SETE - Greek Tourism Confederation Annual Report 2018

Page 1

ANNUAL REPORT



A GREEK TOURISM CONFEDERATION PUBLICATION FOR 2018


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 00

PAGE 04

TABLE OF

MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT page 07

TOURISM IN FIGURES page 11

CORE ACTIVITIES page 51 “Tourism: Generating value for everyone” page 52 SETE in the regions page 54 The voice of Greek tourism at the heart of Europe page 56 SETE Annual Conference: Tourism in Transition: #someTHINKdifferent page 60 This is Athens & Partners page 70 #WanderlustGR page 72 INSETE event for the enhancement of Greek tourism page 80 “On Tour” Tourism School page 82 The massive recycling potential in the tourism sector page 84

MEMBERS´ NETWORK page 87 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6 5.7 5.8 5.9


CONTENTS

CHAPTER 00

PAGE 05

CURRENT ISSUES & SETE’S POSITIONS page 23 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6

Prerequisites for the growth of the Greek economy page 25 Short-term rentals page 25 Spatial planning page 26 Employment issues page 26 Enhancement of the competitiveness of the Greek tourism product page 28 Functional destinations and modern infrastructure page 28

BOARD OF DIRECTORS page 91

COURSES OF ACTION page 31 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4

Strategic information and documentation page 33 Enhancement of human resources page 36 Content creation and promotion of the country worldwide page 40 Linking tourism to other sectors of the economy: culture & agri-food page 44

SPONSORS page 97

CONTENTS


Outward Orientation Synergies Sustainable Development


01 >

MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 01

MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT

PAGE 08


MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT

CHAPTER 01

PAGE 09

n 2018, tourism was once again the sector that played the leading role. The sector became stronger, its social footprint was enhanced and the importance of its dynamics was further consolidated. Greek tourism is still the spearhead of the wounded economy, the sector which makes the biggest contribution to national GDP and a major “reservoir” of jobs. We believed –and still believe– that the great lesson we all learned during the years of the crisis is that tourism is a collective effort of great benefit for local communities and for the Greek society and economy as a whole. It provides proof that with systematic work, trust in the power of the market and in Greek entrepreneurship, and collaboration and dialogue with the people working in the sector, we can achieve very important things. We have joined forces and have worked together to uphold its competitiveness and dynamics as a driving force for the growth of the national economy. Together we have set the goals of modernizing our product, promoting its comparative advantages and strengthening the strategy of holistic and sustainable tourism development.

Our efforts are bearing fruit. Tourism is a unique and valuable asset for our economy, for Greece, for everyone. Our goal now is to embark on a new period of maturity. We can now plan the next new cycle of long-term growth. However, there are still big challenges ahead. We shall continue to work hard, methodically and meticulously. We look forward to a more favourable economic environment with incentives and reliefs for our most profitable sector. We have an ambitious plan for Greek tourism in the next decade. We shall continue to work conscientiously and without fail. SETE, INSETE and Marketing Greece believe that tourism concerns and should involve people from many and different sectors. In this context, we see the development of synergies and collaborations as a top priority, as we believe that joining forces can create the prerequisites for a better future for Greek tourism. In 2019 we can go even higher!

Yiannis Retsos


In 2019 we connect Greece to 120 destinations in 44 countries providing 10,3 mil. seats. Discover all of our destinations here.


02 >

TOURISM IN FIGURES


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 02

PAGE 12

TOURISM IN FIGURES The benefits of tourism have an important impact throughout the economy. Moreover, the sector significantly contributes to GDP, employment and towards covering the trade deficit. These aspects are stressed whenever the opportunity arises.

According to a recent World Travel & Tourism Council report, the Greek tourism sector:

3,5x is growing 3.5 times faster than the Greek economy

20,6% accounts for 20.6% of Greece’s GDP, compared to the global figure of 10.4%

27,9% was enhanced with 18.5 billion euros from international visitor spending, an amount which corresponds to 27.9% of total exports.

Taking into consideration the arrivals and receipts data for 2018 (almost 33 million arrivals and over 16.5 billion euros of direct travel revenue), the contribution to GDP is equally important for the economy. The outward orientation pursued by the sector during the crisis was one of the key parameters that allowed tourism to maintain its momentum throughout the difficult years and to continue doing so in 2018.


TOURISM IN FIGURES

CHAPTER 02

>90% of revenues generated by tourism derives from inbound tourism.

Source: INSETE Intelligence

PAGE 13


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 02

PAGE 14

01. Key Performance Indicators

2017

RECEIPTS (bil. €)

2018

Change

AVERAGE DURATION OF STAY

14,2

7,7

15,7

7,5

+10,2%

-2,3% AVERAGE EXPENDITURE PER TRIP/JOURNEY (€)

OVERNIGHT STAYS (mil.) 209,9

522,0

227,0

519,6

+8,2%

-0,5%

ARRIVALS (mil.)

EXPENDITURE PER OVERNIGHT STAY (€)

27,2

67,7

30,1

69,0

+10,8%

+1,9%

Source: Bank of Greece Processing: INSETE Intelligence

02. Greece & Competitors World Ranking Position, 2017-2018 1 SPAIN

24

32

GREECE CROATIA

44

52

TURKEY CYPRUS

74 EGYPT

Source: UNWTO, WEF Processing: INSETE Intelligence


TOURISM IN FIGURES

CHAPTER 02

PAGE 15

Tourism Direct Contribution to GDP (bil. €)

Contribution to Employment

30,9% of GDP 36,7%-44,2%

TOTAL (bil. €) 57,1 DIRECT

INDIRECT

21,6%

35,6%

INDIRECT

INBOUND TOURISM 15,7 TRANSPORT & CRUISE

16,7%

2,3 DOMESTIC SPENDING 3,4

DIRECT

Source: Bank of Greece Processing: INSETE Intelligence

Source: INSETE Intelligence

03. International Tourist Arrivals in Greece and Competitors, 2018 COUNTRY

ARRIVALS (mil.)

CHANGE 17-18

SPAIN

84,5

3,4 %

ITALY

59,6

3,8 %

TURKEY

35,4

10,5 %

GREECE

30

10,3 %

PORTUGAL

23,2

4,4 %

CROATIA

16,4

5,3 %

Source: Euromonitor from trade sources/national statistics Processing: INSETE Intelligence


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 02

PAGE 16

04. International Tourist Arrivals by Country, 2018 COUNTRY

2018

2017

CHANGE

GERMANY

4.381

3.706

BULGARIA

3.135

2.546

UK

2.943

3.002

ITALY

1.667

1.441

FRANCE

1.524

1.420

ROMANIA

1.389

1.149

NORTH MACEDONIA

1.187

1.571

USA

1.097

865

POLAND

1.050

747

NEDERLANDS

1.015

947

ALBANIA

987

829

TURKEY

930

972

SERBIA

922

1.080

CYPRUS

698

632

BELGIUM

587

527

18,2 % 23,1 % -2,0 % 15,7 % 7,3 % 20,9 % -24,5 % 26,9 % 40,5 % 7,2 % 19,0 % -4,3 % -14,6 % 10,5 % 11,4 %

Source: Bank of Greece Processing: INSETE Intelligence

05. Seasonality of International Tourist Arrivals, 2018 MONTH

ARRIVALS

REVENUE

JANUARY

2,0 %

1,1 %

FEBRUARY

1,6 %

1,1 %

MARCH

2,4 %

1,7 %

APRIL

3,7 %

3,3 %

MAY

8,1 %

10,1 %

JUNE

13,6 %

16,0 %

JULY

18,4 %

23,3 %

AUGUST

20,2 %

24,9 %

SEPTEMBER

16,2 %

16,7 %

OCTOBER

9,0 %

9,5 %

NOVEMBER

2,6 %

2,2 %

DECEMBER

2,2 %

1,9 %

Source: Bank of Greece Processing: INSETE Intelligence

16,5

54,8%

mil.

Arrivals

9, 2 bil.

58,2%

Revenue


TOURISM IN FIGURES

CHAPTER 02

PAGE 17

06. Top 10 Greek Airports in International Tourist Arrivals, 2018 CITY

ARRIVALS

1.

ATHENS

8.121.761

2.

HERAKLION

3.319.392

3.

RHODES

2.362.308

4.

THESSALONIKI

2.162.117

5.

CORFU

1.509.219

6.

KOS

1.195.808

7.

CHANIA

1.181.319

8.

ZAKYNTHOS

853.704

9.

