Chapel Hill Magazine Sept/Oct 2020

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CHAPEL HILL • CARRBORO • HILLSBOROUGH • OR ANGE COUNT Y

S E P T E M B E R /O C TO B E R 2 02 0

l a u n n a h t 1 1 r Ou

& D O O F K N I DRi s sue

LET’S DISH Laurena Ibarra and Jose Ramirez opened Que Chula Tacos in May on West Franklin Street. pg. 52

e d i s n I d Fin EAS,

D I E T A D E M O H AT, S D O O G D E K DELICIOUS BAESTAURANTS HOW R MORE IG VE BACK ANDPage 42


THANK YOU CHAPEL HILL!

CONGRATULATES CHANEL HART D’APRIX

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CHAPELHILL S E P TE M B E R /O CTO B ER 2020 C H A P E L H I L L M AG A Z I N E .CO M E DITO R

Jessica Stringer E DITOR I A L E X E C U T IV E MANAG I N G E D I TO R

Amanda MacLaren

ASS ISTANT E D I TO R

Hannah Lee

E DITORIAL , DIGITA L & M A R K E TI N G COORDIN ATO R

Marie Muir

E DITORIAL I N TE R N S

Renee Ambroso, Mia Cooper, Laney Dalton, Claire Delano, Jade Earnhardt, Elizabeth Efird, Aniya Ellison, James Hatfield, Jalon Hill, Madeline Kraft, Caroline Kloster, Jack LaMarche, Georgia Phillips, Anna Louise Pickens, Megan Pociask, Sarah Rollins, Iphigenia Sarrimanolis, Anna Southwell, Ella Sullivan, Ovriona Weaver, Naomi Wright CONT RIBU TO R

Matt Lardie ART

C RE AT IV E D I R E C TO R

Kevin Brown

P H OTOGR A PH E R

Beth Mann

GRAP H IC D E S I G N E R

Lauren Wilkinson CONT RIB U TO R

Jean Carlos Rosario-Montalvo ADV E RT I S I N G For advertising inquiries, email advertising@chapelhillmagazine.com

Melissa Crane melissa@chapelhillmagazine.com Chris Elkins chris@chapelhillmagazine.com Lauren Phillips lauren@durhammag.com P RODU C T ION M A N AG E R

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CORP OR ATE C H IE F OP E RAT I N G O FFI C E R

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Dan Shannon V IC E P RE S IDE NT O F PLA N N I N G & DE V E LO PM E N T

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P U B L IS H E R , H EA RT OF NC W E DDI N G S

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V IC E P RE S IDE NT O F FI N A N C E & ADMINISTR AT I O N

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DIST RIB U T ION/E V E NTS D E LI V E RY D R I V E R

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Chapel Hill Magazine is published 8 times per year by Shannon Media, Inc. 1777 Fordham Blvd., Ste. 105, Chapel Hill, NC 27514 tel 919.933.1551 fax 919.933.1557 Subscriptions $38 for 2 years – subscribe at chapelhillmagazine.com

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hen I couldn’t shut the bottom drawer in my kitchen, I knew I had a takeout – and corresponding takeout container – problem. I suspect many of your pantries and cabinets look the same, stuffed to the brim with plastic lids and bottoms. During the pandemic, I’ve ordered from as many of my favorite restaurants as my appetite and budget allowed. (These days, I know my credit card number by heart.) Find a few of our staffers’ go-to takeout meals on page 66. I’ve also mourned the loss of some good ones – Lula’s, James Pharmacy – and picked up dinner from newcomers, such as Que Chula Tacos and Napoli Hillsborough. It’s not easy to open or operate a restaurant, let alone in the middle of a global health crisis, so we checked in with the owners of 10 eateries, both the mainstays and the newly established, about their struggles and successes on page 52. These are excruciatingly tough times, but what I find truly amazing is that food and drink businesses have been generous as ever, from Top of the Hill Distillery donating some of its homemade hand sanitizer to first responders to The Picnic Basket Catering providing a whopping 20,000 meals to the Inter-Faith Council for Social Service. Vimala’s Curryblossom Cafe, like many other eateries, put out the call for donations to help keep the business afloat and then shared some of that, awarding $1,000 grants to a few other Chapel Hill restaurants. As Rush Greenslade of Vimala’s says, “Everybody’s hurting.” Find more examples of the culinary community giving back on page 50. As for my excess of containers, I consider them a badge of honor for doing my part to eat local. It’s been easy to fill them with chocolate chip cookies and almond scones and pass them on to friends and neighbors – my own small contribution to keeping spirits fed in days like these.

 jessica@chapelhillmagazine.com

T HE COVER P h o to by B et h M a nn 4


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SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER

CON TENTS

CHAPELHILLMAGAZINE.COM

THE 11TH ANNUAL FOOD & DRINK ISSUE

LOVE

Your Carpet

5634 Durham Chapel Hill Blvd., Durham, NC

Beauty, Artistry & Tradition FOR OVER 40 YEARS

www.persiancarpet.com

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It’s a Date Make staying in special with these fun at-home ideas

50

Food is Love These restaurants bring new meaning to ‘comfort food’

52 Restaurant Possible Ten eateries share how they’ve adapted in the age of the pandemic 60

Count Your Blessings Heavenly Groceries provides food for the soul

61

Dessert Course Children’s cookbook author publishes the ultimate kids’ guide to cupcakes

62

Sugar Rush Local baker serves up vegan goodies

64

Slice of Life Catching up with brothers Angelo Marrone and Vincenzo Marrone of Italian Pizzeria III as their West Franklin Street restaurant celebrates 40 years

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What We’re Eating News from our restaurant community, plus local dishes we love

VOLUME 15 NUMBER 6

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Take a Hike As summer shifts to fall, spend some time at our major parks and hiking trails in Orange, Durham and Chatham counties

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Keep It Casual Stylish and versatile fall fashions for the home office or when you’re on the go

INC. 110

Biz Briefs

118

Local Tourism Takes a COVID-19 Hit Massive drop in visitation numbers and occupancy rates anticipated this year

DEPARTMENTS & COLUMNS 4

Letter From the Editor

8

About Town Events not to miss

17

Noted What we’ve heard around town

28

Dining Guide

124

Engagements Newbauer and Woodfin Mumma and Wise

126

Weddings Luchenbill and Schranz Barbato and Newman Quow and Rucker

FEATURES

PEOPLE & PLACES

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Change of Art This fall will undoubtedly look different in many ways, but there are still opportunities to experience and appreciate the arts in our community

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Compass Center for Women and Families’ Safe Homes, New Lives campaign Pee Wee Homes’ groundbreaking in Northside neighborhood

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Across County Lines Three families – who all live near the borders of Durham, Orange and Chatham counties – know how to make the most of their outdoor living spaces

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Euzelle Smith’s 101st birthday

Meals on Wheels Orange County, NC ice-cream drive-thru



ABOUT TOWN EVENTS NOT TO MISS

Compiled by Ella Sullivan EVENTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE; CHECK WITH ORGANIZERS PRIOR TO ATTENDING

Thomas Wolfe Lecture

Kidzu’s Annual Fall Fundraiser

Oct. 6

Sept. 25

englishcomplit.unc.edu/program/wolfe Hear from novelist Michael Parker, the 2020 recipient of the Thomas Wolfe Prize, as he participates in a virtual reading, interview and Q&A with audience participation. This event is presented by UNC’s

kidzuchildrensmuseum.org/fall-benefit Tune in for this virtual fundraiser supporting Kidzu Children’s Museum and featuring local celebrities such as North Carolina Poet Laureate Jaki Shelton Green.

Battle of the Blues Polo Match

Department of English and Comparative Literature.

Sept. 26

Tarheel Antiques Festival

battleofthebluespolo.com Watch Duke and UNC alumni face off in the eighth annual match, and enjoy a day full of activities including a classical riding exhibition and croquet match. This year, the event takes place in Efland at The Barn at Lloyd’s Dairy.

Sept. 27 burwellschool.org The Burwell School Historic Site hosts this virtual event with speaker Sylvia Hoffert, author and former professor of history and women’s studies at UNC, as part of “She Changed the World.” This initiative, led by the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources, commemorates the 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage. Attendees can watch a video presentation and participate in a live Q&A focusing on women’s physical and mental health in the 19th century. 8

PHOTO BY BETH MANN

The Mad Women of Hillsborough from 1846-1890

Oct. 17-18

Tune in Oct. 4 for WellFest’s 30-plus free livestreamed classes taught by local experts.

tarheelantiquesfestival.com Stop by The Barn at Lloyd’s Dairy for its biannual antiques festival, which was initially inspired by a visit from Mike Wolfe of “American Pickers.” Vendors from across the country will show off their wares, and there will be free antique appraisals and on-site auctions.

Sip & Savor Nov. 7

WellFest wellfestnc.com Push the reset button this fall during a virtual weekend that OCT. focuses on mental and physical wellness. Produced by Chapel Hill Magazine, Chatham Magazine and Durham Magazine, this event features an interactive cooking class for two with Kevin Callaghan, chef and owner of Acme, on Oct. 3 and 30-plus free livestreamed classes taught by local experts on Oct. 4.

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sipandsavornc.com Select an at-home food and wine experience for contactless pickup at Johnson Lexus of Durham. Each of the four adventure options includes five dishes prepared by some of the best chefs in the area, a handpicked wine flight, swag bag and a chef-tells-all video – plus a virtual wine class with Ryan Vet, sommelier and co-owner of The Oak House.



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PEOP LE & P LACES

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1 Orange County Board of County Commissioners Chair Penny Rich. 2 Compass Center Board of Directors Chair Gillian Hare. 3 Compass Center Executive Director Cordelia Heaney. 4 Orange County Sheriff Charles Blackwood.

Safe Homes, New Lives

5 Compass Center Development Director Ashley Ahlers.

In July, the Compass Center for Women and Families launched its Safe Homes, New Lives campaign with board members and community leaders at Scroggs Elementary School. Orange County currently has no dedicated housing or emergency housing for victims of domestic violence, so the campaign’s immediate goal is to raise $675,000, which will support the first three years of a scattered housing program to shelter victims safely for anywhere from a few days up to three months. The Center hopes to have the first apartment funded and ready by October during Domestic Violence Awareness Month with an eventual expansion to six apartments. Photography by Madeline Kraft

6 Vimala’s Curryblossom Cafe’s Vimala Rajendran.

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LegacyChapelHill.com Materials are protected by copyright, trademark, and other intellectual property laws. All rights in these materials are reserved. All products and company names marked as trademarked (™) or registered (®) are trademarks of their respective holders. Copying, reproduction and distribution of materials without prior written consent of Freehold Communities is strictly prohibited. All information, plans, and pricing are subject to change without notice. This information does not represent a specific offer of sale or solicitation to purchase property within Legacy at Jordan Lake. Models do not reflect racial preference.


PEOP LE & P LACES

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Pee Wee Homes’ Groundbreaking Pee Wee Homes broke ground on its third development of tiny homes in Chapel Hill – its second in the Northside neighborhood – on July 18. This new tinyplex project will provide independent housing that totals fewer than 700 square feet for two future residents who are transitioning out of homelessness. “The support from the community to make the PWH vision a reality is absolutely inspiring,” says the Rev. Lisa G. Fischbeck of The Episcopal Church of the Advocate, the first church site to host PWH. Photography by Jonathan Youngpenn

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1 Chapel Hill Town Manager Maurice Jones, Carol Woods President and CEO Pat Sprigg, The Marian Cheek Jackson Center Community Advocacy Coordinator Kathy Atwater and Jim Kitchen, an entrepreneur and professor at UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School. 2 Hudson Vaughan, former director of The Marian Cheek Jackson Center and a Pee Wee Homes board member.

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Meals on Wheels Orange County, NC Ice-Cream Drive-Thru Chapel Hill-Carrboro Meals on Wheels and Orange County Rural Alliance merged to form Meals on Wheels Orange County, NC in June in order to address the challenges of increasing hunger and isolation among older adults in the community. To show appreciation for its volunteers who persevered through the difficulties of COVID-19 and the merger, MOWOCNC hosted an ice-cream drive-thru event at its new location on Laurel Hill Road in July. Volunteers stayed in their cars while enjoying celebratory signs by Card My Yard Chapel Hill, and picked up a new car magnet and prepackaged Maple View Farm Ice Cream cups. Photography by Madeline Kraft 14

1 Longtime volunteer Belinda Musso and MOWOCNC board member Jennifer Thomason. 2 MOWOCNC staff Heather Harris, Anita Moats, Rachel Bearman and Shannon Grabowski.


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101st Birthday Euzelle Smith, an educator and former counselor, turned 101 on July 3. Friends and family celebrated her birthday with a drive-by parade past her home in Northside. The festivities were organized by Euzelle’s family with the help of Howard University student Niya Fearrington and incoming UNC first-year Emile Charles, both Chapel Hill residents. Euzelle and her late husband, R.D., who passed away in 2016, are the namesakes for Smith Middle School in Chapel Hill. They were named Community Treasures in 2008 by the Chapel Hill Historical Society for their dedication to changing the lives of children as educators and mentors.

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Euzelle’s granddaughter Jessica Wall, daughter Patrice Wall, granddaughter Tia Edwards, grandsons Regi Smith III and Trey Edwards, granddaughter Victoria Smith, caretaker Ruby McMillian, granddaughter Aarika Wall, daughter Pam Edwards and son-in-law Jimmy Edwards with Euzelle Smith (center).


ON THE MOVE Penny Gluck retired from Durham Technical Community College this

spring after working there since 1990. In her 30 years at Durham Tech, Penny held positions in student services and workforce development while also working as an instructor. In her final years with the school, she served as executive dean for Orange County operations as well as the executive director for the Center for Community and Workforce Engagement. “It was so rewarding to do what I loved, serving students and the community,” Penny says.

April Burko

WHAT WE’VE HEARD AROUND TOWN … Compiled by Elizabeth Efird

She worked at ATI for 12 years and plans to continue pursuing her career as an expressive arts therapist. J.B. Buxton started his

new role as president of Durham Technical Community College in

mid-July. J.B. previously served as a member-at-large on the North Carolina State Board of Education and founded Education Innovations Group, a consulting practice in Raleigh that works with organizations dedicated to advancing public education. He succeeds Bill Ingram, who retired after serving as Durham Tech’s president for 12 years.

PHOTO COURTESY OF OWASA

NOTED.

Edmon Jones

The Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools Board of Education hired two new principals on June 18. April Burko is the new principal for Culbreth Middle School, and Edmon Jones takes over the position at Phillips Middle School. Hillary Rubesin stepped down from her position as the executive director of the Art Therapy Institute of NC (ATI) on July 1.

Ed Kerwin retired in July from his position as the executive director of Orange Water and Sewer Authority (OWASA). During his

24 years as OWASA’s second-ever executive director, Ed celebrated many achievements, including the creation of the Care to Share program in 1997, the expansion of water treatment plants and reservoirs, and OWASA’s increased preservation efforts. His position will be filled by Todd Taylor, OWASA’s general manager of operations. Orange County Rape Crisis Center

welcomed new Development and Communications Director Kelly Taylor in July. Kelly has more than 10 years of experience working with nonprofits in the area and

focuses on fundraising and event planning as well as communications and development. “We are looking forward to the fresh eyes and track record of engaged, mission-driven work that Kelly brings to our organization,” says Executive Director Rachel Valentine.

PHOTO COURTESY OF CARLTON BASSETT

Dermatology & Laser Center of Chapel Hill

(DLC) welcomed its newest staff member, Ochuole Ode, in July. When Ochuole is not working as a front desk coordinator at DLC, she reviews books on her Instagram account and spends time with her dogs, Teddy and Tobe.

WHAT AN HONOR Chapel Hill-Carrboro Area Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta sorority

has granted scholarships supporting the advancement of education for students in Chatham and Orange counties since 1979. This year, four students received $5,650 in scholarships. East Chapel Hill High School graduate Amaya Royster received the new Ishna J. Hall scholarship and entered her first semester at UNC this fall. The other recipients were East Chapel Hill High School graduate Miles Merriweather, who attends NC State, Orange High School graduate Brooke Currie, who attends Winston-Salem State University, and Orange High School graduate Jazzmin Abernathy, who attends Durham Technical Community College. In June, Orange High School graduate Sebastian Rios was named one of 17 North 17


NOTED

Carolina high school students to receive an Aubrey Lee Brooks Scholarship for the 2020-21 academic year. The scholarship funds students attending N.C. State, UNC-Greensboro or UNC; Sebastian will attend N.C. State. The scholarship provides up to $12,000 for each student for the academic year, and it may be renewed up to three additional academic years.

Teacher of the Year award from Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools at a virtual Eugenia Floyd ceremony on June 12. Eugenia began teaching seven years ago and is an alumna of the district. Among the other award recipients were Evie O’Dor and Stephens Watson, who were each named Honor Teachers. Evie O’Dor

This year’s prompt asked participants to highlight an issue they felt should be addressed by presidential candidates during their campaigns. Teresa and Jett’s documentary, titled “AMERICA: This Equality,” is available to watch at studentcam.org.

GIVING BACK

Orange County launched the new #MaskUpOCNC campaign on July 27. The campaign takes place on social media as well as through a poster series that encourages residents to wear masks. Artists Mike Benson, Marcela Slade and Bob Goldstein created posters of cultural icons, such as Darth Vader and Elvis, wearing masks, which can be found throughout the county. Residents are encouraged to share a photo on social media using the campaign’s hashtag, and one person each week will win a gift card to a local business.

In June, Acme and Carrboro United partnered to donate $15,000 worth of food to help combat food insecurity, particularly in communities of color, throughout Orange County. Through the Pay It Forward program, Carrboro United delivered the food to El Centro Hispano and to more than 300 families in the Rogers-Eubanks neighborhood.

During the same virtual ceremony, Chapel HillCarrboro City Schools also The North Carolina Arts Council honored multiple teachers distributed $105,000 among seven nonprofit and employees for reaching organizations, including the Orange County career milestones within Arts Commission (OCAC), to help many of the school system. East Chapel Hill High teaching Stephens Watson the state’s artists and organizations affected by the pandemic. The OCAC received $15,000 assistant Pamela Tedder was honored for 35 years of teaching. Jennifer to create and invest in programs that will promote the work of local artists. Burnette of Seawell Elementary School, Melissa Pearce of Estes Hills On July 11, UNC’s Alpha Elementary School, Pablo Epsilon Delta Pre-Health Honor Valencia of Frank Porter Society and Alpha Phi Omega Graham Bilingüe Elementary, service fraternity hosted a virtual Facilities Manager Cindy “Race Against Racism.” More Dillehay and Deidre Foushee, Send us your than 250 participants from who works in transportation, noteworthy 17 different states collectively were all honored for 30 years of moments! took 2,020,605 steps and raised service. From births $4,267. All of the proceeds went to awards to the Marian Cheek Jackson Two Smith Middle School to new biz Center to support neighbor students, Jett Mu and Teresa and more – noted@ retention programs for the Fang, won a $750 prize and chapelhill elderly in the Northside and third place in C-SPAN’s video magazine.com Pine Knolls neighborhoods and documentary competition.

POSTER BY MIKE BENSON

Eugenia Floyd, a fourth grade teacher at Mary Scroggs Elementary School, received the

to combat food insecurity through the Heavenly Groceries food ministry.

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BOOKIN’ IT New York Times bestselling author Jill McCorkle released “Hieroglyphics,” her first book in seven years, on July 28. The Hillsborough-based UNC grad has written a dozen notable books and


NOT ED

collections of short stories and has received a variety of awards for her writing. Published by Algonquin Books, her new novel tells the story of a retired couple who move “home” to North Carolina after years in Boston and explores themes of love, loss, truths, half-truths and what can and cannot be known about the past.

IN OTHER NEWS John David Spatola of Hillsborough

competed in an “American Ninja Warrior Junior” wild card race on June 5 with hopes of qualifying for the quarterfinals. John David competed in the 9-10 age division, and the competition aired on Universal Kids.

Local author, activist and editor Corinna Fales’ new book, “This Book is Not a Safe Space: The Unintended Harm of Political Correctness,” is a social commentary that explores the effects of politically correct culture alongside her own experiences of activism. This memoir reaches the audience through personal connection and humor while encouraging open-mindedness and inclusivity. Author Alfred “Mike” Mathers published his book, “Traveling Apple: My 81 Years on Planet Earth,” in July. Mike’s novel details his world travels and numerous experiences as he dedicated much of his life to educating children and enhancing the lives of others. In the ’90s, he worked with teachers and administrators all over the globe, in places like Belarus, Bosnia and Pakistan. He now lives with his wife, Sandra Brooks-Mathers, in Chapel Hill where he spends time with his children and grandchildren.

Come experience the gentle side of Dentistry

Hillsborough author Edward Di Gangi

published “The Gift Best Given: A Memoir” in May. Edward, who was adopted at birth, decided that he would finally uncover his birth mother’s identity as he neared the age of 70; the book explores his search for his mother and the discovery of his parents. He intertwines the details of his mother’s life as a young woman who left home to travel at the age of 17 with his own search for her identity.

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Change of Art This fall will undoubtedly look different in many ways, but there are still opportunities to experience and appreciate the arts in our community. Here are just a few:

GET THE PICTURE

A Q&A with Keith Knight, the Carrboro-based cartoonist whose life inspired a Hulu television series By H an n ah Le e | P h otography by Cornel l Wat son

K

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity. eith Knight lived in San Francisco for 16 years as a cartoonist

working for publications from the SF Weekly to the Salt Lake City Weekly. He eventually moved to Los Angeles for eight years to try to develop “something” for television. But it wasn’t until he settled in Chapel Hill in 2015 (he moved to Carrboro a year later) with his wife, Kerstin Konietzka-Knight, and sons, Jasper, 12, and Julian, 7, that Hollywood came calling. Hulu signed a deal for his show “Woke” in late 2016; it depicts his life as an award-winning cartoonist who focuses on social activism, racial illiteracy and police brutality, which he personally experienced early on after the San Francisco police mistook him as a robbery suspect. All episodes debut on Sept. 9. How did you first get into cartooning? It’s something that I always

did even as a kid, and I think everybody does that, but I was constantly encouraged. I remember in kindergarten drawing dinosaurs, and the teacher holding it up and showing everybody and getting all excited about it. I was always encouraged to create. 20

By the time I got to seventh grade and the [special arts] program [I was in from fourth to sixth grade] was over, I was creating comic books. I was creating zines. That’s when I first started doing autobiographical stuff. I started to incorporate it into my schoolwork, and that worked well with everything except math. It’s like, two plus two is four, and you can’t really deviate from that no matter how much you draw on the paper. So I started doing [a comic strip] for my junior high newsletter, [and then] my high school newspaper. Then I got into college, and that’s where my first strip I still do now started. And it really changed in college when I had my first Black teacher, which was a huge thing. I had him for American literature, and he gave us Ralph Ellison, Richard Wright, Maya Angelou and James Baldwin to read. And when someone asked, “Why are you giving us all Black writers in American literature?” he said, “I’m giving you all American writers.” That totally blew my mind. It was the first time in school reading about the Black experience outside of a paragraph or two about slavery. And so it


really triggered something in me that said, “OK, I should be using my strip to record my life as growing up Black in America.” Did you ever push the envelope too far? Have cartoons been rejected for being too edgy or controversial? I’ve had editors call me

and say, “We’re not going to run it this week. It’s too controversial – too this, too that.” The places that did that the most were San Francisco and [neighboring] Marin County, and the place that did it the least was Salt Lake City. And I would always say, “How come Salt Lake City runs me, and I don’t have an issue there, but for some reason I have an issue in San

Francisco and Marin County?” It was this bizarre thing of people being afraid to offend anybody. ... But it’s an interesting reckoning right now with the whole Black Lives Matter [movement], with George Floyd happening. I think a lot of folks are starting to think [that] maybe we should have more diversity in what we present. What do you make of this social justice swell in America now, especially when you’ve been covering Black lives for decades?

