Page 1

Duboce Park Landmark District

2012-2013


Mayor

Planning Commission

Edwin M. Lee

Rodney Fong, President Cindy Wu, Vice President

Board of Supervisors David Chiu, President John Avalos London Breed David Campos Carmen Chu Malia Cohen Mark Farrell Jane Kim Eric Mar Scott Wiener Norman Yee

Michael Antonini Gwyneth Borden Rich Hillis (started January 2013) Ron Miguel (until July 2012) Kathrin Moore Hisashi Sugaya

Historic Preservation Commission Karl Hasz, President Andrew Wolfram, Vice President Aaron Jon Hyland (started February 2013) Ellen Johnck (started March 2013) Richard Johns Alan Martinez (until March 2013) Diane Matsuda Jonathan Pearlman

San Francisco Planning Department 1650 Mission Street Suite 400 San Francisco, CA 94103-3114 www.sfplanning.org

Great planning for a great city.

Duboce Park cover image from Flickr by davitydave


Table of Contents Message from the Planning Commission President

01

Message from the Historic Preservation Commission President

02

Message from the Director

03

Organizational Overview 06 This Year’s Accomplishments

12

Project Highlights 14 Highlights: Completed Projects

30

Highlights: Projects Underway

34

Communications, Outreach & Engagement

38

Publications 40 Awards & Accolades 42 Grants 43 Planning by the Numbers

46

2012-2013 Stats 47 Case & Permit Volume Trends

50

Performance Measure Improvement Initiative

52

Financial Report 54 Staff List 56


2558 MISSION DESIGN

Kwan Henmi Architects (Housing); Hodges & Assoc. with Kerman/Morris Architects & Architectural Resources Group (Theater Rehabilitation) SIZE

Housing - 114 Dwelling Units with Ground Floor Retail (14,750 sq ft); Total 142,000 gsf BUDGET

Housing Project $40 Million; Theater Rehabilitation $14Million OPENING

Spring 2015 (Housing); TBD (Theater Rehabilitation)

2558

MISSION

19 DEC 2012 images courtesy of Kwan Henmi Architecture/Planning

KH


images courtesy of lineasf.com

1998 MARKET (LINEA) DESIGN

Arquitectonica SIZE

15 Dwelling Units; 7,300 square feet of commercial space BUDGET

$45.5 million OPENING

Early 2014


JEFFERSON STREET PROJECT LEAD

Neil Hrushowy (Project Lead); Nicholas Perry (Lead Urban Designer) CONSTRUCTION LEAD

John Thomas (DPW) DESIGN CONSULTANT

Boris Dramov, ROMA Design Group SIZE

Two blocks on Jefferson Street, from Jones Street to Hyde Street OPENING

June 20, 2013

images courtesy of ROMA Design Group


ANNUAL REPORT 2012 - 2013

Message from the Planning Commission President San Francisco has seen an increase in development activity over the past few years that significantly impact our neighborhoods and our city’s skyline. In order to accommodate for the growth, the Planning Commission continues to work closely with Planning Department staff for managing the city’s land use, transportation, and neighborhood planning.

Rodney Fong President, San Francisco Planning Commission

San Francisco has always been the city of innovation. The City began implementing neighborhood plans and programs that have addressed the growth and quality of life for its residents. These plans are especially important because it helped create the vibrant city that San Francisco is today. Building on these successes, the Commission reviewed a number of neighborhood plans, legislation, environmental reports and development projects that recommends how we can preserve significant parts of the city, where growth should go, how it can happen, and what it should look like in the future. From plans such as Western SoMa, Central Corridor and California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC), to legislation amendments for bike parking and historic preservation designations, all of the projects brought to the Commission from Planning staff are ways that we can plan and improve the future of the City. It is a great honor to serve as President of the Planning Commission. As Commissioners, we play a challenging but essential role managing the growth and development within the City. I would like to recognize my fellow Commissioners for their commitment and passion for their continued service for developing the city for its residents and visitors. I would also like to thank Director John Rahaim and the entire department staff for their dedication and excellent work in making San Francisco a great city.

1


2

SA N F R A NC I S C O PL A N N I NG DE PA RT M E N T

Message from the Historic Preservation Commission President On behalf of the Historic Preservation Commission & preservation staff, I am pleased to present the Planning Department’s 2012-2013 annual report. This past year I was joined by Commissioners Johns, Matsuda and Wolfram in welcoming our newest members, Commissioners Hyland, Johnck & Pearlman. The professional backgrounds and the wealth of experience of this group rings in a new era for our Commission. There were a number of great preservation projects that broke ground or were approved this past fiscal year. We were all excited to see the Metro Theater and New Mission Theater brought back to life, as well as seeing Mid-Market move forward -- led by 1355 Market (Twitter’s headquarters), Hibernia Bank and the Renoir Hotel. All of these projects are leading the way to revitalizing neighborhoods while preserving the historic and cultural fabric of The City. In addition, the Commission stepped into new territory by recommending that Sam Jordan’s Bar and Twin Peaks Tavern be designated as landmarks, due to their cultural significance. With the overwhelming support and interest from The City and its residents, the designations of these cultural recognitions were an exciting time for our Commission. I want to recognize and thank our dedicated staff at the Planning Department for their incredible work. Their efforts extend well beyond reviewing projects as they continue to be innovative with their tremendous efforts in public outreach. With new initiatives such as “Ask a Planner” nights held in different neighborhoods throughout The City, to informational booths at Sunday Streets, and holding workshops that educate residents about the benefits of the Mills Act program, the Historic Preservation staff continues to work hard to keep preservation at the forefront of all development conversations so The City can grow without losing the character we all value. The Historic Preservation Commission had a wonderful year, and we look forward to another year of success.

Karl Hasz President, Historic Preservation Commission


ANNUAL REPORT 2012 - 2013

Message from the Director As we end another year of vigorous, perhaps unprecedented growth, it is increasingly clear that the Planning Department is shaping San Francisco in many ways that will impact the city for years to come. The private development and public investment that is now taking place have largely been shaped by the plans created through years of hard work by the Department, the neighborhoods, and the Commissions. And we are implementing these plans in very specific and tangible ways in our daily work. For me, it is fascinating to see the physical results of our work so clearly.

John Rahaim Planning Director

The current development cycle has also meant we’ve had to increase the size of the Department to keep pace with the demand. The new staff are as intelligent, passionate and hard working as those who have been here many years. It is a testament to the work that we are doing -- that so many new planners are so interested in working at our Department to help enhance our city. This has also been an important year for Historic Preservation activities. The Department researched and steered the adoption of the city’s first Article 10 historic districts in 10 years, the Duboce Park district and the Market Street Masonry District. The preservation staff also conducted substantial research and managed the process to landmark two important city neighborhood institutions: Sam Jordan’s Bar, and Twin Peaks Tavern. In addition, the preservation staff added to the department’s survey information through the Sunset District historic survey. All of these actions further the Departments important preservation mission, safeguarding the city’s important resources for the future, while also providing key information to staff to conduct their reviews more efficiently. With five (plus) years behind me with the department, I believe that the Planning Department continues to improve. The increasing professionalism and dedication of the staff, the support of our hard working and focused Commissioners on both the Planning and Historic Preservation Commissions, and the strong support of the Mayor and Board of Supervisors has made my job easier and just plain fun. My sincere thanks to all of you.

3


“I enjoy the challenge of learning in a complicated urban environment and then helping the public best understand how it affects them.� - Wade Wietgrefe Planner, Environmental Planning


ORGANIZATION OVERVIEW

Great planning for a great city. OUR MISSION The San Francisco Planning Department, under the direction of the Planning Commission, shapes the future of San Francisco and the region by: ƒƒ generating an extraordinary vision for the General Plan and in neighborhood plans; ƒƒ fostering exemplary design through planning controls; ƒƒ improving our surroundings through environmental analysis; ƒƒ preserving our unique heritage; ƒƒ encouraging a broad range of housing and a diverse job base; and ƒƒ enforcing the Planning Code.

OUR VISION

Making San Francisco the world’s most livable urban place – environmentally, economically, socially and culturally.


OUR VALUES

Collaboration We collaborate with the people of San Francisco.

Education We educate our community about our work and we learn from our communities about their neighborhoods and their vision.

Respect We treat our stakeholders with professional courtesy and respect.

Innovation We are innovative in setting new planning standards, and guiding change that embraces our extraordinary setting, unique heritage, vibrant communities and the aspirations of our diverse population.

Consistency We are consistent in our application of policy.

Efficiency We are efficient and timely.

Trust We build trust.

Open Dialogue

Fairness We provide a fair, objective and equitable process.

We facilitate ongoing dialogue that is open and responsive.

Passion Inclusive We provide clear communication that is accessible to all members of our diverse population.

Visionary We are visionary in our plans and practical in their implementation.

photo by David McSpadden

We are passionate about our work.

Employee Satisfaction We are a great place to work -cultivating intellectual inspiration, professional satisfaction and creativity.


8

SA N F R A NC I S C O PL A N N I NG DE PA RT M E N T

Governance Planning Commission The Planning Commission consists of seven appointed who help plan for growth and development in San Francisco. Four members are appointed by the Mayor, while three are appointed by the President of the Board of Supervisors. The Commission reviews a broad range of development projects each year, and advises the Mayor, Board of Supervisors and City departments on San Francisco’s long-range goals, policies and programs on a broad array of issues related to land use, transportation, and neighborhood planning. The Commission additionally has the specific responsibility for the stewardship and maintenance of the San Francisco’s General Plan. The San Francisco Planning Department reports to the Planning Commission through the Planning Director.

2012-2013 PLANNING COMMISSION ROSTER

1

2

5

3

6

4

7

1

Rodney Fong

2

Cindy Wu

3

Michael Antonini

4

Gwyneth Borden

5

Rich Hillis

6

Kathrin Moore

7

Hisashi Sugaya

President Vice-President


ANNUAL REPORT 2012 - 2013

9

Historic Preservation Commission The Historic Preservation Commission is a seven-member body that advises the Mayor, Board of Supervisors and City departments on San Francisco’s historic preservation goals, policies and programs. All members are nominated by the Mayor and subject to the approval of the Board of Supervisors. In addition to the full Commission, the Architectural Review Committee reviews projects at an early stage to advise applicants on the design. The department’s Historic Preservation staff reports to the Historic Preservation Commission. The Commission reviews changes to landmark buildings and to recommend buildings and places that are historically or culturally significant to the heritage of San Francisco for designation by the Board of Supervisors.

2012-2013 HISTORIC PRESERVATION COMMISSION ROSTER 1

Karl Hasz

2

Andrew Wolfram

3

Aaron Jon Hyland

4

Ellen Johnck

5

Richard Johns

6

Diane Matsuda

7

Jonathan Pearlman

President Vice-President

1

2

3

5

6

7

4


10

SA N F R A NC I S C O PL A N N I NG DE PA RT M E N T

Department Organization Management

Divisions

SENIOR MANAGERS 1

John Rahaim

Planning Director

2

Jose Campos

Director of Citywide Planning

3

Thomas DiSanto

4

Jonas Ionin

5

Jeff Joslin

6

Scott Sanchez

7

Bill Wycko

Director, Administration Commissions Secretary (Acting) Director of Current Planning Zoning Administrator Environmental Review Officer

Administration: The Administration division provides support and resources to realize departmental goals. This division includes finance, legislative affairs, communications, information technology, operations, human resources and special projects. Current Planning: The Current Planning section is responsible for reviewing project applications, implementing the historic preservation work program and operating the Public Information Center. Every year, this division reviews and processes over 6000 building permits and several hundred case applications. Citywide Planning: The Citywide Planning division develops policy, maintains and oversees compliance with the City’s General Plan, prepares and implements community plans, and acts as the urban design resource for the city. This division also gathers and analyzes data in support of landuse policy.

1

Environmental Planning: The Environmental Planning Division of the Planning Department reviews projects for potential environmental impacts on the City of San Francisco and its residents, a process known as environmental review.

2

3

4

5

6

7

Zoning and Compliance: This group helps maintain and improve the quality of San Francisco’s neighborhoods by ensuring compliance with the San Francisco Planning Code. The Code Enforcement group under this division responds to complaints of alleged Planning Code violations and initiates fair and unbiased enforcement action to correct violations and maintain neighborhood livability.


ANNUAL REPORT 2012 - 2013

2012-2013 Organization Chart

Planning Commission

Historic Preservation Commission Jonas Ionin Commissions Secretary (Acting)

Planning Director John Rahaim

AnMarie Rodgers

Director, Administration

Legislative Affairs Manager

Thomas DiSanto

Joanna Linsangan Communications Manager

Director of Citywide Planning

Director of Current Planning

Zoning Administrator

Environmental Review Officer

Jose Campos

Jeff Joslin

Scott Sanchez

Bill Wycko

11


12

SA N F R A NC I S C O PL A N N I NG DE PA RT M E N T

“It’s great to plan the city that I live in, see the fruits of my labor and know that my work is place making, and serving the needs of the community.” - Michael Smith Planner, Current Planning


“Community participation is important to historic preservation. Working with the public to honor, celebrate, and promote our shared history is rewarding; their voices help us make better decisions.� - Tim Frye, Preservation Coordinator


THIS YEAR’S ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Project Highlights from 2012-2013


2012-2013 Project Highlights Environmental Impact Reports (EIRs) A 706 Mission Street, The Mexican Museum and Residential Tower Project B 8 Washington Street/Seawall Lot 351 Project C 801 Brannan and One Henry Adams Project D CPMC Final EIR and Revised Project Addendum E The SF Overlook Residential Project

Western SoMa Community Plan, Rezoning of Adjacent Parcels and 350 Eighth Street Project

P.37

Fisherman’s Wharf Public Realm Plan

P.34 Jefferson Street P.31

BAY ST

Street Design

LOMBARD

ST

ST

P.16

P.20 Western SoMa F

C

D 16TH ST

17th & Folsom

Mercado P.32 Bartlett Plaza

Cesar Chavez P.33

Streetscape Project

D

D

EV

BLV SHO

CPMC

OA

BAY

St. Luke’s Campus

P.33 Cesar Chavez East CESAR CHAVEZ ST

RE

P.24

TARAVAL ST

3RD ST

P.32 Park POTRERO AVE

A DR

CLIPPER ST

MISSION ST

Peaks Tavern P.18 Twin Historic Landmark

TOL POR

P.30 Better Market Street H

19TH AVE

A

ST

4T

NORIEGA ST

ET

& Dolores P.32 Market Pedestrian Friendly Plan

Castro Street P.31 Street Design

E

M

K AR

OAK ST

DOLORES ST

BLVD OLN LINC

KEARNY

P.16

District Plan

P.24 CPMC Van Ness & Geary Campus

D

FELL ST

CASTRO ST

CPMC P.24

17TH ST

Landmark Designation

SUNSET BLVD

SS AVE VAN NE

ERO ST

Doelger Building

DIVISAD

P.32

P.33

B

P.32 Transit Center

Landmark District

Landmark District

Davies Medical Center

Broadway Street P.31 Chinatown Street Design

WAY

Market Street Masonry

Duboce Park

N ST

Sunset District

P.22

IC AVE

STANYA

Public Realm Plan

LINCOLN WAY

JCHESS

BROAD

VD GEARY BL

Haight Ashbury

Golden Gate Park

RNIA ST

MASON

25TH AVE

FULTON ST

P.31

CALIFO

ARGUELLO BLVD

L i n c ol n Pa r k

Historic Resource Survey

ST

Presidio

7TH AVE

KD

AL

E

AV

E

SLOAT BLVD

AVE

AVE

E

Lake Merced N

JO

SE

AV

J oh n McLaren Park

GE

NE

VA

AV

MAN

SEL

ST

L ST

P.35 Vistacion Valley/ E

Schlage Lock

S

AV

E

Jordan’s Bar P.18 Sam Historic Landmark

3RD

NO

EAN

BRU

SILVER AVE

OC

AN

SAN

MONTEREY BLVD

SA

F

see full list of Published EIRS


16

SA N F R A NC I S C O PL A N N I NG DE PA RT M E N T

Landmark Districts: Duboce Park & Market Street Masonry

TWO LANDMARK DISTRICTS DESIGNATED IN SAN FRANCISCO

In an effort to preserve significant historic and cultural properties in San Francisco, the department successfully proposed two areas for landmark district status for Market Street Masonry and Duboce Park. Cited for its architectural significance, the Market Street Masonry Landmark District includes eight buildings on and near Market Street. All of the buildings in the district are separated along a stretch of Market Street, but are similar in structure and known for their association with San Francisco’s reconstruction after the 1906 earthquake and fire. The Planning Department’s vision under the Market and Octavia Plan is to create a balance of new development while retaining historical features around Market Street. The designation of the Masonry Landmark District aligns with the department’s goal to revitalize and share San Francisco’s unique character.

The Duboce Park landmark district is cited for its architectural character and historical significance. Approved as the first residential landmark district since 2003, Duboce Park includes 87 residential buildings and three distinctive mid-block park entrances.

For more information on the Duboce Park Landmark District visit:

The shared history of the park and the adjacent residential development resulted in the rare siting of houses directly on the park, with no separation by road or sidewalk. Most buildings were constructed from 1899 to 1902 and were designed in the Queen Anne and Edwardianera styles, resulting in a cohesive streetscape of cottages and flats.

For more information on the Market Street Masonry Landmark District visit:

Both districts were unanimously approved by the Board of Supervisors in 2013.

http://dubocepark.sfplanning. org

http://marketmasonry. sfplanning.org


ANNUAL REPORT 2012 - 2013

Market Street Masonry Landmark District

Duboce Park Landmark District

17


18

SA N F R A NC I S C O PL A N N I NG DE PA RT M E N T

Historic Landmarks: Sam Jordan’s Bar and Twin Peaks Tavern

LOCAL BARS DESIGNATED AS HISTORICAL LANDMARKS

The department celebrated two historical landmark designations, made possible by the historic preservation team. Sam Jordan’s Bar (4004 Third Street) is significant due to its association with the late Sam Jordan, a prominent African American community leader, Golden Gloves champion, pioneering African American business owner along the Third Street corridor in the Bayview District, and the first African American candidate for Mayor of San Francisco (1963). The establishment was known as an organizing space and catalyst for community-based initiative. In 1959, Mr. Jordan opened Sam Jordan’s Bar in a c.1880’s building that was originally constructed adjacent to the corrals, slaughterhouses, and tanneries associated with “Butchertown.” The bar is still in operation and is one of the oldest continuously operating African American businesses along the Third Street corridor.

The Twin Peaks Tavern (401 Castro Street) is the first known gay bar and is a living symbol of the liberties and rights gained by the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered (LGBT) community in the second half of the 20th century. First opened in 1935, the bar lease was purchased in 1972 by two lesbians and refurbished as a fern bar for a gay clientele. Housed in a turnof-the-century building with an intact 1923 Mediterranean Revival-style façade in the heart of the Castro, the bar retains its expansive windows and other character-defining features and continues to serve the LGBT community.

“When working on landmarks, I enjoy meeting and learning the history of people like the Jordan family of Sam Jordan’s Bar, who are still deeply rooted in the African American community in the Bayview.” - Mary Brown, Preservation Planner

The Board of Supervisors unanimously voted to landmark both iconic establishments for their historical status in January 2013.

For more info on the Landmark Designation Work Program: http://www.sf-planning.org/index.aspx?page=2907


ANNUAL REPORT 2012 - 2013

19

Sam Jordan’s Bar Historic Landmark

Twin Peaks Tavern Historic Landmark


20

SA N F R A NC I S C O PL A N N I NG DE PA RT M E N T

Western SoMa

The department supported the Western SoMa Citizens Planning Task Force in an eight-year public planning process to create the Western SoMa Community Plan. Drafted in September 2008 and updated in October 2011, the plan is a comprehensive vision for shaping growth on the western side of the South of Market area. Key objectives of the Western SoMa Area Plan include reducing land use conflicts between industry, entertainment and other competing uses, such as office and housing; protecting existing residential uses on the alleys; retaining existing jobs in the area; improving the public realm for pedestrians and bicyclists; and encouraging diverse and affordable housing. Achieving these objectives will help create a complete neighborhood with a high diversity of land uses. The new plan supports and builds on the Eastern Neighborhoods Plan’s vision for the traditionally industrial and mixed use areas in the eastern part of the City. It complements the Eastern Neighborhoods Plan’s patterns of land use, urban form, public space, circulation, and historic preservation, while making adjustments to the Plan based on understanding the key

issues through community outreach to the residents and workers in the area. The planning process also included associated legislation to amend the General Plan, Administrative Code, Planning Code, and Zoning Map to implement the Plan over time. An Implementation Document was created to outline the Plan’s Public Benefits Program, which addresses the specific public benefit needs of the area and explains the mechanisms to provide the necessary funding for those benefits. As part of the project, the department completed the environmental impact report that analyzed the potential environmental effects associated with the Western SoMa Community Plan at a program level, and also analyzed impacts of the rezoning of adjacent parcels and the 350 Eighth Street project at a projectspecific level. The environmental impact report was certified and the Plan was adopted by the Planning Commission on December 6, 2012. On March 19, 2013, the Board of Supervisors adopted the Western SoMa Area Plan and its associated legislative amendments.

For more info on the Western SoMa Area Plan: http://westernsoma.sfplanning.org


ANNUAL REPORT 2012 - 2013

350 8th Street Kava Massih Architects

21


22

SA N F R A NC I S C O PL A N N I NG DE PA RT M E N T

Japantown Cultural Heritage and Economic Sustainability Strategy

JCHESS

After several years of collaboration with San Francisco’s Japantown community, the Department published a draft of the Japantown Cultural Heritage and Economic Sustainability Strategy (JCHESS), a strategy document that focuses how the City can preserve and celebrate a neighborhood’s cultural heritage. The goals of the Japantown Cultural Heritage and Economic Sustainability Strategy are: ƒƒ securing Japantown’s future as a historical and cultural heart of the Japanese and Japanese American Community, ƒƒ securing the neighborhood’s future as a thriving commercial and retail district, ƒƒ securing Japantown’s future as a home to residents and community-based institutions, and

In partnership with the Office of Economic and Workforce Development and the Japantown Organizing Committee, JCHESS includes a mix of actions from the City and the Japantown community that will support the overall vision of keeping Japantown a culturally rich, authentic, and economically vibrant neighborhood. Some of the proposed strategies include creating a Community Development Corporation, a Community Benefits District, a Neighborhood Commercial District, implementing the Invest in Neighborhoods program, and making improvements to Peace Plaza and the Buchanan Mall. The draft JCHESS was published in July 2013. JCHESS was unanimously endorsed by the Historic Preservation and Planning Commissions in September 2013.

ƒƒ securing the neighborhood’s future as a physically attractive and vibrant environment.

To download a draft of the JCHESS: http://japantown.sfplanning.org


ANNUAL REPORT 2012 - 2013

Todd Lappin

23


24

SA N F R A NC I S C O PL A N N I NG DE PA RT M E N T

California Pacific Medical Center

CPMC

During the last fiscal year, the City re-negotiated a Development Agreement with California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC), as part of CPMC’s long range development plans to construct a new seismically-safe hospital and medical office building at Van Ness & Geary, a new seismically-safe hospital and medical office building at St. Luke’s Campus, and a new Neuroscience Institute building at the Davies Campus. Last June, when CPMC was nearing the end of their approval process, a key provision of the proposed Development Agreement was brought into question. Based on some new information, the City could no longer support the Development Agreement, as negotiated. As a result, the City established a coalition consisting of three members of the Board of Supervisors (President Chiu, Supervisor Campos, and Supervisor Farrell), a mediator (Lou Giraudo), Mayor’s Office staff, and CPMC to renegotiate several key terms of this Agreement. Over the last fiscal year, this coalition worked together to negotiate the new terms, and the Development

Agreement, along with all related pieces of legislation, were ultimately approved – unanimously – by the Planning Commission in May 2013 and the Board of Supervisors in July 2013. Some key components of the renegotiated Development Agreement include: ƒƒ A secure future for St. Luke’s – 120 bed acute care hospital (40 more beds than the previous Agreement) with Centers of Excellence in Community and Senior Health, as well as comprehensive emergency services ƒƒ A smaller Cathedral Hill Hospital, with a maximum of 304 beds (a 251 bed reduction from the previous Agreement) ƒƒ A continued level of Baseline Charity Care for San Francisco’s most vulnerable populations for a period of 10 years. Over and above the Baseline Commitment, CPMC will be responsible for the healthcare services of 5,400 new Medi-Cal managed care beneficiaries for a period of 10 years

For more info on the CPMC project: http://cpmc.sfplanning.org

ƒƒ Funding for a new Innovation Fund to support and improve the capacity of community clinics to increase their participation in managed Medi-Cal programs ƒƒ Protection of the City’s Health Service System (“HSS) from premium increases by capping rates for 10 years ƒƒ Funding for affordable housing ƒƒ Funding for MTA transit facilities and service ƒƒ Funding for pedestrian safety and streetscape improvements ƒƒ Workforce requirements related to local hire for construction, job training programs, and the creation of career paths for San Franciscans Because of this renegotiated Agreement, the City is on track to see the rebuild of two of the City’s most important hospitals, ensuring quality healthcare for patients and guaranteeing seismic safety for generations of San Franciscans.


ANNUAL REPORT 2012 - 2013

25

CPMC Van Ness & Geary Campus

Photo Credit

CPMC Davies Campus

CPMC Van Ness & Geary Campus

CPMC St. Luke’s Campus


26

SA N F R A NC I S C O PL A N N I NG DE PA RT M E N T

CEQA Legislation CREATION OF CEQA APPEAL PROCEDURES AND NOTICING REQUIREMENTS

The California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) ensures that decision makers are aware of potential environmental impacts prior to authorizing any project. While the goal is simple, the process is sometimes confusing. To compound the complexity, since administrative appeals of CEQA determinations were first allowed 2002, San Francisco has had no legislative process or clear deadlines for appeals of the most commonly-issued determinations. Department staff found this lack of clarity resulted in 25% of attempted appeals of exemptions being disqualified from a hearing at the Board of Supervisors. Three different Board members attempted to solve this issue in past years.

Planning Commission and Historic Preservation Commission recommended passage this fiscal year.

This year, the Department successfully partnered with Supervisor Scott Wiener to develop legislation that paired concrete deadlines and new processes with improved public notice requirements. Supervisor Wiener introduced this legislation in the Fall of 2012. Since then, the legislation has had over a dozen public hearings and has been the subject of numerous meetings with both supporters and opponents of the legislation for feedback. Both the

ƒƒ enhanced the public notice procedures, including web posting and subscription based noticing;

Now, after ten years, the City has codified rules around the CEQA appeal process. This big step forward will improve unnecessary delays and reduce confusion for both project sponsors and opponents. This success is the result of much thought and dialogue between the public, elected officials, the commissions, and staff. The final bill benefited from a consensus developed through additional leadership from Board President David Chiu and Supervisor Jane Kim. The final adopted law includes: ƒƒ established procedures and deadlines for appeals;

ƒƒ prioritized CEQA review for affordable housing and bike/pedestrian infrastructure projects; and ƒƒ mandated new review of modified projects and the opportunity for a reconsideration of whether a project was modified.


ANNUAL REPORT 2012 - 2013

Bike Legislation

Bike ridership in San Francisco has significantly increased over the past decade, according to both national American Community Survey commute ridership counts and local SFMTA bicycle counts. This year, the Department proactively brought a comprehensive overhaul of bicycle parking requirements in the Planning Code to the Planning Commission in response to this surge in ridership and the resulting need for bicycle infrastructure.

This forwarding-thinking bicycle parking law sets out to make San Francisco a national model for communities in support of bike use. The requirements also include other features such as:

The new law regulates long-term and short-term bicycle parking based upon the anticipated need for different uses. A residential or office building would require more long-term bicycle parking spaces for residents and employees, respectively, while a retail store would require more short-term bicycle parking to accommodate shoppers.

ƒƒ Establishing design, layout, and clearance guidelines through user-friendly graphics in a Zoning Administrator Bulletin;

The new law also upgrades the number of bicycle parking spaces required for each type of building, based on best practices from similar cities with high bike ridership such as Vancouver, Portland, and New York – as well as national standards from the Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals.

Thomas Hawk

ƒƒ Prioritizing easy access to bicycle parking facilities through location and placement requirements; ƒƒ Allowing conversion of car parking to bicycle parking;

ƒƒ Requiring City-owned buildings and garages to upgrade their existing bicycle parking facilities based on the new requirements; and ƒƒ Creating a new bicycle parking fund administered by the SFMTA to provide more bicycle racks on sidewalks (using revenue from optional fee payments in lien of providing required visitor bicycle parking).

27


28

SA N F R A NC I S C O PL A N N I NG DE PA RT M E N T

Green Connections Project

Green Connections is an effort to increase access to parks, open spaces, and the waterfront by envisioning a network of ‘green connectors’ – city streets that will be upgraded incrementally over the next 20 years to make it safer and more pleasant to travel to parks by walking, biking, and other forms of active transportation. The project aims to make the City more healthy, sustainable, and livable through features such as pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure, street trees and other landscaping, stormwater management techniques, and opportunities for beautification and public art. A collaborative effort between the San Francisco Planning Department, San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency, San Francisco Department of Public Health and the Mayor’s Office of Housing, the City partnered with three community-based organizations to assist with public outreach: San Francisco Parks Alliance, Walk San Francisco and Nature in the City. The Green Connections program held a number of public events and collected hundreds of public comments to help refine the Green Connections network and concept designs.

The project was funded through a grant awarded by the Strategic Growth Council, and includes the following deliverables: ƒƒ Green Connections Network: a map of 25 routes, totaling 115 miles of streets across the City that could be improved to better connect people to parks and open spaces. ƒƒ Design Toolkit: a set of 16 design typologies for street intersections and blocks that could be applied to routes, depending on local conditions and priorities. ƒƒ Planting Palette: a list of recommended plants that are well-suited to local conditions and that provide habitat for native wildlife. ƒƒ Focus Neighborhood Conceptual Designs: preliminary designs for routes in six Focus Neighborhoods: Bayview-Hunters Point, Chinatown, Potrero Hill, Tenderloin, Visitacion Valley, and Western Addition. ƒƒ Implementation Document: Funding sources and strategies available to the City, private sector and community members to get involved in completing the Green Connections network. The draft Green Connections network was unveiled at an open house in October 2012 and is currently under environmental review. The Draft Green Connections report is expected to be complete in late 2013.

For more info on the Green Connections project: http://greenconnections.sfplanning.org


29

ANNUAL REPORT 2012 - 2013

LEGEND

GREEN CONNECTIONS REVISED DRAFT NETWORK

ROUTES 1

August 27, 2013

Y

STOC KTON S

N FO

TRE AT

Crosstown Trail: Coyote Shoreline: Western Snowy Plover and Salt Marsh Harvest Mouse

24

E

LL

ER

E N

IT

IS

LA TH

GS IN SIE

LE

NA

DA

O

O

D

K

DS

IN

E

IS

A

VY

DY

O

N

N ES NO

R TH

R ID

GE

TH

21

FI

N

IF

VA

KE

24

TC FI

FT

IS

TE

TZ

G ER

R

N

A

O

LD

G IL

M

A

N

Connect to future street network as part of Hunters Point Shipyard Development

LL TH

LL

SO

RR

10

RL

N TE

E HU

EV A NU

KE N

RO

EXECUTIVE

P

PARK

24 ALAN

A

Notes: Some portions of routes may not be ideal for bicycles due to conditions such as steep topography, stairs or trails.

NA

HUNTERS POINT

LO

RO

E

W

W

CE

G

N RR

HO

G ER

ER

SA

S

KE

N

A

CA FI

K EY

HU LL

K

UE

GS

T

CA CO

SA

U

H

RO

LL

D ER

FT

GR

ST O

LO

Q A

B AY VIEW PA R K

E C IN

CR

A

SH

EA

DE

RM

N

E AN CR

LE

RD

RA

A PH

Y

S

W

21 B ER

AS

AL

Y

A

IN

EG

PA UL

ER

DD

PA

LA

LUC Y E

N

HERON’S HEAD PA R K

DO

CK

M

RT

SA LIN

E

H

M

EA

SH

LA

O

UN IT

N

H CA

LE

E

TH

M

N

IT

N

A

FI

EG BE

O

MIDDLE POINT

NO

KD

ER SE

RG

S

H

ER

N

X

D D EL

IN

A

ON

IAMS

A

FA

JE

O

IF

N

THO RNT

WILL

LL

IR

L

O

EN

CK

EV FA

N

M

M

KW

D SO

ES

KE

PS PH

EL

K IR

N

TC

RK

HA

T U IN Q

N

O

L

D TL AN

23 24

RL

BU

EW

HU

LD

N

K IN N RA

O

EW APO LLO

RR

WIL

OD T

Ridge Trail: Nutall's White-crowned Sparrow

FI

N

D

SE

LB

Y

BARN EVELD

N

DG EVI BRI

R EV

YO

MIL

INE ERV

RR

DA

IN

TU

D

AB

ER

ON

LB

PE

21

LA

O

ER

RU

EL LIO

T

R

ER

HN

EH

WY

LO

HA

Y

SA

RE IN ER HW SC

SANTOS

ER

TO

U PT

LOOMI S

BAY SHORE

B

SM

S

E N

A GU

LI

PR

D UB

EN A TH OW SC

ES

MO

PL

UE AG

ST

R

NA

A

BL AN

TA

VI

M IS

EN

SI

NA

ON

PERALTA

ELLSWOR TH

N

PUTNAM

ANDERSO

ANDOVE R

GATES FOLSOM

N O N G A

OW SC

ON SB LI RG IN ED

LI

MO

BU

ON SB

PRENTISS

Y AN TI FF

CT

E

PE

SI E

DG

OS

EL

RI

PR

LE CO

NA

WOOL

N IO SS MI YS

CA

AD

BO

GL

EL

ORA

ACADIA

N N DO LO S RI

ID

PA

MA

DR

NO LA

DE E

IC

IN

ST

CA

CU

N

IN M

DE

DETROIT

EDNA

TH W HO G UR SB UI LO

AH SI A JE

SO

HE STE

PLYMOUTH

Bayview to Bay Trail: Black-tailed Jackrabbit

22

LL

A M TO

A N

SAN JOSE

T ET RN BU CAMEO

TA

ELK

MAL

CONGO

BADEN

FOERSTER

GENNESSEE

RIDGEWOOD

PHELAN HAROLD

LEE

BRIGHTON

JO M

DORADO

PLYMOUTH

GRANADA

MIRAMAR

FAXON

ORIZABA

JULES

CAPITOL

BRIGHT

ORIZABA

RAMSELL

VICTORIA

SI E

KNOLLVIEW

SKYV IEW

S

PANORAMA

ST

PE

RE

IN

TW

MI DC

SEQUO IA

T

S

TE OR

TG ES

M AN

W

VICTORIA

SO VI AL

ARCH

EW

BAY SHORE

RALSTON

ARR OYO

Z PE LO E

X NO LE

ON

A N

EM AR CL

SANTA CLARA

SAN LEANDRO

O A PT

A

STONECREST

JUNIPERO SERRA

19TH

STRATFORD

DENSLO WE

LUNADO

BEVERLY

JE

EN

BYXBEE

U ES

ING

CHESTER

ETT

ARBALLO

LV

AR D

GO

LAKE MERCED

AK

DELLBROOK

FUNSTON FUNSTON

E

ON

SID

DR

ST

MA

RE

O

FO

W A

W L TA R PO T

ES LA

W TO R O P

GABILAN

SYLVAN

EVERGLADE

Q

GIR

ELS

PR

02ND

15TH 16TH

CECELIA

14TH 15TH

21ST

23RD

26TH

28TH

ARGUELLO

03RD

OAK PARK

20TH 19TH

22ND

24TH

20TH

27TH

25TH

29TH 30TH

EDGEWO OD

04TH 06TH

05TH

07TH

12TH

08TH

FUNSTON

MI LO

17TH

TA

23RD

26TH

27TH

09TH

15TH 18TH

16TH

14TH

21ST

11TH

25TH

28TH 33RD

31ST

29TH

32ND

10TH

38TH

37TH

34TH 35TH

SUNSET 38TH 39TH

36TH MORNINGSIDE

SUNSET

Folsom, Mission Creek to McLaren: Pollinators

21

ILLINOIS

03RD

V ID

JE

CO LN LIN 28TH 31ST

NS

41ST

40TH 39TH

42ND

20

25TH

CA

LE

KA

GELLERT

TENNESSEE

MINNESOTA

41ST

MICHIGAN

43RD

Downtown to Mission Bay: Western Gull

8

24TH

N

BR USS

N

ILLINOIS

DA

ELS

O

RR

IOWA

O

GA

23 CIO

MINNESOTA

TA

N

SS

TE

ITA

PENNSYLVANI A

KO

US

WA

NE

DE

ND VIS

TUBBS

DA

ON

PE

BR USS

SC

LL

INDIANA

ER

A

IN

O

VA

BU ISE

TIO

BE

LE TA

Tenderloin to Potrero: Western Tiger Swallowtail

19

26TH

BR UN

NE

NR

LA

MP

20TH

23RD

TR IAL

SA N

SU

VE

AR

TENNESSEE

MISSISSIPPI

RN

LE

TA

R

IER

GE

ALE

UE

LE LA

6

MARIPOSA

TU

WISCONSIN

PO

VES

A

Y LO

RQ

AL E

D

18

16TH

A

THD

A

PA

LL

23RD

TI

BLY

YD

ON

H

E

18

O

YM

TERRY A FRANCOIS

03RD

S

B

MISSOURI

44TH

H

EN

B

CONNECTICUT

40TH

4T

EL

6T

U

ARKANSAS

42ND

0

N

TEXAS

41ST

D

24

0

IN

H

SC

CA RA

SU NN

RK

Excelsior: Cliff Swallow

R

N

W

W

TO

RY

A

A

R

IR

KANSAS

ARMO

ST

Y

H

BA

NS ELL

HA

Marina Green to Dolores Park: West Coast Painted Lady

17

D

R

O

CAROLINA

KANSAS

D

W IL

West of Twin Peaks: Green Hairstreak

16

2N

H

ER

A

LS EY

T

TEA

19

G

D

5T

PE

H 8T 0 CAROLINA

RHODE ISLAND

YLA

W OO

IGH

M C L A R E N PA R K

N

RD OV

R

A TT

ITT

LL

VE

W

WE

E

WH

S

C

HA

NO

ND

10

11

12

12

KANSAS

A LY

ON

DE HARO

AZ

VA

CO

IC K

EN

NE

KD

CA

AR D

PO PE

ON

IS

LO

EN

LE

R

K

W

BR

UN SW

ING

IA

W

N

O

GIR

H

ETT

GE LP

A

CK

IRA

A

AL LIS

CU RT

W

MO

E

RS E

IND

GO

AM RO

N

N

MA

SS

0

TO

E

SE

N

MARIN

ELM

TY

RU

EY

M

CO

S

RSI

E

A

EL

TO

O

O

N

BOUTWELL

OIN

M

TT

E

N

A

G

TO N

BO WD

O

O

LE

LA

R

G

O

L IN

HA MIL

R

A

R

CE

IN

N

CESAR CHAVEZ

ELMIRA

T

A

RSE

KE

E

UN IVE

G

N

U

A

AN

H

NA

DO

BA CO

LL

U

TE

SKYLINE

C

O

A

H

LA PLAYA

N

X

19TH

LE

WA

DW

SE

Y

O

H

ET

A

A

FO

N

VE

OW BU RR

OL MS

FR

IT

R

C

17 O

SO ME

FEL

TO N

20

L

N

A

O

GA

IA

A

HU

ITH

EE NY

AN

S

M

NA

LM

SI

HO LYO

RD

R

RI DG

IO

OX FO

LS

HE RST

CE

A ZI

OW BU RR

YA LE

RS

AR D

BR

PE

U

GA

RU

N

PER

EX

LO

ON

11

A VA

CA MB

PE

S

SIL LIM

CH E

IER

EZ

OCEA N

DA

EI DA

PIO

23

A

N

G

N

HA

HA RV

CI

AN

N TA YN

ON

AN

A

ER

EL

N

26TH

O

NY

SW

WEST VIEW

DIS

JU

ES

MA

GLADSTONE

MA

N

TT

IN

ER

A LE

BENTON

Y

GA MB

SA

CO

FR

SA

D

A

TR

CRESCENT

Presidio to Park Merced: Coast Buckwheat

15

LE

R

0

LU

PO

PARK

BENTON

AM

RO

N

25TH

M

JARBOE

BY

N TA

NG

CA

CORTLA ND

T

RICHLAND

TRUMBULL

MAYNARD LE

NT

FA

POWHATT AN

COL

DI

NG

UTAH

PARK

MO

14

EA

B

24TH

RUTLEDGE

JUSTIN

L

UL

ER

SAN BRUNO

A

ELLER

MURRAY

LY EL

PA

TI

TH

VERMON T

TO

20

RIPLEY

Lincoln Park to Zoo: American Dune Grass

B

T

CORAL

BERNAL HEIGHTS PA R K

NEY

11

HAMPSHIRE

G

E

SE

YORK

N

R LI

CUVIER

JO

POTRERO

ER

A

ES

EX

EN

N

LE

SS

N

VERMONT

SU

CH

SA

UTAH

NI

HIGHLAND

R

Y

N

H

N

7T

H

T O

OR TH

R

A

C

A

0

8T

IT

IS Y

R

LM

IT

Y

22ND

20

20

Lake Merced to Candlestick: Western Fence Lizard

13

R

R

0

GE

FF

ON

EU

O M

IL

K

H

48TH

R

ST

6T

M TH

SO

TREAT

ISO N

N CO BY D IG

ADD

FAIRMOUNT

BE

O

E PE

L

23RD

ALABAMA

LUCKY

CHURCH

DOLORES

SANCHEZ

B EA

Y

C

N

A

MARIPOSA

FLORIDA

HARRISON

N

RANDALL

Y

EA

R

IZ

12

X

O

R

PRECITA

CO

IR

MANCHESTER

ZIRCO

LE

SP

SE

TH

M

A

B

18TH

TREAT

OSAGE

ORANGE

CASTRO

PP

15TH

24TH

LILAC

45TH

IN

ES

W

LA

R

A

21ST

BARTLETT

POPLAR

47TH

T

T

A

C

O

LS

IN

Y

C

ALABAMA

CAPP

SOUTH VAN NESS

SHOTWELL

SAN CARLOS

FAIR OAKS

CHURCH

CHATTANO OGA

VICKSBURG

46TH

R

N

H

LN

3

D

LE

0

M

BRYANT

HOFF

VALENCIA

GUERRERO

SANCHEZ

NOE

O

ID

A

O

D

A

R

IP

R

TH

JULIAN

ALBION

LANDERS

RAMONA

SHARON

SANCHEZ

DIAMOND M

ND

EU

A

2N

EN

A

FO

MARIPOSA

26TH

FA

29TH

LA

ST

M

0

U

W

SH

SS

A

20TH

20

17 SA

SA

M

S IC

DE LONG

A

17TH

27TH

HEARST FLOOD

LOBOS

12

PO

A

MONTANA

COLLINGWOO D

LAKEVIEW

MINERVA

BROAD

PALMETTO

24

JOOST MONTEREY

STAPLES

BALBOA PA R K

RANDOLPH

SADOWA

25TH

DAY

LD

D IA

G

SARGENT

GRAFTON

JERSEY

28TH

E

A

SHIELDS

IT

BROTHERH OOD

GARFIELD

HARTFORD

PI

CASTRO

ES

M GO

IN

BO SW

EC

E LI

Z

SURR EY

N

R

T

B

O

A

22ND

VALLEY

IA

A

23RD

N

C

MM

U

SU

12

R

DIAZ

B

22ND

STILLINGS

SE

C

GARCES

JOSEPH A

IR

CAMBO N

MU

EM

A

M

HILL

30TH

MELROSE

ON

11

POND

T

HN

NO

HOLLOWAY

SERRANO

A

ARBOR

MANGELS

WILDWOOD

PICO

P

SWISS

N

JO

PINTO

URBA

M

ALAMEDA

8

CLIPPER

TO

23

JUDSON

OC EAN

MISSION DOLORES PA R K

CUMBERLAND

20

U

H

15TH ADAIR

DUNCAN

BERKELE Y

FO

LAKE MERCED

O

HANCOCK 19TH

Ingleside: Coast Live Oak / California Buckeye

S

T

DIVISION

18TH

27TH

A

SA

14TH

DUNCAN

TT

11

CEDRO

RR

EUREKA

R IE PO

TERESITA

COLON

WINSTON

ZA

T

E

16

HILL

DOUGLASS

A

PI

K

20TH

8

G L E N PA R K CANYON

MOLIMO

EZ

AN D

1S

B

A

13TH

ERIE

CESAR CHAVEZ

LANSDALE

VALD

UPL

MA

ALVARADO

CUBA

DARIEN

PA LO

TO

10

TH

ARMY

M RE

MT DAV I D S O N

EUCALYPT US

R

CLINTON

T

LIBERTY

SUNVIEW

MELROSE

MONCAD A

T

E

Y

ROCKDALE

LU LU

CL UB

22

N

SS

OA

AS

TR Y

ST

O

E

SIT

UN

RB

SLOAT

CLEARFIELD

CO

HE

CREST LAKE

A

ST

HOFFMAN

A

NE

CA

YORBA

EN

Y

GRAND VIEW

IT

IN

AMBER

AN

MA

13 SAN FRANCISCO ZOO

22

BU

A

NE

U LL

A

B

T IS

12

6

18TH

GH

ON

M AR

BA

TL

AU

A

JU

EVELYN

ON

ULLOA

Y ER

ES

SH

ND

IDO RA

MIRALO

WAWONA

14

GL E SH OR

R

IN

E

HO

GT

R

O

EZ

NA

U

GU

IN

TWIN PEAKS

LA

SQ

T

RW

A

ED

A

ET

CO

D

C

A

ELIZABETH

N

ER

G

IE W

C

O

ST

RB

EA

RV

M

HENRY

BEAVER

DOUGLASS

H

A LL

CO

A

A

15

VICENTE

EY

V

NS

T

S

E

R

H

NN

K

FR

D

H

H

TH

O

SATURN

17TH

LL

N

9

R

EW

M

KE

EL

STATES

VI

U

12TH

ULLOA

VICENTE

EY

G

D

MAGELLAN

TARAVAL

TARAVAL

9

A

A

WOO DSID

SANTIAGO

RY

LA

12TH

CRAGMONT

M

EL

V

CORONA HEIGHTS

CASELLI

OLYM PIA

C

SE

NDON

MA

S

O

O

22

PALO ALTO

ALTON

RIVERA RIVERA

13

DOWN

A

E

BELVE DERE

G

R

R

RIVOL I

ER

R IE

QUINTARA

VA

ONT

O

PACHECO

PACHECO

A

ALMA

CLARE

WARREN

L IN

JA

CARMEL

CRE STM

Y

N

15

NORIEGA

ORTEGA

7

6

MT SUTRO

LOC KSLE

15 TH

NORIEGA

ORTEGA

24

LAWTON

MORAGA

MORAGA

7

5

SHRAD

KIRKHAM

LAND

5

LAWTON

AS

RICK

CARL

WOOD

JUDAH

PA RN

H

FREDE

SU S

ASHBU

HUGO

WILLAR D

44TH

46TH

5

BEULA

15

LINCOLN

BELCHER

23 14

0

3R

VETERA

RY

0

H

H

T

5T

IN

0

M

7T

TE

K

DUBOCE

B U E N A V I S TA PA R K

R

19

NAN

HERMA

HAIGH T WALL ER

IRVING

DAVIS

RY

H

A

B

9T

12

BUCHA

4 G O L D E N G AT E PA R K

Yosemite Creek: Red-winged Blackbird

11

DRUM M

Y

4T

N

IE

TE

TH

AN

HAIGH T WALL ER

Vicente, 20th to Beach: Coastal Dune Scrub

10

O

KEARN

0

0

SS

11

ON

4

PAGE

A

M

N

IE SS

0

AL

BAKER

CENTR

RY

CLAYT

ASHBU

COLE

STANY

SHRA DER

JE

HICKO RY

FELL

IN

18

LINDE N

OAK

M

POLK

N

HAYES

GATE

N

FULTO

9

T

ER

BATTE

L

MONT GOME

ER

TURK GOLD EN

ASH

VAN NESS

ISTER

LIN

NAN

MCALL

FRANK

ELM

BUCHA

PIERC E

LYON

BROD ERICK

MASO NIC

R

ONT

PARKE

BEAUM

FULTO

ALAMO SQUARE

GROV E

PAGE

13

FRON T

ME

Y

A

JE

EDDY

ELLIS

16

2

AD

SANSO

TON

POWE LL

STOCK

GRAN T

TH

ELL

OFARR

ELLI S

POLK

LAGUN

HOLLI S

WOOD

E

COOK

SPRUC

OFAR RELL

3

Ortega, 14th St to Beach: Coastal Prairie Noe Valley to Central Waterfront: American Bushtit

POST

NWOR

NAN

GEARY

ANZA VISTA

Mission to Peaks: Anise Swallowtail

8

RC

RY

POWE LL

GRAN T

JONE S

LEAVE

OCTA VIA

BUCHA

SCOTT

COMMONWEALTH

LYON

BROD ERICK

PIERC E

STEI NER

LARKI N

WEBS TER

L

BUSH

JO

TON

MASO N

MENTO

SUTTE R

POST

03RD

05TH

30TH

33RD

40TH

15

14

13

04TH

07TH

31ST

38TH

42ND

48TH

LA PLAYA

45TH

3

CABRILLO

02ND

06TH

10TH

15TH

12TH

19TH

17TH

21ST

37TH

34TH

39TH

43RD

41ST

47TH

PARK PRESIDIO

24TH

23RD

28TH

26TH

35TH

48TH

BALBOA

TROY

ORNI A

PINE

VALLE

COMM ERCIA

TAYL OR

SACRA

CALIF

18

HYDE

DERO

BAKER

TON WAS HING CLAY L A FAY E T T E PA R K

2

LID

GEARY

ANZA

ANZA

GOUG H

FILLM ORE

DIVISA

PRESI DIO

WALN UT

LAURE

T

JORDAN

ARGUELLO

PALM

11TH

14TH

18TH

16TH

22ND

20TH

36TH

32ND

08TH

CLEMENT

EUC

ON

Kirkham, Sutro to Beach: Coyote Bush

6

GA

U

WAS HING JACKS

Bay to Beach: Cedar Waxwing

5

7 BA

B

JO

BROA DWAY

PACIF IC

GEARY

ANZA

3

09TH

FUNSTON

25TH

27TH

29TH

13

CLEMENT

POINT LOBOS

CORNWALL

BROA DWAY

A LTA PLAZA

N

WASH INGTO

15

23

LAKE

14

CALIFORNIA

SEAL ROCK

JO

CLAY

2

Y

2

LAKE

24

MAPLE

CHERR

SCENIC

MCLARE N

IFIC

T PAC

LOCUS

WES

22

WEBS TER

PIERC E

LYON

GREEN

VALLE

VALLE

1

FILB ERT

IN

M

UNION

T

GREE N

MILEY

4

ES

LU

EM

O

GREEN

1

PRESIDIO

Market to Beach: Anna's Hummingbird

E

C

TH

WICH

MONT GOME

GREEN

HA

LOMB ARD

GR

O

NUT

FILBER

KEARN

TON

H

MASO N

OCTA VIA

GREE NWIC

FRAN CISC

1

CHEST

24

R

BAY

MALL ORCA

BROD ERICK

SCOT T

BAY

POINT

NORTH

TAYLO

BEACH

POINT

NORTH

JEFFE RSON

24

China Beach to Bay: Pygmy Nuthatch

3 N

BEACH

FORT MASON

SA

LARKI N

MAS ON

CA

STOCK

JEFF ERSO A GREEN

MARIN

16

MAR INA

Presidio to Bay: Monarch

2

HARNEY

12 JA

ME

ST

OW

N

Connect to new Bay Trail alignment

The proposed network falls mostly on public rights of way, but occasionally deviates onto public properties such as park lands.

I


30

SA N F R A NC I S C O PL A N N I NG DE PA RT M E N T

Highlights: Completed Projects

Live User Maps: Three important new maps were developed in this fiscal year utilizing live data, displaying information on interactive maps for ease of use. The PrivatelyOwned Public Open Space (POPOS) and Public Art map features dozens of spaces and artwork available to the general public. The Landmarks map shows the exact location of each historic landmark, along with property information and images. The CEQA Exemptions map shows existing projects exempt from environmental review. And finally, the SFFind website was developed using the popular Property Information Map template. This tool allows residents to get information about city resources in their neighborhood – libraries, schools, elected officials, street sweeping schedules, and crime statistics. NEW

http://popos.sfplanning.org

Internal Network Administration: MS Office version upgraded from 2003 to 2010, migrated department emails from Lotus Notes to Microsoft Outlook/Office365; Windows 7 upgrade is still in progress. NEW

Adoption of the Transit Center District Plan and Rezoning (August 2012): After approval by the Planning Commission in FY11-12, the Board of Supervisors unanimously adopted the Transit Center District Plan. The plan is a comprehensive vision for shaping growth on the southern side of Downtown to respond to and support the construction of the new Transbay Transit Center project, including the Downtown Rail Extension. 1

Opening of the redesigned Jefferson Street in Fisherman’s Wharf: Since 2006, the department has been working with the Fisherman’s Wharf Community Benefit District and the community to revitalize an important regional destination along the waterfront and make significant pedestrian and bicycle improvements. A ribboncutting ceremony for the completion of the first phase of the Jefferson Streetscape Improvement Project took place in June 2013. 2

http://transitcenter.sfplanning.org

www.newjeffersonstreet.com

Adoption and implementation of Proposition C: created a 30-year Affordable Housing Trust Fund, and added supportive amendments to the City’s Planning Code.

Better Market Street: Led by the Department of Public Works, completed the concept design phase in July 2013 and will begin environmental review this fall. Environmental review will be completed by 2015. 3

Transportation and Streets Infrastructure Package (TSIP): Approval of $5 million in new capital funding for area plan public improvements as part of City FY13/14 capital budget (July 2013). Approval of 2001 Market In-Kind Agreement (March 2013): Agreement with 2001 Market developer to build new public plaza and pedestrian safety enhancements at Dolores and Market Streets. Construction by the project sponsor is expected to be complete in late 2013/early 2014.

www.bettermarketstreetsf.com

Castro Street Design Project: Completion of the conceptual design phase for Castro Street between Market Street and 19th Street, including sidewalk widening, intersection enhancements, improvements to Jane Warner Plaza, and new street furnishings, trees and lighting. The project was approved by the SFMTA Board in August 2013 with construction expected in January 2014. 4 http://castro.sfplanning.org


ANNUAL REPORT 2012 - 2013

Chinatown Broadway Street Design: Completion of the design and project’s planning phase and publication of report (February 2013). The project developed a conceptual design for Broadway between Columbus Avenue and the Broadway Tunnel to enhance pedestrian safety, comfort and enjoyment of the street. The project has received full funding for detailed design and construction through Proposition AA and a One Bay Area Grant allocation, and is now entering the final design phase. 5

Landmark Designation Status for Doelger Building: In March 2013, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors unanimously approved to landmark the Doelger Building (320 Judah Street) for its historical significance serving as a headquarters building for the prolific San Francisco homebuilder, Henry Doelger. It was a prominent landmark in the Sunset District during 1930s - 1950s and served as an advertisement for Doelger’s successful house-building empire. 6

http://broadway.sfplanning.org

Bartlett Mercado Plaza: In partnership with DPW, SFMTA, Rebar Design Group and the Mission Community Market, the Bartlett Mercado Plaza will create a pedestrian plaza to house weekly Mission Community Market and other community events. The final conceptual design phase for Bartlett Mercado Plaza was completed with construction anticipated to begin in April 2014. The expected completion date is January 2015. 7

17th and Folsom Park: After a series of community meetings, a concept design for a new park at 17th and Folsom was developed and has been approved by the Recreation and Parks Commission. San Francisco Recreation and Parks is planning to construct the new park, funded in part by a grant from the California Statewide Park Program of the California Department of Parks and Recreation. http://bartlettplaza.sfplanning.org

NEW

http://bartlettplaza.sfplanning.org

Sunset District Historic Resource Survey: In the past year staff completed the Sunset survey, including a Historic Context Statement that focuses on the Sunset District’s prolific builder developers and residential tracts constructed from the mid-1920s into the post-War era. The survey covers 2,762 singlefamily houses in the Sunset District constructed from 1925 to 1950. It documents clusters of eligible historic districts and individual historic buildings, as well as buildings that do not qualify as eligible historic resources. The Historic Preservation Commission (HPC) adopted the Sunset survey findings on September 18, 2013. http://sunsetsurvey.sfplanning.org

31


32

SA N F R A NC I S C O PL A N N I NG DE PA RT M E N T

HIGHLIGHTS: COMPLETED PROJECTS

1

Transit Center District Plan Concept Vision Sketch - For Illustrative Purposes Only

Streetlife Zone - A Connector in the Financial District

2

Jefferson Street

Concept Vision Sketch - For Illustrative Purposes Only

Streetlife Zone - A Node in the Mid-Market District 3

Fisherman’s Wharf Community Benefit District

Better Market Street

SFDPW

Concept Vision Sketch - For Illustrative Purposes Only


B

C ANNUAL REPORT 2012 - 2013

35

EUREKA

35

Diamond Heights

24

8’

35

Diamond Heights

35

24

K

K

12’ SOUTHBOUND

12’

8’

NORTHBOUND

15’

21.25

+/-

PARKING/ LOADING

SIDEWALK

SIDEWALK

Diamond Heights

35

8209

19’

10’

SOUTHBOUND WITH CURB-SIDE BUS LOADING

NORTHBOUND LEFT TURN

19’

19.5’

NORTHBOUND WITH CURB-SIDE BUS LOADING

20’

18’ SIDEWALK

SIDEWALK

SOUTHBOUND WITH CURB-SIDE BUS LOADING

20’ NORTHBOUND WITH CURB-SIDE BUS LOADING

ALTERNATIVE: SOUTH OF 18TH STREET INTERSECTION ALTERNATE SECTION - CASTRO at 18TH, SOUTH OF INTERSECTION

4 35 24

K

SIDEWALK

20’ SOUTHBOUND WITH CURB-SIDE BUS LOADING

24.5’ SIDEWALK

Provide new crosswalk between Muni stop and sidewalk.

After hearing community interest in seeing additional pedestrian improvements at the Castro and 18th Street intersection, the City reexamined the design proposal for this intersection. Traffic data indicates that the number of cars turning left from north-bound Castro Street on to 18th Street is low enough to consider prohibiting this turn-movement. If north-bound left turns were prohibited, the north-bound left turn pocket could be eliminated and additional sidewalk widening could take place. B e n efi t s : -Eliminates conflict between left-turning vehicles and pedestrians using western crosswalk (Walgreen’s to Harvey’s) -Allows for additional sidewalk widening on Castro Street south of 18th Street -Reduces pedestrian crossing distance across Castro Street

EUREKA

Diamond Heights

35

8209

21.25’

A

33

EUREKA

K

8209

8209

PARKING/ LOADING

EUREKA

20’

21.25’

NORTHBOUND WITH CURB-SIDE BUS LOADING

SIDEWALK

B

Tra d e - of f s : -May cause small number of north-bound vehicles to turn left on 19th Street and elsewhere to the south.

A

Convert curb-side PM tow-away lane into permanent parking lane.

C

Reconfigured crosswalks Remove 17th Street-Only Lane Extend Bike Lane

Jane Warner Plaza Improvements, details TBD Historic Harvey Milk Residence and Castro Camera Shop Site mini-plaza.

Pedestrian-Scale Lighting

Maintain and demarcate gas station driveway

Roadway Lighting/Muni Pole Exact placement of site furnishings including street trees, leaning posts and bike racks will be finalized during the detailed design phase of the project.

Bike Rack

Leaning Post

Relocated Kiosk

Muni Shelter

Ginkgo Tree

King Palm

Existing Tree

O S T R E E T D E S I G N - CO M M U N I T Y O P E N H O U S E

5

7

Chinatown Broadway Street Design

Bartlett Mercado Plaza

6

Doelger Building Historic Landmark


34

SA N F R A NC I S C O PL A N N I NG DE PA RT M E N T

Highlights: Projects Underway

Pavement to Parks Parklet RFP: In January 2013, the City expanded the parklet program by opening a call for new parklet proposals around the city. In addition, the city developed the San Francisco Parklet Manual, a comprehensive overview of the goals, policies, procedures and guidelines for creating a parklet in San Francisco. After the closing date for parklet proposals, the department received 55 proposals, with notification for parklet approval to begin in August 2013. 1 http://pavementtoparks.sfplanning.org

Cesar Chavez Streetscape Project: Construction has begun on the Cesar Chavez streetscape project, (conceptual planning led by Planning Department in 2011) including a new tree-lined median, stormwater planters and bicycle and pedestrian safety improvements. 2

Eco-District Program: Through the department’s sustainable development program, the department created an Eco-District Program Framework for the Central Corridor. The goal of the program is to implement an infrastructure systems-based approach to meeting water and energy goals for the plan area, under the guidance of a Central Corridor Eco-District Task Force. 4

Fisherman’s Wharf Public Realm Plan: A comprehensive vision for the streets, open spaces and new development in the neighborhood, expected to be adopted in the fall of 2013. Funding for the remaining three blocks of the plan’s signature project, the redesign of Jefferson Street, will be sought in 2013-14.

http://sustainabledevelopment.sfplanning.org

Walk First Investment Strategy: Building on recommendations of WalkFirst, the Investment Strategy will develop a prioritized citywide capital project list of pedestrian safety and walkability improvements. Project is a partnership between the Controller’s Office, SFMTA, and the Planning Department. Expected completion: Winter/Spring 2014.

Haight Ashbury Public Realm Plan: Continued work on the Haight Ashbury Public Realm Plan. A draft plan expected early 2014. 5 NEW

http://haightashbury.sfplanning.org

Urban Forest Plan: Policies and Recommendations for long-term health and maintenance of the City’s street trees. Publication of the Draft Urban Forest Plan expected Fall 2013. 6 http://urbanforest.sfplanning.org

Cesar Chavez East: Design plans have been completed for Cesar Chavez East to improve the pedestrian and bicycle environment on this underserved corridor using grant funds from CalTrans Environmental Justice Program. 3 http://chavezeast.sfplanning.org

Visitacion Valley/Schlage Lock Plan: Development of a revised master plan and economic strategy to stimulate change on this 20-acre opportunity site, in the wake of the demise of Redevelopment Agency and the related loss of public funding. http://visvalley.sfplanning.org

http://fishermanswharf.sfplanning.org

http://walkfirst.sfplanning.org

Health Care Services Master Plan: Conclusion of the Health Care Services Master Plan (HCSMP) Task Force and publication of the Health Care Services Master Plan (July 2013), which identifies needs for health care services in San Francisco and recommends how to achieve an appropriate distribution of health care services. Adoption expected Fall 2013.


ANNUAL REPORT 2012 - 2013

General Advertising Signs: In told, 84 signs were removed last year. This includes 18 removed through enforcement action and 66 that were removed voluntarily or due to adjoining development. This brings the total inventory of legal signs down to 818. There are only 54 illegal signs that are pending removal. Most of these signs are the subject of ongoing litigation. http://gasp.sfplanning.org

Case Coordinator Framework: The Planning Department is designing a project management process for all major, active cases whereby one person will be responsible for: (1) keeping all of the elements of a project together; (2) tracking project status using advanced scheduling software; and (3) serving as the main point-of contact for all internal and external stakeholders. Staff designated as Case Coordinators will receive proper project management and scheduling software training. NEW

Permit & Project Tracking System: The Permit & Project Tracking System (PPTS) is intended to integrate the permit tracking systems of the Department of Building Inspection, Planning Department, and other City agencies by consolidating multiple systems into one citywide permitting system. To date, the analysis and configuration phases of the project have been completed. Phase 1 of the User Acceptance Testing of the configured system began in early May, and the remaining 2 rounds of testing will occur in 2013. Due to additional requirements of the system by both Planning and DBI, the scope of the project has expanded, resulting in a new launch date in Q3 of FY13-14. http://ppts.sfplanning.org

File Digitization: Operations staff successfully began digitizing and archiving hardcopy Commission motions and resolutions. NEW

Server Consolidation: The department continued work on the consolidation of an enterprise server room with the Human Services Agency and Department of Building Inspection at 1660 Mission Street in order to reduce technology and infrastructure costs. Storage Area Network: The department added an extensive amount of capacity on its storage area network, or SAN, to accommodate more data storage, as well as prepare for the digitization of many historical case files that will allow for easy searching and accessibility by staff and the public. NEW

35


36

SA N F R A NC I S C O PL A N N I NG DE PA RT M E N T

HIGHLIGHTS: PROJECTS UNDERWAY

1

Pavement to Parks Parklet Program

Parklet Applications

55 46 APPLICANT SUBMITS PARKLET PROPOSAL

Items to Submit: Initial Application Form Initial Site Plan and Photos Concept Description Letters Of Support

INITIAL

REV

MTA IEW BY

, DPW,

PLANN

DEVEL DESIGN

ING

PLANN

ING ISSU

{ dis

ES PUB

d for playe

LIC NO

10 da

OPMEN

T WITH

PLANN

ING BEG

TICE

Parklet applications received Parklet applications under review

INS

APPLICA

MITS NT SUB

CONST

RUCTIO

N DOCU

TION MENTA

le possib with sion } onth n { 6 m nth exte o 6m

ys }

REVIEW

BY MTA

, DPW,

PLANN

ING

PROPOSAL SELECTED PLANNING COMMUNICATES REQUIRED REVISIONS

OBJECTIONS

PROPOSAL REJECTED NO APPEAL

OFFICER AGAINST

NAL MITS FI NING NT SUB TO PLAN APPLICAN PACKAGE O TI APPLICA

DPW HOLDS PUBLIC HEARING APPLICA

NT PAYS

PERMIT

FEES TO

DPW

CHANG

ES

OFFICER SUPPORTS

G MTA LE

BOARD OF PERMIT APPEALS HOLDS PUBLIC HEARING

APPLICANT APPEALS

OFFICER AGAINST

OFFICER SUPPORTS

BOARD OF PERMIT APPEALS HOLDS PUBLIC HEARING

SOMEONE APPEALS

PERMIT REVOKED

REMEMBER TO:

KEEP IT CLEAN. WATER THE PLANTS. RENEW IN ONE YEAR.

{ 6 month with possible 6 month extension }

OFFICER AGAINST

SIGNIFICANT VIOLATION(S)

OFFICER SUPPORTS

ENJOY PARKLET POSTD DPW SPECTION IN ING AN PLANN ION ONSITE CT U R CONST

NT APPLICASTRUCTION CON BEGINS

PRE-IN PLANNING A N STALL ONSITE D DPW INSPEC TION

PERMIT GRANTED

AP 72 HOU PLICANT NO RS BEF TIFIES ORE CO DPW NSTRU CTI

ON

S PA ISLATE

RKING


37

ANNUAL REPORT 2012 - 2013

3

Cesar Chavez East

Cesar Chavez Streetscape Project

2

5

Greening a not-so-green city

URBAN TREE CANOPY COMPARISON

A city’s tree canopy is measured by how much of a city is covered by trees when viewed from above. The benefits and services provided by trees are directly related to the extent of a city’s canopy cover. Larger canopies indicated greater capacity to clean air, absorb stormwater and beautify neighborhoods. San Francisco’s tree canopy is one of the smallest (13.7%) of any large US city - less than Chicago (17%), Los Angeles (21%) and New York City (24%).

San Francisco prides itself on being “green,” but is it really? The City tops lists of the world’s greenest cities for its renewable energy and zero-waste policies, but it suffers from a literal lack of green. San Francisco has one of the smallest tree canopies of any major US city. This translates to very few trees. The San Francisco Urban Forest Plan provides a strategy to create a more sustainable SWA urban forest and a truly green city.

Eco-District Program

4

6

1 GREEN ROOFS & LIVING WALLS

17%

21%

23%

24%

30%

CHICAGO

LOS ANGELES

SEATTLE

NEW YORK CITY

PORTLAND

4 STREET TREES

Rooftop gardens, green roofs and living walls provide many planting and greening opportunities on buildings.

1

13.7% SAN FRANCISCO

6 PARK TREES

Healthy tree-lined streets are a key component of the urban forest. An estimated 105,000 trees grow along San Francisco’s streets.

4

Approximately 131,000 trees grow in city parks and open spaces.

What is an Urban Forest?

4

1 3 2

5

6

San Francisco’s urban forest includes the collection of trees, vegetation and understory plantings found along the city’s streets, within parks and in the built environment. The urban forest is distinguished by its urban setting full of paved surfaces, streets, buildings, vehicle traffic and large population. Our urban forest is primarily human created - the result of tree planting and greening activities carried out by people rather than native forest systems. Given its location, it requires constant maintenance to keep roads, sidewalks and parks clear and safe. The concept of an “urban forest” allows us to think holistically about the trees and vegetation within a city, quantify their benefits, and manage this resource for the enjoyment of present and future generations.

5 7

2 TREES ON PRIVATE PROPERTY

Trees and plantings on private property including the fronts and backyards of homes and apartment buildings make up a significant portion of the urban forest.

Why a Plan?

3 ON-GOING MAINTENANCE

Trees and plantings in the urban environment require consistent maintenance and care to ensure health and public safety.

History of San Francisco’s Urban Forest

7 WILDLIFE

5 UNDERSTORY: SHRUBS & SIDEWALK GARDENS

Aside from the benefits that trees provide for people, trees provide a host of benefits for birds, insects and other animals. These include food, nectar, cover and nesting spaces.

In addition to trees, landscaping and plantings located along sidewalks and medians provides the opportunity to increase plantable space and vegetation in the urban environment.

Benefits of an

Recommendations for

SF’S TREE CANOPY KEY RECOMMENDATIONS:


38

SA N F R A NC I S C O PL A N N I NG DE PA RT M E N T

Communications, Outreach & Engagement

With the introduction of the new Communications function within the department, and the release of the City’s first Public Outreach and Engagement Effectiveness Report, the department’s level of public outreach and internal engagement has significantly expanded and improved in the past fiscal year. Based on the report’s findings and resulting recommendations, the department launched a number of new communications initiatives to help further the department’s goal of increasing awareness and improving engagement. Public Outreach and Engagement Team: An internal advisory group charged with the role of providing advice and support to staff on public outreach-related issues, identifying staff training needs, and developing resources to assist staff in their engagement efforts.

Public Participation Training: Over 30 staff attended a five-day training program with the International Association of Public Participation to learn public participation planning, communications skills, and techniques to engage the public. The department also hosted a one-day training session with the Davenport Institute for Public Engagement and Civic Leadership to over 60 department staff and staff from other city agencies. Ambassador Program: A team of 19 planners selected to be ambassadors for the department, responsible for engaging the general public through attendance at community events. The ambassadors are scheduled to attend 10 community events in 2013, with plans to develop seminars on topics such as permits, legislation, and historic preservation. Employee Newsletter: A bi-monthly electronic newsletter intended to inform, engage and celebrate staff. Regular features include A Message from the Director, Staff Spotlight and contests.

Connect with the San Francisco Planning Department:

@sfplanning

Social Media: A concerted effort in expanding the department’s presence on social media began in this fiscal year, increasing Twitter followers by 28% (1648), Facebook followers by 25% (378). Work is underway to develop videos on common Planning topics. Electronic Notices: Work is underway to offer more notices in electronic format and allow the public to be notified when changes are made to a project webpage. Subscribers will also be able to choose to receive notices via email or text message. Improved Access to Information: Developed internal standard operating procedures to ensure compliance with the City’s Language Access Ordinance and the federally mandated Americans with Disability Act. An internal Language Access committee was developed to explore ways to improve internal processes and provide information to the general public about free language services.

facebook.com/sfplanning


ANNUAL REPORT 2012 - 2013

39


40

SA N F R A NC I S C O PL A N N I NG DE PA RT M E N T

Publications

Completed Reports 4th & King Railyards Study: a study of the air rights development over the 4th and King Railyards. 1 Japantown Cultural Heritage and Economic Sustainability Strategy (JCHESS) (Initial Draft February 2013, Full Draft July 2013). 2 Pedestrian Strategy: an outline of specific departmental commitments to improve pedestrian safety and walkability in San Francisco. Street Tree Census: information on location, age, species type and condition of the City’s street trees Street Tree Financing Study: study to identify a range of potential funding strategies to address the costs of street trees. Invest in Neighborhoods Neighborhood Commercial District Assessments: Neighborhood profiles featuring information on demographic and socio-economic analysis, existing physical conditions, and a listing of opportunities and challenges. 3

Completed Plans Roadmap for City Food Sector Innovation and Investment: a report guiding cities to develop local food investment strategies, create new jobs and strengthen local businesses while increasing a community’s access to healthy, local and sustainably grown foods. Downtown Plan Annual Monitoring Report 2011 4 Commerce & Industry Inventory 2011 5 San Francisco Parklet Manual (February 2013) 6 Public Outreach and Engagement Report: A report outlining the of the department’s effectiveness in engaging the general public on Planning activities and projects. 7 Interagency Plan Implementation Committee (IPIC) Annual Report: A report on impact fees budgeted as part of the City’s 10-year capital plan.

Many of these publications can be downloaded from: www.sfplanning.org

Health Care Services Master Plan Central Corridor Plan Draft for Public Review: an integrated community vision for the southern portion of the Central Subway rail corridor is South of Market. 8

Completed Public Realm/ Streetscape Plans Castro Street – concept design (May 2013) Chinatown Broadway Community Design Plan (February 2013) Better Market Street – concept design alternatives (July 2013) Bartlett Mercado Plaza concept design (June 2013)


41

ANNUAL REPORT 2012 - 2013

SACRAMENTO ST SACRAMENTO ST

CALIFORNIA ST

OFARRELL ST

PIERCE ST

PIERCE ST

ELLIS ST

ELLIS ST

BUCHANAN ST

GOUGH ST

OCTAVIA ST

POST ST

GOUGH ST

LAGUNA ST

LAGUNA ST

POST ST

GEARY BLVD GEARY BLVD CLEARY CT

HOLLIS ST

WEBSTER ST

TOWN JAPAN

OFARRELL ST

OFARRELL ST

WEBSTER ST

GEARY BLVD

GEARY BLVD

OFARRELL ST

HOLLIS ST

STEINER ST

AVERY ST

POST ST

AUSTIN ST AUSTIN ST

AVERY ST

POST ST

BUSH ST

OCTAVIA ST

FILLMORE ST

BUSH ST

JAPANTOWN SUTTER ST

SUTTER ST

and RITAGE RAL HE BILITY CULTU STAINA SU IC M ECONO GY STRATE

PINE ST PINE ST

BUCHANAN ST

FILLMORE ST

WILMOT ST WILMOT ST STEINER ST

SCOTT ST

PIERCE ST

PIERCE ST

SCOTT ST

CALIFORNIA ST

CLEARY CT ELLIS ST ELLIS ST WILLOW ST

WILLOW ST

EDDY ST

DOWNTOWN PLAN

EDDY ST

1/4 Mile 1/4 Mile

NEIGHBORHOOD PROFILE

S JCHES

2011

SACRAMENTO ST SACRAMENTO ST

CALIFORNIA ST

OCTAVIA ST

LAGUNA ST

BUCHANAN ST

LAGUNA ST

BUSH ST BUSH ST

OCTAVIA ST

PINE ST PINE ST

BUCHANAN ST

FILLMORE ST

STEINER ST

FILLMORE ST

STEINER ST

PIERCE ST

SUTTER ST

SUTTER ST

SUTTER ST

SUTTER ST

POST ST POST ST GEARY BLVD

PIERCE ST

CLEARY CT

HOLLIS ST

WEBSTER ST

WEBSTER ST

OFARRELL ST OFARRELL ST

ELLIS ST ELLIS ST

HOLLIS ST

GEARY BLVD

CLEARY CT

GOUGH ST

AVERY ST

GEARY BLVD

PIERCE ST

JAPANTOWN ORGANIZING COMMITTEE

POST ST

GEARY BLVD

AVERY ST

POST ST

JAPANTOWN ( WESTERN ADDITION ) POST STREET FROM FILLMORE TO LAGUNA STREET

GOUGH ST

SCOTT ST

PIERCE ST

SCOTT ST

CALIFORNIA ST

ELLIS ST ELLIS ST

WILLOW ST WILLOW ST

EDDY ST EDDY ST

1

2

3

1/4 Mile 1/4 Mile

4

S A N F R A N C I S C O P L A N N I N G D E PA R T M E N T | J U LY 2 012

Hmmm... how can I get a parklet built in my neighborhood?

PUBLIC OUTREACH & ENGAGEMENT

SAN FRANCISCO

SAN FRANCISCO COMMERCE & INDUSTRY COMMERCE &INVENTORY INDUSTRY INVENTORY

CENTRAL CORRIDOR PLAN

EFFECTIVENESS INITIATIVE

PARKLET MANUAL

FINDINGS & RECOMMENDATIONS REPORT

Version 1.0. February 2013 brought to you by:

SAN FRANCISCO PLANNING DEPARTMENT / SPRING 2012

5

6

Published Environmental Impact Reports

City of San Francisco

7

ƒƒ 200-214 Sixth Street (Draft) ƒƒ 706 Mission FEIR and EIR Appeal (Final) ƒƒ 706 Mission Street, The Mexican Museum and Residential Tower Project (Final) ƒƒ 8 Washington/Seawall Lot 351 Project (Final) ƒƒ 801 Brannan and One Henry Adams Project (Final)

DRAFT FOR PUBLIC REVIEW APRIL 2013

8

ƒƒ San Antonio Backup Pipeline Project EIR (Final) ƒƒ The Peninsula Pipelines Seismic Upgrade Project (Draft) ƒƒ The SF Overlook Residential Project EIR (Final) ƒƒ Western SoMa Community Plan, Rezoning of Adjacent Parcels and 350 Eighth Street Project (Final)

ƒƒ CPMC Final EIR and Revised Project Addendum (Final)

Download these EIRs and more: http://www.sf-planning.org/index.aspx?page=1828


42

SA N F R A NC I S C O PL A N N I NG DE PA RT M E N T

Awards & Accolades

Fisherman’s Wharf Public Realm Plan, Jefferson Streetscape

2013 Connecting People to Beautiful Spaces Award, SF Beautiful

General Advertising Sign Program

2013 San Francisco Beautiful Award, Scenic America and SF Beautiful 34th America’s Cup Environmental Impact Report/ Environmental Assessment and Permitting

2013 President’s Award, National Association of Environmental Professionals 2013 Outstanding Award, Association of Environmental Professionals

Property Information Map

2012 Government-to-Citizen Local Government Award, Digital Government Achievement Award 2012 Bright Ideas in Government Award, Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation

Coast Guard News


ANNUAL REPORT 2012 - 2013

Grants Total

Grants Awarded in 2012-2013

$986,028

$300,000*

$250,000

$250,000

Awarded by Re.Invest Initiative and Rockefeller Foundation for an analysis on San Francisco’s eco-district water systems.

Awarded by Caltrans Environmental Justice to create designs that will enhance neighborhood identity and improve pedestrian access on Mission Street.

Awarded by Caltrans Community Based Transportation Planning to improve pedestrian circulation within the Market-Octavia Plan area.

$81,478

$55,550

$49,000

Awarded by the Historic Preservation Fund Committee to research and author a historic context statement on the African-American/ Black experience in San Francisco.

Awarded by Friends of City Planning for special projects and professional development.

Awarded by the Columbia Foundation to assess the demand for manufacturing space, opportunities for job creation and connections with local farmers, and other required inputs necessary to stimulate the food industry cluster.

* Estimated Value In Technical Assistance/Consulting

Grants Completed in 2012-2013

Total

$563,528

$250,000

$88,528

$22,500

Caltrans Community Based Transportation Planning: improve pedestrian circulation within the Market-Octavia Plan area.

National Park Service Preserve America: designate and promote historical resources in the Market and Octavia Plan area.

Office of Historic Preservation Certified Local Government Program: develop a historic context statement for builder tract housing development from 1925-1950 in the Sunset District.

43


“Through my years working in our Finance division, I see how hard planners work and have a greater appreciation for what they do. It feels good to work together and make this department run smoothly.� - Yvonne Ko, Senior Revenue Analyst


ANNUAL REPORT 2012 - 2013

“I love my job because I get to work with so many different people every day.” - Lulu Hwang, Operations Manager

45


DATA APPENDIX

Planning by the Numbers


ANNUAL REPORT 2012 - 2013

47

2012-2013 Stats FY 2012/13

5-Year Trend

172

2012/13

2008/09 0

5-Year Trend

Completed Environmental Reviews

Approved Building Permits New Construction

FY 2012/13

200

107

2012/13

2008/09 0

120

Existing Alterations

2008/09 0

7,000

595

Changes to the Planning Code Text Changes

40

2008/09 0

50

2008/09

0

600

2012/13

2008/09 0

0

Designated Landmarks & Districts Landmarks

2012/13

2008/09 0

50

15

60

Landmark Districts

3

2

Zoning Administrator Letters of Determination

Variances

190

2008/09

Filed Discretionary Reviews

108

2012/13

General Plan Referrals

60

2012/13

2012/13

Zoning Changes

13

Projects Categorically Exempt from Environmental Review

2012/13

2008/09 0

200

287

2012/13 2011/12

321

20 12/ 2013 S TATS

6,841

2012/13


48

SA N F R A NC I S C O PL A N N I NG DE PA RT M E N T

Project Activity Project Review Meetings Conducted for Potential Projects

Internal Help Desk Support Preliminary Project Assessment Applications

79

329

Enforcement

775 760 $109,895

HelpDesk tickets created

931

777

Resolved within 24 hours

83%

FY 2011/12 Comparison

Web Statistics

Cases closed

452

495,393 272,050 1,085,206

New cases

457

$81,997

Amount collected in penalties, code violation, and other fees

Total number of visits to website

Total unique visitors to website

Total number of page views

Board of Appeals

36

Property Information Map

Appeals (including the first appeal of a decision by the Historic Preservation Commission)

Upheld Overruled * Withdrawn Awaiting Final Action

12 18 2 4

* ultimately approved by the Board with additional conditions

Planning Information Center 2012 /2 013 STATS

Average number of customers a day

83

Average number of customers a week

417

1,850 75,000 2,800

Average unique visitors per weekday

Average hits per weekday

Average searches per weekday

The department’s award-winning online tool, the Property Information Map ( www.propertymap. sfplanning.org ), gives public access to a wealth of property information simply by entering an address. Since its launch date, the site has more than 48 million hits with nearly 1 million unique visitors.


ANNUAL REPORT 2012 - 2013

49

Case Activity Active Cases Filed in Current (2012-2013) Fiscal Year Entitled Cases in Current (2012-2013) Fiscal Year

BAY ST

LOMBARD

AR

KE

T

ST

4T H ST

FELL ST OAK ST

N ST

3RD ST

POTRERO AVE

CLIPPER ST

CESAR CHAVEZ ST D BLV

EV

SHO

RE

TARAVAL ST

BAY

OA

SLOAT BLVD

AVE

AVE

E

Lake Me rc e d

SA

N

JO

SE

AV

Jo hn McL ar en Par k

A “case” refers to all planning cases (i.e. conditional use, variance, etc), not building permits.

GE

NE

VA

AV

E

E

AV

AV

E

E

MAN

SEL

ST 3RD

NO

EAN

BRU

SILVER AVE

OC

AL

S

SAN

MONTEREY BLVD

KD

AN

L ST

20 12/ 2013 S TATS

POR

TOL

19TH AVE

A DR

NORIEGA ST

MISSION ST

7TH AVE

CASTRO ST

16TH ST

17TH ST

DOLORES ST

BLVD OLN LINC

ST

ERO ST

M

IC AVE

STANYA

Golden Gate Park LINCOLN WAY

WAY

VD GEARY BL MASON

25TH AVE FULTON ST

RNIA ST

DIVISAD

ARGUELLO BLVD

CALIFO

BROAD

KEARNY

SS AVE VAN NE

Presidio

L i n coln Pa r k

SUNSET BLVD

ST


50

SA N F R A NC I S C O PL A N N I NG DE PA RT M E N T

Case & Permit Volume Trends The department assumed that planning case and building permit volumes would increase by 3% in FY12-13 from the prior fiscal year in the budget. Very early in the fiscal year, the department saw an influx of many applications, many of which were for much largerscale projects. Overall, total volume of planning cases and building permits were up by 7.6% in FY12-13 compared to FY11-12. The largest volume increases were realized with building permits for new construction, environmental evaluations including categorical exemptions, Mills Act, and variances. FY12-13 volumes were the largest since FY0708.

Case Volume Trend 2000

1500

1000

500

0 2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

Total 2012-13 Case Volume

Permit Volume Trend

2011-12

2012-13

1,977

8000 7000 6000 5000 4000 3000 2000 1000 0

2012 /2 013 STATS

Source: Case Edit Intake Database & DBI Permit Database Downloads

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

Note: DBI Permit Tracking System data by fiscal year may vary slightly due to permit issuance timing.

New Construction Existing Alterations

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

Total 2012-13 Permit Volume

2011-12

2012-13

7,013


ANNUAL REPORT 2012 - 2013

51

Case & Permit Volume 2003-2013 FEE CATEGORY

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

Transportation Study Analysis

14

23

12

29

24

13

10

11

9

16

Certificate of Appropriateness

39

45

43

35

58

43

45

38

77

82

0

1

4

7

7

4

5

6

13

12

Conditional Use + CU Appeal

162

154

155

126

190

144

184

207

226

183

Discretionary Review

305

312

254

202

190

152

130

137

130

108

Environmental Evaluation + Appeals

187

211

117

98

108

91

91

85

79

107

8

66

184

286

455

303

294

314

421

595

49

30

20

16

9

5

5

10

136

5

Designate/Redesignate Bldg Rating

1

0

0

3

2

1

0

0

0

1

Permit to Alter

1

3

1

0

1

2

2

66

79

98

Institutional Master Plan

6

2

2

6

1

5

3

8

4

2

Statement of Eligibility Application

0

0

16

18

9

2

1

4

0

0

51

53

47

51

42

43

30

13

19

34

Landmark Preservation / Historic District

9

4

12

10

2

0

2

13

8

0

General Plan Amendment

5

3

6

4

4

5

7

5

8

4

Application for Certificate of Transfer of TDR

7

15

35

33

35

3

3

4

26

27

Coastal Zone Permit

1

2

3

2

2

2

4

1

1

1

278

301

368

394

367

287

189

237

243

203

General Plan Referral

63

47

52

46

51

50

42

47

46

60

Subdivision of Land

84

80

71

71

58

60

39

39

38

39

Zoning Text Amendment

23

31

26

32

44

39

30

42

25

40

4

7

7

6

14

38

43

40

79

102

226

268

282

240

255

170

156

168

133

190

0

0

0

1

0

1

0

2

1

0

12

16

20

13

18

15

9

9

16

28

Application for Notice of Use of TDR

0

0

3

2

4

2

0

1

0

27

Zoning Reclassification / Map Change

9

18

20

9

16

15

12

13

15

13

237

225

222

215

131

82

54

123

86

172

8,334

8,113

7,682

7,144

7,365

6,073

6,247

6,207

6,437

6,841

10,115 10,030

9,664

9,099

9,462

7,650

7,637

7,850 11,248 11,737

Annual Limit Comp.

Categorical Exemptions Federal E Review for MOCD

Shadow Study Analysis

Condomium Conversion

Mills Act or Other Usual Cases Variance Development Agreement Downtown Control Exception

Building Permits (New Construction) Building Permits (Existing Alterations) TOTAL

20 12/ 2013 S TATS

Applications filed for each category.


52

SA N F R A NC I S C O PL A N N I NG DE PA RT M E N T

Performance Measure Improvement Initiative

During the FY2012-14 budget process, the department revised its set of performance measures to focus more on outcomes, efficiency and customer service. The intent is to more accurately track the work of the department, and inform and encourage more performance-based decision making by staff and management. This year’s performance to complete the required review of planning cases and building permits to approval or disapproval within a targeted number of days was mixed and still below the set targets. Objectives were adversely affected by the increase in workload of many largerscale projects that required additional, more complex and comprehensive review. Staffing levels have stayed relatively flat with few new hires and a number of staff lost due to attrition. (See Staff List on page 56) The department saw an improvement in the processing of conditional use, discretionary review and various environmental review applications, but review times for building permits and general plan referrals were longer. The department also began reporting on how public event participants rate our various community events, such as workshops.

2012 /2 013 STATS


ANNUAL REPORT 2012 - 2013

PERFORMANCE MEASURE

GOAL

TYPE

FY 2012/13 ACTUAL VS. TARGET

1

Percentage of all building permits involving new construction and alterations review, approved or disapproved within 90 days

Perform timely and comprehensive review of applications

Efficiency

63% 75%

2

Percentage of conditional use applications requiring Commission action approved or disapproved within 180 days

Perform timely and comprehensive review of applications

Efficiency

57% 70%

3

Percentage of public initiated Discretionary Review applications approved or disapproved within 120 days

Perform timely and comprehensive review of applications

Efficiency

62% 80%

4

Percent of event participants who rated community events as good or very good

Engage with the community regarding Planning-related projects

Customer Service

89% 80%

5

Percent of general plan referrals completed within 45 days

Perform timely and comprehensive review of projects

Efficiency

80% 90%

6

Transit Center District Plan submittal for final approval at the Board of Supervisors by December of 2012

Successfully implement Planning priority projects

Outcome

Yes

7

Percent of projected development impact fee revenue for the following 2 fiscal years programmed by fiscal year end.

Successfully program development impact fee revenue

Outcome

87% 90%

8

Percent of all environmental impact reports (EIRs) completed within 24 months

Perform timely and comprehensive review of applications

Efficiency

50% 75%

9

Percent of Negative Declarations (Neg Decs), Class 32s, Community Plan Exemptions (CPEs), and Addenda completed within 9 months.

Perform timely and comprehensive review of applications

Efficiency

68% 75%

10 Percentage of categorical exemptions reviewed within 45 days

Perform timely and comprehensive review of applications

Efficiency

84% 75%

11 Percent of complaints where enforcement proceedings have been initiated within 30 business days of complaint filing.

Effectively compel compliance for cases in violation

Outcome

99% 95%

12 Percentage of Ordinances initiated by an elected office that are reviewed by the Commission within 90 days or continued at the request of the elected official.

Perform timely review of legislation.

Efficiency

100% 85%

13 Percent completion of the Permit and Project Tracking System (PPTS) to be fully implemented for staff use by November of 2013

Implement the new PPTS system in a timely manner

Outcome

71% 100%

14 Planning core network uptime percent

Ensure high availability of the Department's machines and systems

Outcome

99.9% 99.9%

15 Percent of helpdesk requests resolved within 24 hours

Respond to information requests in a timely and professional manner

Customer Service

83% 75%

Yes

20 12/ 2013 S TATS

#

53


54

SA N F R A NC I S C O PL A N N I NG DE PA RT M E N T

Financial Report Total Revenues

Fee Revenue

Expenditures

Total Revenues

Total Fee Revenue

Total Expenditures

$28,185,710

$21,109,469

$28,185,710

REVENUE

FEE

EXPENDITURE

FY12-13 ADOPTED BUDGET

Charges for Services (Fees)

$21,109,469

Grants

$1,075,319

Expenditure Recovery

$1,216,771

General Fund Support

$4,784,151

FY12-13 ADOPTED BUDGET

FY12-13 FINAL BUDGET

Building Permit Alterations

$9,322,807

Building Permit New Construction

$1,599,386 $5,051,119

Non-Personnel Services, Materials & Supplies, Capital & Projects

$2,863,472

Environmental Review Fees Other Short Range Planning Fees

$1,826,367

Services of Other Departments

$3,871,638

Conditional Use Fees

$2,361,968

2012 /2 013 STATS

Variance Fees

$351,610

Sign Program & Code Enforcement

$360,107

Certificate of Appropriateness Fees

$236,105

Salaries & Fringe Overhead

$20,886,572 $564,028


ANNUAL REPORT 2012 - 2013

55

General Fund Support for the Planning Department 2003-2013 REVENUE ($ MILLIONS)

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

Fees & Other Revenues

$13.2

$16.1

$16.0

$19.1

$21.7

$22.5

$20.5

$22.4

$22.7

$23.4

General Fund Support

$0.0

$0.4

$1.5

$2.0

$3.3

$3.2

$3.4

$1.4

$1.9

$4.8

$13.2

$16.5

$17.5

$21.1

$25.0

$25.7

$23.9

$23.8

$24.6

$28.2

0%

3%

8%

10%

13%

12%

14%

6%

8%

17%

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

Total Revenues General Fund Support % $30M

2012-2013 General Fund Support

$25M

$4.8M

$20M

% of Total Revenue

$10M

$5M

$0 2003-04

2004-05

FISCAL YEAR BUDGET

NOTES: In FY03-04 through FY05-06, appropriations from the Building Inspection Fund were used in leiu of General Fund Support ($2.3 Million, $5.3 Million and $1.7 Million, respectively) Increase in FY11-12 Proposed Budget due to the Health Care Services Master Plan.

20 12/ 2013 S TATS

REVENUE ($ MILLIONS)

17%

$15M


56

SA N F R A NC I S C O PL A N N I NG DE PA RT M E N T

2012-2013 Staff List Planning Department Staff Aaron Hollister Aaron Starr Adam Varat Adrian Putra Adrienne Aquino Agnes Lau Aksel Olsen Alexis Smith Alicia John-Baptiste Allison Vanderslice Alton Chinn Amnon Ben-Pazi Andrea Contreras Andrea Green Andrea Modena Angela Huisman AnMarie Rodgers Audrey Desmuke Belle La Ben Fu Bill Wycko Brett Bollinger Brian Smith Brittany Bendix Candace SooHoo Casey Noel Cathy Thai Chelsea Fordham Chris Kern Christine Haw Christine Lamorena Christopher Espiritu Claudia Flores Corey Teague Craig Jung Daniel Sider Danielle Harris Dario Jones David Alumbaugh

David Lindsay David Winslow Debra Dwyer Delvin Washington Devyani Jain Diana Sokolove Diego Sรกnchez Don Lewis Donnie Wong Doug Vu Edgar Oropeza Elizabeth Purl Elizabeth Skrondal Elizabeth Watty Erika Jackson Evamarie Atijera-Taylor Gary Chen Genta Yoshikawa Georgia Powell Gladys Fausto-Chan Glenn Cabreros Greg Riessen Gretchen Hilyard Heidi Kline Hien Nguyen Ilaria Salvadori Irene Cheng Tam Irene Nishimura Isabelle Vulis Isoken Omokaro Janice Shambray Jeanie Poling Jeff Joslin Jeffrey Speirs Jeremy Shaw Jessica Look Jessica Range Joanna Linsangan John Rahaim

New Arrivals 2012-13

Johnny Jaramillo Jonas Ionin Jonathan Lammers Jonathan Purvis Jonathan Swae Jose Campos Joshua Switzky Josie Lee Joy Navarrete Julian Banales Kanishka Burns Karen Zhu Kate Conner Kate McGee Kay Cheng Kearstin Dischinger Kei Zushi Keith DeMartini Kelley Amdur Kelly Wong Kevin Brusatori Kevin Guy Kimberly Durandet Kimia Haddadan Laura Lynch Lily Langlois Lily Yegazu Linda Avery-Herbert Lisa Chau Lisa Chen Lisa Gibson Lulu Hwang Margaret Yuen Maria Oropeza-Mander Mark Luellen Marlo Isaac Martin Thibodeau Mary Brown Mary Woods

Departures 2012-13

SFPUC STaff

Mat Snyder Menaka Mohan Michael Eng Michael Jacinto Michael Smith Michael Webster Michael Wynne Micheal Sanders Michelle Stahlhut Milton Martin Monica Huggins Monica Pereira Moises Aceves Moses Corrette Nannie Turrell Neil Hrushowy Nicholas Perry Nora Priego-Ramos Omar Masry Ozzie Taeb Paolo Ikezoe Patricia Gerber Patrick Race Paul Chasan Paul Maltzer Pilar LaValley Rachel Schuett Rachna Randall Dean Richard Sucre Rick Cooper Rick Crawford Robin Abad Ocubillo Sandra Soto-Grondona Sara Vellve Sarah Dennis Phillips Sarah Jones Scott Edmondson Scott Sanchez


ANNUAL REPORT 2012 - 2013

Planning Interns Sharon Lai Sharon Young Sheila Nickolopoulos Shelley Caltagirone Sophie Hayward Steve Wertheim Steven Smith Susan Chu Susan Exline Susan Mickelsen Susan Parks Susan Wong Tara Sullivan

Tatyana Sheyner Teresa Ojeda Theresa Monchez Tom Wang Timothy Frye Timothy Johnston Tina Tam Tom DiSanto Viktoriya Wise VirnaLiza Byrd Vladimir Vallejo Wade Wietgrefe Yvonne Ko

Alexandra Kirby Andrea Kramar Andrew Perry Angela Locke Arthur Alagao Avi Asherov Benjamin Caldwell Brian Wang Carianne Mei Casey Hagerman Corwin Bell David Mitchell Eroch Mak

Forrest Chamberlain Hannah Clark Jenny Wun Joshua Ollinger Julie Luu Karita Cheung Lawrence Ng Lawrence Ma

Employee Milestones Achieved Last Fiscal Year Years of Service to the Department

5

Amnon Ben-Pazi Andrea Contreras Christine Lamorena Diego R Sรกnchez Don Lewis Jessica Range Jon Swae Lily Langlois Devyani Jain Genta Yoshikawa Kevin Guy Pilar LaValley

Nicholas Perry Sharon Lai John Rahaim Chelsea Fordham Jean Poling Ilaria Salvadori Mary Brown Mike Wynne Monica Pereira

10

Adam Varat Rachna

30 Lulu Hwang

15

Andrea Green David Alumbaugh Joy Navarrete Mary Woods Ozzie Taeb

35 Irene Cheng Tam

57


San Francisco Planning Department 1650 Mission Street Suite 400 San Francisco, CA 94103

www.sfplanning.org

Annual Report prepared by: Joanna Linsangan, Communications Manager Gary Chen, Graphic Designer Candace SooHoo, Communications Coordinator

Annual Report 2012-13  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you