Durham Magazine Dec/Jan 2021

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Gift Guide 40

Stellar Side Dishes Weddings: How We for Your Holiday Table 48 Celebrate Now 88

Spirit of the

Season 4 families share why there’s no place like home for the holidays pg. 42

D E C E M BER /JANUARY 2021 DUR H AM M AG. COM

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DECEMBER/JANUARY 2021 VOL 13 NO 8

durhammag.com    EXECUTIVE MANAGING EDITOR

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letter

The Gift That Keeps on Giving

M

y friends and I have a secret Santa tradition that we’ve kept up since college. A group of nine of us draw names, and then send along a present in the mail. It’s been a good way to stay in touch around the holidays and something I look forward to every year. When the topic was brought up for our 2020 exchange, one of my friends immediately responded to our group text: “This year has obviously been very difficult for people. What are everyone’s thoughts on donating to your secret Santa’s favorite charity? Or pooling money to give to a select charity? I personally don’t feel like I really need anything.” I’m glad she raised the point. So many have suffered this year and continue to face hardship. If you have the means, I strongly encourage you to forego something material this year and donate to organizations that mean the most to you. Take a look at our Big Give section, which begins on pg. 60, to learn more about a few local nonprofits, or read our story on pg. 56 for ways you can give back as a family. If you are shopping for family and friends, it’s never been more important to keep your dollars in Durham and our nearby communities. Our local shops, galleries and restaurants have hustled and used their creativity to stay in business this year, offering safe shopping experiences by appointment, curbside pickup and local low- or no-cost deliveries. If we want to patronize these beloved institutions this time next year, we need to show up and spend money with them this year. Glance over the gift guide on pg. 40, or check out our “Buy the Book” story on pg. 52 to get some ideas for the bibliophile in your life. And if the recipes for the scrumptious chef-crafted side dishes on pg. 48 tempt you, but you’re not much of a cook, let the experts handle it and order a meal directly from those restaurants. Holiday traditions this year are going to look different, like the families on pg. 42 share with us. But nothing, not even a pandemic, can take away what this season reminds us every year: love one another, practice kindness, be grateful for what you have and give what you can.

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T HE COVER

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december/january 2021

 @amanda_maclaren amanda@durhammag.com


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december/january

contents FEATURES

PEOPLE & PLACES

42 Home for the Holidays Families rethink their seasonal plans and annual traditions

12 Women of Achievement Luncheon 14 Bull City Squat Challenge

48 All the Fixin’s Four side dishes from local restaurants to round out your holiday meal

15 Giving Back to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Durham and Orange Counties 16 ‘Happy You Day’ Drive-Thru Celebration

52 Buy the Book Support our independent bookshops this holiday season by gifting these good reads recommended by store employees and owners

17 Pickleball Ladder hosted by Durham Parks and Recreation 18 WellFest 2020

56 Good Things Come in Small Packages Ways for kids to give back this holiday season

SPONSORED CONTENT

25 Adopt A Pet Three pets waiting on their forever homes at the Animal Protection Society of Durham

64 This Old House Trinity Design/Build teams up with the Junior League of Durham and Orange Counties to remodel the historic property that the organization calls home

28 Healthy Durham Thoughts on faith and its role in health and well-being

88 How We Celebrate Now Heart of NC Weddings magazine publisher shares her perspective on the new world of weddings

40 Holiday Gift Guide 60 The Big Give How you can get involved in our local nonprofits

DEPARTMENTS & COLUMNS

8 Go.See.Do. Have fun with our winter best bets 19 Noted 26 In Their Words Tianna Spears shares her ode to Durham 30 Dining Guide 95 Engagement & Wedding Tying the knot, Bull City-style

DURHAM INC. 76 Biz Briefs

82 5 Startups That Are ‘Making It’ And the stories behind their success

PHOTOTOGRAPHY BY CORNELL WATSON


The world always looks

brighter

from behind a smile

Martha Ann Keels, DDS, PhD Dylan S. Hamilton, DMD, MS Erica A. Brecher, DMD, MS

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A Christmas Carol DEC. 1-31 Theatre in the Park’s annual performance

of “A Christmas Carol” will be streamed virtually this year due to COVID-19. Ira David Wood III’s musical comedy adaptation of the Dickens classic has been performed since 1974; though the format may be different this year, “the meaning is still the same,” as the Lamplighter in the production says.

Dream Big JAN . 18

Literacy nonprofit Book Harvest honors Martin Luther King Jr. during this 10th annual celebration of books and children at Durham Central Park. The drive-through experience will include safe greetings from beloved children’s book characters, and families and community members can donate books and as well as receive bags with books to take home. For the first time ever, the organization presents a live Dream Big Telecast, which will offer entertaining and inspiring messages.

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Hayti Legacy Kwanzaa DEC. 26

Kick off your Kwanzaa celebration with the Hayti Heritage Center. The virtual family event will celebrate African descendants and their culture, history and contributions alongside performances, workshops and a marketplace.

HAVE FUN WITH OUR WINTER BEST BETS

EVENTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE; CHECK WITH ORGANIZERS PRIOR TO ATTENDING Compiled by Laney Dalton

Mitzvah Day DEC. 25

Join Jewish for Good’s 15th annual Mitzvah Day of service. Participate in a socially distanced outdoor activity, pick up supplies for virtual service projects or discover inspiration for "mitzvot" (good deeds) you can do year-round.


Donna Washington FE B . 6

presents the internationally known author, spoken word recording artist and award-winning storyteller during its Family Saturday Series. Tune in to this free, virtual event to enjoy an animated performance from Donna, who is known for bringing tales and narratives to life with her elastic face, deep characterizations and vocal pyrotechnics. The Carolina Theatre

DEC. 2-6, 9-13, 1 6-20 A ND 26-27

Walk through festively lit pathways along some of the Museum of Life Science’s outdoor and indoor spaces on several evenings in December. Visit the garden, Farmyard, Dinosaur Trail and Magic Wings Butterfly House, or stop by Sprout Café for a nighttime snack. Pass colorful light displays during a train ride on the Ellerbe Creek Railway for the complete celebratory, seasonal and safe experience.

PHOTO BY CATHERINE DAVIS

Holidays in the Park

Streaming Christmas Cheer to Your Home this Holiday Season!

An (Un)familiar Voice Emerges JAN. 23 The Chamber Orchestra of the Triangle

presents this performance as part of its 2020/21 season, Making Space for Music. The concert, held at the Hayti Heritage Center, will be filmed for at-home viewing on thecot.org. Tune in to see classical saxophonist Steven Banks perform alongside the orchestra as well as actors from Playmakers Repertory Company.

Photography credits (clockwise from top left) A Christmas Carol photo courtesy of Theatre in the Park; Hayti photo courtesy of Hayti Heritage Center; Donna Washington photo courtesy of The Carolina Theatre; Holidays photo courtesy of Museum of Life and Science; An (Un)familiar Voice Emerges photo by Chris Lee; Mitzvah Day photo by Jake Axelbank; Dream Big photo courtesy of Book Harvest

919.831.6058 TheatreInThePark.com december/january 2021

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people &places 2

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Women of Achievement Luncheon PHOTOG RAPHY B Y CORN ELL WATSON

presented its annual Women of Achievement luncheon on Sept. 17. Attendees stopped by Hendrick Subaru Southpoint to pick up lunch courtesy of Crossroads Chapel Hill at The Carolina Inn. With the support of The Chamber for a Greater Chapel Hill-Carrboro, the Zoom event hosted nearly 100 women who gathered virtually to celebrate the 2020 honorees. A video montage displaying the 2020 Women of Achievement was shown, accompanied by music from Emily Frantz and Andrew Marlin of Mandolin Orange. The introduction video featured remarks from Shannon Media staff and sponsors, and Alexandra Zagbayou, executive director of Student U, and Esther Campi, CEO of Campi & Company spoke to the group. The afternoon concluded with networking breakout sessions. The event was made possible by Hendrick Subaru Southpoint, The Carolina Inn, Ellis Family Law, Wake Radiology UNC REX Healthcare, Aesthetic Solutions, Edward Jones, Durham Coca-Cola Bottling Company and US Foods. Shannon Media Inc.

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1 Sheena Johnson Cooper (right), director of marketing and community engagement at Durham Public Schools, picks up a meal and swag bag from Durham Magazine’s Jessica Stringer (left) and Lauren Phillips (middle). 2 2020 Women of Achievement honoree and Durham County Commissioner Nida Allam receives her meal and swag bag. 3 2014 Women of Achievement honoree Dana Lange. 4 Laine Staton, neighborhood and family manager at Habitat for Humanity of Durham, and her pup, Cosmo. 5 Durham County Commissioner Brenda Howerton, a 2013 Women of Achievement honoree.

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People & Places

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2 1 Katie Starr. 2 Kevin Edwards, Dan Lehman, Rodney Shepard, Tyrone Irby, George Linney, Craig Helms and David McLaughlin.

Bull City Squat Challenge P HOTO G RA P H Y B Y DVO C P HOTO GR AP HY O F R AL EIG H

hosted its fifth annual Bull City Squat Challenge in September. Fourteen participants, ranging from 27 to 63 years old, completed 871 barbell squat reps with weights varying from 95 to 225 lbs. Of the 871 squats, the women took the top prize with 523, while the men lifted 348. With 123 total donations, the event raised a BCSC record-breaking $8,015 ($2,015 over its goal), which benefits the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals and the SECU Family House at UNC Hospitals this year. The BCSC has raised more than $32,000 for local and national charities since 2015. The Choice Performance Center

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People & Places

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Doing Good in the Neighborhood North Carolina Central University’s Department of Athletics, the Durham Bulls and Blue Cross

and Blue Shield of North Carolina teamed up in September and October for a six-week outreach

program to deliver 2,166 lunches to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Durham and Orange Counties. This collaboration helped the Boys & Girls Clubs save up to three hours daily on meal preparation time and provided the kids with a warm, healthy meal. “We are proud to team up with these partners to make a difference in the Durham community,” says Cheryl Parquet, director of community engagement and marketing activation at Blue Cross NC. “The Boys & Girls Clubs are essential for many Durham families, and it’s essential that we support them during this time.”

1 NCCU Director of Track & Field and Cross Country Tavius “T.J.” Walker hands out lunches to the kids at the Boys & Girls Club of Durham and Orange Counties. 2 Head volleyball coach Jody Brown, external relations assistant Chelsea Brown, assistant volleyball coach Paige Phillips, interim softball head coach Cat Tarvin and donor relations coordinator Anita Parker.

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People & Places

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‘Happy You Day’ B Y M I A CO O P E R

Sisters Network Triangle NC, a nonprofit dedicated to improving breast cancer outcomes in African

American women, hosted a “Happy You Day” drive-thru celebration on Aug. 27. The celebration at Kappa’s of Durham Community Center was designed to allow survivors and SNTNC members to leave their homes and be celebrated safely. “[The celebration] was like a shot in the arm of energy, love and togetherness,” says SNTNC Founder and former president Valarie Worthy, a 21-year breast cancer survivor. Women arrived through a procession of pink balloons, welcoming cheers from SNTNC’s members and music while remaining safely in their cars. Each participant also received a gift bag, including a reusable breast cancer decorated mask and hand sanitizer, and a boxed lunch from Jason’s Deli.

1 Carla Lewis and Helena Taylor prepare to greet sisters safely. 2 Jayda Fletcher, Leslie Love, Valarie Willoughby, Carla Lewis, Portia Hedgepeth, Helena Taylor, Maya Hedgepeth, Dr. Marcella McCord, Emerson Redfearn and Coleen Crespo celebrate Valarie Willoughby’s 40 years cancer free.

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People & Places

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Pickleball Ladder started weekly single pickleball matches for 3.5 level players and above in September. The matches were held at Bethesda Park every Thursday through Nov. 19. Players were ranked based upon their winning percentage, and each week, players were placed in groups of four in the order of their ranking for match play. Players moved up or down the ladder as their winning percentage changed. Durham Parks and Recreation

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1 Stuart Somer. 2 Rachit Bayani. 3 Steven Harper.

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People & Places

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PHOTO BY MARIE MUIR

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WellFest 2020

P HOTO G RA P H Y B Y CO R NE L L WATSO N

hosted WellFest 2020, a virtual festival with 30-plus free wellness classes and a ticketed WellFeast cooking class taught by Kevin Callaghan, chef and owner of Acme Food & Beverage Co. The second annual event transitioned from an in-person event at American Tobacco Campus to a virtual platform due to the pandemic. On Oct. 4, WellFeast participants picked up their meal kits at University Kia of Durham with live music by The Simple Joy band and a live POUND class led by Katrina Dooda. WellFest classes are available year-round and can be viewed upon registration at wellfestnc.com. Each WellFest class is taught by a local wellness professional, including Jessamyn Stanley of Underbelly Yoga, Jennifer King of Busy Bees Maid Service and Heather Pownall of The Confidence Labs, among others. This year, WellFest partnered with the Durham Tech Foundation to fund student scholarships, and for every WellFeast ticket purchased, Hungry Harvest donated 10 pounds of produce to food insecure Durham Public Schools families. The event was made possible by University Kia of Durham, Durham Tech Foundation, Hungry Harvest, Acme Food & Beverage Co., US Foods, Coastal Credit Union, Busy Bees Maid Service, Durham Coca-Cola Bottling Company, Downtown Durham Inc., Greater Durham Chamber of Commerce, Firsthand Foods, Elevate by Longfellow, eXO Skin Simple, Triad Studios and YMCA of the Triangle. Shannon Media Inc.

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1 Serena Jeter and her son, Zion Nantambu. 2 Katrina Dooda leads a live, socially distanced POUND workout class. 3 Durham-based band The Simple Joy plays live music at the WellFest 2020 kickoff event at University Kia of Durham. 4 Durham Magazine Account Executive Chris Elkins and University Kia of Durham General Manager Aric Swanger.


noted

ARTS & CULTURE Local, national and international artists completed more than 40,000 square feet of murals at the University Hill mixed-use development at 3806 University Dr. in September. Visitors are welcome to walk among the buildings to enjoy the 43 murals – the largest collection of murals in the Southeast.

WHAT WE’VE HE ARD AROUND TOWN …

Email noted@durhammag.com

Compiled by Aubrey Austin

In November, the Durham Transportation Department, Cultural and Public Art Program, a panel of community members and the Durham Parks Foundation selected Claire Alexandre, Candy Carver, Jai Martin, Renzo Ortega and Cassandra Rowe to create initial designs for the Club Crossing project, which will feature crosswalk art at the intersection of West Club Boulevard and Glendale Avenue. The goal of the project, which will be completed in spring 2021, is to improve street safety.

ON THE MOVE The Ellerbe Creek Watershed Association hired Laura Stroud (right)

as its water management program coordinator and Steve Anderson as its parttime water management associate in October. Laura will focus on managing watershed improvement projects, and Steve will work on data management and expanding citizen science opportunities with local universities and colleges.

Durham City Manager Tom Bonfield and County Manager Wendell Davis named Sara Moreno Young as the new director of the Durham City-County Planning Department in

September. Sara has worked in Durham for more than two decades and served as interim director of the department during the pandemic. Sara succeeds Patrick Young, who resigned in July. She began her new role in October. Music education nonprofit Kidznotes selected Shana Tucker as its executive director in October. Shana is a renowned cellist, singersongwriter, teaching artist and local champion for diversity, equity and inclusion. Kidznotes provides free instruments and lessons to underprivileged students attending Title I schools in Raleigh, Durham and Chapel Hill. The Durham Sports Commission named Marcus Manning as its next executive director in October. Marcus most recently served as the director of athletics and recreation at Centenary College of Louisiana. In this role, Marcus will expand access to sports for Durham residents and cultivate sporting events that support local businesses and jobs.

Durham artist Beverly McIver returns to Craven Allen Gallery

with “The Light Within,” a powerful new exhibition of paintings. The gallery is open with social distancing guidelines in place, and the work is available for viewing online. Through a series of self-portraits and paintings of family and friends, she confronted her feelings and fears surrounding COVID-19 and racial and political turbulence. The exhibit will be on display through Feb. 20.

From births to awards to new biz and more –

Durham City Manager Tom Bonfield retired on Sep. 30 after a 42-year career in public service, including 12 years in Durham. A farewell vehicle parade took place in September along City Hall Plaza to honor Tom’s contributions to Durham and his retirement while complying with social distancing mandates.

The Durham Literacy Center welcomed five new members to its board of directors: Steven Lebowitz, Candace Rashada, Sandy Roberts, Kathy Sikes and Ike Thomas. Jill Madsen was elected as the newest board chair and Kulwadee Young was elected as treasurer. The center also adds Ellie Danford, a Durham native and Smith College alumna, as an instructional technology

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PHOTO BY CHRIS UBIK

PHOTO COURTESY OF DISCOVER DURHAM

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DURHAM WOMAN MAKES A SPLASH WITH HER SWIMWEAR COMPANY When Bahama’s Heather Hilliard launched her Lion+Wild swimwear business, she aimed for the top from the get-go. “I always set goals for myself, and my very first goal when I started sketching my first swimsuit for my first collection was to make a crazy enough design that I could picture Sports Illustrated wanting to use in their swimsuit issue,” she recalls. “And by some miracle, that exact design was the one they chose! It was such a surreal moment, seeing the goal in my head come to fruition.” Heather, a Northern High School alum, has designed and sold her swimwear since early 2018. “I started sketching suit designs and coming up with a business plan and began selling online that summer, solely through Instagram (@lionandwild) and my website (lionandwild.com).” She honed her design skills at Miami International University of Art & Design before moving back to Durham pre-pandemic. Her swimsuit designs are bold. She describes her style as an attempt at being as different and eye-catching as possible. “[My designs] incorporate an androgynous aspect, pulling from and blending both feminine and masculine vibes.” Her first swimsuit – the Vega – caught the attention of an editor at SI who asked her to send some samples for possible inclusion in its 2020 swimsuit issue. The North Fork, Long Island, resident’s second collection was launched this fall, and she continues to design for impact. “[My] next goal is to land the [SI] cover one year,” she says. “Fingers crossed!”

AmeriCorps volunteer and Sarah Chaoui, a current senior at Duke University studying public policy and visual media studies, as its new communications assistant.

GIVING BACK A $16 million grant from The Duke Endowment will aid Duke University’s Diversity, Inclusion and Anti-Racism Initiative. The grant allocates $10.5 million toward recruiting and retaining underrepresented faculty in specific scholarly areas and $5.5 million to support programs that increase the university community’s understanding of historical and current racism, to oppose racism and to create a more inclusive environment. Me Fine Foundation Inc. raised more than

$210,000 in October during its Comfy for a Cause virtual fundraiser. The Me Fine Foundation provides emotional support and financial assistance to families whose children receive care at North Carolina partner hospitals. The Duke Energy Foundation awarded the Museum of Life and Science a $22,500 grant in October to fund a wetlands restoration 20

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Lion+Wild owner and designer Heather Hilliard (in sunglasses) poses with models wearing swimsuits from her first collection. “I want to create a swimwear line that is aiming at pushing past the norm, giving the desire to bring out your unpredictably wild side,” she says of her bold designs.

projection within its “Explore the Wild” exhibit. The grant will help fund the installation of new vegetation, floating plant platforms and associated emergent edge species plantings, which will improve the wetland ecosystem and water quality for the wildlife and attract new species. The City of Durham began a seven-year project in November to plant trees along the streets in local neighborhoods with a goal to increase the urban forest in historically underserved and low-tree canopy neighborhoods and to replace unhealthy trees. The plantings started in Braggtown followed by the Southside neighborhood. Additional neighborhoods that will receive trees through the project include Old East Durham, Walltown, Lyon Park, Old West Durham, Stratford Lakes and downtown. Planting will continue through 2025. As of October, United Way of the Greater Triangle’s Rapid Response Fund raised and distributed more than $1.4 million to 104 local organizations. The fund began in March to combat challenges related to the pandemic. Nearly 24.5% of the funds went to Durhambased organizations that provided food, child care needs, education support and more to vulnerable residents. The latest round released $199,928 to 28 organizations, including Book Harvest, Durham Congregations in Action, Durham Public Schools Foundation, Kramden Institute, The Salvation Army Boys and Girls

DECEMBER/JANUARY 2021

Club of Durham and World Relief Durham.

Duke University received a $5 million grant in September from alumnus Derek Wilson via The Wilson Foundation, which provides funding for Duke Law’s Center for Science and Justice to advance criminal justice research, education and policy. In recognition of the grant, the center will be named the Wilson Center for Science and Justice. Grand funds will expand the center’s work over the next six years in the accuracy of evidence in criminal cases; the role of equity in criminal outcomes; and the mental and behavioral health treatment needs of people in the justice system. The Durham Bulls partnered with BASF and Cree|Wolfspeed to create a pollinator garden at the Durham Bulls Athletic Park. The interactive space allows visitors to learn about pollinators and their contributions to the environment and increases sustainability efforts in Durham by expanding the availability of food sources to other pollinators in the area. 


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students across the state with interactive, hands-on digital lessons aligned with elementary and middle school curriculum.

Chelsea Rose, a Durham native and senior at Durham School of the Arts, was

WHAT AN HONOR More than 50 residents at the 55 and older Carolina Arbors community are a part of its Elementary School Volunteering Club (pictured here, pre-pandemic) and often volunteer to help tutor, fundraise and assist in the library or at events at Spring Valley Elementary School. In-person volunteering was postponed this year, but the club is working on a way to offer online tutoring to students. Pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline awarded UNC-TV a $400,000 grant in September to support continued production of PBS network’s SciNC series and its science education curriculum work to inspire a future generation of innovators. SciNC reaches

Make-A-Wish Eastern North Carolina, a foundation creating life-changing experiences for children fighting critical illnesses, recognized Coach Mike Kryzewski and the Duke Men’s Basketball team as the 2020 Chris Greicius Award winner. Coach Kryzewski and the Duke basketball team invite kids who are fighting illnesses into the world of Duke basketball and have granted nine wishes since 2012. This is the first collegiate entity to receive this award. The Raleigh and Durham area dropped slightly from its previous No. 10 ranking in the U.S. News and World Report’s 2020-21 “Best Places to Live” list to the No. 11 spot.

named one of 12 winners in the 2020 Musical Theater Songwriting Challenge in September. Each winner received coaching from a twoperson team – a mentor and a music director – to hone an original song into a Broadway-ready composition. All mentoring took place virtually, and recording sessions were a mix of in-person and virtual. Chelsea’s song, “It’s Me, Dorothy,” is about a high school student who reaches out to some of her peers on a Friday night to hang out and is rejected by all of them. Niche, a school search platform for K-12 schools and colleges, ranked Duke University as the No.1 college in North Carolina. Duke ranked first in the admission rate, studentfaculty ratio, gender and racial diversity, graduation rate and post-attendance median salary categories.

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salaries, cover equipment cost, and fund artists and online dance classes.