I think it is more than just a trend, but I would say this, that there are a lot of companies and people who are posting Black Lives Matter on their 21


FALLARTS

FALL ARTS CHECKLIST Events are subject to change; check with organizers before attending

in as musician Tim Carless plays •theTune live score to a classic silent film during a monthly broadcast from his studio in Carrboro. Dates TBA. artscenterlive.org

PlayMakers Repertory Company’s 45th •season includes an encore of Durham native Kane Smego’s one-man hip-hop odyssey, “Temples of Lung and Air” (date TBA) and a live reading of “The Storyteller” by Sara Jean Accuardi, the winner of the first International Thomas Wolfe Playwriting Competition, which will be viewable on PlayMakers’ website. Oct. 30; playmakersrep.org Grab a drink at Hillsborough’s Bakova •Gallery’s bar and then peruse the art on

the gallery’s two floors. The gallery is back to having regular events on Thursdays and Fridays. bakovagallery.com Stop by Margaret Lane Gallery every Sunday from noon-3 p.m. for its meet-theartist series. A different local artist, such as Debi L. Drew, will be on the gallery’s porch weekly to speak with visitors about art and inspiration. margaretlanegallery.com

Twitter feed or whatever, perfect position.” But we’ll see and a few months from now if it gets a lot of people talking. they’re going to go back to This is the awkward discussion business as usual. But I think that we need to have. there are companies and organizations out there that When were you first actually want to make the approached about the effort to change, and people possibility of getting are calling them out: Besides a show? just posting this up here, When I left San Francisco, I what else are you going to do? saw the writing on the wall, It’s one of those things where which was, I was in a rentI will continue to do the controlled apartment, and I work that I do when things was stuck there. I had a three settle down. ... bedroom, it was $1,400 – And it’s amazing how we unheard of – and I had been shot this show in February there for 16 years. I suddenly “Black History should be and how the world shifted saw myself being there for taught to everyone, all year long,” Keith says. “Not right into what the show is another 20 years. So we left, just four or five feel-good all about. I mean, the show and once I got down to LA, stories during the shortest was supposed to drop in it was like, “OK, I have to do month of the year.” November, and we talked to the LA schmooze thing and [Hulu] and said, “This can’t get a show.” And me being run in November. This has to run sooner.” So the defiant San Franciscan, I went down there we convinced them to release it earlier. We’re without having a car and didn’t have one for the very excited they were open to doing that. first three years. I inherited a car from a family Everybody involved – from the actors to the member [who] passed, and I drove it out from writers and directors and everybody else – is Boston, and that’s when it all worked out. I sitting there going, “Oh, my God, that thing was like, “Oh, you actually have to drive across we worked on last February ... it’s pivoting in a town to all these events and schmooze people

Keith recounted his own encounter with police in a slideshow and conversation with Designmatters at ArtCenter College of Design in Pasadena, California, in July: Catch a virtual version of the Sonja •Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History’s annual Diaspora Festival of Black and Independent Film. Popular, resonant short films from past festivals will be shown with post-screening virtual discussions. Dates TBA. stonecenter.unc.edu the exhibit, “Meditations on •theExplore Idea of Sacred Space: the Life and

Enduring Work of Phil Freelon,” and learn about the local legendary architect at Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History. Sept. 1-Nov. 30; stonecenter.unc.edu a decade of FRANK Gallery •withCelebrate a new exhibit featuring work from

artists such as Peg Bachenheimer and Paul Hrusovsky. The exhibit will also be featured on the FRANK website. (Also, Continued on page 26 22

… When I was living in San Francisco for 10 years, I was hanging up posters for my band in my neighborhood about two blocks away – I was hanging [one] up on a telephone pole. And this cop car skids across two lanes of traffic, and the guy jumps out, and he’s like, ‘What are you doing?’ and I said, ‘I’m hanging up posters for my band.’ And I said, ‘I have a stapler. I’m going to put it down on the ground.’ So this guy gets on the radio and says, ‘We have the suspect.’ And I said, ‘What suspect?’ And he goes, ‘Well you fit the description of someone who’s been robbing houses in the neighborhood.’ I said, ‘What’s the description?’ And he said, ‘6-foot tall, Black male.’ And I said, ‘Anything else?’ And he said, ‘No, 6-foot-tall Black male.’ Which means he could pick up anybody he wanted. And here’s the thing, I had dreads that were growing out of control. They were a mess. And you know what I looked like? I looked like a Black Sideshow Bob [from ‘The Simpsons’]. And I would describe myself as that. … So anyway, he called it in, and I looked all the way down Arguello Street, [and] I see a cop car coming. I look all the way up Fulton Street, and I see a cop car coming down the hill. I look all the way down toward the beach, the other side of Fulton Street, and a cop car’s coming. And I was like, ‘Wow, this is that moment. I am in it now.’ This is the thing I always write about, and usually I’m on the outside looking in. Now I’m on the inside looking out. So, I was just trying to take it all in, being the cartoonist that I am. And it was amazing the look on people’s faces how frightened they were of me when I looked out at them. It was so bizarre.”


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FALLARTS all the time.” I eventually met this really cool producer – a young, very go-get-them-type producer – and he responded to my work and essentially introduced me to a bigger production company. So I sat at lunch with him and his dad who was, I think, an African American literature professor, and he goes, “I showed my dad your stuff.” He looked at me, and his dad looked at him and said, “You gotta do a show with this guy. It will be the most important show that you ever do.” So he introduced it to a larger production company, Olive Bridge, that had a deal with Sony. This is the reason why whenever anyone wins something, they have a list of people [to thank] – like 30 people that made this all happen. The number of planets that have to align for all this to happen is crazy … [but] Hulu went for it. When did Hulu accept the offer? Five

years ago? I just remember it wasn’t until I moved out here that things solidified. So I tell people all the time, “Oh yeah, Carrboro is the place to be if you want to make it in Hollywood – that’s the spot.” (laughs) Why did you choose to move here and leave California?

At some point, I felt like I’d met everybody I needed to meet to be able to work outside of LA. We started looking at different places across the country, and it was interesting because we wrote down all the liberal places that we could think of – Portland, Seattle, Austin ... Madison, Wisconsin. I tried to push Pittsburgh, and then I also talked about Chapel Hill. Because about 20 years ago, one of the very first comic strip slideshows I did outside of the Bay Area was at UNC. It was my first time coming to the South that was not Florida [or] New Orleans … and I had all these preconceptions. But when I got here, it was a great experience. I had a great presentation, and I was like, “Man, this is the South? This is pretty cool. If I ever get married and have kids, this is the place that I could live.” So when my wife suggested it, because there’s an Emerson Waldorf School here, I was like, “All right, I’m going to go out there.” So I came out first [before my family], and someone was driving me around Chapel Hill, and we went across the tracks over to Carrboro. And right then, right when I went across those tracks, I said, “Oh, this is where we’re gonna live. Wow.” 24

COLOR WHEEL

Bus shelter art adds character to stops in Chapel Hill and Carrboro

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By Madel i ne Kraf t | Photo by B et h Mann

ext time you’re walking the streets, riding the bus or driving in your car, take a moment to notice the many colorful public art pieces decorating Chapel Hill. The Chapel Hill Community Arts & Culture division commissioned unique crosswalk art, bold murals and artistic bus shelters with hopes to “inspire creativity and celebrate community,” says Steve Wright, the town’s public art coordinator. The Art + Transit program began in fall 2018 in partnership with Chapel Hill Transit to bring art into spaces where a multitude of people wait every day – bus shelters. Funding installations biannually, the Community Arts & Culture division seeks out local artists interested in being a part of the project. The program’s success is evident on 18 bus stop shelters and counting, spread throughout the community. Subjects range from famed Carrboro musician Libba Cotten to the Greek goddess Athena, whose likeness adorns the Town of Chapel Hill seal. The installations are not permanent or high dollar, so artists are encouraged to experiment with different mediums and styles. Chapel Hill resident Joel Sobelson responded to the ask for ideas in 2019. He created “The Ooom Pah Band,” a vinyl art installation for the bus shelter located near the Glen Lennox Shopping Center on Raleigh Road. Joel hopes his series of instrument-playing clowns will bring a smile to everyone who stops to look. “I’ve been told by a few folks that if the conditions are just right, when one closes their eyes, they can actually hear the band playing,” Joel says. The Community Arts & Culture division plans to continue the program with another call for artist submissions this fall or next spring. 


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FALLARTS

the work of 25 accomplished local •andSeenational sculptors at Garden Art

Gallery’s Art in the Garden Sculpture Exhibition. The free exhibition is held in Tinka Jordy’s Hillsborough garden. Sept. 12, 13 and 19; garden-art-gallery.com the North Carolina Botanical Garden •forVisit an outdoor sculpture exhibit featuring work by North Carolina artists. Sept. 13-Dec. 6; ncbg.unc.edu/sculpture Singer-songwriter Tift Merritt partners with Carolina Performing Arts on The Spark, a new video interview series featuring beloved performing artists. First up in the series: CPA artist-in-residence and renowned banjo player and singer Abigail Washburn. Sept. 24; carolinaperformingarts.org

Symphony Orchestra’s concert •willThebe UNC available to watch live from the Kenan Music Building on the UNC Department of Music YouTube channel. Sept. 30; music. unc.edu/calendar

Get in the spooky spirit with the open-air •Creepy Crawly Art Show at Studio 71. The show will feature pop culture horror pieces by Wes Flanary as well as native North Carolina insect pieces by Kylene Babski Figle. Open-air shows Friday nights in October from 7-10 p.m.; gallery71nc.com The 23rd annual Carrboro Music •Festival goes virtual this year with a

variety of local acts performing. Oct. 4; carrboromusicfestival.com It Orange: Plein Air Paint-Out •andPaint Wet Paint Sale expands out from

its usual Orange County borders to the entire state, as artists from across North Carolina are encouraged to participate in Paint It NC, a virtual plein air paint out. ​ Artists paint from Oct. 7-13, and the virtual exhibition will be viewable starting Oct. 20. hillsboroughartscouncil.org/paint-it-orange Watch a variety of early award season •contenders live at Silverspot Cinema and

outdoor venues (to be announced later) during Film Fest 919 2.0. Also kicking off at the same time is a new, year-round streaming event with a focus on student films to highlight burgeoning talent in North Carolina. Oct. 14-18; filmfest919.com The 15th annual Carrboro Film Festival •features virtual screenings of Southern films, livestreamed filmmaker panels and prize giveaways. The event is being planned as an all-virtual festival, but in-person events may take place if deemed safe. Nov. 20-29; carrborofilm.org – Compiled by Laney Dalton 26

TUNE IN

C

A new music streaming service highlights local artists By Sa ra h Rollin s

hapel Hill Public Library and Chapel Hill Community Arts & Culture collaborated to launch Tracks Music Library – a commercial-

free, no-cost music streaming service that features songs exclusively from local musicians – in June. These organizations applied and received a grant a few years ago to host their own music library from Rabble, a company that led the charge on music software and streaming services for libraries, says Melissa Bartoletta, Chapel Hill Community Arts & Culture marketing and communications coordinator. She explains that “libraries are key stakeholders in supporting local music – from crafting musician-friendly policies to helping connect audiences with musicians and musicians with spaces and places.” With a goal of wanting to assist in the discovery of area musicians, Tracks was created. “The name ‘Tracks Music Library’ was inspired by the railroad tracks throughout our town and also the song ‘Freight Train’ by legendary local musician Libba Cotten,” Melissa says. Artists submitted one to three songs representative of their overall work through an application process. Community curators, including Kevin “Kaze” Thomas and Bill Smith, who are familiar with the area’s music landscape, chose artists to upload a full album based on quality, diversity and connection to the Chapel Hill scene. Songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Local music acts such as Rowdy, Violet Rachel Kiel, a 2003 graduate of East Chapel Bell and Fitness Womxn were selected Hill High School, is one of Tracks’ first to be a part of Tracks by community curators. featured artists. She was first introduced to music when she started taking flute lessons and dance classes at age 5. “Being a tap dancer has both a musical and a visual component because you’re creating music with the sounds of your feet while moving through the physical space,” Rachel says. She recalls attending smaller shows at Cat’s Cradle and credits her parents for exposing her to a diverse range of music at a young age. “I grew up with my parents’ record collection, and that’s what really made me want to become a songwriter,’’ Rachel says. “So, the idea of being part of a library of local records felt really good to me.” Tracks features her third album, “Shot from a Cannon,” and for listeners who want to hear more, Rachel is releasing her fourth full-length album this fall. The plan is for Tracks to accept submissions at least once a year, and Melissa says that they hope to someday host live events and “partner with other organizations that support local musicians.”

PHOTO COURTESY OF ROWDY, VIOLET BELL AND FITNESS WOMXN

don’t miss the annual Off the Wall Gala, taking place virtually on Oct. 10.) Sept. 8-Nov. 7; frankisart.com



D INING GUIDE

*DETAILS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. CHECK RESTAURANT WEBSITES AND SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS PRIOR TO VISITING.

INCLUDES RESTAURANTS, DELIS AND BISTROS IN CH APEL HILL, CARRBORO, HILLSBOROUGH AND NORTHERN CHATHAM COUNTY

CHAPEL HILL East Franklin Street Bandido’s Mexican Cafe Burritos, salads, quesadillas, tacos. Open for dine-in and takeout. 159-½ E. Franklin St.; 919-967-5048; bandidoscafe.com Benny Cappella’s Temporarily closed (reopening TBD) Blue Spoon Microcreamery Homemade cryogenic ice cream and brewed coffee and espresso drinks. Open for dine-in, takeout and curbside pickup. 140 E. Franklin St.; 919-869-7166 Carolina Coffee Shop Casual American cuisine for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Open for dine-in and takeout. 138 E. Franklin St.; 919-942-6875; carolinacoffeeshop.com Cosmic Cantina Burritos, salads, quesadillas, tacos. Open for dine-in, takeout and delivery. 128 E. Franklin St.; 919-960-3955 Curry Point Express Indian fare including curry, biryani and wraps. 118 E. Franklin St.; 919-903-9000; currypointexpress.com Down Time Pizza Bar & Night Club Craft beer, wraps, paninis and more. Open for dine-in and takeout. 201 E. Franklin St.; 919-240-7008; downtimechapelhill.com Epilogue Independent bookstore and Spanishstyle chocolatería. Open for inside seating reservations, outdoor seating, takeout and curbside pickup. 109 St., Ste. 100; 919-913-5055; 109 E Franklin St. SuiteE. 100 Franklin www.epiloguebookcafe.com Chapel Hill, NC 27514 epiloguebookcafe.com (919) 913-5055 | @epiloguebooksch

Four Corners American fare, nachos, wings, pasta. Open for dine-in, takeout and delivery. 175 E. Franklin St.; 919-537-8230; fourcornersgrille.com Hibachi & Company Japanese fast-casual spot. Open for dine-in, takeout and delivery. 153 E. Franklin St.; 919-903-8428; hibachicompany.com Imbibe Bottle shop and restaurant serving pizza, salads and appetizers. Open for grocery, takeout and delivery orders. 108 Henderson St.; 919-636-6469; imbibenc.com Linda’s Bar & Grill Local beer, sweet potato tots, cheese fries, burgers. Outdoor seating available and open for takeout. 203 E. Franklin St.; 919-933-6663; lindas-bar.com

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Sup Dogs Creative hot dogs and sides like jalapeño popper tots and funnel cake sticks. Open for dine-in, takeout and delivery. 107 E. Franklin St.; 919-903-9566; supdogs.com Sutton’s Drug Store Old-fashioned diner known for its hot dogs, burgers and sandwiches like “Roy’s Reuben.” Open for dine-in and takeout. 159 E. Franklin St.; 919-942-5161; suttonsdrugstore.com Time-Out Southern comfort food 24 hours a day. Open for dine-in, takeout and delivery. 201 E. Franklin St.; 919-929-2425; timeout247.com Top of the Hill A Chapel Hill brewery that also offers American food, like burgers and flatbreads. Open for dine-in and curbside pickup. 100 E. Franklin St.; 919-929-8676; thetopofthehill.com TRU Deli & Wine Bar Sandwiches and wine. Open for dine-in and takeout. 114 Henderson St.; 919-240-7755; trudeli.com Yaya Tea Japanese cafe with a variety of bubble teas and imported Japanese snacks. Open for takeout and delivery. 157 E. Franklin St.; 919-914-6302; yayatea.com Ye Olde Waffle Shoppe Temporarily closed (reopening TBD) West Franklin Street 411 West Fresh pasta, seafood and pizzas inspired by the flavors of Italy and the Mediterranean, with a healthy California twist; outdoor dining. Open for dinein, curbside pickup and delivery. 411 W. Franklin St.; 919-967-2782; 411west.com Al’s Burger Shack Gourmet burgers and fries. Open for outside dining, takeout and delivery. 516 W. Franklin St.; 919-904-7659; alsburgershack.com B.GOOD Temporarily closed (reopening TBD) Beer Study Bottle shop with in-store drafts and growlers to go. Open for dine-in and pickup. 106 N. Graham St.; 919-240-5423; beerstudy.com Blue Dogwood Public Market Food hall with individually-owned food stalls including traditional Persian, vegan soul food, North Carolina barbecue and a nutrient-dense weekly pre-order menu. 306 W. Franklin St.; 919-717-0404; bluedogwood.com

Boro Beverage Co. Locally made kombucha and craft sodas on tap. Open for takeout. 400 W. Rosemary St., Ste. 1005; 919-537-8001; borobeverage.com Brandwein’s Bagels Classic New York bagels and breakfast sandwiches. Open for takeout. 505 W. Rosemary St.; 919-240-7071; brandweinsbagels.com Bread & Butter Bakery & Coffeeshop Temporarily closed (reopening TBD) BUNS Serves gourmet burgers, fries and shakes made from fresh ingredients. Open for dine-in, takeout and delivery. 107 N. Columbia St.; 919-240-4746; bunsofchapelhill.com Carolina Brewery The fifth-oldest brewery in the state featuring Carolina cuisine. Open for dine-in, takeout, curbside pickup and delivery. 460 W. Franklin St.; 919-942-1800; carolinabrewery.com Cat Tales Cat Cafe A two-story coffee/ beer/wine cafe home to 12 adoptable cats. Open for online reservations. 431 W. Franklin St.; cattalescatcafe.com Chimney Indian Kitchen + Bar Offers both traditional Indian dishes and unique options like lobster pepper masala. Open for dine-in, curbside pickup and delivery. 306 W. Franklin St., Ste. D; 984-234-3671; chimneyindiankitchen.com CholaNad Restaurant & Bar Contemporary and traditional South Indian cuisine. Catering available. Open for dine-in, curbside pickup and delivery. 310 W. Franklin St.; 800-246-5262; cholanad.com Crook’s Corner Temporarily closed (reopening TBD) Crossroads Chapel Hill at The Carolina Inn New American cuisine and seasonal specialties; all ABC permits; outdoor dining. Open for dine-in and pickup. 211 Pittsboro St.; 919-918-2777; crossroadscuisine.com Elaine’s on Franklin Temporarily closed (reopening TBD) Frutta Bowls Temporarily closed (reopening TBD) Heavenly Buffaloes Chicken wings as well as vegan wings with more than 25 rubs and sauces. Open for dine-in, takeout and delivery. 407 W. Franklin St.; 919-914-6717; heavenlybuffaloes.com/chapel-hill


Italian Pizzeria III Pizza, Italian entrees, calzones and subs. The "place to be" in Chapel Hill for 40 years. Open for dine-in, takeout and delivery. 508 W. Franklin St.; 919-9684671; italianpizzeria3.com

Might As Well Bar & Grill Bar favorites , plus pizza, burgers, wings and more. Open for dine-in, takeout and delivery. 206 W. Franklin St.; 984-234-3333; chapelhill. mightaswellbarandgrill.com

Que Chula Authentic Mexican food, tacos and craft tequilas. Open for dine-in, takeout and delivery. 140 W. Franklin St. #110; 919-903-8000; quechulatacos.com

Mint Contemporary Indian Cuisine North Indian subz korma and chicken jalfrezi. Open for dine-in and takeout. 504 W. Franklin St.; 919-929-6188; mintunc.com

Kurama Sushi & Noodle Express Dumplings, salads, noodle dishes. Open for takeout. 105 N. Columbia St.; 919-968-4747; kuramasushinoodle.com

Spicy 9 Sushi Bar & Asian Restaurant Sushi, Thai curries, bibimbap and other Asian entrees. Open for dine-in, takeout and delivery. 140 W. Franklin St.; 919-903-9335; spicy9chapelhill.com

Moe’s Southwest Grill Made-to-order burritos, nachos, quesadillas and more. Open for dine-in, takeout and delivery. 110 W. Franklin St.; 919-914-6217; moes.com

La Résidence French-inspired cuisine. Open for dine-in, outdoor dining and takeout. 202 W. Rosemary St.; 919-9672506; laresidencedining.com

Talulla’s Authentic Turkish cuisine; all ABC permits. Open for dine-in and takeout. 456 W. Franklin St.; 919-933-1177; talullas.com

The Northside District Specialty cocktails and international small plates. Open for dine-in and takeout. 403 W. Rosemary St.; 919-391-7044; thenorthsidedistrict.com

Lantern Temporarily closed (reopening TBD)

Perennial Temporarily closed (reopening TBD)

Trolly Stop - The Beach on Franklin Specialty hot dogs and burgers. Open for dine-in, takeout and delivery. 104 W. Franklin St.; 919-240-4206; trollystophotdogs.com

Lime & Basil Vietnamese fare. Open for takeout and delivery. 200 W. Franklin St.; 919-967-5055; limeandbasil.com

Pho Happiness Pho noodle soup, vermicelli plates and vegetarian/gluten-free options. Open for takeout and delivery. 508A W. Franklin St.; 919-942-8201; phohappiness.com

Mama Dip’s Traditional Southern specialties, brunch and dinner classics like fried chicken and Brunswick stew. Open for dine-in, curbside pickup and delivery. 408 W. Rosemary St.; 919-942-5837; mamadips.com Mediterranean Deli Healthy vegan, vegetarian and gluten-free options. Open for dine-in, takeout and delivery. 410 W. Franklin St.; 919-967-2666; mediterraneandeli.com

The Pizza Press Build-your-own pizza, salads and craft beer. Open for dine-in, takeout and delivery. 133 W. Franklin St., Ste. 120; 984-234-0081; thepizzapress.com The Purple Bowl Acai bowls, toast, smoothies, coffee. Open for takeout and delivery. 306-B W. Franklin St.; 919-903-8511; purplebowlch.com

Vimala’s Curryblossom Café Traditional Indian tandoori and thali. Available for curbside pickup. 431 W. Franklin St.; 919929-3833; curryblossom.com West End Wine Bar Temporarily closed (reopening TBD) YoPo of Chapel Hill Since 1982, YoPo has served up frozen yogurt, treats and shakes with unique flavors. 106 W. Franklin St.; 919-942-7867; yogurtpump.com

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DINING GUIDE

Village Plaza/East Franklin Street/ Eastgate Crossing/Rams Plaza Breadman’s A variety of burgers, sandwiches, salads and grilled meat, with daily soup and specials. All-day breakfast; Open for outdoor seating, curbside pickup and dine-in. Catering available. 261 S. Elliott Rd.; 919-967-7110; breadmens.com Caffé Driade Temporarily closed (reopening TBD) Carolina 1663 Contemporary Southern fare at the Sheraton. 1 Europa Dr.; 919-969-2157 Casa Maria Latin Cuisine Specialty dips, ceviche, street tacos, nachos, burritos and salads. Open for dine-in, pickup and delivery. 1502 E. Franklin St.; 919-929-6566 The Casual Pint An upscale craft beer market with beers and wine on tap, and icecream sandwiches. 201 S. Elliott Rd., Ste. 51; 919-967-2626; chapelhill.thecasualpint.com CAVA Customizable Mediterranean bowls, salads, pitas and soups. Open for curbside pickup and delivery. 79 S. Elliott Rd.; 919-636-5828; cava.com Chopt Offers unique salads, grain and quinoa bowls. Open for outside dine-in, curbside pickup and delivery. Eastgate Crossing; 919-240-7660; choptsalad.com

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Clean Juice Certified organic juices, smoothies, bowls and snacks. Open for curbside pickup and delivery. Eastgate Crossing; 919-590-5133; cleanjuice.com

The Loop Pizza Grill Pizzas, soups, salads, sandwiches, burgers. Open for dine-in, takeout and delivery. Eastgate Crossing; 919-969-7112; looppizzagrill.com

Crab House Company Fresh, flavorful seafood. Open for dine-in or takeout. 237 S. Elliott Rd.; 919-903-9015; crabhouseco.com

Min Ga Authentic Korean cuisine like bibimbap, bulgogi and variety of homemade kimchi. Open for takeout and delivery. 1404 E. Franklin St.; 919-933-1773; min-ga.com

Dunk & Slide at Whole Foods Market Hot bar is open for to-go orders only. Outside seating is available after pickup. 81 S. Elliott Rd.; 919-968-1983; wholefoodsmarket.com Guglhupf Bake Shop European-style breads, pastries and coffee. Open for takeout and curbside pickup. Eastgate Crossing; 919-9146511; guglhupf.com/chapel-hill-bake-shop Il Palio Ristorante at The Siena Hotel N.C.’s only AAA Four Diamond Italian restaurant. Open for dinner dine-in and takeout. 1505 E. Franklin St.; 919-918-2545; ilpalio.com Japan Express Hibachi-style combination meals and sushi. 106 S. Estes Dr.; doordash.com Kipos Greek Taverna Greek cuisine in a relaxed, upscale setting; outdoor dining. Eastgate Crossing.; 919-425-0760; kiposchapelhill.com La Hacienda Burritos, salads, quesadillas, tacos. Open for dine-in and takeout. 1813 Fordham Blvd.; 919-967-0207

Monterrey Mexican Grill Tacos, quesadillas, burritos and more. Open for dine-in, takeout and delivery. Rams Plaza; 919-969-8750; monterreychapelhill.com Mr. Tokyo Japanese Restaurant Unlimited sushi and hibachi. Open for takeout and delivery. Rams Plaza; 919-240-4552; mrtokyojapanese.com/chapel-hill Red Pepper Chinese restaurant offering traditional Szechuan dishes. 1704 E. Franklin St.; 919-968-3488; redpeppernc.com Squid’s Fresh seafood options include wood-grilled fillets, Maine lobster, fried seafood and oysters. Open for dine-in, takeout and delivery. 1201 Fordham Blvd. (15-501); 919-942-8757; squidsrestaurant.com Sunrise Biscuit Kitchen Drive-thru biscuits, sandwiches. 1305 E. Franklin St.; 919-933-1324; sunrisebiscuits.com Sutton’s at the Atrium A cafe version of Sutton’s Drug Store with menu options including its famous hot dogs,


D I NI NG GUI D E

salads and more. Open for dine-in and takeout. 100 Europa Dr.; 919-240-4471; suttonsdrugstore.com Tandoor Indian Restaurant Traditional Indian cuisine, vegan options. Open for takeout and delivery. 1301 E. Franklin St.; 919-967-6622; tandoorindian.com Twisted Noodles Thai noodle soups, pan-fried noodles. Open for takeout and delivery. Eastgate Crossing; 919-933-9933; twistednoodlesch.com University Place Alfredo’s Pizza Villa Pizzas, calzones, salads, subs, pasta, desserts. Open for dine-in, takeout and delivery. 919-9683424; alfredospizzanc.com bartaco Tacos, plus fresh-juice cocktails, poke and mole options. Open for dinein, takeout and delivery. 910-807-8226; bartaco.com City Kitchen Temporarily closed (reopening TBD) Hawkers Inspired by Southeast Asia's street fare, this eatery features homemade favorites, from dumplings to curries. Indoor and outdoor seating available and open for takeout. eathawkers.com Maple View Mobile Temporarily closed (reopening TBD) Stoney River Steakhouse and Grill Southern favorites like deviled eggs meet steakhouse mainstays like the legendary

12 oz. filet. Open for dine-in and takeout. 919-914-6688; stoneyriver.com Trilogy American cafe featuring innovative twists on classic dishes. Outdoor seating available. Silverspot Cinema; 919-357-9887; silverspot.net Village Burgers Temporarily closed (reopening TBD) Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard (Airport Road) Hunam Chinese Restaurant Cantonese cuisine. Open for takeout and delivery. 790 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-967-6133; hunamrestaurant.net Kitchen Bistro-style dining with a seasonal menu that always includes mussels. Open for takeout Tuesdays and Saturdays and wine delivery. 764 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-537-8167; kitchenchapelhill.com Lucha Tigre Latin-Asian cuisine and sake tequila bar. Open for takeout. 746 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-904-7326; luchatigre.com The Root Cellar Sandwiches, salads, desserts and more. Online ordering and pickup, weekly prepared meals, groceries to-go box and Friday night specials. 750 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-967-3663; rootcellarchapelhill.com

1922

Timberlyne/Chapel Hill North Area Chapel Hill Wine Company Wine store with bottles from all over the globe. 2809 Homestead Rd.; 919-968-1884; chapelhillwinecompany.com Deli Edison Neighborhood deli with bagels, sandwiches, salads. Open for takeout and outdoor seating only. 630 Weaver Dairy Rd.; 919-929-7700; deliedison.com Farm House Restaurant Temporarily closed (reopening TBD) Joe Van Gogh Coffee, tea and pastries. Open for online or walk-up window orders. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-967-2002; joevangogh.com Magone Italian Grill & Pizza Italian mains. Open for delivery or takeout. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-904-7393; magoneitalian-grill-pizza.business.site Margaret’s Cantina Mexican and Southwestern cuisine. Open for takeout and outdoor seating available. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-942-4745; margaretscantina.com New Hope Market Breakfast and daily specials like burgers, soups and more. Open for dine-in and takeout. 6117 N.C. Hwy. 86 S.; 919-240-7851 Oishii Specialty rolls, teriyaki, stir-fry, sushi. Open for takeout. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-932-7002; oishiiroll.com

Since

we’ve put our community first.

