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ISBN: 978-988-15648-6-3

Architecture Highlights Vol.9

USD $135.00 / HKD $880.00

Shanglin Edition

Shanglin


Architecture Highlights Vol.9 ISBN: 978-988-15648-5-6

Editor: Hu Yanli Yuan Haibeibei

Publisher: Shanglin A&C Limited Room 1801, Workingport Commercial Building, No. 3 Hau Fook Street, Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon, HongKong Tel: 00852-23682122 Fax: 00852-23673126

Distributor: Shanghai JUNYU Culture Communication Co.,Ltd Room, A401, No. 87, Dongtiyuhui Road Hongkou District, Shanghai, China Tel: 021-56714029  Fax: 021-36368678

Copyright © Shanglin A&C Limited All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form or by any means, graphic,electronic or mechanical, including photocopying and recording by any information storage and retrieval system without written permission from the publisher.

Printed in China


T

he world has experienced great changes over recent years and affects the living condition a lot, as well as the way of

man's life and work. We have to rethink the relationship between built environment and our well-being. When an architect is making a particular choice and decision in the process of architecture creation, he is changing a particular part of world we live in. If do something different, things will be different. What we do and how we do is so important for a better world. In the new volume of <Architecture Highlights>, architects from different regions are selected. We should know well their works and the efforts they make to ensure a wonderful future. They are A D Lab Pte Ltd, BCQ Arquitectura, Benthem Crouwel Architekten, Chiaki Arai Urban & Architecture Design, Cook Robotham Architectural Bureau, Dietmar Feichtinger Architectes, Griffin Enright Architects, Hamonic+Masson & Associés, MXSI architectural studio, Studio Odile Decq, Opus 5 architectes, Óscar Pedrós, OSPA Arquitetura e Urbanismo, Rojkind Arquitectos, Ross Barney Architects, Sheppard Robson Architects, TWS & Partners, UID architects, Wendell Burnette Architects, wurm+wurm architekten ingenieure GmbH.


A D Lab Pte Ltd

Singapore

2 Andrew Road

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2 Holland Grove

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67 Jalan Binchang

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BCQ Arquitectura

Spain

Joan Maragall Library Benthem Crouwel Architekten

028 The Netherlands

Grotiusgebouw, Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen

040

Hörsaalgebäude Osnabrück

050

Chiaki Arai Urban & Architecture Design

Japan

Akiha Ward Cultural Center

060

Niigata City Konan Ward Cultural Center

068

Yurihonjo City Cultural Center

076

Cook Robotham Architectural Bureau

UK

Abedian School of Architecture

088

Departments of Law and Central Administration, Vienna University of Economics and Business

098

Dietmar Feichtinger Architectes

France

University Provence Extension

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Sport Centre Jules Ladoumègue

120

Sports Center Hector Berlioz

132

Griffin Enright Architects

USA

Birch Residence

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Santa Monica Canyon Residence

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Hamonic + Masson & Associés

France

HOME Building, ZAC Masséna, Paris XIII

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Reconstruction of the Marne Departmental Archives Annexe 

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MXSI architectural studio New Museum Serlachius Gösta Pavilion and Bridge Studio Odile Decq

Spain 176 France

FRAC Bretagne

184

GL Events Headquarters

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Opus 5 architectes

France

Rehabilitation and Extension of the Music School Louviers

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Pontivy Media Library

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Óscar Pedrós Mediatheque in Carballo OSPA Arquitetura e Urbanismo

Spain 216 Brazil

Linx Hotel International Airport Galeão

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Nilo 1700

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Rojkind Arquitectos Cineteca Nacional Siglo XXI Ross Barney Architects

Mexico 238 USA

Fermilab Office and Technical Education Building

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The Osu South Campus Central Chiller

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UMD Swenson Civil Engineering Building

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Sheppard Robson Architects

UK

Siemens Middle East Headquarters

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St Ambrose College

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TWS & Partners

Indonesia

The Akmani Legian

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Cross House

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Wall-Less House

304

UID architects Atelier-Bisque Doll

Japan 310

COSMIC316 Pit House

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Shrimp336 Wendell Burnette Architects

USA

Desert Courtyard House 342 wurm+wurm architekten ingenieure GmbH Media Centre Oberkirch

Germany 350

Neutrabuilding358 New building Drehmo Wenden

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Reconstruction multifunctional building

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A D Lab Pte Ltd

Singapore

2 Andrew Road

Singapore

Situated in the well-known Caldecott region of central Singapore, this bungalow by A D Lab enjoys the relaxed atmosphere of its quaint residential neighbourhood with gorgeous views of the MacRitchie Reservoir, one of the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most popular nature reserves. The architects, however, had to contend with the site's proximity to a busy highway, that although is not visible from the site, creates a significant amount of noise. The undulating terrain of the neighbourhood is quite unusual in Singapore, and creates a streetscape whereby the plots of land are about a storey below the street level. As such, each house along the street is entered from the second storey level. The architects took advantage of this unusual situation to lower most of the communal facilities down into a sunken court that shields them from the noise of the highway, as well as heightens the level of privacy and intimacy of the house.

roof form is covered in turf, further defining it as a continuation of the surrounding green landscape. At certain locations, the roof folds up from the earth level to allow wind and light into the sunken courtyard.

From the external entrance of the house, the architectural expression is very understated. The architects kept the built form above street level as ground-hugging as possible by making the roofs appear as folds and peels in the landscape. This understated expression is further assisted by the folding of the roof downward toward the outer edges of the house. The internal spatial expression of this tilting roof form gives the opposite experience, whereby the entrance to the spaces are low and rise upward from the entry, creating the sensation of an enlarging, grand internal room that simultaneously leads the eyes upward to the sky, as well as downward to the intimate central courtyard below. The undulating and folding

The owner lives in this house with his parents, so this network of hidden and detached corridors allows the inhabitants the flexibility of moving around the house either subtly or in full view depending on the varying social situation and need for privacy. The central courtyard is a private and serene oasis. A luxurious swimming pool cools the courtyard along with a series of indoor and outdoor water features that separate the main public rooms from each other and bring the pool element into the house itself.

In another move to increase privacy, A D Lab encircles the main rooms at all levels with circulation space that acts as noise buffers. The corridors and staircases wrap around the outer perimeter of the house, focusing the view from the rooms towards the central courtyard, as well as creating a sense of drama about the movement of a person through the house. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;viewerâ&#x20AC;? moves through the house via these corridors that are at times hidden hallways behind the rooms and at other times open out to theatrical balcony-like spaces that view down to the garden and main living spaces.

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4. Deck 5. Bedroom 6. Dining Room 7. Dry Kitchen 8. Wet Kitchen 9. Tv Room 10. Living Room 11. Swimming Pool 12. Jacuzzi 13. Junior Master Suite Lounge Junior Master Suite 14. Family Room 15. Courtyard

1. Car Porch 2. Entry Foyer 3. Study 4. Deck 5. Bedroom

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11. Family Room 16. Garage 17. Store

1. Entry Foyer 2. Living 3. Dinning 4. Dry Kitchen 5. Wet Kitchen 6. Utility 7. Courtyard 8. Outdoor Deck 9. Powder Room 10. Bedroom 13. Study

A D Lab Pte Ltd

Singapore

2 Holland Grove

Singapore

Having constructed their house themselves over 25 years prior, the clients were somewhat reluctant to tear down the unassuming bungalow that had been a repository for so many memories throughout the years of raising their family. In order to make their plot of land sustainable for the next phase of their lives, however, they decided to replace the existing house with two semi detached houses where their eldest son and his family could be next to them as well as a separate apartment for their youngest son. The designers at A D Lab were sensitive to the emotional bond the clients had to their Holland Grove home and proposed a design that echoed both in form and spatial relationship the existing bungalow in order to facilitate the transference of experience and collective memory from the old to the new houses. After discussions with the owners, the architects found that many of the associations they had to the existing house were related to its double pitched roof form, as well as to its bright and open spaces that gave the feeling that the house was sitting in the gardens. With the new design, the architects retained the concept of the original roof form with one pitch at the front and one pitch along the side of the development. These pitches were then related to the entrance of the parent’s house at the front left side of the lot, and the side pitch defined the son’s house along the right side of the property.

from the rest of the house, however the entrance area of the suite is vertically connected to the rest of the house through a balcony that overlooks the bright and airy living room below. The proportion of the overall development is elongated in the new design and the designers used a pronounced expression of the architectural element of the line of the pitch and roof eave and stretched it across the frontage of both houses in order for the two semi detached houses to read as one large home with two distinct sides. This strong linear expression visually ties the houses together yet allows them have their individual architectural expression. In an effort to surround the houses with gardens as well as to assist with cross ventilation and light into the depth of each house, A D Lab designed a central courtyard and water feature that wraps itself between the two semi detached houses. The designers saw that it was critical to the family’s communication to create openings in the parti wall that typically separates two semi detached houses. They received permission to allow voids in the wall in significant locations where there could be visual connectivity between the main spaces of the houses, while maintaining privacy in others. The permeability of the central courtyard between the two units and their parti walls as well as the cutting out of several other courtyards throughout both houses allows for the strong relationship of the houses with the gardens, the environment, as well as between the two houses.

The front pitch in the parent’s house encloses a two and a half storey living room. This lofty living space anchors the house and serves as central core that visually links all the levels of the house. The youngest son’s bedroom and suite is placed on the upper level of the parent’s house. In order to retain a sense of privacy, this zone is somewhat separated

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10. Bedroom 11. Family Room 12. Master Suite 13. Study 14. Lounge 3. Dinning 4. Dry Kitchen 7. Courtyard 8. Outdoor Deck 10. Bedroom 11. Family Room 12. Master Suite 14. Lounge 17. Store

10. Bedroom 13. Study 14. Lounge 15. Terrace

1. Entry Foyer 4. Dry Kitchen 5. Wet Kitchen 11. Family Room 12. Master Suite 13. Study 14. Lounge 16. Garage

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1. Entrance carporch 2. Swimming Pool 3. Outdoor Deck 4. Entrance foyer 5. Living room 6. Courtyard 7. Dry kitchen 8. Dining toom 9. Powder room 10. Gym room 11. Wet kitchen 12. Laundry room 13. Yard

14. Balcony 15. Master bedroom 16. Family room 17. Bedroom 4 18. Bath 4 19. Bath 3 20. Master dressing 21. Master study 22. Bedroom 2 23. Bedroom 3

24. Entertainment room 25.Attic balcony

A D Lab Pte Ltd

Singapore

67 Jalan Binchang

Singapore

This quiet low-rise cul-de-sac of semi detached houses at Jalan Binchang is similar to many in Singapore. Constructed mostly in the 1970’s, the pairs of two storey brick houses are now at the stage in their building lifespan where renovation is eminent. The designers saw the development of the quaint neighborhood and its natural evolution as a main source of inspiration in the design of no. 67 Jalan Binchang. They brainstormed on how to enlarge and rejuvenate the existing semi detached house while maintaining a harmony with the existing built environment, the history of tropical residential buildings and with the natural environment. The designers looked at the existing building as one would study a living organism that needed to adapt to a new environment. Instead of demolishing its embedded history and reinventing it as something completely new, they decided to use its structure, its internal logic of organization and meaning as a starting point to the design, and to build upon this pre-existing pattern and structure to evolve it into a new form and space. The architects find it important to study how space can evolve with time and with the changing conditions of the inhabitants so that the lifespan of construction can be increased. Also as a way of reducing waste, savings cost on the project, and minimizing disruption to the neighbor’s house, the designers decided to retain the entire 2-storey semi detached house on the site. Between this structure and a newly added 2 storey plus attic extension, a gap between the old and new structures was kept to bring light and wind through the house as well as to allow for the settlement of the new structure independently from the old. The internal building’s logic of the front facing public room, rear facing services and private second storey of

the existing house was maintained and carried over to the side extension. In another effort to minimize material, as well as to link the two structures together, the designers used the 5th elevation of the house, the roof form, as the main façade of the old and new parts of the building. They bent and folded this form around the top and sides of the house. This roof was conceived as an evolution of the traditional sloping gable tropical roof and retains the history of the visual and function importance of the roof in the tropics. The organically wrapping independent roof creates an insulating buffer between the harsh tropical sun and the internal and external living spaces below. An example of resource efficacy in the design is the use of simple, locally available materials to construct a “breathing” wall out of organically organized painted brick on the North-East face of the building. This multi-functional permeable wall helps to cut down noise from the nearby Category 3 road of Bishan Street 22 as well as allows the prevailing winds to flow through the building and to reduce heat in the house so as to lower the building’s dependency on air conditioning. Aesthetically, this breathing wall creates beautiful patterns of light across the inner surfaces of the house, creating a calm and peaceful atmosphere where space is in harmony with its history, its climate and with the natural elements.

