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CHAPEL HILL • CARRBORO • HILLSBOROUGH • OR ANGE COUNT Y

MARCH 2021

THE BIG PICTURE Triad St udios’ t ow ners worked ou of an apart ment re at Carolina Squa y’s during the compan first six months.

S R U E N E R P E ENTR THE

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R E ACH FO R T H E S TA R S Aspyn Attucks, 2, and Avia Attucks, 3, explore the exhibits at the newly reopened Morehead Planetarium and Science Center

March 2021

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VOLUME 16 NUMBER 2

FEATURES 24 Mask Up Meet the team behind a PSA that encourages wearing your mask 28

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Carolina on Our Mind When the pandemic hit last year, UNC alumna and Hillsborough native Dr. Kizzmekia Corbett led a team that developed the vaccine

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Staycation, All I Ever Wanted Ideas for entertainment and fun a little closer to home

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Making the Band A group of high schoolers has raised more than $80,000 for UNC Children’s selling handmade bracelets

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A Second Act Four seniors at The Cedars prove that the show does go on, even in your eighties

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Stories From the Road A Chapel Hill woman traveled across the country sharing stories during the pandemic Sound Check The pandemic put their 10-year touring streak on hold, but Mandolin Orange is content, for now

52

The Entrepreneurs Business owners share lessons learned, how they’ve weathered the pandemic and what it’s like to be their own boss

86

If You Build It … After an exhaustive house search, the Skurky family decided to build their dream home in an established neighborhood

112

Welcoming Wegmans The grocery chain opened a new location in Chapel Hill in late February

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About Town Events not to miss

16

Noted What we’ve heard around town ...

22

What We’re Eating News from our restaurant community, plus a dish we love

116

Dining Guide

118

Joyous Cooking Stewing in Isolation

124

Engagement Kelty O’Brien & Drew Shannon

125

Weddings Niko Gibson & Alexa Phillips Diane Miller & Will Potter Alex Waldorf & Sarah Wilson

PEOPLE & PLACES 10 Salute to Community Heroes 12

The Chamber For a Greater Chapel Hill-Carrboro Annual Meeting

13

Crook’s Corner Book Prize

SPONSORED CONTENT 70 Orange County Strong 2021 Sponsored by Hamilton Point Investment Advisors

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DEPARTMENTS & COLUMNS 6 Editor’s Letter


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began to dream of the RV life halfway through binge-watching the first season of “Breaking Bad” in January. No need for concern – it was the Albuquerque mountains, not the meth, that had me wishing I could trade places with Walter White. I took it as a sign that I needed a vacation, and then I powered through the rest of the series on Netflix. The pandemic has meant hunkering down at home for most, taking lots of walks and venturing out only when necessary. For Chapel Hill’s Michelle Fishburne, it was a call to safely hit the road in her RV in a series of trips across the country. She met folks of all stripes – from artists to business owners to teachers – and talked to them about this “new normal,” telling their stories on her website, whowearenow.us. A storyteller and a traveler myself, I realized Walter White and his RV excursions have nothing on Michelle’s. She wraps up her road trip at the end of this month, but you can read more about her cross-country travels on page 42. Are you champing at the bit for when it’s safe to book that overdue vacation, but yearning for some excitement now? We have a few staycation ideas. On page 32, you’ll find reopened favorites to visit and a hidden gem or two here in Chapel Hill and beyond. As for me, I’m counting down to a trip this fall (fingers crossed!) and meanwhile looking for adventure closer to home. CHM

T HE COVER P h o to by J o h n M ic ha el Sim pson 6

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A B O UT TOWN

Compiled by Renee Ambroso EVENTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE; CHECK WITH ORGANIZERS PRIOR TO ATTENDING

EVENTS NOT TO MISS

Carrboro Annual Kite Fly MARCH

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1-3 p.m.

carrbororec.org Celebrate National Kite Month a few weeks early with Carrboro Recreation, Parks &

Cultural Resources Department by flying a kite at Anderson Community Park. This celebratory event

promises fun for all ages; some kites will be provided for those without one. The event is subject to cancellation due to weather. COURTESY OF CARRBORO RECREATION, PARKS & CULTURAL RESOURCES DEPARTMENT

Kids of all ages enjoyed Carrboro’s annual Kite Fly in 2018.

‘A Thousand Ways’ March 1-14 carolinaperformingarts.org Carolina Performing Arts presents “A

Thousand Ways (Part 1): A Phone Call” by 600 HIGHWAYMEN, a theater collective led by Abigail Browde and Michael Silverstone. This unique project is specifically designed for a socially distanced experience; participants engage from home in a remote phone conversation with a stranger guided by a prerecorded narrator.

Big Night In for the Arts March 11, 7 p.m. bignightin.org Orange County Arts Commission partners

with Chatham Arts Council, Durham Arts 8

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March 2021

Council and United Arts Council to raise nearly $1 million during this regional fundraiser broadcasted and livestreamed via WRAL. The event features performances from local and national talents, such as Mandolin Orange, addresses the impact of COVID-19 on the arts and highlights the missions of the four organizations. Funds benefit local nonprofit arts and culture organizations to assist in their recovery and reentry post-pandemic.

5 Days for Education March 15-19 publicschoolfoundation.org In lieu of its annual 5K, Chapel Hill-Carrboro Public School Foundation and Fleet Feet host a five-day virtual event to raise money for a relief fund providing assistance to families with school-age children who are struggling to cope financially during the pandemic. Participants can watch a five-minute fitness video each day that features local athletes, such as the UNC football team, who will demonstrate exercises.

‘Edges of Time’ March 23-April 4 playmakersrep.org This one-woman show about the life and career of journalist and activist Marvel Cooke was written by playwright and UNC associate professor of dramatic art Jaqueline E. Lawton, directed by Jules Odendahl-James and stars Kathryn Hunter Williams. It will stream between March 23 and April 4 for PlayMakers Repertory Company ticket holders and within 48 hours of purchasing for single-ticket buyers.

‘Sense of Wonder’ March 26-April 29 hillsboroughgallery.com Hillsborough Gallery of Arts’ monthly exhibit features Arianna Bara’s sterling silver jewelry, paintings by Eduardo Lapetina and Larry Favorite’s woodwork inlaid with turquoise

and silver, all created during the pandemic. The exhibit is also available for virtual viewing through the gallery’s website. CHM


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PEOP LE & P LACES

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Salute to Community Heroes The Chamber for a Greater Chapel HillCarrboro honored 11 locals for their commitment to maintaining a thriving, healthy and sustainable community during its 18th annual Salute to Community Heroes in December 2020. In lieu of its usual ceremony, the Chamber staff visited each winner at their workplace to present the award. Photography by Vanessa Watson

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1 Orange County Sheriff’s Office Employee of the Year: K9 Deputy David Funk, pictured with his wife, Angel Funk, and Sheriff Charles Blackwood. 2 Chapel Hill Firefighter of the Year: Fire Equipment Operator Chip Aiken. 3 Carrboro Firefighter of the Year: Driver/Operator Doug Yates. 4 UNC Public Safety Officer of the Year: Investigator Raymond Oliver. 5 Hillsborough Police Officer of the Year: Sgt. Nick Chelenza.


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6 UNC Hospitals Police Officer of the Year: Lt. William Mazurek. 7 South Orange Rescue Member of the Year: Haley Amanda Davies. 8 Orange Rural Fire Member of the Year: Luke Sine, pictured with his wife, Rachel Sine. 9 Carrboro Police Officer of the Year: Officer Steven Dixon. 10 Chapel Hill Police Officer of the Year: Officer Jason Belcher. 11 Orange County Emergency Services Employee of the Year: David Sykes.

March 2021

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PEOP LE & P LACES

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Carolina Chamber 2021 Annual Meeting

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The Chamber For a Greater Chapel Hill-Carrboro convened virtually with hundreds of members for the 78th Annual Meeting on Jan. 29 with the help of Critical Focus Creative. The event marked the Chamber’s 500th Zoom event in the past 10 months. During the meeting, Chamber directors (including Chapel Hill Magazine’s Ellen Shannon, the 2020 board chair) and guests reflected on the perseverance, partnerships and progress forged in the past year during the pandemic and also shared the Chamber’s vision for recovery and resiliency in the year ahead. Eleven individuals were also recognized for their contributions to the community: • Duke Energy Citizenship & Service Award: Orange County Health Director Quintana Stewart • The Chair’s Award for Service to The Chamber: Coastal Credit Union’s Chief Culture & Impact Officer Creighton Blackwell • The Chair’s Award for Public Private Partnership: Chapel Hill Mayor Pam Hemminger, Carrboro Mayor Lydia Lavelle, Hillsborough Mayor Jenn Weaver and former Chair of the Orange County Board of Commissioners Penny Rich • Citizen of the Year: Former Chapel Hill-Carrboro NAACP President Anna Richards • Jim Gibson Volunteer of the Year: Carrboro Business Alliance Immediate Past Chair David Jessee • Town & Gown Award: UNC’s Executive Director of OffCampus Student Life and Community Partnerships Aaron Bachenheimer • Irene Briggaman Lifetime Achievement Award: Retired WCHL 97.9 The Hill and Chapelboro.com Morning Show Host Ron Stutts • Twenty Years of Exceptional Service and Extraordinary Contributions in 2020: The Chamber President and CEO Aaron Nelson

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1 2020 Citizen of the Year Anna Richards. 2 Indira Everett, district manager of community and government relations for Duke Energy. 3 Ellen Shannon, Chapel Hill Magazine’s VP of Planning and Development. 4 Chamber President & CEO Aaron Nelson. 5 2020 Volunteer of the Year David Jessee. 6 Chamber Board Member Creighton Blackwell. 7 Clockwise from top left: Pam Hemminger, Penny Rich, Jenn Weaver and Lydia Lavelle.


P EO PLE & PLACES

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Crook’s Corner Book Prize Chapel Hill native Sion Dayson won the eighth annual Crook’s Corner Book Prize for best debut novel set in the American South. Sion, who now lives in Spain, earned the $5,000 prize for “As a River,” which explores family secrets in the segregated South. In lieu of the usual event held at Crook’s Corner, the program featured a virtual discussion in January among Sion, Jaded Ibis Press Editor Elizabeth Earley and last year’s winner, Devi S. Laskar. The discussion was moderated by Leoneda Inge. “This pandemic year has particularly impacted debut novelists who have a tough time gaining recognition even in the best of times,” Foundation president Anna Hayes says. “With in-person bookstore readings and book launch events canceled, we are especially glad for this opportunity to shine a spotlight on exciting new writers.” CHM

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1 Clockwise from top left: Leoneda Inge, Sion Dayson, Elizabeth Earley and Devi S. Laskar. 2 Chapel Hill Public Library’s Maia James and Crook’s Corner Book Prize Foundation president Anna Hayes.

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WHAT WE’VE HEARD AROUND TOWN … Compiled by Claire Burch

around the world in January. Participate Learning, which provides equitable global education programs to K-12 schools, was ranked No. 51 on the list among gamechangers such as Tesla, Beyond Meat and 147 other well-respected impact brands of all sizes from a variety of industries.

Kasia Kedziora,

a postdoctoral researcher in the UNC Department of Genetics Purvis Lab, and a principal

investigator at the

WHAT AN HONOR Eugenia Floyd, a fourth grade teacher at Mary Scroggs Elementary School, was

named a North Carolina Regional Teacher of the Year in December. She is one of only nine finalists for the state’s top honor, which will be announced April 9 at an awards ceremony in Cary. Eugenia is a product of the Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools district, a 2005 graduate of East Chapel Hill High School and earned a bachelor’s degree from UNC Greensboro.

Real Leaders magazine announced the winners of its 2021 “Top Impact Companies” from 16

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March 2021

Local photographer Martha Hoelzer received an honorable mention in the 2020 International Photography Awards for her project “What Lies Beneath: Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI).” In the series, Martha explores the impact of a traumatic (concussion) or acquired (tumor) brain injury on the visual system. She examines the brain’s ability to interpret the environment from the patient’s perspective. Chapel Hill was named the No. 9 best small college town in America by WalletHub in early December. WalletHub compared more than 400 U.S. cities – also grouped by city and town size – based on key indicators of Send us your academic, social and noteworthy economic growth moments! potential. The data From births set ranges from the to awards cost of living to the to new biz and more – quality of higher noted@ education to the chapelhill crime rate. magazine.com

Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools was named the best school district in North Carolina by Niche, while Orange County Schools ranked No. 16. The rankings were determined by analyzing a combination of academics, diversity, teachers, college prep, clubs and safety.

earned a five-year, $740,000 grant for her project titled, “Empowering Biologists with Deep Learning Approaches for Image Analysis” from the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative. The grant was created to support and fund biomedical imaging researchers, technology development and the BioImaging North America international network of bioimaging facilities and communities. The Chapel HillCarrboro NAACP

named Delores Bailey as the recipient of the branch’s 2021 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Community Service Award in January. A Chapel Hill native, Delores serves the community every day as executive director of EmPOWERment Inc. “Service to others is my life,” Delores says. “I was thrilled to receive this prestigious award and truly thank the members of the branch for this honor.” Chapel Hill High School

Coach Joan Mabe was named the 2019-20 South Section Boys Cross-Country Coach of the Year by the National Federation of State High School Coaches Associations in January.

PHOTO BY BRIANA BROUGH

PHOTO BY CORNELL WATSON

Bioinformatics and Analytics Research Collaborative at UNC,


GIVING BACK On Dec. 9, National Pawn donated more than 100 instruments to Musical Empowerment at YouthWorx on Main in Carrboro, to be distributed among seven North Carolina locations. Musical Empowerment pairs underserved children with college students who provide them with free weekly 40-minute music lessons. “We believe in music’s intrinsic power to transform lives and work hard each day to ensure the children of North Carolina have a chance to experience it,” said Musical Empowerment’s COO Allison Flors in a press release on Dec. 2. “National Pawn’s donation will have an impact on many young musicians across the state, and we are so appreciative of their choice to donate.”

home program, which will enable UNC Health to provide hospitallevel, high-acuity care to patients in the comfort and convenience of their own homes. The program will offer hospitallevel services at home to patients who would otherwise require inpatient hospitalization for serious illnesses as well as for COVID-19. When Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools transitioned to virtual learning last March, culinary teams and volunteers jumped into action to ensure students were still being fed. District employees prepared nutritious to-go meals, worked with volunteers, organized pickup sites and traveled around the district to deliver meals. As of January, the district hit the milestone of providing approximately 1 million meals to students.

Orange County Animal Services

(OCAS) announced in December that it received a $25,000 grant from the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) as part of its national ASPCA Relief & Recovery Initiative. Grant funds will support the Veterinary Care Assistance Program at OCAS, which will assist community residents with some veterinary expenses during the pandemic. “Pivoting to provide assistance to people with pets is of great significance as we face the COVID-19 pandemic,” OCAS Director Bob Marotto says. UNC Health announced in January it has

reached an agreement with Medically Home Group, Inc. to establish an acute care at

event was held in a drive-through format. The event raised more than $100,000 and will help Habitat continue its mission to provide affordable and safe housing. In late 2020, Hope Renovations raised nearly $18,000 for its year-end “Hoperaiser,” $3,000 more than its goal. The nonprofit works to empower women to pursue living wage jobs in construction and provides repairs to maintain the homes of older adults in the community. The fundraiser helps the training team continue to prepare women for careers in the trades and ensures that older adults can stay in their homes safely throughout construction.

ON THE MOVE Renee Price was elected unanimously to serve as chair of the Orange County Board of Commissioners

for 2021. Renee served as vice chair for the past two years. “Being selected to serve as chair by my peers certainly is an honor, and I am most appreciative,” Renee says. “I realize that my responsibilities to the Board and to the Orange County community suddenly have expanded, and I will endeavor in earnest to serve with, by and for the people.” Jamezetta Bedford, who is in her first term as an Orange County commissioner, was chosen unanimously to serve as vice chair. Sonya Bonczek joined UNC Press in December as the director

More than 100 people participated in Habitat for Humanity of Orange County’s

22nd annual House Party, which showcased homes and repairs made by the nonprofit in the Northside neighborhood, on Nov. 22. Due to the ongoing pandemic, this year’s

of publicity. Sonya is a public relations professional with an extensive background in both trade and academic book publishing, most recently as publicity manager at Harvard University Press. She March 2021

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NOTED

Peter L. Perez

also joined UNC Press in January in the newly created position of director of public relations and communications. Peter has worked in various areas of the publishing and retail industries for more than 20 years, most recently, as public relations and communications director at University of California Press. These hires are the result of the departure of UNC Press Publicity Director Gina Mahalek, who retired in December after 20 years at the press. The Orange County Board of Commissioners appointed Laura Jensen as the county’s new clerk to the board at its Dec. 15 meeting. Laura formerly served as Person County’s assistant finance director/budget manager and also as interim assistant county manager for Person County from June 2019 to August 2020. Kirby Saunders, a 22-year emergency management division veteran, was named to lead Orange County Emergency Services

in December. Kirby has served as emergency management coordinator with Orange County since 2014. He replaces Dinah Jeffries, who retired on Dec. 31 after a 37year career with the county. Chief Walter Horton retired in January from the Carrboro Police Department after 27 years in law enforcement. A native of Carrboro, Walter joined the department in 1993 as a member of the patrol division and 18

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March 2021

was appointed chief in 2013. Upon his retirement, Walter says, “I’m thankful to all the officers and the staff of the department, as well as all my Town of Carrboro colleagues. I would not have been successful without them.” PORCH Chapel HillCarrboro announced

the appointment of Sarah Dudzic as its first executive director in January. Sarah comes to PORCH with more than 15 years of experience leading nonprofit organizations in New England. “I am beyond excited to see the programs in action and meet all the volunteers, as they are clearly the heart of the organization,” Sarah said. “We have challenging times and amazing opportunities ahead.” Hillsborough Water Treatment Plant

Accounting firm Blackman & Sloop,

announced in November the addition of Joshua Minor. He joins the firm as a manager in the small business advisory department and has eight years of experience, including 3½ years as the controller of a software company. In February, Chanel Hart D’Aprix

announced the opening of Hart & Olive Real Estate Group

and her affiliation with eXp Realty, the largest independent brokerage in the U.S. Her real estate group will focus on Pittsboro and Chapel Hill and serve as the listing firm for two new home developments, Winding Creek, a 32-home community in Alamance County, and Corbett Landing, a neighborhood of 116 homes near downtown Pittsboro.

Superintendent

NOW IN BUSINESS

Howard Hobson retired

Federal Realty Investment Trust announced the sale of Eastgate Crossing, the longtime Chapel Hill shopping center anchored by Trader Joe’s, Ulta and Petco, which was the company’s only asset in North Carolina. The shopping center, along with two other shopping centers located in Florida and Washington, D.C., was purchased by a company associated with the Kite Realty Group in a $170 million dollar deal.

in February after more than 32 years with the town. Howard started work with the town as a mechanics helper in the motor pool in 1988. In retirement, Howard plans to spend time with family and work on his farm. Police Corporal Keith Bradshaw retired in January after nearly 10 years with the Hillsborough Police Department and

nearly 30 years in law enforcement. “Law enforcement has been wonderful to me and my family,” he says, adding, “I think it’s time to spend time with my family while I can.”

Dr. Sharon Lau and Dr. Caroline Latta opened Eno River Dental in

Hillsborough on Dec. 7. The doctors met while attending the UNC Adams School of Dentistry

and both reside in Orange County. 

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Her work in our community has been recognized and awarded by many. In 2014, the Chapel Hill

(IFC) over the years. She volunteered for a long list of local organizations, including Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools and the Family Violence Prevention Center of Orange County (now the Compass Center for Women and Families), but was perhaps best known for founding RSVVP, the annual fundraiser held on the second Tuesday in November in which restaurants pledge to contribute 10% of proceeds from that day to IFC’s food bank and hunger-relief programs.

Historical Society listed Irene among its Community Treasures and in 2019 the Chamber For a Greater Chapel Hill-Carrboro named her Ambassador Emeritus. Today, the Chamber’s Partnership for a Sustainable Community presents The Irene Briggaman Lifetime Achievement award to “individuals who have demonstrated a lifetime of exceptional public service and volunteerism in the greater Chapel Hill-Carrboro community in multiple capacities with different organizations.”

Chapel Hill Tire opened its ninth location in

Apex in January. The shop is headed up by Stephen Hall.

The Durham-Chapel Hill area was ranked the No. 10 most charitable metropolitan area in the United States by SmartAsset. The study, which measured metrics such as average charitable contribution and volunteer rate, showed that 29.95% of tax returns in the Durham-Chapel Hill area included charitable donations. The Hillsborough Board of Commissioners voted in January to pass an ordinance protecting the members of the LGBTQ community from discrimination. The vote made Hillsborough the first municipality in the state to pass LGBTQ-inclusive nondiscrimination protections in recent years. Chapel Hill and Carrboro passed the same ordinance days later.

