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10 Anniversary Issue th

F EBRUARY / MA RC H 2018

DURH AMMAG .COM

they saw durham's future Page 42

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Test your Bull City knowledge Page 54

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37 organizations that have stood the test of time Page 64


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magazine

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2018 VOL 11 NO 1

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EDITORIAL

EXECUTIVE EDITOR, CHAPEL HILL MAGAZINE

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letter

Still Unfinished Beauty, Artistry, Tradition

919-489-8362

A

DECADE AGO THIS MONTH, the first issue of Durham Magazine rolled off the presses with a promise on this same page, and with a distinctly younger picture of me: “We are committed to making a positive contribution to our city, we will honestly tell the stories and concerns of our neighbors, we will become an integral, organic part of our diverse community. Further, we will stand with our community; our local writers, readers and artists will talk to one another, neighbor-to-neighbor, friend-to-friend.” The headline to the first editorial was, without irony, “An Unfinished Magazine.” Durham Magazine is still an evolving work in progress, but our promise? I wouldn’t change a word. After more than 80 issues created by three outstanding editors over 10 years – and who knows how many stories and photographs? – each month our team goes out, discovers compelling local stories and tells them well. Our readers have been generous with both their favorable and critical comments, and we take them to heart. Our advertisers, too, have walked with us through a recession, a growing economy and everything in between. (See some of the businesses that were here when we started on page 64.) It’s fun to take a moment and savor our magazine’s successes – and longevity in publishing is no small accomplishment – but great editors look ahead, trying to imagine what’s around the next corner, over the next hill, and that’s what we are doing. We’re a lot more excited about the next 80 issues than the last. But we are grateful, and humbled, to still be a part of the greatest city in North Carolina. I’ll end this essay the way I ended the one I wrote a long time ago: “Our fate is twined with our unfinished city’s future [but] enough from me: It’s time for Durham Magazine to speak for itself.”

PERSIANCARPET.COM 5634 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd. Durham, NC Corner I-40 and 15-501

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President and CEO


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february/march

contents

106

SPONSORED

64 The Originals

DEPARTMENTS & COLUMNS 4 Letter

8 The Scene

HOME, SWEET HOME

Our longtime staff photographer shares the details of her favorite rooms from the past 10 years

37 organizations that have stood the test of time

PictureDURM helps us showcase images curated by locals

12 Go. See. Do.

Our top events for February and March

26 In Their Words

Duke’s Dr. David S. Pisetsky talks town-gown relations while author Carl W. Kenney II explains the draw of our city

What we’ve heard around town …

30 Noted

36 Adopt A Pet

Energetic dog Dizzy and curious cat Will await their forever homes

118 Deal Estate

How far does your dollar go in the current housing market?

146 A Second Wind

for the Food Scene Community staples spur spinoffs

148 Taste

38 COVER WORTHY

Discover our city’s best restaurants

151 Sip

All 74 of our covers

Clouds Brewing’s IPA is the J.A.M.

54 HOW DURHAM ARE YOU?

153 Savor

159 Engagement & Wedding

Test your Bull City knowledge with this quiz

124 POTENTIAL, REALIZED

Tying the knot, Bull City-style

CITY PICS

The Hill Center helps children with learning differences excel

16 Animal Protection Society of

Durham’s Tails at Twilight gala

132 SUMMER CAMP GUIDE

Piedmont changes course and its courses; this pasta dish is a prime example

18 Campus Club member luncheon at Parizade

From STEM to outdoor adventures, find a camp for your little ones in Durham and beyond

20 The Hill Center’s 40th

anniversary with The Monti

42 WE BUILT THIS CITY

The people and places that laid the foundation for the city we know and love

22 Chefs for Change dessert gala

at The Rickhouse

24 Hamilton Hill designer trunk show


MAKING ITS TRIUMPHANT RETURN TO DPAC FEB 28-MAR 11 Tickets Going Fast | Seats start at $35

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GROUPS OF 12 OR MORE: Groups@DPACnc.com


SHOWCASING CURATED IMAGES BY LO CALS

BY POSTCARDS FROM DURHAM

The scene

Before Old Bull was built on this corner, John Ruffin Green had a small tobacco warehouse here. After the Confederate surrender at Bennitt* Farm, four miles west, Yankee troops emptied the warehouse of its inventory. Green and others thought they were through until letters from the north started arriving at Durham Station, offering to pay for more tobacco. Top two floors [were] removed around 1930. – @POSTCARDSFROM DURH AM *the correct spelling of the family who lived at what we know now as Bennett Place PictureDURM (@picturedurm on Instagram) is a collection of photos chosen by founder Meredith Martindale from users who share with the #picturedurm hashtag. Over the past two years, 14,500+ photos have been submitted. 8

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We are the only Green Circle Salon in Durham, one of only six in all of NC – among the greenest salons in the world. We divert salon & spa waste from landfill & waterways, creating beauty while reducing waste.

Your Transformation Begins Here 1125 NC-54 | Suite 502 | Durham, NC 27707 atmosphairsalon.com | 919.489.3333 WINNER

IBEST OF DURHAM 2016

Thank you Durham for voting us Best Salon!


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On Bald Head Island, days begin and end with sunshine on the ocean and the pace slows to the rhythm of the tide. You’ll arrive here by ferry, then travel the island by golf cart, bicycle or on foot. No more lush natural environment for exploring can be found on the East Coast, complemented by a host of creature comforts. Just a few hours from the Triangle, what are you waiting for? Contact us today to learn more about our exceptional way of life, and start planning your retreat.


Island Time. Island Time.

BALD H EAD ISL AND NORT H

CAROL INA

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haven 3


The Science of Wine F EB. 2 2

Come taste and learn all about wine at the Museum of Life and Science. Local wine sellers, cheese makers and chocolatiers share samples with wine connoisseurs while researchers reveal how soil and sun affect the color and flavor of your favorite vintages and varieties. And don’t miss the VIP workshop with Wine Authorities’ Craig Heffley.

Feed the Need 110 Gala F EB. 2 4

This black tie-optional event, held at 21c Museum Hotel, will benefit Meals on Wheels Durham and is sponsored by Ellis Family Law and CQC Home. Bid during a live auction and enjoy food and drink provided by the hotel’s restaurant, Counting House. ABC11 Evening News Anchor Steve Daniels will host the night, and Mint Julep Jazz Band will perform.

F EB. 2 3

M ARCH 2 8

Head to The Carolina Theatre to hear all-vocal country sensation Home Free perform Nashville country standards and country-dipped pop hits from their most recent full-length album, “Timeless.” |

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CROP Hunger Walk MAR C H 25

Help neighbors in need at the 44th annual walk, the second largest in the U.S. Proceeds support Church World Service and Durham Congregations in Action to help Durhamites struggling with food insecurity.

OUR TOP EVENTS FOR FEBRUARY AND MARCH

Stagville Under the Stars

Home Free

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go see do Folktales, stargazing and more! Bring your family out to Stagville State Historic Site for African folktales about the night sky and viewings through telescopes. A collaboration with Morehead Planetarium. „

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Local service. Worldwide results. Hasselblad 903 Camera

1900 $20 Gold Double Eagle

Lalique Sculpture

Original WWII D-Day Maps

Sold for $3,666 Shipped to E. Setauket, NY

Sold for $1,700 Shipped to Jay, NY

Sold for $2,025 Shipped to Burr Ridge, IL

Sold for $567 Shipped to McAllen, TX

Camera Equipment

Coins

Crystal

Militaria

Hasselblad, Leica, & High-end Lens

Gold & Silver US & Foreign Coins

Baccarat, Lalique, Steuben, & Waterford

Photos, Weapons, & Equipment

Augarten Lippizaner Figurine

Babe Ruth Signed Baseball

Madame Alexander Doll Collection

Rutherford Hayes White House Plate

Sold for $1,402 Shipped to Detroit, MI

Sold for $7,200 Shipped to Denver, CO

Sold for $7,352 Shipped throughout the U.S.

Sold for $3,189 Shipped to Sidney, IA

Porcelain Figurines

Sports Memorabilia

Vintage Dolls

Historical Memorabilia

American / European

1970s & Earlier

1960s & Earlier

Political or Significant US Events

Vintage Messerschmitt tg500 Toy Car

George III Sterling Teapot

18K Patek Philippe Watch

18K Cartier Ring

Sold for $565 Shipped to Switzerland

Sold for $1,035 Shipped to Taiwan

Sold for $6,000 Shipped to the U.K.

Sold for $1,000 Shipped to Australia

Vintage Toys

Sterling

Watches

Jewelry

Tin Toys, Iconic Toys, & Cast Iron Banks

High-end Flatware & Tea Sets

Rolex, Patek Philippe, & Fine Antique

Gold, Silver, & Fine Costume

Based in Pittsboro, North Carolina, Trader Chris Consignments specializes in selling valuable collectibles, jewelry, watches, and estate silver on eBay. For consignment inquires, please contact us at (919) 448-7325 or visit www.traderchris.biz


GO SEE DO

Nevermore Horror and Gothic Film Festival F EB. 2 3 –2 5

This film festival, held at The Carolina Theatre, is sure to shock and horrify all fans of the genre. Founded in 1999, the event showcases films varying from narrative features to shorts across the spectrum of horror, science fiction, mystery, thriller and action adventure. If you’re looking to get scared, this is a weekend you won’t want to miss.

Alsarah & The Nubatones MARCH 1

Double refugee Alsarah ­­— an ethnomusicologist and singer – brings her velvety voice and socially conscious lyrics to Motorco Music Hall in a Duke Performances concert alongside The Nubatones, composed of percussionist Rami El-Aasser, bassist Mawuena Kodjovi, oud player Brandon Terzic and background vocalist Nahid.

Bull City Food and Beer Experience FE B . 25

LandED: My Hayti  |  Haiti  |  History F EB. 2 3 –2 4

Durham Independent Dance Artists presents Aya Shabu’s dance theater performance that tackles the the history, memory and myth of Durham’s storied African-American neighborhoods. Held at the Hayti Heritage Center, the performance is inspired by her experience giving performative walking tours in the neighborhood and historic sites of Black Durham and Hayti. 14

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Great Human Race M A R C H 24

A 5K run / walk and timed race hosted by The Triangle Nonprofit and Volunteer Leadership Center that benefits more than 100 nonprofit organizations, schools and faithbased groups. It has raised nearly $3 million since its start in 1996. This year’s location is the Durham Bulls Athletic Park.

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Sip on fine brews paired with tasty bites from restaurants around Durham. Tyler’s Restaurant & Taproom and Sam’s Quik Shop’s sixth annual food festival features chefs and breweries on all three floors of the Durham Performing Arts Center. Proceeds benefit Ellerbe Creek Watershed Association. PAGE 12: Science of Wine photo by Courtney Cawley. ABOVE, clockwise from top left: Alsarah photo courtesy of Duke Performances; Aya Shabu photo by Amanda Black; Great Human Race photo courtesy of The Triangle Nonprofit and Volunteer Leadership Center; Bull City Food and Beer Experience photo by Andrea Griffith Cash


fine gifts, custom stationery, furnishings & interior design SOUTHCH A PELHIL L .COM 107 M E A DOW MON T V I L L AGE C I RC L E CH A PE L H I L L , NORT H C A ROL I NA 919. 24 0 . 5 475


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Doggone Good Time

P HOTO G RA P H Y B Y A MA NDA MAC L A R EN

More than $112,000 was raised at the Animal Protection Society (APS) of Durham’s annual Tails at Twilight gala, the nonprofit’s biggest fundraiser of the year. Held at the JB Duke Hotel, guests enjoyed a three-course dinner and silent and live auctions, followed by a fun evening of dancing. Proceeds benefit programs and services that help abused and neglected pets throughout the community receive the care they need to find loving homes. 16

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1 Animal Protection Society of Durham’s Kelly Joy, Darlene Fiscus, Shelley Smith and Annika Hugosson. 2 Kari Linfors and Tim Deck. 3 Eric and Brandi Haase. 4 Jeff and Martha Traylor. 5 Phyllis Moore, Susan Teer and APS Executive Director Shafonda Davis.


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city pics

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Wonder Women P HOTO G RA P H Y B Y KR IST I PIECHNIK

Campus Club, a social organization of Duke University-affiliated women, hosted its 104th annual member luncheon at Parizade, which featured an empowering speech by Dr. Kimberly Jenkins. The more than 100 women in attendance enjoyed Kimberly’s inspiring stories of success – and failure. Kimberly recounted her work history with Steve Jobs and Bill Gates as well as her time as the program director of Duke in Silicon Valley and co-founder of SOAR, a Google-funded initiative to help Triangle women succeed in entrepreneurship. 18

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1 Allison Haltom, keynote speaker Dr. Kimberly Jenkins and Jean Cox. 2 Regina Kronmiller, Elizabeth Gillis, Stephanie Moore, Katina Rogers and Jodi Preminger. 3 Ed Addison,

Bill Carden, Karen Addison and Campus Club Centennial President Jean Carden. 4 New member Claudia Minoiu and Campus Club veteran Frances Rollins. 5 Past Campus Club presidents: Karen Childers, Anne Alexander, Ellen Adams, Pela Gereffi, Macey Colvin, Josefina Tiryakian, Joy Dunlap and Jo Ann Lutz. 6 Campus Club member Karen Palmer asks Kimberly a follow-up question.


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BHHSYSU.com ©2018 BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.® Equal Housing Opportunity.


city pics

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Celebrating 40 with Stories P HOTO G RA P H Y COURT ESY OF T HE HIL L CENT ER

The Hill Center paid homage to its four decades of impact on the community with The Monti and an evening of unscripted personal stories centered on the theme of courage. Along with The Monti founder, creator and emcee for the evening, Jeff Polish, the event featured stories told by educators and parents of Hill Center students, alumni and those dedicated to the field of learning differences and education, including Lee Hark, Sara Gray Horne, J.J. Johnson, Dawn McClendon and Dr. Ann Turnbull. 20

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1 Lee Hark. 2 George “Trig� Horton, Kirsten Kruhm, Rick Rosenberg and Alice Horton. 3 Dr. Ann Turnbull. 4 Linda Butler, Ele Ross and Jean Neville. 5 Leonard Norry and Hill Center Head of School Dr. Bryan Brander. 6 Brian Sickora, Kate Sickora, Michael Thomas, LoriAnn Thomas, Ellen Shannon and Dan Shannon. 7 Hill Center Executive Director Beth Anderson, Allison McClay, Dave McClay and Kathy McKee (seated).


“For three generations, Durham Tech has made a difference in our lives and our community. Someone will walk the halls of Durham Tech who raises the human condition.” -TED GRIFFIN, former chair of the Durham Tech Foundation Board of Directors

THE GRIFFIN FAMILY | Ted and Susan Griffin, longtime community advocates, knew the value of Durham Tech as board members at the College and through the legacy of Dr. William Kimball “Chief” Griffin, who served as a Trustee for many years. But when their children attended Durham Tech and later excelled at UNC-Chapel Hill, the Griffins saw the real impact of great education.

Great communities start with great community colleges. Give today. durhamtech.edu/donate


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Home Sweet Home

P HOTO G RA P H Y B Y HOL LY W EST

To close out 2017, Families Moving Forward held its Chefs for Change Dessert Gala at The Rickhouse, which included a tasting of local desserts, an auction, live entertainment and the unveiling of details for the 2018 Chefs for Change fundraising dinner series featuring distinguished chefs. This year’s chefs are Charlie Deal of Juju and Dos Perros in Durham and Jujube in Chapel Hill; Scott Howell of Nana’s, NanaTaco, NanaSteak and Bar Virgile; Phoebe Lawless of The Lakewood and Scratch; and Aaron Benjamin of Gocciolina. Proceeds totaled more than $10,000 for the night and $70,000 for the 2017 series. The funds raised benefit the nonprofit’s efforts to provide a temporary home to families who have children and are experiencing homelessness. 22

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1 Steve Griffin and Families Moving Forward Executive Director Ryan Fehrman. 2 Bridie McDonough, AmericaCorps Vista member at Families Moving Forward. 3 Families Moving Forward board members Tom Meyer and Tony Williams. 4 Jennings Brody of Parker & Otis, Chet Miller and Tiny; Larry Tilley of ACME Plumbing Co.; and Kelli Cotter of Toast and Dashi. 5 MaryAnne Gucciardi and Rick Waechter. 6 Durham School of the Arts seniors Surrell Brodie and Olivia Fernandez.


DURHAM. Now twice as accommodating. THE JB DUKE HOTEL HAS OPENED ITS DOOR S ADJACENT TO THE RENOWNED WASHINGTON DUKE INN & GOLF CLUB, JUST A SHORT WALK FROM MANY OF DUKE’S STORIED EDUCATION AND SPORTS VENUES.

Each of these two full-featured hotels feature assiduous service, indulgent accommodations and a distinctly individual style. Whether you seek a getaway weekend, executive retreat, corporate event or unforgettable wedding venue, look no farther than this diverse corner of the Piedmont’s Triangle area on Duke’s vibrant West Campus.

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1 Sarah Hill with designers Mark Johns from Bikakis & Johns; Marcel Roelofs; and Roc Majoral from Majoral. 2 Monica Lerina from Antonio Bernardo and Michael Hamilton. 3 Shelly Thompson and Tricia Weiner of Hamilton Hill. 4 Jim and Karen Dougherty.

THE MUSIC OF

MICHAEL JACKSON

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THUR, MAR 8 | 7:30PM

MEYMANDI CONCERT HALL, RALEIGH

A vocalist and a full band join the Symphony to jam on “ABC,” “Rock with You,” “Beat It,” “Thriller,” “The Way You Make Me Feel,” and many more! CONCERT SPONSOR

MEDIA PARTNER

Tickets selling fast—don’t miss out! ncsymphony.org | 919.733.2750

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Real Gems

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Hamilton Hill hosted a designer trunk show featuring both national and international jewelry designers Bikakis & Johns, Antonio Bernardo, Majoral and Marcel Roelofs with food, beverages and music by jazz pianist Andrew Berinson.


FEBRUARY 2: OPENING OF THE BLACK HISTORY: ARTISTS' PERSPECTIVES EXHIBIT FEBRUARY 11: DURHAM SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA WITH MAESTRO WILLIAM CURRY MAESTRO CURRY AND THE DURHAM SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA PRESENT A TRIBUTE TO THE MUSIC OF THE LEGENDARY ELLA FITZGERALD FEATURING VOCALIST YOLANDA RABUN, AND THE POETRY OF LANGSTON HUGHES WITH POET DASAN AHANU. FEBRUARY 15-17: 2018 HERITAGE FILM FESTIVAL CURATED BY LANA GARLAND SHOWCASES DIVERSE WORKS OF, BY AND ABOUT PEOPLE OF AFRICAN DESCENT THROUGH SHORT AND FULL-LENGTH FILMS, SUPPORTING THE TALENTS PRIMARILY OF SOUTHERN FILMMAKERS. MARCH 10: RALEIGH LITTLE THEATRE PRODUCTION WITH MIKE WILEY MARCH 24: WIMMIN@WORK PERFORMING ARTS CELEBRATION OF WOMEN'S HISTORY APRIL 20: JAMBALAYA SOUL SPOKEN WORD/POETRY SLAM PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBIT MAY (TBD) BENEFIT CONCERT JUNE: ROBOTICS STEAM CAMP

FOR CULTURAL ARTS AND ARTS EDUCATION

SEPTEMBER 7-9: BLUES AND ROOTS FESTIVAL

HAYTI.ORG

CELEBRATING THE MUSIC AND EMBRACING THE HERITAGE OF BLUES, GOSPEL AND JAZZ, KICKING OFF WITH A NATIONAL TOURING GROUP OF LEGENDARY ARTISTS

804 FAYETTEVILLE ST., DURHAM, NC 27701 919.683.1709 INFO@HAYTI.ORG

DECEMBER 26: KWANZAA CELEBRATION - AN ANNUAL CULTURAL COMMUNITY EVENT

Celebrating theST., Year of the 804 FAYETTEVILLE DURHAM, NCBlues! 27701 2017 HIGHLIGHTS: 919.683.1709 INFO@HAYTI.ORG

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DECEMBER 9 (TENT.): THE NC JAZZ ENSEMBLE HOLIDAY CONCERT

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JANUARY: NCCU ARTS CELEBRATION OF DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. FEBRUARY: HERITAGE FILM FESTIVAL APRIL: KIM ARRINGTON CONCERT MAY: THE DURHAM SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA CELEBRATES NINA SIMONE SEPTEMBER: BULL DURHAM BLUES FESTIVAL DECEMBER: NC JAZZ ENSEMBLE HOLIDAY CONCERT; KWANZAA CELEBRATION

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in their words

THE AUTHO R IS A DUK E P RO F E SSO R OF ME DICINE A ND IMMUN OLOGY WH O HAS LIVE D IN D URH A M S IN CE THE L AT E ’ 7 0 S .

Our Town and Gown Relations, Pt. 1 B Y DAV I D S . P I S ET S KY, M.D., PH.D.

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E

VER SINCE THE FIRST STUDENT traveled to learn from an eminent scholar, the relationship between universities and surrounding municipalities has been a source of tension that goes under the umbrella term “town-gown relationships.” In this iconic dyad, the gown part dates from medieval times when scholars and students wore gowns; apparently, way back then, academics had minor clerical status and donned outfits similar to those of the clergy. Regardless of the academic roots, in olden times, town-gown relations could turn ugly. The St. Scholastica Day riot in 1355 started with a dispute by students in a tavern in Oxford, England, and led to violent clashes that left almost 100 dead. Thankfully, things aren’t that bad anymore, but the source of town-gown friction should come as no surprise. The make-up of a university often – always? – diverges from that of the community. At


in their words

elite institutions like Duke, students frequently come from wealth while the town in which the school is situated is often much poorer. But we’re talking perceptions here, and they are hard to shake. In fact, the majority of Duke students receive some form of financial aid to attend the school, and, while many students come from middle-class and upper-middleclass backgrounds, the reputation of Duke as a school for “rich kids” is not completely erased. Many people might think the townspeople employed at the undergraduate campus work in service jobs. Actually, most of the Durham residents employed at Duke work in the hospital, clinics and medical school. They’re nurses, technicians and billing clerks. For their part, the faculty usually represents a different demographic from the town, with those arts and sciences ivory tower intellectuals espousing, but not necessarily living, liberal ideas. Wondering about town-gown issues in Durham, I was dismayed to discover that, according to The Princeton Review, Duke has the 11th worst town-gown relationship in the United States. The decadeold, inaccurate and brief write-up characterizes Durham as “a pretty dangerous place” and noted that Durham “has a few quirky streets and squares,” (true) recommending that students journey to Raleigh and Chapel Hill for entertainment (wrong). In fact, Durham has become the mecca for students in the Triangle looking for the best in entertainment, and obviously Duke students spend a lot of time in Durham as the crowds and parking shortages downtown demonstrate. Talk about out of date. I know that Durham has its issues with Duke. I would, too, if I lived adjacent to an off-campus student house and was battered by sonic detonations from a party during the wee hours of the night. Certainly, the lacrosse episode was a great misfortune – a perfect storm of misperception, misinformation and misattribution – causing lots of bad press, self-reflection and soul searching. Fortunately, that dismal period is behind us, and Duke and Durham have entered a new and better period, in no small part because of the cooperation between the university and city leaders. In Durham, town and gown are not two separate entities and I, like thousands of other Durhamites, am both town and gown. Duke has bypassed Food Lion as the second largest private employer in the state of North Carolina (Walmart is No. 1) and has almost 40,000 employees. It is to Duke’s advantage to have Durham be a fine place to live just as it is to Durham’s advantage to have Duke be a fine place to work. The leaders of both Duke and Durham have been very wise and have worked well to spur the city’s recent renaissance. On the Duke side, presidents Terry Sanford, Keith Brodie, Nannerl Keohane and Richard

Town-gown relations [can] turn ugly. The St. Scholastica Day riot in 1355 started with a dispute by students in a tavern in Oxford, England, and led to violent clashes that left almost 100 dead. Brodhead have all been Durham boosters. Brodhead said that “Duke and Durham chose each other” and “had destinies that were entwined.” On the city side, Bill Bell, now retired as mayor after serving six terms since 2001, has been an astute and visionary civic leader. A special shout out to Mayor Bell and all the others who were key to the creation of such civic assets as the Durham Performing Arts Center and exciting innovations such as American Underground at American Tobacco Campus. Duke, too, was supportive of all those endeavors. As this account indicates, town-gown relations in Durham have changed and are changing. In my next column, I will share my reflections as both a Dukie and a Durhamite.

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in their words

CARL W. K E NNE Y II WAS N AME D T H E B E ST S E RIOUS CO LUMNIST OF 2 0 1 1 B Y T H E N ORTH CA RO L INA P RE S S AS S O C IAT IO N. HE IS THE CO P RODUCE R O F “ G O D OF THE OPP RE SSE D,” AN UP COMING DOCUME NTA RY F IL M ON BLACK L IB E RAT IO N THE OLOGY A ND IS T H E AUTHOR O F “ P RE AC H A’ MAN “ AN D T H E SE QUE L

The Draw of Durham

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LE D CON G RE G AT IO NS IN MIS S OURI A ND N ORTH CA RO L INA .

embers of the City Council should vote to approve large billboards in areas where visitors enter the city. They should be large enough to catch the attention of people intent on a short stay. “Warning,” should appear in bold letters. “Enter Durham at your own risk. Once you enter, you will not be able to leave.” Durham is America’s Bermuda Triangle. A sign would have helped me when I arrived in 1988 to attend graduate school at Duke. My plan was to graduate from the divinity school and then apply for schools offering a Ph.D. in theology. I was prepared to move to Boston, New Jersey, Chicago or other places willing to give me a shot. I had an open mind. I repeat: Warning. Don’t come if you have plans not to stay.

B Y CA RL W. K E NNEY II

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“BACK S LID E .” H E H A S

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in their words

I first learned about Durham from an article written by W. E. B. Du Bois. “There is in this small city a group of 5,000 or more colored people, whose social and economic development is perhaps more striking than that of any similar group in the nation,” Du Bois wrote in “The Upbuilding of Black Durham,” published in 1912. I read about the nonviolent protest at the Royal Ice Cream Parlor on June 23, 1957. Douglas E. Moore, pastor at the Asbury Temple United Methodist Church, led the sit-in that sparked future protests including the Greensboro sit-ins. Moore, who studied theology with Martin Luther King Jr. at Boston University, wrote a letter to King on October 3, 1956, proposing that nonviolence could be used as part of a national movement. Durham shaped the strategy of the Civil Rights movement. I read a story about Sam Cooke in Rolling Stone magazine. After a concert in Durham in 1963, Cooke spoke with demonstrators at a sit-in. He returned to the bus where he wrote the lyrics to the song, “A Change Is Gonna Come.” Durham inspired the lyrics for one of America’s most recognizable songs. I wanted to immerse my children in a culture of unlimited possibilities. I wanted my daughters to walk on the ground at North Carolina Central University where Zora Neale Hurston taught what inspired her to write “Their Eyes Were Watching God.” I wanted my three children to witness the brilliance of Dr. John Hope Franklin and reap the benefits of living in a city with no glass ceilings and room to embrace unlimited potential. No one told me about the rest. It takes more than a causal reading of comments from a magazine top 10 list to understand why Durham is a place no one wants to leave. How can you leave when few places offer the combination of comforts that sets Durham apart from other cities? No one told me about Durham’s thirst for diversity. In Durham, we not only celebrate the blending of races and cultures, it’s the foundation of our being. It’s like what the Gospels are to the Church and what an engine is to a car. It’s what gives us life and makes us move. Other places seem bland when compared to the variety of tastes and sounds in Durham. Sometimes Durham sounds like jazz. Sometimes it moves like salsa. Sometimes it’s classical music directed by a black conductor. In Durham, people move back and forth among cultures and perspectives. We learn from one another in rooms where we listen and grow together. I moved to Durham because of the history of the black community. I wanted more for my children. I stayed because of the lessons I learned

We not only celebrate the blending of races and cultures, it’s the foundation of our being. It’s like what the Gospels are to the Church and what an engine is to a car. It’s what gives us life and makes us move. Other places seem bland when compared to the variety of tastes and sounds in Durham. from my friends. I stayed because of the food, the music, the art and locally owned businesses with customers who think like me. I stayed because of the magic that makes it hard to leave. Now I’m stuck. It happened long before the boom downtown and the brewing of Durham’s foodie reputation. Durham has always been a place that’s hard to leave. Ask your friends. When did they know they were stuck in America’s Bermuda Triangle?

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noted.

Send us your news! WHAT WE’VE HE ARD AROUND TOWN …

From births to awards to new biz and more – Email noted@durhammag.com

WHAT AN HONOR

work “From Slavery to Freedom,” which

Durham’s Sylvan Esso was nominated for a

Vickers Avenue, were added to the National

died in 2009 at the age of 94, also helped NAACP

for “What Now.” 9th Wonder, a local hip-hop

in 1901 as homes for tobacco factory workers,

the case that led to the Supreme Court’s Brown v.

The Franklin and Brame houses, located on

chronicled African-American history. Franklin, who

Register of Historic Places. Both constructed

lawyers, including Thurgood Marshall, develop

they were removed from their original spots on

Board of Education decision.

Grammy for Best Dance/Electronic Album

producer and scholar, helped produce Kendrick Lamar’s “DAMN.”, which was nominated for Best Rap Album and Album of Year and was named

Yancey Street in the 1960s during construction

best album of 2017 by Rolling Stone.

relocated to the Morehead Hill Historic District.

