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60 Take Note of This 14-Year-Old Piano Prodigy 70 Summer Camp Guide 82 Cozy Living in Trinity Park

Our 3rd Annual

F EBR UARY /M AR C H 2021 DUR H AM M AG. COM

STAY AWHILE Dorian Bolden founded Beyu Caffe more than 10 years ago, intent on creating a community gathering space. Today, it's become "downtown's living room."

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community champions lead us into a new year page 36


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magazine

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2021 VOL 14 NO 1

durhammag.com   

James P. Furgurson, DDS, FAGD Nathan O. White, DDS

EXECUTIVE MANAGING EDITOR

Amanda MacLaren amanda@durhammag.com

EDITORIAL

EDITOR, CHAPEL HILL MAGAZINE

Jessica Stringer

ASSISTANT EDITOR

Education. Experience. Compassionate Care.

Hannah Lee

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT & DIGITAL EDITOR

Marie Muir

EDITORIAL INTERNS

Meredith Alling, Janet Alsas, Renee Ambroso, Aubrey Austin, Grace Beasley, Claire Burch, Madison Clark, Mia Cooper, Chiara Evans, Nicole Moorefield, Sarah Rollins, Nella Rouse, Aashna Shah, Brooke Spach and Madeline Taylor CONTRIBUTORS

Hannah McClellan, Tianna Spears and Morgan Cartier Weston

ART

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Kevin Brown

JUNIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER & PRODUCTION ASSISTANT

Lauren Wilkinson PHOTOGRAPHER

John Michael Simpson CONTRIBUTOR

Jean Carlos Rosario-Montalvo ART & PRODUCTION INTERN

Hailey Haymond

Advertising

For advertising inquiries, email advertising@durhammag.com Melissa Crane melissa@durhammag.com Lauren Phillips lauren@durhammag.com Kem Johnson kem@durhammag.com

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Caleb Rushing Durham Magazine is published by Shannon Media Inc. Subscriptions, $38 for two years, are available at durhammag.com. To purchase copies, call 919.933.1551.

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february/march

contents DEPARTMENTS & COLUMNS 6 Letter from the Editor

8 Go.See.Do. Our best bets for February and March 16 In Her Words Tianna Spears shares her struggles from 2020 and hopes for 2021 20 Noted What we’ve heard around our city ... 26 Dining Guide 82 Dollar Signs Serendipity led Kelly Witter to her happy place in Trinity Park 103 Engagement & Wedding Tying the knot, Bull City-style

DURHAM INC. 97 Biz Briefs

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHN MICHAEL SIMPSON

FEATURES

36 The Influencers Community members sing the praises of seven people who continue to help our city get through its toughest year yet 60 Tune In A 14-year-old musical prodigy moves from South Africa to Durham to pursue his dreams 64 Mic’d Up Durham Academy siblings launch a kids’ sports podcast 68 For Your Reference A quick update on how you can still utilize our local libraries 70 Summer Camp Guide Does your kid love sports? What about science or engineering? Maybe art? There are dozens of camps in the Triangle to match every kid’s interest.

100 How to Build and Maintain Your Network Ways to stay connected as communication shifts online

PEOPLE & PLACES 12 Sip + Savor 2020

13 Animal Protection Society of Durham’s Tails at Twilight – Beyond the Ballroom virtual gala

SPONSORED CONTENT

24 Healthy Durham Need to know: the COVID-19 vaccine in Durham 50 Durham Strong Businesses share how they made it through this past year and look toward the future 95 Adopt a Pet This sweet tabby is in foster care and waiting on her forever home.


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letter

I Miss Reckless Abandon

LOVE

Your Carpet

L

ast year felt like it dragged on for ages, and yet it also went by faster than any year before it. Anybody else have the same feeling? On March 6, I attended the Greater Durham Chamber of Commerce’s Take No Bull Women’s Conference at the Hilton Durham near Duke University. I sat in a room with hundreds of people, ate a meal elbow to elbow with others whom I’d never met before and shook hands with reckless abandon. Everyone could see my smile, and smiled back. Two days after the conference, my family and I took my mom out to a restaurant for her birthday. There weren’t many other people there – good, we thought, because we heard about this dangerous new virus. We took extra care washing our hands and tried not to touch too many surfaces. My brother and I ordered Coronas as a nod to this novel virus; we couldn’t have known what lay ahead. Mom’s birthday was the last time I hugged my parents and brother. And, given all that’s happened in the past year, I’m just glad that I will be hugging them again. And soon, too. All thanks to the incredible researchers, scientists, clinical trial volunteers (including my partner’s dad, Paul Menchini, who blessedly got the PfizerBioNTech vaccine in the trial) and the first people to receive the FDA-approved vaccine, like nurse Faye Tate Williams, who was the first in the Triangle to get the shot at Duke University Hospital on Dec. 14. She is one of our 2021 Influencers, not only for receiving her vaccine and documenting it to demonstrate its importance in the fight to save lives – especially the lives of those in the Black community, who are disproportionately impacted by the virus – Faye also came out of retirement in the middle of the pandemic to help out on the front lines. She is no less than a hero in my book.

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T HE COVER

Photo by John Michael Simpson

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 @amanda_maclaren amanda@durhammag.com


Can't go out? Have a BIG NIGHT IN with us! Tune into WRAL on March 11

Be dazzled by local celebrity artists from the comfort of your own home. For More Information

BigNightIn.org


Go See Do

Native American Powwow FE B. 6

The North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics hosts its 29th annual powwow virtually this year, welcoming Native American dancers, artists and musicians from across the Southeast. Tickets are $5 and free for kids younger than 5.

Pints of Love: A Virtual Valentine’s Craft Beer Experience FE B. 13-14

90 Second Beer Review, in collaboration with The Glass Jug Beer Lab and Hops Scotch Bottle Shop, celebrates craft beer this Valentine’s Day by exploring 24 big names in the Durham and New York brewing industries. Along with the virtual festival, participants can purchase a limited VIP curated 12-pack.

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go see do

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Big Night In for the Arts MARCH 11 Durham Arts Council partners with

Chatham Arts Council, Orange County Arts Commission and United Arts Council to raise nearly $1 million during this regional fundraiser broadcasted and livestreamed via WRAL. The event features performances from local and national talents such as Durham’s Branford Marsalis, addresses the impact of COVID-19 on the arts and highlights the missions of the four organizations. Funds benefit local nonprofit arts and culture organizations to assist in their recovery and reentry post-pandemic.

OUR BEST BETS FOR FEBRUARY AND MARCH EVENTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE; CHECK WITH ORGANIZERS PRIOR TO ATTENDING Compiled by Grace Beasley

VOCES8 FEB. 20

The British vocal octet performs as a part of Duke Performances’ virtual season, “The Show Must Go Online!” The professional ensemble gained international recognition by The Times in London for its extensive repertoire of concerts and recordings. The livestreamed performance, “Enchanted Isle,” combines English, Scottish and Irish folk music and contemporary ideology.


go see do

Youth Sports Sampler FE B. 20 Durham Parks & Recreation introduces children ages 7-12 to different sports, including disc golf, lacrosse and basketball. Kids will also learn the basic fundamentals of each sport in a fun, controlled and safe environment.

The Great Afikomen Hunt MARCH 21

This scavenger hunt is back, but with a new stay-at-home twist. It’s a Passover-themed romp for “quaran-teams” of all ages, filled with riddles, challenges and activities. Teams must successfully complete a puzzle and post on Facebook where they found the afikomen (a half piece of matzah) in order to compete to win gift cards from Jewish for Good for up to $180. Visit jewishforgood.org/calendar for details and registration.

Purim Costume Party and Drive-In Show FE B. 25

Don a costume to tailgate at Jewish for Good with giveaways, music, dancing and sweet treats, including, of course, hamantaschen (pastries filled with poppy seeds). The acrobatic entertainment at the event will delight audiences of all ages. The event is free, but space is limited.

Pie Day Pi K MA RCH 14

This race traverses 3.14 kilometers (1.95 miles) at C.M. Herndon Park to celebrate pi, the symbol used in mathematics equating a value rounded to eight decimal places of 3.14159265. Each finisher receives a personal crostata pie freshly baked by James Beard pastry chef award semifinalist Phoebe Lawless. (Clockwise from top left) Native American Powwow photo by Tashroom Ahsan; Big Night In for the Arts photo courtesy of Durham Arts Council; Hayti photo by Kumolu Studios; Pie Day Pi K photo courtesy of Precision Race LLC; VOCES8 photo by Kaupo Kikkas; Pints of Love photo courtesy of The Glass Jug Beer Lab

Hayti Heritage Film Festival MARCH 1-6

One of the nation’s longest-running Black film festivals celebrates its 26th anniversary this year. The festival will be held both virtually and in person, screening documentaries, fictional shorts, features and classic Black cinema along with master classes and panel discussions. f e b r ua ry/ m a r c h 2 0 2 1

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2021 SPRING VIRTUAL PERFORMANCE SEASON


people &places Sip+Savor 2020 P HOTO G RA P H Y B Y CO R NE L L WATSO N

Shannon Media Inc. hosted the fourth annual Sip+Savor food and

drink experience presented by Johnson Lexus of Durham and Raleigh on Nov. 7, transitioning from an in-person affair at Durham Performing Arts Center to an at-home dining experience due to the pandemic. Participants selected food and wine pairings from various global cuisines and then visited Johnson Lexus of Durham for contactless meal pickup while enjoying live music by The Simple Joy band. Each meal included four entrees and a dessert to be shared by two people with four half 1

bottles of wine from The Oak House at Durham. The menus featured fare from local restaurants such as Boricua Soul, Goorsha, Guglhupf Bakery, Cafe & Biergarten, Harvest 18, Luna Rotisserie & Empanadas, The Mad Hatter’s Café & Bakeshop / Saladelia Cafe, Soul Cocina and Zweli’s Kitchen & Catering. Participants then went home to watch chef-tell-all videos and take a mini wine-tasting class. Sip+Savor donated a portion of the proceeds from this year’s event to local restaurants and The Carolina Theatre of Durham. The event was made possible thanks to sponsors US Foods, Carrboro Coffee Roasters, Trinity Partners, Durham Coca-Cola, Downtown Durham Inc., eXO Skin Simple and The Oak House.

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1 Durham Magazine’s Marie Muir and her dad, Allen Muir. 2 Johnson Lexus Executive General Manager of Lexus Division Roger Yiu. 3 Members of The Simple Joy. 4 The Oak House provided the wine pairings for the five-course meals. 5 Audrey Shore of The Carolina Theatre and Durham Magazine COO Rory Gillis.


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PHOTOG RAPHY B Y CATHI B ODIN E

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The Animal Protection Society of Durham celebrated its 50th anniversary at its Tails at Twilight Beyond the Ballroom virtual gala on Nov. 8. The Zoom event included a live auction, a mixology class led by Shannon Healy of Alley Twenty Six and a “grab-and-gala” boxed meal from JB Duke Hotel. More than 150 items were included in this year’s auction, including a pet-friendly vacation, jewelry from Jewelsmith and a “Face of APS” pet photo session. APS cared for 4,245 animals in 2020; the $110,000 that sponsors and supporters raised from the gala will support APS throughout the next year to continue supporting Durham’s animals in need. – by Renee Ambroso

1 APS board member, volunteer and Tails at Twilight Gala Committee Member Susan Teer and APS Executive Director Shafonda Davis. 2 Albus and Chico with their owners, Morgan Cartier Weston and James Weston. 3 Longtime APS volunteer and supporter Sally Fessler with Oreo, adopted from APS. 4 Barley and APS alum Margot, pets of Tails at Twilight Committee Member Tara Stocker and her husband and event volunteer Keith Stocker. 5 Brendan Marks and Durham Magazine’s Hannah Lee. 6 Volunteer and Tails at Twilight Gala Committee Member Nancy Kent. f e b r ua ry/ m a r c h 2 0 2 1

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in her words

Starting Over RA I S E D I N DU R HAM, T H E AUT H OR HAS WRI T T E N F OR

T H E LO S A NGE LE S T IM E S , M ATADOR N E T WO RK A ND PO L IT ICO , A ND

WA S F E AT UR ED O N A B C N E W S,

B US I N E S S I N SI DER , C N N , N P R, PR I ’ S

T H E WO RL D AND

I N T H E NE W YO R K T IM E S . T I A N NA

I S T H E F O U NDER A N D C RE ATI VE

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WE B S I T E CALLED

T I A N N A’ S C R EATI VE A N D C RE ATOR OF

T H E B LO G “ W HAT’ S UP WI T H T I ANNA.”

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extremely excited about rescinded its offer due to the virus. It’s been nearly a year without working a full-time job. I found myself wrapped BY TIANNA SPEARS in grief and anger; mourning the loss of career advancement, of stability due to the loss of income and upset that everything I had elcome to 2021. A worked so hard for was gone. With the ethos new year, a break from of America or the American Dream embraced anything related to 2020. so tightly in my grip, I found myself wondering, The majority of us are “Who am I without career and productivity? excited to have this fresh Why do I feel so unproductive on the days that energy. I do absolutely nothing, cross not one item off But the majority of us my to-do list?” In reality, I was grieving the loss are also grieving the loss of loved ones, health, of a sense of control. careers and a sense of normalcy. Simply put, I realize I am not alone; there are millions of 2020 took more than it gave. other unemployed Americans. The one thing New Year’s Eve is one of my favorite that unemployment has done on a personal holidays. I love the idea of putting the past level is challenge me to relearn. This is the first behind me and opening myself up to new time in my life that I have been still. Long gone experiences. I live for filling in calendars and are the days that I spent on autopilot, rushing planners with goals, resolutions, vision boards through any morning routine, and eating my and more. A new year is a space of infinite breakfast in my car. possibility for me. In “Outside of the basics, the past, I’ve spent how much do you really the holiday on packed need?” my childhood streets in New Orleans friend, Kiera Hinton, asked with friends, at parties over a socially distanced in Durham and on walk downtown as we airplanes. This New contemplated stopping for The author and her childhood Year’s Eve, I cooked ice cream at The Parlour. friend, Kiera Hinton, at Pearsontown collard greens and black- Elementary in 2001. She has known me since eyed peas, a tradition my family moved to in my family. From 11:50 p.m. to midnight, Durham when I was 9 years old, back when I turned up the volume on my favorite music our legs grew faster than the rest of our bodies. and danced in my living room. But the only Now here we are, 20 years later. person in my living room was me. In the new year, I am relearning I find that I am grieving the loss of and reframing. Living through such an community, of being with my close friends unprecedented time is challenging and and family, of feeling a part of something exhausting. I’m giving myself grace and bigger than myself. That is when vulnerability learning how to take care of myself. In the comes in. I find myself reaching out and stillness, I watch my plants grow and try to asking for help for the first time in my life. move my body at least once a day. I try to be The last year stretched me in ways that I did kind to myself, remembering that I’ve never not know were possible – and I believe many experienced a pandemic before. We’re all others are feeling the same. doing our best. “You can do hard things,” I found myself unemployed right before author Glennon Doyle writes. Well, bring it, the pandemic hit in 2020. A job that I was 2021. I’m ready.

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noted

WHAT WE’VE HE ARD AROUND OUR CIT Y … Compiled by Chiara Evans

PHOTO BY WILL GEHRMAN PHOTO BY BILL RUSS PHOTOGRAPHY

Metalwork artists José Pereira and Jackie MacLeod (pictured at left and above, respectively) and Jackie’s mentee Whitney Hunt were selected to create public art displays 20

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Durham resident Wesley Hyatt released his 10th book,

Durham-based rock group The Pinkerton Raid released its A-side single “Cinnamon

The Museum of Durham History opened its exhibit, “Faces of Durham,” on Nov. 23 outside its doors along the sidewalk. Each of the 19 framed banners features an individual who uniquely contributed to Durham’s history, ranging from school integration activists Ann Atwater and C.P. Ellis to blues musician Blind Boy Fuller and choreographer Baba Chuck Davis. Those featured on the banners will change on a semi-annual basis.

Sweet” in January. The name for the song came from lead vocalist Jesse James DeConto’s wife’s personal experiences and her finding empowerment during the #MeToo movement. The title for its B-side, “Au Cheval,” came from a Chicago restaurant with a famously desirable cheeseburger. And the seize-the-day ethos (“Suck the marrow from the bone”) comes from Jesse’s adventurous younger brother, who would wait hours in line for said cheeseburger. The band’s new album – featuring bassist Jon DePue and drummer Scott McFarlane – deviates slightly from its past work, as it promises to be more “ground-shaking” and “hip-swaying.” International design firm Duda|Paine Architects announced

last year that it will design the new gateway facility for Sarah P. Duke Gardens. The project includes a 16,000-square-foot addition west of the existing Doris Duke Center, including a gift shop, a lobby, classroom space and offices as well as a 2,500-square-foot addition to Kirby Horton Hall north of the Doris Duke Center.

F E B R UA RY/ M A R C H 2 0 2 1

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for Beechwood and Maplewood cemeteries. José will build artistic handrails for Maplewood Cemetery, while Jackie and Whitney will create a bench for Beechwood Cemetery. Each team received $7,500 to design and install its pieces, expected to be completed this spring.

ARTS & CULTURE

From births to awards to new biz and more –

“Betty White on TV: From Video Vanguard to Golden Girl,” in December 2020. The homage to the beloved actress and comedian – who just turned 99 on Jan. 17 – is available on Amazon. Duda|Paine Architects releases its third book, “Shaping Place,” in spring 2021 following its 25th anniversary. Readers will find a portfolio of completed and in-process projects as well as people and design philosophies that shape the firm.

IN REMEMBRANCE WRAL premiered its documentary, “MaryAnn,” on Jan. 13. The story details the life of MaryAnn Black, a Durham-based social worker who passed away on March 26, 2020. She served on the Durham County Board of Commissioners, worked as the associate vice president of community relations at Duke University Health System and served in the N.C. House of Representatives. The

PHOTO BY BRIANA BROUGH

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documentary is now available for on-demand viewing on wraldocumentary.com, Apple TV+, Roku, Amazon Fire TV and Samsung Smart TV.

Community Safety & Wellness Task Force

PHOTO BY SHAW PHOTOGRAPHY GROUP

Stronger and Faster Durham and Together We Stand NC released a shirt on Jan. 23, 2021,

in memory of runner Ahmaud Arbery’s murder on Feb. 23, 2020, in Brunswick, Georgia. The front of the shirt reads “MAUD 2.23,” and the back features a quote by Nelson Mandela: “As long as poverty, injustice and gross inequality persist in our world, none of us can truly rest.” Fleet Feet Durham will host a virtual 2.23 mile run in collaboration with Stronger and Faster Durham’s virtual Maud 2.23 strength training session on Feb. 23.

GIVING BACK GlaxoSmithKline awarded five local

nonprofits $40,000 each in November 2020 during the 12th annual GSK IMPACT Awards for the Triangle, which recognizes organizations that are working hand in hand with the community to improve health. Winners included Book Harvest, Families Moving Forward, Kramden Institute, Rebound and Threshold, and were chosen by a panel consisting of GSK employees and local and national community health leaders. As of December 2020, the Home Builders Association of Durham, Orange and Chatham Counties and BuildSense provided

nearly $275,000 worth of scholarships over its 20-year partnership to local high school students pursuing post-high school education in building trades. The LE Meyers Scholarship is named for Leon Meyers, a partner at BuildSense with a legacy of commitment to improving his community. Zakat Foundation of America and USDA Farmers to Families, in partnership with local

Nonprofit Meals on Wheels Durham received $750,000 from MacKenzie Scott, the former wife of Amazon founder Jeff Bezos. MacKenzie gave $4.2 billion across 384 charitable organizations who support communities in need. The donation will help Meals on Wheels further its mission to deliver meals to elderly, homebound, disabled or low-income residents. The Durham-Chapel Hill area was ranked the No. 10 place where people give the most to charity, according to a study released by SmartAsset in November. Charitable donations makeup nearly 30% of our area’s tax returns. The study analyzed percent of tax returns with charitable contributions, charitable contributions as percent of income and state volunteer rates.

Wellness brand Carpe donated two cases of its underarm antiperspirants to TROSA, a treatment program for individuals suffering from substance abuse, on Giving Tuesday in December 2020.

ON THE MOVE Durham city representatives named Judge Shamieka Rhinehart (pictured right) and community justice advocate Marcia Owen as co-chairs of the new Durham

House Majority Whip James Clyburn appointed Rep. G.K. Butterfield of North Carolina’s First Congressional District as senior chief deputy whip of the House Democratic Caucus for the 117th Congress, a position previously held by Rep. John Lewis. “Both of us were longtime friends and colleagues of the late John Lewis, and I am honored that G.K. will fill John’s role as senior chief deputy whip,” James says. G.K. shared in a press release that he plans to work across the aisle to pass legislation supporting the American economy following the COVID-19 pandemic. Andrew Lakis, a Duke University alumnus

who currently serves as executive director of Teach For America for Eastern North Carolina, was named executive director of the Robertson Scholars Leadership Program, an undergraduate merit scholarship program that is sponsored and administered by The Robertson Foundation in cooperation with UNC-Chapel Hill and Duke. Andrew will assume his new role later this winter, taking over from William R. Goodell, who has served as interim executive director since April 2020. Andrew and his wife, Kristen Lakis, live in Durham with their two sons, Abe and Sam.

PHOTO COURTESY OF ANDREW LAKIS

mosques and churches, distributed 1,248 boxes of food to low-income families on Dec. 11, 2020, at Jamaat Ibad Ar-Rahman on Revere Road.

in December. The task force plans to evaluate public safety and wellness needs of residents and recommend future programs focused on community-based prevention, intervention and reentry. “I want us to build on the wonderful resources we have right here in Durham as well as learning from the best programs around the country to make Durham a model for community-based safety,” Shamieka says.

Barry Van Deman left the Museum of Life and Science on Dec. 31, 2020, after

serving as president and CEO for 16 years. Barry strengthened the museum’s reputation nationally by partnering with various museums, zoos and universities on exhibits, programs and research. He is recognized for growing earned and contributed revenues, including two f e b r ua ry/ m a r c h 2 0 2 1

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Butler University, and Jackson Brimfield will play golf at the University of Louisville. North Carolina Central University hosted its

Durham County bond referendums of $18.4 million. His successor will be chosen by a search committee established by the Museum’s board of directors.

