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N.C. CENTRAL COACH LeVELLE MOTON: SALUTING SINGLE MOMS 14 MOOGFEST COMES TO DURHAM 32 POISED & POLISHED – NAIL TRENDS 36 AT HOME IN HOPE VALLEY 68 TOP DENTISTS 84 MAY 2016 durhammag.com

Our

4th

Annual

WOMEN’S Issue LEADING FROM THE FRONT

Kim Lan Grout started The Redefining Disabled Project to counteract the media’s portrayal of people with disabilities as either charity cases or superhuman heroes. She and her husband, Sean, live in the Waterford neighborhood with daughters Lily, 3, and Kim-An, 4.

Durham natives. New residents. Businesswomen. Musicians. Thirteen remarkable women

you ought to know. Page 42


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• Compassionate multidisciplinary team that includes physicians, nurse practitioners, nurses, psychologists, social workers, hospital school teachers, child life specialists, and more

• Specialized programs and resources for adolescents and young adults • Part of the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, one of only 41 National Cancer Institutedesignated comprehensive cancer centers in the U.S., and the Children’s Oncology Group, a national research collaborative dedicated to finding new therapies for children with cancer

UNCChampions.org


durham May 2016

Vol 9 No 3

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the women’s issue

DEPARTMENTS & COLUMNS 12 Class Act

EXTRAORDINARY WOMEN 44 Jessamyn Stanley

Triangle Ecycling helps train Durham Public Schools students in computer technology

International yoga teacher, writer and blogger

46 Ellen Andrews

14 The Durham Difference

Church World Service

N.C. Central Coach LeVelle Moton started the Velle Cares Foundation to help families in at-risk situations

48 Shelley McPhatter

BridgePoint General Contracting, BridgePoint Construction Services and BridgePoint Civil

16 Stuff We Like

50 Heather Garrett

Heather Garrett Interior Design

Community idea incubator series groundworkk and children’s author John Claude Bemis’ new book, “The Wooden Prince”

52 Kamara Thomas

20 Noted

46

Singer, songwriter

54 Elizabeth South Durham Academy

55 Laura Helms Reece

26 Behind the Music

Duke University Health System

With banjo-wielding Curtis Eller

58 Sarah Parker

28 Getting Out

Durham Catering Co.

10 events you can’t miss

60 Kim Lan Grout

66 Adopt A Pet

The Redefining Disabled Project

Meet a few pets from The Animal Protection Society of Durham

62 Dacia Jones

Durham Public Schools

63 Po-Ming Wong

63

Magpie Boutique

64 Amy Unell

Office of the Vice Provost for the Arts, Duke University; StoryTales Productions

101 The Drink

Set sail with Picnic’s Skipper and a Little Buddy

102 Taste

Tying the knot, Bull City style

SEEN & HEARDS 4 SEEDS’ Fork Less Traveled dinner series

36 Poised & Polished

with chef Ricky Moore PHOTO BY JEREMY COWART

5 spring nail trends

84 TOP DENTISTS

Our daily arepa at Guasaca

111 Engagements & Weddings

Moogfest debuts in Durham May 19-22; we’ve pulled together a few can’t-miss festival happenings

When their home renovation project didn’t pan out, the Lamb family incorporated old soul into a new build

100 The Dish

Find our city’s best restaurants

FEATURES 32 7 Moog Musts

68 How They Live

Isa Watson launched her technology platform here after falling in love with the city’s entrepreneurial spirit A few of our favorite Bull City products

56 MaryAnn E. Black

Experts share the beauty products and tools they swear by

22 Envested in Durham 24 Shop Local

Rho

38 The Essentials

What we’ve heard around town …

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5 Ronald McDonald House’s Hearts of Gold Gala 6 Durham Art Guild’s Swing Into Spring fundraiser 8 Bull City Food & Beer Experience and Salt & Smoke Festival

10 Porsche Southpoint grand opening celebration Photography by Briana Brough


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GARDEN VARIETY PHOTOGRAPHY BY LAURA ZOLMAN KIRK

SEEDS’ fifth dinner in their The Fork Less Traveled dinner series featured chef Ricky Moore from Saltbox Seafood Joint. These

919-489-8362 PERSIANCARPET.COM 5634 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd. Durham, NC Corner I-40 and 15-501

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mouthwatering events involve favorite chefs from across Durham flexing skills they don’t often use in their usual cuisine, hence the “fork less traveled.” For his dinner, chef Ricky and his Art Institute of Raleigh-Durham team of culinary students took on the flavors of Brazil. The dinner, held at SEEDS, seated 40 diners and was made possible thanks to the support of Firsthand Foods, Eastern Carolina Organics, Fullsteam Brewery, West End Wine Bar and Sassafras Fork Farm. The series supports SEEDS’ gardenbased programming for Durham youth. DM

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Shun Robertson and Scott Edmonds. The Art Institute’s Nate Washington Jr. with chef Ricky Moore. Emily Friedman, Keith Guile and Jonathan Bailey. Angela Wallace and Angela Gilmore. SEEDS’ Jody White serves up cocktails to guests Eric Wiebe and Cynthia Shimer.

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HOME OF HOPE PHOTOGRAPHY BY JULIA BAKER

The Hearts of Gold Gala was held in March as a celebration of the many kind individuals who have contributed to the Ronald McDonald House of Durham and Wake Counties, giving hope to seriously ill children and their families. The event featured a silent auction, Wall of Wine and raffle, and raised more than $230,000 for the organization. Held at the The Pavilion at the Angus Barn in Raleigh, the gala honored the recipients of the 2016 Heart of Gold Awards: Carolyn K. Penny, Ric Richards and Edith Rosenblatt. DM

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1 Heart of Gold Recipient Ric Richards and his wife, Jan.

2 Ariana and Torri Bryant. 3 Howell Brown III. 4 Marcus Gee from Kidznotes – a program that provides opportunities for students to train on classical instruments – performs at the gala.

5 Carolyn L. Penny, daughter of Heart of Gold recipient Carolyn K. Penny, and Kim Kylstra.

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Karen Chilton and Bridget Donell. David, Dylan, Chris and Wade Penny, sons of Heart of Gold recipient Carolyn K. Penny.

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SWING INTO SPRING PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANDREA GRIFFITH CASH

Spring is prime time for the arts in Durham – with Full Frame Documentary Film Festival, the Durham Arts Council’s Spring Art Walk, Art of Cool Fest, Moogfest and American Dance Festival all kicking off between April and June. The Durham Art Guild welcomed the new exciting arts season with a fundraiser at the Durham Arts Council. Swing Into Spring included a silent auction, live auction and raffle. DM

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1 Jen Longee and Paul Marsh. 2 Co-chair Jesica Averhart,

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co-chair Shannon Leskin and Executive Director Katie Seiz. Annick Le Goff, Jason Cho and Mike Bamford.

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Moogfest’s Marisa Brickman and Karly Snajczuk. Natasha Walker of Art of Cool and Tess Mangum Ocaña. Auctioneer Will Leskin.

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BEER PAIRINGS

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1 Sarah Beard, Ari Sanders 2

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANDREA GRIFFITH CASH

Here’s a nice way to spend a Sunday afternoon: Sample food from Durham restaurants like Gocciolina, M Sushi and American Meltdown while enjoying beer pairings by the likes of breweries near (Fullsteam, Bull City Burger and Brewery, Bull Durham Beer Co.) and far (Sierra Nevada, New Belgium, SweetWater). Held at the Durham Performing Arts Center, the Bull City Food & Beer Experience supports the Ellerbe Creek Watershed Association. DM

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and Susan Branion.

Chef Jason Cunningham of Washington Duke Inn with his Bluefin tuna dish. Event organizer Johanna Kramer with her husband, David Jung.

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SALT & SMOKE, NC STYLE PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANDREA GRIFFITH CASH

Acme Food & Beverage Co. of Carrboro is taking its Salt & Smoke Festival on the road. Before Baton Rouge or Birmingham, Kevin Callaghan and his crew headed to Ponysaurus Brewing in Durham in April. Ticket buyers

1 Alodia Mumford and Adam Hall.

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Chef Kevin Callaghan. Lindsey Hums, Lauran Odom and Lisa Andrews.

enjoyed a barbecue plate with sides like cornbread and macaroni and cheese, raw oysters from the Virginia shore and, of course, Ponysaurus beer. Big Fat Gap provided the entertainment, appropriate for the event that uses the hashtag #getyoursouthon. DM

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Hendrick Automotive Group President Ed Brown, Chairman Rick Hendrick, Market Area Vice President Gerald Ramoin and Porsche Southpoint General Manager Phil Whitehead.

TAKE THE WHEEL PHOTO BY AMANDA MACLAREN

Porsche Southpoint, the newest addition to the Hendrick Southpoint Auto Mall, held a grand opening event for its

20,300-square-foot facility. The Porsche dealership includes eight service bays and offers amenities like free Wi-Fi, a coffee and snack bar, service loaner vehicles and complementary shuttle service to The Streets of Southpoint, local area businesses, dining and attractions. Porsche Southpoint also provides customers an exclusive delivery at Bob Ingram’s Porsche Collection in Durham; five cars from the collection were on display at the opening celebration, including the 2011 Porsche 911 Speedster, the only black 911 Speedster the factory ever built. DM

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Dr. David Lee Hill, Jr. Oral & Maxillofacial Surgeon 77 Vilcom Center Circle, Suite 120 Chapel Hill, NC 27514 919-238-9961

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W W W.C H A P E L H I L LO R A L S U R G E R Y.C O M


Hillside New Tech intern Sergio Banda, Hillside intern Aranza Reyes, Jaavid Malette, Logistics/Ecycling Director Zendy Lopez, Triangle Ecycling Founder Larry Herst, E-commerce Director Josh Buczynski, Hillside intern Brian Ray, Head Technician/Teacher Oleg Nepliouev and Asset Management Services Technician Joe Diver.

act

class

w

Downloading Do-Gooders

BY LAURA ZOLMAN KIRK | PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIANA BROUGH

“We’re here and accepting computers,”

Larry Herst wants the Durham community to know. His company, Triangle Ecycling, originally began as a computer

recycling service but has since grown into much more. Now – in addition to recycling – the company handles computer refurbishing, has a nonprofit of the same name and boasts a strong youth education 12

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program with Durham Public Schools, teaching hands-on computer repair skills to students. What has not changed is Larry’s focus on the environment and the community. Of the money he makes from the refurbished machines either locally or online, 10% of profits head right back to DPS. Youth-focused local charities are regularly provided with Larry’s computers – no grants needed. And even if donated computers end up unsalvageable, they will never end up in a landfill; instead, they are recycled responsibly. Since DPS offers only a few hands-on, non-core programs, Larry saw a space he could naturally fill with Triangle Ecycling and made moves to start their youth education program four years ago. Now, Triangle Ecycling is the second-largest trainer of DPS students in computer technology, regularly hosts seven to nine interns during the school year and has recently teamed up with Durham’s YouthWork Internship Program to offer paid internships for two to four students over the summer. Instead of asking for donations for his cause, Larry simply asks for technology already on the chopping block. “This is a great way to give back to the community with stuff you were going to get rid of anyway,” he says. Currently, Triangle Ecycling receives about 1,000 machine donations a month, but if that number grew, so could education opportunities. “We’re really only limited by the number of computers we get,” Larry says of the internship program. Receiving more computers from technology companies, whose older models may have five or so years of life left in them, is ideal for Triangle Ecycling. “We’re just looking for computers,” Larry says. “That’s how we help kids.” DM M a y

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Brian, 18, and Jaavid, 18, sort through donated technology at Triangle Ecycling’s warehouse. Jaavid started with the company as an intern and is now employed part-time as a technician while he completes a degree in computer science at Durham Technical Community College.

RIGHT

Aranza, 16, destroys data on donated hard drives, ensuring the machines can be refurbished without compromising privacy.

MAKING MOVES

Triangle Ecycling is located at 2717 Western Bypass, and their computer drop-off hours are Monday-Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The new site accompanies a service launch for Triangle Ecycling: warehouse space rentals. Those interested can call 919-414-3041.

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Durham the

difference

Love and Basketball

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Raised by a single mom, N.C. Central Coach LeVelle Moton created his own organization to promote health, education and life skills for struggling children and families

Dana Lange, a beloved member of the Durham Magazine team since our launch and the past board chair of the Food Bank of Central and Eastern North Carolina, highlights her fellow Durhamites making a difference by giving back.

BY DANA LANGE

LeVelle Moton sits behind the desk

in his office at North Carolina Central University’s McDougaldMcLendon Arena, surrounded by dozens of photos of his smiling wife, Bridget, and their two children – Brooke, 7, and LeVelle Jr., 3. You’d have no idea that the men’s basketball head coach’s own childhood was far from this picture. The man he is today is completely foreign from the child growing up in a rough southeast Raleigh neighborhood with his single mother, Hattie McDougald, his brother, Earl Moton, and a nearby grandmother, Mattie. To honor his mother, Coach Moton started the Velle Cares Foundation to help families in at-risk situations.

that day. She did let my brother and I know we could be more than we desired; we just didn’t know what that was.” As a young boy, college wasn’t something LeVelle considered as a possibility for his future. “In the 40 years of our housing project, only six kids ever went to college,” he says. “Two were my brother and me.” Because his mother cleaned houses every day, LeVelle spent afternoons after school and summer days at the Boys and Girls Club in his neighborhood, “which kept me off the street.” But it did more than that: It’s where he met his mentor, Ron Williams, director of the club, who helped LeVelle in numerous ways. The most substantial was showing him the world is a much larger place.

O N E D AY AT A T I M E Before LeVelle was the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference coach of the year, a teacher, high school and middle school basketball coach, professional international basketball player or star N.C. Central student-athlete, he was a kid who knew only the four-block radius of his housing project, the Boys and Girls Club and school. “One hundred percent of who I am as a person was instilled in me by my mother and grandmother,” LeVelle says. But his mother didn’t outline the dream he’s currently living so specifically. “I grew up in the crack era of the ’80s,” LeVelle explains. “My mother did not talk to me about the future, but about survival for

THE JOY OF PEPSI “When I was 11, I saw a big Pepsi truck outside the Boys and Girls Club one day in the summer,” LeVelle says. “I had no idea they were not just stocking the vending machines.” That day, Pepsi was holding the “Hot Shot Competition” inside the gym, where kids had the chance to see how many baskets they could make. “The prize was a two-liter bottle of Pepsi,” LeVelle explains, “and I wanted that.” He was late to the game and was one of the last to attempt the shots. He scored 52 points, beating the record; spectating kids swarmed around him. “I had no idea that winning that contest led to a similar contest in

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Charlotte for the state championship, then Atlanta for the regional and lastly to Washington, D.C. I just wanted the Pepsi.” Ron took him to each of those contests as he won one after another. “It was the first time I had stayed in a hotel or flown on a plane,” LeVelle says. The final contest in D.C. was televised at the halftime of a Washington Bullets (now Wizards) and Chicago Bulls game, where Michael Jordan patted him on the head and wished him luck. LeVelle was moved: “I came in second, but my world had been changed.” PAY I N G I T F O R WA R D Knowing that not every kid who grows up with a single mother has a chance to expand his or her world vision is one of the reasons LeVelle created his foundation. “We do three things right now: We have a lunch recognizing people in the Triangle who have been in adverse situations and overcome them; we have a community day the week before M a y

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Coach Moton with his son, LeVelle Jr., 3, and his mother, Hattie McDougald, at last year’s Single Mothers Salute, a tribute to moms who are raising children on their own.

school to give kids in the Boys and Girls Club back-to-school supplies and a fun day; and the largest event is the Single Mothers Salute and Celebration.” Last year, LeVelle honored 100 single mothers. Four received special awards in his mother’s name: for perseverance, strength and courage, as well as the mother of the year, who received a car. Hattie may have been raising her boys alone, but she shaped the future of a man who not only makes her proud, but who is helping children in our area – the ones who need it most – see past any limitations that stand in their way to a world of opportunity beyond. DM d u r h a m m a g . c o m

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stuff we

like

Our editors’ most recent discoveries will have you hooked, too

Subtract the Sharks

When Matt Konar asks what I think the premise is of his event series, groundworkk, during an afternoon meeting at Cocoa Cinnamon, I respond, “Like ‘Shark Tank’?” “Right,” he says. But it’s also nothing like the popular entrepreneur competition on TV. Instead of sharks, Matt says, imagine a community. And instead of fighting for a piece of a project, imagine that community collaborating and supporting one another. “All these people are dedicated to Durham,” Matt says. “They want to do something for Durham.” Three presenters share their ideas for four minutes each, followed by an eight-minute Q-and-A with the audience. Always, Matt says, the community dives into suggestion mode, trying to make the ideas presented stronger. Often, he says, even the “competing” presenters will jump in with recommendations. “We’re just one big group having fun,” Matt says. “There’s no groundworkk champion Katie Coleman of Durham Spirits Co. presents her idea for a culinary-based nonprofit during a recent meeting. friction whatsoever.” The group gathers all across the Triangle, but the location with the most energy, Matt says, is Durham. explains. “It is creating a roundtable, allowing you to bounce ideas off a From the get-go, the Bull City groundworkk community partnered with group of creative people and also make connections with people who, Mercury Studio to offer intimate events featuring small bites and big just by their presence at the events, want to see small businesses and/or ideas quarterly. creative ideas grow and succeed.” Attendees (usually about 30 to 40 people) are asked to donate $5, After Durham Spirits Co. settles in at its new location on Old Chapel which goes into a pot and becomes the winnings – startup money for the Hill Road, Katie plans to launch the nonprofit this summer. top presenter. The ideas shared can range from small-scale to large, but Presenters for each event are announced a week in advance on social are typically arts- and food-based. Some of Matt’s favorite winners include media. To get the full experience, Matt encourages everyone to come groundworkk’s first-fund, the Durham Photography Parade, as well as out and take part. The next Durham event is expected in mid-summer, Piedmont Farm Animal Refuge and Katie Coleman of but events are also offered regularly in Raleigh and Carrboro. Check out Durham Spirits Co. groundworkk.com for upcoming dates. Katie presented her vision to form a nonprofit that helps people “The great thing about [groundworkk] is that it is small, communityovercome employment barriers through culinary training at Durham based – kind of guerrilla,” Matt says. “We just get together, we have fun, we Spirits Co. After her presentation, Katie was floored by the number of get to hear great ideas and great people talk about things they are passionate people willing to offer their expertise and help. about. It just doesn’t get much better than that.” – Laura Zolman Kirk „ “I think, at its core, groundworkk is not just crowdfunding,” Katie

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s t u f f

The Stuff of Legends

As a boy growing up in Pamlico County, children’s author John Claude Bemis spent his days exploring old tobacco barns, swimming in the river, learning to play violin and guitar and, of course, poring over his favorite books. The adventuresome tales informed his passion for writing fantastical stories – he pulls many ideas from the myths, legends, fairy tales and folklore he grew up reading and builds upon them. Such is the case with his latest book, “The Wooden Prince,” a re-imagining of the Pinocchio story. “Pinocchio fascinates me because he’s a wooden boy who comes to life,” John says. “The world around him is so new, exciting and often quite confusing. Everything ignites him with such curiosity M a y

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and wonder. I love this perspective and often remember feeling that way as a young person.” Over many trips to Italy, John grew interested in the history of Venice and the practice of alchemy. He came across the legendary figure of Prester John, who many medieval Europeans believed existed beyond the known world. “Fake letters from him circulated – the original viral sensation!” John says. “And the desire to locate Prester John helped fuel the Age of Exploration.” At first his travels were only research for an imaginary world with no particular story, but then John began to see connections to the Pinocchio tale, which sparked the idea for the book. Perfect for readers ages 8 and older – “or anyone who has ever been a kid,” John says. You can find the “The Wooden Prince” at The Regulator Bookshop, Purple Crow Books in Hillsborough or Flyleaf Books in Chapel Hill. John moved to the writers’ mecca that is Hillsborough in the late ’90s, a few years after graduating from UNC. He does most of his writing at home, which he shares with his wife, Amy Gorely, and their daughter, Rose Gorely-Bemis, 8. He and his family frequent Purple Crow Books, Cup-A-Joe coffee shop, Matthew’s Chocolates and make the rounds at all the restaurants in town. “Why would I ever need to leave?” he says. – Amanda MacLaren DM

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noted. BRAG ABOUT YOUR GRAD!

