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Whatever your passion, Era Living offers eight unique retirement communities designed to bring you closer to everything you love.

Q2/2014 seniorguidebook.com

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Has your nest gotten TOO BIG? If so, it may be time to land at Garden Court. Call today to schedule a tour. 425.438.9080

425.438.9080 RETIREMENT COMMUNITY

520 - 112th Street SW • Everett WA 98204 www.gardencourtretirement.com


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*University House House Wallingford (206) 545-8400

Aljoya Thornton Place (206) 306-7920

Aljoya Mercer Island (206) 230-0150 Lakeshore The Lakeshore South Seattle (206) 772-1200

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Relationships & Humor Make ALL the Difference! by Pam Nagel, Community Relations Director with Meg Bakke, Resident Quail Park of Lynnwood “I need to find myself again,” said Meg, as we made our first connection in the retirement community where I worked. Meg, with fortitude, grace, and a smile walked in with her family: Janet, Peter and Karla, and asked to see what we had to offer. It was just weeks after her beloved husband of 57 years passed away. Meg graciously took the offer of a wheelchair ride through the community. She needed a walker or cane due to the side effects of chemotherapy, and a ride sounded good. Right away, Meg saw the familiar face of an old friend. If this community was okay for Marge, Meg knew she could make this work. This encounter was really important to her decision to make this tremendous move in her life. As we started to tour the community, we established an easy rapport. Meg had an openness, and eagerness that allowed her to see all of the positive aspects of the retirement community she was exploring. She was interested in everything on the calendar of activities I showed her. The highlights that helped make her decision to move into this particular community included: a swimming pool where she could do water exercises – she was an avid swimmer; a piano she could play; a small kitchen for the occasional need to be domestic, since a meal plan was provided; and people who smiled at her and made her feel welcome. Oftentimes, people visit many retirement communities and take a few months or even years to make a decision. Not Meg! She weighed the pros and cons, and had the family support that made the transition doable. Her husband died on September 29th and she was moving into her new apartment, complete with treasures from her home, on November 10th. Meg and her husband owned and operated a printing and stationery store in Oak Harbor on Whidbey Island, after Everett left a 22-year career in public health as Director of Environmental Health for Island County. It was here, for 12 years, that Meg learned to love learning about the lives of her Navy community customers who became friends. She did not realize it would make all the difference in being able to communicate, and relate to the many residents in her new home. Unfortunately, it was the chemicals used in the shop that created health problems for them both. Meg had spent the 5 years before this move as caregiver, and medical advocate for her husband in their home. She had support from family and community services, but the bulk of the care and all it entailed fell upon her. As she said, “You do what works for your spouse and make it happen.” In her new home she quickly learned that along with the smiles, laughter, and incredible life stories, there was compassion and empathy from women who had been through the same trauma in their lives. Meg’s positive attitude accepted their words of wisdom and coping skills, and she was then able to pass it on to new residents. After Meg moved into her new apartment, she turned her days into an exploration of activities. She made a commitment to try something new every day. She tried Bingo, which helped her focus on numbers and chair volleyball, giving her upper body exercise and laughter. She typed song 2

sheets in large type size for Sing-Along sessions, and an art class brought out a latent interest in sketching. She became Secretary of the Resident Council and played Scrabble with Marge, her friend from Whidbey Island. She enjoyed the prepared meals, and tried a different soup, salad, or menu entrée! She tried everything, and stayed with what brought her joy and laughter. However, there was always time to read, plan, and remember. She thanked me often for encouraging her, and assuring her that it was okay to have alone time. Meg e-mailed her children weekly with anecdotes about her adventures. In the meantime, they were busy downsizing her belongings, and selling the house and car. She was that committed to her new lifestyle that she was able to let go of so many things from her past life. I enjoyed seeing Meg flourish in her new home as she reconnected with her old friend, and made new ones along the way. She always had a smile and a kind word for staff and residents alike. In the Dining Room she would approach others and join them for a meal, and when she chose a seat by herself she remained open and approachable, so that others would want to sit with her and share touching, funny, and interesting stories. Losing control of the things you take for granted is a big issue for seniors, and when the car is no longer an option, it really feels like you’re left high and dry. Meg quickly learned the community bus schedule for shopping, errands, and doctor appointments. What a relief! She also appreciated the safety features including morning check-in buttons, and secure surroundings. Last Spring, Meg saw an ad in a local newspaper with photos of familiar faces opening a new retirement community. She continued to read articles about the new community, and then with changes and other circumstances happening where she lived, she decided to call me and check out her options. We reconnected and that relationship, once again, struck a chord in both of us and we felt that kinship. We made the tour together; she marveled at the washer and dryer in the unit, as well as the other new amenities and said, “Yes! Where do I sign?” This time she called her family and asked them to help her move. While it meant downsizing a little more, her daughter reminded her: “Mom, it’s just stuff!” Meg was ready to bring that positive attitude and sense of humor into a sparkling new community. At Quail Park, she found everything she loved, but upgraded, and embraced the warm welcome of the friendly and experienced staff. Meg says we all have some physical limitations, but they must not hold you back. She allows herself only a minute for a mini-meltdown once in a while, and then she smiles, finds someone to laugh with and appreciates being home. Quail Park of Lynnwood 4015 164th Street S.W., Lynnwood, WA 98087 425-640-8529 www.quailparkoflynnwood.com. For more information or to set up a tour contact: Pamn@quailparkoflynnwood.com or Victoriam@quailparkoflynnwood.com

SENIOR guidebook – bridging generations


Q2 / 2014 FEATURES 2 Relationships & Humor Make All the Difference! 6 8 10 12 14 18 20 22 24 26 28 29

Pam Nagel & Meg Bakke A Roommate for Life Nancy Werner Retire From Work, But Not From Life Carolyn Creighton ‘WOW’ for CRISTA Senior Residents Debbie Amble My Journey of Self-Discovery David Ensor Physical Therapy Helps to Ease TMJ Discomfort Holly Treadway How Grandma Got Swindled! Jane Meyers-Bowen Leisure Activities Increase Health and Well-Being Leslie Neely Improving Quality of Life for Those with Memory Loss Loren Shook Chateau Retirement Communities: A History of Caring Russell Smith Riches In Community Martin Taylor Caring Faces

ADVERTISERS Front Cover

ERA Living: Aljoya Mercer Island Aljoya Thornton Place – Northgate/Seattle Ida Culver House – Broadview/Seattle Ida Culver House – Ravenna/Seattle The Gardens at Town Square – Bellevue The Lakeshore – Seattle, University House – Issaquah University House – Wallingford/Seattle Back Cover Mirabella – Seattle Front Inside Cover Garden Court Retirement Community – Everett Back Inside Cover Chateau Pacific – Lynnwood, Chateau Bothell Landing – Bothell, Chateau Valley Center – Renton Center 16 Rosewood Courte – Edmonds

Center 17 Edmonds Landing – Edmonds 1 ERA Living: Aljoya Mercer Island, Aljoya Thornton Place –

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Directory

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For advertising information contact: DAVID KIERSKY, Publisher 213 V Avenue, Anacortes WA 98221 360.588.9181 d.kiersky@frontier.com

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JENNIFER KIERSKY BLAIR Chief Editor/Production Copyright 2014 Kiersky Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Kiersky Publishing Senior Guidebook to Western Washington is published quarterly by Kiersky Publishing, Inc. The opinions, advice or statements expressed by contributing writers don’t reflect those of the editor, the publisher or of Kiersky Publishing Senior Guidebook to Western Washington. No part of this magazine may be reproduced without prior consent of the publisher. It is your responsibility to evaluate the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any information, opinion, advice or other content contained herein. Furthermore, Kiersky Publishing, Inc. makes no representations and, to the fullest extent allowed by law, disclaims all warranties, expressed or implied, including but not limited to, warranties of merchantability and fitness for particular purposes regarding the suitability of the information; the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the content, services or products advertised herein. The content published herein may include inaccuracies or typographical errors.

