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yoga for young ’uns

view from above: life at one city center

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where to spend your golden years

JUNE/JULY 2019

DURHAMMAG.COM

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Dining il toReta &Much More

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w e n t s e Brestaurants!


University Kia and Meals on Wheels Chapel Hill-Carrboro Join Forces University Auto Group has been serving the Triangle for over 30 years. Since inception, University Kia has made its mission to provide outstanding customer service and to create a one-of-a-kind car buying experience. In an industry that is ever-changing, University Kia remains committed to its customers, staff, and communities it serves. University Kia and Meals on Wheels Chapel HillCarrboro have joined forces to help feed the elderly and homebound in the Chapel Hill-Carrboro area. With the generous donation of a New 2019 Kia Soul by University Kia, Meals on Wheels Chapel Hill-Carrboro will be able to continue to provide hot, nutritious meals and personal visits to more than 180 recipients in the Chapel Hill, Carrboro, and southern Orange County areas who are unable to prepare meals for themselves. “We are so grateful for University Kia’s partnership and their generous donation of a KIA Soul. CHCMOW is dependent on our amazing army of volunteers and our giving community to be able to bring food and a human connection to the elderly and homebound. With this donation University KIA is helping to not only bring attention to often isolated and forgotten members of our community but joy and recognition to our volunteers.” said Rachel Sobel Bearman, Executive Director, Meals on Wheels Chapel Hill-Carrboro.

University Kia, previously located in the heart of Durham, has moved to a new location closer to the Chapel Hill area. “With our store moving closer to Chapel Hill, we decided to partner with Meals on Wheels. We were able to donate the New 2019 Kia Soul to the program and we even had it custom vinyl wrapped so that it would stand out when people see it on the street. We are hoping that this raises awareness for the good that Meals on Wheels is doing for the Chapel Hill and Carrboro communities. We also could not have done this venture without the help of WCHL radio in Chapel Hill, which is promoting the University Kia Meals on Wheels Soul.” said University Kia’s General Manager, Aric Swanger. New location: 5105 Durham-Chapel Hill BLVD. Durham, NC 27707 For more information on Meals on Wheels Chapel HillCarrboro or to volunteer, please visit https://www.chcmow.org. For more information on University Kia, please visit https://universitykiaofdurham.com.


WONDER PUSHES THEM to DISCOVER AND US to EXPLORE. At UNC Children’s, the boundless curiosity of our patients inspires our own. Because of them, we are continually driven to explore innovative treatments, utilize advanced technology, and provide comprehensive specialty services. It’s this kid-like wonder that drives us to ensure bright futures and endless possibilities by providing exceptional children’s care in the Triangle.

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magazine

JUNE/JULY 2019 VOL 12 NO 4

Professionalism, integrity and commitment to providing exemplary service.

durhammag.com     EXECUTIVE MANAGING EDITOR

Amanda MacLaren amanda@durhammag.com

EDITORIAL

MANAGING EDITOR/BUSINESS EDITOR

Michael McElroy

EDITOR, CHAPEL HILL MAGAZINE

Jessica Stringer

JENNY BARBER

Realtor®, Broker

EXECUTIVE EDITOR, CHATHAM MAGAZINE

Matt White

ASSISTANT EDITOR

Hannah Lee

EVENTS & COMMUNITY EDITOR

919-624-9532 JennyBarber.com

Dana Lange

EDITORIAL INTERNS

Adam Phan, Cara Siliakus, Elizabeth Holmes, James Dupree and Parrish Alto CONTRIBUTORS

Amber Watson, Colin Huth, David Pisetsky, Hannah McClellan and Matt Lardie

ART

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Kevin Brown

SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Keith Warther

SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Hunter McCumber PHOTOGRAPHER

Beth Mann

Advertising

For advertising inquiries, email advertising@durhammag.com Kem Johnson kem@durhammag.com Melissa Crane melissa@durhammag.com Lauren Phillips lauren@durhammag.com Chris Elkins chris@chathammagazinenc.com AD TRAFFICKER & DISTRIBUTION MANAGER

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Durham Magazine is published by Shannon Media Inc. Subscriptions, $38 for two years, are available at durhammag.com. To purchase copies, call 919.933.1551.

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X Yourself

E PRESS

letter

The Durham Way

T

Be

d i v i V TurnYour Floor Into

his year, our Best of Durham issue comes on the heels of a tragic

event. The gas explosion on April 10 has left a deep scar that is going to take a long time to heal. My heart is still with all of the victims continuing their recovery, and especially with the families and friends of the two who lost their lives – Jay Rambeaut, a first responder locator for Dominion (formerly PSNC) Energy tasked with shutting off the line when the explosion happened, and Kong Lee, the owner of Kaffeinate coffee shop. (Read more about what you can do to help everyone affected by the blast on page 26.) As a customer of Kaffeinate, it pains me to know that no one will again have the chance to enjoy what Kong and his family built within the walls of that coffee shop – because it was more than lattes and fluffy waffles. It was a community. And that’s what helped make it a successful business. The restaurants, organizations, businesses and shops featured on the readers’ favorites list that begins on page 60 have these same attributes. They’ve proved their mettle, well, because you patronized them, and then voted for them, many year after year. And we know it’s not easy, especially in industries like food and dining, where we’ve seen so many longtime establishments fold in the past few months – I know many Durhamites are going to miss Tyler’s garlic fries and its pint selection, blu’s crab mac-andcheese and the inventive pasta dishes from The Boot. It’s important to recognize the hard work that these folks – our neighbors – are putting in to make the Bull City a place where we all want to live. Your mission: Continue to support local – ensure that your favorite businesses thrive. It’s just the Durham way.

AWORK OF ART  @amanda_maclaren 5634 Durham Chapel Hill Blvd., Durham, NC

Beauty, Artistry & Tradition FOR OVER 40 YEARS

www.persiancarpet.com

TH E COVER

by Beth Mann 4

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amanda@durhammag.com


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june/july

contents THE BEST OF DURHAM 34 Getting to Know You The skinny on the top four favorite new restaurants

37 Sensational Sips Hand-picked wines to suit every taste 38 Give Them Something to Taco ’Bout Signature meals from this year’s Mexican food favorites 42

Picnic Perfect Your favorite shops for home furnishings and accessories stocked us with summer essentials for the ideal garden party

46 If You Build It … Our best builders share some special projects from the past year 50

Come on Over The YMCA just launched its Red Rover mobile group exercise classes in Durham

54

Backstage Pass The folks behind your favorite community theater venues give us VIP access to their performance halls

42

60 Best of Durham 2019 Voting Results 72 The Incomparables Eight events you’ll find only in Durham and with a flavor all their own

FEATURES

78 A Room with a View What it’s like to live on the 15th floor of One City Center 92

The 2019 Directory of Continuing Care Retirement Communities and Assisted Living, Independent Senior Living and 55+ Living Communities

50

37


DURHAM INC.

Thank You Durham!

106 Biz Briefs

for Voting Paula Walls Real Estate the Best of the Best for the Last 6 Years!

104

Shop Talk We chat with Andy Stober, the CTO of AveXis, an Illinois-based company in the booming gene therapy industry that is expanding its footprint in RTP

108 Coastal Credit Union Branch Construction Kickoff Ceremony 109 State of Downtown Durham 110

Building Equity The recent sale of 109 W. Parrish St. brought a prime market price and a chance to pass on its legacy of black ownership to a third generation

SPONSORED CONTENT 28

Healthy Durham Big Ideas Surrounding Nutritious Food Access

76

Adopt A Pet

DEPARTMENTS & COLUMNS 8

PAULA WALLS

STACY KEATTS

Go. See. Do. Our hottest events for the summer

20 Noted What we’ve heard around town … 24

Just a Number Duke’s Dr. David S. Pisetsky discusses retirement options and his own decision to remain in his ‘starter house’

26

Come Together Bites of Bull City’s Amber Watson reflects on Kong Lee and Kaffeinate’s legacy, and how you can help the victims of the April 10 gas explosion

919.618.9768 Many thanks & appreciation to our LOYAL Sellers & Buyers for Allowing US to be Part of Achieving Your GOALS & DREAMS

30 Wellness Teaching kids and their parents mindfulness, one breath at a time 118 Taste Discover our city’s best restaurants 127 Engagement & Wedding Tying the knot, Bull City-style

CITY PICS

12 Project Access of Durham County’s 10th anniversary celebration 14 16

PAULAWALLS@GMAIL.COM

Durham 150 Sesquicentennial Birthday Party Second annual Pints for Paws at Durham Central Park

18 22nd annual Full Frame Documentary Film Festival

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TASTE 2019

American Dance Festival JUNE 1 3 - JULY 2 0 Enjoy 38 performances by 25 companies and choreographers at five different venues, including Reynolds Industries Theater, von der Heyden Studio Theater at the Rubenstein Arts Center, Page Auditorium and The Carolina Theatre, during the 86th season of this worldrenowned dance festival. The festival includes its annual Fête on June 19 at DPAC, featuring a performance by Mark Morris Dance Group and complimentary food and drinks. This season is dedicated to Paul Taylor, the choreographer and founder of the Paul Taylor Dance Company who died last year. As part of the 2019 performance season, ADF will activate public spaces with commissioned works by award-winning choreographer and North Carolina native Mark Dendy, who will work with 10 ADF scholarship students to create site-adaptable choreography to perform throughout Durham.

go see do

J U N E 26- 30 This celebration of food and drink features several nights of tastings from the best local chefs, artisans and beverage purveyors. The event kicks off with the Grand Taste Experience & Beer Garden on Wednesday (June 26) and a second Grand Taste with a wine garden tent on Thursday (June 27) at the Durham Armory. On Friday (June 28), join a pop-up speakeasy nightclub – a secret location to be announced. An edible exploration of Southern food heritage with a multi-course meal from some of our favorite Southern chefs takes place Saturday (June 29) at the Washington Duke Inn & Golf Club, and finally, sleep in for a couple hours before coming to a boozy brunch at Clouds Brewing, featuring sweet and savory food stations by five local chefs and a bloody mary bar on Sunday (June 30).

OUR HOTTEST EVENTS FOR THE SUMMER MRG30 Festival J U LY 24

Festival for the Eno JU LY 4 A N D 6

For 40 years, the Eno River Association has drawn thousands of folks to the shaded banks at West Point on the Eno to sing and dance to music while celebrating this beautiful natural area. This year’s festival features more than 70 bands across five stages with food, drinks and crafts from more than 80 regional artisans, all while learning about natural resource conservation and raising funds for land protection in the Eno River basin.

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Merge Records kicks off the first day of its four-day festival with a special evening at The Carolina Theatre and an opening night party at Motorco Music Hall. Co-presented by Duke Performances, artists include The Mountain Goats, Hiss Golden Messenger and special guest H.C. McEntire. „

(clockwise from top left) American Dance Festival photo courtesy of Sara D. Davis; TASTE photo by Briana Brough; MRG30 photo by Elise Tyler; Festival for the Eno photo courtesy of Susan Murray


MUSIC IN THE GARDENS AT SARAH P. DUKE GARDENS 2019

H.C. McENTIRE JOAN SHELLEY WITH NATHAN SALSBURG BEDOUINE JAKE XERXES FUSSELL & BAND CEDRIC BURNSIDE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26

WEDNESDAY, JULY 10

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GO SEE DO

Don’t Get Any Ideas, Little Lady J U N E 28- 30 A+A Dance Company critiques misogynistic systems and gender stereotypes in this powerful performance at the Durham Fruit & Produce Co. as part of Durham Independent Dance Artists spring season. A+A creates art that is inclusive, financially accessible and socially responsible by working with marginalized groups, specifically as it pertains to gender identity and sexuality.

PLAYlist Concert Series J U N E 14 – S E PT E MB E R 20 This free summer concert series at Durham Central Park takes place every other Friday night, rain or shine. The lineup features an eclectic blend of genres and local, national and, for the first time, international acts. Grab some food and drink from a mix of local craft beer vendors and food trucks, take a seat on the open lawn, and enjoy the show.

Music in the Gardens JU NE 1 2 – JU LY 17 Gather your friends and family for live music while relaxing on the lawn behind the Doris Duke Center at Sarah P. Duke Gardens. Take your lawn chairs and picnic blankets, and enjoy frozen treats from Locopops and food from The Palace International. Featured musicians include H.C. McEntire, Joan Shelley with Nathan Salsburg, Bedouine, Jake Xerxes Fussell & Band and Cedric Burnside.

Latin History for Morons JULY 9 John Leguizamo presents this Broadway hit, revealing America’s unsung heroes throughout past and present. From a recap of the Aztec empire to stories of unknown Latin patriots of the Revolutionary War, the actor breaks down the 3,000 years between the Mayans and Pitbull at the Durham Performing Arts Center.

NC Juneteenth Celebration J U N E 15

Pork, Pickles and Peanuts J U LY 2 0 Dig into barbecue and pies at Duke Homestead to celebrate North Carolina food culture and history. Guests can vote on their favorite barbecue, and for dessert, enter into the pie-eating contest. The event also features costumed interpreters at the Duke House who will demonstrate historical cooking methods, plus live music and local vendors.

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Hosted by comedian Darian “DWissh” Tedder, the 15th annual Juneteenth celebrates the emancipation of enslaved African Americans and the legacy they left for future generations through displays of art, history, exotic foods, a fashion show, K97.5 music hour, an 8 p.m. performance by rapper G Yamazawa and a block party.

(clockwise from top left) A+A Poster photo courtesy of Zoe Litaker Photography; PLAYlist photo courtesy of Les Filles de Illighadad; Juneteenth photo by Lawrence Davis III; Latin History for Mormons: photo by Matthew Murphy; Pork, Pickles and Peanuts photo courtesy of the N.C. Department of Natural and Cultural Resources; Music in the Gardens photo courtesy of Duke Performances


TRANSFORM ANY SPACE

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Art shown: Item # 2033433 Cockerel by by Jodi Mass and #1155692 Early Americana by Alexys Henry


city pics 1

Pictures of Good Health PH OTOGRAPH Y BY JAMES DUPREE

Project Access of Durham County (PADC), which links uninsured Durham residents to a local network of medical professionals and clinics, celebrated its 10th anniversary in April at the Doris Duke Center at Sarah P. Duke Gardens. Gayle Harris, vice chair for PADC, gave a welcoming speech that covered the history and accomplishments of the program. Since 2008, PADC has donated $60 million in health care and provided 10,800 residents with quality health care. A remembrance was also held during the event for one of the program’s founding members, Dr. Franc “Andy” Barada Jr., and board members Dr. Gary Greenberg and Bill Gable. The event was sponsored by Duke University Health System, Durham County, Sally Wilson and Gina Upchurch, to name a few.

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1 Phil Harewood, Gayle Harris and Stephanie Triantafillou. 2 BJ Boyarsky, Gina Upchurch and Bill Boyarsky. 3 Gay Bonds, Alex Cho and Michael Lipkin. 4 Dr. Leonor Corsino and Hortensia Corcino. 5 Paul Mosca and Jennifer Perkins. 6 Jayden Guerrero Hernandez, 8, and Kathia Guerrero Hernandez.


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Sesquicentennial Celebration PH OTO G RA P H Y B Y A MA NDA MAC L A R EN

The Durham 150 Sesquicentennial Birthday Party took place at American Tobacco Campus (ATC) April 13 with remarks from Mayor Steve Schewel to officially kick off the fanfare. “The Birthday Moment,” sponsored by North Carolina Central University, followed with confetti cannons, complimentary birthday cake and a singalong. Emcees Jatovi McDuffie of the Durham Bulls and Ken Smith of WRAL introduced the many acts of the day, including Raven Street Dance Academy, Empower Dance Studio, Kidznotes String Trio, African American Dance Ensemble, Jambalaya Soul Slam and the Bouncing Bulldogs jump rope team. Throughout ATC were designated themed areas where attendees learned more about Durham’s past, present and future as well as interactive opportunities, like the Durham 150 Photo Mosaic Mural, the Museum of Durham History’s story kiosk and the “Running of the Bulls” race down the ATC Ol’ Bull River with floatable rubber bulls. 14

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1 Jason Keibler and Jeff Kiser of Aetna, which presented the celebration, and Susan Amey of Discover Durham. 2 Durham City Council Member Charlie Reece, City Manager Tom Bonfield and Durham County Commissioner Wendy Jacobs. 3 Durham Fire Department Chief Robert Zoldos and his wife, Sherri. 4 Amy Unell and Alison Dorsey. 5 Elizabeth and Chris McIntyre. 6 Mayor Steve Schewel and City of Durham Public Affairs Director Beverly Thompson. 7 Michelle Reader with her kids, Becca Herbert-Reader, 7, and Owen Herbert-Reader, 9, with their floatable rubber bull after they won the “Running of the Bulls” race.


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Pints for Paws PH OTOGRAPH Y BY AM ANDA MAC L ARE N

James P. Furgurson, DDS, FAGD Nathan O. White, DDS D E N TA L E X C E L L E N C E • C O M PA S S I O N AT E C A R E

Now Accepting New Patients!

The second annual Pints for Paws at Durham Central Park invited guests to sample beverages from 19 craft beverage vendors while raising funds for the Animal Protection Society of Durham. There was live music by the Rusted Rails, and guests and their dogs participated in agility courses, among other dog-friendly activities. The event raised $27,574 for the shelter.

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@chapelhilldds

1 Melanie Ray and Katelyn Belch of Best of the Bull. 2 Jamie Craig and JoAnn Applegate with Sweet Pea. 3 Caitlyn Chamblee and Enzo Ferroggiaro. 4 Jeff Cofield, Amber Kozak, David Kozak and Mary Cofield with Jethro.


The 2019 Duke Children’s Gala

CELEBR ATING MILESTONES

September 21, 2019

Washington Duke Inn & Golf Club Join us for an unforgettable evening celebrating Duke Children’s commitment to the health and well-being of children in our community and around the world. For tickets or to sponsor the Gala, visit giving.dukechildrens.org/events/duke-childrens-gala

Presented by


city pics

In Focus

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P HOTO G RA P H Y B Y KEN HUT H A ND CO L IN HUT H

The 22nd annual Full Frame Documentary Film

Festival screened nearly 100 films across multiple locations downtown in April. The festival included discussions and panels, and an opening night party honoring filmmakers Steven Bognar and Julia Reichert, winners of the U.S. Documentary Directing Award at the 2019 Sundance Film Festival. Longtime Full Frame supporter Dr. Benjamin D. Reese Jr. received the festival’s 2019 Advocate Award.

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1 Tiffany Malory, director of member relations at the Greater Durham Chamber of Commerce, Sandi Spier, Christine O’Meara and Colin Liebling at Motorco for the film screening of “RBG.” 2 Merle Williams and his daughter, Michelle Benham, Full Frame marketing director. 3Jackson Cooper, Full Frame Festival Senior Development Associate Savannah Lennertz and Kristy Breneman. 4 Full Frame Festival Director Deirdre Haj, Dr. Benjamin D. Reese Jr. and Duke University President Vincent Price. 5 Devon Smith of the Southern Documentary Fund, Full Frame Communications Manager Chris Everett and Sylvia Savadjian, the festival’s publicist. 18

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Summer wedding invites pouring in, leaving you confused as to the correct dress code? Then read on! THE CLASSY AFFAIRFrom New York to California, this Blue Sapphire one-shoulder dress is sure to please guests of all shapes and sizes. With a one size fits all design, this dress can flatter any body type. A rich dark blue tone even beats the Duke Blue Devils while the hand embroidered design of crystals and clear glass beads will reflect ample light to make you shine bright in a room. Of course the breezy look will keep you cool all night. Add a silver or clear-toned shoe and sparkling hair accessories for an extra touch of chic. Can be customized in any color

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noted

noted.

Send us your news! WHAT WE’VE HE ARD AROUND TOWN …

From births to awards to new biz and more – Email noted@durhammag.com

ANNIVERSARY

2:39:17, and the top female finisher was Erica

Residence and 613 Canal St. for Lawn and

second anniversary during Third Friday Durham

to send this sizable group, given that admittance

the Sandy Creek Trails and Boardwalk and

The Artisan Market at 305 celebrated its

Brecher, 3:05:54. “We [were] particularly proud

in May.

to the Boston Marathon requires running a

ON THE MOVE

to the race’s popularity in recent years, only the

Pugh as its executive director in February.

Moss, Bull City Running’s director of community

qualifying time in another marathon [and] due

Landscape; and The Friends at Geer Cemetery, North Street Community Gardens for Keep Durham Beautiful. Keep Durham Beautiful Executive Director Tania Dautlick won the

Durham Symphony hired Melodie Griffin-

fastest qualifying time are accepted,” says Ellen

Melodie has worked in both marketing and retail,

engagement and one of the runners.

In February, Jack Gilmour, a fifth-grader at

directors.

AND THE AWARD GOES TO …

Teacher essay contest

After 38 years of service,

recognized four service leaders at the 2019

League of Junior

director of admissions at

23. At the event, held in the Holton Career

County Chapter.

retire on June 30. She has

Cragg and the LGBTQ Center of Durham won

a $25 gift certificate

students into the center

won the Fair Housing Advocacy Award; Judge

Kitchen, wrote about

financial assistance and other resources.

Advocacy Award; and Jalen McKoy won the

McArthur [pictured at

WHAT AN HONOR

Award.

helped him through a rough patch in the school

the North Carolina Poet Laureate Jaki Shelton

Also in April, the Durham City-County

100 words, Chapter Director Debbie Scully says,

poet laureates across the country to be honored.

Golden Leaf Awards, an annual ceremony

best essays I’ve read, and I’ve been doing this for

launch her project “Literary ChangeMakers,”

design innovation. The 10 winning projects

who are engaged in community activism and

Administrative Building No. 2 for large

and has served on the symphony’s board of

outstanding dedication to the community award.

Easley Elementary, won the Best Mannered

The Durham Human Relations Commission

for the National

Wendy B. Speir, the

Human Relations Advocacy Awards on April

Cotillions Durham

Hill Learning Center, will

and Resource Center Auditorium, Helena

Jack, who received

accepted thousands of

the Carlie B. Sessoms Award; The Herald Sun

to California Pizza

and has helped them find

Shamieka Rhinehart won the Human Rights and

his teacher Michelle

Norris Wicker Youth Human Rights and Advocacy

right with Jack], who

In April, the Academy of American Poets named

year. The essay contest required a minimum of

Green as a Laureate Fellow. Jaki is one of 13

Appearance Commission held the 2019

but Jack wrote three pages. “His was one of the

She will receive a $75,000 award and use it to

that rewards projects for their aesthetic and

22 years,” Debbie says. “It was just wonderful.”

which will support youth poets in North Carolina

and their categories were: Durham County

youth leadership.

development; the Latino Credit Union for

small development; the Chesterfield

Nearly 40 members of the Bull City Running

Building for adaptive

participated in the

Sofia’s Pizza for

April. The group’s top

small scale; the

Gates, with a time of

for hearth and

NEW ON THE SCENE

The Forest History Society (FHS), the world’s largest private library and archives of forest and conservation history, opened a new

headquarters on May 3. The 17,000-square-foot

facility, at 2925 Academy Rd., was built through

Co.’s running clubs

reuse, large scale;

Boston Marathon in

adaptive reuse,

North Carolina Central University opened

male finisher was Evan

Trott Residence

of the Farrison-Newton Communications

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philanthropic support of more than $7 million.

its renovated television studio on the first floor Building on April 23. The $1.86 million project, conducted by the Durham-based design firm


noted

EVOKE Studio, “expands the department’s

A week before its opening celebration on April

the broadcast studio” while “employing leading-

grants totaling $34,250 to help organizations put

13, the Durham 150 committee awarded 21

educational offerings by increasing the size of

edge broadcast technology,” EVOKE says on its website.

Department, took Max about a month to

on their anniversary-related events. The grants

four prominent buildings downtown.

the events include:

complete, and it features the Durham flag and

The Museum of Life and Science welcomed a

litter of six red wolf pups on Earth Day. The family

were part of a second round of funding. Some of •

Swingin’ at Minnie Tee’s at the Hayti

American Dance Festival’s Pop-Up

is “one of the only multigenerational packs of

endangered red wolves in captivity nationwide,” according to

the museum. The Durham Parks Foundation has unveiled

three refurbished basketball courts at Hillside

Park that it funded in partnership with FILA and The Tamia & Grant Hill Foundation. The groups held a ceremony in April, where Grant, the

former Duke and NBA star, also received a key to the city.

The new sign at

American Tobacco Campus, pictured here, is the first

project of a Discover Durham initiative,

commissioning local artists to enliven public spaces

and enhance the

experience for visitors

The public

can see the pack in the museum’s

Explore the

Heritage Center, June 7

Performances throughout downtown Durham, June 13-July 20

“Don’t Get Any Ideas, Little Lady” dance premiere by A+A Dance Company, June 28-30

Bull City Roller Derby’s First Home Bout at Wheels Fun Park, July 28

Durham’s first Make Music Day, a day-long, free,

Wild section,

“do it yourself” celebration of music making in

woodland and wetland habitat site.

June 21 from 10 a.m. to midnight, coinciding

GIVING BACK

thousands of musical gatherings around the

a six-acre

The Durham Regional Association of Realtors (DRAR) and Triangle Mortgage Lenders

Association (TMLA) sponsored the construction of a Habitat for Humanity of Durham home on South Street. The two-story home, called

the “Realtor Community Habitat Home,” broke ground in April, and members of DRAR and TMLA will help build it alongside the future owner.

various locations across Durham, will be held

with Durham’s Third Friday art walk and with world. Of the almost 80 U.S. cities hosting, Durham is the only one in North Carolina.

Anyone in Durham can offer to host an event

as a part of this free participatory music festival, as long as it is free and inclusive. For more

information, visit makemusicday.org/durham. On April 10, United Way of the Greater Triangle partnered with prominent local groups and

organizations to form the Durham

to Durham. Liberty

One Fund, which will support

Forge helped build

gas explosion in April. The partners

Arts and Cricket the sign.

Max Dowdle, founder of Artagem Bespoke Art

Firm in Hillsborough, completed a 95-foot mural at Durham City Hall on April 23. The mural, “Yesterday’s Tomorrow,” was commissioned by the Durham City-County Planning

people affected by the downtown include: Triangle Community Foundation, City of Durham,

Durham County Government,

Upstream Works Collaborative,

Downtown Durham Inc., Greater Durham Chamber of Commerce and Discover Durham. „

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noted

The fund is also budgeted to provide aid in

at left), both of Lincoln Community Health

County. To donate, visit: unitedwaytriangle.org/

new programs at Lincoln: Centering Parenting,

future emergency response situations in Durham durham.

On Feb. 23, Book Harvest helped

sponsor a free laundry day at two Wash

House sites to launch a weekly program

offering free books,

storytime and other

literacy initiatives inside the laundromats.

More than 680 people

attended the laundry day events and washed

22,250 pounds of laundry, organizers say. Book Harvest staff gave away 1,354 books.

The North Carolina Association of Indian

Americans, in what the group called its “first philanthropic endeavor,” raised more than

$500,000 at the Grand Gala Benefit in May.

The gala was held at Durham Marriott City

Center. Proceeds will be used to support two

a support program for new mothers and their

babies; and a home blood pressure monitoring program for the almost 8,000 hypertension patients seen annually at Lincoln.

Dr. Veronica Ray (pictured

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of RTI International; Ginger Young of Book

its latest

Harvest; Micah Gilmer of Frontline Solutions;

and most

Leigh Duque of InterAct; Eric Guckian of United

ambitious album,

PHOTO BY ALEX MANESS

“A Poison

Melody,” on May 30, the same day they kicked

off their album release tour in London. The tour ends with a concert at Motorco Music Hall on June 29.

George “G”

Yamazawa, a spoken-word

poet and rapper who attended

Durham Tech,

returned to the area in April

Luncheon on May 10 at the

Oveta McIntosh-Vick and

Rahul Pagidipati of Ayon Capital; Jim Gibson

released

held its seventh annual Legacy

The co-honorees were Dr.

of community engagement. Pictured above are

Circus

Health Center Foundation

than 300 persons attended.

childhood stories, and spoke of the importance

American

The Lincoln Community

Health Center, and more

Conversation,” where he played music, shared

Curtis Eller’s

“expand high-level STEM education in the state.”

services at Lincoln Community

spoke at The Carolina Theatre in a “Concert &

based band

Foundation, which says it will use the money to

more than $61,000 for patient

being done in the area. Later that evening, Peter

Durham-

Carolina School of Science and Mathematics

Golf Club. The event raised

nonprofit and business leaders about the work

SEEN AND HEARD

Center, and the money was given to the North

Washington Duke Inn &

Buffett), at the W.G. Pearson Center to talk with

for a series of

Durham Tech- and Duke-sponsored events.