The American Dance Festival was awarded a South Arts Resilience Fund grant for $50,000 in October. The South Arts Resilience Fund supports arts and cultural organizations making an impact on the state, regional or national level. The grant allows organizations to position themselves for success after the pandemic and will directly supplement staff

IN OTHER NEWS WGU North Carolina, an affiliate of Western

PHOTO BY ROBERT BENSON PHOTOGRAPHY

The Duke Student Wellness Center was named a best healing space by the American Institute of Architects Academy of Architecture for Health’s 2020 Healthcare Design Awards in October. The center combined its medical and psychological services into one new building designed by Duda|Paine Architects.

The City of Durham held a groundbreaking ceremony for a park at 632 Hoover Rd., which will feature four grass fields, a large picnic area, playgrounds and trails. The park is expected to be completed by November 2021.

Niche released its 2021 Best School Rankings with data from more than 130,000 public, private and charter schools. The North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics was ranked the No. 4 Best

Public High School in America. Niche looks at factors like academics, teachers, resources and facilities, extracurricular activity opportunities and diversity.

NEW ON THE SCENE The Artisan Collective opened at Southpoint Mall in October. The group

of mostly women vendors sell a variety of handmade local and international artisan items. The store is located next to Sephora.

Governors University, signed a partnership agreement in September with Durham Tech that will aid the transition for graduates pursuing a bachelor’s degree offered by WGU. Durham Tech graduates who transfer to WGU will receive a tuition discount of 5% for up to four academic terms. Durham Tech graduates and staff can also apply for scholarships through WGU. “It’s wonderful that 89% of Durham Tech graduates stay in North Carolina and contribute to our economy,” said WGU North Carolina Chancellor Catherine Truitt. “This new partnership will provide an option for graduates who seek to further their education through our accredited online degree programs, even if they are working full- or part-time.” 

MODERN CONSCIENTIOUS

DENTISTRY

Please call or email today to schedule your next appointment. DR. SAMIR NAIK

DECEMBER/JANUARY 2021

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My Durham offers modified, free, yearlong

programming for teens ages 13 to 18 through the Durham Parks and Recreation department. Activities are offered every Monday through Friday from 2:30-5:30 p.m. Academic Access, which allows students to complete their schoolwork in a socially distanced setting, is offered every Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. My Durham programming takes place at the Weaver Street Recreation Center and The Durham Teen Center at Lyon Park. Find more info at dprplaymore.org/411/My-Durham. The City of Durham delayed its downtown parking fee increase from Oct. 5 until April 5, 2021, due to current pandemic conditions and feedback from customers. The flat-rate evening parking rate was also discontinued, and a lower cost option was offered at parking garages for downtown’s evening employees.

NEWS BITES

Parizade opened a European café pop-up called The Grand Café, which is open on

weekdays from 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m before the Mediterranean restaurant opens for dinner. The new café will provide a spot to work or gather with friends in a spacious and socially distant capacity. The menu features a full coffee program from Joe Van Gogh, afternoon cocktails, and Union Special bread and pastries, as well as special lunch items made by Chef Jason Lawless. Big Spoon Roasters received Non-GMO

Project verification for its nut butters and snack bars in October. “Achieving Non-GMO Project verification for our products is a major milestone in our efforts to empower people to make more informed food choices and to partner with allies like Non-GMO Project, who can help us build healthier relationships with our planet,” Big Spoon Co-Founder and President Mark Overbay says. Jack Tar and The Colonel’s Daughter offers

a four-course wine and cocktail-paired supper club experience Wednesdays-Saturdays. Chef Marla Thurman provides elegant seasonal

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and holiday-oriented menus weekly, created with vegetarian and vegan diners in mind, for $55/person. Each week, new wine and craft cocktail pairings will be introduced, including Jack Tar’s signature French wine, Jacques Tar. Here are the weekly themes: • Dec. 9 – Hanukkah • Dec. 16 – Loaves & Fishes • Dec. 23 – Christmas • Dec. 30 – New Year’s Durham Distillery received national awards

from USA Today and “The Fifty Best” in September. USA Today named Durham Distillery the eighth “Best Canned Cocktail Company ‘’ in the country. “The Fifty Best” also awarded the Conniption Rosé Spritz a Double Gold medal in the “Ready to Drink Cocktails” category. “We are especially proud to receive these awards now – in the midst of our most challenging year,” co-owner Melissa Katrinic says.

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in their words

An Ode to Durham: ‘I Am My Community’

W

hen I was 9 years old, I moved with my family to Durham from Los Angeles. Though I was born in California, my roots are here with my paternal grandparents. My grandmother, Almeda Spears, taught for more than 30 years in Durham Public Schools. My grandfather, Arthur Eugene Spears Jr., worked for North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance for 48 years. I am proud of my last name. I graduated from N.C. State University, which led me to a job with the U.S. Department of State as a consular officer in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico. While working for the State Department, I started a master’s in international relations from Northeastern University. As a consular officer, I was responsible for interviewing about 25 immigrant visa applicants a day and deciding on issuance or refusal of their visa. I met grandparents, people my age, teenagers, and I learned so much about others’ stories, backgrounds and the journeys that bring us together. I regularly drove just across the border into El Paso, Texas. When I crossed, I was

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T I A N N A’ S C R EATI VE A N D C RE ATOR OF

T H E B LO G “ W HAT’ S UP WI T H T I A NNA.”

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harassed by U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials who regularly asked if I stole my car, if I really worked for the U.S. Department of State as a diplomat and accused me of lying. I reported these experiences to upper management, who did nothing and decided the best solution was for me to relocate to Mexico City. It was a degrading and disheartening experience for me and nothing that I ever imagined I would experience while serving my country. As a result, in Mexico City, I was diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder, major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder at 26; I’m now 28 years old. I had no choice but to leave a State Department job I loved and return home almost a year ago. Durham is where I continue the difficult and nonlinear journey of healing, and life has been quite the ride since I returned, but I’ve learned a few valuable life lessons. For one, there is strength and power behind my voice and my being. If I stand tall in my convictions, I’ll be OK. Last summer, I shared my experiences on my blog, publishing an essay I called, “What Do I Want from White People? (An Illustration on Being Black in America).” You can never tell what the reaction will be when you post something online, but the story of my experience crossing the border and being harassed went viral, landing me interviews with CNN, the Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, NPR and other media outlets, and op-eds with Politico and LA Times. One night, someone reached out via email to ask how they could help. I knew I wanted to create something positive from such a painful experience. Then someone asked for my Venmo account so that they could send me money but taking money personally didn’t sit right with me. Instead I started a GoFundMe for my Durham community. All that I am is not only the experiences I’ve had, but also the people who poured


in their words

energy, encouragement and support into my life. I attended

organization, since there are so many worthy causes. Instead, I researched and chose a dozen Durham nonprofits. Since June, the donations on my GoFundMe page raised more than $30,000. The money provided internet access to more than 165 members of the

Fayetteville Street Elementary, Pearsontown Elementary, RogersHerr Middle School, Jordan High School

and Ravenscroft. Each experience added a different perspective to my life. I would not be who I am without these experiences and the people I met along the way. I am my community. I decided to contribute to an organization that could help my community in a positive, tangible way. I couldn’t decide on just one

Boys & Girls Clubs of Durham and Orange Counties.

The money provided first month’s rent for four people moving out of the shelter, scholarships for youth summer camp at SEEDS, eight Chromebooks for

students at the Durham Literacy Center, higher education scholarship opportunities for undocumented students, grocery and hygiene product boxes, rent relief for five families, an anti-racism workshop and a healing circle for Black youth. You can read in detail how each organization benefited at whatsupwithtianna.com. This is what felt right. My Durham community supported me throughout the years and especially most recently when I needed help. It’s bittersweet, but I was able to do something positive and actually have an impact. I wouldn’t be who I am without Durham, and I have a debt that perhaps can never be fully repaid. Doesn’t mean I shouldn’t try. I will continue to pour back into my community in whatever way I can. This is my love letter to Durham.

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THOUGHTS ON FAITH AND ITS ROLE IN HEALTH AND WELL-BEING By Sarah Rollins

I N PA RT N E R S H I P W I T H

CITY OF DURHAM | COUNTY OF DURHAM | DUKE UNIVERSITY | DUKE UNIVERSITY HEALTH SYSTEM | DURHAM CAN | DURHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS DURHAM CONGREGATIONS IN ACTION | GREATER DURHAM CHAMBER OF COMMERCE | INTERDENOMINATIONAL MINISTERIAL ALLIANCE LINCOLN COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTER | PROJECT ACCESS OF DURHAM COUNTY | PARTNERSHIP FOR A HEALTHY DURHAM TRIANGLE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION | THE INSTITUTE

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he Rev. Mel Williams, pastor emeritus at Watts Street Baptist Church, served as the church’s pastor for 24 years before taking on his current role. A community minister, Mel also assists as the coordinator of End Poverty Durham, “a catalyst for community health, advocating for the dismantling of racism and poverty, two leading causes of health disparity,” Mel says. Most of Mel’s interactions, like many of us, now take place over Zoom, text and phone. “In-person meetings are High Holy days (Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur) are the most well-attended services of the year severely limited, and that’s at Beth El. Since families couldn’t come celebrate this year, volunteers like Sally Brown distributed a big loss,” Mel says. “It’s gift bags at the synagogue to nearly 50 drivers, who then hand delivered them to congregants to part of the grief that swirls enable them to observe the holidays and facilitate a holy prayer space at home. around all of us.” To stay “It’s reminded us how deeply important those times of healthy in these times of sorrow, fear and chaos, Mel communal meeting are for everything we try to do as a leans on the Bible as a guide to health and well-being. He religious community,” he says. Daniel and other Beth El focuses on how the Bible speaks of Shalom, which Mel members were also challenged with how to constitute describes as “the great Hebrew word that encompasses health, healing, wholeness and peace within the individual certain traditions, prayers and moments in the Jewish faith that typically require a number of people present. They and the wider community. To me, congregations and began looking at Jewish history for answers and valued religious institutions are ‘health centers’ focused on precedent, which told them that seeing one another’s faces increased health for those who show up.” could equivocate to being all together. “By gathering over Similar to Mel’s experience, one of Beth El Synagogue Zoom and leaning on that precedent, we’ve enabled people Rabbi Daniel Greyber’s biggest challenges during COVID-19 has been the lack of face-to-face communication. to be able to say a prayer quorum,” Daniel says. F I N D A C O M P L E T E L I S T O F H E A LT H Y D U R H A M P A R T N E R S AT

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Beth El also hosts socially distanced events to fulfill important rituals in the Jewish tradition and delivers challah to its members. Daniel emphasizes the positive impact of virtual meetings, which have allowed people who previously were unable to physically attend services to join in a virtual community. “When you’re part of a faith community, you’re living a life that is connected,” Daniel says and suggests a correlation among physical, mental and spiritual health. “And I think that connection has been very important for people in a time when the world has defaulted to isolation.” Daniel also stresses that pandemics have happened in the past and that people can make it through. “Part of what religion does at its best is remind us that the world is big, and history is long,” he says. “In the middle of things, it can be difficult to remember that this will end and that better days are ahead.” Daniel also calls on other religious leaders to help share this message. “We can continue to keep hope,” he says. “It’s so important for [us] to remind people to stay vigilant.”

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Aven Schwartz at the front of Beth El Synagogue during her bat mitzvah rehearsal with Rabbi Daniel Greyber on Zoom. “Before the pandemic, I would take a selfie with each of our kids for their bar or bat mitzvah,” Daniel says. “Now I take those selfies over Zoom.”

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GUESS ROAD Northgate Mall Food court permanently closed. Exterior restaurants C&H Cafeteria and Randy's Pizza remain open for takeout. 1058 W. Club Blvd. Earth To Us Latin and American vegan dishes including cauliflower wings, garlic tostones, arepas and more. 1720 Guess Rd., Ste. 18; 919-908-1000 Gocciolina Upscale Italian fare with fresh specials featured on a prix-fixe dinner menu in the dining room or at outside tables. This wildly popular restaurant has graced our Best Of list again and again. 3314 Guess Rd.; 919-973-4089; gocciolina.com Hog Heaven Bar-B-Q Homestyle Eastern barbecue, fried chicken and seafood. Enjoy with a giant glass of iced tea. 2419 Guess Rd.; 919-286-7447; hogheavenbarbecue.com Hong Kong Chinese Restaurant Hong Kong-style dim sum, plus authentic Szechuan, Canton, Peking and Hunan Cuisine. 3003 Guess Rd.; 919-479-8339; hongkongdimsumindurham.com Jimmy’s Famous Hot Dogs Old-fashioned burgers, fries and a mean Carolina-style dog. 2728 Guess Rd.; 919-471-0005; jimmysfamoushotdogs.com La Cacerola Cafe & Restaurant Honduran specialties such as pupusas and chorizo asado. 2016 Guess Rd.; 919-294-6578; lacacerolacafenc.com Thai Spoon All the trappings for a delicious experience: pad thai, drunken noodles and curries. 3808 Guess Rd.; 919-908-7539; thaispoonnc.com HILLSBOROUGH ROAD Bennett Pointe Grill & Bar There’s something to please all palates on the large menu of this multiregional American restaurant. 4625 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-382-9431; bpgrill.com El Jefecito Exceptionally fresh tacos, quesadillas and burritos. 4910 Hillsborough Rd.; eljefecitofoodtruck.com Rockin’ Rolls Sushi Express All-you-can-eat sushi, soup, salads, appetizers like spring rolls, crab rangoon and gyoza, plus entrees including teriyaki and hibachi dinners. Also open for takeout. 3405 Hillsborough Rd., Ste. E; 919-251-8822; rockinrollssushi.com/durham Shanghai Restaurant Established in the 1980s, this Cantonese restaurant is open for takeout and offers both Americanized and authentic dishes. 3433 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-383-7581; shanghaidurham.com

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HILLANDALE ROAD Bleu Olive High-quality comfort food incorporating local ingredients and Mediterranean flair. Family operated and chef-driven. 1821 Hillandale Rd.; 919-383-8502; bleuolivebistro.com BR El Corral Mexican Restaurant Authentic Mexican faijitas, tacos, enchiladas and a great chorizo queso dip. 1821 Hillandale Rd., Ste. 8; 919-309-4543; elcorralnc.com Melo Trattoria & Tapas Classic Italian – think spaghetti and meatballs and chicken parmigiana – meets tapas. 1821 Hillandale Rd., Ste. 3; 919-384-9080; melotrattoria.com Pomodoro Italian Kitchen Homemade sauces on fresh-made pizzas, pastas and other Italian favorites. 1811 Hillandale Rd.; 919-382-2915; pomodoroitaliankitchen.info NORTH POINTE DRIVE The French Corner Bakery Curbside pickup available for artisan breads, crafted tarts and pastries, plus lunch. 2005 North Pointe Dr., Ste. B; 919-698-9836 MORE NORTHERN DURHAM DINING Alpaca Peruvian rotisserie chicken. Need we say more? 302 Davidson Ave.; 919-220-9028; alpacachicken.com Bullock’s Bar-B-Cue A staple in the community since 1952, serving up soul in Eastern-style barbecue, Brunswick stew and fried chicken. 3330 Quebec Dr.; 919-383-3211; bullocks-bbq.com Dogwood Bar & Grill American fare including burgers, sandwiches, soups and salads, plus larger entrees like baby back ribs, shepherd’s pie and penne alle vodka. Try the House Nachos (chips are made in-house) and the spinach salad. 5110 N. Roxboro St.; 919-973-2342 Goodberry’s Frozen Custard All-natural frozen custard with a variety of topping options. 3906 N. Roxboro St.; 919-477-2552; goodberrys.com Picnic Order the pulled pork, of course, but also the fried chicken, mac and cheese, and hushpuppies. 1647 Cole Mill Rd.; 919-908-9128; picnicdurham.com BR

Silver Spoon Restaurant A large menu of breakfast favorites like strawberry waffles and omelettes, plus sandwiches, pastas, salads and kids plates. 5230 N. Roxboro St.; 919-479-7172; silverspoonnc.com Skrimp Shack Fast casual seafood restaurant serving addictive shrimp, fish and a variety of other fried and grilled seafood. 3600 N. Duke St., Ste. 28B; 919-477-0776; theskrimpshack.com Taqueria Los Amigos Mexican and Honduran food. Takeout available. 3810 N. Duke St.; 984-888-0950

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NEAR DOWNTOWN

BROAD STREET Cloche Coffee Serving coffee drinks made with Larry’s Coffee as well as tea, chai and other assorted drinks and snacks in a bright space filled with plant life. Get your coffee fix to-go or savor each sip on their outdoor patio. 721 Broad St.; 919-738-3333; clochecoffee.com Joe Van Gogh Grab your coffee to-go at this local coffee shop that sources quality beans for superior coffee. 1104-B Broad St.; 919-286-4800; joevangogh.com The Palace International Pick up African cuisine to-go, including curry goat, dovi chicken and samosas. 1104-A Broad St.; 919-416-4922; thepalaceinternational.com Wellspring Cafe Temporarily closed. 621 Broad St.; 919-286-2290 BULL CITY MARKET The Mad Hatter’s Café & Bakeshop The artisan café and bakery celebrates the sweet things in life. Scratchmade cakes, cupcakes and pastries, organic salads, sandwiches and wraps, with breakfast all day and delicious brunch every weekend. Espresso, juice and organic smoothie bar as well as local beer and wine selection. 1802 W. Main St.; 919-286-1987; madhatterbakeshop.com BR ERWIN ROAD Early Bird Donuts Doughnuts, biscuits, croissant breakfast sandwiches and coffee. Try the cinnamon sugar doughnut. 2816 Erwin Rd., Ste. 101; 984-888-0417 Hook & Reel Cajun Seafood & Bar Specialty seafood boils, raw bar, fish baskets, po' boys and sliders. 2608 Erwin Rd., Ste. 104; 984-439-8651; hookreel.com/ location/durham Itaewon Grill Build-your-own Korean barbecue bowls for takeout with a variety of meats and meat substitutes, toppings and sauces. 2608 Erwin Rd., Ste. 132; 919-864-9742; itaewongrillkbbq.com MediTerra Grill Mediterranean and Lebanese cuisine, offering gyros, kabobs and curry. 2608 Erwin Rd., Ste. 136; 919-383-0066; mediterranc.com


Naan Stop Indian Cuisine Authentic Indian cuisine with dishes like daal makhani, paneer tikka masala and biryani. 2812 Erwin Rd., Ste. 103; 919-891-3488 & 919-797-2100; naanstopduke.com NOSH “Eclectic foodstuffs” like “Mike’s Breakfast Pizza,” “Coach’s Queso" sandwich and the brown derby chopper salad. 2812 Erwin Rd., Ste. 101; 919-383-4747; noshfood.com BR Saladelia Cafe @ Hock Plaza The cafe offers simple and honest food prepared with authentic, local and seasonal ingredients. Espresso, juice and organic smoothie bar, yum-on-the-run pastries, gourmet sandwiches, salads and soups. Enjoy on their outdoor patio. 2424 Erwin Rd.; 919-416 1400; saladelia.com BR

Smashburger Unique burgers smashed on the grill, chicken and salads. 2608 Erwin Rd., Ste. 116; 919-237-1070; smashburger.com Sushi Love Specialty sushi rolls, such as the “Honey Love” roll topped with mango and kiwi, as well as other Asian cuisine favorites. 2812 Erwin Rd., Ste. 204; 919309-2401; sushilovedurham.com ERWIN SQUARE Guasaca Arepas, salads and rice bowls with South American flavor. 2200 W. Main St., Ste. A100; 919-294-8939; guasaca.com Local 22 Kitchen & Bar Upscale Southern-inspired cuisine, with emphasis on food sourced within a 30-mile radius and local brews. 2200 W. Main St.; 919-286-9755; local22durham.com BR Parizade Sophisticated Mediterranean food like grilled bronzino, Australian lamb chops and pan-fried Roman dumplings. 2200 W. Main St.; 919-286-9712; parizadedurham.com Shuckin’ Shack Oyster Bar Seafood restaurant serving up shrimp, oysters, fish-n-chips, surf-n-turf dinners and more. 2200 W. Main St., Ste. A140; 984-219-7337; theshuckinshack.com NINTH STREET DISTRICT Alpaca Peruvian rotisserie chicken. Need we say more? 703-A Ninth St.; 919-908-1597; alpacachicken.com Banh’s Cuisine Vietnamese and Chinese dishes with great vegetarian specials. Cash only! Currently open for takeout, with patio tables available. 750 Ninth St.; 919-286-5073 The Durham Filling Station Breakfast fare, like madefrom-scratch biscuits, any style of eggs, famous pinto beans, burgers and upgraded hot dogs. 617 Hicks St.; 919-797-1006 Blue Corn Cafe Authentic Latin-American fare with fresh, organic ingredients. 716 Ninth St.; 919-286-9600; bluecorncafedurham.com Burger Bach Signature New Zealand grass-fed beef burgers and fresh-cut fries. 737 Ninth St., Ste. 220; 919-973-4416; theburgerbach.com Chicken Bee Korean fried chicken as well as other dishes like bibimbap, kimchi fried rice and bulgogi. 810 Ninth St., Ste. 129; 984-888-5561; chickenbee.com Cocoa Cinnamon Signature hand-brewed coffees and lattes to-go, like the “Future Nostalgia” latte with cinnamon and anise from their seasonal menu. 2627 Hillsborough Rd.; cocoacinnamon.com

Chocolate cupcake filled with Damn Fine Chocolate Liqueur mint ganache and topped with mint and Damn Fine Chocolate Liqueur icing; a vanilla cupcake infused with American Dry Conniption gin, lemon, ginger and rosemary, filled with a pear compote of ginger, rosemary, lemon and gin, and topped with a buttercream flavored with more rosemary, lemon, ginger and honey; a Damn Fine Chocolate Liqueur Cupcake topped with pistachio buttercream and toasted pistachio; and chocolate macarons filled with Damn Fine Chocolate Liqueur ganache and salted caramel.

what we're eating A F E W D E S S E RTS W E LOV E

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’m not much for desserts in general, but when the holidays roll around, my sweet tooth kicks into high gear. When I discovered that the new Corpse Reviver Bar & Lounge would offer some of its boozy cupcakes – which continue to be available for curbside pickup upstairs at Durham Distillery as well – on a nightcap menu alongside other confections, I had to give them a shot (pardon the pun). Kim Snyder, who makes the desserts, is a server at Bennett Pointe Grill, but was laid off for a time when COVID-19 hit. She still baked for the restaurant, something she’s done for nearly 8 years, but, predictably, business was slow. “I needed to supplement my income, and quickly, so I advertised my baking on my Northgate Park neighborhood listserv,” Kim says. She got enough business to keep her busy, and started an Instagram account to highlight her products. “Once I got the hang of it, I tagged @durhamdistillery when I baked chocolate truffle cupcakes for a client using their Damn Fine Chocolate Liqueur,” Kim says. “Melissa Katrincic, co-owner of the distillery … contacted me about the cupcake, and I sent her the recipe to pass on to Instagram followers. A little over a month later, she contacted me with a business proposal that would combine my baking with their curbside pickup, highlighting their Conniption gin and liqueurs.” The cheesecake – made with a crust of ladyfingers, mascarpone, dark rum and Damn Fine Coffee Liqueur – is silky and rich. The macarons melt in your mouth. The flavors of each ingredient in the cupcakes are so forward. You do get to taste the gin in the vanilla cupcake, for example, but it’s complemented by all those tastes you want alongside gin – ginger, rosemary, lemon – and it just … works. “It is quite amazing to me that our partnership is not even 3 months old,” Kim says. “I feel we have accomplished so much already. This was truly serendipitous.” – by Amanda MacLaren december/january 2021

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Cosmic Cantina Authentic Mexican cuisine with vegan options. Housemade mole and corn tortillas. Pair with a margarita pitcher. 1920 Perry St.; 919-286-1875 Dain’s Place This pub's fare is centered on its award-winning “thick and juicy and juicy and thick burgers.” 754 Ninth St.; 919-4168800; dainsplace.bar Del Rancho Mexican Grill Authentic Mexican lunch and dinner menu with a full-service bar. 730 Ninth St.; 919-286-5330 Devil's Pizzeria & Restaurant Handmade pizzas, pastas, wings, strombolis, subs, calzones and desserts with daily specials. 742 Ninth St.; 919-286-3090; devilspizza.menufy.com Elmo’s Diner Homemade Southern classics with breakfast favorites like cinnamon apple waffles and biscuits and gravy served all day in a casual, family-friendly setting. 776 Ninth St.; 919-416-3823; elmosdiner.com BR Happy + Hale Healthy salads, bowls, breakfast, smoothies, cocktails and cold-pressed juice. 703B Ninth St.; 984-439-1790; happyandhale.com BR

International Delights Authentic Mediterranean & PalestinianLebanese inspired cuisine including pita wraps, gyros, falafel, kabobs and baklava. 740 Ninth St.; 919-286-2884; iddurham.com Juju Asian fusion tapas including selections like steamed barbecue Kurobuta pork belly and chicken fried oysters. Try the crispy Brussels sprouts! 737 Ninth St., Ste. 210; 919-286-3555; jujudurham.com BR

Lime & Lemon Indian Grill & Bar Northern and southern Indian specialties including Gobi Manchurian, Paneer Tikka, Chicken Tikka and Hariyali Murg Kebab. 811 Ninth St.; 919-748-3456; limenlemonnc.com BR

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The Glass Jug Beer Lab is slated to open a second taproom in early spring 2021 in the new Foster on the Park development adjacent to Durham Central Park. This location will allow the Glass Jug to collaborate with musicians, artists, food trucks and other groups in the area. The new taproom will not have a full retail bottle shop, but it will have more seating than its original N.C. Hwy. 55 location plus a rotating selection of more than 10 Glass Jug-produced beers, among other brews. Melina’s Fresh Pasta Owner Camella Alvaro released a new cookbook, “Authentic Homemade Pasta,” in November. The cookbook features 100 recipes for different types of regional Italian pasta, sauces and fillings. The book is available on Amazon and for pickup at the pasta shop.