SANTORINI

524.494

10. MYKONOS

442.704

Source: Hellenic Civil Aviation Authority (HCAA), Athens International Airport (AIA), Fraport Greece Processing: INSETE Intelligence. Data are subject to changes

07. Breakdown of International Tourism Receipts by Country of Origin, 2018* Income in mil. €

GERMANY

USA

UK

Source: Bank of Greece Processing: INSETE Intelligence *Cruise Arrivals and receipts are not included

ITALY

FRANCE

POLAND

NEDERLANDS

SWITZERLAND

ROMANIA

BELGIUM


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 02

PAGE 18

08. Non-Residents΄ Overnight Stays in Greece, 2008-2018* YEAR

TOTAL

2008

152.596.091

2009

141.443.690

2010

140.175.727

2011

150.978.226

2012

140.919.380

2013

160.250.697

2014

184.788.592

2015

185.027.145

2016

190.401.819

2017

209.855.157

2018

227.011.972

8,2% Increase

Source: Bank of Greece Processing: INSETE Intelligence *Cruise Arrivals and receipts are not included

09. Top 10 Countries of Origin in Non-Residents΄ Average Duration of Stay in Greece, 2018 CANADA

AVERAGE DURATION OF STAY

14,0

AUSTRALIA

13,3

RUSSIA

7,5

USA

10,6

days

9,9

GERMANY

9,7

BELGIUM

FRANCE

SWITZERLAND

NEDERLANDS

9,0

Source: Bank of Greece Processing: INSETE Intelligence

9,0

9,1

9,0

UK

8,7


TOURISM IN FIGURES

CHAPTER 02

PAGE 19

10. Contribution to Regional Development Revenue Distribution 2018 PERCENTAGE

REGION

28% 20% 15% 15% 11% 3% 2% 2% 1% 1% 1% 1% 0,4%

SOUTH AEGEAN CRETE ATTICA CENTRAL MACEDONIA IONIAN ISLANDS PELOPONNESE EASTERN MACEDONIA & THRACE THESSALY NORTH AEGEAN WESTERN GREECE CENTRAL GREECE EPIRUS WESTERN MACEDONIA

Source: Bank of Greece Processing: INSETE Intelligence

11. Distribution of Hotel Beds per Category, 2018 REGIONAL UNIT

5*

4*

3*

2*

1*

EASTERN MACEDONIA & THRACE

1,4 %

1,7 %

3,3 %

3,5 %

4,0 %

ATTICA

8,2 %

7,8 %

6,4 %

6,9 %

7,5 %

NORTH AEGEAN

1,1 %

1,4 %

4,1 %

3,8 %

2,5 %

WESTERN GREECE

2,1 %

2,1 %

2,9 %

2,4 %

1,1 %

WESTERN MACEDONIA

0,1 %

0,4 %

1,6 %

0,6 %

0,9 %

EPIRUS

1,5 %

1,8 %

3,1 %

2,3 %

1,5 %

THESSALY

1,7 %

3,1 %

3,8 %

4,7 %

5,5 %

IONIAN ISLANDS

6,4 %

12,4 %

14,9 %

15,1 %

6,0 %

CENTRAL MACEDONIA

12,1 %

7,8 %

11,2 %

8,9 %

30,7 %

CRETE

26,4 %

24,7 %

17,4 %

19,1 %

17,4 %

SOUTH AEGEAN

33,9 %

30,7 %

21,5 %

22,0 %

14,3 %

PELOPONNESE

4,1 %

3,7 %

6,2 %

5,1 %

3,5 %

CENTRAL GREECE

1,0 %

2,5 %

3,4 %

5,6 %

5,3 %

Source: Hellenic Chamber of Hotels (HCH) Processing: INSETE Intelligence


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 02

PAGE 20

12. Number of Hotel Beds, 2018 CATEGORY

BEDS

5 4 3 2 1

146.940 205.617 187.185

798.650 Beds

205.669 53.209

Source: Hellenic Chamber of Hotels (HCH) Processing: INSETE Intelligence

13. Percentage Distribution of Hotel Units, Rooms & Beds by Star Category, 2018

26,1 %

25,8 %

25,8 %

25,7 %

23,6 %

23,4 %

17,9 %

18,4 %

6,7 %

6,7 %

41,0 %

25,2 %

14,6 %

14,5 % 4,7 %

UNITS Source: Hellenic Chamber of Hotels (HCH) Processing: INSETE Intelligence

ROOMS

BEDS


TOURISM IN FIGURES

CHAPTER 02

14. GRI Greece, 2018

GREECE, TOTAL

15. GRI Greece & Competitors, 2018 86,3%

PER CATEGORY

5 4 3 1-2

PAGE 21

DESTINATIONS CITIES

89,3% 86,0% 85,9% 85,0%

ATHENS ISTANBUL ROME BARCELONA THESSALONIKI BOLOGNIA

PER REGION

ATTICA NORTH AEGEAN DODECANESE EPIRUS THESSALY MACEDONIA & THRACE IONIAN ISLANDS CRETE CYCLADES ISLANDS CENTRAL MACEDONIA PELOPONNESE CENTRAL GREECE

GRI

84,6% 86,2% 85,8% 89,9% 86,2% 85,6% 85,0% 86,2% 90,0% 86,0% 84,9% 85,1%

ISMIR MARSEILLE

84,7% 80,9% 81,5% 84,4% 82,2% 82,5% 79,8% 78,9%

SUN & BEACH

DODECANESE IONIAN ISLANDS CRETE CYCLADES ISLANDS HALKIDIKI ANTALYA ISTRIA MAJORCA MARBELLA BODRUM RΙΜΙΝΙ

85,8% 85,0% 86,2% 90,0% 86,1% 82,0% 83,7% 83,9% 85,3% 82,0% 82,0%

PREMIUM

MYKONOS SANTORINI IBIZA SARDINIA

88,5% 89,2% 83,8% 85,1%


www.sete.gr


03 >

CURRENT ISSUES & SETE΄S POSITIONS


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 03

CURRENT ISSUES & SETE’S POSITIONS As a national Social Partner, in 2018 SETE continued to dynamically participate in the social dialogue, making proposals and implementing interventions aimed at the resolution of issues which pertain to the establishment of a more attractive business framework for action, as well as to the sustainable development of tourism for the benefit of the economy and society. Among other things, SETE’s interventions focused on issues such as the growth of the Greek economy, overtaxation, spatial planning, proper use of the shoreline, the regulatory framework for short-term rentals, employment, improving product quality, etc. Moreover, SETE continued to work closely with the other social partners and organizations in order to support its positions more effectively and strengthen the positive synergies of tourism with other sectors of the economy.

PAGE 24


CURRENT ISSUES & SETE'S POSITIONS

CHAPTER 03

3.1 Prerequisites for the growth of the Greek economy With the end of the third economic adjustment programme, Greece saw a window of opportunity to turn to account the structural adjustments which were brought about in its economy, to remain on the reform path and to apply its own growth plan through a viable model which shall create the necessary and sustainable primary surpluses and ultimately reduce debt as a percentage of GDP. According to an INSETE study in July 2018, over the last 8 years significant structural changes can be identified in competitiveness, fiscal adjustment and external balance. As shown throughout the crisis years, tourism is one of the key pillars supporting the national economy. It is indicative that direct income from inbound tourism in the last eight years reached the impressive figure of 100 billion euros. This income could have been even higher, had the tourism sector been routed towards a rationale of enhancing its competitiveness with more strategic targeting. Looking forward, a coherent national plan is essential for boosting the country’s competitiveness and this presupposes the inclusion of tourism as a key priority for the growth model of the next decade, with specific policies for its enhancement.

PAGE 25

3.2 Short-term rentals Equality in the short-term rental market The absence of a practicable regulatory framework in the sharing economy of Greece has two important repercussions: (a) The unequal treatment of licensed accommodation vis-à-vis properties which are available for short-term leasing, with financial repercussions such as the generation / encouragement of unfair competition, the loss of public revenues and the rise of undeclared employment. (b) Collateral –primarily of a social nature– issues which concern the functioning of destinations, such as the prospects of finding a house, increased prices for long-term rentals, the inadequate functioning of blocks of flats (hygiene and safety issues) and even the alteration of the urban physiognomy of neighbourhoods. In order for this activity to be incorporated within the overall tourism product in a way that would support local economies and communities, there has to be a framework which shall ensure a regulatory and fiscal symmetry, but which shall also keep the effects on the destination’s functioning under control. With this in mind, we should take into consideration international practices which, among other things, demonstrate that taxation at source brings more revenues and reduces tax evasion, substantially facilitating the task of the authorities. The active involvement of local government must also be considered, given that the Municipalities and Regions have better knowledge of specific local conditions (for example, demand, supply, saturation by area).