Here, Yamazawa speaks to Durham Tech students about growing up in Durham, his poetry and

how Japanese-American identity is reflected in today’s culture.

Also in April, the United Way of the Triangle

hosted Peter Buffett, an Emmy award-winning

musician and philanthropist (and a son of Warren

J U N E / J U LY 2 0 1 9

Way of the Greater Triangle; Delores Bailey

of EmPOWERment Inc.; Peter Buffett; Attorney Mark Trustin; Alexandra Zagbayou of Student

U; Jes Averhart of Leadership Triangle; David

Reese of East Durham Children’s Initiative; Jim

Goodmon of Capitol Broadcasting Company; Jamaica Gilmer of The Beautiful Project; Will Jackson of Village of Wisdom; and Michael

Goodmon of Capitol Broadcasting Company. Waynell Morris and the Waynell Morris Fund, which supports Hill Learning Center programs with an emphasis on helping parents, hosted

a luncheon at the center on Feb. 21. The New York Times best-selling author Debbie Reber

was the event’s keynote speaker. Pictured below are Elizabeth

Broyhill Morris,

Waynell Morris, Debbie Reber and Beth

Anderson, executive

director of the Hill Learning Center.


in their words

THE AUTHO R IS A DUK E P RO F E SSO R OF ME DICINE A ND

Just a Number

IMMUN OLOGY WH O HAS LIVE D IN D URH A M S IN CE THE L AT E ’ 7 0 S .

B Y DAV I D S . P I S ET S KY, M.D., PH.D.

I

MOVED TO DURHAM IN 1978 WHEN my wife and I were in our early 30s, and our son was just about to turn 6 months old. While I was very excited to join the Duke faculty, the life of an academic is fraught with uncertainty. “Publish or perish” is a frightening and intimidating notion and certainly does not bespeak permanence. Academics can also be vagabonds, journeying around the country to take the next step up the professional ladder to become chiefs, chairs or deans. Would Durham be our only stop or just the first of many? The same tentative feel applied to our house on Hermitage Court. It is a lovely old house – a spec house built in the 1920s to allow people a forest refuge away from the bustling downtown. The house has high ceilings and hardwood floors, but only three bedrooms, and we didn’t know how big the Pisetsky brood would be. Most people I know have moved on to upsize, downsize, right size, get into another school district or build the house of their dreams on some wooded acreage. Some even move to Chapel Hill. We did our share of renovating and remodeling, sprucing up the kitchen with some granite countertops, recessed lighting and an island with a drawer for spices. But, we stayed put. Our starter house remains just that.

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When my wife and I turned 55, we began a conversation about the future and whether we should consider moving to a community that goes by many names depending on the offerings: 55-plus, retirement, senior living, active adult, independent living and assisted living, among others. Our area has many fine communities of this kind. The living is very pleasant, and the facilities can be great with swimming pools, exercise rooms and rec centers. The advantages are many, since the community handles much of the more noisome problems – leaky roofs, flooded basements, crumbling foundations – that can detract from being a homeowner. Over the years, I have given lectures on arthritis at several of these places. Arthritis is one of the banes of aging and is always a popular topic. I have always been impressed by the programs, staff and facilities of the communities that I visited, and the residents seem very happy. Nevertheless, 55 felt young to us, and we were not ready to make a change. The calendar moves relentlessly and, a decade later, we again discussed moving. This time, the discussion had more gravity. Some of our friends were already on waiting lists for a senior living community, and one or two had taken the plunge. Still, we were both working, and 65 is no longer what it used to be. We are not alone since, according to one study I found, labor force participation for people between 65 and 74 years of age is rapidly rising and is soon predicted to exceed 30%. My wife and I are entering another phase of life, which I call 75-minus, since we are a year or two shy of a platinum jubilee. While my head thinks about retirement and moving to a senior living community, my heart remains in my laboratory at the VA and in the house on Hermitage Court and in both locations’ treasure chest of memories. I have a younger colleague whose parents live in a retirement community in another state. He’s a smart fellow, and I wanted his perspective. I asked him whether his parents like it. “They love it!” he said emphatically.


IN THEIR WORDS

PREVENTATIVE DENTISTRY RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY SPECIALTY SERVICES:

“Why?” I asked, and he rattled off a list of things that his parents enjoy and the community provides: yoga, bridge and a friendship circle of congenial and like-minded people. I then asked how he felt about the place. “I hate it!” he said equally emphatically, explaining that he doesn’t like the idea of a gated community, the uniformity of the dwellings and the distance from stores and services. One of the great things about Durham is the variety of living options. I have friends and colleagues who live in houses, big and small, condos and townhouses. Some live in apartments downtown and some live on farms and have deer as neighbors. And, on the weekends, they variously ride around on golf carts, racing bikes, Harleys, horses and tractors. In the same way, there are many excellent choices for 55-plus, 65-plus and 75-plus people. I am certainly glad that, because if we ever chose to leave the homestead, we would not have to move away from Durham. The weather blessedly avoids winter’s worst torments, the people are famously friendly, and there is a great medical center just down the block. Proximity to health care is a priority for older people and, long before Durham was a mecca for millennials, the city attracted retirees. Forest Hills still retains great appeal for me as a place to live. At this time of year, I go to bed hearing the pop-pop-bang of the fireworks at Durham Bulls Athletic Park. In the mornings, birds twill and chirp in a spirited serenade, and a horn blasts intermittently to herald a train’s passing. I estimate that I have driven down Arnette Avenue between 5,000 and 10,000 times to go to work and always enjoy the beauty of the towering oaks and pines and, especially in spring, the pink, red and fuchsia of the azaleas as they burst into splendid bloom. On my little commute, a high point comes when I pass Morehead Montessori Elementary, and I watch as children disembark from the big yellow school buses and are warmly greeted by a welcoming committee of teachers. Who would want to relinquish the joys of such mornings? The legendary baseball player Satchel Paige had a wonderful statement about age: “How old would you be if you didn’t know how old you are?” I agree, and as soon as I’ll be 55-plus, I will definitely consider moving.

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bites of bull city

THE AUTHOR IS

THE CREATOR AND

Come Together

WRITER OF THE LOCAL DURHAM FOOD AND RESTAURANT NEWS

BLOG, BITES OF BULL CITY (BITESOFBULLCITY.COM).

B Y A M B ER WAT S ON

I

REMEMBER FIRST HEARING ABOUT Kaffeinate’s upcoming opening in summer 2017. I immediately established contact with the Lee family to learn more about what they had in mind. “We are looking to create an atmosphere of community and belonging,” Diana Lee shared in Bites of Bull City’s pre-opening blog post. “Coffee shops are unique spaces in that they are ideal for creating connections and exchanging ideas. We’re hoping to cultivate that, and we want Kaffeinate to become a home away from home – a cozy-yet-vibrant destination. In our cafe, you truly are part of our family, and we celebrate you by using the best ingredients, constantly seeking superior techniques and elevating coffee with innovative, transforming ideas.” That goal was certainly realized as Kaffeinate became a special home away from home for so many, including students and staff from Durham School of the Arts (DSA). It was a morning respite for West Village tenants, a place of contemplation and study for Duke students, a leisurely meeting spot or a quick stop before work for downtown employees. We take our day-to-day habits for granted, which is why the gas explosion on April 10 that demolished the cafe and took the life of its owner, Kong Lee, was so devastating. Everyone in Durham felt it – much like the tremble in the ground that morning, we were shaken.

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Immediately after, the Durham community began to do what it does best: show support and find ways to help one another. It is the cycle of giving in action – a community establishment serves the people, and the people serve back in times of need. Maverick’s Smokehouse and Taproom started grilling up free food for first responders that day. Local businesses and restaurants, like It’s a Southern Thing, COPA and The Rickhouse, began to recruit and organize chefs and local talent, planning fundraisers and auctions to raise money for victims. Businesses like Sam’s Bottle Shop and ZenFish donated a portion of their sales to the cause. Several GoFundMe pages were created in support of the Lee family and others who were injured or out of work, including the Durham Restaurant Workers Fund created by Daniel Sartain of Bar Virgile. Rebekah Miel, who owns a design studio downtown, knew she had to do something to help as soon as she felt the explosion. She started the Bull City Rebuilds GoFundMe hours after the news broke. “I knew there would be unmet needs even after insurance and all of the other safety nets. I also knew that as a community, Durham would be looking for ways to help. I wanted to make that a little easier if I could.” Jethro Libutan, a DSA student, immediately created a GoFundMe page for the Lee family. “Kaffeinate meant a lot to the DSA community,” he says, “… it was more than just a place to grab coffee and enjoy delicious waffles, pastries and other wonderful foods – Kaffeinate was a place of fellowship, a popular place to hang out … it was also a place where we could catch up on homework, have important discussions, meet new people and study for an upcoming test or quiz. I personally feel that Kaffeinate will have a special place in all our hearts because of the memories we formed and associated with it.” There is no denying that Mr. Lee, father to Diana and Raymond Lee (who also helped run the shop with him), was a father figure to many in the community, including those DSA students and regulars at the shop. After the explosion, several people shared their kind interactions with Mr. Lee.


bites of bull city

Kaffeinate became a regular spot for Renwei Chung, writer of Above families and small businesses impacted by the the Law Blog, after he relocated to Durham from Austin, Texas. (Renwei explosion. contributed an op-ed piece in the News & Observer about Mr. Lee after Kara Pittman, broker/co-owner of Terra the explosion). Nova Global, was picking up her regular latte As part of the small Asian American minority in North Carolina, he at Kaffeinate the morning of the blast. “Mr. Lee recalls in his blog at being surprised to find a “hip was happily making waffles, spot and cultural hub of the community” owned boxed them up, handed by an Asian American. “In my eyes, Mr. Lee was the them to a group high school embodiment of the American dream.” girls and playfully shooed WAYS YOU CAN HELP Ellen Song, once a regular patron of Kaffeinate them out the door telling Donate to the ongoing before relocating to Boston for work, wrote to them not to be late for GoFundMe campaign Bull Renwei in response to his article: school,” she says. “It was City Rebuilds, organized by

“I felt an immediate kinship toward Mr. Lee. personal, it was sweet. It Rebekah Miel: gofundme. I lived a couple of blocks away from the shop, made me chuckle.” com/bull-city-rebuilds and it soon became the only place I felt at home It’s clear that in the in Durham. Yes, in a town with so few Asian relatively short amount of Also, shop, dine and support Americans, here was a Korean family running a hip time the Lees’ cafe was businesses in the Brightleaf cafe – I noticed this immediately as well.” established in Durham, it Square area, such as After a few visits to the shop, Ellen worked was able to make a longMaverick’s, Ramblers, It’s up the courage to talk to Mr. Lee in Korean, and lasting and heartwarming a Southern Thing, Rose’s he was excited to open up. It turns out he had impression on so many lives. Noodles, Dumplings and previously lived in Ellen’s same neighborhood in After a tragedy like this, Sweets, Devine’s, Goorsha, New York City. From then on, they would swap there is no quick fix. It James Joyce, The Federal, stories in Korean, and he would offer her waffles will take a lot of time and Other End of the Leash, and sandwiches on the house because she was resources to recover and Fifi’s, Social Games & “like family.” heal. Businesses in the area Brews, Sugarfish, Bull City Before moving away, Ellen completed most took a hit financially after the Art and Frame Company, of her dissertation at Kaffeinate and landed a explosion, especially Saint Song of Sixpence, Indio, job lecturing at Harvard. When she told Mr. Lee, James and Torero’s, which Hamilton Hill Jewelry, he was so excited that he started telling random were condemned and are Clouds Brewing, Jackie customers. Ellen wrote to him at Christmas, letting being examined for serious Moore Salon, Bull City Olive him know she never did find a better coffee shop structural damage. Many Oil, Wentworth & Leggett in Boston. Regular visits to Durham included visits of the workers at Kaffeinate Books, James Kennedy and gifts for Mr. Lee, who was like a “beloved and the other affected Galleries, AR Workshop, El uncle” to her. restaurants will need Rodeo, Morgan Imports, Katelyn Belch, the founder and director of ongoing employment and Parker & Otis, Gonza Tacos y Shop Durham, chose to feature the building that support, as will all those who Tequila and Posh the Salon. housed Kaffeinate on her 2019 Shop Durham card were injured. The Lee family, You can also dine at other designed by Paper Mill Creative. “They were one too, will need a lot of time, Torero’s locations and Chef of the first to carry and sell the cards in their shop, gentle encouragement and Matt Kelly’s other restaurants: and I will be forever grateful for them believing ongoing support from the Mateo, Mothers & Sons in us and our mission,” she shares. “It was truly a community they embraced, Trattoria and Lucky’s Deli. special place filled with wonderful, kind, gracious and who embraced them people, including Mr. Lee, who always knew I was back, from day No. 1. going to get an Americano or would bring out an Jethro, the young man from extra table for my family when there were no seats left or would always DSA, sums up what the Bull City is all about: “I stop what he was doing to say goodbye to me when I was leaving. There feel like the Durham community as a whole has are so many seemingly small but powerful acts he did to show he truly realized that we have the ability to overcome cared about you being there. Kindness like his is a rarity. He will be tragedy, to support one another and that we are greatly missed.” Following the tragedy, Katelyn donated 100% of profits capable of doing anything as long as we as a from online sales of the Shop Durham cards and stickers in April to the community stand up and rise to the occasion.”

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T

hink back to when you bought lunch at school growing Essentially, Durham Bowls is bringing our city’s foodie up. The meals probably don’t stick out in your mind, or culture and the talent of our chefs into the lunchroom of if they do, it’s not for a very good reason. But today’s our public schools. At the end of May, several local chefs – school meals are nothing like those of 10, 20 or 30 years ago. including Phoebe Lawless of Scratch, Shawn Stokes of “One of the biggest barriers to participation in school Luna, Gray Brooks of Pizzeria Toro, Jack Tar and Littler, meal programs is perception,” says Beth Katz, director of Billy Cotter of Toast and Dashi, and Zweli Williams of design and implementation at Food Insight Group (FIG), a Zweli’s, as well as a set of culinary students from Northern food systems research organization that collaborates with High School – were partnered up with the school nutrition schools, grocery retailers and childcare centers among other managers of various schools, with the idea that the chef institutions. “School food really would bring the creative has changed a lot since any of culinary insight, and then the us were in school.” managers provide the school One of the ways FIG is nutrition expertise to come combating that stigma up with realistic and doable and supporting continued recipes that are also a little improvement in school bit more unique. They’ll start nutrition is through Durham testing their recipes soon and Bowls, a program designed by will debut the new Durham FIG to “tap into the talent of our Bowls at a public tasting event chef community while uplifting in October. the school food experts – those This is the second year of who work in Durham Public Durham Bowls – DPS started Schools school nutrition – and rolling out the recipes this bring exciting new dishes to the past year in December, with a cafeteria,” Beth says. new bowl on the district-wide “The National School Lunch lunch menu each month. Program is the second-largest They’ve gone through five Students at Lucas Middle School enjoy a recipe food assistance program in recipes so far, with five more co-created by a local chef and a DPS school the country (behind SNAP), slated for the fall. Once the nutrition manager. which makes it a logical place new recipes from this year’s to intervene when designing community-based solutions Durham Bowls event are showcased in October, they will be to reducing food insecurity,” Beth says. “DPS’ School added to the rotation. Nutrition Services operates multiple meal programs, The long-term goal of Durham Bowls, Beth says, is to including breakfast, lunch, after-school meals and summer illustrate what is possible within the many constraints meals. They are the largest nutrition assistance provider in of school meal programs, but also to show that in order Durham, serving around 30,000 meals on school days. … to have food like this on menus every day, DPS needs a Strengthening and supporting school nutrition programs central kitchen. can go a long way toward increasing food security.”

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“One of our Durham Bowls recipes last year from Chef Roberto Copa of COPA and Gwendolyn Coley, child nutrition manager at George Watts Elementary, [was] a Cuban pork and rice bowl, and we used pork from Firsthand Foods,” Beth says. “North Carolina, familyraised pastured local pork in our schools. It doesn’t happen very often. The reason it was possible is because Firsthand Foods was willing to deliver the pork to all 47 kitchens in the district. Not sustainable at all. But if we had a central kitchen, that’d be one delivery, and that would make getting local meat into schools more feasible.” FIG is working on this idea of a central kitchen with a variety of partners. They are planning on doing a feasibility study/design phase and are looking to work with five players to co-fund the initial study, including Durham County Commissioners, the City of Durham, DPS School Board and Duke Office of Durham and Regional Affairs (they are currently looking for a fifth funder). “Our ultimate dream is [that the kitchen] can go in a location that is accessible to neighborhoods and that people could conceivably actually go there, and we would like to have a retail arm connected to it,” Beth says. “That would mean people could swing by on their way home from work, pick up meals for their family that would be extremely affordable, and would meet all of the nutrition requirements of school food. We want to work with school nutrition to design exciting new menus as part of this.” And there are plenty more possibilities with a central kitchen when it comes to supporting expanded afterschool meal programs, summer meals, weekend meals, holiday break meals. The opportunity to increase local procurement, like with Firsthand Foods or Farmer Foodshare. “And along with that, build more equity into that system,” Beth says. “Thinking about not just purchasing locally but also about specifically supporting farmers who have historically faced barriers to institutional markets – farmers of color, female farmers, new farmers.” Beth notes that workforce development can be built into the central kitchen model, too – training for people with traditional barriers to employment or internships for students in high school culinary programs. “When we’re thinking about a big piece of new infrastructure, we feel like it’s really important to think about all the benefits that it could bring to the community,” Beth says. “We’re thinking much bigger than school food.”


wellness

Family Flow

Teaching kids and their parents mindfulness, one breath at a time B Y H A NNA H L E E | PHOTO GR A PHY BY COL IN HUTH

E

mily Behr felt isolated. A foot of snow blanketed the border of her home in January 2018. She stared out her window, feeling trapped inside with her 4-week-old baby, Poppy. There was a growing restlessness inside her, and she was overwhelmed by the incessant demands of new motherhood. Her thoughts were racing. She had never felt this way before. Maybe the occasional loneliness, but not this constant worry. It was, she discovered, the first sign of postpartum anxiety. “I said, ‘Oh, I do yoga, I practice mindfulness. I meditate. I shouldn’t be having these feelings,’” Emily says. “I wasn’t recognizing it. I wasn’t being mindful of it until it came to the point where I was like, ‘Wow, I need to really think about this.’” Postpartum anxiety affects approximately 10% of women, according to Postpartum Support International. “It’s tough having kids,” Emily says, “especially after you Growga instructors Emily Behr, have a C-section, and Maggie McDowell and Paige Holmes. you go from one kid to two kids. For me, it was being mindful that these things were happening and asking for help and being OK with allowing someone to step in.” Not just for her mental health, but for her children’s, too. She never wants her two girls, Poppy, 1½, and Wren, 4, to experience the anxiety she had. A couple months later, she launched Growga, a wellness startup for children and families to practice mindfulness through yoga and other activities. The business, which has a presence in American Underground, 30

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has 17 teachers with classes that take place across the Triangle and Triad. Growga launched a “Mindful May” series of free themed events on the lawn at American Tobacco Campus, including Star Wars Yoga on May 4 and Growga Family Fun, the final event of the series, which will be held June 15. The event begins at 10:30 a.m. and families can participate in an “imaginative journey around the world” and “practice fun movement and pretend play.” In this series, Growga gives kids and adults the opportunities “for kids to be kids and for adults to have fun,” Emily says. “A lot of kids these days have so many pressures that they’re not really given any opportunity to just let loose. And so this [June 15] class is going to be pretending that you’re going on different excursions and pretending we’re different animals and doing animal poses together.” But what is mindfulness, exactly? And how do you get rowdy children to sit down and focus? “You don’t have to be silent to be mindful,” Emily says. “Andy Puddicombe [the co-founder of Headspace, a meditation and sleep app] said that mindfulness can happen anywhere. You can be walking and be mindful. You can be typing on a keyboard and be mindful. You can be talking to a friend and be mindful. You can be doing anything, and you can be mindful about it. It’s

paying attention on purpose.” Many of Growga’s classes involve high-energy games such as “musical mats,” a derivative of musical chairs in which kids do a yoga pose and take a deep breath when the music stops. It’s important for kids to learn how to relax and take everything in, Emily says. Growga has taught her oldest daughter to identify her emotions and to work through them. When Wren is feeling anxious or angry, she goes


to a designated safe space in the house and “blows out the birthday candles,” a kid-friendly breathing exercise. “[Growga] really came out of me just wanting this in my own personal family life,” Emily says. “I really wanted a deeper connection with my daughters, something that we could really share and they can learn from. Wren comes to at least two classes a week with me. She is a big part of why I do it and why I want to continue to grow it.”

ABOVE Emily doesn’t own a studio or practice at one singular location, instead taking her classes out into our communities. BELOW Emily uses both yoga poses and imaginative play to teach kids how to use their energy and channel it through mindfulness. j u n e / j u ly 2 0 1 9

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SEPTEMBER 8 @ AMERICAN TOBACCO CAMPUS Fill your cup by visiting The Mindful Market where you can browse healthy and self-care artisans and vendors, and choose your own experience by selecting from a speaker series, innovative fitness classes for all levels, a tranquility room to rest, hands-on crafting classes, nutritious food and drink, and activities designed to help you discover your inner child!

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THOUSANDS OF BALLOTS CAST. 72 CATEGORIES. NEARLY 300 READERS’ FAVORITES. P h o t o g ra p h y b y Bet h Ma nn | Fu ll li st o f resu lt s beg in s on pag e 6 0

GETTING TO KNOW YOU Cucciolo Osteria

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wner/chef Jimmy Kim is from Seoul, South Korea. He lived in Switzerland most of his childhood and came Durham to attend Duke University for undergrad as well as for his master’s, which he received from the Fuqua School of Business. Cucciolo Osteria opened last July at 601 W. Main St., Ste. C, with a 70seat dining room, including 15 seats at the bar. There’s also limited patio seating for up to eight. Appetizers range in price from $7 to $18; pasta dishes from $13 to $19; and entrees from $19 to $40. “Our goal from the beginning [was] to serve simple, authentic Italian food made well,” Jimmy 34

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THE SKINNY ON THE TOP FOUR FAVORITE NEW RESTAURANTS

says. Cucciolo is best known for its pasta dishes, like the Spicy Vodka Tomato Cream Sauce Rigatoni, Black Truffle Tajarin and Walnut Pesto Tagliatelle; the butter chicken is another fan favorite. Jimmy hints that the popular Cacio e Pepe will be back on the menu for the summer, and he encourages guests to save room for the tiramisu. “We put a lot of effort and time to make this classic dessert the right way,” he says. Another tip: Order family style so that your party can share and taste various dishes. New for this summer, Jimmy and his team are nearing completion on a private dining room – with its own entrance and bathroom – which can accommodate up to 40 people and features paintings by Duke Arts students that were designed for the space.


Eastcut Sandwich Bar The former Family Garden center at 3211 Old Chapel Hill Rd., now Eastcut Sandwich Bar, still has some of the feel of its past life, with plenty of surrounding greenery and a greenhouse that’s been converted into a beer garden backyard patio. Co-founders Brad Bankos and Steve Wuench – who have backgrounds in culinary and restaurant marketing, and management consulting, respectively, and share a passion for food and entrepreneurship – saw an opportunity to create a casual restaurant that offers “scratch-made food at a value price point, with a full and fun liquor program [that is] in a neighborhood setting.” With 55 seats indoors and 55 seats on the front porch and patio, and another 80 seats on the back garden patio, there’s plenty of room to spread out. It’s a relaxing spot to gather with friends or colleagues after work, and the restaurant offers bingo the first Tuesday of the month and trivia the third Tuesday of the month. Sandwiches and salads range from $6 to $14, and some of the more popular sandwiches are the Spicy Gabagool, the Buff Chick and the Burger, but the rotating specials are also pretty hot. If you’re with a group, start with an order of Mozz Sticks or Crispy Brussels to share, and go for the “Flight to Sandwich Utopia,” a dine-in-only option with three, full-sized sandwiches ($18). The frozen alcoholic slushies (like the Prickly Pear Margarita and Cherry Cola Bourbon Slush) have become big hits, but the restaurant also provides a wide and interesting variety of craft beers on draft or in cans. If you want to skip the booze, try its house-made classic and seasonal lemonades, including mint, rosemary, basil, local strawberry and cherry, among other varieties. Even if you’re stuffed, you’ve gotta try the huge sea salt chocolate chip cookies. 

Super Tuscan Chopped Salad, Spicy Gabagool sandwich, Greens & Grains salad with an adult slushie and a draft beer at Eastcut Sandwich Bar.

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THE BEST OF DURHAM

East Durham Bake Shop Ali Rudel and Ben Filippo opened the

Hutchins Garage

Started by a group of familiar Durham brick-and-mortar iteration of East Durham restaurant folks – Owner/Operator Tracy Bake Shop (Ali sold her pies out of their Hancock, Owner Malachy Noone (also of Old East Durham home prior) in March Bull McCabes and Viceroy), Owner Harvey 2018 after years of working in local food Gray and Head Chef Michael Morrone – industries. The shop at 406 S. Driver St. is Hutchins Garage is at 402 W. Geer St. in the located in a beautifully renovated building historic Hutchins Auto Supply building in that housed the Seagroves Grocery Store at the Warehouse District near the Durham the turn of the century, as well as a watch Bulls Athletic Park. ABOVE Tracy Hancock of Hutchins Garage repair shop and a second-hand shoe store. The spot is quickly becoming a staple with their Spicy Vodka pizza. BELOW Cookies, Inside, you’ll step right up to the counter to of food scene on this side of town as more scones, pies and muffins are among the many sweet options at East Durham Bake Shop. place your order – coffee and beverages range businesses spring up in the area. The patio, from $1.85 for drip coffee up to $4.75 for a specialty drink; pastries and baked goods range from $1.25 for a cookie up to $5 for a seasonal fruit galette; soup, salad and savory pies are in the $4 to $6 range and can be paired for a lunch special discount. (They are working to expand the lunch menu, too.) If you’re looking for a whole pie ($25), be sure to order in advance. Regulars know all about the tuffets – a brioche knot of the bake shop's own invention with cardamom, honey, cashews and a hint of rosewater. And always grab a slice of whatever fruit pie is available. Because they only use ingredients that are in season, you may not see the same pie again till next year. And if you’re not into coffee, try a tea latte. “We work with two other local, woman-owned tea companies, Arteao and Jeddah’s Tea, and we regularly add new tea specials to the menu,” Ali says. Before you order, check out the “Just Because” board next to the set far back from the street, is inviting, all the more so when the big register – a pay-it-forward system where visitors to the shop purchase garage door is opened to reveal the fun and Instagram-worthy interior. an item to dedicate to someone. “They range from humorous to sweet Intriguing specially crafted cocktails and curated beer and wine and sincere and have the power to brighten a bad day,” Ali says. selections (check their social media feeds for updates to draft lists) When you’re all settled up, take your pick from 25 seats indoors provide plenty of options for pairings with their pizzas, which range – complete with a large communal table and cozy window seat with from $11 to $16, but can go higher with additional toppings. a children’s library – or one of a dozen seats outside among a small “First timers should consider the margherita pizza,” Tracy says, “or garden of edible and native plants. “For us it’s all in the details,” Ali one of the composed pies, like the Spicy Vodka. Fourteen inches round, says. “Our goal is to create a peaceful environment for connecting with cut into six slices, it’s difficult to not eat most of one yourself, so you may friends and loved ones, working, studying and getting to try classic pies need to order two.” Another good sharing option is the slightly thicker, and pastries as well as creative interpretations that come from seasonal rectangular Grandma-style pizza, which the restaurant has become and local ingredients.” known for. “But save room for the house-made tiramisu,” Tracy says. 36

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THE BEST OF DURHAM

SENSATIONAL SIPS

HAND-PICKED WINES TO SUIT EVERY TASTE

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our spots came out on out on top for favorite wine selections this year – Bar Brunello, NanaSteak, Mateo and Vin Rouge. I was given the grueling task of giving my thoughts on the selection, my favorites and who to consult for help should your wine exploration hit any snags. Tough job, but I strapped on my best drinking pants and got to work. Esteban Brunello’s downtown bar is a favorite for wine geeks and novices alike. An extensive by-the-glass list complements a truly encyclopedic bottle list, but if you’re a newbie, put yourself in the hands of whoever is behind the bar. The list changes often, but some of my recurring favorites have been the Malvasia orange wine from Nicolini in Northern Italy, the “Ique” Malbec from Enrique Foster in Argentina, and the oh-so-smoky and sultry “Sula” Shiraz from India. Yes, that India. Add in selections from places as diverse as Mexico, Arizona, Slovenia and Bosnia as well as never-beforeheard-of wines from familiar spots like Italy, France and California, you’ve got what is perhaps the most diverse wine list in North Carolina. Every steakhouse needs a great wine list, and NanaSteak doesn’t disappoint. This list is overseen by Durham restaurant veteran Aubrey Zinaich. On the bottle list you’ll find well-loved steakhouse classics, heavy on California and France, with varietals like Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Bordeaux blends. The by-the-glass offerings are what I gravitate toward, and a recent list included a delicious German Riesling from August Kessler and one of my go-to glasses, Meiomi Pinot Noir from Northern California. I was also surprised by a glass of Birichino Malvasia Bianca from Monterey, California. I’d had the grape in Eastern Europe before, but never from an American winery, and I was hooked! Another neat thing is the half-bottle list – perfect for date night before a show at DPAC. Go for the Ramey Chardonnay or Duckhorn Merlot if you want that classic steakhouse wine experience. Sherry ain’t just your grandmother’s drink anymore. Ask Matt Kelly and the folks at Mateo bar de Tapas. The wine list leans

Aubrey Zinaich pours a glass of Birichino Malvasia Bianca for Matt Lardie at NanaSteak.

heavy on Spanish wines (no surprise here), but the extensive sherry list is where you should start. I’m particular to the La Cigarerra Manzanilla sherry from Sanlucar de Barrameda. With more than two dozen sherries, you might just want to go for a tasting flight. There is a well-curated by-the-glass list and a more extensive bottle list, but if I had to recommend one unique glass to try, it would be the Getariako Txakolina from the Basque region. Venerated bistro Vin Rouge has been a mainstay for years, and the wine menu reads like a “Greatest Hits of French Wine Regions and Labels,” but look a bit closer, and you’ll find some surprises. Pass over the Veuve Clicquot and Ruinart for the lesserknown Lelarge-Pougeot, a premier cru Brut that gives the Champagne experience at a more approachable price point. If a whole bottle of wine isn’t your style, the by-the-glass offerings are a great way to explore French wine, like the 2015 Domaine Daulny Sancerre or the 2012 Saint-Emilion Grand Cru from Chateau Belregard-Figeac. And if you’ve gone for Vin Rouge’s famous Grand Plateau of seafood, they have a whole separate menu for “Shellfish Wine,” designed to go perfectly with your oysters and shrimp. General Manager Ted Gallagher and the entire staff is well-versed in the wine list, so when in doubt, ask for direction! – by Matt Lardie  j u n e / j u ly 2 0 1 9

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THE BEST OF DURHAM

GIVE THEM SOMETHING TO TACO ’BOUT

SIGNATURE MEALS FROM THIS YEAR'S MEXICAN FOOD FAVORITES

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ousins Gonza Salamanca and Carlos Rodriguez opened their first Gonza Tacos y Tequila in North Raleigh in 2011. Durham’s West Village location was their third Gonza restaurant (there’s now five, total, plus a food truck), which opened in February 2015. In May 2017, a free-standing concession location was added to the left field side of the Durham Bulls Athletic Park. They’ll open a new Latin-inspired concept, Macondo, in Raleigh later this fall.

elebrating its 10th anniversary Aug. 13, Dos Perros is well known for its taco nights (Sundays and Mondays), margaritas and vegan options. Even before it became more common on menus, there’s always been at least one vegan entree and one vegan appetizer available at Dos Perros. Today, a full vegan menu is available for lunch every day as well as Sunday and Monday dinner. 1 P O L LO OA X ACA

Cheese-stuffed chicken breast, blueberry chipotle mole, Oaxaca crema, coconut rice, black beans and seasonal vegetables, paired with a Smoky Pineapple Margarita – Sombra mezcal, pineapple juice, fresh lime, simple syrup – and a Vegan Chocolate Cake with seasonal fruit (in this case, blueberries and blueberry sauce) and drizzled coconut glaze for dessert.