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15 19 21 23 25 27

Northgate/Seattle, Ida Culver House – Broadview/Seattle, Ida Culver House – Ravenna/Seattle, The Gardens at Town Square– Bellevue, The Lakeshore – Seattle, University House – Issaquah, University House –Wallingford/Seattle Living Care: Quail Park of Lynnwood ERA Living: Aljoya Mercer Island, Aljoya Thornton Place – Northgate/Seattle, Ida Culver House – Broadview/Seattle, Ida Culver House – Ravenna/Seattle, The Gardens at Town Square– Bellevue, The Lakeshore – Seattle, University House – Issaquah, University House –Wallingford/Seattle Skagit Valley Senior Village – Burlington Bonaventure: Bonaventure of East Wenatchee, Bonaventure of Lacey, Bonaventure of Salmon Creek – Vancouver, Cedar Ridge – Bonney Lake, Columbia Heights – Wenatchee, Maple Ridge – Freeland, North Creek – Bothell, Park Vista – Port Orchard, Olympic Place – Arlington, Riverton – Richland, Seaport Landing – Port Townsend, Silver Creek – Puyallup, Spring Creek – Bellingham, Woodland – Lacey CRISTA Senior Living – Shoreline, Crista Shores – Silverdale Holiday Retirement: Bridge Park – Seattle, Capital Place – Olympia, Cascadian Place – Everett, Evergreen Place – Renton, Fernwood at the Park – Normandy Park, Parkway Chateau – Bellingham, Peninsula – Gig Harbor, Point Defiance Village – Tacoma, The Garden Club – Bellevue, Willow Gardens – Puyallup Island Hospital – Anacortes Anderson House – Shoreline The Bridge – Mount Vernon Silverado – Everett, Silverado – Bellingham Arthritis Foundation – Seattle Warm Beach Senior Community– Stanwood

SENIOR guidebook – bridging generations


D O WN S I Z E E Z I S T H G I R E H TO T FREE r u o y t e G de at i u G g n i Downsiz zing. i s n w o d .com/ eraliving

For up For upcoming coming seminar da dates, tes, please visit er eraliving.com/downsizing aliving.com/downsizing or ccall: all: A Aljoya ljoya M Mercer ercer IIsland: sland: (206) 230-0150 • A Aljoya ljoya T Thornton hornton Plac Place: e: (206) 306-7920 Whatever W hatever yyour our passion, Er Era a Living offers eight unique ccommunities ommunities designed tto o everything love. bring yyou ou closer tto o ev errything yyou ou lo ve. www.seniorguidebook.com

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A Roommate for Life by Nancy Werner

Our father had lived at a large and beautiful retirement home for six months. He was losing his memory quickly and really didn’t belong in a large building, with long hallways, robust social activities, and especially the dining room, which offered no assistance. He struggled daily, even hourly, to cover up his dementia, and most of the time he ate alone. My dad was the most gregarious person in the world. He always loved baseball, and a good cold beer at mealtime. Now, he had no beer, no friends, and no one to whom he made sense. He spent most of his time wondering where he was, alone in his studio apartment. He was living at the most glamorous place in town, and had absolutely no quality of life.

photo by Stewart Hopkins

The inevitable time finally came to move him into a community where they offered secure memory care. We were going to have to move him quickly, and availability was limited. Of course, I wanted the best for him: a beautiful private room, walking paths, lots of windows...his own furniture. The director showed us in to the only available room, a large studio with two beds and two chairs in it. One of these chairs happened to be occupied by another gentleman. “There is no way my father is going to have a shared room,” I said. “My father hasn’t had a roommate since the army!” The Admissions Director looked at me, and very gently, after a long pause she said, “You know, your father has never lived alone. He lived in his mother’s house...then married your mom, and lived with her for 55 years. Even during the war, he was never alone. No wonder he is frightened, and not doing well. He is probably lonely, and looking for an old friend. I believe a shared suite would be perfect for him.” I was not going for it. My father had lived in the lap of luxury forever...a large home on a golf course in Florida. I was feeling so guilty, and so sad. His whole grand life was coming down to this...a roommate in an old folk’s home. There were only two choices In front of us: either that shared room or my living room sofa...so the choice was evident. “It will do for now” I said, “until a private suite opens up.” My husband and I took him there the next day. I kept thinking...what would I tell him? How will I explain the other man? What if they hate each other? What if, what if, what if? Daddy walked into the building, smiled at everyone, shook hands, laughed at a few of his own bad jokes, and found the path to 103A. We had gone the day before and set up his part of the room nicely, with all his own things. We urged him in, and there was Leonard...the roommate. I held my breath. “What are you doing here?” Daddy asked him. The rest, as they say, is history. He got the best care, and twice as much of it. Every time the staff went to help Leonard they checked in on Dad. Whenever activities began, Leonard urged my dad to go with him. They talked about the war, complained about their aches and pains, and accused each other of everything from stealing to smoking. They always made sure the other had a sweater, and neither was ever late for a meal again. It was perfect, and Leonard was the best and the last friend my father ever remembered having. So, what I learned from that very special woman is that there is little to be gained from living in a room by yourself at 85. Companionship is vital to our spirit. We were not put on this earth to be alone. The Admissions Director knew that well before I did. She gave my father the greatest gift, and one we all hope for: quality of life until the end. To set up a tour please contact Skagit Valley Senior Village at 360-755-5550 for a continuum of care; Retirement, Assisted Living, and Memory Care.

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SENIOR guidebook – bridging generations


Celebrate the ART of Life Every Day Every person has a story The stories created throughout our lives are made richer by the people in our lives and where we choose to live. Skagit Valley Senior Village is proud of the newest edition to our living options – The Memory Village. We now offer a range of living choices all on one campus • Independent Living cottages and apartments • Assisted Living apartments • Memory Care apartments Let us show you how we Celebrate the ART of Life every day. Come for a personalized tour and take advantage of our move-in special

360.755.5550 The Sampler Free 2 Nights Stay with dinner for 2 plus your choice of Salon services (by appointment) Reservations Required www.seniorguidebook.com Skagit Valley Senior Village / 400 Gilkey Road, Burlington WA 98233 / 360.755.5550 / www.SV-SV.com7


Retire From Work, But Not From Life by: Carolyn Creighton

Declutter When people go to look at a potential home, it should always be neat and tidy. This may mean removing a piece of furniture that crowds the room, or removing family photographs and personal items. This better helps the potential homeowners to imagine themselves in the space. Clear everything off of countertops to reveal large clean surfaces. Consider a stager Consider hiring a stager, who will transform your home to help make better use of each space. Turning to a professional stager may help your house to look more appealing to potential buyers, and will save you the time and energy of doing it yourself.

Society has views that tend to shape the way we see certain things. Take gender roles for example. Commercials and ads on television set these gender characteristics in stone by frequently having women cleaning, cooking, and taking care of the kids. On the other hand, men are present in advertisements for sports, cars or home improvement. The same can be said about retirement. For years, everyone has grown up believing that once you retire that’s it, there’s nothing more to do! Sure, you can take this time to relax and take a few moments for yourself, but the idea of this typical retirement should be bent and altered. Here’s a quote that perfectly expresses how this new stage should be viewed: “Retire from work, but not from life” – M.K. Soni Just because people may be stepping down from a career or position, it doesn’t have to mean that they should take the same approach to the rest of their life. Some retirees are even continuing their passion for work past the typical retirement age. Others retire from their job to find a new line of work, or dive into a favorite hobby that they find more enjoyable or fulfilling. If you’ve reached 65, but don’t feel like you’re ready to leave the workforce, or simply don’t want to, you don’t have to. Retirement communities also aren’t what they used to be. These days, it’s about active retirement living – the staff takes care of the daily chores, while you spend time focused on living life on your terms and doing what you want to do. Retirees are also making the move to these communities, so they don’t have to worry about the expense and stress of caring for a large house that they don’t fully utilize anymore. Often times, if you or a loved one has made the decision to move into a senior living community, selling an existing house is a required part of the transition. It can be a daunting task, but to get a jumpstart on the process, here are a few tips to help you along:

