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MARCH 2018 CHAPELHILLMAGAZINE.COM

PEOPLE WHO WILL INSPIRE YOU TO GET MOVING PAGE 94 IT TAKES A VILLAGE After having sons Linus and Errol, Rachel Burton finds motivation working out with other moms


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March 2018 chapelhillmagazine.com PUBLISHER

Ellen Shannon CHIEF VISUAL OFFICER & DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY

Briana Brough

EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Jessica Stringer

C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R

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ART DIRECTORS

Jennifer Hill, Jean Carlos Rosario-Montalvo EXECUTIVE EDITOR, DURHAM MAGAZINE

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Rigorous building standards, uncompromising quality, designer vision and engineering precision — using green and energy-efficient materials and techniques.

Chapel Hill Magazine is published 8 times per year by Shannon Media, Inc. 1777 Fordham Blvd., Suite 105, Chapel Hill, NC 27514 tel 919.933.1551 fax 919.933.1557 Subscriptions $38 for 2 years – subscribe at chapelhillmagazine.com

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MARCH

C H A P E L H I L L M A G A Z I N E . C O M

V O L U M E

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N U M B E R

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IN EVERY ISSUE

68 FEATURES 44 Shop Local

Where to visit along the N.C. coast, from the experts

62 Upstart

Danielle Sunde on founding three schools

68 40 Years of Learning

62

The impact of the educational nonprofit The Hill Center

Semiretired sports fans enjoy life in one of Chapel Hill’s most special homes

Noted

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5 Events Not to Miss

40 Books Q&A with author and Fearrington Village resident Caroline Taylor 126 Taste Find our area’s best restaurants 139 Engagements Maggie Peterson and Kyle Peterson; Chase Woodfin and Hannah Meyers

PEOPLE & PLACES 22 Orange County Rape Crisis Center Holiday Auction 24 Catholic Schools Week at St. Thomas More

28

Four Chapel Hillians share their exercise journeys, health care practitioners dish on the advice they’d give their own families and a directory of area fitness centers.

104 How They Live

12

26 The Carolina Inn’s 23rd Annual Wedding Showcase

84 Wellness and Fitness

Letter from the Executive Editor

141 Weddings Jackson Cox and Margaret Moriarty; Jessica Marsden and Alex Worsnip; Annie Hogan and Steven Lahti; Will Hemsworth and Mandy Brannon

Accessories inspired by the Pantone Color of the Year

50 Hidden Gems

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Chapel Hill-Carrboro Chamber of Commerce’s Community Heroes

30 In Our Schools 32 AC Hotel Chapel Hill Downtown opening 33

104

Crook’s Corner Book Prize

34 Friends’ First Look at Ackland, Hodge & Kittrell Sotheby’s International Realty luncheon 35 CURRENT ArtSpace + Studio opening 36 Chapel Hill-Carrboro Sunrise Rotary Club Helicopter Drop


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COASTIN’ SOMETIME DURING THAT SNOW IN JANUARY, between my fourth and fifth walk to the fridge to find a snack that didn’t exist, my case of cabin fever got real. Stuck inside working for a few days, my mind drifted. I thought back on beach trips to Duck and the Outer Banks. Even though I’m a Virginia native, who among us hasn’t seen a production of “The Lost Colony” on Manteo? I dreamt of biting into that perfect Apple Ugly at Orange Blossom Bakery on Hatteras. I remembered a hot toddy I’d had a few years ago at Pinpoint in Wilmington – the “Keep the Home Fires Burning,” made with coconut milk and brandy. And it came with heart-shaped cookies! I’m still planning my trips for the year but I hope to check out Hello, Sailor in Cornelius overlooking Lake Norman. This made-for-Instagram eatery, from the owners of the muchlauded Kindred in Davidson, serves up catfish, oysters and wedge salads ... and seasonal hand pies. (Can you tell I love a good fried-fruit dessert?) I do have a trip to Southport planned for April, and I’ve already been Googling breweries and bakeries near my friends’ wedding reception site. Thanks to my work on the spring/ summer travel story in this issue, I already know a little more about the neighboring area, including Bald Head Island. I’m tempted to leave my car on the mainland and take the ferry over to explore its beauty. You’ll find a half-dozen more ideas for coastal travel on page 50 – here’s to the arrival of spring in the South! CHM

JESSICA STRINGER @jessstringer

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chapelhillmagazine.com March 2018

jessica@chapelhillmagazine.com


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WHAT WE’VE HEARD AROUND TOWN …

The Chapel Hill-Carrboro Chamber of Commerce welcomed UNC alumna Vanessa Watson as its new member

GIVING BACK

Shoppers at Weaver Street Market raised $260,295 for local hunger relief organizations in 2017 – enough to buy 525,000 pounds of food for neighbors in need. Most of the money came from customers rounding up their purchases. Benefiting organizations included PORCH Chapel Hill-Carrboro, TABLE, Orange Congregations in Mission, the Inter-Faith Council for Social Service and Orange County Schools’ backpack program.

relations specialist. Orange County Schools Athletic

SHELLY BOOKER PHOTOGRAPHY AND LAMONT L. JOHNSON

and residents gathered to light 1,500 luminaries around the clubhouse and golf course and raised more than $8,000. Ronald McDonald was there to welcome children of all ages for caroling and holiday-themed activities, and guests heard from Ronald McDonald House guest Mellie White. ON THE MOVE

Director Bob Hill was elected vice president of the North Carolina Association for Athletic Education Board of Directors. Carrboro Fire-Rescue Department

Firefighter/Chaplain Steve “Pops” Jordan retired in December after more than 30 years of service in public safety. Before joining Carrboro Fire-Rescue in 1999, Steve worked for the North Carolina Department of Correction.

Rachel Raper

The Bouncing Bulldogs raised more than $2,600 at the Second Annual International Kenzie Ruston Legacy Jumpa-Thon, which is held in honor of late Bulldog Kenzie Ruston. In December, Governors Club residents, including Rex Willoughby and daughter Leah (pictured), participated in the 24th Annual Light a Luminary to benefit the Ronald McDonald House of Chapel Hill. More than 150 Governors Club members 12

chapelhillmagazine.com March 2018

(pictured) has been appointed Orange County elections director replacing Tracy Reams, who retired in January after more than 30 years in local government. Rachel previously served as Currituck County elections director.

Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools

announced educators who either earned for the first time or renewed their National Board Certification. Newly certified teachers include Melissa Barry, Carrboro High School; Jessica Wallace, Chapel Hill High School; Molly Caudill and William Giblin, Culbreth Middle School; Sophia Bauers and William Vincent, East Chapel Hill High School; Ashley Sherman, Ephesus Elementary School; Stephanie Bruce, Morris Grove Elmentary


BIRTHDAY BASH Orange County, the towns of Chapel Hill and Carrboro and the Chapel Hill Chapter of the NAACP celebrated the 200th

Orange High School Band members Andrew Mincey, Cassie Lipton, Lucas Woodley, Max Norwood and Joel AlegriaContreras were selected to participate in

the Central District All-District Band. Andrew is eligible to audition for All-State.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY KARYN HLAD

birthday of Frederick Douglass in January at United Church of Chapel Hill with a night

Hillsboroughbased novelist

of discussion and art. Artist

Nancy Peacock

Tarish “Jaghetto” Pipkins was

has been selected as the 2018 Piedmont Laureate. She will appear at workshops, reading programs and speaking engagements throughout Wake, Durham and Orange counties throughout the year.

commissioned to create a puppet of the abolitionist and author.

School; Edward Baruch, Phillips Middle School; and Sarah Cornette, Mary Scroggs Elementary School. Renewals were earned by Julie Halpert and Ginger Becton, Seawell Elementary School; Lisa Frangipane, Morris Grove Elementary School; Heidi Van Brocklin, Estes Elementary School; and Ruth Toro, East Chapel Hill High School. Chapel Hill Emergency Management

Coordinator Barry McLamb retired in January after 27 years of service. Pat Richardson joined PTA Thrift Shop as its director

of communications and community relations.

IN MEMORIAM

Former Orange County attorney Geof Gledhill – a partner of the firm Coleman, Gledhill, Hargrave, Merritt & Rainsford, P.C. – lost

his battle with cancer

in December. Geof served as the county attorney from 1976 to 2008.

WHAT AN HONOR

UNC was ranked the #1 public university on Kiplinger’s 2018 Best College Values list for the 17th consecutive time. Livability.com named Chapel Hill one of the Top 100 Best Places to Live for 2018. Architect Arielle Condoret Schechter, AIA, won a Best of Houzz 2018 award from Houzz.com in the client satisfaction category. This is the third consecutive year she has received recognition from the popular worldwide online community.

Several local students are candidates for the U.S. Presidential Scholars Program: Jackson Asaro, Benjamin S. Gerhardt, Andre F. Javan, Jonathan A. Moul and Arjun Shankar of Carrboro High School; Yixuan Cao, Matthew L. Dai, Vincent Y. Du, Martin A. Hito, Alexander Hoerler, Mian A. Qin and Natalie B. Troy of East Chapel Hill High School; Anne C. Crabill, Nadiya R. Farrington, Douglas E. Heine, Jerry W. Ji and Maggie E. Weber of Chapel Hill High School; Angela C. Guan, Stephanie X. Yao and Kevin Zhang of The North Carolina School of Science & Mathematics; Grace Smith of Woods Charter School.

Chapel Hill High School alumna Laura Sullivan was selected for the first team of

the 2017 United Soccer Coaches NCAA Division III Women’s Scholar All-South Atlantic Region First Team. Laura is a senior psychology major at Roanoke College.

The North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources added the Arthur C. and Mary S.A. Nash House to the National Register of Historic Places. The house is located at 124 South March 2018 chapelhillmagazine.com

13


N O T E D

Boundary St. and represents UNC architect Arthur C. Nash during the most productive period of his career.

Riley Bingham Foster Ori Erna Hashmonay James Hale Jushchuk Rachael MinJung Kang

PHOTO COURTESY OF UNC-CHAPEL HILL

Sanam Louise Kavari Nicholas William McHenry Kayley Peters Ramkumar Rao Frances Emily Reuland Arvind Sivashanmugam

Planned Parenthood Votes! South Atlantic welcomed N.C. Secretary of State Elaine Marshall to their annual Champions of Choice fundraiser at The Friday Center in January. This year’s event featured N.C. poet and author Jaki Shelton Green and honored Carol Teal with a Margaret Sanger Lifetime Achievement Award. The event raised more than $30,000 to support the political work of the organization.

Daniel Lee Stickel Claire Elizabeth Weintraub

Alston Gardner and Sallie Shuping-Russell

Yusheng Zhang

(center of photo) were among four UNC alumni awarded the William Richardson Davie Award by the UNC Board of Trustees and Chancellor Carol Folt in November.

East Chapel Hill High School senior Logan Martin of Troop 1244 earned her Gold Award, the highest honor in Girl Scouts.

AND THE AWARD GOES TO… Cold Stone Creamery was announced as

RIA Channel named Hamilton Point Investment Advisors and Woodward Financial Advisors as two of the Top 100 Emerging Wealth Managers.

the 2017 winner of the Holiday Window Display Contest on Franklin Street. A close competitor was d.b. sutton’s window display inspired by “Stranger Things.”

Andre Davis and Caleb Smith from Phillips

Middle School and Shad Alban, Jackson Fortney and Isaiah Roberson from Smith Middle School competed in the Carolina Bowl, an athletic competition held at Kenan Stadium that highlighted the top youth football players from North and South Carolina. The seventh-grade North Carolina team won 32-0 and Isaiah was named MVP.

PHOTO BY BARBARA BELL PHOTOGRAPHY

The undefeated 1957 UNC Men’s Phi Beta Kappa, the nation’s oldest and most prestigious academic honorary society, induced 165 UNC students, including the following students from Orange County:

Basketball Team, which won the NCAA

Chapel Hill High School student Caroline Zhang and East Chapel Hill High School student Isabel Green (whose painting is pictured) won Gold Keys in the Scholastic Art Awards for Eastern/Central North Carolina. Isabel and Caroline also received honorable mentions as did East Chapel

Mike Gaitens Arneson

championship that year, was honored for its accomplishments at halftime during the UNC vs. Michigan game in November. The remaining team members — Bob Young,

Noah Patrick Balamucki

Tony Radovich, Lennie Rosenbluth, Joe

Sarah Jane Brooks

Quigg and Tommy Kearns — are the subject

Elaine Algarra, art teacher at East Chapel

Nathanael Connor Bedingfield Brown

of an upcoming documentary, “McGuire’s Miracle.”

Hill High School, entered six of her students’ pieces into the N.C. State Fair.

Veronica Carolyn Jean DaVanzo

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chapelhillmagazine.com March 2018

Hill High School student Skylar Searing.


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The students won third place for the High School division group entry and AP Art student Isabel Green also won second place for an individual entry. East Chapel Hill High School teacher Patrick Pudlo was the winner of the ITEEA High School Teacher Excellence Award, one of the highest honors given to technology and engineering education classroom teachers.

Batson and Beau Brauer won conference

championships for swimming. The N.C. Peace Corps Association awarded the 2018 Peace Prize to nonprofit Learning Outside for its efforts to give children outdoor experiences that enhance learning. NEW DEVELOPMENTS

Holman Family Dental Care, led by Dr. Shaina Holman (pictured center, in

The North Carolina Arts Council awarded 2017-2018 Artist Fellowships to 19 individuals including songwriter Wes Collins, composer Lee Weisert and poet Eric Smith.

red), celebrated its opening in January with a ribbon cutting hosted by the Chapel Hill-Carrboro Chamber of Commerce. Fearrington Village is introducing

Orange High School’s wrestling team

placed first and Carrboro High School finished fourth overall in the Tiger Holiday Classic Tournament, held at Chapel Hill High School in December. James Williams, vice president of the

neighborhood Richmond Close in 2018. It will consist of custom single-family homes. Durham-based BuildSense renovated the historic Lawson House, located at 604 E. Franklin St., with a two-story addition and an updated and enlarged basement.

Chapel Hill-Carrboro Branch of the NAACP, received a citizenship award at the

PHOTO BY BRIANA BROUGH

annual Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Banquet. James is hosting a program on March 18 to further the conversation of wealth and racial inequality. In December, UNC women’s basketball coach Sylvia Hatchell earned her 1,000th win in a 7963 win over Grambling State. At press time, she had added four wins to that number, including a 92-86 UNC win over Duke.

Chapel Hill High School students Poppy Ames, Thomas Bretzmann, Peter Bretzmann, Jordan Ren, Adam 16

chapelhillmagazine.com March 2018

The AC Hotel Chapel Hill Downtown opened its doors at 214 W. Rosemary St. It is the first Marriott-branded modular construction project on the East Coast. The factory-built guest rooms were made in Liverpool, Pa., and then delivered and “stacked” over a conventionally built main level in Chapel Hill.

BUSINESS BRIEFS

The Varsity Theatre is now a first-run movie theater. For the past eight years, it had been a discount movie house, showing films weeks or months after they first premiered.

Mesur.io, a Chapel Hill startup, raised

more than $350,000 in equity from a single investor. Mesur.io aims to enter the market of measuring and monitoring in-ground environmental data. AT THE THEATRE PlayMakers Repertory Company

will work with Oakland-based Sarita Ocón, recipient of the Fox Foundation Resident Actor Fellowship, in two main stage productions – original play “Leaving Eden” and a new adaptation of Bertolt Brecht’s “Galileo.” A group of Chapel Hill residents is raising money to save The Chelsea Theater by creating a nonprofit, membership-supported organization. Current owner Bruce Stone announced that he will not renew the theater’s lease after he retires in March. Compiled by Ashley Cruz, Amelia Hanks, Mattias Miller and Molly Weybright CHM


Her Experience. Your Advantage. Dr Adigun is a board certified dermatologist, known for her expertise in laser and aesthetic dermatology. She is a recognized leader in dermatology and a national media expert. She has been featured on Good Morning America, CBS News, and North Carolina’s own The People’s Pharmacy.

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AUCTIONS AND ADVOCACY PHOTOGRAPHY BY MORIAH LEFEBVRE PHOTOGRAPHY

The Orange County Rape Crisis Center hosted their 30th annual Holiday Auction at the Sheraton Chapel Hill Hotel in December. The event raised close to $100,000 that will go toward providing help, hope and healing within the community. CHM 22

chapelhillmagazine.com March 2018

1 Iyman Gaspard

4 Speaker

and Jaclyn Gilstrap.

Anita Woodley.

2 Michael Kaplan,

5 Kelly Holcombe,

Cindy Hoang and board member Ryan Huckabee.

Chris Carini and board member Hilary Cooper.

3 Staff members Olivia Bass, Denisse Horcasitas and Kate Selby Washington.

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Edwin Caldwell III and Cindy Covington.


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CATHOLIC SCHOOLS WEEK PHOTOGRAPHY BY SAVANNAH SHANEY

Students at St. Thomas More Catholic School celebrated Catholic Schools Week in January by participating in acts of service, including bagging food for Meals on Wheels Chapel Hill-Carrboro, making cards for the SECU Family House at UNC Hospitals and The Ronald McDonald House of Chapel Hill, and working in the school garden. Catholic Schools Week, an annual celebration of Catholic education in the U.S., focuses on the value Catholic education provides to young people and its contributions to the church, local communities and the country. CHM 24

chapelhillmagazine.com March 2018

1 Chris Dittmer,

4 Liam Proudfoot,

sixth grade.

kindergarten, and Nate Jones, sixth grade.

2 David Mirikwe, Noah Costa, Ben O’Brien and Sam Malloy, sixth grade.

3 Kathleen Crook, first grade, and Amelia Garstka, sixth grade.

5 Abby Malloy and Evie Newall, eighth grade.


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TYING THE KNOT PHOTOGRAPHY BY JESSICA STRINGER The Carolina Inn hosted its 23rd annual wedding showcase

in January, welcoming couples and vendors from all over the area, including Sugarland, photographer Heba Salama and Carolina Caramel. CHM 26

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chapelhillmagazine.com March 2018

1 Mary Lou Hickey,

4 Bess Matamoros

Kathleen Hickey, Beth Deacon, Lane Deacon and Dree Deacon.

and Shae Smith of Waxing the City.

