Page 1

Q&A with Police Chief

Cerelyn “C.J.” Davis 28

Meet The Makers

Mercantile 36

Four Very Cool

Downtown Offices 66

Duke Transplant Surgeon

Makes History 80

October/November 2016 durhammag.com

The

design issue Great spaces for work and life

HOME-MADE

For Jacque Kohn and her four daughters, being creative is more than a hobby – it’s a way of life. The craft room is a beloved space in this Colvard Farms household. Page 50


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October/November 2016

Vol 9 No 6

durhammag.com     Senior Vice President, Publishing Rory Kelly Gillis rory@durhammag.com Executive Editor Amanda MacLaren amanda@durhammag.com Creative Director Kevin Brown

DENTAL INSURANCE BENEFITS USE THEM OR LOSE THEM!

W

Art Director Sarah Arneson Executive Editor, Chapel Hill Magazine Jessica Stringer Assistant Editor Laura Zolman Kirk Events & Community Editor Dana Lange Staff Photographer Briana Brough Graphic Designer Christy Wright Digital Content Manager Morgan Weston

e would like to give everyone with flex spending accounts, health savings accounts, or insurance benefits a friendly reminder that it’s about that time to start scheduling your dental visit(s) so that you can optimize your benefits.

Most dental plans have a set dollar amount to be paid out each year. Any benefits not utilized by the end of the plan year are lost. Don’t let your unused benefits expire! If you have any questions concerning your remaining dental treatment or benefits, please feel free to contact us. We will be happy to assist you.

Editorial Interns Alexis Allston, Matt Couch, Lauren Moody and Robin O'Luanaigh Contributors Amanda Abrams, Jessie Ammons, Cosette Jarrett, Shayla Martin and Kirsten Mullen ADVERTISING Melissa Crane melissa@durhammag.com Kem Johnson kem@durhammag.com Karli Kittine karli@chapelhillmagazine.com Stacie Luders stacie@durhammag.com CORPORATE President/CEO Dan Shannon danshannon@durhammag.com COO Ellen Shannon Business Manager Amy Bell Director of Digital Media Lauryn Colatuno

TOP DENTISTS

Director of Sponsorship and Digital Sales Thorne Daubenspeck 20102016

2900 Croasdaile Drive, Suite 5, Durham, NC 27705 919.383.7402 | www.croasdailedentalarts.com

William W. Turner, DMD | Jason W. Butler, DMD | W. Wayne Jordan, DDS

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Marketing Manager Chelsea Rush Administrative & Operations Assistant Caroline Kornegay Events Coordinator Grace Beason Distribution Charlie Hyland Durham Magazine is published by Shannon Media Inc. Subscriptions, $38 for two years, are available at durhammag.com. To purchase copies, call 919.933.1551.


october/november 2016 DEPARTMENTS & COLUMNS 4

Letter from the Executive Editor

6

Bull City Scene Setter PictureDURM helps us showcase images curated by locals

18 The Durham Difference The Cornucopia Cancer Support Center provides hands-on help for cancer patients and their caregivers

FEATURES 28 New Chief in the Bull City

66

Learn more about Durham Police Department Chief Cerelyn “C.J.” Davis and what she hopes to accomplish in Durham

32 Fiber is Coming

What you need to know about the Internet service provider’s arrival

40 Positively Ninth Street

David Dickson Sr.’s impact on Old West Durham spans more than four decades

50 How They Live

40

A glimpse into four very cool downtown companies

34 Go. See. Do. The hottest events in October and November 36 Durham’s Entrepreneurs Online shop and blog The Makers Mercantile supports Triangle- and North Carolina-based artists 38 Shop Local The founders of The Makers Mercantile act as guest curators, sharing a few favorite items by Bull City designers

86 Hot Spot Littler invites you to a dinner party, six days a week 88 Dishing with … Motto’s Managing Partner Brandon Carr 90 Taste Find our city’s best restaurants

SEEN & HEARDS 8

76 Crowning Commission

Duke’s own Dr. Linda Cendales performed North Carolina’s first hand transplant

26 The Creatives Get to know stationery designer and blogger Ellie Snow

102 Engagements & Weddings Tying the knot, Bull City style

66 Office Spaces

80 Surgically Speaking

24 Our Latest Obsessions Bull City beef jerky and a shop of horrors, just in time for Halloween

48 Adopt A Pet Meet a few pets from The Animal Protection Society of Durham

When the Kohn family built their southeast Durham home, they focused on the practical

Phil Freelon leads design on the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C.

20 Noted What we’ve heard around town …

80

Fashion for a Cause at Durham Arts Council

10 Hayti Heritage Center’s Bull Durham Blues Festival 12 The Nasher Museum of Art’s Southern Accent opening party 14 Txotxfest at Black Twig Cider House


| letter from the executive editor |

I

Plank Spaces T’S HARD TO FIND SALARIED EMPLOYEES WHO LIMIT themselves to just 40 hours a week anymore. According to the International Labour Organization, Americans work 137 more hours per year than Japanese workers, 260 more hours per year than British workers and 499 more hours per year than French workers. Most of us come in early, stay late, plug away through our lunch hour and work on weekends or holidays, and with the convenience of emails on our phones, we’re never quite out of touch with our jobs. Work-life balance and self-care are frequent topics that come up in workplaces now – no one wants to burn out – but putting ideas into practice is sometimes easier said than done. Like in many offices, it’s natural for myself and my co-workers to be in front of a screen all day, so we’ve taken to holding walking meetings whenever we’re brainstorming and frequently go on quick, two-minute strolls around our building when we’re feeling restless. Our newest attempt at staying alert and focused is by holding daily planking sessions. For one minute, everyone stops what they’re doing and holds a plank pose (it’s great for your abs!). Sure, it looks kind of silly when you’re in business casual attire, but it’s worth it. The companies we’ve featured in this issue, beginning on page 66, are no different – these beautifully designed spaces were constructed with the “work hard, play hard” mentality in mind. Think ping-pong and pool tables, craft beer on tap, treadmill desks and even live performances from musicians (rock on, ReverbNation!). Thanks to Bull City businesses like these, the daily grind is much more enjoyable.

 @amanda_maclaren

The Cover Photo by Briana Brough

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amanda@durhammag.com


THROUGH JANUARY 15

Tickets at ncartmuseum.org or (919) 715-5923

East Building, Level B, Meymandi Exhibition Gallery to p : 1935 Bugatti Aérolithe, Collection of Chris Ohrstrom; Photo © 2016 Joe Wiecha; 1938 Talbot-Lago T-150C-SS Teardrop, Collection of J. W. Marriott, Jr.; Photo © 2016 Peter Harholdt m i d d l e : 1938 Hispano-Suiza H6B “Xenia,” Collection of Peter Mullin Automotive Museum Foundation; Photo © 2016 Peter Harholdt; 1938 Delahaye 135M Figoni Roadster, Collection of Margie and Robert E. Petersen; Photo © 2016 Scott Williamson, Photodesign Studios b o t to m : 1936 Peugeot 402 Darl’mat Coupe, Jim Patterson/The Patterson Collection; Photo © 2016 Michael Furman; 1933 Pierce-Arrow Silver Arrow, The Richard H. Driehaus Collection at Chicago Vintage Motor Carriage; Photo © 2016 Peter Harholdt

Organized by the North Carolina Museum of Art. This exhibition is made possible, in part, by the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources; the North Carolina Museum of Art Foundation, Inc.; and the William R. Kenan Jr. Endowment for Educational Exhibitions. Research for this exhibition was made possible by Ann and Jim Goodnight/The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Fund for Curatorial and Conservation Research and Travel. p r e s e n t i n g s p o n so r

Quintiles Capitol Broadcasting Company

s u p p o rt i n g s p o n so r m e d i a s p o n so r


bull city scene setter

Showcasing images curated by locals – share with #picturedurm

 by @britnaeann  21c Museum Hotel

“Durham the way I like it best: messy, growing, historic, artsy, stormy.” - BRITNAE PURDY

PictureDURM (@picturedurm on Instagram) is a collection of photos chosen from users who share the #picturedurm hashtag. Founder Meredith Martindale started the project as a way to help people connect with, document and preserve the city. “The more diverse the photographers and photographs,” Meredith says, “the richer the experience.”

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| seen & heard | 1 PHOTO BY CAMMEL HURSE / CAMMEL PHOTOGRAPHY

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Saving Lives in Style  by Alexis Allston The second annual Labor Day weekend Fashion for a Cause, presented by Iris Oliver at PSI Theatre at the Durham Arts Council, raised funds for cancer research, patient care and awareness. The show featured fashions by designers including EvitaLoca, Rasoul Amir Designs, Lashele Lavey and Sonique Stephens. Special guest Dr. Nadine Barrett, director of the Office of Health Equity and Disparities at the Duke Cancer Institute, gave a speech on the importance of cancer research during the fashion show. All proceeds benefited Sisters Inspiring Sisters Incorporated (SISI). 8

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1 LaManda Chestnut-Pryor, Dr. Nadine Barrett of the Duke Cancer Institute and Pam Asberry Oxendine. 2 Molisha Branch models for Sonique Stephens. 3 Evita Mensah, designer of EvitaLoca. 4 Homero Herverth-Salinas, Dillon Isaac, Rasoul Butler and Joseph Hines. 5 Chelsea Kithcart models dresses by Sonique Stephens. 6 Alyssa Dumont models for Evita Loca. 7 Brittany Campbell, designer of Lashele Lavey. 8 Bobbiette Chinyere, CEO of Baroque Fashion Media, and Iris Oliver, creator and director of the fashion show.

PHOTO BY CAMMEL HURSE / CAMMEL PHOTOGRAPHY

3


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| seen & heard | 1

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Singing the Bull City Blues  by Laura Zolman Kirk Hayti Heritage Center hosted its 29th annual Bull Durham Blues Festival – one of only two blues festivals in the country presented by an African-American organization – in September. The event featured local acts like Bobby Hinton and Checkerboard Suede and national artists such as Grammy-winning Mississippi artist Grady Champion and Mac Arnold & Plate Full O’ Blues, as well as food trucks and an art market.

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1 Monica and Tracey Bowen. 2 Brenda Faucette and James Kakalec. 3 Lorraine Stephens and Hattie Richardson. 4 Will Hoersting and Kathe Neeley. 5 Lois Cameron and Diane Austin. 6 Daryll Kennedy and Melinda Squires.


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| seen & heard | 1

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A Southern Soiree  by J Caldwell The Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University’s latest exhibition, Southern Accent: Seeking the American South in Contemporary Art, opened with a grand party in August. Two gallery spaces in the museum are filled with works by 60 artists from both within and outside the region. Co-organized by Trevor Schoonmaker, chief curator and Patsy R. and Raymond D. Nasher curator of contemporary art at the Nasher, and Miranda Lash, curator of contemporary art at Speed Art Museum in Louisville, Kentucky, the exhibit explores the many sides of Southern society, culture and politics. The opening celebration featured Southern fare and live performances by Justin Robinson, shirlette ammons and DJ 9th Wonder. 12

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1 Cynthia Brodhead, Duke University President Richard Brodhead, Speed Art Museum Curator of Contemporary Art Miranda Lash, Nasher Museum of Art Chief Curator Trevor Schoonmaker and Nasher Director Sarah Schroth. 2 Musician Justin Robinson. 3 Duke Executive in Residence of Economics John Caccavale and gallery guide Ruth Caccavale. 4 Artists Stacy Lynn Waddell, George Jenne and Damian Stamer. 5 Artists Fahamu Pecou and Amy Sherald. 6 Co-founder of Merge Records and the band Superchunk Mac McCaughan and Henry Sappenfield, attorney for Kennon Craver PLLC. 7 Artist Sonya Clark and Susan Hendricks. 8 Collector Emily Kass and photographer Burk Uzzle 9 Nasher Teens coordinator Emily Perreault (center) with Nasher Teens Rumaisha Tasnim, Pharoah Egbuna, Demarkus Crawley and Mya Reid.


| seen & heard | 10

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=' A Slice of History. A World of Possibilities. Brightleaf Square features a unique mix of restaurants and shops in a pair of historic tobacco warehouses in downtown Durham.

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Stroll through the courtyard. Shop. Eat. Drink. Come to Brightleaf for a perfect afternoon or evening.

BRIGHTLEAF SQUARE

='

10 DJ 9th Wonder. 11 Chief Curator and Director of Art Programming for 21c Museum Hotel Louisville Alice Gray Stites and 21c Museum Hotel Durham Museum Manager Jeff Bell. 12 Driver Mindbody founder Charman Driver and Selman Contemporary founder Teka Selman.

9 05 W e s t M ain S t. Dur ham

=' at th e c o rn e r of W e st M ain and G re gs o n S ts. S to ps N o. 7 & 26 o n th e Bull City C o nn e cto r

W W W. H I S T O R I C B R I G H T L E A F. C O M October/November 2016

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| seen & heard |

Cheers to Txotx!  by Amanda MacLaren 1 Melanie Small and Greg DeKoenigsberg. 2 Christy Brooks and Jeff Gordon. 3 Oval Park Grille General Manager Dominic DeCastro and Chef Todd Whitney.

Black Twig Cider House hosted TxotxFest (choach-fest), the first cider celebration in the Southeast, alongside other East Coast cider houses – Washington, D.C.’s ANXO and NYC’s Wassail among them. Cider producers in attendance included Bull City Ciderworks, Noble Cider, Bold Rock, Urban Orchard and Foggy Ridge Cider. Local names like Watts Grocery, Oval Park Grille, PICNIC, Durham Catering Co. and Rise provided food samples, and Black Twig served a whole, de-boned sausagestuffed local pig from Firsthand Foods. The event benefited Durham-based nonprofit Inspire MEdia Network, an organization that shares inspiring stories – and makes them happen.

1 About Our Name The Sapphire Group at Morgan Stanley

Sapphire is a gem associated with hope, protection, good fortune and insight. It is a symbol of power and strength, but also of kindness and wise judgment. These are also attributes that we strive for every day as a team at Morgan Stanley.

Conservative with Investing

2

• Proactive with Service

• Unwavering in How We Care for Our Clients

3 Cindy Corbett, CFP®

Senior Vice President Portfolio Management Director Financial Advisor

Ashley Paonessa Financial Advisor

Ashley.A.Paonessa@morganstanley.com

Cynthia.L.Corbett@morganstanley.com

3511 Shannon Road, Suite 300, Durham, NC 27707 toll free 855 211 1224 www.morganstanleyfa.com/thesapphiregroup ©2016 Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Member SIPC. CRC1456969 4/16. Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards Inc. owns the certification marks CFP®, CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™, and federally registered in the US which it awards to individuals who successfully complete CFP Board’s initial and ongoing certification requirements.

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| seen & heard | 4

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Come lose yourself for an hour… come find yourself in a day Experience our peaceful and inspiring full service day spa, nestled beside Cates Creek and just minutes from historic Hillsborough. Take time to unwind in our tranquility lounge before or after your treatment and enjoy complimentary use of our steam rooms and infrared sauna with any service. All of our treatments are customized to your unique needs and focus on inner beauty. Come unwind for an hour or for a day retreat full of restorative downtime.

4 NYC restaurant Wassail Executive Chef Vini Campos, Black Twig Cider House Chef John Eisensmith and Alex Vallcorba, executive chef of Washington, D.C., restaurant ANXO Cidery & Pintxos Bar. 5 Inspire MEdia Network’s Andrea Griffith Cash and Black Twig Cider House’s Mattie Beason. 6 Durham Magazine Assistant Editor Laura Zolman Kirk and Patty Baum. 7 Watts Grocery Chef Amy Tornquist with daughter Lizzie Kerman.

919.617.1814 • hillsboroughspa.com •  

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FORM FUNCTION

WINNER

IBEST OF DURHAM 2016

Fine Design & Cabinetry • 3407 University Drive, Durham • 919.490.4922 • www.thekitchenspecialist.com


BEAUTY STYLE Using our expertise and creative vision we have been designing elegant, highly functional, traditional and contemporary kitchens for over 25 years. We invite you to visit our Durham showroom and see how we can make your kitchen dreams come to life.

The Kitchen Specialist


| the Durham difference |

Glenna Maynus provides a healing touch to Cornucopia visitors.

G

Giving Till It Doesn’t Hurt Hands-on helping cancer patients at Cornucopia

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 by Dana Lange |  by Briana Brough

LENNA MAYNUS HAD NEVER HEARD OF CORNUCOPIA CANCER SUPPORT CENTER

– founded in 1995 – when she had breast cancer 10 years ago. It was not until later when she answered a call put out on her Northgate Park listserv to help drive a neighbor with cancer to the hospital that she learned about it. On the

October/November 2016


‘So many people had helped me through my cancer, and I want to do the same for others.’ After being declared cancer-free, ‘I was more conscious of life and living and not just doing.’

way home from that appointment the neighbor asked if school, Glenna opened Quarter Moon Dreams Healing Arts, performing massages on both cancer patients as well they could stop at Cornucopia. “Wow, what a wonderful as healthy people. All the place,” Glenna thought. while she also volunteered at Glenna had recently Cornucopia. left her 20-year career “Glenna really relieves the at GlaxoSmithKline and was searching for a new pain and suffering of our challenge. “I did not know patients,” says Olivia Stancil, the director of community exactly what I was going to relations at Cornucopia. “She do, but I knew I wanted to makes them feel renewed, do something to help cancer revitalized and safe.” patients.” While reading an “So many people had article in a magazine, Glenna helped me through my discovered oncology massage. cancer, and I want to do the “I had a wonderful massage same for others,” Glenna therapist who had helped explains. After being declared me through my cancer, but a beloved member of the cancer-free, “I was more I didn’t know there was a Durham Magazine team since our conscious of life and living specialty [massage treatment] launch and the past board chair of the Food Bank of Central and Eastern and not just doing,” she adds. for cancer.” North Carolina, highlights her fellow When Glenna first was Glenna trained at the Durhamites making a difference diagnosed with her cancer Body Therapy Institute in a by giving back. someone told her, “It is going yearlong course to become a to suck, tell everyone you massage therapist. “During know because they are your support group, and say ‘yes’ my training I did my externship at Cornucopia where when people ask if you need help.” A sentiment that proved I also was volunteering in the peer connect program true. “I was lucky I had support,” she says. “Cornucopia is helping answer questions for women who had a similar there to help people who need more support.” cancer to what I had.” Upon graduating from massage

Dana Lange,

All services at Cornucopia – 20 W. Colony Pl. in Durham – are free to cancer patients and their caregivers, including counseling, Magnolia meals at home, oncology massage, acupuncture, health coaching, art cart and respite care for caregivers. The nonprofit is funded by individuals, fundraising events, community organizations, corporations and foundations.