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Give them a deal In this housing market buyers are always looking for a deal. Whether it’s the seller offering to put money down toward closing costs, or offering to pay those fees entirely. This will certainly sweeten the deal for buyers, and provoke more interest in your property. Invite neighbors If you’re having an open house, invite your neighbors to attend as well. This creates a great opportunity for potential buyers to get to know their friendly neighbors. In a sense, your neighbors can do the selling for you! Don’t forget about the exterior While staging the inside of your home is important, worrying about the exterior is something to think about as well. After all, it’s the first thing that buyers see when they pull up to the home. Make sure it has fresh paint with pleasing landscaping, and even outdoor furniture to help people visualize what their life here might be like. Check out the competition You’ll want to know what you’re up against when selling your house. Talk to your real estate agent about the price and condition of other homes that are also on the market. You can even consider attending a few open houses to see if your home is up to par in comparison with others. Most of all keep an open mind and think about what you really want most out of life, and the exciting opportunities that await your new retirement lifestyle! What have you always wanted to do that you haven’t had the time for? This is the perfect opportunity to start an exciting new chapter in your life, and staying optimistic and enthusiastic can make all the difference! For more information, please contact Carolyn Creighton, Bonaventure of Salmon Creek Executive Director, at (360) 209-1932 or through their website, www.BonaventureSalmonCreek.com

SENIOR guidebook – bridging generations


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‘WOW’ for CRISTA Senior Residents by Debbie Amble

Most students can’t wait for their schooling to end, so they can get on with their lives. The difference here at CRISTA Senior Living, is that we have senior residents that continue to “get on with their lives” by going back to school. WOW Wednesday is one of many programs here at CRISTA Senior Living that provides opportunities for intergenerational relationships, between King’s High School students and the CRISTA senior residents. WOW stands for ‘Welcome to Our World,’ and each Wednesday senior residents are welcome to attend classes with King’s high school students. The King’s High School Con-nections Club started the program in 2007 as a creative way to form intergenerational connections between the two largest pop-ulations on the CRISTA campus: senior residents and students. WOW Wednesdays have been a great success as residents, students, and teachers have jumped on board and enjoyed the interaction with one another. Residents have become so welcome in classes that not only do they sign up to attend monthly, but also they feel comfortable enough to pop in throughout the week. In one instance, a resident came across an interesting mushroom on campus, and decided to take pictures of it. She then proceeded to the Biology classroom where everyone gathered around to study her pictures, and learn about the mushroom together. Residents have also found ways to stay involved outside the classroom. After attending a Drama class, a Cristwood Park resident from France taught student-actors how to speak with a French accent for their roles in Les Miserable. Additionally, a few Garden Apartment residents lent a hand in building the set for the play. Other residents enjoy being able to play their instruments with the band and sing with the choir, while others take advantage of the opportunity to learn more about the Word of God by attending Bible classes. History teachers are especially excited about having residents in class, because they share personal stories about the historic times and events through which they’ve lived. Those who are fascinated by technology enjoy a broad range of classes, from

computer programming to robotics, in our new state-of-the-art STEM building (Science/Technology/Engineering/Math). An added bonus of the connections made through WOW is that as the residents get to know the students, many have taken an interest in their activities on campus and started attending sporting events, plays, and concerts. Some residents have even traveled as far as Centralia to support the football team in the play-offs. King’s students feel honored to have the residents come out and support them. Also, as residents walk around the CRISTA campus or enjoy treats at the Arbor Deli, the students recognize them and stop to visit as they pass between classes. Residents who have participated in the WOW program this year are enjoying all it has to offer. WOW has residents who go to classes with their friends, and couples who go together or pursue their separate interests. One thing is for sure: there is something for everyone. There is enough variety in the classes offered to satisfy a broad range of interests, along with a student body that comes from a variety of countries with diverse stories and interests. When you combine that with the breadth of experience and wealth of wisdom the residents bring to King’s, the WOW program is definitely a win-win experience for all.

Debbie Amble teaches Bible at King’s High School, is the Bible Department Chair and the advisor to the Connections Club. This is her 31st year at King’s. If you would like more information on joining our community or to visit, please contact us on the web at www.cristaseniors.com or call 206-546-7283. 10

SENIOR guidebook – bridging generations


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To schedule a tour or attend upcoming events, call Caitlin at 206.546.7283

Come see our newly remodeled community!

eet 350 N. 190th Str 8133 Shoreline, WA 9


My Journey of Self-Discovery by David Ensor

In today’s fast paced world of options and information, it can be very difficult for families to discern the differences between the vast array of options for the day-to-day choices we make. I remember a time not that long ago when your morning beverage choice was regular or decaf. Now, we have lattes, frappes, mochas, venti non-fat extra hot 4 pump soy caramel macchiatos, and the list goes on; and that’s just coffee. It becomes even more difficult the bigger the decision. I personally experienced this several years ago when my grandfather was diagnosed with Parkinson’s and dementia. He reached the stage where it was no longer a viable option for him to live in his home. Like many families, we started to research and discuss our options. At the time, I was working as a Senior Manager at an IT hardware manufacturer in Dallas Ft Worth, Texas. I spent a lot of time traveling, which made things even more difficult when it came to balancing my work schedule and helping my family with this tough decision. Like many families, we had no idea what was out there. We didn’t know the difference between Independent Living, Assisted Living, Continuing Care, Dementia Care, Adult Family Homes, or the vast array of in home care options. We did the best we could to sift through the mountain of information and reached out to a couple of advisors for assistance. Nothing really helped that much. We finally decided upon the nicest and most affordable place we could find in the area. We then spent the next several months visiting my grandfather, watching his condition worsen until he passed away. Looking back now, this was a major turning point in my life. My experience with my family, and my personal relationship with my grandfather during this stage of his life made me start to question a lot of things. It forced me to look at my life work balance, compared to the way we as a society deal with our aging family members and healthcare in general. Over the next few years I kept coming back to this point. I thought, there has to be a better way, and I made a major life decision for myself at that point. I couldn’t help but think, that I wanted to do something about this and I wanted to help. I started to look into the senior care industry, and learn more about the different options and companies in the industry. It took a few years, but I finally took the leap. After working most of my career in the IT industry, I took a position with Holiday Retirement and began my journey into the Senior Living industry. I have been with Holiday 2 years now and they have been the most challenging and rewarding 2 years in my career. In the past 2 years, I have helped hundreds of families through the exact situation my family went through years ago. I have been able to help them make a much more informed decision. Not all of those families moved in to Holiday communities, but all of them received the respect, and assistance they deserved. I can sympathize with what it is like to have these very difficult decisions to make. I have made it my goal to make sure that every family I meet has a little less guilt and pain to overcome, than my family did. It hasn’t been all rainbows and sunshine; there have been very tough times. I have seen families buckle under the pressure, and have seen couples put off decisions only to have their loved one pass away weeks later. Although there have been some very difficult times I wouldn’t trade them for anything. I know I am making a difference, and more importantly, I know my Grandfather is proud.

David Ensor is the Regional Sales Leader at Holiday Retirement. For more information please contact us at 253-279-9289, or visit our website at www.holidaytouch.com. 12

SENIOR guidebook – bridging generations


Bridge Park West Seattle | 206-938-6394

Capital Place Olympia | 360-357-9922

Cascadian Place

Fun, stress-free, and all-inclusive. The way retirement living should be.

Everett | 425-339-2225

Evergreen Place Renton | 425-226-3312

Holiday Retirement communities make retirement living simple and enjoyable by taking care of life’s daily details, allowing residents to focus on what’s most important to them.

Fernwood at the Park Normandy Park | 206-242-1455

The Garden Club From three chef-prepared meals served daily to live-in managers available 24/7, we provide everything seniors need to live healthy, safe and stress-free lives.