2 NACH O S GABACHOS 1

ALS O TRY: Sweet potato & lentil empanadas with

tomato vinaigrette (vegan and gluten-free) with a Bloody Maria sangrita, made from the fresh juice of pico de gallo, Valentina hot sauce, lime and orange juice, salt and pepper, and reposado tequila with a chilisalt rim. Chile Relleno – the only menu item that has remained on the menu consistently since Dos Perros opened – a Poblano pepper stuffed with roasted seasonal vegetables and creamy asadero cheese over black bean puree drizzled with Oaxaca crema (vegetarian, but it can also be served with vegan cheese and cashew crema) paired with a habanero margarita: house-infused habanero-reposado tequila, lime, fresh orange juice and simple syrup. 38

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Chicken tinga, tortilla chips, cheese, pico de gallo, guacamole and Mexican cream, paired with the Spicy Pepino – Sauza Blue Blanco Tequila, cucumber, mint, lime and agave with organic, house-made spicy sour mix. A LS O TRY: The Mexican Flag – corn tortillas with steak, chicken and paisa beans, cheese, Mexican cream, tomatillo sauce, chile de arbol sauce and cilantro, paired with a Paloma – Sauza 100 Anos Reposado Tequila, lime juice and Jarritos grapefruit soda. Short Rib Tacos – corn tortillas with chile-braised short ribs, roasted corn, poblano salsa and spicy créme fraiche. For dessert, split the Talega de Platano – guava, cream cheese, bananas and cinnamon, wrapped in a tortilla and deep fried. It’s served with a scoop of French vanilla ice cream and drizzled with a heavenly caramel sauce. „


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THE BEST OF DURHAM

ven though La Vaquita calls itself a taqueria, they work in much more than tacos. Typical dishes include Mole Poblano, Barbacoa de Res and Carnitas. “Our commitment, in addition to gastronomy, is to give those who visit us an intercultural experience with the Mexican culture and particularly with the Veracruzana,” says Elsa Guzmán, who co-owns the restaurant with Antonio Rodriguez.

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3 B I ST E C A L A M E X I CA NA

4 BIG DA DDY' S BURRITO

Mexican beef steak prepared with simple ingredients, highlighting especially jalapeno peppers, tomatoes, onions, cilantro and guajillo – “ingredients that cannot be missing in any Mexican cuisine that is respected,” Elsa says. “These common ingredients are marinated and prepared, creating a unique flavor that identifies us as La Vaquita.” Pair it with a horchata and tamarindo.

ALS O TRY: Pollo Asado – a roasted chicken dish unique to the restaurant because the recipe has been passed down orally through Elsa’s family, originally from Veracruz. The procedure takes a couple of days to achieve the perfect seasoning. Guiso Veracruzana, made with a marinade of chile guajillo and chipotle, cumin, pepper, garlic, clove and achiote, among other ingredients. Aguas Frescas including cucumber with lemon and Agua de Jamaica, natural iced tea prepared from hibiscus flowers. 40

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en Gillie opened NanaTaco with

restaurateur Scott Howell back in 2011, and late last year took over as sole owner. Just a couple months ago, the restaurant rebranded as NuvoTaco, but you can still find many of the staples that the restaurant is known for – $5 margaritas, half-price chips and queso on Tuesdays and dirty meats like cochinita pibil (citrusmarinated pork topped with pickled red onions), which is only available every couple of months. “If it’s on the special board, order it!” Jen says.

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Choose three meats (NuvoTaco lead supervisor Michael Thomson says the best combo is duck, pork belly and ropa vieja), plus rice, pork pinto beans, salsa and queso fresco. Pair it with their guacamole – El Camino Mexican Food Distributor keeps the restaurant stocked with ripe avocados year-round – and their spicy watermelon rosé sangria, served with a splash of rose cava. The drink is seasonal to the summer months when they can get local watermelon and includes rosé wine, tequila, habanero simple syrup, lime and orange juice. A LS O TRY: Tacos – Chicken, beef and pork, as well as more adventurous options like ropa vieja – shredded beef with onions, peppers and chipotle served with lettuce and topped with sour cream; fried calamari – battered and fried with banana peppers, topped with fresh arugula and spicy aioli; grilled or fried shrimp – with mango salsa and spicy aioli; and crispy chicken liver – topped with spicy onions and aioli. Jamaica Frozen Mojito with a swirl of hibiscus flower, white rum, lime juice and housemade mint simple syrup. The Afterburn Margarita – the house margarita, kicked up a few notches. It's made with habanero simple syrup and a splash of habanero salsa. „


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THE BEST OF DURHAM

PICNIC PERFECT

YOUR FAVORITE SHOPS FOR HOME FURNISHINGS AND ACCESSORIES STOCKED US WITH SUMMER ESSENTIALS FOR THE IDEAL GARDEN PARTY

2 Stick Candles, Maple, $34/pair, Bungalow These candles are handmade in the mountains, cast from a section of a branch.

1 Promenade Picnic Basket, $48, Morgan Imports If you’re taking your meal on the road, this is an ideal picnic ba(g)sket – it comes complete with full cutlery, plates and a wine glass set for two.

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3 Juliska acrylic wine glasses, $21 each, Bungalow

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4 Foutas – Billow (pinstripe), Seaview (solid blue), Bleus (multi-colored blue), $46, Indio Made in Tunisia of 100% Egyptian Cotton, these foutas are incredibly versatile and durable – use them as a wrap, as a beach blanket or, as we’ve done here, as a tablecloth.

5 Artisan cheese board with cow etching (made in Vermont by JK Adams), $27, Bungalow

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THE BEST OF DURHAM

6 Songfilled Beauty Wren Birdhouse, $60, Morgan Imports This birdhouse has a removable rooftop for easy cleanout. It also makes for a pretty summer centerpiece.

7 Akarregi Txiki, Txakoli Rosado, Pays Basque, Spain 2017, $17.99, Wine Authorities You can’t come to a garden party without bringing a bottle of wine. This rosé from Wine Authoritites (also a readers’ favorite wine shop) has “firm acidity, an herbaceousness that recalls fresh strawberry caps, zesty mineral and a hallmark citric spark” and pairs well with albacore ceviche with avocado and cilantro, and tangy goat milk cheeses.

6 7

8 Juliska acrylic stemless wine glasses, $15 each, Bungalow

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9 Juliska Berry & Thread Melamine platter, $42, Bungalow Melamine is extremely durable and lightweight dinnerware that is dishwasher safe. 10

10 Turkish Pillow, handwoven and hand-dyed silk velvet, $110, Bungalow 

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THE BEST OF DURHAM

1 Assorted wildflowers: Cone flower stem ($12 each), Cosmos stem ($12 each), Amaranth stem ($9 each), Waxflower stem ($12 each), Vintage Home South For a striking centerpiece, play with height – we sat this painted cream can on a cake stand that’s underneath the foutas. And this wildflower bouquet is one that you can use over and over again; as realistic as these stems look, they are artificial.

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2 Painted cream can, $35, Vintage Home South 3 Blue bird with glass vase, $16, Morgan Imports 4 Zinc cheese serving utensils, $25 for set of four, Vintage Home South

9 Le Cadeaux Melamine Rustique Midnight Salad Bowl, $30, Morgan Imports

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10 Ask The Trees handmade cooking spoons, $35, Indio Vanessa Hernandez, a self-taught spoon carver, utilizes downed wood from around Durham to create her spoons. 12

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11 Bamboo utensils, $0.99 each, Morgan Imports This bamboo cutlery is made from solid, organically grown bamboo and is lightweight and reusable – a great alternative to disposable plastic cutlery.

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5 Match Pewter hand-forged pewter candlesticks, $165/pair, Bungalow

12 Juliska Indigo Melamine dessert plates, $16 each, Bungalow

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6 Octaevo paper coasters, $25/pack of 10, Indio

13 Kraft Paper utensil holder, $10, Vintage Home South 14 Juliska Berry & Thread Melamine dinner plates, $22, Bungalow

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7 Chive ceramic green flower, $24, Indio

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8 Chive ceramic succulents, $6-$10, Indio Bring some of your indoor decor outside – like these adorable flowers and succulents made by Canadian company Chive – to accent your picnic table.

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15 Rustic Grey Twig Charger, $15 each, Vintage Home South 16 Floral Kitchen Cotton Flour Sack towel, $16 each, Vintage Home South Who says towels can’t be napkins? 17 Antler bottle opener, $25, Vintage Home South 


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THE BEST OF DURHAM

IF YOU BUILD IT …

OUR BEST BU ILDERS SHARE SOME SPECIAL PROJECTS FR OM THE PAST YEAR

and second fireplace to open up the space; replaced a small mantel and created a floor-to-ceiling feature; and put in a double-sided island to give ample storage space. This project was special because ... the clients had a clear vision of what they wanted and were open to our suggestions along the way. The existing skylights created an obstacle of how to place the beams in a cohesive way, but the end result looked like it was always meant to be! – CQC Home Design Team

CT Wilson Construction THE S P E C S

Commercial – K-12 education; new construction (upper school) STEM building at Durham Academy PHOTO COURTESY OF CQC HOME

28,540 square feet

Kitchen/living space renovation 675 square feet Project began Design – July 2018; Construction – October 2018 Project completed December 2018 Materials utilized Stock J&K Shaker White Cabinetry with Jeffrey

Alexander Bremen Pulls in Dark Antique Copper Machined Finish; Nova Grey Quartz Counters; Byrd Tile – Masia “Gris” 3-by-12 with Mapei Iron Grout; Globe Electric Oil Rubbed with Cage Elior Pendant Light Fixtures; Hardwood Flooring Laced-in Site, Finished to Match Existing; Sherwin Williams “Snow Bound” Wall Color; and reclaimed wood beams, shelves and mantle Vision An open floor plan that would allow our clients to host

large family gatherings and let more light into the home.

An Interesting Fact The clients had just moved here from Portland, Oregon, and wanted the space to have an organic color palette with natural textures. We were able to source local reclaimed wood to use for the mantel and beams to achieve that vision. We removed a large wall

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Local companies used Waspco Corp. drywall,

ACME Plumbing, DWH Painting, Total Electrical Solutions

Materials utilized Concrete, brick (laid in a unique

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Vision This building added much needed lab space for students

to receive collegiate-level lab exposure on subjects like chemistry, physics, robotics and woodworking. Numerous “collaboration spaces” and an assembly area promote integration and ideation. Designed by Cannon Architects. An Interesting Fact This was a two-phase project. The first phase commenced with the demolition of an outdated building and the construction of two-thirds of the new two-story building. Temporary demising walls were constructed so that the school could occupy

PHOTO COURTESY OF CT WILSON

T HE S PE CS

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Project completed 2019

pattern with sections extruding from the façade to create depth and movement on the large expanses of wall), storefront, metal panels, energy-efficient fixtures

CQC Home

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Project began 2017


THANK YOU, DURHAM, FOR VOTING US FAVORITE PAINTER! I just want to say Thank You Durham! I love Durham and we will continue to provide our best service to Durham and triangle areas. Thank you all for your votes! -Ahmad Paktiael, Owner

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THE BEST OF DURHAM

the completed portion of the building in summer 2018. Construction of the remaining portion of the two-story building continued through the school year and will be occupied by summer 2019. All construction was done while the campus remained occupied. CT Wilson worked with the owner to minimize disruptions to the day-to-day operations of the school. The success of this project led to the acquisition of the middle school arts and language building project scheduled to start in 2020. This project was special because ... Charles T. Wilson III, president of CT Wilson Construction, is a Durham Academy alumni with two teenagers at Durham Academy: his son, Charles T. Wilson IV (2019), and his daughter, Anna Catherine Wilson (2021). CT Wilson Construction has completed numerous projects across the Durham Academy campus and has a long-standing relationship with the school. Past projects include the gym, information commons and yearly summer restoration projects. This project taught us that … upfront coordination with the subcontractors led to a smoother delivery. Poor weather contributed to significant delays in the first part of the project. The team made a conscious decision to change approach and take care of activities that would be affected by weather for a two-week period. This two-week commitment enabled construction to continue relatively unhindered for the remainder of the project. The success of this approach is illustrated in the project completion date of May 17, 2019 – more than two months ahead of the contractual substantial completion date of July 31. – Emily Herndon of CT Wilson Construction

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1,931 square feet (Main House); 371 square feet (Apartment) Project began September 2017 Project completed March 2018 Local companies used Kim Jennings, architect; Accent

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Electric; Dante Cabinets; Bivins Grading; Talbert Building

Supply; A&T Masonry; Credle

Engineering; and Takla Engineering Vision It was fantastic to work with a Durham architect and a customer who had an

adventurous sense of design. The resulting house has so much character and charm.

Unique Touches The screen porch with a balcony above it off the master bedroom [had an amazing] view. The kitchen design was unique and included transom over the cabinets. The entire house had character oak floors. It was beautiful. This project was special because ... it was a really cool house plan on a challenging lot. I loved working with the customer, who was a long-time neighborhood resident who lived next door. This project taught me … to listen to neighbors and respect the value of the neighborhood. – Gail Crabtree of G Crabtree Spaces

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PHOTO COURTESY OF G CRABTREE SPACES

T HE S PE CS

Vision Our nickname for the house is "Tall & Narrow." We wanted a plan that is clean and clear and lives well. Our vision was for an unabashedly modern home that is sited with care and consideration in the context of the climate and neighborhood. An Interesting Fact We received our first design hate mail on this house from an anonymous source. This was horrible at first, and then we came around to wearing that as a badge of honor. Our houses do not inspire apathy, instead they inspire comment and interest and criticism and compliments. Since more than 90% of those comments are positive, we are happy with the results. This project was special because … This was the first certified green house in North Carolina using the predecessor to the National Green Building Standard. Environmental consciousness is at the heart of the design. – Randall Lanou, president of BuildSense Inc. 


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THE BEST OF DURHAM

Vanessa Mazuz, Curtis Perkins, Louisa Warren and class instructor Chelsea Butler use TRX suspension bands to work on suspended push-ups at the Red Rover van in Durham Central Park.

COME ON OVER

THE YMCA JUST LAUNCHED ITS RED ROVER MOBILE GROUP EXERCISE CLASSES IN DURHAM

T

he YMCAs in Durham have been named a readers’ favorite every year since the Best of Durham poll started in 2011. But the Durham YMCAs have had dedicated members for decades, dating to the late 1800s. With four locations in the Bull City, many in this tight-knit community participate in one or many of its fitness programs. One of the newest programs to Durham involves a big red van that looks like a food truck. It’s the Red Rover. And instead of food, you’ll find everything from dumbbells and mats to step risers and push-pull sleds inside it. On this particular day, it’s sitting under the pavilion at Durham Central Park. The 50

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two instructors, Chelsea Butler and Channie Thornton, were ready to break a sweat with their seven guests during a Vigorous 6.0 workout. “When you think of old-school gyms, you see machines and things that people get overwhelmed with,” says Chelsea, the director of group fitness and personal training at the YMCA. “They are not conducive [to the movements] we do in our daily activities. Functional fitness really helps promote growth and strength, and being able to perform your daily activities.” “We have a tire out here. You think about bending over and picking up grocery bags, and then reaching up and putting them


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on the shelf. The tire builds the strength, it’s something fun, it’s different.” And the real benefits of working out at a truck versus in a gym? Well, getting people outdoors, first, but also encouraging Durhamites who are not Y members to take the class, too. “We like to change locations, so we can find places where a gym might be 15 minutes away,” Chelsea says. That’s how the program got started in summer 2017 at YMCA of the Triangle’s Chatham branch in Pittsboro. “With Chatham being such a large geographic county with distinct local communities, the Red Rover mobile unit allows the Y to increase its reach and visibility across the county while breaking down some barriers to physical activity by introducing group exercise to neighbors we may not otherwise see,” Chelsea says. The same idea applies to Durham. It’s even getting dedicated Y members in other classes to try something new. First-timer Jane Leer saw the class on the YMCA schedule online a few hours before she arrived. She says she looks for “a lot of variety, hard work, good workout, but at the same time good vibes and good sense of community in a class – not a super competitive environment. What I like about the Y is that there’s all types of people, all ages, all races, all demographics.” Jennifer Chow, a senior policy advisor at USAID, says “enjoying the weather and working out at the same time is super motivating to me, and it’s part of the Y, so I can drop my kids off at the [Y’s] daycare and still get to work out outside.” Split into two groups, three people went to the van for strengthening sets, and four went to the step-decks and barbells to do aerobics. Other classes sometimes see between 10 and 15 participants. The three people at Red Rover used TRX suspension bands hanging from the top of the van to lift their body weight and do suspended push-ups and rows. They would rotate between this and slamming 10- and 20-pound medicine balls. The intense one-hour class also involved turning over a heavy tire and hitting the tire with a sledgehammer. But everyone worked hard, stayed focused and did their best to steady their heavy breaths. Vanessa Mazuz, co-owner of The Parlour, never gave up. “I didn’t know what I was getting into,” and though at the time she said she felt like she was “dying,” she thought she would be back next week. “It was great,” she says, adding, “I’m going to go lie down on the ground now.” – Hannah Lee and Michael McElroy „


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BACKSTAGE PASS

THE FOLKS BEHIND YOUR FAVORITE COMMUNITY THEATER VENUES GIVE US VIP ACCESS TO THEIR PERFORMANCE HALLS

OW N E R T I M WA LT E R O N TH E

DU R HA M F R U I T & P RO D U CE CO. : The Durham Fruit & Produce Co. was built

in the 1920s as a refrigerated distribution center on the rail line to serve local grocers. It grew into a small complex of warehouses, which over the years served as a race car repair (we’ve heard), vintage stores known as the Anti-Mall and a grunge music venue where some of our region’s top musicians played out of the giant garage. In 2018, we officially opened and honor that alternative art scene history, though with proper bathrooms, sprinklers and air conditioning. We’ve unified the space into its full 22,000 square feet, Shaleigh Dance Works with three distinct performance areas and perform “I Promise” a lobby bar. Today, while we have a theater, at The Fruit. what makes the Fruit unique is that we host immersive, site-specific performances that transform the entire space. One day we could What past shows were sellouts/most popular? “The Talk” was a host hundreds of people in a conference, the next day that space huge theater hit. Quite the run. For music performances, our Moogfest contains a Shakespeare play set on a tennis court. all-night afterparties are legendary. Questlove sold out this year. Interesting people who have performed at or used your

venue? We’ve created installations for international artists like Zanele

Muholi, Georges Rousse and Mona Kuhn. The space is loved by local performance artists like Monet Marshall and Ginger Wagg, and we’ve had most of the region’s top modern dancers perform here. We’ve had international jazz greats like Joshua Redman, Nnenna Freelon, Jason Moran and Cécile McLorin Salvant, electronic music heroes like QuestLove and Ellen Allien, Nashville guitarist William Tyler and the Jack Quartet, which played in the pitch black. What’s the “green room” like? Early Jersey Turnpike with an

Oriental carpet.

How many audience members does your venue hold? We’re

a black box and super flexible. If the stage was petite, you could seat about 300. Most shows keep it under 150. How many performances have taken place? We’re young.

Maybe 70 shows. 54

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What’s going on behind the scenes? We’re screamingly fast

in customizing risers, staging and dance floor. Lots of carpentry to transform the space from one week to the next. If your venue was a famous performer from throughout history, who would it be and why? Dolly Parton. She was my guiding voice

during the design and “renovation” of the space, thanks to her quote, “It costs a lot of money to look this cheap.” Are there any superstitions or legends tied with your venue?

After the MLK riots, snipers took up residence on our roof. But curiously, the building and its trucks were untouched, presumably because the business was appreciated for giving away free produce instead of letting it spoil, sort of an early food bank.

What are some performances you are looking forward to in

the coming year? The Bulldog Ensemble’s “White” is a raucous

comedy, and also we have a blues festival coming in December that should blow you away. 


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In the heart of downtown since 1926, The Carolina Theatre opened as the Durham Auditorium. The venue was renovated three years later and renamed The Carolina Theatre, a movie theater that also presented stage shows and concerts. By the 1940s and 1950s, the city-owned Carolina Theatre had become Durham’s most majestic showplace for film and the performing arts, with live shows featuring noteworthy stars such as Ronald Reagan, Katharine Hepburn and many other celebrities of the day. In March 1978 – after economic conditions had forced the closure and a proposed demolition the theater the year before – the City of Durham leased the venue to the Carolina Cinema Corporation with Dr. Monte Moses as president. Through the late 1970s and the 1980s, Connie Moses, Monte’s wife, and her close friend Pepper Fluke organized a legion of volunteers and spearheaded a successful effort to save, preserve and renovate the theater. After screening the world premiere of “Bull Durham” in June 1988, The Carolina Theatre closed again for extensive renovations, reopening with a new cinema wing in 1994, two years after the Carolina Cinema Corporation became The Carolina Theatre of Durham Inc. – the nonprofit that still operates the venue. Interesting people or groups who have performed at or used your venue? Randy Newman, Judy Collins, Durham Savoyards,

Moscow Ballet, Full Frame Documentary Film Festival, Moogfest, Art of Cool Festival, The Marshall Tucker Band and the premiere of the film “Best of Enemies” with Taraji P. Henson in April, just to name a few. How many audience members does your venue hold?

1,048 in Fletcher Hall. 240 in Cinema One. 45 in Cinema Two. How many performances have taken place? I’d guess about

800-1,000 live events.

What past shows were sellouts/most popular? We’ve

had three this week, in fact. Melissa Etheridge, India.Arie and [comedian] Iliza Shlesinger. Boz Scaggs several years ago. Trey Anastasio (FISH) last year, sold out in 11 minutes. Local sellouts include Johnny Folsom 4 in February of this year. What’s going on behind the scenes? The Wall of Fame, where

artists and performers sign the walls after they perform. Names include John Prine, Paul Simon, Paula Poundstone and Al Jarreau. We have many, many famous signatures backstage. Also, the logistics of building out a show, timing the show and coordinating with the concessions groups – it’s a whole thing! 

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THE BEST OF DURHAM

If your venue was a famous performer from throughout history, who would it be and why? I’d personally say Josephine Baker and

Bette Midler – singing, dancing, comedy.

Are there any superstitions or legends tied with your venue?

I hear about the ghost in the basement, but I’ve only been down there once, ever. I’d rather not meet the ghost. What are some performances you are looking forward to

in the coming year? Mavis Staples, The Bacon Brothers (Dude!

“Footloose”!), Mary Chapin Carpenter and Merge Records 30th anniversary show (epic!). Also, anything with Frank Heath from Cat’s Cradle, because everything he brings to us sells out and is an amazing show with great energy in the audience. Hands down! EX E C U T I VE D I RE CTO R A N G E L A L E E ON T HE HAY T I H E RI TAG E CE N TE R:

The Hayti Heritage Center presents cultural and arts education programs that further its mission to preserve and grow the living history and culture of the Hayti community and advance the African American experience for the benefit of all residents, visitors, tourists and patrons. The center provides cultural interventions that strengthen families and communities through movement, songs, discussions,

healthy foods and, recently, through advocating for healthy and safe environments. The structure has stood since 1891. Interesting people or groups who have performed at or used

your venue? Performers include, but are not limited to, Baba Chuck Davis, Roberta Flack, Tito Jackson, Congressman John Lewis, Chief

Justice Thurgood Marshall, Gov. Roy Cooper, Ann Atwater, Tom “Jamaica Funk” Browne, Pigmeat Markham, Ernie Barnes, Biff Henderson, John Lucas II, Clyde McPhatter, "JoJo" Wallace of The Sensational Nightingales, Shirley Caesar, André Leon Talley, John P. Kee, Jean Carne, Branford Marsalis, Harry Connick Jr., Maestro William Curry and many, many more.

How many audience members does your venue hold? Up to 400. How many performances have taken place? We have presented

live performances in our historic performance hall since 1992. Hundreds and hundreds, at least.

What past shows were sellouts/most popular? 100 Men in

Black, The Blind Boys of Alabama, Marcus Anderson, Angelique Kidjo, Norman Connors and Jean Carne, Roy Ayers, Big Daddy Wilson and John Dee Holeman, among others.

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THE BEST OF DURHAM

What’s going on behind the scenes? Audiences normally do not

see the work that typically goes into producing and presenting live arts events and programs, or the other events and activities that are not open to the public. We offer facility rentals year-round.

course, Kwanzaa, Wimmin@Work and the Black History: Artists’ Perspectives exhibition are also favorites that should not be missed! MA R CY CO E EDENFIEL D, SENIO R DI RE CTOR,

If your venue was a famous performer from throughout

V ENUE A ND P R O DUCT IO N MA NAG EME NT,

Neale Hurston, two gifted literary figures who elevated the Harlem Renaissance. They, like Hayti, hold a legacy that is preserved through the stories they told and the experiences they lived. Like Hayti, they stood tall and unmoveable despite the obstacles and hardships they faced. Like Hughes and Hurston, Hayti is an anchor and speaks for generations past, present and future.

