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DENVER // BOULDER

THE NEW NORMAL

06.2016

FESTIVAL THE 2016 F I E L D GUI DE TO COL OR A DO SUM M E R F E ST I VA LS

Celebrit y - Branded

CANNABIS W H Y ? BECAUSE THEY CAN.

PESTICIDES S P EC I A L RE P O RT

&you

{ NOT A LOVE STORY } tales from

red

ROCKS

The Best Outdoor Dining Around

How CBD Oil Heals

Cooking with Cannabis


editor’s

NOTE

A S U M M E R TO R E M E M B E R

masthead. sensi magazine

ISSUE 2

VOLUME 1

06.2016

EX ECUTI VE

summer of ’ 75 ,

I VISITED RED ROCKS

FOR THE FIRST TIME TO SEE A CONCERT. MANY MEMORIES OF THAT DAY ARE FUZZY, BUT A FEW THINGS STICK OUT IN MY MIND. I REMEMBER THE TWIN TOWERING MONOLITHS, AND WATCHING SOME ADVENTUROUS SOULS CLIMB TO THE TOP OF THEM TO

FOLLOW US

BACK IN THE

of that show, four decades ago.

sensimediagroup

were fairly hot at the time. Their songs are still favorites, perhaps because

TAE.DARNELL @ SENSIMAG.COM

Alex Martinez, CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER ALEX.MARTINEZ @ SENSIMAG.COM

E DI T ORI AL

Stephanie Wilson, MANAGING EDITOR

AND THE VIEWS OF DENVER. AND I REMEMBER THE MUSIC.

I missed all of them. Instead, I saw the acoustic folk rock trio America, who

Tae Darnell, PRESIDENT, SENSI MEDIA GROUP

ROB.FEEMAN @ SENSIMAG.COM

I REMEMBER WHERE I SAT, AND THE MOOD OF THE CROWD,

Stills, Judy Collins, and the Eagles played at Red Rocks that summer. But

RON.KOLB @ SENSIMAG.COM

Rob Feeman, CHIEF CONTENT OFFICER/EDITOR

WATCH THE SHOW ( NOW STRICTLY PROHIBITED, OF COURSE ) .

Such legendary performers as James Taylor, Linda Ronstadt, Stephen

Ron Kolb, CEO, SENSI MEDIA GROUP

As senior editor Leland Rucker points out in his article on the iconic outdoor amphitheater, which celebrates its 75th anniversary this month,

STEPHANIE.WILSON @ SENSIMAG.COM

Leland Rucker, SENIOR EDITOR

LELAND.RUCKER @ SENSIMAG.COM

John Lehndorff, FOOD EDITOR

EDIBLE.CRITIC @ SENSIMAG.COM

Randy Robinson CONTRIBUTING EDITOR/PHOTOGRAPHER RANDY.ROBINSON @ SENSIMAG.COM

DE S IGN & P H O T O GR A P H Y

ter how many times you visit, no matter who you see, any trip there is a

Jennifer Tyson, DESIGN DIRECTOR

memorable one. It always sticks in your mind. More than 140 concerts and other events are taking place at Red Rocks this year, with performers like Bob Dylan, Twenty One Pilots, Sublime with Rome, Grace Potter, The String Cheese Incident, and local favorites Nathaniel Rateliff

sensimagazine

“Everybody has a story about Red Rocks.” And it’s true, because no mat-

and the Night Sweats putting in appearances. But that’s just the tip of the iceIn his article, contributor John Lehndorff provides a comprehensive list-

stance, will headline the Ride Festival in Telluride in July. Brad Paisley, Blake

sensimag

for just about any musical taste and any area of interest. Pearl Jam, for in-

Stacey Jacobs, DESIGNER

STACEY.JACOBS @ SENSIMAG.COM

Kim Sidwell, CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER INFO @ CANNABISCAMERA.COM

B U S I NE S S & A DM I N I S T R AT I V E

berg when it comes to summer entertainment options throughout Colorado. ing of festivals and concerts statewide this summer, and there’s something

JENNIFER.TYSON @ SENSIMAG.COM

Shelton, and the Zac Brown Band will perform at the Country Jam in Grand

Tyler Tarr, PUBLISHER

TYLER.TARR @ SENSIMAG.COM

Mark Basser, ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER MARK.BASSER @ SENSIMAG.COM

Alec Varipapa, BUSINESS ANALYST

ALEC.VARIPAPA @ SENSIMAG.COM

Junction this month. Alabama Shakes and Trey Anastasio are among those scheduled for Vertex in Buena Vista in early August, while soul legends Diana Ross and Smokey Robinson will appear at the JAS June Experience including the Telluride Bluegrass Festival, featuring Emmylou Harris and John Prine, and the Glenn Miller Band Swing Fest in Fort Morgan. But there’s more. Summer festivals devoted to such topics as yoga, hot air balloons, wildflowers, comics, mushrooms, cherry blossoms, barbecue, Shakespeare, and even chalk art are all on tap. With all this going on, and so much more, the summer of ’16, like the summer of ’75, promises to be one to remember.

Rob Feeman, 4

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J U N E 201 6

A DV I S O RY B OA R D Boss Tubes Cannabis Clean Cannabis Patients Alliance Cannabis Insurance Services Concentrate Supply Co. EndoCanna

Extract Craft Extracted Colorado GreenHouse Payment Solutions Green Mountain Harvest High Society Jett Cannabis Lab Society

Lucid Mood marQaha Mighty Fast Herbal Infuser Pathways Natural Wellness Center Simply Pure Terrapin Care Station Wana Brands

M E D I A PA RT N E RS EDITOR

National Cannabis Industry Association Students for Sensible Drug Policy Women Grow

KIM SIDWELL © CANNABIS CAMERA

in Aspen. Bluegrass, jazz, swing, and folk fans have a number of options,


CANNA COOKING

contents.

ISSUE 2

VOLUME 1

06.2016

FEATURES 20

Sativa Onion Soup

48

F E ST I VA L GUIDE

Tunes Take the Field

Sensi’s singalong, yoga-fied, dance-a-long, scratch-n-sniff field guide to Colorado summer festivals.

30

Stories in the Stones

38

Stepping Up

42

20

It’s been 75 years since Red Rocks Park was dedicated. A new book examines the history of the world-famous sandstone formation/concert hall in the foothills west of Denver.

The Brice family makes some moves to get CBD oil to help their son D’Marus.

FESTIVAL SEASON

S PEC I A L R E P O R T

is Chic l Ca ealm ica em icCannabis ChChemical ann l Cab annatth bheis e sstate and

With nofhed federal guidance, idance, the state and all dgu de ner noitfe no ora i W fe With eral guidanstce e ici, de industry struggle tog get t pepesticide t heus et ge to suse e le l in tate and gsgl rug stru rdyust ry ygg usttry indus truggle to get cont l. ol. ro ntr errpecontrol. de nd in cannabis cultivation under un st nu ion icide use vattio ltiiva lt nis aabis ncab nacu nn ain bis in caan cultivaat ion u nder control.

NATURE!

Sensi Magazine is published monthly in Denver, CO, by Sensi Media Group LLC, 6565 East Evans Ave., Denver, CO 80224. © 2016 SENSI MEDIA GROUP LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

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RED ROCKS

75 TURNS

EVERY

ISSUE

whoops,

SORRY

4 8 10 12

Editor’s Note Sensi Buzz

Ask Leland/Q&A Perspectives THE CULT OF CELEBRITY

14 EdibleCritic FARE VIEW

48 LastWord FEEL-GOOD FOOD

J U N E 2 01 6

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THE NE W N O R M A L

S IMO N SAYS :

sensi

buzz

PA X 2 IS AWE S OM E

The super-sleek PAX 2 takes the cake when it comes to LOOSE-LEAF VAPORIZERS. Its design is reminiscent of an iPod: clean lines, smooth brushed-metal materials, and only one button to boot. The discrete pocket-sized machine (retail: $279, and worth every penny) works by heating leafy material (such as fine cannabis flower) instead of burning it, releasing active ingredients and natural oils into a subtle vapor. By eliminating the combustion process, it nixes secondhand smoke as well, making it the ultimate indoor-party pairing. It was designed by some Stanford grads, who imbued some extra fun easter eggs into the device, as Silicon Valley geeks are wont to do. Next time you get your hands on one, try rolling it around 13 times. Its indicator lights will flash white, and then you can play the classic Simon memory game on the LED interface, which typically shows charge, heat setting, or party mode. Play by tipping the PAX in the direction of the colored light, and if you win 20 times in a row, you’ll be rewarded by a rendition of "Funky Town" every time you turn it on with a touch of a button. –STEPHANIE WILSON

CL ASSIC {music } COMBO BOOMbastic Bacon Brittle Did you know that bacon makes everything taste better? Quiches, salmon, salads, sandwiches, and yes, even honey-dipped cannabis. It all tastes better with bacon. MOUNTAIN MEDICINE’S BOOMBASTIC BACON BRITTLE combines everyone’s favorite flower with locally cultivated, cold-pressed nectar made by Boulder’s very own Highland Honey. Each square-inch brittle chunk contains bits of bacon, pecans, and a dash of sea salt. The first bite produced a crunch that shattered the brittle into several sugary pieces. Successive bites churned my mouthful of cracked confection into a gooey mess of smoky, sticky sweetness that glued the Bacon Brittle to the little crevices in my teeth. From start to finish, I couldn’t taste or smell any cannabis, so rookies might want to try these as their introduction to edibles. Each brittle chunk contains about 10 mg THC, but just one didn’t do much for me. After I chewed through a second brittle, I shot straight skyward a couple of hours later. Luckily, I cleared my schedule that day. If you’re going to partake in

BO

OM

these porcine morsels, I’d advise you do the same.