Bellevue | 425-643-7111

Parkway Chateau Bellingham | 360.671.6060

And with all of the many benefits included in one monthly fee, retirement living at a Holiday Retirement community is an incredible value. Call today to schedule your complimentary meal and personal tour! Welcome to Holiday. Welcome home.

www.seniorguidebook.com

Peninsula Gig Harbor | 253-858-4800

Point Defiance Village Tacoma | 253-759-8908

Willow Gardens Puyallup | 253-848-4430

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Physical Therapy Helps To Ease TMJ Discomfort by Holly Treadway, PT, DPT, ATC

A recent patient of mine – an animated grandmother with a big Louisiana drawl – had only lived in Anacortes for two years and didn't yet appreciate the perils of a Pacific Northwest winter. She didn't know about black ice and took a bad fall that left her in pain and with a popping in her jaw whenever she opened and closed her mouth. It wasn't until several months later, however, when she re-injured her jaw and could barely open her mouth, that she knew she needed medical help. Her doctor diagnosed her with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction, a complex group of conditions characterized by chronic pain in the jaw and surrounding soft tissues that can limit jaw movement and affect the ability to speak, chew, swallow, make facial expressions, and breathe. Other symptoms include headaches, ear pain and pressure, neck and shoulder pain, and popping or clicking of the jaw. After ruling out other medical conditions that might have caused her symptoms, her doctor referred her to my workplace, Physical, Occupational & Speech Therapy at Island Hospital. Once here, I examined her and pinpointed where manual therapy, stretching, massage, and physical therapy modalities could ease her acute symptoms. I know she could barely eat at that point, and it was obvious that she was in a significant amount of pain that was really limiting her day-to-day quality of life. Even simple things, like waking up and yawning in the morning, caused severe pain. Over the next three months, I worked with her twice each week to normalize joint alignment and decrease muscle imbalance. We discovered during the evaluation that she was not opening one side of her mouth as much as the other side, so I showed her how to use tongue depressors to help stretch the stiff side, which she did at home in between visits. Her dedication to her home stretches, along with her attendance in physical therapy, helped to gradually reduce her stiffness and pain, restore mobility and improve her quality of life. Now, thanks to her perseverance and smart move to seek help, she can eat, brush her teeth, and yawn without pain or jaw popping. Her quality of life has greatly improved. Today more than 35 million people in the U.S. suffer from TMJ dysfunction, which may be caused by injuries to the jaw, autoimmune diseases, infections, dental procedures or various forms of arthritis. Physical therapy is a non-invasive treatment that can relax muscles, improve posture, ease pressure, relieve jaw pain and restore mobility. If you have been diagnosed with TMJ dysfunction, ask your doctor if a physical therapy referral is right for you. It's important that you enjoy your life, one without unnecessary pain and physical limitations. Physical Therapist Holly Treadway practices at Physical, Occupational & Speech Therapy at Island Hospital, located in the Medical Arts Pavilion, 1015 25th Street, Anacortes, WA. For more information, call (360) 299-1328 or visit www.islandhospital.org 14

SENIOR guidebook – bridging generations


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Caring for the Memory Impaired for Over 12 Years See our Freshly Renovated Apartments!

425-673-2875 728 Edmonds Way • Edmonds WA 98020 • www.rosewoodcourte.com

CALL US WE CAN HELP 16

SENIOR guidebook – bridging generations


Life Lives Better at Edmonds Landing! Can it really be different? More than just maintenance free, at Edmonds Landing… Retirement and Assisted Living comes to life! Our emphasis on exceptional well-being is evident in the options available to you and it’s easy to live life to the fullest with our dedicated and talented staff ready to serve you. It can be different...let Edmonds Landing show you how.

Schedule Your Personal Visit Today!

180 Second Ave. South, Edmonds, WA 98020 • 425-744-1181

edmondslanding.com www.seniorguidebook.com

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How Grandma Got Swindled! by Jane Meyers-Bowen MN

Who can you trust? Seniors today are educated enough to know better than to give that smooth talker on the other end of the phone line their social security, credit card, or bank account number. Yet, there are situations in which this unfortunately does still happen. Phony sweepstakes winnings, charitable giving requests, and cheap insurance can siphon funds from a senior. A recent Investor Protection Trust survey found that one in every five, aged 65 or older, has been financially duped! Working in the senior living industry, I have witnessed residents nailed for political “donations” needed to save the free world, by financially strapped family or friends with their hands out, even POA’s (people given, in good faith, Power of Attorney privileges by the resident to act on their behalf) abuse their role. First, I have to say that 99.99% of families and friends have their senior’s best interest at heart. Yet, exploitation can be very subtle. For example, a resident’s friend sold her home, and asked if she could come and stay with her in her apartment at the community. When it was first brought up the friend was talking about staying just a couple of weeks, but that soon turned into a couple of months. Our resident came to me and said, “I love my friend, but I don’t want to live with her.” She was afraid to tell her, so we acted on her behalf and offered the friend an opportunity to rent her own apartment. Of course, she wasn’t interested in paying for that. Let Me Help You Taking over the bills and finances can be a great service to seniors, but it can also let the fox into the henhouse. It is critical that seniors watch their bank statements, (including getting hard copies of statements) as well as insist on participating in discussions with the banker, investment counselor, and realtors so they understand the transactions that are being made. Using fear, and abusing their sense of dependency, i.e. telling the person how lucky they are to have help, over time allows others to take advantage of seniors emotionally and/or financially. I have witnessed ministers that have taken in their flock. They later came to find, that “flock” ended up contributing to the purchase of a larger home for the minister, so the “flock” could come live there. Maybe it was all on the up and up, but it felt “messy.” For months after he moved in with the minister and his family, our former resident would come back to visit his friends in the community and shared that he wished he hadn’t moved out. Cyberstuff In the new age of technology, skillful forgery of documents, statements, and permissions can fool anyone; let alone a person with diminished vision. Perhaps it is still good practice to pick up the phone and check out the facts.

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But it was my Granddaughter! In a recent article in the Daily Herald, about a senior being taken advantage of by her granddaughter, it was noted that “an inside job” is the most insidious of all. Many times family members will note mom or dad becoming very secretive of their affairs. As many seniors do not want to admit they have made some poor financial decisions in the past, as grandparents they will often protect their grandchildren from being exposed for pressing Grandma for money. Little Red Riding Hood knew what she was doing! The fear of being isolated, or cut off is a very powerful motivator to make decisions that can be personally harmful. As a caring family member or friend, pay close attention to subtle changes, guarded questions, and watch for predators. They are really fairly easy to spot once you start looking! The ElderCare Rights Alliance outlines common tactics abusers use to gain control. www.eldercarerights.org. For more information please contact Jane Meyers-Bowen at 425-438-9080, or visit www.gardencourtretirement.com

SENIOR guidebook – bridging generations


www.seniorguidebook.com

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Leisure Activities Increase Health and Well-Being by Leslie Neely

In the past few years, multiple scientific studies have demonstrated a link between an active and fulfilling lifestyle, and the long-term well-being of older adults. Physical activity has long been associated with a healthy lifestyle. The National Institute of Health, in particular, recommends a regular regimen of exercise for older adults. Still, as many as 70% of seniors are not physically active. Research shows that regular physical activity lowers your risk for a variety of conditions, including: Alzheimer's and dementia, heart disease, diabetes, colon cancer, high blood pressure, and obesity. Being active can also improve your bone density and coordination, reducing your chances of falls and broken bones. While these benefits have long been documented, more recent studies show that being socially active is also essential to long-term senior health. One study, published in the Annals of Family Medicine concluded that, "Social contact may be as effective as physical activity in improving mood and quality of life." A growing body of scientific work is amassing evidence that social engagement reduces risk of dementia, rate of cognitive decline, boosts the immune system, lowers blood pressure, and even reduces physical pain. Seniors who are very socially active are twice as likely to remain disability free, and maintain their independence in daily living. Luckily, evidence shows that it is never too late – older adults who were not previously very physically or socially active can still reap benefits by starting now. There are many ways seniors can start to be physically active and socially connected, often at the same time. As the weather warms up and we all emerge from our winter cocoons, it is the perfect time to embrace new hobbies and leisure activities that can keep you on the go. Volunteering provides a chance to meet new people as well as stay active. Becoming more involved in your church can often provide volunteer opportunities, as well as social interaction. Rescuing an older dog from a shelter can not only save a dog that has a low possibility of being adopted, but also offer company and motivation to exercise as you walk your new companion in the beautiful spring weather. Many senior centers and senior living communities, like The Bridge at Mount Vernon, offer senior exercise classes to get you moving. One excellent idea is to take a seminar to learn new skills, maybe even a computer class. A study from the University of Alabama in Birmingham linked Internet use by older adults with a 30 percent reduction in signs and symptoms of depression. If isolation is a serious concern because of lack of transportation or nearby resources, it may be prudent to consider a move. For example, moving closer to family members that are available for assistance. Another option is to move into a senior living community; The Bridge at Mount Vernon provides transportation for residents, as well as numerous social activities. Many residents of The Bridge find that between the exercise classes, parties, and outings to explore the region, their lives are more independent and engaging than before. For more information please contact Shannon Nicholson at 360-416-0400, or snicholson@centurypa.com 20

SENIOR guidebook – bridging generations


It’s good It’s d to t kno know ow w someone your loved loved one. is always there therre for your The Bridge at Mount Vernon offfers a full f range of Assisted Living services including customized care plans, assistance with personal needs and fresh, home-cooked meals. With an all-inclusive fee, you will have peace of mind ved one’’ss knowing your loved needs will always be met. Call (360) 416-0400 to schedule your personal visit.

