Page 1

Gifts for Everyone

on Your List 28

Test Your

Dog’s IQ 34

Memories of

Christmases Past 58

Plan Your

2017 Wedding 80

December/January 2017 durhammag.com

Cheers!

Making spirits bright, at home Page 40

Josh Lindsey’s

Gold Standard Cocktail Creation at Harvest 18

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December/January 2017

Vol 9 No 7

durhammag.com     Senior Vice President, Publishing Rory Kelly Gillis rory@durhammag.com Executive Editor Amanda MacLaren amanda@durhammag.com EDITORIAL Executive Editor, Chapel Hill Magazine Jessica Stringer Assistant Editor Laura Zolman Kirk Events & Community Editor Dana Lange Digital Content Manager Morgan Weston Editorial Interns Alexis Allston, Matt Couch, Hannah Grossman, Lauren Moody and Robin O'Luanaigh Contributors Amanda Abrams, Chantal Allam and Jenna Parks ART Creative Director Kevin Brown Art Director Sarah Arneson Graphic Designers Reba Straley, Christy Wright Staff Photographer Briana Brough ADVERTISING Melissa Crane melissa@durhammag.com Kem Johnson kem@durhammag.com

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Administrative & Operations Assistant Caroline Kornegay Events Coordinator Grace Beason Distribution Charlie Hyland, Roger Nahum Durham Magazine is published by Shannon Media Inc. Subscriptions, $38 for two years, are available at durhammag.com. To purchase copies, call 919.933.1551.


december/januarƈ 2017 DEPARTMENTS & COLUMNS 4

Letter from the Executive Editor

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Bull City Scene Setter PictureDURM showcases images curated by locals

20 The Durham Difference Reality Ministries not only helps teens and adults with developmental disabilities, it also fosters friendships 22 Noted What we’ve heard around town …

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26 Our Latest Obsessions Carolina Godiva Track Club’s New Year’s Day Run and our executive editor’s Sunday traditions at Fullsteam and Monuts 32 The Creatives Getting to know antifolk singer-songwriter Charles Latham 34 Entrepreneurs Discover your dog’s intelligence with Dognition 38 Go. See. Do. The hottest events for the holidays and beyond

FEATURES 40 Your Guide to Stress-Free Holidays

66 Adopt A Pet Meet a few pets from The Animal Protection Society of Durham 94 Hot Spot Chicken, five ways, at M Kokko

Experts give advice on winter wardrobe, mixology, appetizers, decor and a festive playlist to usher in the season

58 Talking Traditions

Durham longtimers share their beloved holiday memories

68 How They Live

Laura and Chad Quinn updated their Rockwood home on a budget

96 Dishing with … Washington Duke Inn & Golf Club’s Jason Cunningham

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80 I Do’s, Durham Style

98 Taste Find our city’s best restaurants 110 Engagements & Weddings Tying the knot in Bull City

SEEN & HEARDS 8

8 trends for your big day in the Bull City

CenterFest Arts Festival

10 Urbaniak-Sanders Fashion Show and Luncheon benefiting Center for Child and Family Health

SPONSORED 28 Holiday Gift Guide

12 Arts For Life’s Local Color fundraiser 14 World Beer Festival

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16 Restaurant Showcase for Meals on Wheels of Durham 17 Northgate Mall’s Music on the Plaza: Halloween Spooktacular 18 Coalition to Unchain Dogs’ Barktoberfest 19 Durham Literacy Center’s 30th anniversary


| letter from the executive editor |

The Giving Spirit

I

N SIXTH GRADE, I WAS DEAD-SET ON GETTING every one of my friends a present for Christmas. I use the word “friend” loosely – I’m sure most were merely acquaintances. Nevertheless, I dragged my mother through department store after department store looking for the most appropriate gifts for Rachel, Allison, Ronnie, etc., and on the day before school let out for winter break, I carried a garbage bag filled with these trinkets (the 11-year-old version of Santa Claus) and doled them out one by one to my astonished peers, who only had a gift for the teacher, given to them by their parents. I didn’t care then, and still do not care, about receiving gifts – it’s always nice, of course, but I find more joy in coming up with the best idea for each family member and friend, almost to a fault. The toaster oven I bought for a college pal who lived in Dallas and was visiting N.C. for the holidays had a lot of thought behind it, except for a plan for how exactly she was going to get it on an airplane. This year, things are a little different. I’m not going to spend as many hours making lists and checking them twice. Instead, I’m going to put that time towards being with loved ones and handwriting meaningful messages in holiday cards for folks whom I don’t see often enough. I’m going to donate to some of my favorite charities (learn more about a great one, Reality Ministries, on page 20), and if I do make purchases, it will be from local artisans and businesses, to support my community. I’ll cook, decorate and unwind with merry tunes, putting into practice some of the recommended tips for a stress-free holiday that start on page 40. Happy holidays, and see you in 2017.

 @amanda_maclaren

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The Cover Photo by Briana Brough

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Details coming soon at tastetheevent.com


bull citƈ scene setter

Showcasing images curated by locals – share with @picturedurm

“City of angels.”  by Chris Cherry at American Tobacco Campus

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Staying Centered  by Robin O'Luanaigh The Durham Arts Council presented the 42nd annual CenterFest Arts Festival downtown, showcasing artists and performers from across North Carolina and beyond. This year, the event featured the largest artist and entertainment lineup in its history, with 147 artists from 17 different states and 74 performing arts groups showcasing their talents. Attendees enjoyed treats from local food vendors like the The Cupcake Bar, Toast and The Parlour. More than 33,000 people attended, making this year one of the most successful CenterFests ever. 8

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1 Chris Walston, Emerson, 14, and Temple, 16. 2 Mary Clare Weiner and Nastassja Ortiz. 3 Martha, 5, and Matt Durden. 4 Pam Newnam, Lexi Newnam and Joyce Childress. 5 Lawson Carmichael with his 5-month-old pup, Hazel. 6 Julio and Lee De Alberdi. 7 Ella, 6, Leo, 6, and Jordan Stankavage, 5, Nina Brandeis, 4, Mauricio Borgen and pup Sabre.


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Fashion for Families  by Laura Zolman Kirk More than 300 guests attended the seventh annual Urbaniak-Sanders Fashion Show and Luncheon benefiting the Center for Child & Family Health (CCFH) at the Washington Duke Inn & Golf Club. They browsed silent auction items from 50 local businesses prior to the lunch and fashion show, which highlighted pieces from Smitten Boutique, Dana LeBlanc Designs and Sassie Rocks. Ten percent of sales from these vendors went to support CCFH’s mission to provide treatment services for children who have endured traumatic stress in their lives. The event was a success, as CCFH surpassed its fundraising goal, raising more than $70,000.

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1 Kelly Marcolini, Nicole Jones and Debby Coffman. 2 Theky Pappas, Muff Urbaniak and Anna MacDonald Dobbs. 3 Lois Deloatch, Anne Micheaux Akwari and C. Eileen Watts Welch. 4 Dr. Lisa Amaya-Jackson, Deon Roach, Mary Jo Rochelle, Lee Wollman and Melrose Fisher.


Dr. David Lee Hill, Jr. Oral & Maxillofacial Surgeon 77 Vilcom Center Circle, Suite 120 Chapel Hill, NC 27514 919-238-9961

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his uncompromising philosophy toward care is reflected in the state-of-the-art

Implant and Oral Surgery Center, they understand. That is why Dr. Hill has created

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a top notch facility and a team of professionals whose one goal is to help you

his patient’s comfort and it shows - from the warm and inviting surroundings to

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If your case calls for implant or oral surgery, let Dr. Hill and his capable team

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Happy HeArts  by Alexis Allston The third annual Local Color fundraiser at The Rickhouse was filled with great food, wine, beer from Fullsteam Brewery, music by the Durham Quintet, do-it-yourself art projects, raffle prizes and a dessert competition. All proceeds benefit Arts For Life (AFL) at Duke Children’s Hospital & Health Center, an organization that supports children battling serious illnesses and disabilities through arts education. Several young patients – 9-year-old Riley Bingham, 4-year-old Quinn Daughtry and 4-year-old

Uriah Priest – and their families attended the fundraiser, sharing how Arts For Life has given them hope when they needed it most. Other guests included Sean Lilly Wilson of Fullsteam, who served as a judge for the dessert competition along with Desmond Scott and Riley. They voted Smallcakes the winner of the Sugar Showdown, and the People’s Choice winner was Lauren Deel – mother of AFL patient, Charlotte – with her homemade Blue Delicious Delight chocolate chip cookies. Local Color raised more than $22,000 for the AFL program at Duke. 12

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1 Leatrice Priest, AFL Executive Director Rachel Zink, and AFL Durham Program Director Mary Margaret Fulk with Leatrice’s sons, Trajan, 6, and Uriah, 4. 2 Tom Droege, Kristen Oakley, Zack Oakley and Paula Droege. 3 Carol Mitchell and her son, Kenny Griffin. 4 Janet Adcock, Kristey Stewart, Caroline Snipes and Emily Faber. 5 Julie Phlegar, David Phlegar, Katharine Phlegar and Robb Broughton. 6 Julie and Van Daughtry with 4-year-old daughter Quinn. 7 Kristi Oristian and Beth Palmer. 8 Durham Public School teachers Lexie Simpson, Marshall McIver, Trish Peters and Laney Golden. 9 Sean Lilly Wilson, Desmond Scott and Riley Bingham, 9.


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Call 919-259-7927 today to learn more about life at The Cedars. www.cedarsofchapelhill.com A Life Plan Community


| seen & heard |

Raise a Glass  by Morgan Weston The 21st annual World Beer Festival, hosted by All About Beer Magazine, brought more than 200 beers from around the globe to the Durham Bulls Athletic Park. Many Durham breweries (and a cidery!) were represented, including Fullsteam Brewery, Bull City Ciderworks and Ponysaurus, as well as a range of brewers from across the state such as Mystery Brewing Company of Hillsborough, Wooden Robot of Charlotte, Bhramari of Asheville, and Raleigh brewers Crank Arm Brewing and Compass Rose Brewery. Attendees also had their pick of several area food trucks, including American Meltdown, Baguettaboutit and Taco Grande. A make-your-own-beer stand, specialty cask ales, discussions with brewing experts and live music rounded out the evening. Cheers to all who attended and made it a special night!

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1 Lynda Gerbe, Deon McCormick, Magdalyn Duffie and Geddie Herring. 2 John Martin and Nicole Ponticorvo. 3 Sierra Tolbert and Darbi Griffith. 4 Jarett Roman and Shelby Dawkins-Law. 5 Jesika Rubin and Erin Compton. 6 Thomas McGee, Ashely McGee, Mitch Barkon, Alex Gunther, Greg Gunther, Tae Braziel and Chris Jordan. 7 Tony Thomas, Brook Osborne, Eliot Cohen, Locky Stewart, Pravin Kamath, Alex Lee and Katie O’Connell.

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EVERYDAYI SA

“ YOU LOOK GREAT” SORTOFDAY

Dr . SueEl l enCoxi sani nt er nat i onal l yr ecogni z edex per t i nf aci alr ej uv enat i onandbodycont our i ng.Aboar d cer t i f i edder mat ol ogi standder mat ol ogi csur geon, Dr . Coxspeci al i z esi nder mal f i l l er s, l aser s, f atr educt i on andt i ssuet i ght eni ngdev i ces. fy I ou’ r et hi nk i ngaboutaest het i cpr ocedur es, getex per t advi ce. Lear nmor eaboutDr . Cox ’ st eachi ng, publ i shi ng andr esear ch–i ncl udi nghowshehel pedobt ai nFDA appr oval ofmanypr oduct si ncl udi ngBot ox , Vol uma, Ky bel l aandLat i sse–atwww. aest het i csol ut i ons. com. Ourpat i ent sl oveher . Youwi l l t oo!

5821Far r i ngt onRoad, Chapel Hi l l NC27517 •( 919)4036200 www. aest het i csol ut i ons. com

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1 Candy Carver, Stacy Jasper and Aaron Averill. 2 CSA staff from left: David Arneson, Scott Harmon, Morgan Haynes, Victor Galloway II, Julie Cohoon, Will Rhodenhiser and Dawn Bland.

Good Eats  by Sarah Arneson Center Studio Architecture, which has designed 16 restaurants in downtown and the Triangle, hosted a Restaurant Showcase and Raffle to benefit Meals on Wheels of Durham. Guests enjoyed wine and hors d’oeuvres from a few of those eateries and were entered to win gift certificates to the restaurants, including The Cupcake Bar, Dashi, The Bagel Bar, The Parlour, Pizzeria Toro, Toast, Scratch and Alivia’s, among others. More than $2,800 was raised for the nonprofit, which is dedicated to providing proper nutrition to seniors, people with disabilities and other eligible citizens in need. That will provide about 800 meals to our neighbors, or feed three people for an entire year.


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Symphonic Spirit  by Matt Couch Northgate Mall hosted its third annual Halloween Spooktacular – the final concert in its fall Music on the Plaza series – with the Durham Symphony Orchestra and Paperhand Puppet Intervention performing for the large crowd of families and people gathered. The Durham Symphony Orchestra played song selections ranging from “The Muppet Show” to Tchaikovsky to “Star Wars.” In addition to the puppet show and live music, there was a costume contest, local food trucks such as Heavenly Smoke and Mama’s Hot Chicken, beer and wine from Bull City Burger and Brewery, and coffee from Esmerelda’s Café.

1 Rachel Yarbarough, Collin Queen, 13, and Laura King. 2 Curt and Kim Henry.

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Puppy Power  by Amanda MacLaren There was no shortage of adorable pups at this year’s Barktoberfest, a fundraiser to benefit the Coalition to Unchain Dogs, a nonprofit that works to help local families in underserved communities access critical services for their pets. The event featured contests – including best trick, a costume and kissing contest – games, several raffles, a photo booth, pet vendors, food trucks and local beer and cider at Durham Central Park. More than $12,000 was raised for the organization, which has built fences for more than 2,100 dogs and provided spay/neuter surgeries and other medical care to nearly 4,300 pets since its founding in 2007.

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1 Christy Velasquez with Meeko and Emil Velasquez with Micro. 2 Jason and Crystal Parker with Atlas. 3 Coalition to Unchain Dogs volunteers Brandon Allen and Cat Mohar. 4 Nettie Jankoviak with Winnie and Lauren Neems with Roush. 5 Camp Bow Wow Chapel Hill owners Cindy Balentine and Glenn Borg, Garrett Johnson, Hillary Klutts and Flo Scavone. 6 Ian and Kathleen Sinclair and Lisa and Barry Chase.


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Reading Rainbow The Durham Literacy Center recently celebrated its 30th anniversary with the reveal

of a mural across the front of its downtown headquarters on Chapel Hill Road. Current and past students, volunteers and supporters were in attendance for the event, which coincided with Adult Education and Family Literacy Week. Designed in partnership with Happymess Art Studios, the mural features a “tree of knowledge,” with books perched on branches, which then transform into birds as they fly off – a metaphor for the empowerment that literacy provides. “Since 1985, the Durham Literacy Center has empowered more than 16,000 Durham County residents through literacy,” says Ike Thomas, board president. “As we celebrate the success of our past students, we look forward to reaching new milestones with current and future students.”

1 County Commissioner Ellen Reckhow and the center’s first executive director, Mary Siedow. 2 County Commissioner Fred Foster, Durham Literacy Center former executive director Reggie Hodges and Greg Bellamy, dean of College and Career Readiness at Durham Technical Community College.

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| the Durham difference |

Betty Brandt Rouse with a few friends from Reality Ministries.

The Best of Friends

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Reality Ministries not only helps teens and adults with developmental disabilities, it also fosters meaningful relationships ď € by Dana Lange |  by Briana Brough

INE YEARS AGO, WHEN BETTY BRANDT ROUSE WAS IN HER FIRST YEAR

at UNC, she thought she wanted to be a special education teacher. To explore that interest, she started volunteering at Reality Ministries, a community center in Durham for teens and adults with developmental disabilities. What she ended

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When you walk in here, you feel known and cared for. I can’t put it into words, but you feel it.

up walking into was a program that exists for much more: the creation of friendships.

Supper Club On any given Monday night, Betty Brandt can be found with 80 “friends” – which is what both the participants and volunteers are called – enjoying dinner, singing songs, playing games and telling stories. Many of Betty Brandt’s friends have what the world considers disabilities, but at Reality, they are just different abilities. “I have been coming to Reality Ministries for so long because it really is a space where everyone experiences belonging,” Betty Brandt says. “Relationships are formed around the idea of mutual dependency and mutual kinship.” To her, coming by the center every week is not just some volunteer job. “My perspective shifted quickly from the beginning,” she says. “I get to do this for my friends, and I am given as much. It is very powerful to witness what we all are learning here.”

Welcome Center

Center. “We have 153 participant friends with 138 volunteer friends in our day programs,” Susan, now the executive director, explains. “They are people of all abilities sharing their day together.” Friends do Zumba, make soap, cook lunch together, all activities that facilitate the strengthening of friendship and the feeling of belonging. In the great room, friends in and out of wheelchairs are playing basketball. Another group is out front tending the garden. They greet visitors with enthusiasm, as they consider them all friends. “We are creating an inclusive community,” Susan says. “It is the mutuality of people being accepted for who they are.” That sentiment is palpable at Reality Ministries. Soon, the community will be able to come and experience the joy of friends of all abilities, when the Reality Café opens on Fridays for lunch. Reality also holds an annual talent show, last year a beloved member of the filling The Carolina Theatre with more than a Durham Magazine team since our launch and the past board chair thousand people enjoying the performances of the Food Bank of Central and Eastern of Reality’s friends.

Dana Lange,

North Carolina, highlights her fellow Durhamites making a difference by giving back.

Reality Ministries was started by husband and wife team Jeff and Susan McSwain as an outreach to help people learn that the deepest reality of life is God’s love in Jesus Christ. They quickly discovered that the greatest need in Durham was for people with developmental disabilities who had aged out of the public school system to have a place to go and things to do. Now individuals of all beliefs are part of Reality. In their second year, they stumbled upon an old church on the corner of Lamond Avenue and North Gregson Street, just across from Durham School of the Arts, that was for sale. That became the Reality

‘Created for Community’

For Betty Brandt, now an ESL teacher at Creekside Elementary School, she sums up what has kept her coming back to Reality week after week for so many years: “I have seen the actuality of being in relationships that transform your perspective to show we all need the same things and have the same desires,” she says. “We are all created for community.” Tearing up, she adds, “When you walk in here, you feel known and cared for. I can’t put it into words, but you feel it.” All people of all abilities are loved and cared for – that is the Reality.

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noted. What an Honor

eMerging Entrepreneurs Inc.’s youth STEM program Urban Leadership Lab was selected by the White House as part of its 2016

“Computer Science for All” learning campaign. It's an honary mention for the organization’s operational commitments to advance the Obama administration’s efforts to give millions of students access to unique computer science educational opportunities. Josephine L. Cranfill and Emma G. Friesen of Trinity School of Durham and Chapel Hill were named “Commended Students” in the 2017 National Merit Scholarship Program for their exceptional academic promise.

North Carolina Central University’s (NCCU) Patrick “9th Wonder” Douthit and Yaba Blay are featured in the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture. Also included is a photograph of noted educator and presidential advisor Dr. Booker T. Washington during a visit to Durham in 1910, as well as a video from NCCU’s “Eagle Access” student web series, as part of a focus on football in the museum’s Sports Gallery. Allan D. Kirk, Donald P. McDonnell and Robert M. Califf of the Duke University School of Medicine have been named to the National Academy of Medicine, an independent advisory organization made up of leading professionals in health, medicine, social and behavioral sciences. Marcia Morey was named Outstanding Judge of the Year for 2016 by the North Carolina Association of Women Attorneys. 22

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Send us you news! r From b irth

s to a to ne noted w biz and mwards @durh o amma re – g.com

What we’ve heard around town …

And the Award Goes to ...