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1. Entrance carporch 2. Swimming Pool 3. Entrance foyer 4. Dining toom 5. Powder room 6. Gym room 7. Yard 8. Balcony 9. Master bedroom 10. Master bath 11. Master study 12. Attic balcony 13. Entertainment room

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BCQ Arquitectura 

Spain

Joan Maragall Library

Barcelona, Spain

The main decision has been to construct the new building under the old existing garden and not to occupy a part of this space. The motto with which the project was presented in the ideas competition was “Garden of Light”. These two words sum up the two ideas of the project: maintaining and improving the existing garden, while at the same time providing joyful and well lit spaces.

Among the courtyards and the volumes, indoor reading and work spaces are articulated. Areas that should be small, seeking to provide a comfortable feeling of domesticity to their users. The interior is solved easily with little textures; ceiling, floor, furniture and walls are white in general, while the face that hide concrete retaining walls and structures of the building are covered with clay tiles. This porous material, sound absorbent and warm, reminds us that it is a half-buried building carved into the earth.

The library inserts under the garden of Vil·la Florida civic center under the shade of its trees. Inside, a landscape in itself, articulated and changing, where each use and each user find their place. It is a personalized and unique space.

To link the library with the upper garden area two volumes stand out. One is a supported space of the library with direct access from the hall, located in a privileged spot. The other is an entry of skylight to the children’s area.

The building will be primarily connected to Sant Gervasi de Cassoles Street. The unevenness between the garden and Sant Gervasi Street naturally provides access to the new facilities. On the other hand, the gardened roof will be on the same level as the old garden, so that the construction of the new facility will mean the restoration of the civic center garden at its maximum dimension, where Vil·la Florida is the building dominating the complex.

The existing garden extends through the roof of the new library to the street of Sant Gervasi de Cassoles, where is planned a new access point to the gardens (next to the entrance to the hall of the library). The old garden’s original trees have been replanted on the roof of the new library.

The building is shaped by “light and silence patios” and “books and knowledge patios”. The first, surrounded by glass, light and ventilate the interior while isolating the library from the street. The second, solid prisms filled with books, are part of the supporting structure of the library.

Photography: Ariel Ramírez, BCQ arquitectura

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Benthem Crouwel Architekten

The Netherlands

Grotiusgebouw, Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen

Nijmegen, The Netherlands

The Grotiusgebouw ( Grotius building) is a new university building of the Radboud University Nijmegen. The university is situated in a green, park-like environment. The compact, detached building with its orientation to all sides fits perfectly into this green campus. The building will mainly be used by the Faculty of Law.

of the building, which include the penthouse floor, and offer stunning views over the campus. Again, transparent walls ensure an open spatial connection and equality between different user groups. Via the atrium daylight flows abundantly into the heart of the building.

The horizontally articulated building has a small footprint and seems to consist of three floors. In reality, there are five. The building â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;dropsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; a level into the ground and has a recessed penthouse on the roof. The car and bike parking are located completely underground. The main entrance is located on a future new square. Through this entrance one enters the bright central atrium. The vital functions such as the library, the large lecture hall for 500 students and restaurant are grouped around the atrium, over several floors. A waterfall of wide stairs, located at the centre of the atrium, connects all floors.

The cantilevered canopies all around the building typify the appearance of the Grotiusgebouw. These canopies of white glossy composite, along with all the glass that reflects the green and wooded area, provide the Grotiusgebouw with an open and classic character. The upside of the canopies reflects the daylight into the building. At the same time direct, blinding sunlight is averted. Natural materials in the interior, mostly wood, create a warm and comfortable atmosphere. The materials are durable, recyclable and easy to maintain. Wood is used in floors, walls, cabinets, ceilings and facade posts. The floor in the actively used atrium is made of stone. Furniture and innovative lighting elements provide colour accents. The interior reflects the distinguished look of the Faculty of Law and at the same time offers students a pleasant learning environment.

On both sides of the glass atrium the different sections of the building are clearly recognisable, such as the library which extends over three floors and is an eye catcher due to the rows of bookshelves. The restaurant, situated on the ground and first floor has a spacious terrace that connects to the library terrace. The study areas, a mix of single rooms and communal areas, are spread over the floors throughout the building. The offices are located mainly in the upper two layers

Photography: Jannes Linders

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Benthem Crouwel Architekten

The Netherlands

Hörsaalgebäude Osnabrück

Osnabrück, Germany

and simple to create the requested higher ceilings in the lecture halls.

Urban design

The master plan for the ‘Hochschulcampus Osnabrück’ (college campus Osnabrück, Germany) is the framework which includes the first building blocks (library, Forum, university building, campus and mensa). The centrally located university building is situated where in the future the campus area and the Forum will meet.

Learning Landscape

The heart of the new university building is formed by the so-called learning landscape. The building interacts with the area outside where campus and Forum connect. In a way, the Forum is continued inside the building, in a ‘landscape’ consisting of various levels and platforms. The learning landscape becomes the central place to meet, connect, communicate, study and exchange information. The spatial quality and striking cutaway give the learning landscape the potential to become a unique spot on campus, with its own very distinct identity.

Because of this location and the position of the university building as “link”, the building is shaped like a volume of three floors with a cutaway at the bottom. The incision ensures a strong relationship with the outside area and gives the university building a clear, recognizable entrance: a striking building is created. In addition, the campus is enriched with a carefully designed outside area, which can be used for events and conferences.

Free ‘learning zones’ will become increasingly important in education. After all, nowadays digital information is always available everywhere: laptops and tablets are mobile, constantly accessible sources of knowledge. People using these media can connect and form flexible groups anywhere and anytime. The question is to what extent the conventional layout of a university building still meets the requirements of these new behavioural patterns. Perhaps spaces with a flexible layout are a necessary complement to the traditional lecture halls. These considerations are the basis for the development of the learning landscape in the new university building.

Clear, simple, compact

Upon entering the building (under the cantilevered section of the building) the hall opens upwards: open space along all floors creates a feeling of generous spaciousness. The glass roof allows natural light to flow through the entire lobby. This space can be used by the university, but can also be used for non-university events. The central atrium and green courtyard are special areas in the tightly organized building volume, which can be experienced in different ways and provide simple and clear orientation for visitors.

In this ‘landscape’ all floors are connected. Plateaus of different width, with parquet flooring of smoked oak, create in the common areas. Tables and objects to sit on start at one and end on another platform, so that the different levels are ‘stapled’ to each other. The tables and sit-objects offer users different ways to work and study. Loose furniture such as bean bags and seating cubes invite users to create their own setups, depending on need. Particular attention is paid to the acoustics and the function of light in the building: sound-absorbing materials and integrated lighting elements ensure a pleasant atmosphere.

The layout (as three adjacent sections) leads to a clear, simple and compact floor plan of the university building. Classrooms and emergency staircases are situated on both sides of the building; in the middle part are the lobby, technical rooms and courtyard. The large lecture halls are perpendicular to the main direction of the building, and get their natural light from the courtyard. Due to the existing topography, the heights of the land is used in the new building, making it clear

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integrated into the insulating surface and are hardly noticeable behind the metal coating.

Façade

The rigid structure of the facade with a grid pattern of 1.25m, is made more light and airy by using windows of differ- ent heights. Due to the arrangement of these differently shaped windows, the size and shape of the various internal spaces can also be read on the outside of the building. In the interior the different functions can be seen by the vary- ing height of the balustrades.

Green

The colour green refers to the ‘origin’ of the university, which has its roots in the Faculties of Agricultural Sciences and Landscape Architecture of the former agricultural college. This fresh, stimulating and inspiring colour gives beauti- ful, striking and contrasting accents to a building which is mostly characterized by the use of restrained colours and materials.

The outer shell is designed as a two-tier structure: the building volume is coated with an insulating green foil mem- brane that protects the façade against wind and rain. On an aluminium sub-structure, a coating of folded panels - on the sides perforated aluminium panels - are mounted. The perforation of the metal skin creates a varied, lively view of the facade: you can see glimpses of the green building shine behind the metal. The anodized aluminium panels have a soft, almost velvety surface and give the building an important, yet friendly and inviting appearance.

Visual communication

For way-finding in the new building an original typographic has been developed. Quotes and printed collections of words on the walls are there to inspire and arouse curiosity. All these graphics elements are presented in the colour green. The same typography is used on glass walls and doors, as a contrast marker for the visually impaired.

The incisions are placed in such a way that the windows and frames are hidden from sight. The principle of these precise incisions is continued in the upper and lower part of the building; the plinth and cornice aren’t visible. The blinds are

Photography: Jens Kirchner

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Fassadenkonstruktion 1. Stahlbeton 2. Wärmedämmung 3. Unterspannbahn 4. Unterkonstruktion 5. Aluminiumblech

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1F Plan

Chiaki Arai Urban & Architecture Design

Japan

Akiha Ward Cultural Center

Niigata city, Japan

Located in a district famous for railway industry in Niigata city, Akiha Ward Cultural Center is a 3000m2 public theater with 496 seats. This building is designed to be the cultural incubator for the locals who have long-waited for it.

corridor. This improves operational availability. To accommodate the gap between the global formation and the planning based on the workshop, the structural concrete walls are bent and twisted to reach the balanced support points of the roof slabs.

Sitting on a 17000m2 former baseball field, the structure, landscape and parking are organized along the arc of baseball field to evoke the site memory. The surrounding area is a residential district on a vast flatland with few small hills. Following some characteristics of some hills, the global formation of the building is terraced landscapes where people can mount and take in the panoramic view.

The main hall is like a concrete cave under a hill. The structural element itself works as acoustic reflectors which give extraordinary acoustics by the force of its high specific gravity. The heavy solid wall and ceiling can reflect the lower sound ranges which conventional wall materials absorb. This provides us with special experiences which makes you feel as if you were at the concert in a natural cave, and not in a building.

The planning has been developed through workshops with the locals. Several rooms and functions were added in response to their requests. From the competition phase, countless transformations changed the building outline from a precise circle to a distorted circular form composed of 46 different arcs. The planning diagram is stratified in the order of exterior corridor, entrance lobby, functional rooms, backstage corridor, the main hall. Due to the simple diagram, several functional rooms such as practice rooms and dressing rooms can be used from both entrance lobby and backstage

To optimize the acoustic effect, the concrete structure is perforated like a net, and the porous aluminum sheets are installed in the holes as acoustic absorbent. Interior finish of the concrete structure of the hall is fully-dabbed for sound diffusion. With the lighting effects, the solid concrete looks sometimes massive, sometimes weightless, and implies warmth of human hands.

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2F Plan

Catwalk Plan

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Section

Composition

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1. Theater 2. Foyer 3. Dressing Room 1-2 4. Dressing Room 3-4 5. Office 6. Historical Exhibition Corner 1 7. Historical Exhibition Room 8. Library 1st floor 9. Children's Library 10. Story Hour Room 11. Library Office 12. Cross Street 13. Music Practice Room 1 14. Music Practice Room 2 15. Activity Room 1-2 16. Lecture Room 1 17. Cafe 18. Japanese Room 1-2 19. Art Room 1-2 20. Nursery Room 21. Lecture Room 2

Chiaki Arai Urban & Architecture Design

Japan

Niigata City Konan Ward Cultural Center

Japan

This project was to gather the dispersed library, local museum, community center and add multipurpose theater for the new ward created from several surrounding towns. We held multiple workshops to realize the true needs of the ward residents and to nurture the feeling of participation and love for the Center. Resident’s local jewels were to be gathered.

413-seat multipurpose hall fulfills the needs of the residents based on our survey throughout the ward. The design concept is ripe golden ears of rice, the main agriculture of the region. The big drape of ears of rice extends from the stage to the seats. 7000 grains at the tip of the drape functions as light, sound diffusion, and sound absorption. Curtains and seats also inspired from rice fields which are resident’s familiar landscape.

Four different programs from different cities are gathered by circulation corridor space called “Cross Street”. Each program opens to the street freely to create new activities. Residents meet people and culture as they arrive.

The project took advantage of the unleveled wetland site. Its foundation is placed to fill the low part of the land to not only level the height of the building to the next, but as to make use of terrestrial heat. To be environmentally friendly, solar power and LED lights are also used. And exterior material is copper which will be coated with verdigris in time to cope with surrounding rice field scenery.

This project applies cutting edge 3 dimensional technology in the use of concrete. 3-D patterns texture the surface. It also pleat and penetrate through tight spaces. The rising concrete polygon structure is not merely an expression, but a distributer of sky light and air. As a total effect, “Cross Street” shows diverse expression through time.

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22. Historical Exhibition Corner 2 23. Special Collection Room 24. Library 2nd floor

Mezzanine Floor Plan

2nd Floor Plan

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Gridiron


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North Elevation

Section

Section

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South Elevation

East Elevation

West Elevation

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Chiaki Arai Urban & Architecture Design

Japan

Yurihonjo City Cultural Center

Kadare, Japan

This is a complex institution composed of Multipurpose Transforming Theater, Library and Community Center. Originally, this project had two sites sandwiching a road. We combined sites by placing an indoor “Gathering Steet” which gives access to each function. Its fissure like form lets sunlight into the deep center of the building.

center stage to be used for various events. The movable seats adapting to multi-configurations with perfect acoustics was designed for this theater. Seats of the first floor can be gathered at the back side of the theater and it stored in the pit underneath. The stage also descends for flat floor configuration.