301 South LaV LaVenture Ventur enture Road Vernon, W WA Mount Vernon, A 98274 www www.thebridgeatmountvernon.com .thebridgeatmountvernon.com

www.seniorguidebook.com

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Improving Quality of Life for those with Memory Loss by Loren B. Shook, Silverado Co-Founder, President and Chief Executive Officer

Silverado was founded in 1996 with the goal of changing how the world cares for and perceives those affected by memory loss. Establishing this purpose as the foundation of our endeavors allowed us – and our associates – to leave behind previous misconceptions and operate in a way that, to this day, provide our residents with utmost dignity, freedom and quality of life. At the time, our approach was met with resistance; but the potential for this model of care was evidenced early on, years before the founding of our organization. At the age of 15, I began working at Fairfax Hospital in Kirkland, Washington; a psychiatric hospital owned and operated by my aunt and uncle. During the many years I worked there, one experience still stands out to me – an experience that helped shape my purpose in life and ultimately became the foundation of Silverado’s life enriching care. More than a week after arriving at Fairfax Hospital, our new patient Janet had still not made a sound. A woman in her late-twenties, Janet was considered catatonic. She was unresponsive to all treatments. Yet, our staff made every effort to engage with her and her family, and eventually learned of Janet’s lifelong love for horses. Not coincidentally, our hospital was also home to a variety of dogs, cats, horses, peacocks and other friendly creatures that were incorporated into our therapeutic environment. So, I found our most social palomino and brought her to meet Janet. What happened next still remains etched in my memory: As the horse approached Janet, there was a long silence. Then suddenly, Janet put a hand on the friendly creature and began to lift herself up and out of the wheelchair. She grasped the horses face and leaned in to softly speak. We couldn’t hear what she was saying, but we didn’t have to – this was a private communication between a silent woman and the 22

empathetic horse that brought her back to the world. Three weeks later, Janet walked out of Fairfax Hospital and went home, her spirit and life restored. This life enriching care, that was able to transform Janet’s life, now lives on through Silverado. Our focus on restorative care creates a community environment where people come to enjoy life, to express their creativity and to experience things they would otherwise not have the opportunity to do. Our communities are often referred to as noisy places, not because the environment is overwhelming, but because there is an abundance of life around every corner. When families first walk in the door, the joy they express is a testament to Silverado’s high-quality standards that are a result of the most passionate staff – a staff dedicated to enriching the lives of people with all types of memory care needs. Families say, “thank you for giving me my life back, you are my lighthouse in the storm, and I can sleep again knowing my mother is safe with Silverado.” The success of this model is a testament to the value of having purpose, freedom and joy in life. Regardless of age or acumen, purpose is what drives us, what helps us enjoy the things around us, and ultimately it is purpose that will make our world a better place. Silverado has also replicated this personalized approach – that aims to treat the individual rather than the disease – through our spectrum of care services, including home care, communities and hospice. And through this approach, we have contributed to literally thousands of transformations among our clients, residents, patients and families alike.

To learn more about Silverado, call 866-522-8125 or visit silveradocare.com.

SENIOR guidebook – bridging generations


www.seniorguidebook.com

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Chateau Retirement Communities: A History of Caring by Russell Smith

Building Community from the Ground Up Chateau Retirement Communities is built on caring. Dedicated to the mission of helping residents to live happier, healthier, longer lives on their own terms – it is an organization based on the principles of truth, respect, and trust. The history of Chateau Retirement Communities in the Puget Sound region begins in the late 1980s when Jim Godfrey developed Peter’s Creek Retirement and Assisted Living Community in Redmond, Washington. After opening Peter’s Creek in 1990, Jim developed and opened a second retirement community, Chateau Marymoor, which opened in 1995.

ABOVE

Jim Godfrey, CEO and Owner of Chateau Retirement Communities. BELOW, LEFT TO RIGHT

Tamra Godfrey, Gerry Godfrey, Michael Schaedig, Jim Godfrey and Sean Godfrey Photos by Bo Jungmayer / Fred Hutch

Expansion and Growth Through Jim’s experience developing Peter’s Creek and Chateau Marymoor and a desire to drive a high quality of life and services for seniors, Chateau Retirement Communities was created. The next project was to develop and build Chateau Pacific, a high-end retirement and assisted living community in Lynnwood which opened in 1999. From there, Jim looked east to Bothell, and saw it as the perfect spot for their next retirement community. Following Chateau Pacific, Chateau Bothell Landing opened in 2002. Peter’s Creek and Chateau Marymoor were sold in 2003, and Jim developed Chateau Valley Center on the campus of Valley Medical Center in 2005. In 2009, the expansion of Chateau Bothell Landing campus included 72 premium constructed apartments. And now, in 2014, nearly 450 residents live in three modern and convenient facilities. From its early days, the company has grown to include almost 200 employees, who are dedicated to caring and community. Committed to Family, Community and Responsibility Chateau Retirement Communities believes in the strength of family and community involvement. Chateau leadership roles are performed by Jim’s son, daughter, and son-in-law. The family tradition of caring for people continues with the next generation. Two of Jim’s children work outside of the Chateau performing vital roles in healthcare and non-profit social services in Downtown Seattle. As Owner and CEO of Chateau Retirement Communities, Jim oversees the team with his extensive background of over 30 years as Owner and CEO of development, constructions, real estate and healthcare operations and management companies. The COO of Chateau Retirement Communities, Michael Schaedig, Jim’s son-in-law, has been with the organization for over 20 years. He became the Chief Operating Officer in 2004, and is proud of Chateau’s values: an unwavering commitment to resident well-being and satisfaction and a strong sense of corporate responsibility. Take a tour to find out what makes Chateau Retirement Communities different. Call (425) 361-0868 to schedule your visit. www.ChateauRetirement.com

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SENIOR guidebook – bridging generations


www.seniorguidebook.com

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Riches In Community by Martin Taylor

