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Recipes for Korean Dishes

A Korean Kitchen Companion by Jia Choi


A Korean Kitchen Companion—28 Recipes for Korean Dishes by Jia Choi Copyright ⓒ 2014 by Jia Choi All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. Published by Seoul Selection 4199 Campus Dr., Suite 550, Irvine, CA 92612, USA Phone: 949-509-6584 FAX: 949-509-6599 Email: publisher@seoulselection.com Website: www.seoulselection.com Printed in the Republic of Korea ISBN: 978-1-62412-025-1 Library of Congress Control Number: 2014934692


A Quick Guide Vegetarian / Vegetarian-friendly

Pescatarian (no animal flesh with the exception of fish or seafood)

About a Korean Meal Basically, a Korean meal consists of bap (rice), banchan, and guk (soup) or jjigae (stew). Dishes that are eaten with the rice are called banchan— let’s call them side dishes—which are prepared with seasonal ingredients. In general, three to five side dishes are served with the rice at each meal. While there are different ways to prepare and season side dishes, their flavors should go well together. Korean meals prepared the traditional way are usually 70% vegetable side dishes and 30% protein and carbohydrates. This is why Korean cuisine is regarded as a well-balanced diet that is both tasty and healthy. Most of the dishes presented in this book are side dishes, but depending on the style and setting, they also make excellent meal substitutes and party dishes. These recipes are designed to be quick and easy to make, so we hope you will try your hand at Korean cuisine!

Cooking / Preparation time * The cooking time included in these recipes only refers to the time you will spend preparing and cooking the dish. It does not include the time required for preliminary activities such as making a marinade.


Contents Barbecue or Meat

Noodles (flour-based food)

01 Braised Chicken in Soy Sauce jjimdak 찜닭

17 Mixed Mushroom and Glass Noodle Salad

02

18 Noodles Served with Spicy Squid

Grilled Chicken dak gui 닭구이

beoseot japchae 버섯잡채

ojingeo somyeon 오징어 소면

03 Korean-Style BBQ Beef Ribs

19 Seafood Pancake

LA galbi LA갈비

04 Sweet and Spicy Fried Chicken

dak gangjeong 닭강정

05 Marinated Stir-Fried Beef

bulgogi 불고기

06 Spicy Stir-Fried Chicken

dak galbi 닭갈비

07 Spicy Stir-Fried Pork

jeyuk bokkeum 제육볶음

20 Spicy Noodle Salad

08 Chilled White Radish Salad

mu saengchae 무생채

09 Garlic Chive Salad

buchu muchim 부추무침

10 Napa Cabbage Salad

geotjeori 겉절이

11 Seasoned Bean Sprouts

kongnamul muchim 콩나물무침

12 Seasoned Spinach

sigeumchi namul 시금치나물

13 Zucchini Salad

hobak namul 호박나물

21 Braised Tofu with Spicy Sauce

14 Kimchi Fried Rice

kimchi bokkeumbap 김치볶음밥

15 Stone Pot Bibimbap

dolsot bibimbap 돌솥비빔밥

16 Multi-Grain Rice in a Stone Pot

yeongyang dolsotbap 영양돌솥밥

dubu jorim 두부조림

22 Soft Tofu Stew

sundubu jjigae 순두부찌개

23 Soybean Paste Stew

doenjang jjigae 된장찌개

Kimchi 24 Napa Cabbage Kimchi

baechu kimchi 배추김치

25 Cucumber Kimchi

oi kimchi 오이김치

26 White Radish Kimchi kkakdugi 깍두기 27 Kimchi Pancake

kimchi jeon 김치전

28 Tofu with Stir-Fried Kimchi

Rice

jaengban guksu 쟁반국수

Bean & Tofu

Vegetables

haemul pajeon 해물파전

dubu kimchi 두부김치


Barbecue or Meat


01

40 min.

