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HOLIDAY

EVENTS 22

MAYORS

PAST & PRESENT 36

MOZART

ON THE HILL 52

DECEMBER 2016 CHAPELHILLMAGAZINE.COM

Giving Back Strowd Roses’

Steve Miller, Eileen Ferrell and Syd Alexander in the Gene Strowd Community Rose Garden

Page

40


OPENING OUR DOORS JANUARY 2017 140 W. Franklin Street, Suite 130 | Chapel Hill, NC 27516 | hodgekittrellsir.com Each Office Is Independently Owned and Operated.


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CHAPELHILL    

December 2016 chapelhillmagazine.com PUBLISHER

Ellen Shannon EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Jessica Stringer

C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R

Kevin Brown

ART DIRECTOR

Sarah Arneson

EXECUTIVE EDITOR, DURHAM MAGAZINE

Amanda MacLaren

A S S I S TA N T E D I T O R

Laura Zolman Kirk

S TA F F P H O T O G R A P H E R

Briana Brough

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

Reba Straley Christy Wright

D I G I TA L C O N T E N T M A N A G E R

Morgan Weston INTERNS

Alexis Allston, Matt Couch, Hannah Grossman, Lauren Moody, Robin O’Luanaigh, Caitlin Scurria CONTRIBUTORS

Chantal Allam, Jennifer Brookland, Melina Casados, Latisha Catchatoorian, Moreton Neal, James Stefiuk ADVERTISING

Melissa Crane melissa@chapelhillmagazine.com Kem Johnson kem@chapelhillmagazine.com C O R P O R AT E

Dan Shannon President/CEO

Ellen Shannon COO Rory Kelly Gillis Senior Vice President/Publishing Thorne Daubenspeck Director of Sponsorship & Digital Sales Cait Hawley Digital Service Representative Chelsea Rush Marketing Manager Amy Bell Business Manager Caroline Kornegay Administrative and Operations Assistant Grace Beason Events Coordinator Charlie Hyland, Roger Nahum Distribution Chapel Hill Magazine is published 8 times per year by Shannon Media, Inc. 1777 Fordham Blvd., Suite 105, Chapel Hill, NC 27514 tel 919.933.1551 fax 919.933.1557 Subscriptions $38 for 2 years – subscribe at chapelhillmagazine.com

2014 BEST REGIONAL MAGAZINE (CONSUMER)

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chapelhillmagazine.com December 2016


Pre-Owned

WINNER

BEST OF CHAPEL HILL 2016

15-501, Chapel Hill | 844-725-2349 | PerformanceAutoMall.com SALES Mon-Fri – 9-8 Sat – 9-6 Sun – closed

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L E T T E R

F R O M

T H E

E X E C U T I V E

E D I T O R

GIVE LOCAL

I

IF YOU’VE FELT THE NEED NOW MORE

than ever to get involved and do some good, you’re not alone. After scanning lists of organizations that could use support, I was a little overwhelmed by the breadth and depth of the nonprofits. Would my donation or time make a dent? Turns out that throwing myself into work – specifically this issue – helped me narrow my focus. “Lead where you stand” is the mantra of Barbara Jessie-Black, executive director of the PTA Thrift Shop. “I’ve always had an inner knowledge that my place in the world was to lead wherever I was placed, in whatever situation presented itself to me,” Barbara wrote. She’s been able to channel her leadership skills and generosity into making the biggest impact close to home. (Read about her path to serving others on page 30.) We could all take a lesson from Barbara and find a way to give back locally. Maybe it’s through your church, synagogue or civic group, or stepping up to be your child’s troop leader. (If you’re looking to get involved, flip to page 40 to read about five organizations making a difference in the greater Chapel Hill community every day.) I’m not sure yet whether my own influence will come by adopting a pet, giving blood or volunteering for a cause close to my heart, but I know it’s time to act. CHM

JESSICA STRINGER @jessstringer

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chapelhillmagazine.com December 2016

jessica@chapelhillmagazine.com


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DECEMBER C H A P E L H I L L M A G A Z I N E . C O M

V O L U M E

1 1

N U M B E R

FEATURES

PEOPLE & PLACES

36 The Mayor’s Club

8 Habitat for Humanity of Orange County’s

Our town’s former mayors gathered to welcome Pam Hemminger to the team

house party

40 ‘Tis the Season to Give Back

10 Chapel Hill High School’s Tiger CHill

9 TABLE’s Empty Bowls event

Five organizations doing good all year-round

11 North Carolina Botanical Garden’s

52 Mozart on the Hill Oboist Blair Tindall’s memoir shook up the classical music world

14 Orange County Rape Crisis Center’s

60 How They Live

with Elvis

The Butlers’ home in Lake Forest doubles as a conversation piece 82 Dishing With Gene Hamer

The longtime Crook’s Corner owner talks cheese pork, decking the pig and parades

7

50th Anniversary holiday auction 16 Chapel Hill Service League’s An Evening 17 EmPOWERment, Inc.’s Opening Doors of Opportunity Gala 18 Chapel Hill-Carrboro Chamber of Commerce’s

business expo 19 Chapel Hill Historical Society’s Town Treasures

SPONSORED

PHOTO BY BRIANA BROUGH

48 Holiday Gift Guide

IN EVERY ISSUE

4 Letter from Our Executive Editor 20 Noted 22 5 Events Not to Miss 24 Calendar of Events 28 Book Column 30 First Person 34 Staycation 58 Adopt-A-Pet 87 Taste 101 Engagement 102 Weddings

PAGE 60


R

The O riginator of Cult ure d Pe arls.

S i n c e 18 9 3 .


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WELCOME HOME

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7 1 Aaron and Dorsey Bachenheimer with Mills, 1.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY LAURA ZOLMAN KIRK

2 Melanie Biese,

Held at the home of Harriet and Edwin Poston, Habitat for Humanity of Orange County’s 18th annual house party was a success, with nearly $74,000 raised to benefit the Northside neighborhood in downtown Chapel Hill, where 10 homes will be constructed and 25 homes will receive needed repairs. CHM

Jennifer Player, Harriet Poston and Kevin Biese.

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chapelhillmagazine.com December 2016

3 Kelli Thomas and Kathy Atwater.

4

Kim Williams and Suki Newton.

5 Sue and David Harvin. 6 Toby Savage, John Sehon, Phil Rees and Michael McVaugh.  

7 Tom Hoerger, Susan Hoerger, Susan Reda and Rob Reda.


P E O P L E

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EMPTY BOWLS

1 Julia Baker

&

P L A C E S

4

and Laura Baker.

Matthew McKirahan and Nicole Cranley.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JESSICA STRINGER

2 Lindsay Barth,

5 Missy Farkouh, Rosario

Guests selected a keepsake handmade bowl and got their fill of soup and desserts at TABLE’s fourth annual event held at Carrboro’s Weaver Street Market as a fundraiser to provide healthy, emergency food aid to area children. CHM

Annah-Claire Summerlin and Susan Hyman.

Vila and Ashton Tippins.

3 Ingrid and Jeremy

6

Bill Harris and Darcy Berger.

Marzuola with Virginia, 2.

December 2016 chapelhillmagazine.com

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P E O P L E

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P L A C E S

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2

3

4 1 Davis Lensch, a fifth-grader at Carolina Friends School,

5

with the Pre-Vets club members freshman Jess Schinsky, junior Iris Schoi, junior Aoi Nakanishi, freshman Rosie Maloney and junior Julia McAfee.

THEY’RE GREAAAAT!

PHOTOGRAPHY BY LAUREN MOODY

The fifth annual Tiger CHill at Chapel Hill High School featured food, arts and crafts and entertainment such as a dunk tank, haunted house and Irish dancers. Attendees played carnival games all afternoon to raise funds for the school’s teachers, teams and clubs. CHM 10

chapelhillmagazine.com December 2016

2 Emma Hansen, a kindergartner at McDougle Elementary, gets her face painted by freshman Ella Understein.

3 Rosie Campbell, a third-grader, and Poppy Campbell, a fifth-grader, from Morris Grove Elementary.

4

Frank Porter Graham student Natasha Bishop (center) with junior Charlotte Macdonald, junior Dale Harwell (the Chapel Hill High mascot) and junior Dorris Offerman.

5 Brad Mitchell, a 10th- and 12th-grade English teacher, savors his last dry moments.


P E O P L E

1

&

P L A C E S

2

FIFTY YEARS OF FLORA

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MORGAN VAN DEN EYNDE

To celebrate its 50th anniversary, the North Carolina Botanical Garden threw a black tie gala at the DuBose House and Rizzo Conference Center. Special honorees for the night included Thomas S. Kenan III, Harriet Martin, Florence Peacock and Joan Gillings. Botanical Garden Foundation, Inc. board member and former president Tom Earnhardt was presented with the Flora Caroliniana Award. CHM

3

1 UNC Vice Chancellor for Communications and Public Affairs Joel Curran and Kitty Curran.

2 North Carolina Botanical Garden Director Dr. Damon Waitt, Tom Earnhardt and Greg Fitch, President of Botanical Garden Foundation, Inc. Board of Directors.

3 Joan Gillings, Harriet Martin, Thomas S. Kenan III and Florence Peacock.

4 D.G. Martin. 5 UNC Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost James W. Dean, Jr. and Jan Dean.

4

5

December 2016 chapelhillmagazine.com

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P E O P L E

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P L A C E S

1

2

3

4

5

6

GIVING SPIRIT

PHOTOGRAPHY BY IVAN WATKINS OF ZOË PICTURES

The 29th annual Holiday Auction benefiting the Orange County Rape Crisis Center held at the Sheraton Chapel Hill Hotel featured a silent auction, a live auction, photo booth and, of course, a delicious dinner. CHM

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chapelhillmagazine.com December 2016

1 Chris Holt and Tia Conner. 2 Leslie Maxwell and Steve Gardner.

3 Kate Pendergrass and Annie McQuaid.

4

Lee Storrow and Noel Bynum.

5 Sonja and Aaron Nelson. 6 State Senator Valerie Foushee, Stan Foushee and Shamecca Bryant.


P E O P L E

&

P L A C E S

BLUE CHRISTMAS The Chapel Hill Service League hosted An Evening with Elvis (with tribute artist Keith Henderson filling the King’s blue suede shoes) at the UNC Friday Center to raise money for the 66th annual Christmas House. Attendees included (left to right in the back row) Daniel and Linda Textoris, Melinda and Jim Wilde, and CL Morton, along with (front row) Bill and Judy Eastman and Nell Morton. CHM

Donate furniture, appliances, building supplies and more. Support the store that builds homes and hope.

When you choose to donate your gently used items to the Habitat ReStore, you are helping to change lives for deserving families in need of affordable housing in Durham and Orange counties. Also, all donations are tax-deductible! Proceeds from our ReStore help build Habitat for Humanity homes in your community and around the world.

Need help with larger items? Use our FREE PICKUP SERVICE: 919-354-0892

SHOP. DONATE. VOLUNTEER. 16

chapelhillmagazine.com December 2016

5501 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd. | Durham, NC 27707 (919) 403-8668 | www.restoredurhamornage.org

We’ll pick it up!


A POWERful GALA PHOTOGRAPHY BY EARL BYNUM EmPOWERment, Inc. celebrated its

20th anniversary with its “Opening Doors of Opportunity” Gala where men’s basketball coach Roy Williams to Mildred “Mama Dip” Council of Mama Dip’s were honored. Guests later danced to Christian Foushee-Green’s “Groove4You” Quartet. CHM

EVERYDAYI SA

“ YOU LOOK GREAT” SORTOFDAY

Dr . SueEl l enCoxi sani nt er nat i onal l yr ecogni z edex per t i nf aci alr ej uv enat i onandbodycont our i ng.Aboar d cer t i f i edder mat ol ogi standder mat ol ogi csur geon, Dr . Coxspeci al i z esi nder mal f i l l er s, l aser s, f atr educt i on andt i ssuet i ght eni ngdev i ces. fy I ou’ r et hi nk i ngaboutaest het i cpr ocedur es, getex per t advi ce. Lear nmor eaboutDr . Cox ’ st eachi ng, publ i shi ng andr esear ch–i ncl udi nghowshehel pedobt ai nFDA appr oval ofmanypr oduct si ncl udi ngBot ox , Vol uma, Ky bel l aandLat i sse–atwww. aest het i csol ut i ons. com. Ourpat i ent sl oveher . Youwi l l t oo!

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December 2016 chapelhillmagazine.com

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P E O P L E

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IN BUSINESS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY NICHOLAS C. JOHNSON

Attendees of Orange County’s largest business expo had the opportunity to network and learn about local companies and products thanks to Chapel HillCarrboro Chamber of Commerce. CHM

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3 1 Heather Witherspoon. 2 Felicia Sawyer, Hayden Harrelson and Tarron Robinson.

3 Audrey Poindexter and Christian Mosley.


P E O P L E

&

P L A C E S

TREASURE TROVE PHOTOGRAPHY BY BILL BURLINGAME

The 2016 Town Treasures inductees included (back row) Gordon Neville, Woody Durham, Henry C. Jones, Dr. George Lensing Jr., Lisa Price, Peggy Misch, (front row) Marvin and Shirley Block and Lula Alston. The Chapel Hill Historical Society began recognizing individuals and couples for their community contributions in 2008. CHM

ALL STORES OPEN! Rd. Please use Legion entrance.

THE FAMILY DOCTOR & SOLA SALONS

BRAIN BALANCE

FOOD LION www.foodlion.com | 919-967-2613 CVS PHARMACY www.cvs.com | 919-942-5125 MR. TIRE AUTO SERVICE www.mrtire.com | 919-942-7466

THE BETTER SLEEP STORE www.thebettersleepstore.com 919-967-8811 FRAMERS MARKET & GALLERY www.theframersmarket.com 919-929-7137

COMMUNITY SMILES www.communitysmilesnc.com 919-942-6313 GRACIE JIU JITSU www.chapelhilljiujitsu.net 919-265-4255

PRINCESS NAILS 919-918-7999 SUPERCUTS www.supercuts.com | 919-967-0226 TUESDAY MORNING www.stores.tuesdaymorning.com 919-960-3072

N.C. FAMILY DOCTOR www.ncfamilydoctor.com 919-968-1985

SOLA SALON www.solasalonstudios.com

BRAIN BALANCE www.brainbalancecenters.com 919-391-6100

NOW OPEN – PIZZA HUT www.order.pizzahut.com

MATHNASIUM www.mathnasium.com/ durham-chapelhill 919-490-5151 COMING SOON – ABC STORE JOINT CHIROPRACTIC TRAIN FOR LIFE

December 2016 chapelhillmagazine.com

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S U S YE N D NOT E OUR M O MW O R T Fro ENT HY S! to nem births w to

NOTED.

biz

aw

a and note mor rds e– magd@chap azin elhil e.co l m

WHAT WE’VE HEARD AROUND TOWN …

Entrepreneurial Development’s October/ November strategic partner spotlights.

