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interior architecture and design

3 2

2013ia+d senior Exhibit


Coalesce:

[koh-uh-les] verb, coalesced,

coalescing. verb (used without object) 1 -to grow together or into one body.

2013 ia+d

2 -to unite so as to form one mass, community, etc. 3 -to blend or come together verb (used with object) 4 -to cause to unite in one body or mass.

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CONTENTS AARON MALINOWSKI

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ERICH MODEROW

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A N D R E W S U M WA LT

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VA L E R I E D AV I S

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TERESA CANO

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ROBYN MILLER

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ANDREA CHASIN

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ERICKA ROSENTHAL

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PA R I S WA N D L E R

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ALEX ANGUIL

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S E R A F I M A K O VA L E V S K AYA

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eric vogel

Interior Architecture + Design

senior thesis fall

spring

chair of 3d design senior thesis faculty

In MIAD’s Interior Architecture + Design (IA+D) major, we believe that spaces and their furnishings can affect people in deep, meaningful ways and that those who create them are truly building whole environments that contribute to our collective psyche. Our students develop their ability to solve spatial problems with solutions that embody both aesthetic and practical concerns. They study building and construction techniques, design light fixtures, cabinetry, and furniture; create dynamic interior environments and work through space planning exercises with real world clients. They learn the fundamentals of site and landscape, as well as the details of material, color, and finish. At MIAD, as in the real world, innovation and creativity are equal partners with functionality and fabrication.

Senior Thesis is a design-intensive year long course of study with an emphasis on research, personal inquiry and creative expression. The fall course permits each student to choose a specific topic or building type based on their personal area of interest. The objective is to research, define and elaborate on a specific problem or concept within that area of interest by developing a series of diagrams, plans, sections, elevations and three dimensional models which ultimately manifest a clear design solution or ‘parti’. This process is by nature rigorous and demanding with significant episodes of self-discovery. At the final presentation of their schematic designs, the students participate in a “roaming review” with local design professionals, faculty, and other guests who are invited to engage each of the seniors in a challenging but constructive professional-level dialogue.

Thesis Presentation in the spring semester focuses on design development and the installation of a professional-quality presentation including exhibit design, architectural models, large scale computer renderings and interior design documents. Students are specifically asked to present an understanding of structure, building materials, fenestration,lighting design, acoustics, furniture, interior finishes and related fixture designs. The senior thesis exhibit, including verbal explanation and graphic presentation, is evaluated during college-wide discussions on “MIAD Define” day and at the spring Gallery Night show, both of which are intended to serve as the artistic culmination of the graduating senior’s three year Interior Architecture + Design curriculum.

robert lynch senior thesis faculty

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aaron malinowski grasp

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Design Intent

The intent of this exploration was to create a furniture piece with a modern industrial aesthetic that exploits the materials that it is comprised of. Due to the nature in which this piece is constructed, components mechanically joined together, material and color choice are easily adaptable to the consumers own aesthetic. The sides of the chair string along from the floor to the top of the backrest, only to be interrupted where the steel components grab hold to give the chair its shape. The steel is utilized to create the rear legs, acting as support for the more effeminate sides. The steel engages the wood in a gentle way, wrapping around and assuming the form of the wood so as to not insult it, but appreciate it for its opposing volumetric qualities.

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Parti Diagram

Straight Edge

Partial Wrap

The initial concept for ths exploration was to design piece of furniture that incorporates the grasping gesture of human hand around an object. The Full Wrap

challenge behind this task was manipulating the steel in a way that it obtains aspects of a human hand while stilll remaing a key strucutal component of the chair.

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Components

Side Profiles What can be done with wodden profiles that cant be done with steel profiles? -Create solid volumes with less effort -Break edges to soften form -Eliminate weak points on corners -Create tappers without worrying about forming By making the rofiles wood, there is no need for there to have metal touching metal The wood profiles give the steel elemetns purpose and meaning

Seat and Backrest Does the steel the makes up the seat need to act as a coushin or should an actual coushin be introduced? If an actual coushin would detract from the overall energy of the design, how can the steel be more welcoming to the human body? What techniques can I employ to increase the duration of which a person will interact with the chair?