Learn more at cancersupport4u.org.

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noted. Business Briefs

Send us you news! r From b irth

s to a to ne noted w biz and mwards @durh o amma re – g.com

What we’ve heard around town …

The Play House toy store on Ninth

Lashanda DeBerry opened Pur Bella’s

Street plans to reimagine the

Organic Haircare Extensions & BlowOut

business from a retail shop to a

Bar in September on Roxboro Street.

resource center focusing on science

Lashanda was inspired to open the

and math programs for children ages

business after a battle with cancer. The

2 to 13. To accomplish this, the locally

salon will offer wig services for cancer

owned business has launched a Go

patients, massage therapy and organic hair

Fund Me page to help raise $15,000.

treatments, among other services.

In the News I.T.S. Baseball (owners Chas and Megan Pippitt, pictured above) will relocate from Hillsborogh to 4502 Bennett Memorial Road, where Bull City Gymnastics is

Vincent and Ethel Simonetti’s Historic Tuba Collection was featured on NPR’s “Morning Edition” in late August.

North Carolina Central University is the third highest-rated public historically black college/ university in the country according to the most recent U.S. News & World Report rankings.

currently located, in late 2017. Austin-based Camp Gladiator, a fitness brand for all ages, has opened a location at Northgate Mall near Stadium 10 Theater. The business was conceived by Ally Davidson, winner of “American Gladiator” on NBC. Empower Dance Studio is moving to 100 W. Parrish St. downtown. Pierce McKoy’s shoeshine business McKoy’s Shoe Shines has moved from The Durham Hotel to Main Street, near Dame’s Chicken & Waffles. Patina, a vintage, new and used furniture store on Durham-Chapel Hill Boulevard, has added MacRae Sollee, Maria Siegal, Anita Hicks and Jane Goss to its creative team, begun by Sissy Anlyan.

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Duke University’s golf club at Washington Duke Inn & Golf Club was selected by Golfweek as one of the publication’s top campus courses for 2016.

October/November 2016


Nonprofit Notables

The Edison Johnson Aquatic Center

Mark Your Calendar

will close on or before Nov. 7 to replace the dehumidification unit and undergo routine maintenance, including new lights and fresh paint. The center is expected to remain

PHOTO BY DVOC PHOTOGRAPHY

Taking a Stand In response to the ACC’s decision to move the 2017 baseball championship from the Durham Bulls Athletic Park, Shelly Green – president of Durham Convention & Visitors Bureau – issued a statement on behalf of the organization Visions of Bull City Art Show, hosted by The Choice Performance Center, raised $7,500 for the Melvin Brent Adcock Memorial Scholarship Fund supporting Girls on the Run of the Triangle. The center and the Adcock family (pictured above) established the memorial scholarship fund in August after Brent Adcock was shot and killed in July. ReCity, a nonprofit serving disconnected youth and their families in the Triangle, officially launched its downtown Durham

saying she was disappointed, but understood the ACC’s decision. “I can only hope that these decisions made by the ACC and NCAA, as well as countless other businesses resolution of this issue either legislatively or through the judiciary,” she said in a statement. DCVB remains opposed to House Bill 2.

And the Award Goes to …

Advance copies of the new LP will be available at the show. Alongside Chapel Hill Wine Company, The Cookery hosts the 10th annual Corks for Kids event to support UNC Children’s

woman this July.

program, and construction is expected to begin spring 2017.

calling 919-401-7252.

John Howie, Jr. and the Rosewood Bluff.

and development tools, served its 10,000th

courtesy of PetSafe’s Bark for Your Park

work, and you can make a reservation by

Nov. 3 at The Pinhook with support from

network of support, professional attire

made possible thanks to a $25,000 grant

for the lemurs and supports conservation

2017. A pre-release show will take place

economic independence by providing a

small- and large-dog sections. The park is

and family-friendly activities. The cost is

recorded at Caveman Studios, in January

that empowers women to achieve

playground equipment for the pups and

program and enjoy a picnic, food trucks

new album “Little Me Time,” which was

of the international nonprofit organization

complete with low stone walls, reclaimed

to meet lemurs in the Adopt-A-Lemur

Charles Latham is poised to release his

Dress for Success Triangle, our local chapter

Duke Park will soon feature a new dog park,

Duke Lemur Center presents Lemurpalooza Oct. 14 from 5-8 p.m. Families are invited

$50 per family, which helps the center care

and organizations, will motivate a speedy

collaborative co-working space in September.

New Developments

PHOTO BY BRIANA BROUGH

closed until mid-February.

Hospital on Nov. 12. On Election Day, Nov. 8, Durham County residents will have the chance to vote on

Durham Academy teacher Kari Newman

education bonds supporting programs

received the Presidential Award for

such as the Main Library renovation,

Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching and was recognized in Washington, D.C., in September. She is one of 105 teachers of students in grades 7-12 nationwide to receive the award, and one of only two in North Carolina.

Durham Technical Community College improvements and program expansion, upgrading facilities throughout Durham Public Schools and upgrades and maintenance to the Museum of Life and Science. „

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| noted | Jennifer Watkins, the mother of Durham

St. Baldrick’s Foundation awarded Duke

Technical Community College student

University Medical Center two grants totaling

Heather Watkins, was one of 10 winners

$257,685 to support the cancer research of

in the North Carolina Education Lottery’s

Duke’s Michael Deel and Dan Wechsler.

Proud Moments in Education essay contest. She wrote about how Heather overcame the challenges of spina bifida and multiple sclerosis in order to graduate from Jordan High School on time in 2015.

On the Move After five years, Bob Geolas is stepping down from his position at president and CEO of the Research Triangle Foundation of N.C., which manages Research Triangle Park.

Which Rooms Do You Want Updated in Time For the Holidays?

All in the Club

The National Council of Negro Women’s State Coalition meeting was held in August by the organization’s Durham chapter at North Carolina Central University.

TOP RIGHT: HARDEN FURNITURE BOTTOM LEFT: AS SEEN ON CURATEDKRAVET.COM. ROOM DESIGN COURTESY OF ELIZABETH LAMONT BOTTOM RIGHT: AS SEEN ON CURATEDKRAVET.COM. ROOM DESIGN COURTESY OF BARCLAY BUTERA.

.

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The Duke Campus Club, an organization for Duke-affiliated women, announced its new executive board for 2016-2017, which includes (from left): VP of Communications Penny Fleming, VP of Membership Diane Staton, past president Joy Dunlap, President Anne Alexander, President Elect Barbara Van Dewoestine, Treasurer Pam Swinney and Secretary Caroline Rourk.

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North Carolina’s Largest Selection of Wine, Beer and More Under One Roof – at the Lowest Prices!

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RAL-16-384


latest obessions

Our editors’ most recent discoveries will have you hooked, too

I

Tear Jerky

T’S TRUE, WE ARE SMITTEN WITH Two Brothers Jerky. Not just because one of their signature flavors is named after our city (Bull City Original Jerky), or that their products are flavorful, 100% grass fed, and made with no hormones or preservatives. It’s Paul Brock and Eddie Wale’s story that gets us. Paul and Eddie, brothers born a year apart in the mid-1960s, were adopted separately through Children’s Home Society of North Carolina. They met each other for the first time six years ago. Their biological mother (whom Paul had reconnected with later in life, too) had told Paul of Eddie’s existence and, after a few months of searching and building up the courage to reach out, Paul connected with his long-lost bro. “We knew we were brothers from the start,” Paul says. However, they do come from different backgrounds: In Durham, Paul is a family law mediator and owns the residential property renovation company Toro Properties; he used to own The Broad Street Café for five years. Eddie is a restaurant owner in Columbia, S.C. (his home state). The pair started Two Brothers Jerky two years ago as a way to combine their passions and intertwine their lives. “This company allows us to hang out together, talk daily and just strengthen the family ties,” Paul says. “It gave Eddie and I an opportunity to do something we love together.” The siblings are now on a mission to give back, collaborating with the organization that facilitated Eddie’s and Paul’s adoptions to their respective families, sponsoring events like We Believe in Families in Raleigh and donating a cut of their profits annually to the cause. “We are also interested in working with reunification organizations because our reunification has been such a cool thing for our family,” Paul says. You can purchase their Bull City Original Jerky – a traditional, meaty jerky made with real hickory smoke – at The Glass Jug, Sam’s Quik Shop, Sam’s Bottle Shop, Fullsteam Brewery, Bulldega, Durty Bull Brewing Company, Rockwood Barbershop and Art Market at Vega Metals. It’s made

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from quality beef sourced from a fourthgeneration family farm near Asheville, where Paul grew up. “We wanted real, natural beef and to get rid of the artificial preservativeladen taste that most commercial beef jerky flavors have,” Paul describes. “In short, Eddie and I wanted to provide a beef jerky as good as I have been producing in my kitchen for family and friends for nearly 30 years.” “I think [Bull City Original Jerky] connects to Durham,” adds Paul, who has lived here since graduating from UNC 24 years ago, “in that it is the real deal. There is not a lot of pretense to Bull City Original; there’s not a lot of pretense to Durham. And they both have an element of nostalgia.” – Laura Zolman Kirk

Paul (left) and Eddie's love of food drove the pair to start Two Brothers Jerky.


W

Tricks and Treats HEN SHOPPERS WALK into Melissa Browning’s Little Shop of Horror for the first time, they generally react with “stunned silence or sometimes rather loud expletives of awesomeness.” From posters to hundreds of VHS tapes ranging from the tame (“Scooby Doo”) to the thrilling (“Dawn of the Dead”) lining the walls, her store is a year-round horror haven that doesn’t confine zombies to just autumn. It’s a far cry from those seasonal Halloween pop-up stores that carry primarily masks and costumes. Instead, Melissa’s got indie items – Jason Voorhees pint glasses, “The Walking Dead” candles and various soaps with names like “Psycho Shower Scene.” The horror bug bit Melissa back in elementary school. “I rented ‘Children of the Corn’ and I was a goner,” she says. Melissa moved to town a decade ago to open rXr CDs, but then decided to concentrate on just the scary stuff. She found her shop’s location at 506 N. Mangum St., Ste. 103, as

Center Studio Architecture was building it back in 2009. “[I] was lucky enough to be able to purchase one of the commercial units and have it made to my weird specs,” she recalls. “Black-and-white tile floors, now accented by blood splatter, were a must.” Little Shop of Horror celebrates one year of chills and thrills in October thanks to its customers who appreciate the full spectrum of terror, from the campy to the macabre. On October 5-9, stop by the store for sales, a raffle drawing for prizes and thank-you goodie bags. (If you can’t make it during the anniversary week, shop on any Friday the 13th for, you guessed it, 13% off.) And as Halloween nears, Melissa is more than happy to use her extensive knowledge of movies – her favorite is “Slither” – and recommend something. She’s been involved in the programming of the annual Nevermore Film Festival, held in February at The Carolina Theatre. “My favorite thing is being able to geek out with others about movies or turn people on to movies they might not have heard of,” she says. “It’s just bonus points to get paid to do it.” – Jessica Stringer October/November 2016

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the creatives | latest obsessions |

 by Amanda Abrams |  by L'amour Foto

Get to Know …

Ellie Snow

Fans of all things matrimony-related may know Ellie Snow’s wedding stationery company, Hello Tenfold. Design enthusiasts are probably familiar with her long-running blog, Mint. And downtown denizens might have spied her walking to the main post office with packages under her arm. Ellie, who lives in Duke Park with her husband, Brendan Ward, and 3-year-old daughter, Juna, talks about art, inspiration and the benefits of working downtown. I began the blog as a part of learning. I was posting three times a day, and people started reading it. I got engaged around then and did my own wedding invitations, and put those on the blog. I started getting requests to do other people’s wedding invitations, so I started an Etsy shop. Right around then, the design firm I was working for – Flywheel Design in Durham – closed, and I had to hit the ground running. I think my style is a little different. I like looking at old advertisements and ephemera – I might find one flourish that’s pretty and make a suite of materials that go with it. In the past year, I’ve been trying to do more hand-generated [items]. It’s fun to do something new, and it’s challenging. I’ve taken some painting classes at the Durham Arts Council and that’s been great, just doing something for myself outside of work. When we moved to Durham, it was really quiet; I think there was one bar downtown. I think that’s what made us fall in love with it: Watching it change. Our studio is on West Main Street, in the Snow Building. It’s got south-facing windows so it has nice light. I love being downtown; I feel more like a part of Durham. My husband is also freelancing in graphic design. His company is Harbor Studio. He quit his job at Capstrat in Raleigh almost two years ago so we could have more of a 50-50 partnership in parenting, and it’s been amazing. We take turns with all the pickups and drop-offs. One of our goals with being self-employed was to take a big trip every year, and we’re about to take an almost two-month trip to Vietnam. I’m sure it’ll inspire me: They have beautiful landscapes there. 26

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Police Chief Cerelyn “C.J.” Davis talks about switching the DPD’s philosophy to ‘a guardian mentality from a warrior mentality’  by Briana Brough

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IN THE BULL CITY

NEW CHIEF


A

FTER A LONG APPLICATION PROCESS AND NATIONWIDE SEARCH, the Durham Police Department found its new chief this spring: Cerelyn "C.J." Davis, a native North Carolinian, born at Fort Bragg to “a very big family, a very close military family,” she says. When her father retired, the family packed up and moved to Atlanta, where she went to high school and eventually decided to go into law enforcement. After a 30-year career with the Atlanta Police Department, Chief Davis, 56, the mother of an adult daughter [Chaun] living in Brooklyn and grandmother to two, was ready for a new challenge. Her husband, Terry, currently a supervisor with the Fulton County Sheriff ’s Office, “will join me here once our house there is sold.” We chatted with her recently about her new position and what she hopes to accomplish here. – Laura Zolman Kirk „

What attracted you to the Durham Police Department? I knew that Durham is a progressive city, a growing city. I was really intrigued by the colleges that are here and the Research Triangle area. There just seemed to be a lot going on in a very concentrated area. I started to take a deeper look into Durham, and the police department specifically. I was pleasantly surprised to see that the Durham Police Department is a great department. And I wouldn’t have moved my husband and household here if I didn’t think this was a great department to work for and city to live in. Durham is a great city with a long history of racial harmony and tolerance, unlike many other cities. Is that one of the reasons you decided to come here? I was very attracted to the widespread philosophy advocating cultural diversity and inclusion in the city of Durham. There is also a deep-rooted sense of pride amongst residents toward Durham’s rich history and economic development in recent years. Durham has a lot of little surprises for newcomers, including some of the best restaurants in the Southeast — what are your impressions so far? I like walking the city; it’s a great place to enjoy festivals and arts, all of the quaint shops, restaurants. It’s a wonderful walking town. That has been my favorite part of the city so far. I really enjoyed a great meal at Parizade, love breakfast at Dame’s Chicken & Waffles, and Beyù Caffè is a great place for a healthy lunch and java. I love the Brightleaf area. And the food truck rodeos are awesome! You’ve only been in office three months; have you developed goals coming into this new position? One of my short-term goals is to identify youth programs that the Durham Police Department can be heavily involved in. What I would like to see more of is a visible presence of the Durham Police Department, not [only] from an enforcement standpoint, but to have our officers in those communities mentoring young people, so that we’re not just talking to them during negative encounters with police. [We’re] changing our philosophy of being enforcers [to having] more of a guardian mentality as opposed to a warrior mentality. How do you do that? I think every police agency in the country should be taking a more surgical look at their department. How can they improve community relations? I think a good start is to find ways to partner with the community as it relates to October/November 2016

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having conversations and collaborative trainings. Traditionally, police agencies train alone; they teach their officers what they think they should know about the community. And we miss so many important factors, the pulse of the community, because we don’t include [the public] in what that training should look like.

