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CHAPELHILL NOVEMBER 2015

CHAPELHILLMAGAZINE.COM

OUR 3RD ANNUAL

DESIGN ISSUE

THE CREATIVE CLASS MEET SIX LOCAL ARTISANS, INCLUDING ACCLAIMED STICK SCULPTURE ARTIST

PATRICK DOUGHERTY PAGE 30


OYSTER PERPETUAL 39

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ThankYou YOU DONATE. YOU SHOP. YOU VOLUNTEER.

YOU MAKE A DIFFERENCE. Since the mid-1980s, the local Habitat for Humanity affiliates of Durham and Orange counties have built more than 650 houses and another 370 internationally.

25 OF THOSE HOUSES

came from the profits of the ReStore in just the past

4 YE ARS.

CHAPELHILL November 2015 chapelhillmagazine.com S E N I O R V P, P U B L I S H I N G

Rory Kelly Gillis

rory@chapelhillmagazine.com V P, C O N T E N T

Andrea Griffith Cash

andrea@chapelhillmagazine.com C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R

Kevin Brown

S E N I O R A S S O C I AT E E D I T O R

Amanda MacLaren

A S S I S TA N T E D I T O R

Jessica Stringer

ART DIRECTOR

Sarah Arneson

PHOTOGRAPHER

Briana Brough

GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Christy Wright

E D I T O R I A L A S S I S TA N T

Virginia Robinson INTERNS

Kayla Anderson, Schyler Martin, Claire Sears, Lily Stephens CONTRIBUTORS

Jessie Ammons, Walter Mears, Moreton Neal, Heba Salama, James Stefiuk ADVERTISING

Melissa Crane

melissa@chapelhillmagazine.com

Ellen Farber

ellenfarber@chapelhillmagazine.com

Kem Johnson

kem@chapelhillmagazine.com

Flann McKinnon

flann@chapelhillmagazine.com C O R P O R AT E

Dan Shannon President/CEO

danshannon@chapelhillmagazine.com

DONATE. SHOP. VOLUNTEER Monday–Saturday: 10 am – 6 pm READERS’ FAVORITE

BRONZE WINNER

BEST OF CHAPEL HILL 2015

Serving Durham and Orange Counties

5501 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd (just off I-40 at the 15-501 exit) M–Sat 10–6 | 919.403.8668 | www.restoredurhamorange.org Donating large items? FREE PICKUP SERVICE: 919.354.0892

Ellen Shannon Vice President Amy Bell Business Manager Jenny Hunt Marketing Associate Caroline Kornegay Administrative and Operations Assistant Grace Beason Events Coordinator Match du Toit Distribution Chapel Hill Magazine is published 8 times per year by Shannon Media, Inc. 1777 Fordham Blvd., Suite 105, Chapel Hill, NC 27514 tel 919.933.1551 fax 919.933.1557 Subscriptions $38 for 2 years – subscribe at chapelhillmagazine.com

2014 BEST REGIONAL MAGAZINE (CONSUMER)

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Š 2015 Porsche Cars North America, Inc. Porsche recommends seat belt usage and observance of traffic laws at all times.

Porsche Southpoint Now Open 866-524-1882 122 Kentington Drive, Durham Southpoint.Porschedealer.com Sales Hours: 9am to 7pm, M-F and 9am to 6pm, Sat Service Hours: 7:30am to 6pm, M-F and 9am to 5pm, Sat

STILL IN CHAPEL HILL. STILL DELIVERING THE PROMISE. STILL SERVICING ALL MAKES AND MODELS.

15-501, Chapel Hill

We Service All Makes and Models

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L E T T E R

F R O M

O U R

V P

O F

C O N T E N T

W HANDIWORK

WHAT I DON’T TALK ABOUT MUCH IN THIS SPACE —

counterintuitive as it may be — is what goes into making a magazine. Just like the endeavors of the talented people featured beginning on page 30, our line of work is a business, but also an art. We’re constantly balancing the two. We have to think about what the consumer — the reader — wants, but also what we want. What represents our brand, our mission? What creative path do we want to go down next? In our office, we use our hands a lot less frequently than folks in the print industry used to. There are no waxers or typesetting machines; instead, we use the Adobe Creative Suite and our file server to piece this together, page by page. That’s why I’m fascinated by people who sculpt, make furniture, sew leather bags, sketch a piece of art. The process of creating is so satisfying. It’s why I still love to take first passes at columns like this one by hand from time to time. There’s something to be said for having a pen in your grip, grazing the paper as you change lines. (Related: It’s also why I, and so many others, still prefer reading print versions of magazines and books rather than their electronic counterparts.) So, in a way, this is a very meta issue: A group of creatives, including Creative Director Kevin Brown, Art Director Sarah Arneson and Photographer Briana Brough, going through their creative processes to pay respects to some very esteemed members of our community’s creative class. CHM

ANDREA GRIFFITH CASH @andreagcash

T H E

C O V E R

P H O T O

B Y

4

B R I A N A

B R O U G H

chapelhillmagazine.com November 2015

andrea@chapelhillmagazine.com


Make your season a little

merrier.

With everything you need for the perfect holiday—plus food to fuel your shopping spree—there’s no better place to shop this season.

Boston Market

Mill House Properties

Bruegger’s Bagel Bakery

The Pink Pearl, a Lilly Pulitzer Signature Store

Chico’s Comfortable Soles Eastgate BP EcoLogic

shoppingeastgate.com EASTGATE IS LOCATED ON EAST FRANKLIN STREET AT THE 15-501 BYPASS A property of Federal Realty Investment Trust federalrealty.com NYSE: FRT

Performance Bicycle Quiksilver

TCBY Ten Thousand Villages Town and Country Hardware

Rite Aid

Trader Joe’s

Rose Nails

Twisted Noodles

Jos. A. Bank

Starbucks

Wild Bird Center

The Loop Pizza Grill

Stein Mart

NOW OPEN

Lynn’s Hallmark

Subway

Massage Envy

Talbots

Great Outdoor Provision Co.

You’ve got to see this.

Petco

Tanner-Doncaster Outlet


NOVEMBER C H A P E L H I L L M A G A Z I N E . C O M

V O L U M E

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N U M B E R

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THE

DESIGN ISSUE 30

Creative Thinking An architect, a sculptor, a bag designer, a pair of custom furniture makers and a calligrapher talk motivation, inspiration and dedication

52

Office Space The style and design of the Rivers Agency’s headquarters in Greenbridge inspires their work

FEATURES 56 How They Live: Home Stead Audrey Williams and Amy Crawford return to their roots 75

Party Ready The most social part of the year is just around the corner. Be sure you’re ready to eat, drink and be merry while looking your best.

82

Reunited, 70 Years Later A series of coincidences and common contacts prompted a visit between H.G. Jones of Galloway Ridge and his World War II executive officer

86 Best Lawyers

PHOTO BY BRIANA BROUGH

PEOPLE & PLACES 10 Fast Break Against Cancer 12 Briar Chapel’s Pepper Festival 14 Italian Pizzeria III’s 35th anniversary party 15 Country for Kids 16 Chatham County Walk and 5K 17 Raise a Racquet 18 Fix-A-Home

IN EVERY ISSUE

4 Letter from Our VP of Content 20 5 Events Not to Miss 24 Our Latest Obsessions 80 Adopt-A-Pet 90 Taste 102 Engagement 103 Weddings

PAGE 30


R

4000 MILES FROM SWITZERLAND, A NEW GOLD STANDARD IN WATCHMAKING IS BEING BUILT BY HAND IN DETROIT.

T H E R U N W E LL F E AT U R I N G A B LU E D I A L W I T H R E M OT E S EC O N D H A N D S W E E P I N A S TA I N L ES S S T E E L C A S E , D E T R O I T- B U I LT A R G O N I T E 10 6 9 M OV E M E N T A N D A M E R I C A N - M A D E B R OW N L E AT H E R S T R A P. B U I LT TO L A S T A L I F E T I M E O R LO N G E R U N D E R T H E T E R M S A N D C O N D I T I O N S O F T H E S H I N O L A GUA R A N T E E .

TH E STR E ETS AT S O UTH PO I NT 919.281.8407 | FINKS.COM


&

P L A C E S

PHOTO BY BRIANA BROUGH

P E O P L E

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COACHES FOR A CURE

2

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANDREA GRIFFITH CASH

With plenty of Tar Heels on hand, BYU Men’s Basketball Coach Dave Rose spoke about his battle with pancreatic cancer at the annual Fast Break Against Cancer held at the Dean E. Smith Center. While guests ate breakfast, Men’s Basketball Coach Roy Williams and Tar Heel announcer Jones Angell auctioned off some one-of-a-kind prizes including a sleepover for kids in the Smith Center and Coach Smith’s Carolina blue office chair – the latter sold for $15,000. The event has raised $2 million for the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center in 10 years. CHM

3

4 1

Jones Angell and Roy Williams.

2

Mike Randall, Shelly Streett and Margaret Luck.

3

Lennie and Dianne Rosenbluth.

6

4 Jean and Woody Durham. 5 Sean May and CHM Assistant Editor Jessica Stringer.

6

Will Barfield and Rod Frankel.

7

Megan Buckland and Clarissa Adams of the UNC Women’s Basketball Team .

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STEP AWAY FROM THE ARTIFICIAL TREES AND STEP OUTSIDE YOURSELF Start your adventure today.

800.852.9506

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P E O P L E

&

P L A C E S

SPICE IT UP

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANDREA GRIFFITH CASH

The eighth annual Pepper Festival at Briar Chapel offered attendees the chance to try samples from 45 of the state’s top food and beverage makers, including Carolina Brewery, the Fearrington Granary and Oakleaf. The event raises money for Abundance NC, a nonprofit that supports local agriculture and sustainable fuels. CHM

2 1

4

3 1

Festivalgoers marvel at gigantic, homegrown bubbles.

2

Piedmont Biofarm’s Geoff Seelen.

3 Ann and Bob Kramer. 4 MEZ’s Aaron Stumb with his sous chef, 8-year-old Austin.

5

Fiddlehead Farm’s Emily and David Boynton.

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P L A C E S

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2

BIRTHDAY BLOCK PARTY

3 1

Vincenzo Marrone, Al Bowers and Angelo Marrone.

2

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JESSICA STRINGER

Leave it to brothers Angelo and Vincenzo Marrone to throw an Italian Pizzeria III celebration that felt like a family reunion. The pizzeria that always makes their customers feel welcome marked 35 years in business with face painting, a DJ, and plenty of pasta and wine. They kept the pies coming and had a little neighborly help with burgers and hot dogs from Al’s Burger Shack and beer from Top of the Hill and Beer Study. Lucky guests went home with an IP3 T-shirt commemorating the milestone birthday. CHM

Andrew Hunt, Ajla Hunt (4 months), Zinaida Mahmutefendic, Bobby Funk and Meg McGurk.

3

Esteban McMahan and Scott Maitland of Top of the Hill and TOPO Distillery.

NEW LOCATION, SAME TRADITIONS

We’re still at 300 East Main, just steps away from our previous store! Pottery • Jewelry • Home Furnishings • Decorative Glass Fine Art • Clothing & Accessories • Greeting Cards Monday-Saturday 10:00am-8:00pm Sunday 12:00pm-5:00pm 360 East Main Street Carrboro, NC • 919.929.3300 Convenient free parking

womancraftgifts.com

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P E O P L E

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&

P L A C E S

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3

COUNTRY FOR KIDS

1 Terry Hart and Annise Ginyard. 2 Yigal Ozeri and

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JESSICA STRINGER

Dr. Jennifer Smith.

Guests donned cowboy boots and rodeo best for a Southern-style barbecue dinner from Linda’s at the newly 3 Brittney Goldston, program opened Country Fried Duck bar. All night long, the crowd enjoyed country music and bid on silent auction director, and Sarah Marion, CEO of Boys and Girls Clubs of items like Darius Rucker tickets. The event served as a fundraiser for the “Hope For Children of North Eastern Piedmont. Carolina” project with donations and school supplies going to the Boys & Girls Club Classrooms in Chapel Hill and students in Scotland County. Co-host and former UNC basketball player Donald Williams will deliver the items and put on a basketball clinic for the kids in Scotland County. CHM

Your appetite is going to love this place.

Have an appetite for fantastic food and fun with friends? Visit Café Symmetry for a wide variety of healthy and delicious dishes you’ll love—all freshly prepared and ready when you are. And all in a unique, welcoming environment with a full bar and intimate patio seating as well. Stop by with a friend (or friends) for a Symmetry meal soon. CAFÉ SYMMETRY IN HISTORIC CARR MILL MALL, CARRBORO 200 N. Greensboro St. Carrboro, NC

Café Symmetry is brought to you by the same people who bring you Elmo’s, Carrboro’s favorite diner for more than 25 years • Hours 11am-10pm • Friday and Saturday til 9, bar menu available • 919.903.9596. And check out our gluten-sensitive selections • Visit us at CafeSymmetry.com

November 2015 chapelhillmagazine.com

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P L A C E S

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WALK THIS WAY

1 Dr. Stan Mandel with his family. 2 Luke and Sabrina Burkhead. 3 Galloway Ridge’s Pat Richardson.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY EDDIE PRICE PHOTOGRAPHY

An estimated 320 walkers and runners participated in the Chatham County Walk and 5K benefiting Alzheimers North Carolina in September, hosted by Galloway Ridge. Since the first Alzheimer’s Walk in Chatham County in 2011, more than $120,000 has been raised to assist Alzheimers North Carolina. The event raised more than $30,000 this year, making Chatham County one of the top fundraiser communities in North Carolina. CHM

Rachmaninoff’s Symphony No. 2

SUN, NOV, 22 | 7:30PM

kitchen & bath | design & consultation

James Feddeck, conductor Brian Reagin, violin Glazunov: Violin Concerto Rachmaninoff: Symphony No. 2 READ

BRO ERS’ FAVO NZE RI WINN TE ER

BEST

A Baroque Christmas WED, DEC 9 | 7:30PM

OF D UR 2014 HAM

Alfred E. Sturgis, conductor North Carolina Master Chorale Your holiday will be uplifted by the beautiful music of Handel and Bach. Enjoy the Hallelujah Chorus from Messiah, Brandenburg Concerto No. 4 and much more. MEMORIAL HALL, UNC-CHAPEL HILL

Tickets on sale now!

ncsymphony.org | 919.733.2750 See participating sponsors at ncsymphony.org/contribute

16

chapelhillmagazine.com November 2015

follow us: @emmadelon

like us: facebook.com/emmadelon

visit us online at: emmadelon.com

Call today to set up your complimentary one hour in-home consultation.