A 608-seat (we can also add 34 seats in the orchestra pit for select performances) proscenium house located on the upper level of Duke University’s Bryan Center at the heart of West Campus, Reynolds opened in 1982 and was used in those early days as a workshop space for many Broadway performances. In recent years, the theater is host to a multitude of university and community groups, with performances nearly every week of the year. The space is flexible, yet intimate enough to have great sightlines from every seat. Its flexibility shows in the diverse array of programming.

history, who would it be and why? Langston Hughes and Zora

Are there any superstitions or legends tied with your venue?

There is a common belief that the symbol atop the steeple on the building represents Erzulie, the spirit or goddess of love and women. What are some performances you are looking forward to in the coming year? The N.C. Jazz Ensemble’s holiday concert,

which inspires the spirit of the season every December with big-band holiday music sounds. Also, the Durham Symphony Orchestra, when Maestro returns to “his house” to celebrate the music and poetry of African American composers with style and pizzazz! Of

O N R EYNO L DS INDUST R IES T H EAT ER:

Interesting people or groups who have performed at or

used your venue? Mikhail Baryshnikov, Paul Taylor, Shen Wei,

Anna Deavere Smith, General Martin Dempsey, E.O. Wilson, Paul Farmer, Greg Louganis, Camille A. Brown & Dancers, Tom Selleck, Branford Marsalis, Simone Dinnerstein, Delta Rae,

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THE BEST OF DURHAM

Urban Bush Women, Bo Burnham, Laverne Cox, Royal Shakespeare Company and, of course, Duke students. What’s the “green room” like? Our green room does have some green in it. It is a nice cozy spot to watch what’s happening on stage. Your basic room with some awesome chairs, a couch and kitchenette. How many performances have taken place? Around 3,000. What past shows were sellouts/most popular? Ailey II, Ron K.

Brown/EVIDENCE, Paco Peña & Eliot Fisk, Reggie Watts, to name a few; performances by Duke student organizations almost always sell out. What’s going on behind the scenes? The Duke Venue and

Production Management team! They are the staff who manages the theaters on campus [and] make the magic happen for each and every performance. The Box Office takes great care of the audience, and the theater operations staff take care of the production and performers. Everyone works really hard to make all of the performances the best they can be.

Burger Bull City Burger and Brewery Burger Bach Only Burger Town Hall Burger & Beer

Sandwiches Eastcut Sandwich Bar Lucky’s Delicatessen Parker and Otis Toast

Are there any superstitions or legends tied with your

venue? Pirate Baby has looked

over Reynolds Theater from backstage for many years. This swashbuckling infant reminds our theater crews to work safely lest we, too, end up with a peg leg. Legend holds that if Pirate Baby ever goes missing, bad things will happen in Reynolds. But as long as it remains, audiences will stay “hooked,” and shows will run smoothly. What are some performances you are looking forward to

in the coming year? Starting in June, we kick off a very exciting

season for the American Dance Festival, who will be bringing several companies back to Page Auditorium as well as Reynolds. In Reynolds, [ADF kicks off ] with their ICONS performances, followed by Dorrance Dance, Paul Taylor Dance Company, Cleo Parker Robinson Dance Ensemble and A.I.M. by Kyle Abraham. Next season we will have some exciting things lined up with Duke Performances.

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Sushi M Sushi Sake Bomb Shiki Sushi Asian Bistro Sushi Love Indian Food NaanStop Indian Cuisine Sitar Indian Cuisine Tandoor Indian Restaurant (RTP) Viceroy

Thank you for voting us a Reader’s Favorite Food Truck

Latin/Caribbean Food Alpaca Peruvian Charcoal Chicken COPA Gonza Tacos y Tequila Luna Rotisserie & Empanadas Greek/Mediterranean Food Bleu Olive Neomonde Parizade Saladelia Cafe Italian Food Gocciolina Mothers & Sons Trattoria Pizzeria Toro Pulcinella’s 

Visit our new American Tobacco location opening this summer boricuasoulnc.com

They did a great job painting my whole house a few years ago. I decided to use them again to paints some rooms and hallways. The house looks great. Everyone was very courteous, professional, and responsive. Highly recommend them! — C H E RY L B

Th e pr emi ere p ainting comp any in a l l o f t h e Tr i a n g l e. Fo r a free estimate, call us at 9 19. 5 9 9. 5 9 9 4 HANSEL L PAINT ING. COM

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THE BEST OF DURHAM

*All results listed in alphabetical order **Five winners indicates a tie

Pizza Hutchins Garage Pie Pushers Pizzeria Toro Pompieri Pizza Place to Buy Frozen Treats Goodberry’s Frozen Custard Locopops The Parlour Rose’s Noodles, Dumplings & Sweets Kid-Friendly Restaurant City Barbecue Eastcut Sandwich Bar Elmo’s Diner Pompieri Pizza

Chef Aaron Benjamin, Gocciolina Matt Kelly, Mateo and Saint James Seafood Michael Lee, M Kokko, M Sushi and M Tempura Ricky Moore, Saltbox Seafood Joint Thomas Card, Counting House at 21c Museum Hotel Catering Foster’s Market Neomonde The Original Q Shack Saladelia Cafe

Craft Alcoholic Beverages Brothers Vilgalys Spirits Bull City Ciderworks Durham Distillery Honeygirl Meadery Brewery Bull City Burger and Brewery Fullsteam Hi-Wire Brewing Ponysaurus

Cocktails Alley Twenty Six Bar Virgile Counting House The Durham Hotel

Food Truck American Meltdown Boricua Soul Chirba Chirba Dumpling Soomsoom Pita Pockets

Wine Selection Bar Brunello Mateo Bar de Tapas NanaSteak Vin Rouge

Wine Shop Bulldega Urban Market Hope Valley Wine & Beverage Total Wine & More Wine Authorities

Beer Shop Beer Durham Beer Study Growler Grlz Sam’s Bottle Shop Beer Selection Burger Bach Eastcut Sandwich Bar Hutchins Garage Sam’s Bottle Shop 

MUCHAS GRACIAS, DURHAM! VOTED BEST MEXICAN FOOD

TAQUERIA LA VAQUITA FIND YOUR REASON WHY WE SELL MORE THAN JUST TACOS!

919.402.0209 2700 CHAPEL HILL RD DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA FIND US ON FACEBOOK AT TAQUERIA LA VAQUITA DURHAM

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Enjoy 300+ group fitness classes, indoor & outdoor pools, personal training and tennis. Kids have a blast and build skills at summer day camps, sports, swim lessons and more!

ACCESS TO FOUR LOCATIONS IN DURHAM!

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Thank you for voting us the Best Real Estate Compay

Office: 984.260.0884 | info@ClassicCarolinaRealty.com | ClassicCarolinaRealty.com 5842 Fayetteville Road, | Suite 113, Durham, NC 27713 |  

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THE BEST OF DURHAM

*All results listed in alphabetical order

RETAIL Gift Store Little Shop of Horror Morgan Imports Parker and Otis Smitten Boutique

Jewelry Store Atelier N Fine Jewelry Hamilton Hill Jewelsmith Light Years

Thrift Store Durham Rescue Mission Thrift Store Pennies for Change The Scrap Exchange TROSA Thrift Store

Clothing Store Dolly’s Vintage Fifi’s Fine Resale Apparel Smitten Boutique Vert & Vogue

Home Furnishings & Accessories Bungalow Indio Morgan Imports Vintage Home South SERVICES Vet Colony Park Animal Hospital Cornwallis Road Animal Hospital Park Veterinary Hospital & Urgent Care Southpoint Animal Hospital Pet Sitting Camp Bow Wow – North Durham Creature Comforts Inn Park Veterinary Hospital & Urgent Care Suite Paws Pet Resort & Spa

G Crabtree

SPACES

Car Wash Bull City Car Wash The Durham Ritz Car Wash & Detail Center Lightning McClean Carwash TC’s of Durham Optometrist/Ophthalmologist Duke Eye Center N.C. Eye, Ear, Nose & Throat Dr. Tonica Johnson, Eye Physicians & Surgeons of Durham Upchurch Optical Cosmetic/Plastic Surgeon Duke Plastic Surgery Gunn Plastic Surgery Center New Image MD Southpoint Plastic Surgery Event Planner A Swanky Affair Events by Emily Soigné Events The Wedding Woman Accountant Anthony F. Armento, CPA, PC Balentine & Borg, PLLC Hutchings & Hutchings [DMJ & Co.] Nelson & Co., PA

SPACES FOR FAMILY | SPACES FOR FRIENDS | SPACES TO LOVE

THANK YOU FOR VOTING FOR US, FAVORITE BUILDER AND KITCHEN DESIGNER! gcrabtreespaces.com • office@gcrabtreespaces.com

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Place to Get in Shape Fitness @ The Cube Fitness World Planet Fitness YMCA 


WE DO REAL ESTATE BY DESIGN

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Thank you Durham, for again voting us BEST REAL ESTATE CO M PA N Y

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THE BEST OF DURHAM

Thanks for voting for Goodberry’s Frozen Custard

Best Frozen Treats in Durham!

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When less is more.

H T

*All results listed in alphabetical order **Five winners indicates a tie

Yoga/Pilates/Barre Center Bikram Yoga Durham Fitness @ The Cube Hot Asana Yoga Studio InsideOut Body Therapies Yoga Off East Bank BB&T Coastal Credit Union State Employees Credit Union Wells Fargo Spa Bella Trio Day Spa & Salon La Vie Nail Spa Massage Envy The Retreat at Brightleaf Salon Atmosp’hair Salon Fuss & Bother Posh The Salon Union Hair Studio Professional Photographer Anna Carson DeWitt Photography BarrowImages Photography Fancy This Photography G. Lin Photography Riley MacLean Photography Lawyer Autumn Osborne, Ellis Family Law Gray Ellis, Ellis Family Law Tara Nichols, Nichols Law Firm Real Estate Agent Bill Stevenson Lisa Ellis Paula Walls Theresa Olson Real Estate Company Classic Carolina Realty Real Estate by Design RED Collective Spotlight Realty Hotel 21c Museum Hotel The Durham Hotel Unscripted Durham Washington Duke Inn & Golf Club 

Brightleaf Square, Downtown Durham 919-683-1474 • HamiltonHillJewelry.com

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VENUE FOR COMMUNITY THEATER & VENUE FOR LIVE MUSIC www.hayti.org

Visual Arts • Performing Arts • Film • Arts Education and much more

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THE BEST OF DURHAM

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Thank you, Durham for voting us a Readers’ Favorite

Zumba, Suspension Training, Yoga, Barre, Pilates, and Pilates apparatus training 2708B Chapel Hill Rd, Durham, NC fitnessatthecube.com fitnessatthecube@gmail.com

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SMART. FUN. CHALLENGING. UPLIFTING.

ZUMBA • SUSPENSION • YOGA • BARRE • PILATES

*Manufacturer’s mail-in rebate offer valid for qualifying purchases made 9/22/18–12/10/18 from participating dealers in the U.S. only. Rebate will be issued in the form of a prepaid reward card and mailed within 4 weeks of rebate claim approval. Funds do not expire. Subject to applicable law, a $2.00 monthly fee will be assessed against card balance 6 months after card issuance and each month thereafter. See complete terms distributed with reward card. Additional limitations may apply. Ask participating dealer for details and rebate form. ©2018 Hunter Douglas. All rights reserved. All trademarks used herein are the property of Hunter Douglas or their respective owners. 18Q4MAGVC2

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*All results listed in alphabetical order **Five winners indicates a tie

New Business Barley Labs Elevated Perspective Hutchins Garage Skin Vitality HOME & GARDEN Builder BuildSense Inc. CQC Home CT Wilson Construction G Crabtree Spaces Architect Belk Architecture BuildSense Inc. Ellen Cassilly Architect RND Architects Landscaper Bountiful Backyards For Garden’s Sake New Leaf Landscaping TROSA Lawn Care Landscape Architect Coulter Jewell Thames Landscape Logic Rob Emerson, Emerson Land Planning Surface 678 Roofer Alpine Roofing The Aluminum Company of North Carolina Chief Roofing Pickard Roofing Company Painter CertaPro Painters of Durham Gonzalez Painters and Contractors Graduate Custom Painting Hansell Painting Company Zarazua Painting Kitchen Designer CQC Home G Crabtree Spaces The Kitchen Specialist Linda Dickerson Interiors Interior Design Linda Dickerson Interiors LK Design nBaxter Design Sew Fine II Interiors


THE BEST OF DURHAM

Florist Flowers by Gary Ninth Street Flowers Pine State Flowers Sanders Florist

et 

Neighborhood Hope Valley Old North Durham Trinity Park Watts-Hillandale Woodcroft ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Dance Studio Barriskill Dance Theatre School Dance Theatre South Empower Dance Studio Ninth Street Dance Venue for Community Theater The Carolina Theatre Durham Fruit & Produce Company Hayti Heritage Center Reynolds Industries Theater (Duke Performances) Venue for Live Music (Large) American Tobacco Amphitheater Baldwin Auditorium (Duke Performances) The Carolina Theatre Durham Performing Arts Center Venue for Live Music (Small) The Blue Note Grill Hayti Heritage Center Motorco Music Hall The Pinhook Art Gallery 21c Museum Hotel Gallery The Carrack Modern Art Durham Arts Council Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University Museum Museum of Durham History Museum of Life and Science Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University NCCU Art Museum Event Space Bay 7 at American Tobacco Campus The Cotton Room The Rickhouse Sarah P. Duke Gardens

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THE INCOMPARABLES

EIGHT EVENTS AND VENUES YOU’LL FIND ONLY IN DURHAM AND WITH A FLAVOR ALL THEIR OWN

CENTERFEST • Now in its 45th year, Durham Arts Council’s CenterFest is North Carolina’s longest-running juried outdoor arts festival, sprawling across the center of downtown, encompassing Main, Chapel Hill, Morris, Market, Corcoran and Parrish streets. Multiple stages – at Five Points, Bull McCabes, Ninth Street Bakery and CCB Plaza – feature music, dance and other acts from local performers – including singers, dance troupes, choirs, bands, jugglers and magicians. • Add to that more than 100 juried local and regional artists and craftspeople display their wares, including ceramics, paintings, jewelry, fiber art, woodwork and everything in between. • The Creative Kids Zone features hands-on art activities. Plus there are bounce houses, face painting and a train for the kiddos as well. • Dates and times: Saturday, September 21, 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.; and Sunday, September 22, 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. • This year, Saturday entertainment will be extended from 6 to 11 p.m.

• You’ll have to wait until the 2020/21 season, but two of the biggest hits in DPAC history, “Hamilton” and “Wicked,” are both coming back in the same season! The Broadway musicals had multiple sellout shows in their first visits. • SunTrust Broadway members who renew for the 2020/21 season will have first priority to purchase tickets. • This season’s lineup of Broadway shows includes “Mean Girls,” “Rent” and “My Fair Lady.” • The American Dance Festival returns to DPAC June 19-20 with the Mark Morris Dance Group’s “Pepperland,” a tribute to the 50th anniversary of The Beatles’ album“Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.” • DPAC also plays host to community events and outreach, like Triangle Rising Stars Showcase and Awards, which recognizes outstanding achievements of high school students and their musical theater productions in our area (Clay Aiken hosted the most recent 72

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Durham Education Awards and the

Reality Ministries PHOTO BY JOAN MARCUS

‘HAMILTON’ IS BACK AT DPAC? ‘WICKED’!

awards ceremony in May), the

Talent Show.

The Discover Broadway and

Golden Tickets

programs provide donated tickets to local school groups

and youth programs, and seniors at the J.J. Henderson Housing Center, respectively. The Performing Arts Ambassadors program gives high school students a behind-the-scenes look at the industry and the opportunity to meet touring performers. • Earlier this year, the First National Tour of “Dear Evan Hansen” broke the box office record for the highest-grossing week of an eight-performance engagement at DPAC. The production grossed $1,827,137 during the show’s March 12-17, 2019, engagement. • DPAC was named North Carolina’s Visitor Attraction of the Year in 2018 by the state’s Travel Industry Association, welcoming more than 500,000 guests a year. 


Thank you, Durham,

FOR YOUR VOTE AND FOR TRUSTING YOUR CARE TO US!

Bringing Clarity to Life! Dr. Tonica Johnson has performed over 7,000 cataract surgeries over the past 12 years. Experienced, board-certified and fellowshiptrained Ophthalmologist, specializing in Premium Cataract Surgery, Dry Eye Treatment, Glaucoma, Cornea Diseases and Diabetic Eye Disease.

WHO WE ARE: We exist to provide the highest quality eye care available with compassion, personal attention and expert precision. Our first priority is your best vision and eye health, now and for the future. We believe strongly that prevention is the best medicine and that’s why we focus on what you can do to get and keep your eyes healthy.

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Prevention, Health and State-of-the-Art Treatment!


THE inc omparables

FESTIVAL FOR THE ENO

BIMBÉ CULTURAL ARTS FESTIVAL

• One of Durham’s biggest, oldest and most unique festivals, the event was formed in 1980 to raise awareness and funding to protect the Eno River and its surrounding watershed. • Featuring more than 70 bands across five stages. Acts over the years have included local favorites like The Mountain Goats, Hiss Golden Messenger, Steep Canyon Rangers and Mipso. • More than 80 artisans show up to share their skills and wares. • Participate in activities like urban farming, kayaking, weaving and clean energy demonstrations • Limited onsite parking at the West Point on the Eno city park. General parking at Durham County Memorial Stadium, with free shuttle buses to the event between 9:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. • Dates and times: Thursday, July 4 and Saturday, July 6, 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.

• Celebrated 50 years in 2019. • A family-oriented celebration of African and African American history, culture, arts and traditions, the festival was started by students at both Duke and North Carolina College at Durham (which became N.C. Central University the same year) as a oneday event at Sarah P. Duke Gardens.

FULL FRAME DOCUMENTARY FILM FESTIVAL

NC GAY & LESBIAN FILM FESTIVAL

• One of the country’s largest non-fiction film events, this four-day, morning-to-midnight festival has been in Durham for 22 years. Centered around screenings of nearly 100 films, the festival also features discussions and panels. But some of the best action is behind the scenes as Durham’s downtown bars and restaurants stay full of filmmakers and professionals, talking shop and networking. • April’s lineup included 46 features and 21 short films from 28 countries, selected from nearly 1,700 submissions. The Opening Night Film was Steven Bognar and Julia Reichert’s “American Factory,” winner of the U.S. Documentary Directing Award at the 2019 Sundance Film Festival. • Along with theaters set up inside the Durham Convention Center, venues include the Carolina Theatre, the Power Plant Full Frame Theater at the American Tobacco Campus, Motorco Music Hall, The Durham Hotel and Durham Central Park. • Save the date for the 23rd annual festival: April 2-5, 2020.

BEAVER QUEEN PAGEANT • Uniquely Durham, the Beaver Queen Pageant brings its own special mix of folly, pageantry and humor. Held at Duke Park Meadow, the event raises money for the Ellerbe Creek Watershed Association (ECWA). Past pageants have raised more than $157,000 for ECWA. • The pageant dates to 2005 in celebration of a successful community effort by neighbors in Duke Park who prevented the eradicating of a den of beavers in wetlands north of I-85. • WUNC’s Frank Stasio serves as emcee. • Attractions include a Scrap Exchange tent where you can construct your own beaver tail and costume, food trucks and a kids’ play area.

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• For its 50th anniversary in May, Bimbé held a logo design contest open to local artists. A public vote picked a design by Durham’s own Joseph R. Churchwell III. • This year’s musical acts featured headliners Dru Hill and Juvenile alongside Durham talent like Sh8kes the Poet, Empower Dance Studio and Trez Falsetto.

• Durham’s iconic film festival at The Carolina Theatre celebrates its 24th anniversary this Aug. 15-19 (tickets go on sale July 27), and takes one final bow under its current name. For 2020, the festival rebrands as OutSouth Queer Film Festival. • The second-largest gay, lesbian and transgender film festival in the Southeast, NCGLFF attracts thousands of patrons yearly. • The Carolina Theatre features other events for film lovers, like the Retro Film Series, a recent screening of the first six “Star Wars” movies and the Nevermore Film Festival.

‘YOU KNOW WHAT THAT MAKES YOU? LOLLYGAGGERS!’ • The Durham Bulls have a long history of fun, Durham-specific theme nights. This year will be no different.

• “You lollygag the ball around the infield. You lollygag your way down to first.” In tribute to the well-known scene in “Bull Durham,” the team will play as the Lollygaggers on June 14. Uniforms will be in the mid-’80s style of the movie’s team and feature Bulls manager Joe Riggins’ memorable speech superimposed over the numbers. • There are three remaining Bark in the Park nights this year when your pup can take in a game, with proceeds benefiting Second Chance Animal Adoption: June 12, July 24 and Aug. 21. • For Latino Heritage Weekend July 26-28, the team will wear themed jerseys and hats, and the jerseys will be auctioned off throughout the weekend with proceeds benefiting El Centro Hispano. • As part of the Bulls tribute to Durham’s 150th birthday celebrations, the team will play as the Tobacconists June 27, July 13 and Aug. 31. • Finally, USA Baseball hosts the Cuban national team at Durham Bulls Athletic Park on July 4 and July 6.


DESIGN | BUILD | REMODEL

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AS YOUR FAVORITE BUILDER & KITCHEN DESIGNER

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home

Gray Ellis and his son, Nik, take in the afternoon sun on their 15th-floor balcony at One City Center.

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A Room with a View What it’s like to live on the 15th floor of One City Center BY AM AN DA MACLAREN PH OTOGRAPH Y BY BETH M AN N

G

ray Ellis moved from Treyburn –

where he’d lived for eight years in a home that was more than 5,000 square feet – into a 1,600-squarefoot One City Center apartment last November. Prior to that, he lived in Watts-Hillandale. “But I think this one is my favorite,” Gray says. He and his son, Nik, 14, share the twobedroom, two-bathroom space, which also

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how they live

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how they live

features a small den. Even when they lived in Treyburn, Gray maintained a small downtown apartment to make it easy to spend weekends enjoying the city. When they started thinking about their next move from Treyburn, Gray says, “Nik loved being downtown, and so I thought, ‘Huh, I should really consider this.’” By that point, all the One City Center condos were pre-sold, but since he wasn’t sure “that we would’ve liked to be in a condo for the next 20 years, I figured, it’s probably good to rent for a minute and see if we even like it,” Gray says, “and the answer is, ‘Yes, we do.’” Moving from a home that was more than three times the size of the apartment required some downsizing – luckily, the folks who bought the

LEFT Father and son chill poolside on the 28th floor. RIGHT A metallic theme runs through the decor in the Ellis’ apartment, like this piece above Nik’s bed.

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2017

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how they live

home in Treyburn had similar tastes and wanted to keep a lot of the items in the home. Apart from that, “we just got rid of everything,” Gray says, and it shows. The decor in the apartment is straightforward and minimal. “It’s definitely simplified our lives.” There is one piece of furniture, however, that Nik and Gray disagree on: the couch. “It is not my taste at all,” Gray says. “I promised him when we moved that we would get a reclining couch, so I did, and I’ve lived through it, as a good parent.” And then there’s another object that adds sentimental value to the room – a piece of wall decor in the form of a mounted bull’s head. It’s traveled with them for nine years and is painted a different 82

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how they live

Bringing hope and healing to families, and building a healthy tomorrow for our children.

LEFT Gray and Nik (far right) catch up with their One City Center neighbors (from left) Ripple Sandhu, Cindi Peeler, Brad Kirby, Jenalyn Logan and Nicole Oxendine. BELOW LEFT The rooftop lounge offers a variety of seating options, from high-top tables to cozy couches and chairs. ABOVE “It’s actually got good storage for the size,” Gray says of his apartment. There’s a spacious master bath, extra shelving for his shoe collection and a walk-in closet.

giving.dukechildrens.org

dukekids@duke.edu 919-385-3147

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how they live

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how they live

AW NORTH CAROLINA LEADING MANUFACTURER OF AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS

Gray and Nicole, who lives on the ninth floor of One City Center, catch up in the rooftop lounge, which has 360-degree views of the city.

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Robert T. Christensen DDS, MS Pediatric Dentistry

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how they live

BELOW Gray’s liquor cabinet that he bought specifically for his bourbon collection. The house plant, as with all the plants in the apartment, came from Stone Brothers & Byrd. RIGHT This wine and cheese board, perfect for sharing with new neighbors, was crafted by Bulldega Urban Market.

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how they live

LEFT You just can’t beat a sunset from up here. RIGHT Gray sits on the couch that was a compromise between him and his son when it came to furnishing the apartment.

color to match the design of the room it’s in – it’s been white, pink, silver, and is now a dark bronze. But nothing compares to the most significant aspect of the apartment: “This is the best view in Durham,” Gray says. “You cannot beat this.” He specifically chose this corner apartment, which has sightlines looking south and west, across the Durham Bulls Athletic Park, American Tobacco Campus and along West Main Street. You can even see University Tower and parts of UNC Hospitals in the distance. Gray chose this residence also for the floor it’s on – it’s just high enough to give a longdistance perspective, but low enough that details on the streets down below and, importantly, in the ballpark, can still be seen. Besides, if you want that 28th-floor experience, it’s one quick elevator ride away. The club room – complete with a catering kitchen, lounge seating, flat-screen TVs and a ping pong table – provides both an escape when you’re working from home as well as a place for community. “We will definitely be up there watching some games, hanging out and meeting neighbors,” Gray says. And they’re both eager to make the most out of the rooftop pool as well. “We should go swimming tonight,” Nik suggests. They also frequently make use of the sixth floor’s fitness center. “On the weekend, he has a routine of waking up on Saturday mornings and

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going over to Rise,” Gray says. “So I like to go over to the farmers market, pick up some things for the next week. We’ll hit the gym or just walk around the city. And if I don’t have him, then I might head to one of the local restaurants or bars; I’m a member of Union Member House, that’s two blocks from here. I go over to The Wine Feed a lot and hang out there; and it’s hard to find a bad meal on Main Street. One of his favorite places is Thai @Main Street. I like Luna.” They also frequent Pokéworks, which is on the retail level of One City Center, and, at the time of the interview, were eagerly awaiting the opening of other One City Center tenants B.Good and Juicekeys. “We don’t keep a lot of food in the fridge,” Gray says. “When I moved here 20 years ago,” Gray says, “You wouldn’t be caught dead [downtown] in the evening. I used to work at a law office on the corner of Parrish and Mangum, and you would leave at 5 o’clock, go straight to your car, and you would leave. Now, you don’t want to leave, you want to be downtown. “It’s the place to be.”