BOOKIN’ IT Author Emily Jane Buehler published her first fiction novel on Nov. 30. “The Forest Bride” is a lighthearted romantic fantasy, something she says gives readers a fun 20

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world to escape into during this sometimes stressful time. “I wanted to write characters who overcome their internal conflicts and become stronger, instead of the badass, sword-wielding heroine that often appears these days,” Emily says. “The Uncollected Stories of Allan Gurganus,” a new novel released in January written by author Allan Gurganus, features nine tales depicting topics such as the human condition and tumultuous relationships. This is his first release since 2015. “To Love and to Loathe,” the second book penned by Martha Waters, comes out April 6 from Atria Books. There will be a virtual event featuring Martha hosted by Flyleaf Books to celebrate the launch of the novel on its release date at 6 p.m. CHM

PHOTO BY ROGER HAILE

Town treasure and local champion Irene Briggaman passed away in early January. Irene dedicated her life to serving the community and raised more than a half-million dollars for the

IN OTHER NEWS

Carrboro coffee shop Johnny’s Gone Fishing changed its name in December to Present Day on Main. Soteria Shepperson and Sophie Suberman, who have been co-managers since August 2017 and co-owners since January 2019, say, “the name ‘Present Day on Main’ came about as a call to action as well as a reflection on what we often miss amid the hubbub of daily life and crises: the present.”

PHOTO BY CORNELL WATSON

IN MEMORIAM

PHOTO BY RYAN CHAMBERLAIN

After months of being closed, the Ackland Art Museum reopened its doors on Jan. 27 with timed ticketing and limited capacity. At press time, the museum is open from 1 to 5 p.m. Wednesdays through Saturdays.


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W H AT WE’ RE EATIN G NEWS FROM OUR RESTAURANT COMMUNITY, PLUS A DISH WE LOVE

➾ NEWS BITES

HOT OFF THE GRILL Jed’s Kitchen, a Moroccan and Mediterranean grill, opened in December in the former Peño Mediterranean Grill on East Franklin Street. The menu includes offerings such as salads, soup, chicken tagine and beef gyro pita. THE OLD COLLEGE TRY As of press time, Trophy Room at the Graduate Chapel Hill was slated to open on Feb. 18. The menu will feature homemade takes on college favorites such as Hot Pockets, Dunkaroos, Eggo Waffles, Doritos and more.

he memory of 10-plus friends seated around one large table covered in sushi and sake has faded since the onset of the pandemic. Spicy 9 Sushi Bar & Asian Restaurant was one of the most popular celebration spots on West Franklin Street for many locals and UNC students. These days, birthdays, job offers and graduations can slip by without anyone saying, “Let’s go out to dinner!” Which is why we checked in with Spicy 9 owner Mike Vikitsreth to see how Chapel Hill’s sushi staple is holding up. “We’re doing well enough,” he says. Mike has worked hard to keep Spicy 9 financially afloat since opening the restaurant’s doors in 2014. He was prepared to safely lead his staff forward when Spicy 9 reopened in August 2020 after months of being closed due to the pandemic. Spicy 9’s menu includes popular dishes from Thailand, Korea, Japan and China, which you can enjoy via curbside pickup, delivery or by dining in; takeout is the most popular option. Mike, an ’06 UNC grad, shared some of his favorite menu items: “I’m a restaurant kid, so I grew up with these rolls,” he says. “My go-tos are always the dragon roll, spider roll and the spicy tuna roll.” There are 40 rolls to choose from, but Mike says these are the classics, especially if you don’t know exactly what you’re craving. If you buy one specialty roll of sushi, you get a second specialty roll of sushi for free any day of the week. Some rolls feature local namesakes, like the “To All The Rolls I’ve Loved Before,” which is a nod to fellow UNC alum Jenny Han whose popular trilogy of young adult novels were adapted for film and released on Netflix. In “Always and Forever, Lara Jean,” the third book of the series, Spicy 9 is featured in a scene where the main character tours UNC’s campus and pops into the sushi bar for a bite. Mike hopes that the ritual of dining out to celebrate life’s milestones and achievements will one day resume. Until then, celebrate the small victories with a saketini, sushi and soy sauce – to go.– Marie Muir Always Roll My Maybe, $16, and Sweet Ninja Roll, $14 SPICY 9 SUSHI BAR & ASIAN RESTAURANT 140 W. Franklin St., Ste. 150; 919-903-9335; spicy9chapelhill.com 22

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I LOVE YOU LIKE BISCUITS & GRAVY The Flying Biscuit Café is slated to open in University Place this spring. Known for its signature biscuits and all-day breakfast, the restaurant, which has 24 other locations across the South, specializes in unique takes on Southern comfort food. EAT LOCAL Owner and chef David Peretin opens his restaurant, Tesoro, in late spring across from Weaver Street Market in downtown Carrboro. David, a graduate of Chapel Hill High School, saw stints in the kitchens of Pizzeria Mercato, The Fearrington House Restaurant and, most recently, Saint James Seafood in Durham. His menu will feature house-made pasta, entrees and sweets with Italian, French and Croatian influences, which will change with the seasons. The restaurant will offer limited dine-in seating to start, plus curbside pickup and retail sales of house-made pasta, sauces and more. SOUTHERN COMFORT Dave’s Hot Chicken announced in January that it signed a franchise agreement with a multi-unit franchise group to open 10 locations throughout North Carolina, including Chapel Hill. Specializing in hot chicken tenders and sliders, with spice levels ranging from “no spice” to “reaper,” each restaurant also serves sides of house-made kale slaw, creamy macaroni and cheese and cheese fries. CHM


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mas k u p Meet the team behind a nationwide PSA that encourages wearing your mask By Lau re n Rive r s | P h o to graphy by B ryan Regan

C

harlie Lehmann “old ad guy,” Charlie decided watched a very sad and deeply he needed to make a public disturbing COVID-19 news service announcement campaign conference as he was quarantining – and fast. in his home at Carolina Meadows Charlie turned to Don retirement community one Stedman, the former dean of the evening last summer. Daily cases UNC School of Education, his of the coronavirus were rising friend of almost a decade and his uncontrollably, and his age group Charles Lehmann neighbor at Carolina Meadows, – 75 to 90 – comprised 20% of the to help him raise money for the daily cases and 80% of the deaths. project. Next, Charlie knew he Charlie said to his wife, Carol needed to find a creative resource Lehmann, “It’s apparent that with an all in-house team. An ad effective medical treatment or a agency with the heart to help. vaccine to prevent this virus might One capable of doing it all – TV, not be seen in the near future.” It radio, design, digital, social, public was during that news conference relations and web – and most that Charlie realized it was our importantly, a creative director responsibility as a community capable of carefully creating their Don Stedman to follow safety precautions and dream campaign, quickly. protect ourselves with the best The phone rang at Rivers tools that we have – “keep your distance Agency, and our old friend Charlie was on and wear a mask.” As a self-proclaimed the other end of the line, looking to speak to 24

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MASK UP

Sarah Owens, our executive creative director,

as the pair has worked together for years on many projects. He said, “Sarah, I have an idea that I think could save lives.” To that, Sarah responded, “What? ... Charlie, you’ve called the wrong place. We’re an ad agency, not UNC Hospitals.” (Sarah is very funny.) “Masks should not be political,” Charlie said. It was at that moment that Charlie and our entire team at Rivers Agency began to learn what it meant to be involved in a public service announcement campaign. The “You Can Help Me – Wear a Mask” project was born. The idea was to urge people to wear a mask in order to prevent the spread of the virus and speed up the reopening of our communities and our lives. Sarah and Charlie envisioned a campaign that would feature ordinary Americans who both need

and want to go back to a pre-pandemic world. We wanted the story in our PSA to focus deeply on real people, with real-life stories, using their real names and expressing the new reality that the lockdown placed on their lives. Enter Catherine Schramm. Cat is our quintessential “finder of real people,” our street-caster extraordinaire. She discovered and brought in those people – a single mom, a special education teacher, a teen and a firefighter, among others – so they could share their stories. Rivers Agency and the whole creative team were honored to be a part of this project to help bring Charlie and Don’s idea to life, make an impact on the community and hopefully save lives by simply reminding people to wear a mask. Visit youcanhelpme. org to see project updates and watch the fulllength PSA. CHM

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CAROLINA ON OUR MIND HAP P ENIN G S AT U N C

On the Fro nt L ine

L

When the pandemic hit last year, UNC alumna and Hillsborough native Dr. Kizzmekia Corbett led a team that developed the vaccine

ast spring, Albert Russell watched with pride and a touch of amazement as TV newscasts aired pictures of a 34-year-old scientist at the National Institutes of Health, explaining to the president of the United States about promising new developments for a coronavirus vaccine. Albert got to know the scientist, Kizzmekia “Kizzy” Corbett, in summer 2002 when she was a precocious 16-year-old working in UNC’s Kenan Laboratories on a Project Seed internship for gifted minorities. He was studying for his 2003 doctorate from UNC in organic chemistry and was one of her mentors. Kizzy stood out because of her relentless curiosity and how quickly she mastered scientific techniques. In other ways, she was a typical teenager, captivated by texting with friends and enthralled by the singer Kelly Rowland. Albert stood out to Kizzy, too: He was the only African American scientist in the lab. He helped her not only think like a scientist but also see herself as one. By summer’s end, Kizzy knew the career she wanted. Eighteen years later, when then-President Donald Trump visited NIH, Kizzy was the only African American scientist in the laboratory that day – and the only woman and the youngest person by decades. As scientific lead in the effort to find a vaccine, it fell to her to help answer the president’s questions. Dressed in a starched white lab coat, she pointed to a colorful computer rendition of the lethal spike protein that allows the coronavirus to bind to human cells. The former president nodded along while Kizzy instructed. “That’s totally not what you expect to see in science,” said Albert, chemistry department chair at Tuskegee University in Alabama. “You expect to see Dr. Anthony Fauci, a white guy with gray hair. Now your superhero doesn’t look like you, doesn’t talk like you, doesn’t dress like you – but has the capability to save the world.” For the previous six years, Kizzy had managed a team of scientists at the Vaccine Research Center in Bethesda, Maryland, creating experimental vaccines for the SARS and MERS coronaviruses, among others. Their work – in partnership with biotech company Moderna Therapeutics – gave them a jump-start on the novel coronavirus, which is 78% genetically identical to SARS. 28

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“She was in the perfect place at the right moment,” said Ralph Baric, professor of epidemiology, microbiology and immunology in UNC’s Gillings School of Global Public Health. Ralph has devoted 35 years to studying coronaviruses and served on Kizzy’s graduate committee at Carolina. Their labs are collaborating. “In the high-pressure, rapid-response environment, a huge number of people are making massive contributions,” he said, “and she’s one of them, and she’s playing a central role.” THEY’RE ‘B ANKING ON US’ n a record 66 days, an experimental COVID-19 vaccine was injected into the first human volunteers. “I could just cry,” Kizzy tweeted March 28, 2020. “Our vaccine is really into human beings, y’all!!!” The pressure was intense. “A lot of people are banking on us or feel that we have a product that could, at least, be part of the answer this world needs,” she told NBC News in April 2020. “And, well, whew, just saying that out loud is not easy.” To cope, she relied on meditation, prayer and phone sessions with her therapist. In the heady days following the former president’s visit, national publications and newscasts sought out Kizzy for interviews, adding another level of pressure. She temporarily became the face of the NIH, poised and personable, adept at conveying complicated science to nonscientists. In an interview with Black Enterprise magazine, Kizzy described herself: “I am Christian. I’m Black. I am Southern, I’m an empath. I’m feisty, sassy and fashionable. That’s kind of how I describe myself. I would say that my role as a scientist is really about my passion and purpose for the world and for giving back to the world.” She is known in scientific circles for being consumed by work, passionate about helping others, generous with her time and not afraid to speak her mind. Outside of work, “the nonscience Kizzy” is known for her humor and sense of style and for remembering friends’ birthdays and anniversaries. She calls herself “a science nerd.” But, as Albert put it, “she’s not a typical pocket-protector scientist.” She starts her days to the edgy sound of rapper Jeezy’s Thug Motivation 101 and ends them with a glass of wine. Before the country shut down in response to the coronavirus, she

I


rushed out to get her eyebrows sculpted and “an emergency hair weave.” Data informs Kizzy’s science while her faith informs her life. She told TarHelium, a publication of the American Chemical Society, that a line from North Carolina rapper J. Cole “is the driver of what I consider to be my ‘Purpose.’ Cole rapped: ‘Believe in GOD like the sun up in the sky. SCIENCE can tell us how, but it can’t tell us why.’” To which, Kizzy adds: “You can design an interesting experiment to answer just about anything. But I think that only the universe – and I use universe and God synonymously – can answer the why. That is one overarching question that science just won’t answer. I kind of love that.” Kizzy presents herself on Twitter as someone who can talk about the virus to just about anyone – “from the trap house to the White House.” It’s important, she says, to make science relatable. “That’s why I tweet about science, but also about my weaves, and my family, and my religion, and whatever I feel,” she wrote last March. “‘My science is the world’s’ but how will I get it to them if I don’t EARN their trust?” “She’s so bright, and the work she does is really complicated and complex, but she has never altered who she is,” said writer Nancy Curlee Demorest, a family friend from Hillsborough, where Kizzy graduated from Orange High School in 2004. “I love the way she has preached to her community on Twitter and had such a big impact. And she’s speaking in the vernacular, and she’s making it real. You can feel her energy.” ‘A B S O R B A N Y THIN G SHE CO U LD’ izzy comes from a large, close family, one she described as “generations of just plain giving a hoot about others.” Her mother still sends her care packages; her grandmothers pray for her every night. Kizzy calls their family a “mixed family” because she and her six siblings are a blend of stepchildren, foster children and adopted children raised by her mother, Rhonda Brooks, and stepfather, Terrence Brooks. “They have a yours, mine and ours, and anybody else’s child who’s been abandoned kind of family,” Nancy said. “Her sense of identity and sense of self is tremendous because she’s gotten so much love and so much support.” Kizzy said her father often told her, “I don’t care what you’re going to be, but whatever it is make sure you’re the best at it.” Over the years, support also has come from a string of mentors. In addition to Albert, they include James Morken, who taught chemistry at Carolina from 1997 to 2006 and ran the University’s organic chemistry lab where Kizzy interned in high school. Kizzy often is asked how a woman from a small town in North Carolina ended up in such a visible and important position. Her short answer: mentorship. “A lot of times to get to where you want to go – and I’m still not where I fully want to go – it helps to have someone see in you the possibilities and guide you in that way,” she said. “Basically, I stand on the shoulders of giants, and they help me see.”

K

@KizzyPhD• April 14, 2020 • “If you see me on TV with @andersoncooper tonight, please remember that my hair salon is closed down, and I painted my own nails for the first time since I was 14 years old. But, the SCIENCE IS GOOD!”

In January 2020, she emailed James a copy of a New York Times article about her role in helping develop a coronavirus vaccine and thanked him “for introducing me to amino acids.” “The research she did was technically sophisticated,” said James, now professor of chemistry at Boston College. The title of a paper Kizzy wrote that summer suggests the complexity of her research: “The Effect of Chiral Phosphoramidites on a Platinum-Catalyzed, Enantioselective Diene Aldehyde-Silylborane Coupling.” “What I remember most is her tremendous curiosity about science,” James said. “She was eager to learn, eager to just absorb anything she could.” While in college at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Kizzy met her future boss and one of her current mentors during an internship at the Vaccine Research Center. Dr. Barney Graham, who is deputy director of the center, asked what she wanted to do with her life. “I want your job,” the 19-year-old Kizzy replied. When Kizzy returned to North Carolina to get a doctorate in microbiology and immunology, she and Kari Debbink met during orientation. Once again, Kizzy stood out. “I just remember her being the most vocal and the best about asking really intelligent questions,” said Kari. “She’s not afraid to ask questions, and that’s something I really admire about her.” Also this: “She makes you feel like you’re important.” HEAD START ON THE VIRUS he two scientists remain friends. Kari invited Kizzy to speak at Bowie State University in Maryland in 2019, where Kari is an assistant professor. Kizzy’s topic: Development of a coronavirus vaccine. “Nobody cared about coronavirus at the time,” Kari said. “The fact that she’s gotten to be front and center for NIH’s coronavirus vaccine is amazing. But she’s in that position in the first place because she recognized coronavirus as an area that would be important in the future, and she worked on it. It comes from a place of empathy to make the world better. “Now little kids all over the United States can look at her and say: ‘She’s a scientist. She’s fashionable and fun and cool, and she does major work in science and is making this big discovery.’” Now that Kizzy is in a position to mentor others, she advises students to assemble “a career committee” of people they see themselves becoming and people who recognize their potential. “It really helps to have an honest, open communication,” she said. “Ask them: What am I doing wrong? How can I change? Am I on the right path? Is this the right step?” She realizes that one reason she attracted attention is because “I look different.” She believes that’s a good thing – that diversity is key to productivity in all facets of life. “In order to have diverse ideas you have to have a pool of diverse backgrounds,” she told the News of Orange County in February 2020. “My background as a Black woman from rural North Carolina might be different than other people who are in the field.” 

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C AROLIN A ON OU R M I N D

But the attention also led to backlash. One person suggested she “go back to McDonalds where you belong” – the type of racism Kizzy has endured for much of her life. Criticism exploded across the internet in response to one of her tweets following reports that Black people were dying disproportionately from the virus. “I tweet for the people who will die when doctors [have] to choose who gets the last ventilator and ultimately … who lives,” Kizzy posted on March 29, 2020. A couple of weeks later, someone replied that the virus “is a way to get rid of us.” Kizzy’s 13-word response went viral: “Some have gone as far to call it genocide. I plead the fifth.” In a webinar for minority STEM students in May 2020, she noted the criticism. Asked whether she has “haters” on social media and how she responds, Kizzy said: “I don’t know if you can necessarily call them haters. Some people are never going to be satisfied. That’s why you have to satisfy yourself. I think that criticism is something that – as hard as it is to take sometimes – it’s something we should all heed to, no matter from whom it comes. And, of course, everyone doesn’t have your best interests at heart. But they go low, we go high – however Michelle [Obama] said it.” Her parents, she said, reminded her that when her scholarships were announced in high school, some people booed. “People are going to hate what they can’t compete with. Period. And so just let your work speak for itself. Keep it moving.”

Dr. Scott Royal, who worked with Kizzy at UNC on developing a better vaccine for dengue fever, said he feels “safe and secure” knowing she’s the scientific lead in the NIH’s effort. He remembered Kizzy as insightful but not afraid to be wrong, laser-focused on her work but also in charge of the annual Secret Santa gift exchange. “I feel like she’s the right person to get this done on schedule and on time,” said Scott, now a pediatric resident at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital in Washington, D.C. “She’s not going to let anything slow this process down. I think she’s going to be on top of it and make sure it’s a safe vaccine for everyone.” “On top of it” has sometimes meant all-nighters in the lab in Bethesda, harkening back to Kizzy’s days in Chapel Hill when she was writing her dissertation and would stay home during the day and work in the lab at night. She resumed that midnight-to-8 a.m. work routine for a while in 2020 to avoid exposure to the coronavirus. And so it was that at 5:30 a.m. one morning, she took to Twitter to explain to one of her nearly 50,000 followers the difference between a sequence and a strain of the novel coronavirus, adding: “I cannot believe I’m explaining phylogeny in lay terms at 5:30 a.m.; what is my life? vs. I LOVE IT.”

This article has been adapted with permission from the Carolina Alumni Review’s September/October 2020 issue, “Some Science Nerd!” CHM

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T RAVEL

If you are dreaming of afternoon rituals across the pond … Dress up and take tea like the British at three area establishments. Step into the world of high society at The Carolina Inn, which offers a traditional menu with a twist served in the Piedmont Dining Room. Southern ingredients make the sweet and savory treats and homemade scones with jam, lemon curd and clotted cream feel closer to home. In Durham, the Washington Duke Inn & Golf Club offers a traditional tea where guests can enjoy finger sandwiches, sweets and scones surrounded by the accoutrements of fine dining. Take tea up a notch by upgrading to the Tea Royale served with a glass of Champagne, mimosa or Kir Royale. In Chatham County, The Fearrington House Restaurant blends influences in its afternoon tea, combining British fare with French- and Southern-inspired treats. Kids can also enjoy a fancy afternoon out as the restaurant has an option for them. For those looking to observe the time-honored ritual at home, Takeout for Two afternoon tea is available on Saturdays with a new menu weekly. Masks and reservations are required at all three.

PHOTO BY BRIANA BROUGH

st aycatio n, all I ever wanted By Madel i ne Tayl or

hile no one wants to jinx their vacation plans in 2021 by mentioning taboo words like “pandemic,” “canceled” or “quarantine,” it is a reality that, at press time, many people might not be ready for full-fledged traveling. However, there is plenty to do in and around the area to satiate that wanderlust that inevitably kicked in months ago. Check out these local opportunities for adventure, dining and entertainment that will make everyone feel like they’ve finally gotten over their cabin fever. 32

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PHOTO COURTESY OF OCCONEECHEE GOLF CLUB

T RAVEL

If you haven’t yet rescheduled your hiking trip out west ...