UNC-TV Public Media North Carolina rebranded itself to PBS North Carolina, Powered by the UNC System on Jan. 12, 2021, updating its logo, visual style guide and messaging. The network first aired in 1955 as WUNC-TV Channel 4, North Carolina’s educational television station. The change to PBS North Carolina represents the innovative multimedia platform it has become, encompassing its statewide broadcast reach to North Carolina’s 100 counties and the many ways it serves communities across platforms and in-person engagement. PBS North Carolina will utilize the UNC System to inform communities in times of crisis; engage with complex local and national issues; offer opportunities to learn; and raise the level of discourse around science, arts and humanities for all North Carolinians.

MARKING MILESTONES

Four Durham Academy seniors formally committed to continue their athletic careers at Division I schools in November. Jay Shanahan and Anna Catherine Wilson will run crosscountry and track at Davidson College. Quinn Shanahan will run cross-country and track at 22

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136th commencement ceremony virtually on Dec. 5, 2020, to award 642 degrees to graduates of doctorate, juris doctor, master’s, professional and bachelor’s programs. Emily Neil-Viera, a seventh grader at Reaching All Minds Academy, was one of 15 students across the state to receive the Victor E. Bell Jr. Scholarship in December 2020. The scholarship allocates $2,000 to Emily every year from now through her fourth year of college, making her eligible to receive up to $20,000 as long as she maintains academic excellence.

WHAT AN HONOR North Carolina Campus Compact, a statewide network of colleges and universities with a shared commitment to community engagement, awarded North Carolina Central University senior Tymia Atkinson the Community Impact Award during a ceremony on Nov. 13, 2020, for her leadership and service on campus. Tymia studies social work and aspires to be a legal advocate and case manager focusing on domestic violence and sexual assault. Tymia is involved in several student organizations, including serving as president of the NCCU Social Work Society, advocating for student mental health needs. “Doing work that is important to the community, my peers and myself is what drives my desire to be a servant leader,” Tymia says. “This award reminds me that the time and effort I provide is well worth it.” The North Carolina Literary & Historical Association awarded William A. Darity Jr. and A. Kirsten Mullen the Ragan Old North State Award for Nonfiction in December 2020 for their book, “From Here to Equality: Reparations for Black Americans in the Twenty-

F E B R UA RY/ M A R C H 2 0 2 1

First Century.” The husband-wife team explores the economic and social impact of slavery, the mirage of equality during Reconstruction and the multiplier effect of ongoing institutional racism to imprison African Americans in poverty while building white wealth for generations. William is the Samuel DuBose Cook Distinguished Professor of Public Policy at Duke University. Kirsten is an author, folklorist and museum consultant. “The Black Baptism,” directed by Stephanie Diane Ford, won best regional film at CineOdyssey Film Festival on Dec. 9, 2020. The fantasy short film tells the story of an imprisoned woman who must complete daunting tasks in order to survive. The Durham City-County Planning Department released the initial results from its new comprehensive plan with the help of initiative ENGAGEDurham in December 2020. The three-year plan, which began in November 2019, aims to actively seek input from Durham community members, particularly those traditionally left out of planning measures. The end result will be a broad policy document that reflects the needs of the community surrounding housing, transportation, the natural environment and more. Locals can share their feedback on the draft at durham.mysocialpinpoint.com/ comprehensiveplan until Feb. 19. The Sports Turf Managers Association, a professional organization of 2,700 men and women who manage sports fields worldwide, announced its 2021 board of directors at its virtual 32nd annual conference. Scott Thompson, superintendent of sports fields and grounds at Duke University, was chosen as at-large elected director. Durham Performing Arts Center and Hyatt Place Durham Southpoint achieved GBAC

STAR Facility Accreditation from the Global Biorisk Advisory Council. Accreditation ensures a facility follows a strict cleaning, disinfection and infectious disease prevention program.


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NEED TO KNOW: THE COVID-19 VACCINE IN DURHAM By Chiara Evans

I N PA RT N E R S H I P W I T H

CITY OF DURHAM | COUNTY OF DURHAM | DUKE UNIVERSITY | DUKE UNIVERSITY HEALTH SYSTEM | DURHAM CAN | DURHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS DURHAM CONGREGATIONS IN ACTION | GREATER DURHAM CHAMBER OF COMMERCE | INTERDENOMINATIONAL MINISTERIAL ALLIANCE LINCOLN COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTER | PROJECT ACCESS OF DURHAM COUNTY | PARTNERSHIP FOR A HEALTHY DURHAM TRIANGLE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION | THE INSTITUTE

I

PHOTO BY SHAWN ROCCO/DUKEHEALTH

n a coordinated effort among the Durham County which includes frontline essential workers, is next, followed Department of Public Health (DCoDPH), the North by Group 4 that includes anyone 16-64 years old with highCarolina Department of Health and Human Services risk medical conditions, incarcerated individuals or those (NCDHHS) and local partners, Durham residents are living in close quarters, and remaining essential workers beginning to receive COVID-19 vaccinations. not yet vaccinated. The general public will have access to On Dec. 20, 2020, the the vaccine in Group 5. State DCoDPH received its first and local officials will have to shipment of 3,200 doses of manage the influx of vaccines Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccine. as well as when, where and Among the first to receive how to distribute them, since shots are health care workers there is not unlimited supply, and staff regularly exposed to and demand for the vaccine COVID-19 patients, health care is expected to outstrip our workers issuing the vaccine allocation initially. But the hope and residents or staff in longis that vaccines will become term care facilities. available to all community The DCoDPH is providing members by summer 2021. vaccinations according to the Dr. Ibukun Akinboyo, Roy Cuttino, 75, gets his COVID-19 vaccination on Jan. 6, 2021. state and national phased assistant professor in Duke’s COVID-19 vaccine rollout plan. Dr. Cameron Wolfe, associate division of pediatric infectious diseases, explains that both professor of medicine at Duke University, offered guidance Moderna and Pfizer vaccines received emergency use to North Carolina and Durham County officials regarding the authorization and were tested primarily in adults. The FDA, vaccination prioritization. He says the prioritization aims to therefore, has not approved its use for children younger than factor in people’s risk, potential exposure to the virus, as well 16, but trials involving children have begun. as equity and diversity. “I expect that in the next three, six months, those trials will “The one thing we’ve tried really hard to do is make sure be published,” Dr. Akinboyo says. “The FDA can go back and that we’re being inclusive to all different sections of our make decisions on when and how to vaccinate to provide community, no matter what your race, ethnicity, affluence or immunizations for children.” job is,” Dr. Wolfe says. Vaccines are currently available via Duke Health and According to DCoDPH, COVID-19 vaccinations are now at DCoDPH, but more locations will be added as supply available to Group 2, all people age 65 and older. There is no increases. Durham residents can visit yourspotyourshot. requirement to have certain qualifying chronic conditions. nc.gov for further information on when and where to receive While DCoDPH has yet to release an exact timeline outlining their vaccination. When you are eligible to receive a vaccine, when the following phases are to expected occur, Group 3, you can also call DCoDPH’s appointment line at 919-560-HELP (919-560-4357) Monday - Friday, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

F I N D A C O M P L E T E L I S T O F H E A LT H Y D U R H A M P A R T N E R S AT

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 @HEALTHYDURHAM2020


H E A LT H Y

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A NEW VISION … Healthy Durham 20/20 serves as a catalyst and amplifier for a thriving and coordinated culture of health throughout Durham County bringing together a broad coalition of government, education, faith, healthcare, community, philanthropy and business F I N D A organizations. L I S T O F H E A LT H Y D U R H A M P A R T N E R S AT

DURHAM 20/20

DCoDPH says receiving a COVID-19 vaccine is “critical for ending the spread of COVID-19 in the community.” The vaccine stimulates an immune defense, Dr. Wolfe says. If you come into contact with the virus, you will not get sick from it, but others who come into contact with you still can, which is why those who receive the vaccine still need to practice the “three Ws” – wear a mask over your nose and mouth; wait 6 feet apart; and wash your hands. Practicing the “three Ws” after completing the vaccination (two shots) will keep a vaccinated person from transmitting the virus to a person who has not been vaccinated. When enough individuals acquire this defense, communities achieve herd immunity. “What we should see over the next few months, if we do this well, is that the total case burden of patients getting infected starts to fall down and will continue to fall,” Dr. Wolfe says. “I think the way that we dig our way out of this quagmire is to make sure we can get people protected as soon as possible, not just for them as an individual, but for us as a community.” Dr. Akinboyo says for those considering the vaccine, “you have to consider what it means to you, how it impacts [you]. ... We know this is actually good for your future because it should prevent you from getting the disease that is rampaging through our country.” Dr. Howard Eisenson, chief medical officer at Lincoln Community Health Center, explains that most side effects of the vaccine are minor or local. “I had my own vaccine last week, and I’d have to say it bothered me less than the flu vaccine,” Dr. Eisenson says. “A little soreness for a couple of days, not even bad enough to take a Tylenol for it.” He says some people may experience fatigue, headache or a low-grade fever, but those symptoms tend to be minor and short-lived. “When you consider the kind of protection that the vaccines confer, I think the great majority of people would agree that those nuisance effects are well worth it,” Dr. Eisenson says. The DCoDPH recommends that Durham residents with further questions visit dcopublichealth.org/covid19vaccines follow along on social media at @durhamhealthnc or email DCoCOVIDvaccines@dconc.gov. Information about eligibility and appointments will be updated frequently as new vaccination sites open.

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taste NORTHERN DURHAM / NEAR I-85

GUESS ROAD Northgate Mall Food court permanently closed. Exterior restaurants C&H Cafeteria and Randy’s Pizza remain open for takeout. 1058 W. Club Blvd. Earth To Us Latin and American vegan dishes including cauliflower wings, garlic tostones, arepas and more. 1720 Guess Rd., Ste. 18; 919-908-1000 Gocciolina Upscale Italian fare with fresh specials featured on a prix-fixe dinner menu in the dining room or at outside tables. This wildly popular restaurant has graced our Best Of list again and again. 3314 Guess Rd.; 919-973-4089; gocciolina.com Hog Heaven Bar-B-Q Homestyle Eastern barbecue, fried chicken and seafood. Enjoy with a giant glass of iced tea. 2419 Guess Rd.; 919-286-7447; hogheavenbarbecue.com Hong Kong Chinese Restaurant Hong Kong-style dim sum, plus authentic Szechuan, Canton, Peking and Hunan Cuisine. 3003 Guess Rd.; 919-479-8339; hongkongdimsumindurham.com Jimmy’s Famous Hot Dogs Old-fashioned burgers, fries and a mean Carolina-style dog. 2728 Guess Rd.; 919-471-0005; jimmysfamoushotdogs.com La Cacerola Cafe & Restaurant Honduran specialties such as pupusas and chorizo asado. 2016 Guess Rd.; 919-265-7916; lacacerolanc.com Thai Spoon All the trappings for a delicious experience: pad thai, drunken noodles and curries. 3808 Guess Rd.; 919-908-7539; thaispoon1nc.com HILLSBOROUGH ROAD Bennett Pointe Grill & Bar There’s something to please all palates on the large menu of this multi-regional American restaurant. 4625 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-382-9431; bpgrill.com El Jefecito Exceptionally fresh tacos, quesadillas and burritos. 4910 Hillsborough Rd.; eljefecitofoodtruck.com Rockin’ Rolls Sushi Express All-you-can-eat sushi, soup, salads, appetizers like spring rolls, crab rangoon and gyoza, plus entrees including teriyaki and hibachi dinners. 3405 Hillsborough Rd., Ste. E; 919-251-8822; rockinrollssushi.com/durham Shanghai Restaurant Established in the 1980s, this Cantonese restaurant offers both Americanized and authentic dishes. 3433 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-383-7581; shanghaidurham.com

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Advertisers highlighted in yellow *Details are subject to change. Check restaurant websites and social media channels prior to visiting.

HILLANDALE ROAD Bleu Olive High-quality comfort food incorporating local ingredients and Mediterranean flair. Family operated and chef-driven. 1821 Hillandale Rd.; 919-383-8502; bleuolivebistro.com BR El Corral Mexican Restaurant Authentic Mexican faijitas, tacos, enchiladas and a great chorizo queso dip. 1821 Hillandale Rd., Ste. 8; 919-309-4543; elcorralrestaurantnc.com Melo Trattoria & Tapas Classic Italian – think spaghetti and meatballs and chicken parmigiana – meets tapas. 1821 Hillandale Rd., Ste. 3; 919-384-9080; melotrattoria.com Pomodoro Italian Kitchen Homemade sauces on fresh-made pizzas, pastas and other Italian favorites. 1811 Hillandale Rd.; 919-382-2915; pomodoroitaliankitchen.info NORTH POINTE DRIVE The French Corner Bakery Curbside pickup available for artisan breads, crafted tarts and pastries, plus lunch. 2005 North Pointe Dr., Ste. B; 919-698-9836 MORE NORTHERN DURHAM DINING Alpaca Peruvian rotisserie chicken. Need we say more? 302 Davidson Ave.; 919-220-9028; alpacachicken.com Bullock’s Bar-B-Cue A staple in the community since 1952, serving up soul in Eastern-style barbecue, Brunswick stew and fried chicken. 3330 Quebec Dr.; 919-383-3211; bullocks-bbq.com Dogwood Bar & Grill American fare including burgers, sandwiches, soups and salads, plus larger entrees like baby back ribs, shepherd’s pie and penne alle vodka. Try the House Nachos (chips are made in-house) and the spinach salad. 5110 N. Roxboro St.; 919-973-2342; dogwoodbarandgrill.com Goodberry’s Frozen Custard All-natural frozen custard with a variety of topping options. 3906 N. Roxboro St.; 919-477-2552; goodberrys.com Picnic Order the pulled pork, of course, but also the fried chicken, mac and cheese, and hushpuppies. 1647 Cole Mill Rd.; 919-908-9128; picnicdurham.com BR

Silver Spoon Restaurant A large menu of breakfast favorites like strawberry waffles and omelettes, plus sandwiches, pastas, salads and kids plates. 5230 N. Roxboro St.; 919-479-7172; silverspoonnc.com Skrimp Shack Fast casual seafood restaurant serving addictive shrimp, fish and a variety of other fried and grilled seafood. 3600 N. Duke St., Ste. 28B; 919-477-0776; theskrimpshack.com

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Brunch Outdoor Seating Full Bar Kid’s Menu Beer & Wine

Taqueria Los Amigos Mexican and Honduran food. Takeout available. 3810 N. Duke St.; 984-888-0950

NEAR DOWNTOWN

BROAD STREET Cloche Coffee Serving coffee drinks made with Larry’s Coffee as well as tea, chai and other assorted drinks and snacks in a bright space filled with plant life. Get your coffee fix to go or savor each sip on its outdoor patio. 721 Broad St.; 919-748-3333; clochecoffee.com Joe Van Gogh Grab to-go coffee at this local coffee shop that sources quality beans for superior coffee. 1104-B Broad St.; 919-286-4800; joevangogh.com The Loop Restaurant Burgers, thin-crust or cauliflower crust pizzas and hand-dipped milkshakes. 1116 Broad St.; 919-408-7448; thelooprestaurant.com The Palace International African cuisine, including curry goat, dovi chicken and samosas. 1104-A Broad St.; 919-416-4922; thepalaceinternational.com Wellspring Cafe Salad and hot bar in the Whole Foods Market, plus sandwiches, pizza and sushi. As of press time, the salad bar is temporarily closed. 621 Broad St.; 919-286-2290 BULL CITY MARKET The Mad Hatter’s Café & Bakeshop The artisan café and bakery celebrates the sweet things in life. Scratchmade cakes, cupcakes and pastries, organic salads, sandwiches and wraps, with breakfast all day and delicious brunch every weekend. Espresso, juice and organic smoothie bar as well as local beer and wine selection. 1802 W. Main St.; 919-286-1987; madhatterbakeshop.com BR ERWIN ROAD Early Bird Donuts Doughnuts, biscuits, croissant breakfast sandwiches and coffee. Try the cinnamon sugar doughnut. 2816 Erwin Rd., Ste. 101; 984-888-0417


Hook & Reel Cajun Seafood & Bar Specialty seafood boils, raw bar, fish baskets, po’ boys and sliders. 2608 Erwin Rd., Ste. 104; 984-439-8651; hookreel.com/location/durham

The Durham Filling Station Breakfast fare, like madefrom-scratch biscuits, any style of eggs, famous pinto beans, burgers and upgraded hot dogs. 617 Hicks St.; 919-797-1006

Locopops Gourmet frozen pops in a variety of rotating flavors like lavender cream, strawberry lemonade and malted milk ball. 2618 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-286-3500; ilovelocopops.com

Itaewon Grill Build-your-own Korean barbecue bowls for takeout with a variety of meats and meat substitutes, toppings and sauces. 2608 Erwin Rd., Ste. 132; 919-864-9742; itaewongrillkbbq.com

Blue Corn Cafe Authentic Latin-American fare with fresh, organic ingredients. 716 Ninth St.; 919-286-9600; bluecorncafedurham.com

Metro 8 Steakhouse Classic American steakhouse with an Argentinian flair. Pair empanadas with a filet mignon or crab-stuffed shrimp with a churrasco steak. 746 Ninth St.; 919-416-1700; metro8steakhouse.com

MediTerra Grill Mediterranean and Lebanese cuisine, offering gyros, kabobs and curry. 2608 Erwin Rd., Ste. 136; 919-383-0066; mediterranc.com Naan Stop Indian Cuisine Authentic Indian cuisine with dishes like daal makhani, paneer tikka masala and biryani. 2812 Erwin Rd., Ste. 103; 919-891-3488 & 919-797-2100; naanstopduke.com NOSH “Eclectic foodstuffs” like “Mike’s Breakfast Pizza,” “Coach’s Queso” sandwich and the brown derby chopper salad. As of press time, temporarily closed. 2812 Erwin Rd., Ste. 101; 919-383-4747; noshfood.com BR Saladelia Cafe @ Hock Plaza The cafe offers simple and honest food prepared with authentic, local and seasonal ingredients. Espresso, juice and organic smoothie bar, yum-on-the-run pastries, gourmet sandwiches, salads and soups. Enjoy on its outdoor patio. 2424 Erwin Rd.; 919-416-1400; saladelia.com BR

Smashburger Unique burgers smashed on the grill, chicken and salads. 2608 Erwin Rd., Ste. 116; 919-237-1070; smashburger.com Sushi Love Specialty sushi rolls, such as the “Honey Love” roll topped with mango and kiwi, as well as other Asian cuisine favorites. 2812 Erwin Rd., Ste. 204; 919-309-2401; sushilovedurham.com ERWIN SQUARE Guasaca Arepas, salads and rice bowls with South American flavor. 2200 W. Main St., Ste. A100; 919-294-8939; guasaca.com Local 22 Kitchen & Bar Upscale Southern-inspired cuisine, with emphasis on food sourced within a 30-mile radius and local brews. 2200 W. Main St.; 919-286-9755; local22durham.com BR Parizade Sophisticated Mediterranean food like grilled bronzino, Australian lamb chops and pan-fried Roman dumplings. 2200 W. Main St.; 919-286-9712; parizadedurham.com Shuckin’ Shack Oyster Bar Seafood restaurant serving up shrimp, oysters, fish-n-chips, surf-n-turf dinners and more. 2200 W. Main St., Ste. A140; 984-219-7337; theshuckinshack.com NINTH STREET DISTRICT Alpaca Peruvian rotisserie chicken. Need we say more? 703-A Ninth St.; 919-908-1597; alpacachicken.com Banh’s Cuisine Vietnamese and Chinese dishes with great vegetarian specials. Cash only! Currently open for takeout, with patio tables available. 750 Ninth St.; 919-286-5073

Burger Bach Signature New Zealand grass-fed beef burgers and fresh-cut fries. 737 Ninth St., Ste. 220; 919-973-4416; theburgerbach.com Chicken Bee Korean fried chicken as well as other dishes like bibimbap, kimchi fried rice and bulgogi. 810 Ninth St., Ste. 129; 984-888-5561; chickenbee.com Cocoa Cinnamon Signature hand-brewed coffees and lattes to-go, like the “Future Nostalgia” latte with cinnamon and anise from their seasonal menu. 2627 Hillsborough Rd.; cocoacinnamon.com Cosmic Cantina Authentic Mexican cuisine with vegan options. House-made mole and corn tortillas. Pair with a margarita pitcher. 1920 Perry St.; 919-286-1875 Dain’s Place This pub’s fare is centered on its awardwinning “thick and juicy and juicy and thick burgers.” 754 Ninth St.; 919-416-8800; dainsplace.bar Del Rancho Mexican Grill Authentic Mexican lunch and dinner menu with a full-service bar. 730 Ninth St.; 919-286-5330; delranchomexicangrill.com Devil’s Pizzeria & Restaurant Handmade pizzas, pastas, wings, strombolis, subs, calzones and desserts with daily specials. 742 Ninth St.; 919-286-3090; devilspizza.menufy.com Elmo’s Diner Homemade Southern classics with breakfast favorites like cinnamon apple waffles and biscuits and gravy served all day in a casual, family-friendly setting. 776 Ninth St.; 919-416-3823; elmosdiner.com BR Happy + Hale Healthy salads, bowls, breakfast, smoothies, cocktails and cold-pressed juice. 703B Ninth St.; 984-439-1790; happyandhale.com

BR

Heavenly Buffaloes Chicken wings (bone-in and boneless) as well as vegan wings in more than 25 rubs and sauces, including peri peri and Jamaican jerk. Plus waffle fries! 1807 W. Markham Ave.; 919-237-2358; heavenlybuffaloes.com International Delights Authentic Mediterranean & Palestinian-Lebanese inspired cuisine including pita wraps, gyros, falafel, kabobs and baklava. 740 Ninth St.; 919-286-2884; iddurham.com Juju Asian fusion tapas including selections like steamed barbecue Kurobuta pork belly and chicken fried oysters. Try the crispy Brussels sprouts! 737 Ninth St., Ste. 210; 919-286-3555; jujudurham.com BR

Lime & Lemon Indian Grill & Bar Northern and southern Indian specialties including Gobi Manchurian, Paneer Tikka, Chicken Tikka and Hariyali Murg Kebab. 811 Ninth St.; 919-748-3456; limenlemonnc.com BR

Mi Calvillo Authentic Mexican fare open for carryout. 748 Ninth St.; 984-219-1642 Moe’s Original BBQ Barbecue sandwiches, platters and Southern-styled sides such as cornbread and baked beans. 2014 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-237-1004; moesoriginalbbq.com/durham Monuts Scratch-made doughnuts, pastries, English muffins, bagels and breakfast sandwiches. Try the bagel and lox. 1002 Ninth St.; 919-286-2642; monutsdonuts.com BR Pincho Loco Latin-flavored ice creams, milkshakes, popsicles and more. Flavors like tequila, Tiger Tail (Mexican vanilla and chocolate), guava, tamarind and more. 1918 Perry St.; 919-286-5111; pincho-loco.business.site Secrets Pho and Noodle Bar Traditional Vietnamese dishes including stir-fry and noodle bowls. 810 Ninth St., Ste. 130; 984-888-5111; secretsphoandnoodlebar.com Triangle Coffee House Coffee and pastries with selections like vegan blueberry muffins. 714 Ninth St.; 919-748-3634; trianglecoffeehouse.com Vin Rouge French bistro-style dinner with regular oyster specials and Sunday brunch. Get the hanger steak and frites! 2010 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-416-0466; vinrougerestaurant.com BR ZenFish Poké Bar A healthy, fast-casual restaurant serving poké (raw fish) in made-to-order bowls containing rice, quinoa or salad, and toppings of your choice, available for takeout. 810 Ninth St.; 919-937-9966; zenfishpokebar.com NEAR DUKE Fairview Dining Room Seasonally inspired contemporary cuisine with selections like coffeerubbed duck breast and seared NC flounder. Located inside the Washington Duke Inn & Golf Club. 3001 Cameron Blvd.; 919-493-6699; washingtondukeinn.com MarketPlace JB Duke Hotel’s main restaurant, now offering a takeout menu, is open for breakfast, lunch and dinner. 230 Science Dr.; 919-660-6400; jbdukehotel.com

DOWNTOWN CENTRAL PARK & WAREHOUSE DISTRICTS The Accordion Club Late-night bar serving beer, hot dogs and green chile stew, plus breakfast burritos on Sundays. 316 W. Geer St. The Blue Note Grill Fantastic barbecue, ribs and live music. 709 Washington St.; 919-401-1979; thebluenotegrill.com

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dining guide

Boxcar Bar + Arcade This bar and arcade offers more than 70 arcade games (temporarily not available for play at this time), a full bar including 24 craft American drafts (and a wide variety of local beer, liquor and wine), private event space and a Neapolitan-style pizza kitchen. 621 Foster St.; 984-377-2791; theboxcarbar.com/durham

NEWS BITES J. Lights Market & Cafe opened Nov. 30, 2020, at the Golden Belt Campus. Owner Jared “J.B.” Burton came up with the name for the restaurant by combining his daughters’ names, Janie and Lightsey. The concept pays homage to the convenience store, bar and deli Common Market in Plaza Midwood, J.B.’s favorite place to hang out when he lived in Charlotte, The menu, created by Chef Carly Adelman, features an array of breakfast, lunch and all-day items, such as a breakfast wrap with egg, chorizo and harissa aioli and confit chicken with crispy sweet potatoes and curry compound butter.