Tell us where they’re graduating from, what scholarships they’ve won and where they’re headed next year! We’ll be featuring graduates in our next issue. noted@durhammag.com

s to ore – m birth From w biz and e @ n d e o t not ag.com amm durh

What we’ve heard around town …

GRAMMY Awards. Goes to ... Durham And the Award

Taking a Stand

“Don’t Be Mean to People, A Golden Rule Saison,” to be released in May, of which 100% of the profits will be donated to Equality NC and QORDS, both local LGBTQ charities.

The U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey recognized Durham as No. 2 on their list of Top 10 Most Educated Mid-Sized Metros, with 44.8% of the city (25 years and older) holding bachelor’s degrees in a 2014 survey. Also, of the women they surveyed, Durham was listed as the Most Educated MidSized Metro with 46% of Durham women, 25 years and older, holding bachelor’s degrees.

 Durham was listed in an Entrepreneur article by John Boitnott – “3 Reasons Tech Workers Are Fleeing Silicon Valley” – as one of the places workers are turning to when it comes time to raise a family, due to the high number of technology jobs and lower cost of living.  The City of Durham received a Popular Annual Financial Reporting Award for its annual publication “Citizens’ Financial Report” and a Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting from the Government Finance Officers Association.

University News For the first time in nearly 20 years, Duke’s and UNC’s graduations will occur on separate weekends. Duke’s will take place the weekend of May 13, and UNC’s will occur Mother’s Day (May 8) weekend. 20

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Business News

MICHAEL GILLMAN PHOTOGRAPHY

 Durham was recognized as the No. 5 Most Tax-Friendly Cities for Small Business, a list compiled by “Thumbtack Journal,” in 2016.

Ponysaurus teamed up with Hillsborough’s Mystery Brewing to produce a beer called

Comedian Joel McHale, who performed at Durham Performing Arts Center April 8, donated his proceeds from that night to the LGBTQ Center of Durham in protest of North Carolina’s recently passed HB2 law. On stage, Joel donned a homemade LGBTQ shirt and discussed his opposition to the controversial law.

 In an effort to disassociate themselves from North Carolina state government until HB2 is overturned or modified, Fullsteam Brewery has asked not to be included in the state’s promotional programs and has withdrawn participation from the Got to be NC Festival and the State Fair.

RENDERING BY CENTER STUDIO ARCHITECTURE

D S E NO U R US Y ORTHY ! EW N O TO M E N T Sards aw M

The Scrap Exchange, a nonprofit dedicated

to promoting creativity, environmental awareness and community through reuse, will purchase 80,000 square feet of the Lakewood Shopping Center and 10 acres of land to create the National Center for Creative Reuse and a Reuse Arts District. The district will include thrift artist studios and market, a recycle-a-bicycle program, an architectural salvage, a sculpture park, community gardens, affordable housing and more.

 Sport Durst opened their Ram Truck Center, located at 4153 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd., in March.

 Nice Price Books will close in May after

more than 25 years in Durham.

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Bull City Craft, a locally owned art supply

store and craft studio, opened a new location in the Homestead Market Shopping Center in March. They will continue to sell art and craft supplies, notebooks and children’s creative toys.

To raise awareness of road cyclists and help foster a cycling community, local groups Adventure Cyclists of Bull City (AC/BC), Durham Cycles, Bullseye Bicycle and Seven Stars Cycles have banded together to put on Pony Ride, a group bike ride from Major the Bull to Ponysaurus Brewing Co. on the second Tuesday of every month.

In Memoriam

PHOTO BY DAWN PANDOLIANO

On the Move

Chef Anthony “TJ” Donovan, 41, of catering company Donovan’s Dish, passed away suddenly March 28. TJ is survived by his wife, Jill, and three daughters: Jillian, Pressley and Cameron.

 Common Ground Green Building Center, a

company dedicated to sustainable remodeling, hosted a grand reopening celebration of their new showroom on West Geer Street in March, featuring a raffle, food and drinks, and more.

The Place to Be

One World Market on Ninth Street

announced recently that Assistant Director Katie Westermann has been named the fair trade retail shop’s new executive director.

 Southern Documentary Fund has moved to 1105 W. Chapel Hill St. between The Cookery and Durham Co-op Market.

What an Honor

PHOTO BY JIM WALLACE, COURTESY DUKE UNIV. ARCHIVES

Now open on East Parrish Street, Everyday Magic is a retail store that carries intentionally made goods, including jewelry, home accessories and more.

PHOTO BY ADAM KISSICK

Tom Butters, former Duke University

In celebration of the Durham Bulls’ first “DURM” night, paying tribute to the City of Durham’s art scene, Bull City-based clothing company Runaway has collaborated with the team to design a special uniform for the Thursday, June 9, game. Runaway’s flagship store and gallery, located at 212 W. Main St., opened April 2. M a y

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Museum of Life and Science was recognized at No. 8 on the “Top 20 N.C. Tourist Attractions of 2015” list compiled

by Carolina Publishing & Associates.

 Sara Foster and Emily Wallace won the International Association of Culinary Professionals Cookbook Award for the photography in “Foster’s Market Favorites.”

vice president and director of athletics, passed away March 31 at age 77. Arriving at Duke in 1967 after retiring as major league Pittsburgh Pirates’ pitcher, Tom served as the director of special events and as coach for the Blue Devils baseball team. He also founded the Iron Dukes fundraising organization before he took the position as the university’s director of athletics in 1977, which he held until retiring in 1997. Tom may best be known for his decision to hire and stick with Duke basketball coach Mike Krzyzewski, who – after suffering many losing seasons early on – has guided the Blue Devils to five NCAA Championships. DM

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ENVESTED D U R H A M ’ S

IN DURHAM

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E N T R E P R E N E U R S

Basing her tech company here wasn’t part of the plan, but Isa Watson fell in love with the Bull City’s vibrant entrepreneurial community

ask anybody for advice or guidance. Some of these people are world names, world-renowned in their field. I just thought that this was too amazing to walk away from.

ISA HONED HER SKILLS IN CORPORATE America but found herself eager to use her talents to give back. She was also motivated to honor her late father, Doval, who tragically died when the bus he had chartered to bring local teens to Hampton University’s Open House Day crashed in April 2013. With the development of her social networking/giving platform Envested, Isa bridges the gap between millennials and nonprofits by connecting younger community members with causes they care about.

How has being here shaped your company? “From a talent perspective, I’ve gotten so lucky in being able to recruit and retain some really talented people who are just great individuals. Durham also has such a strong, vibrant nonprofit community. The response from them … I was so impressed. I don’t think in some other cities I’ve lived in, I would have been able to get so many responses from people just by calling them cold. A lot of times you’ll hear investors and entrepreneurs from other places just trying to focus on what’s best for them; I think that here, being around the types of people and companies that I am, it’s a reminder that I can actually do something that’s not only in my best interest, but in the community’s best interest. And they can exist together. – Laura Zolman Kirk DM

Did you plan to start Envested in Durham? No. I said, “I’m building a technology platform, so that means I need to be in Silicon Valley.” And I had a lot of mentors out there as well. I said, “I’m just going to move home for two months, build out this product, and then pack up my bags and move to Silicon Valley.” What changed your mind? I came home to Chapel Hill, literally Googled co-working spaces, and found American Underground. I thought I was going to be here for a second, but when I got here, it was so unbelievable – the amount of resources and support you find within the AU community, but also being in Durham, which has this amazing entrepreneurship flavor right now. I feel like I can

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PHOTO BY RICK CRANK

Isa grew up in Chapel Hill, graduating from Chapel Hill High School, but started her professional life in New England, beginning in Connecticut at biopharmaceutical giant Pfizer before moving to JPMorgan Chase in New York City. In 2015, Isa moved back to the Triangle and launched Envested soon afterward.

BY THE NUMBERS •

Launched in September 2015, Envested was conceptualized just a few months beforehand.

Beginning with two employees, Envested’s first office was in the general co-working space of American Underground @Main Street. Their current office is also in AU @Main, but they have now upgraded to a five-person office.

60 Triangle nonprofits joined Envested during its first enrollment wave.

The app was downloaded more than 200 times during its first weekend on the Apple Store, no marketing needed.

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OUR ENTREPRENEURS FEATURE SPONSORED BY

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local Some of our favorite finds ‌

Handmade Ugandan banana fiber tray, $42. One World Market

811 Ninth St.

Night-In Tin (1 gallon of popcorn), $19 and $11.40 for refills. The Mad Popper

Homestead Market (105 W. N.C. 54)

Niessing Acrobat steel ring with synthetic sapphire, $385.

Hamilton Hill Jewelry

Brightleaf Square (905 W. Main St.)

Lavender and Clary Sage Body Scrub, $16.

Lo & Behold Natural Body Care

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Subscription of local flowers: $60 for 4 weeks, $114 for 8 weeks and $150 for 12 weeks. Pine State Flowers

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GET T IN G

I

TO

KNOW

Curtis Eller

of Curtis Eller’s American Circus “I was born in Michigan during a period

of relative calm between the Detroit riots and Motown’s move to LA. It’s a good town to be from, especially if you’re a musician. This is a place that Iggy Pop, John Lee Hooker and Stevie Wonder all called home. I expect the Motor City will be turning out great music long after the salt mines and auto plants have vanished from memory. My dad was a bluegrass banjo player and a rockabilly guitarist, so I had somebody to show me the ropes. I was immediately entranced by the strange, sinewy voice of the five-string banjo. There’s a desolate beauty in the silence between the notes that draws you along like the unlit spaces between street lamps. There’s enough darkness in which to hide a great deal of mischief. In addition to being a banjo player, my dad ran a small circus in Detroit when I was growing up. Unsurprisingly, this had a very formative effect on my decision to become a performer. I was born into the circus and had to run away and join a band! My wife, Jamie B. Wolcott, and I left Carrboro in 1995 when she got into art school in New York City. I spent years studying my craft alongside a host of drag queens, anti-folk singers, glass eaters, milliners, blockheads and Elvis impersonators. It was like a surreal, 16-year-long fever dream. I loved it! We finally moved back to Durham in 2011, largely because of the birth of our daughter, Daisy. Durham’s a wonderful place for a banjo player and an illustrator (all the beautiful artwork adorning our album covers, posters, T-shirts and other merchandise was created by Jamie) to raise an aspiring gymnast. One of America’s greatest musical treasures, and a huge influence on me, was Pete Seeger. I studied Pete’s banjo instruction method 26

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obsessively when I was a kid, but it was his connection with his audience that spoke to me most saliently. He was a gentle radical who did to the art of the sing-along what Picasso did to painting. On the eve of the U.S. invasion of Iraq, I found myself on stage with Pete Seeger during an anti-war concert in NYC. When Pete led the audience through a breathtaking rendition of ‘Somewhere Over the Rainbow,’ I knew that I had chosen the right path. That’s the guy I wanted to be. I draw a lot of lyrical imagery from American history, which I guess isn’t too surprising for a banjo player. There’s a vein of raw material running between Nat Turner’s rebellion and Richard Nixon’s fall from grace that has kept me digging for years. Whenever I can’t seem to find the right words to express my worries, I put Groucho Marx and Upton Sinclair together on a subway ride to Coney Island and eavesdrop on their conversation. All I have to do is make it rhyme. Over the years, I’ve performed between horse races at Belmont Park, led a sing-along at the funeral of a wealthy mountain climber and shared the stage with a father-son Elvis impersonation act in Queens. These small, weird moments are the milestones by which I measure my progress. The coming months will find the American Circus gracing stages on both sides of the Atlantic. We’ll be playing everywhere from Majorca and London to Budapest and Amsterdam, including an appearance at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival. Apparently, the citizens of the world need banjo music to guide them through these dark times, and I’m glad I can be there to offer a sympathetic twang.” DM M a y

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PHOTO BY ALEX MANESS

At this point in my life, I’m more or less unemployable. I suppose I might be able to earn a few bucks teaching kids how to juggle. Or maybe I could write poems about Elvis Presley. Is that a job?”

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getting

out ➤

Art of Cool Festival May 6-8

Walk for the Animals May 21

Stretching over three days, five venues and 20 performances — including five-time GRAMMY winner Terence Blanchard, Brandee Younger (pictured), drummer Kendrick Scott and soul band The Internet — the third year of this jazz music festival presented by nonprofit Art of Cool Project promises to be epic.

Join in this morning walk with your furry friends – starting at Duke’s East Campus – to benefit the Animal Protection Society of Durham, which cares for nearly 7,000 animals annually.

Blues on the Plaza May 6 - May 27

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Winding through the historic and revitalized neighborhoods of downtown, American Tobacco Campus, Trinity Park and Old North Durham, this road race – now in it’s eighth year – is a great way to test your endurance and get to know your city. Finish with a lap around the warning track inside the historic Durham Athletic Park.

Bimbe Cultural Arts Festival May 21

PHOTO CREDITS (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT): BRANDEE YOUNGER, PHOTO COURTESY ART OF COOL FESTIVAL; BIMBE, PHOTO BY DAMIEN PROUT, BLACKOPPS ENTERTAINMENT; RUNNING OF THE BULLS, PHOTO BY DUNCAN HOGE; BLUES ON THE PLAZA, PHOTO BY TIM DUFFY

Running of the Bulls 8K June 4

Spend your Fridays in May with blues, beer, food trucks and fun at this outdoor concert series - located on The Plaza at Northgate Mall - featuring local talent including Beauty Operators, Reverend Dan and the Prophets, Handsome Al and the Lookers and Mel Melton & The Wicked Mojos with John Dee Holeman (pictured). Bull City Burger and Brewery will offer wine and beer options; expected food trucks include Heavenly Smoke and Big C Waffles.

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EVENTS

10 YOU CAN’T MISS

Celebrating African and African-American history, culture, arts and tradition, this familyfriendly event is in its 47th year. Hosted by Durham Parks and Recreation at Rock Quarry Park, activities include live music, arts and crafts, ethnic food, local talent and a kids’ zone. „

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g e t t i n g

o u t

Comedy Bang! Bang! Live! May 10

The Carolina Theatre presents a live recording of Scott Aukerman’s popular podcast and TV show. Guests for this completely improvised program include Paul F. Tompkins and Lauren Lapkus, with a special opening act by Neil Campbell.

If/Then May 24-29

This contemporary musical about living in New York stars original Broadway cast members Anthony Rapp, Jackie Burns, Tamyra Gray and Matthew Hydzik. On stage at the Durham Performing Arts Center for a week-long stint, this original show was written by the Pulitzer Prize- and Tony Awardwinning creators of the musical “Next to Normal.” For a full calendar of events,

visit durhammag.com.

Twenty-one of North Carolina’s finest breweries come together with nationally known musicians and on-site food trucks to offer one big night of fun and fundraising for local charities like the Exchange Family Center. This year’s music lineup includes Cool John Ferguson, Handsome Al and The Lookers featuring Emma Davis and Lil’ Ed & The Blues Imperials.

DOUGHMAN Quadrathalon May 28

Hosted at the American Tobacco Campus in joint production with WUNC, each of these eight free concerts begin on Thursday evenings at 6 p.m. The lineup this season is full of allstars, including The Old Ceremony to kick off the series on May 12 and Frank Solivan & Dirty Kitchen on June 2. Grab a picnic-style dinner from nearby restaurants, and enjoy the tunes.

Durham Blues and Brews Festival May 21

Back Porch Music on the Lawn May 12 - Sept. 8

Inspired by Raleigh’s Krispy Kreme Challenge, this nonprofit-minded race pits teams of four against one another as they eat local meals and participate in bike rides, runs and aquatic activities. Costumes are encouraged.

PHOTO CREDITS (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT): IF/THEN, PHOTO BY JOAN MARCUS; DOUGHMAN, PHOTO BY KYLE FOX; BACK PORCH MUSIC ON THE LAWN, PHOTO COURTESY RED STAR MEDIA GROUP

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A Slice of History. A World of Possibilities. Brightleaf Square features a unique mix of restaurants and shops in a pair of historic tobacco warehouses in downtown Durham. Stroll through the courtyard. Shop. Eat. Drink. Come to Brightleaf for a perfect afternoon or evening.

BRIGHTLEAF SQUARE

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9 05 W e s t M ain S t. Dur ham

=' at the c o rne r of W est M ain and G regso n S ts. S to ps N o. 7 & 26 o n the Bull City C o nne cto r

W W W. H I S T O R I C B R I G H T L E A F. C O M

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7

Moog Musts

Moogfest (pronounced mogue-fest) debuts in Durham May 19-22. Prepare to be completely inspired to think about and investigate the future of creativity.

H

ailed as “a sci-fi dance party with a Ph.D. in STEM” by “The New York Times,” Moogfest 2016 will gather more than 250 technologists, musicians and artists to explore new technologies that are pushing the boundaries of creative expression. It will be an experience unlike any other. To prove it, we pulled together seven sensationally diverse, can’t-miss festival happenings.

1

Grimes

Friday, May 20, 8:50 p.m. Moogfest Main Stage outside of Motorco Music Hall

Moogfest celebrates and continues the legacy of Bob Moog, the engineer who invented the analog synthesizer among other creative tools – so, of course, music plays a huge role. Since her critically acclaimed third album, “Visions,” was released, the Canadian electronic musician and producer Claire Boucher (aka Grimes) has toured the world and become an international phenomenon. She’s headlined festivals, performed on late-night TV shows such as “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon” and “Later With Jools Holland,” 32

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and has graced the cover of countless music and fashion magazines. Her latest album, “Art Angels,” is a sprawling, arresting work that’s as uncompromising as it is inviting. Grimes’ performance at Moogfest will include a special AV show, backup dancers and plenty of Grimes’ fantasyinspired costumes and visuals.

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DJ Lance Rock and “Yo Gabba Gabba!” with Mark Mothersbaugh, Bootsy Collins, Malcolm Mooney, Van Partible, Kate Stone, Dorit Chrysler

Saturday, May 21, noon-5 p.m. – American Tobacco Campus Amphitheater

Moogfest celebrates young fans of electronic music and invites both adults and children to experiment with new sounds. The program is anchored by an entire day of free outdoor performances, co-curated by DJ Lance Rock of the award-winning children’s TV show “Yo Gabba Gabba!” Workshops, installations and an open electronic music jam session will explore synthesis, collaborative improvisation and hands-on audio collage. DJ Lance Rock is pleased to be presenting the first all-ages program for Moogfest. After the DJ sets from Lance and Nanny Cantaloupe, there will be a discussion with Nanny, as well as with music pioneers Bootsy Collins, Mark Mothersbaugh (of Devo fame) and original Can vocalist Malcolm Mooney. Joining them will be Van Partible, creator of the Cartoon Network show “Johnny Bravo.” „ M a y

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Join us at DPAC on Monday, June 6, for the top finalists’ performance and the announcement of the 2016 Triangle Rising Stars winners!

The 2015 TRS Finalists (right) 2015 winners: Alex Fernandez from Enloe High School played John Thomas in Miss Saigon and Faith Jones from C.E. Jordan High School played Dorothy in The Wiz.

TICKETS ON SALE NOW! 2015 Triangle Rising Stars Best Actress Faith Jones

The National High School Musical Theatre Awards is a national competition that celebrates outstanding student performances in high school musical productions across the United States. DPAC is proud to host our local competition, Triangle Rising Stars. Throughout the school year judges from DPAC, Theatre in the Park, PlayMakers Repertory Company, and WTVD ABC 11 attend high school musical theater productions across the region. Regional finalists are then selected to attend a weekend retreat with their peers, culminating with the Triangle Rising Stars awards show onstage at DPAC, this year on June 6. Awards in this regional competition include Best Actor and Actress, Best Ensemble, Best Musical, and more. The Triangle Rising Stars Best Actress and Best Actor receive $1,000 academic scholarships and are invited to represent the Triangle in an allexpense paid trip to the NHSMTA competition in New York City. There, they are immersed in a week of professional coaching from Broadway directors, actors, actresses, vocal coaches, and choreographers. The National Awards program takes place at Nederlander’s Minskoff Theatre, home theatre for Disney’s The Lion King. In total, 30 regional competitions send finalists to New York City representing the best high school musical theater students from 1,000 high schools nationwide.