If you couldn’t get a ticket to watch the Masters in Augusta ... PHOTO BY MATT SMITH

With more extreme or unconventional adventures to be found in and around the area, locals can think outside but up the ante! The Professional Disc Golf Association has a course at the UNC Outdoor Education Center that is open to the public. It features long fairways, water hazards and elevation changes as the course was converted from an old golf course. Xtreme Zipline Educational Park in Durham sends explorers across 3,000 feet through the canopies at 35 mph. If that’s not enough, there’s a 60-foot free fall at the end. The 11 zip lines are only some of the activities on the park’s campus – laser tag, paintball, gem mining, escape rooms and a high ropes course can keep you pretty entertained. Zip lining is available for kids as young as 3, and reservations are required. Get out on the water with Frog Hollow Outdoors, a Durham-based adventure company, which offers both self-guided and guided tours, skills instruction and clinics for kayaking, canoeing and stand-up paddleboard. The bald eagle tour on Jordan Lake launches from Farrington Point Boat Ramp in search of the national bird. Jordan Lake is one of the largest summertime nesting sites for bald eagles in the southeastern U.S., so paddlers can attempt to glimpse one in late March, April, May and June.

Book tee time at any of these three local courses, each offering a unique golfing experience. Occoneechee Golf Club in Hillsborough not only has 18 challenging holes, but also supplies a helpful tip for each hole on its website. The Occoneechee Women’s League has a weekly meetup for players of all levels. There’s also Hillandale Golf Course, the oldest course in Durham, which was revamped in the ’60s by famous golf course designer George Cobb. Take part in the Go Fore the Green tournament on March 14 that features a best dressed team contest and on-course prizes. Finally, The Preserve at Jordan Lake, a Davis Love III signature course, hosts a pro-am tournament that encourages a day of competitive play on April 10 before a watch party for the Masters.

Break out of the routine and take advantage of family-friendly activities to keep the kids busy while also learning something new. Kidzu Children’s Museum reopened in November with increased safety protocols, including members-only mornings with staggered check-in times and museum rental, all with limited capacity. In February, Kidzu advanced to a new phase of reopening, so nonmembers can get in on the in-person play. The Museum of Life and Science in Durham employs a reservation-only, timed entry system alongside a new check-in process to keep crowds at a minimum. While not every exhibit is open, more than 15 attractions are still available for both kids and parents to enjoy, including the Magic Wings Butterfly House, Dinosaur Trail and the Aerospace/Launch Lab. Farther south, M&M Alpaca Farm is allowing reservations for tour groups of no more than six people with sanitizing or hand washing required at certain points. Guests will be able to explore the farm and meet the show-winning alpacas. A tour guide will explain how to raise and care for these animals with the opportunity for feeding and petting them. Masks are required for all experiences. CHM

PHOTO BY SP MURRAY

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March 2021

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making the band A group of high schoolers has raised more than $80,000 for UNC Children’s selling handmade bracelets By David Hic k s

F

or the Palladino family – dad Bill, known by most as Dino, mom Wendy and son Zac – soccer comes up frequently at the dinner table. Dino, a Chapel Hill native, was an outstanding athlete at Chapel Hill High School and then at UNC. For close to 40 years, he was an assistant coach for the dynastic UNC women’s soccer team and the director of the world-renowned Carolina Girls’ Soccer Camp. In 1998 and 1999, Dino served as head coach of the former Raleigh Wings team where he, along with his assistant coach, former UNC star Susan Ellis, captured two national championships in the USL W-League. He was an assistant coach for the women’s national team in 2003 and currently serves as an assistant coach with the North Carolina Courage of the National Women’s Soccer League. Wendy, a certified financial planner and a first vice president in the Private Client Group of Wells Fargo Advisors, is a former UNC soccer player with three national championships. She’s also a player who scored for the women’s national team, which won the first Women’s World Cup in 1991. For 36

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many years, Wendy was the voice of women’s soccer as she served as color analyst for ESPN and covered the 1999 and 2003 Women’s World Cups. Son Zac, a sophomore at East Chapel Hill High School, is an accomplished athlete as a member of the golf team and a midfielder on the varsity soccer team. Zac and his friend Ethan Testen were 8 years old when they decided to make and sell rainbow loom bracelets as a way to make some money for the summer. On the corner of their street in their Westwood neighborhood, they set up shop for business. Much to their surprise, they sold $20 worth and decided to buy more supplies for their new venture. Wendy suggested they find another location which would present a better sales opportunity. Right away the boys asked Dino if they could show and sell their BOTTOM CENTER The boys with Dr. Wesley Burks, now the CEO of UNC Health.


Bandz Boyz Robert Hillhouse, Ethan Testen, Zac Palladino, James Robb, Porter Brice and Tommy Robertson at the Bell Tower on UNC’s campus.

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B AN DZ BOYZ

wares at the Carolina Girls’ Soccer Camp. Dino’s only stipulation was that their efforts be for something bigger than making money for themselves. Zac and Ethan, now a sophomore at Chapel Hill High School, immediately thought of UNC Children’s. They thought about what other children faced physically and emotionally between fighting their diseases and long stays at the hospital. Dedicated in September of 2001, the stand-alone

at Chapel Hill High School, and James Robb, a freshman at Durham Academy. Each member also now has superhero power VP titles as the children at the hospital call the group the “undercover superheroes.” After six summers, the boys have donated $80,000 to UNC Children’s for projects that allow the kids to have fun and just be kids while they are battling life-threatening illnesses. Some of the projects have included iPad/goggle combos for usage during chemo, rebuilding a gaming system, N.C. Children’s Hospital funding the purchase of allowed something for North an adaptive bike with head Carolina’s children they and neck supports for kids never had before: a facility to use for physical activity for complete inpatient and and books for the hospital outpatient care for children library. The last two years, in one location – a true the boys have provided the children’s hospital. The Porter, Zac and James used storage tubes to transport their bracelets seed money for an app called state’s children’s hospital. to and from the summer camps. Adventure Squad. Developed Specialty care is provided to by UNC faculty members more than 70,000 children from all 100 counties in North Carolina each year. Dr. Richard Hobbs and Steven King, the game encourages kids to Zac and Ethan were inspired and enlisted two friends, Tommy get out of bed, get active and go on a virtual treasure hunt. The boys’ support has led to the game going commercial and potentially to Robertson, now a sophomore at The Accelerator School, and Robert hospitals around the country. Hillhouse, now a sophomore at Durham Academy. The “Bandz Though the boys skipped selling last summer with camps canceled Boyz” were born and on their way. With help from the moms and because of the pandemic, they are hopeful they’ll be back in business other family members – and the disruption of the Palladino living this summer. For now, they continue to be inspired by the impact they room – the boys embarked on a mission to make 2,000 rainbow loom are able to make. Zac says the most rewarding part of their venture bracelets in one month to sell for $2 each at the camps during the is seeing all the kids and their reactions to the donated items. “We summer. “At the beginning, it took five minutes to make one,” Zac [don’t] really get to see them very often or many of them, but we heard says. “Now it takes one to two minutes.” Campers and staff could buy them at lunch, at dinner and after their camp meeting each night. The stories about how they got to use the stuff that we donated or where the money went to,” he says. boys had a goal of netting $500 for the first summer and ended up far Wendy echoes the sentiment: “One of my most memorable exceeding that goal, donating $8,502 to the hospital. moments when we went over to the hospital was the one year they “When we first started, we thought we’d just make a few because donated an adaptive bike. Kids could ride it around their hallway. we didn’t really know how well we’d do or how much we’d raise. They There was this one story of this boy who was probably 11 or 12, and [sold] out like that,” Zac says, snapping his fingers. “So as the summer went on, we made [more] in between camps, in between lunch and the he had never been well enough in his whole life to ride a bike. And the bike was one of these big, oversize tricycles with neck and chest times we would sell. So we learned our lesson after that [and] started support that the kids needed. They would get on that thing and ride making them before the summer.” and just kind of heal through the physical activity. It has a license plate For year two, the boys switched over to making paracord survival on the back of it that says, ‘Donated by the Bandz Boyz.’ That to me bracelets to sell for $5 each. In a nod to their hometown university, was probably the first really incredibly powerful moment – just seeing the bracelets are Carolina blue, white and navy. In the last few years, the kids.” CHM the group has added new members, Porter Brice, a sophomore 38

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a secon d ac t Four seniors at The Cedars prove that the show does go on, even in your eighties By G race B easley

The group performed their last show together in The Cedars Ballroom.

at Beyle and Karen Cooper were both around 60 years old when they started their musical group, The Can’t-Can’ts, in the 1990s. They chose the name because, unlike dancers of the French cancan, “we were so old that when we sat down, we couldn’t get back up!” But instead of dancing, they performed music ranging from Bach to The Andrews Sisters songs at women’s clubs, meetings and private parties in Chapel Hill. Pat sang and made the arrangements with Karen on keyboard and another band member also on vocals. Music and performing has always been near and dear to Pat’s heart, as she was a music teacher in the Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools 40

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RIGHT Pat, Mary, Jane and Karen. BOTTOM RIGHT Karen gets interviewed for “Show Must Go On!” J.R. spent two weeks with the women to capture their individual stories and preparation for their final show.

district for 20 years. “I’ve seen people light up [watching concerts], but it was for their kids.” The Can’t-Can’ts became Pat’s outlet and her way of spreading joy. “It was such fun to watch them smile and sing with us and laugh,” she says. “And so it’s incredibly invigorating.” Around 2015, Pat, the chair of the arts committee at The Cedars of Chapel Hill, produced a talent show for the residents. After the show, she and Karen were talking with Mary Crabill and Jane Houser and throwing around ideas for their own act, a variety show of sorts. They looked at each other and decided, “If anybody’s going to do this, I’d like it to be us.” The four were instantly compatible, forming a group called Hot Stuff. On a weekend retreat to write at Holden Beach, within 30 minutes, the women say they bonded and were rolling on the floor laughing. “To work with three other women creatively is very different than just being friends or playing bridge,” Pat says. “This is creative right down to your soul … we had to learn to work together, and we had to really learn to respect [one another’s] creativity and to help [one another] when it didn’t go quite the way you wanted it to go. That’s an intimacy that I haven’t had.” For Mary, performing wasn’t new. She says her first performance was in sixth grade at the former Chapel Hill Elementary School, which used to be on Franklin Street. Mary wrote and put on a play based on the movie “Queen of the Amazons.” “You can guess who was the queen,” she laughs. For their act, Hot Stuff took music from both popular and older songs and switched the words around. Part of their act was based on the show “Laugh-In” from the late ’60s, where they would have “wacky windows” and stick their heads out and tell corny jokes. Mary says the most challenging part of their act was maintaining stamina just to make it through the hourlong shows. “We’ve worked that out so we don't kill ourselves,” she says. In 2019, Pat’s son-in-law, J.R. Jones, a Pennsylvania -based documentary film director and producer, came to Hot Stuff with the idea to feature the foursome in a new film. Along with wife Aimée Jones (Pat’s daughter), J.R. filmed the “Show Must Go On!”

which follows the women as they prepare for their final comedy performance as a group since Mary was moving back to Miami to be closer to family. J.R. and Aimée say their goal for the film was to inspire people to redefine aging and to depict seniors discovering the talents and wisdom they have to offer. “While shooting the film, I noticed how much the Hot Stuff ladies inspire others to make a difference using their talents,” J.R. says. Mary hopes viewers of the film will realize that age should not be a hindrance if you have a passion you want to explore. “If you have an itch, you should scratch it. And it’s never too late to do [what] you’ve never done before and enjoy it,” she says. “I just think that if you have that in your wheelhouse, you ought to go for it.” Another byproduct of the film is that it raised more than $9,000 for The Cedars Employees Scholarship Program that benefits employees and their children. J.R. and Aimée are also continuing to offer the film to organizations for virtual screenings and are currently in negotiations for possible national distribution on PBS. Pat says she is in awe of the film’s success. “I’m not sure the first time I see myself on a big screen, I'm not sure I’m gonna be able to handle it,” she says. “I hope other people look at it and say, ‘I can do that too.’” CHM March 2021 chapelhillmagazine.com

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stories from

the road A Chapel Hill woman traveled across the country sharing stories during the pandemic

L

By Mi chel l e Fi shburne

eaving Chapel Hill and heading out to the Wild West during a pandemic might sound crazy. One may wonder whether the purpose was to find adventure and natural beauty. Well, I was already surrounded by natural beauty in Chapel Hill. I lived at the edge of a wooded preserve and was visited regularly by deer, rabbits, hawks, raccoons and the occasional fox. I also had plenty of opportunities for adventure in Chapel Hill, particularly in the summer, when it was hard

Michelle visited Cincinnati, Ohio – also known as the Queen City – during one of her road trips.

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STORIES FROM T HE R OA D

Michelle gave a presentation to the Lions Club of Henryetta, Oklahoma. Here are a few members with Michelle (center) at her RV.

on any given day to decide whether to go out on my motorboat, take the sailboat for a spin, do a little kayaking, try to get better on the paddleboard or just take my motor home to one of the campgrounds along Jordan Lake and sit down by a campfire. The impetus for the trip across America was curiosity. I was curious about how ordinary people all over the country were navigating through the pandemic. In Chapel Hill, I had seen my friends respond to the pandemic by doing things they had never done before. Scott Maitland and Esteban McMahan made hand sanitizer at TOPO Distillery. Beau Bennett went from catering huge events to making gourmet family meals for people to pick up and bring home. My neighbors no longer went to the gym, but their personal trainer came to their home and did workouts in the 44

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driveway. It was a strange new world. People all over the country, all over the world, were doing things differently. My curiosity got the better of me. In September 2020, I moved into my 2006 motor home and headed west to Wyoming. That might seem impetuous, but not for someone who years ago “roadschooled” her kids on cross-country trips ranging from six weeks to 10 months. The path to Wyoming was very familiar to me. The difficult part was figuring out how to get interviews with people I had never met. I crashed and burned through the first few states. Then I discovered something called Facebook. I searched Facebook for the towns I was passing and if something looked interesting, I reached out. Like the axe-throwing business Caleb Dixon started during quarantine in Valdosta, Georgia, or the throngs of people


STO R I E S FRO M T HE ROAD

who gathered for a rodeo this summer in Everything from a stand-up comic Pine Bluffs, Wyoming, or the cornhole who had no place to perform to a man tournament hosted by the Lions Club in whose pastor tried to sneak into the Henryetta, Oklahoma. hospital so they could pray together Once I got into a town and began to before the man’s brain surgery. meet people, more introductions were Every story I heard surprised me in made, and I was off to the races or the one way or another. For example, when dog groomer or town hall. By the end of Los Angeles comedian Kristina Wong’s December, I had interviewed more than national tour was canceled, she started 100 people in 28 states and logged more making face masks on a Hello Kitty than 6,000 miles. sewing machine and then launched a The fascinating part of this oral history nationwide network of volunteers who Michelle with U.S. Army veteran Nate Thomas, project, called “Who We Are Now,” is made and delivered 250,000 masks who earned the nickname “Arkansas Running Man” how ordinary Americans are responding in 2020. And then there’s U.S. Army as he ran from town to town carrying the flag. to these extraordinary times. When I first veteran Nate Thomas, who wanted to set out in September, I thought I would do something to raise people’s spirits, find Americans to be despondent, resigned and feeling down on so he started running from town to town, carrying Old Glory and their luck. What I found for the most part was the opposite. People earning the nickname “Arkansas Running Man.” were focused on putting one foot in front of the other, pivoting when Now you understand why I took to the road again in they needed to and making the best of it. Hope was the predominant January, heading this time to Southern California. New stories emotion and figuring out workarounds was the predominant strategy. are loaded onto the website, whowearenow.us, and social media Politics rarely came up in conversations. People talked most about channels (@whowearenowusa) every week. Follow along on the strangeness of the “new normal” and how it impacted their lives. the journey! CHM

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MANDOLIN ORANGE

sound

check The pandemic put their 10-year touring streak on hold, but Mandolin Orange is content, for now By M o rg an Cart i er Weston | Photography by Kendal l B ai l ey

E

mily Frantz and Andrew Marlin have spent the past year at their home in Chapel Hill, pressing pause on their busy touring schedule as Mandolin Orange for the first time in more than a decade. “The days are kind of flying by, but also blurring together at the same time,” Andrew says. Although the pandemic has disrupted their normal, it has also been an opportunity for the duo to create in new ways. “We have been working on a lot of recording projects this year that started before everything shut down,” Emily says. “Throughout the year, Andrew has also been writing and working on a ton of instrumental stuff.” This is a new turn for the songwriter; his work for Mandolin Orange has always been lyrically focused. “It has actually worked out really well, because instrumental music lends itself to much safer recording sessions,” Andrew adds. Emily’s

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Being off the road has given Emily Frantz and Andrew Marlin a chance to collaborate on new songs during their time at home, like “My Brother, My Keeper,” which was released in October.

March 2021

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MA N DOLIN ORAN G E

listening ear helped, too; Andrew knew he was onto something when he heard her humming one of his tunes around the house. These tunes became two albums, both released in February. Peaceful and inviting, classic Blue Ridge Mountains warmth spills forth from songs like “Woodland Star” on the first album, “Witching Hour.” The second album, “Fable & Fire,” feels more personal, evoking moonlit walks and difficult conversations narrated by vibrant, lilting violin and layered guitar thrums. “I do feel like it’s been easier to write instrumentals than to put any of this into words, what quarantine means to us and to everybody,” Andrew says. “But it’s still a way to process the change and everything we’re all going through.” “I think emotionally, more than artistically, it has affected us to not be able to play in person. Having a slower, less exciting pace to life means we find our adrenaline elsewhere,” Andrew adds. He and Emily have found some of that energy in their daughter, Ruby, 2. “She forces us to stay in the present,” Emily says. “Ruby toured with us a ton for the first year and a half of her life, but now that she’s a toddler, we feel lucky to have gotten to spend this last year at home together with her.” “There’s certainly a lot of singing that goes on in our house,” Andrew adds. “We haven’t put an instrument in Ruby’s hands just yet,

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MA N DOLIN ORAN G E

We are both very introspective people, so sometimes external feedback can help to pull ourselves out of ourselves,” Andrew says.

Mandolin Orange has a big fall coming up with shows tentatively scheduled at Ryman Auditorium in September and at Red Rocks Amphitheatre in October.

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but so much of my instrumental writing has ended up being about her sleep patterns.” “More like a product of her sleep patterns,” Emily laughs. Being off the road has also given the couple a chance to collaborate on new songs during their time at home, like “My Brother, My Keeper,” which was released in October. “That recording was done in our basement, with our trippy old sync recording gear, and has this isolated feel,” Emily says. “It’s a reflection of the tumultuousness of this year, both as it relates to the pandemic as well as how it has been managed, and the racial injustice protests in the country, and just the parallels you can draw between everyone who is struggling right now.” The lyrics offer an apprehensive welcome to anyone who may be feeling disconnected: “As we wander in solitude/ We can but ponder who’s looking out for who.” In addition to creating new music, the band continued to participate in some virtual collaborations and livestreamed events – including the upcoming WRAL Big Night In for the Arts Fundraiser on March 11. “Livestreaming and social media in general has really been a saving grace this year,” Emily says. The band sees these opportunities as ways to engage with the local community in a way they can’t on tour. “It’s definitely not the same as being in front of an audience, receiving energy from them, but we are very proud to represent Orange County in events like this.” “We are both very introspective people, so sometimes external feedback can help to pull ourselves out of ourselves,” Andrew says. But beyond that, Emily explains, a live performance breathes new life into music in a way that social media can’t. “Sharing the experience with the people in that room in that moment is something special. And when you’re used to having that constant feedback in your life and then it goes away, it can be a little disorienting.” Still, there have been plenty of small moments to celebrate. “There have been times I’ve felt really connected with folks over social media, and that little bit has been helpful to stay grounded,” Emily says. “When I’ve posted songs on my Instagram account, there’s been a lot of positive feedback,” Andrew says. “It’s nice to sing and feels good that people want to hear us sing. And everyone needs a little tune now and then.” CHM


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S R U E N E R P E ENTR THE

ered w they’ve weath ph y by Jo hn M ic ha el Si m ps on o h , d e rn a le s n Ph ot og ra share lesso Business owners hat it’s like to be their own boss nd w the pandemic a

L

ONG BEFORE Tom Tucker became a business owner and real estate developer, he was an eighth grader living on the west side of Chicago with his mom, grandmother and 10 siblings. He was working at a summer program at a nearby Catholic church when a visiting priest took up a collection for him after learning he was valedictorian at his middle school. The funds allowed him to attend Benet Academy, a nearby college preparatory high school. It’s a moment Tom says changed his entire trajectory, one that led to his career in engineering and business. Tom moved to the Chapel Hill area in 1987 and worked as an electrical engineer. He began developing real estate and condominiums in 1997 as the principal of real estate development company Peregrine9; he purchased Carolina Car Wash and Detail the same year. Tom knew from the beginning he wanted his family to be involved in the business, and he hopes it stays that way for years to come. “This is the first business that we have in our family,” he says of the car wash, located in Carrboro on East Main Street. “It’s a family business – we just try to do a good job and as long as we make enough money to keep the lights on and keep everybody paid, then we’re happy.” Tom says he’s grateful to work in a place like Carrboro with so many great people. He strives to invest in the community, particularly through partnering with organizations. A previous Northside resident, he’s served on the Northside Neighborhood Conservation District Advisory and Neighborhood Watch committees. He also formerly served as the president of the Chapel Hill Downtown Partnership. In the last few years, Tom’s brother Bruce Tucker came on board as co-general manager to take over day-to-day operations. Bruce worked at the car wash when his brother first bought it, but left to pursue a career in engineering. Employee or not, Bruce would always visit the car wash to see their mother, Willie Dee Tucker, who has faithfully worked the cash register from the beginning. 52

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“It’s a good one-two punch because we’re able now to tag-team things,” Bruce says. “He doesn’t worry so much about the day-to-day, and he can look down the road at some nice long-term projects that we have in mind for the car wash.” When Tom purchased the car wash, not much was automated. Since then, the car wash has expanded its services and offerings while reducing labor, electricity usage and costs through automatic services, including a wide array of wash, detail and cleaning options. Many of the 10 to 15 employees have worked there for more than 10 years, so “they can do this stuff in their sleep,” Bruce says, adding that the car wash owes its loyal customer base to its “wonderful staff.” For example, Bruce says co-general manager Juan Diaz is the best sales person he’s ever seen and dedicates himself to helping every customer leave happy. “We’re more interested in taking care of people’s cars and not necessarily interested in washing hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of cars,” Tom says of their business philosophy. “We’re not trying to gouge people, we don’t want to charge more than we need to charge. We’re just a family business – it’s probably not a real big business success story.” Last year, the car wash’s sales were down nearly 40% compared to the previous year – losses the brothers attribute to the challenges of the pandemic. They’ve focused on providing COVID-19 safe services, remodeling the facility and offering monthly unlimited packages. In addition to continuing contracts with the Town of Chapel Hill and Chapel Hill Police Department, Bruce says adding to their unlimited subscription base will be huge in making up for pandemic losses to stay competitive. He also plans to remodel the waiting room this year to add car merchandise and items. Even with the financial losses, Bruce says he doesn’t regret leaving his engineering career. “It’s the best move that I probably could have made right now,” he says. “There’s a lot that I lose in not staying with that Fortune 500 job and the security of that nice cushy check that comes every month, but the joy of business ownership, this is something that can’t be underestimated.” – by Hannah McClellan 

TO M TUCKER Carolina Car Wash and Detail

March 2021


Bruce Tucker, Willie Dee Tucker and Tom Tucker.