Cocoa Cinnamon Signature handbrewed coffees and lattes, such as the “Dr. Durham” with maca root and black lava salt. 420 W. Geer St.; cocoacinnamon.com Cucciolo Osteria Italian fare like pastas with house-made noodles, antipasti and porchetta. 601 W. Main St.; 984-243-8744; cucciolodurham.com Dame’s Chicken & Waffles Chicken, waffles, shmears. ’Nuff said. 530 Foster St.; 919-682-9235; dameschickenwaffles.com BR

Durham Food Hall All vendors open for takeout. 530 Foster St.; 919-908-9339; durhamfoodhall.com •

Afters Offering solely desserts. Try the fun dessert flights.

Everything Bagels Locally sourced gourmet bagels with a seasonally standard menu.

Ex-Voto Fresh tacos and tamales.

Locals Oyster Bar and Seafood Butchery North Carolina seafood featuring everything from crab cakes to shrimp sausage.

Lula and Sadie’s A modern take on Southern cuisine highlighting local produce with dishes like scalloped potatoes and hot cakes.

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Old North Meats and Provisions A seasonal menu of house-made cured and smoked meats, fish and pickled veggies.

Fullsteam In addition to its well-known “plow-to-pint” beers, Fullsteam now serves bar snacks, sandwiches, small plates and kombucha. Try the Pulled Pork Sandwich and the Spicy Carolina Dip Chicken with a side of deviled eggs. 726 Rigsbee Ave.; 919-682-2337; fullsteam.ag Geer Street Garden Simple, downhome fare in a cozy atmosphere. They make a mean “Dark and Stormy,” and be sure to order “The Pile” to split with the family! 644 Foster St.; 919-688-2900; geerstreetgarden.com Hutchins Garage Grandma-style pizza, salads and sandwiches. 402 W. Geer St.; 984-219-6578 BR

King’s Sandwich Shop Serving up hot dogs, burgers, fries and shakes since 1942. 701 Foster St.; 919-682-0071; kingssandwichshop.com

Also in December, Counting House announced the appointment of Jeff Seizer (above) as its executive chef. Jeff was previously the chef and owner at Royale and Apéro in Raleigh. The new Counting House menu includes handmade rigatoni and herbfilled Japanese milk bread. Counting House guests can also choose to “leave it up to Chef Jeff,” and he'll create a six-course tasting experience. The Loop Restaurant opened its third Durham location at 1116 Broad St. on Feb. 2. The 3,100-square-foot eatery serves burgers, pizza and hand-dipped milkshakes, among many other lunch and dinner options.

Liturgy Beverage Specialty coffee, tea and chocolate company focused on single origin beverages.

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Foster Street Coffee Coffee house on the ground floor of Liberty Warehouse apartments that uses carefully curated coffee beans from around the world for its classic concoctions as well as local produce for house-made smoothies. 530 Foster St., Ste. 2; 919-797-9555; fosterstreetcoffee.com

LouElla Neighborhood bottle shop, bar and event space. 316 W. Geer St., Ste. A; 919-973-2001; louelladurham.com

Napoli Pizzeria and Gelateria Neapolitan wood-fired pizza, small plates, salads and artisanal gelato.

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Picnic named Chris McLaurin as its executive chef in December 2020. Chris trained under Chef Johnny Monis in Washington, D.C. The Chapel Hill native returned to North Carolina in 2013, working at Rose’s Meat Market & Sweet Shop (now Rose’s Noodles, Dumplings & Sweets), LaPlace Louisiana Cookery and Vimala’s Curryblossom Café. Chris plans to highlight “the bounty of North Carolina’s fields, coasts and streams, while making food that’s cravable” at Picnic.

• Auctioneer Bar Seasonal cocktails, curated beer, wine and spirits meant to highlight local breweries.

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Rise Southern Biscuits & Righteous Chicken Daily-changing menu of doughnuts and biscuits available for takeout and delivery. For vegetarians, the fried green tomato biscuit is hard to beat. 401 Foster St.; 984-439-2220; risebiscuitsdonuts.com BR Parts & Labor Dishes meeting many dietary needs, including veggie samosas, “Hipster Poutine” and falafel. 723 Rigsbee Ave.; 919-901-0875; partsnlabor.com BR

The Pit Fried pimento cheese, whole-hog Eastern barbecue and Lexington-style barbecue. As of press time, temporarily closed. 321 W. Geer St.; 919-282-3748; thepit-durham.com

Plum Southern Kitchen & Bar Southern small plates and big bar by Lisa Callaghan and Chef Kevin Callaghan. 501 Washington St.; 919-351-6446; plumdurham.com BRIGHTLEAF DISTRICT Clouds Brewing American favorites with a German flair. Featuring an amazing craft beer selection and brunch on the weekends. 905 W. Main St.; 919-251-8096; cloudsbrewing.com El Rodeo Mexican Restaurant Authentic Mexican cuisine like quesadillas, tacos and huevos con chorizo. 905 W. Main St.; 919-683-2417; elrodeonc.com The Federal Pub fare with bistro panache. Try the “Fe Burger au Poivre.” Offers takeout plus a side patio on Albemarle Street. 914 W. Main St.; 919-680-8611; thefederal.net BR GoJo by Goorsha Ethiopian coffees and teas as well as lunch and sandwiches. 910 W. Main St.; 919-588-4660; goorshadurham.com Goorsha Ethiopian dishes like shiro chickpea stew and tibs (sauteed meat in spices). 910 W. Main St.; 919-588-4660; goorshadurham.com It’s a Southern Thing Kitchen and bar serving traditional Southern dishes with a twist, like jalapenobrined fried chicken; a half-beef, half-bacon meatloaf; and both traditional and vegan barbecue. 605 W. Main St.; 919-294-9632; itsasouthernthingdurham.com BR

James Joyce Irish Pub and Restaurant Traditional pub food and snacks like brisket cheese steak and Reuben sandwiches. 912 W. Main St.; 919-683-3022; jamesjoyceirishpub.com BR

Maverick’s Smokehouse and Taproom Range of barbecue and smokehouse fare as well as Memphis rubbed pulled chicken, wings and smoked sausage. 900 W. Main St.; 919-682-8978; maverickssmokehouse.com Mount Fuji Asian Bistro Sushi & Bar Thai, Japanese, Chinese and sushi. Try the duck wrap. 905 W. Main St.; 919-680-4968; mtfujinc.com


dining guide

Peabody Pizza Co. Specialty pizzas, calzones, stromboli, pasta and salad. 810 W. Peabody St.; 919-797-2554; peabodypizza.com Rose’s Noodles, Dumplings & Sweets East Asian fare like ramen, steamed buns and sandwiches, plus pastries - rhubarb galette, anyone? - and daily dinner specials available for takeout and outdoor dining. 121 N. Gregson St.; 919-797-2233; rosesdurham.com BR Saint James Seafood Raw bar featuring daily selection of oysters, peel-and-eat shrimp and more. Menu also includes seafood towers, Lobster Newberg, shrimp and grits, and Calabash platters. As of press time, temporarily closed. 806 W. Main St.; 984-219-7900; saintjamesseafood.com Torero’s Mexican Restaurant Authentic Mexican cuisine. Try the ceviche de camaron. 800 W. Main St.; 919-682-4197; torerosmexicanrestaurants.com CITY CENTER DISTRICT Alley Twenty Six Originally a craft cocktail bar, the addition of a kitchen now offers burgers, sandwiches and sliders available for takeout. Come out to dine in the alley and enjoy cocktails, beer and wine. Visit the Mixers & Mercantile shop next door. 320 E. Chapel Hill St.; 984-439-2278; alleytwentysix.com Annexe The sister bar of Bar Vigile features a dance floor, a menu of snacks, turntables built into the bar and pink Champagne on tap. As of press time, temprarily closed. 105 S. Mangum St., Ste. 1; 919-973-3000; annexedurham.com Bar Virgile Artfully crafted beverages paired with an ever-changing lunch, dinner and small plates menu. The bar is open for dine in or curbside pickup offering its well-loved cheeseburger, fried oysters and more. 105 S. Magnum St.; 919-973-3000; barvirgile.com Beyu Caffè Coffee shop, restaurant and bar with beignets, buffalo wings and mushroom burgers. 341 W. Main St.; 919-683-1058; beyucaffe.com BR Bull City Burger & Brewery Offering local beef burgers with all components from bun to barbecue sauce made in-house. 107 E. Parrish St.; 919-680-2333; bullcityburgerandbrewery.com Bull McCabes Irish Pub Pub food and bar snacks like nachos, burgers and wings. 427 W. Main St.; 919-682-3061; bullmccabesirishpub.com CONVIVIO This Italian restaurant and wine bar serves locally sourced meat butchered in-house. 104 City Hall Plaza, Ste. 100; 984-219-1961; convivio.wine COPA Cuban-inspired tapas and cocktails. Try the Chuleta a lo Guajiro, a country-style pork chop, with a mojito or daiquiri. 107 W. Main St.; 919-973-0111; copadurham.com Counting House Fresh seafood using local, highquality ingredients. Bar and lounge with housemade cocktails. 111 Corcoran St.; 919-956-6760; countinghousenc.com Dashi Traditional ramen shop and izakaya offering takeout and outdoor dining. 415 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-251-9335; dashiramen.com

Dos Perros Sophisticated Mexican cuisine; plates include carnitas, flautas veganas and pollo relleno. Don’t skip on the guac! 200 N. Mangum St.; 919-956-2750; dosperrosrestaurant.com Indian Monsoon Restaurant & Bar The best of Indian, from North Indian samosas to Southern-style dosas. 105 W. Morgan St., Ste. 100; 919-908-1800; monsoondurham.com BR Jack Tar and the Colonel’s Daughter Updated takes on traditional diner fare. 202 Corcoran St.; 919-682-5225; jacktardurham.com BR Jeddah’s Tea Try these organic, fair-trade and veganfriendly teas. 123 Market St., Ste. A; 919-973-3020; jeddahstea.com Juicekeys Organic juice and smoothie bar. 110 N. Corcoran St.; 919-695-3027; juicekeys.com Kingfisher Owners Sean Umstead and Michelle Vanderwalker transformed the space behind the cocktail bar into a pop-up burger bar called QueenBurger, which serves “smash burgers” two ways – double-stacked beef patties and house-made veggie and vegan burgers – alongside Kingfisher cocktails, plus wine and beer. To-go cocktails can also be ordered from Kingfisher. 321 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-908-9429; kingfisherdurham.com Littler As of press time, temporarily closed. Offering Wine and Provisions boxes through online ordering, as well as take-and-bake dinners for two. 110 E. Parrish St.; 919-374-1118; littlerdurham.com Loaf Oven breads and pastries. Counter Culture Coffee, pain au chocolat and cumin gruyere loaf. 111 W. Parrish St.; 919-797-1254; loafdurham.com Luna Rotisserie & Empanadas South American cuisine meets the American South. Wood-fired rotisserie meats, Andean-inspired braises, empanadas. 112 W. Main St.; 984-439-8702; lunarotisserie.com

Mothers & Sons Trattoria Handmade pasta, classic Italian meat dishes, antipasti and contorni (vegetables and sides). The enoteca next door houses Alimentari at Mothers & Sons, which offers to-go sandwiches, fresh pastas, sauces and Italian specialties during the day and is also used as overspill seating for the trattoria to encourage social distancing. 107 W. Chapel Hill St.; 919-294-8247; mothersandsonsnc.com Neomonde Authentic Mediterranean food like man’ousheh and kabobs, including a variety of vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free options. 202 Corcoran St.; 919-680-1886; neomonde.com Ninth Street Bakery Organic breads, pastries and lunch available for takeout. Grab a “Wheel of Steel” (peanut butter, raisins and oats). 136 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-688-5606; ninthstbakery.com BR The Oak House A Cafe featuring Caballo Rojo coffee, Jeddah’s Tea, fine winesand craft beer. 126 W. Main St.; 919-339-1384; oakhousedurham.com The Parlour Available for takeout and delivery. Try handmade ice cream in rotating flavors like cookies and cream, salted butter caramel and sweet potato. 117 Market St.; 919-564-7999; theparlour.co The Patio Unscripted Hotel’s poolside bar featuring a range of cocktails and gourmet bites including salads and burgers. 202 N. Corcoran St.; 984-329-9500; unscriptedhotels.com BR Pizzeria Toro Wood-fired pizza with selections like spicy lamb meatball with kale, fried eggplant ricotta and soft eggs on white pizza. Also, ricotta dumplings! 105 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-908-6936; pizzeriatoro.com Pie Pushers Grab a slice of staples like the cheese or pepperoni, or try out one of the specials, like the “Pace Car.” 117A W. Main St.; 919-294-8408; piepushers.com BR

M Kokko Casual chicken entrees including the fried chicken sandwich, ramen and “KFC” wings. 311 Holland St., Ste. B; 919-908-9332; m-restaurantscom/m-kokko

Pokéworks Hawaiian-inspired poké with a menu featuring signature “works” like the Spicy Ahi bowl, or customized poké burritos, bowls or salads made with your choice of protein, mix-ins, toppings and sauces. 122 W. Main St.; 919-973-3372; pokeworks.com

M Pocha Korean tapas including Kimchi “Army Stew,” Malaysian fried rice, steamed spicy pork belly buns and more. 101 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-294-9177; m-restaurantscom/m-kokko

Pompieri Pizza Neapolitan pizza joint with a familyfriendly approach. Try the “Drunken Horse” pizza with beer crust and house-made sausage. 102 City Hall Plaza; 919-973-1589; pompieripizza.com

M Tempura Traditional tempura omakase-styled food, featuring select seafood and seasonal vegetables, as well as rich meats like Iberico pork from Spain. 111 Orange St.; 919-748-3874; m-restaurants.com/m-tempura

Pour Taproom Pay-by-the-ounce beer, wine and cider taps, plus tasting board, sandwich and kids’ options. 202 N. Corcoran St., Ste. 200; 919-251-8985; durham.pourtaproom.com

M Sushi Quality sushi from seasonal seafood, daily menu changes and creative rolls like “Unagi Maki” with barbecue eel and fried garlic. 311 Holland St.; 919-908-9266; msushidurham.com Mateo Acclaimed menu of tapas and small plates by chef Matthew Kelly. Now offering a Tapas-Take-Away menu including tapas kits for two or four and panmade paella in pizza boxes – you keep the pan! 109 W. Chapel Hill St.; 919-530-8700; mateotapas.com

The Restaurant at The Durham Locally sourced Southern cuisine crafted by chef Andrea Reusing. Selections include beef tartare and spring pie with asparagus and mushrooms. The Roof at The Durham focuses on shared plates. Reservations are required. Arrive at your selected time; a host will greet you and conduct a contactless wellness check. 315 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-768-8831; thedurham.com/dining Rue Cler As of press time, the French bistro-style cuisine is only available for takeout. 401 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-682-8844; ruecler-durham.com BR

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Saltbox Seafood Joint Local seafood delivered fresh from the Carolina coast and served griddled or fried in a straightforward manner. 608 N. Mangum St.; 919-908-8970; saltboxseafoodjoint.com Spanglish Latin-inspired dishes, bowls and empanadas for lunch and dinner, as well as a full breakfast menu. 104 City Hall Plaza, Ste. 101; 984-219-7168; eatspanglish.com Sweets by Shayda Pastries, macarons, chocolates. 105 W. Morgan St., Ste. 105; 919-454-4015; sweetsbyshayda.com Taberna Tapas Paella, flatbreads, bacon-wrapped dates, gambas. 325 W. Main St.; 919-797-1457; tabernatapas.com Table South Kitchen and Bar Breakfast, lunch and dinner, located in the Durham Marriott City Center. 201 Foster St.; 919-768-6000 Thai @Main Street Classic Thai dishes including tom yum soup, curry, pad thai, drunken noodles and more. 317 W. Main St.; 984-219-7444; thaiatmainstnc.com Toast Italian paninis and soups. The warm goat cheese with honey and peppercorn crostini is our favorite. 345 W. Main St.; 919-683-2183; toast-fivepoints.com Viceroy Fusion restaurant featuring dishes like jeera wings as well as traditional butter chicken. 335 W. Main St.; 919-797-0413; viceroydurham.com AMERICAN TOBACCO DISTRICT Boricua Soul Puerto Rican-meets-Southern soul-food dishes like chopped barbecue-filled empanadas, arroz con gandules, maduros and mac and cheese “just the way Grandma makes it.” Takeout only, outdoor seating available. 318 Blackwell St.; 919-902-0520; boricuasoulnc.com Mellow Mushroom Pizza, hoagies, calzones and salads made using fresh ingredients. 410 Blackwell St.; 919-680-8500; mellowmushroom.com/store/ durham NanaSteak Offers various cuts of beef and steaks, plus other meats like salmon and tuna steaks and pastas like beef short rib ravioli. 345 Blackwell St.; 919-282-1183; nanasteak.com BR Only Burger Build-your-own burger options and sides like bacon-wrapped mac and cheese squares. As of press time, temporarily closed. 359 Blackwell St.; 919-237-2431; onlyburger.com Parker and Otis A gift shop, coffee shop and restaurant all in one. 324 Blackwell St.; 919-683-3200; parkerandotis.com BR Saladelia Cafe @ ATC Simple and honest food prepared with authentic, local and seasonal ingredients. Espresso, juice and organic smoothie bar, yum-on-the-run pastries, gourmet sandwiches, salads and soups. 406 Blackwell St.; 919-687-4600; saladelia.com Tobacco Road Sports Cafe American dishes like “Country Frizzled & Drizzled Chicken” made with local ingredients; overlooks the Bulls’ stadium. 280 S. Mangum St.; 919-937-9909; tobaccoroadsportscafe.com

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EAST DURHAM J. Lights Market & Cafe Breakfast, lunch and all-day items, like a breakfast wrap or confit chicken with crispy sweet potatoes. 800 Taylor St., Ste. 9-152; 984-244-7103; jlightsmarket.com Pierre ToGo Haitian- and Jamaican-inspired cuisine. 2100 Angier Ave.; 919-808-7447; pierrofoods.com Nolia Family-centric space designed to connect families through great coffee, available for takeout. Also serving Jeddah’s Tea and kid-friendly drinks. 1004 Morning Glory Ave.; noliacoffee.com Sofia’s Pizza Neighborhood pizza shop open for takeout. 2201 Angier Ave.; 984-219-3656; sofiaspizzadurham.com Two Roosters Handcrafted ice-cream shop serving takeout only with the hopes of adding patio reservations in the near future. 800 Taylor St.; tworoosters.com

WEST-CENTRAL DURHAM DURHAM-CHAPEL HILL BOULEVARD (15-501) Blaze Pizza Pizzas with made-from-scratch dough and healthful ingredients. 5320 McFarland Dr.; 919-251-6095; blazepizza.com Duck Donuts Warm, made-to-order doughnuts and coffee. Watch your doughnut being hand dipped and topped right in front of you. 5320 McFarland Dr., Ste. 140; 919-973-1305; duckdonuts.com El Cuscatleco Salvadoran and Mexican dishes including Arroz con Pollo. 4212 Garrett Rd.; 919-401-5245; elcuscatlecodurham.com Fiesta Ole Mexican Restaurant Buffet, enchiladas, fajitas, burritos and other classic Mexican dishes. 4600 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd., Ste. 40; 919-489-6468; fiestaolenc.com Foster’s Market Fresh breakfast selections, sandwiches and salads. Pick up brunch, grocery items, or its weekly family dinner. 2694 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-489-3944; fostersmarket.com BR Guglhupf Bakery, Cafe and Biergarten Germaninspired cuisine and artisanal bakery. Restaurant dishes include house-cut noodles, wiener schnitzel and pan-roasted duck. Takeout bakery items, essential groceries, plus beer and wine. The outdoor patio is also open for brunch. 2706 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-401-2600; guglhupf.com BR Kanki Steak, chicken and seafood cooked on hibachi grills, plus an extensive sushi menu. 3504 Mt. Moriah Rd.; 919-401-6908; kanki.com Mariscos Los Cabos Bar & Grill Mexican restaurant featuring a variety of seafood options like fish and shrimp tacos, ceviches and more. 4020 DurhamChapel Hill Blvd.; 919-748-4290 Namu Restaurant and Coffee Bar Bulkogi Truck and Bo’s Kitchen food trucks combine to bring casual Korean eats, local beer, wine and specialty coffee. 5420 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-251-9794; namudurham.com