Life is richer when we share it with others. A cup of coffee by yourself is just coffee, one shared with friends is a celebration. Taking a walk alone is mere exercise, one with a friend is an event, a chance to visit and share. One of the more difficult challenges of aging can be loneliness. Loneliness is one of the road signs that point us to the simple truth that we need other people. Sharing our time, our joys, our sorrows, our worries, and our laughter, with others, is essential for living a life rich with meaning. Very near the top of this list of important people is family. The same parents, who nurtured us in healthy ways, gave us wings to fly out into the world and roots to hold us firm against the storms of life. Children have a bond with mom and dad that can provide great comfort in our older years. Think how good it felt when your young son or daughter slipped their hand into yours when crossing the street. Years later, knowing that person is there to give you a hand is a great comfort. We know in those times that we are not alone. Not everyone has children and not everyone has children close enough to help. However, the fact remains that we still need others. Friends can be a great gift in such times. They can provide a listening ear and an encouraging word, share a good story, or tell a joke to a friend to lift their spirits. It’s not only in a bind that our friends are a blessing. Time spent fishing with a chum, or going out for lunch with a friend can be deeply satisfying, as well. Sometimes our dearest friends are the ones we are most comfortable with, while just sitting quietly together. Their mere physical presence can give us peace. Faith communities can be a great source of comfort as well. People who gather to sing, and give praise to God are often blessed in ways that are soul deep. They come away from such gatherings feeling refreshed, strengthened, and equipped to meet daily challenges. This is the gift of a community. Finally, pets can be a wonderful source of companionship. They look to us for their care and tending. They share affection with us when no one else is around. They love us the way we need and want, without conditions or qualifications. The thump of a dog’s tail on the floor is a greeting of love. Continuing Care Retirement Communities (CCRC) provides built in neighbors, and the endless possibilities of new friends and relationships. Options are created by having independent homes within walking distance of personal care. Residents can count on staying long-term in one community. Spouses can remain close to one another, even if they require different lifestyles. In a CCRC if needs increase, residents are given the help they want without leaving old friends and neighbors. Continuing Care Retirement Communities keep people together, even as circumstances change. There are plenty of good reasons to consider moving to a retirement community, but the gift of people is at the top. For more information about the Warm Beach Senior Community, contact Sheila Bartlett, or Martin Taylor at 360-652-4593 or www.warmbeach.org

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SENIOR guidebook – bridging generations


A LIFE WORTH LIVING AT WARM BEACH SENIOR COMMUNITY People notice it right away – the friendliness, the welcoming smiles, the immediate feeling of being a part of something special. That’s why so many who are 62+ years of age are eager to join our community. This is your chance to experience the fulfilling lifestyle and peace of mind provided by the area’s only full service retirement community.

At Warm Beach, you’ll experience: • Newly renovated apartments and homes • Restaurant dining with 25+ items from our made to order menu • Convenient transportation service • Indoor pool, exercise area and 22 miles of walking trails around campus • Social, recreational and spiritual activities • On-site assisted living and nursing care, if needed during lifetime

New friendships, spiritual vitality, a fulfilling retirement lifestyle, plus the breathtaking scenery of the Pacific Northwest...these are just a few of the things you will experience at Warm Beach Senior Community. But don’t wait, these homes and apartments won’t last long.

20420 Marine Drive, Stanwood WA 98292 360-652-4593 or (800) 652-6302 www.seniorguidebook.com

Visit our website to learn more about us! www.warmbeach.org 27


CARING FACES

Silverado – Everett Letitia London, Administrator 425-348-8800

CRISTA Senior Living Cristwood – Shoreline Sherri Pribble-Jones, Marketing Manager 206-546-7283

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Edmonds Landing – Edmonds Melissa Horman, Life Enrichment Coordinator 425-744-1181

Warm Beach – Stanwood Martin Taylor and Sheila Bartlett, Community Relations 360-652-4593

SENIOR guidebook – bridging generations


DIRECTORY SNOHOMISH COUNTY ARLINGTON Olympic Place Retirement & Assisted Living 20909 Olympic Place NE Arlington WA 98223 360-207-6327 EDMONDS Aegis of Edmonds Assisted Living / Alzheimer’s Memory Care 21500 - 72nd Ave West Edmonds WA 98026 425-776-3600 Edmonds Landing Assisted Living 180 Second Ave South Edmonds WA 98020 425-744-1181 Rosewood Courte Assisted Living/Alzheimer’s Memory Impaired Only 728 Edmonds Way Edmonds WA 98020 425-673-2875 Sunrise of Edmonds Assisted Living/Alzheimer’s Care 750 Edmonds Way Edmonds WA 98020 425-673-9700 EVERETT Bethany at Silver Crest Assisted Living / Nursing Home Adjacent 2131 Lake Heights Drive Everett WA 98208 425-385-2335 Cascadian Place Retirement / Independent Living 3915 Colby Avenue North Everett WA 98201 425-339-2225 Clare Bridge Silver Lake Alzheimer’s & Dementia Care 2015 Lake Heights Drive Everett WA 98208 425-337-6336 Everett Plaza Assisted Living 2204 12th Street Everett WA 98201 425-374-0170 Garden Court Retirement Community Independent and Assisted Living 520 - 112th Street SW Everett WA 98204 425-438-9080

www.seniorguidebook.com

Silverado Senior Living Everett Dementia Care Community 524 - 75th Street SE Everett WA 98203 425-348-8800 South Pointe Independent, Assisted Living 10330 4th Avenue West Everett WA 98204 425-513-5645 Washington Oakes Retirement and Assisted Living 1717 Rockefeller Ave Everett WA 98201 425-339-3300 GRANITE FALLS The Village Independent Living 302 North Alder Avenue Granite Falls WA 98252 360-691-1777 LAKE STEVENS Ashley Pointe Independent and Assisted Living 11117 - 20th Street NE Lake Stevens WA 98258 425-397-7500 LYNNWOOD Aegis of Lynnwood Assisted Living 18700 44th Avenue West Lynnwood WA 98037 425-712-9999 Chateau Pacific Indepedent / Assisted Living / Memory Care 3333 - 148th Street SW Lynnwood WA 98087 425-787-9693 Clare Bridge Lynnwood Alzheimer’s & Dementia Care 18706 - 36th Ave W Lynnwood WA 98037 425-774-3300 Fairwinds – Brighton Court Retirement/Assisted Living 6520 - 196th Street SW Lynnwood WA 98036 425-775-4440 Quail Park of Lynnwood Independent & Assisted Living / Memory Care 4015 164th Street SW Lynnwood WA 98037 425-640-8529

Scriber Gardens Independent & Assisted Living / Wellness Services 6024 200th Street SW Lynnwood WA 98036 425-673-7111

Warm Beach Senior Community Independent & Assisted Living/ Skilled Nursing 20420 Marine Drive Stanwood WA 98292 360-652-7585

MARYSVILLE Grandview Village Retirement / Assisted Living 5800 - 64th Street NE Marysville WA 98270 360-653-2223

SKILLED NURSING CARE Bethany at Pacific - Everett 425-259-5508

The Cottages at Marysville Memory Care Community 1216 Grove Street Marysville WA 98270 360-322-7561

Delta Rehab Center - Snohomish 360-568-2168

MILL CREEK Mill Creek Gardens Assisted Living / Alzheimer’s memory impaired only 13200 - 10th Dr SE Mill Creek WA 98012 425-379-8276

Lynnwood Manor Health Center Lynnwood 425-776-5512

The Cottages at Mill Creek Memory Care Community 13200 10th Drive SE Mill Creek WA 98012 425-341-4356 MOUNTLAKE TERRACE Mountlake Terrace Plaza A Merrill Gardens Community Independent and Assisted Living 23303 - 58th Ave W Mountlake Terrace WA 98043 425-672-4673 MUKILTEO Harbour Pointe Independent and Assisted Living 10200 Harbour Place Mukilteo WA 98275 425-493-8555 STANWOOD Josephine Assisted Living / Nursing Home Adjacent 9901 - 272nd Place NW Stanwood WA 98292 360-629-2126 Stanwood Community & Senior Center Independent Living 7430 - 276th Street NW Stanwood WA 98292 360-629-7403

Bethany at Silver Lake - Everett 425-338-3000

Josephine Sunset Home - Stanwood 360-629-2126

Madeleine Villa Health Care Marysville 360-659-1259 HCR Manor Care - Lynnwood 425-775-9222 Marysville Care Center - Marysville 360-659-3926 Merry Haven Health Care Center Snohomish 360-568-3161 Regency Care Center at Arlington Arlington 360-403-8247 Regency Care Center of Monroe Monroe 360-794-4011

SKAGIT COUNTY ANACORTES Cap Sante Court Retirement 1111 32nd Street Anacortes,WA 98221 360-293-8088 Chandler’s Square Retirement / Assisted Living 1300 “O” Avenue Anacortes WA 98221 360-293-1300 BURLINGTON Skagit Valley Senior Village Retirement / Assisted Living / Memory Care 400 Gilkey Road Burlington WA 98233 360-755-5550

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LA CONNER La Conner Retirement Inn Independent, Assisted Living 204 North First Street La Conner WA 98257 360-466-5700