919•360•7735


P E O P L E

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P L A C E S

2

1

3

RACQUETS UP

1

The Farm’s Sam Weissler, Stacie Luders, Nate Lipson, Emily Kutner and Ryan Lewis.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANDREA GRIFFITH CASH

Held at The Farm, the third annual Raise a Racquet – featuring an adult tennis tournament, silent auction, luncheon and evening kids’ festival – raised money for the UNC Craniofacial Center. Henry Baddour, a sophomore at East Chapel Hill High, spoke about how the center has helped him since birth and through 10 surgeries on his cleft lip and palate. “I’ve learned not to take things for granted,” he said. CHM

2

Front: Cathy Whitt, Sarah Owen and Alyse Levine. Back: Tiffany Devereux and Dr. Amelia Drake of the UNC Craniofacial Center.

3

Henry Baddour, Andrew Montross and Jake Zinn.

RAMS PLAZA FORDHAM BLVD. CHAPEL HILL

FRAMERS MARKET

EZ SHIPPING

FOOD LION CVS PHARMACY BAILEY’S PUB & GRILLE BELLE SPA MR. TIRE AUTO SERVICE

THE BETTER SLEEP STORE FRAMER’S MARKET & GALLERY COMMUNITY SMILES FIT 4 LIFE WOMEN GRACIE JIU JITSU

PRINCESS NAILS SUPERCUTS E-Z SHIPPING & MAILBOXES TUESDAY MORNING N.C. FAMILY DOCTOR NC FAMILY DOCTOR

November 2015 chapelhillmagazine.com

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P E O P L E

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P L A C E S

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EXTREME HOME MAKEOVER PHOTOGRAPHY BY JESSICA STRINGER

Volunteers from the Greater Chapel Hill Association of Realtors worked for more than a week making over the Northside house that longtime Chapel Hillian Jewel Francis shares with her godchild Anita Wilson and her two children. Mayor Mark Kleinschmidt and the volunteers welcomed them home after a week away and revealed the transformation. The largest house that GCHAR has ever tackled for Fix-A-Home, their annual community service project, got a fresh coat of exterior paint, brand-new appliances and more upgrades. CHM

3 1

Greater Chapel Hill Association of Realtors CEO Cub Berrian, President Randy Cox and PresidentElect Sandra Paul.

2

GCHAR volunteers wait for Jewel Francis to see the beautiful results of the makeover.

3

Jackie Tanner, Jewel Francis and Anne Hoole.

THE 41ST ANNUAL PRODUCTION OF THE HIT MUSICAL COMEDY

A Christmas Carol Once A Year It Happens Just Like Magic The Hit Musical Comedy Celebrating 39 Years!

December 12-15 DECPA’s Memorial Auditorium

December 19-22 STARRING

Durham IRA DAVIDPerforming WOOD III Center ASArts SCROOGE *

Tickets On Sale Now! 800-745-3000 ticketmaster.com

* IRA DAVID WOOD IV

WILL PLAY SCROOGE AT ALL SATURDAY MATINEES.

Dec 9-13 in Raleigh at the Duke Energy Center Ticketmaster.com or 800 745 3000

December 17-20 at the Durham Performing Arts Center “One of the most successful shows in North Carolina theatre history!” dpacnc.com or 919 680 2787

THEATREINTHEPARK.COM

18

chapelhillmagazine.com November 2015

Starring Ira David Wood III as Scrooge

Duke Energy Center for the Performing Arts


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EVENTS

NOT TO MISS

Orange County Artists Guild Open Studio Tour NOV. 7-8 and 14-15; Saturdays, 10AM-5PM; Sundays, NOON-5PM orangecountyartistsguild.com

More than 80 artists will open their studios to show off their work and talk with visitors about what they do. See a variety of works of art from sculptures and paintings to ceramics and glass. Visit the website to download a map and plan your route. 20

chapelhillmagazine.com November 2015

Peter and the Starcatcher

The Bluegrass Ball

NOV. 18-DEC. 12

NOV. 21, 7:30PM

playmakersrep.org

catscradle.com

Experience the journey of a novice Starcatcher and an orphan traveling the high seas in what’s been called a grown-up’s prequel to Peter Pan. Featuring more than 100 memorable characters, this play is based on the novel by Dave Barry and Ridley Pearson and is sure to entertain all ages. Tickets: $15 and up

The Travelin’ McCourys will host a night of impromptu jams, collaborations, and footstomping traditional and progressive songs. The show will also feature performances from Drew Emmitt and Andy Thorn of Leftover Salmon. Tickets: $20-$23

Jupiter Ball

Gallop & Gorge 8k NOV. 26, 8AM

NOV. 20, 7PM

cardinaltrackclub.com

moreheadplanetarium.org/jupiter

Before the turkey and football, wake up early on Thanksgiving and get your heart pumping. As the third and final race in the Cardinal Track Club’s 11th annual Le Tour de Carrboro race series, the 8K will take runners through Carrboro neighborhoods, starting and finishing on Weaver Street. Registration: $30 CHM

The Morehead Planetarium’s 16th annual black-tie event will feature a champagne reception, a gourmet dinner, dancing and live music. The event will honor Jeff Powell, designer of 3-D printer prosthetics, and Will and Mary Pope Osborne, acclaimed authors of the Magic Tree House book series. Tickets: $275

PHOTO BY SARAH ARNESON

5

Artist Alan Dehmer in his darkroom. You can visit his studio as part of this month’s OCAG Open Studio Tour.


T HR JA N OU UA R GH Y1 7

THE WORLDS OF

M. C. ESCHER

NATURE, SCIENCE, AND IMAGINATION East Building, Meymandi Exhibition Gallery The most comprehensive Escher exhibition ever presented in the United States. Featuring more than 130 works by the artist, some never before exhibited publicly.

LEONARDO DA VINCI’S

CODEX LEICESTER

AND THE CREATIVE MIND East Building, Gallery 2 The Codex Leicester is a 500-year-old notebook from inventor, scientist, and artist Leonardo da Vinci. Presented in dramatic fashion, the original manuscript offers a rare glimpse into one of the greatest minds in history.

2110 Blue Ridge Road, Raleigh The Worlds of M. C. Escher is organized by the North Carolina Museum of Art. The Codex Leicester is on loan from Bill Gates. In Raleigh generous support for the Codex Leicester is provided by the Ron and Jeanette Doggett Fund. Both exhibitions are made possible, in part, by the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources; the North Carolina Museum of Art Foundation, Inc.; and the William R. Kenan Jr. Endowment for Educational Exhibitions. Research for these exhibitions was made possible by Ann and Jim Goodnight/The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Fund for Curatorial and Conservation Research and Travel.

M. C. Escher, Drawing Hands, 1948, lithograph, 11 1/8 × 13 1/8 in., Private collection, Texas, © 2015 The M. C. Escher Company, The Netherlands. All rights reserved. www.mcescher.com

TICKETS

ncartmuseum.org or (919) 715-5923

Leonardo da Vinci, Codex Leicester (Sheet 1A, folio 1r) (detail), 1508–10, ink on paper, 11 2/3 × 8 1/2 in., Courtesy of Bill Gates, © 1994 bgC3 PRESENTING SPONSOR

PARTICIPATING SPONSORS

celito.net, Lord Corporation, and Quintiles MEDIA PARTNER

Capitol Broadcasting Company


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2015

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O U R

L A T E S T

OBSESSIONS OUR EDITORS’ MOST RECENT FINDS WILL HAVE YOU HOOKED, TOO

THE

DESIGN ISSUE

CUT FROM THE SAME CLOTH The essence of a historic mill has been preserved at new event venue The Cloth Mill

I

n 1915, the Eno River Mill in Hillsborough manufactured yarndyed fabrics like gingham, chambray and denim. A century later, those same textiles might serve as tablecloths for a rustic wedding reception at The An artist’s rendering shows off the space, which is scheduled to open in December. Cloth Mill at Eno River now that Nicole Clayton has transformed the space. The simple so couples can easily decorate no matter their wedding New York native almost bought a bar in Raleigh. But then the colors or Pinterest board theme. former athletic academic advisor who moved to North Carolina Even though she’s nearly got the venue up and running, Nicole’s five years ago spotted a commercial real estate listing she just had not slowing down. She’s still got On the Rocks, the bartending to see. “I came that day and fell in love,” Nicole says. “Under all business she started as a side gig and turned into a full-time the paint and HVAC ducts, I thought ‘This space is perfect.’” business in 2013. It was here she perfected her customer service Restoring her 10,000-square-foot space in the mill complex – and attention to detail that have served her well as she prepares other tenants include Mystery Brewing Company and Weaver to take on a larger role in a couple’s big day. At The Cloth Mill, Street Market’s HQ – has been a long process. Back in the Nicole’s thought of everything from constructing roomy suites for summer when we stopped by, the floors were literally dirt, and the the wedding party to sending a couple off on their honeymoon boarded up windows meant sunshine couldn’t reach the original with airplane bottles of liquor to recreate their wedding’s signature 1896 beams and pillars. Now with new hardwood floors and cocktail. “Every client that books gets treated like they are my only romantic bistro lights out in the courtyard, the mill is the urban, client,” she says. industrial-chic venue of Nicole’s dreams. She kept the design 24

chapelhillmagazine.com November 2015


BIKE LOCAL Performance Bicycle’s CHCB line pays homage to their headquarters

C

yclists as far away as Austin and Seattle may not know it, but when they suit up in casual pieces from Performance Bicycle’s CHCB line, they’re paying tribute to our hometown. Founded in Chapel Hill in 1982, the country’s largest cycling specialty retailer unveiled the CHCB line – named for Chapel Hill and Carrboro – earlier this year. Their expanded second collection just hit stores nationwide. It all started because employees at Performance Bicycle, many of them avid cyclists themselves, recognized that not every rider wants to run to the grocery store or grab a post-ride beer wearing neon bike shorts. “Cycling is a social event for a whole lot of people, and standing around socializing in form-fitting lycra is awkward,” says Product Manager Zach Terry. He and the rest of the team set out to make an apparel line that’s both fashionable and functional. Because everything from polos and henleys to the shorts were designed by cyclists for cyclists, they were made from performance fabrics that stood up to rigorous testing out on the road. Features like pockets for essentials and locking zippers mean your ID and cash won’t slip out on your ride to Beer Study. But with muted colors, patterns like herringbone and asymmetrical reflective strips that add a subtle graphic element, the collection is both sporty and stylish. (Even non-cyclists might want to wear the perfect-for-layering pieces to yoga class.) Product Developer Alicia Landis says of the line, “It’s something that we wanted to wear before and after our ride. We took a lot of inspiration from our own clothes that we wear and people we see around town.” „

Some pieces from the fall collection, modeled outside The Baxter.

What’s In a Name? Graham Henley Long Sleeve Jersey North Graham Street is the home of some Performance favorites like Beer Study, The Baxter and the bike co-op, The ReCYCLEry. Libba Hooded Long Sleeve Jersey This teal hoodie got its name from the Libba Cotten Memorial Bike Path that connects Chapel Hill and Carrboro near South Merritt Mill Road. Weaver Hooded Long Sleeve Jersey The men’s darker blue hoodie was named after Weaver Street Market. Shetler Jacket Andrew Shetler, one of the mechanics at the former Performance Bicycle shop in Carrboro, was the namesake for this jacket.

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OUT OF OFFICE Coworking at Carrboro’s Perch Studios is more chic loft than cubicle farm

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etsey Elbogen brews the first pot of Carrboro Coffee at the beginning of each workday at Perch Studios. After that, it’s up to one of the coworking

members at the communal office to stay caffeinated. Not that any of the freelancers and entrepreneurs, telecommuters and tech designers or lawyers and folks writing their dissertations mind. Whether they’ve been a member since Perch originally opened next to Akai Hana in 2013 or have joined since Betsey took

over in 2014, something keeps them coming back. Maybe it’s the new location Perch moved to last summer. Occupying the back of the building that also houses Glasshalfull, Steel String and Fifth Season, Perch nearly tripled in size and now offers plenty of parking, office suites and a conference room. As Betsey says, the search wasn’t easy. “Nobody wants it to look like office space,” Betsey says of her requirements for the relocation. “It’s got to be cozy and industrial.” The space is more chic loft than cubicle farm thanks to the exposed brick, high ceilings, all the light streaming in and a colossal fire door separating the quiet room from the talking room.

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Some members of Perch joined to have variety in their workingfrom-home routine while others count Perch as their everyday workspace. A member since January 2014, Lindsey Alexander says she appreciates that Perch creates a boundary between her work and downtime. “I never liked the isolation of self-employment, and Perch is a great place to share space and conversation with people in a pretty wide range of fields,” she says. It could be all the fun parts of office culture that attracts people. Members meet up over beers during a weekly happy hour at Steel String, and their art-filled office doubles as a stop on the Second Friday ArtWalk. There are brown-bag lunch gatherings and the occasional yoga class. But really, even 9 to 5 at Perch is enjoyable. Though the members work independently, Betsey says there’s an atmosphere of encouragement. “Great things happen when all the different people connect and collaborate. You want a little community, and that’s what we have here.” – Jessica Stringer CHM


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CREATIVE THINKING AN ARCHITECT, A SCULPTOR, A BAG DESIGNER, A PAIR OF CUSTOM FURNITURE MAKERS AND A CALLIGRAPHER TALK MOTIVATION, INSPIRATION AND DEDICATION

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arah Lipscomb works as a hospice nurse at Duke University Hospital, and she also designs beautifully understated leather clutches. It may seem like a classic creative approach to work-life balance, but look closely, and there’s a common theme. “What inspires me is the human experience,” she says. “I love narrative.” As a hospice nurse, “I learn so much about people and contextualize them and then I get to help them and their families,” Sarah says. “People and their stories keep me going; so, much of what inspires me, just as a person, I get to do at work.” To unwind – and to fulfill an innate need to create – her medium of choice continues the theme. “Leather has a narrative quality,” she explains. “It came from an animal that had a life. It’s scratched and marked and stained. It’s so durable. It tells its November 2015 chapelhillmagazine.com

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SARAH LIPSCOMB OF TORSADES DE POINTES


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MEDITATIVE MAKING The leather speaks for itself in the wallets, clutches and totes Sarah designs, makes and sells online and at Light Art+Design in Greenbridge. Her endeavor is called Torsades de Pointes (a cardiac arrhythmia “that happens to be very beautiful on paper”). The designs are simple – rectangular zip-top wallets and clutches and large square totes – which means they’re manageable. “I’ve always sewn,” Sarah says, “and I love making clothes.” But it takes a long time to make a dress, and alongside a full-time job and mothering son August, 9, and daughter Penelope, 7, “years would go by, and I’d have three half-made things. I didn’t feel fulfilled creatively at all.” Making bags in her home off of Ephesus Church Road has hit the creative sweet spot. Some are plain – nothing but leather or colored suede. Some are tattooed with handpainted dots, dashes and other shapes. “The painting is what keeps it interesting,” Sarah says. “There are endless things I can do, so many variations.” It helps her escape, too. “Pattern painting is really meditative. It’s decorative, but for me it’s more about the act of doing it. It takes me away.” „

PHOTO BY BRIANA BROUGH

own story. I love how beat up leather gets. It makes you consider what it’s been through.”