Legs How are these components different than the other steel components? How does the role that these pieces play impact the manner in which they are constructed? What is the most approporite way for the support arms to terminate into the floor?

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Digital Modeling

Wood: Maple Steel: Matte White

Wood: Black Walnut Steel: Matte Black

Wood: White Oak Steel: Gray

AARON MALINOWSKI

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erich moderow transpose

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transpose

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transitive verb \tran(t)s-’pĹ?z\ to change in form or nature

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MIAD is a hub of creative growth and development. As a leading school of art and design, MIAD should seek to exhibit an aesthetic quality that conveys the creativity of its students, especially in its public spaces. This iterative bench design enhances the public space of the second floor commons and acts as a catalyst for interaction and interdisciplinary activity.

creative hub 24

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This serial plane design provides seating, a casual work space, and an informal screening area for Time Based Media. The design concept for the bench incorporates serial wood and foam, with integrated lighting, assembled to create a larger continuous whole, like the individual frames of an animated film.

serial planes 5.354"

5.000"

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The goal of this project is to encourage and accommodate social interaction by creating a variety of moments within a larger grouping of furniture. These individual moments grow and change seamlessly, one moment leading to the next, framing relaxed conversation and brain-storming. The individual seating areas, taken as a whole, form a new kind of public space and in turn create a prototype for student gathering spaces that re-energizes the larger MIAD community.

public space 28

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ANDREW SUMWALT WILLIOW CREEK HOUSE

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Site Analysis

The house presents an engaging juxtaposition between the exterior surfaces of hardwood plank and corrugated sheet metal. The dominate vertical nature of the materials serves to effortlessly lift the house above the ground. The wood plank facade is activated at the windows, dynamically folding back upon itself to expose the panoramic views while becoming a passive solar awning.

NORTH

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WEST

SOUTH

EAST

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Design Development The house is intended as an occasional living space for the Sumwalt family, a private retreat with a distinct purpose. The barn like form is elevated on its timber supports as it engages the ridge line and arable plateau. There it sits overlooking the family farm, Willow Creek and the valley beyond.

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Design Studies

The barn like qualities of the house are achieved by incorporating and juxtaposing a few quintessential vernacular farm elements, drawn from both recent and earlier times. The clean forms within the house create distinct contemporary spaces that acknowledge and celebrate the humble beginnings of this farming family.

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Living Area

The interior volumes are defined by the timber frame, and the interaction between it and the building envelope. The space north of the frame forms a hallway, connecting the various spaces and allowing the frame to breathe within the interior volume.

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Timber Frame The living spaces of the house nest inside the timber frame structure. The walls appear to be hovering just clear of the timber frame, further emphasizing the structure through back lighting.

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Loft

The hay loft is an essential part of any farm. This loft serves both as a writing studio and as additional sleeping space. The clearstory windows in the loft are positioned to provide the occupants with a vantage point to the valley below.

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VALERIE DAVIS COURTYARD HOUSE

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TERESA CANO SPIRIT

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The Cathedral Center is a homeless shelter located in the lower east side of Milwaukee on the corner of Kilbourn and VanBuren. During the The Cathedral Center is a come homeless shelter located in the lower east side of Milwaukee on thethat corner ofup Kilbourn VanBuren. time spent at this shelter I have to understand the inner-workings of this facility. The very pieces make what isand the center are During the time spent at this shelter I have come to understand the inner-workings of this facility. The very pieces that make that of the people. Staff, residents, volunteers and visitors each become a part in which work together to create a whole, larger then theup what is the center are that of the people. Sta, residents, volunteers and visitors each become a part in which work together to create a sum of its pieces. I have seen first hand the greater good this facility brings and have strived to be apart of that cycle. As a result of the time whole, larger then the sum of its pieces. I have seen rst hand the greater good this facility brings and have strived to be apart of that spentcycle. here itAshas occurred to me how under utilized existingtocourtyard This courtyard has the capability of housing security, a result of the time spent here it hasthe occurred me how is. under utilized the existing courtyard is. This nature, courtyard has the capastability, and spirit, all of which the Cathedral Center aims to accomplish. In order to fully express these goals, various program changes bility of housing nature, security, stability, and spirit, all of which the Cathedral Center aims to accomplish. In order to fully express these various programregarding changes the become keyfacade and allow changes regarding the existing facade the courtyard. become keygoals, and allow for changes existing facingfor the courtyard. By eliminating much of thefacing narrow, double loadedBy eliminating much of the narrow, double loaded corridor centering the building, these changes in the facade will allow for deenite corridor centering the building, these changes in the facade will allow for definite connections to the courtyard both visually and physically. connections to the courtyard both visually and physically.