Braised Chicken in Soy Sauce jjimdak 찜닭

A great meal that can be whipped up in 30 minutes. This dish is originally from Andong, in southeast Korea, and it became popular in the 1980s when a famous restaurant debuted the dish. It doesn’t look spicy, but it has some kick thanks to the dried chili. If you prefer a milder version, just omit the chilies. Serve with steamed rice as a meal for 4 or as part of a banquet for 4-6. Ingredients 1 whole chicken with skin (with bones in) 1 onion, diced 1 potato, diced 1/2 carrot, diced 1 green onion, chopped 4 dried red chilies, sliced 12 cups low-sodium chicken stock

Sauce Ingredients 1/2 cup soy sauce 3 tablespoons oyster sauce 4 tablespoons brown sugar 2 tablespoons rice wine 2 garlic cloves, finely minced 2 teaspoons ginger, minced

(can substitute with water)

A small handful glass noodles (soaked in hot water for 20 minutes and drained, 2.1 oz or 60 g)

Instructions 1. Cut the chicken and vegetables into small bite-size pieces. 2. Mix all the sauce ingredients and set aside. 3. In a pot, heat up some oil over medium-high heat, then add dried chilies and mix thoroughly to make chili oil. 4. Add the chicken and sear it in chili oil, then add the sauce and 4 cups of water. 5. Bring it to a boil and skim any foam that rises to the top. Reduce the heat to medium low. 6. Braise the chicken for about 20 minutes, then add the vegetables and glass noodles and cook until vegetables are fully cooked. Add more water if necessary. 7. Add glass noodles and cook another 6 minutes. 8. Garnish with chopped green onions. * See “Ingredients” section in back.


Braised Chicken in Soy Sauce jjimdak


Vegetables


08

30 min.

Chilled White Radish Salad mu saengchae 무생채

This is one of the first dishes I learned to make when I started working in a kitchen. It’s a great dish for practicing your knife skills! Since white radish is considered a winter vegetable, it tastes crunchier in winter. It’s another simple salad to serve with Korean barbecue or as banchan (side dish). Served as a side dish for 4. Ingredients 1/2 medium-size white radish 1 teaspoon sea salt 1 tablespoon chili powder 1&1/2 tablespoons rice vinegar 1 tablespoon sugar 1 teaspoon chopped garlic

Instructions 1. Thinly julienne the white radish, place in a bowl, and sprinkle sea salt evenly across the top. 2. Let the salted white radish sit for 10 minutes, rinse in cold water, then drain in a colander. 3. Season the white radish with chili powder and add chopped garlic, vinegar, and sugar. Serve chilled. * The point of sprinkling salt on the white radish at the beginning is to draw off moisture while also maximizing the crunch. For this to work, though, you have to use sea salt. * If you don’t feel confident about your julienning skills, it’s okay to use a grater.

* See “Ingredients” section in back.


Chilled White Radish Salad mu saengchae


Rice


14

20 min.

Kimchi Fried Rice

kimchi bokkeumbap 김치볶음밥 At lunch time around Korea, this hearty and delicious dish feeds both the rich and poor. It is easy to make, full of flavor, and comes in many variations, such as tuna, bacon, and cheese. When topped with a sunny-side up egg, it is a welcome sight for hungry people. For the best results, cook this with older, sourer kimchi instead of fresh kimchi. Serve as a meal for 4. Ingredients 1 cup fermented kimchi, chopped 1/2 cup onion, chopped Cooked rice (17.6 oz or 500 g) Black pepper as needed 1 tablespoon soy sauce 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 1 teaspoon sesame oil 1 teaspoon sugar 2 tablespoons green onion, julienned

Instructions 1. Heat the vegetable oil & sesame oil in a pan and stir-fry the kimchi and onion for 3-5 minutes. 2. Add cooked rice to the pan, stir-fry until the kimchi and rice are all jumbled up, and season with soy sauce. Add sugar and pepper. 3. Garnish with julienned green onions.

* See “Ingredients” section in back.


Kimchi Fried Rice kimchi bokkeumbap


Noodles (flour-based food)


17

40 min.