2 Carolina Tracy and Betsy Mills of Mina’s Studio.

3 Jackie Coté and Olivia Ripley.

5 Photographer Krystal Kast.

6 Chapel Hill Magazine’s Melissa Crane, Pat Phelan and Tara P. O’Donnel of Carolina Caramel.


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COMMUNITY SERVICE PHOTOGRAPHY BY NICHOLAS JOHNSON

The Chapel Hill-Carrboro Chamber of Commerce saluted our community heroes in December at a ceremony at University Place. The honorees included Sergeant Brian Whitehurst (Orange County Sheriff’s Employee of the Year); Lysa May (Orange County Emergency Services Employee of the Year); Officer Robert Gerringer (UNC Public Safety Officer of the Year); Firefighter Kendall High (Chapel Hill Firefighter of the Year); Investigator Clark Dickens (Chapel Hill Police Officer of the Year); Driver Michael Law (Carrboro Firefighter of the Year) and Officer Jordan Armstrong (Carrboro Police Officer of the Year). CHM 28

chapelhillmagazine.com March 2018

1 Ron and Lydia

3 Aaron Nelson,

Whitehurst, Sergeant Brian Whitehurst and Stacy Whitehurst.

Mayor Pam Hemminger, Firefighter Kendall High and Fire Chief Matt Sullivan.

2 Investigator Clark Dickens and Police Chief Chris Blue.


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IN OUR SCHOOLS

Glenwood Elementary School kindergarteners – including Tony Mu, Alice Wang, Charlie Jang, Samuel Zhang and Adrian Suggs from Sheryl Bauer’s dual language class –

performed a production of “The Mitten,” a play based on a Ukrainian folktale, in February.

During the second annual Students vs. Staff Quiz Bowl competition at Carrboro High School, the student team – Arun Chakrabaty, Aadit Nerkar, Sean Aiton, Nicholas Carney, Eszter Rimanyi and James O’Brien – took on staff members Spencer Hawkins, John Hite, Mintzy Paige and Stefan Klakovich and won. The CHS Quiz Bowl Team has qualified for Nationals to be held in Atlanta during Memorial Day weekend. 30

chapelhillmagazine.com March 2018

Members of the Ephesus Elementary School quilt club pose with pillows they made learning how to use the machine in preparation for sewing quilts for Project Linus. School social workers Marne Meredith and Kelsey Walker oversee the club that includes (left to right back row) Ellie Zerden, Nialle Garanzuay, Havyn Ray, Elise Fricklas, Isabel Gomez, Samantha Benton, Emma Ignaccolo and Isabella Roberson and (left to right front row) McKenzie Brown and Katia Segura-Price. Ephesus Elementary School students, including Eva Karakoylu, Elijah Love and Max Coleman, presented a flag for Puerto Rico to receptionist Jo-Ann Hodges as a thankyou. The students researched Puerto Rico and the effects of the hurricane and wrote opinion pieces about why people should donate money. They recorded videos that were shared with students and parents and raised almost $400. The students voted to divide the money between three different organizations: The Hispanic Federation, Save the Children and Direct Relief. CHM


McPherson Cleaners Family-Owned for 3 Generations Serving Orange County and Alamance County since 1953 Quality Workmanship and Customer Service Dry Cleaning • Wedding Dress • Dress Shirts Cleaning & Preservation • Monthly Billing Leather and Fur • Christening Gowns Wet Cleaning • Smoke & Water Damage Off-Season Storage Drapery Take-down & Re-hang Visit us online at

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P E O P L E

&

P L A C E S

CHECKING IN PHOTOGRAPHY BY JESSICA STRINGER AC Hotel Chapel Hill Downtown celebrated its

grand opening in February with food and drinks, tours of the guest rooms, a performance from The UNC Clef Hangers and a cake shaped like the four-story modular building. CHM

Pouya Vahdati, Monnoca Badonnih, Andrew Strickland, Jade Young, Chapel Hill Magazine’s Melissa Crane and Ashley Darling.

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P L A C E S

1

PRIZE PIG

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JESSICA STRINGER

For the fifth year in a row, the Crook’s Corner Book Prize Foundation named a debut novel set in the South as the winner. This year, Stephen O’Connor, author of “Thomas Jefferson Dreams of Sally Hemings,” accepted the prize as members of the literary community offered their congratulations over wine and deviled eggs. CHM

2 1 Amanda Ibarra, Jamie

2 Stephen O’Connor

Fiocco and Cindy Sellars.

and Anna Hayes.

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P E O P L E

&

P L A C E S

Diann Worrell, Frances Mayes, Robin White and Ann Matteson.

Carol and Jeffrey Horvitz and Katie Ziglar.

ART & SOUL PHOTOGRAPHY BY SP MURRAY

Ackland Art Museum held a special Friends’ First Look in January to

preview their new “Becoming a Woman in the Age of Enlightenment: French Art from The Horvitz Collection” exhibit on display now through April 8. CHM

HOME SWEET HOME PHOTOGRAPHY BY EMANUEL SCHROETER

Hodge & Kittrell Sotheby’s International Realty brokers Ann Matteson and Diann Worrell hosted a luncheon for local agents to

showcase a new Hillsborough listing. Author Frances Mayes made an appearance and gifted signed copies of her critically acclaimed “The Tuscan Sun Cookbook.” An incredible Italian spread was served by the homeowner, Robin White, a globally acclaimed chef. CHM

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123 OLD MASON FARM ROAD CHAPEL HILL


P E O P L E

&

P L A C E S

ARTS EVERYWHERE PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY UNC-CHAPEL HILL

Scott Maitland, Carol Folt and Emil Kang cut a ribbon during the opening ceremony of CURRENT ArtSpace + Studio, a flexible and immersive performing arts venue in the heart of the new Carolina Square development on Franklin Street. More than 1,000 people stopped by that day in

February to see the first exhibit, “Sound Maze,” a hands-on art experience featuring more than a dozen giant musical instruments. CHM

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P E O P L E

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P L A C E S

The Crystal Garden Gemstones

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chapelhillmagazine.com March 2018

The Chapel Hill-Carrboro Sunrise Rotary Club held a helicopter charity golf ball drop in December at Hank Anderson III Community Park with proceeds benefitting TROSA and The ARCHway Institute. Members of all three organizations sold golf balls and the 12 people whose ball landed closest to the hole (after being dropped from the helicopter) won prizes with $6,000 going to both nonprofits. CHM


Science for all. APRIL 2018

Enjoy a full month of science festival fun!

CONNECT WITH US

@NCSciFest

fb.com/ncsciencefestival

@ncsciencefestival

Find an event near you at: www.ncsciencefestival.org


EVENTS

NOT TO MISS

5K for Education MARCH 17, 9am publicschoolfoundation.org

Run (or walk) over to McCorkle Place and support Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools teachers and students at the seventh annual Public School Foundation 5K for Education. Make sure to register under your child’s school team – $5 of the registration fee will go directly to the school. The institution with the most participants wins a free catered lunch for its teachers. Adults: $30, teachers and students: $15

Live Score of “The Kid” MARCH 10, 8pm artscenterlive.org

Carrboro musician Tim Carless returns to The ArtsCenter to perform a new original score of the 1921 version of Charlie Chaplin’s classic silent film “The Kid.” Tickets: $15 for adults, $10 for children 38

chapelhillmagazine.com March 2018

PHOTO COURTESY OF CHAPEL HILL-CARRBORO CITY SCHOOLS

5

Carrboro Annual Kite Fly MARCH 18, 1-3pm carrbororec.org

Bring your kite over to Hank Anderson III Community Park to help fill the Carolina blue skies with a rainbow of colors. This free annual event is fun for all ages and the perfect way to usher in springtime.

Community Egg Hunt MARCH 24, 10am-1pm townofchapelhill.org

Pack your baskets and head to Southern Community Park for an afternoon of crafts, games and, of course, Easter eggs. Egg hunters ages 2 to 10 are invited to join the search, meet the Holiday Bunny and win prizes! Hop like a bunny on the bouncy inflatables or take a snack break for some delicious local food truck fare. Free admission. Rain date is March 25.


Nederlands Dans Theater MARCH 28 & 29, 7:30pm carolinaperformingarts.org

This Dutch contemporary dance company brings its entrancing and hypnotic performances all the way from The Hague, Netherlands to Memorial Hall. A group of 28 internationally renowned dancers push the boundaries of traditional dance with original pieces by choreographers Jirˇí Kylián and Lightfoot León. Tickets: $15+ – Kristi Piechnik CHM

PHOTO BY RAHI REZVANI

If you haven’t seen

MEMORIAL HALL, CHAPEL HILL

Fountains & Pines of Rome

Carrboro’s redesigned website, you may be missing out!

WED, MAR 21 | 7:30PM Ben Gernon, conductor Brian Reagin, violin

Respighi’s masterpieces Fountains of Rome and Pines of Rome evoke the Italian city at various times of day.

Brahms Symphony No. 4 SUN, APR 15 | 7:30PM David Danzmayr, conductor Angelo Xiang Yu, violin

Visit www.townofcarrboro.org for all of the latest news, information on projects, town meetings, and volunteer opportunities!

Sarah Kirkland Snider: Something for the Dark Prokofiev: Violin Concerto No. 2 Brahms: Symphony No. 4

Tickets start at just $18! ncsymphony.org | 919.733.2750

301 W. Main St. Carrboro, NC 27510

919-942-8541

You can also sign up for both emergency and nonemergency notifications, report concerns, or email staff from the page, and add events to the community calendar.

townofcarrboro.org March 2018 chapelhillmagazine.com

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LOCAL LIT

AUTHOR AND FEARRINGTON VILLAGE RESIDENT CAROLINE TAYLOR ON WESTERNS, THE WRITING PROCESS AND EUDORA WELTY

Were you a voracious reader as a child? My mother would read us stories about Winnie the Pooh. My father used to tell us bedtime stories involving a rabbit named Jam who lived in San Francisco and had one red ear and one green ear, which caused all sorts of problems, the resolution of which (if indeed there was one) usually occurred after we had fallen asleep. I read a lot, beginning with the Ruth Fielding series and Nancy Drew, but also including “Alice in Wonderland,” “Little Women,” “The Three Musketeers,” “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer” and any other adventure stories I could find at the local library. Later on, I read lots of Westerns and stories where the horse was the central character, and in my teens, I always had my nose buried in a science fiction book. What was your career trajectory like? After a brief stint in the Foreign Service, I took a course in editing and graphic design and switched careers. I eventually became a publications director for nonprofits and a couple of federal agencies. These positions required a lot of writing, including magazine and newsletter articles, one-time publications and almost always copy for various annual reports. I became a bit of an expert at the latter and [wrote] my first book, a how-to manual titled “Publishing the Nonprofit Annual Report: Tips, Traps, and Tricks of the Trade.” The successful publication of my first short story, “Beginner’s Lessons,” encouraged me to pursue writing a novel, using the same person as the lead character, and the result was “What Are Friends For?” 40

chapelhillmagazine.com March 2018

How did that work help you with novel writing? I learned early on that copy had to be colorful and that meant it had to be specific. The difference between writing nonfiction and fiction became apparent when I received a rejection notice from a magazine, informing me that my short story read “more like an essay.” In other words, I was telling readers something that I should be showing. Nonfiction lays out the facts; fiction reveals the truth but “tells it slant,” as Eudora Welty put it. Where do you find your inspiration? Mostly from my own life experiences, but also from current events and the novels that I still voraciously read. My novel “Loose Ends” was inspired by Thomas Perry’s Jane Whitefield series, which features an American Indian woman who knows the woods of northern New York and also how to obtain false identity papers so that the people she helps can go off the grid. “What Are Friends For?” was inspired by a desire to spoof hard-boiled fiction with a story of a rank amateur who admires Philip Marlowe but doesn’t have the first clue about how to save herself from an unwarranted murder charge. How did your experiences living abroad inform your writing? We lived for a year in Central America when I was a teenager. It was a real eye-opener for me to learn that rights we take for granted as U.S. citizens do not extend beyond our own borders. Many Americans are unaware of this and have suffered from thinking that their U.S. citizenship protects them from falling prey to justice systems that are sometimes far from just.


My own experience made me identify with novels touching on this theme, such as Paul Theroux’s “The Mosquito Coast,” and I used that idea in “Loose Ends” to explain why the two central characters are so fearful of the authorities.

If you could have lunch with any two writers from history... Could I have lunch with three of them? I would ask Eudora Welty how she managed to make the rhythm and cadence of the words in her short story, “Powerhouse,” so uncannily resemble the blues she was writing about. I would ask Elmore Leonard how he managed to write such spot-on dialogue for his low-life characters. Olivia Manning’s Guy and Harriet Pringle are unforgettable characters ... I would ask if they were based on people she knew or an amalgam of people she knew, or did they spring solely from her imagination? CHM

Where do you write? I have a home office and prefer to write in the morning. I only drink water and usually snack on a raisin-nuts-cranberry mix at about mid-morning. Depending on what’s happening in the fiction I’m writing, I listen to music that fits the mood – either classical music on WCPE or my favorite rock songs. What’s the cure for writer’s block? After fruitlessly trying to just keep on writing, it finally dawned on me that getting stuck is a signal that I’ve been overusing that part of my brain, and it needs a rest. Do you know the plot from the beginning or figure it out as you go? Once I get an idea in my head, I take the plunge. ... I let the characters take me where it seems they want to go. If I don’t like where they’re headed or think they’re going to wind up in a boring cul-de-sac, I will change the path. I believe that’s what they’re talking about when they say the writer can play God. What can readers learn from the strength of “Loose Ends” protagonists Cam and Carson? They are both named after heroes (real and radio) of the Old West. In that way, they are throwbacks to a time when circumstances had no mercy for a woman who fell apart or became immobilized by fear. She had to pick herself up and press on, against whatever odds she faced, because surrender meant certain death. March 2018 chapelhillmagazine.com

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HIDDEN

GEMS WE ASKED TOURISM EXPERTS WHERE TO SPEND SOME TIME ALONG THE N.C. COAST THIS SPRING AND SUMMER PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY WASHINGTON TOURISM DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY

L

LITTLE WASHINGTON Year Founded: 1776 Population: Less

than 10,000

ittle Washington, nestled in eastern North Carolina along the Pamlico-Tar River, combines Southern charm and natural settings to create one of the “coolest small towns in America,” as selected by “Budget Travel.” Little Washington is known for stately homes and gardens that line its residential area, as well as the ornate brickwork featured on the vintage commercial buildings of Main Street. The scenic waterfront creates one of the most popular gathering spots in town, which takes on a life of its own during festivals, special events and holidays. Recently, more than 300 miles of paddle trails were mapped out along the Pamlico River around Little Washington, allowing visitors to explore its small creeks and tributaries. Outdoor enthusiasts have plenty of adventurous options including fishing, camping, hiking and boating. The city is home to the North Carolina Estuarium, the first estuarium in the world and currently the only one in the state. With more than 200 exhibits, the Estuarium is dedicated to the unique ecosystem of eastern North Carolina’s estuaries and its effect on local culture. Little Washington boasts a thriving arts and entertainment scene. As visitors stroll through downtown, works by regional artists, independent art galleries and exhibits line the streets. Many local restaurants feature live music during the weekends, and The Beaufort County Traditional Music Association shares sounds and entertainment with audiences at the historic Turnage Theatre. littlewashingtonnc.com Did you know: The town of Washington was the first city in America to be named for

Gen. George Washington. Because of this, the city is still occasionally referred to as the “Original Washington.” u

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EDENTON Year Founded:

Established in 1712 as “the Towne on Queen Anne’s Creek,” it was later known as “Ye Towne on Mattercommack Creek” and still later as “the Port of Roanoke.” It was renamed “Edenton” and incorporated in 1722 in honor of Governor Charles Eden, who had died that year. Population: 4,816

estled along picturesque Edenton Bay on the north shore of the Albemarle Sound, Edenton has been making history for more than 300 years. Its founding fathers and mothers were instrumental in establishing principles and values upon which our nation was founded while surviving the Revolutionary and Civil Wars. Today, visitors will find historic homes and three National Historic Landmarks in the place awarded the distinction by Forbes.com as “one of America’s Prettiest Towns.” Edenton boasts an active Downtown PHOTOGRAPHY BY KIP SHAW District surrounded with fine examples of Jacobean, Georgian, Federal, Greek revival and Victorian homes, allowing visitors to see the fabric of America’s architectural styles come alive. Guided trolley tours and historic building tours are provided from the Penelope Barker House Welcome Center and Historic Edenton State Historic Site. Seasonal activities on and off the water throughout the year coupled with independent local restaurants and boutique shopping make this short drive away a perfect place to explore and relax. In 2018, the region celebrates the 350th anniversary of the first governmental unit of what would become North Carolina, and regional and local activities will be sprinkled throughout the year in celebration. visitedenton.com Did you know: In 1774, Penelope Barker organized the famous Edenton Tea Party, the first

recorded women's political demonstration in America. She rallied 50 women in Edenton to sign a resolution boycotting British tea in response to the 1773 Tea Act.

L PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF BALD HEAD ISLAND LIMITED

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ocated just 2 miles off the southern coast of N.C. near Southport, Bald Head Island is a hidden gem unto itself. You’ll leave your car on the mainland and travel to the island’s shores via a 20-minute ferry ride, making for a natural transition to “island time.” As your pace slows, you’ll have a chance to take in the lush surroundings – miles of quiet beaches, a rare maritime forest and serpentine tidal creeks. The island’s Federal Road, which once was used to bring supplies down to the Cape Fear Light, tunnels through the maritime forest canopy. Tucked discreetly along this road, you’ll find the Bald Head Woods nature trail, where a short hike leads to the Timmons Oak, a massive, several-hundred-year-old tree that looks like it might be home to the Keebler Elves. For a small donation you can join the Bald Head Island Conservancy, located at the end of Federal Road and join up on a bird walk that takes you to Ibis Pond Sanctuary, a hidden freshwater lagoon where scores of ibises, egrets and herons roost. Captain’s Watch Trail,


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S P R I N G

/

S U M M E R

T R A V E L

BALD HEAD ISLAND Year Founded:

The Village of Bald Head Island was incorporated as a municipality in 1985 Population:

The year-round population is around 220 full-time residents. In the summer, the island population can swell to around 5,000, including vacationers.

located off Federal Road, leads you to Captain Charlie’s Station, three lighthouse keeper’s cottages that date back to 1903. The cottages can’t be seen from the road, but when you arrive at the top of the dune they’re perched on, you’re rewarded with a sweeping view of Cape Fear. Another hidden gem is the Old Boathouse located in Bald Head Creek. The structure, which dates to the turn of the last century, is a favorite photo op for kayakers. baldheadisland.com Did you know: No bridge connects Bald Head Island to the mainland. There are no cars on

the island, apart from service vehicles, and the speed limit is 18 mph.

