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I DETROIT

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QQ Sarfoh’ & ADVOCACY s still going strong in the industry that changed her life

A DEGREE IN GREEN

Universities offer cannabis education

FOR THE GOOD OF ALL

Holiday goodwill is healthy


DETROIT SENSI MAGAZINE NOVEMBER 2019

sensimediagroup @sensimagazine @sensimag

F E AT U R E S

16 After the Gold Rush Former news anchor Q Sarfoh shares her struggles and successes with MS and the cannabis industry.

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24 Single, Not Sorry

Why more and more people are choosing uncoupled adulthood.

SPECIAL REPORT

32 Higher Education A college degree in cannabis is a real thing. And it’s a big sign the industry is legit.

D E PA R T M E N T S

09 EDITOR’S NOTE 10 THE BUZZ News, tips, and tidbits

to keep you in the loop. NANOWRIMO Write a novel in November. LOCAL CO. Donut Shop is not a donut shop. BLACK BEAUTY Reclaimed with Bronzed N Glow.

44 THE SCENE Hot happenings and hip hangouts around town. CALENDAR Get going while the weather’s still bearable.

50 THE END

A century of tradition served on a bun.

ON THE COVER When Anqunette “Q” Sarfoh was diagnosed with MS, she found relief in cannabis. She and her husband launched full-force into the industry where they found hope and healing. PHOTO BY MONICA MORGAN PHOTO EDITS BY JOSH CLARK

40 THE LIFE Contributing to your

health and happiness. VOLUNTEER It’s good for you—and others, too.

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N

EDITOR’S NOTE

Magazine published monthly by Sensi Media Group LLC. © 2019 Sensi Media Group. All rights reserved.

EXECUTIVE Ron Kolb CEO ron@sensimag.com Tae Darnell President tae@sensimag.com

Alex Martinez Chief Administrative Officer alex@sensimag.com EDITORIAL

Stephanie Wilson Editor in Chief stephanie@sensimag.com

Doug Schnitzspahn Executive Editor doug.schnitzspahn@sensimag.com Darralynn Hutson Managing Editor darralynn.hutson@sensimag.com Leland Rucker Senior Editor leland.rucker@sensimag.com

Robyn Griggs Lawrence Editor at Large robyn.lawrence@sensimag.com DESIGN

Jamie Ezra Mark Creative Director jamie@emagency.com Rheya Tanner Art Director Wendy Mak Designer Josh Clark Designer em@sensimag.com

B U S I N E S S /A D M I N Kristan Toth Head of People kristan.toth@sensimag.com Jamie Cooper Publisher jamie.cooper@sensimag.com Kyle Miller Associate Publisher kyle.miller@sensimag.com Leah Stephens Associate Publisher leah.stephens@sensimag.com Constance Taylor Associate Publisher constance.taylor@sensimag.com Amber Orvik Director of Administration amber.orvik@sensimag.com Andre Velez Marketing Director andre.velez@sensimag.com Neil Willis Production Manager neil.willis@sensimag.com Hector Irizarry Distribution distribution@sensimag.com

Now is the time

to talk about gratitude.

The question of gratitude to an entrepreneur is one that boils up continuously and furiously without ever reaching any kind of satisfactory conclusion. For both the consumer and the business owner, it’s not easy to know exactly what to be grateful for when you are still in ‘hustle’ or survival mode. Sensi Detroit pays tribute to these warriors of hustle-dom because we are grateful that so many Detroiters are doing it for themselves. It’s impossible for us not to mention the topic of grateful entrepreneurs when our cover features Anqunette Sarfoh, a serial cannabis entrepreneur who has garnered a great deal of attention and praise as she builds her role as a poster child for the cannabis lifestyle. Our cover story delves into her endearing resilience and beautiful advocacy. Meanwhile, Bronzed N Glow retail space is working on keeping women of color at the forefront of the beauty narrative. We are also grateful for third-generation business owner Grace Keros, who, while continuing a 100-year-old legacy of ownership, puts family, community, and God first. This issue was put together under tight deadlines and we are all very grateful to the people of Detroit, who stepped up speedily to put their entrepreneurial dreams on display. They were enthusiastic about sharing their gratitude, which is not a standard response when asked your goals for a new year. It seems strange to me that while the rest of the world is desperate to gain wealth and power, some of our most successful owners appear to be thankful. In my opinion, they deserve our support. As the new managing editor for Sensi’s Detroit edition, I look forward to seeing how natives adapt this vision of gratitude. As a mother and a woman in her early 50s, I still dream of my penthouse corner office, but I also promise to take advantage of the powerful position to open up the industry’s image a bit wider for those looking for exposure.

As the new managing editor for Sensi’s Detroit edition, I look forward to seeing how natives adapt this vision of gratitude.