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Chapel Hill Location Heymann Orthodontics *Coming Soon*


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retirement

THE 2019 DIRECTORY OF CONTINUING CARE RETIREMENT COMMUNITIES, ASSISTED LIVING, INDEPENDENT SENIOR LIVING AND 55+ COMMUNITIES Minimum Age 60 Contact Information 919-401-1101; carillonassistedliving.com

ASSISTED LIVING COMMUNITIES BROOKDALE CHAPEL HILL ASSISTED LIVING 2220 Farmington Dr., Chapel Hill Entrance Fee One-time community fee, call for pricing Monthly Fee Range Call for pricing Contract Options Month-to-month Medicare Certified No Long-Term Care Insurance Accepted Contact Information 919-933-1430; brookdale.com BROOKDALE CHAPEL HILL ALZHEIMER’S AND DEMENTIA CARE 2230 Farmington Dr., Chapel Hill Entrance Fee One time community fee, call for pricing Monthly Fee Range Call for pricing Contract Options Month-to-month Medicare Certified No Long-Term Care Insurance Accepted Contact Information 919-929-5850; brookdale.com BROOKDALE DURHAM 4434 Ben Franklin Blvd., Durham Entrance Fee One time community fee, call for pricing Monthly Fee Range Call for pricing Contract Options Month-to-month Medicare Certified No Long-Term Care Insurance Accepted Contact Information 919-479-9966; brookdale.com BROOKDALE MEADOWMONT 100 Lanark Rd., Chapel Hill Entrance Fee One time community fee, call for pricing Monthly Fee Range Call for pricing Contract Options Month-to-month Medicare Certified No Long-Term Care Insurance Accepted Contact Information 919-918-7600; brookdale.com CAMBRIDGE HILLS ASSISTED LIVING 140 Brookstone Ln., Pittsboro Entrance Fee Community fee of $1,000 Monthly Fee Range $3,900 – $6,000 Contract Options None. Requires 14-day notice before moving out Refund Options Prorated for the first month from the movein date Medicare Certified No Long-Term Care Insurance Accepted Minimum Age 65 Contact Information Ronda Stubbs; 919-545-9573 or ronda@silver-thread.com; cambridgehillsal.com

CARILLON ASSISTED LIVING OF HILLSBOROUGH 1911 Orange Grove Rd., Hillsborough Entrance Fee Application fee required Monthly Fee Call for pricing Contract Options All-inclusive monthly rate includes care, dining, activities, laundry and housekeeping Refund Options Requires 14-day notice Medicare Certified Not Applicable Long-Term Care Insurance Required No Minimum Age 60 Contact Information 919-732-9040; carillonassistedliving.com CHATHAM RIDGE ASSISTED LIVING & MEMORY CARE 114 Polks Village Ln., Chapel Hill Entrance Fee One month’s rent Monthly Fee Range See Website Contract Options Month-to-month Refund Options Community fees within 30 days of move in Long-Term Care Insurance Accepted Minimum Age 55 Contact Information 919-918-7872; ridgecare.com MEBANE RIDGE ASSISTED LIVING & MEMORY CARE 1999 S. NC Hwy. 119, Mebane Entrance Fee One month’s rent as deposit. 20% discount through June Monthly Fee Range $3,195 – $6,595 Contract Options Month-to-month Refund Options None Medicare Certified No Long-Term Care Insurance Accepted, not required Minimum Age 55 Contact Information 919-568-0083; mebaneridge.com

CONTINUING CARE RETIREMENT COMMUNITIES (CCRCs)

CAMBRIDGE HILLS ASSISTED LIVING 5660 Durham Rd., Roxboro Entrance Fee All-inclusive rates with no entry fees Monthly Fee Range Call for pricing Contract Options None Refund Options Requires 14-day notice Medicare Certified No Long-Term Care Insurance Accepted Minimum Age 55 Contact Information Sandra H. Carden, scarden@cvsliving.com; 336-598-4697; cambridgehills.com CARILLON ASSISTED LIVING OF DURHAM 4713 Garrett Rd., Durham Entrance Fee Application fee required Monthly Fee Call for pricing Contract Options Monthly rate includes care, dining, activities, laundry and housekeeping Refund Options Requires 14-day notice Medicare Certified Not Applicable Long-Term Care Insurance Required No

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CAROLINA MEADOWS 100 Carolina Meadows, Chapel Hill Carolina Meadows is a vibrant community where residents live a lifestyle of wellness and engagement. The beautiful 168-acre campus includes a nine-hole golf course, pristine walking trails, tennis courts, community gardens and more. Residents enjoy six distinctive dining venues, a state-of-the-art wellness center and an auditorium that offers many fascinating lectures and performances. Entrance Fee Range $129,700 – $602,900 Monthly Fee Range $2,852 – $4,410 Contract Options Fee for Service: Housing, residential services and guaranteed access to health-related services in exchange for entrance fee and monthly fee. Health-related services are provided at per-diem rates, which vary. Home Care services are also available. Equity: See below. Refund Options Fully Refundable Equity; Occupancy Right; upon departure, resident/estate receives refund based on Entry Fee calculation and, if applicable, additional 50% of equity in the residence; calculation is current Entry Fee minus remarketing and refurbishing fees compared to original Entry Fee, and then sharing in appreciation of unit if new balance exceeds original payment. Medicare Certified Yes, Medicare Part B Long-Term Care Insurance Not required, but welcome Minimum Age 55 Contact Information 919-942-4014; 800-458-6756; carolinameadows.org

CAROL WOODS 750 Weaver Dairy Rd., Chapel Hill Entrance Fee Range $97,600 – $454,500 Monthly Fee Range $2,466 – $5,342 Contract Options Modified: Entrance fee and monthly payments cover housing, residential services such as meals and housekeeping and some health-related services. Healthrelated services are provided at discounted rate. Refund Options Declining Refund: Pay entry fee; full refund in first 90 days; refund declines at rate of 2% each additional month; after 50 months, no refund. Medicare Certified Yes Long-Term Care Insurance Not required; could help pay for discounted per diems Minimum Age 65 (co-applicant must be at least 55) Contact Information 919-968-4511; 800-518-9333; carolwoods.org THE CEDARS OF CHAPEL HILL 100 Cedar Club Circle (Meadowmont), Chapel Hill Entrance Fee Range $265,000 – $750,000* Monthly Fee Range $2,957 – $5,961 Contract Options *Equity: Actual real estate purchase, with transfer of ownership of the unit. If resident moves to health center, no added amount except two meals per day. After 90 days,member pays discounted rate. Refund Options Not applicable because of ownership Medicare Certified Yes Long-Term Care Insurance Not required Minimum Age 62 (co-applicant must be at least 50) Contact Information 919-259-7000; 877-433-3669; cedarsofchapelhill.com CROASDAILE VILLAGE 2600 Croasdaile Farm Pkwy., Durham Set on 110 acres, Croasdaile Village is in a pastoral setting, which provides a country feel fewer than six miles from Downtown Durham and three miles from Duke University. Croasdaile is within the distinguished residential neighborhood of Croasdaile Farm. Residents enjoy numerous green spaces with yards, gardening and plenty of walking trails, a dog park, lakes and the security of a full continuum of care on-site. The central campus buildings are connected, with a state-of-the-art wellness center, large heated pool, auditorium, woodworking shop, art studio, multiple dining venues and a beautiful chapel. Entrance Fee Range $57,014 – $372,554 (includes new residences) Monthly Fee Range $1,936 – $4,428 (includes new residences) Contract Options Fee for Service: Entrance fee and monthly payments cover housing, residential services such as meals and housekeeping and some healthrelated services. Advanced levels of health services are provided at per-diem rates. Utilities bundled. Refund Options Declining Refund: Option 1: Pay lower entry fee; refund declines at rate of 2% per month; after 50 months, no refund. Option 2: 50% Refund – pay higher entry fee; refund declines at a rate of 2% per month until 50% of residence fee is accrued; refund limited to 50%. Option 3: 90% Refund – pay higher entry fee; refund declines at a rate of 2% per month until 10% of fee is accrued; refund limited to 90%. Medicare Certified Yes Rehab on Site Yes Long-Term Care Insurance Not required, but welcome. Minimum Age 62 Contact Information 919-384-2475; 800-960-7737; croasdailevillage.org „


See Yourself! for

Take another look at The Village at Brookwood, where you can enjoy a robust lifestyle in a down-to-earth retirement community. We invite you to…

✓ visit our newly refreshed and interactive website at VillageAtBrookwood.org

✓ meet lively and like-minded people when you join us for an event – learn more on Facebook or our website’s events page

✓ come for a campus tour and a

complimentary lunch (overnight on-campus accommodations may be available!) Proud to be a part of

1860 Brookwood Ave. | Burlington

800-282-2053 | NEW VillageAtBrookwood.org


retirement

THE FOREST AT DUKE 2701 Pickett Rd., Durham Celebrating 27 years of community, The Forest at Duke is a vibrant continuing care retirement community located in the heart of Durham. Homes, cottages, apartments – each offer spacious, contemporary living with access to an impressive range of luxurious amenities coupled with world-class wellness. At The Forest, discover a retirement that is as varied, engaging and multi-faceted as you are. A leader in social responsibility and outreach, The Forest strives to strengthen the community and organizations that enrich the lives of Durham residents. Entrance Fee Range $92,345 – $561,705 Monthly Fee Range $3,110 – $7,240 Contract Options Modified: Entrance fee and monthly payments cover housing, residential services such as meals and housekeeping, and some health-related services. Health-related services are provided at a greatly discounted rate and are free for a specified number of days. Refund Options The Forest retains $10,000 of each person’s entry fee as a health care reserve. The remaining balance of the entry fee, the residence fee, is refundable based on the following plan: 2% of the Residence Fee accrues to The Forest at Duke each month. The refund decreases to zero over 50 months. 50% and 90% Entry Fee Plans are offered. Please contact the Sales & Marketing Team for current pricing and eligibility. Medicare Certified Yes Long-Term Care Insurance Not required, but welcome. Minimum Age 65 (co-applicant must be at least 62) Contact Information 919-490-8000; 800-474-0258; forestduke.org

GALLOWAY RIDGE AT FEARRINGTON 3000 Galloway Ridge Rd., Pittsboro Lovingly crafted with heart, soul and Southern charm, Galloway Ridge is more than retirement living – it’s a secure, health-conscious, pleasurepacked lifestyle destination. The 50-acre campus is just south of Chapel Hill and adjacent to Fearrington Village, an 1,100-acre planned community, offering miles of trails and sidewalks. Jordan Lake and Haw River are just a short distance away for our outdoor enthusiasts. Galloway Ridge’s main building includes 248 independent living apartments, library and business center, living room, Chapin Auditorium, Weathersfield Café, Bistro Dining Room, Camellia Fine Dining Room, Belties Lounge, billiards room, Players Lounge, stadium seating movie theater, art studio, woodworking shop, multiple meeting spaces and conference room. The Medicare certified health care center, The Arbor, is connected to the main building and offers 91 private rooms for assisted living, memory care and skilled nursing. The residents of the 52 independent living villas have a short walk to all of the amenities of the main building. The Galloway Ridge WellPlex allows residents to maintain their optimal level of health and well-being. It includes the Duke Center for Living, a 20,000-square-foot fitness center, Duke Primary Care and the Center for Physical Rehabilitation. For on-campus primary care services, residents can choose between UNC Health Care within the main building or Duke Primary Care in the WellPlex. Residents and staff volunteer thousands of hours each year to local agencies and partnerships. The Charitable Fund and Community Grant Program supports Chatham County charities, governmental agencies and schools.

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No-cost senior placement service Senior Apartments/Independent Living Assisted Living Homes & Communities Personal & Adult Care Homes Alzheimer’s & Memory Care Communities Nursing Homes or In-Home Care

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Entrance Fee Range $222,000 – $1,479,000 Monthly Fee Range $3,077 – $7,160 Contract Options Extensive: Entrance fee and monthly payments cover housing, residential services such as meals and housekeeping and unlimited assisted and skilled nursing. Little or no additional fees required as one moves from one level of care to another. Refund Options Declining Refund: Option 1:TimeSensitive – Pay lower entry fee; refund declines at rate of 4% in first month; 2% each additional month; after 4 years, no refund.Option 2: 90% Refund, Not Time-Sensitive – Pay higher entry fee; receive 90% of what you paid in. Option 3: 75% Refund, Not TimeSensitive – Pay higher entry fee; receive 75% of what you paid in. Medicare Certified Yes Long-Term Care Insurance Not required. Minimum age 62 Contact Information 919-545-2647; gallowayridge.com

GLENAIRE 4000 Glenaire Circle, Cary Entrance Fee Range $65,000 – $367,000 Monthly Fee Range $2,445 – $4,454 Contract Options Modified: Entrance fee and monthly payments cover housing, residential services such as meals and housekeeping and some health-related services. Healthrelated services are provided at subsidized rate or are free for specified number of days. Refund Options Option 1: Declining Refund – refund declines at rate of 2% per month for 48 months. Option 2: 50% refundable. Option 3: 90% refundable. Medicare Certified Yes Long-Term Care Insurance Not required. Minimum Age 62 (co-applicant must be at least 58) Contact Information 919-460-8095; 800-225-9573; glenaire.org SEARSTONE 17001 Searstone Dr., Cary Entrance Fee Range $360,000 – $840,500 Monthly Fee Range $3,000 – $6,700; Second Person Fee – $1,410 Contract Options Type A LifeCare contract. Residents pay a one-time LifeCare fee to cover costs of assisted living, skilled nurses and/or memory support. The LifeCare program has significant tax advantages and works well with long-term care policies. Refund Options Entrance fee 100% refundable. Medicare Certified No Long-Term Care Insurance Yes Minimum Age 62 Contact Information 919-234-0339; searstone.com SPRINGMOOR 1500 Sawmill Rd., Raleigh Entrance Fee Range Call for pricing. Monthly Fee Range Call for pricing. Contract Options Modified: Housing, residential services and some health-related services in exchange for entrance fee and monthly fee, which includes 30 days of free health care (with a maximum balance of 90 days), then is available at a discounted rate. Refund Options Option 1: Life Occupancy – Residence & Care refund declines at 4% a month for 25 months, then no refund. Option 2: 50% Life Equity – refund declines at 2% a month for 25 months. The remaining 50% is returned to the resident or estate after residency is terminated and within 30 days of re-occupancy of the residential unit. Option 3: 100% Life Equity – 100% of the Residence & Care fee is returned to the resident or estate after residency is terminated. The refund is available, once residency is terminated, six years after initial move-in date, or 30 days after re-occupancy of the residential unit, if six years has passed. Medicare Certified No Long-Term Care Insurance Not required. Minimum Age 62 Contact Information 919-848-7000; springmoor.org „


Galloway Ridge offers the best in healthcare, a diverse array of activities and a community of residents who enjoy vibrant, independent living. gallowayridge.com | 919-328-2657 Medical direction provided by

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TWIN LAKES 3701 Wade Coble Dr., Burlington An intentional community where people move from throughout the country. But all residents have at least one thing in common: They want to have a wellrounded life surrounded by people who are engaged and living purposefully. More than 550 people in independent living enjoy the 218-acre community and all the amenities that create a lifestyle where people of all types thrive. In addition to the spacious campus, this is a unique CCRC: there’s no mandatory meal plan; Twin Lakes offers comparably lower fees; and the neighborhoods are filled with people from diverse backgrounds and life experiences. Entrance Fee Range $55,000 – $395,000 Monthly Fee Range $1,533 – $2,914 Contract Options Fee-for-service contract only. Refund Options Thirty-month declining refund and 50% refund available (50% available on Garden Home only). Medicare Certified Yes Long-Term Care Insurance Not required Minimum Age 62 (co-applicant must be at least 62) Contact Information 336-538-1572; twinlakescomm.org

THE VILLAGE AT BROOKWOOD 1860 Brookwood Ave., Burlington Residents live in a community that feels like one big family. The Village at Brookwood’s intimate size allows the building of strong friendships. Residents can participate in a full array of physical activities that promote healthy living, feed their competitive spirit with fun games and mental challenges, de-stress with their favorite hobby or just relax. The community prides itself on its dining including two newly renovated options: the Edith Street Café and Lakeside Dining, plus a brand new bistro. What could be better than an engaging conversation with friends over a delicious meal prepared by the executive chef while the dining staff tends to your every need? Entrance Fee Range $92,800 – $536,300 Monthly Fee Range $2,189 – $4,287 Contract Options Option 1: Extensive – LifeCare Residential Living: Garden Homes & Apartments, bundled services, campus amenities, maintenance and guaranteed future health care all covered by the entrance fee and monthly fee. When moving from one level of care to another, the monthly fee reflects a 58% reduction of the daily skilled nursing rate. Option 2: Fee for Service – Garden Homes & Apartments, limited bundled services, campus amenities, maintenance and guaranteed access to future health care are provided in exchange for entrance fee and monthly fee. Health-related services are provided at the perdiem rate. Refund Options Declining Refund: Option 1: Extensive – Standard Refund declines over 47 months. 50% and 90% Refund plans also available. Option 2: Fee for Service – Standard Refund declines over 47 months.

Medicare Certified Yes Long-Term Care Insurance Not required, but can help with costs related to Assisted Living, Memory Care or Skilled Care for Fee-for-Service or LifeCare plans. Minimum Age 62 (co-applicant must be at least 55) Contact Information 336-570-8440; 800-282-2053; villageatbrookwood.org

WINDSOR POINT 1221 Broad St., Fuquay-Varina Entrance Fee Range $58,000 – $233,000 Monthly Fee Range $2,276 – $3,284 for independent living; $3,642 – $6,014 with health-related services Contract Options Modified: Housing, residential services and specified amount of health-related services in exchange for the entrance fee and monthly fee. Health-related services are provided at subsidized rate or are free for a specified number of days. Refund Options Declining Refund: Option 1:Life occupancy entrance fee; pay up front and 2% taken out each month over 50-month period, after 50 months there is no refund; before then, pro-rated refund available. Option 2: 50% Refund; refund declines at a rate of 2% per month for 25 months until 50% of residence fee is accrued; refund received only after resident passes away or moves. Medicare Certified Yes Long-Term Care Insurance Not required, but helpful Minimum Age 62 (co-applicant no younger than 55) Contact Information 919-552-4580; 800-552-0213; windsorpoint.com „

KEEP GOING

Vibrant living. Continuing care. In the heart of Durham. 2701 Pickett Road / Durham, NC 27705 919-433-2365 / forestduke.org

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KEEP GROWING

SM


DENTAL IMPLANTS • BONE GRAFTING • WISDOM TEETH • FACIAL TRAUMA • CORRECTIVE JAW SURGERY • PRE-PROSTHETIC SURGERY • ORAL PATHOLOGY • SLEEP APNEA

FOR MORE THAN 50 YEARS, the practice of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Associates has been trusted to provide specialized care in the Chapel Hill, Durham, and Sanford communities. Our five board certified oral and maxillofacial surgeons provide the highest quality of patient care with the latest diagnostic and treatment tools available to assure patient safety and comfort. Drs. Frost, Sacco, Vandersea, Ruvo and Serlo practice a full scope of oral and maxillofacial surgery with expertise ranging from corrective jaw surgery to wisdom tooth removal.

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DAVID E. FROST DDS, MS DEBRA M. SACCO DMD, MD BRIAN VANDERSEA DDS ANDREW T. RUVO DMD, MD ADAM D. SERLO DMD, MD

CHAPEL HILL 501 Eastowne Drive, Suite 110 Chapel Hill 27514 919.929.2196 DURHAM 2823 North Duke Street Durham 27704 919.479.0707 SANFORD 109 Dennis Drive Sanford 27330 919.775.1615

OFFICIAL PARTNERS OF DUKE ATHLETICS

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We’ve moved over 500 times in 11 years!

Are we crazy?! No, we are Senior Move Managers • picture hanging • space planning • scheduling movers • packing • unpacking • organizing • downsizing Jennie Alwood

919.627.1442

here2home.com

INDEPENDENT SENIOR LIVING ATRIA 5705 Fayetteville Rd., Durham Entrance Fee $5,000 Monthly Fee Range Independent living: $4,300– $4,475/one bedroom; $4,600 – $5,000/ two bedroom; cottages: $5,400 – $5,700 Contract Options Independent Living: No lease term, no buy-in, month-to-month rental with 60-day move-out notice. Assisted Living: No lease term, no buy-in, month-to-month rental with 14-day move-out notice. Refund Options Sixty-day notice to terminate independent living lease. Medicare Certified No, except for therapy services. Long-Term Care Insurance Accepted if the resident meets the criteria of the policy. Minimum Age 62 Contact Information 919-401-0100; atriasouthpointwalk.com BARTLETT RESERVE 300 Meredith Dr., Durham Entrance Fee $3,000 – First month’s rent Monthly Fee Range $3,550 – $3,950 Contract Options Sign a year lease, but can give 60-day notice to leave. Refund Options Non-refundable. Medicare Certified Therapy services are covered by Medicare. Long-Term Care Insurance Accepted for personal care and veterans benefits. Minimum Age 55 Contact Information 919-361-1234; Laura Martin, Certified Senior Advisor, lmartin@bartlettreserve.com; bartlettreserve.com DURHAM REGENT 3007 Pickett Rd., Durham Entrance Fee Range $2,750 – $4,250 Monthly Fee Range $2,299–$3,999 on single occupancy, second-person fee. Contract Options Month-to-month leases. All independent living. Medicare Certified No medical services included. Long-Term Care Insurance N/A Minimum Age 55 Contact Information 919-490-6224; durhamregent.com

Twin Lakes Community It’s not summer camp or a cruise ship vacation. It’s an intentional community. Where independence is treasured. And, the transition isn’t about what you give up , but what you gain. With neighbors who understand where you are in life. And a staff who does, too. A community where people of all types thrive, living a life that matters. It’s all right here.

Live, learn and grow at a place where community comes first.

A division of Lutheran Retirement Ministries of Alamance County, North Carolina

BURLINGTON NC • 336-538-1572 • twinlakescomm.org

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EMERALD POND 205 Emerald Pond Ln., Durham Entrance Fee Range Community fee of $2,850 – $4,700 Monthly Fee Range $2,244 – $4,599 Contract Options Month-to-month leases. No buy-in fees. Refund Options A partial refund of community fee if resident stays less than three months. Medicare Certified No medical services included. Long-Term Care Insurance N/A Minimum Age 55 Contact Information 919-493-4713; emeraldpond.net TWIN RIVERS INDEPENDENT SENIOR LIVING 25 Rectory St., Pittsboro Entrance Fee $2,750 per person Monthly Fee Range $2,750/one bedroom, $3,500/two bedroom Second Person Fee $750 Contract Options None. Requires one month’s notice prior to moving out. Medicare Certified No Long-Term Care Insurance Not accepted Minimum Age 65 Contact Information 919-545-0149 or 919-548-7538; kirby@silver-thread.com and silver-thread.com

CAROLINA ARBORS BY DEL WEBB 3055 Del Webb Arbors Dr., Durham Price Range of Houses Starting at $280s Number of Units 1,256 Resale Status New and resale Average Size of Houses 1,100 – 2,600 sq. ft. Amenities Included 37,000-square-foot clubhouse, lifestyle director, fitness center, tennis courts, bocce ball courts, indoor pool, outdoor pool. Sales Contact 877-266-0297, carolinaarbors@delwebb.com; delwebb.com/carolinaarbors

Durham Prosthodontics

specialists in aesthetic oral restoration Geoffrey R. Cunningham, DDS, MS, FACP R. Kyle Gazdeck, DDS, MS, FACP

POST-ACUTE CONTINUING CARE SYSTEM HILLCREST CONVALESCENT CENTER 1417 W. Pettigrew St., Durham Entrance Fee No deposit or application fee required. Monthly Fee Call for pricing. Contract Options All-inclusive monthly rate for shortterm, long-term, assisted living or respite stays. Refund Options Pay only for the days spent, any unused daily rate refunded Minimum Age N/A Contact Information 919-286-7705; admissions@hillcrestnc.com; hillcrestnc.com HILLCREST RALEIGH AT CRABTREE VALLEY 3830 Blue Ridge Rd., Raleigh Entrance Fee No deposit or application fee required. Monthly Fee Call for pricing. Contract Options All-inclusive monthly rate for shortterm, long-term or respite stays. Refund Options Pay only for the days spent, any unused daily rate refunded Minimum Age N/A Contact Information 919-781-4900; admissions@hillcrestraleighnc.com; hillcrestnc.com HILLCREST HOME HEALTH OF THE TRIANGLE 1000 Bear Cat Way, Ste. 104, Morrisville Personal care, respite care in-home support and companionship. Contact Information 919-468-1204 HILLCREST THERAPY & WELLNESS 4215 University Dr., Ste. B2, Durham Physical therapy, specialty treatments, wellness services. Contact Information 919-627-6700 SIGNATURE HEALTHCARE OF CHAPEL HILL 1602 E. Franklin St., Chapel Hill Entrance Fee None. No application or deposit fee. Monthly Fee Range Call for pricing. Contract Options All inclusive monthly rate for shortterm, long-term, assisted living or respite stays. Refund Options Refunds for any days not used. Medicare Certified Yes Long-Term Care Insurance Not required, but accepted. Contact Information 919-967-1418; shcofchapelhill.com; admission.chapelhill@signaturehealthcarellc.com

CAROLINA PRESERVE 115 Allforth Place, Cary Awarded the Community Excellence Award by the Community Association Institute. Price Range of Houses high-$200s – low-$500s Number of Units 1,360 Resale Status Resale only Average Size of Houses 1,200 – 3,500 sq. ft. Amenities Included Tennis courts, bocce ball courts, indoor pool, outdoor pool, fitness center, clubhouse, access to Town of Cary Greenway Contact 919-467-7837; cpamberly.net „

DIRECTORY OF 55+ COMMUNITIES

Only the best for your dental care. 1 BOARD-CERTIFIED

Drs. Geoffrey Cunningham and Kyle Gazdeck are the only board-certified Prosthodontists in private practice in the Durham-Chapel Hill area. In addition, this achievment makes them two of approximately 1,200 board-certified Prosthodontists in the world!

2 PRESTIGIOUS AWARD

Dr. Geoffrey Cunningham has been awarded the 2018 Prosthodontist Private Practice Award by the American College of Prosthodontists. This honor, given to only five practices in the United States, recognizes his commitment to the specialty.

3 RARE SPECIALIST

Dr. Kyle Gazdeck completed a fellowship in maxillofacial prosthetics at the prestigious Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in NYC. This additional training allows him to treat complex cases involving head and neck cancers or trauma.

4 5-STAR GOOGLE RATING

We have achieved a 5-star Google rating with 90+ 5-star reviews. This directly reflects the excellent service our patients receive. We encourage you to see what our patients are saying about us!

Dr. Geoffrey Cunningham and Dr. Kyle Gazdeck American Tobacco Campus, Durham, NC

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CORBINTON LIVING 680 Market House Way, Hillsborough Price Range of Houses low-$290s – mid-$400s Number of Units 70 Resale Status New only Average Size of Houses 1,600 – 2,100 sq. ft. Amenities Included Clubhouse, walking trail, dog park, community gardens, yard maintenance, exterior home maintenance. Sales Contact Julie Amos, 919-260-6348; corbintonliving.com; info@corbintonliving.com

CREEKSIDE AT BETHPAGE 6511 Crown Parkway, Durham Price Range of Houses mid-$200s – mid-$500s Number of Units 410 homes built, 665 total Resale Status New only Avg. Size of Houses 1,300 – 2,500 sq. ft. Amenities Included Recreation/ fitness center, yoga studio, art & pottery room, community garden, resort-style pool, tennis courts, bocce ball courts, dog park Sales Contact 919-551-3515; creeksideatbethpage.com

THE COURTYARDS AT ANDREWS CHAPEL 1007 Havenwood Ln., Durham Price Range of Houses mid-$300s – low-$500s Number of Units 120 Resale Status New only Average Size of Houses 1,500 – 4,000 sq. ft. Amenities Included Large clubhouse, outdoor saltwater swimming pool, fitness center, walking trails, pavilion. Sales Contact Kaylee Daum, 919-289-5784; epconcommunities.com

ENCORE AT BRIAR CHAPEL 117 Boone St., Chapel Hill Play, mingle and live your way in Encore by David Weekley Homes. Exclusively for residents 55+, Encore offers luxurious, main-story living plans with expanded outdoor living areas for entertaining, wellness-inspired design features and yard maintenance. Encore residents can enjoy the privacy of designated 55+ living amenities including a private clubhouse, pool, firepits and fitness facility, along with Briar Chapel’s clubhouse, water park, sports courts, 20+ parks and 24 miles of trails. With social clubs, on-site festivals and events, your community is waiting to welcome you home. Price Range of Houses mid-$300s – high-$400s Number of Units 185 Resale Status New only Average Size of Houses 1,600 – 3,200 sq. ft. Amenities Included Briar Chapel amenities, clubhouse with exclusive fitness center, outdoor pool, fire pits, bocce ball, yoga room and meeting area. Sales Contact 919-659-1562; davidweekleyhomes.com

THE COURTYARDS AT O’KELLY CHAPEL 1601 Vineyard Mist Dr., Cary Price Range of Houses high-$400s – low-$500s Number of Units 149 Resale Status New only Average Size of Houses 2,000 sq. ft. Amenities Included Clubhouse, outdoor swimming pool, fitness center, walking trails, access to American Tobacco Trail. Sales Contact Kaylee Daum, 919-289-5759; epconcommunities.com

FENDOL FARMS MANORS 1003 White Bark Ln., Durham Price Range of Houses low-$300s – low-$500s Number of Units 500 units Resale Status New only Average Size of Houses 2,000 – 2,700 sq. ft. Amenities Included Clubhouse, fitness center, outdoor pool, bocce ball court, tennis courts, pickleball, community garden, dog park, walking trails Contact 919-337-9420; lennar.com/new-homes/northcarolina/raleigh/durham/fendol-farms

COHOUSING ELDERBERRY 60 Elderberry Ln., Rougemont Price Range of Houses low to mid-$200s Number of Units 18 Resale Status Resale only Average Size of Houses 700 – 1,200 sq. ft. Amenities Included Self-developed, community-oriented cohousing, hiking trails, community garden Sales Contact Mary Bennett, 919-482-4222, mbkbennett@gmail.com; elderberrycohousing.com VILLAGE HEARTH 1000 Infinity Rd., Durham Price Range of Houses high-$200s – low-$400s Number of Units 28 Resale Status New only Average Size of Houses 660 – 1,200 sq. ft. Amenities Included Self-developed, communityoriented, large common house, clustered accessible homes on 15 acres, walking trails, community garden Contact 561-714-8009; villagehearthcohousing.com

For those who plan ahead, life expands. Worry about tomorrow gives way to fulfilling activity today. That’s the beauty of choosing our community. With access to a full continuum of on-site care, you’ll live independently and confidently, knowing your future is already secure. CroasdaileVillage.com Owned and operated by The United Methodist Retirement Homes, Inc.

