tour, The Greenbrier Classic, third round, TGC 2 p.m.: PGA Tour, The Greenbrier Classic, third round, CBS

BETTING ODDS

CYCLING 7 a.m.: Tour de France, Stage 8, NBC

AUTO RACING

GLANTZ-CULVER LINE Major League Baseball FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG National League Pittsburgh -135 at Cubs at St. Louis -170 Miami at Washington -180 San Diego at San Francisco -145 L.A. Dodgers at Milwaukee -140 N.Y. Mets Atlanta -120 at Philadelphia at Arizona -150 Colorado American League at Tampa Bay -145 White Sox at N.Y. Yankees -115 Baltimore at Toronto -210 Minnesota at Kansas City -105 Oakland Detroit -140 at Cleveland at Texas -280 Houston at L.A. Angels -115 Boston Interleague at Cincinnati -220 Seattle

8 a.m.: The Wimbledon Championships, women’s championship, ESPN

LINE +125 +160 +170 +135 +130 +110 +140 +135 +105 +190 -105 +130 +240 +105 +200

BASKETBALL WNBA EASTERN CONFERENCE W L Pct Atlanta 10 1 .909 Sky 7 4 .636 New York 5 6 .455 Washington 5 6 .455 Connecticut 3 7 .300 Indiana 3 7 .300 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L Pct Minnesota 7 3 .700 Phoenix 8 4 .667 Los Angeles 7 4 .636 Seattle 5 6 .455 San Antonio 3 7 .300 Tulsa 3 11 .214

GB — 3 5 5 6½ 6½ GB — — ½ 2½ 4 6

Saturday’s Games San Antonio at Los Angeles, 4 p.m. Connecticut at Indiana, 6 p.m. Seattle at Washington, 6 p.m. Sunday’s Games Sky at New York, 2 p.m. Phoenix at Minnesota, 6 p.m.

SOCCER MLS EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF GA Montreal 9 4 3 30 30 24 New York 8 7 4 28 25 24 Philadelphia 7 5 6 27 29 28 Kansas City 7 5 6 27 24 18 Houston 6 6 5 23 19 18 New England 5 5 6 21 19 14 Fire 6 7 3 21 18 23 Columbus 5 8 5 20 22 23 Toronto FC 2 8 7 13 17 24 D.C. 2 13 3 9 8 29 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF GA Real Salt Lake 10 5 4 34 29 18 FC Dallas 8 3 7 31 27 22 Portland 7 1 9 30 28 16 Los Angeles 8 7 3 27 27 22 Vancouver 7 5 5 26 27 25 Colorado 7 7 5 26 23 22 Seattle 7 5 3 24 21 17 San Jose 5 8 6 21 20 30 Chivas USA 3 10 4 13 15 31 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. Saturday’s Games San Jose at New England, 6:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Houston, 8 p.m. Seattle FC at Vancouver, 10 p.m. Sunday’s Games Sporting Kansas City at Fire, 2 p.m. Portland at Columbus, 4 p.m. Chivas USA at Montreal, 6 p.m. D.C. United at Colorado, 8:30 p.m. FC Dallas at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m.

NWSL Saturday’s Games Washington at Sky Blue FC, 6 p.m. Boston at Portland, 9:30 p.m.

NASCAR SPRINT CUP

NASCAR NATIONWIDE

COKE ZERO 400 LINEUP

SUBWAY FIRECRACKER 250 RESULTS

After Friday qualifying; race Saturday At Daytona International Speedway Daytona Beach, Fla. Lap length: 2.5 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 193.723 mph. 2. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 193.299. 3. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 193.158. 4. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 193.154. 5. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 193.129. 6. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 193.075. 7. (55) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 193.058. 8. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 193.009. 9. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 192.984. 10. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 192.947. 11. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 192.93. 12. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 192.901. 13. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 192.876. 14. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 192.864. 15. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 192.802. 16. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 192.798. 17. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 192.724. 18. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 192.715. 19. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 192.715. 20. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 192.583. 21. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 192.522. 22. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 192.489. 23. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 192.448. 24. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 192.439. 25. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 192.197. 26. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 192.152. 27. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 191.877. 28. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 191.755. 29. (7) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 191.546. 30. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 191.306. 31. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 190.795. 32. (36) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 190.735. 33. (51) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 190.726. 34. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 190.375. 35. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 190.202. 36. (95) Scott Speed, Ford, 189.853. 37. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, Owner Points. 38. (34) David Ragan, Ford, Owner Points. 39. (32) Terry Labonte, Ford, Owner Points. 40. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, Owner Points. 41. (83) David Reutimann, Toyota, Owner Points. 42. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, Owner Points. 43. (33) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, Owner Points.

Friday At Daytona International Speedway Daytona Beach, Fla. Lap length: 2.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) Top finishers 1. (19) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 101 laps, 120.1 rating, 0 points, $83,290. 2. (17) James Buescher, Chevrolet, 101, 98.1, 0, $58,475. 3. (9) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 101, 110.4, 42, $46,600. 4. (7) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 101, 112.8, 0, $33,075. 5. (1) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 101, 98.1, 40, $38,800. 6. (13) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 101, 92.9, 39, $30,850. 7. (5) Sam Hornish Jr., Ford, 101, 133.5, 39, $28,710. 8. (11) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 101, 105.2, 37, $27,670. 9. (14) Joey Logano, Ford, 101, 114.8, 0, $20,550. 10. (8) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 101, 67.4, 35, $27,100. 11. (15) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 101, 105.8, 0, $19,325. 12. (6) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 101, 94.2, 33, $24,775. 13. (18) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 101, 90.3, 32, $24,250. 14. (21) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 101, 75.4, 30, $23,725. 15. (16) Michael Annett, Ford, 101, 75.4, 29, $24,075. 16. (23) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 101, 84.6, 28, $23,650. 17. (4) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 101, 69.4, 28, $23,325. 18. (27) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 101, 63.8, 26, $23,000. 19. (30) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 101, 75, 25, $22,875. 20. (12) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 101, 79.4, 24, $23,250. Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 145.767 mph. Time of Race: 1 hour, 43 minutes, 56 seconds. Margin of Victory: 0.189 seconds. Caution Flags: 4 for 16 laps. Lead Changes: 31 among 14 drivers. Lap Leaders: T.Pastrana 1; B.Scott 2; A.Dillon 3; Ku.Busch 4; A.Dillon 5-8; S.Hornish Jr. 9-22; M.Kenseth 23; S.Hornish Jr. 24-31; R.Smith 32; S.Hornish Jr. 33-36; B.Vickers 37-38; S.Hornish Jr. 39-42; B.Vickers 43; S.Hornish Jr. 44-52; E.Sadler 53-54; S.Hornish Jr. 55-60; J.Allgaier 61; S.Hornish Jr. 62-64; J.Buescher 65; Ku.Busch 66; S.Hornish Jr. 67-74; T.Bayne 75; J.Logano 76-77; B.Vickers 78; J.Logano 79; K.Larson 80-81; M.Kenseth 82; S.Hornish Jr. 83; M.Kenseth 84-89; S.Hornish Jr. 90-93; M.Kenseth 94-101.

FOOTBALL ARENA LEAGUE NATIONAL CONFERENCE Central Division W L T Pct PF Rush 8 6 0 .571 776 San Antonio 8 6 0 .571 607 Iowa 6 9 0 .400 700 West Division W L T Pct PF x-Arizona 12 2 0 .857 914 Spokane 10 4 0 .714 935 San Jose 10 4 0 .714 785 Utah 5 9 0 .357 705 AMERICAN CONFERENCE South Division W L T Pct PF x-Jacksonville 10 5 0 .667 791

PA 750 675 719 PA 660 734 717 769 PA 728

Tampa Bay 7 7 0 .500 Orlando 5 9 0 .357 New Orleans 4 10 0 .286 Eastern Division W L T Pct y-Philadelphia 9 5 0 .643 Pittsburgh 3 11 0 .214 Cleveland 2 12 0 .143

787 749 721 800 637 812 PF 832 557 633

PA 689 767 811

x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division Saturday’s Games Rush at Philadelphia, 6:05 p.m. Pittsburgh at Cleveland, 6 p.m. Arizona at Orlando, 6 p.m. Spokane at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. New Orleans at Utah, 8 p.m. San Antonio at San Jose, 9:30 p.m.

TRANSACTIONS PROS BASEBALL American League WHITE SOX — Designated C Hector Gimenez for assignment. Optioned OF Jordan Danks to Charlotte (IL). Recalled C Josh Phegley and OF Blake Tekotte from Charlotte. DETROIT TIGERS — Reinstated OF Matt Tuiasosopo from the 15-day DL. Optioned OF Avisail Garcia to Toledo (IL). HOUSTON ASTROS — Agreed to terms with LHP Kent Emanuel on a minor league contract. KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Requested unconditional release waivers on OF Jeff Francoeur. MINNESOTA TWINS — Designated RHP P.J. Walters for assignment. Reinstated RHP Mike Pelfrey from the 15-day DL. NEW YORK YANKEES — Sent 3B Alex Rodriguez to Tampa (FSL) for a rehab assignment. TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Sent 3B Brett Lawrie to Lansing (MWL) for a rehab assignment. National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS — Optioned RHP Chaz Roe and OF Tony Campana to Reno (PCL). Recalled LHP Tyler Skaggs and RHP Charles Brewer from Reno. ATLANTA BRAVES — Optioned RHP Cory Gearrin to Gwinnett (IL). Transferred LHP Jonny Venters to the 60-day DL. Reinstated RHP Luis Ayala from the 15-day DL. LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Assigned RHP Carlos Marmol outright to Albuquerque (PCL). NEW YORK METS — Recalled RHP Greg Burke and 1B Ike Davis from Las Vegas (PCL). Designated RHP Brandon Lyon for assignment. SAN DIEGO PADRES — Optioned RHP Burch Smith to Tucson (PCL). Reinstated

INF Everth Cabrera from the 15-day DL. HOCKEY National Hockey League BLACKHAWKS — Signed G Karri Ramo to a two-year contract and C Corban Knight to a two-year, entry-level contract. Traded a 2014 fifth-round draft pick to St. Louis for D Kris Russell. Re-signed C Greg Nemiscz to a one-year contract. ANAHEIM DUCKS — Traded F Bobby Ryan to Ottawa for RW Jakob Silfverberg, F Stefan Noesen and a 2014 first-round draft pick. Signed F Saku Koivu to a oneyear contract. CALGARY FLAMES — Signed G Karri Ramo to a two-year contract and C Corban Knight to a two-year, entry-level contract. Traded a 2014 fifth-round draft pick to St. Louis for D Kris Russell. Re-signed C Greg Nemiscz to a one-year contract. CAROLINA HURRICANES — Agreed to terms with D Mike Komisarek and G Anton Khudobin on one-year contracts. COLORADO AVALANCHE — Signed D Andre Benoit to a one-year contract. COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS — Signed RW Nathan Horton to a sevenyear contract and Fs Cody Bass and Ryan Craig, G Jeremy Smith and D Thomas Larkin. DALLAS STARS — Signed G Dan Ellis to a two-year contract. DETROIT RED WINGS — Agreed to terms with F Daniel Alfredsson on a one-year contract. Agreed to terms with F Stephen Weiss on a five-year contract. Signed F Luke Glendening to a one-year, two-way contract. EDMONTON OILERS — Traded C Shawn Horcoff to Dallas for D Philip Larsen and a 2016 seventh-round draft pick. Signed D Andrew Ference to a fouryear contract. FLORIDA PANTHERS — Agreed to terms with D Mike Mottau on a one-year, two-way contract.

MINNESOTA WILD — Signed D Keith Ballard. Re-signed D Jared Spurgeon. NASHVILLE PREDATORS — Signed F Viktor Stalberg to a four-year contract. Signed G Carter Hutton to a one-year contract. NEW YORK ISLANDERS — Re-signed G Evgeni Nabokov C Peter Regin to one-year contracts. Agreed to terms with RW Pierre-Marc Bouchard on a one-year contract. OTTAWA SENATORS — Signed F Clarke MacArthur to a two-year contract. PHILADELPHIA FLYERS — Signed G Ray Emery and G Yann Danis to one-year contracts and C Claude Giroux to an eight-year contract. PHOENIX COYOTES — Signed G Thomas Greiss to a one-year contract, C Mike Ribeiro to a four-year contract and D Michael Stone to a three-year contract. Re-signed F Kyle Chipchura to a multiyear contract and D Chris Summers to a one-year contract. PITTSBURGH PENGUINS — Signed D Rob Scuderi to a four-year contract. SAN JOSE SHARKS — Re-signed D Scott Hannan to a one-year contract. Signed F Tyler Kennedy to a two-year contract. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING — Signed F Geoff Walker to a one-year, two-way contract and F Jonathan Drouin to a three-year, entry-level contract. Signed C Valtteri Filppula to a five-year contract. TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS — Agreed to terms with C Tyler Bozak on a five-year contract. VANCOUVER CANUCKS — Signed F Brad Richardson and D Yannick Weber.

COLLEGE UAB — Named Bill Lansden senior associate athletic director for external affairs.


Page C8 • Saturday, July 6, 2013

Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com


Business

SECTION E APPEARS INSIDE TODAY

Page E3

Breaking news @ www.NWHerald.com

Business editor: Chris Cashman • ccashman@shawmedia.com

THE MARKETS 147.29 15,135.84

Saturday, July 6, 2013 Northwest Herald

8BUSINESS ROUNDUP

“I really enjoy talking with the guys and keeping this old tradition from dying out.”

Employers add 195K jobs; unemployment 7.6 pct.

Scott Strack, owner of Strack’s Barber Shop in Algonquin 35.71 3,479.38

16.48 1,631.89

OIL

$103.24 a barrel +$2.00

THE STOCKS Stock

Abbott Labs AbbVie AGL Resources Allstate

Apple AptarGroup AT&T Bank of Montreal Baxter CME Group Coca-Cola Comcast Covidien Dean Foods Dow Chemical Exelon Exxon Facebook Ford General Motors Google Hillshire IBM JPMorganChase Kohl’s Kraft Foods Group Live Nation McDonald’s Microsoft Modine Moto Solutions OfficeMax Pepsi Pulte Homes Safeway Sears Holdings Snap-On Southwest Air. Supervalu Target United Contint. Wal-Mart Walgreen Waste Mgmt. Wintrust Fincl.

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34.92 42.72 42.65 49.13 417.42 56.62 35.83 58.35 69.88 77.61 40.52 41.70 58.27 10.12 32.69 29.74 91.57 24.37 16.70 34.67 893.49 33.02 194.93 53.99 52.75 55.24 15.95 99.86 34.21 12.01 57.93 10.91 80.80 18.59 24.24 42.13 92.07 12.79 6.82 70.25 31.80 75.21 44.25 40.75 39.99

+0.67 +0.49 +0.10 +0.66 -3.38 +0.74 +0.21 +0.67 +0.48 +1.90 +0.03 +0.55 +0.51 +0.02 +0.26 -0.34 +0.88 -0.15 +0.27 +0.53 +7.06 +0.25 +1.68 +1.22 +0.64 -0.27 +0.05 -0.49 +0.20 +0.29 +0.67 +0.21 +0.07 -0.56 +0.66 -0.11 +1.45 +0.08 +0.11 +0.87 +0.57 +0.45 +0.13 +0.57 +0.74

COMMODITIES Metal

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Gold Silver Copper

1221.60 18.855 3.072

-30.30 -0.845 -0.1025

Grain (cents per bushel) Close

Corn Soybeans Oats Wheat

684.75 1588.00 399.25 656.00

Kyle Grillot – kgrillot@shawmedia.com

Mike Olsen of Algonquin has his hair cut Friday by Scott Strack at Strack’s Barber Shop in Algonquin.

Antiques make the cut Strack’s Barber Shop keeps old-school traditions alive By OLIVIA GILBERTSEN ogilbertsen@shawmedia.com ALGONQUIN – Scott Strack opened Strack’s Barber Shop in Algonquin two and a half years ago with the intent of keeping the old-time, retro barber shop alive. Although the shop has only two barber chairs, business is steadily increasing, so much so that there is occasionally a two-hour wait. Plus, hours have expanded from five days a week to seven. “I’m trying to keep the old-school barber shops from fading away,” Strack said. “The antiques kind of give the shop an old-time feel which is appealing to my clientele. A lot of clients are older gentlemen and it brings back memories for them.” Strack’s Barber Shop has antiques ranging from Strack’s interest in the outdoors to antique barber gear. “The two chairs are antiques. My chair is a Paidar from the year my father was born, 1946.” The other chair in the shop is an 1890s wooden barber chair made by Kochs. “It was one of the first hydraulic barber chairs made,” Strack said. The shop also features a 1930s Michigan cash register which is hand carved and a large assortment of antique straight razors. “The oldest straight razor I have is from the 1790s,” he said. “All of our aftershaves are also retro brands which the old nostalgic clients really enjoy,” Strack added. Antiques always have been something that interested Strack, especially antique barber items. “I like the antiques because they

WASHINGTON – U.S. employers added a robust 195,000 jobs in June and many more in April and May than previously thought. The job growth suggests a stronger economy and makes it more likely the Federal Reserve will slow its bond purchases before year’s end. The unemployment rate remained 7.6 percent because more people started looking for jobs – a healthy sign – and some didn’t find them. The government doesn’t count people as unemployed unless they’re looking for work. Pay also rose sharply last month and is outpacing inflation, the Labor Department’s monthly jobs report Friday showed. Average hourly pay rose 10 cents in June to $24.01. Over the past 12 months, it’s risen 2.2 percent. Over the same period, consumer prices have increased 1.4 percent. The economy has added an average 202,000 jobs a month for the past six months, up from 180,000 in the previous six. Hiring and consumer confidence have risen despite higher taxes and federal spending cuts that kicked in this year. Friday’s report showed the economy added 70,000 more jobs in April and May than the government had previously estimated – 50,000 in April and 20,000 in May. Average hourly pay rose 10 cents to $24.01, 2.2 percent higher than a year ago.

Chrysler minivan recall for side air bag defect

Kyle Grillot – kgrillot@shawmedia.com

Frank Trnka of Algonquin has his hair cut at Strack’s Barber Shop in Algonquin.

Strack’s Barber Shop What: A traditional barber shop that offers both current and classic haircut styles Where: 1109 S. Main St., Algonquin Information: Call 847-658-6948

remind me of simpler times,” he said. Strack said he has very few women who get their hair cut in his shop. “This is generally a men’s place, more like a traditional barber shop. Gals can go to the salon. We like to run it like a locker room. If a dirty joke slips out, we don’t want the clients to have to worry,” he said with a laugh. Strack’s offers both current and classic haircut styles.

“The classic cuts are making a comeback which I enjoy,” Strack added. Cuts for seniors and children cost $12 – as do buzz cuts. All other cuts are $15. He takes walk-ins, however straight razor shaves are by appointment only. The shop is small and cozy and that is the way Strack likes it. “We could expand if necessary but I really like my location. I grew up in Algonquin and it’s an honor to bring back the way it used to be,” he said. “I really enjoy talking with the guys and keeping this old tradition from dying out. I am proud of what I do,” Strack said.

AUBURN HILLS, Mich.– Chrysler is recalling 282,000 minivans from the 2013 model year because the side air bags can deploy on the wrong side in a crash. Side air bags are supposed to deploy on the side of the vehicle that’s involved in a crash. Chrysler says a software problem is causing its air bags to deploy on the opposing side of the vehicle. Affected models are the Dodge Grand Caravan, Chrysler Town and Country and Ram Cargo Van. The campaign involves 224,000 vehicles in the U.S.; 49,300 in Canada; 2,900 in Mexico and 5,300 elsewhere. Chrysler says it began investigating the issue after a customer complaint. The company says there has been one minor injury related to the defect. Chrysler will notify affected customers. Dealers will reprogram the software for free.

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Urban beer revival creates small business hubs By TALI ARBEL AP Business Writer

Livestock

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Live cattle Feeder cattle Lean hogs

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NEW YORK –To see how a small business can transform a neighborhood, just follow the barrels. About 30 years ago, beer lovers wanting to create their own drinks started taking over abandoned old buildings in rundown city districts, refitted them with tanks, kettles and casks, and started churning out beer. The byproduct was a boom in craft beer drinkers: Barrels shipped have more than doubled in the past decade, according to trade publication Beer Marketer’s Insights. Craft beer now makes up nearly 7 percent of the slow-growing U.S. beer market. But beer drinkers weren’t the only beneficiaries. The arrival of a craft brewery was also often one of the first signs that a neighborhood was changing. From New England to the West Coast, new businesses bubbled up around breweries, drawing young people and creating a vibrant community where families could plant roots and small businesses could thrive. It happened in Cleveland. Once an industrial powerhouse, the Rust Belt city has been losing residents since the 1950s. Manufacturing jobs disappeared. The city nearly went bankrupt in 1978. Marred by abandoned buildings and boardedup stores after several hard decades, the downtown Ohio City neighborhood, just west of the

AP photo

Brewer Ethan Elston prepares to add ingredients while making a batch of Harpoon India Pale Ale at the Harpoon Brewery in the Seaport District of Boston. Cuyahoga River, which divides Cleveland, was “perceived as dangerous and blighted” into the 1980s, says Eric Wobser. He works for Ohio City Inc., a nonprofit that promotes residential and commercial development while trying to preserve the neighborhood’s older buildings. Enter Great Lakes Brewing, which opened in 1988. Over the years, it’s built a brewery and a brewpub from structures that once housed a feed

store, a saloon and a livery stable. “We resurrected all of them,” says Pat Conway, who founded Great Lakes with his brother, Daniel. “We’ve beautified the neighborhood, provided a stunning restoration.” Other breweries and businesses – a pasta maker, a bike shop, a tortilla factory, as well as restaurants and bars – followed. Newcomers are flocking to the neighborhood, even though Cleveland’s overall population is still declining. The city repaved the quiet street next to the brewery, Market Avenue, with cobblestones, and poured millions into renovating the West Side Market, whose origins date back to the 19th century. Today, more than 100 vendors sell produce, meat, cheese and other foods there. What’s going on in Cleveland is happening across the country. Trendy small businesses like breweries and younger residents have been returning to downtown neighborhoods in many cities across the U.S. The biggest cities are growing faster than the suburbs around them, according to Census data. Another benefit of the brewery boom: Manufacturers like brewers typically pay workers more than service businesses like restaurants or shops do. That’s good for local economies.

• See BEER, page E2


BUSINESS

Page E2 • Saturday, July 6, 2013

Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

Galaxy S4: Vivid color, vibrant performance

Samsung forecasts record profit

The fight for mobile supremacy continues as Samsung’s latest entry, the Galaxy S4 from Verizon, steps into the ring. How does it stand up to the competition? Weighing just 4.6 ounces, the Galaxy S4 feels smooth and lightweight in the hand. Its generous 5-inch 1080p Super AMOLED screen bursts with color, perfect if you’re looking for a smartphone that can handle video and games but still fits in your pocket. It has a peppy quad-core 1.9GHz Snapdragon 600 processor with 2GB of RAM, more than adequate to handle your on-the-go needs. The model I tested comes with 16GB of on-board memory and includes a microSD slot for the storage-hungry. Duration of battery charge depends on usage. I had no trouble, but if your experience differs you may want to try some battery-saving techniques like reducing the screen brightness and turning off Internet access when not in use. I found no lag in response time when running apps or using Samsung’s easy-to-learn touch gestures. However, I didn’t have as much success with Samsung’s touted Air Gestures and Air View, which allow you to navigate without touching the screen. These features aren’t supported by every app, and where

By YOUKYUNG LEE AP Technology Writer SEOUL, South Korea – Samsung Electronics Co. on Friday estimated its AprilJune operating profit at a record high of $8.3 billion. That is a 47 percent jump from a year earlier and 8 percent growth from the previous quarter. Samsung said sales grew 20 percent to $50 billion. Sales of the latest iteration of Samsung’s flagship smartphone, the Galaxy S4, hit 10 million units in May, less than a month since its debut. Sales of the S4 hit the 10 million mark about 20 days faster than the previous model. Analysts say high marketing costs probably weighed on Samsung’s mobile business despite the robust sales in the first month. The popularity of Galaxy smartphones has fueled Samsung’s year-long string of record quarterly earnings. But worries have emerged that Samsung’s profit growth will slow as developed countries, which are the biggest buyers of high-end phones, near a smartphone saturation point. It has become harder to impress buyers with new features in upgraded models as most smartphones offer similar functions. Fewer wow factors in new smartphones mean people will not upgrade as quickly as they did when the devices were still a novelty, forcing device makers such as Samsung to spend more on splashy advertising and marketing. Another concern is that Samsung is increasingly relying on its mobile business for growth. Samsung’s division that makes and sells mobile phones, tablet computers and cameras contributed 75 percent of its operating income in the first quarter of this year. Analysts surveyed by FactSet said 60 percent of Samsung’s second-quarter sales likely came from the mobile business.

they are, they’re not as reliable as touch gestures. Similarly, Smart Scroll and Smart Pause sound helpful in theory but lose much in the practice. Both track your eye movements to determine when you are looking at the screen. Smart Scroll lets you tilt the phone to scroll, while Smart Pause pauses what you’re watching when you look away from the screen. They’re not perfect, but perhaps future versions will be more precise. The Galaxy S4 runs Android 4.2 Jelly Bean. Samsung augments your Android experience with its own S Apps including S Memo, S Translator, S Voice, and S Health, a fitness app. Of course, you have the entire Google Play store at your disposal as well. Samsung Hub promises to be your one-stop shop for music, video, and books, though people may be getting those elsewhere. Samsung Link allows you to view and transfer content between multiple devices and your computer. The Galaxy S4’s menus are refreshingly intuitive, with default options including email, calendar, apps, In-

ternet, and messaging. This being Android, you can customize any way you wish. The Menu and Back buttons at the bottom of the device only light when active, which can be confusing if you don’t realize they’re there. Other features of the Galaxy S4 include NFC and LTC, plus two cameras, a 13-megapixel rear camera with flash and another 2-megapixel camera in the front. You can edit photos from the device, or use Story Album to create your own professionally-printed albums. You can also use Erasure Mode to crop out that person who accidentally walked into your photo. I was pleased to see that Verizon is calling security to the forefront with its VZ Security service. You can opt for the free basic version, which gives you antivirus plus McAfee SiteAdvisor which checks for bad web links. If you opt for the $1.99/month Premium version, you’ll also get the ability to lock or erase the device, locate it with alarm and GPS, and examine apps for privacy. Samsung wants the Galaxy S4 to be your go-to device for mobile communication and entertainment. Once again they’ve delivered a solid performer that is simple enough for a beginner, yet flexible for the advanced user.

bought by developers who Hindy says won’t renew the lease. He suspects that they want to convert the space into apartments. The landlord, Solomon Jacobs, says he doesn’t yet know what’s going to happen with the lease. But Hindy is already scouting other, cheaper neighborhoods in Brooklyn. “We sowed the seeds of our own demise here,” Hindy says. Gentrification is pressuring at least one other nearby brewer. Kelly Taylor, who owns Kelso, is looking for new space in Brooklyn or the Bronx because he thinks his landlord won’t renew the lease in 2017. In Kelso’s neighborhood, the Clinton Hill section of Brooklyn, home prices have almost doubled over the past 10 years, according to Miller Samuel data. “He’ll tear down and build something more lucrative,” Taylor says speculatively of his landlord. However, the building’s manager, Fred Sanders, says the lease was just renewed last year for five more years, and he hasn’t had any conversations with Kelso about the future. Even if the brewery owners don’t have confirmation that they’ll be forced to move, history shows they have reason to be concerned. Win-

ifred Curran, a geography professor at DePaul University in Chicago, studies how gentrification changes cities. She wrote her graduate-school dissertation on how gentrification in Brooklyn’s Williamsburg neighborhood affected small manufacturers. Small businesses struggled to stay put while developers converted factories and warehouses into lucrative lofts and swarms of wealthy new residents drove up prices, she says. She warns that the appeal of revitalized neighborhoods can decimate small businesses, both old and new. “You can try to use the establishment of manufacturing businesses to be the wedge that allows gentrification to happen, but then you need to protect those businesses,” Curran says. Otherwise “the market creates this demand for industrial space and then kills the goose that laid the golden egg.” Outside of New York, costs are lower, and many brewery owners in other cities say they haven’t felt similar pressures from developers. But New York flashes a warning sign for what can happen when neighborhoods become popular. One brewery, in Boston, is relatively protected. Harpoon Brewery opened on the South Boston waterfront in 1986, when it was surrounded

TECH REVIEW Triona Guidry

• BEER Continued from page E1 But for some, the bubbles are bursting. In Brooklyn, N.Y., breweries are feeling the heat from rising real estate costs. When Brooklyn Brewery opened in the Williamsburg section of the borough in 1996, its neighbors were mostly deserted warehouses and factories. Today, Brooklyn Brewery is surrounded by modern apartment buildings, trendy bars, shops and restaurants. There’s still some graffiti, but that hasn’t deterred the influx of new residents willing to spend a lot of money to live there. In the past decade, home values in the Brewery’s neighborhood have more than doubled — up 145 percent, according to real estate appraiser Miller Samuel. Rising prices might force Brooklyn Brewery to exit the trendy scene it jump-started. It has two buildings in Williamsburg, the brewery and a building across the street where it stores and ages its beer. Leases are up in 2025, and Brooklyn Brewery’s co-founder and president, Steve Hindy, is already worried that the company will get kicked out of its warehouse. Once an iron foundry, the building, built in 1896, has been

AP photo

A picture of Samsung Electronics’ Galaxy S4 smartphone is seen on the screen at a showroom of its headquarters in Seoul, South Korea. • Triona Guidry is a freelance writer and IT specialist. Her Tech Tips blog (http://www.guidryconsulting.com/techtips) offers computer help and social media advice. She can be reached at info@guidryconsulting. com or via Twitter @trionaguidry.

by auto body shops and little else. Now the brewery draws more than 85,000 people a year from tours and tastings. These days, the city is focused on redeveloping the area. New apartment and office buildings, restaurants and a convention center sit nearby. Harpoon recently negotiated a 50-year lease with the city. The rent will rise over time, but generally, long leases provide protection from spikes that can happen when an area becomes so popular that property values skyrocket. On the country’s other coast, the tech boom has made one brewpub’s growth plans more complicated. The 21st Amendment brewery, in San Francisco, is two blocks from the Giants’ baseball stadium, which opened in 2000 and, along with the bustling technology sector, transformed the city’s SoMa neighborhood from abandoned warehouses to hot spot. Now the company wants to build an 80,000-squarefoot brewery — but that’s not possible in SoMa. “The manufacturing element of the business has been priced out,” says 21st Amendment’s founder, Nico Freccia. The company has opened offices in the East Bay, and he’s scouting space there for the brewery, hoping to “help anchor the revitalization” of an Oakland neighborhood.

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For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.

To subscribe to the Northwest Herald, call (815) 459-8118.

By PHILLIP ALDER Newspaper Enterprise Association

Denis Healey, a British politician, said, “Follow the irst rule of holes: If you are in one, stop digging.” If he were a golfer, presumably he would have said, “If you are in a hole, take the ball out and move to the next tee.” In today’s deal, though, South’s problem is which suit to dig at irst. He is in three no-trump, and West leads the spade queen. After West opens three spades, North has a textbook takeout double, and South plunges into the logical game contract. South starts with ive top tricks: two spades, one heart and two diamonds. He can gain three more winners from clubs and at least two from hearts. And there is a natural instinct immediately to play a club, but that is fatal. East wins with his ace and returns his remaining spade, which establishes West’s suit while West still has the heart king as an entry. Declarer needs to realize two things. First, that if West has the heart king and club ace, the contract is unmakable. Second, that it cannot cost to take the heart inesse

before touching clubs. So South plays a diamond to dummy’s king, then runs the heart queen. If the inesse wins, declarer can switch to clubs to establish nine winners. Here, though, the inesse loses and West probably perseveres in spades. South wins and knocks out the club ace, knowing that East is now out of spades. If instead West returns his second diamond at trick four, declarer takes the trick and plays a club, aware that he cannot lose more than one heart, one club and two diamonds.

Contact Phillip Alder at pdabridge@prodigy.net.


CLASSIFIED

Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

Saturday, July 6, 2013 • Page E3

Jobs | Real Estate | Legals | Vehicles | Stuff

, Real Estate Administrative Assistant needed for busy office. Only those with Real Estate exp. considered. Email resumes: cornerstone@ realtyexecutives.com

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CARPENTER / SUBCONTRACTOR NEEDED for small remodeling company. Must be experienced. Email resume to: tcon30@mail.com

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HANDYMAN Anything to do with Wood We can Fix or Replace Doors and Windows Sr. Disc. 815-943-4765 Quiet building, no pets. $825 + security. 847-526-4435

Factory WE NEED GOOD PEOPLE! !! JOB FAIR !! Tuesday July 9th 9am-2pm Working World 14 N. Walkup Ave Crystal Lake Factory Jobs Galore! All Shifts Available! Must have reliable transportation and bring 2 forms of Gov't ID! General Labor

ASPHALT LABORERS/ DRIVERS & FOREMAN:

Immediately hiring all positions for a busy Asphalt Maintenance Company. Interested candidates MUST have a clean and valid Class-A CDL license. Candidates must also read, write and speak English. Interested persons must be willing and able to work long hard hours and enjoy large paychecks! Please call for application 815-648-9099 Harvard, IL. Location

Healthcare LOOKING FOR Compassionate & Caring... !!!!!!!!!!!

JOHNSBURG LRG 2BR, 2ND FLOOR $800/MO+SEC. ALLODIAL R.E. 815-477-5300

CNA's FT/PT & Casual Positions Available

DIETARY AIDES-PT Housekeeping Position - FT !!!!!!!!!!!!! APPLY IN PERSON TODAY:

Fair Oaks Healthcare Center 471 W. Terra Cotta Crystal Lake, IL

No phone calls please

Cat – Female – Brown & Gray Tabby w/Green Eyes – No Collar – Has Micro Chip - Named Pita Last Seen In Bright Oaks, Cary 630-677-5151 Reward

IPAD & BACKPACK – LOST

off back of Motorcycle on Route 120 between Charles Road and Thompson Road in Woodstock just after 4pm on Monday July 1st. If found, please call 815-355-6110 Lost Earrings Sunday, June 30th either at the McHenry Bike Trail, Jewel, Library or Zion Lutheran Church. Angel Earrings, Blue. 815-236-2339

Surgical Specialty Private Practice in McHenry County, IL is seeking a Medical Billings Operations Manager with 3+ years of leadership experience in billing, coding, revenue cycle management. Candidate would supervise staff to ensure compliance of current departmental operational processes and procedures as well as oversee the account receivable activity and performance, identifying aberrations and initiating appropriate corrective measures.

Forward resumes to:

resume1@mbcmw.com

LEGAL ASSISTANT

LEGAL SECRETARY

Manufacturing Personal Care Co. seeks Person to Clean and Sanitize Production equipment. Chemical, mixing and handling a plus. Applicant must be able to lift 80 pounds. Forklift experience a plus. Send resumes to: kerbear80@hotmail.com or fax to: 815-479-9843

WE'VE GOT IT! Northwest Classified 800-589-8237 www.NWHerald.com

$515/mo incl water & garbage. 815-651-6445

MARENGO SMALL 1BR $450/mo + sec. 815-790-7797 MARENGO STUDIO IN TOWN 2nd floor, appliances, no pets. $485/mo. 630-667-7222 Marengo. 4BR. Laundry room. Garage. $900/mo incl electric. 815-482-5052 McHenry $199 Move-In Special Large 1BR, from $699. 2BR, 1.5BA from $799. Appl, carpet and laundry. 815-385-2181

MCHENRY 2 BEDROOM $705/mo + security. 815-363-1208

Strawberries Pick Your Own or Pre-Picked 2 Miles E of Woodstock on Rt 120 then ½ Mile N on Queen Anne Rd.

Heider's Berry Farm 815-338-0301

ORANGE TABBY CAT - MALE Family pet name is Flyer. He has a chip and had a collar. Call 815-923-2498 if found. Leave message if not home. Marengo/Union area.

McHenry Expressive Learners Structured days of fun as you learn and rates to meet any budget. 815-236-5460

Male, orange, micr-chipped, lost in Union vicinity. 815-923-7549

Crystal Lake CHEAP & CLEAN Office Suite. 400 SF.

MCHENRY 2 BED/2 BATH CONDO Large Beautiful 1st floor unit w/ Scenic View. No Stairs with Washer and Dryer. Attached Garage. 1,250/mo. 815-529-0133

Woodstock: full bath, 2 separate rooms, 810 sq ft., possible storage area, $750/mo. 630-514-4956

MCHENRY, 1st Floor, 2 Br, 1.5 Ba, W/D. $850/mo. Call: 815-385-3416 McHenry, clean, 2BR, laundry room, garage, basement. Lawn, snow maintenance included. $1,100. 815-355-5191

WOODSTOCK 3BR, 2 STORY

1.5 bath, C/A, W/D, attach garage. $1175/mo. Days 815-338-3300 Nights/W/E 815-337-3420

MCHENRY - ROUTE 31

IRISH PRAIRIE APTS Must See 2BR/2BA w/Den! Short Terms Available W/D and Fitness Center. 815/363-0322

Rev Anne 847-431-4014 Weddings, Blessings, Memorials, Christenings

WOODSTOCK 3 BEDROOM 1.5 Bath, A/C, Stove, Refrigerator, Garage, No Pets. Broker Owned. 847-683-7944 HURRY!!