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 03

PAGE 26

3.3 Spatial planning Immediate need for a simple and investment-friendly spatial development framework It is obvious that the country’s financial recovery is not feasible without growth and without new quality investments in tourism which shall add value to the tourism product and which shall create new jobs. However, it has been observed that new tourism investments focus mainly on acquiring and restructuring existing units or changing the use of existing buildings and secondarily on investing in new land. The cause is none other than the –accumulated over time– negative experience of aspiring investors in completely new investments, due both to the bureaucracy involved in licensing and to the lack of spatial planning. SETE has highlighted the need to create a simple and investment-friendly spatial development framework which shall extend to municipal level (the so-called Local Spatial Plans), with specific land uses, in order to ensure the necessary legal certainty for investors and, at the same time, protect the natural environment. Our goal is to create a positive institutional framework both through the ongoing Special Spatial Development Framework for Tourism and through other Urban Planning interventions in order to give intangible incentives by minimizing bureaucracy, so as to attract new tourism investments which shall contribute to the country’s economic growth, employment and the enhancement of tourism competitiveness.

3.4 Employment issues In the years of the crisis, the operation of the tourism sector was largely driven by the pursuit of industrial peace. This is proven by the fact that sectoral employment agreements were co-signed (with employees) in several branches of the tourism industry. We strongly believe that a culture of dialogue and understanding has been nurtured through the process of collective negotiation. This must become a legacy for the future. Moreover, supporting the people of Greek tourism is our strategic choice; not just with regard to remuneration and terms of employment, but also through the constant training provided in the form of pertinent programmes. Moreover, we should not forget the sector’s contribution to employment. At the peak of the tourist season, we reach 30% of the country’s total employment, providing job opportunities to high unemployment groups such as young people and women. Furthermore, it has been repeatedly pointed out on every occasion that it is necessary to reduce non-wage labour cost –taxation on labour income and insurance contributions– and also that it is essential to establish, on a constant basis, a lower labour cost –by means either of a lower minimum wage or of a substantially lower non-wage labour cost– for new employees and for at least the first two years of their employment in their field of work. It has also been underlined that the current arbitration system does not reflect the position of the International Labour Office, which censures any arbitration that produces binding effects against the other party.


CURRENT ISSUES & SETE'S POSITIONS

CHAPTER 03

3.4.1 National General Collective Labour Agreement for 2018 SETE co-signed with the other national social partners the National General Collective Labour Agreement for 2018. A common position of the national social partners is that the social dialogue between employers and employees is a key feature of the European social model and a consultation institution recognized by the Treaty on European Union and the International Labour Agreements ratified by the country. Especially at times of crisis such as the one we are currently going through, international experience has shown that social dialogue can contribute towards forging creative and innovative answers and promote a more balanced and non-discriminatory recovery. In the context of the agreement, national social partners decided, among other things, to set up joint technical study groups to deal with the Professional Insurance Fund, the restart of businesses and the rescue of jobs, as well as with the establishment of guidelines for effective collective negotiations. Signing the agreement, SETE reaffirmed its interest in taking initiatives which shall support employment in the country.

PAGE 27

3.4.2 Determination of the minimum wage In the context of their institutional role, SETE and its Institute lodged statements and participated in the tripartite consultation which took place in the process of the determination of the minimum wage for the year 2018. It should be noted that, as prescribed by the law, the final decision was made by the Minister of Labour, who determined the minimum salary for employees and the minimum daily wage for workers, with the consent of the Cabinet. Throughout this procedure, the firm position of the tourism sector was upheld, specifically that any increase in the minimum wage is constructive, viable and relatively harmless for the economy and employment only if it does not have a negative impact on the efficient operation of the labour market, the enhancement of employment and the productivity and competitiveness of the economy. It was also pointed out that it is imperative that measures be taken for the immediate reduction of non-wage labour cost (insurance contributions and taxation) and (in case the sub-minimum wage is eliminated) the simultaneous introduction of a new sub-minimum wage for newcomers in the labour market, regardless of age, for a reasonable period of at least two years of employment in their field of work. Excessive increases in the minimum wage which do not take into consideration these parameters may lead to the failure of individual sectors and businesses to respond and may bring about either a reduction in employment or –more probably– a turn towards more flexible (actual or fictitious) employment forms and a shift towards under-declared or undeclared employment.


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 03

3.5 Enhancement of the competitiveness of the Greek tourism product High taxation impacts the competitiveness of Greek tourism businesses The high tax burden on the tourism package has reduced gains driven by competitiveness by 50%; this resulted from the internal devaluation caused by the Greek adjustment programmes. It should be noted that tourism is largely an exportable product which is provided in a highly competitive and ever-expanding international market. The repeated increases of VAT rates (double for accommodation and catering and triple for air and sea fares), the overnight stay tax along with the corresponding communal tax, and the increases in other business taxes affect seasonality, interfere with the loan servicing capacity and are inhibiting factors for investments. A favourable operating environment for tourism businesses has to be developed so that they can adequately respond to new international challenges. It should be an environment with stable tax rates, without excessive tax burdens, and with the means and financial tools that will improve tourism indicators and competitiveness. After all, improving competitiveness is a requirement of the business world of the country as a whole and not just of the tourism sector.

PAGE 28

3.6 Functional destinations and modern infrastructure Greece now holds an important position among the most popular destinations worldwide. In order to maintain this momentum, we should respond to the challenges of the day after and to the demands of visitors through the experiences and impressions offered by our destination. The key requirement is a strategy of “maturity” which shall ensure a successful course for the future. From the goal of attaining the tourism development of an area, we have now moved to a time when tourism can provide –and, indeed, has already begun to provide– the means to improve a location. With this in mind, effective destination management and operation are required. An adequate level of key infrastructures –such as power and water supply and proper waste management– is crucial for some destinations, which almost reach their limits in high season. This calls for a change in philosophy and the modification of promotional activities for such destinations. We need to shift to a holistic approach and aim at the sustainable development and management of destinations, so as to avert any potential commercialization of the product. The commitment and support of the central government and local authorities are essential, as is the effective dialogue with the citizens. As a matter or priority, a list of all issues should be compiled and action to resolve them should be initiated, turning to account any available funding mechanisms, with a view to contributing to the Greek tourism industry and, hence, to the country's national economy.


CURRENT ISSUES & SETE'S POSITIONS

CHAPTER 03

More specifically, in 2018 proposals were submitted on the following issues: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Spatial Development Framework Determination of the minimum wage The regulation of the market on short-term rentals Growth of the Greek economy Overtaxation

PAGE 29


We advance tourism enterprises that drive the

economy forward

See how we do it here.


04 >

d.

COURSES OF ACTION


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 04

PAGE 32

COURSES OF ACTION

With Marketing Greece and INSETE –SETE’s operational branches–, we have set and pursued the quality upgrade of the product as our main goal. This is achieved by:

Providing the market with strategic information, in as much as the enhancement of the tourism offering requires a deep understanding of the product as well as knowledge and the study of good practices internationally.

Investing in human resources; the workforce is the great competitive advantage of Greek tourism and its ability to quickly adapt and move with the times is a guarantee for the future of the sector.

Linking tourism to other sectors of the economy in order to disseminate its benefits and enrich the tourist experience, with an emphasis on gastronomy and culture.

All our actions are based on the following three pillars:

Outward Orientation – Synergies – Sustainable Development


COURSES OF ACTION

CHAPTER 04

PAGE 33

4.1 Strategic information and documentation INSETE’S RESEARCH DIVISION (ΙΝSETE INTELLIGENCE)

In 2018, through INSETE Intelligence –INSETE’s research division–, SETE continued to provide data, information and studies to its Members and to tourism professionals regarding the latest issues and trends which forge the setting and prospects for the tourism sector. INSETE Intelligence processes data from more than 30 sources, some of which are available in the public domain, while some more specialized ones are only available for a fee. The three pillars INSETE Intelligence uses to disseminate knowledge are statistics, studies and regular publications, and the organization of and participation in conferences and events. In 2018, INSETE Intelligence sustained the publication of the monthly statistical bulletin which provides data of incoming and domestic tourist traffic, information about the demand for hotel accommodation services (in co-operation with Trivago), and quality indicators for hotels in Greece and at competitive destinations. It is worth noting that, during the year, SETE Intelligence conducted approximately 20 studies over a wide range of issues relating to tourism. We would like to point at the following:

Hotel Study: This is a study on the financial data of Greek hotels and includes the application of a “per room” indicator system (for example, income or overheads per room, per star category and per Region). It became clear from the study that the hotel industry is very important for the Greek economy, with a very high invested capital. Most of the activity transpires in 5 Regions and in 4- and 5-star hotels. Finally, the destination “product” is a determining factor for growth (see section 5.7 for details).

Solid Waste Recycling and Management at tourism businesses in Greece: This is a study on practices and possibilities of recycling and managing solid waste from tourism businesses and the development of three practical waste management and recycling guides for hotel businesses, tourist transport companies and marinas and yachts (see section 5.9 for details).