Chinese dumpling shop Sister Liu’s opened a second location at 3524 Davis Dr., Morrisville, on Nov. 11. Takeout, online ordering and catering is available at both locations. Rofhiwa Book Café, a neighborhood bookstore and coffee spot, will open in the former East Durham Bake Shop location next year. It will feature contemporary and classic works by Black writers across the globe. Plans call for launching an online bookstore in December, then construction will start on the building in late January with the goal of a soft opening for the store in March 2021. Goorsha opened its sister cafe and lounge, GoJo by Goorsha, behind the main restaurant at 910 W. Main St. at the end of October.

Locopops Gourmet frozen pops in a variety of rotating flavors like lavender cream, strawberry lemonade and malted milk ball. 2618 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-2863500; ilovelocopops.com

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Beer Tooth Taproom opened in the Homestead Market shopping center in midNovember.

Little Waves Coffee Roasters was named one of three finalists for Roast Magazine’s 17th annual Roaster of the Year awards in the micro category in October. The award recognizes companies that roast high-quality coffees, exemplify a dedication to sustainability, encourage employee and community education, and demonstrate a commitment to the coffee industry.

Heavenly Buffaloes Chicken wings (bone-in and boneless) as well as vegan wings in more than 25 rubs and sauces, including peri peri and Jamaican jerk. Plus waffle fries! Available for delivery and pickup. 1807 W. Markham Ave.; 919-2372358; heavenlybuffaloes.com

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Metro 8 Steakhouse Classic American steakhouse with an Argentinian flair. Pair empanadas with a filet mignon or crab-stuffed shrimp with a churrasco steak. 746 Ninth St.; 919-416-1700; metro8steakhouse.com

MarketPlace JB Duke Hotel’s main restaurant, now offering a takeout menu, is open for breakfast, lunch and dinner. 230 Science Dr.; 919-660-6400; jbdukehotel.com

Mi Calvillo Authentic Mexican fare open for carryout. 748 Ninth St.; 984-219-1642

CENTRAL PARK & WAREHOUSE DISTRICTS The Accordion Club Late-night bar serving beer, hot dogs and green chile stew, plus breakfast burritos on Sundays. 316 W. Geer St.

Moe’s Original BBQ Barbecue sandwiches, platters and Southern-styled sides such as cornbread and baked beans. 2014 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-237-1004; moesoriginalbbq.com/durham Monuts Donuts Scratch-made doughnuts, pastries, English muffins, bagels and breakfast sandwiches. Try the bagel and lox. Takeout only. 1002 Ninth St.; 919-286-2642; monutsdonuts.com BR

Pincho Loco Latin-flavored ice creams, milkshakes, popsicles and more available for takeout. Flavors like tequila, Tiger Tail (Mexican vanilla and chocolate), guava, tamarind and more. 1918 Perry St.; 919-286-5111 Secrets Pho and Noodle Bar Traditional Vietnamese dishes including stir-fry and noodle bowls. 810 Ninth St., Ste. 130; 984-888-5111; secretsphoandnoodlebar.com Triangle Coffee House Coffee and pastries with selections like vegan blueberry muffins. 714 Ninth St.; 919-748-3634 Vin Rouge French bistro-style dinner with regular oyster specials and Sunday brunch. Get the hanger steak and frites! 2010 Hillsborough Rd.; 919-416-0466; vinrougerestaurant.com BR ZenFish Poké Bar A healthy, fastcasual restaurant serving poké (raw fish) in made-to-order bowls containing rice, quinoa or salad, and toppings of your choice, available for takeout. 810 Ninth St.; 919-937-9966; zenfishpokebar.com NEAR DUKE Fairview Dining Room Seasonally inspired contemporary cuisine with selections like coffee-rubbed duck breast and seared NC flounder. Located inside the Washington Duke Inn & Golf Club. 3001 Cameron Blvd.; 919-493-6699; washingtondukeinn.com

DOWNTOWN

The Blue Note Grill Fantastic barbecue, ribs and live music. 709 Washington St.; 919-401-1979; thebluenotegrill.com Boxcar Bar + Arcade This bar and arcade is back open for table service and offers more than 70 arcade games (not available for play at this time), a full bar including 24 craft American drafts (and a wide variety of local beer, liquor and wine), private event space and a Neapolitan-style pizza kitchen. 621 Foster St.; 984-377-2791; theboxcarbar.com/durham Cocoa Cinnamon Signature hand-brewed coffees and lattes to-go, such as the “Dr. Durham” with maca root and black lava salt. 420 W. Geer St.; cocoacinnamon.com Cucciolo Osteria Italian fare like pastas with housemade noodles, antipasti and porchetta. 601 W. Main St.; 984-243-8744; cucciolodurham.com Dame’s Chicken & Waffles Chicken, waffles, shmears. ’Nuff said. 530 Foster St.; 919-682-9235; dameschickenwaffles.com BR Durham Food Hall All vendors open for takeout. 530 Foster St.; 919-908-9339; durhamfoodhall.com •

Afters Offering solely desserts. Try the fun dessert flights.

Everything Bagels Locally sourced gourmet bagels with a seasonally standard menu.

Ex-Voto Fresh tacos and tamales.

Locals Oyster Bar and Seafood Butchery North Carolina seafood featuring everything from crab cakes to shrimp sausage.

Lula and Sadie’s A modern take on Southern cuisine highlighting local produce with dishes like scalloped potatoes and hot cakes.

Napoli Pizzeria and Gelateria Neapolitan wood-fired pizza, small plates, salads and artisanal gelato.

Old North Meats and Provisions A seasonal menu of house-made cured and smoked meats, fish and pickled veggies.

Liturgy Beverage Specialty coffee, tea and chocolate company focused on single origin beverages.

Auctioneer Bar Seasonal cocktails, curated beer, wine and spirits meant to highlight local breweries.

Foster Street Coffee Coffee house on the ground floor of Liberty Warehouse apartments that uses carefully curated coffee beans from around the world for its classic concoctions as well as local produce for housemade smoothies. 530 Foster St., Ste. 2; 919-797-9555; fosterstreetcoffee.com


dining guide

Fullsteam In addition to their well-known “plowto-pint” beers, Fullsteam now serves bar snacks, sandwiches, small plates and kombucha. Try the Pulled Pork Sandwich and the Spicy Carolina Dip Chicken with a side of deviled eggs. 726 Rigsbee Ave.; 919-682-2337; fullsteam.ag Geer Street Garden Simple, down-home fare in a cozy atmosphere. They make a mean “Dark and Stormy,” and be sure to order “The Pile” to split with the family! 644 Foster St.; 919-688-2900; geerstreetgarden.com Hutchins Garage Grandma-style pizza, salads and sandwiches. 402 W. Geer St.; 984-219-6578 BR

King's Sandwich Shop Serving up hot dogs, burgers, fries and shakes since 1942. 701 Foster St.; 919-682-0071; kingssandwichshop.com LouElla Neighborhood bottle shop, bar and event space. 316 W. Geer St., Ste. A; 919-973-2001; louelladurham.com Rise Southern Biscuits & Righteous Chicken Daily-changing menu of doughnuts and biscuits available for takeout and delivery. For vegetarians, the fried green tomato biscuit is hard to beat. 401 Foster St.; 984-439-2220; risebiscuitsdonuts.com BR Parts & Labor Dishes meeting many dietary needs, including veggie samosas, “Hipster Poutine” and falafel. Open for takeout or outdoor seating on the patio. 723 Rigsbee Ave.; motorcomusic.com/eats BR The Pit Temporarily closed. Plum Southern Kitchen & Bar Southern small plates and big bar by Lisa Callaghan and Chef Kevin Callaghan. 501 Washington St.; 919-351-6446; plumdurham.com BRIGHTLEAF DISTRICT Clouds Brewing American favorites with a German flair. Featuring an amazing craft beer selection and brunch on the weekends. 905 W. Main St.; 919-251-8096; cloudsbrewing.com El Rodeo Mexican Restaurant Authentic Mexican cuisine like quesadillas, tacos and huevos con chorizo. 905 W. Main St.; 919-683-2417; elrodeonc.com The Federal Pub fare with bistro panache. Try the “Fe Burger au Poivre.” Offering takeout plus a side patio on Albemarle Street. 914 W. Main St.; 919-680-8611; thefederal.net BR GoJo by Goorsha Ethiopian coffees and teas as well as lunch and sandwiches. 910 W. Main St.; 919-588-4660; goorshadurham.com Goorsha Ethiopian dishes like shiro chickpea stew and tibs (sauteed meat in spices). 910 W. Main St.; 919-588-4660; goorshadurham.com It’s a Southern Thing Kitchen and bar serving traditional Southern dishes with a twist, like jalapenobrined fried chicken; a half-beef, half-bacon meatloaf; and both traditional and vegan barbecue. 605 W. Main St.; 919-294-9632; itsasouthernthingdurham.com BR

Bull City Burger & Brewery Open for takeout and outdoor patio dining. Offering local beef burgers with all components from bun to barbecue sauce made in-house. 107 E. Parrish St.; 919-680-2333; bullcityburgerandbrewery.com

James Joyce Irish Pub and Restaurant Traditional pub food and snacks like brisket cheese steak and Reuben sandwiches. 912 W. Main St.; 919-683-3022; jamesjoyceirishpub.com

Bull McCabes Irish Pub Pub food and bar snacks like nachos, burgers and wings. 427 W. Main St.; 919-6823061 bullmccabesirishpub.com

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CONVIVIO This Italian restaurant and wine bar serves locally sourced meat butchered in-house. 104 City Hall Plaza, Ste. 100; 984-219-1961; convivio.wine

Maverick’s Smokehouse and Taproom Range of barbecue and smokehouse fare as well as Memphis rubbed pulled chicken, wings and smoked sausage. 900 W. Main St.; 919-682-8978; maverickssmokehouse.com

COPA Cuban-inspired tapas and cocktails. Try the Chuleta a lo Guajiro, a country-style pork chop, with a mojito or daiquiri. Open for takeout, delivery and dine-in. Patio seating available. 107 W. Main St.; 919-973-0111; copadurham.com

Mount Fuji Asian Bistro Sushi & Bar Thai, Japanese, Chinese and sushi. Try the duck wrap. 905 W. Main St.; 919-680-4968; mtfujinc.com Peabody Pizza Co. Specialty pizzas, calzones, stromboli, pasta and salad. 810 W. Peabody St.; 919-797-2554; peabodypizza.com Rose’s Noodles, Dumplings & Sweets East Asian fare like ramen, steamed buns and sandwiches, plus pastries - rhubarb galette, anyone? - and daily dinner specials available for takeout and outdoor dining. 121 N. Gregson St.; 919-797-2233; rosesdurham.com BR Saint James Seafood Currently operating as Jimmy’s Dockside To-Go offering vacuum-sealed oysters on ice, smoked fish dip, Maine lobster rolls, fried chicken sandwiches, po' boys and more. Open for takeout. 806 W. Main St.; 984-219-7900; saintjamesseafood.com Trattoria Salve Temporarily closed. Torero’s Mexican Restaurant Authentic Mexican cuisine. Try the ceviche de camaron. 800 W. Main St.; 919-682-4197; torerosmexicanrestaurants.com CITY CENTER DISTRICT Alley Twenty Six Originally a craft cocktail bar, the addition of a kitchen now offers burgers, sandwiches and sliders available for takeout. Come out to dine in the alley and enjoy cocktails, beer and wine. Visit the Mixers & Mercantile shop next door. 320 E. Chapel Hill St.; 984-439-2278; alleytwentysix.com Annexe The sister bar of Bar Vigile features a dance floor, a menu of snacks, turntables built into the bar and pink Champagne on tap every night. Currently closed. 105 S. Mangum St., Ste. 1; 919-973-3000; annexedurham.com Bar Brunello A casually elegant wine bar serving a diverse selection of wines, charcuterie and cheese plates. 117 E. Main St.; 919-294-4825; barbrunello.com Bar Virgile Artfully crafted beverages paired with an ever-changing lunch, dinner and small plates menu, the bar is currently open insisde or for curbside or covered, patio dining offering its well-loved cheeseburger, fried oysters and more. 105 S. Magnum St.; 919-973-3000; barvirgile.com

Counting House celebrates North Carolina’s rich heritage of fresh seafood using local, high-quality ingredients. 111 Corcoran St.; 919-956-6760; countinghousenc.com Dashi Traditional ramen shop and izakaya offering takeout and outdoor dining. 415 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-251-9335; dashiramen.com Dos Perros Sophisticated Mexican cuisine; plates include carnitas, flautas veganas and pollo relleno. Don’t skip on the guac! 200 N. Mangum St.; 919-956-2750; dosperrosrestaurant.com Indian Monsoon Restaurant & Bar The best of Indian, from North Indian samosas to Southern-style dosas. 105 W. Morgan St., Ste. 100; 919-908-1800; monsoondurham.com BR Jack Tar and the Colonel’s Daughter Diner fare with a twist, available for curbside pickup and patio dining. Classic diner menu, plus a new weekly pop-up dinner featuring holiday dishes. 202 Corcoran St.; 919-682-5225; jacktardurham.com BR Jeddah’s Tea Open for takeout, try these organic, fairtrade and vegan-friendly teas. 123 Market St., Ste. A; 919-973-3020; jeddahstea.com Juicekeys Organic juice and smoothie bar open for takeout. 110 N. Corcoran St.; 919-695-3027; juicekeys.com Kingfisher Temporarily closed. Owners Sean Umstead and Michelle Vanderwalker transformed the space behind the cocktail bar into a pop-up burger bar called QueenBurger, which serves “smash burgers” two ways – double-stacked beef patties and house-made veggie and vegan burgers – with griddled onions, hoop cheese, Duke’s mayo and pickles alongside pre-bottled Kingfisher cocktails, plus wine and beer. 321 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-908-9429; kingfisherdurham.com Littler Temporarily closed. Offering Wine and Provisions boxes through online ordering, as well as take-and-bake dinners for two. Loaf Oven breads and pastries. Counter Culture Coffee, pain au chocolat and cumin gruyere loaf. 111 W. Parrish St.; 919-797-1254; loafdurham.com Luna Rotisserie & Empanadas South American cuisine meets the American South. Wood-fired rotisserie meats, Andean-inspired braises, empanadas. 112 W. Main St.; 984-439-8702; lunarotisserie.com

Beyu Caffè Coffee shop, restaurant and bar with beignets, buffalo wings and mushroom burgers. 341 W. Main St.; 919-683-1058; beyucaffe.com BR

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M Kokko Casual chicken entrees including the fried chicken sandwich, ramen and “KFC” wings. 311 Holland St., Ste. B; 919-908-9332; m-restaurantscom/ m-kokko M Pocha Korean tapas including Kimchi “Army Stew,” Malaysian fried rice, steamed spicy pork belly buns and more. 101 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-294-9177; m-restaurantscom/m-kokko M Tempura Traditional tempura omakase-styled food, featuring select seafood and seasonal vegetables, as well as rich meats like Iberico pork from Spain. 111 Orange St.; 919-748-3874; m-restaurants.com/m-tempura M Sushi Quality sushi from seasonal seafood, daily menu changes and creative rolls like “Unagi Maki” with barbecue eel and fried garlic. 311 Holland St.; 919-908-9266; msushidurham.com Mateo Acclaimed menu of tapas and small plates by chef Matthew Kelly. Now offering a Tapas-Take-Away menu including tapas kits for two or four and panmade paella in pizza boxes - you keep the pan! 109 W. Chapel Hill St.; 919-530-8700; mateotapas.com Mothers & Sons Trattoria Partners Matt Kelly and chef Josh “Skinny” DeCarolis own this trattoria that features handmade pasta, classic Italian meat dishes, antipasti and contorni (vegetables and sides). The enoteca next door houses Alimentari at Mothers & Sons, which offers sandwiches, fresh pastas, sauces and Italian specialties to-go during the day and is also used as overspill seating for the trattoria to encourage social distancing. 107 W. Chapel Hill St.; 919-294-8247; mothersandsonsnc.com Neomonde Authentic Mediterranean food like man’ousheh and kabobs, including a variety of vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free options. 202 Corcoran St.; 919-680-1886; neomonde.com Ninth Street Bakery Organic breads, pastries and lunch available for takeout. Grab a “Wheel of Steel” (peanut butter, raisins and oats). 136 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-688-5606; ninthstbakery.com BR The Oak House Cafe featuring Caballo Rojo coffee, Jeddah’s Tea, fine wines and craft beer. 126 W. Main St.; 919-339-1383; oakhousedurham.com The Parlour Available for takeout and delivery. Try handmade ice cream in rotating flavors like cookies and cream, salted butter caramel and sweet potato. 117 Market St.; 919-564-7999; theparlour.co The Patio Unscripted Hotel’s poolside bar featuring a range of cocktails and gourmet bites including salads and burgers. 202 N. Corcoran St.; 984-329-9500; unscriptedhotels.com BR

Pompieri Pizza Neapolitan pizza joint with a familyfriendly approach. Try the “Drunken Horse” pizza with beer crust and house-made sausage. Open for takeout or patio dining. 102 City Hall Plaza; 919-973-1589; pompieripizza.com Pour Taproom Pay-by-the-ounce beer, wine and cider taps, plus tasting board, sandwich and kids’ options. 202 N. Corcoran St., Ste. 200; 919-251-8985; durham.pourtaproom.com The Restaurant at The Durham Locally sourced Southern cuisine crafted by chef Andrea Reusing. Selections include beef tartare and spring pie with asparagus and mushrooms. The Roof at The Durham focuses on shared plates. Reservations are required. Arrive at your selected time; a host will greet you and conduct a contactless wellness check. 315 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-768-8831; thedurham.com/dining Rue Cler Temporarily closed. Saltbox Seafood Joint Local seafood that is delivered fresh from the Carolina coast and served griddled or fried in a straightforward manner. Available for takeout or outdoor dining. 608 N. Mangum St.; 919-908 8970; saltboxseafoodjoint com Spanglish Latin-inspired dishes, bowls and empanadas for lunch and dinner, as well as a full breakfast menu. 104 City Hall Plaza, Ste. 101; 984-219-7168; eatspanglish.com Taberna Tapas Paella, flatbreads, bacon-wrapped dates, gambas. 325 W. Main St.; 919-797-1457; tabernatapas.com Table South Kitchen and Bar Breakfast, lunch and dinner, located in the Durham Marriott City Center. 201 Foster St.; 919-768-6000 Thai @Main Street Classic Thai dishes including tom yum soup, curry, pad thai, drunken noodles and more. 317 W. Main St.; 984-219-7444; thaiatmainstnc.com Toast Italian paninis and soups available for takeout. The warm goat cheese with honey and peppercorn crostini is our favorite. 345 W. Main St.; 919-683-2183; toast-fivepoints.com Viceroy Fusion restaurant featuring dishes like jeera wings as well as traditional butter chicken. 335 W. Main St.; 919-797-0413; viceroydurham.com

Pizzeria Toro Wood-fired pizza available for takeout, with selections like spicy lamb meatball with kale, fried eggplant ricotta and soft eggs on white pizza. Also, ricotta dumplings! 105 E. Chapel Hill St.; 919-908-6936; pizzeriatoro.com

AMERICAN TOBACCO DISTRICT Boricua Soul Puerto Rican-meets-Southern soul-food dishes like chopped barbecue-filled empanadas, arroz con gandules, maduros and mac and cheese “just the way Grandma makes it.” Takeout only, outdoor seating available. 318 Blackwell St.; 919-902-0520; boricuasoulnc.com

Pie Pushers Grab a slice of staples like the cheese or pepperoni, or try out one of the specials, like the "Pace Car," when picking up takeout. 117A W. Main St.; 919-294-8408; piepushers.com BR

Mellow Mushroom Pizza, hoagies, calzones and salads made using fresh ingredients. 410 Blackwell St.; 919-680-8500; mellowmushroom.com/store/durham