Durham was named one of “5 Cities That Are

Washington Duke Inn & Golf Club was named

city’s pay equity and plethora of job opportunities

of the Durham Freeway. In 2016, they were

Great for Women” by Equities.com thanks to our

among the winners of Smart Meetings magazine’s

in health care, education and technology.

excellence in service and amenities at meeting

AND THE AWARD GOES TO …

2017 Platinum Choice Award, which celebrates

Lincoln Community Health Center was awarded

hotels and resorts in North America. Meanwhile, its sister property, JB Duke Hotel, was named

one of ConventionSouth magazine’s 2018 Top

Congressman G. K. Butterfield paid tribute to

New or Renovated Meeting Site Award recipients.

former Durham mayor Bill Bell – who recently

Fullsteam Brewery is now a certified Stormwater

16 as mayor -– on the floor of the U.S. House of

Stormwater and GIS Services Division to

photograph was taken by Durham Magazine’s

and institute practices that protect local creeks,

Durham’s new mayor, Steve Schewel.

educate staff about proper spill prevention and

The Durham Performing Arts Center was

drains around the brewery.

in America by Pollstar, Billboard Magazine and

Three Durhamites were named “Southerners

211 events during the 2017 calendar year and

retired after 45 years of public service, including

STAR business, a designation given by the city’s

Representatives in early December. The featured

businesses that complete a year-long program

Briana Brough. The congressman also welcomed

rivers and lakes. Fullsteam has taken steps to

cleanup practices and frequently cleans storm

a $15,000 grant to purchase a new retinal camera for patients, which will be used in the diagnosis and treatment of diabetes. The grant was

received from the center’s foundation by officials pictured below: Dr. Howard Eisenson, CMO;

Philip Harewood, CEO; Claretta Foye, COO; and Carolyn E. Henderson, board chair.

ranked among the top five theaters of its size

Venues Today. DPAC hosted 462,055 guests at

of the Year 2017” by Southern Living. Merge

had 113 events sell out – a record number.

McCaughan were recognized for the impact of

North Carolina Central University’s Department

community stewardship, while Leigh-Kathryn

Eric Saliim is among 10 professors designated

business, Bee Downtown, has on the local

revises teaching practices and takes risks to

Records founders Laura Ballance and Mac

their business on the music industry and their

of Biological and Biomedical Sciences Instructor

The center was also awarded a three-year,

Bonner was noted for the positive impact her

as a Teaching Innovator – one who constantly

Shield of North Carolina for a project that will

honeybee population.

develop innovative learning environments that

A portion of Interstate 85 was renamed John

The Chronicle of Higher Education. He is the only

Duke University and North Carolina Central

university (HBCU) to be named for the honor.

develop special connections with students – by

Hope Franklin Highway in honor of the late

professor from a historically black college and

University professor and author of the seminal

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$467,000 grant from Blue Cross and Blue

study how social determinants of health affect

patients treated in the community health center environment. Reinvestment Partners and The Duke Center for Research on Personalized Health Care will assist on the project.

Duke University ranked No. 5 on Kiplinger’s

recently released 2018 Best College Values list.


noted

Vision Plan. His selection follows a review of 107 artist applications from across the United States. Olalekan, known as “Lek,” is a Nigerian-born

artist, architect and designer from Brooklyn, New York. Installation is expected to be complete by May or June.

The Durham Tech Foundation received $16,000 Durham Technical Community College student Mohamed Karoui was part of a team that

won first place at the 2017 Robotics: Science

and Systems Conference at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

WTVD ABC 11’s Tim Pulliam was named the North Carolina/

South Carolina TV News Reporter of the Year by the Associated Press

and the Radio Television

Digital News Association in a ceremony that took place in November at the Charlotte Motor

Speedway. A Person County native, Tim and his family now call the Bull City home.

Durham Arts Council, the North Carolina

Arts Council, City of Durham and the SmART Resource Team selected Olalekan Jeyifous as

the artist to create the monumental Art Wrap for the Corcoran Street Garage, which is the first major public art work of the Durham SmART

to provide scholarships for students of Mexican heritage by the General Consulate of Mexico in Raleigh. The grant will fund scholarships for the 2018 and 2019 academic terms.

Bikeshare programs LimeBike, Spin and Ofo

are up and spinning. Hundreds of dockless bikes are available for public use throughout the city.

BUSINESS BRIEFS

Ninth Street staple Francesca’s Dessert Caffe closed after 30 years in business. Owner Jalil Belmouloud cited rising rent prices in the neighborhood.

Most users pay and unlock the bikes using a

smartphone app or credit card, but access cards are also available at City Hall.

HeathLeaf, a new T-shirt and clothing business

created by Durham native Alex Heath, launched

Show your Durham

last fall and sells locally inspired designs.

pride with these

foam Bull City Hands,

Lennar struck a deal to buy CalAtlantic

available at

for $5.7 billion. The combined company

bullcityhands.com.

will be the largest home builder in

the nation and one of the top three home

USA Track & Field, the national

governing body for the sports of track and field, cross country running, road running

builders in 24 of the top 30 U.S. markets.

IFB Solutions – a nonprofit organization aimed

and racewalking, is now utilizing Durham-

based Teamworks’ mobile collaboration and

communication software. Its mobile technologies streamline communication between staff,

athletes and coaches, and is already used by USA

Baseball and other athletic institutions such as the NCAA and United Soccer League.

at providing employment, training and services for people with low vision – opened a new

Community Low Vision Center across from the

Duke Eye Center. The primary goal of the center

is to help people with all levels of low vision retain or regain independence in their daily lives.

NEW DEVELOPMENTS

RTP-based

communications and commerce

company Bell and Howell has been

selected by robotics

company Savioke to provide installation,

maintenance and other advanced services for it’s hospitality robots,

Relay. Relay is able to deliver items to hotel

guests autonomously.

The former Macy’s building at Northgate Mall has been purchased by Durham Realty Inc.

and will soon house Duke University medical

clinics and administrative offices. The two-story, 183,840-square-foot building is projected to

be used by more than 1,000 patients, staff and doctors each day.

Local real estate development firm East West

Partners is building new luxury condominiums

in the Brightleaf District. Named The Bartlett,

the complex will feature 34 residences – ranging in size from 900 to 2,200 square feet with prices from the $300,000s to $1 million – and 6,000

square feet of retail in a seven-story building. It is expected to open in the summer of 2019. „

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noted

Hans Luther has

been named general

manager of Unscripted Durham. He has 15

years of experience,

most recently having served as hotel task

force consultant, strategy & operations for Ian

Schrager’s Public Hotel in New York City, and was previously business planning manager for The

PHOTO BY CARA GALATI

Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas.

The Chesterfield held a ribbon-cutting

Tommy T. McNeill,

ceremony and gave tours of its recently

business development

redesigned building in early December. Located

manager at Mid-South

in the Brightleaf District, the former cigarette

Medical, was appointed

manufacturing factory is now reimagined, slated

to the board of directors

to become a new center for Durham’s life science

for the Triangle

and technology ecosystem.

Healthcare Executives’

Forum of North Carolina.

GIVING BACK

Dentists Carlos Medina, Silvia Umana and

Marvin Umana (pictured above) are studying dental lab technology at Durham Tech after

seeing a lack of qualified technicians – those responsible for designing and creating

prostheses like dentures – in their home country of Honduras. After graduating in May 2019, the

trio plans to open up a practice there that is both a clinic and dental lab.

Startup community American Underground’s former chief strategist Adam Klein is now

director of strategy for Capitol Broadcasting

Company’s real estate holdings in Durham and Rocky Mount.

Doug Speight, founder of equipment-leasing Development group 4 Line LLC unveiled its newconstruction townhome development located at the corner of Jackson and Gordon streets. It will be a mixed-use complex with live-work

startup Cathedral Leasing and the 2016

CODE2040 entrepreneur-in-residence, is now the executive director of American Underground.

units meant to foster entrepreneurship, artistry

United Way of the Greater Triangle announced

residential units will range from 1,300 to 2,400

members. Jes Averhart and Michael Botzis are

early spring.

Emily Page and Olivia Morris are the new staff

and small business. The 62 three- and four-story square feet and are slated to break ground in

two new board members and three new staff

the new board members, and Caren Howley, members.

Duke University’s 70,000-square-foot

Page, former chairman

the arts a prominent new home in the center of

of the Durham

campus. Named after Duke alumnus David M.

County Board of

Rubenstein, who funded the building with a $25

Commissioners, was

million gift, “The Ruby” houses two academic

appointed to serve Durham Technical

programs – dance and arts of the moving image – and is a venue for public arts programs and student rehearsals and events.

Rhonda Johnson has joined StaffMasters/

Hire Dynamics as its account manager for the Durham/RTP area. The company is expanding into Raleigh in early 2019. 32

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Community College’s Board of Trustees.

MILESTONES

ON THE MOVE

National Pawn celebrated its 30th anniversary

last November. Started in Durham, the business now has 15 locations in eight North Carolina counties.

| F e b r ua ry/ M a r c h 2 0 1 8

celebrated Giving Tuesday by making

approximately 300 meals, 50 snacks and 150

hygiene kits. This is the third year the school has undertaken the project, which benefits Urban Ministries of Durham.

Rev. Michael Delano

Rubenstein Arts Center is now open, giving

Students at Immaculata Catholic School

National Pawn donated more than 100 musical instruments and $2,000 for instrument upkeep

to Carrington Middle School. This donation is

part of National Pawn’s ongoing commitment to support music programs in each county where stores are located, and this marks the seventh year in which National Pawn has donated

instruments to schools in North Carolina. „


A PRESENTATION OF

magazine

&

The Triangle’s Annual Food & Drink Festival! April 18–22, 2018

Buy tickets @ tastetheevent.com


noted

BOOKIN’ IT

Laurel Oaks Apartments became the first U.S.

Housing and Urban Development ConnectHome

Duke economics

community in Durham in December. The

professor Lori

program provides residents with free Google

Leachman’s

Fiber internet access, ongoing digital literacy

memoir, “The King

training by the Kramden Institute and Google

of Halloween &

Fiber, and refurbished computers from the

Miss Firecracker

Institute and Triangle Ecycling. ConnectHome is

Queen: A Daughter’s

a public-private partnership aimed at narrowing

Tale of Family and

the digital divide for families with school-age Habitat for Humanity of Durham was chosen

Football,” chronicles

children who live in HUD-assisted housing.

as a 2017 Neighborhood Builder by Bank of

her childhood in the

South, her family’s relationship with football

America in recognition of its work to increase

and her father’s struggle with chronic traumatic

access to affordable housing. The bank provided

encephalopathy, known as CTE. Lori is the

$200,000, which Habitat plans to use to build

daughter of the late Lamar Leachman, a football

a small homes village of between six and 10

player and coach most well-known as a defensive

500- to 800-square-foot residences, the first of

line coach for the Giants in their victory at Super

its kind in Durham. The partnership includes

Bowl XXI.

Bank of America, Habitat home buyers, the City

of Durham and Durham Technical Community

Barnes & Noble – Southpoint customers

College.

purchased 3,413 new books for young children in Durham County during the Barnes & Noble

VISIT. EAT. REPEAT.

27 young women at its 63rd Debutante Cotillion and Christmas Ball in December at the Durham

The District at 410 @ The Art Institute

Convention Center, including Caroline

Maybelle’s Biscuits and Barbecue

up to the ball, the young ladies – freshmen

Rochelle, pictured below with her family. Leading

WXYZ Bar @ Aloft Hotel

college students from Durham and Chapel

The Bullpen

participated in two service projects – a summer

Hill – were mentored by Society members and park clean up at Durham Central Park and

Tyler’s Taproom

assembling hygiene kits for Urban Ministries of

Mellow Mushroom

Durham at St. Philip’s Episcopal Church.

Moe’s Southwest Grill

Holiday Book Drive that ran from November 1-December 31. The books, along with an

additional 250 books donated through other sources, benefit Durham’s Partnership for

Children. This was the 12th year the Partnership has teamed up with Barnes & Noble to collect books for young children who might not

otherwise have access to reading materials. Author Edward Gold’s

newest book, “You Can Be a Writer!,” is out

now. Edward uses his

personal experiences to

Cuban Revolution

offer practical advice on

Tobacco Road

obstacles that can help

overcoming everyday

Nana Steak

American Tobacco

Only Burger Saladelia Basan AmericanTobaccoCampus.com

34

The Durham Debutante Ball Society presented

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F e b r ua ry/ M a r c h 2 0 1 8

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They Eat

Where!!?? Check out where our top chefs nosh

ALSO IN THIS ISSUE 23 The School of the Arts, 4 Mini Profiles 32 Q&A With John Hope Franklin 78 The Nasher Goes to Spain 86 Complete Events Calendar

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JILL HUDGINS tells us what it’s like to come home to train for the 2012 Olympic marathon.

School Choice

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Private, Charter, Boarding & Magnet Schools

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What to Look For & How Much to Spend

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this month, Hillside High stepped into the future. Four students who were there tell us how integration shaped them and transformed our city.

5 businesses make environmentalism pay off

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February/March 2010

Forty years ago

Like Money

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As Told to Matt Dees

28 GREEN,

A Special 44-page Section: Dining, Entertainment, Living & Shopping Page 31

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Hillside

Plus

Actor Colin Firth wasn’t expecting to fall in love, actually, with Durham, but anything can happen at the movies. By Dana Lange

Our

11/14/08 1:11:56 PM

Integrating

Main

on

THE NEXT WAVE Heather Garrett, owner of West Main Street’s Heather Garrett Interior Design, is one of the new retailers betting on our downtown’s renaissance.

ethnic markets share their holiday recipes Page 28

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MUS

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YEARS

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JUST CHILL Kelli and Billy Cotter of Toast Paninoteca relax in their Northgate Park backyard.

Pierce Freelon is taking the musical gifts he got from his jazz-legend mother, Nnenna, in a new direction

making

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to love your summer 50 ways

These faithful friends believe differently but act together

tracks

Downtown,

Bishop Elroy Lewis Fisher Memorial United Holy Church

By Dana Lange | Page 30

Rev. Joe Harvard First Presbyterian Church Rabbi John Friedman Judea Reform Congregation

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Jacqueline and Richard

Gwen

Mathews

of Blue

Coffee

Savoring a red snapper ceviche is one sure-fire way to make the most of a midsummer eve SEE PAGE 31 FOR 49 MORE GREAT IDEAS

Morgan of Morgan Imports

Cafe

Gary and

Leslie Mason

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*

The Palace International and An All-Star Cast

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DURHAM MAGAZINE

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BRANFORD

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LIFE AFTER

THE INDY Ex-Publisher, Next Mayor? Page 20

MAGNOLIA GRILL’S GONE.

Eh,We’re Good.

FAMILY RULES 5 local businesses that have thrived for generations Page 22

SEE PAGE 14

DURHAM’S OLDEST FAMILY-OWNED RESTAURANT Tommy Bullock, of Bullock’s Bar-B-Cue, with granddaughter Emily and daughter Laura.

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covering durham

EATING GREEK AT BLEU OLIVE 8 LIVING BUSY IN FOREST HILLS 28 FASHION: COLOR YOUR CLOSET 42 A P R I L 2 0 13 w w w. d u r h a m m a g . c o m

5TH ANNIVERSARY COLLECTOR’S EDITION

durhamdurham 4th Annual Foodie Issue

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C O M P L I M E N TA R Y

C O M P L I M E N TA R Y

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magazine

COMPLIMENTARY

ishesur d to ad d to yo IBucket list Page 25

THE 2nd ANNUAL

K

THE REAL

ARCHITECTURE • CARS • INTERIOR DESIGN • JEWELRY

DAVID CUTCLIFFE: A COACH’S LIFE 44 THE GOODMONS AT HOME 52 HEY THERE, MR. DURHAM 22 PRIVATE SCHOOLS DIRECTORY 70

– Mickie Krzyzewski, 33-year resident

TIPS FOR HOSTING A HOLIDAY SOIREE 40 BRIDAL TRENDS 82 DIAGNOSED BUT NOT DEFEATED: MEET THREE SURVIVORS 50 DECEMBER/JANUARY 2014 durhammag.com

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2013 durhammag.com

ISSUE 35

THE TASTEMAKER Chef and businesswoman Amy Tornquist of Watts Grocery represents Durham’s culinary past, present and future. Learn more about her and 34 of her remarkable counterparts starting on page 21.

LLY! LOCA SHOP

RIGHT

SINFUL

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2014 durhammag.com

C O M P L I M E N TA R Y

THE

words with friends

Simply the best. Find out our readers’ picks for the coolest ways to eat out, rock out, unwind, shop ’til you drop and oh so much more.

PICTURE PERFECT

PAGE 26

Jeff Polish has convinced hundreds to bare their souls on stage at The Monti. You could be next.

SPRINGSTEEN’S BULL CITY JAM SESSION 15 HEAD TO HILLSBOROUGH 20 RETIREMENT DIRECTORY 76 PHOTOS FROM TASTE – THE EVENT 14 JUNE/JULY 2014 durhammag.com

COMPLIMENTARY

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magaz in e COMPLIMENTARY

DOM FLEMONS’ PLAYLIST 14 | AN INTERIOR DESIGNER’S AWESOME LOFT 58 HOUNDS ON THE HUNT 24 | THANKSGIVING RECIPES FROM BILLY COTTER & KELLY ALEXANDER 62 OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2014

COMPLIMENTARY

PLAN YOUR SUMMER FUN 22 THE DOWNTOWN DWELLERS ARE COMING 28 TOP DENTISTS 52 MOTHER’S DAY MAKEOVERS 69

COMPLIMENTARY

magaz in e

The 7th Annual

HOME

& GARDEN

ISSUE

A HOPE VALLEY TRANSFORMATION The Anderson family – including Mary Eileen and Goldendoodle Harry – bought their home in 2012, intending to make a few minor upgrades. But then they started “having fun” with the idea of a completely new space. Today, the floors and pipes are just about all that remains of their original purchase. Read more starting on page 34.

SYLVAN ESSO’S MUSICAL INFLUENCES 12 WEDDING PLANNING 89 HEALTH CARE HEROES 48 BEST LAWYERS 69

DECEMBER/JANUARY 2015

durhammag.com

Holiday issue The

When Allison Lopatkin and Greg Wood first met Tiki at Carolina Poodle Rescue, the Labradoodle was hairless with ticks and fleas. “We took her in and haven’t looked back,” Allison says. “She is perfect.”

OUR READERS’ FAVORITES

BEST DUR O F HAM

47

The Second Annual Women’s Issue

Remarkable Women

Nonprofit champions, musicians, the Durham Divas, a Duke doctor & many more!

Page 25

PAGE 34

Plus Cynthia Hill, Peabody Winner for A Chef’s Life And 8 Women Making Durham Sweeter

MERRY AND BRIGHT Margaret Sartor and Alex Harris with their Border Collie, Bea, outside of the tobacco-curing barn turned creative work space in their backyard off Old Erwin Road.

CANINE CANDIDS

! Including

paws for a moment to check out our fetching photos from the bulls’ bark in the park

ee Culture Our Coff Page 44 Wine 101 22 Page

of Drinks’s A Round of Durham with 6 Bart enders Best Page 26 wers’ Homebre Local FavoritePage 38 Beers

PAGE 30

A Cozy Writer’s Studio

Page 36

COACH K’S MOTHER’S DAY TRIBUTE 62 A DRESS FOR SUCCESS MAKEOVER 28 TOP DENTISTS 69 PITTSBORO’S NEWEST ATTRACTIONS 82 POPUP CHORUS 22

HISS GOLDEN MESSENGER 26 YOUR GUIDE TO DUKE GARDENS 49 GET OUTSIDE! 66 BAR VIRGILE 90

SONGSTRESS RHIANNON GIDDENS 28 AN ENO RIVER RETREAT 44 RETIREMENT GUIDE 54 KINSTON ON THE RISE 64 NEW FOR FOODIES: BURGER BACH & COUNTING HOUSE 68 AUGUST 2015 durhammag.com

JUNE/JULY 2015 durhammag.com

APRIL 2015 durhammag.com

MAY 2015 durhammag.com

MEETS DURHAM

3

40

|

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|

Hot New Asian Restaurants Dashi, Basan & Juju Page 78

f e b r ua ry/ m a r c h 2 0 1 8

THE

̌

EAST

Dashi’s Miso Ramen Bowl

I’m in the joint business.”

MAY 2014 durhammag.com

DIAMOND IN THE RUFF

Maya Freelon Asante and her mother, Nnenna Freelon. Page 46

THE JOINT IS JUMPIN’ Owner Ricky Moore says about his Saltbox Seafood on North Mangum Street: “I retired from the restaurant business.

durhammag.com

magazine

SEPTEMBER 2014 durhammag.com

NEW RESTAURANTS

| Sake Bomb Mateo | Pizzeria Toro x Seafood Monuts Donuts | Saltbo & Sweet Shop Rose's Meat Market Page 50

MADE IN DURHAM Rob Cotter’s solar/humanpowered ELF, a zero-emission vehicle that could revolutionize transportation, was born and bred right here. See more examples of Bull City ingenuity starting on page 34.

THE JACKSON 7

A meal out at Pop’s is quite the event for Joe and Kisa Jackson, who happily have their hands full with five young sons – Joseph, 6 (on Mom’s lap); Joshua, 5 (far right); and triplets Gabriel, Noah and Elias, 2. Read about this family and two other unique Durham broods starting on page 28.

PAGE 62

6HOTTEST

magaz in e

3RD A N N U A L

ISSUE

IBest of Durham awards Jessica Arden Blakely, captured here behind Motorco during a rare moment in front of the camera, was voted Best Event Photographer by thousands of our readers. She tells us where to take the best snapshots in Durham on page 36.

COMPLIMENTARY

DESIGN

the 2013

OF our

durhamdurham APRIL 2014 durhammag.com

Page 30

C O M P L I M E N TA R Y

including a doughnut that’s worth standing in line for. Page 36

HOW THEY LIVE: MODERN AND MODULAR 54 THE ART OF COOL JAZZ FESTIVAL 28 SPRING FASHION + DOWNTOWN’S MURALS 48

C O M P L I M E N TA R Y

C O M P L I M E N TA R Y

and the

Meet Extraordinary Women

SUMMER CAMP GUIDE 38 GET YOUR CHOCOLATE FIX 58 5 PIVOTAL MOMENTS IN OUR BLACK HISTORY 10

AY OTLGID HIF UIDE G

the

WOMEN S

‘This is us in our community, in our place.This is Durham.’

page 20

elegant the messy DOWN

THE ,

-VILLE

HERE COMES THE SUN The late architect Jon Condoret designed dozens of sun-drenched homes in the Durham area. Here, the brilliantly lit living room of Wendy Robineau and Don Beskind. Page 58.

SEPTEMBER 2013 www.durhammag.com

magaz in e

COMPLIMENTARY

COLLEGE-BOUND Mike and Mickie with young scholars at the Emily K Center

ISSUE

CREATIVE TYPES: JAZZ, FASHION & THE BULLS’ MAIN MAN 30 FALL ACCESSORIES 38 SECRETS OF THE HAYTI HERITAGE CENTER 24

3rndnual A

WOMEN’S

ISSUE 12

REMARKABLE STORIES

PAGE 35

PURE AMBITION At 25, Anjana Mohanty is a VP at American Underground tech company Shoeboxed, having climbed the ranks from marketing intern to her current position in less than three years. (She also practices classical Indian dance in what little spare time she has.) Read her story on page 44.

TAKES US OUT TO THE

BULLS GAME Page 36

LUCKY STRIKE Left-handed pitcher Everett Teaford, new to the Bulls roster this season.

Our Annual Gift Guide Page 29

Save the Date: Festive Upcoming Events Page 20

Ira David Wood III of A Christmas Carol at DPAC Page 14


covering durham

NIDO: CO-WORKING, PLUS CHILDCARE 10 WHAT’S NEXT FOR OUR LGBTQ COMMUNITY 90 BLUEBIRD MEADOWS: A FAMILY FARM 66 PETS WITH A PURPOSE: DUKE’S ANIMAL THERAPY 26

WUNC’S PHOEBE JUDGE 24 DOWNTOWN LIVING 26 THANKSGIVING, PIZZERIA TORO STYLE 60 BEST LAWYERS 70

HOW THEY LIVE EXPERT ORGANIZER 62 LUCIA WILD BOAR, ITALIAN STYLE 78 BRIDAL TRENDS HASHTAGS TO HAIRDOS 88

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2015 durhammag.com

the

• New Heights at The Durham Hotel • The Franchising of Rise • Food Trucks Going Off-Road • & Much More!

PAGE 32

big picture

RAISE THE ROOF Since opening on August 4, The Roof at The Durham has hosted private parties – like the 20th anniversary kickoff for the N.C. Gay & Lesbian Film Festival – and seen a waitlist as Durhamites have clamored to catch the view, sip a cocktail and grab a bite. (Try the beef tartare!)

The talent behind downtown’s Civil Rights History Mural Page 48

ENTREPRENEURIAL

Page 40

KEEPING HER COOL

Town& Country

DURHAM IS RANKED AS ONE OF THE TOP U.S. CITIES FOR BLACK ENTREPRENEURS, MILLENNIAL ENTREPRENEURS AND CREATIVE PEOPLE IN GENERAL.

Get ready, Bull City: Cicely Mitchell is gearing up for the third – and most hotly anticipated – Art of Cool Festival yet, coming this May.

MEET 6 REASONS WHY. PAGE 42

INCLUDING!

Chris Rosati’s next BIGG idea

FALL ARTS PREVIEW 30 | DISHING WITH MOTHERS & SONS CHEF JOSH DECAROLIS 96 THE BUZZ ON BEE DOWNTOWN 32 | MODERN OASIS IN SOUTH DURHAM 76

JUNE/JULY 2016 durhammag.com

HUB

of our health care heroes, compassionate souls who go the extra mile

WHAT A GEM! Ruby Byrd infuses her care at Duke HomeCare & Hospice with love and connection — and, of course, her brilliant million-dollar smile.

GIFTS FOR DAD 41 THE VOICE OF THE DURHAM BULLS 44 ROOM TO GROW IN FOREST HILLS 64 FORMER DUKE COACH AL BUEHLER 80 RETIREMENT GUIDE 86

N.C. CENTRAL COACH LeVELLE MOTON: SALUTING SINGLE MOMS 14 MOOGFEST COMES TO DURHAM 32 POISED & POLISHED – NAIL TRENDS 36 AT HOME IN HOPE VALLEY 68 TOP DENTISTS 84

OUR 9TH ANNUAL

Page 38

8

Meet

the

APRIL 2016 durhammag.com

GIFT GUID E

designissue

WHAT’S NEW On Our Food Scene

WHY WE LOVE THE FOOD BANK OF CENTRAL & EASTERN N.C. 16 FROM PAINT COLORS TO LANDSCAPE DESIGN – BULL CITY HOME TRENDS 80 DO SOME GOOD (AND GET OUTSIDE!) 88 MATEO’S CHEERFUL CHEERWINE SANGRIA 92

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2016 durhammag.com

the

FOODIE issue

MAY 2016 durhammag.com

SHOP LOCAL FOR VALENTINE’S DAY 21 ADAM KLEIN: MR. AMERICAN UNDERGROUND 36 LOVE, BREWED IN A COFFEE SHOP 66 FAMILY FUN, WINTER EDITION 72 GUIDE TO SUMMER CAMPS 74

DECEMBER/JANUARY 2016 durhammag.com

Holid ay

SEPTEMBER 2015 durhammag.com

Grilling Out

Go West

at Ponysaurus 24

AUGUST 2016 durhammag.com

this Fall 30

Practically Modern

Durham, two ways: We juxtapose this rural mid-century farmhouse – which belongs to the Butlers of Green Button Farm – with Charlie Witzleben’s chic Church + Main downtown condo.

All that Jazz

in Duke Forest 40

Q&A with Police Chief

at Beyù Caffè 80

Cerelyn “C.J.” Davis 28

durham

Gifts for Everyone

Page 42

Test Your

Memories of

Dog’s IQ 34

Sing Along with

Durham Children’s Choir 20

Plan Your

Christmases Past 58

2017 Wedding 80

Staff Picks for

N.C. Road Trips 32

5 Bull City

Entrepreneurs 42

Making spirits bright, at home Page 40

Josh Lindsey’s

Gold Standard Cocktail Creation at Harvest 18

More recipes inside

be the Fo od ie s We Get to

! awards

How D id

+ 300 winners,

62

End-of-Summer Fun with the Kiddos

King’s Sandwich Shop, on Wheels

HOME-MADE

Designing a World Without ALS 22

in Trinity Park 56

Our Top

The Best of Issue Our readers’ top picks, revealed pg 51

Wine Down at

Dentists 66

Bar Brunello 80

u # RHYTHM in MOTION # A

Local Experts Demystify Ambitious Wine Lists

June/July 2017 durhammag.com

GOINGTHE DISTANCE

The 5th annual

Women’s Issue 72

Seasonal Sensations at The Lakewood

American Dance Festival celebrates

pg 52

PAGE 48

'

‘MY 3 FAVORITE OFF-ROAD TRAILS’ by Robert Wallace

pg. 44

34

Ways to Relax, Refresh and Practice Self-Care

52

The Wedding Guide: From Engaged to ‘I Do’

74

+

named best dance studio

PAGE 46

What’s in the Works for Downtown

40 years in Durham

Running is a way of life for these 5 athletes.

Women who inspire us – advocates, executives, entrepreneurs and more. Page 49

68

Co-Housing Community

April 2017 durhammag.com

BILL BELL

Easy Meal Prep for Busy Weeks from a South Durham Mom

For Jacque Kohn and her four daughters, being creative is more than a hobby – it’s a way of life. The craft room is a beloved space in this Colvard Farms household. Page 50

May 2017 durhammag.com

MAYOR

46

Great spaces for work and life

Guglhupf’s peach crostata and Rose’s Meat Market & Sweet Shop’s crème brûlée macarons – just a couple of the scrumptious baked goods featured inside! Page 72

beginning on page 34!