McHenry: 1BR, Large, bright, quiet/ In-town location. No smoking. No dogs. $750, heat included. Call Ginelle 815-768-0267 Woodstock Studio $585/mo+sec. Efficiency $550/mo + sec.1-BR $650/mo + sec, all 3 furn'd w/all utils incl. No Pets. 815-509-5876

McHenry: 1BR, small but very clean/quiet. No smoking. No dogs. $575 + util. Call Ginelle 815-768-0267

MAILBOX POSTS INSTALLED 815-653-7095 ~ 815-341-7822 www.mailboxpostman.com Don't See What You're Looking For Today? Check Back Tomorrow! Never The Same Paper Twice! Northwest Classified 800-589-8237 www.nwherald.com

Fi a cial/Mortgage

DOVENMUEHLE DOVE DO VENM VE NMUE NM UEHL UE HLE HL E MORTGAGE, MORT MO RTGA RT GAGE GA GE,, INC. GE INC.

JOB JO OB B AIR AIIR A

ALGONQUIN - 2 BEDROOM Quiet and clean building with storage, laundry and parking. $800/mo. 847-401-3242

$500,000 Algonquin 3 Bedroom Ranch

2 bath, finished basement, W/D. 2 car attached garage, $1350/mo. Available July 1st. 847-857-9956

Crystal Lake 3-4BR 1.5BA Cape Cod House

200 ft waterfront, boat, dock, deck, 1.5 acres. New carpet, tile. 2BA, C/A. $1395/mo. 708-296-4476 HAMPSHIRE: 2BR Home, 1BA, New flooring, large deck, firepit, double lot, oversized 2 car garage. Rent w/ option to buy. $1200/mo. First, last & security required. 815-757-5079.

����� �������� !��� ���� ���� � ����� ������� � ������ LOCATION: Dovenmuehle Mortgage, Inc. ���� ����� ������� ������ � ������ �� �����

Quiet building, hardwood floors, heat and water incl. No pets. 815-455-6964

����� ��������� !��� ����� ���� � ����� ������� � ������ LOCATION: Dovenmuehle Mortgage, Inc. � ��������� ����� � ���� ������� �� ����� Dovenmuehle Mortgage, Inc., o e of the atio ’s oldest a d most respected mortgage servici g compa ies, curre tly has several opportu ities due to growth at our Elgi a d Lake Zurich offices.

���� ��������� �� ���� ������� ‘ Attor ey Oversight Specialist ‘ Ba kruptcy Docs/Audits ‘ Ba kruptcy Quality Co trol Coordi ator ‘ Ba kruptcy Team Lead ‘ Ba kruptcy Supervisor ‘ Ba kruptcy Represe tative ‘ Call Ce ter Customer Service Represe tative ‘ Cash Processor ‘ Cashieri g Supervisor ‘ Cashieri g Tech ical Reports Specialist ‘ Claims/REO Specialist ‘ Clie t Services Accou t Ma ager ‘ F/T Collectio s, Collectio Supervisor & Team Lead ‘ Complia ce Admi istrative Assista t ‘ Complia ce Attor ey ‘ Core Team Positio s ‘ Corporate Admi istratio Liaiso ‘ Corporate Trai er ‘ Data Mapper ‘ Default A alyst & Team Lead ‘ Default Litigatio Team Lead ‘ Eve i g P/T Data E try ‘ Foreclosure Represe tative ‘ I vestor Accou ta t/AP Clerk ‘ I vestor Accou ti g Supervisor ‘ Loss Mitigatio Specialist ‘ Marketi g ‘ Mortgage Dispositio Assista t Ma ager ‘ Process Ma ageme t Coordi ator ‘ Programmer ‘ Project Coordi ator ‘ Quality Complia ce ‘ Release Supervisor ‘ Service Release A alyst ‘ Service Release Ma ager ‘ Staff I ter al Auditor ‘ Systems Clie t Helpdesk ‘ Systems Liaiso ‘ T&C Team Lead ‘ T&C Core Team-A alyst ‘ Avaya Telecommu icatio Coordi ator ‘ Trai i g Procedure Writer ‘ Wi dows Desktop Support ‘ Writer/I structio al Desig er

���� ��������� �� ������ ‘ Escrow Rep.,Team Lead, Supervisor ‘ Payme t Cleari g Accou t Specialist ‘ F/T & P/T Collectio s ‘ Data Processor ‘ T&C Auditor Qualified ca didates for these positio s should possess good verbal a d writte , PC, data e try a d a alytical skills; stro g orga izatio al skills; a d stro g atte tio to detail. If you are unable to attend the Job air, please send your resume to: Dovenmuehle Mortgage, Inc. � ��������� ������ ����� ��� � ���� ������� �� ������ ���� ����� �������� �� �ÿ���� �ÿ�������ÿ��������ÿ�

EOE/M/F/D/V

WOODSTOCK

SILVERCREEK

No smoking/pets, $800 + sec. 815-893-0059 ~ Lv Msg

Crystal Lake ~ 1BR, 2nd Floor Small bldg, $800/mo, no pets/ smoking. Heat incl, near metra. Garage available. 815-344-5797

FOX LAKE 1 BR, Laundry on-site, no pets, Sect 8 OK, $670/mo + sec. 847-812-9830 FOX LAKE ~ GOOD VALUE! Very large 1BR, dining area, balcony, storage and laundry in building, no dogs, $695-$725. Agent Owned 815-814-3348

1 & 2 Bedroom ❍ ❍

Affordable Apts. Garage Included

815-334-9380 www.cunat.com WOODSTOCK 1BR $595, 2BR $745. All appliances, D/W, wall to wall carpet. A/C, balcony/ patio, on site lndry. No pets. 847-382-2313 or 708-204-3823

WOODSTOCK SUMMER SPECIAL RENT AS LOW AS

$695 Autumnwood Apt. Elevator Building 815-334-9380 www.cunat.com

HARVARD AREA Huge 3BR, 2BA loft apt. Quiet. Frplc, W/D, C/A. Fish/Swim. Pets ok. $1025/mo. 815-648-2716

Private Wooded Location. Heat, water, trash incl, laundry, cat with dep, $785/mo. 815-482-1600

Rents from: $800 CALL TODAY! 815-943-6700

www.gallinacos.com M-F: 10am-6pm Sat: By Appt Woodstock: NEW upper 1BR, lndry, A/C, $700+utilities, 815-245-5246

Marengo 5 Min to I-90 Nice, Updated Cedar Ranch

Secluded 1.3 wooded acres. 19x25 LR, fireplace, DR, eat-in kit. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, laundry room, 9x11 sitting room, foyer, 2.5 car gar, 2 decks. Newer roof, kitchen, ceramic baths, hrdwd flrs, crown molding, carpet, paint, electric, lighting & plumbing. Fast closing. $215,000 815-568-0008

McHenry Best Lot on the Fox 3 bedroom, small pool, 2.5 car garage, turn-key including boat. $379,000 815-344-2675

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 22nd JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MCHENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS BAXTER CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. TIMOTHY J. COUGHLIN, MARGARET E. COUGHLIN, BOARD OF MANAGERS OF THE WILLOWS EDGE ASSOCIATION NO. 1, UNKNOWN OWNERS & NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, Defendants.

McHenry Cozy 2BR

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment for Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above-captioned case, the Sheriff of McHenry County, Illinois, or his deputy, on Thursday, the 25th day of July, 2013, at the hour of 10:00 a.m., in the room assigned at the McHenry County Government Center, 2200 N. Seminary Ave., Woodstock, IL 60098, will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, property known as:

McHenry Patriot Estates & Prairie Lake Townhomes 1 Bedroom - $1100 .

2 car garage, pet friendly free health club membership.

815-363-5919 or 815-363-0322 McHenry- 518 Front St., 3 Br. Cottage, Close to shopping & dwntwn. $885/m + Util. Avail. 8/1 Call Stan: 815-245-6098 McHenry/Legend Lakes 4BR DR, FR, 2.5 bath, 2 car gar, all appl., lndry rm, A/C, full bsmnt, fenced yrd, $1850 + sec dep. 815-385-3269 McHenry: 2/3BR, 1BA, attch. gar., screened porch, unique property $1150/mo., NO PETS/SMOKING, 815-814-3453 Spring Grove. 3BR, 1.5BA 2 story home with cellar, 2.5 car garage. In old downtown. $1045/mo. Land Management Properties 815-678-4771 Wonder Lake ~ Beautifully Remod Lake Front House. 2BR, 1BA, huge deck and pier. $1250 + util, no dogs. 815-814-3348

Wonder Lake/West Side Clean 2BR, DR, basement. 1 car garage, fenced yard. $1015/mo. 815-388-5314

Cary- female roommate. Near train, pool, forest preserve, includes professional cleaning in common areas. $110 per week, $220 deposit, Call 815-236-5090

NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S FORECLOSURE SALE

Permanent Index Number: 18-13-206-017-0000. This property is commonly known as 1046 Dovercliff Way, Crystal Lake, IL 60014, and may be improved. This real estate is being sold in an "As Is Condition" for cash or its equivalent in accordance with the terms and provisions of said judgment through which the Plaintiff is owed at least $384,501.76. The successful bidder is required to deposit 10% of the bid amount at the time of the sale with the McHenry County Sheriff, with the balance to be paid by noon of the Tuesday following the sale. For information regarding this real estate, including the possibility of inspection, interested parties may contact Amber L. Michlig of SmithAmundsen, LLC, 2460 Lake Shore Drive, Woodstock, Illinois 60098, Telephone (815) 3375034. Dated: June 20, 2013

All NIU Sports... All The Time

LINE AD DEADLINE: Tues-Fri: 3pm day prior, Sat: 2pm Fri, Sun-Mon: 5pm Fri OFFICE HOURS: Mon-Fri, 8am-5pm PHONE: 815-455-4800

Permanent Index No. 14-08-300006 This notice is to advise you that the above property has been sold for delinquent taxes and that the period of redemption from the sale will expire on October 17, 2013. The amount to redeem is subject to increase at 6 month intervals from the date of sale and may be further increased if the purchaser at the tax sale or his or her assignee pays any subsequently accruing taxes or special assessments to redeem the property from subsequent forfeitures or tax sales. Check with the county clerk as to the exact amount you owe before redeeming. This notice is also to advise you that a petition has been filed for a tax deed, which will transfer title and the right to possession of this property if redemption is not made on or before October 17, 2013. This matter is set for hearing in the Circuit Court of McHenry County, in Woodstock, Illinois on January 14, 2014. You may be present at this hearing but your right to redeem will already have expired at that time.

Keith Nygren McHenry County Sheriff

Sheriff of McHenry County Amber L. Michlig SmithAmundsen, LLC 2460 Lake Shore Drive Woodstock, IL 60098 Telephone- 815-337-5034 Facsimile- 815-337-5035 ARDC#6309698 email: amichlig@salawus.com (Published in the Northwest Herald June 22, 29, July 6, 2013. #A1287) Having a Birthday, Anniversary, Graduation or Event Coming Up? Share It With Everyone by Placing a HAPPY AD!

Northwest Herald Classified 800-589-8237 www.nwherald.com

Amber L. Michlig SmithAmundsen, LLC 2460 Lake Shore Drive Woodstock, IL 60098 Telephone- 815-337-5034 Facsimile- 815-337-5035 ARDC#6309698 email: amichlig@salawus.com (Published in the Northwest Herald June 22, 29, July 6, 2013. #A1287)

PUBLIC NOTICE STATE OF ILLINOIS IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 22ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT McHENRY COUNTY Case Number 13 MR 318 IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF ALEXANDER PETER FIORE FOR CHANGE OF NAME NOTICE OF PUBLICATION (ADULT) Public notice is hereby given that I have filed a Petition for Change of Name and scheduled a hearing on my Petition on August 30, 2013, at 9:00 a.m. In the Circuit Court of the Twenty-Second Judicial Circuit, McHenry County, Illinois, praying for the change of my name from ALEXANDER PETER FIORE to that of ALEXANDER PETER ETLING, pursuant to the Illinois Compiled Statutes on Change of Names. /s/ Alexander Peter Fiore Petitioner's Signature (Published in the Northwest Herald July 6, 13, 20 2013)

PUBLIC NOTICE STATE OF ILLINOIS IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWENTY-SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MCHENRY COUNTYIN PROBATE

YOU ARE URGED TO REDEEM IMMEDIATELY TO PREVENT LOSS OF PROPERTY Redemption can be made at any time on or before October 17, 2013 by applying to the County Clerk of McHenry County, Illinois at the McHenry County Courthouse in Woodstock, Illinois. For further information contact the County Clerk. ADDRESS: Mailing Address: 2200 N Seminary Ave Woodstock, IL 60098 Office Location: 667 Ware Road Woodstock, IL 60098 TELEPHONE: 815.334.4242 Lyubomir Alexandrov, Purchaser or Assignee Dated: July 1, 2013 (Published in the Northwest Herald July 5, 6, 7, 2013. #1407)

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 22nd JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MCHENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS BAXTER CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. TIMOTHY J. COUGHLIN, MARGARET E. COUGHLIN, BOARD OF MANAGERS OF THE WILLOWS EDGE ASSOCIATION NO. 1, UNKNOWN OWNERS & NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, Defendants. Case No. 12 CH 2340

Keith Nygren

Prairie Grove 60x40 Building (2) 14' OH doors, water, heat electric, $750/negotiable. 815-459-6707

County of McHenry Date Premises Sold: October 18, 2010 Certificate No. 2009-01702 Sold for General Taxes of Year 2009 Sold for Special Assessment of (Municipality) N/A and special assessment number N/A Warrant No. N/A Inst. No. N/A

Property Located at: beginning at a point approximately 3044.46 feet West of Ballina Ln, on the South side of Mason Hill Rd, in McHenry, in Nunda Township, McHenry County, Illinois

HEBRON 2BR CONDO

www.HuskieWire.com

Dated: June 20, 2013.

TAX DEED NO: 10TX010182 FILED: July 1, 2013

THIS PROPERTY HAS BEEN SOLD FOR DELINQUENT TAXES

Case No. 12 CH 2340

Cary- River front home to share. $750/ mo, all utilities paid. 847-369-8326 All Appliances Included with W/D, Patio/Deck. $785 - $875, Garage Avail. 815-455-8310

TO: Katherine C Schultz as McHenry County Clerk; Occupant(s), 6909 Mason Hill, McHenry, IL 60050; Marcie Jundanian f/k/a Marcia Jundanian; Joseph Michalcik, Jr heirs; Margaret Michalcik heirs; Mary Dering f/k/a Marcia Dering; Elsa Sekela; occupants or persons in actual possession of the real estate hereinafter described; persons conducting economic, recreational or other activity on the real estate hereinafter described if any; unknown owners and parties interested in the property hereinafter described

Mark Tracy Keller Williams Success 815-715-0535

MCCULLOM LAKE New, beautiful home. 3BR, 2.5BA, appls, W/D, garage, full bsmnt. A/C. $1250/mo. 815-347-8243

Woodstock: 3 bed, 2 bath, many new updates, great yard, great location. $1500/mo. Available August 1. 815-871-3433

Spacious 2 bdrm Apts avail Free extra storage Free heat!! Pets welcome!

Target your recruitment message close to home or reach our entire area. For more information, call 800-589-8237 or email: helpwanted@ shawsuburban.com

30 AC/woods + barn, 7-9 horses, with addt'l fee. 5BR, 3BA, Gas heat/A/C, bsmt. Garage, wood floors, $1950/mo. 312-607-6406

WONDER LAKE: 2 or 3BR, attch. gar., screened porch, big yard, 2 sheds, lake rights, $895/mo. Michael 563-581-2844

HARVARD 1 MONTH FREE* Autumn Glen Luxury Apts.

RECRUIT LOCAL!

MARENGO PRIVATE FARM

Wonder Lake. 3BR. $1150, 4BR $1090, pets OK, washer dryer hook up. Avail now. 773-510-3643 or 773-510-3117

Woodstock Upper 2BR ~ Quiet,

Harvard. 2.5BR, 2BA. Clean, lrg, newly remodel, hrdwd flrs, lrg closets. Porch, deck, bkyrd. $825/mo incl all utils. 815-943-0504

Johnsburg: freshly remod., riverfront, 3BR, 1BA, storage bsmnt, 1 car gar., $1250/mo. Pets OK w/dep., 815-385-3880

815-388-5314

CRYSTAL LAKE 2BR

Porch overlooks Crystal Lake, may have boat. Newly remodeled. Excellent location, good schools, No pets. $1,495/mo. 630-655-2888 Cell 630-899-8899

JOHNSBURG 2 BEDROOM Clean brick home, one bath, appliances, laundry, garage, and large fenced yard for pet or kids. $975 plus sec. 815-690-3327

Fenced yard, 1 car garage. Close to shopping, $965/mo.

Crystal Lake 1BR $760

CRYSTAL LAKE Large, Sunny 2BR,1BA, 1st floor Apt in Duplex

2718 Crystal Way 4 BR, 4.1 BA Custom Brick 2 story in Crystal Woods Estates.

HARVARD ~ 4BR, 2.5BA

EXPERIENCED CAREGIVER

POLISH LADY will clean your home/office. FREE ESTIMATES! Great Ref. 224-858-4515

OPEN HOUSE SUN JULY 7th, 1pm - 4pm

Woodstock - 3BR 2BA. Some appl. Walk to library. Close to park. Broker owned. $1081/mo. 815-236-6361

Appl, WD, new carpet, full bsmt. 2 car gar, $1300/mo + sec + util. Pet w/deposit. 815-943-7329

100% Satisfaction Guar!

CRYSTAL LAKE

PUBLIC NOTICE

This property is commonly known as 1046 Dovercliff Way, Crystal Lake, IL 60014, and may contain improvements. This real estate is being sold in an "As Is Condition" for cash or its equivalent in accordance with the terms and provisions of said judgment through which the Plaintiff is owed at least $384,501.76. The successful bidder is required to deposit 10% of the bid amount at the time of the sale with the McHenry County Sheriff, with the balance to be paid by noon of the Tuesday following the sale. For information regarding this real estate, including the possibility of inspection, interested parties may contact Amber L. Michlig of SmithAmundsen, LLC, 2460 Lake Shore Drive, Woodstock, Illinois 60098, Telephone (815) 337-5034.

TAKE NOTICE

Crystal Lake 4BR On Fox River

❤Ceremonies of the Heart❤

Please allow me to attend to your daily needs incl.: Bathing, Dressing, Cooking, Laundry, Errands, ETC. Marengo and Surr. Area. Call 815-568-0405

Incl. all utils + High Speed DSL. $495/mo. 815-790-0240

Almost New! 2 car, appls. Rent To Own, $1150-$1250/mo. Pets OK. Available now. 815-385-5525

Large wooded lot on Crystal Lake. May have boat. Premier location. Children welcome. No pets. $1,495/mo. 630-655-2888 Cell 630-899-8899

TABBY

Experienced Real Estate Legal Asst. Must be fluent in Spanish/ English. Please Call: 815-338-3838 or email: mpena@bgllaw.net

Wanted energetic organized candidate to work with partner in national product liability defense firm. Experienced required. Managerial skills preferred. Cary, IL. Send resume and salary history to: myjob4444@aol.com

MARENGO 1 BEDROOM

McHenry -Large studio/1BR some utilities included, balcony $690 and up Broker Owned 815-347-1712

Healthcare

Island Lake: TH in Newbury Village, 2BR, 1BA, ranch, attach. Gar., yard, in unit lndry, $950/mo. Avail 8/1 847-830-8217

McHenry 2-3BR, 2-3BA

ISLAND LAKE 2 BEDROOM

Permanent Index Number: 18-13-206-017-0000

Woodstock 40x60 Pole Barn $450/month 815-347-1712

NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment for Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above-captioned case, the Sheriff of McHenry, Illinois, or his deputy, on Thursday, the 25th day of July, 2013, at the hour of 10:00 a.m., in the room assigned at the McHenry County Courthouse, 2200 N. Seminary Ave., Woodstock, IL 60098, will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, property legally described as follows: LOT 14 IN FOUR COLONIES UNIT 19, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF OUTLOT “C” AND OUTLOT “F” OF IN FOUR COLONIES UNIT 17, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 43 NORTH, RANGE 7, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, RECORDED SEPTEMBER 5, 2001 AS DOCUMENT 2001R65376, IN MCHENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS.

In the Matter of the Estate of CAROL ANNE WOODWARD Deceased Case No. 13PR000166 CLAIM NOTICE Notice is given of the death of: CAROL ANNE WOODWARD of: WONDER LAKE, IL Letters of office were issued on: 6/19/2013 to: Representative: JOHN R STEFFEK 1104 WINDHAM CT GENEVA, IL 60134-2972 whose attorney is: KALINA, TERENCE R 300 E ROOSEVELT RD WHEATON, IL 60187-5590 Claims against the estate may be filed within six months from the date of first publication. Any claim not filed within six months from the date of first publication or claims not filed within three months from the date of mailing or delivery of Notice to Creditor, whichever is later, shall be barred. Claims may be filed in the office of the Clerk of Circuit Court at the McHenry County Government Center, 2200 North Seminary Avenue, Woodstock, Illinois 60098, or with the representative, or both. Copies of claims filed with the Clerk must be mailed or delivered to the representative and to his attorney within ten days after it has been filed. /s/ Katherine M. Keefe Clerk of the Circuit Court (Published in the Northwest Herald June 22, 29, July 6, 2013. #A1291)

PUBLIC NOTICE STATE OF ILLINOIS COUNTY OF McHENRY VILLAGE OF GREENWOOD

) )SS )

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF JEREMY & KARI SHAW, LLOYD & SUE SHAW, AND R. RANDALL & PATSY SCHWABER, FOR VARIATION AND RECLASSIFICATION UNDER THE GREENWOOD ZONING ORDINANCE, VILLAGE OF GREENWOOD, MCHENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS. PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN in

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CLASSIFIED

Page E4• Saturday, July 6, 2013 OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF REAL ESTATE ASSESSMENTS FOR 2013 NOTICE TO GRAFTON TOWNSHIP TAXPAYERS: ASSESSED VALUES FOR 2013 Valuation date (35 ILCS 200/9-95): January 1, 2013 Required level of assessment (35 ILCS 200/9-145): 33.33% Valuation based on sales from (35 ILCS 200/1-155): 2010-2012 Publication is hereby made for equalized assessed valuations for real property in this township in accordance with 35 ILCS 200/12-10. As required by 35 ILCS 200/9-210 and 35 ILCS 200/10-115, the following equalization factors have been applied to bring the assessments to the statutorily required three-year median level of 33.33%: Farm Land: 1.0000 Farm Improvements: 1.0000 Non-Farm Land: 0.9920 Non-Farm Improvements: 0.9920 Questions about these valuations should be directed to: WILLIAM OTTLEY 10109 VINE ST UNIT C, HUNTLEY IL 60142 (847) 669-3383 www.graftontownship.us Office hours are: MON-FRI 7:45A-3:45P Property in this Township, other than farmland and coal, is to be assessed at a 33.33% median level of assessment, based on the fair cash value of the property. You may check the accuracy of your assessment by dividing your assessment by the median level of assessment. The resulting value should equal the estimated fair cash value of your property. If the resulting value is greater than the estimated fair cash value of your property, you may be over-assessed. If the resulting value is less than the fair cash value of your property, you may be under-assessed. You may appeal your assessment to the Board of Review. If you believe your property’s fair cash value is incorrect or that the equalized assessed valuation is not uniform with other comparable properties in the same neighborhood, the following steps should be taken: 1. Contact your township assessor’s office to review the assessment. 2. If not satisfied with the assessor review, taxpayers may file a complaint with the McHenry County Board of Review. For complaint forms, instructions, and the Rules and Procedures of the Board of Review, call (815) 334-4290 or visit www.co.mchenry. il.us/departments/assessments/Pages/Forms Rules.aspx. 3. The final filing deadline for your township is generally 30 days from this publication date. After this date, the Board of Review is prohibited by law from accepting assessment complaints for properties in this township. For more information on complaint deadlines, call (815) 334-4290 or visit: www. co.mchenry.il.us/departments/assessments/ PDFDocs/BORReport.pdf. Your property may be eligible for homestead exemptions, which can reduce your property’s taxable assessment. For more information on homestead exemptions, call (815) 334-4290. Your property tax bill will be calculated as follows: Final Equalized Assessed Value – Exemptions = Taxable Assessment; Taxable Assessment x Current Tax Rate = Total Tax Bill. All equalized assessed valuations are subject to further equalization and revision by the McHenry County Board of Review as well as equalization by the Illinois Department of Revenue. Robert H. Ross, ASA, Chief County Assessment Officer, McHenry County, Illinois A list of assessment changes for this township for the current assessment year, except those assessments that were decreased only as a result of the township equalization factor noted above, is as follows:

GRAFTON TWP 18-01-101-012 18-01-101-023 18-01-101-036 18-01-105-013 18-01-132-026 18-01-151-007 18-01-151-017 18-01-201-020 18-01-205-023 18-01-227-002 18-01-227-048 18-01-229-023 18-01-306-019 18-01-307-018 18-01-308-034 18-01-326-001 18-01-326-046 18-01-352-024 18-01-356-007 18-01-376-003 18-01-376-005 18-01-376-007 18-01-376-008 18-01-426-017 18-01-429-001 18-01-431-001 18-01-432-005 18-01-451-005 18-01-454-010 18-01-455-003 18-02-100-007 18-02-102-004 18-02-128-017 18-02-226-021 18-02-259-002

GRAHAM, KAREN A FLAHERTY JAIME M, LAGO LUIGI GASPAR, MARIA T JOSE GEDZYK, OLENA LAUSCHE, MARY C TREU ALBERT J, TALBOTT BONNIE MARTINET, STEPHEN P HIGHTOWER, CA CM HOCH, JOSEPH W & TERRY L PECHOUS, DOROTHY REV TR CHRISTOPHER LOUIS ENT INC NORRIS, WILLIAM H FAM DECL TR CALENDO, MARY E PROP IL LLC MACIAS J R, VILLAGOMEZ J ALEXANDER, NICHOLAS A JUANELL ZUKOWSKI, PAUL A IRREV TR MCHENRY CO TRS NELSON, ROY Y ANN B WESTCHESTER SVCS LLC WESTCHESTER SVCS LLC BANDOLIK, STEVEN BANDOLIK, STEVEN GALIZI, LAWRENCE KAREN P NOBLE, JOSEPH D GERALDINE A CHGO TITLE LAND TR 8002359692 347 WILTSHIRE LN LLC FULLERTON ASSOC FAM LP HANRAHAN, TERRY ANNA ROGALSKI, DENNIS B MARILYN C MCHENRY CO CONSERV DIST SCHOEPEL, SCOTT T JENNIFER A MOLDENHAUER, ANNA TRAVIS TISHLER, STEVEN B GAGLIANESE G A, ROTELLA J A

32,670 40,211 10,186 44,827 28,775 40,585 46,298 39,978 43,076 43,551 43,541 174,835 54,916 43,539 61,843 94,483 71,542 3 1,109 2,531 323 933 486 127,918 71,860 70,523 168,488 97,225 135,242 87,413 25,295 142,943 132,957 21,420 217

18-02-263-001 18-02-264-001 18-02-276-015 18-02-405-022 18-02-427-028 18-02-427-029 18-02-428-015 18-02-430-024 18-03-100-013 18-03-100-014 18-03-100-016 18-03-100-020 18-03-100-023 18-03-100-025 18-03-100-029 18-03-202-018 18-03-251-002 18-03-277-012 18-03-300-012 18-03-300-016 18-03-300-017 18-03-300-018 18-03-300-019 18-03-402-021 18-03-404-008 18-03-404-009 18-04-126-016 18-04-151-001 18-04-151-002 18-04-200-002 18-04-200-004 18-04-200-005 18-04-200-007 18-04-200-009 18-04-200-010 18-04-300-004 18-04-300-005 18-04-300-008 18-04-300-009 18-04-300-010 18-04-300-011 18-04-300-012 18-04-300-013 18-04-400-007 18-04-400-009 18-04-400-010 18-04-400-011 18-04-400-016 18-05-128-009 18-05-201-005 18-05-226-004 18-05-226-005 18-05-226-007 18-05-276-005 18-05-300-002 18-05-300-003 18-05-300-004 18-05-300-005 18-05-300-006 18-05-300-007 18-05-300-008 18-05-301-002 18-05-400-001 18-05-400-005 18-05-400-006 18-05-401-012 18-06-100-002 18-06-400-001 18-06-400-002 18-06-400-003 18-07-100-001 18-07-100-005 18-07-100-007 18-07-100-012 18-07-100-014 18-07-100-015 18-07-100-017 18-07-100-018 18-07-200-003 18-07-200-004 18-07-200-007 18-07-200-008 18-07-200-009 18-07-300-001 18-07-300-002 18-07-300-003 18-07-300-004 18-07-400-001 18-07-400-002 18-08-100-007 18-08-200-001 18-08-200-002 18-08-200-003 18-08-300-001 18-08-400-001 18-08-400-002 18-08-400-004 18-08-400-005 18-09-100-001 18-09-100-002 18-09-100-003 18-09-100-004 18-09-200-003 18-09-200-004 18-09-200-005 18-09-200-006 18-09-200-007 18-09-300-001 18-09-300-002 18-09-300-003 18-09-400-002 18-09-400-003 18-09-400-004 18-09-400-005 18-10-100-003 18-10-100-005 18-10-100-006 18-10-100-009 18-10-100-011 18-10-100-013 18-10-100-014 18-10-200-001 18-10-200-011 18-10-200-017 18-10-200-018 18-10-200-023 18-10-300-002 18-10-300-003 18-10-300-005 18-10-300-006 18-10-300-007 18-10-400-001 18-10-400-002 18-10-400-007 18-10-427-006 18-10-428-001 18-11-126-003 18-11-178-011 18-11-226-008 18-11-400-004 18-11-401-009 18-12-101-013 18-12-127-012 18-12-132-040 18-12-153-002 18-12-154-003 18-12-176-006 18-12-179-002 18-12-179-005 18-12-182-032 18-12-182-033

GAGLIANESE, G A ROTELLA J A GAGLIANESE G A, ROTELLA J A FED NATL MTG ASSN PURNELL ENT LLC REISS F S C M CECL OF TR DROBNIK, ROBERT D FRYE, PAMELA STODDARD, STEVEN E YELDANDI, VIJAY V ANJANA V HALIGUS RD LLC HARRIS, RICHARD A DIMMICK, FLOYD E PATRICIA YELDANDI, VIJAY V ANJANA V BECKER, W J/R E TR 101 * HALIGUS RD LLC DUCZAK, JON R SHARI N HALIGUS RD LLC RODRIGUEZ, JUAN J JORGENSEN, THOMAS W JUDITH L LAKE MAKENA LLC HALIGUS RD LLC ELGIN INVSTMNT HALIGUS RD LLC ELGIN INVSTMNT LUNDSTROM, BRETT E RACHEL A IZQUIERDO, ROLANDO JR TRACY A GARCIA, ROLANDO JR GARCIA, ROLANDO JR SCHNEIDERMAN, TODD SCHNEIDERMAN, TODD R ET AL SCHNEIDERMAN, ROBERT D BECKER, WILLIAM J JR LISA M MILLER, ROBERT W BETTY JANE WETZEL, ERWIN REV TR 92131 LLC SUSANKE, R W/A G TR 1* SUSANKE, KURT J JENNA J HAMILTON RANCHES PRTNSHP HAMILTON RANCHES PRTNSHP SCHNEIDERMAN, ROBERT D SCHNEIDERMAN, ROBERT D SCHNEIDERMAN, ROBERT D LAKEWOOD IL 2003 1 LLC LAKEWOOD IL 2003 1 LLC LAKEWOOD IL 2003 1 LLC RTE 47 5.54 SERIES RTE 47 6.43 SERIES RT 47 PIT SERIES CHGO TITLE LAND TR 8002349418 LANGIEWICZ, J/J REV TR * COMM SVGS BK TRS TR LT1826 HEINKE, ROBERT J JESSICA D VOUGHT, CARRIE L ET AL SHANK, DANIEL W JANE H ZEISEL, ANTON MARIA T BUTENSCHOEN, DANIEL J SUSAN M HUCKSTORF, FRED BONNIE DUKA, THOMAS G VACCARO, JAMES DODEN, C F/U A TR * DODEN, C F/U A TR * LIVINGSTON, D F JR TR/N * LIVINGSTON, D F JR TR 2003 * LIVINGSTON, D F JR TR * KETCHMARK, JAMES A DONNA M OLSON GLISSENDORF FARMS LP OLSON GLISSENDORF FARMS LP BORCHART, KRISTY N TR 1 MCHENRY CO CONSERV DIST SEAVER, ROBERT R TRS SEAVER, ROBERT R TRS DODEN, C F/U A TR * FRUIN, GEORGE J REV TR* FRUIN, ROSS CAROL FRUIN, GEORGE J REV TR WAGNER, JEREMY LORRIE WSTK HARRIS BK TR 9549 WDSTK ST BK TR 5085 FRUIN, ROSS CAROL ANN ROESSLEIN , LONNA J TR NO 1 ZEDONIS, DONALD A TR* HAMILTON FARMS SHEPHERD, DAVID GEORGIE L TR FRUIN, DANNY G SUSAN M TR FRUIN, GEORGE J REV TR FRUIN, ROSS CAROL HENNING, DAVID R ET AL TRS FRUIN, ROSS CAROL HUNTLEY FARMS LLC ZEDONIS, DONALD A TR* LIGHT, LEAH RAE HAMILTON FARMS OLSON GLISSENDORF FARMS OLSON GLISSENDORF FARMS OLSON GLISSENDORF FARMS LIGHT, LEAH RAE OLSON GLISSENDORF FARMS OLIVES FRIENDSHIP FARM LLC HOME STATE BANK 2690 HOME STATE BANK 2690 HAMILTON RANCHES PRTNSHP LAKEWOOD IL 2003 1 LLC HAMILTON RANCHES PRTNSHP HAMILTON RANCHES PRTNSHP HAMILTON RANCHES PRTNSHP HAMILTON RANCHES PRTNSHP BARR 1ST NATL BANK 11 2968 BARR 1ST NATL BANK 11 2968 BARR 1ST NATL BANK 11 2968 HAMILTON RANCHES PRTNSHP HAMILTON RANCHES PRTNSHP HOME STATE BANK 2690 CHGO TITLE LAND TR 8002350453 CHGO TITLE LAND TR 8002350453 HAMILTON RANCHES PRTNSHP HAMILTON RANCHES PRTNSHP JORGENSEN, THOMAS W JUDITH L HAMILTON RANCHES PRTNSHP HAMILTON, ALLAN & PHYLLIS HAMILTON FARMS KELLER, RICHARD P LATOS, THOMAS S TR 101 LATOS, THOMAS S TR 101 JORGENSEN, THOMAS W JUDITH L JORGENSEN, THOMAS W JUDITH L MILICEVIC, KATHY MILICEVIC, KATHY HAMILTON FARMS HAMILTON FARMS HAMILTON FARMS HAMILTON FARMS HAMILTON FARMS HAMILTON FARMS HAMILTON FARMS WHEELING TR SVGS BK TR 73122 WHEELING TR SVGS BK TR 73122 SMITH, ROBERT BUTLER, JAMES D SARA R TR ADAMS, THEODORE JR THEODORE S GEORGE, MICHAELENE MILLS, NIGEL G SUZANNE J SANGIORGIO, LUIGI DOMENICO JOHNSON, ANNETTE REV TR BENKENDORF, JOHN KATHLEEN ROEWER, DENNIS F CAROL M RICHARD H B, WETT J K JR HOBSON, BLAKE ELIZABETH VIRGIL, TODD C NIKOL L HOME ST BK NA ANTONGIOVANNI, MICHAEL JULIE FIFTH THIRD BK 79 191 MACZUGA, JAN IZABELA KULIBABA, JANE I

Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com 32 188 49,430 10,662 101,532 52,939 11,399 69,314 8,980 320 358 67,897 1,941 103,894 1,596 179,111 182 107,654 70,566 180 1,462 642 373 10,187 37,768 66,544 14 400 96 105,928 79,808 64,768 3,027 1,039 66,657 41,731 121 90,265 20 9,934 2,084 1,966 4,854 854 373 315 277 4,551 107,581 73,751 95,895 91,287 99,058 135,311 177,554 71,675 171,447 1,486 4,248 8,801 2,423 87,302 62,903 3,291 76,746 154,673 30,095 96,651 6,891 142,511 95,720 95,218 43,710 116,635 71,812 81,092 127,600 90,978 5,896 9,098 46,025 109,629 2,365 6,886 10,938 6,398 9,662 44,722 12,246 101,342 7,315 6,799 83,008 35,165 13,337 54,550 84 7,276 3,473 431 4,759 14,368 5,072 3,844 58,514 8,293 39,500 2,584 1,461 18,177 88,019 10,880 2,506 2,159 517 23,711 68 111,920 14,697 48 79,234 178,729 111 308 399 1,855 41 1,674 38,874 12,621 3,876 9,773 854 21,496 131,814 127,069 154,348 330 172,105 60,612 133,869 158,296 88,191 57,487 148,554 140,969 83 90,389 315 38,624 43,610