M E D I A PA R T N E R S Marijuana Business Daily Minority Cannabis Business Association National Cannabis Industry Association Students for Sensible Drug Policy

Darralynn Hutson darralynn.hutson@sensimag.com NOVEM BER 2019

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THE

Around the Words in 30 Days It’s NaNoWriMo; send your inner editor packing. Writers, open your laptops. NaNoWriMo—short for National Novel Writing Month—has begun. Since 1999, this annual writeathon nonprofit has sent caffeinated writers (who call themselves Wrimos) across the globe scrambling to complete a 50,000-word novel in 30 days—even if the novel is a pile of garbage—for the sheer satisfac10 D E T RO I T

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tion and a digital diploma. NaNoWriMo began as a challenge between 21 friends in San Francisco and has grown to include chapters in cities around the world. Chapters encourage writers to have fun with parties, peptalk emails, and forums to keep you motivated. Though most Wrimos tackle novels, some—re-

ferred to as rebels—take on memoirs and nonfiction as well. “November is the perfect time to practice turning off your inner editor… and let your instincts run the show for a bit,” writes 13-year Wrimo Naomi Nakashima on NaNoWriMo’s blog. “See what comes from that amazing mind of yours.”

BEAT THE ODDS Though there are nearly 800,000 Wrimos globally, the number of novels that have been completed is only around 370,000. Getting involved in your local chapter (Detroit has a Facebook group, NaNoWriMoTown) gives you the tools and support you need to have the best shot at success.


CONTRIBUTORS

Robyn Griggs Lawrence, Darralynn Hutson

BY THE NUMBERS

PHOTOS COURTESY OF DONUT SHOP / ILLUSTRATION (RIGHT) BY FRANCIS VALLEJO, FIRST FIGHT STUDIO

LOCAL COMPANY

DESIGN WITH TASTE

You won’t find a chocolate-glazed confection at Donut Shop. The Detroit design studio on Woodward downtown, owned by Ian Klipa, David Eppig (right), and Jacob Saphier (left), designs and builds furniture and custom pieces for local businesses. The focus is on using reclaimed wood and other cast-off pieces to create classy urban designs. The studio itself, where you will see the owners and friends welding as you browse, is a living museum of that ethos. “I wanted to utilize material and form to embody the brand, to create a functional store that felt both artful and considered,” says Klipa. “Each piece has details to be discovered, but the entire collection was designed to be experienced as a singular composition.” Donut Shop / donutshopdesign.com

MORE THAN

500 Opposites PROTESTERS

(MOST UNDER 18) gathered at Grand Citrus Park this past September to march for the Global Climate Strike.

30 TAPS

ON ROTATION at Brew Detroit, pouring local and guest beer, wine, cider, and meads. brewdetroit.com

One PERFECT PUPPY

WAITS FOR YOU at the Detroit Dog Rescue, Detroit’s only no-kill shelter. detroitdogrescue.com

Attract

Diversity is what makes First Fight Studio, the motion animation graphics bombshell in midtown Detroit, pump. Cofounders Guy Allen and Andre Foster may both be graduates of the College for Creative Studies, but they’re polar opposites: Guy’s a married man with kids who takes his family vacations seriously. Andre enjoys cigar bars and ordering Old fashioneds with his favorite Knob Creek bourbon. Together they run a studio whose clients include Dave & Buster’s, Rocket Mortgage, Quicken Loans, Macy’s, and most recently StockX, Detroit’s newest billion-dollar start-up. First Fight Studio firstfight.tv

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THE BUZZ

VOX POPULI

Question: What are you Business goals for 2020?

STEPHAN McBRIDE

SHARON FREED

SPENCER RICHARDSON NICCI GILBERT

RHONDA DIANE DAVIS

___________________

___________________

___________________

___________________

Grower/Cultivator, Saginaw

I want to curate events at a lounge where people who share common interests can socialize. That space or place has to have a flourishing tech space.

3D Dance Academy, Detroit

I want to continue spreading our branches to service more after-school programs and adult programs. We want to be the Alvin Ailey of Detroit—the go-to place for entertainment.

Lighthouse Dance Center, Detroit

Vocalist, Recording Artist, Detroit

I want to have a dance space for young artists to grow and express themselves. I want my focus to be on political and social awareness, serious thought, and honest conversation through dance.

I’m focused on my content development and distribution partnership with AIB TV network in Atlanta. I am adding streaming and a programming slate that will increase our viewership.

___________________

Stylist, Cosmetologist, Detroit

My plans for next year are to start my hair and lash line and get my cosmetology license to potentially start a wig line.

PHOTO BY SHALEENA COLE OF LEOSAGE IMAGES

Black Beauty Space According to a 2018 study by Nielsen, black women spent $54 million last year on hair care—yet black beauty shops are predominantly Korean-American owned. Bronzed N Glow is here to change that. This is a retail experience, not a beauty supply store, and it’s Detroit’s first black- and woman-owned beauty retail space, infusing the first-of-its-kind model for the nation’s hair capital housed on Detroit’s Livernois Avenue, “The Avenue of Fashion.” Opening this month, Bronzed N Glow will add a modern twist to the beauty supply haul, challenging the current shopping experience. The space will feature educational classes and host an equitable selection of quality products created by women and people of color. It will also offer embedded technology provides in-depth hair and scalp analyses by measuring parameters like hydration and density, then recommends corresponding products offered in-house. Bronzed N Glow / bronzednglow.com

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EXPERIENCE

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THE BUZZ

SENSIBILITIES WHAT MATTERS THIS MONTH BY STEPHANIE WILSON

1 LIKE MAMA USED TO MAKE Fact: No stuffing will ever compare to your mom’s. Except my mom’s. My mom’s was the best. Fact.