Architect Phil Freelon on

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Full list of

Your Kid to Camp 64

leaves office this year on his terms

Comedian Lewis Black

The

design issue

of readers voted!

Where to Send

‘It’s Time’

Makes History 80

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Cheers!

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Duke Transplant Surgeon

Downtown Offices 66

Thousands

February/March 2017 durhammag.com

December/January 2017 durhammag.com

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ISSUE

The

WATER WORKS Signe and John Offenberg regularly bring their boys Theo, 9, and Anders, 7, to the Eno, though this was the first time setting off in their canoe from the Few’s Ford Access point. They navigated the waters like pros with their yellow Labrador, June, swimming alongside.

you ought to know.

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Kim Lan Grout started The Redefining Disabled Project to counteract the media’s portrayal of people with disabilities as either charity cases or superhuman heroes. She and her husband, Sean, live in the Waterford neighborhood with daughters Lily, 3, and Kim-An, 4.

on Your List 28

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Durham natives. New residents. Businesswomen. Musicians. Thirteen remarkable women

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Annual

Spending a day at the Eno is just one of more than 20 ideas you should check off your bucket list before the season’s over.

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FARM LIVING After spending 10 years in urban Baltimore, “we needed some space from being in the city,” says Alicia Butler of the farm where she lives with her husband, Ryan, and their three young boys.

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ADF alums Sakarah Hall-Edge and Sheldon Mba show off their moves at the downtown mural “Celebrate” by artist Michael Brown.

10th Anniversary Issue

Getting a Piece of the Pie

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GREAT DISHES

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DURH AMM AG . CO M O CTO B E R / NOV E M B E R 2017

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THE RICKHOUSE OWNER DANIEL KULENIC CHOWS DOWN ON HIS FAVORITE WINGS IN TOWN AT THE ORIGINAL Q SHACK

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FEBRUARY/ MARCH 20 1 8

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How families celebrate their traditions

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Four talented makers – including Alicia Hylton-Daniel, who fashioned Beyù Caffè’s new downtown digs – share their inspirations.

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37 organizations that have stood the test of time Page 64

Allie and Mark Balling

find a peaceful moment by the fire in their backyard, decorated for Christmas.

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We’re

10

we built

this city The people and places that laid the foundation for the city we know and love PHOTO GR A P H Y B Y B RI A NA BR OUGH

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The rapidly evolving Durham skyline.

Rise Up

M

ichael Goodmon takes a moment to consider the

question: How to sum up the transformation of downtown in the last decade, from empty storefronts in a crashing economy to today’s building boom and climbing skyscrapers? “To be fair,” he begins with a slight sigh. “We only have one skyscraper. One. Everybody relax, it’s one tall builiding.” At 27 stories, nearly the length of a full football field in the sky, One City Center stands taller than the rest of downtown, looming over the ’80s-era Durham Centre a few blocks away and 21c Museum Hotel in the renovated Hill Building next door. It is,

for now at least, the apparent top of the downtown building boom, both figuratively and vertically. The downtown of today – with million-dollar condos and millions of square feet of office space under construction – is a far cry from the landscape that Michael, who runs Capitol Broadcasting Company’s real estate arm in Durham and who developed American Tobacco Campus, saw a decade ago. “In 2007, you’re talking about the complete collapse of the lending market,” Michael says. “There was no money out there. We had five dead years when development just wasn’t on the list.” Durham architect and developer John Warasila is amused by

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w e b u i lt t h i s c i t y

PHOTO BY BEN CASEY

the often-giddy coverage the city’s rebirth receives. “Everyone looks back at American Tobacco now as obvious and a home run and, ‘What a great project,’” he says. “Well, that wasn’t necessarily the case 15 or 10 years ago. People forget what a leap of faith that was.” “There’s this reaction that, ‘Oh, my gosh, all this stuff happened to downtown Durham,’” Michael says. “But American Tobacco was placed in service 13 years ago, and we’re just starting to see the exponential growth we were all betting on.” John thinks of the rise of Durham, beginning in the mid-’90s, as akin to the rebirth of Baltimore he witnessed a decade before, when its manufacturing base was all but abandoned by industry and residents who could afford to move. “I saw them rebuild the whole city in a period of 10 years,” John says. “When I came to Durham, I said, ‘This is like Baltimore was in 1980. The buildings are here, the sidewalks are here, but there’s no people.’” But well into the early 2000s, developers, city officials and business owners all waited for Durham to take off. In the meantime, they set to creating the city they envisioned. “The feeling was, ‘Look, no one else is coming,’” John says. “‘Whoever is here, we’re it.’” John had just finished renovating a gutted downtown building into The Eleanor condominums as American Tobacco began to land tenants. Chief among them was McKinney, a major advertising agency bringing dozens of creative jobs to Durham. The firm hired Alliance Architecture, John’s firm, to design its space. “I really wanted McKinney to be a statement,” John says. “Everyone was thinking in terms of, ‘Let’s do something great. This is what Durham can be.’” When McKinney’s offices opened in 2007, Alliance’s design drew national attention for its blended use of restored warehouse space with modern glass-and-steel attributes. More notoriety arrived just a year later when Phil Szostak-designed DPAC opened, establishing a major arts center in downtown. Restaurants began “American Tobacco [Campus] was placed in service 13 years to pop up in an expanding hub, from fine dining at ago, and we’re just starting to Rue Cler within the Downtown Loop to a rollicking see the exponential growth brewery and beer hall at Fullsteam in 2009 in the we were all betting on,” says Central Park District. Michael Goodmon. As the Great Recession ended and word of Durham’s success spread, the trickle of projects became a flood. “Durham had proved it could support a large-scale commerical project, and there was a lot of good stuff on the horizon,” Michael remembers. “Certainly this growth we are seeing is broader than we thought it might be, but honestly, we didn’t know what the hell we were talking about in 2007. We were just, at some level, taking a deep breath and saying, ‘Gosh, we made it to here, and isn’t this awesome?’” – Matt White 44

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Take Center Stage

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sell-out audience was midway through the show “On Your Feet!,” a musical based on the life and music of Gloria and Emilio Estefan, at DPAC in January. It was opening night for the show, one of eight touring Broadway productions that DPAC hosts a season. And then something went wrong. A piece of scenery jammed, perhaps, or a fitting came loose. The music stopped. The cast headed backstage, stagehands rushed out, repairs were made and, within a few minutes, the show went on, to loud applause from the audience. “It doesn’t happen often,” says DPAC General Manager Bob Klaus a few days later, smiling slightly at the story. “When it does happen, you’re reminded that this is live theater. When everything goes right, the magic is unbelievable, but once in 200 shows, something goes a little off.” In 10 years, not much has been “off ” at DPAC. The performing arts center has stood as something of a showpiece for our revitalized downtown. Lit brightly for more than 200 shows, it’s drawn in nearly half-a-million visitors each season in recent years. According to Pollstar magazine, DPAC had the fourth highest ticket sales in the country in 2017 among theaters of its size and type, trailing just behind The Fox Theatre in Atlanta, The Axis at Planet Hollywood in Las Vegas and Radio City Music Hall in New York City. In the last five years, the theater has averaged about 475,000 tickets sold, Bob says, with a peak year over 500,000 in 2016, goosed by a long engagement of “The Lion King.” That’s a meteoric rise from a decade ago when, in its debut season of 2008-09, DPAC sold roughly 150,000 tickets.


w e b u i lt t h i s c i t y

The turning point, Bob says, came in 2010, when the theater hosted “Wicked” for four weeks, selling out every single showing. “The biggest cities in the country were hosting [for] four weeks, so for us to host and sell out, that was a benchmark,” he says. The theater’s calendar has, since its opening, been built around an annual series of touring Broadway shows, mixing classics in revival, like “The Sound of Music” this season, with modern hits just months removed from their initial Broadway runs, like “On Your Feet!” last month and, of course, later in 2018, “Hamilton.” Demand for “Hamilton” tickets, Bob says, will likely exceed “Lion King” or “Wicked.” “Every five years, it seems, there’s a huge show,” Bob says. The theater has grown its schedule with special events, from stars like Jason Isbell and Bob Dylan to comedians like Jerry Seinfeld and Chris Rock, along with touring magicians, dance shows and kids programs, like Paw Patrol Live!, which was the second most popular special event in 2017. About half of all DPAC shows sell out, Bob says, with some of the quickest sales coming from a theater trend more recent than even DPAC’s short history: podcast and YouTube stars. Today, DPAC’s Broadway series sells three times as many season ticket packages as it did a decade “The big [Broadway] shows, when they first go on tour out of New York, they want to go ago, to many customers who might rarely, if ever, to the best cities,” says DPAC’s Bob Klaus. “There are over a hundred 3,000-seat theaters come to Durham otherwise. About 40% of season in America. Now, after 10 years, it’s not unusual for us to be on that first-year [tour].” ticket holders come from Wake County, Bob notes, while DPAC’s fastest growing market is ticket 2012, Bull City Burger put out a Wicked Burger with green chimichurri buyers who live more than 100 miles away. One couple, he says, comes sauce against Gruyere cheese and a cranberry gelatin sauce to match the from Virginia Beach. show’s ruby slippers. “We served it on a gold plate with a cloche that was “And there’s a Broadway series in Virginia Beach!” Bob adds. “They a witch’s hat,” Seth says. The entire cast came by to check it out, he says, came for ‘Wicked,’ and they so loved our theater that now they make it and Bull City Burger has had similar themed dishes for “The Lion King” a weekend trip.” and other shows. That may be DPAC’s real legacy: introducing Durham’s growing Since he opened Bull City Burger, the downtown food scene has downtown to visitors who might not have come otherwise. mushroomed from a dozen or so places to, Seth estimates, around 50 “We’ve been the catalyst for a lot of first-time visitors,” Bob says. options on a show night. He opened a second restaurant, Pompieri As DPAC’s predictable crowds grew, so did Durham’s restaurant Pizza, around the corner from Bull City Burger in 2014. “The [Bulls] scene. Seth Gross opened Bull City Burger and Brewery just a few blocks away on Parrish Street in 2011, and he quickly began matching ballpark and DPAC are the two big sparks that started it,” he says. Bob says it’s a two-way street. “Once they come and see the wonderful menu items to DPAC’s playbill. variety of restaurants and cafes to go to before and after the show, it gives “When they have a long-standing show, we have had some thematic them this desire to come back again and again.” – Matt White „ burgers to go along with them,” Seth says. For “Wicked”’s return in F e b r ua ry/ m a r c h 2 0 1 8

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[My time at Magnolia Grill taught me] the value of a strong team [and the] importance of quality ingredients [and] taking the time to learn and use classic techniques.

PHOEBE LAWLESS

Scratch and The Lakewood Assistant baker working dessert service and pastry chef, 1997-2005 (with a break or two)

SCOTT HOWELL Nana’s, NanaTaco, NanaSteak, Bar Virgile

There were many lessons that I took away from my time at Magnolia, but the most important was developing relationships with our local farmers and suppliers. Another lesson I’ve definitely carried with me was the importance of developing my palate in order to create complex dishes that our guests can enjoy and relate to. MY MAGNOLIA MEMORY One year we did an event for the Durham Arts Council. We did a tuna tartare dish that was very popular but also very labor intensive, and our booth got a little behind. Lee Kepler, my good friend and the Magnolia sous chef, looked at Ben, Karen and me and said, “Next year, we’re serving haggis.”

Setting the

Food

Scene

A

COUPLE YEARS AGO, WHEN WE asked how Durham became the foodiest city in the South, Kelli Cotter gave credit to “our largest stepping stone, Magnolia Grill, with Ben and Karen Barker.” ... “So many talented chefs have time with the Barkers under their belts,” Kelli, herself an alumna of Magnolia, added. “That’s no coincidence.” And many of them chose to stay right here and build their own businesses and restaurants. But they won’t forget the lessons they learned at Magnolia, which closed in 2012, or the many memories they made with the Barkers. Here, a rundown of those chefs/ owners who stayed in the Bull City, and some of their reflections:

JASON SMITH

18 Restaurant Group (Harvest 18) Line cook, 1996-1999 (came back for a second stint in 2001-2002)

The most important lessons I took from the Barkers would be how to minimize waste and how to earn a dollar by being frugal. MY MAGNOLIA MEMORY “The Missing Fig” story is, and will be, the greatest story that I remember during my short stint at the Grill. Ben was notorious on always knowing the exact amounts of everything in his inventory. One day, someone, who will always remain nameless, decided to eat a fig when she was in the [walkin-refrigerator]. Moments later, Ben made up a sign-off sheet saying, “I did not take and eat the missing fig,” and made everyone who was working that day sign off on it. Needless to say, a few minutes later we all knew who the swiper was. The moral of the story is to always know your inventory.

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The Original Q-Shack Front production prep cook, 1994


SEAN LILLY WILSON Fullsteam

[I learned] how to taste food and identify flavors – huge lesson and not an easy thing to teach. Ben has an amazing palate. MY MAGNOLIA MEMORY Ben was a huge Redskins fan, and I’m a Cowboys fan. The year after the Cowboys won the Super Bowl, [Cowboys running back] Emmitt Smith sat out the first couple of games in a contract dispute. Ben gave me hell, but when he signed I brought in an Emmitt poster and hung it downstairs. Emmitt went on to win MVP and Cowboys won the Super Bowl. It said a lot that Ben let the poster hang. He’s a great sport!

TOM FERGUSON RISE Biscuits & Donuts Grill cook, 1993

The Barkers both possess an attention to detail that is unique and difficult to maintain. Nearly three decades w eethic b u and i l t consistency t h i s c i t ywith of consistency and growth are virtually impossible without their individual work systems. Ben had a respectful-yet-austere relationship with purveyors. Not one for a cold call, he knew what he wanted and didn’t have much time for flattery or BS. If you were a food or wine purveyor, you were held to a high standard. That level of accountability is contagious ... you just wanted to be a part of it. As a member of their team, you were expected to internalize your relationship with guests. I had success there because I was truly excited for just about every guest who I took care of. I remember being able to recommend food and wine pairings with energy and passion because I was actually envious of the people I was serving. Ben saw that in me: He thanked me for it once, he’s not one for flattery. Both of their talents were a huge impact on my career. That’s where I fell in love with the restaurant business. Magnolia Grill is where I learned that this particular business is for me. They don’t call [Ben] the Jefe for nothing. MY MAGNOLIA MEMORY Once I had a large table of fancy businessmen. It was summer. The menu reflected summer flavors and lighter fare. They proceeded to order a $500 bottle of Cabernet Sauvignon. They also ordered delicate fish dishes. I was excited to show Ben that we had sold the big, fancy wine. He looked at me in the eye and said, “That wine is unavailable, sir.” I hung my head because I knew he was right ... that wine was completely inappropriate for their order. He said, “Those fellas aren’t leaving here thinking I don’t know how to cook.” I went back to the table and said, “The wine you ordered is unavailable.” They asked, “Are you out of it?” I replied, “No, it is simply unavailable.” They knew where we were coming from. I then directed them to a bottle of Riesling from Clare Valley, Australia. I went back to Ben with the new order. He replied something along the lines of, “Thanks for taking your head out of your butt.”

DANIEL SARTAIN,

Bar Virgile Waiter and bartender, January 2007–January 2009

I have always been a friendly server; working at the Grill elevated my friendly customer service to one of a gracious host. I would keep notes on my regular guests so when they returned they felt as if they were being welcomed into our home. ... I practice this still today at Toast and Dashi, making everyone feel welcome, remembered, comfortable chatting about the menu, so they feel as if they’re visiting with family. Billy developed his skills to balance and bring out flavors, to add acidity when a dish needs brightness, [and] the importance of list-making for an organized mind and kitchen. MY MAGNOLIA MEMORY We were living in Atlanta and planning to move back to Durham. We both wanted to work at the Grill. Mid-2000, I sent my resume and cover letter explaining why they just needed me on their team. A month letter, Billy is wrapping up his cover letter; he had just written to Ben, “P.S. congratulations on your James Beard award,” when the phone rang. It was Ben. He was pretty sure he had a server position opening up right when we were planning to arrive, and he thought I might be a good fit. “But where is your husband planning to work?” He was calling for Billy, but swore he wasn’t! We always laughed about it. Billy never mailed his resume, we both interviewed when we got to town, and we both got jobs.

KELLI COTTER, Toast and Dashi Server, November 2000–November 2007

BILLY COTTER, Toast and Dashi Sous chef, November 2000–November 2003

Ben and Karen were pioneers in the local farm-to-table restaurant movement. Over 30 years they crafted their success in a very old-school way – out of passion, dogged hard work and a commitment to doing even the littlest thing in an exact and precise manner that felt honest and intrinsically appropriate to the two of them. At the Grill, that philosophy applied across the board: to menu ingredients sourced from longtime farmer friends; to exterior landscaping at the restaurant, which showcased favorite native NC perennials; to demanding the prettiest pieces of fish (and being willing to send back anything that was less than stellar); to a refusal to expand their business model to include a second property due to quality control concerns. The Barkers, they were hardcore, and they meant it. That is probably my single biggest takeaway from Magnolia Grill: To become a successful, independent, small business owner, you have to mean it, and you have to put in the serious work yourself. There is no outsourcing of your vision.

prepared with an elegance attained through care for the finer details.” My business’ name was chosen to pay tribute to my time spent as a young woman studying and traveling in France, as well as to a longstanding in-house reference at Magnolia Grill. As a Duke undergrad, I studied abroad for a semester in Paris, and then lived there again a few years later while completing my master’s degree. In France, I learned to appreciate fine food and fine wine, which was quite helpful when I applied for a part-time hostess job at Magnolia Grill in 1997. However, upon starting to book reservations for the dining room, I quickly learned that “soigné” also meant VIP in Magnolia Grill parlance, indicating that you better find a table for Dr. Brodie, or that table 63 in the back left corner was where Joel Fleishman should always be seated. A big, handwritten [star] plus a name on the kitchen ticket meant pay extra attention, or Ben is gonna crush you!

MY MAGNOLIA MEMORY I often get asked about the name of my catering company, which is called Soigné Events. Soigné is a French adjective, defined as “indicating an aura of sophistication in dress, manner or design; presented or

Host/Shift Manager, March 1997–March 2001; January 2002–March 2005; Restaurant Manager, April 2005–June 2008

LORA BROOKER, chef-owner and event designer, Soigné Events

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w e b u i lt t h i s c i t y

State of the Art

A

s co-founder of indie label Merge Records and bassist for local rock band Superchunk, Laura Ballance has had a front-row seat to the city’s artistic and cultural evolution. Though the band and label were originally founded in Chapel Hill, Laura, alongside cofounder and bandmate Mac McCaughan, decided to move the label to Durham in 2001. “A large part of our decision to move to Durham was monetary,” she says. Laura bought a house in Durham in 1998, and recalls how quiet it seemed then. “I had taken to riding my bike around Durham looking for a good place to move our offices,” she says. In those days, Laura says downtown felt like a ghost town. The upside? “There were many good deals to be had. When we bought our building, there was a burnt-out building two doors down the alley,” she recalls. (That building has since become The Eleanor condos). Owning their own spot also felt vital to what Merge was working toward at the time. The team had been renting in Chapel Hill and Carrboro, which, while great location-wise, didn’t make them feel invested in the space. “They did not belong to us,” Laura says. “Buying this building in Durham has made us feel really settled.” She says Durham’s development has been a big plus in terms of job perks, too. “We have a lot of options of places we can walk to for lunch or to get coffee.” But for Laura, the value of the city’s progression is that it has resulted in a place full of entertainment options for so many. “Durham is diverse and open-minded, and that is really a big part of why I moved here.” Her current go-tos for food, art and inspiration: Taqueria La Vaquita, Sarah P. Duke Gardens, The Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University, The Regulator Bookshop, The Carolina Theatre and Gocciolina. That appreciation carries over into the arts and music venues and festivals she’s seen either open or grow in her time here, including The Carrack, The Pinhook, Motorco Music Hall, Moogfest, Bull Durham Blues Festival (now the Blues and Roots Festival) and the Art of Cool Festival. “I have loved seeing The Carolina Theatre carry on and flourish,” she says. “Things there have improved a lot, and it seems like it’s going to keep going.” However, with openings come closings, and she fondly remembers several now-shuttered standbys, like Troika Music Festival, Poindexter Records and Starlite Drive-In. “It was my favorite way to see horror movies, because I could pace or chatter if I got nervous and not bother anyone,” she says. As for music venues, “I really miss Ringside,” which held its last show in 2008. “That place was four floors of crazy. Definitely not up to code. I was telling someone the other day that when I think back on it, it was like walking into ‘Blade Runner.’ Urban decay, danger, loud music and beauty.” Though these places no longer exist, they are what paved the way for the kind of growth that Laura says remains true to Durham’s history. After all, we seem to have more festivals than ever before, retail continues to grow – including other downtown record stores like Carolina Soul and Schoolkids in Brightleaf, and cultural additions like Museum of Durham History, Letters Bookshop and galleries galore. Instead of the drive-in, we now watch movies in Durham Central Park thanks to Full Frame Documentary Film Festival, Durham Cinematheque and the Durham’s Parks and Recreaction department. “Durham is evolving rapidly, but still has a gritty underbelly that I really appreciate,” Laura says. “I hope we don’t lose it. That grittiness and squalor allowed creative people to get their feet in the door here and do wonderful things.” – Morgan Cartier Weston “Back in the old, old days, Time After Time Vintage [Thrift Shop] also had a warehouse in Durham and would have warehouse sales occasionally, which I loved,” Laura says. Now, downtowners can find unique clothes and wares at spots like Dolly’s Vintage. 50

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w e b u i lt t h i s c i t y

The Age of a New Black Wall Street

C

ars bustling down the street. The jingle of a bell as customers and business owners exchange greetings. The hum of activity. This is Black Wall Street circa 1908. It’s also Black Wall Street circa 2018. Like many of your favorite TV shows, Durham’s Black Wall Street has gotten a reboot in recent years. During the late 1800s and early 1900s, Parrish Street was the hub of African-American business during a time when black citizens nationwide were being disenfranchised. It set a precedent for the city and the state at large. Mechanics and Farmers Bank and North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company (NC Mutual) both called Parrish Street home. Now it’s home for a new era of business owners and entrepreneurs in the 21st century, including Tobias Rose, principal and creative director of digital agency Kompleks Creative. “When you start talking about Black Wall Street and legacy, that was something that was in my DNA,” Tobias says. He attended high school in Kannapolis on a road named after his great-grandfather. His grandfather sold insurance for NC Mutual, and both Tobias and his father are North Carolina Central University alumni. But it wasn’t until college that Tobias delved deeper into the history of Black Wall Street and its gravitas. “Growing up, I wasn’t exposed to a diverse range of people who looked like me doing professional things,” he says. “Going to NCCU gave me something that I really needed to see, [which was] perspective – seeing black people as attorneys, doctors, educators and chancellors.” It’s a sentiment that Val Jackson, co-owner of Hairizon beauty shop in Northgate Mall, echos. “We have so many mothers who have come into our store and say (to their daughters), ‘See, there are

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w e b u i lt t h i s c i t y

Tobias’ unconventional entrepreneurial journey culminated with his team moving into an office space on Parrish Street in 2014, a milestone for which Black Wall Street’s history gave him a deeper appreciation. “It was beautiful, but it was scary,” Tobias says of his first day in his new office. “Now you have historical perspective, now you know what (your ancestors) went through.” It’s one of several reasons that Tobias dedicates much of his time to fostering the next generation of thinkers, tinkers and tycoons. In addition to being on the board of directors for the Durham Chamber of Commerce and serving as an advisor for the National Society of Black Engineers, he is also a co-founder of the nonprofit Black Wall Street, which continues the same mission this area held at the turn of the century – to build multicultural communities and wealth through business ownership. “[Every year] we host an event called Black Wall Street Homecoming,” Tobias says. “I wanted to provide an alternative to the [typical] homecoming experience, which were parties and step shows. What if people were interested in business? Where could they go and network? We put all of our ideas together and I said, ‘Let’s call it Black Wall Street Homecoming. We’re here on Black Wall Street, let’s bring people home.’” Black Wall Street Homecoming “I feel like we’re creating a new Black Wall Street, and this Black Wall Street does not stretch from corner to corner,” says Tobias Rose of Kompleks cataclysmically aims to bring more diverse Creative. “It is becoming a network and an ecosystem.” entrepreneurial talent to Durham. Each year the gathering gets larger and larger. Last year the speaker lineup included more than 32 speakers ranging from business owners who look like you,’” she says. “It’s exciting to me business owners and engineers to venture capitalists and CEOs – and my daughter, [Joi], to be in the vicinity of where history was all from varying industries. made.” “Durham is a city of innovators and entrepreneurs,” Carl adds. Carl Webb, a 30-year entrepreneur and Durham native, says the city has always been a place where black people have done things in “[It] has a creative energy that is the core of who we are.” The type of innovation that comes from a group of different the business community. people gathering in a room to solve a problem is what drives “It’s a source of pride to see how much downtown and the Tobias. “I feel like we’re creating a new Black Wall Street, and this community has changed,” Carl says. “But, I struggle realizing that Black Wall Street does not stretch from corner to corner,” he says. the black business community has not benefited [at the same level] “It is becoming a network and an ecosystem.” as the general business community. I’m excited, but we still have – Latisha Catchatoorian work to do.” 52

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Minta Bell Design Group I N T E R I O R S

&

F U R N I S H I N G S

Hamilton Centre, 1415 W. NC Highway 54, Suite 103, Durham, NC 27707

919 933 9800 | www.mintabell.com


We’re

10

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SCORE

nally. diago d n a rds ree forwa dd th found all – a e m b e n h nd t ds ca you fi – wor ints if earch o s p d r e s thre ood ! s wo in thi hborh 0, and s 2 ig d e g o n rho m’s ndin ghbo s for fi Durha ’s nei ogle point o m o a G w h t r o , t Du 10 ave 31 of nding on’t h Find t for fi you d in if o l p a t ne our to Add o s to y point s u n bo

T U S C A L O O S A L A K E W O O D L E V E L A N D H O L L O W A Y answers on page 62

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SCORE

how durham are you?

n. r d tow nswe aroun t the a r u a o e e u’ll h figur n! es to es yo sectio d box phras e d d n a of this a h s s le it e d t r h t o s in is the ific w letter t clue -spec se the r. Firs u e rham u n w s e D t an few nd th y righ are a low, a r ever m be o There e f h t t in e po amble e. On Unscr us clu n o b to the

MDRU RCENMOA ICSZREA

A certain group of fans in a specific basketball arena

ETH UEBL GHTIL

A “quik stop” that is also known locally as this

KEPE URDAMH RIYTD

One of the most common bumper stickers around

WKAEUD

Play a round of golf or spend the night at this AAA hotel

PADC

See a Broadway play or famous comedian on this stage

TIYC FO CEDIMNEI

Our health care-related moniker

HNINT ETETRS

Long-standing shopping district located just off Duke’s East Campus

KCULY TEIKRS

Top-selling cigarette brand in the U.S. during the ’30s, its logo now adorns the water tower at American Tobacco Campus

LULB CYTI

We use this phrase interchangeably with “Durham” BONUS CLUE

A center of African-American-owned businesses located on Parrish Street in the early 1900s

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answers on page 62


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SCORE

how durham are you?

f our

ory o e hist

t th abou r. know u answe o t y c hat corre h c a See w re oint fo One p

city.

1 The architecture firm that built the Hill Building

(which 21c Museum Hotel now occupies) also built what famous U.S. landmark?

2 Who is the city named after? Bonus point for what this person did to achieve the honor.

3 The first Durham city high school became city

hall before housing this organization, which remains an occupant of the space to this day. (Add an extra point if you can name a second organization that also occupies the space.)

4 What year was North Carolina Central University founded?

5 Which Durham building was – at the time of its construction – the tallest in North Carolina, featuring Durham’s first elevator?

6 In what year was the first “Durham Bulls” team established? (Hint, it disbanded the same year. Bonus point if you can name the next time the “Durham Bulls” re-formed.)

7 One of the nation’s oldest and largest AfricanAmerican-owned insurance companies was founded in Durham. What is it, and what is the name of its founder? (Two points.)

8 In April 1865, Confederate General Joseph E.

Johnston and Union General William T. Sherman’s met at this North Carolina Historic Site where they signed surrender papers for southern armies in the Carolinas, Georgia and Florida.

9 What was Duke University called prior to its name change in 1924?

10 What was the name of the business where

the first sit-in of the Civil Rights Movement took place in Durham? (One more point if you can give the year, another if you can give the exact date.)

mite. Durha e u r t as a urself unt yo Put at least one Sylvan Esso song o c ch. a n e a t for you c in e o r p fo on your Spotify playlist. e be rself a e don e you v iv a g h d d to , an u nee lished gs yo comp c in Saw an American Dance Festival performance and/or Full Frame a h t e few t you’v are a o wha t documentary and/or local art at Centerfest (three points total). t x There e xn ff a bo Tick o Taken a trip to Museum of Life and Science and/or Duke Lemur Center (two points total). Spent a spring afternoon at Sarah P. Duke Gardens. Strolled around Duke’s East and West campuses. Explored the various access points to the Eno River. Watched the entire two seasons of Stranger Things (created by The Duffer Brothers, who are from Durham) and picked out the Bull City references. Had a locally brewed beer at Bull City Burger and Brewery, Ponysaurus Brewing Co., Fullsteam Brewery, Bull Durham Brewing Co., Clouds Brewing and/or Durty Bull Brewing Co. (six points total). Caught an exhibition at Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University. Went to a Broadway show at the Durham Performing Arts Center. 58

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Saw a show at The Pinhook and/or Motorco Music Hall (two points total). Played life-size chess at American Tobacco Campus.

