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CHAPEL HILL • CARRBORO • HILLSBOROUGH • OR ANGE COUNT Y

N OVE M B E R 2020

class acts

Students r s e h c a e t � ttohe occasion rise school DURING A

virtual

year

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� STRING THEORY Chapel Hill High School sophomore Camille Swann has played the cello for almost five years. Though her practicing and performing is now done from home, she stays connected to her classmates through an online program.


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This year, Duke Children’s needs your support more than ever. The MIX 101.5 Radiothon for Duke Children’s

December 15-16 Though the world has slowed down due to COVID-19, childhood illness and injury has not. Kids are still getting sick and injured, and expert medical attention for these children cannot wait until things are back to normal. They need hope and healing now. You can help. Tune in to MIX 101.5 on December 15-16 to hear inspirational stories, and make a gift during the event by calling 919.684.1015. For more information about this year’s Radiothon, visit giving.dukechildrens.org/events/radiothon Make a secure gift to Duke Children’s online at giving.dukechildrens.org


NOVEMBER

CON TENTS

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FEATURES

Creating Inspiring Interiors FULL SERVICE INTERIOR DESIGN Draperies and Valances Shutters, Blinds and Shades Wallpapers • Area Rugs Custom Bedding Furniture and Accessories Kitchen and Bath Design

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Can You Dig It? Mountain bikers of all ages come together to build new trails in Chapel Hill

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‘In Sync’ Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools expands virtual music education offerings

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Open Your EcoEye Four high school students create a recycling app

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Feed the Need Liz Cartano and her team sprang into action when the pandemic started to ensure students were fed. They haven’t stopped.

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The Show Must Go On(line) Drama students adjust to the virtual stage

70 You’ve Got Class Tips for a successful school year from eight Chapel Hill educators 74

School Guide Directory of independent, regional boarding and charter schools

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Downtown Denizens Convenience is key for these condo owners in Chapel Hill and Hillsborough

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PHOTO BY CORNELL WATSON

2020

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VOLUME 15 NUMBER 7

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Editor’s Letter

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About Town Events not to miss

14 Remembering Randall Kenan When the prolific author and UNC professor passed, the Hillsborough Arts Council and fellow writers paid tribute to him during a live virtual presentation 16

Noted What we’ve heard around town ...

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Tuning In Chapel Hill native designs musical insight app

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On Love and War and Writing A Q&A with author Robert Huddleston about his new World War II historical fiction novella

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The Best of Chatham Readers voted on their local favorites in categories ranging from best restaurant to best gift store

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Dining Guide

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Extra Helpings Tonya Council talks Thanksgiving memories and Mama Dip’s sweet potato pudding

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What We’re Eating Breadman’s Belgian waffle

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The Music Makers ‘Mipso’ infuses fresh energy into the band’s folksy Carolina roots

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Biz Briefs & Forecasting

110

Engagement Jaclyn Holland and Daniel Limbrick

111

Weddings Alex Colaianni and Marshéle Carter Lauren Kilpatrick and Bradley Leeper

PEOPLE & PLACES 10

Women of Achievement Luncheon

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And I Would Walk 200 Miles …

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Bike Loud


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he classrooms were empty; the hallways were quiet. But on that October day when photographer Cornell Watson and I stopped by Northside Elementary School, the cafeteria hummed with activity. Every table was lined with brown paper bags, resembling luminaries. Instead of containing a candle and sand, these bags provide hope in the form of school lunches for Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools students who need them most. This is the command center for Chartwells School Dining Services Director of Dining Liz Cartano and her crew of cafeteria workers, who made quick work of filling each bag with sandwiches, carrots and cookies. Since the pandemic started and the district moved to remote learning, the program has delivered more than 600,000 meals. That’s a staggering number. And it’s just one example of educators and students adjusting, making the best of this atypical time. Read more on page 62. Across town at Mary Scroggs Elementary School, fourth grade teacher Eugenia Floyd was all smiles when we showed up to take her photo that same week (find it on page 71). I hadn’t seen Eugenia since I interviewed her six years ago for a story, but her infectiously positive attitude and wise words about giving your all each and every day – but knowing your limits – stuck with me: “You can only do all that you can. … If you keep asking yourself, what more can I do, you’re going to get a little frustrated, tired and burnt out.” Now in her eighth year of teaching, she was honored as the district’s teacher of the year and has more sage advice for families who are navigating through virtual learning (though I think it applies to just about everyone): “Be sure to amplify success when it occurs, as we all need this now more than ever.” CHM

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ABOUT TOWN

By Aniya Ellison EVENTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE; CHECK WITH ORGANIZERS PRIOR TO ATTENDING

EVENTS NOT TO MISS

Carrboro Film Fest carrborofilm.org Enjoy the 15th annual festival NOV. virtually this year. This 10-day event features livestreamed filmmaker panels, virtual screenings and prize giveaways.

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Actor Drew Matthews speaks at last year’s Carrboro Film Fest.

Orange County Artists Guild Virtual Tour Through Nov. 30 ocagnc.org There are three ways to enjoy the 26th annual event hosted by the Orange County Artists Guild – browse online galleries, enjoy virtual studio visits by appointment only or make an in-person studio visit by appointment only. Admission is free.

In Conversation: Hannah Collins Nov. 12, 6 p.m. musicmaker.org Tune in to the Music Maker Relief Foundation’s Facebook Live or YouTube page as partner artist Freeman Vines chats with award-winning artist Hannah Collins about her involvement with the historical and social work represented in her photography and film.

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PHOTO BY ALEX BOERNER

The Piggy Bank Bash Nov. 16, 6-7 p.m. communityempowermentfund.org Nonprofit Community Empowerment Fund (CEF) hosts this annual fundraiser to promote its mission to help individuals experiencing, or at risk of experiencing, homelessness. This year’s event includes music by the CEF Advocacy Choir and a virtual hangout with CEF members. Tickets are free, and registration is required.

‘The Spark’ with Tift Merritt: Wynton Marsalis and Carlos Henriquez Nov. 19, 7 p.m. carolinaperformingarts.org Grammy-nominated singer-songwriter and UNC alumna Tift Merritt kicks off the third episode of “The Spark” with guest artists Wynton Marsalis and Carlos Henriquez.

This livestreamed series shares artists’ creative processes and the heart of their work. Tickets are free, and registration is required.

Freedom Fund Banquet Dec. 3 chapelhillcarrboronaacp.com Come together for a night of community during the third annual Chapel HillCarrboro NAACP fundraiser. The theme, “The Time Is Now,” supports equality and justice. Keynote speakers are Durham authors William A. Darity Jr. and A. Kirsten Mullen. Tickets are $20-$50. CHM


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PEOP LE & P LACES

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Women of Achievement Luncheon Shannon Media Inc. presented its annual Women of Achievement luncheon on Sept. 17. Attendees stopped by Hendrick Subaru Southpoint to pick up lunch courtesy of Crossroads Chapel Hill at The Carolina Inn. With the support of The Chamber for a Greater Chapel Hill-Carrboro, the Zoom event hosted nearly 100 women who gathered virtually to celebrate the 2020 honorees. A video montage displaying the 2020 Women of Achievement was shown, accompanied by music from Emily Frantz and Andrew Marlin of Mandolin Orange. The introduction video featured remarks from Shannon Media staff and sponsors, and Alexandra Zagbayou, executive director of Student U, and Esther Campi, CEO of Campi & Company, spoke to the group. The afternoon concluded with networking breakout sessions. The event was made possible by Hendrick Subaru Southpoint, The Carolina Inn, Ellis Family Law, Wake Radiology UNC REX Healthcare, Aesthetic Solutions, Edward Jones, Durham Coca-Cola Bottling Company and US Foods. 10

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November 2020

1 Chapel Hill Magazine’s Jessica Stringer, Lauren Phillips and McKenzie Reinhold. 2 2020 honoree Mae McLendon. 3 Dr. Seema Garg. 4 Habitat for Humanity of Orange County’s Jennifer Player. 5 State senator Valerie P. Foushee. 6 2020 honoree Dr. Andrea Hayes-Jordan.


P EO PLE & PLACES

And I Would Walk 200 Miles ... In July, Cami Simpson, a Chapel Hill native and junior at the University of Southern California, hiked more than 200 miles along North Carolina’s Mountains-to-Sea Trail. Her goal was to raise funds and awareness for PORCH Chapel Hill-Carrboro and Romanian Children’s Relief, an organization she’s raised money for and volunteered with for 13 years. Cami and her mom, Sophia Simpson, completed the trek in 10 days, averaging 20 miles a day. They started in Hanging Rock State Park, completing sections eight, nine and 10 of the trail, before ending at Falls Lake Dam. Cami and her family frequently volunteer at PORCH and are passionate about its mission to distribute food to at-risk families in our community.

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PEOP LE & P LACES

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Bike Loud This summer, boy scouts, leaders and parents from Troop 845 in Carrboro cycled across the country to raise funds for the Be Loud! Sophie Foundation, a nonprofit that supports adolescent and young adult cancer patients and their families at UNC Hospitals. These East Chapel Hill High School, Chapel Hill High School and Durham Academy students, who call their team “Bike Loud,” departed from the Maryland coast and cycled through nine states before ending their adventure eight weeks later on the Washington coast. They averaged 75 miles a day and camped in parks and backyards along the way. Troop member Cole Malinchock says there were several occasions when community members from small towns would offer them meals and places to stay for the night. “Our biggest takeaway from this trip is that you can just find the kindness of strangers and whole communities all across the U.S.,” Cole says. “Just by making a simple meal, you can really make someone’s day and give them the encouragement they need when they face challenges.” At press time, the troop has raised $39,315 and hopes to reach its goal of $50,000.

If you haven’t signed up for Carrboro Town News, you’re missing out!

1 Members of Troop 845 in Rialto Beach, Washington, at the end of their 3,300-mile ride: Ryan Murphy, Wyatt Benjamin, Daniel Gulisano, Daniel Price, Blake Hird, Max Hird, Hugh Carbrey, Cole Malinchock, Evan Malinchock, Sean Hankins and Jeffrey Syper. 2 Cole Malinchock, Mike Malinchock and Evan Malinchock. 2 Brothers Max Hird and Blake Hird with license plates from the states where they began and ended their trek.

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SECU Family House at UNC Hospitals is opening 36 new guest rooms to serve more families traveling to Chapel Hill for life-saving medical treatment. Help keep our guest room rates affordable by lending a hand following our recommended safety protocols.

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R E M E M B E R I N G

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R and a llKen ll Ken an When the prolific author and UNC professor passed, the Hillsborough Arts Council and fellow writers paid tribute to him during a live virtual presentation

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teven Petrow It’s a sad honor to remember Randall Kenan, who was our friend, our neighbor, a teacher and a writer. For those of you who are not that familiar with Randall, a biography of him would tell us this: “Born in Brooklyn, he moved to Duplin County as a baby. [His] notable works include “Let the Dead Bury Their Dead,” “A Visitation of Spirits,” “The Fire This Time” and his latest collection, “If I Had Two Wings.” [Randall was] a recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Whiting Award and the John Dos Passos Prize. He was nominated today for the National Book Award for Fiction. Black, gay, Southern, he died too young at age 57 [on Aug. 28]. Beloved.” Alane Mason, a longtime friend and editor of Randall’s, added [to that bio]: “He had a virtuosic panoply of chuckles, like notes of an organ, from chuckles of delight and whimsy, high in the chest, to those, a bit deeper, of wonder at the absurdity, to a perilously deep, dark chuckle of endurance, a one-has-to-chuckle-because-one-can’t-killthe-damn-fool chuckle.”

Jill McCorkle Randall’s chuckle and facial expressions were never

singular, but a complicated mix of all that was going on in his orbit. He didn’t miss a beat, and the chuckle was often good humor. He never missed irony. He took it all in and spun it around and put it back out there in brilliant, provocative ways every time – both in his speech and on the page. Steven Lee, I had asked you via email how you knew Randall, and I

loved what you told me: That you have known him so long, you can’t remember not knowing him. [Talk] a little bit about [his] book, “If I Had Two Wings.” Lee Smith I am just floored by this book. It is filled with vigor and

originality and imagination and things you’ve never seen before, heard before, magic realism and absolute up-to-the-minute social commentary. It’s full of humor, it’s full of belief, it’s full of pathos. Who knows what more he might have written. This is the work of our friend, but it’s the work of a great writer, and we are so privileged [and] honored to have known him. Steven Jaki, you met Randall in the 1980s, and you emailed me this

week that you had circled around each other in different social and academic groups. You wrote, “Our first conversation was at a book reading party for ‘Let the Dead Bury Their Dead,’” where you became really fast friends. What was the core of that friendship?

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Jaki Shelton Green Randall

and I did not have so much a verbal language of communication – we’d be in settings and something would be said from the podium, and he’d turn around and glance back at me, and I knew exactly what that glance meant in context to what was being said. Our relationship was very nuanced, and it was very truthful. I felt like Randall held me accountable as a poet, wanting to make sure that the narratives that I wanted to represent were full of truth and not fear. And that’s really what transpired and continues to transpire through me.

PHOTO BY SARAH BOYD

Steven Tom, as I understand history, you are responsible for bringing

Steven I went to Rate My Professors and looked up Randall. Under

Randall to Duke and UNC in the early 2000s.

the headline “Awesome” was: “Dr. Kenan is one of the nicest people you will meet. He cares about the class and will ensure that you learn something if you care. He tells hilarious anecdotes, and his mentorship through this class makes me want to minor in creative writing. Take him.” It sounds like he really enjoyed teaching.

Tom Rankin Randall and I first met in Oxford, Mississippi, when he

was the Grisham Writer-in-Residence at the University of Mississippi. The amount of gravitas that Randall had, standing there in his quiet, almost retiring way, was so impressive. People say that he knew more than everybody, and I’ve always felt that he understood more than everybody. And so when I got to the Center for Documentary Studies [at Duke University], the area of the center that we didn’t really have developed [yet] was documentary writing. I called [Randall] and said, “Would you be interested in coming?” Within minutes, he was the next Lehman Brady Visiting Joint Chair Professorship for the center. He ended up being hired the next year to stay at UNC. Steven Daniel, Tom mentioned that Randall taught at UNC, and you

teach at UNC. I know you have many intersections in your life with Randall, and it is commonly said that you were the closest of friends.

Daniel [He was] probably the only professor who [wasn’t] scared to go

look at Rate My Professors. Steven Jill, for someone who hasn’t read him previously, where should

they begin? Jill I think it’s always good to start at the beginning, but I do think that

this amazing collection, if you have not read the earlier work, will send you back, because he has his characters who are ever-present. You’re following the genealogy of these people, this tribe of people – Tims Creek. It’s a very specific world that is also universal. I think that the new collection is pretty amazing in that way and that it really is a strong, fair representation of everything Randall, both as a person and his work. CHM

Daniel Wallace We started teaching at UNC at about the same time, and

in the beginning, I was a little bit intimidated by him. He was the kindest person, the sweetest person. His presence was unlike anyone I’ve ever known. He was a presence when he subbed for me. I would actually hate that because when I came back and I tried to teach my class, the students would say, “Well, Professor Kenan said …” It’s always difficult to come back into a classroom after Randall was in it.

*This tribute has been condensed and edited. Watch the entire hourlong presentation on the Hillsborough Arts Council's YouTube page.

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NOTED. WHAT AN HONOR In July, TABLE was named one of five recipients of a $25,000 Blue Bunny Helmet of Hope grant. Recipients also won an ice-cream party and the opportunity to have their names displayed on NASCAR driver Jimmie Johnson’s helmet during a race. On Aug. 15, Orange County Commissioner Renee Price was honored as the Commissioner of the Year by the North Carolina Association of County Commissioners. “[The award] signifies my dedication to advancing quality of life and justice for all people,” Renee said in a press release. On Sept. 1, the Orange County Board of Commissioners voted to approve a proclamation recognizing retiring Maj. David Lewis Caldwell Jr. for his services as a Town of Carrboro police officer and Orange County deputy sheriff for 40 years, and as head of support services and community outreach for the sheriff’s department, a role he’s had since 2016. The proclamation states “the Board profoundly thanks [Maj. Caldwell] for his uncompromising commitment, dedication and distinguished service.”

selected as part of the fourth annual Tarheel Shorties Film Festival, which took place online this year on Aug. 25-27. His film features footage from a past cross-country road trip from Chicago to Las Vegas, documenting leaving one town in the hopes of finding another to love.

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Compiled by Renee Ambroso

Chapel Hill-based architect Arielle Condoret Schechter’s “Haw River House” received second place in the coveted Jury Awards category as part of the 2020 George Matsumoto Prize, which recognizes excellence in modernist residential design. The 2,600-square-foot house, designed for owners Kate Paradis and Scott Zimmerman, blends into a rocky knoll, which faces the western side of the Haw River in Chatham County. Arielle designed the net-zero house to create as much or more energy than the home requires, utilizing a butterfly-shaped roof to collect rainwater, among other ecofriendly features.

PHOTO BY TZU CHEN PHOTOGRAPHY

Sera Cuni, co-owner and chef of The Root Cellar Cafe & Catering, made

BOOKIN’ IT Christine Parks, the founder and owner of Camellia Forest Tea Gardens, co-authored

“Grow Your Own Tea” with tea historian Susan Walcott. The book, released on Sept. 1, provides a thorough overview of growing, harvesting and preparing different types of tea. This handbook was written for avid gardeners as well as tea lovers who are interested in discovering new recipes and learning more about the history of tea.

her national television debut on Food Network’s “Guy’s Grocery Games” on Aug. 19. Hosted by restaurateur Guy Fieri, the show features chefs from across the country who create dishes to be evaluated by a panel of Hillsborough resident and mystery author three judges. The chefs have a limited time to Melissa Bourbon’s new novel “Murder in grab necessary ingredients from the “Flavortown Devil’s Cove” was released on Sept. 22. Set in a Marketplace” designed by Guy for the chance fictional Outer Banks town, it is the first book to win $20,000. Sera never applied to be on in the new series, “Book Magic.” the show and was shocked to receive an invitation via Facebook “Goodnight Carolina” Messenger. Sera came to the author Missy Julian Fox and area in 2006 to work at Foster’s illustrator Elaine O’Neil’s Send us your Market in Chapel Hill. In 2013, new book, “Violet Stands noteworthy she purchased the restaurant moments! Tall,” will be released on Nov. with her wife, Susan White, and 15. The book is their third From births rebranded it as The Root Cellar collaboration and features a to awards a year later. Although she didn’t to new biz creative, entrepreneurial bunny, and more – win the competition, Sera hopes Violet, who opens a clothing noted@ that her appearance will draw store on Franklin Street. chapelhill more people to her restaurants. magazine.com Elaine enhanced her colorful

November 2020

UNC Department of Communication professor Bill Brown’s film “XCTRY” was

WHAT WE’VE HEARD AROUND TOWN …


illustrations with vibrant fabric swatches. Missy says she aimed to “weave a rich, layered story using Violet’s experience that is truly tailormade for those who need a dose of confidence . . . to follow their dreams. There is no age limit to that need.” Find “Violet Stands Tall” and other books at roadtripcarolina.com.

in all 18 Tar Heel victories in the series as either a player or a coach. Scott Forbes was named as Mike’s replacement. As a pitching coach, recruiting coordinator and associate head coach, Scott has been a member of the Tar Heels’ staff for almost 20 seasons.

Senior Resident Superior Court Judge Carl Fox retired on Oct. 1 from his post serving District 15B after a long judicial career. The first Black district attorney in state history, Carl was also the first Black judge appointed in his district. “Thank you so very much for your confidence and trust in me,” Carl

ON THE MOVE

PHOTO BY FRED STIPE

PHOTO BY BETH MANN

After five years as Kidzu Children’s Museum’s development director, Kate Sullivan returned to her former profession, education. This school year, she is teaching seventh grade English at Sherwood Githens Middle School. Lisa Brown returned to Kidzu to serve as interim development director.

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Chief District Court Judge Joe Buckner retired on July 31 after serving for more than 25 years. Joe (pictured second from right with his family, Eva Buckner, Zane Buckner, Nell Buckner and Julia Buckner) presided over District 15B, which includes all of Chatham County and part of Orange County. Born and raised in Siler City, Joe earned his law degree at UNC before becoming a judge. After 22 seasons as UNC’s head baseball coach, Mike Fox announced his retirement in August. Mike became head coach at his alma mater in 1999 and went on to earn more wins than any other coach in the program’s history. He was inducted into the North Carolina Sports Hall of Fame in 2017 and was ACC Coach of the Year in 2018. Mike led the team to seven College World Series appearances and took part

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NOTED

IN M E MO R I A M

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hapel Hill resident Miriam Kresses Slifkin passed

away on Aug. 28, 2020, at the age of 95. She is survived by her four daughters, seven grandchildren, four great-grandchildren and her brother, Sid Kresses. Miriam, a native of Alabama, PHOTO BY FIFTY TWO HUNDRED PHOTO and her late husband, Larry Slifkin, became Chapel Hill residents in 1955. Miriam was a scientist with a Ph.D. in mycology, and after discovering discrimination in her own workplace, she became a tireless advocate for women’s rights. Once she became president of Chapel Hill’s chapter for the National Organization for Women, she helped found the Orange County Rape Crisis Center in 1973. Miriam advocated for the Equal Rights Amendment to be passed by the North Carolina General Assembly, another example of her staunch determination to enact change. At UNC, Miriam was an advisor to students working to establish a women’s studies program, spearheaded a campaign for women to be eligible for the Morehead-Cain scholarship and was inducted into the Order of the Golden Fleece in 1980.

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rogressive pastor and longtime civil rights activist Robert Seymour passed away at 95 on Oct. 11, 2020. He is survived by his two children, Frances and Rob, and grandchildren. Born in Greenwood, South Carolina, Bob earned 18

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his undergraduate degree from Duke University and a master of divinity from Yale Divinity School. He was awarded a doctorate from the University of Edinburgh in Scotland in 1955. When he returned to the States, he met his wife, Pearl Francis, in 1956 during the four years he served as a minister in Mars Hill, North Carolina. Bob and Pearl came to Chapel Hill in 1959 when he was chosen to lead Binkley Baptist Church, which was founded the previous fall by 40 white members who intended to focus on social justice and inclusion. “Binkley was a turning point in my life,” Bob told Chapel Hill Magazine in December 2014. Under Bob’s guidance, the church advocated for civil rights and encouraged women to take on leadership roles. In January 1960, Binkley welcomed its first Black member, a UNC student. Bob’s circle of influence grew as he became involved in other social justice causes. Through the Inter-Faith Council for Social Service, where he served seven years as the group’s founding president, he rallied citizens of all faiths to ensure that the less able had food to eat, clothes to wear and a decent place to live. Though he retired from Binkley in 1988, Bob could not resist engaging in projects that benefited his community. He wrote four books and a regular column in the Chapel Hill News and founded the Chapel Hill Senior Center. When the new facility on Homestead Road opened in 2007, it was named in honor of him and his wife.

REV. ROBERT SEYMOUR (1925–2020)

PHOTO BY BRIANA BROUGH

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hapel Hill resident Euzelle Smith passed away on Sept. 19, 2020, at the age of 101. She is survived by three of her four children, 10 grandchildren, three great-grandchildren and her brother, Audel Patterson. A dedicated educator, Euzelle began teaching at Orange County Training School and Lincoln High School upon moving to the area in 1943. Following the integration of Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools, she taught elementary and middle school students in the school system and finished her career as a guidance counselor at Culbreth Middle School in 1981. Euzelle and her late husband, R.D. Smith, were honored for their long teaching careers and passion for mentoring students in 2008 when Smith Middle School was named after them. They were also named Community Treasures by the Chapel Hill Historical Society that same year. In addition to attending events and visiting Smith Middle School regularly, Euzelle was an active member of First Baptist Church of Chapel Hill.