______ 2 ALT LIFESTYLE Instead of stuffing a turkey, why not stuff some turkey into

a tortilla, then top it with cranberry salsa? It’s an easy twist on Thanksgiving, as long as you follow it up with pumpkin pie. Without the pie, it’s not Thanksgiving, it’s just Taco Thursday, and no one is putting that on a T-shirt.

______ 3 LIFE-CHANGING + BUDGET-SAVING If you’re a reader—and I know you

are; you’re reading this right now—you’ve got to download Libby. The free app connects you to your local library so you can borrow e-books, audiobooks, and magazines wherever you are.

PRODUCT SPOTLIGHT

MORE HAIR HERE Want to add some spunk to your scalp? Bomba Curls Forbidden Oil is infused with organic ingredients, including pure coffee seed and castor oil, that help you achieve maximum length retention and create full, sexy curls. The brand is the brainchild of Lulu Cordero, an AfroDominicana who wanted to share tightly kept Dominican beauty secrets that have been used by generations of women on the island and build a brand based on natural ingredients. bombacurls.com

______ 4 NOT NOT TRUE I heard somewhere that if you hug a palm tree, someone in

a place where palm trees don’t grow gets their wings? Or maybe they just start thinking about getting on an aircraft and winging it to a tropical locale—gotta use up those vacation days before 2020, after all.

______ 5 FAN OF FRONDS If you spot a palm-tree-hugger in the act this month

(portrait-mode selfies count), tag @sensimagazine and @stephwilll for a chance to be featured in an upcoming issue.

“There is no manual or checklist on how to start a small business.” —JEVONA WATSON Entrepreneur and owner of Detroit Sip

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AFTER THE GOLD RUSH

When news anchor Anqunette Sarfoh was diagnosed with MS, she and her husband launched full-force into the industry where they’d found hope and healing. But what happens when the reality doesn’t match the dream?

PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF BOSWELL STUDIO

TEXT DARRALYNN HUTSON

C

annabis entrepreneur Anqunette Sarfoh—best known as “Q” from Detroit’s Fox 2 News—beamed on the small screen as a morning anchor for eight years before being diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2013. That same year, she was introduced to the benefits of canna-

bis and her world opened up to the possibilities of helping others with the same or similar illnesses. “My husband and I were looking for a place to start a processing center for a bakery. In Michigan you have to go through processing before you can start an edibles brand,” Q says. “Our real estate agent was a

part of an investment group and we were asked to join. In April of 2017, we started the process of getting licensed for Botaniq.” Detroiters trust Q and she was passionate about the venture. “I am a true example of this life. I have an incurable progressive disease and I spend a lot of time NOVEM BER 2019

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Q and her husband Richard dove into the cannabis industry when she was diagnosed with MS.

PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF BOSWELL STUDIO

FEWER THAN THREE DOZEN OF THE 3,600 DISPENSARIES IN THE US ARE OWNED BY BLACK PEOPLE. THAT’S ONE PERCENT. around people with pain. If I can help alleviate that pain, then I want to do that. Cannabis has been hugely beneficial in my journey with MS,” says Q. Things did not go as planned. When they opened the doors of Botaniq in Corktown, a progressive part of Detroit’s midtown, on election day in 2018, Q knew immediately that her shelves were low. Then, Botaniq was robbed on New Year’s Eve, the culprit busting down the doors and window with a truck. This was just one warning that something wasn’t right. “Two months later our main investor stopped funding the operations. He wasn’t stocking the store and was using Botaniq proceeds to continue the construction of the grow house. The last straw came when our advice wasn’t being heard. We’re here on the ground working in Detroit taking decisions from someone in Colorado.” Q and Richard later accepted an offer from an out-of-state company to purchase all of Botaniq’s assets. Coming Out on the Other Side Nobody keeps official statistics on race and cannabis ownership,

especially dispensary owners, but based on 150 interviews with owners and insiders done by Buzzfeed in 2016, it appears that fewer than three dozen of the 3,600 dispensaries in the US are owned by black people—1 percent. Under the Michigan law passed soon after these findings, an estimated 200+ licenses have been awarded. Of those, only a handful of dispensaries and growers were black-owned. In Detroit, African Americans still make up more than 80 percent of the population.

Botaniq was one of four black female-owned dispensary and grow houses in the Detroit area. Another is the Huron View dispensary in Ann Arbor, 45 minutes outside the city, which is owned by retired social worker Christina Montaque. The financial requirements to get into the industry in Detroit include, but aren’t limited to, a $6,000 state application fee, $66,000 state regulatory assessments, $5,000 application fee from a local municipality, and proof of $200,000 in assets. “It wasn’t the amount of money…that was the most challenging NOVEM BER 2019