Can you give me an example? [The police] might think that burglaries are a big deal, but if you talk to the community members they might say burglaries aren’t a big deal right now, but loud noise is. So, sometimes we use data – which is important—but the data doesn’t capture some of the qualitative things that are out there in the community that you may not hear about because it is not captured in some sort of system. The only way you can hear about it is if you have some honest, one-on-one, in-your-face conversations with the people that you serve. So, as a police chief, I feel it is critically important to create opportunities for the community to be heard. That would be through our Citizens Police Academy [currently a once-a-year program]. It could be mobilized, a chance for us to go out into the community and hold sessions at recreation centers to make it more accessible to community members. Black Lives Matter, Blue Lives Matter, All Lives Matter — this has to be one of the toughest times to be a police officer. How’s the morale? Officers who take an oath to serve the public are often rattled by incidents that cast distrust on the law enforcement profession as a whole. While we continue to seek opportunities to build better relationships with the communities we serve here in Durham, officers are often discouraged when stereotyped on the heels of controversial police encounters. However, Durham police officers have not wavered in their commitment to duty in spite of recent incidents. Outlook? I am excited about the Durham Police Department’s future. My leadership team is seasoned, competent and eager to take on new challenges in the months ahead. Our first priority is to provide safe and livable communities for our citizens and visiting guests. To accomplish this, we must examine our strengths and weaknesses and develop aggressive and proactive strategies to meet the challenges in our daily work. I’m being challenged with patience. I’m being challenged with understanding a different political landscape than what I’m accustomed to. It’s good for me, it’s expanding my horizons. 30

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Dancin’ Department The DPD busts a move in YouTube video I had a chance to watch your “#BullCity Running Man Challenge” video in response to the Atlanta Police Department. It seemed like you all had such fun making it. It was a great way for me to respond to Atlanta that [Durham] is my new home, and it was also an opportunity for our officers to be engaged in sort of a fun community outreach project. Headed up by public affairs folks, they really did a good job incorporating the Watch fo r yo community. We really wanted the citizens bit.ly/b urself at ullcityru nningm an to see Durham police officers in a different light, especially in light of what is going on around the country. What were some of your favorite moments creating the video? I thought it was really cool for [us] to be out there with the kids. The Bulls stadium, I think, was what Atlanta called the “drop-the-mic moment” and to have the entire audience in the stadium see our officers in that light and be a part of the filming was really special.

Fund the Force In 2015, the Durham Police Department created the Blue Benevolence fund at the behest of citizens as a way to support local law enforcement programs that enhance community relations. In addition to its Blue Benevolence fund, DPD also collects donations for its Police Athletic League (PAL), a program designed to unite police and youth through athletics and leadership activities. For more information, contact Kimberle Walker at 919-560-4322, ext. 29194.


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FIBER IS COMING You may have noticed construction crews tearing up your fiberhood  by Cosette Jarrett

I

F YOU’RE EAGERLY ANTICIPATING GOOGLE FIBER’S move into our city, you’re probably anxious for more information. Currently, best estimates for the first neighborhoods to go live are around mid-2017, though Google won’t confirm that. A lot of residents in south and southeast Durham are noticing a decided uptick in construction activity, but there’s still a lot of guessing going on. “The companies providing gigabit services do not tell us when or where they will be offering service,” says Deputy City Manager Bo Ferguson, “but we know and monitor the building of their infrastructure.” Since Google is not obligated to inform the city how it plans to build out the network, nor which neighborhoods will be able to tap into the service, predicting Google Fiber’s plans is an inexact science. But one thing is certain: The rollout throughout the Triangle, already well underway, will take years. Building a fiber optic infrastructure from scratch is a massive project from a logistical and technical vantage, which is why Google, with its valuation well north of $500 billion, is one of the few, if not only, companies able to even contemplate such an undertaking. But laying hundreds of miles of bright orange fiber optic cable comes with an inevitable inconvenience cost to residents. Scores of residents have complained so far about subcontractors digging without notice, damaging property, blocking roads without notice, 32

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working outside the permitted times and the like. “Periodically we’ve had to shut down construction crews hired by both AT&T and Google Fiber because they have not always performed to our standards,” Bo says. If you have questions regarding the construction process, Google has provided a support page specific to the Triangle: fiber. google.com/cities/triangle/ support. We also found that its team often provides a response via their email contact form (support.google.com/fiber).

The Need for Speed 

Naturally, the first question is: Is the gigabit service as revolutionary as the hype would have it seem? The IT consensus is that a gigabit (a gigabit is 1,000 megabits-per-second – Mbps – upload and download speeds, or about 100 times faster than a typical broadband connection) defines a new speed standard for home Internet usage. Practically speaking it means no more buffering videos – HD movies can download in 40 seconds – and with more Internet activity based in the far-off cloud, speed is of the essence. HD video conferencing, too, will likely become more accessible and widespread as users adapt to the service’s faster speeds and ability to handle volume. “This will offer much faster downloads, no pause, and so on,” Bo says, “I suspect that this tool is going to allow people to do and create things and businesses that we haven’t imagined yet.”


Competitive Edges 

Typically, along with Google Fiber comes real competition. Aside from bringing its own potential for better customer experiences, Google Fiber will likely encourage the city’s current providers to be competitive with their broadband services. According to DSL Reports, ISPs where Google Fiber competes usually offer higher speeds at lower prices. For example, a provider that offers its fastest service for $110 may offer the same service for $70 when Google Fiber enters the market. When Google announced Fiber was coming to Charlotte, Time Warner Cable increased its Internet speeds across the board, by up to six times faster than before, without raising prices. And Google isn’t alone in offering significantly better – read, much, much faster – Internet service, though it gets most of the attention because, well, it’s Google. Nevertheless, private utility companies such as AT&T, Frontier and Time Warner Cable are constructing new and upgrading existing communications infrastructure. In fact, AT&T and Frontier may well beat Google to the market with faster Internet service. In addition to Durham, the various providers will offer their gigabit service to Carrboro, Chapel Hill, Morrisville, Cary, Raleigh and Garner.

Lower Costs 

Google Fiber pricing for the Triangle has been announced as follows: • Fiber 1000 $70/month for up to 1 gig (1,000 Mbps) download and upload speed • Fiber 1000 plus TV $140/month • Fiber Phone $10/month + taxes and fees (when added to a residential plan)

Included in the packages are a range of TV channels, no data caps and free installation. A slower Fiber 100 plan offering up to 100 Mbps upload and download speeds is available for $50 per month. Small businesses have plans ranging up to $250 per month. If you’re planning to switch to Google Fiber from your current provider, you should also factor in any service cancellation fees. This may not be an issue with every plan or provider, but it’s worth double checking. Hopefully this breakdown has you caught up to speed on what we know so far about Google Fiber’s arrival in Durham. Though the final roll-out to all or most of Durham’s residents will take years, you can sign up for email notifications to receive service updates on the support page mentioned above.

What the City Advises

The City of Durham has provided the following expectations and guidelines for residents:

Informational door hangers will be distributed in advance of construction in your neighborhood. Most of the utility companies use subcontractors to perform this work. Subcontractor vehicles/equipment are generally not marked with the contracting company’s name. Google-authorized subcontractor vehicles should have a “Bechtel” or “S&N” logo on each vehicle. Markings Blue, purple, green, orange, yellow, white and/or pink paint markings will be sprayed on the ground several weeks before construction. The paint tells contractors where existing underground utility lines are so that they can be avoided when digging. Rights-of-Way A public right-of-way area is designated between most streets and the adjacent private property. This is where service providers are allowed by law to place their fiber along with water/sewer/electrical lines. Typically, the rightsof-way include the area from the curb towards your home for about eight feet (or about three feet of grass or five-foot-wide sidewalk). Contractors should receive permission from property owners before working on private property (ex: homeowner’s association, townhomes and condos). Time of Day Work typically occurs weekdays 7 a.m. – 7 p.m.; however, sometimes permission is given to expand this schedule on a case-by-case basis. While construction noise can be as loud as necessary during these permitted times, you should not be bothered by noise in your home or business outside of these times. Post-Construction In most cases and weather permitting, private property should be restored to original condition within 3-5 business days once construction is complete. Companies are not required by law to coordinate their activities, which means that even after one company is finished and the property is restored, other companies can come through the same area and start the process over. If You Have Construction Concerns or Need to Report Damages For questions or concerns about construction in your area, call the number on the vehicle, door hanger or the below numbers for assistance. Call 911 immediately if you believe there is a danger threatening life or health. • AT&T / ANSCO: Call 877-845-6660 or email Rd5264@att.com • Google Support/Construction Line: Call 877-454-6959 • Time Warner: Call 919-595-4892 Last Call If you’re not sure which company is responsible for the work or if you’re not satisfied with the company’s response, please call Durham One Call at 919-560-1200 weekdays 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. or Todd Ireland with Kimley-Horn and Associates (City of Durham Consultant for Private Utility Project Mgmt. & Inspections Services for Gigabit Fiber Installation) at 919-677-2042.

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Durham Art Walk Holiday Market Nov. 19-20 Start on your holiday shopping list by browsing works from local artists like Cinc Hayes (above), at this weekend-long event stretching over several walkable Durham sites including Durham Arts Council, Vega Metals and Durham Armory.

Halloween Spooktacular Oct. 23 Join Durham Symphony Orchestra at Northgate Mall for this family-friendly concert featuring Paperhand Puppet Intervention and a best costume contest.

World Beer Festival Oct. 15 All About Beer Magazine presents the publication’s 21st annual festival at the Durham Bulls Athletic Park – a day of unlimited beer tastings with more than 250 varieties from breweries across the globe, as well as a cider garden.

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Oct. 28-30 Catch one of five postmodern dance performances of ‘In Plain Site,’ a project launched by the company to showcase Brown's works in unconventional new spaces, presented by Duke Performances at Sarah P. Duke Gardens on Friday and Sunday, and The Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University on Saturday.

The hottest events in October and November

PHOTO CREDITS (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT): TRISHA BROWN PHOTO COURTESY DUKE PERFORMANCES; NC BBQ REVIVAL PHOTO BY BRIANA BROUGH; WORLD BEER FESTIVAL PHOTO COURTESY ALL ABOUT BEER MAGAZINE; HALLOWEEN SPOOKTACULAR PHOTO BY BRETT E. CHAMBERS, COURTESY NORTHGATE MALL

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Trisha Brown Dance Company

October/November 2016

NC BBQ Revival Oct. 28-30 Hosted by PICNIC restaurant and partner Green Button Farm, this three-day barbecue food fest supports the Triangle Land Conservancy and features educational opportunities and dining experiences galore, culminating with a “BBQ Church” symposium and pig pickin’ on Sunday.


Bull City Race Fest Oct. 16 For this fourth annual event, presented by Quintiles, choose your race – halfmarathon, five-mile or one-mile distance – and run from American Tobacco Campus through downtown and back to a post-race festival, complete with food trucks, a beer garden, kids’ zone and entertainment, on the lawn next to the Durham Performing Arts Center. Proceeds benefit Habitat for Humanity of Durham. n ex

Sat

n urd sa ay , art eet ke t 2 tr s 2 n d du is 1 - 4 tt pm gat 4 0 4

oc

Eric Johnson Nov. 10 This Grammy award-winning instrumentalist takes to The Carolina Theatre’s stage for a solo performance featuring acoustic guitar and piano.

mu ra l du r ha m m u ra l

du r h a

m .co m

Mural Durham Oct. 22 This free graffiti and street art festival put on by Duke University documents existing Durham murals and inspires new works of art across the city, alongside food trucks, DJs, a live mural painting, dance performances and more!

'How the Grinch Stole Christmas' Pumpkin Patch Express Durham County Pottery Tour Nov. 12-13 Tour 19 artists’ studios throughout the county, with hand-crafted works by potters such as Jo Lovvorn (above) and Cynthia Aldrich.

Weekends, October 8-30 Hop aboard Museum of Life & Science’s train to the museum’s on-site pumpkin patch, where visitors are invited to pick out the perfect pumpkin, run through the hay maze, dive into the corn crib, complete a couple crafts and more!

Nov. 29-Dec. 4 Dr. Seuss’ classic tale of the dastardly Grinch who learns the true meaning of Christmas comes to life at the Durham Performing Arts Center. For a full calendar of events, visit durhammag.com.

PHOTO CREDITS (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT): ERIC JOHNSON PHOTO COURTESY OF THE CAROLINA THEATRE; BULL CITY RACE FEST PHOTO BY JUAN CARLOS BRICENO, TAMARA LACKEY PHOTOGRAPHY; GRINCH PHOTO BY PAPARAZZIBYAPPOINTMENT.COM; PUMPKIN PATCH PHOTO COURTESY MUSEUM OF LIFE AND SCIENCE

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| Durham’s entrepreneurs |

Meet Your Makers

T

The founders of The Makers Mercantile are building an online community that supports Triangle- and North Carolina-based artists

• • •

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PHOTO BY BRIANA BROUGH

HE FOUNDERS OF THE

Makers Mercantile, a locally sourced online shop and artist-focused blog, are on a mission to connect makers to a community “who appreciates the mission, Flip the story and craftsmanship of each page for a few artist,” says Maggie Meyer, who, and Ma of Maggie ria’s Durham favorite along with Maria Carroll-Holton, -ma products de launched the website in June. . “The online shop strives to reach a broader consumer group unable to always attend weekend markets or find Both Maggie (left) and Maria work full-time as program directors at Duke Hospital, a source for highly sustainable, local goods but on evenings and weekends they turn their attention to The Makers Mercantile, with 24/7 access,” Maggie says. “[And it] meeting at locations such as Cocoa Cinnamon. provides artists with a greater market beyond North Carolina.” The website shares hand-selected goods from local artisans, By The Numbers like Lo & Behold’s natural bath products or DSH Pipes’ handmade The Makers Mercantile started in March 2016 with a smoking pipes, and pairs them with “a blog offering a glimpse into network of five artists, which grew to 15 by its June launch the life and personality of the artist community.” It allows you to go – and now boasts 20 makers throughout North Carolina. behind-the-scenes in a studio and connect with their inspirations; Seven Durham-based artisans currently sell through envision the workshop of Evie Watts’ grandfather, which she The Makers Mercantile, including Katie Berman’s Redden describes as “an amazing mess, piles of wood, pieces of broken Goods, Ann Thaden, Anna Nickles’ Shibui South, John furniture, screws and nails in baby food jars, cans of oil and paint. Parkinson Furniture, Evie Watts, Elisabeth Chadbourne’s The smell was fantastic.” Read how she depicts her style – “organic, Lo & Behold and David Huber’s DSH Pipes. sensual, with a twist of grit.” And then scroll through her creations. The Makers Mercantile expects to host a total “With each sale,” Maggie says, “the goal is for customers to feel of 120 pieces on their website this fall. truly connected to the piece and be able to pass along the stories and background behind the art.” – Laura Zolman Kirk


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shoƅlocal

The Makers Mercantile acts as guest curator this issue, sharing a few items by Bull City designers featured on their site, themakersmercantile.com

Framed Metal Bull, $99. Evie Watts

Wooden Bottle Openers, $40. John Parkinson Furniture “Each bottle opener has a magnet, which allows it to be held securely on your refrigerator.”

Vlek 16-inch Wool and Cotton Pillow, $123. Redden Goods “Don’t worry, the front is so soft, you won’t even guess it’s made with wool.”

Hand-Sewn Chambray Dot Infinity Scarf, $40. Shibui South ”The perfect accessory for all seasons.”

Aztec Bull Notecard, $5. Ann Thaden 38

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Durham and Chapel Hill Premiere Designer Clothing and Accessories 2699 Durham Chapel Hill Blvd., Durham, NC 27707 banoboutique.com 919-489-9006

Tuesday through Saturday 10:00 am – 5:00 pm Or by Appointment Alterations and Couture Tailoring for Men and Women

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919-831-605 | theatreinthepark.com October/November 2016

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The

Foodie issue

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P O S I T I V E LY

N I NTH STREET David Dickson Sr.’s impact on Old West Durham spans more than four decades  by Amanda Abrams |  by Briana Brough

W

HEN DAVID DICKSON STARTED HIS COMPUTER BUSINESS

on Ninth Street in the 1970s, there wasn’t a lot going on in the area. Erwin Mill was still open then and there was an eclectic scattering of shops serving workers, but north of Markham Avenue, “there wasn’t much activity,” David (pictured left) remembers. Like so much else in town, that’s all changed – and much of it is due to David and his business DataFlow, which grew from two to 140 employees. DataFlow was the first computer company to sell hardware and software maintenance for a turnkey solution of the products he sold, according to son Glenn Dickson. The family has had a continual presence on upper Ninth Street for 40 years, first running a successful business there and then gradually buying up properties and over time building 275,000 sq. ft. of commercial space. Earlier this year, the family’s most recent development, Solis Ninth Street, opened just north of Markham; once its residential and retail spaces are full, it will bring even more life to the commercial strip. But David Dickson didn’t launch DataFlow with a goal of becoming a real estate developer. The Greensboro native started out as a computer pioneer. He

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| kicker | The

Foodie issue

Glenn, David Sr. and David Dickson Jr. at the 200-year-old farm on Erwin Road that David Sr. is restoring.

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| ninth street | moved here in 1964 to work for the National Cash Register Corporation, where he was taught to understand those newfangled processors and the promise they held. Because of his training, he knew a great computer when he saw one, and in 1975 he established DataFlow to take advantage of that opportunity. The company sold, installed and serviced a computer brand and its software, with a focus on customer service. He was determined to take care of the client first and let his team figure out the problems among the hardware, operating systems and software. “Dad did not want the hardware engineer telling the client it was a software problem or the software support person telling the client it was a hardware issue,” Glenn says. The Dicksons cite excellent customer service as the underpinning philosophy that drove their business. “Thanks to dad,” Glenn says, “[We] created the best service and support in the last 20 years of the 20th century, and we have created it again in the first 20 years of the 21st century at TSI Healthcare,” a startup providing software and services to medical providers. David Sr. modestly credits his good fortune to making the most of market opportunity: “We were in the right place at the right time.”