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The Refectory Cafe Dal, chili, salads and soups. 2726 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-908-6798; therefectorycafe.com BR Saltbox Seafood Joint A second location for the popular local seafood place. Fish delivered fresh from the Carolina coast and served griddled or fried in a straightforward manner. 2637 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-237-3499; saltboxseafoodjoint.com Sister Liu’s Kitchen Homestyle Northeastern Chinese food made by hand, like dumplings and Chinese hamburgers. 5504 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd., Ste. 103; 984-244-3973; sisterliuskitchen.com Sitar Indian Cuisine Homemade Indian dishes at affordable prices; new outdoor seating. 3630 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-490-1326; sitar-indiancuisine.com BR Soul Good Vegan Cafe Vegan takes on favorites like mac and cheese and jerk chicken, along with sides like candied yams, plantains and lentils and spinach soup. 4125 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 984-219-6050 Tandoori Bites Indian cuisine with choices like tikka masala and goat curry, and an expansive menu with 17 different bread options. 5318 New Hope Commons Dr., Unit 201-A; 984-219-7363; tandooribites.net Zweli’s Traditional Zimbabwean food and family recipes from owner Zweli herself with a number of options for vegans and vegetarians. Sign up for its online cooking classes! 4600 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd., Ste. 26; 984-219-7555; zwelis.com BR UNIVERSITY DRIVE Alpaca Peruvian rotisserie chicken. Need we say more? 3726 Mayfair St.; 919-973-3707; alpacachicken.com The Boot Room Sandwich shop, soccer pub and event space. Lunch, dinner or brunch is available to order online or in person. 2501 University Dr.; 919-748-3499; bootroomdurham.com Bull City Solera and Taproom Try the solera beer, along with everything from burritos to Italian tacos. Order online and pick up at the drive-thru or window. 4120 University Dr.; 919-908-0203; bullcitysoleraandtaproom.com Capital Seafood Market & Grill Fried catfish, porkchop sandwiches and collard greens. Raw seafood for sale. 1304 University Dr.; 919-402-0777 Don Gallo Taqueria Tacos, pupusas, tortas and horchata. 3411 University Dr.; 919-267-8226 Mi Peru Peruvian fare like ceviche mixto, asado and leche de tigre. 4015 University Dr., Ste. A1; 919-401-6432; miperucuisine.com Nana’s Upscale seasonal dishes influenced by Southern, French and Italian cuisine. The risotto is a must-try! 2514 University Dr.; 919-493-8545; nanasofdurham.com NuvoTaco Inventive taqueria featuring locally produced meats and veggies. Enjoy with margarita in hand. 2512 University Dr.; 919-873-3033; nuvotaco.com


dining guide

The Original Q Shack “Barbecue tender as a mother’s love,” includes signature chile-rubbed beef brisket and Carolina pork shoulder. 2510 University Dr.; 919-402-4227; theqshackoriginal.com Rockwood Dairy Bar Grab-and-go ice cream shop offering pints and quarts with unique and interesting flavors, including sorbets. 2514 University Dr.; 984-219-2744; rockwooddairybar.com Sake Bomb Asian Bistro Asian bistro and sake bar serving specialty rolls like the “Green Monster” with spicy yellow tail and tuna. 4215 University Dr.; 919-401-4488; sakebombdurham.com Saladelia Cafe + Catering Simple and honest food prepared with authentic, local and seasonal ingredients. Gourmet sandwiches, soups and salads, speciality entrees, and mezza platters, made from scratch with Mediterranean flare. Espresso, juice and organic smoothie bar as well as local beer and wine selection. 4201 University Dr.; 919-489-5776; saladelia.com BR Thai Cafe Authentic Thai cuisine like drunken noodles, curries and stir-fries. Don’t miss the coconut cake! 2501 University Dr.; 919-493-9794; thaicafenc.com WEST END & LAKEWOOD Cocoa Cinnamon Local coffee shop with signature hand-brewed coffees and lattes, hot chocolate and churros. Open for takeout with online and contactless ordering. 2013 Chapel Hill Rd.; cocoacinnamon.com

Eastcut Sandwich Bar East Coast sandwich fare and salads, small plates, soups and sweets. As of press time, available for takeout and curbside pickup only. Mainstays include chicken Parm, BLTs and roast beef sandwiches. 3211 Old Chapel Hill Rd.; 984-4391852; eastcutsandwich.com BR

Hope Valley Diner Diner food and breakfast all day with selections like chicken and dumplings, fried pickle chips, biscuits and gravy. 3710 Shannon Rd.; 919-419-0907; hopevalleydiner.com BR La Vaquita Taqueria Authentic Mexican restaurant serving tacos on homemade corn tortillas with traditional fillings like lengua (braised tongue) and carnitas. 2700 Chapel Hill Rd.; 919-402-0209; lavaquitataqueria.com New Tokyo Quick-service Japanese restaurant where everything on the menu – including hibachi-style dishes, sushi, udon and more – comes in under $10. 3822 S. Roxboro St.; 919-224-8811

NEWS BITES St. James Seafood Restaurant and Raw Bar temporarily closed in December 2020. The decision came amidst the ongoing pandemic. Bar Brunello permanently closed in December 2020. Esteban Brunello opened the wine bar in 2016, but ran into challenges during the pandemic. Our State magazine named Soul Good Vegan Cafe as one of 14 delicious vegan and vegetarian restaurants in North Carolina in December 2020. Zweli’s Kitchen received a $25,000 award from Discover’s Eat It Forward Program in December 2020. Owners Leonardo Williams and Zweli Williams were recognized for their local volunteer efforts; they plan to donate $1,000 to Eden Spring Trust, a Zimbabwean nonprofit dedicated to aiding vulnerable populations.

Only Burger The food truck’s brick-and-mortar offers all the same build-your-own burger options and sides for takeout. 3710 Shannon Rd., Ste. 118; 919-937-9377; onlyburger.com Pop’s Backdoor South Fresh pizza and Italian cuisine, including calzones with homemade ricotta-mozzarella filling. 3710 Shannon Rd.; 919-493-0169; popsbackdoorsouth.com BR Randy’s Pizza Pizzas, garlic knots and stromboli. 1813 Martin Luther King Jr. Pkwy.; 919-490-6850; randys-pizza.com Roots Bakery, Bistro and Bar Southern meets Central American at this breakfast, lunch and dinner spot with “from the sea,” “from the ranch” and “from the garden” options. 4810 Hope Valley Rd.; 919-748-4739; rootsbistroandbar.com BR Urel’s Jamaica House Traditional Jamaican dishes like goat curry, jerk chicken, oxtails and ackee and saltfish. 3825 S. Roxboro St., Ste. 123; 919-251-8104

Da Kine’s Kava Bar An assortment of Kava drinks that promote stress relief and mental well being. 1114-B W Chapel Hill St.; 919-864-8002; dakineskava.com GRUB Durham Serves up comfort food favorites with a twist like brioche doughnuts and beer-battered mushroom sandwiches. 1200 W. Chapel Hill St.; 919-973-3636; grubdurham.com The Honeysuckle at Lakewood A new location from the owners of Honeysuckle Tea House, serving wine, beer and mead as well as chef-driven, elevated bar food. 1920 Chapel Hill Rd.; 919-748-4687; thehoneysucklelakewood.com BR

wood-fired pizza • housemade pastas sammies • salads • desserts

RADIUS

Local Yogurt Frozen yogurt treats, including dairy-free sorbet, all served in compostable products. 1114 W. Chapel Hill St.; 919-489-5900; localyogurtdurham.com FAYETTEVILLE STREET Chicken Hut 63-year-old institution with a reputation for perfectly seasoned and tender chicken. Open Monday through Friday for takeout. 3019 Fayetteville St.; 919-682-5697; chickenhutnc.weebly.com Sweet’s Smoothies Healthy smoothies and wraps. 2506 Fayetteville St.; 919-428-3200; sweetssmoothies.business.site MORE WEST-CENTRAL DURHAM Bull and Bean Fresh salads, breakfast and sandwiches like pulled pork-loaded hashbrowns and the turkey and brie sandwich. 3710 Shannon Rd.; 919-237-2398; bullandbeancafe.com BR

112 N. Churton Street • Hillsborough

PAT I O D I N I N G • D O O R D A S H O R D E R O N L I N E oOrR B Y P H O N E

radiuspizzeria.net 919.245.0601

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SOUTHERN DURHAM / NEAR I-40 WOODCROFT SHOPPING CENTER Chubby’s Tacos Fresh Mexican favorites like burritos, nachos and salads, as well as the “Chubbychanga.” 4711 Hope Valley Rd.; 919-489-4636; chubbystacos.com

Piper’s In The Park Soups, salads, hoagies and burgers with selections like curried couscous and “South of Here” turkey sandwich. 2945 S. Miami Blvd.; 919-572-9767; pipersinthepark.com

Harvest 18 Local, seasonal eats. Try the pimento cheese dip and brunch on the weekends. 8128 Renaissance Pkwy., Ste. 114; 919-316-1818; 18restaurantgroup.com/harvest-18 BR

Spicy Green Gourmet Cafe Sandwiches, soups, salads with specialities like California Turkey Flatbread. 2945 S. Miami Blvd., Ste. 126; 919-220-6040; spicygreengourmet.net

Rise Southern Biscuits & Righteous Chicken Order takeout from this daily-changing menu of doughnuts and biscuits. For vegetarians, the “Fried Green Tomato” biscuit is hard to beat. 8200 Renaissance Pkwy.; 919-248-2992; risebiscuitsdonuts.com BR

Joe Van Gogh Cozy and full of natural light, this local coffee shop sources quality beans for a superior coffee available for takeout. 4711-5A Hope Valley Rd.; 919-973-3950; joevangogh.com

HOPE VALLEY COMMONS Highway 54 Public House House-made burgers, N.Y.style pizza, wings and potato chips. 1125 W. N.C. 54, Ste. 301; 919-401-8600; hwy54pub.com

Pulcinella’s Italian Restaurant Southern Italian dishes available for takeout. Antipasto classico, baked ziti and tortellini alla panna. 4711 Hope Valley Rd.; 919-490-1172; pulcinellasitalianrestaurant.com

Denny’s Diner fare serving breakfast anytime, lunch and dinner. 7021 N.C. 751, Ste. 901; 919-908-1006; dennys.com BR

Randy’s Pizza Pizzas, garlic knots and stromboli. 4810 Hope Valley Rd., Ste. 112; 919-403-6850; randys-pizza.com

Makus Empanadas A variety of meat, veggie and cheese empanadas, with vegetarian, vegan and glutenfree options options. 1125 W. N.C. 54, Ste. 304; 984-888-5302; makusempanadas.com

Smallcakes Signature cupcake flavors as well as seasonal specials, available for takeout or delivery. 4711 Hope Valley Rd.; 919-937-2922; smallcakesnc.com

Sweet Charlie’s Thai-inspired hand-rolled ice cream and frozen yogurt. 1125 W. N.C. 54; 984-888-5101; sweetcharlies.com

West 94th St. Pub Traditional pub fare: loaded fries, chili cheese tots and fish & chips. 4711 Hope Valley Rd.; 919-403-0025; west94thstpub.com

NEAR SOUTHPOINT

Yamazushi Japanese fine dining, kaiseki-style, with seasonal menu changes and a multi-course menu as well as sake. 4711 Hope Valley Rd., Ste. 6-A; 919-493-7748; yamazushirestaurant.com SUTTON STATION Bocci Trattoria & Pizzeria Traditional Italian pastas, pizzas, crostinis and salads. 5850 Fayetteville Rd.; 919-206-4067; bocciitalian.com Bua Thai Cuisine Thai classics: pad thai, hot and sour soup, curries, Krapow lamb. Get your meal “Thai hot,” if you’re up to it! 5850 Fayetteville Rd., Ste. 101; 984-219-7357; buathaidurham.com Dulce Cafe Espresso, gelato and sandwiches. Smoked salmon bagel, dulce Reuben and the “B-L-A-T.” 5826 Fayetteville Rd.; 919-797-0497; dulcecafedurham.com BR Nantucket Grill & Bar New England-style cuisine known for their desserts like the “Unbirthday” and coconut cake. 5826 Fayetteville Rd.; 919-484-8162; nantucketgrill.com LINCOLN PARK WEST Danny’s Bar-B-Que Hickory-smoked barbecue, ribs, fried catfish. 2945 S. Miami Blvd., Ste. 118; 919-806-1965; dannysbarbque.com Gussy’s Place Greek street food like gyro pita, Greek fries and baklava. 2945 S. Miami Blvd.; 984-439-8455; gussys.com

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HOMESTEAD MARKET Bean Traders Coffee Coffee specialties and local pastries, including scratch-made waffles and pies. 105 W. N.C. 54, Ste. 249; 919-484-2499; beantraderscoffee.com City Barbeque Smoked meats, peach cobbler and hushpuppies. 208 W. N.C. 54; 919-237-9509; citybbq.com The Mad Popper Gourmet popcorn shop with flavors both sweet and savory. 105 W. N.C. 54, Ste. 259; 919-484-7677; themadpopper.com MILKLAB Organic rolled ice cream and bubble milk tea. 105 W. N.C. Hwy. 54, Ste. 265; 919-937-9798; milklabcafe.com Shiki Sushi Sushi and pan-Asian choices like “Bang Bang Shrimp,” gyoza dumplings and beef pho soup. 207 W. N.C. 54; 919-484-4108; shikitasu.com ZenFish Poké Bar Healthy, fast-casual restaurant serving poké (raw fish) in made-to-order bowls containing rice, quinoa or salad, and toppings of your choice. 105 W. N.C. Hwy. 54, Ste. 261; 919-294-9988; zenfishpokebar.com THE STREETS AT SOUTHPOINT AREA Bruster’s Real Ice Cream Hand-crafted ice creams, sorbets and sherbets in ever-changing flavors. 8200 Renaissance Pkwy., Ste. 1002; 919-237-3537; brusters.com People’s Coffee Specialty coffee, pastries and coldpressed juice. 7830 N.C. 751, Ste. 100; 919-924-0240; pplscoffee.com

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Town Hall Burger and Beer Offerings like the “Carolina Burger” with pork belly and pimento cheese, barbecue salmon burger and fries poutine. 7830 N.C. 751; 919-973-0506; townhallburgerandbeer.com N.C. 54 Akashi Japanese Grill & Sushi Bar Hibachi, sushi and noodle dishes like bento boxes, yakisoba and spicy scallop roll. 2223 N.C. 54, Ste. RS; 919-572-9444; akashisushi54.com Kokyu Global street food like Bulgogi tacos and paneer bowls. 245 E. N.C. 54, Ste. 105; 919-251-9017; kokyubbq.com

RTP N.C. 55 Backyard BBQ Pit Barbecue and other Southern comfort foods like mac and cheese and Brunswick stew. 5122 N.C. 55; 919-544-9911; sweetribs.com Basera Modern, fine-dining Indian restaurant featuring a lunch buffet and tandoor grill. As of press time, temporarily closed. 4818 N.C. 55; 919-205-5050; baseraindiancuisine.com Big C Waffles Gourmet waffles, available for takeout. 2110 Allendown Dr.; 919-797-7576; bigcwaffles.com BR

Brigs at the Park Breakfast selections and sandwiches. 4900 N.C. 55; 919-544-7473; brigs.com BR Jamaica Jamaica Caribbean food favorites like jerk chicken, yellow rice and brown stew chicken. 4857 N.C. 55; 919-544-1532; jamaicajamaicartp.com Na’Mean Asian fusion, Korean barbecue sandwiches available for takeout. A KoKyu joint. 4823 Meadow Dr., Ste. 108; 919-699-4667; kokyubbq.com/nmean Sansui Sushi Bar & Grill Hibachi dishes and sushi rolls like “Spider Man” with crab and crawfish. 4325 N.C. 55; 919-361-8078; sansuisushi.com Sushioki Sushi burritos in traditional flavors, plus rolls with a Southern twist, like double-fried chicken. 4900 N.C. 55, Ste. 510; 919-405-7121; sushiokirtp.com Vit Goal Tofu Restaurant Korean dishes like fried dumplings, tofu soups and Korean barbecue. 2107 Allendown Dr.; 919-361-9100; vitgoals.com


Dining!

dining guide

GREENWOOD COMMONS Benetis Restaurant Classic breakfast with a Mediterranean lunch buffet. 5410 N.C. 55; 919-806-0313; benetisrtp.com BR

MEZ Contemporary Mexican Creative Mexican dishes, based on traditional recipes with a fresh, healthy twist. 5410 Page Rd.; 919-941-1630; mezdurham.com

Sarah’s Empanadas Homemade empanadas. 5410 N.C. 55; 919-544-2441; sarahsempanadas.com

Mr. Cheesesteak Cheesesteaks, fries and wings. 5400 S. Miami Blvd.; 919-991-1403; mrcheesesteak.com

Tandoor Indian Restaurant Traditional Indian like veggie samosas, kababs and naan. 5410 N.C. 55; 919484-2102; tandoorinrtp.com BR True Flavors Diner Upscale Southern diner open for takeout. Try the “Howling Moon” French toast made with Howling Moon moonshine sauce. Currently operating out of the diner, biscuit sandwich shop Debbie Lou’s offers protein options from chicken and duck to lobster, gator and kangaroo. 5410 N.C. 55; 919-316-7978; trueflavorsnc.com BR IMPERIAL CENTER Gusto Farm to Street Farm-to-table offerings including salads and pizza. As of press time, temporarily closed. 5431 Page Rd.; 984-219-2739; eatgusto.com

eral.net

MORRISVILLE G58 Modern Chinese Cuisine Traditional Sichuan and Cantonese flavors abound in sautéed flounder, fried grouper and steamed scallop entrees; a Western influence can be seen in dishes such as Chilean Sea Bass with brandy sauce and Cumin-Dusted New Zealand Lamb Chops. 10958 Chapel Hill Rd.; 919-466-8858; g58cuisine.com

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Magan Gonzales-Smith with her daughter, Sophie, 1, at Lakewood Elementary School, her family’s district neighborhood school.

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INFLUENCERS

THE

Community members sing the praises of seven people who continue to help our city get through its toughest year yet COMPILED AN D EDIT ED B Y H A N N A H LEE PHOTOG RAPHY B Y J OHN M I C H A EL S I M PS O N

*Responses edited for length and clarity

MAGAN GONZALES-SMITH FOUNDING EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, DURHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS FOUNDATION “The huge bright spot of 2020 for me was witnessing the incredible ways our Durham community stepped up to care for our DPS students and families through enormous challenges. DPS Foundation was founded in fall 2018 by community members who believed that Durham is stronger when we all rally around supporting, celebrating and investing in our public schools. 2020 showed us what’s possible when we do just that.”

I

first met Magan in 2018 when [DPS] Superintendent Pascal Mubenga invited a small group to launch a nonprofit to support Durham’s students and educators. We were charged with the urgent responsibility to create, from scratch, the Durham Public Schools Foundation. As the first executive director for DPSF, Magan is a visionary who understands that Durham will only reach its full potential when we expect and ensure thriving and successful public schools that will provide equitable outcomes for every Durham student and citizen. Magan is a brilliant and inspiring leader who loves Durham, our children and our schools. Due to her convictions, the ‘North Star’ principles of equity and success for every student are the centerpieces of DPSF work. When the pandemic forced DPS to end daily meals for four months, Magan led a coalition to create Durham FEAST, which distributed more than 730,000 restaurant-prepared meals to local students and families. And now, she and her team have initiated the Accelerating Digital Equity campaign, raising $1.5 million to provide technical assistance, digital equipment, training, tutoring, and social and emotional support to thousands of families and educators. Whether she is finishing a DPSF planning meeting with her beautiful daughter, Sophie, nearby or convincing yet another excited parent that DPS has excellent schools and teachers, you can be certain that Magan is using her influence and talents to make the Bull City a better home for us all.” – JIM KEY BOARD CHAIR MEMBER, DURHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS FOUNDATION 

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THE INFLUENCERS

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he soulful, organic greeting you get at Beyu Caffe, also known as Durham’s downtown living room, flows from the indisputable visionary leadership of Dorian Bolden. If you ask Dorian to tell you his story, he’ll say he’s just a kid from Decatur, Georgia, with a dream. In reality, he has the heart of a giant, evenly yoked with courage and compassion – something you must experience in his presence. It’s this balance that propels him to lead with his head and his heart and create opportunities that uplift and inspire communities here in Durham. Teasingly, I’ve dubbed him a ‘rebel, though never PRESIDENT, BEYU GROUP an outlaw,’ because once he sees the possible in the “At our first-ever leadership team retreat in Hendersonville, seemingly impossible, he North Carolina, back in July pushes boundaries to make during COVID-19, we didn’t know what the future would be. things happen. This past ... It was some really dark days, year, weathering one of the thinking we wouldn’t be able most challenging seasons for to survive this. It went from the team coming together for daily restaurant owners, Dorian emergency meetings to finally flipped the Beyu Caffe kitchen being able to tread water. In the mountains, we redid our to provide meals for essential core values and our mission workers and school children statement: ‘to uplift and at the outset of the pandemic. inspire communities through excellence.’ For me, being in Now this operation has been business for 11 years, it went established as the Beyu Food from being Dorian’s company to our company. That’s when I Project, in partnership with saw a new level of growth.” local organizations, and has provided more than 150,000 meals to schoolchildren, families and those needing meals while in quarantine due to COVID-19. ‘There’s no reason why food insecurity should exist in our community,’ he says. Now with 11 years of business under his belt, this chief visionary officer of Beyu Group has settled into the thrilling adventures of entrepreneurship and community service. Ask him for his trade secret, and he’ll say, ‘believe in yourself, just be you, and everything else will work out.’”