Visit DPACnc.com/TRS for more information Special thanks to our community partners and judges for participating!

The 2015 TRS participants.


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RTP Convergence – Moogfest’s marquee art installation

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May 19-22, CCB Plaza

In partnership with Research Triangle Park, RTP Convergence will be an interactive installation in downtown’s CCB Plaza that invites people to work with each other and the environment to collaboratively create cityscapes made of light. It’s interactive art, and it promises to be fantastic. Developed by Floating Point Collective, a field of LED rods form a volumetric display. Each rod is equipped with a touch sensor. When touched by a participant, colored light grows from their fingers, creating a light structure that rises into the sky and spreads outward through the other rods. When people are not interacting with the sculpture directly, another layer of interaction is revealed. The light city is affected by real time light data, shifting colored particles and allowing colors to mix in organic ways. Oh, and this attraction, too, is free.

Afrofuturism Conversation: Can You Remember the Future?

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Saturday, May 21, 2-3 p.m., The Durham Armory

A broad discussion featuring Reggie Watts (pictured), Tyondai Braxton and others about Afrofuturism – an aesthetic that critiques both the present-day dilemmas of people of color and also reexamines historical events of the past – as a discipline and a practice, its current state and what insights it holds for what’s to come in arts, culture, politics and beyond.

5

Dr. Martine Rothblatt & “Transhumanism”
 Keynote: The Future of Creativity

Friday, May 20, 2-3:30 p.m. – The Carolina Theatre’s Fletcher Hall

Futurist philosophers set the tone for Moogfest’s mind-expanding series of daytime seminars and workshops. One of the highly anticipated speakers is Dr. Martine Rothblatt: author, entrepreneur, transhumanist and inventor of satellite radio. Rothblatt’s talk will explore the concept of “transhumanism” and include provocative ideas from her book, “Virtually Human: The Promise – and the Peril – of Digital Immortality.” As a preview, the book introduces Bina48, the world’s most sentient robot, commissioned by Martine Rothblatt and created by Hanson Robotics. Bina48 is a nascent Mindclone of Martine’s wife that can engage in conversation, answer questions and even have spontaneous thoughts that are derived from multimedia data in a Mindfile created by the real Bina.

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Transhumanism Conversation: The Future of Our Species

Friday, May 20, 10 a.m.-noon, The Carolina Theatre’s Cinema 1

Cyborg artist Neil Harbisson joins Pau Riba, BJ Murphy, Rich Lee and Daniel Lock to discuss how humans are taking an active part in their own biological evolution. By becoming technology, instead of using or wearing technology, humans are opening up the possibility of having additional organs and senses beyond the ones confined to our species.

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Workshop: Music in the Brain with Duke Institute for Brain Sciences

Saturday, May 21, noon-1 p.m. – 21C Museum Hotel, Gallery 6

Explore the effects of music on brain structure and function in this workshop, which will highlight the intersection between artistic and scientific perspectives on this fundamental and aesthetic form of human expression. DM

Want to Go?

Find out more about Moogfest on its website – moogfest.com. A festival pass costs $249 and offers access to the entire event – performances, conversations, workshops and installations. A VIP festival pass is $499.

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Stamped nails continue to be a design used by professionals throughout the year. Other graphic designs that are trending include: Swarovski crystals, glitter, negative space (as illustrated by nail No. 4) and ombre designs. CND Vinylux Spring 2016 Art Vandal Collection offers bright, vibrant colors such as Art Basil, Irreverent Rose and Digi-teal. … These colors are canvases for exquisite abstract patterns and designs.”

Glenda Turner, nail professional at Aura Salon & Boutique

 “I Saw … U Saw … We Saw … Warsaw” – OPI  “Lavishly Loved” (base) and “Salmon Run” – CND Vinylux “Silver Chrome” – CND Vinylux  “Art Basil” – CND Vinylux  “Mint Convertible” – CND Vinylux

PHOTO BY BRIANA BROUGH NAIL ART BY GLENDA TURNER 36

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Your Transformation Begins Here 1125 Highway 54 | Suite 502 | Durham, NC 27707 | 919.489.3333


b e a u t y

The product we can’t live without is the fabulous Plumping System by Kevin Murphy. Using the eyelash-lengthening industry as inspiration, Kevin Murphy brings a very successful line for woman that uses different natural ingredients adapted to the feminine hormones, so we can now grow hair very fast – an amazing discovery for women who have hair loss and also for our clients who are getting out of cancer treatments.”

[We also love] this Parlux 385 blow dryer; it gives amazing volume to those who need it and also incredible smoothness to those who have frizz! It has both ionic and ceramic systems, incredible airflow, it’s ozone-friendly and so light that you’ll never get tired. This is the best tool I’ve owned since my beginnings 34 years ago. It comes in all different fashion colors, and we always have a few in stock. Nobody is disappointed with this one!”

Essentials The

Lyn Gagnon

owner and master stylist at Atmosp’hair

We asked experts to share the beauty products and tools they swear by

I love using a Wet Brush on my clients’ hair. The soft, flexible bristles easily and painlessly detangle wet hair without snagging or breaking hair, which is more fragile in its wet state. The soft bristles can be used to massage your scalp as you brush, helping to promote circulation for a healthy scalp. These brushes work magic on every type of hair, but I love using them to brush conditioner through curly, dry or unruly hair. Great hair starts with a healthy foundation.”

Lucas Taylor 38

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stylist/owner of Spruce Hair

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I love to have bright eyes, and since I don’t drink coffee, this is only achieved with our 100% Pure Coffee Bean Eye Cream. Not only does it smell like a latte, it brightens and de-puffs under the eyes in seconds. The coffee bean stimulates the cells, which creates the brightening, and the added benefit of reship oil leaves my eyes looking smooth and youthful.”

April Manring

founder and head makeup artist of Be Pure Beauty M a y

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b e a u t y

A must-have product is the glo minerals luxe foundation. It’s super hydrating and leaves a dewy, natural finish to your skin. It’s mainly for skin types that need hydrating, and it’s perfect for mature skin as well.”

Nick Haynes

master stylist/makeup artist at 140 Salon and Blow Dry Bar

Hanz De Fuko Quicksand is a good, multi-faceted product. It includes diatomaceous earth in its ingredients, which gives hair a lightweight, beach-like texture. It can also be used as a dry shampoo to absorb excess oil.”

The glo minerals precision eye pencil is designed for supreme control when applying eye liner; it allows you to create a flawless winged look.”

Jill Batten

master stylist/bridal specialist at 140 Salon and Blow Dry Bar

Laura Martin stylist at Rock’s Bar and Hair Shop

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b e a u t y

Everyone needs to have a great moisturizer with SPF, like the Essential C Day Moisture with SPF 30. It only takes five minutes of being exposed to the sun for your body to start breaking down collagen and elastin, which is why an SPF is so important. Vitamin C is also very high in antioxidants, which helps to repair and prevent free radical damage (when environmental aggressors damage cells in the body and skin, which can lead to premature aging).”

Bamboo-fusion tools are specifically designed to be warmed and used during a massage session. The bamboo has a beautiful quality to it and allows the therapist to perform a deep, luxurious massage. For the client, they receive the benefits of deep tissue work without the discomfort and feel incredibly relaxed as well.”

lead esthetician at Massage Envy

Ivy Jo Staton

Amanda Taylor

licensed massage therapist and owner of Fuzion Massage Therapy

This has tourmaline in it, which acts as a natural barrier, but it gives the skin a really luminous quality. It’s got vitamins A, C and E in it. It infuses dry skin with radiance and moisture – all the tourmaline products do that, but I really love the Aveda tourmaline-charged hydrating cream, especially on mature skin but even on younger skin.”

Sherry C layton-Stanley

owner, head stylist and makeup artist at Wavelengths Salon

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b e a u t y

The Beauty Blender is a tool that gives an airbrush [look] to all liquid and cream makeups, making the finish flawless. [The Mirabella primer] is a product that’s applied prior to foundation and other makeup that smooths and corrects imperfections in texture and color of the skin. It has a cross-polymer that stands out in consistency above the rest – it will blur imperfections in the skin better than most!”

Lauren Taylor

designer and makeup artist at Posh The Salon

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WOMEN’S Issue

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4th Annual

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From

pharmaceuticals to photography to fitness and beyond, these 13 extraordinary women are changing the world around them – on both a local and global scale – for the better. Their stories inspire, and we’re lucky to call them our neighbors. Photography by

Briana Brough Stories by

Learn more about Kim Lan Grout, pictured here with daughters Kim-An and Lily, and her Redefining Disabled Project on page 60.

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Amanda MacLaren, Laura Zolman Kirk and Jessie Ammons

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THE YOGI

Jessamyn Stanley

from teaching live and online classes, to managing digital brand relationships and collaborations, to organizing international yoga workshops, to freelance writing and beyond – I am constantly on my toes and working on a million projects at once. There are a few aspects that stay the same in my day: I always find time for my home yoga practice, whether it’s starting my day with a 30-minute flow or ending it with a two-hour late night restorative International yoga teacher, writer and blogger practice. I try to carve out at least 10 to 30 minutes for daily meditation time. My [average day] is always characterized by an ample amount of time being ‘plugged in,’ answering email correspondence and engaging in social media. Yet, social media can be a very time-absorbing and Born in Greensboro, Jessamyn originally discovered yoga when isolating industry. I have to counter-balance the time I spend ‘plugged she was coerced as a teenager to attend hot yoga classes with her aunt. She rediscovered the practice six years ago, writing in’ with time being 100% unplugged – turning off my phone and about her “yogapades” for three years and professionally teaching computer and spending actual contact time with my friends and family. yoga for one. She lives in Duke Forest. When I’m home and have free time on my hands, I like to spend it with my friends doing the activities that Durhamites enjoy most: sunning on the banks of the Eno River, brunching in the backyard of Geer Street Garden, sipping If you’re looking for a new Bull City local to follow on coffee on the patio at Cocoa Cinnamon. … It Instagram – that is, if you don’t already follow her (she makes me so happy to live in a small town with has more than 167,000 followers these days) – consider big city idealism, and the pleasure of my life Jessamyn (@mynameisjessamyn). Not only are her is just absorbing all of the small moments that photos striking in the way she’s able to bend and shape make big happiness. her body into new forms using yoga techniques, but the My two life philosophies are tattooed on my messages paired with her images are meant to empower arms to ensure I never forget them – ‘esse quam – as is her popular blog “My Name is Jessamyn” videri,’ the N.C. state motto meaning ‘to be, (mynameisjessamyn.tumblr.com), where she discusses rather than to seem,’ always reminds me to be serious cultural issues alongside inside jokes and genuine and authentic no matter the cost. Also, playful anecdotes. Jessamyn’s approachable tone Helen Keller (one of my idols and birthday highlights her fervor for life and confidence in self, twin) said, ‘What I’m looking for is not out and her feed – filled with photos taken against the there, it is in me.’ I work in an industry that is backdrops of destinations like London and Dubai liable to be congested by narcissism and greed. – will leave you yearning to explore. She’ll make you … I constantly remind myself not to fall prey PHOTOGRAPHED ON CHURCH+MAIN ROOF laugh, meditate, wonder and read on. to those devils and to only look within myself for the answers to life’s most pressing questions. I didn’t find happiness in my professional Y WORK LIFE IS FRENETIC life until I stopped trying to have the career that my teachers and parents told me I should seek. I think the landscape for professional and constantly evolving, work is extremely different than it was even 10 to 20 years ago, which is highly motivational and entrepreneurship is king in a way that it really hasn’t been and inspirational for me as since the advent of The New Deal. It’s imperative for millennials to an entrepreneur. Because my acknowledge this shift in the world and build careers that exist outside business life encompasses the boxes constructed for us by a dying generation.” – LZK „ many different categories –

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Jessamyn’s Mantras • Learn the rules so you can break them. • Stand strong in the face of adversity. • Don’t listen when people tell you “no,” and find ways to circumvent boundaries that don’t serve you. • Take responsibility for the future of our society, and create accordingly. • Make art, make art, make art. Art exists in every possible field/genre, and it’s the only thing that remains when we’re gone. • See yourself as a vessel for change, and be the change you wish to see.

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THE HELPING HAND

Ellen Andrews Director, Durham Immigration & Refugee Program, Church World Service

The born-and-raised Durhamite graduated from UNC in 2009 with a degree in psychology, minoring in biology. Always thinking she would go into research, it was only after she spent time volunteering and interning at the Carol Woods Retirement Community that Ellen realized she was best suited to an active, dynamic, interpersonal work environment. She started her work with CWS – which had just opened its doors, too – straight out of college, initially as an employment specialist. After helping more than 100 refugees get jobs that first year, she took a post as a team leader, then a supervisor role overseeing program management responsibilities and moved into her current director position in 2014.

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T’S NORMAL TO STEP into the Church World Service Durham office and hear Somali, Arabic, Dari, Kinyarwanda, Tigrinya and Karen all coming from the waiting area at the same time. Day to day, there’s a revolving door of CWS’s diverse refugee clients, who utilize the organization’s community resources including English classes, employment classes, case management services and immigration legal services. Supervising several direct service staff, Ellen says she maintains an open-door M a y

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policy for questions. “Their jobs are highly unpredictable as well, and we do a lot of problem solving together,” she explains. “The variety of things that can happen is endless when you work across cultures and languages, and in partnership with a number of other community service providers.” (Look right for examples of these partners.) Ellen stays in touch with these providers as well as funders and CWS’s headquarters in New York City as part of her everyday tasks, but it’s the distinct transformation she witnesses within the people she and her colleagues serve that makes her work worthwhile. “When refugees arrive in the country they experience a wide variety of emotions – excitement, joy, fear – but every one experiences doubt, apprehension and uncertainty, and you can see it in their faces,” she says. “It happens all the time that I see someone in our office after they’ve been here for four or six months – their head is high and their eyes are bright – and I think, ‘Wow, they look like a totally different person!’ Refugee resettlement affords the world’s most vulnerable people the opportunity to take back control over their lives and reclaim their dignity.” In recent months, refugee resettlement has become the subject of political discord, particularly the resettlement of Syrians across the country. While that number is still very small, Ellen explains, there is suddenly a tremendous amount of focus on the issue. Still, the anticipation is that the number of Syrians being resettled nationally and locally will continue to increase. “ … In the most basic terms, we are in the midst of a global refugee crisis where there are more displaced people than any point in history since World War II,” Ellen says. “It’s become obvious that repatriating all of those displaced folks home is not a feasible solution at the moment, and the neighboring countries to which they’ve fled are completely overburdened and beyond their capacity to continue to help. “As a nation and a community, we must step up to do our part by welcoming refugees to rebuild their lives here in America – in some ways, it’s really that simple.” – AM „ M a y

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Better Together CWS RDU works closely with the health department, department of social services and public schools across Durham, Orange and Wake counties. In Durham, they also partner with Habitat for Humanity, the Durham Bike Co-op, The Scrap Exchange and Urban Ministries of Durham to offer community service opportunities to newly arrived refugees so they can develop job skills, cultural savvy and get oriented to the community. A number of different student organizations at Duke and UNC also work with new refugees. Lincoln Community Health Center has also expanded in the last year to be able to see most of the refugees who arrive to Durham County for primary care. “These are just a few,” Ellen emphasizes.

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THE BUILDER

Shelley McPhatter

President, BridgePoint General Contracting, BridgePoint Construction Services & BridgePoint Civil 48

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Shelley has worked to build Durham up for almost 13 years – literally. With a career in commercial construction that spans 20 years in the Triangle area, her favorite work was always in Durham, which is why she founded Bull City-based BridgePoint Construction Services in 2007; it has since expanded to include BridgePoint General Contracting and BridgePoint Civil. She lives with her fiancé, David White, 11-year-old son Andrew, and 14-year-old twin daughters, Morgan and Sydney.

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like a nightclub, had a DJ, had catering, and Danny Rowse, [a bartender] from Bar Virgile, poured specialty drinks. It was a true Durham-style event! Do you have any guiding principles? I was fortunate to work with some really great senior project managers early in my career. I always paid attention to what worked and didn’t work in their management styles and

tried to learn from both. Now, I have a staff of 10 people with General Contracting and Construction Services, and another six people with BridgePoint Civil. They’re a great team, and I couldn’t do it without them. When you run a small business, the people you work with are like your second family; keeping my people busy and our clients happy is what keeps me going. That excitement, that sense of “feeding the machine,” gets me out of bed. – JA „

N A MALE-DOMINATED industry, Shelley stands out. Her BridgePoint Construction Services company runs the gamut of building offerings, from new construction to renovations. The LEEDcertification guru often acts as an adviser as much as a project manager. Her team’s repertoire includes American Underground and Bronto Software. Here, a quick chat with the design-minded industrialist: How did you get into construction? I have an ocean engineering degree from Florida Institute of Technology, but watching buildings under construction always interested me. I moved [to the Triangle] in 1996 ... and fell into the construction industry. I’ve been in commercial construction my entire career. I spend my days bringing in new work, making sure our clients are happy, visiting project sites, working with property owners and developers and architects – it’s the perfect fit for me. You’ve helped build some incredible Durham locales. What’s your favorite? That’s difficult; there are so many. I think my office: I have large windows overlooking Peabody Street. I see all of the activity around Lilly’s Pizza, Parker & Otis and Morgan Imports. The energy outside helps to keep me going inside. I like my office so much that I hosted a pop-up party for a friend’s 40th birthday. We set the scene M a y

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Magpie Boutique • 601 West Main St • Suite D • Durham www.magpienc.com @magpiedurham #shopmagpiedurham

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Born in St. Louis to an entrepreneur father and visually gifted mother, the art history major spent her early career in New York City discovering just what form of art she’d like to pursue. Finally landing on interior design, Heather started her own business and moved to Durham 14 years ago. She now lives in a Liggett & Myers’ Bullington Warehouse loft with her kids, Walker, 14, and Blaire, 12, who attend Durham School of the Arts and Montessori Community School, respectively.

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EATHER HAS BEEN AN artistic person all her life; after earning a degree in art history from Wheaton College, she moved to the Big Apple and tried her hand at many art-related trades, from art administration to writing about art. “None of it was right,” Heather says. “I felt a certain failure for a while.” Eventually, she found her niche with interior design. Heather surrounded herself with volumes of design books, binge watched TLC’s “Trading Spaces,” wrote to designer after designer to intern, and finally landed a gig with architect Robert Couturier, who agreed to let Heather file and copy for his staff. “I hardly remember speaking while I had that job,” Heather says. “I was so terrified.” But during that time she was also able to attend Parsons School of Design. Slowly but surely, her design career gained traction and finally found its sweet spot when Heather moved to Durham. During the onset of the move, Heather bought the domain for Heather Garrett Interior Design and started networking with the only person she knew thus far in the area: her realtor. It was after designing a Forest Hills show PHOTOGRAPHED AT HER BULLINGTON WAREHOUSE LOFT WITH SON, WALKER house for the Junior League of Durham and Orange Counties that her business really hit its stride. Heather attributes her success to Durham’s host of transplants who find themselves attracted to her sophisticated, modern THE CREATOR Southern aesthetic. “I was something different,” Heather says. Today, Heather cherishes her Durham life, residing in a warehouse loft with her children. She finds camaraderie with the many other Durham women – such as Po-Ming Wong of Magpie Boutique, Jennings Brody of Parker & Otis and Dr. Lindy McHutchison of Carolina Vein Center – who have used their savvy to grow businesses in market shifts and amid an energetic community. “We love what we do,” Heather says on behalf of the group, “and do Founder, Heather Garrett Interior Design what we love!” – LZK „

Heather Garrett

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THE MUSICIAN

Kamara Thomas Singer, songwriter

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Kamara grew up in Chicago, went to school in Virginia and had a stint in LA before heading to New York City to pursue songwriting. There, she launched a music career, singing and playing both independently and with groups, including rock band Earl Greyhound. Her first solo EP, “Earth Hero,” debuted in 2013, which is also the year she and husband Gordon Hartin relocated to Durham. They have two daughters, 5-year-old Cherokee and 1-year-old Isis.

