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SEPTEMBER 2 0 1 8 DURH AMMAG .COM

Come spring, the honey used in COPA’s Canchánchara – arguably Cuba’s oldest cocktail – will come from the restaurant’s farm, Terra Sacra.


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magazine

SEPTEMBER 2018 VOL 11 NO 6

durhammag.com     EXECUTIVE MANAGING EDITOR

Amanda MacLaren amanda@durhammag.com

EDITORIAL

EDITOR, CHAPEL HILL MAGAZINE

Jessica Stringer

EXECUTIVE EDITOR, CHATHAM MAGAZINE

Matt White

EVENTS & COMMUNITY EDITOR

Dana Lange

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Hannah Lee

EDITORIAL INTERNS

Madison Clark, Nick Motta, Rachel Sauls, Riley Shaner, Sam Bermas-Dawes and Santul Nerkar CONTRIBUTORS

Amber Watson, Andrea Griffith Cash, Carl Kenney, David Pisetsky, James Stefiuk, Julia Baker, Meredith Martindale and Veda Gilbert

ART

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Kevin Brown

SENIOR ART DIRECTOR & PRODUCTION MANAGER

Jean Carlos Rosario-Montalvo GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Keith Warther

PHOTOGRAPHER

Beth Mann

Advertising

For advertising inquiries, email advertising@durhammag.com Zina Craft zina@durhammag.com Melissa Crane melissa@durhammag.com Chris Elkins chris@chathammagazinenc.com Kem Johnson kem@durhammag.com AD TRAFFIC

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Rory Kelly Gillis rory@durhammag.com CHAIRMAN

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Durham Magazine is published by Shannon Media Inc. Subscriptions, $38 for two years, are available at durhammag.com. To purchase copies, call 919.933.1551.

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letter

Staycation, All I Ever Wanted

I

N LATE JULY, I TOOK ANDREA GRIFFITH CASH’S ADVICE AND HAD myself a staycation. Now, I didn’t follow all of her guidelines (find them on page 54). I sort of did the CliffsNotes version; I only took one day off, and I was working maybe 30% of the time, but, hey, I wasn’t in the office – I was exploring my city. And, being that when I was working it was on this, our ninth annual food & drink issue, I gravitated toward restaurants and bars, with a couple retail and cultural excursions in between. I started at Beyú Caffé for breakfast. I ordered a cup of coffee and the French Quarter Toast. Now, I don’t even like French toast all that much, but this challah bread with fresh blueberries, strawberries and the restaurant’s whiskey creme sauce immediately brightened my morning and had me ready to take on my Durham-filled day. Other stops on my tour included The Wine Feed, where I got a flight of rosé and picked up a great deal on a bottle of it, too. At Jack Tar + the Colonel’s Daughter, I finally tried the poutine and an incredibly refreshing and interesting cocktail that combined vodka, Home:bucha blueberry kombucha and ginger (for more unique cocktails, flip to page 34). I dropped by Runaway to check out the talented Ryan Cocca’s art exhibit, Non-Legends, on view till October 18, and then went to the Artisan Craft Market at 305 to pick up a few gifts after browsing the unique items made by more than 40 local artisans. After that, I made a victory lap, perusing the galleries at 21c Museum Hotel, hitting up the new Snow Factory for some Thai pan-fry ice cream rolls and finishing the day at County Fare for a cider and Bulkogi food truck fare with a couple of good friends. It was a packed day, and I slept pretty well that night having accomplished most of my must-visit list. I’m not even bummed I didn’t make it to all of them – it’s easy enough to pop by another time when they’re just a few miles away instead of hundreds or thousands. I hope this issue gives you some inspiration to plan your own staycation!

Beauty, Artistry, Tradition

919-489-8362

 @amanda_maclaren

PERSIANCARPET.COM 5634 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd. Durham, NC Corner I-40 and 15-501

TH E COVER

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SEPTEMBER 2018

amanda@durhammag.com


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september

contents

FEATURES 54 The Ultimate Staycation Skip the travel expenses and explore your own fabulous backyard 62 What We Love About Living in Croasdaile The Foleys found their true home in this tight-knit community

DEPARTMENTS & COLUMNS 4 Letter 8 The Scene PictureDURM helps us showcase images curated by locals 10 Go. See. Do. Our top events in September 22 Noted What we’ve heard around town … 26 Cool Runnings Duke’s Dr. David S. Pisetsky shares the highs and lows from his Durham Senior Games experience 28 Chicken Hut for the Soul Author Carl W. Kenney II’s quest for authentic Southern food

34 CREATIVE COCKTAILS

30 Booze-Free Bull City Bevs Bites of Bull City’s Amber Watson offers options for non-alcoholic drinks

Add a bit of intrigue next time you imbibe

76 Taste Discover our city’s best restaurants

41 SAVOR SEPTEMBER

87 Engagement & Wedding Tying the knot, Bull City-style

A few of our chefs share their tried- and-true recipes for late summer

45 SCOTT FREE

The end of Nana’s marks the beginning of a new chapter for Chef Scott Howell

48 FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Meet the founders of Firsthand Foods, learn more about local CSA and produce box options, and why you should sign up for a GreenToGo box

CITY PICS 12 American Dance Festival’s opening night fête 14 16th annual Duke Hospice Gala 15 Students to Scholars 16 United Way of the Greater Triangle’s Day of Action 17 Liberty Arts Sculpture Studio & Foundry’s Feast From the Furnace 17 The 2018 Book Babies graduates 18 Housing for New Hope’s 2018 Annual Breakfast 20 Hamilton Hill’s Cocktail Party


The secret is out... Don’t be the last one to know! Get on the VIP List for properties that have not even hit the market yet! Check out HPW.com/ComingSoon to be the first to know.

HOWARD PERRY AND WALSTON


SHOWCASING IMAGES CURATED BY LO CALS

BY COURTNEY HAYES

The scene

Even the flowers are brighter in Durham. Thanks for opening early and giving us life and coffee, Geer Street Garden. P HOTO B Y @ COURT N EY LHAY ES

PictureDURM (@picturedurm on Instagram) is a collection of photos chosen by founder Meredith Martindale from users who share the #picturedurm hashtag. Over the past two years, 17,500+ photos have been submitted. 8

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september 2018


SMART PHONE

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SMART TV

SMART RADIO

Through engaging programming and accurate reporting, WUNC delivers enlightening content avid listeners rely on daily to keep them informed. Get your daily dose of smart.

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Fall Plant Sale SEPTEM BER 2 9

Get ready for fall gardening season by shopping the extensive botanical collection at Sarah P. Duke Gardens. Spruce up your outdoor and indoor landscaping with plants, trees, shrubs, vines, bulbs, air plants and decorative pots. Durham County Extension Master Gardeners will be on-site to answer your questions and offer advice, or take home a used gardening book to learn how to maintain your green areas year-round.

CenterFest

SEPTEM BER 1 5 - 1 6 Durham Arts Council hosts this 44th annual showcase of visual arts, featuring performances across multiple stages and local artisans selling handmade goods throughout the weekend. Catch a variety of musicians, dancers, magicians and other performers and browse a selection of ceramics, paintings, jewelry, fiber art and woodwork. Bring your little ones out to enjoy the Creative Kids Zone, munch on tasty treats from food vendors and connect with local nonprofit and government services.

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go see do

september 2018

Art of Cool Festival S E PT E MBE R 28- 29

The fifth annual festival showcases jazz, alternative soul and hip-hop artists, featuring a lineup that includes local artists Young Bull, 9th Wonder and Zoocrü, Grammy winners Anthony Hamilton and Erykah Badu, and Grammy nominees Nas and Meshell Ndegeocello. Performers take the stage at Durham Bulls Athletic Park, the main venue for this year’s event, as well as other spots like The Carolina Theatre, The Pinhook, Durham Armory and Motorco Music Hall. Through Innovate Your Cool and StArt of Cool, the festival will continue to offer educational programming geared toward businesses and budding musicians, respectively.

OUR TOP EVENTS IN SEPTEMBER

TEDxDurham O CTO B E R 6

Modeled after the international TED Conference, this series of events provides a platform for local leaders and creatives to share innovative ideas. This year’s theme – “No Filter.” – explores the idea of removing our personal filters, which are constructed from the news sources we trust, our friends and our wider social media circles. Join other Durhamites at the Holton Career and Resource Center for a day of learning how to engage with the people and details of our world that often go unnoticed, but are within our reach.


Science of Beer SE PT E MB E R 13

Blues and Roots Celebration OCTOBER 5 -6

Presented by the Hayti Heritage Center, the two-day festival celebrates the contributions made by African-Americans to blues and roots music. A juke joint-style cocktail reception on Friday features Baron Tymas and his band, Hit Ya Right Here, and Justin Robinson, formerly of the Carolina Chocolate Drops, to benefit Hayti’s mission to preserve and promote African-American music. Lenora Helm and the B.B. King’s Blues Band with Tito Jackson of The Jackson 5 take the stage the following night.

Sip on samples of North Carolina beer as brewers explain beer chemistry, flavor profiles, yeast culturing and brewing techniques at Museum of Life and Science. There’ll be food samples, live music, and you’ll leave with a commemorative glass. Walk through interactive exhibits indoors, and take your samples outside and tour Gateway Park, Hideaway Woods, The Farmyard, Magic Wings Butterfly House and Ellerbe Creek Railway. Food trucks will be on-site serving up additional bites for purchase. Proceeds benefit the museum’s conservation and education initiatives.

Squirrel Nut Zippers SE PT E MB E R 26

Pride: Durham, NC SEPTEM BER 2 9

Previously organized by NC Pride, this year’s annual parade and festival will be hosted for the first time by the LGBTQ Center of Durham. Held at Duke University’s East Campus, the annual event brings the community together to foster and promote the inclusion of all peoples. Following the parade, catch performances by musicians and drag queens on the main stage, grab a bite to eat from food vendors, browse artisan booths and meet representatives from local nonprofits. LEFT PAGE (clockwise from top left) Fall Plant Sale photo by Sue Lannon; Art of Cool photo by Frank Myers; CenterFest photo by Michael Zirkle Photography RIGHT PAGE (clockwise from top left) Blues and Roots photo by Chuck Ruffin Photography; Science of Beer photo courtesy Museum of Life and Science; Squirrel Nut Zippers photo courtesy The Carolina Theatre; Nrityagram Dance Ensemble photo courtesy Duke Performances; Joan Baez photo by Dana Tynan; Pride: Durham, NC photo courtesy Center for Sexual and Gender Diversity at Duke University

In the mid-1990s, Jimbo Mathus and drummer/percussionist Chris Phillips formed a casual band comprised of family and friends to create a sound that veered away from mainstream modern rock. Their eclectic fusion of jazz chords, folk music and punk rock quickly garnered national attention. After an 18-year break from recording, the band reformed in 2016 to create their latest album, Beasts of Burgundy. The group heads to The Carolina Theatre to share songs from their revival album that echoes the anti-establishment sound in which they are rooted.

Nrityagram Dance Ensemble + Chitrasena Dance Company S E PT E MB E R 22- 23

Joan Baez

SE PT E MB E R 29 The 2017 Rock & Roll Hall of Fame inductee makes a stop on her farewell tour at Durham Performing Arts Center to share music from her new album, Whistle Down The Wind.

A collaboration between Southern Indian company Nrityagram and the Sri Lankan ensemble Chitrasena brings together the unique traditions and body languages of each nation in their program, “Saṃhāra” for Duke Performances. Interweaving classical and lively storytelling, the collaboration at Reynolds Industries Theater is sure to be an exciting display of color, sound and movement. september 2018

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Dance the Night Away P HOTO G RA P H Y B Y BEN MC KEO W N

Celebrating 85 years, the American Dance Festival (ADF) kicked off its season with an opening night performance and fête at Duke University’s Reynolds Industries Theater and Penn Pavilion, respectively. Fête guests were treated to VIP seating for the Dayton Contemporary Dance Company’s performance, which featured classic works and a new ADF-commissioned world premiere by award-winning choreographer Abby Zbikowski. The party continued on the pavillion with drinks – including a signature ADF cocktail – heavy hors d’oeuvres from The Catering Company and music by DJ Bunn. 12

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SEPTEMBER 2018

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1 Sheri “Sparkle” Williams, Robert Pulido, Countess V. Winfrey and Stevie Lamblin. 2 Bailey McFaden, Ou Jian-Ping and Anna Longenecker. 3 ADF’s 2018 Fête Co-Chairs, Nancy P. Carstens and Nancy Carver McKaig. 4 Nile Ruff and Jennifer Meckley. 5 Amy and Jay Andorfer.


city pics

A Fun Fiesta

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PH OTO G RA P H Y CO URT ESY C H RO NI C L E S P H OTOGR A PHY

The 16th annual Duke Hospice Gala, held at the Sheraton Imperial Hotel, raised $90,000 with 250 guests in attendance. The Cinco de Mayo-themed event featured dinner (including a queso fountain!), dancing, silent and live auctions, and presentation of the volunteer of the year and the caregiver of the year awards. Proceeds benefited hospice patients and their loved ones, as well as Camp ReLEAF, which supports children of hospice patients.

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1 Seated: Dr. Herbert Fuchs, Mary Ann Fuchs, Rhonda Brandon, Kevin Brandon, Sarah Woodard. Standing: Seydric Williams, Keisha Williams, Alyson Gordon, Justin Gordon and Senator Mike Woodard. 2 Emcee Steve Daniels of ABC11 and Kelly Phoenix present Clinical Social Worker Ellen Ozier (center) with the Caregiver of the Year Award. 3 Volunteer of the Year Timothy Holley. 4 Camp ReLEAF Counselor Caleb Andrews. 5 Michael Lewis, Kai Barlow, MJ Hackney, Terry Hackney, Chuck Collini, Katie Collini, Karen Cumberbatch, Kim O’Neill, Cleon Cumberbatch and Anthony Clay. 6 Fink’s Jewelers’Joey White and David Sensinger with LaVerne Mullin and Bill Mullin. 7 Dee Blake, Malcolm Anderson and Clarenda Anderson.


city pics

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1 Triangle Day School Head of School Doug Norry with new Students to Scholars student Ashanti Bellamy and first-year Students to Scholars Rashyia Williams, Taleah Fields and Nnamdi Ogboko. 2 Carolina Friends School Head of School Karen Cumberbatch with Makizel Jackson and Jarod Bryant, new Students to Scholars students. 3 New Students to Scholars student Mahaugony Howard, Duke School Head of School Dave Michelman and first-year Students to Scholars student Shariah Warren.

The College Course P HOTO G RA P H Y COURT ESY HEAT HER C R A IG O F S O U RWO O D P HOTOGR A PHY

Students to Scholars, a nonprofit formed in early 2017 in partnership with the Boys and Girls Club of Durham and Orange Counties and three partner independent schools, enrolls hardworking, promising children from the Club in these partner schools, putting them on an academic path that will prepare them to enter college placement classes in high school. The first four children were enrolled last fall at Triangle Day School and Duke School. A celebration held in June at the Hill House highlighted the children’s achievements in their new schools and also welcomed the four new Students to Scholars enrolled this fall, including the two students enrolled at recently added partner school, Carolina Friends School. “Our vision is to change the trajectories of these and other children’s education, and to empower the students and their parents to reach their potential,” says Students to Scholars Co-Founder Jeanne Langley.

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M-F: 9:00 am - 5:00 pm www.sewfine2.com Sat: 10:00 am - 2:00 pm Ask us about special savings on select Sun: Closed Hunter Douglas operating systems. 919-806-3638 www.sewfine2.com Ask us about special savings on select Hunter Douglas operating systems. *Manufacturer’s mail-in rebate offer valid for qualifying purchases made 9/16/17—12/11/17 from participating dealers in the U.S. only. Rebate will be issued in the form of a prepaid reward card and mailed within 6 weeks of rebate claim receipt. Funds do not expire. Subject to applicable law, a $2.00 monthly fee will be assessed against card balance 6 months after card issuance and each month thereafter. Additional limitations may apply. Ask participating dealer for details and rebate form. ©2017 Hunter Douglas. All rights reserved. All trademarks used herein are the property of Hunter Douglas or their respective owners. 17Q4MAGVIGC2

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Leaders of the Pack

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P HOTO G RA P H Y B Y S A M BER MA S -DAW ES

A hot and cloudless summer morning didn’t stop approximately 150 volunteers from pitching in to help pack meals and reading kits for lowincome kids in Durham during United Way of the Greater Triangle’s Day of Action in Durham Central Park, co-hosted by Inter-Faith Food Shuttle. Eric Guckian, President & CEO of United Way of the Greater Triangle, says that, despite rising wages in recent years, there are more people living in poverty in the Triangle. According to the 2017 State of Durham County’s Young Children report, more than a quarter of Durham’s children live in a home where the head of household’s income is at or below poverty level. And during the summer months, food security can suffer from higher energy bills and extra childcare costs. “This is definitely a lifesaver during the summer,” says Amber Simmons, Inter-Faith Food Shuttle’s manager of child hunger programs. By the end of the event, volunteers had assembled 1,500 meals ready for distribution.

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1 United Way of the Greater Triangle’s CEO & President Eric Guckian and Creative Services Leader Joe Lavender. 2 United Way’s Chief Technology and Information Officer Edwin Jeffords and Programs Leader Nick Allen. 3 Marilyn Slaughter and Teresa Jones. 4 United Way’s Chief Financial Officer Olivia Morris.

THE DURHAM

ARTS COUNCIL

PRESENTS

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Out of the Frying Pan …

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P HOTO G RA P H Y B Y S A NT UL NER KA R

Liberty Arts Sculpture Studio & Foundry, in partnership with Nana’s, hosted Feast From the Furnace, a dinner combined with a glass blowing demonstration from local artist Elijah Leed. The event’s 30 guests enjoyed a variety of wine and small plates prepared by Nana’s Pastry Chef Eric Akbari and Co-Owner Aubrey Zinaich. The same 2,000-degree oven that Elijah typically uses to craft his intricate works

1 Elijah Leed. 2 Josh Bond and Cara Robertson. 3 Nana’s Pastry Chef Eric Akbari.

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was employed to prepare savory tapas as well. Courses included seared ahi tuna, which was served on cucumber with mint sauce; chilirubbed shrimp lettuce wraps; beef tacos with fresh pineapple salsa; and molten s’mores for dessert. This was the sixth such dinner and sculpture demonstration at Liberty Arts, and Jackie McLeod, who helped organize the event, says more will be hosted once a month from October 2018 through May 2019.

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Oh, the Places You’ll Go PH OTOGRAPH Y BY JUST SH OOT M E PH OTOGRAP HY

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1 Book Babies Home Visitor Kenitra Williams, Rakeem Vick II and Angela Vick, Rakeem’s grandmother. 2 Kennedy and Bailey Stevenson with their mom, Julie Dowdee. 3 Ian Sebastian Dominguez Ruiz and his dad, Wilmer Dominguez.