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Biz Briefs 106 | Networking 108

DURHAM,

INC.

Highlights from our robust business community

104 Shop Talk: Andy Stober of AveXis

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The sale of a Parrish Street building shows the importance of real estate in driving diversity

Dawn Paige and Elaine Curry, owners of Empress Development.


THE BEST OF WHO WE ARE D

urham is known for its rich history, its evolution from tobacco to technology and world-class research, some of the finest educational

institutions and unique artistry. With countless other accolades to our name, we’ve always known that what’s best about our city is our people. Although a small city, those in our community have big hearts and grit that can rival cities twice our size, and those qualities came to bare when a sudden gas explosion rocked downtown Durham on April 10th. The best of who we are was on full display that day and has remained constant since. Beginning with our city’s most selfless and bravest— our first responders did not hesitate to do what they do best: protect and save. While this tragedy caused much damage, many injuries and the loss of dear lives, had it not been for our first responders, the devastation would have likely been worse.

Left to right: Lt. Brian Reitz, Sgt. Sheldon Perkins, Chief Cerelyn Davis, Capt. Demetrius Mock.


“I’M PROUD TO BE PART OF A COMMUNITY OF PEOPLE THAT CARES SO DEEPLY FOR ONE ANOTHER.

d ombine C m a h Dur or Guard rs Hon n of Colo tatio nual Presen the 5th An rs during t Responde Firs eciation Appr kfast Brea

“I’m proud to be part of a community of people that cares

spirit of our people. It is what keeps us year after year on

so deeply for one another,” said Geoff Durham, President

the list of the best places to work and live.

& CEO of Greater Durham Chamber. “I was amazed at how quickly our members and partners reached out to

Each year the Greater Durham Chamber honors our

us to offer their support and tangible ways to help those

local first responders at a special September event. This

impacted.”

year, that honor will have even more meaning for all of us. To everyone who has contributed and continues

Our broader community, including residents, businesses

to contribute to Downtown Durham’s recovery, we are

and visitors, mobilized to help those impacted by

fortunate to have you as part of our community. You are

establishing GoFundMe accounts, offering workspaces

what make Durham Bull City Strong.

for displaced workers, providing a means to apply for resources, and donating food and supplies—all to help in our recovery. There is no shortage of examples of the


durham inc.

SHOP TALK

AveXis, an Illinois-based pioneer of a booming gene therapy industry, is expanding its footprint in RTP. Andy Stober, the company’s chief technical officer, says there is no time to waste BY M I C H A E L M C E L R OY | P H O T O C O U R T E SY O F AV E X I S

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pinal muscular atrophy is rare, but devastating. It’s genetic and shows itself within the first few years of life. The cells in the brainstem and spinal cord “don’t work properly,” Boston Children’s Hospital says, and there are degrees of severity. In the worst cases, Type 1, children are unable to sit up on their own or breathe, and it is a leading cause of child mortality. All because of a single gene. AveXis has developed a treatment for Type 1, Zolgensma, that has shown great success in clinical trials. The company’s work on the treatment led to an $8.7 billion deal to be acquired by Novartis, the Swiss drugmaker, and the FDA is expected to decide very soon whether to approve Zolgensma. In anticipation, AveXis has built a vast manufacturing and analytics infrastructure, including a $60 million expansion in RTP. The increased presence here, which the company announced in March, will bring an extra 200 jobs to the park, officials say.

and drop a huge genetic payload. And they saw this huge potential in all the diseases they can treat.

The company started in 2010 and nearly immediately had a manufacturing plant in Libertyville, Illinois (outside Chicago). Why invest right away in manufacturing? We sat down with Andy Stober, AveXis’s chief technical officer, to talk about the company’s work and its plans in our area. The interview has been condensed and edited for clarity.

Tell me a little about how AveXis was born. It starts with [Dr.] Brian Kaspar, he is our chief scientific officer and founder. It’s really based on the work that he and his team did at Ohio State University. Brian is an amazing scientist. He and his team discovered a [virus] able to make its way across the blood-brain barrier

I give Brian and his team a ton of credit, because here you have a research person, and a leadership team who understood that you can’t make this great science happen without manufacturing. And they made the decision to spend millions of dollars on a manufacturing facility, at risk, as they developed the manufacturing process. They realized that in order to get the treatment to patients, you have to make it. It can’t just live in a lab somewhere.

It seems like when you learn one amazing thing, it requires you to learn 20 more things.

Gene therapy scientists often experiment with viruses, stripped of their dangerous bits, as genetic delivery vehicles because they are able to flit between the body’s many systems and reach the healthy genes.

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Yes. The first facility was built for speed and how quickly we can get this product to patients. We

learned from that facility operationally and engineeringwise. And now we’re building a facility here in North Carolina on the basis of lessons learned previously but with things that make it even better. As you do with every iteration, every version learns from the last one.

You do the manufacturing yourselves, rather than rely on third party manufacturers? Why? The capacity [in the third-party landscape] is limited, and the skill set is hit or miss. Very few people have done it before, and we haven’t found people who can do it. There’s not a lot of people who can work at the speed we need to work at. Every day matters for these kids. Brian likes to say, “time is motor neurons.” Every day that we don’t treat these kids they lose motor neurons. We need to move with that sense of urgency, and the industry is just not set up for that. So we realized a couple of things. We could supply major markets from the facility in Illinois, but if we wanted to have any kind of reach to the rest of the world then we needed to have more capacity. And if we wanted to have any kind of business continuity, we have


durham inc.

to make sure there’s no supply disruptions – because these are therapies that you can’t just stock out of. These treatments are time sensitive. Patients can’t be waiting around for treatment, which is why we started looking for another site and ultimately came here.

What is the lesson of dealing with so many vital things at once?

We’ve hired great people before we needed them. [AveXis] brought in people who are phenomenal, and you can justify the business cost, because all of a sudden you get explosive growth and you think, “Oh, my gosh, what if we hadn’t hired them?” Hiring people ahead and staying ahead of that curve is vital. When you see somebody who’s talented and a great fit, find a place for them. If we

hadn’t, we never would have been able to keep up. It’s the same thing around investment. Don’t be afraid to invest and take timeline risk, and financial risk. Obviously we never take a quality risk, but to take those kinds of business risks is important. Though we’re part of Novartis, we’re still taking risks, and I think that’s a big part of how it has played out.

What will this increased presence in Durham allow you do?

It will allow us to supply the rest of the world with this product. There will be no issues on what markets we can bring on, it will allow us business continuity so we won’t have to worry about supply disruption from a facility standpoint. And we are also building some capability

in this facility that we either don’t have anywhere or have in limited scale in our other [manufacturing groups].

A lot of startups talk of being able to realize when to pivot, but what is the trick to learning from mistakes in such a complex field when so much is invested in the process?

It goes back to our core values. You don’t get in this industry unless integrity and quality are leading in your mind. Money is an important reality in business, but when you’re trying to help and save patients, you’re not willing to risk quality because of costs. So as painful as some of those things can be, you have to accept that. And tenacity comes naturally when you show people the mission.

Who doesn’t want to give everything they have to save babies?

Does that mean that a sense of mission is vital building a successful business?

Absolutely. It’s not just [the SMA Type 1 treatment]. Some of the products we have, like one to treat a subset of genetic ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), are incredible as well. There are terrible diseases with no treatments, and though they’re in small numbers of patients compared to your bigger [disorders], they have a huge impact. And that’s why the values and the work are so important. You need to do the right thing for the patient every time. – that’s the economics of it. It is an exciting time to be in this industry.

DEEP ROOTS DON’T GROW OVERNIGHT. When it comes to commercial real estate, having an advocate nearby is an absolute necessity. At Trinity Partners, we pride ourselves on delivering comprehensive and creative solutions to our clients, no matter how sophisticated their real estate needs. We have every point in the Triangle covered — and all the ground in-between. trinity-partners.com | 919.674.3690 LOCALLY GROWN. EXCEEDINGLY CAPABLE.

B U Y E R A N D T E N A N T R E P R E S E N TAT I O N | P R O P E R T Y M A N AG E M E N T | C O N S T R U C T I O N S E R V I C E S | P R O J E C T M A N AG E M E N T | L A N D L O R D L E A S I N G | I N V E S T M E N T P R O P E R T Y S A L E S

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BIZBRIEFS Michelle Nelson joined the Greater Durham Chamber of Commerce in April as the director of marketing and communications. Michelle has more than 20 years of leadership experience across many industries, including at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation and Bristol-Myers Squibb. In April, New York-based Signature Bank launched a Venture Banking Group that will be based in Durham and in Denver, Colorado. Several former employees of Square 1 Bank, including Dhruv Patel, Mara Huntington and Arthur Wasson, are among the group’s Durham hires. In March, North Carolina had the highest number of IT openings over the last calendar year, a 40% increase over the same month in 2018. The DurhamChapel Hill area had the largest increase in the state – 64.2%. In April, Pashara Black left her position as the office liaison of the Greater Durham Chamber of Commerce to pursue a career in event planning at StrongKey, a data encryption startup based in Silicon Valley and Durham.

On June 1, Ken Gall was appointed at Duke Pratt School of Engineering’s first associate dean for entrepreneurship. In the role, Ken will collaborate with the Duke Innovation and Entrepreneurship Initiative to help accelerate the school’s entrepreneurship programs.

NEW ON THE SCENE

Durham Technical Community College will begin a culinary arts program in the fall. The program, housed at the American Tobacco Campus in the former kitchen space of the Art Institute of Raleigh-Durham, will offer a short-term certificate in restaurant management. In addition to standard cooking classes, it will offer targeted courses like menu design, catering cuisine and cost control. In April, Provident1898, a coworking space in the Tower at Mutual Plaza, launched its first phase (15,000 square feet) of what will be more than 40,000 square feet of shared workspace, which includes shared desks, conference rooms, small business incubator retail space and a lounge. The remaining 25,000 square feet will be delivered by the end of 2019.

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Olga Khomenko, who moved to Durham three years ago, launched her print T-shirt company, Spot Me Studio, on Shopify in April. Prior to living in Durham, Olga worked as a fashion model in New York City for 12 years before moving to Durham to start her business. She started selling the T-shirts at the Patchwork Market in Fullsteam Brewery in September before taking on her business full-time this year.

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TALENT POOL

The Raleigh-Durham Airport Authority introduced four electric-powered Proterra buses in May. The buses can carry 40 passengers and are about 40 feet long. The buses will shuttle passengers to and from economy parking lots. Travelers at Raleigh-Durham International Airport can now reserve parking online at parkrdu.com. The program began May 1 along with the new ParkRDU Express, a parking option on International Drive that offers users shuttle pickup and luggage assistance right at their vehicles. Devada, the community and resource hub for developers, will begin providing tech trend

reports through its DZone media product. The DZone Trend Reports will start publishing in July with a focus on the current trends in the industry and how developers are reacting to them.

INVESTMENTS

In May, ArchiveSocial, a social media archive company, raised $53 million in investment capital from the private equity firm Level Equity, which has offices in San Francisco and New York. In April, Asklepios BioPharmaceutical Inc. (AskBio), an Adeno-Associated Virus gene therapy-based company in RTP, received a $225 million investment from TPG Capital and Vida Ventures in exchange for minority stakes in the company. In addition, AskBio’s founders and board members will invest $10 million. The combined funds will be put toward clinical trial expenses, enhanced manufacturing capabilities and efforts to promote long-term growth. Biospatial Inc., a health and safety data company that provides real-time analysis and warning indicators during large-scale emergencies, raised $500,000 in equity, according to an SEC filing. Durham-based Lindy Biosciences, a developmentstage company addressing formulation challenges in the growing biotherapeutics market,


durham inc.

raised $548,500 in equity from five investors, according to an April filing with the SEC. Hatteras Venture Partners said in April that it had raised $94 million in deployable capital, which is part of a $200 million target fund to invest in earlystage biopharmaceutical, medical device, digital health and diagnostic opportunities.

MOVEMENT AND DEVELOPMENT

Philip Szostak, the Chapel Hill architect who designed DPAC, will begin construction in 2020 on The Callista, a downtown condo building with units starting at about $1.2 million. The six-story building at 802 Washington St., near the intersection of West Geer Street, will have four units, including a two-floor penthouse. Zippia, a Silicon Valley-based startup with a growing operation in Durham, closed on $8.5 million in new venture capital financing in April. Zippia, a jobs and career development company, is also seeking Durham-based writers, editors and graphic designers on the marketing side.

Coastal Credit Union released a community impact report in April touting a $32.4 million reinvestment, employee assistance programs, and other initiatives. In May, the bank began relocating its Southpoint Crossing branch to a larger facility at 7103 N.C. Hwy. 751. The Durham-Chapel Hill metro area (Durham, Orange, Chatham and Person counties), has a population of 575,000 people, up 13.6% from 2010 to 2018, according to an April report from the U.S. Census. The area’s growth over that time period ranked 47th in the nation. In April, WeWork announced that it had confidentially filed for an initial public offering in late December, a process that lets it initially keep sensitive information private as the SEC reviews the submission. The Durham Technical Community College Foundation launched its Forge Great Futures campaign in April. The campaign supports: upgrades to learning spaces to meet changing industry standards; the creation of integrated technology labs and new programs; and the expansion of scholarships and student aid for work-based learning opportunities. The campaign hopes to raise $5 million by June 2020.

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City Port, new condominiums coming to 600 S. Duke St. – a joint venture of Center Studio Architecture, White Oak Properties and CityPlat – published its floor plans and pricing online in April (cityportdurham.com). The building will have 43 plans ranging from 400 to 1,200

square feet, with prices ranging from the upper $100s to upper $500s. Construction will begin in August, with completion set for Nov. 2020.

PHOTO COURTESY DURHAM TECH

In April, Stanley Martin Homes, a Raleighbased homebuilder, put on the market its new 20acre neighborhood, Cresset Overlook, near U.S. 15-501. The neighborhood has 84 single-family homes with seven available designs. Some 70 homes are still available.

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Cree, the Durham-based semiconductor and LED company, closed on a $310 million deal in May to sell its lighting products group to IDEAL Industries. The deal is part of a $1 billion plan to focus on its Wolfspeed silicon carbide chip business. As it refocuses, Cree reported a loss of $227.9 million in its fiscal third quarter.

AWARDS AND HONORS

$1.1 million grant. Isolere Bio Inc. will use the money to develop a faster and more cost-effective method for purifying antibodies during drug development; Praetego Inc. will develop and test new drugs for treating neuropathy caused by diabetes; PrimeNeuro Inc. will develop software methods and algorithms for improved detection of autism disorders; and Zymeron Corporation will develop a sustainedrelease aspirin formulation for preventing colon cancer. FitMom Athletics and Jeddah’s Tea are among 15 startups across the state to split a $150,000 micro-grant awarded by NC Idea Foundation. Both companies will receive up to $10,000.

IN OTHER NEWS

Durham is the country’s seventh best city in which to start a business, according to a report released in May by WalletHub.

Average rents in Durham over the last year increased 5.1%, from $1,074 to $1,137, according to a Yardi Matrix report in April.

In April, NIRvana Sciences Inc., a tech company that commercializes fluorescent dyes for use in diagnostics and other health care services, was awarded a $3 million research grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the National Institutes of Health. The multi-year grant will be used to accelerate development of a new class of fluorescent dyes that will increase performance in instruments analyzing the body’s immune system.

GoTriangle will discontinue its shuttle within RTP this summer, but will launch a Transit Connect program in the park in August, providing a subsidy of up to $10 for an Uber or Lyft trip within a defined RTP zone weekdays between 6:30 a.m. and 10:45 p.m. Customers would qualify for the subsidy if they use the apps to request a ride that begins or ends within 100 feet of “connection points:” Regional Transit Center; NC 54 at Alston Avenue; NC 54 at New Millennium Way; and TW Alexander Drive at Stirrup Creek Drive. Rides that go outside the RTP zone are not free. Transit Connect is one of several changes GoTriangle plans in the coming year, including free fares for people 65 and older.

Four Durham businesses were among 24 startups in April receiving $50,000 each from the One NC Small Business Program. The money is part of a

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NETWORKING COASTAL CREDIT UNION BRANCH CONSTRUCTION KICKOFF CEREMONY

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P H O T O G R A P H Y BY L A U R E N P H I L L I P S Coastal Credit Union’s management and volunteer board of directors held a brief project kickoff ceremony at Mattie B’s Public House for its newest branch at the entrance to the Hope Valley Commons shopping center. Site work on the 2,800-square-foot branch is underway, and construction should be complete by the end of the year. It will replace Coastal’s Southpoint Crossing location. Coastal leadership was joined by representatives from the City of Durham and the Greater Durham Chamber of Commerce.

1 Coastal Credit Union Field Marketing Manager Leo McEliece. 2 Coastal Credit Union Board Chair Joan Nelson and Relationship Manager Kim Paradise. 3 Coastal Credit Union President and CEO Chuck Purvis. 4 Geoff Durham, president and CEO of the Greater Durham Chamber of Commerce, and Creighton Blackwell, Coastal’s vice president of corporate affairs and community engagement. 5 Mechele Laugel and Tia Cerdena with Community Engagement at Coastal Credit Union.

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1 Skanska USA Building VP - Account Manager Joe Thompson, Lennox & Grae Founder Nish Evans, Skanska USA Building Project Executive Beth Sayman and Skanska USA Building VP - Business Development Kelly Monroe. 2 Joe Lemanski, president at Norwich Realty Services and property manager of The Tower, with Carl Webb and Peter Cvelich, co-founders of Provident1898. 3 Durham Magazine Account Executive Lauren Phillips and COO Rory Gillis with Danielle Kaspar, director of community relations and Executive Club at the Washington Duke Inn & Golf Club. 4 Longfellow Real Estate Partners Marketing Manager Ellie McIntosh and Administrative Associate Anna Boggs. 5 Nicole Thompson, president & CEO of Downtown Durham Inc., and Durham County Commissioner Ellen Reckhow. 6 Diana Brown, project manager at Kimley-Horn and Associates, and Julie Paul, business development manager at York Properties. 7 Leadership Triangle Executive Director Jes Averhart and Dorian Bolden, president and CEO of Beyu Caffe.

Downtown Durham Inc. held its annual State of Downtown Durham meeting and networking reception at The Tower at Mutual Plaza in April. Business owners and community leaders learned the latest news on what’s happening downtown and what it means for Durham’s future. Updates included figures on number of downtown residents (7,200), employees (21,300), hotel rooms (716), as well as the office occupancy rate (91%) and amount of coworking space (391,000 square feet). There is also 440,000 square feet of office space and 1,400 residential units in the pipeline. There are 167 shops and restaurants within downtown – 25% are womenowned, and 50% are minorityowned. Total investment in downtown stands at $1.8 billion. Following the presentation, attendees mingled in the lobby while enjoying food from The Pit and drinks from downtown breweries and wineries, including Durty Bull Brewing Co., Bull City Ciderworks, Honeygirl Meadery and Bull City Burger and Brewery, and had the opportunity to take a tour of The Tower and Provident1898, the coworking space that occupies the lower levels.

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BUILDING EQUITY

The recent sale of 109 W. Parrish St. brought a prime market price and a chance to pass on its legacy of black ownership to a third generation BY H A N N A H M c C L E L L A N | P H O T O BY B E T H M A N N

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S THEY SHOWED a photographer around on a bright spring afternoon, Elaine Curry and Dawn Paige looked up the ladder to the roof of 109 W. Parrish St., the building they bought in 2013 and sold this year for nearly 2 million dollars more. The building had proved to be just the kind of smart, profitable investment that they had in mind when they bought it. But the building itself also held a deep allure, they said, a legacy that they had hoped to preserve and pass on. They bought 109 from Durham stalwarts Irwin Holmes, the first black graduate of N.C. State, and Meredythe Holmes, who has had a long career helping Durham students finish high school and get jobs. Curry and Paige were the second generation of black owners. They hoped to sell to a third. Durham’s recent renewal has not spread proportionally to black- and minority-owned businesses. Only 3.5% of businesses downtown are black owned, according to Downtown Durham Inc. One of the keys to

restoring diversity in business ownership, many black business owners say, is improving diversity in property ownership. If the landlord had a vested interested in diversity, advocates argue, then balance might be restored. Sometimes in business, even on the cold bottom-line of what the market may bear, things require this broader view. So Curry and Paige looked again at the ladder to the roof, took off their shoes and began to climb. The roof of 109 is a nice perch from which to see Durham, both as it is and as it was. To the southwest, there’s the art deco Kress building, which was the site of sit-ins in the ’60s, sat nearly empty in Durham’s bad years, and is now full of high-end condos. Towering above 109 next door is One City Center, the sparkling new home to coworking space WeWork – and to even more condos. And you can see the block itself, a small and irregular rectangle formed by Magnum Street, Parrish, Corcoran and Main. More than 100 years ago, this block was key real estate in Black Wall Street (BWS), a thriving district of some 200 black-owned businesses nearly unrivaled in the rest of the country.

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Then came setbacks and downturns, as urban renewal programs, gentrification and the building of the freeway helped boost the city as a whole, but had an inverse effect on black neighborhoods and businesses.

IT IS GREAT WHEN WE CAN ALIGN WITH PROPERTY OWNERS LIKE ELAINE AND DAWN, WHO SAID [THAT] IF THEY COULD CONTINUE THE TREND OF IT BEING IN AFRICAN AMERICAN HANDS, THEY WOULD. – NICOLE THOMPSON

The paucity in real estate feeds the disparities in businesses, advocates say. “If you’ve got an owner who has a mindset and a commitment and an initiative around an inclusive approach, that’s going to be built into the contractual document, it’s going to be part of the deal,” Gloria Shealey, president and CEO of the construction management company The

Daniele Company, told us in March, then “Then it’s going to be up to the owner to make sure it’s not just words on paper.” It is a blueprint Curry and Paige wanted to follow. “I had the idea that it would be nice, being that it was on Black Wall Street, and we had bought it from another African American couple,” Curry said, “if we could sort of keep it going, at least with that building.” “We wanted to try to preserve some sort of presence downtown,” Paige added. But the passing of legacy was somewhat by chance and was not entirely smooth. After extensive renovations in 2014, they began to lease the space, bringing in Empower Dance Studio on the Parrish Street side, and Luna Rotisserie, Empanadas and Morningstar Law Group on Main Street. In the summer of 2018 they decided to sell, reaching out to their networks to identify potential buyers. But, they did not find the interest they were looking for, and listed the property through a broker, which sparked interest but did not immediately bring offers from black owners. Then Nish Evans came along. While the building was on the market, Nicole Oxendine,


Elaine Curry and Dawn Paige of Empress Development made extensive renovations to 109 W. Parrish St. – seen here on its rooftop with West Parrish Street in the background. They sold the building to Nish Evans this year.

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the owner and director of Empower Dance Studio and Paige and Curry’s first tenant, ran into Evans at a Black Wall Street Homecoming event and told her the building was for sale. She introduced Evans to Curry and Paige. Evans is the owner and founder of the development firm Lennox + Grae, which she named after her two sons, Ellery Lennox and Zoelen Grae. Evans said that Paige and Curry were intentional about wanting to pass on the legacy of the building, but the closing process took nearly four months, and it was not

always clear that things would work out. “We had other offers to purchase the building before we received Nish’s offer, and during the time period when we were waiting to close,” Curry said. “Several extensions of the initial close date were required,” she said, and other “contract offers might have potentially, (and maybe even likely) closed sooner.” But, she said, “once we began this process in earnest, both parties were committed to doing everything possible to make it happen.” It was always going to be

We know downtown.

Economic Development • Clean & Safe • Placemaking

115 Market St. #213 • Durham, NC 27701 • 919.682.2800 downtowndurham.com

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about business, said Paige and Curry, who worked together in investment for 10 years before starting their real estate business, Empress Development. The decision to sell 109 was “first a financial decision,” Curry said, and the price was “dictated solely by the market factors and our desired return.” Because they prioritized finding a black buyer, however, they were able to do it all. “We did what we wanted to do,” Curry said. “In the end, we did not have to choose between keeping the building black-owned and accepting the highest offer, and we consider this the best outcome.” Nicole Thompson, DDI president and CEO, said it is difficult to know the numbers of minority-owned buildings because there are very few specific means in place to track them, and because federal data is published only every few years. But the deal for 109 serves as a good model moving forward, she said. “We had a very passionate buyer of the property in Nish Evans, but I also know we had very patient sellers,” Thompson said. “It is great when we can align with property owners like Elaine and Dawn, who said [that] if they could continue the trend of it being in African American hands, then they would.” “I think a lot of credit is given to them for being intentional.” The transaction benefited all sides, as it does in the best of business deals. Curry and Paige purchased the building from the Holmes’ for a “sweet

deal” of $605,000 and sold the 9,256-square-foot building for $2.45 million. Evans said the building was a great first retail investment for her company and that she hoped to follow in the footsteps of Curry, Paige and the Black Wall Street pioneers. “They were known to ‘ask for a fair shot and [an] open playing field in which to prove their abilities to build a strong business and legacy,” Nish said of BWS. “I wish to mirror this same approach. Equitable spaces are vital to our communities, in addition to black-owned real estate. They both are physical manifestations that people of color ‘belong’ and have been key players to the vibrant attraction of Durham.” Oxendine, who launched her business in June 2015, said she appreciates that approach. “It was exciting to be like, OK, this is my new landlord,” she said, “and I’m excited to give my money to her.” From the beginning, she said, Curry and Paige were supportive of her and expressed their desire to house a black business. It’s been nice to feel the same support from Evans, she said. “It wasn’t just an exchange, like, ‘Here’s a check and go about your way,’ but they were really invested in seeing what I was doing,” Oxendine said. “As a new business owner, that meant so much to me – and I think to the girls, primarily African American girls, to see two black women who own this building – that’s huge.”


DURHAM INNOVATION DISTRICT 200 & 300 MORRIS STREET

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Grand Taste Experience WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26 & THURSDAY, JUNE 27 AT THE DURHAM ARMORY

This year, we are offering two nights of “the culinary experience of the year” featuring a Beer Garden Wednesday night and a Wine garden Thursday evening.

Speakeasy Nightclub

FRIDAY, JUNE 28 AT A SECRET LOCATION

Sneak into this speakeasy and sip on cocktails, snack on ‘20s-era hors d’oeuvres and dance the night away to a jazz band. Dressing up in your tails and flapper dresses is encouraged!

Southern Feast

SATURDAY, JUNE 29 AT WASHINGTON DUKE INN

An edible exploration of the global influences that now define Southern cuisine. Expect ethnic fare, feasting tables, a historic overview and entertainment that will make this an evening to remember.

Let There Be Brunch!

SUNDAY, JUNE 30 AT CLOUDS BREWING

Your favorite meal of the weekend made better with sweet and savory brunch staples, plus signature cocktails.