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– RANDY ROBINSON

IN THE SAME WAY THE CANNABIS PL ANT EMBODIES THE SOIL AND NUTRIENTS IN WHICH IT WAS CULTIVATED, ALLOWING YOU TO EXPERIENCE ITS SUNLIGHT THROUGH YOUR LIGHTER, MUSIC CAPTURES THE TIME AND PLACE OF ITS CREATOR. I INVITE YOU TO TAKE THESE FIRST FIVE ADVENTURES INTO FAMILIAR AND EXOTIC WORLDS OF PAST AND PRESENT WITH PAIRED STRAINS FOR YOUR PLEASURE. –SEAN COLEM AN

M U S I C I A N / C A N N A B I S LO B BY I S T

Ludwig Van Beethoven Symphony in #7 A-Major { Durban Poison } Aaron Copland // Appalachian Spring { N YC Diesel } Dmitri Shostakovich Symphony #10 in E-Major { Deathstar } Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov // Scheherazade { Lavender } Antonın ˇ Dvorák ˘ // Cello Concerto in B-Minor { Dairy Queen }


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Our curious cannabis expert, LELAND RUCKER , answers your questions about all things pot related.

ask

Topical Troubles RECREATIONAL AND MEDICAL CANNABIS USE IS LEGAL IN COLORADO, BUT BUSINESSES HERE ARE ALSO ALLOWED TO DRUG TEST CITIZENS BEFORE EMPLOYING THEM. Most companies use urine tests,

though there are saliva and hair-follicle tests, all designed to detect THC in a person’s system. Unlike many other drugs,

A LOT OF MY F R I E N DS AND I HAVE B E E N USING

which dissipate from the system fairly quickly, THC remains in body fat, with the amount of time it hangs around for dependent on factors like a person’s weight and their frequency and amount of use. I’ve been lucky enough to never have had to submit to a company drug

CANNABIS TOPICAL

test, but a lot of people will endure one at some point or another. And you

MEDICATIONS FOR

can be legally denied a job if THC is found in your system. Today, there are

PAIN RELIEF AND

many more ways to get cannabis into your system, and not always just to

AS HAND LOTION. WILL TOPICAL POT

become elevated. People are using lotions, balms, salves, and transdermal patches for localized pain relief and moisturizing. So will that lotion you’re using on your hands show up on drug tests?

MEDICATIONS SHOW

Opinions vary. Some herbalists, arguing that the lotions have such a minute

UP ON WORKPL ACE

amount of THC, say that applying it to your skin won’t result in a positive

DRUG TESTS?

drug test. Others argue that even though it’s a low dosage of THC, it could

R A N DY AURORA

enter your bloodstream in other ways, such as, for instance, getting it on your finger and then putting that digit in your mouth. Transdermal patches, which are designed to deliver a concentrated dose

ask it. Got a question about anything marijuana related? Email your query to: ASKLELAND @ SENSIMAG.COM

and if we answer your question, you’ll get some cool Sensi merch.

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J U N E 201 6

of medication through the skin, are a different story. Everybody agrees that these kinds of products, since they enter the bloodstream, could show up positive on drug tests. If you’re an occasional user and don’t inhale marijuana from a vaporizer or water pipe, you’re probably not going to show up positive if you use a salve or lotion occasionally. But all in all, if you really want that job, you might want to stay away from any marijuana products, including topical medications, for as long as you can before the test. The safest answer is that you should almost always assume you might test positive for any cannabis product you use. And if it’s any consolation, remember companies that try to exclude candidates simply by their marijuana use are spending lots of money eliminating many of the “best and brightest” they are seeking.

KIM SIDWELL © CANNABIS CAMERA

Leland Rucker

LELAND


{ perspectives } by R ANDY R O B IN S ON

THE CULT OF CELEBRITY Well, we finally lived to see it: full-blown celebrity endorsements for legal marijuana.

In Colorado, sometimes it’s tricky to recall what it was like before all this cannabis craziness. It’s been a part of our lives for sixteen years. Back in 2003, the Bush administration sentenced iconic comedian Tommy Chong to nine months in federal custody. The Up in Smoke actor © KEVIN WINTER

didn’t get busted for selling marijuana. It wasn’t even possession. Chong got busted for selling bongs. “Chong Bongs,” to be precise. Mind you, these bongs were just regular bongs. For all purposes, they were no different than any other water pipe that you’d find in any corner smoke shop. Today, Chong Bongs are a rare collector’s item. Not just because they’re no longer made. They’re collectors’ items because they hit really, really well. As in, they were some of the best bongs ever mass produced. I would know, because I used to have one. We expect celebrity-endorsed products such as the Chong Bong to be high quality. If we adore a particular celebrity, we trust them. If they’re willing to bank their name on this particular brand, then gosh darnit, we’re willing to give it a try. We might even become loyal customers. It’s been thirteen long years since Chong went to jail for simply selling some pipes. A lot has happened in that time. Today, we’re seeing a deluge of celebrity-branded weed: Willie Nelson, the Marley Family, Snoop Dogg, Wiz Khalifa, Whoopi Goldberg—they’re all in on it. There’s even Rihanna’s “Marihanna.”

PICTURED ABOVE :

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Leafs by Snoop chocolate bars, available in recreational and medical doses in a whole bunch of flavors, including Peaches N Cream and Blueberries N Cream.


Oh, and did I mention Chong’s finally selling marijuana, too? I’m ta talking the whole shebang when it comes to Chong’s Choice: edibles, vape cartridges, bags of buds. And good for him. e © NIKOLAY TZOLOV

Get it while it’s still hot, Tommy. AT LEFT :

© RICK THOMPSON

Bob Marley’s star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, Los Angeles, California

And Melissa Etheridge, a breast cancer survivor, is about to launch her line of infused booze. Could you imagine? In the future, it’ll be possible to pop a Whoopi pot pill, grind up a mixed salad of some Willie, Wiz, and Snoop nugs, load it into a Chong Bong, and take a Hollywood hit in between sips of Melissa’s weed wine. That’s the future, folks. And it’s right around the corner. But will these celebrity-brand cannabis products live up to their names? Will they become mainstay faves like Stephen Colbert’s Americone Dream ice cream? Or will they abscond like the Marilyn Monroe-inspired 6126 clothing line? Chances are these celebrity-brand cannabis goods will be hit-and-miss, like any other star-brand product. We can return to Tommy Chong as a great example. Despite his run-in with the feds years ago, he’s still in business. Today, Chong’s got two items on the market. One is his hemp drink, ChongWater. Apparently, it’s supposed to cure

chong! Comedian, entrepreneur, and medical marijuana patient Tommy Chong speaks during Hash Bash 2016. A N N A R B O R, MIC H IG A N // A P R IL 2, 2016

cottonmouth, but it tastes kind of gross. The other is his ChongCone rolling papers, which are pretty awesome. There’s even an exclusive Tommy Chong™ rolling device designed specifically for his ChongCones. Oh, and did I mention Chong’s finally selling marijuana, too? I’m talking the whole shebang when it comes to

The new line of Whoopi Goldberg’s cannabis products, which includes bath soak and medicated rubs.

Chong’s Choice: edibles, vape cartridges, bags of buds. And good for him. Get it while it’s still hot, Tommy. Because an army of famous people are coming for a slice of that sativa pie you baked long, long ago.

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{ ediblecritic } by JOHN LEHNDORFF

FARE VIEW Acquire a taste for stellar al fresco dining on rooftops, by the water, on mountain tops, and out on the farm.

We were winding our way up Flagstaff Road from Chautauqua Park on a summer evening when we rounded a

OURAY BREWERY

corner and ran into a rainbow. Well, not literally, but it formed a perfect hued arch ahead of us that framed Boulder and beyond where the plains disappear into the horizon. “Wow,” I said. “Wow,” said my visiting friend. “Thanks for arranging that.” I took no credit as we pulled into the Flagstaff House for drinks and a softshell crab appetizer on the patio. Showers came and went, and we didn’t mind. Most of us feed

Any outdoor seat in OURAY tends to have a pretty view, what

ourselves a thousand or more meals a year but only a few

with the canyon walls and steaming hot springs. The scenery

produce a cinematic food memory. Colorado is good for that.

from Ouray Brewery’s roof is downright psychedelic on a

There are some things about the state that outlanders do

crisp Colorado evening when one of those lipstick sunsets

not get until they visit. Like if you sit outside deep in the

sets in. Contemplate it over a grilled shrimp remoulade-stuffed

mountains on a clear night eating pie à la mode, you are en-

avocado and a house-brewed Desperado Imperial Red.

veloped by billions of stars, swirling constellations, and colors

OURAY BREWERY // 607 MAIN STREET, OURAY 970-325-7388 // WWW.OURAYBREWERY.COM

… and it’s not the sativa talking. It sounds sappy, but it’s exactly like John Denver’s “Rocky Mountain High” (which actu-

If you walk down the Pearl Street Mall in Boulder, almost all

ally wasn’t primarily about enjoying cannabis at altitude).

of the strange people you encounter are from out of town.