And our commitment to you still stands. We hope that you’ll visit us soon to experience our enhanced safety measures, our brand new menus, and our signature Best of Chapel Hill taste.

EMBARK ON A CULINARY ADVENTURE

to where centuries-old Ottoman recipes are prepared from scratch every day.

2020

Morning. Day. Night.

Now accepting online orders at carolinacoffeeshop.com

31


DINING GUIDE

The Pig Barbecue, fried tofu, collards. Open for takeout and outdoor seating available. 630 Weaver Dairy Rd., Ste. 101; 919-942-1133; thepigrestaurant.com PiggyBack Temporarily closed (reopening TBD) Pop’s Pizzeria Pizzas, calzones, stromboli, pasta. Open for dine-in or takeout. 1822 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-932-1040; pops-pizzeria.com Queen of Pho Vietnamese offerings like banh mi and, of course, pho beef noodle soup. Open for dine-in, takeout and delivery. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919903-8280; queenofphochapelhill.com Rasa Indi-Chinese Indian and Chinese cuisine. Open for dine-in, takeout and no-contact delivery. 1826 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-929-2199; rasachapelhill.com Sage Vegetarian Cafe Vegetarian fare. Takeout only. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-968-9266; sagevegetariancafe.com Sal’s Pizza & Ristorante Thin-crust and deep-dish pizzas plus an array of Italian comfort food. Open for takeout and delivery. 2805 Homestead Rd.; 919-9325125; salspizzaofchapelhill.com YOPOP Frozen Yogurt Frozen yogurt shop featuring 14 flavors, bubble tea and smoothies. Curbside pickup. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-537-8229

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N.C. 54 East/Raleigh Road Amante Gourmet Pizza Create-your-own pizzas. Open for dine-in, takeout and delivery. 6209-B Falconbridge Rd.; 919-493-0904; amantepizza.com

Hawthorne & Wood Fine dining cuisine with an outdoor patio, a fully stocked bar and an extensive international wine list. Open for dine-in or takeout. East 54; 919-240-4337; hawthorneandwood.com

BIN 54 Steaks, seafood and other fine American food. Everything made inhouse. Open for dine-in and takeout. Glen Lennox Shopping Center; 919-969-1155; bin54chapelhill.com

Jujube Eclectic, modern cuisine inspired by the classic flavors of China and Vietnam. Open for dine-in, delivery and takeout. Glen Lennox Shopping Center; 919-960-0555; jujuberestaurant.com

Brenz Pizza Co. Specialty pizzas, subs, salads. Open for takeout and delivery. 3120 Environ Way, East 54; 919-636-4636; brenzpizzaco.com

Nantucket Grill & Bar Clam chowder, lobster rolls and more. Open for dine-in, delivery and takeout. 5925 Farrington Rd.; 919-402-0077; nantucketgrill.com

Coco Bean Coffee Shop Locally owned coffee shop offering Carrboro Coffee Roasters coffee and a vegan market. Open for takeout. 1114 Environ Way, East 54; 919-883-9003; cocobeancoffeeshop.com

Thai Palace Soup, curries, pad thai. Open for takeout. Glenwood Square Shopping Center; 919-967-5805

Elements Cuisine combining classical and modern Asian and European cooking techniques; check out the wine bar with full menu next door. Open for dine-in and takeout. 2110 Environ Way, East 54; 919-537-8780; elementsofchapelhill.com First Watch French toast, pancakes and specialty omelets. Open for dine-in, delivery and takeout. 1101 Environ Way, East 54; 919-537-8488; firstwatch.com

Meadowmont Village Brixx Wood Fired Pizza Specialty pizzas and salads. Open for dine-in, takeout and delivery. 501 Meadowmont Village Circle; 919-929-1942; brixxpizza.com Cafe Carolina & Bakery Temporarily closed (reopening TBD) Fusion Fish Tapas, family-style dinners and sushi. Open for dine-in, takeout and delivery. 100 Meadowmont Village Circle; 919-903-8416; fusionfishcuisine.com Meet Fresh Taiwanese desserts and teas. Open for takeout and delivery. 407 Meadowmont Village Circle; 984-999-4983; meetfresh.us/en


DINING GUIDE

Quickly Hot and cold tea drinks in addition to Asian street food. Open for takeout. 503 Meadowmont Village Circle; 984-234-0401; quicklychapelhill.com Southern Village Al’s Burger Shack Gourmet burgers and fries. Open for takeout and outdoor seating available. 708 Market St.; 919-9146694; alsburgershack.com Market and Moss American cuisine made with fresh local ingredients. Open for takeout and patio dining. 700 Market St.; 919-929-8226; marketandmoss La Vita Dolce Pastries, sorbet, gelato, coffee. Open for takeout and outdoor seating available. 610 Market St.; 919-968-1635; lavitadolcecafe.com Rasa Malaysia Authentic Malaysian dishes. Open for takeout and outdoor seating available. 410 Market St.; 984-234-0256; rasamalaysiach.com Town Hall Grill Temporarily closed (reopening this fall with a new menu and concept) Weaver Street Market Food bar items available as grab and go. 716 Market St.; 919-929-2009; weaverstreetmarket.coop

WE’RE OPEN FOR DINE-IN, CURBSIDE PICKUP AND DELIVERY

CARRBORO Downtown 401 Main Upscale dive bar and sandwich shop serving shareable bar snacks, local brews and po’boys. Open for dine-in, takeout and delivery. 401 Main St.; 984-999-4357; 401main.com

FIRST IN FLAVOR

Proudly serving Award-Winning Beers, Scratch-Made Food, and NC BBQ since 1995.

Acme Food & Beverage Co. Entrees with a Southern touch. Open for takeout through online orders. 110 E. Main St.; 919-9292263; acmecarrboro.com Akai Hana Japanese cuisine including sushi, tempura and teriyaki. Open for outdoor dine-in and curbside pickup. 206 W. Main St.; 919-942-6848; akaihana.com Armadillo Grill Tex-Mex burritos, enchiladas, tacos, nachos. Open for dine-in and takeout. 120 E. Main St.; 919-929-4669; armadillogrill.com Carrburritos Burritos, tacos, nachos and margaritas. Outdoor seating available and open for takeout. 711 W. Rosemary St.; 919-933-8226; carrburritos.com Cham Thai Cuisine Authentic Thai, Siamese and Chinese cuisine. Open for takeout only. 370 E. Main St., Ste. 190; 984999-4646; chamthai.squarespace.com Coronato Pizza Roman-style pizza, snacks and salads. Outdoor seating available and open for takeout. 101 Two Hills Rd., Ste. 140; 919-240-4804; coronatopizza.com

CRAFT BEER - SCRATCH MADE FOOD - PATIO SEATING - CRAFT COCKTAILS - TO-GO FOOD & BEER - ONLINE ORDERING LOCATED IN CHAPEL HILL & PITTSBORO www.carolinabrewery.com

Taste of the South

voted favorite comfort southern food and barbecue 408 W. Rosemary St., Chapel Hill 919.942.5837 mamadips.com

BEST ITALIAN 411 W. Franklin St., Chapel Hill 919.967.2782 411West.com for hours/menu

Take-Out Family Meals Outside Dining • Dine-In Curbside Pick-Up • P L E AS E C A L L FO R U P DAT E S •

Lunch & Dinner Wed-Sun 11 am - 7 pm

 33


DINING GUIDE

Craftboro Brewing Depot Bottle shop and brewery with taps of craft beer. Outdoor seating available and open for takeout. 101 Two Hills Dr., Unit 180; 919-240-4400; craftborobrewing.com Glasshalfull Mediterranean-inspired food and wine. Open for takeout and curbside pickup. 106 S. Greensboro St.; 919-967-9784; glasshalfull.net Gourmet Kingdom Sichuan cuisine. Open for takeout only. 301 E. Main St.; 919-932-7222; thegourmetkingdom.com The Honeysuckle Cafe & Bar Coffee house serving tea and meads in addition to breakfast, lunch and dinner fare. Open for dine-in and takeout. 601 W. Main St.; 919967-9398; thehoneysuckle.org/cafe-bar Krave Kava Bar & Tea Lounge Offers a wide range of tea and herbal drinks, all made from kava, a type of plant root. Open for dine-in and takeout. 105 W. Main St.; 919-408-9596; kravekava.com Mel’s Commissary & Catering Temporarily closed (reopening TBD) Napoli Cafe Wood-fired pizza, espresso, artisanal gelato made from scratch, teas and local craft beer and wines. Open for takeout and delivery. 105 E. Main St.; 919667-8288; napolicarrboro.com Neal’s Deli Buttermilk biscuits and traditional deli fare. Open for takeout and curbside pickup. 100-C E. Main St.; 919967-2185; nealsdeli.com

Oakleaf “Immediate” cuisine like pastas and seafood using ingredients from the chef’s own garden. Outdoor seating available and open for takeout and delivery. 310 E. Main St.; 984-234-0054; oakleafnc.com Open Eye Cafe Locally roasted Carrboro Coffee and espresso, tea, beer, wine and baked goods. Open for takeout only. 101 S. Greensboro St.; 919-968-9410; openeyecafe.com Paco’s Tacos Steak, chicken, seafood and vegetarian tacos. Open for takeout or delivery. 109 W. Main St.; 919-240-7700; doordash.com Pizzeria Mercato Pizza, antipasto, soups and fritti. Open for takeout only. 408 W. Weaver St.; 919-967-2277; pizzeriamercatonc.com Provence Southern French cuisine. Open for takeout and delivery. 203 W. Weaver St.; 919-967-5008; provenceofcarrboro.com The Speakeasy Temporarily closed (reopening TBD) Spotted Dog Vegetarian- and veganfriendly entrees. Outdoor seating available and open for takeout. 111 E. Main St.; 919933-1117; thespotteddogrestaurant.com Wings Over Has 27 flavors of wings. Open for takeout and delivery. 313 E. Main St.; 919-537-8271; wingsoverchapelhill.com

wood-fired pizza • housemade pastas sammies • salads • desserts

RADIUS

112 N. Churton Street • Hillsborough

radiuspizzeria.net

34

BISCUITS ABOVE & BEYOND

DOWNTOWN CARRBORO SOUTHPOINT DURHAM DOWNTOWN DURHAM

RISEBISCUITSCHICKEN.COM

INDOOR DINING | EXPANSIVE COVERED PATIO MENU OFFERS PALATE PLEASERS GALORE! EAT IN OR TAKE OUT AVAILABLE 202 WEST ROSEMARY ST. DOWNTOWN CHAPEL HILL

919.967.2506 LARESIDENCEDINING.COM


DI N I N G G U I DE

East Main Square Amante Gourmet Pizza Create-your-own pizzas, salads and pasta. Open for dine-in, takeout and delivery. 300 E. Main St.; 919-929-3330; amantepizza.com Gray Squirrel Coffee Co. Roastery and espresso bar. Outdoor seating available and open for takeout. 360 E. Main St., Ste. 100; graysquirrelcoffee.com Hickory Tavern Burgers, sandwiches and build-your-own salads. Open for dine-in and takeout. 370-110 E. Main St.; 919-942-7417; thehickorytavern.com Rise Southern Biscuits & Righteous Chicken Biscuits, doughnuts, chicken and coffee. Open for takeout and delivery; limited outdoor seating. 310 E. Main St., Ste. 100; 919-929-5115; risebiscuitschicken.com Vecino Brewing Co. Dozens of craft beer choices plus flavorful small plates. Open for dine-in through reservations, takeout and delivery. 300 E. Main St., Ste. C; 919-537-9591; vecinobrewing.com Carr Mill Mall B-Side Lounge Temporarily closed (reopening TBD) Carrboro Pizza Oven Pizza, calzones. Open for dine-in, takeout and delivery. 919-904-7336; carrboropizzaoven.com Elmo’s Diner Temporarily closed (reopening TBD)

Luna Rotisserie & Empanadas South American cuisine meets the American South. Indoor and outdoor seating available and open for takeout and curbside pickup. 307 E. Main St.; 919-537-8958; lunarotisserie.com Oasis Organic coffee, tea, beer and wine. Open for dine-in and takeout. 919-904-7343; oasisincarrmill.com

100+ Made In-House Gelato Flavors Cups, Cones, Pints Custom on-site Catering

Tandem Farm-to-table, modern American cuisine with full service bar. Open for dinein, takeout and delivery. 919-240-7937; tandemcarrboro.com Thai Station Authentic, fresh Thai dishes. Open for dine-in, takeout and delivery. 201 E. Main St., Ste. C.; 984-234-3230; thaistationnc.com Venable Rotisserie Bistro Upscale comfort food with a heavy emphasis on seasonal ingredients. Open for takeout only. 919-904-7160; venablebistro.com Weaver Street Market Food bar items are available as grab and go. 919-929-0010; weaverstreetmarket.coop N.C. 54 West/Carrboro Plaza Aidan’s Pizza Pizza, wings and salads. 602-D Jones Ferry Rd.; 919-903-8622; aidanspizza.com Anna Maria’s Pizzeria Italian cuisine. Open for dine-in or takeout. Carrboro Plaza; 919-929-1877; annamariasnc. wordpress.com

lavitadolcecafe.com

WE’RE OPEN!

COME EXPERIENCE OUR NEW LOCATION!

Serving Breakfast ALL DAY LONG with Classic Lunch and Dinner Fare! OUTSIDE SEATING, CURBSIDE PICK-UP & DINE-IN

WE CATER! Call 919.428.4470

261 s. Elliott rd., Chapel Hill 919.967.7110 breadmens.com 35


D I N I N G G U I DE

Fiesta Grill Burritos, chimichangas, fajitas, tacos. Open for takeout. 3307 N.C. Hwy. 54 W.; 919-928-9002; fiestagrill.us Monterrey Traditional Mexican cuisine. Open for dine-in or takeout. Carrboro Plaza; 919-903-9919; monterreychapelhill.com Wingman Wings and hot dogs. Open for takeout or delivery. 104 N.C. Hwy. 54 W.; 919-928-9200; bestwingman.net

HILLSBOROUGH Antonia’s Italian cuisine. Open for dine-in, delivery or takeout. 101 N. Churton St.; 919-643-7722; antoniashillsborough.com Bandido’s Mexican Cafe Temporarily closed (reopening TBD) Cup A Joe Coffee and pastries. Open for takeout only through the Cloosiv app. 112 W. King St.; 919-732-2008

BANQUET HALL SPACE CATERING KOSHER EVENTS CERTIFIED GLUTEN-FREE PITA MEDITERRANEAN MARKET CHAPEL HILL & ELON

MEDITERRANEANDELI.COM

El Restaurante Ixtapa Authentic fromscratch Mexican dishes. Open for takeout. 162 Exchange Park Ln.; 919-644-6944; ixtapa.homestead.com/homepage.html Hillsborough BBQ Company Barbecue plates and sandwiches, sides and desserts. 236 S. Nash St.; 919-732-4647; hillsboroughbbq.com Hot Tin Roof Temporarily closed (reopening TBD)

VISIT OUR CAFÉS

Find our coffees at our many area restaurant, cafe, and retail partners. Visit CarrboroCoffee.com for the full list

36

The House at Gatewood Chop house and oyster bar with dishes like signature cracker-crusted pork chop with grits and greens. Open for takeout or dine-in. 300 U.S. 70; 919-241-4083; houseatgatewood.com Jay’s Chicken Shack Chicken, buffalo wings, breakfast biscuits. 646 N. Churton St.; 919-732-3591; jayschickenshack.com Los Altos Serving Mexican dishes, like tacos and chiles rellenos, for breakfast and lunch six days a week and dinner on weekends. 126 W. King St.; 919-241-4177 Maple View Farm Country Store Driveup or window service for homemade ice cream and milk. 6900 Rocky Ridge Rd.; 919-960-5535; mapleviewfarm.com Matthew’s Chocolates Gourmet chocolates, frozen treats and baked goods. 104 N. Churton St.; 919-732-0900 Napoli Hillsborough Neapolitan pizzeria and gelateria. Open for takeout. 230 S. Nash St.; 919-245-8566; napolihillsborough.com Nomad International street food-inspired eatery. Open for takeout. 122 W. King St.; 984-217-0179; thenomadnc.com Panciuto Temporarily closed (reopening TBD) Pueblo Viejo Traditional Mexican food. Open for dine-in, delivery or takeout. 370 S. Churton St.; 919-732-3480

DINE-IN TAKEOUT DELIVERY

2020

BEST PIZZA

AlfredosPizzaNC.com


DI N I N G G U I DE

Radius Wood-fired pizzas, housemade pastas, sandwiches, salads and desserts. Outdoor dining and takeout. 112 N. Churton St.; 919-245-0601; radiuspizzeria.net Saratoga Grill New England-style cuisine. Open for dine-in or takeout. 108 S. Churton St.; 919-732-2214; saratogagrill.com Steve’s Garden Market & Butchery Local meat, baked goods, pimento cheese. 610 N. Churton St.; 919-732-4712; stevesgardenmarket.com Village Diner Southern breakfast, lunch, brunch, dinner and take-out pizza. 600 W. King St.; 919-245-8915 Vinny’s Italian Grill and Pizzeria Italian favorites. 133 N. Scottswood Blvd.; 919-732-9219; vinnyshillsborough.com Weaver Street Market Food bar items are available as grab and go. 228 S. Churton St.; 919-245-5050; weaverstreetmarket.coop Whit’s Frozen Custard Ice cream and frozen treats. 240 S. Nash St.; 919-245-8123; whitscustard.com Wooden Nickel Pub Pub fare on the patio or for pickup. 113 N. Churton St.; 919-643-2223; thewnp.com Yonder: Southern Cocktails & Brew Beer, wine, froze and more for takeout. 114 W. King St.; yonderbarnc.com

CHATHAM COUNTY Governors Village Ciao Bella Pizzeria Pizzas, pastas, sandwiches. 1716 Farrington Point Rd.; 919-932-4440 Flair Restaurant & Wine Bar Frenchinfluenced food, coffee and Sunday brunch. 50100 Governors Dr.; 919-967-9990; flairfusionrestaurant.com Gov’s Burger and Tap Burgers, hot dogs, salads, wraps and sandwiches. 50050 Governors Dr.; 919-240-5050; govsburgerandtap.com Tarantini Italian cuisine. 50160 Governors Dr.; 919-942-4240; tarantinirestaurant.com North Chatham 501 Pharmacy Maple View Farm ice cream, plus malts and shakes. 98 Chapelton Ct., Ste. 300; 984-999-0501; 501rx.com Breakaway Cafe A casual cafe serving breakfast, lunch and dinner, along with coffee and Maple View Farm ice cream. The patio is open, however the inside dining area remains closed. 58 Chapelton Ct., Ste. 100; 984-234-3010; breakawaync.co

Spend an hour in the company of our 12 friendly adoptable cats. Our 2 Story space is a happy place for feline fanatics to interact with kitties in a comfortable, free-roaming environment. Offering coffee, tea, beer, wine, other fun beverages, and tasty sweet treats. A great place for private parties and special events.