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5 EVENTS. 8 MUSIC + DANCE ACTS. 75 CHEFS. 85 DRINKS | JUNE 26-30 THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS


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2 Grand Taste Experiences

City Barbeque | House at Gatewood | Sadie’s Southern | Oakleaf | Alley Twenty-Six | Burger Bach Crossroads Chapel Hill | COPA | Counting House | Crook’s Corner | Gonza Tacos y Tequila It’s A Southern Thing | Local 22 | Neomonde Mediterranean | Papa Shogun Pittsboro Roadhouse | 39 West Catering | Radius Pizzeria & Pub | Saltbox Seafood Joint Societa | Unscripted | Viceroy | Vimala’s Curryblossom Cafe | Harvest 18 | Flair Restaurant Tarantini Italian Restaurant | Kingfisher | Fearrington House Restaurant | Bleu Olive Bistro | Fusion Fish Dashi | Parizade | Acme Food & Beverage Co. | O-Ku Sushi | NanaSteak | Mandolin Plates Neighborhood Kitchen | Oak Steakhouse | Whiskey Kitchen | Babalu Tapas & Tacos | Toast Jack Tar and The Colonel’s Daughter | Earth To Us Kitchen | Syrus Lune - Vegan Culinary Artist Ponysaurus Brewing | Gibbs Hundred | Hi-Wire Brewing | Brewery Bhavana | Bull City Ciderworks Bedlam Vodka | Durham Distillery | Bedlam Vodka | TOPO Organic Spirits Counter Culture Coffee

Speakeasy Nightclub

Durham Catering | Alley Twenty-Six | Duck Donuts | Don Julio Ketel One | Ketel One Botanicals | Tanqueray | Bulleit

Southern Feast

Saltbox Seafood Joint | Littler | The Parlour | Washington Duke Inn & Golf Club Whole Foods Market | Goorsha | Vimala’s Curryblossom Cafe Durham Distillery | Kingfisher | The Prisoner Wine Company | Counter Culture Coffee

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taste NORTHERN DURHAM / NEAR INTERSTATE 85

GUESS ROAD Northgate Mall Food court cuisine offerings cover American, Chinese, Greek, Italian, Japanese and Mexican cuisines, plus full-service restaurants C&H Cafeteria, Green Paradise, Randy's Pizza and Ruby Tuesday. 1058 W. Club Blvd. Earth To Us Vegan Comfort Food Latin and American vegan dishes including cauliflower wings, garlic tostones, arepas and more. 1720 Guess Rd., Ste. 18; 919-908-1000 Gocciolina Upscale Italian fare in a cozy atmosphere. This wildly popular restaurant has graced our Best Of list again and again. 3314 Guess Rd.; 919-973-4089; gocciolina.com Hog Heaven Bar-B-Q Homestyle Eastern barbecue, fried chicken and seafood. Enjoy with a giant glass of iced tea. 2419 Guess Rd.; 919-286-7447; hogheavenbarbecue.com Jimmy’s Famous Hot Dogs Old-fashioned burgers, fries and a mean Carolina-style dog. 2728 Guess Rd.; 919-471-0005; jimmysfamoushotdogs.com La Cacerola Cafe & Restaurant Honduran specialties such as pupusas and chorizo asado. 2016 Guess Rd.; 919-294-6578 Thai Spoon All the trappings for a delicious experience: pad thai, drunken noodles and curries. 3808 Guess Rd.; 919-908-7539 HILLSBOROUGH ROAD Bennett Pointe Grill & Bar There’s something to please all palates on the large menu of this multiregional American restaurant. 4625 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-382-9431; bpgrill.com Shanghai Restaurant Established in the 1980s, this Cantonese restaurant offers both Americanized and authentic dishes. 3433 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-383-7581; shanghaidurham.com

El Corral Mexican Restaurant Authentic Mexican faijitas, tacos, enchiladas and a great chorizo queso dip. 1821 Hillandale Rd., Ste. 8; 919-309-4543; elcorralnc.com Melo Trattoria & Tapas Classic Italian - think spaghetti and meatballs and chicken parmigiana - meets tapas. 1821 Hillandale Rd., Ste. 3; 919-384-9080; melotrattoria.com Pomodoro Italian Kitchen Homemade sauces on fresh-made pizzas, pastas and other Italian favorites. 1811 Hillandale Rd.; 919-382-2915; pomodoroitaliankitchen.info NORTH POINTE DRIVE The French Corner Bakery Artisan breads, beautifully crafted tarts and pastries, plus lunch. Baking classes taught by French-trained master baker chef Benjamin Messaoui. 2005 North Pointe Dr., Ste. B; 919-698-9836 MORE NORTHERN DURHAM DINING Alpaca Peruvian rotisserie chicken. Need we say more? 302 Davidson Ave.; 919-220-9028; alpacachicken.com Bullock’s Bar-B-Cue A staple in the community since 1952, serving up soul in Eastern-style barbecue, Brunswick stew and fried chicken. 3330 Quebec Dr.; 919-383-3211; bullocks-bbq.com Dogwood Bar & Grill American fare including burgers, sandwiches, soups and salads, plus larger entrees like baby back ribs, shepherd’s pie and penne alle vodka. Try the House Nachos (chips are made in-house) and the spinach salad. 5110 N. Roxboro St.; 919-973-2342 Goodberry’s Frozen Custard All-natural frozen custard with a variety of topping options. 3906 N. Roxboro St.; 919-477-2552; goodberrys.com

Wimpy’s Grill Specializing in old-fashioned burgers and hot dogs. Open till 2 p.m. weekdays, cash only. 617 Hicks St.; 919-286-4380; wimpysgrillnc.com

Picnic Order the pulled pork, of course, but also the fried chicken, mac and cheese, and hushpuppies. 1647 Cole Mill Rd.; 919-908-9128; picnicdurham.com BR

HILLANDALE ROAD

Silver Spoon Restaurant A large menu of breakfast favorites like strawberry waffles and omelettes, plus sandwiches, pastas, salads and kids plates. 5230 N. Roxboro St.; 919-479-7172; silverspoonnc.com

Bleu Olive High-quality comfort food incorporating local ingredients and Mediterranean flair. Family operated and chef-driven. 1821 Hillandale Rd.; 919 383-8502; bleuolivebistro. com BR

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Skrimp Shack Fast casual seafood restaurant serving addictive shrimp, fish and a variety of other fried and grilled seafood. 3600 N. Duke St., Ste. 28B; 919-477-0776; theskrimpshack.com

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NEAR DOWNTOWN

BROAD STREET DeeLuxe Chicken Fried chicken with dark and light quarters, plus a sauce bar with almost a dozen options. Other offerings include seafood platters and Velveeta mac and cheese. 1116 Broad St.; 919-294-8128; deeluxechicken.com Joe Van Gogh Cozy and full of natural light, this local coffee shop sources quality beans for a superior coffee. 1104-B Broad St.; 919-286-4800; joevangogh.com. The Palace International African cuisine including curry goat, dovi chicken and samosas. 1104-A Broad St.; 919-416-4922; thepalaceinternational.com Watts Grocery A Durham native, chef Amy Tornquist artfully develops Southern-inspired dishes with seasonal, local ingredients. 1116 Broad St.; 919-416-5040; wattsgrocery.com BR Wellspring Cafe Salad and hot bar in the Whole Foods Market, plus sandwiches, pizza and sushi. 621 Broad St.; 919-286-2290 BULL CITY MARKET The Mad Hatter’s Café & Bakeshop Artisan café and bakery celebratingthe sweet things in life. Scratch made cakes, cupcakes and pastries, organic salads, sandwiches and wraps, with breakfast all day and delicious brunch every weekend. Espresso, juice and organic smoothie bar as well as local beer and wine selection. Dine-in, carry-out, or order online. 1802 W. Main St.; 919-286-1987; madhatterbakeshop.com BR

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Early Bird Donuts Doughnuts, biscuits, croissant breakfast sandwiches and coffee. Try the cinnamon sugar donut. 2816 Erwin Rd., Ste. 101; 984-888-0417 Itaewon Grill Build-your-own Korean barbecue bowls with a variety of meats and meat substitutes, toppings and sauces. 2608 Erwin Rd., Ste. 132; 919-864-9742; itaewongrillkbbq.com MediTerra Grill Mediterranean and Lebanese cuisine, offering gyros, kabobs and curry. 2608 Erwin Rd., Ste. 136; 919-383-0066; mediterranc.com Naan Stop Indian Cuisine Authentic Indian cuisine with dishes like daal makhani, paneer tikka masala and biryani. 2812 Erwin Rd., Ste. 103; 919-891-3488; naanstopduke.com

Shuckin’ Shack Seafood restaurant serving up shrimp, oysters, fish-n-chips, surf-n-turf dinners and more. 2200 W. Main St.; 984-219-7337; theshuckinshack.com NINTH STREET DISTRICT Alpaca Peruvian rotisserie chicken. Need we say more? 703-A Ninth St.; 919908-1597; alpacachicken.com Banh’s Cuisine Vietnamese and Chinese dishes with great vegetarian specials. Cash only! 750 Ninth St.; 919-286-5073

Burger Bach Signature New Zealand grass-fed burgers and fresh-cut fries. 737 Ninth St., Ste. 220; 919-973-4416; burgerbach.com

Nosh “Eclectic foodstuffs” like “Mike’s Breakfast Pizza,” “Coach’s Queso" sandwich and the brown derby chopper salad. 2812 Erwin Rd., Ste. 101; 919-383-4747; noshfood.com BR

Cocoa Cinnamon Signature handbrewed coffees and lattes such as the “Dr. Durham” with maca root powder and black lava salt. 2627 Hillsborough Rd.; cocoacinnamon.com

Saladelia Cafe @ Hock Plaza Simple and honest food prepared with authentic, local and seasonal ingredients. Espresso, juice and organic smoothie bar, yum-on-the run pastries, gourmet sandwiches, salads and soups. Dine-in or carry out. 2424 Erwin Rd.; 919-416 1400; saladelia.com

Cosmic Cantina Authentic Mexican cuisine with vegan options. House-made mole and corn tortillas. Pair with a margarita pitcher. 1920 Perry St.; 919-286-1875; cosmiccantina.com Dain’s Place Pub fare centered around award-winning “thick and juicy and juicy and thick burgers.” 754 Ninth St.; 919-416-8800

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Smashburger Unique burgers smashed on the grill, chicken and salads. 2608 Erwin Rd., Ste. 116; 919-237-1070; smashburger.com Sushi Love Specialty sushi rolls such as the “Honey Love” roll topped with mango and kiwi, as well as other Asian cuisine favorites. 2812 Erwin Rd., Ste. 204; 919-309-2401; sushilove.org

Del Rancho Mexican Grill Authentic Mexican lunch and dinner menu with a full-service bar. 730 Ninth St.

Local 22 Kitchen & Bar Upscale Southern-inspired cuisine, with emphasis on food sourced within a 30-mile radius and local brews. 2200 W. Main St.; 919-286-9755; local22durham.com BR Parizade Sophisticated Mediterranean food like grilled bronzino, Australian lamb chops and pan-fried Roman dumplings. 2200 W. Main St.; 919-286-9712; parizadedurham.com

ON CLOUD WINE In April, The Wine Feed General Manager Brianna Needle earned her diploma in wine and spirits, which only 10,006 people have accomplished globally according to WSET, the largest global provider of wine, spirits and sake qualifications.

Juju Asian fusion tapas including selections like steamed barbecue Kurobuta pork belly and chicken fried oysters. Try the crispy Brussels sprouts! 737 Ninth St., Ste. 210; 919-286-3555; jujudurham.com BR Lime & Lemon Indian Grill Northern and southern Indian specialties including Gobi Manchurian, Paneer Tikka, Chicken Tikka and Hariyali Murg Kebab. 811 Ninth St.; 919-748-3456; limenlemonnc.com BR Locopops Gourmet frozen pops in a variety of rotating flavors like lavender cream, strawberry lemonade and malted milk ball. 2618 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-2863500; ilovelocopops.com

OPENINGS Stem Ciders, a Denver-based cidery, opened The Northern Spy, a bar/restaurant/bottle shop, on Erwin Road in May. The business has 18 rotating ciders and beers on tap as well as cocktails made with beer and cider. The menu, available for lunch and dinner, includes dishes like a fried bologna sandwich, a “not-so classic” wedge salad and a cider float made with Stem’s Real Dry Apple Cider over ice cream.

Metro 8 Steakhouse Classic American steakhouse with an Argentinian flair. Pair empanadas with a filet mignon or crab-stuffed shrimp with a churrasco steak. 746 Ninth St.; 919-416-1700; metro8steakhouse.com Monuts Donuts Scratch-made doughnuts, pastries, English muffins, bagels and breakfast sandwiches. Try the bagel and lox. 1002 Ninth St.; 919-286-2642; monutsdonuts.com BR

Lime & Lemon Indian Grill opened in April in the former Dales Indian Cuisine space on Ninth Street. The menu includes a variety of vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free dishes, some of which are less commonly seen on menus, like idily (fermented and steamed lentil and rice cake), dosa (fermented lentils and rice batter made into crepes), meds vada (lentil donuts) and goat curry, and goat soup.

Pincho Loco Latin-flavored ice cream, milkshakes, popsicles and more, featuring flavors like tequila, Tiger Tail (vanilla, mexican Vanilla and chocolate), guava, tamarind and more. 1918 Perry St.; 919-286-5111 Snow Factory Rolled ice cream treats, including flavors like peanut butter ’n pretzel, Oreo wonderland, Uji matcha and many more, with choice of multiple sweet toppings. 760 Ninth St., 919-294-4111; snowfactorystl.com

Haitian-Caribbean restaurant Pierro ToGo, owned and operated by Chef Jethro Pierre, opened at 2100 Angier Ave. in the old Joe’s Diner location in April.

Tamale Factory and Tequila Bar Authentic Mexican food and drinks, including tamales made daily, scratch-made salsas and sauces and margaritas made using fresh ingredients. 2816 Erwin Rd., Ste. 205, 919-237-1116; tamalefactorync.com ERWIN SQUARE Guasaca Arepas, salads and rice bowls with South American flavor. 2200 W. Main St., Ste. A100; 919-294-8939; guasaca.com

NEWS BITES

Blue Corn Cafe Authentic Latin-American fare with fresh, organic ingredients. 716 Ninth St.; 919-286-9600; bluecorncafedurham.com

The Northern Spy Restaurant, bar and bottle shop with dishes like a fried bologna sandwich, a “not-so classic” wedge salad and a cider float made with Stem’s Real Dry Apple Cider. 2812 Erwin Rd.; 919-321-0203; northernspync.com

Heavenly Buffaloes Chicken wings (bone-in and boneless) as well as vegan wings in more than 25 rubs and sauces, including peri peri and Jamaican jerk. Plus waffle fries! 1807 W. Markham Ave.; 919-237-2358; heavenlybuffaloes.com

PHOTO BY REESE MOORE

ERWIN ROAD Another Broken Egg Cafe Unique breakfast and lunch menu including cinnamon roll french toast and a scrambled skillet. 2608 Erwin Rd., Ste. 120; 919-381-5172; anotherbrokenegg.com BR

Elmo’s Diner Homemade Southern classics with breakfast favorites like cinnamon apple waffles and biscuits and gravy served all day in a casual, family-friendly setting. 776 Ninth St.; 919-416-3823; elmosdiner.com BR Happy + Hale Healthy salads, bowls, breakfast, smoothies, cocktails and cold-pressed juice. 703B Ninth St.; 984-439-1790; happyandhale.com BR

Triangle Coffee House Coffee and pastries with selections like vegan blueberry muffins. 714 Ninth St.; 919-748-3634

COMING SOON Boricua Soul, a Puerto Ricaninspired food truck, is opening its brick-and-mortar restaurant in August at American Tobacco Campus (ATC) in the Crowe Lobby. In addition to a full lunch and dinner menu, Boricua Soul will alsoWINNER have a large, foldable window door with a patio and access to the ATC lawn as well as a stage for programmed year-round performances.

Vin Rouge French bistro-style dinner with regular oyster specials and Sunday brunch. Get the hanger steak and frites! 2010 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-416-0466; vinrougerestaurant.com

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ZenFish Poké Bar A healthy, fast-casual restaurant serving poké (raw fish) in made-to-order bowls containing rice, quinoa or salad, and toppings of your choice. 810 Ninth St.; 919-937-9966; zenfishpokebar. com

NEWS BITES

NEAR DUKE Fairview Dining Room Seasonally inspired contemporary cuisine with selections like coffeerubbed duck breast and seared NC flounder. Located inside the Washington Duke Inn & Golf Club. 3001 Cameron Blvd.; 919-493-6699; washingtondukeinn.com

Geer Street Garden Simple, down-home fare in a cozy atmosphere. They make a mean “Dark and Stormy,” and be sure to order “The Pile” to split with friends! 644 Foster St.; 919-688-2900; geerstreetgarden.com Gonza Tacos y Tequila Columbian-Mexican restaurant with traditional dishes like chilaquiles, enchiladas and sopa in addition to a variety of tacos. 604 Fernway Ave.; 919-907-2656; durham.gonzatacosytequila.com

MarketPlace JB DukeHotel’s main restaurant, open for breakfast, lunch and dinner. 230 Science Dr.; 919-660-6400; jbdukehotel.com

DOWNTOWN

CENTRAL PARK & WAREHOUSE DISTRICTS The Blue Note Grill Fantastic barbecue, ribs and live music. 709 Washington St.; 919-401-1979; thebluenotegrill.com Boxcar Bar & Arcade Offers more than 70 arcade games, a full bar including 24 craft American drafts (and a wide variety of local beer, liquor and wine), private event space and a Neapolitan-style pizza kitchen. 621 Foster St.; 984-377-2791; theboxcarbar. com/durham Cocoa Cinnamon Signature hand-brewed coffees and lattes such as the “Tower of Babel” with honey and date sugar. 420 W. Geer St.; cocoacinnamon.com

Dame’s Chicken & Waffles Chicken, waffles, shmears. ’Nuff said. 530 Foster St.; 919-682-9235; dameschickenwaffles.com BR Foster Street Coffee Coffee house on the ground floor of Liberty Warehouse Apartments that uses carefully curated coffee beans from around the world for its classic concoctions as well as local produce for housemade smoothies. 530 Foster St., Ste. 2; 919-797-9555; fosterstreetcoffee.com Fullsteam In addition to their well-known “plowto-pint” beers, Fullsteam now serves bar snacks, sandwiches, small plates and kombucha. Try the Eastern Carolina-Style Pork Meatballs and the Spicy Carolina Dip Chicken with a side of deviled eggs. 726 Rigsbee Ave.; 919-682-2337; fullsteam.ag

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LouElla Neighborhood bottle shop, bar and event space. 316 W. Geer St., Ste. A; 919-973-2001; louelladurham.com Rise Southern Biscuits & Righteous Chicken Dailychanging menu of doughnuts and biscuits. For vegetarians, the fried green tomato biscuit is hard to beat. 401 Foster St.; 984-4392220; risebiscuitsdonuts.com BR Parts & Labor Dishes meeting many dietary needs, including veggie samosas, “Hipster Poutine” and falafel. 723 Rigsbee Ave.; motorcomusic.com/eats BR

Cucciolo Osteria Italian fare like pastas with housemade noodles, antipasti and porchetta. 601 W. Main St.; 984-243-8744; cucciolodurham.com

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Hutchins Garage Full-service bar serving Grandma-style pizza, salads and sandwiches. 402 W. Geer St. BR

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The Accordion Club Late-night bar serving beer, hot dogs and green chile stew. 316 W. Geer St. The Pit Fried pimento cheese, whole-hog Eastern barbecue and Lexington-style barbecue. 321 W. Geer St.; 919-282-3748; thepitdurham.com Piedmont Seasonal cooking inspired by local ingredients. Broccoli beignet, pickled shrimp and peach or Mills Farm’s beef coulotte. 401 Foster St.; 919-683-1213; piedmontrestaurant.com BR BRIGHTLEAF DISTRICT Clouds Brewing American favorites with a German flair. Featuring an amazing craft beer selection, brunch on the weekends and the NFL ticket. 905 W. Main St.; 919-251-8096; cloudsbrewing.com BR

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El Rodeo Mexican Restaurant Authentic Mexican cuisine like quesadillas, tacos and huevos con chorizo. 905 W. Main St.; 919-6832417; elrodeonc.com

Seth Gross will open his third restaurant, Bull City Solera and Taproom, at 4120 University Dr. behind Target and Sam’s Club at South Square in late 2019. Situated on an acre, the taproom will feature an outdoor patio with a fire pit and a menu that includes Mexican pizza and Italian tacos, as well as glutenfree options and vegan fare.

The Federal Pub fare with bistro panache. Try the “Fed Burger au Poivre.” 914 W. Main St.; 919-6808611; thefederal.net BR

Another KoKyu restaurant is under construction at 245 E. Hwy. 54, Ste. 105.

It’s a Southern Thing Kitchen and bar that serves up traditional Southern dishes with a twist, like jalapeno-brined fried chicken; a half-beef, half-bacon meatloaf; and both traditional and vegan barbecue. 605 W. Main St.; 919-294-9632; itsasouthernthingdurham.com

HAND-TOSSED OVER Lilly’s Pizza closed in the middle of May. Lilly’s shared that a new owner will be taking over and the new restaurant will be called Peabody Pizza Place. GROUND BEEF DELIVERY Zinburger Wine & Burger Bar, an upscale burger restaurant, launched its new catering service in April. Catered meals will include mix-and-match signature proteins including turkey, chicken, veggie, certified Angus beef, prime rib and Kobe beef, as well as cheeses and buns. SHARING IS CARING Unscripted Durham unveiled a new poolside menu in April. Executive Chef Oscar Gnapi designed small, shareable plates, which include shrimp cocktail shooters, tomato and mozzarella skewers, jumbo lump crab cakes, lettuce wraps, veggie burger sliders, cheddar bacon croquettes and a rich orange chocolate lava cake. I WAS ONCE BLIND BUT NOW ACAI Rush Bowls, a healthy fruit/ veggie bowl and smoothie restaurant, has started construction at 752 Ninth St. It aims to open at the end of the summer and will also offer catering and delivery through Postmates, GrubHub, DoorDash and UberEats. WORTH A SHOT Durham Distillery won silver awards for its Conniption Gin & Tonic and Cucumber Vodka soda in the San Francisco World Spirits Competition in May. Coming this summer, the distillery will ride the wave of its success with the release of its third canned cocktail, Conniption Rosé Gin Spritz.

Goorsha Ethiopian restaurant featuring dishes like shiro chickpea stew and tibs (sauteed meat in spices). 910 W. Main St.; 919-588-4660; goorshadurham.com

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James Joyce Irish Pub and Restaurant Traditional pub food and snacks like brisket cheese steak and Reuben sandwiches. 912 W. Main St.; 919-683-3022; jamesjoyceirishpub.com BR

Maverick’s Smokehouse and Taproom Range of barbecue and smokehouse fare as well as Chef Brian Stinnett’s signature fried chicken and Memphis barbecue spaghetti. 900 W. Main St.; 919-6828978; maverickssmokehouse.com Mount Fuji Asian Bistro Sushi & Bar Thai, Japanese, Chinese and sushi. Try the duck wrap. 905 W. Main St.; 919-680-4968; mtfujinc.com Parker and Otis A gift shop, coffee shop and restaurant all in one. First-timers should dedicate a good chunk of time to this delight. Try the No. 26. 112 S. Duke St.; 919-6833200; parkerandotis.com BR Rose’s Noodles, Dumplings & Sweets Sandwiches, pastries - rhubarb galette, anyone? and daily dinner specials. 121 N. Gregson St.; 919-797-2233; rosesdurham.com BR


dining guide

CITY CENTER DISTRICT Alley Twenty Six Originally a craft cocktail bar, the addition of a kitchen and dining room now offers plates like pan-seared duck breast, cornmeal-crusted fried oysters and pimento cheese. 320 E. Chapel Hill St.; 984-439-2278; alleytwentysix.com B. Good Farm-to-table dishes like create-your-own burgers, kale & grain bowls, salads and sides like sweet potato fries and avocado toast. 110 N. Corcoran St.; 919-797-9599; bgood.com/locations/durham Bar Brunello Featuring 25 wines by the glass and 60 by the bottle, as well as draft beers and ciders, the bar’s food menu includes charcuterie and cheese boards. 117 E. Main St.; 919-294-4825; barbrunello.com Bar Virgile Artfully crafted beverages paired with an ever-changing dinner and small plates menu including selections like tandoori chicken and flat iron steak. 105 S. Magnum St.; 919-973-3000; barvirgile.com Beyu Caffè Coffee shop, restaurant, bar and live jazz club. Beignets, buffalo wings and mushroom burgers. 341 W. Main St.; 919-683-1058; beyucaffe.com 0BR Bull City Burger & Brewery Local beef burgers with all components from bun to barbecue sauce made in-house. 107 E. Parrish St.; 919-680-2333; bullcityburgerandbrewery.com Bull McCabe’s Irish Pub Pub food and bar snacks like nachos, burgers and wings. 427 W. Main St.; 919-682-3061; bullmccabesirishpub.com COPA Cuban-inspired tapas and cocktails restaurant. Try the Butifaras a lo cubano, Cuban-style sausages and the Paella del verano, “summer rice,” with a mojito or daiquiri. 107 W.Main St. Counting House Upscale restaurant featuring locally sourced entrees, as well as small plates featuring oysters, shellfish, and meats and cheeses. 111 Corcoran St.; 919-956-6760; countinghousenc.com BR

Dashi Traditional ramen shop and izakaya with

saké options. 415 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-251-9335; SEUM. HOTEL. TAURANT. dashiramen.com

ce our new exhibition Dos Perros Sophisticated Mexican cuisine; plates Speak Up: Costume and Confrontation include carnitas, flautas veganas and pollo relleno.

Don’t skip on the guac! 200 N. Mangum St.; 111 N Corcoran Street 919-956-2750; dosperrosrestaurant.com 919.956.6700 | 21cDurham.com

Jack Tar and the Colonel’s Daughter Diner fare with a twist. Classic diner menu, served all day long, plus smaller dinner menu. Brunch is served on Saturday and Sunday mornings. 202 Corcoran St.; 919-682-5225; jacktar-durham.com BR Littler Look for latkes Benedict, pan-roasted striped bass with sungold tomato and blueberry panna cotta at this small restaurant with big tastes. 110 E. Parrish St.; 919-374-1118; littlerdurham.com

Loaf Oven breads and pastries. Counter Culture Coffee, pain au chocolat and cumin gruyere loaf. 111 W. Parrish St.; 919-797-1254

Pie Pushers Grab a slice of staples like the cheese or pepperoni, or try out one of the specials, like the "Pace Car." 117A W. Main St.; 919-294-8408; piepushers.com BR

Lucky’s Delicatessen Deli crafted by chef Matthew Kelly and headed by chef Drew Brown serves seasonal soups and sandwiches like the garbanzo with chickpea fritters and the super Reuben. 105 W. Chapel Hill St.; 919-864-8841; luckysdelinc.com

Pokéworks Hawaiian-inspired poké with a menu featuring signature “works” like the Spicy Ahi bowl, or Poké Your Way, an option for creating a customized poké burrito, bowl or salad made with your choice of protein, mix-ins, toppings and sauces. 122 W. Main St.; 919-973-3372; pokeworks.com

Luna Rotisserie & Empanadas South American cuisine meets the American South. Woodfired rotisserie meats, Andean-inspired braises, empanadas. 112 W. Main St.; 984-439-8702; lunarotisserie.com

Pompieri Pizza Neapolitan pizza joint with a family-friendly approach. Try the “Drunken Horse” pizza with beer crust dough and house-made sausage. 102 City Hall Plaza; 919-973-1589; pompieripizza.com

M Kokko Casual chicken entrees including the fried chicken sandwich, ramen and “KFC” wings. 311 Holland St., Ste. B; 919-908-9332

Pour Taproom Pay-by-the-ounce beer, wine and cider taps, plus tasting board, sandwich and kids’ options, and specials from Littler and Pizzeria Toro. 202 N. Corcoran St., Ste. 200; 919-251-8985; durham.pourtaproom.com

M Sushi Quality sushi from seasonal seafood, daily menu changes and creative rolls like “Unagi Maki” with barbecue eel and fried garlic. 311 Holland St.; 919-908-9266; msushidurham.com M Tempura Traditional tempura omakase-styled food, featuring select seafood and seasonal vegetables, as well as rich meats like Iberico pork from Spain. 111 Orange St.; 919-748-3874; m-restaurants.com/ m-tempura

The Restaurant at The Durham Locally sourced Southern cuisine crafted by chef Andrea Reusing. Selections include beef tartare and spring pie with asparagus and mushrooms. The Roof focuses on shared plates. 315 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-768-8831; thedurham.com/dining

Mateo Acclaimed menu of tapas and small plates by chef Matthew Kelly. Great for date night or night out with friends. Order a pitcher of “Cheerwine Sangria,” pollo frito, gambas and queso frito y huevo. 109 W. Chapel Hill St.; 919-530-8700; mateotapas.com

Rue Cler French bistro-style cuisine with lunch, brunch and dinner showcasing fresh ingredients. 401 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-682-8844; ruecler-durham.com BR

Mothers & Sons Trattoria Italian restaurant by partners Matthew Kelly and chef Josh “Skinny” DeCarolis. Handmade pasta, bruschetta and antipasti dishes. 107 W. Chapel Hill St.; 919-294-8247; mothersandsonsnc.com Neomonde Authentic Mediterranean food like man’ousheh and kabobs, including a variety of vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free options. 202 Corcoran St.; 919-680-1886; neomonde.com

Taberna Tapas Paella, flatbreads, bacon-wrapped dates, gambas. 325 W. Main St.; 919-797-1457; tabernatapas.com Table South Kitchen and Bar Breakfast, lunch and dinner, located in the Durham Marriott City Center. 201 Foster St.; 919-768-6000

Ninth Street Bakery Organic breads, pastries and lunch. Grab a “Wheel of Steel” (peanut butter, raisins and oats). 136 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-688-5606; ninthstbakery.com BR

Thai @Main Street Classic Thai dishes including tom yum soup, curry, pad Thai, drunken noodles and more. 317 W. Main St.; 984-219-7444; thaiatmainstnc.com