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3ĭĔāĴÉÂǨÂĔļ»āÉǨǨ āĔÂÉÂǨ½ĔĩĩñÂĔĩǨ

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gĩñŌĴÉǨĔŢ½ÉĭǨ»āĔ½ÿǨ ½½ÉĭĭǨĴĔǨĴîÉǨ½ĔļĩĴœĩÂǨ

gĩñŌĴÉǨĔŢ½ÉĭǨ»āĔ½ÿǨ ŌÉñōĭǨĴĔǨ½ĔļĩĴœĩÂ

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Sitting in class one afternoon I stated that I wanted to do more then provide shelter, I wanted the space to house inspiration. The women who left me with the quote I began this writing with, spoke to my spirit, allowing those words nd their way to my sketch book. I instantly knew this advise was important for growth. But, that it would grow with me and my experiences, was something that still catches me off Sitting in class one afternoon I stated that I wanted to do more then provide shelter, I wanted the space to house inspiration. The women guard. It was in one moment that I was able to understand why this quote was in my sketch book and why I was in my thesis class ndwho me withatthe I began this writing with, spoke to all myatspirit, allowing words find their way to mywho sketch I instantly who you ing left it tugging thequote designer, volunteer, and artist in me once. “Don’t those let your surroundings change youbook. are, changing knew this adviseItwas for that growth. that itfrom would grow with mecame and my experiences, was somethingwith thatit.still me offseparatwill become.” wasimportant clear to me the But, strength this statement from how much I disagreed Tocatches this woman, separat ing herself from the existing surroundings is a tool that saved her spirit. For all the women and children in that space it was a battle eveguard. It was in one moment that I was able to understand why this quote was in my sketch book and why I was in my thesis class finding ryday to do just that. As a volunteer I understood this. Sitting at the conference table that day I was a designer and I knew that I it tugging at the designer, volunteer, and artist in me all at once. “Don’t let your surroundings change who you are, changing who you will wanted to be the person that would create a space in which would change these women and children effecting who they saw thembecome.” It was clear to me that the strength from this statement came from how much I disagreed with it. To this woman, separating selves as and who they would become. herself from the existing surroundings is a tool that saved her spirit. For all the women and children in that space it was a battle everyday to do just that. As a volunteer I understood this. Sitting at the conference table that day I was a designer and I knew that I wanted to be the person that would create a space in which would change these women and children effecting who they saw themselves as and who they would become.

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It was light that drove the form. Light is what really drove the entire design. It could be said that the main goal was to give the courtyard a purpose in order to provide a space for residents, and it was one of them. This goal was the answer from the stand point of a volunteer. From the stand point of an architecture and interior design student, it was clear that this was just part of the mission. The mission would entail a accumulation of knowledge as both. This combination is what spoke to the heart enabling an artistic spirit to take charge. It is what made this space come to life. Channeling light into the double loaded corridor would connect people to the courtyard. Creating the outlet was not It was light that drove the form. Light what really the entire could be said that the goal was inspiration. to give the the mission. It was channeling what is inspiration wasdrove already given. Nodesign. matter It the role being played, lightmain would be that

courtyard a purpose in order to provide a space for residents, and it was one of them. This goal was the answer from the stand point of a volunteer. From the stand point of an architecture and interior design student, it was clear that this was just part of the mission. The mission would entail a accumulation of knowledge as both. This combination is what spoke to the heart enabling an artistic spirit to take charge. It is what made this space come to life. Channeling light into the double loaded corridor would connect people to the courtyard. Creating the outlet was not the mission. It was channeling what inspiration was already given. No matter the role being played, light would be that inspiration.