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ITH INFLUENCES LIKE Neil Young, Emmylou Harris and Appalachian spirituals, it’s no wonder the relocated Brooklynite feels right at home down South. We talked to the musician about the power of community and life with two young kids. N AT U R A L G R A C E S “We live up near the Eno at the northern Durham County border,” Kamara says. “We love it. It’s very peaceful, which is what we needed after moving down from New York City.” It’s also where she draws inspiration. “Nature is my place of worship. I love the Eno River; she is a very welcoming and grace-inducing presence in my life.” I T TA K E S A V I L L A G E As a singer/songwriter/sometimes playwright, Kamara has found her place here. “I love how the Durham arts and performance scenes are so integrated,” she says. “I’ve met more people from different artistic fields here in Durham than I ever did in New York City.” A favorite haunt is SPECTRE Arts gallery in Golden Belt, curated by Kamara’s friend Alicia Lange. “She makes the line between art and community seamless and fosters such a creative, celebratory environment that the whole family can enjoy. I always meet someone infinitely interesting at SPECTRE.” GOLDEN HOURS Kamara’s music is introspective and hypnotically layered. How does she find creative space while mothering two active young daughters? By seizing the wee hours. “On days where I have the willpower, I get up at 3:30 a.m. to practice Kundalini yoga and work on my writing,” she says. “After the girls are in bed, my husband and I try to work on music. He’s a pedal steel player.” Of course, they’re only human: Sometimes the nighttime sessions simply turn into “trying to have an adult conversation – unless we fall asleep first.” – JA „ M a y

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PHOTO BY JEREMY COWART

The Sapphire Group at Morgan Stanley

THE SINGER

Elizabeth South

Preschool music and lower school drama teacher, Durham Academy

Cindy Corbett, CFP®

Senior Vice President Portfolio Management Director Financial Advisor

Ashley Paonessa Financial Advisor

Ashley.A.Paonessa@morganstanley.com

Stephanie Staggers Curtis Portfolio Associate

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3511 Shannon Road, Suite 300, Durham, NC 27707 toll free 855 211 1224 www.morganstanleyfa.com/thesapphiregroup ©2016 Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Member SIPC. CRC1456969 4/16. Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards Inc. owns the certification marks CFP®, CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™, and federally registered in the US which it awards to individuals who successfully complete CFP Board’s initial and ongoing certification requirements.

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Originally from Greenville, Elizabeth attended the N.C. School of the Arts and Tisch School of the Arts at New York University. She has two undergraduate degrees in theater and music therapy, and also has a Master of Arts in Teaching degree in music education. Elizabeth settled in Durham 14 years ago. She attends both The Church of the Good Shepherd and The Summit Church and names Sarah P. Duke Gardens, Spartacus Restaurant and Kanki Japanese House of Steaks & Sushi as some of her favorite spots around town. Tight-knit with her parents and brother, Elizabeth is thankful they all now call the Bull City home.

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N ADDITION TO TEACHING AT DURHAM Academy, Elizabeth is an Internet sensation. Just search her name on YouTube – one of her Disney princess song medleys has nearly 14 million views. Her covers of these well-known tracks are engaging, partly due to her dreamy pipes, but also thanks to her spot-on costuming – all designed and created by Elizabeth herself. And her star is only rising: She’s produced six albums, all available on elizabethsouth. com. Among the highlights of her singing career include recording a track she wrote, “I Love You,” with Vince Gill and winning first place for her cover of the song “Let it Go” in an online contest for “On Air with Ryan Seacrest.” She’s also rocked out locally as a member of Durham Academy’s “The Substitutes,” which participated in Triangle Corporate Battle of the Bands to benefit the nonprofit Book Harvest last year. “Never give up on the things in life you want to do and know you can do well,” Elizabeth advises. “Surround yourself with great people that you can learn from and who can help you. Don’t let anyone tell you that you can’t do something.” – LZK M a y

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THE EXECUTIVE

Laura Helms Reece

Chief Executive Officer, Rho

Mother to daughters Elle, 7, and Gwyn, 4, and wife to city council member Charlie Reece, Laura wears many hats in her day-to-day. She and her brother, Russ Helms, are the CEOs of biotech research organization Rho. She was born and educated in Chapel Hill, having achieved her master’s and DrPH at UNC, and worked at Glaxo Inc. and AstraZeneca before settling at Rho in 2002. Close to nine years ago, Laura and Charlie decided to move from Carrboro to Durham, specifically the historic Hope Valley neighborhood, to put down roots.

What gets you out of bed in the morning? Usually, what gets me out of bed is my daughter, Elle, announcing that it’s time to start the day. I’m not sure how I gave birth to an early bird. My day is a crazy mix of focusing on family and focusing on business. I absolutely love both, and I’m truly grateful to have the opportunity to balance the two. One of the blessings of my job is that I get to be part of the team that crafts a business where men and women can balance the joys of our personal lives with the joys of our work. Additionally, the work we do heals the world. That’s pretty awesome, even on a stressful day. What’s the best advice you’ve ever received? My grandmother, Klovia Wagner, repeatedly told me “much is required from those to whom much is given.” She, along with my parents [Ron and Mary Helms, who started Rho in 1984], instilled in me the belief that I have been truly blessed and have a responsibility to make the world a better place. I am raising my children with that same belief. M a y

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Tell us about your Durham life. One of my favorite things to do is take my girls and try out different playgrounds around the city. Each girl has her favorite (Elle’s is Forest Hills Park and Gwyn’s is Piney Wood Park), but we also love to be explorers. I [enjoy] savoring a latte at Bull Street Gourmet & Market while Gwyn takes dance at Barriskill. This fall, my family got to experience a number of new-to-us neighborhoods around Durham while knocking on doors for Charlie’s campaign. Durham is full of wonderful spots! Charlie and I moved to Durham when I was pregnant with our first daughter. We’d been married less than a year. Our marriage and our family have blossomed in Durham. We selected Durham as the right city in which to grow our business and raise our children. This is where we made our commitment as a family to be involved in the civic life of our city through public service. I want Elle and Gwyn to grow up in a Durham that is diverse and vibrant with great sports, great art and great places to experience the outdoors. We choose Durham for all that – and for the amazing food! – LZK „ d u r h a m m a g . c o m

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THE COMMUNITY STEWARD

MaryAnn E. Black

Associate Vice President, Duke University Health System

During her more than 45 years in Durham, MaryAnn spent 10 in the psychology department at Duke University as a clinical social worker, 20 in private practice and 12 as a Durham County Commissioner. She’s now back at Duke as the associate VP of its health system, where she has been since 2002. A mother to two sons – James Christopher Black (deceased) and Jonathan Cedric Black – and grandmother to Jordan Christopher Black, she lives in south Durham.

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Y WORK AT DUKE brings me joy,” says MaryAnn, who is proud to help head up the largest employer in Durham, Duke University Health System. “Along with our great health care system, we also partner with many government and local nonprofits to provide financial support for their work in the community. I help to manage this process.” In addition to her work at Duke, MaryAnn connects to the community through her Ladies Literary Tea Book Club, her place of worship, the Covenant Presbyterian Church, and in her support of the arts: She has been a ticket holder at the Durham Performing Arts Center since it opened in 2008. 56

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“It brings me joy and peace when I watch the shows and meet other people who come to Durham for an evening of entertainment,” MaryAnn says. “It gives me an opportunity to brag about the city.” One of the most memorable moments of her career came in the early 1990s when she was able to unify the Durham County Commissioners and Durham community over the way school board members were elected in the newly created school system. “After months of conflict and discussions,” MaryAnn says, “I was able to guide the board to a vote that unified it with the community and bridged racially related issues.” “Durham is a wonderful place to live,” she says in reflection. “It is my hope that, as Durham grows and many of us prosper, we will include opportunities for others to advance by giving a helping hand.” – LZK „ M a y

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THE TASTE MAKER

Sarah Parker

President & ‘Resident Solutionist,’ Durham Catering Co.

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Sarah was born in Andrews, Texas, but spent most of her life in Los Angeles and Sacramento. She moved to Durham 10 years ago and has been working for Durham Catering Co. for two. She lives in historic Hope Valley with daughters Haley, 13, and Hannah, 11, who both attend Duke School, and Lexie, 3, who attends Lakewood Avenue Children’s School.

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O SQUEEZE IN a workout, a cup or two of strong Bean Traders coffee and a moment alone with the newspaper, Sarah begins her day at 5 a.m. After she completes her morning routine and gets daughters Haley, Hannah and Lexie to school, she’s off to Durham Catering Co., which longtime friend and employer Tom Ferguson sold to her earlier this year. “Knowing [my team is] waiting for me is the biggest motivator I can imagine,” Sarah says. “I don’t feel like [the work we do] is work at all, but rather a passion project for our staff.” “No two clients, events or visions are alike, and rightfully so,” Sarah says of her constantly evolving tasks. “It’s invigorating to know I’m able to approach a new set of challenges each and every day.” Before moving to Durham, Sarah started her career in sales at California-based Fortune 100 company, Vision Service Plan. Accountability, reputation, work ethic and authenticity are among the takeaways Sarah learned during that time; she held fast to those values after moving to North Carolina to manage media relations for friends Jim and Teresa Anile’s downtown restaurant, Revolution. “That introduction to [Durham’s] local food scene helped prime me to truly respect the difference an independently owned business can make in a burgeoning community,” Sarah says. To that point, Sarah does her best to support other locally owned businesses, M a y

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frequenting spots like Nana’s bar for a deliciously curated cocktail with her close-knit group of fellow female leaders (which includes Scratch Bakery chef/owner Phoebe Lawless, Grace Beason of Grace Leisure Events, Mynt Boutique owner Whitney Brown Sandor and Rachael Price of Tre Bella, among others). She also proudly supports the Durham Living Wage Project, providing a sustainable living wage and unlimited vacation days for her crew members. “They work when they feel it’s necessary

and take their own time off when they feel it’s necessary, too,” Sarah says. “I’m focused on producing great results, not counting the hours for staff and micro-managing. I trust my team’s judgment, tenacity, work ethic and awareness.” Her company culture, Sarah says, is one of mutual love and respect. “The love I feel for our local economy, both on a macro Durham scale and a micro Durham Catering scale, cannot be overstated.” – LZK „

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THE PERCEPTION CHANGER

Kim Lan Grout

Founder, The Redefining Disabled Project

Born in Fresno, Calif., the writer, editor and educator owned an academic tutoring academy in San Francisco for years – “I like standardized tests as much as the next person, but I have a knack for making those subjects and tests feel fun and engaging” – before she and her family moved to Durham last April. She started The Redefining Disabled Project, a photo and short narrative series featuring people with various disabilities, two years ago as a way to tell the true, raw stories of real people with disabilities and expose what their daily lives are really like. Kim and her husband, Sean, and daughters Kim-An, 4, and Lily, 3, live in the Waterford neighborhood.

“I

LOST MY LEG ABOVE THE KNEE WHEN I was 18 years old after years of struggle with a congenital vascular syndrome. After the amputation, I was so eager to start walking again that I scheduled an appointment with a prosthetist mere days after the procedure. He noticed my drive, and offered me encouragement and warning in a few short sentences. He said, ‘You can do this. But some days are going to hurt. Some days are going to be harder than hard. And one day you’ll want to throw this prosthesis out the window. You just have to remember that you’re the one who has to hop outside to go get it.’ The message there was to not give up. He made clear that this part of my journey – healing, coping, learning to walk again and then existing in a society that isn’t always friendly or accommodating to people with disabilities – was going to be difficult, and that when I was knocked down with frustration or defeat, I was the only one who could really pick myself back up again. He didn’t mince words, and because of that, I was and am prepared for the hard days. And at times when I feel like I’ve failed,

I know that whenever I’m ready to try again, my success relies on me and me alone to achieve it. With my storytelling tendencies and my love for teaching, starting The Redefining Disabled Project was obvious. As a disabled woman, I am always frustrated when the media portrays people with disabilities as either charity cases or superhuman heroes, reputations that really don’t help anybody understand disabilities and the people who have them. So here I am, breaking it down old school for anybody interested in photos and rad stories of beautiful people. I think about the courage and candidness that my models have shown me and feel moved to do them and their stories justice. I’m constantly thinking about the truths that each of them exist in, the struggle and the beauty in that, and itch to write of their experiences, to share it with others for whom I know those stories will resonate. All – all – of the Redefining Disabled models want so desperately to be heard but feel like they haven’t had the platform to do that or the forum that’s safe enough to spill their deepest, sometimes darkest thoughts without judgment; I’m not a judge. I’m a lover and respecter of all people of all abilities.” – AM „

To all the women out there: Know that you are loved, you are powerful and you are able. Keep thinking that and use your powers for good, and nothing can stop you. Nothing will dare stop you. When you doubt yourself or feel someone doubt you, just repeat, lather and rinse; repeat, lather and rinse: You are loved, you are powerful and you are able.” M a y

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“I THE EDUCATOR

Dacia Jones

K- 5 District Science Specialist and STEM Educator, Durham Public Schools

With 20 years of teaching under her belt, Dacia holds degrees in elementary education, science and music, her “true passions.” She regularly presents at the National Council of Teaching Mathematics conferences in addition to the National Science TeachersAssociation and International Society for Technology in Education, among others. She and her husband, Steve, are parents to daughters Katie, a social work major at Western Carolina University, and Mollie Jones McGuire, a social worker with Child Protective Services who is entering law school at UNC, and recently welcomed their new grandson, Oliver Grey McGuire.

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AM A DISCOVERY EDUCATION GURU and program champion. My job involves teaching staff and students how to implement science, technology, engineering and mathematics into everyday instruction. I get to wear a lab coat, lead labs for 500-plus students a day and blow things up. I am a huge fan of virtual field trips and Skype/ Google Hangout opportunities. My mother, who taught in the classroom for 30 years and passed away 20 years ago, told me this: ‘Dacia, relationships are the most important part of any job you will ever have. Whether it is as a wife, a mom, a friend or a Beyond the teacher. If you develop Classroom that first, everything else “[Dacia] does amazing things will fall in place.’ She was for our kids. She was recently absolutely right. I miss her named a Discovery Education Program Champion for the so much to this day, but 2015-16 school year. [In January], I carry her with me into she moderated a virtual field trip every classroom … and all for approximately 100 Durham aspects of my life. Public School elementary My favorite moment in classrooms, plus other schools Durham Public Schools across the country, with NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. She was actually dissecting is truly an exceptional educator!” frogs with fifth-graders. – Janet DelPinal, marketing/ One of the students had communications specialist at some behavior challenges, Durham Public Schools so the teachers were not sure that he would make it through the entire dissection. But he did. He was fascinated by the way the body systems were connected and how they mimicked his own. At the end of the lab, he asked me this question: ‘Dr. Drizzle,’ – that’s what the teachers and students call me – ‘do you think if I try to stay in school and quit messing around that I could go to college?’ I told them that I absolutely knew that he could. He said, ‘Then I want to be a doctor. I want to find a way to make my Poppa stop shaking all the time.’ I believe that what we do today, as educators, will impact what our students will do in 20 years – we should inspire students by introducing them to what they can do when they finish school. We cannot let these moments pass us by. My desire is to empower educators with the ability to engage students and make a difference each and every day. It’s a lofty goal, but it is my superpower!” – AM M a y

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THE FASHION FORCE

Po-Ming Wong

Owner and Personal Stylist, Magpie Boutique

With a background in economics, Po-Ming worked in finance as the director of treasury operations at Duke University prior to opening Magpie Boutique in 2009. “I took a leap of faith leaving the field of finance to explore a vocation that represented a personal passion, not just my qualifications,” she says. “It feels great being independent, seeing the confidence that comes from clients after personal styling and reaching the six-year mark [in my business].” She lives in West Village.

Tell us about your work life. My day starts with a two-hour workout. I love feeling physically and mentally energized in the morning! Depending on time constraints, I’ll generally stop by Loaf and pick up a pastry and coffee. (It’s my secret indulgence!) Then I head to Magpie or to the home of a personal styling client. At Magpie, the days are always full of variety! I never know who’s going to walk in … or what their styling wishes are. I help with wardrobe needs that range from a dress for a wedding, an interview outfit or what to wear on the weekends. They leave feeling their best, and I’m left feeling so lucky to have such a fulfilling job. When I’m not helping my customers, I’m looking at line sheets and look books, curating one-of-a-kind jewelry and unique clothing for Magpie. When I’m at a client’s house, I’ll either edit their closet or help them make decisions about their clothing based on personality, lifestyle and budget. When my day is over, I’m either headed to a hot yoga class or having a glass of wine. Sometimes, it’s both! What do you do for fun? I’m a huge foodie, and I love spending time with my friends. If there’s a new restaurant in town, typically a friend and I will be there within the first week. Our latest was M Sushi, and I can’t wait to try NanaSteak. I cherish all my friendships and, as I’ve gotten older, I’ve come to realize the most beautiful gift you can give and receive is true availability in friendship. I have an amazing core group of friends. It doesn’t matter what we are doing, we are always having fun, laughing and supporting one another. M a y

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What’s one philosophy you live by? I live by a few philosophies in life: Stay curious and be courageous. Life is remarkable; you never know what can happen, but it will happen when you are ready for it. And of course, my favorite one is look your best, feel your best! It really works! – AM „

Fashionably Philanthropic “Through Magpie, I’m able to really give back to Durham charities and beyond. We have done a fundraising event for Beauty Bus Foundation, a wonderful charity whose mission is to bring dignity and hope to the chronically or terminally ill through grooming services and pampering products. We were proud to support the production of ‘Olympic Pride, American Prejudice,’ a groundbreaking story of 18 African-American Olympians at the 1936 Berlin Summer Games, with a fundraising event. (Everyone can still help support this amazing project through the Southern Documentary Fund!) Last but not least, we have seasonal Denim Donation Parties that benefit one of Durham’s most deserving causes, Pennies For Change.”

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THE ARTS ADVOCATE

Amy Unell

Arts Entrepreneurship, Office of the Vice Provost for the Arts, Duke University; Founder/Producer/Director, StoryTales Productions A native of Kansas City, Mo., this Duke University alumna returned to her alma mater to work with the Office of the Vice Provost for the Arts as well as Duke’s Career Center, Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative, Alumni Affairs and to teach in Policy Journalism and Media Studies. Formerly a LA-based producer for NBC’s “TODAY Show,” she has covered a broad range of subjects – from shark attacks in Hawaii, to the Academy Awards and the Summer Olympics in Athens, Greece, to Sarah Palin’s nomination for vice president in Alaska.

“T Press Play Students in Amy’s “Advanced Media & Innovation” fall seminar produced short documentaries on several Trianglebased entrepreneurs – visit bit.ly/ AdvancedMediaPlaylist to watch the videos.