The PBS documentary series “Twice Born,” produced by Raleigh-based Trailblazer Studios (including Durham’s own Bonnie Cutler), won an Emmy Award in September for outstanding science and technology programming.

Duke’s Center for Documentary Studies awarded the 24th Dorothea Lange-Paul Taylor Prize to Durham native, artist, illustrator and documentarian Steven M. Cozart for his proposal “The Pass/Fail Series,” which explores colorism within the African-American community. Stacey Kirby was awarded a $200,000 Juried Grand Prize at the international 2016 ArtPrize competition for her performance and installation “The Bureau of Personal Belonging,” which was first presented at an ArtPrize Pitch Night at the 21c Museum Hotel in May.

On the Move After five years as the executive director at the

Museum of Durham History, Katie Spencer will step down from that role March 31. “I regularly receive phone calls from museums all over the country who want to build community-centric programs and exhibitions,” Katie said in the museum’s announcement. “While I plan to stay involved in curatorial work at the museum, I want to be able to take those calls.” Winkie La Force, longtime president of Leadership Triangle – a coaching and engagement platform for businesses and leaders – will retire in January. Replacing Winkie will be Jesica Averhart, current engagement director at American Underground.

December/January 2017

Thurman D. Hollins was appointed North Carolina Central University’s director of bands in September. Most recently, Thurman served at St. Augustine’s University.

Timothy A. Daniel is the new head of school at Montessori Community School.

Nicky Charles is the new chief operating officer of East Durham Children’s Initiative.

Marking Milestones International Montessori School celebrated its 20th anniversary in September. The school started as a French-language preschool with four students and has grown to 108 students today, offering Spanish, French and Mandarin Chinese for primary level up to sixth grade.

In October, Vert & Vogue released its lookbook of fall and winter fashions featuring selections photographed at The Carolina Theatre. The boutique also recently celebrated the eighth anniversary of its Brightleaf Square store. Doug and Nelda Lay of The Persian Carpet, located on Durham-Chapel Hill Boulevard, celebrated the 40th anniversary of their business this year. In October, nonprofit Book Harvest gave away its 500,000th book.


| noted |

Business Briefs

At press time, Triangle Circus Arts – owned by Dr. Kerry Donny-Clark – was scheduled to open late November on Hillsborough Road. Skin Wellness Dermatology Associates opened in Southpoint Plaza in July.

The Triangle Nonprofit & Volunteer Leadership Center held its annual Tomorrow’s Community Leaders Award Ceremony in October at the N.C. School of Science and Mathematics to recognize students for 53,470 total hours of community service.

Kitchen and bath design business emma delon has moved from Durham to Chapel Hill.

Mark your Calendar

O’Neil Physical Therapy began accepting clients for its mobile and personalized treatment sessions in September. DPAC earned more than $6.3 million in net income, with $1.8 million distributed to its owner, the City of Durham, this year. Amazon is helping to fund Durham-based Organic Transit, which develops an ultraefficient bicycle-car hybrid called the ELF.

Durham County Department of Social Services (DSS) launched DSS Mobile App to help the 6,000 clients it sees per month apply, recertify or make changes to their status in the Food & Nutrition, Medicaid and Work First programs. It's available for free on Google Play, the website dssmobile. dconc.gov and soon on the Apple Store. Bella Trio Spa & Salon is slated to open at the beginning of March at the American Tobacco Campus.

community for patients and their families.

Issues Confronting Our Nation (ICON) – a Durham grassroots, nonprofit organization founded by six women, recently announced its 2017 lecture series. Five speakers will participate throughout the year, discussing topics such as national security, health care reform, energy and more. The first speaker will be Mike Adams, a professor of criminology at UNC-W, on March 7. All the talks take place at Extraordinary Ventures in Chapel Hill. For more information, visit iconlectureseries.com.

Giving Back

In June, the Debutante Ball Society helped sort 7,500 pounds of food, or about 6,648 meals, at the Food Bank of Central & Eastern North Carolina in Durham. Chair-Elect Sue Ann Glower also presented the food bank with a gift of $1,500, which will provide another 7,500 meals.

PHOTO COURTESY DURHAM ACADEMY

El Centro Hispano – a grassroots, communitybased nonprofit dedicated to strengthening the Latino community – moved to Chapel Hill Road in October. President and CEO of El Centro, Pilar Rocha-Goldberg, and Mayor Bill Bell celebrated with the community at a grand opening event.

Duke Cancer Institute and Caring House host a gala on Feb. 18, 2017, at the Washington Duke Inn & Golf Club to celebrate and support the partnership’s 25 years of providing affordable housing, a healing environment and a supportive

Durham Academy fourth-grader Cadence Adamson spearheaded a Hurricane Matthew relief effort and collected supplies to help the thousands of flood victims in North Carolina. Within days, she had accumulated hundreds of paper towel rolls, toilet paper rolls, sponges and more.

In October, 108 Bronto Software employees volunteered their time to area charities including Urban Ministries of Durham, Food Bank of Central & Eastern North Carolina, Habitat for Humanity of Durham and SEEDS. A part of Bronto parent company Netsuite’s annual Global Impact Week, the employees pulled weeds, sorted clothing, restocked pantries, rebuilt computers and assisted with Hurricane Matthew flood recovery efforts for a total of 416 volunteer hours.

Lessons Outside the Classroom

Durham Public Schools (DPS) and the Museum of Life and Science partnered up in October to bring immersive, curriculum-based STEM learning adventures, called STEM Days, to more than 1,500 DPS fourth-grade students on the museum’s campus. In October, Bell and Howell – which delivers service and technology solutions that enrich customer communications and fulfillment for finance, industry and public sector enterprises – hosted a Manufacturing Day open house for guests from local state and community colleges, as well as community members and elected officials. Bell and Howell gave a tour of its Research Triangle Park headquarters, along with demonstrations of systems used for pharmaceutical material handling and tracking, robotic security patrol, automated vision inspection, 3-D printing and more. „

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3 Durhamites Tom Rankin, Emily Wallace and Michael McFee contributed essays to “The Carolina Table: North Carolina Writers on Food,” edited by UNC’s Randall Kenan and published by Eno Publishers in Hillsborough. 4 Also through Duke University Press, poet, independent scholar and activist Alexis Pauline Gumbs (who appeared on our February/March 2011 cover with her partner, Julia howrdwe the L-wo ca me capitalbe of the South Wallace) has published “Spill: Scenes of Black Feminist Fugitivity,” a collection of scenes depicting fugitive Black women and girls seeking freedom from gendered violence and racism. BLU CHEF TIM LYONS

AT HOME 10 | RICHARD BRODHEAD DIGS DURHAM EMILY K CENTER 45 33 | THE SPA TREATMENT | SUMMER CAMP GUIDE 36 50 | GREAT HOME: WHITE OAK FARM 58

Durhamite David Bockino’s recently published e-book, “Greetings from Myanmar,” was featured in an interview with Kai Ryssdal on NPR’s Marketplace in September. David is an assistant professor at Elon University. On her quest to discover the stories behind Durham’s bull icon, writer Sheila Amir chronicles her journey as it unfolds on her blog medium.com/@sheilaamir. 2 Chancellor Emeritus of Duke University, James B. Duke Professor of Medicine and Director of the Duke Center for Research on Personalized Health Care, Ralph Snyderman has published a memoir titled, “A Chancellor’s Tale: Transforming Academic Medicine,” through Duke University Press.

In Memoriam

Duke School of Medicine professor of neurobiology and Chapel Hill’s Zinfandel Pharmaceuticals CEO, Dr. Allen David Roses passed away September 30 at 73. He was known for his work establishing genetic PHOTO BY JARED LAZARUS, links to Alzheimer’s DUKE PHOTOGRAPHY disease and also served as American Dance Festival’s board chairman.

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February/March 2011

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DURHAM MAGAZINE

The same developer that brought Solis to Ninth Street plans to build a 200-unit apartment complex on the Howerton & Bryan Funeral Home site at 1005 W. Main St. next to Brightleaf Square. Charlotte-based Terwilliger Pappas proposed a seven-story complex, which includes a two-level parking garage and offers studio, one-, two- and three-bedroom apartment options.

1 The New York Times bestselling author John Darnielle (also the singer-songwriter behind the band The Mountain Goats) has released his second novel, “Universal Harvester,” about a small-town video store set in 1990s Iowa that suddenly becomes full of mystery.

| BRIDAL SPA DAY

design of specific spaces, like chef Matthew Kelly for inspired kitchens and Stone Bros. & Byrd for the building’s landscaped rooftop garden. Construction is expected to begin late 2016, with residents scheduled to move in fall of 2017.

Read All About It

OAK FARM | CAMP GUIDE

Plans are in the works to transform the Erwin Building (on the corner of North Buchanan Boulevard and Trinity Avenue) into Wheatland, a complex of 10 residences – ranging from 1,200 to 2,000 square feet – designed by Alliance Architecture in collaboration with local stakeholders including Robert and Fida Ghanem of Mad Hatter’s/Saladelia Cafe and Kenneth P. Lawhorn. Additionally, the team has brought in Durham notables to fuel the

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New Developments

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FEBRUARY/MARCH 2011

Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University recently presented a matinee performance of Southern hardcore punk rock for an all-ages crowd. Organized by musician Mac McCaughan, co-founder of Merge Records and member of indie rock band Superchunk, the event featured punk rock bands Pipe, Blackball and Natural Causes with punk DJs spinning in between sets.

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Partners Julia Wallace and Alexis Pauline Gumbs are right at home in Durham

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5 Rebecca Brewster Stevenson published her first novel, “Healing Maddie Brees,” through Durham’s Light Messages Publishing. The book explores “the questions of honesty and commitment, of disease and isolation, and of the many shapes healing takes.”

Rep. Paul Luebke passed away October 29 at 70. The Democrat represented Durham in the state House of Representatives for 25 years and was running

for re-election to a 14th term in November when he suffered a sudden re-occurrence of lymphoma, which he had been diagnosed with last fall.


latest obessions PHOTOGRAPHY BY RICHARD NEFF WOLFE

Our editors’ most recent discoveries will have you hooked, too

At left: Dana Calder and Crystal Dreisbach at last year's New Year's Day Run. Above: Runners warm up at the starting line at Duke School.

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On the Right Foot ACE UP YOUR RUNNING SHOES AND SHAKE OFF ANY RESIDUAL side effects from the night before when Carolina Godiva Track Club holds its annual New Year’s Day Run. Open to all ages, the 8K out-and-back course starts from Duke School on Erwin Road and heads through the hilly, graveled trails of Duke Forest before swinging back. “Don’t expect age-group awards, live bands, an elaborate post-race spread or any special sense of empowerment from the experience, except what you can imagine for yourself,” says the run’s race director Patrick Bruer. “You’ll meet a lot of people who really enjoy running and have stories to tell.” More than 30 years – ahem – running, the event is part of the club’s winter series. It started from humble beginnings at the Trinity Park home of Godiva club members Ellen Covey and Pete Casseday and ran along the wall of Duke’s East Campus. It quickly grew in size until traffic control

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problems forced organizers to move it off-road to its current location. Sadly, one person who won’t be at the finish line is former club member Greg Sousa, who passed away from brain cancer this past July at the age of 47. As a tribute to the father of two, the club is dedicating this year’s series to him and will donate a portion of proceeds to Badousa Brain – a fundraising team that Greg formed for the Angels Among Us 5K, which is held in April and benefits Duke’s Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center. “Greg made the very best of a dreaded situation,” Patrick says, “and inspired many of us with his warmth, optimism and will to overcome. We can think of no better way to carry on Greg’s legacy than by hitting the trails and running a lap in his honor this New Year’s Day." Race-day-only registration starts an hour before the 1 p.m. kickoff (specifically to allow for a few extra hours of sleep) and costs $5 for nonmembers (with free entry for those younger than 18). True to the club’s mission, it’s billed as a low-key event, with camaraderie trumping finish times. – Chantal Allam


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Monuts & Mindfulness HILE WE’RE CELEBRATING traditions, I thought I’d share my newest – Recovery Yoga with Anna Cordova at Fullsteam Brewery. Every Sunday at 10:45 a.m. (I do my very best to get there five minutes early to find a good spot) 20 to 30 people join together for this donation-based class, from the novice to experienced yogis. I won’t sugarcoat it – this hourand-fifteen-minutes kicks my butt on a regular basis.

But I’ve been attending more often, thanks to one of my best friends, Stephanie Curtis (pictured with me below right, pre-yoga), who recently moved to the area and who can actually maintain a crow pose. Personally, I’ve gotten to the point that I can hold a solid number of poses for much longer, and my balance and flexibility have noticeably improved. And for someone who is always rushing, it’s been a good lesson in slowing down and maintaining focus. Bring your mat and come try it with us sometime! Staying for a beer afterward is always encouraged (Fullsteam opens at noon), but my friend and I typically find ourselves craving two things: carbs and Bloody Marys. These can easily be found on many brunch menus in the Bull City, but the everything bagels at Monuts Donuts are, well, everything. A Lox of Love bagel sandwich for me, and a build-your-own version with avocado, veggies, over-medium egg and Sriracha for her, plus our bloodies with their Miller High Life sidecars, equals a full, satisfying Sunday morning in my book. – Amanda MacLaren

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holidaƈƂiftƂuide SPONSORED CONTENT

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This Kate Spade New York handbag with authentic wool feels like a luxury coat. Red with charcoal gray trim, it offers a picnic basket style with a center zippered section. The Spade logo on the front is 14-karat gold. It also has small, metal feet on the bottom to prevent wear. Retails for $298. Get it at Fifi’s of Durham for $138! $138 1000 W. Main St. 1-B 919-806-3434 fifisconsignment.com


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Share your love of the Bull City this holiday season! This brushed steel ornament handcrafted by Vega Metals makes the perfect adornment for a tree or window. It’s a great gift for all those on your list who love Durham. $20.99

Zola Craft Gallery, 626-B Ninth St. (above Bruegger’s Bagels) 919-286-5112 zolacraftgallery.com

Smallcakes

Looking for the sweetest stocking stuffer for that special someone this season? How about a gift certificate for some of the Triangle’s best cupcakes? Gift cards available in $5, $10, $20 increments. Visit the Durham or Cary cupcakery! $5-$20 4711 Hope Valley Rd., Durham, 919-9372922 1132 Parkside Main St., Cary, 919-388-2253 smallcakesnc.com

Hillsborough Spa and Day Retreat

Spoil that special someone this holiday with the gift of spa bliss! Our customized massages, facials, body wraps and scrubs will leave you feeling relaxed and revitalized for the New Year. All treatments include complimentary use of our steam rooms and infrared sauna. Treatments start at $120 and gift cards can be purchased in any amount. $120+ 1814 Beckett’s Ridge Dr., Hillsborough 919-617-1814 hillsboroughspa.com

Triangle Fish Guy

This low-profile, 60-gallon aquarium setup features a hidden, powerful canister filter and concealed, full-spectrum LED lighting. No bulky light fixtures or filter equipment to ruin the clean lines and surfaces of the aquarium and cabinetry. $980, including all materials (even fish); installation starting at just $100 Trianglefishguy.com December/January 2017

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SPONSORED CONTENT

Whilden

Get holiday party-ready in this fun, sequin dress by Lavender Brown. $200 The Galleria, 400 S. Elliott Rd., Chapel Hill 919-240-5491 facebook.com/shopwhilden

The Persian Carpet

Unique, one-of-a-kind, hand-knotted throw rugs feature tropical critters. Bright colors and handspun wool make these unusual rugs a gift that will last a lifetime. Available in multiple sizes. Prices start at $250. $250+ 5634 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd., Durham 919-489-8362 persiancarpet.com

Habitat for Humanity

Let Habitat for Humanity of Orange County send holiday cards to your friends, customers or loved ones for you! The card features custom art depicting downtown Chapel Hill’s Northside neighborhood, where Habitat is building 10 new homes and completing 25 home repairs. The image was created by local textile artist Elaine O’Neil. $10, a minimum donation per card is appreciated. 919-932-7077, ext. 219 orangehabitat.org/cards

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SPONSORED CONTENT

Nugget

Looking for a memorable gift this year? Try Nugget, a foam couch that ships in a box, and then pops out and takes shape right in front of you. With four soft, sturdy pieces that can be arranged to make dozens of ultra-comfy configurations, it’s part toy, part furniture. Manufactured right in Durham out of durable materials, it will last for many holidays to come. $229 919-307-6553 nuggetcomfort.com

Massage Envy

This holiday season, buy $100 in gift cards and receive a $25 gift card*, or buy $150 in gift cards and receive a $50 gift card* at any of the 15 convenient Massage Envy locations in Durham and Raleigh. Offer expires 12/24/2016. *Some restrictions apply. See clinic for details. $100/$150 MassageEnvyRDU.com

Monkee’s of Chapel Hill

This Tory Burch “Harper” Tote is made of supple, pebbled leather, with a tonal double-T logo, in fall’s hottest color! Finished with multiple pockets and a polished strap, it’s an effortless, versatile style – great for any day of the week. $495 108 Meadowmont Village Circle, Chapel Hill 919-967-6830 monkeesofchapelhill.com

Chapel Hill Pilates

Give the gift of health and well-being. A gift certificate for classes at Chapel Hill Pilates will get you off to a good start with your 2017 resolutions and allow you to de-stress from the holiday. Gift certificates start at $50. $50+ 103 Lloyd St., Carrboro 984-234-3195 chapelhillpilates.com

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the creatives  by Morgan Weston |  by Phillip MacDonald

Get to Know …

Charles Latham

The antifolk singer-songwriter has lived in Durham for the last two years, in that time penning the song “The Living Wage,” with all proceeds supporting the Durham Living Wage Project. His fourth full-length album, “Little Me Time,” was produced at Caveman Studios with a collaboration of local artists including Omar Ruiz-Lopez (Steph Stewart and the Boyfriends), Gordon Hartin (Kamara Thomas and The Night Drivers), Catherine Edgerton (Midtown Dickens), Stephen Mullaney and Christine Fantini (The Wigg Report), and more. The official worldwide release is slated for January 13, 2017.

I grew up around good music. My parents always had music

playing in the house, in the car. My father has been a guitar repairman and luthier since the early ’60s, and used to play in folk groups in the D.C. area. I was really into folk and country rock as a kid, which put me sort of out of step with my peers. I’ve always been interested in history, so I was into old ballads, especially disaster songs. D.C. has a pretty legendary punk scene, too, so eventually I caught onto that and got an electric guitar. I played in a bunch of different bands in high school; I started writing songs as soon as I could put a couple chords together.

I can’t say enough about Durham from a musician’s point of view. Nashville is “Music City,” but I think Durham is a

low-key version of that. Your neighbor is probably a zither virtuoso – it’s that kind of place. When I set out to record this album, I was able to assemble a massive band in no time, which illustrates the collaborative spirit of the music community in this area. The Wigg Report especially: they’re something of a Durham institution, and I more or less officially joined the band as their bass player last year. They introduced me to Greg Klaiber when we recorded their most recent album, and the whole band appears on my record in various capacities.

Antifolk is notoriously hard to define, which I think is also part of the appeal – for me, it’s musicians who have an unconventional and uninhibited approach to songwriting, who use language and sing about topics you don’t hear in most popular songs. I’d point to Beck’s

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“One Foot in the Grave” as a quintessential example of the antifolk sound. It’s convenient shorthand to let the audience know to expect something different. I think it more closely characterizes my early output, though. This record is definitely a departure.

In fact, making this record has been an entirely new experience for me. Early on, I thought being a solo artist

meant you did everything yourself. I used to hole up with an 8-track and whatever instruments I could scavenge and record as a one-man band. The results were always pretty lo-fi, and I love that aesthetic, but the sounds I was hearing in my head were a little more ambitious. After recording “The Living Wage” at Caveman and hearing the result of talented players and Greg’s ear on my songs, I knew I wanted to do a whole album the same way. Stephen Mullaney, Hunter MacDermut and I went to Caveman in the spring and cut the skeletons of these songs in a couple days, and then folks came in piecemeal to lay down their parts over the next few months, so the songs were evolving and changing in the studio.