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David Sr. was raising his family – and eventual colleagues – on Swarthmore Road, near Hope Valley. Glenn and Dickson’s other son, David Dickson Jr., also worked at DataFlow. And when their stretch of buildings – they had bought up most of the properties on Ninth Street between Markham Avenue

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| ninth street |

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| ninth street | and Green Street – needed visual improvement, David Jr. planted flowers and Japanese maples to go along with an external renovation, earning the company a beautification award. Originally, the elder Dickson had dreams of establishing a computer corridor along the block, but instead he wound up selling the business in 1994. Two years later, he and David Jr. and Glenn – CEO, VP of Medical Sales and VP of Customer Engineering, respectively – were amicably terminated from the new ownership. Soon after, David Sr. and Glenn were developing, buying and redeveloping the 800 block, which extended the commercial district. The combination of retail, office and multifamily transitions the commercial district with the residential neighborhood of Old West Durham. Meanwhile, David Sr. and Glenn were grappling with what they might do next with their properties. “Should we renovate [the existing properties] for $1 million, or tear them down and build more densely for $3 million?” remembers Glenn. Without any prospective tenants, they chose the second option. The result, which opened in 2003, was Ninth Street North, a compact retail-and-office building located where DataFlow had been. The Dicksons also redeveloped the nearby building where Vin Rouge and blu seafood and bar operate. But the family had a bigger vision. They already owned several properties fronting the east side of Ninth Street, and for the next seven years they gradually acquired seven other properties on that square. That included six mill houses on Iredell Street, a transmission shop and one giant oak tree, purportedly the third biggest in North Carolina. It was huge, 99 inches in diameter, and the Dicksons were determined to save it. “I’m a tree hugger,” says David Sr. “We spent [a lot of money] trying to work around it.” And then in 1999, a violent storm took it down, answering the question of how to preserve the tree. The result: Solis Ninth Street, a $40 million, 229unit, mixed-use complex at the end of the commercial district of the 800 block Ninth Street. Solis includes five ground-floor retail spaces. The residential piece opened in April, and the apartments are already 80% leased – “ahead of schedule,” Glenn says – and three tenants have signed leases for ground-floor units. All

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| ninth street | The

Foodie issue

WE’VE BANKED OUR LIVELIHOODS ON MAKING OLD WEST DURHAM A BETTER PLACE TO LIVE.

five spaces should be leased up and open for business by the end of the year, he adds. Now that the project is finished, Glenn – who lives in Garrett Farms with his wife, Amy, and three sons – works with his brother David Jr. – who has three children and lives in Chapel Hill’s Governors Club with his wife, Natalie – at TSI Healthcare. David Sr., meanwhile, spends most of time restoring his 200-year-old farm on Erwin Road.

The family is proud of what they accomplished on Ninth Street. With its wide range of amenities, they believe the area challenges downtown for vitality and excitement. “We’re as bullish as we’ve ever been about this area,” Glenn says. “It means a lot to us that we’ve extended the pedestrian-friendly neighborhood.” Dickson wholeheartedly agrees. “You’ve got it all here,” he says. “We’ve banked our livelihoods on making Old West Durham a better place to live. We’ve put all our eggs in this basket.”

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Despite their colorful and custom-decorated rooms, the girls “don’t really spend time in their bedrooms,” Jacque says, as she sits with twins Hannah and Olivia and their three pugs in one of the two family rooms. “They’re usually downstairs hanging out together.”

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how they live

A Practical

place When the Kohn family built their southeast Durham home, they focused on what they needed

T

 by Jessie Ammons |  by Briana Brough

HE KOHN HOME IS SWEEPING AND SUNNY, A VISION OF

neutrals and space and architectural details. “The architect tried to tell me I was putting in too many windows,” laughs Jacque Kohn. “We’ve lived in so many dark houses that I really wanted extra windows. Normally, we rarely turn on our lights during the day. It [naturally] stays nice and bright.” Bright, big (8,700 sq. ft.) and remarkably welcoming is the name of the game in this custom construction home in Colvard Farms that Jacque and her husband, Brad, moved into last year. They wanted something big enough to fit everybody comfortably – daughters Emily, 14, Elizabeth, 13, and Olivia and Hannah, both 12, all of whom attend Durham Academy, plus Yorkie Sophie and pugs Henry, Quincy and Arthur – without sacrificing utility or style. “We really, really like [the end result]," Jacque says. “It’s nice to come home.” Loyd Builders in Apex

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The table on the left between the two Lucite chairs is one of Jacque’s favorites. “I was supposed to put that in my [Wreath on the Door] shop, but I liked it so much I kept it," she says. 52

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| how they live | constructed the custom home designed by architect Tony Frazier of Raleighbased Frazier Home Design. Ironically, the part of the house that’s used the most is one of the house’s smallest and most practical. Tucked off of the kitchen is an office of sorts: four desks along two walls, one for each daughter, and a larger desk for Jacque along a third wall. Each desk bears a personalized bulletin board, and all five Kohn women spend time in the room, working together and listening to music. Called the “desk room” and “homework room” interchangeably, “that’s the one I knew we were going to do,” Jacque says. “I tore out a page in a magazine when I saw a similar setup. We have four girls and lots of homework – I love that room. I’m so glad we have it.”

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FUNCTIONAL luxury With 11-foot ceilings, two variations of a downstairs family room, a movie room, a game room and a bonus room upstairs, and a kitchen with enough space for four teenage girls to bake simultaneously, the house is stately. It’s balanced by a clean aesthetic and sensible priorities. Much of the furniture has traveled with the Kohns throughout multiple houses – they spent the longest time in St. Louis, and before that lived in California and Chicago. As Jacque’s homes change, she simply employs a little elbow grease to adapt the existing furniture. “Pretty much every piece of furniture that’s painted, I painted it,” she says. “Most of it many times.” A number of the upholstered surfaces are also à la Jacque. The majority of Jacque’s online and retail finds were used for the girls’ bedrooms and accent pieces. But she always keeps an open mind, she says. In lieu of dining room art, there are framed blueprint sketches of the „

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| how they live |

ABOVE The kitchen is large enough for four teenage girls to bake simultaneously. "We chose counters that look like marble, even though it's quartz for durability," Jacque says. RIGHT "This room gets used a lot," Jacque says. "They all have their backpacks here, their desks are here. We each have our own personal space, but we’ll play music and chat."

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| how they live |

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While rooted in funtionality, the house’s sprawling nature also intentionally leaves room for tradition. Brad’s job with Cree brought the Kohns to Durham on a somewhat sudden timeline; so, the couple purposefully built a home meant for relaxing and entertaining. Sure enough, once given the chance, rituals have formed. Take for instance the pristine white master bathroom, complete with a double-headed shower and roomy bathtub. When asked if she’s


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| how they live |

We’ve had [Craft Rooms] for so long that we’re accustomed to coming in and making something.

a bath-taker, Jacque says, “I wasn’t until I got that tub. I don’t think I’ve taken one in 10 years, but now I take one every week.” Likewise, room for Emily, Elizabeth, Olivia and Hannah to all four experiment simultaneously in the kitchen has fostered an intense daughter-wide love of baking. “They all four like to make something completely different,” Jacque says. “It’s nice that everyone has a space. We once had to make nine cheesecakes for a school project.” Baking is the preference, but the girls sometimes dabble in cooking meals, too. “About once a summer we have a family dinner where we’re each in charge of a separate course,” Elizabeth explains. The dinners are a fun way to branch out of the family’s recipe norms and all gather in the kitchen together.

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Crafting a home A pastime dominant in the Kohn family that they've adapted the home to is crafting; it’s a tactic Jacque applies to more than just the furniture. She has an Etsy shop and blog called Wreath on the Door (wreathonthedoor.com), where she sells handmade topiaries, pillows and other home goods, and she also has a booth at antique store Hunt and Gather in Raleigh. “Mom’s had craft rooms ever since I can remember,” Emily says. “We’ve had them for so long that we’re accustomed to coming in and making something.” „


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| how they live | The craft room includes a full-size dining room table – painted and repainted throughout the Kohns’ 18year marriage – and one of Jacque’s favorite chandeliers, formerly brown but now with a fresh coat of matte white paint. Rows of glass jars hold supplies and tools, alongside extra topiaries and spools of fabric. It’s here that the girls gather to unwind, chatting while creating. “It’s a very well-used craft room,” Jacque says. Across the hall is another well-used room: the man-cave. Three flat-screen TVs and a leather sectional couch are meant for sports watching, and – despite its moniker – the room isn’t just for men. “This is one of my favorite rooms, too” Elizabeth exclaims. “I like the man cave. Me and dad watch football in here.” Another use? “Eight or nine girls can line up in here, and there’s a bathroom,

Elizabeth often joins her dad, Brad, in the "man cave" to watch football, especially when their beloved Green Bay Packers are playing.

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The Kohns were careful about the size of four particular rooms in their house: their daughters’ bedrooms. “We were very adamant that each girl had to have an almost-identically sized room,” Jacque says. “It took a lot of tweaking,” but, down to the foot, they are equal. When it came time for the girls to choose rooms, it was shockingly easy. Each one gravitated to her own space, each with a different perk — Hannah's has a built-in desk and reading nook, Emily's has a large walk-in closet, and Olivia's and Elizabeth's both have window seats overlooking the pool. As a way to instill the same utility that guides the rest of the Kohn home, each girl had a budget with which to decorate her own room. “It was fun to watch them design,” Jacque says. They turned to HGTV and Pinterest, and also got to sketch out their own ideas for bathroom cabinets and other details. Olivia’s shower features shimmery purple accent tile and a purple chandelier, and Emily has a floating sink. They all made bold but realistic selections. “It was good for them to consider living with their choices the whole time we’re in this house.”

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IT WAS HARD TO LEAVE HOME —

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| how they live | a little refrigerator – it’s a self-contained spot for sleepovers,” Jacque says. Something for everybody makes for a well-loved home, one the Kohns are happily settling into. “We wanted it to be comfortable, not fussy,” Jacque says. “We wanted it to be relaxing, and I think we accomplished that.”

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‘Christmas Tree Farm’

While the Kohns are proponents of a clean and airy interior, empty green spaces aren't ideal. Colvard Farms backs up to Jordan Lake, but the family’s lot was deforested before they bought it. “It was pretty much just a meadow," Jacque says. So she employed her characteristic do-it-yourself attitude. “I found that at the farmers’ market, they sell 6-foot-tall pine trees for $10,” she says. She stocked up over multiple trips and planted them alongside the house. “We planted about 100 last year,” she says, and she plans to continue. This winter, the girls are looking forward to putting twinkling lights on their very own “Christmas tree farm,” as they call it – only nobody will be chopping these saplings down anytime soon.

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A glimpse into four very cool downtown companies „

Clockwise from top left: Known as the Bullpen, Duke I&E's common room features a pool table and pingpong table; Mike Robinson, success manager at ReverbNation, utilizes his standup desk; Solutions Consultant Gabe Macaluso is all smiles at Bronto; Smashing Boxes' Team Coordinator Joan Yabani and Quality Assurance Engineer Ebonee Farrow belly up to the bar in the office, which has craft beer on tap.

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| working downtown |

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| working downtown | D U K E I N N O VAT I O N & ENTREPRENEURSHIP I N I T I AT I V E ( D U K E I & E ) FOUNDED 2013 • VICE PROVOST ERIC TOONE, DIRECTOR NO. OF EMPLOYEES: 25 • 15,000 SQ. FT. • 215 MORRIS ST., STE. 300 • ARCHITECT: PHILLIPS ARCHITECTURE (RALEIGH)

WHAT WE DO Known as the Bullpen, this space is the

hub for all innovation and entrepreneurship activity at Duke University and features collaboration, event, meeting and classroom space as well as the Duke I&E offices. NICEST SURPRISE WITH YOUR SPACE There are wonderful surprises throughout. In a meeting room, you’ll find yourself in the presence of an antique 100-year-old fire door … in the common area, you might notice the original pipes and hoppers on the walls. Look up and see the beautiful wood and steel beams original to the building. The personality and history of the space is everywhere! AMONG YOUR EMPLOYEE PERKS Our employees enjoy beautiful surroundings in our bright, airy, modern space. We have meeting rooms for all the various workshops, meetings and classes we host that are available to our employees. Our common area features a pool table, pingpong table, comfortable seating, collaborative space and a media wall – which is always a great place to gather during March Madness. SHARE SOME OF YOUR COMPANY’S CULTURE Duke I&E strives to ignite the spirit of entrepreneurship for the entire campus community and our space reflects that mission. We have a number of places to work, meet, brainstorm and take classes. The architecture – with its warm original wood floors, brick walls and modern features – make it a bright, inviting and comfortable space. IF THERE IS ONE DRAWBACK TO YOUR OFFICE SPACE, WHAT IS IT? Our space is very open [so it] can be a little loud when a meeting or a workshop gets animated. We’re working on a plan now to improve our sound issues in the space. Our goal is to give everyone the benefits of the open floor plan with plenty of sound privacy. „

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| working downtown |

GARAGE BAND Customer support representatives Ryan Trauley and Sarah Schroeter stroll past the large garage door inside ReverbNation. The location housed a Studebaker dealership in the 1920s.

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| working downtown | R E V E R B N AT I O N FOUNDED 2006 • MIKE DOERNBERG, CEO • 17,000 SQ. FT. NO. OF EMPLOYEES: 65 • 115 N. DUKE ST., STE. 2A ARCHITECT: CENTER STUDIO ARCHITECTURE (DURHAM)

WHAT WE DO ReverbNation helps connect artists to

venues, festivals, brands, publishers, labels and the fans themselves. Our career management and online marketing tools, combined with rapidly growing artists and repertoire (A&R) capabilities and industry relationships, offer emerging artists to the global music industry. LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION

Our office is in a great location in Brightleaf Square that is walking distance to restaurants, shops, breweries and entertainment. AMONG

YOUR EMPLOYEE PERKS

We are probably the only company that is able to regularly provide employees with live performances from our artists! SHARE SOME OF YOUR COMPANY’S

CULTURE Despite [our]

intensity, we believe that our people have lives outside of work. We not only respect that balance, we also believe that it’s our responsibility to support them there as well. The personality and drive of each employee makes ReverbNation a great place to work. IF THERE IS ONE DRAWBACK TO YOUR OFFICE SPACE, WHAT IS IT? The large workstations that came with the space are not the best for the collaborative work culture [we] strive for. We’ve found other ways to get employees together and have repurposed many of our conference rooms and meeting spaces to accommodate. BIGGEST CHALLENGE FOR YOUR COMPANY Finding and recruiting great talent will always be an ever-present challenge for our company. The growth of Durham and the impressive list of emerging companies mean we are constantly competing for the best talent. „

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| working downtown | S M A S H I N G B O X E S
 FOUNDED 2010 • NICK JORDAN, CEO NO. OF EMPLOYEES ON SITE: 52 (WITH PLANS TO HIRE 10 TO 15 MORE OVER THE NEXT YEAR) • 6,200 SQ. FT. DIAMOND VIEW III, 359 BLACKWELL ST., STE. 240 ARCHITECT: ALLIANCE ARCHITECTURE (DURHAM)

WHAT WE DO A digital product agency that creates

next-generation products for web, mobile and connected devices. It has offices in Durham and New Orleans. NICEST SURPRISE WITH YOUR SPACE Our main conference room made out of storage containers and painted Smashing Pink, our brand color. AMONG YOUR EMPLOYEE PERKS Twelve weeks paid maternity leave, four weeks paid paternity leave; flexible hours and workfrom-home friendly; dedicated innovation time every Friday afternoon following a catered lunch; and health and dental insurance premiums 100% covered. SHARE SOME OF YOUR COMPANY’S CULTURE We love dogs! We even have a dog channel on Slack to celebrate them. Our break room is our kitchen, which is stocked with snacks, craft beer on tap and fresh coffee! It’s an open floor plan, so the environment is very collaborative, if at times loud and untamed! Our couches are prime real estate. We like to lounge while we work. WHAT’S THE BEST VIEW FROM THE OFFICE? The Durham skyline. ANY OUTDOOR SPACE AVAILABLE? No private space but all of American Tobacco Campus is our backyard. IF THERE IS ONE DRAWBACK TO YOUR OFFICE SPACE, WHAT IS IT? No storage, argh. BIGGEST CHALLENGE

FOR YOUR COMPANY Being able to accommodate our

clients and team with proper meeting space! Reserving conference rooms is serious business. HAS HB2 AFFECTED YOUR BUSINESS? Any legislation that puts limitations on human potential and hinders companies from doing business in North Carolina hurts us and the tech community at large. „

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TAKE IT EASY Smashing Boxes' Human Resources Operations Manager Anya Fisher, Team Coordinator Joan Yabani and Growth Manager Ellen Gowdy take a break on the company's coveted couches.