NOT ED

UNC’s Asian American Center officially

wrote in his announcement. “It has been my pleasure and an honor to serve you over the past 33 years.” Carl, an alumnus of UNC School of Law, held his position as Superior Court judge for 14 years.

opened in September with a goal to facilitate dialogue and help cultivate the Asian American community at and around the university. Dr. Heidi Kim, an associate professor of English and comparative literature, was appointed director after her continued efforts to develop the center. Students hosted a virtual kickoff event to celebrate.

IN OTHER NEWS The Ronald McDonald House of Chapel Hill held its virtual Carolina Love Gala on Aug. 6. The gala, which featured a silent auction as well as a virtual tour of the house, raised $108,000 to bolster efforts to support families coping with hospital stays and illness.

has been involved with GOTR since 2007 and has served as a board member, fundraiser and volunteer for the nonprofit youth development organization. GOTR Triangle hopes to serve 20,000 girls this year, whether virtually or in person, as the organization shifts to fit the community’s needs.

The Ackland Art Museum received three paintings as part of Connecticut resident Jane Kearns’ bequest. The pieces, two by Joan Mitchell and one by Milton Avery, are valued at $12.1 million.

On Aug. 21, Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools announced a partnership with Chapel HillCarrboro YMCA to provide free academic support and supervised care for 100 K-5 students at the Hargraves Community Center and the Chapel Hill Community Center. The program, running from 8 a.m. to 3:15 p.m., will also offer extended care hours. Tuition, food and transportation is funded by the Oak Foundation and the Chapel Hill-Carrboro Public School Foundation, as well as the YMCA “We Build People” campaign.

School of Law. She replaces Town Attorney Ralph Karpinos, who On July 1, the Chapel Hill Public “UNTITLED,” 1962 © ESTATE OF JOAN served Chapel Hill for 35 years, Library stopped charging late fees for MITCHELL the longest tenure of any town overdue materials. Library Director or city attorney in the state. The Susan Brown noted in a Town Town Council honored Ralph with a key to of Chapel Hill press release: “... Soon after the town at a meeting on Sept. 9 and also adopting a fine-free model, [other libraries declared the date “Ralph Karpinos Day.” that implemented the change saw] both lapsed users and long-lost materials came back in great Dr. Alex Yarborough, numbers, and that well after the model was in DDS, joined Studio G place, items were returned in a timely fashion.” Aesthetic & Family The library previously fined individuals for Dentistry. A boardeach successive day a material was late. Under certified prosthodontist, the new system, a series of notices will be sent Alex came to Studio G out, and after a certain period of time, the following seven years library will send a bill for the missing item and as a clinical assistant professor at the UNC freeze the user’s account until the bill is paid Adams School of Dentistry. She continues or the item is returned. “When the Board and to be an active member of the American Council dug into this issue, we found that Academy of Fixed Prosthodontics and the fines disproportionately affect low-income and American College of Prosthodontics. traditionally marginalized populations,” Town Council Liaison to the Library Advisory Board NOW OPEN Jess Anderson said in the same release. “This The Orange County Historical Museum policy change is one more way that we can put reopened on Sept. 25 after its temporary our values into action in Chapel Hill.” closure last November. The museum welcomed two new staff members: Site Manager Tanya Girls on the Run of the Triangle celebrated Day and Exhibits and Programs Coordinator 20 years of supporting and empowering young Courtney Smith. Visitors can also view women in June. Additionally, after serving as its newest exhibit, “Yésah: Journeys of the interim executive director for 18 months, Meg Occaneechi,” virtually through the museum’s Pomerantz was named executive director of website, orangehistorync.org. Girls on the Run of the Triangle on July 1. Meg

In August, Hillsborough natives Elena Curelop (pictured left) and Rebecca Felicelli (right) began nonprofit Bags for Boredom to provide Orange County children living in poverty or foster care with games that are both educational and fun. Elena says she noticed a “severe lack of entertainment for these children” during the pandemic and hopes the provided games will “improve literacy and give [the kids] social development enhancement during this time of social distancing.” Elena, a junior at Appalachian State University, and Rebecca, a sophomore at N.C. State, have raised funds through discount nights at local restaurants, including Antonia’s, among other avenues. Elena and Rebecca have raised more than $2,500 and aim to donate 250 bags to the Orange County Department of Social Services this month. CHM

The Chapel Hill Town Council appointed Ann M. Anderson as

PHOTO COURTESY OF ANDERSON FAMILY

town attorney in July. Ann was previously a faculty member at the

UNC School of Government and attended UNC

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tuningin Chapel Hill native designs musical insight app By E lle n H ard i s o n

J

ake Zinn had a passion for music as a Carrboro High School student, but felt he had to put

in a lot of effort to discover new songs and information about his favorite artists, which include Jay-Z, Future and Action Bronson. “I was super frustrated because I was finding out either from my friends or from these random blogs,” he says. He wondered why there wasn’t a quick and easy way to stay up to date. Years later, he channeled that love for music into his studies as an arts management major with a concentration in the music industry at the College of Charleston. Sitting in his Introduction to the Music Industry class, Jake heard a peer describe how there’s a data overload of information regarding the music industry. This discussion brought Jake back to his thoughts from high school. “There’s not anything or anywhere where you can filter your own information,” he says. Jake graduated in May and used both his knowledge of popular music and his experience with personalized app notifications to solve that problem by developing his own app, Beepr. The app works as a centralized hub and content aggregator, and users can customize their notification settings. “You just go into the app, and everything on your favorite artist is within a touch of a button,” Jake says. Once users select artists and the news they want to be notified about – from tour dates to new interviews to song releases – the app’s algorithm connects them to methods for receiving information, such as push notifications sending them straight to Spotify or Apple Music to listen to music or to YouTube to watch music videos. Jake says he had no prior experience in the tech industry or marketing apps, but developed ways to gain attention and followers for Beepr via social media platforms. On Twitter, he would quickly reply to a famous artist’s tweet. “So if it was Drake, I would tweet [right] under Drake, and I’d be the first or second tweet with a screenshot [of the Beepr app’s 20

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content featuring Drake’s news],” he explains. He says his tweets would get hundreds or thousands of engagement and impressions because Twitter users were curious about the app. With 110 popular artists from Kanye West and Billie Eilish to Justin Bieber available to follow on the app, Beepr has already gained 20,000 active users since its launch five months ago. The app’s Twitter account averaged 5 to 8 million engagements during its first few months with no paid marketing. Beepr’s click-through rate is 30% within the first 24 hours of a notification. “That statistic really shows that the users that we have on Beepr are super trustworthy of our alerts,” he says. “Labels, PR teams and marketing teams within the industry are going to want to take advantage of the data and the users that we have.” Jake moved to San Francisco in September, where he works on Beepr full time with five employees. He says they are on track to have 100,000 active users within the next year, and his goal is to connect with other businesses and the music industry. “We want to slowly expand into other genres and older artists,” he says. “Our demographic can really be anybody.” CHM


Escape the indoors. From greenways to waterways, Raleigh, N.C., has plenty of amazing, fresh-air experiences and wide-open spaces for visitors to enjoy. And as more indoor spaces like museums, art galleries and restaurant dining rooms open, rest assured that we are taking the necessary steps to keep you safe.

visitRaleigh.com/wish


on love and war

and writing A Q&A with author Robert Huddleston, 96, about his new World War II historical fiction (a lot of action with a dash of romance) novella

C

arolina Meadows’ Robert Huddleston’s new historical novel is based on his experiences as a fighter pilot in the European Theater of Operations during World War II. Born three years before Charles Lindbergh made his cross-Atlantic solo flight, Robert credits the flying aces of World War I and Lucky Lindy as his inspirations to learn to fly, with an added motivation (see below) to becoming a fighter pilot. His new book – “Love and War,” available on Amazon (Paperback, $8.95; hardcover, $21.95; E-book, $4.50) – spans events from the First World War through the end of World War II. Robert and his wife, Pepita, moved to Chapel Hill in 1999, “[W]hen we found Pennsylvania too cold for two elders. We were retired, though I presented myself as a freelance [but unpaid] writer. We purchased a house in Columbia Place just off what was then Airport Road. It was a good investment, and we sold it in 2004 when we moved to Carolina Meadows.” The following is a lightly edited transcript of an email conversation between Robert and Chapel Hill Magazine’s Dan Shannon.

This is your first full-length novel, correct? Why did you decide to write it? I think due

to its brevity, “Love and War” should have been labeled a novella – my second, in fact. In 2014 I published the fictional “An American Pilot with the Luftwaffe.” It was favorably reviewed in Air Power History [magazine]. [The reason I finally wrote it in my mid-90s] was a fellow pilot, Captain Floyd Blair – he and I and one other pilot, who is now 100-plus-years-old, are the last known of our group to be alive – liked the short stories I had written over the years and urged me to write a novel. And it was the late Herb 22

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Bailey, a Carolina Meadows neighbor

(who edited the Princeton [University] Press for 40 years), who urged me to try my hand at fiction. Let’s talk about your book. “Love and War” traces two connected families from WWI through WWII, and without spoiling anything, is it based on your life? Every chapter

in some way relates to my experience and/or my reading and hearing. I simply [tied] it all together using my imagination. You know, that “thing” we are born with that has ghosts in our bedroom and bad persons under our bed. But, as adults, it can produce serial novelists! You served as a fighter pilot in the waning days of WWII, completing 36 combat missions. Thank you for your service. What drove you to become a fighter pilot in the war? The smart-ass answer: Girls!

It’s difficult to find glamour in war, but the public laid it on for fighter pilots – they were called the “Knights of the Air” in WWI, and in WWII, the public idolized fighter pilots in the U.S. Army Air Corps and British RAF [Royal Air Force], even the German Luftwaffe (the


B OOKS

latter having the best-looking uniforms). Among my friends, of the many who tried, just three received the coveted silver wings: one a P-61 pilot (a night fighter), another a P-51 Mustang pilot who became an “ace” with six aerial victories, and yours truly, a P-47 Thunderbolt pilot used mainly in support of ground forces.

How long did you serve? I was separated from active duty in January

I’m guessing Ernie Brown, the dashing pilot in the book, who, like you, flew P-47 fighter-bombers, is based on someone you knew? Yes,

[Victory in Europe] Day, May 8, 1945, my unit, the 404th Fighter Group, occupied a former Luftwaffe base near the border of what would be the Soviet Occupation Zone. Not surprisingly, the U.S. military coveted German advanced military hardware and research documents. Our Air Force wanted anything connected to jet aircraft and rockets [the Germans had] in production or planned. With the Soviets due to move in [very soon], there was little time to locate what was coveted and move it to the American Zone of Occupation. I volunteered.

the [fictional] Ernie Brown was based on the first CO [commanding officer] of my unit, Carroll McColpin, who had been a squadron CO with the RAF in units of American pilots called Eagle Squadrons. He and I flew P-47s in combat, but I had [Ernie] serving with the British RAF before Pearl Harbor. Ernie had to be born in 1920 to pull that off. And when those American RAF pilots transferred to the U.S. Eighth Air Force in September 1942, they flew P-47s before receiving P-51 long-range fighters. As an aside, one American Eagle married an English aristocrat, and Pepita’s father’s second wife was a German princess!

1946, but remained in the Air Force Reserve, promoted to captain and discharged from the reserves in 1957. At the end of the war, your service took an interesting turn that led to your being involved in the dismantling of the German V-2 rocket program. At VE

Then what happened? I was assigned a Jeep, a driver, a sergeant

armed with a machine gun, and a young Dutch student who had been forced to work for the Germans. Operating out of a small German city in the Soviet Zone, [we conducted] “Operation Lusty” (Luftwaffe

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Secret Technology). I was issued a top secret document listing what was coveted. My assigned area was in and around the city of Nordhausen and included the nearby underground factory producing the V-2 ballistic missiles launched against London from September 1944 to VE Day. I went in not knowing much about Nordhausen and the underground [rocket] factory. What [I] found was it held thousands of dead and dying slave laborers from the underground rocket factory that Dr. Wernher von Braun and his civilian plant manager, Arthur Rudolph, had procured from the Buchenwald concentration camp. [We] collected [about 100 German rockets] and shipped them to an army facility in New Mexico that became the White Sands Missile Range. Dr. Von Braun and 100 of his Nazis and ex-SS officers soon followed. Note: In 2011, triggered by the myth that Dr. Von Braun was a decent and honorable German forced to serve Adolf Hitler, I published a history play, “Exploitation.” I had hoped that high schools would perform the play but none, to my knowledge, did.

General Services Administration, an agency that included the National Archives, where I became involved in recruiting a director for the [President] Johnson Presidential Library. Under [President] Nixon, however, the GSA was corrupted, with government grants and contracts only going to those who would support his re-election. I was disgusted, and subsequently published an [anonymous] article in the weekly Federal Times and soon after retired on a reduced pension during a “downsizing” at GSA. The Federal Times invited me to contribute an op-ed column, and I agreed to contribute two per month, an arrangement that lasted from 1975 to 1985 [and] enabled me to improve as a writer.

After the war you had a career with NASA and then on to another federal agency. In December 1967, I transferred from NASA to the

Final question: Do you have any more books in the planning stages or coming out? No more books; eyes too bad! CHM

Tell me a little about your freelance writing career. I first became a book review editor for an

obscure journal that was unable to find reviewers, so I took to the task, only reviewing books that interested me – such as “Management and Machiavelli.” That was back in the late 1960s, and I am still at it reviewing books for Air Power History, The University Bookman and the History News Network.

FINE GIFTS, C U S T O M S TAT I O N E RY, FURNISHINGS & INTERIOR DESIGN

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PHOTO BY ANDREA ANDERSON

The slow-braised lamb shank with creamy Parmesan risotto and crispy onions at Flair Restaurant & Wine Bar.

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the best of

Chatham

Readers of Chatham Magazine (our sister publication) picked their favorites in categories ranging from best restaurant to best gift shop (Originally published in the Oct/Nov 2020 issue of Chatham Magazine.)

*all results listed in alphabetical order **the presence of five winners is the result of a tie

DINING Overall Restaurant Copeland Springs Farm & Kitchen Governors Club Postal Fish Company The Root Cellar Cafe & Catering

Place for Breakfast/Brunch Breakaway Cafe The Root Cellar Cafe & Catering Small B&B Cafe Virlie’s Grill

Italian Food Capp’s Pizzeria & Trattoria Elizabeth’s Pizza (Pittsboro) John’s Italian Pizza Restaurant Tarantini Italian Restaurant

Place for a Date Night The Fearrington House Restaurant The Modern Life Deli & Drinks Postal Fish Company The Root Cellar Cafe & Catering

Outdoor Dining Copeland Springs Farm & Kitchen Mi Cancun The Modern Life Deli & Drinks The Root Cellar Cafe & Catering Small B&B Cafe

Asian Food China Inn Restaurant (Pittsboro) Moon Asian Bistro New Japan Panda Garden

Upscale Restaurant The Fearrington House Restaurant Flair Restaurant & Wine Bar Postal Fish Company Tarantini Italian Restaurant

Kid-Friendly Restaurant Lizzie’s Grill-N-Chill The Root Cellar Cafe & Catering S&T’s Soda Shoppe Town Hall Burger and Beer

New Restaurant Copeland Springs Farm & Kitchen Goodness Gracious Juice Co. Michoacán Mexican Grill O’YA Cantina

Place for a Sandwich Breakaway Cafe The Modern Life Deli & Drinks The Root Cellar Cafe & Catering Virlie’s Grill

Chef Colin Bedford, The Fearrington House Restaurant Sera Cuni, The Root Cellar Cafe & Catering Benjamin Guaman, Governors Club Bill Hartley, Postal Fish Company

Burger & Fries Al’s Diner Carolina Brewery Lizzie’s Grill-N-Chill Town Hall Burger and Beer

Place for Vegetarians Angelina’s Kitchen Breakaway Cafe Copeland Springs Farm & Kitchen Goodness Gracious Juice Co. The Root Cellar Cafe & Catering

Place to Watch the Game Carolina Brewery House of Hops The Modern Life Deli & Drinks Town Hall Burger and Beer Pizza Capp’s Pizzeria & Trattoria Elizabeth’s Pizza (Pittsboro) John’s Italian Pizza Restaurant The Modern Life Deli & Drinks

Mexican/Latin American Food Compadres Tequila Lounge (Pittsboro) Guanajuato Mexican Restaurant Mi Cancun Michoacán Mexican Grill Barbecue Allen & Son Bar-B-Que The Root Cellar Cafe & Catering Smithfield’s Chicken ‘N Bar-B-Q Steak The Belted Goat The Fearrington House Restaurant Hayley Bales Steakhouse Virlie’s Grill Seafood Capt. John’s Dockside Fish & Crab House Dry Dock Seafood (Siler City) Postal Fish Company Comfort Food/Southern Food Bestfood Cafeteria The Root Cellar Cafe & Catering S&T’s Soda Shoppe Virlie’s Grill 

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B EST OF CHATH A M

*all results listed in alphabetical order **the presence of five winners is the result of a tie

Place to Get Coffee Blue Dot Coffee Breakaway Cafe The Phoenix Bakery The Root Cellar Cafe & Catering

Real Estate Company Bold Real Estate (Governors Club Realty) Chatham Homes Realty DeSell & Co. Realty Group Real Living Carolina Lifestyles Realty

Desserts/Pastries Carolina Cravings Co. The Phoenix Bakery The Root Cellar Cafe & Catering Willy’s Cinnamon Rolls Etc.

Bed & Breakfast 458 West Bed & Breakfast The Fearrington House Inn The Inn at Celebrity Dairy The Rosemary House B&B Small B&B Cafe

Frozen Treats 501 Pharmacy Creative Creamery The Root Cellar Cafe & Catering S&T’s Soda Shoppe

PHOTO BY CORNELL WATSON

Catering 39 West Catering Angelina’s Kitchen Governors Club The Old Place Catering and Events The Root Cellar Cafe & Catering Craft Beverage or Local Producer Carolina Brewery Chatham Cider Works Fair Game Beverage Co. Thirsty Skull Brewing Place for a Beer 580 Craft Beer Carolina Brewery The City Tap House of Hops

Pediatrician/Family Medicine Dr. Brad Barnes, North Chatham Pediatrics and Internal Medicine Dr. Woodward D. (Woody) Burgert III, UNC Family Medicine at Pittsboro Dr. John Corey, UNC Family Medicine at Pittsboro Dr. Lisa A. Emrich, North Chatham Pediatrics and Internal Medicine Dr. Stephen Gangemi, Systems Health Care Dr. William Garlick, Garlick and Murray Family Medicine

Megan Lynch has been a volunteer at the Chatham Habitat for Humanity ReStore for five years.

Place for a Cocktail Fair Game Beverage Co. The Fearrington House Restaurant The Modern Life Deli & Drinks Postal Fish Company Wine, Beer and/or Spirits Shop 580 Craft Beer Fair Game Beverage Co. House of Hops Vino!! Wine Shop

Yoga/Pilates Duke Center for Living at Fearrington Joy of Movement Pilates at Studio 8 Yoga Garden PBO Automotive Services/Repairs Chapel Hill Tire Doug’s Auto & Tire Inc. Performance Automotive & Tire Sanders Automotive Bank First Bank State Employees’ Credit Union Truist (SunTrust and BB&T) Wells Fargo

SERVICES New Business Chatham Paint Center Goodness Gracious Juice Co. Lucky Bar Farm O’YA Cantina

Optometrist/Eye Clinic Dr. Robert E. Connelly, Pittsboro Family Eye Center Dr. Ray Hager, Siler Crossing Vision Center Dr. Heather O’Mara, Triangle Visions Optometry of Chapel Hill Dentist/Dental Care Dr. Sidharth Bansal, Pittsboro Dental Associates Dr. Colin Barbaro, Chatham Family & Implant Dentistry Dr. Laura A. Collatz, Enchanting Smiles Family Dentistry Dr. Samir Naik, Pittsboro Family Dentistry Dr. Timothy D. Scheetz Dermatologist/Skin Care Clinic Dr. Chris G. Adigun, Dermatology & Laser Center of Chapel Hill Dr. John Cheesborough, Sanford Dermatology UNC Dermatology & Skin Cancer Center

Nonprofit Chatham Arts Council Chatham Habitat for Humanity CORA Food Pantry Farm Friends Rescue

Pet Boarding Companion Camp Dogwood Veterinary Hospital & Pet Resort Hill Creek Veterinary Hospital Pat’s Grooming & Boarding Kennel Pittsboro Animal Hospital

Salon 64 W. Salon Edge Aveda Men Eric Michaels Salon & Boutique Salon Breeze

Veterinarian Cole Park Veterinary Hospital Hill Creek Veterinary Hospital Hope Crossing Animal Hospital Pittsboro Animal Hospital

Lawyer Paul S. Messick Jr., Gunn & Messick Nicolas P. Robinson, Bradshaw Robinson Slawter Todd Roper, Moody, Williams, Roper & Lee Kathie Russell, Russell & Associates

Sports Club/Fitness Facility Chatham YMCA Duke Center for Living at Fearrington Ladies’ Fitness Center of Pittsboro Wellness Center at Governors Club

Real Estate Agent Chanel Hart D’Aprix, Bold Real Estate Newt Heilman, Realty World Carolina Properties Laurie Lynch, Chatham Homes Realty Tanya Papandrea, DeSell & Co. Realty Group

HOME & GARDEN Landscaping & Garden Supply Store B & L Supply Country Farm & Home Pittsboro Feed Southern States 

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Orthodontist Morgenstern Orthodontics Dr. Tammy R. Severt, Severt Smiles


ORANGE COUNTY TURNS US ON!

5:30 - 10 AM

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B EST OF CHATH A M

*all results listed in alphabetical order **the presence of five winners is the result of a tie

Landscaper Arbor Enterprises Hughes Landscape & Irrigation Poultry Villa Landscaping and Supplies Yanders Landscaping

Architect Steven Clipp Architecture Hobbs Architects Abbie Lee Roehm, Paces and Roehm Architecture

Home Maintenance & Repair B&T HVAC Bud Matthews Services Chimneys Plus Window Wizard

RETAIL Clothing Store Chatham County PTA Thrift Shops Dovecote Style JR Moore & Son New Horizons Downtown New Horizons West

Neighborhood Briar Chapel Chatham Forest Fearrington Village Governors Club Interior Decorator An Acquired Style Hannah Brown, Deep River Mercantile Mary Kate Bedell, Fresh Air Designs Christy Lynch O’Hara, Steel Roots Home Decor Construction Business/Builder Absolute Construction and Development Bold Construction Mid-South Builders Inc. The Rexford Group Ltd.

Gift Store Deep River Mercantile McIntyre’s Books New Horizons Downtown Southern Supreme Fruitcake & More Jewelry Store Deep River Mercantile JG McLaurin, Goldsmith Liquidambar Gallery and Gifts New Horizons Downtown Home Furnishings, Accessories and Decor Chatham Habitat for Humanity ReStore Deep River Mercantile Fragments Reclamation Home Furnishings Steel Roots Home Décor ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Event Space Chatham County Agriculture & Conference Center Fearrington Village Governors Club The Parlour at Manns Chapel Pittsboro Center for the Arts & Sweet Bee Theater

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Natural Microblading

Holistic Facials

For appointments or free consultation arcanabeautyandbrows.com Located at Carr Mill Mall, inside BE PURE 200 N Greensboro St, Suite A8, Carrboro, NC 919.259.2848 30

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Dance Studio 7 Dance Centre Chatham Dance Connection Renner Dance Company Royal Grace Academy of Dance Art Gallery Liquidambar Gallery and Gifts NC Arts Incubator ODDCO Small Museum of Folk Art Artist’s Studio or Workshop Chatham Clay Studio Craig Greiner of Greiner Studio Mark Hewitt Pottery Live Music Venue Bynum Front Porch The City Tap The Modern Life Deli & Drinks Roost Beer Garden Place for a Family Outing Fearrington Village Haw River Jordan Lake State Recreation Area M&M Alpaca Farm CHM


Small Business Saturday ÂŽ is November 28, 2020 We encourage you to Shop Local!