I lived in Chapel Hill from about 2005 to 2007, and then I moved away and did some wandering. It took leaving to realize what a special place this is. I’ve heard it called “the Durham magnet;” people leave, realize what they’re missing, and come back.

For 2017 tour dates, visit charleslatham.com.


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PHOTO COURTESY DOGNITION.COM

| entrepreneurs |

Tassie with Dr. Brian Hare.

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Dog Days at Duke Sure, your pooch is smart, but how smart?

TARTUPS BEGIN WITH THE BIG IDEA – “LET’S ALLOW EVERYONE TO PUT UP

their videos – cats and all – and call it YouTube”; “Let’s get everybody communicating in 140 characters or less”; “What if everyone had every question on every subject answered through a search engine?” – but no one really knows if his or her big idea is going to gain traction. Take Dognition as an example of an idea that is a little left of center and definitely growing: At dognition.com, pet owners can subscribe to get assessments of their dogs’ intelligence, empathy, special skills and much more – discovered through interactive, science-based games. “Contrary to popular belief,” Dr. Brian Hare, professor of cognitive neuroscience at Duke and director of the Canine Cognition Center, says, “all dogs have their own unique

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The pug drooling on your shoe may not look like the brightest bulb in the box, but she comes from a long line of successful dogs and is a member of the most successful mammal species on the planet besides us.

genius, just like people ... humans,” Dr. Hare says, “so Different dogs use different the output of our research has Fast Facts strategies to solve problems major implications for human Dognition launched in February 2014 and features a core and navigate through the health. It’s an incredibly team that fluctuates between 6-10 people, who often meet world,” he says. For example, exciting project, and I can’t virtually at Duke I&E’s Bullpen. Dr. Hare asks, “Does your dog wait to see what we find out!” The team’s favorite Durham spots: Gulghupf, Luna rely on you to solve problems, “Our goal is to become an Rotisserie, Saladelia, The Parlour and Rise Biscuits Donuts. or are they more independent? integral part of the canine Number of dogs signed up, as of October: 20,000 – “which Do they pay attention to research scientific community is a dream in terms of the science,” Dr. Hare says, “as a where you are looking before as well as the every day researcher, I could maybe test 100 dogs for a study in the they decide to sneak food off experience people have with lab – now we can answer questions we could never answer the coffee table, or are they their dogs,” says Dognition before because of the large sample size.” just king of the household president and CEO Kip Frey. Most popular dog names include Lucy, Bella, Charlie, and don’t feel the need for any And even though the Molly and Max. sneakiness?” Dognition’s games project is now scaling, the Most common dog profile is the socialite. help to answer these questions, folks at Dognition are The trickiest Dognition trick? “The inferential reasoning leading to a dog’s profile thankful for the company’s game is probably the hardest,” says Dr. Hare, “it’s when as either an ace, charmer, Durham roots. you hide a ball in one of two cups, then just show your socialite, expert, renaissance “Durham is definitely a dog the empty cup and see if they can infer where the ball dog, protodog, Einstein, community of dog lovers,” is hidden.” maverick or stargazer. Dr. Hare says, “When we first Path to profitability? Moving forward, Dognition plans to “There is no such thing as opened the Canine Cognition invest more in marketing, “with the intention of selling ‘smart’ dogs and ‘dumb’ dogs,” Center, we had over 1,000 large numbers of Dognition assessments and annual memberships,” Kip says. Dr. Hare says. “Different dogs people sign up.” And are good at different things. Dognition has never been Price: One-time assessment, $19; yearly subscription, $79; or monthly price of $9/month + $19 one-time fee. The pug drooling on your shoe low on volunteers to help test may not look like the brightest games or film videos. “The bulb in the box, but she comes people of Durham love their from a long line of successful dogs and are curious about dogs and is a member of the most successful mammal species on them,” he says, “Dognition has had great support here.” And the planet besides us. Rest assured – she is a genius.” the Bull City’s entrepreneurship community has proved to be On top of teaching owners about their furry friends, Dognition a solid source of support as well. “Being part of both the Duke is also making discoveries about the species in general – collecting University and Durham business communities is a huge asset to data to contribute to a citizen science project that helps further our business, because we can take advantage of the knowledge canine research. “Dogs are now being used as a medical model for and talent in both.” - Laura Zolman Kirk

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DECEMBER 7-11 DECEMBER 15-18


KwanzaaFest Jan. 1 The African American Dance Ensemble’s free festival at the Durham Armory includes a children’s village, which features arts and crafts, as well as dance and drumming classes.

Durham Holiday Parade Dec. 10 The city’s holiday parade returns this year! Make your way to Main St. and Dillard St. at 10 a.m. to cheer on hometown bands, drill teams, school and community groups – and, of course, to catch a glimpse of old St. Nick!

Ƃo see do The hottest events for the holidays and beyond

Christmas by Candlelight

Dec. 2 and Dec. 9 Take a journey to Christmases past – those of the 1870s, to be exact – with this celebration chock-full of cookies, cider, storytelling, singing and dancing at the Duke Homestead State Historic Site.

Winter Wonders at American Tobacco Dec. 2-Jan. 1 Bring the whole family to the American Tobacco Campus this season for a host of holiday-themed activities, beginning with the annual Lucky Strike tower lighting on Dec. 2. Pick out your tree, wreaths and garland (and those cute wooden reindeer!) at the TROSA’s tree lot. Come see the Tree of Bikes before those bikes are gifted to deserving Durham children for the holidays, and vote for your favorite tree decorated by a local nonprofit or business during the Triangle Christmas Tree Challenge. (Vote through Dec. 16.)

North Carolina Jazz Ensemble Holiday Concert Dec. 18 Founded in 1980 by Stanley Baird and Oliver Hodge, the 17-piece group will put you in the holiday spirit at this performance held once again at the Hayti Heritage Center.

PHOTO CREDITS (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT): KWANZAAFEST BY JUAN RICHARDSON; WINTER WONDERS BY BRIAN MULLINS PHOTOGRAPHY; NC JAZZ ENSEMBLE BY CHUCK RUFFIN JR.; CHRISTMAS BY CANDLELIGHT BY DURWARD ROGERS

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A Christmas Carol Dec. 15-18 Now in its 42nd year, Theatre In The Park’s musical comedy adaptation of the classic tale returns to the Durham Performing Arts Center with Ira David Wood III starring as Scrooge in each of the five performances, except Saturday’s matinee, when his son, Ira David Wood IV, will take the lead.

Mitzvah Day

Branford Marsalis and Joey Calderazzo Jan. 13-14 The remarkable saxophonist and pianist duo – longtime collaborators who’ve known each other for nearly 30 years – take the stage at Baldwin Auditorium for a concert of blues, ballads and jazz presented by Duke Performances.

Dec. 25 The Jewish Federation of Durham-Chapel Hill invites you to give back this season with a day celebrating volunteerism, activism and unity, which begins with a community breakfast at the Levin Jewish Community Center and then heads out to projects planned throughout the area, involving organizations such as Blanket Durham, Durham Crisis Response Center, Durham Police Department, Durham Literacy Center and many more.

The Holiday Patchwork Market

Moscow Ballet’s Great Russian Nutcracker

Dec. 11 Featuring more than 60 local makers and vintage vendors at the Durham Armory, this handmade market is the perfect opportunity to find amazing holiday gifts for everyone on your list – all in one convenient location!

For a full calendar of events, visit durhammag.com.

Dec. 14-15 Visions of the sugar plum fairy will dance in your head after seeing this performance – featuring new set designs and costumes – by the acclaimed Moscow Ballet at The Carolina Theatre.

PHOTO CREDITS (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT): BRANFORD MARSALIS COURTESY OF DUKE PERFORMANCES; CHRISTMAS CAROL BY STEPHEN J. LARSON; HOLIDAY PATCHWORK MARKET BY ANNA CARSON DEWITT

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Luna's Pisco Brightleaf is sure to make things merry. Find the recipe for this festive cocktail on page 50. Cheers!

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December/January 2017


Your Guide to

Stress-Free

Holidays  by Amanda MacLaren |  by Briana Brough

L

ET’S BE HONEST: THESE NEXT COUPLE OF months – "the most wonderful time of the year" – can be frenzied and complicated. Simplify your to-do list with advice from fashion-forward stylists who will ensure you look your best at every shindig this season, recipes by master food and beverage makers, local decorating gurus to help you deck the halls and a seasoned singer who’ll guide your holiday playlist. „

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“G

o straight towards that little black dress (LBD). You’ve worn it 100 times before, but that’s OK. All you need to do is embellish your trusty LBD with modern and fun accessories and – voila – you have a new look! Wear your hair up and add impact with big sparkly earrings, or wear your hair down and frame your face with a beautiful statement necklace as your centerpiece. Don’t leave your wrists bare: Add a couple of stacked jeweled bracelets for movement and sparkle. Choosing the right clutch for your event is key! A bag with a strap is a must if you are moving around at a cocktail party. For a sit-down dinner, choose a bag that you can hang on the back of your chair comfortably. If your accessories are your main statement, throw on your trusty black pumps, and you’re off! If you’ve gone minimalistic on accessories, think strappy, metallic, patent, platform or anything that will bring drama to your LBD. If you don’t have a LBD, you don’t have to spend a ton of money - just focus on the fit and you’ll look like a million bucks. At Fifi’s, we have a LBD shop, which makes shopping a cinch and easy on your wallet.”

Lauren Calderazzo Owner, Fifi’s Fine Resale Apparel

Fifi's customer Mandy Martin shows off a little black dress by Leith outside the West Main Street shop.

Stylish Night Got a calendar of holiday soirees to attend and not a clue what to wear? Take advice of some of the most fashionable retailers we know. (Psst … that little black dress is still a closet essential!) 42

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| holiday entertaining |

“H

ave a pop of color and some texture, and then add an accessory that’s festive. Make sure your items are versatile – if you have a great jacket or top, you can put different things with it. Black pants and heels and a blazer would go well with this top (featured right), but you could also wear it – depending on what type of party you’re going to – with denim. A plaid shirt is an obvious holiday staple, but pair it with a sweater for a cozier, home-for-the-holidays look. The No. 1 concern I hear is: “I don’t want to wear jeans and a T-shirt if I’m hosting; I want to look like I’m a bit more dressed up, but I also don’t want to be in a party dress and in heels if just the family is coming over. Just put a great plaid with something over top of it, like a cozy sweater, and then jeans and booties – a pair that are comfortable but have a heel, so you’re somewhat dressed up. Add a piece of modern jewelry – it’s the simple details that make it. And a great black pant will take you a long way.” „

Whitney Sandor Owner, Mynt Boutique

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| holiday entertaining |

“I

nvest in metallic shoes. Our pick this season is the Rachel Comey May Heel. We love it styled back to a jumpsuit, like this one from No.6 Store that Vert & Vogue photographer and graphic designer Bekah Bohlen is modeling, or paired with denim and a cashmere sweater for a more casual look. The versatility of a metallic shoe can make getting dressed easy – it’s a fashion staple year-round. Always remember – comfort is key.”

Catherine Kobe Buyer and Creative Manager, Vert & Vogue

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| holiday entertaining |

“F

rom work fêtes to cocktail attire events, turn heads in the most chic and elegant way possible. Our suggestion is always a little black dress to keep things elevated and alluring. This season, our favorite versatile holiday staple is this LBD caressed with leather trim from Otto D’ame. On-point jewelry and accessories are key to giving you a polished look. Tassel necklaces, cuffs and earrings adorned with labradorite stones worn with fur-trimmed accessories are ultraluxe. They always raise the fashion bar! We’re loving the labradorite collection from Atelier Mon and a plaid Linda Richards fox collar, cashmere-blend wrap. While most women will reach for the go-to universal heel, the fashion world favors the bootie for an evening out, and so do we. Ankle booties create height and are a bit more comfortable for those long nights of standing. Leather satchel bags are all the rage this season; you can’t be seen without one. Plus, the handles are essential when you need to go hands-free for sipping that cocktail while texting!” „

Po-Ming Wong Owner and Personal Stylist, Magpie Boutique

Rory Kelly Gillis is both a devoted Magpie customer and Durham Magazine's senior VP of publishing.

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A Gracious Plenty Three chefs share hearty appetizer recipes that are sure to impress

Harvest Soup By The Boot Chef Rob Kinneen

(Makes 2 quarts, or 8 bowls) 2 oz. canola oil ½ an onion, roughly chopped (5 oz.) 2 stalks celery, roughly chopped (3 oz.) ½ oz. garlic, smashed 1 N.C. apple (Gala or Fuji work well), peeled and roughly chopped (6 oz.) 1 lb. local squash (Red Kuri or Butternut), skinned and seeded, roughly chopped 3 oz. white wine 24 oz. vegetable stock (reserve 8 oz.) 1/16 tsp. cinnamon 1/16 tsp. allspice ½ tsp. chopped oregano ½ tsp. pepper 1 tsp. salt, kosher 2 oz. extra virgin olive oil Sorghum In a pot, add canola oil, garlic, onion, celery and apple. Sweat for 3 to 4 minutes over medium-high heat. When glassy and translucent, add squash and deglaze with wine (apple juice can be used as an alternative to wine) and finish with the stock. Bring to a boil and then drop to a simmer; let it simmer for 20 to 30 minutes. With an immersion blender or regular blender, puree the mix. Finish with the spices, herbs and olive oil. Garnish with olive oil and sorghum. (The soup will thicken if it sits overnight, so it’s best to have extra stock or broth on hand to thin it out.) 46

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I often use extra virgin olive oil to finish my puree soups as it keeps the richness and viscosity without the heaviness of cream.


| holiday entertaining |

Vegan Shaved Brussels Sprouts Salad

By Whole Foods Market Chef Matt Props 1 lb. Brussels sprouts, cleaned and shredded ¼ small red onion, shredded thinly 1 cup roasted pistachios or sunflower seeds ¼ cup dried cranberries ½ cup olive oil 2 tsp. apple cider vinegar Juice and zest of 1 medium lemon

PHOTO BY MACKENZIE BROUGH PROPS

(Serves 4-6)

1½ tsp. maple syrup

Shave or shred Brussels sprouts with food processor or mandoline into large bowl.

1 tsp. Dijon mustard

Shred onion thinly and toss with Brussels.

1 tsp. garlic granules

Mix in nuts and cranberries and set aside.

½ tsp. black pepper (more to taste)

Whisk remaining ingredients together until well emulsified and pour over salad.

½ tsp. salt

Toss thoroughly and let sit for at least 20 minutes before serving.

Butternut Squash Gratin By Nana’s Chef Scott Howell also You can e day h t e mak nd before at! rehea

(Serves 4 to 6)

2 Butternut squash, peeled, seeded and sliced thin, about ⅛-inch butter 2 leeks, cleaned and chopped 1 Tbsp. fresh thyme 1 qt. cream salt and pepper to taste Heat oven to 350 F. Butter a small gratin pan. In a saucepan, sweat down the leeks, thyme and salt to taste until soft with no color. Once soft, add the cream, bring to a boil and turn off immediately. Layer the butternut squash in the dish, two layers at a time,

pouring cream and leeks between every two layers of squash until you reach ¼-inch from the top of the dish. Cover with foil and bake for 30 minutes. Uncover and bake until golden brown. Let sit 15 to 30 minutes before serving.

Scott always makes a gratin for the family at the holidays. He loves using vegetables like [squash] because it’s a new and fun way to use an item that people want to use, but always struggle with coming up with ideas other than just straight roasting. My family in particular has a lot of food allergies, and butternut is one thing that everyone can eat, so it’s a winwin … comfort food for a family gathering that everyone can chow down on. – Aubrey Zinaich-Howell „ December/January 2017

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get in the

spirits

Toast the season with these craft cocktails

Gold Standard

By Harvest 18 General Manager Josh Lindsey and alumni bartender Charlie Hyland 1.5 oz. North Carolina’s own Seventeen Twelve Bourbon 0.75 oz. honey syrup (equal parts honey and boiling water, chill) 0.75 oz. housemade limencello (recipe below) Add together over rocks. Mix with a stir straw. Garnish with a lemon wedge. For the limencello: 1 750mL bottle of vodka 10 lemons 2.5 cups white sugar

W TOPO e use Or Vodk ganic a.

Use a vegetable peeler to peel the skin off 10 lemons (try to avoid the white rind as much as possible this will make it a little more bitter). Pour the vodka into a container with the lemon peels and let stand at room temperature in a dark place for about 10 days. Strain out the lemon peels (the vodka should have a yellow hue). Mix equal parts white sugar and boiling water and chill to create simple syrup. Mix the lemon vodka and simple syrup.

We age ours for 45 days. 48

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December/January 2017

Josh Lindsey pours a Gold Standard at Harvest 18.


Todos Bien

Tran Al slatio and l is well n: , eve is fin ryone e.

By Counting House Beverage Manager Jennifer Salome 2 oz. Plantation 5-year rum (use an aged rum) 1 oz. coconut milk .5 oz. simple syrup .5 oz. Korbel brandy 1 drop Bittermens Xocolatl Mole Bitters Combine all ingredients in a shaker with fresh ice. Shake and double strain into a coupe glass. Garnish with grated nutmeg. „

Jennifer Salome (above) created this variation on a traditional drink that is enjoyed with friends and loved ones during the holidays in many Puerto Rican homes.

I grew up watching my family enjoy this drink. For me, it’s comforting and nostalgic. A hug in a glass.

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| holiday entertaining |

Anthony Kofler strains the Pisco Brightleaf mixture at Luna. It's a delicious addition to many other types of liquor – especially bourbon.

PISCO BRIGHTLEAF

By Luna Rotisserie & Empanadas Managers Anthony Kofler & Rob Montemayor (Makes 2 Drinks) 4 oz. pisco

For Brightleaf simple syrup:

1 oz. Cointreau

1 qt. sugar

1 oz. Brightleaf simple syrup (recipe at right)

2 cups water

1 oz. lemon juice

½ cup fine loose pipe tobacco

6 dashes orange bitters

1½ tsp. nutmeg

Fill two 5.5 oz. martini tumblers or rocks glasses with ice. Pour all ingredients into a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake vigorously, strain and split into the two glasses. Garnish with fresh lemon peel.

1 ½ tsp. allspice

We developed this infused simple syrup with the intent of creating a pisco cocktail to fit our ‘South American meets American South’ fusion cuisine.

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3 cinnamon sticks 4 cloves Mix sugar and water in a medium-sized pot and bring to a simmer. Add all other ingredients and simmer for 15 minutes. Remove from heat and let steep for one hour. Pour through a cheesecloth or fine china cap to strain.


deck the halls

Subtle changes around your home can create a big effect for guests and family

PHOTO BY MERRITT CHESSON PHOTOGRAPHY

“M

y holiday decorating shortcuts are based on a simple, pre-set color palette and natural, seasonal elements. I usually go with various shades of silver, gold and white (keep your colors to two or three selections). Because the color palette is simple, you can play with it and add various objects that fall into the palette, and yet still have a unified look. I might take ornaments in shades of golds and silvers and sprinkle them along my table runner and then flank either end of the table with a few candles – of all sizes – in shades of white and silver. Then, I always add a natural element: magnolia leaves, pinecones, herbs. A little touch like this goes a long way in creating a festive table. Decorating with a few colors means you can carry the palette throughout your house (at the entry, on the fireplace mantel, on your front porch, etc.) and everything feels collected and unified. Use creative color combinations like fuchsia and green or gold and blue, to keep it interesting and unpredictable. This approach is also an economical way to decorate because you can switch things around and collect over the years without feeling as if you need to start over every time. I add something every year, but don’t need much since it’s easy to integrate into the collection I’ve been evolving over the years. With this approach, everything works together because the colors are the unifying factor. And adding natural elements such

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as flowers, wreathes, garland and berries warms things up and makes your home feel cozier. I usually just clip branches from the magnolia tree in our front yard! How’s that for easy and economical?”