18-12-182-034 18-12-201-002 18-12-201-006 18-12-203-035 18-12-227-006 18-12-254-013 18-12-329-001 18-12-377-003 18-12-377-011 18-12-377-016 18-12-378-015 18-12-427-002 18-12-427-009 18-12-428-008 18-12-428-010 18-12-431-005 18-12-431-007 18-12-432-010 18-12-476-008 18-12-478-004 18-12-479-024 18-12-481-010 18-13-103-036 18-13-103-080 18-13-202-012 18-13-207-004 18-13-228-002 18-13-281-007 18-13-300-006 18-13-300-012 18-13-300-017 18-13-300-020 18-13-300-033 18-13-352-002 18-13-377-005 18-13-426-029 18-13-452-005 18-13-453-005 18-13-453-015 18-13-476-012 18-13-477-002 18-13-483-009 18-13-484-005 18-14-100-025 18-14-152-004 18-14-203-014 18-14-226-002 18-14-276-001 18-14-276-002 18-14-276-003 18-14-303-012 18-14-303-036 18-14-305-019 18-14-351-011 18-14-351-019 18-14-377-038 18-14-400-026 18-14-409-007 18-14-414-002 18-14-426-001 18-14-426-002 18-14-426-004 18-14-426-010 18-14-427-005 18-14-427-015 18-14-428-003 18-14-428-004 18-14-428-005 18-14-429-015 18-14-429-020 18-14-430-002 18-14-477-001 18-14-477-009 18-14-479-006 18-14-479-014 18-15-100-001 18-15-100-002 18-15-100-003 18-15-200-001 18-15-200-004 18-15-200-007 18-15-200-008 18-15-200-009 18-15-200-016 18-15-200-017 18-15-200-018 18-15-301-017 18-15-302-044 18-15-302-045 18-15-329-005 18-15-351-015 18-15-355-006 18-15-403-006 18-15-426-022 18-15-428-009 18-15-428-011 18-16-100-001 18-16-100-003 18-16-100-004 18-16-200-001 18-16-200-004 18-16-200-006 18-16-300-001 18-16-300-008 18-16-301-001 18-16-301-002 18-16-301-003 18-16-326-002 18-16-326-003 18-16-326-004 18-16-326-005 18-16-326-006 18-16-327-001 18-16-327-002 18-16-327-003 18-16-354-001 18-16-354-002 18-16-354-003 18-16-377-012 18-16-380-001 18-16-380-002 18-16-380-003 18-16-400-005 18-16-400-006 18-16-400-007 18-17-100-001 18-17-100-002 18-17-200-001 18-17-200-002 18-17-200-003 18-17-300-001 18-17-300-002 18-17-300-003 18-17-300-004 18-17-300-005 18-17-400-004 18-17-400-006 18-17-400-007 18-17-400-008 18-18-100-001 18-18-100-002 18-18-200-001 18-18-200-002 18-18-200-003 18-18-300-002 18-18-300-003 18-18-300-004 18-18-300-005 18-18-400-001 18-18-400-002

VOGELSBERG, LINDSEY DEVELOP CORP OF AMERICA MILLER, RONALD R SUSAN M TR SINGER, MARTHA TR JOHNSON, CHARLES STEPHANIE ROCKWELL, JAMES H DONNA M ROBERTSON, DONNA R NOTTOLI, ROBERT G ROKOS, KENNETH KELLY JACOBSEN, ANDREW J KRONE, BRYAN J KUHNS HEIDE M ROBERTS, SCOTT A TARA L THOMAS, KATHLEEN A TR ORLYK, JAMES B SHANNON K ANKLAM FAM 2004 TR SANDERS, DON G ROSEMARY A WRESCH, JAMES M KATHLEEN A TR ARISON, SHEILA TR NOWAKOWSKI, E J C A LUEHR, MATTHEW A GABRIELLE E RUSSELL, CLAUDIA A REV TR GLAWE, CHARLES E DEBRA A SWANSON, NINA T KESSLER, STEPHANIE L CHERYL A FRUHAUFF, JAY E MELANIE C WALTER, MARK C JULIE B OUGHELTREE, C E JR M L MINOGUE, RICHARD A KATHLEEN A OLIVER, JOHN H JOANNE B TR DKF PROP HOLDING 2 LLC ALLIED SVCS WELFARE FUND PENCE HLDGS LLC HOME ST BK NA TR 4298 LEMOINE, SCOTT A KRISTINA SALES, JAMES F JR LINDA REV T LUNDBERG, LAUREN K PAMELA L ROBBINS, KHRISTIAN JAMIE LIUZZI, JOHN JEANNE A MOORHOUSE, BENJAMIN J MACKENZIE, DEBORAH A TR * VLASTNIK JOHN, GARZANELLI TAM DONATI CODY W, BRADSHAW PAIGE NEWBERRY, DONALD J ANGELA M BARR HARRIS BANK 11 4159 SCHWAGER, KURT R NICHOLE P MANNING, STEVEN D/JACKIE GAWART, SUSAN L 2005 LIV TR HALKO, NATALIE E SAULNIER, JOSEPH O ROSENBERG, ELIZABETH J KATELAN, K T FULLER D L BELLO, BOSUN CARTER CARLA GUBERNOV, KIRILL S POWELL, DONALD EILEEN ARMIJO, JOSE R ROGETTE M ALONSO, ISAIAS LINDGREN, BRITTA TR AGNIC, MONICA C PRAIRIE STONE SHOPS LLC LAKE IN THE HILLS VILL OF FUHLER, SIRI B SELF DECL OF T DELATORRE, F R D M WEBER, ANDREW W KATHERINE M LAKE IN THE HILLS VILL OF LAKE IN THE HILLS VILL OF KAISER, JASON K KRISTIN K CATSADIMAS, N P C I WILEY, DAVID P ABBY A HALL, BRADLEY K RITA M FOGEL, FAM LIV TR SCHAFFER, CHRISTOPHER LAURA PATEL, GHANASHYAM G STAWSKI, HENRY KARIN LAKE IN THE HILLS VILL OF LETAK, RAYMOND B JENNIFER L HAMILTON RANCHES PRTNSHP HAMILTON RANCHES PRTNSHP HAMILTON RANCHES PRTNSHP WHEELING TR SVGS BK TR 73122 RABY, W B/K L/PETERSEN G G/P RABY, WILLIAM B KAREN L FRANK, RANDY FRANK, RANDY BARR HARRIS BANK 11 4159 CYGNAR, GREGORY A TR MCGUIRE, LEE ANN REV TR EISENRICH, NICOLE M FEINBERG G C JR , TOPALA J L BEYER, J A PONTRELLI D T VERCAUTREN, G W C A SAFTIG, JOSEPH M KIMBERLY A MANCZKO, BRIAN S JENNIFER C PELLEGRINO, JAMES T TIFFANY L KILVINGER, TOM J TRACY M PINTER, DARYL J JENNIFER A BATES, ROBIN M OLSON GLISSENDORF FARMS LP HEIMSOTH TR ET AL CARDUNAL SVGS BK FSB 98 398 CHGO TITLE LAND TR 8002350453 AMER COMM BK TR C SONS 1 LLC IL SERIES WOO SANG U, PARK EUN Y RYLAND GRP INC RYLAND GRP INC TALAMORE POD 2 HOA RYLAND GRP INC TALAMORE COMM ASSN RYLAND GRP INC TALAMORE POD 2 HOA RYLAND GRP INC RYLAND GRP INC RYLAND GRP INC RYLAND GRP INC TALAMORE POD 2 HOA RYLAND GRP INC TALAMORE POD 2 HOA RYLAND GRP INC HUNTLEY VENTURE LLC RYLAND GRP INC TALAMORE POD 2 HOA RYLAND GRP INC LAKE IN THE HILLS 158 LLC LAKE IN THE HILLS 158 LLC LAKE IN THE HILLS 158 LLC ACKMAN FAM LLC LIGHT, LEAH RAE OLIVES FRIENDSHIP FARM LLC STAADT, OLIVER C TR 1 ET AL 1ST COLONIAL TR CO TR 1079 Y ACKMAN FAM LLC ARGHAVANI, MOHSEN ET AL ERNESTI, B E TRUST 1 ET AL ERNESTI, B E TRUST 1 ET AL ERNESTI, B E TRUST 1 ET AL LIBERG, TIMOTHY A PATRICIA RYLAND GRP INC HUNTLEY VENTURE LLC RYLAND GROUP INC HENNING, D R ET AL HUNTLEY FARMS LLC UTPADEL, NORMAN D TR 1 DITTRICH, JOSEPH SARA ACKMAN FAM LLC UTPADEL, NORMAN D TR 1 LANDAU FAM LP LEACH, DAVID W SR LANDAU FAM LP UTPADEL, NORMAN D TR 1 ACKMAN FAM LLC

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42,520 122,299 117,763 81,771 68,865 90,121 107,540 96,531 97,804 86,744 85,849 66,088 62,798 55,870 60,815 66,502 83,114 64,943 69,752 49,030 67,209 61,235 55,418 45,634 73,448 116,766 79,944 110,062 101,938 119 3,943 89,208 77 93,122 104,167 79,274 94,527 89,736 79,024 83,842 78,055 81,684 72,520 1,018 150,993 118,296 166,447 58,871 60,253 64,560 81,199 74,959 80,658 74,621 69,535 65,986 611 43,877 186 12 167 98,199 99,670 12 12 99,374 97,965 103,838 115,274 79,359 125,685 118,130 112,426 12 106,547 5,315 6,161 2,172 1,439 41,666 70,464 134,012 1,734 5,627 182,717 15 76,887 86,870 67,690 76,723 67,823 91,191 86,936 79,049 107,751 85,040 62,799 17,241 63,037 7,804 1,397 15,919 143,083 939 88 1 88 1 88 1 88 88 88 88 1 88 1 88 67,724 88 1 88 8,993 9,016 10,585 11,723 12,363 17,126 128 8,108 5,275 1,907 113,494 63,008 8,155 11,112 1,143 1,329 6,474 81,938 71,085 9,696 65,898 66,359 83,513 4,940 172,286 10,485 4,867 5,254


CLASSIFIED

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9,759 94,355 42 2,587 6,289 794 1,808 5,536 335 281 3,544 68,658 1,906 1,981 1,042 98,018 84,719 6,315 82,270 2,188 2,488 109,816 7,797 3,777 5,478 1,908 89,761 55,295 106,981 133,755 477 227 74,246 181,679 99,469 82,482 84,089 22,676 138 732 1,738 4,155 1,236 406 97 41 91,869 92,798 94,718 88,327 111,801 95,734 95,053 134,262 52,782 94,015 67,575 121,541 94,405 96,089 89,305 139,657 53,263 133,159 91,402 93,928 96,964 97,139 138,508 138,931 74,703 96,036 93,596 84,092 94,617 123,183 122,649 92,744 83,616 91,514 95,356 67,928 63,921 117,213 90,884 124,149 121,257 123,137 88,468 71,678 121,611 81,492 93,471 90,236 86,271 92,208 120,763 20 1,881 3,998 132,227 111,152 80,714 76,304 64,072 66,823 90,672 93,701 78,092 72,574 78,942 92,077 87,073 92,056 91,017 70,201 92,800 76,410 78,776 91,933 64,690 76,538 74,225 77,285 72,355 49,867 77,908 80,931 79,273 65,934 90,373 78,877 56,120 3,370 6,180 77,924 68,107 79,010 66,701 72,568 79,442 1 96,227 43,716 78,839 77,949 103,416 77,712

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DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC ANDERSON, ROBIN L JUSTIN D VONG, PHU P DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC VERDONCK, R W J A HUTCHISON, J T MC LOVING TR AMER COMM BK TR HUNTLEY VENTURE LLC SEXTON, ERIC M KELLY SHEPHERD, JT TEN TR RADDE, WILLIAM C ELISE M BELL R A , KUEHLING K J RYLAND GROUP INC HILD, ERIC K CHERYL J GEORGE, DAVID WILSON, LINDA L MANON, FRANCISCO RAMIREZ, NAZARIO MIKULEC A W , STUMBAUGH M LOCHING, JOCELYN TAN BEETSTRA D, KEY K A RIZZUTO, MICHAEL A TUCKER, DOUGLAS E KEMPER J A , MATSIE T M LOWE, WILLIAM J ROTH, JON M JOSEPH JANE M PASSARELLI, KRISTINA GRAHAM, ROSANNE T TR CONROY, MARY UDD, CHRISTOPHER C KAREN E THIBEAULT, B M K M MALENIUS, ADAM P JULIE H HRDLICKA, JEAN M RONALD D SCHNEIDER, JOSEPH AMANDA RYLAND GRP INC RYLAND GRP INC PETERSON, SARAH C PINZON, ROY G JACOBSON, MATTHEW R STANGEL, JOHN D KURTEK, ZBIGNIEW B COSTELLO, MICHAEL D DENISE A VONG, LONG P WESEMANN, MELODY RYLAND GRP INC SMITH, CHRISTELLE GIARRATANA, JACQUELYN V VARGAS A M , LEBRON F SR VAUGHN, JUSTIN ET AL CUNNINGHAM J L , MANCKE V L SALINAS, RICARDO BLANKENFELD, C J F KIM, KYUNG K SAMS, KRISTIE R RYLAND GRP INC YEARBY SH, SANTIAGO M RYLAND GRP INC RYLAND GRP INC RYLAND GRP INC SCHLAPIA, MONICA C BARONE, RICH A KAREN D FOSTER, MICHAEL J LISA HERNANDEZ, LINDA KAREEN MONROIG, FRANCISCO SHARAPATA, MELISSA BROCK GOVANI, TUSHAR M PRIYA T MANGAN, DANIEL ELIZABETH MORIARTY, JOHN F TAMMIE K SYMBAL, RICHARD J JUDITH C NIEMASZ, W P N M KINDL, BLAKE E MARIEL S GIESE, MICHAEL S AMY M GORITZ, RYAN K ROBIN M ZIMMERMAN, ANDREA N KRISTALYN NOBLE, DUSTIN A PALCZYNSKI, LORRIE PETER J KEECHAN, SEAN KUREISHY, TANYKA H NADEEM Z RAMOS, MARK JAYNIEL G DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC ADAM, MATTHEW J ANITA XRD HUNTLEY LLC WOLF DA, ROWLAND AM DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DEBALTZ D P , JENSEN T L DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC ROCKFD, CATH DIOCESE HERMAN, JEFFREY A JOANN L SCHAFF, KARA L BOCZNEWYCZ, WILLIAM N WAGNER, DARREN J MICHELE C LUCACCIONI, JOHN TR MASAITIS, JONAS JULIE BELL, ADAM C MARY E JOHNSON, THOMAS D SHERRY S FED NATL MTG ASSN GATZ, FRANK M JR SHEILA A DELAPAZ, DANIEL J MICHELLE K MALDONADO, M M J L QUINTANA, JAIME CRYSTAL M LAIRD, MICHAEL A CHRISTINE M COFFEY, BRIAN J ONG, TROY J HEIDI A VEACH, CHARLES T DLS COMPUTER SVCS INC FRUIN, DAN CON SCHOOL DIST 158 RAY, MARK B HYDE SHERIL D HERMANSEN, DONALD J BRITNI BUCHANAN K A, MENDRALLA M L MEISTER, ANTHONY S JEANNE M ROY, JASON M SARAH L HAAGE, PHILLIP A DONNA M GOLEMA, MARTY DENISE J KLUZEK, DEBRA ZIENTARA, JOHN A/ELAINE M THR PROP IL LP PRYOR, BARBARA DELL TR CRONK, OSCAR MARIA MEADOWBROOK LTD PARTNERSHIP KUHN SCOTT D, KRYSIAK LISA M DVORAK , JNT TEN TR RING, JAMES R SHIRLEY SOLIS, ASAEL G ROSA E PANTALEO, JOSEPHINE A LEONARD BIALOBRZESKI, MAGDALENA C BRUTON, ANON KIMBERLY LANGE, ROBERT A LISA K DAYON, STEVEN JOHN/LAURA LEE WILLETT, JOHN JANET M NIELSEN, ALAN T SHELLY D SINACORE, CHERYL ANN REV TR SHEPARD, SCOTT MICHELE KERR, JASON D MARLO J MIZELL, DUNN SENGSTOCK, MICHAEL G NICOLE A WICKERSTY, WILLIAM J POLIZOS, ANGELO HEATHER L SEVCIK, E SCOTT KARIN SANDERS, BRIAN K WENDY S REIMAN, JAMES J LAURA A SCHULTZ, H G TR 20085 SCHULTZ, H G TR 20085 DLS COMPUTER SVCS INC WAGNER, LUCAS P KOHLBRAND, KARL LAURA STEVENS, M GIRON Y

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PEARS, ROBERT A LORIN E FECSKE, JUDY LAURISHKE, CRAIG L YOLANTA M WATSON, WILLIAM A BRYN M CHGO TITLE LAND TR 8002350412 CHGO TITLE LAND TR 8002350412 MELCHIONNA, KENNETH LINDA PLOTE HOMES LLC PLOTE HOMES LLC PLOTE HOMES LLC PLOTE HOMES LLC PLOTE HOMES LLC PLOTE HOMES LLC PLOTE HOMES LLC PLOTE HOMES LLC PLOTE HOMES LLC PLOTE HOMES LLC PLOTE HOMES LLC PLOTE HOMES LLC PLOTE HOMES LLC ET AL PLOTE HOMES LLC PLOTE HOMES LLC PLOTE HOMES LLC PLOTE HOMES LLC PLOTE HOMES LLC PLOTE HOMES LLC PLOTE HOMES LLC PLOTE HOMES LLC PLOTE HOMES LLC PLOTE HOMES LLC PLOTE HOMES LLC PLOTE HOMES LLC PLOTE HOMES LLC PLOTE HOMES LLC PLOTE HOMES LLC PLOTE HOMES LLC PLOTE HOMES LLC PLOTE HOMES LLC PLOTE HOMES LLC PLOTE HOMES LLC PLOTE HOMES LLC PLOTE HOMES LLC PLOTE HOMES LLC GORDON FAM REV TR, PLOTE HOMES LLC PLOTE HOMES LLC PLOTE HOMES LLC PLOTE HOMES LLC PLOTE HOMES LLC PLOTE HOMES LLC CHGO TITLE LAND TR 8002350412 BOULDER RIDGE POA CELLAS CONFECTIONS INC AR ASSOC LLC FERGUSON, BRIAN D BECKIE HARTIGAN, THOMAS D/ELLEN J GARTRELL, GARY J JUDITH A GOLCHERT, K A JR/J L* PITCHFORD, THOMAS S INGRID GARCIA, JAVIER JOSEPHINE U SELL WE BUY ENT INC BERNHARDT, DONALD S COLLEEN M ARREDIA, MICHAEL C DEBRA L YANDAMURI, SAI P CRUZ, LISBEIDY SALGADO KAPPEL, VALERIE E REID, PATRICIA A TR WSOL, JON R ANCA AHMEDI, HAMDIN FLORIJE WARREN, NEAL SHAWNA LYON, THOMAS C KARIN L BACOL, KENNETH Y POZNANSKI, THOMAS J VICKY A KRUPICZOWICZ, FRANK MICHELLE FINCKLE, LORI A AAVANG, CLARENCE CORA GUPTA, DOLLY GUPTA, DOLLY BLACKHAWK BK CRANE, CHRISTOPHER W EQUITY TR CO CARIDEI, MARK A MARY ANN ODOM, KIMBERLY A JEFFREY M VOCALINO, MARC J JOANN MARTIN, CASSANDRA COLLINS, THOMAS R ALMA J JONES, MARK T AMIE LOVE, ROBERT B BURT, FAM TR PAPE, MARK A CATHERINE A HALAT, THOMAS C TR 101 HALAT, THOMAS C TR 101 NIMED CORP NIMED CORP JONES, KENNETH L ANN MARIE MORENO, MICHAEL P PATEL, PRAKASH K PRAVINA P BALDINI, SCOTT J AMY L ORIHUELA, WALTER J MD TR BOKMA, MAX M JR SHARON M WEINBERG, RYAN CHRISTINE SPRINGBROOK COMM CH HALAT PROP LP LA LUZ, RAFAEL E YOLANDA MITMOEN, JACOB ALEXANDRA ASH, PATRICK KARA L GUZIKOWSKI, J B/E E DECL TR* AMER COMM BK TR ET AL LENNAR COMM OF CHGO LLC AMER COMM BK TR ET AL PHILLIPS, JOAN M DECL OF TRUS TRICKLE, LAVERNE J/ROSE A TR* PIERCE, SANDRA M CHGO AMER NATL BK TR TR 33782 TALASKA, ANDREZEJ ALICJA M ARVANITES, JOHN LISA BECKER, DAVID S JANET J CHRISTOS, NIKOLAOU OCASIO, JUAN TR 1 MULCAHY, NICOLE M KAHL, FRED A/RUTH A TR 1 KAHL, FRED A RUTH A TR 1 N R PROP LLC HUNTLEY VILL OF KNOTT, TERENCE J & LYNN C KAFKA, PAUL E MARGARET M LP XXXVIII LLC SCHIFFMAYER, KARL F TR SCHIFFMAYER, TINA TR GORKA PROP LLC LENNAR COMM OF CHGO LLC MCRN FARMS LLC MCRN FARMS LLC LENNAR COMM OF CHGO LLC RYLAND GRP INC MCRN FARMS LLC MCRN FARMS LLC MCRN FARMS LLC MCRN FARMS LLC RYLAND GRP INC, HUNTLEY VENTURE LLC, LENNAR COMM OF CHGO LLC HUNTLEY VENTURE LLC LENNAR COMM OF CHGO LLC COZZI, JOHN A MCRN FARMS LLC MCRN FARMS LLC MCRN FARMS LLC MCRN FARMS LLC

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72,090 39,823 76,866 93,042 514,511 500,463 92,321 84 84 84 84 84 84 84 84 84 84 84 84 84 84 84 84 84 84 84 84 93 93 93 84 84 84 84 84 84 84 84 84 5 5 5 60,089 105,355 5 84 84 84 84 84 527,487 1 810,189 347,166 96,223 85,269 76,818 97,000 68,947 64,384 39,291 67,074 71,136 70,253 72,343 74,702 140,129 58,139 65,960 72,689 72,365 41,387 74,421 59,304 37,429 146,979 994 542 99,190 59,221 39,005 114,557 97,753 103,597 82,892 88,057 95,042 95,162 91,147 95,817 589,002 651 9,923 1,088 86,218 74,447 84,958 75,228 90,247 63,571 89,036 872 11,307 82,403 54,945 72,897 71,285 6,322 106 334 98,521 98,521 98,521 113,110 48,436 78,672 87,651 558 30,011 41,128 6,944 6,944 370,709 159 63,363 73,562 483,254 816 364 209 785 10,046 12,939 8,005 16 987 9 54 21 182 1,834 5,193 3,979 3,198 60,338 5,729 77,646 14,255 79


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MCRN FARMS LLC MCRN FARMS LLC SAELENS, MICHAEL TOMERA, MICHELLE K HARVARD ST BK TR 898 TOMERA, MICHELLE K BORHART, LEN ANNE AMCORE TR CO TR 1703 AMCORE INVSTMNT GRP TR 1703 LUETH, R F T L E J TOMERA, MICHELLE K BAILEY, DAVID QUIRK SHEILA ZIELINSKI, MARK MARIA HENNIG, LEE R RITA M TR BAILEY, DAVID QUIRK SHEILA CASSATA, PAUL A II ROBIN L TOMERA, MICHELLE K TOMERA, MICHELLE K AMCORE TR CO TR 1703 BORHART, LEN ANNE BORHART, LEN BORHART, LEN ANNE TOMERA, MICHELLE K HEMMER FARM LLC BERNAL, BERTHA RAFAEL JR SCHWEIGER, ALAN R TR 1 SCHWEIGER, RITA M TR 1 HEMMER FARM LLC MCRN FARMS LLC SCHWEIGER, RITA M TR 1 MCHENRY CO CONSERV DIST MCRN FARMS LLC FATIGATO, ANTHONY PATRICIA FRUIN, DAN ROSS QUINN, F F J A TR HEMMER FARM LLC HEMMER FARM LLC HEMMER FARM LLC HEMMER FARM LLC HEMMER, DAVID S DECL OF TR HEMMER, PATRICIA ZILLER, PAUL D/FERN L TR 1 DRASLER, LIV TR PURDY, DEBORAH A TR WALKER, G H J R K TR CRONKHITE FAM REV TR STOCKWELL, GEORGE E TR HANSEN, DIANE L JAHNKE, DORIS L CHAMBERLAIN, RICHARD B LINDA KRULL, DENNIS E RUTH M MACAULAY , D B B E 2006 LIV T OBRIEN, JOHN M SWENSON, HAROLD F MARY M NORTHERN TR CO TR 10216 GIVAN, GENE JANNET TR LINDSEY, KAREN KRIES, ROBERT GLORIA TR TREACY , M C REV INTER VIVOS GLOVETSKI, RONALD J TR VEKTOR DEVELOP GROUP LLC STIRN, FAM TR NOVAK, SAMUEL J CALLAHAN, DANIEL W BETTY A MICHALISKO, JOHN KRIS DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC LAPELUSA C J, SCHRAW E PERANICH M C , NOBLE M T ROGGENSACK, KRISTIAN T DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC FITZGERALD, L M/L G TR 1 AJ TR DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC KITTELSON, DAVID GLORIA M DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC MERTZ, TREVER Y PATTI L ROJAS G R , ARES S DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC STALLBAUM , DANIEL KELLY TR N

8,033 70,663 75,661 1,184 1,450 1,730 8,607 1,029 5,694 70,400 17,866 141,736 151,701 4,989 142 42 59,515 5,093 10,252 2,069 4,439 146,693 2,675 48 53,053 67,008 82 5,785 17 573 17,684 5,829 85,688 5,165 68,312 52,281 2,705 6,741 2,243 9,764 74,642 59,663 84,699 60,709 63,111 99,318 72,725 69,574 65,214 76,819 54,878 95,979 50,291 66,151 57,330 82,168 53,534 73,549 93,400 97,473 1,531 86,963 44,645 81,269 58,838 3,610 92,892 83,363 89,369 3,056 3,056 75,055 41,729 3,226 3,131 3,415 3,068 3,130 3,038 3,122 3,049 92,455 3,124 3,046 3,041 3,142 3,141 3,108 105,637 73,678 3,068 3,039 3,124 3,052 85,635

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ROBELET, VICTOR P AMY E DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC SUTYNIEC, PAWEL JUSTYNA DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC BLASZINSKI, MARGARET A TR BOWGREN, K J C L TRS SCHUESSLER, SANDRA WALSH, DORIS K FALCONER, KAREN L TR SURPRISE ACQUISITION CO LLC SURPRISE ACQUISITION CO LLC WDSTK ST BK TR 4365 DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DHR CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC GUTZWILLER S G , SPADONI J C DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC DRH CAMBRIDGE HOMES INC HUNTLEY STATION CLB T LLC HUNTLEY STATION CLB T LLC HUNTLEY STATION CLB T LLC LINDSEY, GLEN LAURA GRIMES, NANCY L REV TR HAGSTROM, WILLIAM E JAMIE E MELAHN GEM 94 2 LINDLEY, JERRY W TR LAWYER, HOLLY J CAPSTONE RESDEV LLC

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85,436 3,138 3,136 3,036 3,071 3,070 3,152 90,425 3,036 3,124 3,189 3,093 3,179 3,047 3,049 59,514 81,799 71,698 116,218 83,184 6,764 4,973 61,124 3,068 3,068 3,068 3,068 3,068 3,128 3,128 3,128 3,210 3,227 3,123 3,066 3,077 3,091 3,120 3,211 3,106 3,282 3,250 3,248 3,317 3,127 3,263 3,282 3,068 3,041 3,339 3,061 3,136 3,189 3,417 3,352 3,368 3,150 3,257 3,037 3,338 3,146 3,107 3,046 3,214 3,103 3,130 3,101 3,101 3,101 3,364 3,410 3,479 90,370 3,353 3,408 3,427 3,332 3,375 3,235 3,079 3,056 3,054 3,054 3,038 3,206 3,063 3,068 3,210 143,507 58,321 293,899 48,267 34,776 46,968 41,297 2,061 32,469 58,881

18-33-251-008 18-33-252-003 18-33-276-004 18-33-276-005 18-33-301-009 18-33-328-058 18-33-351-004 18-33-352-002 18-33-352-011 18-33-400-002 18-33-400-009 18-33-400-030 18-33-400-031 18-34-100-015 18-34-100-016 18-34-176-004 18-34-200-007 18-34-202-003 18-34-226-007 18-34-226-013 18-34-226-040 18-34-227-023 18-34-228-014 18-34-256-008 18-34-276-001 18-34-276-002 18-34-277-002 18-34-277-017 18-34-277-018 18-34-277-026 18-34-278-013 18-34-279-005 18-34-279-009 18-34-301-001 18-34-301-003 18-34-303-006 18-34-327-009 18-34-355-021 18-34-377-007 18-34-378-012 18-34-381-002 18-34-381-007 18-34-400-007 18-34-402-021 18-34-404-007 18-34-426-001 18-34-427-014 18-34-428-010 18-34-428-033 18-34-429-007 18-34-429-022 18-34-429-023 18-34-429-025 18-34-429-026 18-34-429-027 18-34-429-028 18-34-452-005 18-34-453-009 18-35-100-005 18-35-100-007 18-35-200-008 18-35-227-002 18-35-227-023 18-35-300-002 18-35-300-003 18-35-300-004 18-35-300-005 18-35-300-006 18-35-400-004 18-35-400-006 18-35-400-007 18-36-103-024 18-36-151-004 18-36-178-010 18-36-178-013 18-36-178-019 18-36-179-003 18-36-179-012 18-36-179-021 18-36-206-004 18-36-227-013 18-36-228-021 18-36-251-016 18-36-276-005 18-36-277-008 18-36-278-005 18-36-300-013 18-36-300-015 18-36-300-016 18-36-400-005 18-36-406-002 18-36-427-005 18-36-427-013 18-36-428-006 18-36-451-009 18-36-457-019 18-36-457-020

KUNDE, HAROLD C/ADELINE A HUNTLEY ESTS INC ERVIN, JAMES MARY E CAPSTONE RESDEV LLC SURPRISE ACQUISITION CO LLC HARRIS BK BARR NA 11 4010 SURPRISE ACQUISITION CO LLC BARR 1ST NATL BK 11 1209 HARRIS BK BARR NA TR 114039 HUNTLEY ESTS INC KAHL, A F L B TR 1 ERVIN, JAMES MARY E CAPSTONE RESDEV LLC SHEPHERD OF THE PRAIRIE KUDLACH BROS LLC JORGENSEN DEFIORE LLC SE INVSTMNTS LLC SERIES 7 CINCOTTA, N A J M SORENSEN , DIANE C ET AL PANVINO, ALEXANDER JACQUELINE WISZUS, JOHN F/ELIZABETH P PANZLOFF, THOMAS J JENNIFER KURZYNSKI, ADAM J JENNIFER KAPFF DANIEL, SPROCK HEATHER DROBEK, WOJTEK ANNA DAVIS, ADAM JENNIE A BIGHAM, DANIEL P SUSAN J BLACK, DANIEL H CHRISTINE L KELLY , MATTHEW J CARRIE L RUSCHEINSKY, PETER AMANDA SMEREK, M J C A SCHUMACHER, M F G M FARQUHAR, WILLIAM BRYCE ET AL WEBSTER, KEVIN M DEBORAH A STEDDICK, MICHAEL ELIZABETH KHMYS, JULIYA MAGNESS, LISA J WOOD, TIMOTHY J LISA M REUTHER, THOMAS J DOUGAL, BRIAN R PATRICIA A RADASZEWSKI, GARY J KAREN A STGEORGE, AMY J KREUTZER FAM LTD PARTNERSHIP ROGNSTAD, R M TR J TR CHRISTENSON, LAURA SHANE ROJEK, JASON MICHAEL BETH LEE FLEEGE, P T D M TOMCZYK, CONRAD L VIRGINIA HIBBELER, DANIEL J KELLY A BELONAX, PAUL A JOANNE S KULIKOWSKI, PETER S JENNA T SE INVSTMNTS LLC SERIES 7 SE INVSTMNTS LLC SERIES 7 SE INVSTMNTS LLC SERIES 7 SE INVSTMNTS LLC SERIES 7 SE INVSTMNTS LLC SERIES 7 MINARIK, CAROL SHARON SCHWARTZ, JIM R TRACEY A BARR HARRIS BK TR 115655 SE INVSTMNTS LLC SERIES 7 FRUIN, DAN ROSS NIEMCZURA JOLANTA, BROZEK ZOF TILLEMA, HEATHER KREUTZER FAM LTD PARTNERSHIP BARR HARRIS BK 11 5655 CHGO TITLE LAND TR 8002350423 BARR HARRIS BK 11 5655 BARR HARRIS BK 11 5655 CHGO TITLE LAND TR 8002350430 CHGO TITLE LAND TR 8002350430 CHGO TITLE LAND TR 8002350430 SCHMITT, SHANE M SONDRA L NGUYEN, L V M A TR BROWN, P E/C L TR KAPOLNEK, THOMAS J DANIELLE M SCHUPBACH, MATTHEW P KELLY A SAUER, ROBERT H KATHLEEN A AKERS, TRACY L REINE A ROMANO, TONI M RUCKI, STEVE W JR CHARLOTTE A PAULSON, MATTHEW D SUSAN B GEHRKE FAM 101 GARLIN, BRAD M CHRISTY L HERRINGTON, M R/H R * JORGENSEN, JERROLD G PAMELA GALANTE, JILL R 1999 LIV TR PLOTE HOMES LLC SANGIORGIO, LUIGI DOMENICO SANGIORGIO, LUIGI DOMENICO BARR 1ST NATL BK 11 1419 HARTMANN, SCOTT ANDREW SHEEDY, DANIEL F ANGELA M CONNELLY, WILLIAM G DIANE A KRAUSE, KEVIN C KENDRA L MARTINELLI, R V M M FORGETTE, JACK BARBARA HOFFMAN, JOSHUA A ANGELA M

52,670 81 2,437 4,164 2,632 90,929 692 313,295 118,114 319 444 574 1,218 796 94,283 481,072 430 70,065 67,383 78,044 68,710 75,821 74,404 78,454 90,765 94,864 84,733 105,478 96,703 117,944 96,422 75,084 91,814 65,601 64,506 64,535 55,705 77,412 55,777 76,584 70,531 66,575 58,823 72,696 74,615 85,945 100,151 110,077 86,438 84,689 81,094 14,221 14,221 14,221 14,221 14,221 55,699 64,665 9,713 12,997 6,810 85,913 92,367 1,018 4,274 4,097 9,975 143 1,197 10,468 3,877 100,632 93,345 121,348 127,896 111,675 114,372 118,656 119,339 105,117 101,655 95,883 148,923 111,264 122,813 101,338 4,910 7,180 1,296 117 93,468 122,202 93,993 128,033 136,042 70,490 70,697


CLASSIFIED

Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

Saturday, July 6, 2013 • Page E7 Bring in this ad for $5.00 off your first purchase of $25 or more

• Natural Pet Foods & Supplies • In Home Pet Sitting • Dog Training • Doggy Daycare • Overnight Boarding 2 month old female Shepherd/Australian Cattle Dog She came from a kill shelter with her mother and litter mates. We call them the Brady bunch. Sweet fun girl just waiting for her family.

MARCIA

JAG

NOAH

11 year old male Black DSH He was abandoned by his guardian. He loves his treats but he still keeps his sleek body. Their would be no adoption fee to an approved senior.

8 year old male Lhasa Apso mix We found him at a kill shelter in Wisconsin. He's a nice older guy that enjoys walks. Available for no adoption fee to an approved senior.

���!���� ���� YOUR NATURAL SOURCE OR PET OOD & MORE! ���� ���ÿ���� ���� !��ÿ � � ������ ������ �� �����

Proud Sponsor of Pet of t e Week Check us out on NWHerald com!! ���� ������������ �������!�����������

Located next to the Spring Grove Post Office.

Helping Paws Animal Shelter 2500 HARDING LANE, WOODSTOCK, 60098

815-338-4400

CATS

We are having a Cat Adoption Special - $75 fee includes spay/neuter, up to date on shots and microchip. Kittens are $100. See some of our cats at the Crystal lake Petsmart Adoption Center during their business hours or call Peg at 815-355-9589.

GRACE

Female -Terrier Mix 6 years - 17lbs Grace was an owner relinquish from Aurora Animal Control. She would like to be the only dog. Cats ok. Come meet Grace this Saturday at the Crystal Lake Petsmart from 10:30am - 12:00.

815-455-9411

3 year old Male 1 1/2 year old Female All around great cat. Entertaining, fun loving, affectionate, sweet. Loves to cuddle. Loves when you pet him!

ANNABELLE

1 year old Female Cattle Dog Mix Poor Annabelle is back. She was returned because the family did not have the time to take care of her. However, they told us what we already know and that is that SHE IS A GREAT DOG!

Female - DSH It's kitten time. Come see a few of our kittens at the Crystal Lake Petsmart Adoption Center this Saturday from 10:30am - 12:00pm. Fee includes micro-chip, spay/ neuter and up to date on shots as per age.