KEEPING IT SIMPLE A larger life lesson can be learned from Sarah’s approach to bag designs. “When I try to make more complicated things, I look at the really simple bags I make, and I like them more,” she says. “I’ll spend hours trying to make something more complicated, and it usually still doesn’t look as good. I try to remember that and not make things too complicated or tricky. Why mess with it? It’s simple; it’s functional; it’s good.”

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LEATHER LOVE

PHOTO BY BRIANA BROUGH

Sarah appreciates every aspect of working with leather. “I get really inspired when I buy leather,” she says. “I love everything about leather: I love how it smells; I love the feel of it. That’s where I start, with the leather I buy. Since I usually keep the same design, it’s really in how I mix them.” She’s started using suede, too, to be able to make colored bags.

DIVING IN While she has an art school background and a lifetime of sewing under her belt – Sarah’s mother used to make clothes for her and her siblings – Sarah has no formal training in working with leather or accessory design. “I just started doing it,” she says. She found a machine meant to sew sailboat sails and put it to work on leather. “There was a learning curve,” she admits, but it quickly worked itself out. Torsades de Pointes’ handmade goods are pretty good evidence.

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WELL ROUNDED Years ago, as a hopeful art school student, Sarah never would have predicted this would be her own narrative. She ultimately dropped out of art school to pursue nursing – producing art scratched an itch but didn’t fill a void. Nursing was more fulfilling, and hospice nursing was her ultimate calling. Sarah’s husband is local artist Steven Walls, whose work hangs in the B-Side Lounge and Carrburritos, among other places. It was his work ethic – an intense, relentless desire to paint and create – that helped Sarah realize when she had found her own passion. “I don’t have that built-in daily need to make something with art-making,” she says. “I feel that kind of drive somewhere else. It’s nice to know that I do have that, but it’s just not where I thought it was going to be.” Making and painting bags completes the picture. “It helps me do my job. [Hospice nursing] is my absolute dream job, and I love it, but it is a lot to cope with. It’s good to have a reprieve from that.” – Jessie Ammons „


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SMALL BUT MIGHTY ARIELLE CONDORET SCHECHTER OF MICROPOLIS HOMES

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feel like I popped out of the womb a raging modernist,” says Arielle Condoret Schechter. The architect is sitting in her bright and open living room off of Mount Carmel Church Road, with tunes from jazz guitarist Django Reinhardt detectable beneath whistles and chirps from Gabby, the African grey parrot. This is Arielle in her element – she designed this house for her husband, Arnold Morris Condoret Schechter, and vintage modernist furniture and shelves she built herself complement its layout. “I always was a modernist, even before it was popular. It’s always been really natural for me.” NATURAL CONNECTION As the daughter of the late renowned local architect Jon Condoret (we can thank him for bringing us Fearrington Village’s cozy look), Arielle’s career is perhaps no surprise. Despite her innate love of modern design, though, she took an indirect path. “I went to undergraduate school in music, which was a disaster for me,” she explains. Her college years at Juilliard couldn’t cure her of stage fright but did prove, once and for all, that “architecture is right for me. I like being at my desk, drawing.” Immediately upon graduating from Juilliard, she returned to North Carolina – born in Africa, the Condorets fled from the Algerian War to her grandmother’s basement in Durham,

where she spent her childhood – to study architecture at N.C. State. Just as expected, she flourished. Embarking on an architecture practice converged Arielle’s skills and passions. “I’ve always been a hard-core environmentalist,” she says. “I became a vegetarian at age 11, just out of concern

for the animals.” Thus, her goal is to create homes that are net-zero, “which means the house would produce all it needs, calculated on a 12-month basis.” Her designs also embrace natural light and outdoor spaces. “To have some connection to the outside is grounding,” she says. “I think people crave it – they

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Among Arielle’s design heroes are the mentors from her young architect days. “I’m grateful for my teachers in architecture school,” she says. “They were all so smart and good. Frank Harmon, especially. I felt really close to him.” And then there’s her father, the late noted modernist architect Jon Condoret. “Of course, I love my dad,” she says. “My dad was my best friend. Getting to work with him was so wonderful. He was generous with his time, teaching me things and taking me on job sites. I’m so grateful for that. I miss him so much.”

PHOTO BY BRIANA BROUGH

PAYING HOMAGE

crave seeing green, or just feeling the breeze, or having the right kind of sunshine on you. It’s all so critical to making a space livable.” BRIGHT IDEA Since downtime and work time are one and the same for Arielle, one day she was daydreaming at her desk. “I thought, ‘Wouldn’t it be great to offer people designs that have an architect feel, for those who can’t afford an architect’s services?’ They can still get a cool little house that comes with a great building envelope.” Inspired by the tiny house trend, these ready-made designs would have a minimal footprint. She bounced the idea off of wordsmith Arnold, who has a sports journalism background. “He said, ‘Wouldn’t it be great if, instead of building a metropolis, you built a micropolis of all of these little houses?’” The name stuck, and now she sells the collection of modern “small home” plans (all 150 to 1,500 square feet) for $2,000 and up. “I never expected to get any interest in the Micropolis houses,” Arielle says. “I started drawing them for myself, and then people started liking them.” 38

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She humbly shifts the Micropolis attention from her design ingenuity to a cultural trend. “It shows that people are searching for smaller choices,” she says. “They’re willing to try. I think people are getting tired of, say, paying heating and cooling bills for spaces they don’t use.” Plus, when you build small you can maximize quality. “I love doing smaller houses because you can put more money into the goodies. You can get better windows, more windows, higher quality exterior materials.” AN ESCAPE To recharge, Arielle and Arnold travel. “That’s our main hobby,” Arielle says. “It’s work, work, work, and then take off and go someplace great. It’s really inspiring – I think traveling is invaluable.” Of course, trips are almost always planned around seeing a city’s architecture. “There’s a quote about architecture being the fertilizer of our lives,” she says, just after listing her other hobbies as cooking and growing produce like heirloom tomatoes. “Architecture is a way to be a great, big, juicy tomato. It does – it feeds us.” – Jessie Ammons „


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GREEN THUMB A signature in Arielle’s designs is “a huge connection to the outdoors,” she says. “And a ton of natural light. With those two things, you can really go far in a house. I always include a special outside space: a courtyard, a roof terrace, a screened porch.” There’s usually a third element, too: openness. “I think it makes you feel better. It can make you be more expansive and less insular. If things are open, maybe you’ll feel a little freer.”

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‘THE WAY OF THE FUTURE’ Arielle has a keen interest in green architecture and has been into net-zero building since she was a student. “I consider that to be the most important trend in architecture right now,” she says. “It goes beyond LEED; it goes beyond green building. Net zero is third-party verified, and that means there’s no green-washing. It’s the way of the future. It’s the way we can cause less damage to the planet – or at least minimize it. I feel really strongly about that.”

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PHOTO BY BRIANA BROUGH

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STICK FIGURE PATRICK DOUGHERTY, SCULPTOR

“I

have come to believe that one’s childhood shapes a sculptor’s choice of his or her materials. For me, it was growing up in the woodlands of North Carolina, which are overgrown with small trees and where forests are a tangle of intersecting natural lines. In fact, I have always loved the drawing quality of the winter landscape in which one might imagine fantasy shapes

A MATTER OF SCALE Patrick has created 266 temporary works to date, each of which takes about three weeks to build and lasts approximately “two good years.” “My first works were modest efforts that used sticks to build objects scaled to my own height,” he says. “But as opportunities presented themselves, I began to integrate my work into architectural situations and then to play sapling sculptures against natural settings. Through experimentation, I was able to up-scale my efforts and to build work that seemed to spin across tops of buildings and flow through groups of trees. “

drawn into the upper branches of trees. For me, tree branches and saplings also have the rich associations with childhood play and with the shelters built by animals. Picking up a stick and bending it seems to give me big ideas. I think this ‘know-how’ is one that every human carries as a legacy from our hunting and gathering past. When I turned to sculpture in the early

’80s, I had to rediscover what birds already knew: Sticks have an infuriating tendency to entangle with each other. It is this simple tangle that holds my work together. The work proceeds very quickly and generally each sculpture takes three weeks to complete. I start by finding a good stand of saplings nearby, and often I capitalize on someone’s desire to maintain their

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property. The actual construction technique is a layering process, [which] gives the impression that the surface is moving. Since I often work in public spaces and the viewers can walk up during the building process, I hear many stories about sacred trees and childhood adventure. I hear about birds that build hotels and gorillas that make nests. But under it all, I sense in the comments of the passersby a profound connection between humans and the plant world that surrounds them. Time and time again, I hear a well-dressed couple say, ‘Listen, honey, we could live here...no I mean it, it would be perfect for us.’ They imagine for a moment walking away from the geometry of the city dweller and fading back into the forest for a day. With branches and saplings, the line between trash and treasure is very thin, and the sculptures, like the sticks they are made from, begin to fade after two years. Often the public imagines that a 42

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work of art should be made to last, but I believe that a sculpture, like a good flowerbed, has its season. In my mind, most professions do temporary work, and everyone in the workplace enjoys the process of doing their job. Rarely do we rewrite yesterday’s novel or reread last week’s report. As a sculptor, I enjoy forging ahead to solve the problem of today’s work and relish the opportunity to plan a very different sculpture for the next site. I have worked in many wonderful communities and made friends throughout the world. I enjoy identifying a provocative site for building a sculpture and then constructing an artwork that excites the imagination of those who pass by. I tend to chat and engage the viewers during my stay, hoping to tap the goodwill of that place and weave those energies into the fabric of the sculpture. Ultimately, I love the nomadic life and chance to travel and fully engage with the world.” – as told to Virginia Robinson „


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EYE OF THE BEHOLDER “My viewers see stick castles, lairs, nests, architectural follies – and they remember moments in the woods with their favorite trees,” Patrick says. “I hear stories about the Garden of Eden, and secrets about first dates. Some viewers touch the surfaces and talk about the momentum of wind or other forces of the natural world. Those that pass by are often compelled to explore the sculpture’s strange shapes and hidden passages.”

INTO THE WOODS Patrick grew up playing in the woods in Southern Pines. In the art department at UNC, his desire to become a sculptor gained urgency, and a sapling sculpture he presented at a student show received acclaim as part of a statewide artist exhibition at the North Carolina Museum of Art. These days, he maintains a strong connection to the museum: His wife, Linda, is the chief curator there. You can explore three of his sculptures locally: at the North Carolina Botanical Garden, where we photographed him; in Durham at the Museum of Life and Science; and soon in Hillsborough on the Riverwalk, near the Weaver Street Market end.

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‘A HISTORY OF PROJECTS’ MICHAEL EVERHART & WILL STANLEY OF FIVE FORK STUDIO

Growing up, were you particularly artistic? Were there any indications that you’d end up pursing an artistic field? MICHAEL I certainly would think so. Even playing with Legos is a good first step toward that. I think also it goes to the project side of that. I’ve always been someone who likes to do things with my hands.

PHOTO BY HEBA SALAMA

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ichael Everhart grew up in Durham, while Will Stanley was raised in Orange County, on the eponymous Five Forks Road. They met at Durham School of the Arts and Michael, a UNC grad, and Will, who completed graduate school at UNC, have been good friends since. “We played some music back in the day and have always enjoyed working on projects together,” Michael says. “There was a period of heavy car work. A history of projects is a good way to put it.” Their latest, Five Fork Studio, was formed in 2012 and combines Michael’s woodworking skills with Will’s metal work to create one-of-a-kind pieces from cutting boards and speakers to kitchen cabinets and tables.

“ We watched a lot of YouTube videos and read a lot of forums ... just a lot of research,” says Michael Everhart (left) of building skills – and a business – with Will Stanley.

WILL We sort of straddle a line there. We’re in the [Orange County Artists Guild], but I don’t think either of us totally look at it as art. Furniture is nice in that you can design stuff – you can be creative with it – but it’s still pretty practical. It’s maybe more grounded than if we just made stuff you looked at. MICHAEL The things we make are functional, too, but we want them to be beautiful. But it’s not that every piece we set out to make is fine art or something. How did you start Five Fork Studio? MICHAEL The evolution of the business was a pretty organic one. Will had been in Haiti for a year doing some other work. During that time, I had purchased this house [near Southern Community Park]. There was this awesome woodshop, so I was out there all the time building things like speakers and developing an excitement about that. 44

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Will gets back into the country and, for some reason, buys a welder for some project that was happening [at Will’s studio on Five Forks Road]. We were basically like, “We should build some stuff together.” It was really two independently found hobbies [that] started to bubble up. How did each of you pick up your trade? WILL We had some small projects, and it was an excuse to figure that out. [Our trades] were both just self-taught. It turns out you can teach yourself to do these things, especially MIG [metal inert gas] welding. You can pretty much start producing functional welds on day one. MICHAEL We watched a lot of YouTube videos and read a lot of forums … just a lot of research. I worked for a construction contractor for nine months and picked up a lot of experience from some talented guys. Where do you source your materials? WILL That’s more interesting on the wood side because pretty much


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I just order more steel. A lot of square tubing, simple stuff. As far as finishing, I use a lot of sculptor’s patinas. You can do all sorts of different controlled rusting processes to get different colors. MICHAEL On the wood side, there are two broad categories that we would use: reclaimed wood or some sort of local hardwood. We make a strong effort not to use any exotic woods. A lot of our reclaimed wood has come from old tobacco barns and farmhouses that have been torn down in the surrounding counties. The nicer stuff is culled out and denailed. As far as the fresh hardwoods, most people are fond of walnut, maple, cherry, oak and sometimes hickory and ash. We’ve recently been using these large slabs of extremely expensive big old pieces of wood. [These come from] trees that may be a couple hundred years old that have fallen and have been carefully aged and kiln dried. Those are a lot of fun to work with. What’s the design process like? MICHAEL The most common [situation] is that someone has seen our work and has an idea that is similar. They can picture our materials and style with their pieces. If they’re a local person, we like to meet them and draw up designs together. But usually it sort of begins as a brainstorming process. We go back and forth and narrow in on something. Sometimes people will send us a photo and say, “I want this. Can you make it? How much does it cost?” Sometimes they have very specific ideas on what they want. It’s nice to work with both types of customers for different reasons. Sometimes we’ll have a decision made immediately and just roll with it. Sometimes the customer just wants to see the process through. We often will take pictures of our work as we go and send people updates. That’s a good chance to keep the design process open as we build the piece. How much time do you spend together versus apart? MICHAEL Over the past year, we probably only spent about a third of our time in the same space – be that us doing office hours or meetings or packing and shipping. WILL We design together and build separately and assemble together. MICHAEL Ideally, we’ll have a space that can house both a metal shop and a woodshop. That will allow us to not have to drive across the county to assemble something. For a common table, we’ll get the job, and Will will assemble the base and then bring it over to me. I’ll build the top, and we’ll put it together. „

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What have you learned as far as communication? MICHAEL [Laughs] You nailed it. The big thing is that you learn to communicate about [everything] with each other and with the client. You measure twice and you cut once … ideally. We certainly make our share of mistakes.

