Chapel Hill Magazine January/February 2022

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CHAPEL HILL • CARRBORO • HILLSBOROUGH • OR ANGE COUNT Y

J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 2 2

Make a

splash Find swim lessons, puppet shows, farms • more family fun around town Page 22

JUST ADD W AT E R

Enroll your kids in swimming schools, lifeguarding classes or swim team in Chapel Hill and beyond.




Love Your CARPET

CHAPELHILL JA N UA RY/ F E B R UA RY 2 02 2 C H A P E L H I L L M AG A Z I N E .CO M E DITOR

Jessica Stringer E DITORIAL E X E C U T IV E MANAGING E DITOR

Amanda MacLaren

ASS ISTANT E DITOR

Hannah Lee

E DITORIAL ASS ISTANT & DIGITAL E DITOR

Marie Muir

MANAGING E DITOR, C H ATH A M MAGA ZINE

Anna-Rhesa Versola

E DITORIAL ASS ISTANT

Renee Ambroso

E DITORIAL INT E RNS

Charlotte Goto, Meghan Johnson, Rylee Parsons, Isabella Reilly, Eloise Rich, Brooke Spach, Megan Tillotson, Makayla Williams and Caitlyn Yaede CONT RIB U TORS

Julia Baker, James Dupree, Elizabeth Kane, Hannah McClellan, Chris Vitiello, Amber Watson and Morgan Cartier Weston ART C RE AT IV E DIRE C TOR

Kevin Brown

P H OTOGRAP H E R

John Michael Simpson GRAP H IC DE S IGNE R

Khadijah Weekes-Nolan CONT RIB U TORS

Jean Carlos Rosario-Montalvo and Lauren Wilkinson ADV E RT IS ING For advertising inquiries, email advertising@chapelhillmagazine.com

Melissa Crane melissa@chapelhillmagazine.com Lauren Phillips lauren@durhammag.com Lucinda Poole lucinda@chapelhillmagazine.com Kem Johnson kem@durhammag.com P RODU C T ION MANAGE R

Ashlin Acheson CORP ORAT E P RE S IDE NT

Dan Shannon V IC E P RE S IDE NT OF P L ANNING & DE V E LOP ME NT

Ellen Shannon

C H IE F OP E RAT ING OF F IC E R

Rory Kelly Gillis

V IC E P RE S IDE NT

Chris Elkins

P U B L IS H E R, H EA RT OF NC WED D INGS

Jenna Parks

5634 Durham Chapel Hill Blvd., Durham, NC

Beauty, Artistry & Tradition FOR OVER 40 YEARS Open Monday-Friday 10am to 6pm Closed Saturday and Sunday

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January/February 2022

V IC E P RE S IDE NT OF F INANC E & ADMINIST RAT ION

Amy Bell

DIGITAL OP E RAT IONS MANAGE R

Lizzie Jones

C U STOME R S E RV IC E S P E C IAL IST

Brian McIndoo

DIST RIB U T ION

Matt Bair

Chapel Hill Magazine is published 7 times per year by Triangle Media Partners 1777 Fordham Blvd., Ste. 105, Chapel Hill, NC 27514 919–933–1551 Subscriptions $38 for 2 years – subscribe at chapelhillmagazine.com


January 28 – April 3, 2022

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 101 S. Columbia St. at Franklin St. Chapel Hill, NC 27514 919-966-5736 | ackland.org

Peace, Power and Prestige: Metal Arts in Africa is organized by the Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art at the University of Florida and curated by Susan Cooksey, Retired Curator of African Art. This exhibition is made possible with support from the UF Office of the Provost, Dr. Richard H. Davis and Mrs. Jeanne G. Davis, the C. Frederick and Aase B. Thompson Foundation, the UF Office of Research, Drs. David and Rebecca Sammons, the UF International Center, the Margaret J. Early Endowment, Visit Gainesville Alachua County, the Harn Anniversary Fund, Marcia Isaacson, Roy Hunt, Robin and Donna Poynor, UF Center for African Studies, Kenneth and Laura Berns, and retired Lt. Col. David A. Waller, with additional support from the Harn Program Endowment, the Harn Annual Fund, and a group of generous donors.

Kota-Obamba or Mindimbu artist, Gabon, Reliquary Guardian Figure (Mbulu Ngulu), (detail), 19th century, brass, copper, wood, 21 1/2 x 11 5/8 x 3 1/2 in. Collection of Drs. Nicole and John Dintenfass, L 2021.14.68.


JANUARY/FEBRUARY

CO NT EN TS

CHAPELHILLMAGAZINE.COM

VOLUME 17 NUMBER 1

F E ATU R E S

T HE KIDS ISSUE 22

Building The Nest Visit this wondrous new space for tiny tots

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Schools of Fish Nine places to take lessons around Chapel Hill and beyond

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Behind the Curtain Meet the woman who has been delighting and educating audiences for years

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The Big Picture Down on the Farm

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Summer Camp Guide

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHN MICHAEL SIMPSON

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26 50

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Leaders by the Dozen A new mural highlights 12 Black trailblazers in Carrboro and Chapel Hill

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Shining Example The new Eno Arts Mill is the crown jewel of the arts in Orange County

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Lake Living Two world travelers set down sustainable roots on Lake Orange

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Wedding Venue Guide

D E PA R TME N TS 6

Letter from the Editor

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About Town Events not to miss

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Noted What we’ve heard around our towns …

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What We’re Eating News from our restaurant community, plus a dish we love

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Dining Guide

Weddings 87 Sigmon & Wood 88 Horner & Tabor P E O P L E & P L AC E S 15

Gallop & Gorge 8K

16 Women of Achievement Luncheon 18

Friendsgiving Luncheon


Get Ind rs! Come inside and stay warm by visiting our unique museums and attractions in Randolph County, the Heart of North Carolina.

Richard Petty Museum, Randleman

The Desert Dome, North Carolina Zoo, Asheboro

NC Aviation Museum & Hall of Fame, Asheboro

Linbrook Heritage Estate, Neal Agricultural & Industrial Museum, Trinity

American Classic Motorcycle Museum, Asheboro

Request a free Travel Guide, bit.ly/FREETravelGuide, and learn about all our indoor adventures!

ARCHDALE • ASHEBORO • FRANKLINVILLE • LIBERTY • RAMSEUR • RANDLEMAN • SEAGROVE • STALEY • TRINITY

Our background photo features the The Desert Dome at the North Carolina Zoo, Asheboro


L ET TE R F R O M TH E E DI TO R

WELCOME [BACK]

Renovation & Remodeling Design & Coordination Design Consultation

Project Management Decorating Services Space Planning & Schematic Design

Exterior Living Spaces

Kitchen & Bath Design

Paint & Material Selection

FAMILY-OWNED SINCE 1988: SEW FINE II IS NOW

I

could rattle off 101 dog-friendly places in our area, but when it comes to putting together Chapel Hill Magazine’s annual Kids Issue, I turn to my colleagues with children for advice. When production manager Ashlin Acheson heard we were considering a story about places to take swim lessons in Orange County, she knew just the place. Ashlin raved about Goldfish Swim School where her little ones take lessons in their heated indoor pool. Those are her two kids – Greyson, 6, and Henley, 3 – on the cover. And it only took minimal bribing from their mom to get them to suit up and smile. (Congratulations on your family’s new pony, Ashlin!) The newest parent in our office is photographer John Michael Simpson; he and his wife, Carrie Grace Simpson, welcomed their first child, Ava James, on Oct. 9. Between diaper changes and photo shoots, John Michael shared a few thoughts on fatherhood: “Being a dad has been a joy, and as you can imagine, we’ve taken so many pictures. Every day has something new, and we’re trying to soak it all up.” The new dad crossed the county to photograph kid-friendly activities for this issue, from Kidzu Children’s Museum’s newest venture, The Nest, to a Puppet Show Inc. performance in Carrboro. “I look forward to taking Ava James to 1870 Farm when she is older, so she can meet Pearl, the pony, Socks, the Flemish giant rabbit, and Coda, the huarizo,” John Michael says. To find your own inspiration for family adventures, flip to page 22. And if you’re on the hunt for the perfect summer camp for your kiddo, check out our guide starting on page 38. CHM

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TH E COV E R P h o to by J o h n Mi c h a e l S i m p s o n

January/February 2022


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A B O UT TOWN

Compiled by Megan Tillotson EVENTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE; CHECK WITH ORGANIZERS PRIOR TO ATTENDING

EVENTS NOT TO MISS

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater carolinaperformingarts.org

JAN.

PHOTO BY ANDREW ECCLES

25-26

The longtime Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater – featuring dancers Jacqueline Green and Solomon Dumas – returns to Memorial Hall in January.

Staged: New Play Readings Jan. 9 & Feb. 13 odysseystage.org Theater company OdysseyStage’s new monthly series presenting works in progress by North Carolina playwrights kicks off with Keith Burridge’s “Ona” in January while Grace Siplon’s “Milk and Honey Whiskey” takes the stage in February at The ArtsCenter.

‘Stick Fly’ Jan. 19-Feb. 6 playmakersrep.org PlayMakers Repertory Company stages

this dramatic comedy written by Lydia R. Diamond and directed by Kathryn HunterWilliams. Tensions escalate after the LeVay brothers bring their new girlfriends to a 8

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relaxing weekend at their beach house to meet the family. Tickets may be purchased online or at the box office.

Carolina Jazz Festival Feb. 17-19

music.unc.edu/jazzfest The 45th annual festival features performances from headliner The Theo Croker Quartet, the UNC Jazz Band and guest trumpeter Rachel Therrien during the three-day event held at Memorial Hall, the James and Susan Moeser Auditorium in Hill Hall and Durham’s Sharp Nine Gallery.

‘Yoga Play’ Feb. 23-March 13 playmakersrep.org Directed by Pirronne Yousefzadeh at PlayMakers Repertory Company’s Paul Green Theatre, this sharp comedy written

January/February 2022

Carolina Performing Arts hosts the

dance company that reminds audiences of the power dance has to bring us together. Since 1958, the troupe has worked to enrich and preserve the authenticity of the African American cultural experience. Tickets are required for the performances that take place at Memorial Hall.

by playwright Dipika Guha follows a CEO’s search for enlightenment to save her apparel company and career. Tickets may be purchased online or at the box office.

‘Discourse’ Feb. 25-26 carolinaperformingarts.org Nathalie Joachim and Allison Loggins-Hull, together known as Flutronix, debut this community-centered project at Carolina Performing Arts’ CURRENT ArtSpace + Studio. Individual stories from and about Chapel Hill come to life through an immersive musical performance with voices sourced from community gatherings and archival recordings. CHM


A NOVEL PLACE

Chapter 2

Away We Go S

undrenched days crossed paths with sapphire shores in the rearview.

What had forever been off-limits was now open range. On this epic coast, three bright-eyed and bushy-tailed explorers could cut loose along the breaks.

Discover seasonal offers on vacation rentals & more at CrystalCoastNC.org


N OT E D.

WHAT WE’VE HEARD AROUND TOWN … Compiled by Rylee Parsons

IN MEMORIAM

WHAT AN HONOR

J. Beau Bennett, owner of Beau Catering

Real estate data company Clever named Chapel Hill the 13th-best college town in America on its 2021 list. The analysis included more than 600 cities and towns, and Chapel Hill ranked high based on several factors such as quality of life, affordability and quality of education.

PHOTO BY HEBA SALAMA

in Hillsborough, died on Oct. 8, which was also his 10th wedding anniversary with his wife, Lauren Erickson Bennett. A Chapel Hill resident since 1996, Beau moved here to begin his culinary journey and opened his catering business in 2008. His life was honored by friends and family at a memorial gathering at The Carolina Club on Nov. 10. In honor of Beau’s love for music, fun, anything extracurricular and his community, donations to SKJAJA Fund are being accepted in his memory in lieu of flowers.

Dr. Ralph S. Baric, a professor at UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health

(pictured fourth from left), and Hillsborough native Dr. Kizzmekia S. Corbett (second from right) were among the few who received the 2020 North Carolina Award for Science on Nov. 18. Gov. Roy Cooper awarded the state’s highest honor to recipients who played crucial roles in developing treatments and vaccines for COVID-19.

Alan Rader,

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Senior Care

• Rising Star: Genmy Escamilla, Homewatch CareGivers of the Triangle

• Client Impact: Christina Rich-Parrish, Homewatch CareGivers of the Triangle • Going the Extra Mile: Gloria Borbor, Homewatch CareGivers of the Triangle • Leadership: Crystal Perry, Carol Woods • Direct Care Worker of the Year: Lucy Williams (pictured), independent care provider Employers of award winners were also celebrated in the virtual Direct Care Worker Awards ceremony and included The Arc of the Triangle, Carol Woods Retirement Community, Charles House Association, Homewatch CareGivers of the Triangle, Home Instead Senior Care, LiveWell Assisted Living & Home Care, Piedmont Health, Premier Home Health Care Services, Right at Home of the Triangle, UNC Home Health and six individual family caregivers.

The Orange County Department on Aging and the

community group Senior Health Advocacy and Resource Partners

of Orange County recognized 29 nominees for the 2021 Direct Care Worker Outstanding Service Awards

January/February 2022

Dr. Sue Ellen Cox,

general manager of the Chapel Hill Tennis Club, died on Oct. 3. Alan worked at the club for 16 years and was also a volunteer baseball coach at Margaret B. Pollard Middle School. A tennis fundraising event for Alan’s family – his wife, Tracy Magliocco Rader, and children, Destyn Rader and Jaedyn Rader – was hosted on Nov. 20 by CHTC, and there is a GoFundMe campaign to help his family: gofund.me/655246c1

on Nov. 4. The six recipients are direct care workers in the county, recognized for honorable service in long-term care: • Longevity: Jean Knight, Home Instead

Send us your noteworthy moments! From births to awards to new biz and more – noted@ chapelhill magazine.com

founder and medical director of Aesthetic Solutions, was elected as president of the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery. Dr. Cox has been practicing for more than 25 years. Her year-long term as president began Nov. 20, 2021.


A

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S P O N S O R E D

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NOTED

Kimathi Muiruri, a 2021 UNC graduate,

IN OUR SCHOOLS

received the Rhodes scholarship to fund studies at the University of Oxford. Kimathi is the third UNC graduate to receive the prestigious scholarship this year. UNC has had 54 Rhodes Scholars since 1902.

introduced new measures to support the wellness and mental health of students and staff. At a CHCCS Board of Education meeting on Oct. 21, superintendent Nyah Hamlett named several actions to implement this school year, including adjustments to the academic calendar and an employee bonus.

Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools

ARTS & CULTURE

Casey Carrick,

director of athletic grounds and turf management for UNC, and Dorrance Field received recognition for the “College Sporting Grounds Field of the Year’’ from the Sports Turf Managers Association. The award spotlights the individuals and programs who excelled in 2021 in providing quality, safe playing surfaces.

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The Orange County Arts Commission announced the winners of the fifth annual Paint It Orange Plein Air Paint-out from Nov. 3-5. Fifty-six painters from five states participated in the event judged by Katie Ziglar, director of

January/February 2022

the Ackland Art Museum. Max Dowdle of Hillsborough won first place. Nerys Levy of Carrboro won second. Chapel Hill’s Carroll Lassiter received an honorable mention, and Orange County residents Ellen Cabacungan and Susan Paulsen received sponsor’s choice awards. Chapel Hill residents Triffin I. Morris, Gregory DL Morris and Rachel E. Pollock became published authors with the release of “A History of the Theatre Costume Business: Creators of Character” in October. This book on the history of the theater costume business was published by Taylor & Francis. The authors used their experience


SPRING 2022 HIGHLIGHTS ABT STUDIO COMPANY, PAT METHENY, URBAN BUSH WOMAN THREE LOBED RECORDINGS 21ST ANNIVERSARY BRANFORD MARSALIS, AMONG MANY OTHERS TICKETS ON SALE NOW! DUKEPERFORMANCES.ORG


NOTED

in costume design and Broadway theater to share the history and significance of stage clothes.

adventures. Written by exhibits coordinator Courtney Soling Smith and illustrated by museum volunteer Ron Weisenfeld, the book is available at the museum.

The Orange County Public Library is now fine-free, no longer charging fees for overdue materials. The change is a part of an effort to make library use more accessible.

Jon Ward Beyle, a

ON THE MOVE

Chapel Hill singersongwriter, released his debut folk-rock album, “Worth Stopping For,” on Dec. 2. The 10-track album was recorded in

Transplanting Traditions Community Farm announced that Hsar Ree Ree Wei is

Arbor Ridge Studios with producer Jeff Crawford.

Orange County Historical Museum

Six members of the Chapel Hill jump rope team Aerotrix performed in the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City on Nov. 25. The jumpers joined others ages 12 to 26 to skip along the 2.8-mile parade route.

published “Minnie Finds a Home,” a picture book that teaches children about life in the early 1900s by following the story of a puppy’s

its incoming executive director. Ree Ree joined Transplanting Traditions as a youth intern in 2013 and served in various roles, including as youth program coordinator, a cultural consultant and interpreter, and the business development coordinator. Executive director Kelly Owensby will transition out of her role in spring 2022 to support the farm in a fundraising capacity. CHM

U N PA R A L L E L E D A R T I S T R Y EXTENSIVE EXPERIENCE I N N O VAT I V E T E C H N O L O G Y

Finn Plastic Surgery is a comprehensive aesthetic practice serving patients seeking a variety of services, from minimally invasive treatments and physician-prescribed skincare to surgical procedures. In their fully accredited, on-site, surgical suite, Dr. Finn and Dr. Elkins-Williams perform a full complement of facial, breast, and body plastic surgery procedures. At Finn Plastic Surgery, only fully trained plastic surgeons perform injectable treatments like Botox and fillers. Drs. Finn and ElkinsWilliams offer unparalleled artistry, extensive experience, and innovative technology. Schedule your consultation with Finn Plastic Surgery, and rest assured knowing you have chosen the practice voted “Best of Chapel Hill” for 8 years in a row! WINNER

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January/February 2022


P EO PLE & PLACES

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Gallop & Gorge 8K

1 Dominic Collichio.

By Renee Ambroso

2 The start/finish line on Weaver Street.

Before tucking into Thanksgiving meals, runners and walkers dashed through the streets of downtown Carrboro on the morning of Nov. 25 during the Gallop & Gorge 8K, the final leg of Cardinal Track Club’s 17th annual three-race series, Le Tour de Carrboro. Proceeds from race registration fees will be donated to the club’s six community partners, including the Orange County Rape Crisis Center and Carrboro Family Garden. A virtual option was also available and, combined with the in-person race, 1,244 participants took part. Photography by Randy Young CHM

3 Nat Romaine.

Thank you Chapel Hill for you r continu ous support!