FRANCINE

www.assisi.org • Email: info@assisi.org

RALPHIE

TIPPY

See us the 2nd Sunday of each month at Crystal Lake Petco

Chihuahua/Pug 3 year old Male Sunny is a sweet little guy. Energetic and fun loving. Loves to be in your lap. Given up by his owners that did not have time to train him.

SUNNY

Jack Russell Terrier Pomeranian -Young BUD Mix -Young Bud was actually adopted by Pets ANNABELLE'S KITTENS Tippy is a very sweet boy. He in Need 10 years ago. He was walks great on a leash and is also treated for an ear infection. house-trained. He has facial He is aVERY HAPPY little guy.He scars that indicate a cruel past is looking for his "second" chance but one he has overcome. He in life. Come meet Bud and is looking for someone that will some of his friends at the Petco see the beauty within him and in McHenry this Saturday from his big heart. Despite his scars 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. (no further medical treatment is necessary) he is an absolute P.O. Box 58 • Ringwood, IL 60072 e-mail: pincare@earthlink.net love!

Domestic Shorthair -Young Annabelle and her 5 kittens were rescued by one of our employees in Fox Lake. They were in a neighbors shed living in an old couch. Annabelle is super friendly and very lovable. Her babies are 2 weeks old and will be ready to find their new families when they reach 8 weeks.

adorable neutered 3 month old male tabby kitten Super social, playful, sweet. See Wyatt and his littermates Sat. July 6 at the Algonquin Petsmart from 11 til 2.

5 year old short hair black and white female cat Crinkled ear, very affectionate and sweet. See Nika at the McHenry Petsmart.

815-728-1462

WYATT

815-459-6222 • mcac.petfinder.com ADOPTABLE DOGS Come meet these sweet dogs that will be at Petco in Rockford only from 11:00am – 2:00pm. Saturday June 22nd.

Come meet our adorable kittens that are up for adoption on Saturday June 22nd from 10:00am – 1:00 only at the Petco in Crystal Lake.

A Heart For Animals ROSEY

Shiba Inu/ Schiperkee mix Sweetest 20 lb, chocolate brown, and less than a year old female.

DAISY

3 yr old, loving Border Collie/Flatcoat Retreiver mix Hasn't met a dog she doesn't like. Housebroken, 55 lbs.

Chihuahua/Wirehaired Terrier Mix 1 ½ old male Come meet Bing,Cinnamon,and Ava at the Cary Cares for Canine event Saturday June 22nd from 1pm - 3pm, located at Lions Park on Silver Lake Road in Cary, IL between Crystal Lake Ave. andThree Oaks Rd.

GEORGE

Orange Tiger Male Kitten Do you want to know a secret? All they need is love! George, John, & Paul are irresistible - Imagine one in your home!

www.aheartforanimals.org 2 yr old Calico Her babies went home, now she would like to as well.Very friendly, good with other cats.

On Angels’ Wings Pet Rescue Crystal Lake

M.T.

Brown Tiger Male M.T. was found wandering; we soon realized he is blind. This friendly boy doesn't require anything special, just LOVE!

A.S.A.P., Marengo www.ASAP-USA.org 815-568-2921

847-868-2432 APRIL

petite spayed 2 year old short hair black and white female cat Good with other cats, very social. See Heather at the McHenry Petco.

NIKA

815-385-0005

M,T,Th,F 10:30-4:30; W 10:30-6:30; Sat 10-2:30

BING

HEATHER

Animal Outreach Society www.animaloutreachsociety.org

McHenry County Department of Health Animal Control Division 100 N. Virginia St. • Crystal Lake, IL 60014 Adoption Hours:

KITTENS

ALGONQUIN - 1435 W. Algonquin Rd (847) 658-7738 GILBERTS - 133 E. Higgins Road (847) 836-7738 www.fourlegspets.com

See our cats daily at the Petsmarts in McHenry and Algonquin

DAISY & PEANUT

Tabby,Tortie Female Kittens Playful, loves to purr – what more could you want from a kitten? These pretty sisters will be available at PetVet on Monday!

Meet some of our kitties daily at Pet Vet in Huntley (8-6 M-F, 8-12 Sat)

Advertise your business here for $25.00 per week or $80.00 w/4 week run. Call Asma at 815-526-4459

www.OnAngelsWingsinc.org • 224-688-9739

Golf Rd. (Rt. 58) • Hoffman Estates, IL

800/935-5909 www.motorwerks.com

ANDERSON BMW

AVENUE CHEVROLET

360 N. Rte. 31 • Crystal Lake, IL

888/682-4485

1998 W. McKee at Randall Road Batavia, IL

www.andersoncars.com

866/233-4837

BILL JACOBS BMW 1564 W. Ogden Ave. • Naperville, IL

800/731-5824 www.billjacobs.com

KNAUZ BMW

www.avenuechevrolet.com

MARTIN CHEVROLET 5220 W. Northwest Highway Crystal Lake, IL

www.KnauzBMW.com

MOTOR WERKS BMW Barrington & Dundee Rds. Barrington, IL

800/935-5913 www.motorwerks.com

MOTOR WERKS CERTIFIED OUTLET Late Model Luxury PreOwned Vehicles 1001 W. Higgins Rd. (Rt. 71) or 1000 W. Golf Rd. (Rt. 58) • Hoffman Estates, IL

111 S. Rte 31 • McHenry, IL

815/385-2000 www.bussford.com

SPRING HILL FORD

REICHERT BUICK 2145 S. Eastwood Dr. • Woodstock, IL

815/338-2780 www.reichertautos.com

AUTO GROUP - GARY LANG CADILLAC

www.springhillford.com

847/669-6060

800/628-6087

www.TomPeckFord.com

www.antiochfivestar.com

866/561-8676

ZIMMERMAN FORD

www.raychevrolet.com

2525 E. Main Street • St. Charles, IL

CRYSTAL LAKE CHRYSLER JEEP DODGE

RAY CHEVROLET 39 N. Rte. 12 • Fox Lake, IL

RAYMOND CHEVROLET

630/584-1800 www.zimmermanford.com

REICHERT CHEVROLET 2145 S. Eastwood Dr. • Woodstock, IL

815/338-2780 www.reichertautos.com

AUTO GROUP - GARY LANG GMC Route 31, between Crystal Lake & McHenry

888/794-5502 www.garylangauto.com

866/480-9527

MOTOR WERKS HONDA Barrington & Dundee Rds. Barrington, IL

O’HARE HONDA River Rd & Oakton, • Des Plaines, IL

SUNNYSIDE COMPANY CHRYSLER DODGE

ELGIN HYUNDAI

Route 120 • McHenry, IL

881 E. Chicago St. • Elgin, IL

815/385-7220

847/888-8222

www.sunnysidecompany.com

www.elginhyundai.com

www.antiochfivestar.com

CRYSTAL LAKE CHRYSLER JEEP DODGE 5404 S. Rt. 31 • Crystal Lake, IL

888/800-6100 www.clcjd.com

SUNNYSIDE COMPANY CHRYSLER DODGE

ARLINGTON KIA IN PALATINE 1400 E. Dundee Rd., Palatine, IL

847/202-3900

BILL JACOBS MINI 1564 W. Ogden Ave. • Naperville, IL

AUTO GROUP GARY LANG SUBARU Route 31, between Crystal Lake & McHenry

888/794-5502 www.garylangauto.com

888/446-8743 847/587-3300 www.raysuzuki.com

www.billjacobs.com

409A Skokie Valley Hwy • Lake Bluff, IL

ELGIN TOYOTA 1200 E. Chicago St. Elgin, IL

847/741-2100 www.elgintoyota.com

PAULY TOYOTA BILL JACOBS LAND ROVER HINSDALE

AUTO GROUP GARY LANG MITSUBISHI

300 East Ogden Ave. • Hinsdale, IL

888/204-0042

Route 31, between Crystal Lake & McHenry

www.billjacobs.com

888/794-5502

LAND ROVER LAKE BLUFF 375 Skokie Valley Hwy • Lake Bluff, IL

847/234-2800

LAND ROVER HOFFMAN ESTATES

www.knauzhyundai.com

1051 W. Higgins • Hoffman Estates, IL

O’HARE HYUNDAI

www.billjacobs.com

1035 S. Rt. 31, One Mile South of Rt. 14 Crystal Lake, IL

815/459-7100 or 847/658-9050 www.paulytoyota.com

www.garylangauto.com

LIBERTYVILLE MITSUBISHI 1119 S. Milwaukee Ave.• Libertyville, IL

847/816-6660 www.libertyvillemitsubishi.com

ANDERSON VOLKSWAGEN 360 N. Rt. 31 • Crystal Lake, IL

888/682-4485 www.andersoncars.com

BILL JACOBS VOLKSWAGEN 2211 Aurora Avenue • Naperville, IL

800/720-7036

800/731-5760

www.billjacobs.com

MOTOR WERKS PORCHE

River Rd & Oakton, • Des Plaines, IL

888/553-9036

Barrington & Dundee Rds., Barrington, IL

www.oharehyundai.com CALL FOR THE LOWEST PRICES IN CHICAGOLAND

ROSEN HYUNDAI

BUSS FORD LINCOLN MERCURY

771 S. Randall Rd. • Algonquin, IL

111 S. Rte 31 • McHenry, IL

866/469-0114

815/385-2000

www.rosenrosenrosen.com

ANDERSON MAZDA Barrington & Dundee Rds. Barrington, IL

815/459-7100 or 847/658-9050

800/295-0166

www.raymondkia.com

www.knauzlandrover.com

MOTOR WERKS INFINITI

PAULY SCION 1035 S. Rt. 31, One Mile South of Rt. 14 Crystal Lake, IL

23 N. Route 12 • Fox Lake

www.Knauz-mini.com

775 Rockland Road Routes 41 & 176 in the Knauz Autopark • Lake Bluff, IL Experience the best…Since 1934

847/426-2000

www.motorwerks.com

RAY SUZUKI

119 Route 173 • Antioch, IL

847/604-8100

770 Dundee Ave. (Rt. 25) • Dundee, IL

200 N. Cook Street • Barrington, IL

800/935-5393

815/385-2000

847/604-5050

224/603-8611

MOTOR WERKS SAAB

111 S. Rte 31 • McHenry, IL

RAYMOND KIA

KNAUZ HYUNDAI

www.sunnysidecompany.com

360 N. Rt. 31 • Crystal Lake, IL

888/682-4485 www.andersoncars.com

800/935-5913

BIGGERS MAZDA

www.motorwerks.com

1460 S. Eastwood Dr. • Woodstock, IL

1320 East Chicago Street The Mazda Machine on Rt. 19, Elgin, IL

800/407-0223

847/628-6000

www.bullvalleyford.com

BUSS FORD LINCOLN MERCURY

KNAUZ MINI

815/385-7220

BULL VALLEY FORD/ MERCURY

800/407-0223

www.arlingtonkia.com

Route 120 • McHenry, IL

www.piemontechevy.com

1460 S. Eastwood Dr. • Woodstock, IL

www.oharehonda.com

847/683-2424

800/628-6087

BULL VALLEY FORD/ MERCURY

888/538-4492

206 S. State Street • Hampshire, IL

105 Rt. 173 Antioch, IL

AL PIEMONTE CHEVROLET

www.motorwerks.com

www.clcjd.com

MOTOR WERKS CADILLAC

www.garylangauto.com

800/935-5913

888/800-6100

FENZEL MOTOR SALES

www.Knauzcontinentalauto.com

www.garylangauto.com

www.antiochfivestar.com

5404 S. Rt. 31 • Crystal Lake, IL

AUTO GROUP GARY LANG KIA 1107 S Rt. 31 between Crystal Lake and McHenry

800/628-6087

CRYSTAL LAKE CHRYSLER JEEP DODGE

409 Skokie Valley Hwy • Lake Bluff, IL

847/234-1700

www.bullvalleyford.com

www.raymondchevrolet.com

200 N. Cook St. • Barrington, IL

888/794-5502

888/800-6100

847/395-3600

ANTIOCH CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP

Route 31, between Crystal Lake & McHenry

5404 S. Rt. 31 • Crystal Lake, IL

www.clcjd.com

118 Route 173 • Antioch, IL

877/226-5099

KNAUZ CONTINENTAL AUTOS

105 Rt. 173• Antioch, IL

www.garylangauto.com

AUTO GROUP - GARY LANG CHEVROLET

www.infinitihoffman.com

TOM PECK FORD

888/794-5502

www.motorwerks.com

www.st-charles.mercedesdealer.com

13900 Auto Mall Dr. • Huntley, IL

Route 31, between Crystal Lake & McHenry

800/935-5923

888/280-6844

www.martin-chevy.com

105 Rt. 173 • Antioch, IL

www.garylangauto.com

225 N. Randall Road • St. Charles, IL

888/600-8053

ANTIOCH CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP

888/794-5502

1075 W. Golf Rd. Hoffman Estates, IL

800 Dundee Ave. • East Dundee, IL

www.motorwerks.com

Route 31, between Crystal Lake & McHenry

MERCEDES-BENZ OF ST. CHARLES

815/459-4000

800/935-5909

AUTO GROUP - GARY LANG BUICK

INFINITI OF HOFFMAN ESTATES

ANTIOCH CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP

407 Skokie Valley Hwy. • Lake Bluff, IL

847/604-5000

BUSS FORD

800/935-5913 www.motorwerks.com

MOTOR WERKS CERTIFIED OUTLET Late Model Luxury Pre-Owned Vehicles

1001 W. Higgins Rd. (Rt. 71) or 1000 W. 1000 W. Golf Rd. (Rt. 58) Hoffman Estates, IL

800/935-5909 www.motorwerks.com

PRE-OWNED KNAUZ NORTH 2950 N. Skokie Hwy • North Chicago, IL

847/235-8300 www.knauznorth.com

BARRINGTON VOLVO 300 N. Hough (Rt. 59) • Barrington, IL

847/381-9400


CLASSIFIED

Page E8• Saturday, July 6, 2013 compliance with the Village of Greenwood Zoning Ordinance that a public hearing will be held before the Zoning Board of Appeals in connection with an application for reclassification and a variation of the Village of Greenwood Zoning Ordinance, and before the Greenwood Board of Trustees for consideration of an annexation agreement for the real estate described as follows: THE WEST HALF OF THE WEST HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP 45 NORTH, RANGE 7 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN IN MCHENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS. P.I.N. 08-04-400-001 Commonly known as: 40 vacant acres, north side of Allendale Road, Illinois. The property is subject to a Petition for Annexation to the Village of Greenwood and is located on the north side of Allendale Road, approximately 1/2 mile West of the intersection of Allendale and Queen Anne Roads, unincorporated McHenry County, Illinois and consists of approximately 40 acres, more or less. The subject property has the approximate dimension of 660' x 2,600'. The subject property is presently zoned A-1 Agricultural District, McHenry County. Petitioners are requesting that the property, upon annexation, be reclassified to E-5 Estate District in the Village of Greenwood. Your Petitioners are also requesting a variation for the subject property to allow for three residential lots with a variation of the road frontage from 330' to 313', 30', and 313' respectively. The record title holders of the subject property are: Jeremy & Kari Shaw - 50 Hastings Avenue, Crystal Lake, IL 60014 Lloyd & Sue Shaw - 1010 Rose Court, Woodstock, IL 60098 R. Randall & Patsy Schwaber 8708 Thompson Road, Woodstock, IL 60098 A hearing on the Zoning Petition will be held on the 22nd day of July, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. at the Village of Greenwood, Village Hall, located at 4314 Greenwood Road,

Greenwood, Illinois, at which time and place any person desiring to be heard may be present. A hearing on the annexation agreement will be held before the Greenwood Village Board on the 22nd day of July, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. at the Village of Greenwood Village Hall, located at 4314 Greenwood Road, Greenwood, Illinois. A copy of the Petition and the annexation agreement are on file with the Village Clerk and available for inspection during normal business hours and by appointment. Dated this 5th day of July, 2013. VILLAGE OF GREENWOOD By: /s/ John Ferris President, Village of Greenwood By: /s/ Ronald Schmit Zoning Board Chair (Published in the Northwest Herald July 6, 2013 #A 1414)

PUBLIC NOTICE The Board of Library Trustees of the River East Public Library District, McHenry County, Illinois. Public Notice is hereby given that a public hearing will be held on the proposed Annual Budget and Appropriation Ordinance for the fiscal year July 1, 2013 to June 30, 2014 at the following time and place: 6:30pm, Tuesday, August 6, 2013, River East Public Library District, 813 W. Rte.120, McHenry, Illinois. The said Ordinance in tentative form shall be available for public inspection for at least thirty (30) days prior thereto at said Library during regular library hours. Dated this 2nd day of July, 2013. Heather Grech, Secretary Submitted by: Cherie Wright, Director (Published in the Northwest Herald July 6, 2013 #A1420)

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE Grafton Township and the Grafton Township Road District have passed an Ordinance establishing prevailing wage rates for construction to be the same as

those in McHenry County as determined by the Illinois Department of Labor. Anyone wishing to inspect the Ordinances may do so at Grafton Township, 10109 Vine Street, Huntley, Illinois, between the hours of 8:00 am to 4:00 pm Monday through Friday. Kathryn Francis, Clerk Grafton Township Grafton Township Road District (Published in the Northwest Herald July 6, 2013 #A 1415)

PUBLIC NOTICE PUBLIC NOTICE OF REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS McHenry County will accept sealed qualifications for #13-51 UNDERWRITING SERVICES FOR THE COUNTY OF MCHENRY REVOLVING FUND due July 25, 2013, at 2:00 PM (CST), in the office of Donald A. Gray, Director of Purchasing, McHenry County Administrative Building- Room 200, 2200 N. Seminary Ave. Woodstock, IL 60098. Prospective bidders may obtain bidding documentation at www.co.mchenry.il.us or http://www.co.mchenry.il. us/departments/purchasing/ Pages/index.aspx or by contacting the purchasing department at 815-334-4818. All contracts for the Construction of Public Works are subject to Illinois Prevailing Wage Act (820 ILCS 130/1-12). (Published in the Northwest Herald July 6, 2013. #1418)

PUBLIC NOTICE McHenry County College will be accepting bids from contractors to provide Ceramic Room Ventilation Services for the College. Bids will be accepted at the Office of Business Services, Building A, Room 246 until July 15, 2013 at 10:00A.M. To receive a copy of the bid or bid results, visit our website at www.mchenry.edu/bid. Rita Dubas Business Services Specialist (Published in the Northwest Herald July 6, 2013 #A1421)

BREAKING NEWS available 24/7 at NWHerald.com

PUBLIC NOTICE ASSUMED NAME PUBLICATION NOTICE Public Notice is hereby given that on JUNE 13, 2013, a certificate was filed in the Office of the County Clerk of McHenry County, Illinois, setting forth the names and postoffice address of all of the persons owning, conducting and transacting the business known as

ground on these companies. This newspaper cannot be held responsible for any negative consequences that occur as a result of you doing business with these advertisers.

located at 1515 SCARLETT WAY WOODSTOCK IL 60098

/s/ Katherine C. Schultz County Clerk (Published in the Northwest Herald June 22, 29, July 6, 2013. #A1297)

The Illinois Classified Advertising Network (ICAN) provides advertising of a national appeal. To advertise in this section, please call ICAN directly at 217-241-1700. We recommend discretion when responding. Please refer questions & comments directly to ICAN.

McHenryCountySports.com is McHenry County Sports

READER NOTICE:

As a service to you -- our valued readers -- we offer the following information. This newspaper will never knowingly accept any advertisement that is illegal or considered fraudulent. If you have questions or doubts about any ads on these pages, we advise that before responding or sending money ahead of time, you check with the local Attorney General's Consumer Fraud Line and/or the Better Business Bureau. They may have records or documented complaints that will serve to caution you about doing business with these advertisers. Also be advised that some phone numbers published in these ads may require an extra charge. In all cases of questionable value, such as promises or guaranteed income from work-at-home programs, money to loan, etc., if it sounds too good to be true -- it may in fact be exactly that. Again, contact the local and/or national agency that may be able to provide you with some backnd th ie This

TOW BAR ~ FALCON

A-1 AUTO

All terrain, 6000#, sells for $900, used one time, now $295.00. 847-975-8524

1998 Pontiac Bonneville $2500. 69K, sunroof 815-385-7643 2001 Pontiac Sunfire 153K mi. Sun roof. Runs good. $1200 847-830-0002

2008 FORD ESCAPE Red Metallic 4 Cylinder A/C, AM/FM CD Radio Auto TM, 4 New Michelin Tires and Front Disc Brakes Excellent Condition $10,200 (630) 661-7125 Aft 5 PM

1999 Jeep Cherokee. Red. 6 cyl. Manual trans. 4WD. A/C. 96K mi. Tow pkg. Good condition,$3,900. 815-943-5650 2001 Jeep Cherokee $4695. Runs great, looks great inside & out. New tires and stereo w/ Bluetooth. Mileage 177500 Call Matt 630-797-1895

2001 CHRYSLER T&C LTD MINI VAN Leather, loaded, AWD, clean and runs great! Serviced at Chrysler dealer, $5,500. 815-651-0714 Or 815-404-9401

ATTENTION - CAR COLLECTORS! Add on Air Conditioner Unit 3 compressors – Ford or GM $300.00 TAKES ALL 815-529-4749 Engine Hoist – Older, Comes Apart in 2 Pieces $50 815-382-7080 Hub Caps - Firebird 1967 Set of 4 Exc. Cond. $200 847-669-3937 TOOL BOX. Weather Guard Aluminum. $50. 815-344-4843

WANTED TO BUY Class A or Class C Motorhome. Need badly, will accept fixer-upper, will pay cash. 847-704-0181

Wheels: Chrysler Sebring, 4 - 16” Aluminum $150 obo. 815-219-3882

Will BUY UR USED

!! !! !!! !! !!

ACE 5 CONSTRUCTION

Dated June 13, 2013

Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

I BUY CARS, TRUCKS, VANS & SUVs

CAR, TRUCK, SUV,

MOST CASH

1990 & Newer

* 815-575-5153 *

Will beat anyone's price by $300.

WANTED:

815-814-1224

Call us today: 815-338-2800

!! !! !!! !! !!

ROUTE 14 AUTO PARTS

Share your sports team, birthday party, big catch, pets, or vacation!

Swing Set Large w/slide, you take apart & haul 815-861-9790 TABLES - FREE COME AND GET THEM One octagon shape cocktail table and 1 square end table with storage cabinet underneath. 5 Circle Drive, Algonquin. 815-349-7173

We pay and can Tow it away!

or

Upload photos of your family and friends with our online photo album.

FREEZER - 10 .3 cubic ft. Freezer (chest style) free but must pickup. 815-715-1637 Sony 40" Projection TV Works well w/Stand Call 815-382-7080

$CASH$

815-814-1964

NWHerald.com /myphotos

Free Khaki couch- see nwherald.com/classified for photo Call 815-263-6937

OLD CARS & TRUCKS FOR

Will pay extra for Honda, Toyota & Nissan

Share your photos with McHenry County!

COUCH - Black vinyl couch, great for basement. Restaurant supply round table + 6 chairs. E-Force exercise machine. 815-353-4525

WILL BEAT ANY QUOTE GIVEN!! $400 - $2000 “don't wait.... call 2day”!!

TV – 32” GE Tube 847-494-7038 am TV FREE - COME AND GET IT. 30" Mitsubishi TV in excellent working condition. 5 Circle Drive, Algonquin. 815-349-7173

1995 Glastron 18ft Open Bow 88HP, Evinrude engine, shore lander trailer, hummingbird fish locator, on board 3 battery charger, 24 volt MinnKota trolling motor, new tires and battery, $2000. 847-848-1946 2006 Yamaha High Output Cruiser includes the trailer and cover! EXTREMELY LOW HOURS! Approximately 30 hours. Currently in winterized and ready for you to summerize and go! EXCELLENT CONDITION - very few scratches on front. You can pull a skier or tuber of of this fast waverunner. 1 owner 160 hp, 3 seater, length 10' 11", 772 lbs., includes remote security lock (key fob), tilt steering. $7499 262-581-5095 Northwest Herald Classified It works.

AT YOUR SERVICE

CLOTHES for boys / young men. Swimwear sizes 8-18, shorts sizes 7-20, t-shirts & shirts sizes 8-16. Brand names! Excellent condition! $1-$7. Beth 815-344-9894 CLOTHES FOR MEN L-2XLT, summer shirts, sweaters, long-sleeved dress shirts. XL Reebok jog set & 38x30 Conte di Milano dress pants. Great condition! $1-$10. Beth 815-344-9894 CLOTHES for young women / women, size 6-16. Tops (summer / winter), shorts, jeans, leather skirts, nice dresses, swim wear & pjs. Brand names! Great condition! $1$15. Beth 815-344-9894 COATS & JACKETS - Boys size 10/12 - 18/20. Bibbed snowpants size 10/12. Brand names. Great cond! $3-$12. 815-344-9894

In print daily Online 24/7

Visit the Local Business Directory online at NWHerald.com/localbusiness. Call to advertise 815-455-4800 D. K. QUALITY TUCKPOINTING & MASONRY

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Send your Classified Advertising 24/7 to:

RECRUIT LOCAL!

Email: classified@ shawsuburban.com Fax: 815-477-8898 or online at: www.nwherald.com

Target your recruitment message to McHenry County or reach our entire area. For more information, call 800-589-8237 or email: helpwanted@ shawsuburban.com

DON'T NEED IT? SELL IT FAST! Northwest Classified Call 800-589-8237

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Don't See What You're Looking For Today? Check Back Tomorrow! Never The Same Paper Twice! Northwest Classified 800-589-8237 www.nwherald.com

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Send your Help Wanted Advertising 24/7 to: Email: helpwanted@ shawsuburban.com Fax: 815-477-8898

Great Garage Sale Guarantee you'll have great weather for your sale, or we'll run your ad again for FREE*.

Call to advertise 815-455-4800 *within 4 weeks of original sale date. Ask your representative for details.


CLASSIFIED

Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com FORMAL DRESS by Michaelangelo. Sleeveless, lavender. Size 16. Great cond! $25. 815-344-9894 HANGERS: One style for outfits (with clips for skirts or pants) & clamp hangers for pants, etc. All wood or plastic. One plastic tie hanger. .50 - $2. Beth 815-344-9894 Jeans, sweats, lounge pants for boys/young men. Sizes 8S14S/16R & 30x32 (jeans). Brand names (mostly Levi)! Great condition! $1-$8. 815-344-9894 Purses mostly by Relic. Some wallets & a black leather fanny pack. Very good condition. $1 - $10. Beth...815-344-9894 SATCHEL PURSE - Lg Vinyl Brown Khaki w/Cargo Pant Pockets. 18" W x 14" H. Black lining w/pockets of same material. $35. McHenry 815-236-1747 Sweaters, hoodies, long-sleeved shirts & black dress jacket (10R) for boys/young men. Sizes 7/8 14/16. Brand names. Great cond! .75 - $5. Beth 815-344-9894

WAHL APPLIANCE Reconditioned Appliances Lakemoor 815-385-1872 Air Conditioner $20 779-444-2042

Air Conditioner - Window

Haier, 10,000 BTU, 110 volt, exc condition! Used only one season. $125, C. L. Cell # 312-806-6125 Air Conditioner. Sears. 18000BTU, 320v. Cools 3 rooms. $125. 815-385-9383

Dishwasher: $20 call after Wednesday 7/10 815-338-2951 Dryer. Maytag. Gas. White. Great condition. $299. 630-973-3528 GAS STOVE - GE, XL 44, exc. cond, $150. 815-477-0655 Haier Compact Refrigerator Clean, works great, with books $55, 815-762-0919 Microwave. $5 779-444-2042

NEW Maytag Washer Centennial Edition Energy star, auto water level, never used $325.00 obo 847-639-3250 Range Hood. NEW! White. 36” $25 815-344-4843 Find !t here! PlanitNorthwest.com

REFRIGERATOR - Kenmore. 18.2 cu. Ft - white. 2 yrs. old-exc. condition! Paid $450, asking $200 obo. Call 815-451-4498, leave msg. Refrigerator Whirlpool - $50. Oven - $50 815-715-1637 “Showtime' Rotissorie + BBQ New(Never Used), books + recipes $45, 815-762-0919 Tassimo (T-65) Coffee Maker. Includes: T-Disc rack, book & many T-Discs. Like new condition! Great Deal! $45. 815-344-9894

Antique Mini Oil lamps (3) - . Each lamp is $40. 815-236-1747 McHenry Baseball Cards. Topps 1993 set. 94, '08, '12. 3000+ cards. Worth $300+ Asking $140. 815-338-4829 Basketball Cards Various Stars & Rookies. Range from $5-$50. 815-338-4829

ICE TONGS

22” cast iron, at least 70 years old. $15. 815-455-5903 Lv Msg Japanese Plates (24) The Birds and Flowers. Beautiful Cathay. Rack included. $350. 815-338-5621 JAR - Glass w/Metal Lid. Outside red w/ridges in glass. Top opening 5" diameter. Jar is 7 1/2" diameter & 7" high. $25. McHenry. 815-236-1747 Leaded Glass Hanging Shade from old Crystal Lake bakery, Tiffany's. $125. 815-344-4843 MIXING BOWLS - 3 matching: "Hall's Superior Quality Kitchenware - Eureka Homewood Pattern". Lg 8 5/8", Med 7 3/8", Sm 6 1/8". $49. McHenry. 815-236-1747 Old Records: 57 Records in Albums, 78 RPM, Great Condition $60 815-356-7879 days

Saturday, July 6, 2013 • Page E9

BABY AFGANS - Beautifully hand made crocheted Baby Afgans. Unusual in that they are round & look like a giant doily. They make great shower, birthday or Christmas gifts. Pictures at nwherald/classified.com $40 815-356-9844

CANISTER SET - Mary Engelbreit Cherries Jubilee Collection, Ceramic, Hard to find - retired set. Very pretty in shades of deep apple green, golden yellow & bright cherry red. Adorable. Excellent. $75. 815 477-9023

Crib: “Million Dollar Baby”, Nice Condition, New $450, Asking $150 obo 815-701-4755

Dale Earnhardt 1:24 scale & Car and 4 Boxes of Cereal for Completed Set 1997 $50 815-529-7080

NURSERY ART - Beatrix Potter Benjamin Bunny. Lovely framed print is perfect for a bunny themed nursery. Vivid & detailed, Excellent Condition. $35. 815 477-9023.

Dept. 56 Village Mountain #5228 (Retired), $20 815-568-8036

SPECIAL OCCASION DRESS Stunning, fancy full w/intricate detailing, gorgeous bead work, very beautiful. White, Girls Size 12, Communion, Junior Bride, Flower Girl, Quinceanera. $75. 815-477-9023.

52” Large Screen TV Rear Projection, Excellent Condition. $200 obo 815-245-6818 Blu Ray DVD player, Sony, excellent condition, $35 815-578-0212 CRT TV Wall Mount w/component Mount up to 20" across. (Beige/ white). No scratches! Internet price $55. Mine $15. Beth 815-344-9894

Bicycle Car Rack: Thule, Holds 4 Bikes. Great Condition. $125 Crystal Lake 815-219-6128

Star Wars, Toy Story, Simpsons, M&M. 1997-99. Orig pkg. $10/ea. 847-807-9156 CAKE PLATE AND COVER - Vintage Retro Polished Chrome Square Cake Carrier w/locking lid, fantastic condition for its age. Top locks onto serving tray with two push tabs. $35. 815 477-9023

Parlor Game: Pachincko Nishijin, Wall Mounted, Includes: Power Cord, Stainless Balls & Catch Basket. Has Original Box & Instructions. $125 815-337-3771 after 5pm Plates: Christmas Tree Pattern by Waechtersbach, Red & Green Tree, White Stars, 7-3/4” plate, $25 ea. or 3 for $50. Cake Plate - 12-1/4” $45. New Condition. All for $75 815-245-8367

Huffy Girl's 20" Bicycle Good condition. Price: $35 Call: 815-568-6877 anytime

DVD/CD player, 7 Disc, JVC $50 847-830-9725

Schwinn Bicycles-Mens + Womens 1960's Era bikes in very good condition. 3 Speed generator on one

Pair of Verizon Razor Flip Phones, Complete W/Chargers, Good Batteries & I Case - In Original Boxes $50 For Both. 815-675-2155

CHAIR - Antique Child's Red Wooden Chair - 24-1/2" high at back. $28. McHenry. 815-236-1747

Double Wheeled Pully in 10” wooden block, marked Great Lakes Cont. Co, $15. 815-455-5903 Lv Msg

SCHWINN BIKE - Girls - Hot Pink 20” w/streamers & basket, no rust, ready to ride, excellent shape. $85. 815 477-9023.

RCA - CD Player Deck w/Remote. Very Little Use - Perfect Condition. $15.00 firm. 815-675-2155

Burger King Toys

Chevy Hub Caps - 63-64 Yrs. 14" w/Knock Offs, Set of 4 In Good Condition. $125 815-675-2155 Child-size Ice Cream Parlor (Table + 2 Chairs). Walnut w/ iron legs. Antique. $175, 815-762-0919

Doll of the Year ~ 2012

American Girl, new in box, 18”. “McKenna”, 225. 847-639-2226

Doll ~ American Girl, Historical 18”, “Addy” new in box, Pleasant Co., predates Matel, has hardcover storybook, $85. 847-639-2226 Dolls: set of three boudoir dolls from the 1920's-40's. Need work. $40.00 takes all. Picture online. 815-338-4049 DRESSER - Victorian Eastlake style with handkerchief drawers, candle stands and attached mirror. Walnut and great shape. $350 cash. 815-338-4049. Picture online.

PULLY & BLOCK

Record Collection: 78 RPM. 101 in Jackets or Albums, Plus 2 Old, 33-1/3 RPM Records. No Singles. Must Buy All - $75. Crystal Lake - Email only at: karbil548@sbcglobal.net TOOL BOX - Antique Refinished Pine, 28-1/2" x 13" x 8-3/4" w/ 7 sectioned drawers & brass latch dowel carrying handle. $145. McHenry. 815-236-1747 VANITY - Beautiful pine vanity w/attached mirror & center drawer. This beautiful antique piece was brought from England by the dealer, 37-1/4" wide, 20" deep & 29-1/2" to top of vanity. Mirror 22-3/8" W by 35-3/8" H. Center drawer has metal pull. Legs & side mirror supports have charming decorative sculptured detail. $450. 815-236-1747

Sony ~ Trinitron

Construction Bricks – King Size 9-1/2 x 2-3/4 x 2-3/4 Light red, $50 takes all. 815-382-7080 KITCHEN SINK – White, cast iron, double kitchen sink. Excellent condition w/ nearly new Moen brushed chrome, spray faucet & soap dispenser. $250 firm. Call 815-455-1714

Overhead Door

All glass, aluminum frame, 16'x8', all hardware and springs included. $175 815-742-3171 Screen Doors. Pella 71.24”x81.5” $50/each. 815-477-7702 Window Lattice Inserts. 38 Pella Proline Muntin Series. Var sizes. $50/all. 815-477-7702

RECRUIT LOCAL! Target your recruitment message close to home or reach our entire area. For more information, call 800-589-8237 or email: helpwanted@ shawsuburban.com

DRY SINK - Refinished Dry Sink in perfect condition. Asking $80 firm Call 847-204-9704 Football Cards. Various Stars & Rookies. Range from $5-$50. 815-338-4829

DESKS Liquidating ~ Tan metal cubicles, office supplies, resume folders and stationary, $400. 815-385-9383 Drafting Table, Metal with Light and Arm $75. 847-322-9588

32”, great color and sound, energy star, all video input and speakers in front, $45. 847-639-2226 TELEVISION - 61” HD TV. Excellent Shape. Only 8 yrs old. $100. Call anytime, 815-861-9864.

TV - INSIGINA

Plasma Flatscreen, 42”, less than 1 year old, $400. 815-739-8065 TV/Entertainment Center: 57” Toshiba HD Ready Projection TV & Lighted Bridge Entertainment Center $295. 847-494-7038 am only

TV: 32” TV, Insignia, older, works perfect, $50, 20” TV/VCR Toshiba, older, 20” TV/VCR Memorex $40/each 847-830-9725

Exercise Machine Weider Master Trainer Exercise Machine In good shape. $100

847-302-7009

DON'T NEED IT? SELL IT FAST! Northwest Classified Call 800-589-8237

Fluidity Home Fitness Bar -- Includes: Beginner, Intermediate, Advance DVD, 2 Toning Bands, Toning Ball, Healthy Eating Guide, Seat & Thigh DVD. Used once. Excellent condition. Retails @ $479 - Must sell $380. email: cantcatchtigger@gmail.com

Nordic Track Excell Machine $50.00 call after 6:00 pm 815-385-6839 PILATES POWER GYM, Excellent condition, includes Power Workout & Strength Training DVD & attachments, $75, #847-915-2586, LITH area. Teeter Hangups EP-560 Inversion Table - Acupressure Nodes (8), Lumbar Bridge. Instruction & Healthy Back & Core DVD. ***Never Used after Assembly*** Retails @ $300 - Must Sell $200. email: cantcatchtigger@gmail.com

TREADMILL ~ PROFORM

Crosswalk, #380, $150.00. 847-516-0815 Weight Bench with Lateral Bar in perfect condition. Asking $20. Call 847-204-9704

ANTIQUE DRY SINK - Charming shabby chic painted wood antique dry sink with attached adjustable mirror and white enamel metal bowl. 25-3/4" wide, 21-1/2" deep & 29" high. 2 attached wood towel racks on each side for a total width of 33". White enamel bowl 15" diameter, 6" deep. Bottom shelf 6" from floor. Top section with mirror is 20-1/2" high & 25-3/4" wide & has 2 drawers, each 6" wide & 2-3/4" high. $380 Bring Cash. 815-236-1747 ANTIQUE OAK CHAIR - 36" high at back & seat 16-1/2" wide. 2 curved accent braces as shown. Chair is in excellent condition and is very sturdy. $52. 815-236-1747 BAR STOOLS - Set of 3 Durable hardwood w/larger seating area than your regular bar stool, classic style, perfect for your kitchen island or breakfast bar. Excellent $95. 815 477-9023

Bar stools w/tan seats: Rattan 4/$200

815-385-4353

Bar Stools-4, Oak with Backs. $100. 847-987-2495 BED - Tempurpedic adjustable twin bed. Raise and lower head and feet, vibrates too. Great for guest room, senior, or invalid. Remote function. $390. 815-353-4525 More people read the Northwest Herald each day than all other papers combined in McHenry County!