The inaugural class of Book Babies – a program started by nonprofit Book Harvest in 2013 that works to enhance school readiness for children from Medicaid-eligible families in Durham – graduated this spring. The 29 5-year-olds donned caps and gowns and received diplomas commemorating their literacy accomplishments from participating in the program, which they’ve been enrolled in since their birth. The graduation ceremony included a keynote address by playwright and actor Mike Wiley, as well as Book Babies parent Melissa Ocampo. These toddlers were also the first to participate in an evaluation by Duke University researchers on the impact of the home visiting and book provision program, which found that Book Babies participants exhibited statistically significant differences in performance on key measures related to reading and kindergarten readiness skills when measured against a comparison group. SEPTEMBER 2018

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Do-Good Morning P HOTO G RA P H Y B Y S A M BER MA S -DAW ES

Housing for New Hope’s 2018 Annual Breakfast, held at The Cotton Room, raised funds and awareness for its fight for affordable housing in Durham. Nearly 300 attendees listened as ABC11’s Diane Wilson moderated a conversation on local housing with Mayor Steve Schewel and Farad Ali, president and CEO of The Institute. People who’ve experienced homelessness shared their stories with the crowd, and former board chair Dr. Beverly Ford announced Hope Together, a new, affordable co-housing complex for working women. Housing for New Hope is still accepting donations, which can be made at housingfornewhope.org.

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1 Diane Wilson, Mayor Steve Schewel and Farad Ali. 2 LaKiera Grimes, Tiffany Malory and Pashara Black. 3 Michael Kelly and Corinthia Barber. 4 Brooke Jenkins, Lisa Rist and Susan Ross.

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True Gems

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Hamilton Hill Jewelry featured pieces from Sethi Couture during its Second Best Exotic Marigold Women’s Cocktail Party trunk show in late July. Guests enjoyed a stacking station, bling pong, catering by Viceroy and, of course, cocktails and mocktails. 1 Ken Weston, Stephany Weston, Sarah Hill and Theresa Writz. 2 Amanda Shurgin and Michael Hamilton. 3 Keisha Bentley-Edwards and Dani Devinney.

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noted

noted.

Send us your news! WHAT WE’VE HE ARD AROUND TOWN …

From births to awards to new biz and more – Email noted@durhammag.com

BOOKIN’ IT

Durham Literacy Center and Achievement Academy of Durham have merged into a

IN MEMORIAM

Wynn. Leader, mentor, advocate and friend are

As a combined organization, Durham Literacy

longtime Durham

Phail meant to me. Durham, and the entire state

single organization under Durham Literacy.

Phail Wynn Jr., a

will continue to empower

educator who held

who want to improve their

Duke University and

will continue as usual, and

Community College,

influential roles at

literacy skills. All programs

Durham Technical

the entire Wynn family.” Phail is also survived

died unexpectedly

Rahsaan Wynn and brother Michael Wynn.

volunteers and students. A number of Duke University faculty released books

recently, including: Professor of Practical Ethics Walter

Sinnott-Armstrong (Think

Again: How to Reason and

Argue); Fuqua School of Business Professor Aaron Chatterji (Can Business Save the

Earth?: Innovating Our Way to Sustainability); Professor of Humanities at Duke Kunshan University James Miller (China’s Green Religion: Daoism and the Quest for a

Sustainable Future); Duke theologian Amy

Laura Hall (Laughing at the Devil: Seeing the World with Julian of Norwich); and founding university archivist William E. King (Julian

Abele and the Design of Duke University: An Extended Essay).

by his his mother, Valree Fletcher Wynn, son

age 70. Phail served as president of Durham Tech for 27 years and was the first African-American to be named a community college president in North Carolina. He had just recently retired from his role as Duke University’s first vice president of the Office of Durham and Regional Affairs. Among many notable Durham dignitaries who shared their sympathy was Congressman G.K. Butterfield, who said that he “was shocked

and saddened to learn of the passing of Phail

ON THE MOVE

Association (NCPA). NCPA provides a voice for

of Durham-headquartered Eli Global LLC,

the profession. Tonya is the first African-American

Global Bankers Capital (GB Capital), an affiliate

psychologists and promotes high standards for

announced the appointment of investment

woman to lead the organization.

to coordinate the firm’s credit investment and

Preservation

veteran Seth I. Friedman as managing director business development activities.

Chapel Hill graduate Trace Clevinger self-published his book, “Beneath It All.” The story takes place in Wilmington, N.C., and

highlights several familiar

North Carolina destinations. The book is available for purchase on Amazon.

durhammag.com

condolences go to his beloved wife, Peggy, and

of natural causes at his Durham home July 24 at

Durham resident and UNC-

|

of North Carolina, has lost a giant. My sincere

Durham County residents

they are welcoming new

22

a few words that come to mind to describe what

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April Johnson in

Susan Miller, CPA,

early July as the

DMJ & Co., PLLC July 1.

executive director.

partner-in-charge of the

selected April

she’s worked since 2005.

nationwide search. She was formerly a historic

become a partner at

organization’s

Susan also serves as the

The company

Durham office, where

after a competitive

Dr. Tonya D. Armstrong was elected president of the North Carolina Psychological

SEPTEMBER 2018

Durham hired

preservation planner for the City of WinstonSalem. Prior to working for Winston-Salem, she worked with Preservation Durham in


partnership with the

Nonprofit research foundation RTI International

Historic Preservation to

sustainability features on its new Horizon

National Trust for

is going green with the aid of several new

identify and document

building, including green roofs, energy efficient

lesser-known African-

systems and recycled building materials. Staff

American historic sites

researchers guided the construction to ensure

and buildings

the building’s design encouraged collaboration

in Durham.

for science. The building’s grand opening date is set for early October.

GETTING SCHOOLED

The Behavioral Health Urgent Care, a mental health-focused pilot program based out of

North Carolina

Carolina Outreach at 2670 Durham-Chapel

Central University

Hill Blvd., launched in July 2017 and is striving

has extended its

partnership with Wake

to reduce the rate of mental health admissions

Technical Community College to build on its

DOING GOOD

program. Starting in fall 2018, NCCU will

ever Over the Edge for Duke Children’s,

from the Wake Tech hospitality program into

fundraising goal in exchange for the opportunity

Hospitality and Tourism Administration.

17-story 21c Museum Hotel. Sponsors will also

BUSINESS BRIEFS

booth on the adjacent CCB Plaza.

current Hospitality and Tourism Administration

Duke Children’s Hospital is hosting the first-

welcome students with an associate degree

an event in which participants commit to a

upper level courses for the bachelor’s degree in

to rappel out of the penthouse window of the

to hospital emergency departments. The first

of its kind in the Triangle, the clinic sees clients ages 4 and older who live in Durham, Wake,

Cumberland or Johnston Counties who have

either Medicaid or are eligible for IPRS funding.

Safety assessments, crisis counseling, medication

bridges and connections to further mental health

have the opportunity to rappel down and host a

care are provided.

The Mercedes-Benz Club of the Triangle

AccorHotels signed an agreement to acquire

85% of 21c Museum Hotels, an award-winning

“Rally for the Rescue Mission” raised money and

contemporary art, boutique hotels and chef-

Mission. The club gathered more than $2,000 in

21c Museum Hotels co-founders, Laura Lee

school supplies.

hospitality management company combining

collected items needed for the Durham Rescue

driven restaurants, at the end of July.

donations between cash, household goods and

Brown and Steve Wilson, will retain a 15% stake in the company and will continue to

provide guidance and support of the unique

combination of art, design and hospitality that defines the 21c experience.

Vast Therapeutics, a Durham pharmaceutical startup focused on helping people who suffer

from respiratory diseases, is developing a nitric

oxide-based drug to treat cystic fibrosis patients battling chronic lung infections. The technology enables controlled and local delivery of nitric

oxide in powder form. Early-stage studies show

a 100% success rate in eradicating all superbugs tested so far; Vast is the first company to achieve this level of in vitro eradication. The company anticipates submitting an investigational new drug application and initiating first-in-human clinical trials in 2019.

Sleep in Heavenly Peace, a nonprofit that

builds beds for children in need at no cost to the family, opened a new chapter in Durham. The organization strives to ensure no child sleeps

on the floor. You can visit the “Sleep in Heavenly Peace - NC, Durham” Facebook page for more information on how to get involved.

Duke Dining implemented a full ban on all

disposable plastics in July. The campus-wide

disposable plastic ban is part of The Deliberate

Dining Project, a new sustainable initiative

created to share Duke Dining’s commitment to

sustainability. Specifically, Duke Dining locations will no longer carry single-use plastic carryout bags as well as disposable plastic food service ware.

In 2016, craft breweries Bull City Burger and Brewery, Bull Durham Beer Co., Fullsteam

Brewery, Ponysaurus and now-closed Triangle Brewing Co. joined forces to make beer in

the name of positive social change. Durty Bull

Brewing Co. and Starpoint Brewing also joined the cause, and through the “We CAN Build It CANpaign,” all the breweries sold a series of

limited-edition, seasonal canned six-packs and held special events to raise funds to sponsor a

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noted

Durham Habitat for Humanity home. In July, their goal became reality when “the house

that Durham craft beer built” officially began

construction. In about 18-20 weeks, the Ramirez Pina family – Javier, Miguelina and their

children, Carlos, 9, and Sophia, 6 – will call this house their home.

Elevate Salon Institute celebrated the grand

opening of its location at 300 E. Main St. in late

July, featuring an open house, tours, prizes, swag bags, beverages and hors d’oeuvres. A portion of the proceeds raised from its salon services during its first week open benefited charities Step Up Durham and Dress for Success.

The institute is one of the only cosmetology

schools in the country to partner with the L’Oréal Professionnel beauty brand, and is co-owned and operated by Terry Richardson and Matt Haverkamp.

Longtime Durham resident and hairstylist Eddie

Zuniga purchased the Stage 1 Salon building at the corner of West Club Boulevard and Broad

Street and transformed it into his new business, H2O Hair Salon & Spa.

WHAT AN HONOR

Durham was named the No. 7 best-run U.S. city

by WalletHub’s Top 20 Best-Run Cities in America study. Researchers compared the 150 largest

U.S. cities and based their rankings on operating efficiency measured against the city’s total percapita budget.

Durham was selected as a top retirement

destination by Where to Retire, a magazine

geared toward helping people with retirement relocation destinations.

Durty Bull Brewing Company has been recognized by the Stormwater and GIS

Services division within the City of Durham Public Works Department for completing

a year-long program to become certified as

a Stormwater STAR business. The brewery is

setting an example of environmental

LOOKIN’ GOOD

stewardship for water pollution

O2 Fitness opened its first “Signature” Club in

prevention.

Morrisville. The club expands on the features already offered in every O2 Fitness Club by

The American Veterinary Medical

providing members with new amenities like

Association (AVMA) named Amanda

Fitness On Demand (a virtual class option),

Arrington, founder and director of the

chilled towels with natural essential oils, and

Pets for Life program of the Humane

an oversized indoor playground and climbing

Society of the United States, the

area to go along with youth fun and fitness

winner of the 2018 AVMA Humane

programming for members with kids.

Award. The award is given annually to a non-veterinarian to recognize Dennis Best Men’s Salon (above) is now open at 3307 University Dr. The four-chair barber

shop features artwork by both Dennis’ wife and nephew.

achievement in advancing the welfare

of animals through leadership, public service,

education, research and product development, and advocacy. In addition to overseeing the

national Pets for Life program in more than 30

markets around the country, Amanda founded

the Durham-based nonprofit, Beyond Fences.

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noted

WalletHub also named the Durham-Chapel Hill

area the No. 4 most-educated metropolitan area in the country.

The Durham-Chapel Hill area was named the No.

We are proud to introduce

12 best place for creatives to live by SmartAsset in their most recent research survey, which

Dr. Melissa Owen

measured the concentration of creatives against the cost of living in metro areas nationwide.

Interior design firm Sew Fine II celebrated its

to the Durham community.

30th anniversary in July.

Duke University was named one of the “Best Employers for Women” by Forbes magazine.

Congressman G.K. Butterfield passed his bill, H.R. 3460, designating the United States courthouse located at 323 E. Chapel Hill St. as the “John

Hervey Wheeler United States Courthouse.”

John Hervey Wheeler served as one of the state’s most prominent Black leaders and community advocates, having a decades-long career at

Mechanics & Farmers Bank, starting first as

a bank teller and eventually rising to serve as

bank president as well as being among North Carolina Central University’s first law school graduates.

NEW DEVELOPMENTS

D

r. Melissa Owen joined our practice in August of 2018. She grew up in Virginia Beach, VA. She attended James Madison University where she obtained her bachelor’s degree in Biology. She then went on to pursue her DDS at University of North Carolina Chapel Hill. Dr. Owen has been involved in various organizations including being a coordinator at the Samaritan Health Dental Clinic in Durham, NC. After dental school, Dr. Owen and her husband, Conally packed their bags and moved to Los Angeles, CA. Here, she completed a General Practice Residency at the Sepulveda VA. Afterward, Dr. Owen and her husband

moved back to the east coast and spent two years in Wilmington, North Carolina, where she worked as a dental associate and advanced her clinical skills. She values communication, patient satisfaction, and providing excellent dental care. In her free time, she enjoys traveling, cooking, and spending time outside with her husband and their beagle mix, Sammy. Dr. Owen and her husband are looking forward to making Durham their home again and to many future adventures, in dentistry and beyond. Dr. Owen is accepting new patients and is looking forward to meeting you.

Center Studio

Architecture broke

ground in August on Eleven at 524 North Pantone 106-6 C

Mangum, their first townhome community in

downtown. The homes feature attached garages, decks, private gardens and great downtown

views. Only 11 townhomes are available, and

slots are quickly filling up. More information can be found on elevendurham.com.

Pantone 179-13 C

The FENCE 2018, the largest public art

photography exhibition in North America, has

returned to downtown and includes new art from 50 photographic artists, including nine Trianglebased artists: Nancy Arehart, Rachel Jessen,

2900 Croasdaile Drive, Suite 5, Durham, NC 27705 919.383.7402 | croasdailedentalarts.com 

Mary Shannon Johnson, Ray Pfeiffer, Leah

Sobsey, Tim Telkamp, Dawn Surratt, Barbara

Tyroler and Yousuf Zafar. The FENCE: Durham will be on display through November 2018,

encompassing the block surrounding the city’s Chapel Hill Street Parking Garage.

2010-2018

TOP DENTISTS

William W. Turner, DMD | Jason W. Butler, DMD | Melissa R. Owen, DDS

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in their words

“For when the One Great Scorer comes To mark against your name

He writes – not that you won or lost But how you played the Game.”

– from the 1908 poem “Alumnus Football” by Grantland Rice

THE AUTHO R IS A DUK E P RO F E SSO R OF ME DICINE A ND IMMUN OLOGY WH O

Cool Runnings

HAS LIVE D IN D URH A M S IN CE THE L AT E ’ 7 0 S .

B Y DAV I D S . P I S ET S KY, M.D., PH.D.

In his last column, Dr. Pisetsky shared his training regimen for the 200-meter and 5-meter dashes at the Durham Senior

Games, and the injuries of a hamstring pull and Achilles tendinitis that plagued him prior to the competition.

M

Y TWO EVENTS WERE scheduled for April 17 at Hillside High School; an unseasonably cold day, just above 40 degrees. But the sky was clear. I drove to the track where I saw men throwing a football and putting the shot. The stands were just about empty except for some well-wishers braving the frigid air. I signed in, collected my commemorative T-shirt and then sat in the stands waiting for the start of the running events. I fretted about getting too close to people since I was emitting a powerful combination of menthol and wintergreen from the generous blob of Bengay that I had slathered on my hamstring. I was the only person in shorts and wore a Duke Rheumatology T-shirt under my sweatshirt.

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Waiting for the event to start, I felt part of Durham’s tradition of track and field. Both Duke and N.C. Central were led by coaching legends who were Hall of Famers. Al Buehler, a coach at Duke beginning in the 1950s, wore a wide-brim straw hat and served as coach and manager of the U.S. Olympic team. LeRoy Walker was the coach at Central and was the first African-American to be president of the United States Olympic Committee. They were friends and collaborators and as close as brothers at a time when black-white relations were often troubled. Together, Al and LeRoy made Durham a hot spot for track and field events. Durham was the site of the Pan Africa-USA track meeting in 1971 and the US-USSR meet in 1974. For that event, tens of thousands of people filled Wallace Wade Stadium to witness a Cold War contest of geopolitical and ideological import. At 10 a.m., everyone went to the starting line where the rules were explained. All ages would run together, meaning that someone 50 years old could be competing against someone who was 100. Given the number of entrants for the men’s 50 meter, we were divided into two heats. I watched the first heat intently. The men were amazingly fast, and the winner, I would have guessed, was in his 50s. As I learned later, he’s 69. My heat was next. Ready to give 110% effort, I put myself into the zone and leaned over to start. I waited as the woman with the bullhorn yelled in succession, “Take your mark, get set, go!” Then we all charged down the straightaway to the finish line. My first few steps were fine, but at about the 20-meter point, the hamstring went – a mean stab of a stiletto. I lurched and staggered. I did my best to avoid a fall, fearing the ignominy of landing flat on my face. Somehow I stayed upright and focused my attention on the finish line. Despite the pain, I pushed the last distance, completely oblivious of those running on either side. I walked over to the official in my lane and got my time. It was 9.62 seconds. In that time, Usain Bolt could run 100 meters.


in their words

Breathing hard, I went over to the official tent, noticeably limping. I will start again. And maybe I will buy real track Since all the men ran as a heat, I was anxious to know where I stood in the shoes, something more sleek and less clunky 70-74 group. A woman studied the sheet of results and, with a big smile, than my current ones with an inch of cushionshe said that I had come in first and handed me a shiny gold medal on a ing foam. Or maybe I will save my money on red, white and blue ribbon. frippery and just enjoy myself, appreciative that As it turns out, I was the only competitor in my age group. Recounting at almost 73, I still am in good enough health to my victory many times later, I tell people that, while I won the gold, there even contemplate some sprints and not worry was no silver or bronze. about whether I would win or lose but how I Thrilled with my gold medal, I then had a decision to make. Should I would play the game. run again in the 200 meters, knowing that my time would be abominable, and I would risk a more serious injury, likely not to get better for a few months. If I scratched in the 200, how would the Great Scorer mark against my name, judging that, despite one medal, I did not play the game well? No matter how I did, I wanted to play the game well and decided to run anyway. It does not sound like a long distance – it’s just about one-eighth of a mile but, as I looked around the track, I might as well be running 10 miles since my hamstring ached, and I was stiffening in the cold. The breeze kicked up, and one of my fellow runners wondered if our times would suffer running into a headwind. I had no such worries. The woman with the bullhorn came to our group, and at “Go,” the other runners took Bill Hoover, CFO Ted Smith, CEO off, all of them quickly ahead of me. I was doing my best, but I was laboring as I willed myself around the track. Unlike with the 50 meters, I didn’t want to know my time. As I N T R O D U C I N G a matter of fact, I wanted it expunged from the record since I knew it was distressingly slow. Dejectedly, I walked back to the tent to find out. The nice woman looked through the scores and then said warmly, “You won We’re delighted to introduce our first freestanding outpatient therapy another gold,” and gave me a big hug, handlocation in Durham. So now anyone — regardless of age — can benefit ing me another medal. I felt great again. I drove home with the heater blasting from Hillcrest’s legendary physical therapy expertise. Whether you need in my silver Saab. After showering and to heal after an injury or surgery, fight disease with specialty therapies, or downing a few Advils, I went off to work to simply need more therapy after rehabilitation, think the best, think Hillcrest. regale the laboratory staff with the story of my victory. I was about to close this chapter of my life feeling good, assured that the Great Scorer would look favorably on me, when I received a letter in the mail informing me that I qualified for the finals of the North Carolina Senior Games in both the 50- and 200-meter run. Wow. Slow-me would compete for the state 919-627-6700 I HILLCRESTNC.COM/DM championship of the Senior Games. 4215 UNIVERSITY DRIVE, DURHAM, NC 27707 I am giving myself a little respite from In front of The Fresh Market and At Home shopping center training to allow my injuries to heal, and then

RECOVERING FROM INJURY OR SURGERY? CONTINUING THERAPY AFTER REHABILITATION?