UNC School of Medicine professors Melina Kibbe and Aziz Sancar (pictured above) were elected to the National Academy of Medicine in October. Melina, who is chair of the Department of Surgery at UNC, researches vascular surgery and is an advocate for gender equality in biomedical research. Aziz – a Nobel laureate – is a professor of biochemistry and biophysics, studying the mechanics of DNA repair and the circadian clock.  In November, filmmaker Olympia Stone’s documentary, “Curious Worlds: The Art & Imagination of David Beck,” premiered on UNC-TV’s Explorer Channel, then nationwide on the public television WORLD channel.  Investment advisor Hamilton Point was featured as one of the Council for

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chapelhillmagazine.com December 2016

AND THE AWARD GOES TO... Chapel Hill High School and East Chapel Hill High School were selected by Students

Against Violence Everywhere (SAVE) and The Allstate Foundation to receive mini grant funds, educational materials, training for school and community activities and more. The high schools were two of 20 total schools in the Carolinas to be selected for this aid.  PHOTO COURTESY OF UNC CHILDREN’S

PHOTO COURTESY UNC OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS

WHAT AN HONOR

The inaugural recipient of the Governors Club Distinguished Professorship is Dr. Tim Hoffman, the division chief of

pediatric cardiology at UNC.  Club Nova Community, Inc., Communities In Schools of Chatham County and Charles House Association

were selected as GSK IMPACT Award Winners for the region by Triangle Community Foundation and GSK. Each nonprofit received $40,000 in recognition for its contributions to a healthier Triangle. BUSINESS BRIEFS

Whilden, a new boutique off South Elliott Road specializing in women’s clothing, gifts

and accessories, opened in October with a grand opening party.  In November, Ulta Beauty, which features 20,000 products in 10,000 square feet along with a full-service salon, opened in Eastgate Crossing.  CrossFit Chapel Hill moved from University Place to 257 S. Elliott Rd. inside O2 Fitness, where the group now has locker rooms, child care and access to all the O2 branches. CrossFit Homeward is currently at the University Place location.


 Doubling funds raised in 2015 for the American Cancer Society, Performance Bicycle raised $42,382 through a mix of donations, pink wristband purchases, percent of sales for select merchandise and a matching donation from Performance Bicycle. 

ON THE MOVE

After two years serving as CEO of the Hillsborough/Orange County Chamber of Commerce, Sara

PHOTO BY KRISTIN PRELIPP, KPO PHOTO

Stephens is stepping

NEWS BITES

Milltown Family Dentistry, run by husband-

and-wife team Dr. Ben Lambeth and Dr. Megumi Lambeth, opened in Carrboro on East Main Street in September.

MARKING A MILESTONE

celebrate 30 years of the Bouncing Bulldogs program this year. Currently, they are in the process of building the Bouncing Bulldogs Community Center

on Old Chapel Hill Road. It will be the “first jump rope gym in the world erected from the ground up,” says Ray. The facility is scheduled to be completed in 2017.  Doug and Nelda Lay of The Persian Carpet, located on Durham-Chapel Hill Boulevard, celebrate the 40th anniversary

of their business this year.

 PHOTO BY ROBYN VAN DYKE

Coach Ray Frederick and wife Patricia

PHOTO BY SUNNY LEE, SUNNYSAUCE PRODUCTIONS

The team at Alexan Chapel Hill, including Brooke Archambault, Morgan Metzger and Franklin Goncalves, is now giving hard hat tours of the apartments (available for pre-lease) located on South Elliott Road.

down to pursue a career with United Way of the Greater Triangle. Kim Tesoro, the current program development director of the chamber, will serve as interim CEO while the chamber searches for a replacement.

Parkway Family Dentistry at Briar Chapel

is now open and accepting patients on Falling Springs Drive. Dr. Nick Baker received his undergraduate degree from UNC in biomedical engineering and completed his doctorate of dental surgery at the UNC School of Dentistry. He lives in Meadowmont with his wife, Anne, who is currently at UNC School of Dentistry pursuing a specialty in pediatrics.

Pediatric dentists Alexandra Boudreau and Kevin Ricker have opened Chatham Pediatric Dentistry on Falling Springs Drive, offering comprehensive specialty dental services for infants and children. CHM

December 2016 chapelhillmagazine.com

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PHOTO COURTESY NORTH CAROLINA SYMPHONY

EVENTS

NOT TO MISS

Decorate Your Own Gingerbread House Dec. 4, 11 & 18

rootcellarchapelhill.com/gingerbread

The Root Cellar invites kids of all ages to get creative with candy canes and icing. Supplies, decorations, hot cocoa and cookies included. Tickets: $25.

St. Nick Collection Kick-Off Dec. 9

begin in front of the Morehead Planetarium, continue down Franklin Street and make its way to Carrboro Town Hall. Free.

wonderful revue of songs and stories at Leland Little Auctions in support of Burwell School Historic Site. Tickets: $75.

“Naughty and Nice - An Evening of Songs and Stories�

Messiah Choruses and More Dec. 15

Dec. 11

ncsymphony.org

burwellschool.org

Join the North Carolina Symphony at Memorial Hall for this concert including classic pieces by Handel, Bach, Vaughan Williams and others. Tickets: $18+. CHM

Authors Lee Smith and Jill McCorkle join forces with singer-songwriters Marshall Chapman and Matraca Berg for this

frankisart.com

Chapel Hill-Carrboro Holiday Parade Dec. 10 chapelhillholidayparade.com

Take part in this annual parade showcasing the rich diversity in our community. It will 22

chapelhillmagazine.com December 2016

Jill McCorkle, Marshall Chapman, Matraca Berg and Lee Smith.

PHOTO BY THOMAS RANKIN

Discover jolly old Saint Nick and spread a little holiday cheer for N.C. Cancer Hospital patients and their caregivers at this evening put on in partnership with UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center. Attendees are encouraged to bring art supplies to donate.


SHOP, DINE, ENJOY

BEST BEST

E X P E R I E N C E T H E H O L I D AY S : S P E C TA C U L A R G I F T S , F E S T I V E C E L E B R AT I O N S , C H I L D H O O D W O N D E R S .

OF CH APEL 2016 HILL REA DER’S FAVO RITE

OPEN SOO ING N STO

N STEA EY RIVE R KH & GR OUSE ILL

THE PLACE F& OTRH SE HAORPTPSI ,N GF ,I TDNIENSI NS G&, EBNETAEURTTYA I N M E N T 201 S. Estes Drive, Chapel Hill, NC 27514 | 919.945.1900 | universityplacenc.com | Free WiFi |


CALENDAR

OF EVENTS

Shopping, Art & Exhibitions GINGERBREAD VILLAGE DISPLAY Dec. 1-31

Relish the festive display of gingerbread houses in this competition put on by The Carolina Inn. Entries will be judged by pastry chef Sara Thomas, and the winner will be announced Dec. 28. Bakers of all levels are welcome to compete. carolinainn.com   CHRISTMAS HOLIDAY SHOPPE Dec. 3, 9am-4pm

Shop for everyone on your list at this craft show – complete with raffle, bake sale and candy cane coffee bar – at St. Thomas More Catholic Church, supporting St. Thomas More Catholic School. stmcsnc.org

While at University Place this season, don’t forget to check out Pam Williams’ festive vintage truck display made from the stockpile of inventory at her store, Night Gallery – Branching Out.

FESTIVAL OF THE SOCIETY TREE

ELF FAIR

Dec. 3, 9am-3pm; Dec. 4, 12-3pm

Dec. 3, 11am-5pm

Grab a big bowl of chili and shop around the handcrafted gifts – from pottery and quilts to potted herbs and more – at St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church’s annual event supporting local charities. stmatthewshillsborough.org

Over 40 local vendors selling handmade gifts, jewelry, bath and body products, fine art and more are expected at the 10th annual Elf Fair, held at The ArtsCenter. artscenterlive.org

CLAYWORKS ANNUAL HOLIDAY POTTERY SALE Dec. 3, 10am-4pm

Give a handcrafted gift with practicality from North Carolina ClayWorks Potters Guild’s annual sale at University Place. universityplacenc.com CHATHAM ARTISTS GUILD 24TH ANNUAL STUDIO TOUR Dec. 3 & 10, 10am-5pm; Dec. 4 & 11, 12-5pm

Visit the studios of 53 outstanding artists during one of the oldest studio tours in the state. chathamartistsguild.org

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chapelhillmagazine.com December 2016

Music A CLASSIC COUNTRY CHRISTMAS Dec. 3, 8pm

This celebration of Christmas music will include old time, country and bluegrass style tunes at The ArtsCenter. $25; artscenterlive.org THE VILLAGE BAND Dec. 4, 2pm

Get grooving to your favorite tunes played by Chapel Hill and Carrboro’s community concert band at this free event at University Place. thevillageband.org SOUTHERN CULTURE ON THE SKIDS Dec. 10, 9pm Get out of the house this holiday season and

over to Cat’s Cradle for this area rock ‘n’ roll favorite. $13-$15; catscradle.com CHATHAM COUNTY LINE Dec. 17, 8pm

Join this Triangle-based band at the Haw River Ballroom in Saxapahaw for their Electric Holiday Tour. $20-$22; hawriverballroom.com THE BAREFOOT MOVEMENT Dec. 17, 8pm

Get whisked away to a simpler time with The Barefoot Movement’s program at the Earl & Rhoda Wynn Theater. This award-winning bluegrass group’s Christmas show is always a local favorite. $25; artscenterlive.org BERLIN BROTHERS CHRISTMAS Dec. 23, 8pm

Sponsored by Mystery Brewing, the Berlin Brothers will return for their third annual Christmas show, held this year at The Cloth Mill at Eno River. All proceeds will go to benefit nonprofit Arts For Life. „


THE PLACE

for SHOPPING, DINING, ENTERTAINMENT & THE ARTS, FITNESS & BEAUTY

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C A L E N D A R

Outings HILLSBOROUGH HOLIDAY PARADE AND TREE LIGHTING

SOLSTICE CELEBRATION LANTERN WALK

Dec. 3, 4:45pm

Dec. 18, 5:30pm

Start the season with a parade through downtown Hillsborough and stick around to watch the town’s tree light up. hillsboroughchamber.com

Register to join in this community parade illuminated by a host of creatively decorated and constructed lanterns along Hillsborough’s Riverwalk. hillsboroughartscouncil.com   SKATE WITH SANTA

WEATHERVANE’S HOLIDAY TEA Dec. 8, 3pm

Finger sandwiches, scones and decorative desserts abound at this festive afternoon event. $16-$29, southernseason.com   30TH ANNUAL HISTORIC HILLSBOROUGH NEIGHBORHOOD TOUR

Dec. 18, noon-2:15pm

Dec. 10, 1-7pm

WEATHERVANE’S BREAKFAST WITH SANTA

Get on board the historic Hillsborough holiday train tour and enjoy the neighborhood all decked out, cookies, carolers and a “selfie” with Santa. $15-$20; hillsboroughchamber.com

Dec. 21, 8-10:30am

THE CAROLINA INN’S BREAKFAST WITH SANTA

CHINESE FOOD & FEATURE FILMS

Dec. 11, 17-18, 21-24; breakfast: 8:30-10:30am, brunch: 10:30-12:30

Dec. 25, 11am-close

Dine with Santa while enjoying entertainment by magicians and face painters. Also check out the holiday teas and other Twelve Days of Christmas festivities at the inn this season. Breakfast $30, brunch $40; carolinainn.com

Christmas is almost here, and for many Jews, that means two things: Chinese food and a movie. Silverspot Cinema, and its restaurant, Trilogy, are honoring this tradition by offering a Chinese-inspired, family-style “Jewish Christmas” dinner. A traditional holiday menu will also be available. $25; silverspot.net

Join the big man in red on ice for an afternoon of seasonal celebration just days before Christmas at the Orange County Sportsplex. $5.50-$6.50 + $3.50 for skate rental; oc-sportsplex.com  

Santa will be making his rounds at this holiday breakfast buffet. $14-$16; southernseason.com

NEW YEAR’S COCKTAIL SOIREE Dec. 31, 9:30pm-midnight

Mozart’s Birthday SUN, JAN 29 | 7:30

Ring in the New Year in style with a cocktail soiree and family-style meal at Silverspot Cinema’s Trilogy restaurant. $25; silverspot.net

Clara Yang, piano Joélle Harvey, vocalist

Theater/Dance

Celebrate Mozart’s birthday with his magnificent Symphony No. 39, Rondo for Piano in A, Exsultate, jubilate and his greatest concert arias for soprano and orchestra.

THE NUTCRACKER

Rimsky-Korsakov’s Scheherazade SAT, FEB 25 | 7:30PM It beguiles and seduces, sensuous and exotic…the North Carolina Symphony performs Rimsky-Korsakov’s spectacular showpiece live!

Dec. 3, 2pm & 8pm; Dec. 4, 2pm

Carolina Ballet brings this classic fantasy to life at Memorial Hall with beautiful sets, a live orchestra and more than 100 performers. $49+; carolinaperformingarts.org   NUTCRACKER ON ICE Dec. 16, 6pm; Dec. 17, noon

Bundle up and prepare to be amazed by this 20+ year tradition involving around 100 skaters of all skill levels and ages at Orange County Sportsplex. $8-$10; oc-sportsplex.com   STORYTELLER DONALD DAVIS Dec. 17, 11am; Dec. 18, 1pm

MEMORIAL HALL, UNC-CHAPEL HILL

Tickets start at just $18!

ncsymphony.org | 919.733.2750

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Gather at The Fearrington Barn for an afternoon of stories told by Donald Davis, who has been visiting for this program over 20 years. Donations of canned goods and gently used children’s books to Book Harvest accepted in lieu of admission; fearrington.com  CHM


fine gifts, custom stationery, furnishings & interior design SOUTHCHAPELHILL.COM 1 0 7 M E A D O W M O N T V I L L A G E C I RC L E C H A P E L H I L L , N O RT H C A R O L I N A 919.240.5475

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PHOTO FROM ART CHANSKY’S COLLECTION, COMPLIMENTS OF HUGH MORTON.

B O O K S

s r copie p you oks and u k ic P af Bo ks. at Flyletyre’s Boo In c M

Charlie Scott, Rusty Clark and Dean Smith rejoice after the 1968 Eastern Regional win over Davidson.