BEST SALON & BEST PLACE FOR BEAUTY PRODUCTS VOTED BEST OF CHAPEL HILL BY READERS OF CHAPEL HILL MAGAZINE 2010-2021

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PEOP LE & P LACES

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Women of Achievement Luncheon By Anne Tate

Chapel Hill Magazine, Chatham Magazine and Durham Magazine honored the 2021 Women of Achievement at The Carolina Inn in October. Guests enjoyed prosecco and lunch while networking with business leaders, honorees past and present and Triangle Media Partners’ Rory Kelly Gillis and Ellen Shannon. The event was made possible by Hendrick Subaru Southpoint, Wake Radiology UNC REX Healthcare, Aesthetic Solutions, Edward Jones, Posh the Salon and Elevate by Longfellow. Photography by John Michael Simpson CHM

1 Linda Chabinsky, Tracy Davies, Jennifer Player and Sheena Johnson-Cooper. 2 Tess Mangum, Ellen Cassilly, Spring Council, Women of Achievement 2021 honorees Anna Ruth Jones and Dianne Peerman Pledger. 3 Sharon Van Vechten, Sara Stephens and WoA 2021 honoree Elizabeth Turnbull. 4 Heidi Werner Dawson and Chapel Hill Magazine’s Jessica Stringer. 5 WoA 2021 honorees Jessica Murley and Katerina Gmitter. 6 Lauren Elmore, Aileen Stapleton, Dr. Alessandra Ritter and Tamar Horton. 7 Lysandra Weber, WoA 2021 honoree State Senator Valerie Paige Foushee, Penny Rich and Karen Howard.

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WE ARE OPEN TO BUSINESS

DO BUSINESS IN NORTH CHAPEL HILL INTRODUCING NEW ON THE HILL T H E AT E R

LOOKING FOR SPACE IN CHAPEL HILL? EMAIL US AT INQUIRE@OPEN2.BIZ


PEOP LE & P LACES

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Friendsgiving Luncheon

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By Anne Tate

The Chamber for a Greater Chapel Hill-Carrboro hosted a Thanksgiving-themed luncheon and networking event at The Carolina Inn in November. Professional women gathered to enjoy a holidayinspired meal and mingle with fellow leaders in business. As the event’s keynote speaker, Ellen Hayon of the Bell Leadership Institute presented the “Seven Domains of Happiness,” a theory based on Gerald Bell’s research on happy and successful people. Photography by Ellen Shannon CHM 1 Chapel Hill Magazine’s Ellen Shannon and Poonam Nandani. 2 Jennifer Halloran and Lori Doherty. 3 Spring Council and Sheba Brown. 4 Vickie McDaniel, Ellen Hayon and Karin DeMarco. 5 Carol Retsch-Bogart, Natalie Knox and Leslie Brock. 6 Pam Herndon, Connolly Walker, Peggy Young and Lindsey Lannan. 5

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year New new smile

Come experience the gentle side of Dentistry Mandy Ghaffarpour, DDS & T. J Dakermanji, DMD and Alexandra Yarborough, DDS, FACP Preventive, Restorative & Cosmetic Dentistry | Welcoming New Patients

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W H AT WE’RE EATING NEWS FROM OUR RESTAURANT COMMUNITY, PLUS A DISH WE LOVE

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January/February 2022

GRATA CAFE 200 N. Greensboro St., Ste. B12, Carrboro 919-240-7000; gratacafe.com

PHOTO BY JOHN MICHAEL SIMPSON

“G

rata,” the Italian word for “grateful,” perfectly sums up the new eatery located in the former Elmo’s Diner space in Carr Mill Mall in Carrboro. Taking the place of a popular, long-standing diner meant that Grata Cafe had big shoes to fill, and based on its increasing popularity, it is rising to the challenge. This all-day cafe is the perfect fit for such a unique space, with large, lofty ceilings, natural light that pours in from the tall mill windows and a spacious brick patio, welcoming diners to come by and graciously indulge. Owner Jay Radford is especially grateful for the support of the Carrboro community who have enthusiastically welcomed a dream he held in the back of his mind for over 35 years. Grata was founded on the key principles of community, diversity, inclusivity, kindness and, of course, gratitude. Here, Italian classics and inspired dishes are cooked from scratch with love and consistency. Jay welcomes all diners to enjoy one another’s company and comfort food as if they were enjoying it in his own home. Giving back is a cornerstone of the business. Unlike many other restaurants, Grata has a no-tipping policy. Instead, every employee has a starting salary of $18 an hour, and any tips left on the table are donated to a different nonprofit of an employee’s choosing every month. On the menu, diners will find breakfast served all day – think ciabatta French toast – and classic dishes with a twist, such as Italian sandwiches, subs, burgers, salads and creative “Grata Bowls.” The proceeds of select bowls are donated to local organizations like TABLE and The ArtsCenter. “When I envisioned the food at Grata Cafe, I saw plates and bowls filled with the traditional Italian dishes I had been cooking my entire life: amazing scratch-made meatballs, pastas, sauces and other classics,” Jay shares. Of course, these items hold a prominent spot on the menu – and in Jay’s own kitchen – but one of the most popular items with Grata guests are the omelets. “Specifically, we have a very unique technique we use to create them, a technique I learned during the pandemic from a MasterClass

done by Thomas Keller, the famous chef at The French Laundry in California,” Jay explains. Each omelet contains three Latta Family Farms eggs, stuffed with all kinds of fresh veggies and/or meats. Popular options include “The Works,” with onions, peppers, mushrooms, spinach, Italian sausage, ham and cheddar (pictured above) and “The Caprese” with mozzarella, fresh tomato and basil and a balsamic glaze. All omelets are served with toast or home fries and house-made hot sauces to boost the heat to your liking. Something about being able to order breakfast all day at Grata makes these enormous, appetizing omelets hard to resist no matter what time of day you visit. – By Amber Watson


➾ NEWS BITES

Lime & Lemon Indian Grill & Bar – with locations in Durham and Raleigh – opened its third restaurant in Chapel Hill with a soft launch on Nov. 29 in the former Fusion Fish space at Meadowmont

Village. The grill serves traditional Indian dishes such as various tikka and vindaloo curry dishes. As of press time, no date has been set for the restaurant’s grand opening. -– Compiled by Julia Baker CHM

Shake Shack – the popular chain that was founded in New York City and is known for its burgers, fries and shakes – is slated to open in Eastgate Crossing shopping center in the space formerly occupied by Zoës Kitchen. As of press time, no opening date was set. The Chick-fil-A location in University Place, formerly owned and operated by Sammy Culberson, closed on Nov. 30. Sammy now operates the Chick-fil-A at Carraway Village. After a year in Chapel Hill, Summit Coffee Co. on West Franklin Street closed its doors on Oct. 31. In addition to its flagship store in Davidson, North Carolina, the cafe still has locations in Asheville, Charlotte and Huntersville. Blue Dogwood Public Market welcomed a new vendor, Bouquet Garni Foods, in December. Chef and owner Eric Ndiaye, who has experience as a personal chef, blends West African and French flavors with dishes like chicken yassa – roasted chicken cooked with onions in a tangy lemon sauce – and croque monsieur. Blue House Cafe, a UNC student-run cafe, hosted its soft opening at 462 W. Franklin St. in December. UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School students Rebecca Felicelli, Gabriela Silva and Alex Christian founded the cafe in the hopes of creating an inclusive environment where students can gain professional and entrepreneurial experience. Blue House Cafe will officially open on Jan. 9. Pirate Captain opened in November at 163 E. Franklin St., taking the place of Ms Mong. The restaurant’s menu features ramen noodle bowls alongside Cajun seafood plates, poke bowls, smoothie bowls and more. Joe Van Gogh has launched new retail packaging that features the work of artist Vincent van Gogh. The packaging celebrates the inspiration Joe Van Gogh draws from the artist to craft every roast and search for “the art of the bean.” The packaging will be rolling out to Joe Van Gogh cafes, online stores and wholesale partners.

Feels Like Family

Chris G. Adigun, MD is a board certified dermatologist and recognized leader in dermatology. She is known for her expertise in laser and aesthetic dermatology as well as her warm, compassionate and down-to-earth personality. Dr. Adigun has assembled a team of top notch dermatology-trained professionals offering the latest in technology and treatments. There is a reason DLC has been voted Best of Chapel Hill and Best of Chatham every year since she opened the doors. It’s simple, DLC treats everyone like family!

Chris G. Adigun, MD, FAAD Karlee Wagoner, ANP-BC Leighanne McGill, PA-C Jenny Jahoo, LME

2021

2021

2020

Voted Best Of Chapel Hill 2017-2021 Voted Best of Chatham 2019-2021

Located in The Veranda at Briar Chapel

58 Chapelton Court, Suite 120 Chapel Hill, NC

919.942.2922 dlcofchapelhill.com

Moving Spring 2022 to new building less than 1 mile away! January/February 2022

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THE KIDS ISSUE

NEST BUILDING THE

Visit this wondrous new space for tiny tots By E lizab e th Kane P h o to g rap hy by Jo h n M ic h ael Si m pson

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here’s a welcoming new place coming soon, made especially for our community’s smallest citizens. A spot with a wondrous and rich aesthetic – beautiful hardwood floors, natural textures, soft spaces and copious amounts of natural light for newborns to 3-year-olds to explore. It’s called The Nest, a 1,500-square-foot space from Kidzu Children’s Museum next to its location at University Place. Kidzu first opened its children’s museum in 2006 on East Franklin Street. It’s


ABOVE Holland Varney and Jiakai Cheung-Miaw, both 23 months old, play together in the STEM wing of The Nest. BELOW The main exhibition space at The Nest. OPPOSITE PAGE Nest educator Samantha Shannon plays with 5-month-old Penelope Venutolo-Mantovani.

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moved a few times since then and landed at UPlace in 2015. The Nest is located in the space formerly occupied by O’Neill’s Clothing store adjacent to Kidzu but will have its own separate entrance and will be its own space, says Jamie DeMent Holcomb, Kidzu’s interim executive director. Melanie Hatz Levinson, the museum’s creative director, says Kidzu was eager to expand to serve its smallest community members. “The number and kind of connections that happen in the first three years of life are … the most connections that happen at any time in our lives,” Melanie says. “The research [shows] that when those [brain] connections happen in quality, early learning environments, children … have better outcomes in terms of better grades, better relationships and even better health outcomes.” She says Kidzu has “always had programs and some kind of space for infants and toddlers, but this is the first time we’re really expanding our physical footprint … to reflect the importance of those early years.” Melanie says the idea of The Nest was always there but “began to formalize” during a trip with a group of educators to Reggio Emilia, a town in northern Italy that’s “famous for educational pedagogy.” While there, the Kidzu staff studied infant and toddler classrooms as well as the local approach to education. They then took this newfound knowledge from their trip abroad and created a popular pop-up children’s museum that took place over 10 days at Hillsborough Elementary School in 2019. The pop-up was missed by many after its closure, so the Kidzu staff formed an advisory committee to build The Nest, a $400,000 project. They worked with local early childhood experts from the area’s research community, which has a rich history and has produced some of the most important work in the field, as well as artists and craftspeople to create “a place-based experience that reflects our community and reflects the importance of these early years,” Melanie says. Melanie describes The Nest as having “lots of spaces where children will be invited to play with natural materials, practice early 24

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ABOVE Michael Venotulo-Mantovani and his daughter, Penelope, and Sabrina Varney and her daughter, Holland, read books together in the Back Perch with soft seating. MIDDLE Oliver Gangi, 15 months old, and Jiakai play together in the main exhibition space. BELOW Holland smiles as she colors a picture at one of the activity tables.

engineering skills, develop fine motor skills and build literacy skills together. [It] will also be a space where caregivers can network and interface with early childhood specialists who can help them build confidence and connections with their infants and toddlers.” The fee structure for The Nest has not been set as of press time, but community members can look forward to an opening this year. “Our goal is to open the space in a slowphased way in early 2022, with a larger public opening in early spring of 2022, when we hope that infants and toddlers, and the rest of the community, have the opportunity to be vaccinated,” Melanie says. Jamie, who has a newborn of her own, says she can’t wait for her daughter, Mary Ricci Holcomb, to be in this space. “A center that is dedicated 100% to babies is so incredibly important,” Jamie says. “It is not something that exists anywhere in this area. [W]e’re behind our tiniest citizens … the importance of this space cannot be stressed enough.” CHM



THE KIDS ISSUE

SCHOOLS Nine places to take lessons around Chapel Hill and beyond

By J ul i a B aker | Photography by J ohn Mic h a el Sim ps on

“W

hen you walk into Goldfish [Swim School] Chapel Hill, you immediately know it’s made with happiness in mind,” says Danelle Alex, co-owner of the facility. Bright colors are splashed across the walls of the tropical-themed pool area, complete with a palm tree. Danelle and her husband, Manuel Alex, opened the Chapel Hill location of the national franchise in December 2019. In 2006, Jenny McCuiston, a two-time Olympic trials-qualifying swimmer, and Chris McCuiston founded Goldfish Swim School in response to a growing demand for quality swim instruction. The McCuistons began franchising Goldish three years later, and in 2017, Danelle and Manuel became franchise owners of their first location in Cary. “Goldfish as a company has a commitment to do the most and very best it can to keep kids safe in and around water,” Danelle says of why she and Manuel were drawn to this swim school. According to the Centers 26

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OF FISH Goldfish Swim School features year-round swim instruction for children from 4 months old to 12 years old. The school, located in Rams Plaza, just celebrated two years in business.

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of Disease Control and Prevention, drowning is the second leading cause of death for children ages 1 to 4 and of unintentional injury death for children ages 1 to 14 years old. “Starting swim lessons early on helps children develop a healthy respect for water and learn life-saving skills,” Danelle says. “We incorporate water safety skills and knowledge in every lesson.” With about 30 instructors on staff, Goldfish offers a 4-to-1 studentteacher ratio during regular group classes and a 6-to-1 ratio during mini classes with parent participation. Classes are held year-round – there is no start or end dates for classes, so students can enroll at any point in the year. Swimmers move through classes based on their individual progress, so they can join a more advanced class from one week to the next. In addition to instilling water safety skills, swim lessons offer a host of physical and mental benefits. Danelle says, “Swimming is a wonderful and healthy activity that enhances our bodies in many different ways, from muscular, cardiovascular and lung capacity development to memory, academic and concentration performance.”

YEA! SUMMER CAMPS! June 13–August 5

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OTHER PLACES TO TAKE SWIM LESSONS, LIFEGUARD OR JOIN A SWIM TEAM Chapel Hill - Carrboro YMCA 980 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Chapel Hill 919-442-9622; ymcatriangle.org and Meadowmont YMCA 301 Old Barn Lane, Chapel Hill 919-945-0640; ymcatriangle.org The YMCA’s swim programs include lessons for babies and toddlers (with their parents starting at age 6 months), preschool-aged children, youth and adults. Group lessons both during the week and on Saturdays at the Chapel Hill - Carrboro YMCA will resume mid-January. The Meadowmont YMCA will resume group lessons in late May, with registration opening in the spring. Private lessons are available to YMCA members and are based on the availability of instructors. Summer outdoor lessons are reserved for Y members while indoor lessons are available to members and nonmembers throughout the year. The YMCA also offers lifeguard training, stroke school for youth who are interested in improving the proficiency of their stroke for swim teams or lifeguarding certifications, and summer swim team for kids ages 5 to 18. Chapel Hill Tennis Club 403 Westbrook Dr., Carrboro 919-929-4248; chapelhilltennisclub.com Swim lessons at CHTC are coordinated based on member requests. Interested members can contact Erica Zurburch, aquatics program director at CHTC, for more information. In addition to swim lessons, CHTC partners with The Exchange Pool to form a combined summer league swim team, collectively known as TEST (Tennis Club-Exchange Swim Team). The swim team offers high-quality coaching and technique instruction to swimmers of all ages and skill levels. The Exchange Pool 401 Umstead Dr., Chapel Hill 919-967-8840; exchangepoolswimclub.com At The Exchange Pool, trained and certified instructors teach both group and private lessons for children at the pool with a focus on water safety, building confidence and learning strokes and floating techniques. The Exchange Pool also has a swim team, which competes in the Chapel Hill Summer Swim League and its series of dual meets throughout the summer, culminating with the championship meet in late July. The swim team competes alongside the Chapel Hill Tennis Club, forming a combined team. Practices for the team begin in mid- to late May and are held in the afternoons until the end of the school year. Both morning and afternoon practices will be offered in the summer. For students who can swim at least 10 to 15 yards independently, the Watersprouts program provides a bridge to the swim team. Openings for the positions of lifeguards and swim instructors at the pool are both available.

Weekly programs in arts, sciences, athletics, technology, and more! summer@triangledayschool.org 4911 Neal Road Durham, NC 27705

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Orange County Sportsplex 101 Meadowlands Dr., Hillsborough 919-644-0339; oc-sportsplex.com The Hillsborough Swimming School program at the Orange County Sportsplex focuses on stroke development, water safety and creative ways to enjoy the water. Group and private lessons are available, as well as opportunities to join the competitive


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Hillsborough Hammerheads Summer Swim team, the year-round Hillsborough Aquatic Club swim team, or the Masters swim team. Andrew Stock, general manager of the Sportsplex, says that the facility is currently looking to hire lifeguards to work throughout the day. While registration for January and February swim lessons is on hold, he says the Sportsplex is accepting new members for the Hillsborough Aquatic Club swim team. Southern Village Club 601 Brookgreen Dr., Chapel Hill 919-969-8442; southernvillageclub.com Qualified instructors are available for private and semiprivate swim lessons for members of the club. Swim lessons start in early to mid-May, based on the temperature of the water in the pool. The club offers three levels of swim lessons: beginner, intermediate and advanced. Parents whose children are enrolled in the beginner lessons can choose to work alongside their child, with the instructor socially distanced. Stoneridge/Sedgefield Swim and Racquet Club 6901 Turkey Farm Rd., Chapel Hill 919-967-0915; sssrc.org At SSSRC, the swimming season begins mid-May and extends until September. The 88,0000-gallon pool offers lap lanes, two diving boards and a large 2-foot shallow section for pre-swimmers. Private and semiprivate swim lessons are available to SSSRC members throughout the season, and membership to the club is open to both residents of the Stoneridge/Sedgefield neighborhoods as well as nonresidents. Dedicated lap swim hours are provided throughout the season during the mornings on both weekdays and weekends, with the option to continue lap swimming postseason, depending on water and weather conditions, for an additional fee.