BISTRO CHAIRS - French country style, cute set of 2 hand painted French blue chairs w/cottage fabric seats, includes matching pillow. Excellent condition. $95. 815 477-9023. BR set: full size bedroom set, includes headboard & frame, nightstand, & chest of drawers, $100/OBO 815-862-1112 or 303-349-6418 Brass Bed & Footboard Queen size, $200. 815-385-9383 BUNK BED – Red bunk bed – full size on tope, twin bottom. $100. 815-385-9383

Cabinet for Computer Printer

Maple. On casters, Shelf, closed compartments. 32X16x25” $10. Exc cond, $20. 815-477-7916 Cabinets (2). Wood. 3 shelves ea. 6'Hx30”W. $20/ea. 815-385-9383 Cedar Chest – Light Oak Color, Fabric Bench Top $150. 815-245-6818 Children's Bunk Bed with Slide. $95 815-477-7702 CHINA CABINET - 6' High. Brown wood & Glass. $25 obo. 5 Circle Drive, Algonquin, 815-349-7173 COTTAGE HUTCH – Cute! Hand painted lilac vintage hutch, shelves on top & cabinet on bottom. Adorable for a young girls room, kitchen, dining or sun porch area. Original hardware, fresh paper lined drawer. 67 H x 31 W x18 D. $295. 815 477-9023. COUCH - Beige Couch Love Seat. Good Shape, $25 obo. 5 Circle Drive Algonquin, 815-349-7173 Couch and love seat. Beige microfiber. $325. or best offer. 847373-0614. Dining Room Chairs (8) Parsons chairs. Cream upholstery. Perfect cond. $40/chair, $320/all/obo. 847-564-4064 DINNETTE SET- 5 piece, upholstered, Light brown wood w/blue/gray seats. Octagon shape table w/leaf, Excellent condition. $50.00 obo Algonquin 815-349-7173 Dresser: Victorian Eastlake solid black walnut w/teardrop pulls, hankie drawers & candle stands. Beautiful! $350.00 Cash. 815-338-4049

Filing Cabinets. Black metal. 4 drawers. $25 815-385-9383 Folding Chairs (4). Wood Slatted. Pre-1950's. Used at social events. Asking $99/all. 815-338-4829 FUTON SOFA/BED FRAME, metal, full/queen size, no mattress, $50, #847-915-2586, LITH area.

Glider chair: oak, ottoman incl., evergreen cushions, $125 847-807-9156 Hand-Carved Wood Couch w/2 Coordinating Chairs & Pillows. $250/set; 2 Dressers w/Mirrors $40 each. 847-223-8015 HIGH CHAIR - Antique Pine, Child's. 39" H x 17" W w/ removable metal tray. Tray arm lifts. McHenry $125. 815-236-1747 Kitchen Table & 4 Birch Chairs 59.5 X 38 – Can be lengthened w/ one 15” leaf, Table is in great shape $350. Call Dave 815-342-3754

KITCHEN TABLE

Round with leaf and 6 chairs. $40/obo. 847-658-4720 LEATHER RECLINERS Two Flexsteel leather recliners, brown - gold color Like new condition. Comfortable for a full body person. New $1500, $300 each. Cash or bank check only. E-mail johnmayerhofersr@yahoo.com for pictures Lighted Glass Display Hutch Knotty Pine - $100 815-382-7080 OFFICE DESK - Walnut wood 5' x 3' Beautiful 7 Drawers. $25 obo 5 Circle Drive, Algonquin 815-349-7173 Painted Chair – Green w/fruit Very Cute!! Kitcheny $50 815-382-7080 Patio Furniture, White Rattan, 4 Chairs with glass top table. $200. 847-987-2495 Queen size bed: Serta - $150 815-715-1637 Recliner couch, recliner loveseat + recliner, blue fabric, great condition, $250 obo. 815-353-4525

ROCKING CHAIR

Solid wood, $70 815-385-4353

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER - Amish made solid cherry entertainment center with storage galore! Cabinets, drawers, glass shelves. Holds small flat screen t.v. Absolutely gorgeous, but must go! Over $3,000 new, sacrifice for $400. 815-459-7669

AT YOUR SERVICE

Entertainment center, pecan wood, TV space, cabinet door storage, drop desk. $300. 815-353-4525

Roll Top Desk and chair. Dark walnut. $100 815-385-4353

Roll Top Desk

Excellent condition, $200. Triple dresser with 9 drawers and a mirror, $50. 815-444-9550

In print daily Online 24/7

Visit the Local Business Directory online at NWHerald.com/localbusiness. Call to advertise 815-455-4800

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847-857-8783 In business since 1998 with an unrivaled commitment to detail and quality workmanship.

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Angie's List Member

815-675-0900 847-514-9671 847-833-2598

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Page E10• Saturday, July 6, 2013 ROLL TOP DESK

Large, 53”Lx30”D, $75.00. 815-568-5508

Roll Top Desk ~ Large 53"L x 30"D, $75.00. 815-568-5508

Room dividers (2): rattan $50 815-385-4353 SHELF - Decorative Floor Shelf. Wooden, w/3 shelves (top shelf less deep than others). Bottom shelf raised off floor. 25 1/2" W x 32"H x 11"D. Very Good Condition! $7. 815-344-9894 Sleeper couch $50. Dresser + twin bed and headboard $150. Crib / youth bed $200. 815-353-4525 SOFA TABLE, Smoked Glass, oak base, $50 815-385-4353 SOFAS - 2 Brown Velour 8' Sofas. $20 each, will separate. 5 Circle Drive, Algonquin, 815-349-7173

BAND SAW

SCROLL SAW Wood, like new! Many blades, $125/obo. 708-363-2004 Skil Saw – 6-1/2” Wormdrive, Works Great. $50 815-236-6339

Skill Saw & Jig Saw

Black & Decker. Work good. $30/both. 815-459-7485

SOCKET WRENCH

Table: round oak 50” $80 815-385-4353

3/8” Drive Craftsman, 2” Extender, 15 Sockets, $10. 815-575-4858

Tables Glass & 2 End Tables

TABLE SAW

and 1 coffee table, $150/all 815-444-9550 TRUNK-like rattan coffee and end tables. $75 815-385-4353 TV Cabinet – Pine, Rustic Looking. Can be used for storage cabinet, Excellent Condition $50 815-382-7080

10” contract doors saw, 110/220 volt, 1.5HP, excellent condition! $200/obo 815-482-9136

YOUTH BED

Electrical, 2 wheel, 4 wheel, $85/ea 847-302-7009

Simplicity with a like new mattress. Used only a Grandma's house. $55 815-385-4105

TABLE SAW ~ Professional – Craftsman, 10” tilting arbor, 1hp - 3' x 5' table w/wheels, portable or stationary, $160 815-479-0492

Basement well window - New basement double pane well window from Innerweld 37x31. $49. 815-482-9429 Bathroom Set - Fish Motif for Kids, Includes: waste can, soap dipenser, tissue box, toothbrush holder & more! Very nice condition! $10. Beth 815-344-9894 Bed Ruffle. White Eyelet. Full size. New, never used. $15. 815-338-5621 Candles / candle holders & vases. Varied & in great condition. See picture in online ad. .50 - $4. Beth 815-344-9894 CHAIRS - Quality set of 4 chairs, solid construction, very comfortable, amble room, excellent condition. $95. (815) 477-9023 CHINA – Royal Dolton England: 7 piece – serving dish, caserole cover, & 2 dinner plates. $20. 815-477-7916 Discovery Channel's Info. Globe Digital Caller ID. Excellent condition. $40. Beth... 815-344-9894 Frame - Wooden "baseball glove" supported by wooden "baseball bat". 9"H x 11"W. Picture opening 3 1/2"H x 2 3/4" W. Great condition. $5. Beth... 815-344-9894

ICE CRUSHER

Portable Electric use on counter for drinks or fancy food. Works good, $20. 815-455-3555 Ladders. NEW 6', 7', 8', step type 1, Fiberglass & Alum. $50, $70, $80. Moving. 815-455-3555 MIRROR Wall mounted black chalkboard/ mirror. 19"H x 15 1/2"W, inside mirror is 9"H x 9"W. Comes with chalk & mini eraser. $5. 815-344-9894 “Nature's Miracle” Odor Remover Gallons, $10 each. Crystal Lake 815-219-6128 Pedestal Sink: Cidamar, Made in Brazil $20 excellent condition 815-675-2216 Quilt Clamp - 24" Wall Rack Hanger finished, w/ 3 knob hangers. Excellent condition. $10. 815-344-9894 SERVING BOWL, Ceramic - Made in Italy, by Stefani. Could be used for pasta dishes, has raised garlic cloves painted around the border. Great condition! $5. 815-344-9894 Wooden Butter Churn Old-fashioned, decorated, great for décor! $35, 815-762-0919

Shower Chair – White w/Back, Arm Rests & Adjustable Legs - Like New. $50. 847-659-1980 evenings

32” Insulated Steel Pre-Hung Door New, Panel Look ($150+ value) $50, 815-501-4219 (after 6 pm) CARPET TILES – New, rubber backed, 18x18, 50 tiles for $100. If you lost carpet in the last flood this might be a good solution! 847-639-9176 Chandelier, chrome, from the 1970's w/5 glass domes, excellent condition $25 815-385-7440

DINNERWARE - 46 PIECES

Set of Fairwinds, The Friendship of Salem, brown, exc cond, $350. 847-807-9156 Folding Tables- three 6'x30” two 4'x24”. $30 for all. 815-568-8036 FRAMED BOARD WITH CUBBIES Great for Storage or Display Merchandise in a store. Corkboard measures 23 H x 15 W w/3 cubbies 5 W x 3.5 D & 4 antiqued hooks. Quality made, framed in satin black, like new condition. $35. 815 477-9023 LUGGAGE 3 Pc Samsonite Set w/wheels. Never Used. $50 OBO. Call anytime, 815-861-9864. Luggage Set Top Brand and cond. American Tourister. Not canvas sides, 2 pieces 7x24”, 7x20”, $40. 815-455-3555 Map of United States, professionally framed, 4.5ft w & 3ft h, $50 815-578-0212 Old Time Movies – Super 8mm Titles Include: Pierrebean, The Lively Set, Chilly Willy, Eggnappers, The Mummy's Tomb, Abbott & Costello, Paleface. Also, Large Reel of Demolition Derby VGC. $100 obo 815-337-3771 aft. 5pm Painted Window – Old Country Window; Terra Cotta Pot & Green Ivy $25 815-382-7080 Propane tanks - For gas grill, 20#, Exc. cond. $15 ea. 815-482-8399 SLEEPING BAG for child. Navy blue with stars & moons that glow in the dark! Great condition! $5. Beth 815-344-9894

SLOT MACHINE

With stand, uses tokens, $125. 815-444-9550 Small shop compressor for large stand up style tank, 120v, runs good $50 815-529-4749 TV: flat screen stereo TV & monitor , Magnavox, 15” $35 815-578-0212

WINDMILL

And 2 matching runners, 8x10 oriental style, smoke/pet free, beige tones with maroon & mauve, green & gold, $350. 815-814-1732

Rustic wood with 2 planter boxes, never used. 4'H, $35. 815-578-0212 Wood sitting bench, black bear, $50 815-578-0212

21" PUSH MOWER - Craftsman NEW $145.00 w/mulch bag 847-669-1806 Huntley

ORGAN – Electronic Lowrey Organ in very good condition. $225. Call 815-455-1714

AERATOR, PULL-BEHIND SPIKE TYPE. 36" IN VERY GOOD CONDITION. $50. 815-675-2155

Piano - Kranich & Bach. Very good condition. Crystal Lake 815-219-6128

Craftsman Lawnmower – Briggs & Stratton 550 Series. 158cc 22" cut. $45. Call 815-477-7383

VICTROLA – Antique - Victor Talking Machine in working condition, record storage behind cabinet doors. $375. 815-477-9023

Fertilizer Spreader: Scott's Accu Green (Drop), $7 815-568-8036 Folding Chairs (4). Wood Slatted. Pre-1950's. Used at social events. Asking $99/all. 815-338-4829 LAWN MOWER - Riding Tractor Lawn Mower. Lawn Chief 15/43. Runs really good; $249. 815-482-9429 Lawn Statue: Standing Bear, 27” Heavy Concrete w/Lots of Detail $35. 847-587-0119 Lawnmower - 20" cut, push, 2 years old, 3.5hp Briggs $30.00 815-477-0655

POWER WASHER

Electric, Husky, 1550 PSI, works great! $60. 224-523-1569

5 year old male Pomeranian, black & white, FREE to good home 312-303-0583 Johnsburg area

Adorable Puppies All puppies come with * Health Warranty * Free Vet Visit * Free Training DVD * Financing Available

Petland 6126 Northwest Hwy (Next to Jewel, Rt 14 & Main 815-455-5479

BASSETT HOUND PUPS

Registered, first shots. $500. 815-520-5909

Riding Mower ~ Craftsman

38” cut, 12HP, 5 spd, runs good, cuts good, $250. 815-943-6087 Harvard e-mail for pic: safetydot@aol.com WEEDWACKER Gas Powered, Homelite, dual string w/brand new carb in very good condition w/ papers. $60. Call 815-675-2155 WOODEN GLIDER - Handcrafted double seat glider bench. Great for the patio, porch or among flowering plants in your garden. Hand painted a chippy grey for that cottage setting. Built and designed to last. $225. 815 477-9023.

BUCKY 1 year old male Yorkie/Pug mix. I'm not shy about speaking my mind....you have to put yourself out there to be genuine. Mr. Roger's advice was to always be yourself! www.helpingpaws.net 815-338-4400

RECRUIT LOCAL! GRASS/ALFALFA HAY $4/each. 815-528-8756 Hay for Sale Small and Large Squares Delivery Available. 815-354-0607

JET 4 year old male Black DSH My eyes are the windows to my soul, and reflect my ageless beauty. My inner peace would love some company. Are you available? www.helpingpaws.net 815-338-4400

WILLOW 4 month old female Rottweiler mix. Today is the first day of more joy, an endless supply of optimism and the feeling of all that's possible. It's a day for me to meet you! www.helpingpaws.net 815-338-4400

Dog Exercise Circular Pen

Kittens – 8 weeks old

YORKIE / MIX WANTED! I am looking for a new furry companion to share my big, beautiful home in Marengo. Male or Female (fixed), pref 1+ yrs. 815-568-0405

36”H, 8 panels with door, can be used for dog, puppies or bunnies. Folds to compact travel size, $70/obo. Call or text 815-307-2893

Dog House/Igloo Large Call or text. $40.00/obo. McHenry 815-307-2893 Golden Retriever Puppies. 3 generations, excellent OFA. Light color. Ready. Vet checked, see online ad 815-337-4624

Free to good home. 815-505-1523

Kittens for sale: spectacular Siamese & snowshoe kittens,

815-338-0194

LAB PUPPIES black & yellow, AKC, OFA, champ lines, excellent temp, vet checked, 1st shot. 815-344-9042

Minolta Camera Freedom Family Zoom w/case & Hi-Matic AF2-M w/case. Good Condition! $10 ea. Beth 815-344-9894 Sony Cyber-shot 3.2 mega pixel camera. Works! Great condition. $50. Beth 815-344-9894 TRIPOD - Quest Video Camera Tripod. Very Good Condition. $10. Beth 815-344-9894

Wood Lathe ~ Craftsman

12x36, with or without motor on custom wood bench. $185/obo. 708-363-2004

WOOL RUG

Craftsman LT2000 Riding Mower Kohler 18Hp Pro OHV motor $375 815-459-4764 DROP SPREADER - LAWNCRAFTER brand fertilizer drop spreader, very good condition. $20. If interested email me at: bpk31257@yahoo.com

DAPHNE 1 year old female Bichon Frise/Poodle mix. I want to imagine the choices I'd make if I had no fear---of failing, of losing, of being alone, of disapproval. Just imagine! www.helpingpaws.net 815-338-4400

Wire Spool Racks

All Purpose Saddle

Wintec Wide, black, 16.5” seat with Cair panels. Adj gullet. Like new! $300. 815-693-0542

Baseball Bat by DeMarini. Black Coyote. $10. Beth 815-344-9894

14” vertical, metal or wood, on metal stand, durable speed, like new! $200/obo 708-363-2004 Gas Generator : AGTronics, Electronic Ignition – New, 8HP, 2 - 125w outlets, 1- 240w, 3 ph. $399 firm. 815-479-0492 Kohler Generator - 5000 Watt, 12 Hp w/New Tune-up & New Electric Start. Works Well, Needs Gas Tank Cleaned. $400 815-675-2155

Target your recruitment message to McHenry County or reach our entire area. For more information, call 800-589-8237 or email: helpwanted@ shawsuburban.com

Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

JAN 2 month old female Shepherd/Australian Cattle Dog Close encounters are the best kind. I've got it all figured out, let's ditch any plans and follow our hearts. www.helpingpaws.net 815-338-4400 Have a photo you'd like to share? Upload it to our online photo album at NWHerald.com/MyPhotos

ROSCOE 7 year old male Orange & White DSH. When I count my friends, I don't exclude the trees around me, the sky above, the view ahead. I cherish them and they'll never let me down. www.helpingpaws.net 815-338-4400 Buying? Selling? Renting? Hiring? To place an ad, call 800-589-8237 Northwest Herald Classified

Costume of Evil Jester. (red/black). Youth Large (10-12). Great Condition! $10. Beth 815-344-9894 Snowplow for a Jeep - Best offer 815-715-1637 TV: Flat glass tube, 36”. Best offer. 815-715-1637 WICKER CHAIRS - Vintage garden appeal, hand painted lime green, sturdy construction, durable, classic, very cute cottage chic! $195. 815-477-9023

BREAKING NEWS available 24/7 at NWHerald.com

Football Youth Medium: Bike rib protector, Nike shin guards & extra set of football pads. $9. Beth 815-344-9894

CANOE - Sears Fiberglass 16' and 2 seat Canoe in good condition. 2 seats pads and 4 oars included. Asking $300. Must pick up in Huntley. Call 847-970-2559

GOLF CLUBS: Woman's golf clubs Nichent excellent condition - $100 815-715-1637

Daisy Air Rifle/Pellet Gun, Model Powerline 856 w/Scope, Excellent Condition $40. 815-344-5770

Hit A Way Baseball Trainer. Very Good Condition. $10. Beth 815-344-9894

Check out McHenryCountySports.com for local prep sports and video.

Got a news tip? Call 815-459-4122 Northwest Herald

Motorcycle Tires - Harley Davidson 1992 FXR black powder coated front and rear mags & AVON Venom-X tires, $300. 847-487-1650 Paint ball gun: competition, $400/OBO, like new, Orig. $1200 815-261-8779

POOL TABLE

7 ft with all accessories, exc cond! $100 847-516-0815 Find !t here! PlanitNorthwest.com


CLASSIFIED

Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

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SUDOKU

Saturday, July 6, 2013 • Page E11

CROSSWORD

HOROSCOPE

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TODAY - Your chart indicates that you’ll be in a favorable growth pattern in the year ahead. However, you must work hard and be patient. You won’t become rich overnight -- it will require some elbow grease. CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- Finally, you’ll get the chance to disengage from an unproductive situation that you’ve been waiting for. It’s time to get while the getting’s good. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Your intuition will be in fine fettle. If you get a strong hunch about something, play it for all it’s worth. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Today’s events could awaken much hope in you. There are strong indications that a significant cycle is starting to develop. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- If you haven’t been pushing yourself lately, you’re not living up to your potential. Start setting some lofty goals and/or objectives for yourself. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Take advantage of any opportunity you get to acquire some new, practical knowledge. What you discover could be exactly what you need to get ahead. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Someone with whom you have close, emotional ties is involved in a project that could turn out to be very profitable. Try to get yourself in the picture. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- This is a good day to start revising an agreement that has gone dormant. Something can be worked out that would rejuvenate the matter and prove beneficial to all parties. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Work as hard as necessary for something you hope to achieve, because your possibilities for success look good. If you’re motivated enough, even your labor will be fun. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- If you’ve been seeking greater participation in a current project, don’t wait around to be asked. Make your move today. ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- It should be a good day in general, but your greatest benefits are likely to come about when you go out of your way to help others. Do good things when and where you can. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- There is a good chance you will have some fun today. Recent acquaintances whom you liked a lot will likely invite you to join them in a get-together. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Something could occur that would have an effect on your work or career. Be alert for opportunities for gain and advancement.

JUMBLE

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CBS 2 News at (:35) Criminal Minds “Retaliation” A (:35) CSI: Miami “Slow Burn” Fire (:35) Cold Case CBS 2 News at CBS Evening Entertainment Tonight (N) ’ (CC) NCIS: Los Angeles “Crimeleon” An Brooklyn DA (Season Finale) (N) 48 Hours ’ (CC) ^ WBBM 10PM (N) (CC) man begins a killing spree. ’ elusive, chameleonlike killer. reveals the body of a slain hunter. ’ (CC) 5:00PM (N) ’ News (N) (CC) ’ (CC) NBC 5 Chicago NBC Nightly Access Hollywood Top stories of American Ninja Warrior “Venice Beach Qualifying” Competitors face six Do No Harm “Me Likey” Jason NBC 5 Chicago (:29) Saturday Night Live Kevin Hart; Macklemore and (12:03) 1st (:33) 24/7: % WMAQ News at 5:00 News (N) (CC) the week. (N) ’ (CC) News at 10:00 Ryan Lewis. ’ (CC) Secrets of the obstacles. Look ’ makes a deal with Ian. (N) ’ Weekend ABC7 ABC World Zero Hour “Winding” Molars shares 666 Park Avenue Henry seaches 20/20 ’ (CC) Jeopardy! (CC) Wheel of Private Practice Amelia bonds with Private Practice Addison prepares ABC7 News ’ (CC) _ WLS Fortune (CC) info with White Vincent. (N) News ’ (CC) News for Jane’s father. (N) ’ (CC) a woman in rehab. ’ (CC) for a new baby. ’ (CC) MLB Baseball: (:45) 10th Inning Two and a Half Movie: ›› “You’ve Got Mail” (1998, Romance-Comedy) Tom Hanks, Meg Ryan, Parker WGN News at Nine (N) ’ (CC) 30 Rock “Pilot” Two and a Half Movie: ››› “Shanghai Knights” (2003) Jackie Chan, Owen Wilson. ) WGN Pirates at Cubs (N) (CC) Chon Wang and his comrades shake up Victorian England. (CC) Posey. Two bitter business rivals conduct an online love affair. (CC) Men ’ (CC) Men ’ (CC) ’ (CC) Rick Steves’ Ask This Old Ask This Old McLaughlin As Time Goes Keeping Up Hidden Chicago Doc Martin Martin gets a chance to Movie: ››› “The Thomas Crown Affair” (1968, Adventure) Steve NOVA “Dogs Decoded” The origin of + WTTW Europe (CC) By (CC) Appearances redeem himself. (N) ’ (CC) McQueen. A self-made millionaire masterminds the perfect bank heist. House ’ (CC) House ’ (CC) Group (N) dogs. ’ (CC) (DVS) Musicology: Live from Old Town Inspector George Gently “Gently in the Blood” A Me and Mrs Independent Lens “Deaf Jam” Independent Lens Wampanoag Antiques Roadshow “Seattle” America Revealed New York; Just Seen It ’ Rev. ’ (CC) 4 WYCC Diamond and enamel jewel; chair. (CC) Jones ’ (CC) American Sign Language Poetry. revive their language. ’ California’s Central Valley. ’ (CC) School of Folk Music “Buika” young woman is raped and murdered. ’ (CC) Pro Wrestling Whacked Out Cheaters In a hot tub with another Unsealed: Alien Unsealed: ConAre We There That ’70s Show Futurama ’ Family Guy Movie: ››› “Shanghai Knights” (2003) Jackie Chan, Owen Wilson. Ring of Honor Wrestling (CC) 8 WCGV Yet? Files (N) (CC) spiracy Files (N) Report “Jungle Love” Chon Wang and his comrades shake up Victorian England. (CC) (CC) Sports ’ woman. ’ (CC) ’ (CC) American Dad American Dad Cheaters In a hot tub with another American Dad American Dad Family Guy ’ American Dad Futurama ’ That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Seinfeld “The Family Guy Futurama ’ Family Guy ’ Futurama ’ : WCIU “Cops & Roger” ’ (CC) Pony Remark” “Jungle Love” (CC) (CC) (CC) (CC) (CC) woman. ’ (CC) ’ (CC) ’ (CC) ’ (CC) ’ (CC) ’ (CC) MLB All-Star MLB Baseball: Regional Coverage. (N) ’ (Live) (CC) Goodwin Game Mancow Mash Cops ’ (CC) Paid Program Fox 32 News at Nine (N) Hell’s Kitchen (CC) @ WFLD The Office ’ Burns and Allen P. Allen Smith’s Antiques Pioneers of Television “Science Burt Wolf:Taste Great Old Amusement Parks Early A Hot Dog Program Hot dog’s Antiques Roadshow “Vintage Movie: ››› “The Thomas Crown Affair” (1968, Adventure) Steve D WMVT Garden Home Roadshow Show of Freedom Milwaukee” Tiffany lamp. (N) (CC) McQueen. A self-made millionaire masterminds the perfect bank heist. Fiction” Futuristic storytellers. ’ theme-parks. ’ (CC) impact. ’ (CC) Monk Benjy witnesses a murder. Monk ’ (CC) Monk A teacher’s death. (CC) Monk ’ (CC) Monk ’ (CC) Monk ’ (CC) F WCPX Monk Computer mogul is shot. ’ Monk Monk’s fidelity. ’ (CC) MLB All-Star MLB Baseball: Chicago White Sox at Tampa Bay Rays. From Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Fla. (N) News Big Bang Goodwin Game Bones ’ (CC) Hell’s Kitchen (CC) Law & Order ’ G WQRF Big Bang Bones A con man misleads the Bones Dr. Brennan and Booth track Burn Notice “Noble Causes” Burn Notice The wrong side of The Closer “Sudden Death” Detec- The Closer “Split Ends” A murdered Crime Stoppers Hollyscoop (N) EP Daily “The EP Daily “The R WPWR Case Files Lone Ranger.” Lone Ranger.” Michael’s neighbor needs his help. Jamaican smugglers. (CC) tive Sanchez’s brother is shot. hairstylist. (CC) ’ (CC) team. ’ (CC) a terrorist. ’ (CC) CABLE 5:00 5:30 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30 TBA Longmire “Tell It Slant” (CC) (A&E) (4:00) Movie: ››› “Independence Day” (1996) Will Smith. (CC) Movie: ››› “The Bourne Identity” (2002, Suspense) Matt Damon. Premiere. (CC) (:01) Movie: ››› “The Bourne Identity” (2002) Matt Damon. (CC) (:14) The Walking Dead “Hounded” Michonne makes (:17) The Walking Dead The gover- (:19) The Walking Dead A new (:22) The Walking Dead Rick tries to (:25) The Walking Dead “Home” The (:26) The Walking Dead Rick and Movie ›› “Godzilla” (1998, Science Fiction) Matthew (AMC) a decision. (CC) nor seeks information. (CC) threat arises at the prison. (CC) save one of his group. (CC) group debates the next step. the group must make a choice. Broderick, Jean Reno.‘PG-13’ (CC) My Cat From Hell “Chubs” (CC) My Cat From Hell (N) ’ (ANPL) To Be Announced My Cat From Hell ’ (CC) My Cat From Hell ’ My Cat From Hell ’ My Cat From Hell ’ (CC) My Cat From Hell ’ Anderson Cooper Special Report Anthony Bourdain Parts Unknown Anthony Bourdain Parts Unknown Stroumboulopoulos Anthony Bourdain Parts Unknown Anthony Bourdain Parts Unknown CNN Newsroom (N) (CNN) The Situation Room (:01) Tosh.0 (:32) Tosh.0 (12:02) Tosh.0 (:33) Tosh.0 (COM) (4:30) Movie: ›› “Dinner for Schmucks” (2010) Steve Carell. (CC) Movie: ››› “Role Models” (2008) Seann William Scott. (CC) Movie: ››› “Role Models” (2008) Seann William Scott. (CC) Must See Racing The Golf Scene SportsNet Cent Triathlon Adrenaline SportsNet Cent SportsNet Cent Fight Sports SportsNet Cent Triathlon (CSN) Summer Dew Tour ’ (DISC) Deadliest Catch “Listing Lovers” River Monsters “Killer Torpedo” River Monsters ’ (CC) River Monsters ’ (CC) River Monsters ’ (CC) River Monsters ’ (CC) River Monsters ’ (CC) River Monsters ’ (CC) Good Luck Good Luck Shake It Up! A.N.T. Farm Shake It Up! Jessie “Panic Jessie “Punch Gravity Falls ’ Austin & Ally ’ Fish Hooks ’ Jessie ’ (CC) Austin & Ally ’ Good Luck Austin & Ally ’ Austin & Ally ’ A.N.T. Farm (DISN) Charlie (CC) Attack Room” Dumped Love” (CC) (DVS) “independANTs” Charlie (CC) (CC) (CC) (CC) (CC) “Egg It Up” ’ (CC) “informANT” ’ “Review It Up” Charlie (CC) (3:10) “Twelve (:20) Movie: › “Hudson Hawk” (1991, Comedy) Movie: ›› “Striking Distance” (1993, Suspense) (:45) Movie: ››› “The Fifth Element” (1997, Science Fiction) Bruce Willis, Gary Oldman, (10:55) Movie: ›› “The Jackal” (1997) Bruce Willis, Richard Gere. An (ENC) Monkeys” ’ Bruce Willis, Danny Aiello. ’ (CC) Bruce Willis, Sarah Jessica Parker. ’ (CC) Ian Holm. A New York cabby tries to save Earth in 2259. ’ (CC) imprisoned Irishman accepts an offer to nab an assassin. ’ (CC) (5:55) Soccer: Messi and Friends. From Chicago. (N) (Live) SEC Storied (N) (CC) Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) (CC) SportsCenter (N) (Live) (CC) SportsCenter (N) (Live) (CC) SportsCenter (N) (Live) (CC) (ESPN) SportsCenter (N) (Live) (CC) NFLYearbook NFLYearbook NFLYearbook NFLYearbook Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) (CC) 2012 World Series of Poker MLL Lacrosse: Charlotte Hounds at Boston Cannons. (N) (Live) (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing: Summit Racing Equipment Nationals, Qualifying. (FAM) Pirates-Worlds Movie: ›› “National Treasure” (2004, Adventure) Nicolas Cage, Hunter Gomez, Diane Kruger. Movie: ›› “National Treasure: Book of Secrets” (2007) Nicolas Cage, Jon Voight. Movie: › “Wild Hogs” (2007, Comedy) Tim Allen, John Travolta. Justice With Judge Jeanine FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Justice With Judge Jeanine (N) Geraldo at Large (N) ’ (CC) Red Eye (N) (FNC) America’s News Headquarters Geraldo at Large ’ (CC) Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Restaurant: Impossible Restaurant: Impossible Restaurant: Impossible Iron Chef America Restaurant: Impossible Restaurant: Impossible (FOOD) Food Network Star Unsupervised Unsupervised UFC 162: Silva vs.Weidman - Prelims From Las Vegas. (N) (Live) (FX) (4:00) Movie: ›› “The A-Team” (2010, Action) Liam Neeson. Movie: ››› “Star Trek” (2009, Science Fiction) Chris Pine, Zachary Quinto, Leonard Nimoy. The Golden The Golden (4:00) Movie:“Banner 4th of July” Movie: ››› “Backyard Wedding” (2010) Alicia Witt. Men from the past Movie: › “Hope Floats” (1998) Sandra Bullock, Harry Connick Jr. A Movie: › “Hope Floats” (1998) Sandra Bullock, Harry Connick Jr. A (HALL) (2013) Brooke White. (CC) cause a woman to question her upcoming wedding. (CC) newly divorced woman finds love in her hometown. (CC) newly divorced woman finds love in her hometown. (CC) Girls ’ (CC) Girls ’ (CC) Celeb-Home Celeb-Home Love It or List It “Smyth” (CC) House Hunters Hunters Int’l House Hunters Hunters Int’l House Hunters Hunters Int’l Love It or List It “Hung” (CC) Love It or List It “Hung” (CC) (HGTV) House Hunters Hunters Int’l Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars (:31) Pawn Stars (:02) Pawn Stars (:32) Pawn Stars (:01) Pawn Stars (:31) Pawn Stars Pawn Stars (:31) Pawn Stars (HIST) (4:00) Hillbilly:The Real Story Movie:“Dirty Laundry” (2006) Rockmond Dunbar, Jenifer Lewis. Pre- Movie: ›› “Tyler Perry’s the Family That Preys” (2008, Drama) Kathy Bates, Alfre Wood- Preachers’Wives “Pilot” Women (:31) Prank My (:02) Movie: ›› “Tyler Perry’s the Family That Preys” (2008) Kathy (LIFE) miere. A closeted gay man learns that he has a 10-year-old son. (CC) support their minister husbands. Mom (CC) Bates. Greed and scandal test the mettle of two family matriarchs. ard, Tyler Perry. Greed and scandal test the mettle of two family matriarchs. (CC) Caught on Camera Caught on Camera Lockup: San Quentin Lockup Lockup: San Quentin Lockup: San Quentin Lockup: Corcoran (MSNBC) Caught on Camera Catfish:The TV (MTV) Catfish:The TV Show ’ Catfish:The TV Show ’ Girl Code ’ Girl Code ’ Girl Code ’ Girl Code ’ MTV Special ’ Catfish:The TV Show ’ (NICK) SpongeBob SquarePants ’ (CC) Sam & Cat ’ Marvin Marvin Big Time Rush Wendell-Vinnie The Nanny ’ The Nanny ’ Friends (CC) Friends (CC) Friends (CC) Friends (CC) George Lopez George Lopez (4:30) Movie: ››› “Men in Black” (1997) Tommy Lee Jones, Will Smith. Movie: ››› “Star Wars VI: Return of the Jedi” (1983, Science Fiction) Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford, Carrie (:15) Movie: ›› “The Guardian” (2006, Drama) Kevin Costner, Ashton Kutcher, Sela Ward. A Coast Guard (SPIKE) Secret agents monitor extraterrestrial activity on Earth. ’ Fisher. Luke and his allies have a confrontation with Darth Vader. ’ trainer makes a swimming champ his protege. ’ Sinbad “House of Games” Anwar Sinbad “Old Man of the Sea” The Siberia “Pilot” (Series Premiere) The Sinbad “Hunted” Gunnar and Primeval: New World An anomaly Movie: › “Dragon Wars” (2007, Action) Jason Behr, Amanda Brooks. A Movie: ›› “Dragonquest” (2009, (SYFY) loses The Providence in a bet. crew find a strange old man. competition begins. (N) (CC) Sinbad are ambushed. (N) puts students in danger. (N) reporter learns that the Imoogi have returned to Earth. Fantasy) Marc Singer. (CC) (4:15) Movie: ››› “Those Magnificent Men in Their Flying Machines” Movie: ››› “Key Largo” (1948, Crime Drama) Humphrey Bogart. Movie: ›› “What Price Glory?” (1952) James Cagney, Dan Dailey. Movie: ››› “The Bad Seed” (1956) Nancy Kelly, Patty McCormack. A (TCM) (1965, Comedy) Stuart Whitman, Sarah Miles. (CC) Gangster holds GI and hostages in Florida Keys hotel. (CC) (DVS) Premiere. Capt. Flagg and Sgt. Quirt vie for girl in 1917 France. mother suspects her child’s evil behavior is inherited. (CC) SayYes, Dress SayYes, Dress 48 Hours: Hard Evidence (CC) 48 Hours: Hard Evidence (N) ’ 48 Hours: Hard Evidence (N) ’ 48 Hours: Hard Evidence (N) ’ 48 Hours: Hard Evidence (CC) 48 Hours: Hard Evidence (CC) 48 Hours: Hard Evidence (CC) (TLC) (3:00) Unknown Countdown to Green (N) (CC) NASCAR Racing: Sprint Cup: Coke Zero 400. From Daytona International Speedway in Daytona, Fla. (N) (Live) (CC) 72 Hours “American Southwest” (TNT) Movie: ›› “The Fast and the Furious” (2001, Action) Vin Diesel. (TVL) Roseanne ’ Roseanne ’ Roseanne ’ Roseanne ’ The Exes (CC) Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond (:12) Everybody Loves Raymond The Soul Man King of Queens Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit (USA) A rapist with a unique tattoo. A 15-year-old with an STD. “Behave” ’ (CC) “Scorched Earth” ’ “Blood Brothers” ’ “Missing Pieces” ’ “True Believers” ’ “Authority” ’ (CC) (4:00) Movie:“Vegas Vacation” 40 Greatest Pranks 3 40 Greatest Pranks 3 (VH1) Movie: ›› “Malibu’s Most Wanted” (2003) Jamie Kennedy. ’ Movie: ›› “White Chicks” (2004) Shawn Wayans. Premiere. ’ Hit the Floor “Lights Out” ’ Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Deon Cole’s Our Family (WTBS) King of Queens King of Queens Big Bang Movie: ›› “Meet the Browns” (2008) Tyler Perry. (CC) (DVS) PREMIUM 5:00 5:30 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30 (:15) Movie ›› “The Lucky One” (2012) Zac Efron. A war vet looks for Movie ›› “Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Dog Days” (2012) (:45) Movie ›› “Cowboys & Aliens” (2011) Daniel Craig. Extraterrestri- (:45) Movie › “Wrath of the Titans” (2012, Fantasy) Sam Worthington. Movie ››› (HBO) “Troy” (2004) the woman he believes brought him luck. ’ ‘PG-13’ (CC) Zachary Gordon. Premiere. ’ ‘PG’ (CC) als attack a 19th-century Arizona town. ’ ‘PG-13’ (CC) Perseus must rescue Zeus from the underworld. ’ ‘PG-13’ (CC) (4:30) Movie “National Lampoon’s (:15) Movie › “I Still Know WhatYou Did Last Summer” (1998, Horror) Banshee “Wicks” Man from Lucas’ Movie ›› “The Island” (2005, Action) Ewan McGregor. A mercenary (:15) Banshee “Wicks” Man from (12:10) Sex Games Cancun (MAX) Dorm Daze 2” (2006) Gable Carr. Lucas’ past triggers memories. ’ Feature 1 ’ (CC) past triggers memories. ’ pursues two clones on the run in 2019. ’ ‘PG-13’ (CC) Jennifer Love Hewitt, Freddie Prinze Jr., Brandy. ’ ‘R’ (CC) Ray Donovan Ray’s father is Dexter “A Beautiful Day” Dexter Dexter “A Beautiful Day” Dexter Ray Donovan Ray’s father is Movie ›› “Paycheck” (2003) Ben Movie ›› “The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 1” (2011, Ro(3:30) Movie ››› “War Horse” (SHOW) (2011) Emily Watson.‘PG-13’ (CC) continues to juggle life. ’ (CC) released from prison. ’ (CC) continues to juggle life. ’ (CC) released from prison. ’ (CC) Affleck. ’ ‘PG-13’ (CC) mance) Kristen Stewart. Bella and Edward marry. ’ ‘PG-13’ (CC) Movie “VHS” (2012, Horror) Calvin Reeder, Lane Hughes. Premiere. Movie ›› “Saw” (2004, Horror) (3:30) Movie ›› “Die Another (5:50) Movie ›› “Real Steel” (2011, Action) Hugh Jackman. A boxing Movie ›› “Saw” (2004, Horror) Cary Elwes, Danny Glover. A doctor (TMC) Day” (2002) Pierce Brosnan. (CC) promoter and his son build a robot fighter. ’ ‘PG-13’ (CC) Thieves uncover videos full of sex, demons and depravity. ’ ‘R’ (CC) Cary Elwes. ’ ‘R’ (CC) must kill his cellmate or his family will die. ’ ‘R’ (CC)


