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A FEAST FOR THE EYES True Flavors Diner was named a readers’ favorite spot for breakfast and brunch, thanks in part to dishes like the blueberry barbecue chicken and waffles. pg. 50


O U R G I F T TO YO U … YO U R G I F T TO D U R H A M . O U R G I F T TO YO U … YO U R G I F T TO D U R H A M .

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Experience WellFest, a virtual weekend focused on mental and physical wellness. Choose from 20+ classes featuring local experts, and purchase your ticket to an exclusive delicious and nutritious cooking class.

| October 3 An interactive cooking class with Kevin Callaghan, chef and owner of Acme in Carrboro. Pick up your cooking supplies and swag bag at University Kia in Durham, then prepare dinner for two with a virtual cooking class at home!

OCT 3–4

Purchase tickets at wellfestnc.com Cooking with Chef Kevin Callaghan Your WellFest PLUS ticket purchase includes A cooler of prepped food for a cooking class featuring sustainable produce from Hungry Harvest and pasture-raised meat from Firsthand Foods, plus an exclusive swag bag!

On October 4, 20+ virtual physical and mental wellness classes will be available for FREE! Check out our local wellness experts.

RUTH PENADO

AMY ROSSI

AUBREY ZINAICH

GARTH ROBERTSON

HEATHER POWNALL

JENNIFER KING

DOMINIQUE HAMMONDS

Ruthlessly Strong

YMCA

Global Breath Studio

Song of the Sacred

The Confidence Labs

Busy Bees Maid Service

App State University

CREIGHTON BLACKWELL

KATRINA DOODA

PATRICK JEFFS

PERRI KERSH

TOM FERGUSON

LUCY HAYHURST

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The Resiliency Solution

Neat Freak Professional Organizing

Rise Southern Biscuits & Righteous Chicken

Well Balanced Nutrition

Justine Grosso

Visit wellfestnc.com to secure your tickets A portion of WellFest 2020 profits will support Durham Tech Foundation to fund scholarships


magazine AUGUST 2020 VOL 13 NO 5 durhammag.com    EXECUTIVE MANAGING EDITOR

Amanda MacLaren amanda@durhammag.com

EDITORIAL

EDITOR, CHAPEL HILL MAGAZINE

Jessica Stringer

ASSISTANT EDITOR

Hannah Lee

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT & DIGITAL EDITOR

Marie Muir

EVENTS & COMMUNITY EDITOR

Dana Lange

sip+savor | nov 7, 2020 e arly bird tickets on sale aug 20

EDITORIAL INTERNS

Laney Dalton, Claire Delano, Elizabeth Efird, Caroline Kloster, Madeline Kraft, Jack LaMarche, Anna Louise Pickens, Megan Pociask, Georgia Phillips, Sarah Rollins, Ella Sullivan, Mackenzie Wagamon and Naomi Wright CONTRIBUTORS

Elizabeth Kane and Morgan Cartier Weston

ART

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Kevin Brown

GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Lauren Wilkinson PHOTOGRAPHER

Beth Mann

CONTRIBUTOR

Jean Carlos Rosario-Montalvo A DURHAM MAGAZINE EVENT

A virtual food and wine experience. Select an at-home food and wine experience for contactless pickup on Nov. 7 at Johnson Lexus of Durham! Each of the four adventure options include dishes prepared by some of the best chefs in the Triangle and a handpicked wine flight. Your adventure includes 5 dishes for two + 4 split bottles of wine + a swag bag plus Chef-tells-all video & virtual wine class by Ryan Vet, Sommelier at The Oak House thank you to our sponsors

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For advertising inquiries, email advertising@durhammag.com Melissa Crane melissa@durhammag.com Lauren Phillips lauren@durhammag.com Chris Elkins chris@chathammagazinenc.com PRODUCTION MANAGER

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A portion of Sip + Savor’s profits will be donated to the Food Bank of Central & Eastern North Carolina

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DISTRIBUTION/EVENTS DELIVERY DRIVER

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Durham Magazine is published by Shannon Media Inc. Subscriptions, $38 for two years, are available at durhammag.com. To purchase copies, call 919.933.1551.


letter

It’s Past Time

LOVE

Your Carpet

5634 Durham Chapel Hill Blvd., Durham, NC

n the shadow of Mr. George Floyd’s lynching-by-other-means, our organization is reflecting on how our magazines can make a material contribution to countering racism in our communities. We have always striven to create publications that look like the towns and cities they serve, and we are instituting programs that address racial inequity in our own company, but that’s not enough. Though I am convinced that the solution to racism lies in the better angels of our nature, not in the hands of politicians (half of whom pretend that they think Black Lives Matter means other lives don’t – shame, shame on them) or editorials penned by righteous publishers, surely a local publishing company can share our platform with community stakeholders. But not in a vacuum. In recognition of that fact, I am reaching out to community leaders, readers, staff and friends with a one-line emailed question: “What can our magazines do to help?” I will share their responses in future issues and online. (I’m keeping names confidential in order to guarantee an open exchange of ideas.) The responses so far have ranged from optimistic to resigned to sad to even mournful and angry – usually a combination. All have been thoughtful. A friend of mine and of the magazine responded, “My first thought was why not host community virtual meetings [where] a broad cross section of the community [could] tell their personal stories as it relates to racism as well as have them provide their solutions for fighting racism in our community. You could then dedicate an edition of the magazine [to this idea] and include selected persons who participated in those conversations. Your magazine, I suspect, reaches a readership that may have given no consideration to racism in general and specifically to racism [here].” Another person wrote, “I appreciate you asking me. I think about that question every day, ‘What can I do in this dark time?’ I think of the children and what they are experiencing – are they feeling the hate and confusion? The other day, I listened to a young man [who] was 10 or 12 years old, [and] he said, ‘I just want to live.’ You can imagine what that did to me. They don’t understand and will be hurt the most. “To answer your question: What can you do? The children will lead us. Telling stories of children, black, brown and white together, playing, talking and eating, all the things that adults are supposed to do. When it comes to the police, the adults are going to have to work that out. I wish I had a grand idea, but I think we have lost our way and [are] attempting to find it. In the meantime, I just pray we don’t teach our children to hate.” Amen.

Beauty, Artistry & Tradition FOR OVER 40 YEARS

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T HE COVER

Photo by Beth Mann

P.S. Please send me your constructive ideas:

d an s h an n o n @ s h annonmediainc. com


966 Southpoint Autopark Blvd. Durham, NC | 919-595-4500 J ohnsonVol voCars Durham .com


august

contents BEST OF DURHAM

50 Look So Fry Five crispy, crunchy, flaky fried plates from some of our readers’ favorite restaurants and chefs 60 Talking Shop More than 50 years since its opening, Morgan Imports remains one of our city’s favorite retailers 64 Best of Durham 2020 The winners of our dining, retail and arts and entertainment categories

FEATURES

26 Marching for Justice Images from recent peaceful demonstrations and protests 28 In Their Words Black community members share what it means to be Black in Durham today and messages for change 34 Mindful Conversation Five wellness and health care experts join in a candid discussion on how they’ve adapted in the face of a pandemic 38 Whole Body Reset: How to Get Your Health Back on Track The step-by-step guide to a stronger, calmer and happier you 42 Change of Art This fall will undoubtedly look different in many ways, but there are still opportunities to experience and appreciate the arts in our community 70 Riverside Retreat Giorgios Bakatsias hosts a small dinner gathering at his breezy Bahama abode

DEPARTMENTS & COLUMNS

8 Go. See. Do. Our top picks for August and early September 18 Noted What we’ve heard around town … 95 Engagement & Weddings Tying the knot, Bull City-style

DURHAM INC. 86 Biz Briefs

92 The New Office How to get people back to work, safely

PEOPLE & PLACES

10 Congrats, Grads! Honoring Durham’s Class of 2020 14 Juneteenth Census Parade 15 Downtown Murals by Black Artists 16 Annual Beaver Queen Pageant 17 Walk for the Animals

SPONSORED CONTENT

32 Healthy Durham Arts and wellness in the community 68 Adopt A Pet A cat and many kittens are waiting on their forever homes as they are being fostered through the Animal Protection Society of Durham


Media Sponsor

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Hops & Blues Festival AUGUST 29

Spend your Saturday at The Glass Jug Beer Lab’s second annual event featuring blues musicians – including Tad Walters and the Thomas Rhyant Jr. trio, presented by the Music Maker Relief Foundation – and unlimited samples of local IPAs from hopforward beer makers.

Pints for Paws Craft Beverage Festival Bring your crowd-friendly dogs to Durham Central Park to enjoy live music from Tommy Thunderfoot and the Accelerators, food trucks and local beverages at this third annual event. Enjoy a wide selection of unique beers, ciders, spirits and nonalcoholic beverages. All proceeds benefit the Animal Protection Society of Durham to care for animals in need.

(clockwise from top left) Hops & Blues Festival photo by Richard Mitchell; Running of the Bulls photo by Beth Mann; Bull City Rumble photo by Stephen Sellars; Woman in Interior by David C. Driskell, photo courtesy of the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University; Triangle VegFest photo by Tammie Malarich; Pints for Paws photo by Mike Gourmand

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Hosted by Habitat for Humanity of Durham, the 5K run and 6- or 12-mile bike ride raises money to help families in need of affordable housing. Ride or run during the first two weeks of August to participate in the virtual event. Any course will work – just use the app provided by race organizers or upload your results to the race page. You can also sign up for the socially distanced, single-file 5K time trial on Aug. 16. Follow event updates at bullmoon.org.

EVENTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE; CHECK WITH ORGANIZERS PRIOR TO ATTENDING

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Bull Moon Ride and Run

Compiled by Madeline Kraft

Triangle VegFest AU G U ST 1 5 - 1 6

This annual event brings renowned authors, celebrities and vegan advocates to educate the community on plant-based diets and provide a marketplace for more than 70 vegan-friendly vendors. Head to the Durham Arts Council’s PSI Theatre on Aug. 15 to hear from event speakers. On the following day, peruse vendors’ goods, and enjoy live music and tasty bites at the Durham Armory. The first 200 attendees receive a free tote bag filled with samples and coupons.

august 2020


Running of the Bulls AUGUST 29

Run, walk or jog this 12th annual community road race, which takes runners on a hilly, scenic course that winds through Durham Central Park, the American Tobacco Trail, and the Trinity Park and Old North Durham neighborhoods before wrapping up with a lap around the warning track in the Historic Durham Athletic Park. There will also be a kids’ fun run on the warning track. If you would prefer to compete in the race virtually, complete a request form at bit.ly/BCRCrotb.

Childhood is full of milestones. We’re here to help every child reach them.

Bull City Rumble SEPTE MB E R 4-5

The state’s largest vintage motorcycle and scooter show, hosted by Ton Up NC – a small nonprofit group that promotes the riding, restoration and racing of vintage motorcycles – is back for its 16th year. Free to the public, come downtown to see the sights and sounds of vintage scooters and motorcycles with other bike enthusiasts.

Graphic Pull: Contemporary Prints from the Collection AUGUST 27-FE BR UA RY 21

The Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University presents a collection of prints and handcrafted works showing printmaking techniques dating from the 1970s to the present. The exhibition explores this age-old technique, which is expanded by today’s contemporary artists, and addresses issues related to current or recurring social and political trends and events. Duke Lecturing Fellow and Rubenstein Arts Center Assistant Director for Visual and Studio Arts Bill Fick will have an installation of 63 prints in the exhibition as well, and visitors will be offered a free original print created by Bill to take home with them.

giving.dukechildrens.org dukekids@duke.edu 919-385-3147

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people &places Mauridi “Simba” Masumbuko Simba graduated from Jordan High School. He is supported by his parents, Masumbuko Masudi and Christina Batachoka.

PHOTO BY MICK SCHULTE

I am from Tanzania. What I enjoyed was the ability to learn English quick[ly], I learned it within six months, and I was able to get good grades and help my fellow students; seeing them succeed made me enjoy high school. I was involved with mostly theater. My family had a party for my graduation. Now, I am in Kansas City, Missouri, offering a year of service with my religion, The Baha’i Faith, while taking an online class from Durham Technical Community College. After that, I will do the transfer program from Durham Tech to UNC.

Congrats, Grads!

Honoring a few of Durham’s Class of 2020 Karley Long Karley graduated from Trinity School of Durham and Chapel Hill. She is supported by her parents, Mary Long and Robert Long, who live in Croasdaile Farm.

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Karley is off to High Point University! Dealing with chronic illness [Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome] her whole life has led her to pursue a path in clinical psychology, so that she may help other patients and their families. Karley has a heart for her community and God, and she uses her gifts to bless those around her. To know Karley is to love Karley, and she inspires everyone she meets. Karley, we could not be more proud and can’t wait to celebrate your accomplishments! We love you! august 2020

Christina Griffin Christina graduated from Northern High School. She is supported by her parents, Peggy Royster and Richie Griffin, who live in Braggtown. Christina plans to attend college for cosmetology and fashion design.


Makayla Powell Makayla graduated from Northern High School. She is supported by her parents, Elisha McLawhorn and John Powell, who live in Lakewood.

PHOTO BY MICK SCHULTE

Brenda Nehatobaye Nelem

Brenda graduated from Jordan High School. She is supported by her parents, Nehatobaye Jacques and Denebaye Lydie.

During my time [at Jordan], I enjoyed almost everything. I enjoyed classes with my friends, chatting during lunches and getting to improve my English every day. I was a manager for the Lady Falcons basketball last year; I took dance class for four years; I was on the Fierce Falcons dance team. I was in the French club, and I graduated with honors. I didn’t get to celebrate my graduation the way I had hoped, but my family still did a little something for me. We ate, drank and danced at home, just us. My plans are to study nursing at North Carolina Central University and hopefully one day be a nurse.

Bilal Mangal Bilal graduated from Jordan High School. He is supported by his parents, Raayata Mangal and Yousaf Mangal.

We are from Kabul, Afghanistan. I liked my teacher and friends [at Jordan], and I miss high school so much. I was involved in the National Honor Society. My family celebrated my graduation [by giving] me gifts, and we went to Jordan Lake to cook something for everyone. My plan is to go to Durham Technical Community College. I want to get an associate [degree] in science because I want to transfer to a university for computer science.  PHOTO BY MICK SCHULTE

Makayla [was] a student-athlete in middle and high school ([she’s played] soccer since the age of 6). She is Appalachian State University-bound as a psychology major, with intentions of creating a program for young adults to feel safe and understood while navigating through adolescence and teenage years. Makayla is a self-motivated woman; she has worked part time at Chick-fil-A since her freshman year. She is funny, loving and loyal, and the best friend you will ever have. We are so excited to see what her future holds, and we wish her love and laughter in whatever she does. Congratulations, NHS Class of 2020, experiencing this challenging time dubs you the class name: Most Adaptable Class Ever!

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people & places

Louis “Tre” Averhart Tre graduated from Millbrook High School. He is supported by his parents, Jesica Averhart and Louis Averhart, who live in downtown Durham.

Hannah Weinbaum Hannah graduated from Durham School of the Arts. She is supported by her parents, Aaron Weinbaum and Carolyn Weinbaum, who live in Duke Forest.

Hannah will be attending the Honors College at George Mason University as a bioengineering major. She is the recipient of the Mason Distinction Scholarship and the Green and Gold Scholarship as recognition for all her hard work while at DSA. We are celebrating her graduation and accomplishments as a family virtually across the U.S. Hannah is looking forward to celebrating with some time away at the beach before heading on her next adventure in Fairfax, Virginia. She is spending her quarantine time learning Python coding, yoga, playing with her dog, Doyle, adopted from Saving Grace animal rescue, and working as a nanny and camp counselor at USA Ninja Challenge. We are so proud of Hannah; her hard work has paid off!

Tre will be attending Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia, in the fall to study finance and play football for the Maroon Tigers. Tre was a varsity member of the football and track team and [a part of the] Family, Career and Community Leaders of America. Despite the unforeseen ending, Tre had a memorable senior year, as he was named Mr. Millbrook (homecoming king) and Outstanding High School Senior. We’re planning a special ‘Taste of the South’ graduation/send-off celebration in late summer to honor all of his accomplishments!

Ornella Nehoumamang

Kyla Fisher

Ornella graduated from Jordan High School. She is supported by her parents, Edwije Noudjoum and Evariet Laokoura.

Kyla graduated from Northern High School. She is supported by her parents, Steve and Dee Fisher, who live in the Stephen Woods subdivision.

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“ PHOTO BY MICK SCHULTE

Kyla had a love for the arts throughout her years in school. [She] has played the viola and performed at Duke [University] multiple times! Kyla has been enrolled in honors art programs and even had her art showcased at Durham Public Schools’ Office of the Superintendent. Kyla has a very unique and beautiful personality and will be attending UNC Greensboro to partake in the studio arts program!

I’m from the Central African Republic. We came as refugees when I was 15. First, I went to Riverside High School and played soccer and danced. I played defense and was a captain on the soccer team. Then I transferred to Jordan and participated in dance there. I loved dancing cumbia, salsa and hip-hop. We celebrated with a drive-thru graduation at school; we might celebrate again later. I want to go to college and become a lawyer. I want to have a house for my family and travel and learn to speak different languages.


people & places

Albert E. Baptist III Albert graduated from J.D. Clement Early College High School. He is supported by his parents, Albert Baptist Jr. and Raychelle Baptist.