Every eating establishment from Greeley to Grand Junc-

One place you will find the strange locals (in a good way) is on

tion brags about its “outdoor dining.” Here is our curated col-

the roof patio at the venerable WEST END TAVERN. The pub

lection of “wow”-worthy al fresco dining and rooftop sipping

fare, the beer selection, and the views are nice, but there’s

spots, by the water, on mountain tops, and out on the farm.

a vibe in this old building that feels like home.

Up on the Roof {In and Out of Town}

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WEST END TAVERN // 926 PEARL ST., BOULDER 303-444-3535 // WWW.THEWESTENDTAVERN.COM

The Olinger Mortuary sign casts a friendly glow on a bar that

20 Ales in the Garden

includes a 1975 RV camper on LINGER’s rooftop with a view

Here’s how we do suburban al fresco noshing here: A platter

of downtown Denver. This is a very popular summer happy-

of meats, cheeses, pickles, and bread and a nitro ale chosen

hour hotspot, so arrive early for cocktails, cheese curds and

from the 20 taps enjoyed at a picnic table in the sun. The re-

shisito peppers, and Chinese takeout-style ribs.

cently opened FARM HOUSE AT BRECKENRIDGE BREWERY

LINGER // 2030 W. 30TH AVE., DENVER 303-993-3120 // WWW.LINGERDENVER.COM

is our idea of a super-comfy backyard with first-class brews.

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J U N E 201 6

FARM HOUSE AT BRECKENRIDGE BREWERY 2990 BREWERY LANE, LIT TLETON 303-803-1380 // WWW.BRECKBREWFARMHOUSE.COM


LINGER RESTAURANT

MISHIWAKA

TARA POLLY © LINGER RESTAURANT

A Secret Urban Oasis

Burger and Jam by the River

”POTAGER” means “kitchen garden” but at Terri Rippetto’s

The Mish is a must-experience Colorado eating and listen-

bistro gem, the garden is actually in the alley. The pleasant

ing venue. For instance, on June 30, you can enjoy an Odell

shaded porch, set with worn wooden furniture and barrels

Easy Street Wheat and a blackened tuna salad while the

of herbs and flowers, spells relief on a hot night. Constantly

Dark Star Orchestra recreates an historic Grateful Dead

changing dishes might include Red Wagon Farm arugula with

show. We’re partial to Red Rocks,1978. MISHIWAKA’S deck

charred lemon peel, Ugly Goat Farm chèvre, lemon oil, and

by the rushing water of the Poudre River is also an excep-

pistachio crumble. Note: No reservations taken, so arrive early.

tional brunch spot. On the menu: Rocky Mountain “oysters.”

POTAGER // 1109 OGDEN ST., DENVER 303-832-5788 // WWW.POTAGERRESTAURANT.COM

MISHAWAKA AMPHITHEATRE 13714 POUDRE CANYON ROAD, BELLVUE 303-803-1380 // WWW.THEMISHAWAKA.COM

Four - Star Patio Dining, Mountain - Style The FL AGSTAFF HOUSE has always been a fine-dining place

LYONS FARMET TE

where well-dressed folks celebrated life’s big events. However, there’s room on the restaurant’s gorgeous patio for shorts and Hawaiian shirts. Everyone sips from the same 15,000-bottle cellar. Coffee delivered with a platter of sweets and whipped cream is so worth the drive. FLAGSTAFF HOUSE // 1138 FLAGSTAFF ROAD, BOULDER 303-442-4640 // WWW.FLAGSTAFFHOUSE.COM

Drinking with the Dogs Traffic is tough, parking’s near impossible, but when you settle into the “wooded” patio outside FOREST ROOM 5, you understand. You can sip an old-fashioned and nibble an

Down on the Farm-to-Table

elk slider while sitting on a tree stump next to a roaring fire.

For some souls, eating outside requires getting away from

You probably won’t be able to see the stars, but you may

it all first. That’s why they set the tables on the lawn for a

bring along your very well-behaved canine for company.

sunset repast at the LYONS FARMET TE, a pretty working

FOREST ROOM 5 // 2532 15TH ST., DENVER 303-433-7001 // WWW.FORESTROOM5.COM

organic farm north of Boulder. Genuine farm-to-farm table fare is prepared and served by guest chefs such as Top Chef winner Hosea Rosenberg of Blackbelly Market.

JOHN LEHNDORFF is the former dining critic of the Rocky Mountain News. He hosts Radio Nibbles on KGNU (8 :25 am each Thursday, 88.5 FM, 1390 AM, WWW.KGNU.ORG ). Podcasts are available at: NEWS.KGNU.ORG/C ATEGORY/R ADIO-NIBBLES/

LYONS FARMET TE // 4121 UTE HIGHWAY, LYONS 303-746-6266 // WWW.LYONSFARMETTE.COM/DINNERS/ J U N E 2 01 6

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S P E C I A L A D V I S O R Y B OA R D S E C T I O N

AS THE CANNABIS INDUSTRY GROWS, SO DO THE NUMBER OF NICHE EXPERTS WITHIN IT. CONCENTRATES. EXTRACTION. EDIBLES. DISPENSARIES. AND SO MUCH MORE. SENSI MAG ASKED THE TOP LEADERS IN EACH OF THESE SECTORS TO JOIN WHAT WE’RE CALLING THE SENSI SPECIAL ADVISORY BOARD. THESE MEMBERS ARE INVITED TO IMPART SOME OF THEIR INDUSTRY KNOWLEDGE TO OUR READERS IN THIS SPECIAL ADVISORY BOARD SECTION, WHICH WILL APPEAR IN EACH EDITION. FOR OUR INAUGURAL RUN, WE’VE ASKED THE LEADERS OF ENDOCANNA AND CANNABIS CLEAN TO DISCUSS SOME OF THE TRICKS OF THEIR TRADES. FOR A FULL LIST OF ADVISORY BOARD MEMBERS, TURN TO OUR MASTHEAD ON PAGE 6.

Grow Your Cannabis Clean by S TE VE N M C M OR R OW // Cannabis Clean

In most industries, companies love to use terms such as “organic,” “free-range,” and “non-GMO”—phrases that let the consumer know the product is tested, regulated, and free from harmful pesticides and chemicals. These terms convey a sense of safety, translating into a sense of well-being in the consumer, who can feel better about what they choose to ingest. In the cannabis industry, those terms don’t apply, largely because our main product—cannabis—is still federally illegal and therefore unregulated by the federal government, whose agencies such as the FDA govern the use of terms such as “organic.” That doesn’t mean that some cannabis companies don’t follow the same stringent guidelines while growing their products. Those companies are showing not only concern for the well-being of the consumer, but also incredible foresight, because it is only a matter of time before the FDA steps in and gets involved in the regulation of the cannabis industry. In my mind, it can’t happen soon enough. When a company is growing or producing anything for public consumption, let alone medicine, cleanliness is of the utmost importance, and it’s one of the most underestimated issues. Right now, recreational cannabis is already tested for E. coli, salmonella, mold, and mildew. Starting July 1, medical cannabis will be subject to testing as well. For those in the growing industry, I recommend being proactive rather than reactive, and begin preparing your grow now. If your grow space is sterile and clean, you won’t have to deal with pesticides. You’ll also have less crop loss due to cross contamination. Don’t use bleach or other harsh chemicals that could harm your staff and your plants. Keep in mind while you are growing that some of the people who consume your products use it as medicine, and they may have compromised immune systems. It is your duty to make cleanliness and safety a huge factor in your business model.

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M AY 2016

Keep in mind while you are growing that some of the people who consume your products use it as medicine, and they may have compromised immune systems.