The Parlour Handmade ice cream in rotating flavors like cookies and cream, salted butter caramel and sweet potato. 117 Market St.; 919-564-7999; theparlour.co The Patio Unscripted Hotel’s poolside bar featuring a range of cocktails and gourmet bites including salads and burgers. 202 N. Corcoran St.; 984-329-9500; unscriptedhotels.com BR Pizzeria Toro Wood-fired pizza with selections like spicy lamb meatball with kale, fried eggplant ricotta and soft eggs on white pizza. Also, ricotta dumplings! 105 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-908-6936; pizzeriatoro.com

Saltbox Seafood Joint Local seafood that is delivered fresh from the Carolina coast and served griddled or fried in a straightforward manner. 608 N. Mangum St.; 919-908-8970; saltboxseafoodjoint.com

Toast Italian paninis and soups. The warm goat cheese with honey and peppercorn crostini is our favorite. 345 W. Main St.; 919-683-2183; toast-fivepoints.com Viceroy Fusion restaurant featuring dishes like jeera wings as well as traditional butter chicken. 335 W. Main St.; 919-797-0413; viceroydurham.com AMERICAN TOBACCO DISTRICT Boricua Soul Puerto Rican-meets-Southern soul-food dishes like chopped barbecue-filled empanadas, arroz con gandules, maduros and mac-and-cheese “just the way Grandma makes it.” 318 Blackwell St.; boricuasoulnc.com

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dining guide

Cuban Revolution Restaurant & Bar Cuban tapas served amid ’60s-style decor, plus bolsitas, sandwiches and Havana pork. 318 Blackwell St.; 919-687-4300; thecubanrevolution.com Mellow Mushroom Pizza, hoagies, calzones and salads made using fresh ingredients. 410 Blackwell St.; 919-680-8500; mellowmushroom.com/store /durham NanaSteak Offers various cuts of beef and steaks, plus other meats like salmon and tuna steaks and pastas like beef short rib ravioli. 345 Blackwell St.; 919-282-1183; nanasteak.com BR

Guglhupf Bakery, Cafe and Biergarten Germaninspired cuisine and artisanal bakery. Restaurant dishes include house-cut noodles, weiner schnitzel and pan-roasted duck. 2706 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-401-2600; guglhupf.com BR Kanki Steak, chicken and seafood cooked on hibachi grills, plus an extensive sushi menu. Come for a show! 3504 Mt. Moriah Rd.; 919-401-6908; kanki.com Lily’s Cheesecake Bakery & Cafe Homemade cheesecake, sweet and savory French pastries and Mediterranean sweets. 5504 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd., Ste. 101; 984-219-1226; lilyscheesecake.com

OnlyBurger Build-your-own burger options and sides like bacon-wrapped mac and cheese squares. 359 Blackwell St.; 919-237-2431; onlyburger.com Saladelia Cafe @ ATC Simple and honest food prepared with authentic, local and seasonal ingredients. Espresso, juice and organic smoothie bar, yum-on-the-run pastries, gourmet sandwiches, salads and soups. Dine-in or carry-out. 406 Blackwell St.; 919-687-4600; saladelia.com

Los Cabos Bar and Grill Mexican Restaurant Mexican fare plus a variety of seafood options like fish and shrimp tacos, ceviches and more. 4020 DurhamChapel Hill Blvd.; 919-748-4290 Namu Restaurant and Coffee Bar Bulkogi Truck and Bo’s Kitchen food trucks combine to bring casual Korean eats, local beer, wine and specialty coffee. 5420 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-251-9794 The Refectory Cafe Dal, chili, salads and soups. 2726 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-908-6798; therefectorycafe.com BR

Tobacco Road Sports Cafe American dishes like “Country Frizzled & Drizzled Chicken” made with local ingredients; overlooks the Bulls’ stadium. 280 S. Mangum St.; 919-937-9909; tobaccoroadsportscafe.com EAST DURHAM East Durham Bake Shop Handcrafted sweet and savory pies, baked goods, salads,coffee and more – all made with local ingredients. 406 S. Driver St.; 919-957-1090; eastdurhambakeshop.com Pierre ToGo Haitian- and Jamaican-inspired cuisine. 2100 Angier Ave.; 919-808-7447; pierrofoods.com Sofia’s Pizza Neighborhood pizza shop. 2201 Angier Ave.; 984-219-3656; sofiaspizzadurham.com

WEST-CENTRAL DURHAM

DURHAM-CHAPEL HILL BOULEVARD (15-501) Blaze Pizza Pizzas with made-from-scratch dough and healthful ingredients. 5320 McFarland Dr.; 919-251-6095; blazepizza.com

WINNER

IBEST

Duck Donuts Warm, made-to-order doughnuts and coffee. Watch your donut being hand dipped 2016 and topped right in front of you. 5320 McFarland Road, Ste. 140; 919-973 1305; duckdonuts.com

Saltbox Seafood Joint A new, second location for the popular local seafood place. Fish delivered fresh from the Carolina coast and served griddled or fried in a straightforward manner. 2637 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-908-8970; saltboxseafoodjoint.com

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Sister Liu’s Kitchen Homestyle Northeastern Chinese food made by hand like dumplings and Chinese hamburgers. 5504 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd. Ste. 103; 984-244-3973; sisterliuskitchen.com Sitar Indian Cuisine Homemade Indian dishes at affordable prices, with daily lunch buffets and a weekend dinner buffet. 3630 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-490-1326; sitar-indiancuisine.com BR Souly Vegan Cafe Vegan takes on favorites like mac ‘n’ cheese and jerk chicken, along with sides like candied yams, plantains and lentils and spinach soup. WINNER 4125 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 984-219-6050

Saladelia Cafe + Catering Simple and honest food prepared with authentic, local and seasonal ingredients. Gourmet sandwiches, soups and salads, speciality entrees, and mezza platters, made from scratch with Mediterranean flare. Espresso, juice and organic smoothie bar as well as local beer and wine selection. Catering all of life’s occasions. Dine-in, carry out, or order online. 4201 University Dr.; 919-489 5776; saladelia.com BR

IBEST

WEST END & LAKEWOOD Cocoa Cinnamon Local coffee shop with signature hand-brewed coffees and lattes, hot chocolate and churros. 2013 Chapel Hill Rd.; cocoacinnamon.com GRUB Durham Serves up comfort food favorites with a twist like brioche donuts and beer-battered mushroom sandwiches. 1200 W. Chapel Hill St.; 919-973-3636; grubdurham.com Local Yogurt Frozen yogurt treats. 1114 W. Chapel Hill St.; 919-489-5900; localyogurtdurham.com

Zweli’s Traditional Zimbabwean food and family recipes from owner Zweli herself with a number of options for OF DURHAM vegans and vegetarians. 4600 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd., 2016 Ste. 26; 984-219-7555; zwelis.com BR

MORE WEST-CENTRAL DURHAM Bull and Bean Fresh salads, breakfast and sandwiches like pulled pork-loaded hashbrowns and the turkey and Brie sandwich. 3710 Shannon Rd.; 919-237-2398; bullstreetdurham.com BR

UNIVERSITY DRIVE

Core Cafe & Catering Locally sourced, with a variety of vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free options. Breakfast, lunch, gourmet coffee. 3211 Shannon Rd., Ste. 106, 919-525-6202; corecater.com

four-legged friends. Food from nearby restaurants welcome. 4015 University Dr.; 919-432-4597; barleylabs.com Capital Seafood Market & Grill Fried catfish, porkchop sandwiches and collard greens. Raw seafood for sale. 1304 University Dr.; 919-402-0777

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Sake Bomb Asian Bistro Asian bistro and sake bar; specialty rolls like the “Green Monster” with spicy yellow tail and tuna. 4215 University Dr.; 919-401-4488; sakebombdurham.com

Thai Cafe Authentic Thai cuisine: drunken noodles, curries and stir-fries. Don’t miss the coconut cake! 2501 University Dr.; 919-493-9794; thaicafenc.com

Mi Peru fare like ceviche mixto, asado DURHAM, NC • Peruvian 919-286-1987 Foster’s Market Fresh breakfast selections, and leche de tigre. 4015 University Dr., Ste. A1; sandwiches and salads. Also pick up specialty food MADHATTERBAKESHOP.COM 919-401-6432; miperupci.com items. 2694 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-489-3944; fostersmarket.com BR Nana’s Restaurant Upscale seasonal dishes influenced by Southern, French and Italian cuisine. Of course, the risotto is a must-try! 2514 University Dr.; 919-493-8545; nanasofdurham.com

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The Original Q Shack “BBQ tender as a mother’s love,” includes signature chile-rubbed beef brisket and Carolina pork shoulder. 2510 University Dr.; 919-402-4227; theqshackoriginal.com

Tacos Nacos Tacos, pupusas, tortas and horchata. 3411 University Dr.; 919-267-8226

Barley Labs Choose•from 16 different beers and BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER SNACKS • CATERING ciders on tap while enjoying the company of your SALADELIA.COM

OF DURHAM

NuvoTaco Inventive taqueria that features locally produced meats and veggies. Enjoy with margarita in hand. 2512 University Dr.; 919-489-8226; nanataco.com

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Eastcut Sandwich Bar East Coast sandwich fare and salads, small plates, soups and sweets. Mainstays include Chicken Parm, BLTs and Roast Beef sandwiches. 3211 Old Chapel Hill Rd.; 984-439-1852; BR eastcutsandwich.com

BREAKFAST • LUNCH SA

Hope Valley Diner Diner food and breakfast all day with selections like chicken and dumplings, fried pickle chips, biscuits and gravy. 3710 Shannon Rd.; 919-419-0907; hopevalleydiner.com BR


dining guide

Urel’s Jamaica House Traditional Jamaican dishes like goat curry, jerk chicken, oxtails and ackee and saltfish. 3825 S. Roxboro St., Ste. 123; 919-251-8104

La Vaquita Taqueria Authentic Mexican restaurant serving tacos on homemade corn tortillas with traditional fillings like lengua (braised tongue) and carnitas. 2700 Chapel Hill Rd.; 919-402-0209; lavaquitataqueria.com

Yamazushi Japanese fine dining, kaiseki-style, with seasonal menu changes and a multi-course menu, as well as sake. 4711 Hope Valley Rd., Ste. 6-A; 919-493-7748; yamazushirestaurant.com

SOUTHERN DURHAM / NEAR I-40

New Tokyo Quick-service Japanese restaurant where everything on the menu – including hibachistyle dishes, sushi, udon and more – comes in under $10. 3822 S. Roxboro St.; 919-224-8811 OnlyBurger The food truck’s brick-and-mortar offers all the same build-your-own burger options and sides. 3710 Shannon Rd., Ste. 118; 919-937-9377; onlyburger.com Pop’s Backdoor South Fresh pizza and Italian cuisine, including calzones with homemade ricotta-mozzarella filling. 3710 Shannon Rd.; 919-493-0169; popsbackdoorsouth.com BR Piper’s Deli Deli sandwiches and burgers like pimento grilled cheese and French dip sandwich. 3219 Old Chapel Hill Rd.; 919-489-2481; pipersdeli.com Randy’s Pizza Pizzas, garlic knots and stromboli. 1813 Martin Luther King Jr. Pkwy.; 919-490-6850; randys-pizza.com Roots Bakery, Bistro and Bar Southern meets Central American at this breakfast, lunch and dinner spot with “from the sea,” “from the ranch” and “from the garden” options. 4810 Hope Valley Rd.; rootschapelhill.com BR

SUTTON STATION Bocci Trattoria & Pizzeria Traditional Italian pastas, pizzas, crostinis and salads. 5850 Fayetteville Rd.; 919-206-4067; bocciitalian.com

WOODCROFT SHOPPING CENTER Guacamaya (Chubby’s Tacos) Fresh Mexican favorites like burritos, nachos and salads, as well as the “Chubbychanga.” 4711 Hope Valley Rd.; 919-489-4636 Joe Van Gogh Cozy and full of natural light, this local coffee shop sources quality beans for a superior coffee. 4711-5A Hope Valley Rd.; 919-973-3950; joevangogh.com Pulcinella’s Italian Restaurant Southern Italian dishes. Antipasto classico, baked ziti and tortellini alla panna. 4711 Hope Valley Rd.; 919-490-1172; pulcinellasitalianrestaurant.com

Bua Thai Cuisine Thai classics: Pad Thai, hot and sour soup, curries, Krapow lamb. Get your meal “Thai hot,” if you’re up to it! 5850 Fayetteville Rd., Ste. 101; 984-219-7357; buathaidurham.com Dulce Cafe Espresso, gelato and sandwiches. Smoked salmon bagel, dulce Reuben and the “B-L-A-T.” 5826 Fayetteville Rd.; 919-797-0497; dulcecafedurham.com BR Nantucket Grill & Bar New England-style cuisine known for their desserts like the “Unbirthday” and coconut cake. 5826 Fayetteville Rd.; 919-727-6750; nantucketgrill.com

Randy’s Pizza Pizzas, garlic knots and stromboli. 4810 Hope Valley Rd., Ste. 112; 919-403-6850; randys-pizza.com

LINCOLN PARK WEST Danny’s Bar-B-Que Hickory-smoked barbecue, ribs, fried catfish. 2945 S. Miami Blvd., Ste. 118; 919-806-1965; dannysbarbque.com

Smallcakes Twelve signature cupcake flavors, as well as seasonal specials. 4711 Hope Valley Rd.; 919-937-2922; smallcakesnc.com West 94th St. Pub Traditional pub fare: loaded fries, chili cheese tots and fish & chips. 4711 Hope Valley Rd.; 919-403-0025; west94thstpub.com

Gussy’s Place Greek street food like gyro pita, Greek fries and baklava. 2945 S. Miami Blvd.; 984-439-8455; gussys.com Piper’s In The Park Soups, salads, hoagies and burgers with selections like curried couscous and “South of Here” turkey sandwich. 2945 S. Miami Blvd.; 919-572-9767; pipersinthepark.com

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dining guide

Spicy Green Gourmet Cafe & Catering Sandwiches, soups, salads with specialities like Cuban flatbread. 2945 S. Miami Blvd., Ste. 126; 919-220-6040; spicygreengourmet.net HOPE VALLEY COMMONS Mattie B’s Public House Housemade burgers, N.Y.style pizza, wings and potato chips. 1125 W. N.C. 54, Ste. 301; 919-401-8600; mattiebs.com Denny’s Diner fare serving breakfast anytime, lunch and dinner. 7021 N.C. 751, Ste. 901; 919-908-1006; dennys.com BR Makus Empanadas A variety of meat, veggie and cheese empanadas, with vegetarian and vegan options. 1125 W. N.C. 54, Ste. 304; 919-390-7525; makusempanadas.com Sweet Charlie’s Thai-inspired hand-rolled ice cream and frozen yogurt. 1125 W. N.C. 54; 984-888-5101; sweetcharlies.com Treforni Wood-fired pizza and sandwiches including traditional options like Margherita, as well as more inspired options like the prosciutto arugula pizza. 1125 W. N.C. 54; 919-973-0922; treforni.com

NEAR SOUTHPOINT

HOMESTEAD MARKET Bean Traders Coffee Coffee specialties and local pastries. 105 W. N.C. 54, Ste. 249; 919-484-2499; beantraderscoffee.com The Mad Popper A gourmet popcorn shop with flavors both sweet and savory. 105 W. N.C. 54, Ste. 259; 919-484-7677; themadpopper.com

City Barbeque Smoked meats, peach cobbler and hushpuppies. 208 W. N.C. 54; 919-237-9509; citybbq.com Shiki Sushi Sushi and pan-Asian choices like “Bang Bang Shrimp,” gyoza dumplings and beef pho soup. 207 W. N.C. 54; 919-484-4108; shikitasu.com THE STREETS AT SOUTHPOINT AREA American Meltdown Gourmet melts, sides and desserts. Southpoint; 919-473-6358; americanmeltdown.org Bruster’s Real Ice Cream Hand-crafted ice creams, sorbets and sherbets in ever-changing flavors. 8200 Renaissance Pwy., Ste. 1002; 919-237-3537; brusters.com People’s Coffee Specialty coffee, pastries, coldpressed juice. 7830 N.C. 751, Ste. 100; 919-589-3045; pplscoffee.com Porchetta Slow-roasted Italian-style pork sandwiches and sides. Southpoint; 919-727-6750; porchettardu.com Harvest 18 Local, seasonal eats. Try the pimento cheese dip and a Bloody Mary for brunch. 8128 Renaissance Pkwy., Ste. 114; 919-316-1818; 18restaurantgroup.com/harvest-18 BR Rise Southern Biscuits & Righteous Chicken Daily-changing menu of doughnuts and biscuits. For vegetarians, the “Fried Green Tomato” biscuit is hard to beat. 8200 Renaissance Pkwy.; 919-248-2992; risebiscuitsdonuts.com BR

Town Hall Burger and Beer Offerings like the “Carolina Burger” with pork belly and pimento cheese, barbecue salmon burger and fries poutine. 7830 N.C. 751; 919-973-0506; townhallburgerandbeer.com N.C. 54 Akashi Japanese Grill & Sushi Bar Hibachi, sushi and noodle dishes like bento boxes, yakisoba and spicy scallop roll. 2223 N.C. 54, Ste. RS; 919-572-9444; akashisushi54.com Na’Mean Asian fusion, Korean barbecue sandwich shop. A KoKyu joint. 4823 Meadow Dr., Ste. 108; 919-699-4667; kokyubbq.com/nmean Spice & Curry Traditional Indian, buffet-style or off the menu. 2105 E. N.C. 54; 919-544-7555; spiceandcurry.com

RTP

N.C. 55 Backyard BBQ Pit Barbecue and other Southern comfort foods: mac and cheese, Brunswick Stew and pit-cooked barbecue. 5122 N.C. 55; 919-544-9911; sweetribs.com Basera Modern, fine-dining Indian restaurant featuring a lunch buffet and tandoor grill. 4818 N.C. 55; 919-205-5050; basera-rtp.com Big C Waffles Gourmet waffles. 2110 Allendown Dr.; 919-797-7576; bigcwaffles.com BR Brigs at the Park Breakfast selections and sandwiches. 4900 N.C. 55; 919-544-7473; brigs.com BR

Cafe Meridian Made-to-order salads and sandwiches. 2500 Meridian Pkwy., Ste. 130; 919-361-9333; cafemeridian.com

wood-fired pizza • housemade pastas sammies • salads • desserts

RADIUS

Jamaica Jamaica Carribean food favorites like jerk chicken, yellow rice and brown stew chicken. 4857 N.C. 55; 919-544-1532 Sansui Sushi Bar & Grill Hibachi dishes and sushi rolls like “Spider Man” with crab and crawfish. 4325 N.C. 55; 919-361-8078; sansuisushi.com Sushiōki Sushi burritos in traditional flavors, plus rolls with a Southern twist, like double-fried chicken. 4900 N.C. 55, Ste. 510; 919-405-7121; sushiokirtp.com Vit Goal Tofu Restaurant Korean dishes like fried dumplings and tofu soups. 2107 Allendown Dr.; 919-361-9100 GREENWOOD COMMONS Benetis Restaurant Classic breakfast with a Mediterranean lunch buffet. 5410 N.C. 55; 919-806-0313; benetisrtp.com BR Sarah’s Empanadas Homemade empanadas. 5410 N.C. 55; 919-544-2441 Tandoor Indian Restaurant Traditional Indian like veggie samosas, kababs and naan. 5410 N.C. 55; 919-484-2102; tandoorinrtp.com BR Thai Lanna Restaurant Authentic Thai cuisine like red curry, pad Thai and larb. 5410 N.C. 55; 919-484-0808; thailannarestaurant.com True Flavors Diner Upscale Southern diner. Try the “Howling Moon” French toast made with Howling Moon moonshine sauce. 5410 N.C. 55; 919-316-7978; trueflavorsnc.com BR

112 N. Churton Street • Hillsborough

radiuspizzeria.net

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dining guide

IMPERIAL CENTER MEZ Contemporary Mexican Creative Mexican dishes, based on traditional recipes with a fresh, healthy twist. 5410 Page Rd.; 919-941-1630; mezdurham.com Page Road Grill Traditional American dishes, from house-made soup and bread to burgers to vegetarian options. 5416 Page Rd.; 919-908-8900; pageroadgrill.com Societa Sicilian-American comfort and street food with land, sea, vegetarian and gluten-free offerings. Large bar serving 22 rotating craft beers, bourbon, cocktails and wine. Welcomes single diners or large groups. 5311 S. Miami Blvd. 919-941-6380; societainfo.com MORRISVILLE G58 Modern Chinese Cuisine Traditional Sichuan and Cantonese flavors abound in sautéed flounder, fried grouper and steamed scallop entrees; a Western influence can be seen in dishes such as Chilean Sea Bass with brandy sauce and Cumin-Dusted New Zealand Lamb Chops. 10958 Chapel Hill Rd., Morrisville; 919-466-8858; g58cuisine.com

ALSO CHECK OUT THESE AREA RESTAURANTS …

411 West Pasta, seafood and pizzas inspired by Italian and Mediterranean flavors, with a Californian twist. 411 W. Franklin St., Chapel Hill; 411west.com 501 Pharmacy Maple View Farm ice cream, plus malts and shakes. 98 Chapelton Ct., Ste. 300, Chapel Hill; 984-999-0501; 501rx.com Acme Soups, salads, seafood and entrees with a Southern touch. 110 E. Main St., Carrboro; acmecarrboro.com Al's Burger Shack Gourmet burgers and fries with local ingredients. 516 W. Franklin St.; 708 Market St., Chapel Hill; alsburgershack.com Al's Pub Shack Classic gourmet burger and fries joint, featuring an expanded menu with sandwiches, seafood, soups and salads along with a full bar. 50050 Governors Dr., Chapel Hill; 919-904-7659 The Belted Goat Coffee/wine shop with paninis, cheeses and pastries. Fearrington Village Center, Pittsboro; fearrington.com/belted-goat Breadmen’s Variety of sandwiches, burgers and salads. 324 W. Rosemary St., Chapel Hill; breadmens.com CrossTies Bistro & Beer Garden Barbecue, peel & eat shrimp, lobster rolls and vegetarian options. 201 E. Main St., Carrboro; 919-918-3923; crosstiescarrboro.com

elements Classic and modern Asian and European cooking techniques; check out the wine bar next door. 2110 Environ Way, Chapel Hill; elementsofchapelhill.com Elizabeth’s Pizza Pizzas, calzones, sandwiches, salads and pastas. 160 Hillsboro St., Pittsboro; 919-5459292; elizabethspizzapittsboro.com The Fearrington House Restaurant Contemporary fine-dining with seasonal, farm-to-fork cuisine. Fearrington Village Center, Pittsboro; fearrington.com/house Glasshalfull Mediterranean-inspired food and wine; outdoor dining; all ABC permits. 106 S. Greensboro St., Carrboro; 919-967-9784; glasshalfull.net House of Hops Relaxed bar and bottle shop with a large craft beer selection on tap. 112 Russet Run, Ste. 110, Pittsboro; 919-542-3435; houseofhopsnc.com Italian Pizzeria III Pizza, calzones and subs. 508 W. Franklin St., Chapel Hill; italianpizzeria3.com Kitchen Bistro-style dining with a seasonal menu. 764 MLK Jr. Blvd., Chapel Hill; kitchenchapelhill.com Lula's “Simple food made the hard way,” like fried chicken, homemade biscuits, farm-to-table veggies and more. 101 E. Franklin St., Chapel Hill; lulaschapelhill.com Mama Dip’s Kitchen Traditional Southern specialties. 408 W. Rosemary St., Chapel Hill; mamadips.com Mel's Commissary & Luncheonette Open for lunch, Mel’s serves up a changing menu of comfort food. 109 W. Main St., Carrboro; melscarrboro.com

2637 durham-chapel hill blvd. 919.237.3499 608 North Mangum St. 919.908.8970 saltboxseafoodjoint.com   

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ALSO CHECK OUT THESE AREA RESTAURANTS … Midici Authentic Neapolitan pizza made with all-natural ingredients, plus appetizers, salads, desserts, craft beer and wine. 100 E. Franklin St., Ste. 100, Chapel Hill; 919-240-7454; mymidici.com The Mod Wood-fired, artisan-style pizza, salads, small plates, full bar. 46 Sanford Rd., Pittsboro; themodernlifedeli.com

The Root Cellar Sandwiches, prepared salads, desserts and more. 750 MLK Jr. Blvd., Chapel Hill and 35 Suttles Rd., Pittsboro; rootcellarpbo.com Squid’s Seafood options like live Maine lobster, fried oysters, plus soups and steaks. 1201 Fordham Blvd., Chapel Hill; squidsrestaurant.com

Pho Happiness Pho noodle soup, rice plates, vermicelli plates and vegetarian/gluten-free options. 508A W. Franklin St., Chapel Hill; 919-942-8201; phohappiness.com Pittsboro Roadhouse Hearty American entrees, burgers and salads. 39 West St., Pittsboro; 919542-2432; pittsbororoadhouse.com Radius Wood-fired pizzas, housemade pastas, sandwiches, wraps, salads and desserts. 112 N. Churton St., Hillsborough; radiuspizzeria.net

Roost Beer Garden Wood-fired pizza, local brews on tap, wine by the glass and live music. 2000 Fearrington Village Center; fearrington.com/roost

Starrlight Mead Tastings of honey wines and honey. 480 Hillsboro St., Pittsboro; starrlightmead.com Yogurt Pump Frozen yogurt treats and shakes. 106 W. Franklin St., Chapel Hill; yogurtpump.com

Food photos: Heba Salama Photography • Wedding photo: Liz Condo

magazine Go to durhammag.com for all your foodie news

5320 MCFARLAND DRIVE | DURHAM 8323 CREEDMOOR ROAD | RALEIGH 100 WRENN DRIVE | CARY

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engagement

W ENDY PAG E H O W ER & C HA R L ES DAVID L EE J R .

Sweet Melody

BY H AN N AH LEE PHOTO BY J CALDWELL

Wedding Date June 26, 2019 Occupations Wendy is the director of engagement and marketing at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University, while David works as a consultant for real estate and construction companies. Crossed Paths The couple met at The Pinhook almost three years ago during a Sunday concert with Mitski, Japanese Breakfast and Jay Som. Wendy remembers spotting David across the room and, she says, “hearts immediately began pumping out of my eyes,” like in a cartoon. David had been looking forward to the show for some time, but he missed most of it, distracted and enthused by his conversation with Wendy. He asked her out the next weekend, and they have been together ever since. The Proposal Technically, David proposed to Wendy two years ago in a town outside of Asheville. But before getting married, they wanted to focus on building a new addition to their home in Duke Park. Recently, six of their friends mentioned Hamilton Hill Jewelry. So they stopped in, thinking nothing of it, and came out with the perfect ring. Now, “I Do” Elizabeth Craig at Salon Do or Dye and Laurie Cutler at Rock Paper Scissors Salon and Gallery will help style their looks for the big day, exactly three years from when they met. Wendy and David plan to get married at the Durham County Courthouse and celebrate with pizza delivery in the comfort of their home.

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wedding

M A RY B U C K L EY & S COT T TOBIN

Law of Attraction B Y CA RA S I L I A K U S PH OTO G RA P H Y B Y KAT HER INE MIL ES J O NES , KAT H ERI NE M I L ES J ONES .COM

Date October 27, 2018 Crossed Paths Mary, a Durham native, met Scott during their first week of law school at Loyola University in Chicago. Scott, a Boston native, answered all of Mary’s questions about the Boston Marathon, as it was her dream to qualify and run in the country’s oldest marathon. They spent time getting to know each other that first year, studying and taking the bus to and from class, but they didn’t start dating until Scott asked Mary to dinner after the final exam of the semester. The Proposal After they wrapped up law school (they even tied for the same class rank one semester), Scott brought Mary to dinner at a restaurant in Lincoln Park three years to the day after their first date. He convinced her that the special occasion was for his birthday, but got a waitress to film the couple when he popped the question. They celebrated with limoncello and chocolatissimo. Two weeks later, Mary found out she’d qualified for the 2018 Boston Marathon. The Big Day The couple held a welcome party at Tobacco Road Sports Cafe with drinks and snacks to kick off their wedding weekend. Mary and Scott were married at Immaculate Conception Catholic Church,

surrounded by their family and friends. The reception took place in Bay 7 at the American Tobacco Campus, with catering provided by The Angus Barn and cake and desserts from Guglhupf Bakery, Cafe & Biergarten. They danced the night away to tunes by Bunn DJ Company. The couple reside in Chicago.

Do you live in Durham and want your wedding or engagement featured in our magazine?

Email weddings@durhammag.com

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Durham Magazine June/July 2019  

Durham Magazine June/July 2019