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TALK IS CHEAP; ACTIONS SPEAK louder” – those were the words from Duke’s former track and field head coach and Olympic coach Al Buehler that struck a chord with Amy in her first semester at the university as she sat in his “History and Issues of Sports” seminar. (Just last year, Coach Buehler retired after 60 years, the longest tenure of a professor at Duke.) Following a seven-year stint as a producer for NBC’s “TODAY Show,” Amy was invited back to Duke in 2010 to participate in the Duke Media Fellows program; her project morphed into a documentary featuring her former instructor – “Starting at the Finish Line: The Coach Buehler Story” – focused on civil rights, women’s rights and international relations as seen through the lens of track and field with Coach Buehler and his best friend, former U.S. Olympic Committee President LeRoy T. Walker of N.C. Central University. She went M a y

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on to start StoryTales Productions, and also produced “Duke 91 & 92: Back to Back,” along with filmmaker Madeleine Sackler and NBA All-Stars Grant Hill and Christian Laettner, which airs every March Madness season on Turner Sports. She’s spent the past three years at Duke, wearing many different hats, but always developing options for artistic expression, partnership and engagement. “Creativity, collaboration, positivity and guacamole are my fuel,” Amy says. “Every day is an adventure in engaging students across the university, alumni, faculty, the Triangle and beyond in experiential opportunities in the arts.” In order to build community around creativity at Duke and beyond, Amy fronts the Artstigators movement, established about a year ago. “There’s an endless amount of artstigatin’ collaborations and happenings in Durham including Third Friday, pictureDURM, Art of Cool Festival, Paint Durham, Full Frame, Runaway, Duke Performances, Moogfest’s disco brunches, ‘artstigator gator cookies’ at Mad Hatter’s and ‘heartstigator Cortes chai’ at Cocoa Cinnamon,” Amy says. “It’s been fun to see the #artstigators hashtag catch on across the globe from Durham to Caracas, Venezuela!” While the fruits of her efforts have had a worldly effect, her dedication to the arts also profoundly resonates much closer to home. “Amy has played a large role in encouraging students, including myself, to pursue their artistic passions at Duke and outside in the real world,” says Duke senior Abhi Shah, a former student in Amy’s “Advanced Media & Innovation” seminar who is now working with Jeff Polish of The Monti and is in production on two short documentaries of his own. “Amy helped bolster and create events like the Duke Entertainment, Media and the Arts Network, ArtCon and Mediaville that connect students to alumni and pros in the arts and media industry. These events didn’t previously exist at Duke, and now students like me can benefit from them! “Amy is a big reason why the arts and media scene at Duke has developed vibrancy over my time [here] and why [it] will continue to grow stronger.” – AM DM M a y

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Sydney, Geoff, Loren and Alex Lamb.

When their planned renovation project didn’t pan out, the Lamb family incorporated old soul into a new build BY JESSIE AMMONS

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIANA BROUGH

hey call it both their house of hope and a labor of love.

When the Lambs bought a ’40s-era Hope Valley home, they planned to restore it to its former glory. Instead, they live in a stunning new construction. “We wouldn’t change a thing,” Loren says. For her, husband Geoff, and their daughters, Alex, 17, and Sydney, 15, it was a journey home. „

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ABOVE The dining room table and light fixture have moved with the Lambs many times. Loren likes to mix modern and traditional for a layered look. LEFT The light fixture in the master bedroom is from one of Loren’s favorite antique shops in Shaker Heights, Ohio. The headboard and bedskirt were custom made with Schumacher fabric.

DREAM HOUSE Loren is an interior designer with residential clients across the country, known for creating chic spaces with texture and character. “I love to restore and remodel old homes,” she explains. She knows how to add a bright white Mongolian sheepskin or modern Lucite table to a room built decades ago. For their part, the Lambs have typically lived in older homes, too. The couple met at UNC but had been living in Ohio in a home that was built in 1927 before moving to Hope Valley. “This [Durham] lot had a white lacquer board house that was built in the 1940s,” Loren says. “There aren’t many homes in this area from that time,” and they were excited to renovate and restore it. And then came the hiccups. Their next-door neighbors were also renovating, and working with the existing house would mean uncomfortably close 70

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“This is my favorite room,” Loren says of the porch, which overlooks the golf course. “We have a wood-burning fireplace out here. It’s great to sit and have coffee or a glass of wine.” Or beer!

structures along the property line. It was one thing after another, and it became evident that building a new house would be the easier and more economical solution. Despite Loren’s extensive background, “I was a total newbie,” she says. “I’ve been in the business 20 years and had never built a home. We’d always remodeled.” She and Geoff, a former attorney-turned-brewer who co-founded Big Boss Brewing Company, took the decision to build seriously. They traveled around, considering homes and gathering inspiration. While visiting friends in Atlanta, they drove past a home that left them both swooning – it turned out, their friends knew the homeowners. “It was meant to be,” Geoff says. Their friends called the homeowners for the inside scoop. “They were so lovely,” Loren says. “They told us what kind of stone they had on the house, the grout color, the exterior colors. They took all the guesswork out of 72

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Since we bought this house, I’ve had [cancer] recurrences two times. I didn’t know if I would actually see it finished.�

building.� The Lambs even hired a Georgia architect who was familiar with the inspiration house to build their Durham rendition. C U R AT I N G C H A R A C T E R Two years later, the construction was complete. It was an admittedly extensive and arduous process, and not just because of permits and approvals. Twelve years ago, Loren was diagnosed with breast cancer. “It was obviously difficult,� Loren says. It’s why the family returned to Geoff’s home state, to be closer to family during treatment. “Since we bought this house, I’ve had recurrences two times,� Loren says. “I didn’t know if I would see it actually finished.� Thankfully, she’s relishing in her dream home, complete with her favorite elements of older styles and the amenities allowed by custom building. Take, for instance, the antique brass door hardware. “The builder was like, ‘You’re putting brass in your house?’� Loren remembers. “‘Everyone takes that out.’ Well, back in the ’20s, they only had chrome and brass; that’s what you’d have in an old house. So that’s what I wanted.� The result is special and will continue to develop: “To me, the door hardware looks like jewelry. And because it has a live finish, it will change over time.� The same goes for their character grade walnut floors, which have all the pits and imperfections of the original wood. But then there are upholstered chairs in light, simple and modern fabrics and decidedly trendy art and accents. “The house is a curated mix of old and new things, and natural elements,� Loren says. It’s how she M a y

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LIKE A PRO

Visit the official Loren Lamb Interiors booth at Patina on University Drive and find both well-chosen antique pieces and chic “finishing touches” for a space. “I err on the side of classic, timeless design,” Loren says of her style, although she likes to add a modern touch. One of her most practical and applicable tips is to combine – textures, patterns, materials, anything you can think of. “I think mixing different things is fun,” Loren says. Blending metals can be especially dramatic. “Try stainless and brass. I love brass.” The effect is a balance between old and new, which is how to build the layered but eternal aesthetics Loren is known for. “Mix up [modern] furniture with antiques,” she says. And be sure not to make your decorating too precious. Daughters Sydney and Alex laugh as they remember the days of having furniture as accessory only. “There were pieces to look at but not touch,” Sydney says. “There might be four or five chairs in the room, but you couldn’t sit on some of them.” Loren says she learned quickly that such an approach is impractical. “The older you get, the more you realize you have to be able to live in the house. I can’t say I’ve always had that mentality.” The good news is, when you’re decorating with antiques, you can trust the furniture is built to last. Learn more at Loren’s website: lorenlambinteriors.squarespace.com.

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ABOVE One of Loren’s signature design elements is adding cowhide rugs to a room. “I like the texture, and each one is unique,” she says. BELOW Laundry day doesn’t seem so bad when you have a room like this. The kids also use the space for crafts.

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The second-floor bonus room is the Lamb daughters’ go-to spot. Here, Sydney works on her homework at the vintage Eero Saarinen tulip table, while Alex and her cat, Bo, get comfortable on the Ikea sectional.

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There are a lot of cerebral people in this area – smart people who bring different things in.”

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approaches her clients’ spaces, too. “I try to create classic, timeless designs.” IN-HOUSE It was important to the Lambs to be sustainable as they put the soul of an old house into a new build. It started with the teardown of the original 1940s-era structure: “We had The Reuse Warehouse take it down … everything that could be reused, was,” Loren says. Then, they set about using as many local materials as possible, including exterior stone sourced from the mountains. Even the art is local. It really wasn’t a difficult task, Loren says. “There are a lot of cerebral people in this area – smart people who bring different things in.” Local, layered, modern-yet-charming: The house is expansive, cozy and effortless. And then there’s the downstairs basement. “Geoff did all of this himself,” Loren says, gesturing around at black polished concrete floors and a metal bar. Of course, a selection of Big Boss beers are on tap. “All of our beers are named after aircraft built during World War II,” explains Geoff of his “man cave” inspiration. “I was looking for strong and simple. The tap handles are machined aluminum. The bar is hollowed steel, the bar top is zinc, which is a little softer. The bar detail looks like aircraft ribbons.” He built it all himself, with assistance from the girls. “I helped with electronics,” Sydney adds enthusiastically. Together, they hooked up all of the televisions, speakers and other recreational wiring. “We had 1.8 miles of wire,” Geoff says. “It was a lot of wire. And that was just local tech stuff.” A lot of wire, a lot of time and a lot of influences. “Building our own house was the hardest thing I’ve ever done,” Loren says. “I can do it for a client … narrow down the options. But we had two years, and I was waffling until the day we moved in on what paint color I wanted.” And now she has her house of a lifetime. „ M a y

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SUM OF ITS PARTS The Lambs’ stunning home was a team effort. Here are their major vendors – most are nearby. • Antique brass door hardware by “a little foundry,” Longleaf Collection, in Aberdeen

ABOVE When you’re the co-founder of Big Boss Brewing Company, you need to have your own beers on tap at home! Geoff picked out the black polished concrete floors and the metal bar for the basement. BELOW The kitchen bench and table were custom made by Durhamite Steve Peters. He reuses materials from old barns. You may have spotted his work at Rue Cler.

• Tile and hardwood installed by Damon Frazee in Durham • Landscape architect Barbara Karski of Garden Environments in Durham • Countertops by Stone & Tile Creations in Raleigh • Fitch Lumber & Hardware in Carrboro helped source and supply: • Character grade walnut floors from Bill Campbell in Tennessee • The porch columns, which are pressure-treated Cox southern yellow pine from Orangeburg, S.C. • The southern yellow pine porch ceiling paneling from Ashton Lewis Lumber Co. in Gatesville • Exterior mahogany doors from Dallas Millwork in Hiram, Ga. • Copper and standing seam roofing from Walker Brown • Exterior stone (sourced from western N.C.) from the Stone Center of Carolina in Durham • Wilkinson Supply Co. in Carrboro • Lighting from Ferguson in Carrboro

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Proudly managed by

treyburn residential owners association

For more information

www.treyburnhomeowners.com www.treyburn.com www.treyburncc.com Treyburn is located in northern Durham, just 10 miles from Duke University and 5 miles from Durham Regional Hospital. From RTP or Raleigh take I-40 to Hwy 147 (Durham Freeway) and exit at Duke Street/501 North. Otherwise take I-85 to Duke Street, exit 176B. Follow US-501 N for 7.8 miles to Orange Factory Rd. Cross the bridge over Little River Reservoir. Turn right onto Treyburn Parkway.

Teamworks, Upfit. Durham, NC

R E D E F I N E

R E T I R E M E N T

Vibrant living. Continuing care. In the heart of Durham. 800-474-0258 / forestduke.org

Why rent when you can own for about the same price?

Our incredibly energy-efficient homes at Meadows at Southpoint start in the mid $200s and offer five unique floor plans ranging from 1,762 – 2,676 sq. ft. Make your dreams a reality with a beautiful new energy-efficient home for about the same monthly price as you pay in rent. Meadows at Southpoint | 1310 Catch Fly Lane, Durham, NC 27713

from start to finish and every step along the way. Trinity Partners Commercial Construction Services General Contracting Tenant Improvements Construction Management

Building Renovations and Repairs Historical Renovations Limited Base Building Construction & Sitework

3020 Carrington Mill Boulevard, Suite 425 Morrisville, NC 27560 trinity-partners.com

877-203-4644 meritagehomes.com/durhammag Pictures and other promotional materials are representative and may depict or contain floor plans, square footages, elevations, options, upgrades, extra design features, decorations, floor coverings, decorative light fixtures, custom paint and wall coverings, window treatments (such as shutters, drapes, etc.), landscaping, pool, spa, sound and alarm systems, furnishings, appliances, and other designer/decorator features and amenities that are not included as part of the home and/or may not be available in all communities. Prices, rates, terms, programs and availability subject to change or revocation without prior notice or obligation. Please see sales agent for complete details. ©2015 Meritage Homes Corporation. All rights reserved. F e b r u a r y / M a r c h

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HOMES • CONDOS • APARTMENTS

REAL ESTATE GALLERY h o w

t h e y

l i v e

Franklin Street Realty…Connected to the Community

Eric White

is connected to the community

Born and raised in Chapel Hill Founder of local children’s non-profit: SKJAJA Fund and Color the Hill organizer Volunteer basketball coach Local residential Realtor for 9 years

919-971-5119

BUYING, SELLING, RENTING OR PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

919.929.7174 • franklinstreetrealty.com • Chapel Hill

921 Morreene Road | Durham, NC 27705 | 919-383-4663

Gordon Baker

Realtor & Property Manager gordon@thegatetohome.com 919.603.8425 BORN IN OHIO, BUT LIVIN’ & LOVIN’ ORANGE COUNTY SINCE 2001

Specializing in Sales and Rentals in Durham and Orange Counties 120 South Churton St., Hillsborough • 919.732.5858

www.thegatetohome.com

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If you are looking for your dream home, considering selling your current residence or even if you just have a real estate related question, please contact us. It would be our pleasure to serve you. We make great neighbors®.

W W W. B H H S Y S U. C O M


TOP E N D O D O N T I C S G E N E R A L D E N T I ST R Y O R A L A N D M A X I L LO FAC I A L S U R G E R Y O R T H O D O N T I C S P E D I AT R I C D E N T I ST R Y P R O ST H O D O N T I C S E N D O D O N T I C S G E N E R A L D E N T I ST R Y O R A L A N D M A X I L LO FAC I A L S U R G E R Y O R T H O D O N T I C S P E D I AT R I C D E N T I ST R Y P R O ST H O D O N T I C S E N D O D O N T I C S G E N E R A L D E N T I ST R Y O R A L A N D M A X I L LO FAC I A L S U R G E R Y O R T H O D O N T I C S P E D I AT R I C D E N T I ST R Y P R O ST H O D O N T I C S E N D O D O N T I C S G E N E R A L D E N T I ST R Y O R A L A N D M A X I L LO FAC I A L S U R G E R Y O R T H O D O N T I C S P E D I AT R I C D E N T I ST R Y P R O ST H O D O N T I C S E N D O D O N T I C S G E N E R A L D E N T I ST R Y O R A L A N D M A X I L LO FAC I A L S U R G E R Y O R T H O D O N T I C S P E D I AT R I C D E N T I ST R Y P R O ST H O D O N T I C S E N D O D O N T I C S G E N E R A L D E N T I ST R Y O R A L A N D M A X I L LO FAC I A L S U R G E R Y O R T H O D O N T I C S P E D I AT R I C D E N T I ST R Y P R O ST H O D O N T I C S E N D O D O N T I C S G E N E R A L D E N T I ST R Y O R A L A N D M A X I L LO FAC I A L S U R G E R Y O R T H O D O N T I C S P E D I AT R I C D E N T I ST R Y P R O ST H O D O N T I C S E N D O D O N T I C S G E N E R A L D E N T I ST R Y O R A L A N D M A X I L LO FAC I A L S U R G E R Y O R T H O D O N T I C S P E D I AT R I C D E N T I ST R Y P R O ST H O D O N T I C S E N D O D O N T I C S G E N E R A L D E N T I ST R Y O R A L A N D M A X I L LO FAC I A L S U R G E R Y O R T H O D O N T I C S P E D I AT R I C D E N T I ST R Y P R O ST H O D O N T I C S E N D O D O N T I C S G E N E R A L D E N T I ST R Y O R A L A N D M A X I L LO FAC I A L S U R G E R Y O R T H O D O N T I C S P E D I AT R I C D E N T I ST R Y P R O ST H O D O N T I C S E N D O D O N T I C S G E N E R A L D E N T I ST R Y O R A L A N D M A X I L LO FAC I A L S U R G E R Y O R T H O D O N T I C S P E D I AT R I C D E N T I ST R Y P R O ST H O D O N T I C S E N D O D O N T I C S G E N E R A L D E N T I ST R Y O R A L A N D M A X I L LO FAC I A L S U R G E R Y O R T H O D O N T I C S P E D I AT R I C D E N T I ST R Y P R O ST H O D O N T I C S theGseventh straight Magazine commissioned a peer-to-peer survey E N D O D O N TFor ICS ENERA L D E Nyear, T I SDurham TRY O R A L A N D M A X I L LO FAC I A L of the local dental community – from endodontists to prosthodontists. The following rankings are the result. S U R G E R Y O RDentists THO D O N T I C S P E D I AT R I C D E N T I ST R Y P R O ST H O D O N T I C S were asked the telling question: “If you had a patient in need of a dentist, which dentist would you refer E N D O D O N Tthem I Cto,SotherGthanEyourself?” N E R A L D E N T I ST R Y O R A L A N D M A X I L LO FAC I A L S U R G E R Y O RDurham THO D O NbyTtheI Cdental S community: P E D I AT RIC DEN T I ST Y Pprofessionals R O ST H O D O N T I C S is well-served Hundreds of dentists, specialists andR support E N D O D O N ThaveI Cmade SthisGhome, E NandEtheRoverall A Lquality D Eof dental N Tcare I SinTourRcommunities Y O RisAsecond L Ato none. N DWhat Mgood A X I L LO FAC I A L dentist wouldn’t want to practice here? S U R G E R Y O R T H O D O N T I C S P E D I AT R I C D E N T I ST R Y P R O ST H O D O N T I C S E N D O D O N T I C S G E N E R A L D E N T I ST R Y O R A L A N D M A X I L LO FAC I A L S U R G E R Y O R T H O D O N T I C S P E D I AT R I C D E N T I ST R Y P R O ST H O D O N T I C S E N D O D O N TAI C S GBackground E N E R A L D E N T I ST R Y O R A L A N D M A X I L LO FAC I A L Little S U R G E R Y OThe R TTopHDentists O D list Ofor NDurham TICS P E D I AT R I C D E N T I ST R Y P R O ST H O D O N T I C S is the result of a rigorous evaluation process consisting of peer-to-peer E N D O D O N Tsurveys ICS G E N E R A L D E N T I ST R Y O R A L A N D M A X I L LO FAC I A L of area dentists and professionals. This survey was conducted and managed by the nationally S U R G E R Y Orecognized R T H Othird-party D O NfirmTtopDentists I C S PLLC E Dof IAugusta, AT RGa. I CTheDlistEisNexcerpted T I STfrom RY P R O ST H O D O N T I C S the 2016 E N D O D O N TtopDentists I C S Glist,Ea N E R A L D E N T I ST R Y O R A L A N D M A X I L LO FAC I A L database that includes listings for dentists and specialists in the Durham area. The S U R G E R Y ODurham R T HlistOis based D OonNdetailed TICS P E D I AT R I C D E N T I ST R Y P R O ST H O D O N T I C S evaluations of dentists and professionals by their peers. The complete E N D O D O N Tdatabase I C Sis available G E Nat Ewww.usatopdentists.com. R A L D E N T I ST R Y O R A L A N D M A X I L LO FAC I A L S U R G E R Y O RtopDentists THOD O N T I C S P E D I AT R I C D E N T I ST R Y P R O ST H O D O N T I C S management has more than 40 years experience compiling peer-review referral guides E N D O D O N Tin ItheCdental, S Gmedical E Nand E legal R Afields. L DWorking E Nfrom T I this S Texperience, R Y Oalong RA L A N D M A X I L LO FAC I A L with the input of several S U R G E R Y Oprominent RTHO D O N T I C S P E D I AT R I C D E N T I ST R Y P R O ST H O D O N T I C S dentists from throughout the United States, topDentists created a selection process that has E N D O D O N Tearned I C the S respect G E ofNtheEcountry’s R A Lleading D Edental N Tprofessionals. I S T R YForO R A L A N D M A X I L LO FAC I A L more information call (706) 364-0853; S U R G E R Y Owrite R TP.O. H Box OD O N T I C S P E D I AT R I C D E N T I ST R Y P R O ST H O D O N T I C S 970, Augusta, GA 30903; email info@usatopdentists.com or visit usatopdentists.com. E N D O D O N T IThe Cpurchase S G ofEadvertising NERA L D E N T I ST R Y O R A L A N D M A X I L LO FAC I A L has no impact on who is included in the Top Dentists list. „ S U R G E R Y O R T H O D O N T I C S P E D I AT R I C D E N T I ST R Y P R O ST H O D O N T I C S E N D O D O N T I C S G E N E R A L D E N T I ST R Y O R A L A N D M A X I L LO FAC I A L S U R G E R Y O R T H O D O N T I C S P E D I AT R I C D E N T I ST R Y P R O ST H O D O N T I C S ENDO 84 D O N T I C S G E N E R A L D E N T I S T R Y O R A L A N D M A X I L L O F A C I A L S U R G E R Y O R T H O D O N T I C S P E D I AT R I C D E N T I ST R Y P R O ST H O D O N T I C S

OUR

DENTISTS

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P


The world always looks

brighter

from behind a smile

Martha Ann Keels, DDS, PhD

TOP DENTISTS

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends seeing the dentist by your first birthday. We want to keep your child’s smile healthy for a lifetime!