S P E C I A L A D V I S O R Y B OA R D S E C T I O N

Making Medicine from Cannabis by DU S T IN M A H ON // EndoCanna

Explaining the highly technical process of extracting the compounds from the cannabis plant to create high-quality medicine. How do we make the medicine? Cannabis contains hun-

than absorbing them. In “bubble hash� production, extractors

dreds of compounds that typically comprise 15-40 percent

use water, ice, and agitation to harden the trichomes and

of the plant’s biological makeup. CBD, THC, and beta caryo-

sheer them from the plant material. The trichomes fall to the

phyllene are only a few of the known medicinal components

bottom of the agitation machine, where they are pumped

of the cannabis plant. Extraction of these compounds is

through a series of mesh bags to further separate them

necessary to create effective medicine for patients.

from any residual plant material. This extract will typically be

Colorado approved multiple extraction techniques for commercial production. Most methods involve a solvent,

used to smoke, vape, ingest, or make topicals. The dry sift is a solventless technique that involves beating

spin be it polar (water-soluble) or nonpolar (non-water-soluble).

the plant material against a mesh screen to separate the tri-

Nonpolar solvents are desirable because the medicinal com-

chomes from the plant material. The trichomes are collected

ponents we seek to extract are oils. Most of the undesirable

through a series of increasingly smaller micron screens. The

compounds are water-soluble. Solvents, such as butane,

end product is typically smoked or refined in a heat press.

propane, and heptane, along with CO2, are the approved

Heat press extraction is a solventless method of removing

nonpolar solvents. Hydrocarbons can be used together or

compounds from cannabis. Heating up the plant material cre-

separately (BHO, PHO) to perform extremely high-potency,

ates viscous oil that is pressed through a screen, separating it

high-quality extractions that, when purged properly, provide

from the plant matter. These oils are highly concentrated me-

the highest medicinal compound purity. CO2, an inert, non-

dicinal compounds, commonly referred to as rosin, that allow

toxic, nonflammable gas, is considered a close second on the

patients to ingest, vape, or apply the medicine topically.

purity scale. These extractions create a purity level that al-

Any edible oil with a fat content (e.g. butter, hemp seed)

lows patients to ingest, vape, or apply the medicine topically.

can be heated with dried cannabis to extract compounds.

Ethanol, isopropanol, acetone, and water are the approved

This is a nonpolar solvent process known as hot oil extraction.

polar solvents in Colorado. Nonpolar solvents pull 50-80 per-

The heated oil is combined with dried cannabis to extract the

cent of the medicinal material while polar solvents pull 90-

compounds and infuse them into the oil fats. Once the oil has

plus percent. Ethanol, isopropanol, and acetone dissolve the

been strained from the plant matter, the infused oil will be used

plant walls and remove everything including undesirable im-

for edible and topical products.

purities such as chlorophyll, plant waxes, fats, and lipids. This extract will typically be used for edible or topical products. Water is a polar solvent that repels desirable oils rather

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bubble hash

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These extraction methods lead to the separation of cannabinoids from the cannabis plant to create concentrated, easily dosed, and effective medicinal products.


SUMMER FESTIVALS by J O H N L E H N D O R F F

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THIEVERY CORPORATION, JAMES PETRALLI AND JOAN OSBOURNE © BEST OF THE RIDE 2014

© KEYSTONE BLUEGRASS & BEER FESTIVAL

F E S T I VA L G U I D E

PONDERING THE GLUT OF

must-go

S U M M E R G AT H E R I N G S T H I S S E A S O N

A C R O S S T H E S TAT E A N D T R Y I N G T O S C H E D U L E A C A L E N D A R A N D I T I N E R A R Y C O U L D REQUIRE AN APP, NOT TO MENTION A CALCULATOR. FROM MUSIC FESTIVALS THAT INCLUDE PADDLEBOARDING TO BARBECUE COMPETITIONS AND SHAKESPEARE UNDER THE STARS, THERE SEEMS TO BE A DESTINATION RIGHT FOR HIPSTERS, FAMILIES, CRAFT BREW FANS, S I D E WA L K A R T G E E K S, A N D CO U N T RY M U S I C LOV E R S AL I K E. TO HELP YOU CHOOSE, WE HAVE ASSEMBLED A GUIDE TO COLORADO’S TOP FESTIVALS, CIRCA SUMMER 2016. THE LIST FOCUSES MAINLY ON MULTIPLE - DAY HAPPENINGS, SO WE LEFT OUT A WEALTH OF CONCERTS AT SUCH EPIC VENUES AS RED ROCKS AND CHAUTAUQ UA A U D I T O R I U M . H E R E A R E A F E W O F O U R FAVO R I T E S F O R 2016.

hey, june! \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\ Campout for the Cause

Pagosa Folk & Bluegrass Festival

WWW.CAMPOUTFORTHECAUSE.ORG

WWW. FOLKWEST.COM

June 2-5 // Rancho Del Rio

WHY IT’S COOL : Yoga classes, standup

paddleboard races, music, and camping on the banks of the Colorado River. L INEUP : Paper Bird, Head for the Hills, Trout Steak Revival, The California Honeydrops, Bonfire Dub, Drunken Hearts

Colorado Shakespeare Festival

June 3-5 // Pagosa Springs

WHY IT’S COOL : Listen to great music all day, and

relax afterward in the town’s famous hot springs. L INEUP : Aoife O’Donovan, Rob Ickes, Tony Furtado,

Finnders & Youngberg, The Railsplitters.

Denver Chalk Art Festival June 4-5 // Denver

WWW.LARIMERARTS.ORG

June 3 -August 7 // University of Colorado, Boulder

WHY IT’S COOL : Astonishing temporary art on

WWW.COLORADOSHAKES.ORG

the streets and sidewalks of Larimer Square.

WHY IT’S COOL : Acclaimed Shakespeare

L INEUP : More than 200 professional, amateur,

company performs under the stars at the University of Colorado. Bring (or rent) a seat cushion or chair. L INEUP : The Comedy of Errors, Troilus and Cressida, Cymbeline, and Henry VI, Part 2.

and student chalk artists from around the country descend upon the historic square, and for two days, draw intricate, colorful works as crowds look on. All it takes to wash away artistic effort is a good hard spring rain, so get out to see the creation while it’s happening. J U N E 2 01 6

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June 9 -12 // Boulder

WWW.HANUMANFESTIVAL.COM

Colorado BBQ Challenge June 16 -19 // Frisco

WWW.TOWNOFFRISCO.COM

WHY IT’S COOL : World-class yoga instructors,

WHY IT’S COOL : This long-running competition,

inspirational talks, YogaSlackers, Cacao Ceremony, hiking, music, vegetarian fare, dancing. L INEUP : Saul David Raye, Elijah Ray, Magic Giant, David Newman (Durga Das).

celebrating its 23rd year in the picturesque mountain town, draws some 30,000 people each year to get a taste of the fun. That includes the Breckenridge Whiskey “Rub It, Smoke It, Sip It” BBQ Tour; the Bacon Burner 6k, plus bands, pig races, kids activities, food sampling and demos, and the crowd-favorite Fire Fighter Cook Off. L INEUP : 70-plus serious barbecue masters vie in pork, ribs, chicken, and brisket for the Grand Champion title.

Palisade Bluegrass & Roots Festival

June 10 -12 // Riverbend Park, Palisade WWW.PALISADEMUSIC.COM

WHY IT’S COOL : A three-day hoedown along the

Telluride Bluegrass Festival The mountains provide the perfect backdrop for the summer gathering.

banks of the Colorado River in Colorado’s wine and peach country, including yoga sessions, jamming workshops, guided hikes, and bike rides. L INEUP : David Grisman Bluegrass Experience, Wood & Wire, Colorado’s Caribou Mountain Collective, and The HillBenders doing The Who’s rock opera “Tommy”.

Country Jam

June 16 -19 // Grand Junction WWW.COUNTRYJAM.COM

WHY IT’S COOL : Top country artist meet and greets,

personal port-a-potty campsite rental available. L INEUP : Brad Paisley, Blake Shelton, Zac Brown Band, Lee Brice, Trace Adkins, Big & Rich, and more.

The 43rd Annual Telluride Bluegrass Festival Sonic Bloom

June 16 -19 // Near Walsenburg SONICBLOOMFESTIVAL.COM

WHY IT’S COOL : Yoga, visual artists,

performance art, speakers, and workshops. L INEUP : Tipper, Bonobo, Opiuo Band, EOTO,

Michal Menert, Nightmares On Wax, Justin Martin, Giraffage, SunSquabi, Com Truise.

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DYLAN LANGUILLE © TELLURIDE BLUEGRASS FEST

Hanuman Festival

June 16 -19 // Town Park, Telluride WWW.BLUEGRASS.COM/TELLURIDE

WHY IT’S COOL : Colorado’s most famous music festival

with a stunning mountain setting, bluegrass, rock, jam, and folk stars, a well-run family tent, free workshops in Elks Park. Festival streams live on: WWW.KOTO.ORG L INEUP : Sam Bush, Greensky Bluegrass, Bela Fleck, Ryan Adams, The Oh Hellos, Chris Thile, Sierra Hull, Neil Finn, Emmylou Harris, John Prine.


Denver Comic Con

June 17-19 // Colorado Convention Center, Denver WWW.DENVERCOMICCON.COM

WHY IT’S COOL : Dress like a Romulan

and be among your own kind. L INEUP : Hayley Atwell (“Agent Carter”), Stan Lee, Ralph Macchio, Jenna Coleman and Alex Kingston (Doctor Who), Karl Urban (Star Trek ), Cary Elwes (The Princess Bride ).

JAS June Experience

June 24 -July 2 // Benedict Music Tent, Aspen WWW.JAZZASPENSNOWMASS.ORG

WHY IT’S COOL : Chill in the mountains with

great hotels, restaurants, and shops nearby. L INEUP : Diana Ross, Sheryl Crow, Marcus Miller, Booker T., and Smokey Robinson.