PHOTO COURTESY WILMINGTON AND BEACHES CVB

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KURE BEACH Year Founded: 1947 Population: 2,109

orth Carolina’s “Small Wonder,” Kure Beach is

a scenic wonderland of picturesque shorelines, exotic marine life and natural beauty. Visitors to the isle can tour across six miles of protected shoreline that spans from the beach to the sound at Fort Fisher State Recreation Area. While on the hike, visitors travel through unspoiled paradise, historic battlegrounds dating back to the Civil War era and can view the legendary Hermit’s bunker. If you’ve never heard of a coquina rock formation, it is the definition of a true hidden gem, which can be found at low tide along the Kure Beach ocean shore. This unique structure dates back more than 12,000 years and is host to a rare, mossy, hard rock outcrop cemented together with seashells and coral. If you’re interested in increasing your aquatic life sightings, a trip to the North Carolina Aquarium at Fort Fisher is a must. Not only is the aquarium home to sharks, rays, eels and a rare albino alligator, it also offers behind-the-scenes tours for an insider look at the aquarium. For a little rest and relaxation away from the mainland, hop in a small boat, canoe or kayak and paddle to Zeke’s Island Reserve. This shorebird habitat and scenic paradise consists of three islands that boast natural tidal flats, marshes, dunes and native shorebirds like great blue herons, dunlin and black-bellied plovers, to name a few. wilmingtonandbeaches.com/kure-beach Did you know: Fort Fisher, located at the south end of Kure Beach, was a Confederate fort

during the Civil War and is the site of the largest land-sea battle of the Civil War.

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n Ocracoke Island vacation starts the second visitors step off the mainland and on to one of three state-operated ferries to the island. Travelers are welcome to drive their cars aboard the ferry, park and then head to the front of the ferry to take in the breeze and the occasional dolphin. Ocracoke Village covers one


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S P R I N G

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S U M M E R

T R A V E L

Start planning your summer travels now, it’s never too soon !

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ooking a vacation can be extremely stressful if you apThe Galapagos proach it the DIY way. With so much information available on the internet, you can literally spend hours in front of a computer, jumping from one site to another searching for the best vacation, only to end up frustrated with more unanswered questions. Travelers can save time, money and a whole lot of headaches by using a local travel advisor like Sabine Harris. Cruise Planners, an American Express Travel Representative, has a tremendous reputation for quality, service, and very competitive pricing for ALL of your travel needs. Due to our high sales volume, our buying power enables us to offer you the opportunity to travel in style at the lowest prices available, while still receiving the best service in the travel business. Sabine has over 28 years experience and can provide everything you need to book a perfect vacation: packing necessities, various modes of transportation, early booking discounts, special fares, hotel deals and most importantly be your personal advocate. And she makes house calls. From cruises and resorts to land tours and completely packaged vacations, Sabine specializes in all types of travel and will create an unforgettable vacation just for you.

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OCRACOKE Year Founded: 1753  Population: Around 1,000 year-round

square mile of the island and is home to the island’s year-round residents. The town was founded as a fishing village and continues to be home to a thriving fishing community, as well as restaurants and shops where tourists can spend a day and get to know the locals. Ocracoke Island’s beaches are all part of the Cape Hatteras National Seashore (operated by the National Park Service), so they are – and will remain – completely undeveloped, with no houses or high-rises in view. The beaches on this beautiful island are the perfect venue for swimming, surfing, surf fishing and boating all year long. The island’s ponies are descendants of 16th century horses thrown from shipwrecks in the sound. In the 1950s, the local Boy Scout troop tamed and trained some of the horses – the troop was the only mounted Boy Scout troop in the U.S. visitocracokenc.com Did you know: Ocracoke was a favorite spot of many pirates,

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including the legendary Blackbeard. The shallow waters of Pamlico Sound off the island provided a great hiding spot, so Blackbeard spent much time there and finally met his demise during a battle in 1718. u


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DUCK Year Founded: Incorporated in 2002 Population: 500 year-round

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he town of Duck is Dare County’s northernmost community and also the Outer Banks’ newest town – though hunters and gamesmen have been flocking to the area since the 1800s in pursuit of the abundant waterfowl that gives Duck its namesake. Today, that same rich ecology sets the tone for numerous watersports and outdoor adventures, fine dining and eclectic shopping that thousands enjoy each year. A very popular walking/cycling trail runs parallel to Highway 12; every morning, joggers, parents pushing strollers and dog walkers take in the salty breezes blowing in off the Atlantic Ocean. Another coastal treasure is the Duck boardwalk that winds along the water's edge on the west side of the island. In late afternoon, this is the place to be, as hundreds use this community path daily during the summer. Some of the most gorgeous cottages on the Outer Banks can be found in Duck, and dining opportunities are just as rich in

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atmosphere and development of fare. Bounded by the Currituck Sound to the west and the Atlantic Ocean to the east, the area offers ample opportunities to kayak, Jet Ski and wind surf. The beach affords great shell collecting opportunities, especially in the off-season when the pickings are yours. At the north end of the town, the Army Research Pier is a fascinating attraction worth an afternoon tour. The facility was created to study the dynamic processes of a barrier islands. Over the years, a wealth of data gathered during hurricanes and Nor'easters have helped planners and builders better understand the impact of wind, water and waves on coastal construction. outerbanks.org u

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Year Founded: Incorporated in 1963 Population: 500 year-round; The Greater

Topsail Island Area’s summer population increases to more than 67,000

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he Town of Topsail Beach is located at the southern end of Topsail Island. Often referred to as Mayberryby-the-Sea, this small town has been nationally recognized as one of the top five beaches in the United States. At high tide, the white sandy beaches are 150 feet wide. Topsail Beach is the home of the Assembly Building and the Missiles and More Museum, where rockets and missiles were assembled and tested in the top secret Operation Bumblebee. It’s the birthplace of rocket technology. Throughout the year, the Historical Society of Topsail Island, based in the Assembly Building, offers numerous programs for vacationing families. From Topsail Beach, take a cruise on the Intracoastal Waterway where dolphins romp in the waters. Paddle board or rent a Jet Ski and enjoy Topsail Beach from the water. The Jolly Roger Pier, located in the heart of Topsail Beach, offers terrific pier fishing and equipment rentals. Visit the throwback roller skating rink, located above the post office, where skaters move to tunes from a selection of 45s. Be sure to visit the delicious restaurants in Topsail Beach, including Beach Shop & Grill, Dirty South Bar and Grill, and Cora’s Isle-End Deli. Shop in the boutiques, including Quarter Moon Books, Gifts and Wine Bar, and the Gift Basket, just to name a few. Play putt-putt golf in the throwback miniature golf course called Patio Playground. Topsail Beach is a perfect place for a family vacation or a weekend getaway. topsailbeach.org CHM


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Store on your way for fresh-churned ice

cream. You can sit in a rocking chair on the country store front porch, gaze over the beautiful countryside and watch the sun set. “Take a walk on the Historic Occoneechee Speedway Trail in Hillsborough off of

If you’re only up for a great staycation or have friends in town for a long weekend, take a look at the broader area of Orange County where gardens, art festivals, live

Elizabeth Brady Road,” Patty says. “Four miles of trails take you along the banks of the Eno

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River where you’ll walk around the only surviving dirt speedway from NASCAR’s inaugural 1949 season. The one-mile oval Occoneechee/Orange Speedway was active from 1948 to 1968, attracting the best stock car drivers as well as thousands of spectators.”

music and more abound. Patty Griffin, communications director at Chapel Hill/ Orange County Visitors Bureau, says

stroll down the streets of Chapel Hill to find clues about our history. (Did you know Franklin Street gets its name from inventor and statesman Benjamin Franklin?) Check out the numerous colorful murals throughout downtown or walk the grounds of the nation’s oldest public university. In Chapel Hill, Patty says, top activities includes dining outdoors and listening to live music every Friday on the lawn of

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HEAD OF THE

CLASS

A

DANIELLE SUNDE FOUNDED THREE SCHOOLS WHERE KIDS LEARN AS THEY PLAY

“AS MY OLDEST WAS TURNING 3, WE THOUGHT, ‘Oh man, maybe we should [open] a preschool.’ At the time I was a little perplexed. We found this really lovely in-home preschool in Carrboro. Toward the end of that school year, the woman who owned it said she wasn’t going to continue. We started looking around for a preschool and just didn’t find anything that really resonated. It seemed like there were lots of other families that were struggling with finding a program [where] they liked the quality and the philosophy. My husband said, ‘We could totally do this. We could figure this out.’ I told him he was nuts. But then we got into it and became really passionate about it. It sort of just grew from there. Our director our first year was actually [the woman] who was the one closing her preschool. She got us through that first year and then we were really lucky to figure out what we wanted to be. [Our PlayHouse Chapel Hill] didn’t start off as a Reggio Emilia-inspired program. We were play-based and we just knew we wanted to allow children to be children. We felt like all of these programs we would go visit there was all this forced academic rigor for preschoolers. For us, it just seemed silly to ask 4-year-olds

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A lot of our [family] time gets chewed up by extracurricular activities. [My oldest is 13, my sixth-grader is 11, my second-grader is 7 and my preschooler is 4.] As a family, we’re kind of into food. My oldest wants to be a chef, and he’s a budding foodie. We like to head out to restaurants on the weekends if possible or spend a lot of time outside at our house together. to sit and do worksheets when that’s what school is for. There’s a lot of research out there that supports play and exploration for preschoolers. We started our Chapel Hill school in 2008 and then in 2011, we received a mailer from the owner of the facility in Durham that we ended up buying. … We thought, ‘This would be awesome to do in Durham.’ We had our families tell us, ‘We’re moving to Durham next year and we just can’t find anything we like.’ I’m a cautious entrepreneur at heart. I want the challenge. I want to do

more but I’m also a bit of a nervous Nellie at times. [We] were able to open [Our PlayHouse Durham] in 2012. Most of my job [as owner] is making sure that the teachers have what they need whether that be materials or resources or professional development. I have a really great staff and I’m really lucky that the leadership I can provide is what they need. They don’t need a ton; they all really understand the philosophy. They believe that children are magical. If you don’t come in from a space where you have a lot of respect for what children do, it doesn’t March 2018 chapelhillmagazine.com

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work. If you feel that you know more than they do, then it’s not going to be a good fit for you. They view themselves as colearners. No day is the same. I’m actually the director of our Chapel Hill school this year. I stepped in last year. I’d always been pretty actively involved in the administration of the schools but I had stepped back, I was

less present. When you don’t have someone who’s passionate about the program, it just sort of stagnates. The blessing and the curse about a Reggio-inspired program is that it does take someone who is interested because there’s no curriculum. It’s not like Montessori where everyone learns the same thing the same way in the same form or fashion using the same materials.

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It requires a director who can provide leadership and really operate as a facilitator which is really what I do best. I’m not a teacher by trade. I found the philosophy through educators and it resonated with me. Business ownership is one of those things that has so many facets. I didn’t realize how difficult it would be to work on the business rather than be in the business. You can get really caught up in the minutia of keeping things going but it’s really important to maintain some of that bird’s-eye view to see the whole picture. Having a large family [with four sons] and also having enough bandwidth to be good at everything, it’s nearly impossible. I think that’s what I’ve learned… there’s always something and it’s almost completely impossible to get it all right. You just have to learn and make the next best decision and move forward. I was talking to a friend of mine the other day about it. Ten years ago I had no idea that this is what I would be doing … and I was turning 30. Now I’m here and I’m [thinking], ‘Oh wow, 40 is just around the corner.’ My hair is grayer and I’ve got a teenager who is texting and blushing when he sees girls. It’s just this space that I never knew I would be in. I love knowing that I’m in charge of my own destiny to a certain extent. And then there are times when it’s really overwhelming. It’s really scary to be the one who is making the decisions [for the preschools and our new school, The Studio School of Durham]. I’m in charge ultimately of the fate of a lot of employees and lot of families. That’s a lot to of responsibility. But it’s great – it’s been interesting and it’s been an exciting 10 years for sure.” –as told to Jessica Stringer CHM


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40 years of learning A TEACHER, ALUMNUS AND THE FAMILY OF A CURRENT STUDENT REFLECT ON THE IMPACT OF EDUCATIONAL NONPROFIT THE HILL CENTER

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIANA BROUGH

PROGRAM THAT STARTED IN A LITTLE yellow house 40 years ago is now the go-to resource for Triangle families whose children struggle academically. When it opened in 1977, The Hill Center was a facet of Durham Academy (DA). In 1980, the center was dedicated to founder George Watts Hill

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Scott Morris plays soccer with his son, Woodson, 4.

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and changed its name from the Hill Learning Development Center to The Hill Center. The center now operates as a nonprofit with its own board of Hill Center alumnus Scott Morris, now the vice president at Morris Commercial, directors, but is still affiliated with DA. says he went from almost failing classes to making As because of the help he received Its students in grades kindergarten at the Center. Here, he reads a book to children Woodson, 4, and Nora Anne, 5 months, through 12 come from a variety of as wife Elizabeth Broyhill Morris looks on. public and private “base schools” – the schools students attend when they’re not at the center. Many are also Louise says the center’s tried-and-true formula is what makes it homeschooled. so successful. “We do something by repetition until it’s mastered,” In addition to the regular school year program, in which she says. “It’s very routine, it’s very predictable and it’s very students spend either the morning or the afternoon at the center, differentiated.” it offers summer programs, tutoring and teacher training. Most classes have just four students. Some high school math classes have only two. The individualized attention assists students whether they struggle with ADHD, dyslexia, problems with reading comprehension or some other learning difference. It also helps keep distractions at bay. “I can see when the kids just slide a piece of paper in their ifelong Durham resident Louise Rollins is a proud notebook instead of putting its three holes in the binder,” Louise member of the Little Yellow House Club – a small group of says. “They don’t get away with that. It’s our vigilance in keeping educators at the center who taught in the original building. them organized and holding them accountable, giving them those She started as a substitute teacher in 1986 after graduating from skills to be independent and self-advocates.” Guilford College, then taught in the lower school for a couple of Educators focus instruction for each student based on his or her years before leaving to raise her family. She returned as a middle particular learning differences. Louise says a recent lesson centered school teacher 13 years ago and now serves as the middle school on the novel “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer” by Mark Twain. coordinator and assistant director for the summer program in The class listened to the story together as an audiobook, but they addition to teaching reading and writing. didn’t complete the same assignments. A DA graduate herself, she’s known about The Hill Center since “I had two pretty low-functioning eighth-graders, and I wanted eighth grade, when a couple of her friends received help from the to expose them to Mark Twain. It wasn’t that they were going to program. Her three children – Will, 27; Carlton, 24; and Sarah, take away a lot, but just to know the story and be exposed to it,” 20 – attended Durham Academy, too, and Will spent a year with she says. “The other two kids in that class who were very high the center. Her husband, Steed, is a Realtor with Peak Swirles & functioning, I just differentiated how I assessed them.” Cavallito Properties. Educators teach students practical strategies like crossing off the

recipe for success

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and you can’t figure it out and you need a lot of help,” she says. “You don’t plan on [spending thousands] for three hours a day, and you’ve got to figure out transportation.” The Hill Center does its best to help families make it work, providing around $300,000 in aid each year to students with demonstrated financial need. Additionally, parents may be able to earn tax deductions for tuition and fees, and some students qualify for North Carolina’s Special Education Scholarship Grants for Children with Disabilities program, which gives up to $8,000 a year for specific educational expenses. John Holdsclaw tutors his son, Braden, a fifth-grader who attends The Hill Center. The Hill Center is an investment. But for the words in a word bank as they use them. “It seems obvious to you, families of the more than 170 students who attend, it’s one they probably, but it’s not always obvious to them,” Louise says. know will pay dividends in the future. The middle school has a money management program, MoneyWorks, that teaches students important life skills. Each student receives a mock checkbook, debit card and a salary and must pay monthly bills and encounter unexpected expenses. They also must be prepared for class, or they face financial consequences. There are rewards for doing the right thing, too. raden Holdsclaw is competitive. Students can use “money” they have at the end of the year to buy The fifth-grader says his favorite activity at The Hill real gift cards. Center is playing Word Attack. “They have words on the Seeing kids who have struggled “get it” is one of the most rewarding parts of Louise’s job. The other, she says, is the gratitude iPad, and you have to read them out,” he says. “There’s a time test where you have to read as many words as you can in a minute, and of parents. “For some people, they’ve tried so many things, this is I like those kind of challenges.” kind of the last resort,” she says. His natural drive – combined with The Hill Center’s methods – Louise, whose son attended The Hill Center for a year, says is working. Since he started at the center two years ago, his spelling she understands that it is a commitment for families, and one for has improved from a second-grade to a fourth-grade level. His which parents often aren’t prepared. reading progress is also impressive, advancing from a first-grade “You plan for college, you put money aside for college, but all of level to a sixth-grade level – a year ahead. „ a sudden your child gets to fourth grade and they aren’t reading,

a student’s perspective

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schools don’t – we really feel that Hill has that.” The Hill Center creates a typical, full school day atmosphere by providing recess and reward systems like students would partake in at a base school. Students earn raffle tickets and Hero Bucks for doing good work. John says Braden can often be found counting out his Hero Bucks at the kitchen counter after school, recounting to his parents how he earned them. “One time I earned five Hero Bucks in one day because we came back from our break and all my Veteran Hill Center teacher Louise Rollins, who serves as the middle school coordinator, teaches her students about syllables. homework, [my teacher] said, was super-duper good,” Braden says. When he earns those rewards, he feels especially confident – a continuation of the positive feelings To say that Braden’s parents, John and Marcene Holdsclaw, are he has every day at The Hill Center. John says his son hops out of pleased with the 11-year-old’s progress would be an understatement. the car in the mornings, excited to go to school. “We’re ecstatic. We can’t say it enough,” John says. “He wrote “I’m super-duper happy,” Braden says. something one day, and I was like, ‘Who wrote this?’ He said, ‘I did.’” John, a senior vice president for D.C.-based National Cooperative Bank, and Marcene, who works with North Carolina Head Start, live in Chatham County’s Governors Park neighborhood. They decided to put their son in The Hill Center’s morning program after testing revealed there were some areas where a gap needed to be filled. John says among all the educational options in the Triangle, there was one obvious choice. “The Hill Center just has such an amazing track record,” he says. “We’ve seen so many students who have gone on to base schools and have excelled because of the foundation they received at The Hill Center.” Braden, who previously attended Emerson Waldorf School, is currently homeschooled in the afternoons. He will likely transition back to a base school in the next couple years. For now, both he and his parents are happy with the community The Hill Center provides. “They just had a service day the other day, they’ve been bowling, they raise money through the Hill [Mile] race every year,” he says. “We consider ourselves to be purpose-driven people and – not that most 76

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continuing the legacy

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hen Chapel Hill resident Scott Morris was a sophomore at Chapel Hill High School, he had trouble paying attention and was falling behind. Today, he’s the vice president of real estate firm Morris Commercial. For him, it all turned around at The Hill Center. His parents heard encouraging stories about the center from family friend Jean Neville, but Scott was unsure. “I was very reluctant to try any model other than what I was used to, even though it didn’t fit me,” he says. However, upon his first visit to the center, the welcoming and encouraging attitudes of everyone he met changed his mind. At his base school, Scott was easily distracted and struggled to


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follow the teacher and understand the lessons. He needed individual attention – and that’s just what he received at The Hill Center. “With a smaller class size and the help of the amazing teachers at Hill, I went from almost failing math to making As and loving geometry and calculus,” he says. He attended until he graduated high school in 2001. Over the years, he and his family remained involved with the center to help other students receive the same lifechanging assistance he found there. This school year, the Morris family and their business, Morris Commercial, are sponsors of The Hill Center’s Community Educational Series. It educates community members about topics related to the science of learning and learning styles and provides teachers and parents resources to more effectively help students. Scott’s mother, Waynell Morris, also established an endowment fund at the center this year in honor of mothers who advocate for their children. The fund will help ensure the school remains on the forefront of teaching by providing funding for priority investments. Scott’s wife, Elizabeth Broyhill Morris, serves on the center’s board of directors. She is also the founder of the inspirational website, thisislivinghope.com. Scott and Elizabeth live in the Arbor Lea neighborhood with their children, Woodson, 4, and Nora Anne, 5 months. Scott says what makes The Hill Center stand out from other educational resources is its dedicated team of educators. “The teachers and the executive staff are all so passionate in their work toward helping children better prepare themselves with the unique tools that will help them succeed in life,” he says. “It is truly remarkable.” CHM


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Monday - Friday 9am - 9pm Saturday 9am - 8pm

Monday - Friday 7am - 6pm Saturday 8am - 4pm

Monday - Friday 7:30am - 6pm Saturday & Sunday Closed

127 Kentington Drive, Durham, NC 27713 919-407-8140 | www.HendrickGMSouthpoint.com SOUTHPOINT AUTO MALL

*Collision Center On The Corner of Hwy 70 & Page Rd.