March 2021 chapelhillmagazine.com

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EN TREP RENEUR S

D

IANE JOYAL began her floral business in 2014

after working at UNC Children’s. Her daughter Lily joined in 2016, and shortly after that the pair opened a storefront in Chapel Hill. In May 2020, the Joyals opened a second location inside the Durham Food Hall, featuring an apothecary bar. What’s your background? Diane I’m an artist. I went to art school, and I

D IA N E J O YA L A N D L ILY J O YA L Bowerbird Flowers & Apothecary

wanted to be an illustrator. When I became a single parent ... I decided to move [to Carrboro]. I was looking for some stability and a place where I could raise my kids. I worked in social research initially, which I enjoyed a great deal, and then I moved into medical research. We weren’t administering clinical trials, it was all observational research. So, people sharing their feelings, people talking about their experiences. I love people.

How does that translate into floral design? Diane In a much more joyful way. Obviously, at the cancer

hospital, you’re seeing people during the darkest of days for them. I loved the people who I worked with, but it was just too draining after a while, and I wanted to do something that brought more joy to myself and to the world. What better thing than to bring flowers to someone’s door?

I always wanted to build a community. I felt that we could do more in terms of the apothecary and daily florals and plants, and we definitely had the chance to do that in the last year. We’ve really built that into the business. And we’ve managed to build lifelong friendships and relationships, because the people who are farming here value the same things that we value. Lily It’s really satisfying to see something grow when

you’ve worked so hard. I feel like it has a really huge payoff, and it shows in those relationships that we built. I have a degree in painting, and when I graduated college, I didn’t know what I was going to do. I started [working at Bowerbird] and realized it was such an amazing creative outlet and a way to financially support myself as an artist. It’s a really creative job. I love being able to do [weddings]. Being a part of someone’s wedding day is a pretty big honor.

You both have a creative side and love art. How do you incorporate that into your floral designs? Lily It definitely shows in our color selection. My mom does all the

buying for flowers, and she does an amazing job of creating gradients and color palettes for clients. For weddings, we’ll do arbors or [flowers] hanging from the ceiling or have a tree on the wall. They’re almost like giant sculptures that are temporary. We probably spend three hours onsite building something, and it’s only going to last for a day, but it’s very fun to do.

Is Lily named after the flower? Diane Yes. I had no idea I would be doing this, but I named her Lily, just

Diane Lily has a lot of input now in the flowers I’m buying. That’s the

like the flower.

fun part, getting to pick a color palette [to] design a wedding.

What do you aim to provide for your customers? Diane This store in Chapel Hill is essentially our floral studio. During

Where do you source flowers and other products from? Diane I try to get everything locally when the season’s in high gear.

the pandemic, obviously we’ve had to shift, [but] we were also shifting in general. We are still doing lots of weddings and events, but we also do daily deliveries and pickups. We also have a whole other side of our business that is the apothecary and botanical bar in our Durham location where we [offer] herbal drinks that are nonalcoholic, spritzers and elixirs, and a whole tea brand as well.

[We source from] Sassafras [Fork Farm], Spring Forth Farm, Fireside Farm and Happy as a Coneflower Farm, and we work with Piedmont Wholesale Flowers when we can and a lot of the farmers there. Clear Black Flowers and Orlaya Flora [are two more]. We start local, then we go out regionally, and then we go out to American grown. As far as the herbs go, we deal with Maple Spring Gardens. We also get all of our lavender from Lavender Oaks Farm. I think [herbs] are overlooked and underutilized as a dried crop. I’m trying to learn a little bit about sourcing spices because I think it’s kinda got the same challenges. This is a new world for us, and we’re trying to navigate our way.

How did you choose the name ‘Bowerbird’? Diane I’d seen a special on National Geographic, and I’ve always found

[that bird] very intriguing. They love the color blue. They make this [structure] to have a family – it’s created to attract a mate, which is kind of like the appeal with flowers too. I also wanted to offer home goods and to make you feel at home. It was always in the back of my mind that the home element would come in. What’s your favorite thing about owning your own business? Diane I’ve always loved working for myself. I think I have an

entrepreneurial spirit. I think it’s also slightly addictive. I’m pretty independent, and I’m creative, so I like being able to express those things. 54

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What’s something people might not know about floral design? Diane We really need to educate the public about why flowers cost what

they cost. I look at that as one of my missions in life. Flowers should not cost what they cost 30 years ago. [Flowers are these] amazing products, [one] that is perishable and somehow gets to us from South America sometimes in two days. It’s one thing to go to a store and pick up a bouquet of something for $8.99. It’s a completely different thing to come in here and buy a specialty bloom from us that may cost $5 a stem.


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fall apart last year, to get on the phone with [a farmer] out in California and have him say, “There’s no one here, we’re throwing product in the dumpster by the truckload” was heartbreaking. I can’t emphasize it enough. We know these people. What’s it like working together? Lily It’s taken some growth, but I

thoroughly enjoy it. My mom and I have developed such a great friendship. Diane We’ve learned a lot. I’m

honored that she works here. It means so much to me, that we’re together every day. And we really don’t get sick of each other too often. We figured out our strengths, and we do actually end up meshing together pretty well. I’m more big picture, she’s more detail oriented. Your second location at the Durham Food Hall opened in May. What has it been like to navigate an opening during the pandemic? Diane Stressful. I think the owner

Diane Joyal and Lily Joyal.

Lily [Think about] all the hands that have touched [a flower] before it gets to the consumer’s hand – the farmer, who’s figured out the best way to grow roses. And then the harvester who knows a way to cut it the right way. It’s so important that everyone is paid the way that they should be paid throughout that process. And if that means spending $5 on [each of] your roses, that’s what needs to be done. Diane That really has been an uphill battle at times. I understand that not everyone has a ton of expendable income to blow on flowers, but should you choose to come in and treat yourself to something like this, it’s well worth it. Our blooms last longer, you’re impacting not just our lives, but the lives of the people who we buy these things from. When things did

of the food hall did a phenomenal job. All of the customers who come in have been so respectful. Initially the [owners] approached us about helping them with their store and wanted me to consult as far as stocking it for them. And then I said, “Well, what about that extra space?” [The apothecary] meshes so beautifully with the food hall. The botanical bar had always been a thing in the back of my mind. I think visually it offers a lot to the space – it’s open and has beautiful light fixtures and colors. When people can sit and hang out there, it’s going to be amazing. What’s next? Diane Eventually, I want to see three silos of support for the business.

We have weddings and events, we have the retail part, and then we have the apothecary. Our tea line is going to go wholesale. I think the big idea is getting the tea out into the world. I think ultimately having a location that encompasses everything that we do, like a really beautiful space where someone could come in and look at a book and pick up some gifts and sit down and have a cup of tea with a friend. – as told to Renee Ambroso  March 2021 chapelhillmagazine.com

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T R IS T A N GARDNER, M IC H A E L TH O M AS , J U S T IN FO UTS , B A A Q IR YUSUF AND D A N IE L PA N

ROWING UP in Cary, Baaqir Yusuf thought he wanted to be a doctor and entered UNC as a pre-med student. As he got older, he realized there were other ways he could impact people and switched to majoring in business while experimenting with Photoshop and his new Nikon D3400. “I was building my creative passions through photography and videography but at the same time, learning so much more about

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the business world and entrepreneurship,” Baaqir says. “Then I was like, ‘Wow, I can blend these two,’ and I started to forge my own path.” Baaqir and his childhood friends Michael Thomas and Daniel Pan started the Triad brand in 2017. All three were home from college for the summer – Michael attended Elon University while Daniel went to the University of Mary Washington – when they realized the potential to monetize their passions through creative consulting. The name “Triad” was inspired by the three entrepreneurs who grew up in the Triangle. Over time, the name has taken on a greater meaning. “It’s these principals of innovating, impacting and inspiring through our videos and through the media we create,” Baaqir says. Baaqir met Justin Fouts and Tristan Gardner through UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School. They bonded over their shared interests in storytelling, creative work, photography, videography, gaining new experiences through travel, meeting new people and entrepreneurship. Baaqir introduced Justin and Tristan to Triad, connecting them with Michael and Daniel, and proposed they join forces. Inspired by travel creators and branding companies like Sam Kolder and Beautiful Destinations, the five guys officially founded media production agency Triad Studios in 2018 as full-time students. All five majored in business and none had a film background, so all of their media skills were entirely self-taught. Between classes and schoolwork, the guys worked every second they could, sometimes up to 40 hours a week. “The fact that all five of us happened to be at the right place at the right time and committed to the same vision was huge,” Baaqir says.

“We look at everything from a business angle and a business perspective, but we can apply our creative storytelling and our creative skill sets and merge them. That intersection is really where I think we shine.” Triad offers video production services from cinematic storytelling and graphic animation to visual effects, drone aerials, audio engineering and color grading. Beyond their core services, they offer creative consultation for branding, livestream video production, web design and documentary storytelling. While all five of the guys contribute to each step of the video production process, Baaqir oversees brand design and marketing strategies, Michael handles operations, Daniel focuses on content strategy, Justin manages finance and Tristan specializes in product management. The company focuses on not just producing quality visuals, but telling compelling and important stories. During their creative process, Triad collaborates within the company and with each client to develop a shared vision. The videos are primarily designed for web, social media and television. Some of Triad’s notable clients are Carolina Brewery, Participate Learning and UNC, including the Kenan-Flagler Business School, School of Medicine and Eshelman School of Pharmacy. At first, the guys worked out of Tristan’s Carolina Square apartment, but as the business quickly grew, they realized their need for more space. UNC entrepreneurship professor and Triad mentor Jim Kitchen believed in their vision and gave the guys keys to a small part of his office space on East Franklin Street. They started with half a room but have since expanded to an entire office, conference room and full blackbox studio. After Triad’s first year, earning a revenue of $82,000, the guys realized they wanted to continue to grow the company after graduation. “It made less sense to not do it full time,” Baaqir says. Four of the five founders graduated in May 2020 – right when COVID-19 escalated. The pandemic slowed Triad’s growth for two months, but it wasn’t long before the company was busier than ever. They still hit their third year goal, making $504,000, more than doubling their 2019 revenue. “I think one of the biggest challenges for me throughout our whole journey is the self-doubt that you can face every day,” Baaqir says. “‘Is what I’m doing the right thing?’ You ask that when you’re down, and you ask that even when you’re up. ‘Is this the right path, the one we’ve started to create for ourselves?’ I think while that’s a challenge, overcoming that is a huge reason why it feels amazing to be an entrepreneur.” The five guys are currently the only employees, but Triad has a large network of local freelancers that help with shoots. All five founders are still committed to the company. As Triad grows, they want to continue to learn and tell stories that make an impact. “Every mistake that we make or everything that we try and fail is just us getting better,” Baaqir says. “Being OK with constant failure is one of the best learning points of this entire entrepreneurial journey so far.” – by Anne Tate  March 2021 chapelhillmagazine.com

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ell us about yourself.

I’ve spent my life in Chapel Hill. I grew up right here in Orange County, and I went to Orange High School in Hillsborough. I live at the family home that we built when we moved here in 1973 when we came here from New York.

come by and of course, nobody knew me. I hadn’t been in the field for that long so sometimes I would work for other contractors. But during the last 10 years, it’s been terrific. I’m usually scheduled four to six weeks ahead. We have five employees at the moment. There are three guys working for me, then there’s myself and my wife, [Jennifer Acton,] who runs the entire office and is a CPA.

What was it like training to become an electrician?

What would you say is the most challenging part of being a business owner?

Back in ’89, my sister and her husband had their own [electrical] company, and I just went to work as a helper for them. At that point, you just had to put in a few years of work and have it certified as experience. As soon as I got that experience, I went and took the test and got my electrical license.

What was the driving force behind starting your own business? My father, John Dixon, had his own business [Dixon’s Garage].

I was brought up [believing] that the American dream is having and running your own business. So as soon as I got my electrical license, within probably a year, I went into business for myself. What was taking that next step like?

Being in business for myself is one of the scariest but most rewarding things I’ve ever done in my life. It’s hard to quit a good job where you get a paycheck every week and everybody else worries about all the problems. You just come in, do the work and go home. But it’s definitely worthwhile to run your own business, and there are untold rewards. There was a meeting in Hillsborough years ago that I was invited to – they said that I was the first woman to get an electrician license in North Carolina. I’m not positive if that’s true, but I’m sure I’m one of the first few.

CAROL D IX O N A CTO N Carol’s Electric

One hundred percent the most challenging part is finding good employees. It’s really hard to find good people to work for you who you can trust and have faith in their work. Has your business been affected by the pandemic?

You know, it certainly has. Last year, we actually closed for two to three months and didn’t do any work because I was afraid that the guys would get sick. We’re so inside people’s houses in their intimate spaces [so] we just decided to close and stay out of people’s homes. Things have picked back up again, and we feel pretty confident. We wear our masks everywhere, there are jugs of hand sanitizer in the trucks, we’re careful and, so far, everything’s been fine. What is the best lesson you’ve learned as a business owner?

A few things. Your employees are your best asset, the customer is always right and always, no matter if it hurts, do what’s right. When I first opened my business, I got a job and it was a big job for me, a couple thousand bucks. I put all of these parts in a house, and they just didn’t work out. So, instead of arguing with the customer, I just did what was right, and I took them all back. What is something you want people to know?

One of the things that I would love to see is more women getting into this trade. It’s not hard, there’s no heavy lifting, it pays well, it can be dirty at times, but it’s really rewarding and it’s kind of fun. I go to different people’s Carol Dixon Acton and her wife, Jennifer Acton, How has your business grown houses every day, I meet all these interesting who runs the entire office and is a CPA. over the years? people, and everybody’s always glad to see me In 1990, I went into business for myself for because I’m there to fix their problem. Now, a few years. I was still pretty young, and I people remember me because it’s so unusual had a daughter. It was just too hard to run a business and raise a child, so I to see a woman but we have a stellar reputation. We have to work twice as went back to working for other people. In 2012, I started another business. hard to get half as far but I think that women who run companies are at the At first, I ran the business by myself because work was much harder to top of the game. – as told to Janet Alsas 

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woman with an enthusiastic smile struggles to read a children’s book out loud while two friendly goats climb onto her lap and back, trying to nibble her curly hair. The heartwarming scene titled “Goat Storytime,” is one video of a Facebook Live series recorded by Jasmine Berry, founder of Nanny Posse – a nanny referral agency that connects families with professional child care service providers. Her idea for Goat Storytime was inspired by actress Jennifer Garner, who released a similar virtual series at the onset of the pandemic. “I was looking for a way to connect with my community and bring a smile to faces when we were all feeling a little lost,” Jasmine says. “It also allowed me to support local businesses such as Flyleaf Books and Epilogue Books Chocolate Brews in the early days when our library was still closed. Now it is such a part of who we are, and it’s the time of the week I look most forward to because our community can interact live with me in a fun virtual environment.” Like many with an entrepreneurial itch, Jasmine was eager to finish school and apply her knowledge in the real world. After graduating early from Carolina Friends School, Jasmine decided to take a gap year and work as an au pair in Italy. Since then, she has nannied in four different countries on three different continents ranging from Germany to Saudi Arabia. Jasmine’s travels allowed her to bond with a diverse array of families. Years of experience in providing child care taught her that every family differs in structure and culture, and therefore requires a unique set of nanny services. “There’s not one way to raise a child,” Jasmine says. “Knowing and honoring that is essential because as nannies we are teachers and coaches, but our biggest role is partner.” Like a family coworker, nannies collaborate with parents to provide child care, schooling, cooking, cleaning and more. Over time, Jasmine began to notice a lack of professional acknowledgement and support for career nannies. One of the main issues being that families often overburden and underpay nannies. In 2018, Jasmine earned a degree in early childhood and family studies

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from the University of Washington while nannying, and by the end of 2019 she was prepared to join the nanny industry full time. But this time, she would join the industry as an advocate, not a nanny. Jasmine publicly launched Nanny Posse nanny referral agency in January 2020. Through both her logo and website designed by Carrboro Creative, Jasmine intends to convey that her company is a community space for families and child care service providers. Nanny placement, child care consulting and professional development are at the core of the agency. Nanny Posse gets to know families and nannies through a 12-page questionnaire, a 30- to 45-minute discovery call, face-to-face interview and onboarding meeting. Jasmine is supported by Becky Craig and Tara Sygrave, both former and current nannies, teachers and child care experts. After this in-depth evaluation, Jasmine narrows down nanny candidates based on who is willing and able to best serve each family’s unique set of needs. “For the men and women that come to us, this is their profession, and they take it seriously, like I did in my career,” Jasmine says. “They’re looking for long-term placements and salaries that they deserve.” She has learned how to match nannies with their “unicorn family,” an industry term that signifies when a family matches a nanny’s ideal terms, hours and salary. Jasmine advocates for nannies by encouraging parents to view their nanny as an employee and a teammate, someone to help them along their parenting journey. In February 2021, Jasmine partnered with Family First, a Charlottebased nanny referral agency, to launch Nanny to Success Workshop Series 2021 – a virtual series curated for nannies who desire professional development. Each month, a different expert leads a workshop on child care and professional development topics. Jasmine hopes the virtual platform will encourage nannies, doulas, teachers, parents and child care service providers all over the world to connect and grow together as a community. “How we connect and learn might have changed, but we don’t believe it should stop altogether,” she says. Over the past year, Nanny Posse has matched 12 families with nannies, a small number that reflects pandemic setbacks as well as the selective nature of the referral agency. “Whenever we welcome a new client in, I always say ‘Welcome to the posse,’” Jasmine says. “You’re not just entering into an agreement with my company, but you’re really entering into a community. We do truly mean that.” – by Marie Muir 

J A S M IN E B E R RY Nanny Posse

March 2021


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THE ACKLAND IS OPEN! WE’VE TAKEN STEPS TO MAKE YOUR VISIT SAFE AND ENJOYABLE. ON NOW: YAYOI KUSAMA: OPEN THE SHAPE CALLED LOVE Extended by popular demand! Through March 28

OBJECT LESSONS Through May 14

HOLDING SPACE FOR NOBILITY: A MEMORIAL FOR BREONNA TAYLOR Through July 3

INSTRUMENTS OF DIVINATION IN AFRICA: WORKS FROM THE COLLECTION OF RHONDA MORGAN WILKERSON, PH.D. Through July 3

CLOUDING: SHAPE AND SIGN IN ASIAN ART Through February 13, 2022

VIRTUAL ART FOR LUNCH WITH DAN SHERMAN Wednesday, March 3, 12:30 on Zoom

ARTIST CONVERSATION WITH RENĖE STOUT Friday, March 12, 3:30 on Zoom

Book your free timed tickets on ackland.org. Not able to visit? Join us for virtual programs and explore our learning resources for all ages on ackland.org. Yayoi Kusama: Open the Shape Called Love is supported in part by

Image credits: Works from the collection of the Ackland Art Museum except where noted. Main image: Unidentified artist, Pre-Columbian, Smiling Figure (“Sonriente”) (detail), 600-800 C.E., terra cotta with traces of polychrome. Gift of Gordon and Copey Hanes in honor of Dr. Joseph C. Sloane. Small images: Yayoi Kusama, Japanese, born 1929, Blue and Green Infinity Net (detail), 1967, oil on Masonite. Collection of James Keith Brown ‘84 and Eric Diefenbach. Used by permission. Käthe Kollwitz, German, 1867-1945, Memorial for Karl Liebknecht, 1919, woodcut, Ackland Fund. Shanequa Gay, American, born 1977, holding space for nobility: a memorial for Breonna Taylor, 2020, acrylic, oil, Tiara Cameo Black glassware, and salt water, © Shanequa Gay; photographs by Alex Maness Photography. Unidentified artist, Democratic Republic of Congo, Lobala culture, Miniature slit drum, early 20th century, wood. Lent by Rhonda Morgan Wilkerson, Ph.D. Unidentified artist, Chinese, Han Dynasty (206 BCE—220 CE), Cocoon-shaped Storage Vessel, Gray stoneware with painted red and white decoration. Gift of Smith Freeman and Austin Scarlett. Photograph of Renée Stout by Grace Roselli. Funding credits: holding space for nobility: a memorial for Breonna Taylor and related programming have been made possible by the generous support of Dorothy Heninger, James Keith Brown and Eric Diefenbach. Clouding: Shape and Sign in Asian Art has been made possible in part by the Ackland’s Ruth and Sherman Lee Fund for Asian Art, Linda and Philip Carl, Smith Freeman and Austin Scarlett, and Mina Levin and Ronald Schwarz.