RESERVATIONS STRONGLY RECOMENDED

For more information and to make your reservation, please visit CatTalesCatCafe.com 431 W. Franklin St., Suite 210 Chapel Hill, NC 27516

37


D I N I N G G U I DE

Capp’s Pizzeria & Trattoria Traditional Italian cuisine including fresh pastas, pizzas and more. 79 Falling Springs Dr., Ste. 140; 919-240-4104; cappspizzeria.com

Carolina Brewery The fifth-oldest brewery in the state. Outdoor seating available. 120 Lowes Dr., Ste. 100; 919-545-2330; carolinabrewery.com/pittsboro-brewery

O’YA Cantina Latin cuisine from all over the world. Open for dine-in or takeout. 72 Chapelton Ct.; 984-999-4129; oyacantina.com

Chatham Marketplace Sandwiches, baked goods. 480 Hillsboro St.; 919-542-2643; chathammarketplace.coop

Town Hall Burger & Beer Gourmet burgers plus shared plates, tacos, wings and salads. Inside dining area remains closed, however the patio is open. 58 Chapelton Ct., Ste. 140; 984-234-3504; townhallburgerandbeer.com

PITTSBORO Al’s Diner Traditional American classics for breakfast, lunch and supper. 535 West St.; 919-542-5800; alsdiner.net Allen & Son Bar-B-Que N.C. barbecue. Open for takeout only. 5650 U.S. 15-501; 919-542-2294; stubbsandsonbbq.com

The City Tap Classic bar food. 89 Hillsboro St.; 919-545-0562; thecitytap.com Compadres Tequila Lounge Mexican restaurant with a variety of classic dishes. 193 Lowes Dr., Ste. 107; 919-704-8374; compadresnc.com Copeland Springs Farm & Kitchen Farm-to-table restaurant serving grains and greens bowls, small plates and bar snacks. 193B Lorax Ln.; 919-261-7211; copelandspringsfarm.com Davenport’s Café Diem Carrboro Coffee Roasters coffee and espresso offerings. 439 Hillsboro St.; 919-704-4239; davenports-cafediem.com

Angelina’s Kitchen Greek and Southwestern dishes including gyros. 23 Rectory St.; 919545-5505; angelinaskitchenonline.com The Belted Goat Lunch, dinner and wine shop, offering salads and sandwiches. Open for outdoor dining and takeout. Fearrington Village Center; 919-545-5717; fearrington. com/belted-goat Blue Dot Coffee Joe Van Gogh coffee, lattes, smoothies and pastries. To-go orders can be placed at the window or by phone. 53 Hillsboro St.; 919-704-8064

Elizabeth’s Pizza Pizzas, calzones, sandwiches, salads and pasta. Offering curbside service. 160 Hillsboro St.; 919545-9292; elizabethspizzapittsboro.com The Fearrington House Restaurant Contemporary fine dining. Reservations are

Open Now

Order & Pay Online

Flair

Restaurant & Wine Bar

(919)967-9990

38

Take Out Order & Pay Online

Open Now for Dinner (919)942-4240

Tarantini

Breakfast / Brunch /Lunch / Dinner


DI N I N G G U I DE

needed. Fearrington Village Center; 919-542-2121; fearrington.com/house Greek Kouzina Made from scratch hummus, gyros, kebabs and more available for curbside pickup and delivery. 964 East St.; 919-542-9950; greekkouzina.com Goodness Gracious Juice Co. Breakfast, juices and smoothies. 517 West St.; 919726-2033; goodnessgraciousnc.com House of Hops Bar and bottle shop with a large craft beer selection on tap. Outdoor seating available. 112 Russet Run, Ste. 110; 919-542-3435; houseofhopsnc.com The Mod Wood-fired pizza, salads, small plates and a full bar. Outdoor seating available. 46 Sanford Rd.; 919-533-6883; themodernlifedeli.com

Roost Beer Garden Wood-fired pizza and local brews. Offering outdoor seating and takeout. 2000 Fearrington Village Center; 919-542-1239; fearrington.com/roost S&T’s Soda Shoppe Soda fountain, American fare. 85 Hillsboro St.; 919-545-0007; sandtsodashoppe.com The Root Cellar Sandwiches, prepared salads, desserts and more. Offering online ordering and pickup, weekly prepared meals, groceries to-go box and Friday night specials. 35 Suttles Rd.; 919-542-1062; rootcellarpbo.com Small B&B Cafe Offbeat, eco-friendly eatery offering farm-to-table fare for breakfast and lunch. Offering outdoor dining and online ordering. 219 East St.; 919-537-1909; smallbandbcafe.com

ODDCO An art and design store and music venue featuring regional craft beers. 684 West St.; 919-704-8832; realoddstuff.com

Starrlight Mead Tastings of honey wines and honey. 130 Lorax Ln.; 919-533-6314; starrlightmead.com

The Phoenix Bakery Small-batch and seasonal baked goods and specialty cakes. 664 West St.; 919-542-4452; thephoenixbakerync.com

Virlie’s Grill Soups, salads, burgers, sandwiches. 58 Hillsboro St.; 919-542-0376; virliesgrill.com

Postal Fish Company Fresh seafood from North Carolina’s coast. Serving dinner only. 75 W. Salisbury St.; 919-704-8612; postalfishcompany.com

Willy’s Cinnamon Rolls, Etc. Bakery selling cinnamon rolls, scones, muffins, cookies and bread with ’40s and ’50s flair. 35 W. Chatham St.; 252-305-9227; willysrolls.com

NEWS BITES Now Open Brandwein’s Bagels opened in July at 505 W. Rosemary St. in the space formerly occupied by Midway Community Kitchen. Carrboro’s Akai Hana leveled and renovated its dog-friendly patio, updated electrical work and installed new flooring prior to reopening in early August for curbside pickup and patio dining. Paco’s Tacos opened out of Mel’s Commissary & Catering in Carrboro on June 19. It’s run by sisters Claudia Silva and Betty Silva. Check out Mel’s Instagram or Facebook page for more information. Hate to See You Go After closing temporarily in March, Southern restaurant Lula’s, at the corner of Franklin and Columbia streets, announced its permanent closure in July. Chapel Hill Restaurant Group and Lula’s chef William D’Auvray are working on the group’s next project, a pan-Asian street food restaurant LuLuBangBang, slated to open in Research Triangle Park.

James Pharmacy, a seafood restaurant in Hillsborough, announced on June 3 that its temporary closure was permanent. “The honest truth is that, for this restaurant to be financially sound, it needs to be operating at full capacity nearly always, which can be challenging enough even in the best of times. We don’t see that as a possibility anytime soon and don’t have the ability to wait for those days to return,” the restaurant said on Facebook. Special Treats Chocolate Lounge in Timberlyne Shopping Center in Chapel Hill closed on July 31. The boutique chocolate shop will continue to make its original chocolate creations, crafted by individuals with disabilities, and market them online and at retailers. Latin American vegan restaurant Soul Cocina permanently closed its storefront in Chapel Hill’s Blue Dogwood Public Market. It shifted its service to weekly online ordering and delivery. Customers can also find its food at the Carrboro Farmers Market every Wednesday and Durham Farmers Market every Saturday. News bites continue on page 67

The Place to Be!

CHAPEL HILL FAVORITE FOR 40 YEARS BEST PHILLY CHEESE STEAK IN THE TRIANGLE!

ITALIAN PIZZERIA III

FOR CATERING OF ANY OCCASION, PLEASE GIVE US A CALL! 508 WEST FRANKLIN STREET, CHAPEL HILL

919 968 4671 italianpizzeria3.com 

39


D I N I N G G U I DE

we’re open for dine-in, curbside pickup and delivery! Restaurant & Oyster Bar

BEST SEAFOOD 1201 Fordham Blvd., Chapel Hill 919.942.8757 squidsrestaurant.com for hours/menu

recipes + local events + foodie news

eat& drink D EL I V ERE D

M O N T H LY

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Chapel Hill Magazine, Chatham Magazine and Durham Magazine

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ALSO CHECK OUT THESE AREA RESTAURANTS … DURHAM Alley Twenty Six Craft cocktail bar with a kitchen offering plates like pan-seared duck breast available for takeout. 320 E. Chapel Hill St.; 984439-2278; alleytwentysix.com Annexe Snacks, turntables built into the bar and pink Champagne on tap. 105 S. Mangum St. Ste. 1; 919-973-3000; annexedurham.com

Harvest 18 Local, seasonal eats. Try the pimento cheese dip and a Bloody Mary for brunch. 8128 Renaissance Pkwy., Ste. 114; 919-316-1818; 18restaurantgroup.com Joe Van Gogh Local coffee shop, with orders available for takeout. 47115A Hope Valley Rd.; 919-973-3950; and 1104-B Broad St.; 919-286-4800; joevangogh.com

Beyu Caffe Coffee shop, restaurant and bar with beignets and buffalo wings available for takeout. 341 W. Main St.; 919-683-1058; beyucaffe.com

Makus Empanadas Empanadas, with vegetarian and vegan options available for takeout. 1125 W. N.C. 54, Ste. 304; 919-390-7525; makusempanadas.com

Bleu Olive High-quality comfort food with a Mediterranean flair. 1821 Hillandale Rd.; 919-383-8502; bleuolivebistro.com

MarketPlace JB Duke Hotel’s main restaurant, open for breakfast, lunch and dinner. 230 Science Dr.; 919-6606400; jbdukehotel.com

The Blue Note Grill Fantastic barbecue, ribs and live music. 709 Washington St.; 919-401-1979; thebluenotegrill.com

Mez Contemporary Mexican Creative Mexican dishes with a fresh twist. 5410 Page Rd.; 919-941-1630; mezdurham.com

Bocci Trattoria & Pizzeria Traditional Italian pastas, pizzas and salads. 5850 Fayetteville Rd.; 919-206-4067; bocciitalian.com

Namu Restaurant and Coffee Bar Casual Korean eats, beer and specialty coffee. 5420 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-251-9794; namudurham.com

City Barbeque Smoked meats, peach cobbler and hushpuppies. 208 W. N.C. 54; 919-237-9509; citybbq.com

NanaSteak Steaks, plus other meats like salmon and pasta. 345 Blackwell St.; 919-282-1183; nanasteak.com

Cocoa Cinnamon Signature handbrewed coffees and lattes to-go. 2627 Hillsborough Rd.; 2013 Chapel Hill Rd. and 2627 Hillsborough Rd.; cocoacinnamon.com

The Oak House Cafe featuring Caballo Rojo coffee, Jeddah’s Tea, fine wines and craft beer. 126 W. Main St.; 919-339-1383; oakhousedurham.com

Da Kine’s Kava Bar An assortment of kava drinks that promote stress relief and mental well being. 1114-B W. Chapel Hill St.; 919-864-8002; dakineskava.com Dashi Traditional ramen shop and izakaya with saké options. Temporarily closed. 415 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-2519335; dashiramen.com Eastcut Sandwich Bar East Coast sandwich fare, salads and sweets available for takeout. Mainstays include chicken Parm and BLTs. 3211 Old Chapel Hill Rd.; 984-439-1852; eastcutsandwich.com Fairview Dining Room Washington Duke Inn’s AAA Four Diamond-rated restaurant. 3001 Cameron Blvd.; 919-493-6699; washingtondukeinn. com GRUB Durham Serves up comfort food favorites with a twist like brioche doughnuts and beerbattered mushroom sandwiches. 1200 W. Chapel Hill St.; 919-973-3636; grubdurham.com Guglhupf Bakery, Cafe and Biergarten German-inspired cuisine and artisanal bakery. Restaurant dishes include house-cut noodles, wiener schnitzel and pan-roasted duck. 2706 DurhamChapel Hill Blvd.; 919-401-2600; guglhupf.com

Page Road Grill Traditional Southern dishes. 5416 Page Rd.; 919-908-8900; pageroadgrill.com The Patio Unscripted Hotel’s poolside bar features cocktails and gourmet bites. 202 N. Corcoran St.; 984-3299500; unscriptedhotels.com Pie Pushers Takeout a slice of staples like pepperoni, or try out one of the specials, like the “Pace Car.” 117A W. Main St.; 919-294-8408; piepushers. com University Club Offerings include family-style fare, famous half-pound burger and small plates for takeout or delivery. 3100 Tower Blvd., Ste. #1700; 919-493-8099; universityclubathome. com Zambrero Freshly made, healthy Mexican food. Try the vegan power bowl. 3109 Shannon Rd. Ste. 102.; 910-239-2316; zambrero.com

SANFORD La Dolce Vita Pizzeria Salads, specialty pizza, focaccia sandwiches and dessert, with an outdoor patio. 226 Carthage St.; 919-777-5277; ldvpizzeria.com


November 7, 2020

RE SE RVE YOUR TIC K E TS!

A virtual food and wine experience. Select an at-home food and wine experience for contactless pickup on Nov. 7 at Johnson Lexus Preowned of Durham! Each of the four meal theme options include dishes prepared by some of the best chefs in the Triangle and a handpicked wine flight. A portion of Sip + Savor’s profits will be donated to Carolina Theatre of Durham. A DURHAM MAGAZINE EVENT

thank you to our sponsors

Your adventure includes 5 dishes for two + 4 split bottles of wine + cooler bag and swag plus Chef tells all video & virtual wine class by Ryan Vet, Sommelier at The Oak House

Learn more at

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P INK R D & FOOD

DATE IT’S A

BRUNCH TIME

P

lan an extravagant daytime rendezvous on Saturday or Sunday. Several local restaurants offer special brunch menus over the weekend – we went with Harvest 18’s brunch menu (Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.) and ordered the grilled pork belly sandwich topped with a sunny-side up egg and sweet pepper jelly, and the crabcake Benedict with heirloom tomatoes and sprite melon salad. (The restaurant also offers family meals for two or four people for curbside pickup.) For an extra bountiful brunch, grab a few croissants and scones from Guglhupf’s Chapel Hill or Durham location and local jams or jelly. Alley Twenty Six has a wide assortment in its Mixers & Mercantile shop – we chose the blackberry rum jam for this feast. Start the meal with a 96 oz. Joe Box from Joe Van Gogh – its organic Sumatra Ketiara coffee has notes of dark chocolate and cherry. The shops are open every day from 7:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and offer no-contact pickup and weekend delivery within 4 miles of its Woodcroft cafe. Drink as much as you need on the weekend and save the remainder for iced coffees at the start of the workweek! When it comes to a boozy brunch, there are plenty of options. You can go simple – try Alley Twenty Six’s peach syrup with orange juice and Cantina di Carpi 42

ABOVE Harvest 18’s grilled pork belly sandwich, sunny-side up egg and sweet pepper jelly. BELOW Bowerbird Flowers & Apothecary’s Love & Hope Bouquet, with blooms sourced from local farmers.

Make staying in special with these fun at-home ideas Photography by B et h Mann

‘NotteBianca’ Brut from Durham Food Hall’s Auctioneer Bar for “kind of a cross between a mimosa and a Bellini,” says Alley Twenty Six owner Shannon Healy. Or add ½ ounce of the bar’s cucumber-watermelon syrup to the bubbly for a refreshing sparkler. If you want to take your beverage game to the next level, grab some premade mixers from Durham Food Hall as well. Its bloody mary mix is packed with veggies and pairs beautifully with Durham Distillery’s colddistilled cucumber vodka. Layer on the accompaniments – we went with pickles, blue cheese-stuffed green olives, lemon, lime, celery and even a hard-boiled egg and bacon. But if bloody marys aren’t your style, go with the crowd-pleasing Squeeze the Day blood orange shrub (a drinking vinegar perfect for mixing) and try it with Top of the Hill Distillery’s Organic Piedmont Gin. After you’ve had your fill and made another round of drinks, challenge your partner to a good-natured tournament – the winner claims the title of Brunch Boss. Triangle Lawn Games offers game rentals for delivery or pickup, and most are $20-$30 a day and $5 per additional day (use the code “FunAtHome25” for 25% off at checkout!). Most importantly, employees wear masks and disinfect all games before and after each rental. Have a small space to work with? Go with a game like Giant Jenga or Giant Connect Four. Larger yards are perfect for the classics like cornhole and ladder ball. 


Marie Muir and Caleb Rushing sip on a backyard bloody mary made with Durham Food Hall’s Auctioneer Bar mix and Durham Distillery’s cold-distilled cucumber vodka.

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“Try something new,” suggests Triangle Lawn Games CEO Gordon Buchanan. “Many folks haven’t heard of less popular games like kubb or rollers, but they are super fun and pretty easy to learn.”

FRIDAY NIGHT FAMILY MEAL

A

fter a long week of school projects, work deadlines and endless Zoom calls, use this time to reconnect with your kids before the weekend kicks into full gear. Consider planning your supper around a ABOVE Giant Jenga is a great lawn game option if you don’t have a large yard. produce box. Hungry Harvest, which is on To create Marie’s Gin & Bear It cocktail, mix 2 oz. TOPO Piedmont gin, 1 ½ oz. Squeeze the Day shrub, and ½ oz. lemon juice in a shaker with ice until well-chilled, a mission to eliminate food waste by rescuing and then strain into a Collins glass. BELOW LEFT Caleb tries his hand at ladder ball. produce that’s perfectly good to eat but that BELOW RIGHT Cucumber-watermelon sparkler with cantaloupe and watermelon garnish. grocery stores won’t sell due to a slightly off size, shape or color, curates variety boxes and delivers to your door. For a family of four to six, try a Super Harvest box (you’ll have some extra for meals at the beginning of the week, too!). Box contents vary every week based on what is available to be recovered, and you can customize your box at no additional cost. You can also choose add-on options from Hungry Harvest’s marketplace, like bread, eggs, cooking oils, coffee, kombucha, chocolate and other pantry staples. “Many customers like to be ‘surprised’ by their boxes, like an episode of ‘Chopped,’” says Hungry Harvest Senior Markets Manager Bart Creasman. “For those who are looking for less of a surprise but more for options to expand their cooking, I would recommend checking your box contents in our weekly order reminder emails, and you can choose to keep any surprising/exotic items in the box and customize accordingly. We also provide recipes on our website for more unique items, which can definitely help spark the creative process for utilizing new ingredients.” cookie for dessert, and kids can follow along to an instructional video on Pompieri’s website. Parents can supervise while enjoying a brew from Most Durham County and Orange County deliveries will be made on Fridays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Order by 5 p.m. on Wednesday of that week Pompieri’s sister restaurant, Bull City Burger & Brewery, or a bottle of wine, which is currently 20% off with curbside takeout. to ensure a Friday delivery. Of course, there’s also always the option of ordering a fully cooked If you’re looking for something a bit quicker than preparing a meal family meal. Beau Catering Marketplace in Hillsborough posts a from scratch, but just as fun, try Pompieri Pizza’s Build-Your-Own-Kidnew menu of family meals (for two, four or six people) on Saturdays for Pizza pack. You’ll get the dough, sauce, cheese and your kid’s selected curbside pickup and delivery to Orange County and parts of Durham on toppings for them to build at home. The pack includes a drink and a 44


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HOME COOKING

BACKYARD TWILIGHT

We know there are a lot of home chefs looking to step up their dinner game. Make a night of it with your partner by setting the table, complete with local flowers from Bowerbird Flowers & Apothecary, which offers contact-free pickup at both its flagship studio in Chapel Hill and its newest location in the Durham Food Hall, as well as delivery. Or set the table with a colorful arrangement from Mighty Tendril Farm in Cedar Grove, operated by UNC grads Emily Madara and Adam Sherwood. Order by noon on Friday for $5 delivery or free Saturday pickup at Two Chicks Farm in Hillsborough, the Carrboro Farmers Market or on West Chapel Hill Street in Durham. The restrictions from COVID-19 put a stop to the renowned pop-up dinners by Snap Pea Catering. Now, executive chef and owner Jacob Boehm hosts live, interactive cookalongs on Saturdays at 5:30 p.m. Order to get a South Wind Produce box delivered for free (within a specific delivery zone) on Saturday along with recipes and a list of equipment and other ingredients needed. The box contains enough ingredients for four servings of the meal, plus some bonus produce. Spend the evening watching Jacob create a meal from scratch, and don’t be afraid to ask questions! The class will be recorded, so you can always rewatch it if you need a refresher. On Sundays, cook with Indulge Catering’s Executive Chef Queen Precious-Jewel Earth Zabriskie and Sous Chef Jacqueline “Jay” White on Facebook Live at 6 p.m. Each week features a different dish to master, and these culinary wizards share all their tips and tricks in real time, which makes it easy to get all your burning questions answered. They recently did a date night cookalong with honey-citrusglazed duck breasts and honeycomb candy, utilizing local honey found at Perkins Orchard.

An easy-to-make, alcohol-free ginger cocktail by Shannon Healy Half a peach 4-6 oz. really cold soda water 2 basil leaves ¼ to ½ oz. Alley Twenty Six Ginger Syrup 3-6 drops of Crude Bitters’ “Sycophant” (orange and fig)

Slice ¼ of the ripe peach in thin slices. In a large wine glass, add 4 large ice cubes and soda water and slide the peach slices down the side of the glass. Tear basil leaves in half and slide them down the side of the glass as well. Add ginger syrup. Top with drops of bitters (note: bitters are made with alcohol). Gently stir. Garnish with remaining quarter of peach. 

This Place.

You’ll arrive on Bald Head Island by ferry, then explore by golf cart, bicycle or your own two feet. As your pace slows, you’ll notice little things…a painted bunting flitting through the brush…a ghost crab skittering across the sand…three, no, four dolphins leaping in the surf…and you’ll feel more serene and more alive than you have in a long while. That’s the simple magic of this place, if you’ll allow it.

B A L D HE A D I S L A ND N O RT H

REAL ESTATE: 800-888-3707 | www.BHIRealEstate.com

C A RO LI N A

VACATION: 800-432-RENT | www.BaldHeadIsland.com

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Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. Recent courses included Cajun New York strip steaks, crabcakes and summer vegetable spaghetti. Have some evening entertainment on hand, too. Lawn games might be a good idea for the remainder of the weekend but pull out some games from Ali Cat Toys in Carrboro or puzzles from Flyleaf Books. Folks with older kids might enjoy the virtual cinema program hosted by The Carolina Theatre. (Or enjoy after the kids go to bed!) A variety of first-run films are

BONUS TIP! Date nights aren’t just for weekends. Consider getting takeout for dinner from any of our local restaurants on slower days of the week like Tuesdays and Wednesdays, when they could really use an extra boost.

The Place to Be! Thank you, Chapel Hill, for voting us Best Pizza and Italian Food!

CHAPEL HILL FAVORITE FOR 40 YEARS BEST PHILLY CHEESE STEAK IN THE TRIANGLE

ITALIAN PIZZERIA III

FOR CATERING OF ANY OCCASION, PLEASE GIVE US A CALL!

508 WEST FRANKLIN STREET, CHAPEL HILL

919 968 4671 | italianpizzeria3.com  46

available through the venue’s website, and a portion of proceeds from virtual cinema tickets purchased will benefit Carolina Theatre of Durham Inc., the nonprofit that operates the historic downtown venue. Ticket prices vary per film, which are added and removed week to week. Don’t forget the concessions either! Popcorn, candy, drinks (including beer and wine) and Carolina Theatre merchandise are all available to purchase online every Friday for pickup from 4-8 p.m.

PICNIC PERFECT

S

kip the cooking and grab a few specialty items for an alfresco lunch or dinner. Start with wings from Heavenly Buffaloes, the messiest but oh-so-delicious food that was made for picnics. Pay a visit to Weaver Street Market, Bulldega Urban Market or Durham Co-op Market for grab-and-go accompaniments such as dips or chicken salad. Or get potato salad and pasta sides from Mama Dip’s, which also offers complete picnic meals featuring courses like Southern fried chicken, deviled eggs and yeast rolls that serve two to eight people. And you can’t go wrong with pita and eight different kinds of hummus from Mediterranean Deli. Or, for $7.99 a pound, get a few sides like tabbouleh salad, Israeli red cabbage and broccoli salad. Don’t forget to stock up on some refreshments. The Oak House Wine Club allows you to try out three themed bottles each month, and each bottle comes with digital tasting notes. Acme’s to-go menu regularly features cocktail kits with names like Juicy Fruit or The Weekender. Just add your own booze at home. We also love Annexe sangria, in rotating flavors like Mango Mule and Piña Colada, served in picnic-friendly plastic pouches that will remind you of Capri Sun but more fun. Boricua Soul has similar togo pouches with offerings like Peach Passion Fruit Frose. Pick up some kid-friendly-yet-cool paper products from Parker and Otis; their selection ranges from galactic party cups to large paper plates featuring a quaint farm scene. Or find some reusable Melamine plates and glassware at Bungalow. Lay out your impressive spread – on a versatile throw from Indio or show your Tar Heel pride with a UNC throw blanket from Johnny T-shirt – and dig in!


ON SALE NOW

OCT 3-4

W E L L F E S T N C .C O M

A virtual festival featuring 30+ FREE wellness classes and WellFest PLUS – a premium experience that is the perfect date night or get-together with your COVID-pod!

CH

EF

ME

| An interactive cooking class with Kevin Callaghan, chef and owner of Acme in Carrboro. You’ll pick up your cooking supplies and swag bag at University Kia in Durham, and then prepare dinner with a virtual cooking class at home!

KEV

IN CALLAGHA

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AC

Ticket purchase includes: Dinner for two; Cooler of prepped food and ingredients featuring sustainable produce from Hungry Harvest and pasture-raised meat from Firsthand Foods; exclusive swag bag.

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A portion of WellFest 2020 profits will support the Durham Tech Foundation to fund scholarships for future front-line workers.

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Kevin Callaghan

Jes & Co

Acme

Tyrone Irby

Tom Ferguson

Stronger and Faster Durham Rise Southern Biscuits & Righteous Chicken


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Ruthlessly Strong

Ryan Vet

Amy Rossi

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Nikki Barth

Derek D. Ross

Garth Robertson

The Oak House

YMCA

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Coastal Credit Union

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Heather Pownall The Confidence Labs

NEED A LITTLE MORE?

BUY TICKETS FOR LIVE INTERACTIVE CLASSES ON OCTOBER 4 AT WELLFESTNC.COM


P INK R D & FOOD

T

he pandemic hit the food and beverage industry hard this spring and summer, forcing many to operate with fewer hours and smaller menus; we even lost a few beloved institutions. Yet many restaurants in Durham and Orange counties have still made it a priority to help the community.

PIZZERIA TORO Chef de cuisine Marla Thurman has been making 150 loaves of bread every week for Durham Free Lunch, which provides healthy, accessible meals for anyone who is food insecure. She uses Pizzeria Toro’s leftover dough to bake focaccia, turning an item that could be thrown away into a way of feeding the community. “Food is a gift of pleasure as well as a gift of sustenance,” Marla says. “We in the hospitality industry must have a servant heart to gain pleasure through the gift of food. Every day, I’m baking what pre-COVID-19 would be trash so that I can serve my community in need. I’m grateful for the space to reflect, but like most people, ready to get back to work.”

FOOD IS

LOVE These restaurants bring new meaning to ‘comfort food’ By Caro l i ne Kl oster

50


E

BLUE CORN CAFE Husband-and-wife team Antonio Rios and Danielle Martini-Rios opened Latin American restaurant Blue Corn Cafe on Ninth Street in Durham in 1997. Shortly after Gov. Roy Cooper mandated a statewide shutdown in March, the restaurant began providing meals to front-line workers at Duke Health. As of mid-July, Blue Corn Cafe has catered for workers at Duke HomeCare & Hospice, Duke Department of Surgery and Duke Regional Hospital’s emergency department. They have also provided discounted catering for the City of Durham’s COVID-19 tracing team. After one particular drop-off, Danielle received an email from Iyanna Streeter, a nurse at Duke Regional, that read: “I received the chips and salsa … it came right on time for me. I’m having a pretty rough night, and the bag of chips and salsa really help[ed] to turn it around.”