Developed in the workshops with locals, the spaces were designed based on somesthetic experiences - human scale, the usability of rooms. Its structure follows spaces like how mangrove trees grow, and it embraces a high level of redundancy as a structural system. It is not a consistent, but the inconsistent spaces.

“Super Box” - Theater, Citizen Activity Room, Gallery and north and south Pocket Parks combined. These facilities can be connected together to make a 135 meter long, dynamic and spacious tunnel. Library and Planetarium - Planetarium floats above Library like a moon. Only four bending columns support it, and there are skylights around of it. The large open space of the library, achieved with minimum structure elements, has space for about 220 thousands volumes and there are a total of 188 browsing seats. Users can choose from these various browsing spaces.

Also we had organized workshops with local children and students who are the bears of the future of the region. The whole process of Kadare contributes to "Cultural Sustainability". Multipurpose Transforming Theater (picture13-17) - This theater has varying configurations such as flat floor, normal,

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North elevation

East elevation

south elevation

west elevation

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outside frame

outside frame

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Cook Robotham Architectural Bureau

UK

Abedian School of Architecture

Queensland, Australia

The Abedian School of Architecture is located on the campus designed in the 1980s by Arata Isozaki. It forms part of the Faculty of Architecture and Sustainable Design. Winning the competition in January 2011, CRAB was awarded the contract and the building was completed in 2013.

befits a hot and sometimes sticky climate, the building is airy and folds over upon itself in a series of fan-like roofs and slits with advantage is taken of the east-west axis to clarify a very climate-controlled development of the building envelope that includes sunshade ‘eyebrows’ on the sundrenched north side.

Peter Cook’s and Gavin Robotham’s long experience as teachers of architecture and their regular working knowledge of several including the Bartlett, AA, Harvard, SCI-ARC, Columbia, Frankfurt and UCLA enabled them to incorporate a response to many anecdotal criteria as well as constructional and climatic objectives.

The Abedian School of Architecture is CRAB’S second University building. As with their other work, the sociology and sense of ‘theatre’, of small, intimate groups within institutions, the importance of the non-curricula moments – and a ‘sense of theatre’ – all run through the project which is taken right through to their design of its colourful and highly flexible furniture.

The building is a long, airy loft on two to three levels articulated by a series of ‘scoops’: defining structure-enclosures that can be used for casual meetings and ‘crit’ sessions. These line the central street that gently rises up the hilltop site. As

Photography: Andy Wingate, CRAB studio, Peter Bennetts, Rix Ryan Photography

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01. North Facade Build up: 6 mm Render and Paint/ 190 mm Blockwork/ 25mm Cavity/100 mm Insulation/ 18 mm Hoop Pine Ply 02. South Facade Build up: 250 mm Reinforced Concrete Wall 03. Aluminium Composite Window: 230 mm Aluminium Plate Mullion and Sill/ 160 mm Transoms/ Structural Silicone Glazing with Dow Corning 795 Black Silicone/ Low E Heat Strengthened Laminated Glass 04. Aluminium Window Frame: 100 x 60 mm Aluminium Framing System/ Low E Heat Strengthened Laminated Glass 05. Architectural Fin: 150 x 100 mm Rectangular Hollow Section with 300 x 35 mm Timber cladding 06. 6 mm Aluminium Sunhood and 10 mm Stainless Steel Bracket Arms 07. Perforated Hoop Pine Ply Acoustic Cloud 08. Galvanised Steel Internally Insulated Ductwork

09. Hoop Pine Ply Fitted Joinery Unit 10. Ply Balustrade Build up: 50 x 65 mm SHS posts with 18 mm Hoop Pine Ply Cladding 11. Roof Build up: Sloping Colorbond Corrugated Steel Roof Sheeting/ 200 mm Insulation/ Structural Steelwork/ 18 mm Hoop Pine Ply Sot

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Cook Robotham Architectural Bureau

UK

Departments of Law and Central Administration, Vienna University of Economics and Business

Vienna, Austria

Just completed is a 200 meter long pair of buildings snaking west to east in a series of brightly coloured streaks that cheer up the often grey skies of Vienna’s Prater district. They fold out to form a series of roof decks, they zig in and out to create ‘sunshine corners’ and are occasionally eaten out to create balconies for smokers or others who are needing a break. There are routes under that run from the University courtyard to the Prater Park on the south - diving through the red base.

observers have referred to these as a type of ‘designer stubble’ that male Academics and upwardly mobile young lawyers enjoy.

The building is designed around Cook and Robotham’s strongly held belief (based on many years as University teachers) that a lively and successful college building should have generous and engaging internal spaces that are not just seminar rooms or offices, but places to ‘hang out’ and possibly encourage you to stay around after class: so these are carved out of the interior and slither around in a similar way to the building as a whole.

CRAB STUDIO has also incorporated ‘capsules of quiet’ in the library, ‘sound clouds’ in the seminar rooms with their own undulating mannerisms for chairs and key items of furniture.

The total profile is deliberately inspired by landscape formation (that over time will be infested with vegetation) and by the desire to encourage animation on the decks and all available surfaces.

The new campus of the WU was masterplanned by BUSarchitektur ZT Gmbh and includes buildings by Zaha Hadid Architecture, studio of Hitoshe Abe, Estudio Carme Pinos S.L, NO.MAD Architects and BUSarchitektur ZT Gmbh.

Draped over the exterior is a layer of natural timber louvres that partially deal with sun shading and respond to the woodlands that surround the campus – also acting as staccato foil to the striation of the buildings as a whole. Some

Photography: Ronald Kreimel

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T3 "PORTE" R+3 T2 PÔLE ADMINISTRATION ET PRESIDENCE R+3 T1 PÔLE MULTIMEDIA R+3 B

BIBLIOTHEQUE UNIVERSITAIRE

PLAN MASSE

P PARKING SUR DALLE, 28 PLACES R+1

PLAN RDC

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Dietmar Feichtinger Architectes 

France

University Provence Extension

Aix-en-Provence, France

region, which, however, is tolerable only when combined with the benefits of shade. This makes it all the more regrettable that the fine plane trees which were removed in order to make room for the building were replaced by scrappy shrubs which will take years to reach a decent height. It is also to be hoped that elements of street furniture will soon make this area more comfortable and encourage people to spend time there. These elements could include a fountain – a typical feature that is found throughout this region and would be highly suitable here: there is a river flowing underneath the forecourt, which prevented the construction of underground buildings and led to an open car park being made nearby.

Gesture as provocation

In approaching the project for the extension of the humanities faculty of Aix-en-Provence University Dietmar Feichtinger found himself confronted with a contradiction. On the one hand the extension, by nature of its position, had to mark an entrance to the campus, but on the other neither the brief nor the context suggested a specific form of architectural expression. The brief, relatively modest in terms of floor area (8000 m²) and banal in terms of content (lecture halls and offices), contained no elements such as an auditorium or large library that would have called for strong architectural expression. In addition the dreary mediocrity of the context spoke against a too striking kind of architecture. Given the featureless nature of the periphery of this provincial town with its groups of little houses and allotment gardens, banal workshops, pizzerias, and here and there a social housing block, even a minor architectural gesture would have seemed unsuitable, indeed even provocative.

The uniformity of materials and the construction method used in the facades strengthen the impression of something greater, something open to the skies. The architect’s concept strives for a close relationship to the existing buildings. Erected in the 1960s during the major expansion of the Aix-en-Provence campus, these buildings are characterised by a striking architectural signature: an emphatic repetition of arcades that produces a compressed vertical rhythm. The cladding of light ochre-coloured concrete panels was intended to allow these buildings blend with the landscape of Provence.

Space rather than a building

Consequently, Feichtinger prefers a space to a building, an empty volume to a full one, and a place to a piece of architecture. By breaking up the brief into a number of small buildings he allows an entrance to the campus to develop. Through the considered way in which he positions the buildings and the subtle expression of the facades he gives the place an identity. These are two important characteristics of this project which Feichtinger achieved by appropriating the characteristics of the campus and reinterpreting them.

Classical rhythm

Feichtinger reinterprets this rhythm and verticality but in a minor key, so to speak, as he used the NACO glazing system for all the facades. This very simple and economical system consists of series of screen-printed glass louvres that can be turned around their centre axis and overlap slightly to ensure air tightness. By adjusting the louvres the marvellous light in Provence, whose intensity drove Van Gogh mad, can be modified. The grid of NACO elements that runs up the entire height of the facade provides the vertical quality aimed at. The facades are treated differently, depending upon their position. The fronts facing onto the courtyard consist entirely of NACO bands. This creates homogeneity in the surfaces. In the outward facing facades that address the old buildings the bands of NACO elements alternate with piers made of thin fibre concrete panels.

One of the essential characteristics that results from its difficult topography (a steeply sloping site) is the existence of small open spaces directly in front of the buildings. They all represent recreation spaces along the routes through the campus. Feichtinger takes up this urban pattern: he divides up the brief into three small blocks of different sizes and configurations in this way creating a virtual rectangle whose centre is an empty area. The placing of this ensemble, which is set back from the road, avoids direct confrontation with the context. You enter the campus by crossing this space. The layout of the buildings creates two directions, two streets that lead the students either to the main buildings on the higher ground of the campus, or to the neighbouring library. This quiet place, with proportions comparable to a large internal courtyard, forms a calm entrance to the campus both with regard to the external context and to the steep routes that the students must follow to reach the individual buildings that step up the slopes.

Traditional night-time cooling

The concrete mass contributes to the buildings thermal inertia and takes into account the climatic conditions of the region with marked differences between day and night-time temperatures. Only the lecture halls have an air cooling system. In the other rooms traditional methods are used to ensure comfort: large amounts of external insulation in the solid areas, triple protection for the glazed areas: double glazing, awnings and the NACO system on the facade. When the louvres are closed the transmission of light into the space is reduced by 70%.

Open to the heavens

The way the three blocks are laid out also offers the advantage of protecting this space from the Mistral, a cold wind that often blows from the north and is one of the region’s climatic problems. Another is the strong sunshine, a privilege of this

Photography: Barbara Feichtinger-Felber, Sergio Grazia

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R+1

R+2

R+3 PLAN R+1, R+2, R+3

T2 COUPE TRANSVERSALE I-I

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T2 COUPE LONDITUDINALE D-D


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LEGENDE: 1 Beton fibres blanc, isolation 2 Isolation par l'extérieur 3 Allège en beton 4 Dalle porteuse 5 Revetement de sol 6 Ouvrant respirant triple vitrage 7 Store integré 8 Garde corps vitré DETAIL2 FACADE

LEGENDE: 1 Lamelles en verre, système type naco en habillage 2 Isolation par l'exterieur 3 Allège en beton 4 Dalle porteuse 5 Revetement de sol 6 Ouvrant double vitrage 7 Lamelles en verre orientables, système type naco 8 Garde corps vitré

DETAIL1 FACADE T3

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FACADE Sud

FACADE EST

FACADE NORD

FACADE OUEST

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1.NOUVEAU GYMNASE 2.COURS DE TENNIS COUVERTS 3.TERRAIN DE RUGBY 4.TERRAIN DE FOOTBALL 5.TERRAIN DE TENNIS EXTERIEUTS

6.TERRAIN MULTISPORTS 7.ATELIER RATP 8.LAPAGODE HALLE D'ATHLETISME Site Plan

Dietmar Feichtinger Architectes

France

Sport Centre Jules Ladoumègue

Paris, France

The partial reconstruction of the stadium Jules Ladoumègue has been realized in intricate connection with the new site of the RATP* maintenance center (*public transport service for the Ile-de-France).

A new building situated Route des Petits Ponts in the East completes the offer with new rooms dedicated to sport activities on four floors. Facing the new tramway station and connected to the existent Pagode building by an interior pathway, it distinguishes itself by its luminosity, its transparences and reflections. It indicates the new main entrance of the site.

The construction of the maintenance center and the creation of new space for sport activities expresses the integration of big equipment in dense urban structure and emphasizes its multi functionality.

The stadium becomes representative of the new urban continuity between Paris and its outskirts.

The sport fields for soccer and rugby are situated on the rooftop of the maintenance center, at the same level with the Paris ring road boarding the site on the West.

The notions of space, urban integration, and functionality but also those of light, transparency and comfort of use deeply contributed to the design. The main issue is to build in harmony with the environment while promoting a form of sensuality linked to lightness and transparency.