Town of Chapel Hill Parks & Recreation Homestead Aquatic Center 300 Aquatic Dr., Chapel Hill 919-968-2799; chapelhillparks.org Chapel HIll Parks & Recreation offers group swim lessons for children ages 3 to 12. Group lessons introduce new swimmers to the water while helping more experienced swimmers improve their technique. In each class, swimmers learn the skills needed to advance to the next level offered. Class sizes are currently limited to four students, swimmers are screened upon arrival and instructors wear face shields throughout class, keeping in mind the health and safety of all swimmers, staff and their families. Students ages 5 to 18 can also join the Youth Swim Team at Homestead Aquatic Center – a great opportunity to meet other local youth while improving fitness. For the more advanced swimmers looking to use their skills to help others stay safe in the water, lifeguarding opportunities are available. UNC Aquatics Bowman Gray Memorial Pool 300 South Rd., Chapel Hill Kessing Outdoor Pool 91 Stadium Dr., Chapel Hill 919-962-0768; campusrec.unc.edu/programs/aquatics/programs-classes UNC Aquatics offers swim lessons, swim stroke clinics, lifeguarding and other safety courses throughout the semester. Group, private and semiprivate lessons are available year-round to participants of all ages and experience levels. Students, faculty, staff, their families and community members are welcome to enroll in any of the aquatics programs. After putting lessons on hold for more than a year due to the pandemic, Aquatics Director Catherine Ayers says UNC Aquatics started teaching again as soon as they could do so safely. “We [continue] to offer smaller group sizes in our group lessons, and our instructors wear either face masks or face shields while teaching children in the water,” Catherine explains. CHM

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THE KIDS ISSUE

BEHIND THE

CURTAIN Meet the woman who has been delighting and educating audiences for years By J am es Dupree | Photography by J ohn Mi chael Si m pso n

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rojected behind the stage in Century Hall is an animated backdrop of a snow-covered forest. The sound of a heavy wind fills the room as children and parents alike watch a young boy eagerly search for the Wish Tree. At the end of the show at the Carrboro Century Center, the puppets bow to parental applause, and children dance to cheerful music. Hiding behind the table covered in a sparkling red velvet sheet is sole puppeteer Kathie Guild. She’s the executive director of Puppet Show Incorporated, a nonprofit organization that uses the art of puppetry to inspire imagination and to educate children at venues like Orange County Public Library, Kidzu Children’s Museum and numerous local public and private schools over the years. Though Kathie officially started Puppet Show Inc. in 2017 after her retirement as a counselor for 25 years with Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools, puppetry has been a part of Kathie’s life for decades. In 1990, after having earned her master’s in school counseling, Kathie moved from New York to Büdingen, Germany, where her husband, Pete Guild, an armor officer and instructor at the U.S. Military Academy, had recently been assigned. There, she was

Kathie Guild with her stage and puppets at the Carrboro Century Center. Froggy (above) was her first puppet.

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offered a position working with children of U.S. military personnel through the Department of Defense Dependents Schools network. “I had to immediately start teaching the next day,” Kathie says. “I was really nervous because I didn’t have any materials. [A resource teacher] gave me a Steiff [brand] frog [hand puppet] and said, ‘Take this, and maybe you can do something with it.’” Using puppetry, Kathie counseled students during the Gulf War and was honored for her work with a Meritorious Civilian Service Award. “The puppet shows became instrumental in explaining war to children. I realized if you can talk to children about war, then anything is open with puppetry,” Kathie says. In 1992, the family moved to Chapel Hill, and she worked as a counselor at Seawell Elementary School and McDougle Elementary School. Using an assortment of purchased and handmade puppets, Kathie performed shows for countless students, including her daughter, Chelsea Guild, now 31. “She saw all my puppet shows,” Kathie says. “She’s real good at sewing, and she made the costumes for [some of] the puppets.” Programs include 21 original stories – often hosted by Kathie’s first puppet, “Froggy” – and accommodate audiences of up to 125 students from preschool to second grade. Themes range from bullying and peer pressure to the importance of honesty. She also adapts Grimms’ Fairy Tales and fables from Japan, Africa, Mexico and India, to name a few. “They’re beautiful stories and hundreds of years old. This keeps them alive,” Kathie says. After each show, children are given time to create their own puppets, allowing them to retell those stories or make up their own. Kathie also leads residencies and workshops for all ages to learn puppetry. “There’s always something to learn through [a] story,” says Saskia Etter, a mother of three girls ages 3 to 10 and regular show attendee, who discovered Puppet Show Inc. through the Carrboro Branch Library. “Kids take to that so much more than parents trying to teach them in everyday life,” she says. Along the way, Kathie has had help from three high school volunteers, who set up materials for arts and crafts, greet parents and 34

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ABOVE Fuko Ohara and her daughter, Mei Ohara, 3, and Mie Tashiro and her son, Sakuto Tashiro, 2, watch the story of “The Elves and the Shoemaker.” BOTTOM Chloe Demos and her daughter, Phoebe Westbrook, 1, applaud during the show.

take videos and pictures. “I loved watching the kids interact with the show. They would gasp at certain parts and shout things out,” says Marielle Rath, a 2020 Northwood High School graduate who started volunteering in 2018. “It was refreshing to get a glance of the world from their perspective,” she says. “Doing crafts alongside them helped bolster my creativity as well.” With most shows free to the public, Kathie keeps the program running through grants and donations. “The Mary Duke Biddle Foundation’s grant really propelled us,” she says, allowing her to buy equipment including a projector, screen, sound system and a rolling cart for easy transport. Then came the pandemic. “The public library closed, so I had to switch to a digital platform. I didn’t have a Zoom account, and it costs money,” Kathie says. Luckily, a small grant through the Durham Arts Council allowed Puppet Show Inc. to continue, paying for Zoom and Streamable accounts. “[This year] I have a grant from Wegmans to do shows partnering with Orange County Public Library,” she says. As vaccines become available and some restrictions lift, Kathie looks forward to returning to in-person performances. “I’d like to go back to schools and libraries because it allows the community better access [to the programs],” she says. “And I hope that, in whatever format, people continue to come out and participate in the puppetry shows.” CHM


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THE KIDS ISSUE

DOWN ON THE FARM Ph o to by J o h n M ic h ael S imp so n

C

hapel Hill natives Bart Fox, Virginia Fox and Marilyn Fox, 5, visit with Coda, the huarizo (half llama and half alpaca.) The family is huge fans of 1870 Farm located off of Old Lystra Road; Marilyn attends farm classes, and they attend the holiday event annually. Named for the year the house on the property was originally built, 1870 Farm has 17 active acres for camps and vet workshops. February through March is when the baby goats are born and offer cuddles during the Valentine’s Day event. CHM

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SUMMER CAMP GUIDE There’s a camp in the Triangle for every kid’s interest from sports and science to art and engineering AMERICAN DANCE FESTIVAL 721 Broad St., Durham 919-797-2871; americandancefestival.org

BOUNCING BULLDOGS JUMP ROPE CAMP 101 S. White Oak Dr., Durham 919-493-7992; bouncingbulldogs.org

American Dance Festival’s Samuel H. Scripps Studios hosts a variety of camps taught by expert faculty to expand students’ knowledge and understanding of dance. Ages 6-17 Dates Weekly in June and July. Visit website for details. Price Varies by camp. Visit website for details.

Jump rope skills designed for beginners to advanced participants, some of whom are seven-time national champions and 12time world champions. Ages 5-18 Dates Visit website. Price $45/day; $225/week

ART ADVENTURES AT THE ACKLAND ART MUSEUM 101 S. Columbia St., Chapel Hill 919-966-5736; ackland.org The sessions provide kids with a guided view of art in the Ackland’s galleries, followed by the opportunity to create take-home treasures in an adjacent art studio using newly learned art-making techniques. Materials are provided. Registration required, sign up online. Ages 6-9 Dates May 14, June 11, July 19, Aug. 13; two sessions at 10:30 a.m.-noon, 1-2:30 p.m. Price Free for museum members, $5 per session for nonmembers. BALLET SCHOOL OF CHAPEL HILL 1603 E. Franklin St., Chapel Hill 919-942-1339; balletschoolofchapelhill.com Offers a variety of classes, dance camps and workshops in creative arts, ballet, modern, contemporary jazz, rhythm tap, hip-hop, musical theater and DanceAbilities, a workshop for children with special needs. Ages 3-17 Dates June 13-Aug. 13; frequency and times vary. Price Varies. Call or visit website. BARRISKILL DANCE THEATRE SCHOOL 3642 Shannon Rd., Durham 919-489-5100; barriskilldance.com; contact@barriskilldance.com Classes and dance camps/intensives in creative movement, ballet, jazz, hip-hop, contemporary, conditioning, musical theater and more. Ages 3-18 Dates June 13-Aug. 12; half-day, 3/4-day and full-day camps available, as well as weekly classes. Price Call or visit website.

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CAROLINA TIGER RESCUE 1940 Hanks Chapel Rd., Pittsboro 919-542-4684, ext. 3006; carolinatigerrescue.org Learn in-depth information regarding the animals while getting to observe them and play games to learn about specific adaptations of the cats, complete art projects and make enriching toys for the animals. Campers watch the keepers feed and learn about vet procedures and what it takes to care for about 50 carnivores every day. Grades Third through 12th Dates June 20-24 and June 27-July 1 (rising 3rd-5th grade); July 11-15, 18-22 (rising middle schoolers); July 25-27 (rising 9th-12th grade) Price $300, elementary and middle school camps; $150 for high school camp; before and aftercare available for additional cost. CAMP RIVERLEA 8302 S. Lowell Rd., Bahama 210-908-7629 (winter); 919-477-8739 (summer); campriverlea.com Provides high-quality outdoor and art programs that emphasize personal growth, learning new skills, positive interpersonal relationships and appreciation for the natural world. Ages 5-12 Dates Session 1: June 13-July 1; Session 2: July 4-15; Session 3: July 18-Aug. 5. Open house June 11, 1-4:30 p.m. Price Sessions 1 and 3: $1,230; Session 2: $820 CAROLINA FRIENDS SCHOOL 4809 Friends School Rd., Durham 919-383-6602, ext. 263; cfsnc.org/summer Weekly courses in subject areas such as leadership, theater, outdoor adventures, cooking, weaving, sports, Legos, comic design, Minecraft, fashion design, “Harry Potter,” “Star Wars” and more.

January/February 2022

Ages 4-18 Dates June 20-Aug. 19; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; extended care available from 8 a.m.-5:45 p.m. Price $320-$350/week CHAPEL HILL TENNIS CLUB 403 Westbrook Dr., Carrboro 919-929-5248; chapelhilltennisclub.com Tennis instruction for beginners to advanced players, plus swimming and other sports in a fun and positive environment; advanced tennis camp available for tournament players. Ages 5-15 Dates Call or visit website. Price Call or visit website. CRESSET CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 3707 Garrett Rd., Durham 919-354-8000; cressetchristian.org STEM-focused camp. Ages Check website for more information. Dates June 6-July 15; 8 a.m.-4 p.m.; early drop-off available Price Check website for more information. DPAC – NEXT STOP BROADWAY 123 Vivian St., Durham 919-680-2787; dpacnc.com A weeklong performing arts program of classes, workshops and rehearsals focused on classic Broadway shows. Participants learn songs and choreography and create their own presentations based on shows in the upcoming DPAC season and other hit musicals. Ages 10-17 Dates July 11-15 Price Call or visit website. Registration starts early 2022. DRAWING FOR TWEENS AT THE ACKLAND ART MUSEUM 101 S. Columbia St., Chapel Hill 919-966-5736; ackland.org Tweens look at selected works in the galleries and identify techniques that the artists used to make them. Gallery teachers demonstrate and teach participants technical skills, which they can then apply to their own creations. A mix of drawing from works on display and creating one’s own original work is offered each session. Materials provided. Ages 10-13 Dates May 14, June 11, July 9, Aug. 13; one session at 10:30 a.m.-noon Price Museum members, free; $5 per session for nonmembers. Registration required. 


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DUKE PRE-COLLEGE SUMMER PROGRAMS Campus Box 90700, Durham; 919-684-6259; learnmore.duke.edu/precollege/all-programs Programs provide academically motivated students with rigorous learning experiences. A diverse course selection is designed to provide the Duke experience through cutting-edge topics featuring Duke guest speakers, researchers and resources. Subject areas include engineering, humanities, mathematics, science, social sciences and technology. Summer 2022 will feature residential, commuter, hybrid and online programs. Grades Sixth–12th Dates Vary by selected program. Price Call or visit website. DUKE SCHOOL 3716 Erwin Rd., Durham; 919-493-2642; dukeschool.org More than 50 camps available, including outdoor adventures, sports, arts and crafts, music, technology, coding, makers, community service, day camps for preschool and more. Ages 4-15 Dates June 14-July 30, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.; Aftercare available until 6 p.m. Price $350-$450/week DURHAM ACADEMY 3501 Ridge Rd., Durham; 919-489-3400 ext. 6114; da.org/summer Durham Academy has provided premier summer camp experiences for area families since 1982. The school utilizes 84 acres of campus and state-of-the-art facilities with the goal of providing a summer experience for all ages that grows minds and fosters character. Join for a new program this summer – a transformative

all-day camp experience that keeps campers closer to home but feeling far away as they gain independence and confidence. At the core of the program is the goal to equip campers with the tools to lead moral, happy and productive lives. Ages 4-18 Dates June 13-Aug. 5 Price Starting at $325 per session. DURHAM ARTS COUNCIL 120 Morris St., Durham; 919-560-2726; durhamarts.org Themes vary. One- and two-week cultural camps based on country themes. Flexible mini-camps also available. Campers have the opportunity to participate in clay, drawing/painting, mixed media, dance, theater and music classes. Teen intensives for ages 13-17 also available. Ages Rising K-age 17 Dates June 13-Aug. 19; day camp Price Call for inquiry. Scholarships available. DURHAM BALLET THEATRE 608 N. Duke St., Durham; 919-680-4363; durhamballettheatre.org Dance and aerial camps, classes for all ages. Ages 5-14 for camps, 4 and older for classes. Dates TBA Price Call or visit website. Registration starts March 16. DURHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS – CAMP 4 RISING K Camp location TBA; check website for updates 919-560-9488; dpsnc.net/afterschool This rising kindergartener camp offers a well-rounded summer experience. Campers explore science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics (STEAM). Students participate in weekly STEAM-related activities, including sports, games and swimming and also explore their learning through weekly field trips at no extra cost. Free breakfast and lunch will be provided. Students receive a free T-shirt. Grades Rising K students (must be 5 years old by Aug. 31, 2021) Dates June 20-Aug. 5; Closed July 4 Price $140/week for first child; $130/week for additional children in the same family. $35 registration fee per child. Limited space. DURHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS – CAMP FUNTASTIC Camp locations TBA; check website for updates 919-560-9488; dpsnc.net/afterschool Four- or five-star licensed summer camps by the NC Division of Child Development and Early Education that offer a well-rounded summer experience, including academic enrichment, science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics (STEAM). Campers are placed in age-appropriate groups as they participate in weekly academic and STEAM-related activities and play sports, games, swim and explore their learning through weekly educational and recreational field trips at no extra cost. Free breakfast and lunch will be provided. Accepts DSS vouchers. Students receive a free T-shirt. Grades First through fifth Dates June 20-Aug. 5; Closed July 4 Price $140/week for the first child; $130/week for additional children in the same family. $35 registration fee per child. Limited spaces. EMERSON WALDORF SCHOOL 6211 New Jericho Rd., Chapel Hill 919-967-1858, ext. 143; emersonwaldorf.org Activities include art, cooking, world languages and cultures, outdoor exploration, farming, fiber arts, skateboarding, practical living skills and more. CIT program also available.

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CAM P GUI D E

Ages 4 through high school age Dates June 20-July 29; 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m.; extended care available Price $215-$350/week THE EMILY KRZYZEWSKI CENTER SUMMER CAMPS 904 W. Chapel Hill St., Durham 919-680-0308; emilyk.org/camps Join the Emily K Center and the Justice Theater Project for two weeks of drama camp. Grades Rising second through ninth graders Dates Aug. 1-12 Price $245 per week; partial scholarships available. HILL LEARNING CENTER 3200 Pickett Rd., Durham 919-489-7464; hillcenter.org/summer Provides individualized instruction with a 4:1 student-teacher ratio in reading, writing, and math for children with learning differences. Grades Rising first through eighth Dates June 27-July 29 (closed July 5); Two session options (8:30-11:30 a.m. or 12:30-3:30 p.m. daily) Price $3,125

HOLLY HOUSE PRESCHOOL AND SUMMER CAMP 75 Cedar Run, Pittsboro 201-638-0913; hollyhousepreschool.com; hollyhouseconsulting@gmail.com A series of weeklong themed camps. Sign up for one week or all of them. Relaxed, developmentally appropriate activities. Mid-morning snack and all supplies included in fees. Themes include construction, crafts, fairy tales, gardening and cooking. Ages 4-7 Dates Weeklong camps in June and July; half-day programs from 8:30 a.m. to noon. Price Fees vary depending on camp. Contact hollyhouseconsulting@gmail.com for more information and to be notified when registration opens. INTERNATIONAL MONTESSORI SCHOOL 3001 Academy Rd., Bldg. 300, Durham 919-401-4343; imsnc.org Camps provided in a safe, nurturing environment, tucked away among the trees. Enthusiastic summer camp counselors delight in engaging your young child’s creativity and imagination through music, movement, stories and exciting, hands-on activities with others in a multi-age setting.

Ages 3 through rising first graders Dates June 20-July 29 with partialand full-day options Price Half- and full-day camps (8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. or 3 p.m.); early drop-off and late pick up available for an additional fee. Camp details and prices will be available on the website in early 2022. JUNIOR VET ACADEMY AT 1870 FARM 1224 Old Lystra Rd., Chapel Hill 919-590-4120; juniorvetacademy.com Weekly camps for animal lovers and aspiring vets. Ages 8-14 Dates Visit website. Price $545-$1,895 KIDZU CHILDREN’S MUSEUM 201 S. Estes Dr., Chapel Hill; 919-933-1455 kidzuchildrensmuseum.org Camp favorites include weekly themes of Pirates and Princesses, Around the World, Tiny Tinkerers and more. See website for weekly themes and descriptions. Enrollment available Feb. 1 and is on a first-come, firstserved basis. Ages 3-5 and 6-11 Dates Weekly camps starting June 13; 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., drop-off starts at 9 p.m., pickup ends at 4 p.m. Price See website for details. 

CELEBRATING

42 YEARS IN THE CHAPEL HILL COMMUNITY

NOW ENROLLING: TODDLER • PRESCHOOL • ELEMENTARY

1702 Legion Road, Chapel Hill, NC 27517 • 919.929.3339 For more information, please contact admin@mdsch.org or visit mdsch.org.

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C A MP G U I DE

MARBLES KIDS MUSEUM SUMMER CAMP 201 E. Hargett St., Raleigh; 919-857-1040; marbleskidsmuseum.org/summer-camp C H A P E L

H I L L

C A R R B O R O

kidzuchildrensmuseum.org/schools-out-camp/

School’s Out Camps Ages 4-8

1/24 - Winter Wonders 2/14- 2/15 - Spread the Love 3/28- 4/1 - Spring Break Camp 4/15 - STEAM’D UP

Mad Science Camps Ages 6-11

1/24 - Invention Nation 2 /14 - Security Sleuths camp

kid

zu

Camp Kidzu

Summer Camps!