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 04

PAGE 34

Study on the contribution of the private tourism sector to the economy and taxation: It was estimated that in 2016 tax revenues from the tourism sector accounted for 10.5% of total tax revenue, a higher percentage than its 8.3% direct contribution to the economy. These percentages are even greater if we take into consideration the indirect and induced effects of tourism. Moreover, in the 2009-2016 period the private tourism sector generated more than 105 billion euros in Gross Value Added (GVA), 92 billion euros in income and 52.3 billion euros in revenue for the state. Study on the conditions and prospects of the Greek economy: The adjustment of the Greek economy over the 2010-2018 period was analysed and a considerable fiscal adjustment –mainly in the expenditure component– was identified, as was a significant adjustment to international competitiveness, which led to a substantial increase in the export of goods and services and resulted in a large reduction in the twin deficits. These two major adjustments are the country's most important advantages for the post-memorandum era and should be safeguarded by the political system.

Click on the titles with this symbol to access the INSETE webpages where you can view and download the study files.


COURSES OF ACTION

CHAPTER 04

Other studies by topic Tourism and the Greek economy The contribution of Tourism to the Greek economy in 2017 Employment in Tourism and in Other Sectors of the Greek economy, 2008-2017 Studies on the characteristics of inbound tourism in Greece Profile of Inbound Holiday Tourism in Greece, 2016-2017 Who goes where? How long do they stay? How much do they spend? Analysis of inbound tourism by Region and Market (2017) An X-Ray of Inbound Tourism, 2005-2017 Composite Study on Maritime Tourism (yachting, cruises and coastal tourism) Studies on the characteristics of major developing markets Profile of Inbound Senior Citizen Holiday Tourism in Europe Profile of Inbound Luxury Holiday Tourism in the Mediterranean Inbound air and land traffic: Outlook 2018: Prospects of inbound tourism in Greece in 2018 International Air Arrivals: 2016 & 2017 Review and Analysis of Major Markets Outlook 2018 – addendum: Prospects of land tourism in Greece in 2018

PAGE 35


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 04

PAGE 36

4.2 Enhancement of human resources INSETE's training pillar designs and implements training actions which enhance, develop, inform and motivate the most important factor of the tourist experience: people. Driven by its key motto "Connecting Tourism to its People", INSETE's Training Division studies the training needs of professionals, travels to Greek destinations, gets to know the people and the particular aspects of each place and of its businesses and, together with a constantly evolving dynamic team of partners, organizes seminars and conferences and enters into strategic partnerships which aim at enhancing and developing the skills, abilities and culture of the people of the tourism sector. Moreover, it supervises and scientifically supports all the professional training actions which are implemented by INSETE in the context of co-funded programmes and actively participates in the consolidation of the quality dimension in the sector’s services and professions.

SEMINARS

PARTNERSHIPS WITH TOP INSTITUTIONS

On Tour SCHOOLS OF TOURISM

PARTICIPANTS

PARTICIPANTS

CITIES TOPICS

VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE & DEVELOPMENT ACTIONS


COURSES OF ACTION

CHAPTER 04

Specifically, in 2018 INSETE’s training pillar:

Organized and implemented: 59 Executive Seminars for tourism professionals, in 13 cities, with 28 lecturers, 33 topics and 1,290 participants. It should be noted that 69% of participants came from small and medium-sized enterprises. In addition to the comprehensive organization and implementation of these training programmes, INSETE covers the greatest part of the participation fee (50%-70%), thus offering tourism professionals the opportunity to attend high-standard professional training in their own country and for a nominal fee. 6 “On Tour” Schools of Tourism (Poros, Katerini, Skiathos, Chios, Halkidiki and Nafplio) with more than 1,400 participants, 46 speeches and 8 closed workshops.

Followed and supported: The “Tipping Point” action for the vocational guidance of students in Greek schools. 4 actions related to training and knowledge and skills certification for employees of tourism businesses, provided under co-funded programmes.

PAGE 37

Co-operated with: Lausanne Hospitality Consulting of the Ecole hôtelière de Lausanne, for the implementation of three high-end seminars about “Value Creation in the Food Service Industry” and “Maximizing Revenue and Managing Distribution”, in Athens and Heraklion (Crete). The top American institute “Cornell University”, which offered Greek tourism professionals exclusive access to the University’s online programmes at special prices. In the course of the two rounds that were implemented from October 2017 to December 2018, tourism professionals were able to attend more than 200 eCornell courses. ReGeneration Academy –an innovative paid placement and personal and professional development programme–; moreover, it developed the training programme “ReGeneration Hospitality Front Office Academy Powered by INSETE”. The Greek Wine Federation, through the inclusion in every cooking seminar of a Food & Wine Pairing section, with the aim to connect professional chefs with Greek wine producers and acquaint them with Greek wine varieties. Moreover, people have expressed an interest in participating in the pilot E-counselling distance coaching programme. The programme involves the development and support of the operation of an electronic system of interactive counselling services, which offers a comprehensive management and monitoring solution with customized training programmes and services, as well as the creation of the appropriate supporting material. The programme also involves the pilot operation of the system with the provision of interactive vocational guidance services to more than 1,000 participants.


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 04

Moreover, people have expressed an interest in participating in the pilot E-counselling distance coaching programme. The programme involves the development and support of the operation of an electronic system of interactive counselling services, which offers a comprehensive management and monitoring solution with customized training programmes and services, as well as the creation of the appropriate supporting material. The programme also involves the pilot operation of the system with the provision of interactive vocational guidance services to more than 1,000 participants.


COURSES OF ACTION

CHAPTER 04

PAGE 39

Loading | Digital Marketing for tourism businesses. Aiming to offer extensive and practical Digital Marketing knowledge, Marketing Greece –in a strategic cooperation with EUROBANK and with the contribution of INSETE’s training pillar– supports businesses which operate in the tourism sector and enhances their outward orientation through training seminars exclusively designed for tourism businesses. These training seminars –which focus on Digital Marketing and its momentum– emphasize the increased requirements of the Greek tourism industry and analyse techniques, tools and the latest digital marketing strategies, at the same time underlining the value of content. Distinguished lecturers and executives of the tourism industry share with participants their knowledge and professional experience through a holistic approach to digital marketing.

powered by


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 04

4.3 Content creation and promotion of the country worldwide Marketing Greece –the private sector’s alliance for the promotion of the Greek tourism product– aims to bring together different parties which share a common vision for the development and promotion of the Greek tourism product and to launch campaigns and actions which shall enhance the dynamics of Greek tourism.

This is what we do:

We promote destinations

DiscoverGreece.com

We create

Synergies

We turn to account

Public Relations

PAGE 40


COURSES OF ACTION

CHAPTER 04

PAGE 41

Discover Greece www.discovergreece.com Discovergreece.com is a high-quality interactive platform which provides the basis and strategic pillar upon which multilevel promotional campaigns about destinations in Greece are being developed.

Insights: Traffic 2017 vs 2018 sessions

unique users

page views

2017

3.343.589

2.743.917

5.664.854

2018

4.235.767 3.646.872 6.945.108 +26,7%

+32.9%

+22.6%

total social media engagement

total video views

Social Media Total Results total social media reach

2018

80.910.503 3.947.303 +17%

+11%

6.877.452 +48%


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 04

PAGE 42

Synergies

In 2018, Marketing Greece applied in practice its philosophy of creating synergies. It developed a common scope of action for the enhancement of the tourism product by partnering with 25 associations and companies. Synergies with:

To promote 8 destinations, including:

Halkidiki, Chania, Corfu, the Ionian Islands, Athens, Region of Western Greece, Region of Central Greece, Region of South Aegean


COURSES OF ACTION

CHAPTER 04

PAGE 43

PR & Publicity Activities

powered by

Marketing Greece –emphasizing the multidimensional character of Athens, the less well-known (island and mainland) destinations, Greek gastronomy and the exquisite experiences our country can offer visitors– attracted the attention of popular international media throughout 2018.

1.041

6

DIGITAL OR PRINTED ARTICLES

TELEVISION SPECIALS

JOURNALISM ASSIGNMENTS

76 PRESS TRIPS

11

MARKETS

47

DESTINATIONS

ΑΠΟ

154

BLOG POSTS

12

VLOGS

33

DESTINATIONS

Click here to view all articles for 2018. Click here to view the report by Blogtrotters.

>5.000 SOCIAL MEDIA POSTS


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 04

PAGE 44

4.4 Linking Tourism to other sectors of the economy: culture & agri-food The effective interconnection of tourism with culture and agri-food differentiates Greek tourism, making it more competitive, enhancing its quality features, mitigating the seasonality of the tourist season and distributing more evenly in terms of locations the income derived from tourism. In 2018, SETE, INSETE and Marketing Greece systematically focused on the interconnection between the two sectors, highlighting the benefits of this approach for destinations and businesses. Actions were directed both towards improving supply and towards managing demand.