Albert will attend North

Carolina A&T State University

Alexandra Paul Alexandra graduated from Duke University School of Medicine. A native of San Marino, California, Alexandra is also a Duke Class of 2014 graduate with a degree in neuroscience. She is supported by her mother, Andrea Paul.

and major in electrical engineering. He was actively involved in the first robotics program at Duke University for two years in addition to participating in Science Olympiad his senior year. We celebrated Albert by creating a large outdoor banner; personalized photo shoot in downtown Durham; Zoom celebration with cousins who also graduated; a Kudoboard where family and friends post[ed] photos, videos or messages; and created an Amazon wish list for individuals to purchase gifts. Lastly, before he goes off to NC A&T, we will cook him all his favorite meals since he will not be allowed to come back home until Nov. 23.”

For the Smile Of a Lifetime... We welcome new patients.

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Ask us about special savings on select Hunter Douglas operating systems.

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*Manufacturer’s mail-in rebate offer valid for qualifying purchases made 9/16/17—12/11/17 from participating dealers in the U.S. only. Rebate will be issued in the form of a prepaid reward card and mailed within 6 weeks of rebate claim receipt. Funds do not expire. Subject to applicable law, a $2.00 monthly fee will be assessed against card balance 6 months after card issuance and each month thereafter. Additional limitations may apply. Ask participating dealer for details and rebate form. ©2017 Hunter Douglas. All rights reserved. All trademarks used herein are the property of Hunter Douglas or their respective owners. 17Q4MAGVIGC2

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Juneteenth Census Parade P HOTO G RA P H Y B Y MADE L INE KR AFT

The community gathered to celebrate Juneteenth, support the Black Lives Matter movement and encourage participation in the 2020 census on Saturday, June 20. Organized by SpiritHouse NC in partnership with the Durham Complete Count Committee, parade participants decorated their cars, played music and shouted words of encouragement during the 6-mile front porch parade through the East Durham, McDougald Terrace and Fayetteville Street neighborhoods. 14

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1 Phoebe Gooding with her two sons, Taio Pilapil, 14, and Paz Pilapil, 13. Phoebe owns Hawk’s Nest Healing Gardens and decorated her truck to encourage people to complete the census. 2 Parade participant shouts from a sunroof. 3 Shannon Kelly holds a sign supporting Black Lives Matter and cheers on parade participants from outside the Durham Police Headquarters. 4 Two women cheer and wave to Leslie Moyer as she drives along the Juneteenth parade route. 5 Thrive Durham members in the parade. The children sitting in the back of the truck proudly identified themselves as the “Thrive family.” The nonprofit’s mission is to empower African American youth and their families through educational programming, cultural exposure and community partnerships. 6 Elsa Huerta, Angelica Davila and Roxana Picazo of El Centro Hispano, a nonprofit dedicated to strengthening the community, building bridges and advocating for equity and inclusion for Hispanics and Latinos in our area.


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Black Art Matters PHOTOG RAPHY B Y HILARY WALK ER PHOTOG RAPHY

As Durham’s peaceful protests took to the streets in late May and early June, downtown storefronts that had been boarded up with plywood were transformed by more than 20 local Black artists into murals and messages of hope, solidarity and resistance. Continue to support these artists and others by donating to NorthStar Church of the Arts’ Durham Artist Relief Fund at northstardurham.com/artistrelief.

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1 Art by LA Jarome Chesson. Learn more about this artist at instagram.com/sonofsimba. 2 Art by Nina Oteria. Learn more about this artist at ninaoteria.com. 3 Art by Mack Wilson-Leigh (mackleighart.com) and Eric Cabbell Jr. (ericcabbelljr.wixsite.com/etca). 4 Art by Natasha Powell Walker (left, edithgreydesigns.com) and Kiara Sanders (right, keksand.wordpress.com).

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Beavers in the Stream B Y A N N A LO U I S E PIC KE NS

The community has gathered at Duke Park for the annual Beaver Queen Pageant for the past 15 years. Contestants dressed as beavers compete for the crown as part of a fundraiser for the Ellerbe Creek Watershed Association, a nonprofit that works to preserve, protect and restore the local watershed. This year, the 16th annual pageant was held virtually for the first time due to COVID-19. Community members of all ages watched online episodes that included introductions of the six contestants, talent showcases and formal interviews. Meghan Mishalanie aka “Pain Fonda,” a “retro fitness beaver,” won the title of Beaver Queen, and more than $17,000 was raised for ECWA. Other pageant winners included the Most Sagacious “Beaver Sanders” (Jean-Patrick Grillet), Cleanest Beaver “Boy George Beaver” (Gabrielle Rudesill), Best Tail/Costume “Dr. Beaverly Crusher and Locutus of Beav-org” (Olivia Dietrich and Hal Schnee, respectively), Best Talent “Dr. Dam Savage” (Ken Davis) and the People’s Choice and Best Stage Presence “Martha Dam” (Shannon Drake). 16

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1 Shannon Drake aka “Martha Dam” won the “People’s Choice” award and “Best Stage Presence.” 2 Meghan Mishalanie, aka “Pain Fonda,” was named this year’s Beaver Queen. 3 “Dolly/BeaverJuice” Anastasia Maddox. 4 Jean-Patrick Grillet’s “Beaver Sanders,” modeled after Bernie Sanders, was named “Most Sagacious.”


people & places

Going the Distance

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The first time the Animal Protection Society of Durham held a walk fundraiser was in 1973. Almost 50 years later, APS still holds an annual Walk for the Animals to raise funds for the shelter and the services it provides. Volunteers and hundreds of attendees (pets included) typically join together in a 1.5-mile walk around Duke’s East Campus. This year, APS moved the event online, along with its traditional pet contests, which name winners for best kisser, best trick, best dressed, etc. Participants were invited to collectively record and post their individual walks on social media on May 23. Even as they stayed apart, the animal lovers in our community came together to help APS exceed its goal, raising more than $71,200 that will go directly toward medical care and foster supplies for Durham animals in need as well as the shelter’s new community pet pantry, which provides pet food for those facing financial hardship due to COVID-19.

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1 Melinda Hester of the Durham County Sheriff’s Office, APS Development Director Darlene Fiscus, APS Events and Communications Manager Molly Vaughan, Dawn Drake as Spot-E-Bull, Barrion Thorpe, APS Behavior Manager Julie Handy and APS Executive Director Shafonda Davis. 2 Sarah Smith-Brady and William Brady on their walk with pup Thor.

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Send us your news! WHAT WE’VE HE ARD AROUND TOWN … Compiled by Laney Dalton

From births to awards to new biz and more –

Email noted@durhammag.com

DOING GOOD

Caring House reopened at 27% capacity on June 1 after working with Duke Health

to implement steps to reduce the risk of COVID-19 for guests. The nonprofit is currently looking for monetary and meal donations to help provide a safe environment for Duke Cancer Institute patients and their caregivers. Contact Kat Kirschner at administrative_associate@caringhouse.org for more information. Masks for Mutts, a

fundraising campaign for Hope Animal Rescue, is making and selling nonmedical grade face masks for donations of $10, with all proceeds benefiting the dogs in their care. The campaign was organized by volunteer Sarah Pai to help raise money for Mario, her foster dog who needed surgery. Unfortunately, Mario passed away, but HAR continues to help other dogs in need, raising more than $12,000 in three months. Learn more at hopeanimals.org/masks-for-mutts. The Emily K Center added James Futrell, Seth Jernigan, Rahul Pagidipati and Tracey Temne to its board of directors in June. James is the director of student services for Durham Public Schools; Seth is the president of Real Estate Associates; Rahul is the CEO of ZebPay, India’s largest bitcoin exchange; and Tracey is the assistant vice president of strategic communications and planning at Duke University. Emily K Center Executive Director Adam Eigenrauch says the new members will help improve the nonprofit’s racial equity and college access work. 18

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AJ Cropps, a 7-year-old from Durham,

served as one of four ambassadors for the UnitedHealthcare Children’s Foundation Steppin’ Up for Kids fundraiser throughout the month of June. This move-a-thon competition took place across the U.S. and challenged people to take 50,000 steps throughout the month while also fundraising for medical grants to help children gain access to health-related services. UHCCF is special to AJ because he was a grant recipient, which assisted him in accessing occupational therapy. To help AJ reach his goal and see his progress, visit p2p.onecause.com/sufk/groups. Nido: Coworking & Childcare vacated its location at 902 Broad St. in May. This

decision allows Nido to preserve financial resources in order to plan strategically for its future in a new space. Arts nonprofit Triangle ArtWorks launched an online Black artists and arts organization directory on Juneteenth. The goal of the

directory is to lift up, recognize, fund and hire Black artists and Black-led organizations. View the directory or add a listing at triangleartworks.org/directories/black-artistsand-organizations. On June 17, Girls

on the Run of the Triangle launched the

Power Up Activity Kit to help keep girls active and healthy throughout the summer. Targeted toward girls ages 8 to 11, the kit includes 50 different activities, a GRL PWR T-shirt, a physical activity training plan, a completion certificate and more. Learn more at gotrtriangle.org/power-up.

WHAT AN HONOR

Durham Public Schools Superintendent Pascal Mubenga was named the 2020-

21 Central Carolina Regional Education Service Alliance Superintendent of the Year


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Nine of the 10 specialty areas at Duke Children’s Hospital were ranked among the top 50 at children’s medical centers nationally by U.S. News & World Report. Duke was the only children’s hospital in North Carolina to be ranked in nine areas. The hospital is also ranked highest in the state for cardiology and heart surgery, neonatology, neurology, neurosurgery, cancer and urology.

Durham was ranked No. 54 on PeopleForBikes’ annual rating of best cities for bicycling in the U.S., the highest ranking of cities in North Carolina. The data-driven analysis helps leaders understand how to improve the bicycling experience for residents and visitors. “We’re steadily working to increase our bike networks and appreciate the feedback from PeopleForBikes on how we can do even better moving forward,” says City of Durham Transportation Director Sean Egan. He also says the city plans to extend safe bike networks by working to reduce speed limits, and create a seven-mile network of low-stress neighborhood bike routes as well as eight miles of bicycle facilities outlined in the 2017 Bike+Walk Plan.

(below) are among 25 North Carolina students to receive Albert Schweitzer Fellowships. Zhaojing and Katherine joined nearly 250 fellows this summer to learn how to address social factors impacting individual health, hone their leadership skills, work with children in a bilingual English-Mandarin elementary program and more. Their selection as Schweitzer Fellows came from their proposal for a bilingual creative reading curriculum. “Our goal is to address early bilingual literacy concerns that follow core curriculum guidelines to strengthen cultural identity through creative activities such as singing, dancing and acting,” Katherine says.

The College Transfer Program Association, a statewide network of community college and four-year university professionals concerned with college transfer, elected Tenita PhilyawRogers as a board member representing Independent Colleges and Universities on June 9. Tenita is a Durham resident who works as Western Governors University North Carolina’s liaison to the North Carolina Community College System, helping students transition from associate degrees to bachelor’s degrees. With more than 15 years of higher education experience, Tenita has served as director of transfer articulation for the UNC System, director of transfer services for North Carolina Central University, program representative for Mount Olive University and executive director of the Emily K Center.

North Carolina Central University School of Education graduate students Zhaojing Liu (above) and Katherine Reyes-Rodriguez

In June, Josephine Dobbs Clement Early College High School graduate Gloria Rivera Mendoza was one of 17 North Carolina high school students to receive an Aubrey Lee Brooks Scholarship for the 2020-21 academic year. More than 250 students applied for the scholarship, which funds students attending North Carolina State University, UNC-Greensboro and UNC-Chapel Hill; Gloria will be studying at the latter. The scholarship provides up to $12,000 per student for the academic year, and it may be renewed up to three additional academic years. Personal finance website WalletHub ranked Durham No. 5 on its list of best-run cities in America for 2020. It compared 150 of America’s largest cities and ranked each based

on 38 performance indicators, including school system quality, crime rate, economic mobility and transit scores. This ranking was then measured against “total budget per capita” to measure the effectiveness of local leadership in the cities. The Museum of Durham History announced on June 29 it was certified as a Service Enterprise by Points of Light, the world’s largest organization dedicated to volunteer service. This certification designates that MoDH is capable of and has the management expertise to improve its performance, engage its volunteers and complete its mission. Executive Director Patrick Mucklow says the integration of the Service Enterprise model resulted in major improvements in the museum’s volunteer program and an increase in volunteers.

ON THE MOVE

The board of trustees at The Carolina Theatre named Bethann James as its interim president and CEO effective June 22. She replaces President & CEO Rebecca Newton, who is retiring. Bethann has a certification in nonprofit management from Duke as well as 25 years of experience in the public, social and private sectors. She will serve part-time leading the theater in its COVID-19 response, supporting the staff and maintaining The Carolina Theatre’s profile until a permanent president and CEO is hired. Jenna Armstrong

took over as the new owner of Pine State Flowers

in June. Former owner Maggie Smith (at left) opened the shop in 2013. Maggie recently moved to Knoxville, Tennessee, to be closer to her family and enroll in the landscape architecture master’s program at the University of Tennessee. PHOTO BY BETH MANN

in May. DPS exceeded the average growth expectations for the state and increased enrollment for the first time in years during Dr. Pascal’s leadership. In addition, DPS experienced a decrease in schools that received an “F” for school performance grade, a decrease in schools labeled as low-performing, a decrease in the teacher turnover rate and has been able to provide food for DPS children and families during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Joanne P. McCallie stepped down from the

head women’s basketball coaching position at Duke University in July. During her 13 seasons coaching at Duke, the Blue Devils August 2020

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had a 330-107 record and won three ACC Tournament Championship titles. She was also named ACC Coach of the Year three times and mentored five WNBA first-round draft picks. John Brown (left), director of the Duke University Jazz Program and professor of the

practice of music, was named as the first fulltime vice provost for the arts on June 11. His appointment resulted from a national search

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conducted by a committee that consisted of faculty and administrators across Duke. John has an extensive career in music, including playing in the North Carolina Symphony, performing for former President Barack Obama and former First Lady Michelle Obama and serving as music director for the closing ceremony of the Durham 150 celebration. In addition, he received a Grammy nomination in 1996 and has served as juror for the Pulitzer Prize in Music twice. He started in his new role on July 1. After serving as interim executive director for 18 months, Meg Pomerantz was named executive director of Girls on the Run of the Triangle on July 1. Meg has been involved with GOTR since 2007 and has served as a board member, fundraiser and volunteer for the nonprofit youth development organization. “I have plenty of opportunities to wear my GOTR cape (both literally and figuratively) as we work to empower Triangle area girls,” she says.

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FROM

Duke University and Duke Performances appointed Bobby Asher (above), who has

18 years of arts leadership and programming experience, as the new director of Duke Performances. He replaces Interim Director Eric Oberstein on Sept. 1.

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Hot Asana Yoga Studio Durham closed its location at 8128 Renaissance Pkwy., St. 206 in late June after being forced to keep

its doors shut due to COVID-19. The studio will continue providing livestream classes and honor all packages at the Southern Pines and West End locations when they reopen.


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roasted to create a sweet coffee with hints of dark chocolate, roasted nuts and berry.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

for reopening have not yet been specified, but will include modifications such as cashless transactions, venue disinfection, temperature checks and staggered fan arrival times.

with other major North Carolina venues in May for a new safety initiative. The coalition, called NC LIVE, offers guidance to ensure these facilities use the best practices for the return of concerts, Broadway and comedy events. Plans

The Durham County Library began offering “Library Take-Out” on June 16 as an alternate way for people to access the library’s resources while it is closed to the public. Holds can be placed on books, DVDs and CDs, which can

Durham Performing Arts Center partnered

NEWS BITES

On June 1, Boxyard RTP announced Bulkogi Korean BBQ as the latest vendor to join the modern retail hub opening this fall. The Korean food truck, which opened in 2009, offers make-your-own Korean barbecue dishes and seasonal specials. Joe Van Gogh coffee shop closed its West End location at 1114 W. Chapel Hill St. on May 31. Joe Van Gogh Director of Marketing Lane Mitchell says the lease was up for renewal,

and the company decided to focus on its other Durham locations. Its Broad Street and Woodcroft Shopping Center locations remain open.

Zoey Best and Brent Waffle opened Da Kine’s Kava at the former Joe Van Gogh West End

location in July. The non-alcoholic bar features cocktails made from kava and other herbal alternatives, plus coffee, kombucha and teas. Kava is made from the roots of a tropical shrub and is rising in popularity as an alternative to alcohol because of its ability to naturally relieve stress and anxiety. Beyu Caffe was featured in Newsweek’s article,

“Black-Owned Coffee Shops in the U.S. You Can Visit as Alternatives to Starbucks,” on June 12. Insomnia Cookies opened its first Durham location at 1105 W. Main St. on June 16. It

offers a variety of cookies, ice cream, cookie cakes and brownies until 3 a.m. Contactless delivery and curbside pickup are available.

Coffee roasting company Counter Culture Coffee launched its new year-round dark roast coffee, Gradient, at the end of June. It consists of Colombian coffees from small-scale farmers,

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be picked up at a scheduled time. The library also offers a collection of e-books, audiobooks, magazines, TV shows and more on its website. The Durham Bulls canceled its 2020 season in accordance with Major League Baseball and Minor League Baseball. However, the Bulls are planning to host other events at the Durham Bulls Athletic Park and will provide updates when more information is known about health and safety requirements for the venue. Durham Bulls launched its Safe at Home Fund on June 16. The fund provides financial aid to the more than 200 Bulls’ seasonal employees who are unable to work because of the postponement of the Minor League Baseball season. “In times of such economic uncertainty, the Bulls want to make sure all members of our family are taken care [of ],” says Bulls Vice President of Baseball Operations Mike Birling.