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| working downtown | BRONTO SOFTWARE FOUNDED 2002 • ZACH NELSON, CEO (NETSUITE) NO. OF EMPLOYEES: 310 (WITH PLANS TO HIRE 90 MORE OVER THE NEXT YEAR) • 50,000 SQ. FT. • WASHINGTON BUILDING, 324 BLACKWELL ST., STE. 410 • ARCHITECT: ALLIANCE ARCHITECTURE (DURHAM)

WHAT WE DO Provide a cloud-based commerce marketing

automation platform to mid-market and enterprise organizations, providing them with targeted email, mobile and social marketing. LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION The area has grown up around us with restaurants, DPAC, DBAP, Aloft, housing, etc. The American Tobacco Campus

courtyard provides Wi-Fi, waterfalls, places to sit, to relax, concerts on Thursday, a coffee shop, eateries and lots of activities. There’s a great history and vibe associated with working in a converted tobacco warehouse. AMONG YOUR EMPLOYEE PERKS

Bronto employees enjoy free fresh fruit, drinks and other snacks in each of our two kitchens. Bronto also offers a subsidized YMCA membership and sponsors healthy activities throughout the year, including Belly Busters, a few 5K runs and a treadmill desk. The company also organizes events with local community nonprofit partners to provide employees with ways to engage with each other while doing good work. Our annual participation rate exceeds 90%. SHARE SOME OF YOUR COMPANY’S CULTURE One Friday of each month we gather for News & Noms, where we welcome new employees (who have to perform a Stupid Human Trick, [an odd talent of some sort]) and then have lunch from a local caterer. That afternoon, we knock off work at 4 p.m. and open a keg to relax and unwind together before heading out for the weekend. This year we brought back Assassin, a game that has Brontos chasing one another with Nerf guns over a week until only one is left standing. THE BEST VIEW FROM THE OFFICE The balcony overlooking the inner courtyard of the American Tobacco Campus. October/November 2016

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D

URHAM’S OWN PHIL FREELON HAS

made an indelible mark on the

nation’s landscape. Since founding The Freelon Group in 1990, the award-winning architect has been the designer of record for a number of structures in our own backyard, including the City of Durham’s Transportation Center and Solid Waste Operations Facility, Durham County’s Human Services Building and South Regional Library, the parking deck at RDU and the North Carolina Central University Biomanufacturing Research Institute and

Technology Enterprise facility. More than a decade ago,

he began to build his reputation as a designer of AfricanAmerican museums and cultural centers. Thriving in the fiercely competitive design arena, Phil won commissions to visualize the Museum of the African Diaspora in San Francisco’s Yerba Buena cultural district, the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture in Baltimore, the Harvey B. Gantt Center for African-American Arts + Culture in Charlotte, the National Center for Civil and Human Rights in downtown Atlanta, and the Emancipation Park Project in Houston’s Third Ward, which is the historic site of a 10-acre plot „

COMMISSION Bull City-based architect leads design on the country’s first national museum portraying the full scope of African-American life  Kirsten Mullen |  by Michael Barnes October/November 2016

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purchased by four emancipated African-Americans for the purpose of celebrating Juneteenth – June 19, 1865 – the date the end of slavery was formally acknowledged in Texas. In September, one of the pinnacles of Phil’s career, the National Museum of African American History and Culture, opened on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Situated at the base of the Washington Monument with a view of the White House, the new facility is America’s first national museum dedicated to the full breadth of the black experience. The 313,000-square-foot structure,

constructed on the last buildable location on the National Mall, is comprised of 10 stories in all (five of them aboveground) and is sheathed in a bronze-colored corona, inspired by Yoruba art. “The bronze-clad corona expresses faith, hope and resilience,” Phil says. “The light filters into the interior of the building. At night, the corona glows, creating stunning views from vantage points across the city.” In 2003, Congress committed half of the $500 million needed to pay for the design and construction of the building and the installation of the exhibitions, all under the aegis of the Smithsonian Institution. To date, the museum has raised more than $280 million in private funds (GlaxoSmithKline, in Research Triangle Park, donated $2 million.) Staff salaries, estimated at $44 million, will be paid by the Smithsonian. Phil is the museum’s architect of record, and he was the driving force that pulled the team of collaborators together – AfricanContemporary women’s boutique featuring clothing that matches today's lifestyle. American architectural firm Davis Brody Bond (New York, Washington, D.C., and São Paolo) and Ghanaian lead architect David Adjaye of Adjaye Associates (London and New York), with engineering support from the SmithGroup (Detroit). “The Smithsonian commission did not come out of nowhere,” Phil says. “Our team had a strong body of work, and we produced the best design. The [design] competition had two parts: a solicitation for the pre-design and the concept for the museum.” After consulting with groups including the Association of African American Museums and the Association for the Study of African American Life and History and visiting museums focusing on the diaspora located around the world, the team “produced a six-volume, 1,200-page, thoroughly researched study that gave [the search committee] a taste of our knowledge.”  Of the dozens of firms that competed Visit our website to learn about personal styling and closet editing. during the first phase, Freelon Adjaye Bond SmithGroup emerged among six Magpie Boutique | 601 W. Main Street, Suite D, Durham | 919 683 1981 | magpienc.com finalists in the design phase. Ultimately, Hours: Mon-Fri 11 to 7, Sat 11-6, Sun by appointment only the group would become the winners. “Competing for prestigious @magpiedurham @magpiedurham facebook.com/magpienc commissions is what we do,” Phil says,

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MJ with the Assist

| kicker |

Carolina legend Michael Jordan donated $5 million to the National Museum of African American History and Culture. In recognition of his gift, the museum named its gallery dedicated to African-American sports, “The Michael Jordan Hall: Game Changers.” In an interview speaking about the importance of Jordan’s donation, the museum’s founding director, Lonnie Bunch III, said, “His gift will enable our visitors to explore how sports were used to break barriers.” Athletes like Althea Gibson, the sensational South Carolina tennis player, who trained in Durham with the Algonquin (Tennis) Club and was the first black person to win at Wimbledon, and Charlie Scott,

“We recognized this as an important project, one that we knew we could excel on, and we wanted it.” Many synergies were at work. “It came at a point in my career when I was ready,” Phil says. “The timing was really fortuitous from a process standpoint. The mission and themes of the institution resonated. I wanted to be a part of that and to lend my skills and talents to bringing it about. It’s been a huge honor.” Among the 37,000 artifacts visitors will see on display are: the hymnal that belonged to Harriet Tubman and the shawl given to her by Queen Victoria; Nat Turner’s Bible (which underwent an extensive authentication process involving historians and scientists); a 77-ton, 80-foot-long restored Southern Railway Jim Crow passenger car that’s nearly 100 years old; a prison guard tower from Louisiana’s notorious Angola penitentiary; one of James Brown’s custom skin-tight, red-hot jumpsuits; and materials from the presidential campaigns of Shirley Chisholm and Barack Obama (who was on hand for the museum’s groundbreaking in February 2012). In addition to the museum and its seven exhibition halls, there’s a theater and a cafe. “The building itself will stand as a powerful testament to the centrality and relevance of the African-American culture and history,” Phil says. Kirsten Mullen – folklorist, arts consultant and founding president of Artefactual – was a consultant to The Freelon Group on the museum.

the charismatic New York native who transferred to North Carolina’s Laurinburg Institute, where he was the valedictorian of his class before becoming the first black scholarship athlete at UNC-Chapel Hill, will be featured. Jordan spoke of his desire to pay homage to the “historic contributions of community leaders and athletes” like Jesse Owens, who broke racial barriers with “talent, commitment and perseverance” and laid the “groundwork for the successful careers of so many African-Americans in athletics and beyond.” The Chicago Bulls star will also give the museum a jersey he wore during the 1996 NBA finals.

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SURGICALLY

SPEAKING Duke’s own Dr. Linda Cendales makes North Carolina history by performing the state’s first hand transplant.  by Shayla Martin |  by Briana Brough

D

R. LINDA CENDALES’ JOURNEY TO ASSOCIATE

professor of surgery at Duke University School of Medicine and director of Duke’s hand transplant program hasn’t been easy, but it's one she’s dreamed of since her days as a medical school student in Mexico City. Originally from Bogota, Colombia, Dr. Cendales was awarded a scholarship in high school and completed her International Baccalaureate program in Swaziland, but it wasn’t until her research year studying immunology and rheumatology in medical school that she began to consider the possibility of hand transplantation. “When I was studying in Mexico City,” she explains, “I met a very pleasant lady who had severe hand deformities from rheumatoid arthritis. I wondered what a hand transplant could do for a patient like this; kidney transplantation was a routine therapy October/November 2016

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and she was already on immunosuppression medication.” The thought stayed with her as she completed a fellowship at the Christine M. Kleinert Institute for Hand and Microsurgery in Louisville, Kentucky. There, she helped establish the first hand transplantation program in the country and assisted in performing the first two hand transplant procedures. Dr. Cendales continued to build her career at Emory University in Atlanta before joining Duke’s Department of Surgery to start its hand transplantation program in 2014. “The decision to come to Duke was multi-factorial,” Dr. Cendales says. “It was a next step in my career and the institution itself – its renowned teams in transplantation, plastic surgery and orthopedic surgery, its support for innovation and its excellence. I’ve also found Durham to be a very pleasant place to live. The quality of life is high. I like the comfort and easiness to live in this area. It’s been a good move for me.” Although Dr. Cendales joined Duke just two years ago, she has been in contact with her most recent patient, Rene Chavez of Laredo, Texas, 82

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ABOVE Dr. Cendales says that she and hand transplant patient Rene Chavez have formed a special bond in the three years of knowing each other.

PHOTO BY SHAWN ROCCO

PHOTO BY SHAWN ROCCO

LEFT After a few months of therapy, Rene is beginning to use his new hand and has gained some feeling in it.

October/November 2016

BELOW It took a team of more than 30 surgeons, anesthesiologists, nurses, operating room staff and technicians – led by Dr. Cendales – 12 hours to complete the procedure.

for the past three years. Rene, who severed his hand in a childhood accident at the age of 4, reached out to Dr. Cendales to inquire about a hand transplant after learning that the procedure was becoming more accessible. At the time, Dr. Cendales was transitioning from Emory and offered to refer Rene to another program, but he opted to wait until she established the new program at Duke. “In the last three years and with his perseverance, we developed a relationship,” she says, “it also confirmed his commitment to go through a complex procedure like this,


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THE DOCTOR’S DURHAM Favorite restaurants: I love Juju, Parizade in Erwin Square Gonza Tacos and Tequila and Mateo on Chapel Hill Street. Favorite Blue Devil experience: I’m a big fan of Duke sports. I go to basketball games at Cameron Indoor Stadium. I’ve enjoyed playing basketball [there] with my plastic surgery partners and residents.

Durham downtime: The weather is very permissive for doing a lot of outdoor activities for longer periods of time during the year. The green spaces are great for walking, jogging and biking. I also enjoy going to DPAC; they bring highquality events. I also like the Durham Bulls games in the summertime.

and he had plenty of opportunity to reconsider, but he was consistent. By the time we were ready at Duke, he called me again. He was evaluated and approved by the multi-disciplinary committee, and he was transplanted within a week of being on the waiting list. He is recovering and tolerating the medications well and has been doing hand therapy for more than three months. He and his family are very happy.” As the first transplant of this kind in North Carolina, Dr. Cendales is excited about the potential for growth and innovation in her field at Duke Health. Hand transplantation and the field of vascularized composite allotransplantation (transplants composed of several kinds of tissues) are still being researched, but there are many questions that can be answered that will benefit multiple areas in medicine and surgery. “I feel very fortunate to work and to collaborate with outstanding people across many disciplines at Duke,” Dr. Cendales says. “We are also training future generations, which is one of our missions. Hand transplantation is not performed at every institution in the country due to complexity, resources and expertise. Certain institutional characteristics are necessary to be able to develop novel techniques and therapies. Duke is clearly one of them.” 84

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hot sƅot

Littler 110 E. Parrish St. littlerdurham.com

 by Amanda MacLaren |  by Briana Brough

W

ITH JUST 36 SEATS – 40 IF YOU COUNT THE FOUR-SEAT bar to the left of the kitchen, meant for those waiting on a table – the dining room at Littler is on the small side. That, among other features, makes it feel like you’ve been invited over to a friend’s house for a comfortable, cozy supper, which is exactly the owners’ intent. “My wife, Cara, and Jay [Owens], our third partner, we’ve always been big fans of hosting people at our homes,” says Durham native and owner Gray Brooks, who also owns Pizzeria Toro and the as-of-yet unnamed diner opening in the old Jack Tar hotel later this year. “Once you get into this business and you have your own restaurant, suddenly you don’t get to have dinner parties anymore because you’re always working. So we were like, ‘What if we turn 86

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part of our job into one?’ We wanted to make a place that felt pretty casual, but intimate and familiar and friendly.” At Littler, that idea manifests in several ways: the staff turning 33-rpm records – from Miles Davis to Eric Bachmann – to their B-sides and switching out reel-to-reel tapes (“The reel-to-reels are rad because most of those tapes are older than me, but they still sound amazing,” Gray says.); the “Mercy of the Bartender “ – a cocktail of the bartender’s choosing, where they can showcase their talent and creativity on the fly; and the ability to quickly incorporate ingredients that show up in the market. “If a farmer calls up and says, ‘I have this [product], but I only have eight pounds of it,’” Gray explains, “if you’re in a larger place like Toro, you couldn’t actually put that on your menu because it would be gone halfway through the day. But here,


ABOVE Gray, Cara and their 5-year-old son, Cole. BELOW The Bourbon Blush cocktail – bourbon, Cocchi Americano, Campari, ginger and rosemary.

draw

An unpretentious, neighborly atmosphere reminiscent of both a dinner party and the “small, corner restaurants” that Gray would patronize when visiting pals in New York City. Plus a straightforward menu that highlights seasonal, local ingredients.

drawback

For those of you used to making dinner reservations over the phone, Littler takes online reservations only. “The system we have is super easy to use,” Gray says. “We’re so small that a phone ringing during dinner would just be [a lot of noise].”

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Come w The chic ith an open m ind ken and han fried duck ton . gues ger stea kw marrow flan are ith bone big hits! “And co me hu Gray ad ngry,” ds.

that’s something we can get away with.” That flexibility will come in handy, Gray says as a few menu items will start to change fairly often, possibly weekly. As cooler weather takes over, he’s excited to work Brussels sprouts, pumpkin and braised meats onto the menu. In the meantime, try the beef heart tartare, the chicken fried duck tongues or the side dish that Gray is smitten with, the green beans with benne seeds. “If I was going to snack on anything in here, all day every day, it probably would be that.”

price $8-$28

"Latkes Benedict" comes with smoked trout and a poached yolk.

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dishinƂ with

Managing Partner Brandon Carr of Motto

A

 by Laura Zolman Kirk |  by Sarah Arneson

FTER FOUR SQUARE RESTAURANT

owners Shane Ingram and Elizabeth Woodhouse decided to close the business and retire, Brandon Carr – manager of the fine dining establishment since its opening day 16 years ago – was looking for something new. Meanwhile the owners of Italian restaurant Lucia, Kevin and Stacey Jennings, heard about Four Square’s closing. Knowing they wanted to rebrand Lucia’s concept, they reached out to Brandon, who started his new position in July at the restaurant, now named Motto, working alongside Chef James Huff, who recently moved here from Washington, D.C. We chatted with Brandon about transitions: his own from Four Square to Motto, the shift in concept and the changing nature of Motto’s new menu.

Describe the difference between Lucia and Motto.

The obvious difference is that Lucia was an Italian restaurant, and we are not. The menu itself will kind of be in a constant flux; it’s going to be seasonally influenced and locally sourced, not necessarily from Durham County or North Carolina, but regionally. We’re not trying be a Southern or French restaurant; it’s whatever Chef wants to bring in. We source the best ingredients we can and let the kitchen’s execution allow the ingredients to really shine for themselves.

What led to the decision to rebrand?

The restaurant community in Durham is really thriving, but all these restaurants that I really like going to – Pizzeria Toro, M Sushi, Mateo Tapas – they all seem fairly niche. If you go to Toro, you’re going for pizza. If you go to M Sushi, you’re going for sushi. We’re not trying to pigeon-hole ourselves. If people are saying, “Oh, what do you want for dinner?” [We want them to say,] “Let’s just go to Motto, I know there will be something there we’ll like.”

You worked at Four Square for a long time. What’s this switch to Motto been like for you?

As a concept, we’re more casual than we were at Four Square. When [the owners] were looking to open Four Square, they thought the area in general was underserved in 88

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A trifecta of oysters (clockwise from left): bacon fat-poached oysters with crab and corn ragout; N.C. oysters on the half shell with cocktail sauce, eastern barbecue mignonette and jalapeño mignonette; and oysters Rockefeller.

the fine dining side of things, but the scene’s changed so much in the past 16 years. I don’t know if that’s true anymore.

That seems to be the trend in restaurants these days – away from fine dining to a more casual style. Do you have an opinion on that? I think the focus is going to be on the ingredients that you’re using and the execution. Even in a casual concept, if you’re getting the best ingredients and the chef is working with the cooks to make sure they are used correctly, in a sense, that’s still fine dining. It just doesn’t happen to be on a white tablecloth with a fancy place setting.

e t Hom a s i h Try T

As a front-of-the-house guy, what’s your secret to keeping everything running smoothly?

I don’t know if it’s a secret. Getting the food out of the kitchen, well-prepared food: That’s what people are really coming out for. And just making sure the staff is trained; we go through pretty extensive staff tastings.

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What do you hope people come away with after a dinner at Motto? A good experience, good time. And a desire to come back.