Picked up groceries at the Durham Farmers’ Market and/or South Durham Farmers’ Market and/or Durham Roots Market (three points total). Attended at least three Durham Bulls games in a season. Watched a movie at The Carolina Theatre. answers on page 62


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SCORE

how durham are you?

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how durham are you?

ANSWERS

Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

Hope Valley

Audubon Park

Brightleaf

Bragtown

City Center

Northgate Park

Tuscaloosa-Lakewood

Cleveland-Holloway

East Durham

Duke Forest

Woodcroft

Duke Park

American Village

West End

Walltown

Trinity Park

Old West Durham

Southside

Old North Durham

Lyon Park

Watts-Hillandale

Hayti

Hope Valley Farms

Burch Avenue

Morehead Hill

Parkwood

Rockwood

Treyburn

Forest Hills

Croasdaile

T U S C A L O O S A L A K E W O O D L E V E L A N D H O L L O W A Y

Duke Homestead

Say It Like You’re From Here 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

DURM CAMERON CRAZIES THE BLUE LIGHT KEEP DURHAM DIRTY WADUKE DPAC CITY OF MEDICINE NINTH STREET LUCKY STRIKE BULL CITY BLACK WALL STREET

8.

Bennett Place

9.

Trinity College

10. Royal Ice Cream Parlor; June 23, 1957 Name that Landmark

Pop Quiz 1.

The Empire State Building in New York City

2.

Dr. Bartlett S. Durham. Donated his land for a railway station that became the site of incorporation for Durham.

A.

Durham Bulls Athletic Park

B.

Durham Civil Rights Mural

C.

DPAC

D.

Power Plant Building (American Tobacco Campus)

E.

The Durham Hotel

F.

[John Sprunt] Hill House

G.

Duke Chapel

H.

Lucky Strike water tower

I.

Washington Duke Inn & Golf Club

3.

Durham Arts Council and Durham Arts Guild

J.

Old Bull Building

4.

1910

K.

Ninth Street

5.

The Trust Building

L.

6.

1902 and 1913

Durham Centre [People’s Security Tower]

7.

N.C. Mutual Life Insurance Company; John Merrick

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SCORE SHEET

0-23 Points

Newbie You’ve still got a few things to learn about the Bull City, but don’t worry – we’re here to help with that! Keep shopping, dining and exploring local, and you’ll get there!

24-46 Points

Nearly a Local You’re almost hiding the fact you’re a transplant, but you need to brush up on some of your Durham knowledge. Try taking a historic walking tour led by Preservation Durham, or visit the Museum of Durham History.

47-71 Points

True Durhamite It’s like you’re from here – and maybe you are! Join the rest of the natives for a victory lap on the American Tobacco Trail and a celebratory beer at a brewery or local pub.


Local Durham REALTOR Local Durham Agents Local Durham Knowledge ®

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

originals

t h e

A gallery of Durham businesses that have stood the test of time

LEFT TO RIGHT Kevin Brown, Kem Johnson, Dan Shannon, Melissa Crane, Leslie Land, Amy Bell, Amanda MacLaren, Briana Brough, Ellen Shannon and Rory Gillis.

T

HE EDITORIAL, MARKETING AND DESIGN TEAMS responsible for Durham Magazine and its related print, online and digital publications have committed these past 80-plus issues to helping readers make the most of our great city. Our writers and photographers have published scores of articles highlighting local personalities; the evolution of the foodiest city in North Carolina; diverse cultural, arts and entertainment events; and community-based nonprofits. See pages 38-41 to view our covers from the past decade. PHOTOGRAPHY IN THIS GALLERY BY BETH MANN (EARLYBIRDPHOTO.COM) AND BRIANA BROUGH

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AMERICAN TOBACCO CAMPUS For American Tobacco Campus (ATC), originality binds its storied past to its vibrant character today. A cornerstone of downtown for more than a century, ATC rediscovered and reoriented Durham’s history of innovation in 2004, becoming an international model for urban revitalization. Its first-class dining options, cutting-edge organizations and acclaimed venues for world-class performances attract local and distant visitors alike. ATC is still evolving with new restaurants, enhanced events and a planned expansion to what is presently the site of University Ford/ Kia. By cultivating both a sense of community and spirit of innovation, American Tobacco shows no signs of slowing down. PHOTO BY SCOTT FABER PHOTOGRAPHY

919-433-1566  |  300 BLACKWELL STREET, SUITE 104, DURHAM  | AMERICANTOBACCOCAMPUS.COM


JOHNSON LEXUS OF DURHAM At Johnson Lexus of Durham, brand loyalty and the community’s trust is earned year after year by respecting each guest as an educated car buyer. Fostering a culture of excellence and service starts with our staff. By equipping them with the tools needed to excel in their roles, Johnson Lexus associates guide guests through the sales process in an informative, transparent and easygoing manner. State-of-the-art facilities and convenient amenities create a luxurious, relaxed environment in which guests can browse for their next vehicle. As a local, family-owned business, Johnson Lexus prioritizes community involvement by means of sponsorships and partnerships with philanthropic organizations in Durham, such as Book Harvest and Durham Cares. Additionally, the dealership sponsors more than 170 miles of local freeways through the Adopt-A-Highway program, providing funding to keep the roads clean, therefore alleviating taxpayer burden.  Johnson Lexus maintains its commitment to the Durham community through an unmatched car purchase and ownership experience.

844-314-1194  |  1013 SOUTHPOINT AUTOPARK BOULEVARD, DURHAM  | JOHNSONLEXUSDURHAM.COM


FINK’S JEWELERS A long-standing tradition of value and trust—this is what Fink’s Jewelers provides customers, thanks to 87 years as a family-owned business. Currently run by the third and fourth generations—Marc and Matthew, respectively—, Fink’s began in 1930 and opened its Durham location in 2003. Boasting an impressive selection of the world’s finest jewelry and Swiss timepieces, Fink’s pairs a luxurious buying experience with the dependability of a local jeweler. As long as the Fink family name is on the door, their team will uphold the legacy of unsurpassed customer service and trust that prevails before, during and after the sale of a piece that celebrates life’s unforgettable moments.

Pictured (left to right): David Sensinger, Manager and Joey White, Assistant Manager.

919-281-8407  |  6910 FAYETTEVILLE ROAD, DURHAM  | FINKS.COM


ELLIS FAMILY LAW Built on a reputation of integrity and responsiveness, Ellis Family Law provides legal support for people experiencing a transition in their family lives. Following an initial consultation, clients are paired with an attorney whose particular skill set and personality suits their legal goals. Each attorney then offers a realistic and meaningful approach to the client based upon their needs. What further distinguishes this law firm is the availability of a client liaison, an additional staff member that helps facilitate a close working relationship with each client. Ellis Family Law offers honest guidance in a place of uncertainty.

919-688-9400  |  3200 CROASDAILE DRIVE, SUITES 601 & 603, DURHAM  | ELLISFAMILYLAW.COM


HOPE VALLEY COUNTRY CLUB At the heart of a picturesque, historic community only five miles from downtown Durham, Hope Valley Country Club intertwines tradition with contemporary comforts. The 18-hole Donald Ross championship golf course uniquely features Ross’ original 1926 routing even while having undergone numerous updates. The sprawling, Tudor-style clubhouse pairs the classic design of its original construction with modern pleasures, such as the two swimming pools and recreation areas. A diversity of dining options and yearround calendar of Social events elicit the feeling that the club is an extension of home, and for generations of Durham-area families, that’s exactly what Hope Valley has provided.

919-489-6565  |  3803 DOVER ROAD, DURHAM  | HVCC.ORG


AESTHETIC SOLUTIONS Long before Botox was a household word, before the widespread use of lasers, dermal fillers and noninvasive fat reduction, Dr. Sue Ellen Cox and the team at Aesthetic Solutions were perfecting these treatments at a fledgling medical aesthetics practice on N. Duke St. Now a nationally-recognized expert in facial rejuvenation and body contouring, Dr. Cox credits her dedicated staff and loyal patients with the continued success of the practice. Advancing the state of the art through clinical research, educating the next generation of physicians, and providing exceptional experiences to every patient – Aesthetic Solutions takes a page from the playbook of this vibrant City of Medicine.

919-403-6200  |  5821 FARRINGTON ROAD, SUITE 101, CHAPEL HILL  | AESTHETIC-SOLUTIONS.COM


Jewelsmith has a team of metalsmiths, gemologists, and design associates. Pictured are the 10 who have been with the store for a decade or more—evidence of the value the store places on staff development and expertise.


JEWELSMITH Over the past 40 years, Jewelsmith has grown from a 500-square-foot store in an alley at Lakewood Shopping Center to a 4,000-square-foot gallery and design studio at Erwin Square on Main Street, just west of Ninth. Some things haven’t changed at all: the client-driven focus on custom design; the use of finest-quality metals, diamonds, and colored stones; and the emphasis on jewelry as an art form—as if it were small-scale sculpture—and on centuries-old principles of craftsmanship. In many other ways, Jewelsmith is constantly changing and innovating: using the most up-to-date technology to create intricate and surprising forms; investigating unusual and eye-catching materials, such as pure gold, meteorite, and gems in their rough, uncut state; and working with clients to turn staid, seldom-worn heirlooms into pieces that are ahead of trend. An innovator in Durham before its rapid urbanization, Jewelsmith is one of the reasons for the city’s vibrancy today.

919-286-2990  |  2200 WEST MAIN STREET, DURHAM  | JEWELSMITH.COM


TYLER’S RESTAURANT & TAPROOM Established in Carrboro 20 years ago, Tyler’s Restaurant & Taproom found its way to Durham 7 years later. When a friend told Tyler Huntington about the development of American Tobacco Campus, the owner of the eponymous restaurant decided to open a second location in the up-and-coming downtown district. As the first all-craft taproom in N.C., Tyler’s has remained a leader in the craft beer industry. For guests who had their first dates at the Carrboro location, Tyler’s in Durham is the familiar locale that matured with them. For Tyler’s, the Bull City is a second home in which to watch the popularity and quality of craft beer grow.

919-433-0345  |  324 BLACKWELL STREET, DURHAM  | TYLERSTAPROOM.COM


SANDERS FLORIST In March 1950, Harper Kennedy Sanders Jr. opened Sanders Florist on Broad Street—the same place where it stands today. His young daughters—Jill, Lynn and Holly—soon started accompanying him to the store, beginning a legacy of providing premium-quality flowers to the community. After attending floral design school, the sisters returned to Sanders Florist to serve the same customers who had become like family as they grew up in the shop. Today, Sanders Florist marks its customers’ milestones with flowers produced by local growers and farmers around the world. Housed in a beautifully renovated Pure Oil gas station, the family-owned business plans to offer service, quality and value for generations to come.

919-286-1288  |  1100 BROAD STREET, DURHAM  | SANDERSFLORIST.COM


THE FOREST AT DUKE Celebrating 25 years of community, The Forest at Duke is a vibrant continuing care retirement community located in the heart of Durham. Homes, cottages, apartments - each offer spacious, contemporary living with access to an impressive range of luxurious amenities coupled with world-class wellness. At The Forest at Duke, you’ll discover a redefined retirement that is as varied, engaging and multi-faceted as you. A leader in social responsibility and outreach, The Forest strives to strengthen the community and organizations that enrich the lives of Durham residents.

800-474-0258  |  2701 PICKETT ROAD, DURHAM  | FORESTDUKE.ORG


NANA’S Not only is Nana’s known for its world-class cuisine and award-winning wine list – it’s also recognized as the launch pad for many other local restauranteurs. Since Nana’s opened in 1992, Chef Scott Howell has mentored many former employees who went on to create successful culinary ventures of their own. As he inspires those who work with him, Howell serves up dishes that exemplify his passion and attention to detail. These characteristics shine through Nana’s interior design, which features hardwood floor constructed of reclaimed pine from an old Durham warehouse. Owing to Howell’s precision both in and outside of the kitchen, Nana’s has become a trusted mainstay in Durham’s culinary scene.

919-493-8545  |  2514 UNIVERSITY DRIVE, DURHAM  | NANASDURHAM.COM


ACTIVEDGE FITNESS & SPORTS PERFORMANCE ActivEdge Fitness & Sports Performance opened in 2004 with one employee and one goal—to provide the best service in Durham. Since then, founder Brian Diaz has developed relationships with clients, coaches, medical personnel and fitness enthusiasts to gain a comprehensive perspective on patient care and personal training objectives. As the company evolved, Brian was able to step out of the do-everything role and now is the Director of Physical Therapy. Every client receives a physical therapy evaluation before embarking upon their personal training—a feature that sets ActivEdge apart as a leading studio gym. Director of Personal Training, Rutland Tyler, assists in the recruitment of a talented staff across several disciplines. With a devoted team, loyal client base and thriving fitness community, ActivEdge continues to be a fitness and wellness fixture in the Bull City.

919-493-1204  |  4221 GARRETT ROAD, SUITES 1-2, DURHAM  | ACTIVEDGEFIT.COM


BLUE CORN CAFÉ Growing up, Danielle Martini-Rios understood food as the centerpiece of every family occasion. So, when she and her husband, Antonio, opened Blue Corn Café in 1997, they wanted to bring that same intimate experience to the community. While the original concept behind Blue Corn was to provide fresh food at an affordable price, its mission has evolved along with the capacity of our local food economy. Antonio and Danielle now source ingredients from the 3-state region of North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia. And while change is natural, you can expect one thing to remain the same: a menu composed of fresh Latin food, crafted with an eclectic fusion of flavors.

919-286-9600  |  716 NINTH STREET, DURHAM  | BLUECORNCAFEDURHAM.COM


NINTH STREET FLOWERS When Larry and Lea Wood moved to Durham in 2002, they quickly discovered the need for a full service, independent florist shop. They established Ninth Street Flowers a year later as a local purveyor providing personalized service to individual customers and business clients. Ninth Street Flowers strives to make every customer’s flower buying experience memorable, offering the freshest flowers, artisanal designs and unsurpassed customer service at a fair price. Whether a customer is planning a wedding, commemorating a loved one’s life, celebrating a special occasion or saying “thank you”, the staff accommodates floral needs with attention to detail and sensitivity to the moment. By building relationships within the community, Ninth Street Flowers has developed a reputation for providing beauty and enhancing memories with the freshest flowers. The business continues to grow, and in the very near future, will be launching a spiffy new website.

919-286-5640  |  700 NINTH STREET, DURHAM  | NINTHSTREETFLOWERS.COM


IMMACULATA CATHOLIC SCHOOL Founded in 1909 by the Sisters of St. Dominic, Immaculata Catholic School has long served students from many backgrounds and of various faiths. The Sisters believed that a Catholic education that demands academic excellence should be available to any family who sought such a foundation. More than a century later, Immaculata continues this legacy by affordably educating children with the same focus and mission. While rooted in time-honored values, Immaculata is dedicated to continuous improvement and advancement.  Notably, Immaculata’s Middle School program recently earned the distinction of being the first and only in North Carolina to become AdvancED STEM certified. Immaculata prepares students to tackle the challenges of our age and our future. They learn to approach the world with compassion, equity and thoughtful problem-solving skills. Immaculata is a National Blue Ribbon School and a local treasure for Durham.


919-682-5847  |  721 BURCH AVENUE, DURHAM  | IMMACULATASCHOOL.ORG


BLU SEAFOOD AND BAR Supporting sustainability, providing a warm environment and giving back to the community—these are the three pillars on which Blu Seafood and Bar continues to draw in loyal and first-time guests. By sourcing their ingredients both locally and globally, the restaurant encourages sustainable fishing and aquaculture while serving up the freshest seafood. Valuing its long-time relationship with Duke, Blu offers a discount to the university’s faculty and staff. The restaurant serves up unmatched specials Monday through Thursdays, like $1 select oysters or tacos and sangria, with an ever-changing menu of taco features. A fine-dining experience in a casual atmosphere, Blu Seafood and Bar remains a fixture in Durham.

919-286-9777  |  2002 HILLSBOROUGH ROAD, DURHAM  | BLUSEAFOODANDBAR.COM


WAVELENGTHS SALON Uptown hair with down-home attention—this is what draws in clients new and returning to Wavelengths Salon. Boasting a 20-foot tin ceiling and large windows, the space feels open, yet intimate; contemporary, yet authentically Durham. Trained at the Aveda institutes in London, Minnesota and New York, the Wavelengths’ staff has been recognized for their hair color treatments, curly haircuts and wedding hairstyles and makeup for more than 23 years. With an international, diverse and talented team of stylists, Wavelengths provides a warm, friendly atmosphere and haircare experience that the Durham community has come to trust and enjoy.

919-416-9705  |  704 NINTH STREET, DURHAM  | SALON.WAVELENGTHSALON.BIZ


BRENT L. BLAYLOCK, DDS For more than 35 years, Dr. Brent L. Blaylock has served the Durham community as a cosmetic and restorative dentist. After earning his degree from the UNC School of Dentistry, he moved to Durham and began practicing in 1982. Dr. Blaylock provides care to patients of a wide range of ages—from adolescence to more than 100 years old. Additionally, he volunteers several times a year with other members of the Southwest Durham Rotary Club to treat Urban Ministries and TROSA residents. In taking time to identify and address each patient’s needs and desires, Dr. Blaylock has become one of Durham’s most trusted dentists.

919-518-9963  |  3206 OLD CHAPEL HILL ROAD, SUITE 300, DURHAM  | GENERALDENTISTDURHAM.COM


BRIGHTLEAF SQUARE Comprised of two historic warehouses joined by a beautifully landscaped courtyard, Brightleaf Square was among the first of downtown Durham attractions to undergo revitalization in the early 1980’s. During this time, the buildings were converted into mixed-use spaces, which today are occupied by independent and locally owned retailers, a diverse group of restaurants, as well as professional offices. In the center of it all, the courtyard plays host to a myriad of local events including a summer concert series. Visitors to the Square can stroll through the courtyard as they discover uncommon finds, dine at one of a kind restaurants and delight in the ambience of Durham’s past and future.

919-682-9229  |  905 WEST MAIN STREET, DURHAM  | HISTORICBRIGHTLEAF.COM


DUKE SCHOOL In 1947, Duke School was established as a lab school for the benefit of students in the education and psychology departments at Duke University. 37 years later, Duke School became independent of the university, thanks to a group of parents who restructured it into a nonprofit organization. After 70 years of excellence, Duke School has made an impressive contribution to the community by cultivating students who are independent learners, critical thinkers and decision makers. These outstanding students help create a better future for our city and beyond. Additionally, Duke School raises greater awareness of education in Durham and provides the expertise of its exceptional teachers to other local schools.

Pictured are some of Duke School’s current and retired faculty and staff who have more than 15 years of service at Duke School.

919-493-1827  |  3716 ERWIN ROAD, DURHAM  | DUKESCHOOL.ORG


CLEGG’S TERMITE & PEST CONTROL In the early 1960’s, Reverend Ralph E. Clegg discovered a growing problem at his church: pesky and destructive termites. To get rid of them, Rev. Clegg consulted professional pest control companies. Unfortunately, the cost was too high for his small church. So, he took matters into his own hands. With the help of a friend from North Carolina State University, Rev. Clegg learned all about termites. He gathered a few church members and began treating the church. Soon enough, the termites were gone. In fact, things worked so well, other church members soon started asking Rev. Clegg for help with their pest problems. And so, in 1964, Clegg’s Termite and Pest Control was officially born. What started as a DIY project, turned into a hobby and then quickly developed into a full-time business with 3 employees working out of the Reverend’s home. Six years later, his son, Phil Clegg, joined the firm. Fast forward more than 50 years and Clegg’s can only be described as thriving. With Phil Clegg now serving as President and Phil Jr. as Vice President, Clegg’s and its 300 employees continue to provide termite and pest control to customers from 13 locations across North Carolina.

919-477-2134  |  2401 REICHARD STREET, DURHAM  | CLEGGS.COM


DURHAM PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY & ORTHODONTICS For the Christensens, pediatric dentistry runs in the family. Dr. John Christensen, the son of a pediatric dentist, opened Durham Pediatric Dentistry & Orthodontics in 1987. As a specialist of both pediatric dentistry and orthodontics, he provides both dental and orthodontic care to patients in the same office. His son, Dr. Rob Christensen, is a pediatric dentist and specializes in caring for infants and children through adolescence, including those with special needs. As a small, family-run practice, Drs. John and Rob Christensen cultivate a warm and compassionate environment where children learn good oral hygiene habits that will last a lifetime.

919-489-1543  |  121 W WOODCROFT PARKWAY, DURHAM  | DURHAMPDO.COM


KANKI JAPANESE HOUSE OF STEAKS & SUSHI For more than 15 years, Kanki has served up the best tasting show in Durham. Skilled chefs entertain as they expertly prepare made-to-order food on a teppanyaki grill, including entrees of steak, chicken, shrimp, scallops, salmon and even lobster. Kanki also serves award-winning sushi and great drink concoctions. For diners who prefer a more intimate atmosphere, there’s a quiet dining space without the Kanki chef’s show. Whether celebrating a birthday, anniversary, promotion or simply a day that deserves food, fun and a little fire, guests can expect delicious, freshlyprepared Japanese-style cuisine along with a fun performance by one of Kanki’s expert chefs.

Chef Ricky has been with Kanki for more than 17 years, and he’s now the Chief Chef at KankiDurham. Chef Ricky believes every Kanki experience should be filled with fun and energy.

919-401-6908  |  3504 MOUNT MORIAH ROAD, DURHAM  | KANKI.COM


KIEFER LANDSCAPING AND NURSERY What began as a fascination with the diversity of plants in ninth grade is now a rewarding career for Mark Kiefer. In 1984, he began working in residential yards and quickly noticed the need for quality workmanship and creative landscape. Four years and many contacts later, Kiefer Landscaping was incorporated; a small retail nursery was later added in 1995. Through recruiting quality employees and maintaining a high level of service and workmanship, Kiefer has continued to grow in residential custom landscape design and installation. Mark Kiefer is just as enthusiastic today about landscaping plants as he was during his high school field botany class.

919-596-7313  |  2450 S ALSTON AVENUE, DURHAM  | KIEFERLANDSCAPINGINC.COM


FOIL LAW OFFICE Since 1976, Foil Law Offices has served the Durham community, specializing in family law. When N. Joanne Foil opened the office more than 40 years ago, she began developing relationships with key members of the community. In that time, her reputation grew as a tireless advocate for her clients. She earned the respect of her peers and was elected to the State Bar Council for three consecutive terms. Now, boasting a staff that includes four attorneys and six additional staff members, Foil Law successfully represents clients through all stages of their cases, including at the appellate level, year after year.

919-688-9631  |  112 EAST MAIN STREET, DURHAM  | FOILLAWOFFICE.COM


REAL ESTATE ASSOCIATES For 50 years, Real Estate Associates has been providing Durham and beyond with commercial real estate and property management services. Today they remain a leader in the industry, and Joe Jernigan knows a thing or two about how Durham’s landscape has changed in the past decade. In fact, he’s watched it transform over the last 40 years. Joe has led Real Estate Associates (REA) almost since its inception and, in 2003, his son Seth joined the team. Built on two generations of cultivating long-term relationships with clients throughout Durham’s growth, the team at REA has maintained a reputation of integrity and professionalism. With a deep knowledge of the Durham market and its key players, Joe, Seth and the REA team stand out as advisors and advocates in Durham.

919-489-2000  |  3333 DURHAM-CHAPEL HILL BOULEVARD, SUITE C, DURHAM  | REALESTATEASSOC.COM


THE ORIGINAL Q SHACK Since 2003, The Original Q Shack has attracted loyal customers by consistently serving up high-quality barbecue at a reasonable price; taking pride in maintaining a clean, welcoming restaurant; and providing friendly customer service. From its opening, owner Dan Ferguson has run The Original Q Shack like a family business. The current manager, Prentice Clayton, has been with the barbecue joint for ten years and three former managers stay involved in Dan’s kids’ lives. Grateful and humbled to be a part of the Durham community for the past 15 years, The Original Q Shack generously gives back to the same community in which it started.

919-402-4227  |  2510 UNIVERSITY DRIVE, DURHAM  | THEQSHACKORIGINAL.COM


RIVERBANK CUSTOM HOMES David Parker’s roots run deep in Durham. Both he and his parents grew up here, and after finishing school, he moved back to the place that built him. In 2005, he started Riverbank with a truck and a tool belt. From completing small home repairs and renovations, his company evolved into a team of ten who designs and constructs new homes, renovations and additions ranging in style from Victorian to contemporary. Riverbank maintains its “relationshipfirst” approach to each project by partnering with clients to create spaces that are both functional and aesthetically suited to their tastes. With a thoughtful and creative building experience, Riverbank continues to earn the community’s trust.

919-237-2020  |  3200 CROASDAILE DRIVE, SUITE 201, DURHAM  | RIVERBANKCUSTOMHOMES.COM


DURHAM CONVENTION CENTER Built in the late 1980s, Durham Convention Center stands as a landmark of our city’s revitalization. The versatile meeting and event space plays host to a wide range of occasions, from state-wide conventions and large corporate meetings to elegant weddings and special events. Spectra Venue Management, a professional event management team, takes away the stress of planning events with dedicated event planners, an executive culinary team, and on-site audio-visual and exhibitor services. By offering a premier space to accommodate both small and large events, Durham Convention Center attracts an increasing number of business and leisure travelers to the Downtown Durham area.

919-956-9404  |  301 W MORGAN STREET, DURHAM  | DURHAMCONVENTIONCENTER.COM


CROASDAILE DENTAL ARTS Maintaining a successful business for more than 45 years requires just the right combination of elements. At Croasdaile Dental Arts, this formula consists of an experienced staff that builds lasting relationships with patients as they invest in the greater Durham community by supporting local charities. Now co-owners of the practice, Dr. William Turner and Dr. Jason Butler first joined Croasdaile as associates in 2002 and 2009, respectively. Dr. Eric Cole most recently joined the team in early 2017. By providing aesthetic, restorative and preventative dental care while incorporating patients into their extended family, the team at Croasdaile has become a fixture in the Durham community.

919-383-7402  |  2900 CROASDAILE DRIVE, SUITE 5, DURHAM  | CROASDAILEDENTALARTS.COM


SITAR INDIAN CUISINE Desiring to bring their rich Indian culinary tradition and culture to Durham, the Sitar family opened Sitar Indian Cuisine in 1998. In addition to their regular clients, the restaurant caters to the large Indian and Bangladeshi community during festivities like Diwali, Dussehra, Onam, Rangoli, and Ramadan. Sitar also serves more than 800 students per day at Duke University’s Brodhead Center, where the restaurant is known as Tandoor. Chefs at each location specialize in regional varieties of Indian cuisine, preparing the most authentic dishes native to each state in India. With plans to serve the community for years to come, Ajith Anthony and Rohan Davis join their parents in striving for both excellence and elegance.

919-490-1326  |  3630 DURHAM-CHAPEL HILL BOULEVARD, DURHAM  | SITAR-INDIANCUISINE.COM


HERSHEY & HEYMANN ORTHODONTICS The experienced team at Hershey & Heymann Orthodontics strives to deliver excellent orthodontic results with the highest level of service to their patients. With almost 90 years of collective experience, Dr. Barbara Hershey, Dr. Gavin Heymann and Dr. John Frick offer state of the art orthodontic treatment options including Invisalign-- a series of invisible, removable aligners that serve as an alternative to metal braces – to an increasing number of patients who can receive this method of orthodontic correction. The doctors at Hershey & Heymann Orthodontics are committed to serving their communities and are participants in the Smile for a Lifetime Foundation, a nonprofit organization that identifies and provides orthodontic care to children of families who are otherwise unable to afford treatment.

919-493-7554  |  3206 OLD CHAPEL HILL ROAD, DURHAM  | HERSHEYANDHEYMANN.COM


BULLOCK’S BBQ The longest running restaurant in Durham, Bullocks BBQ has been serving up homemade, Southern-style cooking for 66 years. Its story goes back to the early 1940s, when Tommy Bullock’s dad cooked his first pig, flavored it with his vinegar sauce and sold it door-to-door. After dabbling in the wholesale business, Tommy’s parents opened their own restaurant on August 1, 1952. Eighteen years later, they relocated Bullock’s to where it stands now. In addition to their restaurant service, Bullock’s caters and ships to customers across the country—a show of appreciation for those who enjoy their barbecue. For 47 years, the restaurant has provided catering to the staff of locally televised sports at networks like ESPN, Raycom Sports, CBS and NBC Sports. Bullock’s has also served notable figures like Jimmy Buffet, former Vice President Joe Biden and six Academy Award winners—Richard Dreyfuss, Faye Dunaway, Colin Firth, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Holly Hunter and Robin Williams. Bullock’s is thankful for their committed staff who have helped serve customers with the same care and devotion with which Tommy’s parents established the eatery. With four generations of dedication poured into the restaurant—Tommy’s parents; he and his wife; his three children and their spouses; and his grandchildren—the Bullock family is grateful for its loyal customers who have dined in and ordered from the family restaurant for the past seven decades. They hope to continue the legacy of gratitude toward the Durham community for years to come.”