Go to CarolinaChamber.org/list for a list of local Chamber members in our area Thanks to: BlueCross BlueShield of North Carolina, UNC Health and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill


D INING GUIDE

*DETAILS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. CHECK RESTAURANT WEBSITES AND SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS PRIOR TO VISITING.

INCLUDES RESTAURANTS, DELIS AND BISTROS IN CH APEL HILL, CARRBORO, HILLSBOROUGH AND NORTHERN CHATHAM COUNTY

CHAPEL HILL East Franklin Street Bandido’s Mexican Cafe Burritos, salads, quesadillas, tacos. 159-½ E. Franklin St.; 919-967-5048; bandidoscafe.com Benny Cappella’s Pizza by the slice or whole pie. 122 E. Franklin St.; 919-240-5286; bennysva.com Carolina Coffee Shop Casual American cuisine for breakfast, lunch and dinner. 138 E. Franklin St.; 919-942-6875; carolinacoffeeshop.com Cosmic Cantina Burritos, salads, quesadillas, tacos. 128 E. Franklin St.; 919-960-3955 Curry Point Express Indian fare including curry, biryani and wraps. 118 E. Franklin St.; 919-903-9000; currypointexpress.com Down Time Craft beer, pizza, tacos, wraps, paninis and more. Call or text to make a reservation. 201 E. Franklin St.; 828-7195376; downtimechapelhill.com Epilogue Independent bookstore and Mexican-style chocolatería. 109 E. Franklin St., Ste. 100; 919-913-5055; epiloguebookcafe.com www.epiloguebookcafe.com Four Corners American fare, nachos, wings, pasta. 175 E. Franklin St.; 919-537-8230; fourcornersgrille.com

109 E Franklin St. Suite 100 Chapel Hill, NC 27514

(919) 913-5055 | @epiloguebooksch

Hibachi & Company Japanese fast-casual spot serving healthy hibachi- and teriyakistyle dishes. 153 E. Franklin St.; 919-9038428; hibachicompany.com Imbibe Bottle shop and restaurant serving pizza, salads and appetizers. 108 Henderson St.; 919-636-6469; imbibenc.com Linda’s Bar & Grill Local beer, sweet potato tots, cheese fries, burgers. 203 E. Franklin St.; 919-933-6663; lindas-bar.com Sup Dogs Creative hot dogs and sides like jalapeño popper tots and funnel cake sticks. 107 E. Franklin St.; 919-903-9566; supdogs.com

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Sutton’s Drug Store Old-fashioned diner known for its hot dogs, burgers and sandwiches like “Roy’s Reuben.” 159 E. Franklin St.; 919-942-5161; suttonsdrugstore.com Time-Out Southern comfort food 24 hours a day. 201 E. Franklin St.; 919-929-2425; timeout247.com Top of the Hill A Chapel Hill brewery that also offers American food, like burgers and flatbreads. 100 E. Franklin St.; 919-9298676; thetopofthehill.com TRU Deli & Wine Bar Sandwiches and wine. 114 Henderson St.; 919-240-7755; trudeli.com Yaya Tea Japanese cafe with a variety of bubble teas and imported Japanese snacks. 157 E. Franklin St.; 919-914-6302; yayatea.com Ye Olde Waffle Shoppe Temporarily closed (reopening TBD) West Franklin Street 411 West Fresh pasta, seafood and pizzas inspired by the flavors of Italy and the Mediterranean, with a healthy California twist; outdoor dining. 411 W. Franklin St.; 919-967-2782; 411west.com Al’s Burger Shack Gourmet burgers and fries. 516 W. Franklin St.; 919-9047659; alsburgershack.com B.GOOD Temporarily closed (reopening TBD) Beer Study Bottle shop with in-store drafts and growlers to go. 106 N. Graham St.; 919-240-5423; beerstudy.com Blue Dogwood Public Market Food hall with individually-owned food stalls including traditional Persian, vegan soul food, North Carolina barbecue and a nutrient-dense weekly pre-order menu. 306 W. Franklin St.; 919-717-0404; bluedogwood.com Boro Beverage Co. Locally made kombucha and craft sodas on tap. 400 W. Rosemary St., Ste. 1005; 919-537-8001; borobeverage.com

November 2020

Brandwein’s Bagels Classic New York bagels and breakfast sandwiches. 505 W. Rosemary St.; 919-240-7071; brandweinsbagels.com Bread & Butter Bakery & Coffeeshop Temporarily closed (reopening TBD) BUNS Gourmet burgers, fries and shakes made from fresh ingredients. 107 N. Columbia St.; 919-240-4746; bunsofchapelhill.com Carolina Brewery The fifth-oldest brewery in the state featuring Carolina cuisine. 460 W. Franklin St.; 919-942-1800; carolinabrewery.com Cat Tales Cat Cafe A two-story coffee/ beer/wine cafe home to 12 adoptable cats. Open for online reservations. 431 W. Franklin St.; cattalescatcafe.com Chimney Indian Kitchen + Bar Offers both traditional Indian dishes and unique options like lobster pepper masala. 306 W. Franklin St., Ste. D; 984-234-3671; chimneyindiankitchen.com CholaNad Restaurant & Bar Contemporary and traditional South Indian cuisine. Catering available. 310 W. Franklin St.; 800-246-5262; cholanad.com Crook’s Corner Temporarily closed (reopening TBD) Crossroads Chapel Hill at The Carolina Inn New American cuisine and seasonal specialties; all ABC permits; outdoor dining. 211 Pittsboro St.; 919-918-2777; crossroadscuisine.com Elaine’s on Franklin Fine regional American cuisine, made with the freshest local ingredients; all ABC permits. 454 W. Franklin St.; 919-960-2770; elainesonfranklin.com Heavenly Buffaloes Chicken wings as well as vegan wings with more than 25 rubs and sauces. 407 W. Franklin St.; 919-9146717; heavenlybuffaloes.com/chapel-hill Italian Pizzeria III Pizza, Italian entrees, calzones and subs. The "place to be" in Chapel Hill for 40 years. 508 W. Franklin St.; 919-968-4671; italianpizzeria3.com


E X TRA H E LP INGS TONYA COUNCIL TALKS THANKSGIVING MEMORIES AND MAMA DIP ’S SWEET POTATO PUDDING

I know my favorite time of the year has arrived and that the holiday season is just around the corner when the summer heat disappears and that cold chill hits the morning air. Fall brings back memories of my grandmother, Mildred Council (aka Mama Dip), and her grated sweet potato pudding, a Thanksgiving tradition. Fall was the start of the high season at Mama Dip’s Kitchen, where I worked alongside my grandmother as a teenager. Every Thanksgiving Eve, our family and staff would hustle to get meals ready for customers to pick up. I remember looking at the clock, eagerly waiting for when we’d finally be finished with work so that we could start preparing our own family meal for Thanksgiving Day. I knew I’d indulge in Grandma’s grated sweet potato pudding. It tasted like dessert, but we ate it as a side dish, along with collard greens and Grandpa’s chicken. I would watch in awe as my grandmother peeled and grated the sweet potatoes. She had an easy, confident approach to cooking – and she didn’t need a recipe. If the dining room wasn't too busy, I would help her wash, peel and grate the sweet potatoes. I remember thinking that I wanted to be just like her. Once the dish was prepped and placed in the oven, I’d stick my head in the kitchen between waiting tables so I could get a whiff of the spices and butter starting to come together as the pudding cooked. As I waited for the timer to go off and the door of the oven to open, I couldn’t help wishing that it was tomorrow already and that we were sitting down together for Thanksgiving dinner. Finally, we’d gather at Grandma’s house, where I’d get my huge helping of that sweet potato pudding. My grandmother would watch and chuckle as I struggled to get up from the table after all that delicious indulging. This recipe is my tribute to my grandmother and to those wonderful Thanksgiving memories.

SWEET POTATO PUDDING Makes 8 to 10 servings 4 cups raw sweet potatoes, peeled and grated 1 stick butter or margarine, melted 1/2 tsp. ground cloves 1/2 tsp. ginger 1/2 tsp. allspice 3 eggs, beaten 1 cup brown sugar, packed 1 cup dark corn syrup 1 1/4 cups milk 1/2 cup pecan pieces, raisins or coconut, or any of the three in combination (optional) Heat oven to 350 F. Combine the sweet potatoes, butter, spices, eggs, brown sugar, corn syrup and milk. Stir to mix well. Add the nuts, raisins or coconut, if desired. Pour into a greased, 1 quart baking dish and bake for 50-60 minutes, until well set. CHM

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DINING GUIDE

Kurama Sushi & Noodle Express Dumplings, salads, noodle dishes. 105 N. Columbia St.; 919-968-4747; kuramasushinoodle.com

The Northside District Specialty cocktails and international small plates. 403 W. Rosemary St.; 919-391-7044; thenorthsidedistrict.com

Trolly Stop - The Beach on Franklin Specialty hot dogs and burgers. 104 W. Franklin St.; 919-240-4206; trollystophotdogs.com

La Résidence French-inspired cuisine made from fresh ingredients. 202 W. Rosemary St.; 919-967-2506; laresidencedining.com

Pho Happiness Pho noodle soup, vermicelli plates and vegetarian/gluten-free options. 508A W. Franklin St.; 919-942-8201; phohappiness.com

Vimala’s Curryblossom Café Traditional Indian tandoori and thali. 431 W. Franklin St.; 919-929-3833; curryblossom.com

Lantern Temporarily closed (reopening TBD)

The Pizza Press Build-your-own pizza, salads and craft beer. 133 W. Franklin St., Ste. 120; 984-234-0081; thepizzapress.com

Lime & Basil Vietnamese fare. 200 W. Franklin St.; 919-967-5055; limeandbasil.com Mama Dip’s Traditional Southern specialties, brunch and dinner classics like fried chicken and Brunswick stew. 408 W. Rosemary St.; 919-942-5837; mamadips.com

The Purple Bowl Acai bowls, toast, smoothies, coffee. 306-B W. Franklin St.; 919-903-8511; purplebowlch.com Que Chula Authentic Mexican food, tacos and craft tequilas. 140 W. Franklin St., Ste. 110; 919-903-8000; quechulatacos.com

Mediterranean Deli Healthy vegan, vegetarian and gluten-free options. 410 W. Franklin St.; 919-967-2666; mediterraneandeli.com

Spicy 9 Sushi Bar & Asian Restaurant Sushi, Thai curries, bibimbap and other Asian entrees. 140 W. Franklin St., Ste. 150; 919-903-9335; spicy9chapelhill.com

Might As Well Bar & Grill Bar favorites, plus pizza, burgers, wings and more. 206 W. Franklin St.; 984-234-3333; chapelhill.mightaswellbarandgrill.com

Summit Coffee Cold brews, lattes, teas, special blends and more. 140 W. Franklin St., Ste. 120; 704-895-9090; summitcoffee.com

Mint Contemporary Indian Cuisine North Indian subz korma and chicken jalfrezi. 504 W. Franklin St.; 919-929-6188; mintunc.com

Talulla’s Authentic Turkish cuisine; all ABC permits. 456 W. Franklin St.; 919-933-1177; talullas.com

West End Wine Bar Temporarily closed (reopening TBD) YoPo of Chapel Hill Since 1982, YoPo has served frozen yogurt, treats and shakes with unique flavors. 106 W. Franklin St.; 919-942-7867; yogurtpump.com Village Plaza/East Franklin Street/ Eastgate Crossing/Rams Plaza Breadman’s A variety of burgers, sandwiches, salads and grilled meat, with daily soup and specials. All-day breakfast; catering available. 261 S. Elliott Rd.; 919-967-7110; breadmens.com Caffé Driade Carrboro Coffee, bowlsize lattes, local baked goods, beer and wine. 1215-A E. Franklin St.; 919-942-2333; caffedriade.com Carolina 1663 Contemporary Southern fare at the Sheraton. 1 Europa Dr.; 919-969-2157

FIRST IN FLAVOR

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DINE-IN TAKEOUT DELIVERY

RESERVATIONS STRONGLY RECOMENDED

2020

BEST PIZZA

AlfredosPizzaNC.com 34

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For more information and to make your reservation, please visit CatTalesCatCafe.com 431 W. Franklin St., Suite 210 Chapel Hill, NC 27516

CRAFT BEER - SCRATCH MADE FOOD - PATIO SEATING - CRAFT COCKTAILS - TO-GO FOOD & BEER - ONLINE ORDERING LOCATED IN CHAPEL HILL & PITTSBORO www.carolinabrewery.com


D I NI NG GUI D E

Casa Maria Latin Cuisine Specialty dips, ceviche, street tacos, nachos, burritos and salads. 1502 E. Franklin St.; 919-929-6566 The Casual Pint Upscale craft beer market with beers and wine on tap, and ice-cream sandwiches. 201 S. Elliott Rd., Ste. 51; 919-967-2626; chapelhill.thecasualpint.com CAVA Customizable Mediterranean bowls, salads, pitas and soups. 79 S. Elliott Rd.; 919-636-5828; cava.com Chopt Offers unique salads, grain and quinoa bowls. Eastgate Crossing; 919-240-7660; choptsalad.com Clean Juice Certified organic juices, smoothies, bowls and snacks. Eastgate Crossing; 919-590-5133; cleanjuice.com Crab House Company Fresh, flavorful seafood. 237 S. Elliott Rd.; 919-903-9015; crabhouseco.com Dunk & Slide at Whole Foods Market Hot bar is open for to-go orders only. Outside seating is available after pickup. 81 S. Elliott Rd.; 919-968-1983; wholefoodsmarket.com The Ghost Kitchen & Delivery Co. Chapel Hill’s first delivery-only restaurant group. The group consists of two virtual restaurants, Bistro 501 and The BBQ Company of Chapel Hill. 1322 N. Fordham Blvd.; ghostkitcheneats.com

Guglhupf Bake Shop European-style breads, pastries and coffee. Eastgate Crossing; 919-914-6511; guglhupf.com/ chapel-hill-bake-shop

Monterrey Mexican Grill Tacos, quesadillas, burritos and more. Rams Plaza; 919-969-8750; monterreychapelhill.com

Il Palio Ristorante at The Siena Hotel N.C.’s only AAA Four Diamond Italian restaurant. 1505 E. Franklin St.; 919-918-2545; ilpalio.com

Mr. Tokyo Japanese Restaurant Unlimited sushi and hibachi. Rams Plaza; 919-2404552; mrtokyojapanese.com/chapel-hill

Japan Express Hibachi-style meals and sushi. 106 S. Estes Dr.; doordash.com Just Salad Salads, wraps, smoothies, soups, grain bowls, market plates and toast boxes. 111 S. Elliott Rd.; justsalad.com Kipos Greek Taverna Greek cuisine in a relaxed, upscale setting with outdoor dining. Eastgate Crossing; 919-425-0760; kiposchapelhill.com

Squid’s Fresh seafood options include wood-grilled fillets, Maine lobster, fried seafood and oysters. 1201 Fordham Blvd. (15-501); 919-942-8757; squidsrestaurant.com Sunrise Biscuit Kitchen Drive-thru biscuits, sandwiches. 1305 E. Franklin St.; 919-933-1324; sunrisebiscuits.com

La Hacienda Burritos, salads, quesadillas, tacos. 1813 Fordham Blvd.; 919-967-0207 The Loop Pizza Grill Pizzas, soups, salads, sandwiches, burgers. Eastgate Crossing; 919-969-7112; looppizzagrill.com Min Ga Authentic Korean cuisine like bibimbap, bulgogi and variety of homemade kimchi. 1404 E. Franklin St.; 919-933-1773; min-ga.com

Red Pepper Chinese restaurant offering traditional Szechuan dishes. 1704 E. Franklin St.; 919-968-3488; redpeppernc.com

Sutton’s at the Atrium A cafe version of Sutton’s Drug Store with menu options including its famous hot dogs, salads and more. 100 Europa Dr.; 919-240-4471; suttonsdrugstore.com Tandoor Indian Restaurant Traditional Indian cuisine, vegan options. 1301 E. Franklin St.; 919-967-6622; tandoorindian.com

Gourmet Family Meals MON + WED + FRI Curbside Pick-Up + Delivery

ORDER ONLINE

BeauCateringMarketplace.com November 2020

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DINING GUIDE

Twisted Noodles Thai noodle soups, pan-fried noodles. Eastgate Crossing; 919-933-9933; twistednoodlesch.com University Place Alfredo’s Pizza Villa Pizzas, calzones, salads, subs, pasta, desserts. 919-9683424; alfredospizzanc.com bartaco Tacos, fresh-juice cocktails, poke and mole options. 910-807-8226; bartaco.com Hawkers Inspired by Southeast Asia's street fare, this eatery features homemade favorites, from dumplings to curries. Indoor and outdoor seating. 919-415-1799; eathawkers.com Maple View Mobile Temporarily closed (reopening TBD) Stoney River Steakhouse and Grill Southern favorites like deviled eggs meet steakhouse mainstays like the legendary 12 oz. filet. 919-914-6688; stoneyriver.com Trilogy American cafe featuring innovative twists on classic dishes. Outdoor seating available. Silverspot Cinema; 919-357-9887; silverspot.net Village Burgers Temporarily closed (reopening TBD)

Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard (Airport Road) Hunam Chinese Restaurant Cantonese cuisine. 790 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-967-6133; hunamrestaurant.net Kitchen Bistro-style dining with a seasonal menu that always includes mussels. 764 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-537-8167; kitchenchapelhill.com Lucha Tigre Latin-Asian cuisine and sake tequila bar. 746 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-9047326; luchatigre.com The Root Cellar Sandwiches, salads, desserts and more. Online ordering and pickup, weekly prepared meals, groceries to-go box and Friday night specials. 750 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-967-3663; rootcellarchapelhill.com Timberlyne/Chapel Hill North Area Chapel Hill Wine Company Wine store with bottles from all over the globe. 2809 Homestead Rd.; 919-968-1884; chapelhillwinecompany.com Deli Edison Neighborhood deli with bagels, sandwiches, salads. 630 Weaver Dairy Rd.; 919-929-7700; deliedison.com Farm House Restaurant Temporarily closed (reopening TBD)

WE’RE OPEN FOR DINE-IN, CURBSIDE PICKUP AND DELIVERY

SERVING BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNER & FAMILY MEALS on our patio or takeout

BEST ITALIAN 411 W. Franklin St., Chapel Hill 919.967.2782 411West.com for hours/menu 36

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Mon - Sat 8am - 8pm Sunday brunch 8am - 2pm

Breakawaync.co 984-234-3010 58 Chapelton CT, Chapel Hill, NC

Joe Van Gogh Coffee, tea and pastries. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-967-2002; joevangogh.com Magone Italian Grill & Pizza Italian mains. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-904-7393; magone-italian-grill-pizza. business.site Margaret’s Cantina Mexican and Southwestern cuisine. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-942-4745; margaretscantina.com New Hope Market Breakfast and daily specials like burgers, soups and more. 6117 N.C. Hwy. 86 S.; 919-240-7851 Oishii Specialty rolls, teriyaki, stir-fry, sushi. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-9327002; oishiiroll.com The Pig Barbecue, fried tofu, collards. 630 Weaver Dairy Rd., Ste. 101; 919-942-1133; thepigrestaurant.com Piggyback Temporarily closed (reopening TBD) Pop’s Pizzeria Pizzas, calzones, stromboli, pasta. 1822 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-932-1040; pops-pizzeria.com Queen of Pho Vietnamese offerings like banh mi and, of course, pho beef noodle soup. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-903-8280; queenofphochapelhill.com


D I NI NG GUI D E

Rasa Indi-Chinese Indian and Chinese cuisine. 1826 MLK Jr. Blvd.; 919-929-2199; rasachapelhill.com Sage Vegetarian Cafe Vegetarian fare. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-968-9266; sagevegetariancafe.com Sal’s Pizza & Ristorante Thin-crust and deep-dish pizzas plus an array of Italian comfort food. 2805 Homestead Rd.; 919932-5125; salspizzaofchapelhill.com YOPOP Frozen Yogurt Frozen yogurt shop featuring 14 flavors, bubble tea and smoothies. Timberlyne Shopping Center; 919-537-8229 N.C. 54 East/Raleigh Road Amante Gourmet Pizza Create-your-own pizzas. 6209-B Falconbridge Rd.; 919-493-0904; amantepizza.com BIN 54 Steaks, seafood and other fine American food. Everything made in-house. Glen Lennox Shopping Center; 919-969-1155; bin54chapelhill.com Brenz Pizza Co. Specialty pizzas, subs, salads. 3120 Environ Way, East 54; 919-636-4636; brenzpizzaco.com

Join Us for Thanksgiving Brunch

NOVEMBER 26 traditional holiday bounty of family favorites

$85 per person Limited Seating 11am - 3:15pm To - Go Options Available

Coco Bean Coffee Shop Locally owned coffee shop offering Carrboro Coffee Roasters coffee and a vegan market. 1114 Environ Way, East 54; 919-883-9003; cocobeancoffeeshop.com

Meadowmont Village

Elements Cuisine combining classical and modern Asian and European cooking techniques; check out the wine bar with full menu next door. 2110 Environ Way, East 54; 919-537-8780; elementsofchapelhill.com

Cafe Carolina & Bakery Temporarily closed (reopening TBD)

First Watch French toast, pancakes and specialty omelets. 1101 Environ Way, East 54; 919-537-8488; firstwatch.com

Meet Fresh Taiwanese desserts and teas. 407 Meadowmont Village Circle; 984-999-4983; meetfresh.us/en

Hawthorne & Wood Fine dining cuisine with an outdoor patio, a fully stocked bar and an extensive international wine list. East 54; 919-240-4337; hawthorneandwood.com

Quickly Hot and cold tea drinks in addition to Asian street food. 503 Meadowmont Village Circle; 984-234-0401; quicklychapelhill.com

Jujube Eclectic, modern cuisine inspired by the classic flavors of China and Vietnam. Glen Lennox Shopping Center; 919-960-0555; jujuberestaurant.com

Southern Village

Nantucket Grill & Bar Clam chowder, lobster rolls and more. 5925 Farrington Rd.; 919-402-0077; nantucketgrill.com Thai Palace Soup, curries, pad thai. Glenwood Square Shopping Center; 919-967-5805

Brixx Wood Fired Pizza Specialty pizzas and salads. 501 Meadowmont Village Circle; 919-929-1942; brixxpizza.com

Fusion Fish Tapas, family-style dinners and sushi. 100 Meadowmont Village Circle; 919903-8416; fusionfishcuisine.com

Al’s Burger Shack Gourmet burgers and fries. 708 Market St.; 919-914-6694; alsburgershack.com La Vita Dolce Pastries, sorbet, gelato, coffee. 610 Market St.; 919-968-1635; lavitadolcecafe.com Market and Moss American cuisine made with fresh local ingredients. 700 Market St.; 919-929-8226

BU ILD THE CO MMU N ITY YO U WAN t to live in . CR E ATE . CO N TR IBU Te . Give back. VISIT OUR CAFÉS

Intimate and Safe Dining Experience

carolinainn.com/dining

Find our coffees at our many area restaurant, cafe, and retail partners. Visit CarrboroCoffee.com for the full list

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DINING GUIDE

Rasa Malaysia Authentic Malaysian dishes. 410 Market St.; 984-234-0256; rasamalaysiach.com Town Hall Grill Temporarily closed (reopening TBD) Weaver Street Market Food bar items available as grab and go. 716 Market St.; 919-929-2009; weaverstreetmarket.coop