Life Care Center of Skagit Valley Skilled Nursing 1462 West SR 20 Sedro-Woolley WA 98284 360-856-6867

MOUNT VERNON The Bridge Assisted Living/Respite 301 S LaVenture Mount Vernon WA 98274 360-416-0400

WHATCOM COUNTY

Highland Greens Senior Apartments Affordable Senior Apartments 3100 N 30th St Mount Vernon WA 98273 360-848-8422 Highland Greens Cottages Senior Residences Village Court @ 3200 N 30th St Mount Vernon WA 98273 360-540-1438 Salem Village II Senior Residences 2601-2617 N LaVenture Rd Mount Vernon WA 98273 360-540-1438 Salem Village Apartments Affordable Senior Apartments 2619 N. LaVenture Rd Mount Vernon WA 98273 360-428-5662 Life Care Center of Mount Vernon Assisted Living / Skilled Nursing / Rehab / Alzheimer’s 2120 E Division Mount Vernon WA 98274 360-424-4258 Logan Creek Retirement / Independent Living 2311 E Division Mount Vernon WA 98274 360-428-0222 Mountain Glen Retirement / Assisted Living 1810 East Division Mount Vernon WA 98274 360-424-7900 SEDRO-WOOLLEY Birchview - A Memory Care Community Assisted Living / Enhanced Adult Residential Care 925 Dunlop Ave Sedro-Woolley WA 98284 360-856-1911 Country Meadow Village Retirement / Assisted Living 1501 Collins Rd Sedro-Woolley WA 98284 360-856-0404

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BELLINGHAM Alderwood Park Licensed Skilled Nursing 2726 Alderwood Bellingham WA 98225 360-733-2322 Bellingham Health Care & Rehab Licensed Skilled Nursing / Specialized Care 1200 Birchwood Bellingham WA 98225 360-734-9295 Cordata Health Care & Rehab Center Licensed Skilled Nursing 4680 Cordata Parkway Bellingham WA 98226 360-398-1966 Highgate House Assisted Living / Specialized Care 151 & 155 East Kellogg Bellingham WA 98226 360-671-1459 Highland Care Center Licensed Skilled Nursing 2400 Samish Way Bellingham WA 98226 360-734-4800 The Leopold Retirement & Assisted Living 1224 Cornwall Ave Bellingham WA 98225 360-733-3500 Mt. Baker Care Center Licensed Skilled Nursing 2905 Connelly Ave Bellingham WA 98225 360-734-4181 Parkway Chateau Retirement / Independent Living 2818 Old Fairhaven Parkway Bellingham WA 98225 360-671-6060

Silverado Senior Living Bellingham Dementia Care Community 848 W Orchard Dr Bellingham WA 98225 360-715-1338

The Bellettini Independent & Assisted Living / 62+ 1115 108th Avenue NE Bellevue WA 98004 425-450-0800

Spring Creek Retirement, Assisted Living & Memory Care 223 E Bakerview Road Bellingham WA 98226 360-302-2275

The Garden Club Retirement / Independent Living 13350 SE 26th Street Bellevue WA 98005 425-643-7111

St. Francis Extended Health Care Licensed Skilled Nursing 3121 Squalicum Pkwy Bellingham WA 98225 360-734-6760

The Gardens at Town Square Independent, Assisted Living, Dementia Care 933 111th Avenue NE Bellevue WA 98004 425-688-1900

Summit Place at Mt. Baker Assisted Living 2901 Connelly Ave Bellingham WA 98225 360-738-8447

Sunrise of Bellevue Assisted Living & Alzheimer’s Care 15928 NE 8th Street Bellevue WA 98008 425-401-5152 Wynwood Bellevue Assisted Living Alzheimer’s & Dementia Care 1640 148th Ave SE Bellevue WA 98007 425-373-1161

ISLAND COUNTY FREELAND Maple Ridge Retirement & Assisted Living Community 1767 Alliance Avenue Freeland WA 98249 360-207-6322

BOTHELL Aegis of Bothell Assisted Living / Memory Care 10605 NE 185th Street Bothell WA 98011 425-487-3245

OAK HARBOR Harbor Tower Village Retirement / Assisted Living 100 E Whidbey Ave Oak Harbor WA 98277 360-675-2569

Chateau Bothell Landing Independent / Assisted Living / Memory Care 17543 102nd Ave. NE Bothell WA 98011 425-485-1155

Home Place Alzheimer’s & Dementia Care 171 SW 6th Ave Oak Harbor WA 98277 360-279-2555 Regency on Whidbey Assisted Living, Independent Cottages, Harbor Care 1040 & 1045 SW Kimball Dr Oak Harbor WA 98277 360-279-0933 & 360-279-2224 Summer Hill Retirement and Assisted Living 165 SW 6th Ave Oak Harbor WA 98277 360-679-1400

Rosewood Villa Retirement/Assisted Living 702 32nd Street Bellingham WA 98225 360-676-9193

KING COUNTY

Shuksan Health Care Center Licensed Skilled Nursing 1530 James Street Bellingham WA 98225 360-733-9161

BELLEVUE Aegis of Bellevue Assisted Living / Memory Care 148 102nd Ave SE Bellevue WA 98004 425-453-8100

Foundation House at Bothell Retirement / Independent Living 17502 102nd Ave NE Bothell WA 98011 425-402-9606 Life Care Center of Bothell Assisted Living/Skilled Nursing 707 228th Street SW Bothell WA 98021 425-481-8500 North Creek Retirement, Assisted Living & Memory Care 1907 201st Place SE Bothell WA 98012 425-209-0605 Riverside East Retirement / Assisted Living 10315 East Riverside Drive Bothell WA 98011 425-481-1976

SENIOR guidebook – bridging generations


Vineyard Park at Bothell Landing Independent & Assisted Living Community 10519 East Riverside Drive Bothell WA 98011 425-354-3914 BURIEN El Dorado West Retirement / Assisted Living 1010 SW 134th Street Burien WA 98146 206-248-1975 COVINGTON Covington Place Independent Senior Apartments 26906 169th Place SE Covington WA 98042 253-398-2700 ENUMCLAW High Point Village Retirement / Assisted Living 1777 High Point Street Enumclaw WA 98022 360-825-7780 FEDERAL WAY Foundation House Independent Living / Personalized Assisted Living 32290 1st Avenue S Federal Way WA 98003 253-838-8823 ISSAQUAH Aegis of Issaquah Assisted Living / Memory Care / Hospice 780 NW Juniper Street Issaquah WA 98027 425-526-6037 Spiritwood at Pine Lake Retirement / Assisted Living 3607 228th Avenue SE Issaquah WA 98029 425-313-9100 University House - Issaquah Independent &Assisted Living 22975 SE Black Nugget Road Issaquah WA 98029 425-557-4200 KENMORE Spring Estates - Kenmore Assisted Living / Memory Care 7221 NE 182nd Street Kenmore WA 98028 425-481-4200 KENT Aegis of Kent Alzheimer’s / Memory Care 10421 SE 248th Street Kent WA 98030 253-479-1768

www.seniorguidebook.com

Farrington Court Retirement / Assisted Living 516 Kenosia Avenue Kent WA 98030 253-852-2737 KIRKLAND Aegis of Kirkland Assisted Living / Memory Care 13000 Totem Lake Boulevard Kirkland WA 98034 425-823-7272 Aegis at Totem Lake Retirement / Assisted Living / Memory Care 12629 116th Avenue NE Kirkland WA 98034 425-814-2841 Kirkland Lodge Assisted Living 6505 Lakeview Drive NE Kirkland WA 98033 425-803-6911

REDMOND Aegis of Redmond Assisted Living / Memory Care 7480 W. Lake Sammamish Parkway NE Redmond WA 98052 425-883-4000 Fairwinds – Redmond Retirement / Assisted Living 9988 Avondale Rd NE Redmond WA 98052 425-558-4700 Peters Creek Retirement & Assisted Living 14431 Redmond Way Redmond WA 98052 425-869-2273 The Marymoor Retirement & Assisted Living 4585 W. Lake Sammamish Parkway NE Redmond WA 98052 425-556-9398