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for us—we actually knew what to expect—what was unsurmoutable was that the investor stopped funding a new business just two months after we opened the doors. It was a bait and switch. Plain and simple,” believes Q. “We came out on the other side. We came out better on this side, more financially sound and more knowledgeable about this industry. More investors are approaching us and patrons are still looking to me for advice on what cannabis brand best helps their particular ailment. It was never about the money for Q, because what made her most fulfilled was being able to bring others, especially women, over to the side of cannabis healing. “I’m asked daily on Facebook and Instagram because people feel victim to their meds,” she says. The Stigma of the Pass-Pass, Puff-Puff Era Through these conversations, Q has acquired a following of those looking for a way out of their prescription addictions. “People still trust me from my time on television. They remember how I shot straight from the hip and I can’t help but be authentically me,” says Q. “Plus, I consume so there’s no one better than me to say that the ‘OG Kush’ got me off my meds. Everyone has these new strains out these days, but I’m a true believer in what worked back in the day. People remember those times and want that same high.” An advocate for the benefits of cannabis usage, Q also understands the heavy stigma associated with the pass-pass, puff-puff era that some patrons still visualize when discussing

“PEOPLE STILL TRUST ME FROM MY TIME ON TELEVISION. THEY REMEMBER HOW I SHOT STRAIGHT FROM THE HIP, AND HOW I CAN’T HELP BUT BE AUTHENTICALLY ME.” —Q Sarfoh

alternative medicines. “In some communities, kids could go in a park lot or backyard to smoke a joint and go on about their lives,” says Q. “But in the black communities, what happens when you’re caught? Your entire future is gone. This stigma is especially felt from the women, the mothers.” Most recently, Q was invited to sit on the board of Michigan’s Cannabis Industry Association, an advocacy group where she will be a part of a 15-person team for the cannabis industry. She is currently one of the only two African Americans on the board. One major thing Q learned from her time with Botaniq was that patrons weren’t as well-versed in cannabis as she’d expected. “They want to know what’s next,” she says. “People go home and wonder, ‘how do I use this?’ ‘How much?’ ‘Which strains?’ There are a lot of questions when people leave the dispensary, I want to be a convenient resource.” It’s the reason why once a month, she invites her social media followers to ‘Curiositea,’ a gathering where she answers questions and makes recommendations to those who want to come and ask. “My husband had asked me to do a tea, as a lot of people with MS reach out to me wanting to stop their medications. While I wanted to do something small and intimate, these gatherings end up being 50 to 60 people,” says Q. “We’re gonna smoke, we’re gonna vape, we’re gonna dab, and we’re gonna talk about it all.” Join Q on November 21 and every third Thursday from 7 to 9 p.m. at High End Detroit. Reserve your seat at curiositea.us

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ing 24 DE T RO I T

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gle,

NOT SORRY

Why more and more people are ditching the wedding ring and choosing uncoupled adulthood. TEXT ROBYN GRIGGS LAWRENCE

M

y first newspaper job was on the night desk of a daily. Weekends off were the only time to have any sort of normal life with nine-to-fivers (most of the world), and they were awarded based strictly on seniority. When my time finally came to trade in Wednesday and Thursday for Saturday and Sunday, my boss said not so fast. Steve, who had started several months after me, had a wife. Steve needed weekends off more than I did. “You understand,” my boss said. I was furious, but it was the ’80s. I gave Steve the weekends because that’s what you did (and my boss hadn’t really given me a choice). Over the next couple years, I would leave the newspaper business

and marry the first of two wrong-for-me husbands, beginning decades of coupledom that ended recently. I’m single in the age of Tinder, and this is a whole new world. Singledom today is nothing like it was when I was a twenty-something copy editor looking for love (in all the wrong places, as it turns out). It’s no longer weird to be single. Lots of people have made it their choice. And if you give weekends off to the married guy, you’ll likely be called out as a singlist, which some people consider just as bad as being a sexist or a racist. Singles are demanding respect—and getting it—because they’ve (oh, sorry, we’ve) become a powerful force, in numbers as well as influence. As Americans live longer, marry later (or not at all),

and divorce more, singles have increased from 29 percent of the adult population in 1970 to 48 percent today. Baby boomers are driving the numbers with divorce rates that have nearly doubled (and involve unprecedented numbers of second and third marriages) from 1990 to 2015, the Pew Research Center reports. Determined not to make their parents’ mistakes, more and more millennials are skipping the whole wedding thing. The number of unmarried 18-to-29-year-olds has grown from 40 percent in 1960 to 80 percent today, and the Pew Research Center predicts a quarter of today’s young adults will be single when they turn 50. More than half— 51 percent—of 18-to-34year-olds reported not

having a steady romantic partner last year, a record high for the annual University of Chicago survey. Getting married isn’t the great big life goal it was 25 years ago, when I was among the last of my high school friends to walk down the aisle at 27. More than half—55 percent—of participants in a 2017 Census Bureau report said getting married wasn’t an important criterion for becoming an adult. Instead, 95 percent said formal schooling and full-time employment were key. Half of young millennials told Tinder they were worried about being in a long-term relationship because they didn’t want to lose their independence. A Bustle survey found that 60 percent of people who were single and not dating were prioritizing self-care. NOVEM BER 2019