Pokéworks Hawaiian-inspired poké with a menu featuring signature “works” like the Spicy Ahi bowl, or create a customized poké burrito, bowl or salad made with your choice of protein, mix-ins, toppings and sauces. 122 W. Main St.; 919-973-3372; pokeworks.com

NanaSteak Offers various cuts of beef and steaks, plus other meats like salmon and tuna steaks and pastas like beef short rib ravioli. Open for takeout or outdoor patio seating. 345 Blackwell St.; 919-282-1183; nanasteak.com BR

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Only Burger Temporarily closed. Parker and Otis A gift shop, coffee shop and restaurant all in one. Under construction. 324 Blackwell St.; parkerandotis.com BR Saladelia Cafe @ ATC Simple and honest food prepared with authentic, local and seasonal ingredients. Espresso, juice and organic smoothie bar, yum-on-the-run pastries, gourmet sandwiches, salads and soups available for takeout. 406 Blackwell St.; 919-687-4600; saladelia.com Tobacco Road Sports Cafe American dishes like “Country Frizzled & Drizzled Chicken” made with local ingredients; overlooks the Bulls’ stadium. 280 S. Mangum St.; 919-937-9909; tobaccoroadsportscafe.com EAST DURHAM J. Lights Market & Cafe Breakfast, lunch and all-day items, like a breakfast wrap or confit chicken with crispy sweet potatoes. 800 Taylor St., Ste. 9-152; 984-244-7103; jlightsmarket.com Pierre ToGo Haitian- and Jamaican-inspired cuisine. 2100 Angier Ave.; 919-808-7447; pierrofoods.com Nolia Family-centric space designed to connect families through great coffee, available for takeout. Also serving Jeddah’s Tea and kid-friendly drinks. 1004 Morning Glory Ave.; noliacoffee.com Sofia’s Pizza Neighborhood pizza shop open for takeout. 2201 Angier Ave.; 984-219-3656; sofiaspizzadurham.com Two Roosters Handcrafted ice-cream shop serving takeout only with the hopes of adding patio reservations in the near future. 800 Taylor St.; tworoosters.com

WEST-CENTRAL DURHAM

DURHAM-CHAPEL HILL BOULEVARD (15-501) Blaze Pizza Pizzas with made-from-scratch dough and healthful ingredients. 5320 McFarland Dr.; 919-251-6095; blazepizza.com Duck Donuts Warm, made-to-order doughnuts and coffee. Watch your doughnut being hand dipped and topped right in front of you. 5320 McFarland Dr., Ste. 140; 919-973-1305; duckdonuts.com El Cuscatleco Salvadoran and Mexican dishes including Arroz con Pollo. 4212 Garrett Rd.; 919-401-5245; elcuscatlecodurham.com Fiesta Ole Mexican Restaurant Buffet, enchiladas, fajitas, burritos and other classic Mexican dishes. 4600 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd., Ste. 40; 919-489-6468; fiestaolenc.com Foster’s Market Fresh breakfast selections, sandwiches and salads. Pick up brunch, grocery items, or its weekly family dinner and enjoy outdoor seating. 2694 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-489-3944; fostersmarket.com BR Guglhupf Bakery, Cafe and Biergarten Germaninspired cuisine and artisanal bakery. Restaurant dishes include house-cut noodles, wiener schnitzel and pan-roasted duck. Takeout bakery items, essential groceries, plus beer and wine. The outdoor patio is now open for brunch. 2706 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-401-2600; guglhupf.com BR


dining guide

Kanki Steak, chicken and seafood cooked on hibachi grills, plus an extensive sushi menu. 3504 Mt. Moriah Rd.; 919-401-6908; kanki.com

Capital Seafood Market & Grill Fried catfish, porkchop sandwiches and collard greens. Raw seafood for sale. 1304 University Dr.; 919-402-0777

Mariscos Los Cabos Bar & Grill Mexican restaurant that features a variety of seafood options like fish and shrimp tacos, ceviches and more. 4020 DurhamChapel Hill Blvd.; 919-748-4290

Don Gallo Taqueria Tacos, pupusas, tortas and horchata available for takeout. 3411 University Dr.; 919-267-8226

Namu Restaurant and Coffee Bar Bulkogi Truck and Bo’s Kitchen food trucks combine to bring casual Korean eats, local beer, wine and specialty coffee. Order takeout and enjoy their garden patio. 5420 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-251-9794; namudurham.com The Refectory Cafe Dal, chili, salads and soups. 2726 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-908-6798; therefectorycafe.com BR Saltbox Seafood Joint A new, second location for the popular local seafood place. Fish delivered fresh from the Carolina coast and served griddled or fried in a straightforward manner. 2637 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-237-3499; saltboxseafoodjoint.com Sister Liu’s Kitchen Homestyle Northeastern Chinese food made by hand, like dumplings and Chinese hamburgers, available for takeout. 5504 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd., Ste. 103; 984-244-3973; sisterliuskitchen.com

Mi Peru Peruvian fare like ceviche mixto, asado and leche de tigre. 4015 University Dr., Ste. A1; 919-401-6432; miperupci.com Nana’s Restaurant Temporarily closed. NuvoTaco Inventive taqueria that features locally produced meats and veggies, available for takeout. Enjoy with margarita in hand. 2512 University Dr.; 919-489-8226; nuvotaco.com The Original Q Shack “BBQ tender as a mother’s love,” includes signature chile-rubbed beef brisket and Carolina pork shoulder. 2510 University Dr.; 919-402-4227; theqshackoriginal.com Rockwood Dairy Bar Grab-and-go ice cream shop offering pints and quarts with unique and interesting flavors, including sorbets. 2514 University Dr.; 984-219-2744; rockwooddairybar.com Sake Bomb Asian Bistro Order takeout from this Asian bistro and sake bar; specialty rolls like the “Green Monster” with spicy yellow tail and tuna. 4215 University Dr.; 919-401-4488; sakebombdurham.com

Sitar Indian Cuisine Homemade Indian dishes at affordable prices, now open for dine-in with outdoor seating coming soon. 3630 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 919-490-1326; sitar-indiancuisine.com BR

Saladelia Cafe + Catering Simple and honest food prepared with authentic, local and seasonal ingredients, available for takeout. Gourmet sandwiches, soups and salads, speciality entrees, and mezza platters, made from scratch with Mediterranean flare. Espresso, juice and organic smoothie bar as well as local beer and wine selection. 4201 University Dr.; 919-489-5776; saladelia.com BR

Soul Good Vegan Cafe Vegan takes on favorites like mac and cheese and jerk chicken, along with sides like candied yams, plantains and lentils and spinach soup. 4125 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.; 984-219-6050

Thai Cafe Authentic Thai cuisine available for takeout: drunken noodles, curries and stir-fries. Don’t miss the coconut cake! 2501 University Dr.; 919-493-9794; thaicafenc.com

Tandoori Bites Indian cuisine with choices like tikka masala and goat curry, and an expansive menu with 17 different bread options. 5318 New Hope Commons Dr., Unit 201-A; 984-219-7363; tandooribites.net

WEST END & LAKEWOOD Cocoa Cinnamon Local coffee shop with signature hand-brewed coffees and lattes, hot chocolate and churros. Open for takeout with online and contactless ordering. 2013 Chapel Hill Rd.; cocoacinnamon.com

Zweli’s Traditional Zimbabwean food and family recipes from owner Zweli herself with a number of options for vegans and vegetarians. Sign up for its online cooking classes! 4600 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd., Ste. 26; 984-219-7555; zwelis.com BR UNIVERSITY DRIVE Alpaca Peruvian Charcoal Chicken Specializing in signature Peruvian “Pollo a la Brasa”-style rotisserie chicken, marinated and slow cooked over natural wood charcoal in a custom-made rotisserie oven. 3726 Wayfair St.; 919-973-3707; alpacachicken.com The Boot Room Sandwich shop, soccer pub and event space. Lunch, dinner or brunch is available to order online or in-person. 2501 University Dr.; 919-748-3499; bootroomdurham.com Bull City Solera and Taproom Try the solera beer, along with everything from burritos to Italian tacos. Order online and pickup at the drive-thru or window. 4120 University Dr.; 919-908-0203; bullcitysoleraandtaproom.com

Da Kine’s Kava Bar An assortment of Kava drinks that promote stress relief and mental well being. 1114-B W Chapel Hill St.; 919-864-8002; dakineskava.com GRUB Durham Serves up comfort food favorites with a twist like brioche doughnuts and beer-battered mushroom sandwiches. Order online for pickup; outdoor dining on the patio also available. 1200 W. Chapel Hill St.; 919-973-3636; grubdurham.com The Honeysuckle at Lakewood A new location from the owners of Honeysuckle Tea House, serving wine, beer and mead as well as chef-driven, elevated bar food. 1920 Chapel Hill Rd., 919-748-4687; thehoneysucklelakewood.com

FAYETTEVILLE STREET Chicken Hut 63-year-old institution with a reputation for perfectly seasoned and tender chicken. Open Monday through Friday for takeout. 3019 Fayetteville St.; 919-682-5697; chickenhutnc.weebly.com Sweet’s Smoothies Healthy smoothies and wraps. 2506 Fayetteville St.; 919-428-3200; sweetssmoothies. business.site MORE WEST-CENTRAL DURHAM Bull and Bean Fresh salads, breakfast and sandwiches like pulled pork-loaded hashbrowns and the turkey and brie sandwich, available for takeout. 3710 Shannon Rd.; 919-237-2398; bullandbeancafe.com BR Core Cafe & Catering Locally sourced, with a variety of vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free options. Breakfast, lunch, gourmet coffee. Hot and cold meals available for takeout. 3211 Shannon Rd., Ste. 106; 919-698-0098; corecater.com Eastcut Sandwich Bar East Coast sandwich fare and salads, small plates, soups and sweets, currently available for takeout only. Mainstays include chicken Parm, BLTs and roast beef sandwiches. 3211 Old Chapel Hill Rd.; 984-439-1852; eastcutsandwich.com BR

Hope Valley Diner Diner food and breakfast all day with selections like chicken and dumplings, fried pickle chips, biscuits and gravy. 3710 Shannon Rd.; 919-419-0907; hopevalleydiner.com BR La Vaquita Taqueria Try takeout from this authentic Mexican restaurant serving tacos on homemade corn tortillas with traditional fillings like lengua (braised tongue) and carnitas. 2700 Chapel Hill Rd.; --919-402-0209; lavaquitataqueria.com New Tokyo Quick-service Japanese restaurant where everything on the menu – including hibachi-style dishes, sushi, udon and more – comes in under $10. 3822 S. Roxboro St.; 919-224-8811 Only Burger The food truck’s brick-and-mortar offers all the same build-your-own burger options and sides for takeout. 3710 Shannon Rd., Ste. 118; 919-937-9377; onlyburger.com Pop’s Backdoor South Fresh pizza and Italian cuisine, including calzones with homemade ricottamozzarella filling. 3710 Shannon Rd.; 919-493-0169; popsbackdoorsouth.com BR Randy’s Pizza Pizzas, garlic knots and stromboli. 1813 Martin Luther King Jr. Pkwy.; 919-490-6850; randys-pizza.com Roots Bakery, Bistro and Bar Southern meets Central American at this breakfast, lunch and dinner spot with “from the sea,” “from the ranch” and “from the garden” options. 4810 Hope Valley Rd.; 919-748-4739; rootsbistroandbar.com BR Urel’s Jamaica House Traditional Jamaican dishes like goat curry, jerk chicken, oxtails and ackee and saltfish. 3825 S. Roxboro St., Ste. 123; 919-251-8104

Local Yogurt Frozen yogurt treats, including dairy-free sorbet, all served in compostable products. 1114 W. Chapel Hill St.; 919-489-5900; localyogurtdurham.com

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dining guide

SOUTHERN DURHAM / NEAR I-40

WOODCROFT SHOPPING CENTER Chubby’s Tacos Fresh Mexican favorites like burritos, nachos and salads, as well as the “Chubbychanga.” 4711 Hope Valley Rd.; 919-489-4636 Joe Van Gogh Cozy and full of natural light, this local coffee shop sources quality beans for a superior coffee available for takeout. 4711-5A Hope Valley Rd.; 919-973-3950; joevangogh.com Pulcinella’s Italian Restaurant Southern Italian dishes available for takeout. Antipasto classico, baked ziti and tortellini alla panna. 4711 Hope Valley Rd.; 919-4901172; pulcinellasitalianrestaurant.com Randy’s Pizza Pizzas, garlic knots and stromboli. 4810 Hope Valley Rd., Ste. 112; 919-403-6850; randys-pizza.com Smallcakes Signature cupcake flavors as well as seasonal specials, available for takeout or delivery. 4711 Hope Valley Rd.; 919-937-2922; smallcakesnc.com West 94th St. Pub Traditional pub fare: loaded fries, chili cheese tots and fish & chips. 4711 Hope Valley Rd.; 919-403-0025; west94thstpub.com Yamazushi Japanese fine dining, kaiseki-style, with seasonal menu changes and a multi-course menu, as well as sake. Currently serving only two to six guests per evening for a one-time seating at 6 p.m. 4711 Hope Valley Rd., Ste. 6-A; 919-493-7748; yamazushirestaurant.com

wood-fired pizza • housemade pastas sammies • salads • desserts

RADIUS

SUTTON STATION Bocci Trattoria & Pizzeria Traditional Italian pastas, pizzas, crostinis and salads. 5850 Fayetteville Rd.; 919-206-4067; bocciitalian.com Bua Thai Cuisine Thai classics: pad thai, hot and sour soup, curries, Krapow lamb. Get your meal “Thai hot,” if you’re up to it! 5850 Fayetteville Rd., Ste. 101; 984-219-7357; buathaidurham.com Dulce Cafe Espresso, gelato and sandwiches. Smoked salmon bagel, dulce Reuben and the “B-L-A-T.” 5826 Fayetteville Rd.; 919-797-0497; dulcecafedurham.com BR Nantucket Grill & Bar New England-style cuisine known for their desserts like the “Unbirthday” and coconut cake. 5826 Fayetteville Rd.; 919-246-5785; nantucketgrill.com

Rise Southern Biscuits & Righteous Chicken Order takeout from this daily-changing menu of doughnuts and biscuits. For vegetarians, the “Fried Green Tomato” biscuit is hard to beat. 8200 Renaissance Pkwy.; 919-248-2992; risebiscuitsdonuts.com BR

Piper’s In The Park Soups, salads, hoagies and burgers with selections like curried couscous and “South of Here” turkey sandwich. 2945 S. Miami Blvd.; 919-572-9767; pipersinthepark.com Spicy Green Gourmet Cafe Sandwiches, soups, salads with specialities like California Turkey Flatbread. 2945 S. Miami Blvd., Ste. 126; 919-220-6040; spicygreengourmet.net; HOPE VALLEY COMMONS Highway 54 Public House House-made burgers, N.Y.style pizza, wings and potato chips. 1125 W. N.C. 54, Ste. 301; 919-401-8600; hwy54pub.com Denny’s Diner fare serving breakfast anytime, lunch and dinner. 7021 N.C. 751, Ste. 901; 919-908-1006; dennys.com BR Makus Empanadas A variety of meat, veggie and cheese empanadas, with vegetarian, vegan and glutenfree options options. 1125 W. N.C. 54, Ste. 304; 919-390-7525; makusempanadas.com

City Barbeque Smoked meats, peach cobbler and hushpuppies. 208 W. N.C. 54; 919-237-9509; citybbq.com

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People’s Coffee Specialty coffee, pastries and coldpressed juice. 7830 N.C. 751, Ste. 100; 919-924-0240; pplscoffee.com

Gussy’s Place Greek street food like gyro pita, Greek fries and baklava. 2945 S. Miami Blvd.; 984-439-8455; gussys.com

HOMESTEAD MARKET Bean Traders Coffee Coffee specialties and local pastries, including scratch-made waffles and pies. 105 W. N.C. 54, Ste. 249; 919-484-2499; beantraderscoffee.com

radiuspizzeria.net 919-245-0601

THE STREETS AT SOUTHPOINT AREA Bruster’s Real Ice Cream Hand-crafted ice creams, sorbets and sherbets in ever-changing flavors. 8200 Renaissance Pkwy., Ste. 1002; 919-237-3537; brusters.com

Harvest 18 Local, seasonal eats. Try the pimento cheese dip and brunch on the weekends. 8128 Renaissance Pkwy., Ste. 114; 919-316-1818; 18restaurantgroup.com/harvest-18 BR

NEAR SOUTHPOINT

O R D E R O N L I N E oOrR B Y P H O N E

ZenFish Poké Bar Healthy, fast-casual restaurant serving poké (raw fish) in made-to-order bowls containing rice, quinoa or salad, and toppings of your choice. 105 W. N.C. Hwy. 54, Ste. 261; 919-294-9988; zenfishpokebar.com

LINCOLN PARK WEST Danny’s Bar-B-Que Hickory-smoked barbecue, ribs, fried catfish. 2945 S. Miami Blvd., Ste. 118; 919-806-1965; dannysbarbque.com

Sweet Charlie’s Thai-inspired hand-rolled ice cream and frozen yogurt. 1125 W. N.C. 54; 984-888-5101; sweetcharlies.com

112 N. Churton Street • Hillsborough

Shiki Sushi Sushi and pan-Asian choices like “Bang Bang Shrimp,” gyoza dumplings and beef pho soup. 207 W. N.C. 54; 919-484-4108; shikitasu.com

The Mad Popper Try takeout from this gourmet popcorn shop with flavors both sweet and savory. 105 W. N.C. 54, Ste. 259; 919-484-7677; themadpopper.com MILKLAB Organic rolled ice cream and bubble milk tea. 105 W. N.C. Hwy. 54, Ste. 265; 919-937-9798; milklabcafe.com

december/january 2021

Town Hall Burger and Beer Offerings like the “Carolina Burger” with pork belly and pimento cheese, barbecue salmon burger and fries poutine. 7830 N.C. 751; 919-973-0506; townhallburgerandbeer.com N.C. 54 Akashi Japanese Grill & Sushi Bar Hibachi, sushi and noodle dishes like bento boxes, yakisoba and spicy scallop roll. 2223 N.C. 54, Ste. RS; 919-572-9444; akashisushi54.com Kokyu Global street food available for takeout like Bulgogi tacos and paneer bowls. 245 E. N.C. 54, Ste. 105; 919-251-9017; kokyubbq.com

RTP

N.C. 55 Backyard BBQ Pit Barbecue and other Southern comfort foods like mac and cheese and Brunswick stew. 5122 N.C. 55; 919-544-9911; sweetribs.com Basera Temporarily closed. Big C Waffles Gourmet waffles, available for takeout. 2110 Allendown Dr.; 919-797-7576; bigcwaffles.com BR

Brigs at the Park Breakfast selections and sandwiches. 4900 N.C. 55; 919-544-7473; brigs.com BR Jamaica Jamaica Caribbean food favorites like jerk chicken, yellow rice and brown stew chicken. 4857 N.C. 55; 919-544-1532; jamaicajamaicartp.com Na’Mean Asian fusion, Korean barbecue sandwiches available for takeout. A KoKyu joint. 4823 Meadow Dr., Ste. 108; 919-699-4667; kokyubbq.com/nmean Sansui Sushi Bar & Grill Hibachi dishes and sushi rolls like “Spider Man” with crab and crawfish available for takeout. 4325 N.C. 55; 919-361-8078; sansuisushi.com


dining guide

Sushioki Sushi burritos in traditional flavors, plus rolls with a Southern twist, like double-fried chicken. 4900 N.C. 55, Ste. 510; 919-405-7121; sushiokirtp.com

IMPERIAL CENTER Gusto Farm to Street Temporarily closed.

Vit Goal Tofu Restaurant Korean dishes like fried dumplings, tofu soups and Korean barbecue. 2107 Allendown Dr.; 919-361-9100; vitgoals.com

MEZ Contemporary Mexican Creative Mexican dishes, based on traditional recipes with a fresh, healthy twist. 5410 Page Rd.; 919-941-1630; mezdurham.com

GREENWOOD COMMONS Benetis Restaurant Classic breakfast with a Mediterranean lunch buffet. 5410 N.C. 55; 919-806-0313; benetisrtp.com BR Sarah’s Empanadas Homemade empanadas. 5410 N.C. 55; 919-544-2441; sarahsempanadas.com Tandoor Indian Restaurant Traditional Indian like veggie samosas, kababs and naan. 5410 N.C. 55; 919484-2102; tandoorinrtp.com BR True Flavors Diner Upscale Southern diner open for takeout. Try the “Howling Moon” French toast made with Howling Moon moonshine sauce. Currently operating out of the diner, biscuit sandwich shop Debbie Lou’s offers protein options from chicken and duck to lobster, gator and kangaroo. 5410 N.C. 55; 919-316-7978; trueflavorsnc.com BR

Mr. Cheesesteak Cheesesteaks, fries and wings. 5400 S. Miami Blvd.; 919-991-1403; mrcheesesteak.com Page Road Grill Traditional American dishes, from housemade soup and bread to burgers to vegetarian options. 5416 Page Rd.; 919-908-8900; pageroadgrill.com MORRISVILLE G58 Modern Chinese Cuisine Traditional Sichuan and Cantonese flavors abound in sautéed flounder, fried grouper and steamed scallop entrees; a Western influence can be seen in dishes such as Chilean Sea Bass with brandy sauce and Cumin-Dusted New Zealand Lamb Chops. 10958 Chapel Hill Rd.; 919-466-8858; g58cuisine.com

2020

2637 durham-chapel hill blvd. 919.237.3499 608 North Mangum St. 919.908.8970 saltboxseafoodjoint.com   

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“We have a tremendous opportunity to improve the health of the communities we serve, our members and employees.” – Tunde Sotunde, President and CEO, Blue Cross NC

At Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina (Blue Cross NC), we believe in the power of giving and the future of our communities. This year we’ve donated more than $800,000 to Historically Black Colleges and Universities, delivered more than four million meals statewide and invested nearly $8 million in rural health and wellbeing initiatives across North Carolina.† Although the pandemic has changed the way we work, we remain true to our mission and have given more than $5.6 million to organizations providing crisis response including access to healthy food and safe housing in the wake of COVID-19. And with employees who raised nearly $1.4 million during our annual GivingWorks campaign, totaling $2.3 million with matching funds, it’s easy to see that giving isn’t just a part of our culture, it’s who we are.†

WE RESOLVE.

TO HELP NORTH CAROLINA STAY HEALTHY.

BlueCrossNC.com/Community †

Blue Cross NC Community & Diversity Engagement Report

® Marks of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. All other trade names are the property of their respective owners. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina is an independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. U37397, 11/20



h lidaygiftguide SPONSORED CONTENT

JEWELSMITH 2200 W. Main St., Durham 919-286-2990 jewelsmith.com Dangling Earrings, $520 Mask-ready and lightweight earrings, handcrafted in oxidized sterling silver and 22 karat yellow gold by goldsmith Phillip Dismuke. A perfect treat for yourself or someone special.