It must be nice to have another person to lean on when you fall into a creative rut. MICHAEL I think that’s one of the things we’re best at. That would be a large part of the time we do spend together, knocking ideas back and forth or talking about what’s going to work. We analyze our own work a lot. It’s

nice that it is the two of us. It’s easy for us to meet on an idea versus having too many cooks in the kitchen. What do you admire about your creative partner? MICHAEL Will is unrelentingly ambitious all the time – and optimistic. Also, the fact that this is built on a longtime friendship – we can just trust each other. If I say something and Will doesn’t exactly see me, he probably has the inclination to assume that I’m saying it for the best intentions. WILL We check and balance each other, especially with business decisions and figuring out a way forward. Mike is definitely better at being practical and realistic about whether we’re going to make a living with what we’re charging.

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What’s next for Five Fork Studio? MICHAEL Definitely [getting more] space and adding things to our repertoire of tools and production capabilities. WILL It seems like manufacturing in America is coming back in a way. Not just for trendy stuff but also for short run and prototyping. There are a lot of things that [shouldn’t] be done in China. It’s exciting to get into that and teach ourselves. – Jessica Stringer „

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Visit Will and Michael during the Orange County Artists Guild Open Studio Tour on Nov. 7 & 8 and Nov. 14 & 15. To see what other studios are open those weekends, visit orangecountyartistsguild.com.


T H E

INSPIRED DESIGN A fun fill-in-the-blank exercise with Will and Michael

If we’re just sort of working freely, the [wood] slabs inspire me. The slab dictates what it needs. Sometimes all they need is resin and a butterfly key to hold it back from splitting open. But it’s almost always different. WILL Sometimes you can get cool

D E S I G N

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ideas from making something for somebody, and [when a piece is] on its side, it almost looks like it could be some other piece of furniture. You have a six-legged table and it’s on its side; you think, ‘This could be some sort of cool shelving thing.’

I would style my own coffee table with … MICHAEL A big stack of magazines and a cup of coffee. We both read a lot of magazines: National Geographic, food magazines, Harper’s. A book, blog or magazine that stimulates me is … WILL [Art, design and visual culture blog] This Is Colossal. I would describe our aesthetic as … MICHAEL Probably simple. Clean. WILL Real materials without any veneering. We don’t even usually use stains. An artist I admire is … MICHAEL It’s too cliche to say at this point, but George Nakashima was a famous woodworker who’s pretty inspirational. It comes from a respect of the materials. [You] don’t want to put a dark stain on a nice light oak. WILL George was Japanese and took a very Japanese approach. He used very fine, specific tools and hand woodworking. Having hundreds and hundreds of slabs, he could choose the perfect one for each job. I’m inspired by … MICHAEL I’m fortunate to be inspired by the wood, usually.

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„„„

THE WRITING, ON THE WALL MARIKA WENDELKEN, CALLIGRAPHER

PHOTO BY BRIANA BROUGH

M

arika Wendelken remembers her first encounter with lettering. Sitting in her firstgrade classroom with a sheet of dotted lined paper in front of her, Marika took her time during the cursive lesson. “I don’t know why, but I was doing all these curly qs on the letters, and the teacher was like, ‘You have to finish that up. We’re out of time,’” she recalls. “I think that was my first fascination.” You can’t really blame her for the flourishes – ink runs in her blood. Her parents met in art school and her dad was a graphic designer who was behind a redesign of the classic Uno card game. “Growing up, we always had pens and pencils and all the paper we could want,” she says. She gravitated toward art supplies during her childhood that began in Columbus, Ohio, and took her through five other states. Soon Marika put chisel-tip pen to paper in her first and only calligraphy class.

SEEING SIGNS But it was ballet that became her main artistic outlet as she trained classically for years. During college at the University of Georgia, her parents moved to Durham and later she followed suit, securing a gig at Foster’s Market. “I appointed myself to be the sign maker because we had different items every day, and we had to make a little descriptive sign [for each one],” Marika says. “I would get really into it, and then Sara hired me to do the 48

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chalkboard menus.” Her childhood fascination paid off as people saw the menus and asked her to do small jobs in the area. But soon, another passion took hold as she pursued massage therapy. “Having been a dancer, I was already interested in how the body worked. Massage therapy seemed to fit perfectly,” she says. “I love working with my hands and being active and physical.” Marika spent nearly two decades at day spas and in private


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INSPIRED DESIGN A fun fill-in-the-blank exercise with Marika

practice until someone who remembered her chalkboard signs asked if she could do one for a wedding shoot at The Cookery in Durham. “It was one of those perfect storms of opportunity and people and everything crossing paths at the same time,” she says. The signs got her noticed and Marika, who’s now based in Mebane, realized she was ready for more. She started getting regular jobs – like the Buns and Joe Van Gogh menu boards – through word of mouth. CUSTOM CREATIONS Chances are, if you’ve been to a wedding or event at local venues like The Rickhouse or The Stockroom at 230, you’ve seen her work. You may have received a wedding invite in an envelope addressed by Marika, but more likely, you’ve seen one of her welcome signs or seating charts in handwriting that many wish they had. What you’re not seeing is all the planning and hard work behind each custom creation. It starts with a consultation. “Some people have a clear idea of what they want, but other people are like, ‘I love your work. This is sort of our look. Go for it.’ It just depends on the couple,” Marika says. From there, she’s off to sketching and communicating back and forth with her clients, tweaking the design. On the day of, she’ll arrive early with the trusty chalk box she’s had since college and start by laying out the lettering and sketching lightly in chalk. “With big pieces, I have to keep stepping back to make sure [my design is straight],” she says. “It’s hard to tell exactly how long things will take, but [some] can take six to eight hours.” Sometimes she’s on site finishing right up until the first guest arrives. At the end of a long day, Marika is thrilled to have created something meaningful for a couple’s celebration. “It’s really personal and sweet,” she says. “It’s a nice contribution to make.” Couples love the detail she puts in every design, and some have even wanted a chalkboard keepsake, something Marika is now offering. As her schedule picks up with more work, her ultimate goal is to make calligraphy and lettering her full-time job. “I’m building toward that, and it seems to be happening, which is great,” Marika says. “Being a one-person show, there’s only so much that I can do.” – Jessica Stringer CHM 50

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A book, magazine or blog that stimulates me is … Instagram is great because people will post their work. There are tons of lettering artists and calligraphers who are using [Instagram]. It’s a great way to get your work out there. I don’t have any regular go-tos at the moment. I’m casting out a big net to try to find inspiration, but I don’t find myself going back to the same places. Another art form I dabbled in was … I got into photography a little bit in high school, which I enjoyed, but it was kind of primitive then because it was all film. That was expensive. It’s hard to practice when the materials cost a lot of money. A trend in signage is … It’s really popular right now for brides to choose to have their seating charts written on these big, beautiful mirrors. It’s a really striking presentation. One thing you might not have guessed about calligraphy is that … There’s some math involved, which I’m actually better at than I anticipated. [A couple will] give me their wedding guest list for a seating chart. Then I have to figure out how much space I have and how many columns there need to be and how it’ll fit so that it’s legible. Are there any long, crazy names that I have to be sure fit? There’s some calculation there.


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OFFICE SPACE PHOTOGRAPHY BY MICHAEL MILLS, SZOSTAK DESIGN

T

HE SPACIOUS, OPEN CONCEPT AND CLEAN LINES of the Rivers Agency headquarters in Greenbridge are accentuated with natural materials that give the space warmth and style: genuine hardwood floors, a stone wall, a long community table with waterfall edges of Carrara marble (a signature of Philip Szostak, the architect), and iron work by local metal artist Leo Gaev. President Lauren Rivers has noticed a change in the advertising agency since moving last year. “Everyone gets a lot of energy from this space,” she notes. “The actual style and design of the workspace itself inspires us and our work.” —Virginia Robinson„

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“It’s not overly designed; it’s just high quality materials,” says Sarah Owens, the company’s creative director, of the new digs. “... We have clients ask, ‘Can we use your conference room for a meeting?’ They like the space, so if they want to have a creative kind of meeting, then they’ll come and use it.”

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HOME

STEAD

A

ONE COUPLE’S RETURN TO THEIR ROOTS

BY JESSIE AMMONS | PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIANA BROUGH

AUDREY WILLIAMS AND AMY CRAWFORD

(far right) needed wide open spaces. “We’d had a bug to do some type of homesteading, and we couldn’t do that in the city,” says Audrey. The couple had spent years living in the small town of Mebane; while they loved their time there, they wanted to return to their roots to plant a few of their own. Amy grew up on a dairy farm in Chatham County, and her parents were willing to sell the couple a plot of land across the street. So, to „ 56

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Amy and Audrey are â&#x20AC;&#x153;sort ofâ&#x20AC;? entertainers. They host a lot of potlucks. Last winter, for example, they slaughtered two pigs they had raised and prepared pork five different ways, then had neighbors bring a side dish.

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“I grew up playing in the woods,” says Amy (far right). “I was born and raised right here, and my parents gave us this land to build on. Otherwise, it wouldn’t have been possible.”

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The property is also home to chickens and four goats – Basil, Goldie, Gingko and Ginger. Hopefully, baby goats will come along in the spring, which will mean milk and cheese for Amy and Audrey.

Crawford Dairy Road they went. “For us,” Amy says, “it was more

about the land than the house.” LOGICAL LIVING Alongside a desire to homestead was a desire to live with integrity. “We wanted to build as green as we could, which means building small,” Audrey explains. “People build green homes that are 6,000 square feet. That’s a ton of resources and a ton of energy. That doesn’t make sense to us.” Inspired by the tiny home trend, the two took an honest look at how much space they really needed. Alas, it was slightly more than a tiny house. “Ours is 1,198 square feet,” Audrey says. They consider it their luxurious tiny house. The timber-frame home feels much larger than its footprint thanks to open ceilings with exposed pine beams and wide hallways. After years of brainstorming, Amy drew a detailed sketch of the log cabin „

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Audrey and Amy credit Animal, Vegetable, Miracle with their desire to live this way. Years ago, they went to the beach and listened to the book, by Barbara Kingsolver, in the car. They both say that was a turning point.

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ABOVE “This door is from my parents’ house originally,” Amy says. “It was in the chicken coop, which was falling apart. The doorknob is from my great-grandmother’s house on my mom’s side. My grandpa had had these sitting in his garage, and Mom still had the key.” LEFT Audrey’s grandparents were also dairy farmers. The kitchen was built around their old butcher block. The pot rack consists of old farm tools from the Crawfords. The grater lamp is by an Efland artist. Almost every decorative item or piece of art is local, mostly purchased in Mebane or Saxapahaw.

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sort of place they wanted and took it to builder Kent Wiles, the state’s only green certified log and timber-frame homebuilder. Kent talked them out of a log cabin – “it’s more maintenance than you think” – and into a timber frame. The home draws on passivesolar architecture to minimize the need for heat and air conditioning. And bamboo floors are easy on the environment but hard for springer spaniel Bella, 6, and golden retriever June, 1, to scratch or hurt. “When you build like this,” Amy says, “you build to stay.” RESOURCEFUL THINKING Amy and Audrey moved in almost two years ago, and the couple has an ingenious approach to their nesting. “When you’re building smaller, you have to think about every corner,” Audrey says. That means prioritizing: “No matter whose house you go to, where do they end up? The kitchen,” says Amy. The living room features a leather couch that’s actually a futon, in lieu of a guest room. Hanging above the futon is a painting of a cow that Amy created based off of a photo of a similar piece she once saw at World Market. Follow them through the house, and it becomes clear that Amy is an industrious treasure-hunter. The shelf in the bathroom? “Piece of wood from the barn across the way.” The bathroom curtains? “Old coffee bean bag.” This knickknack, thrift store; that one, antique shop. A side table in the bedroom is an old desk left curbside at Glen Lennox, sanded down and repainted. A light in the kitchen is an old colander turned upside down and fitted with a bulb. Anything not locally made or cleverly procured likely comes from either the Williamses or the Crawfords. Both women share a fierce dedication to family heritage, evident not only in the land they live on but also in the ample heirlooms throughout „

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“The beams are the skeleton of the house,” Audrey says. “They went up first, and then the wall panels [were installed]. … Everything comes already sized, so [the builders] are just assembling it. There’s so much less waste because they’re not bringing all of the materials and cutting them on the property.”

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The shelves’ iron fittings were custom-made by a blacksmith. They hang from the beams for aesthetic reasons, but also for support.

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A relaxing happy hour with pups Bella and June.

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Some of the fruits of Amy and Audrey’s labor.

their home. There’s the old orchard ladder from Audrey’s family that’s now a shelf; the mudroom hall tree from Amy’s grandmother; the bathroom mirror hung from a pulley from Amy’s great-grandfather’s well. There’s the calfskin serving as a bedroom rug, a nod to Crawford Dairy Farm. “It’s fun to hang on to things like that,” Amy says. “Most people don’t have that.”

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2015

C U LT I VAT I O N Most people don’t have family land, either, and the couple doesn’t take that for granted. “For us, this house is really about a lifestyle,” Audrey says. They’re embarking on that homestead dream with a fruit and vegetable garden, chickens, Welsh harlequin ducks (a heritage breed) and goats. For now. “I just want a little bitty slice,” Amy says of the exercise to literally live within their means. “A garden, a couple of chickens – it’s all I need.” So far, it’s been a life full of sunshine and rainbows. No, really. “This is my first time truly living out in the country,” Audrey says, “and the light out here is just amazing. You can go out to the front of the property and watch the orange sun come up and shine through the woods. You don’t get that kind of perspective in the city.” “Plus, rainbows,” Amy adds, and they both pause, almost reverently. “Double rainbows. It’s awesome.” CHM


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HAPPY CHICK FARM Audrey works as a manager at the UNC School of Government, and Amy is a sales rep for Mutual Distributing Company, offering wine and beer to the Saxapahaw area. But they have been influenced by their surrounding agricultural community. “Farming is a full-time job,” Audrey says of what they’ve come to understand from their neighbors. “We both still have full-time jobs. To experiment with a little piece of [farming] has been fun. We challenge ourselves to see how much we can grow and what we can grow for ourselves, which is a different model.” Sometimes they have more than enough for themselves and their friends, so they began Happy Chick Farm. “It’s small-scale,” Audrey says. “We have a few people we sell eggs to, and a couple types of vegetables.” This year’s blackberry harvest went to the folks at Haw River Farmhouse Ales to make a blackberry sour beer, and in the future, they hope to make goat cheese. Till then, they make direct deliveries to Happy Chick Farm customers. What’s leftover is used as a bartering tool. “We’re far enough [out of town] that it is a little bit inconvenient,” Audrey explains, “so you form relationships with neighbors and depend on each other. We’ll trade eggs for mayo — that kind of thing.”

On the menu for Amy and Audrey this Thanksgiving? A bourbon peach upside-down cake made with peaches Audrey canned this summer.