BRANDON SHARP Hawthorne & Wood

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or years, Michelin-rated chef Brandon Sharp worked and learned in kitchens all over the world. In April 2019, he opened his own restaurant, Hawthorne & Wood, which offers an eclectic, Californiainspired menu. What has your culinary journey been like?

I’m from Greensboro and grew up there. I went to school at UNC, where I studied philosophy and worked in kitchens in my spare time. While I was in school, I worked at Southern Season and their restaurant, Weathervane. After graduating, I went to the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park for culinary school and continued working in restaurants. I then went on to work in Napa Valley at The French

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Laundry and made my way to New Orleans to work in Restaurant August. I got married to my wife, Elizabeth, and then we went and spent one summer in Spain where I worked at a top restaurant. When we returned from Spain, we moved to San Francisco, where I worked at Gary Danko. After a few years, I went to Napa Valley and worked at Solbar for nine years and then made my way back to Chapel Hill in 2016. I worked at The Carolina Inn for two years and then realized it was time for me to open my place.

words because it’s a feeling more than anything else. One of my most distinct memories is when I lived out west, my mom sent me a postcard of the Franklin Street sign, and I put it up in every office or department I ever worked in.

What’s one of the biggest lessons you learned while cooking all over the globe?

It is a bit of a cliche, but in the world of food and restaurants, you are always a student, and there is still more to learn. The culinary world is continuously evolving, and that is what keeps it exciting. What was culinary school like?

Culinary school was a crash course in everything from product identification to culinary math to cuisines from all around the world. By that time, I had spent a year in a really good kitchen for a serious chef. I realized that this was the profession that I wanted to pursue. Culinary school was a springboard for me.

What made you want to open your restaurant?

I want everyone to know that there is no such thing as a solitary genius. It is a team effort, and I entirely and gratefully realize that.”

What was your biggest takeaway from culinary school?

It was mostly just to keep your mouth shut, stay humble and stay hungry. What does Chapel Hill mean to you?

My mom grew up half a mile from Chapel Hill, and my grandparents lived there for 40 years, so Chapel Hill was a second home to me from a very young age. It was just a very safe, insular and wonderful place to me. It has been wonderful to bring my wife and kids back here to experience it the same way. It is a bit elusive to encapsulate that in

I was blessed to work with enough experts in every operation area to get a good understanding of financials, legal, HR, management, wine, cocktails and more. I hit the ceiling in a couple of hotels and was ready to do my own thing. I was prepared to call the shots. Where did the name “Hawthorne & Wood” come from?

We wanted the restaurant to reflect our time in California and the Californian influence on the cuisine. Elizabeth’s parents are from California. Her dad is from Hawthorne, down in [Los Angeles] County, and her mom is from St. Francis Wood on the peninsula by San Francisco, so that’s how we came up with the name. What was the design process in creating the ambience?

My wife came up with the color palette, and we also worked with a designer named Amy Howard, who picked out the finishes. I left the design and aesthetic to the two of them. I would interject an opinion now and then and realize I was immediately wrong. What is the cuisine of Hawthorne & Wood?

The cuisine is eclectic, and I would describe it as “the things we want to eat.” There is usually a three-course menu that is always changing and has flavors from all around the world. We try to highlight the California taste in many dishes, but you will also see Persian dishes and southern French flavors. What is something you want everyone to know about you?

I want everyone to know that there is no such thing as a solitary genius. It is a team effort, and I entirely and gratefully realize that. I am lucky to have the team and support I have behind me. I also hope to open another restaurant sometime in the future. – as told to Aashna Shah 

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WHITEHALL ANTIQUES

A TUSCAN VILLA FILLED WITH OVER 7, 500 SQ. FT. OF FINE ANTIQUES A TREASURE TROVE OF UNIQUE ITEMS FOR YOUR HOME OR COLLECTION

Father-Daughter Team David & Elizabeth Lindquist

FROM ROCOCO TO MID

CENTURY MODERN, WHITEHALL HAS SOMETHING FOR EVERY TASTE, EVERY INTERIOR, AND AT EVERY PRICE POINT!

A Family Business Proudly Celebrating over 90 Years of Providing Fine Antiques to the Triangle!

1213 E. FRANKLIN ST., CHAPEL HILL | 919.942.3179 WHCHNC@AOL.COM | MON-SAT: 11AM-6PM

WHITEHALLANTIQUES.COM


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ebeca “Becky” Cabrera was seven months

R E B ECA CABRERA AND PERLA S A IT Z

pregnant when she heard the rumors. Her job at the CHICLE Language Institute was in danger – not because she’d done anything wrong – but because the then-owners, who founded the center in 1999, were ready to sell the business or shut it down completely. The soon-to-be mother was only teaching two Spanish classes a week in 2014, but educating others was her plan for the foreseeable future. The question her husband had asked her kept ringing in her head: “So, what are you going to do?” Answer: take matters into her own hands. First, Becky asked Perla Saitz, the in-theknow Spanish program coordinator since 2001, about the rumors. “I had been here for so long, and I had a role in making it grow,” Perla says, “and so for that, I just couldn’t let it close.” When Perla confirmed the owners’ intentions, she then asked Becky: “Would you want to partner up and take over the institute?” Perla felt that, as the parent of young kids, she couldn’t do it alone. But luckily, Becky said yes. Becky and Perla started out strictly as colleagues, but bonded over their shared backgrounds: Both followed their husbands – Becky from Costa Rica and Perla from Mexico City – to Chapel Hill to raise a family. Of course, these women never expected to take on a business with no entrepreneurial foundation – especially Becky, who jokes that she’s still trying to perfect her English. But with a fearless passion for languages and the fierce instinct to take care of their families, Becky and Perla partnered that year and bought the business. These days, with three full-time employees (including Perla and Becky) and more than 30 contractors, the business has become more than just teaching kids and adults languages – the institute teaches anywhere from six to a dozen at a time. “It’s funny because sometimes we get very specific requests,” Perla says. “One of our former students who took Spanish for many years, she’s traveling to Europe next year to give a [lecture at a] conference, because she’s a physician. She’s going to Poland, so she wanted to learn Polish before she goes. So we found a teacher for her to work on Polish.” Perla and Becky realize they’re lucky to be located in an area with top universities, like UNC and Duke, that bring them fluent

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instructors – in fact, 95% of their teachers are native language speakers. With those credentials, CHICLE attracts big-name clients including current contracts with Orange County Health Department and the Town of Chapel Hill to help residents, especially the growing Karen and Burmese refugee communities, receive translated municipal updates. But far beyond educational courses and interpreting documents, Becky and Perla largely contribute to improving bilingual medical programs in the area. The Duke Physician Assistant Program contracts CHICLE every spring to create and teach a Spanish medical terminology course. Even HR departments from local hospitals ask the CHICLE team to interview potential candidates to find out if they’re truly fit for bilingual positions. These courses and evaluations, very specific to the language institute, are a unique service for the medical community. It also calls attention to Perla and Becky’s many hats, which continue to change in size and color. Their students most certainly see the value in that. Mary Altpeter, who playfulls calls herself the “abuela,” is one such student. The grandmother and retired research scientist has been taking classes on and off with Perla since 2013. And in those years, Mary has been overwhelmed – in the best way – by Perla’s teaching tactics, ranging from playing games together in Spanish to watching full-length foreign films. “She goes so far above and beyond,” Mary says. “Some teachers, it’s like, you have your 45 minutes or your hour, and you’re done. Not Perla.” Perhaps the best example of that is when, right before Mary’s first solo trip to Mexico City, Perla invited her to lunch at a local Latino restaurant in Durham. Only once they arrived, Perla pulled a teaching trick on Mary – the instructor faked like she didn’t speak Spanish, leaving the pupil to order for them both. “At this point,” Mary jokes, “I wanted to die a slow death.” But Perla’s method paid off. Mary timidly approached the counter, then muttered the phrases she’d practiced: “Estoy estudiando español. ¿Puedes practicar conmigo?” (“I’m studying Spanish. Can you practice with me?”) To her surprise, the man behind the counter agreed, flashing a gentle smile. “Si, por supuesto.” (“Yes, of course.”) As Mary went about ordering, the gentleman kindly repeated phrases back to her and corrected her pronunciations. By the time she’d paid, even other Spanish-speaking customers had gotten in on the fun. Perla, meanwhile, sat back watching and smiling. Another satisfied client. – by Hannah Lee CHM

CHICLE Language Institute

March 2021


Becky Cabrera and Perla Saitz.

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SPONSORED BY HAMILTON POINT INVESTMENT ADVISORS

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elcome to our salute to local business leaders and teams whose perseverance and strength during the pandemic inspire us. Every local business is doing more with less, pivoting to remain relevant and overcoming many hurdles to deliver goods and services to our community. We invited some local businesses to share how they’ve adjusted and worked hard to serve our community during this time. Thanks to these businesses and the many others that make up our Orange County Strong business community! We encourage everyone to buy local and support our community businesses and their employees, so that Orange County remains Strong!

Ellen Shannon Publisher

Chapel Hill Magazine

Rick Woods President & CEO

Hamilton Point

Thanks to Hamilton Point for helping Chapel Hill Magazine recognize local businesses, their leaders and their teams.


GRETCHEN CASTORINA - HODGE & KITTRELL SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY Gretchen Castorina has always prioritized taking care of her clients. Guiding clients through the sale or purchase of their most personal and financially significant investment is something she does not take lightly. This dedication earned her top-agent status for closed sales three years in a row since 2018. Gretchen works diligently to ensure her clients know what to expect at all stages of the buying or selling process. What no one could expect in 2020 was the need to introduce rigorous protocols to protect the health and safety of all clients. For in-person viewings, fresh disposable gloves and local distillery-made sanitizer spray are used to supplement the standard mask requirement. To facilitate “sight unseen” sales, Gretchen uses professional photography, Matterport 3-D walk-through tours, drone aerial photos and videos of the interior and exterior of every home she lists. Gretchen has been able to adapt to the changing market demands and needs of her clients with safety measures and enhanced marketing techniques that will linger long after the pandemic has subsided.

PHOTO BY JOHN MICHAEL SIMPSON

919.951.5566

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140 W. FRANKLIN ST., STE.130, CHAPEL HILL

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GRETCHEN.CASTORINA@HODGEKITTRELLSIR.COM


BUD MATTHEWS SERVICES Family-owned since 1981, Bud Matthews provides a range of home services for HVACs, appliances, plumbing and sewer systems and water heaters. Their company also offers complete design and build services for residential renovations and additions. In March 2020, the quarantine relegated many people to their homes, significantly increasing the demand for home services. Bud Matthews swiftly responded to ensure that people could remain safely and comfortably at home. The company also established a Covid-19 policy that pays employees for up to 10 days if they have potentially been exposed to the virus. Bud Matthews also launched the iWave air purifier, which has been shown to reduce the activity of the Covid-19 virus in independent lab studies, and UV light air filters to install in homes. As people adapt to the ever-changing conditions of the pandemic, Bud Matthews continues to prioritize the health and safety of customers and staff.

919-944-4600

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545 OLD FEARRINGTON ROAD, CHAPEL HILL

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BUDMATTHEWS.COM


PAM HERNDON STATE FARM In response to Covid-19, Pam Herndon State Farm adapted its services to meet the needs of its customers. By using both protective barriers at desks and face masks, the agency prioritizes customer safety. For customers who prefer to meet virtually, Pam and her team hold appointments over the phone or use State Farm’s videoconferencing system developed specifically to keep customers’ personal information secure. With fewer drivers on the road and, therefore, fewer accidents, State Farm gave back dividends to many customers. For those struggling to make insurance payments due to loss of work, State Farm issued a deferral period. Pam and her team reached out to individual customers to develop a repayment strategy to maintain continuous insurance coverage. The pandemic gave customers who had been delaying the purchase of life insurance the final push to do so. While Pam and her team miss the daily, face-to-face interactions with customers, they continue to meet customers’ ever-changing insurance needs. PHOTOS BY JOHN MICHAEL SIMPSON

919-204-0155

|

104 S. ESTES DR., STE. 105, CHAPEL HILL

|

PAMHERNDON.COM


SHANNON KENNEDY - HODGE & KITTRELL SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY When Shannon Kennedy, Real Estate Broker with Hodge & Kittrell Sotheby’s International Realty, needs inspiration for getting through a difficult time, she looks no further than the nonprofit organizations in our community that are close to her heart: Habitat for Humanity of Orange County, TABLE, SECU Family House, and the YMCA of the Triangle. During the pandemic, these organizations have not only survived, but thrived in achieving their goals, and Shannon has been honored to support their work. Like these organizations, Shannon relies every day on her strong work ethic and her problem-solving skills – as well as a healthy dose of good humor – to think creatively and strategically about how to serve her clients. She is passionate about her career in real estate and about making the process of selling or buying a home as smooth and easy as possible for her clients. At the end of the day, home is what matters most and Shannon never forgets that.

PHOTO BY NIKKI WHITT, FANCY THIS PHOTOGRAPHY

919.448.6664

|

140 W. FRANKLIN ST, SUITE #130, CHAPEL HILL

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SHANNON.KENNEDY@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM March 2021

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HODGEKITTRELLSIR.COM

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YOGASIX As the world continuously adapts to an ever-changing reality, YogaSix is simultaneously changing the way people think about and experience yoga. Every person deserves the mind-body connection that yoga fosters; YogaSix offers this experience by connecting its students to a practice that is energizing, empowering, and enjoyable. Instead of seeking to be an exclusive studio, YogaSix prides itself on being a place for everyone – expertise is not required to enjoy YogaSix classes. Its six core classes - Y6 101, Y6 Restore, Y6 Slow Flow, Y6 Hot, Y6 Power, and Y6 Sculpt & Flow – deliver lifeenhancing benefits to beginners, those seeking recovery, and advanced students. YogaSix-Chapel Hill is excited to bring its brand to life in this community while providing a safe, friendly environment. Fully-equipped with a SterilAir® system that cleans the studio air after each in-studio class, YogaSix currently offers a range of in-studio, outdoor, virtual, and Y6 GO on-demand classes.

PHOTO BY JOHN MICHAEL SIMPSON

919-240-5056

|

703 MEADOWMONT VILLAGE CIR., CHAPEL HILL

|

YOGASIX.COM


ACTIVEDGE FITNESS & UPRIGHT ATHLETE ActivEdge Fitness & Sports Performance opened in 2004 with one goal — to provide the best service in the Durham/Chapel Hill area. Since then, founder Brian Diaz has developed relationships with clients, coaches, medical personnel and fitness enthusiasts. When the world as we know it changed in March 2020, these relationships kept the business going. As professional sports were halted, Brian and his staff made state-of-the-art adjustments to Upright Athlete, their physical therapy and sports performance arm. Along with industry-leading sanitation practices, their team pivoted to seeing patients both virtually and in-person. ActivEdge began to offer indoor training with a face covering, outdoor training options and virtual appointments. Whether arriving for fitness or rehab, every client receives a physical therapy evaluation – inperson or virtually – before embarking upon their wellness journey. With a devoted team, loyal client base and thriving fitness community, ActivEdge and Upright Athlete continue to be a fitness and wellness fixture. PHOTOS BY NIKKI WHITT, FANCY THIS PHOTOGRAPHY

919-493-1204

| 4221 GARRETT RD. STE 1-2, DURHAM

|

EXPERIENCETHEEDGE.COM


Pictured here (left to right):

FELIX MURIITHI, DIRECTOR OF FINANCE RANYA HAHN, DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES & DAVID YOUNG, CEO OF PARTICIPATE LEARNING PHOTO BY JOHN MICHAEL SIMPSON


PARTICIPATE LEARNING Now more than ever, Participate Learning remains relevant as its work in school systems throughout North Carolina focuses on nurturing the next generation of leaders and strives to unite the world through global learning. Though many new challenges arose in the last year, just as many opportunities emerged to utilize their team’s expertise. Participate Learning now offers an online orientation for incoming ambassador teachers and virtual tutoring for Spanish dual language students, all while continuing to provide world-class support for its partners. As a certified B Corp, the company’s mission is rooted in doing well while doing good. Participate Learning pursues this mission by supporting the local community through nonpartisan volunteering for democratic election efforts and facilitating internal diversity and anti-racism training. Participate Learning’s hope is that global education continues to be a catalyst for changing lives, inspiring more empathy, inclusivity, and positive change for a better tomorrow.

919-967-5144

|

201 SAGE RD., STE. 200, CHAPEL HILL

|

PARTICIPATELEARNING.COM March 2021

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CLIFTON & MAUNEY ORTHODONTICS & PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY While Covid-19 has posed many challenges, Drs. Clifton and Mauney and their staff remain committed to providing care that goes the extra mile. When the office first closed in response to the pandemic, their team maintained timely communication with patients and assisted with emergencies in an effort to keep ERs empty. When the office reopened, enhanced safety measures were implemented, including a new UV sanitizer and several large air filters. The waiting room and coffee station were closed and the office toys and prize baskets were shelved. Even with these additional measures in place, Clifton & Mauney’s focus on patient care has remained evident. Their team prides itself on adapting to individual patient needs, especially those of neurodiverse children who might be struggling to adapt to this new normal. And as orthodontic patients near their new smiles, Clifton & Mauney looks forward to celebrating the finish line of treatment with them. PHOTO BY JOHN MICHAEL SIMPSON

919-933-1007 |

77 VILCOM CENTER DR., STE. 310, CHAPEL HILL

|

CLIFTONANDMAUNEY.COM


CHAN WRIGHT INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. Chan Wright and his team are grateful to every new customer for whom they had the honor of writing auto, home, business, and life insurance policies in 2020. In one of the most challenging years that most people will live through, the insurance agency was able to withstand the many modifications that became necessary to continue to write new business. Much of this success is owed to their customers and companies like Erie Insurance, who gave the support needed to adapt the way in which business was conducted. Closing the office and allowing staff to work from home were important steps taken to keep staff members healthy and safe. Business never stopped: their team processed claims, serviced existing customers by phone and email, and remained socially distant from those in need of the agency’s services outside of the office. Chan Wright Insurance Agency looks forward to working with – and hopefully seeing – new and returning customers this year.

PHOTO BY JOHN MICHAEL SIMPSON

919-341-1606 | 150 PROVIDENCE ROAD, STE. 100-A, CHAPEL HILL

|

CHANWRIGHTINSURANCE.COM March 2021

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HIGH AND RUBISH INSURANCE AGENCY During a time of continuous change, High and Rubish Insurance Agency has adapted with increased flexibility and support of its clients. Through the use of new technology, staff members work remotely or maintain an in-office presence, prioritizing safety while still providing exceptional service to clients. In response to increased virtual communication, the agency has focused on delivering clear and timely answers to clients’ questions and requests. As many families and businesses are forced to make significant changes, High and Rubish agents are accommodating those shifting needs in order to maintain the right protection at the lowest available cost. To fit clients’ current needs, staff members provide the insured with many options – each of which has been individually reviewed. In this way, their staff aims to relieve clients of one source of stress. High and Rubish hopes that communities will continue to support each other as Orange County navigates into tomorrow.

PHOTO BY JOHN MICHAEL SIMPSON

919-913-1144

|

6015 FARRINGTON RD., STE 101, CHAPEL HILL

|

HIGHANDRUBISH.COM


SMITH & HEYMANN ORTHODONTICS In the midst of unexpected closings, stay-at-home orders, and a general sense of uncertainty, Smith & Heymann Orthodontics has continued to provide families throughout the Chapel Hill community with safe and effective orthodontic care. Each location has gone above and beyond CDC recommendations to help limit the spread of Covid-19 while still offering the same friendly service and welcoming atmosphere that patients have come to expect. From virtual visits and social distancing to sanitizing stations and increased PPE, their team’s main priority has been keeping staff and patients healthy. Although the past year has been difficult and their offices have had to adapt and improvise quickly, Smith & Heymann Orthodontics is very proud of both its team and patients for facing the challenges of 2020 with a flexible and positive attitude. Their practice looks forward to creating more beautiful smiles in 2021, and hope for a much healthier, happier year ahead.