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“You have what you need. Now take that...

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...and nurture it in order to be the best version of yourself.�

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robyn miller opal

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S I T E + A N A LY S I S @ Hotel Astor

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EXISTING PROGRAM The property has an OUTDATED TRADITIONAL STYLE. Fig. 4 : The property LACKS PUBLIC SPACE and outdoor seating

924 EAST JUNEAU AVENUE, MILWAUKEE, WI

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SERVICE GUEST RENTED

Fig. 2 : Circulation from the Astor Street ENTRANCE IS DIRECTED AT A WALL

3 Built in 1920, the historic Astor Hotel sits on the edge of where the

Fig. 3 : The parking lot ENTRY IS SHARED between guests and hotel staff

heart of downtown Milwaukee meets the bluff above the shore of

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Lake Michigan. Located within walking distance of the city and lake

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front, as well as many other attractions, the Astor Hotel is located in

The property LACKS STREET PRESENCE. The most valuable real estate on the corner is not available to hotel guests. Fig. 1a, 1b : The circulation PATH TO THE FRONT DESK IS LONG and hidden

one Milwaukee’s premier neighborhoods. Surprisingly, the interior spaces are not open to the pedestrians on the sidewalk or the immediate neighborhood.

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1a

1b

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CONCEPT @ Hotel Astor

PROGRAM + CIRCULATION REORGANIZED REORGANIZING PROGRAM :

SERVICE PUBLIC/GUEST GUEST PUBLIC/GUEST

EXPAND PUBLIC SPACES AND RELOCATE THEM ALONG THE PERIMETER to create a more dynamic STREET PRESENCE ILLUMINATE AND ENERGIZE THE CORNER by creating a lounge at the street intersection

REORGANIZING CIRCULATION :

2b 3 2aa 1

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CREATE MULTIPLE ENTRANCES to reduce congested interior foot traffic: Fig. 1 : OPAL Lounge main entry Fig. 2a, 2b : Hotel guest Fig. 3 : Hotel Staff Fig. 2a : RELOCATING THE MAIN HOTEL ENTRANCE to a less busy street, adjacent to the front desk and North parking lot.

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HOTEL LOBBY @ Hotel Astor

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Hotel Astor’s new main entrance features an illuminated, cantilevered overhang which clearly identifies the property. This element extends past the structure’s envelope to BREAK THE BOUNDARIES BETWEEN PUBLIC AND PRIVATE and invite you in, pulling you across the transparent threshold, directing you past the art gallery to the front desk. The desk is adjacent to the main staircase, elevator, and all

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main circulation routes. A central lounge, which is an extension of the lobby, accommodates hotel guests, bar overflow, as well as 1 Hotel front entrance perspective from Astor Street 2 Front desk perspective from hotel lobby 3 Hotel lobby and front desk perspective

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larger sized groups.

The disassociation of interacting forms found throughout Hotel Astor’s fresh new design approach sets up a contrast to what is existing and communicates that the addition is from a new time through the juxtaposition of historic and contemporary design.

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O PA L

@ Hotel Astor 2

Named after the polished white stone infused with ribbons of bright color, OPAL features hardedged forms and full height glass that frame the interior spaces to create INTERACTIVE VIEWS BETWEEN INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR. An illuminated staircase that ascends from the street invites you through the original facade which is now open, to accommodate outdoor seating. These areas of the original facade that were once dense and opaque, have opened up to CREATE

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A CONNECTION TO THE NEIGHBORHOOD. This gesture serves to invite people into the hotel. Once the location of the hotel’s main entrance, the glass enclosure houses additional seating. This portion is set up on a stage to further ACTIVATE THE STREET PRESENCE. Toward the back of OPAL lies a series of VIP booth seating which is raised up on a platform, VISIBLE FROM ENTRY. The neutral color palette is painted with colorful, ambient light which animates the space

1 OPAL Lounge main entry and patio perspective from Juneau Avenue 2 OPAL Lounge perspective from entrance 3 Bar and VIP perspective from entrance

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and defines circulation and seating. High quality, luxurious materials such as marble and polished limestone paired with high gloss acrylics, create a sense of distinctive grandeur and refined elegance. Furnishings and lavish wallpapers of updated images of the original wallpaper create a modernized style while tying to the history of Hotel Astor.