THE COURT CRUSADERS The tale of student-athlete Charlie Scott and his coach

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he year is 1966. The Civil Rights Movement is still roiling the South, and Chapel Hill is struggling to embrace desegregation. Amidst all this, UNC men’s basketball coach Dean Smith is determined to recruit the best AfricanAmerican player he can find and begin the road to integrating the team. Enter Charlie Scott, the first black athlete to be signed on scholarship to the university. Drawn together by college basketball and momentous change, the pair team up to help transform a university, a community and the racial landscape of sports in the South. 28

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But that’s just part of the story. In “Game Changers,” local veteran sportswriter Art Chansky explores the myths that surround this

period to reveal an intense saga of race, college sport and small-town politics. Drawing on interviews and other sources, Art takes readers beyond the basketball court to highlight the community that supported Dean and Charlie during those tumultuous years, from assistant basketball coach John Lotz to the Rev. Robert Seymour of Binkley Baptist Church to pioneering African-American Mayor Howard Lee. More than 50 years later, it’s hard to imagine our town’s fitful path to integration given its progressive bent. This book will prove a gripping read to Tar Heel fans and enable them to reflect on just how far we’ve come, and how we got here.


PULL UP A CHAIR AND FEAST ON TALES FROM THE CAROLINA TABLE A collection of stories about food and the Tar Heel State

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hether it’s chef Bill Smith’s salty recollections of cleaning crabs for his family’s hard crab stew (“It usually involves beer, a garden hose, and mosquitos.”) or Hillsborough writer Lee Smith’s explorations of her mother’s recipe box, “The Carolina Table” dishes up a collection of stories that offer a glimpse of the true North Carolina through food. Edited by Randall Kenan – Duplin County native and UNC Professor of English – and published by Eno Publishers of Hillsborough, the anthology includes more than 30 writers offering up their own distinct – and often quirky – experiences. But all speak to what North Carolinians know to be true – our foodways contain our culture, our history, our priorities, our health and our souls. Some tales will amuse – such as Celia Rivenbark’s recollections of

working in a Down East barbecue restaurant – while others will conjure up feelings of nostalgia or even homesickness – like poet Jaki Shelton Green’s talk of family reunions and the power of fried gizzards and leftover meatloaf. “We taste North Carolina through the pens of these talented folk,” writes Randall in his introduction. “To me these are food songs, ballads to hunger, hymns of satiation, odes to gustatory joy; but also ditties to disaster, and madrigals of misunderstanding. The generous nature of these writers serves up such a complex portrait of our state, our ways, and our people with which few can argue.” You don’t have to be a food buff to get drawn into these sumptuous tales of shared memories and rituals. Take a seat at the table and join the feast as this big book on North Carolina foodways explores the Tar Heel State’s cuisine.

LOCAL PROPERTY INVESTOR TURNED FIRST-TIME NOVELIST Follow a young man’s quest to save his first love

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round town, Adam W. Jones is known for running his property management firm, Mill House Properties, and fixing up historic houses. Now people are getting to know him for his other calling – published author. For almost two decades, he’d been working on and off on a novel, the unfinished manuscript collecting dust on a shelf in his Gimghoul home. That is, until his wife, Susan, gave him an ultimatum: Finish the book, or never mention it again. That was the final push he needed. This year, Adam, 53, becomes a first-time novelist with the release of “Fate Ball,” published by Wisdom House Books, about a young man’s quest

to save his love from addiction. Adam says the story is loosely based on a real-life love affair he had in his early 20s. “I’d say it’s 25 percent true,” says the UNC alum, who worked in advertising before starting up Mill House in 2002. Now a published writer, he reflects: “It’s exciting, but also a relief and scary. When you do anything creative, to put yourself out there is daunting. Fortunately, feedback has been great.” When he’s not managing properties or writing (he has a children’s book due out next spring), he and Susan are raising daughters Lilly, 8, and Ainslie, 4, who both attend Durham Academy. – Chantal Allam CHM December 2016 chapelhillmagazine.com

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F I R S T P E R S O N

‘LEAD WHERE YOU STAND’ PTA THRIFT SHOP’S BARBARA JESSIE-BL ACK ON A LIFE OF SERVICE AND BEING HER BEST SELF

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PHOTO BY BRIANA BROUGH

“LEAD WHERE YOU

stand” has always been a mantra of sorts to me – either in those exact words or by how I’ve moved and continue to move about the world. I came by these words honestly, as an only child born in Berlin to a German mother and African-American father at a time in America’s history when my parents’ marriage was illegal. This cast the die. Even as early as Ms. Rempel’s

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F I R S T

P E R S O N

Being of service is a spiritual practice to me, one that feeds my soul, energizes me and gives me hope for the future.”

Barbara (far left, back row) in her first-grade class.

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first-grade class at the John F. Kennedy School (a German-American School in Berlin), comments on my report cards included: “likes to talk,” “shows leadership qualities” and “always helpful to others.” These were three comments that continued to show up in some form or fashion throughout my entire school career. Although I’ve always ‘leaned in’ to opportunities that allowed me to lead, it has always been with some degree of discomfort, even now. I believe some of this discomfort comes from being an introvert in a very extroverted world. However, even as an introvert, I’ve always had an inner knowledge that my place in the world was to lead wherever I was put, in whatever situation presented itself to me. If it showed up in my life, then it was meant for me to have a leadership role in it and not necessarily in the ‘top-dog’ kind of way. For me, leading and leadership are about service. Service to others, service to a purpose, service to the greater good. I daresay that the lens through which I look in all aspects of my life is through one of service. It is this lens that blessed me with leadership opportunities in my personal life as early as Girl Scouts in elementary school, Meals on Wheels in


F I R S T

P E R S O N

NCFL#7452

college and the many boards on which I have been privileged to serve since then. In my professional life, it is what led me from the private sector to the nonprofit sector almost 20 years ago when three friends and I co-founded a nonprofit which continues to do good work today. It is what led me to discover that my education, business skills and experience, as well as my passion for service, were a good fit for nonprofit work. This led me to the PTA Thrift Shop in 2004, where it continues to be my privilege to serve and utilize that same business experience and passion for service to expand and enhance the original founders’ collective vision. “Lead where you stand” is also what continues to inform my day-to-day decisions as I direct one of the most amazing organizations, not only in this state, but in the country (of course, I’m a little biased), whose internal and external stakeholders have entrusted me with maintaining its vision and sustaining its significant impact. Being of service is a spiritual practice to me, one that feeds my soul, energizes me and gives me hope for the future ­– no matter what the circumstances. It is this “lead where you stand” mantra that has shaped me from the beginning. It urges me to be my best self, or better yet, it requires that I grow into my best self, which in turn helps others to do the same. CHM

Barbara Jessie-Black received her MBA from Meredith College in the late ‘90s and has called NC home for 30 years. She considers herself a lifelong student of all things holistic, with an emphasis on how those concepts influence activism. She is fluent in German, a yoga enthusiast and includes in her spiritual practice gardening and meditation.

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F I R S T

P E R S O N

Get into the swing of the holidays... The Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis performs at Memorial Hall on December 10.

STAYCATION

GETTING JAZZED FOR THE HOLIDAYS

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TREAT YOUR GUESTS TO AN EVENING OF BIG BAND HOLIDAY TUNES

IT’S THAT TIME OF YEAR AGAIN.

Mom, Dad, Uncle Buck, Aunt Millie and, um, a few other stragglers, are lining up on your doorstep just in time for the holidays, ready to eat you out of house and home and, of course, be entertained. Don’t worry, we’ve got your back. When cabin fever hits, we know just the thing to entice the guests out the door. In this much-beloved annual tradition, The Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra (JLCO) with Wynton Marsalis is back in town to give a swinging performance of your favorite holiday tunes during a Carolina Performing Arts (CPA) show in Memorial Hall on Dec. 10 at 8 p.m. New Orleans-native Wynton founded

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PHOTO COURTESY WYNTON MARSALIS

the group, now a New York cultural institution, in 1987. Think big brass band renditions from Count Basie’s “Jingle Bells” to classics like “White Christmas” and “Zat You, Santa Claus?” – all performed in the 16-piece orchestra’s signature New Orleans-flavored, soulful style. Jazz and blues singer Catherine Russell will also make a special appearance. The daughter of singer Carline Ray and Luis Russell, Louis Armstrong’s musical director, she’s the latest generation in a family of jazz royalty. “This will be our third consecutive year appearing at Carolina Performing Arts, and each year we strive to bring a different repertoire to introduce the virtuosity of the orchestra and range of this music,” says Jason Olaine, JLCO’s director of concerts and touring. “One reason we love playing at [Memorial Hall] is that the audiences are always smart, engaged and enthusiastic. The overall energy in the building inspires our band.” No doubt this must-see performance will fill you with holiday cheer and have you swinging over the river and through the woods. – Chantal Allam CHM

One reason we love playing at [Memorial Hall] is that the audiences are always smart, engaged and enthusiastic. The overall energy in the building inspires our band.”

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THE MAYOR’S CLUB

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HE FORMER MAYORS

of Chapel Hill met recently at The Carolina Inn to welcome their newest colleague, Mayor Pam Hemminger (seated, far right). From left, Howard Lee (term: 1969-1975), Joe Nassif (1979-1985), Ken Broun (1991-1995), Rosemary Waldorf (1995-2001), Kevin Foy (2001-2009) and Mark Kleinschmidt (2009-2015). IN MEMORIAM Former mayors Jonathan Howes (1987-1991) passed away in 2015; Sandy McClamroch (1961-1969) passed away in 2016; and James Wallace, who served two terms (1975-1979 and 1985-1987), died in 1991. „

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PHOTO BY BRIANA BROUGH

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C I V I L

S E R V A N T S

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2008 1,000 WORDS | FRANKLIN STREET

In Good Company Where have all the former mayors of Chapel Hill gone? Nowhere, it turns out. We were delighted – but not surprised – to find that while some are retired and others not, they all maintain a residence in Chapel Hill. So we asked them all to come join the current mayor for a photo at a classic gathering spot: Sutton’s Drug Store. They appear in chronological order of their term(s) as mayor. From left, Sandy McClamroch, 1961-1969; Howard Lee, 1969-1975; Joe Nassif, 1979-1985; Jon Howes, 1987-1991; Ken Broun, 1991-1995; Rosemary Waldorf, 1995-2001; Kevin Foy, 2001-present. James Wallace, who served as mayor from 1975-1979 as well as from 1985-1987, died in 1991. According to Foy, the position of mayor of Chapel Hill “is the greatest job in North Carolina, because our community is engaged and informed and supportive of elected officials –

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DICK KNAPP

even when they take risks.” CHM

D4 Chapel Hill Magazine | September/October 2008

September/October 2008 | Chapel Hill Magazine

D5

THE HIGHS AND THE LOWS TRIUMPHS, CHALLENGES AND SIMPLY HEARTBREAKING MAYORAL MOMENTS

MAYOR PAM HEMMINGER far? We’re most proud of the food-for-the-summer program where

connections on all levels at UNC; it’s a big university. The relationship takes a lot of maintenance, constant maintenance. And they also want to be good [partners]. We all work hard to make the community better.

we fed the children [of Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools] over the summer. I’m so grateful and proud of how well our community rose to the occasion and came out to do all that. And your hardest day? My hardest day was the shooting of Maleah Williams, an infant, on Christmas Day and what that does to a community. Our community pulled together but it was a really, really hard situation. Your biggest challenge, or surprise, since taking office? We struggle with making sure we tell our story well so that people understand what’s going on. We need to tell it in a way the citizens can understand and connect to. Other priorities? I spend a lot of time trying to make positive

KEVIN FOY My proudest achievement is the renaming of Airport Road to Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard that goes right through the middle of our town. It wasn’t universally popular. Well, what it did was it created an opportunity for people to talk about race and culture in our town that we hadn’t necessarily had an opportunity to talk about. What was the toughest part of your job? Violence in our community is really, really hard, especially on its leaders. Eve Carson’s murder was shattering for all of us and I still have a hard time dealing with it.

You’re only a year or so into your first term – how is it going so

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C I V I L

S E R V A N T S

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2011 1,000 words

1,000 words

Civil Servants Icons of our town – the mayors of Chapel Hill past – convene at The Carolina Inn (a worthy icon itself) to toast Mayor Mark Kleinschmidt: Sandy McClamroch (1961-69), Howard Lee (1969-1975), Joe Nassif (1979-1985), Jonathan Howes (1987-1991), Ken Broun (1991-1995), Rosemary Waldorf (1995-2001) and Kevin Foy (2001-2009). CHM

10 Chapel Hill Magazine | www.chapelhillmagazine.com | November/December 2011

From a policy perspective? I think the hardest thing that we had

to deal with, and Mark was on the Town Council at the time, was making sure our relationship with the university grew in a healthy way and that’s harder than it sounds. Carolina North was on the agenda and we slogged through that [until] we came up with a long-term vision that both the town and the university agreed to. It required effort and energy and trust. ROSEMARY WALDORF I’m very proud that I took the lead in moving Chapel Hill from a public safety system to having separate police and fire departments. This allowed our police and fire departments to become more highly specialized, as the times required, and more adequately staffed. Today Chapel Hill excels in its public safety work. What was your most challenging issue? The biggest challenge was the review and approval of Meadowmont, which I supported. The mixed-use neighborhood proposal was extremely controversial for several years. I think the consensus today is that Meadowmont is an integral part of our town,

PHOTO BY MACKENZIE BROUGH

November/December 2011 | www.chapelhillmagazine.com | Chapel Hill Magazine

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with Rashkis Elementary School, a YMCA pool, a commercial center and the wildly popular UNC Wellness Center. MARK KLEINSCHMIDT The hardest thing? No question, the murders that occurred in Finley Forest in my last year. [Note: On February 10, 2015, Deah Shaddy Barakat, Yusor Mohammad Abu-Salha and Razan Mohammad Abu-Salha were murdered by a neighbor] That was the longest day of my life and, you know, of course, it was more than just that day. It’s very difficult making the community feel safe and comfortable. Those were shattering days and you represented the town well. And from a policy perspective, some observations? Because Kevin

[Foy]’s efforts were so successful [with improving town and university relations], we now have this great relationship with the university. I became very close friends with UNC Chancellors Holden Thorp and Carol Folt during my early years, because of the hard work everyone did. I think all mayors will have a lot of work to do to keep improving the [town-and-gown] working relationship. CHM December 2016 chapelhillmagazine.com

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’TIS THE

SEASON IT’S THE TIME OF THE YEAR WHEN WE’RE ALL THINKING OF GIVING. HERE ARE FIVE ORGANIZATIONS THAT DO GOOD ALL YEAR-ROUND PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIANA BROUGH

COMING UP ROSES

The Strowds have made a long-lasting impact for garden lovers and nonprofits alike HATHAM COUNTY NATIVE GENE Strowd and his wife, Irene, moved to town after World War II where Gene co-founded and worked at the Johnson-Strowd-Ward furniture store on Franklin Street until his retirement in 1979. But his real passion grew in the flowerbeds at his Westwood home – his garden of 600-plus rose bushes. That wasn’t enough. Gene turned to the lawyer he had known since he was a child. “In the ‘80s, he decided he wanted to create a community rose garden,” recalls friend and attorney Syd Alexander (shown at right). “He moved bushes primarily from