STEEL ROOTS HOME DECOR 9515 U.S. Hwy. 15-501 N., Chapel Hill 919-444-2778 steelrootshd.com Sierra Kioto Mini Gold Bowl and Spoon, $56 Featuring handsome surfaces and unexpected shapes, these pieces beautifully reinvent metal. Browse the expansive Beatriz Ball collection and find the perfect modern metallic finish to transform any table. CITRINE SALON 3110 Environ Way Chapel Hill 919-929-2209 citrinesalonnc.com

THE CAROLINA INN 211 Pittsboro St., Chapel Hill 919-933-2001 carolinainn.com Christmas Inn Carolina Candle, $25 Infused with natural essential oils, including orange, cinnamon, clove, vetiver and pine, this hand-poured candle creates the ambience of Christmas day all winter long.

Gold Lust Collection, $115 (value: $139) Celebrate the beauty of giving with this Oribe holiday set, which includes Repair and Restore shampoo and conditioner along with the travel-size nourishing hair oil.

SEW FINE II 5850 Fayetteville Rd., Ste. 104, Durham 919-806-3638 sewfine2.com Agate Coasters with Metallic Edge, $129 Beautiful and practical, these colorful coasters are a natural conversation piece. The set of four is a great gift and perfect for any dĂŠcor.

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SPONSORED CONTENT H O L I D A Y

e ATMOSP'HAIR SALON 1125 W. N.C. Hwy. 54, Ste. 502, Durham 919-489-3333 atmosphairsalon.com Mr. Smith The Foundation & Serum Buy the “Serum” and/or “The Foundation” (pictured) to give the gift of beautiful, healthy hair. The Serum moisturizes and nourishes while strengthening damaged and brittle hair. The Foundation creates volume and body while providing flexible hold, natural movement, and heat and UV protection. Simple to use, fantastic results! Serum $52.99, The Foundation, $37.99

G I F T

G U I D E

WHITEHALL ANTIQUES 1213 E. Franklin St., Chapel Hill 919-942-3179 whitehallantiques.com Crystalline Glaze Vase, $225 Blue crystals adorn this crackle glaze ground vase by Sid Oakley. From antique to vintage, Whitehall is a great source for gifts for everyone on your list. Dimensions: 4 ¾” dia., 4 ⅝” height.

FIFI’S OF DURHAM 1000 W. Main St., Durham 919-806-3434 10 karat gold-plated hinge cuff, $295 + tax Hinged bangle, $295 Hinged bracelet, $145 From simple and striking to detailed and ornate, each of these bracelets features a unique design that will elevate an outfit from ordinary to elegant.

eXO SKIN SIMPLE exoskinsimple.com SOUTH 107 Meadowmont Village Cir., Chapel Hill 919-240-5475 southchapelhill.com May Lily of the Valley, $1,200 A display of modesty and sweetness, this lily of the valley is potted in a copper, brass and steel planter, designed by Tommy Mitchel in his North Carolina studio.

Bio.digital Moisturizing Cream, $128 Shop local with eXO Face’s decadent moisturizer. The weightless, cloud-like formula absorbs quickly to clarify the complexion, softening the signs of aging while reducing inflammation.

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Home for the Holidays Families rethink their seasonal plans and annual traditions B Y HAN N AH LEE P HOTOG RAPHY B Y CORN ELL WATSON

A

and Jose Santibanez celebrate two holidays every December: Christmas, to pay homage to her and José’s Hispanic roots, and Kwanzaa, to honor her African American heritage. They spend Christmas Eve with Jose’s side of the family, and when the clock strikes 12:01 a.m. on Dec. 25, they open presents together with their two kids – Ayo Yamir, 3, and Noelani, nearly 1. It’s a ritual that’s followed by tamales and champurrado – a thick hot chocolate with a corn base – from their favorite food truck, mber Santibanez

Amber Santibanez and Jose Santibanez with son Ayo Yamir and daughter Noelani, who was born just before Christmas last year.

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h o l i d ay s

Lonchería San Pablito, on

Christmas Day. Later in the day, the Santibanezes set up a seven-point star piñata, which represents the seven deadly sins, with Amber’s family. The breaking of the piñata symbolizes the triumph of good over evil. The celebration doesn’t end there. For another week, the family reflects on the seven principles of Kwanzaa by lighting one candle every day. “Since I can remember, I’ve always done Kwanzaa and New Year’s Day at the Durham Armory, celebrating with Baba Chuck Davis, the founder of the African American Dance Ensemble,” Amber says. “Noelani was born on Dec. 21, and we still went last year. That was her first experience with a major crowd. It was really cool, because she got blessed by the ancestors and the elders. I think that’s the thing I’m most sad about missing.” Amber doesn’t know how they’ll go about celebrating Kwanzaa otherwise. Her and Jose both stay busy: She’s a visual arts teacher at

Durham School of the Arts, and Futsal Academy.

he’s a founder and coach at Bull City

“We live a day-to-day lifestyle,” Amber says. “The plan is to probably just have smaller gatherings, probably just the immediate family. My mom is involved in our quarantine, because she is the main child care person during the day while we’re working. [There will be] less pressure to prepare for such large gatherings.”

L

‘WHERE THERE’S A WILL, THERE’S A WAY’ et the record show: “Greek School Dance Moms” mean serious business. The pandemic put a pause on annual plans, but these St. Barbara’s Greek Orthodox Church parishioners made an unofficial pact to stay connected to one another, especially for one of their biggest events of the year – the children’s Christmas concert. “We have about 15 to 20 ‘Greek School Dance Moms’ who are deeply involved with their kids and keeping it up culturally, and they do this Hope Joy [youth group],” Catherine Constantinou, one of the mothers, says. “They’re very much looking forward to this.” Christmas is one of the most – if not the most – celebrated holidays of the year for Catherine and many others in the church. Catherine says she’s “not overly religious,” but St. Barbara’s has always been culturally important to her household. Transitioning this pivotal performance – and the rehearsals that come with it – to Zoom was immensely important to all involved. Her son, John Michael Platt Constantinou, 7, misses his friends, and her daughter, Athena Barbara Constaninou, who turns 3 in January, is getting to the age where she might remember this holiday. Along with John Michael’s virtual performance in the annual holiday show, Catherine and her husband, Wes Platt, are doing their best to make the season special, like finding a way that their children can safely say hello to Santa. There’s a drive-thru car caroling event at the church on Dec. 18 where the kids can see Santa outside and receive a gift bag. On Christmas Day, Catherine will cook her usual prime rib and baked goods, and prepare drinks for extended family. The question this year is whether her brother, John Constantinou, will join them. Catherine’s concerned about his blood disorder, thalassemia. And Catherine Constantinou says that their family is looking forward to the car caroling event taking place at St. Barbara’s Greek Orthodox Church on Dec. 18. Wes’ mother, who they usually visit in Florida the day

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Funmi, Teli, DeLacey and Aya are a “very musical” family. While they won’t be attending any Kwanzaa celebrations at the Hayti Heritage Center, where this photo was taken, this year, Aya says there will be plenty of drumming and dancing at home.

after Christmas, has a pacemaker. “[These are] things you would have never thought about. “But there is hope,” Catherine says. “We’ve modified. In our house of worship, in our Greek American house. We, the ‘Greek School Dance Moms,’ modified Halloween. We’ve modified Thanksgiving. We’ve got a plan once a month. We’ve got a plan for Christmas. And you know, where there’s a will, there’s a way, when you try to take a positive from this situation.”

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‘DRUMMING AND DANCING MORE AT HOME’ id-December hits, and it’s time for Aya Shabu, Teli Shabu and their kids, DeLacey Hope, 15, and Funmi Shabu, 10, to prepare for Kwanzaa. They dress their kitchen table with African fabric and a bendera ya taifa (flag). “For us, it is a symbol of Black pride and a commitment to Black people,” Aya says. “It goes on the table first under everything. [The color] black is for the people, red for the struggle and blood shed in that struggle; green is for the struggle’s december/january 2021

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promise of a liberated tomorrow.” There’s My daughter composes songs on her ukulele, also eye-catching yellow and green woven and my son drums. It will be interesting to see mkeka (mats), a wooden kinara (candle what song we add to our repertoire.” holder) adorned with adinkra (a philosophical message) and a goblet-like kikombe cha ‘NOTHING COULD EVER umoja (unity cup). Every year, they buy new STOP THE ENJOYMENT’ mishumaa saba (the seven candles representing im Langsam, mom to Leo, 8, and the seven principles of Kwanzaa). Then, on Maya, 6, strives to make Hanukkah Dec. 26, Funmi and DeLacey race through the celebrations special every year for her house to meet their mom and dad at the table. family. Along with sufganiyot (jelly The children squabble over who lights the first doughnuts) and latkes (potato pancakes) – candle. The family laughs. They sing. “Nothing could ever stop the enjoyment of Those timeless memories-turned-tradition traditional Hanukkah foods!” – Kim plans will carry on this year, even among the many to continue with themed games, movies and changes in their lives. There’s obviously volunteering over the eight days of the Jewish the coronavirus to consider, which will holiday. She prefers to take the emphasis away prevent the them from celebrating with any from presents and focus on creating memories extended family and friends. But beyond of togetherness instead. that, renovations to the family’s home were In a normal year, Kim, her husband, Drew delayed – mainly due to setbacks with Langsam, and their kids celebrate at some deliveries and other imports – and they of Durham’s Jewish institutions, including THE PRIDE THAT COMES were forced to temporarily move into an Lerner Jewish Community Day School, where FROM Airbnb. It will be the first time in more than Leo and Maya learn about the miracle of MAKING five years that they celebrate the seven-day Hanukkah, the history behind its traditions SOMETHING holiday at home. Aya and Teli are both major and the songs of the holiday, and where they WITH OUR contributors to the annual Hayti Legacy also create “the awesome art that makes our HANDS TO THEN GIVE AS Kwanzaa, among other Kwanzaa events. house feel festive!” Kim says. A GIFT IS SO Last year, they partnered with Exotique and This year, the family will opt out of all of SATISFYING.” Pittsboro-based Clapping Hands Farm to the community components – which are – AYA SHABU offer a zawadi (gift)-making workshop for inarguably the most important to them – “and, kids and their families. to be honest, takes so much of the burden off “I would like to continue the tradition of of me to create all aspects of a meaningful making zawadi with my family,” Aya says. “The holiday,” Kim says. “With young kids and pride that comes from making something with so many distractions, celebrations by Zoom our hands to then give as a gift is so satisfying.” haven’t worked for us.” Bringing together and celebrating community While the family won’t host its annual has been important to Aya since she moved to North Carolina backyard party, they’ll have a smaller gathering with one other in 2003 to be a touring dancer with the African American Dance family, and continue their tradition of playing “ChanuGaga,” a family Ensemble. The pandemic has put that on hold, but Aya says that dodgeball tournament (with masks this year). They’ll also connect Funmi and DeLacey are grateful to spend a more relaxing holiday with their fellow congregants through virtual programming put on with their parents this year. by Beth El Synagogue and Jewish for Good. “I’ll miss drumming and dancing with my community, but I also “Overall, I’m trying not to put too much pressure on myself this look forward to drumming and dancing more at home with my year for super meaningful celebrations,” Kim says. “We will do what family,” Aya says. “We have been wanting to give our community we can reasonably do, given the pandemic and our low tolerance for a new Kwanzaa song for many years. Our family is very musical. Zoom, and hope that this year is just an anomaly.”

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h o l i d ay s The Langsams celebrate Hanukkah every year with foods like jelly doughnuts and by competing in a few rounds of gaga, a variant of dogdeball played in an octagonal pit.

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All the Fixin’s

Four side dishes from local restaurants to round out your holiday meal PHOTOG RAPHY B Y JAMES STEF IUK

DEVILED EGGS By Fergus Bradley, Maverick’s Smokehouse & Taproom “These are probably my second favorite item on the menu,” says Maverick’s co-owner Jana Bradley. “I could legitimately eat just the marmalade and may or may not make my own orders with about double what they should be served with!” Eggs Place 12 eggs in a stockpot covered with cold water. Bring to a boil and cook for 2 minutes. Cut off heat and cover. Let stand for 10 minutes. Drain, chill and peel. Halve the eggs (cleaning the knife regularly). Remove yolks and set aside the whites. Filling Egg yolks ½ cup mayonnaise 1 Tbsp. mustard 1 tsp. cider vinegar Pinch of white pepper Pinch of ancho chili powder Salt and pepper, to taste Mix until fully incorporated. Marmalade ¼ cup (2) jalapeño peppers, finely diced 1 cup (½) yellow onion, finely diced ½ cup sherry wine 1 Tbsp. sugar Heat pan and add 1 Tbsp. of oil. Add peppers and onions. Saute on medium-high heat until translucent – about 2 minutes. Salt and pepper to taste. Add sherry and simmer and reduce. Add sugar and stir – about 1 minute. Turn off heat, stretch out and chill. Fill egg white halves with filling and top with marmalade. 48

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BARLEY AND BLACK-EYED PEA HOPPIN’ JOHN By Joey Guenette, Page Road Grill Serves 6-8 “This is a simple but delicious dish that’s an even healthier twist on traditional Hoppin’ John,” Joey says. “It can be served cold as a side dish with any meal, or it’s wonderful served warm and topped with a piece of grilled salmon, like the dish we offer at Page Road Grill. If you don’t want to go to the trouble of soaking and cooking the dried black-eyed peas, the frozen product is far superior to canned peas, but any option will work.” 4 cups cooked barley 2 cups cooked black-eyed peas 1 medium tomato, diced ½ red onion, finely diced ½ cup scallions, chopped ¼ cup parsley, chopped 1 cup raw kale, chopped into thin ribbons ¼ cup red wine vinegar 1/8 cup olive oil 1 tsp. salt 1 tsp. pepper Cook barley by package directions and cool to room temperature. Prepare black-eyed peas by package directions if using either dry or frozen peas (either is preferred) and cool to room temperature. If using canned black-eyed peas, drain and rinse thoroughly. Chop tomato, onion and scallions. Wash parsley and kale thoroughly, pat dry with towel, and chop. Combine all ingredients and adjust seasonings to taste. Serve cold, or heat briefly in a pan and serve hot. 

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GARLICKY BEET SALAD By Sam Papanikas, Bleu Olive “This is a delicious and healthy side dish, which reminds me of the festive holidays with its deep red and green colors,” Sam says. “I prefer this dish to be served chilled.” Serves 4-6 1 large bunch of fresh beets, greens included (about 2-3 lbs.) 3-4 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for the greens 1-2 tsp. Greek red wine vinegar, plus more for the greens 2-3 large garlic cloves, chopped or cut into very thin slivers Salt and pepper, to taste Cut the greens off the beet roots and rinse very well in cold water, then leave to drain. Bring to a boil in a pot of salted water and simmer until tender, about 15 minutes. Remove and drain. Scrub the beets very well and trim off the root and stem ends. Place in a pot of cold, salted water and boil gently for about a half hour to 45 minutes, until tender. Alternatively, place the beets in a roasting pan, cover, and roast at 400 F for about 1 hour, until tender. Let the beets cool slightly to handle, and then peel. Cut the beets into rounds about 1/8-inch thick. Whisk together the 3 tablespoons of olive oil, 2 teaspoons vinegar, garlic, salt and pepper. Toss the beet slices in the dressing and place in the center of a serving platter. Strew the greens around the beets and dress with additional olive oil, vinegar and salt. Serve chilled or at room temperature.

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GRATIN DAUPHINOIS By Matt Kelly, Mateo Bar de Tapas “It’s the only dish my father asked for, and he doesn’t like greens,” Matt says of this dish, which has appeared on Vin Rouge’s menu. “[It] has become my addiction for every holiday get-together. It’s a special treat – a very humble but luxurious dish. Very few ingredients are transformed into something that mashed potatoes never will be. You can also cook gratin dauphinois ahead of time – it’s a special occasion dish that holds well and transports well.” Matt also notes that, while you can shop for ingredients for this dish at the grocery store, it’s important to support local farmers and producers right now: You can sub Gruyere for local cheese and buy dairy and produce from a farmers market to add a local touch to this French dish. “Feeds one Mateo, or six normal humans!” 6 cups heavy cream (Ran-Lew Dairy is my favorite local brand) 1 clove garlic, peeled and chopped 2 sprigs thyme 1 bay leaf 4 lbs. waxy potatoes (such as Yukon Gold), peeled and sliced

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Salt Fresh black pepper Nutmeg 2.5 cups Gruyere or Chapel Hill Creamery Calvander cheese Heat 5 cups of heavy cream in a saucepan with the chopped garlic. Add bay leaf and fresh thyme to the saucepan. Peel potatoes, wash and dry them. Use a mandolin to slice the potatoes, somewhere between the thickness of a nickel to 1/10 of an inch. Add potato slices to the cream and make sure liquid covers the potatoes. Heat over low heat and bring to a low simmer for about 20-30 minutes, until the potatoes are tender. Season with salt, pepper and a smidgen of fresh nutmeg. Fold in a cup of cheese, mix gently. Remove thyme and bay leaf, transfer to a casserole or gratin dish, top with remaining cheese and evenly drizzle heavy cream on top. Matt recommends a dish where the potatoes are 2 inches in depth. Bake at 350 F until the cheese is melted and starts turning golden in color. Remove from the oven, and it is ready to go – or it can be served later.

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Buy the Book Support our independent bookshops by gifting these good reads recommended by store employees and owners B Y MO R GAN CARTIE R WE STO N P H OTO GR AP HY BY CO R NE L L WATSON

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opened in May 2019 and specializes in gently used books of all genres, but also features a small, curated selection of new books. The store, located at 2706 DurhamChapel Hill Blvd., is currently open for browsing from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.; appointments are recommended, as only one group is allowed in at a time. To book an appointment or search its used and new inventory from home (online orders are eligible for $1 flat-rate shipping or curbside pickup), visit goldenfigbooks.com. olden Fig Books

FOR TH E MYST E RY LOV E R “The Aosawa Murders” by Riku Onda

Looking for an imaginative page-turner that will have you glued to every syllable? “The Aosawa Murders” is the tantalizing masterpiece of a mystery you’re looking for, according to Golden Fig Books founder David Bradley. “Years after

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Golden Fig Books founder David Bradley at his bookstore on Durham-Chapel Hill Boulevard. december/january 2021

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David says. “Honest and tender, this book is a perfect antidote to the quarantine reading blues.” The Regulator Bookshop

The Regulator Bookshop’s Elliot Berger and Sara Schwartz hold up two of their top recommendations for this holiday season.

a brutal poisoning claims the entire Aosawa clan, the supposedly solved case is reanimated through interwoven fragments of forgotten moments and missed clues,” David explains. The first of Japanese author Riku Onda’s works to be translated into English, David says all readers will enjoy this tale, which will leave them questioning every turn and pondering how our own experiences with mysteries can interfere with our judgment. FOR TH E S CI-FI FA N AT IC “Tell the Machine Goodnight” by Katie Williams

This novel is both a critique of modern life and a message of hope for our future. A cast full of interesting characters with very different views on the world help tell the story, but its central plot follows Pearl, a technician for a “happiness machine,” as she tries to connect with her teenage son. “[Her son’s] only happiness seems to come from eschewing happiness itself,”

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on Ninth Street has fed Durham readers’ minds for 44 years and offers a selection of books for everyone, curated with the nearby Duke University community in mind. While not currently open to in-store shopping, The Regulator offers curbside pickup, USPS shipping and delivery in Durham, Carrboro and Chapel Hill. Anyone can order books at regulatorbookshop.com or call 919-286-2700 for same-day pickup availability; check the website for updates on holiday hours.

F O R THE M U S I C A F I C I O N A D O “Step It Up & Go: The Story of North Carolina Popular Music, from Blind Boy Fuller and Doc Watson to Nina Simone and Superchunk” by David Menconi

“We love how many amazing writers surround us in the Triangle, and as music lovers, we also feel lucky to live here,” says Sara Schwartz of The Regulator Bookshop. This is why she says her recommendation is one of the most exciting books to be released this year: It offers the best of both worlds. Author David Menconi, known for his recurring music column in The News & Observer, tells the comprehensive story of our state’s musical history with love. “There’s no one more perfect to put our region’s musical heritage between two covers,” Sara says. “Step it Up & Go” makes a great gift for both music lovers and those interested in the evolution of society and culture in North Carolina.


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FOR TH E VE GE TA R IA N

Call us today to schedule a COMPLIMENTARY consultation

“Ottolenghi Flavor” by Yotam Ottolenghi and Ixta Belfrage

“A great book on its own or paired with others in the Ottolenghi collection, this one emphasizes ‘process, pairing and produce’ in taking simple vegetable dishes up a level,” Sara says. The book also proves that vegetables don’t need to be relegated to side dishes; main courses, desserts and even homemade condiments (which the authors refer to as “flavor bombs”) fill the pages with rich inspiration for vegetarians and carnivores alike. “Ottolenghi Flavor” nods to a range of cuisines that will suit a variety of tastes, from stuffed eggplant curry to romano pepper schnitzels to spicy mushroom lasagna. Letters Bookshop opened on Main Street in December 2013

and carries new and used books in all genres. Letters is currently open on Fridays and Saturdays from 1 to 7 p.m. for an open-air pop-up bookshop on the sidewalk in front of the shop (weather permitting). The store will offer expanded pop-up and in-store shopping appointment hours during the holiday season. For more information or to shop online for contactless pickup, free local delivery or USPS Media Mail, visit lettersbookshop.com. FOR TH E H O ME C H E F “This Will Make It Taste Good: A New Path to Simple Cooking” by Vivian Howard

Letters owner Land Arnold’s first pick is by chef Vivian Howard of Kinston’s Chef & the Farmer restaurant and the TV show “A Chef ’s Life.” The PBS star’s second cookbook features delicious recipes in an accessible, engaging format. In fact, the author specifically wrote each recipe based on ingredients she could find at her local Walmart. “During a holiday season that will force more of us into the kitchen than allow us out to restaurants, it’s a great cookbook addition for both novices and experts alike,” Land says. FOR TH E POLITICA L J U N K IE “A Promised Land” by Barack Obama

The first volume of former President Barack Obama’s memoir was released Nov. 17. A powerful account of Obama’s journey as a politician, father and leader, the book delves into his personal and professional challenges, from his early life to his presidency. “This will be the book sensation of the year,” Land predicts, and it will make a fitting gift for anyone interested in reading a story of hope this holiday season. Letters will be offering both books at 20% off the cover price.

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Good Things Come in Small Packages Ways for kids to volunteer and spread holiday cheer B Y ELIZAB ETH KAN E

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Book Harvest Board Member Taquoia Street and her daughter, Ivory Jade Vaughn Bey, 7, drop off books at the nonprofit.