2711 North Duke Street, Durham, NC 27704

919-220-1416

www.dukestreetsmiles.com

Smile

and the world smiles with you

W

e are a brand new state of the art cosmetic and family dental practice focused on making every patient smile. Our goal is to exceed your expectations both in quality and experience!

Debora Bolton DDS 2705 N. Duke Street, Suite100, Durham, NC

919.381.5900 bullcitysmiles.com

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TOP DENTISTS

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Ashley-DURHAMMag.pdf

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11:09 AM

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ENDODONTICS Linda Levin

3624 Shannon Rd., Ste. 106 919-401-4827 www.levinendodontics.com A. K. Bobby Mallik

3719 University Dr., Ste. B 919-493-5332 www.durhamendo.com Roger A. McDougal

5826 Fayetteville Rd., Ste. 209 919-806-8667 www.mcdougalendo.org

C

M

Y

CM

MY

GENERAL DENTISTRY

CY

Brent L. Blaylock

CMY

K

3206 Old Chapel Hill Rd., Ste. 300 919-493-8036 www.drbrentblaylock.com Debora Ann Bolton

2705 N. Duke St., Ste. 100 919-381-5900 www.bullcitysmiles.com Christopher Bouldin

C A L L T OD A Y T O S C H E DU L E A C OM P L I M EN T A R Y C ONS U L TA TI O N

TOP DENTISTS

1920 E. Highway 54, Ste. 570 919-544-3723 www.bouldindds.com „

919-493-4911

2919 COLONY RD . DURHAM, NC . DURHAMORTHODONTICS.COM

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TRIANGLE IMPLANT CENTER

experience, dedication and an

unbeatable team

O

ur surgeons, anesthesiologists and staff work hard to provide a high level of comfort and care. We are trained in minimally invasive surgical techniques, which help improve your recovery from wisdom teeth, implant and jaw surgery.

TOP DENTISTS

UDAY REEBYE, D.M.D., M.D.

AARON PARK, D.D.S., M.D.

UDAY REEBYE, D.M.D., M.D.

AARON PARK, D.D.S., M.D.

Dr. Reebye graduated from Boston University School of Dental Medicine and completed his medical degree at UNC. He has continued to follow his passion in life — helping people — through both work at his private office and treating those who are underserved.

Dr. Park received his B.S. from the University of California at Berkeley, his D.D.S. from the Columbia University School of Dental and Oral Surgery and his M.D. from the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. He has interest in orthognathic surgery, dentoalveolar surgery, bone grafting, implantology, pathology and craniofacial surgery.

A N OF F ICIA L PAR TNER WITH TAR HEEL ATHL ETICS 5 318 N C H I G H W A Y 5 5

919.806.2912

SU I T E 10 6

D U R H A M , N C 2 7 7 13

ticdurham@triangleimplantcenter.com

offices also in Mebane, Wilson, Goldsboro

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Jason Winfield Butler

2900 Croasdaile Dr., Ste. 5 919-383-7402 www.croasdailedentalarts.com Josiah Chen

10290 Chapel Hill Rd., Ste. 600 Morrisville 919-469-3669 www.morrisvillefamilydentistry.com James H. Eaker

B R E N T L . B L AY L O C K D D S COSMETIC AND RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY

4208 S. Alston Ave. 919-544-5620 www.tarheelsmiles.com Amy Gadol

811 Ninth St., Ste. 210 919-286-4481 www.gadolfamilydentistry.com William H. Gordon

1904 Front St., Ste. 530 919-383-6661 Our practice offers services that include dental crowns and bridges, porcelain veneers, teeth whitening, and preventive dentistry for the entire family. NOW ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS

3206 OLD CHAPEL HILL ROAD DURHAM, NC 27707

919.493.8036

OTHER SERVICES INCLUDE

• BONDING • TOOTH-COLORED FILLINGS • THOROUGH EXAMS IMPLANT RESTORATIONS • TMJ EVALUATION • BITE GUARDS • LASER CAVITY DETECTION

TOP DENTISTS

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Brian H. Grunert

5501 Fortunes Ridge Dr., Ste. Q 919-489-1445 Stephanie Jenkins

5317 Highgate Dr., Ste. 118 919-361-0500 www.drjenkins-dds.com „

www.DRBRENTBLAYLOCK.com M a g a z i n e

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GREAT SMILES, GREAT SERVICE! • FREE Consultation • Caring and Dedicated Staff • Pre-Orthodontic Guidance Program free of charge • Payment Plans Available

CHAPEL HILL OFFICE • 1525 E Franklin St. • (919) 967-0474 DURHAM OFFICE • 3206 Old Chapel Hill Rd. • (919) 493-7554

HERSHEYANDHEYMANN.COM

A. K. BOBBY MALLIK D.M.D. Practice limited to Endodontics and Endodontic Surgery

Our team realizes the importance of your dental health and strives to provide all your endodontic needs in a clean, comfortable and stress-free environment. We utilize state-of-the-art technology to ensure you are receiving the specialized care you deserve.

University Commons M a y

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3719-B University Dr.

Using the most advanced knowledge and techniques available today, we can perform many different endodontic treatments with ultimate precision and comfort, including: Root Canal Therapy | Retreatment Apical Surgery | Traumatic Injuries | CBCT Imaging

Durham, NC 27707

919-493-5332

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Wayne Jordan

Danny K. Lloyd

Laura Parra

2900 Croasdaile Dr., Ste. 5 919-383-7402 www.croasdailedentalarts.com

4206 N. Roxboro St., Ste. 140 919-471-1589 www.dannylloyddds.com

3400 Croasdaile Dr., Ste. 209 919-383-7020 www.lauraparradds.com

Thomas A. Leech

Lionel Nelson

Catherine D. Ray

1920 E. Highway 54, Ste. 570 919-544-2001 www.dentistryatthepark.com

3325 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd., Ste. 303 919-489-0497

3310 University Dr. 919-489-5380 www.catherinedraydmd.com

Ellis K. List

Desiree T. Palmer

Grant H. Service

1014 Lamond Ave. 919-682-5327 www.durhamncdentistry.com

105 Newsom St., Ste. 204 919-471-9106 www.anewreasontosmile.com

2711 N. Duke St., Ste. B 919-220-6553 www.durhamdentistgrantservice.com „

For the Smile Of a Lifetime! Now Accepting New Patients!

919.489.1543 DurhamPDO.com

121 W. Woodcroft Pkwy, Durham, NC 27713

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TOP DENTISTS

John R. Christensen DDS, MS, MS

Pediatric Dentistry & Orthodontics

Felicia V. Swinney DMD, MS Pediatric Dentistry

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For weekend events, delicious dishes, biz news and more!

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t o p

d e n t i s t s

Ronald D. Spain

Harold S. Speight

C. Steadman Willis III

2206 Page Rd., Ste. 103 919-596-1219 www.drrdspain.com

2711 N. Duke St., Ste. C 919-220-4200 www.haroldspeightdds.com

1212 Broad St. 919-286-2235 www.steadwillisdmd.com

Jerry H. ter Avest

Julie Witte

2515 E. Highway 54, Bldg. 2000 919-544-6080

922 Broad St. 919-286-1156 www.juliewittedds.com

ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY David E. Frost

More Than Just A Smile

.... Your Health Your Smile, Your Style,

Your Life...

By caring for your mouth with routine exams and daily oral hygiene habits, you are taking an important step toward protecting your health. Schedule your comprehensive exam today. In Network providers for Ameritas, Blue Cross/Blue Sheild and Delta Insurance

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5501 Fortunes Ridge Dr., Ste. G 919-419-9222 www.drjelic.com

5318 NC Hwy. 55, Ste. 106 919-806-2912 www.triangleimplantcenter.com NOW OPEN A new office in Downtown Durham

BULL

105 Newsom Street, Ste. 204, Durham 919 471 9106 | ANewReasonToSmile.com

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Jeffrey S. Jelic

Uday N. Reebye

CITY DENTAL

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2823 N. Duke St. 919-479-0707 www.omsanc.com

Andrew T. Ruvo

2823 N. Duke St. 919-479-0707 www.omsanc.com Debra Sacco

2823 N. Duke St. 919-479-0707 www.omsanc.com

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Adam D. Serlo

Michael J. Wilson

2823 N. Duke St. 919-479-0707 www.omsanc.com

2900 Croasdaile Dr., Ste. 3 919-344-0845 www.wilson-ortho.com

Brian Vandersea

d e n t i s t s

PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY Amy C. Davidian

249 E. Highway 54, Ste. 300 919-354-6220 www.southpointpediatricdentistry.com „

2823 N. Duke St. 919-479-0707 www.omsanc.com

ORTHODONTICS John R. Christensen

121 W. Woodcroft Pkwy. 919-489-1543 www.durhampdo.com

Congratulations, Dr. Cunningham! Services Include:

Barbara T. Hershey

3206 Old Chapel Hill Rd. 919-493-7554 www.hersheyandheymann.com

Dental Implants Dentures Veneers

Gavin C. Heymann

Bonding

3206 Old Chapel Hill Rd. 919-493-7554 www.hersheyandheymann.com

Teeth Whitening Crown & Bridge TMJ Treatment

Julie H. Mol

...and more

5726 Fayetteville Rd., Ste. 104 919-405-7111 J. Dempsey Smith

2919 Colony Rd. 919-493-4911 www.durhamorthodontics.com

Dr. Geoffrey Cunningham is now one of 1,200 board certified Prosthodontists in the world, and the only board certified Prosthodontist in private practice in the Durham-Chapel Hill area.

FOR ALL YOUR DENTAL NEEDS www.mydurhamdentist.com 919.489.8661

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3709 University Drive, Suite D

Durham, NC

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Lionel M. Nelson, DMD PA 3325 Durham Chapel Hill Blvd. Ste 303 919.489.0497 | nelsongentledental@mac.com

D

r. Nelson resides in Durham, NC and is the proud father of three sons, Lionel II, Lorenz and Leland.. He earned a B.A. in chemistry from Miami University (Ohio) in 1995 and received his Doctorate of Dental Medicine from Temple University in 1999. Dr. Nelson and his team of caring dental professionals keep the patient first by administering comprehensive treatment focusing on each patient’s overall health. They give the best of themselves and the best that dentistry has to offer

by continually furthering their personal and professional growth. And they make every effort to show patients they are honored and appreciated. Dr. Nelson offers a full range of services including preventive care, root canals, cosmetic dentistry, single visit porcelain crowns, implant restorations, tooth whitening, dentures and partials, and tooth-colored fillings. Dr. Nelson and his team have been voted one of Durham’s TopDentists for the seventh consecutive year.

TOP DENTISTS

Dr. Esther Vice-Hanson, DDS

Sunrise Dental

Dinah Vice, DDS & Associates 8128 Renaissance Parkway, Durham 919.493.3355 | dinahvice-sunrisedental.com

S

ome might say Dr. Esther Vice-Hanson was born to be a dentist. “As my mother worked as a dental hygienist, I was sitting chair-side, nudging patients from within my mother’s womb.” Dr. ViceHanson’s mother, Dr. Dinah Vice, served as a mentor thought her life, inspiring her to graduate with honors from the UNC School of Dentistry. One of her most significant academic and clinical achievements was being nominated by faculty as an alumni member to the Omicron Kappa Upsilon Honor Dental Society. This honor was awarded to only nine graduating seniors from her class. Dr. Vice-Hanson believes dentistry is not just about dental tools or methods; it is a part of something bigger. “Dentistry offers me a wonderful opportunity to make a positive impact on so many lives, to connect with others and tenderly care for them to help create and maintain a healthy, happy smile. I have always believed that a smile truly can say a thousand words.”

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NEW LOCATION 3310 UNIVERSIT Y DRIVE, DURHAM, NC 27707

Martha Ann Keels

2711 N. Duke St. 919-220-1416 www.dukestreetsmiles.com Cynthia A. Neal

4101 N. Roxboro St. 919-684-8111

We Offer

Felicia V. Swinney

121 W. Woodcroft Pkwy. 919-489-1543 www.durhampdo.com

C AT H E R I N E D . R AY, D . M . D . General Dentistry for Adults 9 1 9. 4 8 9. 5 3 8 0 | C AT H E R I N E D R AY D M D . C O M  catherinedraydmd

PERIODONTICS Liliana Gandini

3115 Academy Rd. 919-289-4738 www.advancedorthoandperio.com Hana Hobbs

2900 Croasdaile Dr. 919-383-6611 www.hanahobbsperio.com Arnold Todd McClain

5015 Southpark Dr., Ste. 130 919-484-8338 www.gumsandimplants.org „

Triangle Restoration Dentistry A Prosthodontic Specialty Practice

Mark S. Scurria, DDS | Rosanna Marquez, DDS 1920 East Hwy. 54 Suite 410 Durham | 919.544.8106 www.trianglerestorationdentistry.com

D

oesn’t your smile deserve a specialist’s care? A prosthodontist is a dentist recognized by the American Dental Association (ADA) as a specialist in restoring and replacing teeth. With additional education and training, prosthodontists have the capability to provide excellent results on crowns, bridges, dentures, dental implants and other cosmetic and restorative procedures. Dr. Mark Scurria and Dr. Rosanna Marquez provide a comprehensive range of treatments with a constant commitment to excellence.

Click on the Patient Stories tab at

trianglerestorationdentistry.com

to see how a healthy, attractive looking smile can increase your confidence and self-esteem at any age.

TOP DENTISTS

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PROSTHODONTICS

top

Geoffrey Cunningham

DENTIST

AWARD

2010-2016

Our practice has been serving the Durham community for over 45 years. We are deeply honored to continue to be recognized by receiving the Top Dentist award for the 6th year in a row. Every day, it is a privilege to come to work and know that we and our staff make a difference in our patients’ lives. And, by partnering with some of the best dental specialists in the area, we create healthy smiles, restore full function, and instill confidence that lasts a lifetime. Thank you once again for voting us Top Dentist!

Drs. Turner, Butler & Jordan Croasdaile Dental Arts

Accepting New Patients

919.383.7402 2900 Croasdaile Drive | Suite 5 | Durham

TOP DENTISTS

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2010-2016

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Annual

WOMEN’S Issue LEADING FROM THE FRONT

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dents. Durham natives. New resi . Businesswomen. Musicians en Thirteen remarkable wom

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dish

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Guasaca

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2200 W. Main St., Ste. A-100 (Erwin Square)

Corn-based arepas are a primary staple of the

Venezuelan diet; they are equivalent to the bread Americans often pair with their everyday meals. One day soon after Heli Mendez came to the United States in 1997, he walked into a build-your-own-sandwich joint and was instantly struck by the familiar concept. “I realized it was comparable to the arepa bars back home,” he says. “At the sandwich place, they were doing it with specialty breads, European cheeses and deli meats, while in Venezuela we do it with some fresh meats, veggies and local cheeses. “The difference [in America] is, because some people lack time to cook at home, they eat a great number of deli meats and bread, surely making awesome sandwiches! But I just wasn’t used to it. I knew we had this product, arepas, that, in a very similar set-up, using fresh ingredients, could be done in a way that would be appealing to the locals here.” Appealing is an understatement. Along with partners Orlando Escobar 100

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919-294-8939

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PHOTO BY SARAH ARNESON

Our Daily Arepa guasaca.com

and chef Jose Alvarez, Guasaca has served thousands of arepas at the flagship Raleigh location, opened about three years ago. The restaurant offers signature arepas – combinations the owners recommend – but you can build your own with any blend of ingredients you prefer, and for less than $5 per arepa. All ingredients are made from scratch every day – “it’s only raw produce and raw meats; there’s not a single can,” Heli says. Today, we went with the grilled steak, black-eyed peas, caramelized onions, white cheese and cilantro sauce (in their new yellow corn arepa; it’s a little sweeter than the white corn option – ask for a sample next time you stop in!) and grilled chicken with black beans, pico de gallo and white cheese. The sauce options feature prominent flavors from cilantro to a spicy red sauce to a honey-tinged mustard sauce with a kick. And the guasaca sauce, the restaurant’s namesake, with its many veggies and avocado base – that’s a game changer. – Amanda MacLaren DM M a y

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Picnic

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1647 Cole Mill Rd.