Outpatient

PHYSICAL THERAPY

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in their words

Chicken Hut for the Soul THE AUTH O R WA S

B Y CA RL W. K E NNEY II

I

N AME D T H E B E ST

MOVED TO DURHAM IN 1988 with an extreme craving. My mid-Missouri upbringing left me envious of the people I read about from the South. There were books filled with stories about the days when signs on walls indicated the safe places to drink from water fountains and where to use the bathroom. All of that is true, but there is a side of Southern ways that left folks like me wondering what life is like on the other side of the river. It’s all about the food. That Southern fried chicken, plates stacked with collard greens, candied yams, macaroni and cheese and that chopped pork that people in North Carolina call barbecue (being from Missouri makes it hard for me to call it real barbecue) is legendary in those places far, far away. Keep in mind it was before Food Network launched programming that introduced people West of the Mississippi to “Diners, Drive-ins and Dives.” My interest in Southern cuisine came from listening to my uncle Lucious talk about his time in the South when he was enlisted in the military. He painted literary pictures that left my tummy growling in great anticipation of fat biscuits served with gravy and a side of grits. My uncle talked about holes in the wall – those small, nondescript restaurants hidden from most people. You have to know someone who knows someone to find places with that authentic soul food taste. I started looking for a place where the recipes aren’t recipes, but wisdom passed down from countless generations. The cooks there feel cooking from the soul – there are no measuring tools to determine the amount of love that goes into the dishes. My expedition to find Durham’s best soul food began with numerous misfires. They were good, but nothing that left me thinking it was better than I could do. Given that my cooking skills are 28

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legendary among members of my family and friends, I was looking for a place that left me searching for a glass of wine to toast the cook; an experience that left me offering a standing ovation. Where does one go to find a hole in the wall? It’s not the dining section of your local newspaper. It’s not the top 10 list on Yelp or some other site dedicated to helping tourists find the exceptional local dining experiences. If you are looking to find good soul food, be it in Durham or any city in America, go to a black barbershop or hair salon. It was there, at the Imperial Barbershop in Phoenix Square, that my barber, Victor Hughes, told me about The Chicken Hut. Glory be to God. It was like I’d found the Holy Grail and taken a sip of abundant pleasure. My soul cried, “Hallelujah!” with each bite of smothered turkey wings, collard greens and candied yams. This was the experience my uncle talked about back in Missouri. This is the reason people come back to the South after moving up North in search of a better life. You simply can’t do better than this. Peggy Tapp, the co-founder of The Chicken Hut, died April 10. It was her 78th birthday. She was the heart and soul of Chicken Hut, where she served meals at the restaurant and catered after funerals for local black churches. Those meals helped ease numerous broken hearts after the drive back to a church from grave sites. Peggy and her husband, Claiborne, founded The Chicken Hut in 1957, making it the longest-serving black-owned restaurant in Durham. The bright yellow sign, with the name in red letters, is easy to find when you look up at 3019 Fayetteville Rd., but many pass by not knowing what they are missing. Tre Tapp, Peggy’s only son, continues his mother’s work. That’s what soul food does. The art of Southern cooking gets passed down with lessons about life and love, and how food keeps bringing people together. I had to drive close to 1,000 miles to get a taste of good Southern cooking. We call it soul food because it’s good for the soul. It’s something about soul food that makes you want to jump in Grandma’s lap while she’s sitting in a rocking chair. Soul food reminds me of my grandma crooning one of those songs about us going to heaven where the streets are paved with gold. How I miss her.

september 2018

S E RIOUS CO LUMNIST OF 2 0 1 1 B Y T H E

N ORTH CA RO L INA

P RE S S ASSO C IAT IO N. HE IS THE CO -

P RODUCER O F “ G O D

OF THE O P P RE SSE D,” AN UP COMING

DOCUME NTA RY F IL M

ON BLACK L IB E RAT IO N THE OLOGY A ND IS T H E

AUTHOR O F “ P RE AC H A’

MAN “ AN D T H E SE QUE L “BACK S LID E .” H E H A S

LE D CON G RE G AT IO NS IN MIS S OURI A ND

N ORTH CA RO L INA .


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2017

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bites of bull city

THE AUTHOR IS

THE CREATOR AND

WRITER OF THE LOCAL DURHAM FOOD AND

Booze-Free Bull City Bevs

RESTAURANT NEWS

BLOG, BITES OF BULL CITY (BITESOFBULLCITY.COM).

B Y A M B ER WAT S ON

V

ARIETY AND CREATIVITY expressed on a restaurant’s drink menu is important, and for those who don’t (or can’t) drink alcohol, this shouldn’t be limited to just the wine and cocktail lists. There are actually quite a few Durham restaurants offering fun and delicious non-alcoholic alternatives from mocktails to milkshakes so that non-drinkers don’t have to settle for a boring soda. Below are some of our favorites.

CHILDHOOD CLASSICS

I’m a big fan of classic mixed soda drinks, especially when they are recreated and revived. Jack Tar and The Colonel’s Daughter takes diner drinks to the next level by offering new-andimproved childhood concoctions like housemade Shirley Temples and a real blast from the past: the Orange Julius. “There’s a slew of copycat

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recipes around the web, so we played around with a few of them to figure out what we did/didn’t like and cobbled together a version that really spoke to our memories of getting an Orange Julius at the mall when we were kids,” shares Owner Gray Brooks. “Although I imagine what we came up with is probably better, since it tastes good to me now as a grown-up.” Gray compares the process to their tomato soup: It attempts to reference Campbell’s iconic soup, which has such a strong memory connected to it, but doesn’t quite live up to the hype when you have it as an adult. The same goes for syrupy Shirley Temples – with a bit of tweaking, a childlike recipe (and memory) is redefined with an elevated house-made version. And with the assistance of talented mixologist Michael Killbridge (who makes all their own grenadine, shrubs, tonic water and other tinctures for the three restaurants) on staff, just about anything is possible. A big part of the reason the owners of Jack Tar put so much thought and effort into their non-alcoholic drink menu is because they have a young child and are consistently reminded what it’s like to be a 6-year-old in an adult’s world. “Whenever we’d go out to eat with Cole, my wife and I often start with a cocktail, so I started asking the bartenders to make something for our son, so that he could be included in that part of dining out,” Gray explains. That familyfriendly focus, from the food to the drinks, became a focus at Jack Tar.

MOCKTAILS

When dining out, our family has also found that good, skilled bartenders are happy to create a mocktail on the fly. So, if you are out to enjoy a nice dinner and don’t see any non-alcoholic drinks listed on the menu, don’t be afraid to ask if they can whip up something special. You may discover a new favorite drink for your child or for yourself! 


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bites of bull city

Many cocktail bars offer a few great mocktails regularly. Some of our favorites can be found at Alley Twenty Six, which highlights a new nonalcoholic cocktail on the menu on a rotating basis – the choice is dependent on the season and what ingredients are available. On Thursday mornings, Owner Shannon Healy and some of the other Alley bartenders hold experimental sessions where they make new syrups and tinctures and also use the time to create those unusual nonalcoholic cocktails that keep with the same quality and inventiveness of their alcoholic counterparts. This summer, they featured a “summer-at-thebeach” inspired Coconut Pineapple Shrub, which included coconut, pineapple, apple cider vinegar, lime and soda water. Past favorites have included the Grapefruit Blueberry Shrub, a shrub with local blueberries courtesy of Eastern Carolina Organics, and the Temperante Tiki, a nonalcoholic riff on a tiki cocktail.

New restaurant Tamale Factory and Tequila Bar also offers a great variety of aguas frescas – all made in house with fresh fruit. These refreshing drinks serve as a great alternative to regular sodas and a much more authentic option to pair with the food. I recently enjoyed the hibiscus water, which had just the right amount of sweetness.

AGUAS FRESCAS

For coffee lovers, The Durham Hotel has a must-try: The coffee soda – coldbrew coffee mixed with sugar, vanilla bean, sparkling water and crushed ice. We live in an area where we get to enjoy food and drink from around the world. Take, for instance, the Kenyan chai latte at The Palace International. “All chais are made with a spice blend known as tea masala, but the taste varies depending on what seasonings are used,” explains Owner Moses Ochola. “Our masala is a blend of spices heavy on cardamom, cloves, nutmeg and ginger. We slow brew the tea masala with Kenyan black tea (unique to Kenya) on the stove until it has the desired flavor and consistency. This is what creates the distinctly bold flavor of our chai.” The Palace also offers a stellar Nairobian punch: a secret blend of tropical juices, but some of the easily identifiable flavors are pineapple, orange and passion fruit juice. At Viceroy, we have enjoyed the masala chai lattes as well as the creamy and smooth lassis (a sweet or savory Indian drink made from a yogurt, water, spices and fruit). Flavors change out regularly, but they currently feature a coconut chia lassi. In past seasons, we’ve enjoyed the fun, pink, beet lassi. With these options and more, “no booze” doesn’t have to mean “boring.” As restaurants become more creative in satisfying customers with food restrictions, I predict a trend toward expanded non-alcoholic drink options as well, so that everyone can sip on something special. We’ll cheers to that!

There’s fruit juice and then there’s aguas frescas, and, really, there’s no comparison. Aguas frescas are made with fresh fruit, flowers and seeds, blended with sugar and water. Popular in Mexico, you can find them at a few Durham restaurants. If you look behind the register at El Chapin, you will see a brightly colored variety of them lining the wall. They rotate flavors often. The one I enjoyed recently tasted like I had stuck a straw straight into a fresh watermelon!

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MILKSHAKES

One of my favorite drinks to enjoy on a hot afternoon (usually after doing yard work!) is a milkshake from NanaTaco. They offer the straightforward flavors of vanilla, chocolate (Hershey’s) and Oreo cookie, but the most popular flavor is the Mexican chocolate, either regular or spicy (they add a dash of cayenne). A close second is the roasted plantain flavor, which takes on the flavor profile of roasted marshmallow. For those in the know, the manager recommends a mix of both Mexican chocolate and plantain. They also offer seasonal milkshake varieties like pumpkin pie during the holidays, which incorporates pumpkin pie filling, shortbread cookie crumbs, a touch of horchata (cinnamon rice milk) and cayenne. This past Girl Scout cookie season, they offered Thin Mint and Caramel Delight, which they’ll bring back next year.

LATTES AND LASSIS


The Nana’sFamily


c r e at i v coc Come Fly With Me West End Wine Bar

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september 2018

SALT OF THE EARTH Chicatanas are flying ants that are considered a regional delicacy in Oaxaca, Mexico. They are often ground up to be used in salsas, sauces and, in this case, salt.


The Hermit Arcana

ve c k ta i ls Add a bit of intrigue next time you imbibe recipes on page 40 „

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the food & drink issue

Shipwreck Shoals Alley Twenty Six

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september 2018


the food & drink issue

Cucciolo Wild Flower Cucciolo Osteria „

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the food & drink issue

FIRE IN THE BELLY Pronounced can-CHANcha-ra, this cocktail was originally made with aguardiente (literally “fire water” – the raw, un-aged “moonshine” to Cuban rum). COPA Owner Elizabeth Turnbull explains that it’s hard to find a good aguardiente here, and it can also be too strong for many drinkers to enjoy. “But the No’lasses is made with sorghum and has just enough grassiness and sharpness to it that it evokes many of the same qualities as a good aguardiente, but with a lower alcohol content."

Canchánchara COPA

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the food & drink issue

Silly Season Kingfisher „

KING CUPS While this version is served in a coupe glass, many Kingfisher cocktails will be presented in pottery created by Michelle Vanderwalker, who is opening the bar in the basement of the Perry building with her husband, Sean Umstead. Come taste for yourself at a pop-up event at the The Roof at The Durham Hotel on September 12.

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RECIPES

Come Fly With Me West End Wine Bar

The Hermit Arcana

1.5 oz. Mother Earth gin 1.5 oz. Matcha-coconut syrup* .5 oz. Fresh orange juice

2 oz. Mango juice 1 oz. Mezcal ¼ oz. Cointreau ½ lime Sal de Chicatana (Can substitute for pepper-salt mix with lime zest and mushroom powder)

Shake and strain. Serve up in a coupe glass.

Mix all ingredients apart from the Chicatana over ice. Shake and strain over fresh ice in a glass with a Sal de Chicatana rim. Garnish with lime wheel.

Mix and strain to get rid of any excess matcha.

Silly Season

*Matcha-Coconut Syrup 1 part Extremely strong matcha tea, made with matcha powder (sifted) 2 parts 1:1 Simple syrup 1 part Coconut milk

Cucciolo Wild Flower Cucciolo Osteria

Mix in a shaker with ice. Served up in a martini glass. Drop a hibiscus flower in for taste/color.

Kingfisher

¾ oz. Fresh lemon juice 1 oz. Salted, dehydrated strawberry and peach powder with habanada pepper syrup* ½ oz. Sherry 1½ oz. Beefeater gin 2 dashes of Angostura bitters Basil oil Combine first five ingredients in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake, and strain using a sieve. Serve up in a coupe glass or on the rocks, depending on preference. Garnish with a few drops of basil oil. *Powdered Fruits + Habanada Pepper Syrup Slice fruit to 1/4 inch pieces. In a dehydrator: Set machine to 135 degrees. Dehydrate for 8-12 hours. In an oven: Set oven to lowest temperature. Check every half an hour. After Dehydration: Let fruit cool. Test fruit for dryness through the “clink” test. Drop dehydrated slice on a hard countertop or table; it should “clink” and sound like a hard object hitting another. Freeze dehydrated fruit until brittle. Add to food processor or blender. Pulse fruit until fairly fine powder is achieved. Immediately store in airtight container. Take 2 fresh habanada peppers along with 10 oz. of water and 10 oz. of sugar, ½ oz. of strawberry powder and 1 oz. of peach powder. Blend together until smooth. Strain through cheese cloth.

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½ oz. Canton ½ oz. St-Germain 2 oz. Chopin Vodka ½ Lime, squeezed

Shipwreck Shoals Alley Twenty Six

¾ oz. Kill Devil white rum ¾ oz. Conniption Navy Strength gin ¾ oz. Orange ¾ oz. Lime ¾ oz. Alley Twenty Six Triangle Tiki Tonic Shake and strain over fresh ice in shifter. Float 1 oz. red wine and ½ oz. Aperol. Garnish with dehydrated lemon and lime, and torched parasol.

Canchánchara COPA

1½ oz. Fair Game Beverage Company No’lasses ½ oz. Local wildflower honey ½ oz. Fresh lime juice Add honey, No’lasses and lime juice to mixing glass. Stir with bar spoon until honey is fully incorporated into the liquid. Add ice to mixing glass. Stir for 3060 seconds until very cold. Single strain into serving glass. Top with ice. Use a bar spoon to incorporate drink and ice. This is typically served in a traditional clay cup, but if you don’t happen to have one of those lying around, an Old Fashioned glass will work just fine.


BLU Oysters Roc

Savor

PH OTO B Y B E TH MANN

Frying oil

1 dozen shucked oysters 8 oz. buttermilk

September

Cornmeal breading 2 cups cornmeal 1 cup rice flour

1 cup all-purpose flour

2 Tbsp. smoked paprika 1 tsp. cayenne pepper Salt

A few of our chefs share their tried-and-true recipes for late summer

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Pepper „

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the food & drink issue

Poblano creamed spinach 2 Tbsp. butter

¼ cup sweet onion, small dice 2 ea. garlic cloves, minced

2 ea. poblano peppers, charred over grill,

seeded and small dice 2 cups heavy cream 4 oz. cream cheese, softened 1 pound baby spinach, roughly chopped ¼ cup Parmesan cheese, grated ¼ cup Cotija cheese, grated (plus more for garnish) Salt

Pepper 4 strips bacon, crispy, chopped Lemon wedges

Start a medium pot with oil for frying over medium heat and bring to 350 degrees. Soak oysters in buttermilk. Prepare the cornmeal breading by mixing all ingredients in a medium bowl and hold to the side. In a large saute pan over medium-high heat, add the butter and onions. Cook until soft and translucent. Reduce heat. Add garlic and diced poblano. Continue cooking for 2 minutes. Add heavy cream and cream cheese. Cook until reduced and slightly thickened, about 5 minutes. Add spinach and cheeses. Adjust seasoning with salt and pepper. Hold warm. Drain oysters. Toss evenly in cornmeal mix, shaking loose any excess. Drop into preheated oil, being careful of splatter. Cook until golden brown and crispy, about 2-3 minutes depending on size of oysters. Remove from oil and hold on towel-lined plate to drain excess cooking oil. Spoon 12 scoops of the creamed spinach onto a serving dish. Place oysters atop each scoop. Top with chopped bacon and freshly grated cotija cheese. Garnish with lemon wedges. Bo Peterson executive chef, Primal/blu seafood 42

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Tomato & Melon Salad Corn Puree

2 cups (about 2 cobs worth)

corn kernels 1 Tbsp. olive oil 1 tsp. salt Water – to cover Optional: lemon juice

Place all ingredients in small saucepot over high heat until water has evaporated (corn should not have browned). Transfer to blender. Puree until smooth. Optional: Pass through a fine mesh strainer. Season with salt and/or lemon juice to your taste. Cool in refrigerator. Fried Garlic & Shallot ¼ cup garlic, minced

¼ cup shallot, minced 1 qt. canola oil

Heat canola oil in (approx. 1” deep) saucepot over medium heat to 325 degrees. Line a baking sheet with paper towels. Fry the shallots in oil until just golden brown. Skim fried shallots from the oil with a skimmer or slotted spoon, and place on the paper towel-lined baking sheet. Repeat process with garlic. Cool garlic and shallots to room temperature. Mix the garlic and shallots in storage container with a tight-fitting lid; add just enough of the used frying oil to cover the mixture and seal. (Helpful tip: The remainder of the oil can be reserved for a number of other uses). 1 large or 2 medium (10-12 oz.) slicing tomatoes 8-10 (3 oz.) Sungold tomatoes 1 cob of corn

½ cup (3 oz.) watermelon (or melon of your choice), small dice


PHOTO BY JAMES STEFIUK

the food & drink issue

6 leaves basil

8 leaves mint

1½ tsp. flaky sea salt, divided

¼ tsp. freshly ground black pepper 5 drops lemon juice Corn puree

Fried garlic and shallot Olive oil

Boil 1 cob of corn, remove kernels from cob, and set aside. Slice the heirloom tomatoes about ½-inch thick and season with flaky sea salt and freshly ground black pepper; set aside. Slice Sungold tomatoes in half and place in a mixing bowl with

an equal amount of diced melon, cooked corn kernels and freshly picked basil and mint leaves. Season with a few drops of lemon juice (and aged balsamic, if you prefer), ½ tsp. of flaky salt, freshly ground black pepper and 1 teaspoon of the fried garlic and shallot. Gently toss together. On the base of the plate, lay down a generous spoonful of corn puree, using the back of the spoon to spread evenly in a circle. Place the sliced heirloom tomatoes atop the corn puree. Spoon tomato and melon mixture carefully on top of the sliced heirloom tomatoes. Finish with a light drizzle of olive oil. Dave Alworth executive chef, Guglhupf Bakery, Cafe & Restaurant „ september 2018

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the food & drink issue

“Pimento” Cheese ½ pound cream cheese 1 bell pepper 1 jalapeño

½ cup shredded yellow cheddar cheese 2 Tbsp. sour cream 1 pinch cayenne

½ tsp. granulated garlic 1 tsp. salt

1½ tsp. chives, minced (Yields 1 quart)

Set up stand mixer (or use large mixing bowl). Allow cream cheese to soften in the bowl. While it softens, turn on oven broiler. Rub a little oil on your bell pepper and jalapeño and place them under the broiler to blister the skin evenly all over. Rotate as needed. Once the skin is blistered, pull them out of the oven and remove the skin, stems and seeds. (I use the faucet to help with this; running water removes the skins and seeds easily.) Dice peppers and add them to the cream cheese. Add shredded cheddar and sour cream and mix. (If you want a very creamy cheese, you can replace the cheddar with Velveeta.) Add cayenne, granulated garlic, salt and chives while mixing. Keep mixing until spices are thoroughly incorporated. Place in storage container and let cool in fridge for at least an hour. Serve with favorite crackers. This will hold up to one week in the fridge. Matt Kulp executive chef, It’s a Southern Thing 44

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PHOTO BY JAMES STEFIUK

DON’T MISS the chance to sample bites from these and 30+ other restaurants and artisanal vendors at Sip + Savor October 14 at DPAC. Visit sipandsavornc.com to learn more and buy tickets.