919-383-3211  |  3330 QUEBEC DRIVE, DURHAM  | BULLOCKS-BBQ.COM


SMITH ORTHODONTICS Dr. Dempsey Smith had his first taste of the Triangle during his time as an undergrad at UNC and later returned to the area for his Orthodontic residency at UNC School of Dentistry. After serving in the Navy for four years, he relocated to Durham with his wife – who had previously worked as a nurse at Duke University Hospital – and started practicing in the community that he came to appreciate years prior. Today, Smith Orthodontics uses the latest technology and techniques, including Invisalign and self-ligating and aesthetic braces, to provide patients with premier clinical treatment and customer service. While he has watched the Bull City rapidly transform over the past years, Dr. Smith has maintained the same attention to detail to offer patients the highest quality of care.

919-493-4911  |  2919 COLONY ROAD, DURHAM  | DURHAMORTHODONTICS.COM


PERSIAN CARPET As a zoologist, Doug Lay landed a position with a mammal collection expedition to Iran in 1962. Over the next 14 years, he returned to Iran 18 times and developed an interest and knowledge of oriental rugs. In 1976, Doug and his wife, Nelda, opened The Persian Carpet, which became nationally recognized for its collection of Persian rugs. As the oriental rug market grew over the next 40 years, The Persian Carpet began directly importing handmade rugs from a growing number of countries, in an everincreasing range of styles. They also started their own lines of specialty designs that they produce and wholesale across the country. Today, Doug and Nelda’s daughter, Cynthia McLaren, continues in her parents’ footsteps bringing beautiful oriental rugs into Durham homes.

919-489-8362  |  5634 CHAPEL HILL BOULEVARD, DURHAM  | PERSIANCARPET.COM


Help make your teen’s senior year unforgettable with a custom senior portrait session!

Now booking Class of 2019 Early Bird Photo is a North Carolina photography studio happily focused on people. Let us turn your short-lived moments into long-enjoyed memories. call us: 919.578.1378 email us: hello@earlybirdphoto.com stop by: Goldenbelt Arts | Building 3 | Studio 107 | 807 E Main St |Durham


We’re

10

Home

sweet

Home BY BR IA NA BR O UGH

O

NE OF THE MOST POPULAR FEATURES of Durham Magazine since we started in April 2008 has been our monthly “How We Live” feature – basically, a look inside the homes and lifestyles of people in the community. From couples with young kids to empty nesters and retirees, it’s always fascinating to see what ingenious elements of design Durhamites choose to incorporate into their living spaces. And of course, people love to see inside others’ homes - that’s probably why it’s one of my favorite things to shoot. Over 10 years of photographing these abodes, I’ve amassed a treasure trove of inspirations and ideas. What follows are some of my top rooms and ideas from a decade of photographing “How We Live.” When the time comes to build my dream home, I’ll definitely be ready! „ 106

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Open and airy – I was obsessed with the Butlers’ ranch renovation, partly because the end result was so awesome and partly because their “before” house was really similar to mine, so I was able to get a real sense of what’s possible. I love how they created this open, airy kitchen and living space from a pretty traditional brick ranch. My favorite part might be the little office nook at the back; I could totally see myself editing pictures there while my husband cooks and the kids play, and then just slide the barn door closed and cover up the work-y chaos!

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File this under “great ideas I never would have thought of” – the Strang family built a little, lightfilled room just for reading and lounging around together. The wall-to-wall mattress makes it extra cozy and kid-friendly. BOTTOM A screened-in porch with room for my entire family plus friends? And a fireplace? Sounds like the perfect way to enjoy a nice Carolina winter – and summer, fall and spring. „

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Love Brilliantly.

4401 Glenwood Ave. | Raleigh, NC 27612 www.diamondsdirect.com

OfďŹ cial jeweler of the Carolina Hurricaines


Celebrating 20 Years as the Only Locally Owned and Operated Mortgage Banking Firm in Chapel Hill. Residential Financing for New Homeowners and Refinancing for Current Homeowners.

Ranked as One of the

Top 75 US Mortgage Bankers 2012 per Scotsman Guide

Ranked as One of the

Top 50

Fastest Growing Private Businesses in the Triangle by Triangle Business Journal 2010, 2013,2016 & 2017

1414 Raleigh Road | Suite 400 | Chapel Hill, NC 27517 | 919.929.6116 1121 Situs Court | Suite 100 | Raleigh, NC 27606 | 919.676.1111

www.CIMGinc.com

Ranked as One of the

Top 100 Small Businesses in North Carolina by Business Leader Magazine 2009




OK, technically this is cheating – it’s not a room, or a feature, it is it’s own little house. But what if I want to escape from my dream home sometime? A sweet little cabin like this one in the Sartors’ backyard could be a guest house, artist studio or just a place to escape with a cup of tea and a good book. Now that I think of it, that does sound pretty great – let’s move this one to the top of the wishlist! „

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CERTIFIED & FULLY INSURED

FREE

4 STAR CERTIFIED SURESTART INSTALL with Roofing Purchase when mentioning this ad.

Includes Certainteed SureStart Plus 4 Star warranty, 50 year non-prorated coverage for materials and labor. Warranty transferrable for 12 years. 10 year workmanship warranty. Ice and Water Shield installed on all protrusions and valleys.

Residential & Commercial Apartments • Churches • Banks • Shingle Roofing • Metal Roofing • Gutter Systems • Roof Repairs • Flat Roof Repairs • Maintenance Programs

DurhamAd_110717.pdf

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11/7/17

10:57 AM

C

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How do you inhabit the Triangle?

CM

MY

i nf o @

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This whole home is amazing, from the floorto-ceiling bookshelves in the library to the spiral staircase leading up to a rooftop deck overlooking downtown, but my favorite element has to be the swing in the kitchen. Definitely a great way to make sure the cook always has company! BOTTOM OK, so I’m not the biggest sports fan, but with a family full of devout Wolfpack watchers (I know, I know – I married in!) we end up watching a fair amount of college sports. Add in the bar and in-home movie theater through that door in the back, and this room is a definite must-have on my theoretical dream-home bucket list.

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ACTIVE-ADULT COMMUNITY • Tennis Courts

• Bar and Grill Patio

• Community Gardens

• Event Lawn

• Dog Parks

• Pool

• Bocce Court

• Clubhouse

• Pickleball Court

Home

JOIN VIP LIST TODAY LENNAR.COM

919-337-9420

Pursuant to the Fair Housing Act, this housing is intended for occupancy by at least one person 55 years of age or older per home. Existing and proposed amenities for the community are subject to changes, substitutions and/or deletions without notice. Lennar makes no representation or guarantee that the community or any amenities will be built out as currently planned. Lennar’s automated homes are built according to the Wi-Fi Alliance’s program guidelines for Wi-Fi Certified Home Designs. See the WiFi Alliance’s website at www.wi-fi.org for additional information regarding the Wi-Fi Certified Home Design program. The Wi-Fi Alliance also certifies home designs after review of a home floor plan which may occur after your closing. Wireless performance in homes will vary due to design changes, construction changes, placement of furnishings and appliances, usage, and local conditions. Network performance will be affected by network configuration, the number of users and the type of use. Homeowners are responsible for providing their own Internet connection and determining their own bandwidth needs, which may vary. Lennar does not guarantee that networks, equipment or services will meet all homeowner needs. Homeowners are also responsible for configuring all security features. Lennar does not warrant or represent that any network or network device is secure or can prevent all privacy intrusions, malware, or cyber-attacks, even when correctly configured. Certain products and services are provided by third parties, and not Lennar. Lennar does not guarantee any equipment or services provided by third parties. Additional disclosures and disclaimers relating to The Connected Home program will apply. See your purchase agreement and related disclosures for details. Models/lifestyle photos do not reflect racial or ethnic preference.Visit Lennar.com or see a Lennar New Home Consultant for further details and important legal disclaimers. This is not an offer in states where prior registration is required. Void where prohibited by law. Copyright © 2018 Lennar Corporation. All rights reserved. Lennar and the Lennar logo are U.S. registered service marks or service marks of Lennar Corporation and/or its subsidiaries. (23893) 01/05/18


Our most prized credential

For more than 75 collective years,* we have taken pride in focusing on integrity. Our mandate is simple – we put our clients' best interest first, we do what we say we're going to do, and we do the right thing.

PICTURED LEFT TO RIGHT

Stephanie Staggers Curtis Portfolio Associate Stephanie.Curtis@morganstanley.com

Toll free 855.211.1224

Autumn B. Yamamura Senior Vice President, Family Wealth Advisor, Financial Advisor Autumn.Buracker@morganstanley.com

3511 Shannon Rd., Ste. 300, Durham

Cindy Corbett, CFP® Senior Vice President , Portfolio Management Director, Financial Advisor Cynthia.L.Corbett@morganstanley.com

Ashley Paonessa Consulting Group Analyst Ashley.A.Paonessa@morganstanley.com

morganstanleyfa.com/thesapphiregroup

The Sapphire Group at Morgan Stanley

* Cindy Corbett = 25 years; Autumn Yamamura = 22 years; Stephanie Staggers Curtis = 14 years; Ashley Paonessa = 14 years

©2017 Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Member SIPC. Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards Inc. owns the certification marks CFP®, CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™, and federally registered in the US which it awards to individuals who successfully complete CFP Board’s initial and ongoing certification requirements. CRC1991704 1/18


FORGET THE REST... ...LIST WITH THE BEST!

Having lived and worked in the Triangle for over 30 years I have had the pleasure of not only watching it grow but also learning the Real Estate market from vacant lots to luxury homes and condominiums and everything in between!

BRYAN GUARNIERI REALTOR ®, SFR ®, RSPS, AHWD ®

bryang@hpw.com

919-573-0726

bryang.hpw.com

COLDWELL BANKER HOWARD PERRY AND WALSTON 1600 EAST FRANKLIN STREET

CHAPEL HILL, NC 27514

Each office independently owned and operated


De al Estate

WHAT YOU GET FOR $250,000 TO $873,000 How far will your home-buying dollar go?

DUKE PARK $250,000

WOODCROFT $350,000

• 2,364 square feet • 6 bedrooms • 2 full/1 half bathrooms • 0.52-acre lot • Year built: 1938 • $106 per square foot • Schools: Eastway ES; Lucas MS; Northern HS

WEST END – BUCHANAN BOULEVARD $550,000

DOWNTOWN – BRIGHTLEAF $650,000

• 2,455 square feet • 3 bedrooms • 2 full/1 half bathrooms • 5,576-square-foot lot • Year built: 2017 • $224 per square foot • Schools: Spaulding ES; Githens MS; Jordan HS

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• 2,923 square feet • 4 bedrooms • 2 full/1 half bathrooms • 0.53-acre lot • Year built: 1983 • $120 per square foot • Schools: Southwest ES; Githens MS; Jordan HS

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• 1,330 square feet • 2 bedrooms • 2 bathrooms • Year built: Under construction • $489 per square foot • Schools: Spaulding ES; Githens MS; Jordan HS

F e b r ua ry/ M a r c h 2 0 1 8

DUKE FOREST $421,900

• 4,769 square feet • 4 bedrooms • 2 full/1 half bathrooms • 0.36-acre lot • Year built: 1962 • $88 per square foot • Schools: Lakewood ES; Githens MS; Jordan HS

WEST CORNWALLIS ROAD $873,000

• 3,229 square feet • 3 bedrooms • 2 full/1 half bathrooms • 2.39-acres lot • Year built: 2003 • $270 per square foot • Schools: Forest View ES; Githens MS; Jordan HS


25th Annual

Show

GREATER TRIANGLE

Saturday, March 3, 2018 10:00am – 5:00pm FREE information provided by industry specialists including builders, REALTORS®, mortgage companies, home improvement experts, attorneys and suppliers. Gain valuable information on buying or selling a home, current market conditions, remodeling and why home ownership is a smart financial move, a means to achieving financial security. For more information visit homeshowtriangle.com or contact DRAR at 919.403.2117. Hosted by The Durham Regional Association of REALTORS® and the Home Builder Association of Durham, Orange and Chatham Counties DURHAM REGIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®


REAL ESTATE GALLERY

HOMES • CONDOS • APARTMENTS

IN EVERY ISSUE

Real Estate Gallery Homes • Condos • Apartments

RELATIONSHIP. TRUST. THOUGHTFUL DESIGN. THE RIVERBANK EXPERIENCE

Durham’s premier full-service general contractor for over a decade. RIVERBANK • 919-237-2020 • RIVERBANKCUSTOMHOMES.COM

Elizabeth Lindquist, Realtor ALWAYS WORKING FOR YOU

Showcasing Realtors, Builders & Leasing Agents For advertising information, call 919.933.1551 or email advertising@durhammag.com

An Eye for Excellence, Design, Marketing & Negotiating I’m a Durham resident, a Chapel Hill native, and a Chapel Hill business owner. Put my experience and expertise to work for you! ELindquist@cbadvantage.com 919-656-3325 ELindquist.CBAdvantage.com COLDWELL BANKER ADVANTAGE 1130 WEAVER DAIRY RD., CHAPEL HILL F e b r u a r y / M a r c h

2 0 1 6


HOMES • CONDOS • APARTMENTS

Stop by our local office to find your new home. 921 Morreene Road Durham, NC 27705 919—383—4663 BHHSYSU.com

REAL ESTATE GALLERY #1 Over

900

Real Estate Company in Central NC Area experts to help you find your home

HPW.com

A member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates, LLC.

We are your

LIFETIME REALTOR.

Gordon Baker

Len Moss, CRS, GRI, SPS Murray Baldwin

919.603.8425

919.636.0459

gordon@thegatetohome.com len@thegatetohome.com

jebmwb97@aol.com

919.604.0285

Victor Poole

vkpproperties@gmail.com

919.368.8727

From rental homes to first purchases, investment properties, upsizing due to family growth or downsizing to single floor living…

Give us a call!

120 South Churton St., Hillsborough 919.732.5858

www.thegatetohome.com


REAL ESTATE GALLERY

HOMES • CONDOS • APARTMENTS

ACTIVE-ADULT COMMUNITY • Tennis Courts • Community Gardens • Dog Parks • Bocce Court • Pickleball Court

• Bar and Grill Patio • Event Lawn • Pool • Clubhouse • Home

JOIN VIP LIST TODAY

LENNAR.COM

919-337-9420

Pursuant to the Fair Housing Act, this housing is intended for occupancy by at least one person 55 years of age or older per home. Existing and proposed amenities for the community are subject to changes, substitutions and/or deletions without notice. Lennar makes no representation or guarantee that the community or any amenities will be built out as currently planned. Lennar’s automated homes are built according to the Wi-Fi Alliance’s program guidelines for Wi-Fi Certified Home Designs. See the Wi-Fi Alliance’s website at www.wi-fi.org for additional information regarding the Wi-Fi Certified Home Design program. The Wi-Fi Alliance also certifies home designs after review of a home floor plan which may occur after your closing. Wireless performance in homes will vary due to design changes, construction changes, placement of furnishings and appliances, usage, and local conditions. Network performance will be affected by network configuration, the number of users and the type of use. Homeowners are responsible for providing their own Internet connection and determining their own bandwidth needs, which may vary. Lennar does not guarantee that networks, equipment or services will meet all homeowner needs. Homeowners are also responsible for configuring all security features. Lennar does not warrant or represent that any network or network device is secure or can prevent all privacy intrusions, malware, or cyber-attacks, even when correctly configured. Certain products and services are provided by third parties, and not Lennar. Lennar does not guarantee any equipment or services provided by third parties. Additional disclosures and disclaimers relating to The Connected Home program will apply. See your purchase agreement and related disclosures for details. Models/ lifestyle photos do not reflect racial or ethnic preference.Visit Lennar.com or see a Lennar New Home Consultant for further details and important legal disclaimers. This is not an offer in states where prior registration is required. Void where prohibited by law. Copyright © 2017 Lennar Corporation. All rights reserved. Lennar and the Lennar logo are U.S. registered service marks or service marks of Lennar Corporation and/or its subsidiaries. (23894) 12/19/17

Franklin Street Realty…Connected to the Community

David Bacon

is connected to the community

Owned and operated Pyewacket Restaurant for 25 years Loves to tend his conifer garden Enjoys sharing food and wine with family and friends Residential realtor for 15 years

919.929.7174 • franklinstreetrealty.com • Chapel Hill

F e b r u a r y / M a r c h

2 0 1 6


HOMES • CONDOS • APARTMENTS

REAL ESTATE GALLERY LIVE TO MAKE AN IMPRESSION

W

e are in a “seller’s market” for well-located land and commercial real estate. Now is a good time to consider selling. Commercial Broker Ron Perkins worked with 21 owners and heirs to assemble and sell this 2+ acre prime retail tract on North Roxboro Street in north Durham. The buyer is now under construction for a self-storage facility. Our experienced brokers are well-versed in zoning, entitlements and other land issues. If you’re looking to buy or sell land or any other commercial property, call us to discuss your needs.

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Potential,

Realized A teacher, alumnus and the family of a current student reflect on the impact of educational nonprofit The Hill Center B Y H O L LY W E ST

PHOTO GR A PHY BY BR IA NA BROUGH

A

PROGRAM THAT STARTED IN A LITTLE YELLOW house 40 years ago is now the go-to resource for Triangle families whose children struggle academically. When it opened in 1977, The Hill Center was a facet of Durham Academy (DA). In 1980, the center was dedicated to founder George Watts Hill and changed its name from the Hill Learning Development Center to The Hill Center. The center now operates as a nonprofit with its own board of directors, but is still affiliated with DA. Its students in grades kindergarten through 12 come from a variety of public and private “base schools” – the schools students attend when they’re not at the center. Many are also homeschooled. In addition to the regular school year program, in which students spend either the morning or the afternoon at the center, it offers summer programs, tutoring and teacher training.

Recipe for success

Lifelong Durham resident Louise Rollins is a proud member of the Little Yellow House Club – a small group of educators at the center who taught in the original building. „ 1 24

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Veteran Hill Center teacher Louise Rollins, who serves as the middle school coordinator, teaches her students about syllables.

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John Holdsclaw tutors his son, Braden, a fifth-grader who attends The Hill Center.

She started as a substitute teacher in 1986 after graduating from Guilford College, then taught in the lower school for a couple of years before leaving to raise her family. She returned as a middle school teacher 13 years ago and now serves as the middle school coordinator and assistant director for the summer program in addition to teaching reading and writing. A DA graduate herself, she’s known about The Hill Center since eighth grade, when a couple of her friends received help from the program. Her three children – Will, 27; Carlton, 24; and Sarah, 20 – attended Durham Academy, too, and Will spent a year with the center. Her husband, Steed, is a Realtor with Peak Swirles & Cavallito Properties. Louise says the center’s tried-and-true formula is what makes it so successful. “We do something by repetition until it’s mastered,” she says. “It’s very routine, it’s very predictable and it’s very differentiated.” Most classes have just four students. Some high school math classes have only two. The individualized attention assists students whether they struggle with ADHD, dyslexia, autism or simple problems with reading comprehension. It also helps keep distractions at bay. 126

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“I can see when the kids just slide a piece of paper in their notebook instead of putting its three holes in the binder,” Louise says. “They don’t get away with that. It’s our vigilance in keeping them organized and holding them accountable, giving them those skills to be independent and self-advocates.” Educators focus instruction for each student based on his or her particular learning differences. Louise says a recent lesson centered on the novel “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer” by Mark Twain. The class listened to the story together as an audiobook, but they didn’t complete the same assignments. “I had two pretty low-functioning eighth-graders, and I wanted to expose them to Mark Twain. It wasn’t that they were going to take away a lot, but just to know the story and be exposed to it,” she says. “The other two kids in that class who were very high functioning, I just differentiated how I assessed them.” Educators teach students practical strategies like crossing off the words in a word bank as they use them. “It seems obvious to you, probably, but it’s not always obvious to them,” Louise says. The middle school has a money management program, MoneyWorks, that teaches students important life skills. Each


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student receives a mock checkbook, debit card and a salary and must pay monthly bills and encounter unexpected expenses. They also must be prepared for class, or they face financial consequences. There are rewards for doing the right thing, too. Students can use “money” they have at the end of the year to buy real gift cards. Seeing kids who have struggled “get it” is one of the most rewarding parts of Louise’s job. The other, she says, is the gratitude of parents. “For some people, they’ve tried so many things, this is kind of the last resort,” she says. Louise, whose son attended The Hill Center for a year, says she understands that it is a commitment for families, and one for which parents often aren’t prepared. “You plan for college, you put money aside for college, but all of a sudden your child gets to fourth grade and they aren’t reading, and you can’t figure it out and you need a lot of help,” she says. “You don’t plan on [spending thousands] for three hours a day, and you’ve got to figure out transportation.” The Hill Center does its best to help families make it work, providing more than $250,000 in aid each year to students with demonstrated financial need. Additionally, parents may be able to earn tax deductions for tuition and fees, and some students qualify for North Carolina’s Special Education Scholarship Grants for Children with Disabilities program, which gives up to $8,000 a year for specific educational expenses. The Hill Center is an investment. But for the families of the more than 170 students who attend, it’s one they know will pay dividends in the future.

A student’s perspective Braden Holdsclaw is competitive.

The fifth-grader says his favorite activity at The Hill Center is playing Word Attack. “They have words on the iPad, and you have to read them out,” he says. “There’s a time test where you have to read as many words as you can in a minute, and I like those kind of challenges.” His natural drive – combined with The Hill Center’s methods – are working. Since he started at the center two years ago, his spelling has improved from a second-grade to a fourth-grade level. His reading progress is also impressive, advancing from a first-grade level to a sixth-grade level – a year ahead. To say that Braden’s parents, John and Marcene Holdsclaw, are pleased with the 11-year-old’s progress would be an understatement. “We’re ecstatic. We can’t say it enough,” John says. “He wrote something one day, and I was like, ‘Who wrote this?’ He said, ‘I did.’” „ F e b r ua ry/ m a r c h 2 0 1 8

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John, a senior vice president for D.C.-based National Cooperative Bank, and Marcene, who works with North Carolina Head Start, live in Chatham County’s Governors Park neighborhood. They decided to put their son in The Hill Center’s morning program after testing revealed there were some areas where a gap needed to be filled. John says among all the educational options in the Triangle, there was one obvious choice. “The Hill Center just has such an amazing track record,” he says. “We’ve seen so many students who have gone on to base schools and have excelled because of the foundation they received at The Hill Center.” Braden, who previously attended Emerson Waldorf School, is currently homeschooled in the afternoons. He will likely transition back to a base school in the next couple years. For now, both he and his parents are happy with the community The Hill Center provides. “They just had a service day the other day, they’ve been bowling, they raise money through the Hill 5K race every year,” he says. “We consider ourselves to be purpose-driven people and – not that most schools don’t – we really feel that Hill has that.” The Hill Center creates a typical, full school day atmosphere by providing recess and reward systems like students would partake in at a base school. Students earn raffle tickets and Hero Bucks for doing good work. John says Braden can often be found counting out his Hero Bucks at the kitchen counter after school, recounting to his parents how he earned them. “One time I earned five Hero Bucks in one day because we came back from our break and all my homework, [my teacher] said, was super-duper good,” Braden says. When he earns those rewards, he feels especially confident – a continuation of the positive feelings he has every day at The


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Hill Center. John says his son hops out of the car in the mornings, excited to go to school. “I’m super-duper happy,” Braden says.

vice president of real estate firm Morris Commercial. For him, it all turned around at The Hill Center. His parents heard encouraging stories about the center from family friend Jean Neville, but Scott was unsure. “I was very reluctant to try any model other than what I was used to, even though it didn’t fit me,” he says. However, upon his first visit to the center, the welcoming and encouraging

Continuing the legacy

When Chapel Hill resident Scott Morris was a sophomore at Chapel Hill High School, he had trouble paying attention and was falling behind. Today, he’s the

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attitudes of everyone he met changed his mind. At his base school, Scott was easily distracted and struggled to follow the teacher and understand the lessons. He needed individual attention – and that’s just what he received at The Hill Center. “With a smaller class size and the help of the amazing teachers at Hill, I went from almost failing math to making A’s and loving geometry and calculus,” he says. He attended until he graduated high school in 2001. Over the years, he and his family remained involved with the center to help other students receive the same life-changing assistance he found there. This school year, the Morris family and their business, Morris Commercial, are sponsors of The Hill Center’s Community Educational Series. It educates community members about topics related to the science of learning and learning styles and provides teachers and parents resources to more effectively help students. Scott’s mother, Waynell Morris, also established an endowment fund at the center this year in honor of mothers who advocate for their children. The fund will help ensure the school remains on the forefront of teaching by providing funding for priority investments. Scott’s wife, Elizabeth Broyhill Morris, serves on the center’s board of directors. She is also the founder of the inspirational website, thisislivinghope. com. Scott and Elizabeth live in the Arbor Lea neighborhood with their children, Woodson, 4, and Nora Anne, 5 months. Scott says what makes The Hill Center stand out from other educational resources is its dedicated team of educators. “The teachers and the executive staff are all so passionate in their work toward helping children better prepare themselves with the unique tools that will help them succeed in life,” he says. “It is truly remarkable.”


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Summer CAMP GUIDE

DON’T LET YOUR CHILDREN SIT ON THE COUCH ALL SUMMER. FROM LEGO ENGINEERING TO GYMNASTICS TO FARMING, THERE’S A CAMP IN THE TRIANGLE FOR EVERY KIND OF KID 1870 FARM SUMMER CAMP 1224 Old Lystra Rd., Chapel Hill 919-590-4120; 1870Farm.com Award-winning program set on 17 acres that incorporates animal care, outdoor games and play, fishing, crafts and farm entrepreneurship in addition to chicken races, gem mining, gardening, hay rides, cooking, fort making, outdoor survival and more. Ages Half-day: 3.5–5; Full-day: 5–13; CIT Program: 14–15 Dates Weekly June 11–Aug. 24 Price Call or visit website. AMERICAN DANCE FESTIVAL 721 Broad St., Durham 919-684-6402; americandancefestival.org Six weeklong camp options include Pilobolus camp, summer dance intensives and a preprofessional dance intensive. Ages 9–18 Dates Weekly June 11–July 27 Price Varies by camp. Visit website. ARTSCAMP AT THE ARTSCENTER 300-G E. Main St., Carrboro 919-929-2787; artscenterlive.org Small classes, taught by professional artists with a focus on skill building and creative expression, are the hallmarks of our camps. Offers both visual and performing art camps every week of summer vacation, including Hiphop Dance, Drawing Techniques, Beat Making Basics, Improv Acting and more. Ages Rising grades K–12 Dates June 11–Aug. 24, 9am–noon, 1–4pm or 9am–4pm; extended care 7:30am–5:30pm Price $165 weeklong half-day camps, $330 weeklong full-day camps. Member discounts available. BALLET SCHOOL OF CHAPEL HILL 1603 E. Franklin St., Chapel Hill 919-942-1339; balletschoolofchapelhill.com Offers a variety of dance camps and workshops in creative arts, ballet, contemporary jazz, rhythm tap, hip-hop, musical theater and fencing. Ages 3–17 Dates June 11–Aug. 18, frequency and times vary Price Varies. Call or visit website.

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BARRISKILL DANCE THEATRE SCHOOL 3642 Shannon Rd., Durham 919-489-5100; barriskilldance.com Classes and dance camps/intensives in creative movement, ballet, jazz, hip-hop, contemporary, conditioning, musical theater and more. Ages 3–18 Dates June 11–Aug. 17; half-day, ¾ day and fullday camps available Price Call or visit website. BOUNCING BULLDOGS JUMP ROPE CAMP 101 South White Oak Dr., Chapel Hill 919-493-7992; bouncingbulldogs.org Jump rope basics and skills, designed for beginners to advanced participants, with the 7-time National Champions and 10-time World Champions. Ages 5–17 Dates Visit website; 8am–noon Price $45/day; $225/week CAMELOT ACADEMY EDU-VENTURES 809 Proctor St., Durham 919-688-3040; camelotacademy.org Daily academic sessions focused on math and language arts, plus adventure-themed field trips. Ages 6–12 Dates June 11–Aug. 3, full or half days Price Call or visit website. CAMELOT ACADEMY SUMMER EXPLORATIONS 809 Proctor St., Durham 919-688-3040; camelotacademy.org Hands-on experiential learning activities like “Design & Build,” agriscience, language immersion, the arts, personal development and more. Opportunity to earn high school credit. Ages 5–18 Dates Weekly June 11–Aug. 13; full or half days Price Call or visit website. CAMELOT ACADEMY SUMMER SCHOOL 809 Proctor St., Durham 919-688-3040; camelotacademy.org Two-week sessions offering remediation or enrichment in math and/or language arts. Ages Grades 4–12 Dates Two-week sessions June 11–Aug. 3; full or half days Price Call or visit website.