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919-908-9128

Sometimes, you’ve got to go with a drink

for its name. This was one of those times. As soon as I saw the Skipper and a Little Buddy on Picnic’s menu, my order was decided. A Budweiser tallboy is accompanied by a well shot – siding with most of the new barbecue joint’s clientele, mine came with whiskey. This was co-owner Wyatt Dickson’s move. “Wyatt was intent on having Budweiser tallboys, because he’s a Budweiser man,” says chef Ben Adams. “Then he stumbled upon this when he was visiting a friend – except it was a 12-ounce can,” and insisted on using tallboys and calling it Skipper and a Little Buddy. “It fits in exactly – we sell mostly beer here, and whiskey is next.” M a y

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PHOTO BY SARAH ARNESON

Ahoy, Matey |

picnicdurham.com The workaround to the ABC rule of one drink per customer at a time, you’re meant to take the shot and then wash it down with Bud. You’re left with plenty of beer for your ’cue. Not a beer or liquor enthusiast? Try Picnic’s Strawberry Ice Pick. Vodka, lemon juice, strawberry puree and sweet tea are shaken, strained into a retro sugar pourer and garnished with mint fresh from Blue Sky Farms. “We want something that’s simple and accessible – you don’t want to have a barbecue sandwich with a hoity-toity cocktail,” Ben says. “The sweet tea fits right in with the strawberry and lemon, and it goes down really easy. It’s a nice patio-sipping drink; you don’t have to overthink it.” – Amanda MacLaren DM d u r h a m m a g . c o m

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taste NORTHERN DURHAM / NEAR INTERSTATE 85

NORTH DUKE CROSSING SHOPPING CENTER (EXIT 176-B) Bamboo House Chinese Restaurant Simple, classic Chinese dishes. 3600 N. Duke St.; 919-477-0078 Golden Krust Caribbean bakery and grill. 3600 N. Duke St.; 919-283-4639

advertisers highlighted in boxes

Italian Pizzeria Restaurant Traditional Italian dishes and pizzas. 3823 Guess Rd.; 919-471-0664

Bel Gusto d’Italia Italian dishes, located inside the Millennium Hotel. 2800 Campus Walk Ave.; 919-382-5024

Jimmy’s Famous Hot Dogs Hot dogs, burgers, wings and fries. 2728 Guess Rd.; 919-471-0005

Bullock’s Bar-B-Que Barbecue and other Southern comfort food. 3330 Quebec Dr.; 919-383-3211

La Cacerola Cafe & Restaurant Honduran-style cuisine. 2016 Guess Rd.; 919-294-6578

Italian Pizzeria & Restaurant Traditional Italian dishes and pizzas. 3500 N. Roxboro St.; 919-220-1386

Las Palmas Mexican Restaurant Authentic Mexican cuisine. 3814 N. Duke St.; 919-479-0080

HILLSBOROUGH ROAD Bennett Pointe Grill Multi-regional American cuisine. 4625 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-382-9431

Ole NC Bar-B-Que Basic barbecue offerings. 3600 N. Duke St. Ste. 17; 919-471-1400

Sharky’s Eat & 8 Pizza, subs and Mediterranean classics like falafel. 4707 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-908-1112

GUESS ROAD

Shanghai Chinese Restaurant Chinese dishes, including steamed whole fish. 3433 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-383-7581

Northgate Mall - 1058 W. Club Blvd. Fast Food •A & D Buffalo’s •Baja Shack •Cajun Café •Chopsticks •Cinnamonster •The Cookie Store •Greek Cuisine •Haagen-Dazs/Planet Smoothie •Marble Slab Creamery •Mickey’s Chicken & Fish •Pretzel Twister •Randy’s Pizza Express •Subway •Tomo Japan Full Service C&H Cafeteria 919-286-7303 Dragon Express 919-286-2098

HILLANDALE ROAD (EXIT 174-A)

bleu

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Bistro

Bleu Olive High-quality comfort food incorporating local ingredients and Mediterranean flair. 1821 Hillandale Rd.; 919-383-8502; bleuolivebistro.com El Corral Mexican Restaurant Authentic Mexican cuisine. 1821 Hillandale Rd.; 919-309-4543 Meelo’s Restaurant Italian and Spanish offerings. 1821 Hillandale Rd., Ste. 3; 919-384-9080

Jade Buffet 919-286-9555

Pomodoro Italian Kitchen Homemade pastas, sauces and pizzas. 1811 Hillandale Rd.; 919-382-2915

Pan Pan Diner 919-416-1950 Randy’s Pizza 919-286-7272

NORTH POINTE DRIVE The French Corner Bakery Artisan breads, cookies and muffins, plus a lunch menu. 2005 North Pointe Dr., Ste. B.; 919-698-9836

Ruby Tuesday 919-286-5100

Koumi Japanese Restaurant Traditional Japanese dishes and sushi. 3550 N. Roxboro St.; 919-381-5753 Perky’s Pizza of Durham American pizzeria. 3422 Red Mill Rd.; 919-682-0202 Silver Spoon Restaurant Diner fare and seafood. 5230 N. Roxboro Rd.; 919-479-7172

NEAR DOWNTOWN BROAD STREET BIG Bundts and More Bakery Bundt cakes and other baked goods. 721 Broad St. Joe Van Gogh This local coffee shop sources quality beans for a superior coffee. 1104-B Broad St.; 919-286-4800 Oval Park Grille Creative comfort food and health-conscious options. 1116 Broad St.; 919-401-6566 The Palace International Traditional East African specialties and African takes on other world cuisines. 1104-A Broad St.; 919-416-4922

Watts Grocery Seasonal contemporary American cooking using local ingredients. 1116 Broad St.; 919-416-5040; wattsgrocery.com

Gocciolina Italian fare. 3314 Guess Rd.; 919-973-4089

Golden China Simple, classic Chinese dishes. 1515 North Pointe Dr., Ste. 110B; 919-220-3168

Hog Heaven Bar-B-Q Eastern barbecue. 2419 Guess Rd.; 919-286-7447

DUKE DINING Blue Express Mediterranean sandwiches and salads. 450 Research Dr.; 919-660-3971

MORE NORTHERN DURHAM DINING Alpaca Peruvian cuisine. 302 Davidson Ave.; 919-220-9028

Duke Gardens Terrace Café Sandwiches, coffee and snacks from The Picnic Basket, located at the Sarah P. Duke Gardens. 426 Anderson St.; 919-660-3957

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Joe Van Gogh This local coffee shop sources quality beans for a superior coffee. 120 Science Dr.; 919-660-5078 The Nasher Cafe Bistro fare using fresh, local ingredients; inside the Nasher Museum of Art. 2001 Campus Dr.; 919-684-6032 Twinnie’s Cafe Irish Pub with pastries, sandwiches, salads and coffee. 101 Science Dr.; 919-660-3944 ERWIN ROAD Another Broken Egg Cafe Unique breakfast and lunch menu. 2608 Erwin Rd., Ste. 120; 919-381-5172 Black Twig Cider House Cider-focused restaurant with more than 80 ciders on draft and in bottles. 2812 Erwin Rd.; 919-321-0203 Chai’s Noodle Bar & Bistro Japanese, Chinese, Thai and Korean dishes. 2816 Erwin Rd., Ste. 207; 919-309-4864 Hungry Leaf Salads and wraps. 2608 Erwin Rd., Ste. 132; 919-321-8001 MediTerra Grill Mediterranean cuisine. 2608 Erwin Rd., Ste. 136; 919-383-0066 Nosh “Eclectic foodstuffs” including sandwiches, soups, salads, wraps and desserts. 2812 Erwin Rd., Ste. 101; 919-383-4747 Saladelia Cafe Espresso and organic smoothie bar, scratch-made pastries, gourmet sandwiches, salads and soups. Open for dine-in or carry-out. 2424 Erwin Rd.; 919-416-1400; saladelia.com Smashburger Unique burgers and Haagen Dazs milk shakes. 2608 Erwin Rd., Ste. 116; 919-237-1070 Sushi Love Sushi and other Japanese cuisine. 2812 Erwin Rd., Ste. 204; 919-309-2401 ERWIN SQUARE Baba Ghannouj Blend of Greek and Lebanese meals. 2200 W. Main St., Ste. A140; 919-286-6699 Guasaca Arepas, salads, rice bowls with South American flavor. 2200 W. Main St., Ste. A100; 919-294-8939 Local 22 Kitchen & Bar Upscale Southern-inspired cuisine, with emphasis on food sourced within a 30-mile radius and local brews. 2200 W. Main St.; 919-286-9755

Parizade Sophisticated Mediterranean food like monkfish tangine, pepper-crusted beef tenderloin and a vegetable caponata made with quinoa. Full bar. 2200 W. Main St.; 919-286-9712; parizadedurham.com NINTH STREET DISTRICT Bali-Hai Mongolian Grill Chinese-Mongolian grill. 811 Ninth St.; 919-416-0200

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Banh’s Cuisine Vietnamese and Chinese dishes. 750 Ninth St.; 919-286-5073

BULL CITY MARKET

Pantones sage green: 5777 brown: 490

The Mad Hatter’s Cafe & Bakeshop Scratch-made pastries, organic salads, sandwiches and wraps, with breakfast all day and delicious brunch every weekend. Award-winning cakes.1802 W. Main St.; 919-286-1987; madhatterbakeshop.com

blu seafood and bar Upscale seafood restaurant featuring innovative regional classics. 2002 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-286-9777; bluseafoodandbar.com Blue Corn Cafe Authentic Latin-American food with fresh, organic ingredients. 716 Ninth St.; 919-286-9600 Burger Bach Signature New Zealand grass-fed beef burgers. 737 Ninth St., Ste. 220; 919-973-4416 Cocoa Cinnamon Coffee, chocolates and pastries. 2627 Hillsborough Rd. Cosmic Cantina Authentic Mexican cuisine with vegan options. 1920 Perry St.; 919-286-1875 Dain’s Place Pub fare. 754 Ninth St.; 919-416-8800 Dale’s Indian Cuisine Traditional Indian food. 811 Ninth St.; 919-286-1760 Elmo’s Diner Homemade Southern and American classics with breakfast all day in a casual, family-friendly setting. 776 Ninth St.; 919-416-3823 EpaChamo Venezuelan arepas, burgers and sandwiches. 730 Ninth St.; 984-439-2923 George’s Java Coffee roaster specializing in organic coffees. 764-A Ninth St.; 919-797-0878 Guacamaya Tacos and burritos. 748 Ninth St.; 919-286-4499 Heavenly Buffaloes Chicken wings and vegan nuggets with more than twenty flavors. 1807 W. Markham Ave.; 919-237-2358 Juju Asian fusion small plates, dumplings and dim sum. 737 Ninth St.; 919-286-3555 Metro 8 Steakhouse American and Argentinean steakhouse. 746 Ninth St.; 919-416-1700 Mesa Latin Kitchen Modern tapas-style restaurant offering an array of Latin cuisine. 2701 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-973-2717 Monuts Donuts Doughnuts, pastries, English muffins, bagels and breakfast sandwiches. 1002 Ninth St.; 919-797-2634 Ninth Street Coffee House Coffee, pastries, smoothies. 714 Ninth St. The Tavern Food & Spirits Classic bar favorites and homemade recipes for burgers, sandwiches, hot dogs and more. 1900 W. Markham Ave.; 919-286-7665 Vin Rouge Bistro-style dinner and Sunday brunch. 2010 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-416-0466

Wellspring Cafe Salad and hot bar in Whole Foods Market, plus sandwiches, pizza and sushi. 621 Broad St.; 919-286-2290

DOWNTOWN BRIGHTLEAF DISTRICT Alivia’s Durham Bistro European-style bistro with breakfast, pub fare and upscale dinner options. 900 W. Main St.; 919-682-8978 Devine’s Restaurant and Sports Bar Sandwiches, wings and burgers.  904 W. Main St.; 919-682-0228 El Rodeo Mexican Restaurant Authentic Mexican cuisine. 905 W. Main St.; 919-683-2417 The Federal Pub fare with bistro panache. 914 W. Main St.; 919-680-8611 James Joyce Irish Pub and Restaurant Traditional pub food and snacks. 912 W. Main St.; 919-683-3022 Lilly’s Pizza Stone-hearth-baked pizzas with fresh, organic, local ingredients. 810 W. Peabody St.; 919-797-2554 The Little Dipper Fondue. 905 W. Main St.; 919-908-1023 Mount Fuji Asian Bistro Sushi & Bar Thai, Japanese, Chinese and sushi. 905 W. Main St.; 919-680-4968 Parker and Otis Breakfast and lunch, plus candy and other specialty food items. 112 S. Duke St.; 919-683-3200 Respite Cafe Fine coffee and tea. 115 N. Duke St.; 919-294-9737 Rose’s Meat Market and Sweet Shop Sandwiches, pastries and daily dinner specials. 121 N. Gregson St.; 919-797-2233 Satisfaction Restaurant & Bar Pub fare including wings, ribs and pizza. 905 W. Main St., Ste. 37; 919-682-7397 Skewers Bar & Grill Buffet and full kabob menu. 1013 W. Main St.; 919-680-8048 Torero’s Mexican Restaurant Authentic Mexican cuisine. 800 W. Main St.; 919-682-4197 Triangle Seafood Market Fresh seafood, Italian entrees and pastas. 905 W. Main St.; 919-956-7360 WAREHOUSE DISTRICT The Blue Note Grill Barbecue, ribs and burgers. 709 Washington St.; 919-489-6591

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Cocoa Cinnamon Coffee, chocolate and pastries. 420 W. Geer St.; 919-697-8990

Beyù Caffè Coffee, pastries and breakfast and lunch menus. 335 W. Main St.; 919-683-1058

Luna Rotisserie & Empanadas Wood-fired rotisserie meats, Andean-inspired braises, empanadas.112 W. Main St.; 984-439-8702

The District at 410 Lunch served Thursday and Friday by The Art Institute of Raleigh-Durham. 410 Blackwell St.; 919-317-3200

Bull City Burger Local-beef burgers and dogs, fresh beers brewed inhouse. 107 E. Parrish St.; 919-680-2333

M Sushi Quality sushi from seasonal seafood, daily menu changes. 311 Holland St.; 919-908-9266

Geer Street Garden Simple, down-home fare. 644 Foster St.; 919-688-2900

Bull McCabe’s Irish Pub Pub food and bar snacks. 427 W. Main St.; 919-682-3061

Mateo Tapas and small plates. 109 W. Chapel Hill St.; 919-530-8700

The Cupcake Bar Cocktail- and beverage-inspired cupcakes. 101 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-816-2905

Ninth Street Bakery Organic breads, pastries and lunch. 136 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-286-0303

Counting House Upscale restaurant featuring locally sourced entrees. Full bar. 111 N. Corcoran St.; 919-956-6760

Old Havana Sandwich Shop Authentic Cuban sandwiches. 310 E. Main St.; 919-667-9525

Dame’s Chicken & Waffles Chicken, waffles, shmears. 317 W. Main St.; 919-682-9235

The Parlour Homemade ice cream. 117 Market St.; 919-564-7999

Rise Biscuits & Donuts Daily-changing menu of doughnuts and biscuits. 401 Foster St. Parts & Labor A variety of dishes meeting many dietary needs. 723 Rigsbee Ave.; 919-901-0875 The Pit Barbecue. 321 W. Geer St.; 919-282-3748 Piedmont Seasonal cooking, inspired by local ingredients. 401 Foster St.; 919-683-1213 CITY CENTER DISTRICT 2 Zero 1 Restaurant Breakfast, lunch and dinner, located in the Durham Marriott Convention Center. 201 Foster St.; 919-768-6000 Bar Virgile Artfully crafted beverages and small plates. 105 S. Magnum St.; 919-973-3000; barvirgile.com

Dashi Traditional ramen shop and izakaya. 415 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-251-9335 Dos Perros Sophisticated Mexican cuisine. 200 N. Mangum St.; 919-956-2750 Loaf Oven breads and pastries. 111 W. Parrish St.; 919-797-1254 Lucia Bar Italiano Housemade pastas, breads and charcuterie. 605 W. Main St.; 984-219-1965

Pizzeria Toro Wood-fired pizza. 105 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-908-6936 Pompieri Pizza A pizza joint with a fine-dining approach. 102 City Hall Plaza; 919-973-1589 The Restaurant at The Durham Locally sourced and inspired Southern cuisine. 315 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-768-8830 Revolution Contemporary global cuisine featuring local ingredients. Extensive wine list. Now serving lunch. 107 W. Main St.; 919-956-9999

newsbites The Executive Chef Life

Former Chef & the Farmer sous chef John May, who worked alongside chef Vivian Howard on the PBS show, “A Chef’s Life,” is now the executive chef at The Boot and is introducing a more seasonal-focused menu.

Closing Time

G2B Restaurant and Brewery shut its doors in early April, as did its Chapel Hill sister restaurant, [ONE]. G2B was open for five years, despite what some considered a tough location off Shannon Road. After nearly four years of existence, LoMo Market closed permanently March 28 due to what CEO and Founder Guenevere Abernathy called an inability to find a sustainable business model. Bar Lusconi’s last night of business was April 9. Triangle Brewing Company, which opened in 2007 as Durham’s first brewery, announced it would close May 2. Due to the pending Durham Police Headquarters construction, Bull City Ciderworks (as of press time) was planning to close at the end of April in order to move the cider bar from South Elizabeth Street to their new location on the corner of Dillard and Roxboro streets. They expect to open at that spot in late summer/early fall.

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New Brews

Kid- and pet-friendly Hope Valley Brewing Company opened in the former City Beverage space on Hope Valley Road.

Pig Pickin’ Sundays

Picnic, located on Cole Mill Road, is now open Sundays from 11 a.m.-9 p.m. (barbecue for brunch!) and closed on Tuesdays.

Community Conscious

Pompieri Pizza was certified by the nonprofit B Lab as a restaurant that meets their rigorous standards of social and environmental performance, accountability and transparency, making it and sister restaurant Bull City Burger and Brewery the only two certified B Corporation eateries in N.C.

To Market, To Market

Durham Roots Farmers’ Market at Northgate Mall, located near Stadium 10 Theaters, opened April 16. It will run every Saturday from 8 a.m. to noon.

Eating Empire

Local restaurateur Giorgios Bakatsias, who has 13 restaurants across the state, plans to open new restaurant Boheme this month in the former Straw Valley Food + Drink space off 15-501. Chefs Chelsea Mock and Damon Barham will head the kitchen, garden and bar.

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d i n i n g

Rue Cler Restaurant & Cafe French bistro-style cuisine. 401 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-682-8844 Saltbox Seafood Joint Local seafood that is delivered fresh from the Carolina coast and served griddled or fried in a simple, straightforward manner. 608 N. Mangum St.; 919-9088970; saltboxseafoodjoint.com Scratch Bakery Sweet and savory pastries, plus lunch. 111 W. Orange St.; 919-956-5200 Taberna Tapas, paella and flatbreads. 325 W. Main St.; 919-797-1457 Toast Italian paninis and soups. 345 W. Main St.; 919-683-2183 AMERICAN TOBACCO DISTRICT Basan A wide variety of fresh, specialty sushi rolls, modern Japanese appetizers and entrees, and an extensive sake selection. 359 Blackwell St., Ste. 220; 919-797-9728; basanrestaurant.com Cuban Revolution Restaurant & Bar Cuban tapas served amid ’60s-style decor. 318 Blackwell St.; 919-687-4300 Mellow Mushroom American pizzas, calzones, salads, hoagies. 410 Blackwell St.; 919-680-8500

359 Blackwell Street Suite 220 Durham NC 27701 BasanRestaurant.com

NanaSteak Offers various cuts of beef and steaks, plus other meats and pastas. 345 Blackwell St.; 919-282-1183; nanasteak.com OnlyBurger The food truck’s brick-and-mortar version offers all the same build-your-own burger options. 359 Blackwell St.; 919-237-2431 Saladelia Cafe Espresso and organic smoothie bar, scratch-made pastries, gourmet sandwiches, salads and soups. Open for dine-in or carry-out. 406 Blackwell St.; 919-687-4600; saladelia.com Tobacco Road Sports Cafe American dishes with local ingredients, overlooking The Bulls’ stadium. 280 S. Mangum St.; 919-937-9909 Tyler’s Restaurant & Taproom Hearty fare and huge beer selection. 324 Blackwell St.; 919-433-0345

Chicken Hut Soul food. 3019 Fayetteville St.; 919-682-5697 New Visions of Africa African soul food. 1306 Fayetteville St.; 919-687-7070 MORE EAST CENTRAL DINING Byrd’s BBQ Restaurant & Catering Classic barbecue and sides. 2816 Cheek Rd.; 919-530-1839 Johnson Family Barbecue Classic Eastern barbecue and sides. 5021 Wake Forest Hwy.; 919-397-5693

WEST CENTRAL DURHAM DURHAM-CHAPEL HILL BOULEVARD (15-501)

Fairview Dining Room Seasonally inspired contemporary cuisine inside the Washington Duke Inn & Golf Club. 3001 Cameron Blvd.; 919-493-6699; washingtondukeinn.com Foster’s Market Fresh breakfast, sandwiches, salads and other specialty food items. 2694 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-489-3944 Full Lotus Wellness Blueprint to healthy living with clean eating programs. 3319 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-998-6621 Guglhupf Bakery, Cafe and Restaurant German-inspired cuisine and artisanal bakery. 2706 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-401-2600 Kanki Steak, chicken and seafood cooked on hibachi grills, plus an extensive sushi menu. 3504 Mt. Moriah Rd.; 919-401-6908; kanki.com Kurama Japanese Seafood, Steakhouse & Sushi Bar Hibachi dishes. 3644 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-489-2669 Peony Asian Bistro Chinese dishes and sushi. 3515 Witherspoon Blvd.; 919-419-8800

Capital Seafood Market & Grill Raw seafood for sale. 1304 University Dr.; 919-402-0777 Mi Peru Peruvian fare. 4015 University Dr.; 919-401-6432

Nana’s Restaurant Seasonal dishes influenced by Southern, French and Italian cuisine. 2514 University Drive; 919-493-8545; nanasdurham.com

NanaTaco Inventive taqueria that features locally produced meats and veggies. 2512 University Dr.; 919-489-8226; nanataco.com

The Original Q Shack “BBQ tender as a mother’s love,” including signature chile-rubbed beef brisket and Carolina pork shoulder. 2510 University Dr.; 919-402-4227; theqshackoriginal.com Saké Bomb Asian Bistro Authentic Asian bistro and sake bar. 4215 University Dr.; 919-401-4488 Saladelia Cafe Delicious, healthy, homemade food with an espresso and organic smoothie bar, scratch-made pastries, gourmet sandwiches, salads and soups. Open for dine-in or carry-out. 4201 University Dr.; 919-489-5776; saladelia.com

Shrimp Boats Southern cuisine. 2637 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-489-6591

Thai Cafe Authentic Thai cuisine. 2501 University Dr.; 919-493-9794

Sitar Indian Cuisine Homemade Indian dishes at affordable prices, with daily lunch buffets and a weekend dinner buffet. 3630 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-490-1326

MORE WEST CENTRAL DINING Amante Gourmet Pizza Gourmet pizzas and calzones. 3825 S. Roxboro Rd.; 919-572-2345

FAYETTEVILLE STREET Bowick’s Ark Southern comfort food. 901 Fayetteville St., Ste. 205; 919-680-3200

Vegan Flava Cafe Vegan/vegetarian bites, Sunday brunch and smoothies. 4125 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-960-1832

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The Boot A neighborhood Italian-American Restaurant serving soups, salads, sandwiches, pastas and traditional Italian entrees, plus a full bar. 2501 University Dr.; 919-294-8383; thebootdurham.com

Tacos Nacos Tacos, papusas, tortas and horchata. 3411 University Dr.; 919-267-8226

EAST CENTRAL DURHAM

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UNIVERSITY DRIVE

The Refectory Cafe Dal, chili, salads and soups. 2726 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-908-6798

Spartacus Restaurant Celebrating 20+ years. Contemporary Greek/ Mediterranean cuisine. 4139 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-489-2848

g u i d e

Bull Street Gourmet & Market Fresh salads and sandwiches. 3710 Shannon Rd.; 919-237-2398 Cafe Love (Live Organic Vegan Eats) Vegan dishes, smoothies and more. 3219 Old Chapel Hill Rd.; 919-251-9541

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Four Square Restaurant Upscale seasonal menu. 2701 Chapel Hill Rd.; 919-401-9877

Pulcinella’s Italian Restaurant Southern Italian dishes. 4711 Hope Valley Rd.; 919-490-1172

Gussy’s Place Pita sandwiches, soup, daily specials. 2945 S. Miami Blvd.