R U N YO U R O W N

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B O O K DR IV E

here’s nothing like the comfort of a well-loved book in your hands. Ginger Young, founder and executive director of Book Harvest, encourages families to run a book drive. She recommends motivating the kids to create some of their own signs to advertise the event around the neighborhood. Then set up a box and choose a place that’s easy for people to drop off new and gently used children’s books (for example, on the front porch of your home). “There’s a very powerful sort of moment between parent and child when they’re bringing [the books] to us,” Ginger says. “That’s really a joy to see. They’ve done something to help another child build a home library of books that they can own and read again and again and keep forever.” For more information, download the Book Harvest Book Drive toolkit by visiting bookharvestnc.org/get-involved/run-a-book-drive.

HIKE , CLE A N UP A N D E X PLO R E

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T HE E N O RIVE R TO G E T H E R

eople have taken to outside activities in large numbers throughout the year. “Our local parks and trails along the Eno have seen an average 42% increase in use since the start of the pandemic,” says Emily Hill, director of development with the Eno River Association. 

Book Harvest Operations and Finance Director Kate Panuska and her daughter, Frankie Lentz, 4, encourage others to donate to Book Harvest.

KEEP LE A R N I N G A LI V E Book Harvest provides contactless grab-and-go pickups of free, ageappropriate books at its Rapid Response Center every Wednesday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and every Saturday from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Visit bookharvestnc.org/ get-books-for-yourkids for more info.

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More use means that more maintenance is needed to preserve the trails. Take the family and enjoy a Small Group Day of Service, spending a few hours along the Eno River completing a project. This may involve removing invasive plant species, cleaning up litter, planting trees, dealing in rock work, trail construction or other maintenance. Or, opt for a DIY Stewardship Kit – you pick your time, your place, your needed supplies, then go your own way! You’ll mostly focus on litter pickup and removal for this project. Trash bags, pickers and safety vests are all available from the Eno River Association office. “It’s really inspiring to see the idea of giving back starting so young,” Emily says. She says kids “really enjoy the challenge” of finding and picking up litter. “It’s like a treasure hunt for trash!” Dave Cook, an education coordinator with the Eno River Association, says participating in stewardship this way helps children understand how they’re caring for the environment. “They have a stake in it now.” For more information, contact education@ enoriver.org or call 919-620-9099, ext. 1204.

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Shop for Families in Need and Share Your Christmas dopt a Durham family in need and provide them with holiday gifts. You’ll get a shopping list with items and the ages of the children you can shop for during the Christmas season. Then wrap up the presents and personalize your gifts with a special note for your adopted family. This volunteer opportunity, now in its 45th year, has been a tradition that many Durham families continue with their children. “We’ve got some parents who will call us and say, ‘When I was a child, my family participated in ‘Share Your Christmas’ ... I want my kids to know how important it is to give back,’” says Kim Shaw, executive director of The Triangle Nonprofit & Volunteer Leadership Center.

Cleaning up local parks and rivers is a family affair with the Eno River Association’s stewardship programs.

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Help Kids Connect With Older Adults onnect older citizens with younger ones! Let your teen learn, interview and record an older adult’s story via The Triangle Nonprofit & Volunteer Leadership Center’s Oral History Project. Geared toward high schoolers, students will talk to senior adults in the community and ask them about their life stories. “[The project] allows the student to form a connection with the older adult,” Kim says. Students will interview them, either through Zoom or on the phone, and discuss the highlights of their life. “Then, [The Triangle Nonprofit & Volunteer Leadership Center] will create a little booklet that the senior adult can have,” Kim says. For more information about Share Your Christmas or the Oral History Project, contact Debalina Chatterjee at debalina@thevolunteercenter.org, youth@thevolunteercenter.org or info@thevolunteercenter.org and visit handsontriangle.org and thevolunteercenter.org.

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REGISTER NOW! jesaverhart.com december/january 2021

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Our Mission

Save the Date

Our Mission

Our Mission Save the Date Volunteer Opportunities Caring House provides patients at Duke Cancer

Our local nonprofits, how they support the community and how you can get involved

Special Advertising Section

Section at Duke Cancer CaringSpecial HouseAdvertising provides patients • : January 30, Institute with peace of mind by providing 2021 at the Washington Duke Inn Our local nonprofits, how they support the community and how you can get involved affordable housing, a healing environment, and • For ticket and sponsorship positive and supportive community. Caring House provides patients at Duke Cancer InstituteOur withaMission peace of mind by providing information, contact Sasha Zarzour affordable housing, a healing environment, and a positive andHouse supportive community. Caring provides patientsSection at Duke Cancer Institute with peace of mind by providing Special Advertising at development_manager@ affordable housing, a healing environment, and a positive and supportive community. caringhouse.org.

Our Mission

Caring House provides patients at Duke Cancer Institute with peace of mind by providing affordable housing, a healing environment, and a positive and supportive community.

Our Mission

Caring House provides patients at Duke Cancer Institute with peace of mind by providing affordable housing, a healing environment, and a positive and supportive community.

Wish List Paper towels

Wish List Toilet paper • Paper towels Coffee (ground and k-cups) •

Toilet paper

Dishwasher detergent

Kitchen size (30-gallon) trash bags

Upcoming Event •

Background Founded in 1992, Caring House provides comfortable, supportive and affordable housing to Duke Cancer Institute patients and caregivers. Caring House is a 12,900-square-foot home with 18 private rooms, each with private bath, television and more. A fully-equipped kitchen is shared by Background guests. Common areas include a great room, Background Founded in 1992, Caring House provides

Coffee (ground, regular & decaf)

Coffee creamer

Benefit Gala • Annual Kitchen size (30-gallon) trash bags Wish List February 8th, 2020 •Brag Paper towels Duke Inn Lines Washington • For Toilet paper Caring House hasand provided a home for ticket sponsorship • Dishwasher detergent more than 13,000 patients and information, visit their Wish List • Coffee (ground, decaf) caregivers. Caring forregular cancer&patients caringhouse.org/events • Paper towels goes beyondcreamer the latest technology and • Coffee Toilet paper treatments. The heart and soul •• Kitchen sizemind, (30-gallon) trash bags

need attention, too. Caring House offers • Lines Dishwasher detergent Volunteer Opportunity Brag programs and activities designed to Background • Coffee (ground, regular & decaf) Brag Lines Caring has provided a home for more than • House Guest Meal Program:

reduce anxiety and promote healing, sunroom, dining room, screened porch and healing • patients Coffee creamer Founded in 1992, Caring Housea provides comfortable, supportive affordable 13,000 and their caregivers. Caring Caring House has provided home for for Founded in 1992, Caringand House provides needed to suchVolunteers as pet and art are therapy, oncological garden. All of these amenities are available to our • Kitchen size (30-gallon) trash bags comfortable, and housing housing to Duke Cancer Institute patients and cancer patients goes beyond theaffordable latest technology more than supportive 13,000 patients and their comfortable, supportive and affordable housing massages, musical performances, etc. guests at a nightly rate of $40. provide weeknight evening to Duke Cancer Institute patients and caregivers. caregivers. Caring House is a 12,900-squareand treatments. The mind, heart and soul need caregivers. Caring for cancer patients to Duke Cancer Institute patients and caregivers. These programs set Caring House apart meals guests. or Caring House is the afor 12,900-square-foot home foot home withis18 private rooms, each with too. Lines Caring House offersIndividuals programs andwith Brag goes beyond latest technology and Background Caring House a 12,900-square-foot home with attention, from the hotel experience—they make 18 treatments. private rooms, each with private bath, television private bath, television and more. A fullydesigned toof reduce anxiety and promote The mind, heart soul groups 10 people or less are 18 private with private bath, television activities Caring provided aand home for Founded inrooms, 1992, each Caring House provides Caring House House has “a home away from home.” andneed more. Aasfully-equipped kitchen isoffers shared by equipped kitchen is shared by guests. Common healing, such pet and art therapy, oncological attention, too. Caring House and more. A fully-equipped kitchen is shared by moreasked than 13,000 patients and their to plan well-balanced comfortable, supportive andfor affordable housing Caring Houseareas hasinclude provided a home moredining than guests. Common areas include aetc. great room, a great room, sunroom, massages, musical performances, These programs and activities designed to guests. Common areas include a great room, caregivers. Caring for cancer patients to Duke Cancer Institute patients and caregivers. meals for approximately 25-30 13,000 patients and their caregivers. Caring for sunroom, dining room, screened porch healing room, screened porch and healingporch garden. Allhealing of programs setanxiety Caring House apart from theand hotel reduce and promote healing, sunroom, dining screened and goes beyond the latest technology and Caring House is aroom, 12,900-square-foot home with people. Meals can be prepared these amenities are available to our guests at a experience—they make Caring House “a home away garden. All of these amenities are available to our cancer patients goes beyond the latest technology such as pet and therapy, garden. All rooms, of theseeach amenities are available to our treatments. Theart mind, heartoncological and soul 18 private with private bath, television nightly rate of $40. from home.” guests at rate of $40. bya nightly volunteers on-site or massages, musical etc. guests at amind, rate ofand $40. and treatments. The heart soul isneed need attention, too. performances, Caring House offers and more. Anightly fully-equipped kitchen shared by These programs set Houseto apart delivered in Caring advance. programs and activities designed guests. Common areas include a great room,

Brag Lines

attention, too. Caring House offers programs and

sunroom, room, screened porch and healing activities designed todining reduce anxiety and promote garden. All of these amenities are available to our

healing, such as pet and art therapy, oncological guests at a nightly rate of $40.

massages, musical performances, etc. These programs set Caring House apart from the hotel

from theanxiety hotel experience—they make reduce and promote healing, Caring “a art home away oncological from home.” such asHouse pet and therapy,

Get in Touch!

massages, musical performances, etc.

Phone: 919-490-5449 These programs set Caring House apart 2625 Pickett Rd. from the hotel experience—they make

• : January7 30, Stay at Home Gala: January – Institute of mind by providing • Guestwith Mealpeace Program: Volunteers 2021 at the Washington Duke Inn January 30, 2021: Join us every affordable housing, a healing environment, and are needed to provide weeknight week inticket the of January as we a• positive andmonth supportive community. For and sponsorship evening meals for guests. Individuals Save the Date willinformation, be sending out exciting video Zarzour or groups of contact 10 peopleSasha or less are premiers, enticing auction items30, & so • at : January development_manager@ asked to plan well-balanced meals much more! For more information, 2021 at the Washington Inn . 25-30Duke caringhouse.org for approximately people. visit caringhouse.org or contact • For ticket sponsorship Meals canand be prepared by volunteers Volunteer Sasha Zarzour atOpportunities development_ information, contactinSasha Zarzour on-site or delivered advance. • Guest Meal Program: Volunteers Wish List manager@caringhouse.org.

development_manager@ • at Laundry Volunteers: Caring House is needed to provide weeknight Paperare towels caringhouse.org actively seeking.laundry volunteers Toilet evening paper meals for guests. Individuals on Mondays, Wednesdays and or(ground groups of 10k-cups) people or less are Volunteer Opportunities Coffee and Fridays for 3-hour shifts starting to plan well-balanced meals • asked Guest Meal Program: Volunteers Due to9am. COVID restrictions, volunteer Kitchen (30-gallon) trash bags atsize A minimum 1-day-a-week for approximately 25-30 people. are needed are to provide weeknight opportunities currently paused. commitment is preferred. Meals can be prepared by volunteers Upcoming Event evening meals guests.for Individuals Please check ourfor website the most • on-site Young Professional Advisory or of delivered in advance. or groups 10 people or less Board: are

information • up-to-date Annual Benefit Gala on when If you are under 30 and looking to asked to Volunteers: plan meals • February Laundry Caring House is these opportunities will resume. 8th,well-balanced 2020 get involved in the community, then for approximately 25-30 people. actively seeking laundry volunteers Washington Duke Inn the Caring House YoungbyProfessional Meals canand be prepared volunteers on Mondays, Wednesdays and For ticket sponsorship Advisory Board may the place on-site for or delivered inbeadvance. Fridays 3-hour shifts starting information, visit Wish List for you. The Young Professional at 9am. AVolunteers: minimum 1-day-a-week • caringhouse.org/events Laundry Caring House is Paper towels Advisory Board helps support the commitment is preferred. actively seeking laundry volunteers • Caring Toilet paper House mission while bringing on Mondays, Wednesdays and • Young Professional Advisory Board: Volunteer Opportunity of detergent our work to a younger • awareness Dishwasher Fridays for 3-hour shifts starting If you are under 30 and looking to • • Guest Meal Program: generation. Coffee (ground, regular & decaf) at 9am. A minimum 1-day-a-week get involvedare in the community, then Volunteers needed to IfCoffee you arecreamer interested in any of the • • the commitment is preferred. Caring House Young Professional provide weeknight evening above opportunities, please sendbags • Advisory Kitchen size (30-gallon) Board may be thetrash place guests. Individuals or • meals Young for Professional Advisory Board: your inquiry to for you. The Young Professional groups of under 10 people or less areto If you are 30 and looking info@caringhouse.org . Brag Lines Advisory helps support the asked to Board planinwell-balanced get involved the community, then

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Caring House mission while bringing meals for approximately 25-30 Caring House has provided aProfessional home for thein Caring House Young Get Touch! awareness of our work to a younger people. Meals can bebeprepared more than 13,000 patients and their Advisory Board may the place

Phone: 919-490-5449

generation. by on-site orpatients caregivers. for cancer forvolunteers you.Caring The Young Professional

2625 Pickett Rd.

in advance. goes beyond the latest technology and helps the • delivered IfAdvisory you are Board interested insupport any of the Durham, NC 27705 treatments. The mind, heart andsend soul Caringopportunities, House mission while bringing above please

Website: caringhouse.org Get in Touch! needyour attention, too. Caring offers awareness of work House to a younger inquiry toour Phone: 919-490-5449 programs and activities designed to generation. info@caringhouse.org . 2625 Pickett Rd. reduce anxiety and promote healing, • If you are interested in any of the

Get Touch! Durham, NC 27705 suchabove asin petopportunities, and art therapy, oncological please send 919-490-5449 Phone: caringhouse.org Website: massages, musical performances, etc. your inquiry to

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2625 Pickett Rd. These programs set Caring. House apart info@caringhouse.org

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Get in Touch! Caring House “a home away from home.” Website: caringhouse.org Phone: 919-490-5449

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2625 Pickett Rd. Durham, NC 27705


Special Advertising Section Our local nonprofits, nonprofits, how how they they support supportthe thecommunity communityand andhow howyou youcan canget getinvolved involved

Wish List

Our Mission Duke Children’s is committed to achieving and maintaining a standard of excellence in all we do. Most importantly, we consistently strive to make the patient experience a model of quality care through advanced treatment, compassionate support and full family participation and communication. Our mission is to provide: •

Excellence in the clinical care of infants and children

Innovation in basic and applied research

Leadership in the education of health care professionals

Advocacy for children’s health

Patient and family centered care

Your options for supporting Duke Children’s are as varied as the children we treat. You can give a gift today. Or, you can plan a transformational gift to underwrite research that could lead to a cure, fund a program to enhance patient quality-of-life or lay the foundation for future endeavors. No matter which route you take, we will work with you to ensure that your generosity makes a difference in the lives of our young patients and their families. For more information on making a gift to Duke Children’s, please visit giving.dukechildrens.org/ ways-to-give.

Signature Events • The Duke Children’s Gala

giving.dukechildrens.org/ events/duke-childrensgala • Over the Edge for Duke Children’s

Background

Brag Lines

Duke Children’s serves patients in the Triangle and

As a major pediatric teaching hospital, Duke

beyond and strives to provide the highest quality

Children’s educates tomorrow’s leading physicians

care through advanced treatment, compassionate

and researchers. As one of the largest southeastern

support, and full family participation. Duke

pediatric providers, Duke Children’s addresses health

Children’s is recognized for its clinical programs,

equity through clinical service, research, education

research initiatives, educational opportunities

and community engagement. Duke Children’s

for medical students, residents, and fellows,

researchers and physicians are internationally

and strong advocacy efforts for children. Duke

recognized for ground-breaking discoveries, and

Children’s is affiliated with the Department of

remarkable advances have emerged from both

Pediatrics at Duke University School of Medicine.

laboratory studies and the investigation of new therapies in patients. Discoveries made here impact children around the world.

giving.dukechildrens.org/ events/over-the-edge • The MIX 101.5 Radiothon for Duke Children’s

giving.dukechildrens.org/ events/radiothon

Get in Touch! Websites: giving.dukechildrens.org dukehealth.org/dukechildrens


Special Advertising Section Special Advertising Section Our local nonprofits, how they support the community and how you can get involved Our local nonprofits, how they support the community and how you can get involved

Our Mission To enhance the quality of life for seniors, people with disabilities and other eligible citizens in our community who are unable to provide proper nutrition for themselves.

Help Feed the Need • Sign up to be a volunteer driver at mowdurham.org/volunteer. • Donate items from our Amazon wish list to help us provide weekend meals for our clients and pet food for their pets year-round. View list at mowdurham.org/wishlist. monetary donations donationsat at • • Make Make monetary mowdurham.orgtotoprovide provide mowdurham.org food for our current clients food for our current clients help us ustake takeindividuals individuals and help off the thecurrent waitlist.waitlist. $1,680$1,680 provides provides aayear’s year’sworth worthofof meals meals for foraaclient. client.

Deliver Cheer MWOD Welcomes to a Durham Senior New ED

Background

Brag Lines

Meals on Wheels Durham (MOWD) is

MOWDon delivers to Durham our clientsprovides Monday-Friday Meals Wheels comfort, from 10am-12:30pm. In addition meal delivery, dignity, and the knowledge thattothe community cares. Many of our clients live alone, so the Meals on Wheels Durham provides comfort, volunteers’ support is justthat as important as the dignity, and the knowledge the community meals we deliver. Due to COVID-19, MOWD cares. Many of our clients live alone so the daily volunteers currently deliver week’s worthasofthe visit from the volunteers is justaas important meals to clients once a week on Mondays. On meal. We provide seniors with the opportunity to age Wednesdays and Fridays, volunteers conduct gracefully and remain in their homes. wellness calls to check in on clients.

celebrating 45 years of service in Durham! The first volunteers served 12 elderly, disabled, blind, convalescing, or undernourished clients who were homebound or living alone. In the years since, Meals on Wheels Durham has grown dramatically. Today, the organization serves more than 550 Durham county residents each weekday and delivers more than 132,000 meals annually. The core of our work has remained the same since 1975 – we help feed the need in Durham.

Sign up to be a volunteer driver at mowdurham.org/volunteer.

Annually, MOWD client gets MOWD is each excited to welcome their to choose a giftdirector, from a list of Peace. new executive Jason curated options. will2020. receive Jason started on They April 1st, the gift wrapped in December. Peace, a Durham native, looks The success of our annual Holiday Gift forward to helping further the Program would not be possible organization's commitment to without the generosity of individuals supporting the nutritional and safety and businesses like you! Go to needs of Durham residents. Peace mowdurham.org/2020giftprogram received his master’s degree in social to learn more.

work from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, along with a certificate in nonprofit leadership

Get in Touch!

Phone: 919-667-9424 Website: mowdurham.org Email: comm@mowdurham.org Follow Us: @mowdurham 2522 Ross Rd. Durham, NC 27703


Special Advertising Section Our local nonprofits, how they support the community and how you can get involved

Annual events

• New Year’s Day Hike: transformed into a BING-ENO Challenge for 2021 • Sunday Guided Hike Series: Sundays January through May • Festival for the Eno: July 4th weekend • JamborEno: October • Educational Programs hosted weekly • Outdoor Stewardship Workdays hosted monthly • For a full calendar of events visit www.enoriver.org

Mission statement

To conserve and protect the natural, historical, and cultural resources of the Eno River basin.

Wish List

Background

A million people visit the Eno River each year for recreation and respite. But many of those visitors don’t know about the Eno River Association – the non-profit land trust which expands, protects, and maintains these 7,400+ acres and 40+ miles of trails. Beyond protecting natural resources, the Association provides advocacy, events, and education to nurture future environmental stewards who will continue to prioritize the conservation of open spaces for human recreation, water quality, wildlife, farms, and forests.

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Since 1966, Eno River Association has helped create natural areas and parks such as Eno River State Park, West Point on the Eno, Occoneechee Mountain, Penny’s Bend, Little River Regional Park, and more. Since the pandemic, State Park traffic has gone from an average 83,000 to 110,000 visitors monthly resulting in increased trash, trail erosion, and infrastructure damage. The Association is working to support this unprecedented strain on park resources and to conserve more land, so that our community can have clean, safe open spaces for recreation and respite.

• Eno River Association members and sustainers who give to protect lands and waters • Donations to support the strain on park resources caused by a nearly doubling of visitors to parks & natural areas • Land management funds to support infrastructural improvements • Landowners seeking to protect their Eno- or creek-adjacent properties from future development • Adopt-a-Trail, Trail Steward, and Site Steward volunteers • Schools seeking educational programs in STEM, environment, and local history • Community groups seeking programs on history, cultural, and nature resource conservation • Tractor and bushhog to maintain early successional fields • Stewardship tools & supplies: string trimmer, hand tools, contractor-grade trash bags • Vehicle funds to replace our aging fleet

Get in Touch!

Eno River Association 4404 Guess Rd. Durham, NC 27712 919-620-9099 association@enoriver.org www.enoriver.org


home

Trinity Design/Build brought new life to the century-old Hill House by sanding every nook and cranny of the soffit and repairing the cracked stucco.