BAR VIRGILE This restaurant and bar in downtown Durham normally serves craft cocktails alongside an everrotating menu, so they understand the unique challenges faced by service industry employees during the pandemic. Currently only open for curbside pickup, Bar Virgile has also added a special option to their limited menu: a Shift Burger with fries, free for any service industry workers. Just call 20 minutes ahead of time.

RADIUS The Hillsborough restaurant’s “Pie It Forward” program allows individuals or companies to purchase a bulk order of pizzas at a discount to be delivered to an organization or nonprofit, such as the UNC Hospitals Hillsborough Campus (pictured) or Durham Rescue Mission. To date, Radius has delivered more than $4,000 worth of pizzas to the community. Visit radiuspizzeria. net/pieitforward to donate.

RONALD MCDONALD HOUSE OF CHAPEL HILL’S RESTAURANT PARTNERS Because the House is still unable to welcome any of their regular meal team volunteers, local restaurants have stepped up to provide fresh dishes for families staying there. Jersey Mike’s, The Pizza Press, bartaco, Four Corners, Brixx Wood Fired Pizza, City Barbeque, Moe’s Southwest Grill, elements, Chimney Indian Kitchen & Bar, Beau Catering and more have all donated meals.

THE PICNIC BASKET CATERING The Chapel Hill catering company offers the option to buy a “thank you” meal for health care providers. They have pledged to match and donate one meal for every four meals purchased. As of mid-August, The Picnic Basket Catering donated 98 family meals of four and 562 lunches to health care heroes, 25 Mother’s Day dinners to the Ronald McDonald House of Chapel Hill and some 20,000 meals to the Inter-Faith Council for Social Service. Visit contactfreedinner.com to contribute.

ZAMBRERO In a partnership with international hunger relief nonprofit Rise Against Hunger, the Mexican food chain has donated a meal to someone in need for every burrito or bowl purchased since the first location opened in Australia in 2005. This Plate 4 Plate program has already provided more than 40 million meals to communities across Africa, Asia and the Americas. Purchase a burrito or bowl at the newly opened Zambrero at University Hill in Durham to help the eatery reach the global goal of 1 billion donated meals by 2025.

COPA

Wanting to do its part, Makus Empanadas launched a Pay-It Forward initiative at the start of the pandemic: When guests purchase a dozen empanadas, they receive a dozen free and are encouraged to gift the extra to at-risk individuals, such as front-line health care workers, the immunocompromised and the elderly. Thanks to loyal customers, the restaurant has already donated more than 10,000 empanadas to those in need as of August.

The Cuban restaurant in downtown Durham launched its 50 Meals a Day Program in a partnership with the Durham Community Food Pantry and Upstream Works Collaborative near the end of July. For every $12 donated, COPA invests $1 in local farms, $0.84 to the administrative fees of Upstream Works and $10 for ingredients purchased from small, local farms; living-wage labor; and COPA’s electricity, water and rent. Up to six days per week, the Durham Community Food Pantry helps COPA distribute up to 50 meals at a time to those in need. To donate and help COPA reach its goal of feeding 300 hungry Durham residents each week, visit copadurham.com/partnering-with-upstream-works.

VIMALA’S CURRYBLOSSOM CAFE

HELP FOR HILLSBOROUGH

MAKUS EMPANADAS

The Chapel Hill restaurant is committed to covering the payroll costs of its hardworking team during the pandemic and continuing the practice of paid sick leave for workers. The restaurant asked for donations in order to maintain that goal and, as of August, had raised about $10,000, says coowner Rush Greenslade. Vimala’s Curryblossom Cafe is also moving forward with its mission to help others, handing out $1,000 grants to a few Chapel Hill “family-owned restaurants with food justice values,” feeding refugee families and providing meals to health care workers with funding from the North Carolina Heathcare Association. Visit curryblossom.com to donate directly through PayPal.

Two fundraising campaigns have raised money to support Hillsborough workers who have lost a significant portion of their income due to the pandemic. In an effort called Hillsborough Strong, The Wooden Nickel Pub publicly provided a list of the Venmo information of nearly 150 service workers – from servers and bartenders to hair stylists and cashiers – who need support at this time. Additionally, the Hillsborough/Orange County Chamber of Commerce’s Hillsborough Hospitality Help (HHH) GoFundMe supports displaced workers of Hillsborough businesses. As of mid-July, the two campaigns have donated more than $25,000 to workers in the community. Donate at gofundme.com/f/hillsborough-hospitality-help. 51


P INK R D & FOOD

POSSIBLE RESTAURANT

Ten eateries share how they’ve adapted in the age of the pandemic

By Mat t Lardi e | Photogra phy by B et h Ma n n

rea restaurants are walking a tightrope as the COVID-19 threat persists, attempting to pull off a balancing act that allows them to survive without compromising the health and safety of employees and customers. To say it’s been difficult would be the understatement of the year. It’s been close to six months since the first coronavirus case was identified in North Carolina. As the state began to reopen over the summer and cases spiked, most restaurants faced the agonizing decision of whether, and how, to welcome back their customers. We reached out to several eateries to get a sense of what life has been like. Some have cautiously reopened. Others are still weighing their options. All agree on one thing – this is a whole new world, and survival means getting creative. 52

KITCHEN EXPERIMENTS

O

ne immediate decision that all restaurants faced when the stay-at-home order went into effect was how to remain open, if at all. With little to no advanced warning, entire business models had to be reimagined. COPA in Durham was in the process of redoing its point-of-sale systems when the shutdown happened and was able to switch to pickup and delivery almost instantly. “We never closed completely,” co-owner Elizabeth Turnbull says. “We were able to get online ordering up and running within 10 days.” For Hillsborough’s Radius, the experience was a bit more challenging. They tried delivery at first, but as coowner Kate Carroll explains, “Delivery was a complex and expensive option we realized we couldn’t sustain. We didn’t have the human power to make delivery


FO O D & D RI NK

E Claiborne Tapp Jr. and his wife, Peggy Tapp, opened The Chicken Hut in 1957. It remains a familyrun business in the hands of their son, Tre Tapp (right), his cousin, Jeff Johnson (left) and his aunts, Ruth Dash (right) and JoAnn Johnson. 53


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feasible.” They’ve since found better success through pickup and outdoor patio service, although sales are still far off from what they used to be. In Chapel Hill, Garret Fleming and Eleanor Lacy, the brother-andsister duo behind Big Belly Que in Blue Dogwood Public Market, cut back their hours and, for a while, stopped offering their wood-smoked barbecue completely, instead switching to heat-at-home meals for pickup or delivery. Eleanor offered to drop off meals herself in the surrounding neighborhoods, close to where she lives. “In some ways it’s been really rewarding, getting to meet new people,” she says of her new delivery route. For Kaleb Harrell, CEO and cofounder of Hawkers Asian Street Fare, thinking outside of the box has been key. He and the other founders – ABOVE Tre serves up a plate of barbecue ribs with sides of macaroni and cheese, Kin Ho, Chee Cheng “Allen” Lo and collard greens, fried okra and red velvet cake. BELOW A model of the restaurant Wayne Yung – opened the location made by a customer five years ago still holds a place of honor in the lobby. in University Place as the shutdown went into effect in March. “We “I said, ‘We gotta do jokingly say, ‘If you could pick the something,’” Tre explains. “The worst weekend to open a restaurant first weekend after the shutdown, in the last 100 years, we nailed it,’” we gave away 900 meals.” He Kaleb says. now estimates the restaurant “We’ve had to take a really hard donates about 500 meals a week look at our business model,” Kaleb and says he has no plans to stop. continues. “We’ve had to prioritize For these and other safety over profit. I think one day the restaurants, there was no right dine-in restaurant experience will way to do business anymore. It normalize, but until then we need to was just a matter of trying find a way to stay in business.” to survive. For Hawkers, that has meant things like bottling and selling some of their sauces and even building and selling restaurant partitions out of their central woodshop to other eateries. ith differing responses from local, state and federal When It’s a Southern Thing on Main Street in Durham officials, it was sometimes confusing for restaurant owners switched to takeout, owner Pete Susca had to lay off about 30 to know where to turn for help. The Paycheck Protection members of his staff. “That was far and away the hardest thing Program (PPP), a loan program meant to allow businesses I’ve ever had to do.” to keep employees on the payroll, for instance, had a The Chicken Hut owner Tre Tapp was instilled with a sense of number of restrictions on who qualified. community responsibility at a young age. As schools shut down and Chapel Hill’s Que Chula Tacos on West Franklin Street opened its Tre tried to navigate the new landscape, he knew he still had to doors in the middle of the pandemic on May 7. “We couldn’t get any help his neighbors. So, the restaurant partnered with Healthy Start help from the government because we had no previous payroll,” explains Academy to give away free meals to local kids. co-owner Jose Ramirez. “Everything has come out of pocket.” 

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ABOVE La Chula Margarita with tequila, orange liqueur, fresh lime juice and agave nectar. LEFT Jose Ramirez and Laurena Ibarra, with their children: Emma Ramirez, 13, Noah Ramirez, 2, and Aidan Ramirez, 15. BELOW The carne asada comes with a side of papas bravas in chipotle mayo.

Jose credits his wife, Laurena Ibarra, with their ability to stay open right now. “I work [from] 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., and she works 5 p.m. to close, sometimes seven days a week,” he says. “That is the main key [to] surviving the pandemic right now, because we are not getting paid. “We hope after the pandemic [that] we do very good so we can take a long vacation,” Jose says, laughing. Durham’s NanaSteak was able to get a PPP loan, but as co-owner Aubrey Zinaich explains, “I can’t pay my vendors with that.” While NanaSteak remained closed over the summer and tried to figure out how to reopen safely, Aubrey says that “our landlords [at American Tobacco], especially the Goodmon family, have been so supportive.” The Durham Performing Arts Center even allowed NanaSteak to use some of its 56

patio space and furniture once the restaurant launched outdoor dining in mid-August. That push for outdoor seating was something that Elizabeth, while still managing her duties at COPA, took on in her role of advocate for Durham’s restaurant community, working with Shawn Stokes of Luna Rotisserie and Empanadas on a joint letter to Gov. Roy Cooper and communicating regularly with Durham Mayor Steve Schewel and city officials. “I understand the challenges they are facing, but I don’t think they understand the urgency of our needs,” Elizabeth says of city and state officials. She points out that it took Durham nearly 10 weeks to launch its outdoor dining program while other cities and towns implemented similar programs in a matter of days. “There is certainly an empathetic ear from our leaders,” she adds, “but I don’t see a whole lot of proactive work that is really going to save us. It’s like the old adage of sending out thoughts and prayers, but they don’t pay our mortgage or our electricity. We need help.” Steve Wuench, co-founder of Durham’s Eastcut Sandwich Bar, echoes Elizabeth’s plea for help. First, he says, the government needs to focus on getting COVID-19 under control. “If there’s a high degree of community transmission, businesses cannot return to normal,” he says. “Secondly, support our local small businesses through grant programs


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[and] reducing property taxes … in the short term, so businesses can focus on sustaining their operations and keeping people employed.”

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pening a new restaurant can be a long and arduous task in normal times. Now it requires almost herculean effort. It’s a Southern Thing was in the process of expanding to the Chicago suburb of Naperville, Illinois, when the pandemic hit. After signing the initial paperwork in February and banking on a midMay opening, Pete says, “We’re still not there yet. Everything from construction to permits to

LEFT Enchiladas suizas, topped with a fresh slice of watermelon radish. RIGHT Noah on the back of Filimona, the donkey statue that resides on Que Chula’s spacious outdoor patio.

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resources that chain restaurants have. We aren’t going to make it if people don’t come to us instead of going to Chipotle or Panera.” COPA’s Elizabeth urges customers to advocate for themselves. “Do your homework,” she advises. “Call the restaurants, look on their websites to see what they are doing to keep people safe. “Restaurants are running out of time, and the help that is coming may not arrive in time,” she warns. Many of these owners point to things like gift cards and takeout as lifelines right now. The restaurants might not turn a profit, but it helps keep the lights on, and during these unprecedented times, even just being able to pay a utility bill can feel like a win. “I hope that the general public realizes that we are right on the front lines,” says Pete of It’s a Southern Thing. “We are just trying to serve people, give people a nice meal and a chance to get out of the house. We’re not gonna put the brakes on anytime soon. If you have the faith that eventually things will get better … ” he trails off. Keep the faith. Work hard. Ask for help. Trust your community. It’s a whole new ballgame for local restaurants, and they’re trying every play in the book in order to survive. liquor licenses to food deliveries has been delayed because of COVID-19.” Annie Johnston, owner of La Vita Dolce in Chapel Hill’s Southern Village, was all set to open a new restaurant a few doors down. With the pandemic slowing everything and Annie forced to devote her attention to the cafe, Market and Moss’ May opening got pushed to September. “Sometimes the universe has other plans, and the best I can do is accept that, adapt and find new ways to create exceptional experiences for our stakeholders,” Annie says.

EAT LOCAL

2020

O

ne thing every restaurant owner we spoke to adamantly voiced was the need for the dining public to help. “In my lifetime, I have never seen anything like this,” says Tre of The Chicken Hut, Durham’s oldest Black-owned restaurant. “It takes the community to keep all of these small businesses going.” “What is sad to me is that chains are going to do fine,” Eleanor of Big Belly Que laments. “I hope that customers really support the unique food businesses that we have here, because we don’t have the 59


P INK R D & FOOD

COUNT YOUR

BLESSINGS Heavenly Groceries provides food for the soul

By Ma delin e Kra f t

H

eavenly Groceries volunteers shuffle through St. Joseph Christian Methodist Episcopal Church’s open

basement every Wednesday afternoon in a rehearsed routine to prep the weekly delivery of fresh food boxes. Theo Cokkinos peruses the piles of potatoes, peaches and peppers, weeding out the spoiled food. Diana Koo makes constant trips from the refrigerator to the containers, distributing milk cartons and eggs. Annie Zhang lifts watermelons one by one into each box. Finally, Aisha Booze-Hall helps transport the filled boxes to volunteers’ cars to be delivered along routes in the Northside, Pine Knolls and Tin Top neighborhoods. Seeing a need in 2002, the Rev. Tory Harrison, then pastor of St. Joseph CME Church, and his wife, Bernie Harrison, began giving loaves of bread to members of their congregation. Today, the program continues to grow thanks to donations from the community, a partnership with the Marian Cheek Jackson Center and the church’s “Heavenly Angels,” longtime members who have operated the ministry since its inception. The volunteers hope to one day provide healthy food for everyone in need and alleviate hunger in the community. Before COVID-19, Heavenly Groceries served approximately 3,500 people by opening its doors five days a week from 3 to 4:30 p.m. as a self-service grocery that was stocked with fresh fruits, veggies, bread, dairy products and dried goods. Anyone in need of food was welcome to come into the store and take whatever they needed. “There is an 60

Heavenly Groceries volunteers Theo Cokkinos and Annie Zhang.

abundance-based practice present in the way that we aim to work with people in the community to provide a high-quality life for them,” says Aisha, a food justice and eldercare senior fellow at Marian Cheek Jackson Center and a 2020 graduate of UNC. However, in order to keep the volunteers and the community safe during the ongoing pandemic, the ministry has shifted its operation to deliver boxes of fresh food once a week instead. Aisha first became involved with Heavenly Groceries by serving as a volunteer through her UNC nutrition class. After her graduation, she became a senior fellow operating the program, drawn to its heavy focus on developing relationships. “It is nice to be completing work with people who you care about,” she says. “It allows the work to be so much sweeter.”


DESSERT

COURSE

Children’s cookbook author publishes the ultimate kids’ guide to cupcakes By N ao mi Wr i g ht | P h o to co u r te sy o f C h ar ity M at hews

T

ell that sourdough starter in the fridge to make way for a new family baking project. Hillsborough food author Charity Mathews released her fourth children’s cookbook, “Cupcake Cookbook for Kids,” in July, which highlights 50 recipes that range from classics like red velvet to the more advanced filled orange dreamsicle. Charity says that cooking empowers children and creates a level of goodwill that helps reduce friction around mealtime. Her first three cookbooks, “Super Simple Baking for Kids,” “Pizza School” and “Kid Chef Junior Bakes: My First Kids Baking Cookbook,” contain easy recipes that kids of all ages can help with, and her latest is no different. She also runs a blog, foodlets, which has a broader scope, focusing on mealtime with her family. “We’re pretty food centric,” Charity says. “My husband would probably say obsessed.” Charity focuses that passion into recipe makeovers and cooking strategies. “I’m not trying to invent new things, but definitely trying to transform them into things that are faster, Charity Mathews – with Violet, 6, Phoebe, 11, Estelle, 9, and George, 8 – jokes that her kids have tried more foods in their lifetime than she did healthier and more kid friendly … cutting half the sugar, adding before she was 30. whole-wheat flour and always doubling any veggie,” she says. Her four kids can often be found in the kitchen with her. Phoebe, 11, whips up pancakes and biscuits on her own while sister Keeping strategy in mind, Charity drops a pro tip for readers Estelle, 9, comes up with a dozen different ways to eat steel-cut oats. tackling her recipes with kids: “On a plate or a baking sheet, put all Charity laughs when she admits the two youngest children, Violet, 6, the elements they will need for decorating. It’s almost like a kit for and George, 8, occasionally get lured away from the kitchen by Legos, them, and then they can just focus on making it.” but they also love being involved in the process. As the pandemic persists, Charity says that the family has been very Her little helpers like to make the carrot cake cupcake recipe for its intentional with their time, and she is proud to see her children turn novel texture, but decorating is where they derive the most enjoyment. to baking for comfort. Upon hearing the family’s neighbor was in an Charity says her recipe for multicolored cupcakes, “A Rainbow in the accident, Charity shares, “My 11-year-old looked at me and said, ‘I’m Clouds,” which features rainbow rope and mini marshmallows as a going to bake her a loaf of bread right now.’” Without any parental topper, is simple and a hit with her crowd. “You couldn’t really tell the prompting, her children took the reins, adding violets and rosemary difference between the one I made and the one my 6-year-old made,” to their homemade focaccia, decorating their goodies with the flair she says, and that’s exactly the point. they’ve learned from their mom’s new book. 61


P INK R D & FOOD

RUSH SUGAR

Local baker serves up vegan goodies

K

eyana Bourne still remembers

the first thing she baked by herself. “I believe [it] was a Duncan Hines yellow cake with the chocolate frosting,” she recalls. “It’s such a nostalgic dessert!” Baking has been her passion since she got her start at just 8 years old with an Easy-Bake Oven. Before long, she moved on to cake mixes and then to baking from scratch. She perfected her skills over years of hard work and practice on everything from croissants to cinnamon rolls. “On the weekends, I would bake anything my family and I [were] craving,” she says. “Anything you can think of, I’m sure I’ve made at one point.” Keyana turned her childhood pastime into a profession when she opened vegan bakery Crumbs in 2017 and made it her full-time job two years later. “As a vegan, I realized there was a lack of vegan options in the area,” she says. “I wanted to create a variety of items for the community that were free from animal products but still delicious!” Her online business serves both Chapel Hill, where Keyana grew up and attended East Chapel Hill High School, and Durham, where she moved last year. Crumbs has no shortage of handcrafted tempting treats, both sweet and savory: Muffins. Biscuits. Cookies. Crumbs offers an array of gluten-free desserts

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By Cl ai re Del ano | Photography cou rtesy of Cru m bs

Keyana Bourne ices a naked cake, which has a thin outer coating of frosting to show the layers of cake and fillings for a more rustic look. She finishes each one with toppings like cookies or edible flowers.

as well, from classic vanilla cake to a s’mores crostata. “[I] slowly started implementing gluten-free items because I wanted to create delicious options despite anyone’s dietary restrictions,” she says. Keyana makes all of her baked goods from scratch and is dedicated to using organic, local ingredients through wholesaler Happy Dirt. Sustainable vegan baking is an exercise in creativity for Keyana. “It’s amazing what you can create without using any animal products,” she says. “It’s also fun experimenting and finding substitutes. I love using seasonal ingredients, so I get to come up with new recipe ideas every few months.” When it comes to presentation, she utilizes fruit, cookie crumbs, sprinkles and “especially flowers” to give her treats that final irresistible touch. “You can really get creative with cake decorating; it’s like a blank canvas!” she says. Crumbs currently hosts pop-ups in Durham coffee shops such as Foster Street Coffee, and Keyana will join the Durham Farmers Market once things with [COVID-19] settle down. As her business continues to grow, she has big dreams for Crumbs’ future. “The plan is to have a bakery/coffee shop that will eventually expand into a vegan cafe!” she says. Sounds sweet.


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P INK R D & FOOD

W

hen customers walk into the Chapel Hill-based Italian Pizzeria III, they’re greeted with the shout of a “hello” and sometimes even their name. Brothers Angelo Marrone and Vincenzo Marrone, who have run the pizzeria for the past 20 of its 40 years, can spot the regulars and make everyone feel at home. “We know exactly the people who walk in here,” Angelo says. “Sometimes we can forget a name, I’ll be honest, but we work at the names.” When the brothers aren’t tossing dough or taking orders, they often find themselves on the receiving end of warm greetings as they go about their days outside the restaurant. They get recognized all over town, but also when they travel. “Last year I was at the Biltmore in Asheville, North Carolina, with my wife and my mother-in-law,” Angelo recalls. He says he was just taking in the view from the grand estate when someone spotted him.

LIFE

Angelo Marrone and Vincenzo “Vinny” Marrone have run the pizzeria for the past 20 of its 40 years. “[Even] after 20 years in business, you learn something new every day,” Vinny says.

SLICE OF

Catching up with brothers Angelo Marrone and Vincenzo Marrone of Italian Pizzeria III as their West Franklin Street restaurant celebrates 40 years

By J essi ca St ri nger | P h oto by B et h Ma n n

64


“Somebody from down below yelled, ‘I-P-3!’” he says, only slightly embarrassed. “That’s just the way people love us.” Angelo and Vinny started working at the pizzeria under Cipriano Illiano, the original owner, a man they call their uncle. “Angelo moved here in ’96, and I moved here in ’97,” Vinny says. They bought the business in 2000 and, eventually, the entire building at 508 W. Franklin St. Angelo and Vinny made some significant additions to the menu when they took over. “I remember the menu first had maybe 10 pizzas,” Vinny says. “Now we have 30. Pasta wise, we were only doing baked ziti, lasagna, manicotti, ravioli, chicken Parm and veal Parm. But then we upgraded with more dishes like chicken alfredo and spaghetti pescati.” Angelo and Vinny have also left their mark through their generosity, whether that’s in sponsoring the PORCH Chapel Hill-Carrboro Food for Schools program or donating a portion of a night’s sales to UNC Children’s Hospital. “If a school calls asking to do a night where a [percentage of sales] will go to the school, we will always be like, ‘Sure, no problem,’” Vinny says. “They can count on us, especially when it comes to the community or helping somebody.” Vinny and Angelo say they want to support the town that has meant so much to them. “For me, Chapel Hill is my home,” Angelo says. “Chapel Hill gives us a lot, but we give back a lot, too.” IP3 recently underwent a renovation, though, naturally, the brothers kept the familiar red booths. “We want people to feel that, when they come back for a visit, nothing’s changed,” Vinny says. “I had a customer come in

The brothers credit their loyal employees for the restaurant’s continued success. “My staff is unbelievable,” Vinny says. “Many of them have been working for us for a long time, and they really take the job seriously.”

recently and say, ‘Oh, my God. I used to go to school at UNC back in 1990, and this place looks the same.’ It’s nice when they get that feeling.” It’s the culinary equivalent of your parents leaving your childhood room intact – if that room was plastered with autographed photos of Angelo and Vinny posing with UNC athletes. IP3 is a well-known hangout for hungry student-athletes looking for a meal after practice. They find supportive fans in Vinny and Angelo, and eventually, an extended family. IP3 has donated pizza to local camps put on by former players, including Marcus Ginyard, who holds a free annual clinic for kids in Orange County. “This is iconic Chapel Hill, and it’s also great they share our vision of what we’re trying to do with these kids,” Marcus told us when we interviewed him during his 2019 Chapel Hill Community Day. “They’re giving pizza, because that’s what they do, but it means a lot more.” One menu item at the pizzeria even bears his name: the “Ginyard Penne.” Other athletes often make a point to visit IP3 when they are back in Chapel Hill. Angelo shares that when former UNC basketball player Harrison Barnes returned to the pizzeria, he had the NBA Championship Trophy from his 2015 NBA Finals win with the Golden State Warriors in tow. “These guys don’t forget us,” Angelo says. Of course, there are the occasional sibling squabbles, Vinny admits, but says that he’s really come to appreciate his brother. “Even when you’re on vacation, you know the place is in good hands with somebody who you can trust,” Vinny says. Angelo echoes the sentiment: “Sometimes we look at each other and say, ‘We gotta be proud.’” 65


P INK R D & FOOD

EATING WHAT WE’RE

News from our restaurant community, plus local dishes we love

lmost nothing has done more to make pandemic-era work-from-home more enjoyable for me and my husband than “Wing Wednesday” at Pie Pushers. We order every week! Not only is it a great lunch deal, with 10 wings – in a variety of flavors or sauces – for $5, but we almost always pick up a pizza and some Pusher Stix or fried Brussels sprouts at the same time, and then dinner’s taken care of, too! Our favorite pies include the My Boy Blue, the Queen Anne and the State of Nirvana – or a delicious Sicilian when we can account for the longer bake time. – BETH MANN, photographer

I have a hard time pinpointing one favorite brewery – especially as Durham’s beer scene continues to expand. (Case in point: newly opened Flying Bull Brewery on Ninth Street.) But I will tip my hat to Hi-Wire Brewing and its incredible deals during the pandemic. On multiple occasions, my partner and I ordered a $30 case, which could last us weeks. I can’t recommend the Go Getter or Pink Lemonade Sour Session Ale enough. When we were finally able to dine out again and enjoy a socially distanced flight, I realized how much I missed our weekends hopping from brewery to brewery. – HANNAH LEE, assistant editor

I’m a stress eater, and nothing calms me down like a basket of Southern goodness from The Original Q Shack. The smiling pig sign has been a bacon, err … beacon of hope in my life. Among all the unknowns right now, one thing I can be sure of is where I can get some of the best barbecue in town. My go-to order is the smoked pork butt sandwich with slaw, hush puppies and a side of fries. If I’m feeling down, a side of macaroni and cheese will usually do the trick. – MARIE MUIR, editorial, digital & marketing coordinator 66

ABOVE Queen Anne pizza with baked wings, fried Brussels sprouts and Pusher Stix. LEFT Hannah and her partner, Brendan Marks, enjoy a couple of beers at Hi-Wire Brewing to wind down the day.