Hope Valley Diner Diner food and breakfast all day. 3710 Shannon Rd.; 919-419-0907

Randy’s Pizza New York-style pizza and subs. 4810 Hope Valley Rd., Ste. 112; 919-403-6850

Pho 9N9 Restaurant Vietnamese cuisine. 2945 S. Miami Blvd., Ste. 102; 919-544-4496

OnlyBurger The food truck’s brick-and-mortar version offers all the same build-your-own burger options. 3710 Shannon Rd.; 919-937-9377

West 94th Street Pub Standard pub fare. 4711 Hope Valley Rd.; 919-403-0025

Piper’s In The Park Soups, salads, hoagies and burgers. 2945 S. Miami Blvd.; 919-572-9767

Smallcakes A gourmet cupcakery. 4711 Hope Valley Rd.; 919-937-2922

Spicy Green Gourmet Cafe & Catering Sandwiches, soups, salads and desserts. 2945 S. Miami Blvd.; 919-220-6040

SUTTON STATION (EXIT 276) 58 Fifty Bistro Modern American cuisine and cocktails. 5850 Fayetteville Rd.; 919-544-8585

HOPE VALLEY COMMONS Char-Grill Burgers, milkshakes and more. 1125 W. N.C. 54; 919-489-6900

Bocci Trattoria & Pizzeria
 Traditional Italian dishes and pizzas. 5850 Fayetteville Rd.; 919-206-4067

Mattie B’s Public House Burgers, pizza, wings and house-made potato chips. 1125 W. N.C. 54; 919-401-8600

Randy’s Pizza Brick oven pizzas. 1813 Martin Luther King Jr. Pkwy.; 919-490-6850 Piper’s Deli Deli sandwiches and burgers. 3219 Old Chapel Hill Rd.; 919-489-2481 Tonali Restaurant Inventive Mexican cuisine. 3642 Shannon Rd.; 919-489-8000

SOUTHERN DURHAM / NEAR I-40 WOODCROFT SHOPPING CENTER (EXIT 274) Guacamaya Tacos and burritos. 4711 Hope Valley Rd.; 919-489-4636 Joe Van Gogh This local coffee shop sources quality beans for a superior coffee. 4711-5A Hope Valley Rd.; 919-973-3950

READERS’ FAVORITE

BRONZE WINNER

IBEST OF DURHAM 2015

Dinner every night but Monday Seasonal menus Locally driven NC cuisine Signature cocktails NC draught beers 1116 BROAD STREET DURHAM

w w w.wattsgrocer y.com

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Dulce Cafe Espresso, gelato and sandwiches. 5826 Fayetteville Rd., Ste. 106; 919-797-0497 Nantucket Grill & Bar  New England-style cuisine. 5826 Fayetteville Rd.; 919-484-8162 LINCOLN PARK WEST Danny’s Bar-B-Que Hickory-smoked barbecue. 2945 S. Miami Blvd., Ste. 118; 919-806-1965

Denny’s Diner fare serving breakfast anytime, lunch and dinner. 7021 N.C. 751, Ste. 901; 919-908-1006; dennys.com

Tender as a Mother's Love READERS’ FAVORITE

PLATINUM WINNER

READERS’ FAVORITE

BRONZE WINNER

IBEST IBEST OF DURHAM OF DURHAM 2015

2015

2510 University Dr. Durham, NC Phone 919 - 402 - 4BBQ (4227)

Catering available

Open 7 days a week 11am - 9pm

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Zinburger Gourmet burgers and wine selections. Southpoint; 919-293-1726 Makus Empanadas A variety of meat, veggie and cheese empanadas, with vegetarian and vegan options. 1125 W. N.C. 54, Ste. 304; 919-390-7525; makusempanadas.com

RENAISSANCE VILLAGE Harvest 18 Locavore, seasonal eats. 8128 Renaissance Pkwy., Ste. 114; 919-316-1818 Rise Biscuits & Donuts Daily-changing menu of doughnuts and biscuits. 8200 Renaissance Pkwy.; 919-248-2992

NEAR SOUTHPOINT HOMESTEAD MARKET (EXIT 276) Bean Traders Coffee Coffee specialties and local pastries. 105 W. N.C. 54; 919-484-2499

WESTPOINT AT 751 Town Hall Burger and Beer Hamburgers, chicken, salad and sides. 7830 N.C. 751; 919-973-0506

The Mad Popper A gourmet popcorn shop. 105 W. N.C. 54; 919-484-7677

Bonefish Grill Seafood. 7820 N.C. 751; 919-248-2906 N.C. 54 Ai Fuji Japanese Steakhouse Hibachi dishes and buy-one-get-one sushi. 202 N.C. 54; 919-998-3988

Shiki Sushi Sushi and pan-Asian choices. 207 W. N.C. 54; 919-484-4108 THE STREETS AT SOUTHPOINT (EXIT 276) American Meltdown Signature gourmet melts; sides and desserts. Southpoint; 919-473-6358 Porchetta Slow-roasted Italian-style pork sandwiches and sides. Southpoint; 919-607-7419; porchettardu.com

Akashi Japanese Grill & Sushi Bar Hibachi dishes and sushi. 2223 N.C. 54; 919-572-9444 Baba Ghannouj Mediterranean Bistro Pita wraps, platters, and salads. 105 N.C. 54; 919-484-0220 The Coffee Element Coffee, tea, smoothies and pastries. 202 N.C 54; 919-361-3320

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newsbites Seasons of the Sea

Piedmont hosts their next sustainable seafood “Seasons of the Sea” dinner May 25. Special guest will be The Boot’s new chef John May, who is planning an early summer barbecue with wholeroasted fish.

Txotx!

Black Twig Cider House, a new restaurant by partners Matthew Beason and John Eisensmith, is now open in the former Six Plates space on Erwin Road. Their menu includes sausage sandwiches and cider pairings (to play off the palate-pleasing apple and pork combo), and the restaurant offers more than 80 ciders both on draft and bottled. Inspired by Matthew’s travels through Spain’s Basque region, the cider house will feature the traditional txotx (pronounced “choach”), when patrons gather around a cider barrel to collect a sample and drink communally.

Fresh baked Delicious Seasonal Seafood Freshly Cooked Good Fish That’s the Hook

Catering available | Open 7 days a week

READERS’ FAVORITE

PLATINUM WINNER

IBEST OF DURHAM 2015

608 N. Mangum St., Durham 919.908.8970 | saltboxseafoodjoint.com

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1125 W. NC HWY 54 | Suite 304 Durham, NC

Takeout Orders: 919.390.7525 www.makusempanadas.com

@makusempanadas

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Na’Mean Asian fusion, Korean barbecue, sandwich shop. A KoKyu joint. 4823 Meadow Dr., Ste. 108; 919-699-4667 Spice & Curry Traditional Indian. 2105 E. N.C. 54; 919-544-7555

PRIMAL FOOD & SPIRITS

Primal Food & Spirits Wood-fired local meat dishes with seasonal sides and craft cocktails. 202 W. N.C. 54; 919-248-3000; primalfoodandspirits.com

RTP N.C. 55 Backyard BBQ Pit Barbecue and other Southern comfort foods. 5122 N.C. 55; 919-544-9911 Brigs at the Park Breakfast, salads and sandwiches. 4900 N.C. 55; 919-544-7473

La Tropicale Cafe & Catering Caribbean cuisine. 4716 N.C. 55; 919-638-8444 Sansui Sushi Bar & Grill Hibachi dishes and sushi. 4325 N.C. 55; 919-361-8078 Vit Goal Tofu Restaurant Korean dishes. 2107 Allendown Dr.; 919-361-9100 GREENWOOD COMMONS (EXIT 278) Benetis Restaurant Classic breakfast with a Mediterranean lunch buffet. 5410 N.C. 55; 919-806-0313 Sarah’s Empanadas Homemade empanadas. 5410 N.C. 55; 919-544-2441 Tandoor Indian Restaurant Traditional Indian dishes. 5410 N.C. 55; 919-484-2102 Thai Lanna Restaurant Authentic Thai cuisine. 5410 N.C. 55; 919-484-0808

Cafe Meridian Mediterranean and American options. 2500 Meridian Pkwy.; 919-361-9333

bleu

Jamaica Jamaica Carribean food. 4857 N.C. 55; 919-544-1532

IMPERIAL CENTER (EXIT 282) MEZ Contemporary Mexican Creative Mexican dishes, based on traditional recipes with a fresh, healthy twist. 5410 Page Rd.; 919-941-1630; mezdurham.com

Page Road Grill Traditional American dishes, from house-made soup and bread to burgers to vegetarian options. 5416 Page Rd.; 919-908-8900; pageroadgrill.com

MORE RTP DINING Carolina Glazed Donuts Coffee shop and bakery. 5400 S. Miami Blvd.; 919-474-9999 Piney Point Grill and Seafood Bar American and Creole dishes inside DoubleTree Suites. 2515 Meridian Pkwy.; 919-361-4660

True Flavors Diner Upscale Southern diner. 5410 N.C. 55; 919-316-7978

live

Mediterranean

Bistro

is Now in

READERS’ FAVORITE

PLATINUM WINNER

IBEST OF DURHAM 2015

Durham! 7021 HIGHWAY 751, #901 DURHAM

919-908-1006

OPEN 24/7! We give AARP discounts

a southern take on an Italian classic Private Dining Room Outdoor Seating 1821 Hillandale Road | Durham

919.383.8502

www.bleuolivebistro.com bleuolivebistro

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1125 W. NC HWY 54 DURHAM

919-489-7300

SOUTHPOINT LOCATION CATERING FOOD TRUCK

RESTAURANT: (919) 607-7419 FOOD TRUCK AND EVENTS: (919) 907-0995 WWW.PORCHETTARDU.COM M a y

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also check out these area restaurants …

READERS’ FAVORITE

PLATINUM WINNER

IBEST OF DURHAM

411 West The menu – including fresh pasta, seafood and pizzas – is inspired by the flavors of Italy and the Mediterranean, with a healthy Californian twist. 411 W. Franklin St.; 919-967-2782; 411west.com Acme Soups, salads, seafood and entrees with a Southern touch; outdoor dining; all ABC permits. 110 E. Main St., Carrboro; 919-929-2263; acmecarrboro.com Breadmen’s A variety of sandwiches, burgers, salads and grilled meat, as well as daily soup and casserole specials. Breakfast served all day; vegetarian options; outdoor dining; beer and wine only. 324 W. Rosemary St.; 919-967-7110; breadmens.com Crepe Traditions Sweet and savory crepes, coffee and espresso. 140 W. Franklin St., Ste. 120; 919-391-9999; crepetraditions.com Crook’s Corner Southern classics like shrimp and grits. Hoppin’ John and jalapeno-cheddar hushpuppies. 610 W. Franklin St.; 919-929-7643; crookscorner.com

Crossroads Chapel Hill at The Carolina Inn New American cuisine and seasonal specialties; all ABC permits. 211 Pittsboro St.; 919-918-2777; crossroadscuisine.com

2015

Elaine’s on Franklin Fine regional American cuisine, made with fresh, local ingredients; all ABC permits. 454 W. Franklin St.; 919-960-2770; elainesonfranklin.com Glasshalfull Mediterranean-inspired food and wine; outdoor dining; all ABC permits. 106 S. Greensboro St., Carrboro; 919-967-9784; glasshalfullcarrboro.com Imbibe Bottle shop and restaurant featuring pizza, salads and appetizers. 108 Henderson St.; 919-636-6469 Kitchen Bistro-style dining with a seasonal menu that always includes mussels. 764 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-537-8167; kitchenchapelhill.com

Now serving

KOREAN BBQ!

We are excited to introduce table service dinner, with an expanded menu! Join us for popular Korean dishes, including Korean BBQ and stews.

We cater! Between our food truck and ƉŽƉƵůĂƌĐƵƐƚŽŵŝnjĂďůĞŝďŝŵďĂƉďƵīĞƚ͕ǁĞ have the perfect food for your next event. 359 Blackwell Street • Suite 220 American Tobacco Campus • Durham, NC (919) 797 - 9728

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BasanRestaurant.com

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also check out these area restaurants … Magone Italian grill and pizza. 1129 Weaver Dairy Rd., Ste. F; 919-904-7393

Pazzo! Italian cuisine, takeout pizza. 700 Market St.; 919-929-9984; pazzo-restaurant.com/

Mama Dip’s Kitchen Traditional Southern specialties, including a country breakfast and lunch and dinner classics like fried chicken and Brunswick stew; outdoor dining; beer and wine only. 408 W. Rosemary St.; 919-942-5837; mamadips.com

Radius Wood-fired pizzas, housemade pastas, sandwiches, salads and desserts. Outdoor dining; all ABC permits. 112 N. Churton St., Hillsborough; 919-245-0601;radiuspizzeria.net

Mediterranean Deli Offers healthy vegan, vegetarian and gluten-free options as well as delicious meats from the grill; beer and wine only; outdoor dining. 410 W. Franklin St.; 919-967-2666; mediterraneandeli.com Mixed Casual Korean Bistro Specializes in bibimbap, customizable bowls of rice, meat, vegetables and sauce. 1404 E Franklin St.; 919-929-0047; mixedkoreanbistro.com

The Root Cellar Sandwiches, prepared salads, desserts and more. Beer and wine only; outdoor dining. 750 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-967-3663; rootcellarchapelhill.com Spanky’s A Chapel Hill institution since 1977, the American bar and grill serves hamburgers, brown sugar baby back ribs, garden fresh salads and barbecue; all ABC permits. 101 E. Franklin St.; 919-967-2678; spankysrestaurant.com

Squid’s The menu of fresh seafood options includes wood-grilled fillets, live Maine lobster, fried seafood and oysters; outdoor dining; all ABC permits. 1201 N. Fordham Blvd. (15-501); 919-942-8757; squidsrestaurant.com Trilogy American cafe featuring innovative twists on classic dishes. Silverspot Cinema; 919-357-9888; silverspot.net Yopop Frozen Yogurt Ice cream, smoothies and self-serve frozen yogurt. 1129 Weaver Dairy Rd.; 919-537-8229; yopops.com Yogurt Pump Since 1982, YoPo has served up frozen yogurt treats and shakes with unique flavors like mocha java and red velvet. Non-fat, low-fat and nosugar-added available. 106 W. Franklin St.; 919-942-7867; yogurtpump.com

Welcome to Glasshalfull, a local

gathering place in downtown Carrboro with a lively, casual atmosphere, beautiful, modern interior, a sexy bar serving an intriguing selection of wines and cocktails, and a kitchen dedicated to delicious contemporary American cooking.

ENJOY THE BEST OF PATIO DINING IN THE PARIS OF THE PIEDMONT 106 S. Greensboro St., Carrboro 919.967.9784

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Graham & Goolsby

Grand Gesture BY LAURA ZOLMAN KIRK

E

ric Goolsby and Heather Graham found romance in an

unlikely place for a long-term relationship: Tinder. That’s right, Heather says, “We’re ‘Tinderonies’ who are now in love and getting married!” In late 2015, about two years after their first date, Eric moved to Wyoming for a few months for work, and Heather flew out to see him. They had big plans to road trip, hike, camp and sightsee, but Heather came down with what she described as a “poorly-timed cold.” “I was the best sport I could be,” Heather says, hiking with big wads of tissues. Despite her sickness, Eric got Heather out to the perfect proposal spot, just off the tourist path at the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone National Park. “I cried, hugged him, said yes … and had to be reminded to open the box,” Heather says. “It was perfect.” The bride-to-be works as the annual fund and communications manager for Habitat for Humanity of Durham, and Eric is the founder, along with his brother and best man Kyle, of Capital Communication Services. Not many details have been nailed down yet for the couple’s big day, but

they do have a saxophone player booked, whom Eric met on the streets of Raleigh while getting coffee one day. Judging by the incredible sound, Eric expected to turn around and find a car blasting professional saxophonist Kenny G; instead it was Bradley, a N.C. Central University music grad who had lost his job and was performing on the streets with an open case at his feet. Eric walked over, dropped $20 in the case, and then invited him to play at the wedding. DM DiamondsDirect.com Your love. Our Passion.

durhammag.com ON TO

WE TWEET AT twitter.com/durhammag

FIND US AT facebook.com/durhammagazine

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WE INSTAGRAM AT @durhammag

VIDEO FLOW

THE ULTIMATE DURHAM CHECKLIST

W

e’re nearly halfway through 2016 – how many of the 70 must-do items on our list have you completed?

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PHOTO BY BRIANA BROUGH

PHOTO BY EMILY TOTH

LOG

G

o behind the scenes of our photo shoot with yoga teacher, writer and blogger Jessamyn Stanley.

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Sloate & Kirkland

Looking for Love in All the Right Places BY LAURA ZOLMAN KIRK PHOTOGRAPHY BY REBECCA AMES; BECCIAMES.COM

D

urham Academy high school sweethearts Rob Kirkland and Kyle Sloate got engaged

New Year’s Eve 2014 through a Durhamthemed scavenger hunt. It took Kyle from the spot at their school where Rob asked her to be his girlfriend, to the Hope Valley Country Club (where they would later host their wedding reception), to the water tower at American Tobacco Campus where Rob was waiting for Kyle on one knee. Their ceremony took place last October at First Presbyterian Church, where Rob and Kyle’s families shared a special collective prayer. A family friend, Morgon Moylan, served as florist for the event and the bride’s rings were a special collaboration of Rob and Kyle’s families – her engagement ring originally belonged to Rob’s grandmother and her wedding band came from her great-grandmother. After their time at Durham Academy, the bride and groom both attended UNC-Chapel Hill for undergrad. Kyle went on to receive her master’s at Duke and is now a physician assistant at North Carolina Orthopedic Clinic. Rob is a sales executive for TIBCO Software. Both Rob’s parents, George and Leslie Kirkland, and Kyle’s parents, Steve and Carolyn Sloate, are from the Hope Valley area, where the couple plans to reside in the future. DM

Want your wedding or engagement featured in our magazine? Email Amanda MacLaren at amanda@durhammag.com.

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Durham Magazine May 2016  

Durham Magazine May 2016