Registration opens February 1st.

General Admission Hours

10am-12pm, 12:30-2:30pm, 3-5pm Tues.-Sun. 201 S. Estes Drive, Chapel Hill WWW. kidzuchildrensmuseum.org

Camp Marbles has long been a community favorite for its playful, fun, creative and original summer camp. The camp follows CDC guidelines and best practices for safe play, giving parents peace of mind while giving children the chance to discover, connect and make new friends. Ages 3-10 Dates June 6-Aug. 26; half-day (ages 3-6) and full-day (ages 5-10) weekly sessions Price Half-day: $165, member; $180, nonmember. Full-day: $300, member; $330, nonmember MONTESSORI DAY SCHOOL OF CHAPEL HILL SUMMER CAMP 1702 Legion Rd., Chapel Hill; 919-923-3339; mdsch.org The school welcomes campers for a fun-filled summer where they will have a chance to enjoy a variety of hands-on crafts and explore different activities in each session. Campers will be split into two age groups, ages 3-5 and ages 6-8. Email admin@mdsch.org for more information. Ages 3-8 Dates June 13-17, 20-24, June 27-July 1; July 11-15, 18-22, 25-29; Aug. 1-5, 8-12; 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Price $195/week MONTESSORI SCHOOL OF DURHAM 2800 Pickett Rd., Durham; 919-489-9045; msdurham.org Weekly themed camps include athletics, music, visual and performing arts, cooking, nature exploration, gardening and science. Ages 3 through rising 7th graders Dates June 13-Aug. 19 (closed week of July 4-8); half- and full-day camps Price Visit website. Registration began Jan. 26. MOREHEAD PLANETARIUM SUMMER SCIENCE CAMPS 250 E. Franklin St., Chapel Hill; 919-962-1236 moreheadplanetarium.org/camps Encourage your child’s natural curiosity and intellectual growth by signing up for a camp at the newly renovated Morehead Planetarium & Science Center. Grades K-8 Dates Weekly from June 13-Aug. 5 Price K-5 half-day camps, $170-$215; full-day camps for grades 6-8, $450. Members are offered a 10% discount.

CAMP KANATA • CAMP SEAFARER • CAMP SEA GULL

Day and Overnight Camps Spring/Fall Weekend Camps Family Camps

CampKanata.org • SeaGull-Seafarer.org 42

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MUSEUM OF LIFE AND SCIENCE 433 W. Murray Ave., Durham; 919-220-5429, ext. 405 summercamp.lifeandscience.org Interactive, hands-on science camps with topics ranging from coding and gaming to animal science and more. New extended hours at two in-person locations in Durham and Chapel Hill, plus virtual options to experience the fun of camp from home! Call 919-220-5429, ext. 405, for general camp info, and ext. 313 for camp reservations and membership. Ages PreK-Grade 8 Dates June 6-Aug. 19 Price TBA ORANGE COUNTY ARTS COMMISSION/ENO ARTS MILL 437 Dimmocks Mill Rd., Ste. 17, Hillsborough; 919-245-2129; artsorange.org Diverse camps that focus on the visual, performing and literary arts. Full and partial day camps will be offered. Ages 5-18 Dates TBD Price Varies for each camp.


CAM P GUI D E

+ OVERNIGHT FARM CAMP AT PIPER HILL 2340 Jessie Bridges Rd., Silk Hope; 919-590-4120; camppiperhill.com Overnight weekend camps and weekly camps by 1870 Farm. Ages 8-13 Dates Visit website for more information. Price $255-$1,375/week PRIMROSE SCHOOL OF CHAPEL HILL AT BRIAR CHAPEL 81 Falling Springs Dr., Chapel Hill 919-441-0441; primrosechapelhill.com Imaginations take flight this summer through different weekly themes that engage students in creative critical thinking while doing fun, STEAMbased projects and weekly field trips for experiential learning. Ages Grades K–5 Dates Weekly, June through August, 8 a.m.–5 p.m. Price Call to inquire.

Offers one-week camps with a variety of themes, all of which end with a concert performance!

+

THE SCRAP EXCHANGE 2050 Chapel Hill Rd., Durham 919-213-1278; scrapexchange.org Offers a variety of creative reuse arts programs, classes and workshops. Can travel to camps and schools or host groups on-site. Ages 4 and older Dates June-August; frequency and times vary. Price Varies. Call or visit website. SEVEN STAR KUNG FU ACADEMY 11312 US Hwy. 15-501, Ste. 306, Chapel Hill; 984-234-0717; chris@sevenstarkungfuacademy.com

SCHOOL OF ROCK CHAPEL HILL 1500 N. Fordham Blvd., Chapel Hill 919-338-1011; chapelhill.schoolofrock.com

+

Grades Rising third graders through rising 12th graders (see camp descriptions on website for specifics) Dates Weeks of June 27, July 11, July 25 and Aug. 8; Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Prices Varies. Call or visit website.

Half-day camps include outings to local parks, a kung fu lesson, cultural lessons including music and Chinese drumming, and a game day with dodgeball. Ages 6 and older Dates Weekly, half-day camps from 8 a.m. to noon; check website for dates Price $225 per week

LEARN. + IMAGINE. EXPLORE. DISCOVER. +

THE STUDIO SCHOOL OF DURHAM 1201 W. Woodcroft Parkway, Durham 919-967-2700; studioschooldurham.org Offers the opportunity to discover, explore and engage in hands-on learning all summer long, with a variety of themes for children that are guaranteed to spark their creativity in a safe and naturally inspiring environment. Ages 5-8 and 9-12 Dates June 20-July 29 Price Visit website for details. SUMMER @ SAINT MARY’S 900 Hillsborough St., Raleigh 919-424-4028; sms.edu Girls have the opportunity to explore new interests, build fundamental skills, pursue artistic dreams and expand academic horizons. Whether creating a charcoal drawing, learning to be a leader, strengthening their writing skills or participating in healthy competition on the playing field, participants will enjoy a summer full of new friends and experiences in an all-girl setting as they master skills and grow in confidence. Registration opened on Dec. 15. Grades Rising grades K-10 Dates June 20-24, June 27-July 1, July 11-15, July 18-22 and July 15-29. Residential, full- and half-day and extended care options are available. 

Newly renovated with 5,000+ square feet of exhibit space plus science demonstrations, planetarium shows + MORE! +

moreheadplanetarium.org + + +

+ January/February 2022

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C AMP GUIDE

SUMMERSCAPE AT THE MONTESSORI SCHOOL OF RALEIGH 7005 Lead Mine Rd., Raleigh 919-848-1545, msr.org

Price $165-$325 per session, $995 for residential Ms. Nancy’s Manners Camp and $1,195 for residential Innovators Hub program. SUMMER SAILING CAMPS AT JORDAN LAKE Crosswinds Boating Center, 565 Farrington Rd., Apex info@carolinasailingfoundation.org; carolinasailingfoundation.org Beginner and intermediate classes taught by US Sailing Certified Instructors. Weeklong, full-day sessions, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. Only 10-12 students per class, so register early. Have fun on the water this summer learning to sail! Ages 9-15 Dates See carolinasailingfoundation.org for schedules and online registration. Price $365 per student per week.

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Seven weeks of full- and halfday camp sessions for students ages 15 months to grade 8. With a range of offerings including arts, athletics, the sciences, strategy games, robotics, outdoor adventure and more, there is something for everyone. Expert instructors and access to excellent facilities on the school’s two beautiful campuses makes for an ideal summer experience. Registration is open to MSR students and nonstudents. Early-bird care available for an additional fee. Ages 15 months-grade 8 Dates Weekly, June 13-Aug. 1; no camp offered the week of July 4 Price Varies by camp. Visit website for details.

January/February 2022

TRIANGLE DAY SCHOOL 4911 Neal Rd., Durham 919-383-8800; triangledayschool.org; summer@triangledayschool.org Students will have the opportunity to learn a new craft or hobby, enhance and develop existing skills, travel to local places and make new friends. Staff consists of experts, artists and educators from TDS and other local schools and programs. A variety of programs focus on art, STEAM, nature, adventure, early childhood and more. CIT program for 13- to 15-year-olds. Ages 4-15 Dates June 13-Aug. 5, 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; extended care available 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Price Before March 1, $300/session; after March 1, $315/session TRIANGLE YOUTH BALLET 1708 A/B E. Franklin St., Chapel Hill 919-932-2676; triangleyouthballet.org Offers a variety of classes, intensives and dance camps in ballet, creative movement, modern, jazz and musical theater. Ages 3 through adult Dates June 12-Aug. 20; frequency and time vary with each program. Price Varies for each program. Call or visit website.


CAM P GUI D E

TRINITY SCHOOL OF DURHAM AND CHAPEL HILL 4011 Pickett Rd., Durham 919-402-8262; trinityschoolnc.org

YMCA CAMP KANATA 3524 Camp Kanata Rd., Wake Forest 919-556-2661; campkanata.org

Camp topics include math, Latin, SAT prep, college essay writing, robotics, scripting, basketball, soccer, volleyball, pottery, art, sewing, cooking and much more. Ages 5-18, Rising K-12 grade Dates Weekly, June 1-Aug. 7; Morning and afternoon sessions available. Price $190-$250/week YMCA CAMP CHEERIO 1430 Camp Cheerio Rd., Glade Valley 336–869-0195 (fall, winter, spring); 336-363-2604 (summer); campcheerio.org YMCA residential camp in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina. Activities offered include horseback riding, climbing, ropes course, aquatics, sports, field games, creative arts and nature study. Ages 7-15 Dates June 6-Aug. 19 Price $1,195-$2,390

Located on 150 acres, this camp nurtures the potential of every child to develop into confident, competent leaders. It is traditional, coed and overnight with activities such as archery, hiking, swimming and creative arts, and water activities like canoeing, kayaking and a 75-foot double waterslide on the camp’s 15-acre lake. Offers an overnight camp in one-week sessions, a traditional summer day camp in one-week sessions, and several overnight weekend camps throughout the fall and spring. Ages 6-16 Dates June-August for day camp and overnight camps; April-May for family camps Price Ranges by length of session. Check website for details.

YMCA CAMP SEAFARER AND CAMP SEA GULL 218 Sea Gull Landing and 2744 Seafarer Rd., Arapahoe; 252-249-1111 (Sea Gull); 252-249-1212 (Seafarer); seagull-seafarer.org Overnight camps – Sea Gull for boys and Seafarer for girls – located on the N.C. coast. Signature four-week program gives campers time to develop their character, build strong relationships, independence and confidence in a safe, resilient and supportive environment. It also offers a Starter Camp (one week), a Mariners camp (two weeks), a Family camp and specialty weekend camping programs throughout the year. Ages 7-16, and family camps Dates June-August for summer camp; dates in May, August and September for family camps Price Ranges by length of session. Check website for details. CHM

YMCA CAMP CHEERIO Residential camping for boys and girls rising 2nd to 10th grade Sessions from June 5th to August 19th Located on 150 acres in the heart of the Blue Ridge Mountains near Stone Mountain State Park Campers can enjoy over 35 activities including Archery, Canoeing, Climbing, Horseback Riding, Guitar, and more! Call (336)869-0195 or visit campcheerio.org for more information! January/February 2022

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leaders by the

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A new mural highlights 12 Black trailblazers in Carrboro and Chapel Hill By Hannah McCl el l an Photography by Mi ri am McSpadden


F

or nearly three months and over hundreds of hours, artist Kiara Sanders worked to paint a nearly 20-foot mural honoring local Black trailblazers. The mural is located where Carrboro and Chapel Hill meet, at 111 S. Merritt Mill Rd., which has been home to two Black-owned businesses: Walt’s Grill and Ms. Molly’s Gift Shop. The building was

built by one of the leaders she painted, Walter Riggsbee – a fact she found out from the people who worked in the building, who would check on her, bring her food and talk to her about local history. “I actually learned about the people I was painting through these conversations, because a lot of these people literally were raised by or taught by or had relationships with them. It just made them feel that

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T RAILBLAZER M U R A L

Orange County Arts Commission, the Chapel Hill Downtown Partnership and the North Carolina Arts Council all helped plan and sponsor the mural.

Artist Kiara Sanders worked 8 to 10 hours a week from mid-July to early September to complete the mural.

much more real,” Kiara says. “To me, it was just amazing to think this man built this building, with his hands laying the bricks, and then I get to come in many years later and paint his image on the building that he built.” Though the mural was finished in early September after about three months of painting, it was nearly 15 years in the making. The Chapel Hill-Carrboro Area Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta sorority devised the idea for the mural, largely due to the lack of public art representing Chapel Hill’s African American community, says Dianne Peerman Pledger, the chairperson of the sorority’s education committee. In addition to the CHCAA chapter of Delta Sigma Theta, the Chapel Hill Community Arts & Culture, the Town of Carrboro, the 48

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For Dianne, the project was a personal one since her father, William D. Peerman, who coached football, basketball and baseball at Lincoln High School in the 1950s and 1960s, is one of the dozen featured. “I’m honored and elated that his legacy continues in the image of him on that building. He was a prominent educator, he was a mentor, he was a father figure to many. He was a very special man,” Dianne says. “It just gratifies my heart, and my sister’s heart, knowing that he is recognized in this way as a trailblazer in our community.” Originally, the mural was going to include many more Black civic leaders, but the list was narrowed down to 12 so each figure could fit prominently on the wall. For Kiara, seeing her hard work result in such a vibrant and educational mural was exciting. She submitted a design to paint the mural last winter and found out in March she’d been selected, partially due to her “stylized and realistic” way of painting people. Before starting to paint in July, Kiara learned how to operate a lift, and she had to figure out how to enlarge her design on the wall. In the end, she made a “doodle grid,” which required weeks of drawing “all sorts of nonsensical numbers and letters” on the wall, taking a picture of the wall and then imposing her design on the picture to see physical markers of where people and shapes should be painted. As she worked, Kiara primarily listened to crime podcasts, stopping occasionally to talk with passersby who wondered what the project was and if she was really painting the whole mural by herself. “Toward the end of the mural, when I knew that I didn’t have anything else left to do, I got this sort of bittersweet feeling – I don’t like endings,” Kiara says. “But then, the art takes on a life of its own, and I’ve already sort of faded into the background.” Dianne says the community response to the mural has been “heartwarming and fantastic.” “It’s almost spiritual. People are just glad to see people they know, people they grew up with. It is extremely important because having that mural there makes everybody feel a part of the community. ‘I’m not left out, because I see people who look like me.’ “It helps blend the fabric of the community,” Dianne says. “And there’s other things that could be done in the community to make us feel that way, too.” CHM


TR A ILB LAZ ER M URAL

THE DOZEN BLACK TRAILBLAZERS HONORED INCLUDE: • Rev. Dr. L.H. Hackney, pastor and founder of the first Black high school in the area • Nurse Adelia Compton, the first Black employee for the Town of Chapel Hill • Sen. Valerie Paige Foushee, North Carolina State Senator • Addie Robinson, director and founder of Holmes Day Care at Hargraves Community Center

I am reminded of the sacrifices made for and by African Americans in this greater community to ensure opportunity and access – from integrating the public schools to integrating public accommodations. I was blessed to know many of the heroes and sheroes depicted on that wall. They taught us respect, responsibility, diligence and discipline. They offered advice when requested and admonishment when necessary.” – State Senator Valerie Paige Foushee

DESIGN. BUILD. REMODEL.

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• Thurman Atkins, developer and entrepreneur • Howard Lee, the only Black mayor of Chapel Hill and the first Black mayor in the South • Susie Weaver and Bynum Weaver, artists, musicians and entrepreneurs

Before

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• Barbara Booth Powell, Chapel Hill Town Council member, educator and politician • William D. Peerman, championship-winning coach, mentor and educator and the first Black head football coach at Chapel Hill High School • Walter Riggsbee, HVAC builder and entrepreneur • Rev. Dr. J.R. Manley, former pastor of the Rock Hill-First Baptist Church and community leader

2021

After

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ABOVE The newly opened Eno Mill Gallery, located within the 10,000-square-foot Eno Arts Mill. RIGHT Book artist Audrey Pinto relocated her studio to the Eno Arts Mill from the Golden Belt studios in Durham.

shining

examp l e The new Eno Arts Mill is the crown jewel of the arts in Orange County By C h r is Vi t i e l lo | P h o to g rap hy by Jo h n M ich ae l Si m pson

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W

hen Renee Price, chair of the Orange County Board of Commissioners, arrived at the Eno Arts Mill’s grand opening on Oct. 1, she had to circle around for a long while just to find a parking space – and that’s a good thing. “We got there, and we couldn’t find a place to park. I mean, it was just that popular,” Renee laughs. “Already, it’s become a venue.” Hillsborough came out in droves to see the new 7,000-square-foot arts center, featuring five artist studios, a classroom, a satellite office for the Carrborobased Art Therapy Institute and a spacious gallery, all housed in the historic Eno River Mill building. The center shares walls with the 3,000-square-foot Eno Mill Studios, which houses 11 artists and opened in February 2020. The Eno Arts Mill represents a remarkable turnaround during the pandemic and speaks to the cultural vision of the county government and especially to the community-oriented will of Orange County Arts Commission (OCAC) Director Katie Murray. When Katie took the commission directorship five years ago, after running an arts center in Elizabeth City,


ABOVE The Eno Mill Gallery features exhibition space for resident studios artists, as well as periodic group shows, such as December’s Deck the Walls Holiday Show, featuring members of the Orange County Artists Guild. Stella Starling, 8, and her dad, David Starling, were two visitors of the exhibit that month. LEFT The studios have recently hosted Beck Tiani, an Orange High School student selected by Carrboro’s Present Day on Main for their “Turning the Tables” public art project. Beck won a competition to create the table, which will be located at the school after completion.