CLASSIFIED

Page E12• Saturday, July 6, 2013

Northwest HeraldSaturday, / NWHerald.com July 6, 2013 “Happy 4th of July from Gizmo” Photo by: Deana

Upload your photos on My Photos – McHenry County’s community photo post! Photos on My Photos are eligible to appear in print in Northwest Herald Classified. Go to NWHerald.com/myphotos

Raquetball Raquet by Wilson. Great condition! $5. Beth 815-344-9894

CRYSTAL LAKE

SKIS ~ (2) SETS

With bag, 1pair of poles & boots. $40. 224-523-1569 SKLZ Football Training Set in net bag. $7. Call Beth 815-344-9894 Soccer Training Net - a hand held net for self practice only. Great condition! $15, web on sale $98! Great deal! Call Beth 815-344-9894 TENT – Sleeps 8. +8 sleeping bag. Canvas tote for tent. $75 total. 815-385-9383 TRAMPOLINE (13 ft) MAT AND NET ENCLOSER. NO FRAME INCLUDED. STILL IN BOX. BRAND NEW. $50. 847-337-7550

McDONALDs DRIVE-THRU CENTER PLAY SET - Colorful restaurant cart Includes: play food accessories, cash register (rings & opens), grill, deep fryer, soda fountain & McFlurry. All make realistic sounds, plenty of storage space. Hours of Drive thru fun! Excellent Condition $45. 815 477-9023

Power Wheels - 4 Wheeler

3501 Sherwood Forest Dr

Algonquin

879 WEDGEWOOD DRIVE Dining room set, large sectional sofa, queen size bedroom set, handsome office suite, Spinet piano, pump organ, Power Flex exercise machine, jewelry, artwork, 2 bikes, kitchen items, electronics, 2 patio sets (1 metal 1 wood), lamps & coffee tables, LOTS of miscellaneous, holiday. .

www.estatesales.net MARENGO

ANTIQUE AND VINTAGE SALE 7/5 & 7/6 9A-3P 7314 N. HILL ROAD Wide selection of estate and garage sale items - antique and vintage - furniture, textiles, RC plane, glassware, primitives, baskets, Christmas ornaments, folk art, spindle bed, art supplies, artist easel, globes, numerous collectible small items.

WOODSTOCK

Lionel & American Flyer Trains

Share your photos with McHenry County!

BABY ITEMS GALORE!! FRI 7/5 & SAT 7/6 8AM-4PM 1204 ORCHARD LANE OAK GROVE CROSSING SUBD Multi-family garage sale. LOTS OF BABY ITEMS, TOYS, INFANT/TODDLER/CHILD CLOTHING, SHOES, &COATS, and so much more! Priced to sell!

Rugs, computer & carry on bags, tools, baby swings, bouncy chairs, bikes, miscellaneous household items and more.

CRYSTAL LAKE

Sat ONLY 7/6 8am-2pm 2919 N. River Rd. Men's & women's clothing, household goods, decorations, & more!!

HIGH END FURNITURE Canadel table w/6 chairs, Pennsylvania House dining table w/6 chairs, Ethan Allen coffee & end table, armories, maple desk w/hutch, leather sectional, white sofa & chair, shabby chic bench, maple sete, Pottery Barn rugs, Espresso silk drapes, upright piano, bar stools, and outdoor furniture.

Garage Sale Guide

Tear out this handy guide to the area’s best sales! Look for more sales on the other side of this page. See the garage sale map online at NWHerald.com/classified

9203 ARTHUR ST. Fri 7/5 & Sat 7/6, 9-5 & Sun 7/7, 9-1 LOTS of brand name GIRLS clothes sizes 4-16, JUNIORS xs - m & 0-4, SHOES, TOYS, HOME DECOR, KITCHEN TABLE & CHAIRS, FULL SZ BED FRAME, JEWELRY, too much to list it all!!

Crystal Lake

BURTON'S BRIDGE

ESTATES

MOVING SALE Fri & Sat 8am-4pm 4707 Burman Dr

Antiques, housewares, furniture, patio furniture, double bed frame w/box spring & mattress (like new), 3 year old mulcing lawn mower, extension ladder...

FRI & SAT JULY 5 & 6 7AM -3PM

NO SALE PREVIOUSLY HELD IN THE PAST 5 YEARS!

1716 NISH RD. Electric tools, lawn spreader, (2) snowblowers rototiller & MUCH, MUCH MORE!

Crystal Lake HUGE MULTI FAMILY SALE

Fri 7/12 & Sat 7/13 8:30-3

6217 Chestnut Dr

CARY

Corner of Ballard Rd & Chestnut Dr Furniture, bikes, electronics, home décor, kitchenware & lots more.

3012 & 3104 HIGHLAND DR

MULTI-FAMILY

Fri & Sat July 5th & 6th 9am-4pm

CRYSTAL LAKE 1263 Amber Ct. Fri 7/5 & Sat 7/6 8:30am-3pm Sun 7/7 9am-12noon Last Chance to Buy!

RIP&RUN

HARVARD EBAY GARAGE SALE

1241 Harvest Ct. Holiday weekend picker's paradise! Thursday thru Saturday, July 4-6, 9AM-1PM TOYS, children's books, kids' furniture, sporting / camping equipment. Call 815-404-8066 Don't See What You're Looking For Today? Check Back Tomorrow! Never The Same Paper Twice! Northwest Classified 800-589-8237 www.nwherald.com

HUNTLEY

MARENGO

Friday & Saturday July 5th & 6th 8 AM – 4 PM

ANTIQUE BARN SALE

8412 Nolan St Thursday the 4th through Saturday the 6th. Downsizing my eBay Store, My Loss Your Gain, Quality Items Priced to Sell ! Over 800 items, Most Items under $1.00, Many Items under $5.00. Many New Items- Buy Ahead for Christmas ! Kitchen, Decorative, Mikasa, Boyd's and Much More.

12406 HENSEL RD Lots of Men's Stuff!

Harvard

1913 Grandview Dr

JOHNSBURG

GARAGE & BARN SALE

Sat 7/6 & Sun 7/7 9am-?

9516 French Dr Rt. 173 between Hebron & Alden, turn on French Dr.

Huge Barn & Yard Sale Variety of Everything 815-648-2258

HUNTLEY

6 Family Sale Fri, Sat, Sun 9am-4pm July 5th, 6th & 7th Tools, toys & games, stereos, cell phones, kids & adult clothes, household & kitchen items, sporting goods, bikes, file cabinets, furniture, tables, pool pumps & filters, shelving, craft items, & vintage items. Western snowplow & snowmobile trailer.

JOHNSBURG

GILBERTS Thurs, Fri, Sat July 4, 5, 6 9am - 5pm 55 Galligan Rd.

815-353-7668

WANTED TO BUY: Vintage or New, working or not. Bicycles, Outboard motors, fishing gear, motorcycles or mopeds, chainsaws, tools etc. Cash on the spot. Cell: 815-322-6383

HARVARD

#'s at 8:30

Windfall Antiques

Antique and Modern Guns

3 FAMILY SALE FRI & SAT 8A-5P SUN 10A-3P 1298 Amberwood Dr

CASH ONLY

Rocking Horse. Springs. $25 815-477-7702 SWING SET - WOODEN WITH 2 SWINGS, TRAPEZE BAR, SLIDE, ROPE LADDER, SWINGING ROPE, AND PLAY PLATFORM. SANDBOX SPACE UNDER PLATFORM. $50 OBO 847-337-7550 YOU PICK-UP.

Old Lever Actions, Winchesters, Marlins, Savages, etc. Old Pistols and Revolvers. Cash for Collection. FFL License 815-338-4731

Fri & Sat 7/5 & 7/6 9am-4pm Furniture, TV's, BR dressers, headboard for queen bed, night stand, clothes, & much more!

$50. 815-236-7276

TOYS - Small bags of McDonald's toys, Burger King toys, asst. toys, balls, stencils. Not new, but in good condition. .50 - $6. Beth. 815-344-9894

Crystal Lake

FRI & SAT JULY 5 & 6 9AM - 3PM

Lakewood One Direction Concert Ticket. Sunday July 14th, 2013. 7:30 pm First Midwest Bank Theatre. Face value. $83.50. Crystal Lake. 815-455-9732

SPRING GROVE

Depression Glass, Toys, Collectibles, Antiques, Small Furniture & Much Misc!

847-426-2260

FRI & SAT JULY 5 & 6 8AM - 4PM 10250 CINDY JO Stainless steel stove & microwave set, tools, washer/dryer, household misc & MUCH MORE!!

Send your Classified Advertising 24/7 to:

OPEN HOUSES

Watch for the Northwest Classified Open House Directory every Friday, Saturday & Sunday. Include your listing by calling 800-589-8237 or email: classified@shawsuburban.com

Email: classified@ shawsuburban.com Fax: 815-477-8898 or online at: www.nwherald.com

5312 Joseph Cr Fri 7/5 & Sat 7/6

9-4

Huge Sale. 30 yrs of collecting furniture, radios, records, boxes of antiques, lawn furniture and ornaments. also kids toys and clothes and sports equipment.

LAKE IN THE HILLS

3 Wexford Court Friday 8-3, Saturday 8-3 Antique Steamer Trunk, small bass amp, sewing and craft supplies, Tascam Porta Studio, dollhouse furniture, drum machine, electronics, bikes, Christmas blow-mold, musical figurine assortment, toys, books, household and holiday misc.

ECKEL'S MCHENRY FLEA MARKET

Upload photos of your family and friends with our online photo album. Share your sports team, birthday party, big catch, pets, or vacation!

3705 WEST ELM MON 4-8, THURS & FRI 11-5 SAT & SUN 8-5 815-363-3532

Northwest Herald Classified 800-589-8237 www.NWHerald.com/classified

MULTI FAMILY SALE/ DOWN SIZING

Friday & Saturday

105 HAWTHORNE RD.

1176 Kishwaukee Valley Rd

Thursday 7/4 thru Saturday 7/6 8:30 - 3

Woodstock

Camping equipment, silver dollars, furniture, microwave, 2 man bass boat with trolling motor (great on the Hollows) dishes, old pin ball machine, German Coocoo clock (needs repair) beanie babies, couple of gold jewelery and coin, plus lots more

9am - 3pm Numbers at 8:30am

Friday & Saturday 2005 Glenmoor West Dundee 9am - 3pm

Cash, Visa & MasterCard Antiques & Collectibles (Home & Barn) TEXTILES

LAKEMOOR

Amish Quilts, Unique Purses, Lace, Flags, Hides And Furs, Baskets, Rugs, Ladies Clothing Including Purses And Accessories, Mens Hats, Ladies' Hats, Collection Of Costumes And More.

Cash, Visa & MasterCard

P.C.P., Krautheim, Wedgwood, Warwick, Rorfrand, Capodimonte, Kylemore Abbey, Coors Pottery,

SAT & SUN JULY 6 & 7 8AM - 1PM

Modern Furnishings & Decor

Navajo Art, Marcrisa, Louisville, Fiesta Ware And Much More

316 Maplewood Dr.

FURNISHINGS

Patio furniture, toys, home décor TONS of holiday outside décor, collectibles, lawn mower

Numbers at 8:30am

FURNISHINGS Ridgeway Display Grandfather Clock, Barcalounger Recliner, IJoy Chair, Leather Sofa, Leather Chairs, Leather Loveseat, Tiffany Style Lamps, Modern Cabinets, Dining Room Table & Chairs, Server, Accent Tables, Accent Chairs, Modern Queen Bedroom,

PORCELAIN & CERAMICS Roseville, Teapots (Gibsons, Royal Albert, Regal), Royal Haeger, Ironstone, Roman, Shawnee, Akro Agate,

Iron Headboard (Cowboys & Indians), Victorian Server, Trunks & Chests, Lamps, Bookcases, Wash Stands, Illinois Cabinet, Dining Room Set, Accent Tables, Accent Chairs, Clocks (United Horse Drawn Wagon, Fireball Radium, Linden And More), Mirrors, Extensive Wall Decor, Sofas, Loveseats, Ottomen, Sterilization Cabinet, Display Cabinets, Wardrobe Cabinet, Secretary, Hat & Coat Rack, Telephone And Much More.

Teak Folding Tables, Lane Chest, Poker Table And More.

GLASS

TEXTILES

Cut, Pressed, Depression, Elegant, Milk, Opalescent, Carnival And More. Kosta, Hobnail, Epergne, Hundreds

Bernina Artista 180 Sewing & Embroidery Machine With Manuals,

Of Vintage Beer Glasses, Inkwells, Hurricane Lamps, Siesta Ware, Alabaster, Carrara Marble And More.

Attachments And Desk. Longaberger Baskets, Singer Sewing Machine,

METALS

Sewing Notions, Fabrics, Crafting Supplies And More.

Cans With Advertising, Samovar (Russian), Horseshoes, Lanterns, Wrought Aluminum, Enameled Pieces,

GARDEN & GARAGE

Milk Jugs, Copper Boilers, Sculptures, Roy Rogers Lunch Box, Spittoons, Bird Cages, Candelabras,

4hp Edger / Trimmer, John Deere Lawnmower, Toro Snowblower,

Ink Wells, School Bell And Much More.

Little Giant Ladder, Concrete Benches, Hand Tools, Power Tools,

OUTDOORS & GARDEN

Clamps, Construction Heater, Air Compressor, Bosch Table Saw,

Concrete (Huge Turtle Bench, Bird Bath, Figures), Hay Wagon Chassis, Snow Blower, Cast Iron Arbor,

603 Deerpath Drive Love seat, full-size mattress set, dresser, Dining set, cabinet end tables. Kitchen, office, and household goods; video games, toys, and books; jewelry and clothing.

MARENGO

Garden Tools, Wind Mills, Cast Iron Garden Furniture And Much More In The Barn.

(Deerpass Estates) at the end of the first cul-de-sac

Alvarez Acoustic Guitar, Enamelware, Cameras, Maverick Projection

MISCELLANEOUS

System, Brass Giraffe, Portable Air Conditioners, Oil Paintings, Chest

Chevy S - 10 (New Engine Has 5,000 Miles), Vintage Kitchen, Toys Including Little Tykes, Planes And

FRIDAY-SATURDAY, JULY 5-6; 8-4 RAIN OR SHINE!

Freezer (18 Cubic Feet), Sports Authority Complete Weight & Bench Set,

Other Hand Tools, Shop Vac, Power Tools, Wall Decor, Guitar, Soapstone, Vanity Set, Vintage

This is a CARING TRANSITIONS Sale

Fri & Sat 7/5 & 7/6 7am-2pm 8908 South Hill Rd

SPRING GROVE 3406 Cardinal Lane

Home décor, stained glass supplies, some tools, & much more.

MCHENRY 3420 Fairway Dr. GARAGE SALE! Sat. 9am-4pm Sun. 9am-2pm

Sat July 6th 9am-3pm

Clothing, Household, Furniture and lots of misc. merchandise!

Household Goods, Kid's Toys & Games, Electronics, Furniture, Brand New Ikea Day Bed (still in box), & MUCH MORE!

MCHENRY

Spring Grove

4 FAMILY GARAGE SALE

Friday & Saturday 8am-3pm

THURS., FRI. & SAT. 9AM TO 3PM

1502 Huron Dr.

521 KENSINGTON McHenry

Snowblower, Little Tikes, Longaberger, Pampered Chef, Household Items, Stamping Items and More!

9am-4pm

5226 BETSY LANE

2 ATV'S, trailer, delta table saw, princess toddler bed, dining room set, boys BR set, toys, home decor, baby, & tons more

Garage Sale Friday & Saturday 8AM – 5Pm 17313 Johnson St.

McHenry Collector's Garage Sale! July 5 & 6 9am – 4pm

Pink Depression Glass, Linens, Farm Toys, Records, Cook Books, Fans & Ceiling Fan, Tools, Milk Cans, Jewelry, & Antiques

Plastic Toy Figures, Playsets, Diecast Trucks, Hot Wheels & Other Related Collectibles

Unsold Garage Sale Items?

Rain Or Shine

3206 S Robin Ln RIMAS Sub.

815-353-7955

McHenry FRI 7/5 9AM-3PM SAT 7/6 9AM-1PM

Don't Repack!

Consider donating to Bethesda Thrift Shop 26 Crystal Lake Plaza in Crystal Lake Sun12-4; Mon-Fri 9-7; Sat 9-5 815-455-2325

WOODSTOCK

5102 W. MALIBU CT Furniture, table w/chairs w/matching hutch, lighted shelving case, lamps, name brand women & men clothing, baby misc., housewares, home good, riding mower needs work, other misc.

MCHENRY

270 Ridgewood Dr Off of Dean St Fri 7/5 9am-4pm & Sat 7/6 8am-1pm New items-great for gifts, baby to adult clothing-boys and girls, Little Tikes, lots of toys, furniture- including Oak Entertainment Center, Table and chairs & Hutch, 36" tires-15" rims, household, and a lot of misc

WOODSTOCK Friday and Saturday 8:30am – 5pm

6520 Midleton Lane

Mchenry J & J's Big Blowout Garage Sale! Fri, Sat, & Sun 9a-5p

1002 Hampton Ct

HUGE-MONGOUS MULTI FAMILY SALE 1320 Moraine Dr Thur, Fri 8-5 Sat 8-12:00 July 4-6 Furniture,household items, kids and adult clothes, home decor, toys, floor cleaner, washing machine, weight bench, lawn garden, ladders and a little of everything. Advertise here for a successful garage sale! Call 815-455-4800

Whispering Oaks

www.HuskieWire.com

Antiques, collectibles, fishing equipment, glassware, jewelry, and much more. Must see sale!

All NIU Sports... All The Time

MCHENRY

MISCELLANEOUS

This is a CARING TRANSITIONS Sale

Marengo

LINDENHURST FURNITURE AND LOTS MORE! Saturday, July 6, 8am-3pm

Wash Tubs, Alumacraft Canoe, Wash Stands, Ladders, Wash Boards, Pails, Planters & Crocks, Sleds,

See Photos at http://www.ctnorthern.com

Friday, July 5 9am-3pm & Saturday, July 6 9am-noon New Kindle in box, like new Nook HD w/case, Cub Cadet rider, lawn tractor utility cart, wheel barrow, garden cart, snowblower, oak rocker, bathroom faucet, leaf blower, trimmer, lamps, kitchen household, gas grill, end tables, tools, much more

Drum set, TV, sectional couch, beer signs, girls clothes size 5/6, girls bike and toys and a ton more!!

Skates, Hockey, Wagon Wheels, Camping, Bicycles (Schwinn, Trek, Motobecane, Open Road), Cauldron,

See Photos at http://www.ctnorthern.com

FRI, SAT, SUN 9-5 1210 N. RT. 23

(Legend Lakes Subdivision)

Assorted Garden Tools And More.

Holiday And Much, Much More.

9415 Glacier Ridge

& MUCH, MUCH MORE!

Delta Compound Miter Saw, Spark Plug Cabinet,

Life Fitness Cross Trainer And Much More.

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A publication of the Northwest Herald Saturday, July 6, 2013

Names and faces that you know

Have news to share? Visit NWHerald.com/neighbors/connect

Cleaning up

COMMUNITIES

The Zion Lutheran Church youth group recently had a car wash fundraiser. Among those pictured are Austin Britt, Nick Marcellis, Sam Fischer, Tyler Schepler, Katelyn Sena, Thomas Borghardt, Rebecca Fischer, Deanna Hunt, Amber Sena, Alex Voska, Gwyndilan Folz, Cassandra Mahlstedt and Zach Luedke.

Algonquin..............................5, 6, 7 Cary................................................6 Crystal Lake......................... 7, 8, 9 Huntley...........................................9 Johnsburg......................................9

McHenry.............................9, 10 Ringwood................................10 Union........................................10 Wonder Lake...........................11 Woodstock............................. 11

COMMUNITY CALENDAR JULY

6

Need something to do this weekend? Use the Community Calendar to find fun events that will get your family out of the house. Page 2

WHERE IT’S AT Birthday Club...........................4 Campus Report........................4 Community Calendar..............2

Community Spotlight.............3 Contact us................................3 Worship Directory............12-15


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Saturday, July 6, 2013

| Neighbors

2

July Saturday, July 6 • 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. – Crystal Lake Toastmasters Club meeting, Exemplar Financial Network, 413 E. Terra Cotta Ave., Crystal Lake. Develop communication and leadership skills while having fun. Information: www.crystallake. toastmastersclubs.org. • 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. – Annual Boat Blessing, 1608 N. Riverside Drive, McHenry. For boats and personal watercraft by Father Paul White of The Church of Holy Apostles in McHenry. Information: 815-385-5673.

Sunday, July 7 • 9:30 a.m. – Lifetree Café, Immanuel Lutheran School Library, 300 S. Pathway Court, Crystal Lake. How to cope with grief will be explored. Free. Information: 815-459-5907.

Tuesday, July 9 • 11 a.m. – Senior bingo, American Legion, 11712 Coral St., Huntley. Guest speaker, lunch presented by Northwest Home Health & Rehab and bingo. Sponsored by Grafton Township. Cost: $1 donation at the door. Doors open 10 a.m. Information: 847-669-3328. • 6 to 7:30 p.m. – Quit smoking class, Centegra Health Bridge Fitness Center, 200 Congress Parkway, Crystal Lake. A seven-week adult program offered by the McHenry County Department of Health and Centegra Health System. Course fee: $25. Registration and information: 877-236-

GET LISTED! Do you want your club or organization event listed in our Community Calendar? Send your submission, complete with event name, time, location, cost and contact information to neighbors@nwherald.com. For information, call Barb Grant at 815-526-4523.

Attic Resale Shop, 307 S. Main St., Algonquin. Offering books, clothing, housewares, toys, linens, jewelry, sporting goods and more. Continues 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. Sponsored by Congregational Church of Algonquin to benefit the church. Information: 847-8544552.

Wednesday, July 10

• 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. – Little Christopher Resale Shoppe, 469 Lake St., Crystal Lake. Offering clothing, housewares, books, jewelry and more. Half-off sale on children’s items and toys. Sponsored by the Women’s Club of St. Thomas the Apostle Church to benefit the church. Information: 815-459-9442. • 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. – Heavenly

• 9 to 11:30 a.m. – Art Camp, Jaycee Park, 650 Cary Algonquin Road, Cary. Outdoor art fun for children ages 5-8.offered by Cary Park District. Continues July 11. Cost: $40 residents, $60 nonresidents. Registration and information: 847-639-6100 or www.carypark.com. • 1:30 to 5 p.m. – Robotics demonstrations, Crystal Lake Public Library, 126 Paddock St., Crystal Lake. Presented by the Octopi robotics team from Crystal Lake South High School. Free. Information: kristin@octopi6007. org. • 7 p.m. – Lifetree Café, Conscious Cup Coffee, 5005 Northwest Highway, Crystal Lake. Ways to cope with grief will be discussed. Free. Information: 815715-5476. • 7 to 8 p.m. – “Fort Dearborn and Beyond,” Algonquin Area Public Library District, 2600 Harnish Drive, Algonquin. Midwestern battle program presented by Nancy McCully. Registration and information: 847-458-6060 or www.aapld.org. • 7 to 9 p.m. – Photo Quilt class, McHenry County College, 8900 Route 14, Crystal Lake. Turn a favorite photo into

information: Laurie or Sandi, 815385-9770. • Noon to 6:30 p.m. July 10 – Harvard Diggins Library, 900 E. McKinley St., Harvard. All donors receive a Culver’s coupon for a free pint of frozen custard. Appointments and information: Wanda, 815-560-2111. • 3 to 6 p.m. July 10 – Marengo Ridge Golf Club, 9508 Harmony Hill Road, Marengo. • 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. July 11 –

McHenry Public Library, 809 N. Front St., McHenry. All donors receive an Oberweis gift card for ice cream. Walk-ins welcome. Appointments and information: 815-385-0036. • 2 to 6 p.m. July 11 – Immanuel Lutheran Church, 300 Pathway Court, Crystal Lake. All donors receive an Oberweis gift card for ice cream. Walk-ins welcome. Appointments and information: Beth, 815-459-7332.

83472 or www.mcdh.info. • 6 to 8 p.m. – Grief Share group, Shepherd of the Hills Lutheran Church, 404 N. Green St., McHenry. Group will meet through Oct. 1. Fee: $15 for materials. Registration and information: 815385-4030. • 7:30 to 9 p.m. – McHenry County Civil War Round Table meeting, Woodstock Public Library, 414 W. Judd St., Woodstock. Bob Frenz, of Crystal Lake, will present “Captain Harley Wayne” of the 15th Illinois Volunteer Regiment. All are welcome to attend. For information, visit: www.mchenrycivilwar.com.

Tues.-Sat., July 9-13

a personalized, quilted wall hanging. Continues July 24. Cost: $30. Registration and information: 815-4558-8588, Course ID:NCFS88007.

Thursday, July 11 • 7:30 to 8:45 a.m. – Crystal Clear Toastmasters 7th anniversary party, Panera Bread, 6000 Northwest Highway, Crystal Lake. Guests welcome. Information: www.crystalcleartoastmasters. org. • 7 p.m. – Country Quilters of McHenry County meeting, Shepherd of the Hills Lutheran Church, 404 N. Green St., McHenry. Lecture by Mary DeRay of Simply Sashiko. Free to members, $5 nonmembers. Information: 815245-9891. • 7 p.m. – Lifetree Café, The Pointe Outreach Center, 5650 Northwest Highway, Crystal Lake. Coping with grief will be explored. Free. Information: 815-459-5907.

Friday, July 12 • 7 p.m. – Ice Cream Social, Marengo High School Cafeteria, Marengo. Hosted by State Rep. Jack Franks (D-Marengo) during the Fay’s barbecue fundraiser. Audience members can talk about issues that concern them. Free. Information: 815-334-0063 or jack@jackfranks.org. • 7 p.m. – Lake in the Hills bingo, American Legion Post 1231, 1101 W. Algonquin Road, Lake in the Hills. Progressive jackpots. Snacks available. Proceeds benefit a charity for pediatric cancer. Information: 847-658-2010 or www. lakeinthehillsbingo.com.

• 7 p.m. – McHenry bingo, VFW Post 4600, 3002 W. Route 120, McHenry. Player-friendly games and prizes. Food available. Proceeds benefit Chicago Thunder Children’s Charity. Information: 815-385-4600 or www.mchenrybingo.com.

Fri.-Sat., July 12-13 • 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. – St. John’s Mission Resale Shop, 215 Washington St., Algonquin. Featuring a variety of clothing, household, holiday, children’s items and more. Continues 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. Sponsored by St. John’s Evangelical Lutheran Church to benefit the community. Information: 847-658-9105.

Saturday, July 13 • 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. – Model rocketry launch, Kishwaukee Park on Davis Road, Woodstock. By the Fox Valley Rocketeers club. Information: 815-337-9068 or www. foxvalleyrocketeers.org. • 10 to 11:30 a.m. – Pet blessing, St. James Episcopal Church, 516 Washington St., West Dundee. Blessing, face painting, free pet treats and refreshments. Information: 847-426-5612. • Noon to 4 p.m. – Family Fest, second annual, Lakewood Commons (next to Lou Malnati’s Pizzeria), Ackman Road and Redtail Drive, Village of Lakewood. Games, prizes, entertainment, live music and more. Hosted by Crosspoint Church and Thrivent Financial. Free. Information: dawn@crosspointlakewood.org or visit: www.crosspointlakewood. org.

BLOOD DRIVES * 8 a.m. to noon July 7 – Bethany Lutheran Church, 76 W. Crystal Lake Ave., Crystal Lake. All donors receive an Oberweis gift card for ice cream. Walk-ins welcome. Appointments and information: Darlene Shaffer, 815-459-8553. • 8 a.m. to noon July 7 – McHenry Moose Lodge 691, 3535 N. Richmond Road, Johnsburg. All donors receive an Oberweis gift card for ice cream. Walk-ins welcome. Appointments and

• 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. July 11 – Walmart, 1205 S. Route 31, Crystal Lake. All donors receive an Oberweis gift card for ice cream. Walk-ins welcome. Sign up online at: www.heartlandbc.org. • 7:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. July 13 – St. Thomas the Apostle Community Center, 451 W. Terra Cotta Ave., Crystal Lake. Sponsored by St. Thomas the Apostle Father McCormick Knights of Columbus Council 3880. All donors

receive an Oberweis gift card for ice cream. Walk-ins welcome. Information: John Orso, 815-4596359 or johorso@aol.com. • 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. July 15 – City of Woodstock Recreation Department, 820 Lake Ave., Woodstock. All donors receive an Oberweis gift card for ice cream. Walk-ins welcome. Appointments and information: 815-338-4363. See DRIVES, page 3


COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT: JOHNSBURG

3

McHenry County Neighbors is published Saturdays by Northwest Herald, a division of Shaw Media.

NWHerald.com NEIGHBORS EDITOR Rob Carroll 815-526-4458 neighbors@nwherald.com FEATURES EDITOR Scott Helmchen 815-526-4402 shelmchen@shawmedia.com

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Paula Dudley pdudley@shawmedia.com TO ADVERTISE: 815-459-4040 Fax: 815-477-4960 GENERAL INFORMATION: 815-459-4122 Fax: 815-459-5640

SUBMISSIONS Submit all Neighbors items at NWHerald.com/neighbors/ connect or mail to Neighbors, P.O. Box 250, Crystal Lake, IL 60039-0250. Deadline is noon Monday for the following Saturday’s publication. BIRTHDAY CLUB Any child, ages 1-7, can be featured in the Birthday Club. Submit a picture (JPEG if submitting electronically) along with the child’s name, age, birthdate and parents’ names and addresses. Include a phone number. Photos should be received no later than a month after the child’s birthday. ONLINE: NWHerald.com/forms/ birthday EMAIL: neighbors@nwherald.com MAIL: Birthday Club, Northwest Herald, P.O. Box 250, Crystal Lake, IL 60039-0250 WORSHIP DIRECTORY To be listed or to make changes to the Worship Directory, call Neighbors editor Rob Carroll, 815-526-4458, or email neighbors@nwherald.com.

The Johnsburg 1 Twizzlers team recently won first place at the U12 Nippersink Girl Softball Tournament in Genoa City, Wis. Pictured (back row, from left) are coaches Ross LaMotta, Rich Dworshak and Jim Kottke; and players (second row) Sedona Pecucci, McKenna Diedrich, Morgan Madsen, Casey Stedman, Megan Madsen and Rachel Dworshak; and (front row) Kara Voce, Ceara Mulvey, Hannah Lamotta, Tori Mulvihill and Leah Kottke.

• DRIVES Continued from page 2 • 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 15 – Jersey Mike’s, 285 N. Randall Road, Lake in the Hills. All donors receive an Oberweis gift card for ice cream and free regular sub. Walk-ins welcome. Appointments and information: Roxie, 815-477-0086. • 4 to 7 p.m. July 15 – Woodstock Public Library, 414 W. Judd St., Woodstock. All donors receive an Oberweis gift card for ice cream. Walk-ins welcome. Appointments and information: 815-338-0542. • 11:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. July 16 – Centegra Hospital - Woodstock, 3701 Doty Road, Woodstock. All donors receive an Oberweis gift card for ice cream. Walk-ins welcome. Appointments and information: Terri, 815-759-4334. • 3 to 7 p.m. July 17 – Cary Park District, 255 Briargate Road, Cary. A donors receive an Oberweis gift card, barbecue pulled-pork sandwich and raffle entry to Tri-Count Pro Rodeo in Harvard July 26-27. Walkins welcome. Appointments and information: Sara Kelly, 847-6396100, ext. 109. • 3:30 to 7:30 p.m. July 17

– Shepherd of the Hills Lutheran Church, 404 N. Green St., McHenry. All donors receive an Oberweis gift card for ice cream. Walk-ins welcome. Appointments and information: Tracy Palma, 815-385-4030. • 4 to 7 p.m. July 17 – Woodstock Commons, 1420 Commons Drive, Woodstock. All donors receive an Oberweis gift card for ice cream. Walk-ins welcome. For appointments and information, see Jackie at the pool or Leslie in the office. • Noon to 3 p.m. July 19 – Little Caesars Pizza, 5006-C Northwest Highway, Crystal Lake. All donors receive an Oberweis gift card and Little Caesars coupon for a free pizza and crazy bread. Walk-ins welcome. Appointments and information: Tanner, 815-245-1778. • 7:30 a.m. to noon July 21 – Grace Lutheran Church, 1300 Kishwaukee Valley Road, Woodstock. All donors receive an Oberweis gift card for ice cream. Walk-ins welcome. Appointments and information: Gretchen, 815-341-7544. • 9 a.m. to noon July 24 – Village of Algonquin, 2200 Harnish Drive, Algonquin. All donors receive an Oberweis gift card for ice cream. Walk-ins welcome. Appointments

and information: Tracy Kenning, 847658-2700, Ext. 2242. • 2 to 6 p.m. July 25 – Spring Grove Village Hall, 7401 Meyer Road, Spring Grove. All donors receive an Oberweis gift card for ice cream. Walk-ins welcome. Appointments and information: 815-675-2121. • 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. July 27 – St. Patick’s Catholic Church, 3500 Washington St., McHenry. All donors receive an Oberweis gift card for ice cream. Walk-ins welcome. Appointments and information: Bobbi Girard, 815-385-4329. • 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. July 27 – Woodstock Harley-Davidson, 2050 S. Eastwood Drive, Woodstock. Drive scheduled in conjunction with Harley-Davidson’s Country Rumble. All donors receive a Harley-Davidson T-shirt an Oberweis gift card for ice cream. Walk-ins welcome. Appointments and information: 815-3373511. • 3 to 7 p.m. July 30 – Zion Lutheran Church, 412 Jackson St., Marengo. • 3:30 to 7:30 p.m. July 30 – Community Church of Richmond, 5714 Broadway, Richmond. All donors receive an Oberweis gift card for ice cream. Walk-ins welcome.