919-493-4911

| 1506 E. FRANKLIN STREET, STE. 304, CHAPEL HILL

|

SMITHANDHEYMANN.COM March 2021

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FINN PLASTIC SURGERY In response to Covid-19, Drs. Finn and Elkins-Williams and their team at Finn Plastic Surgery quickly and efficiently adapted their practice of aesthetic medicine. The practice implemented numerous measures to protect patients and staff, including increased sanitation, parking lot waiting room procedures, thorough screening measures, mask requirements and social distancing. The high-quality standard of care that clients have come to expect of Finn Plastic Surgery remains unchanged during this unprecedented time. Their team strikes a careful balance of accommodating patients’ cosmetic needs while prioritizing the health and safety of patients and staff. With pandemic fatigue weighing heavy on us, a surge in on-camera presence with Zoom calls, and a collective need for self-care, Drs. Finn and Elkins-Williams have responded to an increased demand for elective cosmetic procedures with patients’ safety and comfort at the forefront.

PHOTO BY JOHN MICHAEL SIMPSON

919-933-9522 |

1390 ENVIRON WAY, CHAPEL HILL

|

FINNPLASTICSURGERY.COM


BARTONE INTERIORS A women-owned and -operated interior design firm, Bartone Interiors had started to hit its stride when the global pandemic temporarily closed its office. Early on, the firm had invested in cloud-based project management software, which allowed its team members to work from anywhere – both before and during the shutdown. With already flexible schedules to support working moms, Bartone Interiors readily adapted to the work-from-home environment, maintaining the high level of client service expected of a luxury design firm. Through Orange County’s Paycheck Protection Program (PPP), the company applied for and received financial assistance. The PPP helped Bartone Interiors with payroll, rent and utilities. Bartone Interiors continues to accept new projects and slowly transition back to its office, following a mask protocol, a few days per week. The firm consistently improves to accommodate this ever-changing business landscape.

919-679-2303 |

121 S. ESTES DR. STE. 100, CHAPEL HILL

|

BARTONEINTERIORS.COM March 2021

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HOME & GARDEN

if you

build it ... After an exhaustive house search, the Skurky family decided to build their dream home in an established neighborhood By Mari e Mui r | Photography by J ohn Mi chael Si m ps on

N

eera Skurky first met Dave Skurky when she moved to Atlanta in 2002 and joined an adult recreational kickball league. Neera played on a team with fellow UNC alumni, while Dave was on the University of Virginia alumni team. They were both energetic post-graduates at the time. Fast-forward through first dates, a wedding and moving in together. The young professionals were eager to switch gears after they realized that corporate careers and the cost of big city life had left them in a state of exhaustion. So in 2010, Dave and March 2021 chapelhillmagazine.com

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C H A P E L

H I L L ’ S

Premier Furniture Store –

F E A T U R I N G –

INDOOR & OUTDOOR FURNITURE • HOME DECOR • LIGHTING • RUGS W I N D O W T R E AT M E N T S • WA L L PA P E R • G I F T S & M O R E

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T E A M

T O D A Y

9 1 9 . 4 4 4 . 2 7 7 8 • S T E E L R OOT S H D . C O M 9 5 1 5 U S H I G H WAY 1 5 - 5 0 1 N O R T H

CHAPEL HILL

- Near Briar Chapel -

NORTH CAROLINA


ABOVE Dave and Neera watch as their kids scooter from the front steps of their custom-built home in Silver Creek. LEFT Neera added a splash of color and pattern to this built-in bar nook by applying removable wallpaper.

Neera decided to do what most people only ever dream of doing: They quit their jobs, traveled around the country and Europe for a month, and then they moved to a completely different state. “I don’t want to paint a bad picture of Atlanta, but we were ready for a smaller or medium-size city,” Dave says. “Both of our families were in the Southeast at the time, so we wanted to live somewhere around Richmond, Charlotte, Raleigh, Durham or Charleston. ... So we said whoever gets the job first, we’ll go to whatever city that is.” Dave got an offer first from a Raleigh-based civil engineering job, and Neera was excited to move closer to her network of professional peers at UNC. She accepted a job as an in-house employment attorney at UNC not long after the move and later transferred over to Duke. They rented in Durham for awhile, a nice midpoint between their offices. In 2013, following the birth of their first child, daughter Indira, Dave and Neera began to search for a permanent home in Chapel Hill. The couple noticed an abundance of vacant lots for sale while house hunting. Curiosity led them to compare the price of an older house with a newly built one. “It was comparable, if not cheaper,” Dave says.  90

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hodgekittrellsir.com 92 Sotheby’s chapelhillmagazine.com © MMXIX International Realty Affiliates LLC.January/February All Rights Reserved. Sotheby’s 2021 International Realty Affiliates LLC fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated. Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks licensed to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC.


A Masterpiece of Residential Design 300 E. Main Street, Durham


H OME & GARDEN

ABOVE Indira, 8, snuggles up on a cozy suede couch next to siblings Naya, 5, and Nadal, 3. LEFT Neera used a black permanent marker to freehand an intricate flower mural that encircles the bathroom mirror.

Armed with this new knowledge, they began to window-shop neighborhoods instead of houses. That’s when they discovered a half-acre vacant lot in Silver Creek, a wooded neighborhood built in the 1990s. The established subdivision, which is located within walking distance of East Chapel Hill High School and Cedar Falls Park, checked all of Dave and Neera’s boxes. “There are young families and empty nesters,” Neera says. “It’s a great mishmash of people, and it’s a good community. We also have beautiful hikes in our neighborhood [with Dry Creek and Cedar Falls Creek trails close by], and it’s near everything. I never knew at the time we built that I would end up working at

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Representing Buyers and Sellers in this Southern Part of Heaven

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H OME & GARDEN

Duke as an in-house attorney, but it is so perfectly equal distance between Duke and UNC.” Within a year, Dave and Neera purchased the vacant lot in Silver Creek and completed construction of their 3,500-square-foot Craftsman-style house with guidance from Robert Huls with Franklin Street Realty, Atlanta-based architect Patrick Seferovich with S House and

Dave and Neera purchased the vacant lot in Silver Creek and completed construction within a year on their 3,500-square-foot Craftsman-style house.

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H OME & GARDEN

Dave picked up woodworking five years ago and has since built useful home items like matching twin beds for Indira and Naya’s shared bedroom.

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local builders Jim Bulbrook with Carolina Ventures Mortgage and Beau Long with Long Developers. One of Dave’s favorite architectural elements of the house is that a window is situated directly across from the doorway in every room. “It feels open,” Dave says. “Natural light is a big theme in our house.” That light reflects beautifully off walls painted in a light gray color palette. But Indira isn’t the only kid who gets to enjoy Dave and Neera’s dream house. Her sister, Naya, 5, and little brother, Nadal, 3, add to the family’s kickball team. The entire brood spends most of their time in the neighborhood these days. Wasted space does not exist with both parents working from home and both daughters enrolled remotely at Ephesus Elementary School. Indira and Naya attend school in their shared


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H OME & GARDEN

I’d seen wallpaper that looked like trees before, and so I just decided to draw it instead,” Neera says.

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pink bedroom, Neera set up a work-from-home office in the guest bedroom, and Dave holds down the fort from the second-floor loft, which overlooks their open concept living room and kitchen. The family’s decor depicts their shared love of the natural world. A rainbow of color-coded books line a built-in bookcase underneath the staircase in the foyer. Fallen tree branches plucked from the neighborhood hiking trails and pieces of coral found on family beach vacations fill every other nook and cranny. Evidence of Neera’s passion for nature and art can even be found in the downstairs bathroom. She used a black permanent marker to freehand March 2021


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H OME & GARDEN

Four black-and-white framed photographs of Dave and Neera’s grandmothers hang in the hallway outside of their children’s bedrooms.

Nadal, 3, shows off his Spider-Man moves in his bedroom.

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H OME & GARDEN

The Skurkys gather three times a day for meals – and the occasional board game or puzzle – at a massive granite island in the kitchen.

an intricate tree mural that encircles the bathroom mirror. “I’d seen wallpaper that looked like trees before, and so I just decided to draw it instead,” Neera shrugs. “It was kind of hard doing that in front of your 3-year-old child. I remember Indira walking in and wondering what I was doing. And I [told her], ‘Don’t do this, only Mommy can do this.’” But Neera isn’t the only parent with an appetite for DIY home projects. Dave picked

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H OME & GARDEN

Dave and Neera are thankful for the opportunity to raise their three kids in Silver Creek neighborhood. “There are young families and empty nesters,” Neera says. “It’s a great mishmash of people, and it’s a good community.”

Bringing Healthy Smiles to Chapel Hill

Are you in need of oral surgery?

Whether it’s to remove one or more teeth, implants, or something more involved, you probably have a lot of questions and concerns. What are my options? What can I expect? Will I be in pain? It’s normal to be apprehensive about a surgical procedure and at Chapel Hill Implant and Oral Surgery Center, we understand. That is why Dr. Hill has created a top notch facility and a team of professionals whose singular goal is to help you understand your options and make your procedure as stress-free as possible. Meet Dr. David Lee Hill, Jr. People who meet Dr. Hill are quickly won over by his knowledge and easy-going style. He is a stickler for detail and in his profession, every little detail matters. His commitment to patient safety and surgical precision as well as his uncompromising philosophy toward care is reflected in the state-of-the-art surgical facility he has designed from the ground up. He also places emphasis on his patient’s comfort and it shows - from the warm and inviting surroundings to the caring staff, focused on the patient’s well being. If your case calls for implant or oral surgery, let Dr. Hill and his capable team welcome you for a tour and a discussion about your unique needs.

Dr. David Lee Hill, Jr. Oral & Maxillofacial Surgeon

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CHAPELHILLORALSURGERY.COM 106

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up woodworking five years ago when he needed a side table for their grill on the back deck. He applied his newfound skills throughout the house, creating matching twin beds for Indira and Naya, a bathtub caddy for Neera and a play set for all to enjoy in the backyard. The Skurkys forgo their formal dining room and instead gather three times a day for meals at a massive granite island in the kitchen. Neera thought the island looked enormous when it was first installed, but now she realizes that it could have been made even larger. “Our lives revolve around that counter,” she says. Four black-and-white framed photographs of Dave and Neera’s grandmothers hang in the hallway outside of their children’s bedrooms. “You can see an Italian woman in her 20s, that’s Dave’s grandmother; my grandmothers are both wearing saris, they’re from India; and then you have Dave’s other grandmother, who is from Chicago,” Neera explains. These pictures showcase just one aspect of Dave and Neera’s wish for their children – that they grow up in a home and a town that embraces diversity. CHM


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welcoming

Wegmans The grocery chain opened a new location in Chapel Hill in late February By H an n ah Lee | Photography courtesy of Wegm ans Food Market s

N

orth Carolina’s Wegmans hype is well-documented, especially after the store’s grand opening in Raleigh in 2019. Nearly 3,000 people waited in line for entry before 7 a.m. on a Monday. That is dedication. A second store in West Cary opened not long after. And now there’s a third location off

As of press time, Wegmans was slated to open its third North Carolina location off U.S. Hwy. 15-501 in Chapel Hill. The store brings nearly 450 jobs to Orange County.

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Every Wegmans location, including the Cary store, pictured here, offers thousands of organic options.

compete against the likes of Trader Joe’s and Whole Foods. (Wegmans even beat out Amazon and Costco as the most loved brand on the Harris Poll in 2019. FYI, this location stocks hundreds of family-size, Costco-like products, too.) Wegmans even produces its own cheeses in what Rick calls a “cheese cave” at its headquarters in Rochester, New York. “You might wonder what a cheese cave is,” Rick laughs. “It’s not a real cave, but it simulates that. And really what it is – it’s a state-of-the-art cheese facility, and it’s the first of its kind in an American supermarket chain. So we’re Durham-Chapel Hill Boulevard, slated the only chain in America that has this. as of press time to open Feb. 24, which is BY THE NUMBERS And what it allows us to do is to create an nearly six years in the making. “It’s crazy environment to control and ripen cheese.” to think about how long it’s been,” Chapel 1st Wegmans in North Carolina Wegmans’ “Professor’s Brie” was named Hill store manager Rick Walters says. where customers can watch second place “Best of Show” among “It is such a big deal for the town,” says employees prepare salads, sandwiches and soup in one station more than 1,700 entries at the American Mayor Pam Hemminger. “We were very 2nd store in the state to have a poke Cheese Society competition in 2019. The pleased that Wegmans wanted to come to station Chapel Hill location even took its cheese Chapel Hill in Orange County. It’s slated to 3rd location in North Carolina capabilities to the next level by establishing be one of the biggest sales tax producers in Ranked No. 3 in Fortune magazine’s a partnership with Chapel Hill Creamery our county.” “Best Companies to Work For” in 2020 Wegmans’ passionate following – many a few years ago. Wegmans now carries four Ranked No. 6 for corporate who are Northerners more familiar with the varieties of Chapel Hill Creamery cheeses reputation among the 100 most grocery chain – may seem foreign to locals at all North Carolina and Virginia locations visible companies by The Axios Harris Poll 100 who don’t yet understand the hype. But it with the hopes of bringing their team in to is well-founded, and for several reasons: The do educational training with its Chapel Hill 100 sushi items available every day European-inspired open-air market is much employees and customers. More than 100 local beers in stock larger than a typical grocery store. In this Rick emphasizes that Wegmans actively 105th location in the country case, the Chapel Hill location is more than seeks these local partnerships. And for the Roughly 450 employees twice the size of the average 38,000-squaregrand opening of this location, Wegmans 700 different varieties of cheese foot store. It’s less about getting in and out partnered with Durham’s Hi-Wire Brewing, More than 2,000 different wine options quickly and more of an experience. It’s who produced a beer only available at 99,000-square-foot store not about leaving; it’s about getting lost in Wegmans. The hazy IPA will be available every department until your grocery cart is among more than 100 other local beers – feel spilling over. free to crack open a cold one at its in-house In fact, Wegmans invests in specializing restaurant, Burger Bar, while you’re at it. in as many culinary departments as possible, from an entire aisle Rick attests that customers can be overwhelmed by the sheer size of dedicated to hundreds of gluten-free items to thousands of organic the store and amount of products, so his advice: Take it slow. Plan to items offered in every department. Maybe that’s why it’s able to take some time. CHM 114

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3407 University Drive, Durham, NC 27707 | 919.490.4922 | TheKitchenSpecialist.com PREMIER DESIGN AND REMODELING FIRM SERVING THE TRIANGLE FOR OVER 29 YEARS


D INING GUIDE INCLUDES RESTAURANTS, DELIS AND BISTROS IN CH APEL HILL, CARRBORO, HILLSBOROUGH AND NORTHERN CHATHAM COUNTY

CHAPEL HILL East Franklin Street Bandido’s Mexican Cafe Burritos, salads, quesadillas, tacos. 159½ E. Franklin St.; 919-967-5048; bandidoscafe.com Benny Cappella’s Pizza by the slice or whole pie. 122 E. Franklin St.; 919-240-5286; bennysva.com Carolina Coffee Shop Casual American cuisine for breakfast, lunch and dinner. 138 E. Franklin St.; 919-942-6875; carolinacoffeeshop.com Cosmic Cantina Burritos, salads, quesadillas, tacos. 128 E. Franklin St.; 919-960-3955 Curry Point Express Indian fare including curry, biryani and wraps. 118 E. Franklin St.; 919-903-9000; currypointexpresstogo.com Down Time Craft beer, pizza, tacos, wraps, paninis and more. 201 E. Franklin St.; 828-719-5376; downtimechapelhill.com Epilogue Independent bookstore and Mexican-style chocolatería. 109 E. Franklin St., Ste. 100; 919-913-5055; epiloguebookcafe.com Four Corners American fare, nachos, wings, pasta. 175 E. Franklin St.; 919-537-8230; fourcornersgrille.com Hibachi & Company Japanese fast-casual spot serving healthy hibachi- and teriyakistyle dishes. 153 E. Franklin St.; 919-903-8428; hibachicompany.com Imbibe Bottle shop and restaurant serving pizza, salads and appetizers. 108 Henderson St.; 919-636-6469; imbibenc.com

Sutton’s Drug Store Old-fashioned diner known for its hot dogs, burgers and sandwiches like “Roy’s Reuben.” 159 E. Franklin St.; 919-942-5161; suttonsdrugstore.com

*DETAILS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. CHECK RESTAURANT WEBSITES AND SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS PRIOR TO VISITING.

Brandwein’s Bagels Classic New York bagels and breakfast sandwiches. 505 W. Rosemary St.; 919-240-7071; brandweinsbagels.com

Time-Out Southern comfort food 24 hours a day. 201 E. Franklin St.; 919-929-2425; timeout247.com

Bread & Butter Bakery & Coffeeshop Bread, cinnamon rolls, scones, desserts. 503 W. Rosemary St.; 919-960-5998; chapelhillbakery.com

Top of the Hill A Chapel Hill brewery that also offers American food, like burgers and flatbreads. 100 E. Franklin St.; 919-929-8676; thetopofthehill.com

BUNS Gourmet burgers, fries and shakes made from fresh ingredients. 107 N. Columbia St.; 919-240-4746; bunsofchapelhill.com

TRU Deli & Wine Bar Sandwiches and wine. 114 Henderson St.; 919-240-7755; trudeli.com

Carolina Brewery The fifth-oldest brewery in the state featuring Carolina cuisine. 460 W. Franklin St.; 919-942-1800; carolinabrewery.com

Yaya Tea Japanese cafe with a variety of bubble teas and imported Japanese snacks. 157 E. Franklin St.; 919-914-6302; yayatea.com West Franklin Street

411 West Fresh pasta, seafood and pizzas inspired by the flavors of Italy and the Mediterranean, with a healthy California twist; outdoor dining. 411 W. Franklin St.; 919-967-2782; 411west.com Al’s Burger Shack Gourmet burgers and fries. 516 W. Franklin St.; 919-904-7659; alsburgershack.com

Cat Tales Cat Cafe A two-story coffee/ beer/wine cafe home to 12 adoptable cats. 431 W. Franklin St.; cattalescatcafe.com Chimney Indian Kitchen + Bar Traditional Indian dishes and unique options like pista korma and lobster pepper masala. 306 W. Franklin St., Ste. D; 984-234-3671; chimneyindiankitchen.com CholaNad Restaurant & Bar Contemporary and traditional South Indian cuisine. Catering available. 310 W. Franklin St.; 800-246-5262; cholanad.com Crook’s Corner Southern classics like shrimp and grits, Hoppin’ John and jalapeño-cheddar hushpuppies. 610 W. Franklin St.; 919-929-7643; crookscorner.com

Beer Study Bottle shop with in-store drafts and growlers to go. 106 N. Graham St.; 919-240-5423; beerstudy.com

Linda’s Bar & Grill Local beer, sweet potato tots, cheese fries, burgers. 203 E. Franklin St.; 919-933-6663; lindas-bar.com

Blue Dogwood Public Market Food hall with individually-owned food stalls including traditional Persian, vegan soul food, North Carolina barbecue and a nutrient-dense weekly pre-order menu. 306 W. Franklin St.; 919-717-0404; bluedogwood.com

Möge Tee Bubble tea shop offering cheese foam fruit tea, fresh milk tea, fruit parfaits and fruit yakult. 151 E. Franklin St.; 984-2343278; mogeteechapelhill.com

Blue’s on Franklin North Carolina barbecue, burgers, hot dogs, sandwiches and salads. 110 West Franklin St.; 919-240-5060; bluesonfranklin.com

Elaine’s on Franklin Fine regional American cuisine, made with the freshest local ingredients. 454 W. Franklin St.; 919-960-2770; elainesonfranklin.com

Sup Dogs Creative hot dogs and sides like jalapeño popper tots and funnel cake sticks. 107 E. Franklin St.; 919-903-9566; supdogs.com

Boro Beverage Co. Locally made kombucha and craft sodas on tap. 400 W. Rosemary St., Ste. 1005; 919-537-8001; borobeverage.com

Heavenly Buffaloes Chicken wings as well as vegan wings with more than 25 rubs and sauces. 407 W. Franklin St.; 919-914-6717; heavenlybuffaloes.com/chapel-hill

Jed’s Kitchen Gyro pitas, shawarma wraps, subs and other Moroccan dishes. 105 E. Franklin St.; 919-240-7003; jedskitchen.com

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Crossroads Chapel Hill at The Carolina Inn New American cuisine and seasonal specialties; all ABC permits; outdoor dining. 211 Pittsboro St.; 919-918-2777; crossroadscuisine.com