Cherry Blossom Festival

Clear Creek RapidGrass Music Festival

WWW.CHERRYBLOSSOMDENVER.ORG

Idaho Springs

June 18 -19 // Sakura Square, Denver

WHY IT’S COOL : Taikō drumming, vintage

Japanese textiles, martial arts, ikebana, and bonsai. L INEUP : Menu features traditional teriyaki chicken,

sushi, mochi, chilled somen noodles, Denver-brewed Sakura Matsuri ale, and Oregon-brewed sake.

Bravo Vail

June 26 -28 // Shelly/Quinn Baseball Fields, WWW.CLEARCREEKRAPIDGRASS.COM

WHY IT’S COOL : Instrument Petting Zoo and Slip-n-

Slide for kids, craft beer, local food, banjo workshop. L INEUP : Peter Rowan, David Grisman, Jeff Austin,

Rapidgrass Quintet, Finnders and Youngberg, Caribou Mountain Collective.

June 23 -August 6 // Vail

Glenn Miller Swing Fest

WHY IT’S COOL : One of the top classical music

WWW.GLENNMILLERSWINGFEST.COM

June 28 -30 // Fort Morgan

WWW.BRAVOVAIL.ORG

festivals in Colorado with masterworks, jazz, pops, and chamber music performances. L INEUP : Academy of St. Martin in the Fields with Joshua Bell, Dallas Symphony Orchestra, Philadelphia Orchestra, New York Philharmonic.

WHY IT’S COOL : Native son bandleader Glenn Miller is

feted with concerts, tours, talks, and lots of swing dancing L INEUP : United States Air Force Falconaires, Platte Valley Band, Juke Box Saturday Night Street Dance, Lions Club Pancake Brunch, Glenn Miller Family Cemetery Tour and Museum.

july, july, july! \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\ Cherry Creek Arts Festival July 2-4 // Cherry Creek North, Denver

WWW.CHERRYCREEKARTSFESTIVAL.ORG

WHY IT’S COOL : Cool kids’ art activities, food booths, Denver Comic Con Billed as a three-day popculture extravanganza of fun.

and live music in the streets of Cherry Creek North. L INEUP : 260 juried exhibitors and emerging artists and a huge collaborative mural.

Rocky Mountain Old Time Music Festival July 6 -10 // Parrish Ranch, Berthoud WWW.THECROMA.ORG

WHY IT’S COOL : Historic farm barn hosts square

dancing and workshops on being a square-dance caller. L INEUP : Foghorn Stringband, Red Squirrel

Chasers, Bootlickers. 24

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High Mountain Hay Fever Bluegrass Festival

Crested Butte Wildflower Festival

WWW.HIGHMOUNTAINHAYFEVER.ORG

WHY IT ’S COOL : Hike down one of Colorado’s most

WHY IT’S COOL : Intimate crowd, onsite mountain

eye-popping valleys painted with wildflowers, then learn to capture and portray those flowers during art workshops and photo classes. There are over 200 events on offer during this unique, sophisticated gathering. LINEUP : Botany in Half a Day; Stalking the Wild Edible; Folk Remedies; Birding Among the Upper Loop.

July 7-10 // Bluff and Summit Park, Westcliffe

camping, four days of progressive bluegrass jamming. L INEUP : Claire Lynch, David Grier, Keith Little, BENKO PHOTOGRAPHICS © TELLURIDE BLUEGRASS FEST

Helen Highwater Stringband, Mollie O’Brien and Rich Moore, Steel Pennies.

Rocky Mountain Regional Gay Rodeo

July 11-23 // Crested Butte

WWW.CRESTEDBUTTEWILDFLOWERFESTIVAL.COM

The Divide

July 8 -10 // Jefferson County Fairgrounds, Golden

July 22-24 // Winter Park

WHY IT’S COOL : The hippest, most fun rodeo

WHY IT’S COOL : Coachella-inspired festival

WWW.CGRA .US

event of the summer in Colorado. L INEUP : All day rodeo including riding steers with a Grand Entry of competitors at noon each day.

WWW.DIVIDEMUSICFESTIVAL.COM

includes mountain biking tours, trail running, yoga, camping, and food trucks. L INEUP : Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros, Passion Pit, Kid Cudi, Blondie, Cake, Foxfield Four, Gipsy Moon, Splyt, The Fray.

Bass Center 2016

July 29-30 // Dick’s Sporting Goods Park, Commerce City WWW.BASSNECTAR.NET

WHY IT’S COOL : Multiple official after-parties

This rock star took the stage at Ride in 2015.

offsite and camping villages (The Shire & Narnia); nitrous oxide prohibited. L INEUP : Bassnectar, Flux Pavilion, Wu-Tang Clan, Flying Lotus, Porter Robinson, Lupe Fiasco, AlunaGeorge, Minnesota, G Jones, Dabin & Thriftworks.

The Ride Festival

July 9 -10 // Telluride Town Park WWW.RIDEFESTIVAL.COM

WHY IT’S COOL : Camping, hiking, fishing, biking, a

roaring river, and restaurants in a box canyon surrounded by San Juan Mountains peaks. Not to mention the lineup of rock bands taking the stage in the Telluride Town Park during this music-filled weekend of beautiful fun in one of the most incredible concert settings in the country. L INEUP : Pearl Jam, Cage the Elephant, The Dirty Knobs (with Mike Campbell), The Temperance Movement, Jerry Joseph & the Jackmormons, Radio Moscow, Band of Heathens. 26

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RockyGrass Festival

July 29-31 // Planet Bluegrass, Lyons WWW.BLUEGRASS.COM/ROCKYGRASS/

WHY IT’S COOL : Eye-candy location, small audience,

great food, concert-side creek, Colorado state bluegrass championships, family tent. L INEUP : Steep Canyon Rangers, Tim O’Brien, Jerry Douglas, Bryan Sutton, Abigail Washburn, Mark O’Connor, Rhonda Vincent.


august \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\ Vertex

August 5 -7 // Buena Vista

August 5 -7 // Sunrise Ranch, Loveland

WWW.VERTEXFESTIVAL.COM

WWW.ARISEFESTIVAL.COM/2016

WHY IT’S COOL : From the home base on a revitalized

WHY IT’S COOL : Seven stages, yoga, theme camps,

working ranch just outside of Buena Vista, music, art, and adventure collide. Raft the Arkansas, paddleboard, or hike or bike the trails winding up the 14,000-foot peaks of the Collegiate Range. Those peaks serve as a backdrop for the festival itself, which offers a mishmash of VIP tents, dancing, and organic options. L INEUP : Odesza, Alabama Shakes, Trey Anastasio Band, Dawes, Fruition, Graham Nash, Houndmouth, The Claypool Lennon Delirium.

art gallery installations, children’s village, speakers, films and camping on 100 acres. L INEUP : Ziggy Marley, Jurassic 5, The New Mastersounds, Phutureprimitive, Jeff Austin, Travelin’ McCourys, Fortunate Youth, Everyone Orchestra.

Telluride Jazz Festival August 5 -7 // Telluride

WWW.TELLURIDEJAZZ.ORG

WHY IT’S COOL : It’s in Telluride. Plus:

Free Colorado craft liquor tasting on Friday. L INEUP : Jon Cleary, Marcus Miller, Galactic, John Scofield, Jeff Coffin, Rebirth Jazz Band.

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ARISE Music Festival

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Telluride Jazz Fest The gathering is put on by the nonprofit Telluride Society for Jazz.


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20th Annual Bluegrass & Beer Festival

Rocky Mountain Folks Festival

WWW.KEYSTONEFESTIVALS.COM

WHY IT’S COOL : This is an audience that

August 6 -7 // Keystone

WHY IT’S COOL : Craft breweries, live bluegrass

in an exceptionally cushy environment for a bluegrass festival. L INEUP : Larry Keel Experience, Peter Rowan, Tim O’Brien, Mandolin Orange.

Telluride Mushroom Festival RYAN BONNEAU © TELLURIDE JAZZ FEST

August 18 -21 // Telluride

August 19 -21 // Lyons

WWW.BLUEGRASS.COM/FOLKS

actually listens to lyrics. L INEUP : The Decemberists, Lucinda Williams,

Passenger, Darrell Scott, Dougie MacLean, Kathy Mattea, The Lone Bellow, Cheryl Wheeler.

Nedfest

August 26 -28 // Barker Reservoir, Nederland WWW.NEDFEST.ORG

WWW.TELLURIDEMUSHROOMFEST.ORG

WHY IT’S COOL : Jam-centric season ender is blocks

WHY IT’S COOL : 36th annual fungi-centered

from the hand-carved Carousel of Happiness and a few miles from Caribou Ranch Open Space, site of the legendary Caribou studio where John Lennon and Elton John recorded. WWW.BOULDERCOUNTY.ORG/CARIBOURANCH L INEUP : Taj Mahal, Kyle Hollingsworth, Roosevelt Collier, Melvin Seals and JGB, Paper Bird.

gathering features the famous Mushroom Parade. L INEUP : Forays, mushroom identification sessions, demos, dinners, screenings and discussions about culinary, medical and mind-altering aspects of fungi.