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this old house

Trinity Design/Build teams up with the Junior League of Durham and Orange Counties to remodel the historic property that the organization calls home B Y HAN N AH LEE PHOTOG RAPHY B Y CORN ELL WAT S O N

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oday it’s known as the Hill House, and back when John Sprunt Hill built the Spanish Colonial Revival for his family of five in the early 1910s, the 17,000-square-foot residence was complete with greenhouses, gardens and orchards for the Hills to enjoy. Those facets of the

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home & garden

ABOVE One of the more difficult projects Trinity Design/Build faced was converting this study into a women’s restroom with three stalls. RIGHT This untitled oil painting by Eugen Alfons von Blaas is one of the most impressive pieces of art in the home.

home faded into history, but the building still stands on South Duke Street, and these days, it plays an important role in our community. John passed away in 1961 and donated his home to the foundation created in memory of his wife, who died in 1940. The Annie Watts Hill Foundation was to maintain the house and promote its use for “non-sectarian, non-political female organizations.” The Junior League of Durham and Orange Counties, which Annie originally founded as the Red Cross League in the 1920s, has called it home for more than five decades now. In 2017, the organization decided that it was time to bring new life into the home with the help of Trinity Design/Build. The planning took nearly two years before physical renovations began in January 2020. 66

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Steven Thomsen, the vice president of Trinity Design/Build who led this major undertaking, has worked on nearly 300 historic homes, but none compared to this one. “This is the best,” he says. “Absolutely the best. I mean, there’s no home like it in Durham.” With nine bedrooms and nine bathrooms, the ninemonth endeavor was no easy feat. Durham Magazine was the first outsider to get a look at the space after construction wrapped up in mid-October. Steven gave a thorough tour, even pulling out Cold War-era rations that were tucked away in the shadows of the basement. “I’ve come here a couple times now basically just emptying drawers,” says Alicia Ramsaran, a Junior League member who’s helped clean out the house now that the renovations are done. “We have old lace hanging from places ... that have completely mildewed. And the daughter of [John Sprunt Hill, Laura Valinda Hill DuBose], we found chocolates that were part of her wedding favors, and the chocolates were completely disintegrated.” In fact, the updates to the home were made with future events like weddings in mind. The kitchen features new cabinets alongside the refinished originals, new countertops, new backsplash and new appliances – now mostly used by caterers. But there are remnants of the home’s history, including the original coal-burning stove juxtaposed with new appliances, such as the adjacent stainless steel fridge. “The stove is super cool,” Steven says. “It technically could still work, but nobody uses it. There’s no electricity hooked up to it; there’s no gas hooked up to it. They used to bring up coal from the basement through this dumbwaiter, which is also pretty sweet.”


home & garden

Steven’s 100-person team also repainted nearly the entire house – top to bottom, inside and out – and refinished all the hardwood floors. Some rooms needed more work than others. The dining room had fabric wallpaper, which was originally going to stay, but nearly a month before the slated completion date, Trinity Design/ Build decidedly ripped it out. “We had no idea what the walls were like underneath,” Steven says. “It was worse than we expected.” Trinity Design/Build also installed a new HVAC and repaired all the cracked plaster. But the biggest headache was adding a new bathroom to the main floor. Imagine trying to reroute and add plumbing to a 108-year-old house through 6 inches of concrete. Whew. “But it really is just a refreshing restore for the house,” says Cat Lunger, who initiated the renovations when she was Junior League president-elect in 2017. “A lot of the changes to the house are kind of behind the scenes, like the brand-new HVAC and plaster repair. That’s really unsexy stuff.” Still, it didn’t go unnoticed. The Home Builders Association of Durham, Orange & Chatham Counties

named the Hill House project the “Best Historic Renovation” for 2020. Cat, Steven and everyone else who worked on the restoration ultimately hope it attracts weddings and other big events so the Junior League can acquire the funds necessary to provide more nonprofits, just like their own, with a free or affordable space to congregate.

Meet the Members HILL HOUSE COMMITTEE CHAIR

C

at (above right) has served as a board member at large, presidentelect, president, past president and now is the chair of the Hill House committee for the Junior League. Her commitment to the organization extends

the begins

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well beyond the eight years she’s been a part of it. “If you would have told me when I joined that I’ve been talking to [Durham Magazine] and that I would be past president and [that I would] have loved it so much,” Cat says, “... I didn’t expect that.” Cat and her husband, Adam Lunger, had just moved to the area when she joined the Junior League in 2012. Like most new members, she wanted to get involved in the community, and also find a way to connect with other women who had the same goal. The Junior League met both those needs, but it also allowed her to create her own path. Cat has worked on many projects, from transforming the new membership experience to assisting on the committee for the organization’s Diamond Ball event. Her biggest contribution to the group thus far was getting the Hill House renovations underway. She possesses incredible knowledge about the home, its history and its charm, but she also reopened opportunities for nonprofits looking for a space to rent at low, or no, cost – and also created new options to host events like weddings, which can supplement funds for the Junior League in unique ways. RECORDING SECRETARY

A

licia Ramsaran

(right), like many who graduated from UNCChapel Hill, stayed in the area, moving a few miles down the road to Hope Valley Farms. Tired of her usual extracurriculars, which mostly entailed trying new restaurants and bars with her friends, Alicia wanted to find a new purpose where she could give back. The Junior League checked off that box. “It was like, ‘Oh, I can be a good person, but also still drink wine and do book club,’” Alicia laughs. 68

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ABOVE Trinity Design/Build removed the fabric wallpaper and the navy blue carpet in the dining room. The table and buffets are original to the house, all made in 1912.

When she joined in fall 2018, she was immediately attracted to the idea of working on the cookbook committee. (The Junior League published the “Taste of Tobacco Road: A Culinary Journey Along the Famous Nine Miles” in 2016, with recipes from local celebrities like Duke Basketball Head Coach Mike Krzyzewski. Visit tasteoftobaccoroad.com to learn more and order your own copy.) “I’m like, ‘Cookbook? I love to cook,’” she says. “Now, that’s a misunderstanding of what the


home & garden

POWER CHAIR

S

iobahn Grady

became an official member of the Junior League of Durham and Orange Counties in 2015. She transferred to the Junior League of Greensboro that same year while she was getting her Ph.D. at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University (the first female computer science graduate to do so); after three years, she moved back and rejoined the league here. “I wanted to be around other powerful women who share some of the same philosophies and morals that I have,” Siobahn says. “Junior League is about women’s empowerment

SELLING NOW!

LUXURY. LOCATION. LIFESTYLE. cookbook [committee] is, because it’s really just selling cookbooks and has very little to do with trying recipes. … But it turned out, it was great.” She became the chair of the cookbook committee in fall 2019 after displaying her leadership and event planning prowess during the Mother’s Day Tea she hosted earlier that year at the Hill House. The 45-person event was a huge success and featured pastries, plated cookies and mini cakes (plus, a glass of Champagne that was handed to guests as they entered) with vendors like A Little Something, Purple Puddle Gifts and Flowers, Drybar and more. “I’m now a board member,” Alicia says, “but I would like for the Mother’s Day Tea event to be a separate entity to our Junior League events, and I would love to run it. I would happily do that every year. Now that I know it can work and it’s a success.”

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home & garden

ABOVE Siobahn sits in the home’s breakfast room. “That’s a member favorite room,” Cat says. BELOW This bedroom, which belonged to one of the two Hill daughters, is filled with memorabilia, including family portraits and Laura Valinda Hill DuBose’s wedding shoes.

and uplifting women in the community, and so I joined the league because I wanted to be aligned with women just like that.” It was fitting, then, that Siobahn was nominated as chair for POWER (Providing Ourselves With Empowering Relationships), the League’s internal mentoring program, alongside Judge Shamieka Rhinehart. She and Shamieka work to develop a sense of camaraderie among members. That was obviously much easier before the pandemic, when they would host in-person events with charcuterie and focus on self-care. “But we’ve managed to find a way,” Siobahn says. Most recently, her team started a walk/run challenge using the Nike Run Club app in August (they already have a member who reached the 70

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LEFT The kitchen, now mostly used by caterers, features the original coalburning stove juxtaposed with the adjacent stainless steel fridge. RIGHT The renovations on the pergola “took forever,” Steven says. His team spent a month repairing the rotted roof, removing and replacing the decorative rafters and antique clay roof tiles.

125-mile goal in October!), a collaborative Spotify playlist and a curated list of book recommendations. The organization required to make it all happen and the sisterhood that comes with it … Siobahn loves all of it. “I am from Hillsborough,” Siobahn says. “I graduated from Northern High School. I love this league because it’s home for me. It feels right. All the people here are very friendly. And it’s just something you could almost say is just embedded in who I am.”

DESIGN BUILD REMODEL

2020

PRESIDENT

P

aige Smith

was born and raised in North Carolina but didn’t want her history here to define her. She joined the Junior League nearly six years ago so she could make connections on her own. After completing the provision course, which is required of all members before they become active, she was placed on the membership development committee. Her responsibilities entailed everything

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Junior League President Paige Smith in Hill House’s music room.

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from building networking skills and preparing an elevator pitch to improving LinkedIn profiles and delegating volunteers. She branched out and chaired a new committee completely focused on mentoring, eventually landing a position on the board and continuing to formalize the program she started. She became president-elect last year and now oversees nearly 500 active and sustaining members as this year’s president. The new responsibility came naturally to Paige, who works as a special projects manager at Duke University. “This is an organization of women who care deeply about our community, about one another and about growing as leaders,” Paige says. “At the end of the day, it’s a training organization, and we train women to go out and take on advocacy issues, take on community work, because they can build those skills here and do fundraising activities for efforts they care about. We really believe in the power of collective action. As an organization, we take on a small scope, but we hope that we can spread that impact by lending women those skills. And that’s really special to me. There aren’t a lot of places that are specifically focused on building the potential of women. And everyone here really does have a good heart and wants to do that and to help one another. It’s inspiring to see today.”


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Biz Briefs 76

DURHAM,

INC.

Highlights from our talented and creative business community

Celebrating the successes of 5 thriving startups page 82

photo by cornell watson

Joe Colopy founded GrepBeat, a media company that covers local startups, in 2018.


durham inc.

BIZBRIEFS Compiled by Mia Cooper

ON THE MOVE

Landscape architecture studio Surface 678 named Swati Khimesra as the firm’s president and CEO in September. Khimesra, an awardwinning landscape architect and a LEED Accredited professional, joined the team in January as a principal and senior partner. “[Khimesra] has a unique ability to talk about design, technology, contracts and resources in a way that brings her vision to light,” said Walter Havener, Surface 678’s founding principal and director of design. Timothy Downs left his position as vice president of economic development for the Greater Durham Chamber of Commerce on Oct. 30. Downs joined Charlotte-based Thomas & Hutton, an engineering and design firm that helps build communities along the East Coast. “While he will be missed as a member of the Chamber team, Timothy will remain in Durham and engaged with the Chamber,” said Greater Durham Chamber of Commerce President & CEO Geoff Durham. Downs worked with various companies – including Eli Lilly, Merck, Policygenius,

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AveXis, Q2 Solutions, Clever, Tergus Pharma, Parexel, GRAIL, Beam Therapeutics, Cree, Blue Matrix and more – helping to create thousands of jobs and billions of dollars of capital investment in Durham during his tenure with the Chamber. “Timothy’s holistic approach has broadened the Chamber’s message of the benefits of inclusive economic development strategies,” Durham said. Biopharmaceutical veteran Robert A. Ingram was appointed chairman of Black Diamond Therapeutics’ board of directors in September. Black Diamond is a precision oncology medicine company focused on the discovery of small molecule, tumor-agnostic therapies. “It’s my pleasure to welcome Bob to the board of Black Diamond,” said Dr. Brad Bolzon, Black Diamond’s founding chairman. “[Ingram] is the ideal fit for the company’s next stage of growth, given his deep experience leading both biotech and pharma companies.” Ingram served as chief executive officer and chairman of Glaxo Wellcome, where he co-led the merger and integration that formed GlaxoSmithKline (GSK). He also serves on the board of Research Triangle Foundation

December/january 2021

of North Carolina and RTI International and is chairman of the NCGSK Foundation. G1 Therapeutics named John “Jack” Bailey, a member of G1’s board of directors, as G1’s next chief executive officer, effective Jan. 1, 2021. Bailey will succeed Dr. Mark Velleca, who served as CEO since 2014. Dr. Velleca will transition to the role of senior advisor and will remain a member of the company’s board. With nearly 30 years of commercial pharmaceutical experience, Bailey most recently served as president of GlaxoSmithKline’s pharmaceuticals and vaccines and was appointed to the G1 board of directors in March 2020. “G1 is well positioned to make meaningful contributions to advancing the standard of care in oncology,” Bailey said. “I am honored to succeed Mark as CEO.”

NEW ON THE SCENE

Dr. Dhiren R. Thakker, former interim dean of the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, launched

Med Aditus International Inc., a nonprofit headquartered in Research Triangle Park with a mission to make quality, lifesaving medicines at affordable prices for patients in subSaharan Africa, in September. Med Aditus’ vision includes establishing a state-of-the-art pharmaceutical manufacturing facility in a strategic sub-Saharan African country and working closely with local enterprises and academic institutions to establish next-generation education and creating certification programs to help develop a world-class pharmaceutical workforce in the region.

AWARDS AND HONORS

The Home Builders Association of Durham, Orange and Chatham Counties announced the 2020 Remodelers Outstanding Construction winners in November. The awards were established in 2013 as a way to promote and celebrate impressive remodeling projects completed by HBA DOC members. This year’s winners included Trinity Design/Build for Best Historic Renovation; Unified Custom Homes and Red Ladder Residential for Best Major Renovation, $100,000-$250,000; BuildSense for Best Major



durham inc.

Renovation, $250,000+; and CQC Home for Best Kitchen over $80,000. All American Entertainment announced on Oct. 1 that four of its team members – Edie Boan, Marissa Gallo, Katie Carson and Maddy Robinson – earned a Digital Event Strategist Certification through the Professional Convention Management Association. The DES certification covers a wide range of virtual event best practices and recognizes individuals as authorities on digital and livestream events.

MOVEMENT AND DEVELOPMENT

NC IDEA, a private foundation committed to supporting entrepreneurial ambition and economic empowerment in North Carolina, selected 23 semifinalists from across the state in its 30th SEED grant cycle. Of the 23 semifinalists, five are based in Durham: Davos Corporation, NanoVest Inc., Rownd, Vizma Life Sciences and Wrangle. The $50,000 grants are intended to support business activities that validate target markets, reduce risk and help companies get to a point of suitability for growth. The seven grant recipients were announced in mid-November and included Davos Corporation, Vizma Life Sciences and Wrangle. The foundation also awarded $160,000 to 16 North Carolina startups during its fifth NC IDEA MICRO grant cycle. Since the inaugural cycle in spring 2018, NC IDEA MICRO has awarded $770,000 to 77 young companies across the state. Durham-based Lumen Design Group, Plantd Climbing, RIM HELMETS and SnapPicFix were among the grant recipients awarded funding up to $10,000 each to validate and advance their idea.

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Real estate developer Crosland Southeast plans to rezone a 31-acre parcel in North Durham near the intersection of Latta and Guess roads by Easley Elementary. The multi-use community will feature 200 townhomes, 55,000 square feet of retail space and a mid-size grocery store. It will also feature generous open space along with a courtyard adjacent to the neighborhood park designed to accommodate local food trucks. Many of the townhomes will be alley-loaded to support walkable streetscapes. Home prices will start at $200K. Construction begins in 2022 with completion set for 2023. North Carolina Central University School of Business received a four-year, $400,000 grant from the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation to launch an Entrepreneurship Ecosystem Research Clinic & Lab. Led by principal investigator and NCCU School of Business Director of Entrepreneurship Dr. Henry McKoy, the clinic and lab will support entrepreneurs and communities to create more equitable business ecosystems in Durham and across the United States, while diversifying the entrepreneurial research pipeline. “There has never been a more important time in our society than now to create a more inclusive, diverse and equitable economy,” McKoy

December/january 2021

said. The funding will also support fellowships for 100 undergraduate students and 12 faculty members across different disciplines at NCCU. Student fellows will engage in research and faculty fellows will learn to integrate entrepreneurial research into their disciplines and lead a sub-group of undergraduate entrepreneurial research fellows. Workshops also will be developed to introduce additional faculty members to entrepreneurial research, and 40 summer internships will give students the opportunity to return to their hometowns and other communities to work with local governments to examine the degree of equity present in municipal entrepreneurial ecosystems. Cree, a semiconductor and LED technology company, will donate $4 million to North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University over the next five years as part of its long-term commitment to enrich the communities it serves. The initiative will lead to the establishment of the Cree | Wolfspeed Endowed Scholars Program, which will provide scholarship and program support to

students within the College of Engineering’s Helping Orient Minorities to Engineering Program and the College of Science and Technology’s Inspiring Minds Program. Through the scholarship, students will have the opportunity to be considered for paid summer internships with Cree | Wolfspeed as well as full-time employment with the company after graduation. Cree’s donation also marks the single largest donation in the university’s history. Online candle and soap retailer CandleScience signed a lease in October for a 144,000-squarefoot headquarters within the Regional Commerce Center at 1247 Pearson St., doubling the size of its East Coast fulfillment center. CandleScience has also steadily hired for warehouse positions since April and plans to add at least another 40 new positions in the coming months. “We’re very happy to be able to commit long-term to the Durham community, and keep our business here while increasing our size and capabilities,” said Mike Swimm, co-founder of CandleScience. “We owe much of our success to the quality of workforce in Durham and look forward to being able to offer more quality job opportunities to our community.” CandleScience is expected to move in some time in early to mid-year 2021.


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IBM and The Climate Service, a leader in climate risk analytics for investors and businesses, recently announced a partnership to work with financial institutions and corporations to better measure risks associated with climate change. The companies are creating the TCS Climanomics software platform available via Red Hat OpenShift on IBM Cloud and are also working together to help organizations put a price on climate risk and facilitate reporting consistent with the Task Force on ClimateRelated Financial Disclosures (TCFD) framework. West & Woodall Real Estate celebrated the opening of its 12,000-square-foot office space that now houses all three of its companies – West & Woodall Residential, Pickett Sprouse and West & Woodall Property Management. The new office, located at 1901 Hillandale Rd., Ste. 100, in the former Duke Urgent Care space, provides agents easy access to I-85 as they work with clients throughout the greater Triangle area. “We wanted to stay in the same area as our previous office on Cole Mill Road,” said Bert Woodall, West & Woodall co-owner, broker and Realtor. “The fact that we get to do that, plus have the neighborhood feel of the new office, makes this the perfect base of operations for our growing company.”

Longfellow Real Estate Partners plans to convert more than 100,000 square feet of downtown office space at 300 Morris St. into state-of-the-art lab facilities to support the region’s growing life science community. “We are executing a strategic plan for Durham.ID that will serve top companies and research institutions in the region, and bring more jobs to an already dynamic market,” said Longfellow Partner Jessica Brock. Lab space is expected to be available as early as summer 2021.

ACQUISITIONS

TrialCard Incorporated acquired Colorado-based Canary Insights, a health care information management company that provides comprehensive subscription services for identifying and tracking changes to health plan policies and coverage. This will mark the fifth acquisition for TrialCard in the past two years. TrialCard plans to combine Canary Insights’ expertise within the medical device and diagnostics marketplace with Policy Reporter’s patented policy monitoring technology, which they acquired back in November 2019. “By joining forces with TrialCard and Policy Reporter, I am confident we will be able to create even more value for our loyal customers,” said Patty Telgener, Canary Insights’ cofounder, president and CEO. Bayer AG acquired Asklepios BioPharmaceutical Inc. in October. AskBio specializes in the research, development and manufacturing of gene therapies across various therapeutic areas. The acquisition

includes a state-of-the-art gene therapy technology platform and gene therapy manufacturing capabilities, which helps to offer new treatment options for many untreatable diseases, particularly genetic diseases caused by a single genetic defect. The partnership complements Bayer’s acquisition of BlueRock Therapeutics last year and will further advance Bayer’s efforts to create platforms with the potential to have an impact in multiple therapeutic areas. MBO Partners acquired MindSumo Inc., a hybrid crowdsourcing platform, in September. With a community of 500,000 millennials and Generation Zers, MindSumo allows users to submit solutions to online challenges for a chance to win money and recognition for their creative problem-solving skills. “MBO and MindSumo share a common vision centered around unlocking the creative potential of platform thinking to transform the future of how we create and deliver work outcomes,” said MindSumo’s Co-Founder Keaton Swett. MindSumo will operate a business within MBO, continuing to service its current client base and contracts.

IN OTHER NEWS

Shattuck Labs Inc., a clinicalstage biotech company that focuses on the treatment of cancer and autoimmune diseases, announced its closing on an upsized initial public offering on Oct. 14 at approximately $232.3 million, with shares priced at $17. Roughly 13 million shares of common stock were issued with underwriters having the opportunity to purchase an additional 1.7 million shares. Shares began trading on the Nasdaq Global Select Market on Oct. 9 under the ticker symbol “STTK.” IBM is accelerating its hybrid cloud growth strategy to drive digital transformation by separating the Managed Infrastructure Services unit of its Global Technology Services division into a new public company called “NewCo.” The separation is expected to come as a tax-free spinoff to IBM shareholders and be completed by the end of 2021. Solis Patterson Place, an apartment complex located at 1055 Stillwell Dr., changed its name to The Reserve at Patterson Place at the end of September.

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SUPPORTING SECOND CHANCES

S

HOW LARGE IS YOUR WORKFORCE? We have six full-time staff, four contract workers and two volunteer staff. HOW MANY PEOPLE DO YOU SERVE ON AN ANNUAL BASIS? Pre COVID, we were serving around 300 people. Now, it is closer to 175. Due to COVID, we are not able to work in local prisons/jails. In 2017-2018, we

ince 2015 StepUp Durham has been helping adults build stable

were able to serve 111 currently incarcerated people in just our transition

lives for themselves and their children through the acquisition of

re-entry program.

life skills and employment. The small staff has made a big impact

in our community, and an even bigger impact for generations to come.

WHAT SKILLS DO PARTICIPANTS GAIN?

Executive Director, Syretta Hill shared in a Q&A how they’ve been able to

During our 28-hour employment training, which takes place approximately

achieve success for participants.

every three weeks, participants are reminded about how to “show up” for work, from communication skills to how to deal with conflict in the

WHAT IS THE PURPOSE/MISSION OF STEPUP DURHAM?

workplace. Approximately 56% of those we serve are system-impacted.

StepUp Durham provides employment training, placement and retention

During the employment training, they are reminded that we are not the

services. Our mission is adults and children transforming their lives

sum of our mistakes and how much they will bring to an employer. We work

through employment and life skills training. StepUp Durham partners

with individuals so they have their own individual resume and we recruit

with adults seeking to transform their lives through employment and life

employers who are willing to hire those we graduate from our program. In

skills training. Understanding that employment is the first step to stability,

Step2, the focus is personal development, financial education and career

StepUp Durham offers a 28-hour workshop that teaches the skills needed

pathways. These four 8-week modules take place weekly on Tuesday

to find and sustain employment, as well as personalized employment

evenings and is open to any individual who is working at least 25 hours per

counseling, job referrals, and post-employment support. StepUp’s programs

week. Individuals do not have to go through our employment training to be

are designed specifically for individuals experiencing challenges to finding

eligible to participate in this program. Each week, the individual brings in

employment, such as a criminal background or gaps in employment history.

$10. If the individual is unbanked, we help them set up an account with one

In 2017, StepUp Durham launched the next phase of its work. Step2 is a

of our banking partners, the Latino Credit Union. As individuals in Step2 hit

transformative curriculum that addresses personal development, financial

milestones, we provide financial incentives. It is also through Step2 that

education and career pathways. In 2018, we implemented our transition

individuals have access to material resources like affordable transportation,

re-entry program, where we partner with prisons and jails to provide job

restorative housing and dollars for continuing education.

training to currently incarcerated individuals. And in 2019, we piloted Build, a bridge between graduation from our training to permanent employment. In our fifth year, StepUp Durham is working to build a workforce development

HOW IS STEPUP DURHAM COMMUNITY AT LARGE?