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1 TO 3%

But Kislev has found most people to be pretty closed-minded about OF PEOPLE marital status. Singles ARE ASEXUAL, have heavier workloads meaning they do not and earn less money, he experience sexual attraction. says, and have a harder Like every orientation, asexuality is not a choice. time renting apartments because they’re considered less reliable and stable. “We are open to various sexual identities, we celebrate different ethnicities, and we tolerate a wide array of political views,” he “is your own strength and identified.” In an opinion piece writes in his book, Happy and ability to say with In “Make Way for the for Inter Press Service, confidence, ‘Hey, I made Singlehood: The Rising Single Age,” J Walter demographer Joseph Chamie, former director Thompson calls it “a par- this life decision. I’m the Acceptance and Celebration of Solo Living, “yet adigm shift in adulthood one who lives with it. I of the United Nations we still live in a society made these choices.’” uncoupled…a natural Population Division, where singles, especially Singledom has its adcalls this trend “a signifi- evolution alongside job cant global demographic hopping, coliving, sexual vantages, as a viral Reddit in advanced adulthood, thread asking what people are urged to couple up or change having far-reach- openness, digital conotherwise face prejuloved most about it reing consequences yet re- nection, and a nomadic cently laid out, everything dice.” ceiving scant attention.” workforce.” The US Federal Code from not getting dragged He predicts single-perstates the president can “I Made These Choices” to lame family events to son households will not having to laugh at un- prohibit discrimination Singledom is a choice continue to grow expobased on marital status, funny Facebook memes. nentially throughout the that 44-year-old Brian And with social media, no but there are more than Gross, who has owned world, increasing global 1,000 laws giving marBSG PR since 2001, made one ever feels lonely. demand for housing, ried couples legal and Gross sets his Tinder deliberately. A serial motransportation, natural financial incentives and nogamist for many years, radar to wherever he’s resources, and energy. benefits. Singles make traveling to before he he nearly got married “People across the once and thought better goes and has friends wait- an average of $8,000 less world are bucking the per year and pay more ing in new places. stigma of living alone and of it. Now he relishes for everything from Sociologist Ekyakim singlehood. He can make embracing independent Kislev says marriage isn’t housing, healthcare, and lifestyles,” Euromonitor his clients his priority, answering to them 24/7. for him because he likes mortgages to cell phone International’s “Top 10 plans, insurance, and his freedom and seeks Global Consumer Trends He travels to wherever he wants, whenever he other ways of interacting taxes. Unmarried women 2019” reports. Sociolget hit on more in the with significant others. wants, and meets new ogist Eric Klinenberg told the Christian Science people along the way. He “There are many ways to workplace, according do things,” Kislev says, to a Suffolk University feeds himself when he’s Monitor the shift is “the study, and single workers greatest social change of hungry and works out at “and we need to accept, even celebrate, the are still being asked to the last 60 years that we his whim. “I think what whole spectrum.” stay late and cover weekcomes in time,” he says, haven’t already named

ALONE AROUND THE WORLD: SOUTH KOREA

Unmarried women between 30 and 34 have jumped from 1.4 percent of the population in 1970 to 30 percent today. Young Koreans are called the “sampo” (“giving up on three”) generation because they’re not interested in dating, marriage, or children.

JAPAN

Seventy percent of single people in their 40s and older say they’ll never marry and are prepared to grow old alone. Single women proudly call themselves “wagamama,” which means “self-determining.”

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ends and holidays more often than married ones. The stigma is real, Kislev says. “My research showed me that it is critical for singles to replace falsely internalized negative images of singlehood with positive ones.” “The Most Exciting, Challenging, Significant Relationship of All” Single people exercise more, sleep better, are more open-minded and deeply engaged in social and civil life, and have a much broader definition of “family” than married people. They’re more generous with their time, money, and caregiving, according to numerous studies, and are happy and satisfied with their lives. They take music and art classes, dine out more often, and keep Lululemon in business. In a three-year study of 79,000 US women aged 50 to 79, women who stayed single or got divorced ate healthier, exercised more, and drank less than married women. Several studies have found that single people pay more attention to relationships with friends, neighbors, siblings, and parents, while married couples are more insular. “There is a huge misconception that being alone and lonely are the same,” Kislev says. “Mar-

“Instead of facing loneliness at its roots, many people chase partnership only to discover that loneliness is a standalone problem, the cure for which lies mainly within oneself." —Ekyakim Kislev, Happy Singlehood

ried people can sometimes still feel lonely even if they are not ‘alone.’ It was proven time and again in many studies that married people can be very lonely and emotionally deprived within their wedlock.” In Happy Singlehood, Kislev explains: “Instead of facing loneliness at its roots, many people chase partnership only to discover that loneliness is a standalone problem, the cure for which lies mainly within oneself, as researchers have repeatedly argued.” In a popular TED Talk, women’s rights activist and What a Time to Be Alone author Chidera Eggerue agrees, saying people often use relationships as a distraction from themselves. “We use other people as a tool to run away from the responsibility of getting to know who we really are,” she says. Paul Dolan, who wrote Happily Ever After: Escaping the Myths of the Perfect Life, told The Guardian that married people only present as happier than singles when interviews are conducted with spouses in the room. “When the spouse is not present: [expletive] miserable,” he said. Women who never married or had children are the healthiest and happiest, Dolan found. We ladies are getting it. The number of mar-

ried American women dropped below 50 percent for the first time in 2009, and it has continued to drop as a new feminist wave challenges traditional roles and sexuality. We don’t need marriage for money, social status, sex, or babies anymore. Over the life of Sex and the City, the early twenty-first century series that Harper's Bazaar said changed our view of single life forever, Carrie Bradshaw goes from thinking that being alone was the modern-day equivalent of being a leper to thinking it meant “you’re pretty sexy and you’re taking your time deciding how you want your life to be and who you want to spend it with.” With its focus on Carrie and her friends’ romantic exploits and weddings for all in the end, Sex and the City was hardly a poster child for modern singledom. But Carrie did figure out something about relationships toward the series’ end that bears repeating. “There are those that open you up to something new and exotic, those that are old and familiar, those that bring up lots of questions, those that bring you back,” she says. “But the most exciting, challenging, and significant relationship of all is the one you have with yourself.” NOVEM BER 2019