NEWS BITES ON THE MOVE Breadman’s moved from 324 W. Rosemary St. to 261 S. Elliott Rd. in July, taking over the former Haw River Grill location, which permanently closed last year. The restaurant, founded by brothers Roy and Bill Piscitello and now owned by Omar Castro, first opened in 1974. Mothers & Sons expanded into the neighboring space formerly occupied by Lucky’s Delicatessen and reopened in May as Alimentari at Mothers and Sons, an enoteca offering sandwiches, fresh pastas, sauces and Italian specialties to-go during the day. The space will also be used as overspill seating for the trattoria to encourage social distancing. Owner Matt Kelly plans to relocate Lucky’s, but the location has not been disclosed.

Not in the mood for a sandwich? The Original Q Shack’s chili-rubbed beef brisket with a side salad or french fries are also menu highlights, according to Marie.

COMING SOON A sign in the former Al’s Burger Shack location in Governors Village announced that a new restaurant – “Gov’s Burger Shack” – would open in August and offer takeout before adding delivery and outdoor seating. The menu will include burgers, hot dogs, salads, wraps and a couple of sandwich options. Beyu Caffe is expanding to Boxyard RTP, where it will offer a robust coffee menu as well as grab-and-go breakfast items.

Last fall, I got a sneak peek of Nomad’s global fare during a preview night at Durham sister restaurant Viceroy. In May, the eatery finally opened its doors for takeout in Hillsborough. The menu has gradually expanded, with wraps, tacos and small plates like yucca poutine joining the lineup of signature rice bowls. You can even get a shrub cocktail mix to make drinks at home. Every time I pick up my go-to order – a Korean fried chicken bowl with gochujanghoney glaze – I gaze in the window to admire the former theater’s brick walls and dream of the days I can belly up to the Nomad bar. – JESSICA STRINGER, editor, Chapel Hill Magazine

The first thing I always did when I got to our office during the pre-pandemic “before times” was make a large, strong cup of coffee. Now that we’re working remotely, I’ve had to train myself to do it at home (not something this creature of habit was used to doing). Lucky for me, it’s super easy to order a bag or two of Little Waves Coffee Roasters

for contactless pickup from any of Cocoa Cinnamon’s three Durham locations. Positive Pressure – which I could drink every day, really – is my coffee of choice. – AMANDA MACLAREN, executive managing editor

Durham-based Lime & Lemon Indian Grill & Bar plans to open a second location at 105 Friendly Dr., Ste. 101 in Raleigh in the next few months. Durty Bull Brewing Company is opening a second location in Gastonia, North Carolina, across the street from a new multiuse sports stadium. This location includes plans for a taproom, outdoor seating, an on-site kitchen and stage and will house a small brewing system with experimental beers. Co-owner and manager Matt Pennisi says it’s slated to open in early 2021. STREET FARE In July, the Town of Chapel Hill shut down two lanes on Franklin Street for pedestrian traffic and to allow restaurants to take advantage of outdoor dining on the sidewalks. Town leaders hope partially closing UNC’s main thoroughfare will boost downtown business and encourage social distancing. The lanes are closed from Robertson Lane to Graham Street until at least midSeptember, the town announced in a news release. THAT’S MY ’CUE Durham’s own Mike and Gloria De Los Santos of barbecue sauce company Mike D’s BBQ appear on Discovery Channel’s new series, “I Quit,” which premiered Aug. 18 and follows the founders of six businesses who give up their steady 9-to-5 jobs to follow their passions. READ BETWEEN THE WINES Parizade won an “Award of Excellence” from Wine Spectator. The Mediterranean restaurant, a part of the Giorgios Group family of restaurants, was among 2,289 restaurants around the world that received this award. Recipients are chosen based on the quality and diversity of their wine lists and the wines’ compatibility with the restaurant’s style and menu. PRESS ON Counter Culture released its new, limitedrelease “twenty-fifth anniversary blend” in early August. Over the last three decades, the coffee company has remained committed to sustainability in sourcing as it has grown across the country. After starting out with four employees in Durham, Counter Culture now operates a second roastery in the Bay Area and trains coffee professionals from coast to coast at its training centers. 67


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HOW THEY LIVE

across

county lines These three families – who all live near the borders of Durham, Orange and Chatham counties – know how to make the most of outdoor living spaces Ph o to g rap hy by B e th M an n

M

BAC KYA R D B LISS ost mornings, Neva Howard joins her husband, Shahar Link, on the screened-in porch behind their home in Solterra – a cohousing community in the western part of Durham County near the border with Orange County. The early hours are peaceful, and the space offers room for the couple to meditate. Later on, their 10-year-old son, Nadav Howard Link, who attends Duke School, might wander outside to share a meal with his parents

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Nadav Howard Link, Neva Howard, Shahar Link and family cat, Bacon, cozy up on their California-style back porch.

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PHOTO BY MARILYN PERYER

H OME & GARDEN

ABOVE Grant Bizios Architecture and David W. Roberts Construction made Neva’s vision of a large outdoor family space into reality. BELOW A granite and marble walkway, built by former homeowner and artist Emily Eve Weinstein, leads up to the front door.

or play with the local kids on the shed’s rock wall installed by Progression Climbing. Neighbors walk by throughout the day along a series of trails that connect each of the 37 homes in Solterra. “Each house looks completely different,” Shahar says. “You’re motivated to do something different with your house because everyone else has their own cool thing going on. That’s part of our inspiration.” Shahar, owner of Mindspire Test Prep, and Neva, a pediatric emergency medicine physician at UNC School of Medicine, moved into Solterra in 2012. Originally built by Chapel Hill artist Emily Eve Weinstein, the house’s eclectic design was one of the main selling points for the couple. “There’s craftwork everywhere indoors,” Neva says. “[Emily] took a lot of scraps and old things from the lumberyard and carved wood and created beautiful stairwells.” There’s even a window with a stainedglass nature scene that highlights golden 72

sunflowers, hand-painted by the former homeowner. Surrounded by inspiration, Neva and Shahar decided to add their own personal touch – the screened-in porch. The California-style back porch encloses 650 square feet and features two-story-high ceilings, a casual dining area, a stone fireplace and a copper hot tub. “I wanted a large family space that we didn’t have indoors,” Neva says. “I realized that I could only get that through building a screened-in porch. I turned the dream for the indoor space into the outdoor space.” They hired Grant Bizios Architecture to custom-fit the design to fulfill Neva’s vision. For the building and engineering of the porch, they hired David W. Roberts Construction. The entire project took a little more than 1½ years, plus one giant crane to lift in the hot tub. A skylight above the hot tub allows the family to gaze up at the stars or passing


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H OME & GARDEN

Remnants of Emily’s artwork, such as this handpainted stained-glass window, can still be found throughout the house.

clouds. In a community with a high amount of socializing, Neva and Shahar value the private oasis of their porch, but it does also offer enough space to socially distance with family and friends during the pandemic. That includes both sets of grandparents, Florence Link and Thomas Link, and Guy Howard and Sharon Howard, who were fascinated by Solterra’s community concept and happy to live closer to their grandson. Solterra has a garden where residents can contribute plantings and share the harvest of sweet potatoes, berries and more. The recent arrival of two beehives provides the neighborhood with an abundance of fresh honey. Neva and Shahar’s own front yard is filled with fruit trees. Landscaper Michele DeRose of DeRose Garden

ABOVE Nadav, 10, hangs from the wood-carved stairwell. RIGHT “The hot tub is in the screened-in porch so we can avoid the bugs and be out there in the rain and snow,” Neva says. 74


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PHOTO BY MARILYN PERYER

H OME & GARDEN

Throughout the pandemic, the screened-in porch offered Neva and Shahar a private and safe space to socially distance with family and friends.

and Landscape helped the family select

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2020

native plant species. “We have a fig tree, pawpaw tree, pear tree, muscadine grapes, blueberries and even a kiwi vine,” Shahar says. “We make tons of fig jam, and the pawpaws get eaten raw – it’s an interesting native fruit that you can’t get at most stores.” A granite and marble walkway, built by Emily, leads up to the front door. Inside the house, Shasta, a white golden retriever puppy who the family adopted earlier this year, has rule over the main floor. Each house in Solterra was built with southfacing windows to get maximum sunlight; Shasta and his 8-year-old cat siblings, Bacon and Flour, often lounge in the rays. Every door in the house is recycled and is a different shape and size, and Neva has added artistic light fixtures and decor to complement the eclectic home. Yet, the family’s favorite space remains inside the screened-in porch. “During a storm, it’s incredible. Water barely comes in,” Neva says. “We’ve had dinners out there in the middle of a storm.” – by Marie Muir

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fter completing graduate school studies in Australia, Tracy DeLozier and Steve Choi decided it was time to move back to the States. They found their way to North Carolina when Steve matched with Duke University for an internal medicine residency program in 2001. They lived in Orange County for two years, then spent the next seven in Durham County. Their current house


Family dog Ozzy tries to steal the show from William Choi, 12, Tracy DeLozier, Mena Choi, 15, and Steve Choi.

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PHOTO BY CORNELL WATSON

HO M E & GARD EN


PHOTO BY CORNELL WATSON

H OME & GARDEN

The family spends most of their outdoor time in their screened-in porch, but the wide-open backyard lends itself nicely to the kids’ hobbies of baseball and volleyball.

– with its Chapel Hill address in Durham County – has been a welcome compromise. Tracy, Steve and their two kids, Mena Choi, 15, and William Choi, 12, have called Southpoint Manor home for 10 years. “We settled in this neighborhood due to the family-friendly vibe, the walkability and the neighborhood pool,” Tracy says. “The location between both Chapel Hill and Durham … made it an easy choice as well.” The home is a reassuring home base for the busy family, especially now during the coronavirus pandemic. Tracy, a consultant for PharmaDirections, works virtually from her home office. Steve works as an associate professor of medicine at Duke University Medical Center and is chief of gastroenterology at the Durham VA Health Care System, but always does his best to make it home in time for dinner. The recent specialty on the menu has been classic shrimp and grits, in large part courtesy of Mena, a cooking aficionado and the 2016 North Carolina winner of Michelle Obama’s Healthy Lunchtime Challenge. When the DeLozier-Choi family isn’t cooking bulgogi or bibimbap under Mena’s watchful eye, they 78

We settled in this neighborhood due to the familyfriendly vibe, the walkability and the neighborhood pool.

– Tracy DeLozier

are often gathered outside. Steve utilizes his Big Green Egg outdoor cooker on the deck to smoke ingredients like duck and Brussels sprouts for all to eat out on the sunporch. The porch’s plush couches and dimly lit lanterns provide a comforting reason to stick around after dinner. “Mena also enjoys painting out there with her friends,” Tracy says. “We are planning on putting a TV on the screened porch to utilize it more for entertaining.” The wide-open, airy backyard offers the perfect expanse to serve as a makeshift practice baseball field for William, who plays for the Riptide Baseball Academy team. Mena uses the space to work on her volleyball serve as she prepares for future games with Carolina Edge Volleyball. Plus, it’s open terrain for Ozzy, the family’s Pembroke Welsh corgi, to roam as he pleases. The backyard also served as the ideal spot for William’s 12th birthday party in May. “We kind of made our own backyard movie [theater],” Tracy says. A blow-up screen created the perfect socially distanced celebration. “It was a good time,” Tracy says. “[His friends] came over in masks and gloves … and played PlayStation on


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PHOTO BY CORNELL WATSON

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Card games are serious business for the family. Tracy was ahead in this game of “War.”

the big screen.” To ensure the boys’ safety, William and his friends “ate individual pizzas from Blaze Pizza, individual chips, individual cupcakes, and we also popped individual popcorn bags. [The] party gifts were masks from Nokona, the baseball glove [makers],” Tracy says. As for Tracy, she’s enjoyed watching the plant life flourish in the family’s yard. “We have some gerbera daisy plants as well as schefflera plants ... for foliage and greenery in our screened porch, [but] our gardenia bushes in the backyard … are my favorite when they bloom in the spring,” Tracy says. “They were planted with the house – but I love [them]! The smell is amazing.” – by Megan Pociask

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fter living in 12 different houses over 20 years, Laura Francini and Andrea Francini have finally found “the one” – a Craftsmanstyle house in Pittsboro’s Bingham Ridge. Laura and Andrea know a thing or two about patience and perseverance – they completed the New York City Marathon together after dating for six months and crossed the finish line holding hands. While they appreciated the walkability of their previous homes in towns such as Cornelius, North Carolina, or cities like Long Branch, New Jersey, Laura is grateful


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ABOVE Laura Francini with daughters Scarlett, 15, Margot, 17, and Liza, 8, and Andrea Francini on the front porch of their home in Pittsboro’s Bingham Ridge. BELOW The back patio is a favorite spot for Laura to take work Zoom calls as well as FaceTime sessions with faraway family members.

to raise their three daughters, Margot, 17, Scarlett, 15, and Liza, 8, close to family in her home state. The Francinis returned to North Carolina, Laura’s home state, last year seeking a greater sense of community and culture. “Not only do we cherish its natural beauty every day, I think it’s wonderful being nearby my alma mater, UNC,” Laura says. “However, we are experiencing North Carolina more virtually now, like with the Blue Ridge to the Beach virtual trail.” Bingham Ridge provides residents with access to hilly trails that traverse boulder terrain. At home, the Francinis pay homage to Andrea’s home country by recreating a beachy Italian ambiance complete with a saltwater pool, pebble landscape and native plants such as scarlet hibiscus. “When the pandemic was not yet full-scale in the U.S. but had already ravaged much of Europe, including Italy, we knew it would 82


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Youngest daughter Liza fearlessly scales her backyard climbing wall.

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PHOTO BY MADELINE KRAFT

BELOW A moderate spring led to a bountiful tomato harvest in the Francinis’ vegetable patch, and caprese salad has been a near-nightly addition to their dinners this summer.


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H OME & GARDEN

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Unable to travel during the height of the pandemic, the Francinis styled the landscape of their backyard after a beach in Italy, Andrea’s home country.

farmers market sales to building customraised garden beds, the Francinis were quick to sign up. “[Sandra and Fabian] did an awesome job, with fun along the way and inspiration for further landscaping projects,” Laura says. “Now we are able to harvest much faster, thanks to the timer-controlled irrigation system that they installed.” The newly crafted kitchen garden is easily accessible and offers a daily variety of fresh produce. In late July, the family enjoyed an abundance of tomatoes and zucchini. “The herb bed also provides living space for two baby turtles, so far undisturbed by our puppy, Heidi, an 8-month-old labrahuahua adopted just in time for sheltering in place,” Laura says. “We plan to add more berry bushes this fall. … We find observing the plants go through the stages of their life cycle rewarding in many ways.” The Francinis were also inspired by New Hope Audubon Society, the local

“Gretchen is an exceptional realtor. As international investors who had never been to the Triangle area, live 5,000 miles away and could not visit because of COVID-19, we fully relied on Gretchen’s expertise and advice. She helped us find our dream property and execute closing within 90 days of signing her as our buyer agent. Gretchen went beyond the call of duty to assist us throughout the purchase process.” - Aude & Alberic “Without Gretchen’s masterful negotiation skills, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic, our home would probably still be on the market. She diligently tracked prospective buyers. She is professional, very personable and we highly recommend her.” - Ron & Dottie

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H OME & GARDEN

Until they can get back to hosting friends and family, the Francinis spend a lot of time together with newly adopted puppy, Heidi, in their backyard paradise.

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chapter of the National Audubon Society, to build eco-friendly water features that support native species. This time of year the family often encounters bluebirds, cardinals, hummingbirds, green anole, five-lined skinks, swallowtail butterflies, dragonflies, frogs, toads, box turtles and deer. Poultry Villa Landscaping and Supplies delivered pebbles and organic mushroom soil for the raised beds directly to their home. All the additions ensure maximum outdoor enjoyment for the family, whether it’s in a hammock under the stars, a rocking chair on the covered porch or simply lounging poolside. “A treasured memory is from Mother’s Day this year with my parents and brother’s family,” Laura says. “We ordered Oakleaf takeout and shared brunch together on socially distanced tables set up on each level of decking. And an ice-cream party celebrating the first week of school last year was a blast.” The Francinis look forward to hosting more family and friends at their home as soon as possible. Their yard even features a tribute to family in the forsythia that line the south side of the home, grown from clippings passed down two generations from Laura’s grandfather’s bush in his Southwest Virginia garden. “Knowing that nothing is permanent, we enjoy it while we can,” Laura says. – by Marie Muir


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415 Dimmocks Mill Rd., Hillsborough (Gold Park access) 140 E. Margaret Ln., Hillsborough (River Park access) A 1.8-mile paved, accessible, urban greenway that stretches along the Eno River between Gold Park and trails east of Hillsborough. It is popular for walking, jogging or cycling and connects several neighborhoods. hillsboroughnc.gov/community/ recreation-facilities/riverwalk 3

HISTORIC OCCONEECHEE SPEEDWAY TRAIL 320 Elizabeth Brady Rd., Hillsborough

The 1-mile oval dirt NASCAR speedway was active from 1948-1968, attracting the best stock car drivers and thousands of spectators. Today the track is enjoyed by hikers, runners and walkers. Other hiking trails surround the speedway. 4

SEVEN MILE CREEK NATURAL AREA 2187 Moorefields Rd., Hillsborough

Two miles of hiking trails through natural land undisturbed by roads; provides a home for various wildlife species. Includes the “Seven Mile Creek Sugar Maple Bottom,” the largest bottom land remaining in the county, and “Crabtree Creek Monadnock Ridge.”

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By Madel i ne Kraf t I l l ust rat i ons by Dani el l e J oseph of Ma s on Dixon Des ign s

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OCCONEECHEE MOUNTAIN STATE NATURAL AREA 625 Virginia Cates Rd., Hillsborough

Managed by the Eno River State Park. Offers 3 miles of riverside forests and trails where visitors can walk, fish and enjoy sweeping views of Orange County. Rangers lead regular interpretive programs throughout the natural area. Picnic tables are available near the parking lot. ncparks.gov/occoneechee-mountain-statenatural-area/home 6

GEORGE AND JULIA BRUMLEY FAMILY NATURE PRESERVE 3055 New Hope Church Rd., Chapel Hill (Southern parking lot)

3620 Old State Hwy. 10, Chapel Hill (Northern parking lot) This 613-acre preserve is a model for sustainable land management practices. It offers trails for hiking only, as well as multi-purpose trails where mountain biking is permitted. triangleland.org/explore/ nature-preserves/brumley-forest-nature-preserve 7

PUMPKIN LOOP TRAIL (35.9383040, -79.0731244)

A 2.5-mile easy trail loop in Carolina North Forest. The wide, crushed gravel and dirt surface makes the trail ideal for running and walking. It also connects many single-track trails that wind deeper into the forest. 8

BLACKWOOD FARM PARK 4215 Hwy. 86 S., Hillsborough

Features 4 miles of hiking trails, historic farmlands, open fields, picnic shelters with tables and a pond with fishing area, although no boating.


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Orange county

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MLK PARK 1120 Hillsborough Rd., Carrboro

Features 10.2 acres, a community garden and a multi-purpose field. BOLIN CREEK TRAIL 120 South Estes Dr., Chapel Hill (Community Center Park parking lot; Parking also available along Bolinwood Drive) 11

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A 1.5-mile-long, 10-foot-wide paved greenway that connects the Community Center Park and the Battle Branch Trail. Ideal for biking, walking, running or Rollerblading. BATTLE PARK Located at the corner of Country Club Road and South Boundary Street, metered parking is available nearby 12

A trail system throughout a 93-acre forest. Trails are on mostly uneven and rocky ground, which makes for good hiking as opposed to running. Koch Memorial Forest Theatre, a stone amphitheater that’s more than a century old, is located nearby at one of the corners of the park. ncbg.unc.edu/visit/battle-park-forest-theatre

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Known for similar scenery as the Eno River State Park and Duke Forest, but these 3.5-miles of trails are less trafficked. triangleland.org/explore/nature-preserves/ johnston-mill-nature-preserve

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MORGAN CREEK TRAIL (35.8934805, -79.0597501)

Out-and-back, 2.3-mile, moderately trafficked trail that connects to the town-owned Merritt’s Pasture. NORTH CAROLINA BOTANICAL GARDEN 100 Old Mason Farm Rd., Chapel Hill 15

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Various walking trails throughout the 88-acre forest behind the botanical garden; no bikes allowed. The trails are natural surfaces and follow along creeks and wind over hills. ncbg.unc.edu/visit/ncbg/piedmont-nature-trails 16

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JOHNSTON MILL NATURE PRESERVE 2713 Mount Sinai Rd., Chapel Hill

DUKE FOREST Orange, Durham and Alamance counties

More than 7,000 acres of land across six divisions and one protected natural area. Public access is available via gated entrances in all six divisions. Gravel roads and dirt foot trails can be used for recreation including hiking, running, fishing and picnics, as well as horseback riding and mountain biking, as long as such use does not interfere with the research and teaching projects of Duke University. dukeforest.duke.edu/recreation

MASON FARM BIOLOGICAL RESERVE (35.892098,-79.015797)

A 2-mile, wide, gravel trail loop that circles a 367-acre wildlife preserve and natural area on mostly flat terrain. The parking lot is across a low-overflow bridge, which can only be crossed by vehicles when the gage reads fewer than 5 feet. ncbg.unc.edu/ visit/mason-farm-biological-reserve 17

CAROLINA NORTH FOREST (35.9383040, -79.0731244)

Seven-hundred-and-fifty acres of woodlands located on UNC-Chapel Hill’s campus between the towns of Chapel Hill and Carrboro. Offers hiking, mountain biking and running trails from easy to moderate.  99


T RAILS & PARKS

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Durham county 1

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LAKE MICHIE RECREATION AREA 2802 Bahama Rd., Bahama

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The park offers largemouth bass fishing, city boat rentals and picnic tables. 2

HORTON GROVE NATURE PRESERVE 7360 Jock Rd., Bahama

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Eight miles of hiking trails, including the “That Makes Sense Interpretive Trail” for kids, through mature forests and grasslands. triangleland.org/explore/nature-preserves/ horton-grove-nature-preserve 3

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ENO RIVER STATE PARK 6101 Cole Mill Rd., Durham

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BOBBITT HOLE TRAIL 4390 Old Cole Mill Rd., Durham

A 1.65-mile loop trail in Eno River State Park that extends up river of the Cole Mill Trail.