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P L A N + M AT E R I A L S

@

Hotel Astor

FLOOR PLAN 1 HOTEL ENTRANCE 2 FRONT DESK 3 LOBBY 4 ART GALLERY 5 BELL STATION 6 BELLMAN’S CLOSET 7 OPAL 8 BAR 9 PATIO 10 OUTDOOR SEATING 11 OPAL ENTRANCE

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1 11

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MATERIAL PALETTE A B C D E F G

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2

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10 A

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RECYCLED TILE : EXTERIOR FLOOR AND STAIRS LOUIS GHOST CHAIR : PATIO SEATING MARBLE : INTERIOR WALLS OSTRICH LEATHER : LOUNGE UPHOLSTERY 3 FORM LIGHT ART PENDANT : LOUNGE WALLPAPER : ART GALLERY WALL 3 FORM RESIN : BAR

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C

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andrea chasin garden in the ward

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Garden in the Ward 105 N Water Street

The first par t of the mission was to create community based gardens open to the public. The rooftop garden becomes an extension of the second floor workshop while the previously unfinished nor th facade becomes a ver tical garden. Both allow for the community to have a hand in tending for and creating green spaces.

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Concept The second par t of the mission is attained by implementing specific program that can stand alone but when combined, offers visitors a multi layered experience that includes inspiration and the oppor tunity to gain the knowledge and tools that allows visitors the ability to create green spaces within their dwellings and everyday lives.

Drawing from the anatomy of a flower, the program of this renovation is organized around the three levels according to each floor’s relation to a plant’s roots, stem, and bloom.

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Root Stair

The internal stair star ts thin and delicate on the river level, becoming dense and inter twoven on the first floor, then begins to form the “stem” and emerges onto the roof level.

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Floral The River Level butts up against the Milwaukee River while also extending in the opposite direction under Water Street. This level is the root of the building - where storage and the behind the scenes of the floral shop are exposed. Layered, curving track lighting adds excitement to the ceiling plane as a dense, rooted growth.

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Retail The first floor plays on the idea of “gardening at home� in the retail space by showcasing unique takes on ver tical gardens, a suitable option for city living. Playful and interactive displays, brighter colors and the fast paced motion of Water Street allow this floor to become the stem - the transition between the root and the bloom. Emerging from the roots, the existing historic flooring and brick are left intact while brighter colors begin to saturate the retail space.

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School The second floor pulls visitors up and away from the commotion of Water Street into a workshop space flooded with natural light and a larger spectrum of saturated colors. A dropped soffit and printed mural wall wrap around a large, family-style table, creating a sense of community, inviting all to gather around and become engaged in the various lessons to be held.

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ericka rosenthal garden in the ward

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DESIGN C O N C EP T & S ITE An Embracing Frame Defines a Historic Theater Creating new visually stimulating experiences at every stage

Upon entering the first-floor, a play on volumes and voids is created. The arrangement of the voids provides areas for light to appear. The guests will be visually intrigued and stimulated as the hostess directs them into the auditorium, where they will experience an inspiring crescendo. The stage is illuminated by soft lights, energizing the crowd before the show. Before the event, guests can indulge themselves in the bar and main dining room where they’ll observe it’s striking charcoal black ceramic tiled floors, espresso Lyptus wood cabinetry, translucent 3-Form panels, and luscious teal, graphite, and metallic glass tiles. These elements all combine to frame and show off the bar, with a picturesque view of North Oakland Avenue.

Brown Deer

Whitefish Bay Shorewood Brookfield

New Berlin

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M I LWAU K E E Lake Michigan

Greenfield

Cudahy

Hales Corners

Muskego Franklin

South Milwaukee Oak Creek

East Locust Street

Guided by discreet theatrical lighting, guests reach the top of the open staircase, and are provided with the modern and chic bar that tunnels them to an intimate cabaret theatre. From here the guests can move to the balcony and enjoy the view of the stage from above, experiencing a dramatic expansion within the space. The Miramar Theatre was built in 1913, and located at 2844 North Oakland Avenue, on Milwaukee’s East side. Through the years, the building went through a number of transformations, but always remained a home to live performances.