Maria Siegel

Founder and Owner of Goldenrod Place Interiors

“P

ick an anchor for each room. Don’t get lost in the clutter of small holiday knick-knacks set out on every surface. Instead, limit your focus to a single ‘statement location’ and build on that. A big wreath over a mirror above the fireplace, standout centerpiece for the dining table, or garland over a bay window can provide a focal point for impact. Then you’re able to add layers of fresh flowers and candles, or tuck some metallic pillows or heirloom decorations into the mix – without turning your family room into Santa’s Workshop! Think beyond red and green. For fun, tell yourself that the combo of red and green is off the table this year. What would you choose, instead, that still says ‘holiday’? Plum and silver? Teal and black? Introduce an unconventional color palette into your holiday accessories. You can still utilize traditional holiday pieces, but customize them to merge with your personal style and all-season décor. Hang a bold red-orange ribbon on the door, hunt for black candles (ooh, la la!) to sit on the coffee table or trim the tree with newsprint origami ornaments. Change it up! Place scents all around. Have you ever noticed that when you walk into a room with the delightful smell of fresh flowers or a perfumed candle, the mood is already set? Choose a scent you love that represents the holiday to you and invest in candles, room diffusers or potpourri that will change the ambience from ordinary to special each time you walk through the door this season – even before you hang a single decoration! Just lighting candles on a Tuesday night feels festive, don’t you think?”

Heather Garrett

Founder, Heather Garrett Interior Design

he easiest and most beautiful way to decorate your home (that creates the biggest effect for the least amount of effort) is to use wreaths and strands of live greenery throughout your home. Not only does it make a big impact – it smells so good! Start with your front door, then lay greenery over your fireplace mantel and intersperse with shiny ornaments, berries

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PHOTO BY JEN DEVLIN

“T

and pinecones. Place a big wreath above your fireplace and drape swags of garland over your stair banisters or above wide doorway entrances. Most places that sell trees also sell garlands. The past several years I have gotten some beautiful ones at the TROSA tree lot. When decorating the tree, I love using lots of white lights and strands of gold beads. Add the ornaments at the end, and get the whole family involved. It’s a fun time to bond and remember past Christmases, and it also gets the tree done faster! We always play Christmas music at the same time to get us in the holiday spirit. Make gift wrapping simple and make a statement under the tree just by buying one or two simple designs and using them on all the presents. An inexpensive way to wrap presents is to use brown craft paper and then add beautiful ribbons of all widths and colors. I like adding sprigs of berries, tiny pinecones or magnolia leaves tied to the bows. Instead of going overboard on your outdoor decorating, keep it simple. White lights around trees or bushes give such a peaceful and magical look. If you like to put lights on your house, drape them in swags on your front porch banisters instead of placing them in straight lines. Electric or battery-powered candles in the windows produce a wonderful glow.”

Linda Dickerson

Owner, Linda Dickerson Interiors

“T

he holidays are all about celebrating the season with those you love. That means making sure entertaining is stress-free, so consider these practical ideas that any one person can easily achieve when decorating the mantel, dining table or bed: Layers. Euro shams, a blanket scarf, a quilt and a throw pillow


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on the bed cozy up the room (we especially love incorporating cable knit). Most of us have some extra throws and such around the house that we can re-purpose, so consider shopping your house before heading out to buy new. In the dining room, pull out any meaningful pieces – china and doilies from Nana, wedding dishes, toasting flutes. We think mismatched china/glassware/silver is super swoon-worthy, so the more, the merrier. To layer, start with a charger, add a dining plate, then a napkin, a salad plate or bowl, and a fun, unexpected element on top as a place holder (a fresh sprig of rosemary with a name tied to it, Polaroids from a past party, an ornament.) Incorporating different textures also helps build interest as well – pair organic with geometric for an added pop! Natural Elements. Bringing in something from the outdoors is one of our favorite things to crank up the festivities. I’ve literally walked a mile with a craggy stick I found while walking my dog, Buddy – it was so amazing, I just had to use it on my mantel! Also, think of assorted clippings from pines, magnolias, bright leaves, pinecones, sweet gum fruit, and, yes, craggy sticks or brilliant branches. A Twinkle. With daylight dwindling in the winter, it’s even more important to add a little light in different areas, especially to create a festive mood. Think mercury glass, yummy scented candles, LED

copper wire lights. These items can work as a layer, too, and we love them when they’re worked into natural elements.”

Jen Devlin

Designer and Curator of Vintage Home South

“M

y motto for decorating during the holidays is the same I use with my interior design clients – less is more. “Shop your yard” and use items you have. It’s easy and inexpensive. Do this by mixing natural elements from outside with the classic pieces you already own. Take your bar’s ice bucket, indoor planter or large serving bowl and arrange a variety of greenery with pinecones. Fill a large serving bowl with your existing holiday ornaments. Arrange clippings of greens of boxwood, magnolia, pine, hollies with red berries and curly twigs – all at different heights and lengths in your own clear vase. As for your kitchen counter centerpiece, take a clear vase and fill it with the assorted citrus, nuts, even cranberries to achieve an easy winter vibe. Seek a simple neutral palette of white, gold and silver, which will easily complement any of your existing colors.”

Loren Lamb

Founder of Loren Lamb Interiors and Co-owner of Vintage Vault

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Songs of the Season

We asked our favorite local cabaret singer, Ellen Ciompi, for her best-loved holiday tunes perfect for that long drive to visit family or a party

A

s a musician, the one thing that sets my nerves on edge during the holiday season is the seemingly endless loop of canned music played in most public places. There are days when I grit my teeth and think, “If I hear the Johnny Mathis recording of ‘Sleigh Ride’ just once more …” The trouble is, most commercial playlists are curated to be safe and uncontroversial, but end up being boring, bland and mind-numbingly repetitive. My musical training and tastes run the gamut from classical to popular, so this “Top 10” list does, too. Happy listening!

“A Ceremony of Carols”

by Benjamin Britten This is a suite of 11 pieces for treble choir and harp. The texts come from old English poems. The combined sound of the high voices, harp and odd (yet familiar) Middle English language is absolutely haunting.

“Baby, It’s Cold Outside”

by Frank Loesser Frank Loesser was not yet famous for writing “Guys & Dolls” when he composed this witty duet, which he used to sing with his wife at holiday parties. Over the past 72 years, it hasn’t lost a bit of appeal, and two of my favorite versions are by Louis Armstrong and Ella Fitzgerald, and the one that appears on Nnenna Freelon’s “Christmas” album, where her vocal partner is also the bandleader, John Brown. For extra giggles, check out the version performed by Miss Piggy and Rudolf Nureyev! „

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“Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas”

by Hugh Martin (music) and Ralph Blane (lyrics) The classic movie “Meet Me in St. Louis” is justifiably famous for its wonderful music, and to me this song is the standout. Once again, it’s a song that’s been recorded hundreds of times, but to my mind nothing will ever touch the quivering simplicity of the original, sung by a young (only 22!) Judy Garland to her heartbroken little sister in the movie, Margaret O’Brien.

I’ve always had a fondness for his version, which appears on “A Jolly Christmas.” Yes, there's a rather cheesy chorus that sings along with him, but the arrangement is very clever and, of course, it is Frank.

“Klezmer Nutcracker”

by the Shirim Klezmer Orchestra (after Tchaikovsky) Even a great work like “The Nutcracker” can get old after the 1000th go-round. So if you’ve heard the standard version once too often, listen to Tchaikovsky’s immortal ballet music as reinterpreted by this virtuosic Klezmer sextet (clarinet, trombone, tuba, accordion, banjo and drums).

“Mr. Magoo’s Christmas Carol,” “Jingle Bells”

by James Lord Pierpont You will win at “Holiday Trivia” by knowing that (A) “Jingle Bells” was actually written by someone and isn’t just a “traditional” tune, and (B) it was also the first song broadcast from space (in 1965, performed by the crew of Gemini 6). Because I was raised on Sinatra recordings,

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by Jule Styne (music) and Bob Merrill (lyrics) It’s the Dickens story that never grows old, because it’s got good guys, bad guys, pathos, ghosts, a setting in old London and redemption at the end. The version starring Michael Caine and The Muppets has the best visuals, but I think the music from this very basic cartoon with Mr. Magoo as Scrooge is far superior. Perhaps that’s because Styne and Merrill went on to international fame when they created “Funny Girl” in 1964.


“Twisted Christmas,” “More Twisted Christmas” and “Chipmunks Roasting on an Open Fire”

by Bob Rivers Musical parodies have a long history, and the best of them can leave you weeping with laughter. This Christmas trilogy of CDs includes “Wreck the Malls,” “It’s the Most Fattening Time of the Year” and many others to lighten your spirits after too much holiday mayhem.

recorded this traditional Irish carol for an album put out by the Firestone Company for its employees and customers. Her clear, expressive, bell-like voice is perfectly complemented by the lush orchestration and the medieval feel of the old carol.

Ellen Ciompi has been singing all her life, and creating and presenting cabaret performances with pianist/music director Glenn Mehrbach since 2003. Stay tuned for information on her annual Valentine’s cabaret on February 14 by visiting her website at ellenciompi.com or follow her on Twitter @ellenciompi.

“Smooth Yule” by various artists

If you just want great background music while you cook, wrap, entertain or relax, this is the perfect compilation. I’ve owned it for years and never tire of the easy interpretations. My favorite cuts are “Lo, How a Rose Ere Blooming” by the brilliant composer/pianist Dave Grusin and “God Rest Ye Merry, Gentlemen” by that master of the soprano sax, Kenny G.

Lose yourself for an hour. . . find yourself in a day

Soundtrack to “The Snowman,”

by Howard Blake “The Snowman” is a famous children’s picture book published in 1978. It tells the story of a boy, the snowman he creates and the magical journey they take together one night to visit Father Christmas. A movie adaptation by the BBC in 1982 features a luscious, atmospheric score to go with the wordless animation. In fact, it was nominated for the Best Animated Short Film Oscar that year. Relaxing, gorgeous and evocative.

“The Wexford Carol”

sung by Julie Andrews The star of Broadway’s “My Fair Lady” and “Camelot” and Hollywood’s “Mary Poppins” was at the height of her fame when she

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talking traditions A few Durham longtimers share their beloved holiday memories in the Bull City  by Amanda Abrams

Floyd B. McKissick Jr.

N.C. State Senator

“M

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PHOTO COURTESY MUSEUM OF LIFE AND SCIENCE

PHOTO BY DURHAM HERALD-SUN, COURTESY NORTH CAROLINA COLLECTION, UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL LIBRARY

y father, Floyd McKissick Sr., had an office at 213½ W. Main St.; he was the only African-American attorney to have an office on Main Street at the time. You could overlook the entire parade right from his office. There was lots of activity, lots of hustle and bustle, and beautiful Christmas decorations. This was approximately 1959-1966. And there were always vendors selling these balloons that you could blow up; they’d be about 6 to 8 inches in diameter, 3 feet long. The only time I ever saw them was Christmas. My mother, Evelyn, started the Junior Mothers Club, and they had a tradition of adopting a family during the holiday season, and we also did it as a family. My mother took the lead in that. December/January 2017

Everybody in the families we adopted would receive toys and gifts, as well as meals on Christmas day – breakfast and a dinner. They were actually cooked and delivered; people in the club would deliver them.”

Arthur Rogers

Principal, Eno Ventures

“T

he Santa Train at the Museum of Life and Science was a huge deal for us. It’s the regular train, but it’s at night; you go halfway around the loop and Santa Claus is there in his little house, and he gives out candy. And when you head back, you see a red light in the woods and that’s Rudolph. And the kids think it’s all real. I did that with my sons, Henry and Edward, when they were around 4 to 8 years old, and they loved it, absolutely loved it. I always went to the holiday parade. I liked it


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| holiday traditions |

My son Edward’s favorite holiday tradition now – he’s 12 – is the tower lighting at American Tobacco Campus, [when] they put Christmas lights on the water tower.

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A scene from American Tobacco’s annual Tower Lighting celebration.

because it’s after Thanksgiving, so it’s actually a real Christmas parade. They had all kinds of crazy stuff: a trash truck, vans with crazy dancers – it was very lively. The last time they had it, there wasn’t much going on downtown; it was so quiet. But they’re bringing it back this year. Another big Christmas tradition is a TROSA Christmas tree; we always get it from TROSA, [a comprehensive, longterm, residential substance abuse recovery program based in Durham]. We get them at the American Tobacco Campus (ATC), on the lot beside DPAC. My son Edward’s favorite holiday tradition now – he’s 12 – is the tower lighting at ATC [when they put Christmas lights on the water tower. Last year, “The Sound of Music” was playing at DPAC and the players performed under the water tower. At the end, they light the tower and have fake snow [come down]. And then after that you walk across the street and they have Christmas trees that nonprofits decorate on that lot, and they light those up. It’s really nice.”


| holiday traditions |

PHOTO COURTESY AMERICAN TOBACCO

Harvey’s Cafeteria was a very fancy cafeteria that actually had waiters; somehow I remember white gloves.

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Locals dining at Harvey’s Cafeteria in the ’60s.

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“C

lose to Christmas, we would always go downtown, probably starting when my sister, Debbie, and I were around 6 years old and through our teens. My mother, Bobbie McGill, taught at E.K. Powe Elementary School, and she would be pretty done in after teaching third grade for the day. But she’d take us

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| holiday traditions |

There was a store called Addison’s Playworld, and it was a great place to go for toys – it seemed huge.

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downtown and we’d go to Belk on Main Street, go to the girls’ department and check that out. Mom was scoping things to buy for us and for our grandparents. Then we’d walk down to Ellis-Stone, another department store that was later bought by Thalheimers. Then we’d go to Stride Rite shoes. There was a store called Addison’s Playworld, and it was a great place to go for toys – it seemed huge. And then we’d go to Harvey’s Cafeteria. It was a very fancy cafeteria that actually had waiters; somehow I remember white gloves. They’d take our tray after we’d gotten what we wanted in the cafeteria part and take us to our table. We’d watch the Christmas parade from the second floor of the cafeteria while we were eating. There’d be a crowd of people


PHOTO BY THE HERALD-SUN, COURTESY OPEN DURHAM/PRESERVATION DURHAM

| holiday traditions |

around the window, and a crowd on the street. It was a big deal. The Christmas decorations went all the way across the street, and there was a big Christmas tree at Five Points.”

Seth Jernigan

Vice President of Brokerage, Real Estate Associates

“W

hen I was growing up, we used to go to see Scrooge [in “A Christmas Carol”], and we’d have to go to Raleigh to Memorial Auditorium. And in my adult life, my wife, Kelly, and I have taken our son, Wyatt, 9, to see Scrooge and we didn’t have to go to December/January 2017

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| holiday traditions | Raleigh; we could go downtown to DPAC. We’ve been two or three years in a row now, and are still seeing the same actors. The lead guy is Ira David Wood III; he and his son alternate with the lead role. I’m not sure our daughter, Stella, has been to the show yet as she’s been a little young – she’s 6 now. This might be her first year.”

Charles L. Steel IV

Special Counsel, Manning, Fulton & Skinner

“T

here was always a Christmas parade, and I always marched in it, starting in junior high and then in high school. I was in the band; I played piccolo. It would

If it still keeps things cool… If it still keeps things cool… Vintage photo of Christmas tree at Five Points from the 1920s.

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be on a Saturday and folks would come and watch. We’d start from the west end of Main Street and go through the middle of town. The city would do Christmas decorations; all the lampposts had decorations that went across the street. That was a way to kick off the shopping season. And as an aside, the Durham High band marched in the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade for two years when I was in high school – November 1961 and also 1962. We were the only school to be invited back two years in a row.”

Gabriel Eng-Goetz

Founder/Creative Director, Runaway

“T

his holiday party we’re doing, it’ll be our second annual day-afterChristmas event. It’ll be at Motorco, and


| holiday traditions |

PHOTO COURTESY DURHAM COUNTY LIBRARY, NORTH CAROLINA COLLECTION

The city would do Christmas decorations; all the lampposts had decorations that went across the street. That was a way to kick off the shopping season.

we’ll have all local acts. We have four performers that night. It’s totally for the public; it’ll be ticketed. There’s a charitable aspect: We’ll be giving a percentage of our proceeds to CAPS [Creative Arts in Public and Private Schools], which has been headed up by the Durham Arts Council for more than 40 years. Last year we sold out Motorco, and people had a really awesome time. It went from 9 p.m. to 2 a.m., and we had Bless Your Heart, a local band; we also had a local DJ, Treee City. It was all ‘90s and early 2000s throwback jams. I think everyone definitely had fun. The holidays are obviously extremely important to us because that’s when we make a large portion of our money. So this is grind time for me. I enjoy the holidays more after the 25th – I can actually take a breather once Christmas is wrapped up.” December/January 2017

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The mirror on the mantel is actually the mirror that was originally in the guest bathroom; Chad took it down and painted it orange as an accent color to the room's gray walls.

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how they live

contemporary

comfort The Quinns found a gem of a home in the Rockwood neighborhood and made it their own with a budget-friendly renovation

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AURA AND CHAD QUINN HAD ALL BUT GIVEN UP ON

buying a home. A yearlong search for the right fit led the couple to an eight-month-long journey of trying to build instead, but that wasn’t in the cards, either. “[Building] was over our budget,” says Chad, the director of planning and design at In2it Studio, a landscape architecture firm. “I was disappointed

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| how they live |

"You see a lot of those kitchens where whomever is cooking feels very excluded or they don’t actually get to participate with their friends," Chad says. "That was something that drove a lot of the design." Laura adds, "It was important to us that the chef feel included."

because it’d always been my dream to build.” So, the couple renewed the lease on their apartment in Chapel Hill, where Laura had recently graduated from business school at UNC. Not a week later, that all changed. “I had been tracking everything that was coming on the market in these neighborhoods, and then this came on the market,” Laura, who grew up down the street in Forest Hills, says of the Rockwood home. “So I reached out to the broker [and] we had just agreed we were going to wait, but I came and saw the house and loved it. “What drew me were the open spaces,” she says. “You had big rooms, big closets, big enough bathrooms, and I thought that this could be a space that Chad could do something incredible with.” Laura’s enthusiasm for the house, combined with the fact that there were another six offers the day it went on the

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| how they live |

"He's done such a wonderful job with these spaces," Laura says of Chad's redesign. "I feel like every morning when I walk into the kitchen I’m like, 'Wow, this is amazing.' I mean, what a great place to live."

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| how they live | The Quinns love to cook and entertain, and wine is a big part of that. The couple was married in a small vineyard in Sonoma in California, and they have amassed a small collection of wine from their travels to Italy and France. The final project for Chad is a wine cellar that will store about 500 bottles. (Notice the mobile in the corner of their dining room? Laura's dad, Guy Solie, made it.)

market, meant the Quinns needed to act fast. But Chad was playing in a golf tournament that day, and Laura’s multitude of calls went to voicemail. “It ends up he was golfing with the boss of the broker I’d reached out to,” Laura says. “So the boss said to Chad, ‘I think your wife is buying a house today; you might want to answer your phone.’” The four all met at the house that same evening, “and the next day we had it under contract [for $317,000],” Chad says.