Appointments and information: Carol, 815-675-2011. Blood service organizations • American Red Cross of Greater Chicago – 800-448-3543 for general blood services; 312-7296100 general questions. • Heartland Blood Centers – 800-786-4483; 630-264-7834 or www.heartlandbc.org. Locations: 6296 Northwest Highway, Crystal Lake, 815-356-0608; 1140 N. McLean Blvd., Elgin, 847-741-8282; 649 W. State St., Geneva, 630-208-8105; 1200 N. Highland Ave., Aurora, 630892-7055. • LifeSource Blood Center – Crystal Lake Community Donor Center, 5577 Northwest Highway, Crystal Lake, 815-356-5173. Hours: noon to 7 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday; 7:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Wednesday and Friday; 7:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Saturday. Information: 877-543-3768 or www.lifesource.org. • Rock River Valley Blood Center – 419 N. Sixth St., Rockford, 877-778-2299; 815-965-8751 or www.rrvbc.org. Hours: 6:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays, 6:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Fridays; 7 to 11 a.m. second Saturdays.

• Saturday, July 6, 2013

NORTHWEST HERALD EDITOR Jason Schaumburg 815-526-4414 jschaumburg@shawmedia.com

Neighbors | Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

Softball team victorious at tournament


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Saturday, July 6, 2013

| Neighbors

4

BIRTHDAY CLUB Jacob Blanken Age: 3 Birth date: July 12, 2010 Parents: Deric and Lisa Blanken Crystal Lake

To submit news, visit NWHerald.com/neighbors/connect Chloe Ellen Casey

Adelyn Marie Chropkowski

Age: 3 Birth date: July 7, 2010 Parents: Sean and Denise Casey McHenry

Age: 4 Birth date: July 7, 2009 Parents: Ted and Jennifer Chropkowski Algonquin

Jack Aalto Age: 1 Birth date: June 29, 2012 Parents: Brian and Sarah Aalto McHenry

Sadie Marie Stevens

Lucy Jayne Miceli

Maddux Lee Rueff

Age: 5 Birth date: July 10, 2008 Parents: Ryan Stevens of Johnsburg and Renee Woods of McHenry

Age: 4 Birth date: July 2, 2009 Parents: Shannon and Jeremy Miceli Cary

Age: 3 Birth date: July 8, 2010 Parents: Jason Rueff of Woodstock and Meredith Cartwright of Rockford

DO YOU WANT YOUR CHILD IN BIRTHDAY CLUB? Any child, ages 1-7, can be featured in the McHenry County Neighbors Birthday Club. Send the child’s name, age, birth date, parents’ names and addresses and a color or black-and-white photo of the child (JPEG if submitting electronically). Include a phone number. Photos should be received no later than a month after the child’s birthday. Photos will not be returned. ONLINE: NWHerald.com/forms/birthday EMAIL: neighbors@nwherald.com MAIL: Birthday Club, Northwest Herald, P.O. Box 250, Crystal Lake, IL 60039-0250

CAMPUS REPORT CARBONDALE – Kyle Quirk graduated magna cum laude from Southern Illinois University with a bachelor of science degree in mechanical engineering. He is the son of Anthony and Nadine Quirk of Huntley. • JACKSON, Tenn. – Karolinn Schumaker of Crystal Lake was named to the Union University dean’s list for the spring 2013 semester. • AMES, Iowa – Local students received degrees from Iowa State University. Following are their names and hometowns: Algonquin: Andrew George Nelson, Brian James Nelson and Andrew Paxson; Cary: Maureen E. Foley and Jacob Paul Gerhardt; Crystal Lake: Patrick Michael Dowling, Peter Thomas Patras, William John Petersen and Amanda Lauren Weimer; Johnsburg: Sean M. Toporek;

Lake in the Hills: Patrick John Morrison and Kelly Marla Stickrod; McHenry: Andrew Aaron Backhaus, Nathaniel C. Backhaus and Kelly Nichole Zolnierczyk; Richmond: Sally Marie Adams and Rebecca Ann Schultz; Woodstock: Hannah Christine Huff, Joshua Stephen Sass and Paul Cameron Wilson. •

CEDAR RAPIDS , Iowa – Shannon Lisle of Lake in the Hills received a degree from Kirkwood Community College. • WINONA/RED WING, Minn.– Nicholas Adams of McHenry was named to the spring president’s list at Minnesota State College-Southeast Technical. • KIRKSVILLE, Mo. – Lisa Nicole Kucharski of Woodstock was named to the spring president’s list at Truman State University.

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Algonquin

MEDAL WINNER – Samantha Heustis of Heineman Middle School was a medal winner at the 2013 Illinois Elementary School Association Class A State Final Track and Field Meet at the EastSide Centre in East Peoria.

CAPS FOR A CURE – St. Margaret Mary Catholic School eighth-grade boys hosted Caps For A Cure. Each child paid $1 to wear a baseball cap. This fundraiser raised funds for the American Cancer Society. Pictured (from left) are Zack Mallo, Christopher Shepard and Michael Walsh.

• Saturday, July 6, 2013

Algonquin

Neighbors | Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

Communities listed alphabetically • To submit news, visit NWHerald.com/neighbors/connect

Algonquin

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Food distribution truck headed to church The Society of St. Vincent de Paul-St. Margaret Mary Conference will sponsor a mobile food distribution truck from the Northern Illinois Food Bank 4 to 6 p.m. July 16 in the St. Margaret

Mary Church parking lot, 111 S. Hubbard St. The food distribution will be available to those in need. For information, call the church at 847-658-7625.

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Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Saturday, July 6, 2013

| Neighbors

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COMMUNITY NEWS

To submit news, visit NWHerald.com/neighbors/connect

Algonquin

Algonquin

MEDAL WINNER – Rhian Whitfield of Heineman Middle School was a medal winner at the 2013 Illinois Elementary School Association Class A State Final Track and Field Meet in East Peoria.

Algonquin NATIONAL RECOGNITION – Jacobs High School student Hari Manikandan was awarded seventh place in the national InvestWrite Challenge, sponsored by the Sifma Foundation. He received a $50 gift card and national recognition. Pictured (from left) are social studies teacher Craig Chatham, Manikandan and Econ Illinois president Lori Berkes-Nelson.

Tiara Tea Society to have luncheon July 17 The Tiara Tea Society will have a luncheon noon July 17 at Rainbow Restaurant, 1229 S. Main St.

Reservations are required by Friday to hostesses Louise Cannizzo at 847-961-5733 or Arlenen Wozniak at 847-659-1929.

Cary Cary

SCVN ready for wine tasting July 15 Senior Care Volunteer Network will have its first wine tasting event 5 to 8 p.m. July 15 at Orchard Wine Shoppe, 133 W. Main St. There will be hors d’ oeuvres and 10 wine varietals to sample.

Tickets are $25. The proceeds will benefit the seniors served by the volunteer network. Free parking will be available. For information, call 815-455-3120 or visit www. scvnmchenrycounty.org.

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SAFETY TOWN – Peter LeBron of Boyscout Troop 957 designed and led a group of people to make a Safety Town for the Cary Police Department. A Safety Town is small buildings and road signs used to teach children bicycle safety.

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COMMUNITY NEWS Algonquin

• Saturday, July 6, 2013

BLACK BELT – Jim Blaz, McHenry County College professor, earned his black belt through the karate/self-defense class offered at MCC.

Crystal Lake

Ice cream sales to help food pantry Participating ice cream vendors will donate a percentage of their proceeds to the Crystal Lake Food Pantry this month. Yumz, 5006 Route 14, will donate to the pantry on Mondays. KaleidoScoops, 53 N. Williams St., will donate to the pantry on Tuesdays. Culver’s, 501 Pingree Road, will donate to the pantry July 24 and 31. Julie Ann’s, 6500 Route 14,

will donate to the pantry on Thursdays. Riverside Chocolate Factory, 2 N. Williams St., will donate to the pantry on Fridays. McDonald’s at 551 Crystal Point Drive and 7617 Route 14 will make a donation to the pantry for every McFlurry and ice cream sundae sold this month and August. For information, email Tricia Nasta at tnasta@sbcglobal.net.

LITERATURE FAIR – Margaret Mary School student Matthew Flondro dressed as the main character for the novel “The Capture” for the fourth-grade Literature Fair.

Crystal Lake

St. Paul’s United Church of Christ ready for outdoor worship service St. Paul’s United Church of Christ will have an outdoor worship service 9:30 a.m. Sunday at 485 Woodstock St. Patriotic songs and hymns will be played by St. Paul’s brass band.

Attendees are asked to bring lawn chairs. For information, call 815-459-5096, email info@stpaulsucccl.org or visit www.stpaulsucccl.org.

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Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Saturday, July 6, 2013

| Neighbors

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COMMUNITY NEWS

To submit news, visit NWHerald.com/neighbors/connect

Crystal Lake

Crystal Lake

Groups announce midnight bike ride In collaboration with The Land Conservancy of McHenry County, the McHenry County Bicycle Advocates again are sponsoring a 20-mile midnight bicycle ride Aug. 3-4 throughout the city. The purpose of the ride is to promote bicycling as an alternate means of transportation and exercise, and to benefit The Land Conser-

vancy of McHenry County. The proposed route will start and end at Crystal Lake City Hall. Admission is $15 for riders ages 16 and older. Registration materials are available at www.clnightowlride.org. For information, email Ron Eberle at clnightowlride@gmail.com or call 815-356-0531.

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Thursday READING PROGRAM – Linda Kozlowski (right), registered client associate at Wells Fargo, reads to Mrs. Lichtenberger’s first-grade class at Glacier Ridge Elementary School as part of the monthly Wells Fargo Reading First Program.

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WHY DR. SHAKEEL? With years of experience in the field, Dr. Shakeel is a highly respected expert in the placement and restoration of dental implants from a single missing tooth to the entire upper and lower arch. His background in dental implant surgery provides a strong foundation that ensures medically safe and aesthetically beautiful results. Furthermore, Dr. Shakeel received extensive hands-on training and assisted with numerous successful cases, under the guidance of the pioneer of the All-on-Four procedure, Dr. Paulo Malo of Portugal (2010). Few in the dental industry possess his mastery of the combined surgical and prosthetic demands of successful implant dentistry, especially executing the All-On-Four procedure. IDEAL PATIENTS The All-On-Four technique is for patients dissatisfied with their current dentures or for those who have

no practical alternatives for saving their remaining teeth. In most all cases, patients lacking the bone volume required to support traditional implants are able to enjoy the many benefits of a permanent solution to missing teeth through the All-OnFour procedure. THE TEETH IN A DAY PROCESS This amazing technique enables you to achieve a beautiful, new Smile in a Day by utilizing four implants placed in each arch to which the replacement teeth are securely attached. Gentle oral sedation assures that you receive maximum safety and comfort throughout the procedure. In addition, the entire process, including any necessary extractions, can be completed in one day with minimal recovery time.The result is a fully functional set of teeth that look and feel natural, improves your self-confidence and allows you to once again experience the foods and activities you enjoy most.

DISCOVER THE BENEFITS • Requires minimal recovery • Reduces overall cost when compared to single implants • Eliminates the need for bone grafting in most all cases • Allows for easy maintenance through proper oral hygiene • Restores the ability to eat all types of foods • Relieves the many frustrations of removable appliances • Ensures long-term results with the potential to last a lifetime • Renews a youthful appearance through bone level stabilization • Creates a whole new smile in just one day • Enhances self-confidence and overall quality of life For more information on Teeth in a Day or on All-On-Four Dental Implants, contact:

Dr. Shakeel Signature Dental Group 815-455-3300 www.signaturedentalgroup.com

All procedures are done under concious sedation to ensure patient comfort and safety. Dr Shakeel and Dr Sinha hold anesthesia permits in the state of Illinois.


To submit news, visit NWHerald.com/neighbors/connect

McHenry

Crystal Lake

Culver’s to help local seniors program Culver’s will have a Crystal Lake Senior Services Associates Benefit Day July 18 at 501 Pingree Road. Support the Christmas Shopping Mall, which pro-

vides gift wrapping service, customer service and gift items for seniors to shop for loved ones. For information, call 815356-7457.

Huntley

Church to have retirement celebration

SCHOLARSHIPS AWARDED – The McHenry Garden Club awarded $3,000 in scholarships this year. Amy M. Kruse (left), a graduate of McHenry West High School, will attend Kansas State University. Her $2,000 award will go toward a major in agricultural economics. Clayton G.W. Cooper (right), a graduate of McHenry East High School, will attend Mississippi State University. His $1,000 award will go toward a major in forestry and wildlife management.

Johnsburg

Dance club announces event

McHenry Senior Citizens Club to meet Monday

McHenry B&B Square Dance Club will be dancing July 19 at Johnsburg Community Club 2315 W. Church St. Bob Asp will call squares at 8:30 p.m. and Fred Piper will do rounds at 8 p.m. For information call 815353-5346.

Expires 7/31/13

McHenry Outdoor Theater Golden Age Cinemas 1510 N. Chapel Hill Rd. McHenry, IL 60050

OPEN EVERYDAY! Ticket Prices ONLY $10 & $5!! For July 5 - July 11

✰ NO W S H O W I NG✰

The McHenry Senior Citizens Club will meet 1 p.m. Monday at the McHenry Township Hall, 3703 N. Richmond Road.

It’s “Like Yogurt for Pets™”.

ONLY $10 FOR ADULTS • $5 FOR CHILDREN/SENIORS

www.goldenagecinemas.com

Johnsburg

Kittel has served Trinity for the past 33 years and has been in the ministry for 43 years. Reservation deadline is Sunday. For information, call the church office at 847-669-5780.

Entertainment will be by Rick Pickren. Refreshments will be provided. For information, call 262725-6168.

Ingredients Not Digested Is Nutrition Not Used!

Expires 7/31/13

NATURE’S FEED

2440 Westward Dr., Unit C Spring Grove, IL 60081

Your Natural Source for Pet Food & More!

Located next to the Spring Grove Post Office

Expires 7/31/13

(PH) 815-675-2008

WWW.NATURESFEED.NET

“Despicable Me 2”PG to begin at dusk, followed by:

“Superman: Man of Steel”PG-13

• Saturday, July 6, 2013

There will be an open house to celebrate the retirement of the Rev. Charles W. Kittel 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. July 14 Trinity Lutheran Church in the Fellowship Hall, 11008 N. Church St.

9

Neighbors | Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

COMMUNITY NEWS


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Saturday, July 6, 2013

| Neighbors

10

COMMUNITY NEWS

To submit news, visit NWHerald.com/neighbors/connect

McHenry

McHenry

GUEST SPEAKER – At a recent meeting, the Rotary Club of McHenry welcomed Steve Otten, United Way of McHenry County executive director, to talk about his local office. FLOWER ARRANGING CLASS – The McHenry Garden Club led a flower-arranging class for the residents at Alden Terrace. The club prepares monthly individual flower arrangements for Hospice patients at the residence. Pictured (from left) are McHenry Garden Club members Marita Sension, Jean Schiller and Traudl Koeberlein; Alden Terrace Activity employees Carmen Adams and Beth Goodrich; and garden club members Gloria Mellyn and Dorothy Kowalczyk.

Union

McHenry

Quilters group to meet Thursday The Country Quilters of McHenry County will meet 7 p.m. Thursday at Shepherd of the Hills Church, 404 N. Green St., The meeting will feature

a lecture by Mary DeRay of Simply Sashiko. The meeting is free to members. Admission for nonmembers is $5. For information, call 815245-9891.

McHenry

Church to have annual boat blessing The Rev. Paul White of The Church of Holy Apostles will visit the shores of the Fox River for his annual blessing of boats and personal watercraft 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. Sunday at 1608 N. Riverside Drive. The blessing has grown in popularity each year with

as many as 50 boats and personal watercraft attending. The boat blessing by water will be 3/10 of a mile north of the Route 120 bridge on the west side of the Fox River. For information, call The Church of Holy Apostles at 815-385-5673.

Ringwood

MCCD ready for Living History Open House

QUILTS DONATED – Quilters at St. John’s Lutheran Church made quilts for those in need. The group has made 264 quilts this year. As part of the project, 35 quilts were sent to Moore, Okla., for the tornado relief efforts. Pictured (from left) are Sara Dittrich, Gerda Rosenwinkel, Bob Burns and Shirley Burns.

McHenry County Conservation District’s Living History Open House will be noon to 4 p.m. July 14 at Glacial Park’s Powers-Walker House, 6201 Harts Road. Tour the restored Greek revival house circa 1854 and learn more about the Powers and Walker families who called this area home. Volunteers in historical

attire will answer questions, offer tours and demonstrate skills appropriate to the season. There also will be several presentations during the event. The program is free and registration is not required for this drop-in event. For information, call at 815-479-5779 or visit www. mccdistrict.org.


To submit news, visit NWHerald.com/neighbors/connect Woodstock

Wonder Lake

Civil War Round Table to meet Tuesday The general meeting of the McHenry County Civil War Round Table will be 7:30 to 9 p.m. Tuesday in the lower level at the Woodstock Library, 414 W. Judd St. The speaker for the meeting will be Bob Frenz

of Crystal Lake. His presentation will be on Captain Harley Wayne of the 15th Illinois Volunteer Regiment. The meeting is open to the public. For information, visit www.mchenrycivilwar.com.

Woodstock

JourneyCare announces duck race details children and families facing serious or life-limiting illness or loss. Participants have a chance to win prizes by adopting (buying) rubber ducks. Each duck is numbered, and the numbers of the winning ducks will be announced after the race. For information or to buy ducks, visit www.journeycare.org/duckrace.

Woodstock SHOWCASE WINNERS – Harrison School’s first Technology Showcase participants walked the red carpet and had their picture taken upon their arrival. Their projects were on display during the event. Pictured (front row, from left) are winners Brianna Iacullo, Brooke Iacullo, Kaitlyn Nelson and Lilayna Jepsen; and (back row) Andy Maye, Ciara Duncan and Amberly Pabst.

St. Sophia Greek Orthodox Church’s 35rd Annual

GREEK FESTIVAL 2013 Friday, July 12th • 11am-1pm and 5pm-11pm Saturday, July 13th • Noon-11pm Sunday, July 14th • Noon-10pm Great Music! Agape Dance Troupe - Various Times Admission $2.00 Sounds of Greece - Fri. & Sat. Eve.

Kids Activities

Hellas 2000 - Sun. Evening

Euro-Bungee, Moonwalk, Children’s Games with Prizes *Unlimited Rides $15.00 – Sat/Sun 12pm-5pm *Closed Friday 11am-1pm

Great Food!

Grecian Chicken, Gyros, Souvlaki, Saganaki, Mousaka, Pastichio, Greek Fries, Greek Salad, Calamari, Hamburgers, Hot Dogs and Our Come to the Air Conditioned Exhibitor Hall Where You See and Purchase Items From Returning “Greek Burger!” , Cofees & Desserts *Available All Weekend Long Vendors of All Kinds!

The Marketplace *Closed Friday 11am-1pm

Full Bar Festival Mai-Tais, Greek Wines & Beer

Grand Prize Rale - $10,000.00! Call to Buy Your Tickets Early!

Drive Thru Greek Food! Drive Thru Services Available All Weekend!

525 Church Road Elgin (I-90 and Rt. 31) 847-888-2822 • www.St-Sophia.com

Workshops to give college funding tips Community workshops on college funding will be 7 to 8:30 p.m. July 18 and Aug. 8 at Woodstock Public Library, 414 W. Judd St. Seating is limited to the first 25 people. Reserve seats by calling 800-713-2151. The free workshop will teach parents of high school students about the opportu-

nities available to help them finance their children’s college education. The workshop will take parents through the intricacies of the college funding system from FAFSA applications to student aid reports with descriptions of major student grants and loans. For information, call 847888 3888.

Serving Northern Illinois for Over 40 Years!

Follow a greener path to a cleaner world!! We’ll pay you for your recyclable scrap metal.

T&C Metal Co.

Buyers of Non-Ferrous Recyclable Metals, Industrial Scrap and Speciality Metals

Pick-up Service Available for Commercial Accounts

378 E. Prairie Street • Crystal Lake (815) 459-4445 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sat. 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Closed 12:15 - 12:45 p.m. for lunch.

Our Service Makes a Difference!

• Saturday, July 6, 2013

JourneyCare, formerly Hospice and Palliative Care of Northeastern Illinois, will host the annual McHenry County Duck Race and Pool Party 4 to 7 p.m. July 27 at Woodstock Water Works in Emricson Park. Proceeds from the event will support JourneyCare for Children, which provides specialized, compassionate care and support for infants,

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Neighbors | Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

COMMUNITY NEWS


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Saturday, July 6, 2013

| Neighbors

12

To be listed in or to make changes in this directory, email Neighbors editor Rob Carroll at neighbors@nwherald.com. ANGLICAN St. Paul’s Anglican Church 200 Ellsworth St., Crystal Lake Sunday service 9:30 a.m. 815-338-0205; www.acahome.org; the Rev. Michael DuCette, Vicar. Part of the Diocese of Missouri Valley. Service and Bible School: 9:30 a.m. Sunday.

ASSEMBLY OF GOD Assembly of God 1201 Dean St., Woodstock; 815-338-1316; The Rev. Roger Willis. Prayer 9 a.m. Sunday. Worship 10 a.m. Sunday. Bible studies 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Calvary 5906 S. Route 31, Crystal Lake; 815-4594456; The Rev. Terry Reilly. Worship 10 a.m., small groups/children 7 p.m. Wednesday; children 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. First Assembly of God 22817 W. Grant Highway, Marengo; 815-5681170; The Rev. Wade Heimer. Christian education 9 a.m., Worship 10 a.m.; 6 p.m. irst and third Sunday every month. Maranatha 2505 N. Ringwood Road, McHenry; 815-3440557. The Rev. Michael Hein. 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Prayer time 7 p.m. Wednesday. New Hope Community Church 20906 S. Route 14, Harvard; 815-943-6560. The Rev. Shane Macy. 10:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. Sunday; 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Lighthouse Church 2742 Barney Court, McHenry (behind Culver’s); 815-382-4223; www.lhcag.org; The Rev. Neil Lindwall. 9 a.m. Sunday with children’s church/nursery.

BAHA’I Baha’i Faith www.us.bahai.org – Harvard; 815-943-5998. Thursday gatherings. First of every month. Call for current information on study circles, devotional meetings and other activities in the Harvard area. The Baha’i of Woodstock Call 815-575-5650 for information or visit www.us.bahai.org. We invite people of all backgrounds and walks of life to learn about the Baha’i faith. Weekly study circles on the Baha’i teachings, devotional gatherings and classes for children, youth and adults are held regularly.

BAPTIST Anchor Baptist Church 315 Sumner St., P.O. Box 185, Genoa City, Wis.; 262-279-2838; the Rev. Ryan Vanderwarker. Sunday School: 11 a.m. Worship: 9:30 a.m. Sunday. Church family hour: 6 p.m. Sunday; Pioneer Clubs: 6:30 p.m. Thursday. Awona

6:15 p.m. Wednesday. Bible Baptist 1701 Papoose Road, Carpentersville; 847-4280870; The Rev. Robert M. Jacoby. 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Sunday. Doxa Fellowship 214 Main St., Woodstock; 815-338-4252; www.doxafellowship.org. The Rev. Steve McCoy. 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Christ Life Church 13614 W. Jackson St., Woodstock; 815-3384934; The Rev. James Campbell. Worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday with children’s church, ages 4 through ifth grade; family service: 7 p.m. Wednesday; 6:30 p.m. Thursday, senior youth group. Cornerstone Baptist Church Deicke Park Community Room, 11419 S. Route 47, Huntley; 877-989-8300; www.cornerstonehuntley.org; The Rev. Paul Carlson. 10 a.m. Sunday; Wednesday prayer meeting at 7 p.m. Covenant Baptist 20911 Ratield Road, Marengo; 815-568-6076; www.marengocovenant.com; Interim Pastor Kevin Meek Children’s Church (K-5): 10 a.m.; worship: 10 a.m. Sunday. Nursery available. Crosspoint Church 27430 W. Nippersink Road, Ingleside; 847587-7722; www.thecrosspointchurch.org. The Rev. Chuck Vitel. 10 a.m. Sunday. Crossroads Community Church Roberts and Darrell roads, Island Lake; 847639-2419; The Rev. John Hover. Asst. pastor The Rev. David Heg. Bible study: 9:30 a.m.; Worship: 10:45 a.m. Sunday. Wednesday Bible study and youth meeting: 7 p.m. Victory Rock Fellowship (SBC) 20503 Telegraph St., Marengo; 815-5686404; The Rev. Victor M. Zabelka. Bible study: 9 a.m.; worship: 10 a.m.; discipleship study: 6 p.m. Sunday. Faith Baptist Church Meeting: Jefferson Elementary School, 1200 N. Jefferson St., Harvard; 815-943-8058; www.fbcharvard.com. The Rev. David Neal. Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.; worship: 10:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. Prayer/Bible study: 7 p.m. Wednesday. First Baptist – Crystal Lake 6502 S. Route 31; 815-459-2731; www.fbccl. com. The Rev. Tony Stepansky. Sunday School: 9:15 a.m.; Worship: 10:30 a.m.; AWANA and Youth: 4 to 5:15 p.m.; Adult fellowship and Bible study: 4 to 5 p.m. Sunday. Midweek Bible study: 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. First Baptist – Harvard 1102 N. 4th St.; 815-943-6075; The Rev. Mark Inman.

Sunday School: 10 a.m.; worship: 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Sunday; Bible study: 7 p.m. Wednesday. First Baptist – Marengo 320 E. Washington St.; 815-568-8830; The Rev. Jeffrey Hammer. 9 a.m. adult Sunday school: 8:30 a.m.; Preschool through 12th grade Sunday. Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday. First Baptist – McHenry 509 Front St.; 815-385-0083; fbcmchenry. org; www.bornagaincleric@yahoo.com. The Rev. Ruben Raquel. Sunday school, all ages: 9 a.m.; worship: 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Sunday. Bible study and prayer: 7 p.m. Wednesday; 6:15 p.m. Wednesday, Awana. First of Meadowvale 1715 Papoose Road, Carpentersville; 847426-6110. Foundation Baptist Church 7105 Virginia Road Unit 5, Crystal Lake; 815-271-2121; foundationbaptist-illinois. com. Pastor Jeremy Huston. Worship 10 a.m. Sunday. Bible study 7 p.m. Wednesday. Fox Valley 16N562 Vista Lane; East Dundee; 847-4285413; www.pzilinski@foxvalleybaptist.org. The Rev. Phil Zilinski. Sunday school: 9:15 a.m.; worship: 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Sunday. Grace Baptist 2750 Helm Road; Carpentersville; 847-4267411; The Rev. Eldon G. Schroeder. 10:45 a.m. Sunday; 7 p.m. Wednesday Bible study. Heritage Baptist Church 4609 Greenwood Road; Woodstock; 815575-1190; www.heritagebaptist-church.org. The Rev. Timothy A. Williams. Sunday school: 9 a.m.; worship: 10 a.m. Sunday. Prayer meeting: 6:45 p.m. Wednesday. Lighthouse Fellowship Church SBC P.O. Box 393, Huntley; 847-660-0025; www. huntleylighthouse.com. The Rev. Paul Feitlich. Meets: Leggee Elementary School, 13723 Harmony Road, Huntley. Sunday school: 9:30 a.m.; worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Meadowland Community Church Meets: Ministry Center, 4815 Johnsburg Road, Johnsburg; www.meadowlandchurch. org. The Rev. Adam Reardon. 9 and 11 a.m. Sunday. New Life Baptist Church 9228 Trinity Drive, Lake in the Hills; 847-4589726; www.newlifebaptist-il.com; the Rev. Mark Wood. Sunday school and Adult Life Groups: 9:15 a.m. Worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday. AWANA: Wednesday 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Springbrook Community 10115 Algonquin Road, Huntley; 224-5693300. Services: 5 p.m. Saturday; 9 and 11 a.m.

Sunday.

BUDDHIST

Trinity Community 5916 S. Route 31, Crystal Lake; 815-477-4140; The Rev. Michael J. Love. 11 a.m. Sunday. Twin Oaks Randall Road, Sleepy Hollow; 630-830-1914. Pastor Jerry Gleason. Sunday School: 9:45 a.m.; Services: 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Sunday. Bible study: 7 p.m. Wednesday.

BIBLE Alliance Bible Church 3815 W. Bull Valley Road, McHenry; 815-3851519; The Rev. Paul R. Martin. Services: 8 and 10 a.m. Sunday. Berean Grace Church N665 Highway B, Genoa City, Wis.; 262-2796435; The Rev. Steve Ross. Sunday School: 9 a.m.; Service: 10:15 a.m. Sunday. Bible study: 9 a.m. Wednesday. Harvard Bible 5817 Island Road, Harvard; 815-943-7530; The Rev. Darrell Bendorf. Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.; Service: 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Prayer Service: 7 p.m. Wednesday. Harvest Bible Chapel Ofice: 580 Tracy Trail, Crystal Lake; 847-3987005; www.harvestbible.org. Campus Pastor: Greg Bradshaw. Meeting: 580 Tracy Trail, Crystal Lake. 9 and 11:15 a.m. Sunday, with nursery and children’s ministry. Indian Hill Bible Church 36133 N. Fairield, Ingleside; 847-546-8142; The Rev. John Rosol. Sunday school: 9:30 a.m.; Service: 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m. Sunday. Spring Grove Bible Fellowship 7664 Wilmot Road, Spring Grove; 815675-0041; www.sgbf.org; The Rev. Scott Barrettsmith Sr. Adult Sunday school: 9 a.m.; worship: 10 a.m. Sunday. BLAST Youth Group 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays; prayer 7 p.m. Wednesdays, men’s prayer 8 a.m. Saturdays, food pantry open noon Sundays. Wonder Lake Bible 7511 Howe Road, Wonder Lake; 815-7280422; www.wlbiblechurch.org; The Rev. Daniel Cox. Sunday school: 9 a.m.; worship: 10:15 a.m. Sunday. Prayer service and Bible study: 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Woodstock Bible 770 E. Kimball Ave., Woodstock; 815338-3006; The Rev. Len DiCicco; www. woodstockbiblechurch.com. Worship: 9:30 a.m. Sunday. Nursery available. KidzLife for children ages 3 through ifth grade 9:30 a.m. Free warm meal 11:15 a.m. Sunday. Food pantry open at this time. Youth group meets 7 p.m. Mondays at Java Planet in Woodstock.

Blue Lotus Temple Meditation Group Meets: Congregational Unitarian Church, 221 Dean St, Woodstock; 815-338-0731; Sujatha Peradeniye. 10 to 11 a.m. Saturday; 7 to 8 p.m. Monday; daily meditation 6 to 6:45 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday; young adult meditation 6 to 6:45 p.m. Friday Ten Directions Kwan Um Zen Zen Buddhist Meditation, 815-639-0579; 7 to 9 p.m. Tuesday Congregational Unitarian Church, 221 Dean St., Woodstock; 7 to 9 p.m. Thursday 28025 Lakeview Circle, McHenry. Woodstock Zen Group Practice: 6 to 7 a.m. Tuesday and Thursday; 8 to 9 p.m. Saturday; 6 to 7 p.m. Sunday, Yoga. Call 815-236-2511 for info and directions.

CHARISMATIC Christian Fellowship 3419 Walkup Road, Crystal Lake; 815-4599473; the Rev. Kent Atkinson. 10 a.m. Sunday.

CHRISTIAN The Bridge Christian Church 2620 Bridge Lane, Woodstock, 815-469-0548 and www.churchasitshouldbe.org. 10 a.m. Sunday services. Crystal Lake Christian Church 8015 Ridgeield Road, Crystal Lake; 815-4599350; www.clchristian.net. The Rev. Scott Jewel. Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.; Worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday. New Hope Christian Church 400 Lincoln Ave., Fox River Grove; 815-6394673; the Rev. Randall Grimes Sr. Worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Men’s Bible study: 7 p.m. Tuesday Women’s Bible study: 7 p.m. Wednesday; AWANA club: 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. The Vine 1132 North Madison St.; 815-338-3380; www. atthevine.org. 10 a.m. Sunday; AWANA children’s program on 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Church Ministry Center, 1132 N. Madison St.

CHRISTIAN REFORMED Fox Valley Christian Reformed 9414 Route 176, Crystal Lake; 815-459-9519; the Rev. Dan Gregory. Service: 9:30 a.m.; Bible study: 10:45 a.m. Sunday.

CHURCH OF CHRIST Crystal Lake Church of Christ 401 N. Oak St.; 815-459-4160; www.clcoc. org. 10:30 a.m. and 12:45 p.m. Sunday.

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CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST First Church of Christ, Scientist 431 Woodstock St., Crystal Lake; 815-4593660; www.christiansciencecrystallake.org. Sunday service and Sunday school 10:30 a.m., Wednesday service 7:30 p.m.; Monday Bible study 7 p.m.; Reading Room 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday and Saturday, 6 p.m. Wednesday. First Church of Christ, Scientist – McHenry 1511 Eastwood, McHenry; 815-344-1284; christianscience-mchenry.org. Service and school: 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Wednesday service: 7:30 p.m.; Reading room: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday.

CHURCH OF GOD Carpenter’s House Community Church 201 N. Kennedy Drive (Route 25), Carpentersville; 847-428-0999; Pastor William Legge. Sunday school 9:45 a.m., morning worship 10:30 a.m. Nursery available, kids church available. Wednesday Bible study 7 p.m. Classes for children, teens and adults. Outbreak teen ministry 7 p.m. Friday.

THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS Crystal Lake First Ward 480 N. Walkup Road; 815-459-7775; Bishop Doran Patten. 11 a.m. Sunday. Crystal Lake Second Ward 480 N. Walkup Road; 847-455-2190; Bishop Steven Rands. 9 a.m. Sunday. Woodstock First Ward 2016 Hartland Road; 815-334-1703; Bishop Rob Ogle; Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday. Spanish Branch: 815-337-6371; Worship: noon Sunday.

CONTEMPORARY The Orchard Church 768 Ridgeview Drive, McHenry; 815-385-3410; www.orchardmchenry.org. The Rev. Tim Beavis and Associate Pastors Scott Swanson and Dennis Danylak. Service: 9 and 11 a.m. Sunday. Stade Farm 3709 Miller Road, McHenry; 815-675-6396; www.stadesfarmandmarket.com. 10 a.m. Sun.

EPISCOPAL Church of the Holy Apostles 26238 N. Highway 59, Wauconda; 847-5267148; 8 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday. St. Ann’s Episcopal Church 503 W. Jackson, Woodstock; 815-338-0950; www.stannswoodstock.org; The Rev. Patricia A. Conley, rector. Eurcharist services: 8:30 and

St. Mark 337 Ridge Road, Barrington Hills; 847-3810596; www.st-markschurch.org. The Rev. David Gibbons. Sunday school and adult formation: 9:05 a.m.; Worship: 8 and 10:15 a.m. Sunday. Nursery service: 8:45 to 11:30 a.m. Sunday. St. Mary 210 McHenry Ave., Crystal Lake; 815-459-1009; www.stmaryepiscopal.org. The Rev. Jack Fleming, Rector. Summer Sunday service meets 9 a.m. St. Paul 3706 W. St. Paul Ave., McHenry; 815-385-0390; www.st.paulmchenry.com. The Rev. Lori Lowe. Services: 8 and 10 a.m. Sunday.

EVANGELICAL COVENANT Hope Covenant Church 451 Ackman, Crystal Lake; 815-455-6340; www.hope-covenant.org. The Rev. Lisa & Rev. Bill Orris, co-pastors Sunday Worship celebration 10 a.m. Nursery & children’s church (kindergarten through third grade) available during worship. Sunday School (K.-fourth grade) during worship Sept.-May.

EVANGELICAL FREE Evangelical Free Church 575 E. Crystal Lake Ave., Crystal Lake; 815-4591095; www.efccl.org; Worship: Sunday, 9 and 10:45 a.m. Adult classes and childcare (infants through third grade) available during both services. Classes for fourth through eighth grade available at 9 a.m. High school Bible study at 6 p.m. Fox Valley Free Church 37W073 Huntley Road, W. Dundee; 847-8441010; The Rev. Tom Atchison. Service: 9 and 10:45 a.m. Sunday. LifeSpring Community Church 2503 Spring Ridge Drive, Unit G, Spring Grove; 815-230-7101; info@lifespringefc.org; www. getlifenow.org. The Rev. Cabot Ashwill. Service: 10 a.m. Sunday. Living Grace Community Church 1500 Silver Lake Road, Cary; 847-639-7566; www.livinggraceonline.org; ofice@livinggraceonline.com. Dr. Donald Erickson, senior pastor. Services: 8 and 10:45 a.m. Sunday; adult growth groups and grow zone (birth to high school) 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. Sundays; senior high 6 p.m. Sundays; junior high 7 p.m. Tuesdays; AWANA 7 p.m. Wednesday. Evangelical Free Church of McHenry 2614 N. Ringwood Road; 815-344-1111; www. mchenryefc.com. Service: 10 a.m. Sunday. Kids Towne (birth to grade 5) 10 a.m. Sunday; Adult Sunday school 8:45 a.m. Junior/senior high youth meets 6 p.m. Thursdays; AWANA 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Other ministries and small groups offered. See

website for details.