W

HEN 26-YEARold restaurant icon Nana’s held its last service June 30, the resounding question was, “What’s next for Scott Howell?” A stalwart of the Durham dining scene, the eighttime James Beard Award semifinalist opened Nana’s in 1992, and the fine dining establishment was soon a firm favorite. “Nana’s was always what it was, it just got too financially difficult to operate,” Scott says. “We were doing great business, we just needed to do more business because everything got scaled out of proportion, and it just didn’t make sense anymore.” Despite continuing to run three other successful businesses (quick-service

Rick Robinson and Scott Howell at DeeLuxe Chicken, their new restaurant on Broad Street.

ScottFree The end of Nana’s marks the beginning of a new chapter for Chef Scott Howell B Y V EDA G I L B ERT | PHOTO BY BET H MA NN

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the food & drink issue

I need to finish what I started. I need to keep doing things that I think are cool and that add a lot to Durham. – SCOTT HOWELL

“COME SEE WHY LIFE’S BETTER AT THE BACH!” • New Zealand pasture-raised beef and lamb • • Mid-Atlantic raw bar • Roasted oysters • PEI mussels • • Sautéed seafood • Organic cage-free chicken • • Black bean patties • Fresh-cut fries • Small plates • • Salads • Southern Hemisphere wines • • Seasonal cocktails • 30 Craft beers on tap • • 16 Bach-made dipping sauces •

2018

READERS’ FAVORITE

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magazine

Mexican at NanaTaco, classic steakhouse NanaSteak and craftcocktail specialist Bar Virgile) Scott needed a hot minute to catch his breath. “Well … I’m kind of regrouping a little bit, I’m the first to admit, but it’s starting to come together,” Scott says. By coming together, Scott is referring to DeeLuxe Chicken, a fried chicken joint he’s opening with fellow Magnolia Grill alum, Rick Robinson. It’s on schedule to open close to the time you’re reading this. Embracing the same fast-casual concept as NanaTaco, DeeLuxe will offer a counter-service menu as well as live music – the latter once it’s a little more established in its Broad Street digs (in the former Oval Park Grille space). Speaking of live music, at the time of publication, Scott was in the process of putting a building under contract. “I’ve had some meetings and hey, I’ll be honest, there are a couple of people who doubt me – and rightly so – because they’ve seen that it’s been a difficult year for me and question whether I’m up to the task,” Scott says. “For a while I said, ‘I don’t know if I’m up to the task, I may want to rethink this.’ “But then I had this revelation. I’m 55 years old. I’ve got 10 good years left. Maybe I do want to take another chance by basically rolling the dice again on a big property.”


the food & drink issue

PREVENTATIVE DENTAL CARE • COSMETIC & RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY • TMJ TREATMENT

That property is in East Durham: “lower Durham,” or “LoDu,” as Scott calls it (it’s a nod to Denver’s thriving LoDo district) – he’s hoping it’ll catch on. Though Scott is still crossing the t’s and dotting the i’s, he’s eager to roll up his sleeves and get in on the ground floor of this new venture. Feasibility planning is underway, and though the concept is ever-evolving, patrons can expect a family-friendly live music venue with separate dining and drinking areas to cater to different tastes. In fitting with the warehouse setting, Scott shares that the aptly named Scrap Yard is not going to be fancy. “We’re going to open it up, clean it up, but it’s going to be gritty,” he says. Though Scrap Yard is at least a year away, Scott’s enthusiasm is obvious, as is his drive to succeed. “I’ve been excited about Durham for 30 years, but I’m really excited about what’s going on now – there’s a lot of cool stuff ...” Scott says. “I need to finish what I started. I need to keep doing things that I think are cool and that add a lot to Durham.” And as for the former Nana’s location? “There’ll be something back in that area,” Scott assures. “I love that space. I’ll do a groovy little place that I know the locals will come to. That was one of the things that I was most proud about – that the locals kept coming back.”

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Meat in The Middle

There’s a lot of romanticism around farming, but the reality is that most farmers have other jobs, and it’s difficult to support a family just from farming. By working with Jennifer and Tina (left) at Firsthand Foods, many farmers like Chad (a fireman) and Kim Woods (who works in agricultural extension) of Spring Crest Farm are able to stay small and earn revenue off their animals to pay their taxes and keep their farm in the family (in this instance, it’s been in Kim’s since 1879). 48

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These two entrepreneurs developed a business around acting as an intermediary between farmers and consumers B Y V EDA G I L B ERT | PHOTO BY BET H MA NN

ENNIFER CURTIS AND TINA PREVATTE LEVY “Our processors didn’t necessarily know how to fabricate something in started Firsthand Foods in the Bull City eight years ago. a way to make chefs happy – how thick a pork chop should be for Nana’s Before that, Jennifer was running a small project at N.C. State – so we became that feedback loop of how to get this right,” Tina says. University, working with livestock producers to help them market Fast-forward to 2018, and Firsthand Foods is a viable business, their products directly to consumers. She met Tina, who was halfway sourcing animals directly from 45 small livestock producers, all of through her business degree at UNC. The pair collaborated on a whom raise their animals outdoors, on pastures, without growthfinancial model, looking at what was needed for livestock producers to promoting antibiotics or added hormones. They supply nearly 30 sell their products more effectively. Durham restaurants with their cuts of pork, beef and lamb, including “That was just the beginning of us realizing that we shared a passion the aforementioned restaurants as well as The Boot, Dashi, Bleu Olive for using business as a tool for social environmental good and helping Bistro, Mateo and the Fairview Dining Room at Washington Duke small-scale livestock producers thrive by building a regional food Inn, among others. system that works for everyone,” Jennifer says. “What we do is all the legwork to get the “I just got hooked on the idea of building meat to market,” Jennifer says. “The farmer NORTH CAROLINA something that would get food dollars from can focus on farming, and our customers can HAS A RICH this thriving economy of the Triangle out to focus on serving up delicious meat.” these more rural counties, where our food is Butchering is done off-site by three COMMUNITY OF being produced,” Tina adds. USDA-inspected meat processing plants SMALL-SCALE Firsthand Foods officially launched in 2010 (to their specifications), vacuum sealed and FARMERS, AND WHAT as a food truck, one of the first three in the transported to the Firsthand Foods Durham area, and at a time when downtown was very warehouse for distribution. WE’RE FOCUSED different. “There were farmers out there raising ON IS KEEPING “The growth of Firsthand Foods has their animals, the processors were there and THAT LIVESTOCK really been in tandem with the growth of the the market was there asking for more local, Durham food scene and the food community,” COMPONENT. pasteurized meat, but there needed to be a Tina says. business in the middle connecting the dots – JENNIFER CURTIS Jennifer and Tina had a lot of mentors and making sure that it got from A to B to along the way in this city known for its C with everybody getting their needs met support of small-scale entrepreneurs, and even received infrastructure along the way,” Tina says. “So we designed ourselves to make these support at Bull City Forward, a now-defunct business incubator, connections and to ensure everyone is getting treated fairly.” where they first met Seth Gross of Bull City Burger & Brewery. In the last eight years, Firsthand Foods has spent $5 million “Bull City Burger is our biggest restaurant customer, and we’ve been with local farmers and another $2.5 million with local processors, supplying them since the day they opened,” Tina says. generating $7.5 million for our local food system. Of that, around But when Jennifer and Tina first started out, local and quality 20% of revenue stays with the business while the remaining 80% were not necessarily synonymous. Overcoming that perception was goes right back to farmers and processors, giving as much of that a challenge they faced head-on, putting in place a rigorous quality food dollar back as possible. program for their farmers to follow, thus arming them with the “Transparency is a core value in everything we do,” Tina says. information they needed to meet the market – what they refer to as a “From the pragmatic level of being able to tell customers what farm “feedback loop.” Scott Howell (NanaSteak, NanaTaco, Bar Virgile) their meat comes from, but also in terms of our farmers ... they was an early adopter of this, providing Jennifer and Tina with good know exactly where their meat’s going, and the customer knows feedback who in turn passed it onto the processors. exactly who they’re supporting.”  september 2018

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Farm to Folks

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E CAN ALL AGREE THAT OUR BOUNTIFUL FARMERS MARKETS ARE TOP-NOTCH, providing us with weekly destinations for meeting with farmers and picking up a good supply of meats, produce, fresh flowers and more. But sometimes we don’t always make it to the markets and still want that fresh, local produce on our dinner table. There are several farms and businesses here that have started CSAs (community supported agriculture) and produce boxes, some with missions that extend beyond just helping the customer and the farmer. Here are just a few:

 CROPS BY KIDS Join a CSA that supports Durham Public Schools (DPS) students. The Hub Farm has a student-run model that recruited four volunteer student interns this summer from Northern High School to run the CSA alongside Hub Farm staff. “We are there to teach and guide, but the students complete all the tasks,” says Ashley Meredith, program coordinator at the farm. “Each week they rotate through four leadership roles – animal care, sanitation, harvesting and packing/recording – working together to complete the CSA before lunchtime. In the afternoon, they have the opportunity to try their hand at other farm responsibilities, including addedvalue products (this is led by Peter Brodksy, head of the culinary department at Northern, helping students make pesto and pickles and the like for CSA customers) and even beekeeping. They also have the opportunity to participate in the weekly farmstand – a hands-on way to learn about entrepreneurship, marketing and agribusiness.” For the last week of the CSA, the staff steps aside, and the students put what they’ve learned into practice and manage the farm. All the revenue from the 13 pre-paid CSA memberships goes to purchasing supplies and paying the students a bi-weekly stipend. “Our CSAs have limited spots and always fill up fast, so you should email dpshubfarm@gmail.com to get on the CSA mailing list to hear early about membership opportunities,” Ashley recommends. You can also support the farm by participating in monthly volunteer work days on the 50

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first Saturday of every month, volunteering for general garden work on weekdays, donating to the Friends of the Hub Farm nonprofit or just spread the word.

UGLY DELICIOUS

Ungraded Produce is on a mission. To get “ugly” produce – atypically

sized, shaped or colored, but still high-quality – into the hands of consumers in order to fight food waste and improve food access in our area. The subscription-based produce delivery service bridges the gap between this underappreciated produce and people who need it. “Every year, 20% of the fruits and vegetables grown in the U.S. go unpicked or unsold due to being ‘ugly,’” says Founder Courtney Bell. “From there, this produce rots and generates greenhouse gases. Meanwhile, millions of Americans lack access to a convenient and affordable PHOTO BY LAUREN V. ALLEN source of fresh produce.” Courtney, a 2017 Duke grad, founded Ungraded Produce her sophomore year. “I actually developed an interest in sustainability and food systems in high school, which influenced my decision to study environmental science at Duke,” she says. Her team currently includes two full-time employees and seven part-time employees, and a network of about 20 suppliers, including Eastern Carolina Organics in Durham. The service distributes to Durham, which has the largest customer base, and surrounding cities and towns. Each Ungraded Produce box is about 30-50% cheaper than grocery store prices, and there is no upfront cost to join. You just pay box by box. “Because we buy and sell this produce that would otherwise go unsold, we can help the average American household save $250 per year on their produce,” Courtney says. Ungraded Produce also donates its surplus produce each week to local food pantries like the Durham Tech Community College pantry. “We typically donate a couple hundred pounds of produce each week and will continue to increase our donation amount as our company grows,” Courtney says. Find more information at ungradedproduce.com.

 LITTLE FARM, BIG DREAMS Born-and-raised Durhamite Dave Henderson had farmed for about 10 years, first at Four Leaf Farm in Rougemont and then managing a small-scale urban farm in Chicago that focused on specialty crops for


the food & drink issue

high-end local restaurants and a weekly farmers market. He and his wife, Caitlin Law, decided to return to North Carolina to start their own farm, and Red’s Quality Acre came into existence in 2015. “Dave went to Chicago with the goal of learning as much as he could, [and then] return home and grow for his community,” Caitlin says. They grew on one acre that first season and have grown to two acres of production, utilizing all organic and sustainable practices, having been Certified Naturally Grown (a peer-reviewed certification process for small farmers) – for the past two seasons. Apart from their CSA, they also sell wholesale to Weaver Street Market and Durham restaurants. Red’s CSA is comprised of about 50-60 members a season (April-October) with a variety of share options in order to make it sustainable, accessible and enjoyable for members. This year, Red’s has drop-off locations in Watts-Hillandale and at the farm, off Mt. Sinai Rd. on the border of Durham and Orange County. “We [also] do a bi-weekly drop off at Big Spoon Roasters for their staff, who receive an annual CSA stipend, as well as a bi-weekly CSA at Carolina Friends School for the staff and families,” Caitlin says. “We think CSAs are a mutually successful model for farmers and consumers alike,” Caitlin adds. “By joining, a member is providing the essential capital farmers need to buy seeds, soil amendments and other large costs to get the season started. We spend [close to] 80% (excluding labor) of our annual budget in the winter and early spring, while very little is being grown and sales are at their lowest.” Caitlin says they ask that CSA members sign up before the season starts, but are happy to accommodate new members who email csa@redsqualityacre.com.

FRESH FROM THE FARMSTAND

Funny Girl Farm’s first CSA was a simple egg share when the

farm started about five years ago. “At that time, we had more pasture-raised eggs than we could sell!” says Marketing and Sales Manager Casey Roe. “Now customers clamor over our eggs, and we have a modern, flexible and convenient farmstand CSA [where] members can choose from all of our farmstand offerings.” Funny Girl’s CSA is unique in that way – members can just drop by the farmstand on their own schedule during its regular hours and shop from a diverse array of consciously grown vegetables and fruits, eggs, mushrooms, honey, cheeses, meats and much more. “We load a card in your name and keep a running balance for you, so you can shop at your pace and don’t miss out if you go out of town,” Casey says. “We offer half-shares and pro-rated shares. We’ll find a CSA share amount that works, and your balance rolls from one session to the next. We want our CSA to work for you!”

The farmstand also offers a chance to meet the farmers you’re buying from and see how your food is grown on special CSA member tours. Other perks include member deals: One or more farmstand items are on sale for CSA members each week, and returning members earn a bonus farmstand credit (up to $25). “Our CSA members support the success of our small farm, the local economy, opportunities for beginning farmers, and mindful stewardship of the land and soil,” Casey says. “Upfront payment helps us to invest in seeds, supplies, equipment and our farmers.” Funny Girl is accepting signups for its fall (September-November) and fall and winter (September 2018-February 2019) farmstand CSA sessions. Find more info at funnygirlfarm.wixsite.com/funnygirlfarm/csa.

Get It GreenToGo

G

REENTOGO JUST WRAPPED UP ITS INAUGURAL YEAR of implementation as the first city-wide reusable, returnable takeout container service on the East Coast. Offering restaurant customers the option of choosing reusable containers rather than throwaway boxes, people pay $25 for a one-box membership (which covers costs of the box, return stations, operations and management, etc.), receive their food in the box(es) from participating restaurants, take the food home to eat it, and then return the containers to any station in town. GreenToGo collects the containers, transports them to the central wash facility for cleaning and sanitation, and then redistributes them to the restaurants. Currently available in 25 restaurants, GreenToGo expands to an average of three new restaurants each month. In July, COPA, Dain’s Place and GRUB Durham joined the list, and Blue Corn Cafe and the new Neomonde location downtown were slated to join in August. “We’re taking our experience and best practices to the next level by exploring how reuse systems like ours can be scaled to other industries,” says Crystal Dreisbach, executive director of Don’t Waste Durham, which manages GreenToGo. “We are also currently developing a new technology that will automate and simplify our existing system. We expect it to improve the customer checkout and return experience, strengthen inventory management and further expand our positive environmental and economic impact.” For a list of participating restaurants, visit durhamgreentogo.com/restaurants.

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chef’s table

We asked some of our chefs, restaurant owners and food suppliers why they participate in the Durham Living Wage Project (DLWP), which identifies businesses and nonprofits that pay a living wage, deemed at $13.35 per hour in 2017. (This will be in effect until June 31, 2019, when the rate will increase to $15/hour.)

Ali Rudel owner, East Durham Bake Shop

I view paying a living wage as a part of our commitment to sustainability. We make great efforts to source products from small, local producers, and we make sure that all goods going to our customers are either recyclable or compostable – these things cost our brand-new business more money than other options available, they require more effort, more time, but to us, it’s just the right thing to do. Paying a living wage is the same – it’s difficult. As a food business, we work with really tiny margins. Paying a living wage is admittedly one of the greatest expenses and has been incredibly challenging to work into our business model. But our team is our business, and if they aren’t being paid enough to meet basic needs, then I don’t consider our business to be sustainable.

Sarah Parker owner, Durham Catering Company Participating in the DLWP is one of my highest priorities as a business owner and something I’m incredibly proud of. Paying a living wage treats our team with dignity and helps provide a better overall quality of life for them and their families. DLWP also creates the standard for a modern economy, providing justice for people who have been marginalized in our society – and that’s the Durham I want to do business in!

Lindsay Moriarty chef and owner, Monuts

From the beginning, I knew that if I was going to run a restaurant, I was going to do things a bit differently. Simply put, the day that Monuts does not pay every employee a living wage is the day that Monuts will no longer exist. Yes, I’m in this industry to make money and provide for my family, but I refuse to do that at the expense of my employees’ welfare. As a small business owner, it is my duty to be a responsible employer, and to me, that means I will not hire an employee unless I know I can pay them a living wage. At the end of the day, a living wage isn’t that much. If we, the public, want to keep eating out and enjoying restaurants, then our society needs to find a way to value our restaurant employees in a more meaningful and sustainable way. Nobody who works 40 hours a week should have to struggle to make ends meet and provide for their family, but the reality is that many people in this industry do exactly that.

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Casey Roe marketing and sales manager, Funny Girl Farm It’s a huge challenge for a small farm to make a profit. Labor is our biggest expense, but we know the people on our team are at the heart of our success. Our employees put their hard work (and a lot of sweat!) into our business, and it is important to know that we can all make ends meet. The DLWP provides a balanced guideline and ensures that even our starting salaries provide a living wage for our employees.