A building with six covered tennis courts creates a 200m long visual and acoustic barrier along the “periphérique”. Photography: Barbara Feichtinger-Felber, David Boureau

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1.VIDE SUR HALL 2.BUREAU 3.BUREAUX DIRECTION DE LA JEUNESSE ET DES SPORTS 4.VIDE SUR SALLE D'ESCALADE 5.LOCAUX TECHNIQUES 6.VESTIAIRES DU PERSONNEL

A.ENTREE PRINCIPALE ACCES GYMNASE 1.HALL D'ACCUEIL SALLES DE SPORTS ET TERRAINS 2.VESTIAIRES / DOUCHES EXTERIEURS 3.SANITAIRES B.ENTREE ESCALADE 4.ENTREE ESCALADE C.ENTREE BUREAUX DJS ACCES LOGEMENT 5.SALLE D'ESCALADE GARDIEN 6.LOCAL VELOS D.ENTREE RATP 7.CHAUSSURES DE VILLE 8.CHAUSSURES DE SPORT 9.BUREAUX DIRECTION DE LA JEUNESSE ET DES SPORTS

A.ENTREE LOCAUX PERSONNEL ET LOCAUX TECHNIQUES B.ACCES POMPIERS 1st floor

Ground floor

1.SALLE MULTISPORTS 2.STOCKAGES 3.VESTIAIRES/DOUCHES/SANITAIRES 4.ATELIER 5.SALLE DE REUNION

1.VESTIAIRES / DOUCHES 2.SANITAIRES 3.VIDE SUR SALLE MULTISPORTS

A.ACCES SALLE MULTISPORTS B.SORTIES DE SECOURS C.ACCES POMPIERS

3rd floor

A.ACCES TRIBUNES / VESTIAIRES

2nd floor

1.TERRAINS DE SQUASH 2.DANSE ET GYMNASTIQUE 3.SALLE DE MUSCULATION 4.ACCUEIL 5.BUREAU 6.SANITAIRES / VESTIAIRES PERSONNEL 7.VESTIAIRES SPORTIFS 8.LOCAUX TECHNIQUES 9.PATIO

1.LOGEMENT GARDIEN 2.LOCAUX TECHNIQUES 5th floor 5th floor

A.ACCES ESPACE "BIEN ETRE" 4th floor

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Elevation E Elevation N

Elevation S Elevation W

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1 ATELIER RATP 2 SALLE MULTISPORTS 3 BUREAUX DIRECTION DE LA JEUNESSE ET DES SPORTS 4 TERRAINS DE SQUASH 5 LOCAUX TECHNIQUES 6 LOGEMENT GARDIEN 7 BOSQUET ACCESSIBLE

1 LOCAL VELOS 2 SALLE D’ESCALADE 3 VESTIAIRES / DOUCHES COLLECTIVES 4 SANITAIRES A ACCES TERRAINS EXTERIEURS ET SALLE D’ESCALADE B ACCES LOCAUX DU PERSONNEL ET LOCAUX TECHNIQUES C ACCES SALLE MULTISPORTS D ACCES TRIBUNES E ACCES ESPACE BIEN ETRE

COUPE C-C ech. 1/300

COUPE A-A ech. 1/300

1 TERRAINS DE SQUASH 2 TERRASSE ACCESSIBLE EN BOIS 3 TERRASSE LOGEMENT EN BOIS 4 CIRCULATIONS 5 SANITAIRES / VESTIAIRE / DOUCHES 6 SALLE MULTISPORTS 7 CIRCULATION

1 LOGEMENT GARDIEN 2 SALLE DE MUSCULATION 3 SALLE MULTISPORTS 4 SALLE DE DANSE 5 TERRASSE ACCESSIBLE EN BOIS 6 BUREAUX

COUPE E-E ech. 1/300

COUPE G-G ech. 1/300

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1.BARDAGE DE TOLE EN ACIER INOXYDABLE PLIEE ET POLIE 2.BANDEAU VITRE

COUPE VERTICALE FACADE OUEST

1 BARDAGE EN VERRE SABLE VEC 2 FACADE MUR RIDEAU CF1H 3 FACADE EN LAMELLES DE VERRE SERIGRAPHIEES ORIENTABLES

COUPE VERTICALE FACADE SUD

1 OSSATURE EN ALUMINIUM DU SYSTEME DES LAMELLES DE VERRE, MECANISME INTEGRE 2 MARCHES EN BETON PREFABRIQUE FIXEES ENTRE LIMONS 3 POUTRE EN ACIER SUPPORT DE LA FACADE EXTERIEURE, PROFIL HEA HORIZONTAL 4 LIMON ESCALIER EN ACIER, PROFIL HEA 5 DOUBLE PEAU EN LAMELLES DE VERRE SERIGRAPHIEE ORIENTABLES

1 FACADE MUR RIDEAU VEC 2 BARDAGE DE TOLE EN ACIER INOXYDABLE PLIEE ET POLIE 3 BANDEAU VITRE 4 FACADE MUR RIDEAU DOUBLE PEAU EN LAMELLES DE VERRE SEISGRAPHIEES ORIENTABLES

COUPE VERTICALE FACADE EST

1 OSSATURE EN ALUMINIUM DU SYSTEME DES LAMELLES DE VERRE, MECANISME INTEGRE 2 MARCHES EN BETON PREFABRIQUE FIXEES ENTRE LIMONS 3 POUTRE EN ACIER SUPPORT DE LA FACADE EXTERIEURE, PROFIL HEA HORIZONTAL 4 GARDE CORPS EN CABLES ACIER INOX 5 DOUBLE PEAU EN LAMELLES DE VERRE SERIGRAPHIEE ORIENTABLES

COUPE E

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COUPE E


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1 POUTRE EN ACIER SUPPORT DE LA FACADE EXTERIEURE, PROFIL HEA HORIZONTAL 2 SUSPENTE EN ACIER, DOUBLE PLATS 3 BUTONS DE STABILISATION SECTION CRUCIFORME EN ACIER 4 PIECE DE FIXATION ARTICULEE EN ACIER DES BUTONS SUR STRUCTURE PRINCIPALE 5 OSSATURE EN ALUMINIUM DU SYSTEME DES LAMELLES DE VERRE, MECANISME INTEGRE 6 LAMELLES ORIENTABLES EN VERRE FEUILLETE ET SERIGRAPHIE 7 FIXATION OSSATURE SYSTEME DES LAMELLES SUR STRUCTURE PRINCIPALE

PLAN E & COUPE F

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1.LYCEE HECTOR BERLIOZ 2.COUR DU LYCEE 3.ENTREE GYMNASE

plan masse

Dietmar Feichtinger Architectes

France

Sports Center Hector Berlioz

Vincennes, France

The new building offers specific rooms for various types of sport. Each room allows the practicing of activities in optimal conditions – natural day lighting, ventilation and acoustic treatment.

The volume put on the base is covered with a copper skin and alternates perforated panels with opaque ones. The glass covered zones are covered with perforated metal shutters.

The ground floor façade designs a silk screen glass base – expressing its will to be a showcase for sport.

The façade is animated by the rhythm in the variation of transparency. The functioning of the equipment is optimized. The unique entrance allows a central distribution of the different levels. The connections between the different rooms are short and clearly distributed.

The different activities are visible from the pathway; the landscape design announces the presence of sport. Red lines on the floor reminds of the track for athletics.

Photography: David Boureau

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1.BARDAGE CUIVRE DEPLOYE 2.MECANISME MOTORISE D'OUVERTURE 3.VOLET OUVRANT 4.MUR RIDEAU VEC 5.MONTANT MUR RIDEAU 6.VERRIERE 7.BANDE STERILE 8.TERRASSE VEGETALISEE

Detail facade south

Detail volet ouvrant

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1.HALL PRINCIPAL 2.BUREAU 3.VESTIAIRE 4.SANITAIRE 5.INFIRMERIE

1.SALE DE JUDO 2.SALE DE MUSCULATION 3.ESCALIER PRINCIPAL 4.BUREAU 5.VESTIAIRE 6.STOCKAGE 7.SANITAIRE

Ground Floor

1.SALLE BASKET 2.ESCALIER PRINCIPAL 3.STOCKAGE 4.BUREAU

1st Floor

1.LOCAL TECHNIQUE

2nd Floor

3rd Floor

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1.SALLE BASKET 2.SALLE DE JUDO 3.SALLE DE GYMNASTIQUE 4.LOCAUX TECHNIQUES

Section AA

1.SALLE BASKET 2.HALL PRINCIPAL 3.VESTIAIRES 4.LOCAUX TECHNIQUES

Section BB

1.SALLE BASKET 2.SALLE DE JUDO 3.SALLE DE GYMNASTIQUE 4.VESTIAIRES 5.BUREAUX 6.LOCAUX TECHNIQUES

Section CC

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Griffin Enright Architects

USA

Birch Residence

Los Angeles, CA

This project is a contemporary urban villa that creates a variety ofintimate spaces on a small lot. The house is designed as a spatialchoreography of subtle curves and paths, creating dynamic links to thesky, private gardens and pool.

family interaction - connecting rooms laterally and vertically, while the stair and glass bridge allow one to move through the volume in engaging ways.

The house is organized about a curvilinear path which navigates from the front to the back, accentuating the narrowness of the lot, and connecting public and private areas of the site. This path is a central vertical atriumthat creates the entry, a connection to the sky above, and leads to the garden and pool which is engaged directly into the house. The slight curvatures of thewalls allow for glimpses of views within the house and vertically through a fifty foot long skylight, while a glass bridge connects the two upper bedroom wings. As one moves through the entry, the vertical space expands on the first floor to form an open glass area the full width of the house, opening to the private exterior garden, decks and pool. Translucent wall and skylight panels diffuse the southern light, and are lit from within for evening lighting.

The front faรงade of the house is divided by the central entry atrium, and each wing is then scaled differently. The garage is submerged below ground, with a large horizontal window for the home office cantilevered above. A deck at the main stair landing level above the office offers an exterior balcony at the front and lowers the size of the house at the street side. At the rear of the house, the pool creates a vertical glass space that is bordered by two exterior bedroom decks that cantilever on each side, extending above the garden.The exterior garden is organized around the living areas and pool, and creates a series of exterior spaces for cooking, dining and relaxing. The translucent glass of the pool bath lights up at night and creates ambient lighting for the exterior.

The main level of the house and rear yard decks,clad in polished travertine, are raised above the ground allowing for a semi subterranean garage and storage room below. The floor emerges to form the lower part of the main stair and is completed by a cantilevered set of stairs that merge with the ebony wood ceiling material. The landing is placed at the front of the house above the entry door, allowing a view to the street. The central atrium is a space of movement and

The project reinterprets the typical domestic rituals of moving from space to space, from outside to inside, from up and down, and from public to private to create a house where the inhabitants are actively engaged in a sinuous and fluid form of spatial interaction.

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Griffin Enright Architects

USA

Santa Monica Canyon Residence

Los Angeles, CA

This residence is nestled into a hillside property in little Santa Monica Canyon. At the entry, a path descends into an impromptu, landscaped amphitheater along a path that bends to provide enhanced perspective views. In the entry sequence of this path, the view through the house to the exterior space beyond is framed, offset, and then fully revealed at the doorway. A long skylight extends the geometry of the path as it winds through the living space, illuminating the livings spaces with indirect light. The open, loft-like spaces of the residence are distinguished by the geometry of the meandering skylight. As the skylight bends, visually linking the front and back door of the house, it creates distinction among the kitchen, living and dining areas. The cross-section of the house is punctuated by the skylight, where it slips to further distinguish these living areas, shaping their individual volumes subtly within the whole. As it moves through the house, sculpting the high ceiling, the skylight connects the two new courtyards created by the form of the residence.

At the rear faรงade, pocket doors disappear to frame the view of the exterior from the living room. A deck at the rear views back on the living area and through the house to the front courtyard. The high ceiling of the main living area compliments the view from the back courtyard, as the ceiling lifts and the longitudinal section parallels that of the descending geometry of the entry sequence. The house is both held together as a whole, and divided into parts by the volumetric carving of the skylight and the exterior seems to pull through the house along the same path, as the visual continuity between the back and front courtyards is maintained along this zig-zag spine of the house. Photography: Tim Street-Porter

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Hamonic + Masson & Associés

France

HOME Building, ZAC Masséna, Paris XIII

Paris, France

Members of the Council of Paris revised the urban regulations for the Masséna- Bruneseau sector in Paris’ southeasterly 13th arrondissement at the city council meeting of Tuesday 16th November 2011. This amendment will allow the construction of residential towers measuring 50 metres tall, and of office blocks measuring up to 180 metres tall.

Many people aspire to live in suburban style, individual housing. There are many reasons for this, but in particular being able to create a true identity for one’s own home. Secondly there’s appeal of eating outside, having direct contact with the outdoors from the comfort of your own house, all whilst owning ones own land. These desires must be integrated in to the scale of the apartments in a collective building. We have responded to this search for individual identity, ownership and dif¬ferentiation by creating multiple exterior spaces and apartments with various, differing typologies within the collective.

Functioning as one single building and offering social housing and home ownership opportunities, the project links the strict rigidity of the Avenue de France, the railway landscape, the entrance to the Ivry suburb and finally the transition from a linear city to a vertical one.

Living up high gives a sense of privilege: the view, the light and the sunshine… Some say they “have their head in the clouds.” Being in the city whilst also being able to shut oneself off and see the land below and the horizon: living here is like getting away from it all.