In June, the North Carolina Arts Council provided the Durham Arts Council and NorthStar Church of the Arts $15,000 each to help reduce the impact of COVID-19 on North Carolina artists. The money will establish or create programs for artists to apply to in order to support their work. Author John Manuel’s literary adventure novel “The Lower Canyons” was published in May by Atmosphere Press. The novel is about a canoe trip on the Rio Grande River, where each character must fight to survive on the isolated river. The book is available at The Regulator Bookshop as well as various online outlets. The Forest at Duke sponsored American Dance Festival’s “The World is Our

Stage” online festival in June to support local choreographers, inspire creativity and engage audiences. Twenty North Carolina

choreographers sent in 60-second dance videos that dance fans then voted for. Kristi Vincent Johnson, director of dance at N.C. Central University, artistic director of The Repertory Dance Company at NCCU and founder of The Triangle Dance Project, received the first audience award for “The Rivers Are My Veins.” Cara Mossman won the second audience award for “Peel Off Your Fears.” ShaLeigh Comerford, Irish and Native American dancer, choreographer and artistic director of ShaLeigh Dance Works, won the third audience award for “Bound.” The three videos will be screened during the 2021 festival, and the choreographers received honorariums, rehearsal time at ADF’s Scripps Studios and two tickets to a 2021 ADF performance.

IN MEMORIAM

Dr. Albert N. Whiting, former chancellor of North Carolina Central University, died at

102 on June 4. He served as chancellor from 1967 to 1983 and was named chancellor emeritus when he retired. Albert made a lasting impact at NCCU by adding its School

Trinity’s Back-to-School Plan This season is a disruption for us all, but not a disruption in our mission. Things are changing every day, and we are prepared. We invite you to join us in

Moving Forward Together Trinity School of Durham and Chapel Hill is an independent Christian school serving students in grades TK–12. Learn more about our mission and our plan to return safely this fall:

www.trinityschoolnc.org/backtoschool

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IN OUR SCHOOLS

Forge Great Futures, Durham Technical Community College’s campaign to gain funding to support talent development and economic opportunity for students, exceeded its $5 million goal at the end of June. Hundreds of individuals and organizations contributed, including Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina, Walter and Denise Dilts Newton, the A.J. Fletcher Foundation and Bank of America. The campaign began on July 1, 2017, and ended June 30. Durham Technical Community College launched a new mobile health lab with a $1 million grant from Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina. The mobile lab will allow students and practitioners to travel to places where care is needed most, and will be used for educational and community service purposes. It will provide free glasses fittings and glasses for children, free dental pre-screenings and health fairs at public elementary schools. The lab will mainly engage with elementary-age children in Durham and Orange counties where transportation poses as a barrier to accessing health services. Jordan High School graduate Clayson Good won the 53rd

N.C. Junior Boys’ Championship for golf on June 26 at Maple Chase Golf and Country Club in Winston-Salem. He will go on to play golf for Queens University of Charlotte. 24

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PHOTO BY CHI BROWN

of Business, increasing enrollment, creating new academic programs, adding new buildings, increasing the school’s operating budget and more. Albert (pictured above) is preceded in death by his wife, Lottie Luck Whiting, who died in 2004. They were married for more than 50 years and had two daughters, Dr. Brooke Whiting and Dr. Lila Ammons.

In June, NCCU added two new bachelor degrees for the 2020-21 academic year: information technology and sports medicine (below). NCCU is the only school in the UNC System offering the Bachelor of Science in Information and Technology with concentrations in cybersecurity and data analytics, which will be offered through its School of Business.

The University of North Carolina Board of Governor’s Historically Minority Serving Institutions Committee announced on June 16 that North Carolina Central University was one of six institutions chosen to receive a $6 million grant for COVID-19 care and research. The opportunity comes through a partnership between the UNC Board of Governors and the N.C. Policy Collaboratory at UNCChapel Hill. NCCU’s $1 million share will be allocated for creating the Advanced Center for COVID-19 Related Disparities to study the economic and public health impact of COVID-19 on underserved communities in the state.

IN OTHER NEWS

In May, the City of Durham was named one of 10 cities and counties to win a national challenge to join Cities & Counties for Fine and Fee Justice, a network to reform unjust fines and fees that’s facilitated by PolicyLink, the City of San Francisco’s Financial Justice Project and the Fines and Fees Justice Center. Durham received $50,000 along with access to technical expertise and guidance, and membership in a cohort of other teams to develop solutions with community input. “I am delighted about this opportunity to work with PolicyLink in a national movement towards equity, as it centers the work on creating and implementing policies to decrease harm and address the role of our fines and fees on the financial health and wellbeing of residents in cities, towns and villages across the country like ours,” says Council Member DeDreana Freeman, who submitted Durham’s application. EczeMama Club, a premium private social

network for moms of kids with eczema, launched on June 30. Created by Durham resident Amy Pruitt (below), the club provides exclusive perks, discounts and resources, which can be accessed via a mobile app or online. Branch Basics, Lil Mixins and Blue Lizard Sunscreen are a few of the companies that offer free products or discount codes to members.

Durham Public Schools

purchased more than 20,000 Chromebooks for the DPS One-to-One Initiative, which will provide each DPS student from kindergarten to 12th grade with a digital learning device for the 2020-21 school year. On June 25, the Durham Public Schools Board of Education unanimously voted to rename the DPS Staff Development Center after Minnie Forte-Brown, a board member since 2004. It will now be called the Minnie

Forte-Brown Center for Staff Development.

The City of Durham launched its updated website on June 25; it includes a refreshed design using the city’s colors, simplified navigation and easy access to top tasks. “We worked hard to ensure this design update kept our users in mind, that the functionality is fairly intuitive and that most users will be able to quickly find the information they’re seeking,” says Beverly Thompson, the city’s public affairs director.


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Justice S

ince George Floyd’s death at the hands of a Minneapolis police officer, Durham residents have led more than a dozen peaceful demonstrations and protests calling for an end to racial injustices. Many of these events celebrated and mourned the lives of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and Ahmaud Arbery, among other countless Black lives taken. Other events pivoted to politics, advocating for the reallocation of funds away from the Durham Police Department and toward resources like more social services, as well as other calls for impactful reform. Here are a few images from these events.

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#BLM

PHOTO BY MARIE MUIR

On June 10, Duke Health held a “Moments to Movement” walk of solidarity at Duke University Hospital to take a collective stand against systemic racism and injustice. Following the walk, participants met on the Duke Medicine Circle lawn to listen to brief remarks made by Chancellor for Health Affairs at Duke University and President and CEO of Duke University Health System Dr. A. Eugene Washington, among others.

The Other America Movement (OAM) led a march called “Operation Leverage,” shutting down the Durham Freeway on June 1 in exchange for a summit with City of Durham officials to talk about over-policing and poverty in Durham’s Black community. This photo, with organizer and artist Skip Gibbs, Durham County Sheriff Clarence Birkhead, City Council Member Mark-Anthony Middleton, Mayor Steve Schewel, Chief of Police Cerelyn “C.J.” Davis and former Duke University basketball player Nolan Smith, was taken at The Fruit during a conversation with the press after that meeting on June 5.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY RONALD PARKER

Black Youth Project 100 National Director D’atra Jackson.

Hundreds of people gathered downtown on June 4 for a candlelight vigil for George Floyd, which was organized by Aissa Dearing, class of 2020 J.D. Clement Early College High School graduate, and Elijah King, a class of 2020 Riverside High School graduate.


in their words

community members share what it means to be Black in Durham today and messages for change “I am a 55-year-old black man living in fear every day in America”

I

am a 55-year-old Black man living in Durham, North Carolina. I am scared. I wake up scared. I drive to work scared. And I go to bed at night scared. But fear is not new to me, because I am a 55-year-old Black man living in America. I am not a “thug.” I am a business owner, who happens to be Black. Every morning, I leave my wife and drive 13.4 miles to my business at 3 in the morning on the Durham Freeway. Every morning, I wonder if I will be able to come home to my family. Every morning, I wonder if an officer will stop me on the side of the road. Will that officer feel threatened by a Black man driving a large car at 3 in the morning on 147? Will he/she feel there is no way I am driving to a legitimate place of employment before daylight on a weekday? Will I be labeled a “thug”? When I am inside my business, there is no color. I do not see color, nor do my clients. For more than five years, I have owned a

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I T RE L AT E S TO B LACK L I V E S I N A M E RI CA. F O L LO W O N

I N STAG RA M AT

@TOGETHERWESTANDNC.

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business that is as diverse as any in the city. But I understand once I step out of that building, the world immediately changes, as do I. No longer am I in control of my environment or how I am perceived. I was born and raised in the BedfordStuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York, in the 1970s. I attended elementary and junior high school in Flatbush. I learned early in life how to run while being chased 12 blocks by two white teenagers from South Shore High School on a moped. Racial tension and riots were a norm in my junior high school, and that was 40 years ago. Some people are amazed at what happened to George Floyd. I am not amazed; I am numb. African Americans understand for every one incident like this that is filmed, there are [many] that are not. For every incident that another Black person is humiliated, detained, assaulted and killed, you do not hear about many more. Why did it take the killers of Ahmaud Arbery three months to be arrested when the evidence via videotape was readily available? Arbery was shot and killed on Feb. 23, 2020, and Travis and Gregory McMichael were finally arrested on May 7, 2020. It took almost a week for Minnesota to decide to issue a warrant for the arrest of Minneapolis officer Derek Chauvin, who had his knee on the neck of a handcuffed George Floyd on the concrete for almost nine minutes. Why did it take several days to charge the officer with the murder of Floyd when there were dozens of witnesses? And why weren’t the officers who stood by and allowed it to happen also not [quickly] charged as accessories to murder?


In 1986, the seminal rap group Public Enemy created their iconic logo that is as prevalent today as it was when the group’s first album hit the streets in 1987. The logo is a silhouette of a Black man in crosshairs. “The crosshairs logo symbolized the Black man in America,” Public Enemy co-founder and chief lyricist Chuck D says. “A lot of people thought it was a state trooper because of the hat, but the hat is one of the ones that Run-DMC wore. The B-Boy stance and the silhouette was more like the Black man on the target.” What does being a Black man in America mean? It means that when you are in a department store, you are ignored by the salespeople, but accosted by the security. It means that people will cross the street, hold their purses tighter and lock their cars when you are nearby. It means that the quality of your service in a restaurant will likely be dependent on the quality of your attire and the color of your skin. It means that, in any conflict, you will not be given the benefit of doubt. Yes, you can learn quite a bit in 55 years. It means that you are judged by the color of your skin rather than the content of your character. Amy Cooper in Central Park? Really? How easy was it for that to happen? How fortunate that it was recorded? Because if not, there could have easily been another Eric Garner in Central Park. Do people not understand the power of words and the damage, whether right or wrong, they can cause? Cooper lost her job, her reputation and her dog in fewer than 10 minutes of her life. Again, why was she not [immediately] charged with filing a false report? I am a 55-year-old black man in Durham, North Carolina. I am 5’10” and 185 pounds. Not too big, not too small. But that is my perspective. Is my size threatening to you? As a small business owner in a pandemic, stress is a part of my everyday life. Fear is

also a part of my everyday life. I fear for my life and the lives of every young Black person who I know. Did you know that heart disease is the leading cause of death for Black males in America? [According to a study from the University of Michigan, Rutgers University and Washington University], the sixth leading cause of death for young black men is “use of police force.” Any questions?

PHOTO BY JASON M. WILLIAMSON II

in their words

“All deliberate speed … Durham edition”

D

owntown Durham, early 20th century: The scene is a vibrant Black. “Black Wall Street” housed more than a hundred thriving businesses, everything from eateries to boutiques. The African American culture echoed throughout the city. A hundred years and an “urban renewal” later, this scene has vanished. Typically spunky and social, I walk timidly down Parrish Street where upscale condos and coffee shops have taken the place of those affluent Black businesses of the past. Welcome signs fall on blind eyes because to them, I look suspicious. I do not feel welcome in a place where my history has been erased. Recently, protests over the racial injustice rooted in our country have brought together people of all ages, colors and cultures. Thousands have come to the heart of Durham to support my people, but what happens when the protests stop, and the movement is no longer trending? I am still a Black woman struggling with intersectionality. My men are still being legally murdered. Disparity thrives between the color lines in education, health care and

CAITLIN L E G G E TT IS A JUN IOR AT N ORTH CAROL INA WESLEYAN COL L E G E.

many other aspects of society. Where does this leave me? I wasn’t around to witness Black Wall Street, but I’m here now, and my activism is built on its foundation. My city must take responsibility for gaslighting the issues my people face daily. Durham’s police department was given a $70 million budget this year; its new headquarters cost almost the same. Yet the McDougald Terrace community was left homeless due to gas leaks. I know students whose first encounter with police is a schoolmandated resource officer, perpetuating the school-to-prison pipeline in black and white. How can our youth be the future with no safe place to live or learn? As a young Black woman in 2020, I still have the same fears of not making it home after being stopped by Durham police that my father had as a young Black man in 1977. So, I’ll exhaust every right I have to break this cycle. This movement doesn’t end when police officers are arrested for murder, it ends when the murder never happens. Change, for my people, has tarried at “all deliberate speed” for far too long. Durham is lucky that we want justice and not revenge.  august 2020

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in their words

“Black student lives matter”

T

he tragic, senseless and untimely death of George Floyd has caused many to question, “Do Black Lives matter? Do Black students matter?” We have reached a point of discourse in our nation where the question about the value of Black life has been expressed through protests and outrage. The clamor for racial equity and justice will not be quelled with apathy, placidity or inaction. It behooves us to seize this moment to incite change. We can emulate what others are doing well and create our own success stories right here in Durham. The academic performance of Black and Latinx students is disconcerting. Even with the strides made over the past three years in Durham Public Schools, with increases in reading composite scores, math composite scores and English II scores, staggering gaps still persist between Black and white students. In English II, white students outperformed Black students by 40.1 points in 2019, and in Math I, white students outperformed Black students by 31 points. To make sure that my Black sons did not mirror prevalent negative statistics, I hosted academic playdates, became a fixture at teacher meetings, was extremely vigilant about classroom placement, enrolled my sons in the AVID program, monitored report card comments for bias and made sure my sons enrolled in Advanced Placement and Honors courses. They are both athletes – Paul (soccer) and Michael (lacrosse) – co-captains of their respective teams, club leaders and have worked as lifeguards since they were 15. As an administrator, I treated my parents’ sons as if they were my sons. I created a CARE Team/Academic Plan process to individually monitor and improve the performance of 150 underachieving students, and I hired 30

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80% or more of Black and Latinx students are proficient on the state’s standardized English and math assessments: • Personalize the data: Each data point is represented by a student name and a face; • Generate principal-directed student equity learning goals and promote equitable learning environments by conducting equity audits;

DR. DION N E V. MCLAUGH LIN IS

A DURHAM PARE N T

WITH TWO BLACK S ON S . S HE IS ALS O A FORME R

P RIN CIPAL, AN AUTHOR AN D AN AS S ISTAN T P ROFE S S OR IN THE H . M . M ICH AUX JR. SCH OOL OF EDUCATION AT N ORTH CAROLIN A CEN TRAL UN IVERSITY. HE R N E W

BOOK , “P E RS ON ALIZE D P RIN CIPAL LE ADE RS HIP P RACTICE S : E IGHT STRATE GIE S FOR

LE ADIN G E QUITABLE , HIGH ACHIE VIN G S CHOOLS ” WAS

P UBLIS HE D ON JUN E 2 .

additional staff to provide remediation and tutoring during the school day. I conducted equity professional development and equity classroom walkthroughs. My focus was not solely on “fixing kids,” but on repairing broken systems that have allowed so many children of color to underperform. As an assistant professor working with aspiring principals, my life’s work is communicating with teachers about successful practices, advocating for equitable and racially just environments, and sharing the practices of principals who have been successful in their work with Black and Latinx students. In my new book, I outline eight practices that schools can utilize to increase the achievement of Black and Latinx students. These practices are based on 18 successful public schools where

• Get the right teachers – who can lead discussions about equity and racism, are dedicated to student success, call on everyone, are passionate and maintain structured classrooms – and monitor the implementation of culturally proficient instruction with equityfocused walkthroughs; • Increase teachers’ cultural proficiency by introducing the Cultural Proficiency Continuum, equity downloads and equity execution as strategies for operationalizing equity work in schools; • Infuse highly structured, comprehensive intervention systems for individually monitoring student performance; • Obtain student voice data through equity listening tours, student surveys, student equity panel discussions and a high school course on race, gender and human behavior and make it an integral part of school improvement; • Create academic affinity groups and scholar support programs for African American and Latinx students, like Bridge to Calculus and ChemCafé; • Explore anomalous approaches like inviting Black parents to be part of learning walk teams, be willing to meet parents wherever and whenever they are available. Create parent needs assessments, tap into parent expertise and build trust, connection and understanding. Partner with local businesses, restaurants, car dealerships and supermarkets to provide financial and in-kind donations for academic awards, student incentives, teacher appreciation and parent events. Collaborate with the Durham-based Village of Wisdom parent group for Black males.

If we believe that the lives of Black students matter, then it is our responsibility to create schools where Black students can be successful. It is time for Black students to really matter in our schools.