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his home and laid out the rose garden in its current location [at Chapel Hill Community Center Park].” In 1990, Gene Strowd Community Rose Garden was named after the man with the greenest thumb in town. “Roses were his way of communicating with other people,” Syd says. “He would cut roses [from his yard] and take them to people and visit. It was a way for him to do outreach.” After Gene passed away, Irene provided the resources to maintain the garden and, when it came time to do an estate plan, she looked to Syd and Steve Miller (left), his partner at Alexander, Miller & Schupp, LLP. “She eventually asked Steve to help her create a charitable foundation that would maintain the rose garden in perpetuity and thereafter do good works that


would benefit the community in memory of her husband,” Syd recalls. In 2001, the two men set up Strowd Roses, Inc. to honor Irene’s wishes. Three times a year, the board meets to review the applications – they receive three times more than they can accept. Since the beginning, they’ve been able to grant more than $5 million to 292 organizations in areas from elder services to animals and arts. Chapel Hillian Gini Bell has seen the impact of four different grants as executive director of Farmer Foodshare. Her organization makes sure local farmers can make a living and people in need of fresh, healthy food can get it. “This past year, our recipients requested more fresh food education (like cooking

classes, recipes and veggie/fruit nutrition fact sheets),” she says. “Strowd Roses’ funding directly supported our programs that help hungry community members feel empowered to make healthier food decisions.” This fall, Strowd Roses, Inc. celebrated 15 years in the rose garden with a guest list full of past and present grant recipients. “Just circulating among those people and listening to their stories underscores the positive influence this organization has had on the local community,” Syd says. He’s the only remaining original board member after Steve rotated off last month. “It’s in good hands with executive director Eileen Ferrell [center],” Steve says. “I’m proud of what we’ve done, and now it’s time for someone else to continue.” – Jessica Stringer „

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G I V I N G

B A C K

ALL IN THE FAMILY

A new volunteer program at the Ronald McDonald House of Chapel Hill gets the whole family involved

OR YEARS, LEGEND OAKS RESIDENT Tania Talman searched for ways she, her husband, Wes Talman, and her children could volunteer together as a family. Finally she found the Ronald McDonald House of Chapel Hill, a nonprofit that provides a “home-away-from-home” for families with seriously ill children close to the facilities they need. “It was then that I realized the House is a natural place for both adults and children to volunteer,” she says. Tania got her willing kids – Sofia, 11, a sixth-grader at Margaret B. Pollard Middle School, and Jackson, 8, a

third-grader at Perry Harrison Elementary School – to pitch in. “They ended up planting the flowerbeds by the new community house and helping with the playground,” she says. “They loved it.” That’s how she came up with the idea for “Families Helping Families,” a new program aimed at bringing families together through philanthropy. Developed in coordination with the House’s senior director of development George Marut, the program has two components: spending a minimum number of hours volunteering and also committing to a financial donation. Its launch kicks off with a happy hour, Wii games and a brainstorming session at the House on Thursday, Dec. 8 at 6pm. A second event including brunch will be held on Saturday, Dec. 10, at 10:30am. “If a family likes to cook, they can elect to pick up groceries and cook a meal at the House,” Tania explains. “If a family likes to garden, they can help maintain the flowerbeds. The activities can be completely open and driven on what the families enjoy doing and their skill sets.” Her daughter, Sofia, adds, “It’s really fun to help people going through tough times. It makes me realize how fortunate I am. It’s also good to help sick kids and their siblings feel normal again.” – Chantal Allam „

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Tania, Jackson, Sofia and Wes Talman at the Ronald McDonald House of Chapel Hill playground.

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G I V I N G

B A C K

(Back row) Sarah Thayvee, 8; Josiah Brooks, 7; Kendall Alston, 9; India Alston, 11; (Middle row) Peg Gignoux, Susan Romaine, Susie Wilde and Alex Thein, 11; (Front row) Law Eh Soe, 5.

seed, which brings unity to a divided garden. The title echoes both the story’s meaning and PORCH’s overall mission to get food to hungry families. Susan says PORCH had been marketing its relief efforts through traditional channels like Facebook, when Lisa Goldstein, a neighborhood coordinator, suggested the idea of a children’s book – written by kids, for kids. “When PORCH supporters give ‘Planting Hope’ as a gift to family and friends, readers will enjoy a delightful book with [the] theme of community collaboration,” Susan explains. Over the course of many months, writing instructor Susie Wilde guided after-school

GOOD READS

PORCH plants hope with new children’s book by kids N AVERAGE, IT TAKES THREE YEARS for a children’s book to go from an idea to a published work. With the help of the community, it took nonprofit PORCH just one. PORCH, or People Offering Relief for Chapel Hill-Carrboro Homes, launched in 2010 by founding members Debbie Horwitz, Christine Cotton and Susan Romaine. Their 32-page book, “Planting Hope,” tells the tale of a hard-working girl named Terra and her golden 44

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children, ages 5 to 12, at the Rogers Road Community Center through 30 drafts of “Planting Hope,” while textile artist Peg Gignoux helped the students create colorful collaged images for the whimsical garden story. “[The] project was so much fun because the students would argue with each other and debate so much,” says Sarmuna Wei, 15, who attended Smith Middle School during the book-writing process. “All of that brought us together. I don’t even remember what we discussed exactly, but the nice, warm feeling we had of being together sticks to me really well.” Added Susie, “To give [the kids] a voice [through] this book is so special because so many of these kids are those who are typically not heard. It was an incredible thing.” – Latisha Catchatoorian

Proceeds from “Planting Hope” will go toward PORCH’s marketing and hunger relief efforts. Copies are $20 and will be available at all three Weaver Street Markets, Fifth Season Gardening in Carrboro and at all December PORCH events. To learn more, email info@porchcommunities.org.


G I V I N G

WISHES GRANTED

The Public School Foundation grants are making a difference one student at a time TANDING IN THE BACK OF THE Carillon Assisted Living memory care unit, Phillips Middle School orchestra teacher Ann Daaleman listened to one of her students play the cello. She felt overwhelmed with pride for the student who had blossomed into an amazing musician and was now giving back, sharing his talent with an audience, many of them afflicted with Alzheimer’s. Like many families with kids who pass through Ann’s orchestra class in her 12 years of teaching, the boy’s family could not afford to buy their children instruments or private music lessons. But when the boy showed up in her 2013 class – all smiles and ambition – and used books that Ann lent him to teach himself to play a borrowed cello, she knew he had a unique talent that should be nurtured. For help, she turned to Chapel Hill-Carrboro Public School Foundation (PSF), the independent, nonprofit organization that

B A C K

Ann Daaleman and her orchestra class.

galvanizes support for innovative projects that teachers and students would otherwise not be able to pay for. “One of my core beliefs is that music should not be an elite pursuit and success should not be tied to income level,” Ann says. “PSF’s funding gives me the ability to provide the tools for a student who is passionate about music to advance, regardless of ability to pay.” PSF has granted more than $4 million in the past seven years. “It means a lot in this day and age of budget cuts that someone is out there giving [teachers] something extra, something that may have been cut,” says Lynn Lehmann, PSF’s executive director. Lynn says beyond the student’s growth as a musician, he’s become a confident public speaker, teacher and leader in his community. “It’s just an amazing thing he was able to do and all from a small grant, but really all from a teacher who had the foresight to ask for that kind of funding,” she says. “It’s really life-changing, just that extra bit of help with whatever it is,” Ann says. “It doesn’t fix everything in the world, but it definitely makes a difference.” – Jennifer Brookland „ December 2016 chapelhillmagazine.com

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Shellie Yaseen (left) helps train therapy dogs such as Gretchen Aylsworth’s golden retriever, Luke.

Is your dog a good match for the dog therapy program? Email jodie.skoff@unchealth.unc.edu, call Volunteer Services Department at 984-974-4793 or check out petpartners.org for more information.

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G I V I N G

B A C K

THE GOLDEN RULE

Therapy dogs bring a touch of relief to UNC patients HEN LUKE WALKS IN, THE MOOD IN THE hospital brightens. Smiles appear, and “ooohs” and “awws” take over. Soon, everyone is rubbing their hands together with hand sanitizer for the chance to kneel down and pet Luke, Gretchen Aylsworth’s 3-year-old golden retriever. This is Luke and Gretchen’s second visit to UNC Health Care Medical Center’s Hillsborough campus as one of 22 Pet Partners teams at UNC designed to comfort patients across five UNC hospitals. Gretchen – who lives with her husband, Dr. Arthur S. Aylsworth, and Luke in the Greenwood neighborhood – has helped train dogs with a purpose for years. Since 2008, she’s worked with Eyes Ears Nose & Paws (EENP) – a nonprofit that trains and places service dogs – and currently serves on its board of directors. “Helping to train service dogs, I saw the joy [they] brought people; I’ve seen what dogs can do,” Gretchen says. Unlike a service dog who might be trained to watch his owner for signs of health concern, Luke – as a therapy dog – is trained to welcome pets from people. The first step to getting Luke hospital-ready was regular obedience training, managed with the help of Chris O’Connor of In Good Hands Dog Walking and Training and Barbara Long of Paw In Hand Dog Training. Most dogs need to wait until they are 2 years old and their puppy energy has settled to pass the national Pet Partners’ test. Once Luke passed and was also accepted by the hospital system, Gretchen shadowed Pet Partners evaluator Shellie Yaseen and her shiatsu mix, Daisy, to learn hospital procedures including laying down a clean sheet before Luke can visit with each patient. Gretchen and Luke, then with the mentorship of Shellie for a few more visits, began meeting patients and making an impact. Therapy teams like Luke and Gretchen can visit anywhere from once a month to four times a month, greeting six to eight bedsides on an average visit. However, for the Pet Partners teams, it is the quality of visits that is stressed over the quantity. If a team already has a connection with a patient, they are encouraged to prioritize that patient. On his first visit in November, Luke met Demetrius Brooks of Fayetteville, who had been in the hospital since late September for surgery. They met in the lobby and Luke’s sweet kisses lifted Demetrius’s spirits. When the two met again the following week, Demetrius was eager to share his progress when the golden sidled up to his bed. “He likes meeting people,” Gretchen says of Luke, “and I like meeting people. That is reason enough; [this work] is totally fulfilling.” – Laura Zolman Kirk CHM

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Monkee’s of Chapel Hill This Tory Burch “Harper” Tote is made of supple, pebbled leather, with a tonal double-T logo, in fall’s hottest color! Finished with multiple pockets and a polished strap, it’s an effortless, versatile style – great for any day of the week. $495 108 Meadowmont Village Circle, Chapel Hill 919-967-6830 monkeesofchapelhill.com

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MOZART ON THE

HILL OBOIST BLAIR TINDALL’S MEMOIR OF SEX AND DRUGS SHOOK UP THE CLASSICAL MUSIC WORLD. WHO WOULD’VE GUESSED? BY JILL WARREN LUCAS

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ORTY YEARS BEFORE

she wrote her acclaimed memoir, Mozart in the Jungle: Sex, Drugs and Classical Music, Blair Tindall was one of countless children who took piano lessons from Chapel Hill instructor Shirley Griffith. She was a natural, but the only thing little Blair liked about music was performing.

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“I hated it, really, but it made me the center of attention,” she recalls during a lunchtime call from a noisy L.A. restaurant a few weeks before Amazon Prime’s third season launch of Mozart in the Jungle on Dec. 9. “If you had told me then that music would become an integral part of my life, I would have thought you were crazy.” The Golden Globe- and Emmy Award-honored series has


ventured well past her 2005 book, which covered her early life in Chapel Hill and as a student of the North Carolina School of the Arts (NCSA, now UNC School of the Arts) through her dramatic 23-year career as a freelance professional oboist. While forbidden from sharing inside scoop, Blair says this season’s story takes place in Europe and involves a demanding opera diva. Stars Gael Garcia Bernal, Bernadette Peters and Malcolm McDowell return, as does Lola Kirke, who plays the character based on Blair. Blair herself has appeared in bit parts and serves as a technical consultant. Her oboe performances can be heard in the theme music as well as a cadenza in a Mozart concerto featured in an upcoming episode. Blair started playing oboe at Estes Hills Elementary. It was 1971 and the precocious sixth-grader fidgeted as more desirable clarinets and flutes were doled out to peers lucky enough to have last names at the start of the alphabet. By the time they got to Tindall, her choice was oboe or bassoon. Preferring its relative portability, she took an oboe. The instrument proved to be a perfect match for Blair’s considerable gifts. While she despised practice and carving reeds, she was encouraged to stick with it by her late father, George Brown Tindall, a groundbreaking professor of Southern history and race relations at UNC. “He taught me that doing something unpopular could make a difference,” she says. “He also said I’d do something nobody understands at the time but to go forward with it, which I did. In some ways it ruined my life,” she adds, referring to how her tell-all

got her scratched from NYC hiring lists, “but I feel like I got a lot of people interested in classical music.” Like Blair, Melanie Wilsden’s interest in classical music started early. Now in her 28th season as principal oboist with the North Carolina Symphony, Melanie met Blair at the summer institute of the Brevard Music Center near Asheville when they were both 14. “I remember being struck by how attractive and confident she was,” says Melanie, who had not played as long and was shy. They reunited years later, when Melanie studied at Juilliard and Blair was at the Manhattan School of Music. “She took me to a musician’s party one Halloween and gave me clothes to wear for a costume. I dressed as a call girl, of all things, but it was not like the wild parties in her book. It was just collegiate fun.” In the early 2000s, when Blair was in town to visit family after earning her scholarshippaid master’s degree in communications from Stanford, the pair met for lunch. “She told me about the book and said I didn’t have to worry, that my name would not be in it,” Melanie recalls. “We had different experiences, but I recognized a lot of what she described. I thought she was very brave to write it.” “I read the book. It’s a very sexy book,” says Rev. Robert Seymour, pastor emeritus of Binkley Baptist Church, who remembers Blair as a young girl who played oboe while accompanied on piano by his late wife, Pearl. “She should be commended for her creativity,” adds Robert, who was aware of the TV series it inspired, “but some people might be turned off by it.” While the book’s descriptions of trading sex and drugs for gigs shreds romantic perceptions of life as a professional musician, a December 2016 chapelhillmagazine.com

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resurgence of classical music in the 1970s and ’80s teased scores of kids toward orchestral careers. For many, the outcome was not unlike today’s enrollment surge at culinary schools, where gifted cooks graduate with huge debts, uncertain futures and a determination to do anything to survive. Blair’s training stepped up with high school. Her parents let What is “Mozart in the Jungle”? ... Blair and her memoir were recently on an episode of “Jeopardy.” her decide between going to the rigorous Phillips Exeter Academy, bassoonist who now has a thriving architecture practice in Chapel where her brother Bruce was preparing for a distinguished writing career, or NCSA, then known for its Bohemian climate. A bona fide Hill. “My impression of Blair now is the same as it was back then: she is no-brainer, she chose the latter. an incredibly talented person who doesn’t know how good she is at Just 15, Blair quickly immersed herself in the Winston-Salem everything she does,” says Arielle Schechter. “Even in high school, boarding school culture, which included using drugs and having she was preternaturally talented.” affairs with classmates and faculty later named in her book. One Arielle points out that while many of Blair’s college classmates person who avoided scathing description was her roommate, a were busking in the subways, Blair was filling in with the New York Philharmonic and other elite ensembles. As a union card carrying musician, Blair’s days were filled with rehearsals and recording sessions while her nights often were spent in the pit orchestras of top Broadway musicals. In between, she juggled lovers and slept off binges. Her page-turning descriptions of these formative experiences blew the lid off of the classical music world. Triangle readers were shocked when she named NCSA teachers who took advantage of impressionable boarding students, and many more were stunned at descriptions of what went on behind the curtains of Alexandra Boudreau DDS, MS famous concert halls. Kevin Ricker DDS, MS “Blair got a lot of criticism for being The Veranda at Briar Chapel a whistleblower, regarding some of 79 Falling Springs Drive Suite 120 Chapel Hill, NC the unpleasant aspects of the classical music world,” Arielle says. “But from my perspective, she is one of the kindest chathampediatricdentistry.com people I know. She wrote that book

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He taught me that doing something unpopular could make a difference,” she says of her father, groundbreaking UNC historian George Brown Tindall.