Mixed Mushroom and Glass Noodle Salad beoseot japchae 버섯잡채

This dish is perfect for vegetarians. You can use any kind of vegetable you like, but use at least two or three types of vegetables to bring out the different textures and flavors. Koreans mix dried mushrooms with fresh ones, but the dried mushrooms should be soaked for about 20 minutes beforehand. Serve as a starter for 4 or as a part of a banquet for 4-6. Ingredients Glass noodles (7 oz or 200 g) 1/2 medium onion, julienned 1/4 carrot, julienned Oyster mushroom (3.5 oz or 100 g), julienned 4 dried shitake mushrooms 5 dried wood ear mushrooms Spinach (5.6 oz or 160 g, can substitute spinach with chives), cut into 1-inch pieces

Sauce Ingredients 6 tablespoons soy sauce 1 tablespoon sugar 1 garlic clove, chopped 1 tablespoon green onion (white part), finely chopped 1 tablespoon sesame oil A pinch of toasted sesame seeds for garnish

Instructions 1. Soak the dried mushrooms in water for about 20 minutes, then drain the water and cut them into 2 to 3-inch pieces. 2. Mix all sauce ingredients and set aside. Marinate the shitake mushrooms with 2 teaspoons of sauce. 3. Sauté all main ingredients separately, adding a little bit of oil each time. Start with onions, adding a pinch of salt. Stir fry for a minute and then put the onions on a plate. Next, sauté the carrots, oyster mushrooms, shitake mushrooms, and wood ear mushrooms. 4. Take the pan off the heat, and sauté the wood ear mushrooms. 5. Cook the noodles for about 6 minutes, drain. And sauté the noodles with sauce. 6. Put all sautéed ingredients and the sauce in the pan and mix with the noodles. * When dried ingredients are not available, you can substitute with fresh vegetables. Slice and add them to the sauce. * See “Ingredients” section in back.


Mixed Mushroom and Glass Noodle Salad beoseot japchae


Bean & Tofu


21

40 min.

Braised Tofu with Spicy Sauce dubu jorim 두부조림

This dish is a great way to eat tofu. This dish a common banchan (side dish) that many Koreans eat a few times a week. Panfrying the tofu until it is brown and crispy makes it taste much better. Serve as a side dish for 4-6 people.

Ingredients Firm tofu (10.5 oz or 300 g) 1&1/2 tablespoons rice wine 3 tablespoons corn starch A pinch of toasted sesame seeds for garnish

Sauce Ingredients 4 tablespoons soy sauce 1/2 tablespoon sugar 1&1/2 teaspoons chili powder 1/2 cup water

Instructions 1. Slice the tofu into 1/2-inch thick slices and dust in corn starch. 2. Panfry the tofu with vegetable oil until golden brown in color. Put the cooked tofu aside. 3. Mix the sauce in a separate bowl and pour into pan without oil. When the sauce starts boiling reduce the heat and braise the tofu for 3 minutes. 4. Garnish with a sprinkle of sesame seeds. * To ensure that the tofu is crispy and not soggy, don't turn it over when braising it but instead soak just one side in the sauce.

* See “Ingredients” section in back.


Braised Tofu with Spicy Sauce dubu jorim


Kimchi


24

40 min.

Napa Cabbage Kimchi baechu kimchi 배추김치

This is the most popular type of kimchi in Korea, yet it is the the one with the shortest history. Red pepper flakes came to Korea in the 17th century through Japan, and napa cabbage arrived in Korea in the 19th century. Cabbage kimchi can be eaten fresh, like a salad, but the best part of kimchi is its versatility. You can use cabbage kimchi to make five or six different dishes, such as kimchi stir-fried rice, kimchi stew, kimchi dumpling with pork, and so on. Serve as a side dish to accompany a meal for 4-6. Ingredients 8 pieces green onion 1/2 napa cabbage, trimmed, cut into quarters 1/2 cup chili powder and brined 1 tablespoon salted shrimp (can with substitute (* Brine: 9 cups of water, 1 cup of coarse sea salt )

another fish sauce)

Stuffing Ingredients 1/4 medium white radish, julienned

2 garlic cloves, finely chopped 1/2 tablespoon ginger, finely chopped 2 tablespoons sugar