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brighter from behind a smile

Martha Ann Keels, DDS, PhD Dylan S. Hamilton, DMD, MS Erica A. Brecher, DMD, MS

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ARTS AND WELLNESS IN THE COMMUNITY By Naomi Wright

I N PA RT N E R S H I P W I T H

CITY OF DURHAM | COUNTY OF DURHAM | DUKE UNIVERSITY | DUKE UNIVERSITY HEALTH SYSTEM | DURHAM CAN | DURHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS DURHAM CONGREGATIONS IN ACTION | GREATER DURHAM CHAMBER OF COMMERCE | INTERDENOMINATIONAL MINISTERIAL ALLIANCE LINCOLN COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTER | PROJECT ACCESS OF DURHAM COUNTY | PARTNERSHIP FOR A HEALTHY DURHAM TRIANGLE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION | THE INSTITUTE

DURHAM ARTS COUNCIL Durham Arts Council is one of many organizations that has suffered significant budget cuts. It will continue to feel those effects through the end of the year, says Executive Director Sherry DeVries. When the nonprofit set up its Arts Recovery Fund in March, some 70 applicants responded and reported $1.9 million in revenue losses. Although much of DAC’s normal programming is not currently feasible, it remains committed to its mission. “Arts recovery in our community is likely to take a very long time since most arts activities and events involve larger groups of people,” Sherry says. “DAC will do all it can to support our arts sector and help arts organizations, arts businesses and individual artists recover and rebuild.” Before the pandemic, DAC hadn’t offered virtual programming. But they made that pivot, and Sherry couldn’t be prouder of her team for rising to the challenge. DAC’s virtual classes provide temporary solutions to its declining revenue, and they have also gained popularity. “Since our virtual classes have been successful so far, we

Arts & Health at Duke performing artist-in-residence William Dawson plays the piano in the lobby of the Duke Children’s Health Center.

PHOTO BY JARED LAZARUS/DUKE UNIVERSITY

E

anticipate that we will continue with a mix of both on-site and virtual programs in the future, particularly for high-risk populations,” Sherry says.

ven as the pandemic still looms over our community, art continues to flourish. Organizations like Arts & Health at Duke, the African American Dance Ensemble (AADE) and the Durham Arts Council (DAC) continue to provide hope, inspiration and an escape from the realities of COVID-19.

ARTS & HEALTH AT DUKE As an institution working within Duke Health, Arts & Health at Duke felt the impact of COVID-19 on a different level – an operational one. The four-person staff, while small, allowed the program to focus on the needs of the people they serve and meet patients where they are. “We are not approaching art as, say, a museum would,” Program Manager Sharon Swanson says. “Everything we do is very approachable.” For example, when patients began requesting coloring books, the program leveraged in-house graphic artist Bill Gregory’s skills to create a collection based on Duke Chapel’s stained glass windows and the flora found around Duke Health’s campus. They have strategically staged art kits in units to help A mosaic of children’s art work created during the “Brilliant Barundi” cut down on unnecessary contact. summer camp hosted by the Durham Arts Council.

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AFRICAN AMERICAN DANCE ENSEMBLE With more than 30 years of programming and community experience, African American Dance Ensemble Executive Director Dr. Angeloe Burch Sr. does not feel caught off guard by the pandemic. Instead, his concerns center on staying authentic as the organization pivots to a virtual presence. Online experiences are not ideal, Angeloe says, “the beating of the drums, the clapping of the hands, the yelps and hollers. ... You cannot experience this in its depth and in truth on a computer.” For now, Angeloe continues to advocate for his organization and expand AADE’s wellness initiatives, including healthy cooking lessons and collaborating with medical personnel to help monitor common health concerns. The absence of summer camps full of kids, community dance performances and groups of volunteers is felt keenly by each organization. Despite these times of hardship and division in our nation, there is a resiliency in each group as they look to the future. “As we all endure this space and time of our lives,” Angeloe says, “I remember the words of Baba Chuck Davis, our founder and still our guide: ‘When we’re dancing together, there is no time to hate one another.’”

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Pop-up style events illustrate the “finding a joyful surprise around the corner” ethos that Sharon likes to see the program embody. There was one staff member who was able to enjoy the art on the walls as well as an inhouse musician playing a favorite song. “I had the perfect five minutes,” the person said, “and that’s all I needed.” Arts & Health will offer their annual employee art show virtually this year, and even some patient services are now online. With an eye to the future, Arts & Health is partnering with the Mary Duke Biddle Foundation to create a mural celebrating hospital staff. “It is going to be a powerful message of how important they are to all of us, not just at Duke, but to this community.” The mural is slated to be complete by the end of this year.

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MINDFULCONVERSATION COVID-19 continues to cause unexpected changes across every industry, from hospitality to education to research. We asked five wellness and health care experts to join us for a candid discussion on how they’ve adapted in the face of a pandemic: B Y MORG AN WESTON | PHOTOG RA PH Y B Y B ET H M A N N

Responses have been condensed and edited for clarity. First things first. How are you? How has the way you work changed over the past few months? Dr. Taineisha Bolden I’m OK, but for the first 60

to 75 days, it was exceptionally stressful just being a parent [and] adjusting to a new way of life. But recently we’ve found new routines, I’ve stayed active, and I’ve switched [to] teaching Zumba over Zoom. Being a restaurant owner as well [she and husband Dorian Bolden own Beyu Caffe] definitely factors into the stress. Dr. Ashly Gaskin-Wasson I’ve been seeing patients

virtually, and thankfully my husband, Brian Wasson, and I have been able to take turns caring for our 21-month-old son, London. I’ve been intentionally making space for me so I can show up well for my clients and my family. Marissa Mortiboy The Partnership for a Healthy Durham took

a break from meetings in March and April to reorganize and rethink the structure of our meetings. We began meeting again in May via Zoom. Jasmine Burroughs My practice was actually my side

hustle until recently, and COVID-19 hit right when I went out on my own [with Food That Fits You]. My son, Zaire, is 2, so I’ve recently gotten into a groove where I focus some days of the week on my clients, and others with my son. It helps me stay relatable to my clients and keep balance.

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AGW A challenge for me is not having administrative

DR. TAINEISHA BOLDEN

Owner/Medical Director, AccessiBull Healthcare PLLC ---------------

JASMINE BURROUGHS

Nutritionist and Dietitian, Food That Fits You ---------------

DR. ASHLY GASKIN-WASSON

Licensed Psychologist, Psychological Assessment, Consultation & Therapy Center ---------------

MARISSA MORTIBOY

Coordinator, Partnership for a Healthy Durham ---------------

DR. C. NICOLE SWINER Physician, Durham Family Medicine

help – I spent five hours or more in the first week just trying to ensure that my clients’ insurances covered telehealth. A few folks even paused their mental health treatment, not knowing if it would be covered. TB The way my practice is set up, my patients pay

a flat fee, so nothing is predicated on insurance reimbursement – but in many cases there weren’t mechanisms in place for telehealth, so that was a challenge for many providers.

Dr. C. Nicole Swiner Our practice did not close down,

but we originally shortened our hours so we could process and figure out how we could be humans with all this. We implemented telemedicine across the practice to pivot and continue patient care. When I get home, I shower immediately – none of my family members are allowed to touch me until I have. I would not say things have been completely disrupted, but I have definitely adapted to virtual consultations. JB

I initially paused psychological assessments, but I’m in the process of being able to offer some virtually. AGW

MM Instead of focusing on committee action

plans during meetings, we have check-ins with participants, discuss what has changed in the community and ways we can support community needs. We are also continuing our racial equity work and what that will look like when applied to the entire Partnership.


AGW A word I keep seeing is

“magnified.” We know COVID-19 is disproportionately affecting people of color – and that is in part because of historic disparities. For example, these communities already experience implicit bias in health care. Add to that things like paywalls in news media creating a lack of access to information, or reduced testing sites in less affluent areas; I can’t help but wonder what was lost in those first days and weeks. JB I serve a diverse group, but many

of my clients are women of color. This pandemic has exacerbated existing stressors, especially for those who don’t have the luxury of working from home. Cooking is a big deal – I used to have more conversations around making healthy choices at restaurants. Now, those conversations start with, “How can I take care of myself at home?” This has been especially hard on those who live alone or those who use transit, or otherwise don’t have access or funds for healthy foods. NS There are definitely a lot of

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Dr. Taineisha Bolden, Dr. C. Nicole Swiner, Dr. Ashly Gaskin-Wasson and Jasmine Burroughs.

challenges. I am glad, though, that some of these things are being brought to light. That is the first step toward change. How has COVID-19 impacted mental/full body health? What advice are you giving to your clients/patients to help?

What problems has the coronavirus brought to the forefront in terms of our health care system? TB For me, it can be hard to answer patient questions right now,

because information we are receiving as medical professionals has been inconsistent. That, and the double masking [the wearing of two masks at once because medical-grade masks aren’t always available] has been challenging. MM Factors affecting COVID-19 outcomes include whether someone

has a medical home/primary care provider, who has access to testing sites (due to insurance status, location, transportation and internet access), which jobs offer protections such as working from home, paid sick leave, and if they have to work on-site.

Getting used to a new normal is difficult. There are people who don’t have all the resources they need, and that can cause stress and have a large impact on mental health. MM

Even for my clients who did not have mental health issues prior to the pandemic, they have been experiencing symptoms of depression and anxiety for the first time. TB

NS We’re all still figuring it out. I recommend finding activities that

are relaxing – gardening has been a great option for many, and cooking at home. For me, I’m talking with all of my friends in the mental health field frequently, staying active and keeping my kids busy. They’re currently enrolled in online dance and gym camps – but even that is a august 2020

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wellness

privilege, as it requires having a laptop and Wi-Fi. I do share with my clients how it is affecting me to help them understand it is human to feel worried right now. TB It’s a unique position to be in, for sure. You are trusted to help

Racial and economic disparities surrounding who actually becomes infected with the disease have been thrown into sharp relief in recent months. What do you believe can be done in your field and beyond to help improve outcomes for minorities and low-income families? MM Coronavirus has brought issues that existed in health care – such as

access, affordability, quality of care, discrimination and racial inequities – to the forefront. It has become more apparent that marginalized populations such as African Americans, Hispanics and Latinos, and lowincome [populations] have worse health outcomes overall, and during COVID-19. [Personal protective equipment], social distancing, frequent disinfecting and hand-washing or hand sanitizer for those who have to work on-site are all helpful. People of color are more likely to work in jobs deemed essential and may not have these protective factors at their work sites. This can lead to increased exposure to COVID-19. Health insurance rates are lower in Durham for African Americans, Hispanics and Latinos and Native Americans, which impacts access. Research shows that people of color receive lower-quality care or aren’t listened to as often as white DR. TAINEISHA BOLDEN patients, which impacts the type of care received. Owner/Medical Director,

people through difficult situations. It can be really heavy, and I have no poker face. My patients will ask me if I’m OK, and I just tell them it’s not about me in that moment – I need them to know it’s OK to feel however they feel. AGW Exactly! Something I often say to trauma

victims is, “You are having a normal reaction to an abnormal situation.” I reassure them that it is completely OK to feel how they are feeling. Experiencing a pandemic is definitely an abnormal situation. That’s also true about weight gain – many folks are worried about that right now. The “quarantine 15.” NS

JB I’ve seen that, too. Before [COVID-19], most

AccessiBull Healthcare PLLC

TB When I think back to when everything first

clients came to me for weight management. Now, I’m also asked, “How can I stay healthy right now?” or “How can I boost my immune system?” Yes, you can incorporate sea moss or superfoods into your diet, but it isn’t a cure-all. My recommendations are always the same, simple, practical methods: Get enough rest. Find time for yourself. Stay as active as you can and eat a variety of foods. What is it about sea moss that’s so popular right now? NS

JASMINE BURROUGHS

Nutritionist and Dietitian, Food That Fits You

JB It’s great for the digestive system and has lots of

minerals. But like I said, it is always a good idea to incorporate healthy ingredients into your diet, but if you’re still smoking, eating poorly or not sleeping, it’s not going to do much.

NS On the other side of this, I hope all the wonderful

DR. C. NICOLE SWINER

Physician, Durham Family Medicine

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closed, the people who depend on school for things like meals, supervision for their children ... it has just been a tremendous hardship for so many of our neighbors. How do we figure out school? Bussing? Nutrition? There are some stopgaps, such as The Feed DURM Collective, [an emergency alliance created by Beyu Group Inc. that coordinates safe food deliveries to feed children, individuals, families and health care workers], but the fragility that has existed for decades has been exposed, and these are big questions to be answered. And on a local scale, the fabric of Durham is built on festivals, restaurants, music venues and the people who work here – we need planning and progress to ensure they stay successful.

people we have in our city will hopefully be treated better, staff and patrons alike. I love Durham, but my friends are not always given equal treatment. We need more safe, Black-owned spaces in Durham. And the awareness and acknowledgement that is happening now really has to be mobilized. One of the good things that has come out of the pandemic


wellness

and the drama in politics right now, is that it’s in your face. You can’t avoid it – it’s on social media, it’s on the news, it’s online. It really is not the responsibility of the Black community to fix things – or the health care providers – it has to be everyone, coming together as a community. When it comes to Black Lives Matter and some of the disparities being brought to the surface, it is up to our white allies to realize how they can help and what mindset shifts they have to make, what conversations they have to have in rooms and at tables where decisions are being made, [and] they have to advocate for those changes. Folks in the health care world have been fighting this battle to make things equal long before I’ve been in medicine, and Black folks have been fighting for centuries to make things equal. AGW Right. It’s not just the health care industry.

DR. ASHLY GASKIN-WASSON

Licensed Psychologist, Psychological Assessment, Consultation & Therapy Center

long term, we need to change policies that would ensure equity for people of color, such as raising the minimum wage to a living wage, expanding access to Medicaid, expanding the social safety net, increasing access to safe and affordable housing, ensuring quality education and providing wealth-building opportunities. We can’t return to “normal.” We need to adapt to meet the needs of community members and make changes for the long-term to improve health outcomes for those most impacted. This may involve changing policies and practices, how we engage the community, make decisions and allocate resources. TB I think we need to have both a short- and long-

range view. Maybe in 2022, there will be a vaccine, but until then, we can’t just proceed with blinders on. We have to keep this same energy, and find your lane – whether that’s marching, educating, using your local influence – each piece is important.

All institutions are being affected. It isn’t because of a gap in achievement; it’s a gap in resources. Those same policies and practices I mentioned have also led JB Fewer than 3% of dietitians are Black. We all know to many people of color being essential workers on there are large disparities in health – especially with the front lines, and not just in health care, but also diet-related chronic conditions – and Black people are driving buses, working at stores that are still open, disproportionately affected by those, so it’s shocking MARISSA MORTIBOY etc. I’ve had a lot of conversations with my patients to hear that fewer than 3% of the field represent that Coordinator, Partnership for who are people of color and seeing this time as an population. I hope this conversation can encourage a Healthy Durham opportunity to try to engage with dismantling racism, girls who look like me to explore these kinds of roles in but people are experiencing a lot of burnout, too. We health and medicine. have conversations around the scale of balancing activism and advocacy with self-care, and knowing the scale is going to be tipped depending AGW I think only 4 or 5% of psychologists are Black – we can’t carry on your needs and values, and that’s OK, too. People often feel guilty everyone, so in terms of long-term solutions, why are there only so about self-care, but if you see it as a process – one that other people are many of us in the field? Doctoral programs, social work programs also experiencing – you can give yourself time to recover. and counseling programs need not only recruitment, but retention, and for those institutions to implement policies to ensure that the JB I’m from Tarboro, but I have been here long enough to see a lot of educational environment isn’t hostile. In addition, federal and private change. I’m curious to see what it will look like a couple of years from student loans need to be forgiven – these are barriers to success in now, and like Nicole said, what spaces will exist for Black people. At education that shouldn’t exist. the moment, I have seen people intentionally seeking Black businesses to support, which is so exciting. I hear about this struggle from my TB I’m still just thinking about George Floyd. Unfortunately, for clients and think about my 2-year-old son – for now, I’m focused on many of us, we have a plethora of firsthand stories like that that building his routines and fostering his independence, both as a human we can tell – and I’m not that old, and so that doesn’t include and around food. anything that happened before I was born. So many of us have been conditioned to have this expectation that we will be treated MM We need to look at the bigger picture to support differently, and it is not OK – it isn’t normal. We all need to keep low-income families and people of color. There are immediate needs, feeling this every time a story appears in the media until there are no such as income support, housing and food. But to improve outcomes more stories. august 2020

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WHOLE BODY RESET:

HOW TO GET YOUR HEALTH BACK ON TRACK The step-by-step guide to a stronger, calmer and happier you B Y ELIZAB ETH KAN E | PHOTOG RA PH Y B Y B ET H M A N N

L

ately, you’re feeling just a little bit ... off. Maybe you’re drained by the afternoon and feeling the urge to drink that extra cup of coffee. Perhaps small things get to you more easily than they should. Or maybe, you’re feeling more worn down and burnt out than you’d like to admit. You’re not alone. There’s nothing like a global pandemic to wake you up to strive for better health. The frightening effects of COVID-19 are giving us all a reality check on how resilient we really are. Of course, the journey to better health is a process. You can’t transform your body overnight, but you can make better decisions that will drastically improve your health and happiness over time. Starting now.

Tracy S. Q. Hill and Terry B. Hill, owners of Bikram Yoga Durham, say the key to achieving your fitness goals is maintaining a consistent routine. 38

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RESET YOUR DIET

The secret to improving your skin, sleep and energy levels? It’s all about good digestion. “If your gut’s not healthy, you’re not healthy,” says Deborah Ann Ballard, M.D., M.P.H., with Duke Integrative Medicine. 