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Robyn Griggs Lawrence is the author of the bestselling Cannabis Kitchen Cookbook and Pot in Pans: A History of Eating Cannabis.

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Cannabiz Connection Networking Mixers are a valuable resource for those looking to connect and learn more about the constantly-evolving industry.

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SPECIAL REPORT

Higher Education A college degree in cannabis is a real thing— and it’s a big sign the industry is legitimate. TEXT STEPHANIE WILSON REPORTING LELAND RUCKER

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F

ull disclosure: When I was getting my degree in journalism from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, I never once imagined that I’d put it to use one day in the legal cannabis industry. Although, technically, I’m not in that industry today, as the editor in chief of this magazine, I oversee a team of editors making a series of city lifestyle magazines covering markets across the country. Those magazines, like the one you’re reading now, appeal to advertisers in the cannabis industry—companies eager to reach you, dear reader, and introduce you to their newly legal and therefore probably newly launched brand. But technically, I don’t work in cannabis. My job is indirectly related, my company ancillary. But it’s still part of a growing stat, a field that just a few years ago didn’t exist but now is the fastest growing industry in the US. There are more than 211,000 Americans working full-time in the booming industry, directly employed in cannabis. When ancillary jobs such as mine are taken into account, that becomes 296,000. That means in the US there are now more legal cannabis industry workers than dental hygienists. Than brewery workers (69,000) and coal miners (52,000) and textile manufacturers (112,000). These figures come from a March 2019 special report by cannabis website Leafly with consultancy Whitney Economics, which looked at the stats the US Bureau of Labor Statistics won’t touch, given that cannabis is still illegal on a federal level. But that isn’t stopping it from booming growth, decreased stigma, and sky-

rocketing interest from all sides. As of September 2019, 11 states and Washington, DC, have legalized cannabis for adult-use, and 34 more have legalized medical use in some capacity. Legal cannabis sales in 2018 topped $10.8 billion. The job market is heating up, and the demand for educated employees grows higher every day. It’s a wide-ranging industry, and there are a lot of career paths one could take within it. Beyond the obvious—dispensary manager, budtender, grower, trimmer— there are a ton of opportunities in the field. Career website Glassdoor released a report earlier this year on the state of the job market for the cannabis industry. The research found that between December 2017 and December 2018, the number of job listings increased by 76 percent, covering highly diverse roles, from marketing to retail to research to agriculture to technology, logistics, and law. It concludes that “workers with higher education and skills in fields as varied as marketing, horticulture, and logistics will only be more desirable as the industry grows.” Even now, those skills are in high demand. Cannabis industry employers struggle to find qualified applicants to fill specific roles that require specialized knowledge— broad-based understanding and highly specific skills. Reacting to that employer demand, schools in the US are stepping up, introducing cannabis curriculum to help prepare students to enter the $14-billion-and-rising global industry as trained professionals. From certificate programs to master’s degrees, with everything in between, higher learning is here.

The first four-year undergraduate degree dedicated to teaching students about the cannabis industry was introduced fall 2017 at Northern Michigan University, under the innocuously titled Medicinal Plant Chemistry. Derek Hall, a spokesperson for NMU, says Professor Brandon Canfield suggested the idea for a medicinal plant chemistry degree program after attending a conference. “He came back thinking it was a place for us to step in. On the one side, you have the growers, and on the other side you have the users. In between, you have a chemistry lab measuring compounds—how much and what is being used. Those are the people we are interested in.” The degree program offers two different tracks: bio-analytical and entrepreneurial. The program description mentions that the additional focus means graduates will not only be qualified to perform the instrumental analysis in a laboratory, but “will also be empowered to build their own testing laboratory, dispensary, and growing operation from the ground up.” When the school announced the program, it wasn’t expecting much interest, but it proved to be quite a viral topic. Hall says a lot of people were looking for a credential to help them get into the cannabis industry. “We fielded a ton of calls from people who were serious about it. One interesting thing is we had a lot of students who said, ‘My parents suggested it.’ A lot of others said they knew people who had benefited from the medicine.” It’s a very demanding program. “The heavy chemistry requirements are mind-boggling. Kids who are there are very, very serious,” Hall says. About 20 people signed up NOVEM BER 2019

