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SUMMER SCHOOL

18-20 June 2019


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WELCOME TO THE 2019 SGSAH SUMMER SCHOOL We are delighted to welcome you to the 2019 SGSAH Summer School. We hope the event provides space to learn, share and make new connections. This brochure has all the information you need including how to find the venue, summaries of every workshop and full timings for the entire Summer School. WHERE ARE WE?

We are on level 3 of the Technology & Innovation Centre at the University of Strathclyde, just outside the rooms for all sessions. Be sure to come and say hello and pick up some SGSAH goodies.

“I had a fantastic time at the Summer School - everything I went to was very useful in very different ways so was an excellent all round experience� 3


TUESDAY 18 JUNE AM Workshop Title Data Protection and Ethics in Research Design and Delivery Session 1 Data Protection and Ethics in Research Design and Delivery Session 2 Finding Funding During Your PhD Public Engagement for Researchers Using Apps to Support Your Writing Writing is Hard

Time

Location

0930-1045

Room 6

1105-1230

Room 6

0930-1230

Room 3

0930-1230

Room 2

0930-1230

Room 1

0930-1230

Room 7

Time

Location

1530-1630

Room 4-5

1330-1630

Room 1

1330-1600

Room 6

1330-1630

Room 2

1330-1630

Room 3

1330-1630

Room 8

PM Workshop Title Alumni Talk - Wellbeing, Nature and the Self: Developing transdisciplinary research in Scotland Blended Learning Session Data Protection and Ethics in Research Design and Delivery Session 3 Enlisting the Public as Volunteer Researchers Funding Your First Post-Doc Policy Workshop

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WEDNESDAY 19 JUNE AM Workshop Title

Time

Location

Creative Writing: A Practice Based 0930-1230 Workshop for Personal Development

Room 4

Introduction to Qualitative Methods

Room 2

0930-1230

PM Workshop Title Creative Writing: A Practice Based Workshop for Personal Development Decolonising Methodologies Ethics in Action How to Write a Journal Insights into Social Enterprise Using Games in Research and Teaching

Time

Location

0930-1230

Room 4

1330-1630 1330-1630 1330-1630 1330-1630

Room 2 Room 6 Room 1 Room 7

1330-1630

Room 3

ALL-DAY Workshop Title

Time

Location

Blogging and Wordpress Visualising Your Data Using R

0930-1630 0930-1630

Room 8 Room 5

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THURSDAY 20 JUNE AM Workshop Title

Time

Location

0930-1230

Room 6

0930-1230

Room 3

1000-1230 0930-1230

Room 7 Room 1

Workshop Title

Time

Location

Effective Public Engagement Queerying Methods Walking Tour: Glasgow Necropolis

1330-1630 1330-1630 1400-1600

Room 3 Room 6 Glasgow Necropolis Gatehouse

Time

Location

A Stone-Thrower to Pigeons: Disruption as Knowledge An Introduction to Open Access and Research Data Management Data Visualisation Vlogging in Academia

PM

ALL-DAY Workshop Title

Creative Engagement for Academics 0930-1630 Who Am I When I Write? 0930-1630

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Room 2 Room 4


“The Summer School was, as usual, a brilliant few days. The conversations with other researchers before and after the sessions were of real value to the experience.�

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Walking Tours This year the SGSAH Summer School is delighted to be providing a walking tour as an alternative session, allowing attendees to explore Glasgow and learn about its history. Thursday afternoon sees a walking tour of the Glasgow Necropolis from the experts at the Friends of Glasgow Necropolis. Here you will have the chance to explore the 37 acre Victorian cemetary and learn about the importance of the site to Glasgow’s history, the architectural importance hidden within and the inspiring stories of those laid to rest there. For something a little more modern, self-guided tours are available to lead you around the stunning mural trail in Glasgow’s city centre. Woven amongst the Victorian architecture of yesterday and glass fronted towers of today are striking murals showcasing a diverse range of talent and styles which highlight the position of Glasgow as one of the UKs artistic centres. The Necropolis tour has limited spaces and will require registration in the same manner as registration for other Summer School sessions. As this is a walking tour over occassionally uneven ground, sensible walking shoes are permitted. The mural tour is self-guided with info packs available from the SGSAH team at the Technology & Innovation Centre (level 3 mezzanine). AHRC funded researchers please note that attendance at the walking tour will not meet your funding requirements for attendance at the Summer School.

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“I had a really great time at some of the best workshops I’ve ever been to! I’ll definitely be signing up next year.”

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“I’ve found the Summer School to be a safe space where I could learn and network with others without being submitted to any pressures”.

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General Info

Venue

Contact Point

Technology & Innovation Centre

SGSAH Staff will be available throughout the Summer School at the Mezzanine on the 3rd Floor of the venue. You are welcome to use this space to connect to WiFi, meet friends and colleagues and ask us any questions you might have. Refreshments will also be available in this space during workshop breaks. Email Contact: admin@sgsah.ac.uk

Refreshments

Tea/coffee will be available in the mezzanine between workshop breaks, with lunch also available.

WiFi Access

Access via Eduroam is available throughout the building. Connection should be done as at your home institution. There is also dedicated WiFi available, please ask us for the daily password.

Accommodation

99 George Street, Glasgow G1 1RD Public transport:

The venue is approximately a 7 minute walk from Glasgow Queen Street Station and a 14 minute walk from Glasgow Central Station. The nearest local service is High Street station which is a 4 minute walk. If you’re travelling by bus, there is a bus stop directly outside the venue serviced by the 41 from First Bus. Buses also stop regularly from a variety of locations on Cathedral Street, which is a 5 minute walk. Parking: Discounted parking is available at NCP George Street courtesy of the venue. Validate your ticket at reception. Workshops are held in rooms 1-8 on the third floor

For those who require accommodation, please contact SGSAH staff directly by emailing your request to admin@sgsah.ac.uk

Travel Expenses

All students attending the Summer School can reclaim the cost of travel from their home HEI to the relevant venues. For more information please visit: http://www.sgsah.ac.uk/current/travelguidance/ If you incur any additional costs please contact admin@sgsah.ac.uk

Keep in Touch

Sign up to our mailing list to be the first to receive information regarding SGSAH opportunities by sending an email to enquiries@sgsah. ac.uk with SUBSCRIBE in the header

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TUESDAY18 JUNE AM Workshop Title

Time

Location

0930-1045

Room 6

1105-1230

Room 6

0930-1230

Room 3

0930-1230

Room2

0930-1230

Room 1

0930-1230

Room 7

Time

Location

1530-1630

Room 4-5

1330-1630

Room 1

1330-1600

Room 6

1330-1630

Room 2

1330-1630

Room 3

Policy Workshop

1330-1630

Room 8

Writing is Hard

1330-1630

Room 7

Data Protection and Ethics in Research Design and Delivery Session 1 Data Protection and Ethics in Research Design and Delivery Session 2 Finding Funding During Your PhD Public Engagement for Researchers Using Apps to Support Your Writing Writing is Hard

PM Workshop Title Alumni Talk - Wellbeing, Nature and the Self: Developing transdisciplinary research in Scotland Blended Learning Session Data Protection and Ethics in Research Design and Delivery Session 3 Enlisting the Public as Volunteer Researchers Funding Your First Post-Doc

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DATA PROTECTION AND ETHICS IN RESEARCH, DESIGN AND DELIVERY 18/6, TIMINGS VARY, ROOM 6

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his workshop will explore the legal and ethical challenges faced by researchers as they attempt to design and deliver research projects.

Session 1 - 0930-1045 Preparing your ethics and data protection planning (aimed at 1st year PhD students but open to all) Students to bring their ethics/data protection forms/plans to discuss how to complete them - in compliance with their institutional policies and beyond. Session 2 - 1105-1230 Dealing with data in the field: Legal and ethical issues clinic (aimed at 2nd year PhD students but open to all) Students’ workshop solutions to problems they have or will experience in the field. Session 3 - 1330-1600 Impact - Data Protection after research (aimed at 3rd year PhD students but open to all) Students will discuss their intended dissemination and impact plans. These will then be mapped against their original ethical/ data protection forms/plans and we will discuss how to resolve potential conflict. Please note that these are three distinct workshops, requiring you to register for the specific parts you wish to participate in. Participation in part 1 and/or part 2 will mean that you cannot participate in any other sessions on Tuesday AM. Presenter Bio: Dr Mo Egan is a Lecturer in Criminal law at the University of Stirling. She is currently researching criminal responsibility in digital space. This work examines how an individual’s concept of privacy may impact on their appreciation of harm caused to others through privacy violations.

FINDING FUNDING DURING YOUR PHD 18/6, 0930-1230, ROOM 3

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his workshop explores fundraising during your PhD, from small amounts such as conference bursaries to larger grants for collaborative projects.

Whether it’s a small sum to attend a conference, a hardship grant or support for research expenses, every postgraduate will find themselves applying for money at some point. This presentation will cover many aspects of fundraising for postgraduates, from a helping hand with your fees to setting up a student-led journal. It will explore how to identify potential funders, avoid common mistakes and pitfalls, ensure your application is as attractive as possible, and keep on top of the reporting and evaluation required if successful. Case studies from recent graduates will provide real-world guidance. The session will be followed by an informal Q&A session, where you can discuss your projects and ideas, and get advice on the best approaches. Presenter Bio: Dr Ben Fletcher-Watson manages the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities at the University of Edinburgh. He spent seven years fundraising in the cultural sector, raising over £2 million for a variety of projects and companies. Among others, he has secured significant grants from the ESRC, National Lottery, Arts Council England and Creative Scotland, central government, NHS trusts, local authorities, and many trusts and foundations. Ben’s doctoral research at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland examined theatre for the very young. His postdoctoral work includes studies of technology use by young children and older adults, as well as theatre for people on the autistic spectrum. He also holds an MA (Hons) in English Literature from the University of St Andrews.

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PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT FOR RESEARCHERS 18/6, 0930-1230, ROOM 2

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his workshop explores the role of Wikipedia as a tool for promoting public engagement with – and awareness of – research outcomes. By the end of this workshop, participants will have found a new place to share their learning, and will be inspired to do so. They wiill understand more about the significance of open knowledge in the context of public engagement. Presenter Bio: Sara Thomas is the Scotland Programme Coordinator for Wikimedia UK. She was the Wikimedian in Residence at both the Scottish Library & Information Council, and Museums Galleries Scotland. She believes that you should be editing Wikipedia, and that you will be a better academic / researcher if you do.

WRITING IS HARD 18/6, 0930-1230 AND 1330-1630 (REPEAT SESSION), ROOM 7

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riting is hard invites you to inquire into your own individual writing practice – examining and reflecting on habits and thinking processes that can aid or disrupt the flow of writing on a day-by-day basis. Often the advice given to writers – writers of PhDs, writers of creative works – is: “just write”. However, this advice is often singularly unhelpful and this workshop aims to unpick something of what ‘writing’ means. Presenter Bio: Dr Melissa Stirling Reid recently completed a PhD in Creative Writing at the University of Strathclyde. This involved writing a contemporary coming-of-age novel, with an accompanying critical study which reflexively analysed (and attempted to somewhat ‘demystify’) something of the practice of writing. Since completing her PhD, Melissa has been working on her own writing (both fiction and creative nonfiction), teaching Creative Writing to undergrads and masters students at Strathclyde University, and running monthly writing retreats in Glasgow with Writers’ HQ. She is the founding editor of Quotidian Literary Magazine – an online and print magazine publishing prose and poetry by students studying on Scotland on the theme of ‘the everyday’ – and her writing has been featured on BBC Radio 4 as part of their Scottish Short’s series. She also runs a blog – ‘Something Noticed’ (www.somethingnoticed. com) – which is a love letter to the ordinary.

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USING APPS TO SUPPORT YOUR WRITING 18/6, 0930-1230, ROOM 1

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his workshop will introduce a range of apps (both online and mobile) which can support the participants’ writing practice, and will encourage wider reflection on the process of doctoral writing.

It introduces and discusses apps and websites which can support and facilitate the PhD writing process. Attendees will learn about apps which can support their writing process. They will also have the opportunity to reflect on their writing practice and consider new strategies to facilitate the writing process. Presenter Bio: Dr Jennifer Boyle is an award winning author and the Postgraduate Research Writing Adviser at the University of Glasgow. She works with researchers from all disciplines in the development of their writing. She is the co-author of two Palgrave titles on academic writing.

Using Apps to Support Your Writing received 100% satisfaction rates in 2018. “Excellent workshop with really practical advice that I can implement straight away!” 2018 attendee

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BLENDED LEARNING SESSION 18/6, 1330-1630, ROOM 1

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his workshop covers the basics and best practice tips for blended learning, the combination of online educational materials and opportunities for interaction online with traditional place-based classroom methods. You will have an opportunity to see various different deliveries of blended learning and learn about best practice on the content creation and delivery of materials to students. Presenter Bio: John Maguire is the E-Learning Innovation Officer at the University of Glasgow College of Arts. He is an experienced Learning Technologist with a proven record of working in higher education. Skilled in Moodle, Captivate, Camtasia, Learning Management, Educational Technology, and Instructional Design with a strong specialism in video for learning.

ENLISTING THE PUBLIC AS VOLUNTEER RESEARCHERS 18/6, 1330-1630 ROOM 2

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ometimes in research you just cannot find what you are looking for. When this happens, the general public can be an invaluable source of research data. Once found, very willing and able volunteers provide not only essential research data but often inspire the researcher with new avenues of research not previously considered. This workshop will explore the advantages, disadvantages, pitfalls, and unexpected but welcome surprises that researchers encounter when working with volunteers. Highlighting the ethical and legal implications of working with volunteers and often differing researcher/volunteer expectations, it will illustrate the ways in which enlisted volunteer researchers can enhance research results and contribute to widening impact, research influence and public engagement events. Presenter Bio: Roslyn Chapman’s research focuses on material culture and how objects mediate social and cultural relationships, engage communities with their local histories, and tell the stories of people’s lives. She is an SGSAH AHRC funded Creative Economies Engagement Research Fellow for the Digitisation Strategy for Shetland Museum’s Recognised Textile Collection project. This research investigates and assesses the impact of digitisation on rural museums holding living heritage collections by engaging with contemporary issues and challenges through a dialogue between academic scholarship, applied practice and the end user. She recently collaborated with Shetland Museum and Archives on the RSE funded NottinghamShetland Knitted Lace research project, which examined issues of authenticity, marketing and consumption of two conflicting industries.

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POLICY WORKSHOP 18/6, 1330-1630, ROOM 8

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olicymaking is often assumed to be a rationale process whereby evidenceled interventions are strategically employed to address observable problems. However, numerous scholars have shown that policymaking is a far more complex collection of social processes, not all of which are transparent or even recognised as such.

FUNDING YOUR FIRST POST-DOC 18/6, 1330-1630, ROOM 3

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his workshop explores funding the first steps post-PhD, from Fellowships to postdoctoral positions to jobs within government research or industry.

For many PhD students, the next step after submitting a thesis is to secure a postdoctoral position. This workshop will explore the options, from short-term Fellowships, to a fully-funded academic position supported by charities (Leverhulme, Nuffield) or research councils, to jobs within government, research or industry. It will explore how to identify potential funders, avoid common mistakes and pitfalls, ensure your application is as attractive as possible, and keep on top of the reporting and evaluation required if successful. The session will be followed by an informal Q&A session, where you can discuss your plans, and get advice on the best approaches.

This workshop will introduce participants to a number of the key ways in which the processes of policymaking have been understood and reflect on what they mean for those researchers who want their work to influence policy. Presenter Bio: Dr David Stevenson is Head of the Division of Media, Communication and Performing Arts at Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh. Drawing on his academic research alongside 10 years of management experience in the public and private sector, David teaches at both undergraduate and postgraduate level in the fields of Arts Management and Cultural Policy. David has a PhD in Cultural Policy, an MA (Distinction) in Arts and Cultural Management, and a BA (First Class) in Art History. He is currently undertaking AHRC funded research exploring the role of failure in cultural participation policies.

Presenter Bio: Dr Ben Fletcher-Watson manages the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities at the University of Edinburgh. He spent seven years fundraising in the cultural sector, raising over £2 million for a variety of projects and companies. Among others, he has secured significant grants from the ESRC, National Lottery, Arts Council England and Creative Scotland, central government, NHS trusts, local authorities, and many trusts and foundations. Ben’s doctoral research at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland examined theatre for the very young. His postdoctoral work includes studies of technology use by young children and older adults, as well as theatre

for people on the autistic spectrum.

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ALUMNI TALK - WELLBEING, NATURE AND THE SELF: DEVELOPING TRANSDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH IN SCOTLAND 18/6, 1330-1630, ROOM 4-5

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he SGSAH Alumni talk is your chance to hear from one of our alumni who has completed their PhD and are embarking on their post-doctoral career.

The inagural alumni talk is from Dr Rebecca Crowther, a transdisciplinary, ethnographic, social researcher who will share her research journey with us. Rebecca is a transdisciplinary ethnographic researcher working between, across and beyond disciplines within the arts, humanities and social sciences. Her research interests lie in the phenomenological experience of natural landscapes.

Dr Rebecca Crowther is a SGSAH alumni having completed a PhD at the University of Edinburgh in 2017 funded by the SGSAH AHRC Doctoral Training Partnership.

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Rebecca completed her PhD at the University of Edinburgh having worked across Edinburgh College of Art and The School of Social Anthropology. She published her first book Wellbeing and Self Transformation in Natural Landscapes (Palgrave/ Macmillan), based on her PhD research at the end of 2018, the same year that she passed her viva examination. This book explores how natural landscapes are linked to positive mental wellbeing. Rebecca is now working on her post-doctoral research. Her new research project, Women in Dark Rural Landscapes: Vulnerability and the Self, aims to decipher in what ways cultural and personal narratives act as a lens through which women in Scotland encounter and experience darkness and other material objects within rural excursions at night. Rebecca is also currently working as a policy officer, gaining social policy experience with the Equality Network in Edinburgh. To read more about Rebecca’s work, collaboration projects and research, visit her website at www.sharingnaturalscotland.com Her book is available in hardback and for download online at Palgrave.com, Amazon, Waterstones and Blackwells. Please note registration for this event is free and done through a separate Eventbrite than other Summer School workshops. Please refer to the SGSAH website for more information.


“An excellent vibe, very friendly and welcoming with fascinating workshops.�

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WEDNESDAY19 JUNE

AM Workshop Title

Time

Location

Creative Writing: A Practice Based 0930-1230 Workshop for Personal Development

Room 4

Introduction to Qualitative Methods

0930-1230

Room 2

Time

Location

1330-1630

Room 4

1330-1630 1330-1630 1330-1630 1330-1630

Room 2 Room 6 Room 1 Room 7

1330-1630

Room 3

PM Workshop Title Creative Writing: A Practice Based Workshop for Personal Development Decolonising Methodologies Ethics in Action How to Write a Journal Insights into Social Enterprise Using Games in Research and Teaching

ALL-DAY

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Workshop Title

Time

Location

Blogging and Wordpress Visualising Your Data Using R

0930-1630 0930-1630

Room 8 Room 5


CREATIVE WRITING: A PRACTICE BASED WORKSHOP FOR PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT 19/6, 0930-1230 AND 1330-1630 (REPEAT SESSION), ROOM 4

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his workshop will allow you to experiment and explore your creativity, in a supportive environment, through a series of practice based creative writing exercises. By the end of this workshop, participants will have been introduced to the basic principles of personal creative writing through a range of selected texts and writing prompts. They will have worked to develop their personal writing both independently and collectively and have been encouraged to let their creative mind develop independently of academic writing. Presenter Bio: Lorna Hill is a writer, researcher and teacher. She is founder and director of Sharing A Story CIC, a social enterprise working to reduce social isolation in the community through shared reading and creative writing workshops. Lorna also teaches creative writing at undergraduate level; has run training workshops for Lapidus Scotland, Bloody Scotland and the SGSAH summer school. She worked as a journalist for 15 years and then as a marketing manager in a London FE College. She has an LLB, a PG Diploma in Newspaper Journalism, an MA in Creative Writing and a PhD in Creative Writing from Stirling University

INTRODUCTION TO QUALITATIVE METHODS 19/6, 0930-1230, ROOM 2

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his session will give an overview of what qualitative methods are and how they can be used to generate robust and rigourous data to support your project design. The training will cover the ontologigical and epistemological pathways open to qualitative researchers with a full negotiation of these terms. Further, popular qualitative approaches to data collection will be covered including interviews, focus groups and participant observation. Presenter Bio: Dr Jo Ferrie is the Director of Glasgow Q-Step Centre, a £3 million investment from Nuffied, ESRC and the University of Glasogw in creatng a step-change in data fluency and analsysis skills using quantitative methods, in the social sciences. Leading a team of lecturers in the School of Social & Political Science; School of Education and School of Maths & Statistics, that has produced 5 new ‘with Quantitative Method degrees’ and changed the landscape of methods learning in the MEduc. Dr Ferrie is also Deputy Director - Training for the Scottish Graduate School of Social Sciences, and as such, seconded half-time to this role based at the University of Edinburgh. I lead on all training intiatives across SGSSS, partnering with 16 institutions in Scotland with a significant social science base.

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ETHICS IN ACTION 19/6, 1330-1630, ROOM 6

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his workshop explores the key issues, values and principles of conducting ethical research with human subjects and creates a space for participants to think through and discuss the ethical considerations in relation to their own research projects. It introduces participants to the core principles and values of ethical research conduct with human subjects. It provides an in-depth overview over key principles such as protecting the rights and dignity of research participants, integrity and transparency in the research process, voluntary and informed consent as well as data storage and protection. A particular focus will be on ethical considerations in relation to sensitive research and research with vulnerable groups. This theoretical engagement will be applied to case studies that highlight ethical dilemmas and participants will have the opportunity to reflect on the ethical implications of their own research. Overall, the workshop seeks to frame research ethics and the process of obtaining ethical approval not as a “box-ticking exercise” but as a mindset guiding all phases of research. The aim is to inspire ethical reflection and to promote a culture of responsibility in research conduct. Presenter Bio: Olga Burkhardt-Vetter is an ESRCfunded doctoral candidate at the University of St Andrews’ School of International Relations, working on the themes of healing and reconciliation after mass atrocities and genocide. Burkhardt-Vetter holds an undergraduate degree in Literary Studies and Sociology and an MLitt in Peace and Conflict Studies. Before returning to academia, BurkhardtVetter worked as a journalist in Germany and taught at the University of Stuttgart, the SRH University Heidelberg and the University of Applied Sciences Fulda. Burkhardt-Vetter has 15 years of experience interviewing victims of mass atrocity and genocide, which has equipped her with a deep understanding of the ethical challenges in relation to research with human subjects, particularly with highly vulnerable groups. Burkhardt-Vetter is a member of the University of St Andrews’ School of IR Ethics Committee, which has provided her with deep insights into ethical issues in relation to a wide array of interdisciplinary projects and deepened her knowledge of the institutional requirements of obtaining ethical approval.

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DECOLONISING METHODOLOGIES 19/6, 1330-1630, ROOM 2

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his workshop explores the colonial history of research practices, with a view to equipping doctoral researchers with tools and ideas for decolonising their research and teaching practices. It will explore the colonial roots of commonly used research methodologies, providing a context for why we might want to decolonise our research practices. The workshop will have a group discussion on which methodological process we often use in the arts and humanities so that we can discuss decolonising in a way that is relevant to workshop participants. It will also explore the following themes: positionality, tools for decolonising research, decolonising teaching practice.

Presenter Bio: Diljeet Bhachu is a researcheractivist-musician based in Glasgow and Edinburgh. As well as being artistically active, she is heavily involved in the trade union movement through the Musicians’ Union, and runs an arts organisation, the Scottish-Asian Creative Artists’ Network (ScrAN). Diljeet recently submitted her PhD, completed with support from a SGSAH studentship, at the University of Edinburgh. Over the past few years she has begun to decolonise her academic practice, in particular through her doctoral research. As an early-career lecturer she has also recently started embedding decolonisation in her teaching practices.


HOW TO WRITE A JOURNAL 19/6, 1330-1630, ROOM 1

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his workshop will introduce the process of writing a journal article. From targeting a journal and finding topics to developing your arguments and getting to grips with using social media through the process. It will also show participants how to streamline the process of writing academic papers and how you can make time to write within a busy schedule. Presenter Bio: Rowena Murray is Professor of Education, Director of Research, in the School of Education at the University of the West of Scotland and Adjunct Professor at Swinburne University, Melbourne. Her teaching and research focus on academic writing, the subject of her journal articles and books, including How to Write a Thesis, Writing for Academic Journals and The Handbook of Academic Writing (co-authored with Sarah Moore). Her research has been funded by Nuffield Foundation and British Academy.

100% of 2018 participants would recommend “How to Write a Journal” to others. “Exactly what I was hoping to learn! A good mix of practical, applicable tips for writing I can use now and broader future issues.”

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INSIGHTS INTO SOCIAL ENTERPRISE 19/6, 1330-1630, ROOM 7

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nsights into Social Enterprise will help participants better understand social enterprise and its potential to help shape a better world. It will also explore the challenges and the unique support system that exists in Scotland to support the growth of social businesses. Lorna will use a mixture of case studies and workshop techniques to help participants explore the potential to set up their own social venture. Presenter Bio: Lorna Baird joined the University of Edinburgh in January 2018 as their first social enterprise adviser tasked with supporting staff, students and alumni start up their own social venture. She recently took over as Student Enterprise Manager and now leads a team delivering enterprise support to the 40,000 students studying at the University of Edinburgh. She has over 20 years’ experience in social and economic regeneration with over 10 years delivering business and social enterprise support. She has worked in the private, public and third sectors and has run her own successful marketing consultancy and two start-up social enterprises.

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USING GAMES IN RESEARCH AND TEACHING 19/6, 1330-1630, ROOM 3

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n this workshop participants will explore the many potential uses of games in their research and teaching, covering both board games and video/computer games. This will include examples illustrating the use of games in teaching, an outline of research methods for analysing games, and advice on using games and game-related ideas and approaches in research projects. This interactive session is open to anyone with an interest in the potential for using games, regardless of their current experience with them. It will highlight the rich potential for using games in both research and teaching and provides practical examples of how to begin using them. Presenter Bio: Laura Harrison (University of Glasgow) and William Hepburn (University of Aberdeen) are current SGSAH Creative Economy Engagement Fellows. Both of their projects centre on using games and gameful design for research and public engagement. Laura completed her PhD at the University of Edinburgh in 2018 and her research interests include commemoration, local identities and digital humanities. William completed his PhD at the University of Glasgow in 2014 and has recently worked as a research assistant on the ‘Law in the Aberdeen Council Registers, 1398-1511’ project at the University of Aberdeen. His research interests include the princely court and urban society in pre-modern Scotland, literate culture and digital humanities.


VISUALISING YOUR DATA USING R 19/6, 0930-1630, ROOM 5

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his is a practical, hands-on workshop on data exploration and visualization. We will be using R, a programming language widely used in data science and statistics. R is quite easy to learn and handy for producing attractive data-driven graphs and figures, including ones with interactive elements. By the end of this workshop participants will:

BLOGGING AND WORDPRESS 19/6, 0930-1630, ROOM 8

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his workshop covers the basics and best practice tips for blogging in relation to your PhD. By the end of this workshop, participants will have the knowledge to set up a Wordpress blog of their own; take away some best practice tips for blogging online and have a better insight into search engine optimisation of blogging. The workshop will be of particular interest to those looking to share their findings publicly, reach out to others interested in their field and to those looking to increase their online presence and grow a following. Presenter Bio: Tweetiepie Media was formed in July 2011 offering a small selection of digital solutions to small and medium sized businesses in Scotland’s central belt. Since then, the team has grown, the service offerings have grown and today they work with companies throughout the UK and Europe. Lizzy Todd is the sole founder and owner of Tweetiepie Media. She studied Business and Law at the University of Edinburgh before going onto work in marketing in the Hospitality industry. Here, she works with a variety of individuals and companies which helped to build up knowledge of the ever changing digital landscape, as well as gaining first hand experience.

- be able to deal with data in R and write simple scripts - know how to choose a suitable visualization for a given data type - have learned a transferable skill applicable in any field that deals with data This workshop will be of particular interest to anybody working with either quantitative or quantifiable data (this includes anything countable, from experimental results to texts to cultural artefacts), and looking to communicate their findings in an effective visual manner. Presenter Bio: Andres Karjus is a PhD student at the Centre for Language Evolution of the University of Edinburgh. His PhD project is focused on language change from an evolutionary perspective. He is developing a model of lexical competition based on data from massive centuries-spanning corpora, utilizing tools from natural language processing to quantify topical fluctuations, semantic change and synonymy effects in addition to frequency change. He is also working on the application of the topical fluctuations model to a variety of historical cultural datasets. Besides his PhD research, he is involved in teaching statistics to our MSc students, and has been developing and teaching various short R-based courses and workshops over the past few years, on data science, corpus linguistics and data visualization for humanities and social sciences audiences. All materials are open-source.

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THURSDAY 20 JUNE

AM Workshop Title

Time

Location

0930-1230

Room 6

0930-1230

Room 3

1000-1230 0930-1230

Room 7 Room 1

Workshop Title

Time

Location

Effective Public Engagement Queerying Methods Walking Tour: Glasgow Necropolis

1330-1630 1330-1630 1400-1600

Room 3 Room 6 Glasgow Necropolis Gatehouse

Time

Location

A Stone-Thrower to Pigeons: Disruption as Knowledge An Introduction to Open Access and Research Data Management Data Visualisation Vlogging in Academia

PM

ALL-DAY Workshop Title

Creative Engagement for Academics 0930-1630 Who Am I When I Write? 0930-1630 26

Room 2 Room 4


A STONE-THROWER TO PIGEONS: DISRUPTION AS KNOWLEDGE 20/6, 0930-1230, ROOM 6

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he notion of ‘engagement’, ‘participation’ and ‘impact’ are key aspects of research and funding requirements, however, there is a assumption that these must necessarily be premised on ameliorative and/or congenial notions. Taking on board ethical considerations, this session considers how disruption, intervention and ‘productive conflict’ might also satisfy these requirements and also produce excellent research. • By the end of the session participants will: • Be introduced to practice-based research • Critical assess assumptions of participation and ethics • Be able to reflect and consider the notion of ‘productive conflict’ This session will consist of a talk followed by a group discussion. Presenter Bio: Dr Anthony Schrag is a lecturer on the Cultural Management team at Queen Margaret University, in Edinburgh. He has a practice-based PhD from Newcastle University and is an internationally respected artist who has worked in Iceland, USA, Canada, Finland, Holland and South Africa, as well as elsewhere. Central to practice and research is a broader discussion about the place of art in a social context, and the ethics that such social relations engender. He has been the recipient of numerous awards, commissions and exhibitions and his practice-based PhD explored the relationship between artists, institutions and the public, looking specifically at the productive nature of conflict. The artist Nathalie De Brie once referred to his practice as ‘Fearless’. The writer Marjorie Celona once said: ‘Anthony, you have a lot of ideas. Not all of them are good.’

100% of 2018 participants would reccommend “A Stone Thrower to Pigeons” to others. “This was the best and more inspiring PhD training I’ve attended” 2018 Attendee

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AN INTRODUCTION TO OPEN ACCESS AND RESEARCH DATA MANAGEMENT 20/6, 0930-1230, ROOM 3

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his workshop will introduce participants to open access for publications, show how to comply with open access policies, and introduce best practice for archiving and sharing other outputs, including research data. We will also explore representing and archiving practice-based research. Topics covered will include: •

What is research data?

Data management planning

Funders’ expectations for sharing research data

Managing sensitive research data, ethics and GDPR

Organising and documenting your research data

The role of repositories

Archiving and sharing research data and other outputs

Representing practice-based research

Open Access for publications and for other research outputs

Using ORCID to promote your research

Presenter Bio: Mick Eadie and Matt Mahon are Research Information Officers and Morag Greig is a College Librarian for Arts, all based at the University of Glasgow Library. Nicola Siminson is Institutional Repository and Records Manager at Glasgow School of Art.

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DATA VISUALISATION 20/6, 0930-1230, ROOM 7

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his workshop will serve as an introduction to the vast field of data visualisation. Highlighting on-line tools, you will learn how to tell stories with your data. Examples of unique data visualisation projects will be shown for inspiration. Designing communications that appeal on an aesthetic level is important no matter what discipline you work in. This workshop will look at how data can be turned into compelling visual stories, including flat graphic design (infographics). Topics include the importance of good visual storytelling, designing and presenting graphs and charts and general examples of good practice. Please note: Although different visualisation software options will be discussed during the workshop, this is not a software-training workshop. Presenter Bio: Dr. Mhairi Towler integrates a background in science with animation skills in order to use visual and 3D methodologies to communicate science to a wide audience. Mhairi gained a degree in Biochemistry and a PhD in Molecular and Cell Biology from the University of Dundee. She then carried out postdoctoral work, both in San Francisco and Dundee, in varying fields such as cell biology and human physiology. While working as a scientist she became involved in several Sci-Art projects and collaborating with artists gave her an insight into the art world that inspired her and influenced her career aspirations with the ultimate goal of becoming a scientific visualisation practitioner. She completed a Masters in Animation and Visualisation at Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design at the University of Dundee in 2012 and has exhibited her artwork in Dundee, Lithuania, Amsterdam, Barcelona, Paris, Aberdeen and Edinburgh. Mhairi is Founder and Director of the multi-award winning animation production company, Vivomotion (www.vivomotion.co.uk). The company offers a service of bespoke animations for scientific communication. In addition, training workshops are offered for postgraduate and research staff on visual communication of research and how to launch a new enterprise.


VLOGGING IN ACADEMIA 20/6, 1000-1230, ROOM 1

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ancy yourself as a ‘studytuber’ or perhaps you would like to consider a creative way to document your reflections on your PhD journey? Vlogging is a popular way to capture reflective practice, either for private reflection or for public engagement. This workshop provides an introduction to vlogging, that you can use at different points (or throughout) your PhD.We will look at the challenges and opportunities provided by vlogging and examine the benefits of reflection. We will also look at examples of good practice when it comes to vlogging, as well as the practicalities of creating your own vlog. The workshop will also provide an opportunity for you to start the process of planning for your first vlog or vlogs. Presenter Bio: Dr Amanda Pate is an Academic and Digital Development Adviser at the University of Glasgow where she has a focus on digital pedagogy, as well as running courses in teaching and learning practice for postgraduates who teach. She was previously Programme Leader for the BA (Hons) Journalism at UWS, and is a former news journalist with expertise in digital journalism. Dr Janis Davidson is a Senior Academic and Digital Development Adviser at the University of Glasgow, whose main responsibility is staff professional development. She contributes to accredited provision on learning and teaching practice and convenes the University’s course on supervising students at PGT and PGR level.

New For 2019

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EFFECTIVE PUBLIC MANAGEMENT 20/6, 1330-1630, ROOM 3

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ands-on workshop where you will identify your desired Impact and draft your public engagement approach for your project using a bespoke glucard™ Impact building block tool. You will be introduced to key principles of effective public engagement, learn about a range of different and effective arts and humanities public engagement possibilities that go beyond showcases, public lectures and events, share experiences, thoughts and resolve issues working with your peers in the workshop, and create a glucard™ plan to begin or review your public engagement journey. Presenter Bio: Sabina is a change consultant and collaboration expert who set up glu after 17 years working in management consulting, research development and heritage management across multiple sectors. glu helps people work together better to achieve greater impacts (www.how2glu.com). glu specialises in higher and further education, partnerships, placemaking, culture, service improvement and research and innovation. Recent glu projects include facilitating the development of a major UK city’s culture plan, reviewing a university/cultural organisation partnership, and placement preparation training for PhD students. Sabina is also a trustee of a student engagement charity, an MSc supervisor for the University of Edinburgh, an Edinburgh Napier University employer mentor, and a member of the Royal Society of Edinburgh’s Young Academy of Scotland.

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QUEERYING METHODS 20/6, 1330-1630, ROOM 6

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ften understood as focusing on matters relating to gender, human sexuality, and sexual orientation, the field of queer studies offers a diverse conceptual toolkit for interrogating our understanding of power, knowledge and subjectivity. In this workshop, we will explore how strategies and perspectives drawn from queer scholarship – itself informed by feminist and critical race studies – can serve as methods in support of arts and humanities research. How can thinking queerly test and reframe the assumptions on which we build our research inquiries? Presenter Bio: Dr Steve Greer is Senior Lecturer in Theatre Practices at University of Glasgow where his research focuses on the intersection of queer, cultural and performance studies. His most recent book is Queer exceptions: solo performance in neoliberal times (Manchester University Press 2018).


“The workshops I attended were of a very high standard and I leftt feeling very positive about my PhD going forward into 3rd year�

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CREATIVE ENGAGEMENT FOR ACADEMICS 20/6, 0930-1630, ROOM 2

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xplore how creative engagement can add value to academic research within the creative economy.

This full day workshop will run in two parts. In the morning, the focus will be on ‘Engaging with Creative People,’ led by Dr Johnson, and in the afternoon, the focus will be ‘Engaging with People Creatively,’ led by Dr McAra. Through a series of presentations, talks and workshop activities, participants will reflect on the challenges of engagement, dissemination and impact within their own research, with the aim of capturing these shared insights and co-creating innovative solutions. Key areas this workshop will cover include action research and design-led approaches to research, principles of design innovation and ways these could be adopted, and approaches to evaluation and dissemination for change and impact. The participants will be invited to explore and map out their projects holistically and consider the wider implications of their methodological choices. The aim of the workshop is to foster a community of fellow practitioners and researchers working in the area of the creative economy. Presenter Bio: Dr Michael Pierre Johnson is a post-doctoral design-researcher, with experience in ethnographic and design-led approaches. Since gaining his PhD through the AHRC-funded knowledge exchange hub Design in Action (2016), Michael has worked on collaborative creative engagement projects, which led to him being awarded an AHRC-funded Innovation Leadership Fellowship in the Creative Economy in 2019. His research interests are on making the effects and viability of Design Innovation approaches more explicit within complex collaborative contexts through visual mapping methods. Dr Marianne McAra is a Creative Economy Engagement Fellow and works in the areas of wellbeing, youth engagement, and creative education. Marianne’s research practice is underpinned by human-centred and Participatory Design approaches, with an interest in experimental methods and an expertise in designing and facilitating codesign interventions as well as working in ethically sensitive research contexts.

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WHO AM I WHEN I WRITE 20/6, 0930-1630, ROOM 4

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xamine how adopting techniques from creative writing can enhance your academic writing voice, making your work attractive to read whilst losing none of its academic integrity. This workshop explores how adopting techniques from non-academic writing, for example journalism and prose fiction, can enhance academic writing. Participants will 1. analyse style by considering their identity as writers and not just as academics; 2. consider the choices that they, as writers, make about the language they use to address their readers; and 3. consider how an understanding of narrative can help to develop a confident academic voice. This highly interactive workshop will include lots of practical tips including techniques for communicating abstract concepts, writing rhythmic prose and improving paraphrasing skills. Presenter Bio: Cherise Saywell: Cherise is a novelist and award-winning short story writer. She is a Royal Literary Fund Consultant Fellow, was the RLF Writing Fellow at Stirling University between 2014 and 2016, and is currently the RLF Writing Fellow at the University of Strathclyde. Katie Grant, FHEA: Katie set up the academic writing skills website (AAW) at the University of Glasgow, was a newspaper columnist and, as K. M. Grant and Katharine Grant, is the author of ten novels (Puffin, Quercus, Virago). She is a Royal Literary Fund Consultant Fellow and was the RLF Writing Fellow at the University of Glasgow between 2011 and 2014.


WALKING TOUR - GLASGOW NECROPOLIS 20/6, 1400-1600, GATEHOUSE - GLASGOW NECROPOLIS

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ew to the SGSAH Summer School, author and chairman of the Friends of Glasgow Necropolis Ruth Johnston will be taking a walking tour around the Glasgow Necropolis.

The 37 acre Victorian cemetary is located in the centre of Glasgow and is the resting place for over fifty thousand individuals. Combined with 3500 monuments, this makes the Necropolis a unique place through which to view the history of Glasgow from the individuals to the architecture who overlook the city. The tour lasts approximately two hours. As the Necropolis can be uneven underfoot in places, sensible walking shoes are strongly recommended. AHRC funded researchers please note that attendance at the walking tour will not meet your funding requirements for attendance at the Summer School. Presenter Bio: Ruth Johnston is an author and chairman of the Friends of Glasgow Necropolis. The Friends of Glasgow Necropolis work with Glasgow City Council to both organise the schedule of activities related to the necropolis and encourage investment and tourism to the site befitting it’s importance to the history and culture of Glasgow.

The Necropolis was originally envisaged to be designed with vast catacombs running into the hill overlooking Glasgow Cathedral as a means of protecting the dead against grave robbers.

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