Melissa Katrincic co-owner and CEO/president, Durham Distillery When we opened the tasting room in October 2015, the new law for being able to sell consumers one bottle per year went into effect. We wanted our front-of-house staff to be as passionate about our mission and our products, so being a Living Wage employer was an important aspect for hiring experienced talent. At the time, our goal was to break even on revenue from the bottle sales and our staff’s wages. We still have that as the barometer today. A hundred percent of our profit has been reinvested into the distillery, our growth and our employees. I think Living Wage certification has enabled us to hire experienced talent more quickly, and likewise, potential employees knew they were coming on board as an essential team member. The other side of our retail sales that often surprises guests is that we do not ask for any gratuities as part of our check-out payments [like] you often see in the service industry. The team answers readily that it’s because we are a Living Wage employer – and the best thing that anyone can do as a “tip” is to spread the word about us.

Shawn Stokes chef and owner, Luna Rotisserie & Empanadas Because turnover in our industry is high and costly, paying our staff a living wage saves us money over the long term. For example, if we lose two line cooks in a year, it costs around $6,000 to train replacements. But if we increase their wage by three dollars, say from $12 to $15 an hour, it costs us the same – $6,000. Now, if that line cook stays with me for two or three years because she’s making a living wage, we can give additional raises and still come out ahead. It’s a win-win situation. Paying a living wage also strengthens our local economy. When employees like ours earn more than the minimum wage, they spend that money in area businesses, which in turn creates demand for more jobs.


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T H E

U L T I M A T E

Skip the travel expenses and explore your own fabulous backyard BY AN DR EA GRIFFITH CASH PH OTOG R APHY B Y B ETH MANN

Take in the view of American Tobacco Campus as you lounge beside the heated pool at the Aloft downtown. 54

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S T A Y C A T I O N

I

’M A STAYCATION EVANGELIST. I think of even the most boring Wednesday nights as a staycation. Why cook an uninspired meal when my husband and I can venture off to a favorite restaurant that hasn’t seen us in four months? Why watch Netflix on the sofa when we can head to a Durham Bulls game? But a real staycation means clearing your calendar, booking overnight accommodations september 2018

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neighborhoods

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s tay c at i o n

and committing to backyard exploration. The upsides to a staycation are many. Save money on airfare, rental cars and gas. Plan two days or plan a week. Lose a lot of the anxiety that comes with navigating a totally unfamiliar place. If you have kids, pets or other major responsibilities, you can get to them quickly if there is an emergency. Incorporate various friends into your plans, something that’s impossible when you go hundreds of miles away. But the biggest perk, to me, is that you gain a new appreciation for your city. Which makes returning to your everyday life that much more enjoyable. We spend so much energy (and money!) on travel so that we can gawk at other cities and countries, and I’m a huge fan of the vacation, too. But we often neglect to bring any sense of wonder to our own surroundings. It’s the equivalent, I think, of working extremely hard on a distant friendship, but failing to nurture the relationship you have with your life partner. I staycation the same way I vacation. Meaning: It’s all about balance. A perfect day brings a relaxing activity, a sweat-inducing activity, a cultural activity and an indulgent activity (or two).

RELAX I find shopping at Letters Bookshop, Parker & Otis, Indio, Bungalow, Vintage Home South and Everyday

Magic to be incredibly soothing. Same with Durham Bulls games.

There’s something so relaxing about the slow rhythm of baseball. Other ideas: Stroll through Sarah P. Duke Gardens and venture

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a place four miles from your home, but I want to stress the importance of packing a bag and escaping your regular life, bed and housework. I recommend the elegant and modern JB Duke Hotel, which is currently offering a few staycation deals. And the Aloft is convenient for walking all over downtown.

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s tay c at i o n

INGEST SOME CULTURE Speaking

of The Carolina Theatre, take in a show there, at DPAC or at The Blue Note Grill. Some of my favorite concerts ever? Ones where I knew very little about the act going into it. Check out the Museum of Durham History. Get a selfie in front of each of Durham’s murals. (You can tour the murals on two wheels via Mural Durham bike tours.) Don’t miss the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University – I’m dying to see the new Amy Sherald painting. And it’s always fun to see what’s new, art wise, at 21c Museum Hotel.

WORK UP A SWEAT Run, walk

or bike the American Tobacco Trail. Take a cycling class at SYNCSTUDIO downtown. Start Lunch at Toast: Local farm egg, Taleggio and chive panini, and crostini topped with garlicky your day with Brunch + Burn mushrooms with thyme and Gorgonzola; Merguez sausage with chickpea-tomato puree; at Unscripted Durham (also and fig with Gorgonzola and balsamic. hosted by SYNCSTUDIO) or with La Vita Yoga on the rooftop of The Durham Hotel. Hike at the Eno or hit the Al into Duke Chapel for some extra serenity. Take in the art at Buehler Cross Country Trail. Pleiades. Book a massage at Massage Envy. Treat yourself to a mani/pedi. Get your hair blown out. Enjoy afternoon tea at the Here’s where your staycation to-do list will Washington Duke Inn & Golf Club. Buy tickets to an afternoon movie at The Carolina Theatre or Stadium 10 at Northgate Mall. get super long, super fast. Start by thinking of the culinary gems you’ve never experienced. The ones that make you feel ridiculous. Head back to your hotel for an afternoon nap. You’re paying for that “How could you have not been there?” your friends tease. Maybe it’s room. Use it!

INDULGE

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s tay c at i o n

ZENN PLASTIC SURGERY Visit our office or shop online at zennplasticsurgery.com Rose’s, NanaSteak, Juju, Yamazushi

(book way ahead), Toast, Taqueria la Vaquita, Gocciolina, King’s Sandwich Shop or Vin Rouge. Then, make a list of newer places you haven’t gotten around to checking out. (One thing you’ll learn when you plan a staycation is that “new” to you might mean three years old. It’s so hard to keep up!) Jack Tar and The Colonel’s Daughter, Happy and Hale, East Durham Bake Shop, Mothers & Sons, Eastcut Sandwich Bar, Hutchins Garage and Cucciolo Osteria. Don’t forget the drinks: Pour Taproom, The Wine Feed, Foster Street Coffee, Bull City Ciderworks, Bar Brunello. If you want to hit up one of your go-to restaurants, consider doing so during a different time of day. (For example, Mateo has an incredible lunch menu, but most people think of this as a dinner destination!) When mapping out your day, pick one huge meal per day. Or choose one expensive meal a day and combine that with two more affordable options. (Example: Happy and Hale for breakfast, Taqueria La Vaquita for lunch and NanaSteak for dinner!) Happy staycationing! Durham will never look the same again. Andrea Griffith Cash, the former senior vice president of content at Durham Magazine, now owns and operates Andrea Cash Creative and plans staycations as often as she can.

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home

BOUNDARIES Carver Street to the north, Hillandale Road to the east, Cole Mill Road to the west and Croasdaile Drive to the south. POPULATION More than 200 homes and also nearly 300 apartments, with slightly more than 800 residents. HOME STYLES The homes range in style from traditional Williamsburg exteriors to more modern and contemporary styles. MEDIAN HOME SALE PRICE $500,000

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What We Lo v e A b ou t Livi ng in

croasdaile The Foleys found their true home in this tight-knit neighborhood BY MORGAN CARTIE R W E STON PH OTOGRAP HY B Y B E TH MANN

HOUGH ITS HOMES AND AMENITIES offer many modern comforts, Croasdaile’s history is rooted in Durham’s early rural communities. John Sprunt Hill, prominent Durham financier in the early 20th century, was an avid golfer. He invested in several golf clubs during the Great Depression, including the Durham Country Club (started by him and his father-in-law, George W. Watts, around 1910; the original holes became Hillandale

Charlene Foley helps daughter Ryan, a fifth-grader at Excelsior Classical Academy, with her math homework at the kitchen table.

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neighborhoods

ABOVE LEFT These vases contain sea glass, shark teeth and shells that the family has picked up on their many trips to Topsail Island. ABOVE RIGHT Ryan and Fenway, the family’s English bulldog.

Golf Course) and Forest Hills (now a neighborhood park and clubhouse) and owned or

developed several large tracts of land. By the late 1950s, his daughter, Frances Hill Fox, and her husband, Dr. Herbert Fox, had inherited one of these pieces of land. They decided to transform 500 acres of the Hillandale Dairy Farm into a golf course community and established Croasdaile Country Club in 1966. They worked with prominent architect Archie Davis to design and build the clubhouse; George W. Cobb to design the golf course; and they designated 200 homesites to be developed by Charlie Bradshaw and Willie York, who also developed Cameron Village in Raleigh. Construction on the homes went on from the 1960s until the early 1990s. MAKING A HOUSE A HOME When Mike and Charlene Foley purchased their Croasdaile home in 2001, they only planned to stay a little while. “We found this house after we had lived in Charlene’s

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ABOVE LEFT Mike fires up the grill on the Foleys’ patio. “We love to relax and entertain outdoors,” Charlene says. ABOVE The home, built in 1982, today is 3,100 square feet with four bedrooms and three full baths. BELOW A watercolor painting of Charlene and Mike’s first house in Durham, which was in Watts-Hillandale, as well as its original 1920s blueprints are displayed on the mantel.


A real estate company is like a home. The great ones have a strong foundation. grandmother’s house in Watts-Hillandale. We made some improvements on that house before selling it and really enjoyed the renovation process, so decided to buy something else and do the same thing,” Mike says. “But here we sit,” Charlene adds with a laugh. Built in 1982, their home was one of the last to be completed in the original Croasdaile community as envisioned by the Foxes. “This was not the most desirable place at the time we were searching,” Charlene says. “This house sat vacant for two years, and at one point was at auction – no one wanted it.” When the Foleys moved in as a young married couple, the home, though dated, was the perfect size; two children, 17 years and a 75-pound English bulldog later, it’s evolved with the family. They have completed three major renovation projects over the years, as well as several smaller ones. “Joe F. Berini Construction Co. has been our standby for all of the major work, but we’ve done a few things ourselves, too,” Charlene says. The first renovation started shortly after they moved in and focused on overhauling the kitchen, which was dark and traditional. Later, the indoor and outdoor living areas were extended into the backyard, doubling the size of the family room and adding a screened porch and quiet patio area. “We

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neighborhoods

WELCOME TO THE CLUB Elizabeth and Ryan Wainio, Mike and Charlene, and Tim and Edie Oakley enjoy drinks together at the clubhouse bar.

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Croasdaile Country Club recently underwent a major renovation to its clubhouse. Though the exterior has retained its traditional look, the restaurant and interior are more modern and casual. “Country clubs can have a stuffy reputation, but CCC couldn’t be further from that in spirit,” Mike says. “The remodel reflects who we are and the welcoming atmosphere we have.”


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OCTOBER 13, 2018 For more information or to register please visit:

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neighborhoods In 2016, the Foleys expanded the kitchen/ laundry into the garage (they bumped out the garage, so it is still the same size), adding an eat-in kitchen area and wet bar.

love to relax and entertain outdoors,” Charlene says. “It’s very peaceful here.”

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ON THE MOVE (BUT A L S O S TAY I N G P U T ) In 2016, the rest of the first floor was overhauled. “The guest bathroom was gutted and modernized,” Charlene says. “It was our first foray into demo work.” The garage was then bumped out to make room for a stylish eat-in kitchen, wet bar and, most importantly, a laundry/mudroom combo to help keep the busy family organized. Son Jake, 15, is in ninth grade at Riverside High School. “We’ve loved every minute of Durham Public Schools,” says Charlene, noting the fantastic global education opportunities


neighborhoods “When we moved in, the original owners had this room set up as a sitting room, and it had traditional columns,” Charlene says. “We turned it into a dining room and did a lot of decor and the wood paneling five years ago. You name a room, we’ve touched it in some way.”

Jake received at Carrington Middle School. Daughter Ryan, 10, is in fifth grade at Excelsior Classical Academy. Prior to Excelsior, she was at Easley Elementary, which Jake also attended. “We changed schools purely to get her exposed to another learning curriculum and environment, particularly to carry her through middle school years,” Charlene says. The family also loves to travel, and their favorite destinations are reflected in the home’s decor, including jars of shark teeth from Topsail Island and a painting they picked up on a trip to Denver that hangs in the kitchen. Both kids are involved in sports, too, including the Croasdaile swim team. “We had our largest team ever this year

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neighborhoods

IN EVERY ISSUE

Real Estate Gallery Homes • Condos • Apartments

Ryan points to the location of one of Mike’s dry cleaning businesses, White Star Cleaners.

– more than 80 kids,” Charlene says. “It’s amazing to get the whole community together to cheer them on.” That sense of family and community is one that Mike and Charlene have always felt a part of. They met at Northern High School, but went their separate ways for college. Mike, whose family founded Regency Cleaners in 1982, never saw himself taking on the family business. “We honestly never thought we’d end up back in Durham,” Mike says. “But now I can’t imagine life anywhere else.” In addition to its convenience, Croasdaile has offered the Foleys the sense of home that they wanted for Jake and Ryan. “It feels like we’re 10 minutes from everything, from quiet walks to downtown restaurants,” Charlene says (Jack Tar is a current favorite). “One of our stores is on Ninth Street, and I can’t say enough about the revitalization of that area,” Mike adds. “Dain’s Place is a standby, and our kids have loved Elmo’s Diner since they were toddlers – it’s all part of the life here.” Charlene currently serves on the board of directors for Croasdaile Country Club and has worked for BlueCross BlueShield for the past 21 years. “I love being able to walk into the clubhouse and see so many friendly faces. We have friends from age 5 to 95. Our kids have close friends they have grown up with, and we can really say we know our neighbors,” she says. “I moved around a lot growing up,” Mike says. “I didn’t want that for my kids – I wanted them to feel really grounded. And we couldn’t have picked a better place.” 72

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Showcasing Realtors, Builders & Leasing Agents For advertising information, call 919.933.1551 or email advertising@durhammag.com


COMMERCIAL • HOMES • CONDOS • APARTMENTS

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Pursuant to the Fair Housing Act, this housing is intended for occupancy by at least one person 55 years of age or older per home. Existing and proposed amenities for the community are subject to changes, substitutions and/or deletions without notice. Lennar makes no representation or guarantee that the community or any amenities will be built out as currently planned. Lennar’s automated homes are built according to the Wi-Fi Alliance’s program guidelines for Wi-Fi Certified Home Designs. See the Wi-Fi Alliance’s website at www.wi-fi.org for additional information regarding the Wi-Fi Certified Home Design program. The Wi-Fi Alliance also certifies home designs after review of a home floor plan which may occur after your closing. Wireless performance in homes will vary due to design changes, construction changes, placement of furnishings and appliances, usage, and local conditions. Network performance will be affected by network configuration, the number of users and the type of use. Homeowners are responsible for providing their own Internet connection and determining their own bandwidth needs, which may vary. Lennar does not guarantee that networks, equipment or services will meet all homeowner needs. Homeowners are also responsible for configuring all security features. Lennar does not warrant or represent that any network or network device is secure or can prevent all privacy intrusions, malware, or cyber-attacks, even when correctly configured. Certain products and services are provided by third parties, and not Lennar. Lennar does not guarantee any equipment or services provided by third parties. Additional disclosures and disclaimers relating to The Connected Home program will apply. See your purchase agreement and related disclosures for details. Models/ lifestyle photos do not reflect racial or ethnic preference.Visit Lennar.com or see a Lennar New Home Consultant for further details and important legal disclaimers. This is not an offer in states where prior registration is required. Void where prohibited by law. Copyright © 2018 Lennar Corporation. All rights reserved. Lennar and the Lennar logo are U.S. registered service marks or service marks of Lennar Corporation and/or its subsidiaries. (24591) 02/16/18

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taste NORTHERN DURHAM / NEAR INTERSTATE 85 GUESS ROAD Northgate Mall 1058 W. Club Blvd. • A & D Buffalo’s • Baja Shack • Cajun Cafe & Grill • Carolina BBQ & Chicken • Chef’s House • Chopsticks • Cinnamonster • The Cookie Store • Esmeralda’s Cafe • Greek Cuisine • Haagen-Dazs/Planet Smoothie • Pretzel Twister • Salcedo’s Pizza • Subway • Tomo Japan

Full Service C&H Cafeteria 919-286-7303 Green Paradise 919-286-4009 Pan Pan Diner 919-416-1950 Randy’s Pizza 919-286-7272 Ruby Tuesday 919-286-5100 Vegan Flava Cafe 919-960-1832

Gocciolina Upscale Italian fare in a cozy atmosphere. This wildly popular restaurant has graced our Best Of list again and again. 3314 Guess Rd.; 919-973-4089; gocciolina.com Hog Heaven Bar-B-Q Homestyle Eastern barbecue, fried chicken and seafood. Enjoy with a giant glass of iced tea. 2419 Guess Rd.; 919-286-7447; hogheavenbarbecue.com Jimmy’s Famous Hot Dogs Old-fashioned burgers, fries and a mean Carolina-style dog. 2728 Guess Rd.; 919-471-0005; jimmysfamoushotdogs.com La Cacerola Cafe & Restaurant Honduran specialties such as pupusas and chorizo asado. 2016 Guess Rd.; 919-294-6578 Thai Spoon All the trappings for a delicious experience: pad thai, drunken noodles and curries. 3808 Guess Rd.; 919-908-7539 HILLSBOROUGH ROAD Bennett Pointe Grill & Bar There’s something to please all palates on the large menu of this multiregional American restaurant. 4625 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-382-9431; bpgrill.com Shanghai Restaurant Established in the 1980s, this Cantonese restaurant offers both Americanized and authentic dishes. 3433 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-383-7581; shanghaidurham.com Wimpy’s Grill Specializing in old-fashioned burgers and hot dogs. Open till 2 p.m. weekdays, cash only. 617 Hicks St.; 919-286-4380; wimpysgrillnc.com

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HILLANDALE ROAD Bleu Olive High-quality comfort food incorporating local ingredients and Mediterranean flair. Family operated and chef-driven. 1821 Hillandale Rd.; 919 383-8502; bleuolivebistro. com BR El Corral Mexican Restaurant Authentic Mexican faijitas, tacos, enchiladas and a great chorizo queso dip. 1821 Hillandale Rd., Ste. 8; 919-309-4543; elcorralnc.com Melo Trattoria & Tapas Classic Italian - think spaghetti and meatballs and chicken parmigiana meets tapas. 1821 Hillandale Rd., Ste. 3; 919-384-9080; melotrattoria.com

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Brunch Outdoor Seating Full Bar Kid’s Menu Beer & Wine

NEAR DOWNTOWN

BROAD STREET Joe Van Gogh Cozy and full of natural light, this local coffee shop sources quality beans for a superior coffee. 1104-B Broad St.; 919-286-4800; joevangogh.com.