To enrich the travel experience

2 Thematic Workshops

“Gastronomy Destinations�

Digital Campaigns

Press & Bloggers Trips

on linking tourism to agri-food and wine

Initiative, in 3 pilot areas

in the discovergreece.com ecosystem

to 47 destinations


COURSES OF ACTION

CHAPTER 04

PAGE 45

MARKETING GREECE & «DIAZOMA»: Linking tourism to culture in practice. The concepts of tourism and culture are inextricably linked, for both inherently place people at their core. Today, linking tourism to culture is not only a desired but a strategic goal. This goal is achieved with the participation of SETE and Marketing Greece –as partners– in the mission of the DIAZOMA Association, through the provision of their know-how, tools and communication channels, with an aim to promote ancient theatres and to highlight the importance of the country’s cultural monuments.

Executive Seminars

Strategic Synergies

Thematic Working Groups

Proposal Formulation

with a focus on Food & Beverage

with DIAZOMA & the Greek Wine Federation

with the active participation of SETE members

in order to resolve the main issues pertaining to monuments and archaeological sites


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 04

«Gastronomy Destinations»

The “Gastronomy Destinations” initiative was implemented by INSETE and Marketing Greece in cooperation with the “Greek Gastronomy Guide”. In this context and working together with the gastronomic communities of pilot destinations, we planned and implemented actions to enhance the local culinary identity. Our vision is to prompt the integration and promotion of each area’s full potential by linking tourism to gastronomy. In order to realize this vision, we activated 3 sets of actions –networking, training and promoting– in 3 pilot areas with different levels of tourism development: Corfu, Tinos and Aigialeia.

@travel_and_keep_fit

PAGE 46


COURSES OF ACTION

CHAPTER 04

PAGE 47

As a first step, networking meetings at each destination strengthened the bonds between the key players of the agri-food and tourism sectors. Subsequently, INSETE’s training pillar conducted a seminar exclusively for members of the culinary community, which aspired to acquaint participants with the fundamental insights required to promote the local culinary community, provide high-quality services and create a hub of cooperation and competition that shall differentiate them and help them evolve into a dynamic gastronomy destination in the future.

In the third phase of the project, Marketing Greece implemented a promotion programme emphasizing the gastronomy of the destination. Typical activities included promotion on discovergreece.com and Press and blogger trips in order to generate positive publicity and send targeted messages.

@linamallon


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 04

PAGE 48

Food as a destination

In 2018, Blogtrotters was dedicated to Greek gastronomy. Digital influencers travelled throughout Greece and told stories –based on personal experience– about how Greeks put their heart and soul in every dish, how recipes go from generation to generation and how each celebration is an opportunity for Greeks to gather around the table and share their happiness just as they share their food. Through a series of tailor-made trips, Blogtrotters encouraged digital influencers to discover destinations through their local products, but also to discover local products through the destinations.

To view the case studies of the Marketing Greece “Blogtrotters 2018”, click here.

12 33 15 VLOGS

DESTINATIONS

BLOG P


COURSES OF ACTION

CHAPTER 04

PAGE 49

@madameedith

@madameedith

@madameedith

@benjithorpe

@vaeneat

54 5.000

POSTS

SOCIAL MEDIA POSTS

@restaurantica


We support the most important sector of the greek economy. Learn about the ICT Solutions for hotels here.


05 >

CORE ACTIVITIES


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 05

PAGE 52

“Tourism: Generating value for everyone”

5.1 #kiomos SETE launched the “Tourism: Generating value for everyone” digital campaign through the www.axiagiaolous.gr website and social media, with an aim to highlight the substantial and measurable contribution of tourism to the national economy and society as a whole. A rather unique concept asked the question “Tourism as a profession? #kiomos” (#andyet) and 12 real people from different walks of life described the multiple benefits of tourism, presenting the connection between the tourism industry and other sectors of the economy.

The characters of the campaign (programmer, civil engineer, theatre cashier, linen retailer, truck driver, flower grower, dairy producer, hat designer, oenologist, local restaurant chef, butcher, fisherman) highlighted the positive effect that tourism can generate on other business sectors, becoming the protagonists in a communication that speaks to everybody’s heart. Real, everyday people from different professions were chosen for the campaign and were photographed on location at work. Marketing Greece was responsible coordinating the design of the campaign.

for


CORE ACTIVITIES

CHAPTER 05

Through this initiative, SETE underlines the consensus view that tourism is a sector that widely distributes its benefits in the economy and significantly contributes to GDP, employment and towards covering the trade deficit, while, in recent years, it is a bulwark against recession. Tourism is, in fact, among the leading sectors which can attract investors’ interest and –due to its significance– can be a key driver in the country’s growth path. Among other aspects, the campaign highlighted that the tourism industry and the professions which support it generate 1 in every 4 euros, that tourism creates more jobs for women and young people than any other sector and that it has a positive impact on employment, in as much as it is estimated that it has contributed to the creation of approximately 4 out of every 10 jobs in the country.

PAGE 53


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 05

PAGE 54

SETE in the regions

SETE in Lesvos for the Closed Workshop

5.2 Driven by its outward orientation and aiming at the creation of synergies, SETE –along with INSETE and Marketing Greece– conducted regional workshops with the participation of local associations and institutions, as well as local SETE members. In 2018, workshops were held in Kalamata, Agios Nikolaos (Crete), Kastoria, Kavala, Kos, Lesvos and Naxos, while in 2017, regional workshops were held in Alexandroupoli, Thessaloniki, Volos, Patra, Santorini, Corfu, Heraklion (Crete), Rhodes, Tripoli, Lamia and Ioannina. A total of 18 workshops were held and involved the active participation of SETE President Yiannis Retsos and INSETE and Marketing Greece executives. The issues discussed during the workshops included, among other things, SETE’s strategy for sustainable development, the enhancement of the social footprint of tourism, and the substantial interconnection of sectors such as agri-food and culture, which can directly enhance the quality of

the experience offered by our country. Moreover, the need to improve public infrastructures was pointed out, with an aim to ensure the smooth operation of destinations and to deliver better services to tourists. Sufficient power and water supply and proper waste management are among the biggest challenges. As underlined, it is essential for tourism professionals that local authorities undertake a commitment to invest in the basic infrastructures of destinations. In this context, a list of issues should be compiled and immediate action to resolve them should be initiated, turning to account any available funding mechanisms, with a view to contributing to the Greek tourism industry and hence to the country’s national economy. Overtaxation in the tourism sector was also discussed, with an emphasis on the high VAT rates for accommodation, passenger transport and catering, which undermine the competitiveness of businesses. Moreover, the issue of short-term leases was also brought to attention.


CORE ACTIVITIES

CHAPTER 05

OUTWARD ORIENTATION SYNERGIES SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

PAGE 55

7 WORKSHOPS

7

KOS NAXOS LESVOS CITIES

KAVALA KASTORIA KALAMATA AGIOS NIKOLAOS CRETE


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 05

PAGE 56

The voice of Greek tourism at the heart of Europe

5.3

As part of its strategy, SETE has undertaken a series of actions to enhance the voice of Greek tourism in Brussels, right at the heart of Europe. Moreover, SETE promotes the positions of Greek tourism by participating in international meetings and forging contacts with Ambassadors from countries with which further co-operation in tourism might be pursued. In this context, SETE President Yiannis Retsos and members of the Confederation’s Board of Directors attended a series of meetings at the European Commission with commissioners whose portfolios are directly or indirectly related to tourism. The issues discussed at the meetings included, among other things, access to the funding of tourism businesses, overtaxation, bureaucracy, better use of the funds from the Juncker plan and tourism competitiveness. Moreover, the prospects of tourism at a European level and the role of the industry for the further enhancement of the European economy were also discussed.

Round of Meetings in Brussels

Christos Stylianides

Commissioner for Humanitarian Aid and Crisis Management


CORE ACTIVITIES

CHAPTER 05

PAGE 57

SETE in the European Parliament, February 2018

Jyrki Katainen

European Commission Vice-President for Jobs, Growth, Investment and Competitiveness

Margaritis Schinas

Chief Spokesperson of the European Commission

Valdis Dombrovskis

European Commission Vice-President

for the Euro and Social Dialogue, Financial Stability, Financial Services and Capital Markets Union

ElĹźbieta Bienkowska

Commissioner for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs

Dimitris Avramopoulos Commissioner for Migration, Home Affairs and Citizenship

Carlo Corazza

Chief Spokesperson of the European Commission


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 05

PAGE 58

“ Shaping the future of Greek Tourism: Outward OrientationSynergiesSustainable development ”

SETE participated in a special event organized at the premises of the European Parliament on “Shaping the future of Greek Tourism: Outward Orientation – Synergies – Sustainable development”, during which Mr. Ilias Kikilias –SETE Institute General Director– presented, among other things, the work of INSETE, while Ms. Ioanna Dretta –Marketing Greece CEO– presented the actions of Marketing Greece.