Fox Point

Glendale

THE MIRAMAR

East Geneva Street

This design re-imagines the interior spaces, but remains respectful of the Miramar’s historic facade and neighborhood context. The client sought out a building design that avoided the typical idea of a ‘concert venue’. Representing a frame, the exterior provides an unmistakable presence at the street. This framework is recreated throughout the theatre, allowing guests a visually dramatic experience at every corner. At a more human scale, the design preferences the use of natural materials mixed with elegant fabrics to highlight and enhance the overall atmosphere. From the very first concept drawings, maintaining the steel and masonry structure was a priority. In order to fit the theatre’s program into the framework of the existing building, the designer sought out

creative ways to make the spacial elements fit together. The former auditorium held a high vacant space allowing for the addition of the balcony around the viewing space. The construction of the balcony creates an upper level bar and cabaret stage, and also a new space for offices and the artist retreat at the east end of the building. This renovation also improved ADA access by introducing an elevator into the theatre and balcony. It is the sum of these details that establishes a better functioning environment for the theatre and allows for multiple stages within the new interior. Re-defining the existing structure with new finishes, colors and lighting, rejuvenates the life within the space. This is what announces the Miramar’s new presence on Oakland Avenue.

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PA R T I & D I AG RAMS

PROGRAM VOLUMES

FROM THE STREET TO YOUR SEAT

There are six major program areas that are connected throughout the first floor. Some volumes expand to encourage guests to stop and experience the space while others contract to provoke movement through to the next area.

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Exterior Frame

Interior Frame

(STAGES OF CIRCULATION) The guest experiences the space through a series of well-defined circulation points.

0 1 0

1

2 3 4

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The Miramar’s exterior envelope creates a large rectangle that is then subdivided by the two aforementioned frames. These frames allow for the Miramar to identify two program areas that flow together but are distinctly separated from one another by the framed areas. Ticket/Box Office Lobby

4 5

Bar

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Event/Auditorium

Event Entry

KEY Existing Frames Large, Primary Volumes Small, Secondary Volumes

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TWO PROGRAMS IN ONE

2 3

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0 Exterior Entry 1 Interior Entry

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FRAMING

The Miramar holds two frames of view. One is located on the exterior of the building, while the other frames the stage. These frames act as thresholds for guests to enter into the next program areas.

0 Exterior Entry: tall, framed entry pulling off the sidewalk 1 Ticket Box Office: pushes people torwards the entry, express 2 Interior Entry: gradual increased elevation with condensed height, illuminate light from void 3 Dining Room: area expands laterally, circulation is indicated 4 Bar: enhanced height, creates backdrop from street view, “preview show” 5 Event Entry/Sound Lock: tunnels people into the auditorium, separates the “events” 6 Auditorium: expansive both laterally and longitudally, main event 7 Backstage: dark, compressed spaces

KEY forced split path circulation path

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FIR ST FL O O R

ENT R Y

FIRST FLOOR

The first floor of the Miramar now holds an easily identifiable entrance and ticket office, dining area with a full bar, men’s and women’s restrooms, auditorium and stage with a fully operating backstage, and ADA ramp to the auditorium level and elevator to the second floor.

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MA IN BA R & D I N I N G 100

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S ECOND FLOOR

SECOND FLOOR

The second floor introduces a second bar with seating, a small cabaret theater, a new balcony with additional raised seating, men’s and women’s restrooms, offices, and a fully operating second floor artist retreat.

MAI N S TAG E 102

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Cabaret Theatre With the addition of a cabaret theater, the Miramar is able to include additional performances before the main show. The room is designed for the audience to feel as if the performer has a special relationship while on stage, in an intimate setting. It is a wonderful opportunity for locals to experience, for there isn’t anything like it in the neighborhood.