DORIAN BOLDEN

– STACIA WOOD DIRECTOR OF SALES AND MARKETING, BEYU GROUP  38

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THE INFLUENCERS

HEATHER COOK

Y

ou know those people who arrive in the story of your life and then a decade later you realize what an absolute bummer things would have been had you not both shown up when you did? For me, that person is Kym Register. I can say with certainty that if it wasn’t for our intersections and connections, I would not have the capacity or understanding to be creating and working in the community the way I am today. I first met Kym at a Kimya Dawson show at 305 South in 2006. At the time, I was living in Raleigh, working in Cary and searching hard for a sense OWNER, THE PINHOOK of community and connection. SONGWRITER, LOAMLANDS Kym was (and is) a vibrant, “I am overwhelmed with clarinet wielding, Southern, gratitude for the Durham (and queer punk whose laugh was beyond) artist community, as broad as it is, for reaching out infectious and gracious as I to one another and saying ‘yes’ fan-girled on them after the to strange ideas and projects that we were all trying to put Midtown Dickens set. At a together. Musicians, artists, time when I was feeling lost in bartenders and essentially the Southern seas, Kym helped everyone we know and work with at The Pinhook were left me see Durham’s unapologetic grasping for a stage, a way authenticity, a perspective that to make money, a way to stay connected. We had so many was once best captured from wild ideas that people just said the rooftops of downtown’s yes to. My proudest moment, abandoned buildings. though, [was last year’s] Pride: Durham. We were well into the We were fast friends and fall and had a little experience quickly began scheming on with online events, [but more than] 150 people attended that collaborations, first at Bull party. Although it was like no City HQ, eventually at The other Pride we had experienced, Pinhook and now, with it felt like a reminder that [the] queer community is here and is projects like Since4Eva School going strong.” and Country Soul Songbook, we’re basically global. Kym was the first person to show me the importance of troubling the water. Throughout our 13 years of friendship, they’ve helped peel back the layers of my Midwestern nice to reveal to me that lasting change does not, in fact, come by making the oppressors feel more comfortable, but instead comes with a steadfast commitment to social justice and a refusal to dim your light to meet someone else’s BS standards. The rooftop views may have shifted in the past decade, but Kym remains an integral part of our community as a space holder, an artist and an activist. I feel so lucky to live in a time and place where I get to create with Kym.”

KYM REGISTER

– HEATHER COOK 40

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EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, NORTHSTAR CHURCH OF THE ARTS “[My proudest moment this year is] a three-way tie between watching my 9-year-old join the neighborhood basketball game after months of watching from the sidelines, potty training my 4-year-old and raising and distributing $120,000 in relief funding for Durham artists.”

I

can’t believe it. I’m sitting here reflecting on when I met Heather Cook and am realizing that I’ve known that genuine powerhouse for 13 years. She moved here from the Midwest and plugged in at a DIY space that some friends and I had started (Chaz Martenstein of Bull City Records and Catherine Edgerton of Art Asylum, to name a few). We struggled together then, and we struggle together now in ways that challenge and support each other to the fullest. If you look at The Pinhook and NorthStar, you may not immediately think that these two spaces thrive off of organizing together. But such is the beautiful big bang of a brilliant Midwestern organizer mother of two and a queer Southern radical musician. I feel so lucky to be friends, fam and creative partners with someone as growth-oriented and solid as Heather. When The Pinhook owed back taxes because of an accounting error and I felt like it was over, Heather called me from a parking lot in Wisconsin and kept my head above water. When I didn’t have enough energy to throw a huge 10-year anniversary party, Heather stepped in and made sure it was as epic as it needed to be, including asking friends at Ninth Street Bakery to make several loaves of Pinhook-branded bread. And when COVID-19 hit, it was Heather who started the Durham Artist Relief Fund and worked with me to manage a completely foreign streaming set up so that we could stay connected with our community. Her work with Nnenna Freelon and NorthStar is so inspiring, and I hope to be as much of a support to her! Heather, you’ve been a buoy in a temperamental sea. I don’t know how The Pinhook or I would have made it these past 13 years without you.” – KYM REGISTER 

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Heather Cook and Kym Register at The Pinhook.

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PHOTO BY SHAWN ROC CO/DUKE HEALTH

Duke nurse Rita Oakes administers the first Pfizer COVID-19 vaccination to Faye Tate Williams at Duke University Hospital on Dec. 14, 2020.

FAYE TATE WILLIAMS REGISTERED NURSE, DUKE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DUKE SOUTH LEAD COVID-19 SCREENER FOR CLINIC PATIENTS “[I was so proud to be] selected as the first person to receive the COVID-19 vaccine in the Triangle.”

A

s the spiritual leader of St. Joseph AME Church, I enjoy personal relationships with several of St. Joseph’s most loving members. No one displays selflessness and courage like Sister Faye. A deeply faithful leader, she was almost always in worship on Sunday mornings prior to the pandemic. As evidence of her community influence, she has not only invited others to church, she has also brought large groups. St. Joseph has benefited from her service, as a former president of the Durham Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc. and the Durham (NC) Chapter of The Links, Incorporated. We have welcomed both organizations, on multiple occasions, because of Sister Faye. Without solicitation, at the onset of the pandemic, she blessed others by sharing face masks, gloves, hand sanitizer and disinfectant wipes. We are among the many who know her selfless spirit. Her courage is now publicly displayed for all to see. As the first person in the Triangle to receive the COVID-19 vaccine, her example changed mindsets and will help save lives. I am proud to honor Sister Faye Tate Williams, a person who does so much for so many.” – REV. DR. JONATHAN C. AUGUSTINE SENIOR PASTOR, ST. JOSEPH AME CHURCH 

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THE INFLUENCERS

ADAM KLEIN CHIEF STRATEGIST, AMERICAN UNDERGROUND “We ended 2020 with seven more member companies than we had when COVID-19 hit. The amount of grit and effort that went into actually growing through the pandemic can’t be overstated. While we’ve had to pivot how we build community at AU, relationships deepened. The pandemic forced all of us to be honest about our limitations and struggles, and out of that came deeper friendships among members and a new willingness to support one another. The AU team has my admiration for their commitment to serving our members and evolving when we couldn’t really see the light.”

A

fter the 2019 gas explosion, my business changed dramatically. I needed something new to try. I had this idea in my head about a pencil store, which of course, when you tell someone that idea, they’re like, ‘What?’ Adam was orchestrating the food pop-ups at American Tobacco Campus, so I called him and I said, ‘Would you think about letting us do this pop-up for a month?’ And he was so open to the idea. I remember he was standing there on the first day, smiling. I turned to him and said, ‘Maybe we could make Parker Paper Company permanent here?’ And we did. Then a matter of months later, Parker & Otis found its new home. I often find myself ringing Adam and saying, ‘I need a little help.’ Not only does he always respond and is timely and thoughtful, but he presents solutions that work. The more I learn about him, the more I understand how integral he is to this community. Among other hats he wears, Adam is currently the chair of the Durham Public Schools Foundation and is on the North Carolina Entrepreneurial Council established by Gov. Roy Cooper. He does all these amazing behind-the-scenes things for this city, and I’m just really in awe of it. He is one of those people who makes you want to be better and work a little bit harder the more time you spend with him. He makes connections and creates relationships for people and listens in a way that few are able. I do not know when he sleeps or how his hair is always perfect, but I do know that Durham is lucky that he made this city his home.” – JENNINGS BRODY OWNER, PARKER & OTIS 

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3407 University Drive, Durham, NC 27707 | 919.490.4922 | TheKitchenSpecialist.com PREMIER DESIGN AND REMODELING FIRM SERVING THE TRIANGLE FOR OVER 29 YEARS


THE INFLUENCERS

NOLAN SMITH DIRECTOR OF BASKETBALL OPERATIONS AND PLAYER DEVELOPMENT, DUKE UNIVERSITY “Bringing people together [is] definitely the most humbling experience that I’ve been able to do during COVID-19. Getting out here, just seeing people rally around me, rally around the City of Durham and rally together to bring peace and love to this country. We see now more than ever that’s what this country needs.”

I

’ve known Nolan for almost 14 years. He was a kid [when I met him]. But his career has been about evolving. If you look at his basketball career in college, from when he was a freshman to his senior year, it went in stages. His junior and senior year [were] just incredible years [for him] as a basketball player – but also as a student-athlete. I wasn’t his classmate, but if I happened to be on campus and saw the fans around Cameron Indoor, he was the people’s champ. He can connect with anyone: any age, race, background. Not a lot of people in the world can do that. He does everything for our program. He’s incredible in that aspect. But then you look off the court and what’s been going on in the world; 2020 was a heck of a year. As a Black man, to see what’s going on, what was happening in the world, it hurt. It cut deep. It affected, of course, our race, but it affected everyone. If you were anyone who was in touch with human emotion, wrong is wrong and right is right – and what was happening with the police killings, the Breonna Taylors, the Ahmaud Arberys, it just hurt. Nolan, the man he is, took it upon himself to be outspoken about it. He wanted to be involved. He wanted to have a voice. He wanted to lead the next generation and be on the forefront of racial issues and racial discrimination. And then helping out with underprivileged kids in our neighborhood. ... He was on the forefront of that. Your legacy is what you can do for others. ... Pay it forward, right? Give back. And Nolan, man, he’s just incredible at that. Unbelievable. He’s someone you look up to, because of the person he is and the way he gives back. Man, it’s just special. He’s given every inch, every pound of himself and his soul into helping our people, and into helping people in general. For that, I love him, and I’m so honored to be a part of what he’s been able to accomplish. What he’s done is a beautiful thing.” – CHRIS CARRAWELL ASSISTANT COACH, DUKE UNIVERSITY MEN’S BASKETBALL  46

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Animal Protection Society of Durham Serving our community for 50 years OUR GOAL AND PURPOSE IS TO: • meet the needs of each and every animal as they enter the shelter • provide assistance to keep pets in their homes and • work to end animal homelessness.

adopt • volunteer • support WWW.APSOFDURHAM.ORG • 2117 E. CLUB BLVD. DURHAM, NC 27704 • 919-560-0640


THE INFLUENCERS A continued increase in funding for companies led by founders of color and women. Investing in these companies is a form of economic justice and something Durham has been at the forefront of. AU-based firms saw a nice increase in these figures in 2020, which is so long overdue, and I hope it only grows in the years to come. ADAM KLEIN AMERICAN UNDERGROUND

As the skyline of our city continues to shift, my hope is that the people who benefit from Durham’s rapid growth are aware of and accountable to the impact that these changes have on their community. The very voices and creative energies that developers, Realtors and city government use to attract folks to come to Durham are struggling greatly to find their footing (affordable housing, studio space, living wage work, etc.) amid continual waves of gentrification, a struggle that has only been amplified with the surge of the 2020 pandemic. I hope that 2021 brings to both our municipal government and our residents a deeper understanding of the influential role that artists play in our community, and with that knowledge, a commitment to support the vital utility of art in our city. HEATHER COOK NORTHSTAR CHURCH OF THE ARTS

That we see a new wave of leaders who are truly willing to fight for bringing people in our community together as a whole, because I feel like that is integrated in all facets of our life – home, business and spirituality. We have so much more in common than we [have] differences. DORIAN SMITH BEYU GROUP

Just more empathy, more sympathy. When we come together as a community and as leaders are making decisions, I hope they make decisions based on quality of work and not looking at color of skin. We all know that does still happen in this country, and it shouldn’t. So when we look at leaders who are making decisions, I hope we pick the best candidates for those jobs. NOLAN SMITH DUKE UNIVERSITY

A NEW HOPE

OUR INFLUENCERS SHARE THE CHANGES THEY WANT TO SEE IN 2021

That Durham (and beyond) can put people over profit. We have so many amazing groups that are working to make sure we do. As far as The Pinhook goes, I’m hoping some of the changes that we made this year can stick. We’ve learned a great deal about accessibility and tech. There were always people who were unable to attend shows/events at The Pinhook because of accessibility issues and for health reasons. We want to do everything possible to keep bringing shows to people’s homes so that folks can stay safe and still be a part of our wild, queer and wonderful parties. KYM REGISTER THE PINHOOK

[I hope] that people will listen and adhere to the scientific message regarding the effectiveness of the vaccine. FAYE WILLIAMS DUKE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL

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The structural inequities that have long-existed in education have only been further exposed and exacerbated by the COVID-19 crisis. The disruptions to pre-K-12 education created by this crisis provide a moment in which our community can embrace new ways of imagining the public school experience for Durham students. I hope our community will take time this year to listen to our students, families and educators about their experiences with public education before and through this crisis and follow their lead in developing and embracing innovative approaches to reimagining the public school experience in Durham. MAGAN GONZALES-SMITH DPS FOUNDATION


L

ast year – or, the longest year in history – Durham Magazine’s indomitable staff was called on to reconsider, to re-imagine, to re-create its role as the city magazine in a city that was more or less closed for the duration. Within this public health disaster, they chronicled a confident city and business community that will return, we are certain, stronger, smarter and even more vibrant than before. We happily anticipate waiting in long lines to dine at Durham’s world-class restaurants, see sold-out performances at our sorely missed live entertainment venues and organizations (we’re looking at you, DPAC, American Dance Festival, Duke Performances, The Carolina Theatre and all the rest). Most acutely, we long for the simple pleasure of being with friends and family. Through it all our favorite articles focused on some of our readers and neighbors who responded creatively and bravely during this never-to-be-repeated (we fervently hope) trial. The list is truly endless, because there isn’t a person who has fully escaped the consequences of the pandemic, but a salute to the parents, kids and school staffs who have navigated, and are still navigating, their way through their singular quagmire. Durham Magazine adapted but remains a publication that celebrates the myriad great things that make our city special, though none of those things are what they were. We reinvented our WellFest and Sip + Savor events, turning them into touchless drive-through experiences; we’ve cheered on and written about the ever-changing restaurant business (support your local eatery!); and we’ve applauded our artists and venues as they experiment with different ways of serving audiences. Looking forward to being with you soon, Dan Shannon, President


HAYTI HERITAGE CENTER As businesses and organizations shifted their models of operation starting in March 2020 in response to Covid-19, Hayti began to reimagine its programming. Through virtual and livestreamed events, Hayti continued to engage the community while supporting artists of color. In April, “Piano & A Poet” kicked off Hayti’s Covid-friendly season, featuring poets and pianists in concert. Hayti also presented drive-in movies; a postcard quilting workshop; and a series of weekly fitness classes. The poetry slams and African dance classes have resumed, and the jazz tribute music series has continued. In 2021, Hayti looks forward to more virtual, live-streamed events and, hopefully, re-opening. The Heritage Film Festival will run March 1 - 6. Despite the many ongoing challenges, Hayti pivoted with support from its donors, grantors and the community’s engagement. Hayti uses the arts to promote the African American experience and to continue its legacy of activism.

PHOTO BY NIKKI WHITT, FANCY THIS PHOTOGRAPHY

919-683-1709 |

804 OLD FAYETTEVILLE ST., DURHAM, NC |

HAYTI.ORG

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BRENT L. BLAYLOCK, DDS Since opening his practice, Brent L. Blaylock, DDS and his team have provided a clean, safe environment by maintaining robust infection control procedures. In light of Covid-19, the office has enhanced its safety protocols. Upgraded masks and face shields are used in addition to the standard PPE, and common areas are cleaned and disinfected regularly. Air purifiers located in all treatment rooms, the reception area and business office remove airborne contaminants; longer intervals between patient visits allow purifiers more time to clean the air. Patients are asked to wait in their vehicles and receive clearance before entering to uphold social distancing guidelines. Once in the office, patients are screened with Covid19-related questions and temperatures are checked. Patients have shared with Dr. Blaylock and his team that they feel safe in the office and appreciate the precautions taken. As Covid-19 progresses, their office remains committed to adjusting protocols to always protect the health of the Durham community.

PHOTO BY NIKKI WHITT, FANCY THIS PHOTOGRAPHY

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| 3206 OLD CHAPEL HILL RD., STE. 300, DURHAM, NC | f e b r ua ry/ m a r c h 2 0 2 1

GENERALDENTISTDURHAM.COM


durham strong

THE SMILEY GROUP

The Smiley Group was shell shocked when Covid-19 brought the nation to a halt. The pandemic posed an extreme challenge for the newly formed team, whose goal was to build a client-first approach to real estate while offering a unique, enjoyable experience. As a team, TSG met the challenge head on. By creating a “Smiley Kit” – which includes gloves, sanitizer, wipes, and masks – for in-person showings, TSG met clients’ needs while prioritizing the health and safety of both clients and team members. Virtual tours became part of each team member’s daily routine to ensure that all clients could make their real estate dreams a reality. The Covid-19 pandemic has been one of the nation’s most devastating health crises in recent history. The Smiley Group did not allow it to devastate the American dream of homeownership.

PHOTO BY BETH MANN

919-636-8369 | 321 E. CHAPEL HILL ST., STE. 209, DURHAM

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Pictured here:

DAVID YOUNG, CEO OF PARTICIPATE LEARNING PHOTO BY JOHN-MICHAEL SIMPSON

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PARTICIPATE LEARNING Now more than ever, Participate Learning remains relevant as its work in Durham Public Schools and throughout North Carolina focuses on nurturing the next generation of leaders and strives to unite the world through global learning. Though many new challenges arose in the last year, just as many opportunities emerged to utilize their team’s expertise. Participate Learning now offers an online orientation for incoming ambassador teachers and virtual tutoring for Spanish dual language students, all while continuing to provide world-class support for its partners. As a 7-time ‘Best for the World’ B Corp, the company’s mission is rooted in doing well while doing good. Participate Learning pursues this mission by supporting the local community through nonpartisan volunteering for democratic election efforts and facilitating internal diversity and anti-racism training. Participate Learning’s hope is that global education continues to be a catalyst for changing lives, inspiring more empathy, inclusivity, and positive change for a better tomorrow.

919-967-5144

| 201 SAGE RD., STE. 200, CHAPEL HILL

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PARTICIPATELEARNING.COM

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PHOTOS BY NIKKI WHITT, FANCY THIS PHOTOGRAPHY

ACTIVEDGE FITNESS & UPRIGHT ATHLETE ActivEdge Fitness & Sports Performance opened in 2004 with one goal — to provide the best service in the Durham/Chapel Hill area. Since then, founder Brian Diaz has developed relationships with clients, coaches, medical personnel and fitness enthusiasts. When the world as we know it changed in March 2020, these relationships kept the business going. As professional sports were halted, Brian and his staff made state-of-the-art adjustments to Upright Athlete, their physical therapy and sports performance arm. Along with industry-leading sanitation practices, their team pivoted to seeing patients both virtually and in-person. ActivEdge began to offer indoor training with a face covering, outdoor training options and virtual appointments. Whether arriving for fitness or rehab, every client receives a physical therapy evaluation – in-person or virtually – before embarking upon their wellness journey. With a devoted team, loyal client base and thriving fitness community, ActivEdge and Upright Athlete continue to be a fitness and wellness fixture in the Bull City.

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durham strong DESIREE T. PALMER DMD, PA & ASSOCIATES As a dental practice, Desiree T. Palmer, DMD, PA and Associates is in the business of keeping patients – and their team – safe, while providing optimal oral healthcare to the Durham community. During the two months that the practice closed due to the pandemic, their team participated in continuing education webinars, zoom meetings and on-going conferencing with colleagues. Their offices implemented enhanced procedures and protocols to address Covid-19. Strengthened by the support of their community network and commitment to patients, both practices re-opened in May. Throughout the Covid-19 pandemic, Dr. Palmer witnessed the resiliency of our community; the pandemic revealed the heart and soul of the caring Durham community. A special thank you goes to her support network: patients, Downtown Durham, Inc., Durham Chamber of Commerce, the Community Health Coalition, the City of Durham and Durham County governments, LaTasha BestGaddy, The Legacy Group, and M3 & Co. Global. Our community continues to be Durham strong.

PHOTO BY NIKKI WHITT, FANCY THIS PHOTOGRAPHY

919-680-3531

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106 WEST PARRISH ST., STE 1

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105 NEWSOM ST., STE 204

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AUDREY KEMP, DDS, MPH

BRITTANIE HARRIS, DDS

SMILEITSADURHAMTHING.COM

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BULL CITY DENTAL

DAVIA NICKELSON, DDS

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SMITH & HEYMANN ORTHODONTICS In the midst of unexpected closings, stay-at-home orders, and a general sense of uncertainty, Smith & Heymann Orthodontics has continued to provide families throughout the Durham community with safe and effective orthodontic care. Each location has gone above and beyond CDC recommendations to help limit the spread of Covid-19 while still offering the same friendly service and welcoming atmosphere that patients have come to expect. From virtual visits and social distancing to sanitizing stations and increased PPE, their team’s main priority has been keeping staff and patients healthy. Although the past year has been difficult and their offices have had to adapt and improvise quickly, Smith & Heymann Orthodontics is very proud of both its team and patients for facing the challenges of 2020 with a flexible and positive attitude. Their practice looks forward to creating more beautiful smiles in 2021, and hope for a much healthier, happier year ahead.

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FIFIS

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To say that the past year has been like no other is an understatement. As a small business owner for more than 10 years, Lauren Elmore never could have predicted the challenges to come. After the initial shock of closing FIFIS doors, it was time to get busy and creative. During its 56 days of temporary closure, FIFIS staff teamed up and decided to make in-store improvements: preparing for when the store would reopen—not if it would reopen. When the time came to open FIFIS doors again, Lauren told the team that they were only going to “try.” The store implemented safety protocols, including Covid-19 screening and thorough cleaning practices. Slowly and steadily, FIFIS fell back into a routine – a new normal. The best part of reopening has been the joy that customers bring Fifi’s staff and the joy that the store provides for customers.

PHOTO BY NIKKI WHITT, FANCY THIS PHOTOGRAPHY

919-806-FIFI (3434) | 1000 W. MAIN ST. 1-B, DURHAM, NC 27701 |

FIFISCONSIGNMENTBOUTIQUE.COM

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TUNE in A 14-year-old musical prodigy moves from South Africa to Durham to pursue his dreams

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B Y H ANNAH L E E | P HOTO GR AP HY BY J OHN MICHAEL SIMPSON

t was a fairly average Saturday for Julius Schultz in his hometown of Johannesburg, but he remembers the date exactly: April 7, 2012. He sat on his couch to watch TV, but the show was drowned out by the ghostly mimic of a song he had played on his keyboard earlier that day. Julius was the only one in his family who could play the instrument ‌ as far he knew. Maybe it was his 5-year-old son, Justin-Lee, playing the song on his father’s phone, the jazz guitarist thought. Julius sometimes recorded himself to learn the music. Julius followed the sound into a nearby room. It was Justin-Lee. It was not coming from his phone. Tiny fingers danced elegantly across the keyboard Julius had bought four months prior. Up to

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Justin-Lee Schultz stands in front of a mural created by New York-based Eric Friedensohn at University Hill, which hosts the largest consolidated collection of murals in the Southeast.