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CAMP RIVERLEA 8302 S. Lowell Rd., Bahama 770-633-7698 (winter); 919-477-8739 (summer); campriverlea.com Provides high-quality outdoors and arts programs that emphasize personal growth, learning new skills, positive interpersonal relationships and appreciation for the natural world. Ages 5–12 Dates Session 1: June 11–June 29, Session 2: July 2–July 13, Session 3: July 16–Aug. 3. Open house June 9, 1–4:30pm Price Sessions 1 and 3: $1,035; Session 2: $690 CAROLINA FRIENDS SUMMER PROGRAMS 4809 Friends School Rd., Durham 919-384-9089; cfsnc.org/summer Weekly courses in subject areas such as 3-D animation, theater, fort-building, cooking, forensic science, sewing, sports, LEGOs, comic design, video production, game design, Harry Potter, Star Wars, environmental science and more. Ages 4–18 Dates June 18–Aug. 17; 9am–3pm; extended care available from 8am–5:45pm Price $270–$295/week CARRBORO RECREATION AND PARKS DEPARTMENT 100 N. Greensboro St., Carrboro 919-918-7364; carrbororec.org Individual sports, arts, outdoor adventure and theme camps such as water fun, science, fishing camps, mountain biking, LEGO engineering and much more. Ages 3–16, depending on the camp Dates June 11–Aug. 17. Length/frequency varies. Price Varies for each camp. CHAPEL HILL GYMNASTICS 7405 Rex Rd., Ste. 207, Chapel Hill 919-942-3655; chapelhillgymnastics.com Quality instruction and lots of fun in an energetic learning environment. Ages 3–14 Dates June 4–Aug 24. Full-day camp 9am–4pm, half-day camp 9am–noon or 1pm–4pm; extended care available Price $180/half-day/week; $240/full-day/week u


SUMMER CAMP 2018 June 11 - August 17 Weekly camp options for children ages 3-14 years

MONTESSORI CHILDREN’S HOUSE OF DURHAM

MCH

Registration OPEN HOUSE Begins Sunday, January 8, 2017 January 29

APPLICATION DEADLINE Friday, January 20, mchdurham.org/summer/ 2017 An AMS and SACS accredited F e b r u a r yschool / M a r c hfor 2 0 1children 8 | D u r18 h a months-6th m m a g . c o m | grade 133


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summer camp guide CHAPEL HILL PARKS AND RECREATION 200 Plant Rd., Chapel Hill 919-968-2784; chapelhillparks.org Options include Outdoor Adventure, Social Café, Play-Well TEKnology, Ceramic Arts and Jumpstart Sports theme camps such as lacrosse, cheerleading, Olympics, ultimate frisbee and much more. Some inclusion support is available for campers with disabilities. Ages 5–16 Dates June 11–Aug. 17 Price Varies for each camp. CHAPEL HILL TENNIS CLUB 403 Westbrook Dr., Carrboro 919-929-5248; chapelhilltennisclub.com Tennis instruction for beginners to advanced along with swimming and other sports in a fun and positive environment; advanced tennis camp available for tournament players. Ages 5–15 Dates Call or visit website. Price Call or visit website. CHAPEL HILL-CARRBORO YMCA & YMCA AT MEADOWMONT 980 MLK Jr. Blvd., Chapel Hill / 301 Old Barn Ln., Chapel Hill / 1720 Clearwater Lake Rd., Chapel Hill 919-442-9622; ymcatriangle.org

Camps with activities including cooking, science, sports, outdoor, and teen leadership. Ages 3–17 Dates June 11–Aug. 24, except July 4 Price Call or visit website. THE CLUBHOUSE @ BRIGHT HORIZONS 2500 Highstone Rd., Cary 919-380-2003; trackoutraleigh.com A unique camp experience where children will experience many summer adventures through various activities and field trips. Our facility has a state-of-the-art gym facility, art studio, computer lab with 3-D printer, several playgrounds and a splash pad for children to enjoy. Our experienced counselors plan and provide wonderful adventures and activities that speak to all children from the sports enthusiast to the scientist at heart. Ages 5–14 Dates June 11–Aug. 24 Price Call for pricing. CRESSET CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 3707 Garrett Road, Durham 919-354-8000; cressetchristian.org A high-energy, fun, engaging elementary and middle school all-day camp. Our theme is Passport to Adventure centered on a study of cultures around the world. Activities include indoor/outdoor games, crafts, creative thinking exercises and

academic enrichment. Weekly field trips, swimming, lunch and daily snack included. Ages Rising grades 1–5 for elementary program; rising grades 6–9 for middle school leadership program Dates June 4–June 29; July 9–Aug. 3 (eightweek session); 7:30am–5:30pm Price Weekly: $200, summer package: $1,600 DUKE SCHOOL 3716 Erwin Rd., Durham 919-493-2642; dukeschool.org More than 60 choices, including technology, coding, outdoor adventures, creative writing, art, music, sports, crafts, community service, day camps for preschool and more. Ages 4–15 Dates June 18–Aug. 3, 8am–4pm; Aftercare available until 6pm Price $250–$410/week DUKE YOUTH PROGRAMS SUMMER CAMPS Campus Box 90700, Bishop's House, Durham 919-684-6259; learnmore.duke.edu/youth Program options include science, writing, engineering, math and leadership. Ages Grades 5–11 Dates June 17–June 29, July 1–13, July 15–27; 8:30am–4pm Price $1,600/day campers; $3,000–$3,400/ residential campers; $2,000/extended-day campers (Duke Young Writers participants only) u

Summer camp registration is now open! There’s something fun for everyone: u

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Much more!

LEARN TO FENCE! SUMMER CAMPS FOR KIDS AGES 8–17

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ACHIEVE ACADEMIC SUCCESS THIS SUMMER Summer is a great time to build academic skills and confidence. Our summer programs feature:

• Options for students

Kindergarten — Rising 9th • Durham and Raleigh locations • Five weeks of research-based instruction in reading, writing, math, and executive function • Low student-teacher ratio

Also Offering Group and Individual Tutoring for K – 12 Students

Discover how The Hill Center can make summertime your child’s time to thrive.

The Hill Center transforms students with learning differences into confident, independent learners. Our Summer Programs do not require an LD/ADHD diagnosis

3200 Picket Road Durham, NC 27705

Tours and information | www.hillcenter.org admissions@hillcenter.org • (919) 489-7464.

Sunshine, fresh air and laughs are just ahead. A week at camp equals a happier, healthier kid!

SUMMER DAY CAMP Choose from full-day, half-day, sports and traditional day camps for all ages throughout the Triangle. Weekly themes add variety to activities.

Registration begins January 1 online or at the Chapel Hill-Carrboro YMCA.

Register before April 1,

get 2017 prices!

YMCATriangle.org/day-camp 980 MLK Jr. Blvd., Chapel Hill

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summer camp guide

DURHAM ARTS COUNCIL SUMMER ARTS CAMP 120 Morris St., Durham 919-560-2726; durhamarts.org Themes vary. One-and two-week Cultural Camp themes include Swinging Swaziland, Captivating Cabaret and Groovy Guyana. Flexible Mini-Camp with the theme Durham, Past, Present and Future also available. Campers have the opportunity to participate in clay, drawing/painting, mixed media, dance, theater and chorus classes. Aftercare includes guest artists and field trips. Also offers teen intensives for ages 13–17 (call for details). Ages Rising K–age 13 Dates June 8–Aug. 24; day camp, 9am–3pm; afternoon session, 3–5:30pm Price Morning session, $170/week; afternoon session, $70/week. Scholarships available based on need. DURHAM PARKS AND RECREATION SUMMER CAMP 400 Cleveland St., Durham 919-560-4355; dprplaymore.org; dprcareprograms.org

DPR offers a safe and inclusive environment where all children and teens are encouraged to participate. Committed to the development of campers’ life skills through group activities and exposure to diverse athletic and educational experiences, it also offers a variety of specialty camps for teens with disabilities as well as environmentally friendly and teen camps. Ages 5–21 (Child must have completed kindergarten) Dates June 18–Aug. 17, 7:30am–6pm Price Call or visit website. Registration starts March 12. EMERSON WALDORF SCHOOL 6211 New Jericho Rd., Chapel Hill 919-967-1858, ext. 143; emersonwaldorf.org Activities include fort-making, art, music, drama, outdoor explorations, woodworking, fiber arts, skateboarding and more. CIT program also available. Ages 4–18 Dates June 18–Aug. 3; 8:30am– 3pm; extended care available Price $170–$225/week

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GIGI’S PLAYHOUSE 2887 Jones Franklin Rd., Raleigh 919-307-3952; gigisplayhouse.org/raleigh Weeklong summer programs for teens and adults with Down syndrome. Participants explore their independence while experiencing exciting activities across the Triangle. Traveling with one-to-one volunteers, the program builds lifelong friendships, lasting memories and essential skills for independence. Ages 13+, including adults Dates Visit website. Price Visit website. THE HILL CENTER – LOWER SCHOOL 3200 Pickett Rd., Durham or Ravenscroft School, 7409 Falls of Neuse Rd., Raleigh 919-489-7464; hillcenter.org Summer program offers individualized instruction with a 4:1 student/teacher ratio in reading, writing and math for children with learning differences. Ages Grades K–6 Dates June 25–July 27 (five-week session); 8:30–11:30am daily, except July 4 Price $2,850 THE HILL CENTER – MIDDLE SCHOOL 3200 Pickett Rd., Durham 919-489-7464; hillcenter.org The Hill Middle School program offers a thematic study of reading, writing, math and executive function study skills in a small group setting. Ages Rising grades 7–9 Dates June 25–July 27 (five-week session), 1–4pm daily, except July 4 Price $2,400

DENTISTS

IMMACULATA CATHOLIC SCHOOL 721 Burch Ave., Durham 919-682-5847; immaculataschool.org/camps Offering a variety of camps in academics, arts & crafts, language & culture, music, religion, sports, STEM and more. Visit website for details. Ages PreK–8th grade Dates Weekly June–August Price Varies by camp. INTERNATIONAL MONTESSORI SCHOOL 3001 Academy Rd., Bldg. 300, Durham 919-401-4343; imsnc.org

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Summer camps for young children in a safe, nurturing environment, tucked away in Durham amongst the trees. Enthusiastic summer camp counselors delight in engaging your young child's creativity and imagination through music, movement, stories and exciting, hands-on activities with others in a multi-age setting. Ages 3–5 Dates June 18–Aug. 3 with partialand full-day options Price Half-day camps (8:30am– 12:30pm), $225/week; full-day camps (8:30am–3pm), $295/week; early drop-off and late pick-up available for an additional fee. KIDZU CHILDREN’S MUSEUM 201 S. Estes Dr., Chapel Hill 919-933-1455; kidzuchildrensmuseum.org Camp favorites include weekly themes of Kids in the Kitchen, Lights! Camera! Action!, Tiny Tinkerers and more! See website for weekly themes and descriptions. Enrollment is on a first-come, first-served basis, and we close registration at 15 campers per week. Ages 3–5; expansion for ages 6–9 to be announced Dates Weekly camps June 5–Aug. 3; 9am–noon, optional aftercare until 1pm Price $170 members, $185 nonmembers; aftercare $30. Available Feb. 1. Early registration available for members and past participants. MID-SOUTH FENCERS CLUB 125 N. Gregson St., Durham 919-286-3100; midsouthfencersclub.org Half- and full-day camp options from beginner to advanced. Ages 8-17, varies by camp. Dates Five-day camps, June 11Aug. 17 Price $195-$425 MONTESSORI CHILDREN'S HOUSE OF DURHAM 2800 Pickett Rd., Durham 919-489-9045; mchdurham.org Weekly themed camps include athletics, music, visual & performing arts, cooking, nature exploration, gardening and science. Ages 3–14 Dates June 11–Aug. 17 (closed week of July 4); full- and half-day camps Price Visit website. Registration began Jan. 29. u


summer camp guide

MONTESSORI COMMUNITY SCHOOL 4512 Pope Rd., Durham 919-493-8541; mcsdurham.org Exciting summer camp programs offered in partnership with the Museum of Life & Science conveniently located on our campus. Ages Grades K–8 Dates Call or visit website. Price Call or visit website. MOREHEAD PLANETARIUM SUMMER SCIENCE CAMPS 250 E. Franklin St., Chapel Hill 919-962-1236; moreheadplanetarium.org/camp Children naturally love to explore our world, and Summer Science Camps are the perfect way to encourage your child’s curiosity and intellectual growth in a fun, nurturing environment. Ages Grades K–8 Dates Check website. Price Check website. Registration began Jan. 22. NATURE ADVENTURES CAMP AT SARAH P. DUKE GARDENS 420 Anderson St., Durham 919-668-1707; gardens.duke.edu/learn/camp Ages Rising grades K–8 Dates Spring break camp for grades K–5: April 2–6. Weekly summer camps for rising K–5: June 11–July 27, 9am–1pm (extended

care 1–4pm). Camp for rising 6–8 grades, July 30–August 3, 9am–1pm. Price $200 weekly; $170 for each additional week or sibling; extended care: $100/week. OUR PLAYHOUSE SUMMER CAMPS 3501 Hwy. 54 W., Chapel Hill and 2400 University Dr., Durham 919-967-2700 (Chapel Hill), 919-967-2700 (Durham); ourplayhousepreschool.com Hands-on learning with the support of skilled teachers who use a Reggio-inspired philosophy. Indoor and outdoor classrooms foster children’s growth across social, emotional, academic and cognitive domains. Projects include sensory, art, building and movement activities along with plenty of outdoor play. Ages 2–6 Dates June 18–Aug. 13; three- and five-day schedules available; 8:30am–12:30pm with extended day available Price $185 for 5 days; $135 for 3 days PLAYMAKERS REPERTORY COMPANY THEATRE QUEST Joan H Gillings Center for Dramatic Art – UNC, 120 Country Club Rd., Chapel Hill 919-962-7935; playmakersrep.org Middle school theater camps in acting, musical theater, improv and more.

www.DukeSchool.org

Ages Rising grades 6–9 Dates Weekly June 11–July 20 Price $325/week PLAYMAKERS REPERTORY COMPANY THEATRE INTENSIVE Joan H Gillings Center for Dramatic Art – UNC, 120 Country Club Rd., Chapel Hill 919-962-7935; playmakersrep.org High school actors rehearse and train alongside professional theater artists and perform on PlayMakers’ main stage. Ages Rising 9th graders through recent high school graduates Dates June 18–July 29 Price $1,500; scholarships available. PLAYMAKERS REPERTORY COMPANY THEATRETECH Joan H Gillings Center for Dramatic Art – UNC, 120 Country Club Rd., Chapel Hill 919-962-7935; playmakersrep.org High school theater tech students work alongside professional theater artists and apprentice behind the scenes in stage management, costumes, scenic, props, lighting and sound. Ages Grades 11–12 and recent high school graduates Dates June 18–Aug. 1 Price $750; scholarships available. u

ninjas Turning kids into

one obstacle at a time

classes, parties, summer and school’s out camps

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Take YOUR Time

Open House Dates:

“To Each A Unique Path” • Grades K-12 • Mastery-based Learning • 10:1 Student/Teacher Ratio A Unique Resource for Academically Talented Students Since 1983 809 Proctor St. Durham, NC 27707 (919) 688-3040 www.camelotacademy.org

Saturday, February 24th 1-3 pm

&

Saturday, March 17th 1-3 pm Call (919) 688-3040 for more information.

Merit Scholarships Available!

Pursue

Explore

Summer Camps Since 1983

Academic interests

Career opportunities

Discover New interests and talents CONNECT Experience

With other motivated peers

Campus life

YOUTH PROGRAMS @DukeYouthPrograms @DukeYouthPrograms We provide open enrollment with no application requirement. Just head to: LEARNMORE.DUKE.EDU\YOUTH2018 Youth@Duke.EDU • (919) 684–6259

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summer camp guide

PRIMROSE SCHOOL OF CHAPEL HILL AT BRIAR CHAPEL 81 Falling Springs Dr., Chapel Hill 919-441-0441; primrosechapelhill.com This summer, imaginations take flight through different weekly themes that engage school-aged children in creative and critical thinking while doing fun, STEAM-based projects and field trip experiences. Ages Grades K–5 Dates Weekly June 11–Aug. 23, 8am–5pm Price $295/week includes full lunch and two snacks.

Day or several weeks of camp at Schoolhouse of Wonder, your child will be engaged in a variety of outdoor activities — fort building, nature art, discovering plants and animals in the forest and creeks, listening to storytellers and more. Leadership development and training available for 13- to 17-year-olds through counselor-in-training opportunities and paid junior counselor positions. Ages 5–7; 8–12; 13–17 Dates March 19–Aug. 24 Price $69–$309; multi-camp and sibling discounts, limited financial assistance available.

ST. THOMAS MORE CATHOLIC SCHOOL DAY CAMPS 920 Carmichael St., Chapel Hill 919-929-1546; stmcsnc.org Various themes including cooking, art, music and rhythmic gymnastics. Ages Grades K–8 Dates June and July Price Varies based on camp. Details released online in March.

SOUTHERN SEASON: KIDS IN THE KITCHEN CAMPS 201 South Estes Dr., Chapel Hill 919-929-7133; southernseason.com Each day and week will have unique themes. Ages 8–12 Dates June 18–21, July 16–19; 11am–1pm Price $40 per day/$150 per week. Registration begins early March.

SCHOOLHOUSE OF WONDER SCHOOL BREAK AND SUMMER CAMPS West Point on the Eno, 5101 N. Roxboro St., Durham 919-477-2116; schoolhouseofwonder.org Whether they participate in a single Discovery

SOUTHERN SEASON: TEEN BOOT CAMP 201 South Estes Dr., Chapel Hill 919-929-7133; southernseason.com Two-day sessions that include Cooking 101 and Basic Knife Skills give teens a base of culinary knowledge.

Dates July 9–10, Aug. 1–2; 5–7pm Ages 13–17 Price $40 per day/$75 both days. Registration begins early March. STROUDS CREEK FARM SUMMER CAMP 1600 Friendship Ln., Hillsborough 919-406-4552 ; stroudscreekfarm.com Summer camp programs designed to offer a unique summer experience for your child. Our program is a down-to-earth opportunity for a nature-based experience. The time spent at Strouds Creek Farm is child-centered and focuses on a routine of activities, but is not an inflexible, super-scheduled day. We calmly approach the day and allow for flexibility and following the child's interest. Ages 4–12 Dates Weekly, June 11–August 17 Price Call or visit our website. THE STUDIO SCHOOL OF DURHAM 1201 W. Woodcroft Pkwy., Durham 919-967-2700; studioschoolofdurham.org Hands-on learning in art, STEM, entrepreneurship and a variety of other topics. Ages 6–12 Dates June 26–Aug. 11; closed week of July 4 Price $200 for 8:30am–noon, $300 for 8:30am–3pm u

GIVE THEM A UNIQUE

Summer Experience AT STROUDS CREEK FARM

Summer Camp in a Fun, Educational Farm setting

For Children Ages 4-12

Camp Hours 8:30 am - 4:30pm

Children’s Birthday Parties Year-Round

After-School Programs

Conveniently located minutes from Downtown Hillsborough, I-40, I-85 and US70

919.406.4552

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1600 Friendship Lane, Hillsborough stroudscreekfarm.com

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A day camp in Durham County for ages 5 to 12

www.campriverlea.com

Register online today! Summer 2018 sessions: June 11 – June 29 July 2 – July 13 July 16 – August 3

770-633-7698 winter 919-477-8739 summer

Offering classes for all ages, preschoolers through adults We encourage our dancers to be hard working, independent, responsible and passionate people in all aspects of their lives.

barriskilldance.com

Summer Camps Available! 3642 Shannon Road, Durham NC 27707

919-489-5100

contact@barriskilldance.com

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summer camp guide

Ages 5–11 Dates June 11–August 13 Price $240, members; $260, non-members

SUMMER@SAINT MARY’S 900 Hillsborough St., Raleigh 919-424-4028; sms.edu Summer@Saint Mary’s gives participants the opportunity to explore new interests, build fundamental skills, pursue artistic dreams and expand academic horizons. Ages Rising grades K–12 Dates June 18–July 27, one-week sessions. Early morning drop-off and after-camp care. Full- and half-day, all-girl and co-ed offerings. Price Holiday special rate through Jan. 1, 2018; early bird pricing Jan. 2–Feb. 1. Regular price $165–$325 per session, $995 for residential Innovators Hub program CAMP STARFISH 6901 Turkey Farm Rd., Chapel Hill 919-967-0915; sssrc.org Nine weeks of themed fun. Activities include swimming lessons and tennis instruction, arts/ crafts, various outdoor games and free swim. All staff is CPR certified, and the camper/ counselor ratio is 6:1. The Scrap Exchange, High Touch High Tech and Bricks 4 Kidz join the programs weekly. Extended Care, lunches and sibling discounts available. Montessori Ad PRINT.pdf

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TRIANGLE DAY SCHOOL 4911 Neal Rd., Durham 919-383-8800; triangledayschool.org Students will have the opportunity to learn a new craft or hobby, enhance and develop existing skills, travel to local places and make new friends. Our staff consists of experts, artists and educators from TDS and other local schools and programs. Our ultimate goal when your child leaves TDS feeling happy and full of great memories. Ages 3–15 Dates June 18–Aug. 10, 9am–3pm; extended care available Price Before Feb. 1, $270/session; after Feb. 1, $285/session TRINITY SCHOOL OF DURHAM AND CHAPEL HILL 4011 Pickett Rd., Durham 919-402-8262; trinityschoolnc.org Camp topics include writing, math, basketball, soccer, volleyball, drama, dance, pottery, LEGO robotics, art, sewing, cooking and much more. 10:30 AM

Ages 5–18, grades K–12 Dates Weekly June 4–Aug. 17; morning and afternoon sessions available; schedule available online in January Price $125–$250/week USA NINJA CHALLENGE 1810 Martin Luther King Jr. Pkwy., Ste. A., Durham 984-219-2559; usaninjachallenge.com/durham-nc Turning kids into ninjas one obstacle at a time. Ages 6–15 Dates Call or check website. Price Call or check website. YMCA CAMP CHEERIO 1430 Camp Cheerio Rd., Glade Valley 336–869-0195 (fall, winter, spring); 336-363-2604; campcheerio.org YMCA residential camp in the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina. Activities offered include aquatics, sports, field games, creative arts and nature study. Ages 7–15 Dates June 10–Aug. 17 Price $1,060–$2,540

The Triangle’s only fully accredited toddler through 8th grade Montessori school Inspiring independence, self-discipline and leadership in a challenging, multi-age environment. SERVING STUDENTS 18 MONTHS - 8TH GRADE

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919-493-8541

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mcsdurham.org admissions@mcsdurham.org 4512 Pope Rd., Durham, NC 27707

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Smile. It’s Who You Are. Duke Street Pediatric Dentistry Martha Ann Keels, DDS PhD Dylan S. Hamilton, DMD MS

919.220.1416 Fellow: American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry

www.DukeStreetSmiles.com

2711 N. Duke Street

Durham, North Carolina 27704

Certified: American Board of Pediatric Dentistry

Be who you are…
 Discover who you can be. Accepting applications for 2018-2019 A co-ed, independent school in Durham serving students from TK through 8th.

TRIANGLE DAY SCHOOL

Summer Programs Ages 3-15 June 18-August 10 


Forest Explorers Full STEAM Ahead! Sports Fun LEGO Visual Arts Arts & Crafts Gardening Jewelry Funky Junky Creations Drone Programming Tinker Thinkers Minecraft Baker’s Delight and more… For more information, contact:
 summer@triangledayschool.org www.triangledayschool.org 
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bites of bull city

AMBER WATSON IS THE CREATOR AND WRITER OF THE LOCAL

A Second Wind for the Food Scene B Y A M B E R WAT S ON

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DURHAM FOOD AND RESTAURANT NEWS BLOG, BITES OF BULL CITY (BITESOFBULLCITY.COM).

T’S EVIDENT BY THE NUMBER OF CRANES dotting Durham’s landscape that our city is in the middle of a major growth spurt, and it’s not just builders and investors who view this as prime time for new opportunity. The fact that we have seen several well-known restaurants expand and open up a second (sometimes third!) location in recent months shows that now is the time for many in the local food industry to catch their second wind. Ten years since opening Scratch Bakery downtown, award-winning pastry chef Phoebe Lawless opened her first full-scale restaurant, The Lakewood, last spring in the expanding neighborhood of the same name (which also recently welcomed the third Cocoa Cinnamon location and a new thrift store component of The Scrap Exchange). As Phoebe planned out the new space, she knew it would make an ideal spot to include a second version of the bakery, and so, “Baby Scratch” was born. In that same vicinity, Wendy Woods, longtime resident of the city’s West End and owner of Nosh, made good on a dream to open a fun and friendly eatery in her neighborhood, renovating an old gas station across from the Durham Co-Op Market and turning it into a modern diner called GRUB. After five years of operating out of his popular seafood shack on Mangum Street, Chef Ricky Moore also opened a second Saltbox Seafood Joint location in December, inside the former Shrimp Boats restaurant on Durham-Chapel Hill Boulevard. As popularity for his lightly battered and fried, fresh North Carolina fish grew, so did the line and the wait times. By taking the opportunity to open an additional location – a more traditional restaurant complete with inside seating – Ricky expanded his service to a growing base of customers.

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bites of bull city

of the farm-to-table movement and knew we wanted to focus more on cultivating relationships from the soil to the table while showcasing the diversity of forgotten flavors from 19th-century Cuba,” says owner Roberto Copa Matos. “As we searched for an adequate space, we found many difficulties in the leasing market and decided to pursue the route of owning our own restaurant space. When we found out that –with the help

Revolution space, we knew we had found our perfect match.” COPA, located at 107 W. Main St., will focus on tapas and cocktails of old Cuba. One of the most satisfying aspects of this wave of new spots in the food scene is knowing that it is driven by local restaurateurs and chefs Vignette Modern Roma – people from the community we love, cooking Make suresticking your home is holiday ready by the food we love, around to share it ordering beautiful new with us. Hunter Douglas window fashions today. Rebate savings are ®

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*Manufacturer’s mail-in rebate offer valid for qualifying purchases made 9/16/17—12/11/17 from participating dealers in the U.S. only. Rebate will be issued in the form of a prepaid reward card and mailed within 6 receipt. Funds do not expire. Subject to applicable law, a $2.00 monthly fee will be assessed against card balance 6 months after card issuance and each month thereafter. Additional limitations may apply. Ask partici and rebate form. ©2017 Hunter Douglas. All rights reserved. All trademarks used herein are the property of Hunter Douglas or their respective owners. 17Q4MAGVIGC2

COURTESY HARDEN FURNITURE

Gray Brooks and the team behind Pizzeria Toro also continue to weave culinary roots across the city, this December opening up Jack Tar and The Colonel’s Daughter. In addition to Littler, which opened in 2016, this is their third restaurant downtown. Durham has become a very desirable spot for expanding food and drink businesses based in other parts of the Triangle as well. Take, for instance, Neomonde, a popular Mediterranean restaurant and bakery, with locations in Raleigh and Morrisville. This crowd-pleasing eatery makes its Durham debut this winter in the lower level of the Unscripted Durham, also home to Jack Tar and Pour Taproom, an Asheville-based, pouryour-own-brew concept that now has seven locations in the South and California and continues to expand. Raleigh-based wine shop, bar and lounge The Wine Feed’s owners could not wait to explore options in the Bull City as they looked at opening a second place. “We have enjoyed the food and beverage scene in Durham for many years,” says co-owner Philip Rubin. “Being Raleigh natives, going to some of Durham’s great restaurants always felt like a mini vacation and special treat. We were drawn to that location [on South Roxboro Street, next to Bull City Ciderworks] because there is a tremendous amount of development on that side of Durham with apartments, offices and other retail filling up the lots across the street from us.” Chapel Hill’s Beer Study had the same idea, searching for a couple of years for the perfect spot to expand in the Bull City before it all finally came together at their current location in the Rockwood Shopping Center on University Drive. When construction caused Finch’s Family Restaurant – a long-standing Raleigh staple – to pack up and move, they too pioneered into Durham and converted an old plant nursery, retail shop and greenhouse on Old Chapel Hill Road into their new diner. The quick growth of the area, while boosting the restaurant economy, also comes with some drawbacks, the cost of leasing a building downtown being one of them. This is what promoted Beyù Caffè to move a couple doors down into a building they now own, and the popular Old Havana Sandwich Shop to decide to recently purchase and make plans to move into the former Revolution

Wrap up your holiday décor restaurant space. “Through our journey Old of an SBA loan and the generous gifts from nowat and save. Havana, we made a commitment to be part family and friends – we could purchase the old

Wrap up your holiday décor now and save.