Round of Meetings in Athens

The President of SETE also engaged in a round of meetings in Athens with European officers, including the Managing Director of the European Stability Mechanism Klaus Regling, Mr. Valdis Dombrovskis and Commissioner Pierre Moscovici, while he also delivered a speech about the prospects of Greek tourism at an ECFIN seminar for journalists, organized by Mr. Declan Costello, the European Commission's mission chief for Greece.


CORE ACTIVITIES

CHAPTER 05

PAGE 59

Klaus Regling

Managing Director of the European Stability Mechanism

Valdis Dombrovskis

European Commission Vice-President for the Euro and Social Dialogue, Financial Stability, Financial Services and Capital Markets Union

Pierre Moscovici

European Commissioner for Economic and Financial Affairs

Declan Costello

European Commission's Mission Chief for Greece


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 05

PAGE 60

SETE´s Annual Conference

5.4

Tourism in Transition: #someTHINKdifferent This year's annual conference of the Greek Tourism Confederation highlighted the need to exploit new technologies for upgrading the Greek tourism product as well as devise integrated strategies for shaping the image of destinations.

"Tourism in Transition: #someTHINKdifferent," was attended by more than 300 people from the inner core and related industries of tourism; it was hosted at the Athens Hilton in cooperation with the specialised consultancy firm in the field of visitor economy & destination marketing TOPOSOPHY and "weareJARVIS," the content studio of the organisation for innovation and digital transformation "Found.ation".


CORE ACTIVITIES

CHAPTER 05

In his opening speech, the President of SETE, Yiannis Retsos, spoke of the challenges which Greek tourism will have to address through the use of digital technologies to improve its competitiveness in the international economic environment. At the same time, he highlighted the importance of monitoring best international practices in cities such as Amsterdam and Copenhagen.

PAGE 61

The new format of the conference included on the main stage, inter alia, keynotes, fireside chats and panels of prominent speakers on issues pertaining to the destination management and digital skills while, on the second stage, three interactive masterclasses were held.

Watch the full video of the Conference here.


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 05

Tourism & Destination Management Martin Boisen, co-founder and Vice Chairman of the International Place Branding Association referred, inter alia, to the problems created for destinations by phenomena of hyper-tourism, noting the need for residents and businesses to have a common vision for the development of the area in order to avoid phenomena of ”commoditisation”.

Signe Jungersted, Director of Development of Copenhagen, the official agency for destination management and promotion in the metropolitan area of Denmark’s capital, dwelled on a strategy followed by Copenhagen in order to meet the needs resulting from the increase in tourist traffic. As she emphasized, particular importance in the context of decision-making is placed on the opinion of residents. In this way, the aim is to mitigate the impact of strongly increased tourist activity.

PAGE 62


CORE ACTIVITIES

CHAPTER 05

PAGE 63

Geerte Udo, Director of marketing strategy at Amsterdam Marketing since 2013, responsible for the internationally acclaimed campaign "I Amsterdam," described the steps taken by the agency over the last 15 years to showcase, promote, and manage Amsterdam as a destination. As she stated, 5 years ago, when the city had reached high numbers of tourist arrivals, efforts were focused on management of the destination, as well as targeted actions such as attracting businesses that would like to establish their headquarters in Amsterdam.

Paul Papadimitriou, founder of Intelligencr, researcher in innovation and specialist in strategies for the future, referred, inter alia, to the need for diversification of destinations and promotion of information which will highlight their uniqueness. He also spoke of the tourism potential of the Asian market as well as the possibilities for tourists to utilise technology at low cost to cover their travel needs.


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 05

Human resources & talent management David Bizer, founder and CEO of Talent Fountain, a consulting firm which focuses on acquiring talent, quoted examples of human resources management. More specifically, he mentioned ways of retaining staff through the implementation of education and training programs, while delving into the three essential components for creating a successful corporate culture which include decision-making, behaviour and communication.

Storytelling Ian MacDonald, EMEA Content Director at Quartz, pointed out that the creators of communications and marketing must ensure that the visitor hears the "story" behind products, services, and destinations. Be it on social networking media or a web page, the key is to create content that speaks of consumers’ needs.

PAGE 64


CORE ACTIVITIES

CHAPTER 05

PAGE 65

The role of technology

Co-founder and President of Nannuka, Lela Dritsa, CEO of Exclusiv, Babis Kourtzis, founder of Welcome Alexandros Trimis, and Αgamemnon Papazoglou, co-founder of MyJobNow took the floor and discussed on the role of technology . The four speakers, moderated by Dimitris Kalavros-Gousiou, co-founder and partner at the technology investment group Velocity.Partners, discussed the development of start-ups and the implementation of new business concepts in the tourism sector. In his remarks, Dimitris Kalavros - Gousiou noted that, from today's debate, we must keep the thought that technology developed in Greece today can provide real solutions and new opportunities in the field of tourism. This is real digital transformation.

George Achillias, an expert on strategy and innovation for companies, spoke about how affordable, accessible, and simple technology is in today's world. In periods where decisions are made either under pressure or following long and extensive research. It is now more critical than ever to think two steps ahead rather than simply getting lost in practical details and the deliverable; and this requires courage, a plan, and a strategy in order to be achieved.


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 05

Experiential Travel

Oana Damian, principal of the Damazo Group, with significant past experience in the airline industry, noted that airports constitute the first point of contact as well as the visitor's last impression and should highlight the local character of each destination by taking advantage of local brands in order for them to meet today’s travellers’ desire to explore. During the conference’s third and final panel on the "Little things that at the end of the day make a difference," moderated by Peter Jordan, Head of Insights at TOPOSOPHY, through inspirational remarks, Kash Bhattacharya, founder of Budget Traveller, and Valerie Pretscher, Director of Development at Zoku, cited practical and economic ways which can set apart products and services in tourist accommodation establishments, thus wowing guests. Highlights from the session include discussing how to make better use of public spaces (e.g. encouraging local people to come in, eat, drink and meet the guests), improving the quality and availability of good, local food and drink. To make these changes, accommodation providers should be more open to inviting guests to try things out and get their staff much more involved in concept design.

PAGE 66


CORE ACTIVITIES

CHAPTER 05

PAGE 67

Masterclasses In addition to the conference's main program, the participants had the opportunity to attend three masterclasses. During these, Peter Jordan spoke of modern practices in destination management, David Bizer presented tangible ideas and tools for attracting and retaining human resources which can directly be applied to businesses, while Christos Αndreikos, Partner - Digital Transformtion Services of Found.ation and Michalis Georgakopoulos of Satori Analytics discussed ready to use innovation and data utilisation strategies.


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 05

PAGE 68

S E T E PA R T N E R S

S I LV E R S P O N S O R S S P E C I A L S P O N S O R 2 0 18

SPONSORS

L A N YA R D S P O N S O R

SUPPORTERS


CORE ACTIVITIES

CHAPTER 05

E N V I S I O N E D & C U R AT E D

PAGE 69


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 05

PAGE 70

This is Athens & Partners

The great partnership for the development of Athens Setting as their main goal to gradually establish Athens as a top European destination for visitors, residents, business people and investors, the City of Athens, SETE, AEGEAN and Athens International Airport joined forces in an –unprecedented for Greece– partnership and created the initiative “This is Athens & Partners”.

5.5

Through a comprehensive three-year development plan with a budget of 15 million euros, “This is Athens & Partners” shall undertake the co-ordination and implementation of actions for the development and upgrading of Athens as a destination, along with the effective promotion of the city in major tourist markets abroad. In this context, significant benefits are expected for Athens and the economy of the city’s visitors, which shall result from the exchange, mobilization and activation of insights and resources by concerned stakeholders from both the public and the private sector.

This shall enhance private investments and increase the volume of visits to Athens, thus contributing towards boosting the economic activity and the creation of thousands of new jobs. The development plan signed by the founders of “This is Athens & Partners” focuses on three areas:


CORE ACTIVITIES

CHAPTER 05

PAGE 71

Destination Development

Destination Marketing

Destination Management

with investments to upgrade public spaces and develop products and services for the domestic and international public.

με τη διαμόρφωση και επικοινωνία της ταυτότητας της Αθήνας.

με τον συντονισμό φορέων για τη δημιουργία ενιαίας εμπειρίας

This partnership provides an incentive for the creative forces of the city to come together in order to expand synergies and thus enhance the developmental footprint on the city’s visitor economy.


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 05

PAGE 72

#WanderlustGR

5.6

In 2018, Marketing Greece travels throughout the country with the “Wanderlust Greece” campaign and highlights Greece’s authentic character. The country’s first digital travel show hits the road, records destination images and landscapes, experiences moments and reveals a new aspect of Greece. The campaign emerged from the innate needs and requirements of destination marketing for an ongoing and comprehensive approach to the promotion of the tourism product that keeps up with international trends.