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T HE ARTS

North Carolina, she was looking forward to returning to the artsrich place she had enjoyed during her college years in the 1990s. But she found that things had changed. “What happened?” she recalls thinking. “I was so surprised by the lack of visual arts spaces, especially in Chapel Hill and Carrboro.” ABOVE Multidisciplinary artist Michelle Spaulding recently Despite the presence of a lot of artists, Katie found the county moved into a studio to expand her art-making and teaching severely lacking in physical space for the arts. Thanks to real business after relocating to Hillsborough from the Outer Banks. estate appreciation and rising rents, what had been gallery and ABOVE LEFT Orange County Arts Commission (OCAC) studio space two decades ago had become retail and restaurant Director Katie Murray. space today. “In order to have a healthy arts ecosystem, you have to have spaces for artists to work, live, exhibit, perform and rehearse,” Katie says. expensive. Forming a task force, Katie saw space as the first domino that “So I basically put a hold on everything going on at the commission when needed to fall to catalyze the arts community. I came in, and for two years we did listening sessions and surveys with “If organizations had more space to work with, then they could make anyone who would talk to us just to get a better understanding of how, in their programs more accessible, because it wouldn’t be so bottom-line a community as rich in the arts as we are, did we get to this place.” driven,” she says. “And if the arts had more of a physical presence, then While mapping the arts ecosystem, Katie started identifying possible they would have had a voice at the table when growth is happening so fast. spaces for the arts to get a foothold, which was a challenge. Orange All of these things are interwoven, and I got a really clear picture of how it County lacked the old tobacco warehouses and manufacturing buildings ended up this way.” more common in Durham and Wake counties. Instead, the county is The Eno River Mill building was among the many spaces on the task largely residential and has a rural buffer that – although it keeps the force’s radar, so Katie started emailing Alex Gold, whose family has county pleasantly green – limits development and makes properties more owned the mill since the 1980s, and Frank Gailor, owner of Hedgehog 52

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Holdings, the Raleighbased managing partner, to check out other similar converted spaces, like the Torpedo Factory Art Center in Alexandria, Virginia (a Navy munitions factory after WWI), and the Goat Farm Arts Center in Atlanta (a 19th century industrial complex). Once they saw Katie’s vision for the Eno Mill Studios, they became enthusiastic partners and offered leasing terms and an upfitting plan that she describes as generous. Katie took that plan to the county commissioners in October 2019, and it was unanimously approved. She announced the availability of new studios, and they immediately filled up. And then, a few months later, COVID-19 happened. Around half the artists promptly backed out. ABOVE Shaerie Mead, studio artist and owner of IONA Clothing Studio, Nonetheless, despite low occupancy the initial year relocated to Carrboro from Los Angeles. ABOVE LEFT Michelle McKee looks at art done by Mary Ann Rozear. and the impossibility of public engagement, the space sustained itself. Shaerie Mead, a clothing designer who owns IONA Clothing Studio, was one of the first artists in the door. – I was going insane. So I was able to come here for half-days and to “The space saved my life at the time,” Shaerie says, having relocated develop the ideas I had.” from Los Angeles just three weeks before the shutdown. “I’m a pretty Shaerie describes IONA as a slow fashion clothing line using social person, so to not meet people and just be stuck in the house “sustainable fabrics, ethical production, hand dyeing and effortless

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TH E A R TS

comfort.” Exhausted from the constant hustle and the lack of community in LA, she has found a supportive home in the mill. “The first time I met Katie and she showed me the studio, she was like, ‘We really want to make it work for you. Here’s all the stuff we’re doing, and these are our future plans.’ And I was just blown away,” Shaerie says. “This is exactly the kind of community I want to be involved with.” During the pandemic, office tenants in the rest of the mill building moved out, and Katie saw the opportunity to locate those future plans in the same footprint as the Eno Mill Studios. Frontfacing with exterior doors and parking, the new Eno Arts Mill space is more than twice the size of the first studio building and houses the OCAC offices. Samir Knego is a multidisciplinary artist-writer whose watercolor and ink paintings and drawings draw upon his disability. In his words, he “doesn’t have the motor skills for precise work and needs higher contrast colors for vision reasons.” He has found his work opening up now that he is in one of the studios at the mill. “I explore a lot of disability and accessibility issues in my work; I’m a wheelchair user,” Samir says. “So it felt kind of important, doing stuff on social and community issues, to not just be doing that all on my own.” After having worked at home, on a tabletop that he was constantly having to clear off in order to do other things, Samir now finds himself thinking of larger, longer-term projects and engaging more deeply with each piece he makes. And he feels more outward-looking in the work through his interaction with other artists, and now the public, at the mill. “It’s not just this little island,” he says. “I feel really connected to the whole arts system and community, which is compelling to me. And it’s a really accessible space, too.” Now that the mill is officially launched, look for a full calendar of community events in the gallery and open studios each first Friday of the month, as well as classes and activities in the classroom. But also know that Katie is just getting started. Future plans include a community darkroom, a community ceramic studio, a children’s theater and partnerships with Title I schools to provide after-school arts instruction and activities. It’s all part of a comprehensive vision, one shared by county leadership, that the arts are an essential component of civic life in Orange County. “We have to think about creative placemaking,” Renee says. “The world is changing, and I think there’s a place for the arts that’s more than just economic development; it’s used in therapy for domestic violence and PTSD, and as we try to get through the isolation of the pandemic. The arts do so much for our community. And it also is a way of expressing who we are and what we are.” “We’ve got the know-how and the equipment. We just need to figure out the right space and how to make these programs sustainable,” Katie says, distilling that vision into a workable plan. “I would love it if we could just occupy every empty space with something arts-related, and for this to really become a hub, not just for our community, but for the whole Triangle.” CHM

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Yiqing Huang and Tom Wolf can enjoy the changing views of Lake Orange from their deck in all seasons.

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H O M E & GAR D E N

lake

living Two world travelers set down sustainable roots on Lake Orange By Morgan Cart i er Weston Photography by J ohn Mi chael S im ps on

T

here are many ways to get to Hillsborough – whether by road, trail or even the Eno River – and Orange County’s seat has drawn people from all over. Yiqing Huang and Tom Wolf were attracted to its small-town feel and warmer weather more than 15 years ago, and their dream of building a home there immediately began to take shape. Originally from China, Yiqing studied industrial management at Dalian University of Technology. In

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H OME & GARDEN

ABOVE The line between indoors and outdoors is blurred thanks to large windows that provide sweeping views of the lake. LEFT The open floor plan means that anyone cooking, dining or relaxing can all coexist.

the late ’90s, she decided to continue her education, moving to the United States to attend the New Jersey Institute of Technology for a master’s in computer science. Raised in Germany, Tom was 16 when his family moved to Fayetteville, North Carolina. “It was a culture shock,” he says. He later attended North Carolina State University for his undergraduate degree in computer science and earned a master’s at Columbia University in New York City before moving to New Jersey for work. It was there Yiqing and Tom’s paths finally crossed, and they bonded quickly over a shared love of coffee, culture and computing. The couple were married in 2005, and the following year they visited one of Yiqing’s close friends who lived on Lake Orange. “We fell in love with the lake and looked at a lot of homes in Arrowhead 58

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H OME & GARDEN

Trail,” Tom says. Then, the couple met a neighbor whose large lot

had already been permitted for a septic system for a second home. “I had such fond memories of North Carolina, and my parents still lived in Fayetteville, so it seemed like a great next step for us,” Tom explains. “We purchased the land and sold our home in New Jersey, thinking we would build right away.” But Tom and Yiqing did not want to disrupt school for their daughter, Jessica Wolf, now 23, and decided to stick around New Jersey a little longer. In 2015, Tom moved to North Carolina. “I was sort of the scout and came down first to get a feel for things,” he says. Yiqing joined him in 2017 once Jessica was off to college, and the couple bought a

TOP Vertical tile in the bathroom is a simple way to draw the eye upward and make a space feel larger. MIDDLE The screened porch was a must for Tom and Yiqing to ensure enjoyment of the outdoors year-round. BELOW The home’s roof evokes the shape of the popular houseboats in Amsterdam.

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SHANNON KENNEDY 919.448.6664 shannon.kennedy@sothebysrealty.com

“Shannon recently completed a transaction for us selling a townhouse in Chapel Hill. She is extremely professional and reliable. From the beginning, she helped us set the price, developed a marketing strategy and was able to get us under contract quickly. After the contract she followed up on all the inspection report requests and handled the needed repairs. She even dropped off the check personally with a bottle of champagne. We highly recommend Shannon.” Sally and Mack Brown Chapel Hill

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We had two phases of design – the first time was many years ago when we began drawing our plan in our minds.” - Yiqing

ABOVE Coffee lovers Tom and Yiqing installed a built-in coffee maker In their kitchen so a hot brew is always within reach. BELOW The couple loved their white sectional so much they asked architect Arielle Condoret Schechter to design their living room footprint around it to maximize flow.

new house in Cary while they searched for an architect to design their ideal home. “The only customization we could do to the Cary house was add some windows and pick the finishes,” Yiqing says. “It was nice, but it was just like every other traditional home we’ve ever had,” Tom adds. “We wanted the next one to be special.” TH E R I GHT FI T

“We had two phases of design – the first time was many years ago, when we began drawing our plan in our minds,” Yiqing says. Though the Lake Orange site had been permitted for a septic system, the lot was a very 62

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REPRESENTING BUYERS AND SELLERS

in this Southern Part of Heaven Your professionalism shines through in everything you do. This includes our meetings with you, all the print and online media, your sense of the market, and so much more!”

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HO M E & GARD EN

LEFT An abundance of natural light means there are no bad spots to read or catch up on work. From the center of the room, Yiqing has a gorgeous view of the lake. RIGHT Tom and Yiqing’s minimalist furnishings are complemented by a collection of colorful artwork they have collected or created – both Yiqing and daughter Jessica are artists.

restrictive triangular shape. “We needed someone to maximize every square inch of buildable space,” Tom says. He also wanted to recreate the concrete walls of his German childhood. “It was all we had there, these sturdy stone houses. To me, a house is not really a house unless it is made of concrete and stone.” The couple favored clean aesthetics, natural light and minimal design. “Finding someone who could achieve the modern style was the most important thing to me,” Yiqing says. They reached out to Chapel Hill architect Arielle Condoret Schechter to execute their vision on the unique lot. “Like most of our clients, Tom and Yiqing value light, livability, energy conservation and spaces tailor-made for their lifestyle over ostentation and grandiose square footage,” Arielle says. Though it was easy to fall in love with Arielle’s design style and portfolio, Tom and Yiqing still needed to find a builder. One day, while driving around Durham looking at houses for Tom’s parents, they stumbled upon a striking modern home and decided to knock on the door to ask who built it. “No one was home, but as we walked back to our car, who should pull up behind us but George Smart,” Tom says. George, the executive director of NCModernist, pointed them toward Durham-based BuildSense. “BuildSense did a great job quality wise,” Tom says. “Every time we visited the site, everything was so clean and tidy, and their communication was excellent, too,” Yiqing adds. And while she admits the site constraints were extremely challenging, Arielle is proud to have helped introduce modern, environmentally sustainable living to the

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LEFT Clean lines carry through to the open kitchen, where storage was maximized with large cabinets and a functional waterfall island.

Lake Orange community. “In this case, the water was fundamental to the conception of the house as we designed it to have spectacular views of the lake and sunsets and to welcome the breezes that glide across the water.” The structure itself has a ‘houseboat’ shape, both a nod to Tom’s affinity for Amsterdam’s iconic canal dwellings and to the lakefront property itself. The sloped roof also enabled the installation of solar panels, which, in combination with thoughtful

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H OME & GARDEN

LEFT From the lakeside site they chose to the contractors they worked with, Yiqing and Tom could not be happier with their custom home.

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WENDY THOMPSON

CHAPEL HILL! Locally, we are known as

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window choices and two Tesla Powerwalls to act as battery backups, brought in the element of sustainability that was so important to the couple. “Arielle always asked for our opinion,” Tom says. “It meant everything to us.” L A K E S I D E L I V I NG

The home was completed in February 2020. “It was a little crazy moving to Hillsborough right before the pandemic hit,” Tom says. “We are just now starting to get to know our new town.” There was plenty to do once they moved in, though, and Yiqing and Tom wasted no time making the space their own, adding lighting, furniture and artwork that make bold statements against the home’s crisp white walls and natural light, including a colorful piece by daughter Jessica in the primary bedroom. Two additional bedrooms double as office and yoga spaces for the couple, so the home’s footprint remains minimal yet functional. The soaring ceilings and large windows in the open living and dining area blend seamlessly into the lake view out back; in the evenings, LED sconces mounted high on the walls draw the eye upward and add a subtle dose of grandeur. “We weren’t even thinking about lighting there, but Arielle suggested it, and we think it makes a huge difference,” Tom says. As pandemic restrictions continue to evolve, Tom and Yiqing are making the most of the outdoors, frequenting the Eno River Farmers Market, Eno River and in the summer, Maple View Farm. “We also enjoy the patios at Cup-A-Joe and The Wooden Nickel,” Tom says. “This is such a nice, friendly town, and we had such a great experience building this house,” Yiqing adds. “We feel really lucky.” CHM


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D I NING GUIDE

INCLUDES RESTAURANTS, DELIS AND BISTROS IN CHAPEL HILL, CARRBORO, HILLSBOROUGH AND NORTHERN CHATHAM COUNTY

CHAPEL HILL East Franklin Street Bandido’s Mexican Cafe Burritos, salads, quesadillas, tacos. 159 ½ E. Franklin St.; 919-967-5048; bandidoscafe.com

* DE TAI L S ARE S U B J E C T TO C H A N G E . C H E C K RE STAU RANT W E B S I TE S AND S OC I AL ME DI A C H A N N E LS P RI OR TO V I S I T I NG. A DVERTI S ER S H I GH L I GH T E D I N B OX E S

MOMO’S Master Made-to-order Himalayan dumplings. 110 N. Columbia St.; momosmaster.com

Boro Beverage Co. Locally made kombucha and craft sodas on tap. 400 W. Rosemary St., Ste. 1005; 919-537-8001; borobeverage.com

Pirate Captain Ramen, seafood, smoothie bowls. 163 E. Franklin St.; piratecaptainch.com

Brandwein’s Bagels Classic New York bagels and breakfast sandwiches. 505 W. Rosemary St.; 919-240-7071; brandweinsbagels.com

Benny Cappella’s Pizza by the slice or whole pie. 122 E. Franklin St.; 919-240-5062; bennysva.com

Sup Dogs Creative hot dogs and sides like jalapeño popper tots and funnel cake sticks. 107 E. Franklin St.; 919-903-9566; supdogs.com

Carolina Coffee Shop Casual American cuisine for breakfast, lunch and dinner. 138 E. Franklin St.; 919-942-6875; carolinacoffeeshop.com

Sutton’s Drug Store Old-fashioned diner known for its hot dogs, burgers and sandwiches like “Roy’s Reuben.” 159 E. Franklin St.; 919-942-5161; suttonsdrugstore.com

Carolina Brewery The fifth-oldest brewery in the state featuring Carolina cuisine. 460 W. Franklin St.; 919-942-1800; carolinabrewery.com

Cosmic Cantina Burritos, salads, quesadillas, tacos. 128 E. Franklin St.; 919-960-3955; cosmiccantina.com

Time-Out Southern comfort food 24 hours a day. 201 E. Franklin St.; 919-929-2425; timeout247.com

Curry Point Express Indian fare including curry, biryani and wraps. 118 E. Franklin St.; 919-903-9000; currypointexpresstogo.com

Top of the Hill A Chapel Hill brewery that also offers American food like burgers and flatbreads. 100 E. Franklin St.; 919-929-8676; thetopofthehill.com

Cat Tales Cat Cafe A two-story coffee/beer/ wine cafe home to 12 adoptable cats. 431 W. Franklin St., Ste. 210; 843-345-5289; cattalescatcafe.com

Dame’s Chicken & Waffles Chicken, waffles, schmears. ‘Nuff said. 174 E. Franklin St.; 919240-4228; dameschickenwaffles.com Down Time Craft beer, pizza, tacos, wraps, paninis and more. 201 E. Franklin St.; 919-240-7008; downtimechapelhill.com Epilogue Books Chocolate Brews Independent bookstore and Mexican-style chocolatería. 109 E. Franklin St., Ste. 100; 919913-5055; epiloguebookcafe.com Four Corners American fare, nachos, wings, pasta. 175 E. Franklin St.; 919-537-8230; fourcornersgrille.com Hibachi & Company Japanese fast-casual spot serving healthy hibachi- and teriyakistyle dishes. 153 E. Franklin St.; 919-903-8428; hibachicompany.com

TRU Deli & Wine Bar Build-your-own sandwiches and wine. 114 Henderson St.; 919-240-7755; trudeli.com Yaya Tea Japanese cafe with a variety of bubble teas and imported snacks. 157 E. Franklin St.; 919-914-6302; yayatea.com West Franklin Street 411 West Fresh pasta, seafood and pizzas inspired by the flavors of Italy and the Mediterranean, with a healthy California twist; outdoor dining. 411 W. Franklin St.; 919-967-2782; 411west.com

Imbibe Bottle shop and restaurant serving pizza, salads and appetizers. 108 Henderson St.; 919-636-6469; imbibenc.com

Al’s Burger Shack Gourmet burgers and fries. 516 W. Franklin St.; 919-904-7659; alsburgershack.com

Jed’s Kitchen Gyro pitas, shawarma wraps, subs and other Mediterranean and Moroccan dishes. 105 E. Franklin St.; 919-240-7003; jedskitchen.com

Beer Study Bottle shop with in-store drafts and growlers to go. 106 N. Graham St.; 919-240-5423; beerstudy.com

Linda’s Bar & Grill Local beer, sweet potato tots, cheese fries and burgers. 203 E. Franklin St.; 919-933-6663; lindas-bar.com Möge Tee Bubble tea shop offering cheese foam fruit tea, fresh milk tea, fruit parfaits and fruit yakult. 151 E. Franklin St.; 984-234-3278; mogeteechapelhill.com

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Blue Dogwood Public Market Food hall with individually owned food stalls including Asian fusion, a bottle shop, North Carolina barbecue and a nutrient-dense weekly pre-order menu. 306 W. Franklin St., Ste. G; 919-717-0404; bluedogwood.com Blue’s on Franklin North Carolina barbecue, burgers, hot dogs, sandwiches and salads. 110 W. Franklin St.; 919-240-5060; bluesonfranklin.com

January/February 2022

Buns Gourmet burgers, fries and shakes made from fresh ingredients. 107 N. Columbia St.; 919-240-4746; bunsofchapelhill.com

Chimney Indian Kitchen & Bar Traditional Indian dishes and unique options like pista korma and lobster pepper masala. 306 W. Franklin St., Ste. D; 984-234-3671; chimneyindiankitchen.com CholaNad Restaurant & Bar Contemporary and traditional South Indian cuisine. Catering available. 310 W. Franklin St.; 800-246-5262; cholanad.com Crossroads Chapel Hill at The Carolina Inn New American cuisine and seasonal specialties; all ABC permits; outdoor dining. 211 Pittsboro St.; 919-918-2777; crossroadscuisine.com Elaine’s on Franklin Fine regional American cuisine, made with the freshest local ingredients. 454 W. Franklin St.; 919-960-2770; elainesonfranklin.com Franklin Motors Beer Garden A rooftop and fully licensed ABC bar. The Roquette at Franklin Motors serves beer garden favorites like hand-cut fries, bratwurst and sliders. 601 W. Franklin St.; 919-869-7090; franklinmotors.net Heavenly Buffaloes Chicken wings as well as vegan wings with more than 25 rubs and sauces. 407 W. Franklin St.; 919-914-6717; heavenlybuffaloes.com/chapel-hill Italian Pizzeria III Pizza, Italian entrees, calzones and subs. The “place to be” in Chapel Hill for 41 years. 508 W. Franklin St.; 919-968-4671; italianpizzeria3.com