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Five public access points with 24 miles of hiking trails, canoe launches, picnic areas, a swinging bridge, historic structures and a quarry that’s a popular swimming spot – but caution is advised. ncparks.gov/eno-river-state-park/home 4

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COLE MILL TRAIL 4390 Old Cole Mill Rd., Durham

An easy 1-mile loop trail in Eno River State Park along the river. 6

COX MOUNTAIN TRAIL 6101 Cole Mill Rd., Durham

A 3.75-mile loop trail in Eno River State Park that crosses the river on a suspension footbridge and climbs 270 feet in elevation from the river to the hilltop. 7

HOLDEN MILL TRAIL 6101 Cole Mill Rd., Durham

A 2.6-mile trail in Eno River State Park that connects two loops, one of which is an easy hike around the stone remains of Holden’s Mill. This trail starts from the Buckquarter Creek Trail, creating a 4.1-mile hike round-trip from the Piper-Cox House parking lot. 8

PUMP STATION TRAIL 4023 Rivermont Rd., Durham

A 1.5-mile easy loop in Eno River State Park. This trail is best known for its wildflowers in the spring. The trail begins at the Nancy Rhodes Creek bridge on Rivermont Road. 9

WEST POINT ON THE ENO 5101 N. Roxboro St., Durham

The 404-acre park includes 5 miles of trails along the river and through rocky terrain, granite bluffs covered with wildflowers, the West Point Mill, the McCown-Mangum House at West Point, and the Packhouse & Hugh Mangum Museum of Photography. Frog Hollow Outdoors offers boat rentals on the weekends. enoriver.org/what-weprotect/parks/west-point-on-the-eno 100

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QUARRY TRAIL 4950 Howe St., Durham

A 0.8-mile loop in Eno River State Park that starts from the Cabe Lands Trail and eventually loops around the quarry rim. 11

MOUNTAINS-TO-SEA TRAIL 4770 Pleasant Green Rd., Durham

Connecting the Great Smoky Mountains to the Outer Banks, the MST connects North Carolina’s Appalachian Mountains to the Atlantic Ocean. The Eno River State Park hosts a 7.5-mile stretch of the MST, connecting the Pleasant Green Access with the West Point on the Eno City Park trails beginning at Guess Road. The MST is marked with distinct white circle blazes. mountainstoseatrail.org/the-trail/map 12

ROCK QUARRY PARK 701 Stadium Dr., Durham

Amenities: athletic fields, greenway, picnic tables, playground, the Edison Johnson Recreation Center, sprayground, swings, tennis courts and aquatics center. 13

FALLS LAKE STATE PARK 13304 Creedmoor Rd., Wake Forest

Contains 14.3 miles of trails open for hiking and single-track mountain biking, ranging from easy to advanced. The park also offers various camping amenities, boat-launching ramps, fishing, picnicking and swimming. ncparks.gov/falls-lake-state-recreation-area/trails


T R AI L S & PA R KS

S AV E T H E D A T E 14

WEST ELLERBE CREEK TRAIL 1900 Maryland Ave., Durham

The 1.2-mile, 10-foot-wide paved trail runs through the center of Durham along the Ellerbe Creek providing bike and pedestrian access to downtown. EAST COAST GREENWAY Connects 15 states, 450 cities and towns via 3,000 miles of greenway from Maine to Florida. A study prepared by Alta Planning + Design and designed by GlaxoSmithKline reports that the greenway generates $90 million in total benefits annually for the Triangle region in health gains, environmental and transportation benefits, increased property values and economic improvement. In Durham County, the East Coast Greenway travels along the Ellerbe Creek Trail, South Ellerbe Creek Trail, Downtown Trail and American Tobacco Trail. greenway.org/states/north-carolina 15

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AL BUEHLER CROSS COUNTRY TRAIL 3001 Cameron Blvd., Durham

Located around the perimeter of the Washington Duke Golf Course, the 2.91 miles of gravel provides a trail for running or walking. A 0.11-mile connector trail joins the Al Buehler main trail to a 0.58-mile exercise loop. dukeforest.duke.edu/recreation/running-hiking/albuehler 17

AMERICAN TOBACCO TRAIL Morehead Avenue and Blackwell Street, Durham

The American Tobacco Trail begins at a large trailhead just south of the former American Tobacco factory complex and under the Durham Freeway. About 11.4 miles of the 22.6-mile-long trail runs through Durham County to the Chatham County line. In Durham, the trail is a 10-foot-wide, asphalt-paved greenway with loose gravel shoulders open for foot, bike or equestrian traffic. triangletrails.org/ american-tobacco-trail 18

ROLLING VIEW TRAIL 4201 Baptist Rd., Durham

A short trail in Falls Lake State Park connecting three campground loops, a swim beach, picnic shelters and boat launch areas. The easy 2-mile trail includes natural and paved surfaces. ncparks.gov/ falls-lake-state-recreation-area/trail/rolling-view-trail 19

LEIGH FARM PARK 370 Leigh Farm Rd., Durham

Amenities: disc golf, greenway, picnic tables and the historical Leigh Farm, an “82.8-acre property [that] is anchored by a 7-acre historic core listed on the National Register of Historic Places.” The historic area includes: the Leigh House, an early 19th century dairy, a mid-19th century slave cabin and a late-19th century slave cabin and carriage house along with a few other historically significant buildings. 20

TWIN LAKES PARK 439 Chandler Rd., Durham

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Amenities: turf soccer field with field lights, fishing, picnic shelters with tables and grills, playground and swings. 21

BETHESDA PARK 1814 Stage Rd., Durham

SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR FREEDOM SPONSOR

Amenities: basketball court, disc golf, playgrounds, 22-element high ropes course, picnic tables, tennis courts, tire swing and standard swings.  101


T RAILS & PARKS

SOUTHWEST DISTRICT PARK 15124 Hwy. 902, Bear Creek

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Amenities: picnic shelter that accommodates up to 50 people, softball/multi-purpose field, compacted trail, restrooms, playground and sand volleyball court. NORTHWEST DISTRICT PARK 2413 Woody Store Rd., Siler City

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Amenities: dining hall that accommodates up to 75 people, activity center that accommodates up to 40 people, picnic shelter that accommodates up to 50 people, pool available weekends only from 1-5 p.m., basketball court, playground and a pond for catch -and-release only.

BRIAR CHAPEL 37 Cardinal Ridge Rd., Chapel Hill

Nine hundred acres with 20 community parks and playgrounds, a water park, outdoor tennis and basketball courts and 24 miles of trails. The Briar Chapel Mountain Bike Trail (2526 Briar Chapel Pkwy., Chapel Hill – Briar Chapel Parkway entrance, or visit the parking area on Catulo Road) is a 6.6-mile, single-track mountain biking trail for intermediate or advanced riders and features a 3% average grade and 11% maximum grade. This trail is open for night riding. 4

AMERICAN TOBACCO TRAIL (35.8354283, -78.9281510) Pittard Sears Road Access (35.7843596, -78.9224648) White Oak Church Road Access The 22.6-mile-long Rails-to-Trails Conservancy project runs 4.7 miles through Chatham County. The trail is a dual surface of asphalt and compacted granite screenings. Its open for foot, bike or equestrian traffic. triangletrails.org/ american-tobacco-trail 5

THE PARK AT BRIAR CHAPEL 1015 Andrews Store Rd., Pittsboro

Amenities: two softball fields, football/ multi-purpose field, soccer/multi-purpose field, picnic shelter that accommodates up to 55 people and a playground. 6

NORTHEAST DISTRICT PARK 5408 Big Woods Rd., Chapel Hill

Amenities: softball fields, multi-purpose field, picnic shelter that accommodates up to 20 people, playground, pond, tennis court and a quarter-mile asphalt walking trail loop. 7

Feels Like Family

Amenities: along the Haw River, softball field and a playground.

You are in safe hands! DLC is committed to protecting the safety of our patients, staff, and our community while maintaining highquality care. We look forward to seeing you!

Chris G. Adigun, MD, FAAD Karlee Wagoner, ANP-BC Leighanne McGill, PA-C Voted Best Of Chapel Hill 2017-2020 Voted Best of Chatham 2019

Located in The Veranda at Briar Chapel

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58 Chapelton Court, Suite 120 Chapel Hill, NC

EARL THOMPSON PARK 170 Bynum Hill Rd., Pittsboro

919.942.2922 www.dlcofchapelhill.com

LOWER HAW RIVER STATE NATURAL AREA AND BYNUM MILL 502 Bynum Rd., Pittsboro 8

NC State Parks owns about 1,025 acres along both sides of the Haw River stretching from above Highway 15-501 near Bynum to below Highway 64 at the Jordan Lake State Recreation Area. Enjoy birding, nature photography, fishing, hiking and paddling. While there are not authorized State Park trails at this time, there are multiple unofficial footpaths that you can hike along the lower Haw River.


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BLUE TRAIL

RED TRAIL

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MARY HAYES BARBER HOLMES PARK 304 Old Rock Springs Cemetery Rd., Pittsboro

This 10-acre neighborhood park has a mix of open fields and wooded areas, a 0.33-mile paved walking trail, rain garden, living-roof gazebo, picnic shelters with grills, misting spray fountain and permeable paver parking. TOWN LAKE PARK 10 529 Hwy. 902, Pittsboro Pittsboro’s first park was also once the home of the town’s water supply. It features the Town Lake, a soccer field, swings, trails, a picnic shelter with grills, a fishing pier and free WiFi. 11

VISTA POINT BLUE AND RED TRAIL 2498 N. Pea Ridge Rd., Pittsboro

Choose between an easy 1- or 3-mile loop hike on a natural surface in the Jordan Lake State Park. The Blue Trail passes by an old tobacco barn and crosses a boardwalk, while the Red Trail winds through the pine and mixed hardwood forests. Both trails start from the Vista Point Campground.

JORDAN LAKE STATE RECREATION AREA 280 State Park Rd., Apex 12

A collection of nine access areas across an undeveloped 14,000acre reservoir. The recreation area offers more than 1,000 campsites, various swim areas, beaches, hiking trails and picnic shelters. Visit ncparks.gov/jordan-lake-state-recreation-area to see which spots are currently open. 13

WHITE PINES NATURE PRESERVE 548 South Rocky River Rd., Sanford

Nestled at the confluences of the Rocky and Deep Rivers, these 275 acres are owned and managed by the Triangle Land Conservancy. Offers great birding in the spring and summer and hosts the world’s largest known population of the Cape Fear shiner, a federally endangered minnow species. Offers 6 miles of hiking trails and a canoe launch site. triangleland.org/explore/ nature-preserves/white-pines-nature-preserve 103


Keep It Casual 104

Stylish and versatile fall fashions for the home office or when you're on the go Photography by Nikki Whitt Belch, Fancy This Photography


MODELED BY DEBBIE VU, FIFI’S SALES ASSOCIATE

Cloth & Stone denim skirt, Fifi’s, $12

Kate Spade New York crossbody handbag, Fifi’s, $58

Madewell leather high-top sneakers, Fifi’s, $26

Black diamond-shaped necklace, Fifi’s, $28

Kendra Scott rose gold ring, Fifi’s, $48 NAILS BY BRITTANY MAI, POSH NAIL SPA

Just Living shirt, Fifi’s, $16

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MODELED BY MARION COX, WHILDEN STORE MANAGER

Jonesy Wood “Trier” medallion necklace, Whilden, $74

M.A.B.E. “Sibel” maxi dress, Whilden, $315

ba&sh “Colt” western ankle boots, Whilden, $395

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MODELED BY EMMA ZUNKER, DOVECOTE STYLE FLOOR MANAGER AND STYLIST

Gas Bijoux “Zizanie” earrings small size gold, Dovecote Style, $148

Sabina Savage “The Opulent Ostrich” cashmere scarf, Dovecote Style, $738

Hinson Wu Lizette shirt, Dovecote Style, $158

DIFF “Frankie” sunglasses, Dovecote Style, $98

SPANX cropped flare in black, Dovecote Style, $128

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Shine On Statement pieces that stand out

Clockwise from top left: Diamond Disc ring featuring 18-karat yellow and oxidized sterling silver sprinkled with diamonds, Jewelsmith, $1,900 Antonio Bernardo “Atena” earrings, Hamilton Hill Jewelry, $1,925 Majoral “Baladre” ring, Hamilton Hill Jewelry, $495 Roberto Coin “Princess Flower” collection bangles in 18-karat yellow gold and 18-karat white gold, Fink’s Jewelers, $22,500 each Brackish “Claudia” earrings, SOUTH, $175

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Safe & Nur turing Thank you to all the essential healthcare workers!

Family House is a safe and nurturing home for patients and caregivers traveling to Chapel Hill for life-saving medical treatment. Help keep our guest room rates affordable by making a gift at secufamilyhouse.org

123 Old Mason Farm Road Chapel Hill, NC

Special thanks to our Virtual Happy Hour Sponsor

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inc.

BIZBRIEFS PHOTO COURTESY OF HINES

Compiled by Claire Delano

MOVEMENT AND DEVELOPMENT

In late July, Capitol Broadcasting Co., international real estate firm Hines and USAA Real Estate closed on a joint venture to develop a 700,000-square-foot mixed-use project on 11 acres at American Tobacco Campus. Plans for the first phase of the site, formerly a University Ford dealership, will be on 8 acres and include: 313,000 square feet of leasable space in two Hines T3 creative office buildings; 350 multifamily units in a 14-story high-rise residential building; and 90,000 square feet of experiential retail, including a theater/draft house and a grocer, plus shops and restaurants. It will also feature a central plaza and pedestrian alleyways. The Hines T3 buildings will feature alltimber construction to create a vintage aesthetic and warehouse environment. Construction is expected to begin in late 2021 or early 2022. 110

In June, clothing and collectibles store Night Gallery/Branching Out moved from its location in University Place to a new space near the mall’s main entrance beside William Travis Jewelry. In July, Healing Paws Veterinary Hospital relocated from 603 Hampton Pointe Blvd. to a larger location across the street at 540 Hampton Pointe Blvd. in Hillsborough. The clinic was founded by sisters Dr. Mari McLean and Dr. Eva Welch in 2015. Chapel Hill Town Council approved $5.2 million to support the development of affordable housing projects. A total of 278 new homes will be added to five communities: eight at Johnson Street, 120 at 2200 Homestead Rd., two at Pee Wee Homes, 48 at Merritt Mill Road and 100 at Habitat for Humanity of Orange County’s Weavers Grove.

On June 24, the Chapel Hill Town Council approved the rezoning of 137 E. Franklin St. and 136 E. Rosemary St. for the development of new office space as part of the larger East Rosemary Street Redevelopment Project. The project, headed by Grubb Properties, involves construction of a 1,100-space parking deck and an office building with web lab space, and could bring an estimated $50 million investment and 800 jobs.

ON THE MOVE

Durham-based medical research company Health Decisions, which specializes in women’s health, announced Mary Gunn as its new chief operating officer on July 1. Gunn previously worked as vice president of general management and business development at ICON. Mallory Sikes joined Hodge & Kittrell Sotheby’s International Realty as marketing director of the Chapel Hill and Raleigh offices in April. Entrepreneurial support organization the Council for Entrepreneurial Development announced its 2020-21 Board of Directors in July. They are: Neal Curran of GlaxoSmithKline, Doug Eisner, Anne English of Allobee, Ronnie Eubanks of Cherry

Bekaert, Ravila Gupta of Bagchi Group, Diane Ignar of Surrey View Consulting and Sonna Patel of NuPulseCV. The Board appointed Gupta as its interim chair; she will take over for Brad Schomber of Spoonflower, who served as board chair for the 2019-20 year. Outpatient mental and behavioral health care provider MindPath Care Centers announced that Dr. James Weiss joined its team as a psychiatrist who will practice out of the Chapel Hill office at 401 Providence Rd., Ste. 100. Habitat for Humanity of Orange County welcomed Dianne Pledger as its new vice president of development on July 15. She previously served as the director of development at Shaw University and is currently the president of the North Carolina Central University Alumni Association’s Orange County chapter and a member of the Chapel Hill Cultural Arts Commission. The search process was completed by moss+ross, a consulting firm for North Carolina nonprofits.

NEW ON THE SCENE

Boutique on Millstone opened on June 27 in Formalwear Outlet at 415 Millstone Dr. in Hillsborough. The store sells a variety of women’s clothing, from


inc.

everyday wear to business casual. Clients can also shop virtually at boutiqueonmillstone.com. Tattoo studio Critter Swamp opened at 107 N. Churton St. in Hillsborough on Aug. 1. The studio’s website stated it is jointly owned by three “Black, trans and queer artists,” J. Avery Theodore Daisey, Ayden Love and Terin J.D., who “felt the need to create a space where our communities feel welcome and safe.” Self-storage company Right Fit Storage opened a new location at 3447 N. Roxboro St. in Durham in July. It currently offers a no-contact rental process and online payments in order to provide safer renting options to customers during the COVID-19 pandemic. “We are very excited to be a part of this diverse Durham community and offer a wide array of units to serve everyone’s needs,” said Area Manager Robbie Hinson.

First Horizon Bank opened two locations in Chapel Hill in July: one at University Place at 201 S. Estes Dr. and one at 126 W. Franklin St. The openings are the result of First Horizon’s acquisition of 30 SunTrust Bank branches in North Carolina, Georgia and Virginia.

AWARDS AND HONORS

Seth Noar, a professor at the UNC Hussman School of Journalism and Media and a member of the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, received a $3.35 million grant

from the National Institute on Drug Abuse in June. The grant will be used to create and test communication strategies to discourage electronic cigarette use among adolescents. Fellow UNC professors Ilona Jaspers and Paschal Sheeran are co-investigators on the project. “To date, there has been a dearth of efforts to systematically develop and study communication approaches to effective e-cigarette and vaping prevention,” Noar said. “Our study aims to address this gap.” Blackman & Sloop CPAs P.A. promoted Ben Johnson to the role of principal in June. Johnson joined the accounting firm in 2012 and previously served as senior manager.

In July, Tiffany Griffin, coowner of Bright Black Candles, was one of 15 winners in the 2020 Stacy’s Rise Project, a program created by Stacy’s Pita Chips to support female small business owners. The program received more than 1,600 applications. Griffin will receive a $10,000 grant, one-on-one mentorship and strategic expert advertising design consultation and donated media space to help grow her business.

The Durham-Chapel Hill area ranked No. 4 on WalletHub’s 2020 Most Educated Cities in America list. The ranking was determined by the area’s number of adults younger than 25 with high school, undergraduate and graduate degrees, quality of public schools, racial education gap and other factors.

Durham-based LoanWell – an enterprise solution for community banks, credit unions, CDFIs and loan funds that has created a cloud-based loan management system for intake, origination, underwriting, closing, servicing and reporting – is one of 12 Black-led startups from across the nation to be named to the Google for Startups Accelerator for Black founders three-month intensive program. The Raleigh-Durham area ranked No. 7 in start-up ecosystems in Business Facilities magazine’s 2020 Metro Rankings Report.

Knox St. Studios, a learning and innovation studio for Triangle entrepreneurs, received a $40,000 grant from the Techstars Foundation in June. The funding will go toward resources such as grants and training modules for new small business owners. Dr. Diego Garza, director of telehealth and vice president of strategy and innovation at MindPath Care Centers, received a Triangle Business Journal “40 Under 40 Leadership Award” this year.

Innovation Award; Brandwein’s Bagels is the University-Born Business of the Year; Habitat for Humanity of Orange County earned the Community Impact Award; and Boomerang Youth is the Nonprofit of the Year.

ACQUISITIONS + PARTNERSHIPS

The Chamber for a Greater Chapel Hill-Carrboro hosted its 2020 Business Excellence Awards in a virtual ceremony on July 17. The following 10 winners were selected: Elizabeth Hirsh, owner of The Downsizers, was named the Businesswoman of the Year; Dawna Jones, assistant dean of students at UNC, is the Young Professional of the Year; Weaver Street Market is the Large Business of the Year; Vimala’s Curryblossom Cafe is the Midsize Business of the Year; A Plus Test Prep is the MicroEnterprise Business of the Year; Film Fest 919 is the New Business of the Year; Hope Renovations earned the

On June 29, Liquidia Technologies announced its intent to acquire RareGen. The two companies will merge under the name Liquidia Corporation. Liquidia is currently developing LIQ861, a drug for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), which will be complemented by treprostinil, RareGen’s own PAH drug. “The acquisition of RareGen bolsters Liquidia’s ability to advance much-needed treatment options for the PAH community,” said Liquidia CEO Neal Fowler. Terra Dotta, a higher education software company based in Chapel Hill, announced a new collaboration with the Equity Research and Innovation Center at Yale School of Medicine and White Williams LLP, a law

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113 YEARS AND COUNTING M

g Servin ies nit commu for over NC across ntury. a ce

4. How is M&F engaging with the Durham community? M&F Bank has been engaging with the Durham community since we opened our doors. Our board members and staff are involved with varying local

&F Bank has been serving residential and business

organizations in their personal lives and the bank supports many local

communities across North Carolina for over a century. CEO

initiatives at a corporate level. With the emergence of the COVID-19

& President, James H. Sills recently shared some of the

pandemic, our staff has worked diligently to reach out to our customers

many reasons behind the bank’s longevity and success.

to understand their needs and how we can assist during this trying time. 5. What three words describe M&F’s culture and what kind of

1. How many locations/facilities does M&F have?

experience can potential customers expect? Attention, respect,

Seven branch locations across the five largest markets in NC (Durham,

partnership. A potential customer can expect to receive personal service

Raleigh, Greensboro, Charlotte, Winston-Salem).

that goes beyond the financial transactions. A customer should expect to

2. How large is your workforce? Approximately 75 employees.

develop a partnership with their banker.

3. What sets M&F apart from other banks? M&F is set apart

6. How has COVID-19 changed your business and how is M&F

from other banks by its 113 year history of serving the disadvantaged

responding? The COVID-19 pandemic has forced us to take better

communities, including small and medium sized businesses. Our focus is

advantage of digital banking tools. We have had to adjust to serve

providing capital to those businesses which are often overlooked by larger

our customers with the same quality of care in a remote fashion. This

financial institutions. We pride ourselves on the one-to-one attention

includes encouraging the use of our mobile app, online banking, mobile

that we can provide our customers. Additionally, M&F has maintained

check deposit, etc. We have made it easier for our customers to do

an outstanding CRA rating for over 20 years. 83% of our deposits are

business with us from home by adopting virtual appointments, electronic

redeployed into the communities where we operate in the form of loans.

signatures, and soon, an easier online account opening process.


“83% OF OUR DEPOSITS ARE REDEPLOYED INTO THE COMMUNITIES WHERE WE “

OPERATE IN THE FORM OF LOANS.

7. What else would you like our business and overall community

century, and until the re-opening, there had been minimal updates to the

to know about M&F? We would like for the community to know that

space. This is significant not only because it is our flagship location, but it

despite us being a small institution, we are well equipped to be anyone’s

is also the last remaining representation of Black Wall Street in Durham.

primary bank. We serve everyone and welcome the opportunity to show

Although traffic to the branch is limited at the moment, we are excited

that we can be the bank for you.

that we were able to give the branch the updates that it deserves. The

8. What recent successes/wins has M&F had? We are extremely

renovation is a signal to the community that M&F Bank recognizes the

proud of the work we were able to do through our participation in the PPP

importance of growing and evolving.

program. We were able to impact over 1,300 local jobs and 163 local small businesses. We are also fortunate that, in light of recent social unrest, our

Lastly, we would like for the community to understand the importance

communities are even more prepared to support our institution so that

of banking small and banking local. Small, local financial institutions

we can, in turn, support them.

like M&F Bank are more engaged with their communities and with

9. Is there anything else you’d like to share about M&F that

their customers. We understand that we have a direct impact on our

the previous questions have not covered? We would like for the

communities, so we work hard to make sure that we understand our

community to know that we are well equipped to be your primary bank.

customers and their needs and to make responsible credit decisions. The

We offer convenient digital banking options including a mobile app,

more a community bank is supported by ways of deposits, the more the

online banking, and mobile check deposit so even if you are not near a

bank can, in turn, support its communities in the form of loans. We also

branch or do not wish to visit one, you can still do business with us.

engage with local organizations, businesses, and nonprofits by providing sponsorships and volunteering man-hours at events. At institutions like

We would also like to share with the community that in February of

ours, we make a point to know our customers by name and to connect

2020 we had a successful grand re-opening of our historic Parrish Street

beyond financial transactions, and can provide personal service that can

location. We have been operating out of the same building for nearly a

be difficult to find at large national banks.


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firm with a higher education practice, to deliver a proactive, technology-driven tool to assist in mitigating health risks and monitoring student health to help support universities and colleges as students return to campus. Orthobiologic company Bioventus made a $15 million equity investment into CartiHeal, the developer of an implant to treat joint surface lesions. This funding will allow CartiHeal to complete its investigational device exemption study and apply for premarket approval from the Food and Drug Administration. Part of the agreement is that Bioventus will acquire CartiHeal shortly after it’s granted FDA approval. Modern Energy partnered with EIG Global Energy Partners to create a $100 million debt facility to fund the development of clean energy assets. “A combination of rapid cost reductions in clean energy asset classes, favorable regulatory regimes and innovative financing structures are unlocking a multi-trilliondollar opportunity to invest in the global energy transition,” Mark Laabs, CEO and co-founder of Modern Energy, said in a statement. Global health care industry management consulting firm Vynamic and Innovations in Healthcare formed a partnership to source, strengthen, study and scale promising innovations across all health care sectors. Innovations in Healthcare, a Duke University affiliate and Durhambased nonprofit with a vision to scale health care innovations worldwide, operates in more than 90 countries. The announcement follows Vynamic’s opening of its fourth office in Durham earlier this year. The partnership will also see Vynamic CEO Jeff Dill added to the IiH board of advisors. 114

GIVING BACK

In July, Durham Technical Community College received $129,857 from Duke Energy as part of the company’s 2017 pledge to donate $5 million to apprenticeship programs at North Carolina community colleges. The grant supports student tuition and classroom materials for Durham Tech’s Electrical Line Technician course, which was launched in 2019 through another Duke Energy grant. This was the sixth and last round of funding from the pledge, which supported 23 community colleges in total. Durham Tech also launched the Back-to-Work Initiative to combat the rise in unemployment due to COVID-19. The initiative provides short-term, fully online classes in industries such as biotechnology, skilled trades and more to help job seekers quickly find positions in industries that are currently hiring. UNC Health and the UNC School of Medicine created the Heroes Health app to provide mental health support to health care workers and first responders. Workers can take weekly assessments to better understand their emotional state, and the app suggests free or low-cost mental health resources. The initiative was founded by Dr. Samuel McLean, a COVID-19 unit worker and COVID-19 survivor. “It’s important to give first responders and health care workers a simple, quick way to regularly check in on their mental health and immediately find resources,” he said. Orange County Economic Development awarded $5,000 grants to 52 Orange County businesses in July as part of a second round of COVID-19related financial assistance.