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honestly, and in some ways she held back because she could have been rougher on a lot of the people she talks about.” Blair’s mother, Blossom Tindall, one of the first residents of Carol Woods, was among those who were a little shaken by her daughter’s revelations. “She was not happy with it,” Blair says, her voice betraying the lasting sting of disapproval. Blair, who now lives in California, goes back to visit her mother several times a year. “I know what that’s like. My mother threw a copy of my first book in the river,” chuckles Hillsborough writer Lee Smith, who hired her former Chapel Hill neighbor to babysit for her sons. “Even as a young girl, Blair thought outside of the box and was so very talented. She’s such a wonderful writer, and also so creative to succeed in all these different media [forms] that she works in.” Friends say Blair is still very much the Chapel Hill girl they knew years ago, a person who craves attention but reels from disappointment, including the pain of a failed romance. She is famously no longer married to Bill Nye (“The Science Guy”), who surprised her the day after her 2006 birthday with an impromptu wedding in which the processional was performed by famed cellist Yo-Yo Ma. When their marriage license was discovered to be invalid seven weeks later, Bill took the opportunity to end the relationship. “That whole incident went way too far,” says Melanie Wilsden, who couldn’t help but notice colorful news reports about restraining orders and dueling accusations. “I’m not going to dislike someone if I don’t know the truth. My memories of her are very pleasant. We both still love classical music, and that’s enough for me.” CHM


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HOME as a CONVERSATION PIECE THE BUTLERS DID IT THEIR WAY BY DAN SHANNON | PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIANA BROUGH

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INTERESTING ISN’T THE WORD to describe Cliff and Linda Butler’s sprawl of a home in the Lake Forest neighborhood; better, fascinating. The 3,400-square-foot house they built in 1980 on a plot hard against Cedar Falls Park and next to a strip of greenway at the end of a long dead-end road, is a jumble

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Linda’s 20th wedding anniversary present lights up the wall filled with family photos and artifacts.

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of stuff collected over a lifetime and somehow connected to their families, friends and history. “I just love old solid stuff,” Cliff says, “but it’s really lucky that everything I collected worked out. Of course, we spent a lot of time thinking about what we wanted and how we wanted to use it. Linda was worried that we were going to live forever on Shady Lawn with all [our] stuff piled behind the house and filling an entire tobacco barn.” The result: Every room, each piece of furniture, even interior doors, all mean something to the couple. The house has as many stories as there are pictures on the walls. And there are hundreds of pictures on the walls throughout the house’s 10 rooms. Perhaps not surprising of someone who enjoys collecting – or gathering might be more apt – Cliff is a natural raconteur. “I really don’t know [how I got started picking up this stuff]. For example,


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friend. Scores of heirlooms, artifacts and memorabilia – from a cigar counter salvaged from Cliff’s father’s pharmacy in Dunn to more than a thousand pieces of slate from a demolished church at Cardinal Gibbons High School in Raleigh to interior walls from a Harnett County tobacco barn – are testament to Cliff’s eye for underappreciated treasures and moments in time. “I inherited all


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these shoes from a rich lawyer friend of mine who died,” he says, describing the impressive shoe rack next to his bed. “His wife knew I had the same size. Those are handmade – $875 a pair from London. I had two pairs of dress shoes before I inherited those shoes. Now I have Gucci workout shoes. I mean he had so many


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shoes he never wore them, but then he had no hobbies.�

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SELF-STYLIZED HOME Designed by Cliff and Linda, the house was built by J.P. Goforth for $150,000 nearly four decades ago. “He built the house after we took our designs to him and then he had a draftsman just draw it up exactly like we wanted it. J.P. and I [first] drew it on a little sheet and Leon Meyers, who worked for him at the time, built it. After our house he went [out] on his own and now he’s one of the biggest builders in Chapel Hill and Durham.� Cliff designed the house to be warmed and cooled via passive solar power. The entire southern side of the house, including the master bedroom, has wall-to-ceiling double-pane windows. “If they made triple-pane back in 1980, I would’ve bought [them],� he says. The outdoor curtains are only pulled closed two or three months a year when the temperature is over 90 degrees. The house does not have air-conditioning. Naturally, just finding the piece of land on the uneven terrain alongside Cedar Falls Park and


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I was actually in the woods here and I thought I was in Cedar Falls Park until I tripped over a surveyor’s stake or a property line stake.”

close to their nearby home on Shady Lawn Road is a story in itself. “I was actually in the woods here,” Cliff recalls, “and I thought I was in Cedar Falls Park until I tripped over a surveyor’s stake or a property line stake. So I had a friend of mine go to the [county deeds office] and discovered there was a small piece of land between two parks, the 85-acre park and a 15-acre park along the creek. Developers didn’t want to deal with it because they want to build a road and put house after house after house. They couldn’t do that here, they would have had to build probably 100 yards of road before they could even get to where this three-and-a-half acres were.” TAR HEELS BORN AND BRED Both Dunn natives, Linda and Cliff spent their careers in Chapel Hill and Durham as pharmacists at Eckerd Drug. Linda finished her career at PPD Medical Communications. Cliff is also a UNC alum where he played freshman basketball in 1964-65, which, naturally, generates another good story. “I was on the freshman team with

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This corner hutch was built out of shelving from Linda’s grandfather’s general store in Goldston before the store burned down in 1910. The hutch and china were passed down to her by her aunt Ona.

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chapelhillmagazine.com December 2016

future All-American Larry Miller and Willie Cooper, the first black to wear a UNC basketball uniform,” Cliff recalls. “I talked with Willie after reading a long newspaper article about his time at UNC and what it felt like when he scored his first basket. I complained to him that he didn’t give me credit for the assist. He said as he remembered it, I had put up an air ball.” The couple’s passion for UNC – both graduated from UNC School of Pharmacy – is evident throughout the house, including a dedicated “Carolina Room” and doors from UNC’s Old East and Old West dorms pulled from dumpsters Cliff noticed when he was driving through campus. The couple also has a table fashioned from a tree that had to be cut to build the $75,000 carport three years ago – “The most expensive carport in the world.” Cliff laughs – “That [tree] dates back to the same year the university was founded – 1789.” Thirty-six years and thousands of mementoes in, Cliff responded to an email question about whether he was done with gathering stuff, if the house was finished. “Done,” he wrote. “No more collecting but I still can’t pass up a rock.” CHM


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Materials are protected by copyright, trademark, and other intellectual property laws. All rights in these materials are reserved. All products and company names marked as trademarked (™) or registered (®) are trademarks of their respective holders. Copying, reproduction and distribution of materials without prior written consent of Freehold Communities is strictly prohibited. All information, plans, and pricing are subject to change without notice. This information does not represent a specific offer of sale or solicitation to purchase property within Legacy at Jordan Lake. Models do not reflect racial preference.

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HOMES • CONDOS • APARTMENTS

“Slow down? I just got started.”

REAL ESTATE GALLERY Weaver Street Smarts by Clayton Nell BROKER

Every inspector seems to have a different opinion about the proper way to close up a crawlspace. Close the vents? Keep them open? Is your furnace in the crawlspace? Do you have a vapor barrier? We can help you ask the right questions to get the job done right. Ask a Weaver Street Agent.

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Legacy at Jordan Lake Model Grand Opening Legacy at Jordan Lake is a premier recreation planned community in Chapel Hill located in Chatham County. Integrity Homes are unique yet timeless, and offer the kind of flexibility that today’s homebuyers are looking for in terms of space and design. With a focus on creating strong relationships, Integrity takes a hands-on approach to every home built. SINGLE FAMILY HOMES FROM THE LOW $439,990 - EVERYTHING INCLUDED Home Features * 2,000 to 3,000 square feet * 3 to 4 Bedrooms / 2 to 3.5 Baths * Gourmet Kitchens w/ Stainless Steel Appliances, Granite Countertops, Maple Cabinets, Large Designer Kitchen Islands, Vented Cooking * 12’ x 30’ Rear Deck * Hardwood Flooring throughout Main Level

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G DISHIN WITH

GENE HAMER

THE CROOK’S CORNER OWNER TALKS CHEESE PORK, PARADES AND DECKING THE PIG „ BY JESSICA STRINGER PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARIA BRUBECK

A

ny memories from the first holiday season at Crook’s? We opened 34 years ago in the spring of ‘82. On that first December menu, we didn’t even have Shrimp and Grits but we did have desserts like Mt. Airy Chocolate Soufflé Cake and Hot Fudge

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HOLIDAY

EVENTS 22

MAYORS

PAST & PRESENT 36

MOZART

ON THE HILL 52

DECEMBER 2016 E.COM

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We have been scheming to start a restaurant challenge for the [Chapel Hill-Carrboro Holiday] Parade. ... Who knows – this could have the potential of one day rivaling the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade.”

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Brownies, two of my all-time favorites. We were booked for numerous office parties and family events. What’s your favorite holiday tradition in Chapel Hill/Carrboro? I like the tree at Townsend Bertram & Company, the outdoor store a few blocks from Crook’s. It’s inspiring. Scott Bertram and his family and friends hoist up lights on every limb, and it’s a real Christmas tree, worth coming over to see. What’s your favorite wintry dish that Crook’s Corner serves? I heart Cheese Pork. It’s a schnitzel (with melty and crispy Swiss cheese covering a thin pork cutlet and topped with a Madeira sauce). It’s the sort of food that you want on any cool to wintry night. It lands on the menu reliably during basketball season. What’s the Crook’s holiday party like? We have our party outside the restaurant these days and after the regular holiday season, usually at one of the local bars. We start out with food and a cocktail hour, and by the end most folks are dancing and making merry. How did Crook’s Corner celebrate the holidays in the past? We used to put a wreath around the pig’s neck but haven’t done that in a few years. I used to make the wreath, put the lights on it and climb up on the roof to slide the


popular this time of year. Bill Smith does a “Holiday Duck” (confit leg and seared duck breast) with juicy cranberries. He likes to make rum baba, too. What would you like to see become a Chapel Hill tradition? The Parade. We have been scheming

to start a restaurant challenge for the [Chapel Hill-Carrboro Holiday] Parade. We’re thinking a lot of floats and music with a trophy for the winning entrant. Who knows – this could have the potential of one day rivaling the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. Spectacular. CHM

wreath down the pig’s back and over her head. A three-day ordeal. Now I put a modest mistletoe wreath over the front door and a lighted wreath at the entrance. One year we had Vivian Howard (“A Chef’s Life”) in for a Christmas Sweaters party to benefit the Food Bank of Central & Eastern North Carolina. That was a lot of fun. We don’t play holiday music so as to give people a rest. Will the restaurant serve special dishes this holiday season? This is the first time we’ll be open on New Year’s Day, which is on a Sunday. We’ll offer a brunch from 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Hoppin’ John and Collards are mainstay [items] on the menu, but they get more December 2016 chapelhillmagazine.com

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A presentation of

&

The Triangle’s largest food & drink festival returns! April 20 - 23

Details coming soon at tastetheevent.com


I N

R E S C H A P E L H I A N A D V E R

T A U R A N T S , D E L I L L , C A R R B O R O , D N O R T H E R N C H T I S E R S H I G H L I G

S A N D B I S T R O S H I L L S B O R O U G H A T H A M C O U N T Y H T E D I N B O X E S

TASTE

CHAPEL HILL East Franklin Street Artisan Pizza Kitchen Sand­wiches, hamburgers, pizza. 153 E. Franklin St.; 919-929-9119 [B]SKI’S Specialty wraps. 147 E. Franklin St.; 919-969-9727 Bandido’s Mexican Cafe Burritos, salads, quesadillas, tacos. 159-1/2 E. Franklin St.; 919-967-5048

PHOTO BY SARAH ARNESON

Benny Cappella’s Pizza, by the slice or whole pie. 122 E. Franklin St.; 919-240-5286 Buns Serves gourmet burgers, fries and shakes made from fresh ingredients. 107 N. Columbia St.; 919-240-4746 Carolina Coffee Shop The mainstay serves casual American cuisine for breakfast, lunch and dinner. 138 E. Franklin St.; 919-942-6875 Cosmic Cantina Burritos, salads, quesadillas, tacos. 128 E. Franklin St.; 919-960-3955 Four Corners American fare, nachos, wings, pasta. 175 E. Franklin St.; 919-537-8230 IMBIBE Bottle shop and restaurant featuring pizza, salads and appetizers. 108 Henderson St.; 919-636-6469 Kurama Sushi & Noodle Express Dumplings, salads, noodle dishes. 105 N. Columbia St.; 919-968-4747 Linda’s Bar & Grill Local beer, sweet potato tots, cheese fries, burgers. 203 E. Franklin St.; 919-933-6663 Ms. Mong Mongolian BBQ, banh mi, fusion burritos. 163 E. Franklin St.; 919-933-5277 R&R Grill Spicy wings, kabobs, flatbread pizza. 137 E. Franklin St.; 919-240-4411 Roots Bakery, Bistro & Bar Farm-to-table American and Central American fusion. 161 E. Franklin St.; 919-240-7160

THE DISH

O U R

P I C K

O F

T H E

S E A S O N

Breakaway Cafe 5 8 C H A P E L T O N C T . , 9 8 4 - 2 3 4 - 3 0 1 0 B R E A K A W A Y N C . C O

S T E .