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Features, amenities, floor plans, elevations, square footage and designs vary per plan and community and are subject to changes or substitution without notice. Images may contain options which are not standard on all models. Please see your New Home Consultant for more information and home purchase and sale agreement for additional information, disclosures, disclaimers relating to the home and the actual features designated as an Everything’s Included® feature. †The information from Builder 100 is used or reprinted with permission of Hanley Wood Media, Inc. Copyright © 2015 Lennar Corporation. All rights reserved. Lennar, the Lennar logo and the Everything’s Included® logo are registered service marks or service marks of Lennar Corporation and/or its subsidiaries. (14071) 9/28/15


HOMES • CONDOS • APARTMENTS

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Party Ready

THE MOST SOCIAL PART OF THE YEAR IS JUST AROUND THE CORNER. BE SURE YOU’RE READY TO EAT, DRINK AND BE MERRY WHILE LOOKING YOUR BEST. PRODUCED BY ANDREA GRIFFITH CASH | PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIANA BROUGH

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H O L I D A Y

E N T E R T A I N I N G

The Dress

This Frascara silk faille classic fullskirt dress in an amethyst tone has pockets and is priced at $1,265. Find the flirty, fun party dress at Fine Feathers in University Place.

Fashion Advice

Got a calendar of holiday soirees to attend and not a clue what to wear? Don’t sweat it. Take the advice of some of the most fashionable retailers we know.

Wea r what looks best on you. Play to you r assets. If you’ve got great legs, wea r skirts. If pa nts a re better, just find the shape that fits you. All jewel tones a re really in this season – teal, eggpla nt, a methyst, bu rgu ndy. And graphic bla ck-a nd-white pieces will always be a strong choice. A dress like [ou r model’s] is almost a ca nvas for whatever the mood. The interest is in the shape of the dress. It’s f lirty, with pockets a nd little sleeves. Y ou ca n really dress it up with rhinestone or specialty ge mstone jewelry. Y ou ca n go less conservative with the shoes if you wa nt — something very strappy. I think it’s a jewelry dress. Put a big neckla ce with it if you’re comforta ble. Or really extravaga nt ea rrings. Y ou could certainly do a bea utiful pash mina a nd bring in other jewel tones. Or wea r a bla ck spa rkly pash mina.” Pam Patterson, Fine Feathers  

The Model

Smruti Shah, 33, is a physical therapist who lives in Southern Village with husband Rick and daughters Sophia, 4, and Ella, 10 months. A marathon runner, Smruti enjoyed the opportunity to get pampered for our photo shoot. It was also an educational experience. “I wear my hair down all the time because I don’t know how to put it up without looking like I’m going to prom,” she says.

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“ If you’ve got a lot of pa rties to attend, invest in a good u nderpinning in a basic color that suits you (bla ck or brown, for exa mple). Choose both a ja cket a nd a sweater to pa rtner with it, a nd some great a ccessories to cha nge the look from pa rty to pa rty. It’s easier to have a basic color overall (head to toe in the sa me solid color), a nd then cha nge you r a ccessories (silk sca rves, brightly colored jewelry, pea rls, etc.) to suit the occasion. If you’re not su re of the dress code, the invitation a nd venu e will give you some clu e. Is it business or social related? Are you going directly from work or it is on the weekend? If it’s a fa ncier weekend venu e, consider wea ring cocktail attire. A solid color dress in a silky fa bric is always appropriate a nd easy to a ccessorize.” Susan Coker, Dina Porter

“ Don’t be afraid to spa rkle! The holiday season is the most gla morous of the m all! Wea r a sequin dress or drape you rself in jewel tones – whether it’s cocktail or dinner, a little bit of spa rkle ca n ma ke all the difference! It is importa nt to re me mber, it’s always better to be overdressed tha n u nderdressed. So if you don’t know the dress code, find you r favorite little bla ck dress. K eep you r a ccessories simple a nd wea r sensible heels. K eep a pair of f lats in the ca r just in case.” Mikey Gray, Uniquities


H O L I D A Y

1

Separate the top section of your hair and pin it out of the way. Pull the loose hair into a ponytail at nape of neck and spray Oribe Dry Texture Spray onto the ponytail generously.

2

Using a fine-toothed comb, back comb (tease) your ponytail to make it voluminous and give it texture.

E N T E R T A I N I N G

Mastering the Updo

The women behind Ceremony Salon in Carrboro say updos that are not too fussy – and look DIY, even when they’re done by professionals – are what’s in. “You’ve got to show up to the party like you don’t care that much,” says Rachel Radford, the salon’s owner.

3

Wrap the teased ponytail into a bun and secure with hairpins.

4

Take down your top section and spray with Dry Texture spray for grip and shine. Then, back comb it section by section for volume.

t

e FINIShH LOOKED

5

Smooth out the top with a boar bristle brush.

6

Secure loose ends to your first bun section. Spray with a flexible hair spray for hold. For added flair, add your favorite hair accessory or shiny brooch.

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The Eyes Have It

When Amy Schumer won an Emmy several weeks ago, among those she thanked in her speech was “the girl who gave me this smoky eye.” And for good reason. It can be overwhelming to try to change your entire makeup routine before heading to a holiday party or event. So the eyes are a natural place to focus, says Annie Mercer of Ceremony. Here’s how she achieved our model’s look using Serenity + Scott products:

1

To even out any discoloration around the eye area, apply concealer under the eye and across the entire lid. With a semi-flat, medium-sized shadow brush, apply a neutral shadow slightly darker than your skin tone across lid and into the crease.

3

To achieve the smoky look, before your liner sets, gently buff and smudge liner using a smaller smudge brush. Using backand-forth or small, circular strokes, blend the liner upward and outward. Don’t worry – if you over-smudge, simply apply more liner and repeat!

6

For an added holiday touch, apply a light, glittery shadow to the inner eye.

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4

On the bottom lashes, line the inner rim or waterline with liner. Follow by smudging lower lash line with medium/dark shadow for a sultry, smoky effect.

7

Pair with a universally flattering burgundy lip for the ultimate party look.

2

Using a cream or pencil eyeliner, sketch, using short, deliberate strokes focusing on the outer three-quarters of the lash line. Keeping liner away from inner eye will give a more fresh, open-eyed look.

5

Finish with two coats of mascara.

t

e FINIShH LOOKED


H O L I D A Y

Hostess Gift Advice No need to arrive at the party empty-handed…

I a m a huge fan of packaging, so when I give a gift, it has to look lovely as well as be reasonably priced. My go-to gifts are soaps, lotions, spa products or dusting powders from Greenwich Bay Trading Company. They are beautifully packaged, smell a mazing and can be purchased in travel sizes. They also are made in North Carolina, which I love!” Jeannie Petterson, Uniquitiques of Hillsborough

“ This su mmer, I bought a bu nch of inexpensive, white fa bric dinner napkins a nd a n indigo dye kit. I dyed a huge batch, got some pretty ribbon from Mulberry Silks a nd F ine Fa brics in Ca rrboro a nd tied up sets of fou r napkins for hostess gifts. They a re a ha ndmade, inexpensive a nd trendy alternative to a bottle of wine.”

E N T E R T A I N I N G

C heers!

What’s our model drinking? A nice nod to the season created by Mary Tate Sward of Venable that would be great for your holiday party. The mezcal adds a mild smokiness, and the Krupnikas honey liqueur incorporates those classic fall flavors that we all look forward to this time of year. Light Weight Jacket 1 ½ oz. mezcal (preferably Monte Alban) ¾ oz. Brothers Vilgalys Krupnikas (made in Durham!) 1 ½ oz. Looza Pear Nectar (if you’ve got time and a juicer, try some fresh pear juice) ¼ oz. fresh lime juice Cinnamon stick for garnish Add all ingredients to a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake and strain over fresh ice in a rocks glass. Use a microplane to shave a touch of fresh cinnamon on top. Garnish with a cinnamon stick.  CHM

Molly Dansby, Ply Fine Paper

“ When I’m invited to someone’s home, I love to bring a box of locally made Chapel Hill Toffee. It comes in small, mediu m a nd la rge boxes so I ca n fit the occasion. Everyone thinks it’s awesome, pa rticula rly my gra ndchildren. Also, it’s nicely pa ckaged so the hostess ca n sha re it with other gu ests or keep it to enjoy later.” Catherine Palomba, WomanCraft

“ My favorite hostess present for my foodie friends who love dinner parties is a Moonspoon pickle fork or knife for spreads. Made in Pennsylva nia from lovely cherry wood, they have designs cut into the ha ndles that I ca n match to my friends’ homes.” Ginna Earl, Vespertine

Ceremony Space

This month, Ceremony will move next door to the 300 East Main space formerly occupied by WomanCraft, which has moved down the street. By tripling in size, Ceremony will now have an apothecary and will offer nail services, waxing services and facials. The apothecary will be kind of like Sephora but with a local bent, says Ceremony owner Rachel Radford. Products will include men’s beard care lines, brushes, hair appliances, headbands, nail polish and more. November 2015 chapelhillmagazine.com

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70 Reunited,

YEARS later

A SERIES OF COINCIDENCES AND COMMON CONTACTS PROMPTED A VISIT BETWEEN H.G. JONES OF GALLOWAY RIDGE AND HIS WORLD WAR II EXECUTIVE OFFICER BY WALTER MEARS

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A

N OLD SAILOR’S

salute to his World War II skipper after 71 years footnotes the long story of H.G. Jones, the son of a North Carolina sharecropper who became an honored historian, author and nationally noted archivist. Now 91 and living in Galloway Ridge, H.G. – the initials stand for Houston Gwynne – tells of the reunion in an interview in his living room with two other Navy veterans who now are neighbors and friends. One of them is a military historian who was the bridge between H.G.and Hugh P. McCormick of Baltimore. Hugh was a Navy lieutenant junior grade when he was executive officer of the wooden submarine chaser on which H.G. served as a sonarman in the Mediterranean. Before this summer’s reunion, they’d last seen each other on Sept. 21, 1944. They’d been closer, literally, than most Naval officers and enlisted men because their subchaser USS SC 525 was only 110 feet long and less than 18 feet wide. On it, they pursued German submarines, spotting them for destroyers and other warships that attacked them. H.G. and Hugh, now 94, met again at Galloway to share fading photographs and memories of their service together off North Africa, which included supporting the Anzio southern France invasions, where SC 525 led landing craft toward the beachheads.

The official military portraits of H.G. Jones and Hugh P. McCormick.

MUTUAL FRIENDS Their meeting came about through a series of contacts and coincidences. H.G.’s friend and Galloway neighbor, George Hecker, 92, a World War II and Cold War submarine officer, arranged a meeting with Ken Samuelson of Fearrington Village, a Navy veteran and military oral historian. Ken has conducted more than 100 oral history interviews of veterans. His work is at the Military Section of the North Carolina State Archives in Raleigh. That led him to read H.G.’s book, A Sonarman’s War, where he found the name of Hugh, a friend years earlier in Baltimore. So it all came together, and he arranged Hugh’s August visit. As with many others of their generation, H.G. and George enlisted as teenagers after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941. George, a Naval Academy graduate, made his career in the Navy. H.G. served throughout the war. After his service in the Mediterranean, he was sent to the Pacific aboard a minesweeper. His ship was clearing the channel for a planned U.S. invasion of Japan when the second atomic bomb struck Nagasaki 105 miles away, and the Japanese surrendered. Years later, H.G. met former President Harry S. Truman at his presidential library and thanked Truman for the decision to use the atom bomb and spare the invasion. “He put his arm around my shoulder and said, ‘You don’t know how good that makes me feel,’” H.G. recalls. „

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V E T E R A N S

D A Y

A PUBLIC SERVANT After the war, H.G. resumed the interrupted education he’d begun before the war at a small college near his family home in Caswell County, near the Virginia border. “I got tired of following a mule in a tobacco field,” he says of his initial decision to enter college. On the GI Bill, he went back to school, graduating from Appalachian State University in 1949, then earning graduate degrees, including a doctorate. He was a college history professor, became state archivist in 1956, then served as director of the North Carolina Office of Archives and History. In 1974, he became a professor and curator of the North Carolina Collection at UNC, where he is credited with organizing the nation’s most comprehensive array of documents on state history. H.G. received the North Carolina Award for Public Service in 2002. One of his eight books was influential in the handling of the Richard Nixon Watergate tapes and the movement for independence at the National Archives. Perhaps his most popular was Scoundrels, Rogues and Heroes of the Old North State. His latest, published this year, is Miss Mary’s Money, an account of the heiress from a plantation family whose

During their reunion, Hugh and H.G. reviewed pictures and shared memories of Casablanca and the invasions of Anzio and southern France.

philanthropy supported schools and helped modernize the facilities – notably the plumbing – on the UNC campus. That book testifies to his unfailing curiosity about history. H.G. saw an unusual gravestone cross in a family cemetery in Chatham County and began researching the family. Eight years later, that led to the book, written with researcher David Southern of Durham. CHM

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BEST

LAWYERS

B

est Lawyers® is the oldest and most respected peer-review publication in the legal profession. A listing within it is widely regarded by both clients and legal professionals as a significant honor, conferred on a lawyer by his or her peers. For more than three decades, Best Lawyers lists have earned the respect of the profession, the media and the public as the most reliable, unbiased source of legal referrals anywhere.

HERE’S HOW IT WORKS Lawyers can be nominated by anyone but themselves. Their peers provide feedback on the nominee’s work. The question is asked: “If you could not take the case, how likely would you be to refer a client to this lawyer?” Results are calculated, and feedback is reviewed. As part of an eligibility check, nominees are confirmed to be in good standing with their local Bar Associations. Firms are informed of the results, and the list is published. Only a single lawyer in each practice area and designated

metropolitan area is honored as the “Lawyer of the Year,” making this accolade particularly significant. Lawyers being honored as “Lawyer of the Year” are selected based on particularly impressive voting averages received during the exhaustive peer-review assessments. Receiving this designation reflects the high level of respect a lawyer has earned among other leading lawyers in the same practice areas for their abilities, their professionalism and their integrity. For more information, please visit BestLawyers.com. u

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René Stemple Ellis Beason & Ellis Conflict Resolution beasonellis.com

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BIOTECHNOLOGY LAW Allen R. Baum Brinks Gilson & Lione; brinksgilson.com

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Robert A. Beason Beason & Ellis Conflict Resolution beasonellis.com

Leto Copeley Copeley Johnson & Groninger cjglawfirm.com


APPELLATE PRACTICE M. Gordon Widenhouse Rudolf Widenhouse & Fialko 919-967-4900; rwf-law.com Adam Stein Tin Fulton Walker & Owen 919-240-7089; tinfulton.com BANKRUPTCY AND CREDITOR DEBTOR RIGHTS / INSOLVENCY AND REORGANIZATION LAW John A. Northen Northen Blue; 919-968-4441; northenblue.com BUSINESS ORGANIZATIONS (INCLUDING LLCS AND PARTNERSHIPS) Jeffrey C. Hart Robinson Bradshaw & Hinson 919-328-8800; rbh.com CIVIL RIGHTS LAW Adam Stein Tin Fulton Walker & Owen 919-240-7089; tinfulton.com COMMERCIAL LITIGATION K. Alan Parry Parry & Tyndall; 919-967-0504; parrytyndall.com M. Gordon Widenhouse Rudolf Widenhouse & Fialko 919-967-4900; rwf-law.com CORPORATE LAW John M. Fogg Jeffrey C. Hart Robinson Bradshaw & Hinson 919-328-8800; rbh.com Jonathan Jenkins Schell Bray 919-929-0990; schellbray.com CRIMINAL DEFENSE: NON-WHITE-COLLAR Amos G. Tyndall Parry & Tyndall; 919-967-0504; parrytyndall.com M. Gordon Widenhouse Rudolf Widenhouse & Fialko 919-967-4900; rwf-law.com „

Walker Lambe Rhudy Costley & Gill, PLLC a 2016 U.S. News & World Report BEST LAW FIRM would like to congratulate members of the firm selected as Best Attorneys in North Carolina:

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For thirty-four years, Walker Lambe Rhudy Costley & Gill, PLLC has provided legal counsel to families and businesses in the Greater Triangle Area of North Carolina. In addition to business, estate, trust and elder abuse litigation, our attorneys provide a range of legal services from sophisticated tax and financial planning to elder law and estate planning incorporating wills, trusts, asset protection and charitable giving plans. The firm also works with entrepreneurs and businesses in all aspects of their operations including succession planning, employment, tax, contracts, finance, technology, commercial real estate, leases, vendor relations, and business sales, mergers or acquisitions.