The terraces spiral upwards, catching the light at every angle, adding to the allure of this tiered tower, whilst leaving an impression of progressive transformation. The performance resides in the fact that there is no feeling of repetition throughout this structure of 200 homes. The apartments are stacked on top of one another, but each has its own strong, unique identity.

The HOME project will be complete at the beginning of 2015 and will be the first housing operation of 50 metres to be built in Paris since the 1970s. It is symbolic of a willingness to reconsider the possibility and the potential of height in Paris.

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Hamonic + Masson & Associés

France

Reconstruction of the Marne Departmental Archives Annexe The programme of this competition, won in 2008 by Hamonic + Masson & Associés architects, was to reconstruct the Marne departmental archives annexe, situated in the French city of Reims. The new construction is located opposite the old building, and the project was completed and delivered by Hamonic + Masson & Associés in 2014. The aim was to turn the building in to a modern history research hub and a regional information centre, whilst expanding the linear archival storage space from 7km to 18km.

Reims, France

applied with care, gives the building consistency and identity. The entire building is in an ochre, bronze tint that reflects the colours of the land in the building’s location: the Marne region. A specific metallic tint mixed with stronger gold pigments was created for the project, with the reference RAL 1036. The concrete is dyed with metallic gold pigments duplicating RAL 1036, and a reflective stain was colour matched and added. It is this juxtaposition between shades and tints that provides variation and depth to the concrete.

Considering the size and the impact on the site, we wanted this project for the Reims archives to be read in several ways, to tell different tales depending on distance or nearness to the building, and to allow the discovery of many different elements and feelings as one walks through.

The aluminium metal cladding is coated with RAL 1036 metallic gold varnish with 90% shine. Five different types of pattern were created which, when assembled, create a plant like image effect on the building. The trees surrounding the building are reflected in the metal and overlap with the various patterns. The pattern is similar to a pixel, and was embossed in to the sheet metal in order to give relief to the façade and also to play with varying shadows and light throughout the day.

Located on a gentle slope, the building stands in such a way that does not spoil or overload the setting. It’s a line that we see from the background. Visitors take a path that gradually gives way to the access ramp. The reception area is an intermediary space, before opening onto the inner garden. The entrance demonstrates the building’s functional organisation that we see through the transparent patio.

A reflective silicone structural glazing was chosen for the window glass in the conference room in order to create a mirror for the site’s vegetation.

The effect of time will reveal the charm of the natural, raw materials (glass, metal and golden-brown varnished concrete.) With their richness, textures and vibrations, these industrial materials gain in poetry. It is an aesthetic refinement, which, if

Photography: Sergio Grazia

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MXSI architectural studio

Spain

New Museum Serlachius Gösta Pavilion and Bridge

Mäntta, Finland

Photography: Pedro Pegenaute, Tuomas Uusheimo.

Gösta Pavilion

The project is conceptualized as a dense abstract forest, translated into a series of parallel wooden frames that define its geometry, structure, texture and transversal permeability. The challenge was to formalize a representative building, five times bigger than the existing one, without threatening the presence of the House.

Gösta Bridge

The new bridge has been placed in the same place occupied by the defunct walkway, at the end of the diagonal axis connecting the island with the Joenniemi. Manor House. This axis was drawn as far back as the early twentieth century and is accompanied by a prominent tree line that was part of the original landscape design.

The idea was to bring the exterior spatial quality inside the new building by extending the entry plaza through a porch that blends outside with inside. The new building is organized by a spacious foyer, placed strategically as the heart of the building connecting the whole program with Joenniemi Manor.

To achieve integration in the landscape, the way that infrastructure touched the ground at both ends was carefully studied. The lake shore of the island is relatively higher than the shore side of the park, which has a smooth, descending terrain. To overcome the height difference and accentuate topographic features of the site, the bridge has been placed with a slight slope, emerging from the earth on the side of the park and perched lightly on the island terrain.

Visual continuity between outside and inside was one of the main goals, so landscape is introduced into the main building body through some “incisions”. Those “incisions” or “interruptions” reduced the visual impact of a building in such a sensitive environment by fragmenting it into smaller volumes. They are irregularly shaped, covered with a reflective glass surface that promotes the perception of infinite mirrors; doors or forest walkways optically subdividing transversely the building.

The Corten steel used as a structural element, and welded to get a single piece without joints, also offers fine features and a subtly textured appearance in the landscape where it is placed. However, it was considered necessary to provide museum visitors a soft touch surface. For this reason the sides of the “balustrade-bench” have been designed in larch wood along its course at two different heights. The lower bank was fabricated by a three-dimensional carved balustrade allowing it to move into the centre of the bridge to comfortably accommodate a group of visitors who wish to sit and stop to look at the landscape.

The incisions in the interior volume provoke a sudden and surprising invasion of light with impressive glimpses of exterior views. These invasions transform what would have been a lineal path into an emotional one, allowing external spaces to penetrate inside the building. Outside, the building presents a series of vertical uprights that follow and emphasize the rhythm of the interior structure. Between the uprights a ventilated facade system was designed of spruce wood strips twisted independently to the tectonic limit of the material itself, thereby achieving an effect of a three-dimensional texture that varies along the entire elevation.

Photography: Pedro Pegenaute, Eugeni Bach

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Studio Odile Decq

France

FRAC Bretagne

Rennes, France

"Ambiguity of material, of light of shape and structure A massive block Black material Densities of black From absorbent mat to reflecting lustrous black, becoming transparent mat The inversion of weight and lightness Gravity in suspension Brute and sophisticated" OdileDecq

The new building for the FRAC is the first of new contemporary art museums to be realized in France. It combines the main functions of conservation, exhibiting as well as diffusion of knowledge about art throughout a library, a conference room and educational services. The main façade offers a silent setting in respect to Nemours art work installed in front of the FRAC, but, inside, the building reveals itself in an unexpected complexity, catching the visitor by the strength full and sensual expression of the vertical void running over the entire building’s height. From this void, the museum’s main functions are clearly readable, dispatching and articulating the different spaces in three dimensions along a progressive promenade of discovery and changing perception, from the basement’s open to public storage till the library on top. This museum, though modest in size, is challenging as a local landmark for contemporary art and combining all the functions needed in a densely articulated ensemble realized within the frame of a tight budget.

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Groundfloor : Entrance hall of GL Events offices and public spaces

Mezzanine : public spaces

Studio Odile Decq

France

GL Events Headquarters

Docks Quai Rambaud, Lyon, France

Between the two rivers, the Rhone and the Saône, the new pavilion takes in account the aerial steel structures.

punctuating the open space floors around the atrium, creating subdivision inside a continuous space. On outer floor angles are dispatched the main meeting rooms. 

Suspended on huge double crossing beams on the fourth floor over three strong pylons in the atrium, the two parallelepiped volumes of the building are shifted at 86°. The internal large atrium is scenographying the movements through the whole building. Seen from underneath when passing by along the river, under the cantilever of 28 meters longof the four floors above, the building is discovered through a glass ceiling.

The second important feature is the singular red objects in space: the cafeterias on the 1st and 3d floor; the Chef's kitchen on the 4th; the bar on the roof top… These contribute to social life inside the working space, in favour of informal encounters or meetings, such as in the specific open bench shaped meeting areas on each floor, at the angles of the atrium.

The four facades arethe result of the meeting of the original artwork of Felice Varini with the architecture of Odile Decq: it represents in the four directions the landscape erased by the presence of the building.These black and white photos play an ambiguous game between opacity, representation and transparency.

The dominant colour for the interior design is red. Red happens to be the colour of the GL Events company's logo. We declined it on the singular objects, on the cupboards and the mechanical archives, in contrast with the sober black carpet and chairs. Tabletops remained white due to working comfort.

The basic principle that has guided the interior design is the client's demand for total transparency. The need for meeting rooms and some enclosed office spaces was the opportunity to develop rooms made of full glass walls. They are

The people working now inside Pavillon 8 consider this environment being energizing and dynamic.

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First Floor : open space offices, terrace and meeting rooms

Second Floor : open space offices and meeting rooms

Third Floor : open space offices and meeting rooms

Fourth Floor : executive floor, offices and meeting rooms

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Opus 5 architectes

France

Rehabilitation and Extension of the Music School Louviers History

France

South Extension

The antique convent of the Penitents, in the city center of Louviers – Normandy, is a very exceptional example of "cloister on water", made of a complex assembly of successive constructions. The monastery was built between 1646 and 1659 for the Franciscan brethren. There used to be a church in the west and two conventual wings surrounding the central building. The cloister was sold in 1789 as a national fortune: the conventual parts were transformed into prisons and the church into a tribunal. In 1827, the church was demolished and the tribunal was transferred in a new part of the edifice. The prison closed in 1934 while the old south wing started falling down. The building, partially amputated, was reused as a music school in 1990. The remains of the cloister above the river ‘L’Epervier’ are forming an ‘Impressionist’ picture combining stone, vegetation and water in a beautiful harmony. This landscape value has been highlighted and interpreted in the rehabilitation project.

The second extension, replacing the missing parts of the south wing, exposes its front to the water, towards the cloister and the city. Its incredible position represents the key of the project. It hosts the major element of the program: the big orchestra hall. It represents the emblem of the musical school and composes the landscape with natural elements. This façade fits in a simple rectangular glass box with chrome stripes reflecting the surrounding environment and fading in the sky. It appears as an echo to music and as a poetic image of the sound. It has two characteristics ‐ sweetness and creativity during the day, warm and glowing at night. This room, by its transparency and its lightness, stands out of its strict and severe environment. It is a showcase exhibiting the building's creative life.

Glazed Façade

The North façade is made of laminated glazed panels within the inside layer has been coated with mirror finish (titanium, siliconitride, chrome et siliconitride) A ‘non‐crossing’ attachment system holds the glass and leaves the fixing points invisible from outside. The whole set is maintained on mirror polished stainless steel wales of 10 mm sickness and 25cm depth. The wales are suspended to a mechanically welded steel beam of 450x900mm used as a duct blower for the orchestra room.

Program

The brief was to offer Louviers a new musical school, modern, functional, attractive and representing the town’s cultural policy. The plan was also to highlight the archaeological heritage and its exceptional site in the heart of the city. Finally, the project aimed to display a new image of the place and to shed its prison characteristics. The project of the New Musical School of Louviers in the convent of the Penitents – 24 classrooms, a score library and two big orchestra rooms‐ was raising a certain problematic in term of rehabilitation because of a heavy program implicating substantial interventions: the contemporary extensions have become more important than the existing building. These were conceived in a very tight plot which led the architects to fill all free spaces, removing the "breathings" and raising these extensions on top of existing walls. The result is a compact project where the new parts dominate the ancient elements; however, the historical construction is still governing. This is an ‘intimate’ program within each task requires isolation and concentration and will adapt to the compact and intimate character of the project.

Concrete panels

The frontier façades are made of prefabricated concrete panels of 8 cm thickness/ 180cm width and of variable heights. They are cut out to follow the surface of the ancient masonry. These panels are reinforced and attached on the extensions’ metal structure.

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Plan de masse 1/500°

Opus 5 architectes

France

Pontivy Media Library

France

elements creating rhythms, frames, filters and different angles of vision depending on the location of the visitor in the space: this creates a kinetic vision of the construction.

The building and its location

The media library is pointing at three directions: East, West and South. These are making up the three images and views of the building. East, the city; West, the canal: Two opposite points, drawing a bridge from the city to the nature and inviting the visitor to get away from the noise and the movement. The building is offering a peaceful view and a quiet atmosphere to concentrate and read. South: the outside space stretches the interior volumes.  A screen made out of steel blades creates a partition between the outside and the inside world:  this enables to preserve calm and serenity. It also offers the visitor a feeling of protection and helps to keep concentrated.

Construction system

A series of sixty-two PRS steel crossbars, covered by thermo lacquered metal sheet with clouded effect, are attached to the "strong box".The cross bars are lined up across the outside and inside spaces of the library. A mezzanine, extended over the whole length of the building, is entirely suspended to high beams by a succession of very thin steel bars. The two "pebbles" lying on the floor, unique enclosed spaces of the building are made of a metal structure covered by a thixotropic concrete shell. 

Russian doll system

The building is composed of different layers. The first layer, made of thin crossbars, protects from the sun and the outside perturbations. It brings intimacy to the building designed for reading and concentrating. The second one, a glass box, shelters the public spaces, the lobby and the reading areas.The third one, opaque, encloses the store rooms, the 'treasure' of the building, the technical areas and staff rooms.

The « magic boxes », animation and story-telling

Unusual and attracting, round and soft like pebbles, they are shelters where the visitor could withdraw, think and use their imagination.

The building and the light

The strong box- treasury chest

Compactnessand lightness

The reading spaces and lobby

The light penetrates the building from everywhere. When it is filtered, it animates the space with playful contrasts between shadow and light.