D I NI NG GUI D E

Kurama Sushi & Noodle Express Dumplings, salads, noodle dishes. 105 N. Columbia St.; 919-968-4747; kuramasushinoodle.com La Résidence French-inspired cuisine made from fresh ingredients. 202 W. Rosemary St.; 919-967-2506; laresidencedining.com Lantern Pan-Asian cuisine. 423 W. Franklin St.; 919-969-8846; lanternrestaurant.com Lime & Basil Vietnamese fare. 200 W. Franklin St.; 919-967-5055; limeandbasil.com Mama Dip’s Kitchen Traditional Southern specialties, brunch and dinner classics like fried chicken and Brunswick stew. 408 W. Rosemary St.; 919-942-5837; mamadips.com Mediterranean Deli Offers healthy vegan, vegetarian and gluten-free Mediterranean options. 410 W. Franklin St.; 919-967-2666; mediterraneandeli.com Might As Well Bar & Grill Bar favorites. 206 W. Franklin St.; 984-234-3333; chapelhill.mightaswellbarandgrill.com Mint Indian Cuisine North Indian subz korma and chicken jalfrezi. 504 W. Franklin St.; 919-929-6188; mintunc.com The Northside District Specialty cocktails and international small plates. 403 W. Rosemary St.; 919-391-7044; thenorthsidedistrict.com

Spicy 9 Sushi Bar & Asian Restaurant Sushi, Thai curries, bibimbap and other Asian entrees. 140 W. Franklin St., Ste. 150; 919-903-9335; spicy9chapelhill.com Talulla’s Authentic Turkish cuisine; all ABC permits. 456 W. Franklin St.; 919-933-1177; talullas.com Trolly Stop - The Beach on Franklin Specialty hot dogs and burgers. 104 W. Franklin St.; 919-240-4206; trollystophotdogs.com Trophy Room A Graduate Hotels concept serving up shareable plates, salads and burgers. 311 W. Franklin St.; 919-442-9000; graduatehotels.com/chapel-hill/restaurant Vimala’s Curryblossom Café Traditional Indian tandoori and thali. 431 W. Franklin St., Ste. 415; 919-929-3833; curryblossom.com YoPo of Chapel Hill Frozen yogurt, treats and shakes with unique flavors since 1982. 106 W. Franklin St.; 919-942-7867; yogurtpump.com Village Plaza/East Franklin Street/ Eastgate Crossing/Rams Plaza Breadman’s A variety of burgers, sandwiches, salads and grilled meat, with daily soup and specials. All-day breakfast; catering available. 261 S. Elliott Rd.; 919-967-7110; breadmens.com

Perennial Cafe Serving Carrboro Coffee Roasters coffee, tea and pastries. 401 W. Franklin St.; 919-914-6045; perennial.cafe

Caffé Driade Carrboro Coffee Roasters coffee, bowl-size lattes, local baked goods, beer and wine. 1215-A E. Franklin St.; 919-942-2333; caffedriade.com

Pho Happiness Pho noodle soup, vermicelli plates and vegetarian/gluten-free options. 508-A W. Franklin St.; 919-942-8201; phohappiness.com

Casa Maria Latin Cuisine Street tacos, nachos, burritos and salads. 1502 E. Franklin St.; 919-929-6566

The Purple Bowl Acai bowls, toast, smoothies, coffee. 306-B W. Franklin St.; 919-903-8511; purplebowlch.com

The Casual Pint Upscale craft beer market with beer, wine and ice-cream sandwiches. 201 S. Elliott Rd., Ste. 5; 919-967-2626; chapelhill.thecasualpint.com

Que Chula Authentic Mexican food, tacos and craft tequilas. 140 W. Franklin St., Ste. 110; 919-903-8000; quechulatacos.com

CAVA Customizable Mediterranean bowls, salads, pitas and soups. 79 S. Elliott Rd.; 919-636-5828; cava.com

Roots Natural Kitchen Salads and grain bowls. Children 12 years old and younger eat free all day, every day. 133 W. Franklin St., Bldg. A-115; 984322-5600; rootsnaturalkitchen.com COMING SOON - ​Seafood Destiny Offerings such as crabcakes and shrimp pasta. 100 W. Franklin St.; seafooddestiny.com sôst A build-your-own-pizza concept, plus other options like macaroni and cheese, traditional pastas, sandwiches and wraps. 133 W. Franklin St., Ste. 120; 984-234-0081; kpanns.com/sost

Japan Express Hibachi-style meals and sushi. 106 S. Estes Dr.; 919-928-9600 Just Salad Salads, wraps, smoothies, soups, grain bowls and more. 111 S. Elliott Rd.; 984-999-3700; justsalad.com Kipos Greek Taverna Greek cuisine in a relaxed, upscale setting with outdoor dining. Eastgate Crossing; 919-425-0760; kiposchapelhill.com La Hacienda Burritos, salads, quesadillas, tacos. 1813 Fordham Blvd.; 919-967-0207; lahaciendamex.com The Loop Restaurant Pizzas, soups, salads, sandwiches, burgers. Eastgate Crossing; 919-969-7112; thelooprestaurant.com Min Ga Authentic Korean cuisine like bibimbap, bulgogi and a variety of homemade kimchi. 1404 E. Franklin St.; 919-933-1773; min-ga.com Monterrey Mexican Grill Tacos, quesadillas, burritos and more. Rams Plaza; 919-969-8750; letsgotomonterrey.com Mr. Tokyo Japanese Restaurant Unlimited sushi and hibachi. Rams Plaza; 919-240-4552; mrtokyojapanese.com/chapel-hill Osteria Georgi House-made pasta, braised meat dishes and antipasto. 201 S. Elliott Rd., Ste. 100; 919-375-0600; osteriageorgi.com Squid’s Fresh seafood options include woodgrilled fillets, Maine lobster, fried seafood and oysters. 1201 Fordham Blvd.; 919-942-8757; squidsrestaurant.com Sunrise Biscuit Kitchen Drive-thru biscuits, sandwiches. 1305 E. Franklin St.; 919-933-1324; sunrisebiscuits.com Sutton’s in the Atrium A cafe version of Sutton’s Drug Store with its famous hot dogs, salads and more. 100 Europa Dr.; 919-240-4471; suttonsdrugstore.com Tandoor Indian Restaurant Traditional Indian cuisine, vegan options. 1301 E. Franklin St.; 919-967-6622; tandoorindian.com

Chopt Unique salads, grain and quinoa bowls. Eastgate Crossing; 919-240-7660; choptsalad.com

Twisted Noodles Thai noodle soups, pan-fried noodles. Eastgate Crossing; 919-933-9933; twistednoodlesch.com

Clean Juice Certified organic juices, smoothies, bowls and snacks. Eastgate Crossing; 919-590-5133; cleanjuice.com

University Place

Dunk & Slide at Whole Foods Market All-day breakfast, sushi and more. As of press time, temporarily closed. 81 S. Elliott Rd.; 919-968-1983; wholefoodsmarket.com Guglhupf Bake Shop European-style breads, pastries and coffee. Eastgate Crossing; 919-914-6511; guglhupf.com/chapel-hill-bake-shop Il Palio at The Siena Hotel Italian specialties like butternut squash ravioli. 1505 E. Franklin St.; 919-918-2545; ilpalio.com

Alfredo’s Pizza Villa Pizzas, calzones, salads, subs, pasta, desserts. 919-968-3424; alfredospizzanc.com bartaco Tacos, fresh-juice cocktails, poke and mole options. 910-807-8226; bartaco.com Flying Biscuit Cafe All-day breakfast and Southern favorites like shrimp and grits. flyingbiscuit.com Hawkers Inspired by Southeast Asia’s street fare, this eatery features homemade favorites, from dumplings to curries. Outdoor seating available. 919-415-1799; eathawkers.com

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DINING GUIDE

Maple View Mobile Ice-cream outpost of the Hillsborough dairy farm. 919-244-1949; mapleviewmobile.com

Pop’s Pizzeria & Ristorante Pizzas, calzones, stromboli, pasta. 1822 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-932-1040; pops-pizzeria.com

Old East Tavern Elevated food, wine, craft beer and cocktails. 1118 Environ Way, East 54; 919-903-8699; oldeasttavern.com

Stoney River Steakhouse and Grill Southern favorites like deviled eggs meet steakhouse mainstays like the legendary 12 oz. filet. 919-914-6688; stoneyriver.com

Queen of Pho Vietnamese offerings like banh mi and, of course, pho beef noodle soup. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-903-8280; queenofphochapelhill.com

Thai Palace Soup, curries, pad thai. Glenwood Square Shopping Center; 919-967-5805; order.thaipalacechapelhill.com

Trilogy American cafe featuring innovative twists on classic dishes. Outdoor seating available. Silverspot Cinema; 919-357-9887; silverspot.net

Rasa Indi-Chinese Authentic North Indian and Chinese cuisine, with fusion and Thai dishes. Weekly specials. Patio dining. 1826 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-929-2199; rasachapelhill.com

Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard (Airport Road) Hunam Chinese Restaurant Cantonese cuisine. 790 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-967-6133; hunamrestaurant.net Kitchen Bistro-style dining with a seasonal menu that always includes mussels. 764 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-537-8167; kitchenchapelhill.com Lucha Tigre Latin-Asian cuisine and sake-tequila bar. 746 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-904-7326; luchatigre.com The Root Cellar Cafe & Catering Sandwiches, salads, desserts and more. Weekly prepared meals, groceries to-go box and Friday night specials. 750 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-967-3663; rootcellarchapelhill.com Timberlyne/Chapel Hill North Area Chapel Hill Wine Company Wine store with bottles from all over the globe. 2809 Homestead Rd.; 919-968-1884; chapelhillwinecompany.com Deli Edison Neighborhood deli with bagels, sandwiches, salads. 630 Weaver Dairy Rd.; 919-929-7700; deliedison.com

Sage Vegetarian Cafe Vegetarian fare. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-968-9266; sagevegetariancafe.com Sal’s Pizza & Ristorante Thin-crust and deepdish pizzas plus an array of Italian comfort food. 2805 Homestead Rd.; 919-932-5125; salspizzaofchapelhill.com YOPOP Frozen Yogurt Frozen yogurt shop featuring 14 flavors, bubble tea and smoothies. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919537-8229 N.C. 54 East/Raleigh Road Amante Gourmet Pizza Create-your-own pizzas. 6209 Falconbridge Rd.; 919-493-0904; amantepizza.com BIN 54 Steaks, seafood and other fine American food. Everything made in-house. Glen Lennox Shopping Center; 919-969-1155; bin54chapelhill.com

Meadowmont Village Brixx Wood Fired Pizza Specialty pizzas and salads. 501 Meadowmont Village Circle; 919-929-1942; brixxpizza.com Lime & Lemon Indian Grill & Bar Northern and southern Indian specialties including gobi manchurian, paneer tikka, chicken tikka and hariyali murg kebab. 101 Meadowmont Village Circle; lnlrestaurant.com Meet Fresh Taiwanese desserts and teas. 407 Meadowmont Village Circle; Ste. 101; 984-999-4983; meetfresh.us Quickly Hot and cold tea drinks in addition to Asian street food. 503 Meadowmont Village Circle; 984-234-0401; quicklychapelhill.com Southern Village Al’s Burger Shack Gourmet burgers and fries. 708 Market St.; 919-914-6694; alsburgershack.com La Vita Dolce Pastries, sorbet, gelato, coffee. 610 Market St., Ste. 101-C; 919-968-1635; lavitadolcecafe.com Market and Moss American cuisine made with fresh local ingredients. 700 Market St.; 919-929-8226; marketandmoss.com

Brenz Pizza Co. Specialty pizzas, subs, salads. 3120 Environ Way, East 54; 919-636-4636; brenzpizzaco.com

Rasa Malaysia Authentic Malaysian dishes. 410 Market St.; 984-234-0256; rasamalaysiach.com

Coco Espresso, Bistro & Bar Full menu of plant-based, fresh, locally sourced dishes, as well as classic comfort food, cocktails and mocktails, plus coffee, espresso bar, baked goods and pastries. The Gwendolyn, 101 Glen Lennox Dr., Ste. 180; 919-883-9003; cocochapelhill.com

Town Hall Grill Sandwiches, steak, seafood, Italian dishes. 410 Market St.; 919-960-8696; thetownhallgrill.com

CARRBORO

Margaret’s Cantina Mexican and Southwestern cuisine. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-942-4745; margaretscantina.com

elements Cuisine combining classical and modern Asian and European cooking techniques; check out the wine bar with full menu next door. 2110 Environ Way, East 54; 919-537-8780; elementsofchapelhill.com

New Hope Market Breakfast and daily specials like burgers, soups and more. 6117 N.C. Hwy. 86 S.; 919-240-7851

First Watch French toast, pancakes and specialty omelets. 1101 Environ Way, East 54; 919-537-8488; firstwatch.com

OiShii Specialty rolls, teriyaki, stir-fry, sushi. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-932-7002; oishiiroll.com

Hawthorne & Wood Fine dining cuisine with an outdoor patio, a fully stocked bar and an extensive international wine list. 3140 Environ Way, East 54; 919-240-4337; hawthorneandwood.com

Farm House Restaurant Steaks, salads, potatoes. 6004 Millhouse Rd. (N.C. 86 N.); 919-929-5727; farmhousesteakhouse.com Joe Van Gogh Coffee, tea and pastries. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-967-2002; joevangogh.com Magone Italian Grill & Pizza Italian mains. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-904-7393; magoneitaliangrillpizza.com

The Pig Barbecue, fried tofu, collards and more. 630 Weaver Dairy Rd., Ste. 101; 919-942-1133; thepigrestaurant.com Piggyback Classic cocktails, beer and wine and unexpected, creative bar food. 630 Weaver Dairy Rd., Ste. 102; 919-240-4715; yourneighborhoodbarnc.com

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Jujube Eclectic, modern cuisine inspired by the classic flavors of China and Vietnam. Glen Lennox Shopping Center; 919-960-0555; jujuberestaurant.com Nantucket Grill & Bar Clam chowder, lobster rolls and more. 5925 Farrington Rd.; 919-402-0077; nantucketgrill.com

January/February 2022

Weaver Street Market Food bar items available as grab and go. 716 Market St.; 919-929-2009; weaverstreetmarket.coop

Downtown 401 Main Upscale dive bar and sandwich shop serving shareable bar snacks, local brews and po’boys. 401 Main St.; 919-390-3598; 401main.com Acme Food & Beverage Co. Entrees with a Southern touch. 110 E. Main St.; 919-929-2263; acmecarrboro.com Akai Hana Japanese cuisine including sushi, tempura and teriyaki. 206 W. Main St.; 919-942-6848; akaihana.com Armadillo Grill Tex-Mex burritos, enchiladas, tacos, nachos. 120 E. Main St.; 919-929-4669; armadillogrill.com Carrburritos Burritos, tacos, nachos and margaritas. 711 W. Rosemary St.; 919-933-8226; carrburritos.com


D I NI NG GUI D E

Cham Thai Cuisine Authentic Thai, Siamese and Chinese cuisine. 370 E. Main St., Ste. 190; 984-999-4646; chamthai.squarespace.com Coronato Pizza Roman-style pizza, snacks and salads. 101 Two Hills Rd., Ste. 140; 919-240-4804; coronatopizza.com Craftboro Brewing Depot Bottle shop and brewery with taps of craft beer. 101 Two Hills Dr., Unit 180; 919-240-4400; craftborobrewing.com Glasshalfull Mediterranean-inspired food and wine; outdoor dining; all ABC permits. 106 S. Greensboro St.; 919-967-9784; glasshalfull.net Gourmet Kingdom Sichuan cuisine. 301 E. Main St.; 919-932-7222; thegourmetkingdom.com Krave Kava Bar & Tea Lounge Offers a wide range of tea and herbal drinks, all made from kava, a type of plant root. 105 W. Main St.; 919-408-9596; kravekava.com Lanza’s Cafe Coffeehouse serving tea and meads in addition to local pastries, small plates and daily specials. 601 W. Main St.; 919967-9398; lanzascafe.com Luna Rotisserie & Empanadas South American cuisine meets the American South. 307 E. Main St.; 919-537-8958; lunarotisserie.com Mel’s Commissary & Catering Changing lunch-only menu of comfort food. 109 W. Main St.; 919-240-7700; melscarrboro.com Mosaic Café & Bistro A pastry shop specializing in baked treats by day and a casual tapas-style bistro by night. 203 W. Weaver St.; 919-967-5008; mosaicbistro.com Napoli Wood-fired pizza, espresso, artisanal gelato made from scratch, teas and local craft beer and wines. 105 E. Main St.; 919-667-8288; napolicarrboro.com Neal’s Deli Buttermilk biscuits and traditional deli fare. 100 E. Main St.; 919-967-2185; nealsdeli.com Oakleaf “Immediate” cuisine like pastas and seafood using ingredients from the chef’s own garden. 310 E. Main St.; 984-234-0054; oakleafnc.com Open Eye Cafe Freshly roasted coffee by Carrboro Coffee Roasters, tea, beer, wine and baked goods. 101 S. Greensboro St.; 919968-9410; openeyecafe.com Paco’s Tacos Steak, chicken, seafood and vegetarian tacos. Located in Mel’s Commissary & Catering. 109 W. Main St.; 919-240-7700 Pizzeria Mercato Pizza, antipasto, soups, fritti and gelato. 408 W. Weaver St.; 919-967-2277; pizzeriamercatonc.com

Speakeasy on Main Cocktail lounge with live music. 100 E. Main St.; facebook.com/ speakeasyonmainstreet Spotted Dog Vegetarian- and veganfriendly entrees. 111 E. Main St.; 919-933-1117; thespotteddogrestaurant.com Tesoro 18-seat neighborhood restaurant with house-made pasta, seasonal plates and classic sweets. 100 E. Weaver St.; 919-537-8494; tesorocarrboro.com Wings Over Has 27 flavors of wings. 313 E. Main St.; 919-537-8271; wingsoverchapelhill.com

N.C. 54 West/Carrboro Plaza Aidan’s Pizza Pizza, wings and salads. 602 Jones Ferry Rd., Ste. D; 919-903-8622; aidanspizza.com Anna Maria’s Pizzeria Italian cuisine. Carrboro Plaza; 919-929-1877; annamariasnc.wordpress.com Fiesta Grill Burritos, chimichangas, fajitas, tacos. 3307 N.C. Hwy. 54 W.; 919-928-9002; fiestagrill.us Monterrey Mexican Grill Traditional Mexican cuisine. Carrboro Plaza; 919-903-9919; monterreychapelhill.com