1 0 0

Are there really that many cyclists riding near Briar Chapel to warrant a whole restaurant dedicated to the culture? Breakaway Cafe owner Andy Pignatora thinks so. Right now, “it’s an experiment,” he readily admits, but he’s particularly passionate about the concept. The idea sprung from a weeklong cycling trip in Oregon, when after biking up to 100 miles a day, the group gathered around food and drink. Andy wanted to recreate that sense of community in a restaurant. Whether you’re looking for hearty fare and a beer after a mountain biking adventure or just a great meal made with local, quality ingredients, Andy and chef Danny Vacca have some crowd-pleasing options with a selection of sandwiches, breakfast items and large dinner plates. This winter, try the foraged mushroom tartine – an open sandwich with roasted mushrooms, truffle cheese and caramelized onion puree – with a carrot farro salad and a cold one … that you can actually enjoy. “We have kids,” Andy says of Breakaway’s family-friendly atmosphere, “so we know what it’s like. A stack of toys in the corner means enough time to finish your beer.” Tartine $10, salads $3-$12. – Laura Zolman Kirk CHM

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D I N I N G

G U I D E

Sawasdee Thai Restaurant Thai cuisine such as red curry and pad thai. 110 N. Columbia St.; 919-960-0440

NEWS BITES

Shanghai Dumpling Dumplings, pork buns, hotpots. 143 E. Franklin St.; 919-914-6737

PHOTO COURTESY THE CAROLINA INN

SPANKY’S A Chapel Hill institution since 1977, the American bar and grill serves hamburgers, brown sugar baby back ribs, garden fresh salads and more. 101 E. Franklin St.; 919-967-2678; spankysrestaurant.com

HOME COOKING Brandon Sharp is the new executive chef at Crossroads Chapel Hill at The Carolina Inn. Most recently, Brandon worked as the chef at Solage Calistoga Resort and Spa in Calistoga, California, where he received seven consecutive Michelin Stars. He is a North Carolina native and alum of both UNC and Culinary Institute of America.

A WEEKEND TO INDULGE Vivian Howard of “A Chef’s Life” included Crook’s Corner, Pizzeria Mercato and Weaver Street Market as three of her six essential experiences when visiting the Triangle, specifically recommending Crook’s banana pudding, in a VisitNC.com post. 

PIZZA, PIZZA Roost at Fearrington Village will fire up their pizza oven into the winter months. The seasonal pizza spot typically closes at the end of October, but will serve up wood-fired pies on Fridays and Saturdays.

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Sugarland Cupcakes, gelato, pastries. 140 E. Franklin St.; 919-929-2100 Sup Dogs Creative hot dogs and sides like jalapeño popper tots and funnel cake sticks. 107 E. Franklin St.; 919-903-9566 Sutton’s Drug Store Burgers, sandwiches, breakfast, milkshakes. 159 E. Franklin St.; 919-942-5161

Beer Study Bottle shop with in-store drafts and growlers to go. 106 N. Graham St.; 919-240-5423 Bread and Butter Bread, cinnamon rolls, desserts. 503 W. Rosemary St.; 919-960-5998 BREADMEN’S A variety of burgers, sandwiches, salads and grilled meat, with daily soup and specials. All-day breakfast; vegetarian options. 324 W. Rosemary St.; 919-967-7110; breadmens.com Carolina Ale House Pub food, beer, wine and specialty cocktails. 419 W. Franklin St.; 919-904-7288 Carolina Brewery The fifth-oldest brewery in the state. 460 W. Franklin St.; 919-942-1800 Cholanad Restaurant & Bar Contemporary and traditional South Indian cuisine. Catering available. 308 W. Franklin St.; 800-246-5262

sweetFrog Premium Frozen Yogurt Choose your own yogurt and toppings. 105 E. Franklin St.; 919-537-8616

CRÊPE TRADITIONS Sweet and savory crêpes, coffee, espresso. 140 W. Franklin St., Ste. 120; 919-391-9999; crepetraditions.com

Time-Out Southern comfort food 24 hours a day. 201 E. Franklin St.; 919-929-2425 TOP OF THE HILL Chapel Hill's only distillery also offers beers and American food, like burgers and flatbreads. 100 E. Franklin St.; 919-929-8676; thetopofthehill.com TRU Deli & Wine Sandwiches and wine. 114 Henderson St.; 919-240-7755 Ye Olde Waffle Shoppe Waffles, pancakes, eggs. 173 E. Franklin St.; 919-929-9192 West Franklin Street 411 WEST The menu – including fresh pasta, seafood and pizzas – is inspired by the flavors of Italy and the Mediterranean, with a healthy California twist; outdoor dining; all ABC permits. 411 W. Franklin St.; 919-967-2782; 411west.com Al’s Burger Shack Gourmet burgers and fries with local ingredients. 516 W. Franklin St.; 919-904-7659

CROOK’S CORNER Southern classics like shrimp and grits, Hoppin’ John and jalapeño-cheddar hushpuppies. 610 W. Franklin St.; 919-929-7643; crookscorner.com

For Special Occasions... CROSSROADS CHAPEL HILL AT THE CAROLINA INN New American cuisine and seasonal specialties; all ABC permits. 211 Pittsboro St.; 919-918-2777; crossroadscuisine.com

like Dinner. ELAINE’S ON FRANKLIN Fine regional 454 W. FRANKLIN ST. • cuisine, CHAPEL HILL American made with the fresh960.2770 • www.elainesonfranklin.com est local ingredients; all ABC permits. 454 W. Franklin St.; 919-960-2770; elainesonfranklin.com

Silver Medal: Best Restaurants of 2011, News & Observer

Guru India Restaurant Tandoori, thali, curry. 508-A W. Franklin St.; 919-942-8201


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D I N I N G

G U I D E

ITALIAN PIZZERIA III Pizza, calzones, subs. The "place to be" in Chapel Hill for 35 years. 508 W. Franklin St.; 919-968-4671; italianpizzeria3.com

MEDITERRANEAN DELI Offers healthy vegan, vegetarian and gluten-free options as well as delicious meats from the grill. 410 W. Franklin St.; 919-967-2666; mediterraneandeli.com

SANDWHICH Hot and cold specialty sandwiches and burgers. 407 W. Franklin St.; 919-929-2114 Spicy 9 Sushi Bar & Asian Restaurant Sushi, Thai curries, bibimbap and other Asian entrees. 140 W. Franklin St.; 919-903-9335

Jasmin Mediterranean Bistro Greek-Lebanese cuisine. 100 W. Franklin St.; 919-903-8869

Mellow Mushroom Classic Southern pizza. 310 W. Franklin St.; 919-929-1941

Kipos Greek cuisine in a relaxed, upscale setting; outdoor dining. 431 W. Franklin St.; 919-425-0760

Merritt’s Store & Grill Sandwiches, breakfast biscuits, burgers. 1009 S. Columbia St.; 919-942-4897

Lantern Pan-Asian cuisine. 423 W. Franklin St.; 919-969-8846

Mint North Indian subz korma and chicken jalfrezi. 504 W. Franklin St.; 919-929-6188

La Residence French-inspired cuisine made from fresh ingredients. 202 W. Rosemary St.; 919-967-2506

Moe’s Southwest Grill Made-to-order burritos, nachos, quesadillas and more. 110 W. Franklin St.; 919-914-6217

Lime & Basil Vietnamese fare. 200 W. Franklin St.; 919-967-5055

Noodles & Company Asian, Mediterranean, American noodles. 214 W. Franklin St.; 919-967-7320

Vimala’s Curryblossom Cafe Traditional Indian tandoori and thali. 431 W. Franklin St.; 919-929-3833

The Northside District Specialty cocktails and international bar food. 403 W. Rosemary St.; 919-931-7044

West End Wine Bar Pastries, light tapas, 100 wines. 450 W. Franklin St.; 919-967-7599

MAMA DIP’S Traditional Southern specialties, including a country breakfast and brunch and dinner classics like fried chicken and Brunswick stew. 408 W. Rosemary St.; 919-942-5837; mamadips.com

Old Chicago Pizza and Taproom Deep-dish pizza, calzones, salads and beer. 140 W. Franklin St.; 919-903-9150

WINNER

BEST OF CHAPEL HIL L 2016

N OW NP OW O EN OPEN FOO D & CO F F E E

FOO D & CO F F E E B R II C F FL BFE EOE EO R D& & &B BC COYC YC LEE EES S B E E R & B I C YC L E S

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B BR RE EA AK KA AW W AY AY N NC C .. C CO O B R E A K A W AY N C . C O

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Talulla’s Authentic Turkish cuisine; all ABC permits. 456 W. Franklin St.; 919-933-1177 Trolly Stop Specialty hot dogs and burgers. 306B W. Franklin St.; 919-240-4206 VESPA Innovative Italian and Mediterranean cuisine in a setting that can accommodate parties, receptions and special events. Parking and patio dining. 306D W. Franklin St.; 919-969-6600; vespanc.com

Windows Restaurant at the Franklin Hotel New American cuisine. 311 W. Franklin St.; 919-442-9000 YOGURT PUMP Since 1982, YoPo has served up frozen yogurt treats and shakes with unique flavors. 106 W. Franklin St.; 919-942-7867; yogurtpump.com

Village Plaza/East Franklin Street/ Eastgate Crossing Caffe Driade Carrboro Coffee, bowl-size lattes, local baked goods, beer and wine. 1215-A E. Franklin St.; 919-942-2333 Carolina 1663 Contemporary Southern fare at the Sheraton. 1 Europa Dr.; 919-969-2157 Dunk & Slide at Whole Foods Market Coffee, all-day breakfast, sushi, pizza, sandwiches and more. 81 S. Elliott Rd.; 919-968-1983 Il Palio Ristorante at The Siena Hotel N.C.’s only AAA Four Diamond Italian restaurant. 1505 E. Franklin St.; 919-918-2545 La Hacienda Burritos, salads, quesadillas, tacos. 1813 Fordham Blvd.; 919-967-0207


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D I N I N G

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NEWS BITES GIVE BACK • PORCH will host their December Sort and Open House at St. Thomas More Catholic Church on December 5. Enjoy cocoa and cookies, pick up a copy of “Planting Hope” and learn more about this food-based nonprofit. • Help out Meals on Wheels Chapel Hill-Carrboro this season by participating in their holiday raffle, donating books, magazines, personalized cards, applesauce, fruit cups and homemade art projects to brighten the clients’ days, or volunteer on the delivery team. • This year, give the gift of giving by donating to Carrboro-based TABLE in honor of someone on your list (tablenc.org/make-a-donation), helping the organization continue providing food to hungry children every week.

The Loop Pizza Grill Pizzas, soups, salads, sandwiches, burgers. Eastgate Crossing; 919-969-7112

Tandoor Indian Restaurant Traditional Indian cuisine, vegan options. 1301 E. Franklin St.; 919-967-6622

Market Street Coffeehouse Coffee, pastries and more. 227 S. Elliott Rd.; 919-968-8993

Twisted Noodles Thai noodle soups, pan-fried noodles. Eastgate Crossing; 919-933-9933

Min Ga Korean cuisine. 116 Old Durham Rd.; 919-933-1773

University Place

Monterrey Traditional Mexican cuisine. 237 S. Elliott Rd.; 919-969-8750

Alfredo’s Pizza Villa Pizzas, calzones, salads, subs, pasta, desserts. 919-968-3424

Olio & Aceto Brunch and lunch options inspired by Blue Sky Oil and Vinegar products. 400 S. Elliott Rd.; 919-903-8958

City Kitchen Wholesome American fare with a sophisticated twist. 919-928-8200

Red Pepper Chinese restaurant offering traditional Szechuan dishes. 1704 E. Franklin St.; 919-968-3488 SQUID’S Fresh seafood options include woodgrilled fillets, live Maine lobster, fried seafood and oysters. 1201 N. Fordham Blvd. (15-501); 919-942-8757; squidsrestaurant.com Sunrise Biscuit Kitchen Drive-thru biscuits, sandwiches, burgers, hot dogs. 1305 E. Franklin St.; 919-933-1324

Maple View Mobile Ice cream outpost of the Hillsborough dairy farm. 919-244-1949 Red Bowl Sushi, bento boxes. 919-918-7888 TRILOGY American cafe featuring innovative twists on classic dishes. Silverspot Cinema; 919-357-9888; silverspot.net Village Burgers Gourmet burgers with sides like sweet potato fries and tater tots. 919-240-4008

Magone Italian Grill & Pizza

ARTISAN HAND-CRAFTED | WOOD-FIRED LOCAL, FARM-FRESH INGREDIENTS

NOW OPEN AT VERANDA AT BRIAR CHAPEL 79 FALLING SPRINGS DRIVE CHAPEL HILL, NC

Ready-made family meals and catering trays available.

919.240.4104 WWW.CAPPSPIZZERIA.COM

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Gl e n n L e n n oxS h oppi n gCe n t e r 1201Ra l e i g hRd. , Ch a pe l Hi l l www. j uj ube r e s t a ur a nt . c om

Timberlyne Shopping Center 1129 Weaver Dairy Rd. | Suite F 919.904.7393


D I N I N G

JOYOUS COOKING

M O R E T O N N E A L I S A N A U T H O R A N D I N T E R I O R D E S I G N E R W H O L I V E S I N C H A P E L H I L L . S H E I S A L I F E L O N G F O O D I E , H A V I N G C O - F O U N D E D L A R É S I D E N C E I N 1 9 7 6 .

Gifts for Food Lovers With the exception of homemade goodies, I can’t imagine a better holiday gift than a cookbook or a book about food. Here are a few of my favorites of the year, written or published in our own backyard.

menu (the decadent macaroni au gratin!) and kitchen secrets, but the best part is learning about Ashley’s own background and philosophy, “Give until it hurts.” This big-hearted community leader should run for governor.

“Deep Run Roots” by Vivian Howard This is a thick, handsome tome that reflects the charm of Vivian, familiar to many of us from her TV show, “A Chef’s Life.” The chef/owner of the Kinston restaurant, Chef & the Farmer, shares stories and recipes using familiar Southern ingredients, enhanced by her own imagination and professional techniques. Having just made her brilliant rendition of tomato pie, I predict this will be a best-seller, for good reason.

“Barbecue” by John Shelton Reed John’s recipe for a good cookbook is a combination of cultural history and classic recipes, liberally seasoned with his characteristically wry wit. The former UNC sociology professor mixes his ingredients together with a burning passion for his subject. This is a terrific gift for folks who think they know everything about ’cue as well as those who need an introduction to N.C.’s most beloved and controversial foods.