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Sew Fine II 5850 Fayetteville Rd Ste 104 M-F: 9:00 am - 5:00 pm

Sew Fine II Sat: 10:00 am - 2:00 pm 5850 Fayetteville RdSun: SteClosed 104 919-806-3638 www.sewfine2.com

M-F: 9:00 am – 5:00Ask pm us about special savings on select Sat: 10:00 am – 2:00Hunter pm Douglas operating systems. Sun: Closed 919-806-3638 sewfine2.com

*Manufacturer’s mail-in rebate offer valid for qualifying purchases made 9/16/17—12/11/17 from participating dealers in the U.S. only. Rebate will be issued in the form of a prepaid reward card and mailed within 6 weeks of rebate claim receipt. Funds do not expire. Subject to applicable law, a $2.00 monthly fee will be assessed against card balance 6 months after card issuance and each month thereafter. Additional limitations may apply. Ask participating dealer for details and rebate form. ©2017 Hunter Douglas. All rights reserved. All trademarks used herein are the property of Hunter Douglas or their respective owners. 17Q4MAGVIGC2

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taste NORTHERN DURHAM / NEAR INTERSTATE 85 GUESS ROAD

Full Service C&H Cafeteria 919-286-7303

Northgate Mall 1058 W. Club Blvd. • A & D Buffalo’s • Baja Shack • Cajun Café • Carolina BBQ & Chicken • Chef’s House • Chopsticks • Cinnamonster • The Cookie Store • Esmeralda’s Cafe • Greek Cuisine • Haagen-Dazs/Planet Smoothie • Pretzel Twister • Salcedo’s Pizza • Subway • Tomo Japan

Green Paradise (919) 286-4009 Pan Pan Diner 919-416-1950 Randy’s Pizza 919-286-7272 Ruby Tuesday 919-286-5100

Gocciolina Upscale Italian fare in a cozy atmosphere. This wildly popular restaurant has graced our Best Of list again and again. 3314 Guess Rd.; 919-973-4089; gocciolina.com Hog Heaven Bar-B-Q Homestyle Eastern barbecue, fried chicken & seafood. Enjoy with a giant glass of iced tea. 2419 Guess Rd.; 919-286-7447; hogheavenbarbecue.com Jimmy’s Famous Hot Dogs Old-fashioned burgers, fries and a mean Carolina-style dog. 2728 Guess Rd.; 919-471-0005; jimmysfamoushotdogs.com La Cacerola Cafe & Restaurant Honduran specialties such as pupusas and chorizo asado. 2016 Guess Rd.; 919-294-6578 Thai Spoon All the trappings for a delicious experience: pad thai, drunken noodles and curries. 3808 Guess Rd.; 919-908-7539; thaispoonrestaurant.com HILLSBOROUGH ROAD Bennett Pointe Grill & Bar There’s something to please all palates on the large menu of this multiregional American restaurant. 4625 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-382-9431; bpgrill.com Shanghai Restaurant Established in the 1980s, this Catonese restaurant offers both Americanized and authentic dishes. 3433 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-3837581; shanghaidurham.com Wimpy’s Grill Specializing in old-fashioned burgers and hot dogs. Open till 2 p.m. weekdays, cash only. 617 Hicks St.; 919-286-4380; wimpysgrillnc.com HILLANDALE ROAD Bleu Olive High-quality comfort food incorporating local ingredients and Mediterranean flair. Family operated & chef-driven. 1821 Hillandale Rd.; 919 383-8502; bleuolivebistro. com BR

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El Corral Mexican Restaurant Authentic Mexican faijitas, tacos, enchiladas and a great chorizo queso dip. 1821 Hillandale Rd., Ste. 8; 919-309-4543; elcorralnc.com

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Pomodoro Italian Kitchen Homemade sauces on fresh-made pizzas, pastas and other Italian favorites. 1811 Hillandale Rd.; 919-382-2915; pomodoroitaliankitchen.info NORTH POINTE DRIVE The French Corner Bakery Artisan breads, beautifully crafted tarts and pastries, plus lunch. Baking classes taught by French-trained master baker chef Benjamin Messaoui. 2005 North Pointe Dr., Ste. B.; 919-698-9836 MORE NORTHERN DURHAM DINING Alpaca Peruvian rotisserie chicken. Need we say more? 302 Davidson Ave.; 919-220-9028; alpacachicken.com Bullock’s Bar-B-Que A staple in the community since 1952, serving up soul in Eastern-style barbecue, Brunswick stew and fried chicken. 3330 Quebec Dr.; 919-383-3211; bullocks-bbq.com

BR

Silver Spoon Restaurant A large menu of breakfast favorites like strawberry waffles and omelettes, plus sandwiches, pastas, salads and kids plates. 5230 N. Roxboro Rd.; 919-479-7172; silverspoonnc.com

NEAR DOWNTOWN

BROAD STREET Joe Van Gogh Cozy and full of natural light, this local coffee shop sources quality beans for a superior coffee. 1104-B Broad St.; 919-286-4800; joevangogh.com. The Palace International African cuisine including curry goat, dovi chicken and samosas. 1104-A Broad St.; 919-416-4922; thepalaceinternational.com Watts Grocery A Durham native, chef Amy Tornquist artfully develops Southern-inspired dishes with seasonal, local ingredients. 1116 Broad St.; 919-416-5040; wattsgrocery.com BR

OF DURHAM 2016

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Full Bar Kid’s Menu Beer & Wine ERWIN ROAD Another Broken Egg Cafe Unique breakfast and lunch menu including cinnamon roll french toast and a scrambled skillet. 2608 Erwin Rd., Ste. 120; 919-381-5172; anotherbrokenegg.com BR Black Twig Cider House Cider-and-sausage focused restaurant with more than 80 ciders on draft and in bottles. Try the “Northern Spy” and join in a Txotx! 2812 Erwin Rd., Ste. 104; 919-321-0203; blacktwigciderhouse.com Early Bird Donuts Donuts, biscuits, croissant breakfast sandwiches and coffee. Try the cinnamon sugar donut. 2816 Erwin Rd., Ste. 101; 984-888-0417 MediTerra Grill Mediterranean and Lebanese cuisine, offering gyros, kabobs and curry. 2608 Erwin Rd., Ste. 136; 919-383-0066; mediterranc.com

Picnic Order the pulled pork, of course, but also the fried chicken, mac & cheese and hushpuppies. 1647 Cole Mill Rd.; 919-908-9128; picnicdurham.com

IBEST

Brunch Outdoor Seating

Melo Trattoria & Tapas Classic Italian - think spaghetti and meatballs and chicken parmigiana - meets tapas. 1821 Hillandale Rd., Ste. 3; 919-384-9080; melotrattoria.com

Wellspring CafeWINNER Salad and hot bar in the Whole Foods Market, plus sandwiches, pizza and sushi. 621 Broad St.; 919-286-2290

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Nosh “Eclectic foodstuffs” like “Mike’s Breakfast Pizza,” “Coach’s Queso” sandwich and the brown derby chopper salad. 2812 Erwin Rd., Ste. 101; 919-383-4747; noshfood.com BR Saladelia Cafe Espresso and organic smoothie bar, scratch made pastries, gourmet sandwiches, salads and soups. Open for dine-in or carry-out. 2424 Erwin Rd.; 919-416-1400; saladelia.com BR

Smashburger Unique burgers smashed on the grill, chicken and salads. 2608 Erwin Rd., Ste. 116; 919-237-1070; smashburger.com Sushi Love Specialty sushi rolls such as the “Honey Love” roll topped with mango and kiwi, as well as other Asian cuisine favorites. 2812 Erwin Rd., Ste. 204; 919-309-2401; sushilove.org ERWIN SQUARE Guasaca Arepas, salads and rice bowls with South American flavor. 2200 W. Main St., Ste. A100; 919-294-8939; guasaca.com Local 22 Kitchen & Bar Upscale Southern-inspired cuisine, with emphasis on food sourced within a 30mile radius and local brews. 2200 W. Main St.; 919-286-9755; local22durham.com BR

Parizade Sophisticated Mediterranean food like grilled bronzino, Australian lamb chops and pan-fried Roman dumplings. 2200 W. Main St.; 919-286-9712; parizadedurham.com DURHAM, NC • 919-286-1987 BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER MADHATTERBAKESHOP.COM

SALADELIA


Shuckin’ Shack Seafood restaurant serving up shrimp, oysters, fish-n-chips, surf-n-turf dinners and more. 2200 W. Main St.; 984-219-7337; theshuckinshack.com NEAR DUKE Fairview Dining Room Seasonally inspired contemporary cuisine with selections like coffeerubbed duck breast and seared NC flounder. Located inside the Washington Duke Inn & Golf Club. 3001 Cameron Blvd.; 919-493-6699; washingtondukeinn.com

MarketPlace JB Duke Hotel’s main restaurant, open for breakfast, lunch and dinner. 230 Science Dr.; 919-660-6400; jbdukehotel.com NINTH STREET DISTRICT Alpaca Peruvian rotisserie chicken. Need we say more? 703-A Ninth St.; 919-908-1597; alpacachicken.com Banh’s Cuisine Vietnamese and Chinese dishes with great vegetarian specials. Cash only! 750 Ninth St.; 919-286-5073 blu seafood and bar Upscale seafood restaurant featuring innovative regional classics and a complete oyster menu. Try the crab mac and cheese! 2002 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-286-9777; bluseafoodandbar.com Blue Corn Cafe Authentic Latin-American fare with fresh, organic ingredients. 716 Ninth St.; 919-286-9600; bluecorncafedurham.com Burger Bach Signature New Zealand grass-fed burgers and fresh-cut fries. 737 Ninth St., Ste. 220; 919-973-4416; burgerbach.com Cocoa Cinnamon Signature hand-brewed coffees and lattes such as the “Dr. Durham” with maca root powder and black lava salt. 2627 Hillsborough Rd.; cocoacinnamon.com Cosmic Cantina Authentic Mexican cuisine with vegan options. House-made mole and corn tortillas. Pair with a margarita pitcher. 1920 Perry St.; 919-286-1875; cosmiccantina.com Dain’s Place Pub fare centered around award-winning “thick and juicy and juicy and thick burgers.” 754 Ninth St.; 919-416-8800 Dales Indian Cuisine Traditional Indian food like garlic naan, chicken tikka masala and matter paneer. 811 Ninth St., Ste. 150; 919-286-1760; dalesindiancuisine. net BR Del Rancho Mexican Grill Authentic Mexican lunch and dinner menu with a full-service bar. 730 Ninth St.

Elmo’s Diner Homemade Southern classics with breakfast favorites like cinnamon apple waffles and biscuits and gravy served all day in a casual, family friendly setting. 776 Ninth St.; 919-416 3823; elmosdiner.com BR

Happy + Hale Healthy salads, bowls, breakfast, smoothies, cocktails and cold-pressed juice. 703B Ninth St.; 984-439-1790; happyandhale.com BR Heavenly Buffaloes Chicken wings (bone-in and boneless) as well as vegan wings in more than 25 rubs and sauces, including peri peri and Jamaican jerk. Plus waffle fries! 1807 W. Markham Ave.; 919-237-2358; heavenlybuffaloes.com Juju Asian fusion tapas including selections like steamed barbecue Kurobuta pork belly and chicken fried oysters. Try the crispy Brussels sprouts! 737 Ninth St., Ste. 210; 919-2863555; jujudurham.com BR Locopops Gourmet frozen pops in a variety of rotating flavors like lavender cream, strawberry lemonade and malted milk ball. 2618 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-286-3500; ilovelocopops.com Metro 8 Steakhouse Classic American steakhouse with an Argentinean flair. Pair empanadas with a filet mignon or crab-stuffed shrimp with a churrasco steak. 746 Ninth St.; 919-416-1700; metro8steakhouse.com Monuts Donuts Scratch-made, locally sourced doughnuts, pastries, English muffins, bagels and breakfast sandwiches. Try the bagel and lox. 1002 Ninth St.; 919-286-2642; monutsdonuts.com BR

The Pie Hole Made-from-scratch sweet and savory pies and specialty coffee drinks. 810 Ninth Street, Ste. 130; thepieholela.com/durham Pincho Loco Latin-flavored ice cream, milkshakes, popsicles and more, featuring flavors like tequila, Tiger Tail (vanilla, mexican Vanilla and chocolate), guava, tamarind and more. 1918 Perry St.; 919-286-5111

Triangle Coffee House Coffee and pastries with selections like vegan blueberry muffins. 714 Ninth St.; 919-748-3634

NEWS BITES

Vin Rouge French bistro-style dinner with regular oyster specials and Sunday brunch. Get the hanger steak and frites! 2010 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-416-0466; vinrougerestaurant.com

RIGHT ON, ‘CUE! Mike D’s BBQ entered all four of its products in the 2017 World Hot Sauce Awards and won three awards, including being named the world champion in the “dry rub – fowl” category for its All-Purpose Dry Rub. Its Sweet and Spicy Rub placed third in the “dry rub – pork” category and its Spicy BBQ Sauce placed second in the hot barbecue sauce category.

BR

BULL CITY MARKET

NEW YEAR, NEW LOOK Piedmont has shifted away from its fine dining roots to transform into a more casual, neighborhood restaurant. The new menu stays local and seasonal, but with more small plates and shareable WINNER dishes at lower price points.

The Mad Hatter’s Cafe & Bakeshop Scratch-made pastries, organic salads, sandwiches and wraps, with breakfast all day and delicious brunch every weekend Award-winning cakes. 1802 W. Main St.; 919-286-1987; madhatterbakeshop.com

IBEST

FLOWN THE COOP OF DURHAM Heavenly 2016 Buffaloes wings are no longer sold out of The BR Bullpen. The restaurant’s NC • 919-286-1987 original Markham AvenueDURHAM, spot MADHATTERBAKESHOP.COM is still open and has expanded its hours to include lunch on Mondays and Tuesdays. Delivery BRIGHTLEAF DISTRICT will still be available to the American Tobacco Campus. The Bullpen’s new kitchen menu will feature veggie melts, grain bowl salads and beer-infused chicken chili verde.

BREA

DOWNTOWN

DRINK UP! South Roxboro Street will soon be home to the second location of The Wine Feed, a Raleigh-based wine bar and shop. Located in a renovated warehouse next to Bull City Ciderworks, The Wine Feed will feature an indoor and outdoor wine bar and lounge area that offers wines by the glass, tasting flights and snacks as well as an expanded retail wine section. An adjoining event space, Pine & Poplar, will accommodate up to 125 people for wedding receptions, corporate functions or private gatherings. As of press time, it is slated to open by mid-February.

Clouds Brewing American favorites with a German flair. Try the “Clouds Burger” with a half bratwurst, half-ground chuck patty or the BBQ pork belly burger. 905 W. Main St.; 919-251 8096; cloudsbrewing.com BR

El Rodeo Mexican Restaurant Authentic Mexican cuisine like quesadillas, tacos and huevos con chorizo. 905 W. Main St.; 919-683-2417; elrodeonc.com

NORTHGATE NEWS The Northgate Mall food court’s newest addition is Carolina BBQ & Chicken, a family-owned restaurant bringing Southern favorites found at its buffet restaurant in Creedmoor to Durham shoppers.

The Federal Pub fare with bistro panache. Try the “Fed Burger au Poivre.” 914 W. Main St.; 919-680-8611; thefederal.net BR

Goorsha Ethiopian restaurant featuring dishes like shiro chickpea stew and tibs (sauteed meat in spices). 910 W. Main St.; 919-588-4660; goorshadurham.com

Also at Northgate, Green Paradise serves up 100% vegan/ vegetarian, hand-crafted comfort food in the spot formerly occupied by Earth To Us.

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It’s a Southern Thing Kitchen and bar that serves up traditional Southern dishes with a twist, like jalapeno-brined fried chicken; a half-beef, half-bacon meatloaf; and both traditional and vegan barbecue. 605 W. Main St.; 919-294-9632; itsasouthernthingdurham.com BR

James Joyce Irish Pub and Restaurant Traditional pub food and snacks like brisket cheese steak and Reuben sandwiches. 912 W. Main St.; 919-683-3022; jamesjoyceirishpub.com BR

Fullsteam In addition to their well-known “plow-to-pint” beers, Fullsteam now serves bar snacks, sandwiches, small plates and kombucha. Try the Eastern Carolina-Style Pork Meatballs and the Spicy Carolina Dip Chicken with a side of deviled eggs. 726 Rigsbee Ave.; 919-682-2337; fullsteam.ag

Kaffeinate Coffee shop featuring locally roasted beans and made-to-order Belgian waffles. 115-A N. Duke St.; 919-237-2856; kaffeinatenc.com BR Lilly’s Pizza Stone-hearth-baked pizzas with fresh, organic and local ingredients. 810 W. Peabody St.; 919-797-2554; lillyspizza.com The Little Dipper Fondue, salads and entrees with selections like cheddar ale fondue, seasonal spinach salad and filet mignon with mushrooms. 905 W. Main St.; 919-908-1023; littledipperfondue.com BR Maverick’s Smokehouse and Taproom Range of barbecue and smokehouse fare as well as Chef Brian Stinnett’s signature fried chicken and Memphis barbecue spaghetti. 900 W. Main St.; 919-682-8978; maverickssmokehouse.com Mount Fuji Asian Bistro Sushi & Bar Thai, Japanese, Chinese and sushi. Try the duck wrap. 905 W. Main St.; 919-680-4968; mtfujinc.com Parker and Otis A gift shop, coffee shop and restaurant all in one. First-timers should dedicate a good chunk of time to this delight. Try the No. 26. 112 S. Duke St.; 919-683-3200; parkerandotis.com BR Pine Cone Maple View ice cream, shakes, Joe Van Gogh coffee and baked goods galore. 905 W. Main St., Ste. 20-H; 919-416-6128; pineconenc.com Rose’s Noodles, Dumplings & Sweets Sandwiches, pastries - rhubarb galette, anyone? - and daily dinner specials. 121 N. Gregson St.; 919-797-2233; rosesdurham.com BR Saint James Raw bar featuring daily selection of oysters, peel-and-eat shrimp and more; seafood towers, Lobster Newberg, shrimp and grits, and Calabash platters. 806 W. Main St.; 984-219-7900; saintjamesseafood.com Satisfaction Restaurant & Bar Pub fare including selections like fried pickles, “Kitchen Sink Pizza” and footlong hotdogs. 905 W. Main St., Ste. 37; 919-682-7397; satisfactiondurham.net Torero’s Mexican Restaurant Authentic Mexican cuisine. Try the ceviche de camaron. 800 W. Main St.; 919-682-4197; torerosmexicanrestaurants.com CENTRAL PARK & WAREHOUSE DISTRICTS The Blue Note Grill Fantastic barbecue, ribs and live music. 709 Washington St.; 919-401-1979; thebluenotegrill.com Cocoa Cinnamon Signature hand-brewed coffees and lattes such as the “Tower of Babel” with honey and date sugar. 420 W. Geer St.; cocoacinnamon.com Dame’s Chicken & Waffles Chicken, waffles, shmears. ’Nuff said. 530 Foster St.; 919-682-9235; dameschickenwaffles.com BR

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Geer Street Garden Simple, down-home fare in a cozy atmosphere. They make a mean “Dark and Stormy,” and be sure to order “The Pile” to split with friends! 644 Foster St.; 919-688 2900; geerstreetgarden.com Rise Biscuits & Donuts Dailychanging menu of doughnuts and biscuits. For vegetarians, the “Fried Eggplant ‘Bacon’” biscuit is hard to beat. 401 Foster St.; 984-439-2220; risebiscuitsdonuts.com BR Parts & Labor Dishes meeting many dietary needs, including veggie samosas, “Hipster Poutine” and falafel. 723 Rigsbee Ave.; motorcomusic. com/eats BR The Accordion Club Late-night bar serving beer, hot dogs and green chile stew. 316 W. Geer St. The Pit Fried pimiento cheese, whole-hog Eastern barbecue and Lexington-style barbecue. 321 W. Geer St.; 919-282-3748; thepit-durham.com Piedmont Seasonal cooking inspired by local ingredients. Broccoli beignet, pickled shrimp and peach or Mills Farm’s beef coulotte. 401 Foster St.; 919-683-1213; piedmontrestaurant.com BR CITY CENTER DISTRICT Alley Twenty Six Originally a craft cocktail bar, the addition of a kitchen and dining room now offers plates like pan-seared duck breast, cornmeal-crusted fried oysters and pimiento cheese. 320 E. Chapel Hill St.; 984-439-2278; alleytwentysix.com

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NEWS BITES CHICKEN RUN Dame’s Chicken & Waffles has moved from its Main Street location to the ground floor of Liberty Warehouse Apartments, 530 Foster St. MY HEART IS IN HAVANA Old Havana Sandwich Shop owners Roberto Copa Matos and Elizabeth Turnbull plan to open COPA, a Cuban-inspired tapas and cocktails restaurant, at 107 W. Main St. – formerly occupied by Revolution – by mid-February. Old Havana is closing after seven years so the couple can focus on their new, larger venture. BUTTER ME UP Big Spoon Roasters collaborated with Jacobsen Salt Co. and Bee Local on two limitedbatch, fresh-roasted nut butters. The peanut and peanut hazelnut butters are available in a special two-pack via Big Spoon Roasters, Jacobsen Salt Co. and select retailers while supplies last. HOT OFF THE PRESS Nana’s Chef Scott Howell recounts the incredible tale of how he recovered from a very serious accident – a massive grill fell off a truck and broke his leg in several places in November 2013 – and the surgeries and depression that followed in Men’s Health magazine’s January/February 2018 issue. DINER IS READY Jack Tar & the Colonel’s Daughter is now open at 202 Corcoran St., on the ground floor of the Unscripted Hotel. It’s open from 7am-midnight. The upscale, diner-style establishment combines American food and local ingredients with a focus on craftsmanship.

Bagel Bar Homemade bagel varieties, lunch and breakfast sandwiches. 104 City Hall Plaza, Ste. 101; 919-294-6661; bagelbarbagels.com Bar Brunello Featuring 25 wines by the glass and 60 by the bottle, as well as draft beers and ciders, the bar’s food menu includes charcuterie and cheese boards. 117 E. Main St.; 919-294-4825; barbrunello.com

Bar Virgile Artfully crafted beverages paired with an everchanging dinner and small plates menu including selections like tandoori chicken, flat iron steak and garganelli. 105 S. Magnum St.; 919-973-3000; barvirgile.com Beyù Caffè Coffee shop, restaurant, bar and live jazz club. Beignets, buffalo wings and mushroom burgers. 341 W. Main St.; 919-683-1058; beyucaffe.com BR

Bull City Burger & Brewery Local beef burgers with all components from bun to barbecue sauce made in-house. 107 E. Parrish St.; 919-680-2333; bullcityburgerandbrewery.com Bull McCabe’s Irish Pub Pub food and bar snacks like nachos, burgers and wings. 427 W. Main St.; 919-682-3061; bullmccabesirishpub.com

COFFEE TOFFEE Chapel Hill Toffee has added a new flavor, Griff’s Coffee Toffee, and rebranded its Chapel Hill Toffee as Griff’s Pecan Toffee for retailers outside the region. AW, SHUCKS The Shuckin’ Shack opened its second location in the Triangle at Erwin Square in October. ORIENTAL EATS Geer Street Garden presents a special Chinese food menu the week of February 12-16, which will include a variety of dim sum and stir fry options, in addition to desserts like ginger crème brûlée with almond cookies.

COPA Cuban-inspired tapas and cocktails restaurant. Try the Butifaras a lo cubano, Cuban-style sausages and the Paella del verano, “summer rice,” with a mojito or daiquiri. 107 W. Main St. Counting House Upscale restaurant featuring locally sourced entrees, as well as small plates featuring oysters, shellfish, and meats and cheeses. 111 N. Corcoran St.; 919-956-6760; countinghousenc.com BR


sip Hop J.A.M.

Pardon the pun, but this IPA is our jam! And apparently, it is for a lot of other folks, too. “This is the first and only IPA we’ve done – we had so many people ask for an IPA – and it’s the No. 1 seller as far as the brewery goes,” says Clouds Brewing General Manager Ali Kisiel. The J.A.M. is actually an acronym for the combination of hops used to create the fruity flavor and aroma – Jarrylo, Amarillo and Mosaic. It’s dry-hopped twice and actually has very little bitterness for an IPA. “It’s a good year-round beer,” Ali says. Come in to watch your fave basketball team play, and pair it with the pork belly burger or platter (both come with a hoppy IPA barbecue sauce!), or try it out as a part of a flight.

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Dashi Traditional ramen shop and izakaya with sake options. 415 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-251-9335; dashiramen.com Dos Perros Sophisticated Mexican cuisine; plates include carnitas, flautas veganas and pollo relleno. Don’t skip on the guac! 200 N. Mangum St.; 919-956-2750; dosperrosrestaurant.com Jack Tar and the Colonel’s Daughter Diner fare with a twist. It’s divided into two distinct sides – the restaurant, Jack Tar, and the Colonel’s Daughter, the bar – and a classic diner menu is served all day long in both sections, plus a smaller dinner menu is available in the evening. Brunch is served on Saturday and Sunday mornings. 202 N. Corcoran St. BR

Littler Look for latkes Benedict, pan-roasted striped bass with sungold tomato and elderflower panna cotta at this small restaurant with big tastes. 110 E. Parrish St.; 919-374-1118; littlerdurham.com Loaf Oven breads and pastries. Counter Culture Coffee, pain au chocolat and cumin gruyere loaf. 111 W. Parrish St.; 919-797-1254 Lucky’s Delicatessen Deli crafted by chef Matthew Kelly and headed by chef Drew Brown serves seasonal soups and sandwiches like the garbanzo with chickpea fritters and the super Reuben. 105 W. Chapel Hill St.; 919-864-8841; luckysdelinc.com Luna Rotisserie & Empanadas South American cuisine meets the American South. Wood-fired rotisserie meats, Andean-inspired braises, empanadas. 112 W. Main St.; 984-439-8702; lunarotisserie.com M Kokko Casual chicken entrees including the fried chicken sandwich, ramen and “KFC” wings. 311 Holland St., Ste. B; 919-908-9322 M Sushi Quality sushi from seasonal seafood, daily menu changes and creative rolls like “Unagi Maki” with barbecue eel and fried garlic. 311 Holland St.; 919-908-9266; msushidurham.com Mateo Acclaimed menu of tapas and small plates by chef Matthew Kelly. Great for date night or night out with friends. Order a pitcher of “Cheerwine Sangria,” pollo frito, gambas and queso frito y huevo. 109 W. Chapel Hill St.; 919-530-8700; mateotapas.com Mothers & Sons Trattoria Italian restaurant by partners Matthew Kelly and chef Josh “Skinny” DeCarolis. Handmade pasta, bruschetta and antipasti dishes. 107 W. Chapel Hill St.; 919-294-8247; mothersandsonsnc.com Ninth Street Bakery Organic breads, pastries and lunch. Grab a “Wheel of Steel” (peanut butter, raisins and oats). 136 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-688-5606; ninthstbakery.com BR

Pompieri Pizza Neapolitan pizza joint with a familyfriendly approach. Try the “Drunken Horse” pizza with beer crust dough and house-made sausage. 102 City Hall Plaza; 919-973-1589; pompieripizza.com Pour Taproom Pay-by-the-ounce beer, wine and cider taps, plus tasting board, sandwich and kids’ options, and specials from Littler and Pizzeria Toro. 202 N. Corcoran St., Ste. 200; 919-251-8985; durham.pourtaproom.com The Restaurant at The Durham Locally sourced Southern cuisine crafted by chef Andrea Reusing. Selections include beef tartare and spring pie with asparagus and mushrooms. The Roof focuses on shared plates. 315 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-768-8831; thedurham.com/dining Rue Cler French bistro-style cuisine with lunch, brunch and dinner showcasing fresh ingredients. 401 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-682-8844; ruecler-durham.com BR Saltbox Seafood Joint Local seafood that is delivered fresh from the Carolina coast and served griddled or fried in a straightforward manner. 608 N. Mangum St.; 919-908-8970; saltboxseafoodjoint.com Scratch Bakery Sweet and savory pastries, plus a rotating lunch menu with offerings like meatball subs and pickle plates. 111 Orange St.; 919-956-5200; piefantasy.com BR Taberna Tapas Paella, flatbreads, bacon-wrapped dates, gambas. 325 W. Main St.; 919-797-1457; tabernatapas.com Table South Kitchen and Bar Breakfast, lunch and dinner, located inWINNER the Durham Marriott City Center. 201 Foster St.; 919-768-6000

AMERICAN TOBACCO DISTRICT Basan A wide variety of fresh, specialty sushi rolls, modern Japanese appetizers and entrees, and an extensive sake selection. 359 Blackwell St., Ste. 220; 919-797-9728; basanrestaurant.com

Cuban Revolution Restaurant & Bar Cuban tapas served amid ’60s-style decor, plus bolsitas, sandwiches and Havana pork. 318 Blackwell St.; 919-687-4300; thecubanrevolution.com

Pizzeria Toro Wood-fired pizza with selections like spicy lamb meatball with kale, fried eggplant ricotta and soft eggs on white pizza. Also, ricotta dumplings! 105 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-908-6936; pizzeriatoro.com

The District at 410 Lunch served Thursday and Friday by The Art Institute of Raleigh-Durham. 410 Blackwell St.; 919-317-3200; artinstitutes.edu/raleigh-durham/ about/restaurant

Pie Pushers Grab a slice of staples like the cheese or pepperoni, or try out one of the specials, like the Pace Car. 117A W. Main St.; 919-294-8408; piepushers.com

Maybelle’s A barbecue and biscuit restaurant featuring Eastern N.C. pulled pork, ribs, brisket – don’t miss out on the adult milkshakes and Southern-style pies. 406 Blackwell St.; 984-219-6345; maybellesbbq.com

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Saladelia Cafe Espresso and organic smoothie bar, scratch-made pastries, gourmet sandwiches, salads and soups. Dine-in or carry-out. 406 Blackwell St.; 919-687 4600; saladelia.com Tobacco Road Sports Cafe American dishes like “Country Frizzled & Drizzled Chicken” made with local ingredients; overlooks the Bulls’ stadium. 280 S. Mangum St.; 919-937-9909; tobaccoroadsportscafe.com Tyler’s Restaurant & Taproom Hearty fare and huge beer selection. An order of garlic fries is a must! 324 Blackwell St.; 919-433-0345; tylerstaproom.com

PHOENIX SQUARE SHOPPING CENTER Royal Cheesecake & Varieties Cupcakes, cheesecakes and specialty cakes in flavors like sweet potato, fresh peach and white chocolate peppermint. 902 Old Fayetteville St.; 919-670-8766; rcvcakes.com DURHAM, NC • 919-286-1987 BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER • Viceroy British-Indian gastropub MADHATTERBAKESHOP.COM featuring dishes like SALADELIA.CO jeera wings as well as traditional fish & chips. 335 W. EAST DURHAM Main St.; 919-797-0413; viceroydurham.com East Durham Bake Shop Handcrafted sweet and

The Patio Unscripted Hotel’s poolside bar featuring a range of cocktails and gourmet bites including sushi cones, salads and burgers. 202 N. Corcoran St.; 984-329-9500; unscriptedhotels.com BR

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OnlyBurger Build-your-own burger options and sides like bacon-wrapped mac and cheese squares. 359 Blackwell St.; 919-237-2431; onlyburger.com

IBEST

The Parlour Handmade ice cream in rotating flavors like cookies and cream, salted butter caramel & sweet potato. 117 Market St.; 919-564-7999; theparlour.co

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NanaSteak Offers various cuts of beef and steaks, plus other meats like salmon and tuna steaks and pastas like beef short rib ravioli. 345 Blackwell St.; 919-282-1183; nanasteak.com BR

Toast Italian paninis and soups. The warm goat OF DURHAM cheese with honey and peppercorn crostini is our 2016 favorite. 345 W. Main St.; 919-683-2183; toast-fivepoints.com

The Bullpen Bull Durham Beer Co.’s beer garden with live music provided by the Music Maker Relief Foundation plus veggie melts, grain bowl salads and beer-infused chicken chili verde. 359 Blackwell St.; 919-744-3630; bullpenatc.com

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Mellow Mushroom Pizza, hoagies, calzones and salads made using fresh ingredients. 410 Blackwell St.; 919-680-8500; mellowmushroom.com/store/durham

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savory pies, baked goods, salads, coffee and more – all made with local ingredients. 406 S. Driver St.; 919-949-9848; eastdurhambakeshop.com

WEST-CENTRAL DURHAM

DURHAM-CHAPEL HILL BOULEVARD (15-501) Foster’s Market Brought to you by acclaimed cookbook author Sara Foster, fresh breakfast selections, sandwiches and salads. Also pick up specialty food items. 2694 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-489-3944; fostersmarket.com BR Guglhupf Bakery, Cafe and Restaurant Germaninspired cuisine and artisanal bakery. Restaurant dishes include house-cut noodles, weiner schnitzel and pan-roasted duck. 2706 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-401-2600; guglhupf.com BR Kanki Steak, chicken and seafood cooked on hibachi grills, plus an extensive sushi menu. Come for a show! 3504 Mt. Moriah Rd.; 919-401-6908; kanki.com


Piedmont overhauled its menu in January, an endeavor to create a more casual, fun, neighborhood restaurant vibe. “We’ve got the Brannan, we’ve got Liberty Warehouse, there are other apartments that are going to be right behind us, and I live in West Village,” says chef John May. “[It’s those people who] I’m totally encouraging to – if you’re just leaving work and you have a little bit of stuff still left to do, come sit at our bar, get a burger and a beer, wrap up your work. You don’t have to feel the need to come in here and have a multi-course meal.” Piedmont will maintain its seasonal, locally raised, made-from-scratch focus, but with less of a fine dining approach – nearly everything on the menu, apart from entrees for the table, is $15 or less. This dish features Boxcarr Handmade Cheese’s robiola as well as sunchoke cream, crispy sunchokes and crispy herbs including sage and parsley, and pea shoots. “It’s very rich,” John says, “very warming; it’s got a lot of baking spices – cinnamon, nutmeg, clove – it’s a really good cold weather dish.” John recommends pairing it with a light red wine, or try something off the restaurant’s revamped bottled beer list, like Haw River’s Snow Hands, a Belgian-style dark strong ale brewed with Maine maple syrup and foraged spicebush berries.