ENGAGING

WITH

THE

DURHAM

continuum—from providing skills and hope to citizens before they return

StepUp Durham has been engaged in the community since before I started

to their communities to supporting individuals with securing and retaining

as the Executive Director in 2015. In 2013, 12 Durham community leaders

employment.

were convened to begin building the foundation that would become StepUp


“TRANSFORMING LIVES THROUGH EMPLOYMENT AND LIFE SKILLS TRAINING

Executive Director Syretta Hill, StepUp Staff and Volunteers

Step 2 Virtual Employment Training Session

Durham. We were created with an equity and asset-based lens. We currently

partners like the Scrap Exchange have made masks for the staff and those

engage the community as participants, volunteers, employers, and donors.

we serve. We have seen a decrease in our employment training numbers,

Because we don’t work with a ton of individuals but serve those we work

which has been a surprise. We have moved our employment training to

with deeply, we partner with the community to provide holistic services.

a hybrid experience of physical and virtual learning. So, folks who do not have internet access or prefer physical interaction can come to ReCity and

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR CULTURE AND WHAT KIND OF EXPERIENCE CAN POTENTIAL PARTICIPANTS EXPECT?

take our employment training while others can stay online. All COVID safety

We have a culture focused on participant outcomes. We want participants

help make this happen. Step2 is totally virtual, which has allowed more

to feel valued and well-supported. That is why we recruit second-chance

people to participate because it has eliminated issues around childcare and

employers and partner with other community agencies to provide real

transportation, which have been challenges in the past. Sustainable dollars

employment opportunities and wrap-around services.

continue to be a challenge, as individual donors and funders navigate their

measures are enforced. Our partner, Microsoft, provided new laptops to

own personal financial challenges. However, we feel like we will be stronger WHAT IS YOUR SUCCESS AND PLACEMENT RATES?

organization on the other side of this pandemic because it has allowed us to

This past fiscal year, our goal was to help individuals secure employment

rally as a team and be innovative.

within 90 days of graduation at an average rate of $13/hour. This past fiscal year, we helped individuals secure 116 jobs at an average wage of $13.14 within 54 days of graduation.

WHAT ELSE WOULD YOU LIKE OUR BUSINESS AND OVERALL COMMUNITY TO KNOW ABOUT STEPUP DURHAM? We need more businesses to partner with us. We have diverse participants

HOW HAS COVID-19 CHANGED YOUR BUSINESS AND HOW ARE YOU RESPONDING?

and we need diverse employers. Even though we are experiencing a

We have seen our folks who had secured employment and were experiencing

an increase in the future. The StepUp Durham team is passionate about

a small level of stability lose their jobs and have their hours cut. Some of our

what we do, and we hope the community will partner with us to help families

donors and partners, like Duke, have stepped up by offering COVID-related

in Durham work, grow, and thrive.

emergency funds. With those dollars, we have helped our participants pay for furniture, rent, utilities, and provided gift cards for food. Local artists and

decrease in our employment training numbers, we know we will be seeing


durham inc.

5 STARTUPS THAT ARE ‘MAKING IT’ AND THE STORIES BEHIND THEIR SUCCESS

T

BY B R A N D E E G R U E N E R | P H O T O G R A P H Y BY C O R N E L L WAT S O N

here’s no question: Durham has become a promising place to launch a startup. That’s in part thanks to American Underground, which has partnered with Google for Startups and earned a reputation as a startup hub of the South. Since 2016, American Underground and Google have also collaborated on the Black Founders Exchange, connecting Black-owned companies with the resources needed to grow. It’s also because the talent is here and growing. The DurhamChapel Hill metro area is rated No. 7 most educated in the country, churning out graduates from Duke University, N.C. Central University, UNC and N.C. State University. The area also draws in new tech talent due to a lower cost of living than San Francisco or Boston.

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But while a good idea and good ecosystem for entrepreneurs can get you a long way, venture capitalist Joe Colopy said that’s not enough. Two years ago, he launched media company GrepBeat to promote and support the Durham entrepreneurial community. (Colopy was a successful tech startup founder himself, selling Bronto Software to NetSuite for $200 million in 2015.) “Starting a company is extremely difficult in all environments, whether the economy is good or bad, and the entrepreneur’s persistence and ability and drive in times when things look really gloomy and no one is supporting you, is all-important,” Colopy said. “It’s a very lonely job, and there are a lot of people who think they’re up for the job, but very few actually are.” Here are a handful of Durham companies and their leaders who are up for the job, and what’s helped drive their success:

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ARCHIVESOCIAL Founded 2011 Employees 92 Top Clients New York City, The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration, State of North Carolina, Obama administration

I

n the old days, public officials held meetings that were recorded by a stenographer for posterity. In modern times, your school superintendent or county commissioner might send you a tweet. How do governments keep track of it all and meet their obligations under public records laws? ArchiveSocial exists to respond to that need. “Anybody can engage with their public officials now in a way that historically they never

“I thought one of the things that would help this market is having media here to talk about the story of tech startups and promote them and help connect them,” said Joe Colopy, founder of GrepBeat. “I thought that would be something valuable to help this area, the tech community, and that there was a need.”


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STRONGKEY Founded In 2001 as StrongAuth, rebranded in 2017 Employees 26 in Cupertino, California, and Durham Top clients AT&T, Wix, StubHub, SurveyMonkey

I

could before,” said CEO Ray Carey. “They’ve always had critically important things to communicate about; I’d argue never more so than now with what’s going on in 2020. “We need an accurate record of the truth of what happened, even if it’s not pretty.” ArchiveSocial maintains social media records for more than 5,000 agencies such as city councils, fire departments, public school systems and police departments. The company made history after releasing the first White House social media open archive at the end of the Obama administration.

(ArchiveSocial won’t reveal its customers without permission, so no word if they are doing the same for the Trump White House. If you’d like to flashback to the former administration, visit archivesocial.com/whitehouse). Founder and board chairman Anil Chawla started the company from American Underground in 2011. The computer scientist from Georgia Tech wanted to somehow work with social media. As he began talking with potential customers, they told him they needed a record of interactions with their constituents, and the rest, as they say, is history.

ArchiveSocial received a $53 million investment last year from Level Equity to continue growing, with hopes to reach more of the 70,000 public agencies in this country as well as a few international ones. Carey said they plan to have a staff of around 100 employees by the end of the year. Next year, they could hire six or eight people every month. “Getting the best people and getting those people aligned in a common direction to work for a common set of goals and a common mission is everything,” Carey said.

t’s annoying when someone hacks your personal Facebook account. But to a company working in finance, medicine or government contracting, a data hack can be an existential threat. StrongKey sells products to prevent hacks and make them irrelevant through data encryption. In January 2018, the company received $10 million in series A funding from Japanese software company Systena. Since then, StrongKey has grown to 26 employees, with half located in Durham. There are plans to continue growing after COVID-19 is in the rearview mirror. Pashara Black, PR and content marketing manager, said that interest in data security has grown since the start of the pandemic. Some company leaders have more time to think about IT projects, and most now realize the need to scrutinize the home office. “They’re no longer in a secure office, so that brings a different level of vulnerability to companies, especially if they’re dealing with sensitive data,” Black said. “Companies are thinking about that: How do I keep my remote employees secure at home?” StrongKey’s clientele includes big names. The company was recently chosen by the National Cybersecurity Center of Excellence, under the U.S. Department of Commerce, to work on several projects to

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prevent data breaches and fraud. StrongKey is also a member of the FIDO Alliance, a group of the biggest technology companies working on “solving the world’s password problem” with simpler and more secure authentication. “In a lot of ways, we’re a company that punches above our weight as far GrepBeat has two full-time employees and an office on East Parrish Street. as the customers that we work with,” Black said. She credited much of time he’s managed to bring in the travel, food service that to the expertise of founder a company to profitability in and retail industries froze and CTO Arshad Noor, a public a year. Sift Media is a spinout advertising budgets as soon as speaker who travels the world to from Digital Turbine, which the pandemic hit. Luckily for Sift talk about cybersecurity. bought Appia from Bowman Media, apps in other categories COO Jake Kiser also said a for $100 million in March 2015. like food delivery, gaming and successful startup relies on “the Bowman and three other cocommunications (not to mention ability to somehow discern when founders launched Sift Media TikTok) really took off. to sense the market, listen to in 2015 and raised $3.25 million The Greenville native and the market, respond and adapt in seed funding in 2016. They Durham resident laughed and appropriate[ly] – and the ability haven’t needed to raise equity said there was “not a chance” to know the rare occasion when capital since. that he imagined this kind of to disregard that and build That has a lot to do with success when he was starting something new that the market the automated way in which his first company, Motricity, and may not realize it wants yet.” billions of ads are processed graduating from N.C. School of Black said the average and served to mobile devices Science and Mathematics. He consumer hasn’t realized that through exchanges every day. sees Sift Media’s laser-like focus keeping the internet safe could Sift Media’s algorithm analyzes as instrumental to its success. require eliminating passwords what apps you have on your The team gets together every entirely. Industry leaders are mobile devices and delivers ads quarter and votes on three looking to replace passwords for new apps that you might to five priorities. They receive with touch IDs and other less want to download. It serves bonuses once those goals are hackable methods in the future. 300 million ads a day that achieved. “The password that we drives 100,000 installs for its “It might be a little radical,” use to log into social media, partners and advertisers. Those said Bowman, who calls himself websites, banking, was customers pay a dollar or two CEO in title only. “My view is, if created in 1960,” Black said. for each installation. you’re working with extremely “It’s extremely outdated. “No one likes ads, myself smart people ... and if they have And so one of the biggest included, but you know that’s all the information, they’re going conversations in cybersecurity what pays for the internet, that’s to make good choices. now is: What’s next?” what pays for all the services “You know at some point if we that we take for granted that are were to hit 50 or 100 employees, free,” Bowman said. I don’t know that the way we’re Though they have a staff of running a company would scale, Founded 2015 15, Sift Media’s biggest expense but for right now, it’s been Employees 15 are its servers in Virginia and extremely effective.” Top clients Amazon, Singapore that process 50 Facebook, Hulu, TikTok, billion ads a day. In October, the EO Bernard Worthy and Twitter company added a data center in COO Justin Straight Germany to process ads on the founded LoanWell in 2017 European exchanges. with the goal of generating ift Media Founder and CEO The company has remained wealth for those who are often Jud Bowman is on his third profitable during COVID-19, overlooked by big banks. company in the mobile but it wasn’t easy. Companies LoanWell provides customized app space, but it’s the first

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LOANWELL Founded 2017 Employees 8 Top clients The Institute, NC Rural Center, Thread Capital

loan origination software for community lending institutions, loan funds and grant programs that provide capital to small businesses and entrepreneurs. Many of its customers relied on inefficient paperwork to process loans when LoanWell began selling its business-tobusiness platform last May and can now process significantly more loans. Months later, community funding became unexpectedly critical for small businesses during the pandemic. LoanWell was able to step in for state programs like the N.C. COVID-19 Rapid Recovery Loan Program and RETOOLNC, providing an alternative when lenders and customers could no longer meet face-to-face. The company is now in conversations with similar programs in Virginia. “The state has really shown up when it comes to relief funding for small businesses in ways that other states are trying to emulate and want to emulate,” Worthy said. Worthy and Straight talked about their concept for years. Worthy wanted to use his technology background for good. Straight worked in global microfinancing and saw how small loans could be transformational for individuals and their communities. The two friends started their company in American Underground with the goal of accomplishing the same for overlooked entrepreneurs in the U.S. They launched at a Google for Entrepreneurs demo day in April 2017 and received a $200,000 NC IDEA grant soon


durham inc.

after. This July, Worthy was chosen for the first Google for Startups Black Founders Fund and provided with a $100,000 non-dilutive investment. The company also raised $715,000 in pre-seed funding from investors. Straight said that he credits their success so far to their relationship. “Even with your best networks, you still are going to find yourself in places where you just don’t know what to do next and you have to make a decision because the business will not survive,” Straight said. “And they are going to be imperfect decisions, and you need to have somebody who can walk through with you.” Worthy agreed, adding that their team is key as well. “You can have an A team and not quite have the right timing, but still figure it out, or not quite have the product, but still make it

happen and pivot to something that works,” Worthy said. Worthy and Straight would like to grow the company and one day buy a building on Parrish Street. Worthy said he aspires to become a modernday, social-impact-led Black Wall Street company. “We want to see communities really thriving, and thriving financially,” he said. “We want to see a more equitable financial world for everyone involved, not just for folks who know how to play the game and the system and folks that the system is designed for.”

A

G R E P B E AT Founded 2018 Employees 2 Sponsors Cherry Bekaert LLP, Dualboot Partners, Goodwin Executive Search, Fourscore Business Law, Vaco, Jurassic

fter selling Bronto Software in 2015, Joe Colopy pivoted from running a startup company himself to investing in startups through Colopy Ventures and Jurassic Capital. He saw all that was happening in the Triangle and felt that the region could

do a better job of telling its story. So he founded GrepBeat, a media company that promotes the Triangle’s tech startups through a newsletter, website and podcasts. Before the pandemic, GrepBeat also hosted social events for entrepreneurs to network. Colopy eventually would like GrepBeat to spin off from Colopy Ventures and become self-sustaining, but he sees the company as having a philanthropic purpose.

“It’s hard to grow media outfits, but we think our mission-based approach versus generating profits, quite honestly, is a good formula,” Colopy said. “We believe in community journalism; we believe it’s something that the community will support because they’ll see the value.” GrepBeat has an editor and a brand-new director of growth, and the content is produced by a team of student journalists from UNC. The company has sponsors, much like public radio, and eventually might offer memberships with added benefits. But Colopy wants to share his expertise and support with others both as an investor and as a media company. He believes that is “most beneficial to the entrepreneurs who have the least, and I don’t want to create any barriers from that happening.”

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PHOTO BY KIM TADLOCK

how we celebrate

now

Heart of NC Weddings magazine publisher shares her perspective on the new world of weddings B Y J EN N A PARK S

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t’s easy to overlook that celebrations are a huge part of life … until they are absent. Birthdays, holidays, graduations and myriad monumental occasions are made into memories by virtue of people coming together to intentionally honor that moment. As the pandemic steamrolled our society last year, so began months of near-total isolation. Our life milestones gradually became irrelevant, and, dare I say it, melancholy. Just like that, the joyous world of weddings came to a screeching halt. Well, we’re better off calling it a pause. Couples and vendors worked together

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PHOTO BY KIM TADLOCKÂ

The Durham Hotel launched a microwedding package, perfect for intimate weddings of two to 100 people, this past fall. Victoria Newnam and Mark Foley celebrated their nuptials on The Roof in October.


wedding guide

to reschedule their plans (and then reschedule again, and again). Some couples deconstructed and reassembled smaller versions of the originally planned event. In the end, how we celebrate now reflects what we learned from this entire experience. What follows is my list of the top five impacts from COVID-19 in the world of weddings, all of which I believe will stick around for the near future.

No. 1 CeremonyCentric Weddings PHOTO BY KATHERINE MILES JONES PHOTOGRAPHY

We went back to wedding basics this year: the ceremony took center stage. Couples with wedding dates that fell during the first several months of the pandemic were faced with the question: What’s more important – getting married or having a party? Many determined couples embraced the smaller-than-planned wedding at whatever number of guests were allowed under pandemic guidelines. That meant a trip to the courthouse for some, and a backyard ceremony and family dinner Kami Arulraja celebrated with many friends and family last winter at The Washington Duke for others. Inn and Golf Club. These days, you can still love big but celebrate small at inn or its sister property, the JB Duke Hotel. Contact Diane Tighe at dtighe@wdigc.com or 919-313-215 for And something amazing happened. more details on their new micro-wedding package. Those couples who hosted micro weddings absolutely loved them. The devotion that led these couples to the altar resulted in a newfound decided to have the best of both worlds. The biggest trend we saw appreciation for what their wedding was really about. As an added soar in popularity during the pandemic is the two-event game bonus, they spent ample time with each of the select few family and plan: a micro wedding or elopement on the original wedding date, friends who shared their moment. followed by a larger party, which would include extended friends That’s not to say there isn’t a huge value to throwing down with and families, scheduled for the hopeful post-COVID era. Some hundreds of guests, dancing the night away in jubilee over the couples bill this second event as the wedding itself and plan to momentous occasion of two souls becoming one. Many couples re-enact their ceremony, while others plan to use this party as the 90

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wedding guide

No. 2 All About the Core Crew In a time of forced micro weddings, betrothed folks learned how to refine their wedding guest counts. Some important lessons came from this exercise. Couples finally had the excuse to tell their parents that some of their posse didn’t make the cut. Plus-ones were no longer assumed. Unwanted coworkers got the chopping block, and no one took offense. Don’t get us wrong. We believe one of the most beautiful things about weddings is that all of the couple’s loved ones are able

PHOTO BY KATHERINE MILES JONES PHOTOGRAPHY

reception or even a first anniversary party. We foresee this being a trend for many years to come.

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to witness and celebrate together. But the shedding of those peripheral folks – the ones who aren’t likely to be a part of your lives together in marriage – is a freedom that’s going to be remembered.

No. 3 Entertainment Priorities

No. 4 A New Level of Respect For the betterment of all, we’ve come out of this era with a new level of respect for one another. We were challenged to wear masks during ceremonies and meal service, to group together in pods, to use hand sanitizer, to give one another space in the bathrooms, to refrain from intermingling and even from dancing. Yes, it was hard. But the reason was simple: to protect one another. The idea of looking out for one another’s best interests is going to carry into the future of weddings. Safety protocols will linger for years. And in the world of weddings, this applies both to our guests, 92

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PHOTO BY BLISSMORE PHOTOGRAPHY

With smaller guest counts and often with smaller budgets, couples had no choice but to reconsider the allocation of funds. This helped couples learn how to identify their entertainment priorities. I don’t mean to imply that “cheapening” the wedding day is a trend. In fact, it’s the opposite. With smaller guest counts, couples can lavish their nearest and dearest with higher per-person costs and still save money. Imagine this: over-the-top florals, five-course meals with wine pairings or personalized favors. A videographer or custom lounge no longer seems like an out-of-range splurge. Couples can spoil themselves, too – perhaps spring for exquisite wedding jewelry, a custom suit or that couture gown that they want memorialized in their wedding portraits.

Couples with wedding dates that fell during the first several months of the pandemic were fa c e d w i t h t h e question: What’s more important – getting married or having a part y?

You already love grabbing lunch at The Mad Hatter’s Café + Bakeshop, but did you know they also create luxury wedding cakes and desserts?



wedding guide

who are taking a risk to attend your celebration, as well as with our vendors, who are taking a risk to serve you.

No. 5 Zoom Just Isn’t the Same

PHOTO BY RICHARD BARLOW PHOTOGRAPHY

At the beginning of the pandemic, I feared that we’d all rapidly get accustomed to doing everything virtually, from work, to school, to dating ... and even to weddings. Virtual elements are certainly transforming how we celebrate. It’s no strange thing for Grandma and Grandpa to watch a livestream of the ceremony from home. That’s a beautiful thing. But in the end, there’s nothing like locking eyes with the parade of people from your life as you walk down the aisle after you’re declared married. And there’s no digital replacement for embracing your favorite aunt, posing in a photo booth with your college roommates, toasting with your new in-laws and dancing the night away under flashing lights in a crowd of people, all there to celebrate your new life together!

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Elizabeth Hylton and Maria Alejandra in bridesmaid dresses from Bella Bridesmaids and jewelry from Jewelsmith.


engagement

Jeremy Hall & Julia Weinrich

BY ANNA SOUTHWELL P HOTO G RA P H Y B Y P HOTO S BY C L AY, P HOTO SBYCLAY.COM

Wedding Date March 4, 2022

Neighborhood Scarsdale Village Occupations Jeremy works in sales at pharmaceutical software company

InstantGMP. Julia is in her first semester at UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health, studying for her master’s in health behavior. Crossed Paths The couple met on Tinder in August 2017 when they were both living in Augusta, Georgia. They immediately started talking about what they had in common and decided to meet up for drinks. They bonded over Jeremy’s cooking skills and

Julia’s drive to help others, resulting in a successful first date. The couple say they’ve been inseparable ever since. The Proposal The couple attended homecoming weekend at Jeremy’s alma mater, Hampden-Sydney College, in October 2019, and Julia suspected a proposal was coming when Jeremy bought her a new outfit and paid for her to get her hair and nails done. Jeremy took Julia for a walk through campus to show her his favorite spots, including where he had shared an important moment with his father, Barry Hall, three years before. His father was stationed in Texas at the time, and his orders didn’t permit him to attend Jeremy’s graduation. Luckily, he was able to revise his orders and surprise Jeremy while he was standing in line to graduate. Julia was so caught up in Jeremy’s emotional story that when he led her a few steps away to stand under the bell tower and dropped down on one knee to propose, she was stunned. Their friends hid behind nearby trees to capture pictures of the moment. The Big Day The couple plans to have their reception and ceremony at the Bella Collina Mansion in Stokesdale, North Carolina.

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Mac Albergotti & Emily Lengel

BY S A RA H RO L L I N S P H OTO G RA P H Y B Y SAR A JE AN P HOTO GR AP HY, SA RAW PH OTO G RA P HY. BLO GSP OT. CO M

Wedding Date August 15, 2020

Occupations Emily is a nurse in the pediatric cardiac

intensive care unit at Duke University Hospital. Mac is a graduate student at Duke Divinity School and works at the Goodson Chapel. He is also a pastoral intern at Duke Memorial United Methodist Church. Crossed Paths Mac and Emily met while working as resident advisors in rival freshman dorms during their junior year at Wheaton College in Illinois. But it wasn’t until their senior year in January 2016 that Mac’s friend – and eventual best man – Jackson Bargery gave Mac the push he needed to ask Emily out on a date. (He locked Mac outside of their house until he called her.) Mac took Emily to a local library for their first date, where he asked her to pick out books from her childhood. “We spent hours talking about our favorite books and why they mattered to us … until we got kicked out at closing time,” Emily says. They graduated and spent the next three years in a long-distance relationship. The Proposal After bugging Mac about proposing for months, Emily invited their families to visit them the weekend before Thanksgiving in 2019. Mac planned a trip around Durham with multiple stops for Emily to meet her sister, Mac’s parents and eventually her own parents. The final destination was the Goodson Chapel at Duke Divinity School, where Mac took Emily on their second “book date,” but this time they read books meaningful to their relationship. Mac hid the ring at the end of one of the books, got down on one knee and asked Emily to marry 96

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him. Then the newly engaged couple met up with their families and went to an engagement party planned by their Durham friends. The Big Day COVID-19 forced Mac and Emily to adjust their original wedding plans from a 200-person event to a socially distanced mountain weekend with their wedding party and immediate families. Their families cooked and served all the food to stay in line with safety precautions. Emily’s sister did her hair and makeup, and the bridal party pitched in to get the mountain cabin ceremony-ready, as a surprise rainstorm moved the nuptials indoors. “We had our closest family and friends beside us, [but] we [also] had friends and family logging in over Zoom from across the world,” Emily says.

Do you live in Durham and want your wedding or engagement featured in our magazine? Email weddings@durhammag.com.



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