HendrickSouthpoint SouthpointAuto AutoMall Mall Hendrick

Mercedes-Benz of Durham 919-354-7770 www.mercedesbenzofdurham.com Mercedes-Benzof ofDurham Durham Mercedes-Benz Kentington 110110 Kentington Dr.Dr. Durham, 27713 Durham, NCNC 27713 919-354-7770

110 Kentington Dr. Durham, NC 27713

919-354-7770

2017 Mercedes-Ben 2017 Mercedes-Benz C 300 Coupe C 300 Coupe

PorscheSouthpoint Southpoint Porsche www.Southpoint.PorscheDealer.com www.Southpoint.PorscheDealer.com

122 Kentington 122 Kentington Dr,Dr, Durham, 27713 Durham, NCNC 27713 877-469-3129 877-469-3129


through 12/11/17. Ask for details.

ON QUALIFYING PURCHASES OF HUNTER DOUGLAS WINDOW FASHIONS

Sew Fine II 5850 Fayetteville Rd Ste 104 M-F: 9:00 am - 5:00 pm Sat: 10:00 am - 2:00 pm Sun: Closed 919-806-3638 www.sewfine2.com Ask us about special savings on select Hunter Douglas operating systems.

*Manufacturer’s mail-in rebate offer valid for qualifying purchases made 9/16/17—12/11/17 from participating dealers in the U.S. only. Rebate will be issued in the form of a prepaid reward card and mailed within 6 weeks of reb receipt. Funds do not expire. Subject to applicable law, a $2.00 monthly fee will be assessed against card balance 6 months after card issuance and each month thereafter. Additional limitations may apply. Ask participating dealer and rebate form. ©2017 Hunter Douglas. All rights reserved. All trademarks used herein are the property of Hunter Douglas or their respective owners. 17Q4MAGVIGC2

C OUR TE S Y H A R D E N F UR NI TUR E

Wrap up your holiday décor now and save.

Creating Inspired Interiors $100 REBATE*

ON QUALIFYING PURCHASES OF HUNTER DOUGLAS WINDOW FASHIONS

Custom Windows Treatments H

Furniture, Lamps and Custom Bedding H

Paint, Wallpaper, Rugs and Accessories H

In-House Consultations H

Full Service Interior Design Services

Vignette® Modern Roman Shades

Make sure your home is holiday ready by ordering beautiful new Hunter Douglas window fashions today. Rebate savings are available on select styles, 9/16/17 through 12/11/17. Ask for details. Sew Fine II 5850 Fayetteville Rd Ste 104

Sew Fine II M-F: 9:00 am - 5:00 pm Sat: 10:00 am - 2:00 pm 5850 Fayetteville Rd 104 Sun:Ste Closed 919-806-3638 www.sewfine2.com

M-F: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm Ask us about special savings on select Sat: 10:00 am – 2:00 pm Hunter Douglas operating systems. Sun: Closed 919-806-3638 sewfine2.com

*Manufacturer’s mail-in rebate offer valid for qualifying purchases made 9/16/17—12/11/17 from participating dealers in the U.S. only. Rebate will be issued in the form of a prepaid reward card and mailed within 6 weeks of reb receipt. Funds do not expire. Subject to applicable law, a $2.00 monthly fee will be assessed against card balance 6 months after card issuance and each month thereafter. Additional limitations may apply. Ask participating dealer f and rebate form. ©2017 Hunter Douglas. All rights reserved. All trademarks used herein are the property of Hunter Douglas or their respective owners. 17Q4MAGVIGC2


bate claim for details

bate claim for details

DENTAL IMPLANTS • BONE GRAFTING • WISDOM TEETH • FACIAL TRAUMA • CORRECTIVE JAW SURGERY • PRE-PROSTHETIC SURGERY • ORAL PATHOLOGY • SLEEP APNEA

FOR MORE THAN 50 YEARS, the practice of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Associates has been trusted to provide specialized care in the Chapel Hill, Durham, and Sanford communities. Our five board certified oral and maxillofacial surgeons provide the highest quality of patient care with the latest diagnostic and treatment tools available to assure patient safety and comfort. Drs. Frost, Sacco, Vandersea, Ruvo and Serlo practice a full scope of oral and maxillofacial surgery with expertise ranging from corrective jaw surgery to wisdom tooth removal.

OMSANC.COM

DAVID E. FROST DDS, MS DEBRA M. SACCO DMD, MD BRIAN VANDERSEA DDS ANDREW T. RUVO DMD, MD ADAM D. SERLO DMD, MD

CHAPEL HILL 501 Eastowne Drive, Suite 110 Chapel Hill 27514 919.929.2196 DURHAM 2823 North Duke Street Durham 27704 919.479.0707 SANFORD 109 Dennis Drive Sanford 27330 919.775.1615


DOCTORS’ NOTES

We asked, ‘What’s one piece of health advice you’d give to a family member?’

Get involved with your treatment, ask questions and take responsibility about your oral health. Be proactive [and] don’t wait and delay treatment because ‘it doesn’t hurt.’ When it hurts, it could be too late!

Follow the 80/20 rule: 80% of the time, [eat] healthful foods such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy and lean protein sources; 20% of the time, you can include some of your favorites, whether those items be wine, sweets or snack foods. I don’t ever want anyone to feel as though they have to give up all of their favorite foods when trying to eat healthy. „ 84

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Dr. Mandy Ghaffarpour, Studio G Aesthetic & Family Dentistry

Elizabeth Watt, Clinical Dietitian, UNC Wellness Center


GREAT SMILES, GREAT SERVICE!

• FREE Consultation • Caring and Dedicated Staff • Pre-Orthodontic Guidance Program free of charge • Payment Plans Available

John Frick DDS, MS CHAPEL HILL OFFICE • 1525 E Franklin St. • (919) 967-0474 DURHAM OFFICE • 3206 Old Chapel Hill Rd. • (919) 493-7554 HILLSBOROUGH OFFICE • 406 Millstone Dr. • (919) 732-4655

H ERSHEYAND H EYMANN.COM


W E L L N E S S

A D V I C E

Our longevity and resilience are fed by connections to others. Have you learned the name of the person that checks you out at your grocery store? Did you smile and say hello to every passerby today?

Aging is to be celebrated. What’s inside shows, so if the outside isn’t matching the inside, go see a great dermatologist for the finishing touches!

Dr. Sue Ellen Cox, Aesthetic Solutions

Dr. Michael Sharp, Plum Spring Clinic Holistic Wellness Center

[Yoga] is scientifically proven to reduce low back pain and has numerous other health benefits when practiced under the guidance of a certified instructor. Try to make it a part of your daily routine, and cheers to great health!

I want to instill healthy habits for my children and more importantly promote and invest in their prolonged health. Routine — not intermittent — use of sunscreen prevents skin cancer and preserves the health of your skin. To make things easy for my kids, we keep the sunscreen right next to the toothpaste. That way, applying sunscreen is just another step to getting ready in the morning! 86

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Dr. Seema Garg, UNC Department of Ophthalmology

Dr. Chris G. Adigun, Board Certified Dermatologist, Dermatology & Laser Center of Chapel Hill


Serving Orange & Chatham Counties since 1982

Ken Tunnell, Jay Parker, Louise Barnum, Clayton Nell, Terri Turner, Bill Mullen, Jen Johnston, Don Basnight, Blair Nell, Gary Phillips & Crystal Fisher

THE ONLY CONSTANT IS CHANGE Since 1982 the agents at Weaver Street Realty have been dedicated to making changes in residence a smooth and stress-free experience. And in the process, we’ve built relationships that mean the world to us. When you’re thinking about making a move, think Weaver Street Realty.

(919) 929-5658 • info@WeaverStreetRealty.com

WeaverStreetRealty.com


GETFIT! Chapel Hill Balanced Movement Studio 304 W. Weaver St., Ste. 202, Carrboro 919-798-0555 balanced-movement.com Fees Personal training from $40 for a half-hour or $65 for an hour. Physical therapy $90/hour. See website for online programs and classes offered along with pricing. barre3 Chapel Hill 201 S. Elliott Rd., Ste. 400, Chapel Hill 984-234-0680 barre3.com/studio-locations/chapelhill Fees New client special: 3 for $30. Register online, or email at chapelhill@barre3.com. Carolina Core Pilates 200 N. Greensboro St., Ste. D1, Carrboro 919-942-1414 carolinacorepilates.com Fees Sign in to new classes on website and email for appointments. Carrboro Yoga Company 200 N. Greensboro St., Ste. C1, Carrboro 919-933-2921 carolinayogacompany.com Fees See website for prices. $12-$17 for drop-in class. Chapel Hill Gymnastics 7405 Rex Rd., Ste. 207, Chapel Hill 919-942-3655 chapelhillgymnastics.com Fees See website for training program prices. Chapel Hill Pilates 400 W. Rosemary St., Chapel Hill 984-234-3195 chapelhillpilates.com Fees No enrollment fee. Check website for pricing and packages. Chapel Hill Quest Martial Arts 6118 Farrington Rd., Ste. J, Chapel Hill 919-489-8893 chquestcenter.com Fees $65 per month; per class prices available for cardio kickboxing and fitness program; separate martial arts school programs available. Chapel Hill Tennis Club 403 Westbrook Dr., Carrboro 919-929-5248 chapelhilltennisclub.com Fees Call or email club manager Alan Rader (arader-chtc@nc.rr.com) to inquire. Chapel Hill Training 400 W. Rosemary St., Ste. 1003, Chapel Hill 919-636-4556

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From traditional gyms to barre classes, find a workout for your lifestyle

chapelhilltraining.com Fees Pay per session. Personal trainers start at $38 for half hour, $55 for 45 minutes and $68 for an hour. Small group personal training sessions start at $16 each. Club Pilates Chapel Hill 1800 E. Franklin St., Ste. 9, Chapel Hill 919-781-8089 clubpilates.com/chapelhill Fees Complimentary first class. Offering group classes and private instruction. CrossFit Homeward 201 S Estes Dr., Chapel Hill 919-801-4348 crossfithomeward.com Fees Call for information. CrossFit Local 7401 Rex Rd., Unit 106, Chapel Hill 919-912-9348 crossfitlocal.com Fees Call for information. FIT on Main 207 E. Main St., Carrboro 919-590-0892 fitonmain.com Fees Contact the studio to set up a free initial consultation and complimentary session. Fitness Together Personal Training 605 Meadowmont Village Circle, Chapel Hill 919-932-7303 fitnesstogether.com/chapelhill Fees Call for information about personal training packages. Fleet Feet Sports 310 E. Main St., Ste. 120, Carrboro 919-968-3338 fleetfeetcarrboro.com Fees See website for training program prices. Franklin Street Yoga Center 431 W. Franklin St., Ste. 410, Chapel Hill 919-929-0414 franklinstyoga.com Fees $15 for single class, $35 for first class and newcomer special for 30 days of yoga and $125 for a month of unlimited yoga; see website for more prices. Heart of Yoga School 209 Lloyd St, Ste. 210, Carrboro 919-929-8961 heartofyogaschool.com; info.heartofyogaschool@gmail.com Fees Fees are based on a sliding scale; check website for prices. „


Love Brilliantly.

4401 Glenwood Ave. | Raleigh, NC 27612 www.diamondsdirect.com

OfďŹ cial jeweler of the Carolina Hurricaines


WE OFFER MUCH MORE THAN 29 TENNIS COURTS AND EXCELLENT TENNIS PROGRAMMING

a re

freshing

sp

• Brand New Fully Renovated Fitness Facility • Full Aquatics Programming and one of the largest pools in the Triangle • Summer Camps for ages 5 and up • FREE Weekly Tennis Mixers f t n e ss on • An Awesome Calendar of Events & Pool Parties n i • The Slice Bar Cafe serving up delicious treats daily • Indoor Tennis - The only Club in Chapel Hill and Durham with Indoor Courts • Platform Tennis - one of two clubs in NC with Platform Tennis • Pickleball

2015

WINNER

BEST OF CHAPEL HILL 2016

SUMMER MEMBERSHIPS AS WELL AS YEAR ROUND MEMBERSHIPS AVAILABLE

sc o v e Di

A staff of experts relentlessly dedicated to your family’s year-round fun - at Chapel Hill Tennis Club, we live and breathe fitness.

JOIN US!

r

The Chapel Hill Tennis Club

For more information visit: www.chapelhilltennisclub.com or email Alan Rader arader-chtc@nc.rr.com

Play cornhole and bocce ball in lush gardens by the sea. Dig for hidden gems on a pirate treasure hunt. Join family and friends for a seafood dinner on the harbor. Just another day on the island.

WrightsvilleBeachInfo.com

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800-650-8921

403 Westbrook Dr. Carrboro 919.929.5248


F I T N E S S

Hillsborough Yoga Company 1812 Beckett’s Ridge Dr., Hillsborough 919-766-2108 carolinayogacompany.com Fees See website for prices. $13-$17 for drop-in class. Jazzercise of Chapel Hill 630 Weaver Dairy Rd., Ste. 103, Chapel Hill 919-260-3058 jcls.jazzercise.com/facility/jazzercise-ofchapel-hill; cottencarter@yahoo.com Fees $55-$75 per month memberships of unlimited class pass (offering 30+ classes 7 days a week). $20 walk-in fee. Jyotishmati Yoga Shala Carrboro 309 W. Weaver St., Ste. 300, Carrboro 919-704-5365 jyotishmatiyoga.com; lyndsaybahn@gmail.com Fees No enrollment fee. $10-$15 drop-in/$120 monthly unlimited.

Pure Barre 608 Meadowmont Village Circle, Chapel Hill 919-537-8305 purebarre.com/nc-chapelhill or email chapelhill@purebarre.com Fees See website for prices. New client special is $100 for four weeks of classes. pūrvelo 143 W. Franklin Street Chapel Hill 919-886-3603 purvelocycle.com or email info@ purvelochapelhill.com Fees See website for pricing Snap Fitness Chapel Hill - Southern Village 300 Market St., Ste. 110 (Southern Village), Chapel Hill

D I R E C T O R Y

919-942-7700 snapfitness.com/southernvillage Fees $49/$39.95. TITLE Boxing Club Chapel Hill 2140 Environ Way, Chapel Hill titleboxingclub.com/chapel-hill-nc 919-903-8238 Fees Call for pricing. The Tumble Gym 610 Market St., Chapel Hill 919-942-7687 thetumblegym.com/chapelhill.php Fees Check website for classes and prices. „

New Millennium Fitness The Pit 121 Boone Square St., Hillsborough 919-644-2639 newmillfitthepit.com Fees $35 monthly fee with no contract.

Your place for weight loss & wellness.

O2 Fitness 257 S. Elliott Rd., Chapel Hill; 919-932-7115 6118-F Farrington Rd., Chapel Hill; 919-354-3402 503-C W. Main St., Carrboro; 919-960-9910 o2fitnessclubs.com Fees Enrollment $1-$149; monthly fee $39-$54

It is not just about losing weight. It is about getting the life-altering benefits that come with it.

OC Gymnastics 501 Cornerstone Ct., Hillsborough 919-245-3547 ocgnc.com Fees See website for classes and prices. Orange County Sportsplex 101 Meadowlands Dr., Hillsborough 919-644-0339 oc-sportsplex.com Fees Enrollment $50; monthly fee $25-$94.99 Orangetheory Fitness Chapel Hill 104 Meadowmont Village Circle, Chapel Hill 919-883-9424 orangetheoryfitness.com/chapel-hill Fees First class is free. Call for prices. Planet Fitness 201 S. Estes Dr., Ste. 200A, Chapel Hill 919-240-7118 planetfitness.com Fees See website. Progression Climbing 1713 Legion Rd., Chapel Hill 919-904-7217 climbprogression.com Fees $39-$49 per month memberships. $10 student/youth day pass and $13 adult day pass.

Offering a comprehensive personalized approach to help individuals achieve sustainable weight loss.

• One, Two, Three or Four Week Residential-style Weight Loss Programs • BOD POD Body Composition Testing • OPTIFAST Meal Replacement Program

Visit dukedietandfitness.org to learn more.