JOHN LEHNDORFF has written about music in Colorado for the Boulder Daily Camera, Rocky Mountain News and Bluegrass Unlimited.

J U N E 2 01 6

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Everybody

I K N OW

H A S A S TO RY A B O U T RE D R O C K S. B L O O D R E D S K Y. L I G H T N I N G C R A C K L I N G OV E R D E N V E R A N D T H E P L A I N S . T H E L O N G S L O G J U S T TO G E T U P T HE H I L L TO 6 ,45 0 F E E T A B O V E S E A L E V E L . C R O S S I N G T H AT S TAG E TO P I C K U P YO U R H I G H - S C H O O L D I P L O M A . T H E S U N R I S I N G A B OV E T H E E A S T E R N H O R I Z O N O N E A S T E R S U N DAY.

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STORIESIN THESTONES It’s been 75 years since RED ROCKS was dedicated. A new book examines the history of the WORLD - FAMOUS SANDSTONE FORMATION and CONCERT HALL in the foothills west of Denver. by LEL AND RUC K E R

Given the last half-century of amplified music con-

Of course, there was the natural beauty of the place

certs at the fabled venue north of Morrison, it’s diffi-

where the Great Plains begin to rise to the Rocky Moun-

cult, perhaps, to remember why John Brisben Walker,

tains. But the lure of the enormous natural sandstone

who purchased and tried to develop the area in the

amphitheater was that a person could stand at the bot-

first years of the 20th century, was attracted to what

tom, speak in a normal tone of voice, and anyone, even

was then called the Garden of the Angels.

at the top of the rim, would be able to hear her. J U N E 2 01 6

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That’s among the many points that music historian and author G. Brown makes in Red Rocks —The

Concert Years, a new book being published this month through the Colorado Music Hall of Fame, which Brown founded and directs. He spent more than 12 years poring over newspaper clippings, historical society materials, and private collections, and working with photographers to accrue materials for what he calls a reference book that lends itself to pictures. “Now that we have the modern era using amplification on the stage, it’s a circus, a rock show coming to town in the most beautiful place on earth,” says Brown. “Back then, the sound

U2 Live at Red Rocks The companion concert film to the band’s 1983 album put both U2 and Red Rocks on the global live music map.

It was a mountain park .

C O NC E RT S E C U R I T Y A S W E K NO W I T H A D N ’ T B E E N I N V E N T E D Y E T. T ICK E T TA K E R S, SEC U RI T Y ? T H E RE WA SN’ T AN Y. E V E RYON E

KN E W YOU COUL D JUST STA N D OU TS I DE T H E RO C KS, A ND A S SO ON A S T H E M US IC STA RT E D, YOU J UST B OLT E D I N.

carried all the way up there, and that’s what made it one of the natural wonders of the world.”

The new park was dedicated 75 years ago, on June 15, 1941, and the first Easter Sunrise Service held in

An entrepreneur who gave Denver its first amuse-

1947. “The World War II years were kind of fallow, but

ment park, Walker donated the land that became Re-

when they started ramping it up, a lot of opera stars,

gis University and helped create the Mount Morrison

like Metropolitan Opera star Robert Merrill, visited,”

Incline Railroad, a funicular track up to Creation Rock

Brown says. “It was very much a showcase for the

near the park that offered spectacular views eastward.

Denver elite. They didn’t want to be perceived as a

“You can still see the scars from it up there,” Brown

dusty old cow town. That’s where all that started—

explains. “He also wanted to build a summer White

showing the world we had something going on that

House, a Camp David of the West, if you will, for presi-

nobody else did.”

dents,” a dream that never reached fruition.

Popular folk acts like the Kingston Trio headlined

Walker changed the name to the Garden of the Titans,

the Rocks in the early 1960s. But then came the Beat-

constructed a small stage, cleared areas and pathways,

les. “I think the tipping point was the Beatles’ perfor-

and hosted live performances from 1906-1910. The city

mance in 1964. There was the great Folk Scare going

of Denver purchased the land in 1927 and created the

on, and there was a transition to youth culture being

640-acre Red Rocks Park we know today.

made where the adults who frequented Red Rocks

Denver architect Burnham Hoyt’s designs for the amphitheater were completed by 1936. The Civilian Conservation Corps, part of Franklin Roosevelt’s New

32

started seeing their kids spending their allowances to see the Kingston Trio.” Though known in Beatles’ lore as the only show

Deal to put Americans to work, was enlisted to do the

in their American tours not to sell out— only 7,000 of

actual construction. “Another remarkable chapter in

9,000 tickets were purchased—Brown found that didn’t

Red Rocks history is that they built it with no motor-

stop more people from seeing the show. “At the time,

ized equipment,” Brown explains. “They had dyna-

it was ascribed to Red Rocks being out of the way,”

mite, wheelbarrows, picks and shovels. They might

Brown says. “If you couldn’t get your parents to take

have had a truck with a motor in it, but that was it.”

you, there was just no way to go. There was no public

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J U N E 201 6


transportation. There wasn’t the web of interstate

we’re a bunch of rubes. It’s because we were a little

exchanges surrounding it. Alameda Avenue was the

more creative in our thinking.”

only road into the park. And it was $6.60 to see the

The Beatles’ show helped inaugurate the modern

Beatles, and Igor Stravinsky, considered the world’s

rock era, which grew into a multibillion-dollar busi-

leading composer at the time, had just played for

ness by the 1980s. A video, “Under the Red Sky”, of U2’s

three dollars a ticket. So who are these long hairs

appearance at the venue despite severe November

coming in and taking our money? It was considered

weather in 1983, helped that band find an even larger

an affront.”

audience. “The U2 show definitely introduced the world

Photographs of the Beatles performance show

34

to Red Rocks. When I NXS played at Red Rocks three

teenagers spilling out everywhere. Back then, high

years later, in 1986, they asked the city where all the

school kids knew that you could get into Red Rocks

bonfires and that stuff was,” Brown laughs. “ They

without a ticket. “It was a mountain park. Concert

thought they were paying for that. You gotta bring

security as we know it hadn’t been invented yet. Tick-

your own bonfires.”

et takers, security? There wasn’t any. Everyone knew

Brown alludes to the degrees of difficulty in put-

you could just stand outside the Rocks, and as soon

ting on any show at this challenging location. “Red

as the music started, you just bolted in. That’s exact-

Rocks is hailed as the greatest place to do a concert,

ly what happened: The lights go down, 7,000 girls

but if you’re a roadie, it’s a day of hell on earth,” Brown

start screaming. The cops go, ‘huh?’ and 2,000 people

says. “Because it takes three times as long to get the

come running in while the cops are trying to see what

gear up on that stage. Semis are at the bottom down

the commotion is about,” Brown explains. “Yes, to the

by the Trading Post. Then the gear is loaded onto flat-

letter, the show did not sell out, but it wasn’t because

bed trucks that have to navigate that steep narrow

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J U N E 201 6


backstage road. When they get up to the top, they have to back into that last 200 feet or so with two inches of clearance on each side. Then they have to unload the gear from the flatbeds and shove it up yet another level onto the stage. It’s remarkable. But everyone does it.” And, of course, there is the weather. Besides the infamous U2 performance during a major downpour, a Joni Mitchell show was actually snowed out, and Earth Wind & Fire’s gear melted one summer afternoon, forcing them to cancel. “One of my memories is a Jackson Browne/Steve Earle/Keb Mo concert about 10 years ago,” Brown says. “You got that ozone smell in the air of a storm coming in, which is just unparalleled. And then it knocked the power out— the entire grid—and this torrential rain was just a waterfall going down the stairs. And there was no amplification to let the crowd know it was cancelled—they were just screaming from the stage, ‘Go home.’ That was the only

J U N E 2 01 6

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35


film ON THE ROCKS Besides the music, the Denver Film Society has been programming and producing Film on the Rocks for the City and County of Denver since its inception in 2000. The evening screenings include a live concert and local comedian before the film—a lineup that attracted some 57,000 people to the Rocks last year alone. At the start of the 17th season, the society’s Britta Erickson talked about this year’s line-up. Sensi : HOW DO YOU SELECT THE FILMS? Erickson : We look to bring a balance of programming to every season with something for (almost) everyone— we don’t consider the program to be like so many other family-friendly outdoor summer series. We always include one or two proven FOTRocker’s (what we call our fans) favorite films (i.e. The Big Lebowski ). We look to significant anniversaries of great cult classics (i.e. Ferris Bueller’s Day Off 30th anniversary). And, we always like to incorporate newer films that we think will become

time I saw a show actually ually shut down.” down ” For decades, only the elite played Red Rocks, but today anyone who can pay the rent can book it. “The city of Denver has learned to exploit it, in the best of ways,” Brown, who has attended hundreds of shows there, explains. “It’s well used. There will be more than 140 shows up there this summer, counting Film on the Rocks and high school graduations. That’s probably a good thing, but I miss the old model a bit, when it was just a little more special.” Not to be forgotten is that performers love the place as much as the audiences. “It’s a change of pace on the touring cycle,” Brown says.“In most cities, you’re not sure where you are; the arenas all look the same backstage. You play a place like Red Rocks and you’re in nature, breathing fresh air. It’s a great thing for musicians to be able to soak up a different vibe from that cycle.” The Colorado Music Hall of Fame is located at

great cult classics (i.e. Deadpool ).