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for the program in the fall of 2017, when it opened to grads and undergrads. A year later, there were 225. “We’re pulling in students from all over the country.” Minot State in North Dakota introduced a similar program this year, making it only the second college to offer a four-year degree program specializing in cannabis. In the Rocky Mountain region, Colorado State University, Pueblo, offers a minor in Cannabis Studies, with courses focused on cannabis and its social, legal, historical, political, and health-related impact on society. The degree brochure mentions that “as part of a Hispanic Serving Institution, there is an emphasis on understanding and appreciating the impact cannabis has had on the Chicano/Chicana community and other regional populations of the Southwestern United States.” In New York, SUNY Morrisville is introducing a Cannabis Industry minor this fall semester that combines courses in agricultural science, horticulture, and business programs. It also includes hands-on instruction in cultivating cannabis plants with less than 0.3 percent THC, thanks to the school’s license to grow hemp. In June 2019, University of Maryland announced the country’s first postgraduate program in the field, a master’s of science in Cannabis Science and Therapeutics. Associate degrees in the field are offered at Stockton University in New Jersey and at Philadelphia’s University of Sciences, where students can earn an associate degree in Cannabis Health Therapy. Even the Ivy League is getting into the field. Cornell launches a

“On the one side, you have the growers, and on the other side you have the users. In between, you have a chemistry lab…Those are the people we are interested in.” —Derek Hall Northern Michigan University

“Cannabis: Biology, Society, Industry” course this fall, with plans to introduce a master’s in cannabis next year. That program is said to have an emphasis on oral and written communication skills with media and industry stakeholders, according to reports from Quartz. At Harvard, law students in a Cannabis Law class last spring considered “criminal law enforcement, land use, civil rights, banking, and other issues arising from the Degree in Green These schools offer cannabis cultivation, distribution and use of tracks and classes, or will in the future: marijuana for recreational and/or • Clark University, MA medical purposes.” The university, • Colorado State University along with MIT, received a $9 mil• Cornell University lion alumni donation this summer • Harvard University earmarked for independent research • Minot State, ND on the influence of cannabis on • Northern Michigan brain health and behavior. University • Stockton University, NJ The University of Vermont’s • SUNY Morrisville, NY pharmacology course in Medical Cannabis is considered the first of • UC, Davis • University of Connectiits kind at a US academic insticut tution, and the medical school • University of Denver is also the first to offer a profes• University of Las Vegas sional certificate in cannabis and • University of Maryland medicine. And it’s fully online, led • University of the by faculty from the college, geared Sciences, Philadelphia toward teaching doctors, phar• University of Vermont macists, nurses, PAs—medical professionals—what wasn’t on the course lists whenever and wherever they earned their degrees. Cannabis courses are popping up in undergrad and graduate programs at schools coast to coast, from UConn (Horticulture of Cannabis: From Seed to Harvest) to UC, Davis (Cannabis sativa: The Plant and its Impact on People). Even more institutions have launched certificate programs covering a range of topics. Clark University in Worcester, MA, introduced the country’s first certificate program in cannabis NOVEM BER 2019

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control regulation. University of Las Vegas runs the Cannabis Academy through its continuing education division, with classes in cannabis and the opioid epidemic, cannabis professionals, and pets and cannabis. Professor Paul Seaborn has taught a class titled “The Business of Marijuana” at University of Denver’s Daniels College of Business for a few years now. Seaborn says after legalization in Colorado in 2012, it seemed like a good idea to approach the topic from an entrepreneurial point of view. He offered the first class in 2017, and it was the only accredited business school offering a class in cannabis at the time, open to undergrads and grads. “I’ve never had as many different people—alumni, staff members, parents, students—who showed interest.”

The cannabis industry needs people who have general business skills to help those who don’t. “A student might have a marketing or finance or accounting major, but we’re adding on to that with history and regulation, so we can get the best candidates who can hit the ground running,” says Seaborn. “It’s a steep learning curve, and the competition has gotten more fierce. It’s not guaranteed success. The bar keeps rising, and the more you can be prepared, the better.” To create the curriculum, Seaborn had to start from scratch. “When you teach a course, you use standard materials. In this area, there is no road map. You have to figure it out on your own.” Seaborn drew on people working in the new Colorado industry as guest speakers and found many eager to help. Business Insider reports that the

semester culminates with a field trip to Sweet Grass Kitchen, where students tour the facility and hear from management, including marketing director Jesse Burns. Burns has an MBA from the University of Colorado, Boulder. “It’s been the foundation that I’ve built my career on,” Burns says. “The skills I acquired helped me do the best and become successful and achieve goals. Having that formal education helped me see the bigger picture and helped give me the confidence to make the best decisions.” And as the manager, he does a lot of the hiring. He is very excited to see more qualified applicants enter the field—ones with an education specific to the industry. “A lot of students are ready,” says Seaborn. “It’s a question of universities catching up to them.”