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F I T N E S S

D I R E C T O R Y

Train for Life Brazilian Jiu Jitsu/Fitness/Kickboxing 1728 Fordham Blvd., Chapel Hill 919-265-4255 trainforlifenc.com or email info@chapelhilljiujitsu.com Fees Memberships starting at $29.95. Triangle Yoga 930 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Chapel Hill 919-933-9642 triangleyoga.com Fees Check website for classes and prices. UNC Wellness Center at Meadowmont 100 Sprunt St., Chapel Hill 919-966-5500 uncwellness.com/meadowmont Fees Monthly Dues $56-$145 (special $56 for any UNC employee). Short-term monthly memberships are also available for students ($76) and non-student adults ($115). No enrollment fee. United Tae Kwon Do Academy 102 Brewer Ln., Carrboro 919-933-7778; unitedtkd.com Fees Call for information. YMCA Chapel Hill-Carrboro 980 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Chapel Hill 919-442-9622; YMCATriangle.org Fees Enrollment, $100-$250; monthly, $38.50-$48.41

North Chatham CrossFit 15-501 11552 US Hwy 15-501 N, Ste. 204, Chapel Hill 919-260-2580 crossfit15-501.com Fees Enrollment $175-$205/month Duke Center for Living at Fearrington 100 Clynelish Close, Pittsboro 919-545-2133 dukefitnessfearrington.com Fees $62-$121/month; enrollment $150-$300 FIT4MOM 1600 Briar Chapel Parkway; 175 Poythress Rd.; 160 Woodland Grove Lane, Chapel Hill 919-913-9031 chapelhill.fit4mom.com Fees $65-$125/month O2 Fitness 11 Cole Place, Chapel Hill 919-942-6002 o2fitnessclubs.com Fees $54/month

Pittsboro Joy of Movement 480 Hillsboro St., Ste. 410, Pittsboro 919-444-9224 thejoyofmovementcm.com Fees Call for information

Now part of the

DENTAL BLUE NETWORK

ÂŽ

Kairos Strong 523 Redbud, Pittsboro 919-434-9275 kairosstrong.com Fees $150/16 sessions Ladies Fitness Center of Pittsboro 81 Hillsboro St., Pittsboro 919-545-0099 ladiesfitnesspittsboro.com Fees $40/month; $7 non-member drop-in Snap Fitness Pittsboro 120 Lowes Dr., Pittsboro 919-545-0095 snapfitness.com/pittsboronc Fees $25/Inquire at the gym YMCA Chatham 287 East St., Pittsboro; 919-545-9622 YMCATriangle.org Fees $35/month (14-28), $38/month (29-64), $35/month (65+)

Shaina Holman, DDS 1836 M.L.K. Jr. Boulevard Chapel Hill, NC 27514 https://holmanfamilydentalcare.com

Call today to schedule an appointment! (919) 932-7811 ÂŽ Marks of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. U13034f, 7/17

Siler City Triangle Fitness Center 118 Siler Crossing, Siler City 919-663-2289; trianglefitnesscenter.com Fees $35/month; $75/three months; $140/six months; $260/year

Zone Fitness and Tan

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308 W Raleigh Street, Siler City 919-663-2213; zonefitness.net Fees $30/month; $70/three months; $130/six months, $230/year CHM


FORGET THE REST... ...LIST WITH THE BEST!

Having lived and worked in the Triangle for over 30 years I have had the pleasure of not only watching it grow but also learning the Real Estate market from vacant lots to luxury homes and condominiums and everything in between!

BRYAN GUARNIERI

REALTOR ®, SFR ®, RSPS, GREEN, AHWD ®

bryang@hpw.com

919-573-0726

bryang.hpw.com

COLDWELL BANKER HOWARD PERRY AND WALSTON 1600 EAST FRANKLIN STREET

CHAPEL HILL, NC 27514

Each office independently owned and operated


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THE

FIT

FOUR

FINDING AN OUTLET IN EXERCISE „ PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIANA BROUGH

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F I T N E S S

Croquet provides retirement challenge for lifelong athlete

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fter decades in medicine that included pioneering the field of neuroradiology, Dr. Ralph Heinz knew he couldn’t just play pingpong in retirement. A former college and semi-pro basketball player, he needed a sport that exercised both mind and body but wasn’t too strenuous on his spine, which has undergone several operations. So, nine years ago at age 80, he took up croquet. “Croquet, while it looks superficially silly – everybody remembers their career when they were 14 and played in the backyard – this is a little more sophisticated,” he says. “A lot of people describe this kind of croquet as a combination of golf, billiards and chess.” Ralph plays Association croquet, which follows the rules set forth by the United States Croquet Association and is more complex than the version of the sport most people play at barbecues. He meets with other players at the Stoneridge/Sedgefield Swim & Racquet Club each Saturday. He also plays with a group of three friends at Carolina Meadows, the retirement community where he lives, and makes trips to Pinehurst at least once a year for clinics. His dedication to croquet, as well as bridge, his “inside game,” are the result of a lifelong work ethic. “I worked hard as a physician. I had a lot of this energy I wanted to put in a new place after retirement.” Growing up in a blue-collar factory town in West Virginia, he says sports were his “entire life until age 18.” Near the end of high school, he started taking academics more seriously and enrolled at West Virginia University, where he played on the men’s basketball team. By the time he enrolled in medical school at the University of Pennsylvania, however, school had become the clear winner of these dual aspirations, and he quit playing. In 1962, while working at Columbia University, he became one of the first four people in the United States to become a neuroradiologist, a practitioner that works as an intermediary between a radiologist and a neurosurgeon. At age 39, he was named the chair of the radiology department at the University of Pittsburgh. Ralph later settled in Chapel Hill, working as a neuroradiologist at Duke University Hospital and a professor at the medical school for 35 years. Throughout his career, he continued participating in aerobic exercise, swimming and playing squash and racquetball when he could fit it in. Despite his spinal surgeries, he didn’t want sports to stop being part of his life after retirement. That’s where croquet comes in. “It gets you out in the air,” he says. “In this environment, you can play it year-round.” He plans to continue croquet for the rest of his life. “When you’re my age, you don’t know how long that is. You go out with one foot in front of the other and keep playing.” –Holly West „

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F I T N E S S

It Takes a Village

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f there’s one thing new moms need, it’s a sense of community. So Rachel Burton was especially sad to leave Chatham County with her two little boys just when she’d discovered a wonderful group of active mothers through national fitness franchise FIT4MOM. A former competitive swimmer who’d studied nutrition in college, she had the knowledge to eat right and exercise. But the demands of working full time at her own startup company and raising Linus and Errol just proved too much. Rachel had never managed to lose the pregnancy weight she’d put on, and when she saw a photo of herself with her large male cousins, she realized she fit right into the group

shot. She didn’t want to. So when she arrived in Chapel Hill, Rachel immediately signed up for the brand-new FIT4MOM group and was a member of the first Body Back classes, an eight-week program that combines high intensity interval workouts with nutrition guidance and other encouragement and support. She kept at Body Back for about a year, then participated in one of FIT4MOM Chapel Hill’s first running training programs. She completed the Fleet Feet 4 Miler run and last year, the Tar Heel 10 Miler race, a goal she’d never even considered previously. “I still can’t believe that I can actually say I ran 10 miles!” she says. Rachel slowly succeeded in losing nearly 40 pounds and creating a sustainable lifestyle of nutritious eating and exercise. But beyond the physical benefits of the workout, she found that having a community of moms to connect with was just as transformative. Rachel has taken her kids to music classes put on by a fellow FIT4MOM member and prepped slow cooker meals with other fitness friends she’s made. “It’s a safe space of finding support in wherever you are,” she says. “There’s this nice network and connectivity piece where you can have a community around raising children.” And the positive benefits will extend to her boys, too, whom Rachel says are always watching, soaking up the healthy behaviors she’s modeling. These days, they love playing with her resistance bands and showing off how long they can hold a plank. “If you are actively moving and actively pursuing smart food choices and smart healthy active lifestyle choices, that’s something your kids observe,” says Rachel. “FIT4MOM has been a way for me to have enough energy and build the strength to be present and active in their lives.” –Jennifer Brookland „

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F I T N E S S

Going the Distance

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d Getka had already conquered more than 30

marathons and triathlons by his late twenties. So he figured he could ignore the feeling of something giving out in his leg one day at a cross-country race and kept training. The excruciating pain that followed turned out to be chronic Achilles tendonitis, and for nearly two decades it kept the former distance runner from going more than a mile or two. Ed had plenty to keep him busy, though, with a nursing career and two boys, Sam and David. But when David was diagnosed with leukemia, Ed turned back to running to deal with the stress of his son’s illness. This time, it was a priority. Running outside was one of the only ways he found to disengage from the world and process what his family was going through. It took six months of intense work with a physical therapist to be able to overcome the injury and start racking up the miles. But the accomplishment was bittersweet. David passed away in 2014, when he was just 15 years old. Ed felt that running outside on the trails was his time to spend with his son and deal with the grief of losing him. He kept training even despite a heart condition requiring quadruple bypass surgery and was soon one of 17 runners nationally selected to run the New York City Marathon in November as part of PowerBar’s Clean Start team. It was a race he now felt a special purpose to complete. On the day of the marathon, Ed stenciled David’s name across the top of his shirt. He knew people would be yelling out cheers and support for whatever name they read, and he wanted to hear them all rooting for David. He talked to David the whole time, as he had on his training runs, knowing his son was with him. “It really felt like we were doing it together the whole day,” says Ed. “That was an important part of the race for me, to feel like I was with David. It helped. I have a big hole in my heart from losing my son and this helped fill a part of it.” –Jennifer Brookland „

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Slowing down, for health’s sake

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iving in fast-paced Washington, D.C. took its toll on Lea Shanley’s health, especially after she suffered a moderate concussion. “The lifestyle there is an intense work culture,” she says. “Working long hours often precluded the ability to have a regular workout routine.” So when she moved to Chapel Hill in spring 2016, she decided to slow it down and focus on improving her health. For more than a year, she’s been working out at UNC Wellness Center at Meadowmont, where personal trainer Mary Hale-McDonald has guided her through core exercises two to three times a week. Lea, co-executive director for South Big Data Regional Innovation Hub, was restricted from participating in particularly strenuous exercise because of her concussion, so Mary started her with the basics. “She’s been good about slowly building up my strength, building up my core,” Lea says. “Just challenging me enough to continue to make progress without causing any injury.” This year, she’s decided to add swimming to her workout as part of an effort to incorporate more aerobic exercises into her routine. For that task, she’s working with aquatics instructor Maggie Williams. A Florida native, Lea is interested in learning how to snorkel. She’s also working to improve her balance and plans to add either yoga or tai chi to her regimen. Working with personal trainers has been key in keeping her motivated – and entertained. “Mary has been a lot of fun,” Lea says. She credits part of her success to the deep expertise and patience of her trainers. In addition to exercising, Lea has improved her eating habits with the help of dietitians at UNC Wellness and Mary, who is also a caterer and provides a variety of healthy meals for her each week. “As a busy professional, it’s easy to fall into bad habits, those frozen dinners,” Lea says. She’s happy with her progress so far and only has one regret – that she didn’t start earlier. “I wish I didn’t wait until this point in my life to start doing this,” she says. “It’s been very enjoyable. It’s really made exercise something I’ve looked forward to.”–Holly West CHM

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Living LEGEND SEMIRETIRED SPORTS FANS ENJOY LIFE IN ONE OF CHAPEL HILL’S MOST SPECIAL HOMES BY MORGAN CARTIER WESTON

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIANA BROUGH

HEN JEAN AND DAVE HAAS BEGAN

their home search, words like “modernism” and “famous former owner” weren’t anywhere near the top of their must-have list. The couple had spent the last 21 years living and working in Wilson – Dave as an ophthalmologist and Jean as an exercise physiologist. “Originally Dave’s medical dreams took us all 104

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The original fireplace is the heart of the house, and its open design keeps things feeling bright and welcoming.

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A large dining table by Mark Todd of Hill Country Woodworks anchors the home’s entertaining spaces.

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over the country, but we eventually moved to Wilson to be closer to my family,” Jean says. But once they made the decision to transition into retirement, the couple knew their home would need ample entertaining space, as well as proximity to delicious food and a strong arts and culture scene – ideally within walking distance. “We wanted a new adventure,” says Jean. And they got one – in the form of a lightfilled, mid-century modern classic designed by Arthur Cogswell in


H O W

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Make an entrance with Garden Gate

Celebrating 11 Years in business along with Chapel Hill Magazine!

2015

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1964 for UNC basketball coach Dean Smith. Jean and Dave credit the home’s former owners, Emily Kass and Chuck Weinraub, with making many of the threebedroom, three-bathroom home’s modern updates. They met one another through realtor Chloë Seymore and were able to learn a lot about the home before making their decision. “Emily and Chuck gutted it in 2008 and made a lot of changes. They did a lot of entertaining and designed it for that purpose – and they kept track of everything,” says Jean. “Once we bought it from

“Bonnie [McManus] showed us how to incorporate furnishings and decorations from different eras and price points to make everything feel harmonious,” says Jean.

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them, they moved in next door, so it was great having friends right away.” Although they quickly fell in love with the house, it took a little longer to make it their own. “We had plenty of traditional furniture, mostly from our families, that just didn’t work in the space,” says Jean. “We wanted to be respectful of the midcentury era but still keep things warm, inviting and comfortable.” That’s where designer Bonnie McManus came in. “Bonnie was great at mixing colors and textures that worked with the flow of each room and finding things that complemented the architecture,” says Jean. The most recent updates included a new front interior staircase, combining two bedrooms into a master suite and drywalling most of the home, so an effective design was crucial to bringing it

The front hall opens to a sitting area designed for relaxing. “We want people to feel comfortable from the moment they walk in,” says Jean.

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There’s no shortage of light in the breakfast nook, where the cozy custom banquette invites guests to stay awhile.

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We Know

WENDY THOMPSON

JAYE KRELLER

CHAPEL HILL! Locally, we are known as THE SPECIALIST

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TONY HALL


all together. In fact, almost every room received some attention – except for one. “[The previous owners] decided to leave Coach Smith’s room the same way, and we’ve tried to respect it also,” says Jean, noting the original wood paneling and built-ins that were popular during the 1960s. “That was the way the entire house was,” she says. “But we kind of made it our memorial room, too.” The room truly feels like a sanctuary within the home, filled with both UNC basketball collectibles and items that are special to Jean and Dave, including photos of their families and Jean’s father’s leather military flight jacket. Just like Emily and Chuck turned to architect Philip Szostak and his team at Szostak Design for their renovation in 2008,

ABOVE A painting of New Mexico by Jean’s friend and fellow UNC grad Oona Lewis brings warmth to the neutral tones in the kitchen. BELOW When he’s not busy in his photo studio or baking, Dave can be found creating custom furniture in his wood shop.

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Dave brought them back in to help build a woodworking shed in the backyard in 2016. “We were able to match the home’s exterior perfectly, so it fits right in,” says Dave, who is also a photographer. The home’s spacious basement includes his photo studio, plus a laundry room, art storage, bathroom and a kitchenette. “I can just see this being where [the Smith children] could come down and hang out,” says Jean, whose four nieces and nephews enjoy relaxing in the room when they come to visit. “It’s just such an interesting house.” The home feels even larger than its 3,600 square feet thanks to high ceilings, large windows and transoms, and a sloping landscape that can be viewed from every Coach Dean Smith’s bedroom retains classic mid-century style. “Some friends specifically ask to sleep in here when they stay with us,” says Jean. “It’s very special.”

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room. “The yard was designed beautifully and doesn’t require a lot of upkeep,” says Jean. “Which helps, since we are slowly working our way into retirement,” Dave laughs. Jean works part time at UNC Hospitals Cardiac Rehab in Meadowmont, and Dave at Chapel Hill Ophthalmology; they spend their free time together exploring their new hometown. “We try to go to every restaurant there is and love that we can walk to UNC baseball, basketball and football [games] or Franklin Street if we’re feeling adventurous,” says Jean. Though they both consider themselves big sports fans, the home’s history is especially meaningful to Jean, who played basketball growing up and joined the UNC team her freshman year (a knee injury kept her from getting much court time). She remembers when Spanky’s opened and rushing Franklin Street after big wins. ”It’s nice to be back, to see what’s changed and what’s stayed the same,” Jean says. “There’s definitely an energy here that we love,” adds Dave. “There is youth, intellect and beauty that is helping us see the world in new and different ways.” CHM

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Historic Carrboro Estate with extra buildable lot

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Weaver Street agents are cut from a different cloth. Find out more about how we do business at weaverstreetrealty.com. 116 E Main St. • Downtown Carrboro • 919.929.5658 March 2018 chapelhillmagazine.com

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T A U R A N T S , D E L I L L , C A R R B O R O , D N O R T H E R N C H T I S E R S H I G H L I G

S A N D B I S T R O S H I L L S B O R O U G H A T H A M C O U N T Y H T E D I N B O X E S

TASTE PHOTO BY BRIANA BROUGH

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Chef Michael Chuong barely looks at his marinade as he puts it together. Instead, he tells me about the regional differences of bún chả as he throws a handful of chili flakes into the bowl and continues to add more. The dish originated in his native Vietnam and was ushered into the global spotlight in 2016 when President Barack Obama sat down with Anthony Bourdain among locals in Hanoi for a meal. Michael rhymically cuts up the pork loin, which spends three hours in the mix that also includes brown sugar, sesame oil and lemongrass. “Just like marinade makes barbecue better, this makes [the meat] more tender,” he says. Later, that pork loin is placed atop rice noodles and loaded with vegetables. “You’ve got a lot of things going on

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in this dish,” Michael says. And in this case, it’s not a bad thing. Pickled veggies add some sour while mint and cilantro brighten and fried onions are a fun crunch. Hot is balanced with cold quite nicely, and the dish is served with chã giò tôm cua – egg rolls stuffed with ground pork, crab, shrimp and more. He says bún chả pairs well with a lager but at elements, you really can’t go wrong with wine. The by-the-glass list differs from the offerings in the wine bar where you can sample 1-ounce, 3-ounce or 6-ounce pours before dinner. You might find a favorite, or try Michael’s picks: a nice light oak Chardonnay like the Sterling Chardonnay or a beautiful Pinot Noir such as the Benton Lane from Willamette Valley, Oregon. CHM