17900 Trading Post Rd., inside Red Rocks Park,

Sensi : ANYTHING SPECIAL YOU CAN

Morrison, CO 80465. 303-697-6910.

SAY ABOUT THIS YEAR’S SELECTIONS?

Erickson : Red Rocks is celebrating the 75th anniversary, and we’ve programmed Citizen Kane, arguably the greatest film of 1941 and considered by many critics, filmmakers, and fans to be the greatest film of all time. It is the centerpiece of an evening that will include a re-dedication of the venue. We are also looking forward to celebrating the late, great David Bowie with Labyrinth and a tribute concert by the very talented kids from School of Rock. And Grease should be a lot of fun, having not screened in the program for many years, and this time we screen the singa-long version. And Lissie headlines the show! FOR THE FULL SCHEDULE OF THE FILM ON THE ROCKS 2016 SEASON, VISIT WWW.FILM.REDROCKSONLINE .COM.

36

G. Brown’s musical historyy books include Colorado Rocks: A Half Centuryy of Music in Colorado, and Telluride elluride Bluegrass Festival : The First Forty Years. Red Rock Rocks — The Concert Years (suggested ted retail price $40) is available at the Trading Post at Red Rocks, Twist & Shout, Tattered tered Cover and other independent book stores in Colorado.

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J U N E 201 6


PHOTOGRAPH BY RANDY ROBINSON

“I T’S M O R E T H A N JU S T P O T H E A D S. W E’R E N O T F L O W E R

C H I L D R E N. W E’R E N OT H I P P I E S.”

–T E SA B R IC E

stepping by RANDY ROBINSON

The BRICE FAMILY makes some moves to get CBD OIL to help their son, D’Marus.

understanding

CBD, also known as cannabidiol, is a component of the marijuana plant. CBD stim-

ulates CB receptors on living cells, whereas THC fully activates these receptors. For this reason, CBD alone is not responsible for marijuana’s signature “high,” but it still confers the medicinal properties of THC. These properties include reducing inflammation and regulating neural signals, which a growing number of researchers believe are the keys to cannabis’s success at treating epilepsy patients. 38

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J U N E 201 6

CBD


AT A B O U T T H I S T I M E L A S T Y E A R ,

D’Marus Brice’s

DOCTORS

INFORMED HIS MOTHER THAT THEY RAN OUT OF OPTIONS. D’MARUS, KNOWN AS MURSY TO H I S F A M I LY, H A S H Y D R O C E P H A L U S . H I S C O N D I T I O N , C A U S E D B Y A N E X C E S S I V E B U I L D U P O F F L U I D I N T H E B R A I N C AV I T Y, C A N L E A D T O A N U M B E R O F N E U R O L O G I C A L DISORDERS. IN MURSY’S CASE, THOSE DISORDERS INCLUDE CEREBRAL PALSY AND E P I L E P T I C S E I Z U R E S . AT 12 Y E A R S O L D , H E ’S B E E N U N A B L E TO WA L K , S P E A K , O R F E E D HIMSELF FOR MOST OF HIS LIFE.

The most pressing issue, however, wasn’t Mursy’s

Street Mall. And he was right: in no time, he’d raised

day-to-day care. It was his seizures. On any given

enough donations from his impromptu street danc-

day, he’d have more than a dozen. Modern medicine

ing to afford Mursy’s first bottle of CBD oil.

controlled the seizures for a while, but as time went

Once Tesa got the oil to Mursy, the improvement

on, the medicines became less and less effective.

was significant—and immediate, too. One of the first

Doctors feared an inevitable escalation of epileptic

improvements that the Brices noticed was that Mursy

episodes would soon cut young Mursy’s life short.

had calmed considerably from the CBD oil. Prior to can-

Since conventional medicine couldn’t help Mursy,

nabinoid therapy, Mursy would experience tantrums,

his mother, Tesa, sought out something unconven-

tantrums so loud he’d keep his family awake through

tional. While watching CNN one day, she learned about

the night. As Mursy’s medicine took effect, he became

Charlotte Figi. Charlotte is a child epilepsy patient

more relaxed. In turn, the Brices got more rest as well.

who now lives a relatively healthy life because of

It’s been nearly six months since Mursy began tak-

cannabis oil. At first, Tesa remained skeptical. After

ing CBD oil. Today, his former 10-plus seizures a day

all, she taught her children to avoid cannabis, just

have tapered down to one or two. Tesa also reduced

as she was taught when she was growing up. Yet

his regimen of clobazam, an anticonvulsant that can

Charlotte’s story offered a glimpse at a new way of

be toxic to the liver or kidneys in some patients. Most

life for the Brices.

surprisingly, Mursy is regaining abilities his family

“She had the same symptoms,” Tesa says. “She looked just like D’Marus. After I researched it, I realized this oil could potentially save my child’s life.” Tesa eventually registered Mursy as a medical marijuana patient in Colorado. Although she could cover

hasn’t seen in years. “He’s starting to talk. He’s starting to walk, too,” says Domini’Q. “He’s gotten better with his eye contact. And he tries to reach out to us more often.” Mursy’s dramatic change inspired Domini’Q and

“H E ’S S TA RT I N G TO TA L K . H E ’S S TA R T I N G TO WA L K , TO O.” the costs to get licensed, she hit a hurdle when it came

– D O M I N I ’Q B R I C E

Tesa to do more than cover their own costs for CBD

to obtaining the actual oil itself. Cannabis oil—even

oil. Domini’Q witnessed the kindness of strangers at

the low-frills, high-CBD brand Mursy requires—can

the 16th Street Mall, and now he wants to share that

be expensive. A 100 milliliter bottle typically goes for

same kindness with others. Through the Brice fam-

$300 to $600, which would strain anyone’s budget.

ily’s Mursy Foundation, they hope to raise funds and

That’s when Domini’Q, Mursy’s twin brother, stepped up. At 7, Domini’Q taught himself “popping,”

awareness for other families that need—but cannot afford—cannabis oil.

a style of 1970’s funk-era dancing that’s popular in

“Marijuana is a true-life miracle for D’Marus,” says

the hip hop and EDM communities. He credits the

Tesa. “We’re living testaments to what’s going on. We

Step Up films for showing him how to pull off his

can go out there and literally talk to these people,

first moves. With his mother’s guidance, Domini’Q

just helping people understand the benefits of med-

figured he could showcase his skills at Denver’s 16th

ical marijuana. This is saving people’s lives.”

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SPECIAL

REPORT

by LEL AND R UC K E R

chemical cannabis THE H E ADLINES H AVE BEEN UNSETTLING : CANNABIS PL ANT S AND PRODUCTS RECALLED AND QUARANTINED. STATE OFFICIALS ISSUING PUBLIC HEALTH AND SAFETY ADVISORIES. PL ANTS QUARANTINED AND DESTROYED; OTHERS RETURNED AFTER FURTHER TESTING OR L E G A L C H A L L E N G E S. IF YOU’RE A CUSTOMER HAPPY TO BE ABLE TO FINALLY PURCHASE CANNABIS LEGALLY, YO U ’R E P R O B A B LY W O N D E R I N G

what the hell is going on .

EVEN THOUGH

T H E A D V I S O R I E S A N D R E C A L L S C O N S T I T U T E A T I N Y P E R C E N TA G E O F T H E C O L O R A D O C A N N A B I S M A R K E T, H O W C A N Y O U K N O W Y O U ’R E B U Y I N G A P R O D U C T T H AT H A S N ’ T BEEN GROWN WITH ILLEGAL PESTICIDES?

The cannabis industry in Colorado arose quickly

Pesticides, which include herbicides, fungicides

from a mature, illegal market into what is now a bil-

and other substances, have been regulated since

lion-dollar-a-year business. “From a consumer per-

1910 under the Federal Insecticide Act. Originally

spective, there is definitely a public safety and health

assigned to the Department of Agriculture, pesticide

issue as the market matures,” says Mark Slaugh, ex-

research and management was moved to the United

ecutive director of the Cannabis Business Alliance.

States Environmental Protection Agency in 1972, and

“We We need more scrutiny and product liability, W y, and y

the EPA PA is still charged with registering and approvP

certainly our industry needs to have controls on

ing language on labels of pesticides legally sold here.

pesticides. Our number-one priority is consumer

Pesticides are strictly regulated according to their

safety and to make sure they are not used incorrect-

labels, which contain lists of all ingredients, what

ly or creating danger.”

plants they can be applied to, and in what situations they can be used.

42

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With no FEDERAL GUIDANCE, the state and industry struggle to get PESTICIDE USE in CANNABIS CULTIVATION under control.