Pomodoro Italian Kitchen Homemade sauces on fresh-made pizzas, pastas and other Italian favorites. 1811 Hillandale Rd.; 919-382-2915; pomodoroitaliankitchen.info

The Palace International African cuisine including curry goat, dovi chicken and samosas. 1104-A Broad St.; 919-416-4922; thepalaceinternational.com

NORTH POINTE DRIVE The French Corner Bakery Artisan breads, beautifully crafted tarts and pastries, plus lunch. Baking classes taught by French-trained master baker chef Benjamin Messaoui. 2005 North Pointe Dr., Ste. B.; 919-698-9836

Watts Grocery A Durham native, chef Amy Tornquist artfully develops Southern-inspired dishes with seasonal, local ingredients. 1116 Broad St.; 919-416-5040; wattsgrocery.com BR

MORE NORTHERN DURHAM DINING Alpaca Peruvian rotisserie chicken. Need we say more? 302 Davidson Ave.; 919-220-9028; alpacachicken.com Bullock’s Bar-B-Cue A staple in the community since 1952, serving up soul in Eastern-style barbecue, Brunswick stew and fried chicken. 3330 Quebec Dr.; 919-383-3211; bullocks-bbq.com

Wellspring Cafe Salad and hot bar in the Whole Foods Market, plus sandwiches, pizza and sushi. 621 Broad St.; 919-286-2290 ERWIN ROAD Another Broken Egg Cafe Unique breakfast and lunch menu including cinnamon roll french toast and a scrambled skillet. 2608 Erwin Rd., Ste. 120; 919-381-5172; anotherbrokenegg.com BR

Goodberry’s Frozen Custard All-natural frozen custard with a variety of topping options. 3906 N. Roxboro St.; 919-477-2552; goodberrys.com

Black Twig Cider House Cider-and-sausage focused restaurant with more than 80 ciders on draft and in bottles. Try the “Northern Spy” and join in a Txotx! 2812 Erwin Rd., Ste. 104; 919-321-0203; blacktwigciderhouse.com

Picnic Order the pulled pork, of course, but also the fried chicken, mac and cheese, and hushpuppies. 1647 Cole Mill Rd.; 919-908-9128; picnicdurham.com BR

Early Bird Donuts Doughnuts, biscuits, croissant breakfast sandwiches and coffee. Try the cinnamon sugar donut. 2816 Erwin Rd., Ste. 101; 984-888-0417

Silver Spoon Restaurant A large menu of breakfast favorites like strawberry waffles and omelettes, plus sandwiches, pastas, salads and kids plates. 5230 N. Roxboro St.; 919-479-7172; silverspoonnc.com

Itaewon Grill Build-your-own Korean barbecue bowls with a variety of meats and meat substitutes, toppings and sauces. 2608 Erwin Rd., Ste. 132; 919-864-9742; itaewongrillkbbq.com

Skrimp Shack Fast casual seafood restaurant serving addictive shrimp, fish and a variety of other fried and grilled seafood. 3600 N. Duke St., Ste. 28B; 919-477-0776; theskrimpshack.com

MediTerra Grill Mediterranean and Lebanese cuisine, offering gyros, kabobs and curry. 2608 Erwin Rd., Ste. 136; 919-383-0066; mediterranc.com

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Naan Stop Indian Cuisine Authentic Indian cuisine with dishes like daal makhani, paneer tikka masala and biryani. 2812 Erwin Rd., Ste. 103; 919-891-3488; naanstopduke.com Nosh “Eclectic foodstuffs” like “Mike’s Breakfast Pizza,” “Coach’s Queso”sandwich and the brown derby chopper salad. 2812 Erwin Rd., Ste. 101; 919-383-4747; noshfood.com BR Saladelia Cafe Espresso and organic smoothie bar, scratchmade pastries, gourmet sandwiches, salads and soups. Open for dine-in or carry-out. 2424 Erwin Rd.; 919-416-1400; saladelia.com BR

Smashburger Unique burgers smashed on the grill, chicken and salads. 2608 Erwin Rd., Ste. 116; 919-237-1070; smashburger.com Sushi Love Specialty sushi rolls such as the “Honey Love” roll topped with mango and kiwi, as well as other Asian cuisine favorites. 2812 Erwin Rd., Ste. 204; 919-309-2401; sushilove.org Tamale Factory and Tequila Bar Authentic Mexican food and drinks, including tamales made daily, scratch-made salsas and sauces, and margaritas made using fresh ingredients. 2816 Erwin Rd., Ste. 205, 919-237-1116; tamalefactorync.com ERWIN SQUARE Guasaca Arepas, salads and rice bowls with South American flavor. 2200 W. Main St., Ste. A100; 919-294-8939; guasaca.com

NEWS BITES

MarketPlace JB Duke Hotel’s main restaurant, open for breakfast, lunch and dinner. 230 Science Dr.; 919-660-6400; jbdukehotel.com NINTH STREET DISTRICT Alpaca Peruvian rotisserie chicken. Need we say more? 703-A Ninth St.; 919-908-1597; alpacachicken.com Banh’s Cuisine Vietnamese and Chinese dishes with great vegetarian specials. Cash only! 750 Ninth St.; 919-286-5073

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Parizade Sophisticated Mediterranean food like grilled bronzino, Australian lamb chops and pan-fried Roman dumplings. 2200 W. Main St.; 919-286-9712; parizadedurham.com

AT OUR CORE Core Cafe & Catering recently opened at 3211 Shannon Rd., Ste. 106, providing locally sourced foods and a variety of vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free options. It’s open Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-3 p.m., offering breakfast and lunch as well as gourmet coffee and fresh-baked treats. WINNER

IBEST

CIDER HOUSE RULES

Bull City Ciderworks took home OF DURHAM blu seafood and bar Upscale two double golds (Best in Class 2016

Blue Corn Cafe Authentic LatinAmerican fare with fresh, organic ingredients. 716 Ninth St.; 919-286-9600; bluecorncafedurham.com

Shuckin’ Shack Seafood restaurant serving up shrimp, oysters, fish-n-chips, surf-n-turf dinners and more. 2200 W. Main St.; 984-219-7337; theshuckinshack.com NEAR DUKE Fairview Dining Room Seasonally inspired contemporary cuisine with selections like coffeerubbed duck breast and seared NC flounder. Located inside the Washington Duke Inn & Golf Club. 3001 Cameron Blvd.; 919-493-6699; washingtondukeinn.com

Dain’s Place Pub fare centered around award-winning “thick and juicy and juicy and thick burgers.” 754 Ninth St.; 919-416-8800 Dales Indian Cuisine Traditional Indian food like garlic naan and chicken tikka masala. 811 Ninth St., Ste. 150; 919-286-1760; dalesindiancuisine.net BR Del Rancho Mexican Grill Authentic Mexican lunch and dinner menu with a full-service bar. 730 Ninth St.

seafood restaurant featuring innovative regional classics and a menu. Try the AM, NC • 919-286-1987 BREAKFAST • LUNCH •complete DINNER •oyster SNACKS • CATERING ATTERBAKESHOP.COM SALADELIA.COM crab mac and cheese! 2002 Local 22 Kitchen & Bar Upscale Southern-inspired Hillsborough Rd.; 919-286-9777; cuisine, with emphasis on food sourced within bluseafoodandbar.com a 30-mile radius and local brews. 2200 W. Main St.; 919-286-9755; local22durham.com

A SLICE OF HISTORY Cameo Voorhies and her husband renovated an historic 1920s Gulf gas station in Old East Durham, and it will soon open as Sofia’s Pizza under the leadership of restaurant owners and East Durham residents Jorge González-Peña and Emily Berkeley. The restaurant is set to open by the end of summer.

Cosmic Cantina Authentic Mexican cuisine with vegan options. House-made mole and corn tortillas. Pair with a margarita pitcher. 1920 Perry St.; 919-286-1875; cosmiccantina.com

Burger Bach Signature New Zealand grass-fed burgers and fresh-cut fries. 737 Ninth St., Ste. 220; 919-973-4416; burgerbach.com Cocoa Cinnamon Signature hand-brewed coffees and lattes such as the “Dr. Durham” with maca root powder and black lava salt. 2627 Hillsborough Rd.; cocoacinnamon.com

for Cherry Tart and Slow Ryed) at the Great Lakes International Cider and Perry Competition.

WHAT DO JUNEAU ABOUT ALASKAN RECIPES? Rob Kinneen, executive chef of The Boot and Happy Cardinal Catering, released his cookbook, Fresh Alaska, which ties into his home-state roots by sharing with the reader how to combine contemporary cooking with Alaska’s native plants and animals. The cookbook includes recipes like arctic polenta and razor clam fritters with smoked mustard aioli. He also offers tips for on how to find Alaska flavors in local stores and markets. EASTERN STANDARD TIME Eastcut Sandwich Bar, located in the former Finch’s spot, began full hours July 20. The bar serves “East Coast sandwich fare, salads, small plates, soups and sweets” plus beer, wine and limited cocktails. Family- and dog-friendly! BEER ME The 22nd annual World Beer Festival returns to Durham Bulls Athletic Park October 6. Enjoy selections from more than 55 breweries, plus food truck fare!

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Elmo’s Diner Homemade Southern classics with breakfast favorites like cinnamon apple waffles and biscuits and gravy served all day in a casual, family-friendly setting. 776 Ninth St.; 919-4163823; elmosdiner.com BR Happy + Hale Healthy salads, bowls, breakfast, smoothies, cocktails and cold-pressed juice. 703B Ninth St.; 984-439-1790; happyandhale.com BR Heavenly Buffaloes Chicken wings (bone-in and boneless) as well as vegan wings in more than 25 rubs and sauces, including peri peri and Jamaican jerk. Plus waffle fries! 1807 W. Markham Ave.; 919-237-2358; heavenlybuffaloes.com Juju Asian fusion tapas including selections like steamed barbecue Kurobuta pork belly and chicken fried oysters. Try the crispy Brussels sprouts! 737 Ninth St., Ste. 210; 919-286-3555; jujudurham.com BR Locopops Gourmet frozen pops in a variety of rotating flavors like lavender cream, strawberry lemonade and malted milk ball. 2618 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-2863500; ilovelocopops.com Metro 8 Steakhouse Classic American steakhouse with an Argentinian flair. Pair empanadas with a filet mignon or crab-stuffed shrimp with a churrasco steak. 746 Ninth St.; 919-416-1700; metro8steakhouse.com Monuts Donuts Scratch-made doughnuts, pastries, English muffins, bagels and breakfast sandwiches. Try the bagel and lox. 1002 Ninth St.; 919-286-2642; monutsdonuts.com BR

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dining guide

Pincho Loco Latin-flavored ice cream, milkshakes, popsicles and more, featuring flavors like tequila, Tiger Tail (vanilla, mexican Vanilla and chocolate), guava, tamarind and more. 1918 Perry St.; 919-286-5111

Kaffeinate Coffee shop featuring locally roasted beans and made-to-order Belgian waffles. 115-A N. Duke St.; 919-237-2856; kaffeinatenc.com BR

Snow Factory Rolled ice cream treats, including flavors like peanut butter ’n pretzel, Oreo wonderland, Uji matcha and many more, with choice of multiple sweet toppings. 760 Ninth St., 919-294-4111; snowfactorystl.com

Lilly’s Pizza Stone-hearth-baked pizzas with fresh, organic and local ingredients. 810 W. Peabody, St.; 919-797-2554; lillyspizza.com

Triangle Coffee House Coffee and pastries with selections like vegan blueberry muffins. 714 Ninth St.; 919-748-3634

The Little Dipper Fondue, salads and entrees with selections like cheddar ale fondue, seasonal spinach salad and filet mignon with mushrooms. 905 W. Main St.; 919-908-1023; littledipperfondue. com BR

Vin Rouge French bistro-style dinner with regular oyster specials and Sunday brunch. Get the hanger steak and frites! 2010 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-416-0466; vinrougerestaurant.com BR BULL CITY MARKET

7 8 91 - 6 8 2 - 91 9 • C N , M A H R U D MOC.POHSEKABRET TA HDA M

The Mad Hatter’s Cafe & Bakeshop Scratch-made pastries, organic salads,sandwiches and wraps, with breakfast all day and delicious brunch every weekend. Award-winning cakes. 1802 W. Main St.; 919-286-1987; madhatterbakeshop.com

Mount Fuji Asian Bistro Sushi & Bar Thai, Japanese, Chinese and sushi. Try the duck wrap. 905 W. Main St.; 919-680-4968; mtfujinc.com

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Parker and Otis A gift shop, coffee shop and restaurant all in one. First-timers should dedicate a good chunk of time to this delight. Try the No. 26. 112 S. Duke St.; 919-6833200; parkerandotis.com BR

DOWNTOWN BRIGHTLEAF DISTRICT

Pine Cone Maple View ice cream, shakes, Joe Van Gogh coffee and baked goods galore. 905 W. Main St., Ste. 20-H; 919-416-6128; pineconenc.com

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Clouds Brewing American favorites with a German flair. Featuring an amazing craft beer selection, brunch on the weekends and the NFL ticket. 905 W. Main St.; 919-251-8096; cloudsbrewing.com BR

El Rodeo Mexican Restaurant Authentic Mexican cuisine like quesadillas, tacos and huevos con chorizo. 905 W. Main St.; 919-683-2417; elrodeonc.com The Federal Pub fare with bistro panache. Try the “Fed Burger au Poivre.” 914 W. Main St.; 919-680-8611; thefederal.net BR Goorsha Ethiopian restaurant featuring dishes like shiro chickpea stew and tibs (sauteed meat in spices). 910 W. Main St.; 919-588-4660; goorshadurham.com It’s a Southern Thing Kitchen and bar that serves up traditional Southern dishes with a twist, like jalapeno-brined fried chicken; a half-beef, halfbacon meatloaf; and both traditional and vegan barbecue. 605 W. Main St.; 919-294-9632; itsasouthernthingdurham.com BR James Joyce Irish Pub and Restaurant Traditional pub food and snacks like brisket cheese steak and Reuben sandwiches. 912 W. Main St.; 919-683-3022; jamesjoyceirishpub.com BR

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Maverick’s Smokehouse and Taproom Range of barbecue and smokehouse fare as well as Chef Brian Stinnett’s signature fried chicken and Memphis barbecue spaghetti. 900 W. Main St.; 919-6828978; maverickssmokehouse.com

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Rose’s Noodles, Dumplings & Sweets Sandwiches, pastries - rhubarb galette, anyone? - and daily dinner specials. 121 N. Gregson St.; 919-797-2233; rosesdurham.com BR Saint James Raw bar featuring daily selection of oysters, peeland-eat shrimp and more; seafood towers, Lobster Newberg, shrimp and grits, and Calabash platters. 806 W. Main St.; 984-219-7900; saintjamesseafood.com Torero’s Mexican Restaurant Authentic Mexican cuisine. Try the ceviche de camaron. 800 W. Main St.; 919-682-4197; torerosmexicanrestaurants.com CENTRAL PARK & WAREHOUSE DISTRICTS The Blue Note Grill Fantastic barbecue, ribs and live music. 709 Washington St.; 919-401-1979; thebluenotegrill.com

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NEWS BITES BIENVENIDO! Los Cabos Bar and Grill Mexican Restaurant opened in the spot that most recently was The Saucy Crab, but it too will feature a variety of seafood options including fish and shrimp tacos, ceviches and more. SO LONG, SCRATCH We were sad to see The Lakewood and the affectionately known “Baby” Scratch close at the end of July. Owner Phoebe Lawless announced the closing of her bakery and restaurant, which occupied the former Davis Baking Co. building. The downtown location of Scratch, open for eight years, closed at the end of February. The Lakewood had been open since last May. LET IT SNOW Snow Factory, a Thai rolled ice cream shop, opened July 18 on Ninth Street. Stop in to try flavors like peanut butter ’n pretzel, Oreo wonderland, Uji matcha and more, with choices of multiple sweet toppings. POKÉWORKS IN PROGRESS Pokéworks, a Hawaiian-inspired poké restaurant, is slated to open its first North Carolina location in mid-September at One City Center, 122 W. Main St. The menu features “Signature Works,” like the Limόn Chili poké bowl, or “Poké Your Way,” an option for creating a customized poké burrito, bowl or salad made with diners’ choice of protein, mix-ins, toppings and sauces.

CAN IT! Durham Distillery launched canned cocktails, the first to market in North Carolina and two of only a few options offered in the U.S. The Gin & Tonic is made with the distillery’s Conniption American Dry Gin, house-made tonic and a blend of natural Meyer lemon, orange and lime – all mixed with the right amount of carbonation. The Vodka & Soda features the distillery’s Cold Distilled Cucumber Vodka and bubbly club soda. Each of the products comes in a four-can pack that retails for $15.

Cocoa Cinnamon Signature handbrewed coffees and lattes such as the “Tower of Babel” with honey and date sugar. 420 W. Geer St.; cocoacinnamon.com

Cucciolo Osteria Italian fare like pastas with housemade noodles, antipasti and porchetta. 601 W. Main St.; 984-243-8744; cucciolodurham.com Dame’s Chicken & Waffles Chicken, waffles, shmears. ’Nuff said. 530 Foster St.; 919-682-9235; dameschickenwaffles.com BR Foster Street Coffee Coffee house on the ground floor of Liberty Warehouse Apartments that uses carefully curated coffee beans from around the world for its classic concoctions as well as local produce for housemade smoothies. 530 Foster St., Ste. 2; 919-797-9555; fosterstreetcoffee.com Fullsteam In addition to their well-known “plow-to-pint” beers, Fullsteam now serves bar snacks, sandwiches, small plates and kombucha. Try the Eastern Carolina-Style Pork Meatballs and the Spicy Carolina Dip Chicken with a side of deviled eggs. 726 Rigsbee Ave.; 919-682-2337; fullsteam.ag

Geer Street Garden Simple, down-home fare in a cozy atmosphere. They make a mean “Dark and Stormy,” and be sure to order “The Pile” to split with friends! 644 Foster St.; 919-688-2900; geerstreetgarden.com Gonza Tacos y Tequila Columbian-Mexican restaurant with traditional dishes like chilaquiles, enchiladas and sopa in addition to a variety of tacos. 604 Fernway Ave.; 919-907-2656; durham.gonzatacosytequila.com


dining guide

Hutchins Garage Full-service bar serving Grandma-style pizza, salads and sandwiches. 402 W. Geer St. BR Rise Biscuits & Donuts Daily-changing menu of doughnuts and biscuits. For vegetarians, the “Fried Eggplant ‘Bacon’” biscuit is hard to beat. 401 Foster St.; 984-439-2220; risebiscuitsdonuts.com BR Parts & Labor Dishes meeting many dietary needs, including veggie samosas, “Hipster Poutine” and falafel. 723 Rigsbee Ave.; motorcomusic.com/eats BR The Accordion Club Late-night bar serving beer, hot dogs and green chile stew. 316 W. Geer St. The Pit Fried pimiento cheese, whole-hog Eastern barbecue and Lexington-style barbecue. 321 W. Geer St.; 919-282-3748; thepit-durham.com Piedmont Seasonal cooking inspired by local ingredients. Broccoli beignet, pickled shrimp and peach or Mills Farm’s beef coulotte. 401 Foster St.; 919-683-1213; piedmontrestaurant.com BR CITY CENTER DISTRICT Alley Twenty Six Originally a craft cocktail bar, the addition of a kitchen and dining room now offers plates like pan-seared duck breast, cornmeal-crusted fried oysters and pimiento cheese. 320 E. Chapel Hill St.; 984-439-2278; alleytwentysix.com Bagel Bar Homemade bagel varieties, lunch and breakfast sandwiches. 104 City Hall Plaza, Ste. 101; 919-294-6661; bagelbarbagels.com Bar Brunello Featuring 25 wines by the glass and 60 by the bottle, as well as draft beers and ciders, the bar’s food menu includes charcuterie and cheese boards. 117 E. Main St.; 919-294-4825; barbrunello.com

Counting House Upscale restaurant featuring locally sourced entrees, as well as small plates featuring oysters, shellfish, and meats and cheeses. 111 N. Corcoran St.; 919-956-6760; countinghousenc.com BR

Luna Rotisserie & Empanadas South American cuisine meets the American South. Wood-fired rotisserie meats, Andean-inspired braises, empanadas. 112 W. Main St.; 984-439-8702; lunarotisserie.com

Dashi Traditional ramen shop and izakaya with sake options. 415 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-251-9335; dashiramen.com

M Kokko Casual chicken entrees including the fried chicken sandwich, ramen and “KFC” wings. 311 Holland St., Ste. B; 919-908-9322