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“So, when you eat, if you feel bloated, if you’re having a lot of reflux, or if your bowel function isn’t regular, it’s a sign that your gut is not balanced.” To improve digestion, Dr. Ballard sets down a few basic guidelines: Chew your food well, eat until you’re about 80% full, and don’t drink a lot of liquids with meals, especially ice-cold liquids, which can “stun your digestion.” Also, add in foods with fiber. When it comes to good nutrition, Dr. Ballard says, “sometimes I give my patients this motto: ‘Greens, beans and lean proteins.’” She recommends that folks include more vegetables and fruits in their diet, as well as beans and lentils, to increase their fiber intake. To strengthen your body and sustain your energy, “it’s always important to have a big variety of foods,” Dr. Ballard stresses. She also suggests incorporating foods that give you a boost of vitamin C – opt for fruits like oranges and tangerines. Also, use lots of lemon juice in your cooking.

REWORK YOUR FITNESS ROUTINE

The gym closures that accompanied the COVID-19 pandemic have made keeping up with regular fitness routines all the more difficult. “You’ve got to go easy on yourself,” says Tracy S. Q. Hill of Bikram Yoga Durham, an independently owned and operated yoga studio that Tracy co-owns with her husband, Terry B. Hill. “We’re living with more pressure.” Terry explains that people can also struggle when they’ve become reliant on the gym to stay fit (using treadmills, weights and machines), and suddenly these facilities are unavailable for them to use. “You don’t have to go to a gym to have good health,” he says. Both state the importance of starting where you are and committing to a routine that works for you, right now. If you’re

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trying to get back into an exercise regimen, “you don’t have to jump in on day one with a full workout,” Terry says. Tracy and Terry explain that maintaining a regular fitness routine doesn’t have to be difficult – it just has to be consistent. “You do something small today, then you do something small tomorrow,” Tracy adds. If you’re starting to work out again after a long hiatus, or you’re coming back after suffering from an injury, Terry recommends being safe and practicing proper form. When teaching, Terry tells his students that “one good pushup is better than 10 bad ones.”

RETHINK YOUR SLEEP

Longing for a good night’s sleep? Dr. Ballard says that to sleep well, you need to be active during the day. “It’s just like with little children – when they play hard, and they’ve had a very active, busy day, they tend to sleep better at night!” That also means staying active intellectually. “Being physically active and engaging in things that you find enjoyable, intellectually stimulating and creative during your waking hours will help you sleep better at night,” she explains. Dr. Ballard also recommends relaxing an hour before going to bed, setting aside time to wind down. “Don’t do things at night that get you revved up and tense,” she states. That also means limiting your screen time with electronics. “The light from all these devices kind of keeps your brain awake,” Dr. Ballard explains. That goes for caffeine and alcohol, too. “Excessive alcohol does not promote good sleep – it actually disturbs your REM sleep.” Whatever your reason for making health changes, these experts all emphasized a common theme: the importance of finding your motivation. When you’re clear about what your goal is, you’ll be more likely to stick with good habits. Ultimately, that’s how any progress worth making is done to create a stronger and happier life.


Train and b e reha h th wit

best

4221 GARRETT RD. DURHAM • 919.493.1204 ExperienceTheEdge.com | UprightAthlete.com


art

FALLARTS

Change of

This fall will undoubtedly look different in many ways, but there are still opportunities to experience and appreciate the arts in our community. Here are just a few:

Fueling Creativity Two local organizations help artists stay afloat during the pandemic By Ha n n a h L ee | P hoto gr a p hy by Bet h M a n n

was teaching an acting class at Hillside Gov. Roy Cooper declared a state of emergency on March 10. “I thought it was only going to be two weeks,” James says, “and then the world went into uproar.” The months that followed generated fear and anxiety for James, an actor and writer, and for thousands of other local artists unemployed today. A.yoni Jeffries, a musician and songwriter, also ames Gray

High School when

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t ONE STEP AT A TIME

All of A.yoni Jeffries’ upcoming gigs were canceled in early March. The musician and songwriter, who releases a new album this month, was one of dozens of artists and arts organizations supported by the Durham Arts Council’s Arts Recovery Fund.

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remembers that first week clearly. “All my gigs had been canceled,” she says, “and when I say all, I mean everything.” To counteract the lost gigs, exhibits and concerts, including events scheduled months in advance, Heather Cook of NorthStar Church of the Arts launched the Durham Artist Relief Fund on March 12 with the help of arts advocacy group Art Ain’t Innocent and Kym Register, owner of The Pinhook, a Readers’ Favorite venue for live music. The GoFundMe was designed to raise money for local creators and arts presenters impacted by cancellations due to COVID-19 to somewhat offset the massive revenue loss for hundreds of artists. “When the late Phil Freelon and his wife, Nnenna Freelon, first envisioned the idea of what NorthStar could be, they were clear that they wanted it to be a space that ensured that Durham’s vibrant, 44

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creative energies would be sustained well into the future,” Heather says. “… as the waves of cancellations began, and we prepared to close the doors to NorthStar’s physical space on Geer Street, it became clear to me that we could continue [that vision] by creating a support system for Durham artists …” On March 20, the Durham Arts Council also set up its own Arts Recovery Fund and began accepting applications for cash grants on April 6. “It’s important for people to think about the arts and think about the environment and spaces that the arts operate in,” says Sherry DeVries, DAC’s executive director. “Those are going to be some of the last to reopen. Even when it may seem like the economy is reopening to some extent, these artists and performance venues’ recovery is going to be further down the road.”


• The DAC Arts Recovery Fund will raise money through the end of 2020. Donate at bit.ly/DAC-arts-fund.

Durham’s arts scene is like no other, • Applications for Durham contributing significantly to the spirit of Artists Relief Fund remain open to Durham-based our city and also to our economy. According artists; available funds will to a 2015 study by Americans for the Arts, continue to be distributed on the nearly 6,000 artists in Durham generate a rolling basis for as long as roughly $154 million in annual revenue for resources last. Contributions can be made directly at the city. “Those numbers have gone up (since gofundme.com/f/durham2015),” Sherry says. “But obviously with the artist-relief-fund. pandemic, those numbers are going to take a dip for a while. That’s something most • “Like us on Facebook,” James says. “Like us on social people don’t realize: What an important media. That’s a really big economic sector the arts are for Durham and one.” And simply, “Reach out across the state.” to artists … and ask them what they might need.” In the four-and-a-half months since NorthStar launched its fund, it exceeded its initial $100,000 goal. As of June 26, $80,450 was distributed to 247 local artists, with priority given to BIPOC artists, transgender and nonbinary artists, and disabled artists. The Durham Arts Council raised more than $68,000 by mid-July. While local donors have made an impact, DAC also saw strong support from its corporate partners, including PNC Foundation, NC Arts Council, Mary Duke Biddle Foundation, Triangle Community Foundation, Manbites Dog Theater Fund and Duke University. “We distribute 100% of the funds as fast as the money comes in,” Sherry says. As of June 29, $44,000 in arts recovery grants aided 44 individual artists and 27 arts organizations and businesses, including Empower Dance Studio (one of our 2020 Readers’ Favorite dance studios), Liberty Arts and Sonic Pie Productions. A.yoni and James are two recipients of DAC’s fund, and both emphasized that the work they produce is their livelihood – they can’t see themselves in any other industry. “When you’re so into one field for almost a decade or more, and when you’re trying to apply for another job, people look at you crazy,” James says. “The fund definitely helps. That’s pretty much all you have, besides your savings and the support of other people.” “There [are] no other spaces that I rely on to support myself other than my artistry and Handewa Farms, [my family’s Afro-Indigenous-led farming co-op operating in Rougemont],” A.yoni, who releases a new album, “Potential Gon Pay,” on Aug. 1, adds. “I remember being very stressed out. I wasn’t sad, because there were so many of us who were going through the same thing. ... I did feel like, ‘OK, there’s more than just me right now being affected by this.’ “But when [DAC] reached out, I felt like a weight had been lifted because I knew I could pay my bills,” she continues. “And I knew that I was able to take care of myself, at least for a couple of days.” 

calendar Events are subject to change; check with organizers before attending

Young Bull

Aug. 12, 7 p.m. A part of Music in Your Gardens, a free, eight-week online concert series showcasing nationally renowned artists who call Durham and the surrounding area home, Duke Performances premieres a new, specially recorded performance by Young Bull free of charge on its website and YouTube page. The film, prerecorded in a socially distanced manner, will be accompanied by a live YouTube chat with the artists of Young Bull – a Durham homegrown R&B collective – who will answer questions from viewers. dukeperformances.duke.edu

Rissi Palmer

Aug. 19, 7 p.m. The following week, Duke Performances premieres a performance by Rissi Palmer that “delivers anthems for the national moment” on its website and YouTube page. Rissi, who weaves notes of R&B, gospel and country into a sound she calls “Southern Soul,” will also participate in a live YouTube chat where viewers can ask her questions. dukeperformances.duke.edu

PHOTO BY COLIN HUTH

HOW YOU CAN HELP

OutSouth Queer Film Festival Sept. 11-12

Formerly known as the North Carolina Gay + Lesbian Film Festival, The Carolina Theatre presents the inaugural OutSouth Queer Film Festival. The festival was moved from its original dates in August and was shortened in length due to COVID-19, but it will still include “an exciting lineup of features, documentaries and shorts that fully represent the queer community,” the theater stated in a press release. Audience sizes and cinema numbers may be limited, and parties, luncheons and workshops have been canceled. The full lineup is slated to be announced Aug. 3. carolinatheatre.org/festival/outsouth

‘Behind the Mask’ Sept. 11 – Nov. 6

The Durham Arts Council hosts this art exhibition by Cornell Watson in the Allenton Gallery, august 2020

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marking milestones Walltown Children’s Theatre celebrates 20 years and welcomes a new executive director By sa r a h ro l l i n s

PHOTO BY CORNELL WATSON

which will “visually explore Black individuality and the myriad of emotions Black families experience” surviving in predominantly white spaces. Cornell plans to display 10 pieces crafted using pigment ink on archival paper. A hundred percent of profits from art sales will be donated to Durham-based The Village of Wisdom, an organization with a mission to “close the academic opportunity gap by protecting the intellectual curiosity and positive racial self-concept of Black children through the love and wisdom of their families and communities.” cornellwatson.com/behindthemask

CenterFest Arts Festival Sept. 19-20

The Durham Arts Council presents CenterFest, the state’s longest-running juried outdoor arts festival, virtually this year due to COVID-19. The event will still include visual and performing artists, interactive features and highlights of past years’ CenterFest celebrations. The event is free, but there is a suggested $5 donation for people older than 13 years old. centerfest.durhamarts.org

Pride: Durham, NC

Sept. 26, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. (festival) and 5 p.m. - 10 p.m. (concert) Pride: Durham, NC’s parade and festival will be held at Duke Unviersity’s East Campus followed by a concert at Durham Central Park. The event will focus on bringing “love and activism back to the forefront of Pride as a way to drive stronger connections and further growth and success in a tumultuous political climate.” Food and beverage vendors will be on hand. pridedurhamnc.org

‘Wicked’

Sept. 30 - Oct. 3 “Wicked,” which was named “the defining musical of the decade” by The New York Times, returns to the Durham Performing Arts Center. Based on a novel written by Gregory Maguire, the show tells the story of what happened in the Land of Oz before Dorothy’s arrival and details

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alltown Children’s Theatre commemorates its 20th year by holding

legacy performances that highlight some of the theater’s most successful pieces in its own Black Box Theater during the first weekend in December. Walltown also launched its 20/20 Legacy Campaign in May with a goal of securing 101 donors to commit to giving $20 each month for one year in honor of the anniversary. These monthly donations will contribute to Walltown’s programs and future stability. As of press time, 21 donors have signed up. “We don’t really have a large donor base, but a $20 donation is something that we feel that everyone can do,” says Artistic Director Cynthia Penn-Halal. Cynthia, who served as Walltown’s executive director for 20 years, recently stepped down, and Cara Williams took on the role. Cara’s involvement at Walltown began in 2007 when her daughter, Brianna Michele Williams, was a ballet student there. “At the time, she was 6 years old and very interested in expressing herself through dance,” Cara says. “I naturally fell in love with the organization and began volunteering in the capacities where my skills are strongest: music, administration and particularly finances,” Cara says. Years later, Cara continues to help advance Walltown’s mission, having served as a board member, board chair and now as executive director. Cara describes the adjustment to her new role as a refocusing of her efforts toward the actual mechanisms that contribute to Walltown’s functions. Cara and Cynthia worked closely together in the past, making for a smooth transition, Cara says. Walltown, which was named a Readers’ Favorite Venue for Community Theater, continues to serve its students with high-quality, socially distanced programming. “We are embracing the unique framework to give our kids access to the talents and expertise of artists beyond Durham’s borders through the now-prevalent digital platforms,” Cara says. A recent Triangle Capacity-Building Network grant from the Triangle Community Foundation allowed Walltown to “build our digital infrastructure, keeping youth connected at a time when face-to-face programming has been uncertain,” Cynthia says. Walltown offers virtual classes on dance, creative writing, improv and guitar. Cara says she hopes to strengthen this new approach beyond the current crisis and into the future. She plans “to put an efficient, effective and supportive administrative structure in place that protects and promotes the rich artistic legacy that Cynthia has [built] with the Walltown family.”


take a look, it’s in a book By Madel in e Kraft

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PHOTO BY MICK SHULTE

change their life in an instant.” Four months after her first pop-up, Victoria started the Black Lit Library in Nolia Family + Coffee; it’s bookstore that showcases and celebrates representation in now also located in Sarah P. Duke Gardens and The Durham Hotel, literature and amplifies Black voices, in May of last year. with a location coming to the Durham Public Schools’ Central The catalyst for the idea was a moment where she and her Office in August. These libraries aren’t open at the moment, but you husband, Duane Miller, spent 2.5 hours at a chain bookstore can place an order with Liberation Station for delivery. Victoria searching for titles that represented their Black sons, Emerson, 4, and also hosts a monthly virtual storytime with the North Carolina Langston, 9, and were only able to find five. They began to wonder what it would feel like to go into a “store with accessibility to narratives Museum of Art, where she is developing literacy programming for children of color. that you could just pick out like candy in a candy store.” “What our bookstore hopes to do for the community is to give a “We took the last $250 that we had,” Victoria explains. “We window into our life,” Victoria says. “There is no conversation, no purchased our first round of books and said we were going to open book you can read, to understand what it feels up a bookstore that didn’t have walls, that didn’t like to be a Black woman, a Black child, a Black have doors, but we were going to promote the V I C TO R I A’ S P I C K S man in this county, but what we can do is offer ideology of freedom.” She takes an alleyway, a tools to help you gain more compassion and hotel, a garden, “anywhere you can imagine” and • For the Kids “Thirteen Ways of Looking at empathy, which is the goal.” Victoria created transforms it into her bookstore. a Black Boy” by Tony Medina a Revolution and Juneteenth reading list on Victoria recognized that the purchase of and “The People Could Fly” her website for those interested in exploring a book is a luxury to many, and she wanted by Virginia Hamilton narratives related to our world today. to create a welcoming space where children • For Adults Victoria plans for Liberation Station to could read for free. “Each book is a mirror, “Cotton Candy on a Rainy continue to be a light and a resource for our and sometimes children are seeing themselves Day” by Nikki Giovanni and community and beyond. “What we do is always for the first time,” Victoria says. “We want to “Go Tell It on the Mountain” done out of love,” she says.  make that a special encounter, because it can by James Baldwin ictoria Scott-Miller opened Liberation Station, a pop-up

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PHOTO COURTESY OF DPAC

the relationships between Glinda the Good Witch and the Wicked Witch of the West. dpacnc.com/events/detail/wicked-2

Click! Photography Festival October

This monthlong photography festival includes exhibitions and events focused on “inspiring artistic excellence, supporting professional development and promoting community engagement” at multiple venues in our area. Click! organizers hope to host the festival and Click! 120 events – 120 hours of core programming that condenses exhibitions, keynote lectures, portfolio reviews, art bus tours and Click! Academy professional development programs into five days of events on Oct.14-17 – in person, but plans are being made to convert the experience into an online format if need be. clickphotofest.org

NC Latin American Film Festival

did you know?

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PHOTO BY MARIE MUIR

October

his fall marks the centennial anniversary of Durham High and the 60th anniversary of DPS. Now in its eighth year, DSA’s Fall Art Festival: Día de los Muertos continues to honor and celebrate the histories and cultures that make up Durham, by partnering with local artists and businesses. This year’s festival will take place virtually as well as physically, providing a space for community stories to be shared and heard. This free, five-week-long event in October will include a drive-thru parade, live storytelling, crafting classes, contests, education and fun for the entire family. Visual Arts Teacher Amber Carroll Santibañez started the student-led festival in 2012 and views it as a canvas that reflects students’ home, family and identity. If you’re interested in attending or sponsoring this event, visit the festival’s website (dsaddlm.wixsite.com/diadelosmuertos) or follow DSA Fall Art Festival on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter to learn more. – by Marie Muir

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The 35th annual festival will be virtual and showcase some of the best classic and newly released Latin American films produced in the past 35 years that focus on issues including, but not limited to, migration, globalization and new political landscapes in the Americas. jhfc.duke. edu/latinamericauncduke/home/film-festival

Halloween Phantasmagoria Oct. 30, 6:30 p.m. - 9 p.m.