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D I N I N G

G U I D E

CHAPEL HILL East Franklin Street

Artisan Pizza Kitchen Sand­wiches, hamburgers, pizza. 153 E. Franklin St.; 919-929-9119; artisanpizzakitchen.com [B]SKI’S Specialty wraps. 147 E. Franklin St.; 919-969-9727; bskis.com Bandido’s Mexican Cafe Burritos, salads, quesadillas, tacos. 159-1/2 E. Franklin St.; 919-967-5048; bandidoscafe.com Benny Cappella’s Pizza, by the slice or whole pie. 122 E. Franklin St.; 919-240-5286; bennysva.com/BennyCappellas BUNS Serves gourmet burgers, fries and shakes made from fresh ingredients. 107 N. Columbia St.; 919-240-4746; bunsofchapelhill.com Carolina Coffee Shop The mainstay serves casual American cuisine for breakfast, lunch and dinner. 138 E. Franklin St.; 919-942-6875; carolinacoffeeshop.com Cosmic Cantina Burritos, salads, quesadillas, tacos. 128 E. Franklin St.; 919-960-3955; cosmiccantina.com

FOUR CORNERS American fare, nachos, wings, pasta. 175 E. Franklin St.; 919-537-8230; fourcornersgrille.com IMBIBE Bottle shop and restaurant featuring pizza, salads and appetizers. 108 Henderson St.; 919-636-6469; imbibenc.com Kurama Sushi & Noodle Express Dumplings, salads, noodle dishes. 105 N. Columbia St.; 919-968-4747; kuramasushinoodle.com Linda’s Bar & Grill Local beer, sweet potato tots, cheese fries, burgers. 203 E. Franklin St.; 919-933-6663; lindas-bar.com Lotsa Stone Fired Pizza Build-your-own stone-fired pizza. 100 W. Franklin St.; 919-391-4100; lotsa.com Ms. Mong Mongolian BBQ, banh mi, fusion burritos. 163 E. Franklin St.; 919-933-5277; msmong.squarespace.com R&R Grill Spicy wings, kabobs, flatbread pizza. 137 E. Franklin St.; 919-240-4411; rnrgrill.com

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NEWS BITES OUT WITH THE OLD, IN WITH THE GOAT The Granary at Fearrington Village has closed to make way for The Goat cafe and deli, which has outgrown its location in Village Center. Along with the new space comes a new name – The Belted Goat – and an improved coffee roaster that will make the Fearrington coffee blend more full-bodied. The roaster was placed off-site to give the restaurant a quieter ambiance than its predecessor. GLASSFUL OF GIVING Glasshalfull raised nearly $18,000 for UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center in 2017. Every Tuesday, the restaurant donates 10 percent of sales to the center. FLYING THE CO-OP Weaver Street Market is expanding to Raleigh’s warehouse district inside new mixed-use development The Dillon. Founder and general manager Ruffin Slater said the grocery store will bring its community market to Hargett Street next summer. COFFEE GONE COLD Market Street Coffee closed its Meadowmont Village location in December. But don’t worry caffeine cravers – the locations on Elliott Road and Weaver Street remain open. FRESH FUSION Meanwhile at Meadowmont, a new seafood option, Fusion Fish Sushi & Bar, is taking the spot formerly occupied by One Restaurant. The restaurant is expected to be open by the time you’re reading this, and General Manager Yung Nay says a grand opening is planned for early March. SPREAD YOUR WINGS Ballpark-goers may be sad to hear Heavenly Buffaloes is no longer available at The Bullpen in Durham, but Chapel Hillians are flying high. The popular chicken and vegan wing eatery is opening a location on Franklin Street in the spot formerly occupied by Sandwhich. No word yet on an open date.

Roots Bakery, Bistro & Bar Farm-to-table American and Central American fusion. 161 E. Franklin St.; 919-240-7160; rootschapelhill.com Sawasdee Thai Restaurant Thai cuisine such as red curry and pad thai. 110 N. Columbia St.; 919-960-0440; sawasdeechapelhill.com Shanghai Dumpling Dumplings, pork buns, hotpots. 143 E. Franklin St.; 919-914-6737; shanghaidumplingnc.com SPANKY’S A Chapel Hill institution since 1977, the American bar and grill serves hamburgers, brown sugar baby back ribs, garden fresh salads and more. 101 E. Franklin St.; 919-967-2678; spankysrestaurant.com Sugarland Cupcakes, gelato, pastries. 140 E. Franklin St.; 919-929-2100; sugarlandchapelhill.com Sup Dogs Creative hot dogs and sides like jalapeño popper tots and funnel cake sticks. 107 E. Franklin St.; 919-903-9566; supdogs.com Sutton’s Drug Store Burgers, sandwiches, breakfast, milkshakes. 159 E. Franklin St.; 919-942-5161; suttonsdrugstore.com Tama Tea A wide selection of tea beverages plus smoothies, coffee, desserts, salad bowls and sandwiches. 105 E. Franklin St.; 919-391-3706; tamatea.com Time-Out Southern comfort food 24 hours a day. 201 E. Franklin St.; 919-929-2425; timeout247.com Top of the Hill Chapel Hill’s only distillery also offers beers and American food, like burgers and flatbreads. 100 E. Franklin St.; 919-929-8676; thetopofthehill.com TRU Deli & Wine Sandwiches and wine. 114 Henderson St.; 919-240-7755; trudeli.com Ye Olde Waffle Shoppe Waffles, pancakes, eggs. 173 E. Franklin St.; 919-929-9192; yeoldewaffleshoppe.com West Franklin Street 411 WEST The menu – including fresh pasta, seafood and pizzas – is inspired by the flavors of Italy and the Mediterranean, with a healthy California twist; outdoor dining; all ABC permits. 411 W. Franklin St.; 919-967-2782; 411west.com


D I N I N G

Al’s Burger Shack Gourmet burgers and fries with local ingredients. 516 W. Franklin St.; 919-904-7659; alsburgershack.com Beer Study Bottle shop with in-store drafts and growlers to go. 106 N. Graham St.; 919-240-5423; beerstudy.com Bread & Butter Bread, cinnamon rolls, desserts. 503 W. Rosemary St.; 919-960-5998; chapelhillbakery.com BREADMEN’S A variety of burgers, sandwiches, salads and grilled meat, with daily soup and specials. All-day breakfast; vegetarian options. Catering available. 324 W. Rosemary St.; 919-967-7110; breadmens.com

Carolina Brewery The fifth-oldest brewery in the state features Carolina cuisine. 460 W. Franklin St.; 919-942-1800; carolinabrewery. com Cholanad Restaurant & Bar Contemporary and traditional South Indian cuisine. Catering available. 308 W. Franklin St.; 800-246-5262; cholanad.com Cuban Revolution Express A sister restaurant to Durham’s Cuban Revolution, this location offers wraps, pressed sandwiches and handmade empanadas. 401 W. Franklin St.; 919-240-5276; cubanrevolutionexpress.com CROOK’S CORNER Southern classics like shrimp and grits, Hoppin’ John and jalapeño-cheddar hushpuppies. 610 W. Franklin St.; 919-929-7643; crookscorner.com

For Special Occasions...

CROSSROADS CHAPEL HILL AT THE CAROLINA INN New American cuisine and seasonal specialties; all ABC permits. 211 Pittsboro St.; 919-918-2777; crossroadscuisine.com

like Dinner. ELAINE’S ON FRANKLIN Fine regional American cuisine, made with the 454 W. FRANKLIN ST. • CHAPEL HILL freshest local ingredi960.2770 • www.elainesonfranklin.com ents; all ABC permits. 454 W. Franklin St.; 919-960-2770; elainesonfranklin.com

Silver Medal: Best Restaurants of 2011, News & Observer

Guru India Restaurant Tandoori, thali, curry. 508-A W. Franklin St.; 919-942-8201; guruindianc.com

ITALIAN PIZZERIA III Pizza, calzones, subs. The “place to be” in Chapel Hill for 35+ years. 508 W. Franklin St.; 919-968-4671; italianpizzeria3.com

Kipos Greek cuisine in a relaxed, upscale setting; outdoor dining. 431 W. Franklin St.; 919-425-0760; kiposchapelhill.com Lantern Pan-Asian cuisine. 423 W. Franklin St.; 919-969-8846; lanternrestaurant.com

LA RÉSIDENCE C H A P E L

H I L L ,

N C

LA RESIDENCE French-inspired cuisine made from fresh ingredients. 202 W. Rosemary St.; 919-967-2506; laresidencedining.com Lime & Basil Vietnamese fare. 200 W. Franklin St.; 919-967-5055; limeandbasil.com MAMA DIP’S Traditional Southern specialties, including a country breakfast and brunch and dinner classics like fried chicken and Brunswick stew. 408 W. Rosemary St.; 919-942-5837; mamadips.com Mediterranean Deli Offers healthy vegan, vegetarian and gluten-free options as well as delicious meats from the grill. 410 W. Franklin St.; 919-967-2666; mediterraneandeli.com Mellow Mushroom Classic Southern pizza. 310 W. Franklin St.; 919-929-1941; mellowmushroom.com/store/chapel-hill Merritt’s Store & Grill Sandwiches, breakfast biscuits, burgers. 1009 S. Columbia St.; 919-942-4897; merrittsblt.com Might As Well Bar & Grill Bar favorites like cheese fries plus pizza, burgers, wings, salads and more. 206 W. Franklin St.; 984-234-3333; chapelhill.mightaswellbarandgrill.com Mint North Indian subz korma and chicken jalfrezi. 504 W. Franklin St.; 919-929-6188; mintunc.com Moe’s Southwest Grill Made-to-order burritos, nachos, quesadillas and more. 110 W. Franklin St.; 919-914-6217; moes.com

G U I D E

The Northside District Specialty cocktails and international small plates. 403 W. Rosemary St.; 919-391-7044; thenorthsidedistrict.com Perennial Coffee and pastries; 403 W. Franklin St.; 919-869-7517; perennial.cafe The Purple Bowl Acai bowls, toast, smoothies, coffee. 306-B W. Franklin St.; 919-903-8511; purplebowlch.com Spicy 9 Sushi Bar & Asian Restaurant Sushi, Thai curries, bibimbap and other Asian entrees. 140 W. Franklin St.; 919-903-9335; spicy9chapelhill.com Talulla’s Authentic Turkish cuisine; all ABC permits. 456 W. Franklin St.; 919-933-1177; talullas.com Trolly Stop Specialty hot dogs and burgers. 104 W. Franklin St.; 919-240-4206; trollystophotdogs.com Vimala’s Curryblossom Cafe Traditional Indian tandoori and thali. 431 W. Franklin St.; 919-929-3833; curryblossom.com West End Wine Bar Pastries, light tapas, 100 wines. 450 W. Franklin St.; 919-967-7599; westendwinebar.com Windows Restaurant at the Franklin Hotel New American breakfast cuisine. 311 W. Franklin St.; 919-442-9000 YOGURT PUMP Since 1982, YoPo has served up frozen yogurt treats and shakes with unique flavors. 106 W. Franklin St.; 919-942-7867; yogurtpump.com Village Plaza/East Franklin Street/ Eastgate Crossing

BABALU TAPAS AND TACOS Gourmet Mexican. 1800 E. Franklin St., Ste. 16; 984-528-8030; chapelhill.eatbabalu.com Caffe Driade Carrboro Coffee, bowl-size lattes, local baked goods, beer and wine. 1215 E. Franklin St.; 919-942-2333; caffedriade.com Carolina 1663 Contemporary Southern fare at the Sheraton. 1 Europa Dr.; 919-969-2157; carolina1663.com

Noodles & Company Asian, Mediterranean, American noodles. 214 W. Franklin St.; 919-967-7320; noodles.com

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G U I D E

Cerritos Cantina Specialty dips, ceviche, street tacos, nachos, burritos and salads. 1502 E. Franklin St.; 919-929-6566; cerritoscantina.com Chopt Offers unique salads, grain, noodle and quinoa bowls. Eastgate Crossing; 919-240-7660; choptsalad.com Dunk & Slide at Whole Foods Market All-day breakfast, sushi and more. 81 S. Elliott Rd.; 919-968-1983; wholefoodsmarket.com Guglhupf Bake Shop Bakery serving European-style breads, pastries, desserts and savory baked goods in addition to coffee. Eastgate Crossing; 919-914-6511; guglhupf. com/chapel-hill-bake-shop Il Palio Ristorante at The Siena Hotel N.C.’s only AAA Four Diamond Italian restaurant. 1505 E. Franklin St.; 919-918-2545; ilpalio.com La Hacienda Burritos, salads, quesadillas, tacos. 1813 Fordham Blvd.; 919-967-0207; lahacienda2.eat24hour.com

SQUID’S Fresh seafood options include woodgrilled fillets, Maine lobster, fried seafood and oysters. 1201 Fordham Blvd. (15-501); 919-942-8757; squidsrestaurant.com

Sunrise Biscuit Kitchen Drive-thru biscuits, sandwiches. 1305 E. Franklin St.; 919-933-1324; sunrisebiscuits.com

Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard Contemporary cuisine with a Southern (Airport Road)

Tandoor Indian Restaurant Traditional Indian cuisine, vegan options. 1301 E. Franklin St.; 919-967-6622; tandoorindian.com

Hunam Chinese Restaurant Cantonese 2012 Champions of the cuisine. 790 MLK Jr.“Got Blvd.; 919-967-6133; to be NC” Competition hunamchapelhill.com Dining Series

Twisted Noodles Thai noodle soups, pan-fried noodles. Eastgate Crossing; 919-933-9933; twistednoodles.com Zoës Kitchen Mediterranean soups, salads, sandwiches and kebabs in a colorful space. Eastgate Crossing; 919-883-9310; zoeskitchen.com University Place

Living Kitchen Vegan and vegetarian options including sweet potato sushi, pad thai, burritos, juices and smoothies. 201 S. Elliott Rd.; 919-535-9191; livingkitchen.com

Alfredo’s Pizza Villa Pizzas, calzones, salads, subs, pasta, desserts. 919-968-3424; alfredospizzanc.com

The Loop Pizza Grill Pizzas, soups, salads, sandwiches, burgers. Eastgate Crossing; 919-969-7112; looppizzagrill.com

Bartaco Tacos of various styles like sesame ribeye and fried oyster, plus fresh-juice cocktails, poke and mole options. 910-807-8226; bartaco.com

Luncheonette A weekday lunch spot serving up salads, burgers, soups and pasta dishes house-made with fresh, local ingredients. 100 Europa Dr.; 984-234-0644; roseluncheonette.com Market Street Coffeehouse Coffee, pastries and more. 227 S. Elliott Rd.; 919-968-8993; marketstcoffee.com

City Kitchen Wholesome American fare with a sophisticated twist. 919-928-8200; citykitchenchapelhill.com Maple View Mobile Ice cream outpost of the Hillsborough dairy farm. 919-244-1949; mapleviewmobile.com Red Bowl Sushi, bento boxes. 919-918-7888; redbowlchapelhill.com

Min Ga Korean cuisine. 116 Old Durham Rd.; 919-933-1773; min-ga.com Monterrey Traditional Mexican cuisine. 237 S. Elliott Rd.; 919-969-8750; monterreychapelhill.com Olio & Aceto Cafe Brunch and lunch options inspired by Blue Sky Oil and Vinegar products. 400 S. Elliott Rd.; 919-903-8958; olioandacetocafe.com Red Pepper Chinese restaurant offering traditional Szechuan dishes. 1704 E. Franklin St.; 919-968-3488; redpepperchapelhill.com

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at Southern Season

WEATHERVANE & PATIO • Lunch • Dinner Breakfast RESTAURANT Weekend Brunch Shrimp and grits, sweet potato fries and other gourmet takes on classic flavors. 919-929-9466; southernseason.com/ restaurant/chapel-hill

TRILOGY American cafe featuring innovative twists on classic dishes. Silverspot Cinema; 919-357-9888; trilogyrestaurant.com

Stoney River Steakhouse and Grill Southern favorites like deviled eggs meet steak house mainstays like the legendary 12 oz. filet. 919-914-6688; stoneyriver.com Village Burgers Gourmet burgers with sides like sweet potato fries and tater tots. 919-240-4008; villageburgerchapelhill.com

flare highlighting local ingredients

201 S. Estes Drive, University Mall, Chapel Hill 919-929-9466 | southernseason.com/weathervane

KITCHEN Bistro-style dining with a seasonal menu that always includes mussels. 764 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-537-8167; kitchenchapelhill.com

Lucha Tigre Latin-Asian cuisine and sake tequila bar. 746 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-904-7326; luchatigre.com THE ROOT CELLAR Sandwiches, prepared salads, desserts and more. Beer and wine only; outdoor dining. 750 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-967-3663; rootcellarchapelhill.com Sal’s Ristorante Calzones, pizza, pasta, sandwiches. 2811 Homestead Rd.; 919-932-5125; salsristorantechapelhill.com Timberlyne/Chapel Hill North Area Allen & Son Barbecue N.C. barbecue. 6203 Millhouse Rd. (N.C. 86 N.); 919-942-7576 Farm House Restaurant Steaks, salads, potatoes. 6004 Millhouse Rd. (N.C. 86 N.); 919-929-5727; farmhousesteakhouse.com Joe Van Gogh Coffee and pastries. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-967-2002; joevangogh.com Magone Italian Grill and Pizza. 1129 Weaver Dairy Rd., Ste. F; 919-904-7393 Margaret’s Cantina Creative Mexican appetizers and entrees. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-942-4745; margaretscantina.com New Hope Market Store and grill that uses local products and features breakfast and daily specials like burgers, soups and more. 6117 N.C. Hwy. 86 S.; 919-240-7851


D I N I N G

G U I D E

JOYOUS COOKING

M O R E T O N N E A L I S A N A U T H O R A N D I N T E R I O R D E S I G N E R W H O L I V E S I N C H A P E L H I L L . S H E I S A L I F E L O N G F O O D I E , H A V I N G C O - F O U N D E D L A R É S I D E N C E I N 1 9 7 6 .

Variables In his lectures on human resource management, my husband talks about different personality types. He likes to use examples from home, more often than not about cooking. Without getting into details of MyersBriggs typology, let’s just say he and I are direct opposites. He is a linear thinker and I’m, well, absolutely not. The differences are never more obvious than our approaches to cooking. Drake’s method of arranging spices is to put them in alphabetical order. Mine is to place them according to use (thyme, cumin and red pepper are front and center). He calls this disorganized. To me, it’s the epitome of organization. Take recipes. He actually thinks they need to be followed — ­ to the letter! For me, most recipes offer way too many details. “Use a medium-sized aluminum bowl…” makes me crazy. It’s like relying on the GPS to guide you out of your

own neighborhood. When the ingredients include Spanish onion or red bell pepper, Drake goes to the grocery store, even though we already have yellow onions and orange bell peppers. He’ll buy Italian seasoning when we have plenty of oregano, basil, thyme and rosemary on hand. ‘Use what you have’ is my mantra. Sometimes the result is better than the original recipe. Bill Smith’s inspired cabbage and leeks from “Seasoned in the South” is a perfect example. I’m willing to bet he was out of onions for the traditional cabbage recipe and happened to have an abundance of leeks in the fridge. Despite, or because of, his linear approach, Drake’s actually a good cook. And after 20 years of marriage, he’s learned to improvise (a little) and I’ve occasionally followed a recipe. Last night we had a hankering for chicken paprikash, a recipe I thought

I’d perfected for our own collection of favorites. While at the grocery, I didn’t have the recipe so guessed at what we needed. At home I didn’t bother to read my own instructions. I used three chicken legs and three thighs and a whole bell pepper. I used twice as much paprika. No flour. No tomatoes, but I squirted a little tomato paste from my indispensable “Sicilian toothpaste tube” (Amore tomato paste). I used half as much sour cream. I had no chicken stock, so I substituted Better Than Bouillon and water. (I’m a believer in good homemade stock, but in a recipe like this it’s not crucial.) And it was delicious! Let me encourage y’all to improvise. But if you want to follow a recipe, Drake says this is a good one.