Instructions 1. Cut the cabbage in half lengthwise, then cut one half in two lengthwise. Reserve the other half of the cabbage for later use. Brine the two cut quarters of the cabbage for 8 hours, until the leaves are flexible. Rinse the cabbage and drain. 2. Thinly slice the white part of the green onion and cut the green part into about 1-inch pieces. 3. Julienne the white radish and sprinkle chili powder on it, then thoroughly mix together all ingredients for the stuffing. 4. Place the cabbage in a sheet pan. Starting with the outer leaves and working toward the core of the cabbage, insert the stuffing between the leaves, smearing it generously on each leaf. 5. Tightly press the leaves of the cabbage together, fold in half and use the outer leaf to create a bundle. Transfer it into a container and keep at room temperature for about 8 hours for fermentation. Afterwards, put it in the refrigerator until it is cold, then slice and serve. * See “Ingredients” section in back.


Napa Cabbage Kimchi baechu kimchi


Ingredients 2

1

3

4

5

Asian Pear

Bean Sprouts

Bell Pepper

Black Pepper

Black Rice

콩나물

피망

후추

흑미

Bae

Kongnamul

Pimang

Huchu

Heukmi Can be substituted with wild rice

Kiwi and pineapple could be used as well but need to be reduced in half.

7

6

Buckwheat Noodles/Soba Noodles

8

9

10

Chestnut

Chili

Chili Powder

고추

고춧가루

White Radish/ Daikon Radish

Bam

Gochu

Gochutgaru

무 Mu

메밀면 Memilmyeon

11

12

13

15

14

Dried Anchovies

Dried Kelp

Egg

Eggplant

Fish Sauce

멸치

다시마

계란

가지

액젓

Myeolchi

Dasima

Gyeran

Gaji

Aekjeot Can be substituted with nampla, which is Thai fish sauce


Ingredients 16

17

18

19

20

Flour (All-purpose)

Garlic

Garlic Chives

Ginger

Glass Noodles

마늘

부추

생강

당면

밀가루

Maneul

Buchu

Saenggang

Dangmyeon

Can be substituted with regular chives (herb) or lemon chives

Milgaru

21

22

23

25

24

Gochujang

Green Onion

Honey

Jujubes

Korean Cucumber

(Korean Chili Paste)

대추

오이

고추장

Pa

Kkul

Daechu

Oi

Gochujang

Leek works as well

26

Napa Cabbage/ Chinese Cabbage 배추 Baechu

Korean cucumbers are more similar to the English cucumber than a typical American cucumber.

27

Onion

28

29

30

Oyster Mushroom

Peanut

Potato

양파

땅콩

감자

Yangpa

느타리 버섯

Ttangkong

Gamja

Neutari beoseot


About the Author

Jia Choi developed a natural interest in food culture when she encountered the cultures of Brazil, Japan, and parts of Africa as a child. She began the work she is doing today out of the belief that the best way to share her values and knowledge about Korea with the world is through food. Since 2008, Choi has been the president of O’ngo Food Communications in Seoul. In her work there, she uses her own experience living overseas to bring Korean food to people around the world in a way that suits their sensibilities.

Jia Choi + the president of O’ngo Food Communications in Seoul + currently, she runs a Korean cooking class and food tours. (www.ongofood.com)

The company’s name, O’ngo, means “revitalizing tradition through modernization.” Reflecting this mission, Choi is engaged in researching and disseminating the ways in which traditional Korean food can become quicker, easier, and more delicious to prepare and eat. Choi is an expert in Korean cuisine with a PhD in food and nutrition from Ewha Womans University. She runs a Korean cooking class and food tours. (www.ongofood.com)


Credits Author Photographs Publisher Editor Copy Editor Design Cover Design

Jia Choi Julie Mayfeng Kim Hyung-geun Kim Hwa-pyeong Daisy Larios, Felix Im, David Carruth Dean Sukhoon Chung, Ko Min-jeong, Jung Hyun-young Jung Hyun-young


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USD$ 19.99 | KRW \13,900 ISBN 978-1-62412-025-1

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www.seoulselection.com


A Korean Kitchen Companion: 28 Recipes for Korean Dishes