Trading Spaces “Literally the day we moved in, we put a hole in that wall,” Chad says, pointing towards the kitchen. Originally, there was a dividing wall between the kitchen and a sitting room. But the sizes were awkward – the sitting room felt oddly large, and the kitchen, though a good size, still seemed to lack the space a proper chef ’s kitchen needs. “The first day I walked in,” Chad explains, “I remember it like it was yesterday: turning that corner, seeing that wall, seeing this dimension and then seeing that dimension, and knowing that they just had to flip.” So Chad went to work. He began by putting the room into AutoCAD, a program he uses every day as a landscape architect, and laid out a more intimate sitting room and a new open concept kitchen with not one, but two islands – one dedicated to cooking and one purely for social interactions. Chad was meticulous – measuring distances 72

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| how they live | "I think a lot of what I've learned over my 15 years as a landscape architect has played into doing smaller interior spaces like this," Chad says. "The concepts are the same, you’re just working at a different scale, with different pieces." In fact, he's created his own side consulting business, CQ Design Studio, "just to be able to have some fun in the design world," he says.

between imaginary countertops, figuring out where the new cabinets (all the old ones were donated to TROSA and Habitat for Humanity) and appliances would go, and planning for how the space would function. “I created a little vision board,� Chad says. “I knew all the colors, I knew all the textures, I knew everything that was going to go into it, I had done all the space planning, but then you’re sitting in here and it’s blank, and you still go, ‘I know it all fits, I know it’s all going to look good, but how is it going to feel at the end of the day?’� The sitting room kept its original hardwood floors, but the walls and builtin shelving got a fresh coat of paint, and some new furniture was added. But the kitchen is the star of this redesign. “The materials are all super simple, but very functional,� Chad says, “and at the end of the day, were all cost driven. I tried to do a high-end visual look, but if you knew what I paid for some of those materials, you’d be quite surprised.� Stainless steel open shelving is set against white subway tile, which is wrapped around the rest of the kitchen. “It’s a timeless, classic design that will never go out of style,� Chad says. “It just made sense to wrap it – it was an organic idea, but it turned out perfect.� “And it’s so easy to clean,� Laura adds. For the floors, Chad chose a tile that looks like barn-grade wood in gray tones that paired well with the rest of the color scheme. He cut the 48-inch plank in half

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| how they live | and laid it out in a herringbone pattern. The granite slabs from Raleigh’s Atlantic Countertops have a leathered finish that is both attractive and practical. “I wanted to do the texture because it looked cool,” Chad says. “Functionally, it’s amazing – no dust, no fingerprints, not like any other typical granite. I’d recommend that finish all day long.”

Then there were the cabinets – all 43 of them, which arrived disassembled from Ikea in more than 400 separate boxes. “When they were unloading, I think that was the one time [Chad] said, ‘I think we made a mistake,’” Laura says. “The cabinets were daunting to say the least,” says Chad, who had to carry all those parts up from the garage, match each of the

"There's just a really nice sense of community in Rockwood," Laura says, citing friendly neighbors and diversity as a few of her favorite aspects, as well as the park that's down the street – one of Athens' preferred spots to chase balls when she's not playing fetch in her own front yard.

8 to 15 boxes with which cabinet they belonged to, and then build each one. “But from a cost and quality perspective, worth every penny.” Another plus: Since the Quinns went straight into renovations after moving in, they didn’t have to unpack a single kitchen box. “I don’t even know if we got two plates out – we just used plastic,” Laura says. “Of course, we have Nanataco and Thai Café down the street. We couldn’t have been in a better area to be getting takeout for an extended amount of time.”

Hit Refresh The rest of the 2,400-square-foot house, which was built in 1980, also received a makeover – each room received a fresh coat of paint apart from the living room, the lighting was changed out (as were the window fixtures) and new furniture went 74

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| how they live |

Ultimately, the goal was to create spaces that were truly comfortable.

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The Quinns use their fireplace almost every night during the winters, but when you get a mild North Carolina night from time to time, it's nice to light one on the patio for a festive evening with friends. From left, Chad, Sarah Morrison, Laura, Tina Morrison, Lauren Huneycutt and Kathryn Howlett.

in here and there. The bathrooms were renovated as well: Granite leftover from the former kitchen went to the master bath, and a spare slab of marble found a home in the guest bath. “After the kitchen, the bathrooms were a breeze,” Laura says. Another important space for the Quinns was the home office – both work from home, and so the layout needed to be well thought out in terms of each of their needs – Chad needed a light table for drawing as well as a desk for his computers, and Laura required a space to store important documents for her real estate investment firm, Quinn Partners. “When we moved in,” Laura explains, “we’d been married for a year. How do you create a space – where you both can be most of the day – in a room that’s not gigantic?” Chad spent a good amount of time


| how they live | NCFL#7452

configuring the furniture, and they utilized the double closets in the space for storage. “I feel really comfortable in there to the point where I don’t mind spending eight hours in that room and never come out,” Chad says. Laura, meanwhile, tends to float around the house. “I think it’s because of the way [Chad] set it up, I always feel like there’s a different room to go in,” Laura says. “I can work in the sitting room, I can work in the office, I can work at the table, I can work in the bedroom.” If there are groceries in the fridge, sometimes multiple days will go by that neither leaves the house except to walk their golden doodle, Athens. “How lucky to be in a space where we literally can be here for three days straight and never feel like, ‘Oh God, I need to get out,’” Laura says.

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‘Where the Heart Is’ “The biggest win of this whole project is how these spaces feel when people sit in them,” Chad says. “Ultimately, the goal was to create spaces that were truly comfortable.” Understandably, he is most proud of the new layout in the kitchen and sitting room, which saw the biggest changes and the most planning. “People say the kitchen is where the heart is in the house, it’s the most important room,” Chad says. “And it’s turned out like that. That second island is where everyone congregates – typically because there’s lots of food and wine sitting there for them to enjoy.” And at the end of the day, Chad says there is nothing that they would have done differently. “It worked out,” Chad says. “It’s odd how it worked out, but it worked out quite well.” “We just love our house,” Laura adds. “It’s perfect for us.”

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Pictures and other promotional materials are representative and may depict or contain floor plans, square footages, elevations, options, upgrades, extra design features, decorations, floor coverings, decorative light fixtures, custom paint and wall coverings, window treatments (such as shutters, drapes, etc.), landscaping, pool, spa, sound and alarm systems, furnishings, appliances, and other designer/decorator features and amenities that are not included as part of the home and/or may not be available in all communities. Prices, rates, terms, programs and availability subject to change or revocation without prior notice or obligation. Please see sales agent for complete details. Square footages are approximate and may vary in construction and depending on the standard of measurement used, engineering and municipal requirements, or other site-specific conditions. Not an offer or solicitation to sell real property. Offers to sell real property may only be made and accepted at the sales center for individual Meritage Homes communities. Meritage Homes® is a registered trademark of Meritage Homes Corporation. ©2016 Meritage Homes Corporation. All rights reserved.

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2 0 1 6


HOMES • CONDOS • APARTMENTS

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Wedding Trends

I Do’s, Durham Style 8 trends for your big day in the Bull City  by Jenna Parks

M

MY MOTHER FOUNDED SOUTHERN BRIDE & GROOM MAGAZINE 30 YEARS AGO, WHEN I WAS

a toddler, so I grew up surrounded by weddings. Yet this early exposure did not leave me fantasizing about my own walk down the aisle. Maybe that is because the “elegant” weddings of that era were all alike and akin to the early '90s movie, “Father of the Bride”: Pepto-Bismol pink-centric color palettes, roses tightly wound with ribbon and brides in puffy sleeves, hoop skirts and big bouffants. Weddings today have diverged from the one-style and protocol-fits-all mentality. Each wedding has its own fingerprint: The unique mark of two personalities who are uniting in love. Their story – what brought them together, where they’ve traveled, the local places and products they love, their favorite foods or restaurants, their individual family histories and the values that they hold dear – is told through every detail from the wedding invitations to the favors. And in a deliciously diverse city like Durham, rich with culture, brimming with amazing chefs, artists and creatives, it makes sense that our local weddings are following suit. I’m not just blowing smoke when I say our humble city is producing celebrations of love on par with Metropolitan trendsetters. „

Duke Chapel is a majestic Gothic cathedral that puts Durham weddings on the national map. Couples camp out a full year in advance of their desired wedding month to secure their date, as the chapel books by a first-come, first-served policy for Duke University students and alumni. This lovely bride is wearing a gown from Durham’s local high-fashion bridal salon, Tre Bella Bridal.

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The author is the co-publisher of Southern Bride & Groom magazine.


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PHOTO BY BRONWYN DUFFIELD PHOTOGRAPHY

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| wedding trends |

Experience Artistry in Nature at Sarah P. Duke Gardens Featuring: • Elegant Doris Duke Center for receptions, retreats & meetings • Stunning outdoor locations for large or small gatherings Inquiries: 919-668-5100 • gardens.duke.edu/rentals 420 Anderson St., Duke University, Durham; gardens.duke.edu

Rebecca Ames Photography

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Lime Green Photography


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„„„

AND THEN THERE'S DUKE

Durham attracts folks from far and near, thanks to our topnotch universities and the available careers in medicine, RTP and now a thriving tech start-up sector. Among many new and longtime Durhamites, a traditional favorite venue is the beloved Washington Duke Inn & Golf Club and now its new, upscale, on-campus contemporary, the JB Duke Hotel, opening in January. (Pictured above is an artist’s rendering of the JB Duke Hotel's 5,450-square-foot ballroom.)

THE ART OF MARRIAGE

„„„

PHOTO BY JOE PAYNE PHOTOGRAPHY.

WINNER

21c Museum Hotel has quickly become a point of pride for

Durham locals since opening in 2015. It’s a favorite place to bring out-of-town guests. We pop in for midnight meanderings through the galleries. We all take Instagram snaps of the Durham map table with our happy hour cocktails. But did you know it happens to be one of the most special event spaces in town? The galleries change out every few months and the next exhibit is always a surprise, yet guaranteed to offer up fantastically dramatic wedding photos. Meanwhile, the handsome, wood-paneled, marble-floored ballroom with its three-stories-high ceiling embodies classic historic elegance. „

IBEST

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A Unique Full-Service Salon and Dry Bar

Forty One

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PHOTO BY RILEY MACLEAN PHOTOGRAPHY

| wedding trends |

LIGHT THE WAY

With the help of event designer Grace Leisure Events, this couple took the expansive, upscale warehouse space of The Rickhouse and gave the room a homey ambiance with vintage furniture from ThemeWorks and Edison bulb lighting fixtures from Get Lit Special Event Lighting.

PHOTO BY KATHERINE MILES JONES PHOTOGRAPHY

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This autumn wedding in Bay 7 at American Tobacco Campus was designed by Gather Together Events and themed “light of the world” as a testament to the couple’s Christian faith. The room glowed with candlelit tables and “stars” above. The twinkle lights and draping were by Get Lit Special Event Lighting. Other notable members of the design team included Party Reflections and Tre Bella Flowers.


PHOTO BY SOUTHERN LOVE STUDIOS

„„„

The Cookery’s outdoor patio transformed into an elegant, up-fitted cocktail lounge

at this wedding designed by Chad Biggs Event Planning & Design. „

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(NOT YOUR GRANDMA’S) CHANDELIERS

PHOTO BY THEO MILO PHOTOGRAPHY

GET THE HANG OF IT

PHOTO BY RENEE SPRINK PHOTOGRAPHY

Elaborate florals are not necessary with a few table lanterns and chandeliers from Get Lit Special Event Lighting hanging from the rafters at this Doris Duke Center “garden party” wedding at Sarah P. Duke Gardens.

Presentation is everything! Donovan’s Dish excels in this department, as evidenced by this suspended table display.

This Get Lit Special Event Lighting chandelier is decorated with greenery and blooms designed by Gather Together Events and Tre Bella Flowers, making an incredible aerial centerpiece at The Cookery. 86

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PHOTO BY RILEY MACLEAN PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTO BY KRYSTAL KAST PHOTOGRAPHY

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PHOTO BY CASEY ROSE PHOTOGRAPHY

For a different perspective, wedding consultant A Southern Soiree created a custom escort card rack on a Get Lit chandelier.

Tabletop centerpieces will certainly never go out of style, but for extra impact, Grace Leisure Events and Tre Bella Flowers designed a hanging garden above The Rickhouse dance floor. „


elaborate full service events, weddings, simple delivery drop-offs and everything in-between

www.CateringWorks.com | greatfood@cateringworks.com | 919-828-5932 | 2319 Laurelbrook Street Raleigh, NC 27604


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PHOTO BY BRONWYN DUFFIELD PHOTOGRAPHY

| wedding trends |

THE LOCAL TOUCH

Sally Oakley Wedding and Events helped

one of her couples plan a Durham-themed wedding, even sourcing local blooms from Pine State Flowers. Local flowers are a rising trend that we are overjoyed to see. The wild mix of seasonal flowers lends itself to the loose and unstructured style that is so popular right now.

Southern hospitality is tangible, and we „„„ adore the art of gift giving. A wedding is an opportunity to show love to your friends and to local creative craftspeople at the same time with your gifts and favors. This gift basket is hand-curated by Memento & Muse and includes a host of Durham goodies, like an air plant from The Zen Succulent, stationery from Sage Paper Co. and a downtown map. 88

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PHOTO BY ROBIN LIN PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTO BY ROBIN LIN PHOTOGRAPHY

„„„

No one is suggesting that you skip the cake, but adding extra treats – who doesn't like pie? – is never frowned upon. Ice cream, for example, is scooped out in presentations ranging from self-serve bars to old-time Popsicle trucks.

Cider fever is sweeping the nation, and true to form, „„„ our foodie town is on top of the trend. While Bull City Ciderworks is still on the move to its new location on South Roxboro Street, Black Twig Cider House can recommend the best N.C. flavors to pair with your reception fare. „

CUTS SPECIALTY COLOR CURL EXPERTS WEDDING HAIR

Is it that time of year again? Eyelash extensions Micro dermabrasion Facials / Waxing Permanent Makeup

704 Ninth St. Durham

919.416.9705 | wavelengthsalon.biz December/January 2017

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Hand-written or painted signage is a wonderful touch that can cross over various styles with choice of font and style of sketch. Signage is used to welcome guests, notate the bar menu or simply as an artistic display, such as this one by Marika Wendelken on The Cookery’s in-house chalk wall. „

PHOTO BY CAROLYN SCOTT PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTO BY BRONWYN DUFFIELD PHOTOGRAPHY

| wedding trends |

PHOTO BY RILEY MACLEAN PHOTOGRAPHY

A small flower arrangement goes a long way when placed in a standout container like these geometric shaped terrariums used in a design by Eclectic Sage.

Bull City Cigars will come to your

wedding to roll the good stuff while you watch the technique. Fair warning: Your guests might spend a good portion of the evening puffing away. December/January 2017

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„„„

GO OUT WITH A BANG

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PHOTO BY RENEE SPRINK PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTO BY CAROLYN SCOTT PHOTOGRAPHY

Have fun with your exit! Amanda Scott of A Swanky Affair event planning tells us this couple paid tribute to the groom’s New Orleans family ties with a firstline exit from their Rickhouse wedding, led by a local brass band.

HUMAN ELEMENT

It’s a scientific fact that the more elegant the food presentation, the better it tastes. Local performance arts group Elevate specializes in weddings and events, and their live hors d’oeuvres stations, like this one with bites prepared by Donovan's Dish, will leave guests talking. 92

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Southern Bride & Groom magazine is a trusted wedding guide, offering a curated collection of top resources and local planning tips. The 30th Anniversary Edition releases in late December 2016, so look for it around town over the holidays. A full list of venues, storefronts, wedding shows and other locations where you can pick up your free copy can be found at SouthernBrideandGroom.com.


CEREMONIES | REHEARSAL DINNERS | RECEPTIONS | DINNER MENUS | HONEYMOONS

Your big day is special to us, too. We can provide the ideal atmosphere and service for your wedding rehearsal, ceremony,

reception and more. From the exotic to the metropolitan, we help you plan and hold your wedding ceremony in the setting you’ve dreamed of, the way you envisioned it. Our accommodating team members, stylish design, and numerous planning tools meet your needs at any one of our stunning locations in 80 countries across six continents.

H I LT O N D U R HA M N E A R D U K E U N I V E R S I T Y 3800 HILLSB OROUGH ROAD DURHAM, NC 27705 C O N T A C T : A N T WA N N E B E S T 9 1 9 - 5 6 4 - 2 9 0 9 O R E M A I L : A N T WA N N E . B E S T @ H I L T O N D U R H A M N C . C O M


hot sƅot

 by Amanda MacLaren |  by Briana Brough

M Kokko 311 Holland St., Ste. B 919-908-9332

W

HEN CHEF MIKE LEE OPENED M SUSHI LAST JANUARY, little did we know it was just the beginning of his ingredient-focused ventures. The restaurant highlights seafood and sushi, and is the realm he has most experience in as the chef at Raleigh’s Sono. “If you ask any sushi chef, their ultimate goal is to set up a dedicated sushi restaurant,”

Mike says. “It takes a lot of work and [the restaurants] are very, very small.” M Sushi is just that, in a narrow room on the lower level of the East Chapel Hill Street building across the alley from The Durham Hotel. An even more compact footprint, however, belongs to his new restaurant just around the corner: M Kokko. The two restaurants share a kitchen, making it easy for waiters and cooks to move back and forth. With only 20 seats, M Kokko is the 94

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place where Mike experiments with the next protein group in his restaurant vision: chicken. “I knew chicken was going to be the hardest,” Mike says, “because the simplest things are the most difficult.” As you enter the space, you’ll notice a clipboard – Mike instructs customers to write down their names and how many people are in the party, and then stick around (he's currently planning seating outside for guests who are waiting) and a server will come find you when your table is ready. Or, if you see a long line or list, “Come in and place an order for takeout,” Mike says. On a chalkboard will be the five entrees of the day – ramen, a rice bowl, yakisoba noodles, a fried chicken sandwich and Korean fried chicken – “KFC” – wings. “The key to good Korean fried chicken is you’ve got to have really


good crispy crust that’s durable,” Mike says. It’s very labor intensive – you coat one piece at a time, fry it for five minutes, let it rest for five minutes, and then fry it again for six minutes. But the item he’s most proud of? His chicken sandwich. “I eat it almost on a daily basis,” Mike says. “It’s very unassuming – fried chicken, garlic aioli and pickles – but the chicken is marinated in pickled daikon juice and fried with a wet batter that’s a combination of tempura batter and buttermilk. It’s simple, and so good.” In keeping with the casual theme, Mike recommends pairing your dish with one of the canned beers available – some local, others from Japan, like Orion. “Enjoy your beer, and have wings as a snack,” he says. What’s next for the enterprising chef is a Japanese and Korean tableside barbecue restaurant with a focus on pork and beef. (Imagine the bar at M Sushi, but with a fire pit along it

Here’s a Tip!

and adjustable grills. “It’s going to be Chef Mik e Lee str one-of-a-kind,” Mike says.) To that, he ives for balanc the prop er plans to attach to a taco restaurant dishes, s e of flavors in a ll his o before you add in similar fashion to the M Sushi and or the sp soy sauc icy sa e M Kokko setup – expect traditional with som uce that comes e of the d g iv ishes, e it a tas tacos with an essence of Korean te sans “Apprec condime iate the nt. flavors. And finally, a vegan restaurant. flavor,” h e says. “I’m scared to death about that, because I am least comfortable in [that cuisine],” Mike says. “But I want to tackle it.” And we want to taste it. But for now, there’s fried chicken on the table.

draw With just five menu items all centering around chicken, the kitchen staff has an intense focus to make this beloved ingredient shine. And, you won’t spend too much time laboring over what to order!

ABOVE Chef Mike Lee presents M Kokko's bowl of ramen with a soft-boiled egg and soy-braised pork belly. Below: Mike's daily staple, the fried chicken sandwich topped simply with garlic aioli and pickles.

drawback With only 20 seats, the restaurant can get crowded quickly during peak hours. Shoot for a time before or after the lunch and dinner rush, or grab takeout and skip the line!

price $9-$13

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dishinƂ with

Executive Chef Jason Cunningham of Washington Duke Inn & Golf Club

O

 by Laura Zolman Kirk  by Briana Brough riginally from Wisconsin, Chef Jason Cunningham’s parents moved to the area in 1996, with Jason following soon after to live with them and save money to go to culinary school. In March 2001, after finishing school, he started as a line cook at the Washington Duke. A month later, he was a sous chef. Eventually he rose through the ranks, learning plenty from the executive chef prior to him about hotel operations. When his mentor left in 2004, Jason approached the general manager to throw his hat in the ring for the top position. He was granted a trial run before accepting the title of executive chef six months later. Now, he runs a kitchen of 55 full-time staffers. He lives with his wife, Laura, and sons, Daniel, 8, Andrew, 7, and Connor, 4, in Apex.