In Carrboro, nine businesses received funding: Carrboro Massage Therapy, Flow Beauty, Kate Kager Smith Massage Therapy, Mel’s Commissary & Catering, Spira Pilates Studio, TEJASE healing arts, Thirteen West, Vanessa Adams Hair & Makeup and the UPS Store in Carrboro Plaza. In Chapel Hill, 32 businesses received funding: Ai Software Corporation, Best of M LLC, Blue Dogwood Public Market, Rasa Indi-Chinese Restaurant, Brother Sister Co., Glimmerfae Creations, Carol’s Electric, Cedar Falls Cleaners, Classic, Country Inn Kennel and Cattery, Connect Chiropractic, Avis & Budget Rent A Car, Hannah’s Home Health & Care Consulting, Heartwood Holistic Health, Honey Magpie, Immersion Island, Might as Well Bar & Grill, KC Travel, Learning Well LLC, Maitland & English Law Firm, Metropolis, Queen’s Hair Design, Restoring Balance, Rolling Hills Stables, Little Owl’s Nest, Franklin Mart, Stratus TMS, The Balance Point Acupuncture & Wellness, Todrin Fine Woodwork, Triangle Yoga, VibeHouse405 and Four Corners. In Hillsborough, seven businesses received funding: Cabana Boy BBQ, DonLee Salon, EVERLY’S, Shekinah Wear, Southern Vintage Table, Tiger Cleaning and Yonder: Southern Cocktails and Brew. Get Lit Event Lighting in Hurdle Mills and Pro Video in Rougemont received funding. Two businesses received funding in Mebane: MidSouth MotoX and Red Tail Grains.

from Duke University for grants, and approximately $2 million in public funds for loans from both the City of Durham and Durham County. So far, 81 Durham businesses have received assistance. “Since the program’s launch on June 18, the fund has distributed over $750,000 to small business applicants throughout the city,” said Andre Pettigrew, director of the City’s Office of Economic and Workforce Development. “The program has reached businesses across several industries, including hospitality businesses; performing arts facilities; transportation services; personal care and laundry businesses; and outpatient care centers. The grant recipients were also demographically diverse, with approximately 56% granted to minority-owned businesses and 62% granted to women-owned businesses.” The average grant award is approximately $7,500, and the average loan amount is slightly more than $33,000.

Durham’s Small Business Recovery Fund, which was established to provide loan and grant funds for businesses adversely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic and consists of $1 million in private money

Boron-based discovery platform company Boragen Inc. in Research Triangle Park won a $300,500 Phase I Small Business Innovation Research grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the

FUNDS & GRANTS

North Carolina Central University professor Dr. Xiaoxin Luke Chen was awarded $2.7 million by the National Institutes of Health to investigate new treatment options for a type of esophageal cancer that disproportionally affects African Americans. The award, to be distributed over five years, will support Dr. Chen’s research into the role of a molecular pathway in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, an understudied type of cancer that resists treatment by traditional therapy.


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National Institutes of Health for research on controlling malaria. The grant will accelerate the company’s collaboration with the University of California, San Francisco, which focuses on effective control for the protozoan parasite Plasmodium, the causative agent for malaria. 8 Rivers Capital was awarded seven U.S. Department of Energy grants worth more than $30 million to further develop its carbon capture technologies for flexible clean electricity. “By making clean cheaper than dirty, the 8 Rivers technology platform creates the economics that allows the world to achieve netzero emissions by 2050,” 8 Rivers CEO Bill Brown said.

Durham Tech and Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina launched a mobile health lab using a $1 million grant from BCBSNC, the largest ever given to the college. The lab will provide health care to children in underserved communities in Durham and Orange counties. Services include free dental prescreenings and education, fittings for glasses, and health fairs at elementary schools.

IN OTHER NEWS

Durham ranked No. 13 on a list of 180 cities whose unemployment rates are recovering the quickest, according to financial news site WalletHub.

The Orange County Board of Commissioners’ 2020-21 spending plan will increase funding for public schools and allow property taxes to remain unchanged at 86.79 cents per $100. The school budget, at $89,012,561, marks an increase of $27 per student from last year. Corporate Investors Mortgage Group changed its name to CIMG Residential Mortgage and adopted the tagline “lending on a first-name basis” to reflect its new brand identity. “We decided to strip away the overly corporate feel of our identity and better align our branding with our core values of investing in the community, loaning where we live and building personal relationships through trustworthy service,” said CEO Jeremy Salemson. Additionally,

CIMG Residential Mortgage Managing Director Robby Oakes and his team were named the No. 1 mortgage lender in North Carolina and 12th in the U.S. by National Mortgage News. In July, GoTriangle, the Regional Transportation Alliance and the North Carolina Department of Transportation released the preliminary findings of a study on the proposed Freeway And Street-based Transit network. The FAST network, as described in a press release, is “a scalable approach to transform our roadways into ‘multimodal corridors.’” The study shows, in part, that adding commuter rails and a bus transit system will create a stronger, more accessible regional network. View the full findings at letsgetmoving.org/FAST.

We can’t wait for you to join us. The Forest at Duke is here and proudly serving our residents every day. We look forward to opening our campus to visitors again, and inviting you to experience countless opportunities to live life your way. Call 919-433-2361 or visit forestduke.org to learn more today.

Vibrant living. Continuing care. In the heart of Durham. 2701 Pickett Drive, Durham NC 27705

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LOCAL TOURISM TAKES A COVID-19 HIT

Massive drop in visitation numbers and occupancy rates anticipated this year

BY H A N N A H L E E | P H O T O G R A P H Y BY C O R N E L L WAT S O N he list of canceled events is a long one by this point, six months since the start of the global pandemic: Durham’s Full Frame Documentary Film Festival, the American Dance Festival, the PLAYlist summer concert series, Fourth of July celebrations and more. Others went virtual, like CenterFest and Music in Your Alisha Verwayae, 10, and Brittany Whelan took Gardens. In a world spending in 2020 will likely be without COVID-19, indoor and down 45% from 2019’s numbers. outdoor venues would be That equates to nearly 5.9 packed in the summertime. This million fewer visitors to the Bull year, there were no visitors. No City – and some $419 million vendors. No music in the air, in lost visitor spending versus no frothing beers. It’s a scene the year prior, which saw a that’s persisted: Streets – and record-high $932 million spent hotels – that would normally be across lodging, transportation, packed with guests are eerily food and beverage, retail and empty, save for a few mask-clad entertainment industries. pedestrians. “The hospitality and leisure That visual only scratches the sector,” said Susan Amey, CEO surface of local hospitality sector of Discover Durham, “has been woes caused by COVID-19. hit arguably harder than any Discover Durham told Durham other. … One of the things that Magazine that projected visitor

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by the tourism industry, roughly 5% of Durham’s entire workforce. An estimated half of those jobs have since been lost. Neighboring Chapel Hill is combating the same issue. Laurie Paolicelli, executive director of the Chapel Hill/Orange County Visitors Bureau, said in July that the area will be down approximately $95 million in total projected revenue for 2020. “That will impact the bottom line a dip in Unscripted Durham’s pool. for [the] town and county,” Paolicelli concerns me the most, is just said. “That will impact sales tax, some of the wonderful and occupancy taxes. It’s going to beloved businesses in Durham be a tough time. We hope to be that might not survive.” out of it in fall 2021, but to paint We’ve already seen closures at a rosy picture that everything’s Northgate Mall in May, Durham going to be fine right away coworking and maker space The would be misleading.” Mothership in June and The Businesses had to reinvent Northern Spy in July, as well as themselves over the past few a handful of other restaurants, months to try to make up for like Gonza Tacos y Tequila, those missing hospitality dollars. DeeLuxe Chicken and, most They’ve transferred to accepting recently, True Flavors Diner’s orders and payments online Lakewood location. Prior to and implemented sanitation COVID-19, there were 12,836 measures. They’ve applied for visitor-related jobs created government loans and started


durham inc.

Manuel Guerrero enjoyed a few of The Patio’s signature snacks at one of its socially distanced tables while staying at Unscripted Durham during a trip from Charleston, South Carolina. GoFundMe’s for employees who they can’t provide jobs for at the moment. Those plans, even taken together, won’t recoup all the lost revenue, but they do raise the question: Are all these changes actually helping businesses’ bottom lines? “The short answer is no,” Paolicelli said. “The local businesses define [success] as profitability. Those of us in government who are at civic agencies [and] launching a lot of campaigns are really helping to sustain businesses, but I think many businesses would tell you profitability is a goal that they haven’t attained yet.” Hotel occupancy is still down dramatically in Durham, Amey said. Lodging demand – or total rooms sold – was down 48% this July compared to the same month last year. Some Durham

hotels, including 21c Museum Hotel, closed temporarily, and not all have reopened. That falls in line with national trends: As of July 30, more than half the rooms at open hotels were empty, according to the American Hotel & Lodging Association. That doesn’t account for the thousands of hotels that are currently shuttered; no major hotels have permanently closed in Durham or Chapel Hill yet. Unscripted Durham is one of the few that’s remained open since the onset of the pandemic. The federal Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) made it possible, but it wasn’t without other significant challenges. “We knew we weren’t going to have a ton of business,” said Matthew Whiteheart, Unscripted’s general manager,

“but you want to keep the doors open, keep people employed and keep the economy rolling in some fashion.” That strategy did help the hotel. Occupancy went up slightly in July from what it had been in March and April, hovering around 20% to 25%. For some, the struggle has been more prolonged. The Carolina Inn’s successful return to normalcy hinged on UNC students safely returning to campus. And although the hotel never closed, its restaurant, Crossroads Chapel Hill, only just reopened Aug. 3 at 50% capacity. “We didn’t want to open [Crossroads] because the university was still shut down,” Allal Kartaoui, the Inn’s food and beverage director, said. “Not much travel was going on, so

PHOTO BY BETH MANN

there was no need for us to be open. We decided to open the coffee shop for in-house guests – just a limited menu for graband-go items.” Now that some students have returned, even as classes shift online, there’s a better chance for increased foot traffic in the area – which, in turn, hopefully means more customers. Many hotels’ financial futures are dependent on events happening in and around their locations. “[Even] the football schedule and what football decides to do is going to make a huge impact on our entire community,” said Heidi Werner, director of sales and marketing for the Inn. There are still non-university events Werner has handled for the Inn, with weddings first and foremost among them. She estimates she rescheduled some

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Robert Kingsbury stopped at Unscripted Durham halfway between Atlanta and his home in Arlington, Virginia, to make the trip more manageable and explore “what seemed like a really cool hotel.”

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45 ceremonies from March to June, but the hotel still hosted its fair share of pandemic celebrations. Those provide some economic lift – as does the Inn’s outdoor space that can be used for dining and events – but it can’t completely mitigate other losses. Werner estimates 60% of the hotel’s revenue comes from transient business, which simply won’t be the same until there is better control over the spread of the virus. “As we get into next spring, April, May, June, people want to get back together,” Werner said and noted the Inn’s alreadybooked calendar for 2021. “They’re looking to a point in time where people can come together again and enjoy one another’s company without having to be distanced from one another and without having to have a mask on.” Hotels also provide economic opportunity to various other sectors in the hospitality industry. “Twenty cents on the dollar goes to the hotel,” Paolicelli said of each dollar spent by a visitor,

“but the rest of that money [goes to] restaurants, bars, shopping and attractions.” A decrease in hotel visitors naturally coincides with a drop across the board: fewer restaurant patrons, fewer barhoppers, fewer shoppers. To compensate, many restaurants, for example, opted to pivot their operations to takeout. But now the financial realities of downsizing full-scale restaurants into delivery/takeout operations, even with some restaurants allowing guests back inside at reduced capacities, are coming into focus. Restaurants operate on razor-thin margins when business is booming; those tiny margins have long since disappeared. A study from the National Restaurant Association shows 75% of restaurants think it’s unlikely they will be profitable within the next six months (under the assumption there will be no additional federal relief packages). The lack of full-service restaurants also leaves many traditional restaurant employees without a role. Or a job.


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Acme Chef and Owner Kevin Callaghan shifted his Carrboro restaurant into a full-service takeout operation, but it’s not the same, he said. Customers haven’t dined in since March 17. And while he was able to bring back kitchen staff, “Our front-of-the-house staff has remained completely in limbo since the day Acme shut down,” he said. “It’s been pretty awful for them. … The hospitality end of the business won’t really exist again until we reopen our doors to dine-in service.” As difficult as it may be to remain optimistic, Callaghan and others continue to look on the bright side. “Now that [The Patio] has been open, we are busier than we were during March and April,” Whiteheart said

of Unscripted’s in-house restaurant. “I think that’s just because people are seeing the different measures that places have taken, and they want to get out of their house, stop eating their own food and really just [be] … somewhat normal again.” Even with many planned vacations now postponed, there have been trickles of local travel that might serve as a model for others to follow. Robert Kingsbury, for example, stayed at Unscripted in July. He stopped at the boutique hotel during an almost 10-hour drive from Atlanta to his home in Arlington, Virginia “I literally looked at a map and looked at what was about halfway on my journey,” Kingsbury said. “It was either

Greensboro or Durham. I had been to Durham probably 10 years ago for a friend’s wedding and remember it was a cute town. … I just needed to take a day off and relax. And honestly, I was really looking forward to having some time to myself.” He lounged poolside and ate at The Patio. No grand excursions out into the city – but it was something. Most importantly, Kingsbury didn’t feel that his safety was compromised, especially with the extra precautions taken by Unscripted. “I’m traveling, but I’m not just throwing everything to the wind and traveling,” Kingsbury said. “I’m doing it as safely as possible.” What’s still to be determined in Durham and Chapel Hill

– and across the hospitality industry at large – is how many people will adopt Kingsbury’s mindset. That answer ties directly into the hopes that a pandemic that has cost cities and towns so much in 2020 doesn’t linger, because there are serious concerns that this multi-month dip may morph into years. And regardless of federal subsidies, adjusted business plans and additional safety measures, most businesses cannot reasonably withstand that. If another wave of increased coronavirus cases sweeps across America, the long-term economic ramifications will be heavy. “The [Destinations International Annual Conference] projected [in July] that the travel industry is not going to totally come back

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until 2024 – so it’s a long road,” Amey said. “However, Durham is positioned to come back faster. And I think that’s one of the things that’s exciting for us.” The reason behind that is Durham isn’t considered a “fly market” like, say, Charlotte or Chicago; it’s a “drive market.” During a time where people aren’t comfortable in crowded spaces like airports and airplanes, the antsiest travelers are inclined to hop in their cars, just like Kingsbury. The same ideology Hotels are taking precautions to ensure applies to Chapel the safety of guests. Hill, too. That gives both estimated Orange County Amey and Paolicelli some hotels have invested about $1.5 optimism that this region can million in sanitation equipment: start experiencing serious Everything from spraying economic recovery as early as hotel shuttles with disinfectant next fall. mist to alternative types of “We’re also urging the local room service and contactless community not to underestimate commerce. “It’s been a real the strength we have to keep trying time stripping ourselves Durham businesses intact,” of all of our old best practices Amey said. “As conditions and implementing new best allow us to get back out in the practices,” Paolicelli said. community, a concerted focus And while it’s just one man’s on patronizing local shops, opinion, the early indicators restaurants and even staycations are promising. “As long as you in our hotels will help Durham put that effort in,” Kingsbury bounce back faster.” said, “you can travel and have a Paolicelli and Amey’s good time.” teams already redesigned their respective advertising strategies. Instead of massive For details on area indoor attractions and live hotels and what they are concerts, “clean is the new currently offering, visit sexy” for tourism stakeholders durhammag.com and as the state eases out of chapelhillmagazine.com. coronavirus lockdown restrictions. In fact, Paolicelli

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PHOTO BY BETH MANN

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EN GAGEMENTS

Newbauer & Woodfin BY CA ROLINE KLOST ER PHOTO BY AMB ER BYR D, AM BERBY RDP HOTOG R A P HY.COM

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hapel Hill native Chelsea Woodfin met Jacob Newbauer of Raleigh through mutual friends in college; Chelsea was a senior at UNC while Jacob pursued his master’s degree in education at N.C. State University. After graduation, Chelsea worked for Strata Solar in Chapel Hill, and Jacob became a third grade teacher at Maureen Joy Charter School in Durham. They crossed paths during and after college, but their friendship only blossomed into something more when they began dating about a year ago. This past holiday season, Chelsea and Jacob decided to celebrate the 12 Days of Christmas by giving each other a little gift each day instead of exchanging presents on Christmas

Day. But Jacob’s gift on the 10th day was anything but small in significance. He proposed at Chelsea’s house – a complete surprise to Chelsea. She was stunned again when the pair arrived at Jacob’s house to find an impromptu party with friends and family who traveled from near and far to celebrate. Chelsea and Jacob will tie the knot on July 17, 2021, at Christ United Methodist Church in Southern Village with a reception at The Barn at Fearrington Village. They will reside in Durham.

Mumma & Wise BY CLAIRE DELA N O PHOTO BY REAG A N LU N N , R EAGANLUNN.COM Wedding Date August 28, 2021 Crossed Paths Kyle Mumma and Mia Wise met as undergraduates at Duke University in 2011 when they were assigned to a group

project together. Kyle, then a student manager of the basketball team, says Mia ended up doing “all of the work” while he was out of town for a game. They reconnected in 2016 when Kyle recognized her at Alivia’s Durham Bistro following a UNC-Duke game. Mia lived in Washington, D.C., at the time, but after a few months of phone calls, the two began dating in fall 2016. The Proposal Kyle wanted to propose before their move to Denver in June, so he convinced Mia to celebrate her graduation in May from Duke’s Fuqua School of Business by getting dressed up and taking pictures on campus. He took her by surprise when he asked her to marry him in front of Duke University Chapel. Reagan Lunn, director of athletics photography at Duke, posed as a tourist to capture the moment. Kyle’s sister, Maddy Mumma, brought some of the couple’s favorite treats – Old-Fashioned cocktails from NanaSteak, dinner from 124

Cucciolo Osteria and vegan brownies from The Parlour – and they had a picnic in front of the chapel. Now, “I Do” The big day, organized by Lauren Watson of Lion House wedding planning, will take place at The Cookery. Mia picked out her gown from the Little White Dress Bridal Shop in Denver. The COVID-19 pandemic creates an unpredictable future, but the couple says figuring out the details of their wedding is a welcome distraction. “Planning brings a sense of normalcy and excitement,” Kyle says. “So it’s still fun even amidst the incredible uncertainty.”


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Luchenbill & Schranz BY LA N EY DALTON PHOTOGRAP HY BY H EBA SALA MA PHOTOG R A P HY, H EBASALA MA .COM

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hapel Hill native Bradford Luchenbill met Rebecca Schranz on Match.com in September 2016. They started dating and discovered their shared passion for music, which inspired a trip to MerleFest in Wilkesboro, North Carolina, in 2017, and solidified their relationship. In January 2018, the couple took a walk on the beach at Murrells Inlet in South Carolina, and Bradford told Rebecca to look at the dolphins he saw in the water. “When I turned back around to tell him there were no

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dolphins, he was down on one knee and asked me to marry him,” Rebecca says. On Sept. 28, 2019, the third anniversary of their first date, the couple got married in a ceremony and reception at Lavender Oaks Farm in Chapel Hill. Friends and family from near and far joined them to celebrate. “Our wedding day was perfect!” Rebecca says. “Everything that was supposed to happen did, we ran ahead of schedule, and everyone had a great time.” She adds that they both managed to successfully say their vows, which they were terrified to do. They reflect on their big day often and remember every detail, she says. The couple lives in Pittsboro, where they purchased a home prior to the wedding. Bradford is an arborist, and Rebecca works for National MPS Society, a nonprofit for children with a rare disease called mucolipidosis.


WED D I NGS

Barbato & Newman BY E L I Z A B E TH E F I R D P H OTO G R A P H Y BY K RYSTA L KAST, K RYSTA L KASTP H OTO G R A P H Y.CO M

E

ast Chapel Hill High School alumna Paige Newman attended Virginia

Tech and, after graduating in 2013, moved to Washington, D.C. She soon met Patrick Barbato at a mutual friend’s Fourth of July party. When Paige and Patrick discovered that they not only share the same birthday – June 21 – but also that their parents have the same anniversary – June 21, 1986 – it seemed like fate brought them together. The couple spent some time at Paige’s parents’ house in Wrightsville Beach over Memorial Day weekend in 2018. Patrick asked Paige to go for a walk, and he proposed in a small park. Paige’s sister and best friend were hiding nearby and captured everything on camera. Paige and Patrick were married on Nov. 2, 2019, at The Farm at Old Edwards Inn and Spa in Highlands, North Carolina, the town where Paige spent summers and holidays with her grandparents. They celebrated with their parents, Paul and Genese Newman of Chapel Hill and Patrick and Beth Barbato of York, Pennsylvania; Paige’s maid of honor and sister, Ally Newman; bridesmaids Anna Ward, Martha Glenn and Elizabeth Smith; and usher Cameron Hill. The bride and groom danced the night away in front of the inn’s many roaring fireplaces during the cozy reception with guests. Patrick works in software, and Paige is pursuing her master’s degree in public health at UNC. The couple lives in Durham.

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Quow & Rucker BY GEORGIA P HI L L I P S PHOTOGRAP HY BY L’A M OU R F OTO, L AMOURFOTO.COM Wedding Date July 18, 2020 Occupations Justin Rucker and Krystina Quow both work at Duke University Hospital – Justin as a general surgery resident

and Krystina as a dermatology resident. Crossed Paths In 2014, Krystina, a Duke University graduate from New Jersey, and Justin, a UNC graduate from Maryland, were both accepted to Duke University School of Medicine, and they met at orientation. Although they didn’t speak much that weekend, their relationship blossomed when they arrived on campus in the fall, and they began dating in 2015. The Proposal Justin knew he was ready to propose to Krystina during their last year of medical school. Using residency interviews as a cover to buy the ring, Justin planned to pop the question on a surprise trip to Las Vegas. In January 2018, Krystina flew to Vegas after an interview in California, and Justin was going to fly from Raleigh-Durham International Airport to meet her. Then Durham was suddenly hit with a bad snow storm, delaying Justin’s flight and forcing him to sleep at the airport. But Justin eventually made it to Vegas, and he proposed to Krystina on the High Roller Ferris wheel, the world’s tallest observation wheel, at The LINQ. The Big Day When their original wedding date was postponed due to COVID-19, Krystina’s brother, Alex Quow, nominated the couple for a chance to win an all-expense-paid elopement at the Loose Leaf Event Gallery in Durham Food Hall. Justin and Krystina were shocked when they won, and they had 12 days to finalize the wedding plans. “Our parents thought it was a joke at first because things happened so abruptly, but everything turned out amazing,” Krystina says. With the help of wedding planner Events by Emily, the day was a success; six of the couple’s closest family members attended the heartfelt ceremony in person, while 30 others watched via Zoom. Krystina’s favorite details were the arch and florals designed by Bowerbird Flowers

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& Apothecary, while Justin

favored the personalized desserts from Afters Dessert Bar. Favorite Moments The highlight of their special day was the intimate ceremony officiated by the Rev. Heidi Gessner. Krystina walked down the aisle with her father, Alson Quow, who, while wearing his mask, kissed his daughter on the cheek before taking his seat. After Krystina and Justin were officially declared a married couple, the newlyweds turned to see their guests’ happy faces on Zoom. They live in the Ed Cook neighborhood in Durham with their dog, Zeus.


Heat ing a nd A ir S e rv i c e Yo u Ca n Tru st Fa m ily Ow n e d a n d O p erated

18 Ce rti f i e d a nd Hi ghly Tra i ne d e mpl oye es

2020

Our Core Values As a second-generation company, we are committed to continuing the tradition of providing our community with top quality, affordability and dependable services that we’ve always been known for, which Barry Horton worked so hard to establish since opening the doors in 1988. Awarded

NC Customer Care Dealer of the Year!

AIR CONDITIONING

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Cha pel Hill Office (919) 942-0380

A pex & pi t ts b o ro O f f i c e (919) 36 2 -5 8 46

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www.buildBOLDnc.com 2020

Chapel Hill, Pittsboro, Hillsborough, Durham


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