FOUR SQUARE GOSPEL New Life Christian Center 5115 Dean St., Woodstock; 815-337-4673; the Rev. Scott Schilder. 10 a.m. Sunday; 7 p.m. Wednesday.

GREEK ORTHODOX St. Sophia 525 Church Road, Elgin; 847-888-2822; the Rev. Andrew G. Karamitos. Sunday Orthros: 9 a.m.; Divine Liturgy: 9:30 a.m.

JEHOVAH’S WITNESS Kingdom Hall Algonquin – 1244 Dundee Road; 708-6588340. Crystal Lake – 5303 Terra Cotta Road; 815455-5960. Union – 5105 N. Union Road; 815-923-1914. Spring Grove – 815-678-4854. Woodstock – 1320 Catalpa Lane; 815-3384020. Services: 9:30 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Spanish Domingo: 1 and 1:50 p.m.

JEWISH, SYNAGOGUE Congregation Tikkun Olam Reform Congregation, McHenry County; 815-334-7110; www.tikkun-olam.org. Shabbat Services: 7:30 p.m. fourth Fridays at St. Ann’s Episcopal Church, 503 W. Jackson St., Woodstock. Religious school for second grade through high school: 9 a.m. alternate Sundays at Algonquin Township Hall in Crystal Lake. McHenry County Jewish Congregation 8617 Ridgeield Road, Ridgeield; 815-455-1810; www.mcjc-online.org; Rabbi Maralee Gordon. Sabbath service: 6:30 p.m. Friday; 9 a.m. Saturday. Religious school: 4:30 to 6 p.m. Wednesday and 9 a.m. to noon Sunday.

LATTER-DAY SAINTS Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints 11909 McConnell Road, Woodstock; 847-3036585; the Rev. Bob Elrod. 1 p.m. Sunday.

LUTHERAN Bethany Lutheran (ELCA) 76 W. Crystal Lake Ave, Crystal Lake; 815-4592690; www.bethanylc.com. Senior pastor, the Senior Pastor: Rev. Carrie B. Smith.; Assoc. Pastor: Rev. Paul Cannon Worship: 7:45, 9 and 10:45 a.m. Sunday and 6:30 Wednesday. Sunday school 9 a.m. Bethlehem (Mo. Synod) 401 W. Main St., Dundee; 847-426-7311; Pastor Steve Woita. Services: 8 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday; 9:15 a.m. Sunday school.

1074; http://communityoffaithsg.org. The Rev. Jim McCoid. Worship: 9 a.m. Sunday. Adult Bible study: 9 a.m. Wednesday. Crosspoint Lutheran Church 8505 Redtail Drive, Lakewood, 815-893-0888; www.crosspointlakewood.org Worship 9:30 a.m. Sundays with children ages 4 through ifth grade excused during sermon for Crosspoint Kids. Evangelical Lutheran Church of All Saints (ELCA) 5800 State Park Road, Fox Lake; 847-587-7727; www.allsaintsfoxlake.org; lutheranchurchofallsaints@comcast.net; The Rev. Nathan Anderson Services: 8:15 a.m. (traditional) and 10 a.m. (contemporary/Sunday school). Faith (Mo. Synod) 2505 Helm Road, Carpentersville; 847-4282079; the Rev. James Bauman. 9 a.m. Sunday, Bible study; 11 a.m. Sunday School. Fellowship of Faith (LCMS) 6120 Mason Hill Road, McHenry; 815-7590739; fellowshipoffaith.org. The Rev. David Gaddini. Sunday school: 9 and 10:30 a.m. Worship: 9 and 10:30 a.m. Sundays. Casual and contemporary. Childcare provided for kids 5 and younger. Grace Lutheran (ELCA) 1300 Kishwaukee Valley Road, Woodstock 815-338-0554; www.gracewoodstock.org Rev. Ken Gibson, senior pastor; Worship: 5 p.m. Saturday, 8:30 a.m. & 10 a.m. (contemporary) Sunday. Contemporary service second Sundays in outdoor chapel. Grace Lutheran (ELCA) 6000 Broadway, Richmond; 815-678-3082. Email: ofice@gracelutheran1.org. Website: gracelutheran1.org. The Rev. Andy Tyrrell. Worship: 8 and 9:30 a.m. Sunday. Education classes for all ages 9:15 a.m. Sunday. Holy Cross Lutheran (Mo. Synod) 2107 Three Oaks Road, Cary; 847-639-1702; holycrosscary.org; the Rev. Bill Metzger. Services: 5:30 p.m. Sat; 8:30 a.m. Sunday traditional service in the sanctuary; 9:30 a.m. coffee and refreshments in Fellowship Hall; Sunday school 9:45 a.m., adult and youth classes; 10:45 a.m. contemporary service in the LOFT. Immanuel (Mo. Synod) 407 Johnson, E. Dundee; 847-428-4477; the Rev. William Yonker. Services: 6 p.m. Saturday; 8 and 10:45 a.m. Sunday

Capron (ELCA) 155 S. Second St.; 815-569-2480; capronelca@ verizon.net; The Rev. Jess Harren. Worship 10:15 a.m. Sunday. Sunday school 9 a.m. Wednesday worship 7 p.m.

Immanuel Lutheran (Mo. Synod) 300 S. Pathway Court, Crystal Lake; 815-4591441; www.imcl.us. The Rev. Dr. Larry Tieman and the Rev. Erik Neider. Services: 6 p.m. Saturday at historic church, 178 McHenry Ave., Crystal Lake; Sunday services at 8 and 10:45 a.m. on the new campus. Christian Education Hour 9:30 a.m. Sundays on the new campus.

Community of Faith (LCMS) 3010 E. Solon Road, Spring Grove; 815-675-

Joyful Harvest Church 5050 N. Johnsburg Road; Johnsburg; 847-497-

4569; ofice@joyfulharvest.org or pastor@ joyfulharvest.org; www.joyfulharvest.org. The Rev. Douglas Liston. Saturday worship: 6 p.m. Sunday worship: 8:30 and 10:45 a.m. Sunday school 9:30 a.m. Jubilee Lutheran Church (Mo. Synod) 3604 Chapel Hill Road, 815-600-6995; www. jubileelcms.org. Worship: 9 a.m.; Jubilee Junction: 10:15 to 10:45 a.m. Sunday. Light of Christ Lutheran 100 Hanson Road, Algonquin; 847-658-9250; the Rev. Kendall L. Koenig, senior pastor. Associate Pastor Sharon Rogers. Worship: Blended: 5 p.m. Saturday and 9 a.m. Sunday. Contemporary 10 :30a.m. Sunday. Living Waters Lutheran (ELCA) 1808 Miller Road, Crystal Lake; 815-455-2424; www.livingwaterschurch.com. Pastor Carol Gates. Sunday School: 9:15 a.m. Worship: 8:15 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Lord and Savior Lutheran (Wis. Synod) 9300 Ridgeield, Crystal Lake; 815-455-4175; the Rev. David Carlovsky. Worship: 8 and 10:30 a.m. Sundays. Sunday school and teen and adult Bible study 9:15 a.m. Nativity Lutheran (ELCA) 3506 E. Wonder Lake Road, Wonder Lake; 815653-3832; the Rev. Susie Hill. Worship: 9 a.m. Sunday; 10:15 a.m. Sunday School. Prince of Peace (Mo. Synod) 932 S. McHenry Ave., Crystal Lake; 815-4553200; www.prince-of-peace.org; The Revs. Larry Rubeck and Paul Schuth. Worship: 5 p.m. Saturday; 8, 9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Sunday; 9:30 a.m. Sunday, Sunday School, Jr. and Sr. High and Adult Bible Study. Redeemer Lutheran (ELCA) 1320 Dean St., Woodstock; 815-338-9370; www.rlcw.org. The Rev. Thomas E. Rogers Jr. Worship: 8 and 10 a.m.; Education hour: 9:15 a.m. Sunday. Shepherd of the Hills (ELCA) 404 N. Green St., McHenry; 815-385-4030; shepherdofhills.org. The Rev. Roger Schneider. Services: 6:30 p.m. Saturday; 8, 9:15 and 10:45 a.m. Sunday. Sunday school 8, 9:15 and 10:45 a.m. Nursery available. Shepherd of the Prairie (ELCA) 10805 Main St., Huntley; 847-669-9448; www.sotp.org. The Rev. Mark Boster. 5 p.m. Saturday; 9 and 10:45 a.m. Sunday. St. Barnabas Lutheran (ELCA) 8901 S. Cary-Algonquin Road, Cary; 847639-3959; www.stbarnabas-cary.org; Pastor John Cunningham. Service: 8 and 10:30 a.m. Sundays. Christian education 9:15 a.m. St. John’s Lutheran (ELCA) – Hebron 9812 St. Albans St.; 815-648-2671; www.stjlutheran.com. The Rev. Sarah E. Wilson. Worship: 8 and 9:30 a.m. Sunday.

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• Saturday, July 6, 2013

First Church of Christ, Scientist – Woodstock 111 W. South St., Woodstock; 815-338-2731; fccs.woodstock@sbcglobal.net. Service and Sunday school: 10:30 a.m. Wednesday testimony 8 p.m. Reading room noon to 3 p.m. Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.

10 (with music) a.m. Sunday. St. James Episcopal Washington and N. 6th St. W. Dundee; 847426-5612. Service: 8 a.m. (spoken), 10 a.m. (with music and Sunday School.

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NEIGHBORS | Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

WORSHIP DIRECTORY


Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com • Saturday, July 6, 2013

| Neighbors

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WORSHIP DIRECTORY Continued from page 13 St. John’s Lutheran (Mo. Synod) – Algonquin 300 Jefferson St.; 847-658-9300; www. stjohnsalgonquin.org. The Rev. William Stroup. Worship: 5:30 p.m. Saturday; 8 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Adult Bible class: 8 a.m. Sunday. Service broadcast: 4:30 p.m. Thursday, Channel 17..

St. John’s Lutheran (Mo. Synod) – Union 6821 Main St.; 815-923-2733; www.stjohnsluth. org; The Rev. Caleb Schauer. Services: 6 p.m. Saturday; 7:45 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday; 9 a.m. Sunday School; 9:15 a.m. Bible study. St. John’s Lutheran (Mo. Synod) – Island Lake 405 W. State Road 176, Island Lake; 847-5267614; www.stjohnislandlake.com; The Rev. Rod Krueger. Service: 9 a.m. Sunday; 10:15 a.m. Sunday school, high school breakfast club and adult Bible study. St. John’s Lutheran (Mo. Synod) – Woodstock 401 St. John’s Road; 815-338-5159. Email: ofice@stjohnswoodstock.com. Website: www. stjohnswoodstock.com. Worship: 6 p.m. Saturday; 9 a.m. Sunday; Sunday school/adult Bible study: 10:30 a.m.; Wednesday morning Bible study: 9:15 a.m. St. Matthew Lutheran 720 Dundee Ave., Barrington; 847-382-7002. Services: 5 p.m. Saturday and 9 a.m. Sunday. Sunday School and Sunday Bible study 10:20 a.m. St. Paul Lutheran Church (LCMS) 1601 N. Garield Road, Harvard; 815-943-5330; www.stpaulharvard.com; the Rev. Steven Sward. Services: June to August, 9 a.m. Sunday; September to May, 10 a.m. worship Sunday, 8:30 a.m. Sunday school; All year, worship 7 p.m. Wednesdays. St. Peter Ev. (Mo. Synod) 18N377 Galligan Road, Gilberts; 847-428-4054; the Rev. Bruce Milash. Services: 8 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Christian education 9:15 a.m. Sunday St. Steven (ELCA) 225 Kennedy Drive Carpentersville; 847-4266727; the Rev. Martha Uecker Nelson. Services: 8:15 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Trinity Evangelical Lutheran – Harvard (ELCA) 504 E. Diggins St; 815-943-7433; tlcelca@ sbcglobal.net; trinityharvard.org. The Rev. Herbert Priester. Services: 9 a.m. Sunday and 1:30 p.m. Thursday. Sunday school 9:30 a.m. Trinity (Mo. Synod) – Huntley 11008 N. Church St.; 847-669-5780; trinityhuntley@sbcglobal.net; www.trinityhuntley.org. The Rev. Charles Kittel. Worship: 5:30 p.m. Saturday, 8 and 9:30 a.m. Sunday. Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church (ELCA) – Ingleside

25519 W. Highway 134; 847-546-2109; the Rev. Janet Breum. Worship: 8 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday; 9:15 to 10:15 a.m. Sunday School all ages. Zion Lutheran (Mo. Synod) – Marengo 412 Jackson St., Marengo; 815-568-6564; the Rev. Glen W. Borhart., the Rev. Raymond Ayers. Services: 6 p.m. Saturday; 8 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday; 6:30 p.m. Monday. Zion Lutheran (Mo. Synod) – McHenry 4206 Elm St.; 815-385-0859; zionmchenry.org. The Rev. George Borghardt III Services: 6 p.m. Saturday; 7:45 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday; 9:15 a.m. adult education and Sunday school. Channel 17, 7:30 p.m. Thursday.

MESSIANIC Sanctuary Messianic Congregation 1221 W. Route 176 Mundelein 847-243-4444; Service: 5 p.m. Saturday; 9:30 a.m. Hebrew School Saturday. Mishkan B’ha Emeq Meets Trinity Oaks Christian Academy; 409 First St., Cary; 815-404-7606. Bible Study: 7:30 p.m. Thursday.

METHODIST Alden United Methodist 16532 State Route 173, Alden; 815-648-2240; the Rev. Jim Bell. Worship and Sunday school 9 a.m. Barrington United Methodist 98 Algonquin Road, Barrington; 847-836-5540; www.barringtonumc.com. Worship: 8 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday, Nursery care for infants and toddlers available during both services. Sunday school 9 a.m. Cary United 500 First St., Cary; 847-639-7627; the Rev. David Lagos-Fonseca and the Rev. Shirley Pulgar-Hughes. Service: 8:30 and 11 a.m. Sunday. Praise Service: 11 a.m. on second and fourth Sunday every month. Chemung Route 173, Chemung (Harvard); 815-943-7101; The Rev. Susanne Wilczek. Worship: 9 a.m. Sunday. Christ United 9009 Algonquin Road, 2 miles west of Randall Road.; 847-669-9009; www.ourchristchurch. net; the Rev. Kangse Lee. Teen small group studies 10 a.m. Sunday. Worship Service and Children’s Sunday School 10 a.m. Sunday. First United Dole and Crystal Lake avenues, Crystal Lake; 815-459-0785; www.clumc.org. The Rev. Steve Bullmer. Worship: 5 p.m. Saturday, 8, 9:30 and 11 a.m. Sunday. Check local listing for cable channel. Wednesday 5 p.m. First United Grove and Elm streets, Hampshire; 847-6832598; The Rev. Gavin Brandt. Worship 9 a.m. Sunday. Sunday school 10:15

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a.m. Child care available. First United 1100 N. Division St., Harvard; 815-943-5422; The Rev. Jim Bell; http://sites.google.com/site/ harvardunitedmethodistchurch. 9 a.m. Sunday church school for all ages; 10:30 a.m. Worship; 11 a.m. Fellowship. First United 3717 W. Main St., McHenry; 815-385-0931; the Rev. SungJa Lee Moon; www.mchenryfumc. org. Worship: 8 and 10:15 a.m. Sundays. Sunday school 9 a.m. for all ages. First United 318 W. Main Street, West Dundee; 847-4262113; the Rev. Steve Mindrup. Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday. First United 201 W. South St., Woodstock; 815-338-3310; the Rev. Kurt Gamlin. Worship: 9 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday; Sunday school: 9:20 to 10:15 a.m. for preschool through high school students. High school youth 10:30 a.m. Sundays. Fox River Grove United Methodist Church 400 Opatrny Dr., Fox River Grove; 847-6397737; the Rev. Morgan McLeland; www. frgmethodist.org. Worship: 9:30 a.m. Sunday. Hebron United 9811 Main St., Hebron; 815-648-2512; www. hebronumc.org; the Rev. Soon Sun Lee.. Family worship 9:30 a.m. Sunday Marengo United 119 E. Washington St., Marengo; 815-568-7162; www.marengoumc.org; info@marengo-umc. org; the Rev. Keck N. Mowry. Sunday schedule: 8:30 a.m. Heritage worship; 10 a.m. New Connections worship. 10 a.m. Sunday school/nursery/youth conirmation class. Noon Culto (Hispanic) worship. Mount Hope United 1015 W. Broadway St., Pistakee Highlands; 847-497-3805; the Rev. SungJa Lee Moon and the Rev. Lori Bee; Worship and Sunday school: 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Contemporary service 7 p.m. irst Fridays Ringwood United 5214 Barnard Mill Road, Ringwood; 815-6536956; the Rev. George David. Worship: 9:30 a.m. Sunday. Salem Methodist 115 W. Lincoln Ave., Barrington; 847-381-0524; the Rev. Richard Carlson. Worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday; Sunday School: 9:15a.m.; Bible study, 9:15 a.m.; kids club for kindergarten through fourth grade, 6:15 p.m. Wednesday.

3180; the Rev. David Cooper. Worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday; Sunday School 9:15 a.m.

Service: 10:15 a.m. Sunday; 5 p.m.; Sunday adult Bible study; 7 p.m. Tuesday men’s study; 9:30 a.m. Tuesday women’s study.

Zion United Methodist 157 W. Jefferson Ave., Hampshire; 847-6832430; The Rev. Diana Otterbacher. Worship: 9:30 a.m. Sunday; child care available.

Jesus Saves Full Gospel 44 Sandbloom Road, Algonquin; 847-426-3798; The Rev. Howard Saylor. Service: 11 a.m. Sunday.

NATIONAL CATHOLIC CHURCH St. Francis Mission 5345 W. Flanders Road, McHenry; 773-3800528. English Holy Mass: 11 a.m. Saturday.

NAZARENE Real Life Church of the Nazarene 531 Devonshire Lane, Crystal Lake; 815-4597578; indreallife.com. The Rev. Jeffrey Hodge. Worship: 9:30 and 11 a.m. Sunday; 9:30 and 11 a.m. Sunday school; Adult Bible study 6 p.m. Sunday or 6:30 p.m. Tuesday; Youth Sunday 6 p.m.

NON & INTER DENOMINATION Apostolic Faith Christian Center Holiday Inn, Crystal Lake; 847-289-4476; pureheartinc.org. Service: 10:30 a.m. Sunday. Calvary Chapel Cardunal Meets 50 Cleveland Ave., Carpentersville; 847426-8020; www.calvarychapel.com/cardunal. Service: 10 a.m. Sunday. Calvary Fellowship of McHenry 3421 Pearl St., McHenry; 815-344-3767; the Rev. Mark Drinnenberg. Service: 10 a.m. Sunday. The Chapel Meets at McHenry West High School, 4724 W. Crystal Lake Road, McHenry; 847-201-2777; www.chapel.org; info@chapel.org; Campus pastor Jeff Pittman. Service: 10 a.m. Sunday. Christian Fellowship 3419 Walkup Road, Crystal Lake; 815-459-9473. Service: 10 a.m. Sunday. Christ Life Church 13614 W. Jackson St., Woodstock; 815-3384934; the Rev. James Campbell. Services: 10:30 a.m. Sunday; children’s church; 7 p.m. Sunday for ages 4 through ifth grade; family service 7 p.m. Wednesday; teen night; 7 p.m. Thursday. Faith Community Church 10547 Faiths Way, Huntley; 224-569-6501; www.fccwired.tv; The Rev. Bruce Cole. Service: 5 p.m. Saturday casual service , 9:45 a.m. Sunday blended/traditional service.

Trinity United 1647 Ravine Lane, Carpentersville; 847-4281627; the Rev. Jum Sook Kim. Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday.

Fresh Harvest Church McHenry County Farm Bureau, 1102 McConnell Road, Woodstock; 815-206-0549; www.freshharvestchurch.com. Led by Jorge Rivera. 9:30 a.m. Sunday.

Woodstock Free Methodist 934 N. Seminary Ave., Woodstock; 815-338-

Grace Fellowship Church 200 Cairns Court, Woodstock; 815-337-6510

Lifeline Christian Church Brunswick Zone XL, 1611 S. Randall Road, Algonquin; www.lifelinecc.org; www.facebook. com/lifelinecc. Dave Rudin, lead pastor. Services: 10 a.m. Sunday. Luz de Betel 5906 Route 31, Crystal Lake; 815-459-4456; The Rev. Nick Torres. Service: 10 a.m. Sunday; Bible study: 7 p.m. Wednesday. Morning Star World Outreach 41W350 Powers Road, Huntley; 847-669-9800; the Rev. Stephen and Mary Foster. Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday 7 p.m. Wednesday; Nite Alive: 7:30p.m. Friday. Salvation Army 290 W. Crystal Lake Ave., Crystal Lake; 815-455-2769; Majors John and Joann Price. Service: 11 a.m. Sunday; 9:45 a.m. Sunday School. Solid Rock Community Church 602 Old Orchard Road, Harvard; 815-9439300; www.solidrockchurch.us; Bishop David Gardner. Services: 10 a.m. Sunday school; Worship: 11 a.m. Sunday; Thursday fellowship and Kidz Club 7 p.m. The Journey 234 N. Main St., Woodstock; 815-333-5201; homeofthejourney.org; The Rev. Ed Schoolcraft. Service: 10 a.m. Sunday; 6:30 p.m. Wednesday 6:30 p.m. (adult/children midweek), Thursday 6:30p.m. (teen). The Voice of One Calling Fellowship 11427 Commercial Ave. Suite 22, Richmond; 262-492-8843; www.tvooc.org. The Rev. John Lack. Service: 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday worship. Westlake Community Church 10711 Wolf Drive, Huntley; 847-669-0475; www.westlakecommunity.org. Service: 10 a.m. Sunday, Cosman Cultural Center, 12015 Mill St. Willow Creek Community Church – Crystal Lake 220 Exchange Drive, Crystal Lake; 224-5121737; willowmchenry.org. The Rev. Marcus Bieschke. Services: 5:30 p.m. Saturday, 9 and 10:45 a.m. Sunday. Willow Creek Community Church – Huntley Huntley High School, 13719 Harmony Road; 847-765-7940; www.willowhuntley.org. The Rev. Craig Spinger. Service: 10:30 a.m. Sunday Yahweh Christian Church 1410 Northield Court, Harvard; 815-943-5712; the Rev. Daniel Gezzi. Service: 5:30 p.m. Saturday, 9 and 10:45 a.m. Sunday

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WORSHIP DIRECTORY PENTECOSTAL Apostolic Faith Temple 110 W. Prairie St. Marengo; 815-568-5590; The Rev. A.A. Morgan Service: 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Sunday: Youth: 7 p.m. Thursday 7 p.m.; Sunday School: 10 a.m.; Wednesday Bible: 7 p.m. Apostolic Living Lighthouse of Woodstock 1328 Dean St., Woodstock; 847-809-2986; www.allowupci.org; allofwoodstock@hotmail. com. The Rev. Tony Urback. Service: 2 p.m. Sunday. Crystal Lake United Pentecostal Church 525 Ada Street Cary; 847-462-2166; the Rev. Jason Beardsley. Spanish service: 12:30 p.m. Sunday; English: 10 a.m. Sunday. Sunday school: 10 a.m.; Bible Study: 7:30 p.m. Wednesday.

Sunday; children’s church 11 a.m. Sunday. First Presbyterian – Woodstock 2018 N. Route 47, Woodstock; 815-338-2627; fpcwoodstock.org. The Rev. Paul Nelson. Worship: 9 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday,. Sunday school 9:15 a.m.

appointment.

Linn Presbyterian Church W3335 Willow Road, Lake Geneva, Wis.; 262248-1588; the Rev. Won Ho Kim. Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday.

Sts. Peter & Paul 410 N. First St., Cary; 847-516-2636; the Rev. Stephen St. Jules. Mass: 4:30 p.m. Saturday, 8, 9:30, 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. (Spanish) Sunday and 5 p.m. English.

Presbyterian Church of Barrington 6 Brinker Road: 847-381-0975; the Rev. Curtis Baxter. Service: 10 a.m. Sunday. Ridgefield-Crystal Lake Presbyterian 8505 Church St., Ridgefield; 815-459-1132; the Rev. John Dillon; rclpc.org. Worship; 9 and 11 a.m.; education for all ages 10 a.m. Childcare provided.

Valley Community Church McHenry Township Senior Center, 3519 North Richmond Road, Johnsburg; 815-385-6639; www.vccmchenry.org; the Rev. Chuck Beckler. Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday.

Time Church 330 Van Buren St., Crystal Lake; the Rev. Cora Lou Bermuth. Worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday.

QUAKERS

McHenry Full Gospel Church 3813 W. John St., McHenry; 815-344-6116; The Rev. Harry Jarrett. Sunday school, 10 a.m.; church, 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. Sunday; Bible study, 7:30 p.m. Wednesday.

Upper Fox Valley Quaker Meeting Crystal Lake Montessori, 3013 Country Club; Call 815-385-8512 for information. Sunday schedule: Discussion group 9 a.m. Sunday; Worship 10 a.m.; Potluck lunch 11:15 a.m.; Business meeting noon, first Sunday.

RELIGIOUS SCIENCE The Apostolic Road 105 W. North St., Capron; 815-569-2395; The Rev. Luis Riviera. Worship: 9 to 10 a.m. Spanish; 10 to 11 a.m. Sunday School; 11:30 a.m. worship Sunday. Wonder Lake Pentecostal Church of God 4010 West Wood Drive, Wonder Lake; 815-6539980; The Rev. Janie Long. Worship: 9:30 a.m. Sunday; prayer meeting: Noon Thursday.

PRESBYTERIAN Christ Covenant Presbyterian Church (OPC) Meeting: Immanuel Lutheran Church Historic campus 178 McHenry Ave., Crystal Lake; www. christcovenantpresbyterian.org.; 815-354-5156; the Rev. Brandon Wilkins. Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday; 9 a.m. Sunday School; meets 7 p.m. 1st and 3rd Wednesdays at the church for prayer and fellowship; Meet 7 p.m. 2nd and 4th Sundays at the church for Bible study. Faith Presbyterian 2107 W. Lincoln Road, McHenry; 815-385-5388; The Rev. Kit Stanich; www.mchenryfaithchurch. com. Worship: 9:30 a.m. Sundays. Sunday School: 8:30 a.m. First Presbyterian 7100 Harvard Hills, Harvard; 815-943-4474; the Rev. Jeff Borgerson; Worship: 5 p.m. Saturday, 9 and 10 :30 a.m. Sunday Worship 9 a.m. Sunday School. First Presbyterian – Marengo 203 W. Washington St., Marengo; 815-5687441; the Rev. Janet Potter. Worship: 10:30 a.m.,

Center for Spiritual Evolution 204 Spring Street, Cary; 847-516-1950; www. newthoughtmchenry.org; The Rev. Anne Muelleman. Sunday Meditation 9:30 a.m. service: 10 a.m. Sunday course in miracles 6:30 p.m. SOM children’s Sundays, toddlers through fifth grade; Tuesday meditation 10 a.m.; weekly SOM classes.

ROMAN CATHOLIC Christ the King 5006 E. Wonder Lake Road, Wonder Lake; 815653-2561; the Rev. Andrew Skrobutt. Daily Mass: 8 a.m. Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday, 7 p.m. Monday; Mass: 5 p.m. Saturday, 8 and 10 a.m. Sunday Holy Day Mass: 8 a.m. and 7 p.m.; Confession: 3:45 p.m. Saturday. Call for daily confession. The Church of Holy Apostles 5211 W. Bull Valley Road, McHenry; 815-3855673; the Rev. Paul White. Daily Mass: 7:30 a.m. Monday to Saturday, 12:10 p.m. Monday, Wednesday and Friday; 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, 7 p.m. Thursday (in Spanish). Weekend Mass times: 5 p.m. Saturday; 8, 10 a.m., noon (in Spanish), 6 p.m. Sunday. Confession 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. Thursday (6 p.m. in Spanish), 3 p.m. Saturday. Resurrection Catholic Church 2918 S. Country Club Road, Woodstock; 815338-7330; the Rev. Stephen A. Glab. Mass: 5 p.m. Saturday; 8 and 10:30 Sunday. Weekday Mass: 8 a.m. Reconciliation: 4:15 p.m. Saturday or by

St. Catherine of Siena 845 W. Main St., W. Dundee; 847-426-2217; the Rev. Michael Lavan. Mass: 4:30 p.m. Saturday and 7:30, 9:30 and 11:30 a.m. Sunday. St. Elizabeth Ann Seton 1023 McHenry Ave., Crystal Lake; 815-4593033; the Rev. Brian D. Grady. Mass: 4 p.m. Saturday and 8, 9:30 and 11:15 a.m. Sunday. St. John the Baptist 2302 W. Church St., Johnsburg; 815-385-1477; the Rev. Jacek Junak. Mass: 4 p.m. Saturday and 7, 9 and 11 a.m. Sunday. St. Joseph - Harvard 206 E. Front St.; 815-943-6406; The Rev. Rafael Tunarosa. English Mass: 5 p.m. Saturday, 8 and 11 a.m. Sunday; Spanish Mass: 9:30 a.m. and 12:30 a.m. Sunday, 7 p.m. Wednesday. St. Joseph - Richmond 10519 Main St.; 815-678-7421; the Rev. Andrew Lewandowski. Mass: 5 p.m. Saturday, 8 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday. St. Margaret Mary 111 S. Hubbard St., Algonquin; 847-658-7625; the Rev. Piotr Sarnicki, OFM Conv. Mass: 4:30 p.m. Saturday, 7, 9 and 11 a.m. Sunday. Polish Mass: 6:30 p.m. Saturday and 1 p.m. Sunday. St. Mary - McHenry 1401 N. Richmond Road; 815-385-0024; the Rev. Robert A. Balog. Daily Mass: 9 a.m. Tuesday; 8 a.m. Wednesday to Friday; Mass: 4 p.m. Saturday, 7, 9 and 11 a.m. Sunday. Reconciliation: 3 p.m. Saturday. St. Mary - Woodstock 312 Lincoln; 815-338-3377; the Rev. Msgr. Aaron Brodeski. Daily Mass: 7:30 a.m. Monday to Saturday, 5 p.m. Saturday 7:30, 9, 10:30 a.m. and noon Sunday; Spanish Mass every day at 6:30 p.m. Confessions: 4 to 4:45 p.m. Saturday and 6 p.m. in Spanish. St. Mary - Huntley 10307 Dundee Road, Huntley; 847-669-3137; the Rev. Msgr. Stephen J. Knox. Mass: 5 p.m. Saturday, 7:30, 9, 10:30 a.m., noon and 5:30 p.m. Sunday. St. Monica 90 N. Kennedy Drive Carpentersville; the Rev. Josue Lara. Saturday: 4:30pm (English) 6 p.m. (Español). Sunday: 9:30am (English), 8 a.m., 11:15 a.m., 1 p.m., 6 p.m. (Español). St. Patrick - Hartland

St. Peter 2120 Main St., Spring Grove; 815-675-2288; the Rev. Msgr. Joseph Jarmoluk, Mass: 4 p.m. Saturday, 7, 9 and 11 a.m. Sunday confession; 3 to 3:45 p.m. Saturday; benediction and confessions: 7 p.m. Wednesday. St. Thomas the Apostle 451 W. Terra Cotta Ave., (Route 176 and Oak St.) Crystal Lake; 815-455-5400; the Rev. Msgr. Dan Hermes. Mass: 4:30 p.m. Saturday, 7:30, 9, 10:30 a.m. noon, and 5:30 p.m. Sunday.

SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Cary-Grove Adventist Fellowship 400 Lincoln Ave.; 847-516-2200; the Rev. Gabriel Bardan. Sabbath worship: 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday.

UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST Tree Of Life Unitarian Universalist Congregation 5603 W. Bull Valley Road, McHenry; 815-3222464; www.uucofwoodstock.org; office@ uucofwoodstock.org; the Rev. Sean Parker Dennison. Worship and school: 10:45 a.m. Sunday.

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Congregational Church - Algonquin 109 Washington St., Algonquin; 847-658-5308; the Rev. Brian Cope Service: 8 and 10 a.m. Shepard U and IMPACT Sunday school 10 a.m.; adult Bible study 4:30 to 6 p.m. Tuesday. Nursery care available 9 to 11 a.m. Faith Community United Church of Christ 2023 Route 176, Prairie Grove; 815-479-1307; faithcommucc@aol.com or www.faithcommunityucc.org. Service: 10 a.m. Sunday Alternative service: fourth Sunday of month. Handicap accessible. First Congregational - Carpentersville 30 N. Washington; 847-428-1712; The Rev. Robert J. Tripp. Sunday 10 a.m. Sunday school 9 a.m. First Congregational - Crystal Lake 461 Pierson St.; 815-459-6010; office@fcc-cl. org or www.fcc-cl.org. The Rev. Gilbert “Budd” Friend-Jones, senior minister. Services: Spirit worship 5:30 p.m. first and third Saturdays, Pilgrim worship 10 a.m. Sunday, First Congregational – Dundee 900 South Eighth St., West Dundee; 847-4262161; www.fccdundee.com; info@fccdundee. com; the Rev. Aaron James, senior pastor. Sunday services: 9 and 10:45 a.m. Sunday school rotation. Nursery provided 8:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. First Congregational – Huntley 11628 E. Main St.; 847-669-3691; www. firsthuntley.org. The Rev. Lance Lackore. 9 and

10:30 a.m. Sunday, Taize 7 p.m. third Thursdays Garden Prairie United Church of Christ 1990 Route 20, Garden Prairie; 815-597-3451; www.gp-ucc.org; the Rev. Dina Lauman. Sunday school: 9 a.m. ; Worship: 10 a.m. St. John’s - Harmony 11821 E. Grant Highway; 815-923-4263; www. stjohnsuccharmony.org. Worship: 9 a.m. Sunday. St. John’s - Union 17824 Jefferson St.; 815-923-4203; The Rev. Frank Szewczyk. www.stjunion.org. Worship: 9:30 a.m. Sunday. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. September to May. St. Paul’s United Church of Christ 485 Woodstock St., Crystal Lake; 815-4595096; www.stpaulsucccl.org; info@stpaulucccl. org The Rev. Gregory P. Lucas. Worship 9:30 a.m. Sundays St. Paul United Church of Christ Barrington 401 East Main St.; 847-381-0460; stpauluccbarrington.org. The Rev. Jana Chwalisz. School and service: 9:30 a.m. Sunday. United Church of Christ The Community Church 5714 Broadway St., Richmond; 815-678-6521; www.richmonducc.org; The Rev. Hope Molozaiy. Service: 10 a.m. Sunday with Sunday school rotation 10:15 a.m. Nursery available. Zion Christian Church 138 N. Washington St., Carpentersville; 847426-4247; the Rev. Tom Davis. Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday.

UNITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH First United - McHenry 258 Sunnyside; 815-385-2770; upcofmchenry. com; the Rev. Mark W. Hilderbrand. Sunday school and worship 10 a.m. Bible study 7:30 p.m. Wednesday New Life Pentecostal Church 309 N. Division, Harvard; 815-943-2287; the Rev. Rocky Nolan. Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday school and worship. Bible study: 7 p.m. Wednesday; Bilingual services . Crystal Lake United Pentecostal 9346 Virginia Road, Lake in the Hills; 815-7882750; the Rev. Joe Beardsley. School and worship: 10 a.m. Sunday; Evening worship: 6 p.m. Sunday; Bible study: 7:30 p.m. Wednesday.

UNITY Unity Spiritual Center of Woodstock 225 Calhoun St.; 815-356-5624; unitywoodstock.org; Spiritual Leader: the Rev. Tom Wendt. Service and Youth Education: 10 a.m. Sunday at the center. Nursery available.

VINEYARD Vineyard Christian Church Meets 7105 Virginia Road, Unit 18 in Crystal Lake; 815-444-9829; vineyardcl@sbcglobal.net or www.vineyardcl.net. The Rev. Tim Mengler. Worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday small groups: 7:30 p.m. Fridays, contact church for meeting locations.

• Saturday, July 6, 2013

PROTESTANT Cornerstone Pentecostal Church of God 343 S. Division St., Box 251, Harvard; 815-9433583; The Rev. Bob Brown. Worship: 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Sunday; 9:45 a.m. Sunday School.

Sacred Heart 323 N. Taylor St., Marengo; 815-568-7878; the Rev. Richard M. Russo. Mass: 5 p.m. Saturday and 8 and 10 a.m. Sunday.

15012 St. Patrick Road, Woodstock; 815-3387883; the Rev. Msgr. Aaron Brodeski. Mass: 8 and 10:15 a.m. Sunday. St. Patrick - McHenry 3500 Washington St., McHenry; 815-385-0025; the Rev. Godwin N. Asuquo. Mass: 4 p.m. Saturday, 7, 9 and 11 a.m. Sunday.

Neighbors | Northwest Herald / NWHerald.com

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