What’s your favorite meal to make at home? Really, it’s mac-and-cheese. [The kids will] take it out of the box, but I usually amp it up. I’ll make a classic cheese sauce, use penne pasta, put bacon in there, and bake it off.

How do the holidays change the kitchen dynamic at the hotel?

The holidays here are a really big deal. [Surprisingly,] October is our busiest month, hands down. Once we get into October, start the day-in, day-out, and get into a rhythm, things sort of amp up to Christmas. Our average days will be 600 to 700 diners for breakfast, lunch and dinner. And once we get into the holidays, [that number will grow to] upwards of 1,000 a 96

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day. Our record day is 1,500 people. When you have food service operation for breakfast, lunch and dinner, plus room service and banquet space, it never sleeps in here.

Is it difficult to always work holidays? It has its challenges, but my family is tremendously supportive. We celebrate our holidays the day after. It’s still kind of hard for the kids, though, on Christmas morning … but they’re still getting toys, [so they’re not upset for too long].

Is there a dish you particularly look forward to during the holiday season?

Try This at Home

Roasted Heritage Farms Cheshire Pork Loin with Apples and Cider (Serves 8)

Mix flour with liberal amounts of salt and pepper and the finely chopped rosemary. Rub this mixture all over the pork, coating it evenly.

My mom makes this cheesy potato, bacon casserole thing that I just love. It’s like scalloped potatoes, but not as pretty. It’s just so good. The side dishes, I think, are what really make [the holidays].

Where’s your favorite Durham spot to grab a quick bite to eat?

Cosmic Cantina. I’ve been going there for a long time, ordering a veggie deluxe burrito with guacamole.

And what about if you’re taking your wife on a date?

Nana’s. Usually Scott [Howell]’s pretty generous when we go; he always surprises me. Over the years, I’ve developed a very good relationship with him.

Book in Advance

“For holidays, we start reservations eight weeks in advance,” Jason says. “Typically, we have a lot of availability, but we usually see a push towards the beginning of November as people get their plans in place.” Go to washingtondukeinn.com and make yours today.

1 4 or 5 lb. all-natural pork loin or pork rack 2 Tbsp. all-purpose flour Kosher salt and fresh ground black pepper 1 Tbsp. fresh rosemary, chopped 4 Tbsp. olive oil 4 Tbsp. unsalted butter 2 large yellow onions, peeled and chopped 4 cloves garlic, peeled and split 4 sprigs rosemary 1 sprig fresh sage 4 sprigs fresh thyme 5 or 6 large, crisp apples (N.C. Ginger Crisp or Winesap), cored and quartered 1 12 oz. bottle Bold Rock Hard Cider Heat the oven to 325 F. Truss the pork loin with butcher twine to make it uniform in shape.

Heat a large heavy skillet or roasting pan over high heat, add the olive oil and sear the roast all over until brown on all sides. Turn off the heat. Place onions, garlic, rosemary sprigs and half of the butter in the bottom of the pan, place the pork on top, cover with foil and place in the oven. Cover and cook the roast for approx. 40 minutes. Add the apples, hard cider, remaining butter and herb sprigs to the pan. Baste the pork and apples with the pan juices, and then re-cover and cook 30 minutes more. Raise the oven temperature to 400 F, remove the foil, baste the pork and apples and cook for an additional 15 minutes. Transfer the pork to a cutting board, remove the string and let rest for a minimum of 10 minutes before slicing. Transfer onions and apples to a platter and the pan juices to a pan on the stove. Reduce pan juices by about half, and serve alongside the sliced roast. Place the roast over the apples and onions.

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taste NORTHERN DURHAM / NEAR INTERSTATE 85 GUESS ROAD Northgate Mall - 1058 W. Club Blvd. Fast Food Full Service •A & D Buffalo’s C&H Cafeteria •Baja Shack 919-286-7303 •Cajun Café •Chef’s House Dragon Express •Chopsticks 919-286-2098 •Cinnamonster •The Cookie Store Jade Buffet •Esmeralda’s Cafe 919-286-9555 •Greek Cuisine Pan Pan Diner •Haagen-Dazs/Planet Smoothie 919-416-1950 •Lucky Chicken •Mickey’s Chicken & Fish Randy’s Pizza •Pretzel Twister 919-286-7272 •Randy’s Pizza Express Ruby Tuesday •Subway 919-286-5100 •Tomo Japan Gocciolina Upscale Italian fare in a cozy atmosphere. This wildly popular restaurant has graced our Best Of list again and again. 3314 Guess Rd.; 919-973-4089; gocciolina.com Hog Heaven Bar-B-Q Homestyle Eastern barbecue, fried chicken and seafood. Enjoy with a giant glass of iced tea. 2419 Guess Rd.; 919-286-7447; hogheavenbarbecue.com Jimmy’s Famous Hot Dogs Old-fashioned burgers, fries and a mean Carolina-style dog. 2728 Guess Rd.; 919-471-0005 La Cacerola Cafe & Restaurant Honduran specialties such as pupusas and chorizo asado. 2016 Guess Rd.; 919-294-6578; lacacerolanc.com Thai Spoon All the trappings for a delicious Thai-food experience: pad thai, drunken noodles and curries. 3808 Guess Rd.; 919-908-7539 HILLSBOROUGH ROAD Bennett Pointe Grill There’s something to please all palates on the large menu of this multi-regional American restaurant. 4625 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-382-9431; bpgrill.com Shanghai Chinese Restaurant Established in the 1980s, this Catonese restaurant offers both Americanized and authentic dishes. 3433 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-383-7581; shanghaidurham.com Wimpy’s Grill Specializing in old-fashioned hamburgers and hot dogs. Open till 2 p.m. weekdays, cash only. 617 Hicks St.; 919-286-4380; wimpysgrillnc.com

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HILLANDALE ROAD (EXIT 174-A)

Bleu Olive High-quality comfort food incorporating local ingredients and Mediterranean flair. Family-operated & chef driven. 1821 Hillandale Rd.; 919-383-8502; bleuolivebistro.com

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El Corral Mexican Restaurant Authentic Mexican faijtas, tacos, enchiladas and a great chorizo queso dip. 1821 Hillandale Rd.; 919-309-4543; el-corral.net Melo Trattoria & Tapas Classic Italian - think spaghetti and meatballs and chicken parmigiana - meets tapas. 1821 Hillandale Rd., Ste. 3; 919-384-9080; melotrattoria.com Pomodoro Italian Kitchen Homemade sauces on fresh-made pizzas, pastas and other Italian favorites. 1811 Hillandale Rd.; 919-382-2915; pomodoroitaliankitchen.info NORTH POINTE DRIVE The French Corner Bakery Artisan breads, beautifully crafted tarts and pastries. Plus lunch, and now baking classes taught by Frenchtrained master baker chef Benjamin Messaoui. 2005 North Pointe Dr., Ste. B.; 919-698-9836 MORE NORTHERN DURHAM DINING Alpaca Peruvian rotisserie chicken. Need we say more? 302 Davidson Ave.; 919-220-9028; alpacachicken.com Bullock’s Bar-B-Que A staple in the community since 1952, this barbecue restaurant serves up soul in Eastern-style barbecue, Brunswick stew and fried chicken. 3330 Quebec Dr.; 919-383-3211; bullocksbbq.com Picnic Locally sourced, Eastern whole-hog barbecue. Order the pulled pork, of course, but also the fried chicken, pimento mac & cheese and hushpuppies. 1647 Cole Mill Rd.; 919-908-9128; picnicdurham.com BR

Silver Spoon Restaurant Diner fare and Southern breakfast served all day. Try a “Golden Royal Skillet” (loaded homefries). 5230 N. Roxboro Rd.; 919-479-7172 BR

NEAR DOWNTOWN BROAD STREET Joe Van Gogh This local coffee shop sources quality beans for a superior coffee. 1104-B Broad St.; 919-286-4800; joevangogh.com

December/January 2017

Oval Park Grille Regularly changing the menu, this innovative restaurant remains “local as heck.” 1116 Broad St.; 919-401-6566; ovalparkgrille.com BR The Palace International African cuisine including curry goat, dovi chicken and samosas. 1104-A Broad St.; 919-416-4922 Watts Grocery A Durham native, chef Amy Tornquist artfully develops Southern-inspired dishes with seasonal, local ingredients, like the shrimp and fish stew, which appears in summer and fall. 1116 Broad St.; 919-416-5040 BR ERWIN ROAD Another Broken Egg Cafe Unique breakfast and lunch menu including cinnamon roll french toast and “Popeye’s Favorite” scrambled skillet. 2608 Erwin Rd., Ste. 120; 919-381-5172; anotherbrokenegg.com BR Black Twig Cider House Cider-and-sausage focused restaurant with more than 80 ciders on draft and in bottles. Try the “Northern Spy” and join in a Txotx! 2812 Erwin Rd.; 919-321-0203; blacktwigciderhouse.com MediTerra Grill Mediterranean and Lebanese cuisine, offering gyros, kabobs and curry. 2608 Erwin Rd., Ste. 136; 919-383-0066; mediterranc.com Nosh “Eclectic foodstuffs” like “Mike’s Breakfast Pizza,” “Coach’s Queso” sandwich and the brown derby chopper salad. 2812 Erwin Rd., Ste. 101; 919-383-4747; noshfood.com BR Saladelia Cafe Espresso and organic smoothie bar, scratch made pastries, gourmet sandwiches, salads and soups. Open for dine-in or carry-out. 2424 Erwin Rd.; 919-416 1400; saladelia.com BR


Smashburger Unique burgers smashed on the grill, chicken and salads. 2608 Erwin Rd., Ste. 116; 919-237-1070; smashburger.com

George’s Java Coffee roaster specializing in organic coffees. 764-A Ninth St.; 919-797-0878; georgesjava.com

Sushi Love Specialty sushi rolls such as the “Honey Love” roll topped with mango and kiwi, as well as other Asian cuisine favorites. 2812 Erwin Rd., Ste. 204; 919-309-2401; sushilove.org

Guacamaya (Chubby’s Tacos) Fresh Mexican favorites like burritos, nachos and salads with daily specials, a salsa bar and the “Chubbychanga.” 748 Ninth St.; 919-286-4499; guacamayafreshmex.com

ERWIN SQUARE Guasaca Arepas, salads and rice bowls with South American flavor. 2200 W. Main St., Ste. A100; 919-294-8939; guasaca.com Local 22 Kitchen & Bar Upscale Southern-inspired cuisine, with emphasis on food sourced within a 30-mile radius and local brews. 2200 W. Main St.; 919-286-9755; local22durham.com BR

Parizade Sophisticated Mediterranean food like monkfish tangine, pepper-crusted beef tenderloin and a vegetable caponata made with quinoa. 2200 W. Main St.; 919-286-9712; parizadedurham.com NINTH STREET DISTRICT Banh’s Cuisine Vietnamese and Chinese dishes with great vegetarian specials. Cash only! 750 Ninth St.; 919-286-5073 blu seafood and bar Upscale seafood restaurant featuring innovative regional classics and a complete oyster menu. Try the crab mac and cheese! 2002 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-286-9777; bluseafoodandbar.com Blue Corn Cafe Authentic Latin-American fare with fresh, organic ingredients. 716 Ninth St.; 919-286-9600; bluecorncafedurham.com Burger Bach Signature New Zealand grass-fed beef burgers and fresh-cut fries. 737 Ninth St., Ste. 220; 919-973-4416 Cocoa Cinnamon Local shop with signature hand-brewed coffees and lattes such as the “Lion in the Sun” with rose water and cardamom. 2627 Hillsborough Rd.; cocoacinnamon.com Cosmic Cantina Authentic Mexican cuisine with vegan options. House-made mole and corn tortillas. Pair with a margarita pitcher. 1920 Perry St.; 919-286-1875; cosmiccantina.com Dain’s Place Pub fare centered around award-winning “thick and juicy and juicy and thick” burgers. 754 Ninth St.; 919-416-8800 Dale’s Indian Cuisine Traditional Indian food like garlic naan, chicken tikka masala and matar paneer. 811 Ninth St.; 919-286-1760; dalesindiancuisine.net BR Elmo’s Diner Homemade Southern classics with breakfast favorites like cinnamon apple waffles and biscuits and gravy served all day in a casual, family-friendly setting. 776 Ninth St.; 919-416-3823; elmosdiner.com BR

Happy + Hale Healthy salads, bowls, breakfast, smoothies, cocktails and coldpressed juice. 703B Ninth St.; 984-439-1790; happyandhale. com BR Heavenly Buffaloes Chicken wings (bone-in and boneless), as well as vegan nuggets in more than 25 rubs and sauces, including sweet Thai coconut chili, peri peri and Jamaican jerk. Plus waffle fries! 1807 W. Markham Ave.; 919-237-2358; heavenlybuffaloes. com

BULL CITY MARKET

Hot Wheels Mama’s Hot Chicken

and OnlyBurger were listed at No. 6 and No. 11, respectively, in the “11 of the Best Food Trucks Across North Carolina” on Buzzfeed.

Dean’s List

The Original Q Shack was WINNER

IBEST

listed in QSR magazine’s “The 10 Most Iconic

OF DURHAM College Restaurants 2016

in America.”

BR

DURHAM, NC • 919-286-1987 To MADHATTERBAKESHOP.COM Everything DOWNTOWN There is BRIGHTLEAF DISTRICT a Season Alivia’s Durham Bistro

Mesa Latin Kitchen on Hillsborough Road officially closed in September, and transformed into an event venue and catering Juju Asian fusion tapas including selections like crispy Texas wild boar dumplings and chicken fried oysters. Try the crispy Brussels sprouts! 737 Ninth St.; 919-286-3555; jujudurham.com BR

kitchen, Three Seasons Catering.

Locopops Gourmet frozen pops in a variety of rotating flavors like lavender cream, strawberry lemonade and malted milk ball. 2604A Hillsborough Rd.; 919-286-3500; ilovelocopops.com Metro 8 Steakhouse Classic American steakhouse with an Argentinean flair. Pair empanadas with a filet mignon or crab-stuffed shrimp with a churrasco steak. 746 Ninth St.; 919-416-1700; metro8steakhouse.com Monuts Donuts Scratch-made, locally sourced doughnuts, pastries, English muffins, bagels and breakfast sandwiches. Try the bagel and lox. 1002 Ninth St.; 919-286-2642; monutsdonuts.com BR Triangle Coffee House Coffee and pastries with selections like vegan blueberry muffins. 714 Ninth St. Vin Rouge French bistro-style dinner with regular oyster specials and Sunday brunch. Get the hanger steak and frites! 2010 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-416-0466; vinrougerestaurant.com BR

The Mad Hatter’s Cafe & Bakeshop Scratch-made pastries, organic salads, sandwiches and wraps, with breakfast all day and delicious brunch every weekend Award-winning cakes. 1802 W. Main St.; 919-286-1987; madhatterbakeshop.com

B

European-style bistro with breakfast, pub fare and upscale dinner options including paprika sweet potato fries and risotto. 900 W. Main St.; 919-682-8978; aliviasdurhambistro.com BR

Clouds Brewing American favorites with a German flare. Try the “Clouds Burger” with a half beef, half bratwurst patty or “BEER-ger” with beer-bacon-onion jam. 905 W. Main St., Ste. 22; 919-251-8096; cloudsbrewing.com BR

El Rodeo Mexican Restaurant Authentic Mexican cuisine like quesadillas, tacos and huevos con chorizo. 905 W. Main St.; 919-683-2417; elrodeonc.com The Federal Pub fare with bistro panache. Try the “Fed Burger au Poivre” with fries. 914 W. Main St.; 919-680-8611; thefederal.net BR James Joyce Irish Pub and Restaurant Traditional pub food and snacks like brisket cheese steak and Reuben sandwiches. 912 W. Main St.; 919-683-3022; jamesjoyceirishpub.com BR Lilly’s Pizza Stone-hearth-baked pizzas with fresh, organic and local ingredients. 810 W. Peabody St.; 919-797-2554; lillyspizza.com The Little Dipper Fondue, salads and entrees with selections like cheddar ale fondue, seasonal spinach salad and filet mignon with mushrooms. 905 W. Main St.; 919-908-1023; littledipperfondue.com BR Mount Fuji Asian Bistro Sushi & Bar Thai, Japanese, Chinese and sushi. Try the duck wrap or pineapple shrimp fried rice. 905 W. Main St.; 919-680-4968; mtfujinc.com

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| dining guide | Parker and Otis A gift shop, coffee shop and restaurant all in one. First-timers should dedicate a good chunk of an afternoon to this delight. Try the No. 26. 112 S. Duke St.; 919 683-3200; parkerandotis.com BR

Poutine” and falafels. Go with a group and get a couple items to share. 723 Rigsbee Ave.; motorcomusic.com/partslabor

Welcome to the Table

In December, American Tobacco “pizza crust-focused sandwich shop” that originated in Southern Pines, and Maybelle’s, a barbecue and biscuit restaurant conceptualized

Satisfaction Restaurant & Bar Pub fare including selections like fried pickles, “Kitchen Sink Pizza” and footlong hotdogs. 905 W. Main St., Ste. 37; 919-682-7397; satisfactiondurham.net

Restaurant & Taproom. S inc e

2012

We’ re expandi ng!

Also in the American

Tobacco area, we hear Bull

The Bullpen, a beer garden

and restaurant, just outside

the Durham Bulls Athletic Park on the ground floor of the Diamond View III building.

CITY CENTER DISTRICT 2 Zero 1 Restaurant Breakfast, lunch and dinner, located in the Durham Marriott Convention Center. 201 Foster St.; 919-768-6000

F ine D r inkin g s ince 2012

The new addition will be open year-round and feature a menu courtesy of Heavenly

Outdoor Seating Full Bar Kid’s Menu Beer & Wine plates menu including selections like tandoori chicken, flat iron steak and garganelli. 105 S. Magnum St.; 919-973-3000; barvirgile.com O PEN NI GHTLY

BeyùFRO Caffè M 4 PM TO 2 AM Coffee shop meets restaurant, bar and live jazz club. “Bull City Beignets,” buffalo wings and ultimate mushroom burger. 341 W. Main St.; 919-683-1058; beyucaffe.com BR

Clouds Brewing has opened a Durham location in Brightleaf Square on West Main Street, offering lunch, dinner and drinks. Chef’s House, the newest addition to Northgate Mall’s

Cocoa Cinnamon Signature hand-brewed coffees and lattes such as the “Tower of Babel” with honey and date sugar. 420 W. Geer St.; cocoacinnamon.com

food court, offers hand-breaded chicken, seafood and pork options, along with homemade sides and seasonally rotating desserts. The restaurant is owned and operated by Carmen and Paul Dascanio.

Geer Street Garden Simple, down-home fare in a cozy atmosphere. They make a mean “Dark and Stormy,” and be sure to order “The Pile” to split with friends! 644 Foster St.; 919-688-2900; geerstreetgarden.com BR Rise Biscuits & Donuts Daily-changing menu of doughnuts and biscuits. For vegetarians, the “Fried Eggplant ‘Bacon’” biscuit is hard to beat. 401 Foster St.; 984-4392220; risebiscuitsdonuts.com BR

K I TC H EN MUSEUM. HOTEL. RESTAURANT.