Italian Pizzeria III Pizza, Italian entrees, calzones and subs. The “place to be” in Chapel Hill for 40 years. 508 W. Franklin St.; 919-968-4671; italianpizzeria3.com Kurama Sushi & Noodle Express Dumplings, salads, noodle dishes. 105 N. Columbia St.; 919-968-4747; kuramasushinoodle.com La Résidence French-inspired cuisine made from fresh ingredients. 202 W. Rosemary St.; 919-967-2506; laresidencedining.com Lantern Pan-Asian cuisine. 423 W. Franklin St.; 919-969-8846; lanternrestaurant.com Lime & Basil Vietnamese fare. 200 W. Franklin St.; 919-967-5055; limeandbasil.com Mediterranean Deli Offers healthy vegan, vegetarian and gluten-free options as well as delicious meats from the grill. 410 W. Franklin St.; 919-967-2666; mediterraneandeli.com Mama Dip’s Traditional Southern specialties, brunch and dinner classics like fried chicken and Brunswick stew. 408 W. Rosemary St.; 919-942-5837; mamadips.com Might As Well Bar & Grill Bar favorites, plus pizza, burgers, wings and more. 206 W. Franklin St.; 984-234-3333; chapelhill.mightaswellbarandgrill.com Mint Indian Cuisine North Indian subz korma and chicken jalfrezi. 504 W. Franklin St.; 919-929-6188; mintunc.com

Summit Coffee Cold brews, lattes, teas, special blends and more. 140 W. Franklin St., Ste. 120; 704-895-9090; summitcoffee.com Talulla’s Authentic Turkish cuisine; all ABC permits. 456 W. Franklin St.; 919-933-1177; talullas.com Trolly Stop - The Beach on Franklin Specialty hot dogs and burgers. 104 W. Franklin St.; 919-240-4206; trollystophotdogs.com Trophy Room A Graduate Hotels concept serving up shareable plates, salads and burgers. 311 W. Franklin St.; 919-442-9000; graduatehotels.com/chapel-hill/restaurant Vimala’s Curryblossom Café Traditional Indian tandoori and thali. 431 W. Franklin St.; 919-929-3833; curryblossom.com West End Wine Bar Pastries, light tapas, 100 wines. 450 W. Franklin St.; 919-967-7599; westendwinebar.com YoPo of Chapel Hill Since 1982, YoPo has served frozen yogurt, treats and shakes with unique flavors. 106 W. Franklin St.; 919-942-7867; yogurtpump.com Village Plaza/East Franklin Street/ Eastgate Crossing/Rams Plaza Breadman’s A variety of burgers, sandwiches, salads and grilled meat, with daily soup and specials. All-day breakfast; catering available. 261 S. Elliott Rd.; 919-967-7110; breadmens.com

The Northside District Specialty cocktails and international small plates. 403 W. Rosemary St.; 919-391-7044; thenorthsidedistrict.com

Caffé Driade Carrboro Coffee, bowlsize lattes, local baked goods, beer and wine. 1215-A E. Franklin St.; 919-942-2333; caffedriade.com

Pho Happiness Pho noodle soup, vermicelli plates and vegetarian/gluten-free options. 104 N. Graham St.; 919-942-8201; phohappiness.com

Casa Maria Latin Cuisine Specialty dips, ceviche, street tacos, nachos, burritos and salads. 1502 E. Franklin St.; 919-929-6566; casamariacuisine.com

The Pizza Press Build-your-own pizza, salads and craft beer. 133 W. Franklin St., Ste. 120; 984-234-0081; thepizzapress.com

The Casual Pint Upscale craft beer market with beers and wine on tap, and ice-cream sandwiches. 201 S. Elliott Rd., Ste. 51; 919-967-2626; chapelhill.thecasualpint.com

The Purple Bowl Acai bowls, toast, smoothies, coffee. 306-B W. Franklin St.; 919-903-8511; purplebowlch.com Que Chula Authentic Mexican food, tacos and craft tequilas. 140 W. Franklin St., Ste. 110; 919-903-8000; quechulatacos.com Spicy 9 Sushi Bar & Asian Restaurant Sushi, Thai curries, bibimbap and other Asian entrees. 140 W. Franklin St., Ste. 150; 919-903-9335; spicy9chapelhill.com

CAVA Customizable Mediterranean bowls, salads, pitas and soups. 79 S. Elliott Rd.; 919-636-5828; cava.com Chopt Offers unique salads, grain and quinoa bowls. Eastgate Crossing; 919-240-7660; choptsalad.com Clean Juice Certified organic juices, smoothies, bowls and snacks. Eastgate Crossing; 919-590-5133; cleanjuice.com

Crab House Company Fresh, flavorful seafood. 237 S. Elliott Rd.; 919-903-9015; crabhouseco.com Dunk & Slide at Whole Foods Market Allday breakfast, sushi and more. 81 S. Elliott Rd.; 919-968-1983; wholefoodsmarket.com The Ghost Kitchen & Delivery Co. Chapel Hill’s first delivery-only restaurant group. The group consists of two virtual restaurants, Bistro 501 and The BBQ Company of Chapel Hill. 1322 N. Fordham Blvd.; ghostkitcheneats.com Guglhupf Bake Shop European-style breads, pastries and coffee. Eastgate Crossing; 919-914-6511; guglhupf.com/ chapel-hill-bake-shop Il Palio at The Siena Hotel AAA Five Diamond restaurant serving Italian specialties like burrata and butternut squash ravioli. 1505 E. Franklin St.; 919-918-2545; ilpalio.com Japan Express Hibachi-style meals and sushi. 106 S. Estes Dr. Just Salad Salads, wraps, smoothies, soups, grain bowls, market plates and toast boxes. 111 S. Elliott Rd.; 984-999-3700; justsalad.com Kipos Greek Taverna Greek cuisine in a relaxed, upscale setting with outdoor dining. Eastgate Crossing; 919-425-0760; kiposchapelhill.com La Hacienda Burritos, salads, quesadillas, tacos. 1813 Fordham Blvd.; 919-967-0207 The Loop Pizza Grill Pizzas, soups, salads, sandwiches, burgers. Eastgate Crossing; 919-969-7112; looppizzagrill.com Min Ga Authentic Korean cuisine like bibimbap, bulgogi and variety of homemade kimchi. 1404 E. Franklin St.; 919-933-1773; min-ga.com Monterrey Mexican Grill Tacos, quesadillas, burritos and more. Rams Plaza; 919-969-8750; monterreychapelhill.com Mr. Tokyo Japanese Restaurant Unlimited sushi and hibachi. Rams Plaza; 919-2404552; mrtokyojapanese.com/chapel-hill Squid’s Fresh seafood options include woodgrilled fillets, Maine lobster, fried seafood and oysters. 1201 Fordham Blvd. (15-501); 919-942-8757; squidsrestaurant.com Sunrise Biscuit Kitchen Drive-thru biscuits, sandwiches. 1305 E. Franklin St.; 919-933-1324; sunrisebiscuits.com

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JOYO U S CO O K ING MORETON NE AL IS AN AUTHOR AND INTERIOR DESIGNER WHO LIVES IN CHAPEL HILL. SHE IS A LIFELONG FOODIE, HAVING CO-FOUNDED LA RÉSIDENCE IN 1976.

VIETNAMESE BEEF STEW

Beef stew is having a renaissance. NYT Cooking claims Anthony Bourdain’s boeuf bourguignon is the most requested recipe of the year. Ina Garten’s and Julia Child’s versions are almost as popular. There’s something comforting about beef stew that people (I’m speaking for carnivores here) crave under our present uncomfortable circumstances. Boeuf bourguignon may be the king of stews, but I’ve rarely encountered any beef stew I didn’t enjoy eating and cooking – braising a gelatinous cut of beef for hours is almost impossible to mess up. During the past year, my repertoire expanded after discovering “Glorious Stew,” written (and illustrated!) in 1969 by a severely unsung author, Dorothy Ivens. There’s little information available about the life of my new favorite food writer, besides a list of her other five cookbooks. I find it curious that her husband and collaborator, wine writer William Massee, gets all the Google attention. Hopefully someone is writing a biography of this talented woman whose wit and exuberance radiate from her books. I’d love to know more about her. Dorothy escorts her readers on a tour of classic stews from around the globe. Each recipe includes a short history of the dish, what to serve before and after it, and even wine pairings. Recipes are thorough yet succinct, unlike the pages-long instructions of her peer, Julia Child. Brilliantly, the book is divided into two sections – browned and the less laborintensive unbrowned – stews of all kinds, from ratatouille to tripe, but the beef stews steal the show. Browned beef stews include boeuf bourguignon, Flemish carbonnade, Hungarian goulash, stifado (a Greek stew flavored with cinnamon and allspice) and chili con carne. Unbrowned stews are represented by pot-au-feu, daube a la Provencale, collops (an English stew with anchovies and capers), Viennese goulash, a Russian beef borscht and a Chinese “Five Fragrances Beef.”

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PHOTO BY JAMES STEFIUK

STEWING IN ISOLATION

This month’s recipe is actually not from Dorothy’s book. Vietnamese beef stew, though a close relative of her “Five Fragrances Beef,” is in a category of its own, a hybrid of French and Vietnamese cooking styles and ingredients, most not available in 1969. The hardest part of making this unbrowned stew is collecting the essential components. Lemongrass can now be found at most grocery stores in Chapel Hill, even Food Lion; star anise is available at The Fresh Market and at the superb Li Ming’s Global Market off Durham-Chapel Hill Boulevard in Durham. I imagine Dorothy would recommend serving this unusual stew with a nice pinot noir, a mixed green salad dressed with a simple vinaigrette, a crunchy baguette and, for dessert, lemon curd ice cream. When we can have dinner parties again, that’s what I’ll serve.

2 Tbsp. canola oil 1 large onion, halved and thinly sliced 2 Tbsp. grated fresh ginger 2 Tbsp. grated fresh garlic 2 Tbsp. tomato paste 1½ ½ Tbsp. chile-garlic sauce (such as Sriracha), plus more if needed 2 tsp. brown sugar 4 stalks fresh lemongrass, trimmed and smashed 2½ ½ - 3 lbs. boneless beef chuck roast, trimmed and cut into 1½-inch chunks 2 cups beef broth 3 cups coconut water or plain water (more if needed) 4 star anise pods 2 cinnamon sticks 1 bay leaf 6 medium carrots, peeled and cut into 1-inch pieces 2 Tbsp. fish sauce 2 Tbsp. lime juice Salt and black pepper, to taste Rice or rice noodles, cooked just before serving Chopped scallions Chopped cilantro, mint and/or basil

In a large Dutch oven over mediumhigh, heat the oil. Add onion and cook, stirring occasionally, until lightly browned. Add ginger and garlic, then cook, stirring frequently, until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the tomato paste, chile-garlic sauce, brown sugar, lemongrass and beef, then stir to coat. Add broth, water, star anise, cinnamon and bay leaf. Bring to a boil over medium-high, give the stew a couple of stirs, then reduce to low. Cover and simmer for 2 hours or more, until the meat is quite tender. Remove and discard the lemongrass, star anise, bay leaf and cinnamon sticks. Stir the carrots into the stew and return to a simmer over medium. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the carrots are tender, about 15 minutes or so. Add more water if needed to dilute the sauce. It should be a bit soupy. Stir in the fish sauce and lime juice. Taste and season with additional chile-garlic sauce (if desired), salt and pepper. Spoon rice or noodles into serving bowls, ladle the stew on top, and sprinkle with plenty of chopped scallions and fresh herbs. CHM


D I NI NG GUI D E

Sutton’s in the Atrium A cafe version of Sutton’s Drug Store with menu options including its famous hot dogs, salads and more. 100 Europa Dr.; 919-240-4471; suttonsdrugstore.com Tandoor Indian Restaurant Traditional Indian cuisine, vegan options. 1301 E. Franklin St.; 919-967-6622; tandoorindian.com Twisted Noodles Thai noodle soups, pan-fried noodles. Eastgate Crossing; 919-933-9933; twistednoodlesch.com University Place Alfredo’s Pizza Villa Pizzas, calzones, salads, subs, pasta, desserts. 919-968-3424; alfredospizzanc.com bartaco Tacos, fresh-juice cocktails, poke and mole options. 910-807-8226; bartaco.com Hawkers Inspired by Southeast Asia's street fare, this eatery features homemade favorites, from dumplings to curries. Outdoor seating available. 919-415-1799; eathawkers.com Maple View Mobile Ice cream outpost of the Hillsborough dairy farm. 919-244-1949; mapleviewmobile.com Stoney River Steakhouse and Grill Southern favorites like deviled eggs meet steakhouse mainstays like the legendary 12 oz. filet. 919-914-6688; stoneyriver.com Trilogy American cafe featuring innovative twists on classic dishes. Outdoor seating available. Silverspot Cinema; 919-357-9887; silverspot.net Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard (Airport Road) Hunam Chinese Restaurant Cantonese cuisine. 790 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-967-6133; hunamrestaurant.net Kitchen Bistro-style dining with a seasonal menu that always includes mussels. 764 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-537-8167; kitchenchapelhill.com Lucha Tigre Latin-Asian cuisine and sake tequila bar. 746 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-904-7326; luchatigre.com The Root Cellar Cafe & Catering Sandwiches, salads, desserts and more. Online ordering and pickup, weekly prepared meals, groceries to-go box and Friday night specials. 750 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-9673663; rootcellarchapelhill.com Timberlyne/Chapel Hill North Area Chapel Hill Wine Company Wine store with bottles from all over the globe. 2809 Homestead Rd.; 919-968-1884; chapelhillwinecompany.com

Deli Edison Neighborhood deli with bagels, sandwiches, salads. 630 Weaver Dairy Rd.; 919-929-7700; deliedison.com Farm House Restaurant Steaks, salads, potatoes. 6004 Millhouse Rd. (N.C. 86 N.); 919-929-5727; farmhousesteakhouse.com

Coco Bean Coffee Shop Locally owned coffee shop offering Carrboro Coffee Roasters coffee and a vegan market. 1114 Environ Way, East 54; 919-883-9003; cocobeancoffeeshop.com

Joe Van Gogh Coffee, tea and pastries. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-967-2002; joevangogh.com

elements Cuisine combining classical and modern Asian and European cooking techniques; check out the wine bar with full menu next door. 2110 Environ Way, East 54; 919-537-8780; elementsofchapelhill.com

Magone Italian Grill & Pizza Italian mains. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-904-7393; magone-italian-grill-pizza.business.site

First Watch French toast, pancakes and specialty omelets. 1101 Environ Way, East 54; 919-537-8488; firstwatch.com

Margaret’s Cantina Mexican and Southwestern cuisine. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-942-4745; margaretscantina.com

Hawthorne & Wood Fine dining cuisine with an outdoor patio, a fully stocked bar and an extensive international wine list. 3140 Environ Way, East 54; 919-240-4337; hawthorneandwood.com

New Hope Market Breakfast and daily specials like burgers, soups and more. 6117 N.C. Hwy. 86 S.; 919-240-7851 OiShii Specialty rolls, teriyaki, stir-fry, sushi. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-932-7002; oishiiroll.com The Pig Barbecue, fried tofu, collards. 630 Weaver Dairy Rd., Ste. 101; 919-942-1133; thepigrestaurant.com Piggyback Classic cocktails, beer and wine and unexpected, creative bar food. 630 Weaver Dairy Rd.; 919-240-4715 Pop’s Pizzeria Pizzas, calzones, stromboli, pasta. 1822 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-932-1040; pops-pizzeria.com Queen of Pho Vietnamese offerings like banh mi and, of course, pho beef noodle soup. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-903-8280; queenofphochapelhill.com

Jujube Eclectic, modern cuisine inspired by the classic flavors of China and Vietnam. Glen Lennox Shopping Center; 919-960-0555; jujuberestaurant.com Nantucket Grill & Bar Clam chowder, lobster rolls and more. 5925 Farrington Rd.; 919-402-0077; nantucketgrill.com Thai Palace Soup, curries, pad thai. Glenwood Square Shopping Center; 919-967-5805 Meadowmont Village Brixx Wood Fired Pizza Specialty pizzas and salads. 501 Meadowmont Village Circle; 919-929-1942; brixxpizza.com Cafe Carolina & Bakery Salads, sandwiches, breakfast. 601 Meadowmont Village Circle; 919-945-8811; cafecarolina.com

Rasa Indi-Chinese Indian and Chinese cuisine. 1826 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-929-2199; rasachapelhill.com

Fusion Fish Tapas, family-style dinners and sushi. 100 Meadowmont Village Circle; 919-903-8416; fusionfishcuisine.com

Sage Vegetarian Cafe Vegetarian fare. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-968-9266; sagevegetariancafe.com

Meet Fresh Taiwanese desserts and teas. 407 Meadowmont Village Circle; 984-999-4983; meetfresh.us/en

Sal’s Pizza & Ristorante Thin-crust and deep-dish pizzas plus an array of Italian comfort food. 2805 Homestead Rd.; 919-932-5125; salspizzaofchapelhill.com

Quickly Hot and cold tea drinks in addition to Asian street food. 503 Meadowmont Village Circle; 984-234-0401; quicklychapelhill.com

YOPOP Frozen Yogurt Frozen yogurt shop featuring 14 flavors, bubble tea and smoothies. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-537-8229

Southern Village

N.C. 54 East/Raleigh Road

La Vita Dolce Pastries, sorbet, gelato, coffee. 610 Market St.; 919-968-1635; lavitadolcecafe.com

Amante Gourmet Pizza Create-your-own pizzas. 6209-B Falconbridge Rd.; 919-493-0904; amantepizza.com BIN 54 Steaks, seafood and other fine American food. Everything made in-house. Glen Lennox Shopping Center; 919-969-1155; bin54chapelhill.com Brenz Pizza Co. Specialty pizzas, subs, salads. 3120 Environ Way, East 54; 919-636-4636; brenzpizzaco.com

Al’s Burger Shack Gourmet burgers and fries. 708 Market St.; 919-914-6694; alsburgershack.com

Market and Moss American cuisine made with fresh local ingredients. 700 Market St.; 919-929-8226; marketandmoss.com Rasa Malaysia Authentic Malaysian dishes. 410 Market St.; 984-234-0256; rasamalaysiach.com Town Hall Grill Sandwiches, steak, seafood, Italian dishes. 410 Market St.; 919-960-8696; thetownhallgrill.com

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DINING GUIDE

Weaver Street Market Food bar items available as grab and go. 716 Market St.; 919-929-2009; weaverstreetmarket.coop

CARRBORO Downtown 401 Main Upscale dive bar and sandwich shop serving shareable bar snacks, local brews and po’boys. 401 Main St.; 919-390-3598; 401main.com Acme Food & Beverage Co. Entrees with a Southern touch. 110 E. Main St.; 919-929-2263; acmecarrboro.com Akai Hana Japanese cuisine including sushi, tempura and teriyaki. 206 W. Main St.; 919-942-6848; akaihana.com Armadillo Grill Tex-Mex burritos, enchiladas, tacos, nachos. 120 E. Main St.; 919-929-4669; armadillogrill.com Carrburritos Burritos, tacos, nachos and margaritas. 711 W. Rosemary St.; 919-933-8226; carrburritos.com Cham Thai Cuisine Authentic Thai, Siamese and Chinese cuisine. 370 E. Main St., Ste. 190; 984-999-4646; chamthaicuisineatcarrboro.com Coronato Pizza Roman-style pizza, snacks and salads. 101 Two Hills Rd., Ste. 140; 919-240-4804; coronatopizza.com Craftboro Brewing Depot Bottle shop and brewery with taps of craft beer. 101 Two Hills Dr., Unit 180; 919-240-4400; craftborobrewing.com Glasshalfull Mediterranean-inspired food and wine. 106 S. Greensboro St.; 919-967-9784; glasshalfull.net Gourmet Kingdom Sichuan cuisine. 301 E. Main St.; 919-932-7222; thegourmetkingdom.com The Honeysuckle Cafe & Bar Coffee house serving tea and meads in addition to breakfast, lunch and dinner fare. 601 W. Main St.; 919-967-9398; thehoneysuckle.org/cafe-bar Krave Kava Bar & Tea Lounge Offers a wide range of tea and herbal drinks, all made from kava, a type of plant root. 105 W. Main St.; 919-408-9596; kravekava.com Luna Rotisserie & Empanadas South American cuisine meets the American South. 307 E. Main St.; 919-537-8958; lunarotisserie.com Mel’s Commissary & Catering Open for lunch, Mel’s serves up a changing menu of comfort food. 109 W. Main St.; 919-240-7700; melscarrboro.com

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Napoli Cafe Wood-fired pizza, espresso, artisanal gelato made from scratch, teas and local craft beer and wines. 105 E. Main St.; 919-667-8288; napolicarrboro.com

Dingo Dog Brewing Company The nanobrewery/nonprofit features 16 taps and outdoor seating. 410 N. Greensboro St., Ste. 150; dingodogbrewing.com

Neal’s Deli Buttermilk biscuits and traditional deli fare. 100-C E. Main St.; 919-967-2185; nealsdeli.com

Oasis Organic coffee, tea, beer and wine. Carr Mill Mall; 919-904-7343; oasisincarrmill.com

Oakleaf “Immediate” cuisine like pastas and seafood using ingredients from the chef’s own garden. 310 E. Main St.; 984-234-0054; oakleafnc.com

Tandem Farm-to-table, modern American cuisine with full service bar. Carr Mill Mall; 919-240-7937; tandemcarrboro.com