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BISHOP & SMITH, PLLC

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Keith A. Bishop founded the BISHOP & SMITH, PLLC law firm in 1997 to provide legal service throughout the State of North Carolina. BISHOP & SMITH has a well-deserved reputation for taking on difficult and complex civil and criminal cases. We are proud to maintain a high success rate for many of our clients in need of serious civil and criminal litigation.

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Publishing

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Best Lawyers is the oldest and most respected peer-review publication the attor n eys liste d in the 2016 e dition of T he B e s t L aw yers in Amer ica © from the g reat metro p olises of CHAPEL H ILL a nd C A R RB

ORO!

in the legal profession. A listing in

Best Lawyers is widely regarded by both clients and legal professionals as a significant honor, conferred on a lawyer by his or her peers. For more than three decades, Best Lawyers lists have earned the respect of the profession, the media, and the public, as the most reliable, unbiased source of legal referrals anywhere.

1/2 HORIZONTAL 7.5” X 4.5475”

November 2015 chapelhillmagazine.com

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I N

R E S C H A P E L H I A N A D V E R

T A U R A N T S , D E L I L L , C A R R B O R O , D N O R T H E R N C H T I S E R S H I G H L I G

S A N D B I S T R O S H I L L S B O R O U G H A T H A M C O U N T Y H T E D I N B O X E S

TASTE

CHAPEL HILL East Franklin Street Downtown Artisan Pizza Kitchen Sand­wiches, hamburgers, pizza. 153 E. Franklin St.; 919-929-9119 [B]Ski’s Specialty wraps. 147 E. Franklin St.; 919-969-9727

PHOTO BY JESSICA STRINGER

Bandido’s Mexican Cafe Burritos, salads, quesadillas, tacos. 159-1/2 E. Franklin St.; 919-967-5048 BUNS Serves gourmet burgers, fries and shakes made from fresh ingredients; beer and wine only. 107 N. Columbia St.; 919-240-4746; bunsofchapelhill.com Carolina Coffee Shop The mainstay serves casual American cuisine for breakfast, lunch and dinner. 138 E. Franklin St.; 919-942-6875

THE DISH

Cosmic Cantina Burritos, salads, quesadillas, tacos. 128 E. Franklin St.; 919-960-3955

Il Palio Ristorante

Four Corners American fare, nachos, wings, pasta. 175 E. Franklin St.; 919-537-8230

1 5 0 5 E . F R A N K L I N S T . 9 1 9 - 9 1 8 - 2 5 4 5 S I E N A H O T E L . C O M / I L - P A L I O

Kurama Sushi & Noodle Express Dumplings, salads, noodle dishes. 105 N. Columbia St.; 919-968-4747 Linda’s Bar & Grill Local beer, sweet potato tots, cheese fries, burgers. 203 E. Franklin St.; 919-933-6663 Miss Mong Mongolian BBQ, banh mi, fusion burritos. 163 E. Franklin St. 919-933-5277 R&R Grill Spicy wings, kabobs, flatbread pizza. 137 E. Franklin St.; 919-240-4411 Shanghai Dumplings Dumplings, pork buns, hotpots. 143 E. Franklin St.

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O U R

P I C K

O F

T H E

S E A S O N

I think it was right after chef Teddy Diggs rendered the fat of the house-made guanciale for my duck egg carbonara at Il Palio that it hit me: I will never get tired of the open kitchen concept and watching my dinner get made. If you’re a home chef, you’re probably huddled over your cookbook reading the next direction, but an advanced chef like Teddy is always two steps ahead, cooking in such a fluid manner that it’s mesmerizing. Thanks to the restaurant’s recent overhaul – including a window into the kitchen – you’ll have an unbeatable view of the nightly orchestration. Il Palio has also ditched the tablecloths and redone its dining room with modern art and earthy elements like wood, marble and stone. This marriage of contemporary and old-world Italy mirrors the menu that Teddy and his team worked on all summer long. Whether you’re in the mood for a glass of wine and crostini or a smoky main that shows off Teddy’s finesse with the new custom wood-fired grill, you’re going to find something to savor. But back to my duck egg carbonara. Made with imported bucatini, a local duck egg and a salty pork that’s cured for months, the dish is a creamy indulgence that owes its almost spicy flavor to plenty of black pepper. $21 – Jessica Stringer CHM


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D I N I N G      

G U I D E

     

ROOTS BAKERY, BISTRO & BAR Farm-to-table bakery, bistro American and Central & bar American fusion; 161 E. Franklin St.; 919-240-7160; rootschapelhill.com.

ROOTS

BIENVENIDOS.

SPANKY’S A Chapel Hill institution since 1977, the American bar and grill serves hamburgers, brown sugar baby back ribs, garden fresh salads and barbecue; all ABC permits. 101 E. Franklin St.; 919-967-2678; spankysrestaurant.com Sugarland Cupcakes, gelato, pastries. 140 E. Franklin St.; 919-929-2100 Sup Dogs Creative hot dogs and sides like jalapeño popper tots and funnel cake sticks. 107 E. Franklin St.; 919-903-9566 Sutton’s Drug Store Burgers, sandwiches, breakfast, milk shakes. 159 E. Franklin St.; 919-942-5161 SweetFrog Premium Frozen Yogurt Choose your own yogurt and toppings. 105 E. Franklin St.; 919-537-8616 Time-Out Southern comfort food 24 hours a day. 201 E. Franklin St.; 919-929-2425 TOP OF THE HILL Our only local distillery also offers beers and American food, like burgers, flatbreads and entree specials; all ABC permits; outdoor dining. 100 E. Franklin St.; 919-929-8676; topofthehill.com Tru Deli & Wine Sandwiches and wine. 114 Henderson St.; 919-240-7755 Ye Olde Waffle Shoppe Waffles, pancakes, eggs. 173 E. Franklin St.; 919-929-9192 West Franklin Street Al’s Burger Shack Gourmet burgers and fries with local ingredients. 516 W. Franklin St.; 919-904-7659 411 WEST The menu – including fresh pasta, seafood and pizzas – is inspired by the flavors of Italy and the Mediterranean, with a healthy California twist; outdoor dining; all ABC permits. 411 W. Franklin St.; 919-967-2782; 411west.com

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BEER STUDY Bottle shop with in-store drafts and growlers to go. 106 N. Graham St.; 919-240-5423; beerstudy.com Bread and Butter Bread, cinnamon rolls, desserts. 503 W. Rosemary St.; 919-960-5998 BREADMEN’S A variety of sandwiches, burgers, salads and grilled meat, as well as daily soup and casserole specials. Breakfast served all day; vegetarian options; outdoor dining; beer and wine only. 324 W. Rosemary St.; 919-967-7110; breadmens.com Carolina Brewery The fifth-oldest brewery in the state; 460 W. Franklin St.; 919-942-1800 Crossroads Chapel Hill at The Carolina Inn New American cuisine and seasonal specialties; all ABC permits. 211 Pittsboro St.; 919-918-2777 Crepe Traditions Sweet and savory crepes, coffee, espresso. 140 W. Franklin St., Ste. 120; 919-391-9999 Cholanad Contemporary South Indian cuisine. 308 W. Franklin St.; 800-246-5262 CROOK’S CORNER For Special Southern classics like Occasions... shrimp and grits, Hoppin’ John and jalapeñocheddar hushpuppies 610 W. Franklin St.; 919-929-7643; crookscorner.com

like Dinner. ELAINE’S ON FRANKLIN Fine regional American cuisine, made with the freshest local ingredients; all ABC permits. 454 W. Franklin St.; 919-960-2770; elainesonfranklin.com

NEWS BITES HELLO, SAWASDEE! Raleigh’s Sawasdee Thai will be expanding into the space where Sakura Xpress used to be. A note to lovers of Sakura’s hibachi chicken: rest assured it will be staying on the new menu. NEW ... Three new kids on the block are officially open: Crepe Traditions on West Franklin, a Captain Poncho’s brick-and-mortar in Southern Village and The Shoppe Bar & Meatball Kitchen on East Main Street in Carrboro. … AND IMPROVED! Crossroads Chapel Hill at The Carolina Inn has now reopened after a summer spent renovating the space and revamping the menu. MO’ MOE’S West Franklin will welcome Moe’s Southwest Grill in the spot where Caribou Coffee was, so you may want to give your complicated coffee order a rest and practice your complicated burrito order instead! HOT SPOT FOR A HOTPOT Mei Asian’s location on East Franklin Street has also found its replacement: Shanghai Dumplings, which serves dumplings, pork buns and hotpots. FAREWELL Southern Village has bid adieu to Merlion. We’ll keep you posted on what’s in store for that space.

454 W. FRANKLIN ST. • CHAPEL HILL 960.2770 • www.elainesonfranklin.com

Silver Medal: Best Restaurants of 2011, News & Observer

Fitzgerald’s Irish Pub Burgers and beer. 206 W. Franklin St.; 919-240-4560

KIPOS Greek cuisine in a relaxed, upscale setting; outdoor dining; all ABC permits. 431 W. Franklin St.; 919-425-0760; kiposgreektaverna.com

Guru India Tandoori, thali, curry. 508-A W. Franklin St.; 919-942-8201 KALAMAKI Simple, well-prepared Greek street food dishes and salads; outdoor dining; beer and wine only. 431 W. Franklin St.; 919-240-7354; kalamakichapelhill.com

Italian Pizzeria III Pizza, calzones, subs. 508 W. Franklin St.; 919-968-4671 Jasmin Mediterranean Bistro Greek-Lebanese cuisine. 100 W. Franklin St.; 919-903-8868 Lantern Pan-Asian cuisine. 423 W. Franklin St.; 919-969-8846


A WISE MAN ONCE SAID, “WHISKEY IS LIQUID SUNSHINE.” SO, PUT YOUR SUNGLASSES ON ‘CAUSE TOPO EIGHT OAK IS HERE.

WWW.TOPODISTILLERY.COM


D I N I N G

G U I D E

La Residence French-inspired cuisine made from fresh ingredients. 202 W. Rosemary St.; 919-967-2506 Lime & Basil Vietnamese fare. 200 W. Franklin St.; 919-967-5055 Lime Fresh Mexican Grill Freshly prepared Mexican food. 140 W. Franklin St.; 919-904-7270 Los Potrillos Taquitos, quesadillas, enchiladas. 220 W. Rosemary St.; 919-932-4301 MAMA DIP’S KITCHEN Traditional Southern specialties, including a country breakfast and lunch and dinner classics like fried chicken and Brunswick stew; outdoor dining; beer and wine only. 408 W. Rosemary St.; 919-942-5837; mamadips.com

MEDITERRANEAN DELI Offers healthy vegan, vegetarian and gluten-free options as well as delicious meats from the grill; beer and wine only; outdoor dining. 410 W. Franklin St.; 919-967-2666; mediterraneandeli.com Mellow Mushroom Classic Southern pizza. 310 W. Franklin St.; 919-929-1941 Merritt’s Store & Grill Sandwiches, breakfast biscuits, burgers. 1009 S. Columbia St.; 919-942-4897

Trolly Stop Specialty hot dogs and burgers. 306B W. Franklin St.; 919-240-4206

Monterrey Traditional Mexican cuisine. 237 S. Elliott Rd.; 919-969-8750

Vespa Italian and Mediterranean fare. 306 W. Franklin St.; 919-969-6600

Olio & Aceto Brunch and lunch options inspired by Blue Sky Oil and Vinegar products. 400 S. Elliott Rd.; 919-903-8958

Vimala’s Curryblossom Cafe Traditional Indian tandoori and thali. 431 W. Franklin St.; 919-929-3833 West End Wine Bar Pastries, light tapas, 100 wines. 450 W. Franklin St.; 919-967-7599 Windows Restaurant at the Franklin Hotel New American cuisine. 311 W. Franklin St.; 919-442-9000 YOGURT PUMP Since 1982, YoPo has served up frozen yogurt treats and shakes with unique flavors like mocha java and red velvet. Non-fat, low-fat and no sugar added available. 106 W. Franklin St.; 919-942-7867; yogurtpump.com

Village Plaza/East Franklin Street/ Shops at Eastgate 35 Cafe Buffet for lunch and dinner. 1704 E. Franklin St.; 919-968-3488 Caffe Driade Carrboro Coffee, bowl-sized lattes, local baked goods, beer and wine. 1215-A E. Franklin St.; 919-942-2333 Carolina 1663 Contemporary Southern cuisine at the Sheraton. 1 Europa Dr.; 919-969-2157 Il Palio Ristorante at The Siena Hotel N.C.’s only AAA Four Diamond Italian restaurant. 1505 E. Franklin St.; 919-918-2545

Noodles & Company Asian, Mediterranean, American noodles. 214 W. Franklin St.; 919-967-7320

La Hacienda Burritos, salads, quesadillas, tacos. 1813 N. Fordham Blvd.; 919-967-0207

Sandwhich Hot and cold specialty sandwiches and burgers. 407 W. Franklin St.; 919-929-2114 SPICY 9 SUSHI BAR & ASIAN RESTAURANT Sushi, Thai curries, bibimbap and other Asian entrees. 140 W. Franklin St.; 919-903-9335; spicy9chapelhill.com Talulla’s Authentic Turkish cuisine, including grilled whole fish and eggplant musakka. 456 W. Franklin St.; 919-933-1177