“Phantasmagoria” is a dreamlike state in which real and imagined elements blur together, which guests at Duke Homestead will get to witness firsthand at this Halloween event. Participants will enjoy a “magical” tour of the homestead and learn about the historical roots of spiritualism on the property. dukehomestead.org

Pumpkin Patch Express

Oct. 3-4, 10-11, 17-28 and 24-25, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Climb aboard the Ellerbe Creek Railway for a trip out to the Museum of Life and Science’s patch to pick the perfect pumpkin. Before returning home, decorate your pumpkins, enjoy crafts and participate in carnival games. lifeandscience.org


Durham Arts Council is partnering with Durham Magazine to promote a new resource for artists and arts patrons:

INTRODUCING THE DURHAM ARTS NETWORK! An online directory of individual artists and area arts & culture organizations • • • • • •

Free to those listing, free to search Responds to growing need from area artists/ arts entrepreneurs A resource for finding commissions & initiating collaborations Nonprofit & commercial organizations encouraged to participate Serving Durham and surrounding counties Promotes visibility & engagement between the public & the arts and culture sector

DURHAMARTSNETWORK.ORG

ARTISTS PICTURED (FROM LEFT TO RIGHT): JUSTIN TORNOW, XOXOK, DUKE UNIVERSITY STRING SCHOOL AND HOLDEN RICHARDS

Durham loves our creative community and Durham Arts Council loves to be a support for these local artists and arts organizations. The DAC Arts Recovery Fund is providing emergency grants to assist individual artists, arts organizations, artist-owned businesses and arts venues impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. If you can – please donate to support Arts Recovery in Durham. 100% of funds raised will be granted to help the arts community. Please give so the arts can live! The DAC Arts Recovery Fund is supported by The PNC Foundation, The Mary Duke Biddle Foundation, the Triangle Community Foundation, Duke University, Manbites Dog Theater Fund and individual donors.

Visit durhamarts.org and click on Arts Recovery Fund.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY HOLDEN RICHARDS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY LAURA BRANAN

PHOTOGRAPHY BY AREON MOBASHER

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MICHELLE LOTKER

A resource for artists and arts organizations, made possible by YOU…..


the BEST OF durham look so fry

Five crispy, crunchy, flaky fried plates from some of our readers’ favorite restaurants and chefs BY MARIE MUIR | PHOTOGRAPHY BY BETH MANN

SALTBOX SEAFOOD JOINT THE DISH Fried jolthead porgy, landed in Hampstead, North Carolina, with fried squash, potatoes, slaw and hush-honeys – Chef Ricky Moore’s famous fried cornmeal fritters, glazed with honey curry-parmesan. $25 The North Carolina seafood [in this dish] takes center stage. We practice what I call ‘sure-handed cooking.’ Our philosophy is rooted in preparations that are simple and uncomplicated. We focus on familiar flavors that are purposefully combined. It starts with quality ingredients handled with care. What we are looking to evoke is a vision of your favorite coastal roadside best seafood fish house eatery. The seafood is seasonal, fresh, cooked in moment, and seasoned with bright notes of spice, herbs and citrus. The seafood is lightly dredged [so] as to not miss out on its natural texture and flavor characteristics. In your first fork full, you should experience crisp, seasoned, tangy, savory and spiced. Follow it up with some hush-honeys – a fried cornmeal dumpling gently sweetened with local honey.” – Ricky Moore Saltbox founder and owner  50

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True Flavors Diner THE DISH Blueberry barbecue chicken and waffles – chipotle-blueberry glazed fried chicken breast, scratch-made blueberry buttermilk waffles served with butter, warm syrup and two eggs any style. $14.95 Our blueberry chicken and waffles is special to us for a number of reasons. When we opened our second location at Lakewood, we wanted an exclusive item that would draw some of our existing customers from our Highway 55 location. The dish is familiar (our classic chicken and waffles is our No. 1 seller at Highway 55) but also unique. We stuck with our homemade buttermilk waffle recipe that our customers love, but added fresh blueberries. We kept our crispy, juicy fried chicken breast, but added new seasonings and created a completely new blueberry chipotle glaze. … Familiar, but elevated! The presentation of the dish makes it special for us as well. The beautiful deep best breakfast/brunch blue from the fresh berries makes for a plate that really pops! Our diner is built around our belief that food should be shared, enjoyed and talked about! Most brunch restaurants in the area have their own versions of chicken and waffles, all slightly different, so we love to see the diversity celebrated. We love passing customers in the dining room and hearing how they feel about our version of chicken and waffles. We want customers to feel excited when our servers bring out the dish, when they smell the sweet and spicy aroma of the blueberries mixed with the chipotle peppers … when they cut into the chicken and dip their waffles in the sweet cream butter. We want customers to feel (and taste) the love we put into the dish!” – Sidney Coves True Flavors owner and executive chef 

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bull city burger & brewery THE DISH Burger Bowl with lettuce, tomato, pickles, ketchup, chimichurri, Bull City Burger & Brewery sauce and Dirty Fries (you can build your bowl with your choice of fries, burger patty and add-ons). $12 When the bowl craze hit with the intersection of gluten-free diets becoming popular, we decided to lose the bread and leave the beef, plus we love ramen. So we put a ‘broth’ of our dirty fries in a bowl and topped them with our juicy, North Carolina-raised, grass-fed beef burger, house-made sauces and garnished with lettuce, tomato and house-pickled cucumber on the side. It’s been a hit ever since. [We want customers to feel] happy, [and] then full at the end of eating the bowl and perhaps a little bit of, ‘I am not sharing this, it’s so good.’” – Seth Gross Bull City Burger & Brewery owner 

best burger, fries, kid-friendly restaurant, brewery

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Durham Apparel & Gifts Custom Screen-Printing 2020

Barbara Stover,

Bull City native and owner of Hometown Apparel designs Durham apparel and lifestyle goods for Durhamites ages 0-100+

738 9th Street, Durham 919 286 3933 www.hometowndurham.com ď…­ @hometowndurham

Embroidery


BEST OF DURHAM

2020

boricua soul THE DISH A traditional beef empanada and a mojo chicken empanada, which is citrus-based, with a side of mac and cheese and collard greens. Sauces include a homemade, vinegar-based hot sauce called pique and a sweet chili sauce. $11.25 Our empanadas are not huge, but you should never bite into one and find air. Each crunch is backed with the full flavor of the tasty filling. The chicken [is] slow-cooked in a citrus-packed marinade and left in the marinade overnight before being chopped and receiving a final seasoning [and then] stuffed inside the empanada. Our beef empanadas are more traditional to Puerto Rico, with ground beef finely seasoned with sofrito, bell peppers and minced olives. When customers take a bite from our empanadas, we expect them to first notice the fresh and crunchy texture of the crust followed by the full flavor of the filling.” – Toriano Fredericks, Boricua Soul co-owner 

PHOTO BY MADELINE KRAFT

best latin/caribbean food, new restaurant, food truck

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THANK YOU DURHAM

THAN 2020

FOR VOTING US THE BEST VENUE FOR COMMUNITY THEATER

Thank you for voting TROSA the best Thrift Store and best Landscaping service again in 2018! www.hayti.org

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m tempura

PHOTO BY BRIANA BROUGH

THE DISH North Carolina white shrimp ($4) and Argentine pink prawns with heads ($6) – Ordered a la carte, and all tempura items are two pieces per order. The special thing about Japanese-style tempura, especially the dedicated tempura style, is that the batter is super minimal and very light so that the flavors of the ingredients shine on [their] own. We also time each tempura so that it is the optimal temperature. The shrimp and prawns we like to cook to around medium so that middle is still slightly uncooked to show [those] sweet flavors better. The head is fried a little longer to cook fully so that the innards can be enjoyed safely. I totally do not deserve such a title [of a Readers’ Favorite chef ], but am super thankful for everyone who believes in me. It’s what drives me harder and further every day! When our family immigrated to the U.S., my parents had to work odd hours, so my brother and I had to prep and cook much of our own food. I grew up cooking from a very young age and flipping burgers at [a] Sonic drive-thru at 14: my first job. After high school, I got a job at a local Japanese restaurant working in the kitchen and serving, so the restaurant and food scene always stayed with me as a big part of my life. I enjoyed the restaurant work so much that I dropped out of college in my senior year with one semester left (of course, my parents best chef tried to kill me). I love working in the lines of all my kitchens … and frying up each ingredient and conversing with the guests. It isn’t work most of the time; it’s more like a hobby! Being able to serve the wonderful people of Durham and the Triangle is probably one of the best gifts of my lifetime. The support and love is something I have not felt anywhere else during my work at more than 25 restaurants before North Carolina. I also love how diverse the community is, too, which has a direct effect on the food scene as well. I am here for life!” – Michael Lee chef and owner at M Tempura, M Kokko, M Pocha and M Sushi 

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Talking Shop More than 50 years since its opening, Morgan Imports remains one of our city’s favorite retailers BY ELIZABETH EFIRD | PHOTO BY BETH MANN

ou are absolutely crazy.” It was a sentiment that Richard Morgan often heard when he resigned from the Marine Corps in 1969 with the intention of opening an import store in Durham. That November, Richard rented the old Piggly Wiggly space at the corner of Main and Morgan streets to fulfill his vision. Morgan Imports was ahead of its time. Richard chose downtown to open his store because he didn’t like large shopping malls and wanted to create something different. “He likes redoing old spaces and having a new conception of what it could look like,” says Jacqueline Morgan, Morgan Imports co-owner and Richard’s wife. During a time when commercial businesses were moving away from central Durham, Richard took a risk and opened his store. “We gave people a reason to want to come downtown,” Jacqueline says. The Morgans believe that the initial success of their store gave others the confidence to open other businesses nearby. In the early 1970s, Richard best gift shop, Home Furnishings moved the store into a 10,000-squarefoot building down the street, but later lost it to a fire. After a series of moves and various store iterations, Morgan Imports moved to its current location in the old Durham Laundry in 1991. Richard was drawn to the interesting structure and huge vaulted ceilings. The 25,000-square-foot space was built in 1927 and provided laundry and dry cleaning services for the Durham community as well as students at Duke University. “It’s just a great architectural building,” Richard says. “That’s the reason I wanted to be here.” 

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& Accessories


Jacqueline and Richard Morgan at the Morgan Imports location that’s been open for nearly 30 of the store’s 51 years.

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2020

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Morgan Imports’ impact on the city reaches far beyond its commercial enterprises. “They have been such a wonderful source of largesse to the community, and there are so many nonprofit organizations that they have supported,” says Jane Goodridge, a loyal customer for the past 22 years. The business holds major fundraisers each year and has raised more than $100,000 for Durham causes. Morgan Imports currently supports Senior PharmAssist along with other area nonprofits, has worked with Preservation Durham for many years and also has held fundraisers for the Ronald McDonald House of Durham & Wake, UNC Hospitals and Habitat for Humanity of Durham, among other organizations. Richard and Jacqueline hope to hold fundraising events later this year if they are able. Diligent customer service and the charm of the space keep the doors of Morgan Imports, which was named a Readers’ Favorite Gift Shop and Home Furnishings & Accessories store, open during a time when many choose to shop virtually. “There are many customers who realize that when you shop local, you are putting money back into the community,” Jacqueline says. “They also realize that when you shop local you are getting more originality in the merchandise.” Morgan Imports reflects the personality, tastes and interests of its owners, a characteristic that big-box stores don’t have. Jacqueline notes that independent retailers tend to take more chances when selecting merchandise, which leads to a more diverse and interesting product range. “Some don’t sell, but some are dynamite,” she says. “Whenever I’m looking for a special gift, I always go to Morgan Imports,” Jane says. “I just like to go there to browse. One of the best things about their merchandise is the variety of prices. If you’re looking for something inexpensive, it’s easy, and if you are looking for something really special, you can find that, too.” Those devoted customers also derive from Morgan Imports’ beloved community-wide events. During the annual open house in November, Richard brings out his famous doughnut machine, a fan favorite in addition to the unique products. Last year, the Morgans celebrated the store’s 50th anniversary with a massive shindig, complete with song and dance. It’s a special memory, but Jacqueline says, “We don’t have time to think of all the good things, we just keep thinking about what we will do next. “The future in general for retail is an interesting challenge for everyone, because the internet and [Amazon] Prime try and do everything,” Jacqueline says. With even more people shopping online during the pandemic, the Morgans say they are waiting to see how it all plays out. The shop is here to stay for now, albeit with limited hours and curbside pickup as staff navigate safely opening back up. 


Thank you

Durham for voting us

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BEST OF DURHAM

2020

Best of Durham 2020 Winners *All results listed in alphabetical order **The presence of five winners is the result of a tie

DINING OVERALL RESTAURANT Lime & Lemon Indian Grill & Bar M Sushi Mothers & Sons Trattoria NanaSteak NEW RESTAURANT Boricua Soul Lime & Lemon Indian Grill & Bar M Pocha Sister Liu’s Kitchen BURGER Bull City Burger and Brewery Burger Bach Only Burger Town Hall Burger & Beer FRIES Bull City Burger and Brewery Burger Bach The Federal Only Burger SANDWICHES Eastcut Sandwich Bar Lucky’s Delicatessen Parker and Otis Toast BREAKFAST/BRUNCH Elmo’s Diner Guglhupf Bakery, Cafe & Biergarten Monuts True Flavors Diner COFFEE SHOP Bean Traders Cocoa Cinnamon Joe Van Gogh The Oak House 64

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DESSERT/PASTRIES Dulce Cafe East Durham Bake Shop Guglhupf Bakery, Cafe & Biergarten The Mad Hatter’s Café & Bakeshop

MEXICAN FOOD Cosmic Cantina Dos Perros El Rodeo NuvoTaco

GREEK/MEDITERRANEAN FOOD Bleu Olive Neomonde Mediterranean Parizade Saladelia Cafe

PLACE FOR A DATE NIGHT Alley Twenty Six Littler M Sushi Mateo Bar de Tapas NanaSteak

ASIAN FOOD Dashi Juju M Sushi Shiki Sushi Asian Bistro

ITALIAN FOOD Cucciolo Osteria Gocciolina Mothers & Sons Trattoria Pulcinella’s Italian Restaurant

SUSHI M Sushi Sake Bomb Asian Bistro Shiki Sushi Asian Bistro Sushi Love

PIZZA Hutchins Garage Pizzeria Toro Pompieri Pizza Randy’s Pizza

INDIAN FOOD Lime & Lemon Indian Grill & Bar Naan Stop Indian Cuisine Sitar Indian Cuisine Viceroy

PLACE TO BUY FROZEN TREATS Goodberry’s Frozen Custard LocoPops The Parlour Pincho Loco Sweet Charlie’s

PLACE FOR VEGETARIANS Happy + Hale Neomonde Mediterranean The Refectory Café Saladelia Cafe BARBECUE Backyard BBQ Pit The Original Q Shack Picnic The Pit

LATIN/CARIBBEAN FOOD Alpaca Peruvian Charcoal Chicken Boricua Soul Luna Rotisserie & Empanadas Makus Empanadas

SEAFOOD Bennett Pointe Grill & Bar M Sushi Saint James Saltbox Seafood Joint

KID-FRIENDLY RESTAURANT Bull City Burger and Brewery Elmo’s Diner Pompieri Pizza Town Hall Burger and Beer 

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BEST OF DURHAM

2020

*All results listed in alphabetical order **The presence of five winners is the result of a tie

FOOD TRUCK American Meltdown Boricua Soul Chirba Chirba Dumpling Soomsoom Pita Pockets CHEF Andrea Reusing, The Durham Hotel Antonio Rios, Blue Corn Cafe Matt Kelly, Mateo Bar de Tapas, Mothers & Sons Trattoria, Lucky’s Delicatessen, Saint James and Vin Rouge Michael Lee, M Kokko, M Pocha, M Sushi and M Tempura Scott Howell, Nana’s RESTAURANT CATERING Foster’s Market Makus Empanadas NuvoTaco Saladelia Cafe FULL-SERVICE CATERING Angus Barn (Bay 7) Durham Catering Indulge Catering Sophisticated Catering and Event Planning

wood-fired pizza • housemade pastas sammies • salads • desserts

RADIUS

COCKTAILS Alley Twenty Six Arcana Bar Virgile Kingfisher

THRIFT STORE Durham Rescue Mission Thrift Store Pennies for Change Thrift Boutique The Scrap Exchange TROSA Thrift Store

WINE SHOP Hope Valley Wine & Beverage LouElla Wine, Beer & Beverage Total Wine & More Wine Authorities

HOME FURNISHINGS & ACCESSORIES Morgan Imports Patina TROSA Thrift Store Vintage Home South

WINE SELECTION Bar Brunello LouElla Wine, Beer & Beverage NanaSteak The Oak House

DURHAM-MADE PRODUCT Big Spoon Roasters Bright Black Candles Burt’s Bees The Durham Box Lo & Behold

CRAFT ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES Bedlam Vodka (Graybeard Distillery) Bull City Ciderworks Durham Distillery Mystic Farm & Distillery BREWERY Bull City Burger and Brewery Fullsteam Hi-Wire Brewing Ponysaurus Brewing Co. BEER SHOP Beer Durham Beer Study The Glass Jug Beer Lab Sam’s Bottle Shop BEER SELECTION Beer Study Burger Bach The Oak House Sam’s Bottle Shop ARTISAN FOOD PRODUCT Big Spoon Roasters Bull City Olive Oil Cilantro Artisan Foods Durham Toffee

RETAIL GIFT STORE Hometown Apparel Morgan Imports Parker and Otis Smitten Boutique JEWELRY STORE Fink’s Jewelers Hamilton Hill Jewelsmith Light Years

112 N. Churton Street • Hillsborough

radiuspizzeria.net

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CLOTHING STORE Dolly’s Vintage Hometown Apparel Smitten Boutique Vert & Vogue

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT DANCE STUDIO Barriskill Dance Theatre School Dance Theatre South Empower Dance Studio Ninth Street Dance VENUE FOR COMMUNITY THEATER The Carolina Theatre The Fruit Hayti Heritage Center Walltown Children’s Theatre VENUE FOR LIVE MUSIC (LARGE) American Tobacco Amphitheater The Carolina Theatre Durham Central Park Durham Performing Arts Center VENUE FOR LIVE MUSIC (SMALL) Beyu Caffe The Blue Note Grill Motorco Music Hall The Pinhook ART GALLERY 5 Points Gallery 21c Museum Hotel Gallery Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University Steven Ray Miller Gallery and Frame Shop MUSEUM 21c Museum Hotel Museum of Durham History Museum of Life and Science Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University EVENT SPACE Bay 7 at American Tobacco The Cotton Room The Rickhouse Sarah P. Duke Gardens


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home

When Giorgios Bakatsias moved into his home more than 20 years ago, he wanted to build a garden inspired by the Mediterranean.