Chicken Paprikash

PHOTO BY JAMES STEFIUK

6-8 servings 6 to 8 bone-in chicken thighs Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste 2 Tbsp. vegetable oil 1 large onion, chopped roughly ½ red bell pepper, chopped roughly 3 cloves garlic, minced 1 Tbsp. Hungarian sweet paprika 1 Tbsp. smoked paprika (aka pimentón de la Vera) 3 Tbsp. all-purpose flour 1 cup canned diced or crushed tomatoes 1 cup chicken broth, homemade or, if not, low-sodium 1 lb. egg noodles or spaetzle 2 tablespoons butter ¾ cup sour cream Season the chicken with salt and pepper. Heat the oil in a Dutch oven and sear the chicken on both sides until golden and crisp. Remove chicken to a plate. Pour off all but about 2 tablespoons of

the accumulated fat in the pot. Return the pot to the stove, over medium heat, and add the onion and pepper. Cook, stirring frequently, until the vegetables have softened. Add the garlic, and cook two more minutes. Add the paprika and flour, stir well to combine, then cook, stirring, until the taste of the flour has been cooked out, 4 to 5 minutes. Add tomatoes and broth, whisk until smooth and then nestle the chicken back in the pan, skin-side up. Cover the pan and cook for about 20 minutes over low heat until the chicken has cooked through. Meanwhile, make noodles or spaetzle according to package directions. Drain the noodles, and toss them in a bowl with the butter. Place the chicken on top of the noodles, then add the sour cream to the sauce, stir to combine and ladle it over the chicken. CHM March 2018 chapelhillmagazine.com

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G U I D E

Oishii Specialty rolls, teriyaki, stir-fry, sushi. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-932-7002; oishiiroll.com Pop’s Pizzeria Pizzas, calzones, stromboli, pasta. 1822 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-932-1040; pops-pizzeria.com Queen of Pho Vietnamese cuisine like banh mi, stir fried egg noodles and, of course, pho beef noodle soup. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-903-8280

Jujube Eclectic, modern cuisine inspired by the classic flavors of China and Vietnam. Glen Lennox Shopping Center; 919-960-0555; jujuberestaurant.com Nantucket Grill & Bar Clam chowder, lobster rolls and more. 5925 Farrington Rd.; 919-402-0077; nantucketgrill.com Raaga Authentic Indian delicacies like curry and masala. 3140 Environ Way, East 54; 919-240-7490; raagachapelhill.com

Rasa Indi-Chinese Indian and Chinese cuisine. 1826 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-929-2199; rasachapelhill.com

Thai Palace Soup, curries, pad thai. Glenwood Square Shopping Center; 919-967-5805; thaipalacenc.com

The Bagel Bar More than 20 homemade bagel varieties. 630 Weaver Dairy Rd., Ste. 109; 919-929-7700; bagelbarbagels.com

The Egg & I French toast, pancakes and specialty omelets. 1101 Environ Way, East 54; 919-537-8488; theeggandirestaurants.com

The Pig Barbecue, fried tofu, collards. 630 Weaver Dairy Rd., Ste. 101; 919-942-1133; thepigrestaurant.com

Tobacco Road Sports Cafe Burgers, salads and sandwiches. 1118 Environ Way, East 54; 919-537-8404; tobaccoroadsportscafe.com/chapel-hill

Sage Vegetarian Cafe Vegetarian fare. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-968-9266; sagevegcafe.com Special Treats A chocolate boutique shop offering gourmet chocolates, cookies and biscotti made by people with disabilities. 1129 Weaver Dairy Rd., Unit R; 919-883-2151; specialtreatsnc.com YOPOP Chapel Hill Frozen yogurt shop featuring 14 flavors made daily and 36 toppings including fresh fruit. Bubble tea and smoothies. 1129 Weaver Dairy Rd.; 919-537-8229 N.C. 54 East/Raleigh Road Amante Gourmet Pizza Create-your-own pizzas. 6209-B Falconbridge Rd.; 919-493-0904; amantepizza.com BIN 54 Steaks, seafood and other fine American food. Everything made in-house. Glen Lennox Shopping Center; 919-969-1155; bin54chapelhill.com Brenz Pizza Co. Specialty pizzas, subs, salads. 3120 Environ Way, East 54; 919-636-4636; chapelhill.brenzpizzaco.com Coco Bean Coffee Shop Locally owned coffee shop offering Carrboro Coffee Roasters coffee and a variety of baked goods. 1114 Environ Way; 919-883-9003; cocobeancoffeeshop.com ELEMENTS Cuisine combining classical and modern Asian and European cooking techniques; check out the wine bar with full menu next door. 2110 Environ Way, East 54; 919-537-8780; elementsofchapelhill.com

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CARRBORO Downtown

ACME FOOD & BEVERAGE CO. Soups, salads, seafood and entrees with a Southern touch. 110 E. Main St.; 919-929-2263; acmecarrboro.com Aidan’s Pizza Pizza, wings and salads. 602-D Jones Ferry Rd.; 919-903-8622; aidanspizza.com AKAI HANA Japanese cuisine including sushi, tempura and teriyaki; 206 W. Main St.; 919-942-6848; akaihana.com Armadillo Grill Tex-Mex burritos, en­chiladas, tacos, nachos. 120 E. Main St.; 919-929-4669; armadillogrill.com

Meadowmont Village

Cafe Carrboro Lunch and breakfast served all day, house-roasted espresso and coffees. 401 E. Main St.; 919-929-0445

Brixx Wood Fired Pizza Specialty pizzas and salads. 501 Meadowmont Village Circle; 919-929-1942; brixxpizza.com

Carrburritos Burritos, tacos, nachos and margaritas. 711 W. Rosemary St.; 919-933-8226; carrburritos.com

Cafe Carolina & Bakery Salads, sandwiches, breakfast. 601 Meadowmont Village Circle; 919-945-8811; cafecarolina.com CHRONIC TACOS Mexican grill utilizing authentic recipes. 504 Meadowmont Village Circle; 984-999-4803; eatchronictacos.com Southern Village Al’s Burger Shack Gourmet burgers and fries made with local ingredients. 708 Market St.; 919-914-6694; alsburgershack.com La Vita Dolce Pastries, sorbet, gelato. 610 Market St.; 919-968-1635; lavitadolcecafe.com Pazzo! Italian cuisine, takeout pizza. 700 Market St.; 919-929-9984; pazzo-restaurant.com Rasa Malaysia Authentic Malaysian dishes. 410 Market St.; 984-234-0256; rasamalaysiach.com Town Hall Grill Sandwiches, steak, seafood. 410 Market St.; 919-960-8696; thetownhallgrill.com Weaver Street Market Hot bar and salad bar for breakfast, lunch and dinner. 716 Market St.; 919-929-2009; weaverstreetmarket.coop

GLASSHALFULL Mediterraneaninspired food and wine; outdoor dining; all ABC permits. 106 S. Greensboro St.; 919-967-9784; glasshalfull.net Gourmet Kingdom Sichuan cuisine. 301 E. Main St.; 919-932-7222; thegourmetkingdom.com Jade Palace Sichuan and Chinese. 103 E. Main St.; 919-942-0006; jadepalacecarrboro.com Krave Kava and other exotic root and tea beverages. 105 W. Main St.; 919-408-9596; kravekava.com Market Street Coffee & Ice Cream Locally sourced coffee, ice cream and pastries. 100 E. Weaver St.; 919-960-6776; marketstcoffee.com Milltown Pub fare with an extensive beer list. 307 E. Main St.; 919-968-2460; dininganddrinking.com Neal’s Deli Traditional deli fare. 100-C E. Main St.; 919-967-2185; nealsdeli.com Open Eye Cafe Locally roasted Carrboro Coffee and espresso, tea, beer, wine and baked goods. 101 S. Greensboro St.; 919-968-9410 Pizzeria Mercato Pizza, antipasto, soups and fritti. 408 W. Weaver St.; 919-967-2277; pizzeriamercatonc.com


D I N I N G

Provence Southern French cuisine. 203 W. Weaver St.; 919-967-5008; provenceofcarrboro.com

Gray Squirrel Coffee Co. Roastery and espresso bar. 360 E. Main St., #100; graysquirrelcoffee.com

Shaka Shave Ice Hawaiian-style shaved ice with house-made flavors. 102 S. Merritt Mill Rd.; 919-923-2631

Hickory Tavern Burgers, sandwiches and build-your-own salads. 370-110 E. Main St.; 919-942-7417; thehickorytavern.com

Spotted Dog Vegetarian-friendly appetizers, soups, salads, entrees, desserts. 111 E. Main St.; 919-933-1117; thespotteddogrestaurant.com

One Fish Two Fish Hawaiian poke restaurant offering the traditional raw fish over rice and salad bowls, as well as poke burritos, nachos and tacos. 370 E. Main St., Ste. 140; 919-240-5532; onefishtwofishpoke.com

Steel String Brewery Craft beer and bluegrass music. 106 S. Greensboro St.; 919-240-7215; steelstringbrewery.com Tyler’s Restaurant and Taproom Specialty import beers on tap and traditional pub fare. 102 E. Main St.; 919-929-6881; tylerstaproom.com Wings Over 18 flavors of wings. 313 E. Main St.; 919-537-8271; wingsoverchapelhill.com East Main Square Amante Gourmet Pizza Create-your-own pizzas. 300 E. Main St.; 919-929-3330; amantepizza.com Esperanza Empanada y Tequila Savory and sweet empanadas, 50 kinds of tequila. 370 E. Main St.; 919-617-1674; esperanzanc.com

G U I D E

Carrboro Pizza Oven Pizza, calzones. 919-904-7336; carrboropizzaoven.com CROSSTIES BBQ A variety of barbecue, sides and scratch-made desserts. 919-904-7160; crosstiesbbq.com

Elmo’s Diner Homemade Southern and American classics. 919-929-2909; elmosdinercarrboro.com

Rise Biscuits and Donuts Carrboro Biscuits, doughnuts and coffee. 310 E. Main St., Ste. 100; 919-929-5115; risebiscuitsdonuts.com

Oasis Organic coffee, tea, beer and wine. 919-904-7343; oasisincarrmill.com

The Shoppe Bar and Meatball Kitchen Meatballs, sliders, sides. 370 E. Main St; 919-240-5851; theshoppenc.com

Tandem Farm-to-table, modern American cuisine with full service bar. 919-240-7937; tandemcarrboro.com

Carr Mill Mall B-SIDE LOUNGE Small plates like flatbread, bacon-wrapped dates and fondue. Plus inspired cocktails. 919-904-7160; b-sidelounge.com

VENABLE ROTISSERIE BISTRO Upscale comfort food with a heavy emphasis on locally sourced and seasonal ingredients; all ABC permits. 919-904-7160; venablebistro.com

The Place to Be!

SERVING BREAKFAST ALL DAY LONG

WITH CLASSIC LUNCH AND DINNER FARE WE CATER! Call (919) 906-0765 to discuss your upcoming event!

324 W. RosemarY St., Chapel Hill 919.967.7110 breadmens.com WINNER

BEST OF CHAPEL HILL MAG AZINE

CHAPEL HILL FAVORITE FOR 38 YEARS BEST PHILLY CHEESE STEAK IN THE TRIANGLE!

FOOD & COFFEE | BEER & BICYCLES SERVING BREAKFAST, LUNCH & DINNER ENJOY PATIO DINING

ITALIAN PIZZERIA III WINNER

BEST OF CHAPEL HILL

FOR CATERING OF ANY OCCASION, PLEASE GIVE US A CALL! 508 WEST FRANKLIN STREET, CHAPEL HILL

919 968 4671 italianpizzeria3.com 

ADDING NEW MENU ITEMS WEEKLY. CHECK OUR WEBSITE FOR OUR DINNER SPECIALS.

WINNER

BEST OF CHAPEL HILL

58 CHAPELTON COURT, SUITE 100 VERANDA AT BRIAR CHAPEL BREAKAWAYNC.CO | 984 234 3010

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G U I D E

Weaver Street Market Hot bar and salad bar for breakfast, lunch and dinner. 919-929-0010; weaverstreetmarket.coop N.C. 54 West/Carrboro Plaza Anna Maria’s Pizzeria Italian cuisine. Carrboro Plaza; 919-929-1877; annamariasnc.wordpress.com Fiesta Grill Burritos, chimichangas, fajitas, tacos. 3307 N.C. 54 W.; 919-928-9002; fiestagrill.us Hong Kong Chinese Restaurant Classic Chinese dishes. 602 Jones Ferry Rd.; 919-942-0850; trianglerestaurants.com/ HongKong Monterrey Traditional Mexican cuisine. Carrboro Plaza; 919-903-9919; monterreychapelhill.com Wingman Wings and hot dogs. 104 N.C. 54 W.; 919-928-9200

CHATHAM COUNTY Governors Club

Flair Restaurant & Wine Bar Highquality French-influenced American food, coffee, wine, beer and Sunday brunch.

50100 Governors Dr.; 919-967-9990; flairforfoodrestaurant.com Ciao Bella Pizzeria Pizzas, pastas, sandwiches. 1716 Farrington Point Rd.; 919-932-4440 Tarantini Italian cuisine. 50160 Governors Dr. (Governors Village); 919-942-4240; tarantinirestaurant.com

BREAKAWAY CAFE A casual “cycling-inspired” cafe serving breakfast, lunch, dinner and small plates, along with Counter Culture coffee, beer, wine and Maple View Farm ice cream. 58 Chapelton Ct., Ste. 100; 984-234-3010; breakawaync.co

Veranda (Briar Chapel) 501 PHARMACY Scoops of Maple View Farm ice cream, plus malts and shakes. 98 Chapelton Ct., Ste. 300; 984-999-0501; 501rx.com

Alberello Café & Market / Oakleaf Until Oakleaf’s new location in Carrboro opens, Alberello’s Florentine sandwiches, housemade pastas, from scratch desserts and more are available for lunch while sister eatery Oakleaf’s farm-to-table menu specializing in French and Italian cuisine will be served at dinner. 72 Chapelton Ct.; 984-234-3017; alberellonc.com; oakleafnc.com

CAPP’S PIZZERIA Artisan pizzas that are hand-crafted and wood-fired, utilizing LIFE’S TOO SHORT FOR FAKE PIZZA local ingredients. 79 Falling Springs Dr.; THIS IS THE 919-240-4104; cappspizzeria.com

REAL DEAL

DECIDE Town HallFOR Burger and Beer Gourmet burgers YOURSELF plus shared plates, tacos, wings and salads. 58 Chapelton Ct.; COMING THIS FALL 2016 Ste. 140; 984-234-3504; TO VERANDA AT BRIAR CHAPEL townhallburgerandbeer.com 79 FALLING SPRINGS DRIVE CHAPEL HILL, NC

WWW.CAPPSPIZZERIA.COM

PITTSBORO Allen & Son Barbecue N.C. barbecue. 5650 U.S 15-501; 919-542-2294; stubbsandsonbbq.com

Taste of the South Porch Dining

Thanks for Voting Us Best of Chapel Hill!

WINNER

BEST Voted Favorite BBQ and OF CHAPEL HILL

Southern/Comfort Food!

Meats • Chicken • BBQ/Ribs Chicken & Dumplings • Vegetables • Casserole Brunswick Stew • Gumbo Breakfast items include Chicken & Waffles • Sweet Potato Pancakes

Mama Dip’s Kitchen

408 W. Rosemary St., Chapel Hill 942-5837 mamadips.com M-Sat 8am-9:30pm • Sun 8am-9pm Breakfast served daily M-F till 11am, Sun till 1pm Sat and Sun Brunch

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Now catering!

984-484-0500 504 Meadowmont Village Circle, Chapel Hill 984-999-4803

eatchronictacos.com


D I N I N G

Angelina’s Kitchen Seasonal dishes of the Greek and southwestern variety including gyros, rice bowls and family dinners for pick up. 23 Rectory St.; 919-545-5505; angelinaskitchenonline.com Bella Donna Classic Italian dishes like lasagna and spaghetti carbonara. 440 East St.; 919-545-0900; donnaitalianrestaurant.com THE BELTED GOAT A coffee and wine shop with paninis, cheeses and pastries. Fearrington Village Center; 919-545-5717; fearrington.com/belted-goat Carolina Brewery The fifth-oldest brewery in the state. 120 Lowes Dr., Ste. 100; 919-545-2330; carolinabrewery.com/pittsboro Chatham Marketplace Sandwiches, baked goods. 480 Hillsboro St.; 919-542-2643; chathammarketplace.coop The City Tap Classic bar food. 89 Hillsboro St.; 919-545-0562; thecitytap.com Elizabeth’s Pizza Pizzas, calzones, sandwiches, salads and pasta. 160 Hillsboro St.; 919-545-9292; elizabethspizzapittsboro.com

G U I D E

THE FEARRINGTON HOUSE RESTAURANT Contemporary fine-dining. Fearrington Village Center; 919-542-2121; fearrington.com/house

MOON ASIAN BISTRO An Asian fusion restaurant offering sushi, Chinese dishes like sweetand-sour chicken, Thai curry dishes, rice and noodles. 111 Knox Way. Ste. 100; 919-869-7894. ASIAN BISTRO

THE MOD Wood-fired pizza, salads, small plates and a full bar. 46 Sanford Rd.; 919-533-6883; themodernlifedeli.com The Phoenix Bakery Small-batch and seasonal baked goods and specialty cakes. 664 West St.; 919-542-4452

Dinner Nightly Brunch on Sunday reservations 919.929.2263

acmecarrboro.com

Drink Specials Life’s Too Short For Fake Pizza

THIS IS THE REAL DEAL Artisan Hand-Crafted | Wood-Fired Local, Farm-Fresh Ingredients

Food Special

DECIDE FOR YOURSELF WINNER

BEST OF CHAPEL HILL

Located at Veranda at Briar Chapel 79 Falling Springs Drive Chapel Hill, NC 27516

919.240.4104

* Second item must be of equal or lesser value.