CA BA RET T H EAT E R 104

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paris wandler concert in the park

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CONCERT

IN THE

PARK

HIDDEN DEEP WITHIN THE WOODS ON 380 ACRES OF DENSE FOREST, VIEWERS STUMBLE UPON A HIDDEN ELEMENT, LOCATED IN GRANT PARK IN SOUTH MILWAUKEE. PLACING A CONCERT VENUE ON TOP OF A BLUFF OVERLOOKING LAKE MICHIGAN, REDEFINES THE EXPERIENCE ONE HAS IN THIS NATURAL ENVIRONMENT. WHILE TAKING ADVANTAGE OF THE VAST LANDSCAPE AND NATURAL BEAUTY, THE SITE ALLOWS US TO HEAR MUSICAL COMPOSITION IN A NATURAL ENVIRONMENT.

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Parti Diagram

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Connection between buildings

Theatre concept

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Exterior view east The building forms extrude from the ground, representing geological forces from the earth and the landscape of the lake bluff. 112

Exterior view west The exterior courtyard connects both buildings and provides a stage overlooking Lake Michigan. 113


Entry 114

Reception 115


Lobby View 116

Concert hall 117


alex anguil mcma

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Milwaukee

Contemporary Art Museum Located within Milwaukee’s industrial headquarters lies a center for contemporary art. The center is placed on the edge of the Fifth Ward alongside the main path of the Amtrak train. The proposed building design features sharp dynamic angles that inspire us to look in certain directions. Punctures of glass within the walls provide these moments of appreciation. The design guides our eye towards the action of downtown without letting us forget the industrial aspect that provides Milwaukee with much of its character. While the building form carefully considers its physical relationship to the site, its aesthetic contrasts to its surroundings quite dramatically. The aesthetic is a reflection of its purpose. It stands amongst the warehouses of the fifth ward like a sculpture, giving a taste of what is inside.

Site relationship

SITE model

1st st

Massing+form

Layers Concept

1st st Pittsburg ave Pittsburg ave

Embracing the intersection

A feature on the east facade of the building is the main staircase that pierces through the front facade. Almost like an interactive sculpture, the stair blurs the line between interior and exterior space creating a unique experience as one moves between the floors. The transparency of this path allows for an interesting dynamic between the pedestrians on the sidewalk and the occupants of the museum as they move alongside one another. The West side of the building runs along the main Amtrak pathway. Instead of making this the “back” of the building, it is designed in a way that everyone can experience it. As passengers on the train experience graffiti and old industrial buildings on the ride, they come upon the Milwaukee Contemporary Art Museum. The west facade features a weaved effect, creating different levels and visual gestures that compliment the idea of traveling. Within the weaved walls are tall windows that bring the energy of the 4 into120the gallery space. passing train

MCAM alex anguil

extrusion Concept

1st st

Pittsburg ave

SITE

Joining the grid

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Milwaukee

Contemporary Art Museum SITE diagrams

geometric relationships study models

MCAM alex anguil

process

Early floor plans

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122

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MCAM

Milwaukee

alex anguil

Contemporary Art Museum

floor plans

1st floor plan

2nd floor plan

3rd floor plan

1 2 3 4 5 6

1 2 3

1 2

lobby+reception retail bathrooms service kitchen cafe+mezzanine

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MEdia+Print galleries conference offices UP

5 3 3

2

UP

4 1

1 1

balcony

1 1

3

DOWN

1 UP

DOWN

large works Galleries

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2

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DOW

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DOW

1

2

DOWN

UP

UP

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MCAM

Milwaukee

alex anguil

Contemporary Art Museum

renderings

lobby+retail 10

126

Lobby+retail

mezzanine Mezzanine

exteriorrendering 127

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MCAM

Milwaukee Milwaukee

alex alexanguil anguil

Contemporary ContemporaryArtArtMuseum Museum

Final Finalmodel model

e choice to use colored acrylic for the model The choice to usereasons. colored Iacrylic s made for several wantedfortothe usemodel was made for several reasons. I wanted to use material that would display the complexity a material that would display the complexity the form as well as allow the viewer to see of the form as well as allow the viewer to see o the model and understand the interior into the model and understand the interior aces. The intention was for the model to act spaces. The intention was for the model to act the center piece of the exhibit design. The as the center piece of the exhibit design. The ght neon colors of the acrylic as well as the bright neon colors of the acrylic as well as the y light interacts with the material gave the way light interacts with the material gave the ece piece an incredible glowing effect effect as if as it was an incredible glowing if it was ernally lit. The material also suggested ideas ideas internally lit. The material also suggested possible coloredcolored glass facades. for possible glass facades.