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taste NORTHERN DURHAM / NEAR INTERSTATE 85 GUESS ROAD Northgate Mall - 1058 W. Club Blvd. Fast Food Full Service •A & D Buffalo’s C&H Cafeteria •Baja Shack 919-286-7303 •Cajun Café •Chopsticks Dragon Express •Cinnamonster 919-286-2098 •The Cookie Store •Esmeralda’s Cafe Jade Buffet •Greek Cuisine 919-286-9555 •Haagen-Dazs/Planet Smoothie Pan Pan Diner •Lucky Chicken 919-416-1950 •Marble Slab Creamery •Mickey’s Chicken & Fish Randy’s Pizza •Pretzel Twister 919-286-7272 •Randy’s Pizza Express Ruby Tuesday •Subway 919-286-5100 •Tomo Japan Gocciolina Upscale Italian fare in a cozy atmosphere. This wildly popular restaurant has graced our Best Of list again and again. 3314 Guess Rd.; 919-973-4089; gocciolina.com Hog Heaven Bar-B-Q Homestyle Eastern barbecue, fried chicken and seafood. Enjoy with a giant glass of iced tea. 2419 Guess Rd.; 919-286-7447; hogheavenbarbecue.com Jimmy’s Famous Hot Dogs Old-fashioned burgers, fries and a mean Carolina-style dog. 2728 Guess Rd.; 919-471-0005 La Cacerola Cafe & Restaurant Honduran specialties such as pupusas and chorizo asado. 2016 Guess Rd.; 919-294-6578; lacacerolanc.com Thai Spoon All the trappings for a delicious Thai-food experience: pad thai, drunken noodles and curries. 3808 Guess Rd.; 919-908-7539 HILLSBOROUGH ROAD Bennett Pointe Grill There’s something to please all palates on the large menu of this multi-regional American restaurant. 4625 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-382-9431; bpgrill.com Shanghai Chinese Restaurant Established in the 1980s, this Catonese restaurant offers both Americanized and authentic dishes. 3433 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-383-7581; shanghaidurham.com Wimpy’s Grill Specializing in old-fashioned hamburgers and hot dogs. Open till 2 p.m. weekdays, cash only. 617 Hicks St.; 919-286-4380; wimpysgrillnc.com

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Advertisers highlighed in yellow

HILLANDALE ROAD (EXIT 174-A)

Bleu Olive High-quality comfort food incorporating local ingredients and Mediterranean flair. Family-operated & chef driven. 1821 Hillandale Rd.; 919-383-8502; bleuolivebistro.com

key BR

Brunch Outdoor Seating Full Bar Kid’s Menu Beer & Wine

BR

El Corral Mexican Restaurant Authentic Mexican faijtas, tacos, enchiladas and a great chorizo queso dip. 1821 Hillandale Rd.; 919-309-4543; el-corral.net Meelo’s Restaurant Classic Italian - think spaghetti and meatballs and chicken parmigiana - meets tapas. 1821 Hillandale Rd., Ste. 3; 919-384-9080; melotrattoria.com Pomodoro Italian Kitchen Homemade sauces on fresh-made pizzas, pastas and other Italian favorites. 1811 Hillandale Rd.; 919-382-2915; pomodoroitaliankitchen.info NORTH POINTE DRIVE The French Corner Bakery Artisan breads, beautifully crafted tarts and pastries. Plus lunch, and now baking classes taught by Frenchtrained master baker chef Benjamin Messaoui. 2005 North Pointe Dr., Ste. B.; 919-698-9836 MORE NORTHERN DURHAM DINING Alpaca Peruvian rotisserie chicken. Need we say more? 302 Davidson Ave.; 919-220-9028; alpacachicken.com Bullock’s Bar-B-Que A staple in the community since 1952, this barbecue restaurant serves up soul in Eastern-style barbecue, Brunswick stew and fried chicken. 3330 Quebec Dr.; 919-383-3211; bullocksbbq.com Picnic Locally sourced, Eastern whole-hog barbecue. Order the pulled pork, of course, but also the fried chicken, pimento mac & cheese and hushpuppies. 1647 Cole Mill Rd.; 919-908-9128; picnicdurham.com BR

Silver Spoon Restaurant Diner fare and Southern breakfast served all day. Try a “Golden Royal Skillet” (loaded homefries). 5230 N. Roxboro Rd.; 919-479-7172 BR

NEAR DOWNTOWN BROAD STREET Joe Van Gogh This local coffee shop sources quality beans for a superior coffee. 1104-B Broad St.; 919-286-4800; joevangogh.com

October/November 2016

Oval Park Grille Regularly changing the menu, this innovative restaurant remains “local as heck.” 1116 Broad St.; 919-401-6566; ovalparkgrille.com BR The Palace International African cuisine including curry goat, dovi chicken and samosas. 1104-A Broad St.; 919-416-4922 Watts Grocery A Durham native, chef Amy Tornquist artfully develops Southern-inspired dishes with seasonal, local ingredients, like the shrimp and fish stew, which appears in summer and fall. 1116 Broad St.; 919-416-5040 BR ERWIN ROAD Another Broken Egg Cafe Unique breakfast and lunch menu including cinnamon roll french toast and “Popeye’s Favorite” scrambled skillet. 2608 Erwin Rd., Ste. 120; 919-381-5172; anotherbrokenegg.com BR Black Twig Cider House Cider-and-sausage focused restaurant with more than 80 ciders on draft and in bottles. Try the “Northern Spy” and join in a Txotx! 2812 Erwin Rd.; 919-321-0203; blacktwigciderhouse.com MediTerra Grill Mediterranean and Lebanese cuisine, offering gyros, kabobs and curry. 2608 Erwin Rd., Ste. 136; 919-383-0066; mediterranc.com Nosh “Eclectic foodstuffs” like “Mike’s Breakfast Pizza,” “Coach’s Queso” sandwich and the brown derby chopper salad. 2812 Erwin Rd., Ste. 101; 919-383-4747; noshfood.com BR Saladelia Cafe Espresso and organic smoothie bar, scratch made pastries, gourmet sandwiches, salads and soups. Open for dine-in or carry-out. 2424 Erwin Rd.; 919-416 1400; saladelia.com BR


Smashburger Unique burgers smashed on the grill, chicken and salads. 2608 Erwin Rd., Ste. 116; 919-237-1070; smashburger.com Sushi Love Specialty sushi rolls such as the “Honey Love” roll topped with mango and kiwi, as well as other Asian cuisine favorites. 2812 Erwin Rd., Ste. 204; 919-309-2401; sushilove.org ERWIN SQUARE Guasaca Arepas, salads and rice bowls with South American flavor. 2200 W. Main St., Ste. A100; 919-294-8939; guasaca.com Local 22 Kitchen & Bar Upscale Southern-inspired cuisine, with emphasis on food sourced within a 30-mile radius and local brews. 2200 W. Main St.; 919-286-9755; local22durham.com BR

Parizade Sophisticated Mediterranean food like monkfish tangine, pepper-crusted beef tenderloin and a vegetable caponata made with quinoa. 2200 W. Main St.; 919-286-9712; parizadedurham.com NINTH STREET DISTRICT Banh’s Cuisine Vietnamese and Chinese dishes with great vegetarian specials. Cash only! 750 Ninth St.; 919-286-5073 blu seafood and bar Upscale seafood restaurant featuring innovative regional classics and a complete oyster menu. Try the crab mac and cheese! 2002 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-286-9777; bluseafoodandbar.com Blue Corn Cafe Authentic Latin-American fare with fresh, organic ingredients. 716 Ninth St.; 919-286-9600; bluecorncafedurham.com Burger Bach Signature New Zealand grass-fed beef burgers and fresh-cut fries. 737 Ninth St., Ste. 220; 919-973-4416 Cocoa Cinnamon Local shop with signature hand-brewed coffees and lattes such as the “Lion in the Sun” with rose water and cardamom. 2627 Hillsborough Rd.; cocoacinnamon. com Cosmic Cantina Authentic Mexican cuisine with vegan options. House-made mole and corn tortillas. Pair with a margarita pitcher. 1920 Perry St.; 919-286-1875; cosmiccantina.com Dain’s Place Pub fare centered around award-winning “thick and juicy and juicy and thick” burgers. 754 Ninth St.; 919-416-8800 Dale’s Indian Cuisine Traditional Indian food like garlic naan, chicken tikka masala and matar paneer. 811 Ninth St.; 919-286-1760; dalesindiancuisine.net BR

Elmo’s Diner Homemade Southern classics with breakfast favorites like cinnamon apple waffles and biscuits and gravy served all day in a casual, family-friendly setting. 776 Ninth St.; 919-416-3823; elmosdiner.com BR George’s Java Coffee roaster specializing in organic coffees. 764-A Ninth St.; 919-797-0878; georgesjava.com

Triangle Coffee House Coffee and pastries with selections like vegan blueberry muffins. 714 Ninth St. Vin Rouge French bistro-style dinner with regular oyster specials and Sunday brunch. Get the hanger steak and frites! 2010 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-416-0466; vinrougerestaurant.com BR BULL CITY MARKET

Guacamaya (Chubby’s Tacos) Fresh Mexican favorites like burritos, nachos and salads with daily specials, a salsa bar and the “Chubbychanga.” 748 Ninth St.; 919-286-4499; guacamayafreshmex.com Happy + Hale Healthy salads, bowls, breakfast, smoothies, cocktails and cold-pressed juice. 703 Ninth St.; 984-439-1790; happyandhale.com BR Heavenly Buffaloes Chicken wings (bone-in and boneless), as well as vegan nuggets in more than 25 rubs and sauces, including sweet Thai coconut chili, peri peri and Jamaican jerk. Plus waffle fries! 1807 W. Markham Ave.; 919-237-2358; WINNER heavenlybuffaloes.com

The Mad Hatter’s Cafe & Bakeshop Scratch-made pastries, organic salads, sandwiches and wraps, with breakfast all day and delicious brunch every weekend Award-winning cakes. 1802 W. Main St.; 919-286-1987; madhatterbakeshop.com BR

DOWNTOWN

BRIGHTLEAF DISTRICT Alivia’s Durham Bistro European-style bistro with breakfast, pub fare DURHAM Cocoa Cinnamon is and upscale dinner options 2016 including paprika sweet potato developing a third retail fries and risotto. location at 2013 Chapel 900 W. Main St.; 919-682-8978; DURHAM, NC • 919-286-1987 Hill Rd. in the Lakewood aliviasdurhambistro.com MADHATTERBAKESHOP.COM BR neighborhood. This

Roast On IBEST OF

location will also be home to the coffee Juju Asian fusion tapas including selections like crispy Texas wild boar dumplings and chicken fried oysters. Try the crispy Brussels sprouts! 737 Ninth St.; 919-286-3555; jujudurham.com BR Locopops Gourmet frozen pops in a variety of rotating flavors like lavender cream, strawberry lemonade and malted milk ball. 2604A Hillsborough Rd.; 919-286-3500; ilovelocopops.com Metro 8 Steakhouse Classic American steakhouse with an Argentinean flair. Pair empanadas with a filet mignon or crab-stuffed shrimp with a churrasco steak. 746 Ninth St.; 919-416-1700; metro8steakhouse.com

company’s microroasters, and supply the other two locations on Hillsborough Road and Geer Street.

Uncorked

Now open on East Main Street, Bar Brunello is a wine bar featuring 25 wines by the glass and 60 by the bottle, as well as draft beers and ciders. The bar’s food menu includes charcuterie and cheese boards, chicken liver mousse and varied desserts.

Monuts Donuts Scratch-made, locally sourced doughnuts, pastries, English muffins, bagels and breakfast sandwiches. Try the bagel and lox. 1002 Ninth St.; 919-797-2634; monutsdonuts.com BR

B

El Rodeo Mexican Restaurant Authentic Mexican cuisine like quesadillas, tacos and huevos con chorizo. 905 W. Main St.; 919-683-2417; elrodeonc.com The Federal Pub fare with bistro panache. Try the “Fed Burger au Poivre” with fries. 914 W. Main St.; 919-6808611; thefederal.net BR James Joyce Irish Pub and Restaurant Traditional pub food and snacks like brisket cheese steak and Reuben sandwiches. 912 W. Main St.; 919-683-3022; jamesjoyceirishpub.com BR

Lilly’s Pizza Stone-hearth-baked pizzas with fresh, organic and local ingredients. 810 W. Peabody St.; 919-797-2554; lillyspizza.com

The Little Dipper Fondue, salads and entrees with selections like cheddar ale fondue, seasonal spinach salad and filet mignon with mushrooms. 905 W. Main St.; 919-908-1023; littledipperfondue.com BR Mount Fuji Asian Bistro Sushi & Bar Thai, Japanese, Chinese and sushi. Try the duck wrap or pineapple shrimp fried rice. 905 W. Main St.; 919-680-4968; mtfujinc.com

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| dining guide | Parker and Otis A gift shop, coffee shop and restaurant all in one. First-timers should dedicate a good chunk of an afternoon to this delight. Try the No. 26. 112 S. Duke St.; 919-683-3200; parkerandotis.com BR

Rose’s Meat Market and Sweet Shop Sandwiches, pastries - rhubarb galette, anyone? - and daily dinner specials. 121 N. Gregson St.; 919-797-2233; rosesmeatandsweets.com Satisfaction Restaurant & Bar Pub fare including selections like fried pickles, “Kitchen Sink Pizza” and footlong hotdogs. 905 W. Main St., Ste. 37; 919-682-7397; satisfactiondurham.net Torero’s Mexican Restaurant Authentic Mexican cuisine. Try the ceviche de camaron. 800 W. Main St.; 919-682-4197; torerosmexicanrestaurants.com Triangle Seafood Market Fresh seafood, Italian entrees and pastas including daily raw bar specials. 905 W. Main St.; 919-956-7360; triangleseafood.com WAREHOUSE DISTRICT The Blue Note Grill Fantastic barbecue, ribs and live music. 709 Washington St.; 919-401-1979; thebluenotegrill.com Cocoa Cinnamon Signature hand-brewed coffees and lattes such as the “Tower of Babel” with honey and date sugar. 420 W. Geer St.; cocoacinnamon.com Geer Street Garden Simple, down-home fare in a cozy atmosphere. They make a mean “Dark and Stormy,” and be sure to order “The Pile” to split with friends! 644 Foster St.; 919-688-2900; geerstreetgarden.com BR

Bar Brunello Featuring 25 wines by the glass and 60 by the bottle, as well as draft beers and ciders, the bar’s food menu includes charcuterie and cheese boards, chicken liver mousse and varied desserts. 117 E. Main St.; 919-294-4825; barbrunello.com

BR

MUSEUM. HOTEL. RESTAURANT.

The Pit Fried pimento cheese, whole-hog Eastern barbecue and Lexington-style pork shoulder barbecue. Experience new exhibition 321 W. Geer St.;our 919-282-3748; thepit-durham.com Dress Up, Speak Up: Costume and Confrontation

Beyù Caffè Coffee shop meets restaurant, bar and live jazz club. “Bull City Beignets,” buffalo wings and ultimate mushroom burger. 335 W. Main St.; 919-683-1058; beyucaffe.com BR Bull City Burger & Brewery Local beef burgers with all components from bun to barbecue sauce made in-house. 107 E. Parrish St.; 919-680-2333; bullcityburgerandbrewery.com Bull McCabe’s Irish Pub Pub food and bar snacks like nachos, burgers and wings. 427 W. Main St.; 919-682-3061; bullmccabesirishpub.com

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Beer & Wine

Chicken Out

As of press time, Michael Lee of M Sushi was set to open M Kokko in September next to his sushi restaurant on Holland Street. The two restaurants will share a kitchen, but have separate entrances, and M Kokko will specialize in Korean chicken dishes including fried chicken, chicken ramen noodle

sandwiches.

Changing Gears

Shortly after opening this summer, Boheme

Bagel Bar Homemade bagel varieties, lunch and breakfast sandwiches. 104 City Hall Plaza; 919-294-6661

October/November 2016

Outdoor Seating Kid’s Menu

and Korean-style chicken

Counting House Upscale restaurant featuring locally sourced entrees, as well as small plates featuring oysters, shellfish and meats and cheeses. 111 N. Corcoran St.; 919-956-6760; countinghousenc.com

Brunch Full Bar

soup, dandan noodles

Piedmont 111 N Corcoran Street Seasonal cooking inspired by local ingredients. Try the 919.956.6700 | 21cDurham.com beet-pickled eggs with pimento cheese, crispy oysters Dame’s Chicken & Waffles or Mills Farm’s shortribs. 401 Foster St.; 919-683-1213; Chicken, waffles, shmears. piedmontrestaurant.com BR ’Nuff said. 317 W. Main St.; 919-682-9235; CITY CENTER DISTRICT dameschickenwaffles.com BR 2 Zero 1 Restaurant Breakfast, lunch and dinner, located in the Durham Dashi Marriott Convention Center. 201 Foster St.; Traditional ramen shop and 919-768-6000 izakaya with unique sake Alley Twenty Six options. 415 E. Chapel Hill St.; This cocktail-centric bar offers a menu complete with 919-251-9335; dashiramen.com yellowfin tuna sliders and meat-and-cheese plates with selections like housemate duck pastrami. 320 E. Chapel Hill St.; alleytwentysix.com

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Bar Virgile Artfully crafted beverages paired with an everchanging dinner and small plates menu including selections like tandoori chicken, flat iron steak and garganelli. 105 S. Magnum St.; 919-973-3000; barvirgile.com

Rise Biscuits & Donuts Daily-changing menu of doughnuts and biscuits. For vegetarians, the “Fried Eggplant ‘Bacon’” biscuit is hard to beat. 401 Foster St.; 984-439-2220; risebiscuitsdonuts.com BR Parts & Labor A variety of dishes meeting many dietary needs including veggie samosas, “Hipster Poutine” and falafels. Go with a group and get a couple items to share. 723 Rigsbee Ave.; motorcomusic.com/partslabor

key

has transitioned from a full-time restaurant to a full-service catering company in response to the demand to utilize the space for events.

Get It While It's Hot

In an Eater article posted in September, food writer Andrea Weigl mentioned NanaSteak, Littler, The Durham, M Sushi, Lucky’s Delicatessen and Mother & Sons as a few of the hottest restaurants in Raleigh, Durham and Chapel Hill.