111 N Corcoran Street 919.956.6700 | 21cDurham.com

294-6661

Dos Perros Bar Brunello Sophisticated Mexican Featuring 25 wines by the glass At press time, Viceroy – an cuisine; plates include and 60 by the bottle, as well as pork carnitas, shrimp a la Indian-British fusion pub – was draft beers and ciders, the bar’s diabla and chile relleno. food menu includes charcuterie set to open in the old Beyù Don’t skip on the guac! and cheese boards, chicken Caffè space downtown. The 200 N. Mangum St.; liver mousse and varied desserts. 919-956-2750; pub is a culinary collaboration 117 E. Main St.; 919-294-4825; dosperrosrestaurant.com 320 EAST CHAPEL HILL STREET DURHAM, NC 27701 barbrunello.com between executive chef Rupesh Uprety, who was born and

WWW.ALLEYTWENTYSIX.COM

Littler Look for escarole, house spaghetti and guinea hen with herby dumplings on the menu at this small restaurant with big tastes. 110 E. Parrish St.; 919-374-1118; littlerdurham.com

raised in Nepal and trained in Nepalese and Indian cooking chef de cuisine Adam Barron,

Loaf Oven breads and pastries. Counter Culture Coffee, pain au chocolat and cumin gruyere loaf. 111 W. Parrish St.; 919-797-1254

who most recently served as the executive chef at James Joyce Irish Pub and Alivia’s Durham Bistro.

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Bull McCabe’s Irish Pub Pub food and bar snacks like nachos, burgers and wings. 427 W. Main St.; 919-682-3061; bullmccabesirishpub.com

Alley Twenty Six This cocktail-centric bar offers a menu complete with yellowfin tuna sliders and meat-and cheese plates with selections like housemate duck pastrami. Dame’s Chicken & Waffles 320 E. Chapel Hill St.; Main St.; 919-213-1267; COMING SOON Chicken, waffles, shmears. ’Nuff said. 317 W. 919-682-9235; dameschickenwaffles.com BR alleytwentysix.com Dashi Bagel Bar Experience our new exhibition Traditional ramen shop and izakaya with unique Dress Up,bagel Speak varieties, Up: Costume and Confrontation Homemade sake options. 415 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-251-9335; lunch and breakfast sandwiches. dashiramen.com 104 City Hall Plaza, Ste. 101; 919-

before moving stateside, and

Parts & Labor A variety of dishes meeting many dietary needs including veggie samosas, “Hipster

Bull City Burger & Brewery Local beef burgers with all components from bun to barbecue sauce made in-house. 107 E. Parrish St.; 919-680-2333; bullcityburgerandbrewery.com

Counting House Upscale restaurant featuring locally sourced entrees, as well as small plates featuring oysters, shellfish and meats and cheeses. 111 N. Corcoran St.; 919-956-6760; countinghousenc.com

Buffaloes.

WAREHOUSE DISTRICT The Blue Note Grill Fantastic barbecue, ribs and live music. 709 Washington St.; 919-401-1979; thebluenotegrill.com

durhammag.com

T we n t y S i x

Brunch

CO C K TAI L S

Durham Beer Co. is opening

Triangle Seafood Market Fresh seafood, Italian entrees and pastas including daily raw bar specials. 905 W. Main St.; 919-956-7360; triangleseafood.com

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Piedmont Seasonal cooking inspired by local ingredients. Try the beet-pickled eggs with pimento cheese, crispy oysters or Mills Farm’s shortribs. 401 Foster St.; 919-683-1213; piedmontrestaurant.com BR

Alley

by the folks behind Tyler’s Fine Dr in k in g

Torero’s Mexican Restaurant Authentic Mexican cuisine. Try the ceviche de camaron. 800 W. Main St.; 919-682-4197; torerosmexicanrestaurants.com

100

BR

The Pit Fried pimento cheese, wholehog Eastern barbecue and Lexington-style pork shoulder barbecue. 321 W. Geer St.; 919-282-3748; thepit-durham.com

Campus will add Wedgies, a

Rose’s Meat Market and Sweet Shop Sandwiches, pastries - rhubarb galette, anyone? - and daily dinner specials. 121 N. Gregson St.; 919-797-2233; rosesmeatandsweets.com

key

BR

December/January 2017

Bar Virgile Artfully crafted beverages paired with an everchanging dinner and small

Lucky’s Delicatessen Deli crafted by chef Matthew Kelly serves seasonal soups and sandwiches like garbanzo with chickpea fritters and the super Reuben. 105 W. Chapel Hill St.; 919-864-8841; luckysdelinc.com


savor

| dining guide |

Slow-roasted lamb shank with oyster mushroom and Graviera cheese risotto, flashfried kale and tomatomint Bordelaise.

Bleu Olive Mediterranean Bistro, 27

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PHOTO BY SARAH ARNESON

$


| dining guide | Luna Rotisserie & Empanadas South American cuisine meets the American South. Wood-fired rotisserie meats, Andean-inspired braises, empanadas. 112 W. Main St.; 984-439-8702; lunarotisserie.com M Sushi Quality sushi from seasonal seafood, daily menu changes and creative rolls like “Unagi Maki” with barbecue eel and fried garlic. 311 Holland St.; 919-908-9266; msushidurham.com Mateo Highly acclaimed menu of tapas and small plates by chef Matthew Kelly. Great for a date night or night out with friends. Order a pitcher of the “Cheerwine Sangria,” pollo frito, gambas and queso frito y huevo. 109 W. Chapel Hill St.; 919-530-8700; mateotapas.com Mothers and Sons Trattoria Italian restaurant by partners Matthew Kelly and chef Josh “Skinny” DeCarolis. Handmade pasta, bruschetta and antipasti dishes. 107 W. Chapel Hill St.; 919-294-8247; mothersandsonsnc.com Motto New American cuisine with selections ranging from zucchini fries, rib-eye and barbecue shrimp. 605 W. Main St.; 984-219 1965; mottodurham.com

Old Havana Sandwich Shop Authentic Cuban sides and sandwiches like the “El Caney,” “Tampa” and “Santiago.” 310 E. Main St.; 919-667-9525; oldhavanaeats.com BR The Parlour Handmade ice cream in rotating flavors like Vietnamese coffee, banana pudding and rosewater. 117 Market St.; 919-564-7999; theparlour.co Pizzeria Toro Wood-fired pizza with selections like spicy lamb meatball with kale, fried eggplant ricotta and soft egg white pizza. Also, ricotta dumplings! 105 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-908-6936; pizzeriatoro.com Pompieri Pizza A Neapolitan pizza joint with a family-friendly approach. Try the “Drunken Horse” pizza with beer crust dough and house-made sausage. 102 City Hall Plaza; 919-973-1589; pompieripizza.com The Restaurant at The Durham Locally sourced Southern cuisine crafted by chef Andrea Reusing. Selections include beef tartare and spring pie with asparagus and mushrooms. The Roof focuses on shared plates. 315 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-768-8830; thedurham.com/dining BR Revolution Contemporary global cuisine with local ingredients. Spanish-style charred octopus salad, cast-iron New York strip steak and fun tasting options. 107 W. Main St.; 919-956-9999; revolutionrestaurant.com

Ninth Street Bakery Organic breads, pastries and lunch. Grab a “Wheel of Steel” (peanut butter, raisins and oats) and a blueberry cream cheese Danish. 136 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-6885606; ninthstbakery.com BR

Rue Cler Restaurant & Cafe French bistro-style cuisine with lunch, brunch and dinner showcasing fresh ingredients. 401 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-682-8844; ruecler-durham.com BR

Celebrate your holidays with us this year! Seasonal menus and cocktails and plenty of good cheer. Ask about our event space, too!

FRESH, SEASONAL FARM-TO-FORK ITALIAN

www.dosperrosrestaurant.com

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ROCKWOOD SHOPPING CENTER 2501 UNIVERSITY DRIVE • DURHAM 919.294.8383 • MON-SAT 11:30AM-10PM

Saltbox Seafood Joint Local seafood that is delivered fresh from the Carolina coast and served griddled or fried in a straightforward manner. 608 N. Mangum St.; 919-908-8970; saltboxseafoodjoint.com Scratch Bakery Seasonal bakery serving sweet and savory pastries, plus a rotating lunch menu with offerings like meatball subs and pickle plates. Grab a pie, always. 111 Orange St.; 919-956-5200; piefantasy.com BR Taberna Tapas, paella, flatbreads, bacon-wrapped dates, gambas. 325 W. Main St.; 919-797-1457; tabernatapas.com Toast Italian paninis and soups. The warm goat cheese with honey and peppercorn crostini is our favorite. 345 W. Main St.; 919-683-2183; toast-fivepoints.com AMERICAN TOBACCO DISTRICT Basan A wide variety of fresh, specialty sushi rolls, modern Japanese appetizers and entrees, and an extensive sake selection. 359 Blackwell St., Ste. 220; 919-797-9728; basanrestaurant.com


sip Peppermint bark martini with Stoli vanilla vodka, Godiva white chocolate, pure cane syrup, whipped cream and crushed candy canes.

Kanki Japanese House of Steaks and Sushi, 8

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$


| dining guide | Cuban Revolution Restaurant & Bar Cuban tapas served amid ’60s-style decor, plus bolsitas, sandwiches and Havana pork. 318 Blackwell St.; 919-687-4300; thecubanrevolution.com

Tyler’s Restaurant & Taproom Hearty fare and huge beer selection. An order of garlic fries is a must! 324 Blackwell St.; 919-433-0345; tylerstaproom.com

The District at 410 Lunch served Thursday and Friday by The Art Institute of Raleigh-Durham. 410 Blackwell St.; 919-317-3200; artinstitutes.edu/raleigh-durham/the-district-at-410

WEST-CENTRAL DURHAM DURHAM-CHAPEL HILL BOULEVARD (15-501)

NanaSteak Offers various cuts of beef and steaks, plus othermeats like salmon and tuna steaks and pastas like beef short rib ravioli. 345 Blackwell St.; 919-282-1183; nanasteak.com OnlyBurger The food truck’s brick-and mortar version offers all the same build-your-own burger options and sides like bacon-wrapped mac and cheese squares. 359 Blackwell St.; 919-237-2431; onlyburger.com

Tobacco Road Sports Cafe American dishes like “Country Frizzled & Drizzled Chicken” made with local ingredients; overlooks the Bulls’ stadium. 280 S. Mangum St.; 919-937-9909; tobaccoroadsportscafe.com

bleu

Sitar Indian Cuisine Homemade Indian dishes at affordable prices, with daily lunch buffets and a weekend dinner buffet. 3630 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-490-1326; sitar-indiancuisine.com BR Vegan Flava Cafe Vegan/vegetarian menu with selections like carrot tuna, curry lentils and “Flava Cakes” for Sunday brunch. 4125 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-960-1832; veganflavacafe.com BR

Fairview Dining Room Seasonally inspired contemporary cuisine with selections like bourbon glazed pork chops and pan seared NC grouper. Located inside the Washington Duke Inn & Golf Club. 3001 Cameron Blvd.; 919-493-6699; washingtondukeinn.com

UNIVERSITY DRIVE

Foster’s Market Brought to you by acclaimed cookbook author Sara Foster, fresh breakfast selections, sandwiches and salads. Also pick up specialty food items. 2694 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-489-3944; fostersmarket.com BR

Saladelia Cafe Espresso and organic smoothie bar, scratchmade pastries, gourmet sandwiches, salads and soups. Open for dine-in or carry-out. 406 Blackwell St.; 919-687-4600; saladelia.com

The Refectory Cafe Dal, chili, salads and soups. 2726 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-908-6798; therefectorycafe.com BR

Guglhupf Bakery, Cafe and Restaurant German-inspired cuisine and artisanal bakery. Restaurant dishes include house-cut noodles, weiner schnitzel and pan-roasted duck. 2706 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-401-2600; guglhupf.com BR

The Boot A neighborhood Italian American Restaurant serving soups, salads, sandwiches, pastas and traditional Italian entrees, plus a full bar. 2501 University Dr.; 919-294-8383; thebootdurham.com Capital Seafood Market & Grill Fried catfish, porkchop sandwiches and collard greens. Raw seafood for sale. 1304 University Dr.; 919-402-0777 Mi Peru Peruvian fare like ceviche mixto, asado and leche de tigre. 4015 University Dr.; 919-401-6432; miperupci.com

Kanki Steak, chicken and seafood cooked on hibachi grills, plus an extensive sushi menu. Come for a show! 3504 Mt. Moriah Rd.; 919-401-6908; kanki.com

live

Mediterranean

Fresh baked Delicious

Bistro

WINNER

IBEST OF DURHAM 2016

M, NC • 919-286-1987 TTERBAKESHOP.COM

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER • SNACKS • CATERING SALADELIA.COM

WINNER

OF DURHAM 2016

Catering available | Open 7 days a week

1125 W. NC HWY 54 | Suite 304 | Durham

Private Dining Room Outdoor Seating 919.383.8502

www.bleuolivebistro.com bleuolivebistro

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359 Blackwell Street • Suite 220 American Tobacco Campus • Durham, NC (919) 797 - 9728

@bleuolivebistro

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IBEST OF DU20R16HAM

IBEST

1821 Hillandale Road | Durham

WINNER

December/January 2017

BasanRestaurant.com

OUTDOOR SEATING Takeout Orders: 919.390.7525 www.makusempanadas.com @makusempanadas


| dining guide | Nana’s Restaurant Upscale seasonal dishes influenced by Southern, French and Italian cuisine. 2514 University Dr.; 919-493-8545; nanasdurham.com

Bull Street Gourmet & Market Fresh salads, breakfast and sandwiches like pulled porkloaded hashbrowns and the turkey and Brie sandwich. 3710 Shannon Rd.; 919-237-2398; bullstreetdurham.com BR

NanaTaco Inventive taqueria that features locally produced meats and veggies. Enjoy with margarita in hand. 2512 University Dr.; 919-489-8226; nanataco.com

Hope Valley Diner Diner food and breakfast all day with selections like chicken and dumplings, fried pickle chips, biscuits and gravy. 3710 Shannon Rd.; 919-419-0907; hopevalleydiner.com BR

The Original Q Shack “BBQ tender as a mother’s love,” includes signature chile-rubbed beef brisket and Carolina pork shoulder. 2510 University Dr.; 919-402-4227; WINNER theqshackoriginal.com

IBEST

OF DURHAM Saké Bomb Asian Bistro 2016

Authentic Asian bistro and sake bar; enjoy specialty rolls like the “Green Monster” with spicy yellow tail and tuna. 4215 University Dr.; 919-401-4488; sakebombdurham.com DURHAM, NC • 919-286-1987 MADHATTERBAKESHOP.COM

Saladelia Cafe Delicious, healthy, homemade food with an espresso and organic smoothie bar, scratch-made pastries, gourmet sandwiches, salads and soups. Open for dine-in or carry-out. 4201 University Dr.; 919-489-5776; saladelia.com BR Tacos Nacos Tacos, papusas, tortas and horchata. 3411 University Dr.; 919-267-8226 Thai Cafe Authentic Thai cuisine: drunken noodles, curries and stir-fries. Don’t miss the coconut cake for dessert! 2501 University Dr.; 919-493-9794; thaicafenc.com

10 Years on Ninth Street Metro 8 Steakhouse celebrated its 10th

OnlyBurger The food truck’s brick-and mortar offers all the same build-your-own burger options and sides. 3710 Shannon Rd., Ste. 118; 919-937-9377; onlyburger. com

anniversary in September. Husband-and-wife team chef Frank Pirillo and manager Cassie Ramos moved to Durham after they were convinced by friend and former Duke football player John El-Masry that it was the right decision, and they have been

Randy’s Pizza

Pizzas, garlic knots and WINNER

stromboli. 1813 Martin Luther King Jr. Pkwy.; 919-490-6850; randys-pizza.com

IBEST OF DURHAM

2016 Piper’s Deli

Deli sandwiches and burgers like pimento bacon cheeseburger serving up American MORE WEST-CENTRAL DURHAM • LUNCH • DINNER • SNACKS • CATERING and French dip sandwich. 3219 BREAKFAST steakhouse classics with Amante Gourmet Pizza SALADELIA.COM Old Chapel Hill Rd.; 919-489-2481; an Argentinian flare ever Gourmet pizzas and calzones. pipersdeli.com Try the “Via Bianco.” 3825 S. since. Roxboro Rd.; 919-572-2345; amantepizza.com

Seasonal Seafood Freshly Cooked Good Fish That’s the Hook

a apoletan n a z iz p e dizional

tra

ed wood-fir

WINNER

mons lley Com urham, NC Hope Va D • 4 5 y a C Highw N . W m 5 2 11 eforni.co .0922 • tr m -10:00pm 919 .973 0a :3 aily – 11

Open D

IBEST OF DURHAM 2016

608 N. Mangum St., Durham 919.908.8970 | saltboxseafoodjoint.com

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| dining guide | Tonali Restaurant Inventive Mexican cuisine such as chicken con mole, Mexican chocolate torte and adobo pork. 3642 Shannon Rd.; 919-489-8000; tonalirestaurant.com

Dulce Cafe Espresso, gelato and sandwiches. Smoked salmon bagel, dulce Reuben and the “B-L-A-T.” 5826 Fayetteville Rd., Ste. 106; 919-797-0497 BR

A Weekend to Indulge

A Chef’s Life’s Vivian Howard included Scratch as one of her es-

SOUTHERN DURHAM / NEAR I-40

sential experiences when visiting

Smallcakes Twelve signature cupcake flavors, as well as seasonal specials. 4711 Hope Valley Rd.; 919-937-2922; smallcakesnc.com

the Triangle, recommending the Shaker lemon pie and doughnut

WOODCROFT SHOPPING CENTER Hope Valley Brewing Company Brew pub fare like cheesy buffalo dip and crispy Brussels sprouts. 4810 Hope Valley Rd.; 919-2944955; hopevalleybrewingcompany. com BR

muffin, in a VisitNC.com post.

Brew News

Ponysaurus Brewing Co. was listed as one of Thrillist’s “11 Best College Town Breweries

West 94th Street Pub Traditional pub fare: loaded fries, chili cheese tots and fish & chips. 4711 Hope Valley Rd.; 919-403-0025; west94thstpub.com

in America.” Guacamaya (Chubby’s Tacos) Fresh mexican favorites like Yamazushi burritos, nachos and salads, as Japanese fine dining, kaisekiwell as the “Chubbychanga.” 4711 style, with seasonal menu changes and a multiHope Valley Rd.; 919-489-4636 guacamayafreshmex.com course menu, as well as sake. 4711 Hope Valley Rd.; 919-493-7748; yamazushirestaurant.com Joe Van Gogh Cozy and full of natural light, this local coffee shop SUTTON STATION sources quality beans for a superior coffee. 4711 Hope Pale + Porter Public House Valley Rd.; 919-973-3950; joevangogh.com. Modern American cuisine and cocktails, locally sourced. Pulcinella’s Italian Restaurant Southern Italian dishes. Antipasto classico, baked ziti and tortellini alla panna. 4711 Hope Valley Rd.; 919-490-1172; pulcinellasitalianrestaurant.com

Randy’s Pizza Pizzas, garlic knots and stromboli. 4810 Hope Valley Rd., Ste. 112; 919-403-6850; randys-pizza.com

Beef puff pastries, house oven-roasted turkey sandwich and shrimp and grit cakes. 5850 Fayetteville Rd.; 919-5448585; paleandporter.com

Bocci Trattoria & Pizzeria
 Traditional Italian pastas, pizzas, crostinis and salads. 5850 Fayetteville Rd.; 919-206-4067; bocciitalian.com

MAKE THIS YEAR’S PARTY

EXTRA SPECIAL.