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that point, Julius says, Justin-Lee hadn’t shown an interest in music, unlike his sister, Jamie-Leigh, who was 9 and already playing drums on Julius’ set list. “Three weeks later, we were rehearsing with [my] band the day before this major show I had in East London, South Africa,” Julius says. “Justin-Lee looked at me and said, ‘Can I play the song?’ I'm like, ‘Dude, you haven't even been playing for two or three weeks.’ He said to me, ‘No, I know this song. I know this song.’ He was nagging and nagging, so eventually, I put him on the keyboard.” Julius looked on while the crowd cheered like he had never heard before. This small boy banged and banged on the keys, feeding

ABOVE Justin-Lee plays five different instruments, including the keytar. RIGHT Jamie-Leigh and Justin-Lee are homeschooled by their mom, Charlene, which gives them both plenty of time to hone their musical talents.

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off his dad’s energy as he currently looking to buy played alongside him. Seated a house with more room at the keyboard, Justin-Lee’s than their three-bedroom feet hovered inches above the apartment (they need space floor. He didn’t miss a beat. for all those instruments, “He blew the people away, after all!). The family and ever since then, I knew moved here a month before I had something special on pandemic lockdowns and my hands,” Julius says. are still a bit unfamiliar Julius started inviting with the local layout. Justin-Lee and Jamie-Leigh But time in quarantine to play a few songs at every did allow Justin-Lee to show. Venues began booking complete his biggest project the kids instead of the to date: his debut album, bandmates. People wanted “Gruv Kid,” released in to see these young prodigies. November. The tempo picked up The album features some quickly. Justin-Lee received of the genre’s biggest names a full piano endorsement with guest appearances from Yamaha that same year by Bob James, Gerald and opened a show for one Albright, Jonathan Butler, of the world’s foremost upNajee, Pieces of a Dream and-coming jazz guitarists, and more, appealing to Jonathan Butler. a broad spectrum of jazz Julius, Justin-Lee and Jamie-Leigh performed “Finesse” by Bruno Mars Julius says his 2012 New audiences and beyond. using a talk box on “America’s Most Musical Family” in 2019. Year’s resolution was to “He's got so many people play keyboard himself, but on his debut album that a that goal led to something greater: helping his son succeed in his lot of musicians would dream of having, even just to have one of newfound talent. them,” Julius says proudly. “Man, it's crazy. People who I idolize The best way to do that, Julius thought, was to move to the are all on his album, and to me, that's incredible. There's so many biggest music market in the world – the U.S. Julius called everyone things that happened that I can’t really fathom.” he knew, including a pastor he met in London several years back. Justin-Lee has not quite hit his dad’s wavelength. Long story short, the man offered him a job as a music director at a “I'm not really sure about that,” Justin-Lee says when asked if church in Michigan, and the family relocated to Detroit in 2015. he thinks he’s “made it” in the music industry. “I'm super honored That pivotal move propelled Justin-Lee, who just turned 14, to I got to be on all those TV shows, [and in] magazines. I don't burgeoning stardom. He appeared with his dad and sister on the think of myself as a prodigy, but I'm very flattered that other Nickelodeon show “America's Most Musical Family” in 2019. He’s people do.” also performed on the Harry Connick Jr. talk show and “Little Big He says he owes it all to his family. “[My mom, Charlene Schultz, and dad] are amazing parents,” Justin-Lee says. “They've always Shots,” a NBC talent show. taught me to have a good work ethic. Work hard, and it will pay off Justin-Lee and his family chose to call Durham home after in the long run.” traversing the country from Los Angeles to New York. They’re f e b r ua ry/ m a r c h 2 0 2 1

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MIC’D UP Durham Academy siblings launch a kids’ sports podcast

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BY HANNAH L E E | PHOTOG RAPHY B Y J OHN MICHAEL SIMPSON

ike many of us, Aarav Parekh, who just turned 14, and his younger brother, Arsh Parekh, 12, spent hours early on in the pandemic parked in front of the TV. That meant loads of ESPN and the like for the self-proclaimed sports-obsessed siblings. After weeks of watching Stephen A. Smith share his own sports opinions, the brothers had an idea: Why not make their own show? The “Two Brothers and Their Sports” podcast got off the ground in April 2020, and already the boys have recorded more than 50 episodes. The two opted for this media outlet despite a lack of any prior audio knowledge. Aarav and Arsh started spending their free time teaching themselves how to operate the

Arsh and Aarav with their sister, Anaya, 9. While she doesn’t join her brothers on the podcast, she enjoys playing soccer.

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That popularity might come in part from the boys’ talent at taking the biggest sports news topics and making it digestible for younger listeners. But it also stems from the honest and, at times, critical conversations the two share about athletes and teams during their weekly discussions – even calling out Tom Brady in their debut episode. That element makes for an entertaining show. “Tom Brady is amazing, but he won’t be able to get adjusted fully to the system until a year-and-a-half, two years … and after a few years I think his performance will decline if it hasn’t already,” Aarav says in the first two minutes of the April The brothers cover the latest on the NFL, NBA and MLB on their podcast, specifically focusing 14, 2020 episode. on their favorite teams – the Dallas Cowboys, Boston Celtics and New York Yankees. They credit a lot of that confidence to the aforementioned ESPN personalities, who they listen to and watch equipment. (Nothing you can’t learn from a little Google searching on a regular basis. and some YouTube videos, right?) “We thought, if they can do it, why can’t we?” Aarav says. “And if The boys, with the help of their parents, Zankhna Parekh and we have valid points – and we’re not just calling out Lebron James Selene Parekh, redesigned a bonus room in their South Durham for doing something – then I think it’s appropriate.” home into a personal studio. The walls are now adorned with It is, of course, easy to criticize athletes from a distance; it’s much jerseys of their favorite teams, like the Dallas Cowboys. They’ve set more difficult when you’ve got a professional on the other end of up touch-screen laptops and a Yeti microphone at a table – their the phone line. But the brothers slowly worked their way up the primary workspace – so everything feels and sounds professional. ranks of athletic prestige, interviewing local athletes like UNC field “We wanted to educate young people like ourselves who are hockey forward Dorrit Eisenbeis all the way to Denver Nuggets interested in sports,” Aarav says. “You always see the ‘Skip and forward Mason Plumlee (who also attended Duke University) and Shannon: Undisputed’ show and all that on ESPN. But we U.S. World Cup winner Jessica McDonald. wanted to do something from a kid’s perspective that other kids One question, though: How the heck are two kids from Durham would enjoy.” landing interviews with pro athletes? So far, so good. Listen Notes, a podcast search engine, ranked “We’re using social media and the web to help us connect to “Two Brothers and Their Sports” in the top 10% of most popular these people,” Arsh says. shows out of more than 1.7 million podcasts globally. The brothers’ “And surprisingly,” Zankhna says, “the athletes have been show has also secured six different brand partnerships across responding well.” various industries. 66

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Consider this a self-made internship for the brothers, who both hope to eventually work in the sports industry. Specifically, they’d like to keep doing what they’re doing, just on a larger platform. The dream is to eventually become personalities in their own right, much like those they’ve come to follow on ESPN and Fox Sports. For the time being, Aarav and Arsh will continue riding the momentum they’ve built with their podcast. “These boys literally wake up talking sports, go to bed talking sports and talk sports everything in between,” Zankhna says. “I’m very happy they are following their passion, but most importantly, [they] have fulfilled their dream of being a source of entertainment to their peers during such a difficult time.”

Nominate the incredible kid(s) in your life by submitting a photo, name, and a brief caption. Nominations will be accepted until Feb 22. and followed by a public voting period from Feb 23. - March 14. The photo with the most votes will win a prize! Winner will be announced March 15.

To learn more, visit DurhamMag.com Presented by:

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Dr. John R. Christensen Orthodontics & Pediatric Dentistry

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Dr. Jamie L. Molina Pediatric Dentistry

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We can hardly wait until kids and families can explore the colorful children’s area in the new Main Library.

FOR YOUR REFERENCE A quick update on how you can still utilize our local libraries

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BY MIA COOPER | PHOTOG RAPHY B Y RJ CRUMPLER

offers its Library Take-Out! program at each of its locations, including the newly renovated Main Library. Library Take-Out! allows patrons to go online and hold anything from books to DVDs and CDs, which they are then able to pick up by reservation at any DCL location. Certain DCL locations may also offer free goodies to visitors, such as kid-friendly activity sheets and take-and-make projects, when they pick up their reserved items. Folks can return items 24/7 using the automated book return on the outside of the Main Library building facing Liberty Street. Outdoor book drops are open 24/7 for returns at other DCL locations, too. Many of DCL’s programs and events are now held virtually, including prerecorded videos uploaded on its YouTube page, such as Toddler Tuesdays, Wacky Wednesdays and Adult Thursdays. 68

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DCL also offers a variety of live virtual events via Zoom each month, like Creative Writing/Poetry for Adults, Durham Voices, and Listen and Draw with Molly and Monica. Some of DCL’s virtual programs and events are held in Spanish, too. Weekly schedules are posted every Sunday on its Facebook page. The libraries also provide remote learning resources to kids and families, ranging from homework help and tutoring services to video classes and research databases, as well as access to free digital content available to stream and/ or download – everything from movies to music. Even though the libraries are not open to the public, Durham County residents can still sign up for a library card online to access virtual resources and more. Durham County Libraries will remain closed to the public for in-person activities and continue to operate within state, local and Durham County guidelines. To learn more and to view DCL’s monthly event calendars, visit durhamcountylibrary.org.


A New Name for a New Year! UNC-TV Is Now PBS North Carolina Powered by the UNC System. Visit pbsnc.org/brand for more details.


K I D S + FA M I L Y

CAMP GUIDE

SUM

MER

Does your kid love sports? What about science or engineering? Maybe art? There are dozens of camps in the Triangle to match every kid’s interest.

1870 FARM 1224 Old Lystra Rd., Chapel Hill 919-590-4120; 1870farm.com

Award-winning program set on 17 acres that incorporates animal care, outdoor games and play, fishing, crafts and farm entrepreneurship in addition to chicken races, gem mining, gardening, hayrides, cooking, fort making, outdoor survival and more. Overnight camps now available. Ages Half-day: 3.5–5; Full-day: 5–13; CIT Program: 14–15 Dates Weekly, June 14-Aug. 13 Price $435/week

THE ARC OF THE TRIANGLE 1709 Legion Rd., Ste. 100, Chapel Hill 919-942-5119; arctriangle.org

Year-round community programs and Arc Triangle University classes for teens and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. In-person and online (dependent on COVID-19) classes include “Petals with a Purpose,” cooking and nutrition, gentle yoga, basic workout, selfadvocacy group, basic drawing, voice class, and music and art appreciation. Ages 16 and older Dates Year-round; schedule/calendar varies. Price Varies for each program/class; sliding fee scale

ACKLAND ART ADVENTURES 101 S. Columbia St., Chapel Hill 919-966-5736; ackland.org

Art Adventures sessions provide kids with a guided view of art in the Ackland’s collection followed by the opportunity to create take-home treasures using newly learned art-making techniques. Ages 6-9 Dates May 8, June 12, July 10, Aug. 4; morning and afternoon sessions Price Pay-what-you-wish. Registration required at ackland.org.

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ARTSCAMP AT THE ARTSCENTER 300-G E. Main St., Carrboro 919-929-2787; artscenterlive.org

Small classes taught by professional artists with a focus on building skills and creative expression. Offers both visual and performing arts camps, including hip-hop dance, painting techniques, cartooning and comics, ceramics, improv acting and more. On-site, online and hybrid camps will be offered this summer. Grades Rising grades K-12 Dates June 14-Aug. 20, 9 a.m.-noon, 1-4 p.m. or 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Price $175/week, half-day camps; $350/week, full-day camps. Member discounts available.

BALLET SCHOOL OF CHAPEL HILL 1603 E. Franklin St., Chapel Hill 919-942-1339; balletschoolofchapelhill.com

Offers a variety of classes, dance camps and workshops in creative arts, ballet, modern, contemporary jazz, rhythm tap, hip-hop, musical theater and dance workshops for children with special needs. Ages 3-17 Dates June 14-Aug. 21; frequency and times vary Price Varies. Call or visit website.

BARRISKILL DANCE THEATRE SCHOOL 3642 Shannon Rd., Durham 919-489-5100; barriskilldance.com; contact@barriskilldance.com

Classes and dance camps/intensives in creative movement, ballet, jazz, hip-hop, contemporary, conditioning, musical theater and more. Visit website for COVID-19 protocols. Ages 3-18 Dates June 7-Aug. 13; half-day, three-quarter-day and full-day camps available, as well as weekly classes. Price Call or visit website.

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BOUNCING BULLDOGS JUMP ROPE CAMP 101 S. White Oak Dr., Durham 919-493-7992; bouncingbulldogs.org

Jump rope skills designed for beginners to advanced participants, some of whom are seven-time National Champions and 12-time World Champions. Ages 5-18 Dates Visit website. Price $45/day; $225/week

CAMP RIVERLEA 8302 S. Lowell Rd., Bahama 210-908-7629; campriverlea.com

Traditional day camp on 100 acres of land 20 minutes outside of Durham. Camp has been open for 50 years and offers activities such as swimming, archery, canoeing, arts and crafts, nature, athletics, tennis and golf. Transportation is provided. Camp Riverlea provides a structured program where children can continue to develop as fully self-actualizing people while learning and perfecting new skills, broadening their range of personal experiences and learning how to live more effectively in their world. Ages 5-12 Dates Session 1: June 14-July 2; Session 2: July 5-16; Session 3: July 19-Aug. 6 Price Varies per session.

CAMP SHELANU AT JEWISH FOR GOOD 1937 W. Cornwallis Rd., Durham 919-354-4936; jewishforgood.org

Programs allow campers to experiment with visual and performing arts, sports teamwork and leadership, wildlife and nature conservation, STEM and so much more. All campers get to swim every day, with swim lessons for those who need them included in the tuition. Camp Shelanu is centered on Jewish values like giving, kindness, welcoming newcomers and repairing the world. While there are opportunities to learn about Jewish culture and traditions, there is no religious instruction at camp. All faiths and backgrounds are welcomed with joy.


Ages 5-12, with a LIT program for rising eighth through 10th graders and CIT program for ninth through 10th graders Dates June 7-Aug. 27 Price $238+, need-based scholarships available CAROLINA FRIENDS SCHOOL 4809 Friends School Rd., Durham 919-383-6602 ext. *263; cfsnc.org/summer

Weekly courses in subject areas such as leadership, stop-motion animation, theater, outdoor adventures, cooking, forensic science, sports, Lego, comic design, Minecraft, fashion design, “Harry Potter,” “Star Wars” and more. Ages 4-18 Dates Beginning June 21; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Price TBA

CAROLINA TIGER RESCUE 1940 Hanks Chapel Rd., Pittsboro 919-542-4684; carolinatigerrescue.org/learn/camps

Campers experience the incredible world of the sanctuary. They will visit the animals daily, learn about the essential role carnivores play in their natural habitats, find out what it takes to be a wild cat veterinarian, practice wildlife biology skills and help some of the tigers express their creativity through painting. Each week of camp is limited to 12 campers. Grades 3-12 Dates Visit website for dates. Price Varies

CARRBORO RECREATION, PARKS & CULTURAL RESOURCES DEPARTMENT 100 N. Greensboro St., Carrboro 919-918-7364; carrbororec.org

Individual sports, arts, outdoor adventure and themed camps such as water fun, science, fishing, baseball, mountain biking, Lego engineering and much more. Ages 3-17, depending on the camp Dates June 14-Aug. 20 Price Varies

CHAPEL HILL-CARRBORO YMCA (980 MLK Jr. Blvd., Chapel Hill) CAMP CLEARWATER (1720 Clearwater Lake Rd., Chapel Hill) YMCA AT MEADOWMONT (301 Old Barn Ln., Chapel Hill) 919-442-9622; ymcatriangle.org

Activities include swimming, arts and crafts, sports, outdoor activities and teen leadership. Ages 3-17 Dates June 14-Aug. 13 Price Call or visit website.

CHAPEL HILL PARKS AND RECREATION 200 Plant Rd., Chapel Hill 919-968-2784; chapelhillparks.org; parksrec@townofchapelhill.org Indoor and outdoor leisure activities for participants in youth and teen camps. Due to

circumstances surrounding COVID-19, CHPR is working closely with its stakeholders and the health department to ensure that camps run in a safe environment for the duration of the summer. Ages 5-14 Dates Visit website. Price Varies for each camp.

CHAPEL HILL TENNIS CLUB 403 Westbrook Dr., Carrboro 919-929-5248; chapelhilltennisclub.com

Tennis instruction ranging from beginners to advanced along with swimming and other sports in a fun and positive environment; advanced tennis camp available for tournament players. Ages 5-15 Dates Call or visit website. Price Call or visit website.

CHATHAM YMCA 287 East St., Ste. 412, Pittsboro 919-545-9622; ymcatriangle.org

Community-based camps at school sites and Camp Royall with activities including swimming, sports, outdoor activities, teen leadership, and arts and crafts. Grades Rising grades K-8 Dates TBD Price Call or visit website. 

A day camp in Durham County for ages 5 to 12

www.campriverlea.com

Summer 2021 Sessions: June 14 – July 2 July 5 – July 16 July 19 – August 6

Spots Still Available

210-908-7629 winter 919-477-8739 summer F e b r ua ry/ M a r c h 2 0 2 1

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CRESSET CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 3707 Garrett Road, Durham 919-354-8000; cressetchristian.org summercamp@cressetchristian.org

Diverse recreational experiences for all day and partial day camps: adventure camps; youth tech 3D and video gaming design; ceramic arts; sportsthemed camps such as Ultimate Frisbee, soccer, volleyball and much more. Spring break camps. Summer drama camps. Ages 5–16 Dates June 7–Aug. 13 Price Varies for each camp.

DUKE GARDENS CAMPS 420 Anderson St., Durham 919-668-1707; gardens.duke.edu/learn/camp

Explore the garden with different weekly themes. Details announced on the website in March 2021. Ages Rising K-fifth grade Dates TBA in March 2021 Price $200 (9 a.m.-1 p.m.), $300 (9 a.m.-4 p.m.)

DUKE SCHOOL 3716 Erwin Rd., Durham 919-493-2642; dukeschool.org

More than 50 camps available, including virtual and on-campus adventures. Ages 4-15 Dates June 14-July 30, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.; aftercare available until 6 p.m. Price $175-$420/week

DURHAM ACADEMY SUMMER 3501 Ridge Rd., Durham 919-489-3400 ext. 6114; da.org/summer

Durham Academy’s summer camps make use of the school’s 84 acres of campus and state-of-theart facilities to create an experience that grows minds and fosters character. New for summer 2021 are transformative all-day experiences: Camp Evergreen (ages 3-11) is an all-day camp with the classic feel of a sleepaway camp, and the Summer Institute (ages 12 and older) is an all-day deep-dive option for campers who are interested in intellectual adventures. Also new this year is Night Camp (ages 10-14), an evening intensive that combines social fun, dinner and instruction in a variety of activities/subjects. Ages 3-18 Dates June 14-Aug. 6 Price Starting at $345 per week

DURHAM ARTS COUNCIL 120 Morris St., Durham 919-560-2726; durhamarts.org

One- and two-week cultural camps, one-week mini camps, dance intensives and teen intensives. Themes vary based on age and type of camp. Ages Rising K-age 17 Dates June-August; day camp Price Call for inquiry. Scholarships available.

DURHAM BALLET THEATRE 608 N. Duke St., Durham 919-680-4363; durhamballettheatre.org

Dance and aerial camps, classes for all ages. Registration starts March 16. Ages 5-14 for camps, 4 and older for classes. Dates TBA Price Call or visit website.

DURHAM BULLS YOUTH BASEBALL CAMPS 409 Blackwell St., Durham 919-687-6555; durhambulls.com

Provides children an opportunity to interact and learn fundamental baseball skills and techniques from professional players and coaches in a relaxed environment over a three-day camp at the Durham Bulls Athletic Park. Ages 7-14 Dates Camp dates TBA, check website for more information. All camps are 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m. (includes registration and pickup time). 75 athletes maximum for each camp. Price $150 until Feb. 29; $175 starting March 1

Natural surroundings, challenging activities and good friends shape campers into confident, independent kids.

Day and Overnight Camps Spring/Fall Weekend Camps Family Camps

CAMP KANATA • CAMP SEAFARER • CAMP SEA GULL

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CampKanata.org SeaGull-Seafarer.org


Summer Camp guide

DURHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS – CAMP FUNTASTIC Eno Valley Elementary, 117 Milton Rd., Durham Spring Valley Elementary, 2051 Northern Durham Pkwy., Durham WG Pearson Elementary, 3501 Fayetteville St., Durham 919-560-9488; dpsnc.net

Four- or five-star licensed summer camps by the NC Division of Child Development and Early Education that offer a well-rounded summer experience, including academic enrichment, science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics (STEAM). Campers are placed in ageappropriate groups as they participate in weekly academic and STEAM-related activities and play sports, games, swim and explore their learning through weekly educational and recreational field trips at no extra cost. Free breakfast and lunch will be provided. Accepts DSS vouchers. Students receive a free T-shirt. Grades 1-5 Dates Check website for more information. Price Check website for more information.

DURHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS – CAMP 4 RISING K The Whitted School, 1210 Sawyer St., Durham 919-560-9488; dpsnc.net

This rising kindergartener camp offers a wellrounded summer experience for every child. Campers explore science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics (STEAM). Students participate in weekly STEAM-related activities, including sports, games, swimming and explore their learning through weekly field trips at no extra cost. Free breakfast and lunch will be provided. Students receive a free T-shirt. Ages Rising K students (must be 5 years old by Aug. 31, 2020) Dates Check website for more information. Price Check website for more information.

Jump rope classes & camps for all ages Register Now!