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Since cannabis is illegal on a federal level, the EPA

less likely to be caught. “The biggest problem contrib-

has issued no such guidelines of approved or banned

uting to the pesticide issue was businesses trying to

pesticides for the plant, nor has it tested, for instance,

grow too big too fast,” Larisa Bolivar, executive director

whether a pesticide that might be acceptable for an

of the Cannabis Consumers Coalition, says, “and creat-

edible might also be applicable to a combustible prod-

ing growing environments that foster pests and diseas-

uct. Individual states that have legalized have been

es, as opposed to pest- and disease-resistant plants.”

left to determine their own methods and rules.

The departments of agriculture and revenue have

In 2009-10, as medical marijuana took off in Colora-

become more aggressive, especially after Gov. John

do, pesticides weren’t in the news at all. Medical mar-

Hickenlooper issued an executive order on Nov. 12 last

ijuana wasn’t tested for pesticides—and still isn’t. The

year that said that, until science proves otherwise,

word doesn’t appear in Amendment 64. The legisla-

I think we were trying “ our best to get it out of the

ture, under strict time deadlines, didn’t spend much time on the issue while devising the state’s original rules and regulations for recreational cannabis in 2013. “I think we were trying our best to get it out of the black market by advertising that it was safer,” says House District 11 Representative Jonathan Singer. “We ramped up very quickly. Amendment 64 required that we get product to market. ” Most legal cannabis in Colorado is grown indoors, which increases the possibility of spider mites, powdery mildew, and other bugs. Many growers use nontoxic products like neem, cinnamon, clove, or coriander oils to control mites and aphids on cannabis plants, for instance.

black market by advertising that it was safer. We ramped up very quickly. Amendment 64 required that we get product to market.

JON ATHAN SINGER

HOUSE DISTRIC T 11 REPRESENTATIVE

Others are much more controversial. The EPA has

“marijuana contaminated by an Off-label Pesticide

set tolerance levels (the amount of pesticide residue

shall constitute a threat to the public safety,” and di-

allowed to remain on products) for myclobutanil,

rected them to “utilize all existing investigatory and

an ingredient in several pesticides, including Eagle

enforcement authorities established by law, including,

20EW, for use on grapes, apples, and spinach. But it

but not limited to, placing contaminated marijuana

hasn’t been approved for use on tobacco, and no stud-

on administrative hold and destroying contaminat-

ies have been done on the effects of myclobutanil

ed marijuana product pursuant to existing law.”

from smoking cannabis. It is not on the state’s list of

Singer thinks the governor set the right tone, but

acceptable pesticides for cannabis, yet it has turned

that it’s up to the legislature to dial it back and treat

up in tests on commercial product.

it reasonably. “There are certain acceptable amounts

When your business depends on the next crop,

of hazardous materials in everything: arsenic in Coca-

there is always pressure to use stronger pesticides.

Cola, mercury in our air. It’s important to determine

Loss of even one cycle could be catastrophic to an

what level causes toxic or hazardous levels that

operation. And since pesticide regulation here is on a

cause problems, but we have to be thoughtful.”

complaint-based system, cheaters might feel they are

But how pesticides are regulated and whether

No , r e ally ... w h at t h e h e l l is g o i n g o n? 44

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Denver or the state has the right to destroy plants or

knows what the standards are, then the playing field

products are still touchy subjects. Lawsuits from

is at least closer to level,” Heizer says. “There are still

businesses against the state for destroying product

some who are still going to lie, cheat, and steal. Hope-

have been successful, and state regulators and indus-

fully most players have enough at risk not to do that.”

try leaders continue to struggle to come up with a

The state isn’t equipped to provide its own pesti-

{test your bud }

cide testing facility or monitor every plant. Still,

Greg Duran recently opened GO OD L A BS, a laboratory testing facility in Denver that allows consumers to be able to find out what’s in their cannabis. It utilizes a process called high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to identify and separate components in a mixture. “We can get a profile of 10 cannabinoids,” Duran says, “in order to give patients, caregivers, and others a good idea what they’re consuming in ratios and percentages of the cannabinoids we can test for.” Depending on what the consumer seeks, the service offers testing for profiles of five cannabinoids for $40, 10 for $60. Good Labs also offers consulting, Duran says, “where we will go over the results and tell you exactly what a trace means and what it looks like to help people understand what a lab report means.” The laboratory is in a temporary location but hopes to have a permanent home soon. For more information, call the Good Labs or Cannabis Patients Alliance at 303- 455 -3801.

give out licenses,” he says. “We have the FDA and

GOOD TO KNOW

Singer says the lack of a federal standard shouldn’t deter Colorado from creating good policy. “We don’t need to re-create the wheel. We haven’t had a federal standard for a lot of things, but we still tax them and Department of Agriculture standards. Instead of depending on federal regulators, we can depend on state regulators. We’re not moving mountains here.” So are consumers getting cannabis products that are dangerous? “I think [cannabis products] are safer than they were this time last year,” Bolivar says, “but there is really no way for a consumer to know how safe, since individual consumers cannot have cannabis tested at a licensed lab. Hopefully that will change soon.” Bolivar recommends consumers look into the growing craft cannabis market. “For higher-quality cannabis that is least likely to be contaminated, I recommend craft cannabis,” says Bolivar, “which is grown in smaller batches with much more attention, meaning less pests and therefore less pesticides.” Meanwhile, consumers should be vigilant and do their own research, both online and wherever they purchase cannabis. All legal recreational marijuana sold in Colorado includes batch numbers on labels, which can be checked against recall numbers at the DOA website. When shopping, talk to budtenders, managers, and owners about how they deal with pests. “Once businesses are held to a higher production standard through the self-policing of the industry, consumers will see safer and more consistent products,” Bolivar says. “In the meantime, I recommend shopping recreational until medical mar-

46

workable solution. Given the litigation, recalls, and

ijuana testing is up and running, which is more expen-

quarantines, many business owners I talked with

sive, but at least you know the cannabis is being tested.”

wouldn’t speak on the record. But most say they just

One thing is certain: until the federal government

want clear rules, fair enforcement, and more testing

puts cannabis in the same category as other agricul-

facilities to expedite the process.

tural products, this won’t be solved. “We’re trying to

One who did speak on the record was Dean Heizer,

fix a problem in Colorado that needs to be fixed on the

the chief legal strategist for LivWell, one of the larg-

federal level,” says Mike Elliott of the Marijuana In-

est operations in the state whose product was put on

dustry Group, which lobbies on behalf of cannabis busi-

hold last year after testing positive for myclobutanil.

nesses. “We’re creating a state program to do what the

The company worked with regulators and got most

federal government should be doing. It’s possibly the

of it returned. “If five labs can test, and everybody

most complicated issue we’ve had to deal with.”

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{lastword } by ROB F E E M A N

FEEL- GOOD FOOD When creating her new cannabis cookbook, Boulder-based author Robyn Griggs Lawrence focused on healthy and organic recipes. For Robyn Griggs Lawrence, creating The Cannabis Kitchen Cookbook was a journey that involved unexpected challenges. But through the years-long process, she had a number of goals in mind that helped her see it through to the end. “The reason I came up with the idea for the cookbook,” she says, “was because there wasn’t anything out there for me. I’m a soccer mom, a volleyball mom. I didn’t want to eat sugar food, and I didn’t want to make chicken wings. And there wasn’t anything out there.” Lawrence’s idea was to create not only a cookbook she could leave out on the counter if a neighbor or family member stopped by, but also one deeply ingrained with her passion for healthy and organic cooking. “That’s been my soapbox for a long time,” says the former editor of such publications as The Herb Companion, Organic Spa, and Natural Home. In addition, she wanted the cookbook to be subtle, upscale, and educational, geared toward those who were interested in the subject but didn’t know how to get started. Her agent loved the idea, and thought it would be an easy pitch. Instead, it took two years to sell the concept to a publisher, in part because of the stigma attached to anything cannabis-related at the time. The next challenge was finding recipes that fit the book’s theme. “In the beginning it was hard to find chefs who were of the same mindset,” Lawrence says. But she eventually assembled an impressive group of 12 chefs who contributed recipes for the cookbook, including Scott Durrah of Jezebel’s Southern Bistro and Bar, and the “Boulder Bakers” Grace Gutierrez, Lucienne Bercow Lazarus, and Emily Sloat. The cookbook includes recipes for a variety of cannabis-infused oils and butters, which serve as the foundation for many of the dishes, and provides details on how to create cannabis honey, smoothies, waffles, pancakes, and muffins, as well as appetizers, salads, entrées, desserts, cocktails, and vegan dishes. Lawrence now cooks with cannabis about once a week, and says anyone can get started with as little as a quarter-ounce of flower. “I would suggest a dispensary you trust,” she says. Then it’s simply a matter of getting into the kitchen and making some feel-good food, with a final note from Lawrence: “Start slowly.”

FIND A DISPENSARY YOU TRUST AND

STAR T S LOW LY.

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Profile for Sensi Magazine

Sensi Magazine-Denver/Boulder (June 2016)  

Sensi Magazine (Denver/Boulder) June 2016

Sensi Magazine-Denver/Boulder (June 2016)  

Sensi Magazine (Denver/Boulder) June 2016