“Poole’s: Recipes and Stories from a Modern Diner” by Ashley Christensen “Poole’s” showcases the talent, warmth and generosity of Ashley Christensen. The James Beard Award-winning chef pioneered downtown Raleigh’s nowlively dining scene when she boldly opened Poole’s, and later, a large stable of successful restaurants, each one unique. In these pages you will find extraordinary recipes from the diner’s

“Learn to Cook 25 Southern Classics 3 Ways” by Jennifer Brulé Its unsexy title actually describes the book perfectly, but doesn’t do justice to its liveliness and originality. Inspired by living and eating both in the South and in Europe, the entertaining Jennifer offers varied perspectives on familiar dishes. Each chapter includes one traditional Southern recipe, e.g., classic deviled eggs, followed by one contemporary

recipe (herbed olive oil deviled eggs) and one international (truffled devils). The fun is deciding which to make. “The Carolina Table: North Carolina Writers on Food” Edited by Randall Kenan “A buffet of North Carolina food stories” by Daniel Wallace, Lee Smith, Celia Rivenbark, Jill McCorkle, Bill Smith, Nancy McDermott and many others, including yours truly. CHM

Devils on Horseback In “Bacon,” another book I love, Fred Thompson’s recipe for Devils on Horseback uses just two ingredients, bacon and prunes. I haven’t yet tried his version, but here’s a familiar variant of that 1950s-era crowd-pleaser that’s perfect for holiday parties. Serve it with a Garden and Gun Club, a bourbon cocktail from “Poole’s.” 16 dates 8 slices hickory-smoked bacon, cut into halves

3 oz. blue cheese, more or less Slice along the long side of each date. Open it up and stuff with a small amount of blue cheese. Close and wrap with one-half bacon slice. Secure with a toothpick. Place on a cookie sheet covered with parchment paper. Bake at 350 F for 15 minutes, then flip with tongs and bake another 5 to 10 minutes until bacon is browned. Serve warm. CHM

PHOTO BY JAMES STEFIUK

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Weathervane Shrimp and grits, sweet potato fries and other gourmet takes on classic flavors. 919-929-9466

Timberlyne/Chapel Hill North Area

The Bagel Bar More than 20 homemade bagel varieties. 630 Weaver Dairy Rd., Ste. 109; 919-929-7700

Allen & Son Barbecue N.C. barbecue. 6203 Millhouse Rd. (N.C. 86 N.); 919-942-7576

Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard (Airport Road)

The Pig Barbecue, fried tofu, collards. 630 Weaver Dairy Rd., Ste. 101; 919-942-1133

Farm House Restaurant Steaks, salads, potatoes. 6004 Millhouse Rd. (N.C. 86 N.); 919-929-5727

Hunam Chinese Restaurant Cantonese cuisine. 790 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-967-6133

Queen of Sheba Ethiopian cuisine. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-932-4986

Joe Van Gogh Coffee and pastries. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-967-2002

KITCHEN Bistro-style dining with a seasonal menu that always includes mussels. 764 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-537-8167; kitchenchapelhill.com

Sage Vegetarian Cafe Vegetarian fare. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-968-9266 YOPOP CHAPEL HILL Frozen yogurt shop featuring 14 flavors made daily and 36 toppings including fresh fruit. Bubble tea and smoothies. 1129 Weaver Dairy Rd.; 919-537-8229

MAGONE Italian Grill and Pizza. 1129 Weaver Dairy Rd., Ste. F; 919-904-7393

Lucha Tigre Latin-Asian cuisine and sake tequila bar. 746 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-904-7326 Market Street Coffee & Ice Cream Local coffee, ice cream, pastries and sandwiches. 2805 Homestead Rd.; 919-960-6247

Margaret’s Cantina Creative Mexican appetizers and entrees. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-942-4745

The Root Cellar (formerly Foster’s Market) Sandwiches, prepared salads, desserts and more. Beer and wine only; outdoor dining. 750 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-967-3663

Oishii Specialty rolls, teriyaki, stir-fry, sushi. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-932-7002

N.C. 54 East/Raleigh Road Amante Gourmet Pizza Create-yourown pizzas. 6209-B Falconbridge Rd.; 919-493-0904

Pop’s Pizzeria Pizzas, calzones, stromboli, pasta. 1822 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-932-1040

Sal’s Ristorante Calzones, pizza, pasta, sandwiches. 2811 Homestead Rd.; 919-932-5125

Rasa Indi-Chinese Indian and Chinese cuisine. 1826 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-929-2199

BIN 54 Steaks, seafood and other fine American food. Everything made in-house. Glen Lennox Shopping Center; 919-969-1155

★ ★ ★

★ ★ ★

★ ★ ★

★ ★ ★

★ ★ ★

★ ★ ★

carrboro carrboro carrboro ★

since ★since ★

CROOK’S CORNER

“Long known for both its sumptuous take on Southern comfort food and as a gathering spot for the city’s abundant creative community...” —Garden & Gun

since since since

Thank You, Chapel Hill, for Voting for Us!

★ ★ ★

Eat. Eat. Drink. carrboro Drink. carrboro carrboro Be merry. BEST Be merry. .taE Eat. .okrno birrrD Drink. ac carrboro . y r r e m e B Be merry. 324 W. RosemarY St., Chapel Hill ★

since

ecnis

since

orobrrac

carrboro

ecnis

since

WINNER

On the menu: Crook’s classics & seasonals Full bar includes local beers on tap Recipient of a James Beard Foundation’s America’s Classics Award

OF CHAPEL HILL 2016

919.929.2263

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acmecarrboro.com

private parties & catering

CROOK’S CORNER • 610 West Franklin St, Chapel Hill

Reservations accepted. Walk-ins welcome www.crookscorner.com • 919 929 7643 Dinner Tues-Sun at 5:30 pm • Sun Brunch 10:30 am-2 pm


D I N I N G

Brenz Pizza Specialty pizzas, subs, salads. 3120 Environ Way, East 54; 919-636-4636

Thai Palace Soup, curries, pad thai. Glenwood Square Shopping Center; 919-967-5805

Coco Bean Coffee Shop Locally owned coffee shop offering Carrboro Coffee Roasters coffee and a variety of baked goods. 1114 Environ Way; 919-883-9003

The Egg & I French toast, pancakes and specialty omelets. 1101 Environ Way, East 54; 919-537-8488

ELEMENTS Cuisine combining classical and modern Asian and European cooking techniques; check out the wine bar with full menu next door. 2110 Environ Way, East 54; 919-537-8780; elementsofchapelhill.com

JUJUBE Eclectic, modern cuisine inspired by the classic flavors of China and Vietnam. Glen Lennox Shopping Center; 919-960-0555; jujuberestaurant.com Nantucket Grill & Bar Clam chowder, lobster rolls. 5925 Farrington Rd.; 919-402-0077 Raaga Authentic Indian delicacies like curry and masala. 3140 Environ Way, East 54; 919-240-7490

Southern Village Captain Poncho’s Tacos, quesadillas, burritos. 708 Market St.; 919-697-2237 La Vita Dolce Pastries, sorbet, gelato. 610 Market St.; 919-968-1635

Tobacco Road Sports Cafe Burgers, salads and sandwiches. 1118 Environ Way, East 54; 919-537-8404

PAZZO! Italian cuisine, takeout pizza. 700 Market St.; 919-929-9984; pazzo-restaurant.com

Meadowmont Village Brixx Wood Fired Pizza Specialty pizzas and salads. 501 Meadowmont Village Circle; 919-929-1942 Cafe Carolina & Bakery Salads, sandwiches, breakfast. 601 Meadowmont Village Circle; 919-945-8811 CHRONIC TACOS Mexican grill utilizing authentic recipes. 504 Meadowmont Village Circle; 984-999-4803; eatchronictacos.com Market Street Coffee & Ice Cream Locally sourced coffee, ice cream and pastries. 503 Meadowmont Village Circle; 919-929-1667

G U I D E

Rasa Malaysia Authentic Malaysian dishes. 410 Market St.; 984-234-0256 Town Hall Grill Sandwiches, steak, seafood. 410 Market St.; 919-960-8696 Weaver Street Market Hot bar and salad bar for breakfast, lunch and dinner. 716 Market St.; 919-929-2009 Governors Club Bean & Barrel Coffee shop, bar, grill. 50100 Governors Dr.; 919-967-9990 Ciao Bella Pizzeria Pizzas, pastas, sandwiches. 1716 Farrington Point Rd.; 919-932-4440

Taste of the South

wood-fired pizza housemade pastas sammies • salads • desserts

Porch Dining

RADIUS

112 N. Churton Street Downtown Historic Hillsborough 919.245.0601 WINNER

2016 New Coffee and Juice Bar

NOW OPEN

2011-2016

BEST Voted Best Comfort Food/Southern Food! OF CHAPEL HILL 2016

Meats • Chicken • BBQ/Ribs Chicken & Dumplings • Vegetables • Casserole Brunswick Stew Gumbo Breakfast items include Pork Chops • Chicken & Gravy • Catfish Chicken & Waffles • Fried Green Tomatoes Sweet Potato Pancakes & Biscuits

Mama Dip’s Kitchen

408 W. Rosemary St., Chapel Hill 942-5837 mamadips.com 410 W. Franklin St., Chapel Hill, NC 27516

radiuspizzeria.net

mediterraneandeli.com

M-Sat 8am-9:30pm • Sun 8am-9pm Breakfast served daily M-F till 11am, Sun till 1pm Sat and Sun Brunch

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Tarantini Italian cuisine. 50160 Governors Dr. (Governors Village); 919-942-4240 Briar Chapel Alberello Café & Market Florentine sandwiches, housemade pastas, from scratch desserts and more. 72 Chapelton Ct.; 984-234-3017 BREAKAWAY CAFE A casual “cycling-inspired” cafe serving breakfast, lunch, dinner and small plates, along with Counter Culture coffee, beer, wine and Maple View ice cream. 58 Chapelton Ct., Ste. 100; breakawaync.co; 984-234-3010

CAPP’S PIZZERIA Artisan pizzas that are hand-crafted and wood-fired, utilizing local ingredients. LIFE’S TOO SHORT FAKE PIZZA 79FOR Falling Springs Dr.; 919-240-4104; cappspizzeria.com THIS IS THE

REAL DEAL

Town Hall Burger & Beer Burgers, fries, salads and beer. 984-234-3504 DECIDE FOR YOURSELF

COMING THIS FALL 2016 TO VERANDA AT BRIAR CHAPEL 79 FALLING SPRINGS DRIVE CHAPEL HILL, NC

WWW.CAPPSPIZZERIA.COM

Happy Holidays!

Innovative Italian and Mediterranean Cuisine Serving Lunch & Dinner Private Dining Rooms for Parties, Receptions and Special Events Half-Price Wine on Sundays 306 W. Franklin St, Chapel Hill 919.969.6600 | vespanc.com facebook.com/vespach

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CARRBORO Downtown ACME FOOD & BEVERAGE CO. Soups, salads, seafood and entrees with a Southern touch. 110 E. Main St.; 919-929-2263; acmecarrboro.com AKAI HANA Japanese cuisine including sushi, tempura and teriyaki; 206 W. Main St.; 919-942-6848 Armadillo Grill Tex-Mex burritos, en­chiladas, tacos, nachos. 120 E. Main St.; 919-929-4669 Cafe Carrboro (formerly Jessee’s) Lunch and breakfast served all day, house-roasted espresso and coffees. 401 E. Main St.; 919-929-0445 Carrburritos Burritos, tacos, nachos and margaritas. 711 W. Rosemary St.; 919-933-8226 Country Junction Restaurant Simple southern classics. 404 W. Weaver St.; 919-929-2462

GLASSHALFULL Mediterraneaninspired food and wine; outdoor dining; all ABC permits. 106 S. Greensboro St.; 919-967-9784; glasshalfullcarrboro.com Gourmet Kingdom Sichuan cuisine. 301 E. Main St.; 919-932-7222 Jade Palace Sichuan and Chinese. 103 E. Main St.; 919-942-0006 Krave Kava and other exotic root and tea beverages. 105 W. Main St.; 919-408-9596 Market Street Coffee & Ice Cream Locally sourced coffee, ice cream and pastries. 100 E. Weaver St.; 919-960-6776 Milltown Pub fare with an extensive beer list. 307 E. Main St.; 919-968-2460 Neal’s Deli Traditional deli fare. 100-C E. Main St.; 919-967-2185 Open Eye Cafe Locally roasted Carrboro Coffee and espresso, tea, beer and wine. 101 S. Greensboro St.; 919-968-9410 Pizzeria Mercato Pizza, antipasto, soups and fritti. 408 W. Weaver St.; 919-967-2277


D I N I N G

Provence Southern French cuisine. 203 W. Weaver St.; 919-967-5008 Spotted Dog Appetizers, soups, salads, entrees, desserts. 111 E. Main St.; 919-933-1117 Steel String Brewery Craft beer and bluegrass music. 106-A S. Greensboro St.; 919-240-7215 Tyler’s Restaurant and Taproom Specialty import beers on tap and traditional pub fare. 102 E. Main St.; 919-929-6881 Wings Over 18 flavors of wings. 313 E. Main St.; 919-537-8271

Rise Biscuits and Donuts Carrboro Biscuits, doughnuts and coffee. 310 E. Main St., Ste. 100; 919-929-5115 The Shoppe Bar and Meatball Kitchen Meatballs, sliders, sides. 370 E. Main St; 919-240-5851 Carr Mill Mall B-SIDE LOUNGE Small plates like flatbread, bacon-wrapped dates and fondue. Plus inspired cocktails. 919-904-7160; b-sidelounge.com Carrboro Pizza Oven Pizza, calzones. 919-904-7336

East Main Square Amante Gourmet Pizza Create-your-own pizzas. 300 E. Main St.; 919-929-3330

CROSSTIES BBQ A variety of barbecue, sides and scratch-made desserts. 919-904-7160; crosstiesbbq.com

Bella’s International Cuisine Homemade dishes like pumpkin ravioli and pistachio-crusted grouper. 360 E. Main St.; 919-903-9963 Esperanza Empanada & Tequila Savory and sweet empanadas, 50 kinds of tequila. 370 E. Main St.; 919-617-1674

Elmo’s Diner Homemade Southern and American classics. 919-929-2909

Tandem Farm-to-table, modern American cuisine with full service bar. 919-240-7937 Weaver Street Market Hot bar and salad bar for breakfast, lunch and dinner. 919-929-0010 N.C. 54 West/Carrboro Plaza Anna Maria’s Pizzeria Italian cuisine. Carrboro Plaza; 919-929-1877 Hong Kong Chinese Restaurant Classic Chinese dishes. 602 Jones Ferry Rd.; 919-942-0850

Monterrey Traditional Mexican cuisine. 104 NC 54 (Carrboro Plaza); 919-903-9919

BEST

C AT E R I N G Local

VENABLE ROTISSERIE BISTRO Upscale comfort food with a heavy emphasis on locally sourced and seasonal ingredients; all ABC permits. 919-904-7160; venablebistro.com

WINNER

C H R G Affordable

Oasis Organic coffee, tea, beer and wine. 919-904-7343

Fiesta Grill Burritos, chimichangas, fajitas, tacos. 3307 N.C. 54 W.; 919-928-9002

Hickory Tavern Burgers, sandwiches and build-your-own salads. 370-110 E. Main St.; 919-942-7417

Dependable

G U I D E

OF CHAPEL HILL 2016

The Home of Incredible Crêpes - Coffee - Bubble Tea

Happy Holidays!