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Riverside Retreat

Giorgios Bakatsias hosts a small dinner gathering at his breezy Bahama abode B Y HAN N AH LEE PHOTOG RAPHY B Y B ETH MA N N

G

uests come up a winding, hidden driveway as they arrive at Giorgios Bakatsias’ home in Bahama on a mid-summer evening. The “treehouse,” as the chef and restaurateur calls it, is his own little treasure that blends into the landscape along the Little River. As new and old friends excitedly scramble around the house’s lush vegetation, past the koi pond and through the

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vine-covered arbor, there’s a view – one that carries the beauty of Greece and the memories of Giorgios’ childhood and travels. “I have different layers of gardens,” Giorgios says, overlooking it all from his porch. “It’s intimate. When you grow up in Europe, flowers [are everywhere], and flowers make you happy. Nature is kind of my escape.” Giorgios admits school was not his forte when he was growing up in the small northern Grecian village of Karista. He’d rather help his mother cook, or more often run around their fields planting vegetables and climbing trees to watch as others made wine. To Giorgios, this was formal culinary training. “Having a heroic mother like mine, through her food, you were enlightened,” Giorgios says. “You become healed, in a sense. [I learned]

ABOVE Bin 54 Executive Chef Kevin Draper preps ingredients for the cocktails. LEFT Giorgios and Marika Caraganis remodeled this pool house two-and-a-half years ago. “We designed it on a napkin with the intention of hosting a lot of events,” Marika says. 72

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Kim Bonilla and Bailey Moore enjoy a drink under the cabana at the corner of the pool.

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ABOVE Grilled octopus with wild oregano from the garden, lemon and olive oil. BELOW John Taylor, who built this bar, recycles wood and “makes it into an art piece,� Giorgios says. The overhead lights were made using material from airplane hangars from the Czech Republic.

Kai Karaganis and his wife, Courtney Karaganis, find a secluded table near the vegetable garden. 74

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home & garden

ABOVE The cocktails and conversation are always flowing at Giorgios’ outdoor kitchen. LEFT A vine-covered walkway takes Giorgios from his house to the pool and the Little River.

food should be medicine, and medicine should be food.” This ideology shaped him into the awardwinning restaurateur many Durhamites know him as today. Of his Durham restaurants, Parizade was voted one of our readers’ favorites this year for its Mediterranean dishes, and Vin Rouge Executive Chef Matt Kelly was also named a Readers’ Favorite Chef. Like Giorgios’ restaurants, with their nuanced dining and design, the chef ’s backyard gives off its own entrancing aura. Thousands of plant species line the property, from a rose trellis to wispy wisteria to Italian cypresses. It’s a romantic look, almost like a private resort. It took Giorgios, an avid art collector, more than two decades to craft this living masterpiece.  76

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Call us today to schedule a FREE consultation with Dr. Smith, Dr. Heymann and Dr. Skillestad.

DURHAM

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ABOVE LEFT Courtney Karaganis and Marika Karaganis. BELOW LEFT Keftedes – meatballs – prepared in a traditional Greek style. Giorgios uses parsley and oats to give the dish “lightness and vibrancy.”

As he walks through the arbor leading to the pool, there’s a soothing silence. “It’s more to experience than to talk about it, but when you walk through it, you feel it,” Giorgios says. He steps off the path toward giant wind chimes hanging from the trees. Bong bong, bong bong bong. The sound echoes. It’s a place for him to escape from the fastpaced restaurant industry and find solitude for a few days. “When I’m here, I close my eyes,” he says. “I can be anywhere. It gives me a sense of energy.” That quietness rejuvenates him, allowing him to fully embrace his role – for the evening, at least – of Giorgios the entertainer. Toward the end of the arbor, Giorgios reaches his own outdoor kitchen and patio overlooking the river. A handful of people spread out around the pool, some sit at the bar and a few start up the wood-fired oven for grilled red snapper (see page 81 for the recipe). He smiles. He laughs. He pops a bottle of Dom Pérignon.  78

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B O M B AY S U N Cucumber 1.5 oz. Bombay Sapphire Gin 0.5 oz. lime juice 0.5 oz. lemon juice 0.5 oz. simple syrup 0.25 oz. St. Germain 2 dashes angostura bitters Lime Mint Muddle 3 cucumber slices in a shaker then add the gin, juices, simple syrup, St. Germaine and bitters. Stir, strain over ice, and garnish with mint, lime and cucumber.


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Carrie Davidson, Bailey Moore and Kim Bonilla dip their feet in the pool to cool off from the heat.

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“[His parties] are very theatrical, abundant,” says Marika Caraganis, who runs business development for Giorgios Hospitality Group. “Glamorous, but in a very approachable way. There’s always a very eclectic mix of people because George knows so many people.” He met many of those people during his travels, which are reflected in the design of the space. Many details are salvaged from international adventures – like the overhead lights, made from Czech Republic airplane hangars, or the chicken baskets hovering over the bar nearest to the pool. “I found them on the road [in Vietnam],” Giorgios says. “I didn’t know what they were used for, but I later found a use for it.” Nearby, a fire pit from India waits to be lit on cooler

GRILLE D WH O L E FISH 2 (2-3 lbs.) whole red snapper, scaled and cleaned Extra-virgin olive oil Kosher salt Ground black pepper Red pepper flakes

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6 cloves garlic, smashed 6 fresh parsley sprigs 6 fresh dill sprigs 6 basil leaves 2 lemons, sliced

Generously rub olive oil over fish. Season generously inside and out with salt, pepper and red pepper flakes. Stuff cavities with garlic, parsley, dill, basil and lemon slices. Let marinate for 30 minutes. Preheat grill (preferably wood-fired) and brush grate with olive oil. Cook fish for 7-10 minutes on each side. Transfer to platter. Drizzle fresh lemon juice and garnish with fresh herbs.

THANK YOU DURHAM FOR VOTING CQC HOME BEST KITCHEN DESIGNER, BUILDER AND ARCHITECT!

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evenings, when the days start getting shorter. “I was [in India] for a seven-day wedding. The party never stopped,” Giorgios laughs. He’s even writing a book that highlights these experiences with food and culture called “Nymphs in the Garden: A Journey of the Soul.” As others arrive, Giorgios briefly disappears back inside “the treehouse.” “When you come down, it really feels like you’re in Greece,” guest Michelle Connolly says. “The look, the vibe – it’s peaceful, it’s warm, it’s just gorgeous to see what he’s created from nothing here.” One couple drifts away to the cabana at the opposite corner of the pool for quiet views and conversation. Others flock back to one of two bars, where Giorgios has reappeared with spanakopita, a massive homemade spinach pie with vegetables from his personal garden, which is conveniently set between the bar and the river. “Phyllo dough is like the master class, right?” Kai Caraganis says. “Because it’s very fine. Once you learn how to cook with phyllo, it’s like, OK, yeah, you’re Greek.” North Carolina snapper ceviche “It’s definitely a labor of with grapefruit and orange love,” says his wife, Courtney citrus, finished with dill and Caraganis. “Because the chili pepper flakes. dishes take a while. Some of them are even prepped the night before. Like for Greek Easter, [Kai’s] cousins start cooking two days before.” “So some food is just – there’s a lot of love,” Kai says. “I think that’s what you’re tasting.” Giorgios, again, is nowhere to be seen. He disappeared once more back into his home to prepare more food, for more people. Always more, more, more. It’s as if he’s programmed to host; in some ways, he is. “I love to see the joy of people around the table,” he says. “Everybody lets go and becomes their true self. I think they become more genuine about life. More in the moment, as they say.” 82

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IN EVERY ISSUE

Real Estate Gallery Homes • Condos Apartments • Commercial

Showcasing Realtors, Builders & Leasing Agents For advertising information, call 919.933.1551 or email ellenshannon@durhammag.com


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durham inc.

Biz Briefs 86

DURHAM,

INC.

What Will ‘Going Back to Work’ Look Like? page 92 85 • durhammag.com • February/March 2019

Sanitizing. Wearing a mask. Maintaining 6 feet of distance. Sophia Lopez and Steve Bullock show what a typical day at American Underground’s Main Street office currently entails.

PHOTO BY AMBER ROBINSON

Highlights from our talented and creative business community


durham inc.

BIZBRIEFS NEW ON THE SCENE

„

Multi-cancer early detection company GRAIL Inc. announced in June that it will invest more than $100 million into a laboratory facility and warehouse space at Park Point, which over time could create 398 new jobs. The company, headquartered in California, has developed a test that detects more than 50 cancers in one blood draw. GRAIL has leased the Assembly building, totaling 200,000 square feet, and is the first tenant of life sciences campus Park Point in Research Triangle Park. The former Nortel campus was acquired by Trinity Capital, Vanderbilt Partners and Starwood Capital Group in 2019 and is currently undergoing renovations. GRAIL’s projected occupancy date is sometime in the first quarter of 2021.

Kelly Smedley (above right) previously worked at the UNC-Chapel Hill Department of Psychiatry and Bull City Counseling PLLC, and her partner, Christena Raines (below right) worked at the UNC Center for Women’s Mood Disorders, where she helped develop an innovative perinatal mental health treatment model. Waypoint provides both in-person and teletherapy services.

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In June, Durham Salt Cave opened at 410 W. Geer St. The business provides halotherapy, also known as “salt therapy,” to treat respiratory ailments and other conditions. It also offers sound therapy and massages.

MOVEMENT AND DEVELOPMENT

Dr. Derick Coe and DJ Coe, father and son, respectively, will open a fitness center called Body Games at 3823 Guess Rd., Ste. G once COVID-19 restrictions are lifted. It will offer physical therapy and massage therapy, one-onone coaching and fitness classes in areas such as yoga, Zumba, boxing and more.

North Carolina accounting firm DMJ & Co. PLLC relocated its Durham office to SouthCourt at 3211 Shannon Rd. “As DMJ continues to grow and offer more services in the Durham and Triangle region, it was important that we identify a location that suited the needs of our clients and our team,” said partner Susan Miller.

Urban Tails Veterinary Hospital opened in June at Golden Belt Campus, and as of press time, offers curbside appointments

Renovion Inc. raised roughly $3.1 million in a private equity offering in May. Since the start of the year, the pharmaceutical company has raised $8.1 million, which, according to a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission, will go toward paying salaries. Renovion aims to develop treatments for those with chronic inflammatory airway diseases.

„

Waypoint Counseling & Maternal Wellness PLLC opened in February. The office provides mental health care for women during pregnancy and postpartum, as well as those struggling with infertility, loss or negative feelings. Founder

and remote services via the TeleVet app. Clients can make appointment requests by sending an email to info@urbantails.vet.

August 2020

„

Compiled by Claire Delano Akridge, a Washington, D.C.based real estate investor and developer, bought 949 Washington St. in downtown for $3 million. They plan to redevelop the Brame Building into a Class-B creative office space. On June 1, BioCryst Pharmaceuticals announced the completion of an underwritten public offering of 22,044,447 shares of its common stock. The offering’s total proceeds came to approximately $115 million, which BioCryst plans to use to develop, manufacture and advertise its products. BioCryst also announced on June 10 that its drug, galidesivir, was effective at halting viral replication of the Zika virus in a trial with primates. The drug has been in development since 2013 and is being explored as a treatment for COVID-19, as patients in Brazil undergo the first phase of this trial. MindPath Care Centers, an outpatient mental health care provider, opened a new location in Durham at the Forest Creek Office Park after it closed a location at New Hope Court. The new office provides treatment for addiction recovery, depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder. “We are committed to providing greater access to essential mental and behavioral health services that will have a positive impact for our patients during these chaotic times,” said Jeff Williams, CEO of MindPath.


durham inc.

MedPharm LTD, a contract developer of pharmaceutical products, obtained a manufacturing facility in RTP in May. The facility is just a few miles from MedPharm’s existing Center of Excellence. “MedPharm can now offer both clinical manufacture and formulation development for topical products in North America to complement similar services established for 20 years in the UK,” said President and CEO Eugene Ciolfi. Shattuck Labs Inc. closed on $118 million in Series B equity financing in June. The company aims to advance its proprietary Agonist Redirected Checkpoint platform to develop treatments for cancer and autoimmune diseases. BIOMILQ raised $3.5 million in funding in June. Founded by Leila Strickland and Michelle Egger, BIOMILQ produces cultured breast milk. “We believe parents, caregivers and infants deserve more options in earlystage nutrition,” Strickland said. “We’re determined to give them just that and to create a better world for future generations.” In June, the Duke University School of Medicine announced it had leased 273,000 square feet in RTP. It plans to use the facility to develop and test vaccines, including potential influenza and COVID-19 vaccines. The move follows the school’s acquisition of nearly $600 million in federal grants and contracts.

PHOTO BY BETH MANN

Greater Durham Chamber of Commerce Vice President of Member Investment Joshua Gunn accepted a position as president and CEO of Greater Peoria Business Alliance in Illinois. Gunn is a graduate of North Carolina A&T and worked at the Durham Chamber for three years. His last day was June 26.

Durham Technical Community College announced J.B. Buxton as its new president on June 5. Buxton previously served as a member-at-large on the N.C. State Board of Education and founded Education Innovations Group, a consulting practice in Raleigh that works with organizations dedicated to advancing public education. He succeeds Bill Ingram, who retired after serving as Durham Tech’s president for 12 years. “I am excited to join an institution that values equity and inclusion, student success and innovation,” Buxton said. He started in mid-July. Online insurance marketplace Policygenius welcomed Erik Garr as vice president of property and casualty operations and head of Policygenius’ new Durham office. Garr previously established Google Fiber’s operation in Durham and also serves as a visiting professor at Duke University’s Sanford School of Public Policy. “I am thrilled to be joining the Policygenius team in Durham,” Garr said. “The company has

Duke University Health System. She replaces Jean Davis, who served as CEO for six years.

built a strong reputation as a household name for financial protection, and I’m enthusiastic about how we can continue to elevate our insurance offerings for American consumers.”

AWARDS AND HONORS

ArchiveSocial welcomed Lyle Henderson as head of finance and Nancy Vodicka as head of marketing in June. The company provides social media archiving software to schools, government agencies and law enforcement. Henderson most recently served as corporate controller at BioAgilytix, and Vodicka most recently served as vice president of marketing at Prometheus Group in Raleigh. In June, Jes Averhart stepped down from her position as executive director of Leadership Triangle to launch her own venture, Reinvention Roadmap. The program offers a newsletter, podcast and an online course to help people navigate the process of self-discovery and reinvention.

PHOTO BY BETH MANN

ON THE MOVE

Tracy Doaks became president and CEO of telecommunications provider MCNC on Aug. 1. The nonprofit works to deliver highquality internet, cybersecurity and other technologies to communities in North Carolina. Doaks served on the MCNC Advisory Council and previously worked at the N.C. Department of Information Technology and

Disaster-management firm IEM was named one of the 2020 Best Employers in North Carolina by Business North Carolina. Companies were ranked based on workplace philosophies, practices and policies, as well as employee feedback. “At IEM, our employees are our greatest asset, and we strive to show them they are valued through generous and flexible benefits, as well as a positive work environment,” said IEM Founder, President and CEO Madhu Beriwal. Coastal Credit Union received three awards and recognitions in the month of June. It earned a Diamond Award from the CUNA Marketing & Business Development Council, was named one of the best credit unions in North Carolina by Forbes and was also named one of the 2020 Best Employers by Business North Carolina. LaunchBio, a nonprofit that supports biotechnology startups, announced its regional finalists for the 2020 Big Pitch, a virtual quick-pitch competition for biotech startups. The following Durham companies were chosen: CasTag Biosciences, IMMvention Therapeutix, PhosphoGam, Praetego and TreeCo. Each startup will pitch its technology to investor judges. The Durham Pennant winner will be chosen on Aug. 6 at 1 p.m. and will compete against finalists from San Diego and Cambridge at the Series Championships in late August. Durham ranked No. 11 on LinkedIn’s list of best U.S. cities to launch a career. The ranking

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A CORNERSTONE IN DURHAM S

g the ds n i v r e S nee e r a c health al families of loc early 50 for n ars ye

Since 1971 Lincoln Community Health Center (LCHC) has been providing primary and preventive health care to the medically underserved population in

the Durham community. Formerly part of Lincoln Hospital, which merged with Watts Hospital to form Duke Regional Hospital, LCHC has a long, rich history in serving those most vulnerable. The health center was founded by Dr. Charles DeWitt Watts, the first African American board-certified surgeon in North Carolina. Dr. Watts was chief of surgery at Lincoln Hospital. However, with Lincoln Hospital’s merger in 1976, Dr. Watts recognized the patients he treated would still need a facility for their primary health care needs. LCHC emerged from Dr. Watts and others’ desire to treat a low income, underserved population in the community where they lived and worked. Today, LCHC is accredited and certified as a Primary Care Medical Home by The Joint Commission and offers a wide range of services including, pediatrics, adolescent health, adult medicine, family medicine, dental and behavioral

Philip Harewood


“WE SERVE PATIENTS REGARDLESS OF THEIR ABILITY TO PAY

Lincoln Community Health Center (LCHC)

LCHC Cube

health. With more than 279 full-time employees across nine

of LCHC’s services. “Having patient members on the board

locations, the Center provides an average of 2700 patient

helps inform our strategic direction,” continued Harewood.

visits weekly, more than half of which are uninsured. As with every business, LCHC has had to adjust its services “We serve patients regardless of their ability to pay,”

amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, forming a task force of

said Philip Harewood, Chief Executive Officer. “That’s why

clinicians to help ensure continued critical services while

continued federal funding is important, as well as support

adhering to federal and state social distancing guidelines.

from our community partners like Duke Health and Durham

As a result, well-visits and routine care slowed. However,

County Department of Public Health. These partners help us

the need for access to healthcare in the overall community

meet the demand of patients we serve without compromising

has not. It is expected that as our state reopens, LCHC will

quality of care.” LCHC also provides services such as WIC,

likely see a sharp increase in demand from patients who

lab, pharmacy, radiology, HIV/Aids, gynecology, hepatitis C,

had to postpose routine visits. Despite the expected deluge

and medication assisted treatment.

of patients, LCHC stands ready to serve the community with high quality services, just as they have been for nearly

Unique to LCHC is the structure of its governing board, where 51% of members must be current patients, who have utilized the facility’s services at least once within the past 24 months. This ensures an engaged board with first-hand experience

five decades.


durham inc.

was determined by analyzing the availability of high-paying jobs for recent grads alongside the availability of affordable housing. SmartAsset ranked Durham No. 9 in a list of U.S. cities where women are most successful. The ranking was determined by measuring the percentage of women with bachelor’s degrees, the median annual earnings of women and the percentage of women business owners, among other factors.

