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SUMMER 2020 | SFPGA TOPICSÂ

BACK2GOLF

NEW OFFICER

SFPGA Returns to Golf After COVID-19 sidelined Section events for three months, the SFPGA has returned to the course.

Paul Clivio, PGA becomes newest SFPGA Officer

MICHAEL KARTRUDE WINS SOUTH FLORIDA OPEN Michael Kartrude shoots 17-under to win E-Z-GO South Florida Open.

Summer 2020


Table of contents PAGE 2: SFPGA RETURNS TO THE COURSE PAGE 3: WELCOME, PAUL CLIVIO, PGA PAGE 4: DAN THOMAS JOINS ADVISORY BOARD PAGE 5: ANNUAL MEETING GOES VIRTUAL PAGE 6-7: MICHAEL KARTRUDE WINS E-Z-GO SOUTH FLORIDA OPEN

PAGE 8: JUSTIN BERTSCH, PGA TO PLAY IN SECOND PGA CHAMPIONSHIP

PAGE 9-10: THE PGA PROFESSIONAL'S PANDEMIC CHALLENGE PAGE 11-12: JUSTIN ROSS, JORDAN FISCHER WIN NICKLAUS JUNIOR CHAMPIONSHIP PAGE 13: PGA JR. LEAGUE TO RETURN PAGE 14: MATT CAHILL, JUNIOR TOUR TO PGA PROFESSIONAL PAGE 15: SFPGA SCHOLARSHIP WINNER PAGE 16: COMMITTED TO THE COMMUNITY

PAGE 17: QUICK HITS

PAGE 18: RULES WITH BRETT

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S OUT HF L OR I DAP GA

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SFPGA Returns to the Course After COVID-19 halted activity for three months, the SFPGA returned to the course For the first time in nearly three months, the South Florida PGA operated Section and Junior tournaments as well as other events throughout south Florida, making a safe return to golf following the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. As golf courses open across the country and PGA Professionals learn to operate under new social distancing guidelines, the SFPGA worked with its courses and county officials to develop guidelines that adhere to all executive orders and most importantly keep everyone safe. On Sunday, June 7th, the SFPGA Junior Tour, presented by the Honda Classic returned to the course with its Prep Tour, operating a one-day, 18-hole event with 78 participants.

A success, this event helped set the standard for how SFPGA events will run this summer – masks worn in common areas, no shotgun starts, six feet between players at all times and common touchpoints eliminated. Additionally, the SFPGA will turn to its BlueGolf Tournament app to be the primary scoreboard to eliminate crowds in the scoring areas and tournament administers will text players through the app if needed. South Florida PGA Section tournaments began on Monday June 22nd with Tournament Series No. 1, followed by the E-Z-GO South Florida Open June 23-25th, both played at the Bonita Bay Club in Naples. Professionals rode in their own cart and followed similar precautions as the juniors and will do so until it is safe to lift some of the restrictions. The South Florida PGA is excited to return to operating events and administer a sport that, in many ways, has social distance built in with miles of fairway available for the game to be played. Both the Section and Junior tournament schedule will continue to be modified as the SFPGA works to run safe events while delivering high-quality tournaments throughout south Florida.

I'M EXCITED TO GET OUT AND PLAY. - JENNA FONDA, JUNIOR GOLFER

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Welcome Paul Clivio, PGA PAUL CLIVIO, PGA TAKES OVER THE SECTION SECRETARY ROLE Paul Clivio, PGA has joined the Section Officers as Secretary and will serve the next seven years on the Board of Directors. After Neil Lockie, PGA vacated the position earlier this year for a new role in the Northern Texas Section, the position was open for a special election. Clivio is the Director of Golf at St. Andrew's Country Club in Boca Raton and is the former President of the Southeast Chapter. Additionally, Clivio was honored with the 2019 Bill Strausbaugh Award for the Section.

LEARN ABOUT PAUL Why did you seek this leadership position for the South Florida PGA? It has been very rewarding for me to serve on the Chapter board over the past six years, helping build a strong bond between the chapter and the community as well as a strong camaraderie between our members. During the time I served we expanded committees to get more chapter members involved. It will be my goal to continue to do this at the Section level and to bring new ideas that will help grow the game and unite all three chapters as one. The PGA of America has many resources available to help its members and it would be a goal of mine to help our Section members realize  how these can help them move along in their career path. As a board member of the Chapter I was able to increase the participation in community activities which has resulted in positive exposure for PGA members. I would love to continue that at the Section level and make our brand even stronger. What skill set will you bring to the board? Experience. Over the past six years I have had the opportunity to sit in the Section boardroom and help make decisions that were best for our Section and Chapter members. 

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SECTION LEADERSHIP

Dan Thomas Joins Advisory Board

President | Karl Bublitz, PGA Seagate Country Club Vice President | Scott Kirkwood. PGA Ocean Reef Club Secretary | Paul Clivio, PGA St. Andrews Country Club Honorary Past President | Don Meadows, PGA Quail Valley Golf Club Tournaments | Jeff Waber, PGA Broken Sound - Old Course Southeast At-Large | Shawn Costello, PGA Boca Grove Golf & Tennis Club Island Chapter | Tony Loyola Carts 4 You

The South Florida PGA is pleased to announce that Daniel A. Thomas, Esq. has accepted an invitation to serve on the SFPGA Advisory Board. Thomas is a shareholder in the firm Mrachek, Fitzgerald, Rose and is focused on on complex commercial and construction litigation, construction claims counseling, and contract and business disputes. An expert in his field, Thomas has been honored with a Board Certification in Construction Law by The Florida Bar as well as recognition as one of Florida Trend’s Legal Elite. He serves as a member of the American Bar Association’s Forum on the Construction Industry and Construction Litigation Committee, and The Florida Bar’s Construction Law Committee. Thomas has an AV Preeminent rating from Martindale Hubbell, a peer reviewed ranking which indicates the highest level of professional excellence. Thomas received his juris doctor degree and his bachelor’s degree cum laude from the University of Florida. "Dan is a highly respected attorney in South Florida and will be an incredible asset to our Section as an advisory board member," said Geoff Lofstead, SFPGA Executive Director. "Dan brings a wealth of experience dealing with complex issues and a deep passion and enthusiasm for the game of golf." Thomas will serve alongside Advisory Board members Ken Kennerly, Steve Sponder and Joe Steranka,

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Southwest | Nathan Groce, PGA Palmira Golf and Country Club Southwest At-Large | Bob Radunz, PGA Quarry Golf Club Southern | Shane Warriner, PGA Crandon Golf Key Biscayne Southern At-Large | Steve Jablonowski, PGA Miami-Dade Parks, Recreation Awards | Casey Brozek, PGA Quail West Country Club Juniors | Lee Strover, PGA Emerald Dunes Golf Club Membership Outreach | Ken McMaster, PGA Miromar Lakes Beach & Golf Club Seniors | Jerry Impellittiere, PGA Monarch Country Club District 13 Director | Mark VanDyck, PGA Fort Lauderdale Country Club PGA Career Consultant | Kathy Grayson Executive Director | Geoff Lofstead Advisory Board: Ken Kennerly Steve Sponder Joe Steranka Dan Thomas


CHAPTER LEADERSHIP

Annual Meeting Goes Virtual The Annual Meeting of the Membership was conducted on May 28th. Due to COVID-19 restrictions, the Annual Meeting was conducted virtually via Zoom. Over 420 members and associates joined to hear reports from Section leadership as well as District 13 Director Mark VanDyck, PGA and PGA of America President Suzy Whaley, PGA.

In addition to updates shared from leadership, Resolution 1 on housekeeping was approved after a membership vote and Paul Clivio, PGA was welcomed as the new Secretary for the Section. To view the 2020 Annual Meeting Booklet, click here and to watch back the meeting, click below.

SOUTHEAST President Jeff Waber, PGA Broken Sound Club - Old Course jwaber@brokensoundclub.org Vice President & Treasurer Ben Bauer, PGA The Club at Ibis bbauer@clubibis.com Secretary Paul Crespo, PGA BallenIsles Country Club pcrespo@ballenisles.com

SOUTHERN President Shane Warriner, PGA Crandon Golf Key Biscayne shanewarriner@pga.com Vice President & Treasurer Marty Caifano, PGA Woodmont Country Club mcaifano@woodmontcountryclub.net Secretary Adam Scrimenti, PGA Woodmont Country Club ascrimenti@pga.com

SOUTHWEST President Nathan Groce, PGA Palmira Golf and Country Club ngroce@golfclubatpalmira.org Vice President Jeff Nixon, PGA Stoneybrook Golf Club jeff@stoneybrookgolfestero.com Secretary Matthew Oakley, PGA Worthington Country Club headpro@worthingtoncc.com

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Michael Kartrude Wins E-Z-Go South Florida Open Michael Kartrude of West Palm Beach was determined to win his second E-Z-GO South Florida Open during the final round.     Kartrude wasn’t bothered by a sizzling 30 shot on the back nine by playing partner Alan Morin. Kartrude responded with a 32 to win by a stroke at 17-under 199 at Bonita Bay Club. Kartrude also won in 2016.   “I stuck to what I needed to do,” Kartrude said. “I stayed focused on what I had to do. I made it so Alan had to come get me.”      The savvy of the 30-year-old PGA Professional at the Bear’s Club was evident throughout the last three days. Kartrude held a share of the lead after the first two rounds and secured the victory with four birdies in a six-hole stretch. He made 20 birdies against a bogey and a double bogey.     Earlier this year, Kartrude qualified for his first PGA Tour event, in the Dominican Republic – only to see the event in March postponed because of the coronavirus pandemic. “I was like ‘Great!,’ then boom, it’s gone!” he said. The tournament has been rescheduled for Sept. 24-27.      At least they can’t take away the South Florida Open win.      “It means a lot,” he said. “I’m just really hoping for a great summer of golf, not just for me but for all of golf. With everything that’s going on (with the virus), we just want to go out and do what we do best – play golf.”     Lake Worth resident Morin, looking to win the championship for a record fourth time, saw those hopes evaporate when he shot 1-over on the front nine. Morin, a PGA Professional at The Falls Club, rallied with the six birdies for a 67 to share second place with amateur Austin Schultz (66) of Verandah Golf Club in Fort Myers.      “It was just a blah front nine,” said Morin, 51. “But I almost made a holein-one on 11, and that got things going. I was just trying to give him a fight. “It would have been nice to win again … I think I’ve been second four or five times in this tournament, too. Michael’s a good player. He did what he had to do.”     

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Schultz is in his fifth year as an assistant for the Florida Gulf Coast University men’s golf team. The 26-year-old showed he can still compete with the pros with three rounds in the 60s, including a pair of eagles.        “I would rank this up there with what I’ve done in golf,” said Schultz, who was runner-up in the conference tournament during his senior year at FCGU. “This week we played on some great courses against outstanding competition.”     Michael Welch (71-205) of Bonita National was fourth. Gyles Robin (73-206) finished fifth, a shot ahead of 2017 champion Patrick Rada (70-207) of the McArthur Club. The E-Z-GO South Florida Open, run by the South Florida PGA, is supported by BioSweep Suncoast, Prize Possessions and TechnoGym. Click here for results.

I’M JUST REALLY HOPING FOR A GREAT SUMMER OF GOLF, NOT JUST FOR ME BUT FOR ALL OF GOLF. WITH EVERYTHING THAT’S GOING ON (WITH THE VIRUS), WE JUST WANT TO GO OUT AND DO WHAT WE DO BEST – PLAY GOLF. - MICHAEL KARTRUDE

JUSTIN BERTSCH, PGA WINS TOURNAMENT SERIES NO. 1

MIKE SAN FILIPPO, PGA WINS SENIOR DIVISION

Justin Bertsch picked up where he left off last season - in first place. The 2019 Player of the Year carded an 8-under 64 at the Bonita Bay Club Sabal course to win the first event back after COVID-19 on June 22nd.

Mike San Filippo of Hobe Sound birdied two of his last four holes to win the Senior Division of the E-Z-GO South Florida Open at Bonita Bay Club.

Bertsch edged out Michael Kartrude, Tim Cantwell and Matt Cahill who traded 65s for the day. Click here for results. Presented by: PAGE 7

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San Filippo birdied the 15th and 17th holes for a 4-under 68 on the Cypress Course to hold off three-time overall winner Alan Morin by a shot at 12-under 132. San Filippo led by four after an opening 64.


Justin Bertsch, pga to Play in second pga championship Following the cancellation of the 2020 PGA Professional Championship, Justin Bertsch, PGA Professional at Club Pelican Bay will be one of 20 PGA Professionals from around the nation who will receive an invitation to play in the PGA Championship August 6-9 at TPC Harding Park. This will be the second appearance for Bertsch at the PGA Championship. He previously competed last year at Bethpage Black after qualifying via the PGA Professional Championship. The PGA of America made the decision to cancel the PGA Professional Championship due to ongoing concerns around COVID-19.

In addition to being the national championship of golf for PGA Club Professionals who qualify for the tournament through Section Professional Championships across the nation, the PGA Professional Championship also serves as a qualifier for the PGA Championship, taking the top 20 Professionals each year. With the cancellation, the PGA of America announced that the Top 20 Professionals from the 2019 Player of the Year list will automaticaly receive a PGA Championship bid which includes Bertsch, who was the 2019 South Florida PGA Player of the Year. In addition to the PGA Championship, Bertsch has also made starts on the PGA TOUR at the 2020 Honda Classic, 2020 Puerto Rico Open and the 2019 Corales Puntacana Resort and Club Championship.

KEVIN COMPARE, PGA FINISHES CROSS-COUNTRY BIKE RIDE Kevin Compare, PGA and his daughter Amy finished their cross-country bike trek for charity this month. The duo rode from San Diego to Florida, coast-to-coast, to raise money for charities impacted by COVID-19. The ride raised nearly $20,000 and $2,000 was donated to the South Florida PGA Foundation. Click the image below for more.

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The pga professional's pandemic challenge This article was written by Bruce J. Crowley, Managing Director of Frieda Partners. Crowley is a behavioral scientist and executive coach who has worked with many of the nation’s top clubs and select PGA Section offices. Learn more about him here or reach him by email at bruce.crowley@friedapartners.com.

Every golf professional is evaluated daily on how well he/she delivers relaxed high-end service. And doing so requires the rest of the operating team: instruction, assistants, outside service to follow suit.  The clubs delivering on the promise best have figured out how to engineer a culture of self-directed and engaged employees united around the shared purpose of attentive service accommodation plus.  This purpose is anchored in one of the sacred pillars of service: adapting to say “yes” to member and guest requests. The pandemic has been disrupting and disorienting to PGA Professionals, their staff, and the industry.  In addition to mandating new practices for enforcing safety, social distancing and sanitizing decrees, perhaps the most difficult imposition on Professionals has been an obligation to say “no” to customary service amenities.  For the first time, rather than looking for a way to say yes, and following-up with additional value-add enhancements, Professionals and their staff are now duty-bound to say “no”.  And the first no is often followed by a second as members seek a work-around to gain the favor he/she desires.  This is a sea change of perspective.  It imposes additional levels of emotional stress and pressure on those who tend the game’s experience.  You’re likely wondering: how do I manage this short-term change without damaging relationships longer-term?  The challenge is particularly confounding for younger Professionals tasked with enforcing pandemic-related dictates and service constraints to those two, three or four generations removed.  And as May rolls into June, Professionals report experiencing more pressure about amenity disruption presenting additional challenges.  More questions and subtle suggestions such as: well the club down the street has implemented additional allowances, why can’t we?   And most Professionals report having two types of members: those fully compliant and cautious; and, a separate population less concerned and more assertive pushing for return to the full-service experience they’re accustomed.  

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Here are a few suggestions. Saying “no” is difficult for most people.  For many, it’s rooted in fear of damaging a relationship because the “no” typically feels synonymous with confrontation.  Confrontation generally puts people in conflict.  This is particularly tricky in our service business where so much of the experience is anchored in personal connection.  And intensified by the sense that most of the country is more on edge now, so feelings can be easily bruised and reactions raw. As you look to manage the short-term, don’t view saying “no” as a binary choice between confrontation and preserving a relationship.  There is a middle option known as the “neutral no.”  If you get pushback, keep these points in mind: 1) stay on topic; 2) stick with it; and, 3) use your emotional connection to explain that the rules are for everyone’s benefit and safety.   By sticking with a neutral no, you’re concentrating on the business imperative of no, not the personal.  If this is confusing, consider this: it’s best to aim for a referee’s kind of neutral demeanor, for a referee is required to make a ruling and stick with it when challenged.   Here are characteristics which frame the neutral no.  A neutral no is steady, uninflected with tone, and clear.  It is mostly notable for what it is not: harsh, combative, apologetic, reluctant or overly nice. For instance, one of my top clients experienced the following.  He worked with his board to arrive at a comprehensive set of rules to open up for golf.  Upon completion, an email was sent to the entire membership at 5:15 PM on April 30, within two hours he had three requests for work-arounds, none of which were ultimately permitted and notably there was no dissent within the board.  Here is a case where there was no bending.  They adopted a neutral “referee tone” and stuck with it.  No reported negative impact on the relationships.  And members at this club are similarly not accustomed to hearing “no.”  Another opened for play in mid-April with a limit of one golfer per electric cart: 15 carts total.  Given the cart sanitizing mandate and club-imposed support staff furlough, a limit of 15 carts per day, one golfer per cart, was established.  Priority was given to members with physical hardships making it impossible to walk the course.  Immediately, requests for work-arounds began to flood this Professional’s email.  Here’s an example of more “personal” pleas inducing additional emotional conflict.   In this case, limited exceptions were made while sticking to policy. Finally, the golf-shop no return policy.   A member purchases two sizes of the same shirt and seeks to return one through an assistant.  The lead assistant sticks with the policy; the member persists, trying to pick off a more pliant junior assistant on the staff, yet he too sticks with it despite mounting pressure.  Head Professional is brought into the information loop.   As the member appears for his next round; head professional approaches and after exchanging pleasantries and game-related conversation, brings up the return and neutralizes the issue on the spot:  “I imagine you tried both of the shirts on and want to return the one that doesn’t fit?  You realize, if you do, another member is going to try the same shirt on?   Do you really want to do that?  The policy is for your safety and everyone else’s”.  My observations and quantitative findings affirm that Professionals best equipped to lead in this uncertain time have deeper levels of social and emotional intelligence.  Specifically, they’ve developed more acute self-awareness and an ability to regulate emotions under the moment’s stress and pressure.  Add empathy, the ability to actively listen, and social adaptability and you have a leader (and staff) well-equipped to balance the COVID-19 tactical imperatives with a frontline ability to adapt on-the-fly to navigate the short term.  These teams improvise with competence, and care and stick with the clear neutral no, uninflected by any combative hint or overly apologetic tone. Something to gain in this time of loss.

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Junior Golf Corner JUNIOR GOLF IS BACK IN ACTION UNDER NEW COVID-19 RESTRICTIONS

The SFPGA Junior Tour returned to the course on June 9th with a Prep Tour event. After three months without activity due to COVID-19, the Junior Tour is back and busier than ever. To make up for the cancelled events, the junior department worked hard to put together a summer schedule that would provide the most opportunities possible for junior golfers in south Florida. PAGE 11

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SFPGA JUNIOR TOUR LAUNCHES LEGENDS TOUR In addition to more events in the Links, Prep, Challenge and Championship Tours, the SFPGA has also launched the Legends Tour which will provide college-aged juniors (19-23) the opportunity to compete during the summer. The Legends Tour features four 18 or 36-hole events throughout the summer on championship courses.


Junior Golf Section JUSTIN ROSS, JORDAN FISCHER WIN NICKLAUS JUNIOR CHAMPIONSHIP

Justin Ross re-affirmed his status as one of Florida’s best junior golfers when he cruised to a seven-shot victory in the Nicklaus Junior Championship at Nicklaus’ longtime home, Lost Tree Club.      Ross, the reigning Florida Boys Junior Amateur champion, overcame an early double bogey to shoot 4-under 68 and finish at 10under 133.    

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The Boca Raton resident entered with a three-shot lead after shooting 65 Thursday at North Palm Beach Country Club.      “I made a lot of putts, and my iron play was really good,” said Ross, 17, a senior-to-be at St. Andrews. “I was hitting it 18-20 feet on almost every hole.”   Jordan Fischer, a 14-year-old from North Fort Myers, shot consecutive 69s to win the girls’ title by six shots over Gloria Nip of Port St. Lucie.


Despite being four years younger than some of her competition, Fischer made just one bogey and six birdies the last two days.     “I don’t think about if you’re older, I just try to play my game and not worry about what the others are doing,” Fischer said. “I hit a lot of greens. This (win) ranks up there.”      

FORMER NICKLAUS JUNIOR CHAMPION GETS WIN ON TOUR

This was the first tournament Ross has played in since the coronavirus pandemic shut down golf in March. Ross said he didn’t play for 2 ½ months and started practicing three weeks ago. Ross gets a chance to defend his state title July 7-9 at Streamsong. It wasn’t lost on him Friday that he won a tournament named after the Golden Bear at a course where Jack Nicklaus has lived for more than a half century.       “It means a lot because he’s arguably the best player to play the game,” Ross said.       Reed Greyserman of Boca Raton shot 71 and finished second at 3-under 140. Tyler Mistretta (71-141) of North Palm Beach was third. Nip, who has a win and a runner-up finish in the National Drive Chip & Putt at Augusta National, had a 1-under 71 to finish alone in second at 144. Kayla Holden of Coral Springs matched Fischer’s 69 as the day’s low round and was third.        Greyserman won the Boys 13-15 title. In the Boys 11-12, Reid Korody (74-149) of Jupiter, Jessy Huebner (74-149) of Port St. Lucie and Cruz Pierce (78-149) of Boca Raton shared first place.     The Nicklaus Junior Championship is run by the South Florida PGA in conjunction with the Palm Beach County Golf Association. Click here for results.

Daniel Berger grew up playing on the South Florida PGA Junior Tour and won the Nicklaus Junior Championship in 2008. The 2020 edition was held at Lost Tree Golf Club and North Palm Beach Country Club this June. The Nicklaus Junior Championship was the first major tournament administered by the SFPGA Junior tour after COVID-19 put events on hold for three months, Similarly, Berger won the first PGA TOUR event back, the Charles Schwab Challenge held June 11-13 at Colonial Golf Course in Fort Worth, Texas. The win marks the third TOUR victory for Berger, 27, who followed it up with a third place finish at the RBC Heritage the following week.

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PGA Jr. League Set to begin again At the section level we have seen increases in participation in our Junior Tour events due in part to parents putting their kids in golf because it is deemed to be safer than other activities or sports. As a result, the SFPGA believes there is a great growth opportunity through the PGA Jr. League program. In the last two years the SFPGA PGA Jr. League Program has grown from 458 participants to over 800. This increase has resulted in more revenue generated for our PGA Professionals and their facilities through lesson fees, cart rentals, food and beverage, and new memberships etc. We feel it is important not to lose this momentum, realizing golf is a safe outlet for junior golfers and their families, we encourage you to consider hosting a team this year.  In making this ask, we realize the rules and regulations for this program will have to be adjusted due to restrictions being implemented at many facilities. The goal of the SFPGA is still to administer a competitive and fun Section Championship. Our intention is to host an aggregate score Championship for teams across the section in October, with a prize of a day at Honda Classic with your team. Timeline: Our goal is to have the regular season start by July 13th and run through mid-October. Bringing in outside play this summer is not possible for many facilities. So, we will have a long regular season to ensure that everyone is able to participate as they feel comfortable and are able to do so.

In addition, there will not be any types of restrictions in terms of team size or number of matches played. This is again to make this program as flexible as possible for you all. You can run an “in house” league with two kids or 200 kids, you can travel to other facilities for matches and scrimmages or you can just play at your own facility with your own kids. The possibilities are endless.   Registration:

Click here to register as a PGA JR. League Captain

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FORMER NICKLAUS JUNIOR CHAMPION GETS WIN ON TOUR

Matt cahill, pga: from junior tour to pga professional Things have come full circle for Matt Cahill, PGA. The former South Florida PGA Junior Tour member is now a member of the South Florida PGA Section employed as the Assistant Professional at Seminole Golf Club in Juno Beach. Cahill, who played with the SFPGA Junior Tour in the early 2000's, always knew he wanted to become a PGA Professional. Early on he was influenced by Don Law, PGA who gave him his first job picking range balls before heading to the PGM program at Florida State University.   “Don Law was always encouraging me to keep playing,” said Cahill. “I knew quickly that I wanted to be a PGA Professional so I could have the same impact on people’s lives that he had on mine.   After graduating from FSU in 2013, Cahill’s internships while in school at Oakmont Country Club and Shoal Creek Country Club prepared him for a job at Seminole.

Cahill has spent time splitting seasons between south Florida and facilities up north but is now in south Florida full-time and is excited to finally play in Section tournaments over the summer months. “It’s cool now because Michael Kartrude and Kenny Leech were all players that I competed against on the junior tour and now here we are all playing in Section events together,” explained Cahill. In fact, the recent E-Z-GO South Florida Open featured Cahill, Leech and was won by Kartrude.

Cahill attributes a lot of his success in the golf business to his time on the SFPGA junior tour having opened a lot of doors for him both in the business and in life. Now in his seventh season with Seminole, Cahill is always looking to touch the lives of young people getting into the game, encouraging them the way he was once encouraged. “I get to encourage kids who are learning the game just like I was 10 or 15 years ago” said Cahill. “Any kid who is interested in golf, I would find a PGA Professional who is willing to take you under their wing, learn from them and hang onto them for dear life.” In addition to giving back to young golfers, Cahill’s career has allowed him to check some things off his own bucket list which includes rounds with the likes of Rory Mcllroy and Phil Mickelson. “Every day is a great memory,” said Cahill. “Being around the golf course every day is a dream come true.”

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foundation corner SFPGA FOUNDATION AWARDS SCHOLARSHIP TO NATALIA JIMENEZ OF ARCHBISHOP MCCARTHY HIGH SCHOOL In an effort to assist an exceptional student and lessen the financial burden of attending college, the South Florida PGA Foundation has awarded its third SFPGA Foundation Scholarship to Natalia Jimenez from Pembroke Pines. The SFPGA Foundation Scholarship was created in 2018 and annually provides one local student with a four-year, $20,000 scholarship to assist with their college education, receiving $5,000 increments over the course of four years.   A former South Florida PGA Junior Tour player, Jimenez graduated from Archbishop McCarthy High School and is headed to Rollins College where she will compete on the Women’s Golf Team and major in Psychology while minoring in Business this fall.     “The moment I heard the news over the phone I was speechless,” said Jimenez. “[I was] overwhelmed with happiness and couldn't believe I was granted this incredible opportunity. My heart could not stop beating and I did a celebratory dance”  Jimenez is the third recipient of the SFPGA Foundation Scholarship and was awarded the honor for her work both in and out of the classroom. Insurmountable volunteer hours, academic achievements, leadership positions and a passionate understanding of how the game of golf can change lives made Jimenez the choice to serve as a representative of the South Florida PGA Foundation.  “Natalia is a very strong individual, outgoing with a very energetic personality,” said Tom Wildenhaus, PGA, the President of the South Florida PGA Foundation. “She has accomplished some great things in high school and has big ideas for her future.”  Wildenhaus found Jimenez to be very inclusive and philanthropic with her time to help others, aligning with the mission and values of the South Florida PGA Foundation. With the help of the SFPGA Foundation, Jimenez is looking forward to furthering her education to obtain the skills necessary to make a positive impact on society.  “I feel that the connections we make with the people we surround ourselves with in college are the foundation for our future businesses and relationships,” Jimenez explained. “I am also excited to be part of the Rollins Women's Golf Team and competing in the collegiate field.”    

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committed to the community The South Florida PGA Foundation has remained committed to the community during this unprecedented time. While Foundation programming have been cancelled, the SFPGA Foundation and its PGA Professionals have found ways to ensure the community is receiving Foundation services. Letters For CLS

The South Florida PGA Foundation recruited the players of the SFPGA Junior Tour to write “Thank You” cards to the Child Life Specialist teams of our Smiling Fore Life host facilities. One CLS Team Leader responded to the notes of thanks saying, “It was a very sweet surprise for sure. Our Child Life team rarely receive thank you cards, so I really appreciate the kind and thoughtful words.” Virtual Smiling Fore Life

Since we can no longer physically continue Smiling Fore Life, we have found ways to virtually connect and keep these kids golfing. Recording golf games, drills and stretches for our usual participants, our Professionals continue providing physical activities to fill these children’s days in the hospital. Our endgame being to keep these children smiling and distract them from the hardships surrounding them. HOPE From Home

Our spring and summer seasons of PGA HOPE have been postponed; however, we know our nation's veterans still need care and support. We are encouraging our veterans to stay home and stay connected through #HOPEfromHOME. This campaign includes virtual instruction, a call-it-forward program, and digital communications, to ensure they don't feel alone or isolated.

Golf From Home For a generation connected through social media, this pandemic has curated many new forms of virtual interaction. More specifically, in the sports world it has resulted in many challenges on social media. Our junior golfers joined in the fun and showcased their abilities. Even our Junior Golf Chairperson Lee Stroever, PGA got on the timeline of trick shots, eliciting help from his two children performing trick shots around their home.

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Quick Hits

WELCOME TAYLOR CARADONNA!

FAMILY CUP AT FIRST TEE OF MIAMI The First Tee of Miami is piloting Family Cup this summer. Family Cup is a scramble-style tournament where families can play together on the same team and compete against others. Click below to watch a video and learn more.

SFPGA HOSTS VIRTUAL EDUCATION

The South Florida PGA hosted an education seminar with a panel of three industry professionals discussing operations under the new normal and leadership during crisis situations. The Section was joined by moderator Marty Hall, PGA Assistant Director of the Golf Managment Program at Florida Gulf Coast University, Tom Wildenhaus, PGA Director of Golf at Olde Florida Golf Club, Darren Davis CGCS Superintendent  at the Olde Florida Golf Club and Tony D'Errico, CCM, CCE General Manager at Quail West Country Club. Via Zoom where 70 members and associates of the three different organizations represented logged in, the panel discussed the changes they have made at their club and in their operation as they have navigated the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition, the panel of leaders took questions from the audience and addressed concerns and challenges that all clubs are facing If you missed it, click here for the full discussion.. PAGE 18

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We are excited to have Taylor Caradonna join the SFPGA staff for the summer as an intern in the tournament and junior golf departments. Taylor is currently a student at Florida State University where she is majoring in communications. A former player on the SFPGA Junior Tour, Taylor is a native of Boca Raton and has spent time working at Ospery Point Golf Course and Boca Raton Municipal Golf Course. Additionally, Taylor has volunteered for The Allianz Championship at Broken Sound Old Course and the WGC Cadillac Championship at Trump National Doral. Taylor has already hit the ground running, helping to administer many events with the SFPGA junior and tournament teams. If you see Taylor out in the field, please welcome her to the team!


Rules With Brett Four-Ball Stroke Play The SFPGA uses Four-Ball stroke play in several events throughout the year. There are some intricacies in Four-Ball that are important when applying the rules of golf. Rule 23 in in the USGA Rules of Golf covers this format in its entirety. Team Responsibility: Each score on the scorecard must be clearly identified as the score of the individual partner who made it; if this is not done, the side is disqualified.

Actions Allowed / Not Allowed in Four-Ball:

The side may be represented by one partner during all or any part of a round. It is not necessary for both partners to be present or, if present, for both to play on each hole. Stroke Play – Before Other Partner Starts Hole. If the partner arrives only after the other partner has started play of a hole, the arriving partner is not allowed to play for the side until the next hole. Rule 4.1b(2) is modified to allow partners to share clubs, so long as the total number of clubs they have together is not more than 14. A player may take any action concerning the partner’s ball that the partner is allowed to take before making a stroke, such as to mark the spot of the ball and lift, replace, drop and place the ball. ·A player and the player’s caddie may help the partner in any way that the partner’s caddie is allowed to help (such as to give and be asked for advice and take the other actions allowed under Rule 10), but must NOT give any help that the partner’s caddie is not allowed to give under the Rules. This would include deliberately standing on or close to an extension of your line of play behind your ball for any reason When trying to determine whether a penalty applies the player, the partner, or the side you will need to reference rule 23.8 as it is extremely specific. PAGE 19

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S OUT HF L OR I DAP GA

S OUT H F L OR I DA P GA

S OUT HF L OR I DAP GA

S F P GAGOL F . C OM

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SFPGA Topics | Summer 2020  

SFPGA Topics | Summer 2020  

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