Madison House / Totem Lake Retirement / Assisted Living 12215 NE 128th Street Kirkland WA 98034 425-821-8210

RENTON Chateau Valley Center Independent / Assisted / Memory 4450 Davis Avenue S Renton WA 98055 425-251-6677

Merrill Gardens at Kirkland Independent & Assisted Living 201 Kirkland Avenue Kirkland WA 98033 425-285-7743

Evergreen Place Retirement / Independent Living 1414 Monroe Avenue NE Renton WA 98056 425-226-3312

MERCER ISLAND Aljoya Mercer Island Continuing Care Retirement Community 2430 76th Avenue SE Mercer Island WA 98040 206-230-0150

The Lodge Retirement / Assisted Living 1600 South Eagle Ridge Drive Renton WA 98055 425-793-8080

Merrill Gardens at Island House Independent & Assisted Living 7810 SE 30th St Mercer Island WA 98040 206-204-5421 Sunrise of Mercer Island Assisted Living & Alzheimer’s Care 2959 76th Avenue SE Mercer Island WA 98040 206-232-6565 NORMANDY PARK Fernwood at the Park Retirement / Independent Living 17623 First Avenue S Normandy Park WA 98148 206-242-1455

Merrill Gardens at Renton Centre Independent and Assisted Living 104 Burnett Ave S Renton WA 98057 425-243-2941 SEATTLE Aegis at Northgate Memory Care 11039 17th Avenue NE Seattle WA 98125 206-440-1700 Aljoya Thornton Place - N. Seattle Continuing Care Retirement Community 450 NE 100th Street Seattle WA 98125 206-306-7920

Bridge Park Retirement/Independent Living 3204 SW Morgan Street Seattle WA 98126 206-938-6394 CRISTA Senior Living Independent / Assisted Living / Skilled Nursing / Rehabilitation / Memory Care 19303 Fremont Avenue North Shoreline WA 98133 1-877-639-3292 Faerland Terrace Assisted Living / Alzheimer’s Care 1421 Minor Avenue Seattle WA 98101 206-624-7637 Foundation House at Northgate Independent & Assisted Living 11301 3rd Ave NE Seattle WA 98125 206-361-2758 Ida Culver House, Broadview Independent, Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing, Alzheimer’s, Dementia Care 12505 Greenwood Avenue N Seattle WA 98133 206-361-1989 Ida Culver House, Ravenna Independent & Assisted Living 2315 NE 65th Street Seattle WA 98115 206-523-7315 The Lakeshore Independent & Assisted Living 11448 Rainier Avenue S Seattle WA 98178 206-772-1200 Mirabella Independent, Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing & Memory Care 116 Fairview Ave N Seattle WA 98109 206-254-1441 Northgate Plaza A Merrill Gardens Community Independent & Assisted Living 11030 5th Ave NE Seattle WA 98125 206-388-5061 Remington Place Retirement 3025 NE 137th Street Seattle WA 98125 206-367-0369

Ballard Landmark Retirement/Assisted Living 5433 Leary Ave NW Seattle WA 98107 206-782-4000

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the Stratford at Maple Leaf Independent, Assisted Living and Memory Care 9001 Lake City Way NE Seattle WA 98115 206-729-1200 University House, Wallingford Independent & Assisted Living 4400 Stone Way N Seattle WA 98103 206-545-8400 SHORELINE Aegis of Shoreline & Callahan House Independent, Assisted Living and Memory Care 14900 & 15100 First Avenue NE Shoreline WA 98155 206-367-6700 and 206-417-9747 Anderson House Independent / Assisted Living / Nursing & 2 Adult Family Homes 17201 15th Ave NE Shoreline WA 98155 206-364-9336 WOODINVILLE Fairwinds – Brittany Park Retirement / Assisted Living 17143 - 133rd Ave NE Woodinville WA 98072 425-402-7100 The Creekside A Merrill Gardens Community Independent Retirement Community 18200 Woodinville-Snohomish Rd NE Woodinville WA 98072 425-286-8974

KITSAP COUNTY BREMERTON Bay Pointe Assisted Living 966 Oyster Bay Court Bremerton WA 98312 360-373-9904 Marine Courte Memory Care 966 Oyster Bay Court Bremerton WA 98312 360-373-9904 PORT ORCHARD Park Vista Retirement & Assisted Living Community 2944 SE Lund Avenure Port Orchard WA 98366 360-207-6324

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SILVERDALE Crista Shores Independent, Assisted Living 1600 NW Crista Shores Lane Silverdale WA 98383 1-800-722-4135

PIERCE COUNTY BONNEY LAKE Cedar Ridge Retirement & Assisted Living 9515 198th Avenue East Bonney Lake WA 98391 253-235-4121 GIG HARBOR Peninsula Retirement / Independent Living 3445 50th Street Court NW Gig Harbor WA 98335 253-858-4800

TACOMA Charlton Place Assisted Living 9723 South Steel St Tacoma WA 98444 253-589-1834

GRANT COUNTY MOSES LAKE Pioneer Village Independent Senior Apartments 816 E Sharon Ave Moses Lake WA 98837 509-764-7600

Merrill Gardens at Tacoma Independent & Assisted Living 7290 Rosemount Circle Tacoma WA 98465 253-617-0100

DOUGLAS COUNTY

Point Defiance Village Retirement / Independent Living 6414 N Park Way Tacoma WA 98407 253-759-8908

EAST WENATCHEE Bonaventure of East Wenatchee Assisted Living / Retirement / Memory Care 50 29th Street NW East Wenatchee WA 98802 509-255-8339

CHELAN COUNTY

THURSTON COUNTY

WENATCHEE Columbia Heights Assisted Living / Retirement 1550 Cherry Street Wenatchee WA 98801 509-255-8338

Sound Vista Village Retirement / Assisted Living 6633 McDonald Avenue Gig Harbor WA 98335 253-851-9929

LACEY Bonaventure of Lacey Retirement, Assisted Living & Memory Care 4528 Intelco Loop SE Lacey WA 98503 360-207-6320

LAKEWOOD Maple Creek Residential Care 10420 Gravelly Lake Drive SW Lakewood WA 98499 253-588-0227

Woodland Retirement & Assisted Living Community 4532 Intelco Loop SE Lacey WA 98503 360-207-6321

MILTON Alder Ridge Independent Senior Apartments 2800 Alder Street Milton WA 98354 253-878-5665

OLYMPIA Capital Place Retirement / Independent Living 700 Black Lake Boulevard Olympia WA 98502 360-357-9922

BENTON COUNTY

Mill Ridge Village Retirement / Assisted Living 607 28th Avenue Milton WA 98354 253-925-9200 PUYALLUP Meridian Hills Assisted Living 1813 South Meridian Street Puyallup WA 98371 253-841-4909 Silver Creek Retirement & Assisted Living Community 17607 91st Avenue East Puyallup WA 98375 253-236-0430 Willow Gardens Retirement / Independent Living 4502 6th Street SE Puyallup WA 98374 253-848-4430

RICHLAND Riverton Retirement / Assisted Living 1800 Bellerive Drive Richland WA 99352 509-255-8340

JEFFERSON COUNTY

CLARK COUNTY VANCOUVER Bonaventure of Salmon Creek Retirement / Assisted Living / Memory Care 13700 NE Salmon Creek Avenue Vancouver WA 98686 360-209-1932

PORT TOWNSEND Seaport Landing Retirement & Assisted Living Community 1201 Hancock Street Port Townsend WA 98368 360-207-6323

GRAYS HARBOR COUNTY HOQUIAM Channel Point Village Retirement / Assisted Living 907 K Street Hoquiam WA 98550 360-532-9000

CLALLAM PORT ANGELES Park View Villas Retirement / Assisted Living 1430 Park View Lane Port Angeles WA 98363 360-452-7222

SENIOR guidebook – bridging generations


Mirabella Mir abella Put yourself in the middle of it.

Profile for David Kiersky

Senior Guidebook - Apr/May/Jun 2014  

Senior Guidebook - Apr/May/Jun 2014  

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