ONLINE | PHONE | IN-PERSON

EMERSON WALDORF SCHOOL 6211 New Jericho Rd., Chapel Hill, 919-967-1858; emersonwaldorf.org

Early childhood camps offer outdoor play, stories and crafts. Grade camp themes include drawing, painting, fiber arts, outdoor exploration, farming, practical living skills, woodworking, world languages and cultures, skateboarding and more. CIT program available. Ages 4 through high school age Dates Mid-June and July; 8:30 a.m.–3 p.m. Price $190-$275/week

THE EMILY KRZYZEWSKI CENTER 904 W. Chapel Hill St., Durham 919-680-0308; emilykcamps.org

One-week Emily K & CJ Wilson Hoops Academy Basketball Camp and two-week, single-session Emily K & Justice Theater Project Drama Camp. Grades Rising second through ninth graders Dates TBA Price Basketball, $220; drama, $440 

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summer camp guide

EMPOWER DANCE STUDIO – PINK DIAMOND CAMP & TEEN DANCE INTENSIVE 109 W. Parrish St., Durham 919-943-1099; empowerdancestudio.com/summercamps

An empowering dance experience. The Pink Diamond Camp is a cultural experience including art and etiquette classes. Teen Dance focuses on self-awareness and positive self-image using dance and writing as a form of expression. Ages 6-17 Dates Weeklong, July 6-17 Price $350-$400

ENO RIVER ASSOCIATION – IWALK THE ENO 4404 Guess Rd., Durham 919-620-9099; iwalktheeno.org

Science and nature day camps. Hands-on, feet-wet fun and learning at Eno River State Park. Ages 8-12 Dates June 14-18, 21-25 Price $245 per week, financial need scholarships available

ENO RIVER ASSOCIATION – ENO FIELD STATION 4404 Guess Rd., Durham 919-620-9099; enofieldstation.org

Science and nature day camps. Eno River Field Station at the Confluence Natural Area puts students in the field doing biological, earth and environmental research with scientists.

Ages 12-15 Dates July 19-23 Price $245 per week, financial need scholarships

available

THE FARM CAMP AT PIPER HILL 2340 Jessie Bridges Rd., Silk Hope 919-590-4120; camppiperhill.com

Overnight weekend camps and weekly camps brought to you by 1870 Farm. Ages 8-13 Dates Visit website for more information. Price $255-$1,375/week

HILL LEARNING CENTER SUMMER PROGRAM 3200 Pickett Rd., Durham 919-489-7464; hillcenter.org/summer Offers individualized instruction with a 4:1 student-to-teacher ratio in reading, writing, math and executive function for children with learning differences. Grades Rising grades 1-8 Dates June 28-July 30 (closed July 5); Two session options (8:30-11:30 a.m. or 1-4 p.m. daily) Price $3,075

IMMACULATA CATHOLIC SCHOOL 721 Burch Ave., Durham 919-682-5847; immaculataschool.org

Offering a variety of camps in academics, arts and crafts, language and culture, music, religion, sports, STEM and more. Visit website for details.

Grades Pre-K through eighth grade Dates Weekly, June-August Price Varies by camp. INTERNATIONAL MONTESSORI SCHOOL 3001 Academy Rd., Bldg. 300, Durham 919-401-4343; imsnc.org

Summer camps for young children in a safe, nurturing environment, tucked away in Durham amongst the trees. Enthusiastic summer camp counselors delight in engaging your young child’s creativity and imagination through music, movement, stories and exciting, hands-on activities with others in a multi-age setting. Half-day and regular camps with early drop-off and late pickup available. Comprehensive health and safety protocols will continue to be followed as they have been during the school year. Ages Children who will be between 3 and 5 as of Aug. 31, 2021 Dates Check website after Feb. 1. Price Check website after Feb. 1.

JUNIOR VET ACADEMY AT 1870 FARM 1224 Old Lystra Rd., Chapel Hill 919-590-4120; kidsvetclub.com Weekly camps for animal lovers and aspiring vets. Ages 8-13 Dates Visit website. Price $545-$1,895 

Trinity School of Durham and Chapel Hill

Your Partner. Your ommunity. Educating students in TK-12 http://trinitydch.org/durm

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Explore | Discover | Experience a Montessori and IB World School Whether building foundational skills, learning to read, playing sports, creating a work of art or completing a complex research project, The Montesorri School of Raleigh offers children of all ages the building blocks they need for every step of their journey.

Come see for yourself how real-life learning works at MSR. SCHEDULE YOUR ON-CAMPUS VISIT TODAY

www.msr.org | 919-848-1545 Serving children 15 months to grade 12 Offering high school International Baccalaureate (IB) World Programme

SummerScape 2021 June 7-July 30

at The Montessori School of Raleigh Arts | STEM | Sports | Enrichment Week-long camps for children 15 months to grade 8. Full and half day camps available!

www.msr.org/summerscape

Lower School Campus | 7005 Lead Mine Rd. | Raleigh, NC 27615 Middle & Upper School Campus | 408 Andrews Chapel Rd. | Durham, NC 27703


summer camp guide

KIDZU CHILDREN’S MUSEUM 201 S. Estes Dr., Chapel Hill 919-933-1455; kidzuchildrensmuseum.org

Camp Kidzu is unique for its learning through play and is packed with enriching activities, process over product, games and songs that are age appropriate. Free play time in the museum before it’s open to the general public. Camp favorites include weekly themes of Pirates & Princesses, Lights! Camera! Action!, Tiny Tinkerers and more. New camps for this summer include Mini Magicians and Kidzu 2021: Summer Olympics. See website for weekly themes, descriptions and deadlines. Enrollment is on a firstcome, first-served basis. Ages 3–5; 3 weeks for ages 6-11 Dates Weekly camps, June 1-Aug. 27; 9 a.m.– noon, optional aftercare until 1 p.m. Price See website for details.

THE KID’S GYM 26 Knox Way, Chapel Hill 919-240-7093; kidsgymchapelhill.com

Children participate in organized activities within the gym, unleash their creativity by completing various crafts and/or projects and build character by working as a team to accomplish new challenges. Ages 5-12 Dates TBA, from 9 a.m.–noon Price $35/day

LAKEWOOD YMCA & HOPE VALLEY FARMS YMCA 2119 Chapel Hill Rd., Durham, 919-401-9622; 4818 S. Roxboro St., Durham, 919-401-9621; ymcatriangle.org

MOREHEAD PLANETARIUM SUMMER SCIENCE CAMPS 250 E. Franklin St., Chapel Hill 919-962-1236; moreheadplanetarium.org/camp

Camps with activities including swimming, sports (basketball/soccer/tennis), outdoor, teen leadership and arts and crafts. Ages 3-17 Dates June 14–Aug. 20 Price Call or visit website.

Encourage your child’s natural curiosity and intellectual growth by signing up for a camp at the newly renovated Morehead Planetarium & Science Center. Grades K–8 Dates Check website. Price Check website.

MONTESSORI DAY SCHOOL OF CHAPEL HILL 1702 Legion Rd., Chapel Hill 919-923-3339; mdsch.org; admin@mdsch.org

OUR PLAYHOUSE PRESCHOOL 2400 University Dr., Durham 919-967-2700; ourplayhousepreschool.com

Encourages hands-on learning as children explore their interests in indoor and outdoor classrooms. As children talk, hypothesize and problem solve with their peers, they gain a richer understanding of each topic. Topics include a curriculum based on daily sensory, art, building and movement activities along with plenty of outdoor play. Ages 2-6 Dates June 21-Aug. 13 Price Visit website for details. 

Join Montessori Day School this summer for eight fun-filled weeks of camp. Each week will explore different themes filled with engaging activities. Ages 2.5-6, 7-12 Dates June 14 -Aug. 13 (camp not in session July 5-9); 9 a.m.- 1 p.m. Price $195/week

MONTESSORI SCHOOL OF DURHAM 2800 Pickett Rd., Durham 919-489-9045; msdurham.org

Weekly themed camps include athletics, music, visual and performing arts, nature exploration, gardening and science. Ages 3-14 Dates June 14-Aug. 13 (closed week of July 5-9); half- and full-day camps Price Visit website. Registration begins Jan. 27.

From Wonder to Wisdom Accepting applications

PreK-12TH Grade

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YMCA CAMP CHEERIO Residential camping for boys and girls rising 2nd to 10th grade Sessions from June 6th to August 20th

Located on 150 acres in the heart of the Blue Ridge Mountains near Stone Mountain State Park Campers can enjoy over 35 activities including: Archery Canoeing Climbing Horseback Riding Guitar And Much More...

Call (336) 869-0195 or visit campcheerio.org for more information!


summer camp guide

PIEDMONT WILDLIFE CENTER Leigh Farm Park, 364 Leigh Farm Rd., Durham Blackwood Farm Park, 4215 N.C. Hwy. 86, Chapel Hill; 919-489-0900; piedmontwildlifecenter.org/summer-camp-2021 camp@piedmontwildlifecenter.org

Offers a wide variety of outdoor day camps that connect kids to nature and community through exploration, games and wilderness skills. Exclusive teen programs include advanced skills camps, backpacking trips and a leadership (counselor-intraining) program. Ages 5-17 Dates June 7-Aug. 20; flexible drop-off starting at 7:45 a.m.; 9 a.m. until 3 p.m., aftercare available until 5:30 p.m. Price Varies, early bird and multi-camp specials available.

PRIMROSE SCHOOL OF CHAPEL HILL AT BRIAR CHAPEL 81 Falling Springs Dr., Chapel Hill 919-441-0441; primrosechapelhill.com

Imaginations take flight this summer through different weekly themes that engage school-aged children in creative critical thinking while doing fun, STEAM-based projects and weekly field trips for experiential learning. Grades K–5 Dates Weekly, June 14–Aug. 13, 8 a.m.–5 p.m. Price Call for inquiry.

SCHOOL OF ROCK CHAPEL HILL 1500 N. Fordham Blvd., Chapel Hill 919-338-1011; chapelhill.schoolofrock.com

One-week day camps with a variety of musical themes. Grades Rising third graders through rising 12th graders (see camp descriptions on website for specifics). Dates Weeks of June 21, June 28, July 5, July 12, July 19, July 26, Aug. 2 and Aug. 9; Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Price Varies. Call or visit website.

THE STUDIO SCHOOL OF DURHAM 1201 W. Woodcroft Pkwy., Durham 919-967-2700; studioschooldurham.org

The Studio School of Durham gives the opportunity to discover, explore and engage in hands-on learning all summer long, offering a variety of themes for children that are guaranteed to spark their creativity in a safe and naturally inspiring environment. Ages 6-10 Dates June 21-July 30 Price Visit website for details.

SUMMER @ SAINT MARY’S 900 Hillsborough St., Raleigh 919-424-4028; sms.edu

Participants have the opportunity to explore new interests, build fundamental skills, pursue artistic dreams and expand academic horizons.

Grades Rising grades K-9 Dates June 21-July 30, one-week sessions. Early

morning drop-off and after-camp care. Full- and half-day, all-girl and co-ed offerings for day camps and residential programming available. Price $275+ per full week day session, $1,095 for one-week residential camps.

SUMMERSCAPE AT THE MONTESSORI SCHOOL OF RALEIGH 7005 Lead Mine Rd., Raleigh 919-848-1545, msr.org

Eight weeklong camp sessions covering topics such as robotics, athletics, art, music, literature and much more. MSR students and non-students are encouraged to participate. Morning and full-day sessions and before-care options available. Ages 18 months–12th grade Dates Weekly, June 7-July 31 Price Varies by camp. Please visit website.

TEMPLE THEATRE 120 Carthage St., Sanford 919-774-4512; templeshows.com

Summer educational opportunities designed to promote creativity, discipline, self-confidence and teamwork. The summer conservatories include Musical Theatre Conservatory (2 sessions, 2 weeks, ages 8-18), Advanced Junior Musical Theatre Conservatory (1 week, ages 8-12), Advanced Teen Musical Theatre Conservatory (2 weeks, ages 1318), Shakespeare Intensive (3 weeks, ages 13-18), Rising Stars (7 sessions, 1 week, ages 4-7). 

School may look different, but our commitment to our core values and academic excellence remains the same.

An independent school in Durham serving students from Transitional Kindergarten through 8th grade 919-383-8800 triangledayschool.org

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Now accepting applications for 2021-22 school year

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“The child is both a hope and a promise for mankind.” -Maria Montessori

Tours and Applications

Schedule a personal appointment to learn more! Accepting 2021-2022 school year admission applications online for students 18 months-6th grade.

Summer Camp

Weekly summer camp options for children ages 3-14. Register online.

Montessori School of Durham

Igniting passion and curiosity for lifelong learning Accredited by the American Montessori Society & the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.

2800 Pickett Rd. Durham, NC 27705 • 919-489-9045 • msdurham.org


summer camp guide

Visit website for more information, dates, times and pricing or contact Director of Education Alease Timbers at educationattemple@gmail.com or 919-774-4512, ext. 228. Ages 4–18 Dates June–August Price Varies for each conservatory.

TRIANGLE DAY SCHOOL SUMMER PROGRAMS 4911 Neal Rd., Durham 919-383-8800; triangledayschool.org

Eight weeks of programs – including nature-based adventures, arts, STEAM, literacy, cooking and baking, games, sports and more – taught by a staff of passionate and talented local artists, skilled teachers and experienced college students. Ages 4-13 Dates June 14–Aug. 6 Price $285/week

TRINITY SCHOOL OF DURHAM AND CHAPEL HILL 4011 Pickett Rd., Durham 919-402-8262; trinityschoolnc.org

Camp topics include math, Latin, SAT prep, college essay writing, robotics, basketball, baseball, soccer, volleyball, cross-country, strength and conditioning, art, crafts and much more. Registration/catalog available online in January.

Ages 5-18 (Rising K-12) Dates Weekly, June 7-Aug. 6; morning and afternoon sessions available

Price Varies for each camp.

YMCA CAMP CHEERIO 1430 Camp Cheerio Rd., Glade Valley 336–869-0195 (fall, winter, spring); 336-363-2604 (summer); campcheerio.org

YMCA residential camp in the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina. Activities offered include horseback riding, climbing, ropes course, aquatics, sports, field games, creative arts and nature study. Ages 7-15 Dates June 6–Aug. 20 Price $1,300-$2,600

YMCA CAMP KANATA 13524 Camp Kanata Rd., Wake Forest 919-556-2661; campkanata.org

Located on 150 acres just north of Raleigh, this camp nurtures the potential of every child to develop into confident, competent leaders and their best selves. It is traditional, coed and overnight with activities such as archery, hiking, swimming and creative arts, and water activities like canoeing, kayaking and a 75-foot double waterslide on the camp’s 15-acre lake. Offers an overnight camp in one-week sessions, a traditional summer day camp in one-week sessions, and several overnight weekend camps throughout

the fall and spring. We believe in nurturing the potential of every child to develop into confident, competent leaders and their best selves. Ages 6-16; and family camp Dates May-September (this includes an overnight camp, day camp and family camp) Price Ranges by length of session. Check website for details.

YMCA CAMP SEA GULL 218 Sea Gull Landing, Arapahoe 252-249-1111 YMCA CAMP SEAFARER 2744 Seafarer Rd., Arapahoe 252-249-1212 seagull-seafarer.org

These overnight camps – Sea Gull for boys and Seafarer for girls – are located on the coast of North Carolina. Its signature four-week program gives campers time to experience all that the camp has to offer and to develop their character, build strong relationships, independence and confidence in a safe, resilient and supportive environment. It also offers a Starter Camp (one-week), a Mariners camp (two-week), a Family Camp and specialty weekend camping programs throughout the year. Ages 6-16; and family camp Dates May-September (this includes overnight and family camp) Price Ranges by length of session. Check website for details.

2021 SUMMER CAMPS ARTS* Clay (June 14 - 18) Block Printing (July 12 - 16) Drawing (August 2 - 6)

ATHLETICS* Soccer (June 7 - 11) Basketball (June 28 - July 2) Volleyball (July 26 - 30) * Half-day camps (9:00 - 12:00) Preschool is full-day camp

Visit our website for hours and pricing.

Established 1975 • Fully accredited by ACSI and SBACS

PRESCHOOL: INFANTS-4 YR OLDS • ACADEMY: TK-12 CRESSET CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

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3707 Garrett Road, Durham • 919.354.8000 • CressetChristian.org

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WWW. D UKE S CHOOL.ORG

SUMMER CAMP!

VIRTUAL & ON-CAMPUS OPTIONS OUTDOOR ADVENTURES | TECHNOLOGY | FINE ARTS PRESCHOOL THRU EIGHTH GRADE CAMPS | 919.595.8321


home

The walkability of Trinity Park was one of the main neighborhood characteristics that led Kelly Witter – here with her recently adopted golden retriever puppy, Fiona – to purchase her home on Dollar Avenue.

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Dollar Signs

Serendipity led Kelly Witter to her happy place in Trinity Park B Y MARIE MUIR PHOTOG RAPHY B Y J OHN MICHAEL S I M PS O N

K

elly Witter’s front yard in Trinity Park is frequently filled with

Durhamites of all ages, whether it’s a national holiday or just your average Tuesday afternoon. Stop by to say hello, and you’re in danger of drinking a glass of wine (or two) and becoming fast friends with at least five new people. Kelly’s house is a brick, two-story Colonial Revival on Dollar Avenue that was built by John L. Atkins Jr. and his wife, Delores Atkins, in 1939. Or, as others know it, the house to the left of the blue tree sculpture, which was made by local

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home & garden

Kelly’s work-from-home office includes an antique wooden desk that overlooks the backyard. Her creative space is surrounded by local art, including a turtle painting by Darius Quarles and a metal turtle sculpture by Vega Metals.

Kelly’s son Dillon Leovic and his mom raise a glass as they sit on a butterfly chair from local art market Vega Metals – now named Cricket Forge. 84

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artist and former city council member Frank Hyman and commissioned by Kelly’s next-door neighbor Ellen Dagenhart. Ellen, a Realtor at Marie Austin Realty, correctly predicted that Kelly would purchase the home after their first showing in 2016. Now they share the same driveway. “Kelly’s a very entertaining neighbor, and she’s the worst empty nester you’ll ever find,” Ellen says. Kelly fell in love with the area after she moved from Buffalo, New York, to Durham to attend Duke University in 1980. She earned a bachelor’s degree in geology and math, a master’s degree in civil and environmental engineering, and a master’s in business administration – all from Duke. Several years of Southern sunshine and a summer spent attending grassroots festivals like the American Dance Festival and Festival for the Eno was all it took to convince Kelly to permanently move to the Bull City shortly after grad school. She couch surfed or rented with friends for a few years, and in 1987,


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home & garden

Kelly took a job at the Environmental

Protection Agency’s Office of Research and

in Research Triangle Park. “I’ve always felt connected [to Durham],” Kelly says. “It’s not forcing a place to work, it just worked for me.” Today, she serves as the environmental engineer and director of EPA-RTP’s Community Engagement and STEM Education Program, which Kelly started in 2003 to increase communication of EPA science to students, educators and the public with the goal of increasing the public’s knowledge on how saving the environment also advances human health. “I never thought I would stay someplace my entire career, but I love working at the EPA,” Kelly says. “I love the mission of protecting human health and the environment, and I love the people. I was talking to a high school friend a couple of

Development

Kelly intentionally gave away her lawnmower when she moved to Dollar Avenue. Now free from doing yardwork, she spends more time reading, hiking and leading mural bike tours for Preservation Durham.

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home & garden

weeks ago, and she said, ‘You just did not want a job where you had to wear a suit every day.’” In 1988, Kelly purchased her first home on Ruffin Street in Trinity Park for $70,000. But before long, babies were on the horizon, more room was needed, and so Kelly taped up for-sale fliers in the window of Wellspring Grocery. The Ruffin Street house sold for $84,000 in 1994. Kelly and her former husband lived in a 5,100-square-foot house in Hardscrabble – a subdivision in North Durham – for the next two decades. Kelly has many joyful memories from raising her three kids, Cody Leovic, Dillon Leovic and Cassidy Leovic. There was hardly a dull moment, between hosting holiday parties and attending Durham Public Schools events. After her youngest child graduated from Riverside High School, Kelly realized she

Heirlooms and keepsakes, like this photo of Kelly’s mother as a young girl, fill her home with colorful memories.

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home & garden

Kelly occasionally hosts safe, intimate gatherings with friends and family. Here she celebrates the weekend with wine, co-workers and friends Christina Davis, Paul Harvin, Luke Valin and Wilson Salls, and her daughter’s dog, Novella.

KELLY’S SIX SAFETY TIPS

Advice on how to host an outdoor soiree during a pandemic

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Be clear about your rules and comfort level. Communicate! I am only comfortable having guests outdoors.

If anyone needs to use the indoor bathroom, I’m OK with that as long as people wear masks. I put a roll of paper towels at the sink so everyone doesn’t use the same hand towel.

Provide seating and set it up distanced before guests arrive. If you don’t have enough seats, it’s OK to ask people to BYOC (bring your own chair). When people sit, they wander less.

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Ideally, have everyone bring their own food/ beverages/reusable eating tools. If you decide to provide, offer low-contact options like beer/wine and have guests bring their own wine glasses. The one time I made food was on my birthday, Nov. 12, and I made chili (wearing a mask). The one-dish option worked well.

Provide hand sanitizer and/or wipes.

To ensure that people stay outdoors, don’t plan too far ahead. Wait until the day of so that you are confident about the weather and aren’t in the awkward situation of letting people indoors due to a rainstorm.

f e b r ua ry/ m a r c h 2 0 2 1

had outgrown her suburban lifestyle. It was time to downsize and move back to Trinity Park. Overwhelmed by a lifetime of accumulated items, Kelly followed her dad’s advice: “The best way to get something done is to begin.” Weekday nights were reserved for packing boxes and weekends were booked with back-to-back open houses. The fall before Kelly found her current home, she recalls a different open house on Dollar Avenue. “It was so funny because the street between Englewood and Club was blocked off for


home & garden

a block party,” Kelly recalls. “At the open house, they had my favorite water, LaCroix, and my favorite beer, Hoppyum IPA. I looked at the real estate agent and said, ‘If I was ready to downsize my house, I’d make an offer on this one!’” But she didn’t. Kelly continued to search for a house big enough to host her kids, but small enough for an empty nester – something that would work for “the next five years.” In April 2016, her friend John Sheer and his brother visited to attend a Bruce Springsteen concert. However, Bruce canceled

Kelly’s sunroom often served as a late-night dance floor for friends and family before the pandemic.

the show in solidarity with the people and businesses protesting the state’s recently passed HB2 law. In lieu of the concert, Kelly and her guests wandered around downtown. “We’re driving around at a slow pace, and all of a sudden we end up on Dollar Avenue in front of this house with a Marie Austin Realty sign for sale,” Kelly says. Kelly moved in four months later, carefully mapping out each corner of the 1,800-square-foot house before she was settled. “I was purging stuff,” Kelly says. “Whatever room I was in, I’d have a pile for

The world always looks

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consignments, give away, donate, recycle and trash. I would go once a week to local donation places.” Her first year on Dollar Avenue was a blissful blur. “I’d walk from room to room and say, ‘Oh, I’m so happy,’” Kelly says. “I still do that now. I can’t think of any other place I’d rather spend a pandemic. I’m so lucky.” After graduating from Appalachian State University, Kelly’s daughter, Cassidy, moved into an apartment in Trinity Park with her girlfriend, Hannah Koon, their cat, Sushi, and Siberian husky puppy, Novella. Cassidy loves her mom’s house and looks forward to their weekly dog walks – Kelly recently adopted a golden retriever puppy, Fiona – or wine in the backyard. “We had been looking at houses for a while,” Cassidy says. “I loved all of them, honestly, but this one definitely fit my mom the best. I love how old it is. The house we were moving out of was brand new and furnished with a bunch of antiques from my mom’s parents. It’s so clear that the furniture that fit OK in our old house is really at home [here]. All of the pieces work together to make it such a warm and inviting place.” Kelly is content with the house’s current state, for now. Renovations by former homeowners have made it a cozy sanctuary for her children and friends. Minus the occasional mudroom dance session or dining room dinner, Kelly spends most of her time outside. Behind the house, a stone patio and chairs encircle a fire pit. Chairs and tables in the front yard also accommodate socially distanced gatherings, like Kelly’s latest blind wine tastings, where each participant guesses the wine type and ranks the wines from best to worst. Instead of opening presents, Kelly celebrated the holiday season in the backyard with her kids by hosting a “study abroad”-themed wine tasting. She purchased bottles from The Wine Feed from each of the countries where she and her kids had studied: Kelly in France, Cassidy in South Africa, Dillon in Croatia and Cody in New Zealand. In many ways, Kelly shaped her kids’ appreciation for the city where they grew up. “Before Durham was trendy, [my mom’s] love and pride for the city was so apparent [that] I was embarrassed,” Cassidy admits. “She would wear this pink shirt from Dolly’s Vintage that said, ‘Durham love yourself ’ that would make me cringe. As I got older and experienced the city more, I began to understand the love that was there for Durham.” Now the family has found even more to love in this new neighborhood. “It’s my happy place here,” Kelly says. “I knew it from when I lived on Ruffin Street, I was totally in my happy place. I knew I wanted to be back in Trinity Park.” 92

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Biz Briefs 97

DURHAM,

INC.