Open Eye Cafe Locally roasted Carrboro Coffee and espresso, tea, beer, wine and baked goods. 101 S. Greensboro St.; 919-968-9410; openeyecafe.com Paco’s Tacos Steak, chicken, seafood and vegetarian tacos. Located in Mel’s Commissary & Catering. 109 W. Main St.; 919-240-7700 Pizzeria Mercato Pizza, antipasto, soups and fritti. 408 W. Weaver St.; 919-967-2277; pizzeriamercatonc.com Provence Southern French cuisine. 203 W. Weaver St.; 919-967-5008; provenceofcarrboro.com Spotted Dog Vegetarian- and veganfriendly entrees. 111 E. Main St.; 919-933-1117; thespotteddogrestaurant.com Wings Over Has 27 flavors of wings. 313 E. Main St.; 919-537-8271; wingsoverchapelhill.com East Main Square Amante Gourmet Pizza Create-your-own pizzas, salads and pasta. 300 E. Main St.; 919-929-3330; amantepizza.com Gray Squirrel Coffee Co. Roastery and espresso bar. 360 E. Main St., Ste. 100; graysquirrelcoffee.com Hickory Tavern Burgers, sandwiches and build-your-own salads. 370-110 E. Main St.; 919-942-7417; thehickorytavern.com

Thai Station Authentic, fresh Thai dishes. 201 E. Main St., Ste. C.; 984-234-3230; thaistationnc.com Venable Rotisserie Bistro Upscale comfort food with a heavy emphasis on seasonal ingredients. Carr Mill Mall; 919-904-7160; venablebistro.com Weaver Street Market Hot food bar items are available as grab and go. Carr Mill Mall; 919-929-0010; weaverstreetmarket.coop N.C. 54 West/Carrboro Plaza Aidan’s Pizza Pizza, wings and salads. 602-D Jones Ferry Rd.; 919-903-8622; aidanspizza.com Anna Maria’s Pizzeria Italian cuisine. Carrboro Plaza; 919-929-1877; annamariasnc.wordpress.com Fiesta Grill Burritos, chimichangas, fajitas, tacos. 3307 N.C. Hwy. 54 W.; 919-928-9002; fiestagrill.us Monterrey Traditional Mexican cuisine. Carrboro Plaza; 919-903-9919; monterreychapelhill.com Wingman Wings and hot dogs. 104 N.C. Hwy. 54 W.; 919-928-9200; bestwingman.net

HILLSBOROUGH Antonia’s Italian cuisine. 101 N. Churton St.; 919-643-7722; antoniashillsborough.com

Iza Whiskey & Eats Japanese fusion cuisine serving small plates, sushi, ramen, whiskey, sake and cocktails. 370 E. Main St., Ste. 140; 919-537-8645; izaeats.com

C&B Community Store (OPENING SOON!) The gas station turned community kitchen serves breakfast and lunch five days a week and wood-fired pizzas on weekends. 5515 N.C. Hwy. 86

Rise Southern Biscuits & Righteous Chicken Biscuits, doughnuts, chicken and coffee. 310 E. Main St., Ste. 100; 919-929-5115; risebiscuitschicken.com

The Colorado Burrito (OPENING SOON!) Mexican mainstays like quesadillas, tacos and, of course, burritos. 122 S. Churton St.; the-colorado-burrito.business.site

Vecino Brewing Co. Dozens of craft beer choices plus flavorful small plates. 300 E. Main St., Ste. C; 919-537-9591; vecinobrewing.com

Cup A Joe Coffee and pastries. 112 W. King St.; 919-732-2008; hboro-cupajoe.com

Carr Mill Mall/North Greensboro Street B-Side Lounge Small plates like flatbread, bacon-wrapped dates and fondue. Plus, inspired cocktails. Carr Mill Mall; 919-9047160; b-sidelounge.com Carrboro Pizza Oven Pizza, calzones. Carr Mill Mall; 919-904-7336; carrboropizzaoven.com

El Restaurante Ixtapa Authentic fromscratch Mexican dishes. 162 Exchange Park Ln.; 919-644-6944; ixtapa.homestead.com/ homepage.html Hillsborough BBQ Company Barbecue plates and sandwiches, sides and desserts. 236 S. Nash St.; 919-732-4647; hillsboroughbbq.com Hot Tin Roof Games and specialty cocktails. 115 W. Margaret Ln.; 919-296-9113; hottinroofbar.com


D I NI NG GUI D E

The House at Gatewood Chop house and oyster bar with dishes like signature cracker-crusted pork chop with grits and greens. 300 U.S. 70; 919-241-4083; houseatgatewood.com Jay’s Chicken Shack Chicken, buffalo wings, breakfast biscuits. 646 N. Churton St.; 919-732-3591; jayschickenshack.com Los Altos Serving Mexican dishes, like tacos and chiles rellenos, for breakfast and lunch six days a week and dinner on weekends. 126 W. King St.; 919-241-4177 Maple View Farm Country Store Drive-up or window service for homemade ice cream and milk. 6900 Rocky Ridge Rd.; 919-960-5535; mapleviewfarm.com Matthew’s Chocolates Gourmet chocolates, frozen treats and baked goods. 104 N. Churton St.; 919-732-0900 Napoli Hillsborough Neapolitan pizzeria and gelateria. 230 S. Nash St.; 919-245-8566; napolihillsborough.com Nomad International street food-inspired eatery. 122 W. King St.; 984-217-0179; thenomadnc.com Panciuto Offering rotating weekly suppers called Panciuto: At Home and operating as a temporary pop-up called Hillsborough Bakeshop. 110 S. Churton St.; hillsboroughbakeshop.com

Pueblo Viejo Traditional Mexican food. 370 S. Churton St.; 919-732-3480 Radius Wood-fired pizzas, housemade pastas, sandwiches, salads and desserts. Outdoor dining. 112 N. Churton St.; 919-245-0601; radiuspizzeria.net Saratoga Grill New England-style cuisine. 108 S. Churton St.; 919-732-2214; saratogagrill.com Steve’s Garden Market & Butchery Local meat, baked goods, pimento cheese. 610 N. Churton St.; 919-732-4712; stevesgardenmarket.com Village Diner Southern breakfast, lunch, brunch, dinner and take-out pizza. 600 W. King St.; 919-245-8915; villagedinernc.com Vinny’s Italian Grill and Pizzeria Italian favorites. 133 N. Scottswood Blvd.; 919-732-9219; vinnyshillsborough.com Weaver Street Market Food bar items are available as grab and go. 228 S. Churton St.; 919-245-5050; weaverstreetmarket.coop

Wooden Nickel Pub Pub fare. 113 N. Churton St.; 919-643-2223; thewnp.com Yonder: Southern Cocktails & Brew Beer, wine, frose and more. 114 W. King St.; yonderbarnc.com

CHATHAM COUNTY Governors Village Ciao Bella Pizzeria Pizzas, pastas, sandwiches. 1716 Farrington Point Rd.; 919-932-4440 Flair Restaurant & Wine Bar Frenchinfluenced food, coffee and Sunday brunch. 50100 Governors Dr.; 919-967-9990; flairfusionrestaurant.com Gov’s Burger & Tap Burgers, hot dogs, salads, wraps and sandwiches. 50050 Governors Dr.; 919-240-5050; govsburgerandtap.com Tarantini Italian cuisine. 50160 Governors Dr.; 919-942-4240; tarantinirestaurant.com North Chatham 501 Pharmacy Maple View Farm ice cream, plus malts and shakes. 98 Chapelton Ct., Ste. 300; 984-999-0501; 501rx.com

Whit’s Frozen Custard Ice cream and frozen treats. 240 S. Nash St.; 919-245-8123; whitscustard.com

wood-fired pizza • housemade pastas sammies • salads • desserts

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DINING GUIDE

Breakaway Cafe A casual cafe serving breakfast, lunch and dinner, along with coffee and Maple View Farm ice cream. 58 Chapelton Ct., Ste. 100; 984-234-3010; breakawaync.co Capp’s Pizzeria & Trattoria Traditional Italian cuisine including fresh pastas, pizzas and more. 79 Falling Springs Dr., Ste. 140; 919-240-4104; cappspizzeria.com Captain John’s Dockside Fish & Crab House American seafood dishes. 11550 U.S. Hwy. 15-501 N.; 919-968-7955; docksidechapelhill.com Moon Asian Bistro An Asian fusion restaurant ASIAN BISTRO offering sushi, Chinese dishes like sweet-and-sour chicken, Thai curry dishes, rice and noodles. 111 Knox Way, Ste. 100; 919-869-7894; moonasianbistroch.com O’YA Cantina Latin cuisine from all over the world. 72 Chapelton Ct.; 984-999-4129; oyacantina.com Town Hall Burger and Beer Gourmet burgers plus shared plates, tacos, wings, and salads. 58 Chapelton Ct.; 984-2343504; townhallburgerandbeer.com

Blue Dot Coffee Joe Van Gogh coffee, lattes, smoothies and pastries. To-go orders can be placed at the window or by phone. 53 Hillsboro St.; 919-704-8064 Buzz Cafe at Chatham Marketplace Sandwiches, daily changing hot bar, sushi, salads and baked goods. Chatham Mills; 919-542-2643; chathammarketplace.coop Carolina Brewery The fifth-oldest brewery in the state. Outdoor seating available. 120 Lowes Dr., Ste. 100; 919-545-2330; carolinabrewery.com/pittsboro-brewery Chatham Marketplace Sandwiches, baked goods. 480 Hillsboro St.; 919-542-2643; chathammarketplace.coop

Allen & Son Bar-B-Que N.C. barbecue. 5650 U.S. 15-501; 919-542-2294; stubbsandsonbbq.com Angelina’s Kitchen Greek and Southwestern dishes including gyros. 23 Rectory St.; 919-545-5505; angelinaskitchenonline.com Aromatic Roasters Small-batch coffee shop specializing in espresso shots, Aztec mochas, raspberry lemonade, chai lattes and Thai teas. 697 Hillsboro St.; 919-259-4749; aromaticroasters.com The Belted Goat Lunch, dinner and wine shop, offering salads and sandwiches. Fearrington Village Center; 919-545-5717; fearrington.com/belted-goat

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ODDCO An art and design store and music venue featuring regional craft beers. 684 West St.; 919-704-8832; realoddstuff.com

The City Tap Classic bar food. 89 Hillsboro St.; 919-545-0562; thecitytap.com Compadres Tequila Lounge Mexican restaurant with a variety of classic dishes. 193 Lowes Dr., Ste. 107; 919-704-8374; compadresnc.com

The Phoenix Bakery Small-batch and seasonal baked goods and specialty cakes. 664 West St.; 919-542-4452; thephoenixbakerync.com

Copeland Springs Farm & Kitchen Farm-to-table restaurant serving grains and greens bowls, small plates and bar snacks. 193B Lorax Ln.; 919-261-7211; copelandspringsfarm.com Davenport’s Café Diem Carrboro Coffee Roasters coffee and espresso offerings. 439 Hillsboro St.; 919-704-4239; davenports-cafediem.com

Elizabeth’s Pizza Pizzas, calzones, sandwiches, salads and pasta. 160 Hillsboro St.; 919-545-9292; elizabethspizzapittsboro.com The Fearrington House Restaurant Contemporary fine dining. Reservations are needed. Fearrington Village Center; 919-542-2121; fearrington.com/house

The Root Cellar Cafe & Catering Sandwiches, prepared salads, desserts and more. Offering online ordering and pickup, weekly prepared meals, groceries to-go box and Friday night specials. 35 Suttles Rd.; 919-542-1062; rootcellarpbo.com S&T’s Soda Shoppe Soda fountain, American fare. 85 Hillsboro St.; 919-545-0007; sandtsodashoppe.com Small B&B Cafe Offbeat, eco-friendly eatery offering farm-to-table fare for breakfast and lunch. Offering outdoor dining. 219 East St.; 919-537-1909; smallbandbcafe.com Starrlight Mead Tastings of honey wines and honey. 130 Lorax Ln.; 919-533-6314; starrlightmead.com

Greek Kouzina Made from scratch hummus, gyros, kebabs and more. 964 East St.; 919-542-9950; greekkouzina.com

Virlie’s Grill Soups, salads, burgers, sandwiches. 58 Hillsboro St.; 919-542-0376; virliesgrill.com

Goodness Gracious Juice Co. Breakfast, juices and smoothies. 517 West St.; 919-726-2033; goodnessgraciousnc.com

Willy’s Cinnamon Rolls, Etc. Bakery selling cinnamon rolls, scones, muffins, cookies and bread with ’40s and ’50s flair. 35 W. Chatham St.; 252-305-9227; willysrolls.com

House of Hops Bar and bottle shop with a large craft beer selection on tap. Outdoor seating available. 112 Russet Run, Ste. 110; 919-542-3435; houseofhopsnc.com John’s Pizza Restaurant Pizzas, pastas, wraps, calzones and strombolis. 122 Sanford Rd.; 919-542-5027; johnspizzarestaurant.com

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New Japan Hibachi-style Japanese cooking. 90 Lowes Dr.; 919-542-4380

Postal Fish Company Fresh seafood from North Carolina’s coast. Serving dinner only. 75 W. Salisbury St.; 919-704-8612; postalfishcompany.com

PITTSBORO Al’s Diner Traditional American classics for breakfast, lunch and dinner. 535 West St.; 919-542-5800; alsdiner.net

The Mod Wood-fired pizza, salads, small plates and a full bar. Outdoor seating available. 46 Sanford Rd.; 919-533-6883; themodernlifedeli.com


DI N I N G G U I DE

ALSO CHECK OUT THESE AREA RESTAURANTS … DURHAM The Federal Pub fare with bistro panache. Try the “Fe Burger au Poivre.” Offers takeout plus a side patio on Albemarle Street. 914 W. Main St.; 919-680-8611; thefederal.net James Joyce Irish Pub and Restaurant Traditional pub food and snacks like brisket cheese steak and Reuben sandwiches. 912 W. Main St.; 919-683-3022; jamesjoyceirishpub.com LuLuBangBang Chapel Hill Restaurant Group’s newest venture features handcrafted Pan-Asian street food with fresh local ingredients. 5418 Page Rd.; 919-908-1851; lulubangbangnc.com

Maverick’s Smokehouse and Taproom Range of barbecue and smokehouse fare as well as Memphis rubbed pulled chicken, wings and smoked sausage. 900 W. Main St.; 919-682-8978; maverickssmokehouse.com MEZ Contemporary Mexican Creative Mexican dishes, based on traditional recipes with a fresh,healthy twist. 5410 Page Rd.; 919-941-1630; mezdurham.com Page Road Grill Traditional American dishes, from housemade soup and bread to burgers to vegetarian options. 5416 Page Rd.; 919-908-8900; pageroadgrill.com

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Plum Southern Kitchen & Bar Southern small plates and big bar by Lisa Callaghan and Chef Kevin Callaghan. 501 Washington St.; 919-351-6446; plumdurham.com

Serving Breakfast ALL DAY LONG with Classic Lunch and Dinner Fare! OUTSIDE SEATING, CURBSIDE PICK-UP & DINE-IN

WE CATER! Call 919.428.4470

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EN GAGEMENT

O’Brien & Shannon BY GRACE BEAS L EY

D

rew Shannon and Kelty O’Brien attended the

same elementary school in Westport, Connecticut, but they wouldn’t meet until years later. Mutual friends made the introduction while the pair was in college. Drew graduated from Chapman University and Kelty graduated from Wake Forest University. They moved to San Francisco in 2017 and work at Facebook. The couple had dated for 4 ½ years when Drew decided it was time to propose this past summer. He planned a late dinner with friends and took Kelty on a detour to the Presidio – a favorite spot for the couple – that overlooks the Golden Gate Bridge. That’s where he popped the question, and the couple celebrated their engagement at dinner. Drew and Kelty will tie the knot on Fishers Island, New York, on Oct. 2, 2021. Kelty is the daughter of James O’Brien of Westport, Connecticut, and Kip O’Brien of West Palm Beach, Florida. Drew is the son of Dan and Ellen Shannon, of Chapel Hill. CHM

You Can Volunteer to make a meaningful difference in the lives of patients and caregivers traveling to UNC Hospitals for life-saving medical treatment!

123 Old Mason Farm Road, Chapel Hill | secufamilyhouse.org

Join us for the Family House Classic on Friday, April 30 at the Chapel Hill Country Club. Contact melchee@ secufamilyhouse.org or visit secufamilyhouse.org/ familyhouseclassic for more information.

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WED D I NGS

Gibson & Phillips BY BROOKE SPAC H PHOTOGRAP HY BY T HA I S F ER R EI R A , T HEA N CHORSTU D I O.P HOTOG R A P HY

C

hapel Hill natives Alexa Phillips and Niko Gibson felt sparks fly in the summer of 2014. “We had our first encounter while running the trails of Wilson Park, where we exchanged smiles as we passed each other,” Alexa says. “I hoped we’d run into each other again.” Her wish came true a few weeks later when the two connected while out with friends at La Residence. Niko asked Alexa on a date to Elmo’s Diner the next day, and the two discovered they both attended Frank Porter Graham Elementary but were a grade apart. Niko proposed in January 2020 at his family’s cabin in Chapel Hill. Alexa believed they were there for a friend’s surprise party, but Niko popped the question just before they entered the cabin. Niko’s sister, Carina Gibson, and her partner appeared from around the corner and sang “Hold On, We’re Going Home” by Drake – the song the couple sang to each other on the night they met at La Res. Alexa and Niko were married on Sept. 26, 2020, at the Chapel Hill Carriage House, joined by a combination of in-person and virtual guests. After a Mediterranean Deli-catered dinner, everyone went to the cabin for the after-party. “Donning masks and dousing [ourselves in] hand sanitizer, we were able to tie the knot, dance, eat, drink and celebrate until the wee hours of the morning,” Alexa says. “It felt like a true intimate celebration of love with our closest friends and family members.” The couple lives in Beaverton, Oregon, where Alexa works in communications for Nike, and Niko is a construction contractor. CHM March 2021

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W EDDIN GS

Miller & Potter BY CHIA RA EVAN S PHOTOGRAP HY BY JILLIAN KNIGHT, JILLIANKN IGHT.COM

C

hapel Hill High School alum Will Potter met Boston native Diane Miller in 2014 during a class she taught for Orange County Emergency Services. The two

connected several months later when Will, a captain with the Carrboro Fire-Rescue Department and a captain with the White Cross Fire Department, collected law enforcement patches for an officer with cancer. They met for coffee so Diane, who works as an emergency medicine physician at UNC and is also the medical director for the North Carolina State Highway Patrol, could drop off patches, which turned into hours of conversation. The pair has been together ever since. Will proposed to Diane in a secluded spot by the Haw River on his favorite holiday, the Fourth of July, in 2020. “In Will’s mind, my response to his proposal was going to be, ‘Yes, yes, a million times yes,’” Diane says. “In reality, I said, ‘Are you serious?’” She did in fact say yes, and today the couple laughs at the moment. Local family and friends gathered together for their wedding at The Barn at Union Grove Farm on Oct. 2, 2020. Will grew up with Peter Bohlen, the owner of the venue, and the couple felt lucky to spend their day there. The Catering Company provided the meal for the reception; Patricia Fleeman, Diane’s friend and ER co-worker, baked the dessert. Diane and Will live in White Cross where they are in the process of building Tiny Tails Farm, a home for rescued animals; they currently house three dogs, nine chickens, three guineas and a miniature horse. CHM 126

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HAIRCUTS • COLOR • BALAYAGE • SMOOTHING TREATMENTS 919.929.2209 • 3110 ENVIRON WAY CITRINESALONNC.COM

TOP 100 SALONS IN U.S. 2011+2012+2013+2014


W EDDIN GS

Waldorf & Wilson BY AUBREY AUST I N PHOTOGRAP HY BY KEL SEY N EL SON , KELSEY- N ELSON .COM

S

arah Wilson and Alex Waldorf met at Guy B. Phillips Middle School, but they really got

to know each other and began dating during their sophomore year at East Chapel Hill High School. They parted ways after graduation – Sarah went to East Carolina University and Alex attended Georgetown University – but the two still kept in touch and saw each other over breaks. Sarah and Alex focused on their post-graduation careers, which eventually led them both to New York City. After a job interview in 2018, Sarah serendipitously ran into Alex on Fifth Avenue, and they rekindled. In August 2019, Alex and Sarah went to dinner at Salinas, the location of many previous dates and Sarah’s favorite restaurant in the city. Alex proposed after dinner in their apartment with flowers and a bottle of Champagne. Sarah and Alex flew to Chapel Hill the next day for a surprise engagement party planned by Alex. They celebrated with close friends and family, including Alex’s parents, Gary Waldorf and Rosemary Waldorf, and Sarah’s parents, Timothy Wilson and Elizabeth Wilson. Oct. 10, 2020, began with rain in the morning, but the clouds cleared for Sarah and Alex’s first-look pictures at The Carolina Inn and the ceremony on the Ingle family farm in Chatham County, where Rosemary grew up. Bowerbird Flowers and Apothecary designed the floral arrangements for the ceremony while Guglhupf Bake Shop provided European-style desserts. The night ended with live music performed by Sarah’s brother-in-law, Andrew Shillito. The couple lives in New York City. CHM 128

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Profile for Shannon Media

Chapel Hill Magazine March 2021 – The Entrepreneurs  

Chapel Hill Magazine March 2021 – The Entrepreneurs