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SQUID’S The menu of fresh seafood options includes wood-grilled fillets, live Maine lobster, fried seafood and oysters; outdoor dining; all ABC permits. 1201 N. Fordham Blvd. (15-501); 919-942-8757; squidsrestaurant.com Sunrise Biscuit Kitchen Drive-through biscuits, sandwiches, burgers, hot dogs. 1305 E. Franklin St.; 919-933-1324 Tandoor Traditional Indian cuisine, vegan options. 1301 E. Franklin St.; 919-967-6622

Mint North Indian subz korma and chicken jalfrezi. 504 W. Franklin St.; 919-929-6188

Old Chicago Pizza and Taproom Deep-dish pizza, calzones, salads and beer. 140 W. Franklin St.; 919-903-9150

Penguin’s Cafe Salad bar, hot bar, sandwiches. Whole Foods Market, 81 S. Elliott Rd.; 919-968-1983

The Loop Pizza Grill Pizzas, soups, salads, sandwiches, burgers. Shops at Eastgate; 919-969-7112 Market Street CoffeeHouse Locally sourced coffee, pastries and more. 227 S. Elliott Rd.; 919-968-8993 Min Ga Korean cuisine featuring grilled fish, pan fries, hot pot and noodles. 116 Old Durham Rd.; 919-933-1773 MIXED CASUAL KOREAN BISTRO Specializes in bibimbap, customizable bowls of rice, meat, vegetables and sauce; 1404 E. Franklin St.; 919-929-0047; mixedkoreanbistro.com

Twisted Noodles Thai noodle soups, pan-fried noodles. Shops at Eastgate; 919-933-9933 Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard (Airport Road) Hunam Chinese Cantonese cuisine. 790 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-967-6133 KITCHEN Bistro-style dining with a seasonal menu that always includes mussels; outdoor dining; beer and wine only. 764 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-537-8167; kitchenchapelhill.com Lucha Tigre Latin-Asian cuisine and sake tequila bar. 746 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-904-7326 Market Street Coffee & Ice Cream Local coffee, ice cream, pastries and sandwiches. 2805 Homestead Rd.; 919-960-6247 Pop’s Pizzeria Pizzas, calzones, stromboli, pasta. 1822 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-932-1040 THE ROOT CELLAR (FORMERLY FOSTER’S MARKET) Sandwiches, prepared salads, desserts and more. Beer and wine only; outdoor dining. 750 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-9673663; rootcellarchapelhill.com


JOYOUS COOKING

M O R E T O N N E A L I S A N A U T H O R A N D I N T E R I O R D E S I G N E R W H O L I V E S I N C H A P E L H I L L . S H E I S A L I F E L O N G F O O D I E , H A V I N G C O - F O U N D E D L A R E S I D E N C E I N 1 9 7 6 .

A No-Fuss Supper If you’re interested in culinary history, you will devour Provence, 1970: M.F.K. Fisher, Julia Child, James Beard, and the Reinvention of American Taste. The memoir, written by M.F.K. Fisher’s nephew, Luke Barr, was inspired by letters he discovered after the great food writer’s death. Barr pieced together an account of a singular trip to the South of France when Fisher joined culinary icons Beard, Child, Richard Olney, Simone Beck and Child’s editor Judith Jones for a whole lot of cooking and talking. The aftermath was a reshaping of America’s food culture and, ironically, a turning away from traditional French cuisine, the prevalent trend of the time. It’s a fascinating story, but the best part of the book, to me, is Barr’s description of childhood visits to his aunt’s cottage in Napa Valley. Never, ever, did Fisher fuss over a

meal while guests were there. Simple dishes had been prepared ahead and were ready to be served, chilled or at room temperature, any time they felt like eating. Mary Frances (as her nearest and dearest called her) could then relax and enjoy her visitors. Visions of Mary Frances’s casual hospitality danced in my head as I invited a few friends for supper. Since my husband Drake was away, I couldn’t depend on him to grill the main course, which he often does as I chat away with our company. This was my big chance to serve salmon (a fish Drake despises) as well as quinoa, one of those “weird grains” he’s not crazy about. I chose a third dish for beauty and ease of cooking: simple red and yellow bell peppers, sliced into strips, tossed with olive oil and salt, and roasted in the oven (no need to burn and peel the peppers).

Just as Mary Frances did, I let the dishes sit on the kitchen island as I joined my guests for a leisurely cocktail. We dined when we were good and ready. This is now my new favorite menu for company when Drake is out of town. Both of these dishes travel well, making them great choices for tailgates or potlucks.

Slow-Baked Salmon

Preheat oven to 250 degrees. (Trust me, something truly amazing happens to salmon when you cook it this slowly.) Place the salmon, skin side down, on an oiled baking dish. Baste it liberally with olive oil, then sprinkle with salt, pepper and lemon peel, to taste. Top with thyme sprigs and thin lemon slices, if you like, or substitute fresh dill and sliced sweet onions. Cover with aluminum foil. Bake for 25-30 minutes, depending on the thickness of the filet, until salmon is opaque. Serve warm or at room temperature. There’s no hurry! Chill the leftovers. It’s delicious cold, too. Serves 6-8.

PHOTO BY JAMES STEFIUK

2-3 lb. filet of salmon (you need 4-6 oz. per serving) Olive oil Lemon peel, grated Salt and pepper Fresh thyme sprigs, optional One lemon, sliced into rounds, optional

Mediterranean-Style Quinoa Salad 1 cup uncooked quinoa, preferably red ½ tsp. salt 1 /3 cup chopped red or sweet onion 1 small clove garlic, chopped finely 1 cup chopped seeded cucumber 1 ½ cups chopped tomato 2 Tbsp. or more chopped fresh basil or mint ¼ cup roughly chopped kalamata olives 1 /3 cup crumbled feta cheese 1 Tbsp. red wine vinegar

2 Tbsp. olive oil Salt and black pepper, to taste Cook quinoa with salt and water, according to package directions. Pour into a large bowl and let cool to room temperature. Red quinoa is prettier, but no different in flavor. Stir in all remaining ingredients. Adjust seasonings, adding more herbs or oil and vinegar if you think it needs it. Refrigerate until company comes or serve immediately. Serves 6-8.

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D I N I N G

G U I D E

Sal’s Ristorante 2 Pizza, calzones, pasta, sandwiches. 2811 Homestead Rd.; 919-932-5125

Town Hall Grill Sandwiches, steak, seafood. 410 Market St.; 919-960-8696 Weaver Street Market Hot bar and salad bar for breakfast, lunch and dinner. 716 Market St.; 919-929-2009

Meadowmont Village Area Brixx Pizza Specialty pizzas such as pimento cheese and Mexican. 501 Meadowmont Village Circle; 919-929-1942

University Place Alfredo’s Pizzas, calzones, salads, subs, pasta, desserts; outdoor dining; beer and wine only. 919-968-3424

Cafe Carolina & Bakery Salads, sandwiches, breakfast. 601 Meadowmont Village Circle; 919-945-8811

Maple View Mobile Ice cream outpost of the Hillsborough dairy farm. 919-244-1949

Market Street Coffee & Ice Cream Locally sourced coffee, ice cream, pastries and hot dogs. 503 Meadowmont Village Circle; 919-929-1667

Red Bowl Sushi, bento boxes. 919-918-7888 TRILOGY American cafe featuring innovative twists on classic dishes. Silverspot Cinema; 919-357-9888; silverspot.net

[ONE] Fine dining with a focus on local, seasonal ingredients. 100 Meadowmont Village Circle; 919-537-8207 Southern Village Captain Poncho’s Tacos, quesadillas, burritos. 708 Market St.; 919-697-2237

Weathervane Shrimp and grits, sweet potato fries and other gourmet takes on classic flavors; 919-929-9466

La Vita Dolce Pastries, sorbet, gelato. 610 Market St.; 919-968-1635 Pazzo! Italian cuisine, take-out pizza. 700 Market St.; 919-929-9984

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VILLAGE BURGERS Gourmet burgers, including options from lentils to chicken, with sides like sweet potato fries and tater tots. 201 S. Estes Dr., University Place; 919-2404008; villageburgerchapelhill.com

Timberlyne Area Allen & Son Barbecue N.C. barbecue. 6203 Millhouse Rd. (N.C. 86 N.); 919-942-7576 The Farm House Steaks, salads, potatoes. 6004 Millhouse Rd. (N.C. 86 N.); 919-929-5727 Joe Van Gogh Coffee and pastries. 1129 Weaver Dairy Rd.; 919-967-2002 Margaret’s Cantina Creative Mexican appetizers and entrees. 1129 Weaver Dairy Rd.; 919-942-4745

CITY KITCHEN Wholesome American fare with a sophisticated twist; outdoor dining; all ABC permits. 201 S. Estes Dr., University Place; 919-928-8200; citykitchenchapelhill.com

chapelhillmagazine.com November 2015


D I N I N G

Oishii Sushi Bar Specialty rolls, teriyaki, stir-fry, sushi. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-932-7002 The Bagel Bar More than 20 homemade bagel varieties. 630 Weaver Dairy Rd., Ste. 109; 919-929-7700 The Pig Barbecue, fried tofu, collards. 630 Weaver Dairy Rd., Ste. 101; 919-942-1133 Queen of Sheba Ethiopian cuisine. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-932-4986 Sage Cafe Vegetarian fare. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-968-9266 N.C. 54 East/Raleigh Road Amante Gourmet Pizza Create-yourown pizzas. 6209-B Falconbridge Rd.; 919-493-0904 BIN 54 Steaks, seafood and other fine American food. Everything - including breads and desserts - is made entirely in-house; all ABC permits. Glen Lennox Shopping Center; 919-969-1155; bin54chapelhill.com

Brenz Pizza Specialty pizzas, subs, salads. 3120 Environ Way, East 54; 919-636-4636 ELEMENTS Cuisine that combines classical as well as modern Asian and European cooking techniques; check out the wine bar with small plates next door; outdoor dining. 2110 Environ Way, East 54; 919537-8780; elementsofchapelhill.com

G U I D E

Tobacco Road Sports Cafe Burgers, salads and sandwiches in a sports-friendly atmosphere. 1118 Environ Way, East 54; 919-537-8404 Governors Club Bean & Barrel Coffee shop, bar, grill. 50100 Governors Dr.; 919-967-9990 Ciao Bella Pizzeria Pizzas, pastas, sandwiches. 1718 Farrington Point Rd.; 919-932-4440

jujube Eclectic, modern cuisine inspired by the classic flavors of China and Vietnam. Glen Lennox Shopping Center; 919-960-0555

Tarantini Italian cuisine. 50160 Governors Dr. (Governors Village); 919-942-4240

Nantucket Grill & Bar Clam chowder, lobster rolls. 5925 Farrington Rd.; 919-402-0077

CARRBORO

RAAGA Authentic Indian delicacies like curry and masala served in an intimate setting. 3140 Environ Way, East 54; 919-240-7490 Thai Palace Soup, curries, pad thai. Glenwood Square Shopping Center; 919-967-5805 The Egg & I French toast and pancakes, specialty omelets. 1101 Environ Way, East 54; 919-537-8488

Downtown ACME FOOD & BEVERAGE CO. Soups, salads, seafood and entrees with a Southern touch; outdoor dining; all ABC permits. 110 E. Main St.; 919-929-2263; acmecarrboro.com Akai Hana Japanese cuisine including sushi, tempura and teriyaki. 206 W. Main St.; 919-942-6848

Welcome to Glasshalfull, downtown Carrboroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own restaurant, wine bar and wine shop. Enjoy delicious contemporary American cooking and an intriguing selection of wines from around the world. Craft beers and cocktails, too.

106 S. Greensboro St., Carrboro

919.967.9784

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D I N I N G

G U I D E

Armadillo Grill Tex-Mex burritos, en­chiladas, tacos, nachos. 120 E. Main St.; 919-929-4669 Carrburritos Burritos, tacos, nachos and margaritas made from fresh ingredients. 711 W. Rosemary St.; 919-933-8226 Country Junction Restaurant Simple southern classics. 404 W. Weaver St.; 919-929-2462 GLASSHALFULL Mediterraneaninspired food and wine; outdoor dining; all ABC permits. 106 S. Greensboro St.; 919-967-9784; glasshalfullcarrboro.com Gourmet Kingdom Sichuan cuisine. 301 E. Main St.; 919-932-7222 Jade Palace Sichuan and Chinese. 103 E. Main St.; 919-942-0006 Jessee’s Coffee & Bar Lunch and breakfast served all day, house-roasted espresso and coffees. 401 E. Main St.; 919-929-0445 Krave Kava and other exotic root and tea beverages. 105 W. Main St.; 919-408-9596

Market Street Coffee & Ice Cream Locally sourced coffee, ice cream and pastries; outdoor dining. 100 E. Weaver St.; 919-960-6776 Milltown Pub fare. 307 E. Main St.; 919-968-2460 Neal’s Deli Traditional deli fare. 100-C E. Main St.; 919-967-2185 Open Eye Cafe Locally roasted Carrboro Coffee and espresso, tea, beer and wine; 101 S. Greensboro St.; 919-968-9410 Provence Southern French cuisine. 203 W. Weaver St.; 919-967-5008 Spotted Dog Appetizers, soups, salads, entrees, desserts. 111 E. Main St.; 919-933-1117 Southern Rail Bar foods and more upscale nightly specials. 201-C E. Main St.; 919-967-1967 Steel String Brewery Craft beer and bluegrass music. 106-A S. Greensboro St.; 919-240-7215 Tyler’s Restaurant and Taproom Specialty import beers on tap and traditional pub fare. 102 E. Main St.; 919-929-6881

Porch Dining

Voted Best Comfort Food/Southern Food! Meats • Chicken • BBQ/Ribs Chicken & Dumplings • Vegetables • Casserole Brunswick Stew Gumbo Breakfast items include Pork Chops • Chicken & Gravy • Catfish Salmon Cakes • Fried Green Tomatoes Sweet Potato Pancakes & Biscuits

Mama Dip’s Kitchen

408 W. Rosemary St., Chapel Hill 942-5837 www.mamadips.com M-Sat 8am-9:30pm • Sun 8am-9pm

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300 East Main Amante Gourmet Pizza Create-your-own pizzas. 300 E. Main St.; 919-929-3330

Taste of the South

2015

Wings Over 18 flavors of wings. 313 E. Main St.; 919-537-8271

Breakfast served daily M-F till 11am, Sun till 1pm Open New Years Day

Bella’s International Cuisine A variety of homemade dishes. 360 E. Main St.; 919-903-9963 Calavera Empanada & Tequila Bar Savory and sweet empanadas and more than 50 kinds of tequila. 370 E. Main St.; 919-617-1674 Hickory Tavern Burgers, sandwiches and build-your-own salads. 370-110 E. Main St.; 919-942-7417 The Shoppe Bar and Meatball Kitchen Meatballs, sliders, sides. 370 E. Main St; 919-714-9014 Tom + Chee Fancy grilled cheese, soups, salads, fancy grilled cheese donuts. 370 East Main St., Ste. 140. 919-869-7728 Carr Mill Mall B-SIDE LOUNGE Small plates like flatbread, bacon-wrapped dates and fondue. Plus inspired cocktails. 919-904-7160; b-sidelounge.com