CAPPSPIZZERIA.COM

All prices include sales taxes

www.silv erspot.net

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D I N I N G

201 S. Estes Drive, Chapel Hill, NC 27514 (919) 929-7133 | southernseason.com

G U I D E

PITTSBORO ROADHOUSE Hearty American entrees, burgers and salads; 39 West St.; 919-542-2432; pittsbororoadhouse.com

S&T Soda Shoppe Soda fountain, American fare. 85 Hillsboro St.; 919-545-0007

Starrlight Mead

Heavenly Honey Wines

It’s Honey... All Grown-up!

Our internationally

STARRLIGHT MEAD Tastings of honey wines and honey. 480 Hillsboro St.; 919-533-6314; starrlightmead.com award-winning wines are expertly crafted on the

premises from fruits, herbs, and locally

Postal Fish Company Fresh seafood from North Carolina’s coast prepared thoughtfully by chefs James Clark and Bill Hartley. 75 W. Salisbury St.; 919-704-8612

sourced honey.

Come relax in our

tasting room, the perfect

place to sit, sip, savor, and learn about the art of honey wine. Located in the Heart of Pittsboro at Chatham Mills

Virlie’s Grill Soups, salads, burgers, sandwiches. 58 Hillsboro St.; 919-542-0376; virliesgrill.com Thursday - Saturday 12-6 pm, Sunday 1-5 pm StarrlightMead.com

919-533-6314

480 Hillsboro St. - Around back, under the water tower

ROOST BEER GARDEN AT FEARRINGTON VILLAGE Wood-fired pizza, local brews and live music; 2000 Fearrington Village Center; 919-545-5717; fearrington.com/roost

THE ROOT CELLAR Sandwiches, prepared salads, desserts and more. 35 Suddles Rd.; 919-967-3663; rootcellarpbo.com

HILLSBOROUGH Antonia’s Italian cuisine. 101 N. Churton St.; 919-643-7722; antoniashillsborough.com El Restaurante Ixtapa Authentic from-scratch Mexican dishes. Try the handmade tortillas and the guac. 162 Exchange Park Lane; 919-6446944; ixtapa.homestead.com/homepage.html Hillsborough BBQ Company Barbecue plates and sandwiches, sides and desserts. 236 S. Nash St.; 919-732-4647; hillsboroughbbq.com

Private Events | Weekend Brunch | Full Bar Seasonal Menus | Outdoor Patio

C H R G

C AT E R I N G Dependable

Affordable

Local

411 WEST MEZ

PAGE ROAD GRILL

CROOK’S CORNER Crook’s continues to live up to its national reputation as a temple of Southern Cuisine. —Raleigh News & Observer

WINNER

BEST EL OF CHAP

HILL

SPANKY’S SQUID’S

919-941-1630 events@chapelhillrestaurantgroup.com ChapelHillRestaurantGroup.com

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On the menu: Crook’s Corner’s classics & seasonals Check us out at crookscorner.com Dinner Tues–Sun at 5:30 pm • Sunday Brunch 10:30 am–2 pm 610 West Franklin Street, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27516 www.crookscorner.com • Full bar includes local beers on tap Reservations accepted. Walk-ins welcome • 919 929 7643


D I N I N G

Hot Tin Roof Games and specialty cocktails; 115 W. Margaret Ln.; 919-296-9113; hottinroofbar.com Jay’s Chicken Shack Chicken, buffalo wings, breakfast biscuits. 646 N. Churton St.; 919-732-3591; jayschickenshack.com LaPlace Cajun cuisine. 111 N. Churton St.; 919-245-0041; laplacehillsborough.com

MAPLE VIEW FARM COUNTRY STORE Homemade ice cream and milk. 6900 Rocky Ridge Rd.; 919-960-5535; mapleviewfarm.com

Matthew’s Chocolates Gourmet chocolates, frozen treats and baked goods. 107 N. Churton St.; 919-732-0900 Mystery Brewing Public House A rotating seasonal menu and local beers. 230 S. Nash St.; 919-245-1325; mysterybrewing.com

G U I D E

Panciuto Southern Italian cuisine. 110 S. Churton St.; 919-732-6261; panciuto.com

RADIUS Wood-fired pizzas, housemade pastas, sandwiches, salads and desserts. Outdoor dining; all ABC permits. 112 N. Churton St.; 919-245-0601; radiuspizzeria.net

Saratoga Grill New England-style cuisine; 108 S. Churton St.; 919-732-2214; saratogagrill.com Village Diner Southern diner, buffet. 600 W. King St.; 919-732-7032 Weaver Street Market Hot bar for breakfast, lunch and dinner. 228 S. Churton St.; 919-245-5050; weaverstreetmarket.coop

LOCAL. HANGOUT. F R A N K L I N S T R E E T, C H A P E L H I L L

Voted Best Place to watch a game

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Whit’s Frozen Custard Ice cream and frozen treats. 240 S. Nash St.; 919-245-8123; whitscustard.com Wooden Nickel Pub Pub fare. 105 N. Churton St.; 919-643-2223; thewnp.com

FOURCORNERSGRILLE.COM wood-fired pizza housemade pastas sammies • salads • desserts

Go to chapelhillmagazine.com for recipes, restaurant news and full dining guide with map!

RADIUS

112 N. Churton Street Downtown Historic Hillsborough 919.245.0601

Discover what “Best Of” is made of!

2015

radiuspizzeria.net

Downtown Chapel Hill 106 W. Franklin St. | Chapel Hill 919.942.7867 www.yogurtpump.com

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D I N I N G

G U I D E

ALSO CHECK OUT THESE DURHAM RESTAURANTS… Bar Virgile Artfully crafted beverages and small plates. 105 S. Magnum St.; 919-973-3000; barvirgile.com

NanaSteak Offers various cuts of beef and steaks, plus other meats and pastas. 345 Blackwell St.; 919-282-1183; nanasteak.com

buffets and a weekend dinner buffet. 3630 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-490-1326; sitar-indiancuisine.com

Bleu Olive High-quality comfort food with a Mediterranean flair. 1821 Hillandale Rd.; 919-383-8502; bleuolivebistro.com

Nana’s Restaurant Seasonal dishes of Southern, French and Italian cuisine. 2514 University Dr.; 919-493-8545; nanasdurham.com

The Blue Note Grill Fantastic barbecue, ribs and live music. 709 Washington St.; 919-401-1979; thebluenotegrill.com

Blue Corn Cafe Authentic LatinAmerican fare with fresh, organic ingredients. 716 Ninth St.; 919-286-9600; bluecorncafedurham.com blu seafood and bar Upscale seafood restaurant featuring innovative regional classics and a complete oyster menu. Try the crab mac and cheese! 2002 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-286-9777; bluseafoodandbar.com Bullock’s Bar-B-Que A staple in the community since 1952, serving up soul in Eastern-style barbecue, Brunswick stew and friedchicken. 3330 Quebec Dr.; 919-383-3211; bullocks-bbq.com Clouds Brewing American favorites with a German flare. 905 W. Main St., Ste. 22; 919-251-8096; cloudsbrewing.com COPA Cuban-inspired tapas and cocktails restaurant. Try the Butifaras a lo cubano, Cuban-style sausages and the Paella del verano, “summer rice,” with a mojito or daiquiri. 107 W. Main St., Durham Denny’s Diner fare. 7021 N.C. 751, Ste. 901; 919-908-1006; dennys.com Fairview Dining Room Washington Duke Inn’s AAA Four Diamond-rated restaurant. 301 Cameron Blvd.; 919-493-6699; washingtondukeinn.com

NanaTaco Inventive taqueria that features locally produced meats and veggies. 2512 University Dr.; 919-489-8226; nanataco.com

The Boot Italian-American restaurant serving sandwiches, pastas and traditional Italian entrees. 2501 University Dr.; 919-294-8383; thebootdurham.com

Page Road Grill Traditional American dishes. 5416 Page Rd.; 919-908-8900; pageroadgrill.com

The Original Q Shack “BBQ tender as a mother’s love.” 2510 University Dr.; 919-402-4227; theqshackoriginal.com

Saladelia Cafe Espresso and smoothie bar, pastries, sandwiches. 2424 Erwin Rd., 406 Blackwell St. & 4201 University Dr.; 919-489-5776; saladelia.com

The Pie Hole Made-from-scratch sweet and savory pies and specialty coffee drinks. 810 Ninth St., Ste. 130; thepieholela.com/durham

Saltbox Seafood Joint Local seafood that is delivered fresh from the Carolina coast and served griddled or fried in a straightforward manner. 608 N. Mangum St and 2637 Durham Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-908-8970; saltboxseafoodjoint.com Sitar Indian Palace Homemade Indian dishes at affordable prices, with daily lunch

Mad Hatter Cafe & Bakeshop Scratch-made pastries and cakes, salads, sandwiches. 1802 W. Main St.; 919-286-1987; madhatterbakeshop.com

7021 HIGHWAY 751, #901 DURHAM

919-908-1006

OPEN 24/7! We give AARP discounts

IBEST OF DURHAM 2016

2510 University Dr. Durham, NC 1125 W. NC HWY 54 DURHAM

919-489-7300

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Tender as a Mother's Love WINNER

MarketPlace JB Duke Hotel’s main restaurant, open for breakfast, lunch and dinner. 230 Science Dr.; 919-660-6400; jbdukehotel.com Mez Contemporary Mexican Creative Mexican dishes with a fresh twist. 5410 Page Rd.; 919-941-1630; mezdurham.com

Primal Food & Spirits Gluten-free options featuring wood-fired local meat dishes with seasonal sides, craft cocktails. 202 W. N.C. 54; 919-248-3000; primalfoodandspirits.com

WELCOME TO AMERICA’S DINER

Geer Street Garden Simple, down-home fare in a cozy atmosphere. 644 Foster St.; 919-688-2900; geerstreetgarden.com Kanki Japanese House of Steaks & Sushi Steak, chicken and seafood cooked on hibachi grills, plus an extensive sushi menu. Come for a show! 3504 Mt. Moriah Rd.; 919-401-6908; kanki.com

Tyler’s Restaurant & Taproom Hearty fare and huge beer selection. An order of garlic fries is a must! 324 Blackwell St., Durham; 919-433-0345; tylerstaproom.com

Phone 919 - 402 - 4BBQ (4227)

Catering available

Open 7 days a week 11am - 9pm


E N G A G E M E N T

PETERSON & PETERSON BY OLIVIA COHEN PHOTOGRAPHY BY HYER IMAGES HYERIMAGES.COM

I

“If you marry me you won’t have to change your last name.” This was just one of many reasons why Maggie Peterson fell for her now-fiance, Chapel Hill native and Chapel Hill High School grad Kyle Peterson. The two met in Nashville after college, where they were introduced by mutual friends. They spent the next two years bonding over craft beer, farm-to-table dining and their shared love of their home state. One Friday afternoon, Kyle picked up Maggie from work and took her on an adventure. They ended up in Blowing Rock, the town Kyle had chosen for their last-minute anniversary getaway. After watching the sunset at the Westglow Resort and Spa gazebo, he got down on one knee. But he forgot to pop the question until he stood back up. Maggie laughed and responded with an enthusiastic “yes!” The ceremony will be held on April 14, 2018 at the Governor Thomas Bennett House in Charleston. CHM

VOTE FOR THE

BEST OF CHAPEL HILL‘18 OUR ANNUAL POLL IS BACK! Cast your ballot for your local favorites in dining, retail, arts & entertainment and more. VISIT CHAPELHILLMAGAZINE.COM FOR MORE INFO. VOTING BEGINS IN MARCH.

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E N G A G E M E N T

MEYERS & WOODFIN

BY KRISTI PIECHNIK PHOTOGRAPHY BY MEGAN MONTALVO MEGANMONTALVOPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

U

Upon graduating from East Chapel Hill High School, Chapel Hill native Chase Woodfin continued his education at the University of Tennessee. After college he relocated to Atlanta for a job in sports marketing when he began working on the Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl relationship for his client. During the 2013 game, he met Hannah Meyers, a Floridian who relocated to Atlanta to pursue a career with the Bowl game. Six months later, the two crossed paths again, resulting in a successful first date at an Atlanta Braves game. After three years of dating, Chase surprised Hannah with a goldendoodle puppy, Kennedy. On their first walk through Piedmont Park with the new family member, Chase led Hannah and Kennedy to a bench near the pond and got down on one knee. Hannah enthusiastically said “yes” and the couple celebrated with friends that evening. Their wedding will take place on April 21, 2018 at The RitzCarlton Reynolds, Lake Oconee in Georgia. CHM

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W E D D I N G S

W E D D I N G S

MORIARTY & COX

U

BY MAT TIAS MILLER PHOTOGRAPHY BY SARAH WARDEN SARAHWARDENPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

UNC grad Jackson Cox and Margaret Moriarty met on their

first date at The Pit in 2014 where they bonded over their love of barbecue and hot sauce. On their second date, they went on a hike in Occoneechee Mountain State Natural Area in Hillsborough where Maggie met his dog, Bolin – and they’ve all been inseparable since. After they closed on their house in Chapel Hill, the couple celebrated by making a trip to Asheville with Maggie’s family that would soon become even more special once Jackson asked Maggie for her hand in marriage at the Vance Memorial. They were married on October 21, 2017, at the Horace Williams House just a mile from their new home. Maggie and Jackson wrote their own vows that incorporated their love of Bolin, Sunday homemade pizza dinners and of course, each other. The night was made even more special by involving many personal friends and Chapel Hill vendors, including Fire Watch BBQ, Dingo Dog Brewery, and Courtney, Amy and Cinnamon of Syd’s Hair Shop. The couple was especially delighted to have Skinny Bag of Sugar, frequent performers at 2nd Wind, play at the wedding. Later at the reception, parents Michael and Regina Moriarty and Jack and Micki Cox watched as Maggie’s sister, Fiona, gave a maid of honor speech that brought down the house. The couple resides in Chapel Hill with Bolin and their new puppy, Rosie. CHM March 2018 chapelhillmagazine.com

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W E D D I N G S

MARSDEN & WORSNIP

J

BY AMELIA HANKS PHOTOGRAPHY BY RILEY MACLEAN RILEYMACLEANWEDDINGS.COM

Jessica Marsden met Alex Worsnip while they were both living in

New Haven, Connecticut. Alex was pursuing a graduate degree and Jess was in law school at the time. After dating for a few years, they began talk marriage. While Jess knew the engagement was coming, Alex wanted to make sure the time and place were a surprise. After dinner at their favorite New Haven spot, Alex got down on one knee in the middle of a snowy quad where someone, unrelated to the couple, had serendipitously written the letters J-E-S in the snow. Jess and Alex’s rehearsal dinner took place at Steel String Brewery and was catered by the Napoli Wood-Fired Pizza truck. The couple was married at Coker Arboretum on April 29, 2017 in front of their parents, Leslie and Bruce Marsden and Patrick and Patricia Worsnip. The wedding day turned out to be unseasonably hot – over 90 degrees – and the bridal party had to hide out in the groom’s air-conditioned office. Guests traveled to Rock Quarry Farm for the reception, where Jess and Alex cut into a cheese “cake” 142

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from Boxcarr Farms and others and the writers in attendance made amazing toasts – one was even in rhyme! The couple resides in Chapel Hill. Alex is an assistant professor of philosophy at UNC and Jess is a lawyer and an Equal Justice Works fellow at UNC School of Law. CHM


W E D D I N G S

HOGAN & LAHTI

C BY ASHLEY CRUZ PHOTOGRAPHY BY MIKKEL PAIGE MIKKELPAIGE.COM

Chapel Hill native Annie Hogan met Steven Lahti in physics class just before their senior year at Duke University. However, it wasn’t until the end of that year that they began dating after they were reacquainted by mutual friends at a Lupe Fiasco concert. After six years of dating, Annie suspected a proposal was coming when Steven took her on a surprise trip to the Homestead Resort after finishing one of her medical school clinical rotations. They enjoyed a day of falconry, hiking and a delicious meal before Steven took her outside by the bonfire where he got down on one knee. After saying “yes,” the pair shared some s’mores with fellow guests at the resort. On October 21, 2017, Annie and Steven said their vows in front of their family and friends at Duke University Chapel, just steps from where they had met years ago. In attendance were Annie’s parents, Jane and Chris Hogan of Chapel Hill, Steven’s parents, Cherie Anderson and Doug Lahti, matron of honor and Chapel Hill native Ali O’Leary and many more. The night was filled with

dancing and excitement and Annie couldn’t have been more grateful for all of the support she received on her special day. Steven is a first-year resident in internal medicine at Johns Hopkins, while Annie is a fourth year medical student at Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine. Annie will join Steven in Baltimore when she finishes medical school. CHM March 2018 chapelhillmagazine.com

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W E D D I N G S

BRANNON & HEMSWORTH

W BY NICHOL AS MOT TA PHOTOGRAPHY BY KRYSTAL KAST KRYSTALKASTPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

Will Hemsworth and Chapel Hill native Mandy Brannon first

met at a friend’s New Year’s Eve party in 2014. The two UNC alumni reconnected on their first date in May 2015, and they’ve been together ever since. A year-and-a-half later, the couple took a weekend getaway to Asheville where Will planned a stay at The Inn on Biltmore Estate and a surprise proposal. They walked up the hill to see the statue of Diana on the grounds and set up a GoPro for a selfie. When Mandy got into place, Will got down on one knee. After a “yes” from Mandy, the overjoyed couple returned to an evening by the fireplace with dessert from the inn. The pair exchanged vows on September 9, 2017 at the open-air church at the Chapel Hill Carriage House. Mandy’s uncle, Dick Powell, a Texas pastor, officiated the wedding. With 200 friends and

family at the wedding including their parents – Julie Amos, Rick Brannon and George and Molly Hemsworth – the couple felt the love surrounding them. After the ceremony, guests sipped signature cocktails, enjoyed unique food stations and played lawn games out 144

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near the barn. Carriage House owner Brenda Leeper even brought out her goat and alpaca, who were dressed up as a bride and groom, to join the festivities. Guests kept the party going all night on the dance floor and the couple exited among a sea of sparklers. Following the wedding, Will and Mandy went on a two-week excursion to Hawaii for their honeymoon. They now reside in Raleigh with their dog, Cole. CHM


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Chapel Hill Magazine March 2018  
Chapel Hill Magazine March 2018