Dos Perros Sophisticated Mexican cuisine; plates include carnitas, flautas veganas and pollo relleno. Don’t skip on the guac! 200 N. Mangum St.; 919-956-2750; dosperrosrestaurant.com

M Sushi Quality sushi from seasonal seafood, daily menu changes and creative rolls like “Unagi Maki” with barbecue eel and fried garlic. 311 Holland St.; 919-908-9266; msushidurham.com

Jack Tar and the Colonel’s Daughter Diner fare with a twist. A classic diner menu is served all day long, plus a smaller dinner menu is available in the evening. Brunch is served on Saturday and Sunday mornings. 202 N. Corcoran St.; 919-682-5225; jacktar-durham.com

Mateo Acclaimed menu of tapas and small plates by chef Matthew Kelly. Great for date night or night out with friends. Order a pitcher of “Cheerwine Sangria,” pollo frito, gambas and queso frito y huevo. 109 W. Chapel Hill St.; 919-530-8700; mateotapas.com

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Littler Look for latkes Benedict, pan-roasted striped bass with sungold tomato and elderflower panna cotta at this small restaurant with big tastes. 110 E. Parrish St.; 919-374-1118; littlerdurham.com Loaf Oven breads and pastries. Counter Culture Coffee, pain au chocolat and cumin gruyere loaf. 111 W. Parrish St.; 919-797-1254 Lucky’s Delicatessen Deli crafted by chef Matthew Kelly and headed by chef Drew Brown serves seasonal soups and sandwiches like the garbanzo with chickpea fritters and the super Reuben. 105 W. Chapel Hill St.; 919-864-8841; luckysdelinc.com

Mothers & Sons Trattoria Italian restaurant by partners Matthew Kelly and chef Josh “Skinny” DeCarolis. Handmade pasta, bruschetta and antipasti dishes. 107 W. Chapel Hill St.; 919-294-8247; mothersandsonsnc.com Ninth Street Bakery Organic breads, pastries and lunch. Grab a “Wheel of Steel” (peanut butter, raisins and oats). 136 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-688-5606; ninthstbakery.com BR The Parlour Handmade ice cream in rotating flavors like cookies and cream, salted butter caramel and sweet potato. 117 Market St.; 919-564-7999; theparlour.co

Bar Virgile Artfully crafted beverages paired with an ever changing dinner and small plates menu including selections like tandoori chicken and flat iron steak. 105 S. Magnum St.; 919-973-3000; barvirgile.com Beyù Caffè Coffee shop, restaurant, bar and live jazz club. Beignets, buffalo wings and mushroom burgers. 341 W. Main St.; 919-683-1058; beyucaffe.com 0BR Bull City Burger & Brewery Local beef burgers with all components from bun to barbecue sauce made in-house. 107 E. Parrish St.; 919-680-2333; bullcityburgerandbrewery.com Bull McCabe’s Irish Pub Pub food and bar snacks like nachos, burgers and wings. 427 W. Main St.; 919-682-3061; bullmccabesirishpub.com COPA Cuban-inspired tapas and cocktails restaurant. Try the Butifaras a lo cubano, Cuban-style sausages and the Paella del verano, “summer rice,” with a mojito or daiquiri. 107 W. Main St.

The Cure for what’s been missing in your local dining routine Open for Brunch Sat-Sun! House cured, smoked & roasted meats Joe Van Gogh Coffee

919 797-0355 • curedelinc.com 245 East NC Hwy. 54, Suite #105, Durham Mon-Fri 8a–3p Sat & Sun 9a-2:30p

CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN CUISINE with international flair. MARKETPLACE open daily for breakfast, lunch & dinner JBDUKEHOTEL.COM 919.660.6400

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dining guide

The Patio Unscripted Hotel’s poolside bar featuring a range of cocktails and gourmet bites including sushi cones, salads and burgers. 202 N. Corcoran St.; 984-329-9500; unscriptedhotels.com BR Pizzeria Toro Wood-fired pizza with selections like spicy lamb meatball with kale, fried eggplant ricotta and soft eggs on white pizza. Also, ricotta dumplings! 105 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-908-6936; pizzeriatoro.com Pie Pushers Grab a slice of staples like the cheese or pepperoni, or try out one of the specials, like the Pace Car. 117A W. Main St.; 919-294-8408; piepushers.com BR Pompieri Pizza Neapolitan pizza joint with a familyfriendly approach. Try the “Drunken Horse” pizza with beer crust dough and house-made sausage. 102 City Hall Plaza; 919-973-1589; pompieripizza.com Pour Taproom Pay-by-the-ounce beer, wine and cider taps, plus tasting board, sandwich and kids’ options, and specials from Littler and Pizzeria Toro. 202 N. Corcoran St., Ste. 200; 919-251-8985; durham.pourtaproom.com The Restaurant at The Durham Locally sourced Southern cuisine crafted by chef Andrea Reusing. Selections include beef tartare and spring pie with asparagus and mushrooms. The Roof focuses on shared plates. 315 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-768-8831; thedurham.com/dining

Rue Cler French bistro-style cuisine with lunch, brunch and dinner showcasing fresh ingredients. 401 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-682-8844; ruecler-durham.com BR Saltbox Seafood Joint Local seafood that is delivered fresh from the Carolina coast and served griddled or fried in a straightforward manner. 608 N. Mangum St.; 919-908-8970; saltboxseafoodjoint.com Taberna Tapas Paella, flatbreads, bacon-wrapped dates, gambas. 325 W. Main St.; 919-797-1457; tabernatapas.com Table South Kitchen and Bar Breakfast, lunch and dinner, located in the Durham Marriott City Center. 201 Foster St.; 919-768-6000

AMERICAN TOBACCO DISTRICT The Bullpen Bull Durham Beer Co.’s beer garden with live music provided by the Music Maker Relief Foundation plus veggie melts, grain bowl salads and beer-infused chicken chili verde. 359 Blackwell St.; 919-744-3630; thebullpenatc.com Cuban Revolution Restaurant & Bar Cuban tapas served amid ’60s-style decor, plus bolsitas, sandwiches and Havana pork. 318 Blackwell St.; 919-687-4300; thecubanrevolution.com The District at 410 Lunch served Thursday and Friday by The Art Institute of Raleigh-Durham. 410 Blackwell St.; 919-317-3200; artinstitutes.edu/raleigh-durham/about/restaurant Mellow Mushroom Pizza, hoagies, calzones and salads made using fresh ingredients. 410 Blackwell St.; 919-680-8500; mellowmushroom.com/store /durham

Toast Italian paninis and soups. The warm goat cheese with honey and peppercorn crostini is our favorite. 345 W. Main St.; 919-683-2183; toast-fivepoints.com

NanaSteak Offers various cuts of beef and steaks, plus other meats like salmon and tuna steaks and pastas like beef short rib ravioli. 345 Blackwell St.; 919-282-1183; nanasteak.com BR

Viceroy British-Indian gastropub featuring dishes like jeera wings as well as traditional fish & chips. 335 W. Main St.; 919-797-0413; viceroydurham.com

OnlyBurger Build-your-own burger options and sides like bacon-wrapped mac and cheese squares. 359 Blackwell St.; 919-237-2431; onlyburger.com

Thai @Main Street Classic Thai dishes including tom yum soup, curry, pad Thai, drunken noodles and more. 317 W. Main St.; 984-219-7444; thaiatmainstnc.com

2018

READERS’ FAVORITE

IBEST OF DURHAM

905 W MAIN ST, DURHAM 919.251.8096

magazine

cloudsbrewing.com 

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dining guide

Saladelia Cafe Espresso and organic smoothie bar, scratchmade pastries, gourmet sandwiches,salads and soups. Dine-in or carryout. 406 Blackwell St.; 919-687-4600; saladelia.com

Namu Restaurant and Coffee Bar Bulkogi Truck and Bo’s Kitchen food trucks combine to bring casual Korean eats, local beer, wine and specialty coffee. 5420 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-251-9794

Duck Donuts Warm, made-to-order doughnuts and coffee. Watch your donut being hand-dipped and topped right in front of you. 5320 McFarland Road, Ste. 140; 919-973 1305; duckdonuts.com

Tobacco Road Sports Cafe American dishes like “Country Frizzled & Drizzled Chicken” made with local ingredients; overlooks the Bulls’ stadium. 280 S. Mangum St.; 919-937-9909; tobaccoroadsportscafe.com Tyler’s Restaurant &Taproom Hearty fare and huge beer selection. An order of garlic fries is a must! 324 Blackwell St.;919-433-0345; tylerstaproom.com EAST DURHAM East Durham Bake Shop Handcrafted sweet and savory pies, baked goods, salads,coffee and more – all made with local ingredients. 406 S. Driver St.; 919-957-1090; eastdurhambakeshop.com

WEST-CENTRAL DURHAM

DURHAM-CHAPEL HILL BOULEVARD (15-501) Blaze Pizza Pizzas with made-from-scratch dough and healthful ingredients. 5320 McFarland Dr.; 919-251-6095; blazepizza.com

The Refectory Cafe Dal, chili, salads and soups. 2726 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-908-6798; therefectorycafe.com BR

Foster’s Market Brought to you by acclaimed cookbook author Sara Foster, fresh breakfast selections, sandwiches and salads. Also pick up specialty food items. 2694 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-489-3944; fostersmarket.com BR

Saltbox Seafood Joint A new, second location for the popular local seafood place. Fish delivered fresh from the Carolina coast and served griddled or fried in a straightforward manner. 2637 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-908-8970; saltboxseafoodjoint.com

Guglhupf Bakery, Cafe and Restaurant Germaninspired cuisine and artisanal bakery. Restaurant dishes include house-cut noodles, weiner schnitzel and pan-roasted duck. 2706 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-401-2600; guglhupf.com BR Kanki Steak, chicken and seafood cooked on hibachi grills, plus an extensive sushi menu. Come for a show! 3504 Mt. Moriah Rd.; 919-401-6908; kanki.com Lily’s Cheesecake Bakery & Cafe Homemade WINNER cheesecake, sweet and savory French pastries and Mediterranean sweets. 5504 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd., Ste. 101; 984-219-1226; lilyscheesecake.com

IBEST OF DURHAM

2016 Los Cabos Bar and Grill Mexican Restaurant Mexican fare plus a variety of seafood options like fish and shrimp tacos, ceviches and more. 4020 DurhamChapel Blvd.; 919-748-4290 BREAKFAST • LUNCH • Hill DINNER • SNACKS • CATERING

19-286-1987 SHOP.COM

Sitar Indian Cuisine Homemade Indian dishes at affordable prices, with daily lunch buffets and a weekend dinner buffet. 3630 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.;919-490-1326; sitar-indiancuisine.com BR Souly Vegan Cafe Vegan takes on favorites like mac ‘n’ cheese and jerk chicken, along with sides like candied yams, plantains and lentils and spinach soup. 4125 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 984-219-6050

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2018

READERS’ FAVORITE

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OF DURHAM magazine

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now serving Saturday and Sunday brunch

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NanaTaco Inventive taqueria that features locally produced meats and veggies. Enjoy with margarita in hand. 2512 University Dr.; 919-489-8226; nanataco.com

Zweli’s Traditional Zimbabwean food and family recipes from owner Zweli herself with a number of options for vegans and vegetarians. 4600 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd., Ste. 26; 984-219-7555; zwelis.com BR UNIVERSITY DRIVE Barley Labs Choose from 16 different beers and ciders on tap while enjoying the company of your four-legged friends. Food from nearby restaurants welcome. 4015 University Dr.; 919-432-4597; barleylabs.com The Boot A neighborhood Italian American Restaurant serving soups, salads, sandwiches, pastas and traditional Italian entrees, plus a full bar. 2501 University Dr.; 919-294-8383; thebootdurham.com

Tacos Nacos Tacos, pupusas, tortas and horchata. 3411 University Dr.; 919-267-8226 Thai Cafe Authentic Thai cuisine: drunken noodles, curries and stir-fries. Don’t miss the coconut cake for dessert! 2501 University Dr.; 919-493-9794; thaicafenc.com WEST END & LAKEWOOD Cocoa Cinnamon Local coffee shop with signature hand-brewed coffees and lattes, hot chocolate and churros. 2013 Chapel Hill Rd.; cocoacinnamon.com

The Original Q Shack “BBQ tender as a mother’s love,” includes signature chile-rubbed beef brisket and Carolina pork shoulder. 2510 University Dr.; 919-402-4227; theqshackoriginal.com

County Fare There’s a food truck rodeo happening every night at this family-friendly restaurant. Inside, a bar stocks beer, cider and wine. Outside, patrons can choose food from a rotating group of food trucks. 1920 Chapel Hill Rd.; 984-219-1875; countyfaredurham.com GRUB Durham Serves up comfort food favorites with a twist like brioche donuts and beer-battered mushroom sandwiches. 1200 W. Chapel Hill St.; 919-973-3636; grubdurham.com

Sake Bomb Asian Bistro Asian bistro and sake bar; specialty rolls like the “Green Monster” with spicy yellow tail and tuna. 4215 University Dr.; 919-401-4488; sakebombdurham.com

Capital Seafood Market & Grill Fried catfish, porkchop sandwiches and collard greens. Raw seafood for sale. 1304 University Dr.; 919-402-0777 Mi Peru Peruvian fare like ceviche mixto, asado and leche de tigre. 4015 University Dr., Ste. A1; 919-401-6432; miperupci.com

Local Yogurt Frozen yogurt treats. 1114 W. Chapel Hill St.; 919-489-5900; localyogurtdurham.com

Saladelia Cafe Delicious,healthy, homemade food with an espresso andorganic smoothie bar,scratchmade pastries,gourmet sandwiches,salads and soups. Open fordine-in or carry-out. 4201 University Dr.; 919-489-5776; saladelia.com BR

MORE WEST-CENTRAL DURHAM Bull and Bean Fresh salads, breakfast and sandwiches like pulled pork-loaded hashbrowns and the turkey and Brie sandwich. 3710 Shannon Rd.; 919-237-2398; bullstreetdurham.com BR

FEED YOUR INNER CHILD! WINNER

IBEST OF DURHAM

2016 FRESH, SEASONAL FARM-TO-FORK ITALIAN

IBEST

SALADELIA.COM

KEVIN MILZ PHOTOGRAPHY

DURHAM, NC • 919-286-1987 MADHATTERBAKESHOP.COM

American Tobacco’s restaurants offer WINNER a wide variety of dining options for both grown-ups and kids. OF DURHAM From filet mignon to chicken 2016 tenders, there’s something for•everyone! BREAKFAST • LUNCH DINNER • SNACKS • CATERING

ROCKWOOD SHOPPING CENTER 2501 UNIVERSITY DRIVE • DURHAM 919.294.8383 • THEBOOTDURHAM.COM OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 5:00-9:00PM 82

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The District at 410 @ The Art Institute Cuban Revolution • Nana Steak Only Burger • Tobacco Road WXYZ Bar @ Aloft Hotel Tyler’s Taproom Mellow Mushroom Moe’s Southwest Grill Saladelia

American American Tobacco Tobacco

AmericanTobaccoCampus.com


dining guide

Core Cafe & Catering Locally sourced foods and a variety of vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free options. Offering breakfast and lunch as well as gourmet coffee and fresh-baked treats. 3211 Shannon Rd., Ste. 106, 919-525-6202; corecater.com Eastcut Sandwich Bar East Coast sandwich fare and salads, small plates, soups and sweets. Mainstays include Chicken Parm, BLTs and Roast Beef sandwiches. 3211 Old Chapel Hill Rd.; 984-439-1852; BR eastcutsandwich.com Hope Valley Diner Diner food and breakfast all day with selections like chicken and dumplings, fried pickle chips, biscuits and gravy. 3710 Shannon Rd.; 919-419-0907; hopevalleydiner.com BR New Tokyo Quick-service Japanese restaurant where everything on the menu – including hibachistyle dishes, sushi, udon and more – comes in under $10. 3822 S. Roxboro St.; 919-224-8811 OnlyBurger The food truck’s brick-and-mortar offers all the same build-your-own burger options and sides. 3710 Shannon Rd., Ste. 118; 919-937-9377; onlyburger.com Pop’s Backdoor South Fresh pizza and Italian cuisine, including calzones with homemade ricotta-mozzarella filling. 3710 Shannon Rd.; 919-493-0169; popsbackdoorsouth.com BR Piper’s Deli Deli sandwiches and burgers like pimiento grilled cheese and French dip sandwich. 3219 Old Chapel Hill Rd.; 919-489-2481; pipersdeli.com

Randy’s Pizza Pizzas, garlic knots and stromboli. 1813 Martin Luther King Jr. Pkwy.; 919-490-6850; randys-pizza.com Roots Bakery, Bistro and Bar Southern meets Central American at this breakfast, lunch and dinner spot with an expansive menu including “from the sea,” “from the ranch” and “from the garden” options. 4810 Hope Valley Rd.; rootschapelhill.com BR Tonali Restaurant Inventive Mexican cuisine such as chicken con mole, Mexican chocolate torte and adobo pork. 3642 Shannon Rd.; 919-489-8000; tonalirestaurant.com

Pulcinella’s Italian Restaurant Southern Italian dishes. Antipasto classico, baked ziti and tortellini alla panna. 4711 Hope Valley Rd.; 919-490-1172; pulcinellasitalianrestaurant.com Randy’s Pizza Pizzas, garlic knots and stromboli. 4810 Hope Valley Rd., Ste. 112; 919-403-6850; randys-pizza.com Smallcakes Twelve signature cupcake flavors, as well as seasonal specials. 4711 Hope Valley Rd.; 919-937-2922; smallcakesnc.com West 94th St. Pub Traditional pub fare: loaded fries, chili cheese tots and fish & chips. 4711 Hope Valley Rd.; 919-403-0025; west94thstpub.com

Urel’s Jamaica House Traditional Jamaican dishes like goat curry, jerk chicken, oxtails and ackee and saltfish. 3825 S. Roxboro St., Ste. 123; 919-251-8104

Yamazushi Japanese fine dining, kaiseki-style, with seasonal menu changes and a multi-course menu, as well as sake. 4711 Hope Valley Rd., Ste. 6-A; 919-493-7748; yamazushirestaurant.com

SOUTHERN DURHAM / NEAR I-40

SUTTON STATION Bocci Trattoria & Pizzeria Traditional Italian pastas, pizzas, crostinis and salads. 5850 Fayetteville Rd.; 919-206-4067; bocciitalian.com

WOODCROFT SHOPPING CENTER Guacamaya (Chubby’s Tacos) Fresh Mexican favorites like burritos, nachos and salads, as well as the “Chubbychanga.” 4711 Hope Valley Rd.; 919-489-4636 Joe Van Gogh Cozy and full of natural light, this local coffee shop sources quality beans for a superior coffee. 4711-5A Hope Valley Rd.; 919-973-3950; joevangogh.com

Bua Thai Cuisine Thai classics: Pad Thai, hot and sour soup, curries, Krapow lamb. Get your meal “Thai hot,” if you’re up to it! 5850 Fayetteville Rd., Ste. 101; 984-219-7357; buathaidurham.com Dulce Cafe Espresso, gelato and sandwiches. Smoked salmon bagel, dulce Reuben and the “B-L-A-T.” 5826 Fayetteville Rd.; 919-797-0497; dulcecafedurham.com BR

FLAVORS OF FALL Seasonal Seafood Freshly Cooked Good Fish That’s the Hook

2018

READERS’ FAVORITE

IBEST

&

OF DURHAM magazine

2018

READERS’ FAVORITE

IBEST OF DURHAM magazine

2637 durham-chapel hill blvd. 919.237.3499 608 North Mangum St. 919.908.8970 saltboxseafoodjoint.com   