By contemporary filming methods, the Peloponnese, Athens, Thessaloniki, Evia, Skyros, Crete and the North Aegean islands feature on the social media timeline of discovergreece.com and manage to capture the interest of the travelling public, highlighting the “localhood” experience for visitors in each destination.


CORE ACTIVITIES

CHAPTER 05

Moreover, Marketing Greece uses “Wanderlust Greece� to create an extended image bank by destination, available free of charge for local tourism businesses and organizations to promote each destination.

Click on the following link to visit the Wanderlust Greece website:

www.wanderlustgreece.com

PAGE 73


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 05

72 Hours in Athens (video) In January 2018, promotion activities for the City Break product of Athens were concluded with a video campaign for the “72 hours in Athens” short film.

video RESULTS:

270k

TOTAL VIDEO VIEWS

Click here to watch the video

700k

SOCIAL MEDIA REACH

75%

AVERAGE VIEW RATE

PAGE 74

powered by


CORE ACTIVITIES

CHAPTER 05

PAGE 75

Evia - Skyros Campaign

powered by

CAMPAIGN RESULTS:

633k

TOTAL VIDEO VIEWS

310k SOCIAL MEDIA ENGAGEMENT

5.2M

SOCIAL MEDIA REACH

video RESULTS:

400k TOTAL VIDEO VIEWS

700k

SOCIAL MEDIA REACH

70%

AVERAGE VIEW RATE

Click here to watch the video


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 05

PAGE 76

Crete Campaign

powered by

CAMPAIGN RESULTS:

820k TOTAL VIDEO VIEWS

232k SOCIAL MEDIA ENGAGEMENT

3.6M

SOCIAL MEDIA REACH

video RESULTS:

200k TOTAL VIDEO VIEWS

Click here to watch the video

500k

SOCIAL MEDIA REACH

81%

AVERAGE VIEW RATE


CORE ACTIVITIES

CHAPTER 05

PAGE 77

Thessaloniki Campaign

powered by

CAMPAIGN RESULTS:

540k TOTAL VIDEO VIEWS

230k SOCIAL MEDIA ENGAGEMENT

3.7M

SOCIAL MEDIA REACH

Click here to watch the video


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 05

PAGE 78

North Aegean Islands Campaign

CAMPAIGN RESULTS:

IKARIA

CHIOS

LESV


VOS

CORE ACTIVITIES

CHAPTER 05

PAGE 79

powered by

1M

TOTAL VIDEO VIEWS

290k SOCIAL MEDIA ENGAGEMENT

7.7M

SOCIAL MEDIA REACH

NORTH AEGEAN

LEMNOS


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 05

PAGE 80

INSETE event for the enhancement of Greek tourism

5.7

INSETE: The creation of new tourism products along with the promotion of destinations is a prerequisite for the enhancement of Greek tourism. The prospects and the potential of Greek tourism were discussed at an event that was jointly organized by the SETE Institute (INSETE) and PwC Greece.

The event featured a presentation of the INSETE “Hotel Study: an analysis of financial data of hotels in Greece, by destination and star rating” by Mr. Aris Ikkos, INSETE Research Director, and PwC’s report “The next day of Greek Tourism” by Mr. Costas Mitropoulos, PwC’s Executive Director. Both studies focus on a structural analysis of the Greek hotel sector, with conclusions that extend to the entire tourism sector. As demonstrated, the economic results of the operation of hotel businesses depend largely on the development of each destination, while demand is enhanced by the creation of tourism products that offer a travel experience. According to the INSETE study, the hotel sector has become a significant activity of the Greek economy inasmuch as, with an annual turnover of 5.7 billion euros, it contributes 3.5% of the GDP. The key product that consistently supports the tourism activity and generates positive economic results is the “Sun-Sea” aspect,


CORE ACTIVITIES

CHAPTER 05

followed by “City Break”, despite strong international competition. Furthermore, approximately 85% of the tourism product is concentrated in popular and traditional destinations in 5 regions (South Aegean, Crete, Central Macedonia, Ionian, Attica). In the remaining regions, the sector’s activity (in terms of the “turnover to capital employed” ratio) is very low, as is its profitability in terms of EBITDA, with Earnings Before Tax in negative territory. Moreover, over the past 5 years there has been an increase in investments in 5-star hotels and a decrease in 3- and 4-star hotel units.

PAGE 81

In the course of the event, a discussion was also held with the participation of Mr. Yiannis Retsos, SETE President, Mr. Fokion Karavias, Chief Executive Officer of Eurobank –a strategic partner of the Confederation–, Mr. Michalis Mavropoulos, former Regional Director of TUI Destinations Experiences East Mediterranean, and Mr. Costas Mitropoulos. INSETE General Director Ilias Kikilias moderated the discussion.

You can read the Press Release on insete.gr.


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 05

PAGE 82

TOURISM SCHOOL On Tour The “On Tour” Tourism School is an educational, non-profit action, launched in 2018 through the partnership between the SETE Institute (INSETE) and the Kalamata Tourism School. INSETE is in charge of the nationwide coordination of “On Tour” Tourism Schools, in co-operation with local organizers.

5.8

The “On Tour” Tourism School aspires to provide up-to-date knowledge, skills, incentives and inspiration to the professionals of each destination and mainly travels to developing tourist areas. The “On Tour” Tourism School is based on synergies among local communities and highlights the need for the close cooperation of all providers of the visitor’s tourism experience, thus sending out a message about the multifaceted nature of the tourism product and the crucial significance of the operation of a tourist destination. The topics are selected and adapted according to the needs, maturity and fabric of each destination and are presented by dynamic and expert lecturers. All lectures are suitably adapted by the speakers in order to directly relate to SMEs and their people, as they are the backbone of the Greek tourism industry. All events are offered free of charge and rely on volunteers and local business sponsorships to demonstrate that when local communities decide to join forces for the common good, the outcome can be impressive.

During the first year of the “On Tour” Tourism School, 6 successful events were launched at the following locations: the Saronic Islands-Poros, the Northern Sporades-Skiathos, Chios, Olympus, Halkidiki (Ierissos & Poteidaia) and Nafplio. Each “On Tour” Tourism School was coordinated by the respective “local ambassador” –who was the project manager for all stages of the event–, in co-operation with the national coordination team and with the support of the local organizing team, which worked under the local ambassadors’ leadership. The smooth implementation of the event relied on the most important support and involvement of local volunteers –82 in total–, who were coordinated by the local ambassador. With the participation of 29 expert lecturers from the tourism, technology, catering and education sectors, 46 lectures and 8 individual workshops were conducted on a variety of topics that emerged from a scrutiny of the needs of each area carried out in cooperation with each local ambassador. More than 1,400 participants attended the programme, 72% of whom were also involved in the evaluation of each “On Tour” Tourism School. The evaluation results were as follows (see opposite page):

For more information about Tourism School On Tour, click here


CORE ACTIVITIES

CHAPTER 05

PAGE 83

THE DRIVERS

THE PASSENGERS

29 >170 82

>1.400

LECTURERS SPONSORS VOLUNTEERS

PARTICIPANTS

THE JOURNEY

46

THE ROUTE

8

HALKIDIKI

CHIOS

POROS

LECTURES WORKSHOPS

THE RECORD % %

91 +43 95

%

INCREASE IN KNOWLEDGE LEVEL

INTENTION OF PARTICIPANTS TO ATTEND AN “ON TOUR” TOURISM SCHOOL IN THEIR AREA

OF EVENTS EVALUATED AS EXCELLENT & VERY GOOD

THE ENGINE

THE DIRECTIONS TECHNOLOGY

CLIENT SERVICE MARKETING


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 05

PAGE 84

The massive recycling potential in the tourism sector

5.9 The INSETE study about the current situation and the recycling potential in the tourism sector was complemented by the development of three manuals-practical guides for tourism businesses (hotels – transport – marinas & yachts). The guide’s objective is to inform businesses, professionals and employees in the tourism sector about the institutional framework of recycling, to highlight its benefits and to instruct tourism businesses towards its more effective application with the aid of training material and appropriate tools. The practical guide includes special manuals for waste management and recycling for hotel units, tourist transport businesses, marinas and yachts. Moreover, it includes training material and useful tools that shall simplify the recycling and waste management procedures in tourism businesses and shall contribute to their effective application.

The main conclusion is that the recycling potential in the tourism sector is massive. It is estimated that recycling rates can build up to 60% (from approximately 20% at present) and efforts can be made to reduce organic waste. Thus, the tourism sector may substantially contribute towards higher levels of recycling due to the large quantity of waste but also due to the significant volume of generated waste streams. Furthermore, tourism businesses can benefit in economic terms but also communicate and promote their recycling actions to their customers, thus enjoying better feedback and comments and improving their business image. In the European Union, the tourism sector produces 35 million tons of solid waste every year, a quantity that corresponds to approximately 7% of the total waste generated by the services sector. Likewise, Greek figures show that the average waste production per night for every person ranges from 1.7 to 2.5 kg.