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For the Good of Everyone Research shows that when you volunteer your time and talents for others—especially during the holidays—you also help yourself. TEXT LELAND RUCKER

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The holidays are approaching, and maybe you haven’t been feeling so good about yourself. You’re looking for a change in attitude. Or maybe you’ve recently moved to the area and are trying to find new friends and like-minded people. Or maybe you’re out of work and looking for something challenging. There is no doubt that helping others can help make you feel better. Not

that you need a study to prove it, but a few certainly suggest it. (And we can’t find any that say it’s bad for you.) If you’ve ever volunteered, you know exactly what we’re talking about. “When nonprofits post for help, there are real-time needs in organizations that can create impact. Volunteering is a great way to help,” says Basil Sadiq, senior marketing manager at


VolunteerMatch, an online resource that hooks up nonprofits and volunteers. For many people, the first thing that comes to mind when they think of volunteering is serving dinner at a shelter on Thanksgiving or Christmas Day. While working a food line on holidays is a wonderful way to get involved, meet other people, and make a difference, Sadiq says offering your skills can be even more valuable. “There are ways that can be tailored to you as a person,” he says. “Adding expertise is adding value, and we’re doing it in a way that we haven’t been able to imagine before.” VolunteerMatch works with 122 nonprofits and volunteer efforts around the country. More than a million people visit the website every month. Sadiq calls VolunteerMatch a two-way marketplace—like Airbnb or Uber. On one side are nonprofits posting their volunteer needs. On the other are volunteers looking for the right organization. The site’s search parameters are designed to hook people up with opportunities based on their passions. “They can include skills they have or ones that they’re looking for,” Sadiq says.

“If you play music, you can volunteer to play guitar, or if you’re a programmer, you can create computer code for a nonprofit website,” Sadiq explains. So begin by thinking about what skills you can offer and where they might be most beneficial. Do you love animals? Look for local humane societies and shelters to find out what help they need. (Consider adopting a shelter animal while you’re at it.) Want to help veterans or seniors? There are organizations that deliver meals, build or renovate facilities, or provide child-

care to those who can’t leave their homes. Have a love for history and art? Look into becoming a docent for a local museum. If you’re passionate about education, there are endless volunteer possibilities at your local schools, libraries, and resource centers. There are also business mentorship programs where you can help upand-coming professionals become more successful in the workforce. If you’re retired, there are plenty of chances to get involved. “Volunteering makes seniors feel less lonely because of the social component,” Sadiq says. Plus, adults

over 50 who volunteer on a regular basis are less likely to develop hypertension, according to a study published in Psychology and Aging. Don’t feel bad about getting something out of it for yourself, either. “It’s a way to leverage your skills and learn or get better at those in very practical ways,” Sadiq says. “I saw an article recently that said when we give to others, we feel happier than when we take from others. We’re all a little wired to give.”

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BELOW: GET LOVED UP YOGA BELOW RIGHT: CHANCE THE RAPPER FAR RIGHT: ALL THINGS DETROIT

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On the Calendar

Get Loved Up Yoga with Heather Carter

Get thankful out there during a month when there’s more to talk than turkey.

November 1 Little Caesars Arena, littlecaesars.arenadetroit.com

TEXT DARRALYNN HUTSON

November is sure to keep you in disbelief—as in, you can’t believe it’s already the end of the year. And you really can’t believe the frigid air hasn’t confined you to the house. Whether you’re a visitor here, or you just want to feel like one, this is the last month of the year where the weather’s good enough to get outside. Grab your jacket and gloves, smell winter coming, and enjoy the best Detroit has to offer. 44 D E T RO I T

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Saturdays in November Psychedelic Healing Shack linktr.ee/heather_sea

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Run of the Dead November 2 George S. Patton Park Recreation Center bit.ly/31Ow926

This USATFcertified event takes competitors through two historic cemeteries to celebrate Día de los Muertos.


Detroit Lions Watch Party November 3 Beacon Park detroitlions.com

Detroit football fans of all ages gather to cheer on the Lions during their away game against the Oakland Raiders.

Burlesque! The Sweet Spot Detroit: Red Light Special November 3 Garden Theater sweetspotnation.com

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November 3 Eastern Market visitdetroit.com

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November 10 The Fox Theatre foxtheatredetroit.net

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November 16 TV Lounge, 9pm-2am Tickets via eventbrite

November 21 Motor City Casino detroitpubliclibrary.org

November 22 800 Woodward Ave. downtowndetroitparks.com

November 23 Masonic Temple themasonic.com

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THE END

A Family Tradition

American Coney Island defines the Detroit ethos of keeping it local. AS TOLD BY GRACE KEROS

“I’m thankful for our family business. It hasn’t been easy—they don’t make it easy—but even after 102 years, we still love what we do,” says Grace Keros, third-generation owner of Detroit institution American Coney Island. Grace’s grandfather, Constantine “Gust” Keros, opened the restaurant in 1910. A few years later, he sent for his younger brother Bill, who still lived in Greece, to work with him. Bill soon learned enough to open his own hot dog place next door in 1925 and named it Lafayette Coney Island. Today Grace and her brother, Chris Sotiropoulos, are co-owners of American Coney Island restaurants in Detroit and Las Vegas. “Being thankful and grateful and doing what you love is all that matters,” Grace says. “My parents taught us that our priorities are family, God, and hard work…and, of course, live your life. We do that every day.” American Coney Island 114 W. Lafayette Blvd., Detroit americanconeyisland.com

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TOP: VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS / BOTTOM: COURTESY OF AMERICAN CONEY ISLAND

American Coney Island has been hopping for over 100 years.


Profile for Sensi Magazine

Sensi Magazine - Detroit (November 2019)  

Sensi Magazine November 2019 - Detroit Digital Edition

Sensi Magazine - Detroit (November 2019)  

Sensi Magazine November 2019 - Detroit Digital Edition

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