ACQUISTIONS + PARTNERSHIPS

every meeting is held and every document is shared through connected applications, the need for ThousandEyes’ technology has never been so high,” said Todd Nightingale, senior vice president and general manager of Cisco’s Enterprise Networking and Cloud business. RelyMD merged with Georgiabased telehealth company MYidealDOCTOR in June. The organizations also formed a partnership with hospital service company ApolloMD in order to bring community telehealth to more health systems.

In May, technology conglomerate Cisco Systems acquired the San Francisco-based ThousandEyes Inc. ThousandEyes works to identify issues in internet service delivery to improve user experience. “In a time when

The North Carolina Biotechnology Center partnered with the National Institute for Innovation in Manufacturing Biopharmaceuticals and other organizations to create

We know downtown.

an initiative to prepare veterans, service members and military spouses for careers in biopharmaceutical manufacturing. Pfizer and Merck, both located in RTP, will connect these trainees to jobs in the industry, and Durham Technical Community College, among other state community colleges, will offer technical training. Laura Rowley, director of life science economic development at NCBiotech, said “... we want to better enable service members to transition to a rewarding civilian career in a sector they may not have otherwise considered.”

„

Open Book Extracts, a processor of high-quality cannabinoid products, acquired Chilmark Labs in June and its Israeli affiliate, Beetlebung Pharma Ltd., which have experience manufacturing rare and minor cannabinoids. “We are seeing a proliferation of products utilizing and highlighting the rare, minor cannabinoids to replace the one-size-fits-all approach that CBD offers,” said Open Book Extracts CEO David Neundorfer. “Open Book Extracts is proud to join forces with Chilmark Labs to provide the industry with the most efficacious, pure and highquality ingredients, delivering the results that companies and consumers deserve.”

Economic Development • Clean & Safe • Placemaking

115 Market St. #213 • Durham, NC 27701 • 919.682.2800 downtowndurham.com

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Durham-based Open Invention Network (OIN), a community of technology companies promoting the use and sharing of open-source software (OSS), announced on June 23 that Sumitomo Mitsui Financial Group Inc. (SMFG) joined as a member.

In June, IEM partnered with Quanta Services and ATCO Ltd. to restore Puerto Rico’s electric grid after the effects of hurricanes Irma and Maria. ATCO and Quanta formed a new company, LUMA Energy LLC, to manage the project, and IEM will support LUMA through federal funding and critical emergency management. The team was selected by the Puerto Rico Public-Private Partnerships Authority following a competitive 18-month process.

CLOSURES

The Mothership, a coworking space and retail collective, closed in June after eight years in downtown. “While our decision ultimately comes from the intersection of many important factors, including the unknowns due to COVID-19, our days in our Geer Street home were already numbered,” Founders Megan Bowser, Katie DeConto and Krista Anne Nordgren said in a press release. “Our landlords, like so many throughout downtown, are redeveloping our space, and we would have had to move by early 2021. … Restructuring within the changes caused by COVID-19, while simultaneously preparing to close the space and find a new home, is financially and energetically too much of a risk for us to maintain our integrity as a business.” Frenchies Modern Nail Care permanently closed its Durham location, which had been open for a little more than a year, on June 1 despite the lifting of COVID-19 restrictions. “We appreciate all of those who have supported our business over the last year and our wonderful staff for their hard work,” the team said in a statement.


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Half page H_Durham Mag_Durham Inc.indd 1

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durham inc.

THE NEW OFFICE H o w

t o

g e t

p e o p l e

b a c k

t o

w o r k ,

s a f e l y

BY H A N N A H L E E

PHOTO BY AMBER ROBINSON

Sophia Lopez, a freelancer, Steve Bullock, member success manager at American Underground, and Eddie Hanline, founder of Client Forest, work 6 feet apart at the common tables in the Bullpen at American Underground @Main.

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August 2020

oodbye, water cooler chat. See ya, midday conference room meetings. Really, forget any preconceived notions you had of what the word “office” means. The COVID-19 pandemic – for better or for worse – forced businesses to adjust their operations, including, well, where they do them. Or if they need a physical space to do them at all. According to a Gallup poll conducted in April, 62%

of employed Americans said they’ve worked from home since the onset of the coronavirus. That’s double the rate from as recently as mid-March, and people are discovering en masse how much they enjoy their home “offices.” An IBM study from May found that more than 75% of those surveyed indicated they would like to continue working remotely, at least occasionally. “One thing that has been established,” said John Warasila of Alliance Architecture, a firm that specializes in designing


durham inc.

collaborative office spaces, “is you can work from home, and you can work from home pretty effectively.” Virtual meeting places like Zoom have played a key role in that transition, allowing companies to simulate conference room settings from their employees’ living rooms. It’s not a perfect swap, but by and large, businesses are adjusting. Zoom said in April that it hosts more than 300 million daily meeting participants. So, what happens when employees are gradually allowed to return to their workspaces? Do they? The truth is, no one knows yet. There are still clear benefits, like ease of communication and the appeal of state-of-the-art facilities, but now there will be questions, too. Are shared physical spaces, especially those meant to bring people together, safe from a health standpoint? And are they worth the cost, both in terms of leases and upkeep? Those answers will vary from place to place, but the point remains: An “office” may never look the same again.

Alliance Architecture – a business designed to construct physical spaces – has found it actually doesn’t need one of its own. Over the past four months, its staff has been working remotely. And every month, when Principal Architect Vandana Dake sends out a survey asking if anyone would want to come back, or feel comfortable doing so, the answer is no. Safety and liability are two crucial parts of the equation, but Dake and her husband, Warasila, have found the home

office to be successful. But then that begs the question from a business perspective: “Why do you want to come back?” Dake said. “Why do you want to have an office space? It’s not just, ‘What is the new

people who are in Chicago, Los Angeles [and] Hong Kong who are a part of ‘the office,’ but they don’t really ever have to come to the office. It opens the door to having a much different structure for what a company is.”

PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF NEU CONCEPTS

Neu Concepts makes protective barriers and signage for office reception and desk areas to help businesses reinforce social distancing. office space?’ We do not know right now. Everybody’s guessing. Everybody has some solutions, but I don’t think it’s permanent.” “To me, what that is a metaphor for is flexible workplaces and not just places, but strategies for how people are going to work,” Warasila added. “My office could have

And Dake is not only sending surveys to her team; she’s also sent out polls to clients as well, many of whom are corporate accounts. Of those who responded, 100% don’t see themselves returning to the office any time soon. However, they could see themselves working at a 20% capacity.

Their team hasn’t shut down the idea of a physical office completely. They’re just trying to weave a broader perspective. Warasila noted that employees’ health safety and clusters of people are now going to be important elements to consider when designing a space. And shortterm solutions, or “multiple prescriptions,” as he calls them, of desks spaced 6 feet apart with circles embedded into the carpet to remind employees to social distance, Plexiglas guards on workstations or wearing masks – are not longterm solutions. “Think about every time we see those prescriptions,” Warasila said. “Why would anybody want to come back to that?”

While Warasila, Dake and their team are thinking about permanent post-pandemic office solutions, Cathy Hofknecht and her staff at Neu Concepts, a design firm with experience in cabinet-making and furniture production, are jumping to build quick fixes. Among the low-cost, highimpact measures are “sneeze guards” – plastic glass barriers – as well as moveable walls and directional signage. Establishing firmer boundaries and improving the flow of human traffic, she hopes, will provide employees with a stronger sense of safety – and therefore ease their gradual transition back into the office. “If somebody comes in and they see those physical indicators, it’s that clue that says, ‘This company is really taking all of this very seriously,’” Hofknecht said. “Maybe I am being a little too

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conservative [by taking extra precautions], but by being conservative, I’m certainly not hurting anyone. And I’m potentially helping somebody, and things like wearing a mask or making sure I try to stand 6 feet apart make a difference.” Hofknecht mentioned 9/11 and how the terrorist attacks changed the way airports operate and what security looks like today. She believes a similar mindset will apply to offices, which will try at any cost to avoid widespread sickness. That might dampen the appeal of open, collaborative office spaces, but not bring about the end of offices altogether. “I personally don’t believe that people are going to say, ‘Oh, I’m going to close my office completely, and everybody’s going to work from home,’” Hofknecht said. “There may be a balance between some work from home and some in the office, but a lot of people enjoy the social interaction of being in an office – even the opportunity to be there on occasion has some benefits. People begin to get stir-crazy.” For Neu Concepts specifically, working from home is near impossible given their line of work. They need a facility with mass manufacturing equipment in order to build custom barriers and signage, so some of their employees returned to the office in May. Striking that balance has been key for all businesses similarly deemed essential during the pandemic. American Underground, which is home to 250 startups, never closed its offices in March. And there’s been a notable uptick in people

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coming back in June, said Adam Klein, chief strategist at AU. Companies like AU need the protective equipment that Neu Concepts and similar businesses provide, or else they wouldn’t be able to follow state or CDC health guidelines. And while 95% of the companies at AU work in private offices, they still share common hallways and kitchen areas. Establishing clear protocols like mask wearing and social distancing, in addition to physical redesigns, was necessary to communicate to members immediately. “I would say on a given day, somewhere between 30 and maybe 40 startups are in the space,” Klein said, “and that could be as simple as one person. It might just be the CEO of that company. In other cases, some teams are growing, and they’re growing quickly. And so they’ve got more people in this space.” Some businesses simply couldn’t exist in a virtual-only world, Klein said. Despite offering virtual memberships, certain businesses needed four walls to work within – for production purposes, but for personal ones, too. “There’s going to always be a demand for physical space,” Klein said. “Physical space and being in close proximity is always going to have value. Humans are social creatures at the most basic level, and I don’t think you’ll see a complete virtual move really ever. What’s more likely is some kind of hybrid scenario where people have an office and some portion of their team comes in on a pretty regular basis, while others potentially work remotely.”

August 2020

Because of the constantly changing nature of the coronavirus and subsequent outbreaks, AU adjusts plans on a month-to-month basis. At the end of June, the company decided to extend its no-guest policy through the end of July. As the number of positive cases is still on the rise in North Carolina (as of press time), Klein’s team refuses to take unnecessary risks. But he’s still hopeful for spaces like AU over the next year or two, for two major reasons: belief in the emerging prevalence of hybrid business models and AU’s increasing flexibility with office leases. One such business that plans to engage in some sort of hybrid model is Knox St. Studios. The resource hub, which opened in May 2019, was originally designed for oneon-one, in-person interaction, primarily for African American youth interested in STEM and coding. But at the onset of COVID-19, it quickly transitioned to operating wholly online. “Until there is a cure – a vaccine for COVID-19 – and we have the proper health measures in place, we won’t open back up,” founder Talib Mann-Graves said. “That’s irresponsible.” Shifting to online-only naturally came at the expense of Knox St. Studios’ bottom line. For a business whose revenue stream depended in part on renting out physical space, the inability to do so was always going to be difficult. Mann-Graves is excited for the day he can safely reopen and reengage with his clients in person. But the temporary solution he found – shifting to a virtualonly model – isn’t something

he’ll immediately move away from. That programming has been so successful he can now incorporate it, to some extent, into the business’ long-term revenue plan. How much of it he integrates is still to be determined, and really can’t be until the pandemic ends, but it’s a major positive to come out of a tricky situation. “Turning off the revenue model of having space rental causes a budgetary gap,” Mann-Graves said. “The way to fill that budgetary gap is for us to, say, lean into other parts of our business model – of virtual learning – to compensate for that gap.”

There is no one, clear-cut catchall for what the “new office” will look like. As “normal” life slowly returns – whenever that may be – there will be those who eagerly head back to their conventional spaces. Some, like Neu Concepts, have to in order to do their business. But there will be those who take adjustments made during the pandemic and include them in how they operate moving forward. That might be a hybrid system, like what Knox St. Studios has planned. For others, it’s more wholeheartedly embracing the work-from-home trend many Americans have been practicing since March. “There’s a huge opportunity here,” Warasila said. “We’ve [been] asked pretty directly: ‘Why do I need an office?’ Our thinking around that has started to shift to, ‘Maybe that’s not exactly the right question.’ Maybe the question is: ‘What kind of office do I need?’”


kicker

engagement

Sarah Catherine Carter & Christopher Jaques B Y A N N A LO U I S E PIC KE NS | P HOTO BY ANNA CARSON DEWITT, AN N ACA RS O N DE W ITTP HOTO GR AP HY. CO M

Wedding Date October 16, 2021

Occupations Sarah Catherine is a freelance musical theater teaching artist;

Chris is the assistant manager of Hollow Rock Racquet & Swim Club. Crossed Paths The couple met when they matched on the dating app Bumble in March 2018. Sarah Catherine says first dates typically include getting coffee or a drink, so when Chris invited her out to dinner at 411 West in Chapel Hill, she was skeptical. But all went well, and after a few dinner dates and a trip to Early Bird Donuts, the rest was history. The Proposal On Sept. 14, 2019, the couple ate dinner with their families at Jack Tar and The Colonel’s Daughter and headed to Bull City Ciderworks afterward. On the walk over, Chris popped the question in front of the Bull Durham sign with Sarah Catherine’s great-grandmother’s ring. When they arrived at the cidery, Sarah Catherine was stunned to find a surprise party with their nearest and

dearest. “It was an incredible night,” Sarah Catherine says, “and, following North Carolina tradition, obviously ended with a trip to Cook Out.” Now, “I Do” A Swanky Affair is planning the day, starting with a ceremony at Trinity Avenue Presbyterian Church followed by reception at The Rickhouse. Durham Catering Co. will provide the meal, and there will be treats from Andia’s Homemade Ice Cream and music from Todd Moody Entertainment. “Our wedding was postponed due to COVID-19,” Sarah Catherine says, “and we are so thankful to all our amazing vendors for being so supportive and helpful in rescheduling our big day.”

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wedding

Garrett Dixon & Leah Josephson

B Y C L A I RE DE L A N O P HOTO G RA P H Y B Y ME R R ITT C HE SSO N, ME R R ITTC HESSON .COM

September 1, 2019 Occupations Garrett works as a sales account manager at Raleigh-based computer software company Red Hat. Leah is the co-founder and managing partner of Emergence Collective, a consulting firm that works with nonprofits and philanthropies. Crossed Paths Leah and Garrett grew up in the Triangle – Leah in Cary and Garrett in Raleigh – but did not meet until after college when they were both working in politics. Durham, in particular, is “where we really got to know each other and had our first home together,” Garrett says. The Proposal “We did not have a traditional engagement,” Leah says. “In fact, we booked the Durham Armory as our wedding venue four months before we were officially engaged!” The pair celebrated their engagement privately before sharing the news with friends and family. After meeting through campaign work and getting engaged during election season, they ordered a mock yard sign to celebrate: “Josephson/Dixon 2019!” Wedding Date

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The couple spent the weekend with friends and family; one highlight for Garrett was the Friday night Durham Bulls outing spent with guests “and getting pulled on the field for a trivia game.” Garrett and Leah chose the Armory for their ceremony and reception because of its rich history as a community space. “Long before I even thought of getting married myself, any time I went to an event … at the Armory, it seemed like the perfect place for a wedding,” Leah says. Floral arrangements by Bluebird Meadows adorned the venue. Guests danced to music by Vox DJ Company and enjoyed a family-style dinner from Snap Pea and dessert by Yellowbird Baking. Rabbi Dr. Jenny Solomon officiated the ceremony, and Amanda Scott of A Swanky Affair coordinated the big day. A Favorite Moment Following the reception, the couple joined friends for an after-party at Kotuku Surf Club, where Leah defended her bocce record against Garrett as usual. Then, Leah says, “we stopped by Cook Out, still dressed, at 3 a.m. once all the guests went home.” The Big Day

Do you live in Durham and want your wedding or engagement featured in our magazine? Email weddings@durhammag.com.


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Durham Magazine August 2020  

The Best of Durham

Durham Magazine August 2020  

The Best of Durham

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