Highlights from our talented and creative business community

Advice for Growing and Cultivating Your Network page 100

photo by john michael simpson

Rotarians Larry Crane and Elisabeth Wiener meet at Plum Southern Kitchen & Bar to catch up over a quick drink.


durham inc.

BIZBRIEFS Compiled by Grace Beasley

ON THE MOVE

Toshiba Global Commerce Solutions named Rance M. Poehler as its president and CEO on Nov. 16, 2020. Poehler leads the company’s continued transformation as a trusted retail commerce solutions provider. Poehler joined Toshiba with more than 25 years of experience with extensive retail commerce solutions. SpringWorks Therapeutics promoted L. Mary Smith from senior vice president of clinical research and development to chief development officer on Dec. 15, 2020. Smith has been with the company since its start in 2017 and helped found its management team. She designed and executed SpringWorks’ clinical development programs, led the regulatory strategy for the company’s lead assets and helped build a leading clinical development, manufacturing and quality organization. Bervette Carree joined ABC11/ WTVD-TV as its news director on Jan. 11. Carree has nearly 20 years of experience working in multiple top 10 television markets and cable news networks, including CNN. She had worked as an executive producer of NBC

affiliate WXIATV in Atlanta, Georgia, since 2019. Carree is also a North Carolina native and was an executive producer of WGHP-TV in High Point. “It is a privilege and an honor to return home to join an esteemed group of journalists who are committed to serving the community on-air and behind the scenes – especially during these unprecedented and transformative times,” Carree said. The Heavy Duty Manufacturers Association welcomed Danielle Kaspar as its manager of councils and member engagement on Dec. 7, 2020. The HDMA is the commercial vehicle division of the Motor & Equipment Manufacturers Association, a major industry association focused on advocacy for the motor vehicle supplier industry. Kaspar is responsible for the oversight of all HDMA councils and forums, supporting council and forum activities including budgeting, recruitment, marketing communications and member management. Kaspar previously served as director of community relations and Executive Club at the Washington Duke Inn & Golf Club.

The Research Triangle Foundation welcomed Ray Trapp as its new vice president of strategic engagement on Jan. 6. Trapp worked in military, government and educational environments, and most recently served as director of external affairs at North Carolina A&T State University. Trapp works closely with the foundation’s leadership, planning and marketing teams to strategically position RTP as the best place for business in the country, and will represent RTF on committees and working groups to strengthen relationships among RTP companies, universities, and local and regional partners.

AWARDS AND HONORS

on six key categories: culture and leadership, foundational components, strategic planning, communication and marketing, programming and interventions, and reporting and analytics. “In addition to being recognized for our employee wellness programs and generous benefits, we’ve taken exemplary measures to ensure that we’re working to keep our team safe from COVID-19,” said Joe Mecca, vice president of communication. MED-EL, a global company focused on hearing loss solutions, was named innovator of the year by the Hearing Health & Technology Matters Innovator Awards on Oct. 19, 2020. The company received awards for its cochlear implant system, bone conduction implant and AudioKey app.

Triangle Business Journal recognized MindPath Care Centers as one of the fastest growing private companies in North Carolina on Dec. 4, 2020. MindPath is North Carolina’s largest outpatient mental and behavioral health care provider. It has more than 20 locations across North Carolina and offers addiction recovery services, group and individual therapy, and medication management.

Durham-Chapel Hill ranked as the No. 9 most favorable metro area for creative workers nationwide in a study by STORAGECafé that was released in December 2020. Durham has the third highest concentration of creatives in the United States and ranks No. 9 on the arts vibrancy index. The study was based on creative workers’ wages, allocation of jobs, housing costs, self-storage inventory and costs, and the arts vibrancy index.

Coastal Credit Union was recognized by Springbuk as one of the healthiest employers in the Triangle for the fifth year in a row. The award is based

The Durham-Chapel Hill metro area ranked No. 13 on CompTIA’s “Tech Town Index” report in November 2020. CompTIA concluded Durham-

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Chapel Hill excels in the areas of interactive software, defense technologies, open source, software development and nanotechnology. The study showed the local industry is expected to grow 4% in the next five years and highlighted IT companies hiring in DurhamChapel Hill such as IBM, IQVIA and Cisco. The Raleigh-Durham area ranked No. 5 in the nation for the life sciences industry by CBRE, a commercial real estate services and investment firm. The area is home to Research Triangle Park, the largest research park in the United States, which hosts more than 300 companies. The area saw 5.2% employment growth in 2018 compared to the national average of 4.2%. Raleigh-Durham also ranked No. 5 in the nation for funding from the National Institutes of Health, receiving $1.3 billion for research in 2019.

transformative sanitation technologies to improve public health in India. “Advancing technologies for public health is particularly germane to control the spread of preventable diseases, and in this case also advance a fundamental human right – dignity,” said Ravi V. Bellamkonda, Vinik dean of the Duke Pratt School of Engineering.

MOVEMENT AND DEVELOPMENT

KBI Biopharma Inc., a biopharmaceutical contract services organization providing drug development and biomanufacturing services to international companies, established a new commercial manufacturing facility in RTP in December 2020. The company expects the $150 million, 140,000-square-foot facility to be operational by quarter one of 2022. The facility will host more than 200 technical positions in operations and quality assurance.

Duke University Center for Water, Sanitation, Hygiene and Infectious Disease received a $4.5 million grant in November 2020 from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to support the management of field testing

The Research Triangle Foundation announced in December 2020 that it selected White Point, a Charlotte, North Carolina-based private real estate investment firm, as its retail partner for the first phase of development on the 44-acre Hub RTP mixed-use project. White Point will develop approximately 25,000 square feet of experiential retail surrounding a large outdoor plaza, which will feature outdoor seating, a splash fountain and gathering spaces that engage with the adjacent natural stream and green space, as well as potential rooftop terraces. At least 25,000 square feet of creative office space will be developed in conjunction with, and sit above, the retail. The 50,000-square-foot mixeduse project is expected to cost $20 million, and completion is expected in quarter two of 2022.

Allobee secured $500,000 in funding to grow its women-led tech platform, which supports businesses in North Carolina and nationwide, in January. Allobee provides services such as bookkeeping, tech assistance, website development, graphic design and social media management. Founder Brooke Markevicius created Allobee with the vision of an end-to-end solution that addresses the pain points of underutilized workers in the modern PHOTO BY gig economy and those MELISSA SHAW PHOTOGRAPHY running a small business.

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It will be co-developed by both White Point and KDC Real Estate Development & Investments. ApiJect Systems Corp. was approved for a $590 million loan from the U.S International Development Finance Corporation to construct a multi-facility 185-acre campus in RTP. The campus will enable the U.S. to quickly package high volumes of injectable medicines and vaccines in the event of a national emergency, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, and will be capable of producing up to 3 billion single-dose prefilled injectors annually. The facility is expected to begin operating by quarter one of 2022.

Taysha Gene Therapies Inc. chose Durham as the site of its new gene therapy manufacturing facility. Headquartered in Dallas, Texas, Taysha Gene Therapies is developing an extensive portfolio of gene therapies and expects to file as many as four Investigational New Drug Applications for its product candidates next year. The company’s $75 million investment will create 200 new jobs in the Triangle over the next 2 ½ years. Raleigh-Durham International Airport and SAS collaborated to improve passenger traffic forecast models amid COVID-19 since passenger volumes are inconsistent and varied due to the pandemic. The new model SAS implemented allowed RDU

to successfully predict passenger travel within two percentage points of accuracy in October 2020. “Airports cannot succeed without accurate projections about how many passengers will board a flight tomorrow or a year from now,” said Michael Landguth, president & CEO of the Raleigh-Durham Airport Authority. “RDU’s collaboration with SAS allows the airport to develop more precise forecasts that drive important business and planning decisions.” Ventilator provider IPM Chirana announced in November 2020 that it’s opening a U.S. headquarters in RTP. IPM Chirana also commenced the manufacturing of its Aura V ventilator at its facility in Boston, Massachusetts, that same month. The Aura V ventilator is designed to be used in intensive care units to support and protect patients’ lungs while providing critical information to caregivers. NC IDEA, a private foundation committed to supporting entrepreneurial ambition and economic empowerment in North Carolina, awarded nearly $1.5 million in ECOSYSTEM grants to 17 partners throughout the state, including Durhambased Bunker Labs, Code the Dream and Provident1898. The grant recipients were chosen from 65 applications; NC IDEA required that proposals focus on supporting underrepresented entrepreneurs building scalable businesses.

ACQUISITIONS

ElevateBio joins AgBiome and its subsidiary company LifeEDIT Therapeutics to extend the development of gene editing


durham inc.

enabled solutions to RTP. ElevateBio is a Cambridge, Massachusettsbased cell and gene therapy holding company. Members of the ElevateBio team will join LifeEDIT management in order to maximize its existing scientific leadership and research team. ElevateBio’s Mitchell Finer was named LifeEDIT’s new president and CEO in November 2020. Durham-based startup Boon, which provides software and operational readiness for two-sided marketplaces and was founded by local businessperson Ryan Vet, was acquired by CrowdfundNC. Vet also co-owns downtown craft beverage lounge The Oak House at Durham.

IN OTHER NEWS

Startup hub American Underground released its 20192020 annual report in January, sharing that the companies headquartered at AU raised $108.7 million in total funding; 82% of AU companies who sought money received funds, and 89% earned revenue. Fiftysix percent of AU companies are cash-flow positive. Forty-seven percent of companies that raised money were led by a female founder or a person of color; 40% of companies headquartered at AU are led by a female and/or a person of color. More than 220 new jobs were created.

A study released by Construction Coverage in November 2020 found that 24,792 Durhamites work physically demanding jobs, making up 7.9% of the total workforce. The data was gathered from the U.S. Bureau of Labor statistics from 2018 and 2019. Physically demanding jobs encompass workers in protective service, construction, installation, maintenance, transportation and moving. More than 41% of business owners in Durham are women, which is above the national average of 38.4%, according to a report released by Self Financial in November 2020. There are 10,912 female business owners in Durham, but their businesses make up only one-third of incorporated businesses in the area, which means many of them are

missing out on the benefits of incorporation such as personal asset protection, tax benefits and easier access to capital. Researchers at Spanning used data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ 2019 Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) Survey to identify metros with the largest share of employment in computer and math occupations. The Durham metropolitan area employs 19,540 tech workers who earn a median annual wage of $91,280. The median annual wage for all occupations in the Durham metro is $46,760, which means tech workers in Durham enjoy a wage premium of +95.2% over all occupations. Out of all midsize U.S. metros, Durham has the No. 2 most computer and math jobs per capita.

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HOW TO BUILD AND MAINTAIN YOUR NETWORK WAYS TO STAY CONNECTED AS COMMUNICATION SHIFTS ONLINE BY H A N N A H M C C L E L L A N | P H O T O G R A P H Y BY J O H N M I C H A E L S I M P S O N

A

rthur Rogers very seldom conducted business virtually prior to last March. Rogers, a commercial real estate developer, is the owner of Eno Ventures, which specializes in the adaptive reuse of old properties. “What’s worked so well for me over the years is I typically get my tenants through networking, just by being out in the community and talking to people,” Rogers said. “Networking for me is really important – I just greatly prefer to do it in person.” In-person meetings are, of course, limited these days, due to gathering limits imposed to help slow the spread of COVID-19. With the exception

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of Rotary Club of Durham’s after-hours meetings, Rogers said his networking is almost entirely online. “So this has been quite a bit different for me,” he said. Many people, like Rogers, had to figure out new ways to build their networks and maintain professional relationships as businesses have adapted to a virtual COVID-19 landscape. The distribution of vaccines gives hope that some sense of normalcy could return soon, but businesspeople are also recognizing the benefits of online networking: more opportunities, increased access for people with disabilities and higher meeting attendance. “I’m glad that this is not a permanent way of doing business, because I really enjoy talking with people and finding tenants that way,” Rogers said. “I look forward to getting back

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to face-to-face meetings, but there’s definitely going to be a place for Zoom meetings going forward.”

TA K E A D VA N TA G E O F I N C R E AS E D N E T W O R K I N G OPPORTUNITIES

R

ogers said he misses meeting in person, but that virtual meetings have also removed barriers to conducting business. He recently began work on a project in Wilson, North Carolina, which would normally require over a one-hour drive. Now all he has to do is join a conference call or Zoom meeting. Rogers also noticed increased attendance among most of the organizations he belongs to. “You’re not getting the inperson experience, but in a way, you’re getting a lot more bang for your buck because

Larry Crane and Elisabeth Wiener of the Rotary Club of Durham catch up at a socially distanced happy hour held at new downtown restaurant Plum Southern Kitchen & Bar.


durham inc.

you’re getting a lot more people attending,” he said. The shift to digital events has its pros and cons, said Pashara Black, PR and content marketing manager at StrongKey, which provides custom cybersecurity solutions. Prior to COVID-19, StrongKey hosted a cybersecurity meetup

in the Triangle, which had nearly 700 members. Such a large event is difficult to replicate online, but Black said the company now hosts webinars, participates at online conferences and increases its content output. “We’re trying to diversify, because people still want to

connect and people are still hungry for knowledge and information, but it’s not always in the form of sitting in front of a webcam,” she said. Black said connections in her network have increased their social media usage, particularly on LinkedIn and Clubhouse, an audio-based social media

app. Though she’s mostly been on Clubhouse in a personal capacity, she sees the site as “part of the evolution of digital marketing and networking.” She once joined a Clubhouse room for Black businesspeople in the technology industry. “There were some people that were speaking in the room

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or limiting her media intake, Black said time away from a screen is vital in making the most of other online meetings. Steinbacher also emphasized the importance of stepping away, and said she’s worked hard the last few months to not feel guilty about what she didn’t accomplish during a day – especially when remote work can make work-life boundaries less clear. She’s also tried to find measurable goals for networking, like sending BE SELECTIVE IN 10 invites on LinkedIn W H AT Y O U AT T E N D Robinson Everett looks on as Ed Pikaart stokes the fire at Plum. A handful of Rotarians per day, and including gather safely outdoors on Monday afternoons once a month. t’s easy to get messages to curate a overwhelmed with more authentic network. so many networking and “When I say curate, it’s not allowed us to take care of our Plus, she said, treating your professional opportunities only to curate the people you’re transactional business, but colleagues like people can help available now. Black said it’s talking to,” she said, “but curate not our relationship business,” combat the fatigue of only important to be selective with to the medium that you use to she said. seeing faces from across a the events you attend. actually connect.” She’s addressed this in her computer screen. “I know that people are Rogers, who avoids social work by being selective in “I think just genuinely caring experiencing a lot of Zoom media when he can, said he’s what meetings and events about the people in your fatigue, but I think the remedy tried to make the most of she commits to, prioritizing network has been big – you to that is just committing to, any in-person networking. consistent meetings with her know, caring outside of just the ‘I’m going to attend one virtual At Durham Rotary, where most important connections. professional things,” she said. thing a week,’ instead of trying he previously served as For some meetings, she said, “Not necessarily prying into to make everything,” she said. president, he’s enjoyed the it’s OK to have your microphone people’s personal business, but, “Quantifying it, I think, makes it small in-person meetings and video camera off while you ‘How are your kids adjusting?’ a lot more tangible.” that individual Rotarians multitask, while others require or ‘How is it being home with The pandemic highlighted the have hosted in addition to its your full attention. your kids?’” need to curate networking, said weekly virtual ones. He said “Curate the conversations,” Casey Steinbacher, executive he’s particularly grateful for she said. “You don’t have to be M E E T I N P E R S O N – S A F E LY director of Made in Durham, a places like Gulghupf Bakery, on everything.” ven as people adapt to Durham community partnership Cafe & Biergarten on DurhamTaking a few minutes to make the most of virtual working to create a better Chapel Hill Boulevard, which check in with people also networking, Black said education-to-career system. provides outdoor heaters so made a difference in how she the occasional in-person “We don’t have the luxury people can more safely gather approaches meetings, as it meeting can go a long way. of time, especially in our and network during the colder helps others “feel that there are “Over the course of COVID-19, work, to network randomly,” months. people out there who actually I’ve taken a handful of in-person, Steinbacher said. “Just remember that we are still view them as a person, not socially distanced outdoor She said online meetings getting close to being able to just the transaction on the other meetings just to be able to have often led to blurred work-life reopen everything,” he said. side of the Zoom.” that human interaction,” she boundaries for students and “That’s the only thing I can say, Black agreed, adding that said. “I literally mean a handful, working adults alike, stretching because there’s nothing like communication with your but that’s been great.” many people thin. actual in-person interaction. supervisor is crucial, as most are She also emphasized the “I think the methodologies There’s a substitute, but it’s not a understanding of the stresses importance of taking time that we’ve used electronically perfect substitute – so I just have and responsibilities that people away from the computer. to stay connected and to keep my eyes on the light at are dealing with outside of Whether it’s going on a short network and do business have the end of the tunnel.” work, too. walk, taking a real lunch break that were heads of departments at Twitter,” she said. “Normally, it would cost me a couple hundred dollars to buy a conference ticket to see someone at that level speak, but I’m here in our Clubhouse room, and they’re just willingly answering questions and sharing knowledge.” “Accessibility is really increasing during COVID-19,” she said. “And I think people are being a little bit more vulnerable as well, by allowing access to them.”

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engagement

Stephen Ellis & Amanda Swearingen B Y B RO O K E S PAC H P HOTO G RA P H Y B Y P HOTO S BY C L AY, P HOTO S B YC L AY. COM

Wedding Date March 27, 2021

Occupations Amanda is a math and science teacher at Cedar Ridge

High School, and Stephen is a financial planner for Strategic

Financial Group in Chapel Hill.

Crossed Paths They both hail from the Chicago suburbs and moved

to the area for school in the early 2000s. Amanda attended Duke

University, and Stephen went to UNC-Chapel Hill. The couple

met at Kaplan Test Prep when they were both tutoring there. “After becoming friends one day, we decided to see a movie together and haven’t looked back about nine and a half years later,” Amanda says. The Proposal Stephen and Amanda got engaged on St. Patrick’s Day in 2020, right as lockdown

restrictions went into full swing. Amanda says that the proposal was no surprise, but she was blown away by Stephen’s efforts in designing her engagement ring. He traveled to Long Island, New York, to get a special diamond cut, and he worked with a designer in California on the setting. “Stephen’s attention to detail and his effort in making my engagement ring is not only a testament to our relationship,” Amanda says, “but also that he often knows me and what I want more than myself!” After months of planning and designing the ring, Stephen couldn’t wait to pop the question. He proposed in their kitchen the day the ring arrived. The Big Day The couple’s ceremony and reception will take place at Vidrio in Raleigh. They will be married by Pastor Sharon Schulze of South Durham Connections. “I wouldn’t wish for another pandemic anytime soon, but it certainly does work as a good relationship test,” Amanda says. “I’m happy to say we certainly passed with flying colors!”

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wedding

Aastha Garde & Katie Jacobs B Y C H I A RA E VA N S P HOTO G RA P H Y B Y MIC K SCHULTE , M I C KS C H U LT E PH OTO GR AP HY. CO M

Wedding Date August 22, 2020

Occupations Katie is a genetics and genomics Ph.D. student at Duke University studying cell navigation. Aastha is also a Ph.D. student at Duke and studies cell biology and cell invasion behavior. Crossed Paths The two met in 2015 in their Ph.D. program at Duke. They became friends through classes and bonded over their love for contra dancing. They’ve been together since 2016. The Proposal After three years of dating, marriage came up in one of the couple’s regular “deep chats.” While there was no official proposal, they both felt they were heading toward marriage, so they decided to move in together first. Exactly one year after living together, they were ready to take the next big step. The Big Day COVID-19 shifted the couple’s wedding plans, but they found a way to share the day with friends and family across three different continents. The 50 guests they planned to invite joined via Zoom; only an officiant, two witnesses and their photographer attended in person at the backyard ceremony. “Going virtual made it so that some of our family members who would’ve been unable to attend in person could be there,” Katie says. “It was really special to have them see us get married.” Favorite Moments Aastha, who grew up in India, wanted to include traditional aspects of Hindu weddings. The ceremony featured a garland exchange, which Aastha calls “the perfect little nod to the 104

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Big Fat Indian Wedding,” and handmade outfits made by Aastha, who crafted her own dress and Katie’s top with materials from The Scrap Exchange. She also thrifted Katie’s skirt from Fifi’s Fine Resale Apparel. “There’s nothing more comfortable than getting married in clothes you’ve made for yourself and your wife,” Aastha says.

Do you live in Durham and want your wedding or engagement featured in our magazine? Email weddings@durhammag.com.


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Profile for Shannon Media

Durham Magazine February/March 2021 – 3rd Annual Influencers Issue  

Durham Magazine February/March 2021 – 3rd Annual Influencers Issue