From your friends at

WINNER

BEST EL OF CHAP 2016

HILL

BESTRATED S CRÊPE IN THE LE TRIANG SPANKY’S SQUID’S

411 WEST MEZ

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919-941-1630 events@chapelhillrestaurantgroup.com ChapelHillRestaurantGroup.com

140 West Franklin St., Chapel Hill Convenient Parking Other 2 locations: North Hills & Hillsborough St, Raleigh

919.391.9999 | crepetraditions.com M-Th 8a-9p F-Sat 8a-11p Sun 8a-2p

Italian Pizzeria III 508 West Franklin Street, Chapel Hill 919-968-4671 • italianpizzeria3.com

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Wingman Wings and hot dogs. 104 N.C. 54 W.; 919-928-9200

The Goat Panini, cheeses, pastries. Fearrington Village Center; 919-545-5717

S&T Soda Shoppe Soda fountain, American fare. 85 Hillsboro St.; 919-545-0007

PITTSBORO

Downtown

Starrlight Mead Tastings of honey wines and honey. 480 Hillsboro St.; 919-533-6314

Cole Park Plaza/U.S. 15-501/ Fearrington Village

Chatham Marketplace Sandwiches, baked goods. 480 Hillsboro St.; 919-542-2643

Allen & Son Barbecue N.C. barbecue. 5650 U.S 15-501; 919-542-2294

The City Tap Classic bar food. 89 Hillsboro St.; 919-545-0562

Carolina Brewery The fifth-oldest brewery in the state. 120 Lowes Dr.; 919-545-2330

Elizabeth’s Pizzas, calzones, sandwiches, pasta. 160 Hillsboro St.; 919-545-9292

The Fearrington Granary Small plates, burgers, grill options. Fearrington Village Center; 919-542-2121

The Modern Life Deli & Drinks New York bagels, sandwiches, pizza, coffee. 46 Sanford Rd.; 919-533-6883

The Fearrington House Restaurant Fine-dining French cuisine. Fearrington Village Center; 919-542-2121

OakLeaf Farm-to-table menu specializing in French and Italian cuisine; kids menu; all ABC permits. 480 Hillsboro St.; 919-533-6303

Fig & Honey Southern and Mediterranean fare, from biscuits to kebabs. 141 Chatham Downs Dr., Ste. 201; 919-240-5740

The Phoenix Bakery Small-batch and seasonal baked goods and specialty cakes.  84 Hillsboro St.; 919-542-4452

Moon Asian Bistro An Asian fusion restaurant offering sushi, Chinese dishes like sweet and sour chicken, Thai curry dishes, rice and noodles. 111 Knox Way. Ste. 100; 919-869-7894.

Pittsboro Roadhouse & General Store Hearty American entrees, burgers and salads; outdoor dining; beer and wine only. 39 West St.; 919-542-2432

Virlie’s Grill Soups, salads, burgers, sandwiches. 58 Hillsboro St.; 919-542-0376

HILLSBOROUGH Antonia’s Italian cuisine. 101 N. Churton St.; 919-643-7722 Bona Fide Sandwich Co. Sandwiches, salads and bowls. 104 N. Churton St.; 919-245-7869 Hillsborough BBQ Company Barbecue plates and sandwiches, sides and deserts. 236 S. Nash St.; 919-732-4647 Hot Tin Roof Games and specialty cocktails; 115 W. Margaret Ln.; 919-296-9113 Jay’s Chicken Shack Chicken, buffalo wings, breakfast biscuits. 646 N. Churton St.; 919-732-3591 LaPlace Cajun cuisine. 111 N. Churton St.; 919-245-0041

YOU

Are following us? For Weekend Events, Delicious Dishes Biz News and more...

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D I N I N G

Maple View Farm Country Store Homemade ice cream and milk. 6900 Rocky Ridge Rd.; 919-960-5535 Panciuto Southern Italian cuisine. 110 S. Churton St.; 919-732-6261 RADIUS Wood-fired pizzas, housemade pastas, sandwiches, salads and desserts. Outdoor dining; all ABC permits. 112 N. Churton St.; 919-2450601; radiuspizzeria.net Saratoga Grill New England-style cuisine; 108 S. Churton St.; 919-732-2214 Village Diner Southern diner, buffet. 600 W. King St.; 919-732-7032 Vintage Revival Tea Room & Treasures Tea and scones. 125 E. King St.; 919-644-8000

G U I D E

ALSO CHECK OUT THESE DURHAM RESTAURANTS… Alley Twenty Six This cocktail-centric bar offers a menu complete with yellowfin tuna sliders and meat and cheese plates with selections like housemate duck pastrami. 320 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-213-1267; alleytwentysix.com

meats and cheeses. 111 N. Corcoran St.; 919-956-6760; countinghousenc.com Denny’s Diner fare. 7021 N.C. 751, Ste. 901; 919-908-1006; dennys.com

Dos Perros Sophisticated Mexican cuisine Bar Virgile Artfully crafted beverages and small plates. 105 S. Magnum St.; 919-973-3000; barvirgile.com

like pork carnitas, shrimp a la diabla and chile relleno. 200 N. Mangum St.; 919-9562750; dosperrosrestaurant.com

Basan Specialty sushi, modern Japanese cuisine and sake. 359 Blackwell St., Ste. 220; 919-797-9728; basanrestaurant.com

Fairview Dining Room Washington Duke Inn’s AAA Four Diamond, Forbes Travel Guide Four-Star rated restaurant. 919-493-6699; washingtondukeinn.com

Bleu Olive High-quality comfort food with a Mediterranean flair. 1821 Hillandale Rd.; 919-383-8502; bleuolivebistro.com

Weaver Street Market Hot bar for breakfast, lunch and dinner. 228 S. Churton St.; 919-245-5050

blu seafood and bar Upscale seafood restaurant featuring innovative regional classics. 2002 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-286-9777; bluseafoodandbar.com

Wooden Nickel Pub Pub fare. 105 N. Churton St.; 919-643-2223

Counting House Upscale restaurant featuring locally sourced entrees, as well as small plates featuring oysters, shellfish and

Geer Street Garden Simple, downhome fare in a cozy atmosphere. They make a mean “Dark and Stormy,” and be sure to order “The Pile” to split with friends! 644 Foster St.; 919-688-2900; geerstreetgarden.com

Juju Asian fusion tapas including selections like chicken fried oysters and crispy wild boar dumplings. 737 Ninth St.; 919-286-3555; jujudurham.com

Fresh. Local. Italian Inspired. open 7 days a week 919.929.9984 reservations 919.929.9991 pizzeria

504 Meadowmont Village Circle 984.999.4803

eatchronictacos.com 700 Market Street, chapel hill

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D I N I N G

G U I D E

Mad Hatter Cafe & Bakeshop Scratch-made pastries and cakes, salads, sandwiches. 1802 W. Main St.; 919-286-1987; madhatterbakeshop.com Makus Empanadas A variety of meat, veggie and cheese empanadas, with vegetarian and vegan options. 1125 W. N.C. 54, Ste. 304; 919-390-7525; makusempanadas.com Mez Contemporary Mexican Creative Mexican dishes with a fresh twist. 5410 Page Rd.; 919-941-1630; mezdurham.com Motto New American cuisine with selections like zucchini fries, rib-eye and barbecue shrimp. 605 W. Main St.; 984-219-1965; mottodurham.com NanaSteak Offers various cuts of beef and steaks, plus other meats and pastas. 345 Blackwell St.; 919-282-1183; nanasteak.com Nana’s Restaurant Seasonal dishes influenced by Southern, French and Italian

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cuisine. 2514 University Dr.; 919-493-8545; nanasdurham.com NanaTaco Inventive taqueria that features locally produced meats and veggies. 2512 University Dr.; 919-489-8226; nanataco. com Page Road Grill Traditional American dishes. 5416 Page Rd.; 919-908-8900; pageroadgrill. com Porchetta Slow-roasted Italian-style pork sandwiches and sides. Southpoint; 919-607-7419; porchettardu.com Primal Food & Spirits Wood-fired local meat dishes with seasonal sides and craft cocktails. 202 W. N.C. 54; 919-248-3000; primalfoodandspirits.com Saladelia Cafe Espresso and smoothie bar, pastries, gourmet sandwiches. 2424 Erwin Rd., 406 Blackwell St. & 4201 University Dr.; saladelia.com

Saltbox Seafood Joint Local seafood that is delivered fresh from the Carolina coast. 608 N. Mangum St.; 919-908-8970; saltboxseafoodjoint.com Smallcakes Twelve signature cupcake flavors, as well as seasonal specials. 4711 Hope Valley Rd.; 919-937-2922; smallcakesnc.com The Boot A neighborhood ItalianAmerican Restaurant serving soups, salads, sandwiches, pastas and traditional Italian entrees. 2501 University Dr.; 919-294-8383; thebootdurham.com The Original Q Shack “BBQ tender as a mother’s love.” 2510 University Dr.; 919402-4227; theqshackoriginal.com

Treforni Wood-fired pizza and sandwiches including traditional options like Margherita, as well as more inspired options like the prosciutto arugula pizza and the rosetta sandwich. 1125 W. N.C. 54; 919-973-0922; treforni.com


E N G A G E M E N T

BATES & RAYFIELD BY ALEXIS ALLSTON PHOTOGRAPHY BY HEBA SAL AMA HEBASAL AMA.COM

J

Jared “Jay” Bates and Stephen Rayfield met the old-fashioned way:

online dating. Their first date was two years ago on Thanksgiving Eve. The plans were last minute, as Stephen had already committed to helping out at his friend’s bagel shop that evening. Once Stephen assured Jay that he did not always smell like everything bagel, the two hit it off over wine and conversation. Jay completely surprised Stephen with the proposal during what was supposed to be Jay’s own birthday party at the couple’s home in Chapel Hill. In front of 60 of their closest friends, Jay dropped to one knee and popped the question while the cake and all the decorations were changed out from birthday-themed to engagement-themed. The group celebrated with Stephen’s favorite champagne from Paris, and Jay’s birthday party ended up being one of the most memorable nights of their lives. Stephen and Jay will have their wedding and reception on May 27, 2017 at

Governors Club. Stephen is a teacher at McDougle Middle School, while

DiamondsDirect.com Your love. Our Passion.

Jay is the Senior Business Director for North America at ALK-Abello. CHM

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W E D D I N G S

YUSKO & MADDEN

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BY L AUREN MOODY PHOTOGRAPHY BY PERRY VAILE PHOTOGRAPHY PERRY VAILE.COM

Chapel Hill native and East Chapel Hill High grad Sara Yusko first crossed paths with John Madden while studying abroad in college. The Notre Dame students began dating after graduation in 2013 and their relationship went the distance as Sara worked to obtain her nursing degree from Duke and John began his career in California. Two years later, while running a half marathon with her mom in San Luis Obispo, Sara was shocked to see John standing at the finish line with a ring. During the wedding weekend, John and his groomsmen took a tour of the Dean Dome while the ladies enjoyed a bridal luncheon at 411 West. The couple was married at St. Thomas More Catholic Church and celebrated after at The Carolina Inn. The reception featured dancing, gelato from Sugarland and latenight Bojangles, making for an unforgettable evening. “I really

loved being surrounded by our friends and family and watching them have so much fun,” Sara recalls. “Everyone was dancing until midnight and I remember feeling so happy and so content during the last dance of the night in the beautiful Old Well [Room].” The night never ended as they headed to He’s Not Here for the after party. Sara and John reside in Santa Monica where Sara works as a pediatric oncology nurse and John works as a research analyst at an investment firm. CHM

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W E D D I N G S

ROOT & PORTER

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BY ROBIN O’LUANAIGH PHOTOGRAPHY BY FAITH TEASLEY FAITHTEASLEY.COM

Grant Porter and Chapel Hill High School grad Hanna Root

first met in 2013 at a UNC men’s soccer alumni event at The Crunkleton. Hanna tagged along with her brother, Chipper, a former player for the UNC men’s soccer team, and Grant was the varsity team’s assistant coach. Hanna thought she’d stay for only a bit, but after meeting Grant, she stayed for longer than she expected. The two UNC grads hit it off that night, and they’ve been together ever since. On Easter morning in 2015, Grant and Hanna were taking their daily walk with their golden retriever, Cooper, when Grant suggested they go into a gazebo they passed by every day. “When we went into the gazebo, there was a vase of flowers and a card waiting,” says Hanna. “Then Grant got on one knee and asked me to marry him.” The couple was married on May 28, 2016 at The Forest Theatre. Riding to their reception at the historic Horace Williams House, they savored their first moment alone as a married couple. Hanna is a second-grade teacher at Morris Grove Elementary School, and Grant is still the assistant varsity soccer coach at UNC. They recently bought a house on Kenan Street, which Hanna’s dad, Bo Root, and his company, Bo Root Builders, helped remodel. The couple “can almost see The Crunkleton from [their] new house.” CHM

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W E D D I N G S

BLAIR & ANDERSON

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BY MAT T COUCH PHOTOGRAPHY BY ADELE GIBSON ADELELEEPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

Chapel Hill native Scott Anderson met Caroline Blair of Trinity, N.C., in 2011 and the couple soon began to date. At his family’s Christmas party in 2014, Scott enlisted the help of his brother (and future best man) Will Anderson to pull off the proposal. Will gathered the Blair and Anderson families to take a group photo and just as Will counted to three, Scott took to one knee and asked the unsuspecting Caroline to marry him. The video of the engagement has tens of thousands of hits on YouTube. The wedding weekend took place at Childress Vineyards in Lexington, N.C. with the rehearsal dinner hosted by John and Leigh Anderson, and reception hosted by Ed and Patricia Blair. After the ceremony, the hundreds of guests were surprised by elaborate choreography starting with Caroline and her father’s dance and wrapping up with Caroline and Scott dancing to classics such as “The Time of My Life” from “Dirty Dancing.” Partygoers told Caroline and Scott theirs was one of the best weddings they had ever been to. The couple resides in Durham. CHM

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Chapel Hill Magazine December 2016