Concrete box protecting the archives from the sunlight, enclosing sanitation and staff rooms. Along the reading area, a long wall of blinds, made of prefabricated white panels, enables to vary the lighting of the premises.

The building seems light and ethereal thanks to the fragmentation of the structure. The structure is made of many small

Open and light, they are spread on the whole length of the glass box.

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Óscar Pedrós

Spain

Mediatheque in Carballo

A Coruña, Spain

“Thinking on a 21th. Century library -as a friend of mine would say-, is like wondering about a book´s cemetery”. At that point, all efforts must conciliate architectonic non-variable values as sequence, promenade and staying with the immateriality that new technologies bring nowadays. There is no other solution than sharing jealously material space with virtuality to avoid Carballo´s newest building ending as a book warehouse.

become fulfilled. The main idea comes out from this situation. By means of placing the building in one side of the plot, we put all the stress in the entrance for actual urban situation, but some open space is liberated at the rear, were a new public square and then a second entrance could be settled when that area becomes more dense. The second strategic decision is the appearance of a central patio that orders the whole building, and enables a new landscape inwards, scaping from that rude urban situation, acting as the building’s lung. Then almost all elevations become hermetic outwards, yet some openings appear in the outskirt just when urban perspectives from inside are considered.

The building is placed in Carballo, a medium-sized spanish village (30.000 inh.), 35 km. far away from A Coruña, Galicia, Northwest Spain. Urban atmosphere is strongly rude, full of party walls and unfinished housing blocks. The building becomes quite hermetic and opens itself to an inner patio acting as an open space for reading. It has the chance to be the first one architecture built in that area, but also serious lack of references now and after the urban planning expectations

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An U-shaped ground floor surrounds a central patio with controlled access from outside. This patio behaves as an extension of that future public space northwards already mentioned. First floor closes itself in a O-shaped diagram. Mediareaders access through two staircases placed on both ground floor U-wings, closing a spiral-path so movement and discovering inner space become a natural sequence. Teen/adult worlds converge in fiction and comic (N) and music & media (S). Third piece is a sloping recitals room & reader´s club. This piece is oriented west, covering an open-air space for performances.

There´s yet other significant feature is in terms of materialization: one of the building´s aims is to get as much natural lightning as possible, both to save energy and for a comfortable reading. Then an off-white façade allows to get lots of light by reflection without shining. 3x1 m. ceramic tiles were chosen to fit the scale of an institutional building, all along the rainscreen façade. Their thickness (only 6 mm.) makes possible a bigger space exploitation as inner perimeter gets bigger. Shelves for books will hide the visible structure thrusting out of the inner walls. Working with a really thin façade (25 cm. in total), obligues also to set all installations out of the perimeter (running through the floor or inside walls) to protect holes in the stand-alone brick exterior party-wall. The most specific and meaningful question in its design lies on the fact that tiles are laid in a staggered shape giving continuity to vertical joints. It´s an unusual configuration for rain-screen façades and it is rather unseen. It was necessary to rethink in the way of attaching the tiles to the vertical aluminum substructure as shown in technical plans.

Floorplans are designed following the complicated plot´s geometry to get a better ratio of profit in relationships between inner and outer space, melting the threshold between them. A dynamic & static sequence is pursued, so the visitor can gradually discover the building´s mysteries, just before being seduced by new technologies piled in shelves. There´s no other solution than sharing jealously material and intangible space. Thereby projectual strategy chosen plays with promenade & staying concepts.

The final budget (including furniture as shown in pictures and floor plans) was 764,00 €/sqm. Definitely low-cost architecture.

In terms of construction, the building shows two important features; the first one is a structural effort in designing all singular corners of the building: due to the rotation of first floor looking for urban views (from inside) and the proper building´s presence (from outside), some cantilevered elements appear as part of its language. Special presence gain the hanging auditorium and the covered entrance.

Photography: Óscar Pedrós, Héctor Santos –Díez (Santos-Díez | BISimages)

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OSPA Arquitetura e Urbanismo 

Brazil

Linx Hotel International Airport Galeão

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Project of an executive hotel, located near the Antonio Carlos Jobim International Airport (Galeão), into Infraero concession zone. The undertaking arises from World Cup and Olympic Games lodging demand in Rio de Janeiro before, during and after these events.

The smaller volume is composed of two levels. In the front is located the porte-cochére, leading the guests to the main social areas, e.g. the lobby, the restaurant, the snack bar and the main conference room. In the first floor are found the gym, the bar, meeting rooms and a terrace, where is located a two-lane lap pool.

The hotel's main purpose is to serve transit passengers, business people and tourists which demand a quick connection to the airport. With 7.528,44sqm of floor area in a 4.800sqm lot, the building is composed of two blocks: one for the apartments, another for social and service areas.

The building was fully designed with industrial elements, with precast concrete structure and prefabricated elements in order to optimize the construction runtime. The project combines energy efficiency, rational use of natural resources and automated operating systems.

According to airport zone height restrictions, the accomodation edifice is extended to the ground floor, optimizing the available lodging units in 162 apartments. Besides the standard apartment, in both ends of every corridor two larger apartments are positioned, which can be united through the main circulation without losing each one's privacy.

Photography: Marcelo Donadussi

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OSPA Arquitetura e Urbanismo

Brazil

Nilo 1700

Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil

Project of a shopping center with 12 shops facing one of the most valuable corners of Porto Alegre. The project was designed and built with industrial materials, and its macrostructure made of precast concrete optimizing the construction runtime. The gallery consists of the projected roof and the ground 1.5 m above the street level, so that it is not in visual conflict with the parking necessary, as the project has high traffic. This facade also provides interesting views and protection to the stores and users passing through the gallery. The unique and commercial character necessary for this

project was given with the use of an anodized aluminum cladding in different colors, which contrasts with the austerity of exposed concrete. Photography: Marcelo Donadussi

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Rojkind Arquitectos

Mexico

Cineteca Nacional Siglo XXI

Mexico City, Mexico

The Mexican National Council for Culture and the Arts awarded the expansion and renovation of the National Film Archive and Film Institute “Cineteca Nacional Siglo XXI” to Rojkind Arquitectos.

The project included the total renovation of the complex, originally built as the “Composer’s Square” in 1984 by Manuel Rocha and trans- formed on several occasions since becoming the Nation’s Film Archive and Film Institute in 1974. In addition to the existing screening rooms, the complex has five archive vaults, four of them housing a collection of more than 15,000 reels of film in 35 and 15 mm formats and the fifth vault housing iconographic material including posters, photographs, slides, negatives and video.

To intervene and expand the National Film Archive involves understanding a substantial change in how we relate to film as suggested in the term motion pictures. Today, pictures move not only on a screen, the screen moves with us, it goes where we go, and cinema has evolved from being a gathering space where one came en masse, to being that which also reaches us wherever we might be.

The new project included four new screening rooms with a capacity of 180 seats each, and the renovation of the existing screening rooms with a capacity of 1,775 seats. The total number of seats was increased from 2,050 to 2,495. The area of the vaults also increased from 1500 to over 2200 square meters, with the capacity to house 50,000 extra reels of film.

The new National Film Archive and Film Institute must understand this condition to secure and protect the wealth of the country’s motion pictures, as well as those from the rest of the world, and to make them accessible in all their various forms to the general public. A place for “cinema” of course but also for other spaces where, taking full advantage of available technologies, interaction is possible: common spaces and spaces for communication. The intention is in part to remove film from its classic exhibition site -take it to the park, to the café, to the square and transform those spaces to become more than just services related to the experience of the movies but rather become part of the experience themselves: the park it- self as a movie, or the café, or the square.

A six-level above grade parking was built with a capacity for 528 cars, compared to the original 422. This freed up 70% of the area originally occupied by parking and 40% of the total site area. That area, besides allowing room for the construction of the new screening rooms, now houses an outdoor amphitheatre with a capacity for 750 spectators, a public park and a central public plaza. In total, the National Film Archives increased its built area from 20,000 m2 to almost 49,000 m2, of which 7,000 m2 are destined to public spaces. The purpose is to offer a new comprehensive cinematic experience and more options in terms of programming.

In this way, the “Cineteca Nacional del Siglo XXI” becomes a space of physical and virtual connections between media and people. An interface with two key architectural elements: a continuous ground that links the different programmatic components that make up the National Film Archive and a complementing roof that reinforces their connection.”- Alejandro Hernandez

Photography: Jaime Navarro, Paul Rivera

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Plan Baja

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Explopded axonometric

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Ross Barney Architects

USA

Fermilab Office and Technical Education Building The new Office Technical and Education Building (OTE) is the central facility in the new Illinois Accelerator Research Center (IARC) at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. IARC’s purpose is to bring together private industry with Fermilab’s world leaders in accelerator science and technology to promote new growth in the industrialization of accelerator use.

Warrenville,Illinois, USA

and underfloor air distribution. The light technical laboratory space has been developed to accommodate one large project or three (3) smaller ventures, and is located adjacent to the CDF high bay so experiments can move to larger space as needed. The IARC’s educational facilities include a state-of-the art, 175 seat lecture hall to hold domestic and international seminars and conferences.

The IARC consists of two (2) main elements: the new 47,000 square foot Office, Technical and Educational building and the existing heavy assembly Collider Detector Facility (CDF). During design, goals for the new facility included the creation of a high profile incubator center that respects the historic Fermilab design theme while making an iconic dramatic statement towards the future. The highly flexible, new building seeks to attract private industry partners to work with Fermilab researchers and scientists to develop new ideas and technologies, with a state of the art facility including offices, technical, education, and research capabilities.

The new facility is a registered LEED project that is designed to achieve Gold certification. Passive sustainable design features are the building’s long east-west orientation and the narrow bay width. These strategies maximize views and day lighting while minimizing the solar gain during the day. The building also has a second floor lunchroom with spectacular views of the prairie and Wilson Hall, and includes a vegetative roof with an outdoor seating area. Photography: Kate Joyce Studios

The building accommodates rotating tenants through the use of demountable partitions with a raised access floor system

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Ross Barney Architects

USA

The Osu South Campus Central Chiller

Columbus, Ohio, USA

The Ohio State University South Campus Central Chiller Plant is an iconic marker at a major entry and pathway into campus and provides the Medical District of The Ohio State University with a long term, efficient and sustainable solution for chilled water production and distribution.

result is a dynamic façade that changes with the time of day, season and the location of the observer. Functionally, the facility minimizes the visual, noise and vibration impact of large equipment: chillers, cooling towers, transformers and generators. The plant provides 30,000 tons of chilled water for the adjacent medical center facilities and will accommodate future campus cooling demands. To increase reliability, the plant has been equipped with an emergency power source to provide chilled water for critical operations during power outages.

Conceived of as a “House for Energy,” the LEED Silver Certified building, has an envelope that showcases the energyefficient chiller equipment inside and records the sun’s energy on the exterior. Glazed openings are specifically located to frame views of the chiller equipment, and dichroic glass fins and boxes change in color with the movement of the sun and cast color-changing shadows onto modular precast concrete wall panels that have been polished to a high sheen. The

Photography: Brad Feinknopf

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Ross Barney Architects

USA

UMD Swenson Civil Engineering Building

Duluth, Minnesota, USA

We started by asking, 'What do they need to learn as engineers, and what forces do they need to control?” And in that spirit, a new building for the Civil Engineering program at UMD is designed to teach students about materials, how they go together, how they age, and how they express the forces inherent in any structure.

outside. Taconite fills the large Cor-Ten drums that collect water delivered by the scuppers and is used to filter water for collection and use in the hydraulics laboratory flumes for experiments. On a rainy day, the building is a demonstration of hydraulics and kinetic energy, as water pours from the scuppers and splashes into the Cor-Ten cylinders.

Civil engineers design infrastructure to move water, to move traffic, to hold back the earth, to span long distances. In this part of Minnesota, civil engineers are particularly occupied with mining in the state's Iron Range, where iron ore is extracted. These aspects of professional focus and the special features of this region led the team to design an engineering building that couldn't be anywhere else, for any other discipline.

The south wall is a puzzle of precast-concrete panels purposely designed in a variety of interlocking shapes to demonstrate the material's versatility. The steel braces and kickers used for lateral support during construction were left in place to demonstrate the process. The interior is also pedagogic, with the building’s mechanical systems and architectural features on display. Layers of clear glass permit penetrating views from one end of the building to the other, and across slices of space from the north side through the hydraulics and structural laboratories at 25+ feet high. Daylighting is provided through the glass walls and clerestories found throughout.

The exterior expresses the traits of a place where students design, construct, and test structures to withstand stresses and strains. The elevations are distinguished by Cor-Ten steel, precast and poured-in-place concrete, concrete block, and scuppers clad in reclaimed wood. Steel road plate is used for the building's exterior walkways. Cor-Ten extends inside the building, allowing students to see how the material responds to different environmental conditions.

The civil engineering department intended this building to serve as a recruiting tool. Can an aspiring civil engineer resist a building that spouts water, corrodes constructively before your eyes — and has the biggest toys on campus?

The raw material from which iron ore is extracted is called taconite — a grayish, silica-rich rock found in abundance in the region.

Photography: Kate Joyce Studios Taconite is used in the project in inventive ways, such as gravel in landscaping and also in gabion walls inside and

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Sheppard Robson Architects

UK

Siemens Middle East Headquarters

Masdar City, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

Sheppard Robson’s design for Siemens’ headquarters at Masdar City has established a new model for sustainable office buildings in the Middle East. It is anticipated to be one of the first buildings in the region to achieve LEED Platinum. The design began with a simple and over-arching ambition: to maximise efficiency and build more with less. An iterative process of traditional design and parametric analysis resulted in an efficient and compact plan form that has reduced material and embodied carbon.

Ultra efficient floorplates

The office floorplates, each of 4,500m², have been optimised for efficiency, daylight and flexibility using parametric modelling and achieve over 90% efficiency. They are punctuated by nine atria and served by six perimeter cores.

Siemens Middle East Headquarters was designed from the inside out – led by the ambition to achieve efficiency, rather than a predetermined aesthetic, the resulting building is both commercially successful and environmentally sound: a truly sustainable solution.

Completely column-free floorplates incorporate 15m spans by using an innovative post-tensioned flat slab with integrated void-forming technology. This reduces the material used by approximately 60% and provides maximum flexibility for the office space planning. The arrangement enables each of the floors to be subdivided into a combination of various space sizes and therefore creates flexibility for the building to be remodelled over time to accommodate between one and 32 tenants.

Parametric facade design

Permeable public plaza

The building envelope was conceived as a box within a box: an inner highly-insulated, airtight facade designed to reduce thermal conductivity, and a lightweight aluminium external shading system which minimises solar gain while maximising daylighting and views from the building.

The office floors float above a fully shaded public plaza which connects the level change between the existing adjacent podium and the more formal square with its Light Rail Transport station. The plaza has been conceived as a terraced extension of the existing public realm and encourages pedestrian movement within the heart of the site. The introverted nature of the shared public realm is further enhanced by a series of external rooms, retail units and two fully glazed office receptions.

The variation in the form of the shading systems was designed to offer legibility to the architectural expression with each facade tailored to suit its solar orientation. Delicate, articulate modular components cast intricate shadows on the internal box. As the sun circles the building, shadows animate the interior and give the façade depth. From a distance the building appears as a simple whole, but the individual components become visible and independent as you come closer.

Optimised building performance

In addition to maximising efficiency of all aspects of the built form, the integrated engineering systems have been optimised to complement the building’s function and low carbon design. Rigorous energy modelling has ensured that the building performs 44% better than the baseline ASHRAE energy model.

A small number of materials repeatedly appear in the façade, unifying the design without distracting from the striking geometric pattern. Internal window positions are carefully placed to provide consistent internallighting, and atria are fully glazed, welcoming you with light and a feeling of space as you enter the building.

Photography: Paul McMullin, Huffton + Crow, Nicole Luettecke

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SitePlan

Sheppard Robson Architects

UK

St Ambrose College

Greater Manchester, UK

The brief for St Ambrose College - a Catholic school - called for a design that represented the client’s aspirations to create an open and inclusive environment for students and staff.

in the cantilevered areas around the central space, offering passive supervision of the central space. The lack of barriers between student and staff is also felt in the dining areas, where everyone eats together, further encouraging an ethos of openness.

The building’s compact plan takes the form of a Celtic cross, reflecting the identity of the school whilst also creating a structure that encourages a flexible and efficient use of space. At the centre of the cross is a large, multifunctional space; used for teaching, performances, assemblies, and dining, this forms the social heart of the school.  The central space Cathedral-like is volume - is visible from all points and provides access to all teaching areas, dispensing with the need for internal corridors that are often associated with bullying.

As well as staff areas, the cantilevered platforms on the upper levels house library and ICT facilities. The four wings of the building are on two levels, with eight distinct learning faculties for Mathematics, English, Science, Languages, Humanities, Technology, Theology and Sport. The sports hall, overlooking the grounds, is suspended over a new swimming pool. The positioning of the sports hall is due to site constraints to maintain an operational playing field whilst construction and demolition were underway.

Different layers of learning spaces are arranged concentrically around the central space, with learning areas becoming more private as you move further from the centre. By moving away from conventional circulation spaces, the design encourages variation in how people move within the building and this leads to more social encounters between pupils and staff during the day. The typical horizontal split between floors has been dissolved by creating visual connections between all levels and Spanish steps further enhancing this connectivity

The design was in a sensitive planning area with a curved plan form minimising the visual impact of the building from the road. The external treatment of glazed brick and render has been composed to accentuate the circular form and is punctuated by picture windows which vary from classroom to classroom, offering variation to the learning spaces throughout the day.

The interior spaces have been designed so there is little segregation between staff and pupils. Staff areas are positioned

Photography: David Ardill, Hufton+Crow

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Ground Floor Plan

First Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan

East Elevation

South Elevation

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TWS & Partners

Indonesia

The Akmani Legian

Legian, Bali, Indonesia

The Akmani Legian simply stands as an “Iconic Passage” for Kuta, Bali. The site has 5 meters width of opening both from the Legian and Banesari Street, yet very spacious in the center area. The circulation from both streets is directed towards a “Mingle Point” at Roof Garden Lounge at the top of the northern part of the building, while the top of the southern part is

designated for Villa. The mass under is then filled by Guest Rooms, with the spacious center area as the view orientation. The use of the Kerawang brick helps to create a dynamic façade pattern with a light and see-through effect and spaces that are open, allowing natural sunlight and fresh air into the building.

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TWS & Partners

Indonesia

Cross House

Indonesia

Cross house is built on 800 sqm site area. The unique location of the site with no setback line gives an extraordinary potential for the exploration of the mass. The mass configuration is created by intersection, union, and subtraction. This mass configuration created a welcoming entrance gallery and strong façade characteristic.

material, and furniture difference. A skylight that goes through three floor level, with glass surface make the room feels open and wall less and also create an uninterrupted space correlation and visual continuity between indoor and outdoor. The bold design of a wall less space, with attention to detail of the quality of space and privacy gives a unique experience of sub-urban living.

The space division is made in a “soft manner”, a space is not created by four massive wall, but by glass wall, floor

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TWS & Partners

Indonesia

Wall-Less House

Jakarta, Indonesia

Wall-less house is located at exclusive residential neighborhood in North Jakarta. The site is sandwiched between two public areas, main public road at front and garden with a jogging track at back. In response to these two public areas, the design of the house aims to provide a vista toward the neighborhood at front and also the garden at back.

level to create a canopy. With this treatment, each area in the communal space has an open view towards the front neighborhood, the back garden and also the side garden and to enhance this view to the outside, the 1st floor where the communal area is located, is raised 3 meter from the street level. The privacy issue in this area is solved by creating a hanging folded surface which encloses the dining room and also acts as welcoming feature to the main entrance. The canopy which is created by the fold is then used as a private garden for the Master Bedroom.

The house is separated into 3 floors: Basement floor which is used for service and storage area, 1st floor for the communal space, and 2nd floor for the private bedrooms. The concept for the communal area, which consists of Living Room, Dining Room, and Family Room, is to make as if the whole area is a wall-less space. This idea is achieved by “Origami” treatment to avoid massive wall in this area. The so called “wall” is subtracted and folded towards the upper

Photography: Fernando Gomulya

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UID architects

Japan

Atelier-Bisque Doll

Minoh, Osaka, Japan

Requests and Characteristics of the Site

Floating Belt

When I first visited Minoh City in Osaka Prefecture, I remember the place was plenty of green. It is because the season was spring, but also the city was ordained by vegetation standard, which order more than 10% of the site to plant tall, middle and low trees in urban districts with lower than 60% of building coverage ratio.

Employing 1.2 m level the difference in the site, two functions are allocated to where floating belts overlap. Atelier is put on the lower part facing north-looking front street and the residential piece on the upper south side. An approach was built as a slope as if walking on the slanted topography. By putting a small box that stores necessary functions such as a closet in the atelier and the house, it becomes a space like a street-facing piazza that has no region. The two functions become one room space by triple pile of belts.

This is an atelier for a doll artist and a residence of the couple. The request was an atelier that can be used as a gallery at the same time functioning as a doll-making studio. Additionally, it should be a space where her friends, who are often invited, can be gathered around pleasantly. In the residential environment the atelier and the house are wished to be open, while reserving some privacy from the neighborhood.

Specifically, we expected that territory, which dose not regulate in/out terrain, be made by a spatial diversity that is derived from floating belt, which is accumulated double or triple in rectangle taking balance, and the belt itself.

A simple operation of overlapping belts that have directionality obscures site boundaries and formulates a relationship of the site and the neighborhood that contain new extent.

Form without Territory

In order to secure privacy, we through if it is possible to do so with more peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s involvement rather than building walls or fences on site boundaries and capturing the whole from inside.

That is to say, the entire site becomes a gallery without body-sensed territory and that is connected to creating variety of places that the client requires. In this occasion, we think we could realize a space that has new link to a city by rethinking notion of walls and fences that obstruct boundaries and treating architecture, structure and landscape equivalently.

That is to create the whole from outside by choosing the neighborâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s greenery as outdoor space and not producing necessary functions from inside. Not something like walls, hanging walls or fences but waist-high walls that are freed from gravity or floating belts surround the entire site. This is a theory to create architecture that is interior-like extending from outdoor, opposed to substantial in/out territory.

Photography: UID architects

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UID architects

Japan

COSMIC

Japan

Dwelling is to put oneself in an interactive environmental domain that surrounds humans and other living creatures. There unfold various activities to which living creatures engage themselves for survival. Further expansion of such domain will surely lead us to view the totality of environment as a dwelling as it stretches unsegmented from city to forest and sea and finally from the earth into outer space. The ever-changing ways of living things such as humans and plants, land topographies or climatic conditions all remind us that nothing in our would stays the same forever. My interest lies in the rich spatial domain in which one may perceive in the course of daily life such changes of nature that are the very heartbeats of the earth.

while it generates a certain domain within topological and climatic conditions. While wisps of clouds overlap in layers, exposure and depth of light penetrating through mountain peaks into the valley define the atmospheric void as a domain for a place of living. These screens that flow from east to west not only work as eaves that shield direct sunlight during summer but also serve as constituents along with subtle light tones, sway in the wind, atmospheric condition, natureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sounds and scents and physical sense of distance that highlight the diversity of spatial domains through the seasons. The state of the spot generated by screens becomes the place of living that paraphrases the topography through various actions, rather than being a space specialized in particular functions. The architecture is like a village as it breaks free from borders defined by natural relationship , and is also like a mountain ridge with its layers of mountain peaks. With an ever transforming outline, it will continue to blur into the landscape.

In this project the focus in on the relationship of border derived from mutual interaction with natural environment that surrounds this site sitting on a hill in site. Instead of gathering up a crowd of spaces within the topography or climate by making use of wall/roof elements, it rather involves a domain generated by screens like clouds that shield sunlight and moonlight. In other words this infinitely expansive totality with no boundaries bases itself on the principles of architecture

Photography: Hiroshi Ueda, UID

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First Floor

Second Floor

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Axonometric

South Elevation

West Elevation

Sectional Perspective

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Diagram

Structural model

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Detail

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2F PLAN

1F PLAN

UID architects

1. carport 2. terrace 3. entry 4. kitchen 5. dining room 6. living room 7. bathroom 8. childrenâ&#x20AC;˛s room

9. bedroom 10. storage

Japan

Pit House

Tamano, Okayama, Japan

The house positions itself in Okayama Prefecture near Seto Inland Sea. The site is located on a terraced mountain hill that was developed as a residential land. The family is consisted of a married couple and a child. We considered a new way of architecture on the site condition, where views are open towards the north and the ground level is one meter higher than the road level.

of the outside and connection of the surface like a pit dwelling that is undivided from the land. In concrete, six types of floor levels including a round floor that is created by digging the surface are connected with a concrete cylinder core at the center. Furthermore, delicate and multiple branch-like columns that support the slightly floating boxes produce various one-room spaces.

The relationship is as if the siteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s natural environment and the architecture coexist at the same time. The architecture has become a part of the whole landscape of undivided environment, not simply thinking about connection to the surroundings from the cut off opening in walls. This time, we came up with a living form that accepts the outside environment such as surface of the terraced land, surrounding neighboring housesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; fences and walls, residences that sit along the slope and far beyond mountains. The architectural principle is not a division from the land with a wall, but an interior that is an extension

Environment and architecture create new extensive relationship by connecting surfaces. The territory is undefined in the space in a body sense. I think that is more natural relationship of an architecture standing in a landscape. Photography: Hiroshi Ueda

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Entrance Eaves Detail

Detail

Building Construction Section Detail

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Axonometric

1. carport 2. terrace 3. entry 4. kitchen 5. dining room 6. living room 7. bathroom 8. childrenâ&#x20AC;˛s room

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9. bedroom 10. storage


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SECTION

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Second floor

1. CAR PORT 2. ENTRANCE 3. BATHROOM 4. JAPANESE TATAMI ROOM

First floor

UID architects

5. STORAGE 6. LIVING 7. DINING KITCHEN 8. BEDROOM

Japan

Shrimp

Fukuyama, Hiroshima, Japan

The new three-dimensional courthouse in the city

respective where about shells are being produced while twining with a landscape. And sunlight and a wind are going through the stay location of the person while a shell's different in the size connecting inside space and outside space complicatedly. Though it seems to be the part ridge form by an opening between shell from shell like a crustacean and the intermittent internal space, there is the expanse where territory isn't prescribed. Though there is that in center city, the present-day environment like house in mountain is invented there.

A plan in the housing built in the center of Fukuyama city. The site where touch the north side frontal road is bent slenderly in north and south, and the site is enclosed by housing and a building. The sky, the water, the earth sunlight and the environment like house in mountain that a look and interactive relationship with animals and plants are born also to play some time abundant in daily life in such site. A courthouse-like element was taken in the interior in three dimensions aiming at the relationship into which a person can expand the reach with concerning more, not the relationship sheltered from circumference outside. We cut site to 3 volumes and expected the connection with the external environment.

Though the situation around the site is being read politely in a residential area in an urban area, it's important to produce relationship in moderate territory with neighborhood. I think that is the essence would take some casual daily time something abundant.

3 shells were formed by 6 RC independent cantilevering walls which stand up from the ground of eastern and western neighboring land. The big hollow was born between the shell and slits are made by mixing with the outside and inside shells. That, the shell cut down is chosen as the free wooden Slave with the different floor level sitting astride, and the

Photography: Hiroshi Ueda

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Axonometric

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Wendell Burnette Architects

USA

Desert Courtyard House

Scottsdale, Arizona

The site is a peninsula of granite outcroppings and towering Saguaro cacti surrounded on all sides by deep perennial desert washes except for a single spit of land affording access from an Ocotillo studded ridge above. The building site, further down a long private drive, levels out toward the west into an edge condition dominated by an expansive vista layers and layers of distant mountain ranges - that in the evening seem to epitomize the drama of the Arizona Sunset. Due to the elevation of the site beneath the community’s gaze and the entry gate at the road it became important to us - to recede the house as a deep shadow - into the depth and complexity of the desert floor below.

land and sky - a massive land based land scaled - plinth. The plinth was cast in place with one material throughout such that a wall, a floor, a ramp, a step, or a bench could be experienced as part of one contiguous stone. The Verde River eventually connects to the Salt River, which collectively tumbles some of the worlds hardest aggregate through the lowest point of the valley, where along with sand and cement, it is harvested for locally produced concrete. A “highway concrete mix” with oversized 1 ½” aggregate was specifically selected for this project and mixed with a small percentage of the earth pigment - raw umber. We wanted to work the surfaces of the plinth in order to reveal the composite qualities of the material, sand, conglomerate gravel, pebbles, broken stone, in a cement matrix, and consequently a window into the geologic time of this place.

When your feet begin to move across this delicate floor you feel as though you have entered a Zen garden. At the eastern edge of our garden, the sound of water is heard trickling - remarkably even in our Desert - for half the year through a fractured decomposing granite boulder field and a rush of cattails. At the highest point of the site we took delight in a large arrow-shaped granite boulder pointed west, a peculiar group of volcanic rocks and a large multi-armed Saguaro between. Standing in this place for the first time, we felt immediately compelled to hold and preserve a microcosm of this precious primordial desert landscape including an equally infinite piece of its indomitable sky.

The overall height of the landform follows the design guidelines and therefore the ground at precisely 24’ above natural grade in a segmented monocline that spirals almost imperceptibly up and around and out where the solid mass of the courtyard form opens up to the distant west. In conjunction with this geometry, the outsides of the earth and concrete landform are faceted inward 3 degrees from vertical. The hat required for the earth walls protects the monolithic courtyard form as a contiguous part of a faceted shadow that begins at the outermost edge of the monocline and continues inward toward the inner court where it stops just short of itself inscribing an irregular frame for the sky.

The form for a serene desert courtyard slowly began to emerge. The courtyard concept intrigued our client as the comforts it offered - air, light, privacy, security, and tranquility - were the ones universally desired in a home. For us, it also offered the chance to corral a piece of ancient time unencumbered by the recent development and to do so with a form that evolved from the surrounding landscape, its natural power, its geologic mass, its delicacy, one which would feel as though it had always been there. We began to ask the question “whether the courtyard walls could literally grow from the site itself, from the site excavation with no import no export required?”

Mass, Hollowed Mass, Faceted Mass, Fissured Mass, Mass that cracks open and hinges apart informed how we proceeded to give this home its defining qualities from the courtyard plan, to the split-massing, all the way down to the fittings and fixtures that one touches with the hand or the eye. For instance, the millwork is volumetric only revealing contents within when a contoured bronze void is touched with the fingertips allowing the mass to be gently cracked open. Long fissures in the mill-finish steel plate ceiling reveal light while maintaining the quality of nothingness at night. Mass and the improbability of delicacy discovered within it, is what gives the Sonoran Desert its remarkable presence. As our clients and their guests move into the mass of this landform into our Engawa, we hope they will always rediscover with a hint of surprise the preciousness of things.

We discovered through sample testing that the soil from our site was uniquely suited for rammed earth, one of the oldest methods of construction. Wooden molds held wide apart accept 3 foot high layers of earth in lifts, then a dry mix of dirt and cement (3-8%) is compacted down with pressure pounding into a 12 inch layer of dense thermal mass, lift by lift until the height of the wall is achieved. It requires a stable footing at the ground and a hat for protection from rain and erosion. We raised the requisite foundation just above the flood plane as a base and then expanded it into the courtyard as a piano nobile, beyond the thick perimeter earthen walls, as the most elemental form from which to view the expansive qualities of

Photography: Bill Timmerman

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Ground floor: 1 reception 2 festival room 3 terrace 4 passage way

wurm+wurm architekten ingenieure GmbH

Germany

Media Centre Oberkirch

Oberkirch, Germany

Three levels are connected with an open, organically formed stairwell. The centrally positioned open staircase is not only a movement and communication zone, but is an exposure element for the inside-recumbent zones of utilisation with the generously glazed upper light. The facades, with the large apertures, are understood like shop-windows, which permit varied and exciting views in the surrounding town space. The external, brighter window areas serve the reading zones and stay zones, partially furniture with an up and down movement are integrated which the visitor can use as a table or a bench. By the planning of the building it was respected beside the striking town planning architecture, particularly to create a high stay quality for the visitors in the building. In the whole building one finds the comfortable seat pieces of furniture,

which also invite in the free areas of the reading terraces for staying. By the sculptural architecture, which is modellised full of contrast, the building creates a sensuous experience space which should serve the citizens as a communicative centre where to all generations the varied media technologies and technologies of information are accessible. Photography: Guido Gegg

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Basement: 1 archive 2 visitors

Second floor: 1 children 2 adolescents 3 administration

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Third floor: 1 fiction 2 terrace

Section: 1 archive 2 reception 3 festival room 4 adolescents 5 fiction

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1.Parking 2.Waste storage 3.Foyer 4.Building services 5.Elevator 6.Workshop 7.Office space 8.Balcony 9.sanitation

wurm+wurm architekten ingenieure GmbH

Germany

Neutrabuilding

Jena, Germany

The task in this project was to remodel an empty industrial facility, built in type design of precast concrete, into a modern, flexible office and workshop building meeting modern demands. The new Building should be able to house up to three different companies.

After the removal of the existing precast concrete faรงade and the establishment of the inner structure the building was fitted with a first layer of faรงade consisting of floor to ceiling windows and aluminium sheet cladding. This first insulating layer is shielded by a second shell of precast concrete. These provide shade to the interior and give the building a new face far off the old industrial building.

To obtain the required usable area, two additional floors were installed in the hall with an independent, load-bearing structure: Additional columns were arranged behind , the existing ones at the faรงade, together with an elevator shaft made of reinforced concrete and an inner core of masonry housing the sanitary facilities they carry the new ceilings weight.

Photography: Ester Havlova

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1.Parking 2.Waste storage 3.Foyer 4.Building services 5.Elevator 6.Workshop 7.Office space 8.Balcony 9.sanitation

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Basement: 1 canteen 2 changing room 3 halation with terrace

Ground floor: 1 production area 2 high bay racking 3 loading area 4 foyer 5 office 6 conference room 7 halation

wurm+wurm architekten ingenieure GmbH

Germany

New building Drehmo Wenden

Wenden, Germany

In Wenden, the southernmost town of the german region of Sauerland electromechanical actuators for water management, the power plant sector and the oil and gas industry are manufactured.

building around. The homogeneous materiality of the attic, roof soffits, columns and parts of the wall covering, using lighter aluminum expanded metal panels, the corporeal of construction is emphasized. Constructively effective struts inclined tension between the individual levels or to ground, forming a kind of contemporary framework, it acts like a muscle, supporting and shaping at the same time. A bright expanded metal, even in details processed accurately, draws sharp the contours and ridges.

The special cut of the new building of the Drehmo GmbH is owed the topographical situation in this region. The moving landscape caused the terracing of the landscape and produces irregularly shaped lot. The unusual floor plan, generated by this contour, and the hillside situation with a view over the valley determine the character and exceptional styling.

Inside contrast light wooden floors with large exposed concrete surfaces. Spacious air spaces and the two-story atrium enable always new, surprising perspectives. Slanted concrete columns, already nested in itself, create dynamic images in the overlay.

The basic arrangement consists of the assembly hall with the affiliated areas of the loading bay and an automatic shelf storage. The two-story administrative wing situated in front of the assembly hall forms with this an entrance situation. The basement accommodates staff rooms and the canteen, which is naturally lit via a courtyard and expands into this free area with glazing from floor to ceiling.

Photography: Ester Havlova

The roof with an oversized, band-like Attica spans the entire complex. This band is different in height, as it flows to the

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Second floor: 1 air space 2 office area 3 administration 4 technique

Section: 1 office 2 conference room 3 canteen 4 changing room 5 production area 6 high bay racking

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Detail: 1 oriented structural board 2 T-steel in the level of steel waffle panels 3 insulation with lamination 4 end plate with insulation 5 trapezoidal sheet 6 roofing foil 7 insulation 8 vapor barrier foil

9 trapezoidal sheet 10 expanded metal mesh 11 perforated plate 12 aluminium laminated insulation panel 13 all-glas railing 14 aluminium end-plate 15 steel grating with gorge 16 wooden terrace, built on stilts

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A D Lab Pte Ltd

Ground floor: 1 main entrance 2 employees entrance 3 foyer 4 office / workshop unit 5 atrium with terrace 6 technique 7 delivery

wurm+wurm architekten ingenieure GmbH

Germany

Reconstruction multifunctional building

Jena, Germany

The task in this project was to remodel an empty production facility, which was built in type design of precast concrete, into a modern, flexible office and workshop building, which meets modern demands. In the present Volume was to create a structure that allows for fill ability for up to eight independent functional units and provides for future employees attractive jobs.

existing building and supply the office space and the foyer itself with light. The wall lining large concrete sandwich-panels have been removed, and the existing structure of the hall structure was upgraded statically. The small-scale distribution of the new window faรงade, owed the flexible divisibility of the office space is covered with curtain-like faรงade bands, consisting of individually folded metal-sheets, that vary in height and depth.

To obtain the required usable area, an additional floor ceiling was installed in the hall high ceilings with an independent, load-bearing reinforced concrete structure. The center axis of the total of 9 fields was formed as a common foyer and circulation zone over two levels and with two outside entrances, streets and courtyard positioned. Besides this spatially expressive designed area in the center axis two walkable atriums are arranged, which reduce the high depth of the

Photography: Ester Havlova

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second floor

section AA

section BB

Detail horizontal section: 14 existing concrete column 15 new concrete column for new concrete ceiling above ground floor 16 rectangular steel tube 120x60x6mm 17 end plate with insulation 145mm 18 z-profile folded steel plate 3mm 19 individually folded coated aluminium plate 1,0mm (ground floor) 20 individually folded coated aluminium plate 1,0mm (middle zone between ground floor and second floor) 21 former faรงade before modification

second floor, section AA, section BB: 1 main entrance 2 employees entrance 3 foyer 4 office / workshop unit 5 atrium with terrace 6 technique 7 delivery

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Detail vertical section: 1 individually folded coated aluminium plate 1,0mm 2 end plate with insulation 145mm 3 existing roof system of precast concrete component 4 rectangular steel tube 120x60x6mm 5 rectangular steel tube 150x100x5mm 6 existing reinforced concrete beam 7 existing concrete column 8 internal placed gutter 9 roof parapet of aluminium plate 2mm 10 u-steel 240x85 11 alucobond 12 lighting, flush with the adjacent areas 13 entrance area with open mesh flooring

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Architecture Highlight vol.9  
Architecture Highlight vol.9  
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