East Main Square Amante Gourmet Pizza Create-your-own pizzas, salads and pasta. 300 E. Main St.; 919-929-3330; amantepizza.com Gray Squirrel Coffee Co. Roastery and espresso bar. 360 E. Main St., Ste. 100; graysquirrelcoffee.com Hickory Tavern Burgers, sandwiches and build-your-own salads. 370-110 E. Main St.; 919-942-7417; thehickorytavern.com Iza Whiskey & Eats Japanese fusion cuisine serving small plates, sushi, ramen, whiskey, sake and cocktails. 370 E. Main St., Ste. 140; 919-537-8645; izaeats.com Rise Southern Biscuits & Righteous Chicken Biscuits, doughnuts, chicken and coffee. 310 E. Main St.; 919-929-5115; risebiscuitschicken.com

Wingman Wings and hot dogs. 104 N.C. Hwy. 54 W.; 919-928-9200; bestwingman.net

HILLSBOROUGH Antonia’s Italian cuisine. 101 N. Churton St.; 919-643-7722; antoniashillsborough.com Cup-A-Joe Coffee and pastries. 112 W. King St.; 919-732-2008; hboro-cupajoe.com El Restaurante Ixtapa Authentic from-scratch Mexican dishes. 162 Exchange Park Ln.; 919-644-6944; ixtapa.homestead.com/homepage.html Hillsborough BBQ Company Barbecue plates and sandwiches, sides and desserts. 236 S. Nash St.; 919-732-4647; hillsboroughbbq.com Hot Tin Roof Games and specialty cocktails. 115 W. Margaret Ln.; 919-296-9113; hottinroofbar.com

Vecino Brewing Co. Craft beer and flavorful small plates. 300 E. Main St., Ste. C; 919-391-6788; vecinobrewing.com

The House at Gatewood Supper club serving comfort food and special events venue. 300 U.S. 70; 919-241-4083; houseatgatewood.com

Carr Mill Mall/North Greensboro Street

Jay’s Chicken Shack Chicken, buffalo wings, breakfast biscuits. 646 N. Churton St.; 919-732-3591; jayschickenshack.com

B-Side Lounge Small plates and inspired cocktails. As of press time, temporarily closed. Carr Mill Mall; 919-904-7160; b-sidelounge.com

Los Altos Mexican dishes, such as tacos and chiles rellenos. 126 W. King St.; 919-241-4177; losaltosmexicanrestaurant.com

Carrboro Pizza Oven Pizza, calzones. Carr Mill Mall; 919-904-7336; carrboropizzaoven.com

Maple View Farm Country Store Homemade ice cream and milk. 6900 Rocky Ridge Rd.; 919-960-5535; mapleviewfarm.com

Grata Cafe Italian classics and inspired dishes cooked from scratch. Carr Mill Mall; 919-2407000; gratacafe.com

Matthew’s Chocolates Gourmet chocolates, frozen treats and baked goods. 104 N. Churton St.; 984-245-9571

Oasis Organic coffee, tea, beer and wine. Carr Mill Mall; 919-904-7343

Napoli Hillsborough Neapolitan pizzeria and gelateria. 230 S. Nash St.; 919-245-8566; napolihillsborough.com

Tandem Farm-to-table, modern American cuisine with full service bar. Carr Mill Mall; 919-240-7937; tandemcarrboro.com Thai Station Authentic, fresh Thai dishes. 201 E. Main St., Ste. C.; 984-234-3230; thaistationnc.com Venable Rotisserie Bistro Upscale comfort food with a heavy emphasis on seasonal ingredients. Carr Mill Mall; 919-904-7160; venablebistro.com

Nomad International street food-inspired eatery. 122 W. King St.; 984-217-0179; thenomadnc.com Panciuto Locally sourced, sustainably raised, Southern-influenced Italian dining. 110 S. Churton St.; 919-732-6261; panciuto.com Pueblo Viejo Traditional Mexican food. 370 S. Churton St.; 919-732-3480

Weaver Street Market Hot food bar items are available as grab and go. Carr Mill Mall; 919929-0010; weaverstreetmarket.coop

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DINING GUIDE

Radius Wood-fired pizzas, housemade pastas, sandwiches, salads and desserts. Outdoor dining. 112 N. Churton St.; 919-245-0601; radiuspizzeria.net Saratoga Grill New England-style cuisine. 108 S. Churton St.; 919-732-2214; thesaratogagrill.com Steve’s Garden Market & Butchery Local meat, baked goods, pimento cheese. 610 N. Churton St.; 919-732-4712; stevesgardenmarket.com The Village Diner Southern fare and takeout pizza. 600 W. King St.; 919-245-8915; villagedinernc.com

Yonder Southern Cocktails & Brew Beer, wine, frose and more. 114 W. King St.; yonderbarnc.com

NORTH CHATHAM Briar Chapel 501 Pharmacy Maple View Farm ice cream, plus malts and shakes. 98 Chapelton Ct., Ste. 300; 984-999-0501; 501rx.com

Breakaway Cafe A casual cafe serving breakfast, lunch, dinner and coffee. 58 Chapelton Ct., Ste. 100; 984-234-3010; breakawaync.co

Vinny’s Italian Grill and Pizzeria Italian favorites. 133 N. Scottswood Blvd.; 919732-9219; vinnyshillsborough.com

Capp’s Pizzeria & Trattoria Traditional Italian cuisine including fresh pastas, pizzas and more. 79 Falling Springs Dr., Ste. 140; 919-2404104; cappspizzeria.com

Weaver Street Market Food bar items are available as grab and go. 228 S. Churton St.; 919-245-5050; weaverstreetmarket.coop Whit’s Frozen Custard Rotating flavors of frozen custard, treats, pints to go. 240 S. Nash St.; 919-245-8123; whitscustard.com Wooden Nickel Pub Pub fare. 113 N. Churton St.; 919-932-0134; thewnp.com

O’YA Cantina Latin cuisine from all over the world. 72 Chapelton Ct.; 984-999-4129; oyacantina.com

Town Hall Burger & Beer Burgers plus tacos, wings and salads. 58 Chapelton Ct.; 984-234-3504; townhallburgerandbeer.com Governors Village Ciaobella Pizzeria Pizza, pastas, sandwiches. 1716 Farrington Point Rd.; 919-932-4440 Flair Restaurant & Wine Bar Frenchinfluenced food, coffee and Sunday brunch. 50100 Governors Dr.; 919-967-9990; flairfusionrestaurant.com Gov’s Burger & Tap Burgers, hot dogs, salads, milkshakes, wraps and sandwiches. 50050 Governors Dr.; 919-240-5050; govsburgerandtap.com Tarantini Italian Restaurant Italian cuisine. 50160 Governors Dr.; 919-942-4240; tarantinirestaurant.com North Chatham Village/Cole Park Plaza Captain John’s Dockside Fish & Crab House American seafood dishes. 11550 U.S. Hwy. 15501 N.; 919-968-7955; docksidechapelhill.com

C H A P E L H I L L R E S TA U R A N T G R O U P CHeck out THE NEWEST MEMBER OF OUR RESTAURANT FAMILY

Serving Pan-Asian Street Food from Nationally Acclaimed Chef William D’Auvray

The Place to Be!

Guanajuato Mexican Restaurant Mexican dishes with vegetarian options. 11552 U.S. Hwy. 15-501 N., Ste. 205; 919-929-8012; guanajuatomexicanrestaurant.net Moon Asian Bistro An Asian fusion restaurant offering ASIAN BISTRO sushi, Chinese dishes like sweetand-sour chicken, Thai curry dishes, rice and noodles. 111 Knox Way, Ste. 100; 919-869-7894; moonasianbistroch.com

2021

CHAPEL HILL FAVORITE FOR 41 YEARS BEST PHILLY CHEESE STEAK IN THE TRIANGLE!

ITALIANPIZZERIAIII

Panda Garden Chinese dishes like chow mein and egg foo young. Takeout is available. 11312 U.S. Hwy. 15-501 S., Ste. 303; 919-960-8000; chapelhillpandagarden.com Village Pizza and Pasta A neighborhood pizza place serving up subs, calzones, pastas and salads. 11312 U.S. Hwy. 15-501 S., Ste. 300; 919-960-3232; villagepizzapasta.com

PITTSBORO U.S. 15-501/Fearrington Village

5418 Page Rd, Durham 919-908-1851 Visit lulubangbangnc.com for hours and menu

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FOR CATERING OF ANY OCCASION, PLEASE GIVE US A CALL! 508 WEST FRANKLIN STREET, CHAPEL HILL

919 968 4671 italianpizzeria3.com

January/February 2022

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Allen & Son Bar-B-Que North Carolina barbecue. 5650 U.S. 15-501; 919-542-2294; stubbsandsonbbq.com The Belted Goat Lunch, dinner and wine shop, offering salads and sandwiches. Fearrington Village Center; 919-545-5717; fearrington.com/belted-goat


D I NI NG GUI D E

Carolina Brewery The fifth-oldest brewery in the state featuring Carolina cuisine. 120 Lowes Dr., Ste. 100; 919-545-2330; carolinabrewery.com Compadres Tequila Lounge Mexican restaurant with a variety of classic dishes. 193 Lowes Dr., Ste. 107; 919-704-8374; compadresnc.com

cakes. 664 West St.; 919-542-4452; thephoenixbakerync.com Hillsboro Street/Downtown Aromatic Roasters Small-batch coffee shop specializing in Aztec mochas, chai lattes and Thai teas. 697 Hillsboro St., Unit 101; 919-228-8345; aromaticroasters.com

The Fearrington House Restaurant Contemporary fine dining. Reservations are needed. Fearrington Village Center; 919-542-2121; fearrington.com/house

The Beagle Classic and innovative cocktails and small plates like chilled seafood, charcuterie and a selection of sandwiches. 53 Hillsboro St.; 919-533-6589

House of Hops Bar and bottle shop with a large craft beer selection on tap. Outdoor seating available. 112 Russet Run; 919-542-3435; houseofhopsnc.com

Elizabeth’s Pizza Pizzas, calzones, sandwiches, salads and pasta. 160 Hillsboro St.; 919-545-9292; elizabethspizzapittsboro.com John’s Pizza Restaurant Pizzas, pastas, wraps, calzones and strombolis. 122 Sanford Rd.; 919-542-5027; johnspizzarestaurant.com

Buzz Cafe at Chatham Marketplace Sandwiches, daily changing hot bar, sushi, salads and baked goods. Chatham Mills; 919-542-2643; chathammarketplace.coop

Mi Cancun Classic Mexican cuisine with a modern twist. Outdoor seating available. 114 Russet Run; 919-542-3858; micancunmx.com

Carolina Cravings Co. Bakery serving traditional treats like pie bars, muffins and nobake peanut butter-chocolate cookies as well as Hispanic favorites like flan, bolillos and tres leches cakes. 84 Hillsboro St.; 919-444-2023

New Japan Hibachi-style Japanese cooking. 90 Lowes Dr.; 919-542-4380 Roost Beer Garden Wood-fired pizza, local brews and live music. Open April through October. Fearrington Village Center; 919-542-2121; fearrington.com/roost

The City Tap Classic bar food. 89 Hillsboro St.; 919-545-0562; thecitytap.com

The Root Cellar Cafe & Catering Sandwiches, prepared salads, desserts and more. 35 Suttles Rd.; 919-542-1062; rootcellarpbo.com

Davenport’s Café Diem Carrboro Coffee Roasters coffee and espresso offerings. 439 Hillsboro St.; 919-704-4239; davenports-cafediem.com

The Mod Wood-fired pizza, salads, small plates and a full bar. Outdoor seating available. 46 Sanford Rd.; 919-533-6883; themodernlifedeli.com Postal Fish Company Fresh seafood from North Carolina’s coast. Serving dinner only. 75 W. Salisbury St.; 919-704-8612; postalfishcompany.com S&T’s Soda Shoppe Soda fountain, American fare. 85 Hillsboro St.; 919-545-0007; sandtsodashoppe.com

East Street China Inn Chinese dishes, dine in or carry out. 630 East St.; 919-545-0259 Copeland Springs Farm & Kitchen Grains and greens bowls, small plates and bar snacks. 193B Lorax Ln.; 919-261-7211; copelandspringsfarm.com Greek Kouzina Made-from-scratch hummus, gyros, kebabs and more. 964 East St.; 919-542-9950; greekkouzina.com Hwy 55 Burgers, Shakes & Fries Burgers, cheesesteaks and frozen custard. 987 East St.; 919-542-1312; hwy55.com/locations/pittsboro Michoacán Mexican Grill Traditional Mexican dishes including arroz con pollo and burrito texano. 440 East St.; 919-704-8751 Small Cafe B and B Offbeat, eco-friendly eatery offering farm-to-table fare for breakfast and lunch. Offering outdoor dining. 219 East St.; 919-228-8817; smallcafebandb.com Starrlight Mead Tastings of honey wines and honey. 130 Lorax Ln.; 919-533-6314; starrlightmead.com West Street

Eat Healthy. Be Happy!

Authentic North Indian and Chinese Cuisine, with Fusion, Thai and Vegan/Vegetarian dishes.

RASA Indian & Chinese Restaurant The One & Only Chapel Hill Location!

Al’s Diner Traditional American classics for breakfast, lunch and dinner. 535 West St.; 919-542-5800; alsdiner.net Angelina’s Kitchen Greek and Southwestern dishes including gyros. 23 Rectory St.; 919-545-5505; angelinaskitchenonline.com The Phoenix Bakery Small-batch and seasonal baked goods and specialty

C AT E R I N G • PAT I O • D I N E - I N • D E L I V E R I E S

Chapel Hill North – Timberlyne

1826 MLK Jr. Blvd. • 919.929.2199 • 919.942.6365

rasachapelhill.com

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DINING GUIDE

Brownie Lu’s Restaurant Southern comfort food for breakfast, lunch and dinner. 919 N. Second Ave.; 919-799-7250

The Sycamore at Chatham Mills Upscale steakhouse. 480 Hillsboro St., Ste. 530; 919-704-8731; thesycamoreatchathammills. com

Compadres Mexican Restaurant A variety of classic dishes. 115 Siler Crossing; 919-663-5600; compadresnc.com Crossroads Grill Burgers, biscuits and basics. Drive-thru. Outdoor seating available. 324 E 11th St, Siler City.; 919-742-4819

Tienda Hispana El Rayo Hispanic goods including Mexican pastries and packaged foods and drinks. 119 Hillsboro St.

Elizabeth’s Restaurant Pizzas, calzones, sandwiches, salads and pasta. Offering curbside service. 119 Siler Crossing; 919-663-5555; elizabethspizzasilercity.com

Virlie’s Grill Soups, salads, burgers, sandwiches. 58 Hillsboro St.; 919-542-0376; virliesgrill.com

Lam Buffet Chinese dishes. Drive-thru and delivery available. Buffet inside closed temporarily. 1608 E. 11th St.; 919-663-3133

Willy’s Cinnamon Rolls Etc. Bakery selling cinnamon rolls, scones, muffins, cookies and bread with ’40s and ’50s flair. 35 W. Chatham St.; 252-305-9227; willysrolls.com

New China Inn Chinese dishes. Dine in or carry out. 203 Chatham Sq.; 919-663-0889

SILER CITY

San Felipe Mexican dishes including fajitas, burritos and combo plates. 102 Walmart Supercenter; 919-663-7333; sanfelipenc.com

Antojito’s Mexicanos La Jarocha Small plates and comfort food. 920 N. Second Ave.; 919-742-4484; antojitos-mexicanos-la-jarocha.business.site Bestfood Cafeteria Southern comfort food. 220 E. 11th St.; 919-742-2475 (cafeteria), 919-742-6033 (steakhouse); bestfoodsilercity.com

Panadería y Pastelería Melanie Mexican pastries, tres leches and breads. 224 N. Chatham Ave.; 910-428-2320

Sir Pizza of Siler City Mexican dishes including fajitas, burritos and combo plates. 1403 E. 11th St.; 919-742-6000 Smithfield’s Chicken ‘N Bar-B-Q Plates, sandwiches, hushpuppies, coleslaw and potato salad. 375 Walmart Supercenter; 919-663-7333; scnbnc.com

ALSO CHECK OUT THESE DURHAM RESTAURANTS … The Honeysuckle at Lakewood Wine, beer and mead as well as chef-driven, elevated bar food. 1920 Chapel Hill Rd.; 919-748-4687; thehoneysucklelakewood.com LuLuBangBang Chapel Hill Restaurant Group’s newest venture features handcrafted Pan-Asian street food with fresh local ingredients. 5418 Page Rd.; 919-908-1851; lulubangbangnc.com MEZ Contemporary Mexican Creative Mexican dishes, based on traditional recipes with a fresh, healthy twist. 5410 Page Rd.; 919-941-1630; mezdurham.com NanaSteak Offers various cuts of beef and steaks, plus other meats like salmon and tuna steaks and pastas like beef short rib ravioli. 345 Blackwell St.; 919-282-1183; nanasteak.com Page Road Grill Traditional American dishes, from housemade soup and bread to burgers to vegetarian options. 5416 Page Rd.; 919-908-8900; pageroadgrill.com

Taste of the South

BEST BURGER BEST NEW RESTAURANT • BEST FRIES

THANK YOU! 2021

BEST BREAKFAST/BRUNCH

2021 2021

voted best comfort southern food and best barbecue LOCAL CRAFT BEER • WINE • COCKTAILS PATIO SEATING • PET FRIENDLY DINE IN & TAKE OUT

Governors Village 50050 Governors Drive • Chapel Hill (919) 240-5050

G O V S B U R G E R A N D TA P. C O M

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Serving Breakfast ALL DAY LONG with Classic Lunch and Dinner Fare! OUTSIDE SEATING, CURBSIDE PICK-UP & DINE-IN

WE CATER! Call 919.428.4470

261 s. Elliott rd., Chapel Hill 919.967.7110 breadmens.com

January/February 2022

Take-Out Family Meals • Dine-In Outside Dining • Curbside Pick-Up ChowNow Online Ordering Takeout Central Delivery

408 W. Rosemary St., Chapel Hill 919.942.5837 mamadips.com Lunch & Dinner Wed-Sun 11 am - 7 pm

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PHOTO BY LONG YAU PHOTOGRAPHY

TH E B A RN AT L LOY D ’S DAI RY

gathe r to g e t h e r

This 750-acre family-owned farm in Efland hosts weddings from the end of March through June, and from Sept. 1 to mid-November. The 20,000-square-foot main barn includes a bridal suite, restrooms and plenty of options for a combination of indoor and outdoor seating for up to 450 guests. The barn is dressed up with string lighting and drapes, with lots of vintage touches and antique decor. Couples have access to the working farm for pictures or outdoor seating and ceremony spaces. Contact: 919-730-9365; cherylhumphreydesign@gmail.com TH E B A RN AT VALHALLA