Celebrate with a made-to-order Peking duck* and perfectly paired wines, champagnes and cocktails. *please reserve your duck at least 48 hours in advance by calling (919) 286-3555

a southern take on an Italian classic

737 Ninth St., Durham www.jujudurham.com | 919.286.3555 106

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SOUTHPOINT LOCATION CATERING FOOD TRUCK

RESTAURANT: (919) 607-7419 FOOD TRUCK AND EVENTS: (919) 907-0995 WWW.PORCHETTARDU.COM

Nantucket Grill & Bar New England-style cuisine known for their desserts like the “Unbirthday” and coconut cake. 5826 Fayetteville Rd.; 919-484-8162; nantucketgrill.com LINCOLN PARK WEST Danny’s Bar-B-Que Hickory-smoked barbecue, ribs, fried catfish. 2945 S. Miami Blvd., Ste. 118; 919-806-1965; dannysbarbque.com Gussy’s Place Greek street food like gyro pita, Greek fries and baklava. 2945 S. Miami Blvd.; 984-439-8455; gussys.com Piper’s In The Park Soups, salads, hoagies and burgers with selections like curried couscous and “South of Here” turkey sandwich. 2945 S. Miami Blvd.; 919-572-9767; pipersinthepark.com Spicy Green Gourmet Cafe & Catering Sandwiches, soups, salads with specialities like Cuban flatbread. 2945 S. Miami Blvd.; 919-220-6040 HOPE VALLEY COMMONS Mattie B’s Public House Housemade burgers, N.Y.-style pizza, wings and potato chips. 1125 W. N.C. 54; 919-401-8600; mattiebs.com Denny’s Diner fare serving breakfast anytime, lunch and dinner. 7021 N.C. 751, Ste. 901; 919-908-1006; dennys.com BR


| dining guide | Makus Empanadas A variety of meat, veggie and cheese empanadas, with vegetarian and vegan options. 1125 W. N.C. 54, Ste. 304; 919-390-7525; makusempanadas.com

Treforni Wood-fired pizza and sandwiches including traditional options like Margherita, as well as more inspired options like the prosciutto arugula pizza and the rosetta sandwich. 1125 W. N.C. 54; 919-973-0922; treforni.com

NEAR SOUTHPOINT HOMESTEAD MARKET Bean Traders Coffee Coffee specialties and local pastries. 105 W. N.C. 54; 919-484-2499; beantraderscoffee.com City Barbecue Smoked meats, peach cobbler and hushpuppies. 208 W. N.C. 54. 919-237-9509; citybbq.com Shiki Sushi Sushi and pan-Asian choices like “Bang Bang Shrimp,” gyoza dumplings and beef pho soup. 207 W. N.C. 54; 919-484-4108; shikitasu.com

SOUTHPOINT CROSSING Ai Fuji Japanese Steakhouse Hibachi dishes and buy-one-getone sushi. 202 W. N.C. 54; 919-9983988; aifujijapanese.com

Save the Date!

Durham Performing Arts & Taproom and Sam’s Quik Shop collaborate again to host the fifth

Primal Food & Spirits Gluten-free restaurant featuring wood-fired local meat dishes with seasonal sides with craft cocktails. 202 W. N.C. 54; 919-248-3000; primalfoodandspirits.com

annual Bull City Food and Beer Experience benefiting Ellerbe Creek Watershed Association, to take place March 12, 2017.

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Distinguished Donuts

THE STREETS AT SOUTHPOINT AREA American Meltdown Signature gourmet melts; sides and desserts. Southpoint; 919-473-6358; americanmeltdown.org

Monuts Donuts

was listed as one of the South’s best doughnut shops in a Southern Living travel article.

Bruster’s Ice Cream Hand-crafted ice creams, sorbets & sherbets in ever-changing flavors. 8200 Renaissance Pwy., Ste. 1002; 919-237-3537; brusters.com

WELCOME TO AMERICA’S DINER

7021 HIGHWAY 751, #901 DURHAM

919-908-1006

OPEN 24/7! We give AARP discounts

Porchetta Slow-roasted Italian-style pork sandwiches and sides. Southpoint; 919-607-7419; porchettardu.com

Center, Tyler’s Restaurant

Harvest 18 Local, seasonal eats. Try the pimento cheese dip and a Bloody Mary for brunch. Also ask about the house-infused spirits. 8128 Renaissance Pkwy., Ste. 114; BR 919-316-1818 Rise Biscuits & Donuts Daily-changing menu of doughnuts and biscuits. For vegetarians, the “Fried Eggplant ‘Bacon’” biscuit is hard to beat. 8200 Renaissance Pkwy.; 919248-2992; risebiscuitsdonuts.com BR

Town Hall Burger and Beer “Carolina Burger” with pork belly and pimento cheese, barbecue salmon burger and “Fries Poutine.” 7830 N.C. 751; 919-973-0506; townhallburgerandbeer.com

Celebrate the season with a taste of something special a Saladelia party platter.

Tender as a Mother's Love READERS’ FAVORITE

PLATINUM WINNER

READERS’ FAVORITE

BRONZE WINNER

WINNER

IBEST IBEST IOFBEST DURHAM OF DURHAM OF DURHAM 2015

2015

2016

It’s easy to order www.saladelia.com

2510 University Dr. Durham, NC 1125 W. NC HWY 54 DURHAM

919-489-7300

Phone 919 - 402 - 4BBQ (4227)

Catering available

Open 7 days a week 11am - 9pm

Unexpected combinations.Tantalizing choices.Tastefully done.

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| dining guide | N.C. 54 Akashi Japanese Grill & Sushi Bar Hibachi, sushi and noodle dishes like bento boxes, yakisoba and spicy scallop roll. 2223 N.C. 54, Ste. RS; 919-572-9444; akashisushi54.com Na’Mean Asian fusion, Korean barbecue sandwich shop. A KoKyu joint. 4823 Meadow Dr., Ste. 108; 919-699-4667; kokyubbq.com/nmean Spice & Curry Traditional Indian, buffet-style or off the menu. 2105 E. N.C. 54; 919-544-7555; spicencurry.net

RTP N.C. 55 Backyard BBQ Pit Barbecue and other Southern comfort foods: mac ‘n’ cheese, Brunswick Stew and pit-cooked barbecue.5122 N.C. 55; 919-544-9911; sweetribs.com Brigs at the Park Breakfast selections like “Pineapple Bread Pina Colada French Toast” and sandwiches like the crab wrap. 4900 N.C. 55; 919-544-7473; brigs.com BR Cafe Meridian Made-to-order salads and sandwiches. 2500 Meridian Pkwy., Ste. 130; 919-361-9333; cafemeridian.com Jamaica Jamaica Carribean food favorites like jerk chicken, yellow rice and brown stew chicken. 4857 N.C. 55; 919-544-1532

ALSO CHECK OUT THESE AREA RESTAURANTS … 411 West The menu – including fresh pasta, seafood and pizzas – is inspired by the flavors of Italy and the Mediterranean, with a healthy Californian twist. 411 W. Franklin St.; 919-967-2782; 411west.com BR Acme Soups, salads, seafood and entrees with a Southern touch; outdoor dining. 110 E. Main St., Carrboro; 919-929-2263; acmecarrboro.com BR Breadmen’s A variety of sandwiches, burgers, salads and grilled meat, as well as daily soup and casserole specials. Breakfast served all day; vegetarian options; outdoor dining. 324 W. Rosemary St.; 919-967-7110; breadmens.com BR Breakaway Cafe A casual “cycling-inspired” cafe serving breakfast, lunch, dinner and small plates, along with Counter Culture coffee and Maple View ice cream. 58 Chapelton Ct., Ste. 100; breakawaync.co B-Side Lounge Small plates like flatbread, bacon-wrapped dates and fondue. Plus inspired cocktails. 200 N. Greensboro St., Carrboro; 919-904-7160; b-sidelounge.com Capp’s Pizzeria Artisan pizzas that are hand-crafted and wood-fired, utilizing local ingredients. 79 Falling Springs Dr., Ste. 140; 914-240-4104; cappspizzeria.com

Sansui Sushi Bar & Grill Hibachi dishes and sushi rolls like “Spider Man” with crab and crawfish. 4325 N.C. 55; 919-361-8078; sansuisushi.com

Chronic Tacos Mexican grill utilizing authentic recipes. 504 Meadowmont Village Circle; 984-999-4803; eatchronictacos.com Crepe Traditions Sweet and savory crepes, coffee and espresso. 140 W. Franklin St., Ste. 120; 919-391-9999; crepetraditions.com BR Crossroads Chapel Hill at The Carolina Inn New American cuisine and seasonal specialties. 211 Pittsboro St.; 919-918-2777; crossroadscuisine.com BR

Crossties A variety of barbecue, sides and scratch-made desserts. 201 E. Main St., Carrboro; 919-918-3923. Crook’s Corner Southern classics like shrimp and grits, “Hoppin’ John” and jalapeno-cheddar hushpuppies. 610 W. Franklin St.; 919-929-7643; crookscorner.com BR

Elaine’s on Franklin Fine regional American cuisine, made with fresh, local ingredients. 454 W. Franklin St.; 919-960-2770; elainesonfranklin.com elements Cuisine that combines classical as well as modern Asian and European cooking techniques. 2110 Environ Way, East 54; 919-537-8780; elementsofchapelhill.com

Vit Goal Tofu Restaurant Korean dishes like fried dumplings and tofu soups. 2107 Allendown Dr.; 919-361-9100; vitgoal.com GREENWOOD COMMONS Benetis Restaurant Classic breakfast with a Mediterranean lunch buffet. 5410 N.C. 55; 919-806-0313; benetisrtp.com BR Sarah’s Empanadas Homemade empanadas. 5410 N.C. 55; 919-544-2441 Tandoor Indian Restaurant Traditional Indian like veggie samosas, kabobs and naan. 5410 N.C. 55; 919-484-2102; tandoorinrtp.com BR Thai Lanna Restaurant Authentic Thai cuisine like red curry, pad thai and larb. 5410 N.C. 55; 919-484-0808; thailannarestaurant.com True Flavors Diner Upscale Southern diner. Try the “Howling Moon French Toast” made with Howling Moon moonshine sauce. 5410 N.C. 55; 919-316-7978; trueflavorsnc.com BR IMPERIAL CENTER

EXCESS IN MODERATION

MEZ Contemporary Mexican Creative Mexican dishes, based on traditional recipes with a fresh, healthy twist. 5410 Page Rd.; 919-941-1630; mezdurham.com

WINNER

IBEST OF DURHAM

Page Road Grill Traditional American dishes, from house-made soup and bread to burgers to vegetarian options. 5416 Page Rd.; 919-908-8900; pageroadgrill.com

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Enjoy delicious contemporary American Bistro fare and an intriguing selection of wines from around the world. The perfect place to watch ACC games.

106 S. Greensboro St., Carrboro 919.967.9784

www.glasshalfullcarrboro.com |

December/January 2017


| dining guide |

Glasshalfull Mediterranean-inspired food and wine. 106 S. Greensboro St., Carrboro; 919-967-9784; glasshalfullcarrboro.com

Mediterranean Deli Offers healthy vegan, vegetarian and gluten-free options as well as delicious meats from the grill. 410 W. Franklin St.; 919-967-2666; mediterraneandeli.com

Iris The full-service restaurant at N.C. Museum of Modern Art specializes in seasonal fare utilizing locally sourced ingredients. 2110 Blue Ridge Rd., Raleigh; 919-664-6838; ncartmuseum.org/visit/dining

Mixed Casual Korean Bistro Specializes in bibimbap, customizable bowls of rice, meat, vegetables and sauce. 1404 E. Franklin St.; 919-929-0047; mixedkoreanbistro.com

Italian Pizzeria III Pizza, calzones, subs. The “place to be” in Chapel Hill for 35 years. 508 W. Franklin St.; 919-968-4671; italianpizzeria3.com Jujube Eclectic, modern cuisine inspired by the classic flavors of China and Vietnam. 1201 Raleigh Rd.; 919-960-0555; jujuberestaurant.com Kitchen Bistro-style dining with a seasonal menu that always includes mussels. 764 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-537-8167; kitchenchapelhill.com Magone Italian grill and pizza. 1129 Weaver Dairy Rd., Ste. F; 919-904-7393 Mama Dip’s Kitchen Traditional Southern specialties, including a country breakfast and lunch and dinner classics like fried chicken and Brunswick stew; outdoor dining. 408 W. Rosemary St.; 919-942-5837; mamadips.com

TOPO Chapel Hill’s only distillery also offers beers and American food, like burgers and flatbreads. 100 E. Franklin St.; 919-929-8676; thetopofthehill.com BR

Trilogy American cafe featuring innovative twists on classic dishes. Silverspot Cinema, University Place, 201 S. Estes Dr.; 919-357-9888; silverspot.net BR

Pazzo! Italian cuisine, takeout pizza. 700 Market St.; 919-929-9984; pazzo-restaurant.com

Venable Upscale comfort food with a heavy emphasis on locally sourced and seasonal ingredients. 200 N. Greensboro St., Carrboro; 919-904-7160; venablebistro.com BR

Radius Wood-fired pizzas, housemade pastas, sandwiches, salads and desserts. 112 N. Churton St., Hillsborough; 919-245-0601; radiuspizzeria.net The Root Cellar Sandwiches, prepared salads, desserts and more. 750 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-967-3663; rootcellarchapelhill.com BR

Spanky’s A Chapel Hill institution since 1977, the American bar and grill serves hamburgers, brown sugar baby back ribs, garden fresh salads and barbecue. 101 E. Franklin St.; 919-967-2678; spankysrestaurant.com BR Squid’s The menu of fresh seafood options includes wood-grilled fillets, live Maine lobster, fried seafood and oysters. 1201 N. Fordham Blvd. (15-501); 919-942-8757; squidsrestaurant.com

Vespa Innovative Italian and Mediterranean cuisine in a setting that can accommodate parties, receptions and special events. 306 W. Franklin St.; 919-969-6600; vespanc.com Yopop Frozen Yogurt Ice cream, smoothies and self-serve frozen yogurt. 1129 Weaver Dairy Rd.; 919-537-8229; yopops.com Yogurt Pump Since 1982, YoPo has served up frozen yogurt treats and shakes with unique flavors like mocha java and red velvet. Non-fat, low-fat and no-sugar-added available. 106 W. Franklin St.; 919-942-7867; yogurtpump.com

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Gifts for Everyone

on Your List 28

Test Your

Dog’s IQ 34

Memories of

Christmases Past 58

Plan Your

2017 Wedding 80

December/January 2017 durhammag.com

Cheers!

me Making spirits bright, at ho Page 40

Your Tool to What’s Cool

FOR FREE!

Pick up your free copy of Durham Magazine at any of 50 locations! Go to durhammag.com for a list of distribution outlets. Josh Lindsey’s

Gold Standard Cocktail Creation at Harvest 18

More recipes inside

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| engagements |

Gallagher & Hamilton

D

Friend Request  by Laura Zolman Kirk AVID HAMILTON AND JENNIFER GALLAGHER WERE DESTINED to fall in love … if mutual friend Katherine Calhoun Leib had anything to do about it. But after Katherine’s attempt to seat the two together at her own wedding failed, Jennifer took matters into her own hands and contacted David herself. Soon, the couple found themselves alternating the drive down I-85 between North Carolina and South Carolina, where David was living at the time. A year later, “David and his cats came to their senses and moved to the Tar Heel state,” Jennifer says. After five years of dating, the couple got engaged at a winery in Napa Valley. David had picked out Jennifer’s “perfect” ring after Katherine again had stepped in to rescue him from accidently purchasing a princess cut at Diamonds Direct, rather than the round, brilliant cut in a princess setting that Jennifer actually preferred. Jennifer, a clinical research coordinator focusing on breast cancer at Duke, and David, director of earned media at Burkhead Brand Group in Raleigh, are planning an August 2017 wedding in Charleston, S.C. Fittingly, Katherine will be acting as matron of honor.

 durhammag.com

DiamondsDirect.com Your love. Our Passion.

Durham, PluƂƂed In  @durhammag

 durhammagazine

 @durhammag

 durhammagazine

Holiday Tips from Our Readers Keeping a good bottle of bubbly around is a great idea! If you get invited to something last minute, or haven’t had time to bake something to bring along … you can’t go wrong! If you don’t need it, it’s yours to drink! Stephanie Nikolic, @stephienikolic Give experiences (movie/theater tickets, mani/pedi, dinner/lunch/coffee treat) instead of “stuff” as gifts. @AndreaKnits

 Follow durham_eats

Warning: This Instagram feed may cause salivation. Started in 2014 by three friends who’ve lived in the area for close to seven years, the main goal of the account “is to battle food envy – we only post the best of the best at each restaurant we try and do not post if we do not truly recommend the meal.” Share your perspective: #durhameats.

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Instead of trying to figure out what family and friends want or need, donate to a charity that’s special to them in their name. Rosemarie Dombrowski I throw a “Craftmonsters” party for my friends every year. We drink festive cocktails, share the goss and make crafts – mostly for friend, family and teacher gifts. J.J. Johnson, @jjjohnsonauthor


| weddings |

Jaffe & Ruderman

D

A Doctoral Duo  by Lauren Moody |  by Robin Lin Photography, robinlin.com URHAM NATIVE ANNA JAFFE KNEW SHE WAS HEADED to the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry; what she did not anticipate was meeting and falling in love with fellow classmate and Duke graduate Brandon Ruderman. Three years later, she was surprised again when she found a note from Brandon tucked inside the jacket on their dog, Allie, asking her to marry him. With a desire to return to Durham, the pair decided to hold the ceremony at Sarah P. Duke Gardens, assisted by the planning expertise of A Swanky Affair. “Everything was so much more beautiful and perfect than I [could have] ever imagined,” Anna says of the moment when she walked into the Doris Duke Center. Midway through the evening, as their friends and family were busy on the dance floor, the couple wandered to the amphitheater in the gardens and enjoyed a private moment, letting the day sink in. “We couldn’t have asked for a better wedding,” Anna says. The bride’s hair and makeup was styled by 140 Salon & Blow Dry Bar, and she wowed guests in her dress from Tre Bella. The groom’s party sported tuxedos from Bernard’s Formalwear. Get Lit Special Event Lighting set a romantic mood and illuminated the stunning blossoms from Bluebird Meadows. The newlyweds were both accepted into residency programs at Duke Hospital, Brandon in emergency medicine and Anna in pediatrics. They live in the Watts-Hillandale neighborhood.

Diamonds-Direct.com Where NC says, ”I Do!”

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| weddings |

Pappas & Rudnick

My Big, Beautiful Greek Wedding

I

 by Laura Zolman Kirk |  by Anna Routh, annarouthphoto.com RENE PAPPAS AND BEN RUDNICK HAVE CROSSED PATHS all their lives; the two were born – by chance – in the same Boston hospital, and after their families moved to Durham (at different times), both graduated from Durham Academy. But it wasn’t until they had each moved to New York City on their own that Irene and Ben finally met and started dating. Wedding party members Emmy and William Anlyan – “a brother/sister team who had a funny feeling they were on to something,” Irene says – acted as matchmakers. Four and a half years later, following an engagement that began with a romantic south of France proposal, the two were married in what they both consider their hometown: Durham. The June 2016 ceremony was held at St. Barbara’s Greek Orthodox Church and followed by a reception at American Tobacco Campus’ Bay 7, with about 250 guests attending. Singer-songwriter Dawn Landes sang “Love Song” for the couple’s first dance. Raleigh’s The Shakedown, featuring the couple’s friend Nash Roberts, performed as the main band, and a Greek band was also included, “because it wouldn’t be a Greek wedding without one,” Irene says. Irene, who consults under her firm eyePR, and Ben, who is executive director of finance at INC Research in Raleigh, reside in Hope Valley. Are you from Durham or do you live in Durham and want your wedding or engagement featured in our magazine?

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Diamonds-Direct.com Where NC says, ”I Do!”


TM


Pre-Owned

WINNER

BEST OF CHAPEL HILL 2016

15-501, Chapel Hill | 844-725-2349 | PerformanceAutoMall.com SALES Mon-Fri – 9-8 Sat – 9-6 Sun – closed

SERVICE Mon-Thurs – 7-7 Fri – 7-6 Sat – 8-5

Durham Magazine Dec/Jan 2017