steadInstead of building the model out ofout materials of building the model of materials presentative of actual building materials, I I representative of actual building materials, ntedwanted it to beit to almost a piece of art in itself to be almost a piece of art in itself to flectreflect the buildings purpose. I alsoI also took took the buildings purpose. spiration from models of oneofofone theofbuildings inspiration from models the buildings sedI asused a precedent. In addition to it’storole as a precedent. In addition it’sinrole in e exhibit, this glowing model represents the the the exhibit, this glowing model represents ringdaring of contemporary art asart wellas aswell theasbold of contemporary the bold signsdesigns of contemporary architecture. of contemporary architecture.

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serafima kovalevskaya the lightPath

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PROCESS SKETCHES Welcome to the LightPath Emerging from the Milwaukee Amtrak Train Station, visitors find themselves in a place entirely disconnected from the city it serves. The highway structure and industrial buildings act as a visual barricade, leaving pedestrians uninvited and lost as they enter the city. Here, in this place of persistent, infinite motion, and transition, the city needs a new first impression, a path of light, art and music through this currently marginalized space. Mimicking the geometry of the highway lanes and the movement of the cars, dynamic lines of the visitor pavilion pulls pedestrians onto a new path. Walking down this path, a bank of seating invites you to pause... to embrace someone you’ve missed, to breath the Milwaukee air, to welcome the arriving city and its culture.

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The path splits into three, each featuring a new interactive experience. The first an expression of motion, the second a reflection of light and the third a tunnel which echoes the highway moving and crossing above, continuously. Continuing forward, the paths re-converge into a single walkway that leads on to a pedestrian bridge, bringing the visitor to the apex of the LightPath experience... Here, elevated above the highway, transcending the weight of concrete and metal, the pedestrian is illuminated by light, by transition and finally by the cityscape.

The bridge then branches off to meet the panoramic theater which overlooks a garden of descending terraces, and encircles the amphitheater below. This expression of urban planning, of gathering and light is designed to continue to the shore of Lake Michigan, winding and sculpting its way through the spine of the city. The public sculpture, pathways and green space breathes life into the space which has never been given priority or even a second thought. Here, on the LightPath we gather, walk, bike, play, and behold the power of motion and illumination while watching the city transform.

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CONNECTION FROM ENTRY INTO THE CITY AND THE LAKE

established link missing link

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commercial

institutional

residential

parking

empty concrete lot

entry into the city

neighboring program

current green space

area open to sunlight

building

bridge

highway ramp

highway columns

grass area

parking

light tunnel

area underneath the highway

ST.PAUL AVE.

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DOG WALKERS

DIVIDER WALLS

MOTHERS

TRAVELERS

REFLECTING POOL

THINKERS

CITY WATCHERS

SEATING

LOVERS

KID PLAYERS

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BUILDING

READERS

PEOPLE WATCHERS

SCULPTURE INSTALLATION

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GREEN SPACE

PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE

BIKE RACK

PATH

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PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE

BIKE RACK SEATING

DIVIDER HALF WALLS

SCULPTURE INSTALLATION GREEN SPACE REFLECTING POOL BUILDING

PATH

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Interior Architecture + Design Thesis Publication 2013 Art Direction by Eric Vogel Graphic Design and Layout by class collaboration Cover Design by Paris Wandler Photography by Ericka Rosenthal and Matthew Bushey Editing by Eric Vogel and Serafima Kovalevskaya Copyright 2013 by Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design

All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced without written permission for the publisher, except by a reviewer who may quote brief passages or reproduce illustrations in a review with appropriate credit; nor may any part of this book be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means - electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or other - without written permission from the publisher. The information in this book is true and complete to the best of our knowledge. All recommendations are made without guarantee on the part of the author or the Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design. The author and publisher disclaim any liability in connection with the use of this information. For further information, please call the Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design at 414.847.3200

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