Chandeliers, polished mahogany floors and wraparound porches stand out at this barn that can host up to 125 people for a seated reception, 149 for a ceremony or more with a tent added. The 40-acre serene property features an enclosed gazebo on the pond, outdoor patio, fire pit and hot tub. There’s also a bridal suite, two three-bedroom houses and room for up to 30 overnight guests. Choose a weekday overnight or full weekend with onsite planning and coordination which includes options to add an on-site massage, yoga class, brunch or cocktail hour. Contact: 919-360-4922; valhallabarn@gmail.com

Rustic farms, big ballrooms, renovated industrial spaces – no matter what kind of wedding you’re throwing, you’re sure to find the perfect spot to host your big day in Chapel Hill and beyond Co mp i le d by Re n e e Amb ro so

AC HOTEL CHA P EL HI L L D OW N TOW N

The 625-square-foot Rosemary Room can hold 25 to 30 for a formal seated meal, or more for an informal event. The AC Kitchen hosts semiprivate, reception-style events, and the covered, 400-square-foot Front Patio offers outdoor space for 20 guests. A 1,000-square-foot patio is also available for up to 75 guests. Contact: 919-969-2800; lisa.ganzzermiller@marriott.com

TH E B A R N O F C H A P E L H I L L AT W I L D FLO RA FARM

This stylish boutique hotel breaks the traditional hotel mold and offers three spaces with a combined total of 1,600 square feet. The largest room hosts 80 people for theater-style seating or a reception, and 42 for a banquet. The lively on-site bar offers delicious craft cocktails and live music. Special wedding group blocks and rates are available on request. Contact: 919-442-2773

Celebrate your big day at this beautifully restored 19th century white barn with soaring ceilings and hand-hewn wood beams, located 12 miles from downtown Chapel Hill on a 22-acre flower farm. Choose the Garden Elopement package for an intimate event, or pick from two signature packages for larger celebrations starting at $11,800. The in-house floral design team offers customized plans, and packages include full private access to the barn, gardens and grounds. Contact: 919-590-0955; hello@barnofchapelhill.com

ARDEN WOOD FA R M

TH E C A R O L I N A C LU B

This 47-acre equine farm near Chapel Hill has various tranquil indoor and outdoor settings to host a ceremony. Pick a spot for a custom tent, or book the large covered pavilion that has indoor space attached. All wedding packages include dressing rooms and parking assistance, while on-site staff handles setup. Prices range from $2,500 to $4,500 for an event weekend. Contact: 919-523-2237; info@ardenwoodfarm.com

The perfect spot for a Tar Heel wedding is located on the UNC campus in the George Watts Hill Alumni Center. The 7,200-square-foot Alumni Hall ballroom can accommodate up to 350 people and features a large outdoor terrace spanning the length of the space, ideal for cocktail hours or an intimate ceremony for up to 120. The stunning ballroom includes a built-in stage for entertainment to keep the celebration going. Contact: J.J. Oppegard; 919-962-1101; jj.oppegard@clubcorp.com 

ALOFT CHAP EL HI L L

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VENUE GUIDE

C AROLIN A GROV E PHOTO BY HEBA SALAMA PHOTOGRAPHY

This modern, airy venue offers ideal spaces for both indoor and outdoor ceremonies. Surrounded by 65 acres of scenery, the grove with string lights, covered veranda or indoor reception space make for romantic events. Indoor seating can accommodate up to 220 guests, and up to 300 for formal seating in outdoor spaces. Wedding package rates for weekends range from $8,500 for Friday or Sunday to $9,800 for a Saturday date. Contact: 919-213-1652 T HE CA ROLINA I N N

Whether you’re planning a small, intimate event or a spectacular occasion, this inn delivers the setting and sophistication. A variety of indoor and outdoor spaces and impeccable accommodations give the unique Southern charm and grace that make Chapel Hill ceremonies special. Planners offer a professional eye for detail and help with an endless variety of delightful culinary offerings. Multiple courtyards, ballrooms and the front porch offer spaces for up to 350 guests for a standing reception, or 250 seated. Contact: 919-933-2001; weddings@carolinainn.com

pit, and can enjoy the tranquility of the farm during any season. Contact: 919-622-8646; jandj@catesfarmatcanecreek.com CHAPEL HILL CARRIAGE HOUSE

This family-owned property provides a unique setting for an outdoor ceremony and reception in the beautiful open-air barn. An outdoor chapel, pond and rustic fireplace offer gorgeous scenery, while the farm’s alpaca, llamas and a putt-putt course spice up cocktail hours. Wedding packages for 2022 dates start at $8,200. Contact: 919-260-2986; chapelhillcarriagehouse@gmail.com

C ATES FARM AT C A N E C R EEK

The restored 1940s dairy barn and working farm equidistant from Hillsborough, Mebane and Carrboro can accommodate up to 150 guests for a rustic, charming wedding. Couples are encouraged to “dream away” to create their preferred experience with full access to the garden and fire 82

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CHAPEL HILL COUNTRY CLUB

At this private country club, your indoor or outdoor ceremony and wedding package can include a golf or tennis outing. Contact: Maggie Correll; 919-945-0410; mcorrell@chapelhill-cc.com


VENUE GUI D E

PHOTO BY STEPHEN THRIFT

treat guests to cocktails at the hotel’s restaurant, The Bistro. Contact: 919-883-0700 FOREST THEATRE

Plan your spring or summer nuptials at this amphitheater nestled in the woods. A Chapel Hill landmark, the Forest Theatre hosts ceremonies during daylight hours. The venue is managed by the North Carolina Botanical Garden and follows environmentally friendly event policies. Contact: 919-537-3819; NCBGevents@unc.edu

THE CLOTH MILL AT ENO RIVER

COKER ARBORETUM

This 5-acre garden on UNC’s campus provides a serene outdoor setting for ceremonies at any time of year. The Arboretum is managed by the North Carolina Botanical Garden and follows its green event policies for environmentally conscious celebrations. Contact: 919-537-3819; NCBGevents@unc.edu

GOVERNORS CLUB Nestled on Edwards Mountain in PHOTO BY BRONWYN DUFFIELD PHOTOGRAPHY

Exposed brick walls, hardwood floors, massive original windows, tall ceilings, wood beams and columns plus a private outdoor courtyard make this industrial venue located in Hillsborough’s historic Eno River Mill one of a kind. The Cloth Mill can comfortably accommodate up to 350 guests for an on-site ceremony with a seated reception. Weddings are hosted on Saturdays and Sundays only, and prices start at $5,000. Contact: 919-241-4855; info@theclothmill.com

GRADUATE CHAPEL HILL This hotel on Franklin Street is

COURTYARD BY MARRIOTT CHAPEL HILL

Across five spaces, this hotel offers 27,163 square feet of space to accommodate guests. Easily host a rehearsal dinner, work with the catering team or

PHOTO BY MORGAN CADDELL PHOTOGRAPHY

THE COLONIAL INN

Tie the knot at this historic and stately inn located in downtown Hillsborough. The 2,000-square-foot courtyard offers seating or standing room for up to 100 guests, and the 1,800-square-foot ballroom can accommodate just as many. Wedding packages range from $750-$7,500 and include a two-evening stay in the honeymoon suite, day-of planning services, tables and chairs for up to 75 and more. Contact: Elise Tyler; elise@colonialinn-nc.com

Chapel Hill, the property lends itself to creating unforgettable memories. Exchange your vows against a lush green backdrop overlooking the lake or host your reception in the elegant ballroom with expansive views. The venue can host a maximum of 220 guests inside and up to 250 for an open-air event. The $3,500 package includes tables, chairs, linen and napkins, table settings and setup and breakdown. All packages include a premium bar and hors d’oeuvres. Contact: Katarina Baskey; 919-918-7216; katarina@governorsclubnc.com

full of Tar Heel charm. Choose the 1,512-square-foot Davie Poplar Room for up to 125 guests or the 945-square-foot Dorrance Room that offers space for 50. A full kitchen and catering is available. Contact: 919-442-9000; info@graduatehotelchapelhill.com HAMPTON INN & SUITES CHAPEL HILL-CARRBORO DOWNTOWN

This hotel offers 2,615 square feet of event space with a dance floor for weddings of up to 100 people. The pool area can accommodate cocktail hours or rehearsal dinners, and 142 guest rooms offer plenty of space for overnight guests. Contact: 919-969-6988  January/February 2022 chapelhillmagazine.com

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VENUE GUIDE

H ORACE WILLIAM S HOU SE

PHOTO BY ARIKA JORDAN PHOTOGRAPHY

This historical home in Chapel Hill dates back to the mid-1800s and boasts original woodwork, windows and more. The property offers classic settings both indoors and outside on the lawn for an elegant ceremony or reception. Contact: rentals@preservationchapelhill.com T HE HOUSE AT G AT EWOOD

This property offers multiple spaces across the 16-acre property for weddings, with room for formal seating for 110 inside the restaurant and an additional 100 can be seated on outdoor patio spaces. Enjoy a seasonal, handcrafted menu created for you by celebrated chef and owner Ron Spada. Contact: 919-241-4083; events@ houseatgatewood.com

PHOTO BY JAVA ROSE PHOTOGRAPHY

L A RESIDEN CE

This lavender farm that sits on more than 60 acres in Chapel Hill looks as if it could be in the south of France. Established in 2015, owners Karen Macdonald and Robert Macdonald designed the property specifically to cater to couples’ needs. The elegant 7,000-square-foot Main Barn overlooks blooming lavender fields. There’s also an openair Pavilion Barn and 1,000-square-foot loft, luxury getting-ready suites, 84

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A classic two-story farmhouse and small cottage boast countryside views and overlook sandstone paths and lawns. Choose a package with or without a tent for outdoor receptions. Contact: 919-563-8510; merryhillweddings@gmail.com

Hold your wedding among the landscaped grounds and display gardens. The covered porch and Reeves Auditorium that can hold up to 160 people provide indoor options, and Reeves Auditorium North is available for a smaller event. Weddings must align with the Garden’s green event guidelines such as using compostable materials and bulk beverages. Contact: 919-537-3819; NCBGevents@unc.edu

This hotel, located 2 miles from downtown Chapel Hill and an easy walk to Southern Village, specializes in attentive guest services and is centrally located to many fabulous wedding venues in the area. Inquire about discounted rates when booking room blocks for wedding parties and guests. The hotel’s three meeting spaces offer up to 1,740 square feet for receptions. Contact: Kristi Kass; 984-214-1000

L AVENDER OAKS FA R M

M E RRY H I L L

N O R TH C A R O L I NA B OTANI CAL G A R DE N

H YATT P LACE C HA P EL HI L L / S OUTHERN VILL AG E

The luscious covered garden patio is a romantic spot for a ceremony, conveniently heated and cooled for comfortable yearround events. The patio can hold up to 150 seated guests or 225 for a standing ceremony. Formal indoor dining rooms for receptions can include either plated or buffet-style dinners for 60 people seated or 90 standing. Contact: 919-967-2506; info@laresidencedining.com

a wrought-iron gazebo and a gourmet kitchen for catering. Contact: Karen Macdonald; 919-909-7417; info@lavendaroaksfarm.org

O L D LYSTR A I N N

Located on 10 acres nestled beneath towering oaks and magnolia trees, the Inn is a breathtaking location. The stunning remodeled 1890s farmhouse was once the home of Pulitzer Prize-winning author Paul Green. A 40-by-80 tent with cathedral sides included for receptions can seat up to 176 guests with room for a dance floor and buffet. Contact: 919-397-1377; beth@oldlystrainn.com

TH E PA R LO U R AT MA N N S C H A P E L

An intimate venue for up to 100 guests, this restored chapel is designed for the highly curated guest list and refined events. It features an outdoor patio, Euro-inspired courtyard and garden for a charming ceremony, reception, cocktail hour or dancing. A restored Airstream serves as a private, swanky dressing area, photo booth or hip band backdrop. Contact: info@theparlourchapel.com P OST 6

At the newly opened building, there is more than 15,000 square feet of event space. The Ballroom can hold up to 180 guests under its 35-foot


VENUE GUI D E

copula ceiling; the Club Room features a double-sided fireplace ideal for cocktail receptions; and an outdoor courtyard can host a ceremony or be the backdrop for photos. Contact: Jo Ellen Munsee; 919-619-0630; info@post6events.com R IGMOR HOUSE

This hidden gem features a 1,700-square-foot main room with floor-toceiling pine, an overlooking second-story loft and the option for a dance floor. Wraparound screened porches open to the landscaped 10-acre grounds with perfect sunset views. Other amenities include a wellequipped kitchen, five bedrooms, plenty of seating and table options and outdoor spaces like a pergola and fire pit. Contact: Ben Bork; 919-933-7177 R IZZO CENTER The DuBose Home offers several spaces for varying sizes of pre-wedding

events and rehearsal dinners. Enjoy the pergola or pool courtyard that can host up to 100 people for a fun outdoor event, or choose the Meadowmont Grill or Magnolia Room for indoor celebrations. Contact: 919-913-2227

R O C K Q UA R RY FA R M

This farm that dates back to the 1890s has three sites to host your ceremony; the arbor, gazebo or porch. The barn and grounds include a catering shed, farmhouse with bridal suite, designated space for groomsmen to get ready, benches and chairs and optional linens, tableware and other coordinated vendors. Contact: rockquarryfarm@gmail.com S H E R ATO N C H A P EL H I L L H OTE L

The hotel has a total of 19,564 square feet of space available for weddings. Options include an outdoor deck that can host a ceremony or reception for about 100 people, the 6,927-square-foot grand ballroom, a second ballroom of 3,430-square-feet, the 1,200-square-foot Carolina Room and the boardroom. Couples can upgrade to the club lounge for a reception and are offered a complimentary one-night stay. Contact: 919-968-4900; heather.sehaffran@atmahotelgroup.com TH E S I E N A H OTE L

This 79-room hotel’s Lombardi, Terrace and Tuscany rooms provide options for weddings of up to 100 people. Outdoor spaces like a

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VENUE GUIDE

dining area that can hold up to 30 people, a bocce court, lounge and fountain make for a pleasant atmosphere to relax and enjoy the company of friends and family. Contact: 919-929-4000

and a private suite for your big day. Contact: 919-914-6032; thestoryvenue@gmail.com TH E B A R N AT U N I ON GROVE FARM

This family-run farm has a 4,000-square-foot climate-controlled post and beam barn with newly completed restrooms. The venue is surrounded by picturesque vineyards, orchards, waterfalls and gardens minutes outside of Chapel Hill. Contact: events@uniongrovefarm.com

Set on 33 acres of farmland near Hillsborough, the barn can accommodate 150 guests for dinner, dancing and celebrating and has additional space in the 1,500-squarefoot loft. Choose a spot beside the 3-acre pond or in the grassy pasture for a ceremony. The guest cottage hosts overnight guests, and there’s plenty of parking for all attendees. Contact: 919-238-9199; connie@ stonechurchevents.com T HE STORY VEN U E

Three floors and a rooftop overlook West Franklin Street at this 4,700-square-foot venue featuring exposed brick and rustic accents. There’s also a basement game room

NOSE TOES & TAILS

PET CARE

MICHELLE KEMPINSKI, OWNER 919-418-FUZZ (3899) 86

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PHOTO BY HEBA SALAMA PHOTOGRAPHY

STON ECHURCH FA R M

W I N DY H I L L FA R M

This 70-acre working farm offers several wedding package options for up to 160 guests as well as options tailored to an intimate wedding of up to 30 guests or elopements. Amenities include dedicated getting-ready spaces in the historic farmhouse, optional in-house catering, linens and vintage table settings, goat’s milk soap favors and a stay in the honeymoon suite. Contact: 919-439-4638; hello@visitwindyhill.com CHM

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WED D I NGS

Sigmon & Wood BY MEGHAN JO HN SON PHOTOGRAP HY BY ASHL EY BAG A M A RY, AS HL E YBAG AMA RY P H OTOGRAP H Y.COM

T

aylor Sigmon and Jonah Wood’s

love story began with a high school rivalry. Taylor attended Orange High School, and Jonah went to Cedar Ridge High School. They frequented the same sporting events and ran in the same social circles. But it wasn’t until mutual friend Lani Rountree encouraged the two to spend more time together that they hit it off. The couple started dating during Taylor’s senior year while Jonah worked for Chapel HillCarrboro City Schools. In 2020, while Taylor graduated high school and moved to attend Coastal Carolina Community College in Jacksonville, North Carolina, Jonah headed to Marine Corps boot camp at Parris Island, South Carolina. On Sept. 6, 2020, Jonah surprised Taylor by

getting down on one knee at the Beaufort Docks while on the way to dinner with friends. Taylor and Jonah were married on June 12, 2021, at Cates Farm at Cane Creek. After a week of heavy rain, the weather turned out to be perfect for the big day. Parents Shannon Berry, Ronnie Sigmon, Kimberly Wood and Josh Wood, along with the couple’s friends and family, joined them in celebrating. Flower boys and groomsmen Jackson Wood and Braxton Ragan helped make the ceremony even more special with a fun entrance to Billy Squier’s “The Stroke” while tossing flowers from their fanny packs. Taylor describes it as a “day of tears, smiles and laughter.” The newlyweds live in Beaufort, South Carolina. CHM January/February 2022

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W EDDIN GS

Horner & Tabor BY E LO I S E R I C H P H OTO G R A P H Y BY FA I TH TE ASLEY, FA I T H T E ASL E Y.CO M

C

athy Horner and John Tabor met in 2008 as UNC undergraduates through student fan organization Carolina Fever and found that a

shared love of the university united them. They remained just friends until 2017, when John’s Instagram message to Cathy about the UNC basketball championship brought them back together. Their first date at Top of the Hill on Memorial Day weekend ignited their relationship. John proposed to Cathy in 2019 during a Thanksgiving trip to Chapel Hill to visit family. “I thought that if John would propose, it would have to be in Chapel Hill since it is such a special place for us,” Cathy says. Still, she says, the proposal was a surprise. Carolina blue skies and 72-degree weather made for the perfect wedding day at the Forest Theatre on May 1, 2021. “I had a dream of what Cathy might look like, and the reality surpassed it,” John says. “I remember almost nothing else about that moment [other] than the anticipation and seeing her.” Cathy donned Tar Heel blue shoes and tied a Korean “norigae” to her bouquet, while John wore a Hawaiian lei to acknowledge their respective cultural heritages. La Residence hosted the reception, and the couple says the restaurant was incredibly accommodating on their tight schedule. Guests, including maid of honor Candice Horner and best men Nick Gallo and Garrett Manis, were treated to Carolina-themed goody bags with local items and a plush Rameses. The couple lives in Chapel Hill with their pup, Ziggy. CHM 88

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY ADELYN BOLING PHOTOGRAPHY.

2021

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A Timeless Setting for Exclusive We d d i n g s & E v e n t s

3833 Millard Whitley Road Chapel Hill, NC info@lavenderoaks.far m 919-909-7417



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