CARRBORO Downtown 401 Main Upscale dive bar and sandwich shop serving shareable bar snacks, local brews and po’boys. 401 Main St.; 984-999-4357; 401main.com Acme Food & Beverage Co. Entrees with a Southern touch. 110 E. Main St.; 919-929-2263; acmecarrboro.com Akai Hana Japanese cuisine including sushi, tempura and teriyaki. 206 W. Main St.; 919-942-6848; akaihana.com Armadillo Grill Tex-Mex burritos, enchiladas, tacos, nachos. 120 E. Main St.; 919-929-4669; armadillogrill.com Carrburritos Burritos, tacos, nachos and margaritas. 711 W. Rosemary St.; 919-933-8226; carrburritos.com

Cham Thai Cuisine Authentic Thai, Siamese and Chinese cuisine. 370 E. Main St., Ste. 190; 984-999-4646; chamthai.squarespace.com

Napoli Cafe Wood-fired pizza, espresso, artisanal gelato made from scratch, teas and local craft beer and wines. 105 E. Main St.; 919-667-8288; napolicarrboro.com

Coronato Pizza Roman-style pizza, snacks and salads. 101 Two Hills Rd., Ste. 140; 919-240-4804; coronatopizza.com

Neal’s Deli Buttermilk biscuits and traditional deli fare. 100-C E. Main St.; 919-967-2185; nealsdeli.com

Craftboro Brewing Depot Bottle shop and brewery with taps of craft beer. 101 Two Hills Dr., Unit 180; 919-240-4400; craftborobrewing.com

Oakleaf “Immediate” cuisine like pastas and seafood using ingredients from the chef’s own garden. 310 E. Main St.; 984-234-0054; oakleafnc.com

Glasshalfull Mediterranean-inspired food and wine. 106 S. Greensboro St.; 919-967-9784; glasshalfull.net

Open Eye Cafe Locally roasted Carrboro Coffee and espresso, tea, beer, wine and baked goods. 101 S. Greensboro St.; 919-968-9410; openeyecafe.com

Gourmet Kingdom Sichuan cuisine. 301 E. Main St.; 919-932-7222; thegourmetkingdom.com The Honeysuckle Cafe & Bar Coffee house serving tea and meads in addition to breakfast, lunch and dinner fare. 601 W. Main St.; 919-967-9398; thehoneysuckle.org/cafe-bar Krave Kava Bar & Tea Lounge Offers a wide range of tea and herbal drinks, all made from kava, a type of plant root. 105 W. Main St.; 919-408-9596; kravekava.com Mel’s Commissary & Catering Temporarily closed (reopening TBD)

100+ Made In-House Gelato Flavors Cups, Cones, Pints Custom on-site Catering

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Paco’s Tacos Steak, chicken, seafood and vegetarian tacos. 109 W. Main St.; 919-240-7700; doordash.com Pizzeria Mercato Pizza, antipasto, soups and fritti. 408 W. Weaver St.; 919-967-2277; pizzeriamercatonc.com Provence Southern French cuisine. 203 W. Weaver St.; 919-967-5008; provenceofcarrboro.com Spotted Dog Vegetarian- and veganfriendly entrees. 111 E. Main St.; 919-933-1117; thespotteddogrestaurant.com Wings Over Has 27 flavors of wings. 313 E. Main St.; 919-537-8271; wingsoverchapelhill.com


D I NI NG GUI D E

East Main Square Amante Gourmet Pizza Create-your-own pizzas, salads and pasta. 300 E. Main St.; 919-929-3330; amantepizza.com Gray Squirrel Coffee Co. Roastery and espresso bar. 360 E. Main St., Ste. 100; graysquirrelcoffee.com Hickory Tavern Burgers, sandwiches and build-your-own salads. 370-110 E. Main St.; 919-942-7417; thehickorytavern.com Rise Southern Biscuits & Righteous Chicken Biscuits, doughnuts, chicken and coffee. 310 E. Main St., Ste. 100; 919-929-5115; risebiscuitschicken.com Vecino Brewing Co. Dozens of craft beer choices plus flavorful small plates. 300 E. Main St., Ste. C; 919-537-9591; vecinobrewing.com Carr Mill Mall B-Side Lounge Temporarily closed (reopening TBD) Carrboro Pizza Oven Pizza, calzones. 919-904-7336; carrboropizzaoven.com Luna Rotisserie & Empanadas South American cuisine meets the American South. 307 E. Main St.; 919-537-8958; lunarotisserie.com

Oasis Organic coffee, tea, beer and wine. 919-904-7343; oasisincarrmill.com Tandem Farm-to-table, modern American cuisine with full service bar. 919-240-7937; tandemcarrboro.com Thai Station Authentic, fresh Thai dishes. 201 E. Main St., Ste. C.; 984-234-3230; thaistationnc.com Venable Rotisserie Bistro Upscale comfort food with a heavy emphasis on seasonal ingredients. 919-904-7160; venablebistro.com Weaver Street Market Food bar items are available as grab and go. 919-929-0010; weaverstreetmarket.coop N.C. 54 West/Carrboro Plaza Aidan’s Pizza Pizza, wings and salads. 602-D Jones Ferry Rd.; 919-903-8622; aidanspizza.com Anna Maria’s Pizzeria Italian cuisine. Carrboro Plaza; 919-929-1877; annamariasnc.wordpress.com Fiesta Grill Burritos, chimichangas, fajitas, tacos. 3307 N.C. Hwy. 54 W.; 919-928-9002; fiestagrill.us Monterrey Traditional Mexican cuisine. Carrboro Plaza; 919-903-9919; monterreychapelhill.com

Wingman Wings and hot dogs. 104 N.C. Hwy. 54 W.; 919-928-9200; bestwingman.net

HILLSBOROUGH Antonia’s Italian cuisine. 101 N. Churton St.; 919-643-7722; antoniashillsborough.com C&B Community Store The gas station turned community kitchen serves breakfast and lunch five days a week and wood-fired pizzas on weekends. 5515 N.C. Hwy. 86 Cup A Joe Coffee and pastries. 112 W. King St.; 919-732-2008; hboro-cupajoe.com El Restaurante Ixtapa Authentic fromscratch Mexican dishes. 162 Exchange Park Ln.; 919-644-6944; ixtapa.homestead. com/homepage.html Hillsborough BBQ Company Barbecue plates and sandwiches, sides and desserts. 236 S. Nash St.; 919-732-4647; hillsboroughbbq.com Hot Tin Roof Games and specialty cocktails. 115 W. Margaret Ln.; 919-296-9113; hottinroofbar.com The House at Gatewood Chop house and oyster bar with dishes like signature cracker-crusted pork chop with grits and greens. 300 U.S. 70; 919-241-4083; houseatgatewood.com

The Place to Be!

CHAPEL HILL FAVORITE FOR 40 YEARS BEST PHILLY CHEESE STEAK IN THE TRIANGLE!

ITALIAN PIZZERIA III

FOR CATERING OF ANY OCCASION, PLEASE GIVE US A CALL! 508 WEST FRANKLIN STREET, CHAPEL HILL

919 968 4671 italianpizzeria3.com 

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D I N I N G G U I DE

A vibrant new American restaurant and bar 700 Market Street | Chapel Hill

Jay’s Chicken Shack Chicken, buffalo wings, breakfast biscuits. 646 N. Churton St.; 919-732-3591; jayschickenshack.com Los Altos Serving Mexican dishes, like tacos and chiles rellenos, for breakfast and lunch six days a week and dinner on weekends. 126 W. King St.; 919-241-4177

Steve’s Garden Market & Butchery Local meat, baked goods, pimento cheese. 610 N. Churton St.; 919-732-4712; stevesgardenmarket.com

Matthew’s Chocolates Gourmet chocolates, frozen treats and baked goods. 104 N. Churton St.; 919-732-0900

Village Diner Southern breakfast, lunch, brunch, dinner and take-out pizza. 600 W. King St.; 919-245-8915; villagedinernc.com

Nomad International street food-inspired eatery. 122 W. King St.; 984-217-0179; thenomadnc.com Panciuto Offering rotating weekly suppers called Panciuto: At Home and operating as a temporary pop-up called Hillsborough Bakeshop. 110 S. Churton St.; hillsboroughbakeshop.com Pueblo Viejo Traditional Mexican food. 370 S. Churton St.; 919-732-3480

marketandmoss.com

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Saratoga Grill New England-style cuisine. 108 S. Churton St.; 919-732-2214; saratogagrill.com

Maple View Farm Country Store Driveup or window service for homemade ice cream and milk. 6900 Rocky Ridge Rd.; 919-960-5535; mapleviewfarm.com

Napoli Hillsborough Neapolitan pizzeria and gelateria. 230 S. Nash St.; 919-245-8566; napolihillsborough.com

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Radius Wood-fired pizzas, housemade pastas, sandwiches, salads and desserts. 112 N. Churton St.; 919-245-0601; radiuspizzeria.net

Vinny’s Italian Grill and Pizzeria Italian favorites. 133 N. Scottswood Blvd.; 919-732-9219; vinnyshillsborough.com Weaver Street Market Food bar items are available as grab and go. 228 S. Churton St.; 919-245-5050; weaverstreetmarket.coop Whit’s Frozen Custard Ice cream and frozen treats. 240 S. Nash St.; 919-245-8123; whitscustard.com Wooden Nickel Pub Pub fare on the patio or for pickup. 113 N. Churton St.; 919-643-2223; thewnp.com Yonder: Southern Cocktails & Brew Beer, wine, froze and more for takeout. 114 W. King St.; yonderbarnc.com

November 2020


DI N I N G G U I DE

CHATHAM COUNTY Governors Village Ciao Bella Pizzeria Pizzas, pastas, sandwiches. 1716 Farrington Point Rd.; 919-932-4440 Flair Restaurant & Wine Bar Frenchinfluenced food, coffee and Sunday brunch. 50100 Governors Dr.; 919-967-9990; flairfusionrestaurant.com

Capp’s Pizzeria & Trattoria Traditional Italian cuisine including fresh pastas, pizzas and more. 79 Falling Springs Dr., Ste. 140; 919-240-4104; cappspizzeria.com Captain John’s Dockside Fish & Crab House American seafood dishes. 11550 U.S. Hwy. 15-501 N.; 919-968-7955; docksidechapelhill.com

Gov’s Burger & Tap Burgers, hot dogs, salads, wraps and sandwiches. 50050 Governors Dr.; 919-240-5050 Tarantini Italian cuisine. 50160 Governors Dr.; 919-942-4240; tarantinirestaurant.com North Chatham 501 Pharmacy Maple View Farm ice cream, plus malts and shakes. 98 Chapelton Ct., Ste. 300; 984-999-0501; 501rx.com Breakaway Cafe A casual cafe serving breakfast, lunch and dinner, along with coffee and Maple View Farm ice cream. The patio is open, however the inside dining area remains closed. 58 Chapelton Ct., Ste. 100; 984-234-3010; breakawaync.co

ASIAN BISTRO

Moon Asian Bistro An Asian fusion restaurant offering sushi, Chinese dishes like sweet-and-sour chicken, Thai curry dishes, rice and noodles. 111 Knox Way, Ste. 100; 919-869-7894; moonasianbistroch.com

O’YA Cantina Latin cuisine from all over the world. 72 Chapelton Ct.; 984-999-4129; oyacantina.com

1922

Since

we’ve put our community first.

And our commitment to you still stands. We hope that you’ll visit us soon to experience our enhanced safety measures, our brand new menus, and our signature Best of Chapel Hill taste.

Morning. Day. Night.

Now accepting online orders at carolinacoffeeshop.com

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D I N I N G G U I DE

Town Hall Burger & Beer Gourmet burgers plus shared plates, tacos, wings and salads. 58 Chapelton Ct., Ste. 140; 984-234-3504; townhallburgerandbeer.com

PITTSBORO Al’s Diner Traditional American classics for breakfast, lunch and dinner. 535 West St.; 919-542-5800; alsdiner.net Al’s Lunchbox Walk up or drive-thru sandwiches, homemade ice cream, freshsqueezed orangeades and lemonades. 517 West St.; 919-542-0813; alsdiner.net Allen & Son Bar-B-Que N.C. barbecue. 5650 U.S. 15-501; 919-542-2294; stubbsandsonbbq.com Angelina’s Kitchen Greek and Southwestern dishes including gyros. 23 Rectory St.; 919545-5505; angelinaskitchenonline.com Aromatic Roasters Small-batch coffee shop specializing in espresso shots, Aztec mochas, raspberry lemonade, chai lattes and Thai teas. Orders can be placed online for in-store pickup. 697 Hillsboro St.; 919-259-4749; aromaticroasters.com

The Belted Goat Lunch, dinner and wine shop, offering salads and sandwiches. Fearrington Village Center; 919-545-5717; fearrington.com/belted-goat Blue Dot Coffee Joe Van Gogh coffee, lattes, smoothies and pastries. To-go orders can be placed at the window or by phone. 53 Hillsboro St.; 919-704-8064 Buzz Cafe at Chatham Marketplace Sandwiches, daily changing hot bar, sushi, salads and baked goods. Chatham Mills; 919-542-2643; chathammarketplace.coop Carolina Brewery The fifth-oldest brewery in the state. Outdoor seating available. 120 Lowes Dr., Ste. 100; 919-545-2330; carolinabrewery.com/pittsboro-brewery Chatham Marketplace Sandwiches, baked goods. 480 Hillsboro St.; 919-542-2643; chathammarketplace.coop The City Tap Classic bar food. 89 Hillsboro St.; 919-545-0562; thecitytap.com Compadres Tequila Lounge Mexican restaurant with a variety of classic dishes. 193 Lowes Dr., Ste. 107; 919-704-8374; compadresnc.com Copeland Springs Farm & Kitchen Farm-to-table restaurant serving grains and greens bowls, small plates and bar snacks. 193B Lorax Ln.; 919-261-7211; copelandspringsfarm.com

wood-fired pizza • housemade pastas sammies • salads • desserts

RADIUS

112 N. Churton Street • Hillsborough

O R D E R O N L I N E oOrR B Y P H O N E

radiuspizzeria.net 919-245-0601

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BISCUITS ABOVE & BEYOND

DOWNTOWN CARRBORO SOUTHPOINT DURHAM DOWNTOWN DURHAM

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DINING GUIDE

Davenport’s Café Diem Carrboro Coffee Roasters coffee and espresso offerings. 439 Hillsboro St.; 919-704-4239; davenports-cafediem.com

The Mod Wood-fired pizza, salads, small plates and a full bar. Outdoor seating available. 46 Sanford Rd.; 919-533-6883; themodernlifedeli.com New Japan Hibachi-style Japanese cooking. 90 Lowes Dr.; 919-542-4380

Elizabeth’s Pizza Pizzas, calzones, sandwiches, salads and pasta. 160 Hillsboro St.; 919-545-9292; elizabethspizzapittsboro.com The Fearrington House Restaurant Contemporary fine dining. Reservations are needed. Fearrington Village Center; 919-542-2121; fearrington.com/house Greek Kouzina Made from scratch hummus, gyros, kebabs and more. 964 East St.; 919-542-9950; greekkouzina.com Goodness Gracious Juice Co. Breakfast, juices and smoothies. 517 West St.; 919-726-2033; goodnessgraciousnc.com

ODDCO An art and design store and music venue featuring regional craft beers. 684 West St.; 919-704-8832; realoddstuff.com Postal Fish Company Fresh seafood from North Carolina’s coast. Serving dinner only. 75 W. Salisbury St.; 919704-8612; postalfishcompany.com The Phoenix Bakery Small-batch and seasonal baked goods and specialty cakes. 664 West St.; 919-542-4452; thephoenixbakerync.com

House of Hops Bar and bottle shop with a large craft beer selection on tap. Outdoor seating available. 112 Russet Run, Ste. 110; 919-542-3435; houseofhopsnc.com

The Root Cellar Sandwiches, prepared salads, desserts and more. Offering online ordering and pickup, weekly prepared meals, groceries to-go box and Friday night specials. 35 Suttles Rd.; 919-542-1062; rootcellarpbo.com

John’s Pizza Restaurant Pizzas, pastas, wraps, calzones and strombolis. 122 Sanford Rd.; 919-542-5027; johnspizzarestaurant.com

S&T’s Soda Shoppe Soda fountain, American fare. 85 Hillsboro St.; 919-545-0007; sandtsodashoppe.com

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D I N I N G G U I DE

recipes + local events + foodie news

eat& drink

Small B&B Cafe Offbeat, eco-friendly eatery offering farm-to-table fare for breakfast and lunch. Offering outdoor dining and online ordering. 219 East St.; 919-537-1909; smallbandbcafe.com

ALSO CHECK OUT THESE AREA RESTAURANTS …

Starrlight Mead Tastings of honey wines and honey. 130 Lorax Ln.; 919-533-6314; starrlightmead.com

DURHAM

Virlie’s Grill Soups, salads, burgers, sandwiches. 58 Hillsboro St.; 919-542-0376; virliesgrill.com Willy’s Cinnamon Rolls, Etc. Bakery selling cinnamon rolls, scones, muffins, cookies and bread with ’40s and ’50s flair. 35 W. Chatham St.; 252-305-9227; willysrolls.com

The Federal Pub fare with bistro panache. Try the “Fed Burger au Poivre.” Offering takeout plus a new side patio on Albemarle Street. 914 W. Main St.; 919-680-8611; thefederal.net James Joyce Irish Pub and Restaurant Traditional pub food and snacks like brisket cheese steak and Reuben sandwiches. 912 W. Main St.; 919-683-3022; jamesjoyceirishpub.com Maverick’s Smokehouse and Taproom Range of barbecue and smokehouse fare as well as Chef Brian Stinnett’s signature fried chicken and Memphis barbecue spaghetti available for takeout. 900 W. Main St.; 919-682-8978; maverickssmokehouse.com

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Chapel Hill Magazine, Chatham Magazine and Durham Magazine


DI N I N G G U I DE

NEWS BITES Hey There, Hops Stuff In August, the North Carolina Craft Brewers Guild held its ninth annual NC Brewers Cup competition, which had a total of 636 entries submitted from 94 North Carolina breweries. Medals were awarded in 32 style-based beer categories. The 2020 Best of Show winner was Carolina Brewery’s Copperline Amber Ale. Carolina Brewery also won first for its Sky Blue Kolsch in the Alternative Fermentation category. Carrboro brewery Vecino Brewing Co. took first for its Temporal Justice in the Smoked Beer category, and Craftboro Brewing Depot took fourth in that category for its Maypole Maibock. New on the Scene The C&B Community Store is slated to open in November at the corner of N.C. Hwy. 86 and West Sawmill Road in Cedar Grove. The gas station turned community kitchen serves breakfast and lunch five days a week and wood-fired pizzas on weekends. Panciuto Chef Proprietor Aaron Vandemark started a weekly pop-up called Hillsborough Bakeshop, which launched Sept. 8. Online ordering opens each week at 9 a.m. on Tuesdays and

features a rotating selection of baked goods ranging from black-and-white cookies to a savory crostata. The cutoff to place orders is Thursdays at 3 p.m., and pickup takes place in front of Panciuto between 9 and 11 a.m. on Saturdays. Just Salad, a healthy chain restaurant run by Cattell Street Brands, opened its third North Carolina location in Chapel Hill at Village Plaza in September. On Sept. 24, The Catering Company of Chapel Hill launched The Ghost Kitchen & Delivery Company, Chapel Hill’s first delivery-only restaurant group. The group consists of two virtual restaurants, Bistro 501 and The BBQ Company of Chapel Hill, which operate out of a centralized kitchen. Deliveries are available Tuesday through Saturday, 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Summit Coffee Co. opened in October in the space vacated by Frutta Bowls at 140 W. Franklin St. The outdoors-themed coffee shop and roastery first opened on Main Street in Davidson in 1998 and became a staple of its small-town college scene. It's expanded since then, with locations in Asheville and Charlotte; the Chapel Hill location will be its fourth coffee shop. 

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MEDITERRANEANDELI.COM November 2020

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D I N I N G G U I DE

NEWS BITES On the Move Bottle Rev Chapel Hill is relocating into the space formerly occupied by Tobacco Road Sports Cafe at East 54. The bottle shop and taproom will rebrand its name to Old East Tavern and serve food. Owners Julie Paddison and Lew Hendricks plan to open by early 2021. The space became available after Tobacco Road announced its closing of the Chapel Hill location in August due to financial constraints of the COVID-19 pandemic. Farewell The K&W Cafeteria location at University Place in Chapel Hill closed in August, joining five other North Carolina locations that also closed that month. The cafeteria chain, founded in Winston-Salem in 1937, announced it was filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in September. Peño Mediterranean Grill on East Franklin Street closed in August. Blue Spoon Microcreamery at 140 E. Franklin St. permanently closed in September due to impacts of COVID-19. Elmo’s Diner permanently closed in September after its more than 29 years in Carr Mill Mall. “We thank you all for

95 years and cooking!

your understanding and support over the many years and especially now,” an Elmo’s Diner Facebook post said. “We are sad.” Coffee shop Perennial on West Franklin Street closed in September. “Unfortunately, we were unable to overcome the hardships of this past spring and summer and make our business make sense,” the coffee shop posted on Instagram. “We had a good run, and though it was ephemeral, the experience, creativity, people and lessons in small business will be a part of us forever.” Carrboro Beverage Company permanently closed in September after 16 years in business. This includes Carrboro’s Tyler’s Taproom as well as its bottle shop on Main Street. City Kitchen in University Place permanently closed in September. “While we will not be reopening City Kitchen due to unfavorable lease negotiations,” owner Giorgios Bakatsias posted on Facebook, “we are grateful to the community for supporting this beautiful American brasserie since 2012, and for the opportunity to have served in this location for almost two decades.”

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BEST SEAFOOD 1201 Fordham Blvd., Chapel Hill 919.942.8757 squidsrestaurant.com for hours/menu


W H AT WE’RE EATIN G

PHOTO BY HANNAH LEE

A DISH WE LOVE

BREADMAN’S 261 S. Elliott Rd., Chapel Hill 919-967-7110

A

lot of things have changed about Breadman’s over these past few months. For one thing, it’s not Breadmen’s anymore; it’s Breadman’s. The small-butimportant detail signifies a change – in ownership and location. Longtime employee Omar Castro and his father, Luz Castro, bought the restaurant from brothers Roy and Bill Piscitello earlier this year. Roy opened the diner in 1974, and, after reopening at Elliott Square in August, it’s comforting to see Breadman’s is still the same ol’ joint – booths, basketball posters and all – setting up memories for years to come. Longtime locals and/or Carolina grads, you know what I mean. Saturday and Sunday mornings were well spent at Breadmen’s. You’d squeeze into a gray booth with friends and inhale the breakfast that you longed for from the moment you lifted your head off the pillow. This new location is no different; it just has a modern facelift. Order the eggs, the always-crispy bacon, and give in to the fluffy Belgian waffle. No one leaves Breadman’s with an empty stomach. Big Breadman, $11.50 – Hannah Lee CHM

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H EALTH CA RE PR OV I D ER S

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personalized to establish positive oral hygiene habits, ensure a lifetime of exceptional dental health, and leave our patients with a confident, sparkling smile. We always go the extra smile! For more than 20 years, Drs. Clifton and Mauney have been providing comprehensive pediatric dentistry and orthodontics for families. They both trained at UNC and are board certified. They married in 1993 and have three children.