D I N I N G

CAFE SYMMETRY Eatery that focuses on healthy, locally sourced meals. Juices, draft beers and cocktails. 919-9039596; cafesymmetry.com Carrboro Pizza Oven Pizza, calzones. 919-904-7336 Elmo’s Diner Diner breakfast, lunch, dinner. 919-929-2909 Oasis Organic coffee, tea, beer and wine. 919-904-7343 VENABLE ROTISSERIE BISTRO Upscale comfort food with a heavy emphasis on locally sourced and seasonal ingredients; all ABC permits. 919-904-7160; venablebistro.com Weaver Street Market Hot bar and salad bar for breakfast, lunch and dinner. 919-929-0010 N.C. 54 West/Carrboro Plaza Anna Maria’s Pizzeria Italian cuisine. Carrboro Plaza; 919-929-1877

Fiesta Grill Burritos, chimichangas, fajitas, tacos. 3307 N.C. 54 W.; 919-928-9002 Hong Kong Chinese Restaurant Classic Chinese dishes. 602 Jones Ferry Rd.; 919-942-0850 Monterrey Traditional Mexican cuisine. 104 NC 54 (Carrboro Plaza); 919-960-7640 Wingman Wings and hot dogs. 104 N.C. 54 W.; 919-928-9200

G U I D E

Fig & Honey Southern and Mediterranean fare, from biscuits to kebabs. 141 Chatham Downs Dr., Ste. 201; 919-914-9760 The Goat Panini, meats, cheeses, pastries. Fearrington Village Center; 919-545-5717 Downtown Chatham Marketplace Sandwiches, pastries, baked goods. 480 Hillsboro St.; 919-542-2643 The City Tap Classic bar food. 89 Hillsboro St.; 919-545-0562

PITTSBORO Cole Park Plaza/U.S. 15-501/ Fearrington Village

Elizabeth’s Pizzas, calzones, sandwiches, pasta. 160 Hillsboro St.; 919-545-9292

Allen & Son Barbecue N.C. barbecue. 5650 U.S 15-501; 919-542-2294

Modern Life Deli & Drinks New York bagels, sandwiches, coffee. 46 Sanford Rd.; 919-533-6883

Carolina Brewery The fifth-oldest brewery in the state. 120 Lowes Dr.; 919-545-2330 The Fearrington Granary Small plates, burgers, grill options. Fearrington Village Center; 919-542-2121 The Fearrington House Fine-dining French cuisine. Fearrington Village Center; 919-542-2121

OAKLEAF Farm-to-table menu specializing Sophisticated farm to table dining Pittsboro’s renovated, in inFrench andhistoric Italian cuisine; kids Chatham Mills. menu; all ABC permits. 480 Hillsboro St.; 919-533-6303; oakleafnc.com The Phoenix Bakery Small-batch and seasonal baked goods and specialty cakes Lunch • Dinner 84 Hillsboro St.;• 919-542-4452 Saturday Brunch Bar 2012 Best Restaurant in the Triangle - Greg Cox, N&O

Chatham Mills 480 Hillsboro St. | Pittsboro, NC

919.533.6303 www.oakleafnc.com

2015

     

2015

     

ROOTS Sushi Bar Asian Restaurant

2015 Mediterranean Market Now Open

bakery, bistro & bar beautifully bringing together Central American and Southern Cuisines

because our roots run deep

2011-2015

open for breakfast, lunch and dinner daily

161 east franklin st. chapel hill (next to sutton’s) BIENVENIDOS. www.rootschapelhill.com

919.240.7160

spicy9chapelhill.com | 140 West Franklin St.

919.903.9335 | chapelhill@spicynine.com

410 W. Franklin St., Chapel Hill, NC 27516

mediterraneandeli.com

November 2015 chapelhillmagazine.com

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D I N I N G

G U I D E

CROOK’S CORNER

“Long known for both its sumptuous take on Southern comfort food and as a gathering spot for the city’s abundant creative community...” —Garden & Gun

Pittsboro Roadhouse & General Store Hearty American entrees, burgers and salads; 39 West St.; 919-542-2432 S&T Soda Shoppe Soda fountain, American fare. 85 Hillsboro St.; 919-545-0007

Maple View Farm Country Store Homemade ice cream and milk. 6900 Rocky Ridge Rd.; 919-960-5535

Small B&B Cafe Pancakes, quiche, sandwiches and soups. 219 East St.; 919-537-1909

Panciuto Southern Italian cuisine. 110 S. Churton St.; 919-732-6261

STARRLIGHT MEAD Tastings of honey It’s Honey... wines and honey. 480 Hillsboro St.; All Grown-up! 919-533-6314; starrlightmead.com

Starrlight Mead

Heavenly Honey Wines

On the menu: Crook’s classics & seasonals

Our internationally

award-winning wines are expertly crafted on the

premises from fruits, herbs, and locally

sourced honey. tasting room, the perfect place to sit, sip, savor, and learn about the art of honey wine.

Virlie’s Grill Soups, salads, burgers, sandwiches. 58 Hillsboro St.; 919-542-0376 Located in the Heart of Pittsboro at Chatham Mills

Thursday - Saturday 12-6 pm, Sunday 1-5 pm StarrlightMead.com

919-533-6314

HILLSBOROUGH 480 Hillsboro St. - Around back, under the water tower

Downtown Antonia’s Italian cuisine. 101 N. Churton St.; 919-643-7722;

CROOK’S CORNER • 610 West Franklin St, Chapel Hill

Reservations accepted. Walk-ins welcome www.crookscorner.com • 919 929 7643 Dinner Tues-Sun at 5:30 pm • Sun Brunch 10:30 am-2 pm

READERS’ FAVORITE

PLATINUM WINNER

IBEST OF DURHAM 2015

Radius Pizzeria & Pub Daily-changing entrees, pizzas, salads and sandwiches. 112 N. Churton St.; 919-245-0601 Russell’s Steakhouse Steaks, chicken, burgers. 378 S. Churton St.; 919-241-4902

Come relax in our

Full bar includes local beers on tap Recipient of a James Beard Foundation’s America’s Classics Award

LaPlace Cajun cuisine. 111 N. Churton St.; 919-245-0041

Saratoga Grill New England-style cuisine; 108 S. Churton St.; 919-732-2214 Village Diner Southern diner, buffet. 600 W. King St.; 919-732-7032 Vintage Revival Tea Room & Treasures Tea and scones. 125 E. King St.; 919-644-8000

Hot Tin Roof Games and specialty cocktails; 115 W. Margaret Ln.; 919-296-9113

Weaver Street Market Hot bar for breakfast, lunch and dinner. 228 S. Churton St.; 919-245-5050

Jay’s Chicken Shack Chicken, buffalo wings, breakfast biscuits. 646 N Churton St.; 919-732-3591

Wooden Nickel Pub Pub fare. 105 N. Churton St.; 919-643-2223

Chapel Hill’s FAVORITE SPOT for FROZEN YOGURT since 1982

C H R G

C AT E R I N G Dependable

Affordable

Local

SPANKY’S SQUID’S

411 WEST MEZ

PAGE ROAD GRILL

2015

Discover what “Best Of” is made of!

Downtown Chapel Hill 106 W. Franklin St. | Chapel Hill 919.942.7867 www.yogurtpump.com

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chapelhillmagazine.com November 2015

919-941-1630 events@chapelhillrestaurantgroup.com ChapelHillRestaurantGroup.com


D I N I N G

G U I D E

ALSO CHECK OUT THESE DURHAM RESTAURANTS… Basan Specialty sushi rolls, modern Japanese cuisine and sake. 359 Blackwell St., Ste. 220; 919-797-9728; basanrestaurant.com

Kanki Hibachi, a sushi bar, drinks and more. Now with patio dining. 3504 Mount Moriah Rd.; 919-401-6908; kanki.com

Bleu Olive High-quality comfort food with a Mediterranean flair. 1821 Hillandale Rd.; 919-383-8502; bleuolivebistro.com

Local 22 Kitchen & Bar Upscale Southerninspired cuisine, with emphasis on food sourced within a 30-mile radius and local brews. 2200 W. Main St.; 919-286-9755; local22kitchenandbar.com

blu seafood and bar Upscale seafood restaurant featuring innovative regional classics. 2002 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-2869777; bluseafoodandbar.com Counting House Upscale, locally sourced entrees and small plates. 111 N. Corcoran St.; 919-956-6760; countinghousenc.com Denny’s Diner fare serving breakfast anytime, lunch and dinner. 7021 N.C. 751, Ste. 901; 919-908-1006; dennys.com Fairview Dining Room Seasonally inspired contemporary cuisine inside the Washington Duke Inn & Golf Club. 3001 Cameron Blvd.; 919-493-6699; washingtondukeinn.com Hummingbird Bakery Signature Southern desserts, breakfast fare, lunch and coffee. 721 Broad St.; 919-908-6942; hummingbird-durham.com

Mez Contemporary Mexican Creative Mexican dishes, based on traditional recipes with a fresh, healthy twist. 5410 Page Rd.; 919-941-1630; mezdurham.com Page Road Grill Traditional American dishes, from house-made soup and bread to burgers. 5416 Page Rd.; 919-908-8902; pageroadgrill. com Parizade Sophisticated Mediterranean food like monkfish tangine and a vegetable caponata with quinoa. Full bar. 2200 W. Main St.; 919-286-9712; parizadedurham.com Primal Food & Spirits Wood-fired local meat dishes with seasonal sides and craft cocktails. 202 W. N.C. 54; 919-248-3000; primalfoodandspirits.com

Saladelia Cafe Espresso and organic smoothie bar, scratch-made pastries, gourmet sandwiches. 2424 Erwin Rd., 406 Blackwell St. & 4201 University Dr.; saladelia.com Saltbox Seafood Joint Carolina seafood served griddled or fried. 608 N. Mangum St.; 919-908-8970; saltboxseafoodjoint.com Shiki Sushi Sushi and pan-Asian choices inspired by the home-cooking of Japan, China, Vietnam and Thailand. 207 W. N.C. 54; 919-484-4108; shikinc.com The Mad Hatter’s Café & Bakeshop Scratch-made pastries and cakes, organic salads, sandwiches. 1802 W. Main St.; 919286-1987; madhatterbakeshop.com The Original Q Shack “BBQ tender as a mother’s love,” including and Carolina pork shoulder. 2510 University Dr.; 919-402-4227; theqshackoriginal.com Vin Rouge Bistro-style dinner and Sunday brunch. 2010 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-416-0466; vinrougerestaurant.com Watts Grocery Seasonal contemporary American cooking using local ingredients. 1116 Broad St.; 919-416-5040; wattsgrocery.com

November 2015 chapelhillmagazine.com

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E N G A G E M E N T S

Brackett & Komuves

THE ART OF THE ASK

C

BY LILY STEPHENS PHOTOGRAPHY BY MELISSA STALLMAN, WAKEFORESTPORTRAITS.COM

Chapel Hill High School grad and ECU

alum Ashley Brackett was giving online dating a try in Raleigh in 2013 when Miles Komuves stumbled across her profile. Right away he knew he had to meet her. He carefully crafted the “best darn message” he could, and it paid off: She agreed to the first of many dates. In October of the following year, Miles asked Ashley on a surprise date. She had her suspicions but was disappointed that morning when he called to cancel. It turns out his grand plan to propose in a hot air balloon had been foiled by the windy conditions. Not one to be discouraged,

Miles had a Plan B already in the works. That afternoon, he suggested they take a walk through the North Carolina Museum of Art’s outdoor sculpture park. Their walk ended at a dock overlooking the pond at the center of the park – where he asked Ashley to marry him. They will go back to the Museum of Art to tie the knot on January 9, joined by family and friends from Chapel Hill including Mark, Carolyn and Kaileigh Brackett, and Melissa and McKenzie Sumner.

They live in Raleigh. CHM

Diamonds-Direct.com Where NC says “I Do!”

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osting a party in the next several weeks? We ask local experts for their top tips. (Create a timeline! And don’t forget the bourbon punch!)

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CIAO!

F

ood blogger Kate Sayre just returned from Italy – and brought plenty of delicious ideas back with her.


W E D D I N G S

Gerakaris & Evans

THE PERFECT PAIR

A

BY KAYL A ANDERSON PHOTOGRAPHY BY TRIMPEY PHOTOGRAPHY

Ali Gerakaris and Brian Evans first met while attending Appalachian

State University. The pair worked together at a local restaurant for several years before realizing they were meant to be more than friends. After graduation, Ali and Brian parted ways, but after only a few short months apart, Brian followed his heart to Chapel Hill. Fast-forward to December 2013, when Brian surprised Ali with the best Christmas gift she could possibly imagine. He popped the question in their driveway in the pouring rain. “It was so sweet and simple and personal,” says Ali. Although the wedding day had a few mishaps, including a bridesmaid dress mix-up, the happy couple agreed that after months of planning and years of falling in love, nothing else mattered the moment they saw each other at the altar. Christ United Methodist Church played host to the wedding with a reception following at The Great Room at Top of the Hill. Guests including locals like matron of honor Melissa Brackett Sumner and bridesmaid Kasey Blitchington enjoyed sweet treats by The KupKake Fairy. The couple recently purchased their first home in Mebane in close proximity to Chapel Hill. CHM

Diamonds-Direct.com Where NC says ”I Do!”

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W E D D I N G S

Thompson & Bowe

HAPPY HOUR

C

BY PETER RATHMELL PHOTOGRAPHY BY ROBIN LIN ROBINLIN.COM

Coffee dates are so last year. When Chapel Hill native Cameron Bowe asked Marylander Katie Thompson out for coffee, she politely offered up a more exciting option: cocktails at The Crunkleton. After a year and a half of dating, Katie spent a girls’ weekend in Boston, while Cameron was supposedly at the beach for a bachelor party. As Katie was walking through the Public Garden, she spotted what she thought was a Cameron look-alike. Caught off guard, Katie walked up to a tongue-tied Cameron, who proposed amid several clapping onlookers. Katie and Cameron got married at The Chapel of the Cross and traveled via golf cart to their reception at The Carolina Inn. After pie and cake from The Root Cellar, the couple brought out a piñata filled with candy, confetti and, of course, airplane bottles of TOPO Organic Spirits to liven up the party. The night culminated with bagpipes escorting the newlyweds out of the reception. Cameron currently works as a software engineering director for ChannelAdvisor, and Katie is the director of leadership gifts for Habitat for Humanity of Orange County. They reside in Raleigh. CHM

Diamonds-Direct.com Where NC says ”I Do!”

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AVAILABLE AT...

CRABT R EE • RA LEIGH Selection, Education, Value & Guidance – Redefined. 4401 Glenwood Avenue, Raleigh, NC, 27612 • 919-571-2881 www.Diamonds-Direct.com CHARLOTTE • RALEIGH • BIRMINGHAM • RICHMOND • AUSTIN


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Chapel Hill Magazine November 2015  
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