Dos Perros Sophisticated Mexican cuisine; plates include pork carnitas, shrimp a la diabla and chile relleno. Don’t skip on the guac! 200 N. Mangum St.; 919-956-2750; dosperrosrestaurant.com Littler Reservations are taken online only for this small restaurant with big tastes. Look for escarole, house spaghetti and guinea hen with herby dumplings on the menu. 110 E. Parrish St.; 919-374-1118; littlerdurham.com Loaf Oven breads and pastries. Counter Culture Coffee, pain au chocolat and cumin gruyere loaf. 111 W. Parrish St.; 919-797-1254 Lucky’s Delicatessen Deli crafted by chef Matthew Kelly serves seasonal soups and sandwiches like garbanzo with chickpea fritters and the super Reuben. 105 W. Chapel Hill St.; 919-864-8841; luckysdelinc.com Luna Rotisserie & Empanadas South American cuisine meets the American South. Wood-fired rotisserie meats, Andeaninspired braises, empanadas. 112 W. Main St.; 984-439-8702; lunarotisserie.com M Sushi Quality sushi from seasonal seafood, daily menu changes and creative rolls like “Unagi Maki” with barbecue eel and fried garlic. 311 Holland St.; 919-908-9266; msushidurham.com


savor

| dining guide |

Beef tartare with shallots, capers, horseradish cream, shaved Parmesan, egg yolk and parsley. Served with Dijon mustard, cornichons and crostini.

Alley Twenty Six, 14

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| dining guide | Mateo Highly acclaimed menu of tapas and small plates by chef Matthew Kelly. Great for a date night or night out with friends. Order a pitcher of the “Cheerwine Sangria,” pollo frito, gambas and queso frito y huevo. 109 W. Chapel Hill St.; 919-530-8700; mateotapas.com Mothers and Sons Trattoria Italian restaurant by partners Matthew Kelly and chef Josh “Skinny” DeCarolis. Handmade pasta, bruschetta and antipasti dishes. 107 W. Chapel Hill St.; 919-294-8247; mothersandsonsnc.com Motto New American cuisine with selections ranging from zucchini fries, rib-eye and barbecue shrimp. 605 W. Main St.; 984-219-1965; mottodurham.com Ninth Street Bakery Organic breads, pastries and lunch. Grab a “Wheel of Steel” (peanut butter, raisins and oats) and a blueberry cream cheese Danish. 136 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-2860303; ninthstbakery.com BR Old Havana Sandwich Shop Authentic Cuban sides and sandwiches like the “El Caney,” “Tampa” and “Santiago.” 310 E. Main St.; 919-667-9525; oldhavanaeats.com BR The Parlour Handmade ice cream in rotating flavors like Vietnamese coffee, banana pudding and rosewater. 117 Market St.; 919-564-7999; theparlour.co Pizzeria Toro Wood-fired pizza with selections like spicy lamb meatball with kale, fried eggplant ricotta and soft egg white pizza. Also, ricotta dumplings! 105 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-908-6936; pizzeriatoro.com

Pompieri Pizza A Neapolitan pizza joint with a family-friendly approach. Try the “Drunken Horse” pizza with beer crust dough and house-made sausage. 102 City Hall Plaza; 919-973-1589; pompieripizza.com The Restaurant at The Durham Locally sourced Southern cuisine crafted by chef Andrea Reusing. Selections include beef tartare and spring pie with asparagus and mushrooms. The Roof focuses on shared plates. 315 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-768-8830; thedurham.com/dining BR Revolution Contemporary global cuisine with local ingredients. Spanish-style charred octopus salad, cast-iron New York strip steak and fun tasting options. 107 W. Main St.; 919-956-9999; revolutionrestaurant.com Rue Cler Restaurant & Cafe French bistro-style cuisine with lunch, brunch and dinner showcasing fresh ingredients. 401 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-682-8844; ruecler-durham.com BR Saltbox Seafood Joint Local seafood that is delivered fresh from the Carolina coast and served griddled or fried in a straightforward manner. 608 N. Mangum St.; 919-908-8970; saltboxseafoodjoint.com Scratch Bakery Seasonal bakery serving sweet and savory pastries, plus a rotating lunch menu with offerings like meatball subs and pickle plates. Grab a pie, always. 111 W. Orange St.; 919-956-5200; piefantasy.com BR

Taberna Tapas: paella, flatbreads, bacon-wrapped dates, gambas. 325 W. Main St.; 919-797-1457; tabernatapas.com Toast Italian paninis and soups. The warm goat cheese with honey and peppercorn crostini is our favorite. 345 W. Main St.; 919-683-2183; toast-fivepoints.com AMERICAN TOBACCO DISTRICT Basan A wide variety of fresh, specialty sushi rolls, modern Japanese appetizers and entrees, and an extensive sake selection. 359 Blackwell St., Ste. 220; 919-797-9728; basanrestaurant.com Cuban Revolution Restaurant & Bar Cuban tapas served amid ’60s-style decor, plus bolsitas, sandwiches and Havana pork. 18 Blackwell St.; 919-687-4300; thecubanrevolution.com The District at 410 Lunch served Thursday and Friday by The Art Institute of Raleigh-Durham. 410 Blackwell St.; 919-317-3200; artinstitutes.edu/raleigh-durham/the-district-at-410 NanaSteak Offers various cuts of beef and steaks, plus othermeats like salmon and tuna steaks and pastas like beef short rib ravioli. 345 Blackwell St.; 919 282-1183; nanasteak.com

BOOK YOUR HOLIDAY PARTY WITH US!

PRIVATE ROOM • LUNCH • DINNER

Seasonal Seafood Freshly Cooked Good Fish That’s the Hook

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WINNER

200 N. MANGUM STREET DURHAM DOSPERROSRESTAURANT.COM • 919 956 2750

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mons lley Com urham, NC Hope Va •D 4 5 y a w NC High m 1125 W. eforni.co .0922 • tr m -10:00pm 919 .973 0a :3 aily – 11

Open D

IBEST OF DURHAM 2016

608 N. Mangum St., Durham 919.908.8970 | saltboxseafoodjoint.com


sip Peak Foliage: bourbon, amontillado sherry, verjus, spiced apple cider syrup, Frangelico and orange-fig bitters.

Vin Rouge, 11.75

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| dining guide | OnlyBurger The food truck’s brick-and mortar version offers all the same build-your-own burger options and sides like bacon-wrapped mac-n cheese squares. 359 Blackwell St.; 919-237-2431; onlyburger.com Saladelia Cafe Espresso and organic smoothie bar, scratchmade pastries, gourmet sandwiches, salads and soups. Open for dine-in or carry-out. 406 Blackwell St.; 919-687-4600; saladelia.com Tobacco Road Sports Cafe American dishes like “Country Frizzled & Drizzled Chicken” made with local ingredients; overlooks the Bulls’ stadium. 280 S. Mangum St.; 919-937-9909; tobaccoroadsportscafe.com Tyler’s Restaurant & Taproom Hearty fare and huge beer selection. An order of garlic fries is a must! 324 Blackwell St.; 919-433-0345; tylerstaproom.com

WEST-CENTRAL DURHAM

The Refectory Cafe Dal, chili, salads and soups. 2726 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-908-6798; therefectorycafe.com BR

DURHAM-CHAPEL HILL BOULEVARD (15-501)

Sitar Indian Cuisine Homemade Indian dishes at affordable prices, with daily lunch buffets and a weekend dinner buffet. 3630 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-490-1326; sitar-indiancuisine.com BR

Fairview Dining Room Seasonally inspired contemporary cuisine with selections like bourbon glazed pork chops and pan seared NC grouper. Located inside the Washington Duke Inn & Golf Club. 3001 Cameron Blvd.; 919-493-6699; washingtondukeinn.com Foster’s Market Brought to you by acclaimed cookbook author Sara Foster, fresh breakfast selections, sandwiches and salads. Also pick up specialty food items. 2694 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-489-3944; fostersmarket.com BR Guglhupf Bakery, Cafe and Restaurant German-inspired cuisine and artisanal bakery. Restaurant dishes include house-cut noodles, weiner schnitzel and pan-roasted duck. 2706 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-401-2600; guglhupf.com BR

WINNER Kanki Steak, chicken and seafood cooked on hibachi grills, OF DURHAM plus an extensive sushi 2016 menu. Come for a show! 3504 Mt. Moriah Rd.; 919-401-6908; kanki.com BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER • SNACKS • CATERING

IBEST

M, NC • 919-286-1987 TTERBAKESHOP.COM

Vegan Flava Cafe Vegan/vegetarian menu with selections like carrot tuna, curry lentils and “Flava Cakes” for Sunday brunch. 4125 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-960-1832; veganflavacafe.com BR UNIVERSITY DRIVE The Boot A neighborhood Italian American Restaurant serving soups, salads, sandwiches, pastas and traditional Italian entrees, plus a full bar. 2501 University Dr.; 919-294-8383; thebootdurham.com Capital Seafood Market & Grill Fried catfish, porkchop sandwiches and collard greens. Raw seafood for sale. 1304 University Dr.; 919-402-0777 Mi Peru Peruvian fare like ceviche mixto, asado and leche de tigre. 4015 University Dr.; miperupci.com Nana’s Restaurant Upscale seasonal dishes influenced by Southern, French and Italian cuisine. 2514 University Dr.; 919-493-8545; nanasdurham.com

SALADELIA.COM

bleu

live

Mediterranean

Bistro

WINNER

IBEST OF DURHAM 2016

WINNER

IBEST

Private Dining Room Outdoor Seating

OF DURHAM 2016

359 Blackwell Street • Suite 220 American Tobacco Campus • Durham, NC (919) 797 - 9728

BasanRestaurant.com 96

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1821 Hillandale Road | Durham

919.383.8502

www.bleuolivebistro.com bleuolivebistro

@bleuolivebistro


| dining guide | Tacos Nacos Tacos, papusas, tortas and horchata. 3411 University Dr.; 919-267-8226

NanaTaco Inventive taqueria that features locally produced meats and veggies. Enjoy with margarita in hand. 2512 University Dr.; 919-489-8226; nanataco.com

The Original Q Shack “BBQ tender as a mother’s love,” includes signature chile-rubbed beef brisket and Carolina pork shoulder. 2510 University Dr.; 919-402-4227; theqshackoriginal.com

Hard to believe it, but the holidays are just around the corner! Washington Duke Inn & Golf Club has lined up a

MORE WEST-CENTRAL DURHAM Amante Gourmet Pizza Gourmet pizzas and calzones. Try the “Via Bianco.” 3825 S. Roxboro Rd.; 919-572-2345; amantepizza.com

Saké Bomb Asian Bistro Authentic Asian bistro and sake bar; enjoy specialty rolls like the “Green Monster” with spicy yellow tail and tuna. 4215 University Dr.; 919-401-4488; sakebombdurham.com Saladelia Cafe Delicious, healthy, homemade food with an espresso and organic smoothie bar, scratch-made pastries, gourmet sandwiches, salads and soups. Open for dine-in or carry-out. 4201 University Dr.; 919-489-5776; saladelia.com BR

number of dining events, including a Thanksgiving feast on Nov.24; a threecourse brunch every Saturday and Sunday

Bull Street Gourmet & Market Fresh salads, breakfast and sandwiches like pulled porkloaded hashbrowns and the turkey and Brie sandwich. 3710 Shannon Rd.; 919-237-2398; bullstreetdurham.com

throughout the season, beginning Nov. 26 and 27; and holiday tea served daily from 2:30-4:30pm beginning Nov. 24. And there’s even more to look

BR

forward to in December!

Hope Valley Diner Diner food and breakfast all day with selections like chicken and dumplings, fried pickle chips, biscuits and gravy. 3710 Shannon Rd.; 919-419-0907; hopevalleydiner.com BR

now booking holiday parties

Make your reservations – 919-493-6699.

Randy’s Pizza Pizzas, garlic knots and stromboli. 1813 Martin Luther King Jr. Pkwy.; 919-490-6850; randys-pizza.com Piper’s Deli Deli sandwiches and burgers like pimento bacon cheeseburger and French dip sandwich. 3219 Old Chapel Hill Rd.; 919-489-2481; pipersdeli.com Tonali Restaurant Inventive Mexican cuisine such as chicken con mole, Mexican chocolate torte and adobo pork. 3642 Shannon Rd.; 919-489-8000; tonalirestaurant.com

SOUTHERN DURHAM / NEAR I-40

WOODCROFT SHOPPING CENTER Hope Valley Brewing Company Brew pub fare like cheesy buffalo dip and crispy Brussels sprouts. 4810 Hope Valley Rd.; 919-294-4955; hopevalleybrewingcompany.com BR

Fresh baked Delicious

book now and save

WINNER

IBEST OF DU20R16HAM

NC • 919-286-1987 ERBAKESHOP.COM

Gobble, Gobble

Thai Cafe Authentic Thai cuisine: drunken noodles, curries and stir-fries. Don’t miss the coconut cake for dessert! 2501 University Dr.; 919-493-9794; thaicafenc.com

OnlyBurger The food truck’s brick-and mortar version offers all the same buildyour-own burger options and sides like bacon-wrapped mac-n cheese squares. 3710 Shannon Road; 919-937-9377; onlyburger.com

WINNER

IBEST OF DURHAM 2016

Catering | Open 7 days a week BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNERavailable • SNACKS • CATERING SALADELIA.COM

a southern take on an Italian classic 1125 W. NC HWY 54 | Suite 304 | Durham

info@bluseafoodandbar.com 2002 hillsborough rd 919.286.9777 bluseafoodandbar.com | #bluseafood

OUTDOOR SEATING Takeout Orders: 919.390.7525 www.makusempanadas.com @makusempanadas

SOUTHPOINT LOCATION CATERING FOOD TRUCK

RESTAURANT: (919) 607-7419 FOOD TRUCK AND EVENTS: (919) 907-0995 WWW.PORCHETTARDU.COM October/November 2016

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| dining guide | Guacamaya (Chubby’s Tacos) Fresh mexican favorites like burritos, nachos and salads, as well as the “Chubbychanga.” 4711 Hope Valley Rd.; 919-489-4636 guacamayafreshmex.com

Dulce Cafe Espresso, gelato and sandwiches. Smoked salmon bagel, dulce Reuben and the “B-L-A-T.” 5826 Fayetteville Rd., Ste. 106; 919-797-0497 BR

Joe Van Gogh Cozy and full of natural light, this local coffee shop sources quality beans for a superior coffee. 4711 Hope Valley Rd.; 919-973-3950; joevangogh.com.

Nantucket Grill & Bar New England-style cuisine known for their desserts like the “Unbirthday” and coconut cake. 5826 Fayetteville Rd.; 919-484-8162; nantucketgrill.com

Pulcinella’s Italian Restaurant Southern Italian dishes. Antipasto classico, baked ziti and tortellini alla panna. 4711 Hope Valley Rd.; 919-4901172; pulcinellasitalianrestaurant.com Randy’s Pizza Pizzas, garlic knots and stromboli. 4810 Hope Valley Rd., Ste. 112; 919-403-6850; randys-pizza.com West 94th Street Pub Traditional pub fare: loaded fries, chili cheese tots and fish & chips. 4711 Hope Valley Rd.; 919-403-0025; west94thstpub.com Yamazushi Japanese fine dining, kaiseki-style, with seasonal menu changes and a multi-course menu, as well as sake. 4711 Hope Valley Rd.; 919-493-7748; yamazushirestaurant.com SUTTON STATION Pale + Porter Public House Modern American cuisine and cocktails, locally sourced. Beef puff pastries, house oven-roasted turkey sandwich and shrimp and grit cakes. 5850 Fayetteville Rd.; 919-5448585; paleandporter.com Bocci Trattoria & Pizzeria
 Traditional Italian pastas, pizzas, crostinis and salads. 5850 Fayetteville Rd.; 919-206-4067; bocciitalian.com

LINCOLN PARK WEST Danny’s Bar-B-Que Hickory-smoked barbecue, ribs, fried catfish. 2945 S. Miami Blvd., Ste. 118; 919-806-1965; dannysbarbque.com Gussy’s Place Greek street food like gyro pita, Greek fries and baklava. 2945 S. Miami Blvd.; 984-439-8455; gussys.com Piper’s In The Park Soups, salads, hoagies and burgers with selections like curried couscous and “South of Here” turkey sandwich. 2945 S. Miami Blvd.; 919-572-9767; pipersinthepark.com Spicy Green Gourmet Cafe & Catering Sandwiches, soups, salads with specialities like Cuban flatbread. 2945 S. Miami Blvd.; 919-220-6040 HOPE VALLEY COMMONS Mattie B’s Public House Housemade burgers, N.Y.-style pizza, wings and potato chips. 1125 W. N.C. 54; 919-401-8600; mattiebs.com Denny’s Diner fare serving breakfast anytime, lunch and dinner. 7021 N.C. 751, Ste. 901; 919-908-1006; dennys.com BR

WINNER

IBEST OF DURHAM 2016

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Makus Empanadas A variety of meat, veggie and cheese empanadas, with vegetarian and vegan options. 1125 W. N.C. 54, Ste. 304; 919-390-7525; makusempanadas.com

Treforni Wood-fired pizza and sandwiches including traditional options like Margherita, as well as more inspired options like the prosciutto arugula pizza and the rosetta sandwich. 1125 W. N.C. 54; 919-973-0922; treforni.com

NEAR SOUTHPOINT HOMESTEAD MARKET Bean Traders Coffee Coffee specialties and local pastries. 105 W. N.C. 54; 919-484-2499; beantraderscoffee.com City Barbecue Smoked meats, peach cobbler and hushpuppies. 208 W. N.C. 54. 919-237-9509; citybbq.com Shiki Sushi Sushi and pan-Asian choices like “Bang Bang Shrimp,” gyoza dumplings and beef pho soup. 207 W. N.C. 54; 919-484-4108; shikitasu.com


| dining guide | SOUTHPOINT CROSSING Ai Fuji Japanese Steakhouse Hibachi dishes and buy-one-get-one sushi. 202 W. N.C. 54; 919-998-3988; aifujijapanese.com The Coffee Element Counter Culture coffee, tea, smoothies and pastries. 202 W. N.C 54; 919-361-3320; tce.coffee Primal Food & Spirits Gluten-free restaurant featuring wood-fired local meat dishes with seasonal sides with craft cocktails. 202 W. N.C. 54; 919-248-3000; primalfoodandspirits.com