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Namu Restaurant and Coffee Bar Bulkogi Truck and Bo’s Kitchen food trucks combine to bring casual Korean eats, local beer, wine and specialty coffee. 5420 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-251-9794 The Refectory Cafe Dal, chili, salads and soups. 2726 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-908-6798; therefectorycafe.com BR Saltbox Seafood Joint A new, second location for the popular local seafood place. Fish delivered fresh from the Carolina coast and served griddled or fried in a straightforward manner. 2637 Durham Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-908-8970; saltboxseafoodjoint.com

UNIVERSITY DRIVE The Boot A neighborhood Italian American Restaurant serving soups, salads, sandwiches, pastas and traditional Italian entrees, plus a full bar. 2501 University Dr.; 919-294-8383; thebootdurham.com Capital Seafood Market & Grill Fried catfish, porkchop sandwiches and collard greens. Raw seafood for sale. 1304 University Dr.; 919-402-0777 Mi Peru Peruvian fare like ceviche mixto, asado and leche de tigre. 4015 University Dr., Ste. A1; 919-401-6432; miperupci.com

Sitar Indian Cuisine Homemade Indian dishes at affordable prices, with daily lunch buffets and a weekend dinner buffet. 3630 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-490-1326; sitar-indiancuisine.com

Nana’s Restaurant Upscale seasonal dishes influenced by Southern, French and Italian cuisine. 2514 University Dr.; 919-493-8545; nanasdurham.com

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Souly Vegan Cafe Vegan takes on favorites like mac ‘n’ cheese and jerk chicken, along with sides like candied yams, plantains and lentils and spinach soup. 4125 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 984-219-6050

NanaTaco Inventive taqueria that features locally produced meats and veggies. Enjoy with margarita in hand. 2512 University Dr.; 919-489-8226; nanataco.com

The Original Q Shack “BBQ tender as a mother’s love,” includes signature chile-rubbed beef brisket and Carolina pork shoulder. 2510 University Dr.; 919-402-4227; theqshackoriginal.com Sake Bomb Asian Bistro Asian bistro and sake bar; specialty rolls like the “Green Monster” with spicy yellow tail and tuna. 4215 University Dr.; 919-401-4488; sakebombdurham.com Saladelia Cafe Delicious, healthy, homemade food with an espresso and organic smoothie bar, scratch-made pastries, gourmet sandwiches, salads and soups. Open for dine-in or carry-out. 4201 University Dr.; 919-489-5776; saladelia.com BR

Tacos Nacos Tacos, pupusas, tortas and horchata. 3411 University Dr.; 919-267-8226 Thai Cafe Authentic Thai cuisine: drunken noodles, curries and stir-fries. Don’t miss the coconut cake for dessert! 2501 University Dr.; 919-493-9794; thaicafenc.com

WINNER

IBEST OF DURHAM 2016

DURHAM, NC • 919-286-1987 MADHATTERBAKESHOP.COM

blu seafood and bar • fresh sustainable seafood bluseafoodandbar.com • (919) 286-9777

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINN SALADEL

OPENING EARLY 2018

Primal Food & Spirits • Gluten-Free & Wood-Fired primalfoodandspirits.com • (919) 248-3000

Tapas and Cocktails of Old Cuba

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WEST END & LAKEWOOD Cocoa Cinnamon Local coffee shop with signature hand-brewed coffees and lattes, hot chocolate and churros. 2013 Chapel Hill Rd.; cocoacinnamon.com GRUB Durham Serves up comfort food favorites with a twist like brioche donuts and beer-battered mushroom sandwiches. 1200 W. Chapel Hill St.; 919-973-3636; grubdurham.com The Lakewood Phoebe Lawless’s craft cookery featuring local fare like pickled North Carolina top neck clam dip, grilled okra and peach melba sundaes. 2022 Chapel Hill Rd.; 919-402-8059; thelakewooddurham.com BR Local Yogurt Frozen yogurt treats. 1114 W. Chapel Hill St.; 919-489-5900 MORE WEST-CENTRAL DURHAM Bull Street Gourmet & Market Fresh salads, breakfast and sandwiches like pulled pork-loaded hashbrowns and the turkey and Brie sandwich. 3710 Shannon Rd.; 919-237-2398; bullstreetdurham.com BR East Durham Pie Company Serving coffee, tea and espresso beverages, pastries, a simple seasonal menu of lunch and breakfast items, plus sweet and savory pies. 406 S. Driver St.; eastdurhampie.com Finch’s Restaurant Breakfast foods like pancakes and omelets, plus healthy options, dinner service, outdoor seating. 3211 Old Chapel Hill Rd. BR Hope Valley Diner Diner food and breakfast all day with selections like chicken and dumplings, fried pickle chips, biscuits and gravy. 3710 Shannon Rd.; 919-419-0907; hopevalleydiner.com BR OnlyBurger The food truck’s brick-and-mortar offers all the same build-your-own burger options and sides. 3710 Shannon Rd., Ste. 118; 919-937-9377; onlyburger.com Pop’s Backdoor South Fresh pizza and Italian cuisine, including calzones with homemade ricotta-mozzarella filling. 3710 Shannon Rd.; 919-493-0169; popsbackdoorsouth.com BR

Pulcinella’s Italian Restaurant Southern Italian dishes. Antipasto classico, baked ziti and tortellini alla panna. 4711 Hope Valley Rd.; 919-490-1172; pulcinellasitalianrestaurant.com

NEWS BITES

Smallcakes Twelve signature cupcake flavors, as well as seasonal specials. 4711 Hope Valley Rd.; 919-937-2922; smallcakesnc.com West 94th St. Pub Traditional pub fare: loaded fries, chili cheese tots and fish & chips. 4711 Hope Valley Rd.; 919-403-0025; west94thstpub.com Yamazushi Japanese fine dining, kaiseki-style, with seasonal menu changes and a multi-course menu, as well as sake. 4711 Hope Valley Rd., Ste. 6-A; 919-493-7748; yamazushirestaurant.com

Nantucket Grill & Bar New England-style cuisine known for their desserts like the “Unbirthday” and coconut cake. 5826 Fayetteville Rd.; 919-484-8162; nantucketgrill.com LINCOLN PARK WEST Danny’s Bar-B-Que Hickorysmoked barbecue, ribs, fried catfish. 2945 S. Miami Blvd., Ste. 118; 919-806-1965; dannysbarbque.com

live

Mediterranean

Bistro

Tender as a Mother's Love

Randy’s Pizza Pizzas, garlic knots and stromboli. 1813 Martin Luther King Jr. Pkwy.; 919-490-6850; randys-pizza.com Tonali Restaurant Inventive Mexican cuisine such as chicken con mole, Mexican chocolate torte and adobo pork. 3642 Shannon Rd.; 919-489-8000; tonalirestaurant.com

SOUTHERN DURHAM / NEAR I-40

WOODCROFT SHOPPING CENTER Hope Valley Bar and Grill Brew pub fare like cheesy buffalo dip and crispy Brussels sprouts. 4810 Hope Valley Rd.; 919-294-4955; hopevalleybrewingcompany.com BR

Joe Van Gogh Cozy and full of natural light, this local coffee shop sources quality beans for a superior coffee. 4711-5A Hope Valley Rd.; 919-973-3950; joevangogh.com

Dulce Cafe Espresso, gelato and sandwiches. Smoked salmon bagel, dulce Reuben and the “B-L-A-T.” 5826 Fayetteville Rd.; 919-797-0497; dulcecafedurham.com BR

POP ON OVER Locopops has moved to 2618 Hillsborough Rd., just a few doors down from its previous location. The larger space has a cafe area where patrons can enjoy expanded menu options including a variety of desserts, teas, coffees, milkshakes, housemade aguas frescas and more.

Piper’s Deli Deli sandwiches and burgers like pimiento grilled cheese and French dip sandwich. 3219 Old Chapel Hill Rd.; 919-489-2481; pipersdeli.com

Guacamaya (Chubby’s Tacos) Fresh Mexican favorites like burritos, nachos and salads, as well as the “Chubbychanga.” 4711 Hope Valley Rd.; 919-489-4636

Bua Thai Cuisine Thai classics: Pad Thai, hot and sour soup, curries, Krapow lamb. Get your meal “Thai hot,” if you’re up to it! 5850 Fayetteville Rd., Ste. 101; 984-219-7357; buathaidurham.com

GOOD EATS Alley Twenty Six hosts the Cocktail Bandits, aka South Carolina’s Johnny Caldwell and Taneka Reaves, on Feb. 26 as part of its “Dinner With Friends” charity event series. The event features a five-course meal and cocktail tasting menu, and proceeds benefit famous chef José Andrés’ foundation, World Central Kitchen.

Randy’s Pizza Pizzas, garlic knots and stromboli. 4810 Hope Valley Rd., Ste. 112; 919-403-6850; randys-pizza.com

bleu

SUTTON STATION Bocci Trattoria & Pizzeria Traditional Italian pastas, pizzas, crostinis and salads. 5850 Fayetteville Rd.; 919-206-4067; bocciitalian.com

WINNER

IBEST OF DURHAM 2016

1/2 price bottles of wine

every Thursday 1821 Hillandale Road | Durham

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Catering available

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2510 University Dr. Durham, NC

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Open 7 days a week 11am - 9pm

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Gussy’s Place Greek street food like gyro pita, Greek fries and baklava. 2945 S. Miami Blvd.; 984-439-8455; gussys.com Piper’s In The Park Soups, salads, hoagies and burgers with selections like curried couscous and “South of Here” turkey sandwich. 2945 S. Miami Blvd.; 919-572-9767; pipersinthepark.com Spicy Green Gourmet Cafe & Catering Sandwiches, soups, salads with specialities like Cuban flatbread. 2945 S. Miami Blvd., Ste. 126; 919-220-6040; spicygreengourmet.net HOPE VALLEY COMMONS Mattie B’s Public House Housemade burgers, N.Y.style pizza, wings and potato chips. 1125 W. N.C. 54, Ste. 301; 919-401-8600; mattiebs.com Denny’s Diner fare serving breakfast anytime, lunch and dinner. 7021 N.C. 751, Ste. 901; 919-908-1006; dennys.com BR

NEAR SOUTHPOINT

HOMESTEAD MARKET Bean Traders Coffee Coffee specialties and local pastries. 105 W. N.C. 54, Ste. 249; 919-484-2499; beantraderscoffee.com The Mad Popper A gourmet popcorn shop with flavors both sweet and savory. 105 W. N.C. 54, Ste. 259; 919-484-7677; themadpopper.com City Barbeque Smoked meats, peach cobbler and hushpuppies. 208 W. N.C. 54; 919-237-9509; citybbq.com Shiki Sushi Sushi and pan-Asian choices like “Bang Bang Shrimp,” gyoza dumplings and beef pho soup. 207 W. N.C. 54; 919-484-4108; shikitasu.com SOUTHPOINT CROSSING

Makus Empanadas A variety of meat, veggie and cheese empanadas, with vegetarian and vegan options. 1125 W. N.C. 54, Ste. 304; 919-390-7525; makusempanadas.com Treforni Wood-fired pizza and sandwiches including traditional options like Margherita, as well as more inspired options like the prosciutto arugula pizza. 1125 W. N.C. 54; 919-973-0922; treforni.com

Primal Food & Spirits Gluten-free options featuring wood-fired local meat dishes with seasonal sides, craft cocktails. 202 W. N.C. 54; 919-248-3000; primalfoodandspirits.com BR

THE STREETS AT SOUTHPOINT AREA American Meltdown Gourmet melts, sides and desserts. Southpoint; 919-473-6358; americanmeltdown.org

WE CATER EVENTS large and small and offer our meats and sides by the pound and party packs to-go for most any gathering.

FRESH, SEASONAL FARM-TO-FORK ITALIAN

Bruster’s Real Ice Cream Hand-crafted ice creams, sorbets & sherbets in ever-changing flavors. 8200 Renaissance Pwy., Ste. 1002; 919-237-3537; brusters.com Porchetta Slow-roasted Italian-style pork sandwiches and sides. Southpoint; 919-607-7419; porchettardu.com Harvest 18 Local, seasonal eats. Try the pimento cheese dip and a Bloody Mary for brunch. 8128 Renaissance Pkwy., Ste. 114; 919-316-1818; 18restaurantgroup.com/harvest-18 BR Rise Biscuits & Donuts Daily-changing menu of doughnuts and biscuits. For vegetarians, the “Fried Eggplant ‘Bacon’” biscuit is hard to beat. 8200 Renaissance Pkwy.; 919-248-2992; risebiscuitsdonuts.com BR Town Hall Burger and Beer Offerings like the “Carolina Burger” with pork belly and pimiento cheese, barbecue salmon burger and fries poutine. 7830 N.C. 751; 919-973-0506; townhallburgerandbeer.com N.C. 54 Akashi Japanese Grill & Sushi Bar Hibachi, sushi and noodle dishes like bento boxes, yakisoba and spicy scallop roll. 2223 N.C. 54, Ste. RS; 919-572-9444; akashisushi54.com Na’Mean Asian fusion, Korean barbecue sandwich shop. A KoKyu joint. 4823 Meadow Dr., Ste. 108; 919-699-4667; kokyubbq.com/nmean

Seasonal Seafood Freshly Cooked Good Fish That’s the Hook

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ROCKWOOD SHOPPING CENTER 2501 UNIVERSITY DRIVE • DURHAM 919.294.8383 • THEBOOTDURHAM.COM OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 5:00-9:00PM 156

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LUNCH DINNER LIVE MUSIC NIGHTLY (919) 401-1979 THEBLUENOTEGRILL.COM

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2nd LOCATION NOW OPEN!

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dining guide

Spice & Curry Traditional Indian, buffet-style or off the menu. 2105 N.C. 54; 919-544-7555; spiceandcurry.com

Sansui Sushi Bar & Grill Hibachi dishes and sushi rolls like “Spider Man” with crab and crawfish. 4325 N.C. 55; 919-361-8078; sansuisushi.com

RTP

Vit Goal Tofu Restaurant Korean dishes like fried dumplings and tofu soups. 2107 Allendown Dr.; 919-361-9100; vitgoal.com

N.C. 55 Backyard BBQ Pit Barbecue and other Southern comfort foods: mac ‘n’ cheese, Brunswick Stew and pit-cooked barbecue. 5122 N.C. 55; 919-544-9911; sweetribs.com Basera Modern, fine dining Indian restaurant featuring a lunch buffet, tandoor grill options and signature Biryanis. 4818 N.C. 55; 919-205-5050; basera-rtp.com Big C Waffles Specializes in gourmet waffle varieties such as The Bacon, Egg ‘n’ Cheese Waffle, Thin Mint Waffle, Pecan Waffle, Blueberry Waffle and Donut Waffle, just to name a few. 2110 Allendown Dr.; 919-797-7576 BR Brigs at the Park Breakfast selections like “Pineapple Bread Pina Colada French Toast” and sandwiches. 4900 N.C. 55; 919-544-7473; brigs.com BR Cafe Meridian Made-to-order salads and sandwiches. 2500 Meridian Pkwy., Ste. 130; 919-361-9333; cafemeridian.com

GREENWOOD COMMONS Benetis Restaurant Classic breakfast with a Mediterranean lunch buffet. 5410 N.C. 55; 919-806-0313; benetisrtp.com BR Sarah’s Empanadas Homemade empanadas. 5410 N.C. 55; 919-544-2441 Tandoor Indian Restaurant Traditional Indian like veggie samosas, kababs and naan. 5410 N.C. 55; 919-484-2102; tandoorinrtp.com BR Thai Lanna Restaurant Authentic Thai cuisine like red curry, pad thai and larb. 5410 N.C. 55; 919-484-0808; thailannarestaurant.com

IMPERIAL CENTER MEZ Contemporary Mexican Creative Mexican dishes, based on traditional recipes with a fresh, healthy twist. 5410 Page Rd.; 919-941-1630; mezdurham.com

Page Road Grill Traditional American dishes, from house-made soup and bread to burgers to vegetarian options. 5416 Page Rd.; 919-908 8900; pageroadgrill.com

True Flavors Diner Upscale Southern diner. Try the “Howling Moon” French toast made with Howling Moon moonshine sauce. 5410 N.C. 55; 919-316-7978; trueflavorsnc.com BR

Jamaica Jamaica Carribean food favorites like jerk chicken, yellow rice and brown stew chicken. 4857 N.C. 55; 919-544-1532

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It’s easy to order! 919 489 5776 www.saladelia.com

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ALSO CHECK OUT THESE AREA RESTAURANTS … 501 Pharmacy Scoops of Maple View Farm ice cream, plus malts and shakes. 98 Chapelton Ct., Ste. 300, Chapel Hill; 984-999-0501; 501rx.com

CrossTies BBQ A variety of barbecue, sides and made-from-scratch desserts. 201 E. Main St., Carrboro; 919-904-7160; crosstiesbbq.com

The Mod Wood-fired pizza, salads, small plates, full bar. 46 Sanford Rd.; 919-533-6883; themodernlifedeli.com

411 West Fresh pasta, seafood and pizzas inspired by Italian and Mediterranean avors, with a Californian twist. 411 W. Franklin St., Chapel Hill; 919-967-2782; 411west.com

Elaine’s on Franklin Fine regional American cuisine, made with fresh, local ingredients. 454 W. Franklin St., Chapel Hill; 919-960-2770; elainesonfranklin.com

Moon Asian Bistro An Asian-fusion restaurant offering sushi, Chinese dishes like sweet-and-sour chicken, Thai curry dishes, rice and noodles. 111 Knox Way, Ste. 110, Pittsboro; 919-869-7894

Acme Soups, salads, seafood and entrees with a Southern touch. 110 E. Main St., Carrboro; 919-9292263; acmecarrboro.com Alberello Café & Market Florentine sandwiches, housemade pastas, from scratch desserts and more. 72 Chapelton Ct., Chapel Hill; 984-234-3017; alberellonc.com Breadmen’s A variety of sandwiches, burgers and salads. Breakfast served all day. 324 W. Rosemary St., Chapel Hill; 919-967- 7110; breadmens.com Breakaway Cafe Serving breakfast, lunch, dinner and small plates, Counter Culture coffee, beer, wine and Maple View ice cream. 58 Chapelton Ct., Ste. 100, Chapel Hill; 984-234-3010; breakawaync.co B-Side Lounge Small plates like flatbread, baconwrapped dates and fondue. Inspired cocktails. 200 N. Greensboro St., Carrboro; 919-904-7160; b-sidelounge.com Buns Serves gourmet burgers, fries and shakes made from fresh ingredients. 107 N. Columbia St., Chapel Hill; 919-240-4746; bunsofchapelhill.com Capp’s Pizzeria Artisan, hand-crafted and woodfired pizzas utilizing local ingredients. 79 Falling Springs Dr., Ste. 140, Chapel Hill; 919-240-4104; cappspizzeria.com

Elements Classical and modern Asian and European cooking techniques; check out the wine bar with full menu next door. 2110 Environ Way, Chapel Hill; 919-537-8780; elementsofchapelhill.com The Fearrington Granary Small plates, salads and burgers. Fearrington Village Center; 919-542-2121; fearrington.com/granary The Fearrington House Restaurant Contemporary fine-dining. Fearrington Village Center; 919-542-2121; fearrington.com/house Four Corners American fare, nachos, wings, pasta. 175 E. Franklin St., Chapel Hill; 919-537-8230; fourcornersgrille.com Glasshalfull Mediterranean-inspired food and wine; outdoor dining; all ABC permits. 106 S. Greensboro St., Carrboro; 919-967-9784; glasshalfull.com The Goat Salads, sandwiches and pastries. Fearrington Village Center; 919-545-5717; fearrington.com/the-goat Italian Pizzeria III Pizza, calzones, subs. The “place to be” in Chapel Hill for 35+ years. 508 W. Franklin St., Chapel Hill; 919-968-4671; italianpizzeria3.com Kitchen Bistro-style dining with a seasonal menu. 764 MLK Jr. Blvd., Chapel Hill; 919-537-8167; kitchenchapelhill.com

Chronic Tacos Authentic Mexican grill. 504 Meadowmont Village Circle, Chapel Hill; 984-999-4803; chronictacos.com

La Residence French-inspired cuisine made from fresh ingredients. 202 Rosemary St., Chapel Hill; 919-967-2506; laresdiencedining.com

Crook’s Corner Southern classics like shrimp and grits, and jalapeno-cheddar hushpuppies. 610 W. Franklin St., Chapel Hill; 919-929-7643; crookscorner.com

Mama Dip’s Kitchen Traditional Southern specialties. 408 W. Rosemary St., Chapel Hill; 919-942-5837; mamadips.com

Crossroads Chapel Hill at The Carolina Inn New American cuisine and seasonal specialties. 211 Pittsboro St., Chapel Hill; 919-918-2777; crossroadscuisine.com

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Maple View Farm Country Store Homemade ice cream and milk. 6900 Rocky Ridge Rd., Hillsborough; 919-960-5535; mapleviewfarm.com Maple View Mobile Ice cream outpost of the Hillsborough dairy farm. 919-244-1949; mapleviewmobile.com

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Pittsboro Roadhouse Hearty American entrees, burgers and salads; 39 West St., Pittsboro; 919-542-2432; pittsbororoadhouse.com Radius Wood-fired pizzas, housemade pastas, sandwiches, salads and desserts. Outdoor dining, all ABC permits. 112 N. Churton St., Hillsborough; 919-245-0601; radiuspizzeria.net Roost Beer Garden Wood-fired pizza, local brews and live music; 2000 Fearrington Village Center; 919-545-5717; fearrington.com/roost The Root Cellar Sandwiches, prepared salads, desserts and more. Beer and wine; outdoor dining. 750 MLK Jr. Blvd., Chapel Hill; 919-967-3663; rootcellarchapelhill.com Spanky’s Serving hamburgers, ribs, garden fresh salads and barbecue. 101 E. Franklin St., Chapel Hill; 919-967-2678; spankysrestaurant.com Squid’s Seafood options includes wood-grilled llets, live Maine lobster, fried oysters. 1201 N. Fordham Blvd., Chapel Hill; 919-942-8757; squidsrestaurant.com Starrlight Mead Tastings of honey wines and honey. 480 Hillsboro St., Pittsboro; 919-533-6314; starrlightmead.com Trilogy American cafe featuring innovative twists on classic dishes. Silverspot Cinema, Chapel Hill; 919-357-9888; trilogyrestaurant.com Venable Rotisserie Bistro Upscale comfort food with a heavy emphasis on locally sourced and seasonal ingredients; all ABC permits. 200 N. Greensboro St., Carrboro; 919-904-7160; venablebistro.com Weathervane Shrimp and grits, sweet potato fries and other gourmet takes on classic flavors. University Place, Chapel Hill; 919-929-9466; southernseason.com Yogurt Pump Frozen yogurt treats and shakes. 106 W. Franklin St., Chapel Hill; 919-942-7867; yogurtpump.com


engagement

LAU RA G A I T HER & J OR DA N UL R ICH

Second Time’s the Charm

B Y A M E L I A H A NK S | PHOTOGR A PHY BY MA RT HA MAN N IN G PH OTOGRAPH Y

Wedding Date May 5, 2018 Occupations Jordan is a project manager for pharmaceutical company Novo Nordisk. Laura, a Durham Academy alum, is a horse trainer at Fox View Farm, her parents’ horse farm in Bahama. Crossed Paths After a first date four years earlier that went nowhere, Jordan and Laura “re-met” in August 2015 after Jordan moved back from Australia. He wanted to pick her brain for travel tips about Tanzania. Funny enough, it was a place he’d already visited. The Proposal Plan A was to propose while on a ski trip in Colorado. Jordan was going to feign an injury and get down on one knee in the snow. However, Laura got a concussion a couple

weeks before the trip. After she recovered, Jordan enacted Plan B and insisted they take a trip to Cabo, Mexico, in January last year. Laura was a little suspicious, but went along with it. As they cruised around the coast in a sailboat, Jordan popped the question. Just as he did, in a welltimed performance, humpback whales started breaching in the background. She said yes. Now, “I Do” The wedding and reception will take place at Fox View Farm with the help of A Swanky Affair event planner Amanda Scott. Guests will receive invitations designed by Indigo Envelopes. Flowers will be provided by Tre Bella Flowers, Bernard’s Formalwear will supply the tuxes, Get Lit Special Event Lighting will take care of the ambiance and Durham Catering Co. will handle the food. Key Players from Durham Laura’s parents, John and Shirley Gaither, will be in attendance, as well as her sister and brother-in-law, Christina Gaither-Webb and Ryan Webb.

Vote for the

Best of Durham 2018 OUR ANNUAL POLL IS BACK! Cast your ballot for your local favorites in dining, retail, arts & entertainment and more. VISIT DURHAMMAG.COM FOR MORE INFO. VOTING BEGINS IN FEBRUARY.

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wedding

SA M AT H A B RO W N & MA R K S A L ET NIK

Perfectly Aligned

B Y L I NDS AY M CCONNEL L | PHOTO GR A PHY BY A RIEL PERRY, AR I EL P ERRY. CO M

Date June 3, 2017 Neighborhood Morrisville Occupations Samatha works in the biopharmaceuticals research field as a clinical trial lead. Mark, the former owner of chiropractic practices in Raleigh and Fayetteville, is a locum tenens chiropractor and entrepreneur. Crossed Paths Samatha hails from Long Island, New York. Mark is originally from Chicopee, Massachusetts. The couple met on eHarmony in 2011 and moved to the Triangle for its research opportunities, proximity to the mountains and coast and Samatha’s family ties to Durham. Popping the Question Mark proposed in a small cabin in Wilmington on Sam’s birthday. The Big Day The couple said, “I do” at JC Raulston Arboretum in a ceremony officiated by Samatha’s uncle, Rev. Dr. Murray Edwards. Another uncle, Still Preston Perry, served as ceremony singer. Samatha’s brother, John Brown IV, and Mark’s sister, Linda Bell, gave readings. A reception followed at Caffe Luna.

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Key Players Samatha’s parents, John Brown III and Stilwyn Perry-Brown, and Mark’s parents, Theodore and Wanda Saletnik. Samatha’s younger sister, Dr. Millicent Brown, and Samatha’s best friend, Syreeta SkeltonWilson, served as the “best women,” while Mark’s close friends from chiropractic school, Rob Portillo and Mark Quinn, were his best men. His Favorite Detail The wedding photos. “The pictures are so vivid ... we can relive the intensity of the moment.” The Moment She’ll Remember Forever Their first dance to John Legend’s “Love Me Now.” “It was all about us … our moment, our rhythm, our story, our love for [each other], in the moment, right there on the dance floor.”

Do you live in Durham and want your wedding or engagement featured in our magazine?

Email weddings@durhammag.com


You’re aa leader, leader, You’re nurturer, nurturer, companion. companion.

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Durham Magazine Feb/March 2018  
Durham Magazine Feb/March 2018