CARY | DURHAM | RALEIGH Open 6am-7pm Daily

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dining guide

Nantucket Grill & Bar New England-style cuisine known for their desserts like the “Unbirthday” and coconut cake. 5826 Fayetteville Rd.; 919-727-6750; nantucketgrill.com

Makus Empanadas A variety of meat, veggie and cheese empanadas, with vegetarian and vegan options. 1125 W. N.C. 54, Ste. 304; 919-390-7525; makusempanadas.com

LINCOLN PARK WEST Danny’s Bar-B-Que Hickory-smoked barbecue, ribs, fried catfish. 2945 S. Miami Blvd., Ste. 118; 919-806-1965; dannysbarbque.com

Treforni Wood-fired pizza and sandwiches including traditional options like Margherita, as well as more inspired options like the prosciutto arugula pizza. 1125 W. N.C. 54; 919-973-0922; treforni.com

Gussy’s Place Greek street food like gyro pita, Greek fries and baklava. 2945 S. Miami Blvd.; 984-439-8455; gussys.com

NEAR SOUTHPOINT

Piper’s In The Park Soups, salads, hoagies and burgers with selections like curried couscous and “South of Here” turkey sandwich. 2945 S. Miami Blvd.; 919-572-9767; pipersinthepark.com Spicy Green Gourmet Cafe & Catering Sandwiches, soups, salads with specialities like Cuban flatbread. 2945 S. Miami Blvd., Ste. 126; 919-220-6040; spicygreengourmet.net HOPE VALLEY COMMONS Mattie B’s Public House Housemade burgers, N.Y.style pizza, wings and potato chips. 1125 W. N.C. 54, Ste. 301; 919-401-8600; mattiebs.com Denny’s Diner fare serving breakfast anytime, lunch and dinner. 7021 N.C. 751,Ste. 901; 919-908-1006; dennys.com BR

HOMESTEAD MARKET Bean Traders Coffee Coffee specialties and local pastries. 105 W. N.C. 54, Ste. 249; 919-484-2499; beantraderscoffee.com

SOUTHPOINT CROSSING Primal Food & Spirits Gluten-free options featuring wood-fired local meat dishes with seasonalsides, craft cocktails. 202 W. N.C. 54; 919-248-3000; primalfoodandspirits.com THE STREETS AT SOUTHPOINT AREA American Meltdown Gourmet melts, sides and desserts. Southpoint; 919-473-6358; americanmeltdown.org

The Mad Popper A gourmet popcorn shop with flavors both sweet and savory. 105 W. N.C. 54, Ste. 259; 919-484-7677; themadpopper.com

Bruster’s Real Ice Cream Hand-crafted ice creams, sorbets & sherbets in ever-changing flavors. 8200 Renaissance Pwy., Ste. 1002; 919-237-3537; brusters.com

City Barbeque Smoked meats, peach cobbler and hushpuppies. 208 W. N.C. 54; 919-237-9509; citybbq.com

Porchetta Slow-roasted Italian-style pork sandwiches and sides. Southpoint; 919-607-7419; porchettardu.com

Shiki Sushi Sushi and pan-Asian choices like “Bang Bang Shrimp,” gyoza dumplings and beef pho soup. 207 W. N.C. 54; 919-484-4108; shikitasu.com

Harvest 18 Local, seasonal eats. Try the pimento cheese dip and a Bloody Mary for brunch. 8128 Renaissance Pkwy., Ste. 114; 919-316-1818; 18restaurantgroup.com/harvest-18 BR Rise Biscuits & Donuts Daily-changing menu of doughnuts and biscuits. For vegetarians, the “Fried Eggplant ‘Bacon’” biscuit is hard to beat. 8200 Renaissance Pkwy.; 919-248-2992; risebiscuitsdonuts.com BR

WELCOME TO AMERICA’S DINER

C H R G

C AT E R I N G Dependable

Affordable

Local

7021 HIGHWAY 751, #901 DURHAM

919-908-1006

OPEN 24/7! We give AARP discounts

Tender as a Mother's Love WINNER

IBEST OF DURHAM 2016

LULA’S SPANKY’S SQUID’S

1125 W. NC HWY 54 DURHAM

919-489-7300

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411 WEST MEZ

PAGE ROAD GRILL

919-941-1630 events@chapelhillrestaurantgroup.com ChapelHillRestaurantGroup.com

2510 University Dr. Durham, NC Phone 919 - 402 - 4BBQ (4227)

Catering available

Open 7 days a week 11am - 9pm


dining guide

Town Hall Burger and Beer Offerings like the “Carolina Burger” with pork belly and pimiento cheese, barbecue salmon burger and fries poutine. 7830 N.C. 751; 919-973-0506; townhallburgerandbeer.com N.C. 54 Akashi Japanese Grill & Sushi Bar Hibachi, sushi and noodle dishes like bento boxes, yakisoba and spicy scallop roll. 2223 N.C. 54, Ste. RS; 919-572-9444; akashisushi54.com Cure Delicatessen and Cafe Chef-driven breakfast and lunch eatery specializing in housecured smoked and roasted meats and featuring regionally made products like Neomonde Bakery bread and Joe Van Gogh coffee. 245 N.C. 54, Ste. 105; 919-797-0355; curedelinc.com BR Na’Mean Asian fusion, Korean barbecue sandwich shop. A KoKyu joint. 4823 Meadow Dr., Ste. 108; 919-699-4667; kokyubbq.com/nmean Spice & Curry Traditional Indian, buffet-style or off the menu. 2105 N.C. 54; 919-544-7555; spiceandcurry.com

RTP

N.C. 55 Backyard BBQ Pit Barbecue and other Southern comfort foods: mac ‘n’ cheese, Brunswick Stew and pit-cooked barbecue. 5122 N.C. 55; 919-544-9911; sweetribs.com

Basera Modern, fine dining Indian restaurant featuring a lunch buffet, tandoor grill options and signature Biryanis. 4818 N.C. 55; 919-205-5050; basera-rtp.com

GREENWOOD COMMONS Benetis Restaurant Classic breakfast with a Mediterranean lunch buffet. 5410 N.C. 55; 919-806-0313; benetisrtp.com BR

Big C Waffles Specializes in gourmet waffle varieties such as The Bacon, Egg ‘n’ Cheese Waffle, Thin Mint Waffle, Pecan Waffle, Blueberry Waffle and Donut Waffle, just to name a few. 2110 Allendown Dr.; 919-797-7576; bigcwaffles.com BR

Sarah’s Empanadas Homemade empanadas. 5410 N.C. 55; 919-544-2441 Tandoor Indian Restaurant Traditional Indian like veggie samosas, kababs and naan. 5410 N.C. 55; 919-484-2102; tandoorinrtp.com BR

Brigs at the Park Breakfast selections like “Pineapple Bread Pina Colada French Toast” and sandwiches. 4900 N.C. 55; 919-544-7473; brigs.com BR

Thai Lanna Restaurant Authentic Thai cuisine like red curry, pad thai and larb. 5410 N.C. 55; 919-484-0808; thailannarestaurant.com

Cafe Meridian Made-to-order salads and sandwiches. 2500 Meridian Pkwy., Ste. 130; 919-361-9333; cafemeridian.com Jamaica Jamaica Carribean food favorites like jerk chicken, yellow rice and brown stew chicken. 4857 N.C. 55; 919-544-1532

True Flavors Diner Upscale Southern diner. Try the “Howling Moon” French toast made with Howling Moon moonshine sauce. 5410 N.C. 55; 919-316-7978; trueflavorsnc.com BR IMPERIAL CENTER MEZ Contemporary Mexican Creative Mexican dishes, based on traditional recipes with a fresh, healthy twist. 5410 Page Rd.; 919-941-1630; mezdurham.com

Sansui Sushi Bar & Grill Hibachi dishes and sushi rolls like “Spider Man” with crab and crawfish. 4325 N.C. 55; 919-361-8078; sansuisushi.com Sushiōki Sushi burritos in traditional flavors, plus rolls with a Southern twist, like double-fried chicken. 4900 N.C. 55, Ste. 510; 919-405-7121; sushiokirtp.com. Vit Goal Tofu Restaurant Korean dishes like fried dumplings and tofu soups. 2107 Allendown Dr.; 919-361-9100;

Page Road Grill Traditional American dishes, from house-made soup and bread to burgers to vegetarian options. 5416 Page Rd.; 919-908-8900; pageroadgrill.com

ALSO CHECK OUT THESE AREA RESTAURANTS … 411 West Pasta, seafood and pizzas inspired by Italian and Mediterranean flavors, with a Californian twist. 411 W. Franklin St., Chapel Hill; 411west.com

The Belted Goat Coffee/wine shop with paninis, cheeses and pastries. Fearrington Village Center, Chapel Hill; fearrington.com/belted-goat

Capp’s Pizzeria Artisan, hand-crafted and wood-fired pizzas utilizing local ingredients. 79 Falling Springs Dr., Ste. 140, Chapel Hill; cappspizzeria.com

Acme Soups, salads, seafood and entrees with a Southern touch. 110 E. Main St., Carrboro; acmecarrboro.com

Breadmen’s Variety of sandwiches, burgers and salads. 324 W. Rosemary St., Chapel Hill; breadmens.com

Akai Hana Japanese cuisine including sushi, tempura and teriyaki. 206 W. Main St.; akaihana.com

Breakaway Cafe Serving breakfast, lunch, dinner and small plates, Counter Culture coffee, beer, wine and Maple View ice cream. 58 Chapelton Ct., Ste. 100, Chapel Hill; breakawaync.co

Compadres Tequila Lounge Mexican restaurant with a variety of classic dishes. 193 Lowes Drive, Pittsboro and 115 Siler Crossing, Siler City; compadresnc.com

Al's Burger Shack Gourmet burgers and fries with local ingredients. 516 W. Franklin St.; 708 Market St.; alsburgershack.com Al's Pub Shack Classic gourmet burger and fries joint, featuring an expanded menu with sandwiches, seafood, soups and salads along with a full bar. 50050 Governors Dr. Babalu Tapas and Tacos Upscale Latin-inspired cuisine like redfish tacos, albondigas and a variety of burgers. 1800 E. Franklin St., Ste. 16, Chapel Hill; chapelhill.eatbabalu.com

Beer Study Bottle shop with in-store drafts and growlers to go. 106 N. Graham St.; beerstudy.com B-Side Lounge Small plates like flatbread, baconwrapped dates and fondue. 200 N. Greensboro St., Carrboro; b-sidelounge.com Buns Gourmet burgers, fries and shakes made from fresh ingredients. 107 N. Columbia St., Chapel Hill; bunsofchapelhill.com Caffe Driade Carrboro Coffee, bowl-size lattes, local baked goods, beer and wine. 1215 E. Franklin St., Chapel Hill; caffedriade.com

Crook’s Corner Southern classics like shrimp & grits, and jalapeno-cheddar hushpuppies. 610 W. Franklin St., Chapel Hill; crookscorner.com Crossroads Chapel Hill at The Carolina Inn New American cuisine and seasonal specialties; all ABC permits. 211 Pittsboro St.; crossroadscuisine.com CrossTies BBQ A variety of barbecue, sides and made-from-scratch desserts. 201 E. Main St., Carrboro; crosstiesbbq.com Dunk & Slide at Whole Foods Market All-day breakfast, sushi and more. 81 S. Elliott Rd.; 919-968-1983; wholefoodsmarket.com

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Elements Classical and modern Asian and European cooking techniques; check out the wine bar next door. 2110 Environ Way, Chapel Hill; elementsofchapelhill.com The Fearrington House Restaurant Contemporary fine-dining with seasonal, farm-to-fork cuisine. Fearrington Village Center, Chapel Hill; fearrington. com/house Four Corners American fare, nachos, wings, pasta. 175 E. Franklin St., Chapel Hill; fourcornersgrille.com Glasshalfull Mediterranean-inspired food and wine; outdoor dining; all ABC permits. 106 S. Greensboro St.; glasshalfull.net Italian Pizzeria III Pizza, calzones and subs. 508 W. Franklin St., Chapel Hill; italianpizzeria3.com Kitchen Bistro-style dining with a seasonal menu. 764 MLK Jr. Blvd., Chapel Hill; kitchenchapelhill.com Lula's “Simple food made the hard way,” like fried chicken, homemade biscuits, farm-to-table veggies and more. 1101 E. Franklin St.; lulaschapelhill.com Mama Dip’s Kitchen Traditional Southern specialties. 408 W. Rosemary St., Chapel Hill; mamadips.com Mel's Commissary & Luncheonette Open for lunch, Mel’s serves up a changing menu of comfort food. 109 West Main St

The Mod Wood-fired, artisan-style pizza, salads, small plates, full bar. 46 Sanford Rd., Pittsboro; themodernlifedeli.com

Radius Wood-fired pizzas, housemade pastas, sandwiches, wraps, salads and desserts. 112 N. Churton St., Hillsborough; radiuspizzeria.net

Moon Asian Bistro Asian-fusion: sushi, Chinese dishes like sweet-and-sour chicken, Thai curry dishes, rice and noodles. 111 Knox Way, Ste. 110, Pittsboro

Reverence Farms Cafe Farm-to-table brunch, lunch and dinner. 6956 S. NC Highway 87; 336-525-2266; reverencefarmscafe.com

Oakleaf The daily changing menu includes “immediate” cuisine like handmade pastas, seafood from the Carolinas and ingredients from the chef’s own garden. 301 E. Main St.; 984-234-0054; oakleafnc.com

Roost Beer Garden Wood-fired pizza, local brews on tap, wine by the glass and live music. 2000 Fearrington Village Center; fearrington.com/roost

Olio & Aceto Cafe Brunch and lunch options inspired by Blue Sky Oil and Vinegar products. 400 S. Elliott Rd., Chapel Hill; olioandacetocafe.com Open Eye Cafe Locally roasted Carrboro Coffee and espresso, tea, beer, wine and baked goods. 101 S. Greensboro St., Chapel Hill; openeyecafe.com Pittsboro Roadhouse Hearty American entrees, burgers and salads, plus creative appetizers like Carolina egg rolls and “trashcan” nachos. 39 West St., Pittsboro; pittsbororoadhouse.com The Pizza Press Build your own pizza with dozens of ingredient choices or choose a predesigned signature pie. Coming soon to Carolina Square, Chapel Hill; thepizzapress.com Postal Fish Company Fresh seafood from North Carolina’s coast prepared thoughtfully by chefs James Clark and Bill Hartley. 75 W. Salisbury St.

The Root Cellar Sandwiches, prepared salads, desserts and more. 750 MLK Jr. Blvd., Chapel Hill and 35 Suddles Rd., Pittsboro; rootcellarpbo.com Squid’s Seafood options like live Maine lobster, fried oysters, plus soups and steaks. 1201 N. Fordham Blvd., Chapel Hill; squidsrestaurant.com Starrlight Mead Tastings of honey wines and honey. 480 Hillsboro St., Pittsboro; starrlightmead.com Trilogy American cafe featuring innovative twists on classic dishes. Silverspot Cinema, Chapel Hill; trilogyrestaurant.com Venable Rotisserie Bistro Upscale comfort food with locally sourced and seasonal ingredients. 200 N. Greensboro St., Carrboro; venablebistro.com Weathervane Shrimp & grits, sweet potato fries, chicken & waffles, and other foods with a Southern flair. University Place, Chapel Hill; southernseason.com Yogurt Pump Frozen yogurt treats and shakes. 106 W. Franklin St., Chapel Hill; yogurtpump.com

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engagement

AL E X M A RK I E W I C Z & CA IT L IN R O D ER IC K

Soul Mates in Scrubs B Y S A M B E RM A S - DAW ES

Wedding Date Fall 2019 Occupations Caitlin starts graduate school this year, working towards a master’s in nursing. Alex works at Duke University’s Continuing Studies and Summer Session department on East Campus. Crossed Paths Both were new hires at Duke Regional Hospital in spring 2013: She was a nurse, and he was a nurse’s aide. Caitlin says it was Alex’s “copper-colored beard and big smile” that first caught her eye when they started working together. After brief interactions and some insight from a “get-to-know-your-fellow-coworker” bulletin board post about Alex, Caitlin shared her attraction for him with a mutual friend, who then shared those feelings with Alex. “Thank goodness [Alex] had the courage to ask to exchange cell numbers,” Caitlin says. Their first date was dinner and drinks at Geer Street Garden and Fullsteam. The Proposal The couple traveled to a tiny fisherman’s village in southern Jamaica last November for vacation. Unbeknownst to Caitlin, Alex had a ring and a proposal ready. After a morning cup of coffee on the beach, Alex popped the question. Through tears of happiness Caitlin said, “Yes!” Now, “I Do” A small ceremony in downtown Durham will be followed by a larger reception with family and friends. The couple plan to reside in their new home off East Main Street in the Old East neighborhood with their tuxedo cat, Oliver.

It’s not an ingredient. It’s the ingredient. #HeirloomTomatoes #MakesMeWhole

SEPTEMBER 2018

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wedding

TR ACY H A NCO C K & R A INA L A NGL EY

Eat Your Heart Out

B Y J U L I A B A K ER P HOTO G RA P H Y B Y S A MA NT HA FLOY D, SA M A NT H A F LOY D PHOTO GR A PHY

Date July 1, 2018 Neighborhood Tuscaloosa-Lakewood. Occupations Raina is the salon coordinator and product facilitator at Union Hair Studio, and Tracy is the owner/manager of Hutchins Garage. Crossed Paths While grabbing a drink at Bull McCabes, Tracy’s friend Gee Barger (who would become their wedding officiant) and Raina’s friend Laura Jones encouraged each of them to go out with the other. A date at Frankie’s Fun Park in Raleigh, and a mix CD from Tracy to Raina sealed the deal. The Proposal Raina decided to take the proposal into her own hands. She picked out a ring setting at her family’s jewelry store, and Tracy chose the stone. While waiting for the ring to arrive, Raina ordered a pint glass engraved with the question, “Will you marry me?” on the bottom. One night during dinner, Raina offered Tracy a beer and as soon as he finished it, told him to look at the bottom of the glass. When he responded with, “Yes, of course,” she pulled out the ring box, they opened it together, and Tracy placed the ring on her finger. The Big Day The ceremony was held at The Rickhouse; the reception, at Hutchins Garage, the new bar that Tracy and his business partners opened

together. Grace Beason of Grace Leisure Events helped plan the day. Hutchins Garage Chef Michael Morrone baked pizza for the event, and the cake by The Cupcake Shoppe honored Tracy’s favorite dessert: three layers of Rice Krispies Treats – traditional, Cocoa Krispies and Fruity Pebbles. The women of Union Hair Studio created the wedding-day looks. After purchasing plants from Pine State Flowers, The ZEN Succulent, Barnes Supply Co. and Stone Brothers & Byrd, Raina tended all of the greenery that decorated her ceremony and reception. “There was something about growing and nurturing the plants that would be there with us on our day and still be able to come home with us and grow, which was a good analogy for how I wanted our marriage to be,” Raina says. Key Players Among many others, Tracy’s mother, Martha Hancock; groomsman, Malachy Noone; Raina’s mother, Theresa Gregory; stepfather, Keith Rost; father, Stephen Langley; and bridesmaid, Alexis Nance.

Do you live in Durham and want your wedding or engagement featured in our magazine?

Email weddings@durhammag.com

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Durham Magazine September 2018  

THE FOOD & DRINK ISSUE

Durham Magazine September 2018  

THE FOOD & DRINK ISSUE