RTP

Harvest 18 Local, seasonal eats. Try the pimento cheese dip and a Bloody Mary for brunch. Also ask about the houseinfused spirits. 8128 Renaissance Pkwy., Ste. 114; BR 919-316-1818

N.C. 55 Backyard BBQ Pit Barbecue and other Southern comfort foods: mac ‘n’ cheese, Brunswick Stew and pit-cooked barbecue. 5122 N.C. 55; 919-544-9911; sweetribs.com

Rise Biscuits & Donuts Daily-changing menu of doughnuts and biscuits. For vegetarians, the “Fried Eggplant ‘Bacon’” biscuit is hard to beat. 8200 Renaissance Pkwy.; 919-248-2992; risebiscuitsdonuts.com BR Town Hall Burger and Beer “Carolina Burger” with pork belly and pimento cheese, barbecue salmon burger and “Fries Poutine.” 7830 N.C. 751; 919-973-0506; townhallburgerandbeer.com

BR

THE STREETS AT SOUTHPOINT AREA American Meltdown Signature gourmet melts; sides and desserts. Southpoint; 919-473-6358; americanmeltdown.org Bruster’s Ice Cream Hand-crafted ice creams, sorbets & sherbets in everchanging flavors. 8200 Renaissance Pwy., Ste. 1002; 919-237-3537; brusters.com Porchetta Slow-roasted Italian-style pork sandwiches and sides. Southpoint; 919-607-7419; porchettardu.com

Brigs at the Park Breakfast selections like “Pineapple Bread Pina Colada French Toast” and sandwiches like the crab wrap. 4900 N.C. 55; 919-544-7473; brigs.com BR Cafe Meridian Mediterranean and American made-to-order salads and sandwiches. 2500 Meridian Pkwy.; 919-361-9333; cafemeridian.com Jamaica Jamaica Carribean food favorites like jerk chicken, yellow rice and brown stew chicken. 4857 N.C. 55; 919-544-1532

N.C. 54 Akashi Japanese Grill & Sushi Bar Hibachi, sushi and noodle dishes like bento boxes, yakisoba and spicy scallop roll. 2223 N.C. 54; 919-572-9444; akashisushi54.com Na’Mean Asian fusion, Korean barbecue sandwich shop. A KoKyu joint. 4823 Meadow Dr., Ste. 108; 919-699-4667; kokyubbq.com/nmean Spice & Curry Traditional Indian, buffet-style or off the menu: chicken 65, idli and garlic naan. 2105 E. N.C. 54; 919-544-7555; spicencurry.net

Sansui Sushi Bar & Grill Hibachi dishes and sushi rolls like “Spider Man” with crab and crawfish. 4325 N.C. 55; 919-361-8078; sansuisushi.com Vit Goal Tofu Restaurant Korean dishes like fried dumplings, tofu soups and barbecue specials. 2107 Allendown Dr.; 919-361-9100; vitgoal.com

Now booking holiday parties Book now and save

Tender as a Mother's Love READERS’ FAVORITE

PLATINUM WINNER

READERS’ FAVORITE

BRONZE WINNER

WINNER

IBEST IBEST IOFBEST DURHAM OF DURHAM OF DURHAM 2015

2015

2016

2510 University Dr. Durham, NC

info@primalfoodandspirits.com

Phone 919 - 402 - 4BBQ (4227)

Catering available

202 NC HWY. 54, Suite 107, Durham, NC 27713 919-248-3000

Open 7 days a week 11am - 9pm

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| dining guide | ALSO CHECK OUT THESE AREA RESTAURANTS …

GREENWOOD COMMONS Benetis Restaurant Classic breakfast with a Mediterranean lunch buffet. 5410 N.C. 55; 919-806-0313; benetisrtp.com BR Sarah’s Empanadas Homemade empanadas. 5410 N.C. 55; 919-544-2441 Tandoor Indian Restaurant Traditional Indian like veggie samosas, kabobs and naan. 5410 N.C. 55; 919-484-2102; tandoorinrtp.com BR Thai Lanna Restaurant Authentic Thai cuisine like red curry, pad thai and larb. 5410 N.C. 55; 919-484-0808; thailannarestaurant.com

411 West The menu – including fresh pasta, seafood and pizzas – is inspired by the flavors of Italy and the Mediterranean, with a healthy Californian twist. 411 W. Franklin St.; 919-967-2782; 411west.com BR

Acme Soups, salads, seafood and entrees with a Southern touch; outdoor dining. 110 E. Main St., Carrboro; 919-929-2263; acmecarrboro.com BR Alberello Cafe & Market Market and cafe featuring Florentine sandwiches, housemade pastas, from-scratch desserts and more. 72 Chapelton Ct.; alberellonc.com

True Flavors Diner Upscale Southern diner. Try the “Howling Moon French Toast” made with Howling Moon moonshine sauce. 5410 N.C. 55; 919-316-7978; trueflavorsnc.com BR IMPERIAL CENTER

Al’s Burgers Gourmet burgers and fries with local ingredients. 516 W. Franklin St.; 919-904-7659; alsburgershack.com

MEZ Contemporary Mexican Creative Mexican dishes, based on traditional recipes with a fresh, healthy twist. 5410 Page Rd.; 919-941-1630; mezdurham.com

Breadmen’s A variety of sandwiches, burgers, salads and grilled meat, as well as daily soup and casserole specials. Breakfast served all day; vegetarian options; outdoor dining. 324 W. Rosemary St.; 919-967-7110; breadmens.com BR Breakaway Cafe A casual “cycling-inspired” cafe serving breakfast, lunch, dinner and small plates, along with Counter Culture coffee and Maple View ice cream. 58 Chapelton Ct., Ste. 100; breakawaync.co

Page Road Grill Traditional American dishes, from house-made soup and bread to burgers to vegetarian options. 5416 Page Rd.; 919-908-8900; pageroadgrill.com

B-Side Lounge Small plates like flatbread, bacon-wrapped dates and fondue. Plus inspired cocktails. 200 N. Greensboro St.; 919-904-7160; b-sidelounge.com

Q&A with Police Chief

Cerelyn “C.J.” Davis 28

Meet The Makers

Mercantile 36

Four Very Cool

Downtown Offices 66

Duke Transplant Surgeon

Makes History 80

October/November 2016 durhammag.com

The

gsn desiis ue Great spaces for work and life

HOME-MADE

For Jacque Kohn and her four daughters, being creative is more than a hobby – it’s a way of life. The craft room is a beloved space in this Colvard Farms household. Page 50

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Chronic Tacos Mexican grill utilizing authentic recipes. 504 Meadowmont Village Circle; 984-999-4803; eatchronictacos.com Crepe Traditions Sweet and savory crepes, coffee and espresso. 140 W. Franklin St., Ste. 120; 919-391-9999; crepetraditions.com BR Crossroads Chapel Hill at The Carolina Inn New American cuisine and seasonal specialties. 211 Pittsboro St.; 919-918-2777; crossroadscuisine.com BR

Crossties A variety of barbecue, sides and scratch-made desserts. 201 E. Main St., Carrboro; 919-904-7160. Crook’s Corner Southern classics like shrimp and grits, “Hoppin’ John” and jalapeno-cheddar hushpuppies. 610 W. Franklin St.; 919-929-7643; crookscorner.com BR

Elaine’s on Franklin Fine regional American cuisine, made with fresh, local ingredients. 454 W. Franklin St.; 919-960-2770; elainesonfranklin.com elements Cuisine that combines classical as well as modern Asian and European cooking techniques. 2110 Environ Way, East 54; 919-537-8780; elementsofchapelhill.com Glasshalfull Mediterranean-inspired food and wine. 106 S. Greensboro St., Carrboro; 919-967-9784; glasshalfullcarrboro.com

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| dining guide |

Imbibe Bottle shop and restaurant featuring pizza, salads and appetizers. 108 Henderson St.; 919-636-6469 Iris The full-service restaurant at N.C. Museum of Modern Art specializes in seasonal fare utilizing locally sourced ingredients. 2110 Blue Ridge Rd., Raleigh; 919-664-6838; ncartmuseum.org/visit/dining Italian Pizzeria III Pizza, calzones, subs. The “place to be” in Chapel Hill for 35 years. 508 W. Franklin St.; 919-968-4671; italianpizzeria3.com Jujube Eclectic, modern cuisine inspired by the classic flavors of China and Vietnam. 1201 Raleigh Rd.; 919-960-0555; jujuberestaurant.com Kitchen Bistro-style dining with a seasonal menu that always includes mussels. 764 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-537-8167; kitchenchapelhill.com Magone Italian grill and pizza. 1129 Weaver Dairy Rd., Ste. F; 919-904-7393 Mama Dip’s Kitchen Traditional Southern specialties, including a country breakfast and lunch and dinner classics like fried chicken and Brunswick stew; outdoor dining. 408 W. Rosemary St.; 919-942-5837; mamadips.com BR

Maple View Farm Ice cream outpost of the Hillsborough dairy farm. 6900 Rocky Ridge Rd.; 919-244-1949; mapleviewfarm.com

Mediterranean Deli Offers healthy vegan, vegetarian and gluten-free options as well as delicious meats from the grill. 410 W. Franklin St.; 919-967-2666; mediterraneandeli.com Mixed Casual Korean Bistro Specializes in bibimbap, customizable bowls of rice, meat, vegetables and sauce. 1404 E. Franklin St.; 919-929-0047; mixedkoreanbistro.com Oakleaf French and Italian farm-to-table cuisine. 480 Hillsboro St.; 919-533-6303; oakleafnc.com

TOPO Chapel Hill’s only distillery also offers beers and American food, like burgers and flatbreads. 100 E. Franklin St.; 919-929-8676; thetopofthehill.com BR

Trilogy American cafe featuring innovative twists on classic dishes. Silverspot Cinema, University Place, 201 S. Estes Dr.; 919-357-9888; silverspot.net BR Venable Upscale comfort food with a heavy emphasis on locally sourced and seasonal ingredients. 200 N. Greensboro St.; 919-904-7160; venablebistro.com

Pazzo! Italian cuisine, takeout pizza. 700 Market St.; 919-929-9984; pazzo-restaurant.com

BR

Radius Wood-fired pizzas, housemade pastas, sandwiches, salads and desserts. 112 N. Churton St., Hillsborough; 919-245-0601; radiuspizzeria.net The Root Cellar Sandwiches, prepared salads, desserts and more. 750 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-967-3663; rootcellarchapelhill.com BR

Spanky’s A Chapel Hill institution since 1977, the American bar and grill serves hamburgers, brown sugar baby back ribs, garden fresh salads and barbecue. 101 E. Franklin St.; 919-967-2678; spankysrestaurant.com BR Squid’s The menu of fresh seafood options includes wood-grilled fillets, live Maine lobster, fried seafood and oysters. 1201 N. Fordham Blvd. (15-501); 919-942-8757; squidsrestaurant.com

Vespa Innovative Italian and Mediterranean cuisine in a setting that can accommodate parties, receptions and special events. 306 W. Franklin St.; 919-969-6600; vespanc.com Weathervane Shrimp and grits, sweet potato fries and other gourmet takes on classic flavors. Southern Season, 201 S. Estes Dr.; 919-929-9466; southernseason.com/ restaurant/chapel-hill BR Yopop Frozen Yogurt Ice cream, smoothies and self-serve frozen yogurt. 1129 Weaver Dairy Rd.; 919-537-8229; yopops.com Yogurt Pump Since 1982, YoPo has served up frozen yogurt treats and shakes with unique flavors like mocha java and red velvet. Non-fat, low-fat and no-sugaradded available. 106 W. Franklin St.; 919-942-7867; yogurtpump.com

WELCOME TO AMERICA’S DINER

7021 HIGHWAY 751, #901 DURHAM

Welcome to Glasshalfull, a local

gathering place in downtown Carrboro with a lively, casual atmosphere, beautiful, modern interior, a sexy bar serving an intriguing selection of wines and cocktails, and a kitchen dedicated to delicious contemporary American cooking.

919-908-1006

OPEN 24/7! We give AARP discounts

www.glasshalfullcarrboro.com

KOREAN BBQ!

We are excited to introduce table service dinner, with an expanded menu! Join us for popular Korean dishes, including Korean BBQ and stews.

ENJOY THE BEST OF PATIO DINING IN THE PARIS OF THE PIEDMONT 106 S. Greensboro St., Carrboro 919.967.9784

Now serving

We cater! Between our food truck and ƉŽƉƵůĂƌĐƵƐƚŽŵŝnjĂďůĞŝďŝŵďĂƉďƵīĞƚ͕ǁĞ have the perfect food for your next event.

1125 W. NC HWY 54 DURHAM

919-489-7300

www.mixedkoreanbistro.com October/November 2016

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| engagements |

Edmonds & Robertson

S

Garden Plots  by Laura Zolman Kirk HUN ROBERTSON AND SCOTT EDMONDS MET FIVE YEARS AGO WHILE working at MDC, a Durham nonprofit that works with communities to identify and remove the barriers that separate people from opportunity. The two started dating a year later. Scott stayed on at MDC and is now the program manager there, while Shun works remotely for Jobs for the Future in Boston and volunteers her time locally with the Partners for Youth Opportunity supporting Durham children. On August 17, Scott and Natalie Fogg, Shun’s best friend, put an elaborate plan into motion to get Shun to the WRAL Gardens in Raleigh, where Scott intended to propose. Natalie and Shun began with a manicure-pedicure session that was supposed to lead to a double date, but as the two were headed to dinner, Natalie received a call from a co-worker asking her to pick up a package at Capitol Broadcasting Company. Of course, it was not a co-worker waiting for the pair in the gardens beside Capitol: It was Scott, who handed Shun a card ending with, “I have just one question for you …” When Shun looked up, he was down on one knee. Although Shun and Scott are still working on many details, they have landed on an April 2017 wedding, with the hopes of exchanging vows at Sarah P. Duke Gardens and celebrating afterwards at The Pit.

DiamondsDirect.com Your love. Our Passion.

YOU

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October/November 2016


| weddings |

Blakely and Trehy

Oh, What a Night

J

 by Laura Zolman Kirk  by Riley MacLean Photography & Megapixie Photography ESSICA BLAKELY AND JP TREHY MET IN high school: JP was a lacrosse player at Jordan High while Jessica, who goes by Jessi, was a photography student at Durham School of the Arts. “He used to ride his bike past my house a lot,” Jessi jokes. Their paths led them to separate colleges, however, then on to Boulder, Colorado, and Washington, D.C., respectively, for a few years, but the two reunited when they moved back to Durham around the same time. Soon, Jessi and JP were an item again, and in February 2014, when the couple was on vacation in Mexico, JP asked Jessi to marry him. For this local love story, Durham made the ideal backdrop for the pair to exchange vows on a “balmy 75-degree day in December [2015],” Jessi says. The ceremony and reception, which Grace Beason of Grace Leisure Events helped plan, were held at The Rickhouse with food provided by Durham Catering Co. Jessi’s bridal look came together thanks to vendors like Tre Bella for flowers, hair by A Go-Go Salon, makeup by Tiwa Lawrence, and belt and hair comb by Thea Bloch-Neal of Hushed Commotion. Jessi is still struck by the moment after the wedding party – consisting of Amy Blakely, Kelly Clark, Lisa Nestor, Jenna Bauer, Nolan Trehy, Drew Massey, Will Denton and Trevor Snell – entered the ceremony: “Hearing Miles [Andrews of Big Fat Gap] and Jeff Stickley [of Hammer No More the Fingers] playing ‘All of Me’ as I walked down the aisle was an amazing moment,” she says. The couple has since relocated to Charlotte where JP works at Red Ventures and Jessi has continued her formerly Durham-based photography business, Jessica Arden Photography.

Diamonds-Direct.com Where NC says, ”I Do!”

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| weddings |

Fisher & Juban

C

Destination Durham  by Lauren Moody |  by Heba Salama

PHOTO BY JENN ANN

HAPEL HILL NATIVE KARA FISHER MOVED TO CALIFORNIA for a research internship at Stanford University after receiving her bachelor’s degree at Duke. There, she met Romain Juban, a native of Versailles, France, who was a grad student at the time. The short story is: The two saw each other from across the room at a party, talked, danced and fell in love. Two years later, Romain proposed in the middle of a four-mile hike surrounded by the scenic San Francisco Bay. With guests arriving from France, the Netherlands, Boston and California, Kara and Romain chose a Durham wedding with a French touch. “We kept our wedding very French-inspired, but wanted to incorporate the best of North Carolina,” Kara says. Visitors were welcomed at the Washington Duke Inn & Golf Club the afternoon before the wedding, and Bernard’s Formalwear supplied the tuxedos for the wedding party. The July 16 ceremony was held at Duke Chapel, followed by a candlelit, farm-to-table reception at 21c Museum Hotel. Guglhupf Bakery topped the night off with dessert. “This was a destination wedding for 95% of our guests,” Kara says. “Durham has been so kind to us all to make it a very memorable experience that we will never forget.” She and Romain live in San Mateo, California, where they both work for tech companies in Silicon Valley.

Are you from Durham or do you live in Durham and want your wedding or engagement featured in our magazine?

Email weddings@durhammag.com. 104

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Diamonds-Direct.com Where NC says, ”I Do!”


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