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H EALTH CA RE PR OV I D ER S H EALTH CA RE PR OV I D ER S

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H E A LTH CARE PROVI D ERS


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s r e k a m c i s u m the e band’s folksy th to in gy er en h es ‘Mipso’ infuses fr

Carolina roots

rt ie r W es to n By Mo rg an Ca ct ur es An de rs on Pi L. D. by Ph ot o

ob Sharp, by Rodenbough, Jac LEFT TO RIGHT Lib . son bin Ro od Wo Joseph Terrell and

ipso stepped onto a new plane of confidence after

eight years together. “Being in a band as we have, it’s sort of been this long conversation among all of us,” explains Joseph Terrell, guitarist and vocalist for the band. He and bandmates Libby Rodenbough, fiddle, Jacob Sharp, mandolin, and Wood Robinson, bass, all sing and write, too. “Each time we get together for a new album, we catch one another up on our lives and things in music we’re excited about, and it becomes this weaving together of how all our personalities and musical voices intertwine.” “We’ve always been a fan of very tight arrangements and compact songs, because we’re all interested in the craft of songwriting,” Libby adds. “But on the last album, [“Edges Run”], we started to let the songs breathe a little more, made them a little more playful.” Released Oct. 16, “Mipso” embraces this direction fully, with sprawling sounds that balance layered vocal and electronic elements. The self-titled release is the band’s sixth full-length album, but the first with Nashville-based Rounder Records. “We’ve been lucky with Rounder,” Libby says. “They have been so nonintrusive on the creative process, and no one has put pressure on us of any kind.” The album was recorded at Echo Mountain studio in Asheville in spring 2019, then demoed at Rock Quarry Farm and overdubbed at The Rubber Room, both in Chapel Hill. Joseph says recording in

North Carolina is a critical part of the experience. “So much of my memory of making [‘Mipso’] and the energy that imbues these songs came from the place where we were and where we grew up, and the place that’s been home for so long,” he says. “We would go outside to listen to the cicadas and the rainstorms on the roof. It’s great to be older, to lean into this place that we’re from and tell [its] story, because this is the home we have and the story we can tell best. “Thankfully we started rehearsing and arranging before the pandemic, so we could plan in person and take our time,” Joseph says. When the time came to mix and master the recordings, COVID-19 was in full swing in the United States. Ultimately, the band’s close-knit relationship enabled them to complete the work remotely without too much disruption. “When you’re all in the room together, you can read one another’s body signals, and your own opinions gravitate toward one another in a cool way,” Libby explains. “But when you listen to them independently, you hear things you never would have either. Being [at] home, my boyfriend listened, too, and heard things I didn’t notice. So we widened that listening net.” “So many people who believed in us and wanted to help this album … become [its] best possible version, including Mark Goodell, our longtime engineer, and Shane Leonard, who plays drums on several tracks, helped us a lot,” Joseph says. “We’ve gotten more confident within ourselves and also with one another, and [have] been able to relax into ourselves and our history of playing together.” “It is almost akin to aging,” Libby says. “As you continue to make music together and get to know yourselves and your instrument, you just are less concerned about things you might have been worried about earlier on. Hopefully that process will continue evolving forever.” CHM November 2020

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dig can you

Mountain bikers of all ages come together to build new trails in Chapel Hill

By M ic h ael Ve n u tol o-Mantovani P h o to g rap hy by Cornel l Wat son

it?

C

hris Francis sees dirt a little bit

different than the rest of us. Chris views dirt as an opportunity for connection, for adventure, for the chance to get outside and connect with the natural world around us. It’s this kinship with the dirt that led Chris and his cohort – made up of Chris’ brother, Nathan Mills, and their cycling pal

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Chapel Hill architect Rob Munach, McDougle Middle School student Vivienne Myers and Chapel Hill High School student Amelia Brinson look on as McDougle Middle School student Noah Brinson soars over a gap jump.

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MOUNTA IN BIKI N G

and trail-building friend Jeff Knight – to start the group Trail Science, aimed at adding 10 miles of biking trails to Chapel Hill’s already abundant trail system. Chris is a Chapel Hill native who grew up racing road bikes and was, at one point, a state champion racer. After what he describes as an “early midlife crisis,” he moved to the Dominican Republic for several years. An entrepreneur by trade, Chris’ love of cycling was reignited when he moved back to Chapel Hill from the Caribbean. “The cycling scene here is really, really strong,” he says. “It never stopped growing from when I was here in the ’80s.” As he started new businesses, Chris would schedule his conference calls around his daily bike rides, taking a mid-ride break to enjoy lunch and catch up with his business partners. “One day, I was in this particular place, on a conference call but thinking, ‘Wow, we could really do something with this land,’” he says. About two years ago, after hearing of UNC’s plans to develop the nature trails at its Outdoor Education Center near the crest of the infamously steep Laurel Hill, Chris was in front of the Chapel Hill Town Council, asking permission to be the one to cut bike trails into the thick woods. Knowing little about the formal procedures of a council meeting or the efforts behind such municipal works, Chris offered his services for free, a deep discount from the average of $30,000 per mile a professional might quote. Still unsure of Chris’ bona fides, the town, along with local mountain biking group Triangle OffRoad Cyclists, which had been consulting with the university and its project lead, David Rogers, asked for something of a mud-caked resume. After Chris led them to two trails he and his friends had built on private land, the town agreed to award him the rights to construct his trails. After a mid-2019 fundraiser in conjunction with Beer Study, Big Sadie Smoke Shack and local bike shops, Chris had the funds he needed to start cutting his trails. A year later, Chris and his friends have assembled nearly two miles of trails throughout the Outdoor Education Center. The group gathers at various times during the week, attracting a panoply of volunteers, from 5-year-old kids to men and women in their late 50s, and just about every age group in between. The

ABOVE The trails need regular maintenance from volunteers such as Culbreth Middle School student Finley Wild, Rashkis Elementary School student Callen Enverga and Culbreth Middle School student Grey Enverga as well as Rob Munach. RIGHT Grey Enverga and Smith Middle School student Alex Nelson shovel dirt for the construction of new trail features.

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M O UNTAI N B I KI NG

ABOVE Noah Brinson rides through a berm. LEFT Chris Francis (pictured front with Finley Wild, Grey Enverga, Callen Enverga, Culbreth Middle School student Bertie Turner and Alex Nelson) says there is satisfaction in seeing all their hard work become functional art.

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Raking leaves and removing debris from the trail comes before testing out its new features like jumps and corners.

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biggest turnouts, though, generally happen on Saturday mornings and are filled predominantly with middle and high school students from local schools. Not only do the students provide sweat equity, they’re also the first ones to test out new trail features like berms, jumps and corners. “Those guys are fearless,” Chris says with a laugh. “The trails at the [Outdoor Education Center] are super sweet,” says East Chapel Hill High School freshman Tyler Roe. Tyler has mountain biked for years and turns up to help move the dirt with Chris as often as possible. Along with members of his own school’s biking team, Tyler regularly builds alongside riders from Carrboro High School and Chapel Hill High School. “It’s really rad that they’re building more trails out there.” Every element of the trails is crafted by hand, using tools that are purchased through money earned via local bike shop raffles. Dirt is moved up to a half-mile with buckets and wheelbarrows, rocks are sourced and harvested from the forest around the trails. And after a hard day of digging, the group cooks out and shares a cooler of cold drinks. To date, the group has completed the first two sections of trails, totaling roughly two miles through the Outdoor Education Center. Impressed by the strength of their work, the town and UNC awarded the Trail Science crew the third section of the trail, the construction of which will start later this fall. “To bring so many types of people together in one spot with no judgement,” Chris says. “That’s the coolest part about it. If you’re willing to come out, to work hard and get dirty, you’re part of the group.” You can follow Trail Science on Instagram at @trail.science or head out to a digging session most Saturday mornings from 7 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at UNC’s Outdoor Education Center, 410A Country Club Rd. CHM


“We shall walk together on this path of life, for all things are part of the universe and are connected with each other to form one whole unity.� -Maria Montessori Join us on this path of life! Montessori School of Durham welcomes a diverse, inclusive community and celebrates the uniqueness of all of its members as part of our hope for a peaceful world. Montessori School of Durham is an accredited independent Montessori school bringing authentic Montessori education to families in Durham and the surrounding areas for over 40 years. Now accepting 2021-22 school year applications online for children 18 months through 6th grade.

www.msdurham.org 919-489-9045


SCHOOLS

‘In Sync’

C

amille Swann, a sophomore at Chapel Hill High School, has played the cello for almost five years now.

Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools expands virtual music education offerings By Hannah Lee Photo by Cornell Wat s on

play along and receive instant evaluation while also recording music for Corrie to hear later. “It’s almost like karaoke for instruments,” she says. “It She’s played hundreds of songs with dozens of classmates, lights up when you play the notes, guides students through a music reading not to mention countless hours of practice at home, since comprehension and allows them to also assess their own performance.” her first orchestra class in middle school. But there’s no telling when Camille will find herself on the stage again, But she’s never performed quite like this. playing alongside her peers. She misses feeling the vibrations of sound Chapel Hill-Carrboro City through her feet and the reverberations off the walls of Schools (CHCCS) currently operates her high school’s auditorium. Like most other students, via virtual-only learning, and Camille’s she’s adjusting to her new classroom at home and taking orchestra class hasn’t met in person advantage of the opportunity to connect with her friends this year. There are no practice for a few minutes at the beginning of class every Monday performances, no rehearsals or regular and Thursday during what Corrie calls a “gathering.” Whenever we do get to play roundups of the class as a whole. No As a student who regularly asks questions, Camille says [together], in-person opportunities for a teacher’s learning with SmartMusic has encouraged her, and it’s absolutely advice. So, how does a student – even one with Camille’s students like her, to work independently. amazing. experience – learn an instrument from a distance? “When we were in orchestra, Ms. Franklin helped The answer: SmartMusic. It’s an online program that everyone,” Camille says. “But it’s hard to work with CHCCS sought out as a way to keep students engaged every individual at the same time. With SmartMusic, and on an upward trajectory. “Getting used to the you self-teach.” program has taken a little adjustment just because it’s another new thing,” No, there aren’t virtual-only performances on SmartMusic for Camille says Corrie Franklin, Camille’s orchestra teacher, “but I truly believe it’s the and her friends to take part in. There’s no replicating that aspect of best tool we have for remote learning right now.” orchestra class – dozens of students playing in unison. “I don’t think you On the surface, SmartMusic looks like so much else of our new normal: can ever fully replace the benefit of being in person,” Corrie says, “because sitting in front of a computer screen with a program pulled up, trying you learn so much from seeing and hearing people around you.” to simulate missing aspects of our lives. But there are key features to While it is not a perfect solution, SmartMusic offers the next best SmartMusic that make it a workable substitute, even without the benefits of alternative. And if there’s a way to recreate what Camille loves most, she’s in. human interaction. “Orchestra is a big family,” Camille says. “Everybody likes being able to It offers a database of ensemble music for a wide range of instruments. connect with one another, and whenever we do get to play [together], it’s Students can choose an instrument and piece of music and then listen, absolutely amazing. We’re really in sync.” CHM

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eco eye

open your

Four high school students create a recycling app

By Sarah Rol l i ns | Photo by Cornel l Wat son

eeing recyclable items end up in trash cans is frustrating to many, but rather than ignore the problem, four students were inspired to create an app that makes recycling easier. East Chapel Hill High School sophomore Bo Chi and Chapel Hill High School sophomore Yichen Sun and juniors Ayden Xu and Savannah Xu are frequent volunteers for Chapel Hill nonprofit WE SENSE, which derives its name from its mission to “serve, engage, nurture, share and enrich” the community. WE SENSE often puts on creative and educational programs and service events, such as 2019’s Bloom Fest in downtown Chapel Hill, that promote environmental awareness. “WE SENSE provided us a platform to develop our own service learning interests and projects,” Bo says. Bo, Yichen, Ayden and 64

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Savannah then leveraged their knowledge and relationship with the nonprofit to create something on their own. In 2019, the group started their first project, “Go Green – Holiday Action,” which focused on spreading awareness of the increased waste generated during the holidays from things like gift packaging and more gatherings. “Our main inspiration was that we noticed people around us oftentimes misplaced [recyclable] items, so we wanted to fix that,” the team says. They hosted three holiday-themed events where they quizzed their 700 attendees’ knowledge on recycling, demonstrated DIY crafts using recycled materials and showcased their new app, EcoEye, which uses AI vision technology to classify various waste and its recyclability. “If you don’t know whether


CLOCKWISE FROM TOP Ayden Xu, Savannah Xu, Yichen Sun and Bo Chi.

Our main

inspiration was something can be recycled or not, you can simply take and Smith Middle School math teacher Dr. Boyd that we noticed a picture with EcoEye, and it will identify it for you,” Blackburn and science teacher Regina Baratta. people around us oftentimes Savannah explains. The free app is not yet available to the public, as twins misplaced Their hard work paid off when they received a Ayden and Savannah are still polishing it. “We are still [recyclable] items. President’s Environmental Youth Award for their working to make EcoEye more accurate and plan to add Go Green project in April. “We are very honored new game features like a leaderboard to see who has and humbled to have received the PEYA award,” the recycled the most,” they say. “This not only makes the foursome agrees. “To us, it is a symbol of the continued perseverance of app more fun but also provides an incentive for recycling.” our teamwork. This couldn’t have received the same results without the While COVID-19 put the team’s in-person events on hold, they guidance of each and every volunteer who contributed their precious continue creating virtual projects that promote environmental awareness. time as well as the support of our teachers.” The students credit the In addition to the anticipated release of their app, the high schoolers are encouragement and instruction of past and present educators such as developing new mobile apps and helpful YouTube videos, all revolving Chapel Hill High career and technical education teacher Garrison Reid, around sustainability, on Yichen’s Tigersteve Tech channel. CHM November 2020

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SCHOOLS

feed need t h e

C

Liz Cartano and her team sprang into action when the pandemic started to ensure students were fed. They haven’t stopped. By Co ur t ney H ayes | P h o to by Co r n ell Watso n

hartwells School Dining Services Director of Dining Liz Cartano had to think very differently about school lunches when Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools transitioned to learning from home on March 16. She and her team of 85 staff and volunteers began delivering meals to pickup sites with the Food for Students program, originally called Food for the Summer. “It’s taken the whole community to come together,” Liz says, referring to the volunteer office, police department, faith-based organizations and more groups that help ensure more than 600,000 meals – and counting – make it safely into the hands of students. We asked Liz to share insights on the process.

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PIVOTING “We had a packaged concept [from our original Food for the Summer program] that we could pull off the shelf as needed that already had the logistics figured out. We had a website where we could point people to find out pickup locations and times. … The biggest change [since we started] is that we now have access to buses. … When people see the buses, it gives them a warm and fuzzy feeling.”

LINKING UP “Connecting with students has been a bit of a process. We started out with a bunch of different housing complexes where we knew some families might be struggling. We connected with social workers who knew where students might be struggling. The [Refugee Support


Center] helped us find a lot of our Burmese families.

with students who are home alone or have parents who may be working.”

We’d also drive by an apartment complex, see how many of our students lived there, and then we’d add it on as a delivery site.”

SPECIAL DELIVERY “When we identified people who we couldn’t get out to a [delivery] site, we started building culinary boxes similar to HelloFresh and would go out to communities that we were not tapping into after hours and deliver these food boxes. … We’re also testing door-to-door delivery. We piloted that recently and found we had more people get food. It helped

MORE THAN A MEAL When people see the buses, it gives them a warm and fuzzy feeling.

“We needed to be more than just about food. We could see the boredom setting in [with students]. So we also started doing some enrichment activities. … We put out 700 culinary kits that included everything kids needed to make blueberry muffins. We had [Durham-based literacy nonprofit] Book Harvest giving out books. We didn’t want to put everything on one entity. We took a part to make it all happen. It’s a community effort.” CHM November 2020

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The Show

Must Go on(line) Drama students adjust to the virtual stage

By Dani el Stevenson | Photo by Cornel l Wat son

chool remains virtual and many extracurricular groups have shelved projects this semester, but East Chapel Hill High School students have adapted their fall theater season into a virtual play reading series. The group reads scripts together over Google Meet and has four scheduled performances over the semester. Virtual theater has presented its challenges. Student directors, actors and stage managers have all made changes to their roles to fit the format. But for many students, theater helps make virtual learning feel more normal. “I think virtual theater has really been the thing that has grounded me,” says Maria Ledin, a senior at East Chapel Hill. “I feel like I know the work, and then I can connect it to how it used to work. Everything else for school has been very fluid because it’s new and unfamiliar.” The group is split into two productions: a G series and an R series, the latter featuring Pulitzer Prize68

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winning plays that contain mature content. Parent permission slips are required to participate in the R series, and student actors can choose to read or skip inappropriate content in the script. Hope Hynes Love, the director of the after-school program for East Chapel Hill who facilitates the series, sees this as an unintended benefit of the virtual productions. “There is mature content that we would never be able to produce if we were physicalizing many of the things that were happening on stage,” Hope says. “But as a virtual play reading, we have the advantage of being able to honor all of those constraints.” A unique element in Hope’s approach to virtual drama is the Critical Response Process (CRP), a collaborative method used to provide feedback and workshop all roles within a creative process. Hope was awarded a professional development grant by Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools and studied with CRP creators Liz Lerman and John Borstel just before shutdowns in March. She now uses the technique with her students as a


But as a virtual development tool, giving individuals the opportunity junior and stage manager with the group. Jonathan has play reading, to share their experiences and opinions about the collaborated with the program several times, including we have the advantage of being performance of each creative role – from actors to on a production of his play “Crazytown” last November. able to honor directors – through all stages of the production. “This “He’s been super gracious and super lovely about all of those is almost like a human resources program for me as the offering those opportunities to my students and letting constraints. artistic director, because nobody knows my job better them be a part of some of those things,” Hope says. than all of them,” Hope says. “It’s been transformative The group will air a reading of “Sweat” by Lynn for me as a teacher.” Nottage for their R-rated series and “You Can’t Take In August, the students worked with nationally known playwright It With You” by George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart for their G-rated Jonathan Rand to read and workshop an adapted script of his play, series on Dec. 16. For an invitation to view an upcoming reading, email “Check Please.” “He was pretty fun to work with,” says Laura Stone, a hlove@chccs.k12.nc.us. CHM November 2020

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SCHOOLS

You’ve got class

Tips for a successful school year from eight Chapel Hill educators

Co mp ile d by Nicki H ar r is | P h o to by Co rnel l Wat son I l lu st rat i o ns by Ch r istin Kin g , D e sig n er at @CK.Creat i ons

*Responses have been edited and condensed for clarity

BALANCE IS THE KEY

TEACHABLE MOMENTS

Remember that education is for a lifetime and that students are learning now how to deal with adversity, build resilience and find the hidden lessons in difficult situations. Children should be allowed opportunities to learn physically, emotionally and intellectually. If they have been inside working on school for a while, create moments for them to run, stretch, jump and exert themselves outdoors. If they are consumed with math equations or challenging studies, help them explore the feeling components of their work and relate to other humans around them through community engagement and empathy-building experiences. Balance is the key.”

Finding teachable moments outside the classroom is key for students’ retention. Children are most impressionable and trusting of teachers who relate to them individually. I have the pleasure of working with students across multiple grades. Witnessing the maturity and growth is the best part of my job. When classroom teachers relate everyday concepts to their curriculum, you can see the ‘aha’ moment in the child’s eyes. As a parent of three daughters, I still look for teachable moments that are not academic, but life lessons.” – Wendy Wood, resource teacher/middle school team leader (grades 5-8), St. Thomas More Catholic School 70

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– Benjamin Trueblood, teacher and upper grades chair, Emerson Waldorf School


GET OUTSIDE

BUILD RELATIONSHIPS

The first tip that I would give families during this time would be to keep their children encouraged. Be sure to amplify success when it occurs, as we all need this now more than ever. I also encourage families to allow students to engage in class meetings. This is where teachers and students get to know one another and build relationships and also where the learning happens. Discourse is one of the most valuable tools to learning. The final piece of advice I would give families is something our district has shared and encouraged, which is to remember we all learn more if we have to think more. This includes articulating our needs. For students who are able, allow them to use their teachers as a first line of academic support before using other resources. Beginning my lessons with music, games and social check-ins has been helpful during this time. It allows my classes to get to know one another and build authentic relationships. Live sessions allow students to not only speak to me verbally, but also use the meeting chat. This has also contributed to online learning success. It gives students the option of how they would like to engage with the class in our online platform. Giving students a form of choice during this time has been helpful to many of them.” – Eugenia Floyd, fourth grade literacy Teacher, Mary Scroggs Elementary School

Screens and technology are dominating our children’s attention now more than ever. Stress around pandemic safety and uncertainty can add to our children’s mental toll. Unstructured time outdoors in a natural setting is a mental and emotional balm for all ages. Building in breaks throughout the day for children to reconnect with their physical bodies through movement outside and to reconnect with nature and its healing capacities can go a long way toward enabling students to refocus on their academic tasks. As we move through this time of uncertainty, providing experiences that allow students to feel grounded and connected – to nature, to friends and to family – will help them develop the confidence, resilience and flexibility they will need to have a positive, successful year.” – Dr. Catherine Reyes, high school life sciences and chemistry teacher, Emerson Waldorf School

FIND SOLUTIONS, AN ADVOCATE AND A SCHEDULE Communicate early and often. Teachers might see how students are doing in a physical classroom, but it’s much harder to assess online, regardless of the camera view. Let the teacher(s) know if something isn’t working or if your student is struggling to keep pace. Ask for

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SCHOOLS

other ways of communicating your student’s learning and mastery. Teachers are creative! Work with them to find solutions. Secondly, find an advocate. Is there a staff member they know well or who gives you time out of their day? Are there other people in your community who have navigated similar issues? My students have been trying to do virtual learning for years while being treated for illnesses, and that key contact often saves the day when teachers or administrators don’t realize the challenges that are preventing learning and access. Finally, schedule, routine and organization are critical for learning at home. Teachers may have set class schedules, but think about the rest of the day. When would recess fit in? How do students get a break from their screens? When are they most productive? Schedules and routines provide a safe system to fall back on for structure in a very unstructured time.” – Gage Matthews, teacher, UNC Hospital School

COMMUNICATE AND STAY FLEXIBLE You have to be flexible. Since school for now is virtual, you have to anticipate issues. Those issues are not meant to be the focus, but rather how you respond to them. Another key goal for students’ success is time management. Getting kids logged on into Zoom classes and making sure assignments are completed are priorities. The last key goal is communication. Communication with students, their teachers, parents and job management staff makes for a successful environment. My goal right now is making sure I do my best to keep children focused, ready and engaged during this new virtual learning experience.” – Armando Garcia, lead teacher, School Age Alternative Learning Academy at Legacy Academy Chapel Hill

ASK QUESTIONS Because students are often isolated as they learn, they miss out on the back-and-forth classroom discussions that help reinforce new information. Parents can help address this by simply checking in with their children and asking a few specific questions like, ‘What was most interesting in your lesson today?’ or ‘What’s one thing you can teach me that you learned today?’ Just easy interactions like this can make a huge difference in what students retain. These quick questions also remind children that their parents care and are curious about what they are learning.” – John Elderkin, English and social studies teacher, Phoenix Academy High School

HAVE A DEDICATED WORKSPACE First, stay organized! It’s very easy to get lost in the world of Canvas and Zoom. Finding a way that works for you to keep track of Zoom links, assignments and resources will help ensure success. Next, make space to work. Many of my students do not have a space of their own to do their work, so we have to find creative ways. I tell them that, no matter where they’re working, they should try to set up some sort of station with all their materials. It can even be portable. I also encourage them to try their best to sit up, wherever they are. It’s easy to fall asleep during morning classes. Finally, stay in communication. Ask for help! Ask for extra time! Tell your teacher what your life is like! Teachers are craving time with their students. Some of my most effective teaching moments have been in conferences with students. I’ve been able to meet with more than 60 of my students so far. This is especially important for new students who have never set foot in the school building. It’s so important for students to feel seen – figuratively and literally – and for them to feel like part of a community.” – Suzanne DeConto, seventh and eighth grade English language arts teacher, Gravelly Hill Middle School CHM

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Our community runs on it. CURIOSITY, THAT IS.

At Cary Academy, we challenge our students to be enthusiastically inquisitive: to seek adventure, revel in curiosity, follow passions, broaden worldviews, take risks, and try new things. With our diverse and inclusive community, there is no shortage of different voices with which to collaborate, share new ideas, or get a different perspective. We’d love to add yours. You belong here. Apply at caryacademy.org/admissions. Financial aid and first consideration deadlines are mid-January for the following academic year. Please see our website www.caryacademy.org/admissions for full details on the admissions process and deadlines.

1500 N. Harrison Ave. Cary, NC 27513 Ph: 919-228-4634 | caryacademy.org


SCHOOLS

Directory of Independent, Regional Boarding and Charter Schools ILLUSTRATIONS BY CHRISTIN KING, DESIGNER AT @CK.CREATIONS

Independent Schools BETHESDA CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 1914 S. Miami Blvd., Durham 919-598-0190; bcacrusaders.org Focus Partners with Christian families to help equip students academically, socially, physically and spiritually. Grades K-8 Total Enrollment 160 Student/Faculty Ratio 15:1 Yearly Tuition Elem., $7,061; Middle, $7,786 Special Requirements Student testing and parent interview. BRIGHT HORIZONS CHILDREN’S CENTER Locations: 2352 So-Hi Dr., Durham; 4 UNC-TV Dr., Research Triangle Park; 1012 Slater Rd., Durham; 2500 Highstone Rd., Cary; 800 Weston Pkwy., Cary; 800 Corporate Center Dr., Raleigh; 2051 Shepherd’s Vineyard Dr., Apex brighthorizons.com Focus Empowering children from infancy to become confident, successful learners and secure, caring people. Growing young readers, scientists, artists and explorers who are engaged and curious. Programs invite children to approach academics with skills, confidence and a drive for excellence. Grades Infants-Pre-K Total Enrollment Varies per location. Student/Faculty Ratio Varies per location. Yearly Tuition Varies per location. CAMELOT ACADEMY 809 Proctor St., Durham 919-688-3040; camelotacademy.org Focus Features individualized instruction, mastery-based learning and parental involvement. Grades K-12 Total Enrollment 145 Student/Faculty Ratio 11:1 Yearly Tuition $10,900 (K), $13,350 (Grades 1-4), $15,350 (Grades 5-7), $16,350 (Grades 8-12). Award and merit scholarships available. Special Requirements Reading and math assessments and two-day student visit (virtual during COVID-19); $50 application fee CARDINAL GIBBONS HIGH SCHOOL 1401 Edwards Mill Rd., Raleigh 919-834-1625; cghsnc.org Focus A college preparatory school of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Raleigh that aims to form men and women of faith, service and leadership in church and community. Grades 9-12 Total Enrollment approximately 1,570 Student/Faculty Ratio 14:1 Yearly Tuition $11,470 - $15,590 Special Requirements Previous school records, testing, application, recommendation and an essay.

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CAROLINA FRIENDS SCHOOL 4809 Friends School Rd., Durham 919-383-6602; cfsnc.org Focus The school believes the best education amplifies a child’s curiosity, courage and creative thinking. Every day, its teachers empower students to question the world around them, discover their passions, think deeply and use their voices in service of the greater good. Grades Pre-K-12 Total Enrollment 500 Student/Faculty Ratio 6:1 in Early School; 9:1 in Lower, Middle and Upper Yearly Tuition See website for tuition ranges by unit; adjusted tuition available. Special Requirements Status updates on whether visitors are allowed on campus through the year can be found on the website. Virtual tours and information sessions will be available. Contact admission@cfsnc.org for additional information. CARY ACADEMY 1500 N. Harrison Ave., Cary 919-677-3873; caryacademy.org Focus A college preparatory school cultivating bold lifelong learners and world changers. Grades 6-12 Total Enrollment 775 Student/Faculty Ratio 14:1 Yearly Tuition $25,950; $2,500 new student fee Special Requirements Entrance exam, student visit/ interview, transcripts, teacher recommendations. CHAPEL HILL COOPERATIVE PRESCHOOL 108 Mt. Carmel Church Rd., Chapel Hill 919-942-3955; chapelhillcoop.com Focus Partnering with families of children from diverse backgrounds to respect and honor childhood, celebrate independence, and support children as they learn and grow through play. NAEYC Accredited with a Five Star licensure. Grades Pre-K Total Enrollment 100 Student/Faculty Ratio Infant: 4:1; Toddler: 5:1; Age 2: 9:1; Age 3: 10:1; Ages 4-5: 12:1. Yearly Tuition Varies by age and enrollment status; Half-day, threequarter or full-day options. Part-time options also available Mon., Wed., Fri. / Tues., Thurs. CRESSET CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 3707 Garrett Rd., Durham 919-354-8000; cressetchristian.org Focus Cultivates the heart of each student to educate, nurture and help shape their character in a Christ-centered environment. Grades Infant-Grade 12 Total Enrollment 210 Student/Faculty Ratio Preschool, 5:1; Lower School, 9:1; Upper School, 10:1. Yearly Tuition $8,000-$10,500 Special Requirements Student and parent interview, previous records, visit and application.


DUKE SCHOOL 3716 Erwin Rd., Durham 919-416-9420; dukeschool.org Focus Project-based independent school that inspires learners to boldly and creatively shape their future. Grades Age 3-Grade 8 Total Enrollment 490 Student/Faculty Ratio 7:1 Yearly Tuition For 2020-21: Preschool, $3,882 - $19,408; K-fourth grade, $4,210 - $21,052; fifth-eighth grade, $4,616 - $23,082 Special Requirements Admissions application, student assessment, candidate profile.

DURHAM NATIVITY SCHOOL 1004 N. Mangum St., Durham 919-680-3790; durhamnativity.org Focus Provides a learning environment for young men with high financial need, supporting them in their personal, social, moral and intellectual development, and positioning them to be successful at an independent college prep high school. Grades 5-8 Total Enrollment 60 Student/Faculty Ratio 15:1 Yearly Tuition $20,620 with scholarship-driven tuition awarded to low-income students Special Requirements Open house attendance.

DURHAM ACADEMY Preschool and Lower School, 3501 Ridge Rd., Durham Middle School, 3116 Academy Rd., Durham Upper School, 3601 Ridge Rd., Durham 919-493-5787; da.org Focus Strives to provide an education that will enable students to live moral, happy and productive lives. Grades Pre-K-12 Total Enrollment 1,232 Student/Faculty Ratio 10:1 Yearly Tuition $16,015 - $27,745 (not including activity fees) Special Requirements Assessment or entrance exam, which varies by grade level. Interview required for grades 9-12.

EMERSON WALDORF SCHOOL 6211 New Jericho Rd., Chapel Hill 919-967-1858; emersonwaldorf.org Focus Encourages and promotes independent thinking, social responsibility, and academic and artistic excellence. Grades Pre-K-12 Total Enrollment 250 Student/Faculty Ratio Kindergarten, 5:1; Grades 1-12, 10:1. Yearly Tuition $6,915 - $19,956 Special Requirements Virtual tour, parent-teacher consultation, new student assessment ď‚„

Jump in on the Fun

BOUNCING BULLDOGS FUN + FOCUS + FRIENDS

Jump rope classes & camps for all ages For more information and to register, go to:

bouncingbulldogs.org | 919.493.7992 November 2020

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SCHOOLS

EMPOWERED MINDS ACADEMY 1415 Holloway St., Durham 919-949-0147; empoweredmindsacademy.com Focus A learner-driven community where children cherish freedom and take responsibility for their experiences. Children discover their gifts, passions and purpose, and are active participants in the design and execution of their education, finding joy in hard work, earning apprenticeships and taking deep dives into subjects through hands-on challenges and projects. As a Black-centered community, the school states “that by uncovering, reclaiming and reconnecting with our truth, we will better understand who we were, who we are and who we must be.” Its goal is to provide a high-quality educational experience with a committed focus on character development and lifelong academic learning. Grades K-8 Total Enrollment 20 Student/Teacher Ratio 10:1 Yearly Tuition $7,425, $250 annual registration fee. Special Requirements School visit, trial day and interview.

GORMAN CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 3311 E. Geer St., Durham 919-688-2567; gormanchristian.org Focus Partners with parents to provide an excellent education with a biblical worldview while developing strong Christian character and values. Grades K-8 Total Enrollment 75 Student/Faculty Ratio 12:1 Yearly Tuition K, $5,582; Grades 1-5, $6,700; Grades 6-8, $6,946; Early Learning Center (weekly): Age 2, $189; Age 3-4, $176 Special Requirements Administrator meets parents and child. HAW RIVER CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 2428 Silk Hope Gum Springs Rd., Pittsboro 919-533-4139; hawriverchristian.org Focus A nonprofit, interdenominational private school providing an excellent Christian and classical education. Grades Junior K-Grade 10 Total Enrollment 125 Student/Faculty Ratio 9:1 Yearly Tuition Phonics (JK/K), $5,000; Grammar, $6,000; Logic/Rhetoric, $6,500 Special Requirements Four-part admissions process includes tour with classroom observations, application, academic screening and family interview. 

YMCA CAMP CHEERIO Residential camping for boys and girls rising 2nd to 10th grade Sessions from June 6th to August 20th Located on 150 acres in the heart of the Blue Ridge Mountains near Stone Mountain State Park Campers can enjoy over 35 activities including Archery, Canoeing, Climbing, Horseback Riding, Guitar, and more! Call (336)869-0195 or visit campcheerio.org for more information! 76

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Education Glossary CHARTER SCHOOL Supported by public financing and authorized by the State Board of Education, charters are exempt from many standard public school administration regulations, are not affiliated with any religious group and do not charge tuition. Admission is via lottery rather than by neighborhood. Charter schools set their own curriculum and hire their own instructors, of whom 50% must be licensed. Charter schools may be run by independent parent boards, nonprofit organizations or for-profit education service firms. Charter students take North Carolina standardized End of Grade/End of Course tests and participate in the NC School Report Card program. COMMON CORE A set of national grade-level goals for math and language arts, such as the ability to multiply two-digit numbers or write a paragraph. Common Core does not apply to science, social studies or other subjects. State and local authorities build local curriculums to meet Common Core goals.    Generally, Common Core-based high school-level math classes compare to previous curriculums as: Math I: Equivalent to Algebra I, with a focus on linear and exponential equations. Math II: Equivalent to Geometry, with continued algebra, quadratic equations and probability. Math III: Equivalent to Algebra II, with logarithms, statistics and trigonometry.     Unlike math, English common core classes – generally, English I, II and III – teach four basic skills at increasingly complex levels each year: Reading: How students read and comprehend written materials. Writing: Making logical arguments based on sound reasoning and relevant evidence. Speaking/Listening: Evaluating and presenting increasingly complex information, ideas and evidence. Language: Vocabulary and grammar. DIGITAL LEARNING COMPETENCIES Standards for grades K-12, designed to ensure equitable opportunity to learn throughout remote instruction. North Carolina has adopted the International Society for Technology in Education Standards for Students.  E-LEARNING PROGRAM Mainly used to offer extended class options for accelerated high school and middle school students, offer learning alternatives and increase DPS high school graduation rates. The main purpose of e-learning is to provide students with class options that are not available in school. These courses can be utilized in school computer labs, remote locations and at home. EDUCATIONALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS Students who are at risk based on socioeconomic or educational background.  END-OF-GRADE (EOG) TESTING/ NC SCHOOL REPORT CARD Standardized tests administered to all public school students, including those in charter schools, at the end of grades third through eighth. High school students take End-of-Course (EOC) tests after Math I, Biology and English II. Scores measure students’ readiness for advancement and are compiled into the NC

School Report Card system, which assigns numerical and letter grades to schools based on achievement and growth (improvement). INDEPENDENT (PRIVATE) SCHOOLS Almost 1,200 students in Orange County attend independent schools and about 200 in Chatham. About two-thirds of North Carolina’s independent schools have a religious affiliation. Independent in finance and governance, these schools may follow any curriculum they wish, set their own standards for graduation, and are not required to participate in North Carolina standardized testing (EOGs) or the NC School Report Card program. They have the freedom to serve their distinct missions through their own philosophies, values and approaches to teaching. All must test third-, sixth-, ninthand 11th-graders using nationally recognized standardized tests. Depending on family income, some independent school students may be eligible for state-subsidized voucher awards, known as Opportunity Scholarships. INDIVIDUALIZED EDUCATION PROGRAM (IEP) Special education programs created for children with disabilities to help them make “reasonable progress” in school, including passing from grade to grade. MAGNET SCHOOL Public, lottery application-based schools that aren’t associated with any particular neighborhood and may focus on unique academic curriculums or programs, such as language immersion, Montessori, international baccalaureate, STEM or the arts. Magnet schools take EOGs and participate in the NC School Report Card service. MONTESSORI A style of teaching, named after the Italian educator Maria Montessori, in which children teach themselves and have more control over their time and choice of topics they can explore. Classrooms are often composed of children of many ages and grades.   REMOTE INSTRUCTION Virtual classes, learning and interaction utilized by schools in lieu of traditional in-person instruction in order to provide education while minimizing risk of further spreading COVID-19. A school’s plans may include fully remote or hybrid models (a mix of remote and in-person instruction) until students can safely return to school. NCEdCloud as well as PowerSchool and Canvas are all online programs that North Carolina schools are utilizing this fall to implement remote instruction.  REMOTE INSTRUCTION PLAN  Outlines the tools, resources and requirements for remote instruction. All North Carolina public schools were required to submit their remote instruction plan by July 20, 2020.  STEM Programs with core focuses in science, technology, engineering and mathematics to prepare students for college and other upper-level studies in these fields.   • STEAM adds arts.  • STREAM adds reading or research and arts.    TRANSITIONAL KINDERGARTEN Meant for 4- to 5-yearolds as a transition from a preschool or day care setting to an elementary school classroom. It is often a child’s first experience in a school and offers extra time for a child to develop intellectually, socially and emotionally before elementary school. 

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SCHOOLS HILL LEARNING CENTER 3200 Pickett Rd., Durham 919-489-7464; hillcenter.org Focus Transforms students with learning differences into confident, independent learners through a virtual half-day school (2020-21), tutoring and summer programs. Grades K-12 Total Enrollment 175 Student/Faculty Ratio 4:1 Yearly Tuition $21,060 (1-2 hour options also available for grades 9-12) Special Requirements Application and interview required. HOPE CREEK ACADEMY 4723 Erwin Rd., Durham 919-932-0360; hopecreekacademy.org Focus Provides structure without rigidity for special needs students who struggle in a traditional environment. Grades K-12 Total Enrollment 60 Student/Faculty Ratio 3:1 Yearly Tuition $22,800 and $500 materials fee. Limited financial aid available. Special Requirements School visit. IMMACULATA CATHOLIC SCHOOL 721 Burch Ave., Durham 919-682-5847; immaculataschool.org Focus For more than a century, Immaculata has educated a diverse student body with a focus on character development, faith formation and academic excellence.

Grades Pre-K-Grade 8 Total Enrollment 535 Student/Faculty Ratio 12:1 Yearly Tuition $7,355 - $8,030 for parishioners, otherwise $8,415 $9,540, plus $200 annual enrollment fee Special Requirements Entry test, copy of student’s school records and current teacher recommendations. Application fee is $100. INTERNATIONAL MONTESSORI SCHOOL 3001 Academy Rd., Bldg. 300, Durham 919-401-4343 (office); 678-516-7018 (mobile); imsnc.org Focus Combines the Montessori approach with language immersion in Mandarin Chinese, French and Spanish to provide a truly global education for children. Grades Age 18 months-Grade 6 Total Enrollment 100 Student/Faculty Ratio 9:1 Yearly Tuition Half day, $10,800; Three-quarter day, $12,595; Regular day, $13,595; After-school care, $3,150. Scholarships available. Special Requirements Parent interview and observation. JORDAN LAKE SCHOOL OF THE ARTS 1434 Farrington Rd., Apex 919-387-9440; jordanlakesa.com Focus High school/college preparatory, inclusive special education. Grades K-12+ Total Enrollment 40 Student/Faculty Ratio 7:1 Yearly Tuition $14,900 - $16,900 Special Requirements Application, interview and two-day tryout.

WE BELIEVE THE BEST EDUCATION AMPLIFIES A CHILD’S CURIOSITY, COURAGE, AND CREATIVE THINKING. Every day, we empower our students to question the world around them, discover their passions, think deeply and use their voices in service of the greater good. Because when our students are taught how to think, not just what to think, they are prepared to confidently navigate their own path, advocate for themselves and others, and impact the world around them.

919.383.6602 www.cfsnc.org

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LAKEWOOD AVENUE CHILDREN’S SCHOOL 1701 Lakewood Ave., Durham 919-493-5882; lakewoodavenue.com Focus Providing a high-quality early childhood program with a stable, well-educated teaching staff ensuring consistent care and education for children. Ages 1-5 Total Enrollment 33 Student/Faculty Ratio Ages 1-3, 4:1; Ages 3-5, 8:1. Tuition Toddlers, $1,750/month; preschool, $1,650/month Special Requirements The director offers virtual tours and admissions conversations for families weekday mornings. LEGACY ACADEMY 515 E. Winmore Ave., Chapel Hill 919-929-7060; lachapelhill.com Focus Students are actively involved in multisensory activities, including art, music, language, math, science, brain power and physical activities. Classrooms, gardens, water park and playgrounds are designed to be both fun and nurturing. Kindergarten, after-school program and summer camp for children up to 12 years old also offered. Five Star licensure, NAEYC accredited and NC Pre-K Program site. Ages 6 weeks-age 10 Total Enrollment 115, reduced during COVID-19 Student/Faculty Ratio Maximums when at full capacity. Infants, 5:1; Ages 13-24 months, 6:1; Ages 25-36 months, 9:1; Ages 37-48 months, 10:1; Ages 4-5, 13:1; Pre-K, 9:1; Ages 6-12, 14:1 Yearly Tuition Varies by age and program. Partnerships: Duke, UNC, UNCHC. Special Requirements Registration fee of $150. Need-based scholarships available.

THE LERNER SCHOOL 1935 W. Cornwallis Rd., Durham 919-286-5517; lernerschool.org Focus Educating mensches … one child at a time. Exceptional academics. Jewish culture, values and traditions. Diverse and caring community. Grades Age 2-Grade 5 Total Enrollment 112 Student/Faculty Ratio 9:1 Yearly Tuition $5,000–$18,850. See website for tuition ranges by unit, flexible tuition availability and new student fees. Special Requirements Admissions application, parent virtual visit, student assessment and teacher recommendations. LIBERTY CHRISTIAN SCHOOL 3864 Guess Rd., Durham 919-471-5522; lcsdurham.org Focus Students will acquire knowledge and wisdom with a biblical worldview as demonstrated through service and leadership in worship, missions, care and growth. The core values of truth, intellectual development, potential in Christ, Christian personnel and operational integrity are woven with worship, missions, care and Christian growth. Grades Pre-K-12 Total Enrollment 240 Student/Faculty Ratio 18:1 Yearly Tuition $4,200 per student Special Requirements Entry test and interview. 

School may look different, but our commitment to our core values and academic excellence remains the same.

An independent school in Durham serving students from Transitional Kindergarten through 8th grade

919-383-8800 |

triangledayschool.org

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SCHOOLS MI ESCUELITA SPANISH IMMERSION PRESCHOOL 201 Culbreth Rd., Chapel Hill 919-969-7949; miescuelitanc.org Focus Create an integrated community by providing high-quality programs that honor diversity and encourage understanding through Spanish language immersion activities for Spanish- and English-speaking children, their families, friends and neighbors. Ages 1-5 Total Enrollment Approximately 50 Student/Faculty Ratio Ages 1-2, 5:1; Ages 2-3, 8:1; Ages 3-4, 9:1; Ages 4-5, 12:1 Tuition $424-$1,537/month; varies by class. MONTESSORI COMMUNITY SCHOOL 4512 Pope Rd., Durham 919-493-8541; mcsdurham.org Focus Students learn in a vibrant Montessori community where they are guided toward self-discovery and the realization of their unique contributions to the world. Grades 18 months-Grade 8 Total Enrollment 220 Student/Faculty Ratio 18 months-age 3, 6:1; Ages 3-6, 12:1; Ages 1-3, 12:1; Grades 4-6, 12:1; Grades 7-8, 8:1 Yearly Tuition 18 months-age 3: half day, $12,347, full day, $16,941; Ages 3-4: half day, $11,600, full day, $15,653; Kindergarten, $16,195; Grades 1-3, $16,361; Grades 4-6, $16,979; Grades 7-8, $19,868 Special Requirements Application, family meeting and student visit. MONTESSORI DAY SCHOOL 1702 Legion Rd., Chapel Hill 919-929-3339; mdsch.org Focus A faculty-operated school, a wellequipped learning environment and an enriched Montessori curriculum to meet the needs of children with a wide range of abilities. On-site aftercare available. Grades Toddler-Grade 6 Total Enrollment 60 Student/Faculty Ratio 10:1 Yearly Tuition $9,875-$11,250 Special Requirements Interview process includes general evaluation and meeting with parents. Three-day visit for elementary. MONTESSORI FARM SCHOOL 2400 Broad St., Durham 919-732-5026; montessorifarmschool.com Focus Montessori education with special emphasis on nature study and activities including gardening and animal care. Grades Pre-K-K Total Enrollment Up to 24 Student/Faculty Ratio 8:1 Yearly Tuition Pre-K, $8,250; K, $9,750 Special Requirements Contact the school and set up an appointment to visit.

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fast facts CHAPEL HILLCARRBORO CITY SCHOOLS (CHCCS) 750 S. Merritt Mill Rd., Chapel Hill 919-967-8211 • chccs.org U.S. News and World Report ranked East Chapel Hill High School, Chapel Hill High School and Carrboro High School as the No. 12, No. 20 and No. 26 high schools in North Carolina, respectively. • Graduation rate: 92.7% • Dual Language Programs: Carrboro Elementary School, Frank Porter Graham Elementary School, McDougle Middle School, Culbreth Middle School, Spanish; Glenwood Elementary School, Mandarin. These programs are open to all students residing in the Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools district. They may live anywhere in the CHCCS district, and the district will provide transportation to and from their dual-program school. • 50% of CHCCS teachers hold advanced degrees. TOTAL STUDENTS 11,855 AVERAGE SCHOOL ENROLLMENT ELEMENTARY 451 MIDDLE 734 HIGH 1,305 SUPERINTENDENT Dr. Jim Causby returned to the district as the interim superintendent on July 1, 2020. He previously served as interim superintendent from August 2016 through March 2017. Dr. Causby has had a long and accomplished career in North Carolina’s public education system, including a total of 26 years as superintendent of Swain County Schools, Polk County Schools and Johnston County Public Schools, and was named North Carolina Superintendent of the Year three times. Dr. Causby completed his undergraduate degree and master’s degree in elementary education at Western Carolina University. He received his education specialist degree from Appalachian State University, and his doctorate in education administration from UNC Greensboro.

MONTESSORI SCHOOL OF DURHAM 2800 Pickett Rd., Durham 919-489-9045; msdurham.org Focus Curriculum based on Montessori approach to education. Grades 18 months-Grade 6 Total Enrollment 140 Student/Faculty Ratio Inquire at school. Yearly Tuition From $4,040 - $21,820 for toddlers; $6,040 - $18,640 for early childhood through sixth grade. (Varies by child’s schedule and financial aid award.) Special Requirements Parent meeting required. MONTESSORI SCHOOL OF RALEIGH Middle and Upper School, 408 Andrews Chapel Rd., Durham; Early Learning and Elementary 7005 Lead Mine Rd., Raleigh 919-848-1545; msr.org Focus Mindful practice of the Montessori philosophy. Dually accredited by the American Montessori Society and International Baccalaureate. Independent school in the Triangle offering the IB Diploma Programme for grades 11-12. Grades Age 18 months-Grade 12 Total Enrollment 350 Student/Faculty Ratio Toddler, 6:1; Pre-K-Grade 12, 12:1 Yearly Tuition $11,666-$21,930 Special Requirements Assessment or entrance exam, by grade level, interview. PINEWOODS MONTESSORI SCHOOL 109 Millstone Dr., Hillsborough 919-644-2090; pinewoodsmontessori.com Focus An authentic Montessori education in which children develop a love of learning within a safe, peaceful setting. The school believes in the dignity and ability of children and in their inherent right to respect, protection, assistance and guidance in fulfilling their potential. It is committed to the Montessori philosophy and a childfocused approach to education. It strives to partner with families in their efforts to raise capable, joyful, confident children in an accommodating, affordable environment. It is dedicated to the well-being, integrity and development of the larger Montessori community and of the local communities. Ages 18 months-12 years Enrollment 135 Student/Faculty Ratio Toddler, 12:2; Preschool, 11:1; Elementary, 12:1 Yearly Tuition $5,425 - $9,275, depending on program Special Requirements Contact info@ pinewoodsmontessori.com for more information on admissions. 


CELEBRATING

40 YEARS IN THE CHAPEL HILL COMMUNITY

NOW ENROLLING: TODDLER • PRESCHOOL • ELEMENTARY

1702 Legion Road, Chapel Hill, NC 27517 • 919.929.3339 For more information, please contact admin@mdsch.org or visit mdsch.org.

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SCHOOLS PRIMROSE SCHOOL OF CHAPEL HILL AT BRIAR CHAPEL 81 Falling Springs Dr., Chapel Hill 919-441-0441; primrosechapelhill.com Focus An accredited private preschool delivering an exclusive learning approach that balances purposeful play with nurturing guidance from teachers to encourage curiosity, creativity, confidence and compassion. Grades Infant-private kindergarten Total Enrollment 175 Student/Faculty Ratio Infant, 4:1; Toddler, 6:1; Early Preschool, 8:1; Preschool, 10:1; PreKindergarten, 12:1; Private Kindergarten 12:1; after-school program (ages 6-12), 15:1 Tuition Varies by age level. $1,240- $1,575 per month, full-time enrollment; $750$1,120 per month, part-time enrollment Special Requirements $150 preregistration fee. QUALITY EDUCATION INSTITUTE 800 Elmira Ave., Bldg. B, Durham 919-680-6544; qeidurhamnc.org Focus A student-centered learning community with a rigorous curriculum and clearly defined standards of performance and high expectations. Grades Pre-K-5 Total Enrollment 40 Student/Faculty Ratio 10:1 Yearly Tuition $8,500 SOUTHPOINT ACADEMY 7415 Fayetteville Rd., Durham 919-544-5652; southpointacademy.org Focus Prepares students to become ethical, well-rounded and self-sufficient citizens by providing a world-class education in a nurturing Christian environment. Grades K-6 Total Enrollment About 60 Student/Faculty Ratio 10:1 Yearly Tuition $6,000 Special Requirements Tour, application, meeting with administrator and student testing.

fast facts ORANGE COUNTY SCHOOLS (OCS) 200 E. King St., Hillsborough 919-732-8126 • orangecountyfirst.com • Graduation rate: 89.0% (2018-2019) • 17.4% AP participation rate • 1159 average combined SAT score for class of 2019 • 19.5 average composite ACT score for class of 2019 TOTAL STUDENTS 7,360 AVERAGE SCHOOL ENROLLMENT ELEMENTARY 434 MIDDLE 548 HIGH 1,193 SUPERINTENDENT Dr. Monique Felder started as superintendent on Nov. 1, 2019. Her career in public education has spanned more than 25 years in Maryland and Tennessee, most recently, serving as chief academic officer for the Metro Nashville Public Schools in Nashville, Tennessee. She is a champion for all students, saying “Our schools and our classrooms serve as gathering places for staff and students from all races, ethnicities, religions, nationalities and identities,” she says. “Their very diversity is the power and strength of our district and of our community.”

ST. THOMAS MORE CATHOLIC SCHOOL 920 Carmichael St., Chapel Hill 919-942-6242; stmcsnc.org Focus Provides an education for each child in a God-centered environment. Grades Age 3-Grade 8 Total Enrollment 310 Student/Faculty Ratio Age 3, 7:1; Age 4, 10:1; Grades K-3, 20:2 (teacher and assistant); Grades 4-8, 20:1 Yearly Tuition Pre-K, call to inquire; K-8, $8,730 - $11,350 Special Requirements Application, $230 application fee, test scores, report cards, feedback from previous teachers, birth certificate, baptismal certificate, letter from Catholic parish (if parish tuition rate), health form and immunization record.

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THE STUDIO SCHOOL OF DURHAM 1201 W. Woodcroft Pkwy., Durham 919-967-2700, ext. 2; studioschooldurham.org Focus A research-based, project-focused independent school for children. Believes in a 21st century education, and equips children with a spirit of discovery, mastery and adventure that will empower them to fulfill their greatest potential across their school years and beyond. Grades K-8, middle school launching 2021 Total Enrollment 40 Student/Faculty Ratio 16:2 for lower elementary (ages 5-7), and 18:1 for upper elementary (ages 7-10) Yearly Tuition $9,750 TRIANGLE DAY SCHOOL 4911 Neal Rd., Durham 919-383-8800; triangledayschool.org Focus A welcoming community devoted to academic excellence that ignites intellectual curiosity, fosters compassion and integrity, and nurtures creativity, inspiring confidence in students to lead a life of purpose. Grades Transitional K-8 Total Enrollment 250 Student/Faculty Ratio 9:1 Yearly Tuition $13,215-$16,540 Special Requirements Application and interview required. TRINITY SCHOOL OF DURHAM AND CHAPEL HILL 4011 Pickett Rd., Durham 919-402-8262; trinityschoolnc.org Focus Its mission is to educate students within the framework of Christian faith and conviction, teaching the classical tools of learning; providing a rich, yet unhurried, curriculum; and communicating truth, goodness and beauty. It is a place where staff and teachers partner with parents in educating bright minds with open hearts. The school was founded in 1995, and its campus is nestled in the forest between Durham and Chapel Hill. Grades Transitional K-12

Total Enrollment 520 Student/Faculty Ratio Lower School, 7:1; Middle School, 8:1; Upper School, 8:1 Yearly Tuition $5,780 - $23,200 Special Requirements Check website for complete details, application information, and tour and information dates.

WILLOW OAK MONTESSORI CHILDREN’S HOUSE 1476 Andrew Store Rd., Pittsboro 919-240-7787; willowoakmontessori.org Focus To assist children in achieving their unique potential as responsible global citizens by nurturing self-confidence and independent decision-making in a stimulating, creative and diverse Montessori community. Ages 3-5 Total Enrollment 75 Student/Faculty Ratio 13:1 Yearly Tuition Half day, $6,300; full day, $9,000 Special Requirements $75 application fee, toilet-trained.


Regional Boarding Schools

SAINT MARY’S SCHOOL 900 Hillsborough St., Raleigh 919-424-4000; sms.edu Focus An independent, Episcopal, college-prep, boarding and day school dedicated to academic excellence and personal achievement for girls. Focused on developing key competencies like critical thinking, collaboration, cross-cultural intelligence and new media literacy, offering AP courses, innovative electives, a unique seminar program, college counseling, a rich arts program, 11 sports and a thriving urban location. Saint Mary’s welcomes students from across the region, the state, the country and the world. Grades 9-12 Total Enrollment 295 Student/Faculty Ratio 8:1 Yearly Tuition $58,900; $29,500 for day students. Need- and merit-based financial aid available. Special Requirements Application, three written recommendations, a transcript from the applicant’s current school, SSAT scores and an on-campus interview. Contact admission@sms.edu for more information.

ASHEVILLE SCHOOL 360 Asheville School Rd., Asheville 828-254-6345; ashevilleschool.org Focus Students live in a nurturing community where faculty and students genuinely know one another. The school offers a rigorous college preparatory program for students who represent 16 states and 18 countries. Grades 9-12 Total Enrollment 290 Student/Faculty Ratio 4:1 Yearly Tuition $63,250; $37,300 for day students. Special Requirements Separate interviews for both parents and child required. SSAT exam (SAT, ACT, PSAT also accepted), full application, math and English recommendations, transcript and testing also required. For more information, email admission@ashevilleschool.org. 369 West St., Pittsboro 919-542-3626 MOUNT ZION CHRISTIAN ACADEMY chatham.k12.nc.us  3519 Fayetteville St., Durham 919-688-4245; mzcadurham.org • Graduation rate: 87.3%  Focus Prepares students for college • Dual-language available at Siler or technical school and for obtaining City Elementary School, North employment upon graduation from high Chatham Elementary School, school. Chatham Middle School, Margaret Grades K-12 B. Pollard Middle School and Total Enrollment 200 Jordan-Matthews High School. Student/Faculty Ratio 13:1 • Chatham School of Science and Yearly Tuition $5,000 for day school, Engineering is a high school (9$12,000 for room and board. 12) partially housed at Central Special Requirements Interview with the Carolina Community College that offers early associate degrees and administrators. advanced STEM academics. NORTH CAROLINA SCHOOL OF SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS TOTAL STUDENTS 8,802 1219 Broad St., Durham AVERAGE SCHOOL ENROLLMENT 919-416-2825; ncssm.edu ELEMENTARY 623 Focus To educate academically talented MIDDLE 720 students to become state, national and HIGH 581 global leaders in science, technology, engineering and mathematics; advance SUPERINTENDENT  Dr. Derrick D. Jordan public education in North Carolina; and became interim inspire innovation for the betterment of superintendent of humankind through challenging residential, Chatham County online, summer and virtual learning Schools on September driven by instructional excellence and the 1, 2013, and was sworn excitement of discovery. in as permanent Grades 11-12 superintendent on March 6, 2014. Total Enrollment 680 Dr. Jordan joined Chatham County Student/Faculty Ratio 8.5:1 Schools in 2008 as the director of Yearly Tuition NCSSM is a North Carolina secondary education. A former middle public school. There are no fees associated and high school English teacher, Dr. with applying or attending. Jordan was a high school principal in Special Requirements See ncssm.edu/apply. eastern North Carolina prior to arriving in Chatham County. Dr. Jordan earned a bachelor’s in English from North Carolina Central University, a master’s in school administration from East Carolina University and a Doctor of Education degree in leadership and policy from UNC, where he was elected as a Jackson Scholar by the faculty. 

fast facts

CHATHAM COUNTY SCHOOLS

SALEM ACADEMY 601 S. Church St., Winston-Salem 336-721-2643; salemacademy.com Focus Fosters the intellectual, spiritual, social and physical growth of young women. Offers 10 Advanced Placement courses, competition in 11 sports, a comprehensive fine arts program and technology, advising and co-curricular programs. Offers dual-enrollment college courses at Salem College to supplement AP curriculum. Grades 9-12 Total Enrollment 75 Student/Faculty Ratio 6:1 Yearly Tuition $50,500; $26,000 for day students. Special Requirements Application process includes an interview, essay and transcripts, as well as optional teacher recommendations and optional testing.

Orange/Chatham County Charter Schools (Admission by lottery.) ENO RIVER ACADEMY 1212 NC Hwy. 57 N., Hillsborough 919-644-6272; enoriveracademy.org Focus Utilizing a Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Math (STEAM) curriculum to build upon a 20-year tradition of academic and artistic excellence. Grades K-12 Total Enrollment 750 Student/Faculty Ratio 20:1 Special Requirements Initial enrollment based on lottery in February; students waitlisted once slots are filled. 

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SCHOOLS

THE EXPEDITION SCHOOL 437 Dimmocks Mill Rd., Ste. 33, Hillsborough 919-245-8432; theexpeditionschool.com Focus Embraces the natural curiosity of children and empowers them to become innovative problem solvers and community builders, and to provide excellent education through an experiential, project-based, STEM-focused curriculum. Grades K-8 Total Enrollment 360 Student/Faculty Ratio Grades K-4, 20:1; Grades 5-8, 22:1. Resource/other non-classroom staff not included in ratio. Special Requirements Cut-off for lottery application in February.

know you’re You going places. you want a Now school to help you get there.

WILLOW OAK MONTESSORI CHARTER SCHOOL 50101 Governors Dr., Ste. 170, Chapel Hill 919-240-7787; charter.willowoakmontessori.org Focus Strives to assist children in achieving their unique potential as responsible global citizens by nurturing self-confidence and independent decision making in a stimulating, creative and diverse Montessori community. Grades K-8 Total Enrollment 275 Student/Faculty Ratio 15:1 WOODS CHARTER SCHOOL 160 Woodland Grove Ln., Chapel Hill 919-960-8353; woodscharter.org Focus Emphasizes academic excellence and parent and family involvement in the academic environment. Grades K-12 Total Enrollment 512 Student/Faculty Ratio Elementary, 16:1; Middle school and high school, 20:1 Special Requirements Application deadline in January, February lottery.

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Durham Charter Schools (Admission by lottery. Check with school for key dates.) CARTER COMMUNITY CHARTER SCHOOL 1955 W. Cornwallis Rd. 919-797-2340; carterschool.org Focus Preparing children for college and other productive lifelong learning experiences, beginning in kindergarten. Grades K-8 Total Enrollment 250 Student/Faculty Ratio 17:1 Special Requirements Lottery in March. Some grade levels waitlisted.

At Saint Mary’s School, whether you’re on campus or distance learning, you can immerse yourself in a vibrant high school experience. Our innovative curriculum and real-world learning opportunities let you explore new ideas and interests in a community that values and respects your unique voice and talents. You want to better understand the world and your place in it. We can help. Find what you need at sms.edu/myplace

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CENTRAL PARK SCHOOL FOR CHILDREN Elementary school: 724 Foster St.; Middle school: 121 Hunt St. 919-682-1200; cpscnc.org Focus To create a community rooted in justice and equity where all children thrive. Our goals are to accelerate social justice, advance educational equity, shift and share power and promote healthy integration. Grades K-8 Total Enrollment 616 Student/Faculty Ratio Elementary, 16:1; Middle, 20:1 Special Requirements Tours are strongly encouraged and are offered October through March. Lottery in March, applications accepted November to February. Year-round for waitlist. Waitlist is roughly 300 for kindergarten.


EXCELSIOR CLASSICAL ACADEMY 4100 N. Roxboro St. 919-213-8585; excelsior.teamcfa.school Focus To provide excellence and equity in education by developing a foundation of knowledge, a practice of reason, a quality of eloquence and a habit of virtue to prepare each student for a lifetime of learning and citizenship. Grades K-9 in 2020-21. The school will add a grade each year to grow to K-12. Total Enrollment 840 Student/Faculty Ratio 15:1 Special Requirements Open application and enrollment. If more applications are received than the allotted number of spots for each grade, random lottery for vacant spots. HEALTHY START ACADEMY 807 W. Chapel Hill St. 919-956-5599; healthystartacademy.org Focus Strives to help its students grow, especially in math and reading. Encourages parent involvement. Promotes a childcentered curriculum with a safe and structured academic environment. Grades K-8 Total Enrollment More than 450 Student/Faculty Ratio 16:1 Special Requirements Application. Lottery for Admission. KESTREL HEIGHTS SCHOOL Elementary: 4900 Prospectus Dr.; Middle: 4700 S. Alston Ave. 919-484-1300; kestrelheights.org Focus The only Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Beacon school in the state that focuses on academics, culture and enrichment. Grades K-8 Total Enrollment 505 Student/Faculty Ratio 21:1

of Durham and Chapel Hill

KIPP DURHAM COLLEGE PREPARATORY 1107 Holloway St. 919-973-0285; kippenc.org Focus Empower students with the skills, knowledge and character necessary to succeed in college, strengthen their communities and fight for social justice. Extended school day allows focus on character education, college-prep academics and extracurricular activities. Target population is students who’ll be first-generation college students. Grades 4-8 Total Enrollment 408 Student/Faculty Ratio Varies by grade level. 

Your Partner. Your o unity. Educating students in TK-12 www.trinitydch.org/ch

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SCHOOLS MAUREEN JOY CHARTER SCHOOL 107 S. Driver St. 919-908-1600; joycharter.org Focus To develop the whole child through high-quality instruction, school-community partnerships and the promotion of a positive self-identity. Grades K-8 Total Enrollment 640 Student/Faculty Ratio Kindergarten, 16:1; Grades 1-3, 22:1; Grades 4-8, 24:1 Special Requirements Enrollment application released in December, and lottery held in March.

RESEARCH TRIANGLE CHARTER ACADEMY 2418 Ellis Rd. 919-957-7108; researchtrianglecharteracademy.org Focus Curriculum is built around a strong emphasis on math, reading, science and social studies – the foundation for college readiness. In addition, its Moral Focus program helps students learn the importance of making good decisions and doing the right thing in life. Grades K-8 Total Enrollment 735 Student/Faculty Ratio Kindergarten, 22:1; Grades 1-8, 27:1 Special Requirements Lottery.

REACHING ALL MINDS ACADEMY 2703 Holloway St. 919-596-1899; reachingallminds.com Focus A STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) focus. Grades K-8 Total Enrollment 353 Student/Faculty Ratio 24:2 Special Requirements Kindergarteners must be 5 years old by August 31.

VOYAGER ACADEMY Elementary: 4210 Ben Franklin Blvd. Middle: 101 Hock Parc Ln. High: 4302 Ben Franklin Blvd. 919-433-3301; voyageracademy.net Focus Project-based learning. Grades K-12 Total Enrollment 1,368 Student/Faculty Ratio 18:1 Special Requirements Applications accepted online Jan. 1 - Feb. 28. Lottery held in March. CHM

St. Thomas More Catholic School

Preschool through Grade 8 Shaping minds, hearts and souls since 1964

Joy in Faith • Joy in Academics • Joy in Community

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Visit the Website for a Virtual Tour!

920 Carmichael St, Chapel Hill • 919.929.1546 stmcsnc.org • facebook.com/stmcsnc 86

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Discovery. Mastery. Adventure. We are an innovative, research-based, projectfocused independent school that empowers children to fulfill their greatest potential. If you and your family are ready for a 21st century education, join us at The Studio School of Durham. Serving grades K-6 (Middle School 2022).

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The world always looks

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Martha Ann Keels, DDS, PhD Dylan S. Hamilton, DMD, MS Erica A. Brecher, DMD, MS

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inc.

BIZBRIEFS Compiled by Anna Southwell

NEW ON THE SCENE

M.A. Salon opened on July 8 at 121 N. Scottswood Blvd. in Hillsborough and is owned by Martha Perez and Andres Perez.

ACQUISITIONS + PARTNERSHIPS

Habitat for Humanity of Orange County received an $85,000 sponsorship from Grubb Properties to build its 300th home in the historic Northside neighborhood in Chapel Hill, in partnership with the Northside Neighborhood Initiative. (Each year, Grubb Properties asks clients and industry peers to raise funds and recruit volunteers to build a Habitat home for a local family through the Grubb Giving Project.) Construction began on Oct. 2, with limited volunteers and increased safety protocols due to the pandemic. Some members of Zaw Moe’s family, who will live in the home, helped build during the day (pictured above) alongside employees from Grubb Properties and BB+M Architecture.

Re-Invintaged Home Decor & More opened on July 31 at 120 S. Churton St. in downtown Hillsborough. The home furnishings boutique specializes in farmhouse decor and speciality items from local artisans. Owner Wendi Puckett used to sell her wreaths at MishMosh, a rustic, farmhouse decor shop in Reidsville, North Carolina, and was inspired by the store’s concept where local artisans can rent space. “We have incredibly talented vendors whose passions for what they do really show in their work,” Puckett said. While Puckett had to delay the boutique’s opening due to the pandemic, she said the store will host special holiday events this fall. Carrie Williamson and Meredith Fitch opened Chapel Hill’s Card My Yard, a full-service yard sign rental company, in June. Card My Yard has more than 200 other franchise locations across the country. So far this year, the company has helped with

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about 200 greetings, including celebrations of several milestone birthdays, 50th wedding anniversaries and retirements. SPENGA, a fitness studio franchise with 307 locations, held a ribbon-cutting ceremony at its new location in Elliott Square on Oct. 8. The owners of the Chapel Hill location are UNC alumni, sisters Hutter Black and Suejette Black. SPENGA’s 60-minute classes combine spin, strength training and yoga for a workout designed to improve members’ endurance, strength and flexibility.

The Graduate Chapel Hill celebrated its grand opening on West Franklin Street with a ribbon-cutting ceremony on Aug. 3. The Chamber for a Greater Chapel Hill-Carrboro staff, along with Graduate Hotels President David Rochefort (pictured left) and Graduate Chapel Hill General Manager Wes Rowe (pictured right), participated in the ceremony. The hotel has a mix of modern and classic designs and features Tar Heel icons such as the Old Well and Michael Jordan.

Graduate Hotels expects to have 34 locations across the country by next summer. UNC sophomores Harshul Makwana, Kush Jain and Alekhya Majety founded the startup QUVI and created a device that can sanitize the interior, exterior and water inside of any reusable water bottle by using UV-C light. Their survey found that, out of 250 people, 95% of them have reusable water bottles, but 65% do not clean their bottles regularly. As a result, they created a solution by using powerful UV-C technology to disinfect a reusable water bottle in 90 seconds, eliminating harmful pathogens and viruses such as COVID-19. The team participated in the 2019 Carolina Challenge Pitch Party, joined the two-week UNC Makeathon competition that accelerates ideas into prototypes and joined Launch Chapel Hill’s summer cohort, propelling the startup’s success. They hope to place a QUVI next to every water fountain across campus, from gyms to dorms, to keep students safe. They also envision a business-to-business model to sell sanitization kiosks


inc.

in bulk to large institutions such as colleges and airports. Carraway Village and Glen Lennox lead the trend in bringing new mixed-use communities to town. These developments incorporate residential space – whether it be apartments, townhouses or single-family homes – and also office space and retail options. The completion dates for these two projects are still to be determined. Located in northern Chapel Hill just off Interstate 40, Carraway Village entered its third phase of development this fall. It recently gained a Starbucks and a Chick-fil-A. Upon completion, it will also feature a hotel. A few miles away, at the intersection of Raleigh Road and Fordham Boulevard, the Glen Lennox development originally started as an apartment complex in the 1950s, opening up adjacent shopping centers and more residential space over time. After years of discussions among Grubb Properties, the Town of Chapel Hill and community residents, a 20-year development agreement was eventually reached to include more businesses. Transportation infrastructure is also being adjusted to make the community more accessible, including adding bike lanes. Pilates studio FlowCORPS opened in the Village Plaza shopping center in early September and now offers classes to the public with COVID-19 precautions in place. Owner and founder Nicole Cannon opened the original studio in Raleigh in October 2018.

Carolina Donor Services, North Carolina’s largest organ and tissue donation organization, announced its plans to move from its current location in Durham to a larger, new facility in Chapel Hill. The 50,000-square-foot site at 7000 Millhouse Rd. will house 70 of its 130 employees, is easily accessible from Interstate 40 and is centrally located among four transplant centers. The purpose of the relocation is to better accommodate the needs of donors, increase meeting spaces and provide additional surgical suites to save and heal more people.

ON THE MOVE

Realtor Carly Hemminger joined the Triangle Real Estate Services team in August after running a small local business, GoKart Kids, in Cary. Hemminger earned her undergraduate degree at UNC and her master’s at UVA. She brings experience in business management, marketing and technology to her new career in real estate. The Burlington Shoes store in University Place permanently closed in August. Elsewhere in the mall, Night Gallery/ Branching Out opened that same month with a renovated exterior storefront beside William Travis Jewelry.

In August, Monarch Brow & Facial Studio moved to a location on the second floor of its current building on West Weaver Street in Carrboro. The space, owned by Angela Hugghins, includes a new retail lounge and waiting area. Club Nova, which supports people who have serious mental illnesses, plans to begin construction in early 2021 on a larger, updated facility at its current location at 103 W. Main St. in Carrboro. Club Nova is using Chapel Hill’s Historic Town Hall in order to operate as construction continues during the remaining months of 2020. It continues to maintain intensive outreach, home visits and a “virtual clubhouse” with a full schedule of working groups and socials. The organization’s retail store, Club Nova Thrift Shop, permanently closed in August because many members were in the high-risk category for COVID-19. Gentlemen’s Corner, which opened in Chapel Hill in 2013, permanently closed its West Franklin Street store in June and moved to MacGregor Village in Cary. Owner Harrison Sasser said the rent on Franklin Street was too high, especially during the pandemic. There are three other locations of the men’s shop in Pinehurst, Wilmington and Palm Beach, Florida.

IN OTHER NEWS

Tanjo, an award-winning machine learning company with headquarters based in Carrboro, will help power North Carolina’s COVID-19 reopening plan through its artificial intelligence technology platform. Tanjo entered into a formal strategic partnership with the Digital Health Institute for

Transformation, which was given a grant as part of the North Carolina General Assembly’s 2020 COVID-19 Recovery Act to research, validate and build a simulation platform and decision engine for North Carolina businesses and community leaders as they navigate reopening. Tanjo will support the platform through its machine learning and advanced analytics to process national and regional data, including health and epidemiological data, consumer behavior and attitudinal data, and environmental data. In collaboration with the UNC Institute for Convergent Science, Innovate Carolina and the NC Chamber Foundation, this project also intends to give business owners and community members the ability to predict population health risks as well as simulate the effects of implementing evidence-based recommendations, allowing them to make more informed decisions.

FORECASTING

SCORE Chapel Hill Durham offers various virtual business webinars, both live and prerecorded, throughout the fall. On Nov. 17, tune in for the live webinar, “Google Analytics 101 – Improve Your Online Business by Understanding Essential Data,” which will guide participants through the steps of setting up Google Analytics in order to gather data from their business’s website. Mo Hossain, the founder and owner of Data Up, will lead the webinar. CHM

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Kim Toothman and Don Toothman relax in the laid-back luxury of their living room. The Greenbridge condo serves as an “urban retreat� for the couple who live and work in Cornelius, North Carolina. 90

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HOW THEY LIVE

downtown

denizens Convenience is key for these condo owners in Chapel Hill and Hillsborough By Mari e Mui r | Photography by Cornel l Wat s on

S

tep into the elevator of Greenbridge Condominiums with Don Toothman and Kim Toothman, and you might step out with an invitation to their Thanksgiving dinner. Don and Kim’s ninthfloor condo overlooks downtown Carrboro and Chapel Hill from its location on the corner of West Rosemary and North Graham streets. The nearly retired couple splits their time between the Greenbridge condo and their more suburban home in Cornelius, North Carolina, on Lake Norman. “Chapel Hill is our urban retreat,” Don explains. “Most people escape the city to go to the mountains or beach; we escape to Chapel Hill!” Don and Kim are high school sweethearts from a small town in northern West Virginia. In 1976, Don went to UNC for undergrad November 2020

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H OME & GARDEN

Kim reads a book to her 3-year-old grandson, Oskar, in her master bedroom.

while Kim stayed in West Virginia to obtain a nursing degree. The couple married after Don’s first year at UNC School of Medicine in 1980, and Kim moved to Chapel Hill to work in the neonatal intensive care unit at UNC Hospitals, where she also did neonatal transport. At the time, the hospital used Black Hawk helicopters to transport premature babies from North Carolina, South Carolina and southern Virginia to hospitals with more advanced care. “As it turns out, our first child, a daughter [named Taylor], was born prematurely – age 27 weeks, 2 pounds, ½ an ounce – during my medicine internship year at UNC, and [she] was a patient in Kim’s unit for the first month of her life,” Don says. Kim flew commercial and transported baby Taylor in a wicker basket alongside the chief resident of pediatrics at UNC when the young family moved to California for Don’s radiology residency and 92

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fellowship at University of California, San Francisco, where Taylor was also hospitalized for another month at UCSF Medical Center at Mount Zion. Shortly after Taylor’s birth, Don and Kim adopted their son, Spencer. Spencer’s adoption led to Kim accepting a job opportunity with his adoption agency. They adopted two more children, Sarah and Gabriella, born 11 months apart. Taylor went on to attend the UNC Adams School of Dentistry and married her study abroad sweetheart, Szymon, who is from Poland. In 2017, during her third year of dentistry school, Taylor gave birth to a son, Oskar. Their grandson’s arrival prompted Don and Kim to purchase the Greenbridge condo to spend more time with him. When Taylor joined a dental practice in Winston-Salem, she asked her parents if they would be selling the condo. “No way!” Don says. “We have always loved Chapel Hill, and now that we have an excuse to plant more roots in Chapel Hill, there’s no way we’re giving that up. So we undertook an extensive renovation of [our condo] and plan to spend more time there, particularly after retirement.” It helps that their family is only a short drive in any direction. Sarah also lives in Winston-Salem, Spencer is in Cornelius and Gabriella, who goes by “Bella,” lives in Raleigh. “It’s the family we were always meant to have, that’s how I look at it,” Kim says. “They were placed in this world to be with us.” In addition to their children, Don and Kim have a 13-yearold Yorkie named Louise and a 3-year-old Maltese-Yorkie named Boomer. The couple has had as many as five or six Yorkies at any


HO M E & GARD EN

ABOVE Don and Kim enjoy a cup of coffee together at the illuminated glass bar top, handmade by Tampa-based Jeff Downing, that sits on the kitchen island. BELOW A view from the Toothmans’ balcony; a close-up of the mechanical-inspired coffee table by local artist Mike Dulude.

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H OME & GARDEN

given time at their home in Cornelius, where Don currently works as an interventional radiologist in nearby Charlotte with Mecklenburg Radiology Associates. Don and Kim originally also purchased an adjacent Greenbridge condo with the intention of combining the two to make more space for family. “But we got to thinking, and we realized, we didn’t want to do that at all!” Don laughs. “We wanted the place just for us.” They plan to rent their second condo to UNC students. Don and Kim hired local contractor Jay Taylor of Taylor Design and Care for their renovations. “We took it down to the metal studs,” Don says. “There wasn’t a single light that wasn’t switched out, there wasn’t a single electrical outlet that wasn’t changed.” The couple also hired Katie Corley from Kitchen & Bath Galleries and Allan Beck from Advanced Tech Systems to help with design, cabinet installations, lighting and automated blinds. Altogether, the 1,448-square-foot condo consists of one bedroom, two bathrooms and an office. Kim describes its style as modern and clean, with white and dark color on our community’s houses, neighborhoods, blockage for contrast. schools and cultural activities. Some of their favorite pieces include a Our experience allows us to introduce buyers to the coffee table by local artist Mike Dulude; "quality-of-life" in the Chapel Hill area. an illuminated glass bar top, handmade by Tampa-based Jeff Downing and set up on the Toothmans’ kitchen island; and a picture of the Hill of Crosses from call or drop by our office their travels in Lithuania. Don and Kim for the most varied newcomer packet and have visited 70 countries, 60 of which an interesting introduction to the they toured by motorcycle. And yet, the Chapel Hill area. friendly familiarity and walkability of Chapel Hill keeps them coming back. “What we really love is that we park our car and don’t use it again for the whole week,” Don says. “We can walk to Weaver Street Market or Harris Teeter, and if we don’t feel like cooking, which is frequent, RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE there are only about 35 restaurants on 311 West Rosemary Street Franklin Street – yes, I counted them – Chapel Hill, NC 27516 between our condo and Top of the Hill.” 919.933.8500 A few of Don and Kim’s favorite local Toll Free 800.382.0673 joints include 401 Main in Carrboro and www.tonyhallassociates.com Sutton’s Drug Store on East Franklin Street. “Sutton’s is like family,” Don says. “I know all the people by name, I know the waitresses, and I know their kids. Now I go in there, and they show me their grandkids and baby pictures.”

We Know

WENDY THOMPSON

JAYE KRELLER

CHAPEL HILL! Locally, we are known as THE SPECIALIST

CHRIS CULBRETH

TRACY WRIGHT

TAMMI THORNTON

CINDY GUDEMAN

KATHERINE CLARK

TONY HALL

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HO M E & GARD EN

Bridget Haddican, her daughter Laura, a senior at N.C. State, and their dog, Ruby, in the living room of Bridget’s downtown Hillsborough condo.

Floor-to-ceiling glass windows in the living room provide Don and Kim with a bird’s-eye view over Tar Heel nation. Don often steps out onto their bedroom’s balcony around 7 a.m. to take it all in … and to eye the length of the line for Brandwein’s Bagels.

AT H O M E IN HILLSBO RO U GH Across the street from the Burwell School Historic Site, on the corner of North Churton and West Union streets, sit three modern, single-level condos. One belongs to Bridget Haddican, who moved in on July 2. Like most of the buildings in Hillsborough’s downtown historic district, Bridget’s condo was not originally intended for residential use. Built sometime in the 1950s, the building was once a doctor’s office and senior living facility. Bridget, originally from a town southeast of London, lived in New Jersey and England before settling in Chapel Hill in 2013. Bridget has two daughters, Laura, a senior at N.C. State who’s studying chemical engineering, and Isabel, who goes by “Issy,” a freshman at King’s College London who’s studying international relations. As her youngest daughter prepared to leave the nest this year, Bridget realized it was time to downsize

Hillsborough has a real small-town feel. – Bridget Haddican

from her house in Chandler’s Green. That’s when Issy found an online listing for the newly renovated condos on West Union Street. “The design of the condo is perfect – white walls, high ceilings – it’s a great canvas,” Bridget says. “I love the light and the huge windows … it’s kind of got a European feel, which was nice for me.” Bridget gestures toward her condo’s white oak floors and says that most American homes have darker wood floors compared to the lighter shades of Scandinavianor European-style residences. The 1,177-square-foot space contains two bedrooms, two bathrooms, and an open floor plan with a living room, dining area, kitchen and office and a fenced-in backyard. Colorful artwork from England and Chapel Hill artist Robin Greenberg adorn the home’s white walls. A bright geometric painting hangs above the dining room table – a canvas painted by Bridget and daughter Issy. Parents push strollers and people take their dogs on walks past Bridget’s condo on their way to downtown. Bridget’s stoop provides her with a front-row seat of the daily action. “Everybody around here is so friendly,” Bridget says. “I mean, Chapel Hill is friendly, but [Hillsborough] has November 2020

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The living room windows and front stoop of Bridget’s condo face the Burwell School Historic Site. It’s the perfect spot for an afternoon cup of tea or an evening glass of wine with friends.

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H OME & GARDEN

Covid-Friendly Fun at Midway graham street

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Franklin Street Realty…Working to connect Midway to the greater community 98

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HO M E & GARD EN

The modern art above the dining room table was painted by Bridget and daughter Issy. Family photos, novels, vases and British souvenirs decorate the bookshelves, which are organized by color.

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A Tuscan villa fifillled with over 7, 500 sq. ft. of fifinne antiques for your home or collection.

a real small-town feel.” A history buff, Bridget is eager to share Hillsborough’s historic treasures with friends and family, including the gravesite of Declaration of Independence signer William Hooper. Bridget can easily travel by foot from her home to the Riverwalk, the Occoneechee Speedway Trail, and downtown restaurants and retail. She recently walked to Carlisle & Linny Vintage Jewelry on Churton Street and found the perfect presents to send as a pickme-up gift to her daughters at school. And, when it comes to dining out, “I eat at The Wooden Nickel probably three times a week,” Bridget confesses. “I like the fish tacos, or they have these pickle spears that are fried [and] are very good.” Despite its rave reviews, Bridget has not yet acquired a taste for the pub’s popular tater tots that her American friends love. She also frequents Matthew’s Chocolates, Whit’s Frozen Custard and The House at Gatewood. “The House at Gatewood is a great place [to eat during the pandemic] because they have the nicest patio,” Bridget says.“[It’s] set in a big garden area, all green, a huge patio and pretty lights.” When she’s not out and about, Bridget spends time with her 11-year-old cat, Lily, and 11-year-old rescue dog, Ruby, underneath the market lights in her backyard. Lily is a striking Burmese cat,

Father-Daughter Team David & Elizabeth Lindquist

ROCOCO TO MID CENTURY MODERN, WHITEHALL HAS SOMETHING FOR EVERY TASTE, EVERY INTERIOR, AND AT EVERY PRICE POINT!

FROM

1213 E. FRANKLIN ST., CHAPEL HILL 919.942.3179 | WHCHNC@AOL.COM

WhitehallAntiques.com November 2020

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who came across the pond with Bridget. Bridget and daughter Laura installed a tiny footbridge and cat door for Lily to freely enter and exit the master bedroom into the backyard. Staples of British culture, such as souvenirs featuring Prince William and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, and PG Tips tea line, the shelves of Bridget’s condo. A plush toy replica of Pride the lion, the 2012 London Olympics mascot for team Great Britain, has a prominent spot on a bookshelf organized by color. At the end of our interview, Bridget ponders over weekend plans. Maybe she’ll split a bottle from her stocked wine fridge with a friend or schedule a tennis match at The Farm in Chapel Hill or the Orange Tennis Club, which is less than a mile from her home. In the end, Bridget comes to a conclusion: “Lazy weekend afternoons are best spent at Botanist and Barrel [in Cedar Grove], tasting cider and watching the grass grow!”

SWEET SPOT Vivian Olkin and Sim Sitkin have lived in Chapel Hill for 26 of their 40 years of marriage. Their first home here was in a classic suburban area – perfect for raising daughter Leah Sitkin and son Jared Olkin. The kids spent many hours at The Inside Scoop, their mother’s ice-cream shop, which had locations on MLK Jr. Boulevard and Franklin Street. After Leah and Jared moved to Atlanta to pursue their own business endeavor, a dairy-free gelato manufacturer called Revolution Gelato (you can find it locally at Weaver Street Market and Whole Foods), and Vivian closed The Inside Scoop in 2004, Vivian came to a sudden realization. “We had renovated the house so that we could stay there forever,” Vivian says. “And then I woke up one day and said to Sim, ‘I do not want to live here for the rest of my life.’” The couple realized they used only one floor of their two-story house and yearned to live closer to the action. They moved downtown to 140 West Franklin in 2013. Original homeowners within the building, Vivian and Sim were able to purchase and make major renovations by combining two adjacent condos on the sixth floor to make a 2,139-square-foot space. Sim,

Vivian Olkin likes to read and work in the living room while her husband, Sim Sitkin, prefers to work in one of the two offices in their 140 West Franklin condo. November 2020

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Vivian and Sim hired a California-based designer who they had worked with while living on the West Coast. “Hiring a designer can end up helping you save money,” Sim says. “A lot of designers pride themselves in being able to give their clients better bargains.”

a professor at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business, says they turned to the professionals to keep costs reasonable on home projects. “Hiring a designer can end up helping you save money,” Sim says. “A lot of designers pride themselves in being able to give their clients better bargains.” The couple hired California-based designer Carol Lippert and Frank Cole Building Company in Carrboro. Vivian and Sim had worked with both before and trusted them to understand their style and vision. They also hired Piedmont Craftsmen artist O’Neal Jones from nearby Graham, North Carolina, for a majority of their carpentry needs. Today, it’s easy to see that Vivian and Sim’s home was custom made just for them, from its built-in cabinetry to the industrial kitchen. “We love living here and absolutely love our condo,” Vivian says, noting the open space and plentiful natural light. Rather than purchase new furniture, the couple updated some of their old pieces and splurged on modern light fixtures. Vivian points out the matching set of living room couches, which were recovered in

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The Premier Advisor distinction is held by a select group of Financial Advisors within Wells Fargo Advisors as measured by completion of educational components, businessDirector production and Additional criteria, Managing - professionalism. Investments including length of service, may also be used to determine recipients.

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At Wells Fargo Advisors, we recognize the importance of excellent service and trusted investment advice. Contact us to learn more about our focus on helping clients achieve their financial goals. Lin Roman, Managing Director - Investments 1211 Avenue of the Americas, 27th Floor | New York, NY 10036 Phone: (212) 205-2855 | lin.roman@wfa.com INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE PRODUCTS:

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Sim, a professor at Duke’s Fuqua School of Business, can see the university’s campus from certain windows in their downtown Chapel Hill condo.

Dedicated to Extraordinary Client Service and Exceptional Results

SHANNON KENNEDY 919.448.6664 shannon.kennedy@sothebysrealty.com

November 2020

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REAL ESTATE & HOME SERVICES GALLERY Homes • Condos • Apartments • Commercial

Vivian, a member of one of the first graduating classes of women from The Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, loves to cook in their customdesigned industrial kitchen.

a contemporary cobalt blue fabric. Bright pops of color bounce around the interior of the home, which centers on an open floor plan complete with a kitchen, living room and dining area. Sim’s office, and a lounge area that doubles as a guest bedroom and bathroom, branch off from one side of the common area while Vivian’s office and the master bedroom and bath are on the opposite side. Sim says friends and family were surprised to find out that their new condo would retain its white floors and walls because their former home featured intensely bright paint colors. Instead, artwork stands out against the white canvas with only two accent walls covered in a felt fabric, one blue and one red, which also helps with soundproofing and functions as an office bulletin board. Vivian dips her spoon into a creamy cup of Revolution Gelato’s chocolate mint while Sim shares the story of how they were first introduced in Boston. Sim’s roommate, who was dating Vivian’s best friend at the time, returned from her house with a slice of cheesecake that Vivian had made. “He walked into our place [with] the piece of cheesecake, and he said, ‘I’d like you to meet this person,’” Sim says. “I took one bite of the cheesecake and said, ‘I’m in love. I’d love to meet her.’” More than four decades later, Vivian’s love language remains the same. Every Wednesday, she pulls a commercial panini grill out of the pantry and prepares lunch for the staff at 140 West Franklin. Vivian, a member of one of the first graduating classes of women from The Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, shrugs. “[The 140 West Franklin staff] works hard for us,” Vivian says. “They weren’t able to go out in the beginning [of the pandemic], and then I thought, ‘You know what? This is an easy thing I can do [to help].’” When Vivian isn’t cooking and Sim’s not teaching a virtual class from his office, the couple enjoys going for walks and social distancing with friends. The top of their takeout list includes Pizzeria Mercato, Napoli Pizzeria & Gelateria and Brandwein’s Bagels – with gelato for dessert, of course. CHM 104

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Christina took an unconventional path to becoming a mortgage guru. She graduated from NC State in Mechanical Engineering, spent many years in commercial construction, and then decided she needed a change. She moved into financial planning and, though she loved coaching clients in creative ways, she wanted to serve more families at all stages of life. Now in the mortgage world, Christina uses her financial planning background to help her mortgage clients think holistically about their financial picture. When not coaching her clients, Christina tries to: keep up with her two high-energy boys, crash at every Air BNB the east coast has to offer, sample local Durham restaurants and breweries, and find time for her meditation practice (and fails miserably).

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REAL ESTATE & HOME SERVICES GALLERY Franklin Street Realty…Connected to the Community

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EN GAGEMENT

Holland & Limbrick BY A N I YA E L L I S O N P H OTO G R A P H Y BY A DI TYA AG A RWA L , A D IT YA.PHOTOS

C

hapel Hill native Jaclyn Holland and Daniel Limbrick’s love story began when the two met on Match.com in 2015. The couple had their first date at Spanky’s on Franklin Street and spent the rest of the afternoon walking around UNC’s campus getting to know each other. Jaci says they connected over the shared experience of starting a new phase of life in North Carolina; she had recently moved back to her hometown after eight years away, and Daniel was completely new to the state, having joined the faculty at NC A&T in Greensboro a year prior. After five years of being in a semi long-distance relationship, Jaci knew Daniel was going to propose – they went ring shopping together – but she didn’t know when. In March, Jaci and Daniel took a trip to Topsail Beach, the place where they first said, “I love you.” After a walk along the beach, they sat down in the sand and gazed out over the ocean, and Daniel asked Jaci to marry him. The couple will tie the knot on June 12, 2021, at Orange United Methodist Church in Chapel Hill. CHM

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2011+2012+2013+2014

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Carter & Colaianni BY A N N A ELSASSER PHOTOGRA P HY BY RYA N HER R ON , RYANHERRON.COM

A

lex Colaianni and Marshéle Carter

met during their freshman year at Sunnyslope High School in Phoenix back in 1977. They shared the same friends, the same track team and a few dances at homecomings and proms. “You know as well as me that we will see each other again,” Alex wrote in Marshéle’s senior yearbook. His words came true 38 years later. After reconnecting, Alex took Marshéle on a trip to Las Vegas in April 2019, where he proposed at the Bardot Brasserie restaurant. Restaurantgoers gave the couple a standing ovation, and they ended their celebratory evening with a James Taylor concert at Caesars Palace.

Alex and Marshéle were married on Nov. 8, 2019, under a “sunny, Carolina blue sky” in the Gene Strowd Community Rose Garden in Chapel Hill. They were joined by parents Joyce Carter, Gina Milligan and Dave Milligan

of Phoenix, and the ceremony was officiated by the Rev. Ed Sansbury of Triangle Custom Ceremonies. Marshéle described it as “the perfect setting,” with “roses in full bloom” and a “look of joy in [their] mothers’ eyes and faces.” The couple lives in Chapel Hill, where Marshéle teaches public relations and writing courses at the UNC Hussman School of Journalism and Media while Alex, an executive chef, is opening a new restaurant next year. CHM November 2020

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Kilpatrick & Leeper BY G E O R G I A P H I L L I P S P H OTO G R A P H Y BY TR ACY TI M M E STE R, TI M M E STE R P H OTO.CO M

C

ary native Lauren Kilpatrick grew up spending her summers at Gwynn Valley camp in Brevard, North Carolina. She was a camper for nine years and a counselor for three, so it was an ideal spot for Bradley Leeper to pop the question in June 2019. The couple met in 2015 when mutual friends set them up on a blind date at Carrburritos. Lauren is a Carolina fan, and Bradley roots for Duke, but the two bonded over their shared love of The Avett Brothers and long-distance running. On Dec. 14, 2019, Lauren and Bradley were married at the Chapel Hill Carriage House, a particularly significant venue for the couple, as it sits on the same family-owned property as Bradley’s childhood home. Friends and family gathered for an outdoor ceremony followed by a reception that Lauren describes as “the perfect party,” complete with hot cider and YoPo of Chapel Hill. Lauren’s dad, a pilot, surprised the couple with a two-man flyover from his formation team. Local members of the wedding party included groomsmen Mike Leeper, Casey Leeper and Rich Leeper, as well as matrons of honor Julie Kilpatrick Siegmund and Robin Harrington Sullivan. Guests enjoyed dancing to DJ Al Sibille and Counterclockwise String Band, who played the couple’s favorite Avett Brothers’ tunes. The newlyweds live in Chapel Hill where Lauren works as a pediatric otolaryngologist at UNC School of Medicine, and Bradley owns landscaping business Precision Turfscape. CHM 112

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Heat ing a nd A ir S e rv i c e Yo u Ca n Tru st Fa m ily Ow n e d a n d O p erated

18 Ce rti f i e d a nd Hi ghly-Tra i ne d e mpl oye es

2020

Our Core Values As a second-generation company, we are committed to continuing the tradition of providing our community with top quality, affordability and dependable services that we’ve always been known for, which Barry Horton worked so hard to establish since opening the doors in 1988. Awarded

NC Customer Care Dealer of the Year!

AIR CONDITIONING

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Chapel Hill Magazine November 2020  

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