CORE ACTIVITIES

CHAPTER 05

PAGE 85

WASTE MANAGEMENT HIERARCHY Thus, the hotel sector –including cruises– in Greece is estimated to generate from 400,000 to 550,000 tons of solid waste, while combined with catering the figure ranges from 600,000 to 650,000 tons per year. Given these quantities, the recycling potential is estimated to be from 250,000 to 350,000 tons per year and, for organic waste, from 200,000 to 250,000 tons per year. It should be noted that these quantities are generated within the 7-month –on average– operation of tourism businesses. In Greece, there are currently 22 approved alternative management systems that are based on the principle of extended responsibility of the producer, covering packaging, batteries, accumulators, electrical and electronic equipment waste, used tyres, oil and lubricant waste, End of Life Vehicle waste, and excavation, construction and demolition waste. The European Union estimates that the universal application of the existing European legislation about waste could reduce waste management costs by 72 billion euros per year by 2020 and also generate more than 400,000 new jobs.

PREVENTION reducing waste generation

REUSE potential to reuse materials More desirable

RECYCLE collecting materials and reprocessing them into new materials Less desirable

RECOVERY waste incineration for energy generation

DISPOSAL landfilling of materials without any further use


The ultimate choi of leading busines LG Hotel Solutions. Hotel TVs, Digital Signage, Air Conditioning & Sanitary Hot Water Production.

Learn more here.


06 >

ice sses.

MEMBERS´ NETWORK


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 06

PAGE 88

Members' Network Members Classification: REGULAR

ASSOCIATE

AFFILIATE

Enterprises per industry:

331 61 53 51 28 26 9 17 12 14 26

HOTELS TRAVEL AGENCIES BUSINESS CONSULTANTS / MARKETING MANAGEMENT COMPANIES VARIOUS TOURISM BUSINESSES HOTEL EQUIPMENT COMPANIES TRANSPORTATION TOURISM PUBLICATION COMPANIES TOURISM & HOSPITALITY SCHOOLS CONFERENCE & FAIR PLANNERS & COORDINATORS TOURISM BUSINESSES UNIONS AFFILIATE MEMBERS

HONORARY


MEMBERS' NETWORK

CHAPTER 06

PAGE 89

SETE Members' Privileges The services SETE provides to its Members focus on their active and creative participation in the Confederation’s activities, as well as on:

NETWORKING

COOPERATION

PROMOTION

INFORMATION

Benefits for SETE Regular Members: Participation: SETE members engage in the development of the Confederation’s positions as they can participate in: o work groups which deal with special issues (taxation, the environment, spatial planning, small and medium enterprises, coaching & training / human resources, etc.) o regional events and closed Working Meetings of members across the country o SETE's Annual Conference (special prices) o SETE's Annual Ordinary General Assembly with voting rights Representation: The voice of our members is heard in national and worldwide organizations, such as the UN World Tourism Organization. Networking: Opportunity to connect and collaborate with other businesses. Information/ Research: Timely information regarding trends and developments in the Greek and international tourism landscape and in individual markets which influence or are associated with the sector (through such tools as exclusive research, studies, statistics, newsletters, circulars, press releases and access to the SETE library) Promotion: The promotion of SETE members is also achieved through a Newsletter (sent fortnightly to all members and to an ever-growing database of 5,000 select recipients in Greece and abroad) which provides all Members with the opportunity to publish their profile, their Press Releases and their Business News. Coaching-Training: Special rates for INSETE training seminars (technical, sales-marketing, administration, operational management, etc.) and participation in numerous other Conferences and Workshops. Sponsorship of events of Member companies. The “SETE Member” designation provides evidence of recognition, quality and prestige for businesses.


“Progressive thinki innovative action, hard work „ -Demitris Golemis, Founder of Goldair

HQ: 1st km, Peanias Makopoulou Ave., 19002 Peania, Greece Tel.: (+30) 210 32 74 610, E-mail: pr@goldair.gr, Website: www.goldair.gr


07 >

ing, ,

BOARD OF DIRECTORS


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 07

SETE´s Board of Directors

PRESIDENT

Yiannis Retsos

Electra Hotels & Resorts

1ST VICE PRESIDENT Grigoris Tasios

President of HHF

VICE PRESIDENTS

Eftichios Vassilakis

Hertz Autohellas, Aegean Airlines, Olympic Air

Panagiotis Tokouzis President SETKE

Lyssandros Tsilides

Member of the BoD HATTA

VICE PRESIDENT FOR FINANCE Konstantinos Konstantinidis Atrium Hotels

SECRETARY GENERAL George Vernicos

Vernicos Yachts, President ΟΚΕ

DEPUTY SECRETARY GENERAL Kallinikos Kallinikos Goldair Handling

PAGE 92


BOARD OF DIRECTORS

CHAPTER 07

PAGE 93

ΜΕΜΒΕRS

Konstantinos Alexopoulos

Triantafillos Venetopoulos

Spyros Galiatsatos

Emmanouel Giannoulis

Maria Theofanopoulos

Fotios - Iossif Kokotos

Achilles Konstantakopoulos

Chloe-Maria Laskaridis

Michael Mavropoulos

Domotel ΑΕ

Giannoulis Hotels & Resorts

TΕΜΕS SA

Variety Cruises Ltd

International Publications Ltd / Greek Travel Pages

Lampsa Hellenic Hotels SA

Lassi Hotel

Spatech Consultancy

TUI Hellas Travel Tourism & Airlines S.A.

Yiannis Paraschis

Michalis Sakellis

Andreas Stylianopoulos

Konstantinos Chatzikonstantinou

Fokion Karavias

Aris Marinis

Nikolaos Aggelopoulos

Andreas Andreadis

Stavros Andreadis

Spiros Kokotos

Athens International Airport SA

Navigator Travel

President SEEN

Chatzikonstantinou Bros SA

HONORARY MEMBERS

Eurobank

Secretary General GEPOET

HONORARY PRESIDENTS

Aldemar Resorts

SANI / IKOS Group

SANI / IKOS Group

Elounda Luxury Hotels & Resorts

Agapi Sbokos

Sbokos Hotel Group


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 07

PAGE 94

INSETE´s Board of Directors

PRESIDENT

Yiannis Retsos President SETE

VICE PRESIDENTS Gina Mamidakis

Bluegr Hotels & Resorts

TREASURER

Αλεξόπουλος Κων/νος

Domotel ΑΕ

SECRETARY GENERAL George Vernicos

Vernicos Yachts, President ΟΚΕ

MEMBERS

Maria Theofanopoulos

International Publications Ltd / Greek Travel Pages

Kallinikos Kallinikos Goldair Handling

Nikos Kelaiditis HATTA

Konstantinos Konstantinidis Atrium Hotels

Panagiotis Tokouzis President SETKE


BOARD OF DIRECTORS

CHAPTER 07

PAGE 95

MARKETING GREECE´s Board of Directors

PRESIDENT

Yiannis Retsos President SETE

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Ioanna Dretta

Μarketing Greece

A' VICE PRESIDENT

Β' VICE PRESIDENT Vasilikos Alexandros

Agapi Sbokos

HCF

Sbokos Hotel Group

MEMBERS

Andreas Andreadis

Eftichios Vassilakis

George Vernicos

Eirini Geroulanou

Konstantinos Zikos

Kallinikos Kallinikos

Fotios - Iossif Kokotos

Achilles Konstantakopoulos

Chloe-Maria Laskaridis

Michael Mavropoulos

Maria Bakoula -Kantza

Chariclea Dalekou

Christos Stergiou

SANI / IKOS Group

Benaki Museum

TEΜΕS SA

Aegean Airlines

True Trips

Hotel Brain

Lampsa Hellenic Hotels SA

Hertz Autohellas, Aegean Airlines, Olympic Air

Goldair Handling

Vernicos Yachts, President ΟΚΕ

Spatech Consultancy

TUI Hellas Travel Tourism & Airlines S.A.

EDEE

Yiannis Paraschis

Panagiotis Podimatas

Aris Soulounias

Andreas Stylianopoulos

Athanasios Syrianos

Christina Tetradi

Athens International Airport SA

Navigator Travel

P.C. Podimatas Audiovisual SA

Hellenic Breweries of Atalanti S.A.

Colossos SA

Zante Hospitality Group


Thank you.


08 >

SPONSORS


ANNUAL REPORT 2018

CHAPTER 06

PAGE 98

SETE GENERAL ASSEMBLY 2018 SPONSORS

SΕΤΕ P

Special Sponsor 2018

Silver S

Spon

Suppo


SPONSORS

CHAPTER 06

Partners

Sponsor

nsors

orters

Gold Sponsor

PAGE 99


FOLLOW US!